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River weekly news ( July 12, 2013 )

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Title:
River weekly news
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Newspaper
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English
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Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date:
July 12, 2013
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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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UF00101363:00196

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Material Information

Title:
River weekly news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date:
July 12, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00101363:00196


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FREETake Me Home VOL. 12, NO. 39 OCTOBER 4, 2013From the B eaches to the R iver District downtown Fort MyersRead Us Online at IslandSunNews.com Ding Family Fun Day T argets Archery Skills New this year for Ding Darling Days Family Fun Day kickoff on Sunday, October 20, the JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) will be adding youth archery skills clinics to the agenda of free programs and activities. Certified archery instructors Ben Nottingham from Florida Panther NWR and Dave DeFonzo from the Sanibel Recreation Department will be offering introductory instruction to children from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at multiple stations set up in the grassy area between the refuge and The Sanibel School parking lots. Family Fun Day, a free day valued at $75 for a family of four, will include life-size wildlife puppet presentations, live animal presentations, refuge tram tours, guided trail walks, nature crafts, a butterfly house and touch tanks, and giveaways. The day kicks off a week of nature activities and programs at the refuge October 20 to 26. For more continued on page 22 New this year for Ding Darling Days: archery skills clinics on Family Fun Day, held on Sunday, October 20Opening R eception For The Sinking World E xhibit At Alliance For T he ArtsOn Friday, October 4, the highly-anticipated opening reception for The Sinking World: The Mohawk Project is at Alliance for the Arts. The reception will be held from 5 to 7:30 p.m. in the main gallery. Austrian artist Andreas Franke will be on hand for the reception. On Saturday, he is leading a gallery Walk & Talk at 10 a.m., during which hell answer questions about his process and inspiration. Since June, 12 large surreal images encased in steel-framed Plexiglas have been attached by magnets to a 165-foot long WWII-era Coast Guard Cutter sunk off the coast of Sanibel. The USS Mohawk was scuttled there in 2012 to serve as an artificial reef, beneficial to sea life and attractive to divers. But photographer and graphic artist Franke has made the Mohawk his personal underwater art studio. Franke took photographs of the sunken ship and superimposed over them images of actors dressed in 1940s costumes that he shot in his studio back in Vienna. The scenes depict the life which the Mohawks sailors led while aboard the ship, as well as the ones they dreamed of back home.continued on page 20 Image of a sailor superimposed on a photo of the sunken Coast Guard Cutter, the USS Mohawk Andreas Frankes artwork after four months under water. Marine life has adhered to the piece, making it a living piece of art. Pirate Fest R eturning To Fort Myers B eachThe Pollo Tropical Pirate Fest on Fort Myers Beach will feature two stages filled with simultaneous acts from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. on Saturday, October 12 and Sunday, October 13. Performances on the family-friendly main stage, called the Cannon Stage, located at the foot of Old San Carlos Boulevard on Fort Myers Beach, will be led by The Craic Show. Craic is the Celtic term for good times and this four-piece, drama and musical act uses heavy percussion and bagpipes to render various styles of drumming and percussion complimented by haunting old style pipes and vocals. Full skits are performed using the instruments in a heavy percussive and tribal way. Show times are 10:45 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 4:15 p.m. both days. Other pirate-themed acts on the Cannon Stage include Asartes Gypsy Cabaret, a group of dancers and musicians who perform both dance and contact sword balancing. Piper Brandon Martinelli is a world class bagpiper, and has traveled as far as Scotland to compete with the top pipers in the world. The second stage, called the Crows Nest Stage, is located near Third Street and Old San Carlos Boulevard. Featured performers include Arrr, Inc., a family friendly and fun band of pirates that makes the audience part of the act. Capn Jase N. Sparrows Crew brings their band of pirates to the Crows Nest Stage for family variety shows. Storytime will be continued on page 20 Scallywags of all ages can watch the pirate ship sea battle from Nervous Nellies expansive waterfront patio

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 20132 Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: Looking South On H endryby Gerri R eaves, PhDThe photographer who stood at Edwards Drive in the early 1990s and snapped the southward view on Hendry Street was photographing historic downtowns north-south spine and gateway to the Caloosahatchee. Indeed, one could argue that a history of Hendry Street would encapsulate the history of Fort Myers itself, for Hendry roughly follows the path of the 1,000-foot railway and pier built by the U.S. Army at Fort Myers in 1852. A pier at the foot of Hendry was a main transportation and business hub for much of the towns history. So important was it commercially that it was rebuilt more than once due to storms or deterioration. In fact, a pier extended from Hendry until the late 1930s, when the WPA built the yacht basin and riverfront park. Until then, that spot where the 1990s photographer stood was underwater. But even after Hendry became dock-free, it continued to be the gateway to the river, running through the heart of downtown. And thats true today. The Riverfront Detention Basin Project, phase I, completed last year, recognizes the centrality of the waterfront in Fort Myers history. The street has been significantly broadened and a wide median added. Vintage street lamps and general cleaning up have improved the area and made it more inviting for a casual walk or public event. And what else has changed over the last 20 years? A glance at the early 1990s photo shows that chief among the changes is the absence of the Elks Club Lodge #1288, which was located between Bay and Edwards. The awning marks the lodges side entrance. The lodge left downtown after a fire in 1994. One prominent feature in the landscape hasnt changed much in 20 years the 1905 Bradford Hotel (left), which by the 1990s had become the Bradford House Apartments. Across Hendry, on the northwest corner at First was Heritage Square, which housed businesses ranging from insurance and real estate to a beauty salon, tailor, and antiques dealer. Today, Fowler, White & Boggs occupies that historic building. Walk riverward on Hendry to follow the trail of a mid-19th-century pier that connected Fort Myers to the outside world. Then, visit the Southwest Florida Museum of History at 2031 Jackson Street, just a few blocks away, to learn more about how that well-worn path has been transformed many times over the course of downtown history. For information, call 321-7430 or go to www.museumofhistory.org. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. If local history interests you, be sure to check out the Southwest Florida Historical Society. Explore the archives for facts and see historic photos of Hendry Street. The all-volunteer non-profit organization is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Drop by on Wednesday or Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon, or call them at 939-4044. Sources: Archives of the Southwest Florida Historical Society and The Story of Fort Myers by Karl H. Grismer. The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, please call (239) 415-7732 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, FL 33901. Fax number: (239) 415-7702. E-mail: press@riverweekly.com. The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Co-Publishers Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Isabel Rasi Office Coordinator Graphic Arts/ProductionAnn Ziehl Photographer Michael Heider Writers Anne Mitchell Jeff Lysiak PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Contributing WritersRead Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com Click on The River Ed Frank Max Friedersdorf Tom Hall Today, a much wider Hendry Street borders the new Riverfront Detention Basin Project, phase 1 (right) photo by Gerri Reaves Prominent in this early 1990s photo on Hendry Street are the Bradford House Apartments (left) and the Elks Lodge #1288 (right) courtesy of the State Archives of Florida

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3 THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 2013 Fort Myers Public Art: Call To Artists For Clemente Park Public Artworkby Tom HallThe City of Fort Myers issued a call for artists interested in creating a $20,000 public artwork thats to be installed in the Dunbar communitys Clemente Park. The deadline for submissions is November 1. The artwork will reflect the rich and complex history of the Dunbar community that will aesthetically enhance Clemente Park, promote community pride and reinforce its historical societys mission. In a meeting with members of the Fort Myers Public Art Committee, community leaders and other stakeholders have requested that the chosen artwork be designed for display either on the exterior walls of the office/library, at the entrance to Williams Academy or next to the sidewalk that runs along Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard in the front center of the park. The call is open to any artist living in the United States who has: on a similar scale; ships; porate or museum collections; or in the past five years at an institution that is accredited by the American Association of Museums. While the public art committee normally chooses the artist who will be awarded a public art commission, the representatives from the Dunbar community. From the submissions received, the field will be winnowed to three finalists who will be expected to create a model (known as a maquette) of their intended design (for which theyll receive a $500 design fee). The $20,000 budget that has includes the artists fee, but materials, fabrication, transportation and installation. The community surrounding Clemente Park takes its name from Paul Laurence Dunbar, a poet who was born in Dayton, Ohio in 1872. The new segregated school built in Fort Myers in 1926 was named for him. The Dunbar School eventually gave its name to the surrounding community which until that time had Dunbars father was a Civil War veteran who served in the 55th Massachusetts schooling, having learned how to read expressly for that purpose. Dunbar wrote his first poem at age 6 and gave his first public recital at the age of 9. Over the course of his brief, 33-year life, he wrote a dozen books of poetry, four books of short stories, five novels and a play. In 1903, he also wrote the lyrics for In Dahomey, the first Broadway musical ever written and performed entirely by AfricanAmericans. It went on to become one of the most successful theatrical productions of its time, touring England and America for more than four years. Dunbar became one of the first black poets ever published, and his poems and essays appeared in Harpers Weekly, The Saturday Evening Post, The Denver Post, Current Literature and a number of the other leading died from tuberculosis on February 9, 1906. ments are celebrated public artwork, a bust cast by North Fort Myers sculptor DJ Wilkins in 1989. Part displayed in an alcove in the north galleWhile artists responding to the current call are welcome to pay homage to Dunbar in their proposed piece, they may also center the artwork around the life in Dunbar or key figures whove made contributions to the community during its nearly 90-year history. Interested artcontinued on page 4 The public art committees first commission was Fire Dance, the Dupont red modernist sculpture dedicated in Centennial Park on March 2, 2012 Lazy Flamingo, Inc. 6520-C Pine Avenue Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-5353 Lazy Flamingo 3, Inc. 16501 Stringfellow Rd Bokeelia, FL 33922 239-283-5959 Lazy Flamingo 2, Inc. 1036 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-6939 Lazy Flamingo 4, Inc. 12951 McGregor Blvd. Ft. Myers, FL 33919 239-476-9000 Four Great Locations! We have the NFL Ticket Package and the BIG TEN Network NOW SERVING FULL LIQUOR IN FORT MYERS 20 Wings & Domestic Pitcher for $20 during all College and Pro GamesF M 33 Patio DeLeon, Downtown Fort Myers (239) 337-3377OPEN Tues-ur 11am-10pm, Fri 11am-11pm, Sat 3-11pm Closed Sun & Mon

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 20134 Time Capsule Buried At LIFE AcademyThe Goodwill LIFE Academy buried a time capsule on the morning of September 17. The time capsule burial marks the schools move from a previously leased location to their new, permanent home at The Goodwill Opportunity Center, 5100 Tice Street in Fort Myers. The time capsule is special to our school because we have proud school memories that we can look forward to seeing fifty years from now, said LIFE Academy student Josh Rohloff to the crowd of about 40. I can only imagine what the students {in the future} are going to think about our hard work we left behind. The time capsule holds items like the LIFE Academys newsletter Tiger Tales, pictures of the first day of school in the new building, and letters from the students to the future classes. The time capsule will not be dug up until 2063 50 years after its burial. Our time capsule that we bury today will be a day of remembrance for future students, said fellow student Blake Rhoades. We can connect through our time capsule in 2063. The Goodwill LIFE Academy originally planned on burying the time capsule on September 9, but had to reschedule due to a swarm of bees passing through the burial site. The Goodwill LIFE Academy is a tuition-free Lee County charter school for students with intellectual disabilities ages 11 through 22. The new location, at the Goodwill Opportunity Center, features seven classrooms, a bus ramp area, a large kitchen, dedicated library and computer lab and other accommodations. A ribbon-cutting for the new location was held earlier in the summer. A student shovels dirt on the time capsule A student helps bury the time capsule with principal Lynn Pottorf Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Downtown Fort Myers (Post Oce Arcade Next to Hotel Indigo) 1520 Broadway For Takeout & Delivery Tel: 334-6991 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEKMon-urs 11am 10pm Fri-Sat 11am 11pm Sun 12pm 9pm www. ichiban-sushi-chinese.com www.SeabreezeNurseries.com (239) 560-1422 WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY We can help! Ask about our Season Discount! Palms, Palms, natives, natives, crotons, crotons, bromeliads, bromeliads, buttery bushes, buttery bushes, & much more & much more Open Monday Saturday www.threecraftyladies.com Find us on WE WILL PAY YOUR TOLL!!!Spend $55 and bring us your toll receipt for a full refund! From page 3Artwork-ists also have free choice on whether to incorporate their designs in a mural, mosaic, or either figurative or modernist sculpture. But whatever medium they choose, they must factor in durability and maintenance requirements given Southwest Floridas tropical climate and the high degree of urban exposure. Fort Myers has a total of 45 public artworks located within its boundaries. The latest addition to the citys public art collection was Fire Dance, the Dupont red proto-architectural sculpture that sits in Centennial Park West, steps from the intersection of Heitman and Bay Streets. Applications for consideration must be made online at www.callforentry. org. For more information or assistance, contact Donna Lovejoy, public art liaison, administrator services manager, Public Works, at 321-7217 or dlovejoy@cityftmyers.com. An arts advocate, Tom Hall guides weekly walking tours of the River Districts public art collection in Fort Myers. For more information, go to truetours.net. Rotary Club Of Fort Myers South Donates Dictionaries To Third GradersMembers of Rotary Club of Fort Myers South were hard at work this past weekend, preparing dictionaries for distribution to third grade students in Lee County. Each year, all of the rotary clubs in Lee County provide every third grade student in Lee County schools with a dictionary. This year, Rotary Club of Fort Myers South was assigned Colonial Elementary, Heights Elementary, Orangewood Elementary, Ray Pottorf Elementary, Tanglewood Elementary and Treeline Elementary. Before the dictionaries are distributed to students, volunteers uncase the dictionaries, apply Rotary 4-Way Test labels, re-case the dictionaries, label the boxes for the destination schools and place them on pallets. This year we had so many helpers that we finished the project in record time. We started a little after 9 a.m. and by 9:45 a.m., we had labeled and cased almost 1,000 dictionaries, said Jim Applegate, dictionary project chairman for Rotary Club of Fort Myers South. After we were done with ours, the children volunteers pitched in to help another club who was short-handed. It was a great team effort. The dictionaries will be distributed to schools on Friday, October 4, where Rotarians will give a brief introduction to Rotary before handing the dictionaries to third graders. New to this year, Rotary will also be distributing dictionaries to second and third grade teachers. I have been told by some of the teachers that for some students this is the first book they have ever owned, Applegate added. It is a joy to see the excitement on their faces when we hand them their very own dictionary. For more information, visit www.rotarysouthftmyers.org/.

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5 THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 2013 Goodwill Bear Collection UpdateGoodwill Industries of Southwest Florida, Inc. needs your help for the final half of its teddy bear drive. The organization, in conjunction with several local businesses, still needs about 150 teddy bears for its 7th annual Festival of Trees. Goodwill hopes to collect 300 bears by November, in time for the start of the Festival of Trees on November 29 at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center in the Fort Myers River District. We are so thankful for the teddy bears weve received, said Madison Mitchell, spokesperson at Goodwill. The bears make up the Very Beary Christmas Tree, which is donated to the childrens hospital at the end of the Festival. We just need about 150 more to reach our goal. Goodwills bear tree has been a staple of Goodwills annual Festival of Trees since the events inception in 2006. Made up from bears donated by the community, the tree is one of 25 beautifully decorated trees that is auctioned off at the Festivals signature event, the Tux & Trees Gala, on December 7. Auction guests gather around this special tree to raise money for The Southwest Florida Goodwill Foundation. The tree is then traditionally donated to the childrens hospital. If youre someone who just wants to donate an individual bear, well take it, continued Mitchell. Every bear makes a difference. ArtFest Fort Myers, D&D Air Conditioning & Heating, Fort Myers Vet Center, GMA Architects and TDM Consulting, Goodwill Boutique on First, Imaginarium Science Center, Kelly Road Self Storage, Life Counciling, Puddy n Pearl II, Rnells Tuxedos, and Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center are all hosting public teddy bear drives. Bears can also be dropped off at Goodwills administrative offices in North Fort Myers. If you are interested in hosting a teddy bear drive or have new bears that you would like to donate, contact Madison Mitchell at 995-2106 ext. 2213 or at MadisonMitchell@goodwillswfl.org. For more information on the Festival of Trees and Tux & Trees Gala, visit www.tuxandtrees.com. Last years Festival and Gala raised $93,000 to support the Southwest Florida Goodwill Foundation, which provides long-term financial support to programs and services of Goodwill Industries of Southwest Florida. In 2012, Goodwill helped 30,000 Southwest Floridians with disabilities and other disadvantages become more independent. Above Average Rainfall Delays Library OpeningThe grand opening that was scheduled for the Downtown Fort Myers Library on Saturday, October 26 has been rescheduled to a later date. The above average rainfall this summer has impacted the outdoor site work. The exterior design of the library is a critical component to the overall library experience and is an integral part of the grand opening. Current projections anticipate completion of the project in mid-November. The library grand opening will be rescheduled once Lee County Construction and Design can assure the completion date. Last years festival and gala raised $93,000 for the Southwest Florida Goodwill Foundation RIV Nellies Upstairs Waterside Bar Where its Happy Hour all the time!!! 10% OFF Offer valid with Cash payments only ... No credit cards. ONE COUPON PER TABLE Can not be used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, Expires Oct. 11, 2013 Lunch, Dinner Snacks in Between11am-10pmPLUS LIVE MUSIC! www.nervousnellies.net FREE MARINA DOCKAGE with Dock Attendants Assistance

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 20136 Call for departure time CAPTIVACRUISES H T H E I S L A N D S H THE BEST WAY TO SEE THE ISLANDS IS FROM THE WATER Cruises depart from beautiful Captiva Island Hortoons Democratic Womens Club Francisco Fuentes, VP of Global Compliance and Risk Management for Chicos FAS, Inc. will be the speaker at October 12 meeting of the Democratic Womens Club of Lee County. The meeting is at 10:30 a.m. at the Hilton Garden Inn, in South Fort Myers, at the northeast corner of College Parkway and Summerlin Road. Fuentes has been working for Chicos FAS, Inc. for seven years. He is responsible for the organizational alignment and managing the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) partnerships with internal and external stakeholders. He visits the factories and suppliers around the world to facilitate communication and continuous improvement within CSR. He has more than 20 years of experience in multiple areas of risk management that include corporate social responsibility, safety, environmental and sustainability. He has a proven performance track record working for Fortune 500 companies across multiple industries including retail, healthcare, apparel, food, and biomedical. He is experienced in numerous multicultural environments such as North America, Latin America, Europe, China and South East Asia. He will talk about Chicos corporate social responsibility policy, working conditions in foreign garment factories and the companys economic contribution to Lee County Chicos FAS was founded in 1983. It is headquartered located in Fort Myers and operates 600 Chicos boutiques and 100 outlets, 402 White House|Black Market boutiques and 45 outlets, 206 Soma Intimates boutiques and 16 outlets, throughout the United States, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. The company believes that every person has a right to safe, decent and humane working conditions. Although it does not own the factories that make its merchandise, it has a responsibility to work with suppliers to ensure working conditions consistent with its values and guiding principles. An optional lunch will be served following the meeting at a cost of $18 and visitors may make reservations for lunch by contacting Pat Fish at fishpatricia@ yahoo.com or by calling 466-8381. Brewery And Aquarium TripThe Kennedy Kruisers are off to beautiful Tampa to discover the wonders of this historic part of Florida. A bus excursion offered on Friday, October 11 will take participants to the Yuengling Brewery, the oldest brewing company in the United States, where guests will learn the secrets of the time-honored tradition of beer making. Participants are then off to the Golden Corral for a lavish buffet lunch that is included in the price of the trip, which is $62 for members and $67 for nonmembers. The final destination is the Florida Aquarium, rated one of the Top 10 best aquariums in the country. The bus will leave Lake Kennedy Senior Center in Cape Coral at 8 a.m.; return time that evening is approximately 6:30 p.m. Preregistration is preferred by October 8. To make reservations or for additional information, call the Lake Kennedy Senior Center at 574-0575. Lunch And Learn ProgramDont have lunch plans? Want to learn about a valuable resource? The public is invited to take part in the Lake Kennedy Senior Centers Lunch And Learn Program, scheduled for Wednesday, October 16 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Participation is free. During this session, participants will learn about the valuable Florida Department of Elder Affairs SHINE Program (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders). A complimentary lunch will be provided by Juniper Village. Preregistration is required by October 11. For more information or to sign up, call the Lake Kennedy Senior Center at 574-0575. New Dog Park OpensLee County Parks & Recreation has opened its newest dog park called Paws 4 Duty in Veterans Park in Lehigh Acres, 55 Homestead Road. Paws 4 Duty offers two shaded large off-leash areas; one is for large dogs and the other is for small, shy dogs or puppies that need a smaller space. The park features water and shower stations as well as waste removal stations, and there are public restrooms for pet owners nearby. While dogs are not allowed in the general areas of the 95-acre park, there is a designated dog walk to allow pets/owners to access Paws 4 Duty from the northeast walk through park entrance. Lee County Parks & Recreation has 11 dog-friendly facilities. Six offer onand off-leash areas and five offer on-leash areas. For more information, call 533-7275 or visit www.leeparks.org.

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7 THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 2013 The nest relaxation treatments from around the planet have been brought to Southwest Florida.Call 239.333.1450 or visit www.AssuageCenters.comGET TO KNOW US OPENING SPECIALAssuage Signature Massage, Assuage Signature Facial, And Make-up Application.Special Price: $185 (reg. $215) Summerset Regatta ReturnsFor 48 consecutive years, sailors of Southwest Florida have gathered to celebrate the end of summer by participating in this areas premier sailing event called the Summerset Regatta. This year, hundreds of sailors are expected from Tampa Bay to the Florida Keys, participating in over 50 boats in seven classes. The Offshore Sailing School Buoy Races on Saturday, and the West Marine Coastal Race on Sunday will inspire the competition among sailors representing eight different sailing clubs. This year, the Caloosahatchee Marching and Chowder Society (CMCS) is again proud to present the 48th Summerset Regatta. CMCS will continue the tradition of contributing thousands of dollars ($10,000 in 2012) from the proceeds to local youth sailing groups, up and down the coast. The activities include racing, social and happy hour events, prize drawings and the awards dinner at the Captiva Ballroom at The Pink Shell Resort in Fort Myers Beach. Each vessel entered will be eligible for fantastic door prizes, such as haul-outs, boat services, gift certificates and nautical supplies. The 2013 race will include many of our areas fastest racing yachts and previous Boat of the Year (BOTY) winners. The Summerset Regatta is the first regatta to be scored in the 2013 to 2014 BOTY racing for Southwest Florida, Charlotte Harbor and the Caloosahatchee BOTY competitions. Schedule of events: Wednesday, October 9 Registration deadline 5 p.m. Friday, October 11 Shoreside activities start at 6:30 p.m. when the regatta kicks off with the Sellstate Priority Realty Skippers Meeting/Party at Bonita Bills, with free beer, soda and pizza. Bonita Bills is located at 702 Fishermans Wharf, San Carlos Island at Fort Myers Beach. Saturday, October 12 First start 9:30 a.m. Offshore Sailing School Buoy Races off Fort Myers Beach Post race cocktail party starts at 6 p.m. at Coconuts Poolside, at The Pink Shell Resort. Cash bar with free beer and hors doeuvres. Drawing for racers prizes, music and a nautical art show. Sunday, October 13 First start 9:30 a.m. West Marine Coastal Race off Fort Myers Beach. Racers will finish a 14 to 18 nautical mile distance race in the Gulf of Mexico. 10:30 a.m. Cruisers Coastal Race 6 p.m. Morgan Stanley Smith Barney/Lexus of Fort Myers awards dinner and party at The Pink Shell Resort, Captiva Ballroom. For more information, contact Regatta Chairperson and Vice Commodore Steve Romaine at 4826280 or sromaine294@yahoo.com or Rear Commodore of Racing Steve Roake at 549-2434 or steve@theroakes.com. The Summerset Regatta website is www. summersetregatta.com. The Summerset Regatta returns to Fort Myers Beach next weekend Art Council Launches New Exhibition In partnership with the Art Council of Southwest Florida (ACSWF), the Southwest Florida Community Foundation will hold a reception for this years exhibition series, Art & Community, on Friday, October 4 from 4 to 6 p.m. at the foundations headquarters, 8771 College Parkway, Building 2, Suite 201 in Fort Myers. Dr. Sandra F. Mark, president of the ACSWF, helped to coordinate this inaugural exhibition series, which highlights six of the 19-member organizations of the art council including the Cape Coral Art League, Southwest Florida Fine Craft Guild, Southwest Florida Pastel Society, Art Center of Bonita Springs, Art Quilters Unlimited and Alliance for the Arts. Works from the Cape Coral Art League are now showing through October. We are celebrating our 50th anniversary this year in which the ACSWF has grown to include more than 6,800 member organization artists, said Dr. Mark. This Art & Community exhibition series is a wonderful partnership for us as it provides another opportunity for artists to show their work. Were excited to be partnering with the Art Council of Southwest Florida this year as we welcome a number of its member artists from the Southwest Florida community, said Sarah Owen, president and CEO of the SWFLCF. This community has the great fortune of being the home to many incredible artists whose work has shaped both Southwest Florida and the nation. Weve met some amazing people through art. Public viewing hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call Kim Williams at the SWFLCF office at 274-5900 to schedule a tour.

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 20138 Along The RiverOn Sunday, October 6, Pinktoberfest comes to Fort Myers as the Pink Heals Tour rolls into downtown. Three pink fire engines and firefighters dressed in pink bunker gear will honor and support healthy women and the ones in their fight against all types of cancer. The parade starts at 6 p.m. The City of Fort Myers Fire Department, the City of Cape Coral Fire Department, the River District Alliance, Lee County EMS, along with other area public safety professionals in Lee County, will join forces and celebrate women with a pink 5k in the morning, a pink parade, pink block party and fireworks by the water at nightfall. All proceeds from the event will benefit Hope Hospice of Fort Myers and the Make-AWish Foundation of South Florida and will stay in the community to help with bills, copays and other general financial help for women and families that may be struggling in their fight against cancer. The Pink Heals Tour is led by a group of firefighters that travel the country every year to spread the Cares Enough to Wear Pink campaign. The non-profit mission is to provide a national support for women across the country by wearing the color pink. The event is for fun, awareness and hope. For more information, go to www.thepinktoberfest.com. Every Monday through February 24, join local film buffs judging short indie films submitted to the Fort Myers Film Festival and have your say as to whether or not it makes the grade for final programming during the festival to be held March 19 to 23. Thank God its Monday (TGIM) features happy hour is at 6:30 p.m. The show starts at 7 p.m. Musical guest on October 7 is Princesss Johnson. TGIM takes place at The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center located at 2301 First Street, Fort Myers. Check out updates and deals at www.fortmyersfilmfestival.com. The 8th annual Fort Myers Beach Pirate Fest returns next weekend. Nervous Nellies Crazy Waterfront Eatery invites you to celebrate starting Friday, with wenches, corsairs and beauties at the historic Seaport of Fort Myers Beach. There will be live music and shows on two stages, and spectators can watch pirate ships go to battle with thar cannons ablaze. Nervous Nellies Schedule Friday, October 11: Uglys Waterside Bar from 6 to 9 p.m.; and Saturday, October 12: Beach seaport from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Eatery & Uglys Waterside Bar from 2 to 3 p.m.; music by Celtic Stew from 6 to 11 p.m. and Rich Lancaster and Papo from 6 to 10 p.m. Tickets are $12 in advance or $15 at the door. Pirate Ball begins at 8 p.m.; and Cash prizes are awarded to Best Pirate, Best Wench and Best Couple. Sunday, October 13: a.m.; pier at Nervous Nellies historic Fort Myers Beach seaport from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; action at Nervous Nellies Crazy Waterfront Eatery & Uglys Waterside Bar 2 to 3 p.m.; Nervous Nellies at 5 p.m.; and Live music: High Tide from 6 to 10 p.m. Nervous Nellies Crazy Waterfront Eatery and Uglys Waterfront Bar are located at 1131 First Street, Fort Myers Beach at the historic Seaport of Fort Myers Beach. Call 463-8077 or go to www.nervousnellies.net. The Pink Heals Tour returns to Fort Myers on Sunday with Pinktoberfest Channel your inner Black Beard when Pirate Fest returns to Fort Myers Beach. Nervous Nellies is hosting this years pirate costume contest. Please visit our River Weekly News online advertisers at www.islandsunnews.com. You can click through to their Web sites for more information about real estate, shopping, restaurants and services. Just click on the logos surrounding the front page. Time to Refurnish Your Home or Condo? QUALITY PRODUCTS FROM: CARLTON, CAPRIS, LANE, FLEXSTEEL, SUMMIT DESIGN, DOUGLAS, QUALITY WICKER, SEA WINDS, SIMMONS, RESTONIC, BODY REST, REBWOOD, FOREST DESIGN, SHAW, PATIO DESIGN, BEST AND MORE.LARGE SELECTION OF WICKER & RATTANOur Experienced Staff Will Help You Coordinate Delivery While Youre Here or Away OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FURNITURE WORLD CAN HANDLE ALL YOUR NEEDS! Special in i Sof Sleeper CONDO PACKAGE3 OR MORE ROOMS OF FURNITURE$6162CALL FOR DETAILS15631 SAN CARLOS BLVD, FORT MYERSCONVENIENT LOCATION FROM SANIBEL & FT. MYERS BEACH239-489-3311 www.furniture-world.net

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9 THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 2013 Heights Foundation Seeks Donations For Thanksgiving Holiday OutreachThe Heights Foundation is seeking organizations and individuals to participate in the Bountiful Blessings Thanksgiving outreach. Since 1999, the program has helped families in the Harlem Heights neighborhood make a traditional Thanksgiving meal to share with their families. In 2012, partner agencies, businesses, philanthropic organizations and more than 100 volunteers provided dinners with all of the fixings to 400 families. Donations can be dropped off Thursday, November 21. The outreach event will be held on Sunday, November 24. The Heights Foundation works to build strong, self-sufficient families in the Harlem Heights neighborhood. We can only do this because of the generous support of our neighbors who contribute their time and money to support our mission, said Julie Workman, chief advocacy officer for the Heights Foundation. Donations of food or Publix gift cards will help families in our community. Volunteers are also needed for our donation drop off day and outreach event. Organizations and individuals interested in participating can contact Matt Wallace at 482-7706 ext. 3040 or matt@heightsfoundation.org. All donations are tax deductible. Monetary donations can be made online at www.heightsfoundation.org. The Heights Foundation Thanksgiving Outreach will assist nearly 400 families in the Harlem Heights neighborhood ROCKtoberfest Concert SeriesLocal Rotary clubs are hosting ROCKtoberfest, a free, live music series presented by Bell Tower Shops. Each Thursday in October from 6 to 8 p.m. some of Southwest Floridas finest local talent will provide fun for all ages. Rotary Club of Fort Myers South and Rotary Club of Fort Myers Sunrise will host the outdoor bar in Center Court, offering beer, wine, soft drinks, and water. All proceeds from the outdoor bar benefit these local Rotary groups. The schedule: Thursday, October 3, Memphis 56 of the Fort Myers music scene and regulars at Art Walk and Music Walk, is a trio that plays rockabilly and roots rock including Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash and Hank Williams. Thursday, October 10, Rotary Rocks The house band for Rotary International District 6960 makes a special appearance with their blend of early and classic rock, featuring vocalist Cyndi Doragh. Thursday, October 17, Rockin Horse, whose band members have opened for the Allman Brothers and Toby Keith, This classic rock powerhouse has taken Southwest Florida by storm with their awe-inspiring renditions of Fleetwood Mac, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, The Black Crowes, Tom Petty and Neil Young. Thursday, October 24, Barefoot & Brendon play an eclectic mix of modern and classic rock. They brings acoustic guitar, electric guitar, bass and drums adding up to a full-band sound. Favorites include Muse, U2 and more. Thursday, October 31, Strange Arrangement is unique and unpredictable and hard to categorize. aka The Brothers Van Kirk, they play original, fun and funky music and often incorporate costumes into their high-energy performances. A Halloween costume contest will take place after the October 31 concert at 8 p.m. For more information log onto www. thebelltowershops.com. We Proudly Brew Tropial Outdoor Patio Seating Appetizers & Full Dinners Best Prices On The Planet Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 7 days a week. Snacks In-between Live Music! Outdoor Seating Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Come Try our NEW Cowlicious Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials Sanibels Most Award Winning Restaurant FREE BEER/HAPPY HOUR DAILY LIVE Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Snacks In-between Snacks In-between Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Always Fresh ...Always Fun!

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Churches/TemplesALL F aA ITHS UNIT aA RI aA N CONGREG aA TION (UU A) Where diversity is treasured 2756 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers Summer program: Understanding the Faiths of Our Worlds June 2 to August 25 11 a.m. Interim Minister, Rev. Margaret Beard, begins on September 1 239-226-0900. www.allfaiths-uc.org A LLLL SS A INTSINTS BYZA NTINENTINE RITERITE CA THOLITHOLI C C HH U RR C HH 10291 Bayshore Rd., N. Fort Myers Divine Liturgy is on Sun. at 10:30 a.m.; Rosary begins at 10 a.m. Lenten services (Presanctied Liturgy) will be on Wed. evenings at 6 p.m. starting on Feb. 22. Administrator is Very Rev. Peter Lickman, ph. 305-651-0991. We are a Church of the Eastern Catholic or Byzantine Rite, 1.5 mi. east of Int. 75. A NNNN U NN C II A TIONTION GREEGREE K ORTHOORTHO D OO X C HH U RR C HH 8210 Cypress Lake Dr ive, Fort Myers Reverend Fr. George P. Savas Orthros Service Sunday 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy Sunday 10 a.m. www.annunciation.fl.goarch.org 239-481-2099 B ETHETH SHILOHSHILOH M ESSIESSI A NINI C SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 15675 McGregor Boulev ard, 437-3171 Rabbi: Judah Hungerman Friday Service, 8 p.m., Saturday Service, 11 a.m. Shabbat School Saturday Morning, Adult Hebrew Classes. Call for information on full program. B RERE AD OO F LILI F EE M INISTRIESINISTRIES C HH U RR C HH OO F GOGO D 16581 McGregor Boule vard, 267-3166 Just past the Tanger Outlet Mall Pastor: Barry Lentz, 281-3063 Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. C HH AB AD LL UB AV ITIT C HHO O F SS W F LORILORI D A ORTHOOR THO D OO X 5620 Winkler Road, F ort Myers Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz 433-7708, E-mail: rabbi@chabadswf.org Web site: www.chabadswf.org Services: Friday 6:30 p.m.; Saturday Kabbalah class 9 a.m.; Shacharit 10 a.m.; Kiddush at noon Minyan: Monday and Thursday 7 a.m. C HH AP ELEL OO F CYP RESSRESS C OO V EE 10200 Cypress Cov e Circle Fort Myers 239-850-3943, Located at Cypress Cove Retirement Center on HealthPark Campus An ecumenical non-denominational community of believers. Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. Reverendt Ted Althouse, Pastor revtedalthouse@aol.com C HH U RR C HH OO F THETHE C ROSSR OSS 13500 Freshman Lane; 768-2188 Pastor: Bud Stephens; A nondemonimational church emphasizing a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Sunday Service: 9:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 Contemporary. CONGREG aA TION aA L CH uU R cC H 1619 Lle wellyn Drive Fort Myers Just off McGregor across from the Edison/ Ford Winter Estates 334-4978 Pastor: Douglas Kelchner Worship times Sundays 9 and 10:30 a.m. Website: www.taecc.com CO vV EN aA NT PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937 Rev. Dr. Jeffrey DeYoe, Senior Pastor Reverend David Dietzel, Pastor Emeritus. Traditional Sunday service 10 a.m. Nursery available C ypYP RESS LakLAK E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H 8400 Cypress Lak e Drive, Fort Myers, 481-5442 Randy A. Alston, Reverend. Sunday Services: Bible study, 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship, 11 a.m., Evening Worship, 7 p.m., Wednesday Prayer Meeting, 6:30 p.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 481-3233. www.clpc.us. Clint Cottrell, pastor Prayer Service 8 a.m., Praise 9 a.m., Childrens Church 9 a.m., Traditional 11 a.m. Summer: Prayer Service 8 a.m. Combined Traditional/Praise 10 a.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E UNITE dD METHO dD IST CH uU R cC H 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 482-1250, 8 and 11 a.m. Sunday Traditional Service 9:30 a.m. Praise Service Sunday School all times F aA ITH FELLO wW SHI pP wW ORL dD O uU TRE acA C H mM INISTRIES 6111 South P ointe Boulevard, Fort Myers, 278-3638. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Voice of Faith, WCRN 13.50 AM Radio, Sunday, 1:30 p.m.; Thursday Service, 7:30 p.m.; Friday Youth Service, 7:30 p.m. Nursery care for pre-school children and Childrens Church for ages 5-12 available at each service. F aA ITH uU NITE dD mM ETHO dD IST cC H uU R cC H 15690 McGregor Boule vard Fort Myers, 482-2030 Pastor: David Stauffer. Traditional services 8:45 a.m.; Contemporary, 10:30 a.m. Go south on McGregor Boulevard. The church is mile past the intersection of Gladiolus and San Carlos Boulevard on the way to Sanibel. FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF cC HRIST S cC IENTIST 2390 West First Street, next door to Edison Estates. Sunday Morning Service and Sunday School, 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday Evening Testimony Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Child care provided at all services. Visit our Reading Room for quiet study at: 2281 First Street, River District. www.time4thinkers.com, www.christiansciencefortmyers.com, www.christianscience.com FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF THE NazaNAZA RENE 13545 Amer ican Colony Boulevard off Daniels Parkway in the Colony, Fort Myers, 936-2511 Pastor: Reverend Joey Brummett Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Family Night, 7 p.m. F IRSTIRST U NITENITE D M ETHOETHO D ISTIST C HH U RR C HH in the Downto wn Fort Myers River District 2466 First Street, Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-332-1152, www.fumcftmyers.org Sunday: 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 5 p.m. Youth Program FORT M yY ERS CHRISTI aA N CH uU R cC H (DIS cC I pP LES O fF CHRIST) A SS TE pP HEN MINISTRIES CONGREG aA TION 5916 Winkler Road, F ort Myers, 437-4330 Reverend Mark Condrey, Pastor Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Church School: 9:15 a.m. FORT M yY ERS CONGREG aA TION aA L UNITE dD CH uU R cC H O fF CHRIST : 8210 College Parkway, Fort Myers, 482-3133. Philip White, pastor Morning Worship: 10 a.m. Church School: 10:15 a.m. Adult Forum: 11:30 a.m. II ON aA HH O pP E EpEP IS cC O paP A L cC ONGREG aA TION 9650 Gladiolus Dr ive, Fort Myers 4544778 The Reverend Dr. John S. Adler, pastor. Weekly services: Saturday 5 p.m., Eucharist with Healing Sunday 8 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite One; 9:30 a.m., Family Eucharist with Healing and Church School Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Morning Prayer (in Spanish); Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Eucharist with Healing. Child care available at Saturday 5 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m. services. JES uU S THE WOR kK ER C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H: 881 Nuna Avenue, Fort Myers, 481-1143 Masses Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. K INGING D OO M LILI F EE C HH U RR C HH 2154 McGregor Boulev ard, Fort Myers, 218-8343 Pastor Randy and Anita Thurman 10:30 a.m. Sunday Service All are welcome. LambLAMB O fF GG O dD LuLU THER aA N/ EpEP IS cC O paP A L CH uU R cC H Corner Cypress View Drive and Koreshan Boulevard, Three Oaks area, Fort Myers, 267-3525 Walter Fohs, pastor; Becky RobbinsPenniman, associate pastor Sunday worship services: 8 a.m. Early Grace Traditional 9 a.m. Awesome Grace Contemporary 10:30 a.m. Classic Grace Traditional 8:45 & 10 a.m. Sunday School Gods Group NN E wW BEGINNINGS CENTER Ne w Home Church, 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, North Fort Myers, 239-656-0416 Weekly Friday Meeting Meet & Greet: 6:30 p.m. Kingdom Teaching: 7 p.m. Fellowship and refreshments after service. nbcministry@embarqmail.com, www.facebook. com/nbcministry. Alex & Patricia Wiggins, Ministers NENE W C OO V ENEN A NTNT EE Y ESES C HH U RR C HH See Clearly Meeting monthly at 9 a.m. at the Elks Lodge. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, Fort Myers, FL 33907. 239-220-8519 Pastor Alan Bondar www.newcovenanteyes.com Wear what you want, rockin music, relevant teaching, LIFT Kidz program, free coffee & donuts, people who are real, church thats actually fun. NN E wW HH O pP E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H O fF FOR T M yY ERS 16120 San Car los Boulevard, Unit 10 239-985-8503 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m Sunday Morning Worship. 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study NN E wW HH O pP E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 3825 McGregor Boule vard. Fort Myers Pastors: Stu Austin and Howard Biddulph 8 & 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11 a.m. Contemporary Worship 8, 9:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School Youth and Childrens programming runs concurrent to Sunday services. Nursery care provided at all services 274-1230. For more information visit: www.newhopefortmyers.org P EE A C EE CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H Meets at F ort Myers Beach Masonic Lodge 17625 Pine Ridge Road, Fort Myers Beach 267-7400. Pastors Bruce Merton, Gail & RC Fleeman Adult Discussion Classes: 9-10 AM Countdown to Worship (praise music): 10:10 AM Amazing Grace Worship: 10:30 AM Phone 267-7400 Fax 267-7407 Web site: peacecommunitychurch.com e-mail: peace1265@aol.com P EE A C EE LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH Sunday Worship at 9:30am. Peace is a member of the ELCA. We celebrate weekly communion with traditional liturgy, organ and choir. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers On the way to Sanibel. 239-437-2599, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@peaceftmyers.com. RE dD EE mM ER L uU THER aA N cC H uU R cC H 3950 Winkler Ext., Fort Myers, 274-0143 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. Sunday Services Daily early learning center/day care RIRI V ERER OO F LILI F EE A SSESSE MB LL Y OO F GOGO D 21580 Riv er Ranch Rd, Estero 239-495-0400, Senior Pastor: Todd Weston 8 and 9:45 a.m Services; 11:30 a.m. Legacy Service, multi-generational S amudAMUD R abadAB AD R aA buddB UDD HIST cC ENTER Meditation classes All are welcome. Guided meditations offering many methods for relaxing the body and focusing the mind on virtuous objects to bring increasing peace and happiness into daily activity. For information, class times and locations call 567-9739 or visit www. MeditationInFortMyers.org. SaSA INT COL umbkUMBK ILLE C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H 12171 Iona Road, F ort Myers, off McGregor and north of Gladiolus. 489-3973 Father Joseph Clifford. Weekly masses: Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. Weekend masses: Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday: 7, 9,11, and 5:30 p.m. Reconciliation is available at the church on Saturdays at noon and by appointment SaSA INT JOHN THE A pP OSTLE METRO pP OLIT aA N CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H 3049 Mcg regor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 344-0012 Pastor Reverend Steve Filizzi An Affirming & Inclusive Congregation Sunday Services, 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Mid-Week Service, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. SS A INTINT M II C HH A ELEL LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH & SS C HOOLHOOL ( LL CM SS ) 3595 Broadw ay, Fort Myers, 239-939-1218, Worship: Saturday 5:30 p.m., Sunday 8 & 10:45 a.m. Bible Study for adults and children Sunday at 9:15 a.m. Phone for other dates & times. Plus Marriage Enrichment, Divorcecare, Griefshare. SaSA INT PETER LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H 3751 Estero Boule vard, Fort Myers Beach, 463-4251. Sunday worship at 9:30 a.m. Womens Bible Study is offered on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 9:30 a.m. www.stpeterfmb.com SaSA INT NN I cC HOL aA S MON aA STER yY Church and Bookstore:111 Everg reen Road (southwest corner of Evergreen Road and Gail Street.) Liturgical services conducted in English and Church Slavonic; following the Julian (Old) Calendar. Liturgical Services: Sundays and Holy Days: Hours at 9:30 a.m. Holy Liturgy at 10 a.m. Call to confirm service schedule: 239-997-2847; Bookstore: 239-691-1775 or visit www.saintnicholasmonastery.org SS T VIN cC ENT DE P auAU L C aA THOLI cC CO mmuMMU NIT yY 13031 Palm Beach Blvd (3 miles east of I75) East Fort Myers (across from Ft Myers Shores) 239 693 0818 Weekday masses: 9 a.m. Tuesday-Friday Weekend masses: 4 p.m. Saturday Sunday 9 & 11 a.m. All Are Welcome! SS O uU TH wW EST bapB AP TIST cC H uU R cC H 16940 McGregor Boule vard, Fort Myers, 454-3336 Robert G. Kasten, Pastor Sunday Worship Service 11 a.m. Nursery available 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Junior Church grades one to five Wee Church Pre-K to K Evening Service 6 p.m. Wednsday Service 6 p.m. TETE MP LELE B ETHELETHEL SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 16225 Winkler Rd. 433-0018. Rabbi Jeremy Barras E-mail: rabbi.barras@templebethel.com Cantorial soloist: Lawrence Dermer Temple educator: Dale Cohen, MaEd, RJE Shabbat Services, Friday, 7:30 p.m. Torah Study, Saturday, 9:15 a.m.continued on page 11THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 201310

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11 THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 2013 From page 10Churches/TemplesReligious Education; Sunday School and Midweek classes, Preschool Classes, Monday through Friday Web site: www.templebethel.com Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TEMPLE JUDEA (CONSERVATIVE) 14486 A&W Bulb Road, Fort Myers, 433-0201, Rabbi: Rabbi Marc Sack President: Keith Grossman Minyan: Monday & Thursday at 9 a.m. Services: Friday night at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Religious School Sunday morning Web site: www.tjswfl.org Preschool director: JoAnn Goldman email templejudeapreschool@gmail.com 433-0201, Web site: www.tjswfl.org Affiliated: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism THE NEW CHURCH The New Church of SWFL is located 10811 Sunset Plaza Circ. #401, behind Zoomers. Rev. Gabriella Cahaley officiates worship services on Sundays at 11 a.m. during the season. Other worship events are held on the beach in Fort Myers Beach. See our webpage http://www.newchurchflorida.com/ or call for more information 239-481-5535. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH FORT MYERS 13411 Shire Lane (off Daniels Parkway one mile west of I-75) Minister: The Reverend Allison Farnum Sunday services and religious education at 10:30 a.m. For information on all church events call 561-2700 or visit www.uucfm.org. U NITY OF B ONITA S PRINGS Family Service 10 to 11 a.m. Healing Circle 11 a.m. Hospitality and Fellowship, 11 a.m. Inspiring lesson, uplifting and dynamic music, meditation in a loving environment. Service held at 28285 Imperial Street, Bonita Springs. Call 947-3100. UNITY OF FORT MYERS 11120 Ranchette Rd., Fort Myers Summer Services: Sundays at 10 a.m. Childrens class at 10 a.m. Reverend Jim Rosemergy, Minister Our God is Love. Our Race is Human. Our Religion is Oneness. www.unityoffortmyers.org or 239-278-1511 WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 9065 Ligon Court, Fort Myers, across from HealthPark Hospital, 481-2125 Senior Pastor: Robert Brunson Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Blended Worship www.westminsterfortmyers.org W ORD O F L IFE C HURCH 2120 Collier Ave, Fort Myers, 274-8881; Services: Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. Bishop Gaspar and Michele Anastasi Z ION L UTHERAN C HURCH 7401 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, 481-4040, Interim Pastor Jim Eggert Pastor Peter Weeks Sunday Services: 8:30 a.m. Traditional; 10 a.m. Blended Traditional and Contemporary; 11:30 a.m. Contemporary. Childrens Sunday School, Adult /Teen Bible Classes, 10 a.m. H uckabee To Speak At SFCAFormer Governor Mike Huckabee will be speaking at Southwest Florida Christian Academys (SFCA) Educating For Eternity on the McGregor Baptist campus on Monday, October 7. Tickets are rapidly selling but still available at www.swfca.com. The Huckabee Show is the number one rated weekend hit on the Fox News Channel and Cumulus Media Networks syndicated radio program, The Mike Huckabee Show, heard on more than 175 stations. Hes also listened to three times daily across the nation on The Huckabee Report syndicated on almost 600 stations and has been the fastest growing new program on the Cumulus Media Network in recent years. Author of nine books, his most recent being A Simple Government, was his fourth to appear on The New York Times best-selling list. Huckabee served as the 44th Governor of Arkansas and was recognized nationally for his leadership after being honored by several renowned publications and organizations for his numerous accomplishments. Time Magazine honored him as one of the five best governors in America. Educating For Eternity is an annual fundraiser for SFCA. This years proceeds will benefit the Financial Aid program, transportation, new athletic complex and technology. The dinner sponsor for the evening is Carrabbas Italian Grill. Business sponsorship may still be available for the evenings event. Contact Lisa Blanchard at lisa.blanchard@mcgregor. net or 936-8865 ext. 1472 for further details. Located across the street from Gulf Harbour 15065 McGregor Blvd, Ste 104, Fort Myers ERNE STINE HALL MCKAYErnestine Hall McKay was born on March 10, 1942 to Ernest Hall and Stella Mae Jones Hall in Louisville, Mississippi. She married Marion Ellis McKay, Jr. of Canton, Mississippi in 1962. They celebrated over 51 years of love and adventures together spanning from Mississippi to South Florida. She is survived by her sons, Joel Ellis McKay of Fort Myers, Johnathan Lucas McKay (Katie) of Atlanta, Georgia, and Samuel Hayden McKay of Fort Myers. Her spirit is carried on by her sons; granddaughters Mindy McKay Morton (William) of Madison, Mississippi, and Megan McKay Richards (Brandon) of Dallas, Georgia; great-grandchildren; her sister Betty Hossfeld (Herman); brother Bob Hall; sister-in-law Memrie McKay-Cook (Rhodes); brother-in-law Dee McKay; and other nieces, nephews, friends and family. She is predeceased by her parents; brother Ernest Hall, Jr.; brother Doug Hall, and great-granddaughter Brianna Claire Richards. Ernestine received a B.S. from Belhaven College in Jackson, Mississippi and a Certified Financial Services Counselor designation (with honors) from Northwestern Universitys National Graduate Trust School. Her extensive investment management experience expanded over 40 years. For 17 years, she worked at and later held the position of Senior Vice President of the Trust Department for Deposit Guaranty Bank in Downtown Jackson, Mississippi, now Regions Bank. Later, while President of Pan American Bank, she was responsible for the management of $500 million of trust funds. In 1986, she co-founded Investment Advisors of Key Biscayne, Inc. where she served as President and Portfolio Manager. In addition, she was the co-founder, Executive Vice President and member of the Investment Committee at Biscayne Advisors, Inc. Ernestines professional career rallied respect beyond measure, though she never neglected her love of live theater and the arts. Ernestine was active in local community theater groups, including the Key Biscayne Music and Drama Club, where she directed, produced and starred in numerous productions at Calusa Playhouse on Key Biscayne, Coral Gables Country Club and BIG ARTS Herb Strauss Theater on Sanibel Island. Ernestines contributions to live theater spanned decades, hailed rave reviews and her love affair with the magical tales of The Wizard of Oz never faltered. Ernestine loved big, embraced freely, celebrated the smallest of moments and made habit of overstuffing her family and friends with culinary delights. She cher ished family, laughter, live guitar sessions performed by her sons, Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge, shelling and botanical/wildlife preservation. Keeping with Ernestines motto to do what makes you happy, donations in her honor to a charity or cause of your choice is requested in lieu of flowers. OBITU ARY rf ntbnrr bb bb rtttn Loved this restaurant. Fantastic experience. Food was exceptionally amazing. Service was outstanding. TripAdvisor Member, May 2013

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 201312 October Transitionsby Capt. Matt MitchellAfter somewhat challenging conditions to get out on the water for several days at the beginning of the week, our rains finally let up. Three days of not fishing and I tend to get a little stir crazy, to say the least. It sure felt good to get back out. After the big rains, anglers were greeted with noticeably cooler mornings and a switch to northeast winds. The change of wind direction certainly lowered the humidity but did not do much to slow the fishing action much. It just made the fish move around and feed better on the falling tide after weeks of a high incoming tide bite. Limits of redfish did take a little more work after the rain than in previous weeks, although if you kept bouncing around and working at it, the redfish were still out there in good numbers. Morning windy conditions made spotting schooling redfish all but impossible, so most of my redfishing this week was done during higher tide periods on the mangrove edges. The change of wind direction meant switching it up from shorelines, where I had found good fish in the last few weeks to working areas that had the right set-up. In other words, we fished areas where the wind and tide were moving in the same direction. After spending some time bouncing around, we found fish every trip. Several mangrove shorelines where I targeted redfish have a deeper trough inside a sandbar. Anchoring up on the sandbar, I generally throw across the trough up under the trees. This week, the majority of our redfish came out 20-footplus from the mangroves in the deeper trough. Often these redfish would chase a pinfish up on the surface before taking the bait. The best baits for redfish this week included free-lined, tail-hooked live pinfish along with frozen jumbo shrimp fished under a float. Redfish this week measured between 22 and 33 inches. The snook bite in the bay got a lot more consistent with the change in weather pattern. A northeast wind and an outgoing tide is the ideal set-up for many of my favorite shorelines and docks in the mouth of the river. Snook can be seen laid up during both stages of the tide but only feed when the tide starts ripping out. Snook were feeding better than I have seen all month, with some real monsters out there. Look for them out from the shorelines close to the points with fast moving current. While dock fishing for snook, big pinfish and grunts worked the best. With September over, October will mark the gradual cool down of our waters. This cooling will slowly bring fish in from the beaches and passes closer to their back country winter haunts. Shiners will move into the sound in huge numbers and become the bait of choice as our gamefish make the annual switch to the more oily prey thats packing on weight before winter. With this being a big transition month, look for good action anywhere from the passes in to the mouths of mangrove creeks. Oyster bars and mangrove islands out in the middle of sound are also great areas to target this month. Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions email captmattmitchell@aol.com. Send Us Your Fish TalesThe River Weekly would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include photographs with identification. Drop them at the River Weekly, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, Florida 33901, or email to press@riverweekly.com. Paul Black from Sea Isle, New Jersey with an upper-slot-size redfish caught while fishing with Capt. Matt Mitchell this week ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint Prices ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Your Bottom Your Bottom Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices 1 Paddle Smart Class Offered By San Carlos Bay Sail & Power Squadronsubmitted by Cdr. Mary SmelterThe San Carlos Bay Sail & Power Squadron, a unit of the United States Power Squadrons, will be offering the popular Paddle Smart class. The class will be held on Saturday, October 19 from 8:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. According to the National Marine Manufacturers Association, kayaks and canoes accounted for some 54 percent of new boats sold in 2006 over 493,000 crafts. Kayaking, canoeing or rowing are enjoyable opportunities to get close to nature, have a great time, and get some quality exercise in the process. The class is intended for those about to join the sport and those considering purchasing paddling equipment. Topics discussed in the class include: The class materials include a workbook, a reference handbook, and a bonus handout from the American Canoe Association. The cost of the class is $45. The class is being taught at the San Carlos Bay Sail & Power Squadron Classroom Hardware). Students can register online at www.scbps.com or call 466-4040.

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13 THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 2013 Distinctl norris.com furniture that appeals to your heart... Sanibel 1025 Periwinkle Way Mon Sat. 10 5Evenings & Sundays by appointment 579.0412 Naples & Fort MyeLIMITED T IME SAVINGS ON SEL ECT I TEMS! $11,999 $ $ 11 999 COMPLETE DESIGNER CONDO PACKAGES STARTING AT CROW Case Of The Week: Crested Caracaraby Patricia MolloyThe bird is quite the character and has quickly become a favorite with everyone, said Dr. Heather. The subject of legends and folklore, the large, boldly patterned crested caracara (Caracara cheriway) is often referred to as the Mexican eagle. A member of the falcon family, the appearance and behavior of the raptor is decidedly unlike that of other falcons. Circling the skies high above prairies and open grassland in Florida, the Southwest U.S. and Central America, the caracara can be spotted searching for carrion in the company of turkey and black vultures. A crested caracara was admitted to CROW last week after being attacked by a family dog. The bird had suffered a fractured tarsometatarsus, or ankle bone, and a life-threatening infection had developed. Emergency surgery was required. The wound was heavily contaminated. I repaired the fracture, and the patient is on antibiotics, pain medications and daily topical treatment of the wounds. It is eating well, appears to be healing and has a fair prognosis at this time. It will be several more weeks before it is releasable, revealed Dr. Heather, CROWs hospital director and one of only 200 boarded specialists in avian medicine. The crested caracara is protected as Threatened (U.S. Endangered Species Act) both by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission, as only 250 pair are currently nesting in Florida. They are a very cool species that is threatened in the state of Florida, so weve spared no effort to try to save it, noted Dr. Heather. The areas rich wildlife cannot afford its own medical insurance. To help CROW treat sick and injured pelicans, gopher tortoises, rabbits and, of course, this rare crested caracara, please help them reach their goal by donating to a specific patient or species. If you prefer a hands-on approach, consider volunteering. The nursery at CROW is still very busy with the many adorable, bright-eyed baby squirrels that have arrived from all over Lee County. If you have time to help, volunteer by calling Kathy at 472-3644 ext. 229. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to P.O. Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit www.crowclinic.org. They are a very cool species, noted Dr. Heather, referring to this crested caracara currently recovering at CROW photo courtesy of Kathy McDonough

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 201314 Plant SmartFire Flagby Gerri R eavesFire flag (Thalia geniculata) is a member of the arrowroot family and a Florida native. Colonies of the freshwater plant are common in ponds, swamps, ditches, marshes and streams. Really a giant herb, fire flag emerges from a system of thick rhizomes and can reach 12 feet high. The lanceolate leaves can measure up to a yard long and a foot wide. Rounded at the base, bright green and smooth, they resemble the leaves of heliconia or banana, which is related to fire flag. During the perennials long blooming season of spring to late fall, strikingly pretty bisexual flowers appear in pairs on the zig-zagging stems. The inflorescences can be more than eight feet tall. The irregularly shaped flowers droop in branched clusters from the top of the flower stalks. They are made up of three rosy purple petals, three sepals (petallike structures below the petals), and seven petal-like stamens. The flowers in each pair are mirror images of each other. When pollinators probe the flowers, they react with a mousetrap-like spring action. While those remarkable flowers are not an important nectar source for butterflies, the leaves are important as the host for the larvae of the Brazilian skipper butterfly. The leaves are also eaten by the Io moths stinging caterpillar and the saddleback moth. The movement of the leaves resulting from alligators traveling through the long sturdy sheathed stalks earns the plant another common name, alligator flag. Other names include arrowroot, giant water canna and swamp lily. The small rounded fruit capsule contains a single seed. Fire flag can be grown in an aquatic garden if space provides. Propagate it by dividing the rhizomes and give it full to partial sun. If youre ever stranded in the wilds of Florida without food, its handy to know that the rootstocks of young plants are edible. They turn shrimp-pink when boiled and have a swampy taste. Sources: Everglades Wildflowers by Roger L. Hammer, Wild Plants for Survival in South Florida by Julia F. Morton, National Audubon Field Guide to Florida, Florida Wild Flowers and Roadside Plants by C. Ritchie Bell and Bryan J. Taylor, Native Florida Plants by Robert G. Haehle and Joan Brookwell, keyserver.lucidcentral.org, and plantbook.org. Plant Smart explores sustainable gardening practices that will help you create an environmentally responsible, low-maintenance South Florida landscape. Pairs of rose-purple flowers droop from zig-zagging stems photos by Gerri Reaves Fire flag, a giant native herb, is common in ponds and other freshwater habitats Caring For Your PlantsStump Grindingby Justen DobbsMany homeowners are unsure of what to do with their dead or dying palm or hardwood tree. I will discuss some ideas and options here. The best course of action is to have the stump removed by a professional stump grinding service. This is the best option because it removes the unsightly stump, discourages insect infestation, and provides for the option of installing another tree in the same place. A stump grinder will chew up the hard wood and turn it into mulch. This mulch can be left to fill in the hole and is usually mounded up slightly so that it will become flat once it begins to break down. A new tree can be planted in the same location at any time during the mulch decomposition process. There are companies that specialize in stump grinding alone, but if you hire a tree service to cut down your tree, ask them if they have a stump grinder that they can remove the stump with too and it may be less expensive to have the same company remove the tree and stump. If you cut the tree all the way down to ground level, it will leave a small stump that can be covered over by mulch or other natural groundcover. The remaining stump will eventually biodegrade, but the process may take a few years to decades. In the meantime, there is a chance that the decomposing stump will become infested by ants, termites, or other insects which may or may not affect the rest of your garden or your landscaping plans for that area. Keep in mind, palm tree stumps decompose much faster than hardwood stumps because palms are in the grass family and have a different internal structure. The most creative solution is to mask your stump if it is in a fairly shady or protected area. To do this, cut the tree down and leave a twoto threefoot stump. (If the tree is infested with weevil or fungus, this option will not be ideal and you should have the stump removed as explained before). If the tree is healthy and simply unwanted, you can have it removed and leave the stump for some creative gardening! I have tied bromeliads (air plants) onto stumps before with amazing results. Or, you can hire a wood carver (easy to find if you ask around on Fort Myers Beach) to come by and carve a Polynesian tiki out of the stump. Once the tiki is complete, finish it off with paint or a clear sealant in order to preserve the wood as long as possible. Bromeliads are specialized plants that are able to grow on other trees, rocks, logs and pretty much any surface. They are not parasitic and are overall self-sustaining. There are Florida native bromeliads, which are mostly silver, and also a large number of exotic species from South America. Justen Dobbs is a landscape architect in south Florida specializing in custom, upscale landscapes. He can be reached at seabreezenurseries@ gmail.com. A Canary Island date palm stump can be quite large, but is made of fairly soft wood After the stump has been removed with a stump grinder, the area can be re-sodded

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15 THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 2013 BOAT RENTALS 472-5800 Public I nput Sought O n Land ManagementSan Carlos Bay Bunche Beach Preserve, one of Lee County Parks & Recreations most popular beach preserves, now has a second edition management plan the public can view and offer input. Or people can attend a Tuesday, October 8 meeting on the preserve plan at the Wa-ke Hatchee Park Recreation Center in South Fort Myers. The meeting begins at 6 p.m. The plan called a land management plan is the product of Lee Countys Conservation Lands staff. The plan describes the preserve, its history, on-going management activities and existing public amenities. The plan is critical because the preserve is home to numerous state and federally listed plant and animal species including stiff-leaved wild pine, inkberry, piping plovers, least terns and loggerhead sea turtles. After public review, the plan will be presented to the Lee County Board of County Commissioners for approval. The management plan is available for review until October 8 at the Lakes Regional Library, 15290 Bass Road in Fort Myers; the Fort Myers Beach Public Library, 2755 Estero Blvd. in Fort Myers Beach; and online at www.conservation2020.org/documents/LSP/2013_ SCBBBP_Draft_LMP_web.pdf Wa-ke Hatchee Park Recreation Center the meeting site is at 16760 Bass Road in Fort Myers. Written comments are encouraged and can be given at the meeting, online or through the mail. For more information, visit www. conservation2020.org or www.leeparks. org. Native Plant SaleNative and migratory butterflies and other pollinators have co-evolved with Florida native plants. These are nectar and larval plants they depend on in order to survive and hopefully thrive for generations to come. However, too many homeowners and homeowners associations have been enticed by non-native plants (and many of them Invasive) that they see at the big box stores. Plants that require too much water, too much care, and hardly producing any nectar, not to mention being poisonous to the larval form of the butterfly, the caterpillar! If we want to enjoy butterflies in our home, business and public landscapes, we must utilize Florida native plants, according to the Coccoloba chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society. The chgapter is holding a plant sale on Saturday, October 19 at Manatee Park. Contact Sue Scott at backtenfeet@ gmail.com or John Sibley, Coccoloba president at 939-9663 john@nolawn. com for further information.

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 201316 New Art League Of Fort Myers C lasses B eginThe Art League of Fort Myers is excited to present their new schedule of art classes, available at the Fort Myers Art League Gallery, 1451 Monroe Street in Fort Myers. Mondays Mixed Media Open to adults and children 5 to 7:30 p.m. Teacher: Susan Mills Call 424-8276 or email Millsmokita03@aol.com Wednesdays Open Painting Session Free 9:30 a.m. to Noon Hosted by: Priscilla Jeffcoat Mixed Media Painting 6:30 to 9 p.m. Teacher: Susan Mills Call 424-8276 or email Millsmokita03@aol.com Thursdays Beyond The Written Word (Starts October 31) 1 to 3:30 p.m. Teacher: Helen Ding Watercolor For The Beginner & Intermediate 9:30 a.m. to Noon Teacher: Suzanne Brown Call 466-6153 or email susilla@comcast.net Saturdays Cartooning (Starts October 12) 9 a.m. to Noon Teacher: Helen Ding Cost of classes Six 2.5-hour classes: $96 for members, $120 for non-members Classes start when at least four students register. For specific class information (e.g., syllabus, material list, etc.), contact Susan Mills at 424-8276 or the class teacher. The Art League of Fort Myers Gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, visit www.artleagueoffortmyers.org or call 275-3970. Miss Southwest Florida PageantThe Miss Southwest Florida pageant will be held on Saturday, October 19 at the Gulf Coast Town Center. Open to all ages, male and female, this is a preliminary pageant to the Miss Florida U.S. International and Miss Florida American Beauty Systems. The pageant will begin at 2 p.m. and is open to the general public to attend. For registration and more information, call Envy Pageant Productions at 8224661 or e-mail famemodeltalent@aol. com. October At Davis Art C enterThe Blood-Dimmed Tide The Film and Photography of Anthony Myles will be on display on Friday, October 4 at the Sydney & Berne Davis Art Center, Fort Myers, from 6 to 10 p.m. The exhibit takes place during Art Walk and admission is free. Thursday, October 10, is a Connect Networking Mixer for people to expand their business and personal relationships. There will be raffle prizes, music and mingling from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $6. On Sunday, October 13, there will be Cotillion Opening Dances. From Wednesday, October 16 to Sunday, October 20, Woyzeck, a Ghostbird Theatre play, will be presented. Doors open at 7 p.m. and performances begin at 8 p.m. Saturday performances are at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets are $10. Thursday, October 24 is an Art & Poetry Networking Mixer from 8 to 11 p.m. $10 admission. Every Monday The Fort Myers Film Festivals TGIM Intellectualization features short films that are in consideration for the Fort Myers Film Festival, with discussion. Doors open at 6:30 and the film starts at 7 p.m. Admission is $6. The Art League of Fort Myers holds classes on Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays Lab T heater Presents Miss WitherspoonMiss Witherspoon is a Pulitzer Prize finalist play written by a master of comedy, Christopher Durang. The witty show will open on Friday, October 11. Miss Witherspoon features Veronica in her afterlife. She was depressed about the state of the world and her life, and now that her life is over, shes depressed that she cant just take some time off. Instead, her spirit guide sends her back to earth to be reborn and learn her vital life lesson. With Miss Witherspoon, Christopher Durang recovers the wonderfully irreverent humor that has made him famous Veronica is forced into successive rebirths... She is happiest when briefly reincarnated as a blissfully ball-fetching dog this is easily New Yorks funniest show, says Bloomberg News. The playwright just made headlines with his Tony Award win for another comedy, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike. Stephanie Davis, also known as The Downtown Diva, stars as Veronica. She was last seen on the Lab Theater stage as Martha in Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Supporting Davis are Rob Green, Kathleen Moye, Gerrie Benzing as Veronicas spirit guide and Yvonne Shadrach as Black Woman in a Hat. This is one of the funniest shows youll see this year. Its worth the admission price just to see Miss Witherspoon reincarnate as a golden retriever. You will laugh out loud as she searches for truth and faith in this thought-provoking and funny show, says director Annette Trossbach. Trossbach is the founder and artistic director of the company. She studied at the renowned East 15 Drama School in London, England, where her focus was on Shakespeare and Theater of the Absurd. In addition to producing at Lab Theater, she will also be directing this seasons Tony and Pulitzer Prize winning drama, Glengarry Glen Ross. She was also the director of last seasons outrageous comedy, The Last Days of Judas Iscariot. Miss Witherspoon premieres on October 11 at 8 p.m. Doors open at 7:15 p.m. for the opening night reception. Other performances are on October 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25 and 26. Tickets are between $12 and $22 and are available for purchase at the door or online at www.laboratorytheaterflorida. com. Season tickets are also available on the website. The Laboratory Theater of Florida is located at 1634 Woodford Avenue in Fort Myers. C all For ArtistsThe Arts of the Inland invites artists to apply for its juried Perceptions Art Show, being held on Sunday, November 10 at Majestic Golf Club Crown Room, Lehigh Acres. The sub mission deadline is October 29. Prospectus and application are available on the AOI website at www.artsoftheinland.com. Entry fees for Arts of the Inland and Art Council of Southwest Florida members is $10 per artwork and $20 per artwork for non-members. For additional information, contact LaVon Koenig at artsinland@gmail.com or at 303-5849. Opening night for Lab Theaters production of Miss Witherspoon is Friday, October 11 To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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rr r ircl a ct ar at lf rt i t H r t tr t Napl s is illa t as sla s rt a si illas k all w r Est r lv rt rs ac D H Eagl i g ak s ial p cial D Visit our newest ofce location at Sundial Beach Resort 1451 Middle Gulf Drive 239/472-1478Serving the Islands Since 197517 THE RIVER OCT oO BER 4, 2013

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 201318 Young Artists Awards C abaret And C abernet T ickets Are Still AvailableTickets are still available for the 3rd annual Cabaret and Cabernet benefiting the Young Artists Awards program, to be held on Saturday, October 5 from 6 to 9 p.m. For only $35 a ticket, attendees will enjoy award winning entertainment by Young Artists Awards performers throughout the evening in the main gallery of the Alliance for the Arts as well as on the Foulds Theatre stage, hosted by Stephanie Davis, the Downtown Fort Myers Diva. To reserve your tickets, call Young Artists Awards at 574-9321 or click on the donate button at www. youngartistsawards.org. The event sold out last year. All of the proceeds from the evening will go to student scholarships in the arts. Food stations throughout the Alliance building will feature complimentary sweet and savory items, as well as wine and gourmet coffee provided by Total Wine & More, The Edison, Cohen and Cohen Catering, Jasons Deli, Marios, Sweet Expressions, Bennetts Fresh Roast, Pizza 2000 and Rosies Fudge. Guests will be able to browse a large silent auction including original artwork, tickets to area cultural events, trips, music, wine, theatre and art-related baskets, and more. Performers will include past and current winners of the Young Artists Awards program. Highlights will include a performance by dancer Christopher Scott Caldwell, the overall winner of the 2007 competition, premiering a new solo One Note Samba. Caldwell has been commissioned as a professional dancer, choreographer, and educator, touring as a protg to some of the worlds top choreographers, including the panel from So You Think You Can Dance such as Mia Michaels, Brian Friedman, Napoleon and Tabitha Dumo, Wade Robson and Tyce Diorio. He is currently the founder and artistic director of Ovations Productions, LLC and teaches at the Patel Conservatory at the Stratz Center for the Performing Arts in Tampa. Violinist Kevin Seto, the overall winner of the Young Artists Awards 2013 program, will also be featured. A senior at FGCU, Seto is a student of Patrick Neal, has performed with the Florida Youth Orchestra at Carnegie Hall and wowed the audience performing at this years Arts For ACT gala in August. Additional current and past winners in dance, drama, music and vocal performance will also perform throughout the evening, including Noelle Aparte, Halie Boling, Marcella Brown, Hae-Yang Chang, Sarah Daigle, Peyton Davis, Kaitlyn Nicolosi and Jordan Pilant. The Young Artists Awards, Inc. is a non for profit organization entering its eleventh year of offering ser vices to area children ages 8 to 21 in the performing arts, including vocal and musical performance, drama and dance. Young Artists Awards also sponsors the Art by Kids with Cancer program in conjunction with the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida, assisting families experiencing the financial challenges of childhood cancer. Ticket purchases will allow students to participate in our education, performance and scholar ship program during the 2013-14 season. The event is sponsored by Advanced Pain Management and Spine Specialists. For more information and to purchase tickets, call 574-9321 or visit www.youngartistsawards.org. E dison And Ford Winter E states O ctober Programs And E ventsOctober at the Edison & Ford Winter Estates is highlighted with the annual Edison Ford Clothesline Quilt Show, Airing of the Quilts, Garden Talk and Emerging Inventors as well as a variety of other special programs and activities throughout the month. The October schedule of programs and events includes: Emerging Inventors/Early Learners: Music, Sound & Movement October 3 and 17, 9 to 11 a.m. Edison Ford Emerging Inventors Early Learning Program is for 1to 3-year-old children and their parents, grandparents and other family members. Emerging Inventors will learn the first words recorded and played on Edisons phonograph, play instruments and see sound. The program includes socializing with others, education activities, storytime, singing, crafts and exploring the homes, gardens and museum at the Edison & Ford Winter Estates. Each session introduces science through activities and time to tend the Emerging Inventors Vegetable Garden. Cost for Edison Ford members is $5; non-members are $15 (one adult, one child). Edison Ford Monthly Volunteer Meeting and Program October 8, 9:30 a.m. (Meets at Thomas A. Edison Congregational Church) The monthly meeting and lecture of the Edison Ford Volunteers will move to nearby Thomas A. Edison Congregational Church, located at 1619 Llewelyn Blvd. Councilman and noted architect Mike Flanders will present a lecture on the history and architecture of the church which sits on land donated by the Edisons. The program also includes a musical performance and social time. Meeting and lectures are open to current Edison Ford volunteers, potential volunteers and the public. For additional information, contact the Volunteer Department at 334-7419. Edison Ford Garden Talk: Vegetable Gardens Getting Started October 12, 9 a.m. Join Edison Ford Historic Garden Manager Steve Hottovy to learn how to start a fall garden for winter harvest. Nearly 100 years ago, the Edison family grew fruits and vegetables on their winter estate and today the site has a year round organic vegetable garden, dozens of fruit trees and raised vegetable bed gardens. Participants will learn which vegetables thrive and how to start and maintain their own garden at home. Edison Ford members are free; non-members are $5. Participants will receive 20 continued on page 22 Attend Edison Fords Garden Talk and learn how to start a vegetable garden on October 12 Edison Fords Clothesline Quilt Show will be held on October 26 FGC Us C enter For T he Arts Presents Pippin Florida Gulf Coast Universitys Center for the Arts invites the public to the opening of Pippin, running October 3 to 6 and October 11 to 13 at the FGCU Black Box Theatre located in the Arts Complex. Evening performances are October 3, 4, 5, 11 and 12 at 7:30 p.m., and matinee performances are October 6 and 13 at 2 p.m. Purchase tickets at http://theatrelab.fgcu.edu. Tickets are $7 and are on sale now. Pippin is a beloved musical by Stephen Schwartz and Roger O. Hirson that is currently enjoying a run on Broadway and won the 2013 Tony Award for Best Revival. With special guest director Dominic Missimi (professor emeritus and founder of Northwestern Universitys musical theatre program and Jeff Award recipient), and featuring Bower School of Music faculty Gerritt VanderMeer and Troy Jones, FGCUs Center for the Arts announces its first musical featuring local and inter nationally-renowned talent. For more information, contact Michelle Hayford at 590-7541 or mhayford@fgcu.edu. To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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19 THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 2013 Students Performances H ighlight I ssues O f Domestic V iolenceStudents from Edison State College have key roles in an upcoming perfor mance of three plays. These plays A Different Kind of Love, Raging Love and Trapped all focus on the issue of domestic violence. The performances will take place on October 18 and 19 at 8 p.m. and will be held at the Worldwide Vision Center, located at 1400 Colonial Blvd., Suite 31 in Fort Myers. The Lee County Sheriffs Office will also offer a brief presentation on domestic violence and how individuals can help. Students from Edison State College are participating in a variety of ways for these performances. Student Charlotte Cox wrote two of the plays, A Different Kind of Love and Raging Love. Additionally, three students are actors in the plays; and one student will be running the AV needs for all of the performances. I believe that these performances display that with strength, it is possible to escape the cycle of abuse and that real love is still possible, said Cox. Charlotte illustrates the commitment and creativity of our students; she is an outstanding writer who doesnt shy away from the hard issues in her plays. I enjoyed every minute of having her in my writing classes, said Marty Ambrose, English Professor at Edison State College. In A Different Kind of Love, audience members will see how the main character, Angela, struggles to become free from the cycle of domestic abuse. It depicts her cour age by leaving an abusive husband to venture across the country to start a new life, and her determination to shed the lasting, haunting effects domestic violence can have. Through it all, Angela deals with the highs and lows, learns to regain her self-worth and believe in those around her. The play Raging Love follows Kristen, who has suffered seven years of abuse from her husband. This is her story of abuse from feeling the lowest of lows and learning to celebrate the highest of highs. Kristen tells of escaping her abuse and learning to love herself and life again. The third play in the production is Trapped, which is written by Greg Stallworth, a retired teacher who has been a huge domestic violence advocate for decades. The play centers on Michelle and Richard, once a happily married couple who had a good life. This dramatic on stage re-enactment depicts the emotional, mental and physical pain of domestic violence that is inflicted by an abuser in an intimate relationship. In October 2011, these three plays were shown on stage in New York. One perfor mance took place at the Roy Arias Theater in Manhattan, and a second performance was shown at the Langston Hughes Library in Queens. Tickets are available online at www.thespianproduction.com or at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/450788/. Individuals may also purchase tickets at the door. For more information, email info@thespianproduction.com. R ed Sox Foundation Sponsors I talianFest The Rotary Club of Fort Myers has announced that the Boston Red Sox Foundation is the Title Sponsor of ItalianFest 2013. ItalianFest is a major fundraiser for the Rotary Club of Fort Myers and will be held at the Alliance for the Arts on Sunday, November 10. Event proceeds will benefit the Rotary Club Foundation, the Harry Chapin Food Bank, the Childrens Advocacy Center and Special Equestrians. Over the years, we have sponsored various fundraisers in Southwest Florida and we are excited to be able to support the good work of organizations in Lee County that, every day, are serving people here who are most in need, said Katie Haas, senior director of Florida business operations for the Red Sox. Lee County is not only our Spring Training site, but it is a place we call our home 365 days a year, and were thrilled that roots planted here in 1993 are continuing to grow deeper in this community. We are thrilled to have such a great organization help to underwrite this impor tant event for The Rotary Club. The generosity of the Boston Red Sox will go a long way in our local community and help many who are in in need, said Kevin Lewis, President of the Rotary Club of Fort Myers. This years festival will feature Italian food, cold beverages, Italian ice and ice cream. The family friendly festival features fun for the whole family, including a marinara competition, live entertainment, an Italian market, family games and much more. ItalianFest will be held on Sunday, November 10 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Alliance for the Arts, located on the corner of McGregor and Colonial in Fort Myers. Blankets and chairs will be permitted, however coolers are prohibited. For more information, visit www.FortMyersItalianFest.org or call 939-2787. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President General Manager Personal Lines Agent 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Paradise. Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. We are HERE for all your insurance needs Student Awarded Art GrantArts of the Inland presented Megan Burkhead, a student at Lehigh Senior High School and a member of the Southwest Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra, a grant at their September 17 meeting at ABC Framing. The Youth Orchestra has been invited to play at Carnegie Hall in New York City in April 2014 and Burkheads grant will enable her to participate in this prestigious event. AOI President LaVon Koenig and board members Jere Carrick, Joel Hawkins, Dick Kennedy, Freida Miller and Richard Georgian presented Burkhead with a $500 check. The Arts of the Inland is a 501(c)3 whose mission is to facilitate and nurture the creation, development, promotion and education of arts and culture in the inland communities of South Florida. The organization had also provided grants earlier this year to students in the LaBelle area for the Firehouse Community Summer Theatre program. For more information, contact LaVon Koenig at artsinland@gmail.com, call 3035849 or visit www.artsoftheinland.com. Arts of the Inland awards Megan Burkhead with a grant. Pictured are AOI Board President LaVon Koenig and board members Jere Carrick, Joel Hawkins, Dick Kennedy, Freida Miller and Richard Georgian

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THE RIVER OCT oO BER 4, 201320 From page 1The Sinking WorldThe Mohawk launched 14 attacks against German U-boats, rescued 300 torpedoed ship survivors, and was the last ship to radio General Dwight D. Eisenhower that the weather was clearing for the D-Day invasion. Its going to be like Christmas, said the Alliances Pam Beckman, barely able to contain her excitement. It will be like opening a present to see how [the marine life] has affected it. Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard, just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Call 939-2787 or go to www.artinlee.org for more information. Mike Campbell, Lee County Natural Resources senior environmental specialist, holding one of the artworks that spent several months under water attached to the USS Mohawk TT wins Surprise BB aseball BB y RR etaining Manager RR on Gardenhire Despite TT hree Straight 90-Plus Losing Seasonsby EE d FrankWhat a shocker! Despite three consecutive seasons of losing more than 90 games, the Minnesota Twins earlier this week awarded manager Ron Gardenhire a two-year contract extension. And team officials also announced they were bringing back his entire coaching staff. In the baseball world, it was a foregone conclusion that Gardenhire would be axed. In fact, his name had been mentioned prominently to take over the downtrodden Chicago Cubs and several other teams. Exactly a year ago, Twins General Manager Terry Ryan publicly disclosed that Gardenhire was not given a contract extension. One year remained at that time. That pronouncement was interpreted as a warning to the popular manager that either he improves the teams on-field performance in 2013 or it would be bye-bye. Ryan also dismissed and shuffled the coaching staff at that time. Gardenhire has managed the Twins since 2002 and is the second-longest tenured manager in the Major Leagues, second only to the Los Angeles Angels Mike Scoscia. And while he enjoyed great success in his early years, winning six American League Central Division titles in his first nine years, the last three have been disasters. His record these last three seasons is 195-291, and in both 2012 and 2013, the team posted identical records of 66-96, finishing this season a whopping 27 games behind division champion Detroit. Minnesota lost 10 of its final 11 games, and 20 of its last 25, while being outscored by 90 runs in the season conclusion. The retention of Gardenhire and his staff reaffirms the long held were a family environment of the organization. He took over for Tom Kelly 12 years ago, who had managed the Twins for 15 seasons, including two World Championships. In announcing that Gardenhire and his staff would return for next season, Ryan placed the blame for the losing trifecta on the lack of talent on the field, not in the dugout. Theres a multiple bunch of reasons why we are where we are, Ryan said at a Monday press conference, mentioning the lack of team offense and starting pitching. I need to fix a lot of things, not just one thing. Team owner Jim Pohlad said he has given Ryan the go-ahead to go out into the market to supplement our roster. Starting pitching this past season ranked last in the Majors in nearly every category. As dismal as the past three seasons have been as punctuated by the drop in attendance in the Twins new stadium, there are bright spots on the horizon. The Twins farm system is loaded with talent and some have labeled it the best in baseball. Owning two of the top five prospects in baseball, help is on the way. Centerfielder Bryon Buxton, just 19 years old, had a phenomenal first year of professional baseball at Low A Cedar Rapids and here at High A Fort Myers. He is probably a season or two away from the Majors. The other top prospect is third-baseman Miquel Sano, who started the year here and advanced at mid-season to Double A New Britain. Sano could make It to the big show by next season. But an immediate turnaround for the Twins requires much-needed starting pitching. Ryan must land at least two or three solid starters to see improvement in 2014. Experts predicted a last-place finish for the 2013 Twins. They were nearly right as, despite the September collapse, they edged the Chicago White Sox by three games to escape the AL Central Division cellar. Terry Ryan is one of the shrewdest general managers in the business. But he sure has his work cut out to restore the Minnesota Twins to winning baseball. It is likely we will see a lot of new faces in Twins uniforms when they reassemble here in February for spring training. Ron Gardenhire From page 1Pirate Festheld at 12:45 p.m. each day, with readings by the lovely pirate Cookie Cutter. All these performers will grace the stage next to the Blue Mermaids in their watery abode. Wandering pirate entertainers such as Rascal Roberts Pyrate Magyic (magic show), and For Love Or Money will rove the lanes entertaining young and old alike. The Find The Pirate quest for the children takes place all day, and prizes are awarded to those savvy enough to locate all the wanted scallywags. A childrens fishing tournament will be held each day from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., with free fishing poles for the first 25 entrants each day. The biggest sea battle to churn the Gulf waters happens at 2 p.m. daily. The mighty ships, Pieces of Eight, The Black Pearl, and The Black Duck do battle with the pirates trying to hold the shore. This clash in the pass is an epic black powder conflict. There is a drum circle under the Pavillion on Mantanzas Pass just after closing cannons on Saturday and Sunday beginning at 5:15 p.m. For additional event details, visit www. pollotropicalpiratefest.com. Artist Andreas Franke presenting his work at Nervous Nellies Waterfront Eatery before its deployment on the USS Mohawk on May 31

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21 THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 2013 School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NC SPDear Shelley, When I go to my childs IEP meeting, his teachers say that he does not need assistive technology. I always agree, but its because I really dont understand what they mean by this. Please help me understand what this means. Carmen P., Fort Myers Carmen, You have asked an excellent question. Assistive technology in K-12 classrooms, by definition, is designed to improve the functional capabilities of a child with a disability. Assistive technology (AT) has a very broad range of tools from lowtech devices like mechanical pencils that provide extra feedback vibrations that enable students to guide and use a pencil more effectively to extremely high tech AT, where the blink of an eye can make a computer perform. High tech or low-tech assistive technology tools have the ability to transform the learning experiences for the children who benefit. Here are some of the more areas where AT is making big differences: designed to allow students with disabilities to use computers and related technology easily. Some alternative input devices include touch screens, modified keyboards and joysticks that direct a cursor through use of body parts like chins, hands or feet. On-screen keyboards are another area of input technology that is providing students with disabilities better use of computers and mobile devices for learning. learning advantage for students who have mobility or dexterity problems, or those who are blind. It allows students to speak their thoughts without typing and even navigate online. Text-to-speech options can also talk back to students and let them know about potential mistakes or errors in their work. Most computers and smartphones have this technology built -in and available. need to have information presented in different ways than their peers. For example, a child with a language disorder may benefit from bright pictures or colors to learn new concepts rather than paper bers. Voice analyzers, augmentative communication tools, speech synthesizers or other sensory enhancers are often used to help present information in a way that meets a disabled childs needs. quently to assist students who are blind or have low vision. This technology is slightly different from text-to-speech because it simply informs students of what is on a screen. Visually impaired or blind students then see what is on the screen and can benefit from the audio interface screen readers provide. Instead of struggling to find out the information from a computer screen, a screen reader can almost instantly provide this information to them. These are just a few AT tools that are being used to help students with disabilities learn more easily and effectively. For more information on AT, visit www.atnet. org. Ms. Greggs is adjunct faculty at Edison State College where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also Nationally Certified School Psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. Isabella Rasi 239-246-47161101 Periwinkle Way #105, Sanibel, FL 239-472-0044 ENGEL & VLKERS Excellence in Real Estate A step above! International Client Base 600 Shops Worldwide Multi-Lingual Staff Your success is my aim. Fort Myers C hamber Lunch & Learn SeriesT its Lunch & Learn Series that will kick-off on Tuesday, October 8. The four sessions will take place on October 8, October 22, November 5 and November 19 from 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. Each session will be held at Nova Southeastern University, located The series is a four-week developmental seminar that allows local professionals to learn useful tips and strategies to help their business reach its full potential. The Lunch & Learn Series dates, topics and keynote speakers include the following: continued on page 29

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THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 201322 Financial FocusH arvest Season O ffers Lessons T o I nvestorsby Jennifer B aseyIts harvest time again. Of course, harvest season may not mean that much to you if you dont work in agriculture. Nonetheless, you can learn a lot from those who do especially in your role as an investor. Here are a few of these lessons to consider: proper combination of fertilizers and irrigation, farmers seek to maximize the growth of their crops. And if you want to give your portfolio the opportunity means youll need to own a reasonable percentage of growth-oriented vehicles, such as stocks and stock-based securities. Keep in mind, though, that the value of these types of investments will fluctuate, sometimes sharply and theres no guar antee you wont lose some or all of your principal. in countless hours of work before they see the fruits of their labors. And they know that, along the way, they will likely experience setbacks caused by a variety of issues: too much rain, too little rain, insect infestations the list goes on and on. When you invest, you shouldnt expect to experience obstacles in the form of bear markets, economic downturns, changes in legislation and so forth. and focusing more on long-term results than short-term success can help you as you work toward your objectives. but they can respond to it. So, for example, when its been dry for a long time, they can boost their irrigation. As an investor, you cant control the economic long-term interest rates, which typically have a negative effect on long-term bond prices, you may need to consider reducing your exposure, at least for a while, to these bonds. of risks, including bad weather and flucinstance, they can plant some crops that are more drought-resistant than others, so they wont face complete ruin when the rains dont fall. As an investor, you should also diversify; if you only owned one type of financial asset, and that asset class took a big hit, you could sustain among an array of investments such as stocks, bonds, cash and other vehicles may help reduce the effects of volatility on your portfolio. by itself cant guarantee a profit or protect against loss.) challenges of those who farm the land, help us to nurture our investments. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@edwardjones.com. B each C hamber B usy With Activities enjoyed. sea battle, kids games, musical shows and more. The Greater Fort Myers Beach Chamber ribbon-cutting for Exclusive Consulting Ding Family Fun Day com. Service, and other private and business partners. include: ROSEATE SPOONBILL GREAT BLUE HERON: Arthur Island Sun Wind Inn. REDDISH EGRET SNOWY EGRET: Art and Susan Grille, Good Wheels, Grounds by and George Schnapp, She Sells Sea sion of conservation, wildlife and habitat protection, research, and public education Nature Shop proceeds. a tax-deductible gift, visit www.dingdar darlingsociety@gmail.com. Estates Shoppe. Workshop includes tour of the p.m. available for show and sale, a variety of www.thebelltowershops.com. outdoors on the river side lawn of the national, award-winning festival that has hosted by museums and colleges throughout the country showcasing independent films include a variety of contemporary works drawn from the annual juried selection of award winning films and videos. visit www.edisonfordwinterestates.org or

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23 THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 2013 deaRPharmacistDupuytrens C ontracture Starts With Lumps I n Your Palmsby Suzy C ohen, R PhDear Pharmacist: I have two small nodules in my palm, they are small and painless, but I see (and feel) them below my pinky and ring finger. My doctors appointment isnt for two months and Im worried. Can you weigh in? CS, Sacramento, California Im glad you have an upcoming appointment with a doctor who can examine your hand for other signs like dimples, pitted marks or bent fingers. Those little nodules could be related to so many things including Dupuytrens contracture which stands out in my mind. It starts out with tiny lumps in your palm as you describe. But again, a skilled physician can discern Dupuytrens from other conditions like trigger finger, stenosing tenosynovitis, a ganglion cyst, soft tissue mass, rheumatoid, sarcoma or something else. I wont pretend to know what you have, but for the sake of writing this column, Ill focus on Dupuytrens contracture because its interesting and Ive not covered it before. Former president Ronald Reagan, Samuel Beckett and Margaret Thatcher are a few notable sufferers. These lumpsin the palm suddenly appear, then other symptoms gradually appear. Ultimately, there is a tightening of the tissue in the hand, causing the finger(s) to curl down. How much time between the appear ance of lumps and the actual contracture? It varies, its usually months to years. The contracture could be mild, or severe. No one is sure why it happens, but people with diabetes have a higher risk, as do middle-aged men. Other risk factors include your genetics, liver cirrhosis, epilepsy and those who have excessive oxidative stress. Oxidative stress occurs from free radical damage, like if you smoke, drink, have high insulin, high blood sugar, receive excessive medical ozone or UV blood irradiation, etc.). While researching this, I couldnt find many people claiming success with surgery. Unfortunately, treating Dupuytrens contracture doesnt get much attention or funding for studies so Im happy to share what I know. With Dupuytrens, your body produces too much of a cytokine called TGF (transforming growth factor beta) and this contributes to fibrogenesis or thickening of the tissue. Reducing TGF helps slow the disorder. In 2002, the breast cancer drug Tamoxifen was shown to help Dupuytrens by reducing TGF. Then in 2009, an article appeared in Medical Hypothesis entitled, NAC and ACE inhibitors can prevent the recurrence of Dupuytrens disease. The researchers slowed fibrogenesis with the dietary supplement called NAC (N-acetylcysteine) or ACE inhibitor drugs (i.e. lisinopril, enalapril). I think stretching, heat, acupuncture and red light (laser) could help in the early stages. I also learned of a folk remedy. Mix together: 5 ml (equal to 1 teaspoon) of topical Magnesium Oil with 20 to 30 iodine drops and 10 drops DMSO (usually sold online). Store this liquid mixture in an amber bottle. Apply a little bit with a cotton ball to your palm twice daily. Within weeks to months, this may improve contracture. Consult your physician before trying anything. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. dearpharmacist.com. Mom And Me by Lizzie and PryceLizzie and Pryce answer your questions and give advice about aging concerns from a two-generational perspective. A mother and daughter team, Lizzie is a retired RN and health educator, and Pryce is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in the care of elders and people with chronic illnesses. Dear Mom & Me, My wife and I are very elderly and we have many conditions that could be troublesome, but with good medical care we are enjoying our lives. We moved into a nice apartment complex with many caring neighbors around us. One thing we dont like these caring neighbors are always giving us medical advice. Their friends died with the same condition we have, or their friends are bedridden with the same illness we have, or a friend had to have a leg amputated because of my problem. What do we say to shut them up? Malcom Dear Malcom, I do not know why people are so thoughtless with their remarks. Years ago while I was working in hospitals, I would hear what visitors said to patients and I was appalled. A person struggling to live would be told how terrible they looked and the visitor would suggest to them that they should just get another doctor. A dying patient would be told, Your color is terrible, why are you so yellow? In an apartment complex where you live, you want to keep friends. I suggest when you hear a remark. you immediately say, My doctor is great, he/she is doing a fine job and I am satisfied with my care. Then try to talk about the floods or the money system in China. Lizzie Dear Malcom, Lizzie makes a great point. Living in a community setting, you will always bump into your advisors and certainly you want to maintain a friendship with them. So, your situation requires diplomacy. Having a pat, well-rehearsed comment on the tip of your tongue should work well: Bill, thank you so much for your concern. My physician knows all about it. Have you seen any new movies lately? Being kind but redirecting the focus of your advisors helps keep them friendly but out of your personal business. Pryce Lizzie and Pryces email address is momandmeaging@hotmail.com. C hambers Annual Golf C lassicThere are only four foursome slots remaining to participate in the Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerces Annual Golf Classic, scheduled to take place on Friday, October 11 at the Fort Myers Country Club, 3591 McGregor Blvd. in Fort Myers. Lunch begins at 11 a.m., and the event tees-off with a shotgun start at noon. Other highlights include the helicopter golf ball drop on the fairway at 6 p.m. and the cocktail and awards reception,which runs from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Also, anyone who purchases a tee sign by Friday, October 4 will be put into a drawing to win their choice of one of the following: chambers Business After Five Events tournament on Saturday, November 2 with your company tee sign ber golf tournament ber events To volunteer, donate a door prize or purchase a tee sign, contact Nicole Stefanick at nicole@fortmyers.org or call 332-2930 ext. 211. Walk T o E nd AlzheimersThe Alzheimers Associations Walk To End Alzheimers is a united movement to reclaim the future for millions. Walk To End Alzheimers will take place on Saturday, October 26 at Centennial Park, located at 2000 West First Street. Nearly 600 people from the Fort Myers area are expected at this years event to raise awareness and funds to fight Alzheimers disease. Registration begins at 9 a.m. in front of the band shell near the main parking lot; the walk begins at 10 a.m. Alzheimers Association Walk To End Alzheimers participants will participate in a 2.4-mile walk and will learn more about Alzheimers disease, advocacy opportunities, clinical trial enrollment, and support programs and services of the Alzheimers Association. Each walker will also join in a meaningful tribute ceremony to honor those affected by Alzheimers disease. The end of Alzheimers disease starts here. Start or join a team today at www. act.alz.org/fortmyers or call 405-7008. Powerful T ools For C aregivers SeriesCARE is now offering an exciting new program. Powerful Tools For Caregivers is an education series designed to provide you with the tools you need to take care of yourself. This class is made available through a grant from the Florida Department of Elder Affairs and Senior Choices of Southwest Florida in collaboration with Lee Memorial Health System and the CARE Program. This program helps family caregivers reduce stress, improve self-confidence, communicate feelings better, balance their lives, increase their ability to make tough decisions and locate helpful resources. Classes will be held on Wednesdays, beginning on October 9 from 1 to 4 p.m. at Faith Presbyterian Church, 4544 Coronado Parkway in Cape Coral. If needed, special discounts for companionship care in the home are available for PTC participants during the weekly class times. For more information or to register, call 343-9224. Class size is limited and pre-registration is required. Classes consist of six sessions held once a week. Two experienced Class Leaders conduct the series (many are experienced caregivers themselves, who have successfully applied the techniques they teach). Interactive lessons, discussions and brainstorming will help you take the tools you choose and put them into action for your life. You will receive a book, The Caregiver Helpbook, developed specifically for the class. A donation of $30 to help defray the cost of the book is suggested, but not required to attend the class. Visit www.leememorial.org for more information.

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Event Raises Record Breaking Funds For PACE Center For GirlsKendra Sutton, chair for Love That Dress! 5, announced that this years event raised $134,870 to benefit PACE Center for Girls-Lee. The event, which took place at the Embassy Suites in Estero on August 28, was also a record breaking year for dress collections, ticket sales and attendance with 846 tickets sold. Love That Dress! is a fashion fundraiser held annually to benefit PACE Center for Girls. This years Lee County event marked a record year for PACE Center for GirlsLee. Love That Dress! 5 raised the greatest number of funds, surpassing its previous record of $122,498 raised in 2011. In the months leading up to the event, members of the Southwest Florida community donated their new and gently worn dresses and accessories at donation locations across Lee County. Local businesses and organizations also held dress collection parties to gather dress donations, collect funds and raise awareness for the fundraising event. I am truly appreciative of all the help that we received in making Love That Dress! 5 a huge success. This event could not be possible without the donations and support of the Southwest Florida community, said Sutton. I am ecstatic with the results of this years event, and I look forward to seeing what next year will bring for Love That Dress! 6. All of the proceeds from Love That Dress! 5 will benefit PACE Center for Girls, a non-residential juvenile delinquency prevention and intervention program targeting the unique needs of girls, ages 12 to 18, facing challenges such as physical and sexual abuse, domestic violence, substance abuse, foster care, neglect, death of a parent, family history of incarceration and declining grades. Kelly Fayer, PA and friends in VIP suite Kendra Sutton, Love That Dress! 5 chair; Danielle DePhillip, PACE counselor (found her wedding dress at Love That Dress! 5); and Meg GeltnerPACE executive director The chocolate fountain was a popular attractionTHE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 201324 Shoppers discovered great buys for a great cause Friends and supporters of Love That Dress! 5 Calendar Girls Pay T ribute T o H eroesThe Calendar Girls will pay tribute to heroes on Saturday, October 5 at 7 p.m. at Costco, 7171 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers. This patriotic dance team is 25 members strong. They take every opportunity to salute military and civilian heroes. For more information www.calendargirlsflorida.com. Calendar Girls freedom bo Medicare Enrollment WorkshopsCertified Financial Planner Danielle Gates will be hosting free Medicare annual enrollment workshops on Thursday, October 10 at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. at the Lake Kennedy Senior Center in Cape Coral. During the workshop, Gates will also discuss: Preregistration is required by October 9. Call the Lake Kennedy Senior Center at 574-0575 to sign up or for more information.

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25 THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 2013DID YOU KNOW PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF oO CT oO B erER 7, 2013ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Your Aries charm helps persuade others to listen to your proposal. But its still a long way from acceptance, unless you can stand up to the tough questions that are set to follow. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Plan to share a weekend getaway from all the pressures of your hectic workaday world with a very special someone. You could be pleasantly surprised at what develops. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Your keen insight once again helps you handle a challenging situation with a clearer perception of what its really all about. What you learn helps you make a difficult decision. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) If you want to steer clear of getting involved in a new family dispute, say so. Your stand might cause hurt feelings for some, but overall, youll be respected for your honesty. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Expect recognition for your efforts in getting a project into operation. Besides the more practical rewards, your Lions heart will be warmed by the admiration of your colleagues. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Set aside time to rid yourself of clutter that might well be drawing down your creative energies. Consider asking someone to help you decide what stays and what goes. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A colleague could make a request that might place you in an awkward position with coworkers. Best advice: Share your concerns with an associate you can trust. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Your energy levels are way up, allowing you to take on the added challenge of a task youve been hoping to secure. Expect this move to lead to an important opportunity. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Your continuing sense of confidence in what youve set out to do gives encouragement to others. Expect to see more people asking to add their efforts to yours. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) You might think it would be best to reject a suggestion others insist would be unworkable. But you might be surprised by what you find if you give it a chance. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Changing a decision might disappoint some people, but the important thing is that you be honest with yourself. Dont go ahead with anything you have doubts about. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) There could be some fallout from an emotional confrontation that you really should deal with before moving on. Best to start fresh with a clean, clear slate. BORN THIS WEEK: Your honesty not only helps you make decisions for yourself, but also helps others find the right choices for themselves. Christopher Columbus reaches the New World. Columbus, and most others, under estimated the worlds size. The expedition probably first landed at Watling Island in the Bahamas. Columbus later sighted Cuba, which he thought was mainland China. Naval Academy opens in Annapolis, Md., professors. Known as the Naval School ematics and navigation, gunnery and steam, chemistry, English, natural philosophy and French. Chicago barn of Patrick and Catherine OLeary, igniting a two-day blaze that kills ings and leaves 100,000 homeless. Legend has it that the fire started when a cow kicked over a lantern in the OLeary barn. of the mighty Colorado River, the Hoover miles of transmission lines to Los Angeles. The central reason for the dam, however, was the collection, preservation and distribution of water. Shigematsu Sakaibara, commander of the Japanese garrison on Wake Island, orders claiming they were trying to make radio those POWs remains one of the more brutal episodes of the war in the Pacific. museum on wheels, the Artmobile, opens in there are dozens of Artmobile-inspired museums on wheels in cities and towns world. Live, a topical comedy sketch show featuring Chevy Chase, John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd, Gilda Radner, Garrett Morris, Jane Curtin and Laraine Newman, makes its debut on NBC. It would go on to become the longest-running, highest-rated show on late-night television. Windsor, when asked to reveal the secret to empty, empty whats full and scratch where it itches. Italians spend more time on social media than people of any other nationality. those accused of a crime could prove their innocence (or guilt) in trial by battle. This law was unused and nearly forgotten for Abraham Thornton was charged with murder in the death of a young woman named Mary Ashford. The evidence against Thornton was nearly overwhelming, but he claimed the right to trial by battle against his accuser. Since the law was still on the books, the court decided it had no choice but to grant his request. Thorntons accuser was William Ashford, the victims brother, but since he declined to appear on the field of battle, Thornton was freed. Shortly thereafter, trail by battle was officially abolished in the country. per year, Florida experiences more lightning than any other state in the country. Central Florida is unofficially known as the Lightning Capital of the World. you hate the idea of your parents moving in with you, according to a recent survey. However, if those survey respondents had to have one parent move in with them, two out of three would choose Mom over Dad. what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel. -Maya Angelou THIS WEEK IN HISTORY strSTR A nN G eE BU tT trTR U eE thoTHO UG htHT F orOR theTHE DA yY 1. GEOGRAPHY: Where does the greatest tide change on Earth occur? 2. SCI ENCE: What is the largest cell in the human body? under the name George Orwell? 9. GEN ERAL KNOWLEDGE: Who was known as The Singing Cowboy? 10. TEL EVISION: What was the name of the company where George Jetson worked in The Jetsons? TRIVI aA TES tT 1. The Bay of Fundy in Eastern Canada. The difference between low and high tide can be as ANSWERS SpSP OR tT S QUIZ 1. Who was the first major-league player to compile at least 3,000 hits for a career? 2. Name the last time American League teammates finished 1-2-3 in the regular-season MVP voting. Heisman Trophy voting? NHL regular-season MVP? Award in both the NASCAR Truck and Nationwide series. Name either of the first two to do it. player to have won more. ANSWERS

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 201326 Read us online at IslandSunNews.com CONTRACTOR G I P M SR C D P D P CG D GrSince 2001, A Southwest Florida Paver Contractor www.gigicompanies.com 239-541-7282Schedule free estimates or visit our new show roomLic.# S3-12238 GENERAL CONTRACTOR N C R CGC1517615www.dbrowngc.com239-593-1998 A BBB Accredited Business with an +A Rating COMPUTERS FISHING CHARTER Light Tackle Sport Fishing CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.com BUILDING CONTRACTOR Veggie Stuffed Mushrooms 1 cup zucchini, finely diced 1/2 cup radish, finely chopped 1/2 cup onion, finely diced 1/2 cup bread crumbs 1/2 cup fresh basil leaves, chopped 3 tablespoons Parmesan cheese 1 egg 1 teaspoon Freshly ground pepper 24 medium-sized mushroom caps, rinsed and stems removed Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Combine all ingredients except mushrooms; mix well. Stuff mixture into mushroom caps and place stuffed mushrooms on a large baking pan. Bake until mushrooms soften and mixture begins to brown, approximately 15 minutes. Veggie Stuffed Mushrooms

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27 THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 2013 answer on page 27 PUZZLE ANSWERS SUDOKU SCRAMBLERS FIND AT LEAST SIX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PANELS PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING TREE & LAWN CARE Jesus Hernandez LANDSCAPING & TREE SERVICE 482-7350 We Service All your Landscape Needs FULL Landscaping SERVICES Over 20 years serving San-Cap & Ft. Myers FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the bene ts of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 COSMETICS MAGGIE BUTCHER Ph: 239-395-0978 / 317-509-6014 Career information available Gift ideas available Call for Specials!

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REAL ESTATETHE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 201328 REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS 3883 Sanibel Captiva Road, Sanibel, Fl Phone: 239-472-3644, ext 1 Fax: 239-472-2334 www.crowclinic.orgH ELEL P U SS P LEASELEASE !!We need volunteers for: Clinic emergency patient admissions desk and baby animal feeders Visitor education center greeters and gift shop cashiers CROW (239) 472-3644, ext. 231 or volunteers@crowclinic.orgRS 1/4 NC TFN hH EL pP WANTED ANN uU AL RENTALQUI ETET SANSAN IB ELEL HOM EE WW /P RR IV ATEATE B EAEA CH P ATAT H3200 sq ft home in Gulf Pines, one of Sanibels most beautiful & sought after communities. One house from beach w/private beach path. Short walk to Gulf Pines 2 swimming pools & tennis courts; large landscaped lot provides privacy. 3-4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, large open living area, screened porch & several decks. W/D, 2nd fridge, Elevator, 2-car garage. $4,000/mo. + util. Annual rental only. Unfurnished. Landscaping & association fees paid by owner. Avail Oct 2013. Call 917-680-4440.NS 5/31 CC TFN RERE /M AA X OF TT H EE I SLANDSSLANDS Putting owners and tenants together Call Dustyn Corace www.remax-oftheislands.com 239-472-2311RS 1/4 BM TFN ISABELLA RASiIHAPPY TO HELP Y YOUWithITH A ALL OOF Y YOUrRREAL EEStT At TE NEEDS! RS 1/4 NC TFN 1101 Periwinkle WW ay #105 SS anibel, F LL 33957 ISABELLA RASiI (239) 246-4716E ISABELLARASi I@AOL.COM vV A cC AT ioIO N RENTAL Island VacationsOf Sanibel & CaptivaMillion $ Views Await You! Cottages Condos Homes Miles of Beaches & Bike Paths239-472-72771-888-451-7277RS 1/4 BM TFN LL IGH TT HOU SESE REALTREALT YPaul J. Morris, Broker VACATION RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT & SALES 359 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel Island 239-579-0511RS 1/4 CC TFN hH EL pP WANTEDVO LL U NTEERSNTEERS NEEDEDNEEDED Volunteers needed for the After School Program which runs Mon.-Th, 2:30 3:15 pm call Linda Reynolds 472-1617RS 1/4 NC TFN VO LL U NTEERSNTEERS NEEDEDNEEDED At The Sanibel School Call Michelle Wesley 239-910-8000RS 1/4 NC TFN hH EL pP WANTEDVO LL U NTEERNTEER OPPO RTRT U NN I TT YThe Sunshine Ambassador Program is a new and exciting volunteer opportunity offered at the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida located within HealthPark Medical Center. The Sunshine Ambassadors will greet, assist and be a families and visitors entering the hospital. The Ambassadors also make a difference to families by providing educational and healthful resources to assist in GRANDparenting for GRANDchildren. We are currently seeking year-round volunteers to work one 4-hour shift Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm or 12:00pm to 4:00 pm. If you would be interested in learning more about this wonderful new opportunity, please contact Lisa Ellinwood, Volunteer Resources Coordinator at 239-343-5062 at the Golisano Childrens Hospital.NS 2/8 NC TFN C uU ST omOM ER SS ER vicVIC ETarpon Bay Explorers has an opening for part-time associates to work in the Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge selling tickets for the tram tour and greeting and collecting entrance fees for Wildlife Drive. Must enjoy customer service and helping visitors. Must also be able to operate a basic cash register and credit card processor. Please email resume to EcoErler@aol.com or stop in at 900 Tarpon Bay Road NS 9/27 CC 10/4 C oO ND oO foFO R SS ALE On river Near Ocean Full rental season $435,000 Call (617) 750-4266.NS 10/4 CC 10/18 RR OG ERER NN O DRDR UFF ELEELE C TRTR ICLic# EC12002788. Call Roger 239-707-7203. Aqualink Motor Controls. RS 6/7 CC TFN ScSC ARNAT oO LL AWN SS ER vicVIC ELawn Service, Shrubs and Tree Trimming Weeding, Installation of Plants, Trees and Mulch (one month free service available) Joe Scarnato (239) 849-6163 scarnatolawn@aol.comRS 1/25 BM TFN SER vicVIC ES offOFF ERED SANSAN IB ELEL HOM EE WATWA T CHRetired Police Captain Lives on Sanibel Will Check Your Home Weekly Very Reasonable Rates (239) 728-1971RS 1/4 BM TFN H omOM E/CO NDND O WW AT chCHco CO N ciCI ER gG E SER vicVIC ESDorado Property Management Full Range of Services Island Resident Licensed & Insured 24/7 Call Lisa or Bruce at 239-472-8875RS 1/4 BM TFN HELLES CLEAN iI N gG SS ER vicVIC ESResidential Cleaning to Satisfaction Sanibel Lic. #11412 Lee Co. Lic. #051047NS 1/4 PC TFN SALESLooking for a responsible, enthusiastic person for seasonal help at Island Style Gallery on Sanibel. or near sanibel island. Please come by Wed. through Sat. 11-5 for application. 2075 Periwinkle way, #6, Sanibel Island.NS 10/4 CC 10/11 MOBI LELE HOM EE P ERER I WW I NN K LELE P ARAR K$115,000. 60 x 12 w/ metal roof-over plus 20 x 12 Florida room. Master BR has queen size bed & blt-in dresser & dbl closet. Master bath has combo bath/ shower & dbl sink vanity w/extra storage. Guest BR has dbl closet + blt-in drawers & private bath w/ shower. Eat-in-kit is open to LR which from K to FL room. Private 12 x 12 deck, picnic table and storage shed. One car carport with adjacent 2nd parking space. room & bathrooms. Carpeting in both bedrooms & LR. Home recently inspected & has all required tiedowns. New central air & heat system & stacked washer/dryer, all appliances louvered blinds throughout. Purchase completely furnished including all linens, dishes, pots & pans, tableware, 2 sleeper couches, recliner, 2 dining tables & chairs, 4 outdoor chairs & folding beach chairs, etc. Call owner 317-293-0915 or email LMSrealtor@aol.com for further information or to make offer. RS 10/4 CC TFN

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29 THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 2013 CLASSIFIED DEADLINE FRIDAY AT NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS BOATS CANOES KAYAKSDOCKAGEHourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-5800RS 1/4 NC TFN FOUNDPrescription sunglasses found in parking lot of Limetree Center on Wednesday, February 27. Claim at Island Sun newspaper, suite 2 in Limetree Center, or call 395-1213.NS 3/8 NC TFN TOO L BOX WASHES UP ON SANIBELThis tool box with motor parts washed up on shore Saturday morning, May 8 about 8:30 on the beach at Sundial Resort on Sanibel Island. To claim call Sundial Resort Security 239-472-4151.NS 6/14 CC TFN L OST AND F OUND W ANTED TO BUYCASH P A ID FOR MILITA RY I TEMSCash Paid For Old Military Items. Medals, Swords, Uniforms, helmets, old guns, awards & more. Local Toll Free 1-866-440-3280RS 9/6 CC 11/29 P ETSTO PLA C E A CLASSIF IEDL OG ONT O: IslandSunNews.comCLICK ON PLACE CLASSIFIED GARAGE MOVING YARDSALES CAUTION MOVING SALE BEACHVIEW COUNTRY CLUBIndoor & Outdoor Furniture. Bedding, linens, kitchen supplies, all household goods. Tools, lawn equipt. Bikes. Saturday, Oct. 5th Only, 9am to 4pm. 832 Birdie View Pt., SanibelNS 10/4 CC 10/4 MOVING SALE55 TV, leather reclining love seat, QBed with night stands, leather chairs,lift top coffee table, 2 end tables, knick knacks. Call 239.728.8900NS 10/4 CC 10/4 FREE KITTEN TO GOOD HOMEFree kitten to good, safe home. No de-clawing. Fiesty Bengal mix. Call 472-1788 after 5 p.m.NS 5/31 NC TFN 2 MALE GUINEA PIGS 2 Male Guinea Pigs (12 mos old) free with cage and all accessories. Moving to home that will not allow pets. Please call Beth at 410-4421 or email esk1966@comcast.netNS 10/4 NC TFN FOR SALETWIN BEDSTwo Twin Antique Maple Beds and Night Tables Excellent Condition. $400. New mattresses/box springs available. 395-0041RS 10/4 NC 10/4 From page 21Lunch Series Adoption Special At Lee C ounty Animal Services Gulf C oast H umane Society H olds 1st Annual Duck Dash

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If you would like your club/organization listed in The River Calling Card, phone 415-7732Emergency ......................................................................................... 911 Lee County Sheriffs Of ce ........................................................ 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol ................................................................ 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol .............................................................. 278-7100 Poison Control ................................................................ 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center .......................................1-800-936-5321Ft. Myers Chamber of Commerce ............................................. 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare .............................................. 425-2685 Ft. Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce .................................. 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library ......................................................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library ............................................................ 533-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce .......................................... 931-0931 Post Of ce ..................................................................... 1-800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau ..................................................... 338-3500 ARTS Alliance for the Arts .................................................................. 939-2787 Art of the Olympians Museum & Gallery ................................... 332-5055 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio .................................................. 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers ......................................................... 275-3970 Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall ...................................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS ................................................................................ 395-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre ............................................... 278-4422 Cultural Park Theatre ................................................................ 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light ............................................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade .................................. 332-4488 Florida West Arts ...................................................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers ....................................... 472-0168 Gulf Coast Symphony ............................................................... 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres ..................................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic ........................................................... 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater ......................................................... 472-6862 S.W. Florida Symphony ............................................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy .................................................................. 936-3239 Young Artists Awards ................................................................ 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAngel Flight ................................................................ 1-877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center ............................................................... 731-3535 American Business Women Association ................................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL ..................................................................... 339-8046 Audubon Society ....................................................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR .................................................. 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society ................................................... 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus ................................. 1-855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club ............................................................ 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees ....................................................... 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists ............................................................ 415-2484 Ft Myers UDC Chapter 2614 (United Daughters of the Confederacy .................................. 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL ...................................................... 561-9164 The Horticulture and Tea Society ............................................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society ................................................................. 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society ............................................. 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation ........................................... 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees ............. 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America .......................................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL .................................................... 667-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans .................................................. 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy ........................................ 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association ........................................ 561-2118 Kiwanis Clubs: Fort Myers Beach ................................................. 765-4254 or 454-8090 Fort Myers Edison ..................................................................... 694-1056 Fort Myers South ...................................................................... 691-1405 Gateway to the Islands .............................................................. 415-3100 Iona-McGregor .......................................................................... 482-0869Lions Clubs:Fort Myers Beach ...................................................................... 463-9738 Fort Myers High Noon ............................................................... 466-4228 Estero/South Fort Myers ........................................................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County .............................................. 768-0417 POLO Club of Lee County ......................................................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers ......................................................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society ................................................ 472-6940 United Way of Lee County ........................................................ 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) ................................. 211 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews Shell Museum ................................................ 395-2233 Burroughs Home ...................................................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium ........................................ 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates ................................................... 334-3614 Fort Myers Skate Park .............................................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium ............................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge ................................ 472-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site .............................................. 239-992-0311 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center ....................... 765-8101 Skatium ...................................................................................... 321-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society ........................................ 939-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History ...................................... 321-7430 True Tours ................................................................................. 945-0405 Pets Of The Week SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 27 THE RIVER OCTOBER 4, 201330 Hello, my name is Miles. Im a year-and-a-half-old male boxer mix and Im the happiest dog you ever saw! I like everyone and everyone likes me, too! Im young and fun and would love to be part of your family. Im the perfect size with a beautiful brindle and white coat. I am very boxer-like but come in a more manageable size. Ive got a non-stop smile that is sure to make you laugh. So if you need a little happiness in your life, ask to see me. My adoption fee is $25 during Animal Services Dogtober & Caturday adoption promotion. Hello, my name is Charlie. Im a 5-month-old male black domestic short hair. Boy, its tough getting noticed in a shelter full of cats when youre black! I do everything I can to get people to notice me, but they seem to pass me by for the kitties with more interesting patterned coats. Well, Im very handsome, love to cuddle and give lots of kisses. Please come visit me today... Ill be the one trying to get your attention! My adoption fee is $25 during Animal Services Dogtober & Caturday adoption promotion. For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to Animal Services website at www.LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if 3 months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs 6 months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500. Charlie ID# 562933 Miles ID# 573200 photos by squaredogphoto.com

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BEACH CHAIR PASTIMEAnswers on page 2531 THE RIVER OCTBOER 4, 2013

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