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River weekly news ( July 12, 2013 )

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River weekly news
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Newspaper
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Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
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Fort Myers, Fla
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July 12, 2013
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University of Florida
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Title:
River weekly news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date:
July 12, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00101363:00199


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FREETake Me Home VOL. 12, NO. 42 OCTOBER 25, 2013From the B eaches to the R iver District downtown Fort MyersRead Us Online at IslandSunNews.com Public Art E xhibit Moving T o T he AllianceFor the past year, travelers passing through Southwest Florida International Airport have had the chance to see the Honor, Country & Heroism public art exhibit along the walls of Concourses B and D. The exhibit is part of the Art in Flight Program, a partnership between the Lee County Port Authority and the Alliance for the Arts that brings artwork to the millions of people who travel through RSW every year. The Alliance worked with 32 local artists, including six military veterans, to bring this patriotic-themed art to RSW. continued on page 16 B lack Maria Film Festival Is B ackThe Thomas Edison Black Maria Film Festival returns to the Edison & Ford Winter Estates at 7 p.m. November 1, outdoors on the river side lawn of the Ford Estate; and November 2 at 7 p.m. at Edison State College, Richard H. Rush Library and Auditorium. The Black Maria Film Festival is an international, award winning festival that has toured the nation for 32 years and is hosted by museums and colleges throughout the country, showcasing independent and experimental film and video. The films include a variety of contemporary works drawn from the annual juried selection of award-winning films and videos. The Black Maria is recognized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences as an Academy Awards qualifying festival for short films. A special screening of Thomas Edisons 1910 film Frankenstein and discussion by Dr. Wendy Chase, professor of humanities at Edison State College, will kick off the festival on November 1. Film Selections at Edison Ford on November 1 include: Jeffrey Moser, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Directors Choice Selection This experimental film gazes at automation, industry and American culture by manipulating appropriated 16mm footage from a vintage Ford corporation industrial film. The image is constructed from hundreds of frames inspired by some of the work of the legendary late 1800s photographer Eadweard Muybridge. Jennifer Levonian, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Directors Choice Selection This animated film is based on an epiphany in a college students life; the semester has ended and its time to go home for the summer and deal with parental meddling vs. self-actualization. The mixed-media technique of this short film makes for an engaging work of animation art.continued on page 4 A scene from Here and Away by Meena Nanji Home Again by Gordon Warren Thanks by Carl Schwartz Fort Myers Public Art: ArtC alusa E xhibit Opens With VIP R eceptionby T om HallArtCalusa: Reflections on Representation opens with a VIP reception on Friday, November 1 at the City Pier Building in the downtown Fort Myers River District. Co-curated by Theresa Schober and Barbara A. Hill, the exhibition visually interprets the life and experiences of Floridas indigenous peoples, particularly the Calusa Indians, through their contact with early European explorers. Exhibiting artists include Lucas Century, Merald Clark, Charles Dauray, Christopher Kreider, David J. Meo, Theodore Morris, Dean Quigley, Hermann Trappman and Jackson Walker. The pre-opening festivities include a panel discussion on visual arts, archaeology and history how imagery of the past is developed and the effect of representations on promoting a deeper understanding of culture. The panelists include Jerald Milanich, former State Archaeologist Ryan Wheeler, local archaeologists Theresa Schober and Steven Koski, and American Indian literature scholar Gretchen Bataille as well as ArtCalusa artists Merald Clark, David J. Meo, Ted Morris, Dean Quigley and Hermann Trappman. Together, these Art Meets Archaeology panelists will engage the audience in exploring how representations of science and art coincide and conflict in our appreciation of Florida history. Art Meets Archaeology will take place from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, continued on page 19 Halloween E xtravaganza At Lakes ParkMore than 60,000 park patrons are expected at Lakes Regional Parks 5th annual Fall Festival and Halloween Extravaganza now through Halloween. Take a seasonal train ride through the villages, visit Lee Countys largest pumpkin patch, hop on a hay ride, vote for your favorite scarecrow on display, and take part in family friendly activities and games. The pumpkin patch, hayride, scarecrows and games will be open from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday; and 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The Halloween Express Train rides will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 7 to 9:45 p.m. weekdays; 10 a.m. to 9:45 p.m. Saturday; and noon to 9:45 p.m. Sunday. Scarecrows in the Park 2013 is hosted by the Lakes Park Enrichment Foundation. Lakes Regional Park is open dawn to dusk daily at 7330 Gladiolus Drive, Fort Myers. Costs vary for activities. Parking is $1 per hour or $5 per day. Lee County annual parking stickers are accepted. Volunteers for the event are needed. For more information, contact Lee County Parks & Recreation at 533-7575 or visit www.leeparks.org. To volunteer, call 533-7422.

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 20132 Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: Shuffleboard At The Tourist Clubby Gerri Reaves, PhDPictured in the circa-1935 photo are the shuffleboard courts constructed by the Civilian Works Administration (CWA) around 1934. That federal project was one of many that helped Fort Myers survive the Great Depression by putting people to work. Among the other public works that benefited the area in those hard economic times were Lee Memorial Hospital, the Yacht Basin and riverfront park, a modern water plant, an airport, side walks, and numerous transportation, school, and infrastructure repairs. But the shuffleboard courts provided not only jobs, but enter tainment, relaxation, and support for the tourist economy. The courts were located in the citys first public park, which was located in the northwest quadrant of todays intersection of Main and Heitman Streets. Note how much the intersections configuration has changed since the shuffleboard days. In the mid-1930s, the Mediterranean-style Ford dealership (right background) faced the park from across Main Street. Notice the words Ford Products on the front of the building. Henry Ford himself chose the design for that building constructed in 1926 and demolished in the early 1990s. Located just a stones throw from the courts along the west side of Monroe Street (background) are the railroad freight depot and Biggar & Biggar, one of several busi nesses that shipped local produce on the rails that ran down Monroe. Fort Myers first public park was created in 1921. Soon after the city converted to the commission-manager form of government, it bought the Edward L. and Carrie Belle Hendry Evans property, which stretched 270 feet along McGregor Boulevard and reached 450 feet to the Caloosahatchee. (In those days, the rivers edge lay only a block or so north of West First Street.) After an infill project along the river, the land became the Evans Park, or City Park. The Evans home became the first permanent city hall. The park was a hubbub of activities. On the river at Heitman Street was the grand Pleasure Pier, with the city pool located near the piers entrance. Boy Scout and Girl Scout buildings, as well as a youth center, were located in the park. Numerous public concerts emanated from the parks bandstand. At the Tourist Club pictured here, visitors could play card games, socialize, or play shuffleboard. Although shuffleboard has been around in some form for centuries, its popularity peaked in 1940s and 1950s, with celebrity shuffleboard fans such as Betty Grable, Harry James, Merv Griffin, and Alan Ladd bolstering its appeal. The game was played on military bases and ocean liners and in fraternal clubs, rehabilitation hospitals, youth clubs, community centers, and taverns and in Fort Myers, until only a few years ago. It could be said that when the courts adjacent to the Hall of Fifty States were destroyed, it was the end of an era. Walk down to Main and Heitman and imagine meeting friends there for a relaxing game of shuffleboard. Then walk a few more blocks to the Southwest Florida Museum of History to learn more about the public projects that made Fort Myers a better place to live. For information, call 321-7430 or go to museumofhistory.org. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Be sure to visit one of the areas best research centers, the Southwest Florida Historical Society, where the archives bring old Fort Myers to life. The all-volunteer non-profit organization is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Contact the society at 939-4044, or visit on Wednesday or Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon. Sources: Archives of the Southwest Florida Historical Society, the Story of Fort Myers by Karl H. Grismer, shuffleboard.net/history.html, and shuffleboardfederation. com/historyofgame.html. The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, please call (239) 415-7732 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, FL 33901. Fax number: (239) 415-7702. E-mail: press@riverweekly.com. The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Co-Publishers Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Isabel Rasi Office Coordinator Graphic Arts/ProductionAnn Ziehl Photographer Michael Heider Writers Anne Mitchell Jeff Lysiak PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Contributing Writers Read Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com Click on The River Ed Frank Max Friedersdorf Tom Hall In the 1950s, when a new city hall was built, Evans Park changed. Today, much of the original park is privately owned. photo by Gerri Reaves In the 1930s, shuffleboard was a popular pastime in Evans Park at the Tourist Club courtesy of the Southwest Florida Historical Society (Sara Nell Hendry Gran Collection)

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3 THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 2013 Republican Women To MeetThe Lee Republican Womens Club (Chartered) will hold its November luncheon meeting at the Crowne Plaza Holiday Inn, 13051 Bell Tower Drive, on Tuesday, November 12. Social hour begins at 11:30 a.m. with lunch and program at noon. The featured speaker will be Heather Fitzenhagan, state representative District 78. Representative Fitzenhagen will focus on current key legislative issues. The public and guests are welcome. The cost of the luncheon is $17. For reservations or more information, call 573-6913. Puppet Shows At Slough PreserveJoin the Friends of Six Mile Cypress Slough Preserve on Saturday, October 26 for a puppet show titled Six Mile Cypress Slough and You. Bring the whole family for this fun and educational program featuring a variety of woodland animals. The first show begins at 10 a.m. and will be repeated at 11 a.m. Each show lasts approximately 15 minutes. Meet on the back deck of the Interpretive Center. Shows are free with your paid parking fee of $1 per hour per vehicle. Six Mile Cypress Slough Preserve is at 7751 Penzance Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information call 533-7550 or visit www.leeparks.org or www.sloughpreserve.org. Boys & Girls Clubs Host Haunted House Of PokerThe Boys & Girls Clubs of Lee Countys (BGCLC) Inaugural Haunted House of Poker event will take place this Saturday, October 26 from 5 to 11 p.m. at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, located at 13051 Bell Tower Drive in Fort Myers. This new event will include a cocktail hour with food and drinks, raffle drawing, more than $2,500 in cash and prizes, and a costume contest that will include additional player chips as prizes. The cocktail party begins at 5 p.m., with the poker tournament and raffle drawing to follow at 6 p.m. The firstplace poker winner will take home $1,500 while second place takes $750 and third place takes $250. Were excited to host this new event and provide another fun opportunity for attendees to learn more about the Boys & Girls Clubs and see how their support impacts the lives of the organizations members, said Justin Stockman, the BGCLC board member. The entry fee to participate in the poker tournament is $100 per person. All other guests not participating in the tournament will be $25 each. According to Stockman, the $100 entry fee will help the BGCLC continue to provide a full year of after-school programs including character and leadership development, education and career development, health and life skills, creative and cultural awareness in the arts, and sports and fitness recreation. Each of these corearea programs includes a comprehensive plan for each student to follow while working toward his or her personal goals. While most after-school programs cost approximately $1,000 a year, the Boys & Girls Clubs membership cost only $10 per child per school year, making it accessible to all youth, said Stockman. In order to make the Clubs programs possible year round, the organization hosts events like the Haunted House of Poker to create awareness. We appreciate the growing support weve received through these events. Space is limited to 100 players 21 years old and older. For more information or to register, visit www.bgclcpoker.org. Volunteers Needed To Help With Monofilament CleanupThe Keep Lee County Beautiful Marine Cleanup is slated for Saturday, October 26, where volunteers go out in boats, kayaks, canoes, paddleboards and personal watercraft to remove monofilament fishing line and other harmful debris from Lee Countys mangrove shorelines. Volunteers will pick up trash from 8 a.m. to noon and then bring the debris and join others for a volunteer appreciation barbecue by Sam Galloway Ford at Fish-Tale Marina, 7225 Estero Boulevard on Fort Myers Beach. Volunteers without watercraft can contact Lee County Parks & Recreation to help clean up mangrove sites accessible by foot. A speakers program will be held during lunch and will include a question and answer session by cleanup partners. Because of the focus on fishing line, the project committee has dubbed the cleanup Monofilament Madness. Marine debris will be weighed, measured and tallied to help raise awareness and provide an education campaign targeting anglers and boaters about the impact of such debris on wildlife. For more information call 707-3015 or visit www.klcb.org. No sign up is necessary but volunteers are encouraged to bring their collected debris to Fish-Tale Marina. Lazy Flamingo, Inc. 6520-C Pine Avenue Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-5353 Lazy Flamingo 3, Inc. 16501 Stringfellow Rd Bokeelia, FL 33922 239-283-5959 Lazy Flamingo 2, Inc. 1036 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-6939 Lazy Flamingo 4, Inc. 12951 McGregor Blvd. Ft. Myers, FL 33919 239-476-9000 Four Great Locations! We have the NFL Ticket Package and the BIG TEN Network NOW SERVING FULL LIQUOR IN FORT MYERS 20 Wings & Domestic Pitcher for $20 during all College and Pro GamesF M 33 Patio DeLeon, Downtown Fort Myers (239) 337-3377OPEN Tues-ur 11am-10pm, Fri 11am-11pm, Sat 3-11pm Closed Sun & Mon

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 20134 From page 1Black Maria Film Festival, Emily Hubley, South Orange, New Jersey, Directors Choice Selection is a distinctive animated work made in a tender, elegantly laconic, hand drawn style. An artist struggling to balance doubt and inspiration shares his poetic deliberations with an inner/outer muse. Meena Nanji, Santa Monica, California, Jurors Stellar Narrative Selection is a magical film shot in India as inspired by a short story by Franz Kafka entitled Kafkas story describes a day in the life of a boy living in the countryside. In Nanjis film, Ravi is found lying in the grass contemplating the sky and the mystery of nature. He is aware of changing times and the possibilities of the future. In the evening, an older companion and Ravi gaze at the distant city lights on the horizon and muse about those who dwell there, questioning with wonder in moments of becoming. Quique Rivera Rivera, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Jurors Stellar Animation This is an imaginative underwater neonoir and colorful animation inspired by the Lionfish Plague. Fishes dream, lobster claws trans-mutate and the sea swirls in a story about greed and hierarchy in the Caribbean reefs. Josh Gibson, Durham, North Carolina, Jurors Stellar Award for Documentary In flickering black and white, is a luminous, picturesque documentary filmed on the shores of legendary Lake Victoria in Uganda. This handmade, artisanal film is not only a beautifully made work, with close-up portraiture of a lakeside village and its peoples daily lives as they follow their scenic tradition of net fishing, drying and roasting, but its also a modern-day parable of the effects of globalization on Africa. offers a captivating insight into a people who are in harmony with nature yet the film is equally a meditation on the economic and ecological impact of an invasive species on traditional cultures. Harry Hall, Los Angeles, California, Directors Choice Selection This is a personal tribute to the sci-fi/ fantasy author who died on June 5 2012. Shot over 20 years ago in the basement/office of Ray Bradburys home, the footage has been re-edited using HD stock footage to illustrate the authors droll reflections. His views on creativity, Steven Spielberg, the notorious Black List and politics of the 1950s and a skewering indictment of networks make for an entertaining as well as curiously reconstructed interview film. Harry Hall, Los Angeles, California, Directors Choice Selection An aria from Mozarts is parodied in this outlandish parody of a classic. This version utilizes puppetry, absurdist subtitles and sound effects to create a flamboyantly humorous animation. Film selections at Edison State College on November 2 include: Scott Stark, Austin, Texas Industrial penetrations into the arid Texas landscape yield a strange and exotic flowering. Using images from the Texas Archive of the Moving Image based on oil drilling footage from the first half of the 20th century, offers an involving experience to the viewer. Paul Meyers, San Francisco, California In this whimsical film essay, the maker investigates Western cultural biases and discomfort with things multi-legged with exoskeletons. Bugs for breakfast, lunch and dinner can be a great source of protein and an alternative to the flesh of four-legged creatures. Daniel Sousa, Pawtucket, Rhode Island is a lyrical animated parable rendered in artfully silhouetted images. A windmill floats in from the firmament, a feral boy crouches in the forest, he snarls in an encounter with a wolf. A hunter liberates the child and carries him to town, introduces him to school and the vicissitudes of civilization. But the boy must return to the only home he has ever known. Anne Beal, Hendersonville, North Carolina This hand-painted watercolor animation is a lyrical ode to life and love, and to the beauty of the medium itself. Daniele Wilmouth, Chicago, Illinois traces the antics of a ragtag musical militia as they romp through unexpected environs with their exuberant music and crazed frolicking. This music and dance film features choreography by Peter Carpenter and performances by the circus punk marching band Mucca Pazza, who stage the musical at various inappropriate locations around the city of Chicago. Harry Hall, Los Angeles, California This is a personal tribute to the sci-fi/ fantasy author who died on June 5 2012. Shot over 20 years ago in the basement/ office of Ray Bradburys home, the footage has been re-edited using HD stock footage to illustrate the authors droll reflections. His views on creativity, Steven Spielberg, the notorious Black List and politics of the 1950s and a skewering indictment of networks, make for an entertaining as well as curiously reconstructed interview film. Gregg Biermann, Hackensack, New Jersey The famed hall of mirrors sequence of Welles classic noir i is seen through a succession of four algorithmic progressions of split screen patterns. The result is hypnotic, kaleidoscopic and a bit uncanny. Harry Hall, Los Angeles, California, Directors Choice Selection An aria from Mozarts is parodied in this outlandish parody of a classic. This version utilizes puppetry, absurdist subtitles and sound effects to create a flamboyantly humorous animation. Films are subject to change. John Columbus, founder and director of the Black Maria Film Festival will introduce the films and facilitate discussion afterwards.Tickets are available at the Edison Ford ticket office at 2350 McGregor Boulevard. Cost for November 1: Edison Ford members and students are $5; non-members are $8. Cost for November 2: general public is $8; Edison State College students are free. Cost for both nights is $15. For more information and updates visit the Edison & Ford Winter Estates website at www.edisonfordwinterestates.org. 2013 Calusa Blueway Fishing TournamentIn less than a month, the winner of the 2013 Calusa Blueway Fishing Tournament will take home a new Hobie Mirage Pro Angler 12 fishing kayak, courtesy of Hobie and Estero River Outfitters. Cash prizes also will be awarded to those who place in the November 2 tournament. The event consists of a one-day competition for anglers who catch-and-release snook, redfish, sea trout and other species in Lee County waterways. There will be a captains meeting at Anglers Inn, Matlacha, on November 1 with refreshments from Berts Bar & Grill. The November 2 official weigh-in will be held at Pineland Marina. This years catch-andrelease tournament is expected to lure 75 anglers to Lee County waterways as part of the Calusa Blueway Paddling Festival. The first-place winner will be awarded a Hobie Mirage Pro Angler 12, along with accessories, valued at more than $3,000. The Hobie Mirage Pro Angler 12 is compact and versatile, equipped with features such as vantage seating, under-seat tackle storage, horizontal storage for four rods and a livewell-ready cargo area. The second-place winner will receive $500, based on 50 participants. The third-place angler will win $300, with the fourth-place winner earning $150, and the fifth-place winner taking home $50. Returning this year is a streamlined online registration site for anglers, who pay a $60 fee to compete. Go to www. floridasee.org and click on Blueway Festival under the Events/Registration tab. Tournament proceeds benefit the Florida Society for Ethical Ecotourism, which is hosting the event along with Florida Sea Grant and Lee County Parks & Recreation. A portion of proceeds also goes to the Calusa Blueway Paddling Trail. The tournament runs during the continued on page 8 www.SeabreezeNurseries.com (239) 560-1422 WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY We can help! Ask about our Season Discount! Palms, Palms, natives, natives, crotons, crotons, bromeliads, bromeliads, buttery bushes, buttery bushes, & much more & much more Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Downtown Fort Myers (Post Oce Arcade Next to Hotel Indigo) 1520 Broadway For Takeout & Delivery Tel: 334-6991 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEKMon-urs 11am 10pm Fri-Sat 11am 11pm Sun 12pm 9pm www. ichiban-sushi-chinese.com

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5 THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 2013 Lee County Schools Deliver During Salvation Army Food DriveThe Salvation Army Canned Food Drive is celebrating the most successful year since 2007. Every year, The Salvation Army teams up with schools in Lee County and invites students to bring in canned and packaged food. Students were asked to bring food to their schools from September 23 through October 4. Seventy seven Lee County Schools participated in The Salvation Armys annual Canned Food Drive and blew past their goal of 100,000 cans. A total of 120,446 cans were collected, which is a 26 percent (24,818 can) increase over last years food drive results. Donations collected during this years drive will be used to provide a food basket for each family that has registered for Christmas assistance through The Salvation Armys Christmas Cheer Program. Last year, The Salvation Army served 2,735 families representing 8,019 children through Christmas Cheer. Food collected during the schools drive will also be used to stock the shelves at The Salvation Armys food pantry, where families in crisis can receive help. An awards event celebrating the top schools was held Friday, October 18 at The Salvation Army. Captain Can Good made an appearance and lunch for the students was donated by Fords Garage. Captain Canned Goods Royal Palm Exceptional School Bonita Springs Charter collected 4,386 cans Students from Pelican Elementary School collected 2,179 cans Part of the collected food at Trafalgar Elementary Captain Canned Goods at Nicaea Academy RIV Nellies Upstairs Waterside Bar Where its Happy Hour all the time!!! 10% OFF Offer valid with Cash payments only ... No credit cards. ONE COUPON PER TABLE Can not be used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, Expires Nov. 1, 2013 all the time!!! No credit cards. ONE COUPON PER TABLE Can not be used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, Lunch, Dinner, Snacks in Between 11am-10pm www.nervousnellies.net FREE MARINA DOCKAGE with Dock Attendants Assistance Five Radio Stations Remotes 93X 96.9 more Fm Gator Country 101.9 Contests:

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 20136 Monthly Pancake BreakfastOn Sunday, November 10, the Bayside Mens Club hosts its first monthly pancake breakfast of the season from 8 to 11 a.m. in the Bayside Recreation Hall. Enjoy all-you-can-eat pancakes, scrambled eggs, sausages, coffee and orange juice for the cost of $5. Pancake breakfasts will also be served on December 8, January 12, February 9 and March 9. Bayside Estates is located off San Carlos Boulevard, just south of Pine Ridge Road in Fort Myers. For more information, call Ken Wescoat at 609-226-9955. Guided Birding At Lakes ParkMorning Meander at Lakes Park, Fort Myers is a nature walk with a bird patrol guide. The next one is on Saturday, November 2, at 8:30 a.m. This easy walk along clear paths offers an opportunity to see birds in native vegetation with experienced guides. Lakes Park is a Lee County birding hot spot and crucial nesting area for many species. Arrive a few minutes after 8 a.m. for a brief intro and to sign waivers. Wear comfortable shoes and dress to be outside. Bring water, sunscreen and binoculars. Meet at Shelter A7 at Lakes Regional Park, 7330 Gladiolus Drive. Enter Lakes Park gate from Gladiolus, turn right, drive to end of road, continue through the parking lot. Shelter A7 is located near the train station. For more information, call 533-7580 or 533-7576. This tour is provided in cooperation with Lee County Parks and Recreation. Its free with paid parking. Parking is $1 an hour or $5 all day. Eastern Phoebe photo by Meg Rousher Free Shred Event In an effort to advocate against financial exploitation, LEAPP (Lee Elder Abuse Prevention Partnership) invites the public to a community shred event on Wednesday, October 30. Free shredding of personal documents will be provided by Secure Shredding, Inc. at two locations in Lee County. Residents are invited to bring materials for shredding (two boxes per person) to the Big Johns Plaza, located west of Del Prado on 47th Terrace, Cape Coral from 9 to 11 a.m. and to the Bell Tower Shops, at the corner of U.S. 41 and Daniels Parkway, Fort Myers from noon to 2 p.m. Donations will be accepted to benefit LEAPP. No commercial or business documents will be accepted. For more information, call 433-3900. MOAA MeetingThe next meeting of the Lee Coast Chapter of MOAA (Military Officers Association or America) will be held at Crown Colony Golf and Country Club at 6 p.m. Monday, November 4. The speaker for the meeting will be Hal Crispi, WWII B-29 pilot who flew 35 missions over Japan from Tinian in the Marianas. The Lee County JROTC color guard and vocalist will also be in attendance. Former, retired or active duty uniformed officers who are interested in joining MOAA should contact Joe Smaha at 395-0776 for membership information. Free Guided Walks Are BackLee County Parks and Recreation is offering the following free guided walks in Fort Myers: Low Tide Loafing at Sunset A Guided Exploration Join a naturalist guide as you leisurely explore the mud flats to see what mysteries the low tide uncovers while watching a Florida sunset. Bunche Beach is a great area to explore and learn about the variety of shore birds, shells and possibly spot a manatee or dolphin playing along the shore. Bring a camera, shoes that can get wet, bug spray and drinking water. The next walk will be held on Tuesday, November 5 from 5 to 6 p.m. and again on Monday, November 18 from 5 to 6 p.m. Meet at the picnic tables on the beach. The walk is free. Parking is $2 per hour or free with a valid Lee County Parks and Recreation parking sticker. Bunche Beach Preserve is located at 18201 John Morris Road. Bird Patrol Tour Bunche Beach is known as one of the best birding sites in Lee County. Join Lee County Bird Patrol volunteers on this free tour as they share information on the contribution birds make to the delicate balance of the ecosystems. Bring binoculars, sun protection, shoes that can get wet, bug spray and drinking water. The next tour will take place on Saturday, November 23 and again on Saturday, December 7 from 8 to 10 a.m. Meet at the picnic tables on the beach. Bunche Beach Preserve is located at 18201 John Morris Road.This is a free walk. Parking is $2 per hour or free with a valid Lee County Parks and Recreation parking sticker. Barrier Islands Guided Walk Follow a guide as they lead you through Bowditch Point Park. Learn the importance of the barrier islands, their unique ecosystem, and how they protect the mainland. Explore the beachfront tropical hardwoods, coastal scrub and wetland plant communities. Weekly walks take place each Tuesday and Friday from 9:30 to 11 a.m. starting November 5 and continuing each week through April (no walks on Christmas or New Years Day). Parking is $2 per hour or free with a valid Lee County Parks and Recreation parking sticker. Meet on the upper patio for this free walk. Bowditch Point Park is located at the north tip of Estero Island, 50 Estero Boulevard on Fort Myers Beach. Visit www.leeparks.org or call 533-7444 for more information. Open Monday Saturday www.threecraftyladies.com Open Monday Saturday www.threecraftyladies.com Find us on Limited Registration available. Call us today for details! Our email address is press@riverweekly.com

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7 THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 2013 Academy Installs Stack GardenIsland Coast High Schools (ICHS) Academy of Natural Resources Director Joe Mallon, along with some of the academys students, installed a stack garden, a vertical garden made to experience the immediate benefits of small-space gardening, at Community Cooperative Ministries, Inc. (CCM) in Fort Myers. They also planted the organizations first crop of vegetables. Here at the academy, we teach the students the importance of sustainability and creating as much food as we can while taking minimal resources from the planet so future generations will also have those resources available to them, said Mallon. This stack garden project is a win-win for all; our students get to demonstrate the sustainable hydroponic lessons learned in the classroom by putting those lessons to use in a real-world situation that benefits the community, while CCMI now has a sustainable food source for its Fort Myers Everyday Caf. We are reducing our carbon footprint for the good of us all, one project at a time. Being both nutritional and cost effective, the 100-pot stack garden will continued on page 9 The stack garden at CCMI Students from the academy pitched in Joe Mallon and German Santiago Mitchell Palmer, 17, helped out Tracey Galloway, Meghan Madden, Joe Mallon and Cherie Sukovich Joe Mallon directed the installation brought to you by brought to you by The Scoggins/Moreland Group UBS Financial Services Inc. The Scoggins/Moreland Group & & 18 hole four-person scrambleWIN A CAR!* Hit a hole-in-one on the right hole and win a two-year lease on a 2014 Lexus IS250 or Acura MDX, generously provided by Scanlon Auto Group$125 entry fee (per person) includes 18 holes plus cart, player gift bag, prizes, breakfast, and lunch at Shell Point Golf Club The Scoggins/Moreland Group The Scoggins/Moreland Group rfntbbttFriday, November 8, 2013 18 hole four-person scramble WIN A CAR! WIN A CAR! Hit a hole-in-one on Hit a hole-in-one on the right hole and win a two-year lease on a 2014 Lexus IS250 or Acura MDX, generously provided by Scanlon Auto Group $125 entry fee (per person) includes 18 holes plus cart, player gift bag, prizes, breakfast, and lunch at Shell Point Golf Club Friday, November 8, 2013 rf WIN A NEW CAR!*PRIZES & AWARDSFREE GIFT BAGS WIN A NEW CAR! P P R R I I Z Z E E S S NEW CAR! F F R R E E E E G G I I F F T T B B A A B B A B B G G A A G A A S S G G S G G brought to you by Beneting theMemory Care Center atShell Point

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 20138 Along T he R iverIts not too late to celebrate Oktoberfest. From Friday, October 25 to Sunday, October 27, the Cape Corals German American Social Club is again hosting its popular, family-friendly event. There will be a huge tent and outside biergarten with three stages and two dance floors featuring non-stop live bands such as Maselheimer Musikanten, direct from Germany. A carnival area for the kids features rides and games, along with hand-made crafts, vendors and exhibitors under a large tent.. The annual event includes an extensive menu of homemade-style German specialties: sausage platters, bratwurst, schweinhaxen, leberkaese and the everpopular potato pancakes. Sit-down dinners served in the von Stueben Hall included schnitzel, sauerbraten, dumplings, noodles and red cabbage. Enjoy your meal with imported German or domestic beer, German wines and spirits, and non-alcoholic beverages. The German American Social Club is located at 2101 SW Pine Island Road, Cape Coral. Call 283-1400 or go to www.gasc-capecoral.com for the schedule of events. On Saturday night, the Car Cruise-In returns to downtown Fort Myers historic River District. The monthly event is scheduled for 5 to 8 p.m. on the fourth Saturday and is free to the public. All classic cars and show cars welcome. A DJ spins classic rock with trivia. Heavy rain or general nasty weather will typically cancel the outdoor event. Light rain will not. For more information, go to www. myriverdistrict.com. Nestled in the heart of downtown Fort Myers River District, Ichiban is one of the only restaurants open for lunch and dinner seven days a week. It is a family-owned and operated Chinese and Japanese restaurant with a friendly staff and affordable prices. Whether you dine in or pick-up, the food is always fresh and made to order. With generous portions, it tastes just as good warmed up the next day. Sit outside in the climate-controlled historic Post Office Arcade or sit inside at a table or at the sushi bar and watch the chefs create their culinary artwork. Its the perfect place for a quick but hearty lunch or a nice leisurely dinner enjoyed with a cold Kirin Ichiban beer or hot sake. For sushi and sashimi lovers, order Tako (squid), Hamachi (Yellow Tail), Tuna Tataki, the Volcano Roll or the house Ichiban Special Roll. Chinese appetizers and entrees include Miso soup, General Tso Chicken (or tofu) and Mu Shu Pork. Ichiban is located at 1520 Broadway, downtown Fort Myers, in the historic Post Office Arcade. Hours are Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 9 p.m. Free delivery is available within the River District. For more information, call 334-6991. Every Monday through February 24, join local film buffs judging short indie films submitted to the Fort Myers Film Festival and have your say as to whether or not it makes the grade for final programming during the festival to be held March 19 to 23. Thank God Its Monday features happy hour at 6:30 p.m. and show starts at 7 p.m. Live music is also featured. TGIM takes place at The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center located at 2301 First Street, Fort Myers. Check out updates and deals at www.fortmyersfilmfestival.com. When in comes to catering, The Morgan House Restaurant is a fullservice provider for well organized events. From decor to flowers to food and bever ages, Chef Corry Blanton and the restaurants professional staff will make your event a success and delight your guests with attention to every detail. Whether its a backyard barbecue for 300 people or an elegant reception for 50, The Morgan House will handle every detail, down to the last flower petal on the table. The Morgan House Restaurant is fully licensed and insured for catering events anywhere and can provide a full liquor bar on-site or off-site. With the holidays just around the corner, let the expert staff take the stress out of entertaining by reserving space for your business or personal celebration. For information, contact Laura Williams at 284-3721 Monday through Friday between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. or at morganhousecatering@ gmail.com. The Morgan House is located at 33 Patio de Leon in the historic Fort Myers River District. Call 337-3377 or go to www.morganhouserestaurant.com. From page 4Calusa Blueway Fishing Tournament2013 Calusa Blueway Paddling Festival, which includes instruction, demonstrations, speakers, guided paddles and evening entertainment throughout the weekend in nearby Fort Myers. For more information, contact tour nament director Joy Hazell at hazellje@ leegov.com or 707-1267. Festival schedule is at www.calusabluewaypaddlingfestival.com. Family owned and operated, Ichiban is open Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Pictured from left, Keny Chong, Marytez Tano and Meng Chong creating sushi art See vintage, modern and unique cars at Saturdays Downtown Car Cruise-In JACARANDAThe Entertainment Nightly in Sanibels Social Scene1223 PERIWINKLE WAY, SANIBEL 472-1771 Happy Apps $5.95Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna, Crispy Fried Calamari, Chilled Oysters, Steamed Shrimp, BBQ Beef Satays, Mussels Marinara, Chicken WingsSanibels Best HAPPY HOUR5 7 p.m. Nightly in the lounge1/2 Price DrinksCall & Well Liquor, Draft Beer Selections, Select House Wine

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9 THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 2013 Storage Unit Sale Raises Funds For PACEKendra Sutton, chair of Love That Dress (LTD)! 5, announced that the first ever Post LTD! Storage Unit Sale raised $3,500 for PACE Center for Girls Lee. The post-event sale offered dresses that were not purchased at the Love That Dress! 5 event. The sale took place on Saturday, October 5 at San Carlos Self-Storage, a LTD! 5 sponsor, who stored all of the dresses and provided tagging facilities for this years event. We are very happy with the turnout from our first post-LTD! Storage Unit Sale. We surpassed our initial goal of raising $3,000 for PACE by this event, Sutton said. Those that were unable to attend the main event had the opportunity to support PACE while getting fabulous clothing for 50 percent off. PACE donated the gowns that were not sold at the storage unit sale to Hope Chest, and the remaining clothing was given to Goodwill. Through a partnership with Goodwill, PACE receives vouchers for their girls when Goodwill receives clothing donations in the name of PACE. The girls from the PACE center redeem these vouchers for clothing or other needed items found at Goodwill. The girls at PACE often come to the center with very little clothing or belongings. These vouchers allow them to pur chase things they need for themselves or their families, which takes away some of the burden, especially during the holidays, Sutton said. Shoppers who were unable to attend the event had another chance to shop Love That Dress 5! organizers and PACE girls assisted customersFrom page 7Stack Garden Installationprovide fresh food on CCMIs property while maximizing the organizations limited space. The inaugural launch of the stack garden will include tomatoes, snap beans, romaine lettuce, broccoli, basil and parsley. CCMI is fortunate to have a great community partnership with ICHSs Academy of Natural Resources, said Meghan Madden, director of food innovation at CCMI. We have been frequent recipients of its tilapia and garden har vests the past couple of years. To have the academys guidance and professional consultation on our stack garden design and installation has been a blessing all around. Island Coast High School partnered with the University of Florida to create a one-of-a-kind academy in Lee County, the Academy of Natural Resources. The Academy enrolls 150 students from Lee County who learn about aquaculture, aquaponics, hydroponics, alternative energies, ecological restoration and environmental stewardship while utilizing fish farms as well as indoor and outdoor hydroponics. The Academy of Natural Resources provides a foundation for students planning to pursue a career in the environmental job market. W e Proudly Brew T ropial Outdoor Patio Seating Appetizers & Full Dinners Best Prices On The Planet Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Snacks In-between Live Music! Outdoor Seating Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Come Try our NEW Cowlicious Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials Sanibels Most Award Winning Restaurant FREE BEER/HAPPY HOUR DAILY LIVE Always Fresh ...Always Fun!

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Churches/TemplesALL FAITHS UNITARIAN CONGREGATION (UUA) Where diversity is treasured 2756 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers Summer program: Understanding the Faiths of Our Worlds June 2 to August 25 11 a.m. Interim Minister, Rev. Margaret Beard, begins on September 1 239-226-0900. www.allfaiths-uc.org ALL SAINTS BYZANTINE RITE CATHOLIC CHURCH 10291 Bayshore Rd., N. Fort Myers Divine Liturgy is on Sun. at 10:30 a.m.; Rosary begins at 10 a.m. Lenten services (Presanctied Liturgy) will be on Wed. evenings at 6 p.m. start ing on Feb. 22. Administrator is Very Rev. Peter Lickman, ph. 305-651-0991. We are a Church of the Eastern Catholic or Byzantine Rite, 1.5 mi. east of Int. 75. ANNUNCIATION GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH 8210 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers Reverend Fr. George P. Savas Orthros Service Sunday 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy Sunday 10 a.m. www.annunciation.fl.goarch.org 239-481-2099 BETH SHILOH MESSIANIC SYNAGOGUE 15675 McGregor Boulevard, 437-3171 Rabbi: Judah Hungerman Friday Service, 8 p.m., Saturday Service, 11 a.m. Shabbat School Saturday Morning, Adult Hebrew Classes. Call for information on full program. BREAD OF LIFE MINISTRIES CHURCH OF GOD 16581 McGregor Boulevard, 267-3166 Just past the Tanger Outlet Mall Pastor: Barry Lentz, 281-3063 Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. CHABAD LUBAVITCH OF SW FLORIDA ORTHODOX 5620 Winkler Road, Fort Myers Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz 433-7708, E-mail: rabbi@chabadswf.org Web site: www.chabadswf.org Services: Friday 6:30 p.m.; Saturday Kabbalah class 9 a.m.; Shacharit 10 a.m.; Kiddush at noon Minyan: Monday and Thursday 7 a.m. CHAPEL OF CYPRESS COVE 10200 Cypress Cove Circle Fort Myers 239-850-3943, Located at Cypress Cove Retirement Center on HealthPark Campus An ecumenical non-denominational com munity of believers. Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. Reverendt Ted Althouse, Pastor revtedalthouse@aol.com CHURCH OF THE CROSS 13500 Freshman Lane; 768-2188 Pastor: Bud Stephens; A nondemonima tional church emphasizing a personal rela tionship with Jesus Christ. Sunday Service: 9:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 Contemporary. CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 1619 Llewellyn Drive Fort Myers Just off McGregor across from the Edison/ Ford Winter Estates 334-4978 Pastor: Douglas Kelchner Worship times Sundays 9 and 10:30 a.m. Website: www.taecc.com COVENANT PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937 Rev. Dr. Jeffrey DeYoe, Senior Pastor Reverend David Dietzel, Pastor Emeritus. Traditional Sunday service 10 a.m. Nursery available CYPRESS LAKE BAPTIST CHURCHen 8400 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 481-5442 Randy A. Alston, Reverend. Sunday Services: Bible study, 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship, 11 a.m., Evening Worship, 7 p.m., Wednesday Prayer Meeting, 6:30 p.m. CYPRESS LAKE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH en 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 481-3233. www.clpc.us. Clint Cottrell, pastor Prayer Service 8 a.m., Praise 9 a.m., Childrens Church 9 a.m., Traditional 11 a.m. Summer: Prayer Service 8 a.m. Combined Traditional/Praise 10 a.m. CYPRESS LAKE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH en 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 482-1250, 8 and 11 a.m. Sunday Traditional Service 9:30 a.m. Praise Service Sunday School all times FAITH FELLOWSHIP WORLD OUTREACH MINISTRIES 6111 South Pointe Boulevard, Fort Myers, 278-3638. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Voice of Faith, WCRN 13.50 AM Radio, Sunday, 1:30 p.m.; Thursday Service, 7:30 p.m.; Friday Youth Service, 7:30 p.m. Nursery care for pre-school children and Childrens Church for ages 5-12 available at each service. FAITH UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 15690 McGregor Boulevard Fort Myers, 482-2030 Pastor: David Stauffer. Traditional services 8:45 a.m.; Contemporary, 10:30 a.m. Go south on McGregor Boulevard. The church is mile past the intersection of Gladiolus and San Carlos Boulevard on the way to Sanibel. FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 2390 West First Street, next door to Edison Estates. Sunday Morning Service and Sunday School, 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday Evening Testimony Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Child care provided at all services. Visit our Reading Room for quiet study at: 2281 First Street, River District. www.time4thinkers.com, www.christiansciencefortmyers.com, www.christianscience.com FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 13545 American Colony Boulevard off Daniels Parkway in the Colony, Fort Myers, 936-2511 Pastor: Reverend Joey Brummett Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Family Night, 7 p.m.en FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH in the Downtown Fort Myers River District 2466 First Street, Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-332-1152, www.fumcftmyers.org Sunday: 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 5 p.m. Youth Program FORT MYERS CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) A STEPHEN MINISTRIES CONGREGATION 5916 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, 437-4330 Reverend Mark Condrey, Pastor Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Church School: 9:15 a.m. FORT MYERS CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST: 8210 College Parkway, Fort Myers, 482-3133. Philip White, pastor Morning Worship: 10 a.m. Church School: 10:15 a.m. Adult Forum: 11:30 a.m. IONA-HOPE EPISCOPAL CONGREGATION en 9650 Gladiolus Drive, Fort Myers 4544778 The Reverend Dr. John S. Adler, pastor. Weekly services: Saturday 5 p.m., Eucharist with Healing Sunday 8 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite One; 9:30 a.m., Family Eucharist with Healing and Church School Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Morning Prayer (in Spanish); Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Eucharist with Healing. Child care available at Saturday 5 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m. services. JESUS THE WORKER CATHOLIC CHURCH: 881 Nuna Avenue, Fort Myers, 481-1143 Masses Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. KINGDOM LIFE CHURCH 2154 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 218-8343 Pastor Randy and Anita Thurman 10:30 a.m. Sunday Service All are welcome. LAMB OF GOD LUTHERAN/EPISCOPAL CHURCH Corner Cypress View Drive and Koreshan Boulevard, Three Oaks area, Fort Myers, 267-3525 Walter Fohs, pastor; Becky RobbinsPenniman, associate pastor Sunday worship services: 8 a.m. Early Grace Traditional 9 a.m. Awesome Grace Contemporary 10:30 a.m. Classic Grace Traditional 8:45 & 10 a.m. Sunday School Gods Group NEW BEGINNINGS CENTER New Home Church, 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, North Fort Myers, 239-656-0416 Weekly Friday Meeting Meet & Greet: 6:30 p.m. Kingdom Teaching: 7 p.m. Fellowship and refreshments after service. nbcmin istry@embarqmail.com, www.facebook. com/nbcministry. Alex & Patricia Wiggins, Ministers NEW COVENANT EYES CHURCH See Clearly. Meeting monthly at 9 a.m. at the Elks Lodge. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, Fort Myers, FL 33907. 239-220-8519 Pastor Alan Bondar www.newcovenanteyes.com Wear what you want, rockin music, rele vant teaching, LIFT Kidz program, free cof fee & donuts, people who are real, church thats actually fun. NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH OF FORT MYERS 16120 San Carlos Boulevard, Unit 10 239-985-8503 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m Sunday Morning Worship. 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study NEW HOPE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 3825 McGregor Boulevard. Fort Myers Pastor Eddie Spencer 8 & 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11 a.m. Contemporary Worship 8, 9:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School Youth and Childrens programming runs concurrent to Sunday services. Nursery care provided at all services 274-1230. For more information visit: www.newhopefortmyers.org PEACE COMMUNITY CHURCHen Meets at Fort Myers Beach Masonic Lodge 17625 Pine Ridge Road, Fort Myers Beach 267-7400. Pastors Bruce Merton, Gail & RC Fleeman Adult Discussion Classes: 9-10 AM Countdown to Worship (praise music): 10:10 AM Amazing Grace Worship: 10:30 AM Phone 267-7400 Fax 267-7407 Web site: peacecommunitychurch.com e-mail: peace1265@aol.com PEACE LUTHERAN CHURCH Sunday Worship at 9:30am. Peace is a member of the ELCA. We celebrate weekly communion with tra ditional liturgy, organ and choir. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers On the way to Sanibel. 239-437-2599, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@peaceftmyers.com. REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH 3950 Winkler Ext., Fort Myers, 274-0143 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. Sunday Services Daily early learning center/day care RIVER OF LIFE ASSEMBLY OF GOD 21580 River Ranch Rd, Estero 239-495-0400, Senior Pastor: Todd Weston 8 and 9:45 a.m Services; 11:30 a.m. Legacy Service, multi-generational SAMUDRABADRA BUDDHIST CENTER Meditation classes. All are welcome. Guided meditations offering many meth ods for relaxing the body and focusing the mind on virtuous objects to bring increasing peace and happiness into daily activity. For information, class times and locations call 567-9739 or visit www. MeditationInFortMyers.org. SAINT COLUMBKILLE CATHOLIC CHURCHen 12171 Iona Road, Fort Myers, off McGregor and north of Gladiolus. 489-3973 Father Joseph Clifford. Weekly masses: Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. Weekend masses: Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday: 7, 9,11, and 5:30 p.m. Reconciliation is available at the church on Saturdays at noon and by appointment SAINT JOHN THE APOSTLE METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH 3049 Mcgregor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 344-0012 Pastor Reverend Steve Filizzi An Affirming & Inclusive Congregation Sunday Services, 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Mid-Week Service, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. SAINT MICHAEL LUTHERAN CHURCH & SCHOOL (LCMS) 3595 Broadway, Fort Myers, 239-939-1218, Worship: Saturday 5:30 p.m., Sunday 8 & 10:45 a.m. Bible Study for adults and children Sunday at 9:15 a.m. Phone for other dates & times. Plus Marriage Enrichment, Divorcecare, Griefshare. SAINT PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH 3751 Estero Boulevard, Fort Myers Beach, 463-4251. Sunday worship at 9:30 a.m. Womens Bible Study is offered on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 9:30 a.m. www.stpeterfmb.com SAINT NICHOLAS MONASTERY Church and Bookstore:111 Evergreen Road (southwest corner of Evergreen Road and Gail Street.) Liturgical services conducted in English and Church Slavonic; following the Julian (Old) Calendar. Liturgical Services: Sundays and Holy Days: Hours at 9:30 a.m. Holy Liturgy at 10 a.m. Call to confirm service schedule: 239-997-2847; Bookstore: 239-691-1775 or visit www.saintnicholasmonastery.org ST. VINCENT DE PAUL CATHOLIC COMMUNITY 13031 Palm Beach Blvd (3 miles east of I75) East Fort Myers (across from Ft Myers Shores) 239 693 0818 Weekday masses: 9 a.m. Tuesday-Friday Weekend masses: 4 p.m. Saturday Sunday 9 & 11 a.m. All Are Welcome! SOUTHWEST BAPTIST CHURCH 16940 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 454-3336 Robert G. Kasten, Pastor Sunday Worship Service 11 a.m. Nursery available 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Junior Church grades one to five Wee Church Pre-K to K Evening Service 6 p.m. Wednsday Service 6 p.m. TEMPLE BETHEL SYNAGOGUE 16225 Winkler Rd. 433-0018. Rabbi Jeremy Barras E-mail: rabbi.barras@templebethel.com Cantorial soloist: Lawrence Dermer Temple educator: Dale Cohen, MaEd, RJE Shabbat Services, Friday, 7:30 p.m. Torah Study, Saturday, 9:15 a.m.continued on page 11THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 201310

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11 THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 2013 From page 10Churches/TemplesReligious Education; Sunday School and Midweek classes, Preschool Classes, Monday through Friday Web site: www.templebethel.com Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TEMPLE JUDEA (CONSERVATIVE) 14486 A&W Bulb Road, Fort Myers, 433-0201, Rabbi: Rabbi Marc Sack President: Keith Grossman Minyan: Monday & Thursday at 9 a.m. Services: Friday night at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Religious School Sunday morning Web site: www.tjswfl.org Preschool director: JoAnn Goldman email templejudeapreschool@gmail.com 433-0201, Web site: www.tjswfl.org Affiliated: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism THE NEW CHURCH The New Church of SWFL is located 10811 Sunset Plaza Circ. #401, behind Zoomers. Rev. Gabriella Cahaley officiates worship services on Sundays at 11 a.m. during the season. Other worship events are held on the beach in Fort Myers Beach. See our webpage http://www.newchurchflorida.com/ or call for more information 239-481-5535. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH FORT MYERS 13411 Shire Lane (off Daniels Parkway one mile west of I-75) Minister: The Reverend Allison Farnum Sunday services and religious education at 10:30 a.m. For information on all church events call 561-2700 or visit www.uucfm.org. U NITY OF B ONITA S PRINGS Family Service 10 to 11 a.m. Healing Circle 11 a.m. Hospitality and Fellowship, 11 a.m. Inspiring lesson, uplifting and dynamic music, meditation in a loving environment. Service held at 28285 Imperial Street, Bonita Springs. Call 947-3100. UNITY OF FORT MYERS 11120 Ranchette Rd., Fort Myers Summer Services: Sundays at 10 a.m. Childrens class at 10 a.m. Reverend Jim Rosemergy, Minister Our God is Love. Our Race is Human. Our Religion is Oneness. www.unityoffortmyers.org or 239-278-1511 WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 9065 Ligon Court, Fort Myers, across from HealthPark Hospital, 481-2125 Senior Pastor: Robert Brunson Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Blended Worship www.westminsterfortmyers.org W ORD O F L IFE C HURCH 2120 Collier Ave, Fort Myers, 274-8881; Services: Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. Bishop Gaspar and Michele Anastasi Z ION L UTHERAN C HURCH 7401 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, 481-4040, Interim Pastor Jim Eggert Pastor Peter Weeks Sunday Services: 8:30 a.m. Traditional; 10 a.m. Blended Traditional and Contemporary; 11:30 a.m. Contemporary. Childrens Sunday School, Adult /Teen Bible Classes, 10 a.m. C oursen To Speak T o Gulf C oast WritersLiz Coursen, author, speaker, entrepreneur, will encourage her audience to write their autobiographies using real life stories to illustrate them. Her presentation, titled Yes, You! An Autobiography in Three Easy Steps, will take place Saturday, October 26, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Zion Lutheran Church, 7401 Winkler Road, Fort Myers. It provide an overview of the entire process, practical tips to get started, and the tools necessary to see the project through to completion. Topics include organizing illustrations, editing, working with an editor, book design and selfpublishing. She will provide a handout for each audience member. The presentation is based on her second book, The Complete Biography Workbook. Coursen is the author of Brunswick and Bowdoin College (Arcadia Press, 2009), Self-Editing for the Self-Published Author (FirstPersonPublications.com, 2012), and Having Fun, Wish You Were Here: An Illustrated History of the Postcard in Florida (FirstPersonPublications.com, December 2012). Admission is members $3, non-members, $5, first time guests, free. For more information about Gulf Coast Writers Association, log onto www. gulfwriters.org C onference On Modern Day SlaveryMother of God House of Prayer is hosting a Social Justice confer ence on October 26 from 12 to 5 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Fort Myers in order to explore the issue of modern day slavery in Southwest Florida and how it affects the quality of life for so many in the area.continued on page 21 Liz Coursen rf ntbnrr bb bb rtttn Loved this restaurant. Fantastic experience. Food was exceptionally amazing. Service was outstanding. TripAdvisor Member, May 2013 Food B ank Needs Donations For T hanksgivingThanksgiving is fast approaching and turkeys are in very short supply in order to feed the hungry in Southwest Florida. The Harry Chapin Food Bank has put out a plea for the 6,000 turkeys needed by its network of participating non-profit agencies that rely on the food bank to fill food baskets for the holiday distribution to hungry adults and children. Individuals can assist the food bank by either purchasing turkeys or contributing financial aid to purchase turkeys. The approximate cost of each turkey is $12. Businesses can help by encouraging customers to support the turkey drive. Turkeys can be dropped off at the Harry Chapin Food Bank warehouse, 3760 Fowler Street, Fort Myers; Naples warehouse, 2221 Corporation Boulevard Naples; or checks can be mailed to the same addresses. Call 334-7007 for infor mation. Aviation Day Aviation Day will be held on Saturday, November 2 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. with free admission and parking. Aviation Day is an annual community event hosted by the Lee County Port Authority with the purpose of increasing awareness of our airports. Though parking and admission are free, those coming to the event are asked to help the community by bringing a non-perishable food item. All donations will benefit The Harry Chapin Food Bank. Featured aircraft this year will be a North American B-25J Mitchell and a Vought F4U Corsair. The B-25J is an American twin-engine medium bomber. This aircraft type trained at Page Field and was used in the Doolittle Raid over Japan. The Corsair is a distinctively designed fighter plane built during WWII and made famous by the Black Sheep Squadron. It was also used in Korea as a carrier-based fighter. Other attractions will include experimental, antique and other general aviation aircraft exhibits, airplane and helicopter rides, performances by a 17-piece big band ensemble, childrens activities, char acter appearances, clowns, face painting, demonstrations by airport police and fire departments, aviation-themed shopping and exhibitors, and refreshments. Turkey Challenge Good Deals Appliances is calling on the community to Match The Turkey Challenge. For every turkey donated to the Harry Chapin Food Bank by Good Deals customers, friends and family, Good Deals Appliances will match each donation up to 250 turkeys. We have been very blessed by the Southwest Florida community over the past several years, said co-owner Jay Russo. We feel privileged to give back to those in our area that may be less fortunate than ourselves. This challenge could mean up to 500 or more turkeys being distributed to continued on page 23

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 201312 Tarpon And Sharks Like Beaches Tooby Capt. Matt MitchellFishing this week was all about the options, or basically one of two options: either fish the beaches or fish the sound. Either option was a good call but if you wanted to pull in a really big fish or have a chance at a late season tarpon, the beach was hard to beat. Most days we had light east winds so conditions for getting out in the gulf were near perfect. From West Rocks on Sanibel all the way north to Captiva Pass within a mile of the beach, the gulf side was alive with bait and the predators that make their living on migrating southbound bait schools. From Spanish mackerel and jacks to tar pon and big sharks, everything was feeding. Huge schools of threadfin herring made locating the fish easy; simply find the birds and bait and the feeding fish were close by. Spoons and small white jigs were all you needed to get started on this fast-paced action beachside. Throwing through the surface-feeding jacks and mackerel, the action was non-stop. Often while fighting one of these fish, a shark would grab it and either break your line or cut the fish in two. Once you had enough of this action on the mackerel and jacks, it was time to move up the food chain. Make one throw of a cast net on these threadfins and its time to break out the bigger tackle. I like to anchor up just out from the beach and set out the bait spread. Most days it did not take long to start to see rolling tarpon cruising by. Pitching free-lined threadfins at these rolling fish resulted in a few jumped tarpon, although in two days on the beach, I was unable to land one. These fall beach tarpon are packing on the pounds before they migrate out of here as the water temperature cools. I never found huge numbers of tarpon in one place on the beach this week; most were in small groups and still a little spread out. While sitting on the anchor, we never went more than about 10 minutes without seeing rolling fish passing by the boat. As our weather gets cooler, these tar pon will bunch up tighter around schools of glass minnows, ladyfish and mackerel. This action will continue until we get our first big cold front which could be in as soon as a few weeks out or or as late as Christmas. Then, tarpon fishing will be done until next spring. While waiting for that tarpon bite, expect to catch sharks of all sizes and varieties. The sharks will eat a live threadfin, but a small jack cut in two and put out on a circle hook was a better option, often not lasting more than a few minutes in the rod holder until it got eaten. Action on these sharks was crazy with many double hook ups. These fourto six-footplus sharks are a blast to catch. If you go for option two, water clar ity in the sound has really begun to clear up and catching shiners has been getting easier by the day. Chumming with these live shiners really had the fish fired up all week with just about any shoreline or creek produced fish if the wind and tide were right. On the lower tides, I spent my time in the deeper feeder creeks going in and out of the Ding Darling Refuge. Then, as the water got up higher, I moved out into the sound, targeting mangrove islands and oyster bars. A whiffle ball bat full of stunned shiners pitched out quickly let you know if the fish were around. As our water gets clearer by the day, big trout action has been getting better and better. This week we caught trout up to 25 inches all over the southern sound. Most of these bigger trout were in the deeper creeks during the lower water periods then in potholes out from the mangroves during the higher water. There are a lot of trout out on the open flats too but the majority of them are less than the 15-inch minimum size.Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions email captmattmitchell@aol.com. Send Us Your Fish TalesThe River Weekly would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include photographs with identification. Drop them at the River Weekly, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, Florida 33901, or email to press@riverweekly.com. Ray from Philadelphia with a 25-inch trout caught while fishing with Capt. Matt Mitchell Local Waters/ Charts Classsubmitted by Cdr. Mary SmelterThe San Carlos Bay Sail & Power Squadron will be offering the Local Waters/Local Charts class. The class will be held on Saturday, November 16 from 8:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The class is directed towards new boaters and boaters new to the area, as well as those wishing to learn chart reading. It will provide the boater with some of the basics of navigation, oriented to the Fort Myers area. Students will be using chart 11427 and you must bring this chart to class. Optional onthe-water training will be offered at a later date. Check with the class instructor for details. The cost of the class is $45. The class is being taught at the San Carlos Bay Sail & Power Squadron classroom located at 16048 San Carlos Boulevard, at the corner of Kelly Road (across from ACE Hardware). Students can register online at www.scbps.com or call 466-4040. Introduction To Using GPSsubmitted by Cdr. Mary SmelterThe San Carlos Bay Sail & Power Squadron, a unit of the United States Power Squadrons, will be offering a class in basic GPS operation on Saturday, November 16 from 1:15 to 4:30 p.m. This class will be offered again in the summer of 2014. The class is designed to introduce continued on page 20 ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint Prices 1 472-5800

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13 THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 2013 CROW Case Of The Week: Florida Chicken Turtleby Patricia MolloyIf you take a chicken, put it in a shell. What you have is chicken turtle looking very well. So goes The Turtle Song, written by the Oregon Coast Aquarium. The chicken turtle currently at CROW, however, was not the pillar of health upon its admission last week. Its a fairly uncommon turtle, but we have had two in the past two weeks, said Jordan Donini, assistant wildlife rehabilitator. They are often hit by cars because they are very agile and like to move around. Chicken turtles will burrow into the soil to escape dry conditions if they are unable to find suitable temporary or permanent aquatic habitats. The chicken turtle (Deirochelys reticularia) is a medium size turtle found in the southeastern United States: south from Virginia to Florida and west to Texas, Oklahoma and Missouri. There are three subspecies, including the Florida chicken turtle (Deirochelys reticularia chrysea). Formerly a common sight on the shelves of southern markets, the meat was purported to taste like poultry, hence its name. Social creatures, these turtles may swim in small groups in calm, shallow freshwater, taking time to bask on rocks and logs with their yellow striped legs and unusually long necks out-stretched in blissful repose. Beware: they are quick to bite if handled. Young chicken turtles are primarily carnivorous, gradually adding more vegetation to their diets as they mature. The patient receives daily tub time during which it is fed crayfish and shrimp; in the wild, chicken turtles feed on amphibian larvae, snails, insects and small fish in aquatic vegetation. Due to its fractured carapace, or upper shell, it must be drydocked afterward under a heat lamp to ensure that the wounds dry thoroughly. It is eating well, but its attitude hasnt changed much since it arrived. It was a little more inactive yesterday, but I think thats because it was a little bit cooler yesterday, said Donini. It will take three to six months for the chicken turtle to fully recover from its injuries. If you would like to help patient #2806 on its long road to recovery, go to CROWs website for more information. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to PO Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit: www.crowclinic.org. This Florida chicken turtle, patient #2806, was hit by a careless driver, resulting in fractures to its carapace, or upper shell. Above, its bandages are carefully inspected by Jordan Donini, assistant wildlife rehabilitator Complete Do-It Yourself Boat Parts Store Complete Do-It Yourself Marine Trading Post 15600 San Carlos Blvd, Unit 170, Ft Myers (Beside Big Lots) Call 437-7475 Additional Locations: 1156 N. Tamiami Trail in North Fort Myers Call 997-5777 2397 Davis Blvd in Naples Call 793-5800 Hours: 8am -5:30pm Mon-Sat $ 99. 95 Stainless Steel Pow er Coated White Du l Trumpet Horn Bimini Top $ 199 Large Selection of Steering Wheels

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 201314 Plant SmartEgyptian Crowfoot Grassby Gerri ReavesEgyptian crowfoot grass (Dactyloctenium aegyptium) is an extremely common invasive weed found along roadsides and in disturbed sites, fields and even cultivated lawns. This native to Africa and Asia is found throughout much of the U.S., and its made a pest of itself in the Americas and Europe. The Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council lists it as a category-II invader, a species that has so increased in abundance or frequency that it could be ranked a categoryI invasive should ecological damage be demonstrated. The Florida Department of Transportation lists it as undesired vegetation in mowed areas of rights-of-way. It especially likes dry or sandy habitats, tolerates full sun or moderate shade, and adapts to almost any spot, even coastal sand dunes. It grows up to two feet tall, spreading and branching to form a mat. Also called Egyptian star grass and Durban crowfoot grass, the plants most notable characteristic is the star-shaped inflorescence or seedhead, which resembles a crows foot. Although the plant usually produces five claw-like spikes, the number varies. The seedheads are protected by curved spines that can be painful to step on. The star-shaped structure also resembles the underside of a skinny starfish or sea star. The surfaces of the leaves sheaths have hairs on them. This is one plant you can feel justified in ripping out, but good luck on eradicating this grass permanently. Sources: gobotany.newenglandwild. org, dot.state.fl.us, davesgarden.com, and edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Plant Smart explores sustainable gardening practices that will help you create an environmentally responsible, low-maintenance South Florida landscape. Egyptian crowfoot grass is a category-II invasive species Typically, the inflorescences are five-pointed, but they can have up to seven spikes photos by Gerri Reaves Caring For Your PlantsRock Yardsby Justen DobbsRock yards do not mean dull, lifeless planter beds and cold, cheap stone everywhere. Rock yards can be fun and tropical at the same time. What is a rock yard? It is a landscape that utilizes crushed shell, sand, gravel or river rock instead of grass. Typically, rock yards cost less to maintain and save the owner money on water, fertilizer, pest control and trimming. The type of rock used depends on the look and style of the house. Sometimes, brown river rock compliments the houses trim and other times crushed shell brings out the landscape material and gives the home a Key West look. Rock yards are NOT simply a vast sea of one color with intermittent plants dispersed everywhere. They do have to be carefully laid out by a professional landscaper. Every rock yard should incorporate beds with plants. These beds can either be covered in mulch or pine straw, but they are definitely needed to add character to the yard and break up the solid rock color. I prefer to use pine straw because it can be pur chased in bails, which cover much more area than a bag of mulch. Additionally, pine straw acidifies the soil as it breaks down. This is beneficial for most palms and plants because our Florida soil is very alkaline to begin with. Pine straw looks natural and had no added dies or chemicals (unlike red mulch, which is the worst). Irrigation always helps keep plants healthy and established, but is not necessary. After being planted, the plants and trees in a rock yard will need some water from a hose or irrigation system until they root in and establish. If the particular plants used have high watering needs (majesty palms, Everglades palms, ferns, etc.), then you will definitely need to run your irrigation system or have one installed if you dont already have a system in place. If your landscaper is knowledgeable enough to install droughttolerant plants, whether native or exotic, then you can get by without having an irrigation system which will save you thousands of dollars in the long term. One important point I want to stress: You arent restricted to planting natives if you want a drought-tolerant landscape! There are many imported palms, plants and trees that can live off of our average 55 inches of rain a year, including bismark palms, Chinese fan palms, cycads, bromeliads, ti plants, etc. If you would like to see some examples of rock yards in the area, there are several on Sanibel Island and Fort Myers Beach. Remember, not all of them were done professionally and some of the ones Ive seen have things like blue dyed rock, half-dead fountain grass, huge masses of boring green bushes, cheap concrete statues and other strange features. These ones are typically done by the do-ityourself landscaper and do not have any long-term sustainability or beauty in my opinion. Justen Dobbs is a landscape architect in south Florida specializing in custom, upscale landscapes. He can be reached at seabreezenurseries@gmail. com. This rock yard features palms, cycads and colorful tropical plants; all live off rainwater Another rock yard with a pond and low maintenance plants

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15 THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 2013 Coast Guard Associations Inshore SlamJoin the Coast Guard Enlisted Association and Pinchers Crab Shack for the 2nd annual Coast Guard Enlisted Associations Inshore Slam on Sunday, November 3 at Fish Tale Marina, 7225 Estero Boulevard on Fort Myers Beach. This is a catch, photo and release contest. The captains meeting will be held on Saturday, November 2 from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Fish House Restaurant at Fish Tale Marina. There is a $100 entry per crew of four; $25 per extra crew member. Prizes will be given for first, second, third and seventh places for the largest inshore slam total inches for one snook, one trout and one redfish. Also, there will be a prize awarded for biggest mystery fish category. This will be announced at the captains meeting. In partnership with Fish Tale Marina, there is a complimentary bonus option to pre-stage your boat the night before at Fish Tale Marina, free of cost. On Sunday, November 3, when clocks fall behind to standard time, lines go in at 7 a.m. and and come out at 3 p.m. The awards reception will follow the slam from 5 to 7 p.m. at Fish Tale Marina. As this is an ethical catch, photo and release event, photos must be sent to FishCGEA@gmail.com by 3 p.m. to be considered for prize money. A follow up phone call to 757-618-3655 is required to confirm receipt of photos. For more information or to register, contact tournament director Jerry McMillen at (954) 439-0961 or FishCGEA@gmail.com. Connect at Fish CGEA on Facebook for updates and more tournament information. For sponsorship opportunities, contact Tanya Kaish Keller at tkkeller99@hotmail.com or call 757-618-3655. Special thanks goes out to sponsors Pinchers Crab Shack, Fish Tale Service and Sales, Fish Tale Marina and Suncoast Beverage Sales and Young Boats. Fort Myers Boat Show Is Coming SoonThe 41st annual Fort Myers Boat Show at Harborside Event Center and City of Fort Myers Yacht Basin is coming Thursday, November 14 through Sunday, November 17. The show will run 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday. Widely considered the premier boat show on Floridas west coast, the event will feature even more boats of just about every type and size imaginable. Show attendees can tour a large assortment of boat types both in and out of water, from luxury yachts and off-shore fishing boats to dinghies and kayaks. New to the show this year, guests can discover how easy it is to get into boating at the You Can Afford to Go Boating area in Centennial Park. This special section will include a display of boats that can all be purchased on a budget of $250 or less per month. Informational signs will accompany each boat, allowing visitors to gather more information at their leisure. Resorts and marinas will also be on hand to help guests plan stays and waterfront trips. Vendors will showcase the latest in boating accessories, electronics, marine financing and insurance, motors and fishing gear. The show will include seminars on fishing and boat safety with local guides on hand to answer questions and present instruction about Southwest Florida fishing. There will also be a large kayaking section with information about Lee Countys Great Calusa Blueway paddling trails, and the U.S. Coast Guard with its interactive boating safety trailer displaying a variety of safety equipment. Our show continues to grow and this years promises to be the best yet. There will be a large selection of boats, accessories and activities, all situated around the beautiful new downtown river basin and Harborside Event Center, said John Good, event manager. Food and beverages will be available. Admission is $10 per person, per day and free for children under 16 with a paid adult admission. Tickets can be purchased at the door. For more information about the show, visit www.goboatingflorida. com/41st-annual-fort-myers-boat-show. What You Know About Bonsai Is Probably Wrongby Jim Bremer, President, The Bonsai Society of Southwest Florida, Inc.Most people are familiar with bonsai, those cute little old and very valuable Japanese-style junipers grown indoors in pots. The word bonsai (pronounced bone-sigh) is Japanese for potted tree. The practice itself originated in China, however, and was adopted by the Japanese between 600 and 800 A.D., along with Buddhism, written language and many other cultural and political practices from China during this period. American interest in bonsai developed from the exposure by U.S. servicemen occupying Japan after World War II, and they assumed it was a Japanese practice. Junipers are a traditional species for use in bonsai, but the techniques for creating bonsai work equally well on a large variety of trees and shrubs. In South Florida, its difficult to raise conifers in pots, so many of our bonsai are developed from tropical, and often native, species. Local favorites include bougainvillea, natal plum and crepe myrtle. Not all bonsai are small. Youre familiar with pictures of tiny trees in pots, held on one finger, but most bonsai need one or both hands to lift and carry. Some of the most revered trees in China and Japan would require a forklift truck to move. All are designed to be artistic representatives of the beauty of nature contained in a pot or tray, but the concept can be broadly interpreted. Bonsai trees are often displayed indoors, but are nearly always grown outside. Some varieties (especially succulents) may be successfully raised in a windowsill, but all living plants grow better out of doors, in natural sunlight, rainwater and fresh air. The Oriental custom is to cultivate a number of bonsai, and to bring the best ones (and those in bloom or seasonally appropriate) indoors to display for guests, but only for a few days at a time. Bonsai trees may be very old and very valuable. In the Orient, it is common for a tree to be maintained by succeeding generations of a family, or successive wealthy owners, for decades, or even centuries. Bonsai techniques of periodically trimming foliage and roots in fact significantly reinvigorate the trees, and can enable them to live for extended periods. During our 1976 Bicentennial, the United States received trees from other nations that were already hundreds of years old when our nation was born (these are now maintained at the National Arboretum in Washington, DC). Older, and more beautiful bonsai trees, are revered and when sold, will command high prices similar to any great art works. At the same time, very good bonsai can be created in three to five years by a knowledgeable enthusiast from inexpensive nursery stock or overgrown yard shrubs. I am very proud to display three cascade junipers I created from stock I bought at the hardware store for $5 each. If youre interested in bonsai, The continued on page 22 Luke Hutchinson, 11, from Edinburgh, Scotland caught six snook, from 22 inches to 36 inches, within one hour while fishing with Captain Clarence Reed. Captain Clarence Reed and Luke Hutchinson Fish Caught Call for departure time CAPTIVACRUISES H T H E I S L A N D S H THE BEST WAY TO SEE THE ISLANDS IS FROM THE WATER Cruises depart from beautiful Captiva Island

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 201316 Innovative Play By Ghostbirdby Di SaggauWoyzeck, an unfinished play by Georg Buchner is one of the most performed and influential plays in the German theater repertory. It was performed recently by Ghostbird Theatre at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center. The play has been finished by a variety of artists and was first performed in 1913. Buchner died in 1837. His play deals with the dehumanizing effects of doctors and the military on a young mans life and other complex themes about social conditions. In Ghostbirds production, women took on most of the roles. The play is loosely based on the true story of a soldier who, in a fit of jealousy, murdered a widow with whom he had been living. The cast included Brittany Albury as Woyzeck, Hanny Zuniga as Marie (the mother of his child), Jim Brock as an experimental doctor, Brittney Brady as Grandmother, Jackie DeGraaff as the Captain and five other fine supporting actors. There was also live music and a lot of singing and dancing worked into the production. I was impressed with the way it all came together. I salute Director Barry Cavin for his work and Producing Artistic Director Brittney Brady for bringing innovative works to our area. Next up is Because Beauty Must Be Broken Daily by local playwright James Brock. It opens February 19. Tickets are $10 and are available by calling 3331933, or online at www.sbdac.com. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is at 2301 First Street in the downtown Fort Myers River District. From page 1Honor Country & Heroism ExhibitThe paintings in the exhibit have served as a welcome home for troops returning to Southwest Florida and a tribute to veterans. The Honor, Country & Heroism exhibit comes down at the end of October and it will then move to the Alliance for the Arts for a two-week exhibition, giving the public one last oppor tunity to view or purchase the work. The opening reception is Friday, November 1 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. The exhibit runs through November 16. Work by Adrian Mata will be on display in the Member Gallery during the exhibition. James JR Roberts is featured in the Theatre Lobby. Honor, Country & Heroism will be replaced at the airport by an exhibit created by Lee County art students and their teachers called Oh, The Places You Will Go. It goes on display at the end of the year. For more information about the exhibition, or the Art in Flight Program, visit www.artinlee.org or call 939-2787. The Alliance for the Arts is at 10091 McGregor Boulevard just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Youre Home by Doug MacGregor Sidney & Berne Davis Art CenterNovember events at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center in downtown Fort Myers include: Friday, November 1 Art Walk: Lily Hatchett, Global Warming Art Report 3, 6 to 10 p.m., free. ArtCalusa: Reflections on Representation, VIP opening reception, City Pier Building (formerly Art of the Olympians), 6 to 9 p.m., $50. Saturday, November 2 ArtCalusa: Reflections on Representation Forum: Art Meets Archaeology, City Pier Building, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m., free. Monday, November 4 to Wednesday, December 11 ArtCalusa: Reflections on Representation, City Pier Building, gallery hours 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., MondayFriday. Sunday, November 10 Cotillion Masquerade Ball Thursday, November 14 Connect Networking Mixer, expand your business and personal relationships, get to know each other and connect in your community; raffle prizes, music and mingling, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tickets $6, promotional tables, $25. Friday, November 15 Music Walk: Edison College Jazz Band 7 to 10 p.m., free. Sunday, November 17 Cotillion Thanksgiving Dances Thursday, November 21 Art & Poetry Networking Mixer, 8 to 11 p.m., $10 admission. Friday, November 29 to Saturday, November 30 Festival of Trees, community organizations decorate and display trees at this yearly Goodwill event, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., free. Saturday, November 30 Family Fun Day, brunch with Santa and childrens workshops, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., $15. Brunch with Santa, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., $12. Childrens Workshop, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., $6. Jingle Bell Rock, Nowhere Band, a Beatles tribute band, will play holiday and classic rock favorites beginning after the River District Holiday Stroll and art center wreath lighting, free. Every Monday The Fort Myers Film Festivals TGIM Intellectualization: watch and discuss short films that are in consideration for the Fort Myers Film Festival. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., film starts at 7 p.m., admission, $6. World Premiere At Theatre Conspiracyby Di SaggauThe winner of Theatre Conspiracys New Play Contest, All My Raisins In The Son, looks into what takes place in the teachers lounge of a public high school. It is written by playwright and English teacher John M. Twomey. Katie Pankow plays the enthusiastic new teacher who graduated from the same school five years earlier. Joanna Haley is an English teacher who dresses up as characters from the books she introduces to her students. Angie Koch is a cranky teacher waiting around for the lifeboat of retirement. She grades her stu dents papers without reading them. Todd Fleck is a drama teacher bogged down by his pending divorce. Katherine Cintron is the new assistant principal, unappreciated by the staff because she got the promotion for being daddys girl. Ken Ruisi is the fuss-budget type who does everything by the book. He deserves praise for stepping into the role with only a few days notice. The characters are extremes of the teaching profession. It was fun watching Haley come on stage one moment as Daisy Buchanan from The Great Gatsby and another as Hester from The Scarlet Letter. Koch adds a real comic touch with her sarcastic remarks about the whole educational system. When she cant get a can of soda out of a machine, she puts up a sign that reads Does Not Work, Like My Husband. There is a reason for the title which combines All My Sons and A Raisin In The Sun. It concerns a paper turned in by one of the students. Office politics come into play about how to grade the paper. The audience gets a peek into frustrations faced by teachers due to both administrative and government meddling. During a talk-back with the playwright, he agreed with members of the audience, that most teachers start out with a dedication to make a difference, but over the years can become disenchanted with the system and reach a burnout stage. Knowing when to retire is another mes sage in the play. Directed by Bill Taylor, the cast does a terrific job giving the audience some exam ples of issues faced by todays teachers. The play is funny and thought-provoking. All My Raisins In The Son runs through November 2 at Theatre Conspiracy, located in the Foulds Theatre, Alliance for the Arts, 10091 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. For tickets, visit www.theatreconspiracy.org or call 936-3239. Katherine Lucero, Angie Koch and Katie Pankow

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17 THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 2013Opening Exhibit Artists Reception Arts for ACT Gallery will host an opening reception during Art Walk Friday, November 1 from 6 to 10 p.m. This month, ACT Gallery will feature Expanding the Palette by mixed media artist Stephen GrayBlancett, photography by Bill Hofer, and Patterns of the Land by Michael Pohlman. Blancett was born in Southeastern Ohio, moved to South Florida in 1982 and studied advertising design at the Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale and business at Nova University. For the past 25 years, he has worked two sides of the advertising and publishing business; as a creative/art director and model for clients ranging from Citi Corp to Jockey Underwear. He said, I love the business, but find creativity is sometimes limited by a market or product. My fine art gives me the fuel and freedom to express myself, my feelings and my individuality. It allows me to be me. Gray-Blancett started painting and winning awards for his work at the young age of seven. He painted portraits and pastoral scenes in watercolor almost exclusively until the mid s. I enjoyed working in watercolors, but felt no ownership of a style. I tried many approaches, but it always looked like someone elses work. The results were okay, but too wholesome for me. I like things that are bright, colorful and sometimes sexy. It may have taken me a long time, but I have discovered my own style my own way, he said. Stephen Gray Blancetts works are in the collection of many notable celebrities, and in corporate and private collections around the world. His work has been featured in numerous publications and is exhibited in galleries across the country and in the UK. He was honored in 2011 as the Visual Artists of the Year by Lee County Alliance of the Arts. Pohlman studied art at Bradley University, Prairie State College and Calumet College with professors from the Art Institute of Chicago. In 1995, he was juried into the inaugural show at the Union Street Gallery in Chicago Heights, Illinois. After this exhibit, he accepted a Union Street offer of a resident artist studio. For the next 10 years, his abstract and sports paintings were shown in multiple venues in Chicago. In 2005, he moved to Fort Myers and opened his Gulf Breeze Studio. Pohlman has had two individual and a two-person exhibit at Arts for ACT Gallery. He has been juried into various shows at ACT Gallery, as well as the Alliance for Arts, daas Gallery, Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center and the von Liebig Center in Naples. His work is in collections in China, Spain, the Netherlands, Germany and the United states. Pohlman was a recipient of the 2013 City of Fort Myers Art and Cultural Grant. Patterns of the Land is a City of Fort Myers Art and Cultural Grant Exhibition. Using the principles of Gottlieb, Braque, Hofman, Rothko, and Hodgkins, Pohlman started this series on small surfaces by exploring Pennsylvania Dutch barn hex symbols and antique quilt patterns as muses. He moved on to larger format landscapes and blended them towards abstraction with line and color value. These exhibits will continue through Monday, November 26. ACT will provide accommodations, continued on page 18 Beach Boy by Stephen Gray-Blancett Got Courage by Stephen Gray-Blancett Promises for the Future by Michael Pohlman Florida Residencyand Estate PlanningWORKSHOP Presented by: Complimentary Written Trust Analysis:Bring your current documents to the workshop one-half hour earlyThursday, November 7, 20132:00 p.m.Sanibel Community House 2173 Periwinkle Way Sanibel 33957Wednesday, November 6, 20132:00 p.m.Temple Beth El 16225 Winkler Rd. Fort Myers 33908 9100 College Pointe Ct., Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.sbshlaw.com Reservations: 239-425-9379 You will learn: Will Power ColumnistFlorida Bar Board Certied | Wills, Trusts & Estates Attorneys Presented by: Receive a FREE Florida Estate Planning Guide

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 201318 Global Warming Art E xhibit To Open At T he Davis Art C enterArtist Lily Hatchett unleashes her third Global Warming Art Report at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center, 2301 First Street in the downtown Fort Myers River District. The exhibition opens on November 1 at 6 p.m. during Art Walk and will remain on display until November 23. Hatchetts Global Warming Art Report combines visual art, music and a series of live action multimedia performances and video events; it has a serious side as well as a humorous, celebratory side. Cartoon endangered species will mingle with artist created suns. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center needs volunteers to assist in the office and with regularly scheduled seasonal events. Call 333-1933 or email PR@sbdac.com for more information. Global Warming Art Report by Lily Hatchett Endangered Species ArtFest Fort Myers Wins 5 Pinnacle AwardsThe International Festivals & Event Association (IFEA) paid tribute to ArtFest Fort Myers during the IFEA Pinnacle Awards Ceremony at the 58th annual IFEA Convention. ArtFest Fort Myers won five awards in the prestigious Pinnacle Awards Competition: Benefit a Cause Pedal or Paddle to ArtFest Fort Myers sponsored by Lee Memorial Health System Chalk Block presented by Truly Nolen Pest Control TravelHost Magazine Special Edition Florida Weekly wrapper Haas & Wilkerson Insurance presents the IFEA Pinnacle Awards Competition to recognize the outstanding accomplishments and top quality creative, promotional, operational and community outreach programs and materials produced by festivals and events around the world. Striving for the highest degree of excellence in festival and event promotions and production, 1,000 event professionals from every corner of the globe gather for the IFEA Convention each year. ArtFest Fort Myers Executive Director Sharon McAllister and Associate Director Katie Afflerback attended the three-day convention and look forward to implementing all they learned to continue to enhance ArtFest Fort Myers. Also attending the convention and receiving awards were: Kentucky Derby Festival, Pasadena Tournament of Roses, Des Moines Arts Festival, among others. ArtFest Fort Myers thank its sponsors, volunteers, artists, attendees and the City of Fort Myers for their support and devotion. ArtFest Fort Myers, the annual juried fine art festival, will be held January 31, February 1 and 2 in the Fort Myers River District. There will be 200 professional artists from across the county and around the world, the largest high school art exhibit and competition in south Florida, and free interactive art experiences for children of all ages. For more information visit www. ArtFestFortMyers.com or call 768-3602. From page 17Opening Exhibit Artists Receptionincluding American Sign Language inter preters, assistive listening devices, alternative formats of printed materials and realtime captioning upon request for persons who are deaf, hard of hearing or are living with disabilities. To ensure accommodations, make your request within seven days prior to the event to jbenton@ actabuse.com Arts for ACT Gallery is located at 2265 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. Sharon McAllister accepts IFEA award from Andy Vandepopulier, Haas & Wilkerson Chalk illustrations on pavement

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19 THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 2013 Lee County Extension Service To Host Annual Butterfly ConferenceButterfly enthusiasts, gardeners, master gardeners and landscape designers are invited to Lee County Extension Services 13th annual Butterfly Conference. The Saturday, November 2 conference will include classes from 9 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. and a Butterfly Garden Tour from 2 to 4 p.m. at Lee County Extension Services, 3406 Palm Beach Boulevard Fort Myers. The conference will also feature exhibitors and vendors of butterfly loving plants. The conference will excite people about butterflies and the plants connected to them, and it also will provide an overview of recent and current butterfly conservation efforts within Florida that involve citizen participation and describe how you can help in these efforts, organizer Gayle Edwards said. Cost is $15 for registration and an additional $6 for lunch. Register at http://butterflyflconf.eventbrite.com/ and get the agenda at http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu. Lee County Extension agents offer educational services through a three-way cooperative arrangement between the Lee Board of County Commissioners, the University of Florida and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Local extension agents are off-campus faculty members of the University of Florida housed within Lee County Parks & Recreation. For more information, call Stephen Brown at 533-7513 or email brownsh@ leegov.com. Endangered Schaus swallowtail photo by Dean Jue Longtail skipper photo by Alana Edwards The Tom Allen Butterfly House and Garden Red Sox Back In World Series After A Remarkable Last To First 2013 Seasonby Ed FrankIf we turn back the calendar eight months when the Boston Red Sox reported here for spring training, nary a soul would have predicted that this team would be playing in the 2013 World Series. In fact, the preseason Las Vegas odds were something like 30-1. But defying those odds in a remarkable last to first season, today we find the Red Sox as American League Champions and competing in their third Fall Classic in the last 10 years. Boston and the St. Louis Cardinals, two storied franchises, both with identical 97-65 regular season records, are meeting for the fourth time in the World Series, and it marks the first matchup of teams with the leagues best records since 1999. The Cardinals defeated the Red Sox in 1946 and 1967 while Boston swept the Cards in 2004, ending an 86-year curse. As we went to press with the series start slated for Wednesday, its a bit early to start thinking about a winning celebration when the Red Sox return here in February. But the way this team has performed this year, dont be surprised if we welcome the team back as World Series champions. Bostons return to the World Series is the result of a dramatic defeat of the Detroit Tigers in the ALCS, four games to two. Heroes abounded in that series, but none more dramatic than two grand slam home runs that propelled Boston to the World Series. The first occurred in the eighth inning of Game Two by David Ortiz that tied the game at 5-5. They went on to win 6-5 in the ninth. The second grand slam-dinger literally raised the American League Championship flag above Fenway Park when Shane Victorino, who had been in a deep hitting slump, blasted the ball over the Green Monster in the seventh inning of Game Six to give the Red Sox a 5-2 lead that held up for the final two innings. The MVP in the championship series was awarded to 38-year-old Koji Uehara, the Red Sox closer, who recorded three saves and one win in the four Boston victories. His devastating splitter baffled the Tiger hitters with eight strikeouts and zero walks in those four games. As we have written previously, it would be an outrage if Red Sox manager John Farrell isnt the American League Manager of the Year. Having taken over a last-place team that suffered through 93 losses in 2012, the most in 47 years, to first an AL East Division title and now the League Championship, Farrell should be the unanimous choice for Manager of the Year. All thats left is a 2013 BoSox World Series title. We bet the champagne is ready. From page 1ArtCalusaNovember 2. It is free and open to the public as part of a two-year Making History Memorable partnership between Lee Trust and the Florida Humanities Council. Space is limited and reservations will be required. Valet parking will be available for $8. Register at MakingHistoryMemorable@gmail.com. The Exhibition Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, November 1 to December 11 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. It is free and open to the public. The City Pier Building is located at 1300 Hendry Street in downtown Fort Myers historic River District. An arts advocate, Tom Hall guides weekly walking tours of the River Districts public art collection in Fort Myers. For more information, go to www.truetours.net. CPR And AED Classes OfferedStarting in November, every third Saturday of the month, Veterans Park Recreation Center is offering Family & Friends CPR and AED classes. Instruction and hands on practice in infant, child and adult CPR, first aid for choking and the use of AEDs when appropriate. It is intended for parents, grandparents and teenagers who babysit (age 10 to 15 if accompanied by an adult). The Family & Friends CPR course teaches the lifesaving skills of adult Hands-Only CPR, child CPR with breaths, adult and child AED use, infant CPR and relief of choking in an adult, child or infant. Skills are taught in a classroom setting by using the AHAs research-proven practice-while-watching technique, which provides students with the most hands-on CPR practice time possible. The course does not include cer tification upon completion. The course fee is $25 and is held from 2:30 to 4 p.m. on November 16, December 21 and January 18. Veterans Park Recreation Center is located at 55 Homestead Road South in Lehigh Acres. Call 369-1521 to sign up or for more information.

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 201320 B usinesses Gather O ver 100 B ears For GoodwillGora McGahey Architects and Planners (GMA) sponsored a Teddy Bear Happy Hour for Goodwill Industries of Southwest Florida on October 2. Attendees were encour aged to bring teddy bears to the event, which was held at Goodwills Boutique on First. The teddy bears will be a part of the Festival of Trees annual bear tree. Made up from bears donated by the community, the tree is one of 25 decorated trees that is auctioned off at the festivals signature event, the Tux & Trees Gala, on December 7. Auction guests gather around this special tree to raise money for The Southwest Florida Goodwill Foundation. The tree is then traditionally donated to The Childrens Hospital. We love that GMA wants to be such a large part of this years Very Beary Christmas tree, said Goodwill spokesperson Madison Mitchell. All of our trees are beautiful but, I think the bear tree holds a special place in the heart of attendees. The event was attended by representatives of both organizations, city officials and other community supporters. Over 100 bears were collected. If you are interested in hosting a teddy bear drive or have new bears that you would like to donate, contact Madison Mitchell at 995-2106 ext. 2213 or email MadisonMitchell@goodwillswfl.org. For more information on the Festival of Trees and Tux & Trees Gala, visit www.tuxandtrees.com. Madison Mitchell and Cecil Pendergrass Attendees at Teddy Bear Drive Financial FocusDont Get Frightened By Scary I nvestments by Jennifer B aseyHalloween is upon us. Of course, whether youre navigating the dark corridors of a haunted house or just dealing with the creepy characters coming to your door demanding candy, youre probably not too fearful of the sights of the season. But as you go through life, youll want to avoid some things that really are scary such as these investment moves: By the time you hear about a supposedly hot investment, it may already be cooling off. But even more importantly, it might not have been appropriate for your diver sification needs in the first place, especially if you already own similar investments. achieve your long-term goals, such as a comfortable retirement, you will unquestionably need to own a reasonable per centage of growth-oriented investments in your portfolio. However, the greater the potential reward, the greater the risk, so you dont want to go overboard by investing too aggressively. types of investments can offer a high degree of preservation of principal. But they carry their own type of risk the risk of not keeping up with inflation. Consequently, just as its not a good idea to invest too aggressively and own only growth-oriented investments, its also not wise to invest too conservatively by owning only those vehicles that sacrifice growth potential for principal protection. nas of life, youll find that it may make sense to go your own way rather than follow the crowd. And thats usually the case with investing, too. Its quite common for the crowd to collectively make an unwise investment decision so, make your choices based on your individual needs, goals, risk tolerance and time horizon. After sustaining big losses during the financial crisis of 2008, many investors decided to take a time out from investing which meant they may have missed out on the rally that began in 2009 and ultimately resulted in the financial markets achieving record highs. The best investors just keep on investing right through mar ket downturns and, quite often, their persistence is rewarded. Too often, people will make long-term changes to their investment strategy in response to short-term news events, such as political turmoil, a bad economic report and even natural disasters. Youll likely help your cause tomorrow by not overreacting to the headlines today. You will experience many changes in your life, such as a new job, new spouse, new children, new home, the empty nest and so on. Many of these changes may require changes in your investment strategy. You could jeopardize your progress toward your financial goals by not reviewing this strategy regularly at least once a year, in consultation with your financial advisor and making the necessary adjustments in response to your evolving life. By staying away from scary investment moves, you may well find that investing can be a positive, productive experience. And thats not a frightening thought at all. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@edwardjones.com. League Of Women V oters A program titled By the Numbers: Restoring the Caloosahatchee and Lake Okeechobee, is slated for Saturday, November 2, at 8:45 a.m. by the League of Women Voters of Lee County. Registration and networking is at 9 a.m. with breakfast and networking at 9:30. The program starts at 10:45 a.m. and will feature Ray Judah, former Lee County commissioner and coordinator for the Florida Coastal and Ocean Coalition. In addition, Kathy OFlinn, managing editor of Spotlight Magazines and former league member in New York will discuss her experiences as a member of the LWV Observer Corps. Following this presentation, league leadership will discuss the leagues commitment to informed and active participation in government, how it works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and ways to influence public policy through education and advocacy. The meeting will take place at the Drive, Fort Myers, and the public is invited. Cost for breakfast is $15. Reserve by October 29 by calling 278-1032 or e-mail lwvlee@yahoo.com. From page 12Using GPSnew users to GPS. The class will include discussions on marine navigation, how a GPS works and GPS limitations. There will be an extensive presentation on what a GPS can do and what a boater can do with GPS. For those interested in pur chasing a GPS, you will understand what a GPS can do for you and some of the key features to look for as you shop for a GPS. The cost of the class is $45. The class is being taught at the San Carlos Bay Sail & Power Squadron classroom located at 16048 San Carlos Boulevard, at the corner of Kelly Road (across from ACE Hardware). Students can register online at www.scbps.com or call 466-4040. Kathy OFlinn

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21 THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 2013 School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Shelley, My daughter is in high school and is required to take notes in her history and English classes. She is really struggling with note taking. It isnt coming naturally to her. What she does instead is doodle. Any ideas on helping her? Melanie G., Bonita, Florida Melanie, Effective note taking is an important but very difficult skill to acquire. There are many different types of note taking. To become proficient with this skill, instruction and practice are required. Most schools choose one method and provide some direction in using it for the students. There needs to be a good match between the note-taking system and what a student feels comfortable using in order for a student to get any benefit from the note taking process. It sounds like your daughter is not comfortable with what she doing now and not developing this important skill. You mentioned that your daughter enjoys doodling so maybe a visual note taking system would be beneficial for her although one really doesnt need drawing ability to use this technique. Visual note taking is also known as graphic visualization or sketch noting. So what is this visual note taking? According to Craighton Berman, visual note taking or sketchnotes is, essentially about transforming ideas into visual communication; structuring thoughts and giving hierarchy to concepts can be completed with strictly text and a few lines. He continues by saying that, This form of rapid visualization forces you to listen to the lecture, synthesize whats being expressed, and visualize a composition that captures the idea all in real time. Instead of recording whats being said verbatim, good sketchnotes capture the meaningful bits as text and drawings. Better sketchnotes use composition and hierarchy to give structure to the content, and bring clarity to the overall narrative of the lecture. The best sketchnotes express a unique personal style and add editorial comments on the content entertaining and informing all at once. Are sketchnotes for everyone? Absolutely! Again Berman suggests that as we all become more engaged with our social media tweets and messages and only partially engage in a teachers or speakers presentation, a sketchnoter is focused, singularly engaged in whats being said, and is fully engaging their mind to shape something from that content on the blank page in front of them. Wendi Pillars, a national board-certified teacher in English language learning says that she enjoys using sketchnotes while teaching and so do her students, including her third graders. She says the reasons she believes her students enjoy it so much is that sketchnoting is fun, it encourages critical thinking, imagining and synthesizing information. Sketchnotes utilizes all learning modalities and offers immediate visual feedback that helps the teacher understand where the student is in the learning process. To learn how to sketchnote visit http://www.core77.com/blog/sketchnotes/sketchnotes_101_visual_thinking_19518.asp Ms. Greggs is adjunct faculty at Edison State College where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also Nationally Certified School Psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. Local T een Awarded T itleAria Armstead was awarded the title of Miss Amity at the 2014 Miss Florida Teen USA pageant. Armstead, 15, competed in the 2014 Miss Florida Teen USA pageant from October 4 to 6. There were 65 delegates competing for the prestigious title, but she won Miss Amity hands down by her peers. She was the most helpful young lady there. Armstead also lifted the new delegates spirits and was a delight during the entire experience. Armstead has been competing in array of pageants since she was 3 years old. When she competed in the Miss Sarasota Teen USA and the Miss Sarasota USA pageant, Armstead was first runner up against a contestant who was the third runner up at the Miss Florida Teen USA pageant. She was crowned Miss Cape Coral Teen USA in 2013. Armstead is a Lexington Middle School student, where she is a track athlete. She is also a black belt in Ko AM Mu Du at the United Martial Arts Center, where she is a First Dan at Rank Blue. Armstead has been a Girl Scout of Gulfcoast Florida from a Brownie to a Cadette and enjoys tennis, playing the bass and completed her second year as a student at the National League Junior Cotillion at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center. Aria Armstead is the daughter of LaTasha Armstead, office manager for the Fort Myers Community Redevelopment Agency in the historic River District. Aria Armstead, 15, was named Miss Amity at the Miss Florida Teen USA pageant From page 11Conference On Modern Day SlaveryKeynote speaker Sr. Sallie Latkovich, CSJ, director of biblical study and travel at the Catholic Theological Union in Chicago, and former director of the House of Prayer, will awaken participants to spirit through the lens of the Gospel and the spirituality of the Sisters of St. Joseph. Local panelists will awaken participants to action. Panelists include Pastor Doug Burness, Florida Coalition Against Human Trafficking, Claire Comiskey, Interfaith Action of Southwest Florida, along with a Coalition of Immokalee Worker representative and Coleen Henderson, Abuse Treatment and Counseling (ACT). The conference will be held in the rear building of First Baptist Church of Fort Myers, 1735 Jackson Street. The cost is $30 pre-registration or $40 at the door. Student cost is $10. For more information and to make reservations, call 728-3614 or email moghop@gmail.com. A portion of the event proceeds will go to participating organizations. From page 17Opening Exhibit Artists Receptionincluding American Sign Language inter preters, assistive listening devices, alternative formats of printed materials and realtime captioning upon request for persons who are deaf, hard of hearing or are living with disabilities. To ensure accommodations, make your request within seven days prior to the event to jbenton@ actabuse.com Arts for ACT Gallery is located at 2265 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. Isabella Rasi 239-246-47161101 Periwinkle Way #105, Sanibel, FL 239-472-0044 ENGEL & VLKERS Excellence in Real Estate A step above! International Client Base 600 Shops Worldwide Multi-Lingual Staff Your success is my aim.Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702 or email press@riverweekly.com

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 201322 Path T o Wellness 5K R aises $9,000Nearly 200 runners and walkers participated in the 3rd annual Path to Wellness 5K Run/Walk October 5, raising $9,000 to help residents with mental health disorders in Southwest Florida. The event benefited the Lee County Chapter of NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) and SalusCare, the new not-for-profit formed by the merger of Lee Mental Health and Southwest Florida Addiction Services (SWFAS). The race was won by John Halas, 35, of Fort Myers, who ran the 3.1-mile course at Lakes Park in 18 minutes, 42 seconds. The top female finisher was Jennifer Fagan, 38, of Estero with a time of 22 minutes, 52 seconds. The top three finishers were awarded trophies or medals in nine age groups, for both men and women. Baseball players of the Gulf Coast League Red Sox, the rookie level minor league affiliate team of the Boston Red Sox, also participated in the walk/run with Jose Vinicio, 20, of Fort Myers setting a new record for males 20 to 24 years old at 23 minutes, 10 seconds. Roland Kraemer, 61, of Suhl, also set a new record for males ages 60 to 64, with a time of 21 minutes, 25 seconds. Race results and timing were provided by 3D Racing, Inc., of Cape Coral. Complete race results are available at www.3dracing.com. Major sponsors of the Path to Wellness were the Fort Myers Police Department and Park Royal Hospital with support from Genoa Healthcare, Lee Memorial Health System and Susan Bennett Marketing & Media. Nearly 200 runners and walkers participated in the 3rd annual Path to Wellness 5K Run/Walk Rachel Lee of 3D Racing, Inc., in Cape Coral prepares to start the race SalusCare CEO Kevin B. Lewis and psychiatrist Dr. Omar Rieche Members of the Gulf Coast League Red Sox, the rookie level minor league affiliate team of the Boston Red Sox, participated in the 5K Poker T ournament T o B enefit ACTAbuse Counseling and Treatment, Inc. (ACT) will host its first annual Bet on ACT Texas Holdem Poker Tournament in the poker room at Naples-Fort Myers Greyhound Track in Bonita Springs November 9. This is a professional run tournament and money will be awarded to first, second and third place. There will also be a silent auction. Doors will open early and players will be seated for play at 7 p.m. Tickets are available by calling Abuse Counseling and Treatment, Inc. at 9392553 or on the website www.actabuse. com. The cost is $50 to play and players receive 5,000 chips, and a re-buy for $50 to receive another 5,000 chips. All proceeds go to support the victims and sur vivors of domestic violence, sexual assault and human trafficking and their children. Sponsors for this years tournament are Deborah Ruddell DDS, PA, Encore National Bank and Gavins Ace Hardware, Inc. For more information, contact Jennifer Benton at jbenton@actabuse.com or Kay Timms at ktimms@actabuse.com. Jennifer Fagan of Estero accepts the award from SalusCare CEO Kevin B. Lewis as the top female finisher SalusCare Board Members Mark Atkins of Cape Coral and Ed Kleinow of Sanibel participated in the 5K John Halas of Fort Myers crosses the finish line as the winner From page 15About BonsaiBonsai Society of Southwest Florida, Inc., created to promote the knowledge and appreciation of bonsai, will present its 32nd annual Show and Sale on Saturday and Sunday, November 16 and 17 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Lee County Election Center, 13180 S. Cleveland Avenue (across from Bell Tower Shops) in Fort Myers. About 50 excellent bonsai (including one of my hardware store cascades) will be on public display; other bonsai and bonsai materials will be for sale, and raffles and auctions will be conducted, with proceeds to go to the Society. Demonstrations and beginner bonsai classes will be offered. Admission and parking are free. For more information, visit www.bonsaiswfl.com or call Jim Gehring at 7721411.

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23 THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 2013 Mom And Me by Lizzie and PryceLizzie and Pryce answer your questions and give advice about aging concerns from a two-generational perspective. A mother and daughter team, Lizzie is a retired RN and health educator, and Pryce is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in the care of elders and people with chronic illnesses. Dear Mom & Me, Our 85-year-old father was widowed two years ago and my sister and I would like him to move into a retirement complex. He lives in the family home with a year-old dog. The dog is his faithful companion and gets better care than most children. Our father has isolated himself, is lonely and has commented that he never thought widowhood would be so terrible and he now knows he didnt appreciate what he had. He is deter mined to stay because he likes his home. What do you suggest we do to try to convince him? Mary Liz Dear Mary Liz, Why try to convince him to do something you want him to do? He has lost his wife, your mother, now you want him to lose his home and sense of independence? Why not try to support him in his own home? If you think he is depressed, ask him to be evaluated by his physician. If you think he is lonely and isolated, ask him if that is how he feels, (Not how you think he feels). If he does feel lonely and isolated, open a discussion about how to reduce those feelings through community service and programming. Pryce Dear Mary Liz, If your father has decided to stay in his own home, that is his decision and his right and no amount of talking will change his mind. His memories are there and he feels comfortable there so that is where he should be. However, he may find it increasingly difficult and decide himself to make a change at a future date. Lizzie Lizzie and Pryces email address is momandmeaging@hotmail.com. deaRPharmacistMetal Allergies May C ause E czema by Suzy C ohen, R PhDear Pharmacist: I have eczema that comes and goes, and Im currently using a steroid cream which helps. I am sure when I stop the cream, it will return. Any advice? EH, Tampa, Florida There are many factors to consider when treating eczema, including the state of your digestive tract, immune system and what youre touching. First I would take high-quality probiotics because that helps both your digestive tract and immune system. Then I would eliminate common food triggers such as eggs, soy, wheat (gluten), dairy and corn. Next, look at what you touch. Some of you react to metals that contain nickel which is in coins, necklaces, eyeglasses, watches and rings, for example. A study was published in the July 2012 issue of Contact Dermatitis that is called Coin exposure may cause allergic dermatitis. We knew about this problem as far back as 1991, when a case report was published in the August issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology featuring a 48-year-old cashier with hand eczema and a genuine nickel allergy. Eczema is actually common in cashiers. If I had dyshidrotic eczema (hand eczema), I would stop counting out change, which I do frequently, much to the annoyance of people standing behind me. If you are one of these folks, its easy to remedy. I suggest that you remove all your jewelry and not touch coins for a few weeks. Definitely avoid white gold and costume jewelry. Think about what you are touching, maybe a metallic pen, a cell phone, gear shifter, stainless steel pots or a laptop keyboard. I found a product that tests for nickel in your items, so your skin doesnt have to. Its called The Nickel Solution Kit by Athena Allergy. You can also buy a little bottle of Nickel Guard from that company and paint it on your glasses or your jewelry to stop the rash you would normally get from these items. Theres a prescription drug called Psorizide Forte that contains fumaric acid which blocks the skin cells from growing wildly; it contains a homeopathic form of nickel which desensitizes you to nickel. Also by prescription, Eczemol tablets by Plymouth Pharmaceuticals. Thinking about a skin prick test or intradermal injections to gauge allergic reactions to metal? Um, can I just say no? Metal hypersensitivity blood tests are better. Visit www.melisa.org to find a suitable lab. The MELISA test detects sensitivities to gold, cobalt, chromium, palladium, titanium, tin, nickel, cadmium, mercury and others. This test may help someone with autism, scoliosis, multiple sclerosis, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia and osteoporosis. Your physician orders the blood test for you. Theres much more including soothing creams, teas, home remedies and medications all in my Eczema: Itchin For A Cure book, only available for E-readers on Amazon. You should also peruse the website for the National Eczema Foundation at www.eczema.org This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. dearpharmacist.com. Alzheimers Program At T he AllianceLee County Alliance for the Arts announces a new program, Artful Minds: An Alzheimers Art Tour, under the direction of Angel C. Duncan, MA, MFT, ATR, registered art therapist and marriage and family therapist, and Reina Lombardi, MA, ATR-BC, board certified registered art therapist. This medical arts tour will focus on the importance of art and science for those with Alzheimers Disease. Residents from Shell Point Retirement Community will be the first to kick off this ongoing series, starting October 25. Persons with Alzheimers Disease, along with their spouses, will have the opportunity to explore selected pieces of art from two upcoming exhibits: The Sinking World: The Mohawk Project, and Honor, Country and Heroism. Select pieces from each exhibit will be viewed and discussed, offering a sense of recognition, dignified conversations, and an opportunity to be engaged and involved. Alzheimers disease is a progressive, degenerative disease that often leaves the individual in isolation and disconnected from society. The Artful Minds program provides a safe and welcoming place for individuals to reconnect back into their community and find meaning and purpose once again. Lifelong memories become unlocked, relationships between loved ones become strengthened, and new or old passions for the arts become reawakened. Complementary to the selected artworks, John Davis, radio host from NPRWGCU, and a recognized cellist, has offered to play for attendees. Participants will also have the oppor tunity to get creative in the art studio, provided by Duncan and Lombardi. Duncan is the healthcare liaison and research educator at the Neuropsychiatric Research Center of Southwest Florida, specializing in clinical research studies for Alzheimers Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). Memory screenings and early detection are as crucial as the treatments themselves. Lombardi is an art therapist at Delta Family Counseling in Cape Coral and Fort Myers. In addition, she works parttime providing art therapy and mental health services at The Knox Academy, a small private school serving middle and high school students with social, emotional, behavioral and learning challenges. Artful Minds is about learning and celebrating art, music and science. It is a way of reintegrating individuals with Alzheimers disease back into society and being recognized as individuals, and not a disease. said Duncan. Meaningful engagement in the arts afford opportunities for intrinsic healing to take place. The Artful Minds program will provide opportunities for participants to engage in multiple diverse sensory experiences which are known to stimulate the mind, said Lombardi. Caregivers will be able to take back learned material and research opportunities, and the community will gain an awareness about Alzheimers disease, early interventions, and importantly, become involved. This three-week program is $75 per couple, and $40 per person who has early memory loss. One of the goals of this program is to find a sponsor to make it free for attendees. For more information, contact Brandi Couse, education director at the Alliance for the Arts, 9392787. From page 11Thanksgiving Donations Neededneedy families in time for the holidays, Russo said. Id like to extend this challenge to those business owners and individuals that have the means to do what they can to help those in need. If we have it, we should share it. I cant make it any simpler than that. Good Deals Appliance is located at 14680 S. Tamiami Trail in south Fort Myers. Call 437-9134. Blossoms for Birds A fresh bouquet of flowers can be yours between Monday and Friday, November 11 to 15. All you have to do is take a fresh or frozen turkey to Fort Myers Floral Designs, 11480 S. Cleveland Avenue on those dates. The turkeys will be donated to the Harry Chapin Food Bank for its Thanksgiving Turkey Drive, and youll take home the bouquet of flowers. Fort Myers Floral Designs owner Greg DePasquale notes that many non-profit agencies distribute turkeys and food to the needy at Thanksgiving, and the flower shop will help the food bank provide 9,000 turkeys to those agencies. The flower shop will have a refrigerated truck, and it hopes to fill it to the brim in the three days of the promotion. Turkeys can be dropped off between 8:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. at Fort Myers Floral Design (located at the Beacon Manor traffic light). It is not necessary to make previous arrangements. For more information, call 278-0770, visit http:// www.fortmyersfloraldesigns.com, or stop by the drive-up window. To contribute financially to the Harry Chapin Food Bank, call 334-7007 or go to www.harrychapinfoodbank.org.

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 201324 Womens Legacy Fund Presents Grant At Fall LuncheonThe Womens Legacy Fund (WLF) of the Southwest Florida Community Foundation (SWFLCF) presented $19,000 to support student mentoring at its annual fall luncheon on Thursday, October 10 at Shadow Wood Country Club. The luncheon included an update on the SWFLCFs first regional call to action called FutureMakers, a mentorship program created to help navigate graduating highschool seniors through their next big steps into the future. This cause was selected by the WLFs contributors during their spring luncheon held this past May, and their grant will provide support to the Community Foundation which is partnering with the most effective local organizations in the five-county region to address this regional community need. One of the partner organizations is The Foundation for Lee County Public Schools, Inc. Superintendent Nancy J. Graham, EdD was the luncheons keynote speaker. We all realize there are many issues facing our region, and sometimes deciding where to put our efforts to affect change can be challenging, said Sarah Owen, president and CEO of the SWFLCF. This years Womens Legacy Fund focus area has the potential to change the lives of many Southwest Florida students right now. The WLF is proving again that we, as women, are doing more together than we could ever do alone. In addition, the WLF welcomed two new Angels who were announced during the event. Pam Nulman honored Bonnie Olson, and the late Herbert Conant honored his wife Carolyn Conant, which was presented posthumously. The Angel honorary designation is for mothers, sisters, aunts, daughters, grandchildren, friends, loved ones and community leaders, either living or deceased, who have had a special impact on the lives of those around them. WLF members can make the special women in their lives a WLF Angel with a minimum contribution of $1,000 in their name. The contribution is endowed in the WLF so that it lives on in perpetuity, and the residual interest is used by the foundation to fund initiatives. In just five years of existence, the WLF has provided nearly $75,000 in grants to benefit people and communities in the Southwest Florida region. Currently, the fund has more than $270,000 in endowed funds that will continue to grow and help fund local issues now and in the future. Representatives from FutureMakers accept $19,000 check Jacqueline Ehlers, Carolyn Rogers and Donna Gillroy Pam Nulman and Bonnie Olson Elaine Green, Judi Hughes and Constance Jones Dena Gerahty, Jane de Lisser and Tara Molloy Rachel Rubinski, Dena Geraghty, Kitty Green, Dolly Farrell and Meg Geltner Madelon Stewart and Ruth Condit Meg Geltner and Cheryl Komnick Elaine Hawkins and Pam Beckman Gail Markham and Melissa Cofta

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25 THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 2013DID YOU KNOW My Stars FOR WEEK OF OCTOBER 28, 2013ARIES (March 21 to April 19) The high standards you set for yourself dont always translate into the behavior you expect of oth ers. That relationship problem can be resolved if youre more flexible and less judgmental. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Not enough party bids to satisfy the Bovines funloving side this week? Go ahead and throw one of your own. Then prepare for some seri ous work coming up early next week. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A new and intensely productive cycle is about to kick in. Be careful not to get too stressed out, though. Make time to restore your energies by relax ing with family and friends. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) This could be a good time to share some of your plans with those closest to you. Their comments could give you some added insight into how you might accomplish your goals. LEO (July 23 to August 22) An attack of self-doubt might be unsettling for the usually super-assured Feline. But it could be your inner voice telling you to hold off implement ing your plans until youve reassessed them. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) This is a great time for you to reward your self for all your hard work by taking a trip you havent spent months carefully planning, to somewhere you never thought youd be going. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Some misunderstandings resist being resolved. But your sincerity in wanting to soothe those hurt feelings wins the day. By months end, that relationship should begin to show signs of healing. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) A hectic job schedule begins to ease just in time to blow off all that work-generated steam on Halloween. A family situation runs into an unexpected complication. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A cutting remark in the workplace needs to be handled with finesse. Remember: How you respond could deter mine the depth of support you gain from col leagues. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Once again, that Capricornean stubborn streak sets in and could keep you from get ting much-needed advice. Fortunately, it lifts by weeks end, in time to make an informed decision. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A surprise trip early in the week could lead to other unexpected offers when you return. Word to the wise: Avoid talking too much about this until youve made some decisions. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Learning dominates the week for perspica cious Pisceans, who are always looking to widen their range of knowledge. A series of important job-linked commitments begins late in the week. BORN THIS WEEK: Your sense of humor generates good feelings and good will everywhere you go. Martin Luther nails to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany, a piece of that would begin the Protestant Reformation. In one, Luther condemned the corruption of the Catholic Church for asking for payment for the forgiveness of sins. a law against opium, morphine and cocaine. The new regulations allowed only doctors to prescribe these drugs, which had been legal for cures or pain relief. Wall Street as investors trade 16,410,030 shares. In the aftermath of Black Tuesday, America and the rest of the industrialized world spiraled downward into the Great Depression. By 1932, stocks were worth only about 20 percent of their value in the summer of 1929. Boat -the largest aircraft ever built -is piloted by designer Howard Hughes on its first and only flight. Built with laminated birch and spruce, the Spruce Goose had a wingspan longer than a football field and battle. nates the worlds first thermonuclear weapon, the hydrogen bomb, on Eniwetok atoll in the constructed hydrogen bombs. pleted on the Gateway Arch, a 630-foot-high parabola of stainless steel in St. Louis. An internal tram system takes visitors to the top, where on a clear day they can see up to 30 miles across the Mississippi and to the Great Plains to the west. been secretly selling arms to Iran in an effort to secure the release of seven American hos tages held by pro-Iranian groups in Lebanon. Within weeks, Attorney General Edwin Meese revealed that proceeds from the arms sales were diverted to fund Nicaraguan rebels. made the following sage observation: The is one of the wonders of the Western world. No First World country has ever managed to eliminate so entirely from its media all objec tivity -much less dissent. ably never encountered a tziganologist. That is, unless you consort with those who study Hungarian gypsies. ZZ Top, you probably think of a group of musicians with beards. They dont all have beards, though; the drummer is clean-shaven as a matter of safety (imagine being in the middle of a drum solo and getting a stick caught in a long beard -ouch!). Interestingly, the unbearded drummers name is Frank Beard. year, thousands of trees grow from caches of know that theyre collectively called a grumble. is I am a weakish speller. Incidentally, a person who comes up with anagrams is known as an anagrammatist. might want to add the island of Okunoshima or Rabbit Island, by locals because the bunnies there are tame and approach humans without fear. discovered that if you put a sea sponge in a blender and leave the resulting mess over night, the remaining cells will find each other and start forming a new sponge. An inconvenience is only an adventure wrongly considered; an adventure is an incon venience rightly considered. -Gilbert Keith Chesterton THIS WEEK IN HISTORY STRANGE BUT TRUE THOUGHT FOR THE DAY PUZZLE ANSWERS 1. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What is a group of owls called? bat erectile dysfunction? 6. GEOGRAPHY: In which country is the region of Lombardy located? now? TRIVIA TEST 1. A parliament 2. New York 3. A sentence that contains all 26 letters of a languages alpha ANSWERS SPORTS QUIZ 1. How many consecutive full major-league seasons did Stan Musial hit at least .300? 2. Earl Weaver is third on the list of most wins by a major-league manager who never was a major-league player (1,480 wins). Who are the top two? 3. Which two teams, entering the 2013 NFL season, had recorded the most victories on Monday Night Football? 4. In the 2011-12 season, center Cody Zeller recorded the second-highest field-goal percentage (62.3 percent) in Indiana Hoosiers history. Who had the highest? Stanley Cup? 6. Who was the last NASCAR driver before Jimmie Johnson in 2013 to win the two NASCAR Cup races in Daytona in the same year? in Wimbledon history (four hours, 43 minutes). Who was in the previously longest match? ANSWERS San Francisco, with 43 wins each. 4. Matt Nover made 62.8 percent of his shots in the 1992-93 season.

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 201326 Read us online at IslandSunNews.com TREE & LAWN CARE Jesus Hernandez LANDSCAPING & TREE SERVICE 482-7350 We Service All your Landscape Needs FULL Landscaping SERVICES Over 20 years serving San-Cap & Ft. Myers GENERAL CONTRACTOR N C R CGC1517615239-593-1998 COSMETICS MAGGIE BUTCHER Career information available Gift ideas available ALWAYS A GIFT WITH PURCHASE! CONTRACTOR G I P M SR C D P D P CG D GrSince 2001, A Southwest Florida Paver Contractor www.gigicompanies.com 239-541-7282Schedule free estimates or visit our new show roomLic.# S3-12238 HARDWOOD FLOORING (239) 896-3670 CRC-1329678 JOSEPHGIBSON03@COMCAST.NET ATLANTIC CONSTRUCTION & DESIGN, LLCQUALITY & EXPERIENCE ARE THE FOUNDATION OF OUR COMPANY Eggplant Dip 1 1/2 large eggplants, halved Olive oil cooking spray 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 onion, coarsely chopped 1 clove garlic, minced 1 1/2 tomatoes, coarsely chopped 1/2 tablespoon hot paprika 1 1/2 tablespoons plain low-fat yogurt Coarsely ground black pepper 1 1/2 tablespoons sliced basil Heat oven to 350 degrees F. Coat eggplants with cooking spray. Roast 1 hour. Scoop pulp into a sieve lined with cheesecloth and drain 1 hour. Remove pulp, pure in food processor and transfer to a bowl. Heat oil in a saut pan over medium heat. Cook onion 5 minutes or until soft. Add garlic; cook 3 minutes or until soft. Add tomatoes and paprika; cook 3 to 5 minutes. Let cool. Stir yogurt into pure, then add onions and tomatoes. Season with salt and pepper. Chill 30 minutes. Garnish with basil. Serve with raw vegetables. Eggplant Dip

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27 THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 2013 answer on page 27 PUZZLE ANSWERS SUDOKU SCRAMBLERS FIND AT LEAST SIX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PANELS CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING COMPUTERS FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the bene ts of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 BUILDING CONTRACTOR FISHING CHARTER Light Tackle Sport Fishing CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.com PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 201328 REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS SERVICES OFFERED SERVICES OFFEREDROGER NODRUFF ELECTRICLic# EC12002788. Call Roger 239-707-7203. Aqualink Motor Controls. RS 6/7 CC TFN HELLES CLEANING SERVICES NS 1/4 PC TFN ISABELLA RASiI HAPPY TO HELP Y YOU WithITH A ALL OOF Y YOUrR REAL EEStT At TE NEEDS! RS 1/4 NC TFN 1101 Periwinkle Way #105 Sanibel, FL 33957 ISABELLA RASiI (239) 246-4716 E ISABELLARASi I@AOL.COM www.crowclinic.orgHELP US PLEASE!! Visitor education center greeters and gift RS 1/4 NC TFN NURSERY ATTENDANT Nursery Attendant for year round on Background check and references NS 10/11 CC TFN HELP WANTED ANNUAL RENTALQUIET SANIBEL HOME W/PRIVATE BEACH PATH NS 5/31 CC TFN RE/MAX OF THE ISLANDSPutting owners and tenants together Call Dustyn Corace RS 1/4 BM TFN VACATION RENTAL Island VacationsMillion $ Views Await You! Cottages Condos Homes 239-472-72771-888-451-7277RS 1/4 BM TFN LIGHTHOUSE REALTY 239-579-0511RS 1/4 CC TFN RESERVATIONS MGR skills and working weekends are required. Please forward resume to NS 10/18 CC 11/1 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Call Michelle Wesley 239-910-8000RS 1/4 NC TFN VOLUNTEERS NEEDEDVolunteers needed for the RS 1/4 NC TFN HELP WANTEDMOBILE HOME PERIWINKLE PARK information or to make offer. RS 10/25 CC TFN CUSTODIAL POSITION SANIBEL PUBLIC LIBRARY NS 10/25 CC 10/25 HELP WANTED NS 10/25 CC 11/1 FOR SALEYAMAHA ELECTRIC KEYBOARD ELECTRIC KEYBOARD NS 10/18 CC 10/25 TABLE TENNIS PING PONG OUTDOOR -KETTLER 239-898-0732NS 10/25 CC 10/25 ANTIQUE STONEWARE FOR SALEANTIQUE POTTERY CROCKS FOR SALE BY THE PIECE OR AS A LOT Pictured is a 1-gallon salt-glazed whiskey Ganning Tamworth 2-tone crock. Both Prices range $10-$30. NS 10/25 NC TFN SCARNATO LAWN SERVICE RS 1/25 BM TFN SANIBEL HOME WATCH Will Check Your Home Weekly (239) 728-1971RS 1/4 BM TFN HOME/CONDO WATCH CONCIERGE SERVICES Island Resident ECOHOME PLANS DRAWN NS 10/25 CC 11/08 S. FL LINE DANCE required. Audience: adults and seniors. NR 10/25 CC 10/25 AFFORDABLE HOME CARE NS 10/25 CC TFN

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29 THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 2013 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS BOATS CANOES KAYAKSDOCKAGEHourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-5800RS 1/4 NC TFN WANTED TO BUYCASH PAID FOR MILITARY ITEMSCash Paid For Old Military Items. Medals, Swords, Uniforms, helmets, old guns, awards & more. Local Toll Free 1-866-440-3280RS 9/6 CC 11/29 FICTITIOUS NAMEFICTITIOUS NAMENOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in Total Cleaning Solutions of SWFL, located in Lee County, Florida with an address of 12620 Equestrian Circle, #1708,Ft. Myers, FL 33907 has registered said name with The Division of Corporations of the Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated the 18th Day of October, 2013 Edward Gola Leslie GolaNS 10/25 CC 10/25 PETSFREE KITTEN TO GOOD HOMEFree kitten to good, safe home. No de-clawing. Fiesty Bengal mix. Call 472-1788 after 5 p.m.NS 5/31 NC TFN 2 MALE GUINEA PIGS 2 Male Guinea Pigs (12 mos old) free with cage and all accessories. Moving to home that will not allow pets. Please call Beth at 410-4421 or email esk1966@comcast.netNS 10/4 NC TFN TOOL BOX WASHES UP ON SANIBELThis tool box with motor parts washed up on shore Saturday morning, May 8 about 8:30 on the beach at Sundial Resort on Sanibel Island. To claim call Sundial Resort Security 239-472-4151.NS 6/14 CC TFN LOST AND FOUNDFOUNDPrescription sunglasses found in parking lot of Limetree Center on Wednesday, February 27. Claim at Island Sun newspaper, suite 2 in Limetree Center, or call 395-1213.NS 3/8 NC TFN LOST AND FOUNDLOST CAT BLACK FEMALEIsland East End. Please Call 239-277-0058 or 239-579-0050.NS 10/25 CC 10/25 Last Chance To See Sinking World Exhibit At The Alliance For The ArtsSince it opened on October 4, hundreds of people have visited the Alliance for the Arts to see Austrian photographer Andreas Frankes Sinking World exhibit. It features oversized images encased in steel-framed Plexiglas that spent months at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico affixed to the WWII era Coast Guard Cutter The Mohawk. Frankes pieces surreally merge photos of the sunken ship with photos of actors dressed in 1940s attire. The exhibit has received a great amount of attention and garnered wide acclaim. It closes on Saturday, October 26. Paintings by Beverly Taht are featured in the Member Gallery. Paintings by David Robinson are in the Theatre Lobby. Visit ArtInLee.org or call 939-2787 for more information. The Alliance for the Arts galleries are open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays during GreenMarket. The Alliange is at 10091 McGregor Boulevard just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Sinking World exhibit North Fort Myers Recreation Center To OpenThe public is invited to join Lee County officials and the North Fort Myers community at 10 a.m. on Friday, October 25 for a celebration of the opening of the North Fort Myers Recreation Center. The ribbon-cutting event will be held at the new center, located at 2000 North Recreation Park Way in North Fort Myers. Following the ceremony, people can take self-guided tours and enjoy refreshments. Lee County Parks & Recreations newest state-of-the-art recreation center, construction on the North Fort Myers Recreation Center started in August 2012 in the existing North Fort Myers Community Park. Its 35,000 square feet comprise multipurpose rooms for meetings, youth and adult recreational and educational programs, a fitness center, game room and a gymnasium. The gymnasium has a multipurpose basketball and volleyball courts built to high-level traveling-tournament standards. Other sports can be played on the hardwood floor. The center is constructed of concrete, masonry and steel. It will serve as a Lee County emergency shelter. The center also has an outdoor covered patio that overlooks a green space for community events and performances. For directions to the North Fort Myers Recreation Center or more information about this and other Lee County Parks & Recreation facilities, visit www.leeparks. org. Oktoberfest 5K For United WayOn October 26, in conjunction with the German American Social Club, LCEC will be holding its 2nd annual LCEC Oktoberfest 5K to benefit the United Way. The 5K Run/ Walk and Tot Trot will be held at Jim Jeffers Park in Cape Coral. Registration begins at 6:30 a.m. and the race starts at 7:30 a.m. The Tot Trot will immediately follow the 5K. Advance registration is $25 for ages 18 and over ($30 the day of), $20 for age 17 and younger ($30 the day of), and $10 for the Tot Trot (ages 12 and under). Last years event raised over $6,000 for United Way of Lee, Hendry, and Glades Counties with more than 300 runners, walkers, volunteers and supporters attending. For race information, visit www.uw.lcec. net/5k.html, email Oktoberfest5K@lcec. net or call 656-2342. Fort Myers Institute Of Technology To Hold Open HouseFort Myers Institute of Technology (FMIT) will hold an open house on Saturday, November 2 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The public is invited to tour the campus and see their modern training facility at this free event. Join faculty, staff and students for program demonstrations, free manicures, free blood pressure checks, a car show and much more. Lunch will be available for a nominal charge and door prizes will be given away throughout the day. FMIT offers over 30 career training programs, ranging from Practical Nursing, Automotive Technology, Marine Service Technology, Drafting, Building Construction Technology, Plumbing Technology, Electronic Technology, Accounting, Cosmetology and many, many more. FMIT has been the leading provider of career training in Lee County for over 45 years. The school offers both full-time day programs and part-time evening programs. Bright Futures scholarships are accepted and adults may be eligible for financial aid or scholarships. All students are assisted with job placement. The school, part of the School District of Lee County, is accredited by the Council on Occupational Education and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Call 334-4544 or visit www.fortmyer stech.edu for more information.

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If you would like your club/organization listed in The River Calling Card, phone 415-7732 Emergency . ......................................................................................... 911 Lee County Sheriffs Ofce . ........................................................ 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol . ................................................................ 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol . .............................................................. 278-7100 Poison Control . ................................................................ 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center . ....................................... 1-800-936-5321Ft. Myers Chamber of Commerce . ............................................. 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare . .............................................. 425-2685 Ft. Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce . .................................. 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library . ......................................................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library . ............................................................ 533-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce . .......................................... 931-0931 Post Ofce . ..................................................................... 1-800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau . ..................................................... 338-3500 ARTS Alliance for the Arts . .................................................................. 939-2787 Art of the Olympians Museum & Gallery . ................................... 332-5055 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio . .................................................. 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers . ......................................................... 275-3970 Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall . ...................................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS . ................................................................................ 395-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre . ............................................... 278-4422 Cultural Park Theatre . ................................................................ 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light . ............................................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade . .................................. 332-4488 Florida West Arts . ...................................................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers ....................................... 472-0168 Gulf Coast Symphony . ............................................................... 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres . ..................................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic . ........................................................... 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater . ......................................................... 472-6862 S.W. Florida Symphony . ............................................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy . .................................................................. 936-3239 Young Artists Awards . ................................................................ 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAngel Flight . ................................................................ 1-877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center . ............................................................... 731-3535 American Business Women Association . ................................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL . ..................................................................... 339-8046 Audubon Society . ....................................................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR . .................................................. 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society . ................................................... 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus . ................................. 1-855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club . ............................................................ 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees . ....................................................... 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists . ............................................................ 415-2484 Ft Myers UDC Chapter 2614 (United Daughters of the Confederacy . .................................. 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL . ...................................................... 561-9164 The Horticulture and Tea Society . ............................................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society . ................................................................. 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society . ............................................. 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation . ........................................... 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees . ............. 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America . .......................................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL . .................................................... 667-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans . .................................................. 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy . ........................................ 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association . ........................................ 561-2118 Kiwanis Clubs: Fort Myers Beach ................................................. 765-4254 or 454-8090 Fort Myers Edison . ..................................................................... 694-1056 Fort Myers South . ...................................................................... 691-1405 Gateway to the Islands .............................................................. 415-3100 Iona-McGregor .......................................................................... 482-0869Lions Clubs:Fort Myers Beach ...................................................................... 463-9738 Fort Myers High Noon . ............................................................... 466-4228 Estero/South Fort Myers . ........................................................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County . .............................................. 768-0417 POLO Club of Lee County ......................................................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers . ......................................................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society . ................................................ 472-6940 United Way of Lee County . ........................................................ 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) . ................................. 211 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews Shell Museum . ................................................ 395-2233 Burroughs Home . ...................................................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium . ........................................ 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates . ................................................... 334-3614 Fort Myers Skate Park . .............................................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium . ............................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge . ................................ 472-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site . .............................................. 239-992-0311 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center . ....................... 765-8101 Skatium . ...................................................................................... 321-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society . ........................................ 939-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History . ...................................... 321-7430 True Tours . ................................................................................. 945-0405 Pets Of The Week SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 27 THE RIVER OCTOBER 25, 201330 Hello, my name is Brodie. Im a 6-year-old neutered male brindle Borzoi mix. Did you know that Borzoi are described as long-haired grey hounds? Can you see the resemblance? I am handsome, quiet, know my house manners and, in general, I am a joy to have around. Once we meet, you will love me as much as I love you. My adoption fee is $25 during Animal Services Dogtober & Caturday adoption promotion. Hello, my name is Rufus. Im a 6-month-old male black and white domestic medium hair. Im an adorable little tuxedo kitten with white on my chest, feet and nose. My cuteness isnt my best feature, however. Sometimes, kitties are either playful or cuddly... but Im happy to do both. As long as you hold me, I will purr away. I can enter tain myself for hours playing with my toys, too. My adoption fee is $25 during Animal Services Dogtober & Caturday adoption promotion. For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to Animal Services website at www.LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if three months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs six months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500. Rufus ID# 572128 Brodie ID# 366754 photos by squaredogphoto.com

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BEACH CHAIR PASTIME Answers on page 2531 THE RIVER OCTBOER 25, 2013

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