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River weekly news

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Title:
River weekly news
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, FL
Publisher:
Lorin Arundel and Ken Rasi- Co-Publishers
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Copyright Date:
2010
Language:
English

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newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Lee -- Fort Myers
Coordinates:
26.64328 x -81.868953

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright River Weekly News. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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FREETake Me Home VOL. 17, NO. 15 APRIL 13, 2018From the Beaches to the River District downtown Fort Myers Weather and Tides pa ge 28Scholarships Awarded By Beach Art GroupThe Fort Myers Beach Art Association (FMBAA) handed out scholarships and awards during the 2018 Student Scholarship Show on April 8 at its gallery on Shell Mound Boulevard. The annual show, which featured a reception, gallery talk and awards ceremony, showcases the work of talented high school and middle school art students. In an effort to encourage development of the arts in the community, three scholarships are awarded to high school seniors going on to study art at the college or university level. Eleven students from Cypress Lake High School Center for the Arts and 27 students from Cypress Lake Middle School received accolades. Hannah Gatof captured first prize for her artwork series and earned a $1,200 college art tuition scholarship and a $175 check. Sara Miller earned second prize and col lected a $1,000 scholarship and $125, while Emma Wigington was awarded third prize and received an $800 schol arship and $75. Artistic Merit Awards and a $50 check went to Tyler Bell, Aurianna Clark, Darby Debolt, Mary Deloach, Samuel Finley, Hannah Florell, Shana Jakowlew and Luis Sanchez. At the middle school level, three awards of artistic achievement were handed out. Tommy Kendall won first prize, Yaritza Ittai Soto took second and Brandon Lee picked up third prize. Other middle school students receiv ing praise were Mawwell Burg, Juliana Cabai, Carli Cary, Beatriz Collington, Prisha Devaguptapu, Lilliana Edwards, Dylan Hameetman, Eva Legaspi, Melainey Logue, Elle Macdiarmid, Annie Nichols, Victoria Raines, Diana Rodriquez, Madelyn Schefers, Trevor Soovali, Sarah Stack, Danielle Stens, Zac Syska, Kylee Vagle, Katie Welborn, Madison Welsh, Rebekah Winborn, Zach Yoshida and Zoe Zheng. The annual Student Scholarship Show and awards are supported finan cially through grants by the yearlong fundraising activities of the members of FMBAA. The show was judged by Renee Chastant and Marge Lee. For more information, visit www.fort myersbeachart.com or call 463-3909. Cypress Lake Center for the Arts senior Hannah Gatof photo s provided Winning artwork by Cypress Lake Middle School student Tommy KendallElementary Students Harvest Space TomatoesThe Allen Park Elementary students that will speak to an astronaut on board the International Space Station in the fall are anxiously awaiting the results of their latest lesson. Last week, the students harvested tomatoes that have been growing in their campus garden for months. Half of the seeds they planted were flown on board the International Space Station. The other half were the control seeds that stayed on earth. The students planned and performed an experiment to compare the germination rates of the two groups of seeds. Theyve also used the space tomatoes to generate classroom discussions about meeting an astronauts needs on long duration missions and how missions to Mars might need to rely on growing plants for food. Their data will now be analyzed by Tomatosphere, which is an award-winning,continued on page 24 Allen Park Elementary students checking on their space tomatoes photo provided Baseball Is The Theme For Yappy Hour This FridayBell Tower Shops will incorporate Americas pastime into its always-entertaining Yappy Hour event at Center Court on Friday, April 13 from 6 to 8 p.m. The theme for April is Take me out to the mall game, and dogs can participate in a lively baseball-themed costume contest (but dont expect anyone to buy them some peanuts and Cracker Jack). The cost to partici pate is a $5 donation to the Gulf Coast Humane Society, and one lucky dog will earn the title of MVP (Most Valuable Pooch) and win tickets to see the Fort Myers Miracle, which are offer ing five Bark in the Park dog-friendly events this season at Hammond Stadium. There will be live music by Ayla Lynn in addition to a bounce house, sidewalk chalk station and lawn games. Cru will sell beer and wine for the evening; all pro ceeds from beer purchases will be donated to the Gulf Coast Humane Society. Omaha Steaks will offer $2 hot dogs and $1 water bottles, with proceeds going to the Gulf Coast Humane Society. Throughout Yappy Hour, visitors will have an opportunity to stop by dog-friendly sponsor stations and meet adoptable dogs from the Gulf Coast Humane Society. For more information, visit www.thebelltowershops.com or www.facebook.com/ BellTowerShops Georgia and Bodhi are ready for Yappy Hour photo by Bob Petcher

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Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: Boarding At The Everglades by Gerri Reaves, PhDThis undated photo of the Everglades Hotel on Lee Street exemplifies the boardinghouse hotels that were common in Fort Myers in the early 20th century. The Everglades was located on the east side of Lee Street between First and Second on what is today CenturyLink prop erty. Decorative gingerbread touches in the roof peaks, a large wrap-around porch, and a neat white picket fence were typical features of early pioneer houses. Zoom in for a look at the porch and youll see many chairs that are tipped against the wall as if to protect the seats from rain. Such home hotels, as they were called, were just that homes that had been turned into hotels. In contrast to the higher-end ones like the Royal Palm and Bradford, they were affordable for guests of modest incomes and were year-round homes for some boarders. Food was included in the rent, and it was standard for all the boarding hotels to advertise the best food in town. In 1912, the Everglades advertised as the cleanest, cheapest, quiet home hotel in the city. It was completely modern and had an excellent table. One example? The special turkey dinner served on New Years Day. In the summer months, it offered reduced rates of only $6 per week. All of the rooms were screened a necessity to keep out mosquitoes in that pre-air-condi tioning era when open windows in the summer were a matter of survival. The hotel changed hands in the 19-teens, was expanded to 22 rooms, and had several managers, or proprietors, including DW Sumner, who at various times was a county judge, city clerk and also superintendent of schools. By around 1920, the hotel became the private family residence of Charles W. Bartleson, a wholesale grocer who moved to Fort Myers in 1919 and in the late1920s served as a city commissioner. The Everglades no longer exists. Like many big old houses with porches and shade trees, it has ceded its location to a parking lot. Walk down Lee Street to the CenturyLink parking lot and imagine having a New Years turkey dinner there. Then visit the following two research centers to learn more about early 20thcentury options in accommodations. The Southwest Florida Historical Society is an all-volunteer, non-profit organiza tion open Wednesday and Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon and Wednesday 4 to 7 p.m. It is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Call 939-4044 or visit www.swflhistoricalsociety.org for more information. The Lee County Black History Society is located at 1936 Henderson Avenue, adjacent to the Williams Academy Museum at Roberto Clemente Park. Hours for the all-volunteer, non-profit organization are Wednesday through Fri day from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Saturday by appointment only. For information, call 332-8778 or visit www.leecountyblackhistorysociety.org. Sources: Archives of the Southwest Florida Historical Society, Fort Myers Press and The Story of Fort Myers by Karl H. Grismer. THE RIVER APRIL 13, 20182 The Everglades on Lee Street is long gone, replaced by a parking lot photo by Gerri Reaves In the 19-teens, the Everglades Hotel, a home hotel, advertised as being clean, cheap and modern with an excellent table photo courtesy SWFL Florida Historical Society PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, call 239-395-1213 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1640 Periwinkle Way, Suite 2, Sanibel FL 33957. FAX number: 239-395-2299. Email: press@islandsunnews.com. Email: ads@islandsunnews.com The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Contributing Writers Jennifer Basey Barbara Cacchione Kay Casperson Suzy Cohen Linda Coin Marcia Feeney Ed Frank Shelley Greggs Tom Hall Marion Hauser, MS, RDRoss Hauser, MD Anne Mitchell Capt. Matt Mitchell Trinette Nelson J. Brendan Ryan, CLU, ChFC, MSFS Di Saggau Jeanie TinchPublisher Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Bob Petcher Graphic Arts/ Production Ann Ziehl, Manager Amanda Hartman Justin Wilder Reporters Gerri Reaves, PhD Jeff LysiakIndependently Owned And Operated COPYRIGHT 2018 The River Weekly NewsLORKEN Publications, Inc.Read Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com

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3 THE RIVER APRIL 13, 2018 Being avid conservationists, my wife, Ellen, and I were proud to be the first customers to sign up for the banks e-green checking account services. At SCCF, they have helped us for many years not just as our bankers, but as volunteers and major supporters of our mission. A business that truly cares about its customers and the environment, They make banking about you!W e have both business and personal accounts with them because they are so much more than just our bank. Erick Lindblad, Executive Director, Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation (SCCF) To learn more about our customer services and convenient locations, please visit EdisonNationalBank.com or call 239.466.1800. An Equal Housing Lender | Member FDIC | Bank of the Islands is an office of Edison National Bank. WE MAKE BANKING ABOUT YOU! Volunteers Appreciated At ReceptionCommunity Cooperative celebrated hundreds of its volunteers at the annual Volunteer Appreciation Reception at Crowne Plaza Fort Myers at Bell Tower Shops on March 27. The annual theme of the nonprofit organization is Peace, Love & Volunteer. We are extremely blessed to have some of the most dedicated volunteers here at Community Cooperative. They contribute countless hours of their time without ever asking for anything in return, said Tracey Galloway, CEO of Community Cooperative. 2017 was a busy year for volunteers, which was only amplified with the impacts of Hurricane Irma, added Rachell Mays, volunteer coordinator at Community Cooperative. The storm brought us hundreds of new volunteers who rolled up their sleeves and jumped right in to help others in their time of need in our kitchens, market and mobile pantries. Recognition was awarded to several standout volunteers. The 2018 Award recipients include: Volunteer of the Year JoAnne Lehrer, Joan Birgy and Janet Firley Rising Star Bishop Verot High School and Ed Guerra Volunteer Groups of the Year Pelican Preserve Meals on Wheels Driver of the Year Ren & Bev Whitaker Volunteer Spirit Award Tim and Marla Sullivan Community Cooperative had 2,200 volunteers in 2017 that worked over 43,000 hours throughout all of its social service, education and emergency food programs. Collectively these volunteers cooked and served more than one million pounds of food through Community Cooperatives emergency food programs and drove over 185,000 miles to deliver Meals on Wheels. From left, Marla Sullivan, Tracey Galloway, Tim Sullivan and Rachell Mays with the Sullivans Volunteer Spirit Award photos provided Volunteers showing off their new volunteer shirts

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THE RIVER APRIL 13, 20184 Dog Walkathon At JetBlue April 14Bring your family and bring your fur babies to Southeastern Guide Dogs Walkathon at JetBlue on Saturday, April 14 at 8 a.m. The free morning of entertainment will include a silent auction, carriage rides, food and a one-mile walk to support Southeastern Guide Dogs. Proceeds go to Southeastern Guide Dogs, an internationally accredited guide dog school located in Palmetto, Florida. The school does not receive any government funding. All the funds come from the public. Guide dogs and service dogs are given at no charge to the visually impaired and service dogs to our veterans. For more information about the school, visit www.guidedogs.org. For more information about the walkathon, visit event chairperson Gail Gagliardi at 203-215-6617. Bravo photos provided CG doing her jobHammond Stadium, home of the Fort Myers Miracle, is hosting a sanctioned qualifier for the 2018 Nathans Famous Fourth of July International Hot Dog Eating Contest. The top male and female participants at the Saturday, April 14 competition will claim a seat at the nationally televised Independence Day competition in Coney Island, New York. A trip to the ballpark isnt complete unless you eat a hot dog its a tradition, said Chris Peters, president and general manager of the Fort Myers Miracle. Hopefully the ambiance at Hammond Stadium helps these competitive eaters get in the mood to break some records. Last year, Nathans Famous held its inaugural Southwest Florida qualifier at Germain Arena. The top male contestant, Pablo Martinez, downed 25 hot dogs and buns during the 10-minute competition, and the top female contestant, Mary Bowers, consumed 10 hot dogs. Both local qualifiers finished 12th in their respective divisions at the international championship on July 4, 2017. Joey Chestnut claimed the mens title after consuming 72 hot dogs in 10 minutes, while Miki Sudo downed 41 hot dogs to earn the womens championship. Hammond Stadiums gates will open at 4:25 p.m. on April 14, with the Hot Dog Eating Contest set to begin at 4:30 p.m. The Miracle play the Tampa Tarpons at 6 p.m. Vouchers for free game tickets and parking will be available April 11 to 13 at Nathans Famous Fort Myers location, 11150 S. Cleveland Ave., Suite 100. To register for the Hot Dog Eating Contest, visit MajorLeagueEating.com. The April 14 Miracle game also features a Brian Dozier bobblehead giveaway. For a complete schedule of games and promotions, visit www. miraclebaseball.com or call 768-4210. International Hot Dog Eating Contest Champs Miki Sudo and Joey Chestnut photo provided Local Qualifier For Hot Dog Eating Contest

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5 THE RIVER APRIL 13, 2018 11620 COURT OF PALMS #701, FT. MYERS Panoramic River Views, 9th Floor $739,000 MLS 217076766 Patti Testa 239.770.5445 GULF HARBOUR YACHT & CC 5731 SW 9TH CT., CAPE CORAL Spectacular Location, Gulf Access $1,149,000 MLS 217078905 Jim Peterson 239.470.2353 ROSE GARDEN/TARPON POINT 13510 SHERRILL POINT CT., FT. MYERS 5,092 S.F., 4 BR, 4.5 BA $1,495,000 MLS 217078286 McMurray & Nette 239.850.7888 GATED WATERFRONT COMMUNITY 3112 SE 22ND AVE., CAPE CORAL 3 BR, 2 BA, Pool, 2,318 S.F. $469,000 MLS 218019661 Michelle Forneris 239.849.4387 SAILBOAT ACCESS 766 CAPE VIEW DR., FORT MYERS One of SWFLs Best Locations $929,000 MLS 217078266 McMurray & Nette 238.850.7888 PRIME WATERFRONT LOCATION 2104 SW 28TH ST., CAPE CORAL New Home, Intersecting Canal $459,900 MLS 218018250Paul Jones, Koffman & Assoc. 239.699.7441 GULF ACCESS 15051 PUNTA RASSA RD. #WS02, FT. MYERS Wet Slip 50 x 20 $425,000 MLS 217030648 McMurray & Nette 239.281.4435 SANIBEL HARBOUR YACHT CLUB 16830 SANIBEL SUNSET CT. #803, FT. MYERS Minutes from Sanibel Beaches $159,900 MLS 218014225 Troy De Mond 239.822.0332 SANIBEL SUNSET VILLAS 14521 DORY LN., FORT MYERS $935,000 MLS 218004371 Patti Testa 239.770.5445 GULF HARBOUR YACHT & CC 17861 GREY HERON CT., FT. MYERS BEACH Huge Waterfront Lot $449,950 MLS 216032480 Roger Stening 239.777.4707 PALM ISLES 2817 SW 42ND LN., CAPE CORAL 3 BR, 3 BA w/Optional 4th Bedroom $390,000 MLS 218007855Chad Reedy, McMurray & Nette 239.989.8838 BEACH PARKWAY 6576 SAND SPUR LN., FORT MYERS Sunsets & Protected Dockage $749,000 MLS 217070539 Jamie Gates 239.910.2778 TOWN & RIVER ESTATES 4391 FOREMAST CT. #2C, FT. MYERS Yacht, Golf & Tennis Club $167,000 MLS 216013050 Thom Mueller 239.322.9364 THE LANDINGS ST. CHARLES HARBOUR 13901 BLENHEIM TRAIL RD., S. FT. MYERS Custom Built Executive Home $1,199,750 MLS 217020052 Roger Stening 239.770.4707 $2,749,000 MLS 217069070 Jim Peterson 239.470.235311520 ISLE OF PALM DR., FT. MYERS BEACH Waterfront Sailboat Access $799,950 MLS 216060472 Roger Stening 239.770.4707 PALM ISLES OPEN 4/15 11:00AM 2:00PM OPEN 4/14 & 4/15 12:00PM 3:00PM OPEN 4/14 & 4/15 1:00PM 4:00PM OPEN 4/14 12:00PM 4:00PM OPEN 4/15 12:00PM 3:00PM OPEN 4/15 12:00PM 4:00PM NEW LISTING NEW PRICE NEW PRICE NEW PRICE NEW PRICE NEW PRICE

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THE RIVER APRIL 13, 20186 Fort Myers Art: Students Star In Alliance Youth Theatre Playsby Tom HallThe Alliance Youth Theatre and its intrepid director, Carmen Crussard, presents Freckleface Strawberry by Julianne Moore from April 13 to 15 with a cast restricted to students in third through eighth grades and Spamalot School Edition by Eric Idle and John Du Prez from April 20 to 22 with a cast comprised solely of students age 13 and older. Freckleface Strawberry will do anything to get rid of her freckles from scrubbing them with soap to caking on makeup. Shell even wear a ski mask to school to cover them up! Will her schoolmates realize that its her under the mask? Will Freckleface be brave enough to finally face her complexion in the mirror? With the help of her loveable schoolmates, including an amazingly talented ballerina, a cutie jock, a charming ditz and a totally kooky teacher, Freckleface learns that everyone is different and thats what makes everyone special. There are just four shows, with 8 p.m. performances on Friday and Saturday, April 13 and 14, and 2 p.m. matinees on Saturday and Sunday, April 14 and 15. Tickets are $10 presale, $20 for adults and $15 for students and seniors. For Spamalot School Edition, the setting is England in 932 A.D. The kingdom has been divided. To the west are the Anglo-Saxons; to the east, the French. Above is nothing but Celts and some people from Scotland. In Gwynned, Powys and Dyfed plague. In the kingdoms of Wessex, Sussex, Essex and Kent plague. In Mercia and the two Anglias plague as well. With a 50 percent chance of pestilence and famine coming out of the Northeast at 12 miles per hour, legend tells us of an extraordinary leader who arose from the chaos to unite a troubled kingdom a man with a vision who gathered Knights together in a Holy Quest. This man was Arthur, King of the Britons. For this was England! There are just four shows, with 8 p.m. performances on Friday and Saturday, April 20 and 21, and 2 p.m. matinees on Saturday and Sunday, April 21 and 22. Tickets are $10 presale, $20 for adults and $15 for students and seniors. Both plays takes place in the Foulds Theatre at the Alliance for the Arts, which is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information or purchase tickets, telephone 939-2787. Tom Hall is both an amateur artist and aspiring novelist who writes art quest thrillers. He is in the final stages of completing his debut novel titled Art Detective. A former tax attorney, he lives in Estero with his fianc and their four cats. Fuel Up Schools CampaignThe Fort Myers community is invited to a special Fuel Up Night at participating Circle K convenience stores on Thursday, April 19 to kick off Circle Ks annual Fueling Our Schools fundraising campaign. The campaign invites customers to purchase fuel at a specially marked fuel pump, with Circle K donating one-cent of every gallon of fuel purchased to a participating local school (up to $2,000 per school). Schools will use their dona tions to address different areas of need, such as technology, resources, teacher incentives and more. On special Fuel Up Nights, customers have an opportunity to make an even greater impact. On these dates, 10 cents of each gallon of fuel sold at select Circle K stores will be donated to participating schools. Community events will also be held at select stores (contact your local Circle K store for event details). To date, the Fueling Our Schools campaign has raised nearly $900,000 for local schools. More than 350 Circle K stores across North America participated in continued on page 23 Student actors in Freckleface Strawberry photo courtesy www.artswfl.com Davis Woods is the place to be, located just minutes from area beach and many amenities that SW Florida offers. This 2 bedroom/ 1 bath home has a delightful view of the community pool, lake and tennis courts. Both the living room and master bedroom provides entrance to the lanai through sliding glass doors. Roll down hurricane shutters on the lanai offer storm protection. This property will make a comfortable home or investment. The seasonal rental market at Davis Woods is very strong and many seasonal renters return year after year. The home is being sold fully furnished and has everything you need to make yourself comfortable. Pack your bags and move in!16881 Davis Road #524I will sincerely work for youCathie Lewis, RealtorPhone: 239-745-7367 Cathie@AllAboutHome.LifePfeifer Realty Group Listed $139,000 REAL ESTATE EXPERTSW Florida, Fort Myers Beach, Sanibel & Captiva Islands is All About Home Recently SoldDavis Woods 426 Davis Woods 312Just Sold Beautiful Remodel

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7 THE RIVER APRIL 13, 2018 Providing Custom Interiors to Sanibel & Captiva for 28 years Complimentary In-Home Consultation695 Tarpon Bay Rd. Sanibel, FL 33957 coin.decoratingden.com 239.472.6551 The Ronin Riding Club of Southwest Florida paid their annual visit to Ronald McDonald House Charities twice over the weekend of March 24 to 25. The Saturday visit was part of the groups annual Poker Run, while the Sunday visit was to tour and deliver a years worth of fundraising proceeds. With this years check for $14,921.26 and a generous donation of gas cards, the Ronin Riding Club has exceeded $50,000 in donations to RMHC. Ronin Riding Club of Southwest Florida photo provided Motorcycle Club Fundraiser For Charity Group CEO Academy Application Deadline NearsEntrepreneurial, business-minded teens still have time to register for Junior Achievement of Southwest Floridas popular CEO Academy, a weeklong summer camp in which students learn the basics of starting and operating a successful business. The application deadline is Wednesday, April 18. The CEO Academy is open to rising high school juniors and seniors from Charlotte, Collier and Lee counties. Under the guidance of experienced local business leaders, entrepreneurs and Florida Gulf Coast University professors, participating students work in project teams to develop a unique business concept and comprehensive business plan. Students can expect lessons in economics, entrepreneurship, ethics, finance, global economy, marketing and international trade. The one-week camp runs from June 4 to 8 at FGCUs Emergent Technologies Institute, located at 16301 Innovation Lane in Fort Myers. Camp hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Thanks to generous supporters, college scholarship money will be awarded to each student on the winning team for the business plan competition held at the camps conclusion. A distinguished judging panel consists of past Junior Achievement laureates, who themselves are exceptional entrepreneurs and have been recognized for making a significant contribution to the economic development of Southwest Florida while adhering to high moral and ethical principles. This opportunity offers students invaluable knowledge and experience from successful business leaders and entrepreneurs, which provides an excellent addition to a college application and the chance to participate in future Junior Achievement events. To apply, visit www.JASWFL.org, or call 225-2590. There is a $100 application fee, which is fully refundable if the student is not selected. Audubon Field Trip To Regional ParkAudubon of Southwest Florida will hold a field trip along the Great Florida Birding Trail at Caloosahatchee Regional Park on Saturday, April 18 at 8 a.m. Interested participants are asked to meet at parking lot # 2, which is reached by entering the main park entrance located at 18500 North River Road in Alva. The initial hike will be the 0.13-mile ADA accessible trail through dense hardwoods to the overlook of the Caloosahatchee River. For those adventurous types, the hike will continue following the Oxbow Loop Trail for another 0.85 miles. Located along the Caloosahatchee, the park is an area rich in natural history. Calusa Indians are believed to be the first settlers here, followed by Seminole and early settlers of what is now known as Alva. Early studies have also found two archaeological sites within the park. Members and non-members as well as beginner to advanced birders are welcome. The field trip is free; but donations are always appreciated. There is a $1 per hour or $5 per day parking fee (Lee County Parks parking stickers are acceptable). You may want to bring your camera, field glasses, sunscreen, and water. Send an RSVP to audubon.southwest. florida@gmail.com. History Talk About Barron CollierLearn about the amazing man who changed the face of Southwest Florida at a free talk at the Hedges Family Eco Center in the Naples Preserve on Tuesday, April 17 at 10 a.m. Local historian Marya Repko will give an illustrated lecture about how Barron Collier got sand in his shoes and bought over a million acres before having a county named after him and forging a road through the Everglades. But that was not all Collier did. He owned a chain of hotels, a shipping line, a fleet of buses and several newspapers. And, we forget that he was an important public figure in New York City during the Roaring 20s. Naples Preserve, is locaterd at 1690 Tamiami Trail North in Naples. For more information about Maryas books, including The Story of Barron Collier visit www.ecity-publishing.com or call her at 695-2905. Memorial Day Event At FSW April 19Florida SouthWestern State Colleges Troops and Students Connect (TaSC) student club is hosting a special Memorial Day event on its Fort Myers campus, Building J-117, on Thursday, April 19 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is free and open to the public. As military veterans who proudly served this country, and now as FSW students, this event is especially meaningful to us, said Alyssa Candelmo, president, TaSC. Its important for all of us to always remember the sacrifice our armed forces make. Speakers will include Dr. Jeff Allbritten, president, FSW; Mark Lee, Afghanistan veteran; David Sounders, American Military Veterans foundation; Dale Mullin, president, Wounded Warriors Project (Collier); Kim Hayes, Gold Star Moms Charity; and Gen. Jim Dozier (ret), West Point graduate. In addition to the speakers, groups expected to attend include Korean War veterans, Rolling Thunder, American Military Veterans Foundation, Gold Star Moms Charity and Wounded Warriors Project. Visit www.FSW.edu for more information.

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Along The RiverSouthwest Florida students are invited to a movie night featuring the original classic sci-fi comedy Ghostbusters at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center this Friday, April 13. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the movie begins at 7 p.m. Admission is $5 or $4 with a non-perishable food donation. Movie goers can also purchase concessions, like pizza, popcorn, soda and candy. Seating and floor space for lounging will be available in additional to theater-style seating. Bring pillows if choosing to sit on the floor. A big screen will be set up for the movie. Adults over 18 must be accompanied by a school-aged child to attend. All proceeds benefit the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Centers Junior Board. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. Visit www. sbdac.com or call 333-1933 for tickets and information. The 93X Garlic Fest will take place at Centennial Park in downtown Fort Myers this Saturday, April 14 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The festival will feature many vendors offering garlicky food (surprise!) and beverages as well as live music and an entertainment area for children. Centennial Park is located 2000 West First Street in downtown Fort Myers. The monthly SoCo Second Saturday Art Crawl will showcase another artful night along the SoCo Cultural District this Saturday, April 14 from 6 to 10 p.m. Vendors will set up at various locations in the Royal Palms Square, offering their handmade and fine crafts during the event. The SoCo Second Saturday Art Crawl is a rain or shine monthly event. The SoCo Cultural District location encompasses the block south of Colonial Boulevard, from the corner of McGregor Boulevard to Summerlin Road, to Royal Palm Square Boulevard and back to McGregor Boulevard. For more information, visit www.socoswfl.com or call 590-8645. The Famous Author Lecture Series continues this Monday, April 16 with bestselling, critically acclaimed author Karen Dionne at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center from noon to 2 p.m. A book signing and question-and-answer session will also take place. Dionne is the author of The Marsh Kings Daughter. She is the cofounder of the online writers community Backspace, the organizer of the Salt Cay Writers Retreat and a member of the International Thriller Writers, where she served on the board of directors. Tickets are $35, while a table of eight is $280. The afternoons lunch will be prepared by Chefs Mike and Karen Gavala, owners of G3 Catering. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. For more information and tickets, visit www.sbdac.com or call 333-1933. Shell Point Retirement Community closes out its 2017-18 Performing Arts Concert Series program with My Sinatra at the Village Church at Shell Point this Tuesday, April 17 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $35. My Sinatra stars Cary Hoffman, who translates his cel ebrated PBS special into a hilarious biographical one-man musical play. His poignant and high-ener gy performance centers on the love and admiration he holds for his hero, Frank Sinatra, and explores the perils of wanting to become somebody else. The Village Church at Shell Point is located at 15100 Shell Point Boulevard in Fort Myers. For tickets, visit www.shellpoint.org/concerts or call 454-2067. The 6th annual Mini Masters Golf Tournament will be held at Jungle Golf on Thursday, April 19 from 3 to 8 p.m. The first tee time is at 4 p.m. Presented by the Fort Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce, the mini putt event will feature prizes, raffles and, yes, even mulligans. The 19th hole will be at Pinchers Crab Shack where trophies will be awarded for winning team and lowest individual score. There will also be a secret hole-in-one prize. The tournament is open to the public but space is limited to 18 teams of five players each. Cost is $150 per team. Jungle Golf is located at 17710 San Carlos Boulevard on Fort Myers Beach. For more information and to download an application, visit www.fortmyersbeach.org/ events/mm6 or contact Christi at 454-7500 or events@ fmbchamber.com. Ghostbusters will be playing at Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center Friday evening image courtesy IMDbTHE RIVER APRIL 13, 20188 Fresh ingredients, simplicity, love... the recipe for a treasured dining experience Chef/Owner AJ Black7 Days 5-10 pm 751 Tarpon Bay Road Sanibel Island, FL Reservations Suggested www.iltesoro.net 239-395-4022 FINE ITALIAN CUISINEIL TESORO RISTORANTEinspired by Island Fare in a bistro styleVOTED BEST CHEFBEST OF THE ISLANDS AWARDTASTE OF THE ISLANDS IRON CHEF WINNER AJ BLACKCelebrating Our 10 Year AnniversaryExtensive New Wine List Tasting Menu 15880 San Carlos Blvd. Fort Myers Next to TargetOpen 4:30pm 7 Days a Week 239-590-8147 www.TerraNostraDining.com NOW OPEN FOR LUNCHMON FRI 11:30 AM 2:30 PM

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9 THE RIVER APRIL 13, 2018 Symphony To Celebrate 58th Birthday The Southwest Florida Symphony will celebrates its 58th birthday in an un conventional way on Sunday, April 15. Lee Countys only pr ofessional or chestra and one of the oldest on Floridas Gulf Coast will be attending a birthday brunch hosted by Nice Guys Pizza from noon until 3 p.m. The brunch will feature performances by some of the orchestras musicians, a special menu and cocktail items, gift baskets offered for silent auc tion and, of course, a birthday cake. The symphonys birthday brunch is open to the public. Admission is free and no reservations are required, but there is a suggested donation of $10 per person to attend. Jovana Batkovic, the owner of Nice Guys, recently joined the Southwest Florida Symphony Board of Trustees. Almost immediately upon her arrival, she cultivated an unusual new audience for the orchestra. Between 30 and 50 Gen-Xers and Millennials have followed her to each Masterworks concert this season to experience the power of live classical music performance. She has virtually singlehandedly established a unique fan club-like following of the ever-elusive young classical music audience. Nice Guys continues to host postconcert parties where musicians (many of whom are of the same generations as their new fan base) have the opportunity to interact with orchestra patrons in a relaxed setting. Not only have our new, younger patrons discovered that a classical per formance can be as exciting and riveting as a r ock concert, but theyre expressing the same desire to connect with the musicians who perform for us and those who play in the bands they follow, said Symphonys Executive Director Amy Ginsburg. Nice Guys is located at 1334 East Cape Coral Parkway in Cape Coral. For more information, call the Southwest Florida Symphony office at 418-1500 or Nice Guys Pizza at 549-7542. Free Rides On Try Transit DayLee County Transit, LeeTran, will be offering free rides on all fixed-route buses for Try Transit Day on Friday, April 20. Held the Friday before Earth Day, Try Transit Day is intended to raise awareness of public transit and increase ridership. Commuters are encouraged to try out LeeTran to experience a greener transportation option. The event is organized in conjunction with the Florida Department of Transportations Commuter Services program. Individuals who use alternative transportation modes and track their trips can visit www. commuterservicesfl.com/information/triptracker to enter in prize drawings donated by partnering agencies. To view a full system map and route schedules, visit www.rideleetran.com or plan your route using the transit option in Google Maps. To learn more about LeeTran, visit www.RideLeeTran.com. To register for more information on carpools, transit, biking, walking, emergency ride home program or to track your trips for prizes, visit www.commuterservicesfl.com, call 1.866.585.RIDE (7433) or email outreach@CommuterServicesFL.com. Bonsai Society AuctionThe Bonsai Society of Southwest Florida, Inc. annual Auction and Picnic will be held at the Berne Davis Botanical Garden on Saturday, April 21. Bonsai trees and bonsai materials will be sold at auction beginning at 10 a.m. A free buffet lunch will follow the auction. The public is invited; free parking is available on Larchmont Street, just east of the Edison Garden Shop. The Berne Davis Botanical Garden is located at 2166 Virginia Avenue in Fort Myers. The Southwest Florida Symphony photo provided

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Churches/TemplesALL FAITHS UNITARIAN CONGREGATION Sunday 10:30 a.m., 2756 McGregor Boulevard, allfaiths-uc.org, 226-0900. ALL SAINTS BYZANTINE RITE CATHOLIC Sunda y 10:30 a.m. 10291 Bayshore Road, 305-651-0991. ANNUNCIATION GREEK ORTHODOX Sunday 9 and 10 a.m. 8210 Cypress Lake Drive, annunciation.fl.goarch.org, 481-2099. BETH SHILOH MESSIANIC SYNAGOGUE Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m. 15675 McGregor Boulevard, 437-3171. BIBLESHARE 10 a.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Tuesday, 7050 Winkler Rd, Suite 121, www.simplysimple worship.com, 437-8835. BREAD OF LIFE MINISTRIES Sunda y 10:30 a.m. 16581 McGregor Boulevard, 267-3166. CHABAD LUBAVITCH ORTHODOX Friday 6:30 p.m. 5620 Winkler Road, chabadswf.org, 433-7708. CHAPEL OF CYPRESS COVE Sunday 10 a.m. 10200 Cypress Cove Circle, revtedalthouse@aol.com, 850-3943. CHURCH OF THE CROSS Sunday 9:15 and 10:45 a.m. 13500 Freshman Lane, 768-2188. CONGREGATIONAL Sunday 10:30 a.m. 1619 Llewellyn Drive, taecc.com, 334-4978. COVENANT PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 10 a.m. 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937. CYPRESS LAKE BAPTIST Sunday 9:45 and 11 a.m., 7 p.m.; Wednesday 6:30 p.m. 8400 Cypress Lake Drive, 481-5442. CYPRESS LAKE PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 8, 9, 10 and 11 a.m. 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, www.clpc.us, 481-3233. CYPRESS LAKE UNITED METHODIST Sunday 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, 482-1250. FAITH FELLOWSHIP WORLD OUTREACH Sunday 10:30 a.m.,Thursday 7:30 p.m., Friday 7:30 p.m. 6111 South Pointe Boulevard, 278-3638. FAITH UNITED METHODIST Sunday 8:45 and 10:30 a.m. 15690 McGregor Boulevard, 482-2030. FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST Wednesday 12 noon Testimony Service, Sunday 10:30 a.m. 2390 West First Street, christiansciencefortmyers.net, christianscience.com. FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Sunday 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. 13545 American Colony Boulevard, 936-2511. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. 2466 First Street, www.fumcftmyers.org, 332-1152. FORT MYERS CHRISTIAN Sunday 10:30 a.m., 5916 Winkler Road, 4374330. FORT MYERS CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST; Sunday 10 a.m., 8210 College Parkway, 4823133. IONA-HOPE EPISCOPAL CONGREGATION Saturday 5 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.; Tuesday 9:30 a.m.; Wednesday 9:30 a.m. 9650 Gladiolus Drive, 454-4778. JESUS THE WORKER CATHOLIC Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday 8, 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. 881 Nuna Avenue, 481-1143. KINGDOM LIFE Sunday 10:30 a.m. 2154 McGregor Boulevard, 218-8343. LAMB OF GOD Sunday 7:45 and 10 a.m. 19691 Cypress View Drive, lambofgodchurch.net, 267-3525. NEW BEGINNINGS CENTER Friday 6:30 and 7 p.m. 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, nbcministry@embarqmail.com, facebook.com/nbcministry, 656-0416. NEW COVENANT EYES Monthly 9 a.m. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, newcovenanteyes.com, 220-8519. NEW HOPE BAPTIST Sunday 11 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. 16120 San Carlos Boulevard, Unit 10, 985-8503. NEW HOPE PRESBYTERIAN Sunday 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 10051 Plantation Road, www.newhopefortmyers.org, 274-1230. PEACE COMMUNITY Sunday 10:30 a.m. www. 17671 Pine Ridge Road, peacecommunitychurch.com, 2677400. PEACE LUTHERAN Sunday 8 and 10 a.m. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@ peaceftmyers.com. 437-2599. REDEEMER LUTHERAN Sunday 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. 3950 Winkler Ext., 274-0143. RIVER OF LIFE ASSEMBLY OF GOD 8, 9:45 and 11:30 a.m. 21580 River Ranch Road, 495-0400. SAMUDRABADRA BUDDHIST CENTER Meditation classes. MeditationInFortMyers. org, 567-9739. SAINT COLUMBKILLE CATHOLIC Monday through Saturday 8 a.m.; Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday 7, 9 and 11 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 12171 Iona Road, 489-3973. ST. FRANCIS XAVIER CATHOLIC Monday through Thursday 6:45 a.m.; Friday 6:45 and 11 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.; Sunday 6:45, 9:30 and 11 a.m. 2157 Cleveland Avenue, 334-2161. SAINT JOHN THE APOSTLE METROPOLITAN Sunday 10 a.m. 3049 McGregor Boulevard, 344-0012. SAINT MICHAEL LUTHERAN Saturday 5:30 p.m.; Sunday 8 and 10:45 a.m. 3595 Broadway, 939-1218. SAINT NICHOLAS MONASTERY Sunday 9:30 a.m. 111 Evergreen Road, saintnicholasmonastery.org, 997-2847. ST. VINCENT DE PAUL CATHOLIC Tuesday through Friday 9 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.; Sunday 9 and 11 a.m. 13031 Palm Beach Boulevard, 693-0818. SOUTHWEST BAPTIST Sunday 11 a.m.; Wednesday 6 p.m. 16940 McGregor Boulevard, 454-3336. TEMPLE BETHEL SYNAGOGUE Friday Shabbat 7:30 p.m.; Torah Saturday 9 a.m.; Religious School Wednesday 5:30 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m.16225 Winkler Road, templebethel.com, 433-0018. TEMPLE JUDEA (CONSERVATIVE) Friday 6:30 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. tjswfl. org.14486 A&W Bulb Road, 433-0201. THE NEW CHURCH Sunday 11 a.m. 10811 Sunset Plaza Circle #401, newchurchflorida.com. 481-5535. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST Sunday 10:30 a.m. 13411 Shire Lane, uucfm. org, 561-2700. UNITY OF FORT MYERS Sunday 10 a.m. 11120 Ranchette Road, unityoffortmyers.org, 278-1511. WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. 9065 Ligon Court, 481-2125. WORD OF LIFE Sunday 10 a.m., Wednesday 7 p.m. 2120 Collier Avenue, 274-8881. ZION LUTHERAN Sunday 8, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. 7401 Winkler Road, zionfm.org, 481-4040. THE RIVER APRIL 13, 201810 Immokalee Foundation Grants AwardedSixteen post-secondary students in The Immokalee Foundations programs each have been granted a $500 scholarship from a nonprofit organiza tion established to award fun money to deserving students. Dr Massoud Eghrari and his late wife, Isabella, knew how difficult it is to pursue an education and career particularly so for Immokalee youth, who have limited resources. So they set up the Massoud and Isabelle Eghrari Charitable Foundation not only to support worthy students education al goals, but also to enhance students quality of life by awarding the money with no r equirement other than that the students spend it on themselves. That could mean extra pillows and dorm room decor, a dinner out on a test day or anything else including a trip to Disney World. Thats what Graciela Cervantes plans for a portion of her award, a once-in-a-lifetime experience that she never imagined having. Receiving this scholarship helped me feel like there was someone who not only cared about my education but about me as well, Cervantes said. The point of this scholarship is to use it on something other than school, which was very unexpected because most scholarships are intended for tuition or books. The Immokalee Foundation has helped me so much in the past three years. During this time, I have been in the Career Development Program. I can honestly say it is because of The Immokalee Foundation that I am in college. They always served as a guide to me when I needed help apply ing for college, submitting scholarships and pr oviding help to answer any questions that I had. When Eghrari became a widower, the nonprofit he co-founded continued to pro vide scholarships like the one Cervantes r eceived. Today, Dr. Eghrari and his wife, Tayebeh, continue to be strong supporters of The Immokalee Foundations efforts. To learn more about The Immokalee Foundation, volunteering as a career panel speaker or host, becoming a mentor, mak ing a donation, including the foundation in your estate plans, or for mor e information, call 430-9122 or visit www.immokalee foundation.org. Concert Band Performs April 15The Southwest Florida Concert Band featuring trombone soloist Dr. Stew art Ross will be performing its last concert of the season at South Fort Myers High School on Sunday April 15 at 2 p.m. A $500 scholarship will be awarded. The concert will open with a stirring New Zealand march called Invercargill. Dr. Ross will perform Sammy Nesticos Reflective Mood, and the band will play Wonderful World of Disney songs such as The Mickey Mouse March, Its a Small World, Zip-A Dee Doo-Dah and more as well as Beatles songs and more rock and roll. All concerts are free with donations accepted. South Fort Myers High School is located at 14020 Plantation Road in Fort Myers. For more information, visit www. swflconcertband.org. Dr. Massoud Eghrari and Mrs. Tayebeh Eghrari awarded fun money to The Immokalee Foundation students photo provided

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CROW Case Of The Week: Gopher Tortoise by Bob PetcherFrom a longevity standpoint, the gopher tortoise ( Gopherus polyphemus ) is regarded as a prehistoric creature since it has been roaming coastal dunes, upland forests and sandhills of the southern United States region for thousands of years. These reptiles can live up to and beyond 60 years of age but, as a species, their population is declining and their status is considered threatened in Florida and Georgia. Gopher tortoises are learned survivals, though. Instead of searching for drinking water, they quench their thirsts by eating many water-storing plants and other greenery. They are so named by their ability to dig large, deep burrows with their shovel-like front legs. These dug burrows are home to other animals. In fact, it is reported that some 350 different species of mammals, reptiles, amphibians, insects, and even birds are guests to these burrows. This good neighbor policy allows the gopher tortoise to be termed a keystone species, since it plays a pivotal role in their native community. At CROW, an adult gopher tortoise was admitted to the hospital from Lehigh Acres. The tortoise was hit by a car and sustained a severe shell fracture to its carapace over the area of its left lung, which reportedly opened the coelomic membrane. CROW officials stated x-rays showed an opacity in the left lung field, meaning the lung had been affected by the injury and causing a life-threatening situation. The injury to the shell ripped open the underlying membrane and exposed the lung, which can be a life threatening situation. It can cause respiratory compromise, pneumonia, or collapse of the lung, said Dr. Malka Spektor, CROW veterinary intern. The patients coelomic membrane was sutured closed, and the site was bandaged with telfa, gauze, elasticon and honey. Yes... honey! A close call with death may have been avoided. It appears that the tortoise still has use of the lung, and any minor damage has mostly healed. We have not seen any respiratory distress, bleeding from the nose, or other signs of a damaged lung, said Dr. Spektor. Honey can be a foundation for a wound bed to facilitate healthy regrowth of the tissue. The hole in the membrane was stitched closed first, but the honey was used to help the healing process. Honey also decreases the chance of infection because it has antimicrobial properties. The patient was provided with pain medications, antibiotics to fight and prevent infection as well as iron and B12 to compensate for bleeding. Iron is a component of red blood cells that helps carry oxygen around the body. When the body is anemic, it also becomes iron deficient, said Dr. Spektor. Even if we cannot perform a transfusion, we can still help by supplementing iron. The B12 is used to make hemoglobin, a molecule that carries oxygen in the red blood cell. The patient has been at the clinic since March 20 and appears to be healing nicely. The wound has developed a layer of eschar, which is the tissue that begins to repair the shell defect, added Dr. Spektor. The patient is eating well, active, and will hopefully be released in the next week or two. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to P.O. Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit www.crowclinic.org. Patient #18-0633 has rebounded from a near-death experience photo by Brian Bohlman RIVER 11 THE RIVER APRIL 13, 2018

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Tarpon Have Arrivedby Capt. Matt MitchellTarpon time has started a little earlier this year. When conditions are just right with light winds, its amazing how many fish we are already seeing. During the brief periods of calm we experienced this week, I saw lots of rolling tarpon all over in the sound. Reports have already started coming in of tarpon catches along with anglers jumping them while targeting another species mostly on tackle way too light to even have a chance at landing the fish. Catching the first tarpon of the season will happen any day now. With clean clear water and lots of bait around, things are looking good for an awesome tarpon season. We have no cold fronts in sight so these migrating tarpon will continue to flood into our waters and offer anglers more and more opportunities to hook one. Having a few tarpon rods and a few larger bait onboard rigged and ready to go will make all the difference if that chance arises. Personally I dont schedule any tarpon charters until May as Ive had just too many past years when we get one last April cold front and the fish have simply disappeared. Fishing for large trout continued to be the best action for my clients this week. On most trips, we caught many trout over the 20-inch max while casting free-lined shiners to sand holes in clean clear water. Many deeper sand holes and channels running through the grass flats in the northern sound from hemp key north also held a mixed bag of fish including big Spanish mackerel, bluefish and ladyfish. Chumming sand holes also produced snook and even a few flounder. Running up to the north on a few trips this week made a nice change and gave me a chance to fish some of my favorite sunken bottom structures both around channel markers and in open water. After dropping baits on jig heads to the bottom, we got on some crazy gag grouper action and even hooked a few tripletail and triggerfish. Some of our channel markers in the sound have man-made structures either on or around them that creates artificial fish heavens. These can be great spots to fish during periods of little or no tide movement and can produce a mixed bag of species. Being able to catch gag grouper one after another when there is no tide movement is always a great thing to be able to pull from your back pocket when other action is slow. Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions, email captmattmitchell@aol. com. ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. NEW MOTOR SALES REBUILT POWERHEADS FACTORY TRAINED MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISERCourteous Professional Marine Repair Service Dockside Service Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life472-3380 466-3344 Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint PricesDave Doane NEW M O T O R S ALE S REB U ILT P O WERHEA D S FACTORY T R A I N E D MER C U RY MARINER JO HN SO N EVINR U DE S UZUKI YAMAHA O M C I/ O S MER C RU I S E R C ourteous Professional Marine Repair S erv i ce D oc k s i d e S erv i c e S ervin g Sanibel & C aptiva For Li f e Y B t t Yo ur B ottom Yo ur B ot to m Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices C Call on a c es C C ll n Pa in t Pr i es C C i i Call on Paint Prices D ave Doane1 Send Us Your Fish TalesWe would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include a photograph with identification. Email to press@islandsunnews.com or call 395-1213. A 23-inch gag grouper caught while channel marker fishing this week with Capt. Matt Mitchell photo provided THE RIVER APRIL 13, 201812 BOAT RENTALSFishing Cabbage KeyDolphin Watching Captains Available472-5800Jensens Marina Captiva Island CLEAR YOUR GEAR It Catches More Than FishBarbless hooks cause less damage than hooks with barbs

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Free Amenities On Earth Day At Sanibel RefugeBike or hike Wildlife Drive for free, watch a free film, and take advantage of free upcycle projects at this years Earth Day at JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday, April 21. The refuge will celebrate the 48th anniversary of Earth Day in partnership with Ding Darling Wildlife SocietyFriends of the Refuge (DDWS) and Tarpon Bay Explorers, the refuges official recreation concession. The mornings highlights include earth-friendly, upcycled crafts to take home and a ranger-led bike tour. Throughout the day, guests can meet Bagzilla, a bag monster dressed in the average persons annual plastic bag consumption, and take advantage of free bike rentals from Tarpon Bay Explorers, located two miles south of the Ding Darling Visitor & Education Center. Craft-making continues in the afternoon, plus visitors can watch the award-winning film STRAWS a 30-minute documentary about plastic straw litter and how we can make a sea of change one straw at a time. Throughout the day: Meet Bagzilla, an incarnate reminder of our plastic addiction. JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge is located at 1 Wildlife Drive on Sanibel. For more information or the complete event schedule, call 472-1100 or visit www.dingdarlingsociety.org/ articles/events. Conservancy To Celebrate Earth Day With FestivalThe Conservancy of Southwest Florida will host its 2018 Earth Day Festival, an eco-friendly event featuring fun for the whole family, at the Conservancy Nature Center on Saturday, April 21 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Attractions include live animal programs, including an alligator feeding encounter, electric boat tours, live music, face painting, exhibitions and culinary treats served right out of food trucks. Earth Day offers a great opportunity to celebrate nature and commit, or recommit, to protecting our natural environment and wildlife habitat, said Rob Moher, president and CEO of the Conservancy. Its so important for the community to remain united in protecting our resources and animals, and the Earth Day Festival provides a great opportunity to engage guests of all ages. Cost is $10 for adults and $5 for youth; children under 2 years old are admitted free. Admission is also free for Conservancy members. Presenting sponsors for the festival are Arthrex and Bank of America. Supporting sponsors include Florida Weekly DLatinos, Univision and Naples Daily News The Conservancy of Southwest Florida is located at 1495 Smith Preserve Way in Naples. For more information, visit www.Conservancy. org/EarthDay or call 262-0304. Plant SmartWild Limeby Gerri ReavesWild lime (Zanthoxylum fagara) is a long-lived native shrub or small tree of the rue, or citrus, family. Also called lime pricklyash, its found throughout most of Florida in hammocks and scrub. It can reach more than 25 feet high, but usually less, and can be nearly as wide as tall. It has rough bark and slender branches that have a zig-zag pattern. There are many reasons to include it in the landscape, among them the beautiful evergreen foliage and low maintenance. This species curved spines make it useful as a buffer, screen, or security plant. Gardeners who love wildlife will appreciate that its the host plant for the giant swallowtail and Schaus swallowtail butterflies, the latter of which is on the federal endangered species list. The thorny branches and brown-black fruit provide cover and food for wildlife. The opposite compound leaves are reported by some to have a citrusy scent and are three to four inches long. Leathery in texture, the leaf has seven to 15 oval leaflets and a winged stem. Each leaflet is about an inch long and toothed, with the terminal leaflet being longer than the others. The fragrant greenish yellow flowers look like miniature starbursts. Male and female flower cluster bloom on separate plants along the twigs. They attract various pollinators and appear any time of year, but peak in the early part of the year. The tiny fruit ripens in summer to fall and is edible for people. However, it has a numbing effect and is thus used as a toothache remedy. The bark, leaves and fruit are used for seasoning and tea, and the wood for furniture-making. Give this moderateto fast-grower a spot in full to partial sun with moist well-drained soil. It can grow in nutrientpoor soil and will tolerate a range of conditions, but needs organic matter to do well. It has high-drought tolerance and some salt tolerance. Propagate it with the shiny black seeds or with cuttings. Wild lime sometimes self-sows beneath a female plant. Sources: 500 Plants of South Florida by Julia F. Morton, Florida Plants for Wildlife by Craig N. Huegel, A Gardeners Guide to Floridas Native Plants by Rufino Osorio, Growing Native by Richard W. Workman, National Audubon Society Field Guide to Florida by Peter Alden et al., Native Florida Plants by Robert G. Haehle and Joan Brookwell, The Shrubs and Woody Vines of Florida by Gil Nelson, Trees of Everglades National Park and the Florida Keys by George B. Stevenson, www.edis.ifas.ufl.edu, www. fnps.org, www.nababutterfly.com, www. regionalconservation.org, and www. wildsouthflorida.com. Plant Smart explores the diverse flora of South Florida. The dense foliage, spiny branches, and tiny fruit offer cover and food for wildlife Native wild limes compound leaves have winged stems and pairs of notched oval leaflets photos by Gerri Reaves13 THE RIVER APRIL 13, 2018 EXPERIENCE: HUNDREDS OF SUCCESSFUL LANDSCAPES300 Center Road, Fort Myers FL 33907 PHONE 239.939.9663 FAX 239.939.8504www.NoLawn.com www.AllNative.bizOPEN DAILY: 9 to 5 Mon Sat 10 to 3 SunOUR NURSERY FEATURES OVER 200 SPECIES OF NATIVE PLANTS ON SEVERAL ACRES Buttery Gardens Wildlife/Bird Sanctuaries We also offer landscape design, consultation, installation and maintenance.

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THE RIVER APRIL 13, 201814 Gopher Tortoises More Active In SpringSpring days are a good time to spot a gopher tortoise, as Floridas only native tortoise becomes more active, foraging for food and searching for a mate. If you see gopher tortoises or their halfmoon shaped burrow entrances, it is best to leave them alone. Its illegal to disturb or harm gopher tortoises, their burrows or their eggs. You can help a gopher tortoise cross a road by picking it up and placing it on the roadside in the direction it was heading. But only do this if it is safe for you to do so, and dont put the tortoise in your vehicle. Remember too, the tortoise is a land animal, so never attempt to put it into water. Many Floridians celebrated Florida Gopher Tortoise Day on April 10 by supporting conservation of this threatened species. In 2017, Gopher Tortoise Day resolutions were adopted by Charlotte, Collier, DeSoto, Indian River and Sarasota counties, and the cities of Cape Coral, Flagler Beach and Venice. If youre a fan of the gopher tortoise, help us spread the word on conserving this threatened species, whose burrows are home to hundreds of animals, including the eastern indigo snake, gopher frog and Florida mouse, said Deborah Burr, who heads the FWCs gopher tortoise management program. On the Gopher Tortoise Day website, you can access many resources, including a resolution template for your community to adopt Gopher Tortoise Day, a guide to living with gopher tortoises, gopher tortoises and road safety and ideas for kids activities, including Build a Burrow instructions and the Gopher Tortoise Field Trip Guide. You also can help by using the Florida Gopher Tortoise smartphone app to report gopher tortoise sightings and learn about the species. Gopher tortoises need plenty of sandy, sunny habitats with an open tree canopy to thrive and survive. The FWCs wildlife management areas provide habitat for gopher tortoises. Local governments, military installations and private landowners, including farmers, foresters and ranchers, also work with the FWC to help conserve and restore gopher tortoise habitat. Go to www.myfwc.com/wma75 to find a wildlife management area where you might spot gopher tortoises and their burrows. For more information on gopher tortoises, visit www. myfwc.com/ gophertortoise. Gopher Tortise photo provided Paddle During Great American Cleanup Coastal Keepers and Ocean Tribe Paddlers will team up on Saturday, April 21 from 8 to 11 a.m. for the Great American Cleanup, a nationwide event led by Keep America Beautiful. Volunteers are invited to spend the morning traveling through Sanibels east end canals via paddlecraft, collecting marine debris along the way. We are putting our own unique spin on the cleanup, said Sam Lucas, conservation initiative coordinator for Coastal Keepers. It will be the perfect combination of paddling and doing something great for our island environment. All cleanup materials will be provided, and a limited number of stand-up paddleboards are available to borrow. Paddlers will meet at the Sanibel Boat Ramp at 888 Sextant Drive at 8 a.m. for a briefing, then divide into small groups. It is possible to park at the boat ramp for a small fee. To register for this event, visit www. klcb.org/great-american-cleanup. html to register, and choose Sanibel Canals as your location. To reserve a board, contact oceantribepaddlers@ sanibelseaschool.org or call 472-8585 prior to April 21. Coastal Keepers creates and implements local conservation initiatives that promote and improve the future of marine resources and the coastal heritage. Ocean Tribe Paddlers is a club that helps the Southwest Florida paddling community better explore, enjoy and understand the ocean. Visit www.sancapcoastalkeepers.org and www.oceantribepaddlers.org to learn more. County Pools To Close For Event April 14The four community pools operated by Lee County Parks & Recreation will be closed Saturday, April 14, so lifeguard staff can be reassigned to assist with the annual Florida Open Water Championship event at Miromar Lakes in Estero. Signs have been posted at the sites to inform pool patrons of the one-day closing. The pools will reopen for regular hours Tuesday, April 17, following normally closed days on Sunday and Monday. The pools are: Lehigh Community Pool, 1400 West Fifth Street, Lehigh Acres North Fort Myers Community Pool, 5170 Orange Grove Boulevard, North Fort Myers Pine Island Community Pool, 5675 Sesame Drive, Pine Island San Carlos Community Pool, 8208 Sanibel Boulevard, Fort Myers Lee County lifeguard staff is assigned to the water safety team for the Open Water event. The public is invited to attend. Events are held from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, April 14, and Sunday, April 15, at Miromar Lakes. For more information about the event, visit www.openwaterfestival.org or contact Nancy Apperson at 2290545. For more information on Lee County Parks & Recreation, visit www. leeparks.org or call 533-7275. Matlacha Amenities To Close TemporarilyThe Matlacha Community Center, park and boat ramp at 4577 Pine Island Road in Matlacha, will be closed for routine parking lot maintenance from Tuesday, April 17 through Thursday, April 19. No vehicles or pedestrians will be able to access the facilities. The center, park and boat ramp will reopen at 7 a.m. Friday, April 20. All programs held inside the Matlacha Community Center will be suspended during the three-day closure. Boaters may use the boat ramp located at Lavenders Landing, 7290 Barrancas Ave. NW, in Bokeelia. Parking is $10 daily; ramp hours are 7 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Lee County Parks & Recreation parking stickers are not accepted at Lavenders Landing. Other ramp options are available at www.leegov.com/parks/ boat%20Ramps. The county scheduled this maintenance to be done after both spring break and the peak of tourist season but before Memorial Day weekend. For more information about other Lee County Parks & Recreation locations, amenities and special events, visit www. leeparks.org, call 533-7275 or email leeparks@leegov.com. Audubon Program On Plovers April 19On Thursday, April 19, Audubon of Southwest Florida will hold a Piping Plovers program at Southwest Florida Masonic Temple at 7 p.m. Presented by Aubrey Albrecht, the program is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. Albrecht is a biologist and snowy plover coordinator for the SanibelCaptiva Conservation Foundation. She graduated from the University of Rhode Island with a bachelor or science degree in wildlife conservation biology and management in 2006. Southwest Florida Masonic Temple is located at 10868 Metro Parkway in Fort Myers. For more information, visit www.audubonswfl.org. Or consider not using any rat poisons at all. Instead, seal all entry points to your home. Help SCCF Bring Back the Barn Owls SCCF 472-2329 sccf.orgPoisoned rats can kill the eagles, hawks, bobcats and owls that eat them.Tell your pest control professional to NOT use these rat poisons: brodifacoum bromailone difenacoum difethialone

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15 THE RIVER APRIL 13, 2018 3075 Sanibel-Captiva Road Sanibel Island, Florida 33957 (239) 395-2233 Open Daily, 10 a.m. p.m.www.ShellMuseum.org www.SanibeIlsIandVacations.com APRIL 2018MUSEUM SPONSOR DAILY CRAFTS AND TANK TALKS Republican Women To Host CandidatesRepublican candidates for Florida District 27 State Representative will be the featured speakers at the monthly Fort Myers Republican Womens luncheon at The Landings Yacht, Golf & Tennis Club on Tuesday, April 17. A social hour begins at 11:15 a.m. The noon lunch will be followed by the business meeting and program. A question-and-answer session will be held following the candidate presentations. This will begin the monthly forums for the club. The public is invited to attend the luncheon at the Helm Club. Cost is $20. Reservations are required by Thursday, April 12, and may be made by contacting Tina Laurie at 489-4701. For more information, contact Tina Laurie at 489-4701. National HealthCare Decisions Daysubmitted by Samira K. BeckwithSpring is filled with special occasions that provide opportunities for celebrating, sharing joy and making memories with our families and loved ones. To commemorate the significance of important events like birthdays, weddings, anniversaries and graduations during this season, we often spend hours deliberating over the perfect gift that symbolizes our love for those we hold dear. Yet there is another important gift we can give our families. We can talk with them about our plans for our care when we are unable to make our own decisions. Sadly, Ive seen the consequences of not having the discussion ahead of time. Not sharing our thoughts and concerns, as well as our desires, can affect our loved ones. Ive seen heartbroken families fall apart, with siblings arguing and spouses wracked with confusion and guilt. Sometimes, the emotional intensity of this situation can overtake a lifetime of great memories. We devote our lives to making sure our loved ones feel cared for, in ways large and small. Please dont leave these major decisions to them at a time when they need you most. Should we become ill and unresponsive, it is essential that everyone is on the same page. Having our wishes in writing gives our loved ones a plan to follow, knowing it is what we intended. But while 62 percent of adults have talked about their end of life wishes, only 35 percent have actually put their wishes in writing according to a Pew Research Center study. Each April, Hope recognizes National Healthcare Decisions Day as an opportunity to encourage discussions about advance care planning. This year, rather than limiting these important conversations to one day, National Healthcare Decisions Day has been extended to a weeklong event from April 16 to 22. Hope has been the local leader in facilitating this discussion and provides community education events throughout the year to help people plan for their future health care needs. We recommend reviewing Five Wishes an easy-to-use guide that provides direction and guidance for our loved ones based on our own personal, emotional and spiritual needs. The form legally documents your desires for future medical care and provides information for family and physicians, such as: Who should make care decisions on your behalf if you are unable? What kind of medical treatment options do you want to receive, and which do you prefer not to receive? What do you want your loved ones to know about your choices? It is also an opportunity to share smaller details. Do you want to be surrounded by family and friends, or do you want only your closest loved ones nearby? Which are your favorite hymns and flowers? Do you want friends to honor your passing by contributing to your favorite charity in your name? Simply record the information and add your signature to the Five Wishes document, which is valid under the laws of most states. Youll want to let someone you trust know that it has been completed and where it will be kept. You may also consider sharing your wishes with your clergy, doctor, attorney and other trusted advisors and care providers. As a community service, Hope Healthcare offers the Five Wishes advance directive forms through our website at www.hopehcs.org/ fivewishes and by calling 482-4673. After completing the form, let someone you trust know that it is completed and where it will be kept. You may also consider sharing your wishes with your clergy, doctor or other care providers. Planning gives our loved ones peace of mind when they need it most. It is the ultimate gift. Samira K. Beckwith photo provided

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THE RIVER APRIL 13, 201816 Bringing The Outdoors In Part 2 of 3Outdoor Furniture Selectionby Barb CacchioneOutdoor furniture needs to be resilient to stand up to the suns rays and the outdoor elements, so lets consider the basic elements for your furniture. Timber 1. Teak a natural wood product that doesnt rust when joined with metal. It also doesnt rot and never has to be treated. You may choose to coat it with teak oil, but you dont have to and my suggestion is to let it age gracefully turning a mellow gray. Known for its longevity, some teak benches in European cities have been around for a 100 years. 2. Cedar a natural wood from cedar trees with a distinct scent. It produces natural oils and doesnt have to be sealed either. Good cedar will last dozens of years. 3. Rattan one of the strongest woods available. Can have viney parts or long flat parts that can be shaped with steam. It may not necessarily be weatherproof. It is great for a porch, but it is susceptible to wind. 4. Bamboo a hard woody grass used in making outdoor furniture. It is one of the best renewable resources. Bamboo must be treated for water regularly. 5. Wicker really represents the process of weaving rather than a type of wood used in furniture. The wicker process typically uses vines and bamboo and rattan to weave a seat or table. Usually lightweight and great for a porch. Resin wicker is made from timber. Aluminum 1. Powder-coated cast Aluminum aluminum construction makes outdoor furniture strong, and the powder coating assists in the ability to resist corrosion. A truly good coating should last at least three years and longer. Look for this product on picket fences and exterior lighting. The life span is good, and the product is lightweight. 2. Wrought Iron These are heavy aluminum pieces, typically with intricate designs or patterns. Prone to rust, wrought iron needs to be repainted. However, the heavy weight makes it great in windy areas. Miscellaneous 1. PVC plastic or PVC is inexpensive and used in many outdoor pieces. One of its primary uses is near pools due to its ability to handle water well. It is not very heavy and can easily be blown about in high winds. It is normally the least desirable choice, except near pools when combined with metals to increase the weight factor. 2. Resin Both natural and synthetic compounds are used in chemical processes to form resins. Natural resins include pine sap and gum from plants. Synthetic resins are known as polymers. Some resins make great outdoor furniture, especially if used in conjunction with powder-coated cast aluminum. 3. Glass primarily, glass is used along with other products to create table tops. 4. Stones Typical stones include granite and marble and often they are used as tiles or table tops to extend the feeling of using natural elements in the furniture. There is a great deal of choices in types and styles of outdoor furniture. The outdoors is becoming another living space particularly here in Southwest Florida. Barb Cacchione is an interior designer on Sanibel/Captiva Islands. She can be reached at barb@ coindecden.com. LCEC Provides Six Environmental Funding AwardsLee County Electric Cooperative will provide the City of Sanibel, the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW), Coastal Keepers, Calusa Land Trust and Nature Preserve of Pine Island, Inc., BaileyMatthews National Shell Museum and Monofilament Busters with environmental funding awards. To apply for this award, organizations can email pr@lcec.net to receive an application. The next deadline for a 2018 award is September 1. Interested organizations must meet certain criteria to be considered for the award including being located within LCEC service territory, funding utilized for projects/programs related to the environment and the utility industry, and having a demonstrated need for funds. Nearly $79,500 has been awarded since the programs inception in 2014. This funding award is just one of the many ways that LCEC positively impacts and supports wildlife and the environment. Community Club Presents Check For $26,970 To UFFHoliday House Chair Tracy McGee of the Fort Myers Womans Community Club presented a check for $26,970 to Uncommon Friends Foundation (UFF) Executive Director Jennifer Nelson recently. The funds came from the 61st annual Holiday House. As every year, the historic Burroughs and Langford-Kingston homes at 2505 and 2500 First Street are decorated in miles of ribbon, garland and lights, recreating the sparkle and richness of traditional holiday dcor. We appreciate all the work the Fort Myers Womans Community Club puts into planning and executing the annual Holiday House fundraiser every year as its special gift of love to the community and to raise money for property maintenance year around, said Nelson. Each event is always unique and spectacular. Planning is already underway for 2018 Holiday House open from December 7 through 22. The Uncommon Friends Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization established in 1993, is dedicated to lifelong character building among todays youth and business leaders. For more information, visit www.uncommonfriends. org or call 337-9503. Tracy McGee and Jennifer Nelson photo provided Bank Appoints New Chairman Lyman Frank III has retired after 15 years of service as chairman of Sanibel Captiva Community Banks board of directors. A retired banker on Sanibel since the mid-1980s, Frank will remain on the board as a director. David Owens, CPA, president and CEO of Midland IRA Inc. and 1031 Tax Free Strategies LLC, has assumed chairmanship on the board. Owens has served on the banks board since the bank opened in 2003. Lyman has been with SanCap Bank since day one, and we are truly appreciative of his unwavering service and dedication, said Craig Albert, Sanibel Captiva Community Bank president and CEO. We look forward to Davids service as our new bank chairman. For more information about Sanibel Captiva Community Bank, visit www. sancapbank.com. David Owens photo provided Conserve Water Plea Made To County ResidentsThe local region has recorded belowaverage rainfall from November through March, and as seasonally dry conditions continue, residents and visitors are urged to conserve water and to limit lawn irrigation in accordance with Lee Countys year-round water conservation ordinance. The ordinance prohibits irrigation between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Irrigation outside of these hours is limited to Thursday and Sunday for even-numbered addresses and Wednesday and Saturday for oddnumbered addresses. The ordinance must be followed, regardless of a home or business water source. Conserving now, during the dry season, will help protect declining groundwater levels throughout the county. Groundwater conditions should improve with the onset of seasonal rains, which typically begin in June. However, the increase in usage brought about by the drier than normal conditions and the increased seasonal population makes spring a critical time to cut back unnecessary use. All residents are urged to abide by local ordinances that restrict lawn irrigation. Lawn irrigation can account for 50 percent of household use. While the Lee County ordinance applies to those in unincorporated Lee County, a comprehensive list of local rules can be found at www.sfwmd.gov/ mywateringdays. All local ordinances have provisions for enforcement of ordinance violations; they vary by community. Residents in unincorporated Lee County who irrigate outside the permissible days and hours can receive a warning on a first offense and fines following a warning. Lee County is coordinating with the South Florida Water Management District to monitor conditions. In the event that a water shortage is declared for Lee County or other areas in Southwest Florida, the South Florida Water Management District will provide notice of any associated mandatory water use restrictions. The South Florida Water Management District also provides information on how residents, businesses and other water users can implement some easy steps to conserve water.

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17 THE RIVER APRIL 13, 2018 Get Your Vehicle Serviced Before You Head Up NorthAll Makes and Models both Foreign and Domestic 35 years experience in the service and repair of all makes and models. Reputation of honestly, trust and experience. 3 years or 36,000 Mile Warranty on most services. Caring, well-trained staff Let us earn your business. Come and experience the Legendary service difference. Service coupons available on website OPEN Monday Friday 8am to 5:30pm Saturday 8am to 4pm Planned Giving Council Meeting And LuncheonThe Planned Giving Council of Lee County, Inc. will present The Team Approach to Fund Development at its Thursday, April 26 meeting at Blue Coyote Business & Social Club. Networking begins at 11:30 a.m., lunch and program begin at noon. Speaker Carolyn Rogers, who is the vice president of development and communications for the Southwest Florida Community Foundation, will discuss how creating a win-win for the donor, their wealth advisor and your organization positions you as an important resource. Guests will learn how to create an effective team approach to philanthropy for their organizations. Combining more than 30 years of experience in nonprofit fund development and public relations with her passion for the community, Rogers holds what she calls the dream job of being a change-maker overseeing development and communications at the Southwest Florida Community Foundation. In her role, she works with the Foundation team and board of trustees, community leaders and philanthropists to positively impact the community making it a better place for everyone who lives, works, learns and plays here. The meeting is sponsored by Florida SouthWestern State College. The event is free to members. The cost for non-members is $30 and includes lunch. Reservation deadline is Monday, April 23 at noon. To RSVP, visit www. plannedgivinglee.org. Blue Coyote Business & Social Club, is located at 9854 Caloosa Yacht and Racquet Club Drive in Fort Myers. Carolyn Rogers photo provided File Your Taxes For Free Through VITA ProgramUnited Way of Lee, Hendry, Glades, and Okeechobee Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program is available at 15 sites in Lee, Hendry and Charlotte counties to individuals and families making less than $66,000 per year. Residents can have their federal tax returns prepared and e-filed for free by any one of United Way VITA programs 150 IRS certified volunteers. Returns are carefully reviewed and checked for maximum use of earned income, child care and educational tax credits, then filed electronically, making tax refunds available as quickly as from commercial tax preparing companies. To locate the most convenient VITA site, schedule an appointment at https://booknow.appointment-plus. com/7z18p1x6/ or simply call United Way 211 by dialing 2-1-1 or 433-3900. If you have access to a computer and would like to file your taxes free of charge, United Way can help. Log on to www.myfreetaxes.com. Its simple, fast and secure while offering online assistance with the process. All money raised in the United Way campaign stays in the local community to help support the local human service network. United Way partner agencies and initiatives like Abuse Counseling and Treatment (ACT), Boys and Girls Clubs, Literacy Council of Gulf Coast, Harry Chapin Food Bank, The Salvation Army and United Way 211 serve a diverse range of needs in our community such as nurturing children and youth, strengthening families, meeting critical needs such as helping the elderly and disabled live independently, and empowering communities by bringing health and human services to neighborhoods. In addition to raising funds for human service organizations in our community, the United Way promotes partnerships and collaborations among agencies, helping them to work together focusing on issues and solutions that continue to improve lives. The United Way of Lee, Hendry, Glades, and Okeechobee has raised over $167 million since it was established in 1957. For more information, call 433-2000 or visit www.unitedwaylee.org. United Way VITA Programs Vicki Riley and Mary Huigens photo providedHurricane Preparedness SeminarsLee County Emergency Management has scheduled additional Hurricane Preparedness Seminars that are open to the public. The free seminars will include information on how to prepare families and homes for hurricane season, how to use new hurricane-related technology and how Emergency Management responds to hurricanes and other disasters. The seminars now scheduled are: Thursday, April 26 at 6 p.m. City of Bonita Springs Recreation Center, 26740 Pine Avenue, Bonita Springs Wednesday, May 9 at 2 p.m. Large Meeting Room A at Lakes Regional Library, 15290 Bass Road, Fort Myers Wednesday, May 9 at 6 p.m. Veterans Park Recreation Center, in the gymnasium, 55 Homestead Road South, Lehigh Acres Tuesday, June 5 at 10 a.m. Fort Myers Regional Library, in Meeting Room AB, 1651 Lee Street, Fort Myers Tuesday, June 26 at 2 p.m. Large Meeting Room at Cape Coral Lee County Public Library, 921 SW 39th Terrace, Cape Coral Seminars are open to the public. Additional seminar dates and locations will be posted at www.leeeoc.com. Check the website to see if registration is necessary for individual events.

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THE RIVER APRIL 13, 201818 Financial FocusDont Panic If Bear Market Returnsby Jennifer BaseyIf youre in your 20s or 30s, you might be starting to focus more on investing to reach your financial goals. Because of this, you also may be more attuned to moves in the financial markets. Depending on your age, you may have only experienced the bull market of the past nine years, so you might not know what to expect or how to respond whenever the next bear market strikes. Of course, just recently, youve witnessed a market correction a drop of at least 10 percent in the major stock market indices, such as the S&P 500. This sudden plunge made big news and reminded many investors of how volatile the financial markets can be. But a full-fledged bear market usually isnt identified until the markets are down 20 percent from their recent highs. Plus, bear markets, unlike corrections, tend to linger for a while. The last bear emerged from hibernation in October 2007 and stayed on the prowl until early March 2009. During that time, the S&P 500 declined by about 50 percent. Clearly, investors were not happy but the market recovered and moved to new heights. This long and strong run-up may have obliterated your bear market memories, if you ever had them at all. And thats why you might want to familiarize yourself with some of the bare facts about bear markets: Bear markets may provide good buying opporunities. When gas is expensive, you may just buy a few gallons at a time but when the price falls, youre probably more likely to fill up your tank. The same principle can apply to investing when stock prices are down, your investment dollars will buy more shares. And the more shares you own, the greater your ability to build wealth once the share price rises. In short, a bear market may provide you with a chance to buy quality investments at good prices. Bear markets dont last forever. No one can predict precisely how long bear markets will run, but theyve typically been much shorter than bull markets. So, while you might not particularly like looking at your investment statement during a decline, you can take some comfort in knowing such downturns are a normal feature of the investment landscape. Bear markets dont affect all investments equally. If you only own U.S. stocks, your portfolio may well take a sizable hit during a bear market. But other types of investment vehicles may not be as directly affected and some may even show positive results. Consequently, you could reduce the bears bite if you also own a variety of other investments, such as international stocks, bonds, government securities, certificates of deposit (CDs) and so on. However, while owning this type of diversified portfolio can help reduce the impact of market volatility, it does not guarantee profits or protect against losses. A bear market can be challenging. But by making the right moves, such as staying patient, looking for buying opportunities and maintaining a diversified portfolio, you may be able to prevent a market decline from becoming unbearable. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones financial advisor. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@ edwardjones.com. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE Personal Lines 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. Mark OBrien Owner/Agent Trish Barbone Agent Justin Wheeler Agent We are HERE for all your insurance needs Base Operations At Page Field Among The BestBase Operations at Page Field has been ranked in the top 10 percent of fixed-base operators (FBO) in a prestigious international survey conducted by Aviation International News (AIN). This is the sixth consecutive year that Base Operations at Page Field has been named a top fixed-base operator by AIN. Base Operations ranked first in the Fort Myers/ Naples area and scored in the top 20 for all FBOs in the Americas. The FBO survey is conducted annually and asks pilots, flight attendants and dispatchers to provide feedback on the level of customer care at individual business and general aviation service providers throughout the U.S., Canada, Mexico, South and Central America and the Caribbean. AIN conducts the survey year-round online and calculated cumulative averages from 2013 to present for this years results. The survey asked qualified subscribers to evaluate FBOs they visited the previous year in five categories: line service, passenger amenities, pilot amenities, facilities and customer service representatives. The Lee County Port Authority operates Southwest Florida International Airport and Page Field in Fort Myers. Page Field provides services to corporate, commercial and private aviators through their business arm, Base Operations at Page Field. For more information, visit www.baseoperationsfmy.com. Ward 6 MeetingFort Myers City Councilwoman Gaile Anthony will host a Ward 6 community meeting at Fort Myers Fire Station No. 5 on Wednesday, April 18 from 4 to 6 p.m. Councilwoman Anthony encourages citizens to bring concerns and comments to the community meetings. All are welcome to attend. Fort Myers Fire Station No. 5 is located at 9700 Treeline Avenue in Fort Myers. For more information, contact Councilwoman Anthony at ganthony@ cityftmyers.com, 321-7006 or 9800575. RCMA Executive Honored For Hurricane HelpGloria Padilla an RCMA executive who exhausted herself helping fellow Immokalee residents recover from Hurricane Irma has been recognized for her selflessness in the U.S. House of Representatives. Gloria is an exemplary citizen who has chosen to use her many talents in service of those around her, said U.S. Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart, in a statement entered into the Congressional Record on March 15. Padilla is an Immokalee native who manages the seven child-care centers that RCMA operates in Immokalee and Bonita Springs. When Hurricane Irma struck Immokalee in September, Padilla opened the RCMA Immokalee Community School as an unofficial shelter for staff and their families. She and RCMA coworkers commandeered the RCMA school cafeteria and oversaw meals for thousands of people. FEMA set up shop there and accepted more than 1,000 applications for assistance. Padilla worked with Diaz-Balart to open Horizon Village as temporary housing for families who lost their homes. Diaz-Balart was impressed and wrote in the Congressional Record, I find myself fortunate to have had the opportunity to collaborate with such a dedicated individual who cares so deeply about her community. Padilla was grateful to Diaz-Balart for the honor. But really, Padilla added, this was a team effort for the whole community. I share this acknowledgement with everybody who helped. Gloria Padilla photo provided To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 395-1213

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19 THE RIVER APRIL 13, 2018 RIVER Book ReviewThe Woman In The Windowby Di SaggauThe Woman in the Window by AJ Finn is a beautifully written and plotted book that tells a tale about love, loss and mad ness. Movie rights, including for eign rights in multiple countries, were sold before its publication. Thirty-eight-year-old Anna Fox lives alone in her fashionable uptown Manhattan brownstone. She often peers out her window watching the neighbors, and we soon find out why. Anna is agoraphobic and has not left home in nearly a year. Outside of spying on her neighbors, Anna drinks a lot of merlot wine and watches one black-andwhite movie classic after another. Gaslight, Spellbound, and Rebecca are among her favorites. Back to the author. AJ Finn is a pseud onym for Dan Mallory, a longtime editor of mystery fiction. He cr edits James Paterson for his short chapters. The book begins October 24 and ends November 15, with a six-weeks-later, two-chapter segment that serves as an epilogue. For awhile you feel as if you are reading Annas diary. The day she thinks she has witnessed an act of violence is when things really heat up. No one believes her, not the police, not her tenant, and not her neighbors. Considering she consumes two or three bottles of wine a day along with many prescription drugs, who can blame them? Annas husband has left her and taken their 8-year-old daughter with him. She talks to them by phone. Being a child psychologist, she still advises a few patients by email, but she is mostly alone with her wine, her movies and her cat. She also has a handsome tenant who lives in her basement. Finns plot is a slick puzzle that cannot be revealed, but I can say that his characters are rarely who or what they first appear to be. The story ends with a series of huge surprises. Stephen King wrote, One of those rare books that really is unputdownable delightful and chilling. The Woman in the Window is a riveting thriller that sympathetically captures the life of a depressed person, and it will keep you guessing to the very end. School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Shelley, My conversations with my children seem to get more and more negative. I need to change how I talk to them, and I would like some ideas on how to do that. What do you suggest? Marta W, Fort Myers Marta, Its very easy for parents to get caught up in a cycle of negativity, and it can seem like you spend a lot of time talking about challenges. Changing the conversation to building on your childs strengths can help to break that nega tive cycle, and focusing on strengths is just as important as improving weak nesses when it comes to helping your children succeed. What are your childs strengths? Heres a list of typical strengths for school age kids to help you identify them. You and your child should go through these strengths and have conversations about how each strength might apply. Discuss how these strengths have helped and will help your child in the future. Your child may have different perceptions than you do, so listen closely to understand how your child sees him or herself. These conversations will take some time maybe plan to have them this summer when things arent as busy. Both of you will be pleased that you took the time to learn more about one another. General Strengths Is able to work or play independently Is interested in doing well Understands and sets goals Wants to/is eager to learn new things Asks for help when needed Works well/gets along well in groups Works well/gets along well one-on-one Is able to organize items and thoughts Admits disappointments/mistakes and is able to move on Has passions and hobbies Can plan ahead Makes good choices Is curious and creative Problem-solves well Social Strengths Shares, takes turns and negotiates Seeks out social interactions Asks for help and comfort when needed Is comforting and offers help when needed Accepts personal responsibility for actions (good and bad) Has a good sense of humor Doesnt follow the crowd (resists peer pressure) Follows rules and routines well Accepts redirection well Is able to make friends and keep them Is truthful and honest Has positive relationships with adults Shows empathy and sensitivity to others Likes to help others Reacts appropriately when frustrated Language Strengths Is able to express needs, wants and ideas verbally Uses inflection and expression when speaking Understands jokes, puns and riddles Can talk about events in the correct and logical order Understands the give-and-take of conversation Uses grammar appropriate to his age Has and uses a growing vocabulary Is interested in listening to stories, music and other activities Participates in discussions at home, at school and with friends Answers who, what, when, where questions in conversation (or about a story) Literacy Strengths Enjoys reading Can match letters to sounds and sounds to letters Is able to sound out unfamiliar words Recognizes sight words Can follow written directions Recalls and retells stories and facts after reading Can make predictions based on whats happened so far in the story Can pause when reading and return to that sentence after being interrupted Reads accurately and with expression Figures out what new words mean by looking at the context or asking questions Has creative and imaginative ideas; likes to tell stories Makes connections between reading material and personal experiences Math Strengths Sees and understands patterns in nature and in numbers Remembers math facts and can perform mental math Thinks logically Understands math concepts and can apply them to the real world Uses and understands math vocabulary Shelley Greggs is adjunct faculty at Florida SouthWestern State College, where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also a nationally certified school psy chologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educa tional consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. Packed with facts and employing an engaging storytelling style, [Female Pioneers of Fort Myers] both teaches and entertains. Local history buffs and newcomers to history will value Tuthill and Halls research and appreciate the accessible format, too.Gerri Reaves, PhD, author of Legendary Locals of Fort Myers and Fort Myers, Then & Now Available atWWW.AMAZON.COM WWW.EDITORIALRXPRESS.COM

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Ball Teams Fight Bitter Cold Up North After Warmth Of Spring Training by Ed FrankThere are certain things in life that you can count on year after year, one being the opening of the Major League baseball season in frigid, often snowy weather. This year is certainly no exception. It actually has been even worse because the season started nearly a week earlier. In the new labor contract between owners and players, the union successfully bargained for an extra four days off during the long season. And since Major League baseball was reluctant to extend the postseason into November, the season began March 29. So its no surprise that in the first week of the season eight games were postponed, including four home openers. If you exclude games played in warmer climates or in stadiums with retractable roofs, nearly all the rest were played in temperatures below 45 degrees. The Minnesota Twins home opener last Thursday against the Seattle Mariners was in bitter, cold weather. Then on Saturday, it was 27 degrees when the game started, the coldest recorded start temperature in Twins history. The weather was about as bad on Sunday, so the game was mercifully postponed. The Twins had played in blowing snow and mid-30s temperatures the week before in Pittsburgh temperatures that felt like 22 when factoring in the wind. It was no surprise that this Mondays scheduled home opener for the Chicago Cubs was postponed due to snow. As we wrote at the outset of this column, the weather issue plagues the opening of the baseball season year after year. Yet little is done to rectify the problem. We found that exactly one-half of the 30 Major League teams play in either stadiums that are climate controlled or in areas where the average temperatures are over 50 degrees at the end of March. So why couldnt all of these early season games be played in those cities? The cold weather teams will argue that they do not want to start the season with long road trips. However, with the exception of opening day, attendance falls off sharply in cold weather. If the season was pushed back a couple of weeks, postseason play would extend well into November. It appears, therefore, there are no easy answers. As the weather warms and the crowds return to the ballparks, the bitter cold of March and early April baseball will be forgotten. But you can bet the bank, the same weather-related problems will be repeated next year, the year after and into the future. Everblades Complete Regular Season At Record-Setting Pace The Florida Everblades hockey team completed the regular season last Saturday with a 4-1 victory over Jacksonville before an announced crowd of 7,214 at Germain Arena. The team concluded the season with a 53-13-2-4 record, tying the team mark for the most wins and setting a new team record for points in a season at 112. The Everblades also broke the team record for fewest goals allowed at 171, beating the old record of 180 in the 1998-90 season. Florida begins the first round of the Kelly Cup playoffs Monday at Germain against Atlanta. The following is the schedule for the best-of-seven series: Games 1 and 2 Monday and Tuesday, Germain Arena; 7:30 p.m. Games 3, 4 and 5 (if necessary) -Thursday, Friday and Sunday in Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Games 6 and 7 (if necessary) April 24 and April 25, Germain Arena, 7:30 p.m.. RIVER THE RIVER APRIL 13, 201820 Pfeifer Realty is Your Home Team!PfeiferRealtyGroup.com 239.472.0004 Fishing Skills Learned At Angler UniversityWomen from all over in Florida united to learn fishing skills at the Ladies, Lets Go Fishing! (LLGF) Gulf Coast University held at Bass Pro Shops from March 23 to 25. The university offered education, hands-on fishing activities, networking and an optional fishing trip. The three-day event began with an informal reception on Friday and continued on Saturday with classroom presentations and hands-on skill practice including hook removal/release techniques, knot tying, spin casting, fly casting, net casting and backing with Magic Tilt Trailers. On Sunday, participants embarked on their chosen fishing adventures from boats. They had a chance to catch or release snook, redfish, snapper, sea trout and more. Featured on national network television and more, the series is supported by major partners including Recreational Fishing and Boating Foundation, Mercury, Magic Tilt trailers, Penn, Power-Pole and Fish Florida. Those and other supporters are recognized on www.ladiesletsgofishing.com. Other LLGF events are held state-wide as well as international trips to Cuba and Bahamas. Bass Pro Shops is located at 10040 Gulf Center Drive in Fort Myers. For more information, call 954-475-9068, email info@ladiesletsgofishing.com or visit www. ladiesletsgofishing.com or www.facebook. com/ladiesletsgofishing. Class graduates of Ladies, Lets Go Fishing photo provided SPORTS QUIZ 1. Florida States Mike Martin enter ed the 2018 college baseball season second on the career wins list for a head coach. Who is No. 1? 2. When Maury W ills of the Los Angeles Dodgers led the National League with 104 stolen bases in 1962, the runner-up was a teammate. Who was it? 3. Who holds the Big T en football championship game record for most passing yards? 4. Name the last NBA center to have a triple-double in which he scor ed 50 or more points? 5. Bill Stewart was the first American-bor n NHL coach to win a Stanley Cup (1938). Who was the second to do it? 6. Who was the first Asian-American to win an Olympic medal? 7. Between 2001 and 2010, T iger Woods and Phil Mickelson combined to win six of the 10 Masters golf tournaments. Name two of the other four winners. ANSWERS 1. Augie Garrido (Cal State-Fullerton, Texas), with 1,975 wins. 2. Willie Davis, with 32 stolen bases. 3. Trace McSorley of Penn State, with 384 yards in 2016. 4. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, in 1975. 5. Pittsburghs Bob Johnson, in 1991. 6. Platform diver Sammy Lee, who won gold in 1948 and 1952. 7. Mike W eir (2003), Zach Johnson (2007), Trevor Immelman (2008) and Angel Cabrera (2009).

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21 THE RIVER APRIL 13, 2018 For the 23rd consecutive year, 100 percent of Florida SouthWestern State Colleges (FSW) dental hygiene program graduates have passed the National Board Dental Hygiene Exam (NBDHE). FSWs Dental Hygiene program accepts 18 students per year, and students take the NBDHE in March while enrolled in their last academic semester at FSW. The NBDHE consists of 350 questions to include general education, program specific general education and dental hygiene core courses, said Karen Molumby, FSW Dental Hygiene program director. FSWs dental hygiene curriculum prepares students to apply critical thinking and evidencebased care through the application of rigorous didactic examinations, laboratory competencies and clinical performance evaluations. Because of their diligence and hard work, 100 percent of the dental hygiene class of 2018 has once again passed the NBDHE. We are extremely proud at the continued success of our dental hygiene students, said Dr. Marie Collins, dean, FSW School of Health Professions. It is through the exceptional instruction provided by our faculty and staff, that our students continue to achieve this amazing feat and a one-of-a-kind, national accomplishment. The associate in science degree in dental hygiene is one of 17 career options offered in the FSW School of Health Professions. The program is fully accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation. FSW Dental Hygiene Class of 2018 photo provided Perfect Pass Rate For FSW Dental Program Graduates Plastic Surgeon Among Top DoctorsFort Myers Facial Plastic Surgeon Dr. Stephen A. Prendiville has been named one of the nations Top Doctors by Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. in New York. It is the fourth consecutive year that Dr. Prendiville has been recognized for the honor in the Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery specialty, which includes surgery of the ear, nose, throat, facial plastic and reconstructive surgery, and related structures of the head and neck. Dr. Prendiville, who also is the medical director of Assuage Luxury Spa in Fort Myers and Naples, is the only Fellowship-trained facial plastic surgeon in Fort Myers who is certified by both the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and the American Board of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery. He has performed more than 5,000 surgical procedures during his 17 years of practice in Fort Myers. Dr. Stephen A. Prendiville photo provided Local Students Excel At State CompetitionTwenty eight student scientists and engineers from the 61st annual Thomas Alva Edison Kiwanis Regional Science and Engineering Fair participated in the 63rd annual State Science and Engineering Fair (SSEF) of Florida STEM Competition, which concluded March 29 with the Grand Awards Ceremony in Lakeland. All 28 SSEF participants had already been granted scholarships to FGCU during regional competition for their precollegiate research. Twenty two of the regions State Finalists from area public and private schools received statelevel recognition by winning multiple first place, second place, third place, honorable mention, recognition awards and special awards. Dahlia Dry, an 11th grader at Fort Myers High School, received a First Place Category Award in Mathematics and Computational Sciences and three Special Awards for her exoplanet candidate detection project. Dry was also selected to be a Junior and Senior Outstanding Narratives (JASON) Colloquium Speaker (one of seven honorees) and addressed attendees with her presentation, Math: The Story of an Unrequited Love, during the opening ceremonies of the state science fair (Link to speech at https://www.pscp. tv/w/1ypJdmAwDldxW). Second Place Category Awards were presented in the Senior Division to Luke Long (Canterbury School), and in the Junior Division to Maya Chandar (Canterbury School), Pavan Patel (Paul Laurence Dunbar Middle School) and Junwei Tan (Gateway Intermediate Charter School). Third Place Category Awards were presented to two team projects: Sierra Rainville and Caitlin McCartney (Canterbury School), and Magnolia Cahill and Michael MacHarg II (Canterbury School), as well as Michael Cherbini (Paul Laurence Dunbar Middle School). In addition to the rigorous, three-day STEM competition and professional judging, there were field trips to the SeaWorld Education Pavilion and a canoe adventure down the Hillsborough River. A total of five projects from the Kiwanis Science Fair will be advancing to this years Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (Intel ISEF) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania from May 13 to 18. Representing the Thomas Alva Edison Kiwanis Regional Science and Engineering Fair will be Dahlia Dry (Fort Myers High School), Anna Kucera (Canterbury School), Mark Leone (Canterbury School), Luke Long (Canterbury School) and Jackson Windhorst (Fort Myers High School). Follow these students online at www. EdisonFairs.org and on social media (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter) as they showcase their independent research and compete against 1,800 high school students from more than 75 countries, regions and territories at this years International Science and Engineering Fair. Dahlia Dry photos courtesy EdisonFairs.org Michael Cherbini Pavan Patel

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THE RIVER APRIL 13, 201822 Appreciation Event For Wine And Food Fest VolunteersSWFL Childrens Charities, Inc. hosted an appreciation event for volunteers of the 2018 Southwest Florida Wine & Food Fest recently. The event was generously hosted by Cru at Bell Tower Shops in Fort Myers. The two-day wine and food festival included Chef Vintner Dinners on March 2 and The Grand Tasting and Live Auction on March 3 at Quail West Golf and Country Club, which raised $2.9 million in total to support pediatric health care services and education. Volunteers were instrumental to the events success, from the production of the event to the creation of an enhanced experience for guests, donors and participating chefs and vintners. From left, Elaine Hawkins, Chris Knapp and Brooke Denson photos provided Teri Hansen and Holly Boldrin Lucy Costa and Melissa Cofta From left, Heather Maupin, Allie Schotanus and Elise Rose Illeny Farese and Laura Ragain From left, Paula Kamberos with Jack and Janet Sigman From left, Anna and Jonathan Price with Courtney Brown From left, Mirian Carvajal, Pam Carnahan and Janet Sigman Ava Bickel and Emily Golden From left, Gail Root, Melissa Cofta and Joel Mitchell

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23 THE RIVER APRIL 13, 2018 Primary Care Physicians Named Top DoctorsFive physicians with Physicians Primary Care of Southwest Florida have been named Top Doctors by Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. in New York. Family Medicine physician Charles Curtis, MD, Pediatrician Georgia Rocha-Rodriguez, MD, and Obstetrician/ Gynecologists Paul Joslyn, MD, Blaise Kovaz, MD, and Sarah Krauss, MD, will be featured in the June issue of Gulfshore Life magazine. Dr. Curtis, Dr. Joslyn and Dr. Kovaz are repeat winners from 2013 to 2017. Dr. Krauss and Dr. Rocha-Rodriguez were honored in 2016 and 2017. Selections are made through a national survey of physicians and hospital administrators conducted by Castle Connolly, an independent research and information company that is the nations leading provider of information on top physicians. After the votes are tallied, Castle Connolly ensures that the physicians meet the companys criteria, which include board certification, years of experience in their specialties and a clean disciplinary record. Castle Connolly is widely recognized for its extensive research of the medical profession. This demonstrates to our patients that we have been evaluated and meet their highest standards, said Dr. Mary Yankaskas, managing physician of Physicians Primary Care of Southwest Florida. The physicians will be honored by Gulfshore Life magazine at an awards banquet. For more information, visit www.ppcswfl.com. Dr. Blaise Kovaz Dr. Paul J. Joslyn Dr. Charles H. Curtis Dr. Sarah H. Krauss Dr. Georgia RochaRodriguezVolunteer For SHINE ProgramSHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders) is seeking volunteers to assist Medicare beneficiaries, their families. SHINE is an award-winning informa tion and counseling program that is administer ed by the Florida Department of Elder Affairs and operated locally by the Area Agency on Aging for Southwest Florida (AAASWFL). SHINE volunteers have the opportunity to perform a variety of functions, including providing counseling on Medicare, Medicaid, health insurance, prescription drug plans, and long-term care planning. SHINE volunteers may also deliver educational presentations in the community and participate in health fairs and outreach events. In 2017, 60 local SHINE volunteers helped more than 9,400 clients in Southwest Florida. In total, the AAASWFL SHINE volunteers provided more than 5,750 hours of counseling last year. Requirements to become a SHINE volunteer include an interest in assisting seniors and people with disabilities, along with basic computer knowledge and Internet navigation skills. A background in health care or insurance is not required. Specialized training and informational materials are provided to all SHINE volun teers. The ability to speak Spanish or other languages is helpful, but not necessary. Potential SHINE volunteers may contact Camilita Aldridge, SHINE Liaison, at 652-6900 for more information about volunteer opportunities or to apply. Volunteer applications can also be found at the State of Floridas SHINE website at www.floridashine.org. From page 6Fuel Upthe fundraising campaign in 2017. In the Fort Myers area, participating locations include: Circle K: 1603 Cape Coral Parkway West, Cape Coral; Beneficiary school: Ida S Baker High School Circle K: 4395 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte; Beneficiary school: Deep Creek Elementary School Circle K: 4025 Pine Ridge Road, Naples; Beneficiary school: Golden Gate High School Circle K: 19373 S. Tamiami Trail, Fort Myers; Beneficiary school: San Carlos Elementary School Circle K: 6220 Marlympia Way, Punta Gorda; Beneficiary school: Charlotte High School Circle K is passionate about giving back to the neighborhoods where we work and live, said Jeff Burrell, vice president of Global Fuels. Through this unique fundraising program, we are helping to address critical needs and enabling educators to make a difference in the classroom and beyond. Beautifulife:Secretsby Kay CaspersonDo you have a secret? Can you keep a secret? I would bet that most of us have had a secret or two shared with us in confidence, as well as a personal secret that we have decided to keep to ourselves at some point in our lives. For some reason, keeping secrets can sometimes get a bad wrap, but I believe that there are places in life when they are necessary and lets face it, sometimes better left unsaid. There is definitely a time and a place for everything including when, if ever, to reveal a secret. Secrets become secrets for various reasons including protecting your loved ones or even protecting yourself in some instances. Not everything needs to be revealed to the world at every moment even in this day and age of mass communication on so many levels. Below are some secrets that, in my opinion, are best to keep to yourself: New business ventures You wouldnt want your competition to find out what youre up to, would you? Only reveal your plans when the time is right, and you are ready to roll things out. Special places We all have those places that we love to go to and cherish special times with ourselves or with loved ones. You might want to keep them to yourself, or they just might lose the significance. Personal experiences This is a tough one because I believe our experiences lead to who we ultimately become, but not all of them should be highlighted. I believe that your experiences should be shared if they will help you or someone you know get to a better place of understanding and growth. Favorite Recipes Yes, there is something to be said about keeping that family or favorite recipe to yourself. There is a fun mystery and conversation that continues with this one through the generations. Family Issues The only time these things should ever be shared and talked about is with a trusting friend or while in counseling. Life will certainly throw you some ups and downs but be careful about the people you share your peaks and valleys with. And, last but certainly not least, the one secret you should always keep to yourself is... other peoples secrets. You might say, well, of course, this is obvious, right? But it actually takes a lot of discipline and integrity for people to keep your secrets to themselves, so my advice to you is to be extremely cautious when revealing something close to your heart to just anyone. My affirmation for you this week is: I will cherish my life secrets and will take extra special care in whether or not they will be revealed to the world. Kay Casperson is a beauty and lifestyle expert, founder and CEO of Beautifulife by Kay Casperson. She owns resort spas on Sanibel and Captiva islands and manufactures beauty and lifestyle products sold across the country. To stay inspired, visit www. kaycasperson.com or follow on social media @kaycasperson.

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RIVER deaRPharmacistThe FDA Might Be Feeding You Foolishnessby Suzy Cohen, RPhDear Readers: Who should decide if your food is healthy? Do you think that the Food & Drug Administration should? The reason I ask is because this year, the FDA is going to become more involved in considering what healthy means. They will also have input about the claims that food companies make. On the surface, this sounds absolutely reasonable. The FDA name itself implies that it should have some say about food, but Ive noticed their track record and its awful. Have you noticed that their interventions to fortify food dont work that well? When they fortify cereal with folic acid, thats a synthetic form of vitamin B9. When they fortify milk with calcium, its not a very good form and can cause stomach upset. Furthermore, I think that an agency thats in charge of drugs, should not simultaneously be in charge of food. Unless perhaps you want to look forward to Prozac Popsicles and Requip Rice Krispies. If it wasnt so sad, it would be hilarious. Scott Gottlieb, who is the commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, was speaking at the CNBC Healthy Returns Conference in New York a few days ago, and he looks like a nice, reasonable guy. I wish I could get a meeting with him. Id tell him that his prior attempts to help out with obesity are failing pathetically. His changes to the food industry intended to reduce the incidence of heart disease, diabetes and chronic illness arent working. They wont ever work not until his agency stops the genetic modification of our food and the spraying of it with hundreds of hormone-disrupting pesticides. Why dont you start prioritizing that, hmm?! The FDAs intention is noble, but do we want to let the same people who sanction margarine dictate whats healthy now?! Theyre working towards making food manufacturers create an icon or symbol on all of their labeling in order to meet new definitions of healthy. But food makers cheat, not all of them, but for sure, some of them are failing to disclose additives, MSG and bug parts. The industry is not the most ethical sort, and I bet those officials will be putting the new icon on their labels without doing a darn thing to make it healthier. And youll pay more for the pretty (but meaningless) badge on the label. As the expression goes, You cant put lipstick on a pig. If you sense my frustration, its because Ive worked very hard my entire life, not just to purchase real food, but to cook authentically healthy meals, the kind that automatically come with nutrition. No icon needed. If you want healthy food, dont look for boxes with an icon. Shop around the perimeter of the grocery store or go to a farmers market and buy organic when possible. Dont rip open a box that has an ingredient list of 45 things you cant even pronounce, and then shove it in the oven just because some agency stuck an icon it. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. SuzyCohen.com. THE RIVER APRIL 13, 201824 Doctor and DieticianSurgery And The Elderlyby Ross Hauser, MD and Marion Hauser, MS, RDSurgery comes with risks for everyone, but it can pose serious risks for older people, who tend to tolerate anesthesia poorly and who also take longer to heal. In our culture, aggressive medical care is often sought, without taking into full consideration the various risks involved. Oftentimes, recovery time in the hospital is double and may result in a prolonged stay in intensive care. Although some elderly folks may be strong physically and even quite healthy, others may not be, and operating on someone who is more frail may not help prolong life, or even improve the quality of life. Surgical procedures for the elderly have been in the news lately, as nearly one in three Medicare patients undergo surgical procedures in the year before they die. These surgical procedures range from major operations that require lengthy recoveries to relatively minor surgery. Why is surgery so prevalent? Older folks often have a high regard for the medical profession, which can make them vulnerable to unwanted interventions. They agree to the procedure simply because the doctor suggests it. And why not, if insur ance pays most of the cost? But problems with wound healing, length of r ecovery, or whether the benefits outweigh the risks may not be investigated. The patients overall health, their goals and values, and realistic expectations need to be considered when making these medical decisions. The best, the worse and the most likely outcomes should be laid out, for a welladvised plan. The baby boomer generation is aging and the population of patients older than age 65 seeking surgical care is increasing. Surgical services need to focus on provid ing safe and specialized care for this aging population. When sur gery is elective, other non-surgical alternatives should be sought to improve quality of life. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Caring Medical Regenerative Medicine Clinics has two locations: one in Oak Park, Illinois, and one in Fort Myers. It was established in 1991 by Ross Hauser, MD, and Marion Hauser, MS, RD. They can be reached at info@caringmedical. com. Nutrition Program For Better HealthLee Health recognizes the importance of nutrition for a balanced, healthy lifestyle. To help people adopt healthier eating habits, especially those interested in adopting a whole food, plant-based lifestyle, Lee Health is offering Start Anew, a 10-day nutrition program to promote better health. A kick-off of the 10-day program will be held at HealthPark Medical Center on Monday, April 16 at 6 p.m. Preregistration is required to participate and fees apply. The 10-day Start Anew program fights known side effects (poor diet, including grogginess, brain fog, bloating, and aches and pains) through healthy, plant-based, whole foods. Research shows that following this type of plan promotes numerous health benefits, including weight loss; reduction in cholesterol; reduction in blood sugar; reduction in blood pressure; clearer thinking; increased energy; and more optimistic feelings. Its never too late to combat the effects of a poor diet, said Rowe Hudson, RD, LD, CDE, director, Lee Health Solutions. Good nutrition plays an important role in helping to keep you healthy and is a non-surgical intervention to improve chronic medical conditions. Many people experience substantial results after the 10-day program. Start Anew includes: 20 Flavor Harvest plant-based entrees prepared by Culinary Solutions Lab (cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose) testing before and after the 10-day program Plant-based recipe book Plant-based movie DVD Initial kick-off meeting led by Brian Taschner, MD, Lee Physician Group cardiologist HealthPark Medical Center is located at 9981 South Healthpark Drive in Fort Myers. For more information, costs or to register, call Lee Health Solutions at 424-3121 or email StartAnew@ LeeHealth.org. Senior Empowerment Education SeriesThe Leadership Coalition on Aging (LCA) will be hosting a three-part educational series on senior empow erment during the months of May, July and September The series is being held to educate community seniors on a wide array of topics; the three sessions during this series will equip seniors to be better informed and empowered. Sessions topics and dates are as follows: The Spirituality and Aging session will be held Thursday, May 10 from 1 to 3 p.m. at Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Greater Naples, 6340 Napa Woods Way, Naples. At this session, spiritual leaders from area churches and temples will share their unique perspective about spirituality and aging during an interactive panel discussion. Senior Housing and How to Pay for It session will be held on Thursday, July 12 from 1 to 3 p.m. at Bradford Square, 3255 Vanderbilt Beach Road, Naples. Attendees will gain objective insights from area experts about senior housing options and how to pay for it. Advanced Planning: Getting your Affairs in Order will be held on Thursday, September 13 from 1 to 3 p.m. at the South Regional Library, 8065 Lely Cultural Parkway. Naples. Experts from the legal, medical, financial and real estate professions will help attendees get a better perspective on advanced planning. The sessions are free and open to the public, and seniors are highly encouraged to take part. To register, call 687-3156. The Presenting Sponsor is Doctors Hearing. Other sponsors include Osterhout & McKinney PA, CapTel, Juniper, Eyeglass World, Caring Transitions, Tuscany Villa of Naples, Moorings Park Home Health Agency, Senior Housing Solutions, Avow, Golden Care, Lara, May & Associates, LLC, Barrington Terrace of Naples and Healthcare Network of SWFL. From page 1Space Tomatoescurriculum-driven free program that uses the excitement of space exploration to teach the skills and processes of scientific experimentation and inquiry.Sometime in the fall, a select group of students will use a Ham Radio provided by CenturyLink to speak with an astronaut on board the International Space Station. Allen Park is the first Lee County school to participate in Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) Only 14 schools are participating in this round of ARISS. A preliminary time frame for the available windows of opportunity could be announced soon. FGCU will provide telescopes to the school so students can observe the space station flying overhead while their classmates speak to the astronaut.

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THE RIVER APRIL 13, 2018 25 Emergency . ............................................... 9 11 Lee County Sheriffs Ofce . .............................. 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol . ................................... 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol . .................................. 278-7100 Poison Control . ................................... 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center . ...................... 1-800-936-5321Ft .. Myers Chamber of Commerce . ......................... 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare . .......................... 4 25-2685 Fort Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce . ................... 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library . ............................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library . ................................ 5 33-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce . ........................ 931-0931 Post Ofce . ..................................... 1 -800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau . ............................ 3 38-3500ARTSAlliance for the Arts . .................................... 9 39-2787 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio . ............................ 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers . ............................... 275-3970 Barbara B .. Mann Performing Arts Hall . ...................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS . .......................................... 3 95-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre . .......................... 2 78-4422 Cultural Park Theatre . ................................... 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light . ................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade . ....................332-4488 Florida West Arts . ...................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers . ...................... 288-2535 Gulf Coast Symphony . .................................. 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres . ..................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic . ................................ 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater . ............................... 472-6862 SW Florida Symphony . .................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy . .................................... 936-3239 Young Artists Awards . ................................... 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAmerican Legion Post #38 . ........................... 2 39-332-1853 Angel Flight . .................................. 1 -877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center . .................................. 731-3535 American Business Women Association . .................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL . .................................... 3 39-8046 Audubon Society . ...................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR . ............................ 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society . ............................ 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus . ................... 1 -855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club . ................................. 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees . .............................. 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists . ................................. 415-2484 Embroiderers Guild of America Sea Grape Chapter . ...... 2 39-267-1990 FM UDC Chapter 2614 United Daughters of the Confederacy . ... 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL . .............................. 561-9164 Garden Club of Cape Coral . .......................... 2 39-257-2654 Horticulture and Tea Society . ............................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society . ................................... 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society . ......................... 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation . ........................ 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees . ......... 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America . ....................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL . ............................. 66 7-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans . ............................ 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy . ....................... 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association . ...................... 5 61-2118 Kiwanis Fort Myers Beach . .................... 7 65-4254 or 454-8090 Kiwanis Fort Myers Edison . .............................. 694-1056 Kiwanis Fort Myers South . ............................... 691-1405 Gateway to the Islands .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218-5768 Iona-McGregor . ....................................... 482-0869 Lions Club Fort Myers Beach . ............................. 463-9738 Lions Club Fort Myers High Noon . ......................... 466-4228 Lions Club Estero/South Fort Myers . ....................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County . ......................... 7 68-0417 Organ Transplant Recipients of SW Florida . .................. 247-3073 POLO Club of Lee County . ............................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers . ............................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society . ........................... 472-6940 United Way of Lee County . ............................... 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) . ................... 2 11 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews National Shell Museum . .................... 395-2233 Burroughs Home . ...................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium . ....................... 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates . ............................ 334-7419 Fort Myers Skate Park . .................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium . ................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge . .................. 4 72-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site . ......................... 2 39-992-0311 Langford Kingston Home . ............................ 239-334-2550 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center . .............. 765-8101 Skatium . ............................................. 3 21-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society . ...................... 93 9-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History . ...................... 321-7430 True Tours . .......................................... 94 5-0405 To be listed in calling card email your information to: press@riverweekly. .com PETS OF THE WEEK Haven on Earth Animal LeagueTriscuit And MaliaDuring the month of April, Haven on Earth Animal Leagues adoption fee for adult cats is only $35. Hi there! Im Triscuit. I am a beautiful, 1-year-old calico kitty, and I just had a litter of kittens. I am being fostered while I raise my babies and will be available for adoption in about a month. I will be spayed and brought up to date on all vaccines. As an adult, my special adoption fee is only $35 during the month of April. Hello! Im Malia. I am a very pretty Siamese girl with beautiful blue eyes. Im about 7 years old. I would prefer to be the only cat in the house, but I get along well with dogs. I am currently staying with a foster mom. I am spayed and up to date on all vaccines. My adoption fee is $35 during the month of April. We are being cared for by Haven on Earth Animal League. For more information, call Diane at 860-833-4472 or email havenonearthanimalleague@yahoo.com. Triscuit photos provided Malia Lee County Domestic Animal ServicesLiger, Benji And AmberIn honor of Animal Control Appreciation Week, LCDAS is featuring brothers Liger and Benji who are 1-year-old-male American bulldogs with ACO Mena. Each brother has their own individual personality. Benji is a bit more laid back while Liger is the free-spirited one of the two. Both are full of the playfulness one would expect at this age. The volunteer staff cant wait to show you the new things both have learned in their short time here at LCDAS.Their adoption fee is $75. Amber is a 6-year-old female domestic shorthair who is one of the Super Seniors this week, but dont tell her that. She still thinks shes a kid (which she certainly is at heart.) She is very curious and is content people-watching by a window. Her adoption dee is $25 For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to Animal Services website at www.LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if three months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs six months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee, and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500. Liger ID# A712867, Carlos and Benji ID# A712869 photos provided Amber ID# A583362

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THE RIVER APRIL 13, 2018 26 PUZZLESAnswers on page 29

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THE RIVER APRIL 13, 2018 27 FIND AT LEaAST S SIX D DIffFFERENCES BETWEEN PaANElLS SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 29 answer on page 29Grouper Oriental p hoto courtesy Fresh From Florida Grouper Oriental cup soy sauce teaspoon toasted sesame oil 1 clove garlic, crushed 1 teaspoon green onions, diced 4 tablespoons hoisin sauce teaspoon fresh ginger, minced teaspoon brown sugar 4 six-ounce grouper fillets teaspoon Chinese 5 Spice powder Kosher salt, to taste Fresh ground black pepper, to taste cup corn starch or rice flour 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons unsalted butter For sauce, combine soy sauce, sesame oil, garlic, green onion, hoisin sauce, ginger and sugar in a small mixing bowl. Mix well, adding additional hoisin sauce to thicken mixture if needed. Cover and refrigerate for 1 to 2 hours to blend flavors. To serve, heat sauce in a small saucepan and keep warm. Sprinkle fillets with seasonings and dredge in corn starch or rice flour. Heat oil and butter in a large saut pan over medium-high heat. When butter foams, add fillets; cook 4 minutes per side or until opaque in center. Transfer fillets to serving plate and serve with sauce on the side. Yields four servings.

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORYTHE RIVER APRIL 13, 2018 28 Would you like to advertise your business card every week ? Call: 239-395-1213HOME SERVICES P.O. BoOX 1050 SANIbBEL FLoORIDA 33957WWW.IsSLANDHoOMEsSERVICE.CoOM INfoFO@IsSLANDHoOMEsSERVICE.CoOMp P Ho O NE: (239) 472-5247 C CELL: (239) 229-6366JUERGEN SCHREYEROWNERYYARD SERVICE TREE SERVICE PooOOL SERVICEHHoOME WWAt TCH CCLEANING SERVICE ISLAND HOME SERVICE TREE TRIMMING, ARBORIST Licensed, insured, workers compensation Arbor Specialist Since 1995 Tree Trimming Tree Removal Stump Grinding239-910-3256info@treewest@gmail.comwww.treewestorida.comP.O. Box 564, Sanibel, FL 33957Tell A Friend TREE SERVICE CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the benets of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor42 Barkley Circle, Suite 1 Fort Myers, FL 33907 239-931-4543GENERAL CONTRACTOR N C R CGC1517615www.dbrowngc.com239-593-1998 A BBB Accredited Business with an +A Rating CONTRACTOR Bathrooms Kitchens Lanai Enclosures Windows Screen Rooms Decks Railings Safety Tubs Doors Add a Room or Garage Outdoor Kitchens Storm Shutters and Much More $500. OFF WITH AD cbc1261010239-936-0836Family owned, 40 Years Local Surfside Home Improvements Aluminum & Remodeling CLEANING SERVICES Jennifer Watson(239) 810-6293 Residential & Commercial Construction Clean Up Interior Windows Home Watch FISHING CHARTERLight Tackle Sport Fishing Tarpon Snook Redsh & More CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.comHOME SERVICES WUNDERFUL HOME SERVICES LLC. LANDSCAPING: MAINTENANCE, RE-DESIGN, S S OD, MULCH, WALKw W AYS, DEBr R IS REmo MO VAL & MorOR EHOME WATCh H: WEEKLY OrR MoO NTHLY C CHECK U UPS WELL C CATEr R T ToO Y YoO Ur R S SPECIFIC N NEEd D SHANDYMAN: MINor OR REPAIr R S OrR F FIXESPPRESSURE WASh H ING: L LANAIS, DrR IVEw W AYS, P PAVEr R S, H HoO USE S SId D ING & MorOR EWINDOw W WASh H ING: WINdow DOW S, S SCr R EENS, T TrR ACKS & MorOR E WUNDERFUl LHOMESSERVICES@G GMAIl L.COM 239-258-9322 SUNDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 71 TUESDAYSunny High: 76 Low: 66 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 66 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:01 am6:13 am12:52 pm6:27 pm Sat12:48 am6:41 am1:07 pm7:05 pm Sun1:34 am7:07 am1:24 pm7:43 pm Mon2:20 am7:32 am1:45 pm8:24 pm Tue3:08 am7:56 am2:11 pm9:09 pm Wed4:03 am8:21 am2:42 pm10:00 pm Thu5:07 am8:44 am3:19 pm10:58 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:40 pm6:23 amNone6:39 pm Sat12:34 am6:56 am1:05 pm7:20 pm Sun1:13 am7:28 am1:26 pm8:00 pm Mon1:51 am7:58 am1:41 pm8:42 pm Tue2:35 am8:30 am1:54 pm9:27 pm Wed3:31 am9:01 am2:15 pm10:14 pm Thu4:37 am9:34 am2:49 pm11:04 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:57 am6:15 am11:53 pm6:29 pm Sat12:12 pm6:43 amNone7:07 pm Sun12:39 am7:09 am12:29 pm7:45 pm Mon1:25 am7:34 am12:50 pm8:26 pm Tue2:13 am7:58 am1:16 pm9:11 pm Wed3:08 am8:23 am1:47 pm10:02 pm Thu4:12 am8:46 am2:24 pm11:00 pm Day High Low High Low Fri2:11 am9:29 am3:02 pm9:43 pm Sat2:58 am9:57 am3:17 pm10:21 pm Sun3:44 am10:23 am3:34 pm10:59 pm Mon4:30 am10:48 am3:55 pm11:40 pm Tue5:18 am11:12 am4:21 pmNone Wed6:13 am12:25 am4:52 pm11:37 am Thu7:17 am1:16 am5:29 pm12:00 pm WEDNESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 67 MONDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 84 Low: 73 FRIDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 71 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 13, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 71 TUESDAYSunny High: 76 Low: 66 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 66 Day High Low High Low Fri12:01 am6:13 am12:52 pm6:27 pm Sat12:48 am6:41 am1:07 pm7:05 pm Sun1:34 am7:07 am1:24 pm7:43 pm Mon2:20 am7:32 am1:45 pm8:24 pm Tue3:08 am7:56 am2:11 pm9:09 pm Wed4:03 am8:21 am2:42 pm10:00 pm Thu5:07 am8:44 am3:19 pm10:58 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:40 pm6:23 amNone6:39 pm Sat12:34 am6:56 am1:05 pm7:20 pm Sun1:13 am7:28 am1:26 pm8:00 pm Mon1:51 am7:58 am1:41 pm8:42 pm Tue2:35 am8:30 am1:54 pm9:27 pm Wed3:31 am9:01 am2:15 pm10:14 pm Thu4:37 am9:34 am2:49 pm11:04 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:57 am6:15 am11:53 pm6:29 pm Sat12:12 pm6:43 amNone7:07 pm Sun12:39 am7:09 am12:29 pm7:45 pm Mon1:25 am7:34 am12:50 pm8:26 pm Tue2:13 am7:58 am1:16 pm9:11 pm Wed3:08 am8:23 am1:47 pm10:02 pm Thu4:12 am8:46 am2:24 pm11:00 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:11 am9:29 am3:02 pm9:43 pm Sat2:58 am9:57 am3:17 pm10:21 pm Sun3:44 am10:23 am3:34 pm10:59 pm Mon4:30 am10:48 am3:55 pm11:40 pm Tue5:18 am11:12 am4:21 pmNone Wed6:13 am12:25 am4:52 pm11:37 am Thu7:17 am1:16 am5:29 pm12:00 pm WEDNESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 67 MONDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 84 Low: 73 FRIDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 71 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 13, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 71 TUESDAYSunny High: 76 Low: 66 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 66 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:01 am6:13 am12:52 pm6:27 pm Sat12:48 am6:41 am1:07 pm7:05 pm Sun1:34 am7:07 am1:24 pm7:43 pm Mon2:20 am7:32 am1:45 pm8:24 pm Tue3:08 am7:56 am2:11 pm9:09 pm Wed4:03 am8:21 am2:42 pm10:00 pm Thu5:07 am8:44 am3:19 pm10:58 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:40 pm6:23 amNone6:39 pm Sat12:34 am6:56 am1:05 pm7:20 pm Sun1:13 am7:28 am1:26 pm8:00 pm Mon1:51 am7:58 am1:41 pm8:42 pm Tue2:35 am8:30 am1:54 pm9:27 pm Wed3:31 am9:01 am2:15 pm10:14 pm Thu4:37 am9:34 am2:49 pm11:04 pm Day High Low High Low Fri11:57 am6:15 am11:53 pm6:29 pm Sat12:12 pm6:43 amNone7:07 pm Sun12:39 am7:09 am12:29 pm7:45 pm Mon1:25 am7:34 am12:50 pm8:26 pm Tue2:13 am7:58 am1:16 pm9:11 pm Wed3:08 am8:23 am1:47 pm10:02 pm Thu4:12 am8:46 am2:24 pm11:00 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:11 am9:29 am3:02 pm9:43 pm Sat2:58 am9:57 am3:17 pm10:21 pm Sun3:44 am10:23 am3:34 pm10:59 pm Mon4:30 am10:48 am3:55 pm11:40 pm Tue5:18 am11:12 am4:21 pmNone Wed6:13 am12:25 am4:52 pm11:37 am Thu7:17 am1:16 am5:29 pm12:00 pm WEDNESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 67 MONDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 84 Low: 73 FRIDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 71 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 13, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 71 TUESDAYSunny High: 76 Low: 66 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 66 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:01 am6:13 am12:52 pm6:27 pm Sat12:48 am6:41 am1:07 pm7:05 pm Sun1:34 am7:07 am1:24 pm7:43 pm Mon2:20 am7:32 am1:45 pm8:24 pm Tue3:08 am7:56 am2:11 pm9:09 pm Wed4:03 am8:21 am2:42 pm10:00 pm Thu5:07 am8:44 am3:19 pm10:58 pm Day High Low High Low Fri12:40 pm6:23 amNone6:39 pm Sat12:34 am6:56 am1:05 pm7:20 pm Sun1:13 am7:28 am1:26 pm8:00 pm Mon1:51 am7:58 am1:41 pm8:42 pm Tue2:35 am8:30 am1:54 pm9:27 pm Wed3:31 am9:01 am2:15 pm10:14 pm Thu4:37 am9:34 am2:49 pm11:04 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:57 am6:15 am11:53 pm6:29 pm Sat12:12 pm6:43 amNone7:07 pm Sun12:39 am7:09 am12:29 pm7:45 pm Mon1:25 am7:34 am12:50 pm8:26 pm Tue2:13 am7:58 am1:16 pm9:11 pm Wed3:08 am8:23 am1:47 pm10:02 pm Thu4:12 am8:46 am2:24 pm11:00 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:11 am9:29 am3:02 pm9:43 pm Sat2:58 am9:57 am3:17 pm10:21 pm Sun3:44 am10:23 am3:34 pm10:59 pm Mon4:30 am10:48 am3:55 pm11:40 pm Tue5:18 am11:12 am4:21 pmNone Wed6:13 am12:25 am4:52 pm11:37 am Thu7:17 am1:16 am5:29 pm12:00 pm WEDNESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 67 MONDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 84 Low: 73 FRIDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 71 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 13, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 71 TUESDAYSunny High: 76 Low: 66 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 66 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:01 am6:13 am12:52 pm6:27 pm Sat12:48 am6:41 am1:07 pm7:05 pm Sun1:34 am7:07 am1:24 pm7:43 pm Mon2:20 am7:32 am1:45 pm8:24 pm Tue3:08 am7:56 am2:11 pm9:09 pm Wed4:03 am8:21 am2:42 pm10:00 pm Thu5:07 am8:44 am3:19 pm10:58 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:40 pm6:23 amNone6:39 pm Sat12:34 am6:56 am1:05 pm7:20 pm Sun1:13 am7:28 am1:26 pm8:00 pm Mon1:51 am7:58 am1:41 pm8:42 pm Tue2:35 am8:30 am1:54 pm9:27 pm Wed3:31 am9:01 am2:15 pm10:14 pm Thu4:37 am9:34 am2:49 pm11:04 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:57 am6:15 am11:53 pm6:29 pm Sat12:12 pm6:43 amNone7:07 pm Sun12:39 am7:09 am12:29 pm7:45 pm Mon1:25 am7:34 am12:50 pm8:26 pm Tue2:13 am7:58 am1:16 pm9:11 pm Wed3:08 am8:23 am1:47 pm10:02 pm Thu4:12 am8:46 am2:24 pm11:00 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:11 am9:29 am3:02 pm9:43 pm Sat2:58 am9:57 am3:17 pm10:21 pm Sun3:44 am10:23 am3:34 pm10:59 pm Mon4:30 am10:48 am3:55 pm11:40 pm Tue5:18 am11:12 am4:21 pmNone Wed6:13 am12:25 am4:52 pm11:37 am Thu7:17 am1:16 am5:29 pm12:00 pm WEDNESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 67 MONDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 84 Low: 73 FRIDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 71 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 13, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 71 TUESDAYSunny High: 76 Low: 66 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 66 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:01 am6:13 am12:52 pm6:27 pm Sat12:48 am6:41 am1:07 pm7:05 pm Sun1:34 am7:07 am1:24 pm7:43 pm Mon2:20 am7:32 am1:45 pm8:24 pm Tue3:08 am7:56 am2:11 pm9:09 pm Wed4:03 am8:21 am2:42 pm10:00 pm Thu5:07 am8:44 am3:19 pm10:58 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:40 pm6:23 amNone6:39 pm Sat12:34 am6:56 am1:05 pm7:20 pm Sun1:13 am7:28 am1:26 pm8:00 pm Mon1:51 am7:58 am1:41 pm8:42 pm Tue2:35 am8:30 am1:54 pm9:27 pm Wed3:31 am9:01 am2:15 pm10:14 pm Thu4:37 am9:34 am2:49 pm11:04 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:57 am6:15 am11:53 pm6:29 pm Sat12:12 pm6:43 amNone7:07 pm Sun12:39 am7:09 am12:29 pm7:45 pm Mon1:25 am7:34 am12:50 pm8:26 pm Tue2:13 am7:58 am1:16 pm9:11 pm Wed3:08 am8:23 am1:47 pm10:02 pm Thu4:12 am8:46 am2:24 pm11:00 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:11 am9:29 am3:02 pm9:43 pm Sat2:58 am9:57 am3:17 pm10:21 pm Sun3:44 am10:23 am3:34 pm10:59 pm Mon4:30 am10:48 am3:55 pm11:40 pm Tue5:18 am11:12 am4:21 pmNone Wed6:13 am12:25 am4:52 pm11:37 am Thu7:17 am1:16 am5:29 pm12:00 pm WEDNESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 67 MONDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 84 Low: 73 FRIDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 71 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 13, 2018 7-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 71 TUESDAYSunny High: 76 Low: 66 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 66 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:01 am6:13 am12:52 pm6:27 pm Sat12:48 am6:41 am1:07 pm7:05 pm Sun1:34 am7:07 am1:24 pm7:43 pm Mon2:20 am7:32 am1:45 pm8:24 pm Tue3:08 am7:56 am2:11 pm9:09 pm Wed4:03 am8:21 am2:42 pm10:00 pm Thu5:07 am8:44 am3:19 pm10:58 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:40 pm6:23 amNone6:39 pm Sat12:34 am6:56 am1:05 pm7:20 pm Sun1:13 am7:28 am1:26 pm8:00 pm Mon1:51 am7:58 am1:41 pm8:42 pm Tue2:35 am8:30 am1:54 pm9:27 pm Wed3:31 am9:01 am2:15 pm10:14 pm Thu4:37 am9:34 am2:49 pm11:04 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:57 am6:15 am11:53 pm6:29 pm Sat12:12 pm6:43 amNone7:07 pm Sun12:39 am7:09 am12:29 pm7:45 pm Mon1:25 am7:34 am12:50 pm8:26 pm Tue2:13 am7:58 am1:16 pm9:11 pm Wed3:08 am8:23 am1:47 pm10:02 pm Thu4:12 am8:46 am2:24 pm11:00 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:11 am9:29 am3:02 pm9:43 pm Sat2:58 am9:57 am3:17 pm10:21 pm Sun3:44 am10:23 am3:34 pm10:59 pm Mon4:30 am10:48 am3:55 pm11:40 pm Tue5:18 am11:12 am4:21 pmNone Wed6:13 am12:25 am4:52 pm11:37 am Thu7:17 am1:16 am5:29 pm12:00 pm WEDNESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 67 MONDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 84 Low: 73 FRIDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 71 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 13, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 71 TUESDAYSunny High: 76 Low: 66 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 66 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:01 am6:13 am12:52 pm6:27 pm Sat12:48 am6:41 am1:07 pm7:05 pm Sun1:34 am7:07 am1:24 pm7:43 pm Mon2:20 am7:32 am1:45 pm8:24 pm Tue3:08 am7:56 am2:11 pm9:09 pm Wed4:03 am8:21 am2:42 pm10:00 pm Thu5:07 am8:44 am3:19 pm10:58 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:40 pm6:23 amNone6:39 pm Sat12:34 am6:56 am1:05 pm7:20 pm Sun1:13 am7:28 am1:26 pm8:00 pm Mon1:51 am7:58 am1:41 pm8:42 pm Tue2:35 am8:30 am1:54 pm9:27 pm Wed3:31 am9:01 am2:15 pm10:14 pm Thu4:37 am9:34 am2:49 pm11:04 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:57 am6:15 am11:53 pm6:29 pm Sat12:12 pm6:43 amNone7:07 pm Sun12:39 am7:09 am12:29 pm7:45 pm Mon1:25 am7:34 am12:50 pm8:26 pm Tue2:13 am7:58 am1:16 pm9:11 pm Wed3:08 am8:23 am1:47 pm10:02 pm Thu4:12 am8:46 am2:24 pm11:00 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:11 am9:29 am3:02 pm9:43 pm Sat2:58 am9:57 am3:17 pm10:21 pm Sun3:44 am10:23 am3:34 pm10:59 pm Mon4:30 am10:48 am3:55 pm11:40 pm Tue5:18 am11:12 am4:21 pmNone Wed6:13 am12:25 am4:52 pm11:37 am Thu7:17 am1:16 am5:29 pm12:00 pm WEDNESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 67 MONDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 84 Low: 73 FRIDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 71 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 13, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 71 TUESDAYSunny High: 76 Low: 66 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 66 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:01 am6:13 am12:52 pm6:27 pm Sat12:48 am6:41 am1:07 pm7:05 pm Sun1:34 am7:07 am1:24 pm7:43 pm Mon2:20 am7:32 am1:45 pm8:24 pm Tue3:08 am7:56 am2:11 pm9:09 pm Wed4:03 am8:21 am2:42 pm10:00 pm Thu5:07 am8:44 am3:19 pm10:58 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:40 pm6:23 amNone6:39 pm Sat12:34 am6:56 am1:05 pm7:20 pm Sun1:13 am7:28 am1:26 pm8:00 pm Mon1:51 am7:58 am1:41 pm8:42 pm Tue2:35 am8:30 am1:54 pm9:27 pm Wed3:31 am9:01 am2:15 pm10:14 pm Thu4:37 am9:34 am2:49 pm11:04 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:57 am6:15 am11:53 pm6:29 pm Sat12:12 pm6:43 amNone7:07 pm Sun12:39 am7:09 am12:29 pm7:45 pm Mon1:25 am7:34 am12:50 pm8:26 pm Tue2:13 am7:58 am1:16 pm9:11 pm Wed3:08 am8:23 am1:47 pm10:02 pm Thu4:12 am8:46 am2:24 pm11:00 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:11 am9:29 am3:02 pm9:43 pm Sat2:58 am9:57 am3:17 pm10:21 pm Sun3:44 am10:23 am3:34 pm10:59 pm Mon4:30 am10:48 am3:55 pm11:40 pm Tue5:18 am11:12 am4:21 pmNone Wed6:13 am12:25 am4:52 pm11:37 am Thu7:17 am1:16 am5:29 pm12:00 pm WEDNESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 67 MONDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 84 Low: 73 FRIDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 71 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 13, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 71 TUESDAYSunny High: 76 Low: 66 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 66 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:01 am6:13 am12:52 pm6:27 pm Sat12:48 am6:41 am1:07 pm7:05 pm Sun1:34 am7:07 am1:24 pm7:43 pm Mon2:20 am7:32 am1:45 pm8:24 pm Tue3:08 am7:56 am2:11 pm9:09 pm Wed4:03 am8:21 am2:42 pm10:00 pm Thu5:07 am8:44 am3:19 pm10:58 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:40 pm6:23 amNone6:39 pm Sat12:34 am6:56 am1:05 pm7:20 pm Sun1:13 am7:28 am1:26 pm8:00 pm Mon1:51 am7:58 am1:41 pm8:42 pm Tue2:35 am8:30 am1:54 pm9:27 pm Wed3:31 am9:01 am2:15 pm10:14 pm Thu4:37 am9:34 am2:49 pm11:04 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:57 am6:15 am11:53 pm6:29 pm Sat12:12 pm6:43 amNone7:07 pm Sun12:39 am7:09 am12:29 pm7:45 pm Mon1:25 am7:34 am12:50 pm8:26 pm Tue2:13 am7:58 am1:16 pm9:11 pm Wed3:08 am8:23 am1:47 pm10:02 pm Thu4:12 am8:46 am2:24 pm11:00 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:11 am9:29 am3:02 pm9:43 pm Sat2:58 am9:57 am3:17 pm10:21 pm Sun3:44 am10:23 am3:34 pm10:59 pm Mon4:30 am10:48 am3:55 pm11:40 pm Tue5:18 am11:12 am4:21 pmNone Wed6:13 am12:25 am4:52 pm11:37 am Thu7:17 am1:16 am5:29 pm12:00 pm WEDNESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 67 MONDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 84 Low: 73 FRIDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 71 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 13, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides SUNDAYMost ly Sunny High: 81 Low: 71 TUESDAYSunny High: 76 Low: 66 THURSDAYMost ly Cloudy High: 76 Low: 66 Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:01 am6:13 am12:52 pm6:27 pm Sat12:48 am6:41 am1:07 pm7:05 pm Sun1:34 am7:07 am1:24 pm7:43 pm Mon2:20 am7:32 am1:45 pm8:24 pm Tue3:08 am7:56 am2:11 pm9:09 pm Wed4:03 am8:21 am2:42 pm10:00 pm Thu5:07 am8:44 am3:19 pm10:58 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri12:40 pm6:23 amNone6:39 pm Sat12:34 am6:56 am1:05 pm7:20 pm Sun1:13 am7:28 am1:26 pm8:00 pm Mon1:51 am7:58 am1:41 pm8:42 pm Tue2:35 am8:30 am1:54 pm9:27 pm Wed3:31 am9:01 am2:15 pm10:14 pm Thu4:37 am9:34 am2:49 pm11:04 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri11:57 am6:15 am11:53 pm6:29 pm Sat12:12 pm6:43 amNone7:07 pm Sun12:39 am7:09 am12:29 pm7:45 pm Mon1:25 am7:34 am12:50 pm8:26 pm Tue2:13 am7:58 am1:16 pm9:11 pm Wed3:08 am8:23 am1:47 pm10:02 pm Thu4:12 am8:46 am2:24 pm11:00 pm Day HighLowHighLow Fri2:11 am9:29 am3:02 pm9:43 pm Sat2:58 am9:57 am3:17 pm10:21 pm Sun3:44 am10:23 am3:34 pm10:59 pm Mon4:30 am10:48 am3:55 pm11:40 pm Tue5:18 am11:12 am4:21 pmNone Wed6:13 am12:25 am4:52 pm11:37 am Thu7:17 am1:16 am5:29 pm12:00 pm WEDNESDAYSunny High: 77 Low: 67 MONDAYSunny High: 78 Low: 68 SATURDAYSunny High: 84 Low: 73 FRIDAYSunny High: 81 Low: 71 Island Sun Weather Outlook April 13, 20187-Day Local Forecast Cape Coral Bridge Tides Redfish Pass Tides Point Ybel Tides Punta Rassa Tides

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THE RIVER APRIL 13, 2018 29 KING CROSSWORD SUPER CROSSWORD MAGIC MAZE SUDOKU PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF APRIL 16, 2018Aries (March 21 to April 19) A little woolgathering is OK. But dont let that dreamy state linger beyond midweek, when youll want to be ready to take on new workplace responsibilities. Taurus (April 20 to May 20) Love rules the week for single Bovines seeking romance. Attached pairs also find new joy in their relationships. Friday should bring news about a business opportunity. Gemini (May 21 to June 20) Home becomes the center of a new social whirl, as you show your talent for hosting great parties. You can expect to impress a lot of people whove never seen this side of you. Cancer (June 21 to July 22) The Moon Child might have to raise those powers of persuasion a notch to get a still-wary colleague to agree to go along. Finding more facts to back up your position helps. Leo (July 23 to August 22) Hold off trying to fix the blame for an apparent mishandling of a work situation. A full investigation could reveal surprising facts on how and why it really happened. Virgo (August 23 to September 22) Your ability to find details others might overlook gives you an advantage in assessing a possibly too-good-to-be-true offer. A trusted colleague has advice. Libra (September 23 to October 22) Expect to be called on once again to act as peacemaker in a long-simmering dispute that suddenly flares up. Offer advice, but be careful to stay out of the fray. Scorpio (October 23 to November 21) Your organizational skills help you line up your priorities so that you get things done without added pressure. The weekend could hold a special surprise. Sagittarius (November 22 to December 21) New ventures are favored. But dont launch yours before rechecking all facts and sources. Also, be sure you can rely on support from certain people. Capricorn (December 22 to January 19) Dont be pushed into renegotiating an agreement, even though it might help avoid a potential impasse. Get legal advice before you sign or agree to anything. Aquarius (January 20 to February 18) Helping others is what Aquarians do so well. But this time, someone wants to help you. Expect to hear some news that will both surprise and delight you. Pisces (February 19 to March 20) Things go so swimmingly that youre tempted to take on more tasks. Best advice: Finish what you have now, then enjoy a well-earned relaxing weekend. Born This Week: Your understanding of human nature helps you make wise decisions that are appreciated by all. You would make a fine judge. On April 18, 1775, as British troops march out of Boston on a mission to confiscate the American arsenal at Concord, Massachusetts, patriots Paul Revere and William Dawes set out on horseback to sound the alarm. Early on the morning of April 19, a British patrol captured Revere and briefly questioned him. On April 16, 1789, newly elected President George Washington leaves his Mount Vernon, Virginia, home and heads for New York, to be sworn in as the first American president. Washington had admitted that he would have preferred to stay in retirement. On April 22, 1889, at precisely high noon, some 50,000 to 60,000 would-be settlers make a mad dash into the newly opened Oklahoma Territory to claim cheap land. Towns like Norman, Oklahoma City, Kingfisher and Guthrie sprang up almost overnight. On April 21, 1953, two of Sen. Joseph McCarthys chief aides return to the U.S. after a controversial investigation of United States Information Service posts in Europe. As a result, thousands of books were ordered removed from USIS libraries. Authors targeted included Dashiell Hammett, W.E.B. Du Bois, Herman Melville, John Steinbeck and Henry Thoreau. On April 20, 1978, Soviet aircraft force a Korean Air Lines passenger jet to land on a frozen lake after the jet veers into Russian airspace. A civilian American aircraft later retrieved the survivors. On April 19, 1993, at Mount Carmel in Waco, Texas, the FBI launches a tear-gas assault on the Branch Davidian compound, ending a tense 51-day standoff with the religious cult. The compound was burned to the ground, and some 80 Branch Davidians perished in the inferno. On April 17, 2002, ABC airs the 10,000th episode of the daytime drama General Hospital, the networks longestrunning soap opera. The show premiered on April 1, 1963. It was Swedish poet Vilhelm Ekelund who made the following sage observation: To read fast is as bad as to eat in a hurry. Bullies, take note: Director Wes Craven reportedly named the character Freddy Krueger, from the Nightmare on Elm Street horror films, after a kid who had bullied him in school. Though coffee has been around for about 700 years, instant coffee was invented just over 100 years ago, in 1906. By George Washington. Of course, it wasnt that George Washington. The man who made coffee more convenient -and, many would say, less flavorful -was from Belgium. Those who study such things claim that there are roughly 5 million bubbles in a single glass of champagne. That factoid begs the question: How do you count the bubbles in a glass of champagne? The next time youre planning a European vacation, make time to visit the coast of the Netherlands, where you can stay in one of the worlds most unusual hotels. Along the banks of the Wadden Sea youll find Harlingen Harbour Crane, an actual derrick that was once used to haul timber. These days it holds aloft luxurious sleeping quarters designed for only one party at a time. If you need a change of scenery, just head to the control room to swing the crane around until you find a view that strikes your fancy. Talk about a serious typo: In 2008, the Chilean mint issued thousands of copies of a coin with the countrys name spelled Chiie instead of Chile. It is fortunate to be of high birth, but it is no less so to be of such character that people do not care to know whether you are or are not. -Jean de la Bruyere THIS WEEK IN HISTORY STRANGE BUT TRUE THOUGHT FOR THE DAY SCRAMBLERS TRIVIA TEST 1. One-eighth uid ounce 2. Yellow dwarf 3. Winnie-the-Pooh 4. Off the western coast of north Africa 5. XX (1,000 divided by 50) 6. Charlton Heston 7. Hogans Heroes 8. Marine One 9. Krungthep 10. Nine. TRIVIA ANSWERS 1. Measur ements: How much is a dram in U.S. measurements? 2. Astr onomy: What kind of star is our sun? 3. Literatur e: What childrens book features the characters Tigger, Eeyore and Piglet? 4. Geography : Where is the island nation of Cape Verde located? 5. Math : What is M divided by L in Roman numerals? 6. Movies : Who was the lead actor in the 1968 movie Planet of the Apes? 7. T elevision: What 1960s show featured POWs by the name of Newkirk, LeBeau and Kinchloe? 8. U.S. Pr esidents: What is the call sign of the helicopter that carries the president? 9. General Knowledge : What is the name of Bangkok in native Thailand? 10. Religion : How many candles does a Hanukkah menorah have?

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THE RIVER APRIL 13, 2018 30 www.islandsunnews.com PLACE CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED HELP WANTEDJERRYS FOODS SERVERS & BARISTASPart Time Evening And Weekend Front End Associates Needed. Looking for energetic, personable, and fun individuals, with open availability Monday through Sunday. If interested call and ask for John, Norm Sarah 472-9300. 1700 Periwinkle Way5/6 TFN EXPERIENCED RETAIL SALESSeeking 2 experienced retail sales associates on Sanibel for a gift shop and a Ladies Boutique. Full time positions. Tolls paid. Call Amy 239-565-9495 Leave message.4/6 4/13 HELP WANTEDDairy Queen Sanibel SW FLs #1 is now hiring all positions. Fast paced, friendly environment. Bring your smile and join our team. Randy 472-11704/6 4/27 SERVICES OFFEREDJC WINDOW CLEANINGResidential-Commercial-New Construction $120 Window Cleaning. Inside And Out. Single Home Or 10% Off. First Time New. Customers/Free Estimates. JC 407-902-7845-jccpcleaning@aol.com11/17 TFN SCARNATO LAWN SERVICELawn Service, Shrubs and Tree Trimming Weeding, Installation of Plants, Trees and Mulch (one month free service available) Joe Scarnato (239) 849-6163 scarnatolawn@aol.com1/25 TFN HELLES CLEANING SERVICESResidential Cleaning to Satisfaction Sanibel & Captiva 239-565-0471 Sanibel Lic. #11412 Lee Co. Lic. #0510471/4 TFN Complete Landscaping Services & Weekly Lawn Service New Client Special 10% OFF your Mulch Installation, Landscaping Project, or Tree Trimming Project. 239-896-6789 4/13 TFN PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTADDICTION SCREENINGS Narconon can help you take steps to overcome addiction in your family. http://www.narconon-suncoast.org Call today for free screenings or referrals. 877-841-55093/2 TFN PSA RENTALS WANTEDANNUAL RENTAL WANTED Professional family relocating for a job opportunity. Looking for a 4 bedroom home to rent on Sanibel for 1 year. Please call Beth at 720-644-7524.3/23 4/13 WANTED TO RENT 2019Mature woman looking to rent a 1-2 bedroom unit on Sanibel for March 2019. Call 860-391-32384/13 5/4 ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL 472-6747Gulf Beach Properties, Inc. Call Today GREAT DEAL NOW RENT TILL NOV. 1 RIGHT ACROSS FROM BEACH Furnished two BR/two baths. Poo/Tennis. Discounted $1,000/mo Waterfront This 4/2 UF piling Home with dock. $3,100/mo. 04/13 TFNROGER NODRUFF ELECTRICLic# EC12002788. Call Roger 239-707-7203. Aqualink Motor Controls. 6/7 TFN PROFESSIONAL CAR WASH & WAX & DETAIL BY HANDSanibel & Captiva Islands & South Fort Myers. Exterior & Interior Cleaning. Tire Dressing. No job too big or too small. I come to your Home, Condo, or Hotel. Reasonable Rates. Satisfaction Guaranteed. Call Bryan 239-284-3639.9/29 TFN SERVICES OFFERED COMMERCIAL RENTALWONDERFUL RENTAL IN POPULAR LOCATION ON SANIBEL2 Rooms, Bathroom, Approx. 1,000 sq. feet. Call Judy at 239-851-4073.8/5 TFN VACATION RENTAL Island VacationsOf Sanibel & CaptivaMillion $ Views Await You! Cottages Condos Homes Miles of Beaches & Bike Paths239-472-72771-888-451-72771/4 TFN 2427 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 Local: (239) 472-6385 Toll Free: (800) 472-5385 Fax: (239) 472-5858 www. cottages-to-castles.com1/26 TFN HOUSE FOR RENT2BR2B, den, garage, boat dock & lift, furnished, W/D on a canal near Ding Darling. Available June 1October 31, $2,000/mo. 239-410-89794/13 5/4 ANNUAL RENTAL ON SANIBELDuplex located in The Dunes, 3 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, pool, great views, garage. Call SanCap Gateway Realty at 239-472-2400.3/30 4/20 ANNUAL RENTAL REAL ESTATELOVE SANIBEL? MASTIQUE HI RISE2 miles from causeway. Full resort amenities on 50 acres. direct elevator to unit. Fabulous pool, huge clubhouse, tennis, bocce, water sports on our natural lake, breathtaking sunsets over Gulf and Sanibel. Gated community. $549K. Call my broker, Ted 239-900-7323.3/30 4/20 GARCIA REAL ESTATE AND CONSULTINGRICHARD J. GARCIA, GRI, BROKER239-472-5147garciaonsanibel.comOffering Personal, Private, and Professional Real Estate Services on Sanibel and Captiva Islands. 30 Year Resident of Sanibel. Licensed in Florida, New York, Pennsylvania and New Jersey.4/29 TFN PERIWINKLE PARK #160This contemporary, open concept, one bedroom unit has been completely renovated. New air conditioner, water heater, doors and windows. Top down/ bottom up window treatments. Antique paved patio, landscaped gardens. Corner unit Must See. Asking $179,000. Call 516-526-9379. 4/13 4/20 BUILD NEW ON SANIBEL $500,000Call Ann Gee, Realtor 239-850-0979 John Gee & Company, Realtors4/13 6/1 To advertise in the Island Sun and The River Weekly News Call 395-1213 BOATS CANOES KAYAKSDOCKAGEHourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-58001/4 TFN FOR SALEGAME TABLEStand up air hockey table with overhead scoreboard. Brand new, still in package. $75. Please call KC at 239-470-15164/13 4/27 WENONAH ADIRONDACK CANOE16 ft with paddles, accessories. Best offer. Call 607-280-26994/13 4/13 GARAGE SALEMOVE IN SALE-SANIBELUpright GE freezer 14 cuft, Computer Desk, Yard blower, Stihl trimmer, Gas edger, Kitchenaide stand mixer, Lamps, Dishes and glassware, & Lots more stuff Saturday Apr 21, 8 to 2, 580 Boulder Dr.4/13 4/20 PRIVATE ORCHID COLLECTIONEvery plant must go. Many beautiful & mature plants. Some very rare. Sat. & Sun. April 14/15th. 1710 Sand Pebble Way, Sanibel. Please: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. or 239-201-5554.4/13 4/13

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THE RIVER APRIL 13, 2018 31 Top 10 Real Estate SalesCourtesy of Royal Shell Real Estate Subdivision City Year BuiltSquare FootageListing Price Selling Price Days On Market Little Hickory ShoresBonita Springs 2017 4,000 $2,985,000 $2,825,000 396 Sanibel Estates Sanibel 2005 3,448 $2,295,000 $2,250,000 7 Devonwood Fort Myers 2007 6,016 $1,680,000 $1,350,000 129 Sanctuary Bonita Springs 1995 4,391 $1,495,000 $1,275,000 150 Navona Miromar Lakes 2015 2,575 $1,375,000 $1,285,000 23 Carolands Bonita Springs 1991 1,791 $1,199,000 $995,000 191 Cape Harbour Cape Coral 2015 3,315 $1,175,000 $1,120,000 111 Hidden Harbor Fort Myers 2016 2,873 $1,174,990 $1,084,000 379 Not Applicable Sanibel 1987 2,342 $1,095,000 $1,000,000 70 Gulf Ridge East Subdivision Sanibel 1988 3,090 $1,049,000 $975,000 59Bonita Chamber Spring RaffleThe Bonita Chamber Foundation, a 501(c)3 organization dedicated to community development through leadership programs and student scholarships, is selling raffle tickets for a chance to win a restaurant certificate package featuring eight top Southwest Florida restaurants, valued at $800. There are only 200 tickets available for $50 each for the 2018 Spring Raffle that supports the foundations mission The Bonita Chamber Foundation is the philanthropic arm of the Bonita Springs Area Chamber of Commerce. Its signature programs include Leadership Bonita, Impact SWFL and annual scholarships for local students. The foundation seeks to develop community leaders who are educated about local and regional issues and will engage in solutions. The foundation plays a critical role in connecting our business leaders to the community itself, and to volunteer opportunities in the area, said Tiffany Esposito, president and CEO of the Bonita Chamber and Foundation. Many of our Leadership Bonita alumni, for example, graduate and jump right into volunteer roles they didnt know existed prior to getting involved with Leadership and make new connections between their business and the community. Tickets will be sold through May 25. A virtual live drawing will be held on May 30 to announce the winner. Tickets can be purchased at www. bonitaspringschamber.com or by calling 992-2943. Preserve Seismic Exploration Project UpdateBurnett Oil Company (Burnett) began their large-scale oil and gas exploration project in Big Cypress National Preserve (The Preserve) in March 2017. On March 19, 2018, Burnett provided notice that it would restart survey operations. In 2016, the National Park Service approved Burnett to conduct this seismic survey in sensitive wetlands of The Preserve using 33-ton vibroseis trucks, which after expert review, did indeed flatten sensitive vegetation, damage soils and disturb sensitive wildlife. Officials from The Conservancy of Southwest Florida and partners legally challenged this approval last year but were unsuccessful. Despite continued opposition from the Conservancy and partner organizations, Burnett Oil Company is set to begin another round of seismic exploration in the Preserve in the coming days. Adopt A Shelter Pet Festival At GCHSTake advantage of the Pay Their Weight adoption fee at the 3rd annual Adopt a Shelter Pet Festival at Gulf Coast Humane Society (GCHS) on Sunday, April 15 from noon to 3 p.m. At the festival, adoption fees are equal to the weight of the shelter pet. Puppies and kittens six months and younger are excluded in the Pay Their Weight adoption fee special. Our ultimate goal is seeing all of our shelter animals find their forever homes and this is a wonderful adoption fee special to have during our festival, said GCHS executive director Jennifer Galloway. The first two festivals were very successful and fun. Come out to GCHS April 15 and find your forever friend by taking advantage of this great adoption fee special. The event will include a variety of vendors available to talk about their specialties such as pet care, pet boarding and pet food/treats. There also will be raffles, food, a vegan bake sale and a garage sale. A two-week-long raffle will also be kicked off at the festival, which includes $10 a ticket for a chance to win a popular Yetti Cooler. To help with the fundraising for the shelter animals, GCHS is asking for donated items for the garage sale. Items which cannot be accepted include furniture and clothes. The vegan bake sale was a hit last year, so it returns and will feature vegan dishes. We want the public to know that we are a great resource in finding the right companion pet, said Galloway. We are also an educational and animal care resource. By having this event we can showcase our great adoptable pets, partner with area businesses and provide information to the public about the importance of spaying and neutering, microchipping and heartworm prevention. GCHS is located at 2010 Arcadia Street in Fort Myers. For more information, visit www. gulfcoasthumanesociety.org. Hortoons

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THE RIVER APRIL 13, 201832