<%BANNER%>

River weekly news ( July 12, 2013 )

PRIVATE ITEM Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
River weekly news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date:
July 12, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00101363:00197

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
River weekly news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date:
July 12, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00101363:00197


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

FREETake Me Home VOL. 12, NO. 40 OCTOBER 11, 2013From the B eaches to the R iver District downtown Fort MyersRead Us Online at IslandSunNews.com Sunday Afternoon B luegrass At T he Alliance For T he ArtsThe Acoustic Music Society of Southwest Florida brings bluegrass music back to the Foulds Theatre at the Alliance for the Arts on Sunday, October 13 from 2 to 5 p.m. The show features the Palm Bay-based Highway 41, The Bean Pickers from Naples, and the Fort Myers-based Bugtussle Ramblers. The Sunday afternoon concert series continues on November 3 and December 8. Tickets are $7 at the door; $5 for Alliance members. Seating is open and first come, first served. Children 12 and under are free if accompanied by an adult. Doors open at 1:30 p.m. Visit www.artinlee.org or call 939-2787 for more information. The Alliance for the Arts is at 10091 McGregor Boulevard just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. T ickets On Sale For PACE LuncheonPACE Center For Girls of Lee County will host its 7th annual luncheon on Thursday, November 14 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre in Fort Myers. The Planting Seeds With PACE gardenthemed event will gather 400 community leaders for an uplifting celebration to help girls facing abuse, neglect and abandonment reach new heights and a brighter future. The goal of the luncheon is to raise awareness as well as raise $50,000 in operating support for the Lee Center. Tickets are $75 per person or $500 for a reserved table for eight and can be purchased online at www.pacecenter. org/lee. You may also call the PACE Lee office and purchase tickets at 425-2366 ext. 58 and 25. In addition to raising critical funds to support the PACE mission and recognizing major donors, Senator Lizbeth Benacquisto will be honored as Senator of the Year by representatives from PACE, Inc.s state office headquartered in Jacksonville. The program will also include special announcements including an update on PACE Lees capital campaign. The Planting Seeds With PACE luncheon is being chaired by Diana Willis and emceed by NBC-2 news anchor Kellie Burns. Lead sponsors include Lee Memorial Health System, Publix Supermarket, CenturyLink and Investors Security Trust Company. Luncheon sponsors also include Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre, Jasons Deli, Caloosa Tent & Rental, Ruth Messmer Florist, Palm Printing, Red Door Studio and Blue Dahlia Salon. Before I came to PACE, I was being bullied by other girls, and I made a lot of poor choices. I was always trying to make friends, but I picked the wrong ones, said PACE girl, Kelsey, age 15, PACE is helping me figure out who I am. I want to be a good person. The success of the PACE program in transforming young girls into productive members of our society benefits the entire community, said Willis, event chair, We are grateful for our many friends and partners who have wholeheartedly embraced continued on page 19 Family Fun Day At T he AllianceCelebrate the changing season with your family and friends at the Alliance for the Arts on Saturday, October 19 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. during Fall for the Arts 2013. This annual free family festival features live performances, games, art and craft stations, a dunk tank and face painting. Families will be able to explore Florida Repertory Theatres Costume Trunk, Gulf Coast Symphonys mini Musical Discovery Zone, the Southwest Florida Symphonys Instrument Petting Zoo, and Trouper the Blind Raccoon will be back by popular demand. Kids can participate in the Fall for the Arts Creativity Contest where one lucky student will win a free week of art camp. There will be dozens of booths, with artists displaying and demonstrating their work, as well as cultural organizations presenting their upcoming seasons. Food and beverages will be available. The Performance Schedule: 10:30 a.m. Dance Bochette 11 a.m. NFM Academy for the Arts Steel Drum Band 11:30 a.m. Kellyn Celtic Arts Irish Dance Noon The Todd Greene Experience 12:30 p.m. Gulfshore Ballet 1 p.m. Young Artists Awards 1:30 p.m. Creative Theater Workshops 2 p.m. Dance Alliance 2:30 p.m. Florida Repertory Theatre 3 p.m. Heart & Soles Dance Troupecontinued on page 15 Ms. Silvias Face Painting Young dancers will perform for the crowd Bugtussle Ramblers

PAGE 2

THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 20132 Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now:Gays Laundryby Gerri Reaves, PhDIn October 1926, John E. and Thomas P. Gay held a threeday reception at their laundry and dry cleaning business. The historic photo captures the fanfare of the occasion, with company trucks lined up in front of building and drivers in crisp white uniforms, ready for deliveries. The up-to-date facility was located on Evans Avenue at Thompson Street and occupied much of the block. In the early twentieth century, that section east of the core downtown business district was a combination of industrial and residential struc tures, including plants such as Gays Laundry. It still is today. Gays Laundry was established in 1911 as Fort Myers Laundry, with Thomas Gay managing it in the 19-teens. A new building was con structed during that decade. In 1920, his brother moved from Atlanta to join the business, which eventually became Gays Laundry & Dry Cleaning Company. The plant advertised an electrolitic process for sterilizing linen, in which the chlo rine in table salt was rendered active to electricity. Who could argue with a claim such as, This electrolitic sodium hypochlorite is the most powerful antiseptic known to science? The laundrys ads must have been appealing to the hardworking housewife of the 1920s, especially if she didnt have a modern washing machine: If washday worries vex your spirit, bundle your troubles in a laundry bag and send them to us. Ads promised inconspicuous marking of clothes, sousing and rinsing in suds and soft water, ironing without scorching, immaculate finishes and more puzzling drying without flapping. This large steam-laundry housed several water-related businesses, including a soft water plant. There was a local market for table water, for the sulphur water from the city drinking supply was distasteful to many people. During the boom years of the late 1920s, Gays Service Company sold Misto table water from their distillation plant. The sign in the left foreground advertises Gays automobile-washing busi ness, which involved soft water and Simonizing. But the boom years didnt last, and by the end of the decade, the Gay brothers suffered bankruptcy. In the 1930s, it was running under new opera tors. In 1936, Frank A. Prather, who had been in the laundry business in Fort Myers since 1926, bought Gays building and moved his business there. He built a new plant on the site in 1949. Today, a shutter business is located there. Visit the corner of Evans and Thompson, where the Gay brothers washed away vexing laundry problems and then delivered clean bundles to the door steps of countless Fort Myers homes. Then, drop by the Southwest Florida Museum of History at 2031 Jackson Street to learn more about the industrial section on the east side of town. For information, call 321-7430 or go to www.museumofhistory.org. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. If local history interests you, be sure to check out the Southwest Florida Historical Society, the place to do research. The all-volunteer non-profit organization is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Drop by on Wednesday or Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon, or call them at 939-4044. Sources: Archives of the Southwest Florida Historical Society and The Story of Fort Myers by Karl H. Grismer. The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, please call (239) 415-7732 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, FL 33901. Fax number: (239) 415-7702. E-mail: press@riverweekly.com. The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Co-Publishers Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Isabel Rasi Office Coordinator Graphic Arts/ProductionAnn Ziehl Photographer Michael Heider Writers Anne Mitchell Jeff Lysiak PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Contributing Writers Read Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com Click on The River Ed Frank Max Friedersdorf Tom Hall Today, the laundry plant built by Frank Prather in 1949 stands on the site photo by Gerri Reaves Gays Laundry and Dry Cleaning Plant at Evans Avenue and Thompson Street held a reception from October 23 to 25, 1926 courtesy of the State Archives of Florida

PAGE 3

3 THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 2013 Daily Tours Offered At The EstatesThe Edison & Ford Winter Estates, open year round, seven days a week, from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. The site honors the legacy of the Thomas Edison and Henry Ford families through science, history, arts, programs and tours. Every day of the week, visitors have the option of an Historian Led Tour, Audio Tour in English German, Spanish or French or a Lab and Museum Tour. Throughout the week, Edison Ford offers specialty tours which include: Language Tour that includes a historian led tour of the homes, gardens, lab and museum in German. The Scenes Tour that takes you inside and up close in the Edison and Ford homes led by curatorial staff. Mucker/Young Inventors Tour for children of all ages. Includes hands-on science activities based on the inventions of Thomas Edison and Henry Ford. Lab/Museum Hands-On Science, a behind-the-scenes program inside the lab and museum. The insider program includes invention demonstrations and other activities. The Edison & Ford Winter Estates is Fort Myers. It is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. For additional information, winterestates.org. The Edison & Ford Estates is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. photos by Mike Shapiro The Behind The Scenes Tour on Thursdays takes visitors inside the Edison & Ford Estates. Pictured at left is Chris Pendleton, president and CEO Fort Myers Beach Shrine Club Hosts OktoberfestT will be hosting the Potentate of Araba Shriners illustrious Sir Troy will be provided by Ron Gruno and his Luxemburg squeeze box. He will play Mussudenn, Einprosit, Du, Du Liest, Mirinherzen and many others, together with the good old oompah-pa music. served at 7 p.m. For those who prefer fish. All Shriners, Masons and their guests our Oktoberfest has something for everyone. per person, which includes everything: food, music, dancing, entertainment, tax, tips and a lot of laughter, fun and much, much more. Make your reservations early 33 Patio DeLeon, Downtown Fort Myers (239) 337-3377OPEN Tues-ur 11am-10pm, Fri 11am-11pm, Sat 3-11pm Closed Sun & Mon Lazy Flamingo, Inc. 6520-C Pine Avenue Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-5353 Lazy Flamingo 3, Inc. 16501 Stringfellow Rd Bokeelia, FL 33922 239-283-5959 Lazy Flamingo 2, Inc. 1036 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-6939 Lazy Flamingo 4, Inc. 12951 McGregor Blvd. Ft. Myers, FL 33919 239-476-9000 Four Great Locations! We have the NFL Ticket Package and the BIG TEN Network NOW SERVING FULL LIQUOR IN FORT MYERS 20 Wings & Domestic Pitcher for $20 during all College and Pro GamesF M

PAGE 4

THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 20134 Fort Myers Public Art: Edisons Black Maria Film Festival Returnsby Tom HallThe Thomas Edison Black Maria Film Festival returns for its seventh season to the Edison & Ford Winter Estates on November 1 and Edison State College (n/k/a Florida Southwestern State College) on November 2. The Black Maria Film Festival is an international, award-winning festival showcasing independent and experimental film and video. Hosted by museums and colleges throughout the country, it has toured the nation for 32 years. Its films include a variety of contemporary works drawn from the annual juried selection of award-winning films and videos. At Florida Southwestern, the festival takes place in the plush Rush Library auditorium. But at the Edison & Ford Winter Estates, the films air under the stars shining down on the riverside lawn of The Mangoes, Henry and Clara Fords Fort Myers home adjoining friend Thomas Edisons rambling winter estate. Its a romantic, garden setting that serves as a perfect backdrop for a film festival that bears the name of the inventor and the studio where his team made the first commercially-exhibited motion pictures. Seeking to design an instrument that does for the eye what the phonograph does for the ear, Edison and experimental staff member W.K.L. Dickson invented a motion picture camera and a peephole viewing device called the Kinetoscope in 1892. The devices were shown publicly for the first time in 1893, with the first Edison films being exhibited commercially a year later. Those films were made in the Black Maria, a tar-paper shack at Edisons West Orange laboratory. The roof of the Black Maria lifted up to let sunlight in because early films required a tremendous amount of bright light. The studio was built on a turntable so the window could rotate toward the sun throughout the day, supplying natural light for hundreds of Edison movie productions over its eight year lifespan. But the facility was so cramped and uncomfortable that it reminded Dickson and fellow Edison employee Jonathan Campbell of Black Marias (police vans that were also called paddywagons at the time), which were notoriously cramped, stuffy and a similar black color. While Dickson, Campbell and the rest of Edisons staff wryly called the studio the Black Maria, Edison simply referred to it as The Doghouse. One of the first films that Dickson made in the Black Maria was Fred Otts Sneeze ( The Edison Kinetoscopic Record of a Sneeze). Made to accompany an article in Harpers Weekly for publicity purposes, the film consists of a series of still photographs of Dicksons colleague, Fred Ott, sneezing comically for the camera. It became one of the earliest motion pictures to receive a copyright. When word spread about the new invention, performers flocked to the Black Maria from all over the country in order to be in the films. The silent movies that Dickson and his cohorts subsequently made featured dancers, boxers, magicians, vaudeville performers and even acts from Buffalo Bills Wild West Show. The performers appearances at the studio were used as publicity opportunities by Edison, who would often pose with the actors for newspaper articles. The studio was closed in 1901 after Edison built a glass-enclosed rooftop movie studio in New York City. Two years later, Edison had the building demolished, but the U.S. National Park Service maintains a reproduction of the Black Maria that was built in 1954 at what is now the Edison National Historic Site in West Orange. Tickets for the Seventh Annual Thomas Edison Black Maria Film Festival are available at the Edison Ford ticket office located at 2350 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. Cost: November 1 Edison Ford members and students $5, non-members $8; November 2 general public $8, Edison State College students free; $15 for both nights. For more information and updates, visit the Edison & Ford Winter Estates website at www.edisonfordwinterestates.org. The Edison Ford is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. The Edison Ford is the winner of the 2009 National Stewardship Award from the National Trust for Historic Preservation and is an official project of Save Americas Treasures at the National Trust for Historic Preservation, a Florida Historic Landmark and a National Register Historic Site. For additional information, call 334-7419 or visit www.edisonfordwinterestates.org. An arts advocate, Tom Hall guides weekly walking tours of the River Districts public art collection in Fort Myers. For more information, go to www.truetours.net. The Black Maria Film Festival showcases independent and experimental films and videos CONTINENTAL CUISINEAT THEIR NEW HOME. 20351 SUMMERLIN ROAD, FORT MYERS. ACROSS FROM TANGER FACTORY OUTLETS. IN THE PUBLIX SHOPPING PLAZA. Courtneys has something for everyone. Come & see why Courtneys aims to please!239.466.4646Chef Dale Tonell Award Winning Classic Cuisine Voted Best Chef Chef Dale Tonell SUNSET DINING SPECIAL4-6PMHAPPY HOUR DAILY4PM-7PM $3.00 HOUSE WINES$3.00 WELL DRINKS$2.00 OFF APPETIZERS AT THE BAR FROM 4-6PMLUNCH SERVED DAILY AT 11AMSUNDAY BRUNCH10AM TO 2PM MAKE HOLIDAY RESERVATIONSTODAY! Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Downtown Fort Myers (Post Oce Arcade Next to Hotel Indigo) 1520 Broadway For Takeout & Delivery Tel: 334-6991 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEKMon-urs 11am 10pm Fri-Sat 11am 11pm Sun 12pm 9pm www. ichiban-sushi-chinese.com

PAGE 5

5 THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 2013 First Annual Pier-2-Pier Cruise The 1st annual Pier-2-Pier Cruise from the Fort Myers Pier to the Naples Pier will be held on Saturday, November 2. Proceeds from the event will be donated to the Harry Chapin Food Bank to help provide food for the needy during the holidays. Bikes meet at Naples Harley-Davidson at 10:30 a.m. When they register, they receive a wristband. The cost of each wristband is $5 or two cans of food for the Harry Chapin Food Bank. One hundred percent of the money and food collected goes to the food bank. Kickstands go up at noon. Bikers will follow the route to Jacks Bait Shack. There will be a sheriffs escort from Naples Harley-Davidson to Jacks Bait Shack. Then, the bikers are on their own to travel to the other token stops along Fort Myers Beach. From there, they ride to Miromar Outlets, where they can enjoy a free concert featuring Big Engine. Show cars meet at Fort Myers HarleyDavidson at 10:30 a.m. They will also receive a wristband when they register. Again, each wristband is $5 or two cans of food for the Harry Chapin Food Bank, with all money and food collected going to the food bank. Show cars start their engines at noon. They will follow the route to The Lazy Flamingo, then on to the other token stops along Fort Myers Beach. There will be a sheriffs escort from Fort Myers Harley-Davidson to The Lazy Flamingo. Then, the show cars are on their own to the other token stops along Fort Myers Beach. From there, they drive to Miromar Outlets, where they can enjoy a free concert featuring Big Engine. Along the route, each rider/driver/passenger with a wristband will receive tokens at designated locations. By picking up tokens at all designated stops, they will be eligible to participate in the $1,000 cash drawing at Miromar Outlets. The winner will be selected during the concert. Each token stop will have four volunteers from local car and bike organizations: HOG Chapter Car Club teer group) group) group) Club Chapter All of the volunteers will be automatically be eligible for the $1,000 cash drawing at tion would like to man one of the token stops Pier-2-Pier chairperson, at jodahanlon@ Nilles, volunteer organizer, at anilles@nillesdeRIV Nellies Upstairs Waterside Bar Where its Happy Hour all the time!!! 10% OFF Offer valid with Cash payments only ... No credit cards. ONE COUPON PER TABLE Can not be used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, Expires Oct. 18, 2013 Lunch, Dinner Snacks in Between11am-10pmPLUS LIVE MUSIC! www.nervousnellies.net FREE MARINA DOCKAGE with Dock Attendants Assistance

PAGE 6

THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 20136 Gardening Workshops R esumeGreenMarket Saturday workshops resume Saturday, October 5 at the Alliance for the Arts. The kick-off workshop will focus on kitchen gardens and the vegetables, herbs and fruits Southwest Florida yields during fall and winter months. The workshop begins at 10:30 a.m. Knowledgeable local growers and gar deners will guide visitors through proven practices and methods to optimize output from small residential spaces and by using organic methods. The first workshop will cover the basics of soil preparation, raised bed placement, and recommended seasonal crops. A demonstration at one of the raised beds at the Alliance campus will follow the class. Visitors who want to participate in the practical demonstration are encouraged to wear hats and appropriate clothes, and to drink plenty of fluids. The GreenMarkets mission is to encourage sustainability by supporting local growers and artisans, and by educating visitors about simple, fun steps they can take to reduce pollution, exercise and live a healthier life. The workshops will continue on the first and third Saturdays of the month through March. Presenters will cover everything you need to know to grow a successful organic garden, including soil preparation, growing techniques, earth-friendly pest control, crop selection, what to do with small or shady spaces, preserving the harvest, and composting. The workshops are free, but a suggested $5 donation will help sustain the market and support year-round community activities at the Alliance. Visit artinlee.org or call 939-2787 for more information. The Alliance for the Arts campus and galleries are open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays, located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Visitors work at one of the Alliance garden areas, led by nursery operator Kara Alfaro of Elata Natives A rain barrel for sale at the Alliance GreenMarket; rainbarrels improve a homes overall sustainability by reusing rain water Fresh, locally grown peppers for sale at the Alliance GreenMarketV olunteer C ampground H osts SoughtVolunteer campground hosts are needed at Lee County Parks & Recreations largest camping site starting in January for tourist season. Volunteers receive a free RV site with water, electric and sewer hookups. The position requires a commitment of 20 to 30 working hours per weekend with most weekdays off. Schedule times vary seasonally. Volunteers may not have pets on site, and a threeto four-month commitment is preferred. Caloosahatchee Regional Park features 768 acres of pine flatwoods, scrub oak, cypress swamps and oak hammocks. More than 18 miles of hiking, mountain biking and equestrian trails exist. Primitive camp sites for families and groups are available, along with equestrian sites for people with horses. Kayaking and fishing are available along the banks of the Caloosahatchee River. Volunteer campground host duties include greet and register tent campers; enforce campground use guidelines; collect revenues for campsites, firewood, and kayak rentals; general campground maintenance and cleaning; provide infor mation and assistance to park visitors. For more information regarding the position responsibilities or the park, call park supervisor Kathryn Ball at 6940398. The appointment of this position is contingent on the successful completion of the Lee County Volunteer Application, which includes a background check. Applications can be found online at www. LeeParks.org. Applications are processed through Lee County Volunteer Services Coordinator Kathy Cahill at 533-7422. Caloosahatchee Regional Park is located at 18500 North River Road in Alva. Hortoons

PAGE 7

7 THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 2013Pirate Fest To Feature Sea B attle And T hieves MarketA Sea Battle and larger-than-usual Thieves Market will highlight the 8th annual Pollo Tropical Pirate Fest on Fort Myers Beach, coming Friday through Sunday, October 11 to 13. The Thieves Market will include vendors selling handmade pirate costumes, leather goods and gear. The Sea Battle, sponsored by Torchlight Productions, takes place at 2:00 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, and Sunday, Oct. 13. The Pollo Tropical Pirate Fest on Fort Myers Beach is a family-oriented, threeday event, free to the public, featuring two stages and live entertainment from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday of Columbus Day Weekend. This year, three pirate boats will par ticipate the Pieces of Eight, the Black Pearl and the Black Duck, said Pirate Fest coordinator Belinda Hadcock. Well have more cannons, muskets and black powder than ever before. Also new this year is back-story to the battle: The year is 1718. The Port of Old San Carlos on the Island of Estero is held by England. Lord Governor William Pennypacker holds a tenuous grip on the port, now assaulted continuously by the dreaded pirate Grimm and his crew of the Pieces of Eight. The Lord Governor, a man of questionable integrity, allows other pirate crews and their ships safe harbor... for a price, of course. Those pirates have a long-simmering feud with Grimm. A raid occurs and the battle joins. There will be some surprises, and it will be a great family show to watch, according to Hadcock. The Fort Myers Princess will offer sea battle viewing cruises each day at 1:45 p.m. at $12 per person for people who want to get up close to the action. The Thieves Market will offer 40 vendors, 15 of which will be vendors selling period-authentic pirate costumes, leather goods and accessories. Well have vendors that can provide everything needed for that perfect pirate costume for the Pirates Ball Saturday night or for Halloween, said Fort Myers Beach Chamber president Bud Nocera. Whether bodice or baldric, it will all be there for sale until the vendors run out of merchandise. For more details and a daily schedule of events, visit www.pollotropicalpiratefest.com. Greeters C lub MeetingTThe Greeters Club of Greater Fort Myers will host a Chicos fashion show at its October 17 luncheon. Members will be modeling the latest fashions from Chicos, founded on Sanibel in 1983. Luncheon meetings are held on the third Thursday of the month at the Colonial Country Club, 9181 Independence Way in Fort Myers. Find out about upcoming activities, meet the members and find out more about joining this group of Lee County women. Call Marie Gaither at 791-8966 or email wmgaither@aol.com to make a reservation. Cost is $20 per person. C harity B each B all T ickets Are Still AvailableThe Fort Myers Beach Community Foundation announced their 2nd annual Charity Beach Ball will take place on Saturday, November 2 at DiamondHead Beach Resort. The Beach Ball is a black-tie optional silent auction to include an open bar from 6 to 8 p.m., dinner and dancing with The Marc Vee Band. Tickets are $95 per person or buy a table of 10 for $875 (save $75). Tickets are available online at www.charitybeachball.com or by mail at Fort Myers Beach Community Foundation, c/o Charity Beach Ball, P.O. Box 2834, Fort Myers Beach, FL 33931. Last years Beach Ball was a huge success. Thanks to their generous supporters and attendees, the foundation was able to support many local causes and provide scholarships to three outstanding students. With the continued support of the community, they hope to make this event more memorable than the last. This years special guest is NBC-2s Senior Chief Meteorologist Robert Van Winkle, DiamondHead Beach Resort and Spa has special room rates for November 2, Santini Floral is once again donating floral centerpieces for the event and Mens Wearhouse has a special discount on tuxedo rentals. Check out www.charitybeachball.com to see an updated list of donors and special offers. More information is available by calling or emailing Nicole at 849-1460 or nbennettdc@yahoo.com. To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

PAGE 8

THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 20138 Along The RiverOn Saturday, October 12, the Edison & Ford Winter Estates hosts Garden Talk: Vegetable Gardens Getting Started at 9 a.m. Join Edison Ford Historic Garden Manager Steve Hottovy to learn how to start a fall garden for winter harvest. Nearly 100 years ago, the Edison family grew fruits and vegetables on their winter estate and today, the site has a year round organic vegetable garden, dozens of fruit trees and raised vegetable bed gardens. Participants will learn which vegetables thrive and how to start and maintain their own garden at home. The price is $5 or free for members. Participants will receive 20 percent off in the Edison Ford Garden Shoppe. The Edison & Ford Winter Estates is located at 2350 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. Call 334-7419 or go to www.edisonfordwinterestates.org. On Sunday, October 13, the Acoustic Music Society of Southwest Florida brings bluegrass music back to the Foulds Theatre at the Alliance for the Arts from 2 to 5 p.m. The show features the Palm Baybased Highway 41, The Bean Pickers from Naples and the Fort Myers-based Bugtussle Ramblers. The Sunday afternoon concert series continue on November 3 and December 8. Tickets are $7 at the door or $5 for Alliance members. Seating is open and first come, first serve. Children 12 and under are free if accompanied by an adult. Doors open at 1:30 p.m. The Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Visit www.artinlee.org or call 939-2787 for more information. On Monday, October 14., the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) presents Owls of Southwest Florida as part of its year-round Wonders of Wildlife (WOW) series. The presentation begins at 11 a.m. and is presented by a member of the CROW team. Learn about the areas owl species the Great Horned Owl, Screech Owl and Barred Owl including their adaptations for hearing, sight and hunting. Find out what makes these species so unique. CROWs Healing Winds Visitor Education Center offers immersive, hands-on exhibits and live video footage focusing on wild animal stories that is exciting for guests of all ages. It is located at 3883 Sanibel Captiva Road on Sanibel. For a complete event schedule and additional information, call 472-3644 ext. 229 or go to www.crowclinic.org. Every Monday through February 24, join local film buffs for Thank God Its Monday (TGIM). Short indie films will be judged to determine if they will earn a spot in the Fort Myers Film Festival, held March 19 to 23. TGIM features happy hour at 6:30 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m. The musical guest on October 14 is Jon Dunn. The Fort Myers Film Festival is an intelligent independent filmmakers preferred event to create, unite and showcase the finest artistic cinematic works. The Fort Myers Film Festival is known for world-class swagger and support of local filmmakers. The festival event offers the most vibrant intellectual and edgy crowd to grace Lee County in decades. The event has featured over four dozen local filmmakers and is a must attend for cineasts who love indie film and film festivals living in Lee, Collier and Charlotte counties. TGIM takes place at The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center located at 2301 First Street in Fort Myers. For more information, go to www.fortmyersfilmfestival. com. Heading out to Sanibel? Make sure to check out the great food and live music at The Jacaranda, or The Jac to locals. With live music nightly, the Patio Lounge attracts an affluent crowd to the friendly and casual restaurant. Although The Jacaranda is best known as a local gathering spot, it has also received several dining awards. The Jac Bar features a daily happy hour from 4 to 7 p.m. and serves two for one drinks and $5.95 appetizers. Live bands, including The Amazing Groove Masters, Both Hands and Renata, play every evening from 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. The Jacaranda is located at 1223 Periwinkle Way on Sanibel. Call 4721771 or visit www.jacarandaonsanibel. com. The Edison & Ford Winter Estates is hosting Garden Talk on Saturday at 9 a.m. On Monday, CROW presents Owls of Southwest Florida from 11 a.m. to noon. Pictured are juvenile screech owls www.SeabreezeNurseries.com (239) 560-1422 WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY We can help! Ask about our Season Discount! Palms, Palms, natives, natives, crotons, crotons, bromeliads, bromeliads, buttery bushes, buttery bushes, & much more & much more JACARANDAThe Entertainment Nightly in Sanibels Social Scene1223 PERIWINKLE WAY, SANIBEL 472-1771 Happy Apps $5.95Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna, Crispy Fried Calamari, Chilled Oysters, Steamed Shrimp, BBQ Beef Satays, Mussels Marinara, Chicken WingsSanibels Best HAPPY HOUR5 7 p.m. Nightly in the lounge1/2 Price DrinksCall & Well Liquor, Draft Beer Selections, Select House Wine Please visit our River Weekly News online advertisers at www.islandsunnews.com. You can click through to their Web sites for more information about real estate, shopping, restaurants and services. Just click on the logos surrounding the front page.

PAGE 9

9 THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 2013 The Fish Were Biting For SFCAThe 3rd annual Fall Slam Fishing Tournament at Southwest Florida Christian Academy (SFCA) was a huge success. The net proceeds of over $35,000 will be used to enhance the athletic complex. Winners of the tournament were divided into two divisions: adults and students. The first place winner was Team Reed (Captain Andrews); the second place winner was Team HONC and third place went to Team BCI Pools. Seth Reed, a sixth-grader at SFCA, caught the heaviest redfish. A sophomore, Michael Lobbestael, caught the heaviest trout. Also, the Taylor family was the lucky winner of the 2014 boat drawing. Dawn Peden chose the lucky box of chocolates with a $1,500 Diamond District gift certificate enclosed. Southwest Florida Christian Academys annual Fall Slam Fishing Tournament was a huge success Proceeds from the tournament are used for enhancement of the athletic complex We Proudly Brew Tropial Outdoor Patio Seating Appetizers & Full Dinners Best Prices On The Planet Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Snacks In-between Live Music! Outdoor Seating Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Come Try our NEW Cowlicious Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials Sanibels Most Award Winning Restaurant FREE BEER/HAPPY HOUR DAILY LIVE Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Snacks In-between Snacks In-between Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Always Fresh ...Always Fun! To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

PAGE 10

Churches/TemplesALL FAITHS UNITARIAN CONGREGATION (UUA) Where diversity is treasured 2756 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers Summer program: Understanding the Faiths of Our Worlds June 2 to August 25 11 a.m. Interim Minister, Rev. Margaret Beard, begins on September 1 239-226-0900. www.allfaiths-uc.org ALL SAINTS BYZANTINE RITE CATHOLIC CHURCH 10291 Bayshore Rd., N. Fort Myers Divine Liturgy is on Sun. at 10:30 a.m.; Rosary begins at 10 a.m. Lenten services (Presanctied Liturgy) will be on Wed. evenings at 6 p.m. start ing on Feb. 22. Administrator is Very Rev. Peter Lickman, ph. 305-651-0991. We are a Church of the Eastern Catholic or Byzantine Rite, 1.5 mi. east of Int. 75. ANNUNCIATION GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH 8210 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers Reverend Fr. George P. Savas Orthros Service Sunday 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy Sunday 10 a.m. www.annunciation.fl.goarch.org 239-481-2099 BETH SHILOH MESSIANIC SYNAGOGUE 15675 McGregor Boulevard, 437-3171 Rabbi: Judah Hungerman Friday Service, 8 p.m., Saturday Service, 11 a.m. Shabbat School Saturday Morning, Adult Hebrew Classes. Call for information on full program. BREAD OF LIFE MINISTRIES CHURCH OF GOD 16581 McGregor Boulevard, 267-3166 Just past the Tanger Outlet Mall Pastor: Barry Lentz, 281-3063 Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. CHABAD LUBAVITCH OF SW FLORIDA ORTHODOX 5620 Winkler Road, Fort Myers Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz 433-7708, E-mail: rabbi@chabadswf.org Web site: www.chabadswf.org Services: Friday 6:30 p.m.; Saturday Kabbalah class 9 a.m.; Shacharit 10 a.m.; Kiddush at noon Minyan: Monday and Thursday 7 a.m. CHAPEL OF CYPRESS COVE 10200 Cypress Cove Circle Fort Myers 239-850-3943, Located at Cypress Cove Retirement Center on HealthPark Campus An ecumenical non-denominational com munity of believers. Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. Reverendt Ted Althouse, Pastor revtedalthouse@aol.com CHURCH OF THE CROSS 13500 Freshman Lane; 768-2188 Pastor: Bud Stephens; A nondemonima tional church emphasizing a personal rela tionship with Jesus Christ. Sunday Service: 9:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 Contemporary. CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 1619 Llewellyn Drive Fort Myers Just off McGregor across from the Edison/ Ford Winter Estates 334-4978 Pastor: Douglas Kelchner Worship times Sundays 9 and 10:30 a.m. Website: www.taecc.com COVENANT PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937 Rev. Dr. Jeffrey DeYoe, Senior Pastor Reverend David Dietzel, Pastor Emeritus. Traditional Sunday service 10 a.m. Nursery available CYPRESS LAKE BAPTIST CHURCHen 8400 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 481-5442 Randy A. Alston, Reverend. Sunday Services: Bible study, 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship, 11 a.m., Evening Worship, 7 p.m., Wednesday Prayer Meeting, 6:30 p.m. CYPRESS LAKE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH en 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 481-3233. www.clpc.us. Clint Cottrell, pastor Prayer Service 8 a.m., Praise 9 a.m., Childrens Church 9 a.m., Traditional 11 a.m. Summer: Prayer Service 8 a.m. Combined Traditional/Praise 10 a.m. CYPRESS LAKE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH en 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 482-1250, 8 and 11 a.m. Sunday Traditional Service 9:30 a.m. Praise Service Sunday School all times FAITH FELLOWSHIP WORLD OUTREACH MINISTRIES 6111 South Pointe Boulevard, Fort Myers, 278-3638. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Voice of Faith, WCRN 13.50 AM Radio, Sunday, 1:30 p.m.; Thursday Service, 7:30 p.m.; Friday Youth Service, 7:30 p.m. Nursery care for pre-school children and Childrens Church for ages 5-12 available at each service. FAITH UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 15690 McGregor Boulevard Fort Myers, 482-2030 Pastor: David Stauffer. Traditional services 8:45 a.m.; Contemporary, 10:30 a.m. Go south on McGregor Boulevard. The church is mile past the intersection of Gladiolus and San Carlos Boulevard on the way to Sanibel. FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 2390 West First Street, next door to Edison Estates. Sunday Morning Service and Sunday School, 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday Evening Testimony Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Child care provided at all services. Visit our Reading Room for quiet study at: 2281 First Street, River District. www.time4thinkers.com, www.christiansciencefortmyers.com, www.christianscience.com FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 13545 American Colony Boulevard off Daniels Parkway in the Colony, Fort Myers, 936-2511 Pastor: Reverend Joey Brummett Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Family Night, 7 p.m.en FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH in the Downtown Fort Myers River District 2466 First Street, Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-332-1152, www.fumcftmyers.org Sunday: 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 5 p.m. Youth Program FORT MYERS CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) A STEPHEN MINISTRIES CONGREGATION 5916 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, 437-4330 Reverend Mark Condrey, Pastor Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Church School: 9:15 a.m. FORT MYERS CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST: 8210 College Parkway, Fort Myers, 482-3133. Philip White, pastor Morning Worship: 10 a.m. Church School: 10:15 a.m. Adult Forum: 11:30 a.m. IONA-HOPE EPISCOPAL CONGREGATION en 9650 Gladiolus Drive, Fort Myers 4544778 The Reverend Dr. John S. Adler, pastor. Weekly services: Saturday 5 p.m., Eucharist with Healing Sunday 8 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite One; 9:30 a.m., Family Eucharist with Healing and Church School Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Morning Prayer (in Spanish); Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Eucharist with Healing. Child care available at Saturday 5 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m. services. JESUS THE WORKER CATHOLIC CHURCH: 881 Nuna Avenue, Fort Myers, 481-1143 Masses Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. KINGDOM LIFE CHURCH 2154 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 218-8343 Pastor Randy and Anita Thurman 10:30 a.m. Sunday Service All are welcome. LAMB OF GOD LUTHERAN/EPISCOPAL CHURCH Corner Cypress View Drive and Koreshan Boulevard, Three Oaks area, Fort Myers, 267-3525 Walter Fohs, pastor; Becky RobbinsPenniman, associate pastor Sunday worship services: 8 a.m. Early Grace Traditional 9 a.m. Awesome Grace Contemporary 10:30 a.m. Classic Grace Traditional 8:45 & 10 a.m. Sunday School Gods Group NEW BEGINNINGS CENTER New Home Church, 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, North Fort Myers, 239-656-0416 Weekly Friday Meeting Meet & Greet: 6:30 p.m. Kingdom Teaching: 7 p.m. Fellowship and refreshments after service. nbcmin istry@embarqmail.com, www.facebook. com/nbcministry. Alex & Patricia Wiggins, Ministers NEW COVENANT EYES CHURCH See Clearly. Meeting monthly at 9 a.m. at the Elks Lodge. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, Fort Myers, FL 33907. 239-220-8519 Pastor Alan Bondar www.newcovenanteyes.com Wear what you want, rockin music, rele vant teaching, LIFT Kidz program, free cof fee & donuts, people who are real, church thats actually fun. NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH OF FORT MYERS 16120 San Carlos Boulevard, Unit 10 239-985-8503 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m Sunday Morning Worship. 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study NEW HOPE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 3825 McGregor Boulevard. Fort Myers Reverend Eddie Spencer and Stu Austin 8 & 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11 a.m. Contemporary Worship 8, 9:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School Youth and Childrens programming runs concurrent to Sunday services. Nursery care provided at all services 274-1230. For more information visit: www.newhopefortmyers.org PEACE COMMUNITY CHURCHen Meets at Fort Myers Beach Masonic Lodge 17625 Pine Ridge Road, Fort Myers Beach 267-7400. Pastors Bruce Merton, Gail & RC Fleeman Adult Discussion Classes: 9-10 AM Countdown to Worship (praise music): 10:10 AM Amazing Grace Worship: 10:30 AM Phone 267-7400 Fax 267-7407 Web site: peacecommunitychurch.com e-mail: peace1265@aol.com PEACE LUTHERAN CHURCH Sunday Worship at 9:30am. Peace is a member of the ELCA. We celebrate weekly communion with tra ditional liturgy, organ and choir. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers On the way to Sanibel. 239-437-2599, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@peaceftmyers.com. REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH 3950 Winkler Ext., Fort Myers, 274-0143 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. Sunday Services Daily early learning center/day care RIVER OF LIFE ASSEMBLY OF GOD 21580 River Ranch Rd, Estero 239-495-0400, Senior Pastor: Todd Weston 8 and 9:45 a.m Services; 11:30 a.m. Legacy Service, multi-generational SAMUDRABADRA BUDDHIST CENTER Meditation classes. All are welcome. Guided meditations offering many meth ods for relaxing the body and focusing the mind on virtuous objects to bring increasing peace and happiness into daily activity. For information, class times and locations call 567-9739 or visit www. MeditationInFortMyers.org. SAINT COLUMBKILLE CATHOLIC CHURCHen 12171 Iona Road, Fort Myers, off McGregor and north of Gladiolus. 489-3973 Father Joseph Clifford. Weekly masses: Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. Weekend masses: Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday: 7, 9,11, and 5:30 p.m. Reconciliation is available at the church on Saturdays at noon and by appointment SAINT JOHN THE APOSTLE METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH 3049 Mcgregor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 344-0012 Pastor Reverend Steve Filizzi An Affirming & Inclusive Congregation Sunday Services, 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Mid-Week Service, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. SAINT MICHAEL LUTHERAN CHURCH & SCHOOL (LCMS) 3595 Broadway, Fort Myers, 239-939-1218, Worship: Saturday 5:30 p.m., Sunday 8 & 10:45 a.m. Bible Study for adults and children Sunday at 9:15 a.m. Phone for other dates & times. Plus Marriage Enrichment, Divorcecare, Griefshare. SAINT PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH 3751 Estero Boulevard, Fort Myers Beach, 463-4251. Sunday worship at 9:30 a.m. Womens Bible Study is offered on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 9:30 a.m. www.stpeterfmb.com SAINT NICHOLAS MONASTERY Church and Bookstore:111 Evergreen Road (southwest corner of Evergreen Road and Gail Street.) Liturgical services conducted in English and Church Slavonic; following the Julian (Old) Calendar. Liturgical Services: Sundays and Holy Days: Hours at 9:30 a.m. Holy Liturgy at 10 a.m. Call to confirm service schedule: 239-997-2847; Bookstore: 239-691-1775 or visit www.saintnicholasmonastery.org ST. VINCENT DE PAUL CATHOLIC COMMUNITY 13031 Palm Beach Blvd (3 miles east of I75) East Fort Myers (across from Ft Myers Shores) 239 693 0818 Weekday masses: 9 a.m. Tuesday-Friday Weekend masses: 4 p.m. Saturday Sunday 9 & 11 a.m. All Are Welcome! SOUTHWEST BAPTIST CHURCH 16940 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 454-3336 Robert G. Kasten, Pastor Sunday Worship Service 11 a.m. Nursery available 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Junior Church grades one to five Wee Church Pre-K to K Evening Service 6 p.m. Wednsday Service 6 p.m. TEMPLE BETHEL SYNAGOGUE 16225 Winkler Rd. 433-0018. Rabbi Jeremy Barras E-mail: rabbi.barras@templebethel.com Cantorial soloist: Lawrence Dermer Temple educator: Dale Cohen, MaEd, RJE Shabbat Services, Friday, 7:30 p.m. Torah Study, Saturday, 9:15 a.m.continued on page 11THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 201310

PAGE 11

11 THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 2013CCMI Awarded GuideStar Exchange GoldCommunity Cooperative Ministries, Inc. has received the GuideStar Exchange Gold participation level for transparency and accountability from GuideStar USA, Inc., an organization that provides donors with data about charities to help guide informed giving. This level of achievement demonstrates CCMIs deep commitment to nonprofit transparency and accountability. We have worked hard to showcase our progress toward our mission and our long-held belief in being transpar ent about our work to our constituents, said Tracey Galloway, CEO of CCMI. As a GuideStar Exchange participant, we use the organizations platform to share a wealth of up-to-date information about our work to our supporters and GuideStars immense online audience of nonprofits, grantmakers, individual donors and media. In order to be awarded the GuideStar Exchange logo, CCMI had to meet the requirements of GuideStars nonprofit report page. I encourage all potentional donors to check out our profile on GuideStar to see what were all about, added Galloway. We are engaged in exciting initiatives and are thrilled to have another platform for communicating our advancement and progress. GuideStar USA, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) public charity that works to revolutionize philanthropy and nonprofit practice by providing information that advances transparency, enables users to make better decisions and encourages charitable giving. GuideStar Exchange is an initiative designed to connect nonprofits with current and potential supporters. With millions of people coming to GuideStar to learn more about nonprofit organizations, the GuideStar Exchange allows nonprofits to share a wealth of up-to-date information with GuideStars many audiences. Becoming a GuideStar Exchange participant is free of charge. To join, organizations need to update their report pages, completing all required fields for participation. The GuideStar Exchange level logos, acknowledged as symbols of transparency in the nonprofit sector, are displayed on all Exchange participants nonprofit reports. Learn more about GuideStar at www. guidestar.org CCMI is an innovative nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization made up of social service entrepreneurs fighting to end homelessness and hunger in our community. The agency provides more than 15,000 meals each month through its Everyday Caf and Marketplace and Home Delivered Meals programs. CCMI also educates 40 children in its Community Montessori Preschool, offers homeless services and comprehensive case coaching services through its United Way Resource Houses, oversees an emer gency mobile food pantry and supplies weekend backpacks full of food to more than 2,500 children each school year. For more information, call 332-7687 or visit www.ccmileecounty.com. rf ntbnrr bb bb rtttn Loved this restaurant. Fantastic experience. Food was exceptionally amazing. Service was outstanding. TripAdvisor Member, May 2013 Ric Jaeggi In Concert Organist Ric Jaeggi will perform in concert at St. Columbkille Catholic Church in Fort Myers on Sunday, October 20. The musical pulpit exchange begins at 2 p.m. Jaeggi will be seated at the console of the Rodgers organ and interrupt his humor with an occasional organ piece.Music will include two French toccatas, two Bach chorales, an adagio, a reverie, a set of variation on a familiar hymn, a trumpet tune for a queen, and a short tribute to opera. The composers represent Italy, Germany, France, Great Brittian and, of course, the United States. Also included will be a gift of repartee as only Ric would share. Come and bring friends for an hour or less of music, words and respite from the world. St. Columbkille Catholic Church is located at 12171 Iona Road in Fort Myers. For more information, call 489-3973. Ric Jaeggi Community Thrift Store Celebrates 2nd AnniversaryOn Wednesday, October 30 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., customers are invited to chose an autumn leaf with a secret discount to receive additional savings off already well-priced items during the Community Thrift Stores 2nd anniversary celebration. A cornucopia of surprises will pop-up each hour for shoppers, along with complimentary theaterstyle popcorn and apple cider. The Community Thrift store is located in Miners Plaza, next to Planet Fitness, on the corner or McGregor Boulevard and Gladiolus in the Iona area of South Fort Myers. Regular store hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call 225-6529.The store features home dcor, clothing, artwork, knick knacks and furniture, as well as building supplies, construction materials, appliances, and fixtures. When an individual or an organization donates items to the store, they receive a tax deductible receipt. Shell Point Retirement Community, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to serving seniors in Southwest Florida, opened the Community Thrift Store in 2011. Since the first year of operation was so successful, the store was expanded into a larger space in the same shopping center in 2012. From page 10Churches/TemplesReligious Education; Sunday School and Midweek classes, Preschool Classes, Monday through Friday Web site: www.templebethel.com Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TEMPLE JUDEA (CONSERVATIVE) 14486 A&W Bulb Road, Fort Myers, 433-0201, Rabbi: Rabbi Marc Sack President: Keith Grossman Minyan: Monday & Thursday at 9 a.m. Services: Friday night at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Religious School Sunday morning Web site: www.tjswfl.org Preschool director: JoAnn Goldman email templejudeapreschool@gmail.com 433-0201, Web site: www.tjswfl.org Affiliated: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism THE NEW CHURCH The New Church of SWFL is located 10811 Sunset Plaza Circ. #401, behind Zoomers. Rev. Gabriella Cahaley offici ates worship services on Sundays at 11 a.m. during the season. Other worship events are held on the beach in Fort Myers Beach. See our webpage http://www.new churchflorida.com/ or call for more informa tion 239-481-5535. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH FORT MYERS 13411 Shire Lane (off Daniels Parkway one mile west of I-75) Minister: The Reverend Allison Farnum Sunday services and religious education at 10:30 a.m. For information on all church events call 561-2700 or visit www.uucfm.org. UNITY OF BONITA SPRINGS Family Service 10 to 11 a.m. Healing Circle 11 a.m. Hospitality and Fellowship, 11 a.m. Inspiring lesson, uplifting and dynamic music, meditation in a loving environment. Service held at 28285 Imperial Street, Bonita Springs. Call 947-3100. UNITY OF FORT MYERS 11120 Ranchette Rd., Fort Myers Summer Services: Sundays at 10 a.m. Childrens class at 10 a.m. Reverend Jim Rosemergy, Minister Our God is Love. Our Race is Human. Our Religion is Oneness. www.unityoffortmyers.org or 239-278-1511 WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 9065 Ligon Court, Fort Myers, across from HealthPark Hospital, 481-2125 Senior Pastor: Robert Brunson Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Blended Worship www.westminsterfortmyers.org WORD OF LIFE CHURCH 2120 Collier Ave, Fort Myers, 274-8881; Services: Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. Bishop Gaspar and Michele Anastasi ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH 7401 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, 481-4040, Interim Pastor Jim Eggert Pastor Peter Weeks Sunday Services: 8:30 a.m. Traditional; 10 a.m. Blended Traditional and Contemporary; 11:30 a.m. Contemporary. Childrens Sunday School, Adult /Teen Bible Classes, 10 a.m.

PAGE 12

THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 201312 Government Shutdown Closes Ding Darlingby Capt. Matt MitchellThe first white pelicans just starting to arrive and thousands of crab pots being put out gulf-side for the October 15 opening of stone crab season are the subtle signs on the water that fall is close at hand. One big drawback that hits close to home during this crazy government shutdown is the JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge is closed. Not only is Wildlife Drive and the visitor center closed, pretty much the whole bayside of Sanibel from Tarpon Bay to Blind Pass, being inside the refuge boundaries, is shut down to anglers, too. However, cooler mornings and a live well full of shiners made for some quality days fishing this week. Being able to pull up on a favorite shoreline and pitch a few scoops of stunned shiners up around the mangroves quickly let you know if it was holding any hungry fish. As snook, redfish and trout explode on the freebees, it was a sure sign you had picked the right spot to fish. It seems just about anywhere you fish right now, there are jacks. In places, these jacks are so thick you have to leave if you want to catch anything else. An unusual thing I saw while working one of my favorite shorelines around St. James City in the southern end of Matlacha Pass this week were alligator gar close to four feet long and a roughly 10-foot alligator that swam between the boat and the shoreline while we were catching redfish. Even though I run into gators once in a while, I dont ever remember seeing one in the mouth of the river in such a high boat traffic area. This big gator was within a half mile of the busy intracoastal waterway and Picnic Island. Other happenings on the sound this week are the huge amounts of mullet that have already began to school as they get ready to spawn. Look for redfish and big trout following and mixed in with these mullet schools out on the open flats. Some crazy redfish action has been in and around these mullet. When targeting redfish around the mullet schools, I go with a float rig and a live pinfish. Dont be surprised to find big bull sharks feeding in shallow water on these mullet schools, too. While out on the flats, keep your eyes open for pompano. Several times this week while out riding on the edges of shallow flats, I would skip large schools of pompano. Once you locate the fish by skipping them, shut down and throw either Silly Willy jigs or shrimp-tipped small bucktail jigs. These are some of the larger schools of pompano that I have seen in years. Out along the beaches, Spanish mackerel are showing up in good numbers as the fall bait migration gets into full swing. Jigs, spoons, small plugs, flies and live bait will all catch as many mackerel as you want. Look for feeding birds and get in on this fast-paced, easy angling action. Once you find the mackerel, the sharks will be there, too. Hook up a chunk of cut bait rigged on a circle hook with a short piece of wire leader and hook into one of these much larger predators. A little further out from the beaches, the first Bonita are starting to show up, too. This National Geographic-style food chain action will only get better as the water cools.Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions, email captmattmitchell@aol.com. ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint Prices 1 472-5800 Send Us Your Fish TalesThe River Weekly would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include photographs with identification. Drop them at the River Weekly, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, Florida 33901, or email to press@riverweekly.com. The opening of stone crab season on October 15 means tripletail like these will be hanging out on the crab buoys Paddle Smart Class Offered By San Carlos Bay Sail & Power Squadronsubmitted by Cdr. Mary SmelterThe San Carlos Bay Sail & Power Squadron, a unit of the United States Power Squadrons, will be offering the popular Paddle Smart class. The class will be held on Saturday, October 19 from 8:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. According to the National Marine Manufacturers Association, kayaks and canoes accounted for some 54 percent of new boats sold in 2006 over 493,000 crafts. Kayaking, canoeing or rowing are enjoyable opportunities to get close to nature, have a great time, and get some quality exercise in the process. The class is intended for those about to join the sport and those considering pur chasing paddling equipment.continued on page 18

PAGE 13

13 THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 2013Call for departure time CAPTIVACRUISES H T H E I S L A N D S H THE BEST WAY TO SEE THE ISLANDS IS FROM THE WATER Cruises depart from beautiful Captiva Island CROW Case Of The Week: Red-Bellied Woodpeckersby Patricia MolloyHave you ever heard a woodpecker tapping loudly on a neighbors metal roof and thought to yourself, Has that poor bird gone mad? If it is a redbellied woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus), it has simply discovered that the sound from a steel drum amplifies farther than that of a wooden one. The male red-bellied will drum loudly on aluminum roofs, metal gutters, utility poles and even cars to attract a mate, as these woodpeckers are drawn to resonating noises. Courtship begins with the female hammering along with her partner followed by the pair tapping their beaks together. They will remain monogamous throughout a nesting season. A male may continue drumming to define and defend its territory. Several weeks ago, three tiny redbellied woodpeckers were admitted to CROW as orphans. While two were in good health, albeit a bit thin, one had deformities in both feet. It has been snowshoed to see if we can correct that, said Kristen Dub, DVM intern. A snowshoe is an orthopedic splint used to correct a deformity in a patients foot. They call it a snowshoe because it is shaped like one, explained Dr. Heather Barron, hospital director. In order to survive in the wild, avians must have full mobility in their feet, as they are used for perching. Due to the young age of the woodpecker (patient #2594), the prognosis to correct the malformation is favorable. Students and volunteers feed the three orphaned red-bellied woodpeckers every two hours to ensure that their muscle structure has developed adequately. Once old enough, Dr. Heather will relocate them to a small flight cage on CROWs campus where they will beginning flying through a combination of practice and instinct. As soon as the three woodpeckers have honed their skills as aviators, they will be released to embark on new careers as woodland drummers. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to PO Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit: www.crowclinic.org. These healthy juvenile red-bellied woodpeckers have not yet developed their distinctive coloration. An adult male has red on its crown and the nape of its neck while an adult female only has red on the nape and above its bill. Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702or email press@riverweekly.com

PAGE 14

THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 201314 Caring For Your PlantsT his I s Floridaby Justen DobbsI would really like to see less bushes, hedges and boxed plants in everyones yard. This is Florida! We can grow some pretty cool stuff here in our subtropical rainforest. Now, Ive probably touched on this subject before, but I just want to reiterate it. Take a look at the two pictures next to this article. Both pictures are of landscapes here in Fort Myers. Which one is more visually appealing? Now, I know what youre saying: I just cant afford all those specialty tropical plants. Actually, they require less maintenance and save you money on irrigation, fertilizer, trimming and pest control in the long run. My last landscaper put in my plants and trees and now there is nothing I can do about it. Its never too late to put in a couple new plants here and there as long as you know what to use. Eventually, you can transform your boring green landscape into your own tropical paradise. I prefer my Florida landscape to look like my home up north. I dont hear this one too much, but I kind of wonder why one would spend a bunch of money on their winter home down here in Florida and then not want it to look more color ful and tropical then their home up north. I have said it before and Ill say it again do your best to: 1. Plant Florida native trees and plants in buffer zones or in a back area where they can be appreciated for their own sake instead of taking up precious space in your front yard. 2. Plant colorful, low maintenance plants such as crotons, cordylines, Ti plants, plumeria, bromeliads, cycads and annuals in your front and side yards where they can be appreciated by everyone. 3. Use as little grass as possible. Sod should be placed in a small area or two for your kids or pets to play on. Refrain from planting a huge sea of grass that no one except your lawn maintenance guy will ever walk on. Instead utilize more beds for plants, water features, etc. 4. Use cypress or eucalyptus mulch instead of red mulch. Red mulch pulls your eye away from your colorful plants and trees and also typically contains arsenic and other dyes that are harmful to pets and the environment. 5. Refrain from planting Juniper, Ixora, Indian Hawthorne, Eugenia, green Buttonwood, Ficus and other green bushes that require high maintenance and simply do not fit into the tropical Florida look. Be careful of taking advice from people who claim to be a landscaper when, in fact, all they do is trim trees, mow grass and recently put in a few Home Depot plants for a neighbor down the street. Find a professional landscaper who is privy to the newest generation of tropical plants and trees, both native and exotic. This person should know the botanical names of the plants they use, as well as their country of origin, culture and advantages over other plants. Dont be afraid to quiz them, too. Youll learn a lot yourself! Justen Dobbs is a landscape architect in south Florida specializing in custom, upscale landscapes. He can be reached at seabreezenurseries@gmail. com. Tropical Florida landscape can be both colorful and low maintenance Standard, boring Florida landscape Plant SmartT hree V ines Will C over Itby Gerri R eavesThis time of year, wild vines are at peak visibility, climbing rapidly, dripping from the ends of other plants, and sometimes engulfing other species. Know these three common vines so you can recognize a blessing or a curse when it pops up in the yard. Then, evaluate its purpose and place before eradicating it or letting it be. Its hard to beat native Virginia creeper ( Parthenocissus quinquefolia) for hardiness, adaptability, low maintenance and some would say beauty. A member of the grape family, it is sometimes confused with poison ivy. Its also called five-leaved ivy as well as woodbine. Virginia creepers leaves almost always have five points and are toothed and pointed. Poison ivys have only three points and are oval and often shiny. Creepers fruit is purple-black; poison ivys white. Like many vines, Virginia creeper will take over opportunistically, but its handy for covering a trellis or fence or as a groundcover. Cut it back to confine it to one area of the landscape. Drought and salt tolerant, it will grow in full sun or shade. Bunches of berries ripen to a deep purple-black late in the year provide food for wildlife. In the winter, the leaves turn vivid red and drop, only to be soon replaced by new reddish growth. Like Virginia creeper, the native muscadine or southern fox grape (Vitis rotundifolia) wont usually be found in plant nurseries, so successfully do they self-sow and so easily are they propagated with seeds or cuttings. The leaves are coarsely serrated, the flowers greenish white or white and fivepetaled. The clusters of nearly black grapes are an important food source for a wide variety of birds and wildlife and a delicious one for people who like to eat them warm from the vine or use them to make wine or jelly. This grapevine is also the larval host plant for nessus sphinx and mournful sphinx moths. The bland name air potatos ( Dioscorea bulbifera) name doesnt hint at the threat this species poses to Florida. The photo of the native pine tree smothered in air potato illustrates why its compared to the dastardly kudzu. Also called the air yam, it is one of the continued on page 20 This pine tree in Lakes Park is covered in the highly invasive air potato vine Floridas native wild muscadine grapes are a food source for wildlife and people Native Virginia creeper is a wildlife-friendly vine with berries that ripen to purple-black photos by Gerri Reaves If you see one of these tubers on your property, get expert advice on eradicating the vine

PAGE 15

15 THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 2013Bonsai Society Monthly MeetingJudy Gore, a founding member of the Bonsai Society of Southwest Florida, will be the featured speaker at the Saturday, October 19 meeting of the Society. The public is invited to attend the meeting, which will be held at 6281 Metro Plantation Road in Fort Myers beginning at 9 a.m. There is no charge to attend. Experienced bonsaists will be available to provide advice on bonsai trees brought to the meeting. Bonsai-related materials will be offered in a raffle. The Bonsai Society will be presenting its 32nd annual Bonsai Show and Sale on Saturday and Sunday, November 16 and 17, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Lee County Election Center, 13801 South Cleveland Avenue in Fort Myers. Numerous bonsai trees will be on public display. Demonstrations and beginner classes will be offered, and a large variety of bonsai trees, plant material, and bonsai related items will be available for sale. Raffles and an auction will be conducted. Admission and parking are free, and the public is welcome. For more information about the show, contact Jim Gehring at 772-1411. For more information, visit www. bonsaiswfl.org or call Jim Bremer at 4827543. Bird Patrol At Bunche BeachExperience the Beautiful Birds of Bunche Beach with a bird patrol guide on Saturday, October 19 from 8 to 10 a.m. Bunche Beach is excellent for both migrant and resident waders and shorebirds working the mudflats at low tide due to the diversity of micro-invertebrates. Also seen may be waterfowl, raptors and warblers. Participants will meet on the beach located in South Fort Myers, off of Summerlin Road. Drive south of John Morris Road until it deadends. Provided in cooperation with Lee County Parks and Recreation, this event is free with the parking fee of $1 per hour (tour is approximately two hours long). Restrooms are available in the building at the first parking lot. Bring binoculars, sun protection, shoes that can get wet, a bottle of drinking water, your curiosity and a love of nature. For more information, call 707-3015 or visit www.birdpatrol.org. From page 1Family Fun DayParticipating organizations include Acoustic Music Society of Southwest Florida, ArtFest Fort Myers, Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre, Community Youth Chorus, Cultural Park Theater, JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge, Florida Repertory Theatre, Gulf Coast Symphony, Gulf Coast Writers Association, Imaginarium Science Center, Jungle House Publications, Little Miss Etiquett, Madieros Studios, North Fort Myers Academy for the Arts, Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center, Southwest Florida Symphony, Southwest Florida Fine Craft Guild and the Symphonic Chorale of Southwest Florida. Participating artists include David Arrowsmith, Jen Byer, Lori Denney, Karen Hubbard, Kelly Jumper, Joel Loeper, Lynn Martindale, Alice Melzer, Kelly Muselman, Diana Ripoll, John Swank, Christina Thompson, Andrea Trank, James Usavage and Erma Woodis. Fall for the Arts 2013 is made possible through sponsorships and partnerships with The News Press Media Group, Caloosa Tent & Rental and Publix Supermarkets Charities. The event is powered by Fafco Solar Energy. The Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. The Bait Box PresentsTHE ESPERANZA WOODRING MEMORIALCASTNETRODEO20th Annual Saturday, November 9, 2013 239-472-1618 REFRESHMENTSAVAILABLE NOALCOHOLPERMITTEDA FUN FAMILY EVENT!! GREAT RAFFLE ITEMS!!!Esperanza Lorraine Woodring, Woodring Point, Circa 1952 YOUTH COMPETITION NO REGISTRATION FEE SCHEDULE OF EVENTS 8:30 a.m. Free Lessons and 9:30 a.m. All Proceeds to Benefit the Sanibel-Captiva Chapter of START Solutions ToAvoid Red Tide a not-forprofit organization that funds efforts to improved the quality of our marine waters through research, public education, and programs that restore marine habitats, preserve marine species and promote healthy beaches and waterways To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

PAGE 16

THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 201316 Art League Artist Of T he MonthThe Art League of Fort Myers announced that Helen Hong Ding is the the October Artist of the Month. Stop by the gallery, 1451 Monroe Street, Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. during the month of October to view Dings art. Ding is also teaching calligraphy and cartooning at the art league. Ding holds a masters degree in fine art and multimedia art from Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology. She grew up in Singapore and was educated in Europe. She is an IB authorized visual arts examiner for the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO) and was appointed to the team of examiners responsible for visual arts higher/standard level of the IB program. Ding instructs in the fields of painting, ceramics, sculpture, sand sculpture, print making, silk screen, lithography, design, and multimedia art. She has been working as an executive designer at the Singapore Art & Design Company in Singapore. She has held a number of joint exhibitions in Europe and Southeast Asia. She is represented in private and public collections in France, Australia, Saudi Arabia and Singapore. The art league holds free open painting sessions on Wednesday mornings at the gallery at 1451 Monroe Street from 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Other art classes are offered for adults and children throughout the week, instructed by accomplished artists within the art league. Membership is open to all artists and friends of the arts. Annual memberships are available for children, adults and families. Visit www.artleagueoffortmyers.org, artleagueoffm@embarqmail.com or call 275-3970. Helen Hong Ding Ghostbird T heatre Presents WoyzeckGhostbird Theatre Company continues its second season with Woyzeck, a play by the German playwright Georg Bchner, running October 16, 17, 18 and 20 at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center in Fort Myers. Showtime is at 8 p.m. Doors open at 7 p.m., with a cash bar for patrons. Written in 1837, Woyzeck is Bchners final achievement and is considered to be the first modern drama. The play explores highly relevant issues of mental health, of authoritative oppression, and of working-class poverty. Woyzeck is an impoverished soldier, who takes on work as a barber and as a subject for medical experiments to supplement her income. She is passionately in love with Marie, but Woyzecks jealousy of a shadowy drum major derails her mental health. One part cautionary tale and one part country song, Woyzeck gives profound insight into a soldiers attempt to maintain sanity within a confusing world on the homefront. Guest director Barry Cavin has made a culturally-charged choice in setting the location in Appalachia. He wants the audience to be placed in a setting that is familiar, but deeply insular. Original music and live performance by Pearlie Mae and the Crawdaddy Boys will color the atmosphere with folk and bluegrass undertones. With Brittany Albury as Woyzeck and other military roles played by female actors, the tragedy takes on contemporary shades. Hanny Zuniga plays Marie, and Rebakah Goldberg is featured as Andres, Woyzecks compatriot. The cast also includes Sarah Blinkhorn, Brittney Brady, Jim Brock, Jackie DeGraaff, Stephanie Langnas and Katherine Myers. Ghostbird Theatre Company is the resident theater company of the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center. Ghostbird will be featuring two more plays this season as well as a special fundraising cabaret in December. Ghostbird Theatre Company is dedicated to bringing new and magical performances to Fort Myers and beyond. Tickets are $10, each and are available through the Sidney & Berne Davis Arts Center ticket office at 333-1933 or online at www.sbdac.com. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. Brittany Albury as WoyzeckFort Myers B each Art Association To Open SeasonWith the annual fall potluck on Thursday, October 17, the Fort Myers Beach Art Association kicks off the season chock full of artistic opportunities. For those who wish to find out more about association, guests are welcome to attend and can sign up by calling 263-3909. Diners are asked to bring a dish to pass, their own tableware and pay a small donation. The Fall Members Show of artwork will be on display and will hang until November 1. It can be seen during regular gallery hours; Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sunday, noon to 3 p.m. after October 17. The association will host watercolor ist Pat Weaver for a four-day workshop Exploring Color with Limited Palettes November 18 to 21. This will be the first of three famous artists to teach at the working gallery. Registration is now being taken on the website at www.fortmyersbeachart.com, by calling 812-923-9128 or by email at papaandnana63@aol.com. Weaver will give a demonstration on Sunday, November17 from 4 to 6 p.m. The demo is free to workshop participants and $10 for all others. Guests are welcome. Members Brian Christensen, Penny Fox and Patty Kane will be teaching acrylic, palette knife and watercolor painting classes in October and November. See the website for details, www.fortmyersbeachart.com. Paint the Beach... Sandcastles to Shrimpboats, a plein air festival, will be held on the beach November 4 to 10. This is the 4th annual competition which is now a national event featuring over 50 talented artists who paint throughout the town then show their work in the festival tent at Santini Marina Plaza. Collectors can have first choice at the gala preview party on November 8. Food will be provided by restaurants in the plaza. A quick draw competition will be held in Times Square on Saturday morning followed bycontinued on page 20 Fred Bushnell painting at Bowditch Beach photo by M. Buelow Upcoming C lasses And Workshops At T he Alliance For T he ArtsThe fall education season is under way at the Alliance for the Arts in Fort Myers and there are a variety of classes and workshops starting soon. Upcoming Adult offerings are Painting, Drawing, Photography (including photographing artwork), Fused Glass, Weaving, Basketry, Palm Art, Recycled Bottle Art and Knitting. A featured new workshop on Saturday, October 12 is The Art of Sculpting With Masking Tape with Fort Myers artists Dale and Jeff Ocasio. This all ages session, from 9:30 a.m. to noon, is perfect for families or individual artists who want to learn this fascinating and accessible sculpting technique. Youth classes include Drawing, Painting, Yoga, The Art of Etiquette, Piano, Guitar and Drums. The complete educational season features nearly 50 classes for kids and adults. Visit the Alliance website at www. artinlee.org for class descriptions and to register online, or call 939-2787 for more information. The Alliance campus and galleries are located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard, just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Masking tape sculpture

PAGE 17

17 THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 2013Florida Rep To Present Comedy, Social SecurityFlorida Repertory Theatre has announced the opening of its 2013-14 season with Social Security by Andrew Bergman, an uproarious comedy where modern art meets family mayhem. Playing in the Historic Arcade Theatre November 1-20 with four nearly sold-out previews October 29-31, Social Security is the story of two married art dealers struggling with their impossible in-laws. Get ready for big laughs this season in the Historic Arcade Theatre as we present six unique comedies, said Founder and Producing Artistic Director Robert Cacioppo. In this comedy from the author of Blazing Saddles, The In-Laws and The Freshman, David and Barbara Kahn have it made. They live their ideal life in a swank New York apartment surrounded by the finest in modern art and are isolated from their bizarre relatives. What could possibly go wrong? Everything! When Barbaras dreary and dissatisfied sister, Trudy, and her accountant husband arrive from Long Island with their nearsenile Jewish mother in tow, the comic sparks fly, and the Chagall hits the fan! As David and Barbara Kahn, Florida Rep welcomes back David Breitbarth and Kate Hampton, Asolo Rep regulars who were seen most recently in last seasons Lend Me a Tenor. Also returning are Florida Rep Ensemble members, Carrie Lund and David S. Howard. Lund, Florida Rep associate producer, makes her first of many appearances this season and was seen most recently in last seasons Miracle on South Division Street and Other Desert Cities. Howard, also an Asolo Rep regular, comes back to the Arcade Stage after appearances in 2011s Rumors and 2010s nationally acclaimed production of You Cant Take It with You. Howard was also in the recent Broadway Revival of Im Not Rappaport, opposite Ossie Davis and was featured in the film Moonstruck, among others. Making their Florida Rep debuts are Orlando based actors, Mark Lainer and Ann D. Hurst. Lainer, a veteran of the stage and screen has made frequent appearances with Orlando Shakespeare Theatre, Mad Cow Theatre, and many more. Also a veteran of stages throughout the country and internationally, Hurst is a Carbonell Award-winner who was most recently seen in Grey Gardens with FreeFall Theatre in St. Pete. Social Security Single tickets are now on sale through the box office at 3324488, online at www.floridarep.org, and are $40-$45 and $25 for discounted previews. Social Security is generously sponsored by Ed and Ellie Fox. Florida Repertory Theatre performs in the historic Arcade Theatre on Bay Street with free parking in the Fort Myers River District. Florida. Game Nation To Transform Downtown AreaOn November 1, 2 and 3, the Fort Myers downtown area will be transformed into a massive interactive, story based adventure. Visitors will be treated as VIPs, surrounded by the art and culture of video games, immersive storytelling, and video gaming competitions. Dreams and fantasies will come to life in adventures yet to be told. Players will become anything they like and live out the characters they create. But this is no game. Its real. Game Nation Celebration is our celebratory launch party to showcase all of the amazing things we are doing at Game Nation, from the theme park to the roleplaying game. Everything we do is based on the vision Its your theme park, said Daniel Ruke, Game Nation creator. Fort Myers will be our first test area where visitors will get an exclusive feeling of whats to come. Theyll be able to evaluate some of the latest gaming technologies. Entertainment attractions include live music, interactive role playing, video game tournaments and events, and kids creative areas. There will be activities for kids of all ages. Tickets, packages and accommodations are already on sale. Pre-registration is imperative as tickets and accommodations are limited. Those who pre-register now will also be entered into a digital raffle. Game Nation will be handing out pre-event prizes. For more information, go to www. gncelebration.com. To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732 Florida Residencyand Estate PlanningWORKSHOP Presented by: Complimentary Written Trust Analysis:Bring your current documents to the workshop one-half hour earlyThursday, November 7, 20132:00 p.m.Sanibel Community House 2173 Periwinkle Way Sanibel 33957Wednesday, November 6, 20132:00 p.m.Temple Beth El 16225 Winkler Rd. Fort Myers 33908 9100 College Pointe Ct., Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.sbshlaw.com Reservations: 239-425-9379 You will learn: Will Power ColumnistFlorida Bar Board Certied | Wills, Trusts & Estates Attorneys Presented by: Receive a FREE Florida Estate Planning Guide

PAGE 18

THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 201318 Alliance Members Discuss The MasterpieceThe Alliance for the Arts continues its Member Gallery Book Club on Tuesday, October 15 with a discussion of Emile Zolas The Masterpiece. This monthly exploration of literature focuses on art, artists, art history and art appreciation. The Masterpiece is the tragic story of Claude Lantier, an ambitious and talented young artist who has come from the provinces to conquer Paris but is conquered instead by the flaws of his own genius. Set in the 1860s and 1870s, it is the most autobiographical of the twenty novels in Zolas Rougon-Macquart series. It provides a unique insight into Zolas career as a writer and his relationship with Cezanne, a friend since their schooldays in Aix-en-Provence. It also presents a well-documented account of the turbulent Bohemian world in which the Impressionists came to prominence despite the conservatism of the Academy and the ridicule of the general public. The Member Gallery Book Club meets from 7 to 9 p.m. on the third Tuesday of every month. Club members must purchase their own copy of each book. A discussion guide is available for download at www.artinlee.org. Pre-registration is encouraged; an active Alliance member ship is all thats required. This is one of many benefits of an Alliance member ship. The November discussion of Clara and Mr. Tiffany by Susan Vreeland will be held on Tuesday, November 19. Alliance individual memberships are $50 per year, and a family can join for just $75 per year. Membership benefits include 20 percent discounts on all classes and workshops, a wide variety of free class Try It sessions, discounts on theatre tickets and youth camps, special exhibition opportunities and the satisfaction of knowing youre supporting a vibrant community of artists and art enthusiasts here in Southwest Florida. Visit www.artinlee. org or call 939-2787 to become a member today. The Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard, just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. $1 Million Donation Ends Community ChallengeLee Memorial Health System Foundation and Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida announced that the $20 million challenge grant issued by Tom Golisano in May 2012 has been matched. Chicos FAS, Inc. donated $1 million to close out the match. Chicos FAS and its associates have been committed to helping those in need in Southwest Florida. The corporations philanthropic efforts predominately focus on organizations that cater to women, children, health, education, and the environment all causes that are very close to the hearts of the companys customers and associates. Chicos FAS, Inc. will name part of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) neighborhood that will occupy the entire 64-bed third floor. Private suites will be clustered into Neighborhoods and will deliver 24/7 accommodations for family members and guardians providing the finest family-centered care. Each suite will be telemetry-enabled and provide the latest state-of-the-art equipment and technology near the entrance of the room to provide maximum privacy for the patient and family during hospitalization. Thousands of individuals, companies and foundations supported Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Floridas capital campaign and saw their gifts matched dollar for dollar by the gener osity of Tom Golisano. The Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida has been renamed Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida in his honor. Mr. Golisano issued the challenge in the spring of 2012 and publicly stepped for ward in October 2012 to issue a call to the community to support the children of Southwest Florida. Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida is raising funds via its capital campaign to construct a new 128-bed state-of-the-art pediatric medical facility on the campus of HealthPark Medical Center in Fort Myers. The project is still in need of funding and the community is urged to continue its generosity to raise the remaining $19 million needed to complete the campaign. The new facility will break ground in fall of 2013 and will be fully operational by 2017. Of the close of the matching challenge and its outstanding success, Mr. Golisano said. My congratulations to Lee Memorial Health System Foundation on the successful completion of my $20 million challenge grant. I also extend my thanks to the individuals, businesses, philanthropists and foundations in the community whose tremendous outpour ing of support in just over a year will help turn the dream of a new state-of-the-art Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida into reality. And although this challenge has been met, the hospitals need for support does not end here. I hope that the community will continue to demonstrate its compassion and generosity to help this new childrens hospital bring the highest quality care to the regions youngest patients in need. Jim Nathan, President, Lee Memorial Health System, remarked, The incredible generosity of Tom Golisano and his special gift truly inspired so many Southwest Florida residents to band together in support of excellence in childrens health care. We are humbled and honored to have the support of so many in the goal to keep children close to home during their health care and treatments. Though this challenge comes to a close, we will carry on our efforts to raise an additional $19 million to achieve our capital campaign goal of $100 million on behalf of the children of Lee, Collier, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades counties. We hope the community will continue to stand with us in helping this vision become a reality. Were truly grateful Chicos FAS has chosen to support this important effort on behalf of Southwest Florida children. Their support in taking the campaign over the top of the $20 million matching challenge is an outstanding contribution to ongoing efforts to raise $100 million. Chicos FAS has been a long-time supporter of the health and well-being of children and their families and we are honored to have them stand with us on this lifesaving cause, added Joe Catti, President and CEO FineMark National Bank & Trust and Chairman, Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida capital campaign. From page 12Paddle Smart ClassTopics discussed in the class include: canoes clip examples ations The class materials include a workbook, a reference handbook, and a bonus handout from the American Canoe Association. The cost of the class is $45. The class is being taught at the San Carlos Bay Sail & Power Squadron Classroom located at 16048 San Carlos Blvd at the corner of Kelly Road (across from ACE Hardware). Students can register online at www. scbps.com or call 466-4040. NARFE October Meeting The NARFE (National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association) South Lee County Chapter #1263 will meet on Thursday, October 17 at 11:30 a.m. at the Golden Corral, 4690 Colonial Blvd. in Fort Myers. The guest speaker will be from Blue Cross/Blue Shield Federal Employee Health Benefit Program. For additional information, call 4826713. Best-Selling Author Hoag To Visit Fort Myers For Read Between The WinesInternational best-selling author Tami Hoag will be in Fort Myers on Friday, October 18 at the Colonial Country Club from 6 to 8 p.m. for Read Between The Wines, an event which includes a meet-and-greet, book-signing, reception and silent auction. Hardcopies of her latest release, The 9th Girl, will be available for sale and autographing. Suspense author Hoag first hit The New York Times best-seller list with Night Sins, and each of her books since then has been a best-seller. She will talk about her experiences during her 25-year writing career, how she creates and relates to her char acters and answer questions from the audience. This will be an intimate evening in the round with a thrilling discussion, exquisite Masciarelli wines and delicious hors doeuvres. A silent auction will also take place. Some of the auction items include: a two-night stay at South Seas Island Resort, two tickets to Busch Gardens, a one-night stay at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino from Salty Sams Marina, gift certificates to Norman Love, Bistro 41, Captiva Cruises and much more. Read Between The Wines is sponsored by the News-Press, Masciarelli Wines and Books-A-Million. Tickets for Read Between The Wines are $50 each. Ticket sales close at midnight on Monday, October 14. All proceeds go to fund the Southwest Florida Reading Festival. Purchase tickets online at www.ReadBetweenTheWines.info. For more infor mation, call 533-4826. Our email address is press@riverweekly.com

PAGE 19

19 THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 2013 Juried Art Exhibition WinnersThe Arts In Healthcare program at Lee Memorial Health System announced the winners of the 2013 Art By The disABLEd Juried Exhibition. Over 30 pieces of work were entered from disABLEd artists in our community and awarded first, second, and third place, as well as honorable mention by our panel of local judges, which included Jamie and Kathy Kuser from Happenings Magazine of Fort Myers and owners of the Reverie & Rock Art Gallery in Fort Myers, and Kevin Owen, graphic designer for LMHS System Communications Department. The winning art and all disABLEd pieces will be on display at the ACT Gallery, located at 2265 First Street in Fort Myers, during the month of October. First place was awarded to Rose McGahee, second place went to Nancy Cameron Smith, third place went to Cindy Steakley and an honorable mention was given to Freda Van Pelt. For information on the Lee Memorial Health System Arts In Healthcare program or the Art By The disABLEd program, call Doug MacGregor at 3432633. Nancy Cameron Smith won second place Freda Van Pelt won an honorable mention Rose McGahee was awarded first place Cindy Steakley won a third place ribbon Additional Support Available For Pavilion At Burroughs HomeSouthwest Floridians are invited to assist in building an open-air pavilion on the property of the Burroughs Home in the River District in Fort Myers. The Edward and Gale McBride Foundation has provided major financial support and has issued a challenge grant to the community to match the amount of their gift by the end of this calendar year. The pavilion has been named in perpetuity the Gale McBride Pavilion for Character and Ethics Education as a result of a $350,000 contribution to the Uncommon Friends Foundation, manager of the Burroughs Home. The pavilion will enable the Uncommon Friends Foundation to offer a year-round, climate controlled facility to provide a venue for character education and business eth ics conferences, corporate meetings, non-profit events, weddings and other special occasion meetings. The architectural intent is to be complementary to an existing pavilion while offering versatility and protection during inclement weather conditions. Additional naming rights are being accepted. of the foundations character and ethics society. Gates Construction has provided one such gift. character and ethics society. tion events held in the pavilion. two bricks for $500. The pavilion committee includes Joseph Catti, Gray Davis, Todd Gates, Randall Edward and Gale McBride Foundation was established in 1989 by the late Edward McBride. Over the past 24 years, they have funded many educational charities, includ ing being a significant donor to the Uncommon Friends Chair of Business Ethics at Florida Gulf Coast University. The Edward McBride and Jim and Ellie Newton Scholarships in Family Business are provided at Stetson University. Both of the McBrides are deceased. lished in 1993, is dedicated to lifelong character building among todays youth and business leaders. Its mission is to promote character education in schools, business ethics in the workplace and historic preservation of the Burroughs Home and James Newton Archives. For more information about contributing to the pavilion project or activities of the Uncommon Friends Foundation, call 337-9505 or visit www.uncommonfriends,org. From page 1PACE Luncheonour passion to believe in all girls. PACE Center For Girls, Inc. is a non-residential delinquency prevention program targeting the unique needs of girls, ages 12 to 18, facing challenges such as abuse, school truancy, academic failure, foster care, exposure to substance use and/or incar cerated parent(s). At PACE, girls find a supportive environment focusing on their strengths through a gender-responsive approach that centers on the emotional and physical safety of each girl. As a result, PACE reduces the significant long term costs associated with teen pregnancy, substance abuse, unemployment and long term eco nomic dependency. For more information about the luncheon or the PACE program, visit www.pace center.org/lee or call Dolly Farrell, Director of Development, at 425-2366 ext. 25. Schenkel Schultz Architects rendering of the Gale McBride Pavilion for Character and Ethics Education, to be constructed on the site of the Burroughs Home in Fort Myers Photo Classes At Six Mile Cypress Slough PreserveHave you ever wondered how to use your digital camera to take better pictures? Then join Spencer Pullen, a professional photographer and owner of Premiere Graphics, for his class titled Digital Photography Exposed. Participants will learn the fundamentals of photography such as ISO, aperture and shutter speed and how they work together to create an image just in time for our annual photo contest which begins on November 1. Classes will be held on Saturdays, October 12 through November 16 from 1 to 4 p.m. Reservations are required by calling 533-7440 or online at www. leeparks.org. The cost is $100 per par ticipant for six classes (adults only) and the limit is 10. Meet in the Interpretive Center at the Six Mile Cypress Slough Preserve. Each day will alternate between classroom discussion and field trips along the Sloughs boardwalk or at other local sites. Questions can be directed to Spencer Pullen at 941-764-7824 or info@premieregraphics.net. A parking fee of $1 per hour per vehicle is required.

PAGE 20

THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 201320 Present Gold Sponsors Congress Jewelers Coral Veterinary Clinic Sanibel Gear Warm Vanilla Sun Advanced Disposal Linda and Wayne Boyd The Burns Family Sealife by Congress Doug & Sherry Gentry LCEC Molnar Electric, Inc. Brian Murty, Realtor Red, White & Brew Rosier Insurance Sanibel Taxi Donna & John Schubert Suncoast BeveragesFriend Sponsors Sam Galloway Ford LincolnTHE 32ND ANNUAL Baileys General Store Barrier Island Title Services Dan Hahn Custom Builders Heidrick & Co., Insurance Nave Plumbing Lynn and Ed Ridlehoover She Sells Sea Shells Tween Waters Inn Sunday, November 10 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Dunes Golf & Tennis Club Event Sponsor Low T ide E xplorationJoin a naturalist guide as you leisurely explore the mud flats to see what mysteries the low tide uncovers while enjoying a beautiful Florida sunset. Bunche Beach is a wonderful place to explore and learn about the amazing variety of shore birds, shells and possibly spot a manatee or dolphin playing along the shore. Bring a camera, shoes that can get wet, bug spray and drinking water. The next nature walk will be held on Thursday October 17 from 6 to 7 p.m. and again on Saturday, November 5 from 6 to 7 p.m. Participants will meet at the picnic tables on the beach. The walk is free but parking is $2 per hour, or free with a valid Lee County Parks & Recreation parking sticker. Bunch Beach Preserve is located 18201 John Morris Road in Fort Myers Beach. For more information, call 5337444 or visit or www.leeparks.org. From page 14Three Vinesmost invasive and ecologically damaging plants in South Florida. The University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) recommends that air potato be removed from public and private properties to help protect the states natural areas. It is listed as a category-1 invasive plant species by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council and as a noxious weed by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. And yet, its everywhere both natural and cultivated areas. Make sure this vine does not have a foothold in your yard. If you see a prolific vine with pleated heart-shaped leaves and smooth lightbrown potatoes or tubers, contact the extension service for advice on eradicating the species. Sources: National Audubon Society Field Guide to Florida, Native Florida Plants by Robert G. Haehle and Joan Brookwell, floridata.com, and nsis.org, fleppc.org, edis.ifas.ufl.edu, and hort.ufl.edu. Plant Smart explores sustainable gar dening practices that will help you create an environmentally responsible, lowmaintenance South Florida landscape. From page 16Open Seasonjudging at the festival tent. Music, refreshments and demonstrations will continue throughout the day. Singer Jo List per forms with Joe McConaghy from 3 to 5 p.m. in the festival tent, Jazz Caf, with food and bar service available through Skyes. Tickets for the gala and raffle will go on sale at the Howloween Pet Parade at Santini Marina Plaza Octtober 19. They can also be ordered on line at www. fortmyersbeachart.com. Sponsored by Fort Myers Beach Art Association, The Greater Fort Myers Beach Friends of the Arts, Santini Marina Plaza, Fish-Tale Marina and supported by the Town of Fort Myers Beach, this years plein air festival is shaping up to be the best yet. Artists will kick off with check in hosted by Nervous Nellies on Monday and begin to paint around the town. Items for artists goodie bags are provided by local businesses and friends. Prizes are underwritten by Santini Marina Plaza, Fish-Tale Marina, Smokin Oyster Brewery, John and Jean Kakatsch, Edward Jones Investments, Plein Air Magazine, Watercolor Magazine, Chartpak, and shirts will be underwritten by Beach Pub Inn. The working gallery on Donora and Shellmound will be open during the hours of 9 a.m. to noon on Wednesdays and Thursdays only through October 17. Hours will then be 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 12 to 3 p.m. on Sunday. For more information on shows or classes, call the gallery at 463-3909 or go to www.fortmyersbeachart.com. Party I n T he ParkParty in the Park passes, which include entry into JetBlue Park, lunch on the Green Monster provided by Rib City and batting practice swings on the field are still available for purchase for the second annual Party in the Park on Friday, October 25 at 1:30 p.m. Passes for the Party in the Park are $50 per adult, and children younger than 12 are $25 each. Guests will have the opportunity to take batting practice on the field at JetBlue Park, tour the facility and bid on one-of-a-kind silent auction items and raffle prizes including weekend getaways, Players Championship passes at TPC Sawgrass, an opportunity to throw out the ceremonial first pitch at a Red Sox Spring Training game and a meet-andgreet with Red Sox pitcher Jon Lester. Former Red Sox pitcher and 2004 World Series hero Derek Lowe will also be on site signing autographs. All funds raised will be used by the Red Sox Foundation to support the Foundation for Lee County Public Schools, Inc. Last years inaugural event raised more than $23,000, and the Heights Foundation and the Childrens Home Society each received $10,000 from the tournament proceeds. The Boston Red Sox organization naturally understands the meaning of team work and how it takes a team working together to succeed. The same concept applies to making sure our public-school students achieve at their highest potential, said Marshall T. Bower, president and CEO of the Foundation for Lee County Public Schools, Inc. Working together, our community can help students and teachers excel, and the Foundation for Lee County Public Schools is proud to work with the Boston Red Sox to help us succeed in our mission of enhancing and enriching public education. Presenting sponsors for this years event are Hertz Corporation, Marco Island Marriott and Florida Gulf Coast University. Other sponsors include WCI Communities, Lee Memorial Health System, CVS Caremark, Suncoast Schools Federal Credit Union, Manhattan Construction, Pool Pros, Merrill Lynch and Rib City. For more information, call 226-4783 or email jbpevents@redsox.com.

PAGE 21

21 THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 2013School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NC SPDear Readers,It is that time of year again when there is an opportunity to learn more about childrens literature. Of course I am writing about the 5th annual Lee Bennett Hopkins Writers Institute: From Inspiration To Publication, to be held at the Lee Campus of Edison State College on Saturday, October 26 from 9 a.m. to noon. The goal of the annual Lee Bennett Hopkins Writers Institute is to promote engagement in reading and writing among students, teachers and the community at large. Once again this year, there will be renowned writers and an illustrator. Take a look below to find out whos speaking and to learn a little more about these outstanding presenters. The 2013 speakers include as Keynote: Lee Bennett Hopkins, Patricia MacLachlan and Stephen Alcorn. Lee Bennett Hopkins is a prolific writer of books for adults and children. He is one of the leading writers and anthologists of poetry. He is the namesake and founder of Lee Bennett Hopkins / Penn State University Award for Childrens Poetry, and Lee Bennett Hopkins / International Reading Association Promising New Poet Award. He has won numerous awards and honors for his writing including the 2009 National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Excellence in Poetry for Children, the 1995 Christopher Award, and the 1996 Golden Kite Honor Book Award for his autobiographical poetry collection, Been To Yesterdays. Recent works include I Am The Book, Sharing The Seasons, Amazing Faces, City I Love and Incredible Inventions. The second Keynote Speaker of the morning is Newbery Medalist Patricia MacLachlan, the author of many wellloved novels and picture books, including Sarah, Plain and Tall, winner of the Newbery Medal; its sequels, Skylark and Calebs Story; Edwards Eyes; The True Gift; Waiting for the Magic; White Fur Flying; and Your Moon, My Moon, illustrated by Bryan Collier. MacLachlan will be introducing her latest book at the conference, Snowflakes Fall. This book was written as a message of hope for children and their families following the tragic events in Sandy Hook, Connecticut on December 14, 2012. It is an inspiring picture book that is both a celebration of life and a tribute to the qualities that make each individual unique, said one reviewer. The Keynote Illustrator is Stephen Alcorn. While born in the U.S., Stephen Alcorn spent his formative years in Florence, Italy. It was there that he attended the Istituto Statale dArte, an experience that left an indelible impression upon him and where he also met his future wife, Sabina Fascione, a native of Pisa, Italy. Stephen and Sabina work side by side in a multifaceted, 19th century carriage house, where they incorporate a unique blend of studio related activities and rotating exhibitions of their work. Alcorn is the illustrator of numerous childrens books including America At War / A Poetry Anthology; Poems Selected by Lee Bennett Hopkins; McElderry Books My America; Lee Bennett Hopkins, anthologist; Simon & Schuster, Days To Celebrate / An Almanac of People, Events, and Poetry; selected by Lee Bennett Hopkins; Greenwillow Books, and Marys Song by Lee Bennett Hopkins; Eerdmans Books for Young Readers. For more information or to make a reservation to attend this event, please visit www.edison.edu/writersinstitute. See you there! Ms. Greggs is adjunct faculty at Edison State College where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also Nationally Certified School Psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. C hildrens Mental H ealth C onferenceFor the third consecutive year, Florida Gulf Coast University College of Education and Floridas Institute of Government host the annual Childrens Mental Health Conference from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, November 2 at the FGCU Cohen Center ballroom to create an alliance between mental health professionals and the community. Problems resulting from mental health disorders in children can include misbehavior, school failure, suicide, school dropout, substance abuse, and more. This conference will address some of the problems associated with mental health disorders in children and youth, and will provide insight about what the community can do to make a difference in their lives by building stronger linkages, networks and resources within the community. Keynote speaker is Ross Szabo, an award-winning speaker, author, consultant and Peace Corps volunteer. He served as Director of Outreach for the National Mental Health Awareness Campaign for eight years, and is co-author of Behind Happy Faces: Taking Charge of Your Mental Health. Topics include: signs and symptoms, suicide prevention, effective interventions for the classroom; ADHD misdiagnosis, integrated stress relief, and the new DSM5. The conference is intended for par ents, educators, mental health professionals and university students. General registration is $49, student rate is $25 Isabella Rasi 239-246-47161101 Periwinkle Way #105, Sanibel, FL 239-472-0044 ENGEL & VLKERS Excellence in Real Estate A step above! International Client Base 600 Shops Worldwide Multi-Lingual Staff Your success is my aim.and $69 with 0.4 CEUs. To register, visit http://registeriog. fgcu.edu/. Limited scholarships are available at the registration site. For more information, call Joanne Hartke at 4253273. Event sponsors include FGCU College of Education, Florida Institute of Government, Southwest Florida Community Foundation, and NAMI (National Association of Mental Illness). Local vendors will be available to share community resources to attendees. Open H ouse Week At E dison State C ollegeEdison State College will host Open House Week, November 4 to 7 from 4 to 7 p.m. All events are free to attend and each day will feature a particular Edison State College location so that guests who wish to see more than one campus have the oppor tunity to do so. Attendees are encour aged to register online for a fast-pass through check-in at www.edison.edu/ openhouse. Specific dates and locations are as follows: 1092 East Cowboy Way, LaBelle, Building A 26300 Airport Road, Punta Gorda, Building J 7007 Lely Cultural Parkway, Naples, Building M College Parkway, Fort Myers, Building U Edison State College offers multiple programs that prepare students to enter the workforce upon graduation, said Dr. Christine Davis, Vice President for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management. At our open house events, students will learn more about these academic programs and the support services we offer to assist students in reaching their personal and professional goals. While at the open house, visitors will receive information about the admissions process, academic programs, financial aid, scholarships and additional funding information. The events will offer campus tours, free give-a-ways, snacks, entertainment as well as the opportunity to meet with current students, faculty and staff. On the Fort Myers campus, visitors will also have an opportunity to visit the on-campus residence hall, Lighthouse Commons. For more information about the open house and to register for your fast-pass through check-in, visit www.edison.edu/ openhouse. Registration for Spring 2014 begins on Monday, October 21.

PAGE 22

THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 201322 Financial FocusLessons Learned From Save For R etirement Weekby Jennifer B aseyCongress has designated the third week in October as National Save For Retirement Week which means its a good time to think about your own retirement savings strategies. Ensuring that you have enough money to support your chosen retirement lifestyle is certainly important. Unfortunately, many of your fellow Americans have apparently not done enough in the way of building retirement savings to ease their minds. Consider these figures, taken from the Employee Benefit Research Institutes 2013 Retirement Confidence Survey: said they are not confident about being able to afford a comfortable retirement. dents say they and/or their spouse have even tried to calculate how much money they will need to live comfortably in retirement. What steps can you take to gain confidence in your ability to retire in the manner you have envisioned? Here are a few suggestions: what age do you want to retire? When you retire, do you plan to travel or stay close to home and pursue your hobbies? Will you do some part-time work or consulting? Its important to identify your retirement goals and then, as best as possible, estimate how much they will cost. Once you know what your retirement goals look like, youll be able to shape a strategy for achieving them. afford to your retirement accounts. No matter what your retirement goals may be, youll help yourself by contributing as much as you can possibly afford to earn your employers matching contrithe point where you can max out on these plans, look for other tax-advantaged investments to which you can contribute. your goals, youll want to include a reasonable percentage of growth-oriented exact percentage will depend on your risk tolerance and your specific objectives, but its important to have that growth potential. Keep in mind, though, that investing in growth-oriented vehicles involves mar ket risk and possible loss of principal. a year, review your portfolio to determine if its performance is still on track to help you make the progress you need to reach your goals. investments are simply underperforming, you may need to make some changes. And in the years immediately preceding your retirement, you may also need to adjust your holdings, possibly by moving some dollars from growth-oriented investments to income-producing ones. However, even at this stage of your life, you may still need your portfolio to provide you with some growth potential you could be retired for two or three decades, so youll want your money to last and to stay ahead of inflation. National Save For Retirement Week to heart. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@edwardjones.com. E xperts Discuss I nvesting I n SW Florida B usinessesAbove Board Chamber of Florida presents Investing in Southwest Florida Businesses, a unique opportunity for local professionals to hear from a panel of experts on how Southwest Florida businesses can attract Nemoytin, an attorney who was appointed by Governor Scott as the Regional Frank Abernathy, attorney and owner of EFS Investment Partners, who dedicates time to fostering positive political relations between the U.S. and other counHispanic American Business Association Florida is attractive to foreign investors, and what foreign investment would mean identify what foreign investors look for in local businesses and share strategies for making your business look more attractive great opportunity for local businesses to explore funding and expansion options outside of the U.S. ideal for anyone who is interested in continued on page 23 Attorney Joins Law Firm As AssociateAttorney Blake P. Hampton has joined the law firm of Sheppard, Brett, Stewart, Hersch, Kinsey & Hill, P.A. as an associate of the firm, working closely with estate planning Florida. Hampton was admitted to the Florida Bar on September 21, 2012 and is a Florida Alumni Association, Phi Alpha Chapter, Southwest Florida Gator Club, Franklin Ethics Fellow at the University of Florida Poe Center for Business Ethics. County, where he has taught special needs athletes the fundamental skills and rules of tennis and coached members to Florida state tennis championships. Blake P. Hampton T op 10 R eal E state SalesCourtesy of Royal Shell Real Estate Development City Year BuiltSquare FootageListing PriceSelling PriceDays On Market Bay Woods Bonita Springs 2001 80Plantation Village of SanibelSanibel Pointe Santo de Sanibel Sanibel Vivaldi 31 Sanibel 2,038 Shell Harbor Sanibel 310 Carrillon Woods 20

PAGE 23

23 THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 2013 deaRPharmacistE strogen Levels Affect B oth Guys And Galsby Suzy C ohen, R PhDear Pharmacist: I am debating whether or not to fill the prescription for Estradiol, and I want more information on this drug and estrogen in general. I need it for hot flashes. MG, San Diego, California Estrogen is a highly misunderstood hormone that both men and women have. Some men dont even realize they have estrogen; likewise, women have testosterone, the manly hormone. Its the amount of each that helps shape us. When the word estrogen is used, its really defining three different hormones: estrone, estradiol and estriol. Estrone, or E1 as we call it, is the predominant estrogen post-menopausally. Its important because theres a strong correlation between healthy levels of estrone and your bone health, as well as proper insulin and BMI (body mass index) values which translate to diabetes risk. Estradiol or E2 is the most potent estrogen, and its what you have most of before menopause hits. Estradiol in a drug version as you have been prescribed is considered bio-identical (because we make estradiol), but if its a prescription cream or tablet, the dosage is much higher than what you need physiologically. It may help reduce hot flashes, but I worry about long-term use (unless you test your levels). Now, contrast that with estradiol that is sometimes put into compounded bio-identical creams, they are using a fraction of the prescription dose, and its customized based upon your lab work. Keep in mind, the higher your serum estradiol, the greater the risk of certain cancers. Estradiol, in normal physiological amounts, assists the body in many good ways, its not to be feared, its to be respected and dosed only according to your needs. With a prescription dose, I fear it may be too much if taken daily for more than a few weeks or months. Estriol, or E3 as we call it in the literature, is actually derived from the other two estrogens. Its the least potent of all three estrogens and considered the safest. Estrogen levels that are erratic or low, can cause menopausal symptoms like hot flashes, vaginal dryness, urinary leakage (incontinence), chronic anxiety, and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Low estrogen in a man can result in some bone loss, high insulin, elevated blood sugars and abnormal cholesterol ratios. They dont get the hot flashes! What about high estrogen? Termed estrogen dominance or progesterone deficiency, it could cause heavy, painful periods (bad PMS), uterine fibroids, endometriosis, fibrocystic breasts, higher risk of breast cancer and increased TH1 immune activity, which increases risk of autoimmune disorders like Hashimotos or Lupus. In men, high estrogen tilts the hor mone see-saw such that testosterone (T) goes down and estrogen goes up. Darn, because that may cause low sex drive, erectile dysfunction, shrinking muscles, increased fat tissue (remember, estrogen causes weight gain), a disappearing sixpack in trade for a beer belly, enlarged prostate, diabetes and higher risk of cancer. For an expanded version of column, sign up for my free newsletter at www. DearPharmacist.com. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. dearpharmacist.com. White C ane Fest For V isually I mpairedLighthouse of SWFL is holding a free day of awareness for those living with blindness or a visual impairment on Tuesday, October 15. There will be free food, music and a guided blindfolded tour around an inter section. It will be at Lighthouse of SWFL, 35 West Mariana Avenue, North Fort Myers, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Lunch will be provided by Bahama Breeze and there will be performances by Indecision and Calendar Girls. Popcorn, line dancing, tours around the Lighthouse agency and puppy guide dogs will be among the attractions. Lighthouses mission enables people of all ages living with a visual impairment or blindness to remain independent, active and productive. Transportation will be provided from the Lighthouse to the intersection of U.S. 41 and Pine Island Road for the annual Walk at 11:30 a.m. After the walk transportation will take everyone back to the Lighthouse for the festivities at 12:30 p.m. For more information call Lisa at 9977797 or email LCronin@lighthouseswfl. org. Mom And Me by Lizzie and PryceLizzie and Pryce answer your questions and give advice about aging concerns from a two-generational perspective. A mother and daughter team, Lizzie is a retired RN and health educator, and Pryce is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in the care of elders and people with chronic illnesses. Dear Mom & Me, We moved around a lot because of my husbands job. We always quickly adjusted, made new friends and then moved to the next place. But now that we have retired, making friends is not so easy, and I miss having a female confidante. All I want is another gal to discuss my problems with, but this is very difficult and my husband is totally unable to comprehend female concerns. What would you suggest I do? Betty Sue Dear Betty Sue, Use the skills you developed earlier in your life. It may be harder now, but you developed your networking skills, were successful in the past and will be successful in the future. As far as your husband not under standing your concerns well, what can I say? That is a harder nut to crack! Pryce Dear Betty Sue, Making new friends gets increasingly more difficult as we age. Many seniors are isolated, have health problems and cannot travel around to clubs and other meeting places. Senior couples also have difficulty meeting other well functioning senior couples, but with perseverance and an element of luck, new friendships can be formed. As far as a female confidante is concerned, a lot of senior women will not discuss any of their problems with others and only if absolutely needed will they consult a family member or a professional. Lizzie Lizzie and Pryces email address is momandmeaging@hotmail.com. Shell Point H osts Free Open H ouseShell Point Retirement Community will host its annual Fall Open House on Thursday, October 24 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Fall Open House will offer visitors the chance tour the community in a relaxed atmosphere, with refreshments and fun for all. This event is free and open to the public. Shell Point offers a variety of amenities along with excellent health care, and it is such a beautiful place to live, said Lynn Schneider, assistant vice president of marketing and communications for Shell Point. We want to invite the public to come out and learn more about Shell Point, as well as to see the many features of our community that are available to the general public. The Open House will include tours of decorated models located in the Island and Woodlands neighborhoods, where retirement counselors will be on hand to answer specific questions and present seminars explaining Shell Points lifestyle with lifecare model for retirement. There will be question-and-answer sessions after each presentation. Visitors will receive a program with the schedule of events and locations when they arrive. This way they can pick and choose what they want to see while they are on our campus, added Schneider. For more information about the Fall Open House, call 466-1131. From page 22Investing In SW Florida Businessestaking advantage of a valuable oppor tunity to learn more about attracting investors from abroad. RSVP is required. If you sign up and pay before October 11, admission is $22 for members and $28 for non-members. After this date, admission is $28 for members and $32 for non-members. The event is sponsored by Leo Kremenchuker from the Kremenchuker Law Firm and will be emceed by Keith Grossman of Grossman Conflict Management. For more information on the event or on how to become a member of the Above Board Chamber, contact Jeanne Sweeney at 910.7426 or visit www. aboveboardchamber.com. CPR And AED C lasses OfferedStarting in November, every third Saturday of the month, Veterans Park Recreation Center is offering Family & Friends CPR and AED classes. Instruction and hands on practice in infant, child and adult CPR, first aid for choking and the use of AEDs when appropriate. It is intended for parents, grandparents and teenagers who babysit (age 10 to 15 if accompanied by an adult). The Family & Friends CPR course teaches the lifesaving skills of adult Hands-Only CPR, child CPR with breaths, adult and child AED use, infant CPR and relief of choking in an adult, child or infant. Skills are taught in a classroom setting by using the AHAs research-proven practice-while-watching technique, which provides students with the most hands-on CPR practice time possible. The course does not include cer tification upon completion. The course fee is $25 and is held from 2:30 to 4 p.m. on November 16, December 21 and January 18. Veterans Park Recreation Center is located at 55 Homestead Road South in Lehigh Acres. Call 369-1521 to sign up or for more information.

PAGE 24

THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 201324 B oy Scouts Distinguished C itizen AwardsThe Southwest Florida Council of the Boys Scouts of America announced two recipients of the 2013 Distinguished Citizen of the Year Award: Edward A. Morton of Naples and John W. Sheppard of Fort Myers. The honorees will be celebrated dur ing the 23rd annual gala, dinner and silent auction taking place on Monday, November 4 at the Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort & Spa in Bonita Springs. The Distinguished Citizen Good Scout Award started in Southwest Florida in 1991 and recognizes individuals who have rendered outstanding service to the community, state or nation. Former honorees include George Sanders, Jim Newton, Jody Hendry, Miles Schofield, Leo Wotitzky, T. Wayne Miller, Dr. Abbott Kagan, Chet Perry, Congressman Connie Mack, Congressman Porter Goss, Dr. David Brown III, David Lucas, Gary Trippe, Steve Shimp, Dr. W. Bernard Lester, Lou and Steve Pontius, Rusty Whitley, Dr. Kenneth Walker, Dudley Goodlette, Jeff Kottkamp, Joe Catti, Sam Galloway Jr., Jim Nathan and Samira K. Beckwith. Morton is managing director of Wasmer, Schroeder & Company and is responsible for business development and strategic planning. Previously, Morton served nearly 35 years as an executive at NCH Healthcare System, including six years as chief executive officer. Morton holds a bachelors in accounting from the University of Notre Dame, an MBA from the University of Miami and a masters in Health Science from Florida Gulf Coast University. Morton is of counsel to The Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce; trustee of the Youth Development Foundation (Quest); trustee of the Moorings Park Institute; community representative on the Lee Memorial Health System board, and was most recently appointed to the Board of Governors of the State of Florida University System by Governor Rick Scott. Ed Morton demonstrates extraordinary integrity, character and civic-mindedness, said Greg Graham, scout executive and chief executive officer of the Southwest Florida Region Scouting program. He is an exceptional role model for todays Scouts and an outstanding example of the good works, values and service that the Distinguished Citizen Good Scout Award is meant to honor. Sheppard is a third-generation native of Lee County. His private law practice opened in the late 1950s, and in 1986, Sheppard was in the first class of boardcertified attorneys in Florida in the area of wills, trusts and estate planning. Sheppard earned his bachelors and law degrees at the University of Florida, where he served as editor of the Florida Law Review. He is past president of the Lee County Bar Association and past chairman of the 20th Circuit Grievance and Judicial Nominating Commissions. Sheppard who was recognized with his wife, Ellen, as Philanthropists of the Year in 2006 is a founder of the Southwest Florida Community Foundation and a supporter of the Golisano Childrens Hospital and the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center. John Sheppard has demonstrated extraordinary humility and passion over the years in serving his community, said David Robinson, event chairman and longtime friend of Sheppard. His desire to serve others with no expectation of return is truly inspirational to others. The Distinguished Citizen Good Scout Award ceremony brings together civic-minded individuals and business leaders throughout the Southwest Florida community in an event that recognizes and celebrates the importance of scouting in guiding and developing todays youth. Platinum, Golden and Silver Eagle cor porate sponsorships are available, which provide reserved seating and recognition in the printed program. For sponsor ship opportunities, table reservations and individual ticket purchases, contact the Southwest Florida Council, Boy Scouts of America in Fort Myers at 936-8072 or www.swflcouncilbsa.org. The Southwest Florida Council serves more than 26,000 youth and 3,000 volunteers in the seven-county region. Edward A. Morton John W. Sheppard Fire Prevention E vent At E dison MallThe Lee County Fire Marshals and Inspectors Association, along with the fire departments around Lee County, will be at the annual fire prevention event at the Edison Mall on Saturday, October 12 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. to talk to parents and children about a variety of fire safety topics as part of National Fire Prevention Week. Firefighters and educators will be set up inside and outside of the mall and everyone will have an opportunity to meet with firefighters, fire inspectors, alarm technicians, law enforcement officers and others in public safety. Firefighting apparatus will be stationed outside of the mall so the children and families can look at various pieces of equipment. Inside the mall, agencies will be distributing free pamphlets, brochures and other gifts. Agencies showing adults and children their equipment and talking about fire safety include: tractor. Their message this year is Stomp Out Wildfires and they will be educating the kids and adults on how to achieve this. class to answer questions that people have, and display their bunker gear and tools. ers, SWAT, Crime Prevention, Police Explorers, KOPS kids (Kids Our Primary Source), McGruff, Community Policing officers and the Mobile Command Post. tions and learn how a fire alarm panel works. This years theme is Prevent Kitchen Fires, which is one of the largest creators of single family structure fires, so we will be working on bringing attention to this issue. According to the latest NFPA research, cooking is the leading cause of home fires. Two of every five home fires begin in the kitchen more than any other place in the home. Cooking fires are also the leading cause of home fire-related injuries. Often when were called to a fire that started in the kitchen, the residents tell us that they only left the kitchen for a few minutes, said Alan Carter, Fire Marshal. Sadly, thats all it takes for a dangerous fire to start. We hope that Fire Prevention Week will help us reach folks in the community before theyve suffered a damaging lesson. Among the safety tips that Lee County Fire Marshals and Inspectors will be emphasizing: home, and use a timer to remind you. children and pets at least three away from the stove. anything else that can burn, away from your stovetop. For more information, contact LCFMIA President Alan Carter at 443-0938. Michaels Stores Donate T o B oys & Girls C lubsThe Boys & Girls Clubs of Lee County is busy sorting the large amount of supplies donated by local Michaels Stores after a successful supply drive, held from August 17 to September 17, at the three Southwest Florida store locations. Directly benefiting local BGCLC members, the supply drive collected five large shipping boxes full of folders, notebooks, book covers, award certificates, drawing pencils, stickers, colored pencils, bookmarks, erasers and more. Michaels Stores customers were also encouraged to donate supplies during their checkout process. We are very grateful to Michaels and those members of the community who donated supplies to benefit this effort, said BGCLC Chief Professional Officer Shannon Lane. Its these simple tools that are vital in achieving academic success. The supplies will also be used as homework incentive prizes throughout the year. We are proud to partner with Boys & Girls Clubs to give kids the needed school supplies to better handle their workload and succeed academically, said, Michaels Stores, Inc. CEO Chuck Rubin. At Michaels, we believe in making a differ ence in the lives of our associates and customers by supporting organizations with a strong focus on families and children. The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs is to inspire and enable young people to realize their full potential as productive, responsible and caring citizens. The clubs provide safe places where children can learn, grow, receive help with homework and develop coping skills that assist them in avoiding destructive influences in a fastpaced, complex world. Membership dues are $10 per school year so that all children can have access to our programs. The Boys & Girls Clubs of Lee County relies upon the philanthropic support of individuals, corporations and foundations in order to sustain and grow its services. For more information about the Boys & Girls Clubs of Lee County, call 3341886 or visit www.BGCLC.net.

PAGE 25

25 THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 2013DID YOU KNOW My Stars FOR WEEK OF oO CT oO B erER 14, 2013ARIES (March 21 to April 19) A bid for you to step in and take over an incomplete project could prove to be an excellent learning experience that you can take with you when a new opportunity opens up. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Its a good time for socializing, both with family and with friends. Your aspects also favor developing new relationships, any or all of which might become especially meaningful. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Your success in handling a recent difficult situation prompts a request to handle another workplace problem. But this is one you should accept only if you get all of the relevant facts. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) New information about a past decision raises some unsettling questions from an old friend. Be prepared to explain your actions fully and, if necessary, to make adjustments. LEO (July 23 to August 22) This is not a good time to share personal secrets, even with someone youve known for a long while. What you dont reveal now wont come back to haunt you later. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Pushing yourself to meet a project deadline is admirable. But be careful not to leave out important details in your rush to complete your work and send it off. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Watch that you dont take on more than you can handle when offering to help someone with a personal problem. There might be hidden factors you werent told about. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) That major move youve been considering could come sooner than you expected. Make sure youll be ready with the facts you need when decision time arrives. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Languishing relationships can benefit from a break in routine. Get out of the rut and do something new and maybe more than a little unpredictable this weekend. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Although you dont think of yourself as a role model, your ability to make a tough decision at this time sets an example for others, who admire your courage. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) You need to move any remaining obstacles out of your way before you can take on a new challenge. Seek advice from close, trusted friends and associates. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A career change appears increasingly likely to happen during the next several weeks. Its a good idea to start now to prepare, so you can be ready to make the move when the time comes. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a strong sense of obligation to justice, which inspires others to follow your example and do the right thing. German shoemaker, impersonates an army officer and leads an entire squad of soldiers ated the German army by exploiting their blind obedience to authority and getting them to assist in his audacious robbery. ed for espionage by a French firing squad. circumstantial evidence, and it is probable that French authorities trumped her up as the greatest woman spy of the century as a distraction for the huge losses the French army was suffering. fly faster than the speed of sound. Yeagers X-1 rocket plane was lifted to an altitude released through the bomb bay. introduced a version built on the brawnier classic. press corps is told that President John F. Kennedy has a cold; in reality, he is holding secret meetings with advisers on the eve of seen photographic proof that the Soviets were building ballistic missile sites on the is attacked in his own bathtub when an exgirlfriend pours a pot of scalding-hot grits severe injuries but also shaken emotionally an ordained Baptist minister and purchased a Memphis church, where he still preaches today. bile executive John DeLorean is arrested in a Los Angeles motel with a briefcase containing $24 million worth of cocaine. According to authorities, DeLorean was attempting to make a drug deal in order to rescue his financially ailing DeLorean Motor following sage observation: There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle. one superstition holds that doing so is per fectly acceptable -as long as the ring is being used to ward off a witch. fact that upon the death of British novelauthors body was cremated. What is unusual is that, at Lawrences request, his ashes were mixed into the plaster used to build the in New Jersey, Pennsylvania or Iowa, you might want to keep in mind your states tax policy. If youre buying a pumpkin to carve into a jack-o-lantern, youll need to pay tax on the gourd. Pumpkins used for food pur poses, however, are subject to no such tax. their honeymoon in Malaysia encountered difficulty on the return flight home. It seems that the groom felt the bride was taking too long in the airport restroom, so he boarded the flight back to Saudi Arabia before she did. When he allowed the plane to leave without her, she insisted on an immediate divorce. hour out with friends, you might want to consider the virtually unknown adjective gambrinous, which means to be content and happy due to a stomach full of beer. My advice to you is to get married. If you find a good wife, youll be happy; if not, youll become a philosopher. -Socrates THIS WEEK IN HISTORY strSTR A nN G eE BU tT trTR U eE thoTHO UG htHT F orOR theTHE DA yY PUZZLE ANSWERS TRIVI aA TES tT eight times. ANSWERS SpSP OR tT S QUIZ 1. Who was the first major-league player to hit 20 or more homers as a rookie, then improve 2. Who holds the record for highest career slugging percentage in the major-league postsea ANSWERS the Belmont Stakes).

PAGE 26

PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 201326 GENERAL CONTRACTOR N C R CGC1517615www.dbrowngc.com239-593-1998 A BBB Accredited Business with an +A Rating FISHING CHARTER Light Tackle Sport Fishing CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.com BUILDING CONTRACTOR CONTRACTOR G I P M SR C D P D P CG D GrSince 2001, A Southwest Florida Paver Contractor www.gigicompanies.com 239-541-7282Schedule free estimates or visit our new show roomLic.# S3-12238 COSMETICS Career information available Gift ideas available Call for Specials! Over The Border Rock Shrimp Salad 1 pound rock shrimp, cooked, peeled and deveined 1 15-ounce can black beans, rinsed and drained 1 8 3/4-ounce can whole kernel corn, drained 1/2 cup red bell pepper, chopped 1/2 cup celery, chopped 1/4 cup red onion, chopped 1/4 cup cilantro or parsley, chopped 3 tablespoons green onions, chopped 1 jalapeo pepper, seeded and finely chopped 1/4 teaspoon cumin Iceberg lettuce, shredded 1 avocado, sliced 1 cup vinaigrette dressing In a medium bowl, combine all ingredients except avocado slices, lettuce and dressing; pour 1/2 cup of vinaigrette dressing over mixture and refrigerate for one hour. Serve on shredded lettuce garnished avocado slices. Serve with additional Red Wine Vinaigrette Dressing. May also be served on lettuce in a taco salad shell. Red Wine Vinaigrette Dressing 1/2 cup olive oil 6 tablespoons red wine vinegar 6 tablespoons lime juice 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 2 teaspoons honey 2 teaspoons Italian seasoning 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper Directions: In a medium bowl, combine all ingredients except avocado slices, lettuce and dressing; pour 1/2 cup of vinaigrette dressing over mixture and refrigerate for one hour. Serve on shredded lettuce garnished avocado slices. Serve with additional Red Wine Vinaigrette Dressing. May also be served on lettuce in a taco salad shell. Red Wine Vinaigrette Dressing 1/2 cup olive oil 6 tablespoons red wine vinegar 6 tablespoons lime juice 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 2 teaspoons honey 2 teaspoons Italian seasoning 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper In a small bowl, combine all ingredients; mix well. Over The Border Rock Shrimp Salad

PAGE 27

27 THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 2013 answer on page 27 PUZZLE ANSWERS SUDOKU SCRAMBLERS FIND AT LEAST SIX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PANELS PROFESSIONALDIRECTORY TREE & LAWN CARE Jesus Hernandez LANDSCAPING & TREE SERVICE 482-7350 We Service All your Landscape Needs FULL Landscaping SERVICES Over 20 years serving San-Cap & Ft. Myers CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING COMPUTERS FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the bene ts of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900

PAGE 28

REAL ESTATETHE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 201328 TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED LOG ONTO: IslandSunNews.com CLICK ON PLACE CLASSIFIED CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS ROGER NODRUFF ELECTRICLic# EC12002788. Call Roger 239-707-7203. Aqualink Motor Controls. RS 6/7 CC TFN SCARNATO LAWN SERVICE RS 1/25 BM TFN SERVICES OFFEREDSANIBEL HOME WATCH RS 1/4 BM TFN HOME/CONDO WATCH CONCIERGE SERVICES HELLES CLEANING SERVICES NS 1/4 PC TFN ISABELLA RASiI HAPPY TO HELP Y YOU WithITH A ALL OOF Y YOUrR REAL EEStT At TE NEEDS! RS 1/4 NC TFN 1101 Periwinkle Way #105 Sanibel, FL 33957 ISABELLA RASiI (239) 246-4716 E ISABELLARASi I@AOL.COM MOBILE HOME PERIWINKLE PARK RS 10/4 CC TFN VOLUNTEERS NEEDED RS 1/4 NC TFN VOLUNTEERS NEEDED 239-910-8000RS 1/4 NC TFN VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY NS 2/8 NC TFN HELP WANTEDCZECH TRANSLATIONS NS 10/11 CC 10/18 www.crowclinic.orgHELP US PLEASE!! RS 1/4 NC TFN NURSERY ATTENDANT NS 10/11 CC TFN HELP WANTEDSALES NS 10/4 CC 10/11 ANNUAL RENTALQUIET SANIBEL HOME W/PRIVATE BEACH PATH NS 5/31 CC TFN RE/MAX OF THE ISLANDS RS 1/4 BM TFN VACATION RENTAL Island VacationsMillion $ Views Await You! Cottages 239-472-72771-888-451-7277RS 1/4 BM TFN LIGHTHOUSE REALTY 239-579-0511 RS 1/4 CCCC TF NN CONDO FOR SALE NS 10/4 CC 10/18 REAL ESTATEHELP WANTED NS 10/11 CC 10/18

PAGE 29

29 THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 2013 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS BOATS CANOES KAYAKSDOCKAGEHourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-5800RS 1/4 NC TFN FOUNDPrescription sunglasses found in parking lot of Limetree Center on Wednesday, February 27. Claim at Island Sun newspaper, suite 2 in Limetree Center, or call 395-1213.NS 3/8 NC TFN TOOL BOX WASHES UP ON SANIBELThis tool box with motor parts washed up on shore Saturday morning, May 8 about 8:30 on the beach at Sundial Resort on Sanibel Island. To claim call Sundial Resort Security 239-472-4151.NS 6/14 CC TFN LOST AND FOUND PETSFREE KITTEN TO GOOD HOMEFree kitten to good, safe home. No de-clawing. Fiesty Bengal mix. Call 472-1788 after 5 p.m.NS 5/31 NC TFN 2 MALE GUINEA PIGS 2 Male Guinea Pigs (12 mos old) free with cage and all accessories. Moving to home that will not allow pets. Please call Beth at 410-4421 or email esk1966@comcast.netNS 10/4 NC TFN WANTED TO BUYCASH PAID FOR MILITARY ITEMSCash Paid For Old Military Items. Medals, Swords, Uniforms, helmets, old guns, awards & more. Local Toll Free 1-866-440-3280RS 9/6 CC 11/29 GARAGE MOVING YARDSALES CAUTION MOVING SALE SATURDAY, 10/12, 9-3Treasures For Everyone: Furniture, antiques, glassware, bicycle, compressor, ladders, brass headboard, beach cart, jewelry, dulcimer, tools... 501 Sea Walk Ct, SanibelNS 10/11 CC 10/11 MOVING SALERecliner Sofa & Love Seat, Rattan Shelf Unit, Dresser w/mirrors, Coffee Table, Roll Top Desk w/Chair, End Table, Entertainment Center, Wine Cooler, Small Chest Freezer, Barrister Stacking Book Cases, Computer Desk w/Rolling File Cabinet. Call (239) 935-7803.NS 10/11 CC 10/11 FOR SALELIFT CHAIRPower lift and recline chair, blue. Like new. $500 or best offer. Call 395-0927NS 10/11 CC 10/18 Humane Society To Host Inaugural Duck DashThe Gulf Coast Humane Societys (GCHS) 1st annual Duck Dash will be held on October 19 from 12 to 3 p.m. with the duck race at 2 p.m., hosted by Bass Pro Shops in Gulf Coast Town Center. Adopted rubber ducks will race in the pond behind Bass Pro for prizes. Prizes will be awarded for first, second, third and last place and will include hotel stays, restaurant gifts cards, shopping sprees, movie tickets and gifts from both Tervis Tumbler and Guy Harvey. Ducks can be adopted for $5 at the Gulf Coast Humane Society, all GCHS off-site events and online. This fun family day will feature Gator Country 101.9, the Calendar Girls, vendors, food, drinks, entertainment and a Duck Dynasty Look-a-Like Contest. Sponsorship and vendor opportunities are still available. For more information, call 332-0364 or email Courtney@gulfcoasthumanesociety.org or visit http://www.gulfcoasthumanesociety.org/duck-dash. html. Spay On/Snip Off Veterinary Clinic PromotionThe Gulf Coast Humane Societys Veterinary Clinic announces their October Spay On/ Snip Off promotion, offering discounts on already low cost sterilization surgery for dogs and cats. The discounts are $15 off cat spay/neuter and $25 off dog spay/neuter. According to the Humane Society of the United States, Getting your pet spayed or neutered can reduce the number of homeless pets killed, improve your pets health, reduce unruly behavior, and save on the cost of pet care. The Gulf Coast Humane Veterinary Clinic is located at 2010 Arcadia Street in Fort Myers. For more information, call 332-2719 or email jennifer@gulfcoasthumanesociety.org. Gulf Coast Humane Society: Roxines UpdateThe Gulf Coast Humane Societys Roxine, a previous Second Chance Fund recipient, is excelling after her surgery and doing well in the Second Chance Pals program at the Department of Corrections Fort Myers Work Camp. Officer Adela Davis, who works closely with the Second Chance Pals program, said this of Roxine, When she looks at you, her black lined lips make it seem as if she is smiling at you. She is a sweet, sweet girl and loves for you to sit on floor so she can snuggle and she will lay her head on your lap for as long as you let her. Even though her hind legs bother her at times, she loves to run and play... Roxine is a three-year-old black mouth cur mix who had two torn cruciates in her rear legs and was in need of surgery to repair both legs. Her surgery was successful in June and after completing physical therapy, Roxine was enrolled in the Second Chance Pals program at the Department of Corrections. For more information about Roxine or the Gulf Coast Humane Societys Second Chance Pals pro gram, call 332-0364 or email Jennifer@gulfcoasthumanesociety.org. Roxine at the Department of Corrections, Second Chance Pals program

PAGE 30

If you would like your club/organization listed in The River Calling Card, phone 415-7732Emergency ......................................................................................... 911 Lee County Sheriffs Of ce ........................................................ 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol ................................................................ 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol .............................................................. 278-7100 Poison Control ................................................................ 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center .......................................1-800-936-5321Ft. Myers Chamber of Commerce ............................................. 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare .............................................. 425-2685 Ft. Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce .................................. 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library ......................................................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library ............................................................ 533-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce .......................................... 931-0931 Post Of ce ..................................................................... 1-800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau ..................................................... 338-3500 ARTS Alliance for the Arts .................................................................. 939-2787 Art of the Olympians Museum & Gallery ................................... 332-5055 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio .................................................. 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers ......................................................... 275-3970 Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall ...................................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS ................................................................................ 395-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre ............................................... 278-4422 Cultural Park Theatre ................................................................ 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light ............................................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade .................................. 332-4488 Florida West Arts ...................................................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers ....................................... 472-0168 Gulf Coast Symphony ............................................................... 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres ..................................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic ........................................................... 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater ......................................................... 472-6862 S.W. Florida Symphony ............................................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy .................................................................. 936-3239 Young Artists Awards ................................................................ 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAngel Flight ................................................................ 1-877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center ............................................................... 731-3535 American Business Women Association ................................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL ..................................................................... 339-8046 Audubon Society ....................................................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR .................................................. 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society ................................................... 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus ................................. 1-855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club ............................................................ 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees ....................................................... 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists ............................................................ 415-2484 Ft Myers UDC Chapter 2614 (United Daughters of the Confederacy .................................. 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL ...................................................... 561-9164 The Horticulture and Tea Society ............................................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society ................................................................. 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society ............................................. 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation ........................................... 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees ............. 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America .......................................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL .................................................... 667-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans .................................................. 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy ........................................ 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association ........................................ 561-2118 Kiwanis Clubs: Fort Myers Beach ................................................. 765-4254 or 454-8090 Fort Myers Edison ..................................................................... 694-1056 Fort Myers South ...................................................................... 691-1405 Gateway to the Islands .............................................................. 415-3100 Iona-McGregor .......................................................................... 482-0869Lions Clubs:Fort Myers Beach ...................................................................... 463-9738 Fort Myers High Noon ............................................................... 466-4228 Estero/South Fort Myers ........................................................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County .............................................. 768-0417 POLO Club of Lee County ......................................................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers ......................................................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society ................................................ 472-6940 United Way of Lee County ........................................................ 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) ................................. 211 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews Shell Museum ................................................ 395-2233 Burroughs Home ...................................................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium ........................................ 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates ................................................... 334-3614 Fort Myers Skate Park .............................................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium ............................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge ................................ 472-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site .............................................. 239-992-0311 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center ....................... 765-8101 Skatium ...................................................................................... 321-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society ........................................ 939-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History ...................................... 321-7430 True Tours ................................................................................. 945-0405 Pets Of The Week SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 27 THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 201330 Hello, my name is Atticus. I am a 5-year-old male black and white lab mix. I must have been named after one of the most beloved characters from American literature. Google it and you will find we are a lot alike: calm, well balanced, loyal, patient, intelligent and very handsome. I am very well behaved, too, so you will want to say, Attaboy, Atticus! My adoption fee is $25 during Animal Services Dogtober & Caturday adoption promotion. Hello, my name is Sienna. I am a 2-yearold female brown tabby and white domestic short hair cat. Im as beautiful as my name, not to mention alert, smart and playful. I promise to be a great addition to your single or multi-pet household. My adoption fee is $25 during Animal Services Dogtober & Caturday adoption promotion. For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to Animal Services website at www. LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour, so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if three months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs six months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500. Atticus ID# 573035 photos by squaredogphoto.com Sienna ID#570872

PAGE 31

BEACH CHAIR PASTIME Answers on page 2531 THE RIVER OCTBOER 11, 2013

PAGE 32

AWARD WINNING Flavors From The Caribbean Rim! NOW OPEN! NOW OPEN! Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! 239-463-5505 | 1249 Estero Blvd. Live Music Wed-Sun! Happy Hour Mon-Fri 2-5pmTheBeachedWhale.com Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! THE RIVER OCTOBER 11, 201332