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River weekly news

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Title:
River weekly news
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, FL
Publisher:
Lorin Arundel and Ken Rasi- Co-Publishers
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Copyright Date:
2010
Language:
English

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newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Lee -- Fort Myers
Coordinates:
26.64328 x -81.868953

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright River Weekly News. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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FREETake Me Home VOL. 17, NO. 25 JUNE 22, 2018From the Beaches to the River District downtown Fort Myers Weather and Tides pa ge 28Art Of Burlesque Showcased At Davis Art Centerby Jeff LysiakIn the time-honored tradition of the American stage, an evening showcase featuring burlesque dancers, blues music, contemporary cabaret and comedy returns to the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center on Saturday, July 7. The performance is entitled Show Me The Honeys. Glam! Bam! Burlesque!, a Southwest Florida-based burlesque group, brings the art of classic tease, traditional and neo-burlesque to life in a performance featuring singing, dancing, bumping and grinding. However, this unique entertainment genre offers much more than just provocatively dressed ladies clad in lacy corsets, fishnet stockings and feather boas. Burlesque is something that everybody can do, and all kinds of people can enjoy, said Rosie Luxure, the stage name of the co-founder of the dance troupe that began in 2016. Its a real theatrical experience. According to Luxure, she and fellow co-founder Nettie Boom were teaching dance lessons at a Naples studio, offering instruction on a wide variety of genres including burlesque, hula, swing, belly and contemporary dance. After working together for some time and expressing a mutual interest in staging burlesque performances, the pair decided to create their own group. We both wanted to do it for a long time, said Boom. But we had no idea how it was gonna blow up the way it has, added Luxure. Over the past two years, Glam! Bam! Burlesque! has staged dozens of performances across the state of Florida, with private gigs and major shows in venues such as The Ranch in Fort Myers (at the 2017 Cattle Barons Ball of Lee County), the Southwest Florida Event Center in Bonita Springs and at The Colosseum, Pelican Larrys and Off The Hook Comedy Club in Naples. We do lots of shows throughout the year, but our biggest, full-scale production is held at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center every year, said Luxure, who noted that the troupe will also be appearing at the 2018 Burlypicks, a burlesque and variety performance competition in Orlando this month. Other members of the troupe include Lucie Fair, Kelly Koquette, Audrey Delicious and Etal Noir. All of the girls live in Southwest Florida, between Fort Myers and Naples. One of the reasons that burlesque has become so popular is the womens empowerment movement, said Koquette. Everybody seems to really love it, and actually the majority of the crowd is made up of women. During a recent rehearsal for their July 7 performance in Fort Myers, all of the ladies shared what feedback theyve heard from audience members following their shows. A lot of the women who had never seen a burlesque show tell me they love it and they want to learn how to do it themselves, said Luxure. Its like this ever-evolving circle. When people come up to me after the show, they never use the word sex. They always say how beautiful the show was, added Fair. They also compliment us on how professional we were. What our show does is bring a freshness to the area, something that many people who live here have never seen before, said Boom. In addition to the performance at the Davis Art Center, the Glam! Bam! gals will be appearing at the Love That Dress! Collection Party, a fundraiser for the PACE Center For Girls of Lee County, on Tuesday, July 17 at the Red Door Photography Studio, located at 1601 Lee Street, Suite 2 in Fort Myers. continued on page 16 Glam! Bam! Burlesque! photo by Annie Watson Photography Photography And Paintings In Underwater Works The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center will highlight an underwater art exhibition during a group show during Art Walk on Friday, July 6 from 6 to 10 p.m. Theres Something in the Water features photography from Mila Bridger, Katy Danca Galli and Bob Halstead, plus paintings from Arturo Sameniego. Halstead is an award-winning underwater photographer whose work has been published in books and featured in galleries around the world. Through his interest in scuba diving, he has captured some of the most incredible underwater images. Halstead is credited with devising a now common technique called muck diving, which reveals unique creatures or objects in the sediment. His photography has also had an impact on marine biology since he has been able to help identify several new and unknown species of sea life. For more information, visit www. bobbeneaththesea.weebly.com. Originally from the city of Koszalin in the northwest of Poland, Bridger is best known for her abstractly surreal, color-saturated photographs featuring what she labels as manufactured fantasy. She is renowned both locally and internationally for fantastical portraits that feature thoughtfully stylized, saturated settings that evince a high degree of kinetic energy and unmistakable Expressionist flair. For more information, visit www.milabridger. com. A Florida west coast native, Danca Galli is the former photo editor for Scuba Diving magazine, master diver, former Boy Scout (seriously), ocean advocate and lover of all bodies of water. Her work has been featured on www.baresports.com, Scuba Diving magazine online and in print, Sport Diver magazine and Divephotoguide. com. Danca Galli has won contests with the Ocean Conservancy, Our World Underwater and the Cover of the Year Charlie Award for 2012. For more information, visit www.katydancagalli. com. Originally from Mexico, Sameniego earned degrees in business and art. The continued on page 4 Moray Eel by Bob Halstead photo provided

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Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: Taff Langford House Lingered On by Gerri Reaves, PhDCenter left and encircled in this circa-1950 aerial photo, the 19th century Taff Langford house looks like a hold-out. Sitting on the southwest corner of Dean and Bay, its sandwiched between the classic boom-time commercial buildings (left) and the unattractive it must be said -riverfront west of the yacht basin (right). Across Dean, stands the Morgan Hotel, as indicated by the huge letters on the side of the building. Behind the Langford house runs a nearly horizontal line of one-story structures (top). They line the railroad that runs down the center of Monroe Street to the riverfront packing plants. The large open area (lower right), which was known as Richardson Field, is evidently the scene of a carnival, judging from the Ferris wheel and tents. Prominent on the Hendry-Edwards corner (left center) is the catty-cornered Elks Club Lodge #1288. That building no longer exists either. Despite looking like an anachronism, the historic Langford house survived until 1992. In September of that year, News-Press writer Joe Workman lamented its loss only three months earlier to create a parking lot. For him, it was yet another dispiriting case of local history being sacrificed to dubious progress. Today, Taff Langford is perhaps best known for his namesake, the 1911 Langford Building on First Street. The current brick structure replaced the original wood-frame Langford Building. Located next door to the Bank of Fort Myers Building on the Jackson corner, it was recently renovated and is now a restaurant with loft apartments on the second floor. Along with other prominent family members, Taff helped to shape early Fort Myers history. He came to the town sometime between 1878 and 1885 (sources differ) with his brother Dr. Thomas Langford. In the early days, the brothers had houses next to each other on First Street at what is now the Dean Street intersection. Taff also was a cattleman and owned saloons back in the days when the business district resembled something out of an old movie about the Wild West. In addition, with brother NL Langford, Taff owned a store in the 1890s, and he served as a town councilman in 1892. Another member of the influential Langford family was Walter G. Langford, first president of the First National Bank and the builder of the historic Langford-Kingston Home. In 1913, Taff sold his property on First Street to Addie Sanchez, who with husband Sol, ran the Cottage Home Hotel on the future site of the Morgan-Dean Hotel. Eventually, the porches on Taffs two-story wood-frame home were removed and it was relocated a block north to the southwest corner of Dean and Bay, as indicated in the historic photo. In the 1920s, it was the lodge of the American Legion Post 38. Imagine -in the mid1920s, the legionnaires stuccoed the pioneer building so it would conform in appearance to the new boom-time hotel across the street! In its final years, the former house was a law office and as the citys housing administration office. Then it was destroyed. According to Workman, the demolition upset local history lovers and historic preservationists. Even the State of Florida spoke out, since the Fort Myers business district had been added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1990, and the demolished house lay within the designated district. Walk to Dean and Bay and imagine the old Langford house hanging on as downtown modernized around it. Then, visit the following two research centers to learn more about the historic structures that didnt quite survive, even after the commercial districts historic designation. The Southwest Florida Historical Society is an all-volunteer, non-profit organization open Wednesday and Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon and Wednesday 4 to 7 p.m. It is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Call 939-4044 or visit www.swflhistoricalsociety.org for more information. The Lee County Black History Society is located at 1936 Henderson Avenue, adjacent to the Williams Academy Museum at Roberto Clemente Park. Hours for the all-volunteer, non-profit organization are Wednesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Saturday by appointment only. For more information, call 332-8778 or visit www.leecountyblackhistorysociety.org. Sources: The Archives of the Southwest Florida Historical Society and The NewsPress. THE RIVER JUNE 22, 20182 The house was destroyed in 1992. Today, a modern office building stands at Dean and Bay. photo by Gerri Reaves In this circa-1950 aerial photo looking to the southwest, the pioneer-era Taff Langford house (circled) stands at the corner of Dean and Bay. Across Dean is the Morgan Hotel and across the top of the photo are buildings alongside the railroad on Monroe Street. The large building near the upper left corner is the Kress Building. (This is a zoomed shot from a larger photo.) photo courtesy IMAG History & Science Center PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, call 239-395-1213 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1640 Periwinkle Way, Suite 2, Sanibel FL 33957. FAX number: 239-395-2299. Email: press@islandsunnews.com. Email: ads@islandsunnews.com The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Contributing Writers Jennifer Basey Barbara Cacchione Kay Casperson Suzy Cohen Linda Coin Marcia Feeney Ed Frank Shelley Greggs Tom Hall Marion Hauser, MS, RDRoss Hauser, MD Anne Mitchell Capt. Matt Mitchell Trinette Nelson J. Brendan Ryan, CLU, ChFC, MSFS Di Saggau Jeanie TinchPublisher Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Bob Petcher Graphic Arts/ Production Ann Ziehl, Manager Amanda Hartman Justin Wilder Reporters Gerri Reaves, PhD Jeff LysiakIndependently Owned And Operated COPYRIGHT 2018 The River Weekly NewsLORKEN Publications, Inc.Read Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com

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3 THE RIVER JUNE 22, 2018 FIRST STREET LIQUORCelebrating 10 years of Business2023 Altamont Ave, B107, Fort Myers Mon. thru urs. 10am 9pm Fri. & Sat. 10am 10pm Sun. 10am 7pm Tel: 239-332-3945 We Deliver!!!SPECIAL CASE PRICES FOR ALL LIQUORS 5% o purchases over $30 on all wines & liquors with this ad We Sell Wines, Spirits, Beer, Cigar-Cigarettes & Lotto-LotteryExp. 5/11/18 Convenient, Friendly, Full Service Neighborhood Liquor StoreBitcoin ATM Machine On Site Cool moves, cool music, total body, low impact. Dance tness, group exercise, contemporary movement, step aerobics, body sculpting. 2nd Saturday of the month! Ballroom, Latin, Swing. 6 p.m. lesson followed by open dancing. Foxtrot, waltz, rumba, cha-cha, tango, swing, and more! Private lessons, and beginner, intermediate, and advanced group lessons. No partner needed. Boutique-style group exercise and dance studio. Unique classes, friendly and inviting atmosphere.Fitness with Flair @ Royal Palm Square Over $93,700 In Funds AwardedFour local nonprofits, a church mission trip and a high school senior were this years recipients of funds from the Jordan Ashley Gutheim Foundation Fund and the Jordan Ashley Gutheim Scholarship Fund, funds of the Southwest Florida Community Foundation. This is the second year for Jordans blessings, which now totals $226,700 with over $108,000 already distributed. The funds were established in memory of Jordan Gutheim, a 20-yearold who graduated from Evangelical Christian School and was a junior at Florida State University. Jordan and her boyfriend, Benji Piechoczek, were killed in a car accident while waiting to make a legal turn on May 12, 2016. Born in Fort Myers, Jordan was known for her fun and loving spirit, her happiness, sensitivity and interest in going out of her way to help others. This years recipients included Cape Coral Animal Shelter, the Lee County Sheriffs Office Teen Driver Challenge, Valeries House and the Dr. Ella Piper Centers Foster Grandparents Program. In addition, Sylvia Canko of Cape Coral High School is the scholarship recipient of the Jordan Ashley Gutheim Scholarship for four years at $2,000 per year, and a grant was made to New Hope Presbyterian Church to aid with a mission trip to Puerto Rico planned for this summer. While Were Waiting, a faith-based retreat for bereaved parents, will also receive $10,000. According to her family, Jordan was passionate about animals, seniors, families and helping those in need in impoverished countries. The funds support what Jordan loved, including no-kill animal shelters, seniors facing dementia, humanitarian mission trips, driver safety and family services. Annually, the foundation also awards a four-year scholarship to FSU. Jordans light shined so bright with her outpouring of love for her family, friends and people in need. Our family, and the world for that matter, lost someone irreplaceable, said members of her family. Jordan loved to travel, exercise, experience new things and make others laugh. We miss her more and more each day, and through this fund, our wonderfully kind and caring daughter will live on and continue to help others. The fund is available for anyone who would like to contribute at www.bit.ly/ JordanAshleyGutheim, or send a check to the Southwest Florida Community Foundation. For more information about Jordan, visit www.jordangutheim. org. For more information about the Southwest Florida Community Foundation, call 274-5900 or visit www.floridacommunity.com. From left, Greg and Lorraine Gutheim with Sylvia and Svitlana Canko photos provided Jordan Gutheim

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THE RIVER JUNE 22, 20184 Loggerhead Released On Fort Myers BeachOn June 12, the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) released a sub-adult loggerhead sea turtle on Fort Myers Beach with the help of Turtle Time, Inc. volunteers. The volunteer group rescued the turtle on May 29 when it was found floating upside down in the surf. It was transported to CROW where it received care and treatment for brevetoxicosis, also known as red tide poisoning. Before being released, the turtle was tagged with a passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag and a flipper tag on each of its front flippers. This is the fifth sea turtle in 2018 to be treated and released from the clinic for red tide poisoning. CROW students Abbey Bierman and Jennifer Hurlebaus releasing the sea turtle on Fort Myers Beach photo provided Registration Open For Law & Order BallRegistration is now open for the fifth annual Law & Order Ball to be held at Germain Arena on September 15 at 6 p.m. Attendees can register online at www.lawandorderball. org. Presented by Creighton Construction and Development and hosted annually by the Rotary Club of Fort Myers South, the esteemed event pays tribute to seven of Lee Countys local law enforcement agencies for their commitment to public safety. The gala also honors an Officer of the Year and raises funds to provide grants to Lee County law enforcement agencies and local non-profit organizations. The Law & Order Ball will recognize the everyday heroes of the following Lee County law enforcement agencies: Cape Coral Police Department, Florida Gulf Coast University Police Department, Florida Southwestern State College Police Department, Fort Myers Police Department, Lee County Port Authority Police, Lee County Sheriffs Office and Sanibel Police Department. The black-tie optional gala is open to the public and will feature cocktails, hors-doeuvres, a formal dinner, silent and live auctions, entertainment, raffles, and even more surprises. The evening will also include a presentation for the Officer of the Year award among all participating agencies. Individual registration for the festive evening is $175 each, and a table for 10 guests is $1,750. Those unable to physically attend are asked to Fund-ACop to attend the event in their place. The event, designed to thank local law enforcement agencies, raises funds for the Rotary Club of Fort Myers South Foundation which provides grants to Lee County law enforcement agencies and local non-profit organizations. A portion of funds raised at the event will be distributed among the honored agencies for their youth programs. Along with Creighton Construction and Development, sponsors include The Eventful Company, RapidPrint, Edison National Bank, Fort Myers Police Department, Henderson, Franklin Attorneys at Law, Siesta Pebble, Southwest Florida Public Service Academy, Suncoast Credit Union, Aubuchon Team of Companies, Bank of the Ozarks, Finemark Bank, Florida Power & Light, Markham Norton Mosteller & Wright, Millennium Physicians Group, Round Table Provisions and Pushing the Envelope. Sponsors, silent auction items, and other contributions are still needed for this years program. For more information about the event, to become a sponsor, or to make a contribution, visit www.lawandorderball.org or contact info@lawandorderball.org. Davis Woods is the place to be, located just minutes from area beach and many amenities that SW Florida offers. This 2 bedroom/ 1 bath home has a delightful view of the community pool, lake and tennis courts. Both the living room and master bedroom provides entrance to the lanai through sliding glass doors. Roll down hurricane shutters on the lanai offer storm protection. This property will make a comfortable home or investment. The seasonal rental market at Davis Woods is very strong and many seasonal renters return year after year. The home is being sold fully furnished and has everything you need to make yourself comfortable. Pack your bags and move in! 16881 Davis Road #524 REAL ESTATE SPECIALISTSW Florida, Fort Myers Beach, Sanibel & Captiva Islands is All About HomeCathie Lewis, RealtorPhone: 239-745-7367 Cathie@AllAboutHome.Life Pfeifer Realty Group REAL ESTATE SPECIALISTSW Florida, Fort Myers Beach, Sanibel & Captiva Islands is All About HomeNow Available Unit 513 delightful rst oor pool side 2 bdrm, 2 bth condo at Davis Woods. Step out from your large, corner lanai to the gorgeous pool area or pick up the tennis racket and head out to the tennis court. It is all right there for your convenience and located minutes to the beaches. This condominium will make a comfortable residence or good investment property. Don't miss the great affordable opportunity.Listed at $137,000 Listed $156,000 next 14 years were spent developing a successful computer business until his dream of being a painter could wait no longer. In 2004, Sameniego took the plunge to become a full-time artist. The last 14 years have been an exciting journey that allowed Sameniego to develop a successful career as a visual artist, with galleries representing his work in different parts of the country, including Miami, Houston, Charleston and Denver. Sameniegos work has received several national and regional awards, as well as publication in magazines such as Juxtapoze, Studio Visit, International Artist Magazine, and American Art Collector. For more information, visit www. samaniegoart.com. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First St. in the historic downtown Fort Myers River District. For more information, visit www.sbdac.com or call 333-1933. Photography by Mila Bridger photo provided From page 1Underwater Works

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5 THE RIVER JUNE 22, 2018 6061 SILVER KING BLVD. #103, CAPE CORAL Never Lived In, 3 BR, 3.5 BA, Den $552,000 MLS 218016644 Tina Tusack 239.634.3810 TARPON POINT MARINA 421 SNOW DR., FORT MYERS 4 BR, 4 BA, 3,619 S.F. $1,195,000 MLS 218039794Tom Kiddy, McMurray & Nette 239.410.8047 MCGREGOR ISLES 11701 OLIVETTI LN. #408, FT. MYERS New 3 BR, 2 BA Condo, 1,394 S.F. $246,980 MLS 218033001Ross Winchel, Koffman & Assoc. 239.898.1214 MAJESTIC PALMS 1131 SE 20TH ST., CAPE CORAL 3 BR, 2 BA, 1,600+ S.F. $220,000 MLS 218036716 Tina Tusack 239.634.3810 UTILITIES IN & PAID 11620 COURT OF PALMS #701, FT. MYERS Panoramic River Views, 9th Floor $699,000 MLS 217076766 Patti Testa 239.770.5445 GULF HARBOUR YACHT & CC 15736 CALOOSA CREEK CIR., FT. MYERS $485,000 MLS 218035946Stacey Glenn, Team Stacey 239.823.1343 CALOOSA CREEK 11701 OLIVETTI LN. #106, FT. MYERS New 3 BR, 2 BA Condo, 1,624 S.F. $295,568 MLS 218033106Ross Winchel, Koffman & Assoc. 239.898.1214 MAJESTIC PALMS 1766 CAPE CORAL PKWY. E. #210, CAPE CORAL Canal & River View from Your Balcony $164,900 MLS 218033959Ross Winchel, Koffman & Assoc. 239.898.1214 FANTASTIC GULF ACCESS CONDO 15250 INTRACOASTAL CT., FT. MYERS 3 BR, 2.5 BA + Den, Pool $699,500 MLS 218037903 Roger Stening 239.770.4707 INTRACOASTAL HARBOUR 17861 GREY HERON CT., FT. MYERS BEACH Huge Waterfront Lot $449,950 MLS 216032480 Roger Stening 239.777.4707 PALM ISLES 13400 CAUSEWAY PALMS CV., FT. MYERS On-Island Lifestyle, Off-Island Pricing $275,000 MLS 218036804 Scott Allan 239.333.3635 CAUSEWAY KEY 12431 COCONUT CREEK CT., FT. MYERS 3 BR, 3.5 BA + Den, Family Rm., Pool $649,000 MLS 218038803Linda von Wowern, McMurray & Nette 239.223.3382 COCONUT CREEK 1534 COCONUT DR., FT. MYERS Old Florida Charm off McGregor Blvd. $189,000 MLS 217061937 Troy De Mond 239.822.0332 COCONUT GROVE GULF HARBOUR YACHT & CC 11421 LONGWATER CHASE CT., FT. MYERS Custom Estate Home, 3,876 S.F. $1,399,000 MLS 218038285 Jamie Gates 239.910.2778 GATED WATERFRONT COMMUNITY 13510 SHERRILL POINT CT., FT. MYERS 5,092 S.F., 4 BR, 4.5 BA, Guest Quarters$1,495,000 MLS 217078286 McMurray & Nette 239.850.788818436 DEEP PASSAGE LN., FT. MYERS BEACH $675,000 MLS 218029096 Ed Biddison 239.218.7444 SIESTA ISLES OPEN DAILY 12:00PM 4:00PM NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW LISTING

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THE RIVER JUNE 22, 20186 Fort Myers Art: Lab Sequel Funnier Than Parody Last Yearby Tom HallLast summer, Randall Kenneth Jones and Rob Green slayed Southwest Florida with overthe-top portrayals of the Hudson sisters in Lab Theaters campy parody of the 1962 Bette Davis-Joan Crawford cult classic film Whatever Happened To Baby Jane. Jones has returned this summer to torment a new victim in Labs sequel, an even campier spoof of the sequel to Baby Jane, the 1964 Southern Gothic grand guigno, Hush Hush, Sweet Charlotte. Both the play and Jones are better than last year and thats saying a lot! The laughs are bigger, bolder and more protracted. Theyre not just side-splitting. Theyre of the fall-out-of-your-seat intensity and variety. As Cousin Miriam, Jones gloriously unrestrained. The bitch is diabolically manipulative. Ruthlessly Machiavellian. Blissfully amoral. There isnt anything she wont say or do to get what she wants and what she wants isnt fame, love or affection; its power, control and, above all, money. In the film, Olivia de Havilland elected to give Miriam a refined, reserved demeanor. Jones and Lab Artistic Director Annette Trossbach have gone in the other direction. Perhaps thats in recognition that Hush Up Sweet Charlotte is, after all, a parody. Be that as it may, Miriams inner self warrants, nay mandates, a campier, more idiosyncratic and outlandish depiction of the character. On the other end of the spectrum, Brian Linthicums beleaguered Charlotte Hollis is the perfect foil for her cousins machinations. There are just some people who are professional victims. Sweet Charlotte is one of them. Charlotte had two great loves during her life. The first was her father, Big Sam Hollis. The other was her married lover, John Mayhew. The latter chooses the social event of the season, a glam party at the Hollis mansion, to end his affair with poor Charlotte. Little does Char know that her dad gave him little choice. Big Sam threw down on his philandering neighbor after learning of the tryst from Mayhews wife, Jewel. But then, dear John lost a hand, his head and (obviously) his life. Her dress smeared in Johns blood, Char becomes the top suspect in the unsolved murder and is shunned by everyone in the small backwater Louisiana town. The problem is that Charlotte herself isnt sure who did the deed. Was it her father, or did she kill old Johnny boy and then block the heinous crime from her fragile memory. But all thats just so much backstory. We dont meet the wizened and bedraggled Southern belle until some 37 years later. By then, Charlotte is barely clinging to her fathers mansion and the last shreds of sanity. After nearly four decades of isolation and self-imposed agoraphobia, shes a mess in a dress. Linthicum captures Charlottes confliction (guilt over what she may have done and anger about what her sainted father may have done to her instead) and gnawing regret for the life she might have enjoyed but for Johns betrayal and ensuing death. In the film, Bette Davis played the part with maniacal elan. Linthicum emulates her role model, but adds a number of his own touches to make the character come alive on stage. In particular, Linthicum realizes his character is a gritty survivor, if nothing else. But the problem is that shes never encountered anyone as devious as her cousin or as duplicitous as Dr. Drew. Sue Schaffel is equally mesmerizing. She sizzles in the role of Charlottes staunchly loyal maid. In the film, Agnes Morehead (Samanthas mom in Bewitched) played this part so well that she garnered a Best Supporting Actress Academy Award nomination and a Golden Globe win. Schaffels Velna is a Southern-fried Ruth Buzzi. Her screechy bayou drawl adds to overall humorous tenor of the story. Her interactions with Miriam and the nefarious Dr. Drew are scene stealers, one and all. (But dear God, what would ever possess dear crusty Velna to turn her back on a bushwacker like Miriam?) The rest of the cast turn in equally hilarious performances. Heather McLemore Shaw couldnt be funnier as spit-ding Sheriff Luke Standish. Steven Coe channels previous roles in Play On!, Last Night of Ballyhoo and The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940 to put on the ritz as a snoopy British journalist eager to uncover the truth about John Mayhews murder all those years ago. Albert continued on page 24 Brian Linthicum as Charlotte Hollis and Randall Kenneth Jones as Cousin Miriam photo courtesy www.artswfl.com Automotive Service That You Can Trust Clean and Comfortable 239-277-10041921 Courtney Drive Fort Myers 33901 OPEN Monday Friday 8am to 5:30pm Saturday 8am to 4pm Sunday Closedwww.LegendaryFL.com service delivered to you of any $25 OffAll Makes and Models both Foreign and Domestic Limit one per customer, no cash value, cannot be combined with any We look forward to earning your business Female Comedy Night At Alliance For The ArtsThe Alliance for the Arts will present The Comediannettes (formerly Diva Comedy Night) on Saturday, July 21 at 8 p.m. in the theater. This one night of side-splitting standup comedy features funny and fierce female comedians all from Florida. General seating tickets are $15 for Alliance members and $20 for non-members. The line-up features Pam Bruno, Dani Thralow, Nancy Francis and Mariannette LaPuppet. Bruno, from Hollywood, Florida, is the winner of 2015 Ultimate Miami Comedian. Bruno has worked with many nationally known comedians, including Wendy Liebman, Emmywinner Louie Anderson, Tommy Davidson, Bobby Lee, and the legendary singer Roberta Flack. She recently appeared with Kevin Hart in his new TV series, Hart of the City on Comedy Central. Thralow was recently named Acme Comedy Clubs Second Funniest Person in Minneapolis and St. Paul. She has been selected to perform at comedy festivals throughout the United States. She enjoys spending time with her daughters, running, and speaking about entrepreneurship. Francis is a life-long family woman and a 30-year veteran of the real estate title business. This librarian look-alike decided to take to comedy. Francis take it or leave it mom attitude transcends generations. Watching the audience watch this grandmom tell it like it is must be seen. LaPuppet is a professional actress and writer of over 25 years turned comedian. She was a finalist in Nick at Nites Americas Funniest Mom winner of the 2nd Annual Comedians Ball in Florida and finalist in Comic Cures Floridas Funniest Female. She has featured for top comedians like Craig Shoemaker, Michael Winslow, Judy Tenuta and Pauly Shore. For more information or tickets, visit www.artinlee.org/comediannettes or call 939-2787. Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers.

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7 THE RIVER JUNE 22, 2018 Providing Custom Interiors to Sanibel & Captiva for 28 years Complimentary In-Home Consultation695 Tarpon Bay Rd. Sanibel, FL 33957 coin.decoratingden.com 239.472.6551 Call or e-mail us for more information. Phone: 239-558-5733 E-mail: rabbitrdmgt@gmail.com www.RabbitRoadMgt.com Rabbit Rd. Property Management & Home Watch Company which specializes in managing small county area. We are licensed, insured and bonded with over 20 years of experience. We are also Florida CAM licensed and accredited members of the National Home Watch Association. Local Navy Man Performs In Military ExhibitionMusician 1st Class Winnie Dawkins, a native of Cape Coral, recently was a part of a performance with the massed bands at the 2017 Virginia International Tattoo. Dawkins, who plays saxophone and flute, serves as a drum major in the U.S. Fleet Forces Band. Dawkins earned his bachelors degree from Florida International University and joined the U.S. Navy in 2005. In his spare time, he enjoys playing sports such as football, basketball, ultimate frisbee and bowling. One of Dawkins favorite memories is going to Canada to participate in the Royal Nova Scotia International Tattoo in 2017. Winnie Dawkins photo provided FGCU Foundation Board Of Directors Makes ChangesThe Florida Gulf Coast University Foundation, Inc. recently announced the election of two board members and inducted three members as Foundation Fellows at its quarterly meeting Wednesday, June 6. Newly elected board members will serve four-year terms. New members include: Kimberly Reese is a partner with RiteAire TEK, a distributor of RiteAire TEK Know-It-All plugs, which monitors air, power and water leaks on yachts using cellular technology. Reese moved with her husband to Fort Myers from Indiana, where he founded Cadence Environmental Energy. Reese served on the FGCU Foundation Development Committee as a community representative. Nancy Wickham began her career at Pfizer, Inc. after graduating from Pomona College in California. While working in marketing at IBM in Tampa, she met her husband, Jeff. A native New Yorker, Wickham has been a full-time resident of Sanibel since 2010. Three board members have been elected as Foundation Fellows, an elite group of longtime donors and advocates for the Foundation. New Fellows are: W. Bernard Lester, PhD., rotating off the foundation board, served the university over the course of 25 years in many roles, including the FGCU Board of Trustees, Foundation Board of Directors and the Financing Corporation Board, to name a few. Lester and Ben Hill Griffin III were instrumental in gifting, from Alico Corporation, the 760 acres of land on which FGCU sits. Further gifts from Lester and Alico have supported scholarships, professorships, chairs and Alico Arena. David Lucas, rotating off after eight years on the foundation board, also served 10 years on the FGCU Board of Trustees. Lucas is a distinguished founder of the university from its inception as a lead donor through an endowment supporting the Lucas Center for Real Estate and an endowment of the Lucas Center for Faculty Development. Lucas is an avid supporter of the annual Founders Cup golf tournament and has served on the Foundations Finance Committee. J. Dudley Goodlette, Esq, served on the foundation board for 12 years and the FGCU Board of Trustees for six years. He served in the Florida House of Representatives, representing Collier County, 1998 to 2006, and as chief of staff to the Speaker of Florida House of Representatives, 2009 to 2011. Goodlette was interim president of Edison College (now Florida SouthWestern State College) in 2012. Current officers of the FGCU Foundation Board of Directors are beginning their second year of a two-year term. They are as follows: David Holmes, Esq, chair, is an attorney and president of Farr, Farr, Emerich, Hackett, Carr and Holmes, PA in Punta Gorda. David Call, vice chair, is the regional president of Fifth Third Bank within Florida. Timothy Cartwright, treasurer, is a partner with Fifth Avenue Advisors, and serves as the managing director of Compass Advisory Group in Naples. Steve Magiera, assistant treasurer, is FGCUs vice president for administrative services and finance. Kimberly Johnson, Esq, secretary, is the chair of the law firm Quarles & Brady in Naples. The FGCU Foundation supports the universitys educational mission by securing and administering gifts on its behalf, managing its endowment and allocating funds that advance student achievement and enhance academic programs. For more information, contact Chris Simoneau, vice president for advancement and executive director of the FGCU Foundation, at 590-1064. Paws Pawty Benefit June 22Take your furry friends to the Paws Pawty at the Gulf Coast Town Center on June 22 from 5:30 to 9 p.m. Center retailers will become pet friendly for the evening, and there will be free activities. Patrons can participate in fun pet contests, a photo booth, paint with your pet, taste samples from six differentcontinued on page 23

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Along The RiverBring your four-legged friend to Pet Walk at the Butterfly Estates this Friday, June 22 at 6 p.m. The monthly fourth Friday event offers a lot of great pet-themed activities within the complex. Event sponsors include River District Alliance, Lee County Visitor & Convention Bureau, Fort Myers Community Redevelopment Agency and the City of Fort Myers. The Butterfly Estates is located at 1815 Fowler Street in downtown Fort Myers. The Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium will hold its quarterly Laser Light Shows this weekend and next weekend. Shows are on Friday, Saturday and Sunday at 6, 7, 8 and 9 p.m. There will also be Kids Laser Shows at 4 p.m. daily. The Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium is located at 3450 Ortiz Avenue in Fort Myers. For more information and a schedule of shows, visit www.calusanature.org/laser-shows. The second concert of the Sounds of Summer series at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center (SBDAC) will feature local favorite Sheena Brook and newcomer Melissa Lee this Friday, June 22. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. and the music begins at 8 p.m. The Sounds of Summer concert series is a biweekly event that features two acclaimed acts performing inside on the SBDAC stage. Lee, an emerging Nashville singer, will open the evening by performing her original songs. She is a contemporary country artist that is highly influenced by pop and classic rock. Her voice can be compared to Miranda Lambert and Natalie Maines of The Dixie Chicks. She kicked off the new year with a sold-out album release show at Kewadin Casino in Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan and spent 2017 on tour with Confederate Railroad. Lee has opened for many national acts such as Brothers Osborne, Cole Swindell and David Allan Coe. Brook, who appeared on NBCs Season 12 of The Voice will then perform an hour-long solo acoustic set of her original music. Though considered a country singer/songwriter, she has created her own sound by playing all types of genres. With her quick wit and ability to connect and interact with her audience, she uses techniques like looping to create music on the fly that leaves anyone watching in awe. A Southwest Florida native, Brook has a laid-back style with an energetic and inviting vibe. Behind the scenes, she has had the pleasure of collaborating with hit writers such as JT Harding, Andy Albert and many others. She released an EP titled The First Time. Tickets are $5. FSW and FGCU students can buy one ticket and get one free by presenting their student ID at the box office. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. For more information or tickets, visit www.sbdac. com or call 333-1933. The Academy of Lifelong Learning at Shell Point Retirement Community will present Writers Workshop: Successful Writing Projects in the communitys Grand Cypress Room this Saturday, June 23 from 1 to 4 p.m. Led by award-winning author and historian Robert Macomber, the three-hour workshop will share tips on how to organize, start and complete a successful writing project. The course will teach guests how to keep a project on schedule, offer ways to edit without angst and provide ideas to inspire memorable writing. Attendees are encouraged to bring a large notepad and a pen or pencil. Tickets to attend the writing course with Macomber, who recently won the Silver Medal for Popular Fiction from the Florida Book Awards, is $35. Tickets can be purchased by calling 489-8472. Shell Point Retirement Community is located at 15101 Shell Point Boulevard. For more information, visit www. shellpoint.org. Dancers will take the stage at Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre this Sunday, June 24 to honor the late Jeanne Bochette, the regions pioneering dance teacher, woman entrepreneur, Grande Dame and performing arts advocate. The Festival of Dance produced by Dance Bochette, its affiliated nonprofit Gulfcoast Dance Inc., and hosted by Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre, will include a noon brunch followed by a 2 p.m. matinee. The tribute features performers from Bochettes historic Fort Myers studio including those she trained during her six-decade career showcasing ballet, tap, modern, jazz and hip hop. In addition, professional guest artists will travel to Fort Myers for special appearances and contributions. Tickets are $35 for adults, $25 for children and $20 for the performance only. Performance highlights include: Carla Amncio and Fhillipe Teixeria, principal dancers from Dance Alive National Ballet, performing the classic pas de deux from Romeo and Juliet as well as modern works; Broadway-inspired original tap choreography by area master teacher Ron Fucci; Dance Bochette director and former Mark Morris Dance Group member Alyce Bochette will pay homage to her mother with her new work set to Beethovens enchanting Moonlight Sonata ; A re-staging of May ODonnells classic Dance Energies taught to Dance Bochette students by Nancy Lushington, former ODonnell soloist, Marymont Manhattan College assistant professor of dance and board member of the ODonnell Green Foundation for Music and Dance. Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre is located within Royal Palm Square at 1380 Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Tickets can be purchased by calling the theater at 278-4422. Sidney Berne & Davis Art Center will host its monthly Art & Poetry Networking Event on Thursday, June 28 at 8 p.m. The Gulf Coast Leisure event will feature mixed media artists, music, spoken word, and vendors. Attendees also have a chance to network and connect with other like minded people in the arts community. Sign up early to perform, or be a part of the audience. Join in this interactive music and art showcase. Cost is $10 per person. Visit www. gclmovement.com/vendors-sponsors to register as an artist or vendor. Sidney Berne & Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. Laser Light Shows are returning to the Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium this weekend image courtesy calusanature.org THE RIVER JUNE 22, 20188 Beach walks daily at 9 am Departure from Island Inn Advance reservations required at SHELLMUSEUM.ORG/BEACH-WALKSMuseum open 10 am-5 pm daily 3075 Sanibel-Captiva Road Sanibel, FL 33957SHELLMUSEUM.ORG MUSEUM BEACH WALK MUSEUM ADMISSIONBUY ONE AT FULL PRICE, GET THE OTHER HALF OFF! BOGO

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9 THE RIVER JUNE 22, 2018Scholarships For Environmental Studies AwardedAt a special after-hours gathering at JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge on June 13, Ding Darling Wildlife Society-Friends of the Refuge (DDWS) awarded $19,700 in conservation education scholarships to 15 students from the surrounding five-county area. During its 12-year history, the DDWS Environmental Scholarship Program has awarded a total of $116,700. The society is committed to educating todays youth to become conservation stewards of the future, said DDWS Education Chair Wendy Kindig. We work with businesses and individuals to provide annual scholarships to award to outstanding students pursuing degrees related to conservation, wildlife biology and the environment. A big thank you to our scholarship sponsors for helping us in our mission. Nine donors sponsored the 15 scholarships this year. Some sponsors were on hand at the ceremony to present checks to and congratulate the students who were able to attend. Many of those scholarship recipients who were unable to attend the ceremony sent thank-you videos that highlighted their education and career plans. DDWS awarded two Richard Bailey Scholarships named in memory of a longtime refuge volunteer and donated by his family. They went to Taylor Hancock, an Estero High graduate now studying environmental science at Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU) in Fort Myers, and Robert Smith, a North Fort Myers High graduate who will be majoring in environmental studies at FGCU. The Mike and Terry Baldwin Scholarship, named for DDWS president and his wife, an emeritus board member, went to Katie Thorp, a Fort Myers High graduate studying environmental engineering at the University of Florida (UF) in Gainesville. Sarah Swiersz, a Southwest Florida Christian Academy graduate studying computational and physical science at the University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando, received the Dr. Andrew and Laura Dahlem Scholarship. The Dahlems live part-time on Sanibel and were honored with a named scholarship by family members. Barron Collier High graduate Morgan Humphrey, who now studies environmental engineering at FGCU, was awarded the Dr. H. Randall Deming Endowed Scholarship for Conservation & Environmental Studies. Demings family established the memorial in 2016 as a permanent endowed scholarship in his memory. Two Leslie & Hans Fleischner Scholarships went to Anthony Bonacolta, a Bishop Verot High graduate who studies marine science and microbiology at the University of Miami (UM), and Cypress Lake High graduate Dara Craig, who studies wildlife ecology and conservation at Vanderbilt University in Tennessee. The Fleischners are part-time Sanibel residents whose love of the islands environment moved them to sponsor the scholarship. Maegan Mikkelson, a recent graduate of North Fort Myers High who is headed to UF to major in environmental studies, won the Mary Elaine Jacobson Memorial Scholarship, made possible by the Sanibel-Captiva Audubon Society. Barron Collier High graduate Kevin Macias, studying biological sciences at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, received the Francine Litofsky Scholarship, in memory of a published nature photographer and active refuge volunteer. Tarpon Bay Explorers Scholarships sponsored five recipients: Seacrest Country Day School graduate Stella Souza, who will study environmental science at the University of South Florida (USF) in Tampa; Adrian Dougherty, a graduate of Fort Myers High studying wildlife ecology and conservation at UF; Jack Joers, a Barron Collier High graduate studying oceanic engineering at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton; Danielle Winchel, a recent Oasis High graduate headed to UF to study environmental science; and Haleigh Niles, a recent Lemon Bay High graduate entering Washington University in St. Louis to study environmental earth science. Tarpon Bay Explorers started the original DDWS scholarship program in 2007. The Jane Werner Endowed Environmental Scholarship, DDWS first permanent endowed scholarship established in 2011, went to recent Naples High graduate Griffin Alexander, who will be attending UM to study marine ecosystems, policy and law. The family of the late Jane Werner, who volunteered at the refuge for 25 years, set up the scholarship in her honor. These students become part of the greater Ding Darling family, said Kindig. We welcome them back as scholarship applicants next year and as fellow conservation stewards in years to come. DDWS will be awarding scholarships of $1,000 to $4,000 each at the end of the 2018-19 school year. High school seniors and college students living in Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Glades, and Hendry counties and pursuing careers in biology, conservation and environmental studies are eligible. For an application and to read full descriptions of 2018 scholarship winners and donors, visit dingdarlingsociety.org/ articles/student-scholarships. Individuals and businesses interested in establishing a named scholarship of $1,000 or more for 2018-19 should contact Birgie Miller or Sarah Lathrop at 472-1100 ext. 4. Class Of 2018 Earns Millions In ScholarshipsThe Lee County School District graduating class of 2018 has earned millions of dollars in scholarships and will be attending colleges, universities and technical centers across the United States. Early data show that the Class of 2018 earned over $54 million in scholarships. Along with scholarship dollars earned, members of the Class of 2018 reported their post high school plans. Of the students who provided information, the breakdown is as follows: Attend a four-year college or university: 2,019 Attend a two-year community/state college: 1,650 Attend a technical college/school: 502 Enter the workforce directly: 254 Enter the U.S. Armed Forces: 201 Uncertain of future plans at this time: 372 Other: 238 From left, Wildlife Refuge Ranger Paul Tritaik, DDWS Philanthropic Coordinator Sierra Hoisington, DDWS Education Committee Chair Wendy Kindig, recipients Maegan Mikkelson, Morgan Humphrey, Danielle Winchel, Marlin Smith, Kevin Macias, Jake Joers, Taylor Hancock and Supervisory Refuge Ranger Toni Westland. photo provided Fresh ingredients, simplicity, love... the recipe for a treasured dining experience Chef/Owner AJ Black7 Days 5-10 pm 751 Tarpon Bay Road Sanibel Island, FL Reservations Suggested www.iltesoro.net 239-395-4022 FINE ITALIAN CUISINEIL TESORO RISTORANTEinspired by Island Fare in a bistro styleVOTED BEST CHEFBEST OF THE ISLANDS AWARDTASTE OF THE ISLANDS IRON CHEF WINNER AJ BLACKCelebrating Our 10 Year AnniversaryExtensive New Wine List Tasting Menu SUNSET DINING 4:30-6:30 P.M. 3-Course Tasting Starting at $19.95

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Churches/TemplesALL FAITHS UNITARIAN CONGREGATION Sunday 10:30 a.m., 2756 McGregor Boulevard, allfaiths-uc.org, 226-0900. ALL SAINTS BYZANTINE RITE CATHOLIC Sunda y 10:30 a.m. 10291 Bayshore Road, 305-651-0991. ANNUNCIATION GREEK ORTHODOX Sunday 9 and 10 a.m. 8210 Cypress Lake Drive, annunciation.fl.goarch.org, 481-2099. BAT YAM-TEMPLE OF THE ISLANDS Friday Shabbat at 7 p.m. 2050 Periwinkle Way. www.batyam.org 579-0296.BETH SHILOH MESSIANIC SYNAGOGUE Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m. 15675 McGregor Boulevard, 437-3171. BIBLESHARE 10 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Tuesday, 7050 Winkler Rd, Suite 121, www.simplysimple worship.com, 437-8835. BREAD OF LIFE MINISTRIES Sunda y 10:30 a.m. 16581 McGregor Boulevard, 267-3166. CHABAD LUBAVITCH ORTHODOX Friday 6:30 p.m. 5620 Winkler Road, chabadswf.org, 433-7708. CHAPEL OF CYPRESS COVE Sunday 10 a.m. 10200 Cypress Cove Circle, revtedalthouse@aol.com, 850-3943. CHURCH OF THE CROSS Sunday 9:15 and 10:45 a.m. 13500 Freshman Lane, 768-2188. CONGREGATIONAL Sunday 10:30 a.m. 1619 Llewellyn Drive, taecc.com, 334-4978. COVENANT PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 10 a.m. 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937. CYPRESS LAKE BAPTIST Sunday 9:45 and 11 a.m., 7 p.m.; Wednesday 6:30 p.m. 8400 Cypress Lake Drive, 481-5442. CYPRESS LAKE PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 8, 9, 10 and 11 a.m. 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, www.clpc.us, 481-3233. CYPRESS LAKE UNITED METHODIST Sunday 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, 482-1250. FAITH FELLOWSHIP WORLD OUTREACH Sunday 10:30 a.m.,Thursday 7:30 p.m., Friday 7:30 p.m. 6111 South Pointe Boulevard, 278-3638. FAITH UNITED METHODIST Sunday 8:45 and 10:30 a.m. 15690 McGregor Boulevard, 482-2030. FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST Wednesday 12 noon Testimony Service, Sunday 10:30 a.m. 2390 West First Street, christiansciencefortmyers.net, christianscience.com. FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Sunday 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. 13545 American Colony Boulevard, 936-2511. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. 2466 First Street, www.fumcftmyers.org, 332-1152. FORT MYERS CHRISTIAN Sunday 10:30 a.m., 5916 Winkler Road, 4374330. FORT MYERS CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST; Sunday 10 a.m., 8210 College Parkway, 4823133. IONA-HOPE EPISCOPAL CONGREGATION Saturday 5 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Tuesday 9:30 a.m.; Wednesday 9:30 a.m. 9650 Gladiolus Drive, 454-4778. JESUS THE WORKER CATHOLIC Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday 8, 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. 881 Nuna Avenue, 481-1143. KINGDOM LIFE Sunday 10:30 a.m. 2154 McGregor Boulevard, 218-8343. LAMB OF GOD Sunday 7:45 and 10 a.m. 19691 Cypress View Drive, lambofgodchurch.net, 267-3525. NEW BEGINNINGS CENTER Friday 6:30 and 7 p.m. 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, nbcministry@embarqmail.com, facebook.com/nbcministry, 656-0416. NEW COVENANT EYES Monthly 9 a.m. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, newcovenanteyes.com, 220-8519. NEW HOPE BAPTIST Sunday 11 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. 16120 San Carlos Boulevard, Unit 10, 985-8503. NEW HOPE PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 10051 Plantation Road, www.newhopefortmyers.org, 274-1230. PEACE COMMUNITY Sunday 10:30 a.m. www. 17671 Pine Ridge Road, peacecommunitychurch.com, 2677400. PEACE LUTHERAN Sunday 8 and 10 a.m. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@ peaceftmyers.com. 437-2599. REDEEMER LUTHERAN Sunday 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. 3950 Winkler Ext., 274-0143. RIVER OF LIFE ASSEMBLY OF GOD 8, 9:45 and 11:30 a.m. 21580 River Ranch Road, 495-0400. SAMUDRABADRA BUDDHIST CENTER Meditation classes. MeditationInFortMyers. org, 567-9739. SAINT COLUMBKILLE CATHOLIC Monday through Saturday 8 a.m.; Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday 7, 9 and 11 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 12171 Iona Road, 489-3973. ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CATHOLIC Monday through Thursday 6:45 a.m.; Friday 6:45 and 11 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.; Sunday 6:45, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 2157 Cleveland Avenue, 334-2161. SAINT JOHN THE APOSTLE METROPOLITAN Sunday 10 a.m. 3049 McGregor Boulevard, 344-0012. SAINT MICHAEL LUTHERAN Saturday 5:30 p.m.; Sunday 8 and 10:45 a.m. 3595 Broadway, 939-1218. SAINT NICHOLAS MONASTERY Sunday 9:30 a.m. 111 Evergreen Road, saintnicholasmonastery.org, 997-2847. ST. VINCENT DE PAUL CATHOLIC Tuesday through Friday 9 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.; Sunday 9 and 11 a.m. 13031 Palm Beach Boulevard, 693-0818. SOUTHWEST BAPTIST Sunday 11 a.m.; Wednesday 6 p.m. 16940 McGregor Boulevard, 454-3336. TEMPLE BETHEL SYNAGOGUE Friday Shabbat 7:30 p.m.; Torah Saturday 9 a.m.; Religious School Wednesday 5:30 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m.16225 Winkler Road, templebethel.com, 433-0018. TEMPLE JUDEA (CONSERVATIVE) Friday 6:30 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. tjswfl. org.14486 A&W Bulb Road, 433-0201. THE NEW CHURCH Sunday 11 a.m. 10811 Sunset Plaza Circle #401, newchurchflorida.com. 481-5535. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST Sunday 10:30 a.m. 13411 Shire Lane, uucfm. org, 561-2700. UNITY OF FORT MYERS Sunday 10 a.m. 11120 Ranchette Road, unityoffortmyers.org, 278-1511. WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. 9065 Ligon Court, 481-2125. WORD OF LIFE Sunday 10 a.m., Wednesday 7 p.m. 2120 Collier Avenue, 274-8881. ZION LUTHERAN Sunday 8, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. 7401 Winkler Road, zionfm.org, 481-4040. THE RIVER JUNE 22, 201810 Immokalee Foundation Receives GrantThe Immokalee Foundation has been awarded a $10,000 grant from the Suncoast Credit Union Foundation to provide Career Develop ment program scholarships. Career Development introduces a broad range of career choices to high school and middle school students through workshops, career panels, internships and job shadowing oppor tunities that allow the students to gain exposure to industries and careers out side of agriculture. The Immokalee Foundations Career Development program also provides job and college readiness initiatives to ensure that by graduation, students have the academic knowledge and professional skills needed to succeed in post-secondary education or training for their chosen careers, whether through attendance at a community college, university, technical or vocational pro gram, or an apprenticeship or intern ship. Critical components of the Career Development workshops include ACT preparation, resume writing, network ing skills and financial literacy. The success of The Immokalee Foundations programs speak for themselves: more than 5,000 students have received critical support at no cost to them, and 100 percent of the students enrolled in its programs graduate from high school. Similarly, 100 percent of those high school graduates continue on to a college or vocational postsecondary path, and nearly 90 percent of those post-secondary students have graduated or are on the path to gradua tion from their institutions of choice. Through the Career Development program, the foundation is working to help students discover careers in fields they may not even know are avail able to them, said Steven Kissinger, executive director of The Immokalee Foundation. The Suncoast Credit Union Foundation has raised and donated over $22 million to help provide a better future for children. For more informa tion, visit www.suncoastcreditunion. com. The Immokalee Foundation provides a range of education programs that focus on building pathways to suc cess through support, mentoring and tutoring, and life skills development leading to economic independence. To learn more about The Immokalee Foundation, volunteering as a men tor, making a donation, including The Immokalee Foundation in your estate plans, or for more information, call 430-9122 or visit www.immokaleefoun dation.org. Girl Scouts To Host Summer Sizzler For FamiliesGirl Scouts of Gulfcoast Florida is inviting families to a morning of all-ages fun, Girl-Scout style, at Camp Caloosa on Saturday, June 23 from 9 a.m. to noon. The free Summer Sizzler event will feature camp tours, music, games, handson STEM stations, solar smores, and more. The invite is designed to introduce families to the many Girl Scout program options available for girls, as well as volunteer opportunities for adults. The first 100 girls to register online will receive a free goody bag at the event. To register, click on the Events tab at www.gsgcf.org. Camp Caloosa is located at 19931 State Road 31 in North Fort Myers. For more information about the event, contact Baileigh Davis at bdavis@gsgcf. org, or 941-921-5358 ext. 317. To learn more about Girl Scouts of Gulfcoast Florida, visit www.gsgcf.org. A mother and daughter snack on smores photo provided

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CROW Case Of The Week: Loggerhead Sea Turtle by Bob PetcherThe loggerhead sea turtle ( Caretta caretta ) is the most common sea turtle in Florida. In 1987, there were nearly 96,912 nests reported in the state by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Compare that to the 53,102 Green sea turtle nests reported in the state last year, and you can see the nearly 2-to-1 ratio between the most common and second most common. While the numbers appear impressive, these marine reptiles are still considered an endangered species and protected by state law. Loggerhead sea turtles are so named due to their large blockheads to go with their strong jaw lines. They have a heart-shaped upper shell and thick front flippers. At CROW, an adult male loggerhead sea turtle was admitted after it was reported to be struggling and rolling over in the water just offshore of Sanibel. The turtle was rescued by Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation (SCCF) staff. During the intake exam, the patient weighed in at about 239 pounds. Based on its clinical signs, CROW medical staff stated the turtle was suspected to have been affected by brevetoxicosis, also known as red tide poisoning. Since this past October, we have admitted 274 patients for suspected brevetoxicosis; 229 of those have been admitted since January 1 of this year, said Dr. Robin Bast, CROW veterinary intern. Typically, brevetoxicosis cases make up approximately 10 percent of our caseload annually. Dr. Bast explained that larger sea life like a sea turtle is not necessarily less susceptible to red tide poisoning than a small fish, We see a wide variety of clinical presentations depending on the species affected, she said. For example, if they have another concurrent medical condition, that makes them more susceptible or are unable to clear the toxin. Severity of clinical signs has not been directly correlated with patient weight or amount of toxin found in the blood. The toxin remains in the environment and food chain long after the algal bloom itself resolves. The prehistoric patient also had some other minor health problems that were addressed. Epibiota, or external barnacles and algae buildup, were found on the turtles shell. This indicates the turtle may have been debilitated for some time, said Dr. Bast. It is easily removed within 48 hours of admission by placing the patient in fresh water. The turtle was given ceftazidime to prevent complications with possible aspiration due to rolling over in the water. Ceftazidime is an injectable antibiotic. In this turtles case, we suspected aspiration and potential pneumonia due to its history of being upside down in the surf, said Dr. Bast. Additionally, patients with brevetoxicosis get ileus, or slowing of their gastrointestinal tract, and antibiotics are indicated to treat this as well. After two weeks at CROW, the loggerhead sea turtle appears to be returning to good health. The loggerheads bloodwork has improved; he is swimming well in the tank, and has started to eat on his own, added Dr. Bast. Bloodwork will be reassessed this week to determine a plan for potential release. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to P.O. Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit www.crowclinic.org. CROW medical staff members work on patient #18-2170 after he was brought in for suspected brevetoxicosis. photo by Brian Bohlman RIVER 11 THE RIVER JUNE 22, 2018

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Big High Tides Offer Lots Of Optionsby Capt. Matt MitchellCalm conditions and great tides made for an awesome week of charters. Snook and large mangrove snapper kept my clients busy. The tide pattern we have been on for more than a week now is as good as it gets with a huge high incoming tide coming right at midday. Three foot tides like these dont come very often, and when they do, it offers anglers lots of options with many mangrove islands becoming reachable and very fishable. During the morning, lower incoming tide areas around the passes have been the places to be with some of the best catch-and-release snook action of the year now happening. Along with the snook, we did mix it up with a few trout, gag grouper, mangrove snapper and even a few Spanish mackerel all right in the passes. As the tide really starts to flood in and the current gets too fast to pass fish, Ive been moving to the areas both inside and just outside the passes to keep this nonstop snook bite going. During the last few hours of the incoming tide, the options are endless with the water being so high. Oyster bars have been a good choice with the ones on the western side of the sound bringing the better snook action. When fishing these bars, either the action is almost every cast or not at all. If you throw a few baits and dont get bit, its time to move. Several of my favorite oyster bars resulted in double and even triple hook-ups on snook for 20 to 30 minutes. What these snook lack in size they make up for in sheer numbers, and when there are so many smaller males around its only a matter of time till you hook into a much bigger female. Mangrove islands around St James city, south Matlacha Pass and the mouth of the river have also been on fire during the very top of the tide. Both the very end of the incoming tide and the first hour of the outgoing tide has resulted in some crazy action on big mangrove snapper up to 16 inches, giant dragscreaming jacks and snook. I just dont fish many of these places in these areas until we have these super high tides. Watching 10-pound-plus jacks and big mangrove snapper crash bait on the surface is a sight to be seen when this bite goes off. As we are getting later through the month of June, more and more large mangrove snapper are being caught throughout the sound. The fish houses, docks of the intercoastal, deeper mangrove shorelines and any submerged structure can be just loaded with big schools of these hard-fighting fish of summer. Live free-lined shiners or small pinfish are key to catching these mangs along with a small light wire hook and light fluorocarbon leader as these snapper have really good eyesight. Limits of these excellent table fish will become more and more common over the next few months and become my go-to fish when my clients want to take home fillets. Although I did not tarpon fish this week, I sure did see lots of them all through the southern sound. Most days while catching bait up off Regla Island, I would see rolling fish in the slick calm morning conditions then, while returning to St James City or the causeway area, there where rolling fish south of the powerlines in the deeper water. Then when heading to Punta Rassa, I would go under the C-span of the causeway, and there they were again. After not being able to find any tarpon for the last few weeks in the southern sound, I was making a run to Foster Point and north to locate them. Now that these fish do not have all the boat pressure on them that they did through mid-April, this bite will only get better. Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions, email captmattmitchell@aol.com. ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. NEW MOTOR SALES REBUILT POWERHEADS FACTORY TRAINED MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISERCourteous Professional Marine Repair Service Dockside Service Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life472-3380 466-3344 Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint PricesDave Doane NEW M O T O R S ALE S REB U ILT P O WERHEA D S FACTORY T R A I N E D MER C U RY MARINER JO HN SO N EVINR U DE S UZUKI YAMAHA O M C I/ O S MER C RU I S E R C ourteous Professional Marine Repair S erv i ce D oc k s i d e S erv i c e S ervin g Sanibel & C aptiva For Li f e Y B t t Yo ur B ottom Yo ur B ot to m Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices C Call on a c es C C ll n Pa in t Pr i es C C i i Call on Paint Prices D ave Doane1 Send Us Your Fish TalesWe would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include a photograph with identification. Email to press@islandsunnews.com or call 395-1213. Adam from North Port with a bonus small tarpon caught while targeting snook with Capt. Matt Mitchell this week photo provided THE RIVER JUNE 22, 201812 BOAT RENTALSFishing Cabbage KeyDolphin Watching Captains Available472-5800Jensens Marina Captiva Island CLEAR YOUR GEAR It Catches More Than FishBarbless hooks cause less damage than hooks with barbs

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Plant SmartFalse Hawksbeardby Gerri ReavesFalse hawksbeard ( Youngia japonica ) is a non-native wildflower present in most Florida counties and throughout the southeastern U.S. A native of Asia, it is also called oriental false hawksbeard, Japanese hawkweed, rocketweed, or Asiatic false hawksbeard. It is common in disturbed sites, lawns and even sidewalk cracks. It blooms all year, the slender leafless stem arising from the center of a rosette of lobed oblong basal leaves. The stem can be up to two feet tall. The leaves are prominently veined and reach up to 10 inches long. Ruffled or curled edges give them a wrinkled look. The petals, or ray flowers, are five-toothed, which gives them a fringed effect. They measure only about a centimeter across. Flowers on one plant are often in various stages of blooming. When it goes to seed, the clusters of flowers resemble dandelion puffs but are only about one-fifth of that size. The plant has a milky sap. The dry one-seeded fruit has a ring of stiff hairs that act as a parachute, dispersing the seeds on air. A short taproot makes it easy to pull up this weed, but it spreads so easily that eradication is difficult, nevertheless. Some homeowners abandon the herbicides and enjoy the flowers that provide nectar for bees. If you love asters, there are plenty of native ones to choose from, so replacing this weed with a pretty native aster is simple. One way to dispense of this weed is to eat it, for its a potherb. But be warned -some people find the leaves quite bitter. False hawksbeard was used medicinally in China to treat colds, diarrhea and sore throats. It has shown promise in the treatment of leukemia. Sources: Everglades Wildflowers by Roger L. Hammer, Florida Wild Flowers and Roadside Plants by C. Ritchie Bell and Bryan J. Taylor, The Guide to Florida Wildflowers by Walter Kingsley Taylor, National Audubon Society Field Guide to Florida Wildflowers of Florida by Jaret C. Daniels and Stan Tekiela, www.eattheweeds.com, www. garden.org https://plants.ifas.ufl. edu, www. rufino-osorio.blogspot.com, www.susanleachsnyder.com, and www. wildsouthflorida.com. Plant Smart explores the diverse flora of South Florida. The ray flowers toothed edges create a fringed look photos by Gerri Reaves False hawksbeard is a non-native annual and member of the aster family13 THE RIVER JUNE 22, 2018 EXPERIENCE: HUNDREDS OF SUCCESSFUL LANDSCAPES300 Center Road, Fort Myers FL 33907 PHONE 239.939.9663 FAX 239.939.8504www.NoLawn.com www.AllNative.bizOPEN DAILY: 9 to 5 Mon Sat 10 to 3 SunOUR NURSERY FEATURES OVER 200 SPECIES OF NATIVE PLANTS ON SEVERAL ACRES Buttery Gardens Wildlife/Bird Sanctuaries We also offer landscape design, consultation, installation and maintenance. Or consider not using any rat poisons at all. Instead, seal all entry points to your home. Help SCCF Bring Back the Barn Owls SCCF 472-2329 sccf.orgPoisoned rats can kill the eagles, hawks, bobcats and owls that eat them.Tell your pest control professional to NOT use these rat poisons: brodifacoum bromailone difenacoum difethialone Scallop Season: Use Divers-Down Flags And BuoysWith the opening of scallop seasons fast approaching, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) wants to remind everyone engaged in this outdoor activity to use a diversdown warning device whenever they are snorkeling or scuba diving while searching for these tasty treats. The divers-down symbol is rectangular or square and red in color with a white diagonal stripe. A diversdown flag displayed on a boat must be at least 20 inches by 24 inches and displayed at the highest point where it can be observed from 360 degrees around the vessel. A buoy may not be used or displayed from a vessel. A divers-down flag or buoy, displayed from the water, must be at least 12 inches by 12 inches. A flag must have a wire or other stiffener to hold it open, and a buoy may be threeor four-sided. All divers must prominently display a divers-down device in the area in which the diving occurs. Displaying and understanding what constitutes a proper divers-down symbol are critical, said Capt. Tom Shipp of FWCs Boating and Waterways Section. These safety devices are meant to alert boaters to the presence of people under the waters surface and to give them plenty of room. All vessels must make reasonable effort to stay at least 100 feet away from a divers-down device within a river, inlet or channel. In open waters, vessels must make reasonable effort to stay 300 feet away. For safety, divers should stay within those same distances of their displayed device. A vessel that approaches closer must be fully off plane and at idle speed. Divers share the responsibility of boating safety with the boat operators, Shipp said. Diving without the divers-down symbol properly displayed or using it for reasons other than to inform others of the presence of divers is unlawful. The divers-down device should only be displayed when divers are in the water. When divers or snorkelers exit the water, it must be taken down. More information on divers-down requirements is available online at www. myfwc.com/boating by clicking on Boating Regulations and Divers-Down Devices. For more information on the 2018 scallop season dates and bay scallop regulations, visit www.myfwc.com/ fishing and click on Saltwater Fishing, Recreational Regulations and Bay Scallops. A divers-down warning device photo by Tim Donovan

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THE RIVER JUNE 22, 201814 Conversations And CocktailsBell Tower Shops welcomed area business leaders and young professionals for a lively Conversations and Cocktails social event on May 31. Attendees at the two-hour gathering were treated to a mini Taste of Bell Tower Shops, a tasting session that featured food and drink samples provided by five of the centers restaurants and eateries: Cru, DaRuMa Japanese Steak House & Sushi Lounge, Grimaldis, Spice Wine Smoothies and World of Beer. Each month, the Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerce schedules a Conversations and Cocktails social event at a member venue, offering an opportunity for members and non-members to familiarize themselves with the host business while networking, socializing and enjoying food and drinks. The May 31 event was particularly enlightening as guests were able to review the comprehensive redevelopment underway at Bell Tower Shops. Extensive facility enhancements include new gathering areas, updated architecture, redesigned storefronts, fresh paint and contemporary lighting, all of which combine to create an overall modern look. Additionally, Bell Tower Shops is pursuing new boutiques, salons and restaurants to build the landmark into an 18-hour-a-day destination for shopping, dining and entertainment. Recently, Bell Tower Shops welcomed Noire the Nail Bar and Spice Wine Smoothies, and Dave & Busters has announced plans to open an entertainment center on site in early 2019. From left, Chris Forbes, Dominic Cervio, Steven Niehaus and Joseph Welsh photos provided Eden McIntyre and Brad McIntyre Jodi Suskind and Jeff Parcheta Melissa Steindler and Rich Denezza Dawn Brown and Adam Welsh Jay Graham and Bryce Grimsley From left, Jovita Perez, Debra Szymczak, Phily Tascher and Laura Spencer From left, Susan Blust, Mark Blust, Dorothy Taylor and Sherri Kubesh From left, Melissa Vogt, Laura Reed and Colleen DePasquale

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15 THE RIVER JUNE 22, 2018 Attorney Certified Law Expert By The Florida BarHenderson, Franklin, Starnes & Holt, PA, Attorney Suzanne Boy has become Florida Bar Board Certified in Labor and Employment Law. Certification is the highest level of evaluation by The Florida Bar. Only seven percent of eligible Florida lawyers are board certified. Douglas Szabo, chair of Henderson Franklins Business Litigation department, shares, We are all proud of Suzannes accomplishment, but not surprised. Suzanne has been providing superior employment law advice to her clients for years and has established herself as an expert in her field. Suzanne assists clients with all aspects of employment-related litigation, claims, and counseling, and she is passionate about helping her clients proactively and cost-effectively resolve workplace issues. She frequently conducts workplace training sessions, and she speaks to businesses and professional groups on various employment matters. Boy is the editor of the Southwest Florida Employment Law Blog and chair of the firms HR Law & Solutions annual conference. Boy has been recognized for her professional achievements and community involvement. She was honored as one of Gulfshore Business magazines 40 Under 40 and Business Observers 40 Under 40; recognized by Florida Super Lawyers magazine every year since 2010; and, named an Up and Comer by Florida Trend magazines Legal Elite. She also holds the highest AV rating by Martindale Hubbell. Boy is the legislative director for the SHRM SWFL Board of Directors. She is a graduate of the 2012 Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerce Leadership class and serves on its board of directors. Boy is also a Trustee for the Canterbury School. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of Florida (with honors, 2002) and her law degree from Stetson University College of Law (2006). Suzanne Boy photo provided Lieutenant Graduates From FBI AcademyFort Myers Police Department Lt. Victor Medico recently graduated from the 272nd session of the FBI National Academy held at Quantico, Virginia. Lt. Medico completed the internationally known, 10-week law enforcement and academic program as part of a 232-member class from throughout the United States and 25 international countries. The quality of leadership and professionalism I was surrounded by for the last 10 weeks was world class, said Lt. Medico. It was an honor to attend the FBI National Academy, and I look forward to sharing the knowledge and experience gained. Training for the program is provided by the FBI Academy instructional staff, special agents and other staff members holding advanced degrees, many of who are recognized internationally in their fields of expertise. Lieutenant Medicos successful completion of the FBI National Academy is an integral part of the FMPDs dedication to the advancement of our officers, said Chief Derrick Diggs. This departments vision is to recruit, train and develop future leaders for our command staff who are committed to the safety and security of our citizens. A total of 51,042 graduates now represent the alumni of the FBI National Academy since it began in 1935. Victor Medico photo provided To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 395-1213

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THE RIVER JUNE 22, 201816 ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. Mark OBrien Owner/Agent Trish Barbone Agent Justin Wheeler Agent We are HERE for all your insurance needs United Way Campaign Chairs The United Way of Lee, Hendry, Glades, and Okeechobee announced that the 2018-19 United Way Campaign chairs will be Linda Doggett and Robert Shearman. The goal for the new campaign will be $10,301,386, which is a three percent increase over what was raised for the previous campaign. Doggett is the clerk of the circuit court and comptroller for Lee County. She is also a native Floridian. Doggett is a United Way board member and a United Way allocations team leader. She has been active in many court related organizations such as the Florida Commission for Access to Civil Justice, and is on the board of directors of the Florida Court Clerks and Comptrollers organization. Shearman is a board certified civil trial attorney with Henderson Franklin Attorneys at Law, and concentrates on defense of tort, civil rights and real estate law. He is a United Way board member, a United Way allocations team leader and a United Way ReadingPal. Shearman has been a Big Brother and a trustee of the Calusa Nature Center and Planetarium. Regarding this years campaign, Shearman said, Linda and I have chosen a theme for the campaign, The Power of U, that refers to both the power of you as an individual and the power of United Way to make a difference in the community. Every individual, every company, every dollar given to United Way makes a difference in the lives of hundreds of thousands of local people. Doggett added, The United Way of Lee, Hendry, Glades, and Okeechobee has a strong history of successful campaigns and continues to support the growing needs of the people of our community. This campaign will be the largest ever, and every penny of it will be needed to meet the needs of our constantly growing community. This campaign will support over 100 agencies and 250 programs that help hundreds of thousands of our friends and neighbors. I am a native Floridian, and I know how important United Way is to this community. I am excited to be a part of this vital campaign, and hope the community will embrace the challenge and support the needs of our community. Being asked to chair the United Way Campaign is an honor and a challenge, said Shearman. It is a huge responsibility to raise over $10.3 million for our United Way, but we will pursue the goal with passion and enthusiasm. When people ask me why I support our United Way, I answer that it is one of the most efficient, effective and compassionate ways to give back to the community we love. Both Linda Doggett and I have been involved with United Way as members of the board of directors and allocations team leaders. The allocations process has given us an understanding and appreciation of the incredible work being done by United Way Partner Agencies. We have seen these agencies in action helping children, veterans, seniors and families who are struggling. United Way and over 100 partner agencies work tirelessly to meet the real human needs of our community. I witnessed United Way in action during Hurricane Irma and observed firsthand the difference it makes. The United Way of Lee, Hendry, Glades, and Okeechobee has raised and distributed over $167 million since it was established in 1957. All money raised in the United Way campaign stays in the local community to help support the local human service network. United Way Partner Agencies and initiatives include: The Alvin A Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center, Partners for Breast Cancer Care, Harry Chapin Food Bank, the Boys and Girls Clubs, and United Way 211, to mention a few. These agencies serve a diverse range of needs in the community such as nurturing children and youth, strengthening families, and meeting critical needs like helping the elderly and disabled live independently, and empowering communities by bringing health and human services to neighborhoods. In addition to raising funds for human service organizations in our community, the United Way promotes partnerships and collaborations among agencies and initiatives, helping them to work together focusing on issues and solutions that continue to improve lives. For more information, call 433-2000 or visit www.unitedwaylee.org. Linda Doggett photos provided Bob Shearman rfntb r fntnbt Online: www.NaumannLawPA.com and www.RealtyClosings.comWe provide the personal attention and service that you deserve! From page 1Art Of BurlesqueThe show starts at 6 p.m. and admission is $25, or $20 plus a gently used dress. Hosted by the sassy, saucy and oh-so-bossy Chloe Bone Cicconi and Stage Kitten Isabella Von Leopard, the July 17 Davis Art Center show will also feature Miami-based performers The Prima Latina and Reigning Queen of the Latina and Hispanic Burlesque Festival Sofia Luna. In addition, Rio Dios Mio will perform as Rio Chavarro, The Little Tramp, in an homage to Charlie Chaplin. Live music will be provided by international performing and recording blues artists Joel DaSilva and Little Eddie and the Fat Fingers. Originally from Chicago, DaSilva has performed across the world at prestigious events including the Montreal International Jazz & Blues Festival, RiverWalk Blues Festival and the San Diego Music & Roots Festival. He has opened for headline acts the likes of BB King, Ray Charles, Jeff Beck, The Black Crowes and Leon Russell. Tickets for the Glam! Bam! Burlesque! Show Me The Honeys performance (open to ages 21 and older) are $35 each. Tables of four are $250; tables of eight are $500. Doors open at 8 p.m. and the show runs from 9 to 11 p.m. at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center, located at 2301 First Street in Fort Myers. To purchase tickets, visit www.sbdac.com. The troupes Show Me The Honeys performance will be repeated on Saturday, August 18 at Dixie Roadhouse in Cape Coral. For more information, go to www. glambamburlesque.com. Blues musician Joel DaSilva will perform throughout the evening photo provided

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17 THE RIVER JUNE 22, 2018 3075 Sanibel-Captiva Rd. Sanibel, Florida 33957 (239) 395-2233 Open Daily, 10 a.m. p.m.SHELLMUSEUM.ORG Free with paid Museum admission. ** Preregistration required at ShellMuseum.org/beachwalks Schedules subject to change. SUNDAYSSuper Scavenger Hunt THURSDAYSCollections Tour MONDAYSCollection Connection SATURDAYSMollusk University FRIDAYSStory Time & Craft TUESDAYS Fossil Dig WEDNESDAYSShell JewelryPlus, EVERY day: Shell Arts & Crafts*, Tank Talks*, and Beach Walks departing **NEW DAY, NEW ADVENTUREExperience a different adventure at the Museum each day from AT THE MUSEUM Community Completes Villas ExpansionCypress Cove at HealthPark Florida officials and guests recently gathered to celebrate the completion of the Life Plan communitys multiple million dollar 14-villa home expansion project. The two-and three-bedroom villa additions, featuring lakeside and preserve-view homes, increases Cypress Coves Villas home community to 44. Constructed by Fort Myers-based ChrisTel Construction, Inc., the spacious new villa homes, with large lanai and attached garages, boast from 1,700 to slightly more than 1,900 square feet of living space. Todays ribbon cutting ceremony, said Cypress Cove Executive Director Michele Wasserlauf, completes what has been an extremely busy three-year expansion period on our beautiful 48-acre campus where weve added key components to our Life Plan community in living options and resident services. Since 2016, Cypress Coves expansion has not only included the upscale villa homes, but also the opening of its nationally acclaimed memory care assisted living facility (The Cottage), a large state-of-the-art rehabilitation and therapy center (The Mead Therapy Center), renovation of its 64-private room skilled nursing facility and of its 44-apartment assisted living community. Attending Thursdays festivities were members of Cypress Coves Board of Directors, representatives from Lee Healthcare Resources and directors and residents of Cypress Cove. Event remarks were presented by Wasserlauf, Cypress Cove Board of Directors Chairman Charles Edwards, Lee FP, Inc. President Doug Dodson, Chris-Tel Construction President Howard Wheeler and Cypress Cove Marketing and Sales Director Gerry Harris. For more information, visit www. cypresscoveliving.org. Front row from left, Lee FP Chief Financial Officer Matthew Lux, Cypress Cove Board of Director Dan Adams, Chris-Tel Construction President Howard Wheeler, Cypress Cove Board of Directors Chairman Charles Edwards, Lee FP, Inc. President Doug Dodson, Cypress Cove Executive Director Michele Wasserlauf and Cypress Cove Marketing and Sales Director Gerry Harris. Back row, members of Villas project look on. photo provided Bank PromotionSanibel Captiva Community Bank has promoted Christina Almeida to senior vice president at its College Parkway branch in Fort Myers. She is responsible for supervising and overseeing all aspects of the Bank Secrecy Act/Anti-Money Laundering Program for the bank. Almeida joined the bank in February and has more than two decades of banking experience, including previous positions as compliance officer and vice president. She earned a bachelors degree in biology from Monmouth University in New Jersey and moved to Southwest Florida in 2005. Almeida received her Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialist certification and is a member of the Association of Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists. Founded in 2003, Sanibel Captiva Community Bank has two locations on Sanibel and five locations in Fort Myers. For more information, visit www. sancapbank.com. Christina Almeida photo provided

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THE RIVER JUNE 22, 201818 Financial FocusWhat To Look For In An Annual Financial Reviewby Jennifer BaseyGiven the complexities of the investment world, you might consider working with a financial professional to help you move toward your goals, such as a comfortable retirement. Youll want to establish good communication with whomever you choose, and you should meet in person at least once a year to discuss your situation. At these annual reviews, youll want to cover a variety of topics, including these: Your portfolios progress Obviously, you will want to discuss how well your investments are doing. Of course, you can follow their performance from month to month, or even day to day, by reviewing your investment statements and online information, but at your annual meeting, your financial professional can sum up the past years results, highlight areas that have done well or lagged, and show you how closely your portfolio is tracking the results you need to achieve your longterm goals. Your investment mix Your mix of investments stocks, bonds, government securities and so on helps determine your success as an investor. But in looking at the various investments in your portfolio, youll want to go beyond individual gains and losses to see if your overall mix is still appropriate for your needs. For example, is the ratio of stocks to bonds still suitable for your risk tolerance? Over time, and sometimes without you taking any action, this ratio can shift, as often happens when stocks appreciate so much that they now take up a larger percentage of your portfolio than you intended with a correspondingly higher risk level. If these unexpected movements occur, your financial professional may recommend you rebalance your portfolio to align it more closely with your goals and risk tolerance. Changes in your family situation A lot can happen in a single year. You could have gotten married, divorced or remarried, added a child to your family or moved to a new, more expensive house the list can go on and on. And some, if not all, of these moves could certainly involve your financial and investment pictures, so its important to discuss them with your financial professional. Changes in your goals Since your last annual review, you may have decided to change some of your long-term goals. Perhaps you no longer want to retire early, or youve ruled out that vacation home. In any case, these choices may well affect your investment strategies, so its wise to discuss them. Changes in the investment environment Generally speaking, its a good idea to establish a long-term investment strategy based on your individual goals, risk tolerance and time horizon, and stick with this basic strategy regardless of the movements of the financial markets or changes in the economy. Still, this doesnt mean you should never adjust your portfolio in response to external forces. For instance, if interest rates were to rise steadily over a years time, you might want to consider some changes to your fixed-income investments, such as bonds, whose value will be affected by rising rates. In any case, its another thing to talk about during your annual review. These arent the only elements you may want to bring up in your yearly review with your financial professional but they can prove to be quite helpful as you chart your course toward the future. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones financial advisor. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@ edwardjones.com. Superior InteriorsWelcome To Our Homeby Barb CacchioneEach one of our clients expresses their own individual taste and style preferences. Ask them about color, and there are those who like bright happy hues while others desire a more subdued neutral or monochromatic palette. As far as comfort level, they will let you know if formality best suits their lifestyle, or the way they like to live is more casual. Today the trend is individuality whatever spells living well to a client. However, as a group, clients face universal challenges and goals. Every client desires feeling at ease when she or he entertains family and friends. Taking pride in the way a home looks is extremely important. Nobodys home comes without a challenge or two that needs to be addressed. Its surprising how long many people wait before converting the room that guests first see when they enter a house into attractive, functional, inviting space. Enhancing the foyer or creating an inviting entry can be easily accomplished with minimal investment. Its important that the foyer sets the tone for the homes dcor. Highlight a color present in the public rooms and add a few functional furniture pieces, rug and accessories to finish off the space. If the entry into your home is directly into the living area, concentrate on making an inviting first impression there. A welldesigned living or great room begins with a furniture plan with distinct conversation areas. These cozy arrangements draw your guests in with a sit a while attitude. Layers of interest with the addition of color, texture and form with paint, fabrics and furniture will complete the space. Consider adjacent rooms that are visible from the entry door and address this area as well to ensure that there is a continuous design flow throughout your home. Barb Cacchione is an interior designer on Sanibel/Captiva Islands. She can be reached at barb@coindecden.com. Bank Hires TellerCassie Spara has joined Sanibel Captiva Community Bank as a teller at the College Parkway branch in Fort Myers. She is responsible for assisting customers with personal and business banking transactions. A Fort Myers resident since 2015, she earned a bachelors degree in marketing from Florida Gulf Coast University. We are pleased to have a recent FGCU marketing program graduate join our team, said Craig Albert, Sanibel Captiva Community Bank president and CEO. She is a great addition. Founded in 2003, Sanibel Captiva Community Bank has two locations on Sanibel and five locations in Fort Myers. To learn more, visit www. SanCapBank.com. Cassie Spara photo provided Student Named Academic All-Conference Fort Myers native Whitman Wiggins, a student-athlete at Wheaton College, was named to the College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin (CCIW) Academic All-Conference team as a football player.College GraduatesAbigail McClory of Fort Myers recently graduated from the University of New Hampshire in Durham, New Hampshire. She earned a bachelor of arts degree in political science. North Fort Myers native Golan Gil-More recently graduated from Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pennsylvania with a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy. Fort Myers native Michele Cabell recently graduated from the University of Dayton in Dayton, Ohio.Deans ListSixteen Southwest Florida natives were recently named to their respective schools Spring 2018 Deans List. Kelly Harder of Fort Myers was honored at Mississippi College in Clinton, Mississippi. Mikayla Ries of Fort Myers was named at Oglethorpe University in Atlanta, Georgia. Marco Tanzella of Fort Myers was honored at Coastal Carolina University in Conway, South Carolina. Nicole FortnerRodriguez of Fort Myers was named at Jacksonville State University. Tristen Protzmann of Cape Coral was honored at Siena College in Loudonville, New York. Matthew Celebrado of Fort Myers was named at Tufts University in Boston, Massachusetts. Jaelyne Gary of Cape Coral was honored at the University of Hartford in West Hartford, Connecticut. Wendy Waks of Fort Myers was named at the University of Delaware in Newark, Connecticut. Jillian E Richter of Fort Myers was honored at Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama. Eight of the students were named to the Spring 2018 Deans List at Tallahassee Community College in Tallahassee, Florida. They are Fort Myers natives Ashley Carlton, Phenise Charles, Lauren Proce, Eliphetejo Supervil and Harper Walker as weel as Cape Coral natives Cristian Marzullo, Tyler Myers and Devyn White.Deans List Pursuing MastersFort Myers native Kaleigh B. Hall has been named to the Spring 2018 semester Deans List at Husson University in Bangor, Maine. Hall is a senior who is currently pursuing a bachelor of science degree in healthcare studies and a master of business administration degree with a concentration in health care management program.Presidents List Three Fort Myers natives recently were named to the Spring 2018 Presidents List at Tallahassee Community College in Tallahassee, Florida. They are Hannah James, Melissa Menard and Yndia Rivera. SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENTS

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19 THE RIVER JUNE 22, 2018 RIVER Book ReviewThe Immortalists by Di SaggauChloe Benjamins new novel The Immortalists is devoted to the awareness of death and how different people deal with it. Her characters are more aware than others because as small children, the four Gold children, in 1969 New York, visit an old crone who claimed to be able to tell anyone the day they will die. She gives each of them a date. They then live their lives knowing exactly when they will die. Simon learns that he will die at 20 so he embraces his homosexual identity and starts a new life in San Francisco. He figures he has no time to lose. He runs away at age 16 and is one of the first victims of the AIDs plague. The disease kills him before the disease has even been named. His sister, Klara, teaches herself the art of magic and performs it brilliantly. Her specialty is dangling at great heights with a rope between her teeth. She too has a date with death at age 32. Daniel is a military doctor who determines which recruits are healthy enough to face mortality on the battlefield. He is set to die at 48. His passion to learn the truth about his brother and sister puts his life in peril. Only Varya is given a long lifespan, living to 88. Shes a scientist who researches longevity. She learns to embrace her death-haunted siblings and believes that the best ways to stop aging are to suppress the reproductive system or restrict ones caloric intake. The Gold siblings are different from everyone else because they are all aware of their death all the time. They are always a little bit sad all the time. Its what they do with their sadness and their fear that makes them worth following. Benjamin takes us from 1969 to the present. She goes inside each siblings head sequentially, so the book reads like a four-act play. We have the gay scene in San Francisco in the early 80s, what its like to be a touring magician in the 90s, what its like to live in the suburbs in 2006 and what its like to be a female scientist in 2018. The writing flows easily, and we are entranced by the world of the Gold siblings. Nathan Hill, author of The Nix, said this about the book, A beautiful, compassionate, and even joyful novel. Chloe Benjamin has written an inspiring book that makes you think hard about what you want to do with the time youre given. This is not really a book about dying, its a book about how to live. The Immortalists is a deeply moving testament to the power of story, the nature of belief and the unrelenting pull of familial bonds. School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Shelley, My 12-year-old daughter has some visual, motor and sensory processing deficits that slowed the development of her fine and gross motor skills. Her skills are improving but she still needs to work on them. I would like some suggestions for helping her with this over the summer. Leslie C, Fort Myers Leslie, Children develop fine and gross motor skills at different rates. Improvement of these skills is usually targeted to younger children, and its often assumed that these skills have been ameliorated by the tween and teen years. In fact, many older children do need to work on their fine and gross motor skills. Here are some suggestions from an occupational therapist that are both instructional and enjoyable. For Fine Motor Skills: Cooking From chopping vegetables to kneading bread or pizza dough, cooking together can be a relaxing way to build fine motor skills. It also gives you some time together and learning how to cook is a valuable life lesson. Building If your child enjoys working with her hands, put her to work doing some home repairs. Working with tools like a hammer and a screwdriver allows kids to make use of the small muscles in their hands. It also improves hand-eye coordination. Playing a musical instrument Playing an instrument, especially piano, woodwind instruments and guitar, can help build fine motor skills. Even if your child had trouble playing an instrument as a younger kid, its worth trying again if she expresses an interest. Practicing beauty routines Putting on makeup and creating complex hairstyles require a surprising amount of fine motor skill. Assuming the use of makeup works with your house rules, this could be a lot of fun for your daughter. 3D puzzles 3D puzzles have foam-like pieces that fit together to create models of everything from the Millennium Falcon to the Eiffel Tower. Until your childs fine motor skills improve, it may be hard to place the pieces. Start with simpler puzzles and work up to the more complicated ones. For Gross Motor Skills: Trampolines Jumping on a trampoline is a great activity to improve balance. Going to an indoor trampoline park can turn practice into a social event with friends as well. You can also buy a mini-trampoline to use at home but, if you do, make sure to set safety rules, like having a jump bar. Bowling Aiming for targets and rolling a bowling ball is another way to work on gross motor skills. If you dont have a bowling alley nearby, you can always set up water bottle bowling at home, using empty plastic water bottles and a soccer ball. Walking or hiking Walking or climbing over unstable surfaces can help kids work on strengthening their trunk muscles. Taking a hike with your child would also be beneficial for both of you. Swimming Swimming is a wholebody activity in which your childs body must work against the resistance of the water. It not only builds gross motor skills, it also helps develop proprioceptive awareness (knowing where your body is in space). Playground activities Using unstable playground equipment also helps develop your childs trunk muscles. Kids can try out things like rope ladders and wobble bridges. And it gives tweens, especially, an excuse to return to the playground. Riding a bike or a scooter Some kids who struggle with gross motor skills may learn to ride a bike later than their peers do. A scooter is a little easier to master and can be a step on the way to bike riding. Once kids do get the hang of it, though, bike riding can help older kids learn to maintain balance. Plus, it gives them a way to get around independently and an activity where they can interact with their peers. Dancing Whether its a dance class, a dance at school or just dancing to music at home, dancing has many benefits. Dancing helps kids develop balance, coordination and motor sequencing skills. It can also be a great way for kids to socialize. Shelley Greggs is adjunct faculty at Florida SouthWestern State College, where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also a nationally certified school psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. Packed with facts and employing an engaging storytelling style, [Female Pioneers of Fort Myers] both teaches and entertains. Local history buffs and newcomers to history will value Tuthill and Halls research and appreciate the accessible format, too.Gerri Reaves, PhD, author of Legendary Locals of Fort Myers and Fort Myers, Then & Now Available atWWW.AMAZON.COM WWW.EDITORIALRXPRESS.COM

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U.S. Open Golf Championship Win Is What Should Be Remembered, Not Veteran Players Amateurish Anticsby Ed FrankWhen the dust settles over last weekends 118th U.S. Open Golf Championship, most will remember the ridiculous slapping back a runaway putt on the 13th hole Saturday by Phil Mickelson rather than the stirring back-to-back championships by Brooks Koepka. And its a shame. Koepkas victory at the brutally tough Shinnecock Hills Golf Club in Southampton, New York, was the first repeat since Curtis Stranges feat in 1988 and 1989. But, unfortunately, the golf world, and much of the sports world, will continue talking about Mickelsons childish antics during the third round. It was the kind of behavior you would expect from a weekend golfer playing at a municipal golf course not what you would expect from one of golfs all-time favorite players competing in our national championship. To set the record straight, conditions last Saturday at Shinnecock Hills, particularly in the afternoon, were nearly unplayable. A 25to 30-mile-an-hour wind had dried the greens to a crusty, lightning-fast surface. That, added to the design of the greens, made it often impossible for the worlds best golfers to keep their approach shots, and even some of their putts, from tumbling off the greens. So here comes Mickelson, who was having a bad round anyway, to the 13th green. His downhill, bogey putt rolls well past the hole and before it stopped moving, Mickelson slaps the ball back past the hole. He ends up with an eight and was assessed a two-stroke penalty for a 10 on the hole. He ended the day with an embarrassing 81. To his credit he shot a respectable 69 in the closing round. Mickelsons run and slap was stunning. Many said they had never seen such a thing in a professional tournament. But Mickelson defended his move, claiming he knew he would be penalized two strokes rather than having his putt roll all the way off the green. Others said it was in a fit of anger, not becoming in this most prestigious championship. It probably will be debated, and debated, whether he should have been disqualified. More, important, however, what should be discussed and remembered was the thrilling finish to the U.S. Open. Koepka showed what real champions are made off. His one-over-par, one-stroke victory over Englands Tommy Fleetwood earned him $2.16 million. This is what we should remember, not the likeable Mickelsons slippery slope performance on the 13th green last Saturday. Mircles Blankenhorn Wins All-Star Game Home Run Contest Fort Myers Miracle infielder Travis Blankenhorn won the Florida State League All-Star Game home run contest last week belting 31 homers. Blanekenhorn is ranked the 14th best prospect in the Minnesota Twins organization having been drafted in the third round of the Major League Draft in 2015. He has been hitting .333 in the month of June to raise his season average to .270. RIVER THE RIVER JUNE 22, 201820 239.472.0004 Community, Service, Leadership, Expertise, Integrity, Results PRGHomeTeam.com Pfeifer Realty Group Is Your Home Team!Eric PfeiferBroker, Owner SPORTS QUIZ 1. Name the first major -league relief pitcher to win an MVP award. 2. Pitcher Jim Kaat was in the majors for seven pr esidential administrations. Name the first and last presidents in office when he pitched. 3. When was the last time befor e 2016 that Army beat Navy in football? 4. Who was the first Eur opean player to win the NBA Defensive Player of the Year award? 5. After the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim joined the NHL for the 1993-94 season, how long was it before the team made the NHL playoffs? 6. In 2018, Chip Ganassi Racing r ecorded its 200th overall victory. In which car series did Ganassi record a majority of its 200 victories? 7. When was the last time befor e 2017 that France won tennis Davis Cup? ANSWERS 1. Jim Konstanty, in 1950. 2. Kaat pitched in the majors from 1959 to 1983 (from Dwight Eisenhower to Ronald Reagan). 3. It was 2001. 4. Marc Gasol, with Memphis in 2013. 5. It was the Mighty Ducks fourth season (1996-97). 6. Ganassi captured 103 of its 200 wins in IndyCar. 7. It was 2001. Fishing Programs Reward Anglers, Promote FisheriesSummer fishing season is heating up, and he invitation is open to Catch a Florida Memory with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) by participating in any of three Saltwater Angler Recognition Programs. See if you can catch all 71 species in the Saltwater Fish Life List. Caught a big fish that warrants bragging rights? Submit it to the Saltwater Reel Big Fish program. And be sure to check out the nine categories of Saltwater Grand Slams that challenge anglers to catch three specific fish in a 24-hour period. Anglers of all ages and skill levels can earn various prizes such as certificates, shirts, hats, rods and reels, dehooking tools, rubber-coated nets and more. Successful anglers receive recognition in Florida Saltwater Recreational Fishing Regulations booklets and on the club members page of www.catchafloridamemory.com, plus A young angler with his catch photo courtesy Gavin Hart Brooks Koepka photo courtesy PGA Tour profile

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21 THE RIVER JUNE 22, 2018 the chance to win monthly raffle prizes courtesy of generous program partners. Catch a Florida Memory programs are not only fun and rewarding, but they also promote fisheries conservation. Anglers are encouraged to target a diversity of species to help decrease fishing pressure on the most sought-after fishes. Catch-and-release fishing and responsible fish handling practices are emphasized, and anglers do not have to harvest their catches to qualify. Photos of the angler with each catch are required and could even be featured in FWC publications or on social media. Saltwater Fish Life List Can you catch them all? Similar to a birding life list, this program allows anglers to track their progress at catching 71 different species of saltwater fish. Anglers who catch at least 10 different Life List species can join the Saltwater Fish Life List 10-Fish Club and receive a prize pack including a certificate of accomplishment and a shirt, plus be eligible for additional prizes as they catch 30, 50 and all 71 fish on the list. Anglers who complete their Life List by submitting all 71 fish will be awarded a grand prize. Get started today and print your Saltwater Fish Life List or request to receive one by mail at www. catchafloridamemory.com. Saltwater Reel Big Fish Dont let that whopper of a fish turn into just a whopper of a story. Memorialize your Saltwater Reel Big Fish by submitting a photo of you with your catch and a photo of the fish over a measuring device. This program includes 30 different species in both adult and youth (age 15 and younger) categories. Successful participants receive a prize pack including a certificate of accomplishment and a shirt, and are eligible for additional prizes as they catch five, 10, 15 or all 30 different Saltwater Reel Big Fish species. Plus, anglers who submit all 30 species will get a grand prize. Saltwater Grand Slams Can you meet the challenge? FWC has nine different Saltwater Grand Slams that award anglers for catching three specified fish within a 24-hour period, and the categories may surprise and challenge you. From the Inshore Grand Slam consisting of red drum, spotted seatrout and flounder to the Florida Grand Slam of permit, tarpon and bonefish, these challenges will make you work to increase your fishing skills. The program even includes a Small Fry Grand Slam for anglers age 15 and younger who catch a pinfish, catfish and grunt. Successful anglers receive a prize pack with a certificate of accomplishment and a shirt showing the fish from their Grand Slam, and can win additional prizes when they catch three, six, or all eligible Grand Slams. Plus, a grand prize will be given to anglers who complete all eligible slams. For more information, visit www. catchafloridamemory.com, view how-to videos at www.myfwc.com/ saltwaterfishing and brush up on your saltwater fish identification skills at www.myfwc.com/fishinglines.

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THE RIVER JUNE 22, 201822 Benefit Raises $35,588 For PACE Center For GirlsPACE Center for Girls, Lee County recently raised more than $35,500 during its Sunset at St. Charles Yacht Club Love That Dress! collection event on June 5. It was hosted by Sandy Stilwell-Youngquist and St. Charles Yacht Club in Fort Myers. A collection event for PACE Lees 10th season of Love That Dress!, the event was emceed by Gina Birch and ABC-7s Mackenzie Bart and featured smooth jazz and Latin sounds by Marc Vee and extensive silent and live auctions featuring packages from local businesses. A Progressive Dinner, hosted by residents of St. Charles Harbour, is expected to raise an additional $5,000 once the few remaining spots are filled. Nearly 200 dresses were collected during the gathering to be sold at discounted prices during Lee Countys Love That Dress! event on August 22, with all proceeds benefiting PACE educational programs and therapeutic social services, which impact middle school and high school age girls and young women. Sponsors of the event included Sanibel Captiva Community Bank, Bateman Contracting, Dominos Pizza, Dorothy Fitzgerald, Richard and Sandy Heinrich, M. Elizabeth Byck, Dean and Lori Munro, Tim and Sandy Youngquist, Adore Cosmetics, Advanced Aesthetic Solutions, Jay Brown, 96.9 WINK-FM, Fort Myers Infiniti, New Beginnings, Gulfshore Life Comcast Spotlight, Living Local Florida Weekly TOTI Media, South Seas Island Resort, Island Sun and The River Weekly News Back row from left, Cookie Douglas, Heather Decker, Paula Kambros, Cindie Barker; Front row from left, Allyson Ross, Sandy Stilwell-Youngquist, Nancy Finch photos provided Sandy Heinrich and Gail Markham Anna Toole and Jennifer Norman Alexianna Thompson and John Carr From left, Heather Fitzenhagen, Karen Scott and Sherri Kubesh From left, Andrea Henderson, Robert McDonald and Mackenzie Bart From left, Gretchen Sax, Cheryl Komnick and Barb Bates From left, Pason Gaddis, Scott Fischer and Mark Blust

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23 THE RIVER JUNE 22, 2018 Family Child Advocate Of The Year AwardGolisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida has awarded Mike Ellis the 2018 Prendergast Family Child Advocacy Award. Ellis received the award at the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida Annual Pediatric Conference held at Sanibel Harbour Marriot Resort & Spa on June 9. Mike Ellis has been a pillar in the community for pediatric health for decades. We are extremely grateful for his contributions and, with this award, recognize Mike for his efforts of improving mental health access for the children of Suthwest Florida, said Dr. Emad Salman, regional medical officer, Golisano Childrens Services. His integrated program has changed the lives of many families. Ellis is the president/CEO of Healthcare Network of Southwest Florida. Prior to coming to Healthcare Network, he was executive director of the Golisano Childrens Hospital. He also held senior staff positions at the Family Health Centers of Southwest Florida, University Hospital at the University of Florida in Jacksonville, Nemours Childrens Hospital in Jacksonville and St. Elizabeth Medical Center in Dayton, Ohio. Ellis is a former Lee Memorial Health System board of director and currently a commissioner on the Lee County Mosquito Board of Commissioners. Every year, in recognition of Child Abuse Prevention Month, Golisano Childrens Hospital and the Prendergast Family Endowment Fund host a lecture on child abuse and recognize a special individual in the community for their commitment to prevention and advocacy. In 2005, Eileen Prendergast and her family gave the community a million reasons to help children in Southwest Florida when they made a $1 million gift to establish the Prendergast Endowment Fund for the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Floridas Child Advocacy Program and the annual Prendergast Child Advocate of the Year recognition. The program features free parenting classes taught in partnership with the Childrens Advocacy Center of Southwest Florida to prevent child abuse. These classes have touched the lives of more than 7,500 parents in the Southwest Florida region. Mike Ellis and Dr. Emad Salman photo provided Suicide Prevention: Signs, Symptoms, HelpRcently, we have learned about the tragic suicide of designer Kate Spade and famous chef Anthony Bourdain, who committed suicide in France. As a society, there has been a tendency to put celebrities on a pedestal, at times over-identify with them, believe that they have everything they could ever dream of and therefore should have no issues or concerns in their everyday life. As sometimes happens when high profile celebrities are found dead and suicide is either suspected or confirmed, people may find themselves or loved ones who are dealing with depression thinking, feeling or expressing fear and worry that if they couldnt deal with it and they had everything in the world, how am I supposed to deal with it? According to the Centers for Disease Control, suicide is the 10th leading cause of death for adults and the second leading cause of death for ages 10 to 34. Unfortunately, between 1999 and 2016, the rate of suicide increased in nearly every U.S. state and rose in some areas of the country by 30 percent, which highlights the importance of suicide awareness and prevention as both a national and personal public health imperative. There is typically not a single reason that may be identified as the cause of suicide, but rather a combination of factors related to physical, environmental, financial and relationships. According to the National Institutes of Mental Health, risk factors and signs/ symptoms include such things as: Risk Factors A history of a mental health condition A physical health condition including chronic pain Experiencing prolonged stressful situations such as harassment/bullying Experiencing a stressful life event such as divorce, death of a loved one and loss of financial security A family history of suicide A family history of mental health conditions or substance abuse Previous suicide attempts Childhood abuse and/or trauma Access to lethal means including firearms in the home Being exposed to others suicidal behavior including family members, friends and celebrities Signs and Symptoms Talking about wanting to die or killing themselves Making plans or researching ways of killing themselves Feelings of hopelessness and helplessness, guilt or shame, unbearable pain (physically or emotionally) and feeling like a burden to others Increased use of alcohol or other drugs Withdrawing or isolating from support systems Saying goodbye to friends and family, putting affairs in order and/or giving away important possessions If you or someone you know is experiencing, expressing or displaying any of these warning signs, or other behaviors that are concerning or out of character, reach out to someone immediately. Be there as a support for them, keep someone safe by removing access to lethal means, listen carefully to what they are thinking and feeling, and dont be afraid to ask directly if they are thinking of wanting to kill themselves; studies have shown this does not increase the risk of suicide. There are many resources available for someone in need that includes: The phone number to a trusted family member or friend The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or for the deaf and hard of hearing via TTY at 1-800-799-4889 available 24 hours a day, seven days a week The Crisis Text Line: 741741 The non-emergency number of your local law enforcement Call 911 for those in immediate risk of harm to self or others and request a CIT (Crisis Intervention Team) Officer as they have had additional training in working with those in crisis If you want to learn more about suicide prevention and awareness or other mental health conditions, visit the following internet sites: Suicide Prevention Lifeline: www. suicidepreventionlifeline.org National Institutes of Mental Health: www.nimh.nih.gov/index.shtml Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: www.cdc.gov National Alliance on Mental Illness: www.nami.org Suicide Prevention Resource Center: www.sprc.org The important thing to remember is that you are not alone even though it may feel that you are, you are loved even though you may not feel it and you are needed even if you dont feel that you are. Help is available reach out. The Lee Health Behavioral Health Center offers assistance and support. To speak with a team member for an appointment for you or a loved one, or to learn about additional resources in the community, call 343-9180. From page 7Paws Pawtyrestaurants and meet pet-related organizations and businesses showcasing their causes, products and services in a animal-friendly environment. There will also be raffles and an agility course. So, whether you have a chihuahua or a mastiff, dog owners are encouraged to attend with their pets. Paws Pawty has partnered with the Gulf Coast Humane Society and Paws Lee County Inc. to help provide dog owners with helpful resources for their animals. Both will be bringing out pets soon to be available for adoption and educating patrons on their resources and services. Gulf Coast Town Center is located at 9903 Gulf Coast Main Street in Fort Myers. For more information, contact Sonya at sonya@simplyeventsfl.com.

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RIVER deaRPharmacistEat Bananas In The Pursuit Of Happinessby Suzy Cohen, RPhDear Readers:Most bananas are peeled and eaten within one minute. Thats according to The Guiness Book of World Records. While not officially amazing in my opinion, the most bananas peeled and eaten in one minute is eight and was accomplished by a man named Patrick Deep Dish Bertoletti, a competitive eater. Because bananas have a constipating effect on your digestion, this guy was probably constipated for days, lol! Bananas have a tremendous amount of medicinal applications. For one, the peel of a banana is known as a home remedy to promote wound healing from minor burns. The actual fruit could have substantial impact on several illnesses, including depression. Last year in 2017, the crop that sells about 145 million tons of bananas (worldwide) came under attack. A deadly fungus spread through plantations and, simultaneously, bacterial disease killed some plantations in Africa. Bananas are not doomed, so dont worry, and thats a good thing if you have depression or Parkinsons disease which are due in part to low dopamine. Dopamine is a happy brain chemical; its your bodys natural antidepressant. Dopamine is what makes you want to garden or golf for example, to dance, laugh and do fun hobbies. Healthy dopamine levels are critical for movement and coordination. With declining levels of dopamine, or dopamine receptor insensitivity, you could see Parkinsons-like symptoms, depression, bladder dysfunction, obesity, memory loss, sometimes attention problems and unexplained fear or anxiety spells. So where do bananas fall into this discussion? In their small way, they contribute a chemical that helps you make dopamine. They are naturally high in an amino acid called tyrosine that is part of the dopamine chemical structure. Without tyrosine, you cant make dopamine or thyroid hormone for that matter. Dopamine and thyroid hormone are two primary happy brain chemicals. So, if youre in the pursuit of happiness, go bananas! In some strange banana news, a British man was driving in Taiwan, and he threw his banana peel out the car window. A Taiwanese man, who saw this act of littering, followed him and confronted him at a red light. The man said, Littering is unethical and uncivilized behavior. While I do agree, I dont think I would have chased someone down over a flying banana peel. Bananas could possibly help with diabetes due to the pectin and resistant starch. Leg cramps could be soothed by the amount of potassium and magnesium in bananas. And some research suggests anti-cancer effects. Ive written an extensive article on the health benefits of bananas and, if youd like to read that version, sign up for my free newsletter at www.suzycohen.com In the meantime, here are seven ideas to help you go bananas. 1. Just peel and eat 2. Add a banana to your smoothie 3. Make banana chocolate chip bread or muffins 4. Make banana chips with a dehydrator 5. Dip bananas into melted chocolate then freeze the pop 6. Make banana tea by boiling it in water, I have a recipe at my site. 7. For breakfast, make banana nut collagen pancakes This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. SuzyCohen.com. THE RIVER JUNE 22, 201824 Workshop To Assist Seniors With Legal NeedsSeniors face an array of unique legal needs, including issues such as advance directives, elder abuse, and probate issues. To help Southwest Florida seniors and their caregivers better understand their legal options, Florida Rural Legal Services (FRLS) is presenting a half-day workshop, Resourceful Strategies for Older Adults, at the Riverside Community Center on Tuesday, June 26 from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. The workshop is presented in coordination with the Area Agency on Aging for Southwest Florida (AAASWFL) and is funded through the Florida Department of Elder Affairs. Seniors and caregivers interested in attending should reserve a seat by calling Florida Rural Legal Services at 334-4554. The event will assist FRLS and AAASWFL in identifying and addressing the legal needs of vulnerable seniors in Southwest Florida. We will discuss topics that are important to Southwest Floridas older adults, said Lorraine Barker, paralegal at FRLS. These include bankruptcy, divorce, domestic abuse, advance directives, nursing homes and financial obligations after the death of a spouse. Florida Rural Legal Services is a nonprofit law firm that provides civil legal advice, representation and education for people with limited incomes, including elders and migrant workers. FRLS provides free services to those that qualify. For more information, visit www.frls.org. The Area Agency on Aging for Southwest Florida is a nonprofit organization serving Charlotte, Collier, DeSoto, Glades, Hendry, Lee and Sarasota Counties. AAASWFL is the states designated Aging and Disability Resource Center for Southwest Florida. The organization is committed to helping adults ages 60 and over and people with disabilities to live with independence and dignity in their own homes and communities. For more information, visit www.aaaswfl.org or by calling the toll-free Elder Helpline at 966-413-5337. The Riverside Community Center is located at 3061 Riverside Drive in Fort Myers. Doctor and DieticianInfection Fighting Foodsby Ross Hauser, MD and Marion Hauser, MS, RDFood affects every process and function of the human body. It is literally the bodys fuel. Providing our body with healthy food encourages a healthier body. Proper nourishment not only keeps us moving, but also supports the immune system, fending off viruses or infections. Incorporating fresh, raw vegetables is an important part of a healthy diet and body. Spinach, a green, leafy superfood, contains folate, Vitamin C and fiber. Broccoli has Vitamins A and C, and the antioxidant glutathione. Include onions and garlic as part of your kitchen staples and recipes, because they both possess anti-inflammatory agents that help with chronic pain, decrease inflammation and fight infection. Many fruits are loaded with antioxidants, especially berries. Blueberries, elderberries and acai berries have a darker color, a sign that they contain a strong antioxidant called anthocyanin. They also provide selenium and the B vitamins riboflavin and niacin, which help build the immune system. Watermelon strengthens the immune system too, because its high in the antioxidant glutathione, which can help fight infections. Fruit is raw, fresh and very tasty, but since it contains high amounts of fructose, be careful not to overdo it. Try fruit on top of plain, Greek yogurt for added protein, probiotics and Vitamin D. The beautiful orange color of sweet potatoes indicates high amounts of carotenoids, powerful antioxidants that fight systemic inflammation and bolster the immune system. Sweet potatoes baked as French Fries, are delicious and much healthier than the fried version. When we are fighting a bug, homemade chicken soup is one of our favorites. Its a true remedy with science to back. It contains carnosine, which is made up of amino acids that act to slow down degenerative conditions. Great to know. These foods help fight infections as part of a healthy lifestyle. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Caring Medical Regenerative Medicine Clinics has two locations: one in Oak Park, Illinois, and one in Fort Myers. It was established in 1991 by Ross Hauser, MD, and Marion Hauser, MS, RD. They can be reached at info@ caringmedical.com. Our email address is press@riverweekly.com From page 6Fort Myers ArtGayoso excels as Dr. Drew Bayliss. Char Loomis, Kenneth Cosmo Ruisi and newcomer Danica Murray also contribute to the madness and mayhem that unfolds along the way. But dont be lulled by the preceding into concluding that Hush Up Sweet Charlotte is little more than an aggregation of memorable characters, unapologetically over-exaggerated performances and uninterrupted laughs. At its core, Hush Up Sweet Charlotte is a cleverly-crafted murder mystery. The challenge of figuring out who actually killed that lyin, cheatin John Mayhew keeps the audience invested in the convoluted twists and turns unfolding on the stage on both an overt and subliminal way. Was it actually Charlotte with the hatchet in the boat house? Or did Big Sam find out that his randy married neighbor was going to run away with his daughter after all? Or did Miriam do in Mayhew and let her rich bitch cousin take the fall? The nagging who-dunnit question is insidious. It tugs at the back of the mind even in the midst of outrageously funny sequences. It unifies, lends cohesion to the plot and provides impetus to the characters thoughts and motives. Last year, a host of current and prospective Lab patrons experienced their own regret over having missed Whatever Happened to Baby Jane a Parody of the Horror. Admittedly, there exist lots of reasons to miss any stage production. A plethora of other events and happenings compete for your scarce reserves of time, attention and discretionary dollars. Dont be diverted! This is a show Southwest Florida will be talking about for years, and you really dont want to be caught on the outside looking in. The remaining show times are June 22, 23, 29 and 30 at 8 p.m., with a 2 p.m. matinee on June 24 and July 1. Tom Hall is both an amateur artist and aspiring novelist who writes art quest thrillers. He is in the final stages of completing his debut novel titled Art Detective. A former tax attorney, he lives in Estero with his fianc and their four cats.

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THE RIVER JUNE 22, 2018 25 Emergency . ............................................... 9 11 Lee County Sheriffs Ofce . .............................. 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol . ................................... 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol . .................................. 278-7100 Poison Control . ................................... 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center . ...................... 1-800-936-5321Ft .. Myers Chamber of Commerce . ......................... 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare . .......................... 4 25-2685 Fort Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce . ................... 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library . ............................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library . ................................ 5 33-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce . ........................ 931-0931 Post Ofce . ..................................... 1 -800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau . ............................ 3 38-3500ARTSAlliance for the Arts . .................................... 9 39-2787 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio . ............................ 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers . ............................... 275-3970 Barbara B .. Mann Performing Arts Hall . ...................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS . .......................................... 3 95-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre . .......................... 2 78-4422 Cultural Park Theatre . ................................... 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light . ................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade . ....................332-4488 Florida West Arts . ...................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers . ...................... 288-2535 Gulf Coast Symphony . .................................. 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres . ..................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic . ................................ 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater . ............................... 472-6862 SW Florida Symphony . .................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy . .................................... 936-3239 Young Artists Awards . ................................... 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAmerican Legion Post #38 . ........................... 2 39-332-1853 Angel Flight . .................................. 1 -877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center . .................................. 731-3535 American Business Women Association . .................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL . .................................... 3 39-8046 Audubon Society . ...................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR . ............................ 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society . ............................ 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus . ................... 1 -855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club . ................................. 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees . .............................. 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists . ................................. 415-2484 Embroiderers Guild of America Sea Grape Chapter . ...... 2 39-267-1990 FM UDC Chapter 2614 United Daughters of the Confederacy . ... 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL . .............................. 561-9164 Garden Club of Cape Coral . .......................... 2 39-257-2654 Horticulture and Tea Society . ............................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society . ................................... 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society . ......................... 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation . ........................ 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees . ......... 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America . ....................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL . ............................. 66 7-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans . ............................ 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy . ....................... 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association . ...................... 5 61-2118 Kiwanis Fort Myers Beach . .................... 7 65-4254 or 454-8090 Kiwanis Fort Myers Edison . .............................. 694-1056 Kiwanis Fort Myers South . ............................... 691-1405 Iona-McGregor . ....................................... 482-0869 Lions Club Fort Myers Beach . ............................. 463-9738 Lions Club Fort Myers High Noon . ......................... 466-4228 Lions Club Estero/South Fort Myers . ....................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County . ......................... 7 68-0417 Organ Transplant Recipients of SW Florida . .................. 247-3073 POLO Club of Lee County . ............................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers . ............................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society . ........................... 472-6940 United Way of Lee County . ............................... 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) . ................... 2 11 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews National Shell Museum . .................... 395-2233 Burroughs Home . ...................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium . ....................... 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates . ............................ 334-7419 Fort Myers Skate Park . .................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium . ................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge . .................. 4 72-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site . ......................... 2 39-992-0311 Langford Kingston Home . ............................ 239-334-2550 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center . .............. 765-8101 Skatium . ............................................. 3 21-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society . ...................... 93 9-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History . ...................... 321-7430 True Tours . .......................................... 94 5-0405 To be listed in calling card email your information to: press@riverweekly. .com PETS OF THE WEEKphotos provided Haven on Earth Animal LeagueKristmas And BiscuitHi there! We are Kristmas and Biscuit. We are both 8-years old, neutered and up to date on all vaccines. We are about to lose the only home that we have known our entire lives. Our human mother has to move into an assisted living facility, and she cant take us with her. We need to stay together because all we have now is each other. We are very friendly and well-behaved boys. Our scratch posts, toys, food and litter boxes will come with us, and it will help us feel at home to have our own things. Biscuit is a dark tabby with beautiful, bright, green eyes and a cute little, white chin. I am a red tabby, with four white paws and an adorable face. Call Marcy with Haven on Earth Animal League at 410-9983 to learn more about us. We are being cared for by Haven on Earth Animal League. For more information, call Diane at 860-833-4472 or email havenonearthanimalleague@yahoo.com. Biscuit Kristmas Lee County Domestic Animal ServicesWinnie And SmokeyWinnie is a 3-year-old female labrador retriever mix who is part of the new Foster-to-Adopt program. Have you been interested in adopting a dog but arent sure of what breed will fit into your lifestyle? Maybe you are not sure that a dog of a particular size, age or energy level is right for your home and family. Lee Countys Foster-to-Adopt Program gives you the opportunity to see if a dog is the perfect fit before committing to adoption. What happens if it isnt the perfect fit? Thats ok! You can provide us with valuable information on how the dog was in your home to better pair him or her up successfully in their next home, and you will be given the option to select another dog that may be a better fit. The adoption fee is $50. This silver-haired beauty is Smokey, a 3-month-old female domestic shorthair who is available to go home with another feline friend at no charge when you pay for her $20 adoption fee. The adoption fee includes spay, up-to-date vaccinations, rabies, county license, 10-day health guarantee. Thats a $500 package! This fun-loving kitten will give you years of love and all-day fun. The adoption fee is $20. The shelter is open to the public Monday through Saturday at 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers. Adoptions are available 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For information, visit Lee County Domestic Animal Services at www.leegov.com/animalservices or call 533-7387. Winnie ID# A741547 Smokey ID# A737488

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THE RIVER JUNE 22, 2018 26 PUZZLESAnswers on page 29

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THE RIVER JUNE 22, 2018 27 FIND AT LEaAST S SIX D DIffFFERENCES BETWEEN PaANElLS SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 29 answer on page 29Sauted Shrimp And Green Beans 1 pounds shrimp, peeled and deveined 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 cups green beans, cleaned 2 cups mushrooms, sliced cup almonds, sliced 2 tablespoons soy sauce Cook shrimp in half the olive oil, set aside. Heat remaining oil and saut beans and mushrooms until beans are tender. Add almonds and soy sauce. Yield: Four servings. Sauted Shrimp and Green Beans p hoto courtesy Fresh From Florida Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORYTHE RIVER JUNE 22, 2018 28 Would you like to advertise your business card every week ? Call: 239-395-1213CONTRACTOR Bathrooms Kitchens Lanai Enclosures Windows Screen Rooms Decks Railings Safety Tubs Doors Add a Room or Garage Outdoor Kitchens Storm Shutters and Much More $500. OFF WITH AD cbc1261010239-936-0836Family owned, 40 Years Local Surfside Home Improvements Aluminum & Remodeling CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the benets of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor42 Barkley Circle, Suite 1 Fort Myers, FL 33907 239-931-4543GENERAL CONTRACTOR N C R CGC1517615www.dbrowngc.com239-593-1998 A BBB Accredited Business with an +A Rating FISHING CHARTERLight Tackle Sport Fishing Tarpon Snook Redsh & More CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.comCLEANING SERVICES Jennifer Watson(239) 810-6293 Residential & Commercial Construction Clean Up Interior Windows Home Watch ELECTRICAL 204-B Waldo Avenue, Lehigh Acres, FL 33971generator@jteelectricinc.comBrady J. ReesGenerator and Service ExpertT | 239-368-9511 C | 239-980-1596 Lee, Collier, Hendry, Charlotte, Sarasota CountiesLic.# EC-13002460 SERVICE RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL REMODEL HOME SERVICES P.O. BoOX 1050 SANIbBEL FLoORIDA 33957WWW.IsSLANDHoOMEsSERVICE.CoOM INfoFO@IsSLANDHoOMEsSERVICE.CoOMp P Ho O NE: (239) 472-5247 C CELL: (239) 229-6366JUERGEN SCHREYEROWNERYYARD SERVICE TREE SERVICE PooOOL SERVICEHHoOME WWAt TCH CCLEANING SERVICE ISLAND HOME SERVICE TREE TRIMMING, ARBORIST Licensed, insured, workers compensation Arbor Specialist Since 1995 Tree Trimming Tree Removal Stump Grinding239-910-3256info@treewest@gmail.comwww.treewestorida.comP.O. Box 564, Sanibel, FL 33957Tell A FriendHOME WATCH For more information: Phone: 239-558-5733 E-mail: rabbitrdmgt@gmail.com www.RabbitRoadMgt.comRabbit Rd. Property Management & Home Watch Company which specializes in managing small county area. We are licensed, insured and bonded with over 20 years of experience. We are also Florida CAM licensed and accredited members of the National Home Watch Association. SUNDAYMostl y Cloudy High: 88 Low: 82 TUESDAYFew Showe rs High: 88 Low: 82 THURSDAYFew Showe rs High: 85 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:54 am2:51 am11:00 pm4:34 pm Sat 10:28 am3:31 amNone5:31 pm Sun12:19 am4:08 am11:00 am6:19 pm Mon1:26 am4:42 am11:31 am7:00 pm Tue2:22 am5:13 am12:02 pm7:38 pm Wed3:09 am5:43 am12:32 pm8:13 pm Thu3:47 am6:13 am1:04 pm8:47 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:13 am3:08 am9:52 pm3:57 pm Sat 9:55 am3:51 am11:01 pm4:51 pm Sun10:41 am4:36 amNone5:45 pm Mon12:09 am5:25 am11:29 am6:38 pm Tue12:59 am6:16 am12:11 pm7:27 pm Wed1:43 am7:03 am12:47 pm8:14 pm Thu2:29 am7:47 am1:18 pm9:01 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:59 am2:53 am10:05 pm4:36 pm Sat 9:33 am3:33 am11:24 pm5:33 pm Sun10:05 am4:10 amNone6:21 pm Mon12:31 am4:44 am10:36 am7:02 pm Tue1:27 am5:15 am11:07 am7:40 pm Wed2:14 am5:45 am11:37 am8:15 pm Thu2:52 am6:15 am12:09 pm8:49 pm Day High Low High Low Fri12:04 pm6:07 amNone7:50 pm Sat 1:10 am6:47 am12:38 pm8:47 pm Sun2:29 am7:24 am1:10 pm9:35 pm Mon3:36 am7:58 am1:41 pm10:16 pm Tue4:32 am8:29 am2:12 pm10:54 pm Wed5:19 am8:59 am2:42 pm11:29 pm Thu5:57 am9:29 am3:14 pmNone WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 87 Low: 81 MONDAYCloudy High: 91 Low: 84 SATURDAYMostl y Sunny High: 91 Low: 84 FRIDAYSunny High: 88 Low: 82 Island Sun Weather Outlook June 22, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMostl y Cloudy High: 88 Low: 82 TUESDAYFew Showe rs High: 88 Low: 82 THURSDAYFew Showe rs High: 85 Low: 79 Day High Low High Low Fri9:54 am2:51 am11:00 pm4:34 pm Sat 10:28 am3:31 amNone5:31 pm Sun12:19 am4:08 am11:00 am6:19 pm Mon1:26 am4:42 am11:31 am7:00 pm Tue2:22 am5:13 am12:02 pm7:38 pm Wed3:09 am5:43 am12:32 pm8:13 pm Thu3:47 am6:13 am1:04 pm8:47 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:13 am3:08 am9:52 pm3:57 pm Sat 9:55 am3:51 am11:01 pm4:51 pm Sun10:41 am4:36 amNone5:45 pm Mon12:09 am5:25 am11:29 am6:38 pm Tue12:59 am6:16 am12:11 pm7:27 pm Wed1:43 am7:03 am12:47 pm8:14 pm Thu2:29 am7:47 am1:18 pm9:01 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:59 am2:53 am10:05 pm4:36 pm Sat 9:33 am3:33 am11:24 pm5:33 pm Sun10:05 am4:10 amNone6:21 pm Mon12:31 am4:44 am10:36 am7:02 pm Tue1:27 am5:15 am11:07 am7:40 pm Wed2:14 am5:45 am11:37 am8:15 pm Thu2:52 am6:15 am12:09 pm8:49 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:04 pm6:07 amNone7:50 pm Sat 1:10 am6:47 am12:38 pm8:47 pm Sun2:29 am7:24 am1:10 pm9:35 pm Mon3:36 am7:58 am1:41 pm10:16 pm Tue4:32 am8:29 am2:12 pm10:54 pm Wed5:19 am8:59 am2:42 pm11:29 pm Thu5:57 am9:29 am3:14 pmNone WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 87 Low: 81 MONDAYCloudy High: 91 Low: 84 SATURDAYMostl y Sunny High: 91 Low: 84 FRIDAYSunny High: 88 Low: 82 Island Sun Weather Outlook June 22, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMostl y Cloudy High: 88 Low: 82 TUESDAYFew Showe rs High: 88 Low: 82 THURSDAYFew Showe rs High: 85 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:54 am2:51 am11:00 pm4:34 pm Sat 10:28 am3:31 amNone5:31 pm Sun12:19 am4:08 am11:00 am6:19 pm Mon1:26 am4:42 am11:31 am7:00 pm Tue2:22 am5:13 am12:02 pm7:38 pm Wed3:09 am5:43 am12:32 pm8:13 pm Thu3:47 am6:13 am1:04 pm8:47 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:13 am3:08 am9:52 pm3:57 pm Sat 9:55 am3:51 am11:01 pm4:51 pm Sun10:41 am4:36 amNone5:45 pm Mon12:09 am5:25 am11:29 am6:38 pm Tue12:59 am6:16 am12:11 pm7:27 pm Wed1:43 am7:03 am12:47 pm8:14 pm Thu2:29 am7:47 am1:18 pm9:01 pm Day High Low High Low Fri8:59 am2:53 am10:05 pm4:36 pm Sat 9:33 am3:33 am11:24 pm5:33 pm Sun10:05 am4:10 amNone6:21 pm Mon12:31 am4:44 am10:36 am7:02 pm Tue1:27 am5:15 am11:07 am7:40 pm Wed2:14 am5:45 am11:37 am8:15 pm Thu2:52 am6:15 am12:09 pm8:49 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:04 pm6:07 amNone7:50 pm Sat 1:10 am6:47 am12:38 pm8:47 pm Sun2:29 am7:24 am1:10 pm9:35 pm Mon3:36 am7:58 am1:41 pm10:16 pm Tue4:32 am8:29 am2:12 pm10:54 pm Wed5:19 am8:59 am2:42 pm11:29 pm Thu5:57 am9:29 am3:14 pmNone WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 87 Low: 81 MONDAYCloudy High: 91 Low: 84 SATURDAYMostl y Sunny High: 91 Low: 84 FRIDAYSunny High: 88 Low: 82 Island Sun Weather Outlook June 22, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMostl y Cloudy High: 88 Low: 82 TUESDAYFew Showe rs High: 88 Low: 82 THURSDAYFew Showe rs High: 85 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:54 am2:51 am11:00 pm4:34 pm Sat 10:28 am3:31 amNone5:31 pm Sun12:19 am4:08 am11:00 am6:19 pm Mon1:26 am4:42 am11:31 am7:00 pm Tue2:22 am5:13 am12:02 pm7:38 pm Wed3:09 am5:43 am12:32 pm8:13 pm Thu3:47 am6:13 am1:04 pm8:47 pm Day High Low High Low Fri9:13 am3:08 am9:52 pm3:57 pm Sat 9:55 am3:51 am11:01 pm4:51 pm Sun10:41 am4:36 amNone5:45 pm Mon12:09 am5:25 am11:29 am6:38 pm Tue12:59 am6:16 am12:11 pm7:27 pm Wed1:43 am7:03 am12:47 pm8:14 pm Thu2:29 am7:47 am1:18 pm9:01 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:59 am2:53 am10:05 pm4:36 pm Sat 9:33 am3:33 am11:24 pm5:33 pm Sun10:05 am4:10 amNone6:21 pm Mon12:31 am4:44 am10:36 am7:02 pm Tue1:27 am5:15 am11:07 am7:40 pm Wed2:14 am5:45 am11:37 am8:15 pm Thu2:52 am6:15 am12:09 pm8:49 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:04 pm6:07 amNone7:50 pm Sat 1:10 am6:47 am12:38 pm8:47 pm Sun2:29 am7:24 am1:10 pm9:35 pm Mon3:36 am7:58 am1:41 pm10:16 pm Tue4:32 am8:29 am2:12 pm10:54 pm Wed5:19 am8:59 am2:42 pm11:29 pm Thu5:57 am9:29 am3:14 pmNone WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 87 Low: 81 MONDAYCloudy High: 91 Low: 84 SATURDAYMostl y Sunny High: 91 Low: 84 FRIDAYSunny High: 88 Low: 82 Island Sun Weather Outlook June 22, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMostl y Cloudy High: 88 Low: 82 TUESDAYFew Showe rs High: 88 Low: 82 THURSDAYFew Showe rs High: 85 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:54 am2:51 am11:00 pm4:34 pm Sat 10:28 am3:31 amNone5:31 pm Sun12:19 am4:08 am11:00 am6:19 pm Mon1:26 am4:42 am11:31 am7:00 pm Tue2:22 am5:13 am12:02 pm7:38 pm Wed3:09 am5:43 am12:32 pm8:13 pm Thu3:47 am6:13 am1:04 pm8:47 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:13 am3:08 am9:52 pm3:57 pm Sat 9:55 am3:51 am11:01 pm4:51 pm Sun10:41 am4:36 amNone5:45 pm Mon12:09 am5:25 am11:29 am6:38 pm Tue12:59 am6:16 am12:11 pm7:27 pm Wed1:43 am7:03 am12:47 pm8:14 pm Thu2:29 am7:47 am1:18 pm9:01 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:59 am2:53 am10:05 pm4:36 pm Sat 9:33 am3:33 am11:24 pm5:33 pm Sun10:05 am4:10 amNone6:21 pm Mon12:31 am4:44 am10:36 am7:02 pm Tue1:27 am5:15 am11:07 am7:40 pm Wed2:14 am5:45 am11:37 am8:15 pm Thu2:52 am6:15 am12:09 pm8:49 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:04 pm6:07 amNone7:50 pm Sat 1:10 am6:47 am12:38 pm8:47 pm Sun2:29 am7:24 am1:10 pm9:35 pm Mon3:36 am7:58 am1:41 pm10:16 pm Tue4:32 am8:29 am2:12 pm10:54 pm Wed5:19 am8:59 am2:42 pm11:29 pm Thu5:57 am9:29 am3:14 pmNone WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 87 Low: 81 MONDAYCloudy High: 91 Low: 84 SATURDAYMostl y Sunny High: 91 Low: 84 FRIDAYSunny High: 88 Low: 82 Island Sun Weather Outlook June 22, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMostl y Cloudy High: 88 Low: 82 TUESDAYFew Showe rs High: 88 Low: 82 THURSDAYFew Showe rs High: 85 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:54 am2:51 am11:00 pm4:34 pm Sat 10:28 am3:31 amNone5:31 pm Sun12:19 am4:08 am11:00 am6:19 pm Mon1:26 am4:42 am11:31 am7:00 pm Tue2:22 am5:13 am12:02 pm7:38 pm Wed3:09 am5:43 am12:32 pm8:13 pm Thu3:47 am6:13 am1:04 pm8:47 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:13 am3:08 am9:52 pm3:57 pm Sat 9:55 am3:51 am11:01 pm4:51 pm Sun10:41 am4:36 amNone5:45 pm Mon12:09 am5:25 am11:29 am6:38 pm Tue12:59 am6:16 am12:11 pm7:27 pm Wed1:43 am7:03 am12:47 pm8:14 pm Thu2:29 am7:47 am1:18 pm9:01 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:59 am2:53 am10:05 pm4:36 pm Sat 9:33 am3:33 am11:24 pm5:33 pm Sun10:05 am4:10 amNone6:21 pm Mon12:31 am4:44 am10:36 am7:02 pm Tue1:27 am5:15 am11:07 am7:40 pm Wed2:14 am5:45 am11:37 am8:15 pm Thu2:52 am6:15 am12:09 pm8:49 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:04 pm6:07 amNone7:50 pm Sat 1:10 am6:47 am12:38 pm8:47 pm Sun2:29 am7:24 am1:10 pm9:35 pm Mon3:36 am7:58 am1:41 pm10:16 pm Tue4:32 am8:29 am2:12 pm10:54 pm Wed5:19 am8:59 am2:42 pm11:29 pm Thu5:57 am9:29 am3:14 pmNone WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 87 Low: 81 MONDAYCloudy High: 91 Low: 84 SATURDAYMostl y Sunny High: 91 Low: 84 FRIDAYSunny High: 88 Low: 82 Island Sun Weather Outlook June 22, 2018 7-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMostl y Cloudy High: 88 Low: 82 TUESDAYFew Showe rs High: 88 Low: 82 THURSDAYFew Showe rs High: 85 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:54 am2:51 am11:00 pm4:34 pm Sat 10:28 am3:31 amNone5:31 pm Sun12:19 am4:08 am11:00 am6:19 pm Mon1:26 am4:42 am11:31 am7:00 pm Tue2:22 am5:13 am12:02 pm7:38 pm Wed3:09 am5:43 am12:32 pm8:13 pm Thu3:47 am6:13 am1:04 pm8:47 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:13 am3:08 am9:52 pm3:57 pm Sat 9:55 am3:51 am11:01 pm4:51 pm Sun10:41 am4:36 amNone5:45 pm Mon12:09 am5:25 am11:29 am6:38 pm Tue12:59 am6:16 am12:11 pm7:27 pm Wed1:43 am7:03 am12:47 pm8:14 pm Thu2:29 am7:47 am1:18 pm9:01 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:59 am2:53 am10:05 pm4:36 pm Sat 9:33 am3:33 am11:24 pm5:33 pm Sun10:05 am4:10 amNone6:21 pm Mon12:31 am4:44 am10:36 am7:02 pm Tue1:27 am5:15 am11:07 am7:40 pm Wed2:14 am5:45 am11:37 am8:15 pm Thu2:52 am6:15 am12:09 pm8:49 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:04 pm6:07 amNone7:50 pm Sat 1:10 am6:47 am12:38 pm8:47 pm Sun2:29 am7:24 am1:10 pm9:35 pm Mon3:36 am7:58 am1:41 pm10:16 pm Tue4:32 am8:29 am2:12 pm10:54 pm Wed5:19 am8:59 am2:42 pm11:29 pm Thu5:57 am9:29 am3:14 pmNone WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 87 Low: 81 MONDAYCloudy High: 91 Low: 84 SATURDAYMostl y Sunny High: 91 Low: 84 FRIDAYSunny High: 88 Low: 82 Island Sun Weather Outlook June 22, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMostl y Cloudy High: 88 Low: 82 TUESDAYFew Showe rs High: 88 Low: 82 THURSDAYFew Showe rs High: 85 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:54 am2:51 am11:00 pm4:34 pm Sat 10:28 am3:31 amNone5:31 pm Sun12:19 am4:08 am11:00 am6:19 pm Mon1:26 am4:42 am11:31 am7:00 pm Tue2:22 am5:13 am12:02 pm7:38 pm Wed3:09 am5:43 am12:32 pm8:13 pm Thu3:47 am6:13 am1:04 pm8:47 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:13 am3:08 am9:52 pm3:57 pm Sat 9:55 am3:51 am11:01 pm4:51 pm Sun10:41 am4:36 amNone5:45 pm Mon12:09 am5:25 am11:29 am6:38 pm Tue12:59 am6:16 am12:11 pm7:27 pm Wed1:43 am7:03 am12:47 pm8:14 pm Thu2:29 am7:47 am1:18 pm9:01 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:59 am2:53 am10:05 pm4:36 pm Sat 9:33 am3:33 am11:24 pm5:33 pm Sun10:05 am4:10 amNone6:21 pm Mon12:31 am4:44 am10:36 am7:02 pm Tue1:27 am5:15 am11:07 am7:40 pm Wed2:14 am5:45 am11:37 am8:15 pm Thu2:52 am6:15 am12:09 pm8:49 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:04 pm6:07 amNone7:50 pm Sat 1:10 am6:47 am12:38 pm8:47 pm Sun2:29 am7:24 am1:10 pm9:35 pm Mon3:36 am7:58 am1:41 pm10:16 pm Tue4:32 am8:29 am2:12 pm10:54 pm Wed5:19 am8:59 am2:42 pm11:29 pm Thu5:57 am9:29 am3:14 pmNone WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 87 Low: 81 MONDAYCloudy High: 91 Low: 84 SATURDAYMostl y Sunny High: 91 Low: 84 FRIDAYSunny High: 88 Low: 82 Island Sun Weather Outlook June 22, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMostl y Cloudy High: 88 Low: 82 TUESDAYFew Showe rs High: 88 Low: 82 THURSDAYFew Showe rs High: 85 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:54 am2:51 am11:00 pm4:34 pm Sat 10:28 am3:31 amNone5:31 pm Sun12:19 am4:08 am11:00 am6:19 pm Mon1:26 am4:42 am11:31 am7:00 pm Tue2:22 am5:13 am12:02 pm7:38 pm Wed3:09 am5:43 am12:32 pm8:13 pm Thu3:47 am6:13 am1:04 pm8:47 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:13 am3:08 am9:52 pm3:57 pm Sat 9:55 am3:51 am11:01 pm4:51 pm Sun10:41 am4:36 amNone5:45 pm Mon12:09 am5:25 am11:29 am6:38 pm Tue12:59 am6:16 am12:11 pm7:27 pm Wed1:43 am7:03 am12:47 pm8:14 pm Thu2:29 am7:47 am1:18 pm9:01 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:59 am2:53 am10:05 pm4:36 pm Sat 9:33 am3:33 am11:24 pm5:33 pm Sun10:05 am4:10 amNone6:21 pm Mon12:31 am4:44 am10:36 am7:02 pm Tue1:27 am5:15 am11:07 am7:40 pm Wed2:14 am5:45 am11:37 am8:15 pm Thu2:52 am6:15 am12:09 pm8:49 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:04 pm6:07 amNone7:50 pm Sat 1:10 am6:47 am12:38 pm8:47 pm Sun2:29 am7:24 am1:10 pm9:35 pm Mon3:36 am7:58 am1:41 pm10:16 pm Tue4:32 am8:29 am2:12 pm10:54 pm Wed5:19 am8:59 am2:42 pm11:29 pm Thu5:57 am9:29 am3:14 pmNone WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 87 Low: 81 MONDAYCloudy High: 91 Low: 84 SATURDAYMostl y Sunny High: 91 Low: 84 FRIDAYSunny High: 88 Low: 82 Island Sun Weather Outlook June 22, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMostl y Cloudy High: 88 Low: 82 TUESDAYFew Showe rs High: 88 Low: 82 THURSDAYFew Showe rs High: 85 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:54 am2:51 am11:00 pm4:34 pm Sat 10:28 am3:31 amNone5:31 pm Sun12:19 am4:08 am11:00 am6:19 pm Mon1:26 am4:42 am11:31 am7:00 pm Tue2:22 am5:13 am12:02 pm7:38 pm Wed3:09 am5:43 am12:32 pm8:13 pm Thu3:47 am6:13 am1:04 pm8:47 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:13 am3:08 am9:52 pm3:57 pm Sat 9:55 am3:51 am11:01 pm4:51 pm Sun10:41 am4:36 amNone5:45 pm Mon12:09 am5:25 am11:29 am6:38 pm Tue12:59 am6:16 am12:11 pm7:27 pm Wed1:43 am7:03 am12:47 pm8:14 pm Thu2:29 am7:47 am1:18 pm9:01 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:59 am2:53 am10:05 pm4:36 pm Sat 9:33 am3:33 am11:24 pm5:33 pm Sun10:05 am4:10 amNone6:21 pm Mon12:31 am4:44 am10:36 am7:02 pm Tue1:27 am5:15 am11:07 am7:40 pm Wed2:14 am5:45 am11:37 am8:15 pm Thu2:52 am6:15 am12:09 pm8:49 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:04 pm6:07 amNone7:50 pm Sat 1:10 am6:47 am12:38 pm8:47 pm Sun2:29 am7:24 am1:10 pm9:35 pm Mon3:36 am7:58 am1:41 pm10:16 pm Tue4:32 am8:29 am2:12 pm10:54 pm Wed5:19 am8:59 am2:42 pm11:29 pm Thu5:57 am9:29 am3:14 pmNone WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 87 Low: 81 MONDAYCloudy High: 91 Low: 84 SATURDAYMostl y Sunny High: 91 Low: 84 FRIDAYSunny High: 88 Low: 82 Island Sun Weather Outlook June 22, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMostl y Cloudy High: 88 Low: 82 TUESDAYFew Showe rs High: 88 Low: 82 THURSDAYFew Showe rs High: 85 Low: 79 Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:54 am2:51 am11:00 pm4:34 pm Sat 10:28 am3:31 amNone5:31 pm Sun12:19 am4:08 am11:00 am6:19 pm Mon1:26 am4:42 am11:31 am7:00 pm Tue2:22 am5:13 am12:02 pm7:38 pm Wed3:09 am5:43 am12:32 pm8:13 pm Thu3:47 am6:13 am1:04 pm8:47 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri9:13 am3:08 am9:52 pm3:57 pm Sat 9:55 am3:51 am11:01 pm4:51 pm Sun10:41 am4:36 amNone5:45 pm Mon12:09 am5:25 am11:29 am6:38 pm Tue12:59 am6:16 am12:11 pm7:27 pm Wed1:43 am7:03 am12:47 pm8:14 pm Thu2:29 am7:47 am1:18 pm9:01 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri8:59 am2:53 am10:05 pm4:36 pm Sat 9:33 am3:33 am11:24 pm5:33 pm Sun10:05 am4:10 amNone6:21 pm Mon12:31 am4:44 am10:36 am7:02 pm Tue1:27 am5:15 am11:07 am7:40 pm Wed2:14 am5:45 am11:37 am8:15 pm Thu2:52 am6:15 am12:09 pm8:49 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:04 pm6:07 amNone7:50 pm Sat 1:10 am6:47 am12:38 pm8:47 pm Sun2:29 am7:24 am1:10 pm9:35 pm Mon3:36 am7:58 am1:41 pm10:16 pm Tue4:32 am8:29 am2:12 pm10:54 pm Wed5:19 am8:59 am2:42 pm11:29 pm Thu5:57 am9:29 am3:14 pmNone WEDNESDAYFew Showers High: 87 Low: 81 MONDAYCloudy High: 91 Low: 84 SATURDAYMostl y Sunny High: 91 Low: 84 FRIDAYSunny High: 88 Low: 82 Island Sun Weather Outlook June 22, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides

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THE RIVER JUNE 22, 2018 29 KING CROSSWORD SUPER CROSSWORD MAGIC MAZE SUDOKU PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF JUNE 25, 2018Aries (March 21 to April 19) Count to 10 if you must, but dont lose your temper, despite that persons (you know who!) efforts to goad you into reacting. Your restraint will pay off in a big way. Taurus (April 20 to May 20) This week finds you in a sociable mood, ready and eager to enjoy the company of family and friends. Its also a good time to seek out and renew old friendships. Gemini (May 21 to June 20) Patience is called for as you await a decision about that project youre eager to launch. Meanwhile, try to set aside more time to share with that special person in your life. Cancer (June 21 to July 22) Avoid becoming involved in a workplace dispute early in the week by insisting both sides submit their stands to a neutral arbitrator. Things begin to cool off by Thursday. Leo (July 23 to August 22) It promises to be a busy but productive week for the Big Cat. The pace slows by Friday, allowing you to catch up on matters you put aside but that now need your attention. Virgo (August 23 to September 22) A suddenly disruptive family situation is best handled with a cool, calm and collected response. Wait until things settle to let off all that pent-up emotional steam. Libra (September 23 to October 22) Your practical side dominates the week as you reassess your finances to make some sensible adjustments in what you plan to spend and what you expect to save. Scorpio (October 23 to November 21) An unexpected meeting with a former colleague opens some interesting possibilities. But you need to press for full disclosure before making a decision. Sagittarius (November 22 to December 21) A recent flurry of activity eases by midweek, giving you time to readjust your disrupted schedule and make new plans for a weekend getaway. Capricorn (December 22 to January 19) Youre usually the one who gives advice. But now its time to open yourself up to counsel from friends who have your best interests at heart. Aquarius (January 20 to February 18) You might find resistance to your call for a full inquiry into a workplace problem. But by weeks end even the most rigid naysayers begin to come around. Pisces (February 19 to March 20) A recurring problem surfaces once again. Maybe its time you used your creative talents to help you find a new approach to resolving it once and for all. Born This Week: You are guided in what you do both by your intelligence and your emotions. An acting career would suit you quite well. On June 27, 1829, English scientist James Smithson dies, leaving behind a will with a peculiar footnote. Smithson decreed that the whole of his fortune would go to the United States, to found an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge. Today, the Smithsonian Institution is composed of 19 museums. On June 26, 1945, delegates from 50 nations sign the United Nations Charter, establishing the world body as a means of saving succeeding generations from the scourge of war. Four years later, the cornerstone was laid for United Nations headquarters, in New York City. On June 28, 1953, workers at a Chevrolet plant in Flint, Michigan, hand assemble the first Corvette. The car carried a price tag of $3,490 and could go from zero to 60 mph in under 12 seconds. On June 25, 1969, the U.S. Navy turns 64 river patrol gunboats valued at $18.2 million over to the South Vietnamese Navy so that they could assume more responsibility for the war, raising the number of boats in its navy to more than 600. On June 30, 1975, less than a week after her divorce from Sonny Bono, Cher tied the knot with rock star Gregg Allman, only to file for divorce from him just nine days later. She then reconsidered and remained married to Allman until 1979. On June 29, 1989, in reaction to the Chinese governments brutal massacre of protesters in Tiananmen Square in Beijing earlier in the month, the House of Representatives unanimously passes a package of sanctions against the Peoples Republic of China. China remained largely unrepentant. On July 1, 1997, Hong Kong reverts back to Chinese rule, ending Britains 99 years of rule over Hong Kong. In exchange, China pledged to preserve Hong Kongs capitalist system. It was French author, philosopher and journalist Albert Camus who made the following sage observation: Nobody realizes that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal. Famously flamboyant country singer and songwriter Dolly Parton once entered a Dolly Parton look-alike contest and she lost. If youre a sailor youre probably familiar with the hazards of being out on the water: high seas, storms, hidden reefs. You probably wouldnt count whales among the dangers, but youd be wrong. In 2010, on a day sail out of Table Bay Harbor in South Africa, a couple on a 30-foot sailboat were whale-watching when one got too close for comfort. A 40-ton whale they had been viewing breached right next to the boat and landed on the deck, breaking off the mast and then thrashing around before sliding back into the water. The whale lost some skin and blubber, but was otherwise unharmed; the couple were lucky to still have a seaworthy craft and made it safely back to the harbor. Married women arent likely to be surprised by the following tidbit of information: Studies show that women with husbands typically do 30 percent more housework than single women do. If youre heading to the state of Washington with mischief on your mind, youll need to keep in mind this state law: A motorist with criminal intentions [must] stop at the city limits and telephone the chief of police as he [or she] is entering the town. I bet that one has been really effective in stopping crime. Its been reported that singer Sting doesnt use deodorant. In fact, after interviewing him for a concert once, the journalists nicknamed him Stink. Its far better to be unhappy alone than unhappy with someone. -Marilyn Monroe THIS WEEK IN HISTORY STRANGE BUT TRUE THOUGHT FOR THE DAY SCRAMBLERS TRIVIA TEST 1. Vietnam 2. 19,000 miles 3. 1948 4. Persephone 5. Hinduism 6. Armed Freedom 7. 15th century 8. Bess 9. Sustained 10. 1925. TRIVIA ANSWERS 1. Geography : Which nations tallest mountain is called Fan Si Pan? 2. Astr onomy: About how many miles across is Jupiters Great Red Spot? 3. History : When did apartheid become the official policy of South Africa? 4. Mythology : Who was the Greek goddess of the underworld? 5. Religion : Sankara was an important theologian of which religion? 6. General Knowledge : What is the name of the famous sculpture that sits atop the U.S. Capitol Building? 7. Inventions : In what century was the printing press invented? 8. Pr esidents: What was the first name of Harry Trumans wife? 9. Music : What is the meaning of the musical term tenuto? 10. Literatur e: When did George Bernard Shaw win the Nobel Prize for Literature?

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THE RIVER JUNE 22, 2018 30 www.islandsunnews.com PLACE CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTADDICTION SCREENINGS Narconon can help you take steps to overcome addiction in your family. http://www.narconon-suncoast.org Call today for free screenings or referrals. 877-841-55093/2 TFN PUBLIC SERVICE VACATION RENTAL2427 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 Local: (239) 472-6385 Toll Free: (800) 472-5385 Fax: (239) 472-5858 www. cottages-to-castles.com1/26 TFN VACATION RENTAL Island VacationsOf Sanibel & CaptivaMillion $ Views Await You! Cottages Condos Homes Miles of Beaches & Bike Paths239-472-72771-888-451-72771/4 TFN REAL ESTATEGARCIA REAL ESTATE AND CONSULTINGRICHARD J. GARCIA, GRI, BROKER239-472-5147garciaonsanibel.com Professional Real Estate Services on Sanibel and Captiva Islands. 30 Year Resident of Sanibel. Licensed in Florida, New York, Pennsylvania and New Jersey.4/29 TFN COMMERCIAL RENTALWONDERFUL RENTAL IN POPULAR LOCATION ON SANIBEL2 Rooms, Bathroom, Approx. 1,000 sq. feet. Call Judy at 239-851-4073.8/5 TFN COMMERCIAL UNIT FORRENTEast End of Sanibel in Punta Ybel Plaza. Call Dee at 472-0121, leave a message. 6/1 6/29 SERVICES OFFEREDHELLES CLEANING SERVICESResidential Cleaning to Satisfaction Sanibel & Captiva 239-565-0471 Sanibel Lic. #11412 Lee Co. Lic. #0510471/4 TFN JC WINDOW CLEANINGResidential-Commercial-New Construction $120 Window Cleaning. Inside And Out. Customers/Free Estimates. JC 239-232-2232 jccpcleaning@aol.com05/25 TFN ROGER NODRUFF ELECTRIC FPE panel replacement, Landscape Lighting. Generator Sizing, etc, etc, etc. Call or text Roger 239-707-7203 State License #130027884/20 TFN Complete Landscaping Services & Weekly Lawn Service New Client Special 10% OFF your Mulch Installation, Landscaping Project, or Tree Trimming Project. 239-896-67894/13 TFN SCARNATO LAWN SERVICELawn Service, Shrubs and Tree Trimming Weeding, Installation of Plants, Trees and Mulch (one month free service available) Joe Scarnato (239) 849-6163 scarnatolawn@aol.com1/25 TFN ANNUAL RENTALSANIBEL ANNUAL RENTALAvailable July 1 Canal front home 3 bedrooms, 2 bath pool home in Shell Harbor close access to the beach and causeway on the East End of Sanibel. Perfect location $3,800 per month. Call or text Rose at 239-851-5188.6/15 7/13 JERRYS FOODS SERVERS &BARISTASPart Time Evening And Weekend Front End Associates Needed. Looking for energetic, personable, and fun individuals, with open availability Monday through Sunday. If interested call and ask for John, Norm Sarah 472-9300. 1700 Periwinkle Way5/6 TFN HELP WANTEDEAST END COTTAGEAnnual or Seasonal rental, East End Cottage, 1/2 duplex, near beach, 2BR/1BA, Furnished or Unfurnished, Laundry, Non-smoking, No pets. Available July 1, 630-417-0249.6/15 6/22 ANNUAL RENTALCALOOSA SHORES3BR/2B Annual Rental $2,700 month. Furnished, two car garage. Ground level, no stairs, 3 miles from school near Ding Darling. Begin July 2018. 239-770-5568. Call in evening.6/8 6/22 ANNUAL RENT ALS NOW AVAILABLE 2/1 apt on Main Street $1,900/mo. Dogs okay. 3/ apt on Schooner Place $2,000/mo. Dogs okay. Call Bridgit 239.728.1920 6/8 6/29 ANNUAL RENTAL 472-6747Gulf Beach Properties, Inc. Call Today 06/22 TFNSTUNNING!! BR/3.5 BA Home, large gourment kitchen, elevator, Huge mbr suite and bedrooms, 2 car garage, steps to beach. Fully furnished. All high end. $6,000/mo. WATERFRONT This Beautiful, Private 4/2 home is on Bayou with Gulf & Bay access. $2,950/mo. BOATS CANOES KAYAKSDOCKAGEHourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-58001/4 TFN ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT PART-TIMEThe Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) is looking for a detail-oriented, people person to help with our student and volunteer programs and to perform Duties include correspondence, maintaining schedules and databases, coordinating arrivals and orientations, taking reservations, and helping with of computer and email, have excellent communication skills written and verbal, and the ability to multi-task and meet deadlines. Must be a team player with positive attitude and must be able to work cooperatively with co-workers, students, volunteers and the public. Please submit a resume to jurasky@ crowclinic.org to be considered.6/15 6/29 HELP WANTEDLOOKING FOR GRANDCHILDRENGrandmothers passed away and grandfathers tryinig to locate the grandchildren. Tampa Jo Lee and Lance Allen Lee please call 812-372-5536.6/22 6/22 PERSONALSNOTICE TO CREDITORSThe administration of the estate of Suzanne H OConnor, deceased, whose date of death was December 9, 2017, is pending in the Circuit Court for Lee County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Justice Center, 1st Floor, 1700 Monroe Street, Fort Myers, Florida 33901. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SECTION 733.702 WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE publication of this notice is June 22, 2018. Attorney for Personal Representatives: Richard J. Miller, Jr., Morris & McVeigh LLP, 540 Broadway, Albany, NY 12207. Personal Representatives: Kathleen Donovan, 703 Great Oak Lane, Kennett Square, PA 19348, Denis OConnor, 1296 Bruynswick Road, Gardiner, NY 12525, and Cynthia Gamble, 20 Cedar Street, Charlestown, MA 02129. Date of Pub: June 22 & 29, 2018.6/22 6/29 LEGAL NOTICE Landing a big fish from the beach can be hard on the fish. Dragging a fish up onto the sand if youre going to release it is not an option as it usually damages or kills the fish. Hold the fish in the water while you unhook it if youre going to release it. The less you can touch a fish before release the better for the fish. If you want a picture with the fish, support it as you lift it out of the water and do it quickly. Before releasing, revive the fish while holding it in the water; moving it slowly back and forth so water goes over its gills. The fish will let you know when its ready to swim off. Florida just recently changed the regulations on fishing from shore. Florida residents as well as out of state visitors need a fishing license to fish from shore. by Capt. Matt Mitchell Shore Fishing:Don't Harm The Fish

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THE RIVER JUNE 22, 2018 31 Top 10 Real Estate SalesCourtesy of Royal Shell Real EstateSurvey Support Improves Fisheries ManagementFaster access to data. Improved fisheries estimates. More informed decisionmaking. Participation in the Gulf Reef Fish Survey has led the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), for the first time ever, to be able to manage the harvest of recreational red snapper in both state and federal waters in the Gulf. Participants in the survey are helping improve fisheries management in Florida. Since April 2015, recreational anglers who fish from private boats on the Gulf coast of Florida have been asked to sign up for the Gulf Reef Fish Survey. Signing up is required to legally harvest red and vermilion snappers; gag, black and red groupers; gray triggerfish; and amberjack species. The purpose of the Gulf Reef Fish Survey is to provide timely and precise data to state and federal agencies that are responsible for managing reef fish and making decisions that impact recreational anglers in Florida. By signing up for the survey, anglers are eligible to receive a questionnaire in the mail about recent fishing activity. Each month, angler responses from the mail survey are used to estimate the numbers of recreational trips taken on the west coast of Florida to fish for Gulf reef fish species. By working collaboratively with NOAA Fisheries, the Gulf Reef Fish Survey produces data that are complementary with the existing Marine Recreational Information Program. When information collected from the two surveys is used together, estimates of landings are more precise, and this allows fishery managers to have greater confidence in the data. Later this year, the FWC will request NOAA Fisheries certify the Gulf Reef Fish Survey for use in regional stock assessments and fisheries management. The Gulf Reef Fish Survey is the primary data collection method for private recreational anglers to help improve recreational data collection for use in fisheries stock assessments and fisheries regulations. For red snapper, anglers can also use a smartphone/tablet app called iAngler Gulf Red Snapper to voluntarily log red snapper fishing trip data. Anglers who report through the app are still asked to participate in the Gulf Reef Fish Survey if they receive a questionnaire in the mail or are interviewed by an FWC biologist at the dock. Participation in the survey, MRIP and the iAngler app is important for fisheries management. If you receive one of the Gulf Reef Fish surveys in the mail, we ask that you fill out the questionnaire and return it to the marked address. Return the questionnaire even if you did not fish during the month of the survey. If an FWC biologist greets you at a boat ramp or marina, the interview takes just a few minutes of your time. By participating in an interview for the Gulf Reef Fish Survey, you are making an important contribution to help conserve Floridas recreational fisheries. For more information about the Gulf Reef Fish Survey, visit www.myfwc. com/research, click on Saltwater, then Commercial and Recreational Fisheries and Gulf Reef Fish Survey. Gag grouper photo provided Hortoons Subdivision City Year Built Square FootageListing Price Selling Price Days On Market Frowes Subdivision Captiva 1946 3,161 $2,495,000 $2,350,000 138 Cases Fort Myers Beach 1945 2,024 $2,300,000 $2,140,000 22 Colony Beach Estates Sanibel 1988 3,240 $2,075,000 $1,950,000 238 Herons Landings I Sanibel 1989 2,880 $1,349,000 $1,279,000 105 Lakewood Fort Myers 2005 3,871 $995,000 $975,000 181 Cranbrook Bonita Springs 1992 2,974 $959,500 $925,000 54 Renaissance Fort Myers 2018 3,255 $946,805 $920,000 83 Idlewilde Estero 2003 3,122 $895,000 $830,000 69 Cape Coral Cape Coral 2014 2,853 $845,000 $810,000 231 Wildcat Run Estero 1990 3,311 $874,900 $800,000 217

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