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River weekly news ( July 12, 2013 )

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Title:
River weekly news
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Newspaper
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Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date:
July 12, 2013
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University of Florida
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Title:
River weekly news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date:
July 12, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00101363:00200


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FREETake Me Home VOL. 12, NO. 43 NOVEMBER 1, 2013From the B eaches to the R iver District downtown Fort M yers Young Artists To Perform At Downtown Art WalkOn Friday, November 1, Young Artists Awards will present three performers at the Reverie & Rock Art Gallery from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in conjunction with Novembers Art Walk in downtown Fort Myers. Vocalists Callie Atkinson, Elisabeth Best and Sarah Best will be featured. Callie is a freshman at Cypress Lake High School, Elisabeth is a freshman at North Fort Myers High School and Sarah attends Trafalgar Elementary School. All have been multiple year participants in the Young Artists Awards program. The Young Artists Awards, beginning its 11th year of programming, is a not-for-profit education, performance, audition and scholarship program for students from throughout Southwest Florida. The organization is also a monthly partner with Art Walk. Reverie & Rock Art Gallery and is located at 1528 Jackson Street in the downtown Fort Myers River District. The performance is free and open to the public. For more information on the Young Artists Awards, visit www.youngartistsawards.org. Callie Atkinson, Elisabeth Best and Sarah Best Free Kids Fishing Derby Casts O ff O n The Causeway November 9Kids of all ages who are able to hold their own fishing pole may participate in the free 2nd annual Ding Darling Kids Fishing Derby to be held on the Sanibel Causeway Islands Park (Island A) on Saturday, November 9. JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge and the Ding Darling Wildlife Society-Friends of the Refuge (DDWS) cosponsor the event. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. on the causeway. Ages 15 and younger start fishing at 9 a.m. and finish at 11 a.m. The awards ceremony is at 11:30 a.m. Judges will record catches during the session. After the results are tallied, they will award winners in two age groups: 10 to 15, and 9 and younger. Based upon total inches of fish caught, the refuge will award first, second, continued on page 26 Kids, get ready to reel in the big ones at the refuges free fishing derbySaturday Is Tomato Day At GreenM arketLearn how to grow tomatoes in your yard or on your porch during the next Fall & Winter Growing Season Workshop at the Alliance GreenMarket on Saturday, November 2 at 10:30 a.m. Even if you think you already know everything there is to know about growing this fruit, GreenMarket manager Santiago De Choch says youre sure to learn something from this workshop. Topics will include: hanging baskets and hydroponically. from Everglades to green zebras. and their organic control. freezing and sun-drying. After the workshop, visitors will be guided through the practical steps of planting tomatoes in the Alliance community garden area. Every season, GreenMarket patrons and friends set up edible gardens around the Alliance campus, where they organically grow herbs and vegetables. Everyone with an interest in sustainability is welcome. This tomato workshop is presented continued on page 26 Locally-grown Green Zebra tomatoes Different tomato varieties available at the GreenMarketAn Afternoon O f B luegrass M usicBluegrass music returns to the Foulds Theatre at the Alliance for the Arts on Sunday, November 3 from 2 to 5 p.m. The Acoustic Music Society of Southwest Florida has lined up another great group of bands. This show features Banyan Bluegrass, Captain Joe and the Bottom Feeders, and The Myakka River Band. The Sunday after noon concert series continues on December 8 with bands to be announced.Tickets are $7 at the door, or $5 for Alliance members. Seating is open and first come, first served. Children 12 and under are admitted free when accompanied by an adult. Doors open at 1:30 p.m. Visit www. artinlee.org or call 939-2787 for more information. The Alliance for the Arts is at 10091 McGregor Boulevard just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Captain Joe and the Bottom Feeders Banyan Bluegrass Daylight Savings Time Ends Sunday, Fall Back One Hour

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 20132 Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: Church Of Several Namesby Gerri Reaves, PhDThe church pictured in the circa-1940 photo was originally named the ONeill Memorial Church, but it underwent a few name changes in the halfcentury it stood on First Street at Royal Palm Avenue, across from the Royal Palm Hotel. How it came to be built in 1903 is a story involving sorrow, generosity, gossip, forgiveness, faith, and a large dose of prac ticality. The story is one of the most interesting in the long his tory of the institution known today as the First United Methodist Church. Fort Myers oldest church traces its history to January 1872. Its first service was conducted by a circuit-riding preacher in a log cabin that also served as a schoolhouse.That cabin was located across First Street from the current church location, on the land where the Royal Palm Hotel was built and where an unused parking garage now stands. The church grew and organized officially in 1879. However, it wasnt until 1881 that the fledgling church constructed its first home. That building soon proved inadequate and a larger church was needed. Enter Hugh ONeill, who had built the grand Royal Palm Hotel. Soon after it opened in 1898, he wanted to donate $4,000 to the Methodists for a new church to be named in honor of his son, Hugh Jr., who had died in 1892. It was understood that the church would raise an equal amount. But his generosity met resistance from some church members, who disapproved of his policy of serving alcohol in his hotel and even with his moderate drinking habits. The church rejected the gift. After ONeill died suddenly in March 1902, the church developed a more forgiving attitude toward him. In retrospect, perhaps his character wasnt so questionable, and anyway, his hotel and the investors it attracted had greatly benefited Fort Myers. The gift was accepted, albeit a bit late for the benefactor to appreciate the fact. The church planned a larger building and acquired more land. The building that was in use was sold, moved, and eventually became the first permanent home of the First Presbyterian Church. The ONeill Memorial Church was constructed, and in November 1903, the first sermon was preached there. Over the next 50 years, the town and the church grew, and additional Methodist churches were founded in Fort Myers. In only a few years, the churchs association with the ONeill name seems to have faded. By the 1900s, the church was called the Methodist Episcopal Church, then First Methodist Church, and today, First United Methodist Church. In 1953, the Methodists built a new church on the same site where the ONeill Memorial Church had stood. Walk down to First and Royal Palm and see the home of Fort Myers first orga nized religious institution. Then walk a few blocks to the Southwest Florida Museum of History to learn more about the many churches that anchored the pioneer town. For information, call 321-7430 or go to museumofhistory.org. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Be sure to visit one of the areas best research centers, the Southwest Florida Historical Society, where you can see more photos of the historic Methodist church es. The all-volunteer non-profit organization is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Contact the society at 939-4044, or visit on Wednesday or Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon. Sources: Archives of the Southwest Florida Historical Society and the Story of Fort Myers by Karl H. Grismer. The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, please call (239) 415-7732 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, FL 33901. Fax number: (239) 415-7702. E-mail: press@riverweekly.com. The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Co-Publishers Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Isabel Rasi Office Coordinator Graphic Arts/ProductionAnn Ziehl Photographer Michael Heider Writers Anne Mitchell Jeff Lysiak PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Contributing Writers Read Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com Click on The River Ed Frank Max Friedersdorf Tom Hall Todays First United Methodist Church was opened in 1953 photo by Gerri Reaves This church in this undated photo was originally named the ONeill Memorial Church and stood at First and Royal Palm. Notice the Royal Palm Hotel sign (right). Coincidentally, the hotels existence (1898 to 1948) roughly corresponded to that of the church. courtesy of the Southwest Florida Historical Society (Sara Nell Hendry Gran Collection)

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3 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 2013 (239) 337-3377 www.MorganHouseRestaurant.com Winter Hours Return November 1 st 33 Patio de Leon Fort Myers Fort Myers Public Art: Local Artist Wins Third International Awardby Tom HallOne of Marcus Jansens large-scale canvases has won in the mixed media category at the Irreversable Magazine juried international art project in Miami. The Irreversible international art project is a pioneering exhibition platform for projects that transcend the classical art show, including small format, large scale installations, theatrical events, mixed media, video projections, massive sculptures, music, live performances and unlimited kids programs. Jansens winning entry will be featured in a Critics Choice Review published by Irreversible in a limited edition issue released during Art Basel Miami in December. It will also be included in a bricks-and-mortar exhibition opening in Hollywood, Florida on November 21. All the works chosen as category winners, exceptional entries, and special invitees were judged on the basis of: to, the public; thoroughness and accuracy in presentation of issues in approach to subject matter and effectiveness of presentation entrys production Irreversible strives to broaden the global understanding of contemporary art and to foster cultural exchange by creating new paradigms through creative initiatives. Under the stewardship of editor Norelkys Blazekovic, the magazine communicates a vision of the burgeoning arts scene around the world with an energy that has not previously been captured. In a very creative way, Irreversible documents an extremely significant era in Miamis birth as well as an international cultural destination capturing an international audience. In just the last 12 months, Marcus Award (2012) and the Aesthetica Art (where he also enjoyed the distinction of being the only American painter selected as a finalist by the shows international panel of jurors) and was chosen by an esteemed panel of jurors as a finalist at Australia, which is one of the most significant landscape painting competitions anywhere in the world. Jansen maintains his studio and private viewing space at UNIT A Contemporary Art Space in downtown Fort Myers. For more information or to arrange private showings, contact Terry Tincher at terryunitaspace@gmail.com or visit www.unitaspace.com. An arts advocate, Tom Hall guides weekly walking tours of the River Districts public art collection in Fort Myers. For more information, go to www.truetours.net. Aviation Day And Food DriveA with free admission and parking. This annual community event is hosted by purpose of increasing community awareness of our airports Southwest Florida The event is held on the ramp on Airport Road, east of U.S. 41 and south off North Airport Road and U.S. 41 with complimentary shuttle bus transportation to the event. This year, the main attraction will be is a distinctively designed fighter plane built during WWII and made famous by the Black Sheep Squadron. It was also B-25J Mitchell twin-engine bomber, Doolittle Raid over Japan. In addition, this years free childrens activities (giant slide and bounce houses) Other attractions will include experimental, antique and general aviation aircraft, airplane and helicopter rides (for a fee), performances by a 17-piece big band ensemble, character appearances, airport continued on page 26 Marcus Jansen still maintains a studio in Fort Myers Lazy Flamingo, Inc. 6520-C Pine Avenue Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-5353 Lazy Flamingo 3, Inc. 16501 Stringfellow Rd Bokeelia, FL 33922 239-283-5959 Lazy Flamingo 2, Inc. 1036 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-6939 Lazy Flamingo 4, Inc. 12951 McGregor Blvd. Ft. Myers, FL 33919 239-476-9000 Four Great Locations! We have the NFL Ticket Package and the BIG TEN Network NOW SERVING FULL LIQUOR IN FORT MYERS 20 Wings & Domestic Pitcher for $20 during all College and Pro GamesF M JOIN US Sunday, November 10thTASTE OF THE ISLANDSVote Us Peoples Choice!

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 20134 Sixty Artists Coming For Plein Air FestivalSixty plein air artists will be in town from November 4 to 10 to paint their vision of Fort Myers Beach. Everyone is invited to watch them while they create their artwork Tuesday through Thursday. This year is the biggest yet, with artists arriving from outside Florida and the USA with their brushes in hand. Paint the Beach: Sandcastles to Shrimpboats is the fourth annual competition which is now a national event featuring artists who paint throughout the town then show their work in the festival tent at Santini Marina Plaza. Collectors can have first choice at the gala preview party on November 8 and sample food provided by restaurants in the plaza. A quick draw competition will be held in Times Square on Saturday morning followed by judging at the festival tent. Music, refreshments and demonstrations will continue throughout the day. Singer Jo List performs with Joe McConaghy from 3 to 5 p.m. in the festival tent Jazz Caf with food and bar service available through Skyes. Tickets for the gala and raffle are on sale at the Fort Myers Beach Art Association gallery, Fish-Tale Marina office or at www.fortmyersbeachart.com/ Sponsors are Fort Myers Beach Art Association, The Greater Fort Myers Beach Friends of the Arts, Santini Marina Plaza, Fish-Tale Marina and supported by the Town of Fort Myers Beach. Artists will kick off with their checkin hosted by Nervous Nellies Waterfront Eatery on Monday and begin to paint around the town. Items for their goody bags are provided by many of the local businesses and friends. Prizes are underwritten by Santini Marina Plaza, FishTale Marina, Smokin Oyster Brewery, John and Jean Kakatsch, Edward Jones Investments, Plein Air Magazine, Watercolor Magazine and Chartpak. Shirts will be underwritten by Beach Pub Inn. The associations gallery hours will be 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Sunday and noon to 3 p.m. Sunday. Call 463-3909 for further details. Gala nightDonate A Used Purse To Dress For SuccessThe Lee Republican Women Federated (LRWF) will meet on Wednesday, November 20 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at The Forest Country Club, located at 6100 Country Club Blvd. in Fort Myers. Included will be fashions by Razzle Dazzle, door prizes, a silent auction, a Chinese auction for new purses stuffed with gift certificates, jewelry and surprises. Cost to attend the luncheon is $35 plus a gently used purse/handbag for a donation to Dress For Success. To make reservations, call Maria at 454-6817 or email november19@netzero.net. For more information about the LRWF, contact Michele Duryea, Publicity Chair, at michelemduryea@embarqmail. com or call 280-7653. Indoor Cardio Tennis OfferedIndoor Cardio Tennis, presented by the Lake Kennedy Senior Center in Cape Coral, will be offered from 8 to 9 a.m. on Thursdays beginning on November 7. Instructor Paul Segodo is a former Davis Cup professional tennis player from Benin who came to America at the age of 9 to represent his country playing tennis. He has provided tennis instruction for more than 10 years to students of all ages and all skill levels, and he still competes regularly. Class is open to all skill levels, beginner or advanced. Cost is $12, and preregistration is preferred. To sign up or for more information, contact the Lake Kennedy Senior Center at 574-0575. Friday November 1, 2013 7:00 p.m. Edison & Ford Winter Estates Saturday November 2, 2013 7:00 p.m. Edison State College Fort Myers Campus Since 2007, Edison Ford and Edison State College have collaborated to bring the international lm festival to Florida that celebrates Edisons pioneering work in cinema and features contemporary independent and experimental short lms. Tickets on Sale NOW TICKE TS: NOVE R 1 Edison Ford Members and Edison Students $5 Non Members $8 NOVE R E Films showing at Richard H. Rush Library, Edison State College, Fort Myers Campus $15 for both nights BLA CK MA RI A FILM FEST IVAL RETUR NS TO SOUTHWEST FLO RI DA IN NO VEMBER To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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5 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 2013 T urkish Carpets Featured At B urroughs H omeA Turkish Carpet Show is being offered at the Burroughs Home, 2505 First Street in Fort Myers, by the Uncommon Friends Foundation on Friday, November 15 at 5 p.m. The unique event will be held on the dancing porch as a benefit for the Uncommon Friends Foundation historic preservation programs. The event is free and open to the public. The carpet show will include Turkic carpets from Turkey, Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan. Besides a very unusual selection of carpets, including some from Persia, there will be very rare Rahrahs. These are kilims made by speciallytrained/experienced artisans from a small tribal village in eastern Turkey. The Burroughs family, owners of the architecturally significant Burroughs Home built in 1901, were world travelers and art collectors. Among the many historical artifacts in the home are four wellworn family carpets that may have been purchased in Istanbul during a family trip in 1905. Carpet experts from Harem 49 in Istanbul, Emre and Ayhan Elci, will share their expertise during the carpet demonstration. Emre has visited Fort Myers three times and has placed carpets in the homes of several local community leaders. If you wish to select a carpet from the show, an arrangement will be made to have it viewed in your home. Fifteen percent of the sale of these handmade carpets will be donated to historic preser vation for the Burroughs Home. Reservations for the event are required and can be made by emailing aroth. uncommonfriends@gmail.com. Attendees will be able to sip wine and sample appetizers. Parking is available across the street at the Langford-Kingston Home. For more information, call 337-9503 or visit www.uncommonfriends.org. Turkish Carpet expert Emre Elci and Arlene Roth, Uncommon Friends Foundation Executive Director, with Turkish carpets on the dancing porch at the Burroughs HomeCounty R eceives Green AwardThe Board of Lee County Commissioners has been awarded a United States Green Building Council award from the Florida Gulf Coast chapter. The county received the Outstanding Municipality/Business of the Year Award at the fourth annual LEEDership Awards ceremony in St. Petersburg. The awards recognize companies, municipalities and project teams in the Florida Gulf Coast region that advance LEED projects and principles, demonstrate leadership, advocacy, and commitment to the advancement of the mission of the United States Green Building Council in the marketplace and in the community. LEED stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. This award recognizes countless hours and tireless efforts on behalf of Lee County and its commitment to sustainability, Lee County Commission Chairman Cecil Pendergrass said. Lee County received the award by incorporating sustainability into planning practices, increasing energy efficiencies in buildings and operations, supporting multi-modal transportation systems, and focusing on transparency and collaboration. Examples include LEED-certified JetBlue Park and the Six Mile Cypress Slough Preserve Interpretive Center as well as efforts leveraged to obtain the recently received $10.5 million federal TIGER grant. Members of the Lee County Sustainability Committee, which advises Lee County Commissioners, include Scott Kashman, Matthew Johnson, Ken F. Buschle, David V. Willems, Clara Anne Graham, Jennifer A. Duffala Hagen, Stephanie Keyes, Diana M. Giraldo, Roger Strelow, Jennifer Nelson, Christopher M. Ressler, John Lai, Ann Pierce, Charles Gary Verwilt, Damon Shelor and Cathleen Morgan. The Lee County Sustainability Office is led by Tessa LeSage. Lunch Dinner Snacks in Between 11am-10pm RIVER FREE MARINA DOCKAGE 10% OFF Offer valid with Cash payments only ... No credit cards. ONE COUPON PER TABLE Can not be used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, Expires Nov. 8, 2013

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 20136 Shoes For PreschoolersOn October 17, members of Continental Womens Club of Fort Myers delivered 32 new pairs of shoes to needy pre-schoolers at CCMI Montessori School. The children were delighted as they selected shoes to match their outfits. For three years, every fall and spring, Continental Womens Club has been donating shoes to the students. To date they have provided a total of around 100 pairs. The children are thrilled to receive the new footwear and the club members who deliver them come away with unforgettable memories of having given a helping hand to the kids. Continental Womens Club meets the first Thursday of every month at Colonial Country Club. Members are involved in many philanthropic and social activities. For information about becoming a member call Margery Connor at 5618973. Rasheed and Tzorria in their new shoes Tianna and Izariya show off their new shoes Delivering the shoes are Linda Brown, Clare Schumacher, Linda Esbjorn and Carol Dee Hamilton rf ntbnrr bb bb rtttn Loved this restaurant. Fantastic experience. Food was exceptionally amazing. Service was outstanding. TripAdvisor Member, May 2013 Bikers Go Behind Bars For Good To Support MDAFort Myers Harley-Davidsons biggest supporters from throughout the Southwest Florida area will be arrested and put behind bars for the Muscular Dystrophy Associations LockUp fundraiser on Thursday, November 7 at Fort Myers Harley-Davidson and Naples Harley-Davidson. Accused of having big hearts and being heavily armed with kindness, the jailbirds volunteer to be part of MDAs Lock-Up in order to raise bail by encouraging friends, family, co-workers and business contacts to make contributions to MDA that will directly benefit families in the greater Southwest Florida area living with progressive muscle diseases. The actual day of the Lock-Up will be a fun celebration of the work each person did to help families who live right here in our community, explained Kim Viquesney, Executive Director of the Southwest Florida MDA office. Lock-Ups are one of MDAs signature fundraising programs, benefiting local individuals living with muscular dystrophy, ALS and related progressive muscle diseases in the Southwest Florida area. The event also will help send Southwest Florida-area youngsters to a special week at MDA summer camp at Rotary Camp in Brandon, Florida. Youngsters with muscle diseases, as well as the many volunteers who help create magic at MDA summer camp each year, enjoy a wide variety of activities designed specifically for youngsters with limited mobility. Some activities include swimming, fishing, and arts and crafts. MDA is the nonprofit health agency dedicated to curing muscular dystrophy, ALS and related diseases by funding worldwide research. The Association also provides unparalleled health care services; advocates for the families it serves; and invests significant resources educating the medical and scientific communities, as well as the general public, about neuromuscular diseases affecting more than 1 million Americans. MDA maintains a nationwide network of some 200 hospital-affiliated clinics 38 of which are designed as MDA/ ALS centers that provide unparalleled medical and health care services to adults and children with neuromuscular diseases. Families in greater Southwest Florida area are encouraged to visit the MDA Clinic Sarasota Memorial. For more information about MDAs Lock-Up campaign, contact Kim Viquesney at 239-437-6900 or 516. office@mdausa.org. Help Needed For Sand Sculpting ChampionshipThe Greater Fort Myers Beach Area Chamber of Commerce needs a Crew of 200 volunteers in order to conduct the 27th annual American Sand Sculpting Championship, to be held November 22 through December 1. Volunteers are needed for each day of the event. The event will be held behind the Holiday Inn, located at 6890 Estero Boulevard on Fort Myers Beach.Volunteers will be assisting with a variety of tasks including ticket selling, gate admission and other light duties. They will each receive a free T-shirt and meal voucher. Students needing community service hours are more than welcome to sign up. To become a member of the Crew of 200 for one or more days, contact Jane Ross at the Beach Chamber at 454-7500 or jane@fmbchamber.com. 239-288-5318 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEKWe Carry Large MachinesHappy WifeCoin Laundromat BIG LOTS PLAZA 15660 San Carlos Blvd. Ft. Myers, FL 33908

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The Sanibel-Captiva chapter of START is proud to announce our fifth annual Cracker Fest celebrationThe laid-back atmosphere of Sanibels favorite celebration returns on Friday, November 8th. Come celebrate Floridas cultural legacy while raising awareness and financial support for our START chapters mission to promote healthy waterways and beaches. Included in this years festivities will be an authentic Cracker-style Feast, the music of Uproot Hootenanny, a live auction, raffles, and our new cast net throw-down. New this year we have added a cast net competition; come compete with your friends and family to find the best cast netter. Heats will be run for men and women of varying skill groups, come out and enter for a chance at cash prizes and more. Our cast net competition is limited to our event ticket holders. Lessons are available at the event and if you want a lesson before Cracker Fest come by or call The Bait Box (239-472-1618) to get a lesson from island legend Ralph Woodring. For more information on Cracker Fest or to purchase tickets please contact Ben Biery at 239-472-1175 or email START@sanibelseaschool.org C racRAC KE rR FE stST Returns November 8, 2013 6:00 p.m. on The Bait Box Property 7 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 2013

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 20138 Along The RiverEating locally grown and produced foods are good for the area economy and great for your health. Lee County boasts several farmers markets that offer chemical-free and organic produce, along with fresh baked goods, native plants and all-natural products. Support area farmers and practice good eating hab its at these locations: Thursday: The River District Farmers Market, under the US 41 Caloosahatchee Bridge. 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Fruit, vegetables, local honey, bread, seafood, BBQ, flow ers and plants. It is open year-round. Call 321-7100 or go to www.cityftmyers.com. Friday: Fort Myers Beach Farmers Market, under the Matanzas Bridge between Second and Third Streets. 7:30 to 11:30 a.m. until April, rain or shine. Fruits and vegetables, flowers, seafood, baked goods, snack foods and plants. Call 765-0202 or go to www.fortmyersbeachfl.gov. Lakes Park, 7330 Gladiolus Drive, Fort Myers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. until May. Fruits, vegetables, breads, honey, soaps, jams and seafood. Call 533-7275. Saturday: GreenMarket at Alliance of the Arts, 10091 McGregor Boulevard near the Colonial intersection. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. An exclusive selection of locally grown, caught and cultivated foods and other products available to sample and pur chase. Enjoy live entertainment by local musicians and fun activities for kids. It is open year-round. Call 939-2787 or go to www.artinlee.org. Cape Coral Chamber Farmers Market in Club Square, downtown Cape Coral. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. until May. Locally grown produce, native plants, fresh Gulf seafood, live music/entertainment and informative community presentations. Call 549-6900 or go to www.capecoralfarmersmarket.com. Sunday: Sanibel Island Farmers Market, 800 Dunlop Road (City Hall, next to the library). 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. until May. Call Crystal Mansell at 472-3700. On Sunday, November 3 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., the Junior League of Fort Myers (JLFM) celebrates the 31st annual Taste of the Town at JetBlue Park. Funds raised at Taste of the Town contribute directly to the Junior Leagues volun teer programs, which currently include programs to fight childhood obesity, support at-risk youth and provide local mini-grants. Entrance to the park is $5 and children under 12 enter free. Cash only is accepted on the day of the event. Once in the park, you may purchase food and beverage tickets to purchase the food and beverages from vendors. Vendors will not accept cash for purchases. All food and beverage items will cost between $1 and $5 worth of tickets. Tickets will also be used to purchase entry to all kids entertain ment events. JetBlue Park is located at 11500 Fenway South Drive, Fort Myers. For more information about Taste of the Town, including a list of participating restaurants, call 277-1197 or visit www.jlfmtaste.com. Every Monday through February 24, join local film buffs judging short indie films submitted to the Fort Myers Film Festival and have your say as to whether or not it makes the grade for final programming during the festival to be held March 19 to 23. Thank God Its Monday features happy hour at 6:30 p.m. with live musical entertainment. Show starts at 7 p.m. TGIM takes place at The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center located at 2301 First Street, Fort Myers. Check out updates and deals at www.fortmyersfilmfestival.com. Did you know that the Fort Myers Beach shrimping fleet is the largest com mercial fishing fleet in the Gulf of Mexico? Shrimping, known as Pink Gold, contributes millions of dollars to our economy. On Wednesdays, the Ostego Bay Foundations Marine Science Center offers tours of San Carlos Islands commercial fishing fleet. The three hour guided tour starts at 9 a.m. It includes a one-and-a-half hour guided visit at the museum which contains a touch tank, a hands-on beach area and several aquariums and exhibits. The tour continues with a visit to several commer cial fishing industry businesses. See how the boats are unloaded, the trawl doors are build, the shrimp nets are hand-sewn, the seafood is processed, and other important factors used in this unique million dollar industry. It is a memorable experience for the entire family. The cost for the tour is $15 per adult and $10 for children seven years of age and older. Reservations are required. Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center located at 718 Fishermans Wharf on San Carlos Island in Fort Myers Beach. Call 765-8101 or go to www.ostegobay.org. Take a tour of the Fort Myers Beach multimillion dollar shrimping fleet with Ostego Bay and meet the people who harvest and sell Pink Gold All six local farmers markets are now open for season. Pictured here is a sample of the abundant fresh produce available at the Lakes Parks market on Fridays Please visit our River Weekly News online advertisers at www.islandsunnews.com. You can click through to their Web sites for more information about real estate, shopping, restaurants and services. Just click on the logos surrounding the front page. Call for departure time CAPTIVACRUISES H T H E I S L A N D S H THE BEStT WAY TO SSEE THE ISLANDS IS FROM THE WAt TER Cruises depart from beautiful Captiva Island Our email address is press@riverweekly.com

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9 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 2013 CONTINENTAL CUISINEAT THEIR NEW HOME. 20351 SUMMERLIN ROAD, FORT MYERS. ACROSS FROM TANGER FACTORY OUTLETS. IN THE PUBLIX SHOPPING PLAZA. Courtneys has something for everyone. Come & see why Courtneys aims to please!239.466.4646Chef Dale Tonell Award Winning Classic Cuisine Voted Best Chef Chef Dale Tonell SUNSET DINING SPECIAL4-6PMHAPPY HOUR DAILY4PM-6PM $3.00 HOUSE WINES$3.00 WELL DRINKS$2.00 OFF APPETIZERS AT THE BAR FROM 4-6PMLUNCH SERVED DAILY AT 11AMSUNDAY BRUNCH10AM TO 2PM MAKE HOLIDAY RESERVATIONSTODAY! Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Downtown Fort Myers (Post Oce Arcade Next to Hotel Indigo) 1520 Broadway For Takeout & Delivery Tel: 334-6991 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEKMon-urs 11am 10pm Fri-Sat 11am 11pm Sun 12pm 9pm www. ichiban-sushi-chinese.com Open Monday Saturday www.threecraftyladies.com Open Monday Saturday www.threecraftyladies.com Find us on Limited Registration available. Call us today for details! Doc Fords Rum Bar & Grille is Named for the Doc Ford character in local author Randy Wayne Whites bestselling mystery novels. Its a well known gathering place and tropical theme sports bar with indoor and outdoor patio seating. The combined menu offers all the lunch and dinner items from 11 a.m. until closing. It includes cedar plank salmon topped with a mango chipotle glaze or a marinated grilled chicken sandwich. The fish tacos are an island favorite and theres a well provisioned raw bar. Tropical drinks are a specialty, notably the signature rum drink, Island Mojito. 708 Fishermans Warf, Fort Myers Beach. Call 765-9660. Ichiban is a downtown favorite for Chinese and Japanese cuisine. The name means Number One in Japanese and offers its customers the perfect balance of great quality and affordable prices. Ichiban has been family owned and operated for eight years and its enduring popularity is a testament to its exceptional, friendly service. 1520 Broadway #106, Fort Myers. Call 334-6991. As local seafood lovers know, The Lazy Flamingo is a great place for grouper sandwiches, raw oysters on the half-shell, conch chowder and mussels marinara served in a nautical-themed atmosphere. The Lazys motto is If our seafood were any fresher, we would be serving it underwater. The restaurant is also known for its secret recipe Flamingo garlic bread, buffalo wings and giant burgers; best enjoyed with a frosty mug of beer. The Lazy Flamingo #4 offers a full liquor bar with daily happy hour specials. For family outings, the little grown ups can choose from kid-approved dishes such as chicken fingers, pasta and hot dogs. All items on the childrens menu include a Lazy Flamingo flying disk and collectors cup. 12951 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers. Call 476-9000. Experience Old Florida Hospitality with New Florida Flair at The Morgan House in the historic River District. Nightly Specials: Monday, $20 prime rib and half-price select bottles of wine; Tuesday, $6 Morgan House burger and half-off craft beer; Wednesday, half off appetizers and house wine; Thursday, $4 martinis and half-off select shots; Friday, complimentary buffet upstairs with two drink minimum and half-off house wine and select domestic drafts; and Saturday, half-off select margaritas and tequila shots. Also features live music. 33 Patio De Leon, Fort Myers. Call 337-3377. Nervous Nellies is a casual, family-fun restaurant that boasts a large selection of appetizers, fresh seafood, over-stuffed sandwiches and entres. Dine in airconditioned comfort or outside on Nellies expansive waterfront patio. Free parking for car and boat. Live music and happy hour all day. Swing to the beats of live reggae, rock and island music from the areas premier musical talent. Just upstairs from Nellies is Uglys Waterside Bar, the place where everyone gets prettier, and happy hour is all day, every day. Parking for your car or boat is free for patrons of Nellies and Uglys. 1131 First Street, Fort Myers Beach. Call 463-8077. FORT MYERS FAREDining From Downtowns Historic River District To The Beaches For more information, check out our advertisers in this weeks River Weekly DOC FORDS RUM BAR & GRILLE ICHIBAN LAZY FLAMINGO #4 MORGAN HOUSE NERVOUS NELLIES CRAZY WATERFRONT EATERYKeny Chong, Marytez Tano and Meng Chong creating sushi art at Ichiban

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 201310 Fort Myers Beach Plein Air FestivalPaint The Beach: Sandcastles To Shrimp Boats is a plein air festival in Fort Myers Beach held from November 4 to 10. It is the 4th annual competition, which is now a national event, featuring 60 talented artists who paint throughout the town then show their work in the festival tent at Santini Marina Plaza. Collectors can have first choice at the gala preview party on Friday, November 8 and enjoy wonderful food provided by restaurants in the plaza. A quick draw competition will be held in Times Square on Saturday morning, followed by judging at the festival tent. Music, refreshments, demonstrations and more will continue throughout the day. Singer Jo List performs with Joe McConaghy from 3 to 5 p.m. in the festival tent Jazz Caf, with food and bar service available through Skyes. Tickets for gala and raffle are on sale at the Fort Myers Beach Art Association gallery, Fish-Tale Marina office or online at www.fortmyersbeachart.com. Sponsored by Fort Myers Beach Art Association, The Greater Fort Myers Beach Friends of the Arts, Santini Marina Plaza, Fish-Tale Marina and supported by the Town of Fort Myers Beach, this years plein air festival is shaping up to be the best yet. Artists will kick off with their check-in hosted by Nervous Nellies on Monday and begin to paint around the town. Items for their goody bags are provided by many of the local businesses and friends. Prizes are underwritten by Santini Marina Plaza, Fish-Tale Marina, Smokin Oyster Brewery, John and Jean Kakatsch, Edward Jones Investments, Plein Air Magazine, Watercolor Magazine, Chartpak, and shirts will be underwritten by Beach Pub Inn. Also, Fort Myers Beach Art Association will host watercolorist Pat Weaver for a workshop during November. It is the first of three famous artists to teach at the working gallery. Registration is being taken now for the four-day session. Entitled Exploring Color with Limited Palettes, it will run November 18 to 21. Find out more at www.fortmyersbeachart.com, call 812-923-9128 or email papaandnana63@aol.com to reserve your space as soon as possible. Weaver will offer a demonstration on Sunday, November 17 from 4 to 6 p.m. The demo is free to workshop participants, and is $10 for all others. Guests are welcome. FMBAA Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 3 p.m. on Sunday. For more information on shows or classes, call the gallery at 463-3909 or go to www.fortmyersbeachart.com. Trash & Treasures SALE e Center 4 Life Palm Ridge & Library Way, Sanibel, FL Dont miss this great opportunity to discover great nds at low, low prices! W L F D NBring gently used or new items to the Center 4 Life at Palm Ridge & Library Way. To have items picked up, call the Center (239) 472-5743.Please: No clothes, shoes, bed pillows, mattresses, computers, printers or old TVs Refreshments will be for sale! Fort Myers Beach Art Association Fall Show OpensFor the first major exhibition of the season, artists of the Fort Myers Beach Art Association will be hanging art in the gallery on November 2 awaiting judging by Pat Weaver, a watercolor artist who will be teaching at the gallery November 18-21. Weaver will give a demonstration at the gallery on November 17 from 4 to 6 p.m. and all are welcome to attend. Admission is $10. Refreshments will be served. Weavers workshop has been popular and only a few spots remain for the fourday session. On November 24 the exhibition reception will be held at the gallery from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. and awards will be given to those selected by the judge. A special award of the Maya Bryant Outdoor Painter prize will be given to a plein air piece. At the same time Studio II will house an exhibit of the work done by association artists who traveled as a group to Limoux, France in June. Prior to the reception there will be a panel discussion at 1:30 p.m. of their experience of painting plein air in the French countryside as well. This was the first time a group from the Fort Myers Beach Art Association has made such a trip but it will not be the last. At least two more are in the works for members to experience. Check out www.fortmyersbeachart. com to see all the seasons events such as famous artist workshops, local artist short workshops, classes, special exhibits and shows. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and Saturdays and noon to 3 p.m. on Sundays. For more information call 463-3909 or log onto www.fortmyersbeachart.com. Boat Show Comes To Fort Myers This MonthThe 41st annual Fort Myers Boat Show at Harborside Event Center and City of Fort Myers Yacht Basin is coming Thursday, November 14 through Sunday, November 17. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday. The event will feature boats of about every type and size imaginable. Show attendees can tour a large assortment of boat types both in and out of water, from luxury yachts and off-shore fishing boats to dinghies and kayaks. New to the show this year, attendees can discover how easy it is to get into boating at the You Can Afford to Go Boating area in Centennial Park. This special section will include a display of boats that can all be purchased on a budget of $250 or less per month. Informational signs will accompany each boat allowing visitors to gather more information at their leisure. Resorts and marinas will also be on hand to help guests plan stays and waterfront trips. Vendors will showcase the latest in boating accessories, electronics, marine financing and insurance, motors and fishing gear. Now in its 41st year, the show will include seminars on fishing and boat safety with local guides on hand to answer questions and present instruction about Southwest Florida fishing. The show will also feature a large kayaking section with information about Lee Countys Great Calusa Blueway paddling trails and returning is the U.S. Coast Guard with its interactive boating safety trailer displaying a variety of safety equipment. Our show continues to grow and this years promises to be the best yet. There will be a large selection of boats, accessories and activities, all situated around the beautiful new downtown river basin and Harborside Event Center, said John Good, event manager. Food and beverages will be available inside the event as well as several new downtown venues. Admission is $10 per person per day and free for children under 16 with a paid adult admission. Tickets can be purchased at the door. For more information about the show, visit www.goboatingflorida.com/41stannual-fort-myers-boat-show. Christmas Boat ParadeThe 25th annual Fort Myers Beach Christmas Boat Parade will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. on Saturday, December 7, and this year will commemorate the attack on Pearl Harbor. World War II veteran Russ Winset will be on board the lead boat as guest of honor. Participating boats are welcome. Boaters are urged to show Christmas and patriotic spirit. Those who live along the parade route can also get in on the fun and show spirit by entering their party in the house party competition. Visit www.fmbboatparade. com for entry information. Good viewing spots include Parrot Key Caribbean Grill, Big Game Waterfront Grille, Doc Fords, Bonita BIlls, Matanzas Inn Restaurant and Nervous Nellies. You can also watch the parade by sea on board the Fort Myers Princess and the Pieces of Eight. Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702 or email press@riverweekly.com

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11 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 2013 Students Study Life In EcuadorWhat is it like to be a child living in a different country than ours? What do they eat? Where do they go to school? Do they have pets? What do they do for fun? Can they go to church and do they have Bibles? Third graders at First Baptist Academy had a great time learning the answers to these questions as they studied the country of Ecuador. The students learned that children in Ecuador eat many of the same foods we eat but one of the biggest differences was eating guinea pig. Ecuadors schools are very different than ours depending on whether they live in the jungle or the Andes Mountains. Most of the third graders wished they could have pet monkeys like the Ecuadorian children do. Technology doesnt play a major part of Ecuador childrens idea of fun. They would rather do flips out of their canoes into the cold river. Third graders had hands-on opportunities to shoot real jungle blowguns, play native musical instruments and walk in Otovalan shoes. They also observed a giant tarantula, volcanic ash and handmade crafts. They learned how missionaries travel not only to Ecuador but other foreign countries to start churches and translate the Bible in the various native languages. First Baptist Academy is located at 3000 Orange Blossom Drive, on the corner of Orange Blossom Drive and Livingston Road, Naples. The students check out Ecuadoran crafts and artefacts Trying out a real blowgun Distinctl norris.com furniture that appeals to your heart... Sanibel 1025 Periwinkle Way Mon Sat. 10 5Evenings & Sundays by appointment 579.0412 Naples & Fort MyeLIMITED T IME SAVINGS ON SEL ECT I TEMS! $11,999 $ 11 999 COMPLETE DESIGNER CONDO PACKAGES STARTING AT NORS 12859 11-1-13 Island Sun&River Weekly.indd 1 10/24/13 4:10 PM

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Churches/TemplesALL F aA ITHS UNIT aA RI aA N CONGREG aA TION (UU A) Where diversity is treasured 2756 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers Summer program: Understanding the Faiths of Our Worlds June 2 to August 25 11 a.m. Interim Minister, Rev. Margaret Beard, begins on September 1 239-226-0900. www.allfaiths-uc.org A LLLL SS A INTSINTS BYZA NTINENTINE RITERITE CA THOLITHOLI C C HH U RR C HH 10291 Bayshore Rd., N. Fort Myers Divine Liturgy is on Sun. at 10:30 a.m.; Rosary begins at 10 a.m. Lenten services (Presanctied Liturgy) will be on Wed. evenings at 6 p.m. starting on Feb. 22. Administrator is Very Rev. Peter Lickman, ph. 305-651-0991. We are a Church of the Eastern Catholic or Byzantine Rite, 1.5 mi. east of Int. 75. A NNNN U NN C II A TIONTION GREEGREE K ORTHOORTHO D OO X C HH U RR C HH 8210 Cypress Lake Dr ive, Fort Myers Reverend Fr. George P. Savas Orthros Service Sunday 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy Sunday 10 a.m. www.annunciation.fl.goarch.org 239-481-2099 B ETHETH SHILOHSHILOH M ESSIESSI A NINI C SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 15675 McGregor Boulev ard, 437-3171 Rabbi: Judah Hungerman Friday Service, 8 p.m., Saturday Service, 11 a.m. Shabbat School Saturday Morning, Adult Hebrew Classes. Call for information on full program. B RERE AD OO F LILI F EE M INISTRIESINISTRIES C HH U RR C HH OO F GOGO D 16581 McGregor Boule vard, 267-3166 Just past the Tanger Outlet Mall Pastor: Barry Lentz, 281-3063 Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. C HH AB AD LL UB AV ITIT C HHO O F SS W F LORILORI D A ORTHOOR THO D OO X 5620 Winkler Road, F ort Myers Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz 433-7708, E-mail: rabbi@chabadswf.org Web site: www.chabadswf.org Services: Friday 6:30 p.m.; Saturday Kabbalah class 9 a.m.; Shacharit 10 a.m.; Kiddush at noon Minyan: Monday and Thursday 7 a.m. C HH AP ELEL OO F CYP RESSRESS C OO V EE 10200 Cypress Cov e Circle Fort Myers 239-850-3943, Located at Cypress Cove Retirement Center on HealthPark Campus An ecumenical non-denominational community of believers. Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. Reverendt Ted Althouse, Pastor revtedalthouse@aol.com C HH U RR C HH OO F THETHE C ROSSR OSS 13500 Freshman Lane; 768-2188 Pastor: Bud Stephens; A nondemonimational church emphasizing a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Sunday Service: 9:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 Contemporary. CONGREG aA TION aA L CH uU R cC H 1619 Lle wellyn Drive Fort Myers Just off McGregor across from the Edison/ Ford Winter Estates 334-4978 Pastor: Douglas Kelchner Worship times Sundays 9 and 10:30 a.m. Website: www.taecc.com CO vV EN aA NT PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937 Rev. Dr. Jeffrey DeYoe, Senior Pastor Reverend David Dietzel, Pastor Emeritus. Traditional Sunday service 10 a.m. Nursery available C ypYP RESS LakLAK E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H 8400 Cypress Lak e Drive, Fort Myers, 481-5442 Randy A. Alston, Reverend. Sunday Services: Bible study, 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship, 11 a.m., Evening Worship, 7 p.m., Wednesday Prayer Meeting, 6:30 p.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 481-3233. www.clpc.us. Clint Cottrell, pastor Prayer Service 8 a.m., Praise 9 a.m., Childrens Church 9 a.m., Traditional 11 a.m. Summer: Prayer Service 8 a.m. Combined Traditional/Praise 10 a.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E UNITE dD METHO dD IST CH uU R cC H 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 482-1250, 8 and 11 a.m. Sunday Traditional Service 9:30 a.m. Praise Service Sunday School all times F aA ITH FELLO wW SHI pP wW ORL dD O uU TRE acA C H mM INISTRIES 6111 South P ointe Boulevard, Fort Myers, 278-3638. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Voice of Faith, WCRN 13.50 AM Radio, Sunday, 1:30 p.m.; Thursday Service, 7:30 p.m.; Friday Youth Service, 7:30 p.m. Nursery care for pre-school children and Childrens Church for ages 5-12 available at each service. F aA ITH uU NITE dD mM ETHO dD IST cC H uU R cC H 15690 McGregor Boule vard Fort Myers, 482-2030 Pastor: David Stauffer. Traditional services 8:45 a.m.; Contemporary, 10:30 a.m. Go south on McGregor Boulevard. The church is mile past the intersection of Gladiolus and San Carlos Boulevard on the way to Sanibel. FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF cC HRIST S cC IENTIST 2390 West First Street, next door to Edison Estates. Sunday Morning Service and Sunday School, 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday Evening Testimony Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Child care provided at all services. Visit our Reading Room for quiet study at: 2281 First Street, River District. www.time4thinkers.com, www.christiansciencefortmyers.com, www.christianscience.com FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF THE NazaNAZA RENE 13545 Amer ican Colony Boulevard off Daniels Parkway in the Colony, Fort Myers, 936-2511 Pastor: Reverend Joey Brummett Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Family Night, 7 p.m. F IRSTIRST U NITENITE D M ETHOETHO D ISTIST C HH U RR C HH in the Downto wn Fort Myers River District 2466 First Street, Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-332-1152, www.fumcftmyers.org Sunday: 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 5 p.m. Youth Program FORT M yY ERS CHRISTI aA N CH uU R cC H (DIS cC I pP LES O fF CHRIST) A SS TE pP HEN MINISTRIES CONGREG aA TION 5916 Winkler Road, F ort Myers, 437-4330 Reverend Mark Condrey, Pastor Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Church School: 9:15 a.m. FORT M yY ERS CONGREG aA TION aA L UNITE dD CH uU R cC H O fF CHRIST : 8210 College Parkway, Fort Myers, 482-3133. Philip White, pastor Morning Worship: 10 a.m. Church School: 10:15 a.m. Adult Forum: 11:30 a.m. II ON aA HH O pP E EpEP IS cC O paP A L cC ONGREG aA TION 9650 Gladiolus Dr ive, Fort Myers 4544778 The Reverend Dr. John S. Adler, pastor. Weekly services: Saturday 5 p.m., Eucharist with Healing Sunday 8 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite One; 9:30 a.m., Family Eucharist with Healing and Church School Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Morning Prayer (in Spanish); Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Eucharist with Healing. Child care available at Saturday 5 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m. services. JES uU S THE WOR kK ER C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H: 881 Nuna Avenue, Fort Myers, 481-1143 Masses Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. K INGING D OO M LILI F EE C HH U RR C HH 2154 McGregor Boulev ard, Fort Myers, 218-8343 Pastor Randy and Anita Thurman 10:30 a.m. Sunday Service All are welcome. LambLAMB O fF GG O dD LuLU THER aA N/ EpEP IS cC O paP A L CH uU R cC H Corner Cypress View Drive and Koreshan Boulevard, Three Oaks area, Fort Myers, 267-3525 Walter Fohs, pastor; Becky RobbinsPenniman, associate pastor Sunday worship services: 8 a.m. Early Grace Traditional 9 a.m. Awesome Grace Contemporary 10:30 a.m. Classic Grace Traditional 8:45 & 10 a.m. Sunday School Gods Group NN E wW BEGINNINGS CENTER Ne w Home Church, 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, North Fort Myers, 239-656-0416 Weekly Friday Meeting Meet & Greet: 6:30 p.m. Kingdom Teaching: 7 p.m. Fellowship and refreshments after service. nbcministry@embarqmail.com, www.facebook. com/nbcministry. Alex & Patricia Wiggins, Ministers NENE W C OO V ENEN A NTNT EE Y ESES C HH U RR C HH See Clearly Meeting monthly at 9 a.m. at the Elks Lodge. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, Fort Myers, FL 33907. 239-220-8519 Pastor Alan Bondar www.newcovenanteyes.com Wear what you want, rockin music, relevant teaching, LIFT Kidz program, free coffee & donuts, people who are real, church thats actually fun. NN E wW HH O pP E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H O fF FOR T M yY ERS 16120 San Car los Boulevard, Unit 10 239-985-8503 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m Sunday Morning Worship. 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study NN E wW HH O pP E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 3825 McGregor Boule vard. Fort Myers Pastor Eddie Spencer 8 & 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11 a.m. Contemporary Worship 8, 9:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School Youth and Childrens programming runs concurrent to Sunday services. Nursery care provided at all services 274-1230. For more information visit: www.newhopefortmyers.org P EE A C EE CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H Meets at F ort Myers Beach Masonic Lodge 17625 Pine Ridge Road, Fort Myers Beach 267-7400. Pastors Bruce Merton, Gail & RC Fleeman Adult Discussion Classes: 9-10 AM Countdown to Worship (praise music): 10:10 AM Amazing Grace Worship: 10:30 AM Phone 267-7400 Fax 267-7407 Web site: peacecommunitychurch.com e-mail: peace1265@aol.com P EE A C EE LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH Sunday Worship at 9:30am. Peace is a member of the ELCA. We celebrate weekly communion with traditional liturgy, organ and choir. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers On the way to Sanibel. 239-437-2599, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@peaceftmyers.com. RE dD EE mM ER L uU THER aA N cC H uU R cC H 3950 Winkler Ext., Fort Myers, 274-0143 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. Sunday Services Daily early learning center/day care RIRI V ERER OO F LILI F EE A SSESSE MB LL Y OO F GOGO D 21580 Riv er Ranch Rd, Estero 239-495-0400, Senior Pastor: Todd Weston 8 and 9:45 a.m Services; 11:30 a.m. Legacy Service, multi-generational S amudAMUD R abadAB AD R aA buddB UDD HIST cC ENTER Meditation classes All are welcome. Guided meditations offering many methods for relaxing the body and focusing the mind on virtuous objects to bring increasing peace and happiness into daily activity. For information, class times and locations call 567-9739 or visit www. MeditationInFortMyers.org. SaSA INT COL umbkUMBK ILLE C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H 12171 Iona Road, F ort Myers, off McGregor and north of Gladiolus. 489-3973 Father Joseph Clifford. Weekly masses: Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. Weekend masses: Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday: 7, 9,11, and 5:30 p.m. Reconciliation is available at the church on Saturdays at noon and by appointment SaSA INT JOHN THE A pP OSTLE METRO pP OLIT aA N CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H 3049 Mcg regor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 344-0012 Pastor Reverend Steve Filizzi An Affirming & Inclusive Congregation Sunday Services, 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Mid-Week Service, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. SS A INTINT M II C HH A ELEL LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH & SS C HOOLHOOL ( LL CM SS ) 3595 Broadw ay, Fort Myers, 239-939-1218, Worship: Saturday 5:30 p.m., Sunday 8 & 10:45 a.m. Bible Study for adults and children Sunday at 9:15 a.m. Phone for other dates & times. Plus Marriage Enrichment, Divorcecare, Griefshare. SaSA INT PETER LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H 3751 Estero Boule vard, Fort Myers Beach, 463-4251. Sunday worship at 9:30 a.m. Womens Bible Study is offered on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 9:30 a.m. www.stpeterfmb.com SaSA INT NN I cC HOL aA S MON aA STER yY Church and Bookstore:111 Everg reen Road (southwest corner of Evergreen Road and Gail Street.) Liturgical services conducted in English and Church Slavonic; following the Julian (Old) Calendar. Liturgical Services: Sundays and Holy Days: Hours at 9:30 a.m. Holy Liturgy at 10 a.m. Call to confirm service schedule: 239-997-2847; Bookstore: 239-691-1775 or visit www.saintnicholasmonastery.org SS T VIN cC ENT DE P auAU L C aA THOLI cC CO mmuMMU NIT yY 13031 Palm Beach Blvd (3 miles east of I75) East Fort Myers (across from Ft Myers Shores) 239 693 0818 Weekday masses: 9 a.m. Tuesday-Friday Weekend masses: 4 p.m. Saturday Sunday 9 & 11 a.m. All Are Welcome! SS O uU TH wW EST bapB AP TIST cC H uU R cC H 16940 McGregor Boule vard, Fort Myers, 454-3336 Robert G. Kasten, Pastor Sunday Worship Service 11 a.m. Nursery available 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Junior Church grades one to five Wee Church Pre-K to K Evening Service 6 p.m. Wednsday Service 6 p.m. TETE MP LELE B ETHELETHEL SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 16225 Winkler Rd. 433-0018. Rabbi Jeremy Barras E-mail: rabbi.barras@templebethel.com Cantorial soloist: Lawrence Dermer Temple educator: Dale Cohen, MaEd, RJE Shabbat Services, Friday, 7:30 p.m. Torah Study, Saturday, 9:15 a.m.continued on page 13THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 201312

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13 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 2013 Present Friend Sponsors Advanced Disposal Adventures in Paradise Linda & Wayne Boyd The Burns Family Sealife by Congress Doug & Sherry Gentry LCEC Molnar Electric, Inc. Brian Murty, Realtor Red, White & Brew Rosier Insurance Sanibel Taxi Donna & John Schubert Suncoast Beverages R.S. Walsh LandscapingSam Galloway Ford LincolnTHE 32ND ANNUAL Baileys General Store Billys Bikes Barrier Island Title Services Dan Hahn Custom Builders Heidrick & Co., Insurance Nave Plumbing Lynn & Ed Ridlehoover Norris Home Furnishings She Sells Sea Shells Tween Waters Inn Caloosa Tent & Rental Sunday, November 10 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Dunes Golf & Tennis Club Event Sponsor Gold Sponsors Event Sponsor From page 12Churches/TemplesReligious Education; Sunday School and Midweek classes, Preschool Classes, Monday through Friday Web site: www.templebethel.com Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TEMPLE JUDEA (CONSERVATIVE) 14486 A&W Bulb Road, Fort Myers, 433-0201, Rabbi: Rabbi Marc Sack President: Keith Grossman Minyan: Monday & Thursday at 9 a.m. Services: Friday night at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Religious School Sunday morning Web site: www.tjswfl.org Preschool director: JoAnn Goldman email templejudeapreschool@gmail.com 433-0201, Web site: www.tjswfl.org Affiliated: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism THE NEW CHURCH The New Church of SWFL is located 10811 Sunset Plaza Circ. #401, behind Zoomers. Rev. Gabriella Cahaley offici ates worship services on Sundays at 11 a.m. during the season. Other worship events are held on the beach in Fort Myers Beach. See our webpage http://www.new churchflorida.com/ or call for more informa tion 239-481-5535. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH FORT MYERS 13411 Shire Lane (off Daniels Parkway one mile west of I-75) Minister: The Reverend Allison Farnum Sunday services and religious education at 10:30 a.m. For information on all church events call 561-2700 or visit www.uucfm.org. UNITY OF BONITA SPRINGS Family Service 10 to 11 a.m. Healing Circle 11 a.m. Hospitality and Fellowship, 11 a.m. Inspiring lesson, uplifting and dynamic music, meditation in a loving environment. Service held at 28285 Imperial Street, Bonita Springs. Call 947-3100. UNITY OF FORT MYERS 11120 Ranchette Rd., Fort Myers Summer Services: Sundays at 10 a.m. Childrens class at 10 a.m. Reverend Jim Rosemergy, Minister Our God is Love. Our Race is Human. Our Religion is Oneness. www.unityoffortmyers.org or 239-278-1511 WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 9065 Ligon Court, Fort Myers, across from HealthPark Hospital, 481-2125 Senior Pastor: Robert Brunson Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Blended Worship www.westminsterfortmyers.org WORD OF LIFE CHURCH 2120 Collier Ave, Fort Myers, 274-8881; Services: Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. Bishop Gaspar and Michele Anastasi ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH 7401 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, 481-4040, Interim Pastor Jim Eggert Pastor Peter Weeks Sunday Services: 8:30 a.m. Traditional; 10 a.m. Blended Traditional and Contemporary; 11:30 a.m. Contemporary. Childrens Sunday School, Adult /Teen Bible Classes, 10 a.m. Petsgiving Adoption SpecialLee County Domestic Animal Services is giving adopters a chance to give a home to a shelter pet this November and receive $30 off the regular adoption fee. In return, the pets will give unconditional love to their new families. When it comes to felines, get twice the love with two-for-one adoptions for all cats and kittens. Many families plan to bring home a new pet sometime during the holidays so now is a great time to adopt before the December rush, said Donna Ward, LCDAS Director. All adoptions still include spay or neuter surgery, ageappropriate vaccinations, microchip ID, and many other veterinary services valued at more than $500. During the Petsgiving promotion, potential adopters may visit Lee County Domestic Animal Services located off Six Mile Cypress Pkwy. next to the Sheriffs Office to meet their new companions. Adoption hours are Monday through Saturday, 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. For more information, call 533-7387 (LEEPETS) or visit www.LeeLostPets.com. Adoption applications may be submitted online. Also, view a current list of pets for adoption and lost pets online. The website updates hourly. First Baptist Academy Open HouseFirst Baptist Academy is holding an open house on Thursday, November 7 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. First Baptist Academy offers a comprehensive program balanced with a biblical worldview, college preparatory academics, competitive athletics and compelling fine arts. The students benefit from a total educational experience that includes opportunities to learn, demonstrate leadership and prepare to excel in life beyond graduation. Guided tours of the facility will be provided. Curriculum will be on display. The guidance counselor, principals and admissions director will be available to answer questions. If you are unable to attend, the school staff will meet with you on an individual basis. For more infor mation, visit the school website, www. fbalions.org or on Facebook at facebook/ FirstBaptistAcademy. First Baptist Academy is located at 3000 Orange Blossom Drive, on the corner of Orange Blossom Drive and Livingston Road. First Baptist Academy is a ministry of First Baptist Church Naples, under the leadership of Dr. Hayes Wicker, senior pastor. Our email address is press@islandsunnews.com

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 201314 ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint Prices 1 Cold Front Creek Fishingby Capt. Matt MitchellThe first real cold front of fall blew through this week cooling our temperatures drastically and bringing windy conditions for several days, Anglers who found places to hide out of the wind on the low tides discovered the fishing was still good with snook and trout both feeding well. Trips this week produced good numbers of fish along with a few shots at slotsized or better snook. Water clarity really improved too as our water temperature dropped more than 10 degrees in four days. Narrow, deep feeder finger creeks in the Ding Darling Refuge made for awesome action this week. Chumming with live shiners in these creeks had fish exploding on the surface. Snook, trout and jacks gave us non-stop action at times when we found the right creek with strong tide movement. After not fishing way back in these creeks since last spring it felt good to get back in the Ding and catch some quality fish so close to home. Limits of trout came easy although getting a slot-sized snook took a little more work. Having plenty of live shiners was the key to getting the action going and catching good fish. If you struggled to get the right bait you would struggle to catch fish. Blacking out the livewell came pretty easy on the causeway most days if you got on the bridge before sunup. I dont ever remember seeing so much perfectly sized twoto three-inch bait on the bridges as there is right now. Often the bait would be up on the surface and look like rain as birds and mackerel fed. Chumming live shiners adds such a visual aspect to fishing. I chum with a wiffle ball bat that has the end cut off and a plug placed in the handle. After putting a scoop of shiners in the bat shake them up stunning them so they do not just swim off when pitched out. This simple tool lets you pitch the baits out further from the boat in a specific direction. A few dozen stunned shiners thrown out in a creek or on a shoreline quickly lets you know if you are in the right place as the fish will blow up on the baits within minutes. Different types of fish make differ ent pops on the baits. Trout slash at the baits on the surface, while snook make a sound like a depth charge when they eat. Once the hungry fish are feeding on the surface you can catch them by free-lining hooked live shiners or by casting shiner-type artificials and even flies. One of my favorite plugs to throw while doing the bait and switch is a Mirrodine in a shiner pattern silver with a green back, This neutral buoyancy bait works just at and below the surface and with a slow twitching retrieve its just deadly and works as well if not better than the real thing in certain situations. Chug Bug and Skitterwalk surface type plugs also work well for this. While targeting snook in the refuge one day this week a client had a 20-inch snook hooked up and was bringing it to the boat when a giant 40-inch-plus snook shot out from the depths and inhaled the fish right next to the boat as we all were watching, The huge 25-pound plus snook made one quick run before the smaller snook pulled out of its mouth. It was completely scaled up from the gills back. No matter how much time I spend on the water I still see things that I have never seen before, Its a snook eat snook world out there.Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or ques tions email captmattmitchell@aol.com. Send Us Your Fish TalesThe River Weekly would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include photographs with identification. Drop them at the River Weekly, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, Florida 33901, or email to press@riverweekly.com. Sam and Art Coffey from Indiana with a 29-inch and a 31-inch snook caught while fishing with Capt. Matt Mitchell this week 472-5800

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15 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 2013 CROW Case Of The Week Bald Eagleby Patricia MolloyDuring the opening sequence of Colbert Report, a bald eagle the majestic emblem of our fair nation since 1782 swoops in front of the screen accompanied by a piercing shrill. The strong, intimidating call with which audiences are so familiar is... a myth. Hollywood has long substituted the call of the red-tailed hawk with that of the bald eagle; for such a large, powerful bird, the bald eagle emits a sur prisingly unimpressive call. The raptor with the seven-foot wingspan, however, makes up for its vocal shortcomings with stunning aerial acrobatics. Early this month, a female bald eagle was admitted to CROW with a gaping wound in the pectoral muscle (chest). The laceration was carefully cleaned and an antiseptic ointment was applied to fight infection. Dr. Heather order a round of antibiotics, which were injected into a fish that was fed to the patient for breakfast. Administering medications in this manner allows the staff to keep its interactions with the eagle at a minimum. Fortunately, bald eagles have a poorly developed sense of smell and often do not detect the medication. After nearly a week at the wildlife clinic, the eagle was regaining strength rapidly. They looked at her wound and it looked fine, so as long as shes clinically normal, she is going outside. She will probably go outside once shes done with her antibiotics, said Katie McInnis, DVM intern. The staff at CROW goes to great lengths to ensure that the wildness of each patient remains intact during its stay. Due to the high-strung nature of bald eagles, patient #2815 had a private room in the clinics quiet ICU. Team members entered her room only to feed her and to ensure that her cage was clean. Nonetheless, the eagle was bothered by the human intrusions. She needs to get out of here because she is very upset with us, added Dr. McInnis with a sympathetic smile. The eagle was indeed moved to a large outdoor flight cage on CROWs campus, where Dr. Heather can quietly observe her movements from a distance. She has not yet been released as she is not yet flying normally. But she is outside and seems to be healing well, said the hospital director. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to P.O. Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit www.crowclinic.org. Pictured is the female bald eagle currently recovering from a chest injury at CROW photo courtesy of CROW

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 201316 Plant SmartClimbing Figby Gerri ReavesClimbing fig (Ficus pumila) is a fast-growing woody vine of the mulberry family. This native of Southeast Asia is an attractive ornamental, but in South Florida, this species requires regular pruning to keep it under control. Also called creeping fig, it has high drought tolerance and adapts to almost any soil or light conditions. The aggressive vine doesnt need support to get started. It will climb and keep on going, clinging with aerial rootlets that exude a rubbery adhesive. Its generally agreed that it works best as a groundcover or on a concrete wall where surface damage wont be a concern. The tendrils adhere strongly to a surface and are difficult to remove. Allowing it to grow on a wood structure is not advised. The dense evergreen foliage of oval leaves protrudes a foot or more from the wall, creating a kind of hanging jungle. The leathery leaves are oval, blunt, and two to four inches long. Not only can the foliage take over, but the underground roots can cause problems too. The fleshy pale-green figs that are about the size of hens egg appear on horizontal branches that develop on mature vines. The seeds and plant parts are poisonous and even handling them might cause skin irritation of an allergic reaction. Balanced against the vines aggressiveness and high maintenance are attractiveness and energy savings. Given time, it can cover an entire building and produce a protective layer from the suns heat. It also makes a good hanging plant. Climbing fig can be propagated with cuttings. Sources: Florida Landscape Plants by John V. Watkins and Thomas J. Sheehan; Florida, My Eden by Frederic B. Stresau; swbiodiversity.org; hort.ufl. edu; davesgarden.com; and floridata.com. Plant Smart explores sustainable gardening practices that will help you create an environmentally responsible, low-maintenance South Florida landscape. The figs are about the size of a hens egg Fast-growing climbing fig easily covers a wall, even an entire building photos by Gerri ReavesLocal Waters/ Charts Classsubmitted by Cdr. Mary SmelterThe San Carlos Bay Sail & Power Squadron will be offering the Local Waters/Local Charts class. The class will be held on Saturday, November 16 from 8:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The class is directed towards new boaters and boaters new to the area, as well as those wishing to learn chart reading. It will provide the boater with some of the basics of navigation, oriented to the Fort Myers area. Students will be using chart 11427 and you must bring this chart to class. Optional onthe-water training will be offered at a later date. Check with the class instructor for details. The cost of the class is $45. The class is being taught at the San Carlos Bay Sail & Power Squadron classroom located at 16048 San Carlos Boulevard, at the corner of Kelly Road (across from ACE Hardware). Students can register online at www.scbps.com or call 466-4040. Introduction To Using GPSsubmitted by Cdr. Mary SmelterThe San Carlos Bay Sail & Power Squadron, a unit of the United States Power Squadrons, will be offering a class in basic GPS operation on Saturday, November 16 from 1:15 to 4:30 p.m. This class will be offered again in the summer of 2014. The class is designed to introduce new users to GPS. The class will include discussions on marine navigation, how a GPS works and GPS limitations. There will be an extensive presentation on what a GPS can do and what a boater can do with GPS. For those interested in purchasing a GPS, you will understand what a GPS can do for you and some of the key features to look for as you shop for a GPS. The cost of the class is $45. The class is being taught at the San Carlos Bay Sail & Power Squadron classroom located at 16048 San Carlos Boulevard, at the corner of Kelly Road (across from ACE Hardware). Students can register online at www.scbps.com or call 466-4040. HALLOWEEN COSTUME CONTEST October 31st 8 p.m. in The Jac Bar JOIN US Sunday, November 10thTASTE OF THE ISLANDSVote Us Peoples Choice!

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17 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 2013 Caring For Your PlantsPlants For Shadeby Justen DobbsSome large, older landscapes in Southwest Florida have a lot of large shade trees. These trees can be pine, oak, jacaranda, cypress or royal poinciana. While this creates a beautiful, lush atmosphere by holding in moisture and keeping the ambient temperature higher during frosts, it may pose a problem with the plants growing below the canopy. Most plants, including Florida natives, prefer filtered sun or full sun. So, how do you properly landscape a yard that is almost completely shade? There are many different plants that actually prefer heavy shade and can grow normally under those conditions. Notice, I said grow normally, because you can actually grow any plant you want in heavy shade, but it doesnt mean it is going to thrive and live longterm. Plants that require sun but are planted in shade can become stretched, a term used to describe the abnormal lengthening of the stems, leaves or fronds upwards toward the sun. These plants are not used to growing in undergrowth so they shoot up abnormally fast in order to try to reach for more sunlight. This can cause weak, sickly stems and leaves and is bad for the plant in the long-term. Think about a palm seed that falls from a towering palm in the Amazon rainforest. The seed can germinate due to the warmth and humidity, but then has to live in nearly 90 percent shade because of the canopy up above. So, the seedling will grow up to three times as fast in order to reach more sunlight above. Once the palm breaks through the canopy above, its trunk grows slows way down and the stem will begin to harden off. With regard to Southwest Florida yards that have heavy shade, there are some plants that you will want to put at the top of your list. These plants include: 1. Ferns Just make sure they have plenty of water 2. Bromeliads Focus on variegated (striped) varieties since many colored ones can fade in heavy shade while variegation will not. 3. Variegated Flax Lily Will grow in any light conditions and is low-maintenance. 4. Cat Palms Stay under 7 feet tall and prefer shade. 5. Cordylines; Ti plants May lose some color, but do fine in shady conditions. 6. Seville Sod This is a hybrid strain of grass that is engineered to live in shady conditions without thinning out like typical Floritam. You should water and fertilize shade plants the same as you do any other plant. Just because your shady plants are nice and green year-round doesnt mean that they dont need fertilizer. Also, make sure that they are not planted too close together so that each plant can receive some airflow. Lack of airflow can lead to pest problems such as sooty mold. Justen Dobbs is a landscape architect in south Florida specializing in custom, upscale landscapes. He can be reached at seabreezenurseries@ gmail.com. Ferns thrive in shade and Ti plants come in many colors To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732 We Proudly Brew Tropial Outdoor Patio Seating Appetizers & Full Dinners Best Prices On The Planet Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Snacks In-between Live Music! Outdoor Seating Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Come Try our NEW Cowlicious Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials Sanibels Most Award Winning Restaurant FREE BEER/HAPPY HOUR DAILY LIVE Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Snacks In-between Snacks In-between Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Always Fresh ...Always Fun! JOIN US Sunday, November 10thTASTE OF THE ISLANDSVote Us Peoples Choice!

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 201318 Calendar Girls At Breast Cancer WalkThe Calendar Girls had a double hit ter on Saturday, October 12. They performed first at Making Strides Against Breast Cancer in Cambier Park, Naples, and then following the Breast Cancer Walk, they traveled to Lakes Park in Fort Myers to perform for the participants in the Vision Awareness Walkathon. The Calendar Girls pride themselves for their community service performing at over 130 events per year, and love to pay it forward in the community. For more information about the Calendar Girls visit www.calendargirlsflorida.com or phone 850-6010. The Calendar Girls in their pink outfits The Calendar girls in pink for breast cancer awareness Calendar Girls At Zombicon 2013Channeling 1920s-era flappers, The Calendar Girls roamed the streets at Zombicon 2013 on October 19 in downtown Fort Myers. For more informa tion, visit www.calendargirlsflorida.com. photo by Bill FloydShare your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702or email press@riverweekly.com

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19 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 2013 Conservancy Nature ExperiencesConservancy of Southwest Florida announced a number of Nature Experiences coming to the Naplesbased Nature Center during November and December: Beginning December 2 Free Clam Pass Walks, through April 30: Monday to Saturday at 9 a.m. Free guided walk: Boardwalk, Bay and Beach. Learn importance of mangrove trees, some Florida history, and meet fascinating creatures and plants that share this unique habitat. Meet your guide at the gazebo near the parking lot tram stop. Wear sun protection. Clam Pass Park is located west of the Waldorf Astoria on Seagate Drive, west of US 41. Free parking with beach sticker. Approximately 2 hours. November 12 Evenings at the Conservancy with Joanna Fitzgerald, Wildlife Rehabilitation, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. December 10 Evenings at the Conservancy with Ian Bartoszek, Burmese Python Research in Southwest Florida, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. As part of the 50th season of celebration, join Conservancy of Southwest Florida for the monthly after hours program series on the second Tuesday of each month, November through May. The series features a wide variety of presenters, eco-pro grams, panel members from the Conservancy, and local and regional environmental experts. Seating is space-available. For further information and reservations, visit www. conservancy.org/evenings. December 7 Breakfast with Santa, Saturday at 9 and 11 a.m. Kick off the holiday season at the Conservancy Nature Center and enjoy a fabulous breakfast buffet with Santa. Limited availability. For more information, call 403-4200 or email nikkied@ conservancy.org. The Conservancy of Southwest Florida Nature Center is located in Naples, Florida at 1495 Smith Preserve Way, south of Naples Zoo off Goodlette-Frank Road. For more information about the Conservancy of Southwest Florida, call 262-0304 or visit www.conservancy.org. Ian Bartoszek with a Burmese python A pair of fox kittens Breakfast with Santa returns December 7 Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 201320 Three Local Artists Featured In Viva Florida 500 ExhibitionDesignated a signature Viva Florida 500 event by the Florida Department of State, ArtCalusa: Reflections on Representation, a group exhibition featuring Floridas leading historical artists, opens on Friday, November 1 at the City Pier Building (formerly Art of the Olympians Museum), 1300 Hendry Street in Fort Myers. Three local talents are among the distinguished group of nine premier artists in the exhibition and attending the VIP Opening Reception. David J. Meos family once lived on the western slope of Browns Mound at the Pineland site, on what is now the Randell Research Center, at Pineland. His recollections of playing and wandering where the Calusa once trod has inspired him to bring the Calusa back to life with his artwork. Three acrylic and oil on canvas works of Meos are included in ArtCalusa. Full-time self taught Sanibel artist Lucas Century developed and perfected an innovative photographic process for creating stencils that he uses for sand-blast engraving. The erosion of the surface technique became a metaphor for the sands of time; what natural elements do over millennia, but faster. Among his public art commissions, Century used his unique etching process to engrave names of the fallen onto the Vietnam Veterans Memorial granite wall in Washington, DC. Century was inspired to produce three new works to be shown at ArtCalusa. As a world traveler and idiosyncratic collector of antiquities and artifacts, Charles Daurays artwork continues to be informed by a lifelong curiosity and study of global tribal cultures, archeology and paleontology, traditions and religions. Seeking to unite his love of history and nature, he uses the Abrus precatorium ( Rosary Pea) to produce his highly textured paintings, three of which are included in ArtCalusa. Through painting, works on paper, and sculpture, ArtCalusa visually interprets the life and experiences of Floridas indigenous peoples, particularly the Calusa Indians through their contact with early European explorers. The exhibition also details the dramatic changes in Floridas environment since people first moved to Florida over 12,000 years ago. In addition to Meo, Century and Dauray, exhibiting artists include Merald Clark, Christopher Kreider, Theodore Morris, Dean Quigley, Hermann Trappman and Jackson Walker. The exhibition is co-curated by Theresa Schober and Barbara Hill. The exhibition and associated programs have been made possible by generous gifts from the College of Life Foundation and Florida Anthropological Society, grants from the Southwest Florida Community Foundation, Lee County Tourist Development Council, and Florida Humanities Council to the Lee Trust for Historic Preservation, and exhibition partners: City of Fort Myers, Florida House on Capitol Hill, Florida Museum of Natural History, Hotel Indigo, Pineapple Press, Sidney and Berne Davis Art Center and Useppa Island Historical Society. The VIP Opening Reception will be held on November 1 from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Cocktails and hors doeuvres, meet the artists and view the ArtCalusa exhibition before it opens to the public. Music by award-winning recording artist and composer Kat Epple. To set the stage for the theme of the exhibition, preeminent scholar and American Academy of Arts and Sciences inductee Dr. Jerald Milanich will explore the 420-year old mystery of Theodore de Brys engravings in his presentation, Tattooed Ladies: Do Theodore de Brys Iconic 1591 Engravings of Florida Indians Reflect Reality or Something Else? Tickets for the VIP reception are $50 each, avail able from the Sidney and Berne Davis Art Center at www.sbdac.com or 333-1933. Complementary valet parking provided. A published exhibition catalogue of all works will be available for purchase. Forum: Art Meets Archaeology will take place on November 2 from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Join in a discussion on visual arts, archaeology and history how imagery of the past is developed and the effect of representations on promoting a deeper understanding of culture. Panelists Jerald Milanich, former State Archaeologist Ryan Wheeler, local archaeologists Theresa Schober and Steven Koski, and American Indian literature scholar Gretchen Bataille as well as ArtCalusa artists Merald Clark, David J. Meo, Ted Morris, Dean Quigley and Hermann Trappman will engage the audience in exploring how representations of science and art coincide and conflict in our appreciation of Florida history. Free and open to the public as part of a twoyear Making History Memorable partnership between Lee Trust and the Florida Humanities Council. Reservations are strongly recommended. Register via email at MakingHistoryMemorable@gmail.com. Valet parking will be available for $8. Exhibition gallery hours are Monday through Friday, November 4 to December 11, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The exhibit is free and open to the public. Viva Florida 500 is a statewide initiative highlighting the 500 years of historic peo ple, places and events in present-day Florida since the arrival of Juan Ponce de Len to the land he named La Florida in 1513. While Floridas Native American heritage dates back more than 12,000 years, Spains claim in 1513 began a new era. 2013 marks 500 years of history and diverse cultural heritage in Florida a claim no other state in America can make and Viva Florida 500 promotes the place where the worlds cultures began to unite and transform into the great nation we know today as the United States of America. Learn more at www.VivaFlorida.org. David J. Meo River District Saturday Art Fair The sidewalks of First Street will be full of art and craft vendors on Saturday, November 16 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. There will be over 35 local art vendors selling their original art, jewelry, photography, stained glass, fused glass, upcycled art and pottery on First Street in downtown Fort Myers. Attendees can get their portrait done in 15 minutes or less starting at $10. This is a perfect time to visit the downtown Fort Myers galleries, shops and restaurants. The Saturday Art Fair is the third Saturday of each month from November to April. Local artists wishing to join the fair can contact Claudia Goode at cgoode@ actabuse.com or Arts for ACT Gallery at 337-5050. Colorful paintings and jewelry ArtFest Fort Myers High School Art Competition Art Under 20 is a visual art exhibit and competition for Lee County high school students who exhibit their work at ArtFest Fort Myers as they compete for $7,000 in cash awards. ArtFest Fort Myers will be held February 1 and 2 in the Fort Myers River District. Opening night is January 31 from 6 to 10 p.m. Awards will be given to the best student artists in six categories: Digital, Drawing, Painting, Photography, 3-D and Mixed Media. ArtFest Fort Myers created this exhibit and competition 14 years ago to encour age students in their pursuit of art and to encourage community support of art programs in the schools. Kristin Woolam, Art Under 20 chairman said, Each year hundreds of students exhibit their artwork in a gallery style tent to thousands of family members, teachers, friends and 70,000 admiring art festival attendees. Edison State College is the Presenting Sponsor of Art Under 20 as part of its mission to create an innovative education system which provides accessible educational pathways that prepare students to be enlightened and productive citizens. All Lee County high school students (public, private and home-schooled) are invited to participate in Art Under 20, showcasing artwork created exclusively by them. Entry forms and more infor mation are available through all Lee County high school art departments or at ArtFestFortMyers.com. Application deadline for the exhibit and competition is December 6. Send your editorial copy to:en press@riverweekly.com

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Nearly 100 sponsors, volunteers and staff celebrated the Duck Stamp program at a reception at the refuge on October 25, hosted by the Ding Darling Wildlife SocietyFriends of the Refuge (DDWS)Ding Darling Duck Stamp Reception USFWS Regional Director Cindy Dohner chats with DDWS President John McCabe Supervisory Refuge Ranger Toni Westland and Education Ranger Becky Wolff applaud Jefferson Jones, four-time Florida Junior Duck Stamp winner from Lehigh Acres Mike Baldwin with Don and AnnMarie Wildman enjoying the reception Madison Grimm, the youngest-ever Federal Junior Duck Stamp contest winner at age 6, with her father Adam Grimm. Adam was the youngest-ever Federal Duck Stamp contest winner for the 2000-01 stamp. He again won the 2013 contest for the 2014-15 stamp, so hell be back to the refuge for next years Ding Darling Days Filmmaker Samuel Koltinsky presented DDWS President John McCabe and Refuge Manager Paul Tritaik with a newspaper plate of political cartoonist Jay N. Darlings farewell cartoon. It will be displayed in the free Visitor Education Center for three years Matzaluna Italian Kitchen offered a tantalizing Italian buffet Robert Steiner, winner of the 2012 Federal Duck Stamp contest for the 2013-14 stamp21 THE rR IVE rR NOVEMBE rR 1, 2013

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 201322 Writing Workshop At Shell PointThe Academy of Lifelong Learning at Shell Point welcomes to its Fall Academy award-winning maritime author, lecturer, and TV commentator Robert Macomber for a Writers Workshop on Thursday, November 7. Macombers success as a researcher and writer are well known. His Honor series of novels cover the career of a fictional American naval officer, Peter Wake, beginning in 1863 during the Civil War. From 1882 to the end of his career in 1908, Wake serves in Americas first espionage agency the Office of Naval Intelligence. Macombers Honor novels illuminate the U.S. Navys critical role in the expansion of America from a continental country into a global power. Macombers 11th novel in the series, Honors Rendered, was published in September. This is the first time in Fort Myers that Robert is presenting the popular writing workshop hes given throughout the world, said Teri Kollath, Manager of Volunteer Services and The Academy at Shell Point. We are thrilled such an experienced author is sharing his exper tise not only with our residents, but also with the local community of writers. The four-session workshop includes Planning Your Project; Getting Organized; The Art of Writing; and Connecting To Your Readers. The workshop is scheduled from 9:15 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. in the Social Center on the Island at Shell Point. The one-hour lunch break will be on your own; and Shell Points Crystal Dining Room and Island Caf are open to the public. The workshop is $35. Reservations are required, and space is limited. To register, call 489-8472. The Academy of Lifelong Learning at Shell Point is an educational initiative for the residents of the retirement community. The Academy provides approximately 80 classes each semester that encompass a well-rounded curriculum of educational opportunities for senior adults. The Academy of Lifelong Learning at Shell Point was named as one of 2008s most innovative active aging programs by the International Council on Active Aging, an association that supports professionals who develop wellness/fitness facilities and services for age 50-plus adults. To learn more about Shell Point, visit www.shellpoint.org or call 1-800-7801131. Robert Macomber Lakes Regional Library Programs Next months roster of activities at Lakes Regional Library offers topics for all ages. The following activities are free to the public: Adults English Caf 6 p.m. Mondays, November 4, 18 and 25 Practice English with English Caf, a free, conversation session for adult ESOL and ESL students. Each 90-minute session provides adult learners an oppor tunity to practice speaking English with native speakers. Participants may start at any time. Advanced registration is not necessary. Remembering Miss Millay 2 p.m. Thursday, November 14 Laurie Nienhaus presents the life and poetry of Edna St. Vincent Millay. Sponsored by the Friends of Lakes Regional Library. Registration is required. Book Discussion: The Round House by Louise Erdrich 2 p.m. Tuesday, November 19 Read and discuss this National Book Award winner. When his mother, a tribal enrollment specialist living on a reser vation in North Dakota, slips into an abyss of depression after being brutally attacked, 14-year-old Joe Coutz sets out with his three friends to find the person that destroyed his family. Registration is required. Meet the Author: Robert Macomber 2 p.m. Friday, November 22 Join the Friends of the Lakes Regional Library and welcome local author Robert Macomber. Mr. Macomber is the author of the Commander Peter Wake Honor series; his new book Honors Rendered was released in late September 2013. Tellabration: Storytelling for Adults and Families with School Age Children 2 p.m. Saturday, November 23 Presented by the Tamiami Tale Tellers, the local storytelling guild and member of the Florida Storytelling Association. A variety of stories will be presented, from ancient traditional tales to original stories written and performed by the teller. Tellabration is an event that is held on the weekend prior to Thanksgiving in many communities in the United States and abroad. It is an international celebration of the joy and power of storytelling. Registration is required. Families Baby-Parent Rhyme Time 10 a.m. Mondays, November 4 and 18 Be prepared to tickle, jump and fly with your baby! These rhymes and songs are for infants, up to 24 months, accompanied by an adult. This 20-minute program is filled with songs designed to introduce rhyming and movement to infants. Registration is required. Toddler Storytime 10 a.m. Wednesdays, November 6, 13 and 20 Children 2 years old and their caregivers participate in song, fingerplays and short stories. The success of this age group depends on adult participation and encouragement. Toddler storytime lasts approximately 30 minutes. Family Storytime 11 a.m. Wednesdays, November 6, 13 and 20 This program is for the whole family and lasts about 30 minutes. Registration is required. Tellabration: Storytelling for Adults and Families with School Age Children 2 p.m. Saturday, November 23 Presented by the Tamiami Tale Tellers, the local storytelling guild and member of the Florida Storytelling Association. A variety of stories will be presented, from ancient traditional tales to original stories written and performed by the teller. Tellabration is an event that is held on the weekend prior to Thanksgiving in many communities in the United States and abroad. It is an international celebration of the joy and power of storytelling. Registration is required. Children Preschool Storytime 11 a.m. Mondays, November 4 and 18 Preschoolers (ages 3 to 5) attend this storytime independently while parents or caregivers wait nearby in the library building. This storytime includes activities that require more participation and a longer attention span. Each preschool storytime lasts about 30 minutes. Registration is required. Kids Read Down Fines 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday, November 2 Children and teens can earn a $2 coupon for every 15 minutes of reading, during the allotted time. A total of $8 per day may be earned. For ages 18 and younger. Coupons may be applied to cards issued to patrons age 18 and under only. Reading Academy 4:30 p.m. Wednesdays, November 6, 13 and 20 Books + puppets + drawing = fun! Well bring out the puppets and mini drawing boards for this interactive event. Join us each week for new stories and games. This program is designed for children who can read and write. Sponsored by the Friends of Lakes Regional Library. For children in grades 1 to 5. Registration is required. Fairy Tale Festival 10:30 a.m. Thursday, November 7 For everyone who loves a story that starts with Once Upon A Time, join the library for books, games and crafts about favorite fairy tales. Come dressed as a prince, princess, or even dragon! Sponsored by the Friends of Lakes Regional Library. For children ages 3 to 5. Registration begins October 17. Special Needs Storytime 10 a.m. Saturday, November 9 This storytime emphasizes books, music and sensory experiences designed for children with special needs. The welcoming environment will create a positive experience for children. Each child must be accompanied by a parent or caregiver, who will be an active participant with the child. Class size is limited to 10 children, plus their parents or caregivers. Registration required. For ages 3 to 12 with special needs. Registration begins three weeks prior to event. Diary of a Dork Papers: Creating a Journal 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, November 19 Fans of Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Dork Diaries, or the Popularity Papers, who have always wanted to start their own journal, should join this exciting program. Learn different ways to record memories and create a journal to take home. Sponsored by the Friends of Lakes Regional Library. For grades K to 5. Registration begins October 29. Preschool Superhero Party! 10:30 a.m. Thursday, November 21 Preschool-age children are invited to don their superhero disguises and swoop into the library for some fun! Enjoy super hero stories, make a marvelous craft, and test out super powers with spectacular games! For ages 2 to 5. Registration begins October 31. Teens Kids Read Down Fines 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday, November 2 Children and teens can earn a $2 coupon for every 15 minutes of reading, during the allotted time. A total of $8 per day may be earned. For ages 18 and younger. Coupons may be applied to cards issued to patrons age 18 and under only. The Lakes Regional Library is located at 15290 Bass Road in Fort Myers. For more information about a program or to register, call the library at 533-4000. A sign language interpreter is available with five business days notice to library staff. Check the Lee County Library Systems website at www.leelibrary.net to find out about programs at other locations. Call the host library, or Telephone Reference at 479-INFO (4636), for more information about a specific program. Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702 or email press@riverweekly.com

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23 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 2013Childrens Show At B roadway PalmBroadway Palm Childrens Theatre presents How I Became A Pirate playing November 1*, 2, 5*, 8*, 10, 12*, 15*, 19* and 22*. How I Became A Pirate was adapted for the stage by award-winning composers, lyricists and playwrights Janet Yates Vogt and Mark Friedman and is based on the best-selling childrens book written by Melinda Long and illustrated by David Shannon. When Jeremy Jacobs exceptional skills for building sand castles and digging moats earned him an invitation to join Braid Beards pirate crew, Jeremy thinks the pirate life is for him. Until he realizes that the simple things in life, like a kiss and a warm tucking in at night, are those that are most important. Set sail for a fun-filled journey as Jeremy learns that the most important things in life are worth more than buried treasure. A story of adventure and finding ones own heart a path that cant be found on any treasure map. Broadway Palm Childrens Theatre presents full-scale productions that are great for all ages. All performances begin with a buffet at noon and showtime at 1 p.m. (except where indicated*, lunch is at 10:30 a.m. and the show is at 11:30 a.m.). The chefs special buffet includes childrens favorites like chicken nuggets, tacos, french fries, pizza, pasta and more. How I Became A Pirate is playing selected performances through November 22 at Broadway Palm. Ticket prices for the buffet and the show are only $18 for all ages. Group rates are available for par ties of 20 or more. Tickets are now on sale and can be reserved by calling 2784422, by visiting www.BroadwayPalm. com or by stopping by the box office at 1380 Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Broadway Palms latest childrens theater production is based on the best-selling book. It runs through November 22Cypress Lake H igh School Presents M usicalPushed to the boiling point, three female co-workers concoct a plan to get even with their sexist, egotistical, lying boss. This hilarious story of friendship and revenge comes to Cypress Lake High School November 21 through 24. Director Jason Loete says, We have so many talented girls this year, and 9 To 5 is a great production to show them off!9 To 5: The Musical, with music and lyrics by Dolly Parton and book by Patricia Resnick, is based on the 1980 hit movie Nine To Five. This musical is about teaming up and taking care of business.9 To 5: The Musical stars Martina Long as Violet. Long was most recently been seen in Ordinary People as Beth. Also starring Gabrielle McAfee as Dora Lee. McAfee is a vocal major at Cypress and is a part of the A Capella Group (TAG). Halie Boling portrays Judy, and has been seen at the Florida Reparatory Theatres Conservatory as Elle in Legally Blonde. Mr. Hart is portrayed by Garret Nowlin, also seen in Ordinary People as Conrad Jarrett. Roz, Mr. Harts loyal secretary, is played by Lily Anderson, who has been seen in Ragtime and Bye Bye Birdie. Violets son Josh is played by Marcos Martins, Mr. Harts wife is played by Marissa Zumbo, and the office drunk, Margaret, is played by Jena Whitesman. The female ensemble includes Gianna Appolonia, Callie Atkinson (Kathy), Marissa Brooks, Courtney Camarillo (Maria), Isabel Daher, Tricia Garmager, Sarah Emily Hall, Kianna Jackson (Anita), Kelly Johnson, Gillian Marino (Daphne), Erica Olsson, Maddie Slamka and Sophia Marie Vartdal. The male ensemble includes Lucas Ackerman, Lambert Barnes, Spencer Barney, Tyler Charpentier, Chance Cintron, Christian Fernandez, Zachary Holmer (Bob Enright), Nick Huston (Dick), Christian Richardson, Thomas Short (Tinsworthy), Monty Stobb (Dwayne) and Josiah Vega (Joe). The creative team for 9 To 5 includes Jason Loete as director and set designer. Patty Gair is the choreographer and continued on page 29 Located across the street from Gulf Harbour 15065 McGregor Blvd, Ste 104, Fort Myers Online: www.NaumannLawPA.com www.RealtyClosings.com ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President General Manager Personal Lines Agent 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Paradise. Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. We are HERE for all your insurance needs Isabella Rasi 239-246-47161101 Periwinkle Way #105, Sanibel, FL 239-472-0044 ENGEL & VLKERS Excellence in Real Estate A step above! International Client Base 600 Shops Worldwide Multi-Lingual Staff Your success is my aim.

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 201324 Records Abound With Big Papis 2013 World Series One Of The Greatest In The History Of The Fall Classic?by Ed FrankThe never-before wild finishes of Games Three and Four of this years World Series undoubtedly will become major chapters of in the history of the Fall Classic. But as we write this column prior to the start of Game Five, the unbelievable performance of Bostons David Ortiz overshadows everything else. Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson is known as Mr. October, but Big Papis World Series hitting is beyond anything seen in decades. After four games, he was hitting .727. Thats right .727 and had been on base 12 times in 15 appearances, including seven straight. He had three hits and a walk in Game Four. In those four games, he had two home runs, five RBIs and four walks. And he started Game Five with two additional consecutive hits, a single and a double, stretching his consecutive on-base streak to a series record nine and raising his average to .769. He added a third hit in the eighth inning. Ortiz has reached base safely in all 13 of his World Series games dating back to 2004. There have been only four players in World Series history to hit .600 or bet ter. They are Billy Hatcher of the 1990 Cincinnati Reds (.750) and three New York Yankees: Babe Ruth in 1928 (.625), Hideki Matsui in 2009 (.615) and Ricky Ledee in 1998 (.600). Ortiz, however, is much more to the Red Sox than just his slugging. For nearly a decade, he has been the heart and soul of this team. For example, with his team trailing the St. Louis Cardinals two games to one, he gathered his teammates in the dugout in the middle of Game Four for a pep talk. Catcher David Ross recalled Big Papis words: Guys, lets be ourselves. This opportunity (the World Series) doesnt come along very often. Lets have some fun and grind this thing out. A few minutes later, outfielder Jonny Gomes blasted a three-run homer to give the Red Sox a 4-2 lead that they never relinquished to even the series, 2-2. As we mentioned at the start of this column, the strange endings to Games Three and Four had never occurred in the prior 109 World Series. Game Three ended in a bizarre interference call at third base to hand the Cardinals a 5-4 victory. And Game Four concluded when Red Sox closer Koji Uehara picked off rookie Kolten Wong at first base with the tying run at the plate for a 4-2 Boston win. But Big Papis 2013 World Series is one for the ages. Everblades Begin 2013-14 Hockey Season With A Perfect 5-0 Record The Florida Everblades return home to Germain Arena tonight (Friday) having won their first five games, four on a lengthy road trip to Orlando, Ontario and Bakersfield. The puck drops at 7:30 p.m. with Orlando (2-2) providing the opposition. The Everblades are home again next Wednesday against Elmira. With a 5-0 record starting the week, Florida sat atop the South Division of the ECHL. Shell Point Charity Golf Tournament On November 8To celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Shell Point Open Charity Golf Tournament, golfers will have the chance to score a 24-month lease on their choice of a brand new Lexus or Acura from Scanlon Auto Group by hitting a hole-in-one on the fifth hole of the clubs newly-renovated championship course. We are delighted Scanlon Auto Group is supporting our 10th anniversary tournament in such a special way, said Timothy Stephenson, executive director of the Legacy Foundation of Shell Point. It adds an extra element of excitement to a great day. Registration is under way for the Friday, November 8 tournament, which is presented by the Legacy Foundation to raise funds for the communitys Memory Care Center. Located in the Larsen Pavilion, the center serves senior adults who have memory loss or dementia from Alzheimers and other brain diseases. The Scoggins/Moreland Group of UBS Financial Services, Inc. is the title sponsor for this years tournament, which is the first public event where golfers will have the opportunity to play Shell Points newly renovated course. Players are excited to try out the brand new Platinum Paspalum greens we installed over the summer, said Gary Keating, the communitys new golf professional. This year, Shell Point invested $625,000 to redesign each hole and completely renovate the course. We are continuing our commitment to a quality golf experience, added Keating. The tournament registration and a light breakfast will begin at 7:15 a.m. The $125 entry fee includes the 18-hole, four-person scramble, golf cart, player gift bag, prize opportunities and lunch. Individuals or teams can register by contacting Deborah Henning at the Legacy Foundation at 466-8484. Jay Scanlon with hole-in-one prizes for the 10th annual Shell Point Open Golf Tournament on November 8 FGCU Founders Cup Nets $80,000 For Scholarships And ProgramsThe sun and the spirit of generosity were shining on October 11 as Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU) celebrated the 22nd annual Founders Cup golf tour nament at Pelicans Nest Golf Club in Bonita Springs. The annual fundraiser for the FGCU Foundation netted more than $80,000 for student scholarships and scientific, educational and charitable programs related to the mission of the university that are not supported by state funds. One of FGCUs most successful single-day fundraisers, the tournament has raised more than $1.2 million since its inception. The Founders Cup is a great day for FGCU, and this years event was another success, said Chris Simoneau, executive director of the foundation and vice president for university advancement. Not only does it honor the visionaries who led the charge for the university in Southwest Florida, but it also is a significant financial contributor to helping the university support students, faculty and staff in doing great work. FGCU appreciates the support of our many sponsors, especially those who come through year after year. More than 200 golfers on 52 teams played the Tom Fazio-designed golf courses at Pelicans Nest. Following tournament play, they returned to the clubhouse for a dinner buffet, to bid on donated silent-auction packages and receive awards for their play. Low gross on the Gator Course was Office Furniture & Design Concepts. Low gross on the Hurricane Course was Coleman, Hazzard & Taylor, PA. Major sponsors of this years tournament were: Service Painting Florida, shirts; Estero Bay Chevrolet, hole-in-one; Johnson Controls, pin; Arthrex, driving range; United Mechanical, hats; B&I Contractors Inc., golf carts; Manhattan Kraft Construction, luncheon; Wright Construction, reception; Taylor Rental of Naples, pho tographs; Maddox Construction Co., scorecard; Wayne Wiles Floor Coverings, bever age cart. Season Of Praise Concerts Begin With Two TenorsThe first performance in the 201314 Season of Praise Concert Series at The Village Church at Shell Point Retirement Community is Two Tenors on Sunday, November 3 at 6:15 p.m. Traditional classical singer Barry Craft duos with contemporary artist Jacob Taylor in an inspirational evening of sacred music. The Season of Praise is a series of inspirational performances, sacred music, and gospel songs. The 2013-14 series offers seven concerts. Residents and visitors alike have enjoyed the Season of Praise for many years, said Pastor Randy Woods, minister of worship and music for The Village Church. Each season, we try to provide a variety of musical presentations to inspire and delight audiences. Tickets are now on sale and are $10 each. To purchase tickets online, go to www.shellpoint.org/seasonofpraise. To receive additional information about the concert series, call 454-2147. The Village Church at Shell Point is a ministry of the Christian and Missionary Alliance and serves a congregation of more than 600. The Village Church is located near the entrance to the Island at Shell Point and seats 1,000 people. Two Tenors

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25 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 2013Fair At Fenway South Coming To Town In NovemberSouth Floridas newest fair will be rolling into town for two weekends in November. The Fair at Fenway South will include free live entertainment and shows including Flying Pages Circus, grizzly bears, exotic animals and a full petting zoo. The Fair awill be held two weekends, November 8 to 10 and 14 to 17 at the Boston Red Sox 106-acre Spring Training and Player Development Complex located at 11500 Fenway South Drive in Fort Myers. Fair hours will be from 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. on weekdays and noon to midnight on weekends. Our focus is on packing the event with family-friendly entertainment for all ages, said Ron Weber, general manager of the event. There is something for everyone to see and enjoy including a huge carnival midway, delicious food, games, free live entertainment and shows including the Flying Pages Circus, A Grizzly Experience and the Banana Derby. The Flying Pages are a third and fourth generation, international award-winning circus family who came to the U.S. from Cuba in the early 1960s as flying-trapeze performers. They will be performing several death-defying shows each day at the fair. In the Banana Derby, monkeys dressed in jockey outfits race trained dogs around a track. Fairgoers can even meet the monkeys up close and personal after the races, which are held several times each day. The fair will also include A Grizzly Experience. Attendees can watch these giant, majestic creatures and learn about their behavior through the expert guidance of the Osbourne family, the bears loving owners. In the petting zoo attendees can see tigers, birds and dozens of creatures normally only found in zoos. Attendees can also ride a camel or pony. All shows are free with fair admission. Wade Shows, one of the largest carnival companies in North America, will be bringing its rides and attractions to the midway at the event. Many of the rides appear each year at the Florida State Fair and are being brought exclusively to Fort Myers by the producers of the event. Rides include the Crazy Cat Coaster, one of the largest portable roller coasters in North America, the Fireball, which swings riders high above the midway, and the 100-foot tall Giant Wheel. There will also be plenty of rides for the younger children. Admission to the fair starts at $3 per person with a two-for-one admission discount available at www.FairatFenway.com. Pay-One-Price unlimited rides wristbands are also available at a discount through the website before the start of the fair for $20 each. Individual ride tickets may also be purchased at the event. For more information, visit www.FairatFenway.com. The Banana Derby The Flying Pages A Grizzly Experience brought to you by brought to you by The Scoggins/Moreland Group UBS Financial Services Inc. The Scoggins/Moreland Group & & 18 hole four-person scrambleWIN A CAR!* Hit a hole-in-one on the right hole and win a two-year lease on a 2014 Lexus IS250 or Acura MDX, generously provided by Scanlon Auto Group$125 entry fee (per person) includes 18 holes plus cart, player gift bag, prizes, breakfast, and lunch at Shell Point Golf Club The Scoggins/Moreland Group The Scoggins/Moreland Group rfntbbttFriday, November 8, 2013 18 hole four-person scramble WIN A CAR! WIN A CAR! Hit a hole-in-one on Hit a hole-in-one on the right hole and win a two-year lease on a 2014 Lexus IS250 or Acura MDX, generously provided by Scanlon Auto Group $125 entry fee (per person) includes 18 holes plus cart, player gift bag, prizes, breakfast, and lunch at Shell Point Golf Club Friday, November 8, 2013 rf WIN A NEW CAR!*PRIZES & AWARDSFREE GIFT BAGS WIN A NEW CAR! P P R R I I Z Z E E S S NEW CAR! F F R R E E E E G G I I F F T T B B A A B B A B B G G A A G A A S S G G S G G brought to you by Beneting theMemory Care Center atShell Point

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 201326 Hortoons Crew of 200 Needed For Sand Sculpting ChampionshipThe Greater Fort Myers Beach Area Chamber of Commerce needs a Crew of 200 volunteers in order to conduct the 27th annual American Sand Sculpting Championship, to be held November 22 through December 1. Volunteers are needed for each day of the event. The event will be held behind the Holiday Inn, located at 6890 Estero Boulevard on Fort Myers Beach. Volunteers will be assisting with a variety of tasks including ticket selling, gate admission and other light duties. They will each receive a free T-shirt and meal voucher. Students needing community service hours are more than welcome to sign up. To become a member of the Crew of 200 for one or more days, contact Jane Ross at the Beach Chamber at 454-7500 or jane@fmbchamber.com. From page 1Free Kids Fishing Derbyand third place prizes, plus awards for the largest and smallest fish hooked, in both age categories. Participants should bring fishing poles, but Tarpon Bay Explorers will provide a limited number of loaner poles for those who dont have their own equipment. Shallow Bait and Dale Shirley will be supplying the bait. Throughout the day, volunteers and staff will teach fishing skills and safe, ethical fishing practices and will engage children in fish crafts. We had an exciting event in our inaugural year, said ranger Becky Wolff, the refuges education specialist. Thanks to everyone who contributes to this effort. The event is made possible also by support from the Lexington Fishing Club, Sanibel Island Fishing Club, and Lee County Parks & Recreation. For more information or to volunteer for Kids Fishing Derby, contact Wolff at Rebecca_ Wolff@fws.gov or 472-1100 ext. 236. To support DDWS and the refuge with a tax-deductible gift, visit www.dingdar lingsociety.org or contact Birgie Vertesch at 292-0566, 472-1100 ext. 4, or dingdarlingsociety@gmail.com. From page 3Aviation Daypolice and fire department demonstrations, clowns and face painting, aviationthemed shopping and food. Those attending are asked to help the local community by bringing a non-per ishable food item for The Harry Chapin Food Bank of Southwest Florida. From page 1Tomato Dayby De Choch, a local farmer who runs a small company called Green Coaches that specializes in edible gardens. He has participated in farming and community gardening projects around the world, and has been growing tomatoes in Southwest Florida for many years. The GreenMarkets Fall & Winter Growing Season Workshop Series continues every first and third Saturday of the month through March 2014. The series hopes to inspire people to adopt more sustainable practices, including growing their own food organically in small spaces. The workshops are free, but a $5 donation is suggested, to help the Alliance continue to bring these programs to the public. Visit www.ArtInLee.org or find the Alliance for the Arts GreenMarket page on Facebook for more information. Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702, or email press@riverweekly.com JACARANDAThe Entertainment Nightly in Sanibels Social Scene1223 PERIWINKLE WAY, SANIBEL 472-1771 Happy Apps $5.95Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna, Crispy Fried Calamari, Chilled Oysters, Steamed Shrimp, BBQ Beef Satays, Mussels Marinara, Chicken WingsSanibels Best HAPPY HOUR5 7 p.m. Nightly in the lounge1/2 Price DrinksCall & Well Liquor, Draft Beer Selections, Select House Wine JOIN US Sunday, November 10thTASTE OF THE ISLANDSVote Us Peoples Choice!

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27 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 2013 School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Shelley, My son is in second grade and he is having trouble understanding what the main idea is in the stories they are reading. How can I work with him at home to help him with this concept? Jennifer K., Fort Myers Jennifer, Identifying the main idea and supporting details is an important part of reading comprehension. The main idea of a piece of writing is the central point the author tries to make; this can be an opinion, argument or a general idea and sometimes a very difficult concept for kids to grasp. Sometimes its the vocabulary associated with main idea that is problematic. Here is an exercise using very simple language for you and your son to use. Choose some books to read together maybe one per day for the next week. Make sure that your son takes part in the selection process of these books so he that he has some interest in them. Before you read the story aloud, tell your son that you and he will both will be discussing the main idea of the story after you read it. Explain that the main idea of a story is what the story is mostly about not just a fact or two from the story. Most kids understand what mostly about means. After reading the story, have him answer the question what was the story mostly about. If he answers by stating a less important fact or concept, ask him again to answer what the story was mostly about. You could ask him, Is that what the whole story was mostly about, or is it just a fact we learned from the story? Discuss why the answer is either what the story is mostly about or only a fact. Practicing this daily for about a week will allow him to practice this skill to a mastery level. After he understands this concept of mostly about or the main idea, let him know that most of the time but not always the main idea is stated in a topic sentence. This sentence is usually near the beginning and sets up what the rest of the writing will be about. Then, tell him about the supporting ideas and details that he will see. Supporting details are sentences that support the main idea. These sentences have information that helps explain and prove the authors point. Heres a good website to use for practicing this concept: www.manatee.k12. fl.us/sites/elementary/samoset/mainideaprac.htm. Ms. Greggs is adjunct faculty at Edison State College where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also Nationally Certified School Psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. Kiwanians To Host Golf ScrambleThe San Carlos Park Estero Kiwanis Club will hold their 22nd annual Kiwanis Golf Scramble on Saturday, November 2 at the Estero Country Club at The Vines, located at 19501 Vintage Trace Circle in Fort Myers. The range will open at 7:30 a.m., and play will begin at 8:30 a.m. Profits from the event will go to support the service projects and sponsored youth organizations funded by the San Carlos Park Estero Kiwanis Club. A team of four entry fee is $400, and a single golfer entry fee is $100. Entry fee includes range, cart, golf and lunch following round. Prizes will be awarded to first, second and third place teams, longest drive and closest to the pin. There will also be a 50/50 raffle. Sponsorships are available at the following levels: Platinum at $450, Gold at $425, Silver at $100 and Bronze at $50. Proper attire is required. To register for the golf scramble or to inquire about sponsorship, call 823-4818 or email sancarlosbeefs@gmail.com or gunnyusmc2@comcast.net. The San Carlos ParkEstero Kiwanis Club is looking for more service-minded individuals and business professionals who would like to make a direct impact on the community through volunteering. Meetings are held every Thursday at 7 a.m. at the Beef O Bradys in Fort Myers. For details on joining the San Carlos Park Estero Kiwanis Club, email Gunny Mathews at gunnyusmc2@comcast.net or call 823-4818. Local Named To Deans ListBerklee College of Music announced that Keith Cute, a resident of Cape Coral, has earned placement on the Deans List for the summer semester of the 2013 academic year. The Berklee curriculum focuses on practical career preparation for todays music industry. Four-year degrees are offered in Performance, Jazz Composition, Music Production & Engineering, Film Scoring, Music Business/Management, Composition, Music Synthesis, Contemporary Writing & Production, Music Education, Songwriting, Music Therapy, and Professional Music. Scholarship Applications Accepted By Uncommon Friends FoundationApplications for 2014 Uncommon Friends Foundation scholarships, honoring deserving individuals who have a financial need and the potential to succeed in school, are available now. Students in Lee, Charlotte, Collier, Glades and Hendry counties are eligible to apply. Completed applications are due by February 15. The recipients of the scholarships will be announced on March 26 at the foundations Uncommon Evening, being held this year at Harborside Convention Center in Fort Myers. Since 1998, the foundation has provided scholarships to more than 335 individuals who have demonstrated the personal traits of the five unique men and their wives James D. Newton wrote about in his book, Uncommon Friends. His uncommon friends were Thomas Edison, Henry Ford, Harvey Firestone, Dr. Alexis Carrel and Charles Lindbergh and their wives. Scholarship categories include the following: need, the desire and potential to succeed in school, and possesses positive character traits. plies for one term at High Tech Center. There are no age requirements for this scholarship. tuition and local fees to ninth grade students who contract to succeed in high school, say free of drugs and crime, and fulfill other scholarship conditions. of college. who have overcome extraordinary obstacles in furthering their education and in gaining skills to enter the workforce. leading to a degree in education. gram leading to a degree in law to assist with the tuition, books, and supplies at any Florida college/university. The Uncommon Friends Foundation, a not for profit 501(c)3 organization established in 1993, is dedicated to lifelong character building among todays youth and business leaders. Its mission is to promote character education in schools, business ethics in the workplace and historic preservation of the Burroughs Home and James Newton Archives. For more information, call 337-9505 or visit www.uncommonfriends.org. Time to Refurnish Your Home or Condo? QUALITY PRODUCTS FROM: CARLTON, CAPRIS, LANE, FLEXSTEEL, SUMMIT DESIGN, DOUGLAS, QUALITY WICKER, SEA WINDS, SIMMONS, RESTONIC, BODY REST, REBWOOD, FOREST DESIGN, SHAW, PATIO DESIGN, BEST AND MORE.LARGE SELECTION OF WICKER & RATTANOur Experienced Staff Will Help You Coordinate Delivery While Youre Here or Away OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FURNITURE WORLD CAN HANDLE ALL YOUR NEEDS! Special in i Sof Sleeper CONDO PACKAGE3 OR MORE ROOMS OF FURNITURE$6162CALL FOR DETAILS15631 SAN CARLOS BLVD, FORT MYERSCONVENIENT LOCATION FROM SANIBEL & FT. 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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 201328 Lowes Donates M emory Garden T o Goodwills LIFE AcademyAbout fifteen Lowes Heroes came out to the Goodwill LIFE Academy on October 19 to donate their time, supplies and talent for the LIFE Academy Memory Garden. The school, which is for students with developmental disabilities, is located at the Goodwill Opportunity Center, 5100 Tice Street in Fort Myers. Three trees planted to represent students the school has lost. The students have been asking for a garden for years, said LIFE Academy principal Lynn Pottorf. Now that we have our own building, we can finally give it to them. The school recently moved from a leased location to its permanent home at the Opportunity Center. The Memory Garden features a stone path accessible for students with wheelchairs and three Hong Kong Orchid trees each one representing Travis, Alexis and Laura, students the school has lost. The stones were painted by family and friends of the deceased students. Travis would have loved this, said Becky Watt, whose son, Travis, died shortly after he graduated in 2012. Travis went to the school for two and a half years, and if he was here now, hed be right in the middle of this, planting trees and getting dirty. The volunteers, from Fort Myers stores 582 (Gladiolus and US 41) and 2221 (Colonial and Dani Drive), along with a few students and the parents of the students whom the garden is in memory of also put up trellis with climbing jasmine, set up a vegetable and herb garden, planted fruit trees, added mulch and decorative shrubs, hibiscus and desert roses. Its about helping the community and being part of our community, said Lisa Padilla, Lowes commercial pro specialist. The vegetable and herb garden is a sustainable garden. The students will plant their own vegetables and herbs, and theyll gain a life skill, plus it enhances their self-esteem because of the pride of creating and growing something on their own. The Lowes Heroes pick one service project a year to help improve the community. Lowes really went above and beyond, added Pottorf. I cant wait to see the looks on the students faces when they get here Monday morning. The Goodwill LIFE Academy is a tuition-free, open-enrollment Lee County charter school. The schools curriculum is designed to promote self-advocacy and develop life skills for independent living, by focusing on academic skills, daily life skills and vocational/workforce skills. For more information, visit the schools website at www.GoodwillLIFEAcademy.org or call Principal Lynn Pottorf at 334-4434. Lowes Heroes from store #582 perform work around the trellis Lowes Heroes from store #2221 plant orchids in the garden Lowes Heroes installing pavers Stephanie Pappas hangs a windchime The finished memory garden at Goodwills LIFE Academy Laura Jaras hand-painted memory stones Maria kisses a plant for Laura Memory stones in a potted plant

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29 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 2013 Financial FocusTake Advantage Of Open Enrollmentby Jennifer BaseyAt many places of work, its open enrollment season the time where you get to make changes to the various benefits you receive from your employer. As you review your overall benefits package, what areas should you focus on? Here are three possibilities: offers life insurance as a benefit, and you havent already signed up for it, consider adding it during your open enrollment period because life insurance can be important to your familys financial securiyour employer, you may want to take the time, during open enrollment, to review experienced a change in your family situation, such as divorce or remarriage, youll want to update your beneficiaries, as needed. However, the amount of life insurance offered by your employer in a group policy may not be sufficient for your needs, so you may want to consult with a financial professional to determine if you should add private, or individual, cover age. You may find that individual cover age is comparable, in terms of cost, to your employers coverage. Also, individual coverage is portable that is, you can take it with you if you change jobs. may also offer disability insurance as a low-cost benefit. The coverage can be women, and about one in four men, can expect to suffer a disability that keeps them out of work for 90 days or longer at some point during their working insurance, your employers disability policy may not be enough for your needs, so you may need to consider additional coverage. for an educational institution or a nonyou work for a governmental unit. All these plans offer the chance to contribute pretax dollars; so the more you put in, important, your earnings can grow tax deferred, which means your money can accumulate faster than if it were placed in an account on which you paid taxes every year. much as you can possibly afford to your boosting your contributions during open enrollment. Also, take this opportunity to review the array of investments youve you feel that theyre underperforming and not providing you with the growth opportunities you need, you may want to consider making some changes. You might also think about making adjustments if your portfolio has shown more volatility than the level with which you are comfortable. Your financial professional can help you determine if your investment mix is still suitable for your goals, risk tolerance and time horizon. Open enrollment season gives you the perfect opportunity to maximize those benefits offered to you by your employer. So, think carefully about what youve got and what improvements you can make it will be time well spent. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@edwardjones.com. Royal Palm Yacht Club Becomes Marina At Edison FordA building. As of the closing on October 15, the facility is now owned by three Built in 1961, the facility was for many years considered the club to belong to, and a hub of activity for the downtown area. With the recent sale and future plans for renovation, the group believes it will soon return to its former glory and look forward to sharing it with the public. cated kitchen and private dining areas and will primarily be used for private events and large groups and it will be set up for catering services which will include the neighbor service to their onsite events and a pass through will be formed between the proper access the grounds easily through a side entrance if they prefer. We look forward to working on projects that are sustainable with the historical we will have an entire floor dedicated to catering and events and operate the marina below for group boat-ins and yacht clubs a true waterfront dining experience. will call the marina home while leaving plenty of room for patrons who prefer to travel to host fishing tournaments, eco trips and boat cruises from the marina in the future. The yacht club and its members couldnt be more excited to be involved with two We look forward to calling the marina home for many years to come, said Terri 9 To 5 serve as the lighting and costume designers. Tickets for 9 To 5: The Musical are priced at $5 for students and $10 opens one hour before curtain at the Tickets can also be purchased during school hours at the Blackbox Theatre box office on the Center for the Arts campus. Call 481-2233 ext. 6510 for more information. Fifth Third Bank Collects Donations For Folds Of Honor Veterans GroupA other assistance to the spouses and children of soldiers killed or wounded in action. $50,000. Were proud to partner with an organization with such an admirable mission and million dependents of military service men and women 87 percent of whom do not government programs. tinues to be a strong supporter in our mission to leave no family behind on the field of battle. Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702 or email press@riverweekly.com

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 201330 Hope HealthCare Services Hosts Rainbow Trails Camp For KidsHope HealthCare Services, dedicated to comfort and support for individuals and families facing life-limiting illness, offers assistance to youngsters coping with the loss of a loved one through its upcoming Rainbow Trails Camp program. Scheduled for Friday, November 8 to Sunday, November 10 at Riverside Retreat in LaBelle, the free program available to all children ages 6 to 16 provides an understanding of the grief process, skills to cope with grief and loss, and an opportunity to memorialize and say goodbye to loved ones. Saying goodbye is difficult for all of us, said Mary Tilson, camp coordinator. Rainbow Trails believes in helping children cope in a loving and creative manner in order to help them deal with the loss of their loved ones. The campers will be picked up by bus from the HealthPark office and transported to the LaBelle camp on Friday, returning Sunday afternoon. Upon arrival, campers are greeted by and introduced to the counselors, who are Hope professionals, school counselors, teachers and volunteers who have completed a special Rainbow Trails education series. The camp itinerary is filled with creative, stress-reducing activities including crafts, swimming and singing. While Rainbow Trails may have a serious purpose, campers will have plenty of fun, said Tilson. During this time, children will connect with new friends, have fun while growing as an individual, and enjoy an experience they will never forget. For more information about Rainbow Trails Camp or to apply, call 855-4543104 or visit www.hopehospice.org/ rainbowtrailscamp. Additional information will be provided during parent orientation on October 21. Medicare Advantage Open HousesRiverchase Dermatology and Cosmetic Surgery will host three Medicare Advantage Plan open houses in November. Representatives from different health plan organizations will be on hand to assist in open enrollment, which will end December 7. These educational events are free and open to the public. In addition, attendees have the opportunity to enroll if they wish. There will be refreshments and raffle prizes. The changes brought about by government health care reform continue to make national headlines, but may leave some Medicare and Medicare Advantage participants searching for answers as to how these changes affect them. The locations are: Cape Coral, on Friday, November 15, from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Cape Coral Association of Realtors, 918 Southeast 46th Lane; in Fort Myers on Saturday, November 16 from 9 a.m. to noon at the Crowne Plaza in Bell Tower Shops, 13051 Bell Tower Drive; and in Naples on Saturday, November 16 from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. at the Double Tree Suites by Hilton, 12200 Tamiami Trail North. For more information on these events, visit www.riverchasedermatology.com or call 800-591-3376. Edison State College Offers Weight Loss ClassEdison State College will offer a four-week course to teach individuals the facts about long-term weight loss. Students completing the course will learn how to create a healthy diet while also discovering effective exer cise programs to succeed in reaching, and maintaining, their weight loss goals. Individuals are always looking for ways to live a healthier lifestyle, and achieve weight loss, said Adrian Kerr, Associate Dean and Director of Continuing Education for Edison State College. We hope that by attending this class, attendees learn a variety of ways to accomplish that goal weight, and more importantly, live a healthy life. This course will take place once a week from November 5 through November 26 on Tuesdays from 4:45 to 5:45 p.m. To register, or to learn more about this course and others, visit www. edison.edu/ce or call 433-6963. CPR And AED Classes OfferedStarting in November, every third Saturday of the month, Veterans Park Recreation Center is offering Family & Friends CPR and AED classes. Instruction and hands on practice in infant, child and adult CPR, first aid for choking and the use of AEDs when appropriate. It is intended for parents, grandparents and teenagers who babysit (age 10 to 15 if accompanied by an adult). The Family & Friends CPR course teaches the lifesaving skills of adult Hands-Only CPR, child CPR with breaths, adult and child AED use, infant CPR and relief of choking in an adult, child or infant. Skills are taught in a classroom setting by using the AHAs research-proven practice-while-watching technique, which provides students with the most hands-on CPR practice time possible. The course does not include cer tification upon completion. The course fee is $25 and is held from 2:30 to 4 p.m. on November 16, December 21 and January 18. Veterans Park Recreation Center is located at 55 Homestead Road South in Lehigh Acres. Call 369-1521 to sign up or for more information. Local Families Struggle To Afford Enough FoodThe recession has meant that high numbers of all types of households have been struggling to purchase adequate food, but households with children suffered extraordinarily high rates, according to a new national report recently released. In surveys running for five years through 2012, nearly one in four households with children said they couldnt consistently afford food. Food Hardship 2008-2012: Geography and Household Structure, released by the Food Research and Action Center (FRAC), found that in surveys from 2008-2012, Cape Coral/ Fort Myers ranked third in the country, with 30.6 percent of households with children reporting that they did not have enough money to buy needed food. Meanwhile, Florida ranked fourth nationally with 28.6 percent of households with children reporting that there were times in the prior year when they did not have enough money to buy food that they needed for themselves or their family. Additionally, 17.5 percent of households without children in Florida said they faced the same struggle. This report is consistent with data released by the federal government this month that show how many Americans continue to struggle. Food insecurity data, released by the Economic Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), show that 28.6 percent in Florida struggled with hunger during the 2010 to 2012 period. (Those data are not broken down by households with and without children.) And national poverty data released earlier by the U.S. Census Bureau showed that the national poverty rate has remained at elevated rates since the recession began. What these data tell us is that theres a new reality for too many Americans. Hunger and poverty rates spiked at the beginning of the recession and have stayed high ever since, said Al Brislain, president and CEO of the Harry Chapin Food Bank, and the food hardship data reveal the extraordinary frequency of that struggle for households with children who say they cant afford enough food. The FRAC analysis examines food hardship rates the inability to afford enough food for households with and without children. Data are available for the nation, every state and region, and 100 of the countrys largest Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), Florida. The full analysis is available on FRACs website, www.frac.org. Substance Abuse Treatment Center Faces $300,000 Funding CutSalusCare officials have announced that the non-profit provider of mental health and substance abuse treatment is consolidating all adult residential services into one location at its Transitional Living Center campus on Grand Avenue in central Fort Myers. The decision means that the Drug Abuse Treatment & Education (DATE) residen tial program at the Ortiz Avenue campus of SalusCare will stop admissions immedi ately and close within four weeks. All other services on the Ortiz Avenue campus of SalusCare remain intact. SalusCare CEO Kevin B. Lewis said the consolidation is in response to an anticipat ed $300,000 state funding cut, but the impact on patients will be minimal due to the flexibility created by the recent merger of Lee Mental Health and Southwest Florida Addiction Services (SWFAS). Our goal is to minimize patient impact to the greatest degree possible. There con tinue to be clear messages from the state that residential treatment should be utilized only as a last resort, he said. It is our plan to seek to use some of the funding at the TLC campus and to support expanded psychiatric services for adults, which are in great demand. Up to 10 adult residential treatment beds will be lost, Lewis said, impacting 90 to 100 individuals during the remaining eight months of the fiscal year, although it is pos sible that some of those publicly funded beds could be transferred to the TLC campus. The center currently provides residential treatment for 46 men and women with drug and/or alcohol problems or adults with co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders in either a short-term residential program or a longer term transitional living program. Permanent supportive housing also is offered for an additional 34 individuals in a variety of duplexes on the campus that stretches from Dixie Parkway to Grand Avenue in central Fort Myers. Staff impacted by the consolidation will have opportunities to work elsewhere within the SalusCare organization due to vacancies in other positions. No layoffs are planned, Lewis added. SalusCare, Inc., is a comprehensive mental health and substance abuse treatment program in Southwest Florida, serving 17,000 people per year from seven locations in Lee County and two in Hendry County. The non-profit organization offers outpatient and residential treatment for adults and adolescents, detoxification services for adults, prevention programming and an Employee Assistance Program for about 60 area companies. Fees are charged on a sliding scale, based on family income. In many cases, private insurance is accepted. SalusCare is a United Way agency. For more information, call 332-6937 or visit www.SalusCareFlorida.org. Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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31 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 2013 deaRPharmacistHerbal Relief For Nerve Pain by Suzy Cohen, RPhDear Pharmacist: I have nerve pain that is chronic and related to my diabetes. I take medication for that, and want to add some supplements that might help. I promise to ask my doctor if theyre alright for me... if you pick my question and answer me in the paper. Love your work Suzy. PT, Tulsa, Oklahoma Perfect, because herbs are just plantbased drugs and have many interactions and cautions. There are inexpensive vitamins that can help you, too. Ill cover that today. Nerve pain is termed neuropathy and sometimes you see it as peripheral neuropathy. It can be best described as tingling, burning, radiating and sharp; some people say they feel like ants are biting. Everyones experience is differ ent, and the sensation may feel differ ent depending on the cause. Diabetes medications can sometimes exacerbate neuropathy by causing a drug nutrient depletion. Some of the most popular medications prescribed (i.e. metformin, glipizide) are what I call drug muggers of vitamin B12. You need B12 to produce myelin, a protective fatty coating around your nerve fibers. Your nerves get touchy and neuropathy can begin if you run out of myelin. Supplementing with methylcobalamin might help, but do a test to see if you are low in that. Its a blood test. You never want to supplement with something you already have enough of. There is more about diabetes and nerve-soothing remedies in my Diabetes Without Drugs book. Herbs that are in the nervine category can be very nourishing and soothing to the nerve tissue. Among the best are Chinese skullcap, lemon balm, wood betony, St. Johns wort, chamomile, prickly ash and milky oats. These are found in a variety of ways including commercial tea, dried herb so you can make your own tea or compress, tinctures, capsules and so forth. They each have a book full of side effects and precautions. St. Johns Wort interacts with many, many drugs. I love herbs, and have a special relationship with them. I study them all day long because Im fascinated that Mother Nature has its very own medicine cabinet! So I can assure you that these plant drugs have side effects and interactions. Do not take it upon yourself to just self-treat without seeing a knowledgable practitioner who studies and prescribes herbs for a living. For milder effects, you could always take a bath in herbs; mix together all of the following to make two cupfuls: Oatstraw, skullcap, wood betony and St. Johns wort. Put it in a clean sock and drop into your bath. You can also put 5 to 10 drops of lavender essential oil in there. Soak for at least 20 minutes, keeping the water lukewarm, not too hot on those sensitive areas. This must be discussed with your practitioner, since there is transdermal absorption of these herbs. If you have a local (small) area, you can also try a commercial product called Neuragen sold at pharmacies nationwide. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. dearpharmacist.com. Mom And Me by Lizzie and PryceLizzie and Pryce answer your questions and give advice about aging concerns from a two-generational perspective. A mother and daughter team, Lizzie is a retired RN and health educator, and Pryce is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in the care of elders and people with chronic illnesses. Dear Mom & Me, We were thrilled when our daughterin-law told us she was pregnant with her second child. The medical procedure she had to help her become pregnant worked. However, three months later we were told the heart-breaking news that all the tests showed their child would be severely handicapped. The doctors told her an abortion would be available to her if she decided to go that route. It is against our religious beliefs to even consider an abortion, so now it is being left to God to give us the strength we need. My daughter-in-law, our son, her parents and my husband and I are all going through a terrible, worrisome time. Do you have any suggestions to help us cope? Sylvia Dear Sylvia, I am sorry to hear about your family situation. Just as our ethics, morals and beliefs guide our behavior and actions, the same ethics, morals and beliefs provide comfort and support during difficult times. I cannot even begin to understand the journey ahead for your family. My thoughts are with you all. Pryce Dear Sylvia, I am so sorry about this developing problem. It is only in recent years that families know in advance about the condition of a developing child. Handicapped children are accepted in many families with open arms and love; in others, it is extremely difficult. It is difficult for mothers, fathers, siblings and grandparents. Many marriages cannot survive and the financial costs can be enormous. It is time for you to come to terms with your own feelings and ask yourselves if you can accept the burden and the responsibility. Professional counseling by a licensed mental health professional may help you consider all of the available options. Lizzie Lizzie and Pryces email address is momandmeaging@hotmail.com. Cypress Cove Earns National AwardCypress Coves Love Where You Live marketing and advertising campaign has been honored with the Bronze Award by the National Mature Media Awards. The Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC), located at HealthPark Florida in South Fort Myers, is home to more than 500 older adults. The awards celebrate the best marketing communications, educational materials and programs for older adults. The Love Where You Live campaign was judged against hundreds of programs from retirement communities across the country. Cypress Coves marketing campaign has won awards for two consecutive years, earning the Gold Award last year. The Love Where You Live campaign, launched in 2012, was developed by Cypress Cove in partnership with advertising agency, Martino and Binzer of Hartford, Connecticut. Cypress Cove Marketing Director Nicole Muller explains that the cam paign utilizes a fresh creative approach with consistent messaging and artistic flair. Muller noted that the campaign has been very effective in generating interest about Cypress Cove. And as a result, the communitys apartments and lakeside villas are sell ing fast. We are thrilled with the results of our efforts, she said. Our campaign really cap tures the essence of how residents feel about living here at Cypress Cove: they love the lifestyle! The National Mature Media Awards, organized by the Mature Market Resource Center of Alexandria, Virginia, is the nations largest awards program that annually recognizes the best marketing, communications, educational materials and programs for adults aged 50 or more, the nations fastest growing population. Free Autism Screening Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida, in partnership with Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southwest Florida, offers a free monthly autism spectrum disorder screening for toddlers 18 months to five years of age. The next screening on the Ronald McDonald Care Mobile will be held on Friday, November 1 from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at McDonalds, located at 12990 S. Cleveland Avenue in Fort Myers. It is estimated that one in every 88 children is diagnosed with some form of Autism Spectrum Disorder, making it more common than childhood cancer, juvenile diabetes and pediatric AIDS combined. Medical consultants for the project stress that an early diagnosis can make a vast difference for toddlers and their families. They say early intensive behavioral interven tion can make an immense difference not just in the development of the child, but in their families as well. The ASD screening is conducted by the Neurosciences Center at Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida. The screenings are administered by an Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner, who has extensive training and experience in typical child development and developmental disorders. A physician referral is not required. To schedule a screening, call 343-6838. Rocking Out Dreams For KidsCandlelighters of Southwest Florida will present a fun evening at The Sandy Parrot, located at 17200 S. Tamiami Trail, on Saturday, November 9 to raise funds for local children diagnosed with cancer and blood disorders. Rocking Out Dreams For Kids is open to the public. This fun event begins at 4:30 p.m. and will feature a 50/50 drawing, live music with Alter Ego beginning at 6:30 p.m. and more than 30 raffle items valued at over $5,000, including: Sanibel Harbour Princess The Wizard of Oz For more information about Candlelighters Rocking Out Dreams For Kids, to make a monetary donation, donate a gift certificate or item for the raffle, contact Candlelighters at 432-2223 or visit www.CandlelightersSWFL.org. Donations to Candlelighters are tax-deductible. Candlelighters is a non-profit 501c3 charity whose funds support various programs and activities organized throughout the childs treatment. The charity extends free ser vices to meet the special needs of the whole family to all registered Southwest Florida members. For information on the venue, contact The Sandy Parrot at 454-8454.

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 201332 Lighthouse OO f Southwest Florida RR eceives GiftLighthouse of Southwest Florida received more than $20,000 from The Palms of Fort Myers on October 10. To celebrate our 25th anniversary of providing Five Star Senior Living in Fort Myers, we decided to pay it forward and hold a black tie gala in honor of a local non-profit agency. We decided on Lighthouse of Southwest Florida, said Christy Skinner, executive director of The Palms. continued on page 37 Doug and Wanda Fowler Susan and Sarah Hoffman Evan and Laura Connell Tiffany Glass and Debbie Kostanich Stewart and Angela Kaplan Christy Skinner, Lisa Cronin, Linn Higgins and Susan Rosen Artist Freda Van Pelt painting during the cocktail party. Her work was later auctioned off

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33 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 2013DID YOU KNOW My Stars FOR WEEK OF NOVEMBER 1, 2013ARIES (March 21 to April 19) You enjoy the attention early in the week, but it might be a good idea to opt for some privacy by weeks end so that you can have more time to consider an upcoming decision. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) You unearthed some surprising facts. Now you need to consider how to use them to your advantage. Meanwhile, it might be best to keep what youve learned secret for now. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A comment by a colleague piques your curiosity to know more. Best advice: Youll find people more likely to offer information if youre dis creet when making your inquiries. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Your energy levels begin to rise by midweek. This allows you to catch up with your heavy workload and still have plenty of get-up-andgo to go out on the town this weekend. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Youre probably roaring your head off about a perceived slight from a longtime critic. Ignore it. That person might just be trying to goad you into doing something you might later regret. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) The early part of the week is open to sponta neity. Then its time to settle into your usual routine to get all your tasks done. A personal situation could require more attention from you. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A meeting of the minds on a workplace project might well develop into something more personal for Librans looking for romance. Aspects are also favorable for platonic rela tionships. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) A more-positive mood might be difficult to assume in light of a recent problem involving the health of someone special. But by weeks end, your emotional barometer should start to rise. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Look for a changed attitude from a former adversary once he or she real izes you have your colleagues full support. Now you can refocus your energies on that workplace project. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) This time, a difference of opinion might not be resolved in your favor. But be patient. It ultimately could all work out to your advantage, as new information begins to develop. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A tug of war develops between the artistic Aquarians creative aspect and his or her practical side. Best advice: Prioritize your schedule so you can give appropriate time to both. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) You could be entering a career phase awash with job-related demands. But avoid being swamped by the overflow and, instead, keep treading water as you deal with demands one by one. BORN THIS WEEK: You are an excep tionally loyal person, and youre respected for your ability to keep the secrets entrusted to you. England learns of a plot to explode the Parliament building. Guy Fawkes had been found lurking in a cellar with 20 barrels of gunpowder. Fawkes revealed that he was part of a conspiracy to annihilate Englands Protestant government and replace it with Catholic leadership. States over a deeply divided Democratic Party, becoming the first Republican to win the presidency. Lincoln received only 40 per cent of the popular vote but handily defeated the three other candidates. Conrad Rontgen becomes the first person to observe X-rays, an advance that became an important diagnostic tool in medicine. In 1897, X-rays were first used on a military battlefield to find bullets and broken bones inside patients. and homes in Munich are destroyed, and Jewish men, women and children are beaten and murdered, in an exercise in terror. The of replacing broken glass in looted Jewish Delano Roosevelt is elected to an unprec edented fourth term in office. FDR remains the only president to have served more than two terms. Roosevelt presided over two of States has no plans to send combat troops American troops were in South Vietnam. students were demanding the return of Irans deposed leader, the Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlevi. After the student takeover, President Jimmy Carter ordered a complete embargo of Iranian oil. Shaw who made the following sage observa tion: If all the economists were laid end to next summer, you might want to make a stop only can you visit the graves of such stars as Rudolph Valentino, Jayne Mansfield and Douglas Fairbanks (both Sr. and Jr.), but in the summer you also can picnic there while watching classic movies. plants have fairly high levels of nicotine. kitchen red or yellow can help stimulate your appetite, while painting it blue can help suppress it. The kitchen isnt the only living area in which color research has been done, though; those who study such things say that those who sleep in yellow bedrooms get an average of 7.7 hours of sleep per night, while hours per night on average. Penn and Teller, has a son named Zolten Penn Jillette and a daughter named Moxie CrimeFighter Jillette. want to take note of some old superstitions: It was once thought that hiding a knife under the mattress of a laboring woman would cut the birth pains. Also, unlocking all the doors in the house and tying knots in the curtains were believed to guarantee an easy delivery. (Just dont try these in the hospital.) world is due to people who want to feel important. They dont mean to do harm, but THIS WEEK IN HISTORY STRANGE BUT TRUE THOUGHT FOR THE DAY PUZZLE ANSWERS TRIVIA TEST ANSWERS SPORTS QUIZ of Texas football team. ANSWERS

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 201334 Read us online at IslandSunNews.com COSMETICS MAGGIE BUTCHER 904 Lindgren Blvd. Sanibel Island, FL 33957 Ph: 239-395-0978 / 317-509-6014 mbutcher@marykay.com Products: www.marykay.com/mbutcher Career information available Gift ideas available ALWAYS A GIFT WITH PURCHASE! CONTRACTOR G I P M SR C D P D P CG D GrSince 2001, A Southwest Florida Paver Contractor www.gigicompanies.com 239-541-7282Schedule free estimates or visit our new show roomLic.# S3-12238 CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING HARDWOOD FLOORING (239) 896-3670 CRC-1329678 JOSEPHGIBSON03@COMCAST.NET ATLANTIC CONSTRUCTION & DESIGN, LLCQUALITY & EXPERIENCE ARE THE FOUNDATION OF OUR COMPANY TREE & LAWN CARE Jesus Hernandez LANDSCAPING & TREE SERVICE 482-7350 We Service All your Landscape Needs FULL Landscaping SERVICES Over 20 years serving San-Cap & Ft. Myers Mini Pizza Snacks 6 mini pizza crusts cut out from whole wheat pitas, or pre-baked pizza crusts 1/2 cup tomato sauce or your favorite pizza sauce (optional) 1 cup mozzarella cheese Pizza toppings such as pepperoni, black olives, green pepper, tomatoes, onions, mushrooms, etc. Preheat oven broiler. Use a cookie cutter to cut pizza crusts that will fit in the wells of a muffin pan. Place one crust in each well. If you want pizza sauce, spoon some onto each crust. Top with a sprinkle of cheese, then some of your favorite pizza toppings. Place muffin pan on the lower rack of the oven, and broil for about 5 minutes, or until the cheese has melted. Remove from oven. Let pizzas cool for a couple of minutes before carefully using a fork to remove them from the pan. Mini Pizza Snacks

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35 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 2013 answer on page 35 PUZZLE ANSWERS SUDOKU SCRAMBLERS FIND AT LEAST SIX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PANELS PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY BUILDING CONTRACTOR FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the bene ts of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 COMPUTERS FISHING CHARTER Light Tackle Sport Fishing CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.com GENERAL CONTRACTOR N C R CGC1517615www.dbrowngc.com239-593-1998 A BBB Accredited Business with an +A Rating

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THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 201336 REAL ESTATETO PLACE A CLASSIFIED LOG ONTO:IslandSunNews.com CLICK ON PLACE CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON SERVICES OFFERED ISABELLA RASiI HAPPY TO HELP Y YOU WithITH A ALL OOF Y YOUrR REAL EEStT At TE NEEDS! RS 1/4 NC TFN 1101 Periwinkle Way #105 Sanibel, FL 33957 ISABELLA RASiI (239) 246-4716 E ISABELLARASi I@AOL.COM MOBILE HOME PERIWINKLE PARK$95,000. 60 x 12 w/ metal roof-over plus 20 x 12 Florida room. Master BR has queen size bed & blt-in dresser & dbl closet. Master bath has combo bath/ shower & dbl sink vanity w/extra storage. Guest BR has dbl closet + blt-in drawers & private bath w/ shower. Eat-in-kit is open to LR which from K to FL room. Private 12 x 12 deck, picnic table and storage shed. One car carport with adjacent 2nd parking space. room & bathrooms. Carpeting in both bedrooms & LR. Home recently inspected & has all required tiedowns. New central air & heat system & stacked washer/dryer, all appliances louvered blinds throughout. Purchase completely furnished including all linens, dishes, pots & pans, tableware, 2 sleeper couches, recliner, 2 dining tables & chairs, 4 outdoor chairs & folding beach chairs, etc. Call owner 317-293-0915 or email LMSrealtor@aol.com for further information or to make offer. RS 10/25 CC TFN SCARNATO LAWN SERVICELawn Service, Shrubs and Tree Trimming Weeding, Installation of Plants, Trees and Mulch (one month free service available) Joe Scarnato (239) 849-6163 scarnatolawn@aol.comRS 1/25 BM TFN SANIBEL HOME WATCHRetired Police Captain Lives on Sanibel Will Check Your Home Weekly Very Reasonable Rates (239) 728-1971RS 1/4 BM TFN HOME/CONDO WATCH CONCIERGE SERVICES Full Range of Services Island Resident Licensed & Insured 24/7 Call Lisa or Bruce at 239-472-8875RS 1/4 BM TFN ROGER NODRUFF ELECTRICLic# EC12002788. Call Roger 239-707-7203. Aqualink Motor Controls. RS 6/7 CC TFN HELLES CLEANING SERVICESResidential Cleaning to Satisfaction Sanibel Lic. #11412 Lee Co. Lic. #051047NS 1/4 PC TFN ECOHOME PLANS DRAWN Cool FL-SMART ReBuilding encouraged. NS 10/25 CC 11/08 AFFORDABLE HOME CAREHomeCare Services Alzheimers,Parkinson,Stroke etc. Live-ins, 8 hrs, 24 hrs. FBI Background Check available. Licensed & Insured. References Available, call Cell: 561-509-4491 or 239-963-8449NS 10/25 CC TFN HELP WANTEDVOLUNTEERS NEEDEDAt The Sanibel School Call Michelle Wesley 239-910-8000RS 1/4 NC TFN VOLUNTEERS NEEDEDVolunteers needed for the After School Program which runs Mon.-Th, 2:30 3:15 pm call Linda Reynolds 472-1617RS 1/4 NC TFN HELP WANTED experience. EMR experience a plus. Reply to: periwinkle2499@aol.com or mail to PO Box 53, Sanibel, FL 33957.NS 10/25 CC 11/1 VOLUNTEERS NEEDEDVolunteers needed for light general maintenance. Call (CHR) Community Housing & Resources, Inc. 472-1189.NS 11/1 NC TFN CUSTODIAL POSITION SANIBEL PUBLIC LIBRARY Under general direction, performs custodial services in keeping library and grounds assigned. Flexible schedule, some nights and weekends required. Tolls paid. Send resume or apply at: Sanibel Public Library, secretary@sanlib.orgRS 11/1 CC 11/1 NURSERY ATTENDANT Sanibel Congregational United Church of Christ seeks paid part-time Sunday Nursery Attendant for year round on Sunday mornings for infant-4 year olds. Background check and references required. 2-3 years teaching experience preferred. We are a theologically diverse congregation. For more information contact 472-0497.NS 10/11 CC TFN RESERVATIONS MGRCaptiva Cruises is looking for a full-time professional to manage our front desk checking in cruises, answering phones, assisting customers & overseeing small retail shop. A love for working with the public, customers service skills, computer skills and working weekends are required. Please forward resume to info@captivacruises.com.NS 10/18 CC 11/1 HELP WANTED3883 Sanibel Captiva Road, Sanibel, Fl Phone: 239-472-3644, ext 1 Fax: 239-472-2334 www.crowclinic.orgHELP US PLEASE!!We need volunteers for: Clinic emergency patient admissions desk and baby animal feeders Visitor education center greeters and gift shop cashiers CROW (239) 472-3644, ext. 231 or volunteers@crowclinic.orgRS 1/4 NC TFN VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY The Sunshine Ambassador Program is a new and exciting volunteer opportunity offered at the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida located within HealthPark Medical Center. The Sunshine Ambassadors will greet, assist and be a families and visitors entering the hospital. The Ambassadors also make a difference to families by providing educational and healthful resources to assist in We are currently seeking year-round volunteers to work one 4-hour shift Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm or 12:00pm to 4:00 pm. If you would be interested in learning more about this wonderful new opportunity, please contact Lisa Ellinwood, Volunteer Resources Coordinator at 239-343-5062 at the Golisano Childrens Hospital.NS 2/8 NC TFN VACATION RENTAL Island VacationsOf Sanibel & CaptivaMillion $ Views Await You! Cottages Condos Homes Miles of Beaches & Bike Paths 239-472-72771-888-451-7277RS 1/4 BM TFN LIGHTHOUSE REALTYPaul J. Morris, Broker VACATION RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT & SALES 359 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel Island 239-579-0511 R SS 1/4 CCCC T FNFN ANNUAL RENTALRE/MAX OF THE ISLANDSPutting owners and tenants together www.remax-oftheislands.com 239-472-2311RS 1/4 BM TFN GULF PINES HOME W/PRIVATE BEACH PATH SANIBEL ANNUAL RENTAL $3,500/MO UNFURNISHED3200 SqFt single family home in beautiful, private community. One house from beach, short walk to 2 community pools and tennis courts. Large, private landscaped lot.3-4 Bedrooms -most with LR& EIK open to screened porch. 2 car garage. Contact: (917) 680-4440NS 11/1 CC 11/1 REAL ESTATELIVE ON SANIBEL $79,000Unique,charming Beach cottage. 1br,1bath Move in condition. Private,landscaped yard. Steps to private beach. Wooden Call 239-849-8096 or 239-472-6836.NS 11/1 CC TFN CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS

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CLASSIFIED DEADLINE FRIDAY AT NOON 37 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 2013The chefs in charge of providing a gourmet experience for the guests at the gala Lisa Cronin and Allison LeoneFrom page 32Lighthouse GiftTwo hundred guests were in attendance as the gala featured a six-course fine dining experience, live entertainment and a live auction. Local artist Freda Van Pelt, who has severe visual impairments, painted live during the cocktail party and her artwork was auctioned off. It was an awesome event. We cannot thank enough, Christy Skinner, her staff and all of those who contributed to the event, for their compassion, support and generosity, said Doug Fowler, executive director for Lighthouse of Southwest Florida. Lighthouse of SWFLs mission enables people of all ages living with a visual impairment or blindness to remain independent, active and productive in our society. For more infor mation, visit www.lighthouseswfl.org or call 997-7797. Christy Skinner BOATS CANOES KAYAKSDOCKAGEHourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-5800RS 1/4 NC TFN WANTED TO BUYCASH P A ID FOR MILITA RY I TEMSCash Paid For Old Military Items. Medals, Swords, Uniforms, helmets, old guns, awards & more. Local Toll Free 1-866-440-3280RS 9/6 CC 11/29 Read us online atIslandSunNews.com CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS P ETSFREE KITTEN TO GOOD HOMEFree kitten to good, safe home. No de-clawing. Fiesty Bengal mix. Call 472-1788 after 5 p.m.NS 5/31 NC TFN 2 MALE GUINEA PIGS 2 Male Guinea Pigs (12 mos old) free with cage and all accessories. Moving to home that will not allow pets. Please call Beth at 410-4421 or email esk1966@comcast.netNS 10/4 NC TFN TOO L BOX WAS HES UP ON SANIBELThis tool box with motor parts washed up on shore Saturday morning, May 8 about 8:30 on the beach at Sundial Resort on Sanibel Island. To claim call Sundial Resort Security 239-472-4151.NS 6/14 CC TFN L OST AND F OUNDFOUNDPrescription sunglasses found in parking lot of Limetree Center on Wednesday, February 27. Claim at Island Sun newspaper, suite 2 in Limetree Center, or call 395-1213.NS 3/8 NC TFN L OST AND F OUNDLOST CAT BLACK FEMALEIsland East End. Please Call 239-277-0058 or 239-579-0050.NS 10/25 CC TFN FOR SALEJewelry Art Uniquities Best Prices Great Selection 2431 Periwinkle Way www.SanibelSeaLifeGallery.comNS 11/1 CC TFN BUY SELL TRADE

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If you would like your club/organization listed in The River Calling Card, phone 415-7732 Emergency . ......................................................................................... 911 Lee County Sheriffs Ofce . ........................................................ 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol . ................................................................ 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol . .............................................................. 278-7100 Poison Control . ................................................................ 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center . ....................................... 1-800-936-5321Ft. Myers Chamber of Commerce . ............................................. 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare . .............................................. 425-2685 Ft. Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce . .................................. 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library . ......................................................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library . ............................................................ 533-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce . .......................................... 931-0931 Post Ofce . ..................................................................... 1-800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau . ..................................................... 338-3500 ARTS Alliance for the Arts . .................................................................. 939-2787 Art of the Olympians Museum & Gallery . ................................... 332-5055 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio . .................................................. 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers . ......................................................... 275-3970 Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall . ...................................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS . ................................................................................ 395-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre . ............................................... 278-4422 Cultural Park Theatre . ................................................................ 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light . ............................................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade . .................................. 332-4488 Florida West Arts . ...................................................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers ....................................... 472-0168 Gulf Coast Symphony . ............................................................... 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres . ..................................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic . ........................................................... 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater . ......................................................... 472-6862 S.W. Florida Symphony . ............................................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy . .................................................................. 936-3239 Young Artists Awards . ................................................................ 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAngel Flight . ................................................................ 1-877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center . ............................................................... 731-3535 American Business Women Association . ................................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL . ..................................................................... 339-8046 Audubon Society . ....................................................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR . .................................................. 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society . ................................................... 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus . ................................. 1-855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club . ............................................................ 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees . ....................................................... 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists . ............................................................ 415-2484 Ft Myers UDC Chapter 2614 (United Daughters of the Confederacy . .................................. 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL . ...................................................... 561-9164 The Horticulture and Tea Society . ............................................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society . ................................................................. 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society . ............................................. 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation . ........................................... 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees . ............. 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America . .......................................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL . .................................................... 667-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans . .................................................. 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy . ........................................ 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association . ........................................ 561-2118 Kiwanis Clubs: Fort Myers Beach ................................................. 765-4254 or 454-8090 Fort Myers Edison . ..................................................................... 694-1056 Fort Myers South . ...................................................................... 691-1405 Gateway to the Islands .............................................................. 415-3100 Iona-McGregor .......................................................................... 482-0869Lions Clubs:Fort Myers Beach ...................................................................... 463-9738 Fort Myers High Noon . ............................................................... 466-4228 Estero/South Fort Myers . ........................................................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County . .............................................. 768-0417 POLO Club of Lee County ......................................................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers . ......................................................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society . ................................................ 472-6940 United Way of Lee County . ........................................................ 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) . ................................. 211 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews Shell Museum . ................................................ 395-2233 Burroughs Home . ...................................................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium . ........................................ 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates . ................................................... 334-3614 Fort Myers Skate Park . .............................................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium . ............................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge . ................................ 472-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site . .............................................. 239-992-0311 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center . ....................... 765-8101 Skatium . ...................................................................................... 321-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society . ........................................ 939-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History . ...................................... 321-7430 True Tours . ................................................................................. 945-0405 Pets Of The Week SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 35 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 201338 Hello, my name is Tracy and I am a 7-month-old female brown and white beagle mix. Im bouncy, trouncy, flouncy, pouncy with a top made of rubber and a bottom made of springs. Just like Tigger in Winnie the Pooh, it describes me to a tee. With love, patience, training and exercise I may just turn out to be your best little friend for ever, My adoption fee is $45 during Animal Services Petsgiving Adoption promotion Hello, I am Gretel, a domestic female short haired cat aged four months. My color is brown tabby. Im a petite little purring machine. Im ready to give my new family lots of love and attention. I will fit in great with a multi-pet household or Id be happy to be your one and only. Youll be thankful to have a great little kitten like me. My adoption fee is $45 during Animal Services Petsgiving Adoption promotion For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to Animal Services website at www.LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive, Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office, off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if three months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs six months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee, and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500. Gretel ID# 575218 Tracy ID# 574271 photos by squaredogphoto.com

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BEACH CHAIR PASTIME Answers on page 3339 THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 2013

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AWARD WINNING Flavors From The Caribbean Rim! NOW OPEN! NOW OPEN! Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! 239-463-5505 | 1249 Estero Blvd. Live Music Wed-Sun! Happy Hour Mon-Fri 2-5pmTheBeachedWhale.com Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Weve Got Your Game! Happy Hour Your Game! Your Game! Join Us Sunday, November 10thTASTE OF THE ISLANDSVote Us Peoples Choice!THE RIVER NOVEMBER 1, 201340