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River weekly news

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Title:
River weekly news
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, FL
Publisher:
Lorin Arundel and Ken Rasi- Co-Publishers
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Copyright Date:
2010
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English

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newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
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United States -- Florida -- Lee -- Fort Myers
Coordinates:
26.64328 x -81.868953

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright River Weekly News. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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FREETake Me Home VOL. 17, NO. 17 APRIL 27, 2018From the Beaches to the River District downtown Fort Myers Weather and Tides pa ge 28Meet The Artists At Arts For ACT ReceptionArts for ACT Gallery will hold an opening reception and meet-theartists session during Fort Myers Art Walk on Friday, May 4 from 6 to 10 p.m. Whitney Hacketts exhibit Dream in Color will be featured in the main gallery, while Tina Marie Fleurys artwork will be shown in the white gallery. New works from the gallery co-op artists will also be shown. These exhibits continue through Monday, May 28. Hackett grew up in Southwest Florida and first became serious about her art continued on page 18 Untitled by Whitney Hackett i mage provided The Alliance for the Arts May exhibit entitled Along the Coast will feature work by Laura Waller and Sarah Hull, award-winning painters from Tampa. The opening reception will be held Friday, May 4 from 5 to 7 p.m. and is open to the pub lic. A conversational walk-and-talk with the exhibiting artists will be held on Satur day, May 5 at 10 a.m. during Alliance for the Arts Weekly GreenMarket. The exhibition that explores Floridas coast continues until May 26. Admission to the gallery is free, but a $5 suggested donation helps keep arts programming accessible. Wallers large scale paintings serve as a metaphor and provide the narrative for her continued on page 15 C-Tractor 8 No.1 by Laura Waller image provided Senior Improv Troupe Returns To Broadway PalmThe Off-Broadway Palm welcomes back the fun-filled improv comedy show Harrys Senior Moment for five performances from May 3 to 6. Featuring 84-year-old Harry Lichtcsien (who has been battling 4th stage colon cancer since 2011) and his younger improv family cast, the troupe takes audiences on a rollicking, completely improvised show each time. Harry and his improv family will also be joined by a stellar group of improv friends from the Southwest Florida community. Harrys first successful battle with cancer occurred in 2006. However, it returned as 4th stage colon cancer in 2011; he started chemotherapy imme diately, and his fight continues today. Told by doctors a few years ago that he should already be dead, hes defied the odds with treatment, palliative care and regular doses of comedy improv. Audiences will have an opportunity to learn more about palliative care as spe cial guest Dr. Colleen Tallen, medical director of Palliative Care at Lee Health, will be joining the group on May 3 for a post-show talk-back session. Annalise Smith, senior vice president of Avow, will join a palliative care talk-back follow ing the May 6 performance. Excellent cancer treatment and the early palliative care helped Harry find his passion to go on and help others find theirs. Improv, laughter and my (adopted) improv family have given me a reason to get up each morning and keep fighting this illness, he said. And when someone comes up after the show and says Thank you you really affected me, thats how I know Im making a difference. His improv family feels that way too. We love Harry, said Leigh Shein, improv family member and direc tor of Harrys Senior Moment We are proud to share his mission to entertain, teach, inspire and spread the word that improv changes lives. Harrys Senior Moment has been performed throughout Southwest Florida for the past three years and no two shows are the same. The audience gets involved immediately, giving suggestions and interacting with the performers. They have been involved in shows in continued on page 24Alliance Presents Coastal-Themed Exhibit Harrys Senior Moment Improv Troupe photo provided

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Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: Cherishing History With A Picnicby Gerri Reaves, PhDAge should have its privileges, and one of the perks of being an old timer in Lee County is being eligible to attend the annual Pioneer Picnic. The event in its 69th year has a year rule. Only people who had been residents of Lee County for 50 or more years (or lived at least part of their lives in the county prior to then) have the honor of attending. The picnics origin goes back to 1950, when the Pioneer Club formed to celebrate the Centennial. The word centennial has had various meanings in Fort Myers history, but in this case evidently referred to the founding of the U.S. Army Fort Myers during the Second Seminole War. Robert A. Henderson, Jr., descendent of a local pioneer family, was an appropriate choice to head the effort. He was chairman of the board of the Lee County Bank at Main and Hendry, and it served as the clubs headquarters. People who joined the club received a membership card signed by Henderson. The first event was actually an evening picnic in Lions Park on Cleveland Avenue. Held on February 22, it was also billed as a Washingtons Birthday Celebration. The stated purpose was for people to reminisce with your friends about old times. The afternoon before the picnic, the bank exhibited 500 pioneer photographs and served free orange juice. The list of the surnames of people who attended that first picnic included many who had arrived in Fort Myers in the 1870s and 1880s and reads like the index of a book on local history: Armeda, Bartley, Bass, Battey, Blount, Bylaska, Carson, Damkohler, Farabee, Foxworthy, Franklin, Garner, Goldsby, Gonzalez, Gould, Hanson, Henderson, Hendry, Ireland, Kellow, King, McAdow, McCann, Menge, Powell, Starnes, Stout, Vivas, Watson, and others. Following the initial years at Lions Park, the picnic was held elsewhere, such as the downtown Exhibition Hall (now demolished), Terry Park and the Buckingham Community Center. Today it is held at the Lee County Civic Centers Tinsley Pavilion on Bayshore Road in North Fort Myers. Nowadays, the picnic also serves as the reunions for high school classes of 50 years ago, one reason the event draws plenty of out-of-county pioneers and is a good time to catch up. Picnic tradition also dictates the recognition of pioneers for notable achievements such as oldest man and woman born in the county, the person who traveled the longest dis tance to attend, as well as the couple married the longest. In 1985, when the picnic was held at Buckingham, four pioneers posed beneath arching live oaks for the photo seen here. That classic Florida setting is one of the main things that Woody Hanson remembers about the picnics of years ago. (Thats his late father in the photo.) When he was growing up, the annual event always gave him a sense of family you knew everybody and you belonged. Love of Fort Myers was what it was all about. The Buckingham location gave the event a different feel, from the more recent pic nics, he thinks, partly because Fort Myers was simply a smaller place then. Then ther es the reality that recent picnics are a reminder that many people who are no longer with us. Musings on history, loss, memories and maintaining connections comes naturally to Hanson. Love of history is virtually a multi-generational family trait or responsibility. His family alone could be the subject of several books. His paternal great-grandparents, Dr. William and Julia Allen Hanson, settled in Fort Myers in 1884. Hansons mother, Mary Ellen Gonzalez, descended from two of Fort Myerss first families, Gonzalez and Vivas. His grandfather, Stanley Hanson, was the white medicine man to the Seminoles. So, its no surprise that his parents always attended the Pioneer Picnic and encour aged him to go. In fact, for many years, his father organized the picnic mailings from his downtown pr operty appraisal office. His son continues that tradition. Despite the less picturesque setting of todays picnic, a concrete pavilion, the rewards of going are still overwhelming, Hanson thinks. You can still walk in and see someone you havent seen in 30 or 40 years. It reminds you of what you miss during the years you fail to attend. Its the gift I get by going, as he puts it. Since the picnics inception nearly seven decades ago, other things have changed too. continued on page 4THE RIVER APRIL 27, 20182 Last years picnic was held at the Lee County Civic Centers Tinsley Pavilion on Bayshore Road in North Fort Myers. The location is the same for this years. photo by George T. Mann, Jr. In 1985, the Pioneer Picnic took place at Buckingham Community Center. Pictured are (left to right) an unidentified man, Floyd Ellis, Judge Lamar Rose and W. Stanley Hanson, Jr. photo courtesy Hanson Family Archives PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, call 239-395-1213 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1640 Periwinkle Way, Suite 2, Sanibel FL 33957. FAX number: 239-395-2299. Email: press@islandsunnews.com. Email: ads@islandsunnews.com The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Contributing Writers Jennifer Basey Barbara Cacchione Kay Casperson Suzy Cohen Linda Coin Marcia Feeney Ed Frank Shelley Greggs Tom Hall Marion Hauser, MS, RDRoss Hauser, MD Anne Mitchell Capt. Matt Mitchell Trinette Nelson J. Brendan Ryan, CLU, ChFC, MSFS Di Saggau Jeanie TinchPublisher Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Bob Petcher Graphic Arts/ Production Ann Ziehl, Manager Amanda Hartman Justin Wilder Reporters Gerri Reaves, PhD Jeff LysiakIndependently Owned And Operated COPYRIGHT 2018 The River Weekly NewsLORKEN Publications, Inc.Read Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com

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3 THE RIVER APRIL 27, 2018 Providing Custom Interiors to Sanibel & Captiva for 28 years Complimentary In-Home Consultation695 Tarpon Bay Rd. Sanibel, FL 33957 coin.decoratingden.com 239.472.6551 Black And White Gala May 11Dress for Success SW Floridas annual signature event: A New York Night in Black & White will be held at the Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort and Spa on Friday, May 11 from 6 to 9 p.m.. This year the theme celebrates the style and sophistication of New York. The gala will include hors doeuvres, champagne, dinner and live and silent auctions. Guests are invited to wear their finest black and white cocktail attire for an evening of fun and fashion to support Dress for Success SW Florida. Liz Carey, chief affiliate growth abd sustainability officer of Dress for Success Worldwide, is the keynote speaker. She is responsible for the overall health and governance of the organizations global affiliate network. Carey overhauled the application process for new Dress for Success locations. With the help of her leadership, the affiliate network has more than doubled during her tenure. Global reach expanded from five countries to 30 as part of this effort. She joined Dress for Success in 2004. White House Black Market is returning as the founding sponsor. The brand has been instrumental with its continued support to grow Dress for Success SW Florida. Sponsorship opportunities are still available. The Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort and Spa is located at 5001 Coconut Road in Bonita Springs. For more information, contact Nickole Hendra at 689-4992. Liz Carey photo provided Art By The Disabled ProgramArtwork by participants in Lee Healths Arts in Healthcare program will be on display in the BIG ARTS Phillips Gallery on Sanibel from Wednesday, May 2 through Friday, June 1. An artists reception will be held on Friday, May 4 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Art by the disABLEd is a program for individuals with disabilities who are looking for showcase and exhibition opportunities for their creative works. Each of Lee Healths hospitals maintains a gallery to display their artwork, and the health system arranges juried art shows and assists disabled artists in participating in local art shows. Arts in Healthcare is led by the program coordinator with the support of more than 75 volunteers, and the Art by the disABLEd program is funded by donations. Arts in Healthcare is a nationwide movement that links the expressive arts with the healing arts and brings these into the mainstream of the traditional health care to promote the well-being of those who are ill and their caregivers. It inte grates the expressive arts in all forms into the health car e setting to provide creative outlets for patients, families and staff. BIG ARTS is located at 900 Dunlop Road. For more information about the program, contact Doug MacGregor at 343-2633 or art@leehealth.org. Digital Artwork By County StudentsDigital artwork from Lee County students will be on display at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center during the month of May. The Digital Lee exhibit will open on Friday, May 4 from 6 to 10 p.m. Awards will be given for excel lence in each discipline on Friday, May 11. The exhibit closes on May 22. Students in middle, high, and postsecondary schools have been invited to submit digital artwork. Digital Lee is a year-end showcase that bridges the gap between education and industry, providing opportunities for students to gain internships, jobs and other design and technology experiences that will enrich their futures. Graphic design, web design, animation, digital photo and publication students are invited to submit work that they have created using industry-standard software and techniques. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First St. in downtown Fort Myers. Call To Artists For Juried Art ExhibitArts for ACT Gallery is in need of professional and emerging artists for an open themed group exhibit that will open on July 6. This years theme is Of Myth or Lore, which explores the stories humanity has created and passed on to explain the world around us. A non-refundable entry fee for one piece is $10, two pieces is $15 and three pieces is $20. Judge will be announced. Cash prizes include first place $100; second place $75; third place $50; and honorable mention $25. Artists can drop off artwork from Friday, June 29 through Monday, July 2 between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. Art sales involve a 40 percent commis sion retained by Arts for ACT Gallery with pr oceeds benefitting the ACT shelter. Arts for ACT Gallery is located at at 2265 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. For more information, contact Claudia Goode at cgoode@actabuse.com or call 337-5050. Good Neighbor Citizenship GrantHabitat for Humanity of Lee and Hendry Counties was recently awarded a $5,000 grant from the State Farm Good Neighbor Citizenship Grant program. The funds will be used to purchase materials for the affiliates homeowner education classes and establish a resource library for Habitat homeown ers. This is the fifth consecutive year State Far m will fund the homeowner education program for the local affiliate. State Farm not only supports the Habitat mission fi nancially, but also through volunteerism by gathering staff fr om the area to participate in multiple build days throughout the year. Families in need of decent and af fordable housing partner with Habitat to build better lives thr ough homeownership. Partner families must volunteer 300 sweat equity hours, contribute $1,700 towards closing cost, and complete homeowner education classes to learn how to become a self-sufficient homeowner, including post-purchase counseling. The curriculum includes information on budgeting, money management, banking, credit, homeown ers insurance, mortgages, and safety and maintenance. Participants receive hands-on training in minor home repairs and fire safety. Then families sign a mortgage to purchase their Habitat home. Since October 1, 2017 (the beginning of Habitats fiscal year), 487 people have attended a Habitat information meeting and currently 47 families have been selected to partner with Habitat. Greeters Club LuncheonA new generation of leaders will be installed at the Greeters Club of Greater Fort Myers luncheon meeting at the Crown Plaza Hotel on Thursday, May 17. Registration for the luncheon is from 10:45 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. with the lunch and program to follow. A representative of Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southwest Florida, which is the beneficiary of the clubs Under The Big Top With Ronald McDonald fundraiser, will be present. Cost is $20. To pre-register, email greetersclub@gmail.com and provide your name, email address and phone number. You will receive a return email confirming your reservation. Crown Plaza Hotel is located at 13051 Bell Tower Drive in Fort Myers. For more information, visit www.greetersfortmyers. com.

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THE RIVER APRIL 27, 20184 From page 2Historic DowntownNotably, the picnic has not been racially segregated for a very long time, a change that Hanson attributes to his mother, who, the year she organized it, insisted on including the Tillis family. Nelson Tillis, who arrived here in 1867, was the towns first black settler. Contrast that with the first picnic, when there was a separate and simultaneous colored pioneer dinner at a different location. But some picnic traditions have not changed and hopefully never will -principally the joys of fellowship, good food, laughter, storytelling and down-toearth local history. The Pioneer Clubs original purpose, to reminisce with your friends about old times, endures. If youre a true old timer and lived in Lee County prior to 1968, dont miss the Pioneer Picnic on April 28 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Email pioneerleecounty@gmail. com for information. Want to know more about local pioneers? Then visit the following two research centers. The Southwest Florida Historical Society is an all-volunteer, non-profit or ganization open Wednesday and Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon and W ednesday 4 to 7 p.m. It is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Call 939-4044 or visit swflhistoricalsociety.org for more information. The Lee County Black History Society is located at 1936 Henderson Avenue, adjacent to the Williams Academy Museum at Roberto Clemente Park. Hours for the all-volunteer, non-profit organization are Wednesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Saturday by appointment only. For more information, call 332-8778 or visit leecountyblackhistorysociety.org. Zonta Woman Of The YearTiffany Esposito, president and CEO of the Bonita Springs Area Chamber of Commerce, recently accepted the 2018 Woman of the Year Award from the Zonta Club of Bonita Springs-Estero. The award luncheon was held at Bonita Bay Club and featured keynote speaker Amira Fox, chief assistant state attorney for the 20th Judicial Circuit, and guest emcee Kellie Burns of NBC-2. I would like to thank the ladies of Zonta for such a wonderful recognition, Esposito said. The women of Zonta are a catalyst for empowerment and creating positive change in our community and around the world, and I am proud to be a recipient of the Woman of the Year award and honored to join the group of amazing women who have been recognized before me. Esposito has served in her current role with the Bonita Chamber since 2016. From left, past Woman of the Year recipients Trish Leonard, Nancy Near, Brenda Tate, 2018 Recipient Tiffany Esposito, Arden McCurdy, Cherrill Cregar, Marjorie Rubacky and Teri Lamaine photo provided Our Mothers Home Receives $5,000 GrantThe League Club, Inc. has chosen Our Mothers Home as the recipient of a $5,000 grant. The funds will be used for ar Mentored Living Program. The grant was among $327,970 in grants that The League Club awarded from its Community Trust Fund to 30 local non-profit agencies in Collier and Lee counties. Since 1987, The League Club has granted more than $4.2 million to 157 local non-profit agencies. Liz Winebrenner, president of The League Club, stated, We were pleased and grateful to be able to give so much to help our community partners raise the quality of life for residents in Collier and Lee counties. We thank our 600 members, Circle of Friends supporters, the com munity members who support our events and our business sponsors. Their financial generosity and caring for the community are what enable us to make these grants. The mission of Our Mothers Home is to keep teen mothers from foster care, hu man trafficking and other traumas together with their childr en in a safe, nurturing home. Through the Mentored Living Program, residents are provided with the education, life skills, parenting classes, physical and mental healthcare allowing them to become productive members of the community. For more information about Our Mothers Home, visit www.ourmother shome.com, call 267-4663 or email info@ our mothershome.com. Karen Watson, executive director of Our Mothers Home, and Liz Winebrenner, president of The League Club photo provided Lee VCB New Sales Coordinator And InternLee County Visitor & Convention Bureau (VCB) welcomes Jennifer Walla as its new sales coordinator and McKenzy Lacko as its new marketing intern. Wallas role includes promoting The Beaches of Fort Myers & Sanibel to travel agents and potential visitors. She has 12 years in the hospitality industry, including working at various restaurants and hotels in Lee County. Prior to the VCB, she was revenue/sales system analyst at The Westin Cape Coral Resort at Marina Village. She received that hotels Associate of the Year honor in 2016, and was nominated eight times for the Elaine McLaughlin Outstanding Hospitality Service Awards (E Awards). Walla is a 2012 graduate of Florida Gulf Coast University with a bachelors degree in resort and hospitality management. She is a Lee County native and has passion for the destination. In her roles as an intern, Lacko will support the marketing team in upcoming campaigns, including Travel Rally, Island Hopper Songwriter Fest, as well as assist the website team. She is a junior at Florida Gulf Coast University majoring in market ing with a minor in digital media design. She gr ew up on Anna Maria Island and is a graduate of Manatee High School in Bradenton. She looks forward to using her coastal background to help promote Lee County as a tourism destination.

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5 THE RIVER APRIL 27, 2018 4415 SE 20TH PL., CAPE CORAL Riverfront w/Oversized Backyard $749,000 MLS 217052226Yesi Snyder, Koffman & Assoc. 239.887.8339 ORCHID COMMUNITY 11330 LONGWATER CHASE CT., FT. MYERS 8,300 S.F., Harbourside Riverfront Home$2,750,000 MLS 217064189 Patti Testa 239.770.5445 GULF HARBOUR YACHT & CC 4926 SW 2ND PL., CAPE CORAL 3 BR, 2 BA, Sailboat Access, Pool $349,000 MLS 217071193 Marc Wozny 239.297.0760 PELICAN ROSE GARDEN 13411 CAUSEWAY PALMS CV., FT. MYERS Luxury Villas Just Off the Causeway $275,000 MLS 217044966 Scott Allan 239.872.5107 CAUSEWAY KEY 5624 SW 10TH AVE., CAPE CORAL 3 BR, 2.5 BA + Den, Gulf Access, Pool $950,000 MLS 218017222 Jim Peterson 239.470.2353 VILLA WONDERVIEW 13896 RIVER FOREST DR., FT. MYERS 3 BR, 2 BA, 2,600 S.F. w/Boathouse $649,000 MLS 217027794 Bradford Bateman 239.273.8842 RIVER FOREST 2817 SW 42ND LN., CAPE CORAL 3 BR, 3 BA w/Optional 4th Bedroom$374,000 MLS 218007855Chad Reedy, McMurray & Nette 239.989.8838 BEACH PARKWAY 4268 ISLAND CIR. #G, FORT MYERS Gorgeous Remodeled Attached Villa$189,000 MLS 218012875 Jason Lomano 239.470.8628 CHARMING CALOOSA BAYVIEW 11520 COMPASS POINT DR., FT. MYERS Golf Course Views from 2 Story Courtyard$1,199,000 MLS 217066969 Patti Testa 239.770.5445 GULF HARBOUR YACHT & CC 17861 GREY HERON CT., FT. MYERS BEACH Huge Waterfront Lot $449,950 MLS 216032480 Roger Stening 239.777.4707 PALM ISLES 13401 CAUSEWAY PALMS CV., FT. MYERS On-Island Lifestyle, Off-Island Pricing $350,000 MLS 217072603 Scott Allan 239.872.5107 CAUSEWAY KEY 15152 ANCHORAGE WAY, FT. MYERS 3 BR, 2.5 BA, 2,177 S.F. Living Area $779,000 MLS 218026929 McMurray & Nette 239.850.7888 THE SHALLOWS 15120 PORTS OF IONA DR. #104, FT. MYERS Spanish Style Waterfront Condo $221,000 MLS 218009672 Toni Shoemaker 239.464.3645 HARBOUR ISLE Y & R CLUB PALMETTO POINT 4810 GRIFFIN BLVD., FORT MYERS Mediterranean Design by Bud Lawrence$3,395,000 MLS 218006762 McMurray & Nette 239.850.7888 UNIQUE & UNPARALLELED 1240 COCONUT DR., FORT MYERS Michelangelo Custom by Stofft Cooney$15,950,000 MLS 218006778 McMurray & Nette 239.850.78886081 SILVER KING BLVD. #1002, CAPE CORAL Popular Bonaire Floor Plan $799,900 MLS 218016562 Tina Tusack 239.634.3810 TARPON POINT MARINA OPEN 4/28 1:00PM 3:00PM OPEN 4/28 & 4/29 12:00PM 4:00PM OPEN 4/27 4/30 11:00AM 3:00PM OPEN 4/28 & 4/29 12:00PM 4:00PM NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW PRICE NEW PRICE

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THE RIVER APRIL 27, 20186 Fort Myers Art: A Look At Lab Theaters 2018-19 Season by Tom HallLab Theaters 2018-19 season will include the following shows: Hush Up, Sweet Charlotte June 1 to July 1 If you loved last seasons Whatever Happened To Baby Jane, youll love this campy parody of the movie Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte. We journey to a plantation in the Old South and meet Charlotte Hollis, a southern belle whose only companion is her maid. She has been shunned by her community since the long-ago mysterious murder of her lover. Now the family home is about to be torn down, so she calls upon her cousin, Miriam, for help. Its sure to be a drag-tastic time with these divas! Laughter is the only way to make sense of it all. Evil Dead, The Musical (High School Version) July 19 to 22 What do you get when you combine cult classic zombie movies with stereotypi cal teen movies and put it all to music? Y ou get this crazy, cheesy, hilarious, fun-filled show that appeals to horror and non-horror fans alike! Get ready for blood, chainsaws, limbs and demons along with laughter and singing! Its Only A Play August 3 to 26 Set in the townhome of a Broadway producer, we meet the team behind The Golden Egg as they are waiting for their opening night reviews. Theres the pro ducer herself, the terrified playwright, his best friend, the has-been female lead, the British director and a theater critic (wait, why is he there?). Filled with one-liners about the entertainment world that will make you laugh and cringe, this show will remind you that there truly is no business like show business! Anna In The Tropics September 14 to 30 Picture it: Ybor City, Tampa in 1929. Its hot and humid inside a small cigar factory. Workers are hand-rolling tobacco leaves, while a lector reads anything from newspapers to poetry to novels to entertain them. But when the new hire reads from the novel Anna Karenina, it sets in motion the major events of the story. Themes in this Pulitzer Prize-winning play range from love, lust and infidelity to violence and debt. And they turn the lives of these Cuban-American families into the very story to which theyve been listening. Hand To God October 19 to November 4 Admit it. Youve had certain impulses, right? Ones youve thought about, but would never actually say out loud or act upon? Its human nature. And that darkest human nature is exposed when a Texas church youth-group assignment to create original hand puppets goes strangely awry. 24-Hour Playwriting Project November 17 Playwrights will bring their sleeping bags and coffee mugs to Lab Theater, where they will be assigned a theme, a director and actors. Within just 24 hours, you will see the fruits of their labor when we stage all of their 20-minute one-act plays! Every Christmas Story Ever Told November 30 to December 22 Its the holidays! Time for the classics Rudolph, Frosty, Ebenezer Scrooge, The Nutcracker and many more. But maybe not the way were accustomed to hearing them. In what can best be called a holiday mash-up, actors take beloved stories and traditions from around the world and turn them upside-down and sideways. A Guy, A Girl, A Piano (Cabaret Act) January 4 to 6 Theresa Quinn and Randy Kramer will join The Lab with their four-handsone-piano cabaret. Enjoy an evening of virtuosic four-hand piano arrangements, vocal solos and duets, featuring the music of Gershwin, Sondheim, the Beatles, Beethoven, Joplin, Bernstein, Fats Waller and others. Hedwig And The Angry Inch January 1 to February 3 Meet Hedwig, one of the most unique characters to hit the stage in this wickedly funny, innovative and heartbreaking rock musical sensation. It is the winner of four 2014 Tony Awards, And The Winner Is -February 22 to March 16 Tyler Johnes just wants to make it to the Oscars to accept his award for Best Supporting Actor. Theres just one prob lem he seems to be stuck in a bar where things ar e not quite normal. Seamus the bartender isnt helping matters, either. While Tyler continues to try to make it onto the red carpet, he is interrupted by unusual visitors. Filled with humor and emotion, this play will win your heart. Andorra March 29 to April 14 One of the most oft-produced plays in Europe, this parable about racism and prejudice is a great example of epic-the ater. Set in fictionalized Andorra, Andri is adopted by a teacher and raised as a Jew. Throughout the play, Andri is faced with outright prejudice and complicit silence from his fellow townspeople. Playwright Max Frischs message is loud and clear: prejudice happens in every country, both in the past and the present, and we must learn to accept everyones differences if we are to lead happy, productive lives. Tickets are $25 for adults and $12 for students at the door. However, discounts are available for season tickets and snow bird ticket-holders. For more information, visit www.laboratorytheater florida.com. Tom Hall is both an amateur artist and aspiring novelist who writes art quest thrillers. He is in the final stages of completing his debut novel titled Art Detective. A former tax attorney, he lives in Estero with his fianc and their four cats. Hush Up, Sweet Charlotte leads off the 201819 season photo courtesy www.artswfl.com For pickup only on Sanibel. All furniture in Good condition $1500.00 or best offer, Jim Urbelis (973) 216-4780 One-Of-A Kind Furniture Art Signed by Ikko Matsumoto Viva Cape Coral! Festival April 28Viva Cape Coral! festival will be held in Downtown Cape Coral on the corner of Lafayette Street and Vincennes Street on Saturday, April 28 from 5 to 10 p.m. The festival, which is Southwest Floridas largest and best attended Hispanic event, is sponsored by the Southwest Florida Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; Jorge de la Mar, Esq.; Playa 98.1; Beasley Media Group, B103.9; Sunstate Academy; CenturyLink; Sanibel Captiva Community Bank; and Hurtado Cavanaugh, Attorneys at Law. The event is free and open to the public. There will be food, merchandise, busi ness vendors, a kids area with rides and live musical per formances by international artists Frankie Negrn and Charlie Cruz as well as Heat Latin Jazz, Orquesta Clssica, Orquesta Tropical Sound, L-Yen, Thaliana and a Zumba performance by Around the Clock Fitness. For more information, contact the SWFL Hispanic Chamber of Commerce at 418-1441 or info@hispanicchamber florida.org, or visit www.vivacapecoral. com.

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7 THE RIVER APRIL 27, 2018 Documentary On Cayo Costa To Air On May 3A half-hour history documentary about the way of life, past and present on Cayo Costa will make its debut on WEDU PBS on Thursday, May 3 at 8:30 p.m. Mullet & Mangroves, The Pioneer Fishing Families of Cayo Costa Island traces the islands inhabitants from its native Calusa origins to Spanish coloniza tion through modern day fishing families and their descendants. T oday, 94 percent of the island is a state park, where visitors arrive by boat for a day or stay overnight camping to enjoy its seclusion and nine miles of white sand beaches with millions of seashells, surrounded by the tropical waters of the Gulf of Mexico. Ilene Safron, who owns Main Sail Video Productions, Inc., in Fort Myers, is the programs director/videographer. Bob Hite, who is WFLA-TV Channel 8s main news anchor, tells the story through historical research and interviews with the few remaining pioneers who grew up on Cayo Costa. The program was a collaboration of sponsors, which included non-profit groups: Friends of Cayo Costa, Barrier Island Parks Society and the Lee County Tourist Development Council, along with private in-kind donations. For the pro grams full schedule, visit www.wedu.org. For mor e information about Cayo Costa, visit www.floridastateparks.org/ cayocosta. Cayo Costa photo provided Alliance Theatre Presents Classic Play And TalkbackTheatre Conspiracy at the Alliance for the Arts presents A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry and directed by Sonya McCarter from May 3 to 13. It is considered by many to be one of the greatest plays of the 20th century. A Raisin in the Sun, a drama in three acts, follows the story of the Younger family as they discover the dangers of dreaming big and the heartbreak of real ity. It was first published and produced in 1959. The plays title is taken from Harlem a poem by Langston Hughes, which examines the question What happens to a dream deferred?/Does it dry up/like a raisin in the sun? This penetrating study of a workingclass black family on the south side of Chicago in the 1950s reflected Hansberrys own experiences of racial harassment after her prosperous family moved into a white neighborhood. To widen the post-show conversation and discuss what the art onstage means to us as individuals and as a society, the Alliance will facilitate a community conversation on race and segregation through talkbacks on May 6 and May 13. Talkbacks allow the audience to ask questions and express thoughts, ideas and emotions on issues revealed in the play through the form of meaningful discussion with the cast or panel guests. The opportunity is included with ticket purchase. The May 6 talkback will be a discus sion of the play with the director and cast; exploring the history of the play, its author and characters, as well as its themes, symbols and motifs. The May 13 talkback will take a closer look at specific themes presented, namely racism and segregation. The guest panel ranges in race, age and cultural experience. Panelists include Jarrett Eady, Anita Katherine Dennis, Johnathan Harrison and Constance White-Davis. The play takes place in Chicago, but I felt it was important that my actors connect the play to the space we are currently living: Southwest Florida, said Sonya McCarter in a directors note. There are a number of people here in Fort Myers who lived through the Jim Crow laws and whose lives were influenced and changed by racism of the time. We dont have to research racism in Chicago in the 1950s to be able to relate the experiences of the characters. We can look at our own citys history. Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information, visit www. artinlee.org. image providedTravel Rally For Tourism May 1The Lee County Visitor & Convention Bureau (VCB) will host tourism part ners, their employees and families, along with the community at the annual Lee County Travel Rally at Lakes Regional Park in Fort Myers on Tuesday, May 1 from 4 to 7 p.m. The theme for this years travel rally is Youre Our Super Heroes! New this year will be an opening ceremony, touch-a-truck with the Lee County Sheriffs Office SWAT Team and South Trail Fire & Rescue District, tourism race competitions and photos with Abigail the Wonder Dog. In addition, there will be a dunk tank with hot seat guests, including the general managers from the Pink Shell Beach Resort & Marina and Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort & Spa, along with Lee VCB Executive Director Tamara Pigott and Marketing Director Brian Ososky. Dunk tank proceeds will benefit the United Way. Hospitality exhibitors, music, prize giveaways, face painting, magic, food and family-friendly fun are all part of Travel Rally. Feel free to come in costume to show your support of the power of travel and tourism. To RSVP, visit www.leevcb.com. An admission ticket and free parking sticker will be emailed, and your name will be included in the prize drawings throughout the event. All registered attendees will be entered into a prize drawing for two complimentary JetBlue airline tickets. You must be present to win. This tourism appreciation day is in sup port of National Travel and Tourism Week. The VCB r ecognizes the importance of hospitality professionals and the critical impact tourism has on local businesses. Tourism is a major economic engine that brings almost 5 million visitors who spend more than $3 billion in Lee County. Our tourism partners are our superheroes, said Pigott. The rally is a wonderful opportunity to celebrate and thank the people who work so hard to create memorable experiences and deliver excellent customer service to our guests. Lakes Regional Park is located at 7330 Gladiolus Drive in Fort Myers. For more information, call 590-4855 or visit www. leevcb.com. Large single family homesite Walking distance to the beach Centrally located Quiet residential neighborhoodI will sincerely work for youCathie Lewis, RealtorPhone: 239-745-7367 Cathie@AllAboutHome.LifePfeifer Realty Group Listed at $199,000 REAL ESTATE EXPERTSW Florida, Fort Myers Beach, Sanibel & Captiva Islands is All About Home Davis Woods is the place to be, located just minutes from area beach and many amenities that SW Florida offers. This 2 bedroom/ 1 bath home has a delightful view of the community pool, lake and tennis courts. Both the living room and master bedroom provides entrance to the lanai through sliding glass doors. Roll down hurricane shutters on the lanai offer storm protection. This property will make a comfortable home or investment. The seasonal rental market at Davis Woods is very strong and many seasonal renters return year after year. The home is being sold fully furnished and has everything you need to make yourself comfortable. Pack your bags and move in!16881 Davis Road #524 Listed $139,000

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Along The RiverThe 5th annual Smoke on the Water Barbecue Competition and Music Festival returns to Centennial Park this Friday, April 27 from 6 to 10 p.m. and on Saturday, April 28 from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Admission is free. The event features a Florida BBQ Association sanctioned competition that includes professional teams from all across the Southeast who fire up their smokers for a chance at the Grand Champion title. Festivalgoers can purchase barbecue from the vending teams. Other vendors will be selling local sweets, food and retail merchandise. Musical acts will include Sheena Brook, the Nowhere Band, The Electric Mud and the Ben Allen Band. There will also be a fun-filled Kid Zone for children. VIP tickets for Saturday are $75 and include a covered picnic area near the stage, one meal, a T-shirt and two drink tickets. Centennial Park is located at 2000 West First Street in the downtown Fort Myers River District. For more information, call 333-1933 or visit www.sbdac.com/ smoke-on-the-water-fort-myers. Hundreds will join the American Lung Association for an endurance climb up the Oasis Grand this Saturday, April 28 at 8 a.m. The stair-climbing event is in support of friends and loved ones who suffer from lung diseases like asthma and lung cancer. It raises funds for clean air and lung disease research, education and advocacy. Fight For Air Climb will feature participants scaling over 31 flights of stairs of the 32-story building. Local firefighters will be showing their support at the end of the race by climbing the 31 flights in full firefighter gear helmet, hood, pants, coat, gloves, boots and air pack weighing over 45 pounds. Firefighters have an increased risk for lung disease from the exposure to gases, chemicals and smoke in the line of duty. Local first responders will also participate in this years climb. Fight For Air climbers can participate individually or as a team. Registration is $25 per participant and includes a $100 fundraising minimum. Oasis Grand is located at 3040 Oasis Grand Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information or to register, contact Kurt.Goerke@lung.org, 908-2685 or visit http://action.lung.org/site/ TR?fr_id=16385&pg=entry. Nonprofit 21st Century CARE foundation is hosting the 6th annual 5K Run/2-Mile Walk in conjunction with the Schreiner/Lemos Family to support head and neck cancer patients in Southwest Florida at the CenturyLink Sports Complex at Hammond Stadium this Saturday, April 28 at 8 a.m. Registration begins at 7 a.m. on race day. Refreshments, awards and drawings will follow the walk. Registration fee for adult runners and walkers is $25. Youth runners and walkers (ages 5 to 17) can register for $15. There is no fee for children age 5 and younger. The first 100 registered participants will receive a gift bag with a T-shirt and other gifts. All funds raised at the 5K Run/2Mile Walk will help provide head and neck cancer screenings, treatment, follow-up care and financial assistance to patients in Southwest Florida. More than 50,000 people are diagnosed with head and neck cancers in the U.S. annually. However, these diseases are preventable and treatable. The CenturyLink Sports Complex at Hammond Stadium is located at 14100 Six Mile Cypress Parkway in Fort Myers. For more information or to register, visit www.kintera.org/faf/ home/default.asp?ievent=1176793. The Fort Myers Miracle will be offering the 13th annual Disability Dream & Do Baseball Camp for children with special needs at the CenturyLink Sports Complex at Hammond Stadium this Saturday, April 28 from 10 a.m. to noon. Space is limited. The camp is free in partnership with the Dave Clark Foundation, and offers children with disabilities an opportunity to interact with Miracle players and coaches on the ballfield as they progress through hitting, fielding and throwing stations. Cost is $115 per child and includes a T-shirt, Miracle gift, pre-camp snacks and lunches, and one box seat ticket to a Miracle game each night of the camp. The CenturyLink Sports Complex is located at 14100 Six Mile Cypress Parkway in Fort Myers. For more information or to register for a camp, call 768-4210 or visit www. miraclebaseball.com. Alliance for the Arts will host a Bluegrass in the Theatre in Foulds Theater this Sunday, April 29 from 2 to 5 p.m. According to the Alliance website, a sensational fusion of American country music; Irish, Scottish and English ballads and traditional dance music; with a heaping helping of jazz influence makes our bluegrass concerts a toetapping, knee-slapping good time. Cost is $10 per person. The band line-up is Kindred Spirit, Captain Joe & the Bottom Feeders and Frank Corso. It is being presented in partnership with the Acoustic Music Society of SWFL. Seating is on a first come, first serve basis. Pre-sale tickets are available until Saturday, April 29 at noon. Tickets at the door are first come, first serve if available. Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information or tickets, call 939-2787 or visit www.artinlee. com. THE RIVER APRIL 27, 20188 Fresh ingredients, simplicity, love... the recipe for a treasured dining experience Chef/Owner AJ Black7 Days 5-10 pm 751 Tarpon Bay Road Sanibel Island, FL Reservations Suggested www.iltesoro.net 239-395-4022 FINE ITALIAN CUISINEIL TESORO RISTORANTEinspired by Island Fare in a bistro styleVOTED BEST CHEFBEST OF THE ISLANDS AWARDTASTE OF THE ISLANDS IRON CHEF WINNER AJ BLACKCelebrating Our 10 Year AnniversaryExtensive New Wine List Tasting Menu Get your tasty barbecue at Smoke on the Water Barbecue Competition and Music Festival this weekend. photo provided FIRST STREET LIQUORCelebrating 10 years of Business2023 Altamont Ave, B107, Fort Myers Mon. thru urs. 10am 9pm Fri. & Sat. 10am 10pm Sun. 10am 7pm Tel: 239-332-3945 We Deliver!!!SPECIAL CASE PRICES FOR ALL LIQUORS 5% o purchases over $30 on all wines & liquors with this ad We Sell Wines, Spirits, Beer, Cigar-Cigarettes & Lotto-LotteryExp. 5/11/18 Convenient, Friendly, Full Service Neighborhood Liquor StoreBitcoin ATM Machine On Site

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9 THE RIVER APRIL 27, 2018 The Pilot Club of Fort Myers recently donated $500 to the Childrens Network of Southwest Florida. The focus of the Pilot Club of Fort Myers is helping organizations seeking to improve the quality of life for individuals with brain-related disorders through volunteer activities, education and financial support. For information, contact club president Fran DAlessandro at 332-1140. The Childrens Network of Southwest Florida is the private, nonprofit organization that administers the child welfare system in Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Hendry, and Glades counties. For more information, contact network CEO Nadereh Salim at 226-1524. From left, Janet Davenport, Pilot Club board member; Dennis Anderson, Childrens Network CFO; Nadereh Salim, Childrens Network CEO; Jody Van Cooney, Pilot Club secretary; Fran DAlessandro, Pilot Club president; and Raymond Fisher, Childrens Network COO. photo provided Pilot Club Donates To Childrens NetworkContinental Womens ClubThe Continental Womens Club will meet at The Hideaway Country Club on Thursday, May 3 at 11:30 a.m. Club officials will honor their past presidents and install the new officers for 2018-19. Cost to attend the luncheon is $22. Call 691-7561 for additional information. According to club officials, the annual scholarship fundraiser held on March 19 was a huge success. Thanks go out to the members and many guests who attended. Scholarships will be awarded to very deserving high school seniors to help in their further education endeavors. 15880 San Carlos Blvd. Fort Myers Next to TargetOpen 4:30pm Monday Saturday Closed Sunday 239-590-8147 www.TerraNostraDining.com NOW OPEN FOR LUNCHMON FRI 11:30 AM 2:30 PM Art And Musical Summer Camps Begin In JuneThe Alliance for the Arts has limited space available for visual and per forming arts summer camps for grades 1 to 6. The program is coupled with one-of-a-kind, family-friendly summer gallery exhibitions. Summer Arts Camps, which are sponsored by Family Thrift Center in Fort Myers, allow children to discover their creative abilities by taking part in visual and performing arts with a different theme each week. Alliance camps focus on painting and visual arts, theater, music and dance instruction, which come together for an art exhibition and performance each Friday afternoon. Camp runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. with extended care available from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. for a fee. Summer Arts Camp is $160 per week for Alliance members or $200 per week for non-members. You may become a member to receive a 20 percent discount. Themes include: June 4 to June 8: Once Upon A Time June 11 to June 15: Trapped in a Video Game June 18 to June 22: Robot Mayhem June 25 to June 29: The Search for Yellow Beards Hidden Treasure July 9 to July 13: Are You Game? July 16 to July 20: Broadway: Another Opening, Another Show! July 23 to July 27: Super Heroes July 30 to August 3: Lets Rock Out! For the duration of the summer, the Alliance will present two educational gallery exhibitions to enrich camper experiences. From June 1 to June 30, the Alliance invites campers to explore historical spaces and artifacts in new ways through its exhibition, Augmented Reality. With Augmented Reality, the Alliance will superimpose virtual world over whats actually in front of you through cuttingedge technology. The traveling Smithsonian Exhibition Hometown Teams: Sports in American Communities is on display from June 30 to August 4. This project gives patrons an opportunity to share stories, celebrate local legends and collect memorabilia from the community. The show provides educa tional initiatives about sports and ideals such as team work, fair play, leadership and respect. For students in grades 6 to 12, the Alliance also offers Musical Theatre Intensive, held in the rehearsal space at Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre in Royal Palm Square, and offers students the unique opportunity to work with Broadway Palms resident choreographer Amy McCleary and with actors from current Broadway Palm shows. Camp runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Daily arrival time is 8:45 to 9 a.m. with no extended care available. There is a final performance each Friday at 3 p.m. Each week is $175 for Alliance members or $220 for non-members. Camps run from June 4 to 8 and four more weeks from July 9 to August 3. Teen volunteer and scholarship applica tions are also available. Volunteer positions ar e offered to students age 14 and older who want to gain experience and confidence through assisting the Summer Arts Camp Education Team. Scholarship applications are awarded on need and based on availability of funds; they are due by April 30 and rewarded by May 14. The Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre is located at 1400 Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information, visit www.artinlee. org/summercamp or call 939-2787. Summer Arts Campers show their artwork photo provided

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Churches/TemplesALL FAITHS UNITARIAN CONGREGATION Sunday 10:30 a.m., 2756 McGregor Boulevard, allfaiths-uc.org, 226-0900. ALL SAINTS BYZANTINE RITE CATHOLIC Sunda y 10:30 a.m. 10291 Bayshore Road, 305-651-0991. ANNUNCIATION GREEK ORTHODOX Sunday 9 and 10 a.m. 8210 Cypress Lake Drive, annunciation.fl.goarch.org, 481-2099. BETH SHILOH MESSIANIC SYNAGOGUE Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m. 15675 McGregor Boulevard, 437-3171. BIBLESHARE 10 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Tuesday, 7050 Winkler Rd, Suite 121, www.simplysimple worship.com, 437-8835. BREAD OF LIFE MINISTRIES Sunda y 10:30 a.m. 16581 McGregor Boulevard, 267-3166. CHABAD LUBAVITCH ORTHODOX Friday 6:30 p.m. 5620 Winkler Road, chabadswf.org, 433-7708. CHAPEL OF CYPRESS COVE Sunday 10 a.m. 10200 Cypress Cove Circle, revtedalthouse@aol.com, 850-3943. CHURCH OF THE CROSS Sunday 9:15 and 10:45 a.m. 13500 Freshman Lane, 768-2188. CONGREGATIONAL Sunday 10:30 a.m. 1619 Llewellyn Drive, taecc.com, 334-4978. COVENANT PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 10 a.m. 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937. CYPRESS LAKE BAPTIST Sunday 9:45 and 11 a.m., 7 p.m.; Wednesday 6:30 p.m. 8400 Cypress Lake Drive, 481-5442. CYPRESS LAKE PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 8, 9, 10 and 11 a.m. 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, www.clpc.us, 481-3233. CYPRESS LAKE UNITED METHODIST Sunday 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, 482-1250. FAITH FELLOWSHIP WORLD OUTREACH Sunday 10:30 a.m.,Thursday 7:30 p.m., Friday 7:30 p.m. 6111 South Pointe Boulevard, 278-3638. FAITH UNITED METHODIST Sunday 8:45 and 10:30 a.m. 15690 McGregor Boulevard, 482-2030. FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST Wednesday 12 noon Testimony Service, Sunday 10:30 a.m. 2390 West First Street, christiansciencefortmyers.net, christianscience.com. FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Sunday 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. 13545 American Colony Boulevard, 936-2511. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. 2466 First Street, www.fumcftmyers.org, 332-1152. FORT MYERS CHRISTIAN Sunday 10:30 a.m., 5916 Winkler Road, 4374330. FORT MYERS CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST; Sunday 10 a.m., 8210 College Parkway, 4823133. IONA-HOPE EPISCOPAL CONGREGATION Saturday 5 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Tuesday 9:30 a.m.; Wednesday 9:30 a.m. 9650 Gladiolus Drive, 454-4778. JESUS THE WORKER CATHOLIC Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday 8, 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. 881 Nuna Avenue, 481-1143. KINGDOM LIFE Sunday 10:30 a.m. 2154 McGregor Boulevard, 218-8343. LAMB OF GOD Sunday 7:45 and 10 a.m. 19691 Cypress View Drive, lambofgodchurch.net, 267-3525. NEW BEGINNINGS CENTER Friday 6:30 and 7 p.m. 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, nbcministry@embarqmail.com, facebook.com/nbcministry, 656-0416. NEW COVENANT EYES Monthly 9 a.m. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, newcovenanteyes.com, 220-8519. NEW HOPE BAPTIST Sunday 11 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. 16120 San Carlos Boulevard, Unit 10, 985-8503. NEW HOPE PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 10051 Plantation Road, www.newhopefortmyers.org, 274-1230. PEACE COMMUNITY Sunday 10:30 a.m. www. 17671 Pine Ridge Road, peacecommunitychurch.com, 2677400. PEACE LUTHERAN Sunday 8 and 10 a.m. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@ peaceftmyers.com. 437-2599. REDEEMER LUTHERAN Sunday 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. 3950 Winkler Ext., 274-0143. RIVER OF LIFE ASSEMBLY OF GOD 8, 9:45 and 11:30 a.m. 21580 River Ranch Road, 495-0400. SAMUDRABADRA BUDDHIST CENTER Meditation classes. MeditationInFortMyers. org, 567-9739. SAINT COLUMBKILLE CATHOLIC Monday through Saturday 8 a.m.; Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday 7, 9 and 11 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 12171 Iona Road, 489-3973. ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CATHOLIC Monday through Thursday 6:45 a.m.; Friday 6:45 and 11 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.; Sunday 6:45, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 2157 Cleveland Avenue, 334-2161. SAINT JOHN THE APOSTLE METROPOLITAN Sunday 10 a.m. 3049 McGregor Boulevard, 344-0012. SAINT MICHAEL LUTHERAN Saturday 5:30 p.m.; Sunday 8 and 10:45 a.m. 3595 Broadway, 939-1218. SAINT NICHOLAS MONASTERY Sunday 9:30 a.m. 111 Evergreen Road, saintnicholasmonastery.org, 997-2847. ST. VINCENT DE PAUL CATHOLIC Tuesday through Friday 9 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.; Sunday 9 and 11 a.m. 13031 Palm Beach Boulevard, 693-0818. SOUTHWEST BAPTIST Sunday 11 a.m.; Wednesday 6 p.m. 16940 McGregor Boulevard, 454-3336. TEMPLE BETHEL SYNAGOGUE Friday Shabbat 7:30 p.m.; Torah Saturday 9 a.m.; Religious School Wednesday 5:30 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m.16225 Winkler Road, templebethel.com, 433-0018. TEMPLE JUDEA (CONSERVATIVE) Friday 6:30 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. tjswfl. org.14486 A&W Bulb Road, 433-0201. THE NEW CHURCH Sunday 11 a.m. 10811 Sunset Plaza Circle #401, newchurchflorida.com. 481-5535. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST Sunday 10:30 a.m. 13411 Shire Lane, uucfm. org, 561-2700. UNITY OF FORT MYERS Sunday 10 a.m. 11120 Ranchette Road, unityoffortmyers.org, 278-1511. WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. 9065 Ligon Court, 481-2125. WORD OF LIFE Sunday 10 a.m., Wednesday 7 p.m. 2120 Collier Avenue, 274-8881. ZION LUTHERAN Sunday 8, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. 7401 Winkler Road, zionfm.org, 481-4040. THE RIVER APRIL 27, 201810 EDWARD HICKEYIn loving memory of Edward Hickey, there willl be a celebration of life on Saturday, May 5 at the Wyndham on Fort Myers Beach, located at 6890 Estero Boulevard. The service will be held on the beach beginning at 11 a.m., followed by a gathering of friends and family to celebrate the memories of the beloved Capt. Ed. Food will be provided by Texas Tonys, with a cash bar available for guests. Rooms are available at the Wyndham. RSVP to Mary at 565-9717 or tropicalwave@comcast.net. CELEBRATION OF LIFE PHILIP LEIGH JOHNSONPhilip Leigh Johnson, a native Florid ian and 35-year resident of Sanibel, passed away on April 17 in Jack sonville, Florida. He and his late wife Ed die owned and operated a popular island gift shop, Ile Crocodile. Phil closed Ile Crocodile in 2005 after 25 years. Before moving to Sanibel, he and Eddie both worked for Richs in Atlanta as assistant display director and assistant fashion co ordinator respectively. They then moved to New Jersey where Phil worked for Bambergers, a division of Macys, as vice president of visual merchandising, design ing special events as well as store display layouts. During his years on Sanibel, Phil used his creative talents to design elaborate themed parties as fundraisers for the Pirate Playhouse, Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation, Gulfshore Bal let and the American Cancer Society. A graveside service will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, May 5 at Fort Myers Memorial Gardens, located at 1589 Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Any of Phils friends are invited to join the family at the service. Philip is survived by his sister Dorothy Ponce, her husband Jose and their son Hilario. He is also survived by his late wifes sons Richard Smith and wife Patricia, and Clay Smith and wife Brenda, three grandchildren, five great grandchildren and one great-great grandchild. Community Prayer BreakfastSouthwest Florida residents are invited to attend the annual Community Prayer Breakfast in observance of the National Day of Prayer at City of Palms Park on Thursday, May 3. The breakfast buffet begins at 6:05 a.m. and the pro gram follows at 7 a.m. Hosted by the City of Fort Myers, this years event will be emceed by Mayor Randy Henderson. The national theme for the 2018 National Day of Prayer is unity. The program includes keynote speaker Rick Rigsby, a nationally acclaimed speaker, author and president/CEO of Rick Rigsby Communications. Rigsby is a former award-winning journalist, college professor, character coach and chaplain for Texas A&M Universitys football team. With engagements around the world, Rigsbys audiences include Fortune 500 companies, academic institutions, services organizations and sports teams from the NFL and PGA. The National Day of Prayer is an annual observance on the first Thursday of May, when individuals of all faiths join together in unified prayer for continued blessings on the nation. Every year, local, state and federal observances are held from sunrise to sunset across the nation and attract more than 2 million people. The Fort Myers community has been hon oring the National Day of Prayer since the Community Prayer Br eakfasts inception in 1988. Local businesses and organiza tions annually step in to support the event thr ough sponsorships and donations. The Community Prayer Breakfast can unite Southwest Florida for one cause, said Rev. Israel Suarez, founder and CEO of Nations Association Charities and a founder of the Community Prayer Breakfast. We all have different back grounds, religious beliefs and political perspectives, but one thing we can agr ee upon is the need to build a brighter future for our children and grandchildren. Bringing the community together for a day of prayer certainly is a step in the right direction. The Community Prayer Breakfast is free, but tickets are required and available on a first come basis at www.cpb2018. eventbrite.com. City of Palms Park is located at 2201 Edison Avenue in Fort Myers. For more information, call 994-9770. OBITUARY

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CROW Case Of The Week: Loggerhead Shrike by Bob PetcherThe loggerhead shrike ( Lanius ludovicianus ) is not related to a familiar sea turtle that is currently beginning to nest on local beachfronts, but rather is a thickbodied songbird that is so-named due to the relatively large size of its head as compared to the rest of its body. These tweeters sing during courting or do so to maintain territories. While smaller than a robin, the loggerhead shrike can attack larger prey and is nicknamed the butcherbird after its carnivorous tendencies. The gray bird with a black mask and black wings with white markings is known for impaling rodents, lizards and other birds on thorns or barbed wire so that they can return and eat their caught prey later. The shrike patiently waits on elevated perches and hunts by scanning the ground area, then dives at its prey and uses its thick bill with a small hook for killing. The northern mockingbird and Clarks nutcracker are similar bird to the loggerhead shrike. It is smaller than the northern shrike but has a similar call. At CROW, an adult loggerhead shrike was admitted to the hospital from northeast Cape Coral. The bird was found on the sidewalk, and the finder noted that it had ants on its face. When the bird arrived, it was noted in the intake exam to having swelling of its right shoulder and was suspected to have a fracture of the right coracoid, similar to a collarbone in humans. Loggerhead shrikes are a common species found in this area. However, we only see approximately 20 cases per year in our hospital, and the most common reason for admission is falling from the nest, said Dr. Robin Bast, CROW veterinary intern. The shrike was unable to fly at time of admission to the hospital, and because of its debilitated state, the ants were able to attack it. X-rays confirmed the right coracoid fracture. Shortly after its April 6 intake, the patients right wing was placed in a body wrap and the bird was given pain medications. The shrike had a body wrap bandage on its wing while the fracture healed and received physical therapy every three days, said Dr. Bast. Last week, the bandage was removed, and the shrike is currently on a week of cage rest this means it is only able to take short flights around its small soft-sided enclosure. In a few days, it will be moved to a larger, outdoor enclosure for the next step of its rehabilitation. On April 15, CROW medical staff inspected the fracture by palpation and deemed it stable. Three days later, the body wrap was believed to be no longer necessary. There does not appear to be any complications due to the fracture at this time, and it has normal range of motion in the wing, said Dr. Bast. It is building back strength in the muscles on the affected wing. By April 24, the loggerhead shrike was closer to being moved to an outdoor enclosure for more extensive rehabilitation. The patient will likely be released within the next one to two weeks once it has regained normal flight patterns, added Dr. Bast. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to P.O. Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit www.crowclinic.org. Patient #18-0961 is gaining strength in its previously fractured wing and is expected to be released within the next two weeks photo by Brian Bohlman RIVER 11 THE RIVER APRIL 27, 2018

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Lots Of Fishing Options by Capt. Matt MitchellFishing certainly improved this week due to much more consistent weather conditions. Add bait that was much better and the wide variety of species that took part in the rod-bending fun, and it was a great week to be out fishing. Snook, trout, tripletail, grouper and mackerel were all part of the weeks menu for anglers. Although we still are waiting for the snook bite to go off in the passes, the big trout bite has been as good as it gets. We fished with live shiners rigged with a split shot to keep it down in the current, and limits of trout came easily in all of our local passes. My clients managed a few real bruiser trout pushing in excess of 24 inches along with lots of trout in that 17to 19-inch range. At times, this bite was basically every cast and made for a much-needed easy fishery that we have not had for what seems like months. During periods of slack tide, we switched it up and went dipping channel markers throughout the sound. Many of the intercoastal markers have man-made structures either right on them or just out from them. These structures can hold a crazy amount of fish. Catching gag grouper on almost every cast is a awesome thing no matter what size they are. Ive been starting out on these markers by dropping live shrimp on a jig head to reach the bottom, then once the bite is going off, switching up to heavier gear with a half-ounce jig head and a live pinfish. Trying to pull some of these larger grouper out of this structure is only what can be described as full-contact fishing. We also were lucky enough to catch a few keeper tripletail on these channel markers this week. Snook fishing remained a little tough with slower-than-normal tides for the majority of the week. Every time we snook-fished, we did catch a few but just never found that wide-open bite. Fishing mid-week with clients Melissa and Tom from Sanibel, we sat in a favorite sand pothole in the middle sound and watched dozens of 30-inch-plus snook just milling around. Even when I live-chummed these fish, we just could just not get them to feed. After camping and watching these big snook swim by the boat for well over an hour, Tom managed to get a bite and caught a 30-inch slot snook as our patience finally paid off. In and around the passes, look for feeding birds on schools of small bait to locate some really large Spanish mackerel. These mackerel are suckers for live shiners but will also readily eat spoons and small diving plugs. Further down the beaches, more and more tarpon are being spotted and caught as we get into prime-time tarpon fishing we experienced in May. Knapps Point is hard to beat to find a large school of early-season tarpon. First light and light winds offer anglers some of the best sight fishing for these tarpon, although many places in the sound hold these fish when conditions are not so perfect. Along with the tarpon, we are seeing more and more sharks both out along the beaches and in the sound. Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions, email captmattmitchell@aol. com. ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. NEW MOTOR SALES REBUILT POWERHEADS FACTORY TRAINED MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISERCourteous Professional Marine Repair Service Dockside Service Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life472-3380 466-3344 Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint PricesDave Doane NEW M O T O R S ALE S REB U ILT P O WERHEA D S FACTORY T R A I N E D MER C U RY MARINER JO HN SO N EVINR U DE S UZUKI YAMAHA O M C I/ O S MER C RU I S E R C ourteous Professional Marine Repair S erv i ce D oc k s i d e S erv i c e S ervin g Sanibel & C aptiva For Li f e Y B t t Yo ur B ottom Yo ur B ot to m Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices C Call on a c es C C ll n Pa in t Pr i es C C i i Call on Paint Prices D ave Doane1 Send Us Your Fish TalesWe would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include a photograph with identification. Email to press@islandsunnews.com or call 395-1213. Tom from Sanibel with a 30-inch snook caught while fishing with Capt. Matt Mitchell this week photo provided THE RIVER APRIL 27, 201812 BOAT RENTALSFishing Cabbage KeyDolphin Watching Captains Available472-5800Jensens Marina Captiva Island Single hooks cause less damage than treble hooksCLEAR YOUR GEAR It Catches More Than Fish

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Plant SmartYellow Necklacepodby Gerri ReavesYellow necklacepod (Sophora tomentosa var. truncata) is a longlived perennial shrub or tree and a member of the pea family. In the wild, its found in shell mounds, coastal strands, dunes, hammocks and salt marshes. This Florida native has a lot to recommend it wildlife friendliness, low maintenance, year-round butter-yellow flowers and attractive foliage. Use it as a buffer or in a wildlife garden, where it will provide cover for wildlife. A tendency to be leggy makes it suitable as a background plant. Multi-trunked with an irregular rounded crown, it reaches six to 10 feet in height and eight to 12 feet in width. The alternate leaves are glossy and evergreen. Hairy when young, they have 11 to 21 pairs of opposite oval leaflets that are three-fourths to an inch long. The showy irregularly shaped flowers are densely clustered and drooping on terminal spikes up to 16 inches long. Less than an inch long, they bloom at the branch ends, opening from the base of the spike to the tip. They bloom throughout the year, attracting bees, moths, hummingbirds, and butterflies, in particular, mangrove skippers. The seed pods measure two to eight inches long and contain up to nine seeds. They turn brown with age and persist on the plant. The pod, tightly constricted between each rounded seed, resembles a string of beads, thus the common name. This hardy species has a moderate growth rate and is highly drought and salt tolerant. It will adapt to a variety of conditions, even poor soil, although it needs organic content to do well. Give it full sun to partial shade and well-drained soil. Propagate it with the seeds. Self-sowing sometimes occurs near the parent plant. The seeds are a food source for birds and other wildlife but are poisonous to people. This plant is used medicinally to treat a wide variety of conditions. Another variety of necklacepod, Texas or hairy necklacepod (Sophora tomentosa var. occidentalis) is very similar to the native one, so be sure to buy plants from a supplier who knows the difference. The non-native variety with the velvety silver-green leaves is becoming naturalized in Florida and hybridizing with the native species. Sources: Everglades Wildflowers by Roger L. Hammer; Florida, My Eden by Frederic B. Stresau; A Gardeners Guide to Floridas Native Plants by Rufino Osorio; Growing Native by Richard W. Workman; A Guide to Florida-Friendly Landscaping by Florida Yards & Neighborhoods; Native Florida Plants by Robert G. Haehle and Joan Brookwell; The Shrubs and Woody Vines of Florida by Gil Nelson; Wildflowers of Florida Field Guide by Jaret C. Daniels and Stan Tekiela; www.fnps.org, www. regionalconservation.org, www.wildflower. org, and www.wildsouthflorida.com. Plant Smart explores the diverse flora of South Florida. Clusters of flowers attract butterflies, bees, moths and hummingbirds The constricted seed pod inspires the common name Yellow necklacepod grows up to about 10 feet tall and almost as wide photos by Gerri Reaves13 THE RIVER APRIL 27, 2018 Or consider not using any rat poisons at all. Instead, seal all entry points to your home. Help SCCF Bring Back the Barn OwlsSCCF 472-2329 sccf.orgPoisoned rats can kill the eagles, hawks, bobcats and owls that eat them.Tell your pest control professional to NOT use these rat poisons: brodifacoum bromailone difenacoum difethialone EXPERIENCE: HUNDREDS OF SUCCESSFUL LANDSCAPES300 Center Road, Fort Myers FL 33907 PHONE 239.939.9663 FAX 239.939.8504www.NoLawn.com www.AllNative.bizOPEN DAILY: 9 to 5 Mon Sat 10 to 3 SunOUR NURSERY FEATURES OVER 200 SPECIES OF NATIVE PLANTS ON SEVERAL ACRES Buttery Gardens Wildlife/Bird Sanctuaries We also offer landscape design, consultation, installation and maintenance. Wildlife Refuge Hiring Students For Summer ProgramJN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge on Sanibel is hiring high school students for its annual Youth Conservation Corps (YCC) summer pro gram. Three students will be hired to assist with either maintenance or visitor services. The YCC pr ogram targets young men and women, ages 15 through 18, to pro vide them with a valuable work-earn-learn experience. The eight-week pr ogram runs from June 11 through August 3. Duties for the maintenance position will include facilities and trail maintenance and removal of invasive plants. Visitor services duties will include assisting with environmental education tours, greeting visitors, working in the visitor center, answering phones and entering data. The three hired students will par ticipate in educational field trips to local envir onmental venues. Pay rate is $9 per hour. Work hours are from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. with a 30-minute lunch break. Bring your own lunch; refrigerator and microwave available. Reliable transporta tion is required. Sanibel toll is paid by the participant. For an application, contact Supervisory Refuge Ranger Toni Westland at 4721100. Indicate which position you are interested in on your application by circling the position, either maintenance or visitor services at the bottom of the form. No prior work experience is required. Deadline for applications is 4 p.m. on Thursday, May 10. Late applications will not be accepted. Applications may be submitted by mail, fax to 472-4061, or email to toni_westland@fws.gov.

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THE RIVER APRIL 27, 201814 Big Brothers Big Sisters Hosts VIP Pre-Party For Signature EventBig Brothers Big Sisters of the Sun Coast recently hosted a VIP Pre-Party in preparation for its April 19 signature event Chefs Cooking for Kids at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center. About 70 sponsors, board members and other VIPs attended the cocktail party at the home of Marc and Lori Collins in Fort Myers. Chefs Cooking for Kids is the largest fund-raiser of the year for the non-profit organization, which provides one-on-one mentors for children facing adversity. Leading local chefs and restaurants provide culinary samplings of food at the event that also includes music and an auction. Amy Wegmann from Fox 4 News will serve as emcee, and Scott Robertson will serve as auctioneer. There also will be a chance drawing valued at more than $8,000. Participating restaurants and top chefs include: Norman Love Confections, Crave Culinaire, G3 Catering, Rumrunners, Cru, 3 Pepper Burrito Company, Bubbas Roadhouse & Saloon, Grump Goat Coffee, Il Cielo and Palladio Trattoria. Gold Sponsors for the event are Norman Love Confections, Comcast and enterprise rent-a-car. Additional sponsors include: Coastal Wine & Spirits of Florida, FineMark National Bank & Trust, Scott Robertson Auctioneers, Dominos, Ensite, Florida Blue, LaRue Pest Management, Mr. Greens, Publix Super Market Charities, Roetzel & Andress, LLC, Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center, FOX 4 WFTX-TV, Gulfshore Life, Sam Galloway Lincoln, Molloy Financial Group, Rapid Print, Planned Perfection, The Flower Path, Babcock Ranch Foundation, Ben Simmons, Cru, First Community Bank, Good Deals Appliances, Henderson, Franklin, Starnes & Holt, PA, Marc & Lori Collins, Mark Loren Designs, and SVN | KOVA. For more information, contact Aimee McLaughlin, regional development director for Lee County at 8491187 or amclaughlin@bbbssun.org or visit www.bbbssun. org/events. Marc Collins and Stacey Cook-Hawk Michael Lehnert and Bryan Blackwell From left, Phil Bennett, Lori Collins and Susan Battaglia From left, Mary Love, Norman Love, Amy Frith and Glenn Frith From left, Joe Brydia, Linda Knowlton and Mark Jones photos provided From left, Jerry Snyderman, Barbara Snyderman and Aimee McLaughlin From left, Jim Griffith, Bryan Blackwell and Kara Griffith From left, Kathy Galloway, Sam Galloway, Jr. and Pat Carroll Todd Swaney and Stephanie Davis Charles Barnes and Tamara Roberts

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15 THE RIVER APRIL 27, 2018 3075 Sanibel-Captiva Road Sanibel Island, Florida 33957 (239) 395-2233 Open Daily, 10 a.m. p.m.www.ShellMuseum.org www.SanibeIlsIandVacations.com APRIL 2018MUSEUM SPONSOR DAILY CRAFTS AND TANK TALKS Chrysalis Awards Business And Tourism WinnersThe Lee County Visitor & Convention Bureau (VCB) and the Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerce recently honored six local individuals and businesses who positively influence Lee County at the Celebration of Business & Tourism Awards Luncheon and Trade Show at The Westin Cape Coral Resort at Marina Village. The 2018 Chrysalis Award honorees celebrated for their positive impact on the local community were: Business Development: Sanibel Captiva Community Bank Cultural Achievement: Alliance for the Arts Eco-Innovation: CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife) Education: The Laboratory Theater of Florida Sales & Marketing: HelloSWFL Business Tourism Leader: Courtney Fraser/Eat Local Lee The event prior to National Travel and Tourism Week, May 6-12, celebrates the successful collaboration between tourism and the community to maintain and enhance tourism as the major economic engine for Lee County. Iberiabank is the presenting sponsor. These are the MVPs of tourism and business in Lee County, said Commissioner Cecil Pendergrass, chairman of the Lee Board of County Commissioners as well as the Tourist Development Council. Their commitment to excellence goes a long way toward benefiting our community and our citizens. The 19 businesses and four individuals nominated for Chrysalis Awards were judged on innovation in their respective category. The judges also focused on how the nominees distinguished themselves in the community, the results of their efforts to promote the destination and their contributions to business and tourism partnerships for the overall benefit of the county. Honorees were recognized for their commitment to excellence in improving community growth and creating job opportunities for the citizens of Lee County. The awards event was attended by members of the local business and tourism community. Tourism brings an estimated $3 billion annually into the local economy and accounts for one in five jobs in Lee County. From page 1Coastal-Themed Exhibitpaintings. Hulls use of perspective, angles and shadows conveys tension and mood. Waller was born in Brooklyn, New York and received her undergradu ate and masters degrees fr om Newcomb College and Tulane University, both in New Orleans. Concurrent with studies in sociology, psychol ogy and social work, she developed a passion for art and art history. After an 11-year career as a professional therapist, Waller became a certified financial plan ner and founder of the successful W aller & Wax Advisors firm in Tampa. She was awarded the Arts Council of Hillsborough County 2016 Individual Artist Grant in 2016. Her paintings are collected by individuals and corporations nationwide. A few years ago, Hull began to paint objects, figures and landscapes as they appear from an elevated point of view. In 2015, she began to focus specifically on beaches in Florida and New England. She first began to photo document beach scenes from the top floor of hotels, later in an airplane. She has also learned to use drones to capture references for this high-elevation, birds eye perspective. Hulls intent is to evoke a sense of isolation one might experience in a crowd; the juxtaposition of isolation and loneliness co-existing within a relaxed, leisurely recreational space, voyeuristically looking into, but not being part of the world below. Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information, visit artinlee.org/coastal or call 939-2787. Elevation 52 by Sarah Hull image provided To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 395-1213

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THE RIVER APRIL 27, 201816 Superior InteriorsColor Trendsby Linda CoinColor is a key ingredient in decorating it adds life, excitement and fun to our rooms. Color has a large impact on us it can affect things such as our moods, our appetite and our working efficiency. Heres a look at some hot new color trends that you might consider for your next decorating project. The new neutrals are classic and sophisticated. Hues of gray, from pale to deep, are the top trend in the neutral palette. They also link the area between black, which may be too severe, and taupe, which may not be strong enough. These grays are classy and are at home in any room. Rich browns such as mink, espresso and chocolate are other neutrals that are key to the home fashion palette. Emerging as a hot fashion color last fall, purple is not just a fad. Look for gray violets as an accent color or neutral, as well as deeper purples in a huge range of products. Mauve is making a comeback as an accent but also serves as a neutral now. Purple, silver and gray create a lovely color palette for the contemporary living room or a guest room. Passionate, warm and inviting the red and orange family will have a strong presence moving forward. From softer orange tones to hot and spicy shades of red and orange, they are great at livening up a space. Crimson, tangerine and cool apricot add life and spice up any room whether it is with paint or adding trendy accessories in these striking colors. Cool and calm blues are relaxing and still a hot trend, especially in Southwest Florida. Watery blues, sea glass, spa blue and sky blue will help you create a tranquil and peaceful feeling. They are ideal for bedrooms and baths where relaxation is key. Expect several versions of pink, from modest blush to barely-there beige-pinks to vibrant pinks some with hints of purple and coral. They are all great color choices for those extra special accents. Complementary colors are huge. Whether its black and white or blue and green, opposite shades can make a room more exciting. Use neutrals in opposite sides of the spectrum for an elegant, distinct look or couple primary colors for a more daring result. Dont know where to start? Use colors that are in keeping with your surroundings. If you have a gorgeous view, neutrals will make the view stand out. If your home is lacking in architectural interest, the addition of color will add some. Finally, color is a personal choice. When choosing colors, think about what colors look good on you and make you happy and ask, what do I want to feel when I am in this space? Choose a color palette that reflects that. Linda Coin is an interior designer on Sanibel/Captiva Islands and can be reached at linda@coindecden.com. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. Mark OBrien Owner/Agent Trish Barbone Agent Justin Wheeler Agent We are HERE for all your insurance needs Tax Collector To Emcee Viva La DerbyLarry Hart will be the emcee for Viva La Derby, the annual fundraiser of the Guardian ad Litem Foundation (GALF), 20th Judicial Circuit, Inc., at Colonial Country Club on Saturday, May 5 from 5 to 9 p.m. We are excited to have Mr. Hart as this years emcee, said GALFs Executive Director Roxanne Dyer. We look forward to his charm and wit and to seeing the lighter side of a man charged with such a serious task, and we hear he does it so very well. Larry Hart was elected Lee County Tax Collector in 2012 after being appointed to the position by Governor Rick Scott. The derby-themed event now in its fourth year is billed as an evening of fun and entertainment. With the live-streaming of the actual Kentucky Derby race, the parade of colorful hats and eclectic bowties, the atmosphere becomes very festive and alive with excitement. Other fun activities include casino games, heads and tails contest, a cork-pull and auctions. A disc jockey will be on hand to spin the right mix for such a party, and the host venue will serve a buffet dinner. With a mantra which says Treat everyone who walks through the door with kindness and respect, Larry Harts voice will be perfect to speak on behalf of the thousands of children in the 20th Judicial Circuit who have been removed from their homes due to abuse, neglect, or abandonment and placed under the supervision of the court. Larry Hart photo provided To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 395-1213 Legislative Session To Be Reviewed At REIS MeetingState Representative Matt Caldwell will review the 2018 Legislative Session and implications for Southwest Floridas real estate industry at the Real Estate Investment Societys (REIS) luncheon meeting in the Osprey Room at Pelican Preserves Clubhouse on Tuesday, May 8 at 11:45 a.m. Recent legislative action and budget allocations will have far-reaching impacts on our local economy, and Caldwell will summarize the key issues to watch. He is also expected to provide insight on the legislative process and political factors. Following the presentation, Caldwell will respond to questions of specific interest to the real estate investment and development industry. Representative Caldwell has served in the Florida House of Representatives since 2010 and is now running for Commissioner of Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS), which includes Forestry Services and the Office of Energy. Caldwell is a real estate appraiser and qualified expert witness on appraisal issues in several jurisdictions. Admission is $30 for members and $40 for guests, which includes lunch. Reservations are required by Thursday, May 3. Pelican Preserves Clubhouse is located at 9802 Pelican Preserve Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information, visit www.reis-swfl.org. Free Google Event For Local Business OwnersGoogle thought leaders will share insights into how you can boost your business online at a free event at Endeavor Innovative Workspaces on Wednesday, May 2 from 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. Hosted by Fort Myers-based Be Brilliant! Marketing, the Google Partners Connect livestream event is limited to 25 business owners who are interested in learning how online advertising can help them generate leads and increase brand awareness. To RSVP, visit http://bebrilliant.link/ PrtnrCnnct. Lunch will be provided. Endeavor Innovative Workspaces is located at 8831 Business Park Drive, Suite 301, in Fort Myers. For more information, contact Bryon McCartney at Be Brilliant! Marketing at 851-5190 or bryon@bebrilliant.com.

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17 THE RIVER APRIL 27, 2018 Dave & Busters To Open At Bell Tower ShopsDave & Busters, a popular entertainment center offering patrons the opportunity to Eat, Drink, Play and Watch all in one location, will be opening in Bell Tower Shops. Dave & Busters will be located in approximately 40,000 square feet of space formerly occupied by Saks Fifth Avenue. Construction will begin in June 2018 with a grand opening antici pated for early 2019. Dave & Busters will be a gr eat addition as Bell Tower Shops continues to evolve into an 18-hour-a-day destination for shopping, dining and entertainment, said Whitney Livingston, senior vice president at Madison Marquette. Dave & Busters appeals to a wide audience, from children and families to young profession als and sports fans looking for a unique envir onment to have dinner and drinks. Bell Tower Shops recently commenced construction on a comprehensive redevelopment to create a more modern destination, including new common areas, updated architecture and redesigned storefronts, fresh paint and contemporary lighting. Dave & Busters operates 112 restau rant/entertainment complexes throughout North America, including six locations in Florida: Brandon, Hollywood, Jacksonville, Miami, Orlando and Panama City Beach. Dave & Busters sports bar photo provided Marketing Director To Discuss StrategiesThe gift of knowledge is the highest gift in the world. Jaimie Miller, APR, marketing director at CONRIC PR & Marketing, looks to gift Goodwills MicroEnterprise students with marketing knowledge during their training class in Cape Coral on June 4. Goodwills MicroEnterprise program provides aspiring small business owners with the skills they need to succeed as entrepreneurs and become more independent. The program is designed to help individuals with low to moderate income levels and other disadvantages to start or stabilize their own businesses. As a part of the support system for these budding entrepreneurs, Goodwill provides a six-week training class covering topics that are essential to establishing and growing a stable business. During the marketing training, Miller will cover detailed components of a marketing plan, branding and messaging, guerilla marketing, implementation and evaluation. I am always happy to help others learn and grow in their businesses. Knowledge is the greatest gift that we can give that nobody can ever take away, says Miller. Miller is an alumnus of Florida Gulf Coast University and has served on their alumni association board of directors, as well as the Florida Public Relations Association Southwest Florida chapter board of directors. Jaimie Miller photo provided Hazmat Team Responses To College Incident First responders from the Fort Myers Fire Department, Fort Myers Police Department, Iona Fire Department, Estero Fire Department, Lee County EMS and members of the Region 6 Hazmat team responded to an incident on April 18 at the Hodges University campus, located at 4501 Colonial Boulevard. While cleaning and organizing a lab where chemicals are stored, a faculty member of the university moved a jar containing an unknown substance with high vapor pressure. Following Hodges University and FMFD emergency response protocols, the two buildings were evacuated and a hazmat team was called to the site to evaluate the situation. The faculty member who encountered the unknown substance was treated by EMS personnel and did not require transport to the hospital. Upon inspection, hazmat crews found the site to be safe and the building suitable for occupancy. Hodges University is working with a private contractor to clean up the room where the incident occurred. FMFD works together with community organizations to review emergency response plans; the Hodges University plan was updated in November 2017 and directly informed emergency protocols followed by the university and emergency responders. Everything went according to plan, said FMFD Division Chief James Hayden, who was the onsite safety officer. With preparedness from the university, our emergency personnel were able to evacuate the buildings safely and bring in the hazmat team to successfully mitigate the situation, said Hayden. We couldnt have asked for a better scenario in terms of response time and coordination from our first responders, said Dr. John Meyer, president of Hodges University. Having these working relationships is immensely helpful. Skip Camp, our director of campus security and facilities management, knew exactly what to do under potentially dangerous circumstances. City of Fort Myers firefighters are state certified in the management of hazardous materials (hazmat), and are also the designated team for Southwest Floridas six-county area Region 6. The FMFDs hazmat team is staffed with 40 personnel, trained to the technician level, who each complete 160 hours of initial training followed by a minimum of 36 hours of annual training. The hazmat team is capable of providing identification, stabilization, and mitigation of hazardous materials incidents, and is based out of FMFD Station 5. For more information, contact Stephanie Schaffer at 321-7157 or sschaffer@cityftmyers.com.

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THE RIVER APRIL 27, 201818 Financial FocusKeep Investment Ecosystem Healthyby Jennifer BaseyApril 22 is Earth Day. First observed in 1970, Earth Day has evolved into an international celebration, with nearly 200 countries holding events to support clean air, clean water and other measures to protect our planet. As an investor, what lessons can you learn from this special day? Consider the following: Avoid toxic investment moves. Earth Day events show us how we can help keep toxins out of our land, air and water. And if you want to keep your investment ecosystem healthy, you need to avoid making some toxic moves. For example, dont chase after hot stocks based on tips you may have heard or read. By the time you learn about these stocks, they may already have cooled off and they may not even be appropriate for your goals or risk tolerance. Another toxic investment move involves trying to time the market that is, buying investments when they reach low points and selling them at their peaks. Its a great theory, but almost impossible to turn into reality, because no one can really predict market highs and lows and your timing efforts, which may involve selling investments that could still help you may disrupt your long-term strategy. Reduce, reuse, recycle. Reduce, reuse, recycle is a motto of the environmental movement. Essentially, its encouraging people to add less stuff to their lives and use the things they already have. As an investor, you can benefit from the same advice. Rather than constantly buying and selling investments in hopes of boosting your returns, try to build a portfolio that makes sense for your situation, and stick with your holdings until your needs change. If youre always trading, youll probably rack up fees and taxes, and you may well end up not even boosting your performance. It might not seem exciting to purchase investments and hang on to them for decades, but thats the formula many successful investors follow, and have followed. Plant seeds of opportunity. Another Earth Day lesson deals with the value of planting gardens and trees. When you invest, you also need to look for ways to plant seeds of opportunity. Seek out investments that, like trees, can grow and prosper over time. All investments do carry risk, including the potential loss of principal, but you can help reduce your risk by owning a mix of other, relatively less volatile vehicles, such as corporate bonds and U.S. Treasury securities. (Keep in mind, though, that fixed-rate vehicles are subject to interest-rate risk, which means that if interest rates rise, the value of bonds issued at a lower rate may fall.) Match your money with your values. Earth Day also encourages us to be conscientious consumers. So, when you support local food growers, you are helping, in your own way, to reduce the carbon footprint caused in part by trucks delivering fruits and vegetables over long distances. Similarly, you might choose to include socially responsible investing in your overall strategy by avoiding investments in certain industries you find objectionable, or by seeking out companies that behave in a manner you believe benefits society. Earth Day is here, and then its gone but by applying some of its key teachings to your investment activities, you may improve your own financial environment. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones financial advisor. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@ edwardjones.com. Attorney Joins Law Firm DivisionAttorney Spencer Shaw has joined the workers compensation division at Henderson, Franklin, Starnes & Holt, PAs. Shaw is a native of Southwest Florida, graduating from Naples High School (2008), Florida Gulf Coast University (bachelor of science, 2012) and Ave Maria School of Law (JD, magna cum laude, 2016). Shaw is an attorney in the firms Fort Myers office and focuses her practice in workers compensation defense. While in law school, she served as editor-in-chief of the Ave Maria School of Law International Law Journal and treasurer of Phi Alpha Delta. Shaw also served as a staff attorneys intern for the 20th Judicial Circuit Court. She was a recipient of Ave Maria School of Laws deans scholarship. Shaw has volunteered with Oceans Conservancy beach clean-up and Empty Bowls of Naples for Womens Law Association. She may be reached at 344-1132 or by email at spencer.shaw@ henlaw.com. For more information on Shaw or Henderson Franklin, visit www.henlaw. com. Spencer Shaw photo providedPre-Construction GraduatesWith low unemployment rates and multiple new development projects in the City of Fort Myers, the Southwest Florida Enterprise Center recognized an unmet need and developed a training program for citizens seeking jobs in the construction industry. Recently, the Enterprise Centers inaugural class graduated with 17 students ready to enter the construction workforce. Participants attended classes from February 1 through April 10, meeting on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to noon at the Southwest Florida Enterprise Center. Michael Love, director of the Southwest Florida Enterprise Center, credits the program partners working with the city to make this program a success. Partners include SKANSKA, B&I, Career Source of Southwest Florida and Lee County Economic Development. Students learned from a curriculum including construction 101; basic safety; introduction to construction math; introduction to hand tools and ladders; basic communication skills; basic employability skills; introduction to materials handling and basic rigging; and first aid. Its wonderful to connect job seekers with training from industry leaders in our area, remarked Saeed Kazemi, city manager. This is a community on the move, and we are taking steps to make sure everyone who wants to work has the appropriate training resources available right here in the City of Fort Myers. For more information on future classes, including the next session starting on April 24, contact the Southwest Florida Enterprise Center at 321-7085. Routine Temporary Change In WaterLee County Utilities will be temporarily converting its disinfectant process from chloramines to free chlorine residual from May 1 through May 29. This is a routine measure common among water utilities that use chloramines as a primary disinfectant. Anyone who uses a kidney dialysis machine at home should contact his or her equipment supplier so the proper filtering equipment can be installed in advance. Tropical fish or aquatic animal owners should contact a local tropical fish store for appropriate pretreatment of water before adding water to tanks. Customers may notice a temporary change in the taste, odor and color of the water, which is not harmful. This is a routine, precautionary measure to ensure Lee County Utilities customers of clean, safe potable water. Customers with questions can call 533-8845 during normal business hours, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. For service area locations, visit www. leegov.com/utilities/new-development/ service-franchise-area-maps. Fort Myers Among Best In Business StartingWalletHub has named Fort Myers as 2018s 10th-best small city to start a business. To determine the rankings, WalletHub compared the business-friendliness of more than 1,200 small-sized cities and analyzed 18 key metrics ranging from average growth in number of small businesses to investor access to labor costs. WalletHub compared 1,261 cities across three key dimensions including business environment, access to resources and business costs, evaluating cities with a population of between 25,000 and 100,000 residents. City refers to city proper and excludes the surrounding metro area. Weve streamlined our permitting process and are experiencing a significant uptick in activity, said Saeed Kazemi, PE, city manager. The positive growth environment for new and existing businesses is incredible. Eight cities in Florida made the top 100, with Fort Myers being the only Florida city ranked in the top 20. For more information and the full list, visit wallethub. com/edu/best-small-cities-to-start-abusiness/20180. From page 1ACT Receptionwhile attending Fort Myers High School where she studied ceramics and photogra phy for three years. She graduated from the University of Florida with a bachelor of fine arts degree, focusing in painting. Hackett loves collecting imagery from the world around her and turning it into a visual experience on canvas. Nature photography and collage work are two ma jor influences for her work. Her imagery ranges fr om a surreal collage style, to more traditional landscapes and animal portraits with a twist. Fleury is a licensed mural artist, instructor and independent faux finisher. She specializes in commissioned canvas artwork, hand-painted murals and wall finishes. She has been selling and design ing art for more than 19 years. Fluery has completed models and projects for designers and builders, such as PGI, Koogler Homes, Pinnacle Builders, Tundra Models and INTEX Builders. Her murals can also be found in many local hair salons, casinos and restaurants. Arts for ACT Gallery is located at 2265 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. For more information, visit www.artsforactgal lery.com.

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19 THE RIVER APRIL 27, 2018 RIVER Book ReviewThe Whispering Room by Di SaggauThe Whispering Room by Dean Koontz, is a sequel to The Silent Corner and again features former FBI agent Jane Hawk as she continues her fight against an evil conspiracy that brainwashes people with nanomachines. Before she takes her own life, schoolteacher Cora Gundersun utters these words, No time to delay. Do what you were born to do. Fame will be yours when you do this. The phrase is also uttered by many others in the same situation. When Coras secret journal is discovered, its contents lead the authorities to think she must have been insane. Jane thinks differently. The 27-year-old Jane is the most wanted woman in America because shes been killing the bad guys responsible for the murder of her husband, by making it look like a suicide. Using disguises and her brain power to avoid surveillance by government agencies that have been infiltrated by the company, she continues her search for the murderous billionaire whose California biotech firm developed the microscopic control mechanisms being injected into peoples bloodstreams. These people are bent on hijacking Americas future for their own monstrous ends, but they never banked on Jane, a highly trained FBI agent, to go rogue in order to detail their insidious plans. Jane finds a good friend in a cop, Luther Tillman, after a teacher in his Minnesota town drives a car bomb into a hotel and kills 42 people including the governor and a congressman. Driven by her love for her lost husband and by fear for her 5-year-old son she has sent into hiding, Jane has become an unstoppable predator. The Silent Corner still remains my favorite read, but The Whispering Room will not disappoint as the charismatic Jane turns into an avenger. Shes a new heroine who will continue her thrilling journey in Koontzs next book The Crooked Staircase available May 8. School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Shelley, My preschool daughter lied to her teachers twice last week. We discussed this with her and told her that lying is wrong, but I am concerned that she may have some type of psychological problem. Her teachers said that lying at this age is generally not a problem. Is this true? Jenna R, Cape Coral Dear Jenna, All children lie at some time or another. The key issue here is that you need to examine the behavior and see if the root cause can be determined. Lying, particularly with younger children, is often not serious but there is a range of issues that lying may represent from mild misunderstanding to fear. In your case with a young child, her teacher is probably correct since lying at the preschool age is very common and does not typically represent abnormal behavior. Young preschool-aged children often make up stories and tell tall tales. This is typical of this age because preschoolers enjoy hearing and creating stories for fun. Sometimes though, young children may blur the distinction between reality and fantasy which results in lying. This type of lying is usually not a serious problem, and children typically outgrow this behavior. As children get older, they may tell a lie to be self-serving, for example, to avoid doing a chore or to deny responsibility for their behavior. Parents should respond to these isolated instances of lying by talking with their child about the importance of truthfulness, honesty and trust. Older children and teenagers may also lie to avoid hurting anothers feelings, to protect their privacy or to help them feel psychologically separate and independent from their parents, as the American Academy of Adolescent Psychiatry has reported. Lying can become a bad habit if it goes unchecked. It can also indicate malicious behavior or emotional problems. Children may lie to get attention from peers or adults, to deal with daily demands or to cover up a serious problem such as substance abuse. If you find that your child has lied to you, you should take that opportunity to talk about their behavior. Parents are the most important role models for children and honesty is learned at home. The importance of honesty at home, school and in their community, should be discussed, as should alternatives to lying. This could be a great way to discuss and model how to problem solve. Teach your child different ways to cope and meet their needs without lying. And with the younger children, make sure to include a discussion about reviewing the differences between make believe and reality. If as a parent, you do see a maladaptive pattern of lying with your child that is serious and repetitive, it may be time to seek professional help. An evaluation by a professional child/ adolescent counselor could help both the child and parent understand and remediate this behavior. Shelley Greggs is adjunct faculty at Florida SouthWestern State College, where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also a nationally certified school psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. Packed with facts and employing an engaging storytelling style, [Female Pioneers of Fort Myers] both teaches and entertains. Local history buffs and newcomers to history will value Tuthill and Halls research and appreciate the accessible format, too.Gerri Reaves, PhD, author of Legendary Locals of Fort Myers and Fort Myers, Then & Now Available atWWW.AMAZON.COM WWW.EDITORIALRXPRESS.COM Golf Tournament To Benefit School Athletic ProgramsThe East Lee County High School Athletic Department Golf Tournament will take place at the Majestic Golf Club on Saturday, May 5. Registration begins at 7 a.m., with a shotgun start slated for 8 a.m. Cost to enter is $70 per player or $250 for a foursome if payment is made in full prior to event. The fee covers driving range access, 18 holes of golf with a cart, hot dog and drink at the turn, buffet style lunch, raffle prizes, auction and awards handed out directly after golf. William Hagen, athletic director at East Lee, said the money raised will directly impact our athletic programs by providing students with uniforms, safe equipment, awards and will help with repairs and maintenance of current equipment. East Lee County High School is a Title I school, with over 90 percent of the students qualifying for free or reduced lunch. Hagen says his goal is to provide a positive environment in which the athletes learn life lessons to help them become productive members of our community. Registration deadline is April 28. East Lee High School is also actively looking for sponsors to help support the golf tournament.

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Everblades Perfect In First-Round Of Hockey Playoffs; Next Up Orlandoby Ed FrankFor lovers of sports, this may be the best time of the year. The 2018 baseball season is in full swing (15 games on some days), the National Hockey League and the National Basketball Association playoffs are being played, and the National Football League draft is this week. In addition, what some say is the most exciting two minutes in sports, the Kentucky Derby, is next weekend, and there is profes sional golf, soccer and tennis on television. Ive probably missed others. Right her e in our own area, however, there is exciting playoff hockey as the Florida Everblades, having advanced to the South Division Finals of the ECHL with a four-game sweep of the Atlanta Gladiators, take on the Orlando Solar Bears in a best-of-seven series starting tonight, Friday, at 7:30 p.m. at Germain Arena. The puck drops at 7 p.m. tomorrow, Saturday, for Game Two. Games Three, Four and Five (if necessary) will be in Orlando next week before returning here if Games Six and Seven are necessary. Orlando swept South Carolina in the first round. The Fort Myers-Orlando best-ofseven series marks the first time in ECHL history that two teams meet having swept their opponents in the previous round. The history of the Florida Everblades is one of true success in, not only minor league hockey, but minor league sports in its entirety. The Everblades have qualified for postseason play in 19 of its 20 years of franchise history. The team won the ECHL championship, known as the Kelly Cup, in 2012, and advanced to the league championship finals in the 2003-04 and 2004-05 seasons. Nearly every season the Everblades are among the leagues top five teams in atten dance, averaging nearly 6,500 fans per game. More than 4 million fans have attended Everblades hockey at Ger main Arena in the teams history. Thirty-one former Everblades players have been promoted to the National Hockey League. There were doubters that minor league hockey could survive when the franchise began as we have seen minor league basketball and arena football teams here fold. But they were sure wrong about the Florida Everblades. Miracle Also Home This Weekend In addition to Florida Everblades playoff hockey here this weekend, the Fort Myers Miracle baseball team also will be home at Hammond Stadium hosting a four-game series against Daytona that began Thursday and concludes with a Sunday matinee. The Miracle began the week with an 8-9 season record and a fifth-place standing in the Florida State League South Division. Daytona came here in first-place in the North Division with a sparkling 12-5 season record. Game times for the series are 7 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 6 p.m. Saturday and 4 p.m. Sunday. RIVER THE RIVER APRIL 27, 201820 PRGHomeTeam.comCall Eric Pfeifer239.472.0004Community, Service, Leadership, Expertise, Integrity, Results New Basketball Coach At NorthNorth Fort Myers High School recently hired Leland Clifford as its boys basketball team head coach. Coach Clifford says hes excited to take over the program at North Fort Myers. In my first job interview in Lee County six years ago I told a colleague I will be the head coach at North Fort Myers one day! I have wanted this job for a very long time. I couldnt be more excited to join the Red Knight family, and I will build a program the student body, administration, faculty and community will be proud of. Coach Clifford comes to the Red Knights after four years as the head coach at Gateway Charter High School. In his 10 years of coaching, he has also been an assistant coach at Bishop Verot High and on the basketball staff at Mullen High in Denver, Colorado. Leland Clifford photo providedBonita Springs High Golf TourneyThe Bonita Springs High School Bull Sharks are getting ready for year two with their inaugural golf tournament. Players will hit the links at the Spanish Wells Golf and Country Club on May 12. A lunch and live auction will begin at 11 a.m. Players will tee off in a shotgun start at 1 p.m. Entry fees for the tournament are $100 per person or $400 for a team of four. Athletic Director Luke Eliser says, All proceeds from this event will go to the athletic and activities department for the purchasing of equipment, uniforms and the ability to insure that no student is unable to participate in activities due to financial concerns. Special events planned for the golf tournament include contests for Closest to the Pin, Longest Drive and putting. The deadline to register to play is May 4. The Bonita Springs High School Athletic Department is also looking for sponsors to help their student athletes Spanish Wells Golf and Country Club is located at 9801 Treasure Cay Lane in Bonita Springs. For more information or sponsorship opportunities, contact Luke Eliser, Bonita Springs High School athletic director, at 495-3022 or lukede@ leeschools.net. Candlelighters Golf Tournament Candlelighters of Southwest Florida will host the 23rd annual Gold Ribbon Classic Golf Tournament at Bonita Bay Club East on Saturday, May 12. Check-in begins at 8 a.m. followed by a shotgun start at 9 a.m. Entry fee for an individual player is $150, which includes 18 holes of golf with cart, range balls, golfers goodie bags and a buffet lunch with awards presentation immediately following play. Pre-registration is required. The tournament is open to the public. There will be a variety of raffle prizes offered including hotel stays, tickets for Florida attractions, rounds of golf and gift certificates to area restaurants. Proceeds will assist local children with cancer or blood disorders from the time they are diagnosed, throughout treatment and recovery. This year in the U.S., over 15,780 children will be diagnosed with cancer and one in 530 young adults between age 20 and 39 will be a survivor of childhood cancer. Bonita Bay Club East is located at 3700 Wildwood Boulevard in Naples For more information, to make a tax deductible donation, donate a gift certificate, raffle item, goodie bag or sign up to play, visit www.candlelightersswfl.org. SPORTS QUIZ 1. Who are the three official Montreal Expos in the Baseball Hall of Fame? 2. How many times did Hall of Famer Steve Carlton win at least 20 games in a season for the Philadelphia Phillies? 3. When was the last time befor e 2016 that the Temple Owls football team won a conference championship? 4. Golden States Stephen Curry set a r ecord in 2016 for most 3-pointers in a game (13). Who had held the mark of 12? 5. Who holds the NHL r ecord for most consecutive games played? 6. Which two soccer gr eats have won the Ballon dOr award as soccers best player five times each? 7. Name any of the thr ee horses trained by Bob Baffert that won the Breeders Cup Classic between 2014 and 2016. ANSWERS 1. Gary Carter, Andre Dawson and Tim Raines. 2. Five times -1972, , and 3. It was 1967. 4. Kobe Bryant (2003), Donyell Marshall (2005) and Curry (2016). 5. Doug Jarvis, with 964 consecutive games played. 6. Cristiano Ronaldo and Lionel Messi. 7. Bayern, 2014; American Pharoah, 2015; Arrogate, 2016.

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21 THE RIVER APRIL 27, 2018Florida Board Of Education Honors FSW Student Pam Stewart, the education commissioner of Florida, recently recognized outstanding college students during the State Board of Education meeting at LaBelle High School. Fleener Cophy, a freshman at Florida SouthWestern State College, was one of the students honored. It was an honor to recognize Fleener Cophy with the Commissioners Leadership Award at the March State Board of Education meeting, said Commissioner of Education Pam Stewart. The struggles that she has faced would be enough for some to give up, but Fleener has pursued her dreams relentlessly. I commend her for her hard work, and I am grateful for the high school teacher who ignited her passion for education and public service. I hope that her story motivates others to be a positive force in the life of a Florida student. Cophy struggled academically in high school until a history teacher inspired her. After starting at FSW last fall, she worked hard and now has a 4.0 GPA while being very involved on FSWs Collier Campus in Naples. She is a student assistant for the colleges adjunct faculty, senator for Student Government Association (SGA) and chairs the judiciary committee. Cophy has been invited to join Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society. After she earns her associate in arts degree at FSW, her plans are to transfer to a university to major in political science and minor in political philosophy. Ultimately, she wants to attend law school. Visit www.fsw.edu for more information. Fleener Cophy pictured with her plaque and education board members photo providedThe Speakers Assembly of Southwest Florida awarded four $2,500 scholarships to local students at its April 6 luncheon. The students, all seniors at area high schools, are Zachary Clark (Estero High School), Kelsey Parker (Fort Myers High School), Tasnim Thakur (Fort Myers High School) and William Yarley (Fort Myers High School). The students were interviewed and selected for the scholarships by a Speakers Assembly committee. At the luncheon, they met with speaker Steven Cook, who presented on the topic of Protest, Democracy and Violence in the New Middle East. Membership applications for the 2018-19 season of eight speaking events between November and April are available at www.speakersassembly.com. Call 948-7909 for more information. From left, William Yarley, Tasnim Thakur, Kelsey Parker, Zachary Clark and Steven Cook photo provided Assembly Awards Four Scholarships To Local Students SCHOOL ACCOMPLISHMENTS Honor Society InducteeKimberly Ni of Cape Coral was recently initiated into The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, the nations oldest and most selective all-discipline collegiate honor society. Ni was initiated at The University of Tampa. Ni is among approximately 30,000 students, faculty, professional staff and alumni to be initiated into Phi Kappa Phi each year. Membership is by invitation only and requires nomination and approval by a chapter. Only the top 10 percent of seniors and 7.5 percent of juniors are eligible for membership. Local Students In Phi Kappa PhiFive Southwest Florida natives were recently initiated into The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, the nations oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines. Darla Billington of Cape Coral was initiated at University of Central Florida. Katherine Mavridou-Hernandez of Fort Myers was initiated at University of Florida. Ryan Shuman of Fort Myers was initiated at University of Florida. Fort Myers natives Keelin McKenna and Samuel Weiss were initiated at Florida State University. Fort Myers Native Senior Art ShowEmma Heussner of Fort Myers recently exhibited in The University of Alabamas Exit 2018 senior art show, an annual senior exhibition for bachelor of arts majors. The exhibition ran from April 5 through 12. The Exit 2018 exhibition showcases graduating seniors work in ceramics, digital media, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture and mixed media. Batch 1 Student Assignments For 2018-19 YearThe School District of Lee County recently reported that 84.9 percent of the 19,090 students that participated in Student Assignment Lottery received their first choice school for the 2018-19 school year. The preliminary data also indi cates that 95.9 percent were assigned to a school among their top thr ee choices. This year, a pilot program to automati cally assign younger siblings to the same school as their older siblings appears to be a success. Some 2,172 students were placed in the same schools as their older brothers and sisters. Students that applied online can now view their assigned school. Students who completed their applications in person or mailed them in will have a letter sent to them on Friday, April 20. The numbers breakdown includes 88.9 percent of students entering kindergarten, 81.8 percent of students entering 6th grade and 84.9 percent of students enter ing 9th grade received their first choice school. Over the next several months, as vacancies occur, those numbers should improve as students are moved into their first choice. Students who did not get their first choice school are automatically placed into the eligibility pool for their first choice school. It is not necessary for parents to call to request placement on a waiting list it is already done. Parents who have questions about the student assignment program can call the Student Assignment Office at 3378247. For more information, visit www. leeschools.net. Nominations For Teacher AwardThe Uncommon Friends Foundation has set a Tuesday, May 15 dead line for nominations for the annual Character Education T eacher award to be presented at Uncommon Evening on November 8. Educators in elementary, middle and high schools throughout Lee, Charlotte and Collier counties who teach the foundations character education cur riculum are eligible. The award recognizes outstanding educators who teach character education using the foundations Lessons Learned from the Uncommon Friends, as well as inspire their students to adopt and live by high ethical standards. The full eligibility criteria and nomina tion form are available at www.uncommonfriends.org/character-education. The completed nomination for m and a letter of support from the nominees supervising administrator must be emailed to jennifer@ uncommonfriends.org no later than May 15. The character education programs meet the Florida educational standards and are easily aligned with the standards of other states. For more information, visit www. uncommonfriends.org or call 337-9503.

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THE RIVER APRIL 27, 201822 Hope Hospice Benefit Raises Nearly $150,000The Friends of Hope Womens Committee recently hosted its 15th annual Spring Luncheon at the Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort & Spa, raising nearly $150,000 to benefit Hope Hospice. The continued support of The Friends of Hope Womens Committee allows us to fulfill our mission to provide comforting care to all who need our help, said Samira K. Beckwith, president and CEO of Hope Healthcare. We are so grateful for the committees dedication, for our sponsors, and for all who made this years Spring Luncheon a success. Event chairs Barbara Caccese, Etta Smith and Signe Wynne, along with event committee members, coordinated the celebration for more than 275 guests. The afternoons events included boutique shopping; raffle prizes; silent auction packages to Costa Rica, San Francisco and Italys Amalfi Coast; and a fashion show featuring spring apparel from Kathryns Collection. Henderson, Franklin, Starnes & Holt, PA served as presenting sponsor. Event sponsors included Northern Trust, Suncoast Print & Promotions, Inc., Denas Secretarial Services, Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort and Spa, Kathryns Collection and the Spring Luncheon Committee. Hope Healthcare is a not-for-profit health care organization dedicated to providing care and comfort to every individual and their loved ones as they fulfill lifes journey. For more information or to make a donation, call 482-4673 or visit www.hopehcs.org. From left, Barbara Caccese, Luella Hayes and Cheri Howarth photos provided From left, Claire McMahon, Sally Bowie, Marian Bouwer and Susan Larimore From left, Dena Lyons, Linda Klocke, Pat Gunderson and Ruth Zacharias From left, Janice Miller, Joyce Kozlowski and Joan Hjalmquist From left, Donna Roberts, Samira K. Beckwith and Etta Smith Jessie Dalman and Mary Anne Hopkins

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23 THE RIVER APRIL 27, 2018 Former and current members of the Hope Healthcare Board of Directors met to celebrate the past, present and future of Hope at a reunion luncheon with Samira K. Beckwith, president and CEO. Hope Healthcare is a not-for-profit health care organization dedicated to providing care and comfort to every individual and their loved ones as they fulfill lifes journey. For more information or to make a donation, call 482-4673 or visit www. hopehcs.org. Hope Healthcare Board of Directors members past and present with Hope President and CEO Samira K. Beckwith photo provided Our email address is press@islandsunnews.com Beautifulife:Edgesby Kay CaspersonI enjoy my walks on the beach as often as I have time to fit it into my morning or evening routine. There are many times that I come home with a pocket full of shells that I have found to be interesting. Many of my favorites were found not in the midst of all the new ones just washed in, but the ones around the outside edges of the beach, swept up, stepped over, forgotten and ignored. Since I have lived on or near the beach for many years now, I have quite the collection of these beautiful shells sitting in bowls, used for art or given away to guests and visitors. I have often given visitors a favorite shell in a little organza bag with an affirmation attached to brighten their day and send them home with a happy memory. Finding these shells makes me think about the fact that there are also people in our lives that are staying around the edges yet they are the most precious, beautiful, talented and interesting individuals if we would take the time to engage and interact with them. Some of the most laid back, quiet, content and confident individuals can tend to be the most interesting and inspiring people that you would want to meet and know. Who are the people in your life that live around the edges, not necessarily in the spotlight all the time or maybe even a bit shy, private or just not interested in putting themselves out there for the world to see? Maybe there are distant relatives that you have not taken the time to get to know or members of your club or organization that you have never really had a conversation with. How about at your church or even your place of work? It might be nice to find out something new about someone that you have seen so many times yet know so little about. I believe that exploring more around the edges in life will bring you many new surprises that you might not have found if you had stayed only on the path that everyone takes. I promise thatcontinued on page 24 Lee School District Nurse Of The YearColleen Cartwright was recently honored as the School District of Lee Countys Nurse of the Year. Cartwright sets the example for the staff at Buckingham Exceptional Center, according to Principal Dr. Ruthie Lohmeyer. Part of the team at Buckingham for the last five years, Cartwright is known for her specialized attention to the students. She trains the staff, helps with transportation needs and always gives 100 percent to the students. The compassion, professionalism and interaction with our families, said Dr, Lohmeyer, Ive never seen anything like it. The announcement was a surprise for Cartwright. Her daughter traveled from Tallahassee to be there for her, and the students presented her with cards of congratulations. Before joining the staff at Buckingham Exceptional Center, Cartwright spent years working in hospitals. Her co-workers believe that is why she stays so calm, cool and collected during any kind of emergency. Her motto is said to be safety first. Colleen Cartwright reacts to the surprise announcement Colleen Cartwright, center with flowers, with her daughter, staff, co-workers and students photos provided Hope Healthcare Board Reunion Luncheon

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RIVER deaRPharmacistTaking Medicine That Makes You Gain Weightby Suzy Cohen, RPhDear Readers: Some of you are eating like a bird, and still strug gling to lose weight. As a phar macist, Ive seen it time and time again. Someone comes in looking fit and great, and six months later they have 30 pounds on them. And, it is out of character, meaning, theyve been thin all their life. Counting calories wont matter. Todays article will shed light on why youre getting heavier and heavier, even though you may be exercising or eating a diet that should keep you slim. Estrogen-containing hormones: This category includes oral contraceptives as well as HRT, hormone replacement therapy. Its partly because high levels of estrogen cause insulin resistance and make it harder for you to break down glu cose. Your fat cells expand to four times their size. These fake estr ogens, as well as pesticides which are also estrogenic, cause a relatively lower amount of testosterone which is needed for lean muscles. Antidepressants: The reaction varies, so in some of you, these drugs can cause weight loss during the first few months. However, its often short-lived as many users of antidepressants develop a vora cious appetite (especially for carbs) after the initial weight-loss effect. Ster oids: Hydrocortisone, prednisone and methylprednisone are part of this cat egory, and they are popular medications. These corticoster oids are taken by mouth, unlike some of the ones you inhale for the treatment of asthma. So, as a result, the oral medications cause more dramatic weight gain. In 2006, a survey showed that about 70 percent of steroid users gained weight despite trying to exercise and diet. Antipsychotics: Clozapine (Clozaril) and olanzapine (Zyprexa) are second genera tion antipsychotics that are used in the tr eatment of mental health disorders like bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. These second generation medications cause serious weight gain. Insulin: The weight gain can be dramatic if you take insulin, and it doesnt matter the type. Its such an irony too if you think about it. Insulin is used to treat diabetes, which is frequently associated with obesity, and insulin is the drug used to treat diabetes, but it causes more obesity. Obviously, if you take these medica tions, please do commit to a healthy exer cise regimen and continue on a clean low fat, low carb diet. But hopefully reading this will give you some peace and the realization that its not your fault, and that another medication might exist that isnt associated with as much weight gain. Its a good conversation to have with your doctor. If youd like a more comprehensive version of this article, sign up for my newsletters at www.suzycohen.com and Ill email you every Tuesday with the electronic version of this health blog. Why Tuesday? Because Sam thought of it; he said Tuesdays are Suze-days! LOL. And just recently, Ive written a new series of newsletters which includes delicious recipes and funny cartoons; these will come to your email on Sundays because Sunday is fun day! This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. SuzyCohen.com. THE RIVER APRIL 27, 201824 Doctor and DieticianBeneficial Foods To Decrease Inflammationby Ross Hauser, MD and Marion Hauser, MS, RDOur daily food choices fall into either pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory categories. Interestingly, researchers have found links between eating a pro-inflammatory (bad inflammation) diet and increased fractures in women, as well as an increase in osteoarthritis in both men and women. As we age, pain and fractures are very real concerns, and smarter dietary decisions can help us stay strong and pain-free. Salmon, for example, is a well-known source of omega-3 fatty acids. These essential fats are often labeled as anti-inflammatory, since they decrease systemic inflammation. The fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosa hexaenoic acid (DHA), can improve functional ability and reduce pain in a myriad of conditions, including osteoarthritis. Onions and garlic both possess antiinflammatory agents that help with chronic pain. Onions also have the antioxidant quercetin that aids in inflammation. Since both onions and garlic are the basis of so many recipes, the fact that they are so good for us is a great bonus. Berries are excellent sources of anti oxidants. The popular blueberry contains a str ong antioxidant called anthocyanin. Strawberries contain high concentrations of anthocyanins as well. A major antho cyanin in strawberries, pelargonidin-3-Oglucoside (P3G), can help in inflammatory conditions. According to a 2018 edition of Food Chemistry, oxidative stress and its components were halted and reduced by P3G. The benefit of strawberries doesnt stop there. Resveratrol is found in high concentrations in strawberry seeds. Resveratrol has shown cardiovascularprotective properties as well as anti-cancer properties. Overall, berries are a delicious and powerhouse health food. What are pro-inflammatory foods? Sugar is one of the top inflammatory foods to eliminate much as possible. Others include trans and saturated fats, fried foods, processed meat, refined carbohy drates and articficial sweeteners/additives. Choosing fr esh, whole foods instead of pro-inflammatory foods as often as pos sible has far-reaching effects on our health, including our joints. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Caring Medical Regenerative Medicine Clinics has two locations: one in Oak Park, Illinois, and one in Fort Myers. It was established in 1991 by Ross Hauser, MD, and Marion Hauser, MS, RD. They can be reached at info@caringmedical. com. From page 1Senior Improvsenior communities, in workshops and performed as the premier night entertainment for the opening of The Lyon Center in Naples, the first freestanding palliative care building in the U.S. The tremendous interest in Harrys Senior Moment is also evidenced by its continued position for the past two years (and counting) as the number one Google search result for senior improv. An interactive improv course for seniors, their families and caregivers is currently being developing. One of the keys to Harrys survival in the battle against cancer is his early introduction into palliative care, which was initiated by his close friend, Bonnie Grossmann. They have been family for each other for over 20 years and now she has added caregiver to the list. She also has been part of a team that created a national palliative care awareness campaign, helping people better understand the benefits of this medical specialty. She saw firsthand the benefits of it during that time. Palliative care is a medical specialty that addresses the pain, stress and other symptoms of a serious illness. It helps the patient, family and caregiver navigate a complex health care system by creating a supportive team of medical professionals. And, it can begin at any stage, and at any age for those with a serious illness. As Harry grew more and more depressed with his situation, Grossmann knew that palliative care could help him. As a result of listening to Harry with the palliative care team at Lee Health, she learned that he needed something to inspire him. That something turned out to be improv. Upon taking him to a comedy improv show, He was out of his seat and on the stage improvising with the group within five minutes after the show began, said Grossmann. I suggested he take classes. He did. He even went to class with his chemo bag attached to his belt. Upon his graduation, she created Harrys Senior Moment Improv Troupe for Harry. Many of its members came from that graduating class. Improv and this new family troupe that supports him has helped keep Harry alive and happy since it was created, said Grossmann. It has offered great entertainment to audiences and delivered the benefits of palliative care to Harry, helping him live his best life and inspiring others. Cost for tickets range from $25 to $45. Reserve by calling 278-4422, by visiting www.broadwaypalm.com/ shows/harrys-senior-moment or stopping by the box office at 1380 Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Diabetes Prevention ProgramLee Health will offer a free program at The Sanctuary beginning May 2 from 9 to 10 a.m. The Wednesday programs are designed to help you make modest lifestyle changes and cut your risk of Type 2 diabetes by more than half at. This year-long program with weekly meetings for the first six months, then once or twice a month for the second six months, is part of the National Diabetes Prevention Program, led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Information presented in the work shop can help you become empowered to prevent Type 2 diabetes. Learn about the benefits of physical activity; manage symptoms of stress, make smarter decisions related to healthy eating, and tips to stay motivated. Participants will receive a participant guide to use as an ongoing reference tool once the classes are completed. The Sanctuary is located at 8960 Colonial Center Drive in Fort Myers. Seating is limited and registration is required. Call 424-3127 for more information. From page 23Edgesyou will be even more inspired and will open up your heart and mind to living your most balanced and beautiful life. My affirmation for you this week is: I am taking the time to explore around the edges of my life and will open my heart and mind to embrace the things that might have been missed along the way. Kay Casperson is a beauty and lifestyle expert, founder and CEO of Beautifulife by Kay Casperson. She owns resort spas on Sanibel and Captiva islands and manufactures beauty and lifestyle products sold across the country. To stay inspired, visit www.kaycasperson.com or follow on social media @kaycasperson.

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THE RIVER APRIL 27, 2018 25 Emergency . ............................................... 9 11 Lee County Sheriffs Ofce . .............................. 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol . ................................... 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol . .................................. 278-7100 Poison Control . ................................... 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center . ...................... 1-800-936-5321Ft .. Myers Chamber of Commerce . ......................... 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare . .......................... 4 25-2685 Fort Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce . ................... 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library . ............................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library . ................................ 5 33-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce . ........................ 931-0931 Post Ofce . ..................................... 1 -800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau . ............................ 3 38-3500ARTSAlliance for the Arts . .................................... 9 39-2787 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio . ............................ 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers . ............................... 275-3970 Barbara B .. Mann Performing Arts Hall . ...................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS . .......................................... 3 95-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre . .......................... 2 78-4422 Cultural Park Theatre . ................................... 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light . ................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade . ....................332-4488 Florida West Arts . ...................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers . ...................... 288-2535 Gulf Coast Symphony . .................................. 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres . ..................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic . ................................ 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater . ............................... 472-6862 SW Florida Symphony . .................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy . .................................... 936-3239 Young Artists Awards . ................................... 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAmerican Legion Post #38 . ........................... 2 39-332-1853 Angel Flight . .................................. 1 -877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center . .................................. 731-3535 American Business Women Association . .................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL . .................................... 3 39-8046 Audubon Society . ...................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR . ............................ 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society . ............................ 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus . ................... 1 -855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club . ................................. 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees . .............................. 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists . ................................. 415-2484 Embroiderers Guild of America Sea Grape Chapter . ...... 2 39-267-1990 FM UDC Chapter 2614 United Daughters of the Confederacy . ... 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL . .............................. 561-9164 Garden Club of Cape Coral . .......................... 2 39-257-2654 Horticulture and Tea Society . ............................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society . ................................... 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society . ......................... 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation . ........................ 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees . ......... 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America . ....................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL . ............................. 66 7-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans . ............................ 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy . ....................... 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association . ...................... 5 61-2118 Kiwanis Fort Myers Beach . .................... 7 65-4254 or 454-8090 Kiwanis Fort Myers Edison . .............................. 694-1056 Kiwanis Fort Myers South . ............................... 691-1405 Gateway to the Islands .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218-5768 Iona-McGregor . ....................................... 482-0869 Lions Club Fort Myers Beach . ............................. 463-9738 Lions Club Fort Myers High Noon . ......................... 466-4228 Lions Club Estero/South Fort Myers . ....................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County . ......................... 7 68-0417 Organ Transplant Recipients of SW Florida . .................. 247-3073 POLO Club of Lee County . ............................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers . ............................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society . ........................... 472-6940 United Way of Lee County . ............................... 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) . ................... 2 11 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews National Shell Museum . .................... 395-2233 Burroughs Home . ...................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium . ....................... 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates . ............................ 334-7419 Fort Myers Skate Park . .................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium . ................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge . .................. 4 72-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site . ......................... 2 39-992-0311 Langford Kingston Home . ............................ 239-334-2550 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center . .............. 765-8101 Skatium . ............................................. 3 21-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society . ...................... 93 9-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History . ...................... 321-7430 True Tours . .......................................... 94 5-0405 To be listed in calling card email your information to: press@riverweekly. .com Haven on Earth Animal LeagueTriscuit And MaliaDuring the month of April, Haven on Earth Animal Leagues adoption fee for adult cats is only $35. Hi there! Im Triscuit. I am a beautiful, 1-year-old calico kitty, and I just had a litter of kittens. I am being fostered while I raise my babies and will be available for adoption in about a month. I will be spayed and brought up to date on all vaccines. As an adult, my special adoption fee is only $35 during the month of April. Hello! Im Malia. I am a very pretty Siamese girl with beautiful blue eyes. Im about 7 years old. I would prefer to be the only cat in the house, but I get along well with dogs. I am currently staying with a foster mom. I am spayed and up to date on all vaccines. My adoption fee is $35 during the month of April. We are being cared for by Haven on Earth Animal League. For more information, call Diane at 860-833-4472 or email havenonearthanimalleague@yahoo.com. Triscuit Malia PAWS Of SanibelMallory Ann And Corey JamesHello, my name is Mallory Ann. I will be 7 years old in June, and Im looking for a forever home. Im beautiful, shy when you first meet me, but would love to be your only kitty, so that I can sit with you and get all of your attention. I will give you all of mine. My last year has been a sad one, and Im looking for a fresh start with someones loving that I can love in return. If you want to be that person, please call Pam at PAWS at 4724823 and come and see me!Hi, Im Corey James. Im a big, laid back boy, a real charmer. Im almost 7 years old, and Im looking to hang out with you and your family doing anything you like to do. I really enjoy being a couch potato, watching footbal and movies. Anything that you like to watch, I will watch too. If youre interested in hanging out with me, call Pam at PAWS at 472-4823. Mallory Ann Corey James Lee County Domestic Animal ServicesNibbler And OrlandoHello, my name is Nibbler. I am a 2-year-old female domestic shorthair who is a sweet gal that loves attention. My favorite place to be pet is behind her ears. I recently visited with Girl Scout Troop 223 when they brought in donations for me and my shelter friends, and I loved all the attention. I get along well with adult and young felines. My adoption fee is $50, and when you adopt me, you get another kitty for free. Hi, Im Orlando. I am a 1-year-old male pit bull who is a fun, playful boy who would love to have a backyard to run and play fetch in. I am currently involved in Canine Good Citizen training with volunteers. My lucky new family can continue my training if they wish to as well. My adoption fee is $75. For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to Animal Services website at www. LeeLostPets. com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if three months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs six months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee, and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500. Nibbler ID# A7355753 Orlando ID# A735048 PETS OF THE WEEKphotos provided

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THE RIVER APRIL 27, 2018 26 PUZZLESAnswers on page 29

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THE RIVER APRIL 27, 2018 27 FIND AT LEaAST S SIX D DIffFFERENCES BETWEEN PaANElLS SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 29 answer on page 29 Pan Grilled Red Snapper with AvocadoStrawberry Salsa 1 jalapeo pepper, finely chopped 1 ripe avocado, diced 2 cups strawberries, finely chopped cup red onion, finely chopped 2 tablespoons cilantro, finely chopped 1 teaspoon fresh lime juice teaspoon sugar Sea salt, to taste 4 six-ounce red snapper fillets 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 tablespoons fresh lime zest Salt and pepper to taste Stir jalapeo, avocado, strawberries, onion, cilantro, lime juice, sugar and sea salt together in a bowl. Cover and set aside. Salsa may be made several hours ahead and chilled. When making ahead, add the sugar, salt and avocado when ready to serve. Preheat stovetop grill pan over high heat. Pat fillets dry then brush both sides with the oil; sprinkle with the lime zest, salt and pepper. Lay fillets on grill pan skin side down and cook 4-5 minutes on each side, turning once, until cooked through. Transfer fillets skin side up to individual serving plates. Carefully remove skin; top with avocadostrawberry salsa. Pan Grilled Red Snapper with Avocado-Strawberry Salsa photo courtesy Fresh From Florida

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORYTHE RIVER APRIL 27, 2018 28 Would you like to advertise your business card every week ? Call: 239-395-1213 SUNDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 75 TUESDAYSunny High: 82 Low: 76 THURSDAYSunny High: 83 Low: 77 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:08 am5:56 am12:36 pm6:35 pm Sat1:05 am6:25 am12:54 pm7:17 pm Sun1:55 am6:50 am1:13 pm7:56 pm Mon2:42 am7:11 am1:33 pm8:33 pm Tue3:27 am7:31 am1:56 pm9:10 pm Wed4:12 am7:52 am2:22 pm9:49 pm Thu5:03 am8:14 am2:52 pm10:33 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:18 pm6:06 amNone6:33 pm Sat12:44 am6:45 am12:46 pm7:17 pm Sun1:23 am7:22 am1:12 pm7:59 pm Mon2:00 am7:57 am1:34 pm8:40 pm Tue2:41 am8:29 am1:52 pm9:22 pm Wed3:26 am8:59 am2:08 pm10:02 pm Thu4:18 am9:24 am2:30 pm10:42 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:41 am5:58 amNone6:37 pm Sat12:10 am6:27 am11:59 am7:19 pm Sun1:00 am6:52 am12:18 pm7:58 pm Mon1:47 am7:13 am12:38 pm8:35 pm Tue2:32 am7:33 am1:01 pm9:12 pm Wed3:17 am7:54 am1:27 pm9:51 pm Thu4:08 am8:16 am1:57 pm10:35 pm Day High Low High Low Fri2:18 am9:12 am2:46 pm9:51 pm Sat3:15 am9:41 am3:04 pm10:33 pm Sun4:05 am10:06 am3:23 pm11:12 pm Mon4:52 am10:27 am3:43 pm11:49 pm Tue5:37 am10:47 am4:06 pmNone Wed6:22 am12:26 am4:32 pm11:08 am Thu7:13 am1:05 am5:02 pm11:30 am WEDNESDAYSunny High: 85 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 73 SATURDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 72 FRIDAYSunny High: 75 Low: 69 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 27, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 75 TUESDAYSunny High: 82 Low: 76 THURSDAYSunny High: 83 Low: 77 Day High Low High Low Fri12:08 am5:56 am12:36 pm6:35 pm Sat1:05 am6:25 am12:54 pm7:17 pm Sun1:55 am6:50 am1:13 pm7:56 pm Mon2:42 am7:11 am1:33 pm8:33 pm Tue3:27 am7:31 am1:56 pm9:10 pm Wed4:12 am7:52 am2:22 pm9:49 pm Thu5:03 am8:14 am2:52 pm10:33 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:18 pm6:06 amNone6:33 pm Sat12:44 am6:45 am12:46 pm7:17 pm Sun1:23 am7:22 am1:12 pm7:59 pm Mon2:00 am7:57 am1:34 pm8:40 pm Tue2:41 am8:29 am1:52 pm9:22 pm Wed3:26 am8:59 am2:08 pm10:02 pm Thu4:18 am9:24 am2:30 pm10:42 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:41 am5:58 amNone6:37 pm Sat12:10 am6:27 am11:59 am7:19 pm Sun1:00 am6:52 am12:18 pm7:58 pm Mon1:47 am7:13 am12:38 pm8:35 pm Tue2:32 am7:33 am1:01 pm9:12 pm Wed3:17 am7:54 am1:27 pm9:51 pm Thu4:08 am8:16 am1:57 pm10:35 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:18 am9:12 am2:46 pm9:51 pm Sat3:15 am9:41 am3:04 pm10:33 pm Sun4:05 am10:06 am3:23 pm11:12 pm Mon4:52 am10:27 am3:43 pm11:49 pm Tue5:37 am10:47 am4:06 pmNone Wed6:22 am12:26 am4:32 pm11:08 am Thu7:13 am1:05 am5:02 pm11:30 am WEDNESDAYSunny High: 85 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 73 SATURDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 72 FRIDAYSunny High: 75 Low: 69 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 27, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 75 TUESDAYSunny High: 82 Low: 76 THURSDAYSunny High: 83 Low: 77 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:08 am5:56 am12:36 pm6:35 pm Sat1:05 am6:25 am12:54 pm7:17 pm Sun1:55 am6:50 am1:13 pm7:56 pm Mon2:42 am7:11 am1:33 pm8:33 pm Tue3:27 am7:31 am1:56 pm9:10 pm Wed4:12 am7:52 am2:22 pm9:49 pm Thu5:03 am8:14 am2:52 pm10:33 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:18 pm6:06 amNone6:33 pm Sat12:44 am6:45 am12:46 pm7:17 pm Sun1:23 am7:22 am1:12 pm7:59 pm Mon2:00 am7:57 am1:34 pm8:40 pm Tue2:41 am8:29 am1:52 pm9:22 pm Wed3:26 am8:59 am2:08 pm10:02 pm Thu4:18 am9:24 am2:30 pm10:42 pm Day High Low High Low Fri11:41 am5:58 amNone6:37 pm Sat12:10 am6:27 am11:59 am7:19 pm Sun1:00 am6:52 am12:18 pm7:58 pm Mon1:47 am7:13 am12:38 pm8:35 pm Tue2:32 am7:33 am1:01 pm9:12 pm Wed3:17 am7:54 am1:27 pm9:51 pm Thu4:08 am8:16 am1:57 pm10:35 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:18 am9:12 am2:46 pm9:51 pm Sat3:15 am9:41 am3:04 pm10:33 pm Sun4:05 am10:06 am3:23 pm11:12 pm Mon4:52 am10:27 am3:43 pm11:49 pm Tue5:37 am10:47 am4:06 pmNone Wed6:22 am12:26 am4:32 pm11:08 am Thu7:13 am1:05 am5:02 pm11:30 am WEDNESDAYSunny High: 85 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 73 SATURDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 72 FRIDAYSunny High: 75 Low: 69 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 27, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 75 TUESDAYSunny High: 82 Low: 76 THURSDAYSunny High: 83 Low: 77 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:08 am5:56 am12:36 pm6:35 pm Sat1:05 am6:25 am12:54 pm7:17 pm Sun1:55 am6:50 am1:13 pm7:56 pm Mon2:42 am7:11 am1:33 pm8:33 pm Tue3:27 am7:31 am1:56 pm9:10 pm Wed4:12 am7:52 am2:22 pm9:49 pm Thu5:03 am8:14 am2:52 pm10:33 pm Day High Low High Low Fri12:18 pm6:06 amNone6:33 pm Sat12:44 am6:45 am12:46 pm7:17 pm Sun1:23 am7:22 am1:12 pm7:59 pm Mon2:00 am7:57 am1:34 pm8:40 pm Tue2:41 am8:29 am1:52 pm9:22 pm Wed3:26 am8:59 am2:08 pm10:02 pm Thu4:18 am9:24 am2:30 pm10:42 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:41 am5:58 amNone6:37 pm Sat12:10 am6:27 am11:59 am7:19 pm Sun1:00 am6:52 am12:18 pm7:58 pm Mon1:47 am7:13 am12:38 pm8:35 pm Tue2:32 am7:33 am1:01 pm9:12 pm Wed3:17 am7:54 am1:27 pm9:51 pm Thu4:08 am8:16 am1:57 pm10:35 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:18 am9:12 am2:46 pm9:51 pm Sat3:15 am9:41 am3:04 pm10:33 pm Sun4:05 am10:06 am3:23 pm11:12 pm Mon4:52 am10:27 am3:43 pm11:49 pm Tue5:37 am10:47 am4:06 pmNone Wed6:22 am12:26 am4:32 pm11:08 am Thu7:13 am1:05 am5:02 pm11:30 am WEDNESDAYSunny High: 85 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 73 SATURDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 72 FRIDAYSunny High: 75 Low: 69 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 27, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 75 TUESDAYSunny High: 82 Low: 76 THURSDAYSunny High: 83 Low: 77 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:08 am5:56 am12:36 pm6:35 pm Sat1:05 am6:25 am12:54 pm7:17 pm Sun1:55 am6:50 am1:13 pm7:56 pm Mon2:42 am7:11 am1:33 pm8:33 pm Tue3:27 am7:31 am1:56 pm9:10 pm Wed4:12 am7:52 am2:22 pm9:49 pm Thu5:03 am8:14 am2:52 pm10:33 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:18 pm6:06 amNone6:33 pm Sat12:44 am6:45 am12:46 pm7:17 pm Sun1:23 am7:22 am1:12 pm7:59 pm Mon2:00 am7:57 am1:34 pm8:40 pm Tue2:41 am8:29 am1:52 pm9:22 pm Wed3:26 am8:59 am2:08 pm10:02 pm Thu4:18 am9:24 am2:30 pm10:42 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:41 am5:58 amNone6:37 pm Sat12:10 am6:27 am11:59 am7:19 pm Sun1:00 am6:52 am12:18 pm7:58 pm Mon1:47 am7:13 am12:38 pm8:35 pm Tue2:32 am7:33 am1:01 pm9:12 pm Wed3:17 am7:54 am1:27 pm9:51 pm Thu4:08 am8:16 am1:57 pm10:35 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:18 am9:12 am2:46 pm9:51 pm Sat3:15 am9:41 am3:04 pm10:33 pm Sun4:05 am10:06 am3:23 pm11:12 pm Mon4:52 am10:27 am3:43 pm11:49 pm Tue5:37 am10:47 am4:06 pmNone Wed6:22 am12:26 am4:32 pm11:08 am Thu7:13 am1:05 am5:02 pm11:30 am WEDNESDAYSunny High: 85 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 73 SATURDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 72 FRIDAYSunny High: 75 Low: 69 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 27, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 75 TUESDAYSunny High: 82 Low: 76 THURSDAYSunny High: 83 Low: 77 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:08 am5:56 am12:36 pm6:35 pm Sat1:05 am6:25 am12:54 pm7:17 pm Sun1:55 am6:50 am1:13 pm7:56 pm Mon2:42 am7:11 am1:33 pm8:33 pm Tue3:27 am7:31 am1:56 pm9:10 pm Wed4:12 am7:52 am2:22 pm9:49 pm Thu5:03 am8:14 am2:52 pm10:33 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:18 pm6:06 amNone6:33 pm Sat12:44 am6:45 am12:46 pm7:17 pm Sun1:23 am7:22 am1:12 pm7:59 pm Mon2:00 am7:57 am1:34 pm8:40 pm Tue2:41 am8:29 am1:52 pm9:22 pm Wed3:26 am8:59 am2:08 pm10:02 pm Thu4:18 am9:24 am2:30 pm10:42 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:41 am5:58 amNone6:37 pm Sat12:10 am6:27 am11:59 am7:19 pm Sun1:00 am6:52 am12:18 pm7:58 pm Mon1:47 am7:13 am12:38 pm8:35 pm Tue2:32 am7:33 am1:01 pm9:12 pm Wed3:17 am7:54 am1:27 pm9:51 pm Thu4:08 am8:16 am1:57 pm10:35 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:18 am9:12 am2:46 pm9:51 pm Sat3:15 am9:41 am3:04 pm10:33 pm Sun4:05 am10:06 am3:23 pm11:12 pm Mon4:52 am10:27 am3:43 pm11:49 pm Tue5:37 am10:47 am4:06 pmNone Wed6:22 am12:26 am4:32 pm11:08 am Thu7:13 am1:05 am5:02 pm11:30 am WEDNESDAYSunny High: 85 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 73 SATURDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 72 FRIDAYSunny High: 75 Low: 69 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 27, 2018 7-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 75 TUESDAYSunny High: 82 Low: 76 THURSDAYSunny High: 83 Low: 77 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:08 am5:56 am12:36 pm6:35 pm Sat1:05 am6:25 am12:54 pm7:17 pm Sun1:55 am6:50 am1:13 pm7:56 pm Mon2:42 am7:11 am1:33 pm8:33 pm Tue3:27 am7:31 am1:56 pm9:10 pm Wed4:12 am7:52 am2:22 pm9:49 pm Thu5:03 am8:14 am2:52 pm10:33 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:18 pm6:06 amNone6:33 pm Sat12:44 am6:45 am12:46 pm7:17 pm Sun1:23 am7:22 am1:12 pm7:59 pm Mon2:00 am7:57 am1:34 pm8:40 pm Tue2:41 am8:29 am1:52 pm9:22 pm Wed3:26 am8:59 am2:08 pm10:02 pm Thu4:18 am9:24 am2:30 pm10:42 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:41 am5:58 amNone6:37 pm Sat12:10 am6:27 am11:59 am7:19 pm Sun1:00 am6:52 am12:18 pm7:58 pm Mon1:47 am7:13 am12:38 pm8:35 pm Tue2:32 am7:33 am1:01 pm9:12 pm Wed3:17 am7:54 am1:27 pm9:51 pm Thu4:08 am8:16 am1:57 pm10:35 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:18 am9:12 am2:46 pm9:51 pm Sat3:15 am9:41 am3:04 pm10:33 pm Sun4:05 am10:06 am3:23 pm11:12 pm Mon4:52 am10:27 am3:43 pm11:49 pm Tue5:37 am10:47 am4:06 pmNone Wed6:22 am12:26 am4:32 pm11:08 am Thu7:13 am1:05 am5:02 pm11:30 am WEDNESDAYSunny High: 85 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 73 SATURDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 72 FRIDAYSunny High: 75 Low: 69 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 27, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 75 TUESDAYSunny High: 82 Low: 76 THURSDAYSunny High: 83 Low: 77 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:08 am5:56 am12:36 pm6:35 pm Sat1:05 am6:25 am12:54 pm7:17 pm Sun1:55 am6:50 am1:13 pm7:56 pm Mon2:42 am7:11 am1:33 pm8:33 pm Tue3:27 am7:31 am1:56 pm9:10 pm Wed4:12 am7:52 am2:22 pm9:49 pm Thu5:03 am8:14 am2:52 pm10:33 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:18 pm6:06 amNone6:33 pm Sat12:44 am6:45 am12:46 pm7:17 pm Sun1:23 am7:22 am1:12 pm7:59 pm Mon2:00 am7:57 am1:34 pm8:40 pm Tue2:41 am8:29 am1:52 pm9:22 pm Wed3:26 am8:59 am2:08 pm10:02 pm Thu4:18 am9:24 am2:30 pm10:42 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:41 am5:58 amNone6:37 pm Sat12:10 am6:27 am11:59 am7:19 pm Sun1:00 am6:52 am12:18 pm7:58 pm Mon1:47 am7:13 am12:38 pm8:35 pm Tue2:32 am7:33 am1:01 pm9:12 pm Wed3:17 am7:54 am1:27 pm9:51 pm Thu4:08 am8:16 am1:57 pm10:35 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:18 am9:12 am2:46 pm9:51 pm Sat3:15 am9:41 am3:04 pm10:33 pm Sun4:05 am10:06 am3:23 pm11:12 pm Mon4:52 am10:27 am3:43 pm11:49 pm Tue5:37 am10:47 am4:06 pmNone Wed6:22 am12:26 am4:32 pm11:08 am Thu7:13 am1:05 am5:02 pm11:30 am WEDNESDAYSunny High: 85 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 73 SATURDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 72 FRIDAYSunny High: 75 Low: 69 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 27, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 75 TUESDAYSunny High: 82 Low: 76 THURSDAYSunny High: 83 Low: 77 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:08 am5:56 am12:36 pm6:35 pm Sat1:05 am6:25 am12:54 pm7:17 pm Sun1:55 am6:50 am1:13 pm7:56 pm Mon2:42 am7:11 am1:33 pm8:33 pm Tue3:27 am7:31 am1:56 pm9:10 pm Wed4:12 am7:52 am2:22 pm9:49 pm Thu5:03 am8:14 am2:52 pm10:33 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:18 pm6:06 amNone6:33 pm Sat12:44 am6:45 am12:46 pm7:17 pm Sun1:23 am7:22 am1:12 pm7:59 pm Mon2:00 am7:57 am1:34 pm8:40 pm Tue2:41 am8:29 am1:52 pm9:22 pm Wed3:26 am8:59 am2:08 pm10:02 pm Thu4:18 am9:24 am2:30 pm10:42 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:41 am5:58 amNone6:37 pm Sat12:10 am6:27 am11:59 am7:19 pm Sun1:00 am6:52 am12:18 pm7:58 pm Mon1:47 am7:13 am12:38 pm8:35 pm Tue2:32 am7:33 am1:01 pm9:12 pm Wed3:17 am7:54 am1:27 pm9:51 pm Thu4:08 am8:16 am1:57 pm10:35 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:18 am9:12 am2:46 pm9:51 pm Sat3:15 am9:41 am3:04 pm10:33 pm Sun4:05 am10:06 am3:23 pm11:12 pm Mon4:52 am10:27 am3:43 pm11:49 pm Tue5:37 am10:47 am4:06 pmNone Wed6:22 am12:26 am4:32 pm11:08 am Thu7:13 am1:05 am5:02 pm11:30 am WEDNESDAYSunny High: 85 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 73 SATURDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 72 FRIDAYSunny High: 75 Low: 69 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 27, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 75 TUESDAYSunny High: 82 Low: 76 THURSDAYSunny High: 83 Low: 77 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:08 am5:56 am12:36 pm6:35 pm Sat1:05 am6:25 am12:54 pm7:17 pm Sun1:55 am6:50 am1:13 pm7:56 pm Mon2:42 am7:11 am1:33 pm8:33 pm Tue3:27 am7:31 am1:56 pm9:10 pm Wed4:12 am7:52 am2:22 pm9:49 pm Thu5:03 am8:14 am2:52 pm10:33 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:18 pm6:06 amNone6:33 pm Sat12:44 am6:45 am12:46 pm7:17 pm Sun1:23 am7:22 am1:12 pm7:59 pm Mon2:00 am7:57 am1:34 pm8:40 pm Tue2:41 am8:29 am1:52 pm9:22 pm Wed3:26 am8:59 am2:08 pm10:02 pm Thu4:18 am9:24 am2:30 pm10:42 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:41 am5:58 amNone6:37 pm Sat12:10 am6:27 am11:59 am7:19 pm Sun1:00 am6:52 am12:18 pm7:58 pm Mon1:47 am7:13 am12:38 pm8:35 pm Tue2:32 am7:33 am1:01 pm9:12 pm Wed3:17 am7:54 am1:27 pm9:51 pm Thu4:08 am8:16 am1:57 pm10:35 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:18 am9:12 am2:46 pm9:51 pm Sat3:15 am9:41 am3:04 pm10:33 pm Sun4:05 am10:06 am3:23 pm11:12 pm Mon4:52 am10:27 am3:43 pm11:49 pm Tue5:37 am10:47 am4:06 pmNone Wed6:22 am12:26 am4:32 pm11:08 am Thu7:13 am1:05 am5:02 pm11:30 am WEDNESDAYSunny High: 85 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 73 SATURDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 72 FRIDAYSunny High: 75 Low: 69 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 27, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 75 TUESDAYSunny High: 82 Low: 76 THURSDAYSunny High: 83 Low: 77 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:08 am5:56 am12:36 pm6:35 pm Sat1:05 am6:25 am12:54 pm7:17 pm Sun1:55 am6:50 am1:13 pm7:56 pm Mon2:42 am7:11 am1:33 pm8:33 pm Tue3:27 am7:31 am1:56 pm9:10 pm Wed4:12 am7:52 am2:22 pm9:49 pm Thu5:03 am8:14 am2:52 pm10:33 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:18 pm6:06 amNone6:33 pm Sat12:44 am6:45 am12:46 pm7:17 pm Sun1:23 am7:22 am1:12 pm7:59 pm Mon2:00 am7:57 am1:34 pm8:40 pm Tue2:41 am8:29 am1:52 pm9:22 pm Wed3:26 am8:59 am2:08 pm10:02 pm Thu4:18 am9:24 am2:30 pm10:42 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:41 am5:58 amNone6:37 pm Sat12:10 am6:27 am11:59 am7:19 pm Sun1:00 am6:52 am12:18 pm7:58 pm Mon1:47 am7:13 am12:38 pm8:35 pm Tue2:32 am7:33 am1:01 pm9:12 pm Wed3:17 am7:54 am1:27 pm9:51 pm Thu4:08 am8:16 am1:57 pm10:35 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:18 am9:12 am2:46 pm9:51 pm Sat3:15 am9:41 am3:04 pm10:33 pm Sun4:05 am10:06 am3:23 pm11:12 pm Mon4:52 am10:27 am3:43 pm11:49 pm Tue5:37 am10:47 am4:06 pmNone Wed6:22 am12:26 am4:32 pm11:08 am Thu7:13 am1:05 am5:02 pm11:30 am WEDNESDAYSunny High: 85 Low: 78 MONDAYSunny High: 79 Low: 73 SATURDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 72 FRIDAYSunny High: 75 Low: 69 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 27, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides HOME SERVICES P.O. BoOX 1050 SANIbBEL FLoORIDA 33957WWW.IsSLANDHoOMEsSERVICE.CoOM INfoFO@IsSLANDHoOMEsSERVICE.CoOMp P Ho O NE: (239) 472-5247 C CELL: (239) 229-6366JUERGEN SCHREYEROWNERYYARD SERVICE TREE SERVICE PooOOL SERVICEHHoOME WWAt TCH CCLEANING SERVICE ISLAND HOME SERVICE TREE TRIMMING, ARBORIST Licensed, insured, workers compensation Arbor Specialist Since 1995 Tree Trimming Tree Removal Stump Grinding239-910-3256info@treewest@gmail.comwww.treewestorida.comP.O. Box 564, Sanibel, FL 33957Tell A Friend TREE SERVICE CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the benets of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor42 Barkley Circle, Suite 1 Fort Myers, FL 33907 239-931-4543GENERAL CONTRACTOR N C R CGC1517615www.dbrowngc.com239-593-1998 A BBB Accredited Business with an +A Rating CONTRACTOR Bathrooms Kitchens Lanai Enclosures Windows Screen Rooms Decks Railings Safety Tubs Doors Add a Room or Garage Outdoor Kitchens Storm Shutters and Much More $500. OFF WITH AD cbc1261010239-936-0836Family owned, 40 Years Local Surfside Home Improvements Aluminum & Remodeling CLEANING SERVICES Jennifer Watson(239) 810-6293 Residential & Commercial Construction Clean Up Interior Windows Home Watch FISHING CHARTERLight Tackle Sport Fishing Tarpon Snook Redsh & More CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.comHOME SERVICES WUNDERFUL HOME SERVICES LLC. LANDSCAPING: MAINTENANCE, RE-DESIGN, S S OD, MULCH, WALKw W AYS, DEBr R IS REmo MO VAL & MorOR EHOME WATCh H: WEEKLY OrR MoO NTHLY C CHECK U UPS WELL C CATEr R T ToO Y YoO Ur R S SPECIFIC N NEEd D SHANDYMAN: MINor OR REPAIr R S OrR F FIXESPPRESSURE WASh H ING: L LANAIS, DrR IVEw W AYS, P PAVEr R S, H HoO USE S SId D ING & MorOR EWINDOw W WASh H ING: WINdow DOW S, S SCr R EENS, T TrR ACKS & MorOR E WUNDERFUl LHOMESSERVICES@G GMAIl L.COM 239-258-9322

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THE RIVER APRIL 27, 2018 29 KING CROSSWORD SUPER CROSSWORD MAGIC MAZE SUDOKU PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF APRIL 30, 2018Aries (March 21 to April 19) Dont waste your time and energy fretting over remarks you consider unnecessary or unkind. Best advice: Ignore them, and just keep doing your usual good job. Taurus (April 20 to May 20) Getting that new perspective on a workplace situation could lead to a solution everyone will accept. Meanwhile, make time to keep up with your creative pursuits. Gemini (May 21 to June 20) Those changes you planned to implement in early summer might need to be reassessed. But dont make any moves until youve discussed this with someone you trust. Cancer (June 21 to July 22) Your aspects favor harmony, making this a good time to work out problems in relationships -whether personal or professional, big or small. An old friend comes back. Leo (July 23 to August 22) While youre still riding that high-powered beam, you might begin to lose focus by weeks end. Could be that youll need to do a little cat-napping to restore your spent energies. Virgo (August 23 to September 22) An unexpected development creates a lot of excitement. Where it takes you is your decision. Check out the possibilities, then decide if you want to go with it or not. Libra (September 23 to October 22) Although your supporters help you squash an unfair claim against you, dont let this go unchallenged. You need to learn more about the motives of those behind it. Scorpio (October 23 to November 21) There still are some tasks to clear up by midweek. Then you can welcome the new month on a high note. A friend brings surprising but very welcome news. Sagittarius (November 22 to December 21) You might want to change your plans before theyre set in cement. Consider advice from colleagues. But remember that, ultimately, its your choice. Capricorn (December 22 to January 19) A difficult situation is working itself out. Lingering problems should be resolved by weeks end, allowing the Goat to enjoy a calmer, less stressful period. Aquarius (January 20 to February 18) Be careful not to move so quickly that you miss possible warning signs that could upset your plans. Slow down. Your supporters will continue to stand by you. Pisces (February 19 to March 20) Your generosity in sharing your time and wisdom with others leads to an intriguing development that could have you considering some interesting choices. Born This Week: You have a way of influencing people to be and do their best. You would make an excellent teacher. On April 30, 1933, Willie Nelson is born into a family of Texas musicians. He penned his first song at age 7. Years later he wrote Funny How Time Slips Away, Night Life and the Patsy Cline classic Crazy all in one week. On May 5, 1944, Bertha Benz, the wife of inventor Karl Benz and the first person to drive an automobile over a long distance, dies in Germany. In 1888, Bertha drove 65 miles to her mothers, over unpaved roads. She refueled the car with Ligroin, a detergent then used as fuel. When the cars fuel line clogged, she unclogged it using one of her hairpins. On May 2, 1957, Sen. Joseph McCarthy (R-Wisconsin) succumbs to illness exacerbated by alcoholism and dies at age 48. McCarthy had been a key figure in the anticommunist hysteria known as the Red Scare that engulfed the U.S. after World War II. On May 1, 1963, despite running out of oxygen, James Whittaker of Redmond, Washington, becomes the first American to reach the summit of Mt. Everest, the tallest mountain in the world. On May 4, 1977, British journalist David Frost interviews former President Richard Nixon. In the televised interview, Nixon admitted that he had not thought the White House tape recordings regarding the Watergate scandal would come out. On May 3, 1980, 13-year-old Cari Lightner of Fair Oaks, California, is killed by a drunk driver while walking along a quiet road on her way to a church carnival. Caris tragic death compelled her mother, Candy Lightner, to found the organization Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD). On May 6, 2004, the familiar theme song (Ill Be There For You by the Rembrandts) heralds the final original episode of NBCs long-running comedy series Friends. The show had debuted in 1994 and ran for 236 episodes. It was Hungarian psychiatrist Thomas Stephen Szasz who made the following sage observation: If you talk to God, you are praying. If God talks to you, you have schizophrenia. That iconic symbol of the Old West, the Pony Express, was based on the mail system used throughout the Mongol Empire in the 13th century. However, the Mongol riders often covered 125 miles in a single day, which was faster than the best record held by a Pony Express rider. Someone with way too much spare time discovered that a quarter has 119 grooves on its edge. Whats in a name? A great deal, it turns out, if youre talking about housing prices. Those who study such things say that a house on a boulevard is valued at over one-third more than the same house that has street in its address. Confectioner Milton Hershey suffered through founding two candy companies that ended in failure, then succeeded on his third attempt, and finally sold that company and used the proceeds to found the Hershey Company. After all his hard work, though, he seemed to be less interested in enjoying the fruits of his labors than in helping others. In 1909 he established the Hershey Industrial School for Orphaned Boys, and 10 years later he donated control of the company to a trust for the school. Today the institution is called the Milton Hershey School, and it continues to have a controlling interest in the candy company. Southern California has more cars than India has cows. If cows are sacred in India, what does that say about how Californians feel about their automobiles? Men are not against you; they are merely for themselves. -Gene Fowler THIS WEEK IN HISTORY STRANGE BUT TRUE THOUGHT FOR THE DAY SCRAMBLERS TRIVIA TEST 1. Jacob Schick 2. Flint 3. Los Angeles 4. The Peace Corps 5. Four 6. William Taft weighed 332 pounds 7. F. Scott Fitzgerald 8. Ray Charles 9. Marble 10. ...is good for the gander. TRIVIA ANSWERS 1. Inventions : Who invented the first successful electric razor? 2. U.S. States : What is Ohios official gemstone? 3. Geography : Where is the Griffith Observatory located? 4. Or ganizations: What volunteer organization celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2011? 5. Measur ements: How many gills are in a pint? 6. U.S. Pr esidents: Which president was the heaviest? 7. Literatur e: Who popularized the term The Jazz Age in a book title? 8. Music : Who had a 1961 hit with the song Hit the Road Jack? 9. Geology : The terms carrara and calacatta refer to what type of stone? 10. Pr overbs: What is the end of the proverb that begins, Whats good for the goose ... ?

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THE RIVER APRIL 27, 2018 30 www.islandsunnews.com PLACE CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED L Shore Fishing: Don't Harm The Fishby Capt. Matt Mitchell COMMERCIAL RENTALWONDERFUL RENTAL IN POPULAR LOCATION ON SANIBEL 8/5 TFN VACATION RENTAL Island VacationsMillion $ Views Await You! 239-472-72771-888-451-72771/4 TFN REAL ESTATEGARCIA REAL ESTATE AND CONSULTINGRICHARD J. GARCIA, GRI, BROKER239-472-5147garciaonsanibel.com 4/29 TFN BUILD NEW ON SANIBEL $500,000Call Ann Gee, Realtor 239-850-0979 4/13 6/1 HELP WANTEDJERRYS FOODS SERVERS & BARISTAS 5/6 TFN HELP WANTED 4/6 4/27 SERVICES OFFERED OFF 239-896-6789 4/13 TFN JC WINDOW CLEANING 11/17 TFN SCARNATO LAWN SERVICE 1/25 TFN HELLES CLEANING SERVICES 1/4 TFN ROGER NODRUFF ELECTRIC 4/20 TFN VACATION RENTAL 1/26 TFN HOUSE FOR RENT 4/13 5/4 RENTALS WANTEDWANTED TO RENT 2019 4/13 5/4 RENTAL WANTED 4/27 5/18 ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL 472-6747Gulf Beach Properties, Inc. Call Today GREAT DEAL NOW RENT TILL NOV. 1 Waterfront 04/13 TFNANNUAL RENTAL AVAILABLE 4/27 5/11 To advertise in the Island Sun and The River Weekly News Call 395-1213 FOR SALEGAME TABLE 4/13 4/27 KEYBOARD WANTED 4/27 5/4 ITEMS WANTED GARAGE SALEGARAGE SALE MULTI-FAMILY 4/27 4/27 BOATS CANOES KAYAKSDOCKAGE 1/4 TFN LEGAL NOTICESFICTITIOUS NAME 4/27 4/27 FICTITIOUS NAME 4/27 4/27

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THE RIVER APRIL 27, 2018 31 Top 10 Real Estate SalesCourtesy of Royal Shell Real Estate Subdivision City Year BuiltSquare FootageListing Price Selling Price Days On Market Metes and Bounds Sanibel 2000 4,123 $3,595,000 $3,500,000 1 Bay Woods Bonita Springs 2002 6,479 $3,200,000 $3,000,000 30 Sanibel Estates Sanibel 1997 4,595 $2,995,000 $2,850,000 881 Bonita BeachBonita Springs 1975 1,186 $2,800,000 $2,800,000 0 Gulf View PlazaFort Myers Beach 1946 1,872 $2,649,000 $2,561,000 12 Costa AmalfiMiromar Lakes 2014 4,348 $2,325,000 $2,000,000 208 Cape Coral Cape Coral 2003 4,102 $1,999,500 $1,900,000 66 Kinzie Island Sanibel 1989 5,100 $1,895,000 $1,820,000 27 Costa AmalfiMiromar Lakes 2016 3,553 $1,664,900 $1,535,000 145 Hills TP Fort Myers Beach 1998 2,246 $1,650,000 $1,576,800 146Public Forums Set For Sales Tax ReferendumThe School District of Lee County is inviting all parents and interested parties to two community forums about the Sales Tax Referendum on this Novembers ballot. The first forum will be held Tuesday, May 1 in the Gateway neighborhood of Lee County. The second is Thursday, May 3 on Sanibel Island. Superintendent Dr. Greg Adkins and School Board Member Chris Patricca will be presenting Change-for-Change, the Facts about the School Boards Half-Cent Investment in our Children. Topics to be covered include: The capital need Why a sales tax? How will the money be spent? There will be time set aside for a question-and-answer session after the presentations are finished. The Gateway Community Forum is being held at Next Level Church at 11081 Gateway Boulevard from 7 to 8 p.m. on May 1. The Sanibel Island Community Forum is being held at The Community House at 2173 Periwinkle Way from 6:30 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, May 3. The public and media are invited to attend. Send an RSVP to news@ leeschools.net. For details about the Sales Tax Referendum, visit www. leeschools.net/change-for-change. Summer Slump Business BoostThe Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerce Women in Business Committee (WIB) will host its May networking meeting at Hello SWFL on Wednesday, May 2 from 4 to 6 p.m. This months WIB event will focus on getting through off-season with Summer Slump Business Boost while providing open networking for local professionals. The dynamic team of Hello SWFL, the 2018 Chrysalis Award for excellence in sales and marketing, will provide insight into attracting new customers and avoiding common pitfalls that many businesses experience during the summer months. WIB wants to heat up its members summer marketing and PR program plans while cooling off with locally brewed beer provided by EightFoot Brewing. Cost is $10 for Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerce (GFMCC) members and $20 for future GFMCC members. All business professionals are invited to attend. Hello SWFL is located at 13099 South Cleveland Avenue in Fort Myers. To register, call 332-3624 or visit www. fortmyers.org. Human Trafficking Symposium May 3The 4th annual Human Trafficking Symposium will be held within Florida Gulf Coast Universitys Cohen Center Ballroom on Thursday, May 3 from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The symposium is presented by the Department of Justice Studies, Florida Gulf Coast University; the Department of Social Work, Florida Gulf Coast University; and Christys Cause, Inc., a local nonprofit working to eradicate child sex trafficking. Louis Bivona, founder and chairman of The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, northeast region, and founder of Bivona Child Advocacy Center, will be the keynote speaker. Admission is $50. Lee Health employees may attend at no cost with employee badge. Florida Gulf Coast University students may attend at no cost, based on space availability. Breakfast and lunch will be provided. The symposium will offer professional training tracks for law enforcement and prosecution, health care providers and mental health professionals. Licensed clinical social workers, mental health counselors and marriage and family therapists can receive up to five hours of continuing education hours through the Department of Social Work, Florida Gulf Coast University. Nurses can receive two hours of Human Trafficking continuing education credits by attending the WeCare break out session. To register visit www.bit.ly/htsfgcu or email humantraffickingsymp@fgcu.edu. Hortoons Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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THE RIVER APRIL 27, 201832