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River weekly news ( July 12, 2013 )

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Title:
River weekly news
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Newspaper
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Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date:
July 12, 2013
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University of Florida
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UF00101363:00195

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Title:
River weekly news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date:
July 12, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00101363:00195


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FREETake Me Home VOL. 12, NO. 38 SEPTEMBER 27, 2013From the B eaches to the R iver District downtown Fort M yersRead Us Online at IslandSunNews.com Growing Season Workshop Series Offered At GreenM arketThe cooler months are prime vegetable growing season here in Southwest Florida. With many residents and seasonal visitors discover ing the benefits of backyard gardening, the Alliance for the Arts GreenMarket is bringing the community a new series of free Growing Season workshops. Presented by local growers, master gardeners and homesteaders, the classes will take place at 10:30 a.m. on the first and third Saturdays of the month beginning in October and running through March. Presenters will cover everything you need to know to grow a successful organic garden, including soil preparation, growing techniques, earth-friendly pest control, crop selection, what to do with small or shady spaces, preserving the harvest and composting. The workshops are free, but a suggested $5 donation will help sustain the market and support yearround community activities at the Alliance. Visit www.artinlee.org or call 939-2787 to learn more. The Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard, just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. A past growing season workshop Locally grown heirloom tomatoes, lettuces, strawberries, radishes and pigeon peas Wildlife Drive T o R eopen At Ding DarlingThe public is invited to the grand reopening of Wildlife Drive at JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge on Sanibel on Tuesday, October 1 starting at 9 a.m. Admission to the drive is free to all visitors the entire day until the gate closes at 6:30 p.m. Tram tours will run that day at regular fare. Closed since May 20, the four-mile Wildlife Drive now has one new water control structure and another that was deteriorated has been replaced. These improvements will assist with habitat restoration and wildlife management. Other improvements include new per vious parking areas at popular stopping points and additional parking spaces at the Calusa Shell Mound Trail, the latter of which also removes a blind curve. The main purpose of the project was to replace the old deteriorated pavement with a new smooth surface that will be more cyclistand pedestrian-friendly. The old pervious pavement, installed in 2002, had deteriorated to a point where it was no longer pervious and had become so rough that our cycling visitors could no longer comfortably ride the drive, said Wildlife Refuge Manager Paul Tritaik. It was supposed to last at least 10 years, but it barely lasted that long as it was severely crumbling and functionally impervious. The new asphalt surface will extend the life of Wildlife Drive for at least 20 years, Tritaik said. Following the official reopening on October 1, Wildlife Drive will remain open to the public during nor mal operating hours with regular entrance fees. The drive closes on Fridays for maintenance and to give wildlife a disturbancefree day. continued on page 21 Wildlife Drive reopens to the public on Tuesday, October 1 at 9 a.m. B attle Of T he Sexes At Off B roadway P almby Di SaggauThe Off Broadway Palm Theatre opens its new season with You Say Tomato, I Say Shut Up!, a humor ous memoir by a real life married couple. Writers, actors Annabelle Gurwitch and Jeff Kahn wrote the comedy about love and marriage based on their own differing personalities and the conflicts that come with most marriages. Adam Clough and Rachael Endrizzi portray the couple. As the play opens, Annabelle and Jeff are celebrating their 10th anniversary in a posh nightclub. Annabelle is late as usual and talking non-stop on her cell phone. Jeff plans a lovely dinner followed by an amorous evening of love-making. Bestcontinued on page 17 Rachael Endrizzi and Adam Clough Art Walk 5th Anniversary Street P arty October 4For the 5th anniversary celebration, Art Walk organizers are blocking off the streets and throwing a party on Friday, October 4. The event will include art in the galleries and out on the streets, and street performers. Art Walk was created by a group of gallery owners and art enthusiasts. Since then, it has been a major force in revitalizing the River District with new galleries, stores and restaurants. A team effort since the beginning, Art Walks success is due in part to a private and public partnership. Those team members include the local businesses, the City of Fort Myers, the River District Alliance and the Fort Myers Community Redevelopment Agency. The first Art Walk on October 3, 2008, was under the leadership of Greg Knezevich, who owned the former La Casa del Arte gallery. Other co-founders include Andy Howl and Alainna Zwiernik of HOWL Gallery, Jamie Kuser of Happenings Magazine and Reverie & Rock Art Gallery, Claudia Goode of continued on page 15

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Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: Sulphur Drinking Pool At Royal Palm Hotelby Gerri Reaves, PhDEvery resident of Florida is familiar with that rotten-egg smell in hard sulphur water. Although most people now access the public water supply for drinking water, many people know the smell from the well water used for landscape irrigation. In early Fort Myers, concrete cisterns or cypress rain tanks at residences and businesses were often used to collect fresh water for drinking. Cisterns also served as early water-conservation devices to help with the dry season. The recent popularity of the rain barrel with gardeners draws on that concept. But even though mineral-rich sulphur water might be unpleasant to drink, it has always had its appeal, too. The healing property of drinking and bathing in it have been claimed for centuries, for everything from wound healing to arthritis, to pain relief and psoriasis. Artesian mineral water springs do still exist throughout the region and are touted for their medicinal properties. Entire resorts sometimes developed around a sulphur spring. Tampa, for example, is only one of many Florida locations with such an historic spring. And even in little Fort Myers, downtown hotels marketed the benefits of the artesian water. The Riverview, for example, advertised hot and cold sulphur baths among its many amenities. But no hotel in town had more amenities than the Gilded-Age Royal Palm Hotel, which stood on First Street at the foot of Royal Palm Avenue for half a century (1898 to 1948). The hotel grounds encompassed much of the width of the block and stretched to the Caloosahatchee River. The birds-eye view shown in the historic postcard image snapped, from the Franklin Arms Hotel, dates to roughly the same time as the other historic photo and illustrates the hotels scope and grandeur dur ing its heyday. One of the less spectacular offerings was the sulphur drinking pool shown in the circa 1920 photo. The exact location of the drinking pool is unknown, but evidence suggests that it was likely on the eastern edge of the property near the river and bath houses. What is surprising is the towns slowness to invest in a municipal water supply. What isnt surprising is that the slowness was due to factional differences over taxes. So, it was almost 20 years after the vote to incorporate, in 1904, that the town drilled wells to create the first public water supply and fire protection. And that was only for several blocks along First Street. Not until 1910 did voters finally approve a bond issue to fund a municipally owned waterworks. But the water was still odiferous. In fact, messages on historic postcard reveal that tourists sometime mentioned the towns unappealing hard sulphur water hardly the detail a tourist town wants to advertise. In the early 20th century, public officials realized that the lack of a plentiful sulphurfree water supply was a considerable impediment to growth. Nevertheless, Fort Myers did not have a sulphur-free public water supply until the Public Works Administration (PWA) built a modern water plant in 1937. It was one of several federal projects that helped Fort Myers get through the Great Depression. The city paid slightly less than half of the $200,000 cost. The grand Royal Palm Hotel and its sulphur drinking pool have been gone for 65 years, but the land where it once stood is ready for another chapter in history as highrise residential community with commercial space. Who knows? Maybe that historic sulphur spring will make a comeback. continued on page 4 The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, please call (239) 415-7732 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, FL 33901. Fax number: (239) 415-7702. E-mail: press@riverweekly.com. The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Co-Publishers Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Isabel Rasi Office Coordinator Graphic Arts/ProductionAnn Ziehl Photographer Michael Heider Writers Anne Mitchell Jeff Lysiak PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Contributing Writers Read Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com Click on The River Ed Frank Max Friedersdorf Tom Hall Guests drank to their health at the Royal Palm Hotel if they could tolerate the rotten egg odor courtesy of the Southwest Florida Historical Society (Sara Nell Hendry Gran Collection) Over its 50-year history, the Royal Palm Hotel on First Street offered everything from elegant dining and accommodations to a casino and swimming pool, from a recreation pier and lush gardens to medicinal drinking water from an artesian well courtesy of the State Archives of FloridaT hH E rR IVE rR S EE P TETE MB EE R 27, 20132

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3 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 Lazy Flamingo, Inc. 6520-C Pine Avenue Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-5353 Lazy Flamingo 3, Inc. 16501 Stringfellow Rd Bokeelia, FL 33922 239-283-5959 Lazy Flamingo 2, Inc. 1036 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-6939 Lazy Flamingo 4, Inc. 12951 McGregor Blvd. Ft. Myers, FL 33919 239-476-9000 Four Great Locations! We have the NFL Ticket Package and the BIG TEN Network NOW SERVING FULL LIQUOR IN FORT MYERS 20 Wings & Domestic Pitcher for $20 during all College and Pro GamesF M 33 Patio DeLeon, Downtown Fort Myers (239) 337-3377OPEN Tues-ur 11am-10pm, Fri 11am-11pm, Sat 3-11pm Closed Sun & Mon Fort Myers Public Art Community Foundation Grants Availableby Tom HallAfter months of delay, applications for City of Fort Myers Arts & Cultural Grants are now being accepted through the Southwest Florida Community Foundations online application portal, E-Apply. The deadline for applying is 5 p.m. October 7. Recognizing the importance of the arts to the cultural, educational and economic well-being of its diverse population, the City of Fort Myers has earmarked $97,000 for arts and cultural grants for fiscal year 2013-2014. The grants are designed to ensure that a full range of cultural experiences are available to its residents, businesses and visitors. According to a study conducted by the Lee County Alliance for the Arts in tandem with Americans for the Arts, Lee Countys nonprofit arts and culture industry generated $68.3 million in economic activity in 2010, supported 2,038 full-time equivalent jobs and produced $9.4 million in revenue for the City of Fort Myers, Lee County and the State of Florida. The report also found that Lee County arts and cultural events drew more than 500,000 visitors from other counties and states in 2011 alone. More than half (55.4 percent) of all nonresidents visiting Lee County for an art or cultural event came specifically to attend that event. While most arts and cultural events are day trip destinations, the study revealed that more than 10 percent of those coming from out of town stayed the night, spending money on lodging, meals and fuel incident to their trip. Two types of grants are offered for organizations making a meaningful contribution to the arts and culture of the city: grant amount of $10,000. maximum grant amount of $5,000. Grants are also available for individuals making a meaningful contribution to the arts and culture of the city, with a maximum grant amount of $2,500 per individual artist. Although not a requirement, grant recipients are strongly encouraged to seek matching funds from earned income, foundations, individual and corporate contributions, government agencies and other organizations. These matching funds can include in-kind goods and services as well as volunteer and professional time as a part of the cash match. In the past, the citys arts and cultural grants were reviewed and awarded by the citys public art committee. However, because many of the committee members either apply for grants themselves or know the artists and organizations who apply, the city has elected to partner with the Southwest Florida Community Foundation in order to eliminate bias and potential conflicts of interest. The Southwest Florida Community Foundation was formed in 1976 with $500 from First National Bank of Fort Myers by a small, dedicated group of attorneys, trust officers, and community leaders who had the vision and foresight to plan for the future needs of our rapidly growing community. Since 1976, the foundation has been supporting the communities of Lee, Charlotte, Collier, Glades and Hendry counties through over 330 endowed funds. With current assets of over $60 million, the foundation has provided more than $50 million in grants and scholarships to these communities. You can access the grant applicathe Southwest Florida Community Foundations website, www.floridacommunity.com. Once on the page, click on the E-Apply button to go to the logon page for the application portal. There, you will need to create an account in order to access the application. If you have any questions about the online application process or how to continued on page 4 The Alliance for the Arts hosted the 2012 City of Fort Myers Individual Artist Grant Recipients Exhibition

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 20134 From page 2Sulphur Drinking PoolWalk down to the former site of Fort Myers Gilded Age hotel and contemplate the many well-off tourists who traveled from afar to dine in luxury and drink the spring water. Then stroll a few blocks to the Southwest Florida Museum of History at 2031 Jackson Street to learn about the hotel that helped invent the town as a worldwide tourist destination. For information, call 321-7430 or go to www.museumofhistory.org. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Then the Southwest Florida Historical Society, where you can explore the archives and see historic photos that bring back old Fort Myers. The all-volunteer non-profit organization is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Drop by on Wednesday or Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon, or call them at 939-4044. Sources: Archives of the Southwest Florida Historical Society and The Story of Fort Myers by Karl H. Grismer. Celebrity Dinner For Child Care Of Southwest FloridaMini-vacations, golfing foursomes, tickets to sporting events, attractions and performances, and gift certificates galore are among the auction lots Child Care of Southwest Florida will offer during its 5th annual Stars for Kids Celebrity Waiter Dinner. The silent auction begins at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, October 5 at Harborside Event Center in the downtown Fort Myers River District. Throughout dinner, auctioneer Jack Burges will take bids on live auction items, including a Dustin Pedroia jersey and four Red Sox spring training tickets; the use of a suite at the October 20 Miami Dolphins vs. Buffalo Bills game; a five-day stay at The Belleair Beach Club, just south of Clearwater Beach; and dinner for two at Connors Steak & Seafood every month for a year. Tickets are $100 per person and may be purchased online at www.CCSWFL. org or by calling 278-1002. Table sponsorships are available for $1,000. Some of Lee Countys favorite personalities have signed on to tote trays, fetch beverages and demonstrate their performing talents during the event, which traditionally includes some surprises. Guests are encouraged to tip their waiters for exceptional service and deserving performances. Costume changes, extravagant table decorations and songs, dances and skits add to the fun. JetBlue Park announcer Ted Fitzgeorge, who was the voice of the Fort Myers Miracle for a decade, will emcee the evening, which includes a cocktail reception, dinner and the auctions. Among the organizations that are sponsoring tables are CRS Technology Consultants, Copy Lady, LeeSar, Digital Benefits, Hodges University, Southwest Florida Transportation Group, BB&T, BB&T-Oswald Trippe & Company, Greater Fort Myers Chamber of Commerce, Sam Galloway Ford and Henderson, Franklin, Starnes & Holt, PA. Event proceeds will support Child Care of Southwest Floridas mission of strengthening and enhancing the lives of children and their families by providing scholarships for low-income children at the agencys six accredited centers in Lee and Hendry counties. Child Care of Southwest Florida Inc., a United Way agency established in 1967, also provides state-mandated training for child care professionals and administers the federal food program for eligible centers and family child care homes throughout Southwest Florida. Visit www. CCSWFL.org to learn more. Greeters Club MeetingTThe Greeters Club of Greater Fort Myers will host a Chicos fashion show at its October 17 luncheon. Members will be modeling the latest fashions from Chicos, founded on Sanibel in 1983. Luncheon meetings are held on the third Thursday of the month at the Colonial Country Club, 9181 Independence Way in Fort Myers. Find out about upcoming activities, meet the members and find out more about joining this group of Lee County women. Call Marie Gaither at 791-8966 or email wmgaither@aol.com to make a reservation. Cost is $20 per person. The Sheraton Towers was built on the former Royal Palm Hotel property in the 1990s facing Edwards Drive, a street created in the early 1950s. Since then, it has been reinvented as at least two other hotels and now awaits redevelopment photo by Gerri Reaves Open Monday Saturday www.threecraftyladies.com Find us on WE WILL PAY YOUR TOLL!!!Spend $55 and bring us your toll receipt for a full refund! Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Downtown Fort Myers (Post Oce Arcade Next to Hotel Indigo) 1520 Broadway For Takeout & Delivery Tel: 334-6991 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEKMon-urs 11am 10pm Fri-Sat 11am 11pm Sun 12pm 9pm www. ichiban-sushi-chinese.com From page 3Fort Myers Artcreate an account, you can contact the community foundation at 274-5900. Community foundation staff will check applications for eligibility, accuracy and completeness, and will follow up with applicants if any required materials were not submitted. If missing items are not submitted, the application will not be forwarded for committee review. Application materials will be assigned to an independent arts and culture review committee, composed of artists, arts and culture administrators, and community arts and culture representatives for individual review and ratings according to review criteria that can be found in the application. A committee meeting will be scheduled for discussion, and ratings will be averaged to determine each applicants overall rating. After the committee has rated the applicants, the panel will make funding recommendations to present to the public art committee. The public art committee will review the recommendations of the arts and culture review committee in preparation for presentation to the mayor and city council. Awards will be approved December 2. An exhibition of artistic work completed by the grant recipients is typically held in May, although the timing of next years show may be postponed given the nearly three-month delay in awarding this years arts and cultural grants. An arts advocate, Tom Hall guides weekly walking tours of the River Districts public art collection in Fort Myers. For more information, go to truetours.net. Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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5 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 B ird P atrol Guided WalkLee County Parks and Recreation is offering a nature walk with a bird patrol guide on Saturday, October 5 at 8:30 a.m. at Lakes Regional Park. This easy walk along clear paths offers an opportunity to see birds in native vegetation with experienced bird patrol guides pointing out the many species in Lakes Park, a Lee County birding hot spot and crucial nesting area for many birds. Arrive a few minutes after 8 a.m. for a brief introduction and to sign waivers. Tours start promptly at 8:30. Wear comfortable shoes and dress. Bring water, sunscreen and binoculars. The tour is free with paid parking; $1 per hour or $5 for all day. For more information, call 5337580 or 533-7576. Lakes Regional Park is at 7330 Gladiolus Drive. Meet at Shelter A7. Enter Lakes Park gate from Gladiolus. Turn right. Drive to end of road, continue through the parking lot. Shelter A7 is located near the train station. Eastern phoebe photo by Meg Rousher Lexington Country Club Gifts $103,000 T o Childrens H ospitalLee Memorial Health System Foundation has announced a gift of $103,000 from Lexington Country Club, Fort Myers. The gift was the result of a number of fundraising activities at Lexington Country Club, including a recent golf tournament. The gift will support Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Floridas capital campaign via Barbaras Friends and Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Floridas Cancer Fund. For more information, visit ChildrensHospitalGoal.org. Front: Larry Antonucci, MD, chief operating officer Lee Memorial Health System; Al Kinkle, chairman & CEO Lexington Country Club and chairman of Barbaras Friends of Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Floridas Cancer Fund; and Frank Haskell; row 2: Jean Burns; Deborah and Jack Macgruder; Edward Andrews; row 3: Barbara and Robert Kidwell; row 4: Chris Andrews; Shonda Lott; and Tim Myers; row 5: Donald Thiel; Linda Thiel; and Patricia Lotz; row 6: Steve Tolnar; Robert Lotz; Rosalie Blakey; and Richard Blakey

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 20136 www.SeabreezeNurseries.com (239) 560-1422 WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY We can help! Ask about our Season Discount! Palms, Palms, natives, natives, crotons, crotons, bromeliads, bromeliads, buttery bushes, buttery bushes, & much more & much more Hortoons Brewery And Aquarium TripThe Kennedy Kruisers are off to beautiful Tampa to discover the wonders of this historic part of Florida. A bus excursion offered on Friday, October 11 will takes participants to the Yuengling Brewery, the oldest brewing company in the United States, where guests will learn the secrets of the time-honored tradition of beer making. Participants are then off to the Golden Corral for a lavish buffet lunch that is included in the price of the trip, which is $62 for members and $67 for non-members. The final destination is the Florida Aquarium, rated one of the Top 10 best aquariums in the country. The bus will leave Lake Kennedy Senior Center in Cape Coral at 8 a.m.; return time that evening is approximately 6:30 p.m. Preregistration is preferred by October 8. For reservations or additional information, call the Lake Kennedy Senior Center at 574-0575. Continental Womens Club MeetingContinental Womens Club of Fort Myers meets the first Thursday of every month at Colonial Country Club. The October 3 meeting will feature a talk by Carol Rooksby of the Lee County Genealogical Society. She will talk about How to Begin Your Family History Journey. The meeting starts at 11:30 a.m. followed by a noon luncheon. Cost for lunch is $19. This club is for those who enjoy getting together with women interested in social and philanthropic activities. The members raise monies for various charities throughout the year and also offer such outings as Lunch Bunch, Dining Out, Book Club, Bridge and Bunko. Yearly membership is $19. For more information contact Margie Connor, 5618973. Lee County Library System Tweaks Borrower PoliciesAs always, library cards are free to residents, Lee County property owners or people who work or go to school in Lee County. In September, several small changes went into effect for Lee County Library System card holders. All new or renewed library accounts must be in the legal name of the person whether child or adult. Adults age 18 and older applying for library cards must provide photo identification, birth date and proof of current address. The adult library cards must be renewed every two years and in person with photo identification and proof of current address. The library offers visitor cards and reciprocal borrowing cards for adults who are not eligible for a free library card for a fee. Children and teens under age 18 applying for library cards must provide identification such as a birth certificate or other official document. Childrens and teens library cards must be renewed every two years as well. To renew a card the child or teens parent or legal guardian must be present with photo identification and the child or teen must a have identification such as a birth certificate or other official document. If the parent or legal guardian owes $10 or more on their own library account, the child or teen will be issued a Limited card, which limits check outs to two items. Children and teens who visit the library without a parent or legal guardian may apply for Limited card with name identification. Also beginning in September, library accounts with fines and/or fees of $10 or more will incur an additional recovery fee which will be added to the account. Contact Telephone Reference at 479-4636 if you have questions about library cards or a library account. A library card enables a borrower to check out up to 50 items at once. However, only seven of each audio visual (AV) type are allowed out at one time. This applies to AV items such as DVDs/Blu-rays, music CDs and Books on CD. The length of borrowing time varies by item. Library card holders may also check out ebooks, e-audio books, e-magazines and take online classes all at no charge. Dont have a Lee County Library System library card? Getting one is free and easy. Visit leelibrary.net to apply online, or stop by any branch. Information about Lee County Library System is available for your convenience 24/7 at leelibrary.net where you can find out about library services, programs, locations, view an online events calendar or place a hold on library items. Telephone reference is available at 479-INFO (4636). Read us online at IslandSunNews.com To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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7 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 VCBS erves Up R estaurant Week Celebrating Local, S ustainable FareThis fall, The Beaches of Fort Myers & Sanibel whips up its 2nd annual Restaurant Week offering interactive culinary experiences, local libations, farm tours and overnight hotel packages. Restaurant Week, which is a 10-day culinary celebration, runs October 11 to 20. It highlights local producers and sellers of the countys sustainable culinary delights. More than 40 restaurants throughout Lee County will prepare three-course prix fixe menus for lunch and dinner. There will also be one-of-a-kind chef-curated culinary experiences such as hydroponic farm tours, as well as exclusive wine tastings tours and cooking demonstrations. Restaurant Week provides a wonderful venue to show the local community and visitors how we support one another, said Tamara Pigott executive director of the Lee County Visitor & Convention Bureau (VCB). The Beaches of Fort Myers & Sanibel is dedicated to sustainability and this is an ideal way for people to experience the delicious tastes and flavors of our destination, enjoy our beautiful scenery and see how we fuel each others economies. This year, the VCB, which organizes the feast-fest, anticipates Restaurant Week will please anyone on a culinary quest. Here are the bureaus recommendations for dontmiss opportunities during the event. 11, 3 to 6 p.m.; free admission Winter Park, Florida., via California, London and Paris. A recent James Beard nominee and Best Chef South semifinalist, he has won acclaim at Luma on Park (www. lumaonpark.com) and Prato (www.prato-wp.com) restaurants as an executive chef known for his innovation and local sourcing. He regularly travels to Lee County to shop for ingredients at Rabbit Run hydroponic farm in Buckingham and meet with Students will run guided tours of their Food Forest, a botanical garden highlighting local, edible plants. Area chefs will provide prepared samples, along with locally grown sprouts, heirloom produce, micro greens and sustainably harvested seafood available on October 12. per person inclusive Denise Muir leads a tour of her Rabbit Run Farm (www.rabbitrunfarmllc.com), introducing a variety of heirloom plants and the workings of a hydroponic system. Following the tour, Chef Kristina San Filippo will create dishes using Rabbit Run Farm edenwinery.com), and Buckingham Farms (buckingham-farms.com), on a tour that includes a bottle of wine, a farm-fresh, three-course lunch; raffle prizes and a gift bag. Participants can enjoy a u-pick farm experience, learn about hydroponics, shop for produce and locally made crafts, and find out more about whats growing in southwest Florida. Several chefs from area restaurants will demonstrate how they use local ingredients demo plate paired with a complimenting wine. Featured chefs include Jeff Acol, A visiting instructor; and Melissa Talmage, Sweet Melissas, Sanibel Island. Stay tuned to www.tastedeliciouslee.com to see what special dinners and other culinary experiences local chefs have planned and to grab your reservations for the best deals. For more information on Restaurant Week menus and events, visit www.tastedeliciouslee.com. For more information on The Beaches of Fort Myers & Sanibel, visit www.FortMyersSanibel.com. S S W A M S, F M Brf, FLFLORIDAPIRATECRUISE.COM 800-776-3258S C P P Cf F Sr B$5 OFFWITH THE PURCHASE OF 2 FARES. NO OTHER OFFERS APPLY LIMIT 4 PEOPLE EXPIRES: 10/11/13 SUN13 S uperintendent T o S peak At M etro-M cGregor Kiwanis M eetingD employed by Collier County Public Schools. pgrabe@comcast.net or Kim Berghs at kim@unitedwaylee.org. A buffet lunch is availals and business professionals who would like to make an impact on the community through volunteering. Meetings are held every Tuesday at 11:30 a.m. at the Hilton pampered-pooch.com. Kiwanis Club of Fort Myers South can be found on Facebook or on the web at www.metro-mcgregor.com. Award Winning Film Festival R eturning I n November T November 2, for a seventh season. The Black Maria Film Festival is an international, award winning festival that has toured the nation for 32 years and is hosted by museums and colleges throughout the country showcasing independent and experimental film and video. The films include a variety of contemporary works drawn from the annual juried selection of award winning films and videos. The Black Maria is recognized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences as an Academy Awards qualifying festival for short films. S neak P review Of New M usical Discovery S eries At T he Alliance Tat the Foulds Theater on the Alliance campus. Based on the popular Musical Discovery Zone from the Symphonys Family Concerts, the Musical Discovery Series offers kids of all ages the chance to engage with musicians and their instruments in a fun, relaxed program. Admission is free and open to kids of all ages. a.m. with a Musical Discovery Zone, where kids meet musicians from the orchestra and can try their own hand at playing some instruments. It then moves into the theater for a brief presentation by the musicians of different pieces and stylings for their instrument, followed by a question-and-answer session. This months program offers a sneak preview of the new monthly series that will continued on page 20

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 20138 Along T he R iverOn Saturday, October 28, Alliance for the Arts presents its Musical Discovery Series from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. The event is held in the Foulds Theatre and is free to participants of all ages. Meet musicians from the Gulf Coast Symphony in the interactive event that introduces musical instrument groups and sounds, and gives kids the chance to play the instruments themselves. Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers near the Colonial intersection. Call 939-2787 or go to www.artinlee.org. Also on Saturday, The Edison & Ford Winter Estates presents a quilting and stitchery demonstration from 10 a.m. to noon. The demonstration is included in Edison Ford complete tour admission and is free to members. Items will be available for purchase. Both the Edison and Ford families collected handmade quilts, embroidered linens and other textiles. Continuing the tradition, members of the Southwest Florida Quilters Guild and Southwest Embroidery Guild meet monthly at Edison Ford to demonstrate their work and answer questions. In the warmer months, the members meet inside the Edison Caretakers House and in the more temperate months, activity moves outdoors to the porches of the historic homes. The Edison & Ford Winter Estates is located at 2350 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers. Call 334-7419 or go to www.edisonfordwinterestates.org. On Saturday night, the Car Cruise-In returns to downtown Fort Myers historic River District. The monthly event is scheduled for 5 to 8 p.m. on the fourth Saturday and is free to the public. All classic cars and show cars welcome. A DJ spins classic rock with trivia. Heavy rain or overall nasty weather will typically cancel the outdoor event; light rain will not. For more information, go to www.myriverdistrict.com. If you appreciate the beauty of downtown Fort Myers historic River District, take a tour of one of Fort Myers oldest homes The Burroughs Home. Walk among live oaks and lush gardens, relax in a rocking chair on the veranda as you watch the river roll gently by....but, first, join Mona and Jettie Burroughs as they share the history and colorful tales of living in the home. Built in 1901, this Georgian Revival mansion was the scene of many social events that hosted the Fort Myers elite including the Edisons, Fords and Firestones. Antique furnishings, historical artifacts and delightful tales of growing up as the privileged daughters of wealthy businessman Nelson Burroughs and his wife Adeline await visitors who want to take a step back in time. Tours are offered Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Prices are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors and $5 for children ages 6 to 12. No need for reservations unless you have a group of 10 or more. Box lunches are offered at $10 and require 24-hour advance notice. The Burroughs Home is located at 2505 First Street, Fort Myers in the historic River District. Call 337-0706 or go to www.burroughshome.com. On Wednesdays, take the Working Waterfront Walking Tour with Ostego Bay Marine Science Center on Fort Myers Beach. The tour begins from 10 a.m. and includes a one-and-a-half hour guided visit at the museum which contains a touch tank, a hands-on beach area and several aquariums and exhibits. The tour continues with a visit to the commercial fishing industry, including Erickson & Jensen Supply House, Trico Shrimp loading dock and Beach Seafood. See how the boats are unloaded, the trawl doors are built, the shrimp nets are hand-sewn, the seafood is processed, and other important factors used in this unique million dollar industry; a memorable experience. The cost for the tour is $15 per adult and $10 for children seven years of age and older. Reservations are required. Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center located at 718 Fishermans Wharf on San Carlos Island on Fort Myers Beach. Call 765-8101 or go to www.ostegobay.org. Meet musicians from the Gulf Coast Symphony at the Foulds Theatre at Alliance for the Arts on Saturday morning See classic cars at the Car Cruise-In in the historic downtown Fort Myers River District. The event is free. JACARANDAThe Entertainment Nightly in Sanibels Social Scene1223 PERIWINKLE WAY, SANIBEL 472-1771 Happy Apps $5.95Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna, Crispy Fried Calamari, Chilled Oysters, Steamed Shrimp, BBQ Beef Satays, Mussels Marinara, Chicken WingsSanibels Best HAPPY HOUR5 7 p.m. Nightly in the lounge1/2 Price DrinksCall & Well Liquor, Draft Beer Selections, Select House Wine Please visit our River Weekly News online advertisers at www.islandsunnews.com. You can click through to their Web sites for more information about real estate, shopping, restaurants and services. Just click on the logos surrounding the front page. S hare your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702or email press@riverweekly.com

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9 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 Fill Our Fleet To Feed The Hungry The Harry Chapin Food Bank, Publix and LeeTran set a new record by collecting 166,399 pounds of food in Lee County during the 5th annual Fill Our Fleet to Feed the Hungry food drive on September 15. LeeTrans 140 volunteers helped load buses at 34 Publix stores, while more than 100 volunteers helped unload the buses at the Harry Chapin Food Bank warehouse. The goal had been to collect 100,000 pounds of food, topping last years collection of 76,000 pounds. The food will be sorted, organized, and distributed free of charge to the food banks 150 partner agencies in Lee, Hendry, Glades, Charlotte and Collier counties. The food drive also netted $2,510.16 in cash donations, which will enable the food bank to distribute more than $15,000 of additional food to families. Volunteers included members of 4H Clubs, Girl Scout Troops, the Greater Fort Myers Kiwanis, Youngs Electrical, Edison State College nursing students, Robs Crew, Estero Key Club, the FGCU womens basketball team, Soul Food Ministries and Southwest Airlines. The News-Press Media Group sponsored the event, and Beasley Broadcasting radio stations (96 K-Rock, Sunny 106.3, B103.9, ESPN 99.3 and The Link 96.5) promoted the event and was on location at Publix stores during the food drive. Thanks were given to LeeTrans Joann Haley, Steve Myers, staff and volunteers, Publix staff and customers, and the generous community for making this years Fill Our Fleet To Feed The Hungry such an overwhelming success. For additional information about or to contribute financially to the Harry Chapin Food Bank, call 334-7007 or go to www.harrychapinfoodbank.org. Denise Paul making a donation at the University Crossing Publix Megan Mathis and Jennifer Krutky Members of the 4-H Club and Steve Myers, Lee Tran Transit Director Shell Point Invites Southwest Florida Residents, Visitors To Holiday BazaarKick off your holiday shopping with the Shell Point Crafters Group at their 8th annual Holiday Bazaar on Friday and Saturday, November 1 and 2, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. More than 60 booths will be set up on the first and second floors of The Woodlands Commons and will feature a large assortment of quality crafts for sale. All of the items are handmade by the residents of Shell Point, and include intricate wood sculptures, handbags, pottery, toys, books, paintings, jewelry, cards and much more. This years bazaar will also feature holiday items, home decorations, childrens clothes and candy. After shopping, guests can visit one of Shell Points four onsite restaurants to enjoy a light snack or a full lunch. Barbara Hilton, chairperson of the craft show, is pleased to welcome the public to view and purchase items created by the many talented crafters at Shell Point Retirement Community. There are several new participants this year, and it will be the largest bazaar in the events eight-year history. The annual Holiday Bazaar has become a very popular event, and it continues to grow with each year due to the support of the community, said Hilton. We are so excited to offer such great items for purchase that you wont find in a department store, and the prices cant be beat, she added. The 2013 Shell Point Holiday Bazaar is free and open to the public. If you would like to receive additional information about the bazaar, call Melody Desilets at 4542290. Shell Point resident Roger Ruth displays his wood craftsmanshipCall for departure time CAPTIVACRUISES H T H E I S L A N D S H THE BEST WAY TO SEE THE ISLANDS IS FROM THE WATER Cruises depart from beautiful Captiva Island To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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Churches/TemplesALL F aA ITHS UNIT aA RI aA N CONGREG aA TION (UU A) Where diversity is treasured 2756 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers Summer program: Understanding the Faiths of Our Worlds June 2 to August 25 11 a.m. Interim Minister, Rev. Margaret Beard, begins on September 1 239-226-0900. www.allfaiths-uc.org A LLLL SS A INTSINTS BYZA NTINENTINE RITERITE CA THOLITHOLI C C HH U RR C HH 10291 Bayshore Rd., N. Fort Myers Divine Liturgy is on Sun. at 10:30 a.m.; Rosary begins at 10 a.m. Lenten services (Presanctied Liturgy) will be on Wed. evenings at 6 p.m. starting on Feb. 22. Administrator is Very Rev. Peter Lickman, ph. 305-651-0991. We are a Church of the Eastern Catholic or Byzantine Rite, 1.5 mi. east of Int. 75. A NNNN U NN C II A TIONTION GREEGREE K ORTHOORTHO D OO X C HH U RR C HH 8210 Cypress Lake Dr ive, Fort Myers Reverend Fr. George P. Savas Orthros Service Sunday 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy Sunday 10 a.m. www.annunciation.fl.goarch.org 239-481-2099 B ETHETH SHILOHSHILOH M ESSIESSI A NINI C SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 15675 McGregor Boulev ard, 437-3171 Rabbi: Judah Hungerman Friday Service, 8 p.m., Saturday Service, 11 a.m. Shabbat School Saturday Morning, Adult Hebrew Classes. Call for information on full program. B RERE AD OO F LILI F EE M INISTRIESINISTRIES C HH U RR C HH OO F GOGO D 16581 McGregor Boule vard, 267-3166 Just past the Tanger Outlet Mall Pastor: Barry Lentz, 281-3063 Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. C HH AB AD LL UB AV ITIT C HHO O F SS W F LORILORI D A ORTHOOR THO D OO X 5620 Winkler Road, F ort Myers Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz 433-7708, E-mail: rabbi@chabadswf.org Web site: www.chabadswf.org Services: Friday 6:30 p.m.; Saturday Kabbalah class 9 a.m.; Shacharit 10 a.m.; Kiddush at noon Minyan: Monday and Thursday 7 a.m. C HH AP ELEL OO F CYP RESSRESS C OO V EE 10200 Cypress Cov e Circle Fort Myers 239-850-3943, Located at Cypress Cove Retirement Center on HealthPark Campus An ecumenical non-denominational community of believers. Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. Reverendt Ted Althouse, Pastor revtedalthouse@aol.com C HH U RR C HH OO F THETHE C ROSSR OSS 13500 Freshman Lane; 768-2188 Pastor: Bud Stephens; A nondemonimational church emphasizing a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Sunday Service: 9:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 Contemporary. CONGREG aA TION aA L CH uU R cC H 1619 Lle wellyn Drive Fort Myers Just off McGregor across from the Edison/ Ford Winter Estates 334-4978 Pastor: Douglas Kelchner Worship times Sundays 9 and 10:30 a.m. Website: www.taecc.com CO vV EN aA NT PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937 Rev. Dr. Jeffrey DeYoe, Senior Pastor Reverend David Dietzel, Pastor Emeritus. Traditional Sunday service 10 a.m. Nursery available C ypYP RESS LakLAK E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H 8400 Cypress Lak e Drive, Fort Myers, 481-5442 Randy A. Alston, Reverend. Sunday Services: Bible study, 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship, 11 a.m., Evening Worship, 7 p.m., Wednesday Prayer Meeting, 6:30 p.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 481-3233. www.clpc.us. Clint Cottrell, pastor Prayer Service 8 a.m., Praise 9 a.m., Childrens Church 9 a.m., Traditional 11 a.m. Summer: Prayer Service 8 a.m. Combined Traditional/Praise 10 a.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E UNITE dD METHO dD IST CH uU R cC H 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 482-1250, 8 and 11 a.m. Sunday Traditional Service 9:30 a.m. Praise Service Sunday School all times F aA ITH FELLO wW SHI pP wW ORL dD O uU TRE acA C H mM INISTRIES 6111 South P ointe Boulevard, Fort Myers, 278-3638. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Voice of Faith, WCRN 13.50 AM Radio, Sunday, 1:30 p.m.; Thursday Service, 7:30 p.m.; Friday Youth Service, 7:30 p.m. Nursery care for pre-school children and Childrens Church for ages 5-12 available at each service. F aA ITH uU NITE dD mM ETHO dD IST cC H uU R cC H 15690 McGregor Boule vard Fort Myers, 482-2030 Pastor: David Stauffer. Traditional services 8:45 a.m.; Contemporary, 10:30 a.m. Go south on McGregor Boulevard. The church is mile past the intersection of Gladiolus and San Carlos Boulevard on the way to Sanibel. FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF cC HRIST S cC IENTIST 2390 West First Street, next door to Edison Estates. Sunday Morning Service and Sunday School, 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday Evening Testimony Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Child care provided at all services. Visit our Reading Room for quiet study at: 2281 First Street, River District. www.time4thinkers.com, www.christiansciencefortmyers.com, www.christianscience.com FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF THE NazaNAZA RENE 13545 Amer ican Colony Boulevard off Daniels Parkway in the Colony, Fort Myers, 936-2511 Pastor: Reverend Joey Brummett Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Family Night, 7 p.m. F IRSTIRST U NITENITE D M ETHOETHO D ISTIST C HH U RR C HH in the Downto wn Fort Myers River District 2466 First Street, Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-332-1152, www.fumcftmyers.org Sunday: 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 5 p.m. Youth Program FORT M yY ERS CHRISTI aA N CH uU R cC H (DIS cC I pP LES O fF CHRIST) A SS TE pP HEN MINISTRIES CONGREG aA TION 5916 Winkler Road, F ort Myers, 437-4330 Reverend Mark Condrey, Pastor Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Church School: 9:15 a.m. FORT M yY ERS CONGREG aA TION aA L UNITE dD CH uU R cC H O fF CHRIST : 8210 College Parkway, Fort Myers, 482-3133. Philip White, pastor Morning Worship: 10 a.m. Church School: 10:15 a.m. Adult Forum: 11:30 a.m. II ON aA HH O pP E EpEP IS cC O paP A L cC ONGREG aA TION 9650 Gladiolus Dr ive, Fort Myers 4544778 The Reverend Dr. John S. Adler, pastor. Weekly services: Saturday 5 p.m., Eucharist with Healing Sunday 8 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite One; 9:30 a.m., Family Eucharist with Healing and Church School Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Morning Prayer (in Spanish); Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Eucharist with Healing. Child care available at Saturday 5 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m. services. JES uU S THE WOR kK ER C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H: 881 Nuna Avenue, Fort Myers, 481-1143 Masses Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. K INGING D OO M LILI F EE C HH U RR C HH 2154 McGregor Boulev ard, Fort Myers, 218-8343 Pastor Randy and Anita Thurman 10:30 a.m. Sunday Service All are welcome. LambLAMB O fF GG O dD LuLU THER aA N/ EpEP IS cC O paP A L CH uU R cC H Corner Cypress View Drive and Koreshan Boulevard, Three Oaks area, Fort Myers, 267-3525 Walter Fohs, pastor; Becky RobbinsPenniman, associate pastor Sunday worship services: 8 a.m. Early Grace Traditional 9 a.m. Awesome Grace Contemporary 10:30 a.m. Classic Grace Traditional 8:45 & 10 a.m. Sunday School Gods Group NN E wW BEGINNINGS CENTER Ne w Home Church, 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, North Fort Myers, 239-656-0416 Weekly Friday Meeting Meet & Greet: 6:30 p.m. Kingdom Teaching: 7 p.m. Fellowship and refreshments after service. nbcministry@embarqmail.com, www.facebook. com/nbcministry. Alex & Patricia Wiggins, Ministers NENE W C OO V ENEN A NTNT EE Y ESES C HH U RR C HH See Clearly Meeting monthly at 9 a.m. at the Elks Lodge. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, Fort Myers, FL 33907. 239-220-8519 Pastor Alan Bondar www.newcovenanteyes.com Wear what you want, rockin music, relevant teaching, LIFT Kidz program, free coffee & donuts, people who are real, church thats actually fun. NN E wW HH O pP E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H O fF FOR T M yY ERS 16120 San Car los Boulevard, Unit 10 239-985-8503 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m Sunday Morning Worship. 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study NN E wW HH O pP E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 3825 McGregor Boule vard. Fort Myers Pastors: Stu Austin and Howard Biddulph 8 & 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11 a.m. Contemporary Worship 8, 9:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School Youth and Childrens programming runs concurrent to Sunday services. Nursery care provided at all services 274-1230. For more information visit: www.newhopefortmyers.org P EE A C EE CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H Meets at F ort Myers Beach Masonic Lodge 17625 Pine Ridge Road, Fort Myers Beach 267-7400. Pastors Bruce Merton, Gail & RC Fleeman Adult Discussion Classes: 9-10 AM Countdown to Worship (praise music): 10:10 AM Amazing Grace Worship: 10:30 AM Phone 267-7400 Fax 267-7407 Web site: peacecommunitychurch.com e-mail: peace1265@aol.com P EE A C EE LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH Sunday Worship at 9:30am. Peace is a member of the ELCA. We celebrate weekly communion with traditional liturgy, organ and choir. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers On the way to Sanibel. 239-437-2599, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@peaceftmyers.com. RE dD EE mM ER L uU THER aA N cC H uU R cC H 3950 Winkler Ext., Fort Myers, 274-0143 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. Sunday Services Daily early learning center/day care RIRI V ERER OO F LILI F EE A SSESSE MB LL Y OO F GOGO D 21580 Riv er Ranch Rd, Estero 239-495-0400, Senior Pastor: Todd Weston 8 and 9:45 a.m Services; 11:30 a.m. Legacy Service, multi-generational S amudAMUD R abadAB AD R aA buddB UDD HIST cC ENTER Meditation classes All are welcome. Guided meditations offering many methods for relaxing the body and focusing the mind on virtuous objects to bring increasing peace and happiness into daily activity. For information, class times and locations call 567-9739 or visit www. MeditationInFortMyers.org. SaSA INT COL umbkUMBK ILLE C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H 12171 Iona Road, F ort Myers, off McGregor and north of Gladiolus. 489-3973 Father Joseph Clifford. Weekly masses: Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. Weekend masses: Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday: 7, 9,11, and 5:30 p.m. Reconciliation is available at the church on Saturdays at noon and by appointment SaSA INT JOHN THE A pP OSTLE METRO pP OLIT aA N CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H 3049 Mcg regor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 344-0012 Pastor Reverend Steve Filizzi An Affirming & Inclusive Congregation Sunday Services, 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Mid-Week Service, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. SS A INTINT M II C HH A ELEL LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH & SS C HOOLHOOL ( LL CM SS ) 3595 Broadw ay, Fort Myers, 239-939-1218, Worship: Saturday 5:30 p.m., Sunday 8 & 10:45 a.m. Bible Study for adults and children Sunday at 9:15 a.m. Phone for other dates & times. Plus Marriage Enrichment, Divorcecare, Griefshare. SaSA INT PETER LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H 3751 Estero Boule vard, Fort Myers Beach, 463-4251. Sunday worship at 9:30 a.m. Womens Bible Study is offered on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 9:30 a.m. www.stpeterfmb.com SaSA INT NN I cC HOL aA S MON aA STER yY Church and Bookstore:111 Everg reen Road (southwest corner of Evergreen Road and Gail Street.) Liturgical services conducted in English and Church Slavonic; following the Julian (Old) Calendar. Liturgical Services: Sundays and Holy Days: Hours at 9:30 a.m. Holy Liturgy at 10 a.m. Call to confirm service schedule: 239-997-2847; Bookstore: 239-691-1775 or visit www.saintnicholasmonastery.org SS T VIN cC ENT DE P auAU L C aA THOLI cC CO mmuMMU NIT yY 13031 Palm Beach Blvd (3 miles east of I75) East Fort Myers (across from Ft Myers Shores) 239 693 0818 Weekday masses: 9 a.m. Tuesday-Friday Weekend masses: 4 p.m. Saturday Sunday 9 & 11 a.m. All Are Welcome! SS O uU TH wW EST bapB AP TIST cC H uU R cC H 16940 McGregor Boule vard, Fort Myers, 454-3336 Robert G. Kasten, Pastor Sunday Worship Service 11 a.m. Nursery available 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Junior Church grades one to five Wee Church Pre-K to K Evening Service 6 p.m. Wednsday Service 6 p.m. TETE MP LELE B ETHELETHEL SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 16225 Winkler Rd. 433-0018. Rabbi Jeremy Barras E-mail: rabbi.barras@templebethel.com Cantorial soloist: Lawrence Dermer Temple educator: Dale Cohen, MaEd, RJE Shabbat Services, Friday, 7:30 p.m. Torah Study, Saturday, 9:15 a.m.continued on page 11THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 201310

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11 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 From page 10Churches/TemplesReligious Education; Sunday School and Midweek classes, Preschool Classes, Monday through Friday Web site: www.templebethel.com Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TEMPLE JUDEA (CONSERVATIVE) 14486 A&W Bulb Road, Fort Myers, 433-0201, Rabbi: Rabbi Elyssa Auster President: Keith Grossman Minyan: Monday & Thursday at 9 a.m. Services: Friday night at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Religious School Sunday morning Web site: www.tjswfl.org Preschool director: JoAnn Goldman email templejudeapreschool@gmail.com 433-0201, Web site: www.tjswfl.org Affiliated: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism THE NEW CHURCH The New Church of SWFL is located 10811 Sunset Plaza Circ. #401, behind Zoomers. Rev. Gabriella Cahaley officiates worship services on Sundays at 11 a.m. during the season. Other worship events are held on the beach in Fort Myers Beach. See our webpage http://www.newchurchflorida.com/ or call for more information 239-481-5535. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH FORT MYERS 13411 Shire Lane (off Daniels Parkway one mile west of I-75) Minister: The Reverend Allison Farnum Sunday services and religious education at 10:30 a.m. For information on all church events call 561-2700 or visit www.uucfm.org. UNITY OF BONITA SPRINGS Family Service 10 to 11 a.m. Healing Circle 11 a.m. Hospitality and Fellowship, 11 a.m. Inspiring lesson, uplifting and dynamic music, meditation in a loving environment. Service held at 28285 Imperial Street, Bonita Springs. Call 947-3100. UNITY OF FORT MYERS 11120 Ranchette Rd., Fort Myers Summer Services: Sundays at 10 a.m. Childrens class at 10 a.m. Reverend Jim Rosemergy, Minister Our God is Love. Our Race is Human. Our Religion is Oneness. www.unityoffortmyers.org or 239-278-1511 WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 9065 Ligon Court, Fort Myers, across from HealthPark Hospital, 481-2125 Senior Pastor: Robert Brunson Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Blended Worship www.westminsterfortmyers.org WORD OF LIFE CHURCH 2120 Collier Ave, Fort Myers, 274-8881; Services: Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. Bishop Gaspar and Michele Anastasi ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH 7401 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, 481-4040, Interim Pastor Jim Eggert Pastor Peter Weeks Sunday Services: 8:30 a.m. Traditional; 10 a.m. Blended Traditional and Contemporary; 11:30 a.m. Contemporary. Childrens Sunday School, Adult /Teen Bible Classes, 10 a.m. Christian Academy Annual LuncheonThe public is invited to attend the annual luncheon meeting of Ebenezer Christian Academy, an after school program in Fort Myers for children in grades K through 12. The event is scheduled to begin at 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, October 5 at 2420 Highland Avenue. Organizers are asking for a minimum donation of $5. Activities will include a silent auction to benefit the program and the naming of a Volunteer of the Year. The board of directors will recognize other volunteers and donors and present the executive committee. Dr. Michelle Cort-Mora, an assistant principal at Trafalgar Middle School in Cape Coral, is the keynote speaker. She volunteers at the Academy continued on page 19 The Salvation Army Is In Need Of Furniture And ClothingThe trucks going out to stock The Salvation Armys Family Thrift Stores are nearly empty. Donations of used goods to the charity typically slow in the summer months, but this year, September has shown a marked decline. All proceeds from thrift store sales fund The Salvation Armys Crossroads program, a six-month drug and alcohol rehabilitation center for men. If the thrift stores are unable to make money, this life-saving program is at risk. Crossroads is a faith-based residential program to help men struggling with drug and alcohol addiction. Up to 38 men at one time can be enrolled in Crossroads, where they receive therapy, addiction counseling, spiritual guidance, life skills training, help with GED or continuing education, employment skills and training, assistance finding housing, and much more. As part of the work therapy component of the program, the men in Crossroads help collect, sort, repair and distribute donated items to The Salvation Armys three local Family Thrift Stores. The income from these stores turns right around and fully funds the Crossroads program expenses. Donate your gently used furniture, housewares, bedding, bikes, kitchen items, jewelery, clothing, and shoes to The Salvation Army. Also accepted are electronics in working condition, tools, sporting goods, cars, boats and motorcycles. These items can be dropped off at any Salvation Army location, or you can call 337-0955 and schedule a pickup of large items. The Salvation Army still makes house calls. Your donation of furniture, clothing and household items will change lives and help those in the grip of addiction find help, hope and a second chance at life. For more information, call 278-1551 or visit www.salvationarmyleecounty.org. Stockings 4 Kids Kicking Off, Seeks SponsorsSantas elves are starting early! For the fifth year, local business consultant Lee Knapp is rallying the community to make Christmas dreams come true for local, less fortunate children through Stockings 4 Kids, a United Way partner organization. Founder of the organization, Knapp started Stockings 4 Kids, a 501c3 organization, with a desire to give every child a happy Christmas morning, something she feels every child deserves. Christmas is my favorite time of year and the thought of a child having nothing to open on that special morning is heartbreaking, she explained. Stockings 4 Kids brings local businesses, adults and children together to provide a beautiful Christmas stocking filled with wonderful surprises to 1,500 less fortunate children in the area. For some children it may be the only gift they receive. Preparations of the 5th annual Stockings 4 Kids effort are already underway and sponsors are being actively sought to help fund the project. In order to meet the 1,500-stocking goal, Knapp needs to raise $20,000. Each beautiful nineteen inch Christmas stocking costs $12 including the stocking itself and all gifts inside it. Businesses, individuals and families are invited to make a tax-deductible donation to help fund Stockings 4 Kids. There are two sponsorship levels Santa and Elf. To provide a Santa sponsorship, donors are asked to contribute $1,200, which will fill 100 stockings. To provide an Elf sponsorship, the donation is $600, which will fill 50 stockings. Donations of any kind are accepted and appreciated. All donations should be made out to United Way of Lee County with a note that the donation is designated for Stockings 4 Kids. United Mechanical, Inc. is a major sponsor, providing and decorating their warehouse space as Santas Workshop. Santas Workshop is where Kids Helping Kids will take place on December 7 and 8. Young children volunteers will be the elves responsible for stuffing the 1,500 stockings for other children, a true example of kids helping kids and sharing the magic of Christmas. For more information, to donate or become a sponsor for Stockings 4 Kids, contact Lee Knapp at stockings4kids@ gmail.com or call 481-8557 or 8980941. To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 201312 ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint Prices ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Your Bottom Your Bottom Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices 1 The First Feel Of Fall Is In The Airby Capt. Matt MitchellFor the first time in months, our morning low temperatures and humidity took a little break and things finally felt a bit cooler. Daytime highs were still hot but its always refreshing to feel the first little signs that cooler temperatures are on the way. After a long hot summer, cooler temperatures and the change of season will be welcome. The timing for our first cold front is generally in November or early December, though some years its earlier or later. Once that first cold front pushes through, it seems we get on 7to 10-day pattern of cold fronts passing through. Once our water temperatures drop into the mid 70s fishing really goes off. With the change of season, fall fishing will bring some great action, often some of the fastest paced of the year. Huge amounts of bait fish show up all through our area along with the migrating species that follow as everything makes its way south for winter. Resident gamefish such as snook will begin to pack on pounds, feeding hard on whitebait before things get cold. This week marked the first time since the end of spring that I started to switch it up and fish with whitebait again. In places where I have been catching pinfish in the cast net, shiners have just started to show up. Fishing with live shiners always makes for some great visual surface strikes. Although the fish have not completely switched over to a shiner pattern yet, its started and will happen in the next few weeks. Redfish action continues to be the best bite in town with lots of redfish being caught on just about every trip. Often for the first few hours of a trip we have spent our time catching other species while waiting for the tide to get up high enough to target redfish. That often entails going out on the flats for trout, ladyfish, mackerel and sharks, then fishing some deeper mangrove channels for gag grouper, a few snook and jacks. I did not run into any low water schools of redfish this week in the southern sound as most mornings seemed to be more on the choppy side than last week, making the redfish harder to spot Once the tide got up about half way I would move on to mangrove fish. The bite would often start out a little slow then pick up as the tide got higher. This often meant finishing up a trip hot, which is never a bad thing. Redfish up to 31 inches were caught mangrove fishing in the southern sound this week along with a great mixed bag of other species. Mixed in with the redfish were some snook, big mangrove snappers, a few 4to 5-pound trout and even a 30-inch barracuda. Small freelined pinfish, tail-hooked, were the bait of choice. These fish were often out from the mangroves during the middle stage of the incoming tide then as the tide got higher the fish would push up tighter to the tres. With our tides flipping over by the end of the week we will have great early morning high tides giving anglers lots of options. Oyster bars in the middle sound were also good places to target redfish on the higher water. During high water periods, many were holding good numbers of hungry redfish. This action was at polar opposites: not a bite or as many redfish as you wanted to catch. The key was to keep fishing and moving bar to bar until you located them. One day one bar would be on fire then the next day it would be a different bar. These schools of redfish are on the move and to get on them usually means fishing a lot of different spots to find them. Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions email captmattmitchell@aol.com. Send Us Your Fish TalesThe River Weekly would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include photographs with identification. Drop them at the River Weekly, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, Florida 33901, or email to press@riverweekly.com. This mother and daughter team from Nebraska caught lots of keeper redfish while fishing with Capt. Matt Mitchell this week 472-5800 Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702 or email press@riverweekly.com Bird Patrol At Bunche BeachExperience the Beautiful Birds of Bunche Beach with a bird patrol guide on Saturday, October 19 from 8 to 10 a.m. Bunche Beach is excellent for both migrant and resident waders and shorebirds working the mudflats at low tide due to the diversity of micro-invertebrates. Also seen may be waterfowl, raptors and warblers. Participants will meet on the beach located in South Fort Myers, off of Summerlin Road. Drive south of John Morris Road until it deadends. Provided in cooperation with Lee County Parks and Recreation, this event is free with the parking fee of $1 per hour (tour is approximately two hours long). Restrooms are available in the building at the first parking lot. Bring binoculars, sun protection, shoes that can get wet, a bottle of drinking water, your curiosity and a love of nature. For more information, call 707-3015 or visit www.birdpatrol.org.

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13 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 We Proudly Brew Tropial Outdoor Patio Seating Get Crabby At The Cow Get Crabby At The Cow with our Famous Stone Crabs1/2 lb & Best Prices On The Planet Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Come Try our NEW Cowlicious Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials Sanibels Most Award Winning Restaurant LIVE Famous Stone Crabs Famous Stone Crabs Always Fresh ...Always! ...Always! with our with our Always Fresh ...Always Fun! Always Fresh ...Always Fun! CROW Case Of The Week Cattle Egretby Patricia MolloyBull riding has been called the most dangerous eight seconds in sports. For the cattle egret (Bubulcus ibis), it is a daily pastime. Frequently seen riding on the backs of grazing cattle, picking ticks from their hides, these avians arrived in North America from Africa in 1953. Also found in Asia, Australia, Europe and South America, they spend their days quietly foraging alongside rhinos, camels, ostriches and beach-bound shell collectors, eating the insects stirred up by slow-moving livestock and herds of wild animals. The cattle egret is more terrestrial than other members of the heron family and well-adapted to urban areas. Possessing an unusually large range, the mediumsize bird is easily distinguished by its short orange legs and stocky white body. Earlier this month, a downed cattle egret was admitted to CROW. The bird was extremely thin and is currently on strict cage rest. Hes doing better with eating since we increased the number of feedings throughout the day, said Katie McInnis, one of CROWs DVM interns. He still seems really depressed and not willing to walk around regularly, but he may not feel well enough yet. What we need to do, first thing every morning, is feed a couple of fish to him, before we do hospital rounds, then feed another fish or two to him right after rounds. Every hour, on the hour, all day long, Dr. Heather, CROWs hospital director, advised the staff. See if we can get some weight back on him, because weakness due to so much weight loss is most likely the problem. If you want to learn more about patient care at the Sanibel wildlife clinic, attend the special presentation Clinic Rounds on Thursday, October 3 from 11 a.m. to noon. The event is presented weekly by the CROW medical staff. Meet the veterinarian, rehabbers or students who will share insight about the innerworkings of CROWs hospital, which sees about 4,000 patients per year. CROWs Visitor Education Center is located at 3883 Sanibel Captiva Road on Sanibel. For more information, call 4723644 ext. 228 or visit www.crowclinic. org. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to P.O. Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit www.crowclinic.org. This cattle egret, patient #2538, is hand-fed a fish by Thea

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 201314 Plant SmartI ndian H awthornby Gerri R eavesIndian hawthorn (Rhaphiolepis indica) is a low-growing ornamental shrub that is native to Southern China and India. As a member of the rose family, it is a relative of the loquat, quince and apple. Low maintenance and slow growth add to its popularity. Because it typically reaches only three or feet tall, it makes a good low border or mass planting. Deemed Florida-friendly, it has become a staple of Florida landscaping, partly because it remains short and doesnt require repeated trimming. It has a compact irregularly branched form. The evergreen leaves are about three inches long, leathery and serrated. Panicles of tiny fragrant five-petaled flowers range from white, to pinktinged, to deep pink, depending on the cultivar. Flowers bloom most profusely in spring and attract bees and butter flies. The purple-black berries called pomes attract birds. Indian hawthorn prefers full sun but will tolerate shade. It has moderate salt tolerance and water requirements. Give it a well-drained area and avoid over-watering. Sources: Waterwise: South Florida Landscape by South Florida Water Management District; Florida, My Eden by Frederic B. Stresau; Florida Landscape Plants by John V. Watkins and Thomas J. Sheehan; ifas.ufl.edu; and floridata.com. Plant Smart explores sustainable gardening practices that will help you create an environmentally responsible, low-maintenance South Florida landscape. Indian hawthorn remains only three to four feet high without repeated shearing The berries are a food source for birds, one reason the shrub is dubbed Florida-friendly Non-native Indian hawthorns small flowers bloom most profusely in spring photos by Gerri Reaves Caring For Your PlantsR ock P lantsby Justen DobbsDid you know that rock walls and water features can be adorned with tropical plants? Thanks to the thousands of tropical plants available for sale these days and our sub-tropical climate here in South Florida, the aver age homeowner now has many options with regard to landscaping, even in places you never before thought possible. Did you know that there are plants that literally grow right on rocks? This can be seen much more frequently in tropical countries in South America and Southeast Asia. A plant that is able to grow on rocks, without any soil, is a saxiphytic plant. These plants actually root onto the rocks simply for support while gathering their water and nutrients entirely through the leaves. Bromeliads are the most common type of plant that does this, but there are others as well, such as ferns, grasses, cycads, etc. While rock used in walls, water features, and other hardscape can be colorful and ornamental, it is always neat to add a splash of color to it as well. Sometimes growing plants on your rock features can have added benefits such as erosion control, a nesting place for small animals, and a great conversation piece for you and your guests. Go by your local nursery or shop online for epiphytic plants and, while they are not necessarily ubiquitous, they can be found if you search hard enough. Once you have your plant, you will want to secure it into your rock feature or hardscape. To do this, leave some soil on the roots (or whatever it was growing in), and stick the base of the plant into a crack or hole in your rock feature. Make sure the plant is facing upwards at least a little bit so that it can catch rain water and falling debris for food. Also make sure that the plant is very secure because our Florida thunderstorms can knock it off easily if we get a downpour. Lastly, check the plant often for the first few months to make sure it has not moved and also that it is pushing out new roots for support. If you secure your plant into a water fall or other feature connected to your pool or Jacuzzi, it must not get splashed too much by the chlorinated water that is cycling through. All pools and waterfalls that are not natural have some type of chlorine in them which will kill surrounding plants if they are splashed too much. Now your entire yard can be covered in tropical color and cascading plant life! Get creative. Move things around. See what does well and what doesnt in your yard thats part of the fun. Justen Dobbs is a landscape architect in south Florida specializing in custom, upscale landscapes. He can be reached at seabreezenurseries@gmail. com. These bromeliads have rooted to this rock wall and will form large, colorful clusters These colorful plants have been planted right into crushed shell; no soil needed

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15 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 From page 1Art WalkArts for ACT Gallery, David Acevedo and Xavier Brignoni of the former daas Gallery, Terry Tincher and Tanya Daigle of Space 39, John Pappas of the Art League of Fort Myers, Marcella Avila of the former Union Street Artists Company and representatives from the Sidney and Berne Davis Art Center, the Alliance for the Arts, ArtFest Fort Myers, Art of the Olympians, SW Florida Museum of History and Harborside Event Center. Additional Art Walk Committee members over the years included artist Stephen Gray-Blancett (Coloring The World Gallery) and Paul Rodino (In One Instant Gallery). Today, the downtown Fort Myers River District is home to at least seven art galleries, another seven shops that sell local artwork, and numerous restaurants, bars and businesses that partner with Art Walk to create a cultural destination like no other in Southwest Florida. For the anniversary celebration, the streets will be blocked off from 6 to 10 p.m. to accommodate a larger crowd. Besides the exciting art exhibits in the downtown galleries, several artists will set up tents on the street. Local theatre groups and arts organization will per form short scenes and vignettes on small stages. Those groups include Florida Repertory Theatre, Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre, Laboratory Theater of Florida, Young Artists Awards and Cultural Park Theatre Company. Additionally, street performers will include a fire dancer, stilt walkers, live art statues and performance artists. Beer and wine will be available for purchase on the street, thanks to volunteers from the local ACT Shelter. Key sponsors for the fifth anniver sary street party include Broadway Palm, Seminole Casino Immokalee, Budweiser, River District Alliance and the City of Fort Myers and the Community Redevelopment Agency. Many of the downtown businesses will be conducting raffles and giveaways and offer a variety of specials. Other activities will include: reception for new exhibit, Harvest of the Arts. Additionally, the league will have a community canvas for people to paint. Tara Phillips will again be doing face painting. Small art pieces will be raffled off that night, too. tion for Protese Proposa series by David Acevedo in the main gallery also showing off the main gallery will be Xavier Brignoni and Art of the DisAbled. Kiser. Nick Mettro will be on hand. exhibit by artists from the Pan American Alliance. collection of artwork featuring sculpted sculls, face masks wall art, wearable horns and hand-dyed art T-shirts; and a raffle for a chance to win art by Jeff and Dale Ocasio. Face painting and live art demonstration will be in front of the studio gallery. Hendry: Live artist demos by Greg Wiegand (copper wire sculptures) and Larry Garland (beach art water color paintings), Susan Cantwell (oil painting) and Marty Mirer (illuminated hand crafted flower arrangements. features digital surrealism art by Kathy Kuser and concert photography by Jamie Kuser. Kathy will also be set up in a tent on the street. The Blood Dimmed Tide, a solo exhibition of new photographic works by Florida artist Tony Myles opens. Incorporating complex photographic processes, Myles explores universal themes of dissolute order, loss, and societal decay. The exhibition continues through October 24. Opening for Dark Art 7 exhibit (in conis hosting a special opening for the occasion with new works by world renowned artist Marcus Jansen accompanied by DJ in an after party setting. For more information, contact Claudia Goode, at cgoode@actabuse.com or 3375050. R ead B etween T he Wines E and thrilling conversation with best-selling author Tami Hoag at Read Between The Wines. Hoag will be in Fort Myers on Friday, October 18 at the Colonial Country Club from 6 to 8 p.m. Hardcopies of her latest release, The 9th Girl, will be available for sale and autographing. Tickets are $50. Ticket sales close at midnight on October 14. Purchase tickets at www. ReadBetweenTheWines.info. International best-selling suspense author Tami Hoag first hit The New York Times best-seller list with Night Sins and each of her books since has been a best-seller. She will talk about her experiences during her 25-year writing career and how she creates and relates to her characters and answer questions from the audience. This will be an intimate evening in the round with a thrilling discussion. Exquisite wines, chef carved sweet chile glazed salmon, bruschetta, assorted cheeses, gourmet crackers and tropical fruit will be served. Read Between The Wines is sponsored by the News-Press, Masciarelli Wines and Books-A-Million. All proceeds go to fund the Southwest Florida Reading Festival. For more information, call 5334826. Local E mployees Collect Food For H arry Chapin Food B ankPaychex, Inc. employees participated in a United Way Day of Caring by collecting food for Harry Chapin Food Bank. Harry Chapin Food Bank is a United Way Partner Agency. In August, Paychex employees conducted a food drive in their office and delivered 415 pounds of food to Harry Chapin Food Bank. Bret Lutsky, Paychex branch manthink of those that are less fortunate than us. Im really proud of our branch and the amount of charitable activities that we participate in. Cliff Smith, president of the United Way of Lee, Hendry, and Glades said, Because of community minded companies like Paychex, our partner agencies benefit from Day local food pantries and to people who really need it. Thank you very much for giving back to our community. The United Ways Days of Caring is a year-round program that connects businesses with nonprofit agencies in need of assistance. Businesses have many choices as they community, degree of physical labor and time commitment. You can reach The United Way Volunteer Center by calling 433-2000 ext. 260. Paychex, Inc. employees collected food for Harry Chapin Food Bank rf ntbnrr bb bb rtttn Loved this restaurant. Fantastic experience. Food was exceptionally amazing. Service was outstanding. TripAdvisor Member, May 2013

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Upcoming Production By Ghostbird Theatre CompanyGhostbird Theatre Company will present Woyzeck, a play by Georg Bchner at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center from October 16 through 20. Founded in May 2012, Ghostbird Theatre Company serves as the resident theater company of the Davis Art Center. Woyzeck lives in a provincial German town where he makes a living by subjecting himself to medical experiments and performing menial jobs. As Woyzecks mental health deteriorates, he begins to experience apocalyptic visions which drive him over the edge. Bchners unfinished tragedy of 1837 sustains a deeply contemporary, harrowing and uncompromising vision of power and submission. The Ghostbird production of Woyzeck is directed by Barry Cavin, theater professor and chair of the Department of Visual and Performing Arts at Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU). Cavin has had a lengthy career as a director and as theater artistic administrator as well as a teacher of acting and directing. His principal professional focus is directing and designing works for the stage. He has directed and designed over 40 fully produced plays during his career, and has produced more than a dozen works for the FGCU community. At FGCU, Cavin writes, directs and designs his own original conceptual work. Performances are on Wednesday through Friday, October 16 through 18 at 8 p.m; Saturday, October 19 at 2 p.m.; and Sunday, October 20 at 8 p.m. The box office opens one hour before the play, and doors to the theater open a half hour before the play. Tickets are $10 and are available through the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center Box Office at 333-1933 or online at www.sbdac.com. The art center is at 2301 First Street in the downtown Fort Myers River District. THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 201316 Theatre Conspiracy Celebrates 20th S easonTheatre Conspiracy is proud to announce its 20th anniversary season of premiere shows at the Foulds Theatre, Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Beginning with the a world premiere production from its Annual New Play Contest and finishing with a Florida premiere, this years lineup is full of award winning plays never before seen in the area. Each year, we try to provide audiences a unique theatrical experience, said Producing Artistic Director Bill Taylor. None of these shows have been done in the area before. It is a very exciting year for us in many ways. We are also bringing in some professional actors from outside the area. Kim Crow, who was seen in Wit at Florida Repertory Theatre will be performing in Becky Shaw. Also we are negotiating with gentleman who originated one of the roles in Beauty Queen Of Leenane and you cant beat our price for season subscriptions this year! To celebrate the 20th anniversary season Theatre Conspiracy is discounting its regular season subscription price by more than 20 percent. You can get five shows for $72 or four shows for $60. Individual tickets are $20 each. Performances are Thursday, Friday and Saturdays at 8 p.m. with one Sunday matinee for each show at 2 p.m. Tickets can be purchased by calling Theatre Conspiracys box office at 9363239 or by visiting www.theatreconspiracy.org. Theatre Conspiracy is proud to continue its mission to produce and promote the work of the next generation of talented American playwrights. The theatre is a very difficult business for anyone involved but even more so for playwrights. The opportunities that were once present for having new works produced have, over time, continually declined. By producing new works, Theatre Conspiracy is not only providing a venue that will bring them to life, but helps create a more promising future for theatre in America by providing a more nurturing environment for the greatest asset theatre can have: great playwrights. Theatre Conspiracy is a 501(c)(3) non-profit Florida corporation, headed by Producing Artistic Director Bill Taylor. Funding is derived from ticket sales, advertising sales and donations. During its 19 years, it has been described as innovative, exciting, daring, and a treasured member of the areas theatrical community. October 18 to November 2. Matinee on October 27 at 2 p.m. All My Raisins In The Son by John Twomey Winner of Theatre Conspiracys 15th annual new play contest, All My Raisins In The Son tackles high school or at least the teachers. An eager new teacher gets quite the education when confronted with the quirky personalities and deadly serious politics of the public high school teachers lounge. November 22 to December 15. Matinee on December 15 at 2 p.m. Becky Shaw by Gina Gionfriddo Winner of the Barrymore Award for outstanding play, Becky Shaw was described by The New York Times as being as engrossing as it is ferociously funny, like a big box of fireworks fizzing and crackling across the stage from its first moments to its last. When Suzanna decides to set her best friend Max up on a blind date with her husbands mysterious co-worker, Becky Shaw, she sets into motion a series of cataclysmic events forever changing all of their lives. Mixing sharp wit and humor with the taut suspense of a psychological thriller, Becky Shaw is a comedy of romantic errors that keeps audiences at the edge of their seats guessing what will happen next. January 3 to 25. Matinee on January 19 at 2 p.m. Relatively Speaking, three one-act comedies by Ethan Coen, Elaine May and Woody Allen. Four-time Oscar winner Ethan Coen and two-time Oscar nominee Elaine May join with Woody Allen for a one-of-a-kind evening of entertainment. In Talking Cure, Ethan Coen uncovers the sort of insanity that can only come from family. In George Is Dead, Elaine May explores the hilarity of death. In Honeymoon Motel, Woody Allen invites you to the sort of wedding day you wont forget. February 7 to February 23. February 23 Matinee at 2 p.m. The Beauty Queen Of Leenane by Martin McDonough Set in the mountains of Connemara, County Galway, The Beauty Queen Of Leenane tells the darkly comic tale of Maureen Folan, a plain and lonely woman in her early forties, and Mag, her manipulative aging mother, whose interference in Maureens first and possibly final chance of a loving relationship sets in motion a train of events that leads inexorably towards the plays terrifying dnouement. March 14 to 29. Matinee on March 23 at 2 p.m. The Whale by Obie Award winner Samuel D. Hunter Since the death of his boyfriend, morbidly obese, 600-pound Charlie has confined himself to his small Idaho apartment and is eating himself to oblivion. With his health quickly failing, Charlie becomes desperate to reconnect with Ellie, his estranged and angry teenage daughter whom he has not seen in 17 years. He would give her anything: his love, his money maybe even his life. 2013 Paint The BeachAll are invited to participate in the 4th annual international Paint The Beach event. There will be more than $2,500 in cash and prizes awarded to artists. The judge this year is American impressionist John C. Terelak. The gala collectors preview and awards party will be held on Friday, November 8. Artists will paint throughout the town of Fort Myers Beach and festivities will be held at Santini Marina Plaza, located on Estero Blvd. The event will be hosted by the Fort Myers Beach Art Association, Santini Marina Plaza, Fish-Tale Marina, The Greater Fort Myers Beach Friends of the Arts and the Town of Fort Myers Beach. This is a non-juried event open to artists over the age of 18. The non-refundable registration fee is $40, with a $10 late fee if received after October 30. A separate Quick Draw competition will be held on November 9 with a $10 fee. Visit www.fortmyersbeachart.com for complete details and registration information. A maximum of 60 artists will participate. Follow us on Facebook at 2013 Paint The Beach Proceeds help support the promotion education, appreciation and study of the arts in the Town of Fort Myers Beach. Our email address is press@riverweekly.com

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17 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 Classical M usic S cholarship P rogramBIG ARTS is accepting applications for its Classical Music Scholarship Award. Florida high school and college students who have professional goals to pur sue classical musical instruments, composition and conducting may apply. The scholarship is awarded to one student annually and includes a cash prize of up to $5,000. All application materials must be submitted to BIG ARTS no later than 3 p.m. on Friday, October 4. Previous BIG ARTS Classical Music Scholarship recipients are encouraged to apply. Additional details about the BIG ARTS Classical Music Scholarship as well as the application form are available online at www.BIGARTS.org. Applicants may also pick up a copy of the scholarship application Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at BIG ARTS, 900 Dunlop Road, Sanibel, FL 33957. BIG ARTS Board Member Kenneth L. Nees created the endowment in 2010 to generate funds to encourage talented musicians who aspire to pursue a professional career in classical music. The first recipient of the BIG ARTS Classical Music Scholarship, Erik Hopkins, graduated from the Florida State University in Tallahassee with a Bachelor of Music degree in Percussion Performance, and earned a Master of Music degree in 2013 from the Manhattan School of Music. He now plays the dual role of percussionist and associate principal timpanist in the Utah Symphony/Utah Opera. Two-time BIG ARTS Classical Music Scholarship winner, Priscila Navarro currently attends Florida Gulf Coast University Bower School of Music. She has won several prestigious piano competitions including first place at both the Biennial International Beethoven Sonata Competition in Memphis, and 20th Annual International Chopin Competition of Texas. She performed at BIG ARTS Schein Performance Hall in January of 2013, and at New York Citys Carnegie Hall in March. Although the popularity of classical music performances have declined in recent years in the U.S. and many orchestras are struggling financially, classical music audiences have grown in many parts of the world. Classical scholarship committee member and violinist Jessica Baxter earned a Bachelor of Arts in Music from Indiana University Jacobs School of Music. She is BIG ARTS Associate Executive Director, and Associate Concertmaster at Gulf Coast Symphony. Ive experienced first-hand how classical music training can enrich a young persons life, said Baxter. BIG ARTS is very proud to fund these extremely gifted students to help launch their classical music careers. This years BIG ARTS Classical Music Scholarship winner will be announced on Sunday, December 8 prior to a performance by the 2013 Cleveland International Piano Competition winner Stanislav Khristenko. BIG ARTS Classical Series concerts are free for children 17 and under and students with valid student ID. Individual concert tickets are general admission $32. To reserve child/student tickets, call BIG ARTS Marks Box Office at 395-0900. The classical afternoon concerts continue with piano and violin musicians Kaleidos Duo on Sunday, January 19, and cellist Dmitry Kouzov accompanied by pianist Peter Laul on Sunday, January 26. All Classical Afternoon concerts begin at 3:30 p.m. and are held at BIG ARTS Center, located at 900 Dunlop Road on Sanibel. Classical Afternoons Grand Patron Series Sponsor is Deborah and John La Gorce. The BIG ARTS Classical Music Scholarship is one of several scholarship programs supported by generous donors to BIG ARTS. To learn more about establishing a scholarship fund to support your artistic or cultural passion and to make a difference in the lives of young artists, contact Jessica Baxter at 395-0900. To learn more about BIG ARTS scholarships, performances or to become a member, visit www.BIGARTS.org. S hop For S uccess E vent R eturning On November 7Mark your calendars! Dress For Success Southwest Florida announced their annual shopping extravaganza, Shop For Success, presented by Founding Sponsor White House, Black Market. This exclusive one night shopping event takes place at the Crowne Plaza at the Bell Tower Shops on Thursday, November 7 from 5 to 9 p.m., with VIP admission from 3 to 5 p.m. Shop For Success features 5,000 square feet of new and gently used designer and designer-inspired apparel and accessories with prices starting at just $5! One hundred percent of the proceeds will benefit Dress For Success Southwest Florida. Shop For Success is the organizations biggest fundraising event of the year. Across 135 affiliates worldwide, Dress for Success Southwest Florida remains a top performer in raising funds for women in need during this fabulous shopping event. The event is free for all, with VIP tickets for $50 that include champagne and early admittance from 3 to 5 p.m. New this year 90 percent of the clothes on sale at Shop For Success are new, thanks to gracious donations from Somas, Chicos, Boston Proper, White House | Black Market, Steinmart and Macys. Shop For Success is an excellent opportunity for people in the community to have fun while shopping for a great cause, said Barbara Dell, Executive Director for Dress for Success SW Florida. Each year we have a great turnout, and Dress For Success Southwest Florida is able to raise money that helps us better serve our clients. Dress For Success Southwest Florida relies on donations and volunteers from the Southwest Florida community to help them continue their life-changing mission of providing career wardrobes, employment counseling, and career development tools to disadvantaged women in the area. The funds raised at Shop For Success help them continue this mission, so come out on November 7 and shop for a cause. For more information about Shop For Success, purchase VIP tickets, sponsorships or any other events by Dress For Success Southwest Florida, call 689-4992 or email swflorida@dressforsuccess.org. Barbara Dell From page 1Battle Of The Sexesmade plans can sometimes go awry. The couple decides to tell the audience how they first met. It was not love at first sight, at least not on Annabelles part. A cat named Stinky plays a big role in their relationship. They even lived next door as neighbors before they fell in love and decided to get married. Annabelle is a career-driven woman who wants a plan for their marriage. Jeff just figures everything will fall into place. There is a lot of sexual banter between the two and for the most part it rings true as the audience relates to the obvious differences between the sexes. In one scene, these references cheapen the dialogue and add no value or content to the script. I question the motive behind the inclusion of the remarks. That being said, I enjoyed every other bit of the play. Endrizzi and Clough make us laugh out loud as they share various aspects of life and marriage, including who they should friend on Facebook. During one scene, Jeff is so exasperated with Annabelles phone chatter that he runs through the aisles of the theater screaming and it is one of the highlights of the show. Their beloved cat Stinky has gone to the great litterbox in the sky. They now share their home with two kittens, named Anthony Perkins and Alexander Pushkin. Be sure to read the authors bios in the program. You Say Tomato, I Say Shut Up! is directed by Paul Bernier. It runs through November 2 at The Off Broadway Palm Theatre, located in the main lobby of Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre. For tickets, call 278-4422, visit www. BroadwayPalm.com or stop by the box office aft 1380 Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Alliance Announces New 2013-14 S eason Of T he ArtsThe 2013-14 Season of the Arts is under way at the Alliance for the Arts and once again it is bringing the community a diverse set of arts programming. The Alliance has been serving the community since 1975 from its 10-acre Fort Myers campus, connecting people to the arts, cultural programming and educational opportunities. The upcoming season offers something for people of all ages and includes a full schedule of exhibitions, indoor and outdoor concerts, family friendly festivals, theatrical performances, classes and camps. Many of these programs are brought to the community through partnerships with other area cultural organizations like Florida Rep, Theatre Conspiracy, Gulf Coast Symphony, Young Artist Awards, among many others. To get more information on the 2013-14 season, or see the diverse selection of classes for kids and adults, visit www.artinlee.org or call 939-2787. Alliance programming is brought to you with support from our nearly 1,000 strong membership base, as well as the City of Fort Myers, Florida Division of Cultural Affairs, Lee Visitor & Convention Bureau, and the Southwest Florida Community Foundation. And a very special thanks to our 2013-14 Season Partners: Assuage Spa, Bireley Family Foundation, Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre, Dwayne Bergmann, Family Thrift Center, LCEC, Leigh Frizzell Hayes, Magic T-Shirts: William and Shareen Groce, Northern Trust, Dr. Stephen Prendiville, Pamela Templeton UNLimited. The Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard, just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. The Alliance of the Arts 10-acre campus in Fort Myers

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 201318 October PP rograms At Lakes RR egional LibraryNext months roster of activities at Lakes Regional Library offers topics for all ages. The following activities are free to the public: Adults English Caf 6 p.m. Mondays, October 14, 21 and 28 Practice your English with English Caf, a free, conversation session for adult ESOL and ESL students. Each 90-minute session provides adult learners an opportunity to practice speaking English with native speakers. Participants may start at any time. Advanced registration is not necessary. Book Discussion: No Easy Day by Mark Owen 2 p.m. Tuesday, October 15 Read and discuss No Easy Day: The Firsthand Account of the Mission That Killed Osama bin Laden by Mark Owen (pseudonym). The author not only describes the raid but gives an inside look at the culture of the Navy SEALs. Registration is required. Meet Author Tim Dorsey 1 p.m. Saturday, October 26 Tim Dorsey, author of the Serge Storms series of books, will visit Lakes Regional Library to talk about his latest book, The Riptide, Ultra-Glide. Tim will take questions and sign autographs. Sponsored by the Friends of the Lakes Regional Library. Registration is required. Families Baby-Parent Rhyme Time 10:30 a.m. Monday, October 28 Be prepared to tickle, jump and fly with your baby. These rhymes and songs are for infants, up to 24 months, accompanied by an adult. This 20-minute program is filled with songs designed to introduce rhyming and movement to infants. Registration is required. Toddler Storytime 10 a.m. Wednesday, October 30 Children 2 years old and their caregivers participate in song, fingerplays and short stories. The success of this age group depends on adult participation and encouragement. Toddler storytime lasts approximately 30 minutes. Family Storytime 11 a.m. Wednesday, October 30 This program is for the whole family and lasts about 30 minutes. Registration is required. Children Reading Academy 4:30 p.m. Wednesdays, October 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30 Books + puppets + drawing = fun! The library provides the puppets and mini drawing boards for this interactive event. Join the gr oup each week for new stories and games. This program is designed for children who can read and write. For children in first to fifth grade. Sponsored by the Friends of Lakes Regional Library. Registration is required. Kids Read Down Fines 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday, October 5 Children and teens can earn a $2 coupon for every 15 minutes of reading, during the allotted time. A total of $8 per day may be earned. For ages 18 and younger. Credit may be applied to cards issued to patrons age 18 and younger only. Preschool LEGO Storytime 10:30 a.m. Thursday, October 10 Calling all preschoolers and caregivers get ready to read, build and play at the library. The group will combine storytelling, music and building with LEGO DUPLO bricks for a fun new experience. This hands-on playtime will foster creativity and early literacy. For ages 2 to 5. Registration is required. Library 101: Librarian For A Day 10:30 a.m. Friday, October 11 Enjoy a fun activity for homeschoolers and school age kids. Discover the secret lives of library books and what it takes to be a librarian. The group will play games and explore the furthest corners of the childrens room. Do you have the librarian skills? Come find out. For grades K to 5. Registration is required. Star Wars: Jedi Academy 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, October 15 Is the Force strong within you? Join the group for Jedi Academy training and learn the ways of the Force with fun activities, crafts and games. Attendees are encouraged to come dressed as their favorite Star Wars character. For grades K to 5. Sponsored by the Friends of Lakes Regional Library. Registration is required. Music Together 10:30 a.m. Thursday, October 17 Do you want your kids to love music the way that you do? The librarys friends from Family Music Time will create a relaxed, playful environment where adults and kids can share songs, play instruments and learn rhythm patterns. Sponsored by the Friends of Lakes Regional Library. Registration is required. Preschool Storytime 11 a.m. Monday, October 28 Preschoolers (ages 3 to 5) attend this storytime independently while par ents or caregivers wait nearby in the library building. This storytime includes activities that require more participation and a longer attention span. Each preschool storytime lasts about 30 minutes. Registration is required. Grossology 4:30 p.m. Monday, October 28 Calling all mad scientists. Get grossed out with wacky science tricks, revolting riddles and creepy crafts. Explore the disgusting side of science. For grades K to 5. Sponsored by the Friends of Lakes Regional Library. Registration is required. Teens Kids Read Down Fines 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday, October 5 Children and teens can earn a $2 coupon for every 15 minutes of reading, during the allotted time. A total of $8 per day may be earned. For ages 18 and younger. Credit may be applied to cards issued to patrons age 18 and under only. The Lakes Regional Library is located at 15290 Bass Road in Fort Myers. For more information about a program or to register, call the library at 533-4000. A sign language interpreter is available with five business days notice to library staff. Assistive listening system available; request at desk. Check the Lee County Library Systems website at www.leelibrary. net to find out about programs at other locations. Call the host library, or Telephone Reference at 479-INFO (4636), for more information about a specific program. October PP rograms At North Fort MM yers PP ublic LibraryNext months roster of activities at North Fort Myers Public Library offers topics for all ages. The following activities are free to the public: Adults Miss Marple Monthly Knitters 2 p.m. Tuesday, October 1 These sessions are for knitters and crocheters of all levels. Come visit and share project and technique ideas. Books n Bites 10:30 a.m. Monday, October 7 Join this monthly social hour. Discuss any books in any format, or movies of interest. Whether given a rant or a rave it will be fun to talk about. We provide the coffee and refreshments, you provide your enthusiasm. Registration is required. Book Discussion: Wild by Cheryl Strayed 2 p.m. Thursday, October 17 Cheryl Strayeds memoir, Wild, details her courageous, spontaneous and solitary journey through the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mojave Desert through California and Oregon to Washington State. Strayed ventured over 1,100 miles on a solo hike after the heartbreak of a failed marriage and the death of a beloved mother to get away from regular life, but to ultimately heal the wounds she carried with her on her journey. Family Baby-Parent Rhyme Time 11 a.m. Thursday, October 24 Be prepared to tickle, jump and fly with your baby. These rhymes and songs are for infants, up to 24 months, accompanied by an adult. This 20-minute program is filled with songs designed to introduce rhyming and movement to infants. Registration is required. Family Storytime 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, October 30 This program is for the whole family and lasts about 30 minutes. Registration is required. Children Kids Read Down Fines 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday, October 12 Children and teens can earn a $2 coupon for every 15 minutes of reading, during the allotted time. A total of $8 per day may be earned. For ages 18 and younger. Credit may be applied to cards issued to patrons age 18 and under only. Spooktacular Stories and More 4 p.m. Thursday, October 24 Have a frightfully fun time with spooktacular stories and grisly games. Children in grades K to 5 are welcome. Teens Kids Read Down Fines 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday, October 12 Children and teens can earn a $2 coupon for every 15 minutes of reading, during the allotted time. A total of $8 per day may be earned. For ages 18 and younger. Credit may be applied to cards issued to patrons age 18 and under only. Teen Read Week Games 4 p.m. Tuesday, October 15 Seek The Unknown during this Teen Read Week by playing a new board game. Choose between Forbidden Island, Pandemic and Ticket To Ride. The North Fort Myers Public Library is located at 2001 N. Tamiami Trail NE in North Fort Myers. For more information about a program or to register, call the library at 533-4320. A sign language interpreter is available with five business days notice to library staff. Assistive listening system available; request at desk. Check the Lee County Library Systems website at www.leelibrary.net to find out about programs at other locations. Call the host library, or Telephone Reference at 479-INFO (4636), for more information about a specific program. League Of Women VV oters MM eetingLee County Government will be the topic of the League of Women Voters next Educational Program Meeting on Saturday, October 5 at the Hilton Garden Inn, 12600 University Drive in Fort Myers. The public is welcome to attend. Denise Sabatini will provide an overview of Lee County Government Agencies and LeeGROWS (Government Resource and Orientation Workshop Series), a program designed to help the public understand what happens behind the scenes of county government. Following the presentation, league leader ship will discuss the leagues commitment to informed and active participation in government, how it works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and ways to influence public policy through education and advocacy. Cost to attend the breakfast is $15. Reservations should be made by October 2 by calling 278-1032 or by e-mailing lwvlee@yahoo.com. For more information, contact the League of Women Voters of Lee County at 278-1032.

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19 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 2013Local P laywrights At T heatre ConspiracyTheatre Conspiracy is pleased to announce six one-night staged readings of works by local playwrights starting on Thursday, September 26. Each work will be performed at the Foulds Theatre, Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Admission is only $5. Tickets can be purchased at the door or at www.theatreconspiracy.org. The six works have been developed through Theatre Conspiracys playwrighting group Playwright Conspiracy. The six playwrights have met once a week for the past 10 months developing their work. John Repas play The Kepler Complex will be performed on Thursday, September 26 at 8 p.m. The Pembridge Provocation by Louise Wigglesworth will be on Friday, September 27 at 8 p.m. followed by Bob Hilliards The Inquisition on Saturday, September 28 at 8 p.m. The following weekend, Wally Kain will have his play A Letter From Miss Kitty on Thursday, October 3 at 8 p.m., with Stephen Hoopers The Boardroom on Friday, October 4 at 8 p.m. Closing out the staged readings will be Fay Ellen Graetzs three one-act plays 3 By The Sea on Sunday, October 6 at 2 p.m. The staged readings consist of basic sets and props. The actors will read from scripts but move about the stage. Each show is given four or five rehearsals to prepare. This is a great opportunity to support not only new work but work by local playwrights. The Kepler Complex by John Repa is, on its basic level, about the testing for The Right Stuff of the next generation of space explorers. But on a deeper level, it examines the drives; intellectual, emotional, philosophical and religious that makes us what we are and defines what it is to be human. 3 By The Sea by Fay Ellen Graetz consists of three short plays. In the first, a fisherman teaches his grandchild what to do when threatened by a water-spout at sea. In the second, a captain says farewell when his old sailing buddies must leave him behind. The last takes place at a taverna on a Greek island. A couple of tourists become suspicious of their new friend. In The Inquisition by Robert Hilliard, under the threat of international terror ism, the government has gradually eroded civil liberties, including surveillance of citizens and journalists communications and activities, and has intimidated freedoms of speech, press and assembly. Three university professors, best friends, have been subpoenaed to testify in front of a government committee investigating alleged terrorist sympathizers in education. The professors and their spouses meet to discuss whether to cooperate with or defy the committee. Their disagreement reveals unspoken secrets and threatens their marriages and relationships. In The Penbridge Provocation by Louise Wigglesworth things unfold with a simple but courageous question printed on some shirts, three targeted teens incite a school administrator to reassess policies and practices in todays educational system which actually support bully behaviors. Along the way love is lost and found, forgiveness earned and a hopeful future for the community of Penbridge takes shape. The Boardroom by Stephen E. Hooper is a play about the inner workings of a mans brain as he attempts to accomplish a very challenging assignment. The main character is Michael Casey, a talented but clearly flawed freelance writer. The other characters are people who represent distinct aspects of his personality and give voice to the thoughts that he entertains as he under takes what turns out to be the most difficult writing task of his life. In A Letter From Aunt Kitty by Wally Kain, a refined, cultured and loving Aunt Kitty visits a greedy nephew and his dysfunctional family. They try to hurry her departure until they learn she is rich and the clutches of a smooth Ponzi scheme operator. Alas for them, its too late to get money that means very little to her. John Repas association with Theater Conspiracy goes back to Becoming Eleanor, where he was half of Europe and The Imposters. His first work produced here was the Christmas comedy The Other Shepherds Play and his Shakespearean drama, Epilogue at Elsinore, won a New Play competition at the Naples Players in 2009. His drama Time Tables was read at last years play readings. John trained as a playwright and studied as a set designer and technician. he has a BA from Columbia College in Chicago. Currently, he performs five nights a week on the Murder Mystery Dinner Train in Fort Myers. He has also appeared at Florida Rep in Inherit The Wind and The Bad Seed. Fay Ellen Graetz appreciates hearing a good story and began writing them in letters to family and friends while living abroad. Since returning to the United States in 2000, shes written a novel, short stories and plays. Her fiction has received awards locally from the Florida Weekly and from Gulf Coast Writers Association. In 2008, her two-act play, On The Hard, was staged at the Purple Heart Theatre in Fort Myers Beach. A staged reading of her most recent twoact play, Facing Up, was stage read at Theatre Conspiracy in 2012. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin, she lives in Fort Myers. Robert Hilliard appreciates Bill Taylors encouragement and support of new plays, including through his Playwrights Group, the source of the current play presentations. This is Hilliards eighth full-length play. He is also the author of 40 books. Louise Wigglesworth plays include No Bad Dance, which was presented in a staged reading at Theatre Conspiracy in 2012 as part of its annual celebration of new plays. Her adaptation of Albert Camus novel, The Plague, was produced at The Laboratory Theater of Florida in 2011. In The Shade Of Old Trees, another full length play, is scheduled for a staged reading at The Laboratory Theater of Florida in 2014. A workshop production of Atlantic City Lights, a themed one-act collection produced at Richard Stockton College, was made possible in part by a grant from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, and later appeared at Cultural Park Theatre, re-titled Drawing The Human Form. Stephen E. Hooper has been per forming in and directing and producing plays throughout Southwest Florida for nearly 30 years. Favorite roles include Col. Jessup in A Few Good Men (Peninsula Players), Martin in Social Security (Florida Rep) and Mittler in Dispatches From Hell (his first of many roles with Theatre Conspiracy). Favorite directing turns include Three Days Of Rain, Barrymore, A Tuna Christmas and most recently Intimate Exchanges, all for Theatre Conspiracy. This is Steves second year as a participant in Bill Taylors Playwright Conspiracy. His first play staged last year was An Act Of God. Wally Kain was born in Nebraska and grew up in Yonkers, New York. He got degrees from Princeton and Harvard Law School with a Korean era break with the 82nd Airborne Division. Wallys first career was in the world of patents, copyrights and trade secrets. He was drawn from this to paint and write on Sanibel Island. Writing for island newspapers led to elective office and two terms as Mayor of Sanibel. He has two published novels, The Nunca Riddle and The Red Column. A Fly In The Butter, true stories about growing up in the 1930s and 1940s, was published in 2012. His plays Homecoming For Sergeant Porter and The Gray And The Blue were finalists in the Naples Players New Play Contests for 2008 and 2012. His short plays have been read on the stages of Lee County Alliance for the Arts, and BIG ARTS of Sanibel. From page 11Luncheonas a math tutor. Dr. Cora-Mora has a bachelors degree in engineering, a masters degree in finance, a doctorate of educational leadership and an educational specialist degree. Those interested in attending the lunch/meeting should RSVP no later than Monday, September 30 by calling 337-9456 or by sending an email to gabrielinvictory@netzero.net. Ebenezer Christian Academy is a non-profit organization with a goal of enriching the lives of students through tutoring, field trips, sports, music, English language classes and other activities. Its mission is to encourage each child to have a positive attitude in life. For additional information, contact Natacha Gabriel at 337-9456. Isabella Rasi 239-246-47161101 Periwinkle Way #105, Sanibel, FL 239-472-0044 ENGEL & VLKERS Excellence in Real Estate A step above! International Client Base 600 Shops Worldwide Multi-Lingual Staff Your success is my aim. Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 201320 B aseballs S tory Of T he Year T he R esurgence Of T he B oston R ed S oxby E d FrankOK, Red Sox Nation, you have much to cheer about as your beloved team has gone from last to first capturing the American League Eastern Division, and as we went to press earlier this week, was within an eyelash of securing Fenway Park advantage throughout the postseason. The 2013 reclamation of the Boston Red Sox is truly one of the top if not the top sports story of the year. Here was a team that lost 93 games a year ago, finishing a staggering 26 games out of first place. As the week began, Boston was 95-62, with its sight set on reaching the 100-win mark for the season, which would be a first since 1946. Of course, that goal would require running the table for the last five games. A 5-0 season finale would guarantee home field advantage, an important post-season factor for the Red Sox considering they owned the AL best home record at 53-28 earlier this week. Any time we can play in Fenway Park in front of our fans, youve seen all year long the energy that gives us, said first-year manager John Farrell, who in my book should be a consensus choice for American League Manager of the Year. Entering the final week of the regular season, the Red Sox were hoping to get center fielder Jacoby Ellsbury back. He suffered a compression fracture in his right foot, and Boston went 10-5 during his absence. They need him in the leadoff spot. Getting Jacoby back is probably as big a key as anything, Farrell said recently. That 95-62 record on Monday (.605) not only was the best in the American League but the best in all of baseball. Close behind was the AL West Division Champion Oakland Athletics at 93-63 (.596). Oaklands resurgence this year is worthy of a new chapter in Money Ball, a bestseller based on General Manager Billy Beanes use of sabermetrics to build a winning As team a decade ago. The book was later made into a popular movie. But for now, the accolades must go to the 2013 edition of the Boston Red Sox. Bonita Springs Jacobsen Winner Of 2013 Payne Stewart Award Popular local golfer Peter Jacobsen last week was named the 2013 Payne Stewart Award winner, an honor given annually to recognize a player for his sportsmanship and integrity. He joins a list of Stewart Award winners that includes Byron Nelson, Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer and 2012 winner Steve Stricker. He (Stewart) was a good friend of mine, Jacobsen said upon learning of the award. We did a lot of things together with our families, but mostly we competed against each other and laughed. We also played some music together, really good music. A self-taught guitarist, Jacobsen was a founding member and lead singer of Jake Trout & The Flounders, a band he formed in the mid-80s with fellow golfers Mark Lye and Stewart. They recorded two albums together. E dman S elected To P lay For T he M ens S occer T eamJeffrey Edman of Fort Myers earned a spot on the Clearwater Christian College mens soccer team for the 2013 season. An exercise sport science major, Edman is a graduate of Southwest Florida Christian Academy in Fort Myers and the son of Fred and Kelly Edman of Fort Myers. From page 7Musical Series-ent instrument family percussion, strings, woodwinds and brass for a more indepth look at the various types and sounds of symphonic instruments. Were excited to expand this popular program, so that more kids can discover music and the wide array of musical instruments, said Andrew M. Kurtz, the symphonys music and executive director. This sneak preview is just the start, as we look to offer more hands-on experiences all around town this season and beyond. For more information, visit www.gulfcoastsymphony.org or call 277-1700. Disabled H ockey T eam Looking For P layersThe Southwest Florida-based Florida Ice sled hockey team is looking for players for the 2013-14 season. The team, which is comprised mainly of athletes with physical disabilities, is hosting a sign-up clinic at the Fort Myers Skatium, 2250 Broadway, Fort Myers, on Saturday, September 28. Sled hockey is an adaptive version of ice hockey, modified for athletes with lower-body disabilities. Rather than using skates, players utilize a specialized sled to travel the ice, using their sticks not only for game play but also for propulsion. The Florida Ice is a recreational squad supported by the Florida Sled Hockey Association, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization that provides barrier-free recreational opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Ice practices are held weekly at the Fort Myers Skatium, with games and scrimmages held monthly. Players can be any age, skill level, or gender, and the team is also able to accommodate a small number of able-bodied players. Sign-ups will start at 7:30 p.m. at the Skatium and players will have ice time from 8:30 to 10 p.m. Our clinics have been very popular, here in Fort Myers and across the state, said Florida Sled Hockey Association President Ron Robichaud. More than half of the Florida Ice players were introduced to hockey through one of our Fort Myers clinics. Florida Ice players who show exceptional skill may be invited to join the Florida Sled Bandits, a statewide travel team. In both 2012 and 2013, the Sled Bandits won the National Disabled Hockey Festivals Open A Division. Last year, five Florida Ice players were members of the championship team. If youve ever been to a wheelchair basketball or rugby game, you know how exciting those sports can be, said Robichaud. Its the same with sled hockey. Our athletes might use wheelchairs and prosthetics off the ice, but on the ice, they can shoot, score and hit just as hard as anyone. The Florida Ice and Florida Sled Hockey Association are sponsored by Goodwill Industries of Southwest Florida, the City of Fort Myers, and USA Hockey, among others. There are quality recreational oppor tunities out there for people with disabilities, but theyre not always easy to find, said Kirsten ODonnell of Goodwill. In our area, the Florida Sled Hockey Association is changing that. Theyre really showcasing Southwest Florida as a leader in accessible sports. For more information about the Florida Sled Hockey Association, visit www.floridasledhockey.com or contact Ron Robichaud at 207-252-7134 or by email at floridasledhockey@yahoo.com. Players of all ages, gender and skill level are welcome Players use specialized sleds to travel the ice Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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21 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 S chool S martby S helley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Readers, I want to pass along some important information for those of you who have friends and family with Down syndrome. A new national registry is launching an effort to connect individuals who have Down syndrome with researchers studying the chromosomal disorder. Plans to create the registry were first announced last year after the idea emerged as one of the primary recommendations of the NIHs 2007 Down Syndrome Research Plan. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) defines Down syndrome is a set of cognitive and physical symptoms that result from having an extra chromosome 21 or an extra piece of that chromosome. It is the most common chromosomal cause of mild to moder ate intellectual disabilities. People with Down syndrome also have some distinct physical features, such as a flat-looking face, and they are at risk for a number of other health conditions. The registry is a free, confidential online database known as DS-Connect and is designed to collect health infor mation on a voluntary basis from those with Down syndrome or family members who sign up on their behalf. Participants can anonymously compare their health experiences with those of others in the registry and users can also volunteer to be contacted to take part in research studies. According to Yvonne Maddox, deputy director of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development at the National Institutes of Health, which developed the registry, The Down syndrome community has voiced a strong need for a centralized, secure database to store and share health information. DS-Connect fills that need, and helps link individuals with Down syndrome to the doctors and scientists working to improve their health and quality of life. Maddox emphasized that there is a need for registry participants of all ages. Right now, we dont have much data on older individuals with Down syndrome, and thats been a problem, she said. People with Down syndrome are living longer, and researchers and physicians will require information about the health issues and needs of these individuals to make recommendations about their health care. For more information on this new registry or to join this new register go to https://dsconnect.nih.gov/. Ms. Greggs is adjunct faculty at Edison State College where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also Nationally Certified School Psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. Domestic V iolence Awareness M onthAbuse Counseling and Treatment, Inc. (ACT) will be hosting a variety of events in October in recognition of Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Different organizations have partnered with ACT to make these events possible. All upcoming events are listed on the ACT website at www.actabuse.com. Domestic violence continues to be a serious social issue in our community as well as other communities around the world. Each year, ACT provides emergency shelter for over 548 men, women and children; crisis intervention, counseling, advocacy and information and referrals for over 9,500 individuals; over 500 free trainings to social service agencies, hospitals and law enforcement; and provides education to over 8,000 middle and high school students. This October, ACT is striving to increase awareness of domestic violence and the existence of ACT and the services offered through the following events: From October 1 to 31, an electronic billboard located at Colonial and Six Mile Cypress will display anti-violence messages along with ACTs hotline information. In addition, Lamar Advertising has included bonus spots on billboards at different inter vals throughout Lee County. Contact Christine Kobie, ACT Teen Educator at 9392553 if you would like to sponsor a billboard in the future. On Friday, October 4, ACT volunteers will be at Art Walk in Downtown Fort Myers distributing wallet cards to patrons which includes warning signs of an abusive relationship. Friday, October 18 through Thursday, October 31, Miller, Helms and Folk, CPAs will sponsor ACT in the Scarecrows in the Park at Lake Park in Fort Myers. This event expects over 50,000 men, women and children who will view our display on ACTs services. Friday, October 25 from 7 to 9 p.m., there will be a free screening of Telling Amys Story and a candlelight vigil at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Fort Myers, located at 13411 Shire Lane in Fort Myers. Telling Amys Story follows the timeline of a domestic violence homicide that occurred in central Pennsylvania on November 8, 2001. A candlelight vigil will follow to honor the women, men and families who have been silenced by their batterers as well as those who have broken their silence to take a stance against domestic violence. Contact Marcie Kaveney at 939-2553 to register for this event. Seating is limited. From October 1 to 31, the second ACT Thrift Store, which is located at 12519 S. Cleveland Avenue in Fort Myers, will have purple light bulbs for sale, with all proceeds benefitting victims and survivors of domestic violence in our community. The shining of purple lights sends a strong message that, Domestic Violence Has No Place In Our Community. E arly R egistration For S torytellers Creative Arts ConferenceRegister now for the 4th annual Storytellers Creative Arts Conference, scheduled for November 7 to 9 in Naples, and take advantage of the early registration rate of $79 per person. Ticket prices go up October 1 for the three-day event, held to inspire creativity in art, music, performance, film, writing and media. Register or find more information at www.storytellerscreativearts.com. The conference includes keynote speakers, workshops, small group sessions and performances, plus a juried art exhibit. Literary, visual and performing arts leaders will share their expertise for using creativity to positively impact culture. The conference is planned and organized to help emerging and professional artists, as well as people with a passion for the arts, to connect, share ideas and build mentor relationships. The conference will be held at Covenant Church of Naples-PCA, 6926 Trail Boulevard, across from Pelican Bay in Naples. Events include a Thursday songwriters workshop led by award-winning singer and songwriter Martha Christian; the Evening of Music & Arts, a Friday showcase of talented artists who come together for a night of music, dance, live art and other performances; and a variety of Saturday workshops from Change the World Through Movies led by film director David Nixon and Ten Commandments of Fine Art with Naples artist and author Marco Bronzini to Jerry Roots writers workshop Learning from CS Lewis The Craft of Storytelling and sessions on speed painting, writing for Hollywood, vocal coaching, journaling, improv and other topics. The conference is sponsored by Storytellers Creative Arts Inc., founded in 2010 to inspire and develop creative people to use their artistic gifts to influence culture. From page 1Wildlife DriveWith the reopening of Wildlife Drive, the public will now also have full access to the new Wildlife Education Boardwalk that opened last month off of Indigo Trail. We appreciate everyones patience with the Wildlife Drive closure, said Tritaik. We know it has been an inconvenience to our loyal nature-lovers, but we hope it will be worth the wait. B arrios E nrolled At Clearwater Christian CollegeJonathan Barrios of North Fort Myers is attending Clearwater Christian College in Clearwater, Florida and is currently enrolled as an exercise sport science major. Barrios is a 2013 graduate of Island Coast High School and the child of Marysol Coronado of North Fort Myers. Road resurfacing work on Wildlife Drive

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 201322 by Jennifer B aseyAs an investor, how much risk can you tolerate? Its an important question, because the answer can help you make the right investment choices. Before you know your risk tolerance, youll want to make sure you first under stand the nature of investment risk the risk of losing principal. This risk is especially prevalent when you invest in stocks, because stock prices will always fluctuate and there are never any guarantees about performance. Of course, a decline in value does not mean you need to sell; you can always hold on to the stock with the hope that its value will bounce back. And this can certainly happen, but again, no guarantees. How you respond to this type of investment risk will tell you a great deal about your own risk tolerance. Of course, no one, whether he or she has a high tolerance for risk or a low one, particularly likes to see declines. But people do react differently. If youre the sort of person who can retain your confidence in your investment mix and can focus on the long term and the potential for a recovery, you may well have a higher tolerance for risk. But if you find yourself losing sleep over your losses (even if, at this point, theyre just paper losses), becoming despondent about reaching your goals, and questioning whether you should be investing at all, then you may have a low tolerance for risk. This self-knowledge of your own risk tolerance should help inform your investment decisions, to a point. Even if you determine you have a high tolerance for risk, you almost certainly should not load up your portfolio exclusively with stocks. If the stock market enters a prolonged slump, you could face heavy losses that may take many years to overcome, causing you to lose significant ground in the pursuit of your financial goals. Conversely, even if you discover you dont have much tolerance for risk, you wont want to invest only in supposedly safe vehicles, such as certificates of deposit (CDs). During those periods when rates on CDs and similar instruments are low, as has been the case in recent years, your interest payments from these investments may not even keep up with inflation meaning that, over time, you could end up losing purchasing power, which, over the long term, can be just as big a risk as market declines. Ultimately, then, youll probably want to let your risk tolerance guide your investment choices but not dictate them with an iron hand. So, if you believe you are highly tolerant of risk, you might have a somewhat higher percentage of stocks in your portfolio than if you felt yourself to be highly risk-averse. In any case, youll likely benefit from building a diversified portfolio containing stocks, bonds, government securities, CDs and other investments. While this type of diversification cant guarantee profits or protect against loss, it can help reduce the effects of volatility on your portfolio. By knowing your own risk tolerance, and the role it can play in your choices, you can help yourself create an effective, suitable investment strategy one that you can live with for a long time and that can help you avoid the biggest risk of all; not reaching your long-term goals. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@edwardjones.com. Financial FocusH ow S hould Your R isk T olerance I nfluence I nvestment Decisions? S hell P oint Fall I nformational M eetingsResidents of Southwest Florida who would like to learn about resortstyle retirement options and lifecare are invited to attend one of several informational meetings at Shell Point Retirement Community. One of Shell Points experienced retirement counselors will explain the numerous benefits of becoming a Shell Point resident. The meetings will be held at 10 a.m. in the main Commons located in The Woodlands neighborhood at Shell Point on the following dates: October 2, 8, 16 and 29 November 6, 12, 20 and 26 December 4, 10 and 18 During the casually-structured meeting, guests will learn about lifecare and the retirement options and amenities available at Shell Point. Guests can also tour two of the three Shell Point neighborhoods, The Island and The Woodlands, and see a model residence. Admission to these informative sessions is free; however, seating is limited, so reservations are required and may be made by calling Maureen Thomson at 466-1131 or 1-800-780-1131. Shell Point Retirement Community is a not-for-profit continuing care retirement community located in Fort Myers just off Summerlin Road and McGregor Boulevard, two miles before the Sanibel Causeway. T op 10 R eal E state S alesCourtesy of Royal Shell Real Estate Development City Year Built Square Footage Listing PriceSelling PriceDays On Market Cape Coral Cape Coral 2008 9,000$2,500,000 $2,700,000 30 Captiva Captiva2002 4,857$1,899,000 $1,800,000 160 Cape HarbourCape Coral 2005 3,521$1,699,000 $1,639,000 168 River RidgeBonita Springs 1991 4,113$959,000 $800,000 265 Laguna ShoresFort Myers Beach 1972 2,426$750,000 $690,000 246 Bayland HeightsFort Myers Beach 1979 1,682$689,000 $650,000 58 Tarpon LandingsCape Coral 2006 2,844$649,000 $639,500 349 Pointe Santo De Sanibel Sanibel1974 1,245$635,000 $620,000 95 Sundial of Sanibel Sanibel1980 1,519$649,900 $603,000.00 260 Cape Coral Cape Coral 1995 2,118$599,999 $575,000.00 191 E dison S tate H osting Job FairCareer Services at Edison State College will host a Job Fair from noon until 2 p.m. on Thursday, October 10 in Building U, Room 102. This free event is open to the public and will feature a variety of businesses looking for employees to join their workforce. Attendees are encouraged to bring resumes with them to this event and dress professionally. The Job Fair will provide employers with the opportunity to network with interested individuals, while allowing attendees the chance to ask questions about job openings. Positions available include full-time, part-time and internship possibilities. Currently, the following organizations have signed up to participate: ABT SRBI, Inc.; Bealls Department Stores, Inc.; Cintas Fire Protection Division; Collier County Public Schools; Computer Solutions of America; Cotton On; Edison State College; Enterprise Holdings (National, Enterprise Car Rental); Florida Highway Patrol; Fort continued on page 24 M urray Named T o NAWI C B oardAssocia Gulf Coast congratulates Wendy Murray, who was recently sworn in to the National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC) board of directors, where she will serve as secretary of Chapter 297. I am extremely honored to be chosen as secretary on this prestigious board of directors, said Murray, president and CEO. I look forward to representing Associa Gulf Coast in this role and to helping the board educate and promote its core values and objectives. Murray was recently installed to the board at the annual awards dinner in August.continued on page 24

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23 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 The nest relaxation treatments from around the planet have been brought to Southwest Florida.Call 239.333.1450 or visit www.AssuageCenters.comGET TO KNOW US OPENING SPECIALAssuage Signature Massage, Assuage Signature Facial, And Make-up Application.Special Price: $185 (reg. $215) deaRPharmacistYes! Yes! OH NO!by Suzy Cohen, RPhDear Pharmacist: I get headaches during sex. Its not all the time, but Im worried. It takes the fun out of it. My doctor said dont worry. But I do. EL, Dunnellon, Florida Orgasmic headaches or plain old sex headaches affect about one in 100 people. The pain often begins at the base of the brain and radiates to the front of your head at any point. It can happen any time during lovemaking. Most people get a sudden, sharp headache right at the Big O, as in orgasm. Yes! Yes! OH NO! The headache comes on suddenly and its severe. I suspect migraineurs and clusterheads are more prone to these, although sex headaches have no aura, stars, blurriness, no halo, nothing... and theyre short-lived. If its postural, the pain will reoccur as soon as you get out of bed and stand up but then it goes away quickly. Lots of you have sworn off sex. These headaches dont always happen to people who get lucky, they can also be brought on by exercise, coughing or exertion. Scary. You probably think you burst an aneurysm! Fortunately, its just a headache, but do all the tests and brain scans your physician orders okay?! A Russian study evaluated 19 participants who suffered from sex headaches. The researchers discovered that 58% developed headaches during foreplay but before orgasm, and 26% of them developed the headaches during orgasm. Some participants developed their headache post-orgasm. Most headaches lasted for several minutes, although one unlucky persons did linger for 24 hours! The researchers suspect that sex headaches are caused from a disturbance of venous outflow and dysfunction of antinociceptive systems. Essentially, something is amiss with your blood vessel around your brain and your pain perception. Experts also wonder if it happens from an increase in blood (arterial) pressure combined with tension from the big event. That makes sense to my good friend, Douglas Hall, MD, who has four decades experience in obstetrics and gynecology. He says, Endothelial dysfunction with low nitric oxide (NO) can cause vasoconstriction with resulting headaches. You can check NO levels with urine testing strips. NO is stimulated by estrogen and thyroid so you might have to increase these hormones to a physiologically normal level in order to prevent the headaches. Other ways to relieve these include the following (ask your doctor): *Take an anti-inflammatory about one hour before the big event, such as 500mg acetaminophen or 400mg ibuprofen. *Dont be so active during sex, take it easier if you know what I mean. *Maybe race a little faster to the finish line? If you linger for an hour to get there, your blood pressure remains higher, for longer. *Prescribed beta blockers (propanolol) are sometimes used, but not with great success. Foods with natural beta blocking activity include bananas, potatoes, raisins, beans, celery, citrus, spinach and chamomile. *Progesterone. Its the pregnancy hormone, but you should only apply this cream, or take pills if you are low. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. dearpharmacist.com. Mom And Me by Lizzie and PryceLizzie and Pryce answer your questions and give advice about aging concerns from a two-generational perspective. A mother and daughter team, Lizzie is a retired RN and health educator, and Pryce is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in the care of elders and people with chronic illnesses. Dear Mom & Me, I am fed up being treated as if I am an inconvenience at my medical center. I would leave in a flash but no one else around here takes Medicare. I am not a nuisance, having been there only once in a year. I called and, after going through all of their hoops on their telephone system, I finally reached a live one. She asked my name and birth date and then asked, Why do you want to see the doctor, whats wrong with you? The earliest appointment was in six weeks, and then she said, If youre not satisfied, call 911 or go to the hospital emergency. It is bad enough being old, but being abused along with it is getting hard to take. Is it like this where you live? Doris Dear Doris, Medical care is an industry, a very complex industry. To stay in business, medical practices need more revenue coming in than expenses going out. Unfortunately, the strategies for reducing expenses include reducing the number of support staff; using technology, i.e. phone routing systems to increase productivity, minimum education requirements for staff and increasing the number of patients seen per day. What all of this seems to mean to patients is that we have become work units, tasks and to some office staff, interruptions in their productivity. To the credit of some offices I have found, the physicians and support staff have found a way to practice medicine and run a business in a way that does not forget the patient. I hope you can find a similar office. Pryce Dear Doris, Exactly the same this seems to be the way modern medical offices are going. No longer will physicians know our name or even care because it is only a business. However, some people do have physicians who do care, will call on the phone and run their offices the old fashioned way. My husband goes out of state and has a team of physicians who are wonderful and it is no wonder Johns Hopkins has been rated number one for patient care for about the last 20 years. Lizzie Lizzie and Pryces email address is momandmeaging@hotmail.com. World Wine Tour To Benefit Ronald McDonald House CharitiesMyers Brettholtz & Company will present the 6th annual World Wine Tour at the Bell Tower Shops on Thursday, November 7 benefiting Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southwest Florida. From 6 to 8 p.m., wine lovers will enjoy domestic and international wines and appetizers from participating Bell Tower Shops merchants and restaurants. In addition to being the first night for the spectacular Bell Tower Shops holiday lights, there will be live music by Memphis 56 plus a fabulous Champagne Raffle sponsored by Mark Loren Designs. Tickets are $35 per person, which includes a keepsake wine glass and a swag bag provided by Aubuchon Team of Companies. Several Bell Tower merchants will be offering special discounts during the two hour event. Pre-registered guests will have preferred check-in at 5:30 p.m. Advance tickets are available by contacting Ronald McDonald House at 437-0202 or online at www.rmhcswfl.org. Most major credit cards are accepted. Sponsorships are also available. Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southwest Floridas mission is to create, find and support programs that improve the health and well being of children in Lee, Charlotte, Collier, Glades and Hendry counties. Ronald McDonald House provides a home away from home for families of hospitalized children; Ronald McDonald Care Mobile delivers medical and dental services to underserved children; RMHC Scholarships are awarded to deserving high school seniors; and a Grants Program, provides assistance to other local childrens charities. For more information, visit www.rmhcswfl.org or call 437-0202.

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 201324 From page 22Job FairMyers Police Department; GameStop; Gartner; Hertz; Home Depot; Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort & Spa; Labor Ready; Lowes; NCH Healthcare System; RaceTrac Petroleum; Renaissance School; ReliabilityWeb.com; Seminole Casino Immokalee; Shell Point Retirement Community; Sundial Beach Resort and Spa; SunTrust Bank; SWFL Works; SymMetric Revenue Solutions; South Seas Island Resort; Target; U. S. Army and Wells Fargo Banks. We are very excited to welcome so many reputable organizations who are seeking employees for a variety of job roles, said Kevin Kennedy, Career Services Coordinator at Edison State College. We try to provide as many opportunities and services to our students for job placement when they graduate, but we also want to open this particular event to anyone searching for a job in Southwest Florida. For more information about Career Services at Edison State College, visit www.edison.edu/careerservices or call 489-9394. From page 22MurrayMurray began her Associa career at Association Services of Florida as the director of business development. She then served as the regional director of marketing and national sales for Associa headquarters. She has many years of experience with Associa and has served on numerous Boards pertaining to the community association industry. She has been the CEO and President of Associa Gulf Coast since 2012 and is involved in several community organizations. She is a Florida Licensed Community Association Manager (LCAM), has received the Certified Manager of Community Associations (CMCA) designation and holds the designation of Florida Emergency Management Volunteer (FEMV) as accredited via the Florida Emergency Preparedness Association (FEPA). To learn more about Associa and its charitable organization, Associa Cares, go to www.associaonline.com and www. associacares.com. Naples P layers Announce Upcoming S howThe Naples Players will perform The Mystery of Irma Vep in the Tobye Studio from October 30 through November 23. Mike Santos and Mark Vanagas will play seven roles in this quick-change send up of horror stories. Dallas Dunnagan will direct. Mike Santos is scenic designer and Dot Auchmoody is costume designer. Light and sound design will be done by Craig Walck. The show will be performed Wednesday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets are $25 for adults and $10 for children 21 and under and can be purchased at the box office by calling 239-263-7990 with credit card information, or by visiting naplesplayers.org. Sugden Community Theatre is located at 701 5th Avenue South on the Plaza in downtown Naples. Feline Adoption Fall P romotionThe Fall Frenzy September Adoption Promotion at Lee County Domestic Animal Services is nearing an end, but the shelter is still overflowing with felines. To boost cat and kitten adoptions even further LCDAS is featuring the following specials through September 30: Monday Night Football Madness Free cat and kitten adoptions Touchdown Tuesdays All felines $5 Winning Season Wednesday Adopt a cat or kitten for just $10 Three-and-Out Thursday Adopt two or more cats or kittens for $15 Fantasy Football Friday All felines $5 Sideline Saturdays Free cat and kitten adoptions During the Fall Frenzy Promotion, dogs 40 pounds and over are just $40. The adoption fee for all pets includes spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, flea treatment, de-worming, heartworm test for dogs six months or older, feline aids and leukemia test for cats, a Lee County license for pets three months or older, training DVD, Behavior Help Line, Microchip Pet ID, and a 10-day Health Guarantee. The total adoption package is valued at more than $500. Photos and information about lost pets or pets for adoption are available on the agencys website at www.leelostpets.com. Pet information on the website updates hourly. As part of the UnitedHealthcare and Florida 4-H Eat4-Health partnership, more than 70 4-H youth leaders from across the state gathered at Camp Cherry Lake in Madison, Florida on September 14 to learn important skills about eating healthy and the importance of exercise as part of a program aimed at reducing obesity rates among young people and families in Florida. The youth utilized the training they receive to be Teen Health Ambassadors and to bring their knowledge and skills back to their communities to promote healthy living at schools and special events to help reach thousands of residents about these important health issues. 4-H youth leaders divided into teams and were challenged to successfully complete a series of fitness obstacles and nutritional challenges during a day full of health and fitness activities modeled after Survivor-type competitions. 4-H youth leaders utilized the OptumizeMe smartphone application technology during the competitions to optimize their health and learning activities. UnitedHealthcares mascot Dr. Health E. Hound joined 4-H leaders as they worked together to complete a series of fitness challenges that included testing strength and endurance with fun exercises designed to burn calories as well as being able to advance to the next level of the competition by answering trivia questions on nutrition, diet and healthy living. TheUnitedHealthcare 4-H Eat4Health partnership is in its third year, already activating thousands of 4-H Teen Health Ambassadors to make healthy choices for themselves and in the communities where they live. The activities at the Camp Cherry Lake retreat are part of a series of trainings and events made possible by a $30,000 grant provided this year by UnitedHealthcare to the University of Florida Extension Service, which provides 4-H programs to all counties in the state. 4-H Teen Health Ambassadors Emily Glazier from Bonita Springs, along with Shelby French from LaBelle, Ben Burkey from Fort Myers, Kyle Marshall from Cape Coral and Krista Wyant from Fort Myers participated in a hula-hoop competition as part of Florida 4-H and UnitedHealthcare Eat4-Health partnership at Camp Cherry LakeLocal Youth P articipate In Survivor-T ype Competition E mail your editorial copy to: press@riverweekly.com

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25 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 2013DID YOU KNOW PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF S eE PT eE MB erER 30, 2013ARIES (March 21 to April 19) You might need to get more facts to help you work out those problems with your new project. As always, a friendly approach shows the charming Arian at his or her per suasive best. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Information is what energizes ambition, and this is a good time for the ambitious Bovine to expand his or her range of knowledge and to be ready for the challenges that lie ahead. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) This is a good time to consider making some longoverdue decorating changes at home or in your workplace. A splash of color can help raise spirits, even on the grayest day. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Learn more. Earn more. Thats the formula for Moon Children looking to expand their career horizons. Investigate the best places to get those training courses youll need. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Your creative side helps gain attention for many of your ideas. But dont neglect the practical aspects involved in implementing their move from paper to production. Good luck. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) A health problem should not be ignored. The sooner you check it out, the sooner you can deal with it and then move on. Some job advice comes from an unlikely source. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A relationship takes an unexpected shift that could leave you puzzled and hurt. Asking for an explanation could help uncover the reason for this sudden turn of events. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Your busy schedule has drawn down much of your energy levels. Restore them by spending a well-earned time out enjoying the arts -perhaps with that special someone. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Make that presentation with confidence. Remember: When you show you believe in yourself, it helps persuade others that you truly know what youre doing. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Although you usually prefer doing things on your own, a group effort might be advisable at this time. Try to keep an open mind about suggestions from colleagues. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) This could be a good time to reassess some of your recent decisions and see if any adjustments should be made based on facts that you might have just uncovered. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) An emotionally charged situation creates uncer tainty about the future of your relationship. Best advice: Talk things out while theres still time to reach a new understanding. BORN THIS WEEK: You tend to act on matters of principle despite what others might advise. William Penns offer of 5,000 acres of land in the colony of Pennsylvania and the freedom to practice their religion, the first Mennonites arrive in America aboard the Concord. The German Mennonites were founded in Europe by Menno Simons in the Andre, an accomplice of Benedict Arnold, is hanged as a spy by U.S. military forces in Tappan, N.Y. Andre wrote a letter to Gen. George Washington asking that he be executed by firing squad, that being a more gentlemanly death than hanging. Lincoln observes a balloon demonstration near Washington, D.C. Both Confederate and Union armies experimented with using balloons to gather military intelligence in the early stages of the war, but the balloons proved to be dangerous and impractical for most situations. Model T Ford is completed in Detroit. The cheapest one initially cost $825, or about $18,000 in todays dollars. It had a 22-horsepower, four-cylinder engine that could run on gasoline or hemp-based fuel. the worlds first nuclear submarine, is commissioned by the U.S. Navy. In August 1958, Nautilus accomplished the first voyage under the geographic North Pole. After a career spanning 25 years and almost 500,000 miles steamed, Nautilus was decommissioned in 1980. folk icon Woody Guthrie dies in New York. Guthrie, originally from Oklahoma, introduced a form of music called protest folk. Most famous was This Land Is Your wins the Nobel Prize for literature. Singer wrote in Yiddish about Jewish life in Poland and the United States, and translations of his work became popular in mainstream America as well as Jewish circles. One of his stories, Yentl, was made into a movie directed by and starring Barbra Streisand in 1983. made the following sage observation: A consensus means that everyone agrees to say collectively what no one believes individually. been known to try to mate with cars. dress is made of silk will have good fortune in her marriage. A woman who wears velvet to her wedding will face poverty, and a satin wedding gown will bring bad luck. quakes around the world every year. being buried alive, so at his request, after his death his heart was removed, preserved in alcohol and returned to his native country, Poland. Once in Warsaw, the urn containing Cross Church with the inscription, For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also. after a mythical island of Amazon women ruled by a warrior queen named Califa. and tried to pass legislation mandating a $100 fine for public flatulence, crepitation, gaseous emission and miasmic effluence. breeder of chickens, one might venture to guess) submitted a request to patent eyeglasses for chickens, designed to prevent injury due to pecking by other chickens. The request was refused. of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World still in existence. Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and Im not sure about the former. -Albert Einstein THIS WEEK IN HISTORY strSTR A nN G eE BU tT trTR U eE thoTHO UG htHT F orOR theTHE DA yY 8. FAM OUS QUOTATIONS: What comedian observed, Everywhere is within walking TRIVI aA TES tT burg 10. Woodrow Wilsons. ANSWERS SpSP OR tT S QUIZ 1. Name the last team before San Francisco in 2012 whose starting pitchers earned victories while allowing one run or less in the first three games of the W orld Series. 3. When was the last time in franchise history before 2012 that the Arizona Cardinals started an NCAA championship in 1998. Name two of the three teams. 5. When was the last time before 2013 that there was a three-overtime game in the Stanley Cup three of them. ANSWERS

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 201326 Read us online at IslandSunNews.com BUILDING CONTRACTOR COMPUTERS FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the bene ts of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 GENERAL CONTRACTOR N C R CGC1517615www.dbrowngc.com239-593-1998 A BBB Accredited Business with an +A Rating FISHING CHARTER Light Tackle Sport Fishing CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.com Florida Swordfish Sliders 4 3-ounce swordfish steaks, skinless 4 leaves romaine lettuce leaves 1 large tomato, sliced 1/2 small red onion, sliced 4 small rolls, toasted 2 tablespoons low-fat mayonnaise 1/2 lemon, juiced 2 teaspoons blackened seasoning 4 grape tomatoes, for garnish Oil for cooking In a small mixing bowl, combine mayonnaise, lemon juice and 1 tablespoon of the blackened seasoning. Stir to combine and store in the refrigerator until needed. Preheat a medium-sized saut over medium heat. Use 1 tablespoon of the blackened seasoning to season both sides of all four swordfish steaks. Add 1 tablespoon of oil to the preheated saut pan. Carefully add the seasoned swordfish steaks to the saut pan. Cook swordfish steaks for 2 or 3 minutes on both sides or until they are completely done. Remove swordfish steaks from pan and let them cool slightly on a paper towel. Make sliders by evenly layering the tomato, lettuce, and onion on each of the four rolls. Place the swordfish steaks on each of the buns and top with the mayonnaise sauce and roll top. Garnish each of the swordfish sliders with the grape tomatoes on a toothpick. Florida Swordfish Sliders

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27 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 answer on page 27 PUZZLE ANSWERS SUDOKU SCRAMBLERS FIND AT LEAST SIX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PANELS PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY To advertise in The River Weekly NewsCall 415-7732 CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING CONTRACTOR G I P M SR C D P D P CG D GrSince 2001, A Southwest Florida Paver Contractor www.gigicompanies.com 239-541-7282Schedule free estimates or visit our new show roomLic.# S3-12238 TREE & LAWN CARE Jesus Hernandez LANDSCAPING & TREE SERVICE 482-7350 We Service All your Landscape Needs FULL Landscaping SERVICES Over 20 years serving San-Cap & Ft. Myers

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 201328 REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS 3883 Sanibel Captiva Road, Sanibel, Fl Phone: 239-472-3644, ext 1 Fax: 239-472-2334 www.crowclinic.orgH ELEL P U SS P LEASELEASE !!We need volunteers for: Clinic emergency patient admissions desk and baby animal feeders Visitor education center greeters and gift shop cashiers CROW (239) 472-3644, ext. 231 or volunteers@crowclinic.orgRS 1/4 NC TFN hH EL pP WANTEDVO LL U NTEERSNTEERS NEEDEDNEEDED Volunteers needed for the After School Program which runs Mon.-Th, 2:30 3:15 pm call Linda Reynolds 472-1617RS 1/4 NC TFN RR OG ERER NN O DRDR UFF ELEELE C TRTR ICLic# EC12002788. Call Roger 239-707-7203. Aqualink Motor Controls. RS 6/7 CC TFN ScSC ARNAT oO LL AWN SS ER vicVIC ELawn Service, Shrubs and Tree Trimming Weeding, Installation of Plants, Trees and Mulch (one month free service available) Joe Scarnato (239) 849-6163 scarnatolawn@aol.comRS 1/25 BM TFN SANSAN IB ELEL HOM EE WATWA T CHRetired Police Captain Lives on Sanibel Will Check Your Home Weekly Very Reasonable Rates (239) 728-1971RS 1/4 BM TFN SER vicVIC ES offOFF EREDH omOM E/CO NDND O WW AT chCHco CO N ciCI ER gG E SER vicVIC ESDorado Property Management Full Range of Services Island Resident 24/7 Call Lisa or Bruce at 239-472-8875RS 1/4 BM TFN HELLES CLEAN iI N gG SS ER vicVIC ESResidential Cleaning to Satisfaction Sanibel Lic. #11412 Lee Co. Lic. #051047NS 1/4 PC TFN ANN uU AL RENTALQUI ETET SANSAN IB ELEL HOM EE WW /P RR IV ATEATE B EAEA CH P ATAT H3200 sq ft home in Gulf Pines, one of communities. One house from beach w/private beach path. Short walk to Gulf large landscaped lot provides privacy. 3-4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, large open living W/D, 2nd fridge, Elevator, 2-car garage. $4,000/mo. + util. Annual rental only. fees paid by owner. Avail Oct 2013. Call 917-680-4440.NS 5/31 CC TFN RERE /M AA X OF TT H EE I SLANDSSLANDS Putting owners and tenants together Call Dustyn Corace www.remax-oftheislands.com 239-472-2311RS 1/4 BM TFN ISABELLA RASiIHAPPY TO HELP Y YOUWithITH A ALL OOF Y YOUrRREAL EEStT At TE NEEDS! RS 1/4 NC TFN 1101 Periwinkle WW ay #105 SS anibel, F LL 33957 ISABELLA RASiI (239) 246-4716E ISABELLARASi I@AOL.COM vV A cC AT ioIO N RENTAL Island VacationsMillion $ Views Await You! Cottages Condos Homes 239-472-72771-888-451-7277RS 1/4 BM TFN LL IGH TT HOU SESE REALTREALT YPaul J. Morris, Broker VACATION RENTALS 359 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel Island 239-579-0511RS 1/4 CC TFN VO LL U NTEERSNTEERS NEEDEDNEEDED At The Sanibel School Call Michelle Wesley 239-910-8000RS 1/4 NC TFN hH EL pP WANTEDC ompOMP AN ioIO N/HEL pP ERSome meal prep and light housekeeping. Good Driving record. References Required. 239-437-1991 or 239-223-0660.NS 9/27 NC 9/27 VO LL U NTEERNTEER OPPO RTRT U NN I TT YThe Sunshine Ambassador Program is a new and exciting volunteer opportunity offered at the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida located within HealthPark Medical Center. The Sunshine Ambassadors will greet, assist and be a families and visitors entering the hospital. The Ambassadors also make a difference to families by providing educational and healthful resources to assist in GRANDparenting for GRANDchildren. We are currently seeking year-round volunteers to work one 4-hour shift Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm or 12:00pm to 4:00 pm. If you would be interested in learning more about this wonderful new opportunity, please contact Lisa Ellinwood, Volunteer Resources Coordinator at 239-343-5062 at the Golisano Childrens Hospital.NS 2/8 NC TFN SARASSARAS O TATA TT IM ESES H AREARE FO RR RENTRENT Located on Lido Beach overlooking the Gulf. Week 40 Oct 5th to the 12th, 2013. Limetree Beach Resort, 1050 Ben Franklin Drive, Sarasota, FL. Bargain! $750. Call Pauline at 239-481-3981.NS 9/20 CC 9/27 T imIM E S hH ARE ANN uU AL RENTALS FO RTRT MY ERSERSREDRED UC EDED P RR IC EE C ANALANAL & DD OCK Five Minutes to Sanibel T oll-Booth!! This UF ground level updated home offers 3 BR/2 BA + family room, double garage, screened in pool, 65 boat dock, + boat lift for boat. $1,800/mo. 472-6747Gulf Beach Properties, Inc. Paul H. Zimmerman, Broker/Ownersanibelannualrentals.comServing The Islands Rental Needs Since 1975 RS 9/27 BM TFNC uU ST omOM ER SS ER vicVIC ETarpon Bay Explorers has an opening for part-time associates to work in the Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge selling tickets for the tram tour and greeting and collecting entrance fees for Wildlife Drive. Must enjoy customer service and helping visitors. Must also be able to operate a basic cash register and credit card processor. Please email resume to EcoErler@aol.com or stop in at 900 Tarpon Bay Road NS 9/27 CC 10/4 TO PLA cC E AA CLA ssSS I fF IED LL OG OntONT O: IslandSunNews.com cCLIcCK OnNPLACE CLASSIFIED

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29 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 CLASSIFIED DEADLINE FRIDAY AT NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS BOATS CANOES KAYAKSDOCKAGEHourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-5800RS 1/4 NC TFN 22-FOOT GLACIER BAY CATAMARANIn good condition. Needs some detailing and a high pressure fuel pump. $9,000 or best offer. The boat was donated to the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) for quick sale. Contact James Robinson at CROW at (239) 472-3644, ext. 221 or development@ crowclinig.org. Or contact Peg Albert at (239) 472-3644, ext. 232 or peg@ crowclinic.org. RS 7/26 NC TFN FOUNDPrescription sunglasses found in parking lot of Limetree Center on Wednesday, February 27. Claim at Island Sun newspaper, suite 2 in Limetree Center, or call 395-1213.NS 3/8 NC TFN TOOL BOX WASHES UP ON SANIBELThis tool box with motor parts washed up on shore Saturday morning, May 8 about 8:30 on the beach at Sundial Resort on Sanibel Island. To claim call Sundial Resort Security 239-472-4151.NS 6/14 CC TFN LOST AND F OUND The Island Sun and The River Weekly NewsAlways on the table, and online, with everything you need to know about your community. NEWSPAPERSanibel & Captiva IslandsTHEIVER R r rf WEEKL Y NEWS Serving Sanibel, Captiva and Fort Myers since 1993 Phone 395-1213 or 415-7732 Pick up a copy or go to IslandSunNews.com. Click on Read the Island Sun or The River Weeklywww.IslandSunNews.com W ANTED TO BUYCASH P AID FOR MILITARY ITEMSCash Paid For Old Military Items. Medals, Swords, Uniforms, helmets, old guns, awards & more. Local Toll Free 1-866-440-3280RS 9/6 CC 11/29 P ETSFREE KITTEN TO GOOD HOMEFree kitten to good, safe home. No de-clawing. Fiesty Bengal mix. Call 472-1788 after 5 p.m.NS 5/31 NC TFN F OR SALETWIN BEDSTwo Twin Antique Maple Beds and Night Tables Excellent Condition. $400. New mattresses/box springs available. 395-0041NS 9/20 CC 9/27 AUTO F OR SALE2008 HYUNDAI GLS SONATA40K milage Good Shape Call Ed 239-472-5065NS 9/20 CC 9/27 2001 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER LIMITED2001 Toyota Highlander Limited with Leather,only 75K miles. Luxury Island Car. Kelly Book Value $12,870 Quick Sale $10,000. Call Tony 472-8885 or 851-4288.NS 9/27 CC 9/27 To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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If you would like your club/organization listed in The River Calling Card, phone 415-7732Emergency ......................................................................................... 911 Lee County Sheriffs Of ce ........................................................ 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol ................................................................ 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol .............................................................. 278-7100 Poison Control ................................................................ 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center .......................................1-800-936-5321Ft. Myers Chamber of Commerce ............................................. 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare .............................................. 425-2685 Ft. Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce .................................. 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library ......................................................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library ............................................................ 533-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce .......................................... 931-0931 Post Of ce ..................................................................... 1-800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau ..................................................... 338-3500 ARTS Alliance for the Arts .................................................................. 939-2787 Art of the Olympians Museum & Gallery ................................... 332-5055 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio .................................................. 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers ......................................................... 275-3970 Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall ...................................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS ................................................................................ 395-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre ............................................... 278-4422 Cultural Park Theatre ................................................................ 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light ............................................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade .................................. 332-4488 Florida West Arts ...................................................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers ....................................... 472-0168 Gulf Coast Symphony ............................................................... 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres ..................................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic ........................................................... 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater ......................................................... 472-6862 S.W. Florida Symphony ............................................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy .................................................................. 936-3239 Young Artists Awards ................................................................ 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAngel Flight ................................................................ 1-877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center ............................................................... 731-3535 American Business Women Association ................................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL ..................................................................... 339-8046 Audubon Society ....................................................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR .................................................. 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society ................................................... 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus ................................. 1-855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club ............................................................ 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees ....................................................... 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists ............................................................ 415-2484 Ft Myers UDC Chapter 2614 (United Daughters of the Confederacy .................................. 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL ...................................................... 561-9164 The Horticulture and Tea Society ............................................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society ................................................................. 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society ............................................. 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation ........................................... 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees ............. 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America .......................................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL .................................................... 667-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans .................................................. 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy ........................................ 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association ........................................ 561-2118 Kiwanis Clubs: Fort Myers Beach ................................................. 765-4254 or 454-8090 Fort Myers Edison ..................................................................... 694-1056 Fort Myers South ...................................................................... 691-1405 Gateway to the Islands .............................................................. 415-3100 Iona-McGregor .......................................................................... 482-0869Lions Clubs:Fort Myers Beach ...................................................................... 463-9738 Fort Myers High Noon ............................................................... 466-4228 Estero/South Fort Myers ........................................................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County .............................................. 768-0417 POLO Club of Lee County ......................................................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers ......................................................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society ................................................ 472-6940 United Way of Lee County ........................................................ 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) ................................. 211 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews Shell Museum ................................................ 395-2233 Burroughs Home ...................................................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium ........................................ 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates ................................................... 334-3614 Fort Myers Skate Park .............................................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium ............................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge ................................ 472-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site .............................................. 239-992-0311 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center ....................... 765-8101 Skatium ...................................................................................... 321-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society ........................................ 939-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History ...................................... 321-7430 True Tours ................................................................................. 945-0405 Pets Of The Week SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 27 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 201330 Hello, my name is Echo. Im a 4 month old male blue brindle and white American Staffordshire Terrier. My brother Sky and sister Fiona also need homes. They look just like me, and we are all adorable and sweet. We tend to be a little on the shy side, but love us and well love you back forever. My siblings and I have a special adoption fee of just $25 each! Hello, my name is Taylor. I am a 5 month old female black and white domestic shorthair cat. My sister Maggie and I are quiet little kitties that love to play together. We would love to stay together, too. The good news is, you can adopt us both for one low adoption fee! Check out the great Animal Services Fall Frenzy Feline Adoption Specials, which are running anywhere from free up to $10 depending on the day of the week. For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to Animal Services website at www.LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if three months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs six months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500. Taylor ID# 566416 Echo ID# 572007 photos by squaredogphoto.com

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BEACH CHAIR PASTIMEAnswers on page 25 31 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 27, 2013

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