Citation

Material Information

Title:
River weekly news
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, FL
Publisher:
Lorin Arundel and Ken Rasi- Co-Publishers
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2010
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Lee -- Fort Myers
Coordinates:
26.64328 x -81.868953

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright River Weekly News. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

Full Text

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FREETake Me Home VOL. 17, NO. 27 JULY 6, 2018From the Beaches to the River District downtown Fort Myers Weather and Tides pa ge 28 A Much-Loved Musical At Broadway Palm by Di SaggauOh my goodness, to quote one of the orphans in Annie, this show at Broadway Palm is not to be missed. Its full of tender loving care with great songs and choreography, and a few comi cal villains to boot. Piper Sobon, in the role of Annie, captur es our hearts immediately. She has amazing stage presence and can belt out the tunes, like the popular Tomor row and Maybe. The orphans are darling and talented, singing and dancing with adorable fierceness including stomping on Miss Hannigans feet. Jennifer Hope plays the role of the boozy head of the orphanage, a tough job for her because she actually seems allergic to kids. Then there is her brother Rooster (Craig Smith) and his gal pal Lily St. Regis (Theresa Walker) who claim to be Annies parents. All three excel in the Easy Street number. Annie thinks her parents are still alive and Daddy Warbucks (Victor Legarreta) promises to find them for her. Early in the show, he sends his personal secretary, Grace Farrell (Melissa Whitworth), to the orphanage to select an orphan to spend two weeks in his mansion during the Christmas holiday. Against Miss Hannigans objections, she selects Annie. Both Legarreta and Whitworth are well-suited to continued on page 21 Front, Piper Sobon as Annie and Peyton as Sandy. Back, Melissa Whitworth as Grace Farrell and Victor Legarreta as Daddy Warbucks photo provided Student Artwork On Exhibit In JulyDAAS Co-op Art Gallery & Gifts will host a talented group of stu dents from North Fort Myers High S chool during the month of July. Under the direction of art teacher and membercontinued on page 23 images provided Summer Concert Features Folk And Indie ArtistsThe Sounds of Summer Concert Series at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center continues with indie music on Friday, July 13 from 8 to 10:30 p.m. Indie quartet The Woodwork are joined by folk artist Mountain Holler. Sounds of Summer features Floridas best emerging artists across genres. Local, original music is highlighted in this bi-weekly series. The Woodwork is from Naples, and their name was derived from the old saying out of the woodwork. It couldnt be more apt for their rise to prominence. After releasing their EP Burning Bridges in 2016, The Woodwork caught the attention of audiences and promoters in the Florida music scene. The band was recently invited to participate in the Sugarshack Sessions and performed at Gasparilla Music Festival in St. Petersburg, Florida this past spring. It was at Gasparilla Music Festival that The Woodwork met Mountain Holler, a soulful solo musician. Mountain Holler is the moniker of multi-instrumentalist and vocalist Mark Etherington of St. Petersburg. His unique style caught the attention of The Woodwork, and the artists became friends. When offered the Sounds of Summer date at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center, The Woodwork wanted Mountain Holler to open the show. Cost to attend the concert is $5. FSW and FGCU students can buy one ticket and get one free by presenting a student ID at the box office. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. The series is sponsored by The Beaches of Fort Myers and Sanibel, Island Hopper Songwriter Fest, Volvo of Fort Myers and Carbon Press. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in the historic downtown Fort Myers River District. For more information, visit www.sbdac.com. The Woodwork photo by Jesi Cason Photography Mountain Holler photo by John Ferreira

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Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: Heitman-Evans Float On Riverfront by Gerri Reaves, PhDThis circa-1915 photo of the Heitman-Evans Co. float displays the originality and hands-on approach typical in Fort Myers parades. Schools, fraternal organizations, womens clubs, bands, businesses and veterans organizations showcased their creativity, community spirit and patriotism. And, as this float shows, advertising flair was sometimes a key component. Heitman-Evans had recently moved into an impressive twostory modern pressed-brick store on the northwest corner of First and Hendry, a building that still stands. Legendary businessman Harvie E. Heitman built the store in 1914 one of several outstanding downtown structures to his credit -and Edward L. Evans managed it. Evans was perhaps the stores biggest asset, for he was an internationally known fishing guide and tackle designer and was particularly knowledgeable about tarpon fishing. The store, which survived into the 1930s, also sold the usual items of hardware stores: building supplies, farm implements, sporting goods, paint, cutlery, yacht supplies and appliances. The businesss pioneer-theme float relies on standard themes, such as the American flag. Note the flags flying fore and aft, as well as on the horses (or mules) heads. You could always count on a parade float to have at least a flag or two, whether the occasion was Fourth of July, Washingtons Birthday, or just the opening of a new school. The log cabin -in this case a chickee-style one with a palm-frond roof -was also a staple of early parades. The slogan emblazoned on the rear of the float, Favorite stoves or ranges for log cabin or palace, plays on the cabin theme. Look closely inside the cabin to see a seated figure wearing what resembles traditional Seminole clothing. Those animal pelts hanging at the front corner pay tribute to the era when hunters periodically loaded ox-drawn wagons with skins and other items and headed for little Fort Myers to trade at general stores for household staples. The words on the side of the float, more economical and more satisfactory than wood, frequently appeared in Heitman-Evans ads for Detroit gasoline stoves during the mid-19-teens. The surrounding scene -todays Bay Street captures the riverfronts dreary appearance a flood-prone unpaved street and frame buildings and docks in need of attention. However, even as this very horse-drawn float paraded through downtown streets, the city was beginning to realize that the riverfront was more than just something to use. Instead, it was a valuable asset to beautify and market for tourism and recreation. Thus, by the 19-teens, cleaning up the waterfront became a major topic of debate. Debris, water pollution (including from sewage), ramshackle structures and general unattractiveness were justifiably cited as health and economic issues. By the early 1920s, this stretch of Bay Street would be transformed. Walk down to the Bay Street between Jackson and Hendry and imagine the days when horse-drawn floats advertised and entertained, and Bay Street was the rivers edge. Then visit the following two research centers to learn more about the early businesses that went all-out for parades. The Southwest Florida Historical Society is an all-volunteer, non-profit organization open Wednesday and Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon and Wednesday 4 to 7 p.m. It is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Call 939-4044 or visit www.swflhistoricalsociety.org for more information. The Lee County Black History Society is located at 1936 Henderson Avenue, adjacent to the Williams Academy Museum at Roberto Clemente Park. Hours for the all-volunteer, non-profit organization are Wednesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Saturday by appointment only. For more information, call 332-8778 or visit www.leecountyblackhistorysociety.org. Sources: The Archives of the Southwest Florida Historical Society, The News-Press, and The Story of Fort Myers by Karl H. Grismer. THE RIVER JULY 6, 20182 Circa-1915, the Heitman-Evans parade float pauses by the riverfront, which was then at Bay Street. Docks lined with frame buildings are visible in the right distance. photo courtesy SWFL Florida Historical Society PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, call 239-395-1213 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1640 Periwinkle Way, Suite 2, Sanibel FL 33957. FAX number: 239-395-2299. Email: press@islandsunnews.com. Email: ads@islandsunnews.com The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Contributing Writers Jennifer Basey Barbara Cacchione Kay Casperson Suzy Cohen Linda Coin Marcia Feeney Ed Frank Shelley Greggs Tom Hall Marion Hauser, MS, RDRoss Hauser, MD Anne Mitchell Capt. Matt Mitchell Trinette Nelson J. Brendan Ryan, CLU, ChFC, MSFS Di Saggau Jeanie TinchPublisher Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Bob Petcher Graphic Arts/ Production Ann Ziehl, Manager Amanda Hartman Justin Wilder Reporters Gerri Reaves, PhD Jeff LysiakIndependently Owned And Operated COPYRIGHT 2018 The River Weekly NewsLORKEN Publications, Inc.Read Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com Candidate Forums At AllianceThe Alliance for the Arts and League of Women Voters of Lee County invite the public to participate in the following candidate forums: July 12 School Board (District 6) July 19 State Attorney July 26 State Rep (District 78) August 2 U.S. House Seat 19 All four forums will be held from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Alliance campus in the theatre at 10091 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers The forums will be conducted according to the guidelines of the League of Women Voters of Lee County (LWV). LVW will moderate, track time and present questions from the audience. Candidates will be given three minutes for an opening introduction, one minute to answer questions and two minutes for a closing statement. Attendees do not need to RSVP. For more information, call 939-2787 or visit www.artinlee.org.

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3 THE RIVER JULY 6, 2018 FIRST STREET LIQUORCelebrating 10 years of Business2023 Altamont Ave, B107, Fort Myers Mon. thru urs. 10am 9pm Fri. & Sat. 10am 10pm Sun. 10am 7pm Tel: 239-332-3945 We Deliver!!!SPECIAL CASE PRICES FOR ALL LIQUORS 5% o purchases over $30 on all wines & liquors with this ad We Sell Wines, Spirits, Beer, Cigar-Cigarettes & Lotto-LotteryExp. 5/11/18 Convenient, Friendly, Full Service Neighborhood Liquor StoreBitcoin ATM Machine On Site Cool moves, cool music, total body, low impact. Dance tness, group exercise, contemporary movement, step aerobics, body sculpting. 2nd Saturday of the month! Ballroom, Latin, Swing. 6 p.m. lesson followed by open dancing. Foxtrot, waltz, rumba, cha-cha, tango, swing, and more! Private lessons, and beginner, intermediate, and advanced group lessons. No partner needed. Boutique-style group exercise and dance studio. Unique classes, friendly and inviting atmosphere.Fitness with Flair @ Royal Palm Square Girl Scouts Donate Supplies To Sea Schoolsubmitted by Leah BieryGirl Scouts from Cape Coral-based Troop 210 recently visited Sanibel Sea School to deliver a donation of supplies for the organizations camp and ocean outreach programs. Donated items included art supplies and campus necessities like toilet paper and cleaning products. Troop 210 chose Sanibel Sea School as their 2018 nonprofit to support because many of the members had participated in camps and field trips there and wanted to give other students a chance to have meaningful ocean experiences as well. Each year, Girl Scout troops donate a portion of their cookie profits in the form of material goods to a local nonprofit that is important to them, said group leader Michelle Sedorchuk. Troop members are invited to make presentations about potential organizations they would like to support, then the group votes to select a favorite. Our service unit has partnered with Sanibel Sea School for programs these past two years, and has plans in the works for future programs, Sedorchuk added. Many of the girls in our troop have participated in those programs and have attended camps on their own. They truly love what Sanibel Sea School is all about, its mission and its employees. Although Girl Scouts prohibits troops from making monetary donations to other 501(c)3 nonprofits, the group was excited to shop for craft supplies and other essentials that would help support Sanibel Sea Schools summer camps, Free Community Camp Days, ocean outreach programs for landlocked kids and more. Our troop chose to donate to Sanibel Sea School because of their programs for kids and adults. They wouldnt be able to run these programs without help from the community, said ninth grader Zoe Sedorchuk. We are so grateful for Troop 210s donation, said Sanibel Sea Schools executive director, Dr. Bruce Neill. We truly rely on our community to help us provide meaningful ocean experiences for all. This group really thought about what we might need, and delivered supplies that will absolutely be used. And now we will be able to bring more landlocked kids to Sanibel to explore with us. To learn more about Girl Scouts of Gulfcoast Florida, visit www.gsgcf.org. A Cappella Mens Ensemble Seeks ParticipantsReal men love to sing. That is the mantra of the Gulf Coast Harmonizers barbershop chorus. Members are embarking on a summer campaign to seek singers in Lee County with an extra emphasis on its scholarship program. The scholarship program has been created to assist eligible college students and includes most expenses, such as membership dues and performance costume purchases. The Gulf Coast Harmonizers meet at Cypress Lake Presbyterian Church, 8260 Cypress Lake Drive in Fort Myers, on Monday evenings from 6 to 9 p.m. to hone their craft and prepare for upcoming performances. Vocal warm-ups are led by Jonathan Riviere, the recently appointed director. His credentials include a music degree as well as a business degree. A renewed enthusiasm permeates rehearsals as the chorus appreciates its light-hearted workouts, sparked by the directors humorous approach and very skilled musical knowledge. It has been a great experience to reunite with the Gulf Coast Harmonizers says Bob Christie, a long-term former member. Interested men of all ages are invited to attend a rehearsal. For more information, visit www. gulfcoastharmonizers.org. Girl Scout Troop 210 members, from left, Courtney Dingerson, Delaney Blackwell, Mia Sedorchuk, Isabella Lauzon and Zoe Sedorchuk delivered a donation of supplies to Sanibel Sea School photo provided

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THE RIVER JULY 6, 20184 Davis Woods is the place to be, located just minutes from area beach and many amenities that SW Florida offers. This 2 bedroom/ 1 bath home has a delightful view of the community pool, lake and tennis courts. Both the living room and master bedroom provides entrance to the lanai through sliding glass doors. Roll down hurricane shutters on the lanai offer storm protection. This property will make a comfortable home or investment. The seasonal rental market at Davis Woods is very strong and many seasonal renters return year after year. The home is being sold fully furnished and has everything you need to make yourself comfortable. Pack your bags and move in! 16881 Davis Road #524 REAL ESTATE SPECIALISTSW Florida, Fort Myers Beach, Sanibel & Captiva Islands is All About HomeListed at $137,000 Listed $199,000REAL ESTATE SPECIALISTSW Florida, Fort Myers Beach, Sanibel & Captiva Islands is All About HomeCathie Lewis, RealtorPhone: 239-745-7367 Cathie@AllAboutHome.Life Pfeifer Realty Group Large single family homesite Close to the beach Centrally located Quiet residential neighborhood Microsoft National ChampionDunbar High School freshman Kevin Dimaculangan recently captured the 2018 Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) U.S. National Championship for Excel 2016. He competed against more than 320,000 total entrants. Dimaculangan earned a $3,000 grand prize and an all-expenses-paid trip to compete against challengers from more than 120 other countries in the 2018 MOS World Championship in Orlando from July 29 to August 1. Kevin is a perfect example of a young man who is driven towards success, said Principal Carl Burnside. I am a believer that the exceptional staff we have here at Dunbar, coupled with our acclaimed technology programs and the International Baccalaureate courses, that you will see more students from Dunbar accomplishing many other extraordinary achievements. Dimaculangan is the ninth Dunbar High School student to place in the top three in the Microsoft National Championship, and he is the fourth contender for the Microsoft worldwide competition. Dunbar High School has already had three top performers for the Microsoft Worldwide Championship, including Tyler Mills, who placed first in 2014. It was no surprise to me that Kevin was the winner. His talents go far beyond just knowing Microsoft excel; he is a first place state champion on our schools math team, said IT Programs Manager Denise Spence. Kevin has earned around 12 technology certifications already, including getting a perfect score for the Microsoft Excel Expert certification. No doubt that you will hear Kevin Dimaculangans name a lot in the coming years. For more information on Dunbar High Schools Academy for Technology Excellence certification programs, contact Denise Spence at 461-5322. For more information on other certification programs or the Microsoft Office Worldwide Competition, visit www.moschampionship.com. Radio Station Earns Four More National AwardsWGCU-FM added more accolades to a winning year on June 23 when it was honored with four national awards from the nonprofit Public Radio News Directors Inc. WGCU won first place in the nation in Division B, for stations with four to seven full-time employees, in the following categories: Breaking News, for Hurricane Irma Hits Southwest Florida, by station staff. Newscast, All Things Considered February 6 Newscast, by Jessica Meszaros. News/Public Affairs Program, Trumps Immigration Orders Hit Home in Southwest Florida, by Julie Glenn and Matt Smith. WGCU won second place for: Best Writing, Artificial Mangroves Could Bring Back Vanishing Habitats in Florida, by Jessica Meszaros. This recognition by public radio news directors from all across the country is testament to the hard work and commitment to excellence that our news team displays every day in service to the communities of Southwest Florida, said WGCU General Manager Rick Johnson. PRNDIs contest is the only national one recognizing outstanding public radio news reporting at local stations. More than 190 awards were presented at the associations annual conference in Philadelphia, for categories including breaking news, callin programs, documentaries, interviews, and news features. Stations compete in categories based on staff size: Division AA, 16 or more full-time news staff members; Division A, eight to 15 full-time news staff members; Division B, four to seven full-time news staff members; Division C, one to three full-time news staff members. The Dimaculangan family was excited for Kevin, third from left, and his recent victory photo provided

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5 THE RIVER JULY 6, 2018 926 SW SANTA BARBARA PL., CAPE CORAL 3 Bedrooms, 3 Baths, Pool $374,900 MLS 218038407 Ricca-Mulino Team 239.689.7660 ON LAKE KENNEDY 11520 COMPASS POINT DR., FT. MYERS Golf Course Views, 2 Story Courtyard $1,150,000 MLS 217066969 Patti Testa 239.770.5445 GULF HARBOUR YACHT & CC 17890 GREY HERON CT., S. FT. MYERS Direct Gulf Access w/Dock $249,900 MLS 218026446 Roger Stening 239.770.4707 PALM ISLES WATERFRONT 6012 KENNETH RD., FT. MYERS Between McGregor & the River $249,900 MLS 217054259 Cindy Roberts 239.565.9756 TWIN PALM ESTATES 6061 SILVER KING BLVD. #104, CAPE CORAL 3 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths + Den $519,750 MLS 218016261 Tina Tusack 239.634.3810 TARPON POINT MARINA 20051 SANIBEL VIEW CIR. #103, FT. MYERS 2 BR, 2 BA, San Carlos Preserve Views $309,900 MLS 218032303 Jason Lomano 239.470.8628 SANIBEL VIEW 13400 CAUSEWAY PALMS CV., FT. MYERS On-Island Lifestyle, Off-Island Pricing $275,000 MLS 218036804 Scott Allan 239.333.3635 CAUSEWAY KEY 4626 SE 5TH PL. #101,CAPE CORAL Stunning Gulf Access $169,999 MLS 218038253Branden Leeb, Koffman & Assoc. 239.470.0725 CORAL ISLE CONDO 14601 HEADWATER BAY LN., FT. MYERS Updated 4 BR, 3 BA + Den, Pool $949,900 MLS 217070143 Patti Testa 239.770.5445 GULF HARBOUR YACHT & CC 11701 OLIVETTI LN. #304, FT. MYERS New 3 BR, 3 BA Condo, 1,751 S.F. $290,170 MLS 218041251Ross Winchel, Koffman & Assoc. 239.898.1214 MAJESTIC PALMS 1027 SE 5TH PL., CAPE CORAL 4 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, 3 Car Garage $259,900 MLS 218038564 Michelle Forneris 239.849.4387 DONT MISS OUT ON THIS! 14380 RIVA DEL LAGO DR. #505, FT. MYERS Overlooks Lakes Park $379,000 MLS 218031984 Toni Shoemaker 239.464.3645 RIVA DEL LAGO 11701 OLIVETTI LN. #108, FT. MYERS New 3 BR, 2 BA Condo, 1,394 S.F. $236,980 MLS 218039397Ross Winchel, Koffman & Assoc. 239.898.1214 MAJESTIC PALMS BAY HARBOUR ESTATES 14221 BAY DR., FT. MYERS Private Gated Community w/4 Homesites$2,995,000 MLS 217078021 McMurray & Nette 239.850.7888 PALMETTO POINT 4810 GRIFFIN BLVD., FT. MYERS Mediterranean Design by Bud Lawrence$3,395,000 MLS 218006762 McMurray & Nette 239.850.788812593 COCONUT CREEK CT., FT. MYERS Lakefront, Pool, S. Exposure $499,000 MLS 218043422Adam Fernandez, Team Stacey 239.464.5953 COCONUT CREEK OPEN DAILY 12:00PM 4:00PM OPEN 7/7 10:00AM 1:00PM NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW LISTING

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THE RIVER JULY 6, 20186 Fort Myers Art: Alliance Bringing Back Arts On Tap Fundraising Event by Tom HallThe Alliance for the Arts is bringing back its annual fundraiser Arts On Tap. The event is scheduled for Saturday, October 20 from 7 to 10 p.m. on the Alliance campus at 10091 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. The announcement comes alongside the nationwide celebration of American Craft Beer Week. Now in its second year, Arts On Tap is a taste of creativity in the Alliance gallery featuring the craft of local brewers benefiting the Alliance for the Arts. For one night only, guests can delight their senses with locally handcrafted beers and spirits, handselected wines and culinary creations against a vibrant backdrop of local art. Participating crafters include Big Blue Brewing, Bury Me Brewing, Eight Foot Brewing, Fort Myers Brewing Company, Momentum Brewhouse, Palm City Brewing, Point Ybel Brewing Company and Scottys Bierwerks, with more participants to be announced. The event is sponsored by Briers CPA, Custom Packaging and Products, EnSite, HBKS Wealth Advisors, Priority Business Solutions and Sanibel Captiva Community Bank. Sponsorships and visibility opportunities are also available at www.artinlee.org/ontap. Last year, Arts On Tap attracted 200 guests. Tickets are $75 and include unlimited tastings from participating breweries and distilleries, culinary creations, pub snacks, gallery admission, music and games. The first 75 guests to purchase a ticket will receive an exclusive Support Local pint glass. The Alliance for the Arts is all about supporting small, independent makers who have a story, said development and marketing director Jessica Wisdom. Were excited to celebrate the art of craft beer for the second year in a row. In our never-ending quest to outdo ourselves, this years event will be bigger and better with more art, more food, more fun and, of course, more beer. Arts On Tap is a fundraising event for the Alliance for the Arts, a nonprofit visual and performing arts center located in the heart of Fort Myers. Since 1975, the Alliance has been transforming lives and improving community through the arts. Event proceeds support a creative hub that spurs self-expression, imagination and individuality. Arts On Tap is for ages 21 and older. A state-issued form of ID is required. For more information, call 939-2787 or visit www.artinlee.org/ontap. Submissions accepted for Fort Myers Film Festival; TGIM set to return Its been 88 days since the 8th annual Fort Myers Film Festival (FMff) closed with a champagne and dessert awards ceremony at the Broadway Palm Dinner Theater. If youre also jonesing for some good indie films, then youll be happy to know that TGIM resumes in August. Join FMff every first Monday from August through February, and help decide which of the short indie films submitted to the Fort Myers Film Festival will make it into next years film festival and which do not. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., with the films starting at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for seniors and students. So mark your calendars. The relevant first Mondays are August 6, September 3, October 1, November 5, December 3, January 7, 2019 and February 4, 2019. Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in Fort Myers. And if youre a filmmaker, FMff is now accepting submissions for the 9th annual Fort Myers Film Festival. Submissions are through Withoutabox. Visit www.withoutabox.com/login/9514 for a submission form. There are six categories: full-length features, documentaries, shorts, short shorts, strictly local and student films. Tom Hall is both an amateur artist and aspiring novelist who writes art quest thrillers. He is in the final stages of completing his debut novel titled Art Detective. A former tax attorney, he lives in Estero with his fianc and their four cats. Suppport the Alliance for the Arts at Arts On Tap photo courtesy www.artswfl.com Automotive Service That You Can Trust Clean and Comfortable 239-277-10041921 Courtney Drive Fort Myers 33901 OPEN Monday Friday 8am to 5:30pm Saturday 8am to 4pm Sunday Closedwww.LegendaryFL.com service delivered to you of any $25 OffAll Makes and Models both Foreign and Domestic Limit one per customer, no cash value, cannot be combined with any We look forward to earning your business Symphony Concerts Coming To Arts Hall The Gulf Coast Symphony will present two Saturday summer concerts Patriotic Pops on July 14 and Best of Broadway on August 4 at the Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall, both at 7 p.m. Julys concert will be a celebration of the red, white, and blue with the Gulf Coast Symphony performing patriotic favorites, including a salute to the Armed Forces. There will be a backyard barbecue feeling, with complimentary sliders and mini hot dogs provided, and an array of beers and soft drinks available for purchase. Audiences will travel the Great White Way on August 4 when the symphony performs the Best of Broadway with guest artist Mark Sanders, one of Southwest Floridas favorite vocalists. The concert will include hits from Broadway, including works from Rodgers and Hammerstein, George Gershwin and Marvin Hamlisch, and music from the smash hit, Hamilton Patrons at both events are encouraged to bring a contribution for the Harlem Heights Centers clothing drive for their summer camp, after school and charter school kids. Visit www.gulfcoastsymphony.org for a list of clothing needs. Tickets for both the Patriotic Pops concert and Best of Broadway concert start at $27. Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall is located at 13350 FSW Parkway in Fort Myers. Purchase tickets at www. gulfcoastsymphony.org or by calling the box office at 481-4849. Mark Sanders photo provided

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7 THE RIVER JULY 6, 2018 Providing Custom Interiors to Sanibel & Captiva for 28 years Complimentary In-Home Consultation695 Tarpon Bay Rd. Sanibel, FL 33957 coin.decoratingden.com 239.472.6551 Cirque du Soleil is coming to the Germain Arena with a brandnew arena creation with six performances from Thursday, July 12 through Sunday, July 15. Cirque du Soleils Crystal explores the artistic limits of ice for the first time in the companys 34-year history. This unique production features gymnasts and skaters performing acrobatics on the ice and in the air, combining multiple disciplines for a world-class audience experience. Synchronized skating, freestyles figures and extreme skating are highlighted alongside traditional circus disciplines such as swinging trapeze, aerial traps and hand-to-hand. Presale tickets for performances of Crystal are now available. Germain Arena is located at 11000 Everblades Parkway in Estero. For more information, visit www.cirquedusoleil. com/crystal. A scene from Cirque du Soleil Crystal photo by Matt BeardCirque Du Soleil Skating Acrobats Sanibel-Based Duo To Perform At Shell PointWild Coffee Duo will perform during the Shell Point Retirement Communitys 2018 Summer Concert Series in the Grand Cypress Room at The Woodlands at Shell Point on Thursday, July 19 at 7 p.m. The event is open to the public. Cost is $20 per ticket. Wild Coffee Duo will perform Back in Time: A Musical Retrospective of a Century Ago. With the end of World War I and the birth of Leonard Bernstein in 1918, audiences will celebrate music from this milestone year, including popular songs such as Im Always Chasing Rainbows and selections from West Side Story The Sanibel-based duo was formed in 2015 by pianist Abbey Allison and cellist Susie Kelly. The classically trained music group presents an engaging repertoire that draws on a variety of musical styles, and the versatile pair is dedicated to presenting chamber music to audiences in Southwest Florida. The Woodlands at Shell Point is located at 14441 Woodsong Lane in Fort Myers. To learn more about the upcoming performance by Wild Coffee Duo, visit www.shellpoint.org/concerts or call 454-2067. Tickets purchased online or by phone will be held for pick-up at will call on the night of the performance. The Wild Coffee Duo photo provided July Programs At Fort Myers Regional LibraryNext months roster of activities at Fort Myers Regional Library offers topics for all ages. The following activities are free to the public: Adult Programs English Caf Library Building, Conference Room C; 6 p.m. Tuesdays, July 10, 17, 24; Free, informal conversation sessions for adult ESOL/ESL students. Knitting Nook Library Building, Conference Room C; 1 p.m. Thursday, July 19; A casual, self-guided group of knitters and crocheters share ideas, techniques and patterns. Attendees should bring their own projects. Basic supplies available for newcomers. Long Distance Genealogical Research Meeting Room AB; 9:30 a.m. Saturday, July 14; Speaker: Bryan L. Mulcahy, Lee County Library System; Locating genealogical information about ancestors presents many challenges. When you live hundreds or thousands of miles from their place of residence, it sometimes feels impossible. This seminar will focus on options that researchers may use when trying to conduct genealogical searches in other parts of the United States and overseas. Registration is required. Book Discussion: The Swamp: The Everglades, Florida, and the Politics of Paradise by Michael Grunwald Library Building, Conference Room C; Noon Wednesday, July 18; Sometimes fiction seems real and nonfiction reads like a novel. This year both will be discussed. Space is limited so registration is required. International Film Series: The Way Home Meeting Room ABCD; 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 18; Join us for the next installment in our film series. This month we visit South Korea in The Way Home. Sponsored by the Friends of the Fort Myers Library. How to Apply for a Habitat for Humanity Home Meeting Room AB; 10 a.m. Thursday, July 19; A Habitat for Humanity representative explains the Habitat program and how to apply for a Habitat partnership. Small Business Series: Understanding the Basics of a Marketing Plan Meeting Rooms AB; 2 p.m. Monday, July 23; Get your business seen and heard. Learn new approaches to tackling the marketing mix and how to put the pieces of the marketing puzzle together. Presented in collaboration with FGCU Small Business Development Center (SBDC). Registration is required. Storytime Family Storytime 10 a.m. Mondays, July 9, 16; Your whole family is invited continued on page 13

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Along The RiverThe River District Alliance will host Art Walk in downtown Fort Myers this Friday, July 6 from 6 to 10 p.m. and Saturday, July 7 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fourteen galleries invite visitors and residents to meet the artists and enjoy live art demonstrations and exhibitions along the river district. For more information, visit www. fortmyersriverdistrictalliance.com. One of the galleries, Arts for ACT, will host an opening reception of its annual open-themed group exhibit Of Myth or Lore from 6 to 10 p.m. More than 75 group artists have created thoughtprovoking and imaginative paintings, sculptures and more for the exhibit. Arts for ACT Gallery is located at 2265 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. For more information, visit www. artsforactgallery.com. Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center will hold an opening reception for artist Bradford Hermann and his mask collection titled A Head of the Past. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. Visit www.sbdac.com or call 333-1933 for more information. The Animal Refuge Center (ARC). ARCs 6th annual Casino Royale will be held at the Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort and Spa this Friday, July 6 from 7 to 11 p.m. Casino Royale is a James Bond-themed signature event of the Animal Refuge Center. This year, there will be an added element of an outdoor terrace adjoining the air conditioned ballroom that overlooks the Hyatts grounds. As always, favorite games of chance will be available: blackjack, poker, roulette and craps. Tickets to the event include $2,000 in cash to gamble as you see fit. Additional cash can be purchased with a donation to ARC. There will be a silent and live auction, as well as a few new attractions. Attire should range from cocktail to formal (if youre feeling Bond-like). A spectacular selection of food is planned, as well as a fully stocked cash bar. And, of course, no event would be complete without a few ARC residents there to remind you why you came. Tickets are $75. Casino Royale is being presented by Bonney Leckie Century 21 Selling Paradise, and sponsorships are still available. License to No-Kill sponsorships for $750 and Diamonds Are Furever sponsorships for $500 will be offered. All money raised at Casino Royale supports the Animal Refuge Center in North Fort Myers, Southwest Floridas largest no-kill shelter. Tickets and sponsorships can be purchased directly through the Animal Refuge Center website at www. animalrefugecenter.com. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center will present an evening showcase featuring burlesque dancers, blues music, contemporary cabaret and comedy this Saturday, July 7 from 8 to 11 p.m. The performance is entitled Show Me The Honeys. Glam! Bam! Burlesque!, a Southwest Florida-based burlesque group, brings the art of classic tease, traditional and neoburlesque to life in a performance featuring singing, dancing, bumping and grinding. Hosted by the sassy, saucy and oh-sobossy Chloe Bone Cicconi and Stage Kitten Isabella Von Leopard, the show will also feature Miami-based performers The Prima Latina and Reigning Queen of the Latina and Hispanic Burlesque Festival Sofia Luna. In addition, Rio Dios Mio will perform as Rio Chavarro, The Little Tramp, in an homage to Charlie Chaplin. Live music will be provided by international performing and recording blues artists Joel DaSilva and Little Eddie continued on page 10THE RIVER JULY 6, 20188 Fresh ingredients, simplicity, love... the recipe for a treasured dining experience Chef/Owner AJ Black7 Days 5-10 pm 751 Tarpon Bay Road Sanibel Island, FL Reservations Suggested www.iltesoro.net 239-395-4022 FINE ITALIAN CUISINEIL TESORO RISTORANTEinspired by Island Fare in a bistro styleVOTED BEST CHEFBEST OF THE ISLANDS AWARDTASTE OF THE ISLANDS IRON CHEF WINNER AJ BLACKCelebrating Our 10 Year AnniversaryExtensive New Wine List Tasting Menu SUNSET DINING 4:30-6:30 P.M. 3-Course Tasting Starting at $19.95 Butterfly Dancer by Kim Beckler will be exhibited at Arts for ACT Gallery image provided MIDDLEGULFDRIVESUNDIALRESORTCOM Shima Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Bar at Sundial Beach Resort & Spa is celebrating summer with a special 2 for 1 menu on Tuesdays.For menus, reservations and more visit shimasushisteak.com VOTED BEST CHEF, BEST SUSHI AND BEST STEAK ON SANIBEL AND CAPTIVA ISLANDS

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9 THE RIVER JULY 6, 2018 Critical Thinking Lecture Series PresentationsThe Critical Thinking Lecture Series at Florida SouthWestern State College (FSW) returns this July with two lectures presented by FSW faculty and students. The Critical Thinking Lecture Series is free and open to the public. Presentations can be viewed live on the Thomas Edison Campus or digitally at other FSW locations. Identifying and Acknowledging Subconscious Biases with Dr. Mary Ellen Schultz, professor of school of arts, humanities and social sciences at FSW Tuesday, July 10, 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Dr. Schultz earned her bachelors degree in liberal studies from California Polytechnic State University and her masters degree in education with a focus on bilingual education from Columbia University. She earned her doctorate of philosophy in education with an emphasis on English as a second language from North Central University. Dr. Schultz has a passion for people and spent several years volunteering with the Peace Core in Costa Rica. This year, Dr. Schultz presented at the national conference on First-Year Experience and the National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development. Gaining a New Perspective: Italy Through Our Eyes with FSW study abroad students Wednesday, July 18, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Learn about the experiences of 10 FSW students who studied abroad in Florence, Italy in June. FSW students took classes focused on the Italian language, art history, the ancient roots of Florence, architecture, marketing and Italian cuisine at Istituto Lorenzo de Medici. The FSW campus locations are: Thomas Edison Campus: Building U-102; Charlotte Campus: Building O-117; Collier Campus: Building M-201 For more information on the FSW Critical Thinking Lecture Series, contact Whitney Rhyne, director, strategic initiatives, at 433-6943 or whitney.rhyne@ fsw.edu. Dr. Mary Ellen Schultz FSW students in the study abroad program in Florence, Italy photos providedThe Multicultural Centre of Southwest Florida recently announced Neal Communities as the title sponsor of The BIG Backpack Event for 2018. The 19th annual event is free and open to the public and will be held at its new location at North Fort Myers High School on Sunday, July 29 from 10 a.m to 2 p.m. Neal Communities has set a goal to raise $20,000 to support the more than 2,000 students who will receive free backpacks and school supplies for the 2018-19 school year. After a recordbreaking donation in 2017, the homecontinued on page 18 From left, Multicultural Centre of SWFL Co-Founder Leonardo Garcia, Neal Communities SWFL Regional President Michael Greenberg, Media & Marketing Event Chair Connie Ramos-Williams and Neal Communities Executive Assistant Paula Terry photo provided Title Sponsor Returns For Big Backpack Event Presidents List And Deans ListThree Fort Myers natives were named to the Presidents List and two more were named to the Deans List for the 2018 spring semester at the University of Alabama. They are: Morgan Jane LaRosa, Presidents List; Gillian Sara Levitt, Presidents List; Olivia Kristina Stover, Presidents List; Samantha Lauren Dellacroce, Deans List; Alina Farah Faunce, Deans List. College GraduatesFort Myers native Brittnie Stoy recently earned a masters of social work degree in social work from Springfield College in Springfield, Massachusetts. Fort Myers native Jerald Wallace recently earned a doctor of business administration from Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, Georgia. Steaks Seafood Pastas Veals International Wine List! Opens at 4pm! Mon-Sat. 15880 San Carlos Blvd (In Target Center)(239) 590-8147 www.TerraNostraDining.comTERRA NOSTRA ristoranteest. 2008

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Churches/TemplesALL FAITHS UNITARIAN CONGREGATION Sunday 10:30 a.m., 2756 McGregor Boulevard, allfaiths-uc.org, 226-0900. ALL SAINTS BYZANTINE RITE CATHOLIC Sunda y 10:30 a.m. 10291 Bayshore Road, 305-651-0991. ANNUNCIATION GREEK ORTHODOX Sunday 9 and 10 a.m. 8210 Cypress Lake Drive, annunciation.fl.goarch.org, 481-2099. BAT YAM-TEMPLE OF THE ISLANDS Friday Shabbat at 7 p.m. 2050 Periwinkle Way. www.batyam.org 579-0296.BETH SHILOH MESSIANIC SYNAGOGUE Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m. 15675 McGregor Boulevard, 437-3171. BIBLESHARE 10 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Tuesday, 7050 Winkler Rd, Suite 121, www.simplysimple worship.com, 437-8835. BREAD OF LIFE MINISTRIES Sunda y 10:30 a.m. 16581 McGregor Boulevard, 267-3166. CHABAD LUBAVITCH ORTHODOX Friday 6:30 p.m. 5620 Winkler Road, chabadswf.org, 433-7708. CHAPEL OF CYPRESS COVE Sunday 10 a.m. 10200 Cypress Cove Circle, revtedalthouse@aol.com, 850-3943. CHURCH OF THE CROSS Sunday 9:15 and 10:45 a.m. 13500 Freshman Lane, 768-2188. CONGREGATIONAL Sunday 10:30 a.m. 1619 Llewellyn Drive, taecc.com, 334-4978. COVENANT PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 10 a.m. 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937. CYPRESS LAKE BAPTIST Sunday 9:45 and 11 a.m., 7 p.m.; Wednesday 6:30 p.m. 8400 Cypress Lake Drive, 481-5442. CYPRESS LAKE PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 8, 9, 10 and 11 a.m. 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, www.clpc.us, 481-3233. CYPRESS LAKE UNITED METHODIST Sunday 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, 482-1250. FAITH FELLOWSHIP WORLD OUTREACH Sunday 10:30 a.m.,Thursday 7:30 p.m., Friday 7:30 p.m. 6111 South Pointe Boulevard, 278-3638. FAITH UNITED METHODIST Sunday 8:45 and 10:30 a.m. 15690 McGregor Boulevard, 482-2030. FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST Wednesday 12 noon Testimony Service, Sunday 10:30 a.m. 2390 West First Street, christiansciencefortmyers.net, christianscience.com. FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Sunday 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. 13545 American Colony Boulevard, 936-2511. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. 2466 First Street, www.fumcftmyers.org, 332-1152. FORT MYERS CHRISTIAN Sunday 10:30 a.m., 5916 Winkler Road, 4374330. FORT MYERS CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST; Sunday 10 a.m., 8210 College Parkway, 4823133. IONA-HOPE EPISCOPAL CONGREGATION Saturday 5 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Tuesday 9:30 a.m.; Wednesday 9:30 a.m. 9650 Gladiolus Drive, 454-4778. JESUS THE WORKER CATHOLIC Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday 8, 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. 881 Nuna Avenue, 481-1143. KINGDOM LIFE Sunday 10:30 a.m. 2154 McGregor Boulevard, 218-8343. LAMB OF GOD Sunday 7:45 and 10 a.m. 19691 Cypress View Drive, lambofgodchurch.net, 267-3525. NEW BEGINNINGS CENTER Friday 6:30 and 7 p.m. 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, nbcministry@embarqmail.com, facebook.com/nbcministry, 656-0416. NEW COVENANT EYES Monthly 9 a.m. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, newcovenanteyes.com, 220-8519. NEW HOPE BAPTIST Sunday 11 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. 16120 San Carlos Boulevard, Unit 10, 985-8503. NEW HOPE PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 10051 Plantation Road, www.newhopefortmyers.org, 274-1230. PEACE COMMUNITY Sunday 10:30 a.m. www. 17671 Pine Ridge Road, peacecommunitychurch.com, 2677400. PEACE LUTHERAN Sunday 8 and 10 a.m. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@ peaceftmyers.com. 437-2599. REDEEMER LUTHERAN Sunday 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. 3950 Winkler Ext., 274-0143. RIVER OF LIFE ASSEMBLY OF GOD 8, 9:45 and 11:30 a.m. 21580 River Ranch Road, 495-0400. SAMUDRABADRA BUDDHIST CENTER Meditation classes. MeditationInFortMyers. org, 567-9739. SAINT COLUMBKILLE CATHOLIC Monday through Saturday 8 a.m.; Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday 7, 9 and 11 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 12171 Iona Road, 489-3973. ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CATHOLIC Monday through Thursday 6:45 a.m.; Friday 6:45 and 11 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.; Sunday 6:45, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 2157 Cleveland Avenue, 334-2161. SAINT JOHN THE APOSTLE METROPOLITAN Sunday 10 a.m. 3049 McGregor Boulevard, 344-0012. SAINT MICHAEL LUTHERAN Saturday 5:30 p.m.; Sunday 8 and 10:45 a.m. 3595 Broadway, 939-1218. SAINT NICHOLAS MONASTERY Sunday 9:30 a.m. 111 Evergreen Road, saintnicholasmonastery.org, 997-2847. ST. VINCENT DE PAUL CATHOLIC Tuesday through Friday 9 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.; Sunday 9 and 11 a.m. 13031 Palm Beach Boulevard, 693-0818. SOUTHWEST BAPTIST Sunday 11 a.m.; Wednesday 6 p.m. 16940 McGregor Boulevard, 454-3336. TEMPLE BETHEL SYNAGOGUE Friday Shabbat 7:30 p.m.; Torah Saturday 9 a.m.; Religious School Wednesday 5:30 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m.16225 Winkler Road, templebethel.com, 433-0018. TEMPLE JUDEA (CONSERVATIVE) Friday 6:30 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. tjswfl. org.14486 A&W Bulb Road, 433-0201. THE NEW CHURCH Sunday 11 a.m. 10811 Sunset Plaza Circle #401, newchurchflorida.com. 481-5535. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST Sunday 10:30 a.m. 13411 Shire Lane, uucfm. org, 561-2700. UNITY OF FORT MYERS Sunday 10 a.m. 11120 Ranchette Road, unityoffortmyers.org, 278-1511. WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. 9065 Ligon Court, 481-2125. WORD OF LIFE Sunday 10 a.m., Wednesday 7 p.m. 2120 Collier Avenue, 274-8881. ZION LUTHERAN Sunday 8, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. 7401 Winkler Road, zionfm.org, 481-4040. THE RIVER JULY 6, 201810 Volunteers Sought For Family Mentor ProgramThe United Way Volunteer Center and the Childrens Network of Southwest Florida are recruiting individuals to become family mentors. Volunteers will be trained and matched with parents who have been involved in the Child Welfare System and are ready to be reunified with their children. An ideal family mentor will be one who can be nonjudgmental, offer a min imum of an hour a week to work with t he parent(s) and provide a caring and supportive relationship to reduce the feeling of isolation in the spirit of fami lies helping families. Mentors will assist p arents with basic parenting and family budgeting skills by teaching, coaching and modeling. Todays parents need a support sys tem. Each mentor will work to build a c ommitted and trusting relationship with the parents, supporting them though the transition. The mentor will empower the parents to define and meet goals for themselves, to achieve self-reliance and offer advice that parents may be uncom fortable seeking elsewhere. Building this k ind of relationship is particularly impor tant for struggling families who have few r ole models or positive outlets for both children and adults. Training classes are offered monthly and will cover the topics such as confi dentiality, planning for success, family e ngagement and an overview of the Child Welfare System. To become a mentor, register online at www.unitedwaylee.org/family-mentorprogram or contact Patrice Cunningham at patrice@unitedwaylee.org or 4337557. The United Way Volunteer Center connects individuals and companies to volunteer opportunities throughout the community. Volunteers can reach the United Way Volunteer Center by call ing 433-5767 or by visiting the United W ay website at www.unitedwaylee.org/ volunteer. Conservation And Voters WinIn a written order issued recently, a court in Tallahassee delivered a major victory to Florida conservationists and the voting public by enforcing the terms of the Land Acquisition Trust Fund Amendment to the Florida Constitution. In 2014, an extraordinary 75 percent of the Florida electorate voted to approve the amendment, requiring reinstatement of long-standing conservation land acquisition programs that had been terminated by the legislature. Instead of using the funds dedi cated by the amendment for those land pr ograms, the state spent them on ongo ing operations, arguing that the amendment required only changes in bookkeeping. Under the amendment, about $12 billion over the next 16 years is dedicated to conservation land programs. Manley Fuller, president of Florida Wildlife Federation and a primary plain tiff in the case, said, This decision is o ne of the most important victories for land conservation in Florida history. The conservation land amendment was approved by the vast majority of Florida voters, and the courts order will protect millions of acres of sensitive land and also protect essential water resources. From page 8Along The Riverand the Fat Fingers. Originally from Chicago, DaSilva has performed across the world at prestigious events including the Montreal International Jazz & Blues Festival, RiverWalk Blues Festival and the San Diego Music & Roots Festival. He has opened for headline acts the likes of BB King, Ray Charles, Jeff Beck, The Black Crowes and Leon Russell.Tickets for the Glam! Bam! Burlesque! Show Me The Honeys performance (open to ages 21 and older) are $35 each. Tables of four are $250; tables of eight are $500. Doors open at 8 p.m. and the show runs from 9 to 11 p.m. at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center, located at 2301 First Street in Fort Myers. To purchase tickets, visit www.sbdac.com. Family mentors are being recruited to help parents photo provided

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CROW Case Of The Week: Purple Gallinule by Bob PetcherThe purple gallinule ( Porphyrio martinicus) is a medium-sized water bird with long legs and toes. It is known to swim like a duck, but can also walk on top of marsh vegetation due to its lengthy toes. Purple gallinules are so named because they have dark purple heads, necks and undersides. The rest of their colorful bodies include a green back, light blue forehead, red-tipped bill and yellow legs. Gallinules are related to rails and coots. It differs from its cousin the common gallinule by its brilliant coloration. The common gallinule lacks that striking visual appearance in regards to color, and looks duller if both birds were side by side. Purple gallinules do have some quirks. As if walking on lily pads wasnt strange enough, these birds flick their tails nervously, nod their heads while swimming and regularly fly short distances with legs dangling to attract attention. While they are awkward fliers, purple gallinules do make trips to northern states and southern Canada as well as numerous flights to Europe and South Africa. At CROW, an adult purple gallinule was found with a droopy wing and unable to fly. The bird was transported to the Sanibel clinic where veterinarians were able to determine it had a fractured right coracoid bone, which is connected to the shoulder blade and attaches part of the biceps. Due to no other wounds present, the fracture was likely caused by some type of blunt trauma, according to CROW medical staff. The bird was given pain medications and placed in a body wrap to stabilize the fracture. We use a type of tape bandage, said Dr. Robin Bast, CROW staff veterinarian, in describing the material used for the body wrap. It is easily removable and does not damage the feathers when we place and remove it. The body wrap being easily removable is important due to the frequency of rehabilitation needed. The wrap is removed every three days during physical therapy, and then replaced to continue to stabilize the wing as it heals, added Dr. Bast. The gallinule is also receiving pain medications, fluids and nutritional support as well as physical therapy. The body wrap and physical therapy process will continue for nearly a month. The bandage will be in place for three weeks, and then removed for a week of strict cage rest before the bird will be moved to an outside enclosure for further rehabilitation, said Dr. Bast. Purple gallinules are not a common patient seen at CROW. This case reportedly marks just the ninth purple gallinule to be admitted in the past seven years. The patient will be with us for a few more weeks, but so far there have been no complications, Dr. Bast said on June 30. It will be a little while longer before we know if the fracture is healing appropriately, which will be determined using radiographs. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to P.O. Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit www.crowclinic.org. Sporting a body wrap, patient #18-2407 rests after suffering a fractured coracoid bone photo by Brian Bohlman RIVER 11 THE RIVER JULY 6, 2018

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Great Flats Action All Week Long by Capt. Matt MitchellDespite red tide reports all over the news, the southern end of Pine Island Sound has not been affected. In fact, some of the open water flats fishing thats going on is amazing. Although the water is brown, it is still pretty clear. Once you get up past the middle sound, there are large patches of floating grass making it hard to fish. In the very northern end around Cabbage Key and Useppa Island, we are seeing floating dead fish. Small baits, either shiners or small pinfish fished under a popping cork, have brought some crazy nonstop action from St. James City all the way up to Flamingo Bay channel. Limits of trout along with lots of small sharks and Spanish mackerel have kept the rods bent basically until you run out of bait. This southeastern end of the sound for some reason has been the prettiest water around and is just filled with life. Soft plastic jigs in a shiner pattern have also been getting it done in these same areas. Soft plastics can either be fished under a popping cork like you would a like bait or fan cast and bounced along the bottom. The variety of fish in these threeto six-foot grass flats has been amazing. With water temperatures topping out shiners have all but disappeared for at least the next few months. Pinfish have become the go-to bait with smaller pinfish catching lots of keeper-sized trout. Another option with the hot water temperature is to use frozen jumbo shrimp to pitch against the mangroves for redfish. Floating a big piece of shrimp on a jighead close to the mangroves and letting the current move it down the bank has drawn the redfish in when nothing else will. Getting out early morning or late night is the only way to beat this summer heat. Although the afternoon bite has been OK, its been tough to dodge the afternoon thunderstorms. These fast-moving storms can be filled with lightening and should not be taken lightly especially when out on a boat. Even if it means wrapping the days trip up early, its always better to be safe than sorry. Low tides have been late night and are the perfect set-up to fish docks or the passes for some great snook action. Not only do you beat the heat, you will usually have the whole pass to yourself. Flies work great for this along with large live baits in the fast-moving current. The better snook bite in the passes has come during this outgoing tide. Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions, email captmattmitchell@aol. com. ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. NEW MOTOR SALES REBUILT POWERHEADS FACTORY TRAINED MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISERCourteous Professional Marine Repair Service Dockside Service Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life472-3380 466-3344 Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint PricesDave Doane NEW M O T O R S ALE S REB U ILT P O WERHEA D S FACTORY T R A I N E D MER C U RY MARINER JO HN SO N EVINR U DE S UZUKI YAMAHA O M C I/ O S MER C RU I S E R C ourteous Professional Marine Repair S erv i ce D oc k s i d e S erv i c e S ervin g Sanibel & C aptiva For Li f e Y B t t Yo ur B ottom Yo ur B ot to m Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices C Call on a c es C C ll n Pa in t Pr i es C C i i Call on Paint Prices D ave Doane1 Send Us Your Fish TalesWe would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include a photograph with identification. Email to press@islandsunnews.com or call 395-1213. Gillie Russell with a slot-sized redfish caught while fishing with Capt. Matt Mitchell photo provided THE RIVER JULY 6, 201812 BOAT RENTALSFishing Cabbage KeyDolphin Watching Captains Available472-5800Jensens Marina Captiva Island Single hooks cause less damage than treble hooksCLEAR YOUR GEAR It Catches More Than Fish

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Plant SmartMuscadineby Gerri ReavesMuscadine (Vitis rotundifolia) is a native woody vine that grows throughout Florida as well as the southeastern U.S. In the wild, its found in hammocks, woods and scrub, and also flourishes weed-like in undeveloped lots and along roadsides. It spreads by using coiled tendrils and is capable of scrambling over other plants and into the treetops and growing as long as 90 feet. If you want a fast-growing wildlifefriendly vine to cover a trellis or fence, this might be a good choice. While this member of the grape family often volunteers its seeds are spread by wildlife it is also cultivated to make grape jelly, juice and wine. Historically speaking, it was the first grape species to be cultivated in North America. Today, many cultivars exist. Its natural pest resistance is an advantage for commercial growers as well as home gardeners, and it can often be grown without pesticides. Inconspicuous yellow-green, fivepetaled flowers appear in spring, followed by fruit clusters -not bunches -of up to 30 grapes in fall. Each grape is one-half to an inch across and ranges in color from pinkish bronze to deep purple-black. The skin is tough, the interior flesh translucent, juicy and seeded. The alternative triangular, or heart-shaped, leaves have toothed edges and are deciduous, so the vine is bare part of the year but re-leafs quickly. It will tolerate some shade but does best in full sun. Propagate it with seeds or cuttings. Sources: A Gardeners Guide to Floridas Native Plants by Rufino Osorio, National Audubon Society Field Guide to Florida by Peter Alden et al., Native Florida Plants by Robert G. Haehle and Joan Brookwell, The Shrubs and Woody Vines of Florida by Gil Nelson, www.edis.ifas.ufl.edu, and www. floridata.com. Plant Smart explores the diverse flora of South Florida. Muscadines toothed leaves (across center) mingle with native palmetto and invasive air potato in the wild In the fall, native muscadine produces clusters of small grapes consumed by birds and other wildlife. Jelly, juice and wine are made from the fruit. photos by Gerri Reaves 13 THE RIVER JULY 6, 2018 From page 7July Programsto this enjoyable, all-ages storytime that encourages the development of prereading skills through songs, rhymes, fingerplays and stories. Toddler Tales 10 a.m. Tuesdays, July 10, 17; This interactive and active time for toddlers and their caregiver is designed to advance prereading and social skills. Theyll experience storytelling, wordplay, felt board stories, fingerplays, puppets, singing, musicmaking, socializing, dancing and, of course, books. Preschool Storytime 10 a.m. Wednesdays, July 11, 18; Your preschooler will build relationships with other kids, books and the library in a storytime designed specifically for them. Baby Rhyme Time 10 a.m. Thursdays, July 12, 19; During this special storytime, you and your baby will learn new nursery rhymes and fingerplays, interact with puppets, sing, read books and dance. Childrens Programs Kids Read Down Fines 5 to 6 p.m. Monday, July 9; Children and teens can earn a $2 credit for every 15 minutes they read in the designated area for a total of $8 in one session. Credit may be applied to cards issued to patrons age 18 and under only and applies only to charges on overdue materials. Bring your library card. Katie Adams: Cracker Cinderella Meeting Room ABCD; 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 10; In this original version of Cinderella, puppets crafted like old-fashioned dolls, a helpful tree fairy and a gown made with magic moss are all combined to bring a unique flavor of old-time Florida to this beloved rags-to-riches tale. Sponsored by Friends of the Fort Myers Library. For children who have completed kindergarten through fifth grade. Registration is required. Pirates Dont Rock the Boat Meeting Room ABCD; 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 17; Test your pirate trivia knowledge, complete fun challenges and earn pirate loot for your team. Will you end up a winning pirate or a sandstranded landlubber? Lets batten down the hatches and find out. For children who have completed kindergarten through fifth grade. Registration is required. Rockin Magic Show Meeting Room ABCD; 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 24; Joey, Alexandra and Sydney (the Eclectus parrot) will lead you on an adventure featuring comedy, magic, music and audience interaction. Sponsored by Friends of the Fort Myers Library. For children who have completed kindergarten through fifth grade. Registration is required. Libraries Rock Back to School Party Meeting Room ABCD; 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 31; Rock out the end of summer with some great music and fun movement. Take home a goody bag of back-to-school supplies, too. Registration is required. Teen Programs Kids Read Down Fines 5 to 6 p.m. Monday, July 9; Children and teens can earn a $2 credit for every 15 minutes they read in the designated area for a total of $8 in one session. Credit may be applied to cards issued to patrons age 18 and under only and applies only to charges on overdue materials. Bring your library card. Lego Mind Storms 2 p.m. Wednesday, July 11; Tweens, lets get together and build blocks with Lego Mind Storms. Get creative, have fun and meet new friends. No registration is required. Sponsored by Friends of the Fort Myers Library. Game Night for Teens 5 p.m. Monday, July 16; Play Super Mario, NHL, Sonic, FIFA, Madden and many others. Sponsored by the Friends of the Fort Myers Library. Mixing Rocks 2 p.m. Wednesday, July 18; Teens, would you like to learn about mixing music? Chris Presnell will show you the basic programming skills for mixing music in your home studio. Learn how to create tracks, connect mics, keyboards and other instruments, how to use a click track, overdub and final output ready to be posted or published. No registration is required. Sponsored by Friends of the Fort Myers Library. End of Summer Party 2 p.m. Wednesday, July 25; Celebrate the end of summer with your friends by playing games, eating relax and having fun. Sponsored by Friends of the Fort Myers Library. Registration is required. The Fort Myers Regional Library is located at 2450 First Street in Fort Myers. Adult programs are held in the meeting room building located across the library campus at 1651 Lee Street. For more information about a program or to register, call the library at 5334600or visit www.leelibrary.net. EXPERIENCE: HUNDREDS OF SUCCESSFUL LANDSCAPES300 Center Road, Fort Myers FL 33907 PHONE 239.939.9663 FAX 239.939.8504www.NoLawn.com www.AllNative.bizOPEN DAILY: 9 to 5 Mon Sat 10 to 3 SunOUR NURSERY FEATURES OVER 200 SPECIES OF NATIVE PLANTS ON SEVERAL ACRES Buttery Gardens Wildlife/Bird Sanctuaries We also offer landscape design, consultation, installation and maintenance.

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THE RIVER JULY 6, 201814 Outreach Project Involves Students And EducatorsMiddle School Students enrolled in The Immokalee Foundations Summer Academy Program recently took part in a No Child left On Shore (NCLOS) Environmental Education Outreach Project Field trip. Departing McCarthys Marina on Captiva aboard Captiva Cruises motor catamaran The Playtime, students and Immokalee Foundation teachers cruised the waters of Pine Island Sound en route to Cayo Costa State Park. In addition to having fun in the Gulf of Mexico, students observed some of the inhabitants of the Gulf Beach and Tidal Zone habitats, including sand dollars, mole crabs, coquina clams, horseshoe crabs as well as the variety of mollusk shells. For some of these students it was their first experience being in ocean water and being on an island. Part of the cruise experience included using a trawling net for a random sample of marine life within the Back Bay Estuary. Captiva Cruises Educator Richard Finkel described characteristics and adaptations of the fish and other marine life pulled up in the net, which included sea stars, hermit crabs, pin fish, grunt fish, trigger fish, all of which were released back into the shallow sea grass habitat. Students were amazed at the abundance and variety of life. The Immokalee Foundation is dedicated to building pathways of success for the children of Immokalee. The NCLOS is a collaborative endeavor of The SanibelCaptiva Conservation Foundation (SCCF) and Captiva Cruises which strives to provide the opportunity for the younger generation of Southwest Florida to gain a firsthand learning experience and exposure to our coastal environment. SCCF and Captiva Cruises have been partners in many environmental education programs over the past 25 years. SCCF, founded in 1967, is dedicated to the conservation of coastal habitats and aquatic resources on Sanibel and Captiva and in the surrounding watershed. Captiva Cruises, established in 1987, is a multi-faceted boat tour company offering a variety of excursions in Pine Island Sound. For more information about the No Child left On Shore Environmental Education Outreach project, including sponsorship opportunities, contact SCCF at 472-2329 or visit www.sccf.org or contact Captiva Cruises at 472-5300 or visit www.captivacruises.com. Students look at fish photos provided A horseshoe crab exoskeleton Captiva Cruises Educator Richard Finkel, left, poses with students of The Immokalee Foundations on Cayo Costa State ParkCaloosahatchee Algae Causes Health AdvisoryThe Florida Department of Health in Lee County (DOH) is issuing a health advisory for the Alva Boat Ramp, Davis Boat Ramp and Franklin Locks based on water sampling results from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). DEP officials conducted sampling in the area and found the presence of Cyanobacteria, commonly known as blue-green algae. When algae is visible, DOH recommends individuals using the boat ramp avoid contact with the water. DEP officials will continue to monitor the Alva Boat Ramp, Davis Boat Ramp and Franklin Locks and post updates at www. floridadep.gov/dear/algal-bloom. Blue-green algae can cause gastrointestinal effects if swallowed. Children and pets are especially vulnerable, so keeping them away from the water during a bloom is especially important. DEP, the five water management districts, DOH, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services all work together to respond to algal blooms. DEP has been closely monitoring and testing algal blooms and will continue to respond to any new reports. For more information on blue-green algae, visit www.floridahealth.gov/ environmental-health/aquatic-toxins/ cyanobacteria.html. If you spot bluegreen algae, contact Kalina Warren, environmental administrator with DEPs Water Quality Assessment Program for the South Region at 407-897-4177.

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15 THE RIVER JULY 6, 2018 Chamber Installs 2018-19 Board Of DirectorsThe 2018-19 board of directors and officers were recently installed for the Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerce and the Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerce Foundation. The Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerces Board of Directors will be led by board chair Joe Mitchell, president of Pool Pros, Inc. He will be joined by first vice chair Bryan Blackwell, financial advisor and managing partner of Molloy Financial Group; second vice chair Jim Larkin, general manager of Crowne Plaza Fort Myers at Bell Tower Shops; treasurer Angela Schivinski, publisher for Fort Myers Florida Weekly ; and immediate past chairman Dan Adams, vice president south Florida of Stevens Construction. New board members include Chris Peters, president and general manager of the Fort Myers Miracle; Stephen Sanford, sales manager at Lamar Advertising; Samantha Scott, owner of Pushing the Envelope; and Kelly Talamo, controller at Stokes Marine. Working to support the Chambers efforts to enhance education in Southwest Florida, the Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerces Foundations Board of Directors will be led by board chair Dan Adams, vice president south Florida of Stevens Construction. He will be joined by first vice chair Dr. Guido Minaya, CEO and chief learning officer for Minaya Learning Global Solutions LLC; treasurer Sharon Thompson, managing shareholder of Hughes, Snell & Co., PA; and secretary Suzanne Boy, attorney for Henderson, Franklin, Starnes & Holt, PA. The 2018-19 board of directors were appointed during the Chambers General Membership Meeting on June 21. Outgoing board chairs, board members and volunteer committee chairpersons were recognized during the ceremony for their year of service. Paula Sisk, solutions engineer for Telephone Support Systems, was honored as Ambassador of the Year. For more information, visit www. fortmyers.org. The Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerce Foundation Board of Directors for 201819 are, from left, Mark Weber, Dr. Terri Kinsey, Joe Mitchell, Dan Adams, Melissa Cofta, Janette LHeureux, Suzanne Boy and Sharon Thompson photos provided From left to right: Jeff Brown, Paula Sisk and Dan Adams. Sisk was recognized as Ambassador of the Year

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THE RIVER JULY 6, 201816 Employee Training Grant AwardedWhat can a growing and successful company like Cheney Brothers do with a $524,000 grant? Hire and train onsite up to 330 new employees. Cheney Brothers, in partnership with Florida SouthWestern State College (FSW), has been awarded that $524,000 grant. Our partnership with FSW furthers our commitment to building our local workforce by attracting and training the employees we need to continue growing and expanding, said Shane Simmons, president of Cheney Brothers in Punta Gorda. We are deeply committed to being a vital part of the communities we serve. Our employees work here, live here and raise families here. We are proud of this partnership and the results our corporate training center at FSW brings to our regions business economy. Cheney Brothers is a well-established and successful company, that with this grant now has the funding necessary to train and expand our regions workforce with up to 330 new hires, said Dr. Robert R. Jones, vice president, economic development and external affairs, FSW. These new employees will receive training that ranges from logistics to management and supervision positions. These are the type of positive, economic driving companies that these grants are designed to help take their success to the next level. In turn that helps our economy. Cheney Brothers, Inc. began its family business in 1925. From humble beginnings in West Palm Beach with one truck delivering eggs, milk and butter, Cheney Brothers has grown into one of the largest broadline food and beverage service distributors across the Southeast. Cheney Brothers presently employees over 2,500 people in Florida with yearly sales exceeding $2 billion. Their export services extend to over 80 countries worldwide, including the Caribbean and Latin America. Florida SouthWestern State College (FSW) administers the Quick Response Training (QRT) grants in southwest Florida by working closely with the state of Florida Economic Development Office. FSW has been successful in securing $2.6 million in QRT funds to train over 1,400 new hires since July 1, 2017. This funding not only directly benefits the companies receiving training funds, but also results in a benefit to the local economy through increased jobs and increased wages. Since 2013, FSW has secured over $12 million in QRT funding to train over 6,800 new hires. The QRT grant lasts for one year and is targeted on the highly customized training programs that companies need to improve the transferable skill base of new hires. These programs can be instructed by FSW faculty and consultants or by specialists from the company itself. For more information, contact Adrian Kerr, FSWs director of corporate training and services, at 432-5233 or adrian.kerr@fsw.edu. Government Contracting SymposiumLearn more about the contracting opportunities available with local, state and federal government entities at the third annual Southwest Florida Government Contracting Symposium and Expo at Florida SouthWestern State College in Building U-102 on Friday, July 20 from 9 a.m. to noon. Organized by the Lee County Economic Development Office, the free event is designed to help interested business leaders gain insight into government contracting and identify resources that align with what local businesses have to offer. More than 25 exhibitors will be available for possible government subcontracting opportunities. In addition, presentations on various topics are planned throughout the event. The Lee County Economic Development Office provides business assistance to retain existing businesses, encourage entrepreneurship and to attract new businesses, so that Lee County has a strong economy, thriving communities and broadly shared prosperity. To register, visit www.eventbrite. com and enter government contracting symposium and expo in the search field or call the Lee County Economic Development at 533-6800. For exhibitor information, contact Amy McQuagge at amcquagge@leegov.com. Florida SouthWestern State College is located at 8099 College Parkway in Fort Myers. For more information, visit www.leecountybusiness.com. Luncheon To Cover Exit Strategy PlanningBuilding a successful business means creating a strong team of professionals and planning for the day when you will no longer be a part of that team. Both subjects will be topics at Julys Above Board Chamber of Florida luncheon meeting at the Crowne Plaza Fort Myers at Bell Tower on Thursday, July 12 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Luncheon attendees will hear from an expert panel on strategies for dealing with an evolving and diverse workforce, including recruitment and training ideas for employee retention. Attendees should come prepared to learn valuable techniques for identifying, evaluating and hiring quality employees. Panelists include Angela J. Pruitt, chief human resources officer for the School District of Lee County; Robin Larkin, principal at Performance Management Associates in Naples; Denise Perchall, PEO Business development manager for AccessPoint in Bonita Springs; and Lori Burke, MBA, SPHR, SHRM-SCP, director of human resources at Sunshine Ace Hardware. Hollinger Jobs President & CEO John Huttner will serve as master of ceremonies. Cost is $29 for members and $32 for nonmembers. Register at www. aboveboardchamber.com or call 910-7426. Crowne Plaza Fort Myers is located at 13051 Bell Tower Drive in Fort Myers. Bonsai Society Meeting At Garden July 21The Bonsai Society will meet at the Berne Davis Botanical Garden on Saturday, July 21 at 9 a.m. Members will create slabs in a workshop conducted by John Bartolozzi. There is a recommendation to wear old clothes. The public is invited; admission and parking are free. Advice will be available on selecting and cultivating bonsai trees. The Berne Davis Botanical Garden is located at 2166 Virginia Avenue in Fort Myers. For more information, visit www.bonsaiswfl.org. Nominations Sought For Business AwardThe Uncommon Friends Foundation has opened nominations for the 2018 Business Ethics Award that are due by September 1. Businesses in Lee, Charlotte, Collier, Hendry and Glades counties who consistently demonstrate a system-wide commitment to high ethical business practices are eligible. Businesses can nominate themselves or be nominated by a third party. The online nomination form and detailed submission guidelines are available at www.uncommonfriends. org. Independent judges will determine finalists and the winner. Finalists will be announced in advance and honored at a special business ethics luncheon hosted by Florida Gulf Coast Universitys Lutgert School of Business and the Uncommon Friends Foundation on Tuesday, October 23. The recipient of the Business Ethics Award will be announced at the annual Uncommon Evening Gala on Thursday, November 8 at the historic Burroughs Home & Gardens in Fort Myers. For more information, call 337-9503 or visit www.uncommonfriends.org. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. 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17 THE RIVER JULY 6, 2018 Director Of Public Safety Named At FSW Anthony Tony Giaimo has been named the director of public safety for Florida SouthWestern State College. Tony brings a wealth of experience to FSW, said Dr. Gina Doeble, vice president, administrative services. He has demonstrated a strong belief in community service and has an extensive career in law enforcement, and safety and emergency management. Giaimos career in law enforcement spans 27 years, and he has been a college instructor for 10 years. He most recently was the superintendent of police for the Tredyffrin Township Police Department in Pennsylvania for 27 years. He has also taught criminal justice/sociology and emergency medical techniques for police officers. Giaimo graduated from Temple University with a bachelors degree in accounting/law; Mountain State University with a masters degree in strategic leadership; and the FBI National Academy with a diploma and certifications in behavioral science, terrorism, management and criminal justice. He has been honored with numerous awards in his career, including Police Officer of the Year, the Safe Cities Award in 2016, the Board of Supervisors Award and the Life Saving Program Award. He is also a member of numerous professional organizations. Visit www.fsw.edu for more information. Tony Giaimo photo provided APEX Award Finalists To Be RevealedThe Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerce Women in Business (WIB) will announce the nominees and the five finalists for the 13th annual APEX Award at Hodges University on Wednesday, July 11 from 4 to 6 p.m. The APEX Awards recognize outstanding individuals in our community who are members of the Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerce and excel in the areas of professionalism, philanthropy, leadership and mentoring. Nominees this year include: Dr. A. Aurora Badia, Florida Skin Center, Inc. Susan Bennett, Susan Bennett Marketing and Media LC Valerie Clark, Fort Myers Technical College Stacey Cook-Hawk, SalusCare, Inc. Indera DeMine, DeMine Immigration Law Firm Brandie Dickerson, Tri-Town Construction LLC Megan DiPiero, Megan DiPiero Photography Talisha Faber, Iberiabank Kelly L. Fayer, Kelly L. Fayer, PA Teri Hansen, APR, Priority Marketing Christina Harris Schwinn, Pavese Law Firm Beth Hendry, Iberiabank Karen Johnson-Crowther, CFS Roofing Services Maggie Miller, Von Ahn Associates Susan Minaya, Minaya Learning Global Solutions LLC Jennifer Pfenninger, Embassy Suites Fort Myers-Estero Jessica Sanchez, Mothers Against Drunk Driving Lisa Sbuttoni, Edison & Ford Winter Estates Annette Trossbach, The Laboratory Theatre of Florida Karen Watson, Our Mothers Home of Southwest Florida, Inc. Trudi Williams, TKW Engineering Judy Williams, SPADA Salon and Day Spa The APEX Awards, presented by Vector & Ink, will be held at Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort and Spa on Saturday, August 25 from 6:30 to 10 p.m. Sponsorship opportunities are available. Hodges University is located at 4501 Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information, contact Stephanie Davis at stephanie@fortmyers.org or 332-2930 ext. 213. Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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THE RIVER JULY 6, 201818 Superior InteriorsNatural Textures Used Throughout Your Spaceby Linda CoinTheres something so inviting about using natural textures throughout your home in decor and design. Using elements like wood, stone, clay, mud and other materials inspired by the environment can liven up any room. Bringing the outside in is one of the easiest ways to freshen up your house, no matter what time of year it is. Here are a few ways to use natural textures throughout your space: Stone countertops bring the colors, veins and speckles of the earths minerals to life. Consider placing them in the kitchen, bathroom, or both. This is a simple yet subtle way to incorporate earthen beauty into your home design. Wooden accents in the form of living or dining room furniture make for a rustic yet elegant statement throughout the house. Its a more rugged take on traditional style that embraces the outdoors for all its worth. Try a farmhouse table in the kitchen, dining area or entryway of your home. Leather is a timeless texture that turns any room into a chic and sophisticated space. Leather sofas and chairs can add a fun and traditional yet timeless touch to your living areas. Place a leather lounge chair in your office or entryway as an endearing statement piece. Marble home decor is trendier than ever, and it stands as a great way to embrace natural textures throughout your space. Whether youre in love with marble coffee tables and desks, or youd rather take advantage of bowls, lamps, candle holders and other accessories, there are dozens of ways to utilize this material. Even plates, cutting boards and flatware with marbleized design make a sophisticated statement in the kitchen. Greenery was all the rage in 2017, but we believe the trend of decorating with natural foliage throughout your home will continue. From fresh flower arrangements to winding vines and shrubbery, you can embrace the great outdoors year-round and play with different accents in various rooms. Fill pillar holders with candles wrapped in green sprigs real or fake for the perfect centerpiece. A mantle adorned with a small eucalyptus tree looks as captivating as its natural fragrance. Succulents are popular as ever, and they can be placed near any window in your home to create a modern and refreshing indoor garden. You can even go simple and place fresh flowers throughout the house. Your options are endless. Place greenery in clay pots to maximize the use of natural textures in an efficient space. Clay is a beautiful option that can easily bring the outdoors in to any room of your home in a subtle yet endearing way. Linda Coin is an interior designer on Sanibel/Captiva Islands and can be reached at linda@coindecden.com. Financial FocusSaying I Do Might Mean I Cant For Roth IRAby Jennifer BaseyJune and July are popular months for weddings. If you are planning on tying the knot this month, its an exciting time, but be aware that being married might affect you in unexpected ways including the way you invest. If you and your new spouse both earn fairly high incomes, you may find that you are not eligible to contribute to a Roth IRA. A Roth IRA can be a great way to save for retirement. You can fund your IRA with virtually any type of investment, and, although your contributions are not deductible, any earnings growth is distributed tax-free, provided you dont start withdrawals until you are age 59 and youve had your account at least five years. In 2018, you can contribute up to $5,500 to your Roth IRA, or $6,500 if youre age 50 or older. But heres where your just married status can affect your ability to invest in a Roth IRA. When you were single, you could put in the full amount to your Roth IRA if your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) was less than $120,000; past that point, your allowable contributions were reduced until your MAGI reached $135,000, after which you could no longer contribute to a Roth IRA at all. But once you got married, these limits did not double. Instead, if youre married and filing jointly, your maximum contribution amount will be gradually reduced once your MAGI reaches $189,000, and your ability to contribute disappears entirely when your MAGI is $199,000 or more. Furthermore, if you are married and filing separately, you are ineligible to contribute to a Roth IRA if your MAGI is just $10,000 or more. So, as a married couple, how can you maximize your contributions? The answer may be that, similar to many endeavors in life, if one door is closed to you, you have to find another in this case, a backdoor Roth IRA. Essentially, a backdoor Roth IRA is a conversion of traditional IRA assets to a Roth. A traditional IRA does not offer tax-free earnings distributions, though your contributions can be fully or partially deductible, depending on your income level. But no matter how much you earn, you can roll as much money as you want from a traditional IRA to a Roth, even if that amount exceeds the yearly contribution limits. And once the money is in the Roth, the rules for tax-free withdrawals will apply. Still, getting into this back door is not necessarily without cost. You must pay taxes on any money in your traditional IRA that hasnt already been taxed, and the funds going into your Roth IRA will likely count as income, which could push you into a higher tax bracket in the year you make the conversion. Will incurring these potential tax consequences be worth it to you? It might be, as the value of tax-free withdrawals can be considerable. However, you should certainly analyze the pros and cons of this conversion with your tax advisor before making any decisions. In any case, if youve owned a Roth IRA, or if you were even considering one, be aware of the new parameters you face when you get married. And take the opportunity to explore all the ways you and your new spouse can create a positive investment strategy for your future. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones financial advisor. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@ edwardjones.com. From page 9Backpack Eventbuilder hopes to set another new fundraising mark this year. The final amount of the donation will be unveiled at a check presentation to be held the week prior to the event. Our company and communities are proud to pull together to support students in need, said Neal Communities Southwest Florida Regional President Michael Greenberg. We enjoy volunteering the day of the event as much as its been our pleasure to give monetarily. The Multicultural Centre of Southwest Florida is truly making an impact. In advance of the event, the public is invited to participate in the Adopt-AStudent fundraiser. Each $10 donation provides a student with a new backpack and school supplies that include notebook paper, folders, crayons, glue, pencils and pens. To date, The BIG Backpack Event has provided new backpacks and school supplies to more than 35,000 students. The event lends a helping hand to students and families in need while celebrating the diversity in Southwest Florida with live multicultural entertainment, including hip hop, Irish step dancing, salsa dancing and more. Children age 5 to 12 will receive free backpacks and school supplies while supplies last. Thanks to generous vendors, students may also receive eye exams, haircuts and other giveaways. Children must be present with a parent or guardian to receive the free supplies. For more information on how to Adopt-A-Student or become a vendor, volunteer or sponsor, visit www. multicultural-centre.org or email info@ multicultural-centre.org. Executive Director Named To CRAMichele Hylton-Terry has been named executive director for the Fort Myers Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA). The CRA leads redevelopment and revitalization of the citys most blighted areas. Hylton-Terry started at the CRA in 2003 and has acted as interim executive director since May 12, prior to which she served as the agencys redevelopment manager. As redevelopment manager, HyltonTerry led efforts to restore historic McCollum Hall and has overseen redevelopment initiatives in the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard, Dunbar/Michigan areas, and the former Velasco Village redevelopment area. She also managed the CRAs Commercial Corridor Grant Programs and the citys parking operations. Hylton-Terry holds a bachelor of science in information systems from Hodges University and a master of public administration from Barry University. She has completed advanced training from the Florida League of Cities Institute for Community and is a certified redevelopment administrator from the Florida Redevelopment Association. I am honored and excited to serve the citizens of Fort Myers in this capacity. I look forward to continuing to work with our staff, advisory board and the board of commissioners to achieve the goals and objectives of the CRA, said HyltonTerry. Sanibel Resort TripAdvisor AwardSundial Beach Resort & Spa was recently awarded the 2018 TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence. The award validates Sundials consistently high guest ratings and celebrates the resorts active engagement with customers. Were thrilled to again have earned this badge of honor which recognizes our achievement of continually delivering a high-quality guest experience, said Sundial General Manager Phillip Starling. Were very thankful to our guests as well as to our team members who strive to provide exceptional service. The Certificate of Excellence accounts for the quality, quantity and recency of reviews submitted by travelers on TripAdvisor over a 12-month period. To qualify, a business must maintain an overall TripAdvisor rating of at least four out of five and have a minimum number of reviews. Sundial Beach Resort & Spa has repeatedly ranked high with travelers, with over 2,700 published reviews. With last years addition of 12 pickleball courts and a sushi Grab N Go market, Sundial continues to elevate its full-service property by offering more activities and amenities.

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19 THE RIVER JULY 6, 2018 RIVER Book ReviewThe President Is Missingby Di SaggauThe President is Missing is a book that has been flying out of stores everywhere, becoming a best seller. I admit to buying it right after seeing an interview with Bill Clinton and James Patterson talking about how they cowrote the book. Patterson has written a ton of best-sellers. Of late, he has been co-authoring with other writers. Its an approach that seems to work well. This book has received good reviews over all with headlines like, The Day of the Jackal for the 21st century, The political thriller of the decade and This book moves like Air Force One, Big and fast. While not everyone is as kind, I agree with the positive reviews. The President is Missing is a compelling read, and it touches on a subject that is of great concern to many of us, a terrorist attack that would cripple the United States. The book opens with president Duncan, a widower, testifying before a mock House Select Committee, but all he can say is, I have no specific recollection of that, Congressman. One Congressman, from Ohio, intends to have the president impeached for past actions involving a known terrorist, Suliman Cindoruk. Following the rehearsal hearing, the president goes rogue from the White House, because he feels he is the only one who can remedy a huge cyber attack on the United States. The consequences of such an attack would put us in the Dark Ages. Everything would stop working. The commander in chief, with the help of a disguise from an old friend, attends a baseball game to meet with an informant who has information on the upcoming cyberattack. The two are nearly gunned down, and the chase scenes that follow are not only exciting, they introduce us to an intriguing character named Bach. She is named for her devotion to the classical music that plays in her earbuds. Bach has killed on every continental. She has assassinated generals, activists, politicians and businessmen. She has a 100 percent kill rate. The pages sparkle every time Bach appears. Only six people in the presidents inner circle are aware of the code name Dark Ages. Soon it is discovered that there is a traitor in the White House. There are lots of good plot twists, and its interesting to read about the dedication of people who work in government, whose only goal is to serve this great nation. If you havent already, pick up a copy of The President is Missing Its an entertaining thriller about a mortal threat to our nation. School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Readers,As we read, watch and hear about the separation of migrant families, we need to understand and be aware that this horrific situation can also impact our own children. How a child experiences an event and how its handled by those around him have an effect on how traumatizing it can be, notes Child Mind Institute psychologist Dr. Jerry Bubrick. When we, as adults, are caught off guard by events and respond in a highly emotional way, it may impact our children. Television coverage, social media and shocking newspaper headlines can also amplify the impact of this disturbing situation. Many parents are concerned that viewing and hearing about other children who are suffering is traumatic for their own child. Parents are asking, What constitutes a traumatic event for a child? Can young people thrive despite a trauma in their past? How important is the family in helping children through upsetting and destabilizing experiences? These questions are in our minds as we watch our own children observe and absorb the pain of the incarcerated children. Here are some suggestions from experts in the psychological and psychiatric community for parents on assisting their children process trauma through calm and supportive dialog about their feelings As a parent, you cant protect your children from grief, but you can help them express their feelings, comfort them, help them feel safer and teach them how to deal with fear. By allowing and encouraging them to express their feelings, you can help them build healthy coping skills that will serve them well in the future, and confidence that they can overcome adversity, said Dr. Bubrick. Breaking the news When something happens that will get wide coverage, the most important suggestion is that you dont delay telling your children about whats happened: Its much better for the child if youre the one who tells her. You dont want her to hear from some other child, or a television news report. You want to be able to convey the facts, however painful, and set the emotional tone. Take your cues from your child Invite her to tell you anything she may have heard about the incarceration, and how she feels. Give her ample opportunity to ask questions. You want to be prepared to answer (but not prompt) questions about upsetting details. Your goal is to avoid encouraging frightening fantasies. Model calm Its okay to let your child know if youre sad, but if you talk to your child about a traumatic experience in a highly emotional way, then he or she will likely absorb your emotion and very little else. If, on the other hand, you remain calm, he or she is likely to grasp whats important: that tragic events can upset our lives, even deeply, but we can learn from bad experiences and work together to grow stronger. Be reassuring Talking about a catastrophe is always difficult, but this situation of being separated from ones parents is especially tough because of how egocentric children are: theyre likely to focus on whether something like this could happen to them. So, its important to reassure your child about how unusual this kind of event is and the measures that have been taken to prevent this kind of thing from happening to them. You can also assure him that this kind of tragedy is investigated carefully, to identify causes and help prevent it from happening again. Its confidence-building for kids to know that we learn from negative experiences. Help children express their feelings In your conversation (and subsequent ones), you can suggest ways your child might remember those shes lost: draw pictures or tell stories about things you did together. If youre religious, going to church or a synagogue could be valuable. Be developmentally appropriate Dont volunteer too much information, as this may be overwhelming. Instead, try to answer your childs questions. Do your best to answer honestly and clearly. Its okay if you cant answer everything; being available to your child is what matters. Difficult conversations like this arent over in one session; expect to return to the topic as many times as your child needs to come to terms with this experience. Be available If your child is upset, just spending time with him may make him feel safer. Children find great comfort in routines, and doing ordinary things together as a family may be the most effective form of healing. Adapted from www.childmind.org Shelley Greggs is adjunct faculty at Florida SouthWestern State College, where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also a nationally certified school psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. Packed with facts and employing an engaging storytelling style, [Female Pioneers of Fort Myers] both teaches and entertains. Local history buffs and newcomers to history will value Tuthill and Halls research and appreciate the accessible format, too.Gerri Reaves, PhD, author of Legendary Locals of Fort Myers and Fort Myers, Then & Now Available atWWW.AMAZON.COM WWW.EDITORIALRXPRESS.COM

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Big 3 Basketball Is Living Testimony To Where They Are Nowby Ed FrankIts fun to recall former athletes as Sports Illustrated does annually with its Where are they Now edition. But a relatively new basketball league, Big 3, provides the opportunity to see the stars of yesterday in live action today. Big 3 was founded last year by actor and music legend Ice Cube and entertainment executive Jeff Kwatinetz. The eight teams comprising the league include a virtual whos who of former NBA players and coaches Far different from regular basketball, the roving teams play on just half-a-court in 3-on 3 competitions. And the rules of the game also are far different. The 10-week season tipped off June 22 and each Friday night all eight teams four games compete in NBA arenas in Houston, Chicago, Oakland, Detroit, Miami, Toronto, Boston and Atlanta. The playoffs in Week Nine will be in Dallas with the championship in Barclays Center, Brooklyn, New York. Should you want to watch this exciting back-to-back brand of basketball on July 20 in the American Airlines Arena in Miami, the four games will pit the Killer 3s against the Ball Hogs; Tri State versus Ghost Busters; 3s Company versus 3 Headed Monsters, and Trilogy versus Power. But heres just a sampling of the stars you will see: The eight coaches are Rick Mahorn (Trilogy); Gary Payton (3-Headed Monsters); Nancy Lieberman (Power); George The Iceman Gervan (Ghost Busters); Charles Oakley (Killer3s); Michael Cooper (3s Company); Julius Dr. J Erving (Tri-State), and Rick Barry (Ball Hogs). Each team is limited to six players and oh what memories some of these Big 3 players bring Chauncey Billups, Metta World Peace, Drew Gooden, Amare Stoudemire, Brian Scalabrine, Glen Big Baby Davis, Nate Robinson, Alan Henderson, Bonzi Wells, Quentin Richardson and Mike Bibby. And these are just a few of the current Big 3 players. We wont attempt to describe all the Big 3 rules, but obviously they were crafted to provide up-tempo basketball. For example, the shot clock is only 14 seconds. There are four-point zones 30 feet from the basket. To win, a team must score 50 points and lead by at least two points. Halftime occurs when one team scores 25 points. Although this is just the leagues second season, its popularity appears to be catching on. The games are broadcast live on Fox Broadcast Network and FS1. Its great to know that these stars of yesteryear can still compete today. Miracle Off To Good Start In Second Half Bolstered by Minnesota Twins regulars Miquel Sano and Jorge Polanco, the Fort Myers Miracle baseball team started the week with a second-half record of 6-4, which placed the team in first place in the Florida State League South Division. Sano was sent down to the Miracle in an attempt to regain his batting stroke, and Polanco was here for just two games following his 80-game suspension for testing positive for performance enhancing drugs. Sano was hitting .345 in eight games with the Miracle and Polanco .333 in two games. The Miracle is on the road this weekend at Bradenton, returning home to Hammond Stadium Monday for a four-game series against Palm Beach. All have 7 p.m. starts. RIVER THE RIVER JULY 6, 201820 NBA Draft Full Of Classic AlumsThe road to the NBA goes through Fort Myers. One fifth of the players taken in Thursdays NBA Draft took part in at least one Culligan City of Palms Classic, a premier showcase for elite high school basketball talent held annually at Suncoast Credit Union Arena on the campus of Florida SouthWestern State College. The Phoenix Suns began the draft with their selection of DeAndre Ayton, who became the fifth Culligan City of Palms Classic alumnus in nine years to go No. 1 overall. Five of the top 10 picks and seven of the 14 lottery selections played in the Culligan City of Palms Classic. The tournament produced nine first-rounders, the most in its history. The 2018 NBA Draft picks who played in the Culligan City of Palms Classic, the team that picked them and when they were picked include: DeAndre Ayton, Phoenix Suns, 1 Mohamed Bamba, Orlando Magic, 6 Wendell Carter Jr., Chicago Bulls, 7 Collin Sexton, Cleveland Cavaliers, 8 Kevin Knox, New York Knicks, 9 Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, Charlotte Hornets (traded to Los Angeles Clippers), 11 Michael Porter Jr., Denver Nuggets, 14 Grayson Allen, Utah Jazz, 21 Anfernee Simons, Portland Trail Blazers, 24 Devonte Graham, Atlanta Hawks (traded to Charlotte Hornets), 34 Hamidou Diallo, Brooklyn Nets (traded to Oklahoma City Thunder), 45 Ray Spalding, Philadelphia 76ers (traded to Dallas Mavericks), 56 This years Culligan City of Palms Classic takes place on Monday, December 17 through Saturday, December 22. Ticket packages covering all six days of the tournament can be purchased online at www.cityofpalmsclassic.com/tickets or by calling the box office at 481-4849 or 1-800-440-7469 Mondays through Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Junior Golf Clinic To Begin July 30The City of Fort Myers is offering a second session of its five-day junior golf clinic from July 30 through August 4 at the Fort Myers Country Club. The classes will teach juniors ages 6 to 13 the fundamentals of golf, including rules, etiquette, chipping, putting and the full swing. City of Fort Myers Golf Professionals Rich Lamb and Todd Brown will teach the clinic, which is limited to 40 participants. The 75-minute clinics will start at 9:15 a.m. daily. Registration for the five-day session costs $60 and includes refreshments and range balls. Participants are welcome to bring their own equipment, and beginners are welcome to borrow equipment at no cost if needed. To register for a summer junior golf clinic, download the registration form at www.cityftmyers.com/ documentcenter/view/8688/ summer-junior-golf-clinic-2018. The Fort Myers Country Club is located at 3591 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information, contact Rich Lamb at 321-7488. SPORTS QUIZ 1. Name the only major -league pitcher in the modern era to hit three home runs in one game. 2. Who was the last Baltimor e Orioles player to lead the American League in RBIs for a season? 3. Who was the last Heisman T rophy winner before Louisvilles Lamar Jackson in 2016 to win the award despite playing on a team that lost the last two games of the regular season? 4. Name thr ee of the five players in Boston Celtics history to have 50 or more points in a playoff game. 5. When was the last time befor e 2018 that the Buffalo Sabres beat the Chicago Blackhawks in a regular-season NHL game? 6. Name the last American male befor e Matthew Centrowitz Jr. in 2016 to win the Olympic mens 1,500 meters race. 7. When was the last time befor e 2018 (WGC Mexico Championship) that PGA golfer Phil Mickelson won an event? ANSWERS 1. Jim Tobin of the Boston Braves in 1942 2. Chris Davis had 138 RBIs to lead the AL in 2013. 3. Tim Brown of Notre Dame, in 1987 4. Ray Allen, Bob Cousy, John Havlicek, Sam Jones and Isaiah Thomas. 5. It was 2009 6. Mel Sheppard, in 1908 7. It was the 2013 British Open. 239.472.0004 Community, Service, Leadership, Expertise, Integrity, Results PRGHomeTeam.com Pfeifer Realty Group Is Your Home Team!Eric PfeiferBroker, Owner

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Big 3 Basketball Is Living Testimony To Where They Are Nowby Ed FrankIts fun to recall former athletes as Sports Illustrated does annually with its Where are they Now edition. But a relatively new basketball league, Big 3, provides the opportunity to see the stars of yesterday in live action today. Big 3 was founded last year by actor and music legend Ice Cube and entertainment executive Jeff Kwatinetz. The eight teams comprising the league include a virtual whos who of former NBA players and coaches Far different from regular basketball, the roving teams play on just half-a-court in 3-on 3 competitions. And the rules of the game also are far different. The 10-week season tipped off June 22 and each Friday night all eight teams four games compete in NBA arenas in Houston, Chicago, Oakland, Detroit, Miami, Toronto, Boston and Atlanta. The playoffs in Week Nine will be in Dallas with the championship in Barclays Center, Brooklyn, New York. Should you want to watch this exciting back-to-back brand of basketball on July 20 in the American Airlines Arena in Miami, the four games will pit the Killer 3s against the Ball Hogs; Tri State versus Ghost Busters; 3s Company versus 3 Headed Monsters, and Trilogy versus Power. But heres just a sampling of the stars you will see: The eight coaches are Rick Mahorn (Trilogy); Gary Payton (3-Headed Monsters); Nancy Lieberman (Power); George The Iceman Gervan (Ghost Busters); Charles Oakley (Killer3s); Michael Cooper (3s Company); Julius Dr. J Erving (Tri-State), and Rick Barry (Ball Hogs). Each team is limited to six players and oh what memories some of these Big 3 players bring Chauncey Billups, Metta World Peace, Drew Gooden, Amare Stoudemire, Brian Scalabrine, Glen Big Baby Davis, Nate Robinson, Alan Henderson, Bonzi Wells, Quentin Richardson and Mike Bibby. And these are just a few of the current Big 3 players. We wont attempt to describe all the Big 3 rules, but obviously they were crafted to provide up-tempo basketball. For example, the shot clock is only 14 seconds. There are four-point zones 30 feet from the basket. To win, a team must score 50 points and lead by at least two points. Halftime occurs when one team scores 25 points. Although this is just the leagues second season, its popularity appears to be catching on. The games are broadcast live on Fox Broadcast Network and FS1. Its great to know that these stars of yesteryear can still compete today. Miracle Off To Good Start In Second Half Bolstered by Minnesota Twins regulars Miquel Sano and Jorge Polanco, the Fort Myers Miracle baseball team started the week with a second-half record of 6-4, which placed the team in first place in the Florida State League South Division. Sano was sent down to the Miracle in an attempt to regain his batting stroke, and Polanco was here for just two games following his 80-game suspension for testing positive for performance enhancing drugs. Sano was hitting .345 in eight games with the Miracle and Polanco .333 in two games. The Miracle is on the road this weekend at Bradenton, returning home to Hammond Stadium Monday for a four-game series against Palm Beach. All have 7 p.m. starts. SUN ISLAND SUN JULY 6, 201844 LCEC Rates Are Fourth Lowest In FloridaLee County Electric Cooperative (LCEC) recently announced that its electric rates are the fourth lowest amongst electric providers in the state of Florida as of the latest comparison released in April 2018. These recent industry benchmarks reflect LCECs operating expenses per 1,000 kWh sold as being in the lowest quartile nationwide and one of the lowest amongst comparable cooperatives in the state. Rate levels are determined through forecasting sales levels (expected revenue) compared to budgeted spending needs for operations, power supply and capital investment in the electric infrastructure. When revenue is expected to be more favorable compared to spending, LCEC passes those savings through to customers in the form of stable rates and sometimes a reduction. LCEC has decreased rates five times since 2014 and has not had a rate increase for 10 years in a row. This means that LCEC customers are paying less for electricity today than they were a decade ago. We are very pleased to be able to pass through operating and power cost savings to our customers, LCEC CFO Denise Vidal said. LCEC continually strives to contain costs in order to keep rates competitive, while providing excellent reliability and customer service. SPORTS QUIZ 1. Name the only major -league pitcher in the modern era to hit three home runs in one game. 2. Who was the last Baltimor e Orioles player to lead the American League in RBIs for a season? 3. Who was the last Heisman T rophy winner before Louisvilles Lamar Jackson in 2016 to win the award despite playing on a team that lost the last two games of the regular season? 4. Name thr ee of the five players in Boston Celtics history to have 50 or more points in a playoff game. 5. When was the last time befor e 2018 that the Buffalo Sabres beat the Chicago Blackhawks in a regular-season NHL game? 6. Name the last American male befor e Matthew Centrowitz Jr. in 2016 to win the Olympic mens 1,500 meters race. 7. When was the last time befor e 2018 (WGC Mexico Championship) that PGA golfer Phil Mickelson won an event? ANSWERS 1. Jim Tobin of the Boston Braves in 1942 2. Chris Davis had 138 RBIs to lead the AL in 2013. 3. Tim Brown of Notre Dame, in 1987 4. Ray Allen, Bob Cousy, John Havlicek, Sam Jones and Isaiah Thomas. 5. It was 2009 6. Mel Sheppard, in 1908 7. It was the 2013 British Open. 239.472.0004 Community, Service, Leadership, Expertise, Integrity, Results PRGHomeTeam.com Pfeifer Realty Group Is Your Home Team!Eric PfeiferBroker, Owner Taking Charge Of Your Financial Health ProgramFISH of SanCap, along with Fifth Third Bank, is offering a community presentation, entitled Taking Charge of Your Financial Health, on Wednesday, July 18 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at Sanibel Community Church. This workshop will help individuals and families learn how to do basic budgeting, slash their debt and boost their credit score. Kathy Y. Monroe, FISH facilitator and program director, said, This session will attempt to help individuals develop a plan for budgeting and saving which can lead to boosting their credit score, while helping to eliminate debt. Financial health is just as important as physical health, because lacking the first can have an impact on the latter. The presenter, Ruben Perales, financial relationship manager from Fifth Third Bank, will introduce this information in an interesting and interactive manner. Participants will leave the session knowing how to create a budget, interpret a credit score and manage debt. This seminar is open to the community and snacks will be provided. To RSVP, contact Kathy Y. Monroe at 472-4775. For more information, visit www.fishofsancap.org.

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21 THE RIVER JULY 6, 2018 Preferred Pre-K Providers NamedThe job of getting children ready for tomorrow starts today. The School District of Lee County recognized the commitment that Childcare of Southwest Florida (CCSWFL) makes to preparing young children for kindergarten by selecting two CCSWFL centers as Preferred Pre-K Providers. The Childrens Learning Center at Florida SouthWestern State College and The Community Childrens Center in Lehigh Acres were among only five pre-kindergarten programs countywide to receive the designation. Centers have to meet a rigorous set of criteria to qualify, including a rating of 4 or above on the Early Learning Coalition of Southwest Floridas Quality Rating Improvement System. The two CCSWFL centers that received the distinction have 5 ratings, the highest possible. A smooth transition between pre-kindergarten and kindergarten is a critical step that sets the foundation for a childs educational future, said Chris Hansen, CEO of CCSWFL. Were continued on page 24 Megan Greeley Gibson photos provided Martha KebhartCounty FSA Data ReleasedFlorida school districts recently received results from the Florida Department of Education for students that participated in the 2018 Spring Florida Standards Assessment (FSA) and End of Course (EOC) Exams. Students in Grades 3 to 10 took the FSA test in English language arts, which includes both reading and writing skills. The FSA math test was administered in Grades 3 to 8, and the Science test was administered in Grades 5 and 8. Students enrolled in civics, algebra 1, algebra 2 and geometry in Spring 2018 participated in the states EOC exams for those subjects. All high school End of Course Exams (EOCs) showed significant gains resulting in an increased ranking among Florida districts. The percentage of students scoring Level 3 or higher in geometry jumped 10 percentage points. Algebra 1 scores improved from 59 percent to 62 percent, which is important because passing the algebra 1 EOC is a state graduation requirement. A significantly higher percentage of students scored Level 3 or higher in U.S. history, likewise student scores on the biology EOC increased by five percentage points. In addition, more students met their graduation requirement, as 10th graders increased their English language arts scores by four percent. In an effort to provide our middle school math students the opportunity to take more advanced math courses when they reach high school, 23 percent of our sixth grade students took the seventh grade FSA mathematics exam and one percent of our sixth graders took the eighth grade FSA mathematics exam to match their more rigorous course work. This led to a positive trend in seventh grade FSA math, making Lee County 10th in the state for seventh grade proficiency in math while eighth graders outperformed their peers across the state. Success was achieved in elementary science as well, where fifth graders increased their proficiency by three percentage points, moving from 49 percent to 52 percent achieving a Level 3 or higher. Despite the challenges we faced due to Hurricane Irma, collectively we increased student achievement for grades 3 to 10 in almost all tested areas, said Superintendent Dr. Greg Adkins. I am very proud of our students, teachers and administrators and the positive gains we made. However, we are not complacent. We have already begun planning and developing academic initiatives for the coming school year with a systemic focus on instructional planning, personalized learning and increased rigor. We will continue to strive so our students reach their highest personal potentials. Scores that were released are for all students and measure achievement levels. Later in the summer, state officials will release school and district grades which will be based on students enrolled the entire school year, and will include measures of student learning gains. In July, parents will be able to pick up their students Individual Student Report. A message will be sent when the reports are available at the school where the child took the assessment. Lee School Grades ReleasedThe Florida Department of Education just released the preliminary school grades for the 2017-18 school year. According to the results, 52 percent of traditional Lee County public schools, not including charters, earned an A or B. The District maintained its B grade for a fifth year in a row. I am especially proud of the 16 schools that improved one or more letter grade, said Dr. Greg Adkins, superintendent of schools. That is a testament to the dedication and commitment of our teachers, and the hard work of our students. Tice Elementary School raised its grade from a D to a B in one year, while Edison Park Elementary and Estero High School both went from a C to an A. This year, three of Lee high schools earned A grades: Fort Myers High, North Fort Myers High and Estero High. Fifty district schools maintained their letter grades, while 14 dropped. This year no school received an F grade, and only one, East Lee County High School received a D grade. Last year, the district had five D schools, which put them in Differentiated Accountability (DA) status at the state level. DA schools are identified for escalating interventions, support and monitoring. In four years, we have taken this district from having 23 schools in DA status, down to one, and we are appealing that schools grade. That is a remarkable feat for a district of our size and the diverse student population we have, explained Dr. Adkins. We continue to move this district in the right direction with a laser focus on student achievement and helping our kids reach their highest personal potentials. From page 1Broadway Palmtheir roles, and have phenomenal voices. Jim Heffernan plays multiple roles, and he really gets a chance to show his stuff as Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Daddy Warbucks knows everyone including the president. However when inviting FDR to dinner, he tells Grace, Find out what Democrats eat. Theres so much to like in this show. The NYC number in Times Square was one of my favorites, but I truly enjoyed them all. And then theres our favorite dog Sandy (Peyton), who had his routine down pat. Annie is a heartwarming story about everyones favorite spunky, redheaded orphan and its playing through August 11 at Broadway Palm. The show is directed and choreographed by the multi-talented Amy McCleary. For tickets, call 278-4422, visit www.broadwaypalm. com or stop by the box office at 1380 Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. The opening night crowd loved the show, and I know you will too.

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THE RIVER JULY 6, 201822 FUNky Fashion Show FundraiserPACE Center for Girls, Lee County recently raised $19,400 during FUNky Fashion Show, a Love That Dress! collection event, at Cape Coral Yacht Club on June 20. Hosted by Iberiabank, the FUNky Fashion Show featured one-of-a-kind pieces made completely from recycled or repurposed items. Marie C. Dyer was this years featured designer whos Charting the Course for Success creation, inspired by the PACE Girls, won Peoples Choice. Vector & Inks Southwest Florida Destination dress won both FUNkiest Fashion and Runway Ready. Nearly 125 dresses were collected during the gathering to be sold at discounted prices during Lee Countys 10th Love That Dress! event on August 22, with all proceeds benefiting PACE programs and services, which impact girls and young women ages 11 to 18. Sponsors of the event included The Gunterberg Charitable Foundation, Iberiabank, WastePro, Mike Patrick Electric, Big Blue Brewing, New Beginnings Events, Priority Marketing, 96.9 WINK FM, Caloosa Tent & Rental and Cape Coral Lifestyle magazine. From left, Kathy Kramer, Kathy Ogden and Meg Geltner photos provided Ralph and Cathy Sangiovanni John Carr and Alextianna Thompson Ellen Dunkelberger and Valerie Lawrence Robert McDonald and ToniRae Hurley Gloria Tate and Kara Holleran Tonya Justice and Stacy Francioni From left, Shelley Newell, Angela Melvin, Talisha Faber and Alana Newell Clockwise from left, Katie Damminger, Sarah Hoogerhyde, Elise Rose, Olivia Orth and Rachel Toomey

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23 THE RIVER JULY 6, 2018 3075 Sanibel-Captiva Rd. Sanibel, Florida 33957 (239) 395-2233 Open Daily, 10 a.m. p.m.SHELLMUSEUM.ORG Free with paid Museum admission. ** Preregistration required at ShellMuseum.org/beachwalks Schedules subject to change. SUNDAYSSuper Scavenger Hunt THURSDAYSCollections Tour MONDAYSCollection Connection SATURDAYSMollusk University FRIDAYSStory Time & Craft TUESDAYS Fossil Dig WEDNESDAYSShell JewelryPlus, EVERY day: Shell Arts & Crafts*, Tank Talks*, and Beach Walks departing **NEW DAY, NEW ADVENTUREExperience a different adventure at the Museum each day from AT THE MUSEUM Lee Health Chief Human Resources OfficerMichael Wukitsch has joined Lee Health as chief human resources officer. In his new role, Wukitsch is responsible for all employee-related operations across the health system including benefits and compensation, recruitment and workforce management. Wukitsch has 25 years experience in HR management for large companies with 13 years in health care, providing leadership for HR process improvement efforts, building employee satisfaction and managing organizational change. We are very excited to add Michael to our team. He brings extensive leadership experience with large and diverse health care systems and an excellent track record of building collaborative relationships within those systems, said Larry Antonucci, MD, MBA, Lee Health president and CEO. Wukitsch most recently served as the vce president of human resources for Northwestern Memorial Healthcare in Chicago, where he was responsible for the business unit HR Business Partners across all hospitals and outpatient sites as well as system-wide responsibility for HR operations. Northwestern Memorial Healthcare is an academic health system comprised of seven hospitals and 60 outpatient facilities in the Chicago metro area. The system has more than 25,000 employees. Before that, Wukitsch served as the executive vice president, human resources for Cadence Health in the Chicago area, and vice president and chief human resources officer for Childrens Hospital Colorado, located in the Denver metro area. He also served as director of human resources operations for Coors Brewing Company in Golden, Colorado. Wukitsch has an MBA from the University of Michigan Ross School of Business and is completing his PhD in Organizational Learning, Performance and Change at Colorado State University. Wukitsch replaces Jon Cecil, who retired in May after more than 40 years with Lee Health. Mike Wukitsch photo providedMeetings For Alzheimers CaregiversThe Alvin A. Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center holds monthly support-group meetings for those caring for loved ones in various stages of Alzheimers disease or related memory impairments. The meetings provide opportunities to connect with others who face similar challenges and to learn more about Alzheimers disease and related dementias, effective coping strategies and community resources. Select meetings feature guest speakers as well as informal times for sharing. Making the decision to join a support group can be difficult for some people, said Dubin Center Executive Director Jan Kerlin. While it may seem impossible to think about joining a group of strangers and sharing personal thoughts and struggles, participating in support group meetings is one of the best things caregivers can do for themselves and their loved ones. A qualified staff member of the Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center attends each meeting to facilitate discussion and provide practical information for caregivers. Caregivers are invited to participate in the following monthly meetings, which are held at no charge: In Fort Myers: Second Tuesday at 2 p.m., Pine Ridge at Fort Myers, 4801 Lakeside Club Boulevard (Press the phone symbol and 777 at the gate) Second and fourth Wednesday at 10 a.m., Saint Columbkille Catholic Church, Ministry Center Room 1, 12175 Iona Road Fourth Tuesday at 10 a.m., Fort Myers Congregational Church, 8210 College Parkway Fourth Tuesday at 1 p.m., Community Cooperatives Resource Center, 3429 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard; RSVPs are required; call 437-3007 Third Wednesday at 10 a.m., Peace Lutheran Church, 15840 McGregor Boulevard. Respite care is available, and RSVPs are required; call 437-2599 Fourth Tuesday at 2 p.m., Brookdale Fort Myers The Colony, 13565 American Colony Boulevard Third Thursday at 6:15 p.m., Alvin A. Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center, 12468 Brantley Commons Court In Cape Coral: First and third Thursday at 2 p.m., Gulf Coast Village, 1333 Santa Barbara Boulevard Third Tuesday at 3 p.m., Grace Church, 13 SE 21st Place. Registration is required for respite care; call 8234960 or 246-9816 In Bonita Springs: Second Monday at 2 p.m., The Terraces at Bonita Springs, 26455 South Tamiami Trail Fourth Monday at 10:30 a.m., Hope Lutheran Church, 25999 Old 41 In North Fort Myers: Fourth Thursday at 2 p.m., Pine Lakes Country Club, 10200 Pine Lakes Boulevard (3.5 miles north of the Shell Factory off U.S. 41) On Pine Island: First Thursday at 10:30 a.m., Pine Island United Methodist, 5701 Pine Island Road, Bokeelia In Lehigh Acres: Third Monday at 2 p.m., Lehigh Acres United Way House, 201 Plaza Drive, Suite 103 On Sanibel Island: Fourth Wednesday at 1:30 p.m., Sanibel Congregational United Church of Christ, 2050 Periwinkle Way In LaBelle: First Wednesday at 1 p.m., Oakbrook of LaBelle, 250 Broward Avenue A support group for adults who are assisting or caring for their aging parents meets the first Tuesday at 6:15 p.m. at Alvin A. Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center, 12468 Brantley Commons Court in Fort Myers. In addition, the center offers support groups for those with early stage dementia who are dealing with memory loss, coping with changes and feelings, and adjusting to new situations. The center also offers a group for caregivers whose role is transitioning either due to facility placement or death of their loved one. The Alvin A. Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center, a United Way partner agency, provides information, education and practical support to individuals with memory impairment and their family caregivers. The center is a local, independent not-for-profit agency supported by United Way, grants, donations and fundraisers, including an annual show of art created by those with dementia and a yearly evening of remembrance. To learn about safety, community education and training programs or to subscribe to a quarterly newsletter, visit www.alzheimersswfl.org or call 437-3007. From page 1Student Artworkartist Ellen Bianchi, the students produced artwork exclusively for the exhibition, entitled De Novo. The opening reception is scheduled for Saturday, July 14 from 6 to 9:30 p.m. North Fort Myers High School is the arts magnet in the west zone for the School District of Lee County and enrolls nearly 1,900 students, grades nine to 12. These students may choose art courses in the areas of ceramics, painting, photography, drawing and printmaking. Many of the students in this De Novo show have participated in SoCo District events this past season. This is a way to encourage these creative students and give them the opportunity to exhibit in a professional gallery setting, which is very exciting and important for their future careers in art, said Bianchi, who is also a founding member of the cooperative gallery. DAAS Co-op Art Gallery is located at 1400 Colonial Boulevard, Suite 84 in Fort Myers. For more information, visit www.daascoop.com or call 590-8645.

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RIVER deaRPharmacistIts Tough Getting Olderby Suzy Cohen, RPhDear Readers:As we age, we notice symptoms creeping up every few months. With women, its called menopause and includes many symptoms such as fatigue, forgetfulness, hot flashes, vaginal discomfort or atrophy, decreased libido, irritability and insomnia. Menopause can be surgically induced, as occurs when you get a total hysterectomy. With men, its termed andropause and the symptoms include reduced fatigue, sex drive, weak erections, depression, loss of strength and muscle mass, weight gain as well as occasional night sweats akin to a womans hot flash. You might find that youre less competitive than normal. In the news recently, there have been some interesting findings reported from brand new studies. The first that comes to mind is about post-menopausal women and how they have an elevated risk for heart failure or coronary heart disease, if they have higher testosterone levels compared to estradiol (an estrogen hormone). What about your brain and mood? For sure, psychological symptoms are one of the first (and worst) things noticed by men and women during menopause and andropause. You might think youre going crazy, and so might those around you. It differs for everyone, and new research suggests that if youve been struggling with mental health issues prior to menopause/ andropause, they are bound to get worse. In particular, symptoms such as panic attacks and suicidal ideation seem to heighten, and its much harder to deal with than typical annoyances such as depression, irritability, mood swings, insomnia and memory loss. The CDC found that the rate of women committing suicide has been on the rise since the year 2000, its up by 50 percent and the average age is between 45 and 64. I have to wonder how many of these people were brought to the brink from the use of mind-bending anxiolytics or antidepressants that are thought to impair otherwise good judgement and possibly raise risk of suicide. It brings to mind fashionista Kate Spade and TV chef Anthony Bourdain, both of whom were taking anti-anxiety medications. They impact your brain and sometimes in a good way, but also in a bad way due to unexpected side effects. Today, Id like to offer a few tips that could help you, as a couple, age more comfortably together and minimize the problems that drive people to doctors, or worse, to psychiatrists who numb you with addictive medications. Here are eight ideas to get your hormones balanced: 1. Manage stressful situations 2. Avoid estrogenic chemicals 3. Maintain a healthy sex life 4. Watch what you eat 5. Exercise 6. Actually, sleep at night 7. Get enough rest 8. Aswhagandha This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. SuzyCohen.com. THE RIVER JULY 6, 201824 Doctor and DieticianRoasting Colorful Summer Vegetablesby Ross Hauser, MD and Marion Hauser, MS, RDSummer is a great time to fill your plate with as many fresh vegetables as possible. Floridians have the wonderful opportunity to enjoy fresh vegetables all year long, but gardeners everywhere enjoy the thrill of the summer garden bursting with vegetables. Luscious commodities such as asparagus, garlic, greens, colorful varieties of tomatoes, carrots, cucumbers and eggplant, are ready for your consumption. Its always great to eat vegetables fresh from the garden, or tossed together to make different salads. One of our favorites is mixing basil and tomatoes from the garden with fresh mozzarella for an irresistible Caprese salad. When youre not in the mood for salad, a simple and sometimes overlooked technique is to roast vegetables. We love our roasted veggies and eat them multiple times per week. If you are new to roasting vegetables, you may be surprised at how yummy they are. Even picky veggie eaters tend to like them roasted, and often go back for seconds! The caramelization brings out a totally different and wonderful flavor. Choose one veggie or roast a colorful combination. The reds, oranges, yellows, purples and greens, all add different nutrients. Brightly colored vegetables are more nutrientdense and rich in antioxidants. Pair with a piece of fish or other protein, and youll have a delicious and healthy meal. Toss the vegetables with some sea salt, garlic or your other favorite seasonings, and olive or coconut oil. Spread the vegetables out well on a baking sheet, or the trapped steam will stew rather than caramelize them. Roast at 425 degrees, stirring every 15 minutes to allow for an even roast. Roast until the vegetable tips are toasty, usually 25 top 40 minutes. Veggies like carrots and beets take longer to roast than green beans, peppers, or mushrooms. Have fun as you try different tasty combinations. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Caring Medical Regenerative Medicine Clinics has two locations: one in Oak Park, Illinois, and one in Fort Myers. It was established in 1991 by Ross Hauser, MD, and Marion Hauser, MS, RD. They can be reached at info@ caringmedical.com. Free Parenting Workshops OfferedGolisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida will be offering free eight-week Partners in Parenting workshops focused on parenting children with special needs, including developmental disabilities, special health care needs including Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) or emotional disturbances. The workshops, which began July 1, are ongoing with two different sessions available from 3 to 4:15 p.m. and 4:45 to 6 p.m. The specialized group parenting classes help teach parents how to focus on their strengths, set appropriate expectations for their children as well as set specialized and effective discipline strategies. Free child care is available during the workshops. The Partners in Parenting workshops feature lessons focused on positive discipline from the Nurturing Parenting Program, authored by Stephen J. Bavolek, PhD. The workshops help parents: Manage their childs behavior without spanking or shouting; Learn effective communication skills; Establish nurturing routines for meal times, bath times, bedtimes, chores and homework; Understand the exceptional childs effect on typical siblings; Gain a sense of personal power and feel good about themselves; Enjoy their families and have fun together. Golisano Childrens Hospital is located at 9981 Bass Road in Fort Myers. For more information or to register to participate, call 343-6468 or email Richard.Keelan@LeeHealth.org. Free Autism ScreeningGolisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida, in partnership with Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southwest Florida, offers a free monthly autism spectrum disorder screening for toddlers 18 months to five years of age. The next screening on the Ronald McDonald Care Mobile will be held on Friday, July 13 from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the IMAG History & Science Center, 2000 Cranford Avenue in Fort Myers. It is estimated that one in every 68 children is diagnosed with some form of autism spectrum disorder, making it more common than childhood cancer, juvenile diabetes and pediatric AIDS combined. Medical consultants for the project stress that an early diagnosis can make a vast difference for toddlers and their families. They say early intensive behavioral intervention can make an immense difference not just in the development of the child, but in their families as well. The ASD screening is conducted by the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida. The screenings are administered by an advanced registered nurse practitioner, who has extensive training and experience in typical child development and developmental disorders. A physician referral is not required. To schedule a screening, call 3436838. From page 21Pre-K Providersdedicated to making that a reality for every child. According to Megan Greeley-Gibson, director of The Community Childrens Center in Lehigh Acres, the jump to kindergarten isnt simply an educational issue. Its a social, emotional and physical challenge for children. The children have to learn to be more independent and handle situations on their own, Greeley-Gibson said. The expectations are a lot higher in kindergarten. CCSWFLs goal is to continue to advocate for the interests of children as they approach those challenges. Being designated as a Preferred Pre-K Provider is just the start. This is a continuous effort, Greeley-Gibson said. Were going to be continuing every school year with trainings and our teachers working with the kindergarten teachers and just learning more from each other about what our children in pre-K need to know about kindergarten. Communication is at the heart of the seamless educational experience the centers provide, said Martha Kebhart, director of the Childrens Learning Center at FSW. The communication between the preschool teacher who is working with her children for nine months and that kindergarten teacher who is going to be getting our children is really important for success. To find out more about the Preferred Pre-K Provider initiative, visit www. leeschools.net/preferred-pk-providers. To learn about other ways Child Care of Southwest Florida works to prepare children for the bright future in front of them, visit www.ccswfl.org or call 278-1002.

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THE RIVER JULY 6, 2018 25 Emergency . ............................................... 9 11 Lee County Sheriffs Ofce . .............................. 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol . ................................... 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol . .................................. 278-7100 Poison Control . ................................... 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center . ...................... 1-800-936-5321Ft .. Myers Chamber of Commerce . ......................... 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare . .......................... 4 25-2685 Fort Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce . ................... 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library . ............................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library . ................................ 5 33-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce . ........................ 931-0931 Post Ofce . ..................................... 1 -800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau . ............................ 3 38-3500ARTSAlliance for the Arts . .................................... 9 39-2787 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio . ............................ 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers . ............................... 275-3970 Barbara B .. Mann Performing Arts Hall . ...................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS . .......................................... 3 95-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre . .......................... 2 78-4422 Cultural Park Theatre . ................................... 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light . ................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade . ....................332-4488 Florida West Arts . ...................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers . ...................... 288-2535 Gulf Coast Symphony . .................................. 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres . ..................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic . ................................ 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater . ............................... 472-6862 SW Florida Symphony . .................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy . .................................... 936-3239 Young Artists Awards . ................................... 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAmerican Legion Post #38 . ........................... 2 39-332-1853 Angel Flight . .................................. 1 -877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center . .................................. 731-3535 American Business Women Association . .................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL . .................................... 3 39-8046 Audubon Society . ...................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR . ............................ 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society . ............................ 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus . ................... 1 -855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club . ................................. 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees . .............................. 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists . ................................. 415-2484 Embroiderers Guild of America Sea Grape Chapter . ...... 2 39-267-1990 FM UDC Chapter 2614 United Daughters of the Confederacy . ... 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL . .............................. 561-9164 Garden Club of Cape Coral . .......................... 2 39-257-2654 Horticulture and Tea Society . ............................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society . ................................... 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society . ......................... 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation . ........................ 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees . ......... 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America . ....................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL . ............................. 66 7-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans . ............................ 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy . ....................... 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association . ...................... 5 61-2118 Kiwanis Fort Myers Beach . .................... 7 65-4254 or 454-8090 Kiwanis Fort Myers Edison . .............................. 694-1056 Kiwanis Fort Myers South . ............................... 691-1405 Iona-McGregor . ....................................... 482-0869 Lions Club Fort Myers Beach . ............................. 463-9738 Lions Club Fort Myers High Noon . ......................... 466-4228 Lions Club Estero/South Fort Myers . ....................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County . ......................... 7 68-0417 Organ Transplant Recipients of SW Florida . .................. 247-3073 POLO Club of Lee County . ............................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers . ............................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society . ........................... 472-6940 United Way of Lee County . ............................... 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) . ................... 2 11 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews National Shell Museum . .................... 395-2233 Burroughs Home . ...................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium . ....................... 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates . ............................ 334-7419 Fort Myers Skate Park . .................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium . ................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge . .................. 4 72-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site . ......................... 2 39-992-0311 Langford Kingston Home . ............................ 239-334-2550 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center . .............. 765-8101 Skatium . ............................................. 3 21-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society . ...................... 93 9-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History . ...................... 321-7430 True Tours . .......................................... 94 5-0405 To be listed in calling card email your information to: press@riverweekly. .com PETS OF THE WEEKphotos provided Haven on Earth Animal LeagueIrish And LucyHi there! Im Irish. I am a beautiful male 13-year-old, orange tabby, Maine Coon. I have a very fluffy tail and long white whiskers. I am neutered and up to date on all vaccines. I am also declawed and currently living with a foster family. I am still young at heart and very healthy. My adoption fee is $100. Hello, Im Lucy. I am a beautiful female tabby with white feet and bright green eyes. Im 2 years young and currently living with a foster family. Im not real crazy about other cats, so I need to be the only one in your house. I have been fully vetted and brought up to date on all vaccines. My adoption fee is $100. We are being cared for by Haven on Earth Animal League. For more information, call Diane at 860-833-4472 or email havenonearthanimalleague@yahoo.com. Irish Lucy Adoption DiscountsCelebrate this Independence Day by allowing a new pet to enjoy the freedom of a forever home. Adoption fees will be reduced for the entire month of July. Adult dogs are just $30 to adopt; cats are $10; and kittens are $20. In addition, cats and kittens are two-for-one; adopt one and you can take home a feline friend at no additional charge. Adoption package includes spay or neuter, microchip, up-to-date vaccinations, county license and a 10-day health guarantee. This is a $500 package. LCDAS team of volunteers and staff are waiting to introduce your new family member to you. Just stop by the adoption center 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday at 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers. Visit www.leelostpets.com to see pets available for adoption. Lee County Domestic Animal ServicesPriscilla And KingHello, my name is Priscilla. I am a 1-year-old female domestic shorthair who came to Lee County Domestic Animal Services with my twosisters. All have distinct personalities, and I seem to be a combination of both Mia and Gelipa. I like attention, but Im so independent that it requires you come to me for it. I am very sweet and like ear rubs. My adoption fee is $10. Hi, Im King. I am a 1-year-old male pit bull mix who is a stunning mixed breed that, as you can see, will match anything. I am definitely a looker. I am well-mannered and love to play with tennis balls in the play yard and then cool off in our kiddie pool. I am an all-around kind of guy that would make a great addition to any family! My adoption fee is $30. The shelter is open to the public Monday through Saturday at 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers. Adoptions are available 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For information, visit Lee County Domestic Animal Services at www.leegov.com/animalservices or call 533-7387. Priscilla ID# A742353 King ID# A722545

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THE RIVER JULY 6, 2018 26 PUZZLESAnswers on page 29

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THE RIVER JULY 6, 2018 27 FIND AT LEaAST S SIX D DIffFFERENCES BETWEEN PaANElLS SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 29 answer on page 29Mango Enchiladas 3 mangoes, peeled and sliced 6 (8-inch) flour tortillas 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/3 cup margarine 1/2 cup natural sugar 1/2 cup, packed brown sugar 1/2 cup water Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Saute mangoes with 1 teaspoon of butter until almost soft. Spoon mangos evenly onto tortillas, sprinkle with cinnamon. Roll up tortillas and place seam side down on lightly greased 8x8-inch baking pan. Bring margarine, sugars and water to a boil in a medium sauce pan. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring constantly for 3 minutes. Pour sauce evenly over tortillas; sprinkle with extra cinnamon on top, if desired. Bake in preheated oven for 20 minutes. Serve with ice cream, if desired. Mango Enchiladas p hoto courtesy Fresh From Florida

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORYTHE RIVER JULY 6, 2018 28 HOME SERVICES P.O. BoOX 1050 SANIbBEL FLoORIDA 33957WWW.IsSLANDHoOMEsSERVICE.CoOM INfoFO@IsSLANDHoOMEsSERVICE.CoOMp P Ho O NE: (239) 472-5247 C CELL: (239) 229-6366JUERGEN SCHREYEROWNERYYARD SERVICE TREE SERVICE PooOOL SERVICEHHoOME WWAt TCH CCLEANING SERVICE ISLAND HOME SERVICE TREE TRIMMING, ARBORIST Licensed, insured, workers compensation Arbor Specialist Since 1995 Tree Trimming Tree Removal Stump Grinding239-910-3256info@treewest@gmail.comwww.treewestorida.comP.O. Box 564, Sanibel, FL 33957Tell A FriendCONTRACTOR Bathrooms Kitchens Lanai Enclosures Windows Screen Rooms Decks Railings Safety Tubs Doors Add a Room or Garage Outdoor Kitchens Storm Shutters and Much More $500. OFF WITH AD cbc1261010239-936-0836Family owned, 40 Years Local Surfside Home Improvements Aluminum & Remodeling CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the benets of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor42 Barkley Circle, Suite 1 Fort Myers, FL 33907 239-931-4543GENERAL CONTRACTOR N C R CGC1517615www.dbrowngc.com239-593-1998 A BBB Accredited Business with an +A Rating Would you like to advertise your business card every week ? Call: 239-395-1213 FISHING CHARTERLight Tackle Sport Fishing Tarpon Snook Redsh & More CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.comCLEANING SERVICES Jennifer Watson(239) 810-6293 Residential & Commercial Construction Clean Up Interior Windows Home Watch ELECTRICAL 204-B Waldo Avenue, Lehigh Acres, FL 33971generator@jteelectricinc.comBrady J. ReesGenerator and Service ExpertT | 239-368-9511 C | 239-980-1596 Lee, Collier, Hendry, Charlotte, Sarasota CountiesLic.# EC-13002460 SERVICE RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL REMODEL HOME WATCH For more information: Phone: 239-558-5733 E-mail: rabbitrdmgt@gmail.com www.RabbitRoadMgt.comRabbit Rd. Property Management & Home Watch Company which specializes in managing small county area. We are licensed, insured and bonded with over 20 years of experience. We are also Florida CAM licensed and accredited members of the National Home Watch Association. SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 86 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:59 am1:03 am8:01 pm2:08 pm Sat8:39 am1:46 am9:40 pm3:25 pm Sun9:19 am2:30 am11:17 pm4:32 pm Mon10:02 am3:14 amNone5:32 pm Tue12:42 am3:58 am10:47 am6:27 pm Wed1:54 am4:42 am11:35 am7:19 pm Thu2:53 am5:26 am12:24 pm8:09 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:34 am1:01 am7:38 pm1:56 pm Sat7:55 am1:39 am8:37 pm2:57 pm Sun8:18 am2:16 am9:45 pm3:54 pm Mon8:52 am2:51 am11:13 pm4:58 pm Tue9:38 am3:25 amNone6:07 pm Wed12:31 am4:06 am10:56 am7:12 pm Thu1:33 am5:55 am12:26 pm8:12 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:04 am1:05 am7:06 pm2:10 pm Sat7:44 am1:48 am8:45 pm3:27 pm Sun8:24 am2:32 am10:22 pm4:34 pm Mon9:07 am3:16 am11:47 pm5:34 pm Tue9:52 am4:00 amNone6:29 pm Wed12:59 am4:44 am10:40 am7:21 pm Thu1:58 am5:28 am11:29 am8:11 pm Day High Low High Low Fri10:09 am4:19 am10:11 pm5:24 pm Sat10:49 am5:02 am11:50 pm6:41 pm Sun11:29 am5:46 amNone7:48 pm Mon1:27 am6:30 am12:12 pm8:48 pm Tue2:52 am7:14 am12:57 pm9:43 pm Wed4:04 am7:58 am1:45 pm10:35 pm Thu5:03 am8:42 am2:34 pm11:25 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 90 Low: 84 MONDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 85 SATURDAYFe w Showers High: 92 Low: 85 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Island Sun Weather Outlook July 6, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 86 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Day High Low High Low Fri7:59 am1:03 am8:01 pm2:08 pm Sat8:39 am1:46 am9:40 pm3:25 pm Sun9:19 am2:30 am11:17 pm4:32 pm Mon10:02 am3:14 amNone5:32 pm Tue12:42 am3:58 am10:47 am6:27 pm Wed1:54 am4:42 am11:35 am7:19 pm Thu2:53 am5:26 am12:24 pm8:09 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:34 am1:01 am7:38 pm1:56 pm Sat7:55 am1:39 am8:37 pm2:57 pm Sun8:18 am2:16 am9:45 pm3:54 pm Mon8:52 am2:51 am11:13 pm4:58 pm Tue9:38 am3:25 amNone6:07 pm Wed12:31 am4:06 am10:56 am7:12 pm Thu1:33 am5:55 am12:26 pm8:12 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:04 am1:05 am7:06 pm2:10 pm Sat7:44 am1:48 am8:45 pm3:27 pm Sun8:24 am2:32 am10:22 pm4:34 pm Mon9:07 am3:16 am11:47 pm5:34 pm Tue9:52 am4:00 amNone6:29 pm Wed12:59 am4:44 am10:40 am7:21 pm Thu1:58 am5:28 am11:29 am8:11 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri10:09 am4:19 am10:11 pm5:24 pm Sat10:49 am5:02 am11:50 pm6:41 pm Sun11:29 am5:46 amNone7:48 pm Mon1:27 am6:30 am12:12 pm8:48 pm Tue2:52 am7:14 am12:57 pm9:43 pm Wed4:04 am7:58 am1:45 pm10:35 pm Thu5:03 am8:42 am2:34 pm11:25 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 90 Low: 84 MONDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 85 SATURDAYFe w Showers High: 92 Low: 85 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Island Sun Weather Outlook July 6, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 86 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:59 am1:03 am8:01 pm2:08 pm Sat8:39 am1:46 am9:40 pm3:25 pm Sun9:19 am2:30 am11:17 pm4:32 pm Mon10:02 am3:14 amNone5:32 pm Tue12:42 am3:58 am10:47 am6:27 pm Wed1:54 am4:42 am11:35 am7:19 pm Thu2:53 am5:26 am12:24 pm8:09 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:34 am1:01 am7:38 pm1:56 pm Sat7:55 am1:39 am8:37 pm2:57 pm Sun8:18 am2:16 am9:45 pm3:54 pm Mon8:52 am2:51 am11:13 pm4:58 pm Tue9:38 am3:25 amNone6:07 pm Wed12:31 am4:06 am10:56 am7:12 pm Thu1:33 am5:55 am12:26 pm8:12 pm Day High Low High Low Fri7:04 am1:05 am7:06 pm2:10 pm Sat7:44 am1:48 am8:45 pm3:27 pm Sun8:24 am2:32 am10:22 pm4:34 pm Mon9:07 am3:16 am11:47 pm5:34 pm Tue9:52 am4:00 amNone6:29 pm Wed12:59 am4:44 am10:40 am7:21 pm Thu1:58 am5:28 am11:29 am8:11 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri10:09 am4:19 am10:11 pm5:24 pm Sat10:49 am5:02 am11:50 pm6:41 pm Sun11:29 am5:46 amNone7:48 pm Mon1:27 am6:30 am12:12 pm8:48 pm Tue2:52 am7:14 am12:57 pm9:43 pm Wed4:04 am7:58 am1:45 pm10:35 pm Thu5:03 am8:42 am2:34 pm11:25 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 90 Low: 84 MONDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 85 SATURDAYFe w Showers High: 92 Low: 85 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Island Sun Weather Outlook July 6, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 86 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:59 am1:03 am8:01 pm2:08 pm Sat8:39 am1:46 am9:40 pm3:25 pm Sun9:19 am2:30 am11:17 pm4:32 pm Mon10:02 am3:14 amNone5:32 pm Tue12:42 am3:58 am10:47 am6:27 pm Wed1:54 am4:42 am11:35 am7:19 pm Thu2:53 am5:26 am12:24 pm8:09 pm Day High Low High Low Fri7:34 am1:01 am7:38 pm1:56 pm Sat7:55 am1:39 am8:37 pm2:57 pm Sun8:18 am2:16 am9:45 pm3:54 pm Mon8:52 am2:51 am11:13 pm4:58 pm Tue9:38 am3:25 amNone6:07 pm Wed12:31 am4:06 am10:56 am7:12 pm Thu1:33 am5:55 am12:26 pm8:12 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:04 am1:05 am7:06 pm2:10 pm Sat7:44 am1:48 am8:45 pm3:27 pm Sun8:24 am2:32 am10:22 pm4:34 pm Mon9:07 am3:16 am11:47 pm5:34 pm Tue9:52 am4:00 amNone6:29 pm Wed12:59 am4:44 am10:40 am7:21 pm Thu1:58 am5:28 am11:29 am8:11 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri10:09 am4:19 am10:11 pm5:24 pm Sat10:49 am5:02 am11:50 pm6:41 pm Sun11:29 am5:46 amNone7:48 pm Mon1:27 am6:30 am12:12 pm8:48 pm Tue2:52 am7:14 am12:57 pm9:43 pm Wed4:04 am7:58 am1:45 pm10:35 pm Thu5:03 am8:42 am2:34 pm11:25 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 90 Low: 84 MONDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 85 SATURDAYFe w Showers High: 92 Low: 85 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Island Sun Weather Outlook July 6, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 86 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:59 am1:03 am8:01 pm2:08 pm Sat8:39 am1:46 am9:40 pm3:25 pm Sun9:19 am2:30 am11:17 pm4:32 pm Mon10:02 am3:14 amNone5:32 pm Tue12:42 am3:58 am10:47 am6:27 pm Wed1:54 am4:42 am11:35 am7:19 pm Thu2:53 am5:26 am12:24 pm8:09 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:34 am1:01 am7:38 pm1:56 pm Sat7:55 am1:39 am8:37 pm2:57 pm Sun8:18 am2:16 am9:45 pm3:54 pm Mon8:52 am2:51 am11:13 pm4:58 pm Tue9:38 am3:25 amNone6:07 pm Wed12:31 am4:06 am10:56 am7:12 pm Thu1:33 am5:55 am12:26 pm8:12 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:04 am1:05 am7:06 pm2:10 pm Sat7:44 am1:48 am8:45 pm3:27 pm Sun8:24 am2:32 am10:22 pm4:34 pm Mon9:07 am3:16 am11:47 pm5:34 pm Tue9:52 am4:00 amNone6:29 pm Wed12:59 am4:44 am10:40 am7:21 pm Thu1:58 am5:28 am11:29 am8:11 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri10:09 am4:19 am10:11 pm5:24 pm Sat10:49 am5:02 am11:50 pm6:41 pm Sun11:29 am5:46 amNone7:48 pm Mon1:27 am6:30 am12:12 pm8:48 pm Tue2:52 am7:14 am12:57 pm9:43 pm Wed4:04 am7:58 am1:45 pm10:35 pm Thu5:03 am8:42 am2:34 pm11:25 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 90 Low: 84 MONDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 85 SATURDAYFe w Showers High: 92 Low: 85 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Island Sun Weather Outlook July 6, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 86 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:59 am1:03 am8:01 pm2:08 pm Sat8:39 am1:46 am9:40 pm3:25 pm Sun9:19 am2:30 am11:17 pm4:32 pm Mon10:02 am3:14 amNone5:32 pm Tue12:42 am3:58 am10:47 am6:27 pm Wed1:54 am4:42 am11:35 am7:19 pm Thu2:53 am5:26 am12:24 pm8:09 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:34 am1:01 am7:38 pm1:56 pm Sat7:55 am1:39 am8:37 pm2:57 pm Sun8:18 am2:16 am9:45 pm3:54 pm Mon8:52 am2:51 am11:13 pm4:58 pm Tue9:38 am3:25 amNone6:07 pm Wed12:31 am4:06 am10:56 am7:12 pm Thu1:33 am5:55 am12:26 pm8:12 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:04 am1:05 am7:06 pm2:10 pm Sat7:44 am1:48 am8:45 pm3:27 pm Sun8:24 am2:32 am10:22 pm4:34 pm Mon9:07 am3:16 am11:47 pm5:34 pm Tue9:52 am4:00 amNone6:29 pm Wed12:59 am4:44 am10:40 am7:21 pm Thu1:58 am5:28 am11:29 am8:11 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri10:09 am4:19 am10:11 pm5:24 pm Sat10:49 am5:02 am11:50 pm6:41 pm Sun11:29 am5:46 amNone7:48 pm Mon1:27 am6:30 am12:12 pm8:48 pm Tue2:52 am7:14 am12:57 pm9:43 pm Wed4:04 am7:58 am1:45 pm10:35 pm Thu5:03 am8:42 am2:34 pm11:25 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 90 Low: 84 MONDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 85 SATURDAYFe w Showers High: 92 Low: 85 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Island Sun Weather Outlook July 6, 2018 7-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 86 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:59 am1:03 am8:01 pm2:08 pm Sat8:39 am1:46 am9:40 pm3:25 pm Sun9:19 am2:30 am11:17 pm4:32 pm Mon10:02 am3:14 amNone5:32 pm Tue12:42 am3:58 am10:47 am6:27 pm Wed1:54 am4:42 am11:35 am7:19 pm Thu2:53 am5:26 am12:24 pm8:09 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:34 am1:01 am7:38 pm1:56 pm Sat7:55 am1:39 am8:37 pm2:57 pm Sun8:18 am2:16 am9:45 pm3:54 pm Mon8:52 am2:51 am11:13 pm4:58 pm Tue9:38 am3:25 amNone6:07 pm Wed12:31 am4:06 am10:56 am7:12 pm Thu1:33 am5:55 am12:26 pm8:12 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:04 am1:05 am7:06 pm2:10 pm Sat7:44 am1:48 am8:45 pm3:27 pm Sun8:24 am2:32 am10:22 pm4:34 pm Mon9:07 am3:16 am11:47 pm5:34 pm Tue9:52 am4:00 amNone6:29 pm Wed12:59 am4:44 am10:40 am7:21 pm Thu1:58 am5:28 am11:29 am8:11 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri10:09 am4:19 am10:11 pm5:24 pm Sat10:49 am5:02 am11:50 pm6:41 pm Sun11:29 am5:46 amNone7:48 pm Mon1:27 am6:30 am12:12 pm8:48 pm Tue2:52 am7:14 am12:57 pm9:43 pm Wed4:04 am7:58 am1:45 pm10:35 pm Thu5:03 am8:42 am2:34 pm11:25 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 90 Low: 84 MONDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 85 SATURDAYFe w Showers High: 92 Low: 85 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Island Sun Weather Outlook July 6, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 86 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:59 am1:03 am8:01 pm2:08 pm Sat8:39 am1:46 am9:40 pm3:25 pm Sun9:19 am2:30 am11:17 pm4:32 pm Mon10:02 am3:14 amNone5:32 pm Tue12:42 am3:58 am10:47 am6:27 pm Wed1:54 am4:42 am11:35 am7:19 pm Thu2:53 am5:26 am12:24 pm8:09 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:34 am1:01 am7:38 pm1:56 pm Sat7:55 am1:39 am8:37 pm2:57 pm Sun8:18 am2:16 am9:45 pm3:54 pm Mon8:52 am2:51 am11:13 pm4:58 pm Tue9:38 am3:25 amNone6:07 pm Wed12:31 am4:06 am10:56 am7:12 pm Thu1:33 am5:55 am12:26 pm8:12 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:04 am1:05 am7:06 pm2:10 pm Sat7:44 am1:48 am8:45 pm3:27 pm Sun8:24 am2:32 am10:22 pm4:34 pm Mon9:07 am3:16 am11:47 pm5:34 pm Tue9:52 am4:00 amNone6:29 pm Wed12:59 am4:44 am10:40 am7:21 pm Thu1:58 am5:28 am11:29 am8:11 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri10:09 am4:19 am10:11 pm5:24 pm Sat10:49 am5:02 am11:50 pm6:41 pm Sun11:29 am5:46 amNone7:48 pm Mon1:27 am6:30 am12:12 pm8:48 pm Tue2:52 am7:14 am12:57 pm9:43 pm Wed4:04 am7:58 am1:45 pm10:35 pm Thu5:03 am8:42 am2:34 pm11:25 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 90 Low: 84 MONDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 85 SATURDAYFe w Showers High: 92 Low: 85 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Island Sun Weather Outlook July 6, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 86 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:59 am1:03 am8:01 pm2:08 pm Sat8:39 am1:46 am9:40 pm3:25 pm Sun9:19 am2:30 am11:17 pm4:32 pm Mon10:02 am3:14 amNone5:32 pm Tue12:42 am3:58 am10:47 am6:27 pm Wed1:54 am4:42 am11:35 am7:19 pm Thu2:53 am5:26 am12:24 pm8:09 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:34 am1:01 am7:38 pm1:56 pm Sat7:55 am1:39 am8:37 pm2:57 pm Sun8:18 am2:16 am9:45 pm3:54 pm Mon8:52 am2:51 am11:13 pm4:58 pm Tue9:38 am3:25 amNone6:07 pm Wed12:31 am4:06 am10:56 am7:12 pm Thu1:33 am5:55 am12:26 pm8:12 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:04 am1:05 am7:06 pm2:10 pm Sat7:44 am1:48 am8:45 pm3:27 pm Sun8:24 am2:32 am10:22 pm4:34 pm Mon9:07 am3:16 am11:47 pm5:34 pm Tue9:52 am4:00 amNone6:29 pm Wed12:59 am4:44 am10:40 am7:21 pm Thu1:58 am5:28 am11:29 am8:11 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri10:09 am4:19 am10:11 pm5:24 pm Sat10:49 am5:02 am11:50 pm6:41 pm Sun11:29 am5:46 amNone7:48 pm Mon1:27 am6:30 am12:12 pm8:48 pm Tue2:52 am7:14 am12:57 pm9:43 pm Wed4:04 am7:58 am1:45 pm10:35 pm Thu5:03 am8:42 am2:34 pm11:25 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 90 Low: 84 MONDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 85 SATURDAYFe w Showers High: 92 Low: 85 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Island Sun Weather Outlook July 6, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 86 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:59 am1:03 am8:01 pm2:08 pm Sat8:39 am1:46 am9:40 pm3:25 pm Sun9:19 am2:30 am11:17 pm4:32 pm Mon10:02 am3:14 amNone5:32 pm Tue12:42 am3:58 am10:47 am6:27 pm Wed1:54 am4:42 am11:35 am7:19 pm Thu2:53 am5:26 am12:24 pm8:09 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:34 am1:01 am7:38 pm1:56 pm Sat7:55 am1:39 am8:37 pm2:57 pm Sun8:18 am2:16 am9:45 pm3:54 pm Mon8:52 am2:51 am11:13 pm4:58 pm Tue9:38 am3:25 amNone6:07 pm Wed12:31 am4:06 am10:56 am7:12 pm Thu1:33 am5:55 am12:26 pm8:12 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:04 am1:05 am7:06 pm2:10 pm Sat7:44 am1:48 am8:45 pm3:27 pm Sun8:24 am2:32 am10:22 pm4:34 pm Mon9:07 am3:16 am11:47 pm5:34 pm Tue9:52 am4:00 amNone6:29 pm Wed12:59 am4:44 am10:40 am7:21 pm Thu1:58 am5:28 am11:29 am8:11 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri10:09 am4:19 am10:11 pm5:24 pm Sat10:49 am5:02 am11:50 pm6:41 pm Sun11:29 am5:46 amNone7:48 pm Mon1:27 am6:30 am12:12 pm8:48 pm Tue2:52 am7:14 am12:57 pm9:43 pm Wed4:04 am7:58 am1:45 pm10:35 pm Thu5:03 am8:42 am2:34 pm11:25 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 90 Low: 84 MONDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 85 SATURDAYFe w Showers High: 92 Low: 85 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Island Sun Weather Outlook July 6, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 TUESDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 92 Low: 86 THURSDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:59 am1:03 am8:01 pm2:08 pm Sat8:39 am1:46 am9:40 pm3:25 pm Sun9:19 am2:30 am11:17 pm4:32 pm Mon10:02 am3:14 amNone5:32 pm Tue12:42 am3:58 am10:47 am6:27 pm Wed1:54 am4:42 am11:35 am7:19 pm Thu2:53 am5:26 am12:24 pm8:09 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:34 am1:01 am7:38 pm1:56 pm Sat7:55 am1:39 am8:37 pm2:57 pm Sun8:18 am2:16 am9:45 pm3:54 pm Mon8:52 am2:51 am11:13 pm4:58 pm Tue9:38 am3:25 amNone6:07 pm Wed12:31 am4:06 am10:56 am7:12 pm Thu1:33 am5:55 am12:26 pm8:12 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri7:04 am1:05 am7:06 pm2:10 pm Sat7:44 am1:48 am8:45 pm3:27 pm Sun8:24 am2:32 am10:22 pm4:34 pm Mon9:07 am3:16 am11:47 pm5:34 pm Tue9:52 am4:00 amNone6:29 pm Wed12:59 am4:44 am10:40 am7:21 pm Thu1:58 am5:28 am11:29 am8:11 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri10:09 am4:19 am10:11 pm5:24 pm Sat10:49 am5:02 am11:50 pm6:41 pm Sun11:29 am5:46 amNone7:48 pm Mon1:27 am6:30 am12:12 pm8:48 pm Tue2:52 am7:14 am12:57 pm9:43 pm Wed4:04 am7:58 am1:45 pm10:35 pm Thu5:03 am8:42 am2:34 pm11:25 pm WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 90 Low: 84 MONDAYPa rtly Cloudy High: 91 Low: 85 SATURDAYFe w Showers High: 92 Low: 85 FRIDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 89 Low: 83 Island Sun Weather Outlook July 6, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides

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THE RIVER JULY 6, 2018 29 KING CROSSWORD SUPER CROSSWORD MAGIC MAZE SUDOKU PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF JULY 9, 2018Aries (March 21 to April 19) Dont be Sheepish about asking questions and demanding answers. You not only gain needed information, but also respect for your steadfast search for the truth. Taurus (April 20 to May 20) A money problem that shows up early in the week is expeditiously resolved by savvy Bovines who know how to turn a momentary financial lapse into a monetary gain. Gemini (May 21 to June 20) Its a good time to shed negative energydraining forces and develop a positive approach to handling current, as well as upcoming, personal and/or professional situations. Cancer (June 21 to July 22) Your urge to do your best on a current task is commendable. But dont let it become all-consuming. Spend some spiritually restorative time with those who love you. Leo (July 23 to August 22) This could be a good time for all you Leos and Leonas to take your bows for your recent achievements and then go off to enjoy some fun times with your prides and joys. Virgo (August 23 to September 22) A negative response to a well-intentioned suggestion could communicate a sense of distrust you might later find hard to refute. Think carefully before reacting. Libra (September 23 to October 22) Your loving attention comforts a family member who is feeling a bit out of sorts. But be careful to prioritize your time so you dont neglect your work duties. Scorpio (October 23 to November 21) Your curiosity might be resented by some. But those who know you will support your penchant for never settling for less than the truth. So stay with it. Sagittarius (November 22 to December 21) A pesky situation from the past recurs, albeit in an altered form. Deal with it promptly before it can go from merely irksome to decidedly troublesome. Capricorn (December 22 to January 19) Dont wait too long to submit your proposals after giving them a last lookover. If necessary, you should be able to defend any portion called into question. Aquarius (January 20 to February 18) A bid to use your workplace disputesettling skills in another situation is tempting. But be careful: You might not have all the facts youll need if you agree to do it. Pisces (February 19 to March 20) That sense of self-doubt is so untypical of you, you should have no qualms in shaking it off. Remind yourself of all youve done and can do, and then do it again. Born This Week: Your ability to charm others without sacrificing sincerity is what makes people want to follow your leadership. On July 15, 1606, Dutch master Rembrandt van Rijn is born in Leiden, the son of a miller. His humble origins may help account for the uncommon depth of compassion given to the human subjects of his art. On July 11, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signs the Federal Aid Road Act. Since the mid-19th century, the building and maintenance of roads had been seen as a state and local responsibility. On July 13, 1930, France defeats Mexico 4-1 and the United States defeats Belgium 3-0 in the first-ever World Cup soccer matches, played simultaneously in host city Montevideo, Uruguay. The World Cup has since become the worlds most watched sporting event. On July 9, 1947, in a ceremony at the Pentagon, Gen. Dwight Eisenhower appoints Florence Blanchfield a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army, making her the first woman in U.S. history to hold permanent military rank. On July 14, 1968, Atlanta Braves slugger Henry Hank Aaron hits the 500th home run of his career. Aaron retired in 1976 as the all-time leader in runs batted in, extra base hits and total bases. He was named to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1982. On July 12, 1984, Walter Mondale, Democratic presidential candidate, announces his choice of Rep. Geraldine Ferraro of New York as his running mate, the first woman nominated by a major party for the vice presidency. On July 10, 1992, the Alaska court of appeals overturns the conviction of Joseph Hazelwood, the former captain of the oil tanker Exxon Valdez. Hazelwood, who was found guilty of negligence for the massive oil spill in Prince William Sound in 1989, argued that he was entitled to immunity because he had reported the oil spill 20 minutes after the ship ran aground. It was popular British romance author Jilly Cooper who made the following observation: The male is a domestic animal which, if treated with firmness, can be trained to do most things. If youre like the average human, you blink about 17,000 times every day. Filmmaker George Lucas is arguably best known for his Star Wars franchise, but he also directed American Graffiti. During the making of that earlier film he designated each reel of film with an R before the reels number, and each instance of dialog was prefixed with a D. At one point during the sound mixing, the sound designer needed to use Reel 2, Dialog 2, and so asked for R2D2. Lucas liked the sound of it so much that he used it for the name of a robot character in his later work. At 6 feet, 4 inches tall, Abraham Lincoln is the tallest president in the history of the United States. Id be very surprised if youd ever heard of Bokassa I, former emperor of the Central African Republic. Its interesting to note, though, that while he was on trial for infanticide, cannibalism and torture, he commented, Being head of state is an extremely thankless job. If you suffer from ophidiophobia and, sadly, many people do you may find the following tidbit to be rather unsettling: There are more than 3,000 different species of snakes. Researchers have discovered that humans arent the only ones to imbibe alcohol on a regular basis. It seems that the tiny pen-tailed tree shrew makes a habit of consuming naturally fermented palm flower nectar, which has an alcohol content of 3.8 percent comparable to that of most beers. An intelligent man is sometimes forced to be drunk to spend time with his fools. Ernest Hemingway THIS WEEK IN HISTORY STRANGE BUT TRUE THOUGHT FOR THE DAY SCRAMBLERS TRIVIA TEST 1. 135 2. Robert Heinlein 3. Dry ice (sublimation is the transition of a solid to a gas without going through the liquid stage) 4. Brussels 5. River horse 6. Mauritania, in 1981 7. Three 8. Demeter 9. Mae Jemison 10. Return of the Jedi TRIVIA ANSWERS 1. General Knowledge : How many missions did the space shuttles fly during the history of the space program? 2. Literatur e: Who wrote the sci-fi novel The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress? 3. Science : What is an example of sublimation? 4. Geography : What is the capital of Belgium? 5. Animal Kingdom : What does the word hippopotamus mean? 6. History : Which country was the last to abolish slavery? 7. Music : How many valves does a trumpet have? 8. Mythology : What is the name of the Greek goddess of agriculture? 9. Firsts : Who was the first AfricanAmerican woman to travel in space? 10. Movies : In which Star Wars film did the Ewoks first appear?

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THE RIVER JULY 6, 2018 30 www.islandsunnews.com PLACE CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED Landing a big fish from the beach can be hard on the fish. Dragging a fish up onto the sand if youre going to release it is not an option as it usually damages or kills the fish. Hold the fish in the water while you unhook it if youre going to release it. The less you can touch a fish before release the better for the fish. If you want a picture with the fish, support it as you lift it out of the water and do it quickly. Before releasing, revive the fish while holding it in the water; moving it slowly back and forth so water goes over its gills. The fish will let you know when its ready to swim off. Florida just recently changed the regulations on fishing from shore. Florida residents as well as out of state visitors need a fishing license to fish from shore. Shore Fishing:Don't Harm The Fishby Capt. Matt Mitchell Cycling Safety NotesRide to the right Warn to pass Wear a helmet Use lights at night Always be courteousSANIBEL BICYCLE CLUB ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL 472-6747Gulf Beach Properties, Inc. Call Today 06/22 TFNSTUNNING!! WATERFRONT HELLES CLEANING SERVICES 1/4 TFN JC WINDOW CLEANING 05/25 TFN SCARNATO LAWN SERVICE 1/25 TFN 239-896-6789 4/13 TFN SERVICES OFFEREDROGER NODRUFF ELECTRIC 4/20 TFN PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT 3/2 TFN PUBLIC SERVICEJERRYS FOODS SERVERS & BARISTAS 5/6 TFN HELP WANTED BOATS CANOES KAYAKSDOCKAGE 1/4 TFN COMMERCIAL RENTALWONDERFUL RENTAL IN POPULAR LOCATION ON SANIBEL 8/5 TFN REAL ESTATEGARCIA REAL ESTATE AND CONSULTINGRICHARD J. GARCIA, GRI, BROKER239-472-5147garciaonsanibel.com 4/29 TFN SANIBEL NEW CONSTRUCTION 6/29 7/20 VACATION RENTAL 1/26 TFN Island VacationsMillion $ Views Await You! 239-472-72771-888-451-72771/4 TFN CLOSE TO BOWMENS BEACH 6/29 9/14 SEASONAL RENTALSEEKING ANNUAL RENTAL 6/29 7/13 ANNUAL RENTAL WANTEDSANIBEL ANNUAL RENTAL 6/15 7/13 ANNUAL RENTAL

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THE RIVER JULY 6, 2018 31 Top 10 Real Estate SalesCourtesy of Royal Shell Real Estate Subdivision City Year BuiltSquare FootageListing Price Selling Price Days On Market St. Andrews Fort Myers 2008 6,970 $2,500,000 $2,000,000 14 Bayfront GardensBonita Springs 1990 5,415 $2,495,000 $2,210,000 300 Spring RidgeBonita Springs 1999 4,622 $2,450,000 $2,325,000 10 Shell Harbor Sanibel 1998 3,364 $1,900,000 $1,810,000 173 Cape Harbour Cape Coral 2013 3,606 $1,850,000 $1,660,000 59 McPhie ParkFort Myers Beach 2007 3,730 $1,799,500 $1,600,000 173 Frowes Subd Captiva 1947 2,322 $1,595,000 $1,465,000 587 St. Charles HarbourFort Myers 2001 4,271 $1,495,000 $1,425,000 42 Island ShoresFort Myers Beach 1952 1,446 $1,350,000 $1,350,000 1 Bougainvillea Condo Sanibel 1996 3,020 $1,299,000 $1,170,000 25Florida Health Swimming TipsThe Florida Department of Health in Lee County reminds residents and visitors to safely enjoy Floridas waters this summer. Floridas 9,000 miles of freshwater and salt water shoreline offer opportunities to have fun and stay cool, but it is important to know when to swim, stick to the shore or avoid naturally occurring living organisms like mosquitoes or algae blooms. Cyanobacteria/blue-green algae are a group of organisms that can live in freshwater, salt water or mixed brackish water. When conditions are right, such as warm water and increased nutrients, these organisms can increase in numbers and accumulate in some areas of a water body. These blooms can sometimes be pushed near the shore by winds, waves, tides and currents. When this happens, people have a greater chance of contact with the blooms. Exposure to water containing algae may cause gastrointestinal effects if swallowed and rash if touched or inhaled. Swimming in water with bluegreen algae blooms may cause ear, eye and skin reactions, and hay fever and flu-like symptoms (including diarrhea). These reactions are not common. Algae blooms can also remove oxygen from the water and cause fish kills. The department offers the following Swim It, Shore It or Dodge It reminders: Swim It with a buddy when safety flags and signs indicate that it is safe to do so. Shore It on the sand if you have a cut on your skin, have a weakened immune system or you are alone Dodge It to avoid organisms that live in or near the water, and stay clear of algae blooms. If you experience illness related to an algae bloom, call the Florida Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222. For health-related questions, contact the Florida Department of Health in Lee County at www.lee-pio@flhealth.gov. To report fish kills, call Fish Kill Hotline (Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission) at 800-636-0511. To report algae blooms, contact the Florida Department of Environmental Protection at 855-305-3903. For more information about bluegreen algae and enjoying Floridas water ways safely, visit www.floridahealth.gov/ environmental-health/aquatic-toxins/ cyanobacteria.html. LCEC Rates Are Fourth Lowest In FloridaLee County Electric Cooperative (LCEC) recently announced that its electric rates are the fourth lowest amongst electric providers in the state of Florida as of the latest comparison released in April 2018. These recent industry benchmarks reflect LCECs operating expenses per 1,000 kWh sold as being in the lowest quartile nationwide and one of the lowest amongst comparable cooperatives in the state. Rate levels are determined through forecasting sales levels (expected revenue) compared to budgeted spending needs for operations, power supply and capital investment in the electric infrastructure. When revenue is expected to be more favorable compared to spending, LCEC passes those savings through to customers in the form of stable rates and sometimes a reduction. LCEC has decreased rates five times since 2014 and has not had a rate increase for 10 years in a row. This means that LCEC customers are paying less for electricity today than they were a decade ago. We are very pleased to be able to pass through operating and power cost savings to our customers, LCEC CFO Denise Vidal said. LCEC continually strives to contain costs in order to keep rates competitive, while providing excellent reliability and customer service. Hortoons

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