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River weekly news ( July 12, 2013 )

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River weekly news
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Newspaper
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Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
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Fort Myers, Fla
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July 12, 2013
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University of Florida
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Title:
River weekly news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date:
July 12, 2013
Publication Date:

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Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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UF00101363:00194


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FREETake Me Home VOL. 12, NO. 37 SEPTEMBER 20, 2013From the B eaches to the R iver District downtown Fort M yersRead Us Online at IslandSunNews.com Artists R eception At ACT Gallery Arts for ACT Gallery will host an opening reception during Art Walk on Friday, October 4 from 6 to 10 p.m.This month, the gallery will feature the Protest Proposal series by David Acevedo in the main gallery. Also showing will be works by Xavier Brignoni and Art of the DisAbled. After a self-imposed artistic hiatus, visual artist and former art gallery owner David Acevedo presents a new series of paintings that mark a transitional period in his career. The Protest Proposal series explores a different side of the artist with darker and more suggestive subjects. Acevedo became known in Southwest Florida for his vibrant and aggressively textured paintings with impeccant whimsy. Color is still a big part of my work. I am simply exchanging the tones because the style of these new paintings demands it, said Acevedo. I am opening up a bit more in regards to my personal beliefs, disbeliefs, points of view and social opinion. Acevedo was born in Puerto Rico. He moved to Southwest Florida in 2000 and in 2007 opened his first professional studio. In 2008 he opened daas Gallery in the heart of downtown Fort Myers. Along with a group of gallery owners, he cofounded the Fort Myers Art Walk, which now celebrates its fifth year. In 2009, Acevedo was awarded Visual Artist of the Year during the Lee Countys Angel of the Arts ceremony. During his gallery owner years, he discovered and promoted many emerging artists including Veron Ennis, Joe Lemay, Troy Thomas and Willow. He curated numerous exhibitions for his gallery and other art spaces around town and collaborated with international artist Ronnie Ford in the creation of the Vibrant Arts Movement or VAM, which promotes arts through exhibitions, performance and culinary arts in Europe and the United States. Xavier Brignoni was an artist before he became an artist. Being a custom framer by trade for over 10 years, he learned to admire and love art in all shapes and styles. Photography was an ever-present medium in his life. His father, an avid amateur photographer, had cameras and continued on page 16E dison State College P resents Fall Film SeriesThe Rush Library at Edison State College will present a free screening of three films for the fall 2013 film series. The first film, When You Feel Love, which was shown at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival, will be featured at 7 p.m. on Friday, September 20; the second film, Persepolis, will be featured at 7 p.m. on Friday, October 4. The final film in the series, The Singularity is Near, will be screened at 7 p.m. on Monday, November 18. All films will be shown in the Rush Library Auditorium on the Edison State College Campus in Fort Myers. Our region has a strong love for theater and the arts, and Edison State College wants to create additional opportunities for students, and anyone with a passion for the arts, to participate in more than classroom experiences, said Jane Bigelow, faculty librarian and adjunct history professor at Edison State College. The opening film, When You Feel Love, follows the story of a young man who comes to understand what it really means to be in love after realizing his previous mistakes. This film was directed by Edison State College Fine Arts Adjunct Professor Steve Chase and features music composed by Chris Ludvigsen, Rush Library circulation services assistant. Edison State College alumni Jed Krause and Willie Filkowski star in this short film, which was featured in the Short Film Corner at the prestigious Cannes Film Festival in May. Light refreshments will be served prior to the screening and a Q&A with the director and composer will take place following the 25-minute film. The second film, Persepolis, is a story about Marji, an audacious and outspoken Iranian girl who grows up in Iran and Austria during the Islamic Revolution. This film was directed by Vincent Paronnaud and Marjane Satrapi. Nathan Lee with The Village Voice says, Youd have to be blind not to see the excellence of Persepolis, an affecting, amusing, visually arresting adaptation of Marjane Satrapis graphic-novel memoir about growing up during the Iranian Revolution and coming of age amid the punk-rock intellectuals of Vienna. The final film in the 2013 Rush Library Film Series, The Singularity is Near, is based on Ray Kurzweils New York Times bestselling book The Singularity is Near: when Humans Transcend Biology. The film is part documentary, part science fiction, and explores transhumanism and the evolving union of human and machine. This film is being screened as part of the Humanities Colloquiums Dueling Documentaries event in November. Edison State College Humanities Professors Wendy Chase and Catherine Wilkins facilitates the Humanities Colloquium. To learn more about the series, visit http://www.edison.edu/library/filmseries.To RSVP, contact Jane Bigelow at jbigelow@edison.edu. Persepolis Artwork by David Acevedo Artwork by Xavier Brignoni Nancy Cameron-Smiths Inner Child

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Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: Fort Myers Incorporates Againby Gerri Reaves, PhDThis circa 1910 photo shows us the heart of downtown Fort Myers not long before its incorporation as a city. The photographer who took this photo stood in the intersection at First and Jackson Streets and shot a marching band proceeding west and into the distance on First. Within four years, all the wooden structures on both sides of this block between Jackson and Hendry would be replaced by brick or stone ones. Indeed, the business district would soon take on a more citified appearance. Of course, this was not the first incorporation for Fort Myers. The 45 fathers of Fort Myers had voted unanimously to incor porate as a town on August 12, 1885, and the state legislature made it official the following March. However, 25 years later, the towns growth and change in self-image, as well as the influx of influential out-of-town investors and new citizens, prompted a reassessment. On May 23, 1911, Florida Gov. Albert W. Gilchrist signed the act that endowed Fort Myers with city status. By that time, a building boom was already starting, and no block reflected it more than the one shown here. In 1910, construction would start on the Bank of Fort Myers Building on the southwest corner at Jackson (far left in photo). The bank replaced the two-story balconied structure, the former Towles & Hendry Store. The Langford Building (now Miller Building) was built next to the bank the following year. The 193-foot Earnhardt Building followed in 1913, and in 1914, commencement on the First National Bank at the Hendry corner finished off the block. On the north side, the Bradford Hotel continued to expand, and the Heitman Arcade and Theatre were completed by the mid-19-teens. After city incorporation, the town council carried on much as usual for several months. But on July 22, a very long list of names was stricken from the voter registration rolls in readiness for the August 1 election. Almost all names were stricken for non-payment of polls, with left town and dead being the two other reasons. The fact that the serving town officials were returned to city office ensured a smooth transition. Among the returnees were familiar names in political, civic and business history: Mayor Louis A. Hendry and city councilmen William H. Towles, chairman; Harvie E. Heitman; Larkin M. Stroup; Andrew L. Kinzie; Robert A. Henderson, assessor; and William L. Long, clerk. Within days of the election, the city council held a special meeting and raised valuations on real and personal property. The increases were significant in many cases. The council also scheduled a special meeting to hear the inevitable complaints and requests that resulted. It wasnt long before a perennial issue arose: the need for public amenities. As proponents pointed out repeatedly, there was no public park, recreation center or pier, or even good road system. Finally, long-time advocates for a public recreation pier on the Caloosahatchee got their wish. The citys very first amenity, the recreation pier at the foot of Fowler Street, was opened in spring 1913, funded by both the council and private donations. (That pier no longer exists, having been destroyed to make way for the first Edison Bridge, which opened in 1930 and was dedicated in 1931.) In the 128 years since the town fathers voted to incorporate, many things have changed more than once -government structure and town insignia, to name only two. But disputes about some issues never go away: tax levels, the funding of schools The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, please call (239) 415-7732 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, FL 33901. Fax number: (239) 415-7702. E-mail: press@riverweekly.com. The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Co-Publishers Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Isabel Rasi Office Coordinator Graphic Arts/ProductionAnn Ziehl Photographer Michael Heider Writers Anne Mitchell Jeff Lysiak PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Contributing Writers Read Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com Click on The River Ed Frank Max Friedersdorf Tom Hall Only four years after Fort Myers incorporated as a city, every building now standing on this block had been constructed photo by Gerri Reaves Circa 1910, First Street between Jackson and Hendry still looked like a 19th century pioneer town, with an unpaved business district and decades-old wooden structures courtesy of the Florida State ArchivesTHE riRI VE rR SE pP TE mM BE rR 20, 20132

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3 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 and roads, the best use for the riverfront, and how to encourage desirable growth. Other constant factors through history? Cooperation and its opposite. Walk down First Street and ponder how much has changed and has not since pioneer Fort Myers took the big leap to city status. Then stroll a few blocks to the Southwest Florida Museum of History at 2031 Jackson Street to see exhibits that capture the downtown of that era. For information, call 3217430 or go to www.museumofhistory.org. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Then travel south of downtown to the favorite research center of local history buffs the Southwest Florida Historical Society. Explore the archives and peruse historic photos that bring old Fort Myers to life. The all-volunteer non-profit organization is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Drop by on Wednesday or Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon, or call them at 939-4044. Sources: Archives of the Southwest Florida Historical Society and The Story of Fort Myers by Karl H. Grismer. Students Honor Local Heroes Every year on September 11, Crestwell school students honor and celebrate local firefighters, EMS, and police officers. These local heroes are invited to the school each year for a commemorative ceremony recognizing their service to the community. The students dress in red, white and blue, recite the Pledge of Allegiance, and serenade their local heroes with patriotic songs. After the ceremony, refreshments are served and the local heroes are given heartfelt letters, notes and artwork from the students, thanking them for their service. Crestwell students with New York firefighter Ken Davis, who was a first responder to the Twin Towers on September 11, 2001 Crestwell students Maia Howard, Katya Samson, Emma Ugi, Rachel Mandelkorn and Alexa Jones 33 Patio DeLeon, Downtown Fort Myers (239) 337-3377OPEN Tues-ur 11am-10pm, Fri 11am-11pm, Sat 3-11pm Closed Sun & Mon Lazy Flamingo, Inc. 6520-C Pine Avenue Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-5353 Lazy Flamingo 3, Inc. 16501 Stringfellow Rd Bokeelia, FL 33922 239-283-5959 Lazy Flamingo 2, Inc. 1036 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-6939 Lazy Flamingo 4, Inc. 12951 McGregor Blvd. Ft. Myers, FL 33919 239-476-9000 Four Great Locations! We have the NFL Ticket Package and the BIG TEN Network NOW SERVING FULL LIQUOR IN FORT MYERS 20 Wings & Domestic Pitcher for $20 during all College and Pro GamesF M

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 20134 Airport Secures Funding For New Air Traffic Control Tower ProjectThe Lee County Port Authority (LCPA) has secured nearly $45 million in funding to begin design and construction of the new Air Traffic Control Tower (ATCT) and Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) project at Southwest Florida International Airport (RSW). LCPA has been awarded $22.8 million in grant funds from the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) and received authorization from the Federal Aviation Administration to use $22 million in Passenger Facility Charges (PFC) for the new ATCT, as part of the airports Parallel Runway project. LCPA is very pleased by the endorsement from our airlines, funding from FDOT and the FAAs PFC approval to move forward on construction of the new control tower at Southwest Florida International Airport truly the linchpin for progress and growth at RSW, said Robert M. Ball, AAE, executive director of the Lee County Port Authority. The parallel runway has been the boards vision and part of the airports master plan since the early 1990s and each piece of the project gets us one step closer to it becoming a reality. We applaud the FAA for recognizing the importance for increasing capacity of the air transportation infrastructure in our region. This is a large, long-term capital project for LCPA, which will take approximately five years to complete. The funding authorization allows the airport to proceed with design, relocation and construction of a new RSW ATCT and TRACON. The new tower will be almost twice as tall as the existing one, at 215 feet, and will double the building footprint size to nearly 17,000 square feet to meet current FAA standards for operations and personnel, as well as incorporating the latest building and hurricane codes. Work in progress related to this project is the Apron and Taxiway Expansion, which will eventually connect to the 9,100-foot parallel runway. Already complete is the relocation and construction of Southwest Florida International Airports Aircraft Rescue & Fire Fighting Station. Southwest Florida International Airport served more than 7.3 million passengers in 2012 and is one of the top 50 U.S. airports for passenger traffic. No ad valorem (property) taxes are used for airport operation or construction. For more information, visit www.flylcpa.com or go on Facebook at www.facebook.com/flyRSW. Sneakers Donated To Boys & Girls ClubsSneakers for Students, a program established by IHOP and IHOPE charities to provide new sneakers to children in need, donated more than 70 pairs of sneakers to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Lee County. The sneakers were collected from participating IHOP restaurants. It was such a joy to see the smiling faces of the children who received the new shoes, said Shannon Lane, chief professional officer of the BGCLC. The simple experience of receiving new shoes can empower a child and set him or her up for success. The generosity of our community is truly overwhelming. This is such a help, said one foster parent of three children at the BGCLC. New shoes werent in our household budget, and I know my children were upset about wearing old shoes to school. The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs is to inspire and enable young people to realize their full potential as productive, responsible and caring citizens. The clubs provide safe places where children can learn, grow, receive help with homework and develop coping skills that assist them in avoiding destructive influences in a fast-paced, complex world. Membership dues are $10 per school year. The organization relies upon the philanthropic support of individuals, corporations and foundations in order to sustain and grow its services. For more information about the Boys & Girls Clubs of Lee County or to arrange a tour, call 334-1886 or visit www.BGCLC.net. Happy BGCLC members Charity Beach Ball ScheduledThe Fort Myers Beach Community Foundations 2nd annual Charity Beach Ball will take place on Saturday, November 2 at DiamondHead Beach Resort. The Beach Ball is a black-tie optional silent auction with an open bar from 6 to 8 p.m., dinner and dancing with The Marc Vee Band. This years special guest is NBC-2s Senior Chief Meteorologist Robert Van Winkle. Tickets are $95 per person or buy a table of 10 for $875 and save $75. Tickets are available online at www.charitybeachball.com or by mail: Fort Myers Beach Community Foundation Charity Beach Ball, PO Box 2834, Fort Myers Beach, FL 33931. Thanks to all the generous supporters and attendees, the foundation was able to support many local causes and provide scholarships to three outstanding students last year. Check out the website http://www. charitybeachball.com/ to see the list of donors. For more information, call Nicole at 849-1460 or email nbennettdc@ yahoo.com. Open Monday Saturday www.threecraftyladies.com Find us on WE WILL PAY YOUR TOLL!!!Spend $55 and bring us your toll receipt for a full refund! Kiwanis Fundraiser To Support Regional Science FairThe Fort Myers Kiwanis Club will hold the Kool Science Event fundraiser on October 17 from 6 to 9:30 p.m. at The Edison Restaurant, 3583 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. Proceeds will help to fund the Thomas Alva Edison Kiwanis Science and Engineering Fair. The Kool Science Event will include buffet dinner, science superhero mystery contest and silent auction. Tickets are $58 per person and must be purchased in advance at www.koolscienceevent. com. The Fort Myers Kiwanis Club annually supports the Thomas Alva Edison Kiwanis Science and Engineering Fair by providing volunteer staff support and fundraising to pay in excess of $15,000 for travel expenses of winners to the state and international competitions, scholarships, trophies and other awards at the local level. This year the fair will be held January 25 at Harborside Event Center in Fort Myers. In addition to learning about their specific project, students learn logic, scientific method, organizational skills, creativity and presentation skills, said Nathan Fred Shaw of the Fort Myers Kiwanis Club, We are counting on the public to help support our fundraisers or become a sponsor to keep the fair going for our local students. The Fort Myers Kiwanis Club is a community service organization that meets every Wednesday at noon at Kiwanis Hall at 2nd Street and Woodford Avenue. For more information on the Fort Myers Kiwanis Club or the Kool Science Event, e-mail Nathan Fred Shaw at nathanfmkiwanis@gmail.com or call 297-1551. To find a Kiwanis club in your area, contact Div. 19 Kiwanis Lt. Gov. Robert Jarrett at rtj1938@gmail.com or 248-9100. Saturday Art FairThe sidewalks of First Street will be full of art and craft vendors on Saturday, October 19, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Some 35 local art vendors are selling their original art, unique jewelry, photography, stained glass, fused on First Street in downtown Fort Myers. Organizerzs say its a great time to enjoy the downtown Fort Myers galleries, shops and the Saturday Art Fair at a slower and less crowded pace. The Saturday Art Fair takes place the third Saturday of each month from October through April and offers the opportunity to support local artists and buy hand-made items. Artists wishing to join in the event may contact Claudia at cgoode@actabuse.com or call Arts for ACT Gallery at 337-5050.

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5 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 2013Fort Myers Public Art: Sinking World Exhibit Opens October 4by Tom HallUntil now, the Sinking World exhibition has only been available to divers. That changes on Friday, October 4 when the deep water art show will finally be unveiled at the Alliance for the Arts. Since June, 12 large surreal images encased in steel-framed Plexiglas have been attached by magnets to a 165foot long WWII-era Coast Guard cutter sunk off the coast of Sanibel. the USS Mohawk was scuttled there in 2012 to serve as an artificial reef, beneficial to sea life and attractive to divers. But Austrian photographer Andreas Franke has made The Mohawk his personal underwater art studio. Franke took photographs of the sunken ship and superimposed over them images of actors dressed in 1940s costumes that he shot in his studio in Vienna. The scenes depict the life the Mohawks sailors led while aboard the ship, as well as the ones they dreamed of back home. The Mohawk launched 14 attacks against German U-boats, rescued 300 torpedoed ship survivors, and was the last ship to radio General Dwight D. Eisenhower that the weather was clearing for the D-Day invasion. Its going to be like Christmas, said the Alliances Pam Beckman, barely able to contain her excitement. It will be like opening a present to see how (the marine life) has affected it. This is Frankes second such exhibition in the United States. He also created images for the 1950s-era USS Vandenberg about a mile offshore from Key West. Franke will be on hand at the 5 to 7:30 p.m. opening reception, and will host a Gallery Walk at 10 a.m. on Saturday, October 5, during which hell answer questions about his process and inspiration. The Sinking World exhibition will be on display in the Main Gallery from October 4 through October 28. Artwork by Beverly Taht will be featured in the Member Gallery. Taht recently took Best of Show honors at Arts for ACTs 6th annual Open Theme Juried Group Show in July for her impressionist cityscape Tuscany Shadows. Taht has been painting since she retired. She works primarily in oils, but intrigued by the millions of beading materials from which to choose, Taht also expresses her creative talents in the form of art jewelry. Although her 2D work tends to gravitate toward realism, she aspires to a freer, continued on page 6 Austrian artist Andreas Franke made the USS Mohawk his personal underwater art studio RIV RIV Nellies Upstairs Waterside Bar Where its Happy Hour all the time!!! 10% OFF Offer valid with Cash payments only ... No credit cards. ONE COUPON PER TABLE Can not be used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, Expires Sept. 27, 2013 Lunch, Dinner Snacks in Between11am-10pm www.nervousnellies.net FREE MARINA DOCKAGE with Dock Attendants Assistance PLUS LIVE MUSIC!

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 20136 Hortoons Family Fun At Free Fall FestivalNorth Fort Myers Community Park is hosting the annual Fall Festival, Friday, October 25 from 6-9 p.m. This is a free event for the community. Children in costume (up to 200) will receive a free bag of safe candy after the costume contest. Activities will include inflatable bouncers, family entertainment and give-aways. The North Fort Myers Knights concession stand will be selloing food and nonalcoholic drinks). All local area businesses are invited to set up a 10 x 10 booth area decorated with a fall theme and advertise their business for free. Businesses are encouraged to have small give-aways for the children such as candy, key chains, coupons, etc. The Fall Festival, in its 12th year, has drawn over 1,500 people in the past. Volunteers and donations are encouraged. For more information, call James at 652-4512. From page 5Sinking Worldmore fluid impressionist style especially when I am painting in France, like at Monets garden in Giverny. Her motifs include portraits, florals, wildlife art and landscapes that are richly informed by her extensive travels. Visit www.ArtInLee.org or call 9392787 for more information or to become an Alliance member. The Alliance for the Arts proudly supports artists and arts organizations in our area as the state designated Local Arts Agency for Lee County. The Alliance for the Arts galleries and gift shop are open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays at 10091 McGregor Boulevard, just south of Colonial Boulevard. An arts advocate, Tom Hall guides weekly walking tours of the River Districts public art collection in Fort Myers. For more information, go to truetours.net. Call for departure time CAPTIVACRUISES H T H E I S L A N D S H THE BEST WAY TO SEE THE ISLANDS IS FROM THE WATER Cruises depart from beautiful Captiva Island Send your editorial copy to: press@riverweekly.com Shop & Stroll In The River DistrictFort Myers Historic River District announces a new monthly shopping event promotion called Shop & Stroll, beginning on Saturday, October 5. Shop & Stroll will be held the first Saturday, every month, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Customers are invited to Shop & Stroll downtown Fort Myers retail stores on a shopping adventure. Participating shops will have passports that include a map with all the retail stores and their locations listed. Customers will be asked to stop by each shop and have their passport validated. All completed passports will be dropped off at the last shop and entered into a drawing with one winner chosen to receive a Shop & Stroll Boutique Basket from the downtown Fort Myers retail merchants. In addition, every month the merchants will be decorating their store windows. Shop & Stroll customers will also be asked to vote for their favorite store window as they shop. Shop & Stroll includes more than 20 retail Mom and Pop shops downtown: The Franklin Shops, Enjewel, The Art of Fashion and Moore, River District Florist, Linen Cottage, Cats Meow, Charme, The Open Door Shoppes on Hendry Street, Naples Soap Co., Wisteria Tea Room & Caf Gift Shop, The Nest Home and Garden, Market Earth, Rossy Fashion Accessories, Main Street Antiques, Arts for ACT Gallery, Goodwill Boutique on First, Mother Natures Gift Shop at The Butterfly Estates, He, She and Me, Vapin on Hendry Street and Dr. Bruce H. Senior OD. Shop & Stroll begins on Saturday, October 5 and is held the first Saturday of every month, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Shop & Stroll features River District Rewards such as downtown discounts, special giveaways, trunk shows, wine tastings, boutique items and more. www.SeabreezeNurseries.com (239) 560-1422 WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY We can help! Ask about our Season Discount! Palms, Palms, natives, natives, crotons, crotons, bromeliads, bromeliads, buttery bushes, buttery bushes, & much more & much more

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7 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 T railways Camp For Special Needs Adults T o Be H eld October 7 T o 11The Robert V. & Benjamin G. Miller Fund, along with Goodwill Industries of Southwest Florida is currently accepting applications for its Trailways Camp. The camp, which will be held at Riverside Retreat in LaBelle, will run October 7 to 11. Applicants should have a desire to make lifelong friends, sing songs around a campfire, and experience all the fun that comes along with camping in the great outdoors! Our vision when we created the Robert V. and Benjamin G. Miller Fund was to honor our sons by developing camp experiences that turn life into living for adults with disabilities, said Sharon Miller, of the Robert V. & Benjamin G. Miller Fund. We are filled to the brim with peace and satisfaction when we see the joy and hear the laughter of our campers. The session will include fishing, campfire roasts, swimming, a talent show and more. Many of our campers have never flown a kite, held a fishing rod, danced on stage, or won an award in their lives, said Jesi Cason, camp counselor and skills trainer at Goodwill. At camp, everyone gets a chance to create unforgettable experiences and make lifelong friendships with people who understand what it is like to have a disability. The Trailways Camp mission is to remove the social isolation often felt by people with disabilities by providing opportunities for fun, friends and support. Through outdoor activities, group exercises, crafts and more, campers have the opportunity to develop recreational skills and build relationships. An act as simple as sitting down for a meal with friends, or roasting marshmallows over a campfire can, and has, changed lives for people who otherwise would not have the opportunity, explained Cason. The campers will always remember the feeling of accomplishment and acceptance they experience. For more information regarding Trailways Camp, visit www.goodwillswfl.org/trailwayscamp/ or contact Jesi Cason at 357-3623. Special Equestrians are a part of the Trailways Camp experience Music Series Showcases Local T alentROCKtoberfest, a free, live music series every Thursday in October from 6 to 8 p.m. will be presented by Bell Tower Shops in Fort Myers. The series benefits Rotary Clubs of Fort Myers South and Fort Myers-Sunrise. Set in Center Court, all ages will enjoy this energetic concert series. The outdoor bar, offering beer, wine, soft drinks and water, is hosted by and benefits Rotary Club of Fort Myers South and Rotary Club of Fort Myers-Sunrise. The musical lineup includes: Thursday, October 3 Memphis 56: Favorites of the downtown Fort Myers music scene and regulars at Art Walk and Music Walk, this trio plays rockabilly and roots rock including Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash and Hank Williams. You wont want to miss their flaming upright bass! Thursday, October 10 Rotary Rocks: The house band for Rotary International District 6960 makes a special appearance at Bell Tower Shops with their blend of early and classic rock. Featuring vocalist Cyndi Doragh, the all-Rotarian band will get you dancing around the Center Court fountain. Thursday, October 17 Rockin Horse: Boasting band members who have opened for the Allman Brothers and Toby Keith, this classic rock powerhouse has taken Southwest Florida by storm with their awe-inspiring renditions of Fleetwood Mac, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, The Black Crowes, Tom Petty and Neil Young. You wont want to miss this show! Thursday, October 24 Barefoot & Brendon: Offering an eclectic mix of modern and classic rock, the duo brings acoustic guitar, electric guitar, bass and drums adding up to a full-band sound. Favorites include Muse, U2 and more. See them at this rare Fort Myers appear ance! Thursday, October 31 Strange Arrangement: Unique and unpredictable, it is impossible to categorize Strange Arrangement aka The Brothers Van Kirk. Playing original, fun and funky music, the group is also known for their awesome stage presence, often incorporating costumes into their high-energy perfor mances. The October 31 concert will culminate in a Halloween costume contest at 8 p.m. For more information, visit Bell Tower Shops on Facebook or www.thebelltower shops.com. Democratic Womens Club MeetingFrancisco Fuentes, VP of Global Compliance and Risk Management for Chicos FAS, Inc., will address the Democratic Womens Club of Lee County at their next meeting on Saturday, October 12. Fuentes will speak on foreign garment factories and corporate social responsibility. Fuentes has been working for Chicos FAS, Inc. for seven years. He is responsible for the organizational alignment and managing the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) partnerships with internal and external stakeholders. He visits the factories and suppliers around the world to facilitate communication and continuous improvement within CSR. Fuentes has more than 20 years of experience in multiple areas of risk management that include corporate social responsibility, safety, environmental and sustainability. He has a proven perfor mance track record working for Fortune 500 companies across multiple industries including retail, healthcare, apparel, food and biomedical. He is experienced in numerous multicultural environments such as North America, Latin America, Europe, China and Southeast Asia. The meeting will begin at 10:30 a.m. at the Hilton Garden Inn in South Fort Myers, located at the northeast corner of College Parkway and Summerlin Road. An optional lunch will be served following the meeting at a cost of $18. Visitors may make reservations for lunch by contacting Pat Fish at fishpatricia@yahoo. com or by calling 466-8381. The Democratic Womens Club of Lee County is a member of the DWC of Florida. It works year-round to organize the Democratic voters of Lee County, Florida. The DWC of Lee County brings together in common purpose all Democratic Women of Lee County, although men are members as well. The DWC strives to stimulate interest in civic affairs, encourage good citizenship and educate the public on questions of public interest. The DWC encourages the active participation of Democratic voters, seeks to increase Democratic voter registration and supports qualified Democratic candidates for public office. Presented by Sunday, November 10th 32nd Our email address is press@riverweekly.com

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 20138 Along T he R iverOn Friday, September 20, the Edison State College Rush Library presents the first film of its Fall 2013 Film Series. Screening of all three films is free. The first film, When You Feel Love, which was shown at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival, will be featured at 7 p.m.; the second film, Persepolis, will be featured at 7 p.m. on Friday October 4. The final film in the series, The Singularity is Near, will be screened at 7 p.m. on Monday, November 18. All films will be shown in the Rush Library Auditorium on the Edison State College Campus in Fort Myers. If you are interested in attending, RSVP to Jane Bigelow at jbigelow@edison.edu. On Saturday, September 21, the first inaugural Rockwave Festival is at JetBlue Park in Fort Myers. Rockwave features seminal alternative rock bands Janes Addiction and Stone Temple Pilots with Chester Bennington, along with per formances from Chevelle, Filter, Anberlin, Beware Of Darkness, and an opening band TBA performing on the Monster Main Stage. Regularly priced general admission and VIP tickets are on sale now at www.rockwavefest.com, www.Ticketmaster.com and at all Ticketmaster outlets. General admission tickets will be $45 (plus fees) and VIP tickets will be $89.50 (plus fees). Doors open at 1 p.m. VIP tickets include: a VIP entrance to venue; access to VIP lounge area featur ing dedicated bar, beverage and food service; viewing of main stage (seated and standing areas); seated area with shade for dining and private restroom facilities; and a VIP guest laminate. JetBlue Park is located at 11500 Fenway South Drive in Fort Myers. Go to www.rockwavefest.com. Autumn is the perfect time for boating with friends and family, so make a pit stop at Nervous Nellies Crazy Waterfront Eatery in Fort Myers Beach. Free marine dockage with dock attendants assistance is available for patrons at Nellies Snug Harbour Marina. Parking for your car is also free if you dine at the restaurant. Drink specials are available daily along with live music upstairs at Uglys Waterside Bar. Start out with the coconut fried shrimp appetizer, the tropical spring rolls or the devilish mussels. Nellies menu also features fresh salads, burgers, seafood dishes and over-stuffed sandwiches. The childrens menu includes twice-baked macaroni and cheese, chicken fingers, pizza and the char-grilled cheesedog. Swing to the beats of live reggae, rock and island music every day at Nellies and Uglys. Go to www.nervousnellies.net for a daily listing of live music from the areas premier local talent along with upcoming special events. Nervous Nellies and Uglys are located at 1131 First Street, Fort Myers Beach in the historic Baywalk district. Reserve a spot in air-conditioned comfort or outside on the expansive waterfront patio by calling ahead at 463-8077. On Tuesday, September 24 from 5 to 7 p.m., the Edison & Ford Winter Estates presents KIDding Around at Bell Tower Shops. The educational series for children is held on the fourth Tuesday of every month. Join the Edison Ford Wild Wizard and learn about Thomas Edisons work with electricity through light bulb demonstrations and simple circuits. The program is free to the public. The Estates Emerging Inventors Early Learning Program for one to three year old children and their parents, grandparents and other family members classes begins October and will be held on the first and third Thursday of each month (except January and March 2014) from 9 to 10:30 a.m. The program includes socializing, education activities, story time, singing, crafts and explor ing the homes, gardens and museum at the Edison & Ford Winter Estates. Each session will introduce science through activities and time to tend the Emerging Inventors Vegetable Garden. The price for the Emerging Inventors Early Learning program is $5 for members (one adult and one child) and $15 (one adult and one child) for non-members. Registration is required by calling the Education Department at 334-7419. The Edison & Ford Winter Estates is located at 2350 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers. Call 334-7419 or go to www.edisonfordwinterestates.org. New Yorkers will be happy to know that Nervous Nellies serves ice-cold Reingold The Edison & Ford Winter Estates offers entertaining and educational programs for kids of all ages. Pictured are Lauren Johnson with her daughters Kasey and Kate. vacations Please visit our River Weekly News online advertisers at www.islandsunnews.com. You can click through to their Web sites for more information about real estate, shopping, restaurants and services. Just click on the logos surrounding the front page. JACARANDAThe Entertainment Nightly in Sanibels Social Scene1223 PERIWINKLE WAY, SANIBEL 472-1771 Happy Apps $5.95Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna, Crispy Fried Calamari, Chilled Oysters, Steamed Shrimp, BBQ Beef Satays, Mussels Marinara, Chicken WingsSanibels Best HAPPY HOUR5 7 p.m. Nightly in the lounge1/2 Price DrinksCall & Well Liquor, Draft Beer Selections, Select House Wine

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9 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 Celebrity Birders R eturn For Private R efuge Birding T oursNationally acclaimed bird authors, TV personalities and longtime Sanibel Island winter residents Don and Lillian Stokes will again contribute their time and expertise to lead two fundraising birders tram tours of JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge on the morning of Friday, February 28. Wildlife Drive is normally closed on Fridays, meaning tour participants will have the birds and the Stokes to themselves. Lillian Stokes will speak about and demonstrate bird photography on one of the trams, while her husband, on a second tram, will focus on the principles of bird identification. Tarpon Bay Explorers, the refuges official recreation concession, will be donating the use of two trams. Together, they accommodate 80 passengers, so interested persons are encouraged to make reservations as soon as possible, because the Stokes past tram tours have filled up quickly. The Stokes have authored 32 books in their Stokes Field Guides series, including their new best-seller, The Stokes Field Guide to the Birds of North America, and have hosted a birding television show for PBS. The Stokes are veteran birding experts recognized throughout the country, and they have a huge following, said Birgie Vertesch, Executive Director of the Ding Darling Wildlife Society-Friends of the Refuge, which is organizing the tours. Thanks to their generosity and our partnership with Tarpon Bay Explorers, 100 percent of the proceeds from this fundraiser will benefit wildlife and education programs at the refuge. Cost for tour tickets are $75 each for a half-day tour that includes coffee and pastries in the Refuge Education Center starting at 7:30 a.m. and use of spotting scopes on the drive. To make reservations, email dingdarlingoffice@yahoo.com or call 472-1100 ext. 233. Below is a schedule of special events planned by DDWS and the refuge for this fall and winter. For details, visit www. dingdarlingsociety.org. National Public Lands Day September 28 24th Annual Ding Darling Days October 20 to 26 Kids Fishing Derby November 9 Ladies-Only Holiday Shopping Happy Hour December 3 Volunteer Holiday Luncheon December 13 Men-Only Last-Minute Holiday Shopping Happy Hour December 23 Winter Refuge Programs January 5 to April 20 Bi-Weekly Wednesday Film Series January 8 to April 16 Weekly Friday Lecture Series January 17 to April 11 Second Annual Trailgate Party February 21 Stokes Birding Tour February 28 Volunteer Awards Luncheon February 28 To support DDWS and the refuge with a tax-deductible gift, visit www.dingdar lingsociety.org or contact Birgie Vertesch at 292-0566 or director@dingdarlingsociety.org. Don and Lillian Stokes Join SCCF Saturday For Coastal Cleanup On Saturday, September 21, SCCF invites the public to participate in an international volunteer effort to rid our coastlines and waterways of marine litter, pollution, and debris. As many as 600,000 volunteers worldwide remove millions of pounds of coastal trash that can hurt local economies, injure and kill marine wildlife, and choke the ocean environment. SCCFS partner in the Ocean Conservancys 27th annual Coastal Cleanup are Keep Lee County Beautiful and Baileys General Store. Through Baileys, Barefoot Wines is also a Coastal Cleanup partner this year, and the combpany will be providing T-shirts, gloves and bags while supplies last. Participation is easy. Arrive at the Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation at 3333 Sanibel-Captiva Road between 9 a.m.and noon on Saturday to check in and pick up Coastal Cleanup data cards and trash bags. Helpers are asked to bring their own water to reduce the use of plastic water bottles and their own work gloves to reduce the use of the plastic gloves that will be available. Lunch and snacks on the Nature Center porch will be available thanks to Baileys from 10 a.m. until noon. There will be a Dumpster there for the collected trash. Worldwide last year, volunteers picked up 10,149,988 pounds of trash on 17,719 miles of coast. Cigarettes topped the list of things found with plastic bottles coming in third. In Florida, 23,362 people collected 452,913 pounds of trash on 1,175 miles of coast. Trash in the ocean is one of the most widespread problems threatening our waterways and wildlife and it is all preventable. If you have questions, want to reserve your clean up spot, or get your data cards ahead of time, call 472-2329. Volunteers gather trash at last years Coastal Cleanup Aquatic E ducation SeminarThe University of Florida, IFAS Lee County Extension is offering a one-day pesticide and aquatic education training seminar titled Urban Pond Management and Aquatic Areas Seminar. CEUs will be provided in Aquatic Areas, Right of Way, Private Ag and CORE. CEUs are also available for CAM licensed property managers. The seminar will be held Thursday, September 26 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Lee County Extension Office, 3406 Palm Beach Boulevard in Fort Myers. The cost is $15 per person payable by check made out to: LCEOAB and mailed to Pond Management Conference, 3406 Palm Beach, Blvd., Fort Myers, FL 33916. Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Downtown Fort Myers (Post Oce Arcade Next to Hotel Indigo) 1520 Broadway For Takeout & Delivery Tel: 334-6991 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEKMon-urs 11am 10pm Fri-Sat 11am 11pm Sun 12pm 9pm www. ichiban-sushi-chinese.com Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702or email press@riverweekly.com

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Churches/TemplesALL F aA ITHS UNIT aA RI aA N CONGREG aA TION (UU A) Where diversity is treasured 2756 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers Summer program: Understanding the Faiths of Our Worlds June 2 to August 25 11 a.m. Interim Minister, Rev. Margaret Beard, begins on September 1 239-226-0900. www.allfaiths-uc.org A LLLL SS A INTSINTS BYZA NTINENTINE RITERITE CA THOLITHOLI C C HH U RR C HH 10291 Bayshore Rd., N. Fort Myers Divine Liturgy is on Sun. at 10:30 a.m.; Rosary begins at 10 a.m. Lenten services (Presanctied Liturgy) will be on Wed. evenings at 6 p.m. starting on Feb. 22. Administrator is Very Rev. Peter Lickman, ph. 305-651-0991. We are a Church of the Eastern Catholic or Byzantine Rite, 1.5 mi. east of Int. 75. A NNNN U NN C II A TIONTION GREEGREE K ORTHOORTHO D OO X C HH U RR C HH 8210 Cypress Lake Dr ive, Fort Myers Reverend Fr. George P. Savas Orthros Service Sunday 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy Sunday 10 a.m. www.annunciation.fl.goarch.org 239-481-2099 B ETHETH SHILOHSHILOH M ESSIESSI A NINI C SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 15675 McGregor Boulev ard, 437-3171 Rabbi: Judah Hungerman Friday Service, 8 p.m., Saturday Service, 11 a.m. Shabbat School Saturday Morning, Adult Hebrew Classes. Call for information on full program. B RERE AD OO F LILI F EE M INISTRIESINISTRIES C HH U RR C HH OO F GOGO D 16581 McGregor Boule vard, 267-3166 Just past the Tanger Outlet Mall Pastor: Barry Lentz, 281-3063 Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. C HH AB AD LL UB AV ITIT C HHO O F SS W F LORILORI D A ORTHOOR THO D OO X 5620 Winkler Road, F ort Myers Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz 433-7708, E-mail: rabbi@chabadswf.org Web site: www.chabadswf.org Services: Friday 6:30 p.m.; Saturday Kabbalah class 9 a.m.; Shacharit 10 a.m.; Kiddush at noon Minyan: Monday and Thursday 7 a.m. C HH AP ELEL OO F CYP RESSRESS C OO V EE 10200 Cypress Cov e Circle Fort Myers 239-850-3943, Located at Cypress Cove Retirement Center on HealthPark Campus An ecumenical non-denominational community of believers. Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. Reverendt Ted Althouse, Pastor revtedalthouse@aol.com C HH U RR C HH OO F THETHE C ROSSR OSS 13500 Freshman Lane; 768-2188 Pastor: Bud Stephens; A nondemonimational church emphasizing a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Sunday Service: 9:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 Contemporary. CONGREG aA TION aA L CH uU R cC H 1619 Lle wellyn Drive Fort Myers Just off McGregor across from the Edison/ Ford Winter Estates 334-4978 Pastor: Douglas Kelchner Worship times Sundays 9 and 10:30 a.m. Website: www.taecc.com CO vV EN aA NT PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937 Rev. Dr. Jeffrey DeYoe, Senior Pastor Reverend David Dietzel, Pastor Emeritus. Traditional Sunday service 10 a.m. Nursery available C ypYP RESS LakLAK E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H 8400 Cypress Lak e Drive, Fort Myers, 481-5442 Randy A. Alston, Reverend. Sunday Services: Bible study, 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship, 11 a.m., Evening Worship, 7 p.m., Wednesday Prayer Meeting, 6:30 p.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 481-3233. www.clpc.us. Clint Cottrell, pastor Prayer Service 8 a.m., Praise 9 a.m., Childrens Church 9 a.m., Traditional 11 a.m. Summer: Prayer Service 8 a.m. Combined Traditional/Praise 10 a.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E UNITE dD METHO dD IST CH uU R cC H 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 482-1250, 8 and 11 a.m. Sunday Traditional Service 9:30 a.m. Praise Service Sunday School all times F aA ITH FELLO wW SHI pP wW ORL dD O uU TRE acA C H mM INISTRIES 6111 South P ointe Boulevard, Fort Myers, 278-3638. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Voice of Faith, WCRN 13.50 AM Radio, Sunday, 1:30 p.m.; Thursday Service, 7:30 p.m.; Friday Youth Service, 7:30 p.m. Nursery care for pre-school children and Childrens Church for ages 5-12 available at each service. F aA ITH uU NITE dD mM ETHO dD IST cC H uU R cC H 15690 McGregor Boule vard Fort Myers, 482-2030 Pastor: David Stauffer. Traditional services 8:45 a.m.; Contemporary, 10:30 a.m. Go south on McGregor Boulevard. The church is mile past the intersection of Gladiolus and San Carlos Boulevard on the way to Sanibel. FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF cC HRIST S cC IENTIST 2390 West First Street, next door to Edison Estates. Sunday Morning Service and Sunday School, 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday Evening Testimony Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Child care provided at all services. Visit our Reading Room for quiet study at: 2281 First Street, River District. www.time4thinkers.com, www.christiansciencefortmyers.com, www.christianscience.com FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF THE NazaNAZA RENE 13545 Amer ican Colony Boulevard off Daniels Parkway in the Colony, Fort Myers, 936-2511 Pastor: Reverend Joey Brummett Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Family Night, 7 p.m. F IRSTIRST U NITENITE D M ETHOETHO D ISTIST C HH U RR C HH in the Downto wn Fort Myers River District 2466 First Street, Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-332-1152, www.fumcftmyers.org Sunday: 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 5 p.m. Youth Program FORT M yY ERS CHRISTI aA N CH uU R cC H (DIS cC I pP LES O fF CHRIST) A SS TE pP HEN MINISTRIES CONGREG aA TION 5916 Winkler Road, F ort Myers, 437-4330 Reverend Mark Condrey, Pastor Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Church School: 9:15 a.m. FORT M yY ERS CONGREG aA TION aA L UNITE dD CH uU R cC H O fF CHRIST : 8210 College Parkway, Fort Myers, 482-3133. Philip White, pastor Morning Worship: 10 a.m. Church School: 10:15 a.m. Adult Forum: 11:30 a.m. II ON aA HH O pP E EpEP IS cC O paP A L cC ONGREG aA TION 9650 Gladiolus Dr ive, Fort Myers 4544778 The Reverend Dr. John S. Adler, pastor. Weekly services: Saturday 5 p.m., Eucharist with Healing Sunday 8 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite One; 9:30 a.m., Family Eucharist with Healing and Church School Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Morning Prayer (in Spanish); Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Eucharist with Healing. Child care available at Saturday 5 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m. services. JES uU S THE WOR kK ER C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H: 881 Nuna Avenue, Fort Myers, 481-1143 Masses Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. K INGING D OO M LILI F EE C HH U RR C HH 2154 McGregor Boulev ard, Fort Myers, 218-8343 Pastor Randy and Anita Thurman 10:30 a.m. Sunday Service All are welcome. LambLAMB O fF GG O dD LuLU THER aA N/ EpEP IS cC O paP A L CH uU R cC H Corner Cypress View Drive and Koreshan Boulevard, Three Oaks area, Fort Myers, 267-3525 Walter Fohs, pastor; Becky RobbinsPenniman, associate pastor Sunday worship services: 8 a.m. Early Grace Traditional 9 a.m. Awesome Grace Contemporary 10:30 a.m. Classic Grace Traditional 8:45 & 10 a.m. Sunday School Gods Group NN E wW BEGINNINGS CENTER Ne w Home Church, 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, North Fort Myers, 239-656-0416 Weekly Friday Meeting Meet & Greet: 6:30 p.m. Kingdom Teaching: 7 p.m. Fellowship and refreshments after service. nbcministry@embarqmail.com, www.facebook. com/nbcministry. Alex & Patricia Wiggins, Ministers NENE W C OO V ENEN A NTNT EE Y ESES C HH U RR C HH See Clearly Meeting monthly at 9 a.m. at the Elks Lodge. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, Fort Myers, FL 33907. 239-220-8519 Pastor Alan Bondar www.newcovenanteyes.com Wear what you want, rockin music, relevant teaching, LIFT Kidz program, free coffee & donuts, people who are real, church thats actually fun. NN E wW HH O pP E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H O fF FOR T M yY ERS 16120 San Car los Boulevard, Unit 10 239-985-8503 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m Sunday Morning Worship. 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study NN E wW HH O pP E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 3825 McGregor Boule vard. Fort Myers Pastors: Stu Austin and Howard Biddulph 8 & 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11 a.m. Contemporary Worship 8, 9:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School Youth and Childrens programming runs concurrent to Sunday services. Nursery care provided at all services 274-1230. For more information visit: www.newhopefortmyers.org P EE A C EE CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H Meets at F ort Myers Beach Masonic Lodge 17625 Pine Ridge Road, Fort Myers Beach 267-7400. Pastors Bruce Merton, Gail & RC Fleeman Adult Discussion Classes: 9-10 AM Countdown to Worship (praise music): 10:10 AM Amazing Grace Worship: 10:30 AM Phone 267-7400 Fax 267-7407 Web site: peacecommunitychurch.com e-mail: peace1265@aol.com P EE A C EE LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH Sunday Worship at 9:30am. Peace is a member of the ELCA. We celebrate weekly communion with traditional liturgy, organ and choir. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers On the way to Sanibel. 239-437-2599, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@peaceftmyers.com. RE dD EE mM ER L uU THER aA N cC H uU R cC H 3950 Winkler Ext., Fort Myers, 274-0143 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. Sunday Services Daily early learning center/day care RIRI V ERER OO F LILI F EE A SSESSE MB LL Y OO F GOGO D 21580 Riv er Ranch Rd, Estero 239-495-0400, Senior Pastor: Todd Weston 8 and 9:45 a.m Services; 11:30 a.m. Legacy Service, multi-generational S amudAMUD R abadAB AD R aA buddB UDD HIST cC ENTER Meditation classes All are welcome. Guided meditations offering many methods for relaxing the body and focusing the mind on virtuous objects to bring increasing peace and happiness into daily activity. For information, class times and locations call 567-9739 or visit www. MeditationInFortMyers.org. SaSA INT COL umbkUMBK ILLE C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H 12171 Iona Road, F ort Myers, off McGregor and north of Gladiolus. 489-3973 Father Joseph Clifford. Weekly masses: Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. Weekend masses: Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday: 7, 9,11, and 5:30 p.m. Reconciliation is available at the church on Saturdays at noon and by appointment SaSA INT JOHN THE A pP OSTLE METRO pP OLIT aA N CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H 3049 Mcg regor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 344-0012 Pastor Reverend Steve Filizzi An Affirming & Inclusive Congregation Sunday Services, 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Mid-Week Service, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. SS A INTINT M II C HH A ELEL LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH & SS C HOOLHOOL ( LL CM SS ) 3595 Broadw ay, Fort Myers, 239-939-1218, Worship: Saturday 5:30 p.m., Sunday 8 & 10:45 a.m. Bible Study for adults and children Sunday at 9:15 a.m. Phone for other dates & times. Plus Marriage Enrichment, Divorcecare, Griefshare. SaSA INT PETER LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H 3751 Estero Boule vard, Fort Myers Beach, 463-4251. Sunday worship at 9:30 a.m. Womens Bible Study is offered on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 9:30 a.m. www.stpeterfmb.com SaSA INT NN I cC HOL aA S MON aA STER yY Church and Bookstore:111 Everg reen Road (southwest corner of Evergreen Road and Gail Street.) Liturgical services conducted in English and Church Slavonic; following the Julian (Old) Calendar. Liturgical Services: Sundays and Holy Days: Hours at 9:30 a.m. Holy Liturgy at 10 a.m. Call to confirm service schedule: 239-997-2847; Bookstore: 239-691-1775 or visit www.saintnicholasmonastery.org SS T VIN cC ENT DE P auAU L C aA THOLI cC CO mmuMMU NIT yY 13031 Palm Beach Blvd (3 miles east of I75) East Fort Myers (across from Ft Myers Shores) 239 693 0818 Weekday masses: 9 a.m. Tuesday-Friday Weekend masses: 4 p.m. Saturday Sunday 9 & 11 a.m. All Are Welcome! SS O uU TH wW EST bapB AP TIST cC H uU R cC H 16940 McGregor Boule vard, Fort Myers, 454-3336 Robert G. Kasten, Pastor Sunday Worship Service 11 a.m. Nursery available 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Junior Church grades one to five Wee Church Pre-K to K Evening Service 6 p.m. Wednsday Service 6 p.m. TETE MP LELE B ETHELETHEL SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 16225 Winkler Rd. 433-0018. Rabbi Jeremy Barras E-mail: rabbi.barras@templebethel.com Cantorial soloist: Lawrence Dermer Temple educator: Dale Cohen, MaEd, RJE Shabbat Services, Friday, 7:30 p.m. Torah Study, Saturday, 9:15 a.m.continued on page 11THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 201310

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11 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 From page 10Churches/TemplesReligious Education; Sunday School and Midweek classes, Preschool Classes, Monday through Friday Web site: www.templebethel.com Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TEMPLE JUDEA (CONSERVATIVE) 14486 A&W Bulb Road, Fort Myers, 433-0201, Rabbi: Rabbi Elyssa Auster President: Keith Grossman Minyan: Monday & Thursday at 9 a.m. Services: Friday night at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Religious School Sunday morning Web site: www.tjswfl.org Preschool director: JoAnn Goldman email templejudeapreschool@gmail.com 433-0201, Web site: www.tjswfl.org Affiliated: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism THE NEW CHURCH The New Church of SWFL is located 10811 Sunset Plaza Circ. #401, behind Zoomers. Rev. Gabriella Cahaley officiates worship services on Sundays at 11 a.m. during the season. Other worship events are held on the beach in Fort Myers Beach. See our webpage http://www.newchurchflorida.com/ or call for more information 239-481-5535. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH FORT MYERS 13411 Shire Lane (off Daniels Parkway one mile west of I-75) Minister: The Reverend Allison Farnum Sunday services and religious education at 10:30 a.m. For information on all church events call 561-2700 or visit www.uucfm.org. U NITY OF B ONITA S PRINGS Family Service 10 to 11 a.m. Healing Circle 11 a.m. Hospitality and Fellowship, 11 a.m. Inspiring lesson, uplifting and dynamic music, meditation in a loving environment. Service held at 28285 Imperial Street, Bonita Springs. Call 947-3100. UNITY OF FORT MYERS 11120 Ranchette Rd., Fort Myers Summer Services: Sundays at 10 a.m. Childrens class at 10 a.m. Reverend Jim Rosemergy, Minister Our God is Love. Our Race is Human. Our Religion is Oneness. www.unityoffortmyers.org or 239-278-1511 WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 9065 Ligon Court, Fort Myers, across from HealthPark Hospital, 481-2125 Senior Pastor: Robert Brunson Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Blended Worship www.westminsterfortmyers.org W ORD O F L IFE C HURCH 2120 Collier Ave, Fort Myers, 274-8881; Services: Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. Bishop Gaspar and Michele Anastasi Z ION L UTHERAN C HURCH 7401 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, 481-4040, Interim Pastor Jim Eggert Pastor Peter Weeks Sunday Services: 8:30 a.m. Traditional; 10 a.m. Blended Traditional and Contemporary; 11:30 a.m. Contemporary. Childrens Sunday School, Adult /Teen Bible Classes, 10 a.m. Calendar Girls Support V eteransThe Calendar Girls hearts beat red, white and blue, and they love veterans. At all their events, they take a moment to thank them for defending our freedom. Since 2006, the Calendar Girls have been supporting Paws for Patriots, a program of Southeastern Guide Dogs in Florida, and have now sponsored 11 guide dog puppies, and sponsored the stay of the first female Paws for Patriots recipient. They average 130 performances a year to bring awareness to this and other causes in the community. For more information log onto www.calendargirlsflorida.com or call 850-6010. The Calendar Girls gather around a Korean War veteran Shell Museum Closed Until October 7 For R enovations The Bailey-Matthews Shell Museum will be closed to the public beginning Saturday, September 21 through Sunday, October 6. It will reopen at 10 a.m. on Monday, October 7. During this time, hurricane glass is being installed in windows above the Great Hall and the collections area to protect important shell collections and exhibits. The lobby is also being renovated to make it more welcoming and enhance visitors experience. For more information about the museum and hours, visit the www. shellmuseum.org, or call 395-2233. The lobby of the shell museum rf ntbnrr bb bb rtttn Loved this restaurant. Fantastic experience. Food was exceptionally amazing. Service was outstanding. TripAdvisor Member, May 2013 The Bailey-Matthews Shell Museum

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 201312 Great September Fishing Action Continuesby Capt. Matt MitchellThe brown water of summer continues in the sound. Personally, I think this whole water situation is being blown way out of proportion. We have not seen any fish kills and the amount of bait and life in the sound is amazing. We do need a long-term solution for these huge water releases from Lake O but unlike what is reported all over the local evening news, fishing right now is as good as it gets. Talk to anyone who spends time out on the water and the reports are all the same: fishing action is awesome. This is the first time in five to six years we have had our regular summertime rainfall amount. Even without any major water releases from the lake, our water in the sound would still be its usual summer brown color. This color comes every year from the tannin-stained run-off out of the mangroves along with the mixing of fresh and saltwater from the rain. Really black colored sweetwater is found all summer long in Charlotte Harbor and in the Everglades. Its all part of a south Florida regular rainy season cycle. If we have a drier than usual summer our water is clearer than it is right now. Redfish are everywhere. The calm days we have had make spotting schools of hungry redfish in shallow open water during lower tides a much more common thing. These mostly over-the-slot breeder sized redfish will continue to school up through October. Often these schools can be fast moving and trying to get the boat out in front of them for a shot can be a little tough. Often these schooling reds will cross a shallow water bar that you simply cannot get to and once they drop off into the deeper water you lose sight of them. Take your time when you locate a school and try to quietly get out in their projected path. Watching the bait scatter as these redfish stampede over a shallow bar is an awesome sight. Look for these fish to appear anytime soon on a bar or flat near you. High water redfish action has also been going off. I have been finding mangrove shorelines with the wind and tide working in the same direction. If you dont have a fish hooked up in five minutes, keep moving until you find them. Once you locate these fish its amazing so see how many redfish can be lying under one little mangrove overhang. One such place I found them this week during the first hour of the falling tide was on the long outer mangrove shoreline of Tarpon Bay. For about an hour, just about every live bait flipped up to the shoreline got eaten. Redfish would often chase the live baits up to the surface making for a great-to-see visual strike. If one redfish would miss the bait another one would hit it a few seconds later. These reds ranged in size from 22 to 30 inches. We had many double hook-ups; as one fish was brought boatside, another two or three would often follow it up. This past week the amount of tarpon showing up around the bay and on the beaches has been crazy. While catching bait north of Chino Island at sunrise this week, I had rolling tarpon just about bouncing off the boat. This has been an early morning calm water bite with these fish disappearing by mid-morning. Tarpon are packing on the pounds before they migrate out of our area come the first cold front of fall. They eat much more freely than our much more documented pre-spawn spring push of fish. With calm conditions and light winds fishing these tarpon can be as good s tarpon action will ever get, Add to that you often will have these fish all to yourself as it seems there are very few other boats targeting tarpon right now. All it takes is a large live pinfish or threadfin presented under a float out in front of these rolling fish. Make the right cast and hold on. With very few boats on the water this month just about everything moves at what seems like a slower pace. If youre looking for a little faster pace, go fishing. Dont buy into the brown water Lake O hype.Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions email captmattmitchell@aol.com. Molly Potter from Orlando with an over-the-slot-size redfish caught and released while fishing with Capt. Matt Mitchell ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint Prices ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Your Bottom Your Bottom Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices 1Send Us Your Fish TalesThe River Weekly would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include photographs with identification. Drop them at the River Weekly, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, Florida 33901, or email to press@riverweekly.com. 472-5800 481-4733 12600 McGregor Blvd, Ft Myers www.scubavicedivers.com Swim with the Fishes

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13 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 2013CROW Case Of The Week Eastern Screech Owlby Patricia MolloyEerie. Haunting. These words are often used to describe the lowpitched trill of the eastern screech owl (Megascops asio). The unique avians also possess a large repertoire of vocalizations that includes rasps, barks, chuckles and whinnies. Their distinctive sounds are frequently used to set the mood in movie and television scenes. Ranging in size from 6.3 to 9.8 inches, eastern screech owls are one of the smallest species of owls in the world. Swooping down from a high perch under the cover of night, the superior hearing of these birds allows them to detect even the quietist movements of their tiny prey. Strictly nocturnal hunters, the owls are difficult to detect during daylight hours due to their habit of occupying old woodpecker holes and natural cavities of trees. On August 15, an eastern screech owl was admitted to CROW. Found on the side of a busy road, it was surmised that it was hit by a passing car. As a result of the accident, the rear of its left eye was torn, causing discoloration of the iris and enlargement of the pupil. More shockingly, air bubbles were visible in the eye. Dr. Heather has consulted with several ophthalmologists, as this is the first time in her lengthy career that she has seen eye bubbles. Neither I, nor any other ophthalmologist I spoke with, has seen (this), said the hospital director. While she fears that the owl may be permanently blinded in the affected eye, she feels certain that it can survive in the wild; eastern screech owls rely predominately on their keen sense of hearing for hunting. Dr. Heather has ordered another round of radiographs this week to determine how well the eye has healed during its stay at the wildlife clinic. We will then talk about getting him into a small flight cage to gauge his recovery. Once the injured patients strength and stamina have been fully restored, this magnificent owl with the bright yellow eyes will once again whinny and hoot under the cloak of darkness. With the continued, combined efforts of local agencies and concerned residents, Lee Countys native and migratory wildlife will continue to prosper. Never underestimate the difference that you, as an individual, can make to impact change. Start by volunteering your time or donating money to support CROW in its mission to rehabilitate sick, injured and abandoned wildlife for present and future generations to enjoy. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to PO Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit www.crowclinic.org. We Proudly Brew Tropial Outdoor Patio Seating Get Crabby At The Cow Get Crabby At The Cow with our Famous Stone Crabs1/2 lb & Best Prices On The Planet Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Come Try our NEW Cowlicious Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials Sanibels Most Award Winning Restaurant LIVE Famous Stone Crabs Famous Stone Crabs Always Fresh ...Always! ...Always! with our with our Always Fresh ...Always Fun! Always Fresh ...Always Fun! This eastern screech owl, patient #2430, has suffered damage to its eye, possibly as a result of a car accident. Note the enlarged pupil and discoloration of its left eye. Eye bubbles were seen immediately upon intake of the patient photo courtesy of CROW

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 201314 Plant SmartFiddlers Spurgeby Gerri R eavesFiddlers spurge (Poinsettia heterophylla) is native to Florida and much of the western hemisphere, particularly the tropics and sub-tropics. Mexican fireplant is another of its many other common names. This herb, usually considered a weed, crops up in fields, on roadsides, in disturbed sites and other uncultivated areas. Short-lived and upright with branched stems, it can reach up to three feet tall. All plants parts exude a milky latex sap that can be very irritating to the skin. Unlike its relative, the native paintedleaf (Poinsettia cyathophora), also a widespread native, it does not have red at the base of the upper leaves. Fiddlers spurges leaves can vary in shape, with the upper ones paler green at the bases. As is the case with the various poinsettia species, these leaves are often mistaken for the flowers. The actual flowers are the petal-less yellow-green clusters that appear at the tips of the branches. One female flower is surrounded by several male ones. Fiddlers spurge is a nectar plant for native butterflies and a host plant for the Ello Sphinx silkmoth. The plant easily spreads by seed. Sources: plantbook.org and weeds. org.au. Plant Smart explores sustainable gardening practices that will help you create an environmentally responsible, low-maintenance South Florida landscape. A wasp explores Fiddlers spurge flowers Fiddlers spurge is one of several poinsettias native to Florida photos by Gerri Reaves Caring For Your PlantsLawn P lantersby Justen DobbsA lot of homeowners have an expansive lawn and prefer it that way. But others prefer to plant shade trees or palm trees around their property for that tropical feel. There are a few things to consider before you go planting trees randomly around your property. First of all, hardwood trees do provide good shade, branches for birds to nest on, privacy, and colorful blooms. However, they are usually messy, dropping a lot of leaves, and can often choke out your lawn by blocking too much sun. Additionally, as a general rule, hardwood trees send out adventurous roots that can grow to three times the height of the tree. This can push up sidewalks and driveways, causing damage down the road. If you do decide to plant a hardwood tree, make sure it is as far from hardscape as possible. It is not necessary to make a circular planter around the base of the tree because the trunk will expand. Simply dig a hole large enough to fit the trees root ball comfortably and allow your grass to cover up the hole with time after the tree is planted. One exception might be citrus trees, which may benefit from a ring of mulch around the base and generally keep a small caliper trunk. Palm trees are a bit different in that they can be planted practically anywhere. Their roots will not dig up any concrete or brick pavers and they typically wont deprive your lawn of precious sunlight. When planting a palm tree, you will want to create a circular bed around the base on which you can lay down fresh mulch or pine straw periodically. The radius of the bed should be about three to four times the diameter of the trunk. So, if you are planting a Chinese fan palm, which will grow a trunk to about 12 inches in diameter, your bed around the tree should be about 48 inches in diameter. There are a few reasons why a small bed is beneficial to a palm tree: 1. It will prevent damage to the base of the trunk from weed-eaters, lawnmowers, and other power equipment; 2. The mulch or pine straw will retain moisture in the soil which may help the palm survive our dry months; 3. The mulch or pine straw will alter the pH of the soil, making it more acidic which is beneficial to most palms; and 4. It makes it easy to apply granular fertilizer around the base of the palm (because our Florida soil is generally void of nutrients). Some people choose to bor der their planters with brick pavers or stone in order to give the planter a bit more identity. This can look very nice if done cor rectly and adds extra protection to the palm and its root system. Lastly, if you dont want to dig up the grass to create a lawn planter, you can spray it with an herbicide such as Round-Up and then lay the mulch right on top. Justen Dobbs is a landscape architect in south Florida specializing in custom, upscale landscapes. He can be reached at seabreezenurseries@gmail. com. These lawn planters have been done correctly and accent the palms very well

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15 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 Free Orchid Classes At Everglades Wonder GardensFree classes on How to Grow Orchids in Southwest Florida are offered to the public on third Saturdays in September, October and November at the Everglades Wonder Gardens in the historic district of Bonita Springs by the Gulf Coast Orchid Alliance. The classroom is indoors and air-conditioned, but seating is limited, so please arrive promptly for the 10 to 11 a.m. class. Sorry, reservations are not accepted. The September 21 class features award-winning exhibitor Jim Longwell, who will open his bags of tricks to show how he takes ordinary household items like chopsticks (chopsticks?) to make practical, inexpensive orchid potting materials. Longwell will explain about various clippers, scissors and stakes as well as how to make custom hangers from common acoustical ceiling wire. Hell also reveal his special recipe for mixing potting media and how to keep orchids healthy with fungicide treatments. Longwell has been growing orchids for over 25 years and has accumulated more than 50 American Orchid Society (AOS) awards. He won Best of Show at the Miami International Orchid Show as the first place hobby grower and has won the AOS show trophy at three different Florida orchid shows. He served in the AOS judging program for several years and was formerly the owner of Sanctuary Orchids for eight years. Following the class, attendees will be given a special entry rate for the gardens that includes a guided tour by garden operator John Brady, who is preserving the history and heritage of the garden while expanding its legacy. Brady will also explain his vision for the parts that are still being renovated. Free orchid classes will be held from 10 to 11 a.m. on September 21, October 19 and November 16. Attendees are encouraged to bring in their own orchids for questions and answers about re-potting, mounting, pest and disease control, and so much more. Attendees are asked to park in the back lot or across the street. The Everglades Wonder Gardens has been a focal point of Bonita Springs since 1936. Recent renovations and additions include a butterfly house and Japanese garden, as well as a flamingo park and up-close settings for observing native animal species like alligators. An orchid walk is being developed by volunteers from the Gulf Coast Orchid Alliance and the Naples Botanical Garden. Overgrowth was cleared to reveal rare decades-old trees, which are becoming hosts for mounted orchids, many of which were donated for the project. More volunteers are needed, as well as additional shade-loving orchids, to complete the walk. Call the gardens at 992-2591 if you would like to help. Everglades Wonder Gardens is located at 27180 Old 41 Road in Bonita Springs. Admission is free, but seating is limited and there are no reservations. Please be prompt. For more information about the Gulf Coast Orchid Alliance, call 498-9741. John Brady conducting an orchid class Jim LongwellFishing Tournament Gives Anglers A Chance To Win New Hobie KayakThe winner of the 2013 Calusa Blueway Fishing Tournament will nab a Hobie Mirage Pro Angler 12 fishing kayak, courtesy of Hobie and Estero River Outfitters at the annual event scheduled for November 2. Cash prizes will also be available to those who place in the tournament. Rapidly becoming the premier tournament in Southwest Florida, the catch-andrelease fishing tournament is expected to draw 75 anglers to Lee County waterways as part of the Calusa Blueway Paddling Festival along the shores of Southwest Florida. This year, the Lee County Parks & Recreation event features a one-day competition for anglers who catch and release snook, redfish, seatrout and other species. All fishing must occur on Lee County waterways. The November 1 captains meeting is at Anglers Inn in Matlacha, with refreshments from Berts Bar & Grill. The weigh-in happens on November 2 at Pineland Marina. The first place finisher will win a Hobie Mirage Pro Angler 12, along with accessories for the kayak, which has a retail value of more than $3,000. The Hobie Mirage Pro Angler 12 is compact and versatile, equipped with features such as vantage seating, under-seat tackle storage, horizontal storage for four rods and a livewell-ready cargo area. The secondplace winner will receive $500, based on 50 participants. The thirdplace angler gets $300, with the fourth-place winner getting $150, and the fifth-place winner earning $50. Fishing to win this Hobie kayak or a cash prize should amp up competition, Festival Coordinator Jesse Lavender said. The Calusa Blueway trail and Southwest Florida waters are among the finest in the U.S. for kayak fishing. We are grateful to Estero River Outfitters for its support of the sport and the tournament. Tournament proceeds benefit the Florida Society for Ethical Ecotourism, which is hosting the event with assistance from Florida Sea Grant, Lee County Parks & Recreation and Calusa Blueway volunteers. Florida SEE is excited to be hosting this tournament for the fifth year running, said Joy Hazell, Lee Countys Sea Grant agent and the Florida SEE tournament liaison. The fishing happens during the 2013 Calusa Blueway Paddling Festival, which features demonstrations, instruction, speakers, guided paddles and evening entertainment throughout the first weekend in November in nearby Fort Myers. Returning this year is a streamlined online registration site for anglers, who pay a $60 fee to compete. Go to www.floridasee.org and click on Blueway Festival under the Events/Registration tab. For more information, contact Lavender at 533-7275 or jlavender@leegov.com, or Hazell at hazellje@leegov.com or 707-1267. Find festival and trail information on Facebook by searching Great Calusa Blueway or using this link: www.facebook.com/TheGreatCalusaBlueway. Or visit www. CalusaBluewayPaddlingFestival.com. To request trail maps be mailed to you, visit www.CalusaBlueway.com. Or download the Calusa Blueway smart-phone app at the Google Play or iTunes store.

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 201316 SS olo EE xhibition At Art CenterThe Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center presents The BloodDimmed Tide, a solo exhibition of new photographic works by Florida artist Tony Myles. The exhibit opens Friday, October 4. Incorporating complex photographic processes, Myles explores universal themes of dissolute order, loss, and societal decay. The Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in the downtown Fort Myers River District. The exhibition continues through October 24. Myles photographs are presented as episodes that function as narrative scenes from an interior film. As a professional cinematographer with more than 17 years experience, Myles is known primarily for his moving images. His interest in film, however, began with a fascination for still photography in his early teens. After early graduation from high school, Myles, in a brief but informative career, started a comic book publishing company in collaboration with three other artists. He became intrigued with the dark world of underground narratives, in stark juxtaposition to the mainstream themes of superhero comic books. Myles streamlined the production process by combining photography with illustration, in a narrative picture book format. Myles graduated from film school in 1996 and began his career in the film industry. He worked on independent feature and short films as well as commercial productions. In 1998, Myles began teaching at Full Sail University, serving as associate course director of film lighting and 35mm film production. In 2005, Myles founded Cage XXI Enterprises, a film production company based in Fort Myers. He has been commissioned by numerous private clients and corporations throughout the United States, producing a variety of collaborative and independent projects. His projects have included feature films, DVD design, album cover art, theatrical trailers, television commercials, music videos, short films, experimental films and thesis film projects. Myles short film, Ordinary Story, which he wrote, photographed, and directed, received an Honorable Mention from the 53rd Rochester International Film Festival. He is cur rently working on a feature film slated to begin production in 2014. Parental guidance suggested: This exhibition contains material that is not appropriate for children. Escape Familiar Home by Tony Myles VV C BB EE arns One Of Floridas TT op TT ourism MM arketing AwardsThe Lee County Visitor & Convention Bureau (VCB) was honored with the Silver Henry Award for imaginative destination marketing, at the 46th Annual Governors Conference on Tourism Flagler Awards Competition presented on September 11 in Orlando, Florida. Sponsored by Visit Florida, the official tourism marketing organization for the state, and the Florida Commission on Tourism, the Flagler Awards program is designed to recognize outstanding tourism marketing in Florida. Annually, the Flagler Awards honor many individuals and organizations that help maintain and improve Floridas position as one of the worlds most popular travel destinations. The awards are open to all individuals, private businesses and not-for-profit organizations offering a product or service that promotes tourism to or within Florida. Working independently, a panel of five judges evaluated the creativity, innovation, production quality and effectiveness of each entry. Based on the judges cumulative scores, awards were presented to the top three entries in each category: the Bronze Award for the third highest scoring entry, the Silver Award for the second highest scor ing entry, and for the highest scoring entry in each of the 17 categories, the Henry Award. There was a total of 203 entries in the competition. The VCB received a Silver Award for its Shellabration 75th Annual Shell Fair & Show entry in the Creativity in Public Relations category. The Silver Award honor resulted from a six-month campaign to promote the 75th Annual Shell Fair & Show (Shellabration) on Sanibel Island. Various events and media tactics created awareness and substantial publicity, focusing on the quirky side of shell collecting, for which the destination is renowned. The many tactics included filming and publicizing a beachside class for the area residents to learn the locally famous Sanibel Stoop, the position of bending down and picking up shells; posting this class on YouTube; and distributing a multi-media news release to announce Shellabration that featured the Sanibel Stoop class video and imaginative shell arts and crafts. National television coverage was secured for an event gathering the largest number of people doing the Sanibel Stoop in February 2012 to compete for a Guinness Book of World Records designation as the worlds largest treasure hunt to help kick off the 75th Annual Shell Fair & Show. Notable coverage of Shellabration aired nationally on Bill Geists segment on CBS Sunday Morning (two airings with a total of 10 million viewers) and on Martha Stewart Living (227,169 viewers). The achievement of the Guinness record was featured in an Associated Press story that was published nationally in daily newspapers (4.3 million readers). The Multi-Media News Release was posted multiple times on billboards in New York Citys Times Square and the Las Vegas Fashion Show Mall. The resulting broadcast, print and online media coverage for the entire campaign had an advertising value of more than $5 million with an audience reach of 41 million. We are thankful to be recognized by Visit Florida and the tourism industry for our bureaus marketing efforts over the years, said VCB Executive Director Tamara Pigott. The exceptional work of our staff and the VCBs agency, MMGY Global, is to be commended. From page 1Artists RR eceptionfilms around the childhood home. Yet it wasnt until his adulthood that photography took center stage in this artists body of work. Brignoni started taking pictures and playing with filters, lighting and other media to create his photographic works. Innevitably, the mixed media works began. Traces of his former practices of drawing, interior design and collage constructions opened the doors to his current works. His love for vintage looks and styles in fashion play an important role in the subjects. Architecture, which is yet another one of Brignonis admired forms of art, plays a role in what forms his collections of photos and mixed media pieces. Jewelry design is another way of self expression for Brignoni. Brignoni co-owned daas Gallery from 2008 to 2012. He is also an avid art collector and supporter of the arts and culture in the community. The disABLEd Artists are part of the Arts in Healthcare program at Lee Memorial Health System. Artists with many diverse physical and emotional challenges will share their artistic abilities during the month of October. The artwork consists of over two dozen paintings, drawings and photographs created by artists within the Lee County community, including those from The Lighthouse Center in North Fort Myers, and the Special Population Program within the Cape Coral Parks and Recreation Department. The exhibits will be on view through October 28. Arts for ACT Gallery is located at 2265 First Street in downtown Fort Myers.

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17 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 Evening Benefit For Young Artists Awards ProgramTickets are now on sale for the 3rd annual Cabaret and Cabernet at the Alliance for the Arts, benefiting the Young Artists Awards program. The event will be held on Saturday, October 5 from 6 to 9 p.m. Tickets are $35. There will be award winning entertainment by Young Artists Awards performers throughout the evening in the main gallery of the Alliance as well as on the Foulds Theatre stage, hosted by Stephanie Davis, the Downtown Fort Myers Diva. There will be cocktails and hors doeuvres, and a silent auction featuring a variety of offerings. Tickets are available by calling Young Artists Awards at 574-9321, or by clicking on the donate button at www. youngartistsawards.org. The event sold out last year. All of the proceeds from the evening will go to student scholarships in the arts. Wine tastings, gourmet coffee and food will be provided by Total Wine & More, The Edison, Cohen and Cohen Catering, Jasons Deli, Sweet Expressions, Bennetts Fresh Roast, and Rosies Fudge. Original artwork, tickets to area cultural events, trips, wine, theater, and art related baskets will be featured in the silent auction. Performers will include past and current winners of the Young Artists Awards program. Highlights will include a performance by dancer Christopher Scott Caldwell, the overall winner of the 2007 competition, premiering a new solo. Caldwell has been commissioned as a professional dancer, choreographer and educator, touring as a protg to some of the worlds top choreographers including the panel from So You Think You Can Dance, Mia Michaels, Brian Friedman, Napoleon and Tabitha Dumo, Wade Robson and Tyce Diorio. He is currently the founder and artistic director of Ovations Productions, LLC and teaches at the Patel Conservatory at the Stratz Center for the Performing Arts in Tampa. Violinist Kevin Seto, the overall winner of the Young Artists Awards 2013 program, will also be featured. Seto, a senior at FGCU, is a student of Patrick Neal and has performed with the Florida Youth Orchestra at Carnegie Hall. Other current and past winners in dance, drama, music and vocals will perform throughout the evening. The Young Artists Awards, Inc. is a non-for-profit organization entering its 11th year of offering services to area children ages 8 to 21 in the performing arts, including vocal and musical performance, drama and dance. Young Artists Awards also sponsors the Art by Kids with Cancer program in conjunction with the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida, assisting families experiencing the financial challenges of childhood cancer. The event is sponsored by Advanced Pain Management and Spine Specialists. Sponsorships of the program are still available, and silent auction items are being accepted. Free Art Demo At Veterans ParkEach month instructor June De Vincent demonstrates a different art medium in Veterans Park Recreation Center, Lehigh Acres. Demonstrations are held the third Wednesday of the month from noon to 2 p.m. for ages 14 and older. The schedule: October 16 Watercolors November 20 Pastels January 15 Rice Paper February 19 Optical Illusion Art Veterans Park Recreation Center is at 55 Homestead Road South, phone 3691521 or e-mail: rmee@leegov.com. Kevin Seto Christopher Caldwell Distinctl norris.com furniture that appeals to your heart... Sanibel 1025 Perwinkle Way Mon Sat. 10 5Evenings & Sundays by appointment 579.0412 Naples & Fort MyeLIMITED T IME SAVINGS ON SEL ECT I TEMS! $1199 $ 1199 COMPLETE DESIGNER CONDO PACKAGES STARTING AT

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 201318 Salieri V ersus M ozart At Lab T heaterby Di SaggauLaboratory Theater of Florida opens their new season with Amadeus, a Tony Award winner for Best Play. This is a long play, almost three hours, with lots to keep the audience engaged. While Mozart has a large role in the play, it is more about Antonio Salieri and the destructive jealousy of a mediocre but highly ambitious composer. It also centers around the story of how Mozart died. Was it pneumonia, or was he murdered by Salieri? Rumor has it that he confessed to murdering Mozart, but no one will ever know for sure. History and fiction combine in this account of rivalry between two musicians. I was blown away by the talent I saw on stage. The play begins with Salieri, brilliantly played by James Recca, in his final years telling the audience what happened during the years he first met Mozart. Salieri wanted to be a great composer, but had to settle for mediocrity. Salieri was in fact the court composer to Joseph II, the Emperor of Austria, although his music ended up in the dustbins of history. Recca lets us feel the agony of his character as he realizes he will never possess the musical talent of Mozart. He also shows us the ecstasy he feels while listening to Mozarts many compositions. Although he lacks Mozarts talent, he has the ability to recognize Mozarts genius more than many people of his day. Recca gives an astonishing perfor mance. He totally inhabits the character of Salieri, easily switching from old age to a much younger man. As Mozarts nemesis, he plots the maestros demise in a manner that leaves one feeling great empathy for Mozart. Connor Zerilla gives a charming performance as Mozart, with his silliness, his genius, his lack of common sense and his frequent giggles. He doesnt hesitate to offend stuffy courtiers who have the power over his musical career. Eden Shelton plays Mozarts wife Costanze with wonderful spark and loving devotion. The entire cast is up to the challenge of this ambitious play. While serious in nature, there is much humor sprinkled throughout. One very funny scene is when Salieri is caught in a room in which Mozart and his wife-to-be think they are alone, playing their cat and mouse sex game. Lois Kuehne did a fine job with the 18th century costumes. Kudos to Ken Bryant for his direction and set design. A large portrait of Mozart backstage transforms into many scenes throughout the show and is very effective. The music in the play is recorded, however, on opening night a quartet from Cypress Lake High School played chamber music prior to curtain call. A classy touch. The quartet is scheduled to per form at Carnegie Hall in the near future. I highly recommend Amadeus, playing through September 28 at Laboratory Theater of Florida, 1634 Woodford Avenue in the First Myers River District. For tickets, call 218-0481 or go to www. laboratorytheaterflorida.com. James Recca as SalieriAcademy Of Lifelong Learning At Shell P oint Offers October Art ClassesThe Academy of Lifelong Learning at Shell Point welcomes to its Fall Academy instructor Dorothy Magen, M.Ed., presenting two art classes. Magen will present Matisse and Picasso two great 20th century giants who were both rivals and friends. Learn about their influence on the world of art that continues today in two sessions on Thursdays, October 3 and 10 from 9:45 to 11:45 a.m. in the Social Center on the Island at Shell Point. Magen will also present Caravaggio: The Man, The Art, The Mind, which focuses on one of the most important artists in 17th century Italy. Who was this man a dear friend of the Cardinals of the church, much in demand for his religious paintings, or a dangerous criminal, street fighter and murderer? Examine the work and mysterious behavior of this famous painter on Thursday, October 17 from 9:45 to 11:45 a.m. in the Social Center on the Island at Shell Point. Tickets for each session are $10, and seating is limited. To reserve your space and purchase a ticket, call 489-8472. Dramatic Offerings At Ghostbirdby Di SaggauGhostbird Theatre Company opened its new season last week with a play by Swedish playwright August Strindberg. Miss Julie, a one-act tragedy, gives a brutally frank portrayal of the intimate thoughts of man and the age-long antagonism between classes. The message of the play is that at the bottom theres not so much difference between people, regardless of their class. Miss Julie (Dana Lynn Frantz) has the intense passion of her mother and the neurotic aristocratic tendencies of her father. While celebrating Mid Summers Eve with the servants, she pursues her fathers valet, Jean (Drew Scott Dietsch). She does this not out of love for Jean but because persons of her station feel they may do what they want. Jean is only a servant but he has his pride and dreams, too. I was not hired to be your plaything, he says to Julie. I think too much of myself for that. When the inevitable happens, Jean is willing to bear his share of the responsibility but he also tells Julie, Do you think any one of my position would have dared to raise his eyes to you if you had not invited it? The play is about power and sex and continued on page 24 Drew Scott Dietsch and Dana Lynn Frantz Isabella Rasi 239-246-47161101 Periwinkle Way #105, Sanibel, FL 239-472-0044 ENGEL & VLKERS Excellence in Real Estate A step above! International Client Base 600 Shops Worldwide Multi-Lingual Staff Your success is my aim.

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19 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 2013Art League Announces September Show Winners The Art League of Fort Myers announced the winners for the September show, September Song. The public is invited to stop by the Art League of Fort Myers Gallery, open Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. to view the photography of the winners and other entries for the show. Winners included: First Place: MewacoKyato, photography by Jerry Hawkings Second Place: Toys, photography by Bernie W. Moore Third Place: Blue Satin, photography by Alan Tiller Merit Awards: Kissed by the Sun by Irma Bakelant; Tattered Wings by KiKi Brewsaugh; and Gazing Ball by John Swank. Honorable Mention: Birds of Flight by George A Hoch; and The Twins by Beth Ivans. Peoples Choice Award: Low Tide by Jerry Hawkins The Art League of Fort Myers is located at 1451 Monroe Street, on the street level of the City of Palms Parking Garage between First and Bay Streets in the heart of the River District in downtown Fort Myers. Visit www.artleagueoffortmyers.org or call 275-3970 for more information. Mewaco-Kyato, photographed by Jerry Hawkings, won the first place prizeFace Painting At Art League Of Fort Myers Gallery The Art League of Fort Myers is excited to announce that Tara Phillips will be doing face painting at the Art League of Fort Myers Gallery on Friday, October 4 from 6 to 8 p.m. as part of the 5th anniversary of Art Walk, Come see me at The Art League of Fort Myers from 6 to 8 p.m. for henna, glitter and temporary tattoos, face painting, hair braiding and feather extensions, said Phillips, who does face painting on both children and adults. For more information, visit www. TarasArtAndEnterainment.com The Art League of Fort Myers Gallery hours are Tuesday to Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The public is invited to come in and visit and there is no charge to attend. The gallery is located on the street level of the City of Palms Parking Garage between First and Bay Streets in the Fort Myers River District. For more information, visit www. artleagueoffortmyers.org or call 2753970. Artist Of The MonthThe Art League of Fort Myers announced that the Artist of the Month for September 2013 is KiKi Brewsaugh, current president of the Art League of Fort Myers. Tara Phillips and a child with her face painted KiKi Brewsaugh Art Therapy WorkshopAngel C. Duncan and Reina Lombardi began a four-week art therapy and mindfiulness course on Thursday, September 26. It will continue weekly through October, 17, from 4-6 p.m. at the Alliance for the Arts, 10091 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers Duncan is the healthcare liaison and research educator at the Neuropsychiatric Research Center of Southwest Florida, and also is a clinical instructor and consultant, working with leading professionals across the country in brain health initiative projects. In addition, she is a published author for art-psychotherapy and medical books, and regularly contributes to other publications. Lombardi provides art therapy and counseling services at Delta Family Counseling in Cape Coral, and at the private therapeutic school, the Knox Academy in Bonita Springs. She has lectured and facilitated workshops on art therapy at local and national venues. She is also a published author on the topic of art therapy. Mindfulness involves developing an awareness of inner thoughts and emotions, without judgment. This has been shown to be an effective tool for relaxation, stress reduction, and managing challenging thoughts and emotions. No artistic or mindfulness experience is necessary to participate. Register at www.artinlee.org or email education@artinlee.org. Angel Duncan Reina Lombardi The nest relaxation treatments from around the planet have been brought to Southwest Florida.Call 239.333.1450 or visit www.AssuageCenters.comGET TO KNOW US OPENING SPECIALAssuage Signature Massage, Assuage Signature Facial, And Make-up Application.Special Price: $185 (reg. $215)

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 201320 Are T he Manning Brothers T he Greatest Sibling Combo I n T he H istory Of Sports?by E d FrankYou be the judge, but has there ever been a better brother-brother combination in sports than Peyton and Eli Manning? Combined they have accounted for 31 National Football League playoff games, three Super Bowls, three Super Bowl MVP awards and together they are closing in on 100,000 passing yards. Eli has two Super Bowl victories and Peyton one with his former team, the Indianapolis Colts. In fact, last Sunday, when Peyton tossed for two touchdowns in Denvers 41-23 win over Elis New York Giants, he topped 60,000 passing yards himself. The elder Manning clearly outplayed his younger sibling in the lopsided victory as Eli was intercepted four times by a bruising Denver defense. It was the third time that the Brothers Manning matched up against each other and perhaps the last time. Denver is off to a 2-0 record in the young NFL season while the Giants are 0-2, so its doubtful that the two teams will meet in next Februarys Super Bowl that interestingly will be played on the Giants home field in New Jersey. Debating sports is like debating politics there seldom is the right answer. You might argue that the sibling rivalry belongs to the DiMaggio brothers Vince, Dom and Joe, who had 22 baseball all-star appearances, nearly 5,000 hits and all served our country in World War II. And what about hockeys Sutters Brian, Darryl, Duane, Brent, Rich and Ron, who skated on six Stanley Cup champions. This argument could go on and on... and why limit the debate to the male side of sports? There are a couple of sister tennis stars who certainly rate among the all-time sibling greatest Serena and Venus Williams, who account for 24 Grand Slam singles titles. So as we wrote at the start: You be the judge. Miracles Buxton Named Baseballs Minor League Player Of The Year Fort Myers Miracle centerfielder Byron Buxton last week was named the best minor league player in all of baseball by Baseball America, the so-called bible of baseball. Thats quite an honor for the Minnesota Twins top prospect when considering that are hundreds of minor league players. The Twins top draft choice in 2012, Buxton started the year at Low A Cedar Rapids of the Midwest League, where he hit .341 in 68 games. At mid-season, he was promoted to High A Fort Myers of the Florida State League, where he continued his torrid pace, batting .341 in 57 games. Combined with the two teams, the 19-year-old scored 109 runs, stole 55 bases in 74 attempts and accounted for 77 RBIs. At seasons end, the Twins sent him to the Arizona Fall League. He is likely to start next season with the Twins Double A New Britain or Triple A Rochester. Tickets Now On Sale For CME Group Titleholders The grand finale of the LPGA season takes place November 18 to 24 at the CME Group Titleholders that returns for the second year at the Tiburon Golf Club in Naples. The tournament features the seasons tournament champions. To date, 19 Solheim Cup competitors have qualified for the local event. There are a variety of ticket packages that can be purchased at the Tiburon Golf Club. Peyton and Eli Manning Commander T o Speak On Arab CultureThe Academy of Lifelong Learning at Shell Point welcomes to its Fall Academy retired U.S. Navy Commander Douglas B. Quelch for a series of lectures about Arab culture. Quelch has a rich experience in Arab culture honed through almost eight years as an advisor to the Royal Saudi Naval Forces after his 23-year Navy career. In Arab Culture, Quelch will put Arab culture, religion, and history into unique per spective and discuss the impact of World War I on the formation of modern Saudi Arabia and much of the Middle East. Sessions are scheduled for Monday, October 7, 14 and 21 from 1:15 to 2:45 p.m. in the Social Center on the Island at Shell Point. Quelchs sessions are free, but space is limited and reservations are required. Call 489-8472 for more infor mation. Commander Quelchs masters degrees in National Security Affairs, National Security and Strategic Studies, and Management, along with his background, have given him a unique understanding of Arab culture, said Teri Kollath, manager of Volunteer Services and The Academy at Shell Point. We are excited he is coming to share his experiences and explain the cultural nuances. The Academy of Lifelong Learning at Shell Point is an educational initiative for the residents of the retirement community. The Academy provides approximately 80 classes each semester that encompass a well-rounded curriculum of educational opportunities for senior adults. Commander Douglas Quelch Symphony Appoints New Director Of Marketing And DevelopmentThe Southwest Florida Symphony appointed Amy Ginsburg Padilla as its new director of strategic marketing and development. Padilla comes to the Southwest Florida Symphony from the Jewish Federation of Lee & Charlotte Counties, where she spent the past year as its program director. During her tenure at the Jewish Federation, Padilla created and implemented several new programs with an emphasis on bringing arts and culture to the Jewish community. In addition, she developed new relationships with corporate sponsors and oversaw Jewish Family Services Food Pantry operations. Prior to her position at the Jewish Federation, Padilla spent more than five years with the Gulf Coast Symphony, where she held the marketing and public relations director position. During her tenure with the Gulf Coast Symphony, the orchestra experienced significant growth in visibility, subscribership and concert attendance. In her new position, Padilla will collaborate with the Southwest Florida Symphonys board of directors to assist with identifying and pursuing new funding sources and will oversee strategic marketing and public relations efforts. Amy Ginsburg Padilla

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21 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 2013M ental H ealth Symposium At B roadway P almTickets are still available for the 3rd annual Mental Health Symposium featuring mental health advocate Dottie Pacharis and other presenters. HOPE Clubhouse of Southwest Florida will host the symposium on Tuesday, October 1 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre in observance of Mental Health Awareness Week, which runs from October 7 to 13. Registration begins at 10:30 a.m. Tickets for Mental Illness: A Family Affair cost $35 including lunch and $50 with 2.0 CEUs for mental health professionals. Tickets are available at HOPE Clubhouse at 267-1777 or may be pur chased online at www.hopeclubhouse. org. Tables for eight may be purchased for $750 with corporate recognition. Pacharis, author of Mind On The Run, will discuss her familys struggle to get help for her son, who ultimately committed suicide. The symposium also will include a presentation on the genetics of mental illness by Fort Myers psychiatrist Dr. Steven Machlin. A highlight of the symposium will be a panel discussion by Pacharis and three local women, each of whom has been impacted by mental illness in her own family: Dawn-Marie Driscoll, an executive fellow at the Center for Business Ethics at Bentley University and a former cor porate attorney, who has a 61-year-old sister diagnosed with schizoaffective disor der, bipolar type; Sarah Owen, CEO of the Southwest Florida Community Foundation, who has a 23-year-old son living independently with mental illness; and Andrea Prather, co-owner of the Broadway Palm, who was diagnosed with depression and has managed her illness with appropriate medication. The Broadway Palm, Florida Weekly and The News-Press Media Group are the major sponsors with support from FineMark National Bank, Gavins Ace Hardware, Gulf Coast Clinical Research Center, Northern Trust, Park Royal Hospital, Rehak & Branning Attorneys at Law, and Storm Force. HOPE Clubhouse board vice-chair Shawn Seliger will serve as master of ceremonies. We are very honored that Dottie Pacharis, Dr. Machlin and our three distinguished panelists have agreed to join us for our 3rd annual symposium on mental health, said symposium chair Jeanne Sweeney of the Above Board Chamber of Florida. They have a wealth of knowledge about the mental health field that we can all learn and benefit from. Dr. Machlin is board-certified in adult psychiatry and has practiced in Fort Myers for 22 years. He is a graduate of the medical school at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri and completed his internship and residency at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, Maryland, where is a part-time assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. He has published research papers on neuroimaging and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and treats all psychiatric disorders in adults and geriatrics. HOPE Clubhouse of Southwest Florida is a model of rehabilitation for people living with severe mental illness such as bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and clinical depression. It opened its doors in March, 2010 and has 138 active members. HOPE Clubhouse received a threeyear accreditation from the International Center for Clubhouse Development ear lier this year. For more information, visit www. hopeclubhouse.org. Dottie Pacharis Dr. Steven Machlin Dawn-Marie Driscoll Sarah Owen Andrea Prather Celebrity Waiters Aid Stars For KidsSome of the areas favorite per sonalities will tote trays, fetch beverages and demonstrate their performing talents on Saturday evening, October 5, to raise funds for Child Care of Southwest Florida. The 5th annual Stars For Kids Celebrity Waiter Dinner & Auction is scheduled to begin at 6:30 p.m. at Harborside Event Center in the downtown Fort Myers River District. Among the celebrities making encore appearances are Fort Myers Mayor Randy Henderson, Lee County Tax Collector Larry Hart and Downtown Rotarians Bob Beville, Steve Bowen, Don Molloy and Bob Sheehan. These celebrity waiters and others will serve and enter tain while portraying Elvis and Priscilla Presley, Sandy Olsen and Danny Zuko from Grease, Pet Detective Ace Ventura, Minnie Pearl and The Wizard of Oz cast, including Dorothy, Toto, The Wicked Witch of the West, The Tin Man, The Scarecrow and The Cowardly Lion. JetBlue Park announcer Ted Fitzgeorge, who was the voice of the Fort Myers Miracle for a decade, will emcee the evening. Popular local auctioneer Jack Burges will officiate the live auction. Tickets for Stars For Kids are $100 per person and may be purchased online at www.CCSWFL.org or by calling 2781002. Table sponsorships are available for $1,000. The evening includes a cocktail reception, dinner and silent and live auctions. Guests are encouraged to tip their waiters for special table services, performances and other deeds. The energy of this event is indescribable, said Beth Lobdell, executive director of Child Care of Southwest Florida. We are so lucky to have the support of our celebrity waiters, whose creativity and enthusiasm inspires the generosity of our guests. Stars For Kids also gives us the chance to reinforce an appreciation of the long-term value of early childhood education. Event proceeds will support Child Care of Southwest Floridas mission of strengthening and enhancing the lives of children and their families by providing scholarships for low-income children at the agencys six accredited centers in Lee and Hendry counties. The agency provides early childhood education, as well as voluntary prekindergarten and Head Start programs, at its centers near Page Field, in Dunbar, Lehigh Acres, LaBelle and Clewiston, and on the campus of Edison State College. Dedicated to the premise that kinder garten is too late, the centers professionals work to ready children for school success. Research shows that high-quality early-childhood education reduces dropout rates, teen pregnancy and arrests. Child Care of Southwest Florida Inc., a United Way agency established in 1967, also provides state-mandated training for child care professionals and administers the federal food program for eligible centers and family child care homes throughout Southwest Florida. Visit www. CCSWFL.org to learn more. The Blues Brothers Bob Sheehan, Steve Bowen, Don Molloy and Bob Beville

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 201322 Financial FocusConsider Your I nvestment Strategy... At E ach Seasonby Jennifer BaseyFall is almost officially here and if youre like most people, youre probably wondering how summer went by so fast. Those trips to the lake or the beach are fading in memory now, giving way to helping kids with homework, raking leaves and the other rites of autumn. And just as your day-today tasks change with the seasons, so, too, will your money management and investment activities at different phases of your life. Heres how these scenarios might look: Phase One: Planning For Possibilities When youre young and youre starting out in the working world, your most immediate financial concerns may be to pay off student loans and then, possibly, save for a down payment on a house. To address both these goals, youll need to budget carefully. And yet, even at this stage of your life, you should start thinking about saving for retirement... because time is your biggest ally. Consequently, if you work for an employer who offers a retirement plan, such as a 401(k), contribute what you can afford. At the very least, put in enough to earn your companys matching contribution, if one is offered. You may also want to open an Individual Retirement Account (IRA). Phase Two: Gearing Up For Other Goals As you move through life, and possibly begin a family, youll likely develop other financial goals, such as helping your children pay for college. You may want to consider investing in a tax-advantaged college savings vehicle, such as a 529 plan. Also, its important to have enough life insurance to protect your young family. Phase Three: Ramping Up For Retirement When you reach the mid-tolater stages of your working life, you may find you have more financial resources available, as your earnings may have increased significantly, your children have grown and your mortgage may even be paid off. If you are not already doing so, max out, if possible, on your 401(k) and IRA. And if you still have money available to invest, you may want to look for other tax-advantaged retirement vehicles. Phase Four: Reaping The Rewards Now its time to enjoy the results of your lifetime of hard work and your many years of saving and investing. You may have to tap into your retirement accounts, so youll need to choose a sustainable annual withdrawal rate. The amount you withdraw each year from your IRA and 401(k) depends on a variety of factors: how much youve saved, the lifestyle youve chosen, your estimated longevity, how much you have available from other sources, and so on. Phase Five: Examining Your Estate Plans During your retirement years, if not sooner, youll want to review your estate plans so that you can leave the legacy you desire. If you have a need to create or update your legal documents, such as a living trust and durable power of attorney, you should consider consulting a qualified estate-planning attorney. Youll need to make the appropriate financial and investment decisions at many different times over the years. This may sound daunting, but with diligence and discipline, you can discover the paths to take as you move through the seasons of your life. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@edwardjones.com. United Way Announces New Staff MembersUnited Way of Lee, Hendry and Glades announced that Amy Singer, Chelsea Cicero and Catherine Vernon have joined the organizations staff. Singer is the new community programs manager and will be responsible for working with United Way partner agencies, managing the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program and coor dinating the activities of 16 United Way Houses. She formerly was employed by Goodwill Industries of Southwest Florida. She is a graduate of the University of Central Florida and has a masters degree in mass communication. Cicero is a United Way 211 information and referral specialist. She is attends Florida Gulf Coast University and will graduate shortly. Her major is community health. Vernon is a United Way 211 information and referral specialist. She graduated magna cume laude from Florida Gulf Coast University. Her major was social work, and she was the secretary of the FGCU Social Work Honor Society. United Way 211 is a free 24-hour information and referral service for health and social services that provide food, housing, medical, child care assistance and more in Lee, Hendry and Glades Counties. To reach an information and referral specialist, dial 2-1-1. T echnology Makes H ospital Waits E asierWaiting time at Gulf Coast Medical Center just got a tech upgrade. Time can stand still in a surgical waiting area, and many visitors come unprepared only to find that staring at the TV or fumbling through crossword puzzles just isnt enough to take their mind off their worries. Medical procedures that are routine to hospital employees are often unfamiliar to patients and their loved ones, leaving them to feel frightened and uncertain. With this in mind, Gulf Coast Medical Center is using modern technology to create a supportive and reassuring environment in which patients and their visitors can feel more at ease. We have a variety of amenities available to patients and their loved ones to help them pass the time and keep them informed as the patient progresses through their medical procedure, said Patricia Carroll, guest service coordinator. Waiting can be such an emotional process. We make it a priority to make the experience as relaxing and enjoyable as possible. Recent additions to the waiting area were made possible by a generous donation from Richard and Cindy Harding of Miromar Lakes. A portion of the donation was used to purchase 16 Kindle Fires, which are available for loan to patients and visitors. Seven are used in the waiting area, seven more in recovery, and two in pre-testing. My wife and I watched the demonstration video that takes you through the entire surgical process, said 71-year-old North Fort Myers resident Ernest Piche. It was helpful for us to know what to expect from the time we arrive until the time we leave. Displayed throughout the waiting area are signs offering visitors the use of the gadgets, equipped with Internet access. The Kindles are great, said Carroll. They are useful to all ages and provide a variety of activities in one small, user-friendly tablet. Any free app can be downloaded. Borrowers surrender an ID and must be the companion of a surgical patient. Staff checks the battery supply every two hours, and users can swap for a fully charged Kindle if need be. Visitors often need a good stretch and they like to get up and get moving. Guest Services provides pagers, similar to the devices used at restaurants when waiting for a table. They allow family members some freedom, knowing theyre not going to miss anything important. Venus Nolan of Cape Coral used the pager while waiting for her husband. I went and had a coffee at the cafe across the lobby. Its nice to know they can reach you wherever you are. The hardest part of surgery is the people waiting, Nolan said. Shontae Russ of Alva was waiting as her grandmother underwent a biopsy. When they arrived she was handed a card with a five-digit number, assigned to her grandmother, which she could follow on the patient update screens located throughout the surgical waiting area as her grandmother moved from pre-op to surgery, and to recovery. The displays use the five digit code to identify the patient without disclosing any personal information. Color codes are used to let family members know where patients are in the progression of their procedure. It really helps to know whats happening instead of constantly running up to the desk to ask, said Russ. The board is helpful because it shows me whats going on. Like right now, this is her number, and I know that color represents that shes in recovery and that means were almost out of here. Patricia Carroll, guest service coordinator Program On I nteraction With E ldersLee Elder Abuse Prevention Partnership (LEAPP) will hold the Intergenerational Friends Program on Thursday, September 26. The event will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Broadway Palm, 1380 Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Buffet lunch will be served at 11:30 a.m. followed by the program. LEAPPs 2013 focus on intergenerational projects and awareness of elder abuse across generations spurred the coalition to bring guest speaker Inez Bracy to the community for the progam. Bracy is a lifestyle transitions coach, speaker, award-winning author and radio/ TV personality. Bracy will speak on the topic of communication that bridges the generation gap. People of all ages interact with one another in interactions that are hopefully clear, focused and understood, but unfor tunately often leave one wondering what just happened? Generational stereotyping keeps us from strengthening relationships across generations. Putting an end to elder speak when talking with or about older adults is the goal. Changing interactions based on stereotypes and myths into positive exchanges with older adults is the way to show respect for elders. Bracy will offer tips on effective communication across generations. Cost to attend the lunch program is $20 per person. Advance registration with payment is required. Mail guest name(s) with check made payable to the Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center, 12468 Brantley Commons Court, Fort Myers, FL 33907. For more information, call the center at 437-3007.

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23 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 deaRPharmacistP ropolis I s P erfect For I mmunity, B lood Sugar And Cholesterolby Suzy Cohen, RPhDear Pharmacist: I take a dozen antibiotics per year due to frequent infections. What else can I take? Dont worry, I take probiotics; what I want is a natural antibiotic. MW, Santa Barbara, California For millions of years, honeybees have protected themselves with a sticky substance called propolis to coat and clean their hives. Call it bee glue, this compound has exceptional medicinal benefits just like other tree saps such as Frankincense and Myrrh. Propolis has over 200 active ingredients including cinnamic acid derivatives, which cause cancer cells inside you to kill themselves (even leukemia). It has antibacterial, antiviral, antiseptic, anti-fungal and antimicrobial effects. Im stocking up now before cough and cold season rolls in. The Brazilian species, as in Brazilian green propolis, has higher amounts of these healing compounds, sold at health food stores and online. When combined with vitamin D, probiotics, Matcha tea, Maitake mushrooms and prescribed lowdose naltrexone (LDN about 4.5mg at night), I am confident you will ramp up your immune system. Talk to your doctor about these options. Now, Id like to focus on how propolis can rapidly clear the body of danger ous pathogens, improve blood sugar and cholesterol, all the while reducing paincausing cytokines. Artepillin C, a compound in propolis shuts down NFKB, a metabolic pathway in your body that churns inflammatory compounds that make you hurt. So, propolis is an antiinflammatory. It supports healthy blood sugar levels as well as blood lipids (like cholesterol). Ive always been somewhat afraid of these critters, but after studying this, lets hear it for the bees! As an antibiotic, propolis has been shown to kill H. pylori is implicated in gastric ulcers and colitis; also MRSA, as in the potentially fatal bug Methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus. It acts on these pathogens without destroying your probiotic flora. Id still take probiotics, but its good to know propolis doesnt harm your gut like conventional antibiotics. That means no diarrhea, cramping and bloating like you get from antibiotics. As an anti-fungal, propolis has been shown to fight Candida strains of all sorts including C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. krusei. That last one is dangerous, and it occurs during production of chocolate and wine. A study compared natural propolis to the drug Nystatin, and they were equally effective. Propolis boosts your own macrophages to go and fight harder. One of the most difficult to treat viruses known to man is influenza, another one is herpes and, of course theres the infamous small pox. Would it shock you at this point if I told you various studies have shown antiviral capacity by propolis? Two separate studies have shown it work against HPV, or human papilloma virus, implicated in cervical cancer. Whenever I see hype about injecting little kids with vaccines for HPV, I wonder why propolis doesnt even get honorable mention? For enhanced immune benefits, youll see high quality brands combine the Brazilian green propolis with probiotics, astaxanthin or other immune-boosting antioxidants. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www.dearpharmacist.com. School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Shelley, My family is in transition and probably moving to a new county. We have to move and I am concerned about my childs schooling. He is in seventh grade and has an IEP. Does he have to go through the whole testing thing again at a new school? Amber T., Fort Myers Beach Amber, It is hard for kids to move and change schools but this happens frequently and most schools are quite prepared for a new student entering after the beginning of the school year. In the case of a student with an IEP, schools have a special responsibility to provide continuity when students with disabilities move from one district to another, federal education officials say. Education leaders and officials said that under IDEA, a child moving to a new school is entitled to receive services that are similar or equivalent to what was provided in their last placement. This mandate includes not only offerings provided during the traditional school year, but also any summer programming included in the students individualized education program or IEP. Regulations state that in cases where students transfer schools within the same state, such services must be provided until the new school either adopts the students IEP or develops and implements a new one. Similarly, when children move out of state, comparable services must be offered until an evaluation is conducted, if needed, and a new IEP is put in place. Given these policies, your son should be able to have his IEP implemented without delay. I would recommend that as soon as you enroll your son in his new school, make sure to give them a copy of his IEP so the new teacher(s) can begin to prepare for him. I would also recommend that you bring an additional copy of the IEP to the new schools administration on his first day there just to insure that all parties have seen the document and are aware of your sons program. Ms. Greggs is adjunct faculty at Edison State College where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also Nationally Certified School Psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. M om And Me by Lizzie and P ryceLizzie and Pryce answer your questions and give advice about aging concerns from a two-generational perspective. A mother and daughter team, Lizzie is a retired RN and health educator, and Pryce is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in the care of elders and people with chronic illnesses. Dear Mom & Me, On a recent visit to my parents, I realized that they are now starting to develop serious health problems. I suggested that they move to be closer to me, but they seemed very reluctant to do so. They are fearful that they will be unable to find a doctor who will take them on as patients. I inquired around my area and find it is a very real problem because so many of the doctors here will not take Medicare patients. Do others complain about this problem? Agatha Dear Agatha, This is a real problem and also a national problem. Many doctors complain that they cannot pay rent and staff and are forced to take patients that are private pay only. Your parents could also ask their present physicians if they have any contacts in your area and possibly there could be a referral. In the meantime, they could go to the hospital emergency room if a crisis develops. Lizzie Dear Agatha, Moving to a new area does present problems and can be very difficult and being on Medicare just compounds the problem. You could talk to the medical society in your area and they may have some valuable information and, who knows, they may have a wonderful referral service. Best of luck to you. Pryce Lizzie and Pryces email address is momandmeaging@hotmail.com. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President General Manager Personal Lines Agent 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Paradise. Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. We are HERE for all your insurance needs H umane Society E xtends T hursday Operating H oursIn an effort to allow potential adopters more time to visit the pets of the Gulf Coast Humane Society, located at 2010 Arcadia Street in Fort Myers, Thursday adoption hours have been extended from 5 to 7 p.m. Executive Director Jennifer Galloway stated, We wanted to give the public more opportunities to visit our pets after normal business hours. Staying open later also means our volunteers can come and walk dogs and socialize our cats after work. The Gulf Coast Humane Society is open seven days a week, Monday Tuesday and Saturday from noon to 5 p.m., Wednesday and Friday from 2 to 5 p.m., Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. and now Thursday from noon to 7 p.m. For more information about the Gulf Coast Humane Society, call 332-0364 or email info@gulfcoasthumanesociety.org.

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 201324 Local Dress For Success Member R eceives Worldwide R ecognitionBarbara Dell, executive director of Dress for Success SW Florida, announced that Dress for Success Professional Womens Group (PWG) member Laura Mobley-Williams from Cape Coral won first runner-up at the International 2013 Success Summit for her Community Action Project (CAP). Her CAP work with After the Rain, a non-profit home for women in despair is located in Fort Myers. Mobley-Williams and a winner from London, England were honored for their outstanding projects. They were selected from over 50 Dress for Success affiliate delegates across the globe. Mobley-Williams became a member of Dress for Success SW Florida while participating in the Going Places Network (GPN), a nine-week program in partnership with Wal-Mart that helps unemployed and under-employed women gain professional skills and build confidence. After finishing the program, she became a member of the Professional Womens Group. A year later, she was chosen to be the delegate for Dress for Success SW Floridas Community Action Project, an annual project designed by Dress for Success Global for the purpose of reaching out into the community and helping an underserved organization. After reading a news article about After the Rain, I knew that this was the perfect organization for my CAP. Our goal was to enhance the living conditions, educate, and uplift the spirits of the broken and abused women who are helped by this organization, said Mobley-Williams. After the Rain of Southwest Florida is a non-profit transitional housing facility for women in Fort Myers. The program aims to help women in recovery from addiction, homelessness and domestic violence. After the Rain has a director and assistant living onsite to provide residents with a supportive, home-like environment that maintains the structure and discipline needed for full recovery. After finding out what this organization needed most, Mobley-Williams designed a program consisting of wardrobe makeovers, a fashion show and four life enrichment classes featuring high profile guest speakers. Wal-Mart also funded a shopping trip to Home Depot for cabinets and a Wal-Mart shopping spree for other necessary items on After the Rains wish list. The project ended with a graduation for the women who went through the program. Mobley-Williams was mentored by Wal-Mart Regional Vice President Elise Vasquez Warner and had the support of local Market Manager Shelley Allman as well. She also had the on going coaching from Dress for Success SW Florida Business Development Manager Mary McDonough. We are very proud of Laura and the work she has done to help After the Rain, said Dell. As a local affiliate that has only existed for three years, Dress for Success Southwest Florida is truly honored to be recognized on a global level for our work within the Southwest Florida community. Laura Mobley-Williams E dison State College EMT Program R ecognized I n T op 80 NationallyEdison State Colleges Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) program was recognized as one of the top 80 institutions with the highest return on investment (ROI) for graduates, according to Fire Science online at www.firescience.org and ChipleyBugle.com. Edison State College ranked 47th, and 20 colleges of the top 80 were Florida colleges. Students in our program are receiving the best possible education because of the sophisticated class and simulation projects, and the partnerships we have with sur rounding organizations that work with First Responders, said Joseph Washburn, EMT-P, RN, MAA, Director of Emergency Services Programs at Edison State College. The Emergency Medical Services Technology Program at Edison State is designed to prepare students to become competent entry-level Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) and/or Paramedics. The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) in conjunction with the Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs for the Emergency Medical Services Professions (CoAEMSP). The Fire Science Online wanted students to understand which schools offered excellent programs at affordable rates, and created a list of the top 80 in the U.S. More than 1,100 colleges and institutions offered EMT programs, and to calculate the programs with high ROIs, Fire Science Online reviewed national salary, tuition, enrollment and accreditation data. Additionally, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that employment of paramedics and EMTs is projected to grow by 33 percent between 2010 and 2020. To learn more about Fire Science Online, and review additional data on the EMT rankings, visit www.firescience.org. Peoples lives depend on the quality of care provided by EMTs and paramedics, said FCS Chancellor Randy Hanna. I commend our colleges for providing the job training needed to ensure the needs of our state are met while helping graduates achieve significant return on their investments. For more information about Edisons Emergency Technician Programs, or related degrees and certificates, visit www.edison.edu/sohp/programs or call 489-9392 ext. 1392. For more information on graduation rates, employment statistics and earnings data for Florida college programs, visit http://smart-college-choices.com. From page 18Miss Juliemoney and class. Katelyn Gravel contrasts beautifully as the stern Kristine, Jeans fiancee, hard working and clear about her place in society. The play could be called disturbing, which is exactly what the playwright had in mind. I applaud director Brittney Brady for bringing this kind of cutting edge theater to our area. There were lighting problems opening night that hopefully will be worked out for future productions. Next up is Woyzeck by Georg Buchner, which is called a work of revolutionary realism and of jagged poetic beauty. It plays October 16 through 20 at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center, 2301 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. Go to www.GhostbirdTheatreCompany.org for more information. Area R esidents E nroll At ClemsonLocal residents who have enrolled at Clemson University for the fall semester include: Jayron Khari Kearse of Fort Myers, majoring in Communication Studies; Joseph William Sedlak of Fort Myers, majoring in English; and Natalie Carrie Zipperer of Fort Myers, majoring in General Engineering. They join more than 3,200 freshmen at Clemson this semester. Local R esidents E nrolled At H eidelberg UniversityHeidelberg University has enrolled a class of nearly 400 new and transfer students for the fall 2013 academic year, ranking the incoming class as one of the largest in the universitys history. Among the members of the Class of 2014 are the following local residents: Business Administration. and Human Performance. SPORTS QUIZ 1. In 2012, Houston and the Chicago Cubs set a record for most pitchers used in a nine-inning, 1-0 game. How many was it? 2. Who had the most stolen bases for his career: George Brett or Pete Rose? 3. When was the last time before 2012 that Texas A&M won at least 10 games in a season? 4. Name three of the four players to win the NBA All-Star MVP Award and NBA Finals MVP Award in the same season. 5. When was the last time before 2013 that the Toronto Maple Leafs won an NHL playoff game? 6. Name the country that has made the most trips to the World Cup (mens soccer) without bringing home a title. 7.Which of the three Triple Crown races has jockey Gary Stevens won the most times? ANSWERS Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702 or email press@riverweekly.com

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25 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 2013DID YOU KNOW PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF S eE PT eE MB erER 23, 2013ARIES (March 21 to April 19) The changing season brings new experiences as well as challenges for the ever-adventurous Aries. Your social life expands, as do the opportunities at your workplace. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) That recent period of uncertainty has passed. You can now feel more confident about making decisions, especially those that relate to an important personal relationship. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Although you might be faced with a number of tasks on your to-do list, try to take time out to enjoy the arts. Music, especially, can be soothing to the sensitive soul of a Gemini. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A disagreement with a colleague or friend is best resolved with open and frank discussion. Trying to force the other party to see things your way is bound to backfire. LEO (July 23 to August 22) That Leonine pride might be ruffled by a colleagues challenge to one of your pet ideas. But stop growling and listen. You could learn something that will work to your advantage. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Someone in authority might decide to select you as a candidate for a project that carries more responsibilities. Be prepared to show why youre the right choice for the job. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) That new workplace problem should be dealt with as soon as possible. Leaving it unresolved for too long could lead to an even more unsettling and time-consuming situation. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) You might have to do some fancy juggling to keep both your work responsibilities and personal obligations on track. But ultimately, youll work it all out, as you always do. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) You might hear some upsetting things about a situation in your life. But dont be swayed by talk. Demand proof before making any decisions on the matter. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Dont risk depleting those precious energy levels by taking on more tasks than you can realistically handle. Also, remember to ask for help when you need it. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) It might be difficult for the Aquarian who is used to giving advice to take counsel when offered. But its a good idea to listen to what trusted friends feel you should know. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Things might be a little unsettled as you move through a period of reassessment. But once you get your priorities sorted out, you should be ready to tackle an important decision. BORN THIS WEEK: Youre able to achieve a happy balance in your productive life by never feeling overwhelmed or under appreciated. sionary organization -receives its charter from Pope Paul III. The first Jesuits took vows of poverty and chastity, and made plans for the conversion of millions to first time after stealing a basket of laundry. He broke out of jail and roamed the American West, eventually earning a reputation as an outlaw and murderer, with a rap sheet that allegedly included 21 murders. the greatest singing cowboy of all time, is born in Tioga, Texas. While Autry was no cowboy, he was a genuine Westerner who had lived on a ranch. His lasting fame came from films and his first movie, In Old Santa Fe, eventually was followed by nearly 100 other films. parade in Philadelphia prompts a huge outbreak of the flu epidemic in the city. By the time the epidemic ended, an estimated 30 million people were dead worldwide. The most likely origin of the 1918 flu pandemic was a bird or farm animal in the American Midwest. Motorola radio, the first mass-produced commercial car radio. (The name had two parts: motor evoked cars and motion, while ola derived from Victrola record players.) Athletics ageless wonder Satchel Paige end, proved his greatness by giving up only one hit in his three innings of play. He was the oldest pitcher ever to play a game in the major leagues. Ben Johnson runs the 100-meter dash in triumph, however, was short-lived: He tested positive for steroids three days later and was stripped of the medal. made the following sage observation: All are lunatics, but he who can analyze his delusion is called a philosopher. sign was constructed in 1923, it read Hollywoodland. It was an advertisement for a new housing development and was expected to be in place only about a year and a half. The sign became such a recognizable symbol of the new film industry in Los Angeles that it has been refurbished and rebuilt as necessary for 90 years. Administration approved the use of maggots as a medical device for cleaning wounds. Wyo., you might want to make a pilgrimage to the Ames Pyramid. At the end of a 2-mile dirt road, in the middle of featureless pasment seemingly plunked down at random. The pyramid was built in 1882 near a line of the Union Pacific railroad and in honor of the railroads financiers. It was thought that the monument would be a welcome distraction to railroad passengers traveling through the plains of Wyoming. The decline of railroad travel, however, caused many tracks to be removed, including the line that ran by the pyramid. Now only cows are left to admire this relic of the industrial age. become a cult classic, but not many people realize that it was originally titled Star Beast. Hollywood is a place where theyll pay cents for your soul. I know, because I turned down the first offer often enough and held THIS WEEK IN HISTORY strSTR A nN G eE BU tT trTR U eE thoTHO UG htHT F orOR theTHE DA yY 1. LANGUAGE: What does the phrase entre nous mean? 2. TELEVISION: What was the name of The Flintstones family pet? 3. AD SLOGANS: What product uses the advertising slogan, How do you spell relief? 8. MOVIES: Which blockbuster movie featured the character Jack Dawson? friends reside? TRIVI aA TES tT ANSWERS SpSP OR tT S QUIZ inning, 1-0 game. How many was it? 3. When was the last time before 2012 that Texas A&M won at least 10 games in a season? MVP Award in the same season. off game? out bringing home a title. ANSWERS

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 201326 Florida Refrigerator Pickles 3 large cucumbers, seeded and cut into small wedges 1 bell pepper (your favorite color), sliced 1 tbs dry Italian seasoning 4 to 6 cups cider or rice wine vinegar Kosher salt and fresh ground pepper to taste 2 to 4 small mason jars with lids or any other food storage container Add cucumber, bell pepper and Italian seasoning to a mixing bowl and season with salt and pepper. Mix to combine spices. Add cucumber mix to several jars or food containers. Pour the vinegar over to cover completely. Put the lid on and let marinate in the refrigerator for two days. Florida Refrigerator Pickles Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702 or email press@riverweekly.com TREE & LAWN CARE Jesus Hernandez LANDSCAPING & TREE SERVICE 482-7350 We Service All your Landscape Needs FULL Landscaping SERVICES Over 20 years serving San-Cap & Ft. Myers COMPUTERS GENERAL CONTRACTOR N C R CGC1517615239-593-1998 FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the bene ts of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 FISHING CHARTER CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.com

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27 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 answer on page 27 PUZZLE ANSWERS SUDOKU SCRAMBLERS FIND AT LEAST SIX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PANELS PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING CONTRACTOR G I P M SR C D P D P CG D GrSince 2001, A Southwest Florida Paver Contractor www.gigicompanies.com 239-541-7282Schedule free estimates or visit our new show roomLic.# S3-12238 To advertise in The River Weekly NewsCall 415-7732 BUILDING CONTRACTOR

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 201328 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS TO PLACE AA CC LAS SIFIED LL OG OO N tT O: II sland SS un NN ews.c om CLICK ON PLACE CLASSIFIED 3883 Sanibel Captiva Road, Sanibel, Fl Phone: 239-472-3644, ext 1 Fax: 239-472-2334 www.crowclinic.orgH ELEL P U SS P LEASELEASE !!We need volunteers for: Clinic emergency patient admissions desk and baby animal feeders Visitor education center greeters and gift shop cashiers CROW (239) 472-3644, ext. 231 or volunteers@crowclinic.orgR SS 1/4 NCNC T FNFN hH EL pP WANTEDVO LL U NTEERSNTEERS NEEDEDNEEDED Volunteers needed for the After School Program which runs Mon.-Th, 2:30 3:15 pm call Linda Reynolds 472-1617R SS 1/4 NCNC T FNFN SER vV ICES oO FFERED RR OG ERER NN O DRDR U FFFF ELECTRICELECTRIC Lic# EC12002788. Call Roger 239-707-7203. Aqualink Motor Controls. R SS 6/7 CCCC T FNFN SS CARNAT oO LL AWN SS ER vV ICELawn Service, Shrubs and Tree Trimming Weeding, Installation of Plants, Trees and Mulch (one month free service available) Joe Scarnato (239) 849-6163 scarnatolawn@aol.comR SS 1/25 BM T FNFN SANISANI B ELEL HOM EE WATCWA TC HRetired Police Captain Lives on Sanibel Will Check Your Home Weekly Very Reasonable Rates (239) 728-1971R SS 1/4 BM T FNFN SER vV ICES oO FFERED RESRES O RTRT M ANAANA G EE M ENTENT Retired couple seeks position as small resort management team. Both have 30 years of Sanibel familiarity. On-site residence desired; salary negotiable. 231-421-9194 / jcrounds11@charter.net. NSNS 8/23 CCCC 9/13 H omOM E/ CC O NDND O WW ATC hH C oO NCIER gG E SER vV ICESDorado Property Management Full Range of Services Island Resident 24/7 Call Lisa or Bruce at 239-472-8875RS 1/4 BM TFN HELLES CC LEANIN gG SS ER vV ICESResidential Cleaning to Satisfaction Sanibel Lic. #11412 Lee Co. Lic. #051047 NSNS 1/4 P CC T FNFN ANN uU AL RENTAL LoLO N gG TT ER mM RR ENTAL2BR 2Bath 1,500 Sq. Ft. Executive Condo in Sanctuary available for long term rental. 6 month minimum, multi-year available. No pets, no smoking. $2,200 per month plus utilities. Call 407-227-3554. NSNS 8/30 CCCC 9/20 QU IETIET SANISANI B ELEL HOM EE WW /P RIRI V ATEATE B EACEAC H P ATAT H3200 sq ft home in Gulf Pines, one of communities. One house from beach w/private beach path. Short walk to Gulf large landscaped lot provides privacy. 3-4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, large open living W/D, 2nd fridge, Elevator, 2-car garage. $4,000/mo. + util. Annual rental only. fees paid by owner. Avail Oct 2013. Call 917-680-4440. NSNS 5/31 CCCC T FNFN RERE /M AA X O FF TT H EE ISLANDSISLANDS Putting owners and tenants together Call Dustyn Corace www.remax-oftheislands.com 239-472-2311R SS 1/4 BM T FNFN ISABELLA RASiIHAPPY TO HELP Y YOUWithITH A ALL OOF Y YOUrRREAL EEStT At TE NEEDS! R SS 1/4 NCNC T FNFN 1101 Periwinkle WW ay #105 SS anibel, FLFL 33957 ISABELLA RASiI (239) 246-4716E ISABELLARASi I@AOL.COM vV ACATI oO N RENTAL II sland VacationsMillion $ Views Await You! Cottages Condos Homes 239-472-72771-888-451-7277R SS 1/4 BM T FNFN LILI GH TT HOU SESE REALTREALT YPaul J. Morris, Broker VACATION RENTALS 359 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel Island 239-579-0511R SS 1/4 CCCC T FNFN ANN uU AL RENTALS FF O RTRT MY ERSERSCANALCANAL & DD O CC K Five Minutes to Sanibel T oll-Booth!! This UF ground level updated home offers 3 BR/2 BA + family room, double garage, screened in pool, 65 boat dock, + boat lift for boat. $2,500/mo. 472-6747Gulf Beach Properties, II nc. Paul H. Zimmerman, Broker/Ownersanibelannualrentals.comServing The Islands Rental Needs Since 1975 R SS 9/20 BM T FNFNANNANN U ALAL RENTALRENTAL 2/1 in Quiet neighborhood on canal. Newly remodeled. Perfect for single professional W/D $950 Plus Ut. Small dog w/deposit Available 10/1. 908-246-3577 NSNS 9/20 CCCC 9/20 VO LL U NTEERSNTEERS NEEDEDNEEDED At The Sanibel School Call Michelle Wesley 239-910-8000R SS 1/4 NCNC T FNFN ThTH E SS ANI bB EL BEAD ShopSHOP PT sales. Jewelry making exp. preferred. Will train reliable person with strong retail sales experience. Apply in person. 1101 Periwinkle Way, Mon.-Sat, 11-5 p.m.R SS 9/20 CCCC 9/20 hH EL pP WANTED CompCOMP ANI oO N/HEL pP ERSome meal prep and light housekeeping. Good Driving record. References Required. 239-4378-1991 or 239-223-0660. NSNS 9/20 CCCC 9/20 VO LL U NTEERNTEER OPPO RTRT U NITNIT YThe Sunshine Ambassador Program is a new and exciting volunteer opportunity offered at the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida located within HealthPark Medical Center. The Sunshine Ambassadors will greet, assist and be a families and visitors entering the hospital. The Ambassadors also make a difference to families by providing educational and healthful resources to assist in GRANDparenting for GRANDchildren. We are currently seeking year-round volunteers to work one 4-hour shift Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm or 12:00pm to 4:00 pm. If you would be interested in learning more about this wonderful new opportunity, please contact Lisa Ellinwood, Volunteer Resources Coordinator at 239-343-5062 at the Golisano Childrens Hospital. NSNS 2/8 NCNC T FNFN ExpEXP ERIENCED PERS oO NAL LL INES II NS uU RANCE AgAG ENTExperienced Personal Lines Insurance have 440 or 220 license. Email resume to: alarson@rosierinsurance.com NSNS 9/20 CCCC 9/20 ANN uU AL RENTAL RR I vV ER DD ISTRICT HIST oO RIC DD EAN PAR kK 1924 Pristine 2 story 2700 sq ft Tudor, 3-2.5-2, newly done kit (w/granite), MBR, breakfast/sun rm, den, DR, storage area, walk to downtown. Special. No pets. $1,500. 239-543-4278.R SS 9/13 CCCC 9/20 SARASSARAS O TATA TITI M ESES H AREARE FF O RR RENTRENT Located on Lido Beach overlooking the Gulf. Week 40 Oct 5th to the 12th, 2013. Limetree Beach Resort, 1050 Ben Franklin Drive, Sarasota, FL. Bargain! $750. Call Pauline at 239-481-3981. NSNS 9/20 CCCC 9/27 TI mM E S hH ARE

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29 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 2013 CLASSIFIED DEADLINE FRIDAY AT NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS BOATS CANOES KAYAKSDOCKAGEHourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-5800RS 1/4 NC TFN 22-FOOT GLACIER BAY CATAMARANIn good condition. Needs some detailing and a high pressure fuel pump. $9,000 or best offer. The boat was donated to the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) for quick sale. Contact James Robinson at CROW at (239) 472-3644, ext. 221 or development@ crowclinig.org. Or contact Peg Albert at (239) 472-3644, ext. 232 or peg@ crowclinic.org. RS 7/26 NC TFN FOUNDPrescription sunglasses found in parking lot of Limetree Center on Wednesday, February 27. Claim at Island Sun newspaper, suite 2 in Limetree Center, or call 395-1213.NS 3/8 NC TFN TOOL BOX WASHES UP ON SANIBELThis tool box with motor parts washed up on shore Saturday morning, May 8 about 8:30 on the beach at Sundial Resort on Sanibel Island. To claim call Sundial Resort Security 239-472-4151.NS 6/14 CC TFN LOST AND F OUND AUTO F OR SALE2008 HYUNDAI GLS SONATA40K milage Good Shape Call Ed 239-472-5065NS 9/20 CC 9/27 The Island Sun and The River Weekly NewsAlways on the table, and online, with everything you need to know about your community. NEWSPAPERSanibel & Captiva IslandsTHEIVER R r rf WEEKL Y NEWS Serving Sanibel, Captiva and Fort Myers since 1993 Phone 395-1213 or 415-7732 Pick up a copy or go to IslandSunNews.com. Click on Read the Island Sun or The River Weeklywww.IslandSunNews.com W ANTED TO BUYCASH P AID FOR MILITARY ITEMSCash Paid For Old Military Items. Medals, Swords, Uniforms, helmets, old guns, awards & more. Local Toll Free 1-866-440-3280RS 9/6 CC 11/29 P ETSFREE KITTEN TO GOOD HOMEFree kitten to good, safe home. No de-clawing. Fiesty Bengal mix. Call 472-1788 after 5 p.m.NS 5/31 NC TFN F OR SALETWIN BEDSTwo Twin Antique Maple Beds and Night Tables Excellent Condition. $400. New mattresses/box springs available.NS 9/20 CC 9/20 GARAGE MOVING YARDSALES CAUTION CLEANING OUT!Sat. 9/21 and Sun. 9/22, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 1606 Bunting Lane off Dixie Beach Blvd. Gumbo Limbo, Sanibel Storage Shed, Bike Lift, NYPD Pedal Car, Hide-a-Bed, Household, Lots More!NS 9/20 CC 9/20 To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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If you would like your club/organization listed in The River Calling Card, phone 415-7732Emergency ......................................................................................... 911 Lee County Sheriffs Of ce ........................................................ 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol ................................................................ 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol .............................................................. 278-7100 Poison Control ................................................................ 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center .......................................1-800-936-5321Ft. Myers Chamber of Commerce ............................................. 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare .............................................. 425-2685 Ft. Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce .................................. 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library ......................................................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library ............................................................ 533-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce .......................................... 931-0931 Post Of ce ..................................................................... 1-800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau ..................................................... 338-3500 ARTS Alliance for the Arts .................................................................. 939-2787 Art of the Olympians Museum & Gallery ................................... 332-5055 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio .................................................. 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers ......................................................... 275-3970 Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall ...................................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS ................................................................................ 395-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre ............................................... 278-4422 Cultural Park Theatre ................................................................ 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light ............................................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade .................................. 332-4488 Florida West Arts ...................................................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers ....................................... 472-0168 Gulf Coast Symphony ............................................................... 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres ..................................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic ........................................................... 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater ......................................................... 472-6862 S.W. Florida Symphony ............................................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy .................................................................. 936-3239 Young Artists Awards ................................................................ 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAngel Flight ................................................................ 1-877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center ............................................................... 731-3535 American Business Women Association ................................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL ..................................................................... 339-8046 Audubon Society ....................................................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR .................................................. 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society ................................................... 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus ................................. 1-855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club ............................................................ 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees ....................................................... 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists ............................................................ 415-2484 Ft Myers UDC Chapter 2614 (United Daughters of the Confederacy .................................. 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL ...................................................... 561-9164 The Horticulture and Tea Society ............................................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society ................................................................. 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society ............................................. 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation ........................................... 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees ............. 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America .......................................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL .................................................... 667-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans .................................................. 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy ........................................ 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association ........................................ 561-2118 Kiwanis Clubs: Fort Myers Beach ................................................. 765-4254 or 454-8090 Fort Myers Edison ..................................................................... 694-1056 Fort Myers South ...................................................................... 691-1405 Gateway to the Islands .............................................................. 415-3100 Iona-McGregor .......................................................................... 482-0869Lions Clubs:Fort Myers Beach ...................................................................... 463-9738 Fort Myers High Noon ............................................................... 466-4228 Estero/South Fort Myers ........................................................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County .............................................. 768-0417 POLO Club of Lee County ......................................................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers ......................................................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society ................................................ 472-6940 United Way of Lee County ........................................................ 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) ................................. 211 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews Shell Museum ................................................ 395-2233 Burroughs Home ...................................................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium ........................................ 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates ................................................... 334-3614 Fort Myers Skate Park .............................................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium ............................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge ................................ 472-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site .............................................. 239-992-0311 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center ....................... 765-8101 Skatium ...................................................................................... 321-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society ........................................ 939-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History ...................................... 321-7430 True Tours ................................................................................. 945-0405 Pets Of The Week SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 27 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 201330 Hello, my name is Bahia. Im a year-and-a-half-old female brindle Florida Curr. My name is pronounced Ba-hi-a and that means joyful. I have beautiful brown eyes and a gorgeous brindle coat. Im calm, quiet, loving, eager to please and just an all around good girl. My adoption fee is $40 (regularly $75) during Animal Services Fall Frenzy adoption promotion. Hello, my name is Heloise. Im a 6-month-old female brown tabby domestic short hair. Need a Helpful Hint From Heloise? Here it is. Get down to Animal Services fast because cats and kittens 6 months and older are only $25 during October. Cats and kittens are also two-for-one adoption fee. You wont find a better time to adopt a feline like me or one of my shelter buddies. Im absolutely adorable and super sweet! My adoption fee is $25 (regularly $75) during Animal Services Fall Frenzy adoption promotion. For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to Animal Services website at www.LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office, off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if three months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs six months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500. Heloise ID# 572124 Bahia ID# 570163 photos by squaredogphoto.com

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BEACH CHAIR PASTIMEAnswers on page 25 31 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 2013

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AWARD WINNING Flavors From The Caribbean Rim! NOW OPEN! NOW OPEN! Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! 239-463-5505 | 1249 Estero Blvd. Live Music Wed-Sun! Happy Hour Mon-Fri 2-5pmTheBeachedWhale.com Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 20, 201332