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River weekly news ( July 12, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101363/00150

Material Information

Title: River weekly news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication: Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 09-13-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101363:00193

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101363/00150

Material Information

Title: River weekly news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication: Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 09-13-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101363:00193


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FREETake Me Home VOL. 12, NO. 36 SEPTEMBER 13, 2013From the B eaches to the R iver District downtown Fort M yersRead Us Online at IslandSunNews.com USS Mohawk Lift E ventOn Saturday, September 7, the 165-foot World War II warship USS Mohawk CGC now a living reef thriving with exotic marine life, as well as an under water art gallery shared its underwater artwork with landlubbers. Celebrated photographer Andreas Franke of Austria led a team 28 nautical miles off the coast of Sanibel Island to lift the previously installed images that created a gallery within the ships inner spaces. Each image measures roughly 2.5 by 3.5 feet and is encased in steel-framed Plexiglas. During the past three months at sea, the photos evolved with an accumulation of marine life, which now provides a seaworthy patina and life of its own. For the project, Franke exhaustively researched the history of the Mohawk, which survived 14 attacks against German U-boats and rescued 300 torpedoed ship survivors continued on page 20 During their time at sea, the photos evolved with accumulation of marine life, which gave them a seaworthy patina and life of their own. They will be on display at Alliance for the Arts in October. photos by Michael Heider Artist Andreas Franke presenting his work at Nervous Nellies Waterfront Eatery before its deployment on the USS Mohawk on May 31 R obert B utler Of T he Florida Highwaymen T o T each Workshopby T om HallThe Art League of Fort Myers has announced a workshop with Florida Highwaymen artist Robert Butler. Taking place on Wednesday, September 18, the workshop is being sponsored by the art league in conjunction with the Calusa Nature Center and Planetarium.continued on page 16 A workshop led by Florida Highwaymen artist Robert Butler is September 18 at the Art League of Fort Myers. Butler is pictured above with his wife Dorothy. Lab T heater To P resent AmadeusAmadeus by Peter Shaffer, opening on Friday, September 13, will be the first show for the Lab Theaters 2013-14 season. History and fiction intertwine in this account of the rivalry between two genius composers, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Antonio Salieri. As Salieri watches the young Mozarts brilliance ascend to surpass his own, he grows resentful and vows to shatter the career of his nemesis at any cost. Amadeus asks the question many have asked throughout history: What if Mozarts death was not so natural after all? The New York Post calls it A total iridescent triumph... of complexity of thought, emotion and dramatic power. The play premiered on Broadway in 1980 with Ian McKellen as Salieri, Tim Curry as Mozart and Jane Seymour as Constanze. It ran for more than a thousand performances and was nominated for seven Tony Awards. In 1984, the play was adapted as a motion picture that went on to win eight Oscars, including Best Picture. On the heels of his success as Satan in last seasons The Last Days of Judas Iscariot, the role of Salieri will be played by James Recca. Connor Zerilla will be playing the young Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Constanze Weber, wife of Mozart, will be played by Eden Shelton. The play also stars Patrick Day as Emperor Joseph II, Dale Hoover as Count Franz OrsiniRosenberg, Ken Johnson as Baron continued on page 20 Connor Zerilla as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

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Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: A Naturopath Comes To Townby Gerri Reaves, PhDDr. Edwin L. Rasmussen first came to Fort Myers during the 19-teens. Sources differ as to the exact year, but while living in Savannah, he had met Capt. Fred Menge, co-owner of Fort Myers Menge Brothers Steamship Line when they were passengers on the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad. The naturopath came to know Menge well and was encour aged to come to the wonderful town. The doctor impulsively took him up on it, and visited another friend in town, JB Cox, too. Fort Myers evidently lived up to expectation, for Rasmussen bought 320 acres in the vicinity of the future Page Field for $10 per acre and wrote his wife Hazel that they would be moving medical practice and all. Upon his return home, the family packed up and headed to Florida in a Model-T Ford. The going was especially rough, for he failed to heed advice and attempt the trip in the dry season. Roads were flooded and bridges washed out, so he was forced to follow an old grade along the railroad in the final stages of the journey. Little did he know that the driving challenges would be good training for the itinerant medical career he would pur sue in wild Southwest Florida. Other doctors in town were unfriendly, Rasmussen later recalled. There was not much interest in natural or new medicine. His preference of the use of herbs over surgery and his treatment of disease with diet were unconventional ideas to most residents. He summed up his approach as teaching people how to stay well. Rasmussen was continuing in the profession of his father, a Danish naturopath who was an original member of the famous Battle Creek Sanitarium. The towns new naturopath opened his first office in 1919 on Bay Street. He was destined for a very busy and somewhat stormy career. Once, he was shot at from ambush when he returned home from a late-night call. Over the years, he had an office in various downtown locations, including the Earnhardt Building on First and the Pythian (now Richards) Building on Hendry. For a time, the family lived in the house pictured in the circa 1926 photo, the 1884 William Bill Towles house on McGregor Boulevard at Five Points (near the Caloosahatchee Bridge overpass). continued on page 4 The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, please call (239) 415-7732 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, FL 33901. Fax number: (239) 415-7702. E-mail: press@riverweekly.com. The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Co-Publishers Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Isabel Rasi Office Coordinator Graphic Arts/ProductionAnn Ziehl Photographer Michael Heider Writers Anne Mitchell Jeff Lysiak PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Contributing Writers Read Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com Click on The River Ed Frank Max Friedersdorf Tom Hall Circa 1926, members of the Rasmussen family sit on the steps of the house that William Wild Bill Towles built in 1884. From 1934 to 1986, it was used as the Engelhardt Funeral Home and later as a bank Courtesy of the Southwest Florida Historical Society thTH E rR IVE rR SE ptPT EMBE rR 13, 20132 Dr. Edwin L. Rasmussen Courtesy of the Southwest Florida Historical Society Today, the former home site is open space. In 2004, the Towles house was moved across McGregor Boulevard. It is now a law firm and listed on the National Register of Historic Places photo by Gerri Reaves

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3 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 Goodwill Still Collecting Teddy BearsGoodwill Industries of Southwest Florida, Inc., in conjunction with several local businesses, is still collecting teddy bears for its 7th annual Festival of Trees. Goodwill hopes to collect 300 bears by November, in time for the start of the Festival of Trees on November 29 at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center in the Fort Myers River District. They currently have just fewer than 100. The teddy bears are a huge part of Goodwills Festival of Trees, said Madison Mitchell, spokesperson at Goodwill. The bears make up the Very Beary Christmas Tree, which is donated to the childrens hospital at the end of the Festival. Goodwills bear tree has been a staple of Goodwills annual Festival of Trees since the events inception in 2006. Made up from bears donated by the community, the tree is one of 25 beautifully decorated trees that is auctioned off at the Festivals signature event, the Tux & Trees Gala, on December 7. Auction guests gather around this special tree to raise money for The Southwest Florida Goodwill Foundation. The tree is then traditionally donated to the childrens hospital. ArtFest Fort Myers, D&D Air Conditioning & Heating, GMA Architects and TDM Consulting, Goodwill Boutique on First, Imaginarium Science Center, Kelly Road Self Storage, Puddy n Pearl II, Rnells Tuxedos and the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center are all hosting public teddy bear drives. Bears can also be dropped off at Goodwill administrative offices in North Fort Myers. If you are interested in hosting a teddy bear drive, or have new bears that you would like to donate, contact Madison Mitchell at 995-2106 ext. 2213 or email MadisonMitchell@ goodwillswfl.org. For more information on the Festival of Trees and Tux & Trees Gala, visit www.tuxandtrees. com Last years Festival and Gala raised $93,000 to support the Southwest Florida Goodwill Foundation, which provides long-term financial support to programs and services of Goodwill Industries of Southwest Florida. In 2012, Goodwill helped 30,000 Southwest Floridians with disabilities and other disadvantages become more independent. This years Festival of Trees will take place on November 29 at the Davis Art Center Goodwill hopes to collect more than 300 bears this year Lazy Flamingo, Inc. 6520-C Pine Avenue Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-5353 Lazy Flamingo 3, Inc. 16501 Stringfellow Rd Bokeelia, FL 33922 239-283-5959 Lazy Flamingo 2, Inc. 1036 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-6939 Lazy Flamingo 4, Inc. 12951 McGregor Blvd. Ft. Myers, FL 33919 239-476-9000 Four Great Locations! We have the NFL Ticket Package and the BIG TEN Network NOW SERVING FULL LIQUOR IN FORT MYERS 20 Wings & Domestic Pitcher for $20 during all College and Pro GamesF M Every 3rd Tue Wine Tapas Tasting

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 20134 $10.5 Million Transportation Grant Announced For Lee Will Boost Bicycle-Pedestrian SafetyU.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx announced a $10.5 million grant designated for Lee County on September 5 during a visit to Six Mile Cypress Slough Preserve and Lees bicycle-pedestrian paths. This project is one of 52 transportation projects in 37 states to receive funding from the U.S. Department of Transportations (DOT) Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) 2013 discretionary grant program. The Lee County Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO), the official grant applicant, worked in coordination with the representative MPO Board, citizen advocates and consultants to develop its application. Based on Lee Countys Complete Streets initiative, the funded project builds upon the dedicated and committed work completed through the years to provide more coordinated services across organizations and to plan, design and build safer, more Livable Communities here in Lee County. Over the last few years, the MPO with its transportation partners have made a commitment to develop an integrated network of bicycle, pedestrian and transit facilities, said Kevin Ruane, Sanibel mayor and MPO board chair. The MPO is currently completing a Bicycle Pedestrian Safety Action Plan that has identified strategies to address bicycle and pedestrian safety, which we believe will be achieved with assistance of this grant. TIGER has enjoyed overwhelming demand since its creation, a trend continued by TIGER 2013. Applications for this most recent round of grants totaled more than $9 billion, far exceeding the $474 million set aside for the program. In all, the Department received 585 applications from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam. Created by Congress in 2009, the TIGER grant program directs the Department of Transportation to invest in a variety of transportation modes and selects projects to be funded on a merit-based process. These TIGER projects are the best argument you can make for investment in our transportation infrastructure, said U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx. Lee Countys Complete Streets Initiative will complete a safe, integrated bike and pedestrian network, increasing economic activity for local businesses. The MPO had cited four target areas for project funding: designed to connect several Lee County parks, anchored by Lakes Regional Park in south Fort Myers, and is focused on significantly boosting eco-tourism in this area. This segment will also connect two spring training stadiums (JetBlue Park and Hammond Stadium) to the multi-use path system, encouraging alternative and active transportation to games and entertainment. gaps in bicycle/pedestrian facilities linking the FGCU campus to the rest of Lee County to encourage bicycle travel. segment that links Lee County, the City of Bonita Springs and Collier County. The project will add sidewalks and new bus shelters to further support the phenomenally successful year-old LinC Lee/Collier transit route. A communitywide effort brought this to fruition today, Lee County Sustainability Manager Tessa LeSage said. Partners across the board included municipalities, the health community, education leaders, transportation officials, citizen groups and residents, environmental groups, and economic and tourism industry representatives and multiple Lee County departments. The cooperation set us apart from others competing for the grant dollars. The community as a whole can be very proud today. In addition to projects that are ready to go, DOT assessed surface transportation projects for their potential positive impact on their region or metropolitan area. Projects have the potential to improve existing transportation facilities and systems; contribute to the nations economic competitiveness; create and preserve jobs; increase transportation choices and access to transportation services for people in communities across the U.S.; improve energy efficiency, reduce dependence on oil, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and improve safety. TIGER is one more in a number of grants awarded to Lee County for their outstanding citizen lead and staff supported drive for a more sustainable, livable quality of life for all residents, current and future. Open Monday Saturday www.threecraftyladies.com Find us on WE WILL PAY YOUR TOLL!!!Spend $55 and bring us your toll receipt for a full refund! Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Downtown Fort Myers (Post Oce Arcade Next to Hotel Indigo) 1520 Broadway For Takeout & Delivery Tel: 334-6991 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEKMon-urs 11am 10pm Fri-Sat 11am 11pm Sun 12pm 9pm www. ichiban-sushi-chinese.com From page 2NaturopathHe was a rather enterprising sort for a medical man. He also ran a sanitarium on Riverside Drive in East Fort Myers in the late 1920s. In those days, doctors still usually traveled to their patients, so he spent much of his life on weekly rounds to his offices in Fort Denaud, Alva and Buckingham. In later years, he started the Orange River Sanitarium and widened his travels to Olga, LaBelle, Punta Gorda and Cleveland, Florida, when automobiles and the railroad made travel easier. years and then went to Coral Gables to open a clinic, but eventually move back. On his 90th birthday, he said he had stayed healthy by minding his own business, and added that the key to a long life is not to let things bother you. He wrote several books late in his life and died in 1972. Take a stroll to Five Points to the site where the Rasmussen family sat on the steps of one of the towns oldest houses. Then visit the Southwest Florida Museum of History at 2031 Jackson Street, where you can learn more about the medical professionals who attended early citizens of Fort Myers. For information, call 321-7430 or go to www.museumofhistory.org. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Then, be sure to check out the favorite research center of local history buffs the Southwest Florida Historical Society. Explore the archives and peruse historic photos. The all-volunteer non-profit organization is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Drop by on Wednesday or Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon, or call them at 939-4044. Sources: Archives of the Southwest Florida Historical Society. Greeters Club Meeting If you sometimes wonder if the family legends passed down over generations are accurate, then the speaker for the September 19 luncheon meeting of the Greeters Club of Greater Fort Myers might start you on a path of historical discovery. Carolyn Ford is the education chairperson for the Lee County Genealogical Society and has spent hundreds of hours assisting residents with tracing their family lineage. Her topic will be Genealogy Basics: How to Climb Your Family Tree. She will give an overview on how to get started and will be able to answer more difficult questions for those who are already climbing the tree but have run into a weak branch. The cost for the luncheon meeting is $20. To make a reservation, contact wmgaither@aol.com. Luncheons are held on the third Thursday of the month at 11:30 a.m. at the Colonial Country Club, 9181 Independence Way, Fort Myers. League Of Women Voters MeetingLee County Government will be the topic of the League of Women Voters next Educational Program Meeting on Saturday, October 5 at the Drive in Fort Myers. The public is welcome to attend. Denise Sabatini will provide an overview of Lee County Government Agencies and LeeGROWS (Government Resource and Orientation Workshop Series), a program designed to help the public understand what happens behind the scenes of county government. continued on page 15

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5 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 Fort Myers Public Art: New Mural Tells Story Of Matlachaby Tom HallArtist Leoma Lovegrove is painting a mural on the side wall of the Matlacha Island Post Office. Her depiction of a bright orange fish against a shimmering purple background will remind visitors entering the island that Matlacha was once a prospering fishing community. At first blush, one might think that Lovegrove has merely painted one of her trademark expressionist fish on an enormous blank wall. But good public art tells a story about the place in which it is located, and this is precisely what Lovegroves mural does. Until 20 years ago, Matlacha was an old Florida fishing community. But in 1992, a voter referendum led to a ban on net fishing designed to protect the popular recreational fish typically snared along with the mullet being targeted by commercial fishermen. Immediately following passage of the net ban, Matlachas fishermen shot holes in their boats and set them on fire. The pyre of burning fishing boats could be seen from Fort Myers Beach and Sanibel Island, and it signalled the end of Matlachas existence as a commercial fishery. Today, there are still a few shrimp boats tied up to the working docks, and while you can occasionally see the grisled, bearded holdouts from the mullet fishing days about town, Matlacha is now a highly-regarded artists community. Appropriately, the shacks and bungalows that the fishermen once called home are now splashed with bright funky colors and house art galleries, gift and island wear boutiques, seafood restaurants, rental cottages and small motels. Even the telephone poles have murals. Famous musicians like Jimmy Buffet drop into the local bar to toss back a few brews and play a set, unannounced, while authors spin tales behind laptop monitors in darkened corners. And most of the fishing now takes place on the bridge from Cape Coral to Matlacha which has the strange nickname of Fishing-est Bridge in the World due to the volume of people who fish off it, night and day. Both the brightly painted former fishing bungalows and Matlachas new bridge make their appearance in the mural. But make no mistake, its the fish and bright colors that dominate The Catch of Matlacha. Included in the green scales that dot the fish are special embellishments collected from the rubble of Matlachas 1968 landmark bridge, which was recently replaced by a more modern span. Even the rafters inside the post office were from the original bridge and used by Bruce Scott when he built the post office building way back when, says Donna Loibl, who owns the post office building. Once completed, the project will have bridge artifacts inside and out, preserving some of the islands history in a very colorful form of art for all to enjoy. Lovegrove originally estimated that the project would be finished by Labor Day, but you cant rush perfection. Ready or not, The Catch of Matlacha is already making a statement. An arts advocate, Tom Hall guides weekly walking tours of the River Districts public art collection in Fort Myers. For more information, go to truetours.net. The Catch of Matlacha by Leoma Lovegrove is nearly complete photo by Bob Phillips RIV RIV Nellies Upstairs Waterside Bar Where its Happy Hour all the time!!! 10% OFF Offer valid with Cash payments only ... No credit cards. ONE COUPON PER TABLE Can not be used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, Expires Sept. 20, 2013 Lunch, Dinner Snacks in Between11am-10pm www.nervousnellies.net FREE MARINA DOCKAGE with Dock Attendants Assistance PLUS LIVE MUSIC! Our email address is press@riverweekly.com

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 20136 Community Youth Chorus Seeks MembersDoes your child like to sing? The Community Youth Chorus is accepting new members and we would love to have your child sing with us! The chorus is a multicultural music education and performance program for youth that fosters talent, confidence and community. The Community Youth Chorus performs at many venues throughout the community including BIG ARTS, Shell Point, Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center, Butterfly Estates, Cape Coral Yacht Club, Alliance for the Arts, Southwest Florida Reading Festival and Bell Tower Shops. We are a volunteer non-profit organization and perform free of charge to help promote fundraising events. The chorus is open to all students, age 7 and up, all levels of singing abilities. Singers are taught to sing in two-part harmony and experience a wide variety of musical styles. There are three rehearsal locations, in Sanibel, Cape Coral and Lehigh Acres you choose the one nearest to you. There is no tuition charge to belong to the chorus. Auditions are not required but it is necessary to register. To register your child or schedule a performance, contact the director, Debby Dorr, at pianodorr@gmail.com or 8341899 or visit www.communityyouthchorus.com. The Community Youth Chorus conducts rehearsals in Sanibel, Cape Coral and Lehigh Acres Continental Womens ClubLadies who may be interested in joining other women in various group activities, both social and philanthropic, are invited to consider joining the Continental Womens Club of Fort Myers. Luncheon meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at 11:30 a.m. at Colonial Country Club in Fort Myers. The club offers numerous activities including lunch bunch, dining out, bridge, book club and more. For additional information about becoming a member, call Margie Connor at 561-8973. Presented by Sunday, November 10th 32ndCall for departure time CAPTIVACRUISES H T H E I S L A N D S H THE BEST WAY TO SEE THE ISLANDS IS FROM THE WATER Cruises depart from beautiful Captiva Island www.SeabreezeNurseries.com (239) 560-1422 WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY We can help! Ask about our Season Discount! Palms, Palms, natives, natives, crotons, crotons, bromeliads, bromeliads, buttery bushes, buttery bushes, & much more & much more Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702 or email press@riverweekly.com

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7 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 Ding Darling To Celebrate National Public Lands DayJN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge will celebrate National Public Lands Day on Saturday, September 28 on Sanibel Island with a beach cleanup, hiking and other activities. The days events begin at 9 a.m. with Beach Clean-up at the Refuges Perry Tract. Participants must park and pay at the Gulfside City Park lot. Clean-up ends at 11 a.m. In the afternoon, talk turns to trash as rangers and volunteers assess the trash collected that morning, discussing how long different products take to biodegrade. The program starts at 1 p.m. in the free Visitors Education Center at the refuge, followed by a showing of the film Addicted To Plastic. In the Refuge Nature Store, the Ding Darling Wildlife Society-Friends of the Refuge (DDWS) is giving away a free Kick The Bottle reusable water container with a purchase of $5 or more.National Public Lands Day is presented with support from DDWS. For more information about the event, contact Ranger Becky Wolff at 472-1100 ext. 236. The Lets Talk Trash game challenges participants to guess how long it takes plastic, disposable diapers, glass and other materials to biodegrade We Proudly Brew Tropial Outdoor Patio Seating Get Crabby At The Cow Get Crabby At The Cow with our Famous Stone Crabs1/2 lb & Best Prices On The Planet Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Come Try our NEW Cowlicious Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials Sanibels Most Award Winning Restaurant LIVE Famous Stone Crabs Famous Stone Crabs Always Fresh ...Always! ...Always! with our with our Always Fresh ...Always Fun! Always Fresh ...Always Fun! Calendar Girls Join RednecksThe Calendar Girls performed at the 2nd annual Redneck Games and Family Festival hosted by the Chamber of Commerce of North Fort Myers on Labor Day. Activities included bobbing for frozen pigs feet and a hairy back contest. The Calendar Girls defied the heat to raise awareness for their favorite charity, Paws for Patriots. For more information on The Calendar Girls, go to www.calendargirlsflorida.com. Calendar Girls with Chris Jackson, games organizer photo by Bill FloydEmail your editorial copy to: press@riverweekly.com

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 20138 Along T he R iverOn Friday, September 13 from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m., animal ambassador Trouper, a blind raccoon, will be at CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife) with his caretaker Dot Lee and author/friend Kyle Miller. The special event is part of the wildlife clinics WOW, Wonders of Wildlife program. With a photographic PowerPoint presentation, Miller and Lee will tell Troupers amazing story from his life-threatening head injury at eight weeks of age to becoming a certified animal ambassador for educational purposes. CROWs Visitor Education Center is located at 3883 Sanibel-Captiva Road, Sanibel Island. For more information, call 472-3644, ext. 228 or go to www.crowclinic.org. Every Saturday morning, The Alliance for the Arts GreenMarket offers an exclusive selection of locally grown, caught and cultivated foods and other products available to sample and purchase. Theres live entertainment by local musiciansm activities for kids, gardening classes and live cooking by local chefs. Eating locally grown and produced foods is good for the area economy and great for your health. Vendors at the GreenMarket offer chemical-free and organic produce, along with fresh baked goods, native plants and all-natural products. Alliance of the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard near the Colonial intersection. It is open year-round from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Call 939-2787 or go to ww.artinlee.org. On Tuesday, September 17, The Morgan House is hosting an evening of wines and gourmet tapas. The monthly tapas and wine tasting is featured on the third Tuesday from 6 to 8 p.m. Reservations are required. The Morgan House offers a birds eye view of the historic Patio de Leon in downtown Fort Myers River District. Lounge outside and catch the live music and special events taking place in the courtyard while sipping cocktails, drafts, microbrews and wines. The restaurant and bar features 14 beers on tap, full liquor bar and daily happy hour. Casual dining is available either inside in air-conditioned comfort, outside on the terrace or upstairs overlooking the Patio de Leon. The Morgan House is open Tuesday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., and Saturday 3 to 11 p.m. It is closed Sunday and Monday. The Morgan House is located at 33 Patio de Leon in downtown Fort Myers River District. Call 337-3377 or go to www.morganhouserestaurant.com. If youre heading out to Captiva for a bit of excitement this weekend, YOLO (You Only Live Once) Watersports provides all the fun youll need. It offers waverunner rentals, parasailing trips, motor scooter rentals, bikes rentals for the entire family, beach chairs and umbrella rental, stand-up paddleboard rentals and instruction, sailboat rentals, and banana boat rides. YOLO also has a full retail store which has all the goods youll need for a day at the beach including, longboard skateboards, sunglasses, momentum and freestyle watches. It now carries a full line up of GoPro HD cameras and mounts, Rainbow sandals and Peppers floating sunglasses. YOLO Watersports is located at 11534 Andy Rosse Lane, Captiva. Call 472-9656 or go to www.yolowatersports.com. After working up an appetite playing on Sanibel or Captiva, check out the great food and live music at The Jacaranda, or The Jac to locals. With live music nightly, the patio lounge attracts an affluent crowd to the friendly and casual restaurant. Although The Jacaranda is best known as a local gathering spot, it has also received several dining awards. The Jac Bar features a daily happy hour from 4 to 7 p.m. and serves two for one drinks and $5.95 appetizers. Live bands, including The Amazing Groove Masters, Both Hands and Renata, play every evening from 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. The Jacaranda is located at 1223 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel. Call 472-1771 or visit online at www.jacarandaonsanibel. com. Meet Trouper, the blind raccoon, on Friday at CROW on Sanibel. Troupoer is pictured with caretaker Dot Lee, a certified wildlife rehabilitator, and author/friend Kyle Miller The Morgan House features 14 beers on tap, full liquor bar and daily happy hour Please visit our River Weekly News online advertisers at www.islandsunnews.com. You can click through to their Web sites for more information about real estate, shopping, restaurants and services. Just click on the logos surrounding the front page. JACARANDAThe Entertainment Nightly in Sanibels Social Scene1223 PERIWINKLE WAY, SANIBEL 472-1771 Happy Apps $5.95Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna, Crispy Fried Calamari, Chilled Oysters, Steamed Shrimp, BBQ Beef Satays, Mussels Marinara, Chicken WingsSanibels Best HAPPY HOUR5 7 p.m. Nightly in the lounge1/2 Price DrinksCall & Well Liquor, Draft Beer Selections, Select House Wine

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9 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 E mployees Create P layground M ural For CCMI SchoolMembers of Chicos construction and design departments recently completed a mural for Community Cooperative Ministries, Inc.s Montessori Preschools playground. Three teams from the Fort Myers-based womens retailer spent three days creating and completing the colorful mural on the exterior wall of CCMIs preschool playground. The colorful mural includes various scenes including a cityscape, farm, sea life and flower garden. The Chicos team was great to work with, and we are so grateful for Chicos donating their talents and time, said Cindy Venezia, Montessori director for CCMI. We wanted something that was fun and educational for the students. What they created is amazing and really adds life to our school. Chicos FAS, through its brands Chicos, White House Black Market, Soma Intimates and Boston Proper, is a specialty retailer of private branded, sophisticated, casual-to-dressy clothing, intimates, complementary accessories and other non-clothing gift items. Founded on Sanibel in 1983, the company gives back to its community through supporting neighborhood programs that are aligned with their core values, the arts, festivals and events that enhance the community through promoting women and children and preserving green space. CCMI is an innovative nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization made up of social service entrepreneurs fighting to end homelessness and hunger in our community. The agency provides more than 15,000 meals each month through its Everyday Cafs and Meals On Wheels programs. CCMI also educates 35 children in its Community Montessori Preschool, offers homeless services and comprehensive case coaching services through its United Way Resource Houses, oversees a community mobile food pantry, as well as school pantries and a weekend backpack program that supplies emergency food to more than 1,500 children each school year. CCMI serves Fort Myers and the greater Lee County area, including Bonita Springs, Cape Coral and Lehigh Acres. CCMI works in partnership with United Way of Lee, Hendry and Glades, Harry Chapin Food Bank and regional community foundations as well as collaborating with fellow community and service groups including The School District of Lee County and numerous churches, businesses and community support organizations. For more information, call 332-7687 or visit www.ccmileecounty.com. Students, staff and volunteers from CCMIs Montessori Preschool stand in front of the recently-completed playground mural The mural includes a cityscape, a barnyard and underwater sea life The mural also includes an evening cityscape and farm scene The farm portion of the mural includes a red barn, apple trees and a cow A portion of the mural features a butterfly and an octopus

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Churches/TemplesALL F aA ITHS UNIT aA RI aA N CONGREG aA TION (UU A) Where diversity is treasured 2756 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers Summer program: Understanding the Faiths of Our Worlds June 2 to August 25 11 a.m. Interim Minister, Rev. Margaret Beard, begins on September 1 239-226-0900. www.allfaiths-uc.org A LLLL SS A INTSINTS BYZA NTINENTINE RITERITE CA THOLITHOLI C C HH U RR C HH 10291 Bayshore Rd., N. Fort Myers Divine Liturgy is on Sun. at 10:30 a.m.; Rosary begins at 10 a.m. Lenten services (Presanctied Liturgy) will be on Wed. evenings at 6 p.m. starting on Feb. 22. Administrator is Very Rev. Peter Lickman, ph. 305-651-0991. We are a Church of the Eastern Catholic or Byzantine Rite, 1.5 mi. east of Int. 75. A NNNN U NN C II A TIONTION GREEGREE K ORTHOORTHO D OO X C HH U RR C HH 8210 Cypress Lake Dr ive, Fort Myers Reverend Fr. George P. Savas Orthros Service Sunday 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy Sunday 10 a.m. www.annunciation.fl.goarch.org 239-481-2099 B ETHETH SHILOHSHILOH M ESSIESSI A NINI C SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 15675 McGregor Boulev ard, 437-3171 Rabbi: Judah Hungerman Friday Service, 8 p.m., Saturday Service, 11 a.m. Shabbat School Saturday Morning, Adult Hebrew Classes. Call for information on full program. B RERE AD OO F LILI F EE M INISTRIESINISTRIES C HH U RR C HH OO F GOGO D 16581 McGregor Boule vard, 267-3166 Just past the Tanger Outlet Mall Pastor: Barry Lentz, 281-3063 Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. C HH AB AD LL UB AV ITIT C HHO O F SS W F LORILORI D A ORTHOOR THO D OO X 5620 Winkler Road, F ort Myers Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz 433-7708, E-mail: rabbi@chabadswf.org Web site: www.chabadswf.org Services: Friday 6:30 p.m.; Saturday Kabbalah class 9 a.m.; Shacharit 10 a.m.; Kiddush at noon Minyan: Monday and Thursday 7 a.m. C HH AP ELEL OO F CYP RESSRESS C OO V EE 10200 Cypress Cov e Circle Fort Myers 239-850-3943, Located at Cypress Cove Retirement Center on HealthPark Campus An ecumenical non-denominational community of believers. Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. Reverendt Ted Althouse, Pastor revtedalthouse@aol.com C HH U RR C HH OO F THETHE C ROSSR OSS 13500 Freshman Lane; 768-2188 Pastor: Bud Stephens; A nondemonimational church emphasizing a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Sunday Service: 9:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 Contemporary. CONGREG aA TION aA L CH uU R cC H 1619 Lle wellyn Drive Fort Myers Just off McGregor across from the Edison/ Ford Winter Estates 334-4978 Pastor: Douglas Kelchner Worship times Sundays 9 and 10:30 a.m. Website: www.taecc.com CO vV EN aA NT PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937 Rev. Dr. Jeffrey DeYoe, Senior Pastor Reverend David Dietzel, Pastor Emeritus. Traditional Sunday service 10 a.m. Nursery available C ypYP RESS LakLAK E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H 8400 Cypress Lak e Drive, Fort Myers, 481-5442 Randy A. Alston, Reverend. Sunday Services: Bible study, 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship, 11 a.m., Evening Worship, 7 p.m., Wednesday Prayer Meeting, 6:30 p.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 481-3233. www.clpc.us. Clint Cottrell, pastor Prayer Service 8 a.m., Praise 9 a.m., Childrens Church 9 a.m., Traditional 11 a.m. Summer: Prayer Service 8 a.m. Combined Traditional/Praise 10 a.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E UNITE dD METHO dD IST CH uU R cC H 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 482-1250, 8 and 11 a.m. Sunday Traditional Service 9:30 a.m. Praise Service Sunday School all times F aA ITH FELLO wW SHI pP wW ORL dD O uU TRE acA C H mM INISTRIES 6111 South P ointe Boulevard, Fort Myers, 278-3638. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Voice of Faith, WCRN 13.50 AM Radio, Sunday, 1:30 p.m.; Thursday Service, 7:30 p.m.; Friday Youth Service, 7:30 p.m. Nursery care for pre-school children and Childrens Church for ages 5-12 available at each service. F aA ITH uU NITE dD mM ETHO dD IST cC H uU R cC H 15690 McGregor Boule vard Fort Myers, 482-2030 Pastor: David Stauffer. Traditional services 8:45 a.m.; Contemporary, 10:30 a.m. Go south on McGregor Boulevard. The church is mile past the intersection of Gladiolus and San Carlos Boulevard on the way to Sanibel. FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF cC HRIST S cC IENTIST 2390 West First Street, next door to Edison Estates. Sunday Morning Service and Sunday School, 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday Evening Testimony Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Child care provided at all services. Visit our Reading Room for quiet study at: 2281 First Street, River District. www.time4thinkers.com, www.christiansciencefortmyers.com, www.christianscience.com FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF THE NazaNAZA RENE 13545 Amer ican Colony Boulevard off Daniels Parkway in the Colony, Fort Myers, 936-2511 Pastor: Reverend Joey Brummett Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Family Night, 7 p.m. F IRSTIRST U NITENITE D M ETHOETHO D ISTIST C HH U RR C HH in the Downto wn Fort Myers River District 2466 First Street, Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-332-1152, www.fumcftmyers.org Sunday: 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 5 p.m. Youth Program FORT M yY ERS CHRISTI aA N CH uU R cC H (DIS cC I pP LES O fF CHRIST) A SS TE pP HEN MINISTRIES CONGREG aA TION 5916 Winkler Road, F ort Myers, 437-4330 Reverend Mark Condrey, Pastor Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Church School: 9:15 a.m. FORT M yY ERS CONGREG aA TION aA L UNITE dD CH uU R cC H O fF CHRIST : 8210 College Parkway, Fort Myers, 482-3133. Philip White, pastor Morning Worship: 10 a.m. Church School: 10:15 a.m. Adult Forum: 11:30 a.m. II ON aA HH O pP E EpEP IS cC O paP A L cC ONGREG aA TION 9650 Gladiolus Dr ive, Fort Myers 4544778 The Reverend Dr. John S. Adler, pastor. Weekly services: Saturday 5 p.m., Eucharist with Healing Sunday 8 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite One; 9:30 a.m., Family Eucharist with Healing and Church School Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Morning Prayer (in Spanish); Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Eucharist with Healing. Child care available at Saturday 5 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m. services. JES uU S THE WOR kK ER C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H: 881 Nuna Avenue, Fort Myers, 481-1143 Masses Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. K INGING D OO M LILI F EE C HH U RR C HH 2154 McGregor Boulev ard, Fort Myers, 218-8343 Pastor Randy and Anita Thurman 10:30 a.m. Sunday Service All are welcome. LambLAMB O fF GG O dD LuLU THER aA N/ EpEP IS cC O paP A L CH uU R cC H Corner Cypress View Drive and Koreshan Boulevard, Three Oaks area, Fort Myers, 267-3525 Walter Fohs, pastor; Becky RobbinsPenniman, associate pastor Sunday worship services: 8 a.m. Early Grace Traditional 9 a.m. Awesome Grace Contemporary 10:30 a.m. Classic Grace Traditional 8:45 & 10 a.m. Sunday School Gods Group NN E wW BEGINNINGS CENTER Ne w Home Church, 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, North Fort Myers, 239-656-0416 Weekly Friday Meeting Meet & Greet: 6:30 p.m. Kingdom Teaching: 7 p.m. Fellowship and refreshments after service. nbcministry@embarqmail.com, www.facebook. com/nbcministry. Alex & Patricia Wiggins, Ministers NENE W C OO V ENEN A NTNT EE Y ESES C HH U RR C HH See Clearly Meeting monthly at 9 a.m. at the Elks Lodge. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, Fort Myers, FL 33907. 239-220-8519 Pastor Alan Bondar www.newcovenanteyes.com Wear what you want, rockin music, relevant teaching, LIFT Kidz program, free coffee & donuts, people who are real, church thats actually fun. NN E wW HH O pP E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H O fF FOR T M yY ERS 16120 San Car los Boulevard, Unit 10 239-985-8503 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m Sunday Morning Worship. 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study NN E wW HH O pP E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 3825 McGregor Boule vard. Fort Myers Pastors: Stu Austin and Howard Biddulph 8 & 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11 a.m. Contemporary Worship 8, 9:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School Youth and Childrens programming runs concurrent to Sunday services. Nursery care provided at all services 274-1230. For more information visit: www.newhopefortmyers.org P EE A C EE CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H Meets at F ort Myers Beach Masonic Lodge 17625 Pine Ridge Road, Fort Myers Beach 267-7400. Pastors Bruce Merton, Gail & RC Fleeman Adult Discussion Classes: 9-10 AM Countdown to Worship (praise music): 10:10 AM Amazing Grace Worship: 10:30 AM Phone 267-7400 Fax 267-7407 Web site: peacecommunitychurch.com e-mail: peace1265@aol.com P EE A C EE LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH Sunday Worship at 9:30am. Peace is a member of the ELCA. We celebrate weekly communion with traditional liturgy, organ and choir. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers On the way to Sanibel. 239-437-2599, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@peaceftmyers.com. RE dD EE mM ER L uU THER aA N cC H uU R cC H 3950 Winkler Ext., Fort Myers, 274-0143 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. Sunday Services Daily early learning center/day care RIRI V ERER OO F LILI F EE A SSESSE MB LL Y OO F GOGO D 21580 Riv er Ranch Rd, Estero 239-495-0400, Senior Pastor: Todd Weston 8 and 9:45 a.m Services; 11:30 a.m. Legacy Service, multi-generational S amudAMUD R abadAB AD R aA buddB UDD HIST cC ENTER Meditation classes All are welcome. Guided meditations offering many methods for relaxing the body and focusing the mind on virtuous objects to bring increasing peace and happiness into daily activity. For information, class times and locations call 567-9739 or visit www. MeditationInFortMyers.org. SaSA INT COL umbkUMBK ILLE C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H 12171 Iona Road, F ort Myers, off McGregor and north of Gladiolus. 489-3973 Father Joseph Clifford. Weekly masses: Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. Weekend masses: Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday: 7, 9,11, and 5:30 p.m. Reconciliation is available at the church on Saturdays at noon and by appointment SaSA INT JOHN THE A pP OSTLE METRO pP OLIT aA N CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H 3049 Mcg regor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 344-0012 Pastor Reverend Steve Filizzi An Affirming & Inclusive Congregation Sunday Services, 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Mid-Week Service, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. SS A INTINT M II C HH A ELEL LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH & SS C HOOLHOOL ( LL CM SS ) 3595 Broadw ay, Fort Myers, 239-939-1218, Worship: Saturday 5:30 p.m., Sunday 8 & 10:45 a.m. Bible Study for adults and children Sunday at 9:15 a.m. Phone for other dates & times. Plus Marriage Enrichment, Divorcecare, Griefshare. SaSA INT PETER LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H 3751 Estero Boule vard, Fort Myers Beach, 463-4251. Sunday worship at 9:30 a.m. Womens Bible Study is offered on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 9:30 a.m. www.stpeterfmb.com SaSA INT NN I cC HOL aA S MON aA STER yY Church and Bookstore:111 Everg reen Road (southwest corner of Evergreen Road and Gail Street.) Liturgical services conducted in English and Church Slavonic; following the Julian (Old) Calendar. Liturgical Services: Sundays and Holy Days: Hours at 9:30 a.m. Holy Liturgy at 10 a.m. Call to confirm service schedule: 239-997-2847; Bookstore: 239-691-1775 or visit www.saintnicholasmonastery.org SS T VIN cC ENT DE P auAU L C aA THOLI cC CO mmuMMU NIT yY 13031 Palm Beach Blvd (3 miles east of I75) East Fort Myers (across from Ft Myers Shores) 239 693 0818 Weekday masses: 9 a.m. Tuesday-Friday Weekend masses: 4 p.m. Saturday Sunday 9 & 11 a.m. All Are Welcome! SS O uU TH wW EST bapB AP TIST cC H uU R cC H 16940 McGregor Boule vard, Fort Myers, 454-3336 Robert G. Kasten, Pastor Sunday Worship Service 11 a.m. Nursery available 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Junior Church grades one to five Wee Church Pre-K to K Evening Service 6 p.m. Wednsday Service 6 p.m. TETE MP LELE B ETHELETHEL SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 16225 Winkler Rd. 433-0018. Rabbi Jeremy Barras E-mail: rabbi.barras@templebethel.com Cantorial soloist: Lawrence Dermer Temple educator: Dale Cohen, MaEd, RJE Shabbat Services, Friday, 7:30 p.m. Torah Study, Saturday, 9:15 a.m.continued on page 11THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 201310

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11 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 From page 10Churches/TemplesReligious Education; Sunday School and Midweek classes, Preschool Classes, Monday through Friday Web site: www.templebethel.com Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TEMPLE JUDEA (CONSERVATIVE) 14486 A&W Bulb Road, Fort Myers, 433-0201, Rabbi: Rabbi Elyssa Auster President: Keith Grossman Minyan: Monday & Thursday at 9 a.m. Services: Friday night at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Religious School Sunday morning Web site: www.tjswfl.org Preschool director: JoAnn Goldman email templejudeapreschool@gmail.com 433-0201, Web site: www.tjswfl.org Affiliated: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism THE NEW CHURCH The New Church of SWFL is located 10811 Sunset Plaza Circ. #401, behind Zoomers. Rev. Gabriella Cahaley officiates worship services on Sundays at 11 a.m. during the season. Other worship events are held on the beach in Fort Myers Beach. See our webpage http://www.newchurchflorida.com/ or call for more information 239-481-5535. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH FORT MYERS 13411 Shire Lane (off Daniels Parkway one mile west of I-75) Minister: The Reverend Allison Farnum Sunday services and religious education at 10:30 a.m. For information on all church events call 561-2700 or visit www.uucfm.org. U NITY OF B ONITA S PRINGS Family Service 10 to 11 a.m. Healing Circle 11 a.m. Hospitality and Fellowship, 11 a.m. Inspiring lesson, uplifting and dynamic music, meditation in a loving environment. Service held at 28285 Imperial Street, Bonita Springs. Call 947-3100. UNITY OF FORT MYERS 11120 Ranchette Rd., Fort Myers Summer Services: Sundays at 10 a.m. Childrens class at 10 a.m. Reverend Jim Rosemergy, Minister Our God is Love. Our Race is Human. Our Religion is Oneness. www.unityoffortmyers.org or 239-278-1511 WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 9065 Ligon Court, Fort Myers, across from HealthPark Hospital, 481-2125 Senior Pastor: Robert Brunson Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Blended Worship www.westminsterfortmyers.org W ORD O F L IFE C HURCH 2120 Collier Ave, Fort Myers, 274-8881; Services: Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. Bishop Gaspar and Michele Anastasi Z ION L UTHERAN C HURCH 7401 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, 481-4040, Interim Pastor Jim Eggert Pastor Peter Weeks Sunday Services: 8:30 a.m. Traditional; 10 a.m. Blended Traditional and Contemporary; 11:30 a.m. Contemporary. Childrens Sunday School, Adult /Teen Bible Classes, 10 a.m. Womens Legacy Fund Annual Fall Luncheon R eturns October 10The Womens Legacy Fund of the Southwest Florida Community Foundation will hold its annual fall luncheon on Thursday, October 10 from 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Shadow Wood Country Club for contributors to the fund and women who are interested in making a difference in their community. The luncheons keynote speaker will be Lee County Schools Superintendent Nancy Graham, Ed.D. The luncheon will also include an update on the Future Makers mentorship program for post-secondary opportunities and career planning for high-school seniors in the region. This cause was selected by the funds contributors to be the area of focus for the year. We all realize there are many issues facing our region, and sometimes deciding where to put our efforts to affect change can be challenging, said Sarah Owen, president and CEO of the SWFLCF. This years WLF focus area has the potential to change the lives of many Southwest Florida students right now. The WLF is proving again that we, as women, are doing more together than we could ever do alone. According to Owen, through the WLFs collective contributions and the endowed fund, the group of contributors will distribute nearly $20,000 in grants to local agencies that are developing these innovative mentoring programs. In just five years of existence, the WLF has provided nearly $75,000 in grants to benefit people and communities in the Southwest Florida region. Currently, the fund has more than $270,000 in endowed funds that will continue to grow and help fund local issues now and in the future. The Womens Legacy Fund is a fund of the Southwest Florida Community Foundation, created to enable women in Southwest Florida to direct their giving in focused and strategic ways. The funds mission is to engage women in affecting change in our community through collective philanthropy. The Southwest Florida Community Foundation is celebrating its 36th year of supNancy Grahamporting the communities of Lee, Charlotte, Collier, Glades and Hendry counties by connecting donors and their philanthropic aspirations with evolving community needs. With assets of nearly $70 million, the Southwest Florida Community Foundation has provided more than $55 million in grants and scholarships to the communities it serves. During its 2012 fiscal year, the SWFLCF granted over $3 million to more than 100 different organizations supporting education, animal welfare, arts and human ser vices. The event is open to the public. Shadow Wood Country Club is located at 22801 Oakwilde Boulevard in Estero. The cost is $35 per person, and reservations are required by Thursday, October 3. To register, visit www.floridacommunity.com or call 274-5900. rf ntbnrr bb bb rtttn Loved this restaurant. Fantastic experience. Food was exceptionally amazing. Service was outstanding. TripAdvisor Member, May 2013 I nstallation Service For R everend At New H ope P resbyterian ChurchOn Wednesday, September 25, Reverend Eddie Spencer will be formally installed as the pastor of New Hope Presbyterian Church. The service will be held in the sanctuary at 6:30 p.m. and a reception will follow in Fellowship Hall. The Reverend Dr. David Swanson, former pastor of Covenant Presbyterian Church in Fort Myers and present pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Orlando, will deliver the message from Gods Word at the service. All are welcome.New Hope is located at 3825 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. Sunday worship services are at 8 and 9:30 a.m. (traditional) and 11 a.m. (contemporary). Sunday morning classes are available for adults, youth and children. Nursery care is provided. For more information, call 274-1230 or visit www.newhopefortmyers.org. Dr. David Swanson

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 201312 Redfish And Snook Make For Great Actionby Capt. Matt MitchellHot would best describe our midday September temperatures and the same applies to the redfish action this week. Plenty of quality sized redfish were caught all over the sound on just about any stage of the tide. Once located, the bite could be wide open action with 20-plus redfish trips not being unusual. Snook action remained strong too but that bite relied much more on a right time on the right tide. During the lower tide stages, concentrate on the outer edges of oyster bars, sand bars and deeper pot holes. During periods of low water the redfish will move out off of the mangroves to more comfortable deeper water. One favorite bar/ edge that always seems to hold redfish this time of year is the long bar that runs just out from the mangrove shoreline from Tarpon Bay north towards the power lines. I like to fish these edges two different ways; either by casting a live pinfish or grunt under a float, or with a cut bait. Work the sand holes and the edge of the shallow water out in the threeto fourfoot depth transition. Most of these redfish will be moving up and down these edges within 20 feet of the super shallow water. They have been ranging in size from 20 inches all the way up to 30 inches-plus. Look for a set up with the wind behind you so you can make a long cast. Generally, I will give a stop 10 to 15 minutes before moving further down the edge of the bar. Mangrove fishing for redfish during the higher tides has been as good as it gets. Any time the tide has been over two feet high, action has been very consistent. Most mangrove keys and shorelines in the southern sound have been loaded up with hungry redfish. Pick a mangrove key that has good moving current and work the entire shoreline. Tail hooked pinfish or grunts have been the bait of choice for this. Mangrove islands from Chino all the way around the southern tip of St. James City are as far as I have needed to go to get in on the spectacular action. The edges of oyster bars during the higher tides have also been loaded up with redfish of all sizes. Bars from the mouth of the river all the way north up past Captiva have been holding lots of fish too. Our redfish bite right now throughout the area is as good as it gets. Expect a little variety while targeting these redfish too. This week while targeting redfish we had several bonus large flounder, a few keeper grouper and big trout. Snook action this week was also on with lots of fish hooked on my boat but not so many landed. It seemed any way these snook could get the better of us, they did. From thrown hooks, leaders chaffed through, mangrove break-offs and even one memorable fish breaking off on the bow eye of the boat, they outsmarted us. After releasing one 36-incher, we had a real giant 40-inch-plus boatside before it chaffed through the leader. Look for snook action to keep getting better and better as the fish make their way back into the bays from the beach and start to pack on the pounds before winter. Target these fish anywhere from the passes to deep mangrove creek mouths.Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions email captmattmitchell@aol.com. Big M Casino TripJoin the Kennedy Kruisers as they head to Fort Myers Beach for an excellent day of gaming fun aboard the Big M Casino on Thursday, September 19. Enjoy bingo, exciting slot machines, table games and an all you can eat buffet lunch included. This is Southwest Floridas only luxurious 162-foot gambling ship. As an additional incentive, when you travel with the Kennedy Kruisers, you have the opportunity to enter the entertainment extra raffle for a free ticket to an upcoming event. There will be a membership raffle as well. Participants should arrive by 8:45 a.m., and the bus will depart for the Big M Casino in Fort Myers Beach at 9 a.m. The bus will return for home at 4 p.m., arriving back in Cape Coral at approximately 5 p.m. Cost is $25 per member and $30 per non-member. Preregistration is preferred by September 16. To make reservations or for additional information, call the Lake Kennedy Senior Center at 574-0575. Send Us Your Fish TalesThe River Weekly would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include photographs with identification. Drop them at the River Weekly, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, Florida 33901, or email to press@riverweekly.com. This 40-inch snook was caught and released by Capt. Matt Mitchell ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint Prices ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Your Bottom Your Bottom Your Bottom Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices 1 472-5800

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13 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 CROW Case Of The Week: Florida Softshell Turtlesby Patricia MolloyAs one of the most ancient of earthlings, turtles have ignited the collective imagination of humans; they appear frequently in literature, symbolizing persistence, endurance and longevity. Certain Native American tribes believe that North America was created on the back of The Great Mother, a turtle. Florida is home to more species of turtles than any other state; 26 to be exact. Of that number, 18 live in freshwater, including the Florida softshell (Apalone ferox). They spend most of their time hiding in shallow water with only their long, snorkel-shaped snouts exposed. Their large, fleshy oval shells are perfectly camouflaged to blend with the bottom of canals, ponds, swamps, streams and marshes. While they must breathe air, they can stay underwater for hours thanks largely to the oxygen-absorbing vessels that line their throats and skin. CROW recently admitted two Florida softshell turtles for treatment. The first softshell is particularly large, possibly a result of swelling. She came in that way. I dont know yet if it is a circulatory issue. We will radiograph her and give her an ultrasound, just to see what her heart is doing, said Dr. Kristen Dube, DVM intern. Additionally, the turtle has a fractured carapace, or upper shell. While Dr. Heather Barron, hospital director, has prescribed daily soaks in shallow water to promote hydration, the patient spends most of the time dry-docked so that the wound has ample time to heal. The second turtle is not eating on her own and has been fitted with a feeding tube. To encourage her appetite, Dr. Heather asked the staff to present her with smelt and crab. Keep offering her the chopped-up smelt and anything else that is stinky. Leave it there all day. Leave it there overnight. Its fine. They like it stinky and disgusting. The freshwater turtles admitted to CROW are often innocent victims of automobile accidents. Fractured shells require a course of antibiotics, often surgery and a lengthy stay in the Intensive Care Unit of the wildlife clinic. To support the care of these ancient creatures, visit CROWs website. You may specify that your donation be used toward a specific species or patient. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 fleshyp.m. Mail donations to P.O. Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit www.crowclinic.org. CROW is currently treating these two Florida softshell turtles, patients #2241 (top) and #1974 (bottom). The towels relieve pressure from their plastrons, or undershells, while they are dry-docked FGCU Lectures To Explore Red TideFlorida has been making headlines this year with one environmental news story after another: red tide, invasive species, pollution that threatens tourism. The Everglades Wetland Research Park at Florida Gulf Coast University will tackle these timely issues and others of regional and global concern in its second Moonlight on the Marsh lecture series beginning Thursday, December 12. Distinguished scientists from the United States and abroad will share their expertise in the public lectures at the research park, which is at FGCUs Harvey Kapnick Education and Research Center at the Naples Botanical Garden, 4940 Bayshore Drive in Naples. Moonlight on the Marsh was launched last year by renowned wetlands researcher William J. Mitsch, PhD, who was appointed director of the research park and Juliet C. Sproul chair for Southwest Florida Habitat Restoration and Management. The inaugural year was quite successful, with an all-star cast of scientists and engineers suggesting how we can protect and clean up the environment, Mitsch said. The 2013-14 series is even better and will focus on some of the gigantic ecological and environmental issues we have in Southwest Florida. Experts will talk about red tide, beach pollution and invasive pythons in the Everglades. We also have two presentations on wetlands and how they can provide important ecosystem functions. Ulo Mander, professor of landscape ecology and geography department head at the University of Tartu in Estonia, will launch the lecture series on December 12 with a presentation on water quality improvement with wetlands. Other talks in the series are: tides: Whats manageable and whats not, by Hans W. Paerl, PhD, William R. Kenan professor of marine and environmental sciences at the University of North Carolina Institute of Marine Sciences, Morehead City, North Carolina. beaches? Understanding contamination sources, health risks and protection of beach water, by Jiyoung Lee, PhD, associate professor of environmental health science, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. and protecting wetlands: The Dutch approach, by Jos Verhoeven, PhD, professor of ecology and biodiversity, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. pythons in the United States, by Michael E. Dorcas, PhD, associate professor of biology, Davidson College, Davidson, North Carolina. Kapnick Center auditorium. Seating is limited and can be reserved for a $5 donation. Call 239-325-1365 for reservations or more information. continued on page 20 Time to Refurnish Your Home or Condo? QUALITY PRODUCTS FROM: CARLTON, CAPRIS, LANE, FLEXSTEEL, SUMMIT DESIGN, DOUGLAS, QUALITY WICKER, SEA WINDS, SIMMONS, RESTONIC, BODY REST, REBWOOD, FOREST DESIGN, SHAW, PATIO DESIGN, BEST AND MORE.LARGE SELECTION OF WICKER & RATTANOur Experienced Staff Will Help You Coordinate Delivery While Youre Here or Away OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FURNITURE WORLD CAN HANDLE ALL YOUR NEEDS! Special in i Sof Sleeper CONDO PACKAGE3 OR MORE ROOMS OF FURNITURE$6162CALL FOR DETAILS15631 SAN CARLOS BLVD, FORT MYERSCONVENIENT LOCATION FROM SANIBEL & FT. MYERS BEACH239-489-3311 www.furniture-world.net

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 201314 Plant SmartAllspiceby Gerri R eavesAllspices (Pimenta dioica) common name derives from the fact that the leaves and fruit smell of several spices, including cloves, black pepper, nutmeg and cinnamon. It is a member of the myrtle family, which includes other trees with aromatic leaves, such as eucalyptus and melaleuca. Native to the West Indies, southern Mexico and Central America, the ever green tree was discovered in the 1500s by Spanish explorers in the New World. They mistook the plant for pepper, thus the common name Jamaica pepper and the term pimenta, related to the Spanish word for pepper. The spice or condiment is perhaps most familiar as an ingredient in pumpkin pie, but it has other culinary, cosmetic and medicinal uses. The spice itself is made from the small dried unripe brown berries, which are edible. This slow-growing tree can reach up to 40 feet tall, but in South Florida aver ages about 20 feet with a 15-foot spread. It prefers full sun but will adapt to dappled shade. After established, it will tolerate dryness. It makes a pretty specimen or container plant, with the white-gray peeling bark being one of its best ornamental features. The large coarsely textured leaves of up to eight inches long are used to make Bay Rum, an after-shave popular for centuries. Spring brings clusters of small white flowers bloom in pyramidal inflorescences. Allspice can be propagated with seeds. Sources: Florida, My Eden by Frederic B Stresau; floridata.com; and Waterwise: South Florida Landscapes. Plant Smart explores sustainable gardening practices that will help you create an environmentally responsible, low-maintenance South Florida landscape. Allspice has a dense canopy of large leaves White peeling bark enhances allspices ornamental value photos by Gerri Reaves Caring For Your PlantsT he B eauty Of B ambooby Justen DobbsBamboo seems to have acquired a bad reputation in landscaping. The truth is, the only bamboo varieties that growers produce these days are the clustering species. These are the ones that have one central base from which many canes emerge and grow straight up. In plainer terms, these are the good varieties. The other form of bamboo is the running variety which can send sneaky underground stolons (stems; runners) as far as 30 feet from the main plant. This can be very invasive and sometimes impossible to eradicate from a landscape. They can, however, be contained within concrete planters or pots which will restrict their invasive habit. The clustering varieties can make a very fast (a species of Asian bamboo is the fastest growing plant in the world) hedge, filler, or protecting screen in larger yards. Clustering bamboo is drought-tolerant, cold-tolerant, needs little fertilizer, and is actually fairly low maintenance. Some varieties used here in Southwest Florida are: 1. Variegated Chinese bamboo yellow canes with green vertical stripes; grows to about 25 to 30 feet tall with two to three inch diameter canes. 2. Black bamboo jet black canes with green rings around them; very ornamental; grows to 25 to 30 feet tall with twoto three-inch diameter canes. 3. Blue bamboo turquoise canes that can get very tall and very thick, up to five to seven inches in diameter; difficult to cut even with a good chainsaw. There is another variety of bamboo that is very popular among collectors, it is called Buddha belly bamboo because of its series of bulges along the stems. This one makes a great potted plant and can be enjoyed for years without much hassle. If you have an Asian or Mediterranean themed house or landscape, bamboo might be a good fit for you. Just make sure you plant it somewhere where it can grow upwards with impunity and is spaced about 10 feet or so from any other plants so that its new canes can grow up from the central base. If it begins to get too large, you can remove the unwanted canes by cutting them with a small handsaw; make the cut as close to the ground as possible. I wouldnt recommend fertilizing your bamboo because it doesnt really need to grow any faster and the leaves should never show any signs of yellowing or malnutrition. Bamboo is among some of the toughest plant species on earth! Also, dont forget that you can use the cut canes for walking sticks, projects, crafts, yard art, or any other creative idea your mind can come up with. If you choose to have your bamboo removed down the line, you will need to hire a tree crew that has a stump grinder. This is a machine that removes most underground traces of the bamboo stems and roots that would otherwise emerge later and grow into a new cluster. Justen Dobbs is a landscape architect in south Florida specializing in custom, upscale landscapes. He can be reached at seabreezenurseries@gmail. com. The dark stems on black bamboo contrast nicely with the bright green leaves Buddha belly bamboo is a smaller species with very peculiar stems

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15 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 DDWS Teacher Grants Deadline ApproachesThe Ding Darling Wildlife SocietyFriends of the Refuge (DDWS), with JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge, has announced its 7th annual donation of $5,000 worth of grants of up to $1,000 each to Lee County schools for conservation education-related projects. Teachers may use the grant money to purchase teaching aids, books, and classroom materials; fund new classroom science projects; take field trips; or conduct work projects in the community. All Lee County schools are invited to submit environmental educationor science-related unit proposals by October 31. The approved proposals will be awarded in November for projects to be completed by May 2014. With environmental education funding being cut throughout the school district, teachers and students are so grateful to receive our grants to fund special projects, said Doris Hardy, DDWS Environmental Education Committee chair. Its an important part of the societys mission to educate and make future conservation stewards out of todays youth pool. In the past six years, the society has granted more than $34,000 to local schools for environmental projects. The teacher grants are funded by DDWS monies received from the Ding Darling Foundation earmarked specifically for education. For further information and an application, visit www.dingdarlingsociety.org/ grants or contact Gary Ogden at 4721100 ext. 233 or Doris Hardy at hardydd@comcast.net. As a non-profit 501(c)3 organization, DDWS works to support JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuges mission of conservation, wildlife and habitat protection, research, and public education through charitable donations and Refuge Nature Shop proceeds. To support DDWS and the refuge with a tax-deductible gift, visit www.dingdarlingsociety.org or contact Birgie Vertesch at 292-0566, 472-1100 ext. 4, or dingdarlingsociety@gmail.com. Gulf Elementary School students of Cape Coral working on their Tracking the Ultimate Predator project funded by a DDWS grant awarded for 2012-2013 Selecting The Perfect Pot For Your BonsaiSelecting appropriate pots for your bonsai trees to enhance their presentation will be the program for the Saturday, September 21 meeting of the Bonsai Society of Southwest Florida. Mike Knowlton, a member of the Society and President of Bonsai Societies of Florida, will be the featured speaker. The meeting, which begins at 9 a.m., will be held at the SPALC Building, 6281 Metro Plantation Drive in Fort Myers. The public is invited to attend and experienced members will be available to answer questions about bonsai trees brought to the meeting. There is no fee to attend. The Bonsai Society of Southwest Florida, incorporated in 1973, will hold its annual Bonsai Show at the Lee Election Center in Fort Myers on November 16 and 17. The public is invited to attend; parking and admission are free. Additional information about the Bonsai Society and the upcoming show are available at www.bonsaiswfl.org or by calling Jim Bremer at 482-7543. Missy Scoville of Nashville, Tennessee caught a 32-inch redfish when she and her husband, Tony, were fishing with Capt. Daniel Andrews of Captain Daniel Andrews Fishing Charters. Fish Caught Missy Scoville with her catch From page 4League Of Women VotersFollowing the presentation, league leadership will discuss the leagues commitment to informed and active participation in government, how it works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and ways to influence public policy through education and advocacy. Cost to attend the breakfast is $15. Reservations should be made by October 2 by calling 278-1032 or by e-mailing lwvlee@yahoo.com. For more information, contact the League of Women Voters of Lee County at 2781032.

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 201316 Locals Compete I n Drum Corps Championshipsubmitted by Cello Bennett, Cello Bennett ArtistsNorth Fort Myers High School senior Martino Locci had the honor of competing in the Drum Corps Associates (DCA) World Championships at the Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland over Labor Day Weekend. He played a baritone with the Sun Devils Drum and Bugle Corps, which won the bronze medal in the competition. Martino, who was the only Lee County high school student participating in the competition, is a music major whose main instrument is French horn. He is currently playing French horn for the second year with The Edison College Concert Band. Martinos main musical activities at North Fort Myers High include: Concert (4) French Horn/Euphonium; Jazz (2) Trumpet (Lead Trumpet senior year), Symphonic (4) French Horn,and Red Knight Marching band (3) Mellophone. Martino is currently the Brass Captain in marching band. He plans to study Music Education at the University of South Florida. Martinos instructor and mentor, Oscar Escobar, also participated in the DCA competition. Escobar, who marched with the Boston Crusaders drum and bugle corps from 1998 to 2000, has been playing French horn with the Charlotte Symphony Orchestra since 2005. He has been a marching band instructor since 1998 and has been a member of the Edison State College concert band since 2003. This year, Escobar is the Horn Sergeant and plays lead mellophone for the Sun Devils Drum and Bugle Corps. The Sun Devils Drum and bugle corps is a non-profit organization, a member of Drum Corps Associates (DCA). The Sun Devils, whose members from all over Florida range in age from 15 to 35. is based in Iverness, Florida. For further information, visit www.sundevilsdrumcorp.org. Martino Locci Oscar Escobar From page 1Robert Butler WorkshopLearn the art of landscape and wildlife painting with Florida Highwaymen artist Robert Butler, states the flyer announcing the two-hour workshop. Paint along with the artist while he talks about his history, the Florida Highwaymen and the history of historical Fort Myers and Billys Creek. The Florida Highwaymen are a group of 26 African-American artists who broke convention to paint beautiful iconic landscapes originating in the mid-1950s, an era marked by racism and poverty. These self-taught entrepreneurs mentored each other while they painted on basic materials like Upson board in lieu of canvasses, and used crown molding for more expensive gilded frames. Because local galleries shunned their work, states the Highwaymens website, they peddled their art from car trunks along area roadways, hence their name. Their art freed them from work in citrus groves and labor camps, and they created a body of work that has become not only a timeless collection of a natural environment, but a symbol of determination and belief in oneself. Now in their 60s and 70s, the surviving Highwaymen are part of an impor tant chapter in Americas culture and history. Many even consider them to be a national treasure. Their self-determination in the face of adversity remains an impor tant story of perseverance, inspiration and creativity. Butler is one of 26 Highwaymen whos been inducted into the Highwaymen Hall of Fame. The Georgiaborn painter is best known for his por trayals of the woods and backwaters around Floridas Everglades. His professional career began in 1968. In the early days, he often sold his paintings door-todoor or on the roadside. He honed his skills by creating upwards of 100 paintings per year. Despite a lack of formal training, Butler developed his own style, which was exemplified by dramatically-lit and romanticized portrayals of landscapes. Workshop participants are responsible for bringing their own #3, #4, Flat #2, #4, Round #2, #3 or #4, Angle 1/4 or 3/4 and Strip Liner #1 or #2 brushes; a Fredrick Red or Blue Label 18 x 24 or 20 x 24 canvas; and titanium white, yellow ochre, yellow Hansa light, Hookers green or sap green, burnt sienna, burnt umber, Alizarin crimson, cobalt blue, ultramarine blue, magenta (medium or light) and purple pigments. The workshop takes place from 6 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, September 18, costs $100, and will be taught in the art leagues gallery at 1451 Monroe Street, on the ground floor of the City of Palms parking garage in downtown Fort Myers historic River District. Call 275-3970. Ghostbird T heatre Company Presents August Strindberg PlayGhostbird Theatre Company begins its second season with Miss Julie, a play by the Swedish playwright August Strindberg, running through September 15 at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center in Fort Myers. Doors open at 7 p.m., with cocktails available, and the curtain at 8 p.m. Miss Julie is the unruly daughter of a count who is too stuck up in some ways and not proud enough in others. While her father is away, Miss Julie celebrates Midsummers Eve with the servants, dancing in the barn. She takes to Jean, her fathers valet, and they spend the rest of the evening seducing one another. At times, they smolder for each other and other times they burn, but inevitably, this dangerous game of playing with fire ends in a pile of ash. This play contains adult language and sexual content. Playing Miss Julie will be Ghostbird veteran Dana Lynn Griffin and debuting as Jean will be Drew Scott Dietsch. Completing the triangle is Katelyn Gravel, who plays Christine, Jeans fiance. Directing the play is Brittney Brady. Ghostbird Theatre Company is the resident theater company of the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center. Ghostbird will be featuring three more plays this season as well as a special fundraising cabaret in December. Ghostbird Theatre Company is dedicated to bringing new and magical performances to Fort Myers and beyond. Tickets are $10 each, available through the Sidney & Berne Davis Arts Center ticket office or online at www.sbdac.com. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. Shell Point H osts T hree Concerts With Symphony Orchestra I n 2013-14Shell Point Retirement Community will once again host the Southwest Florida Symphony for three concerts during the 2013-14 season. The Holiday Pops Concert, featuring the Symphonic Chorale of Southwest Florida, will perform Monday, December 16 at 7:30 p.m. in The Village Church Auditorium. Composer, arranger and conductor Jim Stephenson will bring his fresh take on the joyous music of the season with this spirited symphonic performance of holiday favorites. The Miracle of Mozart on Thursday, January 23 at 7:30 p.m. with conductor Leif Bjaland tells the story of how the divinely gifted Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart came to write one of the most revolutionary works of his time. Towards the end of his short but brilliant life, Mozart was broke, ignored by his formerly adoring public and mourning the death of his daughter. It is said that Mozarts final symphony sums up an era, but more than that, it is a glimpse into the intimate life of this child-like genius. No. 41 in C Major, known as the Jupiter Symphony, holds the key that unlocks the miracle of Mozart. During the Mendelssohn Marathon on Tuesday, March 25 at 7:30 p.m., conductor Leif Bjaland will explore many of his most brilliant creations with two of his Scottish-inspired works; the symphonic poem Fingals Cave and the evergreen Scotch Symphony. Mysterious water sprites and ancient curses abound in the The Fair Melusina Overture, and twilight becomes magical with his most famous of works in the Overture to A Midsummer Nights Dream. The Holiday Pops performance is a stand-alone concert with tickets available for $25. The Mozart and Mendelssohn concerts can be purchased as a package for $32 or individually for $20. To purchase tickets or receive additional information about the concert series, visit www.shellpoint.org/concerts or call 454-2067. It is such a pleasure to partner with the Southwest Florida Symphony by hosting several of their performances at Shell Point, said Dawn Boren, director of resident life. Shell Point residents thoroughly enjoy the opportunity to attend these concerts so close to home, and we enjoy sharing them with the public as well. Shell Point Retirement Community is a not-for-profit continuing care retirement community located in Fort Myers just off Summerlin Road and McGregor Boulevard, two miles before the Sanibel Causeway. To learn more about Shell Point Retirement Community, visit www.shellpoint.org or call 1-800-780-1131. E mail your editorial copy to: press@riverweekly.com

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17 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 2013Laugh Out Loud Dinner ShowLaughter is healthy and good for the soul. Enjoy a full lineup of comedians at the Laugh Out Loud Dinner Show on Friday, September 27 at the Lake Kennedy Senior Center in Cape Coral. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and dinner starts at 7 p.m. The evenings emcee will be the local radio personality Don Lee. Performances by comedian Damian Semon from Second City Chicago, and comedian David Sayh from The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson and Carolines on Broadway. Nationally-known entertainer and mentalist Bob Criss will grace the stage as well. Come and join us for an evening of laughter, fun, food and friends. Dinner features BBQ chicken, baked beans, potato salad, rolls and butter. Dessert will feature apple cobbler. Courtesy of our caring community partner Advanced Pain Solutions Dr. Stephen Stokes. Cost is $18 per member and $23 per non-member. Preregistration is required. To make reservations or for additional information, call the Lake Kennedy Senior Center at 574-0575. Cape Coral Art League To Display WorksThe Cape Coral Art League will be the featured artists for the Southwest Florida Community Foundations fall art exhibit this September through October. Works of art from CCAL members will be showcased in the public spaces at the foundations office, located at 8771 College Parkway in Fort Myers. The exhibit will open on September 13 and will run through October 13. Public viewing hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. A reception will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. on Friday, October 4. This community has the great fortune of being the home to many incredible artists whose work has shaped both Southwest Florida and the nation, said Sarah Owen, president and CEO of the SWFLCF. Weve met some amazing people through art. The CCAL was chartered in 1965 as a non-profit 501(c)(3) and 501(a)(2) charity organization that promotes the advancement of art throughout Southwest Florida. The league offers year-round classes for adults, youth and children, seven major art exhibits annually, workshops with world-renowned artists and a scholarship program for high-school seniors. The Southwest Florida Community Foundation is celebrating its 36th year of supporting the communities of Lee, Charlotte, Collier, Glades and Hendry counties by connecting donors and their philanthropic aspirations with evolving community needs. With assets of nearly $70 million, the Community Foundation has provided more than $55 million in grants and scholarships to the communities it serves. During its 2012 fiscal year, the SWFLCF granted over $3 million to more than 100 different organizations supporting education, animal welfare, arts and human services. For more information, visit www.floridacommunity.com or call 274-5900. Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium with the Art League of Fort Myers Presents:Adult Workshop with Florida Highwaymen Artist Robert ButlerLearn the art of Landscape & Wildlife painting with Florida Highwaymen Artist Robert Butler. In this 2-hour workshop, paint along with the artist while he talks about his history, the Florida Highwaymen and the history of historical Fort Myers and Billys Creek.Date: Wednesday, September 18 Time: 6 8 pmLocation: Art League of Fort Myers1451 Monroe Street, Fort Myers 239-275-3970Cost: $100/ student Brushes: Fan #2, #3, #4 Flat #2, #4 Round #2, #3 or #4 Angle 1/4 or 3/4 Strip Liner #1 or #2 Canvas: Fredrick Red or Blue Label 18 x 24 or 20 x 24 Colors: TITANIUM WHITE, YELLOW OCHRE, YELLOW HANSA LIGHT HOOKERS GREEN OR SAP GREEN BURNT SIENNA, BURNT UMBER, ALIZARIN CRIMSON COBALT BLUE, ULTRAMARINE BLUE MAGENTA(MEDIUM OR LIGHT), PURPLESupplies RequiredRegister by Monday, September 2nd To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 201318 September I s Library Card Signup M onthLibrary Card Signup Month is held in September all across the country to remind parents and caregivers that a library card is the most important school supply of all. Library cards are free and provide residents with an almost unlimited number of books, movies, music, information sources and professional librarians who are there to help individuals find exactly what they need. The possibilities for entertainment or personal growth in all areas of life are available to an individual with a library card. There is no limit to what one can learn or research, said Sheldon Kaye, Lee County Library System Director. Check out these 50 ways to use the Lee County Library System with a library card: 1. Download an e-book from home. 2. Not sure how to download an e-book on your new device? The library website has tutorials to show you how. 3. Use a computer to finish a school project. 4. Use free Wi-Fi. 5. Learn the secrets of editing digital photos in an online Photoshop class via the library. 6. Learn how to edit your family vacation video. 7. Pick up a DVD to watch together at home. 8. Research and gather authoritative information on health and medical issues from trusted medical journals and medical organizations. 9. Take a gardening class. 10. Watch a foreign film. 11. Download free popular and current music for you devices. 12. Obtain demographic data about a target market. 13. Take a nutrition or wellness course online via the library. 14. Read the daily newspaper for free. 15. Spend a rainy day reading magazines at the library or at home with the online magazine software. 16. Attend a crafts workshop. 17. Attend preschool story hour with your child. 18. Ask for a recommended reading list for your children. 19. Enroll your child in a summer reading program. 20. Build your young readers self esteem by letting her read to a dog at the library. 21. Launch your future: Get free assistance with job searches, resume writing and interviewing tips. 22. Use a library computer to apply for a job online or check out materials to help study for a certification exam and take a practice exam online via the library. 23. Get help with homework. 24. Get ready for the SAT with online test-prep services. 25. Explore new opportunities and research technical schools, community colleges and universities. 26. Register to vote. 27. Book a meeting room for your club or community organization. 28. Learn about the history of your family, city or town. 29. Get involved join your librarys Friends group or teen advisory board. 30. Check out your favorite graphic novel.31. Research before you buy. Access an online consumer guide on the librarys website. 32. Learn how to manage your money at a free financial planning seminar. 33. Search out tips for building your retirement nest egg. 34. Learn how to write a business plan. 35. Get new ideas for redecorating your house. 36. Hear a local author reading his/her latest novel. 37. Use style guides to write a bibliography for your new book. 38. Learn how to self-publish and market your new book. 39. Take an online cooking class via the library. 40. Learn a new language with books or online language-learning software. 41. Broaden your world by checking out cookbooks of foods from other cultures. 42. Borrow or download an audiobook for your next road trip or commute. 43. See a new art exhibit. 44. Find a new hobby. 45. Use free online tools to research your family tree. 46. Empower yourself through home improvement: check out a book on learning how to fix that leaky faucet. 47. Find a quiet spot, curl up with a good book and enjoy. 48. Talk mysteries with people who like mysteries, too, at a library book club. 49. Find the best resources on how to preserve that photo of your great grandmother. 50. Get Go back in time: use databases or microfiche to access early newspapers or rent a classic movie, like Back To The Future. Dont have a Lee County Library System library card? Getting one is free and easy. Visit leelibrary.net to apply online, or stop by any branch. The Lee County Library System issues library cards to individuals for free who can: show proof of residency in Lee County, or are employed in Lee County, or own property or a business in Lee County, or are students in Lee County, or are residents of other Southwest Florida libraries participating in the reciprocal borrowing program. Children under 12 must have a parent or guardians signature to receive a library card. The cards are issued at all locations in the system and can be used at all locations. Regardless of where books are borrowed, they may be returned at any Lee County Library System location. After hours book drops are provided at most locations. The Lee County Library System serves Lee County with free books, downloadable e-books, digital content, Books-By-Mail, a bookmobile, e-sources, music and films, programs and meeting space. Information about Lee County Library System is available for your convenience 24/7 at www.leelibrary.net where you can find out about library services, programs, locations, view an online events calendar or place a hold on library items. Telephone reference is available at 479-INFO (4636). Gallery B ook Club At T he AllianceThe Alliance for the Arts launches its members only Gallery Book Club on Tuesday, September 17 with a discussion of Provenance: How a Con Man and a Forger Rewrote the History of Modern Art. Join fellow Alliance members in an exploration of literature revolving around art, artists, art history and art appreciation. Participate in group discussions and expand your appreciation and knowledge of the art world. The group meets from 7 to 9 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month. Club members must purchase their own copy of each book. A discussion guide is available for download at artinlee. org. Pre-registration is encouraged. An active Alliance membership is all that is required. Provenance: How a Con Man and a Forger Rewrote the History of Modern Art by Laney Salisbury and Aly Sujo is an astonishing narrative of one of the most far-reaching and elaborate cons in the history of art forgery. It tells the story of the infamous con man John Drewe and his accomplice, the affable artist John Myatt. The duo exploited the archives of British art institutions to irrevocably legitimize the hundreds of pieces they forged, many of which are still considered genuine and hang in prominent museums and private collections today. The October selection is Emile Zolas The Masterpiece, and the November selection is Clara and Mr. Tiffany by Susan Vreeland. Individual Alliance memberships are $50 per year; family memberships are $75 per year. Membership benefits also include 20 percent discounts on all classes and workshops, a wide variety of free class Try It sessions, discounts on theater tickets and youth camps and special exhibition opportunities. Visit www. artinlee.org or call 939-2787 to become a member. The Alliance for the Arts galleries and gift shop are open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays, located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard just south of Colonial Boulevard. Adult Lecture & Life E nrichment P rogramsThe Renaissance Academy of Florida Gulf Coast University announces its fall 2013 schedule of adult lifelong learning and life enrichment programs featuring an extensive and diverse curriculum of single lectures and short courses. The fall program begins on Friday, October 4 at 9:30 a.m. with the start of a computer workshop titled Understanding Technology: What is the Right Technology for YOU? to be held at the FGCU Naples Center, 1010 5th Avenue South. This lecture program tackles the challenges and rewards of understanding the myriad of tech options available including desktops, laptops, tablets, phones, readers and printers. John Guerra, director of the Renaissance Academy, will assist participants in unraveling and understanding the complex world of technology so participants can make intelligent choices about the right technology for them. A free, complete catalog of the Naples, Bonita Springs, Estero and Fort Myers offerings may be found at local libraries or by calling 425-3272. Online registration is available at https:// RegisterRA.fgcu.edu where participants may browse and register for courses safely and securely online. Among the Renaissance Academys offerings are affordable, non-credit single lectures, short courses, day trips, computer classes, film series, life enrichment classes, writing workshops, travel abroad programs and other special events. There are no exams or grades, just learning for the joy of learning with friends, neighbors and peers. Course fees are typically $25 per lecture and provide access to Academy programs located at 12 locations throughout Collier, Lee and Charlotte counties.

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19 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 Broadway Palm Welcomes Three-Millionth CustomerBroadway Palm Dinner Theatre announced that it has entertained its three-millionth customer. The theatre opened its doors in October of 1993 and annual attendance has grown to more than 170,000. The owner, management team, staff members and customers in attendance greeted the three-millionth customer just before 5:30 p.m. on August 30. Anna Proto was joining a group for the evening performance of Burt & Me and was surprised when she walked through the theatre doors with a balloon drop, champagne, a basket full of goodies and a season subscription for her and a guest Broadway Palms 21st season. Proto has attended many productions at Broadway Palm and has even been a season subscriber with the theater, but this was her first time attending a production in more than a year. When asked how she felt about being Broadway Palms threemillionth customer, Proto said, This is the best thing that has happened to me in quite a long time! In the last 20 years, Broadway Palm has been involved with hundreds of different productions including 152 main stage shows, 60 Off Broadway Palm Theatre productions, 55 childrens theater shows and numerous specialty concerts. To date, the Broadway Palm complex includes the main stage, the Playbill Bar, Art Gallery, Gift Shop, Caf Cabaret, Art Caf and Off Broadway Palm Theatre. Prather Entertainment Group owns and operates both the Broadway Palm and the Dutch Apple Dinner Theatre in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Broadway Palm celebrated its three-millionth customer on August 30 Burkhead To Receive Arts Of The Inland Grant Arts of the Inland (AOI) president LaVon Koenig announced that a grant presentation will be made to Megan Burkhead on Tuesday, September 17 at their general meeting (open to the public), held at ABC Framing, 12801 Commerce Lakes Drive, Suite 14 in Fort Myers. Burkhead will play at 6 p.m. and the check presentation will follow. Burkhead is a member of the Southwest Florida Youth Symphony, which has been invited to perform at historic Carnegie Hall in New York City in April 2014. The AOI grant will assist Burkhead with the expense of her trip with the Youth Orchestra. We are happy to provide grants to aspiring students so they can be enriched on their cultural journey, said Koenig. A sophomore student at Lehigh Senior High School, Burkhead is an accomplished flutist, having played on the county and state level. She was awarded All State 1st Chair for flute for seventh and eighth graders. Megan Burkhead The nest relaxation treatments from around the planet have been brought to Southwest Florida.Call 239.333.1450 or visit www.AssuageCenters.comGET TO KNOW US OPENING SPECIALAssuage Signature Massage, Assuage Signature Facial, And Make-up Application.Special Price: $185 (reg. $215) More Sponsors Announced For Inaugural Event Downtown Streets Alive of Lee County, Inc. announced that Lee County Electric Cooperative (LCEC) and Edison National Bank are the organizations newest sponsors for the inaugural event in early November. Streets Alive events are a great opportunity to get outside and enjoy the natural environment to play, said LCECs Karen Ryan. We are excited to partner with Streets Alive in temporarily returning the streets to the public for people-powered fun. Edison National Bank takes great pride in sponsoring Streets Alive, said Robbie Roepstorff, president of Edison National Bank. We hope to lead the way and encourage local businesses to participate and engage their employees and families to become involved in active living. Streets Alive offers a free, accessible way to get active and have fun. Streets Alive opens traffic-free downtown streets to traffic and opens them up for people to play, including free activities such as walking, biking, aerobics, kickball, yoga and dance. The first event is set for Sunday, November 10 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the downtown Fort Myers River District. Streets Alive features instructors offering a buffet of free and accessible games, sports, dance and other movement for attendees to try. There will be several activity villages where a variety of activities and instructions will be offered, along with a series of events taking advantage of the traffic-free downtown streets. Participants of all ages and abilities are encouraged to participate, with the focus being on easy-to-learn activities to get people moving. The family-friendly Streets Alive will have local restaurants and markets along the route vending food and beverages, highlighting their most nutritious menu items. A range of other vendors will also bee participating in the event. A Healthy Lee community partner, Streets Alive Lee is a 501(c)3 tax-exempt nonprofit corporation actively writing grants and soliciting sponsors to support its events. For more information or to become a sponsor, contact Kate or Ken Gooderham at kgooderham@comcast.net or 489-2616. For more event information or sponsorship options, go to www.streetsalivelee.org.

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THE RIVER S EE P TETE MB ERER 13, 201320 Construction Begins On $50 Million EE xpansion, RR enovation Of HH ammond Stadium And Minor League Complexby EE d FrankJust as soon as the Fort Myers Miracle baseball team concluded their successful 2013 season last week, work began on a massive renovation and expansion of the 23-year-old Hammond Stadium in the Lee County Sports Complex. And just a few weeks earlier, site work began on several additional projects at the complex to enhance the Minor League operations of the Minnesota Twins. When completed in 2015, nearly $50 million will have been spent on the stadium and the new Minor League facilities. Bill Smith, assistant to the president and general manager of the Twins, said the improvements will provide the Twins and their Minor League affiliates with a state-of-the-art facility second to none in baseball. Lee County is financing the vast majority of the work, about $42.5 million, with the Twins providing the remainder for design work and a dormitory for minor leaguers. The Twins have occupied the complex since it was built in 1991, and recently signed a 30-year lease extension that will kick in when the improvements are completed in 2015. The big project follows the $80 million investment by Lee County for jetBlue Park at Fenway South, the new spring training home for the Boston Red Sox. Here are the major components of the Hammond Stadium and sports complex project as outlined in an interview with Smith: Phase I, to be completed by mid-February, will include a 360-degree boardwalk around the entire stadium that will allow fans a walkway encompassing Hammond Stadium. Also included in Phase I are renovations of the Minor League offices, clubhouse, meeting rooms and a new therapy facility. A fourth practice field and an agility field also will be completed by next spring. The first floor of a large Player Development Academy will be finished by March 1 and will include a multi-tiered auditorium, dining room, kitchen, classrooms, game room, computer room and three study areas. Smith stressed that continued education for minor leaguers is a principal focus of the new academy. English and Spanish will be taught along with public speaking, money management and other life-skill classes. Every player needs education in money management and accounting, he said. The second and third floors of the building will contain 55 dormitory rooms and should be finished by May 1, he said. They will be utilized during spring training as well as by the players assigned to the Twins Gulf Coast Twins rookie team that plays at the complex during the summer. Phase II will begin upon the completion of the 2014 Spring Training season. Although it includes a massive renovation of Hammond Stadium, Smith emphasized that the Fort Myers Miracle will continue to play their home games in the stadium next year. The stadium capacity will expand from 8,100 to 9,300 seats, concourses will be widened, two additional elevators will be installed, and a new grand entrance will be constructed along with a new ticket office, new concessions and restrooms. The Major League clubhouse and training room will be redone with a new weight room. Five ultra-modern suites with seats also will be completed in addition to a new retail store and new permanent offices for the Miracle staff. Smith had high praise for Lee County government officials who are spearheading the multi-million dollar project. They have treated us (the Twins) like kings for the many years we have been here, he added. White Book Signing EE vent At Doc Fords A book signing for Randy Wayne Whites new novel Deceived will take place on Wednesday, September 18 from noon to 2 p.m. and from 4 to 6 p.m. at Doc Fords Rum Bar & Grille, 708 Fishermans Wharf in Fort Myers Beach. Each event begins with a 15-minute question-and-answer session and fans are invited to make an afternoon or evening of it. Enjoy Island Mojitos while savoring award-winning flavors from the Caribbean rim; theyre inspired by Randys favorite rural tropics cuisine full of sauces, spice and passion. Deceived is Whites second Hannah Smith novel. The tale begins with a hundred-pound tarpon landing in the fishing guides boat, knocking two paying clients overboard. Hannah works fast to retrieve the men as a 12-foot hammerhead works to retrieve a meal. Is the unusual incident an omen? Will there be death, injury or lawsuit? Buy the book and find out. Copies of Deceived are available for purchase at all three Doc Fords locations Fort Myers Beach, Sanibel and the newest location on Captiva Island. For more information, call 765-9660 or visit www.DocFordsFortMyersBeach. com. From page 1AmadeusGottfried Van Swieten, Todd Fleck as Count Johann Killian Von Strack, Wil Harbison as Venticello I and Jon Best as Venticello II. The play is directed by Ken Bryant, who was also the director of last seasons hit show, Cat On A Hot Tin Roof. Before relocating to Lee County, Bryant ran the Tennessee Williams Fine Arts Center in Key West, was stage manager with Miami City Ballet, and even staged an opera in Poland. Amadeus premiers at 8 p.m. on September 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27 and 28. Tickets are between $12 and $22. Tickets are available for purchase at the door or online at laboratorytheaterflorida.com. (Season tickets are also available on the website.) The opening of the fifth season will be celebrated at the opening. Doors open at 7:15 p.m. on September 13. The Laboratory Theater of Florida, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, is dedicated to the promotion of the performing arts, through live performance, education, community outreach, experimentation and the development of ensemble work. The company features ensemble productions, produces classic works, takes artistic risks and features and challenges local performers of various skill levels. Stay up to date with its news and events on Facebook and Twitter @LabTheaterFL. For more information, call 218-0481. The theater is located at 1634 Woodford Avenue in Fort Myers. From page 1Underwater EE xhibit Lift EE ventbetween 1942 and 1945. One of her most famous deeds was being the last ship to radio General Dwight D. Eisenhower that the weather was clear ing for the D-Day invasion. Based on his research, he envisioned the life of sailors past aboard the Mohawk their daily lives and dreams of home and superimposed images of models in period clothing onto original photography. The opening reception for the exhibit is Friday, October 4 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. at Alliance for the Arts. A gallery Walk and Talk with the artist will be announced. The exhibit will remain on display until October 28. From page 13FGCU LecturesThe Everglades Wetland Research Park is dedicated to research on the wise management of freshwater and coastal ecosystems of Southwest Florida and to protection and enhancement of wetlands and water resources worldwide. Visit the website at www.fgcu.edu/swamp. FWC II mplements SpecialEE vents License EE xemption For Disabled VV eterans And Military PersonnelThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) has implemented a new recreational hunting and fishing license exemption for disabled veter ans, active and reserve duty military personnel, immediate family members of these veterans and military personnel and assistants during special events designed for the enjoyment or rehabilitation of participating military personnel and disabled veterans. This effort to help disabled veterans and those serving in the military came about during the 2013 legislative session on September 5, when the Commission requested and the Legislature and Governor approved the new license exemption. The Commission was directed to craft rules to implement the law. Our disabled veterans and military have given so much to us that we wanted to give something to them, by allowing them to participate in fishing or hunting events without having to buy a license and/or permit, Chairman Richard Corbett said. Event organizers apply for the permit to exempt their qualifying participants. To qualify for the exemption, special events must be designed to provide rehabilitation or enjoyment to participating disabled veterans or active or reserve duty military personnel in any branch of the U.S. Armed Forces, U.S. Coast Guard or Florida National Guard. Immediate family members (parents, spouses and children) of participating disabled veterans and military personnel and one designated assistant for each disabled veteran are included in each events license and permit exemptions. Exemptions will last for the duration of the events. FWC regional directors, as the executive directors designee, will issue these permits. Established seasons, bag or slot limits, size restrictions and all other laws will still apply. Limited-entry activities wont be permitted under this exemption. We worked with stakeholders; military, veterans and other state agencies and related organizations in drafting the exemption, said the FWCs Northeast Regional Director, Shannon Wright. Commissioners approved staffs recommendations for implementing the rule, so now staff will advertise the proposal and file for adoption as soon as possible, as allowed by Florida Statutes, without further hearing. For more information and to apply, visit www.MyFWC.com/License.

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21 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 Senator R ichter Delivers Keynote Address T o GraduatesThe Goodwill Southwest Florida MicroEnterprise Institute graduated four hopeful entrepreneurs on September 5. The ceremony was held at the Naples Chamber of Commerce. The session marks Collier Countys second graduating MicroEnterprise class. Classes have previously been held throughout Lee and Charlotte counties. The Goodwill Southwest Florida MicroEnterprise Institute is a training program to help emerging entrepreneurs start new ventures and grow small businesses. Graduates complete a 12-module business and management training course over six weeks and work with mentors who are successful businesspersons. Delivering the keynote address was Senator Garrett Richter, who was elected president pro tempore of the Senate in November, 2012. You are on a journey pursuing the American Dream, Richter told the graduates. It is directly in your path. Graduates Michael Doody, Mark Gionfriddo, Pamela Schmidt and Alex Terronez were all on hand to receive the certificates symbolizing their completion of the small business training course. This is absolutely a tremendous program, Schmidt told the crowd. Terrific speakers. Subjects from marketing, insurance, all people who answered our questions about starting our own business. Session facilitator Joanne Show and session coaches Bob Murray and Julie Pekrul also attended the graduation and received certificates of appreciation. Sherri Lange served as a coach but was not on hand for the event. The Goodwill Southwest Florida MicroEnterprise Institute is administrated by Goodwill Industries of Southwest Florida and is part of Goodwills mission to help people with disabilities and disadvantages overcome their barriers to employment and independence. To learn more about the SWFL MicroEnterprise Institute, visit www. goodwillswfl.org/microenterprise or call 995-2106 ext. 2219. Alex Terronez, Pamela Schmidt, Senator Garrett Richter, Mark Gionfriddo and Michael Doody School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Shelley, Is there something I can do with my pre-school child to help him to do well in math later on? Or is it better just to let his school teach him what he needs to know? I dont want to teach him the wrong thing. Jessica A., Fort Myers Jessica, It is very important for you to help teach and reinforce basic skills with your child. Teachers do expect parents to help their children learn basic skills and there are quite a few fun ways to re-enforce skills that will make it an enjoyable time for you and your child. In regard to math skills, counting not just reciting numbers is a very important skill for your child to learn. A recent study found that students who could recite and count to 20 in preschool had the highest math scores in first grade. According to Dr. Louis Manfra, a math professor at University of Missouri, Reciting means saying the numbers from memory in chronological order, whereas counting involves understanding that each item in the set is counted once and that the last number stated is the amount for the entire set. When children are just reciting, theyre basically repeating what seems like a memorized sentence. When theyre counting, theyre performing a more cognitive activity in which theyre associating a one-to-one correspondence with the object and the number to represent a quantity. Manfra also reported that, Counting gives children stronger foundations when they start school. The skills children have when they start kindergarten affect their trajectories through early elementary school; therefore, its important that children start with as many skills as possible. Parents (and teachers) should integrate counting into all aspects of childrens daily activities so children can master this very important skill. You can practice counting anywhere; from counting the number of raisins in a cookie, to counting how many plates are on the table to counting how many crayons are in the crayon box. This counting activity can be extended to just about anything the list is endless. Usually when children are in this age group you dont want to go beyond 20, as this tends to be confusing for them.Once your child can count from 1 to 20, there are a variety of other counting patterns you can teach them although they will learn these in school. Normally children learn to count in twos, fives and tens between first and second grade, many school districts vary in teaching methods so its possible that you might be teaching a number pattern somewhat differently than your childs school teaches it.continued on page 22 Isabella Rasi 239-246-47161101 Periwinkle Way #105, Sanibel, FL 239-472-0044 ENGEL & VLKERS Excellence in Real Estate A step above! International Client Base 600 Shops Worldwide Multi-Lingual Staff Your success is my aim. To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 201322 Clinger Named United Way Campaign Chair For 2013-14John Clinger, Senior VicePresident of Merrill Lynch Wealth Management and Senior Financial Advisor of Clinger, Sizemore and Associates, and a United Way Board Member, has been named 2013-14 United Way Campaign Chair. As the Campaign Chair, Clinger will lead the campaign that includes thousands of volunteers working to meet the $8,320,794 fundraising goal. I am honored to be selected as the United Way Campaign Chair, said Clinger. It is a big responsibility that I will pursue with great passion and enthusiasm because I believe in the United Way and what it does to strengthen our community. Clinger has been a Southwest Florida resident since 1991. He began his professional career in banking and joined Merrill Lynch in 2000. He has been actively involved in the community by coaching Little League Baseball and volunteering for many organizations. John and his wife, Rusti, have four daughters. People often ask me why I support United Way. I began my involvement in our United Way through their allocations process. This process is how United Way deter mines how much United Way Partner Agencies receive. This allocations team took me to United Way agencies to see how the partner agencies programs help citizens in need. Our teams help ensure fiscal and performance accountability for all 70 partner agencies and over 170 United Way funded programs, Clinger said. I was extremely impressed by how United Way meets the real human needs of our community. Being actively involved with the United Way is one of the best ways to give back to my community. I am fortunate to be able to live in and work in such a dynamic and beautiful area, and I want to do my part to help others who are in need. Our local residents have always been incredibly supportive of the company I work for, and my connection to the United Way is one way to say thank you! As with every United Way Campaign, we are focused on meeting the needs of our community. One area where our United Way truly makes a difference is helping agencies collaborate to solve a clients problem. For example a Meals on Wheels volunteer notified the United Way 211 helpline that one of his customers appeared to be in real distress. United Way 211 connected the woman to the Alvin A. Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center for assistance with her husband who was exhibiting Alzheimers symptoms. Every day United Way 211 receives calls for help with food but they go beyond the food issue to find the basis of the clients problem such as unemployment, lack of health care, need for mental health counseling, and many more needs. I am passionate about the United Way and look forward to a successful campaign. With your help, United Way can make its campaign goal, but we need your help. Every company campaign, every dollar given by an individual, together makes a big difference. Your gift is an investment in our community. With your help, we can change live and make this community an even better place to live, Clinger concluded. For more information, call United Way of Lee, Hendry and Glades at 433-2000 or visit www.unitedwaylee.org. John Clinger, 2013-14 United Way Campaign Chair Financial FocusWhats Your R etirement Contingency P lan?by Jennifer B aseyYou probably have thought about what youd like to do during your retirement years. But all your plans probably depend, to at least some extent, on your financial situation. What happens if you reach the age at which you wish to retire and you just dont have the money you thought youd have? If this occurs, its time for Plan B. What does that look like? Here are a couple of possibilities: job, you may not mind working an extra year or so. Youll be bringing in more income and contributing more to your 401(k) or other retirement account and, perhaps almost as importantly, you may be able to avoid tapping into these retirement accounts, thus giving them more time to potentially grow. (However, once you turn 70, youll need to begin taking withdrawals from your 401(k) and a traditional IRA.) But if you are really not enamored with the idea of working any longer, you might find that even the ability to beef up your retirement plans for another couple of years isnt much consolation. pretty simple: If you dont save as much as you had planned for retirement, you probably cant do all the things you wanted to do as a retiree. For example, you may not be able to travel as much, or pursue your hobbies to the extent youd like. Clearly, youd like to avoid these retirement contingency plans. To do so, though, youll need to take steps well before you retire. And the most impor tant move you can make may be to contribute as much as you can possibly afford to your IRA and your 401(k) or other employer-sponsored retirement plan. During the last several years before you wish to retire, you may be in a strong position to max out on these plans because, at this stage of your life, your income may be at its highest point, your children may be grown and you may even have retired your mortgage. If you still have money left with which to invest, you may want to look at other tax-advantaged vehicles that can be used for retirement. But while its important to put in as much as possible to your retirement accounts, you need to do more than that you also must put the money in the right investments within these accounts. Your exact investment mix should be based on your individual risk tolerance and time horizon, but, as a general rule, these investments must provide you with the growth potential youll need to accumulate sufficient resources for retirement. Of course, as you know, investments move up and down. You cant prevent this, but youll certainly want to reduce the effects of volatility as much as possible when you enter retirement. Consequently, during your final working years, you may need to adjust your retirement accounts by shifting some of your assets (though certainly not all) from growth-oriented vehicles to incomeproducing ones. Its a good idea to have contingency plans in place for virtually every endeavor in life and paying for your retirement years is no different. But if you can make the right moves to avoid the contingency plans in the first place, then so much the better. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@edwardjones.com. SWFL Childrens Charities Adds New OfficersSouthwest Florida Childrens Charities Inc., a non-profit organization that provides funding to local childrens causes, has announced new officers effective July 1: Elaine Hawkins, president; Dorothy Fitzgerald, vice president and secretary; and Gary King, treasurer. All three have been involved as trustees for several years in the organizations annual event, the Southwest Florida Wine & Food Fest, as well as other philanthropic causes in the community. Southwest Florida Childrens Charities donates the proceeds from the event primarily to the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida. Additional benefiting organizations are Edison State Colleges pediatric nursing program and Florida Gulf Coast Universitys music therapy program. More than $8.9 million has been raised over the last five years. The Southwest Florida Wine & Food Fest is a two-day event that begins with dinners featuring select vintners and local chefs in private homes from Fort Myers to Naples Friday, February 21, and concludes with a Grand Tasting and Auction the following day, Saturday, February 22 at Miromar Lakes Beach & Golf Club. For Southwest Florida Wine & Food Fest tickets, sponsorships or additional information, contact Southwest Florida Childrens Charities Inc. at 513-7990, email info@swflwinefest.org or visit www. swflwinefest.org. From page 21School SmartIf your child is ready to move on beyond the number 20, you could also introduce the process of counting to 100. This is a more advanced skill. There are literally hundreds of online sites and apps for math practice for preschoolers. You and your child should visit them together. It will be fun and you will be helping your child to learn valuable skills. Ms. Greggs is adjunct faculty at Edison State College where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also Nationally Certified School Psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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23 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 by Suzy Cohen, RPhDear Pharmacist: I have neck pain, sciatica and headaches. Ive tried prednisone, Celebrex, Ibuprofen, Vicodin, physical therapy, chiropractors, massage, reiki, acupuncture, prayer work, laser and two surgeries on my neck. Nothing helps. Please, any ideas? DC, San Diego, California Assuming your diet is good, Id try yoga next. I hear you thinking, I cant even sit without pain, why should I twist myself into a knot? Because research proves yoga can help certain types of neck and back pain, headaches, migraines, anxiety, high blood pressure and osteoporosis. Since youve tried addictive narcotics, anti-inflammatories, steroids, surgery and whatever else, spending thousands of dollars and suffer ing endlessly, I think yogas worth a shot. It has no side effects, other than making you feel refreshed... sort of like a human breath mint! In a 2012 German study, researchers saw how a nine-week yoga program helped participants with chronic neck pain. Yoga has been around for centuries, and theres no harm so long as you dont push your body past its limits, but in your case, I would still get your physician and chiropractors blessings. And speaking of blessings Ive never associated a religious connotation with yoga, its about stretching and breathing. Besides, youll be the life of the party if you can turn yourself into a human pretzel! If your hips are tight, it may be the result of inflexibility, and it can subsequently cause your knee joint to become misaligned with the other bones in your leg, causing pain throughout the leg. Sciatica is a rather common condition in which lower back pain extends into one or both legs, by way of the sciatic nerve. A January 2013 study demonstrated that certain asanas or yoga poses relieved symptoms of sciatica including pain, rigidity and walking. Flexibility helps your posture, and the strength that yoga builds in your bones and muscles may reduce your odds for arthritis. A systematic review was per formed earlier this year in New Zealand, evidence showed regular yoga practice might alleviate pain caused by musculoskeletal disorders. What about your bones? Different yoga poses and transitions create mild stress on your bones, which causes the bone to become denser (and stronger!) in order to balance out this stress. Your mind benefits, too. A 2012 study performed in London showed yoga and meditation significantly reduced anxiety and blood pressure and improved mood. That occurs by increasing happy serotonin levels, while lowering cortisol, a stress hormone. Choose classes carefully, when I walked into my first yoga class and it was 105 degrees! Its called Bikram yoga, or sometimes hot yoga. What a nightmare for me, I despise heat. I could not get out of there fast enough. So call in advance and ask about the class you want to take. Classes labeled restor ative or yin are gentle and cool; also, those labeled Vinyasa or Hatha are also fairly easy, at least for me. Start out slowly and with your doctors permission, since youve had surgeries. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. dearpharmacist.com. deaRPharmacistR esearch Shows Yoga M ay H elp B lood P ressure, Chronic P ain And H eadaches M om And Me by Lizzie and P ryceLizzie and Pryce answer your questions and give advice about aging concerns from a two-generational perspective. A mother and daughter team, Lizzie is a retired RN and health educator, and Pryce is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in the care of elders and people with chronic illnesses. Dear Mom & Me, Sunday was always a fun day for us. We enjoyed going to church services and then going out for a nice brunch. All this has changed and it is irritating to go to service and you feel that you are sitting in the middle of a day care. The young parents allowing their children to scream and holler, with no regard for the others all around them. They wear their jeans, cutoffs and look as if they are ready to clean their basements. Do others complain about these problems, or is it just us? Dora Dear Dora, Most people, it seems, who go to church are no longer dressed in their Sunday best. That was a long and distant era. What you wear is no longer important and most of the clergy do not seem to care either. The churches are so happy to see people in the congregation that they would never say a word of criticism. This all seems to be a part of modern times. Lizzie Dear Dora, My generation enjoys casual, comfortable clothing. There is nothing wrong with children being in church with their parents as they probably spend so much time in day care, that this is an opportunity to be together. But if things get out of hand, I think that one parent should take the child out in respect of the others in the congregation and the clergy involved. Pryce Lizzie and Pryces email address is momandmeaging@hotmail.com. Free Car Seat I nspectionsKohls Kids Safety Program and Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida will be providing free car seat safety inspections on Saturday, September 14 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the LaBelle Fire Department, 290 South Main Street, LaBelle. Research shows that an estimated 30 percent of children still continue to ride unrestrained and 73 percent of all car seats are used incorrectly. More than 1,700 children have been saved since 1996 just because they were riding in a properly fitted car seat and in the back seat. Education and information to improve these numbers is of critical need in the community. According to Safe Kids and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, a correctly used safety seat reduces fatality risk by 71 percent and serious injury risk by 67 percent. Car seats will be available at a reduced price if your car seat is part of a recall, out-dated or is not the appropriate car seat for the child. Bilingual fitting technicians will be available. Appointments are encouraged. Call 239-343-5224. M edical Office Skills T rainingLee County residents currently working at low-skill, low-paying jobs who have not already had an opportunity for higher education or previous job training may take advantage of cost-free job training in medical front office skills to increase their pay. The seven-month, no-cost job-training program starts on October 15 and the class will graduate in May 2014. Telephone interviews will be accepted through October 8. The class is filled on a first-come, first-served basis and fills up quickly. All applicants must be working, must provide proof of earned income or Unemployment Compensation, proof of high school diploma or GED, proof of Lee County residency; must pass a criminal background check and must pass a basic assessment in reading, language and spelling. This training is available through the Lee Education and Employment Program and is funded by a Community Services Block Grant. The federal grant gives lowincome persons the opportunity to raise their income and enter a new career at the front desk of a medical facility or in medical records. The Medical Office Skills (certificate) Program includes keyboarding and computer applications, medical terminology, medical front office procedures, basic billing and coding, electronic medical records, HIPAA training and critical thinking skills. As well, students will receive one full year of individual case management and assistance with resumes, job search and interview skills. The program won a 2001 National Association of Counties Achievement Award for employment and training and was the only county program in the United States to win a 2002 Public Service Excellence Award. Successful applicants must have reliable transportation to and from all classes which are held Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Fort Myers Institute of Technology (formerly High Tech Central), 3800 Michigan Avenue in Fort Myers. The LEE Program covers all costs for tuition, books and can cover childcare cost during class hours. Contact Marti Mills at 533-7933 for a telephone screening to determine eligibility. H ealth Care R eform R oundtablesThe Southwest Florida Chapter of IMA is having its next quarterly IMA CFO Breakfast Roundtables on September 18. The topic is Health Care Reform, presented by Janette LHeureux, employees benefits advisor for Leading Edge Benefits Advisors. Find out the implications of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act for employers, employer actions that must be taken by 2013 to be in compliance, discover potential penalties and how to avoid them. LHeureux, RHU, REBC, PHR, ChHC, joined Leading Edge in 2005 and serves as a benefits advisor to her clients. She has been in the benefits business since 1984 and has developed a thorough understanding of the marketplace. The 1 CPE program will be presented on two dates and locations to accommodate schedules: Lee County on Tuesday, September 10 at the CliftonLarsonAllen office at 6810 International Center Boulevard in Fort Myers, and Collier County on Wednesday, September 18 at Collier Government Building, Building W, 3299 Tamiami Trail East in Naples. The format for the program will be a continental breakfast at 7:30 a.m. and presentation followed by a roundtable discussion that ends at 9:30 a.m. There is no cost to participants, but registration is requested at www.swflima.org. continued on page 24

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 201324 B usiness H all Of Fame CeremonyTickets and sponsorship opportunities for the Junior Achievement of Southwest Florida 2013 Business Hall of Fame, Collier County, to be held Tuesday, October 29 at the Waldorf Astoria Naples, are now available at www.jaswfl. org or by calling 239-225-2590. During the dinner and awards ceremony, Junior Achievement of Southwest Florida will induct Laureates John DeAngelis and David Diamond of DeAngelis Diamond Construction, Inc. and Mayela and Orlando Rosales of Media Vista Group. The prestigious award recognizes outstanding entrepreneurs who serve as role models for youth through their professional accomplishments and commitment to the community. Business sponsorships are available and include tickets to the event with platinum level sponsorships available for $7,500 and gold level sponsorships for $5,000. Tables of 10, which include two reserved seats for students, are available for $1,800 (silver sponsor level). Tables of five are available for $900 (bronze sponsor level) and include a reserved seat for one student. Individual seats are also available for $250 each. Sponsors also are needed to support student admission, which is $125 per ticket. Junior Achievement students who attend the event have an opportunity to interact with local professionals and practice their etiquette skills. Full-page and half-page advertisements are available in the event program book for $1,000 and $500 respectively. Proceeds benefit local Junior Achievement programs. John DeAngelis David Diamond Orlando Rosales Mayela Rosales H osfeld Nominated B est P ageant DirectorSuzi Hosfeld, executive director of Envy Pageant Productions, Inc., and Envy Models and Talent and the franchise holder of the Miss Florida U.S. International and Miss Florida American Beauty Pageants, has been nominated as Best Pageant Director by the Global Film, Fashion, Music, Television, Theater & Sports Awards. The organization seeks the best and brightest of those in the fashion and beauty industry. This distinct and prestigious awards ceremony recognizes and honors the achievements of both well known existing talents and unknown emerging talents in the entertainment, beauty, fashion and sports industries. Envy Pageant Productions, Inc. and Envy Models and Talent is located in The Atrium Complex at 8695 College Parkway, Suite 2360 in Fort Myers. Suzi Hosfeld Follow Lee County E mergency M anagement On Social M ediaNow is a great time to become a Facebook fan or Twitter follower of Lee County Emergency Management. Throughout September, in honor of National Prepared Month, youll get daily tips to prepare for hurricanes and other emergencies. Each week of the social media campaign is broken into functional topics such as Knowing Your Risks, Making A Plan, Getting A Kit and Staying Informed. Lee Countys Hazard Analysis was used to focus the campaign on the countys five greatest hazards: lightning, flooding, tropical storm, drought and wildfires. September is also the historic peak of the Atlantic hurricane season. While September is the designated preparedness month, Lee County Emergency Managements goal is to engage the public to make preparedness a part of their lives all year long. Preparedness is important because in the event of an emergency, Lee County residents need to be self-reliant for at least three days without access to electricity, water or food. Launched in 2004, National Preparedness Month is FEMAs national annual preparedness outreach. NPM is managed and sponsored by FEMAs Ready Campaign. For more information on how to be better prepared, visit www.leeEOC.com. Also, follow us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/lcemfl) and Twitter (@LCEMFL) for daily preparedness tips, news and events. For specific activation information, follow our Emergency Operations twitter (@LeeEOC). P urdue Confers Degrees Following Spring SemesterPurdue University awarded about 7,100 degrees to students following the spring semester. Those earning degrees include: Ethan Lapham of Fort Myers, who earned a bachelor of science degree from the College of Technology Jordon Stamper of Fort Myers, who earned a bachelor of science degree from the College of Health & Human Science. From page 23Health Care RoundtablesDesigned for chief financial officers and senior financial executives in Southwest Florida, the objective of the CFO Roundtable is to provide a forum for discussion of important issues of a financial and business nature, to present timely, relevant information related to financial management and to provide a networking opportunity for CFOs and their peers. For more information or to register, visit the IMA CFO Roundtable page of the IMA Southwest Florida website at www.swflima.org. Gruning Admitted To T exas UniversityChristopher Gruning from Fort Myers has been admitted to the Master of Public Service and Administration at Texas A&M Universitys Bush School of Government and Public Service in College Station, Texas. The Bush School has a record number of new fulltime students enrolled in its signature programs, the Masters Program in International Affairs (MPIA) and the Master of Public Service and Administration (MPSA). Ninety-three students are enrolled in the MPIA program, and 65 are enrolled in the MPSA program. They come from 18 different countries and 36 states.

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25 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF S eE PT eE MB erER 16, 2013ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Aspects favor new romances for unpaired Ewes and Rams. Already-paired Arian twosomes experience renewed harmony in their relationships. Money matters also take a bright turn. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Use that strong Bovine determination to help you keep the faith with your convictions while you move through a period of uncertainty. Things begin to ease by the weeks end. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Pay attention to your intuition. It could be alerting you to be more careful about accepting a statement of fact simply on trust. Dont be shy about asking for more proof. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Concern for the well-being of someone in need is admirable. But dont forget to take care of yourself as well. Ask a family member, close friend or colleague to help you. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Its OK to focus on the demands of your career. But try to avoid misunderstandings by also reaching out to family and friends. Your sharp intuitive sense kicks in by midweek. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Keep a rein on that green-eyed monster. Jealousy is counterproductive. Instead of resenting a colleagues good points, concentrate on developing your own abilities. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Spending time on a creative project during this high-energy week can pay off both in emotional satisfaction and in impressing someone who is glad to see this side of you. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Now is a good time to start planning that trip youve put off because of the demands on your time. Be sure to choose a destination that is new and exciting. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) That upbeat mood in the first part of the week makes you eager to take on new ventures. A more serious note sets in later to help you assess an upcoming decision. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) A high energy level gives the Goat the get-up-and-go to finish outstanding tasks before deadline, leaving time for well-earned fun and games with friends and family. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Dealing with disappointment is never easy. But the wise Aquarian will use it as a vital lesson and be the better for it. A close friend has something important to say. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Best bet is not to get involved in an argument between colleagues until you know more about who started it and why. And even then, appearances could be deceiving. Be alert. BORN THIS WEEK: You have creative gifts that inspire those who get to see this sometimes-hidden side of you. Francisco Vasquez Coronado, his health badly deteriorated from injuries and the toll of his strenuous travels, dies. Coronado explored much of the southwestern United States, but never found the fabled Seven Cities of Gold he had sought for decades, and died believing that he had been a shameful failure. Revolution, American Gen. Benedict Arnold meets with British Major John Andre to discuss handing over West Point to the British, in return for money and a high position in the British army. The plot was foiled, and Arnold, a former American hero, became synonymous with the word traitor. into an all-out brawl, Jim Bowie kills a banker in Alexandria, La., with an early version of his famous Bowie knife. The actual inventor of the Bowie knife, however, was probably not Jim Bowie, but rather his equally belligerent brother, Rezin Bowie. in history begins with more than 100,000 people pouring into the Cherokee Strip of Oklahoma to claim valuable land that had once belonged to Native Americans. With a single shot from a pistol, the mad dash began. der Mickey Thompson takes another shot at the world land-speed record. Although he only managed to coax his streamlined trips across the Bonneville Salt Flats won worldwide fame for the car and its driver. one of the biggest box office draws of malpractice suit against her former lawyer. After the death of her third husband, Martin Williams becomes the first black to win the Miss America crown. Williams later launched a successful singing and acting career, including a featured role on the hit television sitcom Ugly Betty. Pearl S. Buck who made the following sage observation: Nothing is less reliable than a machine. It is difficult not to wonder whether that combination of elements which produces a machine for labor does not create also a soul of sorts, a dull resentful metallic will, which can rebel at times. Spanish moss is not actually a moss; its a cousin of the pineapple. telephones was the South Asian nation of Bhutan, and both television and the Internet were banned there until 1999. Incidentally, Bhutan also is the only nation in the world in which the well-being of the citizens is so important that the government measures the countrys Gross National Happiness. whale songs rhyme. youre most likely to see examples of didaskaleinophobia in action -thats a fear of going to school. you think youre a better driver than everyone else on the road. trip to Yellowstone National Park, keep in mind that as you walk through the seemingly peaceful scenery and view the iconic geysers, youre actually walking on top of lots of dishes before a couple gets married. The couple, of course, has to work together to clean up the mess. For centuries, theologians have been explaining the unknowable in terms of the-not-worth-knowing. -Henry Louis Mencken THIS WEEK IN HISTORY strSTR A nN G eE BU tT trTR U eE thoTHO UG htHT F orOR theTHE DA yY DID YOU KNOW 1. MYTHOLOGY: A satyr is a mythical creature that is half man and half what? 2. MILITARY : What is a dreadnought? 3. FAMOUS QUOTA TIONS: What famous actor once said, Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious? 8. ENTERTAINERS: What was the name of ventriloquist Edgar Bergens most famous puppet? 9. HISTORY : What land did Alexander the Great rule as king? 10. MUSIC: Which rock group recorded the hit W alk This Way? TRIVI aA TES tT ANSWERS SpSP OR tT S QUIZ 1. In 2012, San Franciscos Pablo Sandoval became the fourth player to hit three home runs in one World Series game. Name two of the first three to do it. 2. When was the last time a team rallied from losing the first two games of the World Series to win the championship? 3. Since 2002, only one NFL team has had 13-plus wins in consecutive seasons twice. Name it. Williams make at the event before missing it in 2013? ANSWERS

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 201326 PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY Read us online at IslandSunNews.com CONTRACTOR G I P M SR C D P D P CG D GrSince 2001, A Southwest Florida Paver Contractor www.gigicompanies.com 239-541-7282Schedule free estimates or visit our new show roomLic.# S3-12238 TREE & LAWN CARE Jesus Hernandez LANDSCAPING & TREE SERVICE 482-7350 We Service All your Landscape Needs FULL Landscaping SERVICES Over 20 years serving San-Cap & Ft. Myers FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the bene ts of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 FISHING CHARTER CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.com Grilled Steak Sandwiches with Arugula and Horseradish 1 pound beef (flank or skirt steak) 4 rolls or 8 slices bread 1/2 cup plain yogurt 1/2 lemon, juiced 1 tablespoon prepared horseradish 2 cups arugula Sea salt and fresh ground pepper to taste Grill steak over hot coals or cook in a saut pan until desired doneness. Chill the cooked steak in the refrigerator. Slice the chilled steak against the grain into thin strips. Toast the bread. In a small mixing bowl, combine the yogurt, lemon juice and horseradish. Taste the horseradish sauce and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. Assemble sandwich by layering steak, arugula and horseradish sauce on the toasted bread. Grilled Steak Sandwiches with Arugula and Horseradish Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702or email press@riverweekly.com

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27 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 answer on page 27 PUZZLE ANSWERS SUDOKU SCRAMBLERS FIND AT LEAST SIX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PANELS PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING COMPUTERS BUILDING CONTRACTOR To advertise in The River Weekly NewsCall 415-7732

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 201328 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE ISABELLA RASiIHAPPY TO HELP Y YOUWithITH A ALL OOF Y YOUrRREAL EEStT At TE NEEDS! RS 1/4 NC TFN 1101 Periwinkle Way #105 SS anibel, F LL 33957 ISABELLA RASiI (239) 246-4716E ISABELLARASi I@AOL.COM VACATION RENTAL II sland VV acationsOf Sanibel & CaptivaMillion $ Views Await You! Cottages Condos Homes Miles of Beaches & Bike Paths239-472-72771-888-451-7277RS 1/4 BM TFN LILI GH TT H OO U SESE REALTREALT YPaul J. Morris, Broker VACATION RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT & SALES 359 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel Island 239-579-0511RS 1/4 CC TFN SS ERVERS AA SSISTANT SS ERVERS LL INE COOKIL Tesoro Ristorante, 751 tarpon Bay Rd. Sanibel Now hiring; Servers, Assistant Servers and Line cook Email resumes to: applications between 11-2 daily.NS 1/18 NC TFN 3883 Sanibel Captiva Road, Sanibel, Fl Phone: 239-472-3644, ext 1 Fax: 239-472-2334 www.crowclinic.orgH ELEL P U SS P LEASELEASE !!We need volunteers for: Clinic emergency patient admissions desk and baby animal feeders Visitor education center greeters and gift shop cashiers CROW (239) 472-3644, ext. 231 or volunteers@crowclinic.orgRS 1/4 NC TFN hH EL pP wW ANTED VOLVOL U NTEERSNTEERS NEEDEDNEEDED Volunteers needed for the After School Program which runs Mon.-Th, 2:30 3:15 pm call Linda Reynolds 472-1617RS 1/4 NC TFN RORO G ERER NODRNODR UFF ELECTRICELECTRIC Lic# EC12002788. Call Roger 239-707-7203. Aqualink Motor Controls. RS 6/7 CC TFN VOLVOL U NTEERNTEER OO PP ORTORT U NITNIT YThe Sunshine Ambassador Program is a new and exciting volunteer opportunity offered at the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida located within HealthPark Medical Center. The Sunshine Ambassadors will greet, assist and be a families and visitors entering the hospital. The Ambassadors also make a difference to families by providing educational and healthful resources to assist in GRANDparenting for GRANDchildren. We are currently seeking year-round volunteers to work one 4-hour shift Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm or 12:00pm to 4:00 pm. If you would be interested in learning more about this wonderful new opportunity, please contact Lisa Ellinwood, Volunteer Resources Coordinator at 239-343-5062 at the Golisano Childrens Hospital.NS 2/8 NC TFN hH EL pP wW ANTED VOLVOL U NTEERSNTEERS NEEDEDNEEDED At The Sanibel School Call Michelle Wesley 239-910-8000RS 1/4 NC TFN H ELEL P W ANTEDANTED Norris Home Furnishings is a fast growing company that is seeking a motivated, cheerful and experienced part time sales person. This person should enjoy meeting new people and helping them make their dream homes a reality. Being good with colors and textures is a plus. Stop by store for application, or send resume to dulrich@norrishomefurnsihings.comNS 8/30 BM 9/6 ThTH E SS ANIBEL BB EAD ShSH O pP PT sales. Jewelry making exp. preferred. Will train reliable person with strong retail sales experience. Apply in person. 1101 Periwinkle Way, Mon.-Sat, 11-5 p.m.NS 9/6 CC 9/13 ANN uU AL RENTAL LL ON gG TT ERM RR ENTAL2BR 2Bath 1,500 Sq. Ft. Executive Condo in Sanctuary available for long term rental. 6 month minimum, multi-year available. No pets, no smoking. $2,200 per month plus utilities. Call 407-227-3554.NS 8/30 CC 9/20 QU IETIET SANIBELSANIBEL H OMEOME W/P RIVATERIVA TE BEACBEAC H P ATAT H3200 sq ft home in Gulf Pines, one of Sanibels most beautiful & sought after communities. One house from beach w/private beach path. Short walk to Gulf Pines 2 swimming pools & tennis courts; large landscaped lot provides privacy. 3-4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, large open living area, screened porch & several decks. W/D, 2nd fridge, Elevator, 2-car garage. $4,000/mo. + util. Annual rental only. Unfurnished. Landscaping & association fees paid by owner. Avail Oct 2013. Call 917-680-4440.NS 5/31 CC TFN RERE / MAMA X OO F TT H EE ISLANDSISLANDS Putting owners and tenants together Call Dustyn Corace www.remax-oftheislands.com 239-472-2311RS 1/4 BM TFN ANN uU AL RENTAL RR IVER DD ISTRICT HISTORIC DD EAN PARK 1924 Pristine 2 story 2700 sq ft Tudor, 3-2.5-2, newly done kit (w/granite), MBR, breakfast/sun rm, den, DR, storage area, walk to downtown. Special. No pets. $1,500. 239-543-4278.RS 9/13 CC 9/20 ANN uU AL RENTALS SS ANIBEL 472-6747Gulf BB each Properties, II nc. Paul H. Zimmerman, Broker/Ownersanibelannualrentals.comServing The Islands Rental Needs Since 1975 RS 9/6 BM TFN LAKELAKE F RONTRONT This Old Florida Style piling home has a Great view over the large heated pool to the Lake! Of fering 3 bedrooms/two baths, two car garage plus storage. Short distance to the beach. $3,000/mo. CANALCANAL & DOCKDOCK Five Minutes to Sanibel Toll-Booth!! This UF ground level updated home of fers 3 BR/2 BA + family room, double garage, screened in pool, 65 boat dock, + boat lift for boat. $2,800/mo. fF ORT M yY ERSTO PLA cC E AA CLA ssSS I fF IED LL OG OntONT O: II slandSunNews.com cC LIc C K On N PLAc C E cC LAss SS If F IED SERVICES O ffFF ERED RESORTRESORT MANAMANA G EMENTEMENT Retired couple seeks position as small resort management team. Both have 30 years of Sanibel familiarity. On-site residence desired; salary negotiable. 231-421-9194 / jcrounds11@charter.net.NS 8/23 CC 9/13 SERVICES O ffFF ERED SANIBELSANIBEL H OMEOME W ATCATC HRetired Police Captain Lives on Sanibel Will Check Your Home Weekly Very Reasonable Rates (239) 728-1971RS 1/4 BM TFN HOME/ CONDOCONDO WATC hH CONCIER gG E SERVICESDorado Property Management Full Range of Services Island Resident Licensed & Insured 24/7 Call Lisa or Bruce at 239-472-8875RS 1/4 BM TFN SS CARNATO LL A wW N SS ERVICELawn Service, Shrubs and Tree Trimming Weeding, Installation of Plants, Trees and Mulch (one month free service available) Joe Scarnato (239) 849-6163 scarnatolawn@aol.comRS 1/25 BM TFN HELLES CC LEANIN gG SS ERVICESResidential Cleaning to Satisfaction Sanibel Lic. #11412 Lee Co. Lic. #051047NS 1/4 PC TFN HO uU SEKEE pP ER GIRL FRIDA yY Experienced Housekeeper. Excellent References, Reliable, I will also help with light cooking and errands. Call Heather (239) 826-1045 Sanibel & Lee Co. LicenseRS 9/13 CC TFN

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29 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 CLASSIFIED DEADLINE FRIDAY AT NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS The Island Sun and The River Weekly NewsAlways on the table, and online, with everything you need to know about your community. NEWSPAPERSanibel & Captiva IslandsTHEIVER R r rf WEEKL Y NEWS Serving Sanibel, Captiva and Fort Myers since 1993 Phone 395-1213 or 415-7732 Pick up a copy or go to IslandSunNews.com. Click on Read the Island Sun or The River Weeklywww.IslandSunNews.com BOATS CANOES KAYAKSDOCKAGEHourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-5800RS 1/4 NC TFN 22-FOOT GLACIER BAY CATAMARANIn good condition. Needs some detailing and a high pressure fuel pump. $9,000 or best offer. The boat was donated to the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) for quick sale. Contact James Robinson at CROW at (239) 472-3644, ext. 221 or development@ crowclinig.org. Or contact Peg Albert at (239) 472-3644, ext. 232 or peg@ crowclinic.org. RS 7/26 NC TFN PETSFREE KITTEN TO GOOD HOMEFree kitten to good, safe home. No de-clawing. Fiesty Bengal mix. Call 472-1788 after 5 p.m.NS 5/31 NC TFN WANTED TO BUYCASH PAI D FOR MILITARY ITEMSCash Paid For Old Military Items. Medals, Swords, Uniforms, helmets, old guns, awards & more. Local Toll Free 1-866-440-3280RS 9/6 CC 11/29 LOSTLost Ladies Watch Make: Brighton Area of Mucky Duck on Captiva Island Lost on Dec. 10, 2012 around noon If found call: 941-639-5395RS 1/4 NC TFN FOUNDPrescription sunglasses found in parking lot of Limetree Center on Wednesday, February 27. Claim at Island Sun newspaper, suite 2 in Limetree Center, or call 395-1213.NS 3/8 NC TFN TOOL BOX WAS HES UP ON SANIBELThis tool box with motor parts washed up on shore Saturday morning, May 8 about 8:30 on the beach at Sundial Resort on Sanibel Island. To claim call Sundial Resort Security 239-472-4151.NS 6/14 CC TFN LOST AND F OUND F OR SALEEMERGENCY GENERATOR COLEMAN PROPANE 1500 POWER STATIONIncludes ASCO 165 Power Transfer switch. Great Condition Never Been Outside. Power When You Need It. 423-291-9831.RS 9/13 CC 9/13 FURNITURE FOR SALERoll Top Desk 54 wide, 46 high, 24 deep. Four Dining Room Chairs. Call 239-466-4445.NS 9/13 CC 9/13 GARAGE MOVING YARDSALES CAUTION GARAGE SALEINTERIOR DESIGNER & COLLECTOR From Vintage Bears to Hand Painted China & All the Fabulous Stuff Inbetween. Sat & Sun. Sept. 14th & 15th. 9a.m-4p.m 5721 SanCap Road (between mile markers 5-6) Look for the Red Mailbox. SANIBELNS 9/13 CC 9/13

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If you would like your club/organization listed in The River Calling Card, phone 415-7732Emergency ......................................................................................... 911 Lee County Sheriffs Of ce ........................................................ 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol ................................................................ 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol .............................................................. 278-7100 Poison Control ................................................................ 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center .......................................1-800-936-5321Ft. Myers Chamber of Commerce ............................................. 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare .............................................. 425-2685 Ft. Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce .................................. 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library ......................................................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library ............................................................ 533-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce .......................................... 931-0931 Post Of ce ..................................................................... 1-800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau ..................................................... 338-3500 ARTS Alliance for the Arts .................................................................. 939-2787 Art of the Olympians Museum & Gallery ................................... 332-5055 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio .................................................. 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers ......................................................... 275-3970 Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall ...................................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS ................................................................................ 395-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre ............................................... 278-4422 Cultural Park Theatre ................................................................ 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light ............................................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade .................................. 332-4488 Florida West Arts ...................................................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers ....................................... 472-0168 Gulf Coast Symphony ............................................................... 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres ..................................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic ........................................................... 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater ......................................................... 472-6862 S.W. Florida Symphony ............................................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy .................................................................. 936-3239 Young Artists Awards ................................................................ 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAngel Flight ................................................................ 1-877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center ............................................................... 731-3535 American Business Women Association ................................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL ..................................................................... 339-8046 Audubon Society ....................................................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR .................................................. 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society ................................................... 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus ................................. 1-855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club ............................................................ 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees ....................................................... 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists ............................................................ 415-2484 Ft Myers UDC Chapter 2614 (United Daughters of the Confederacy .................................. 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL ...................................................... 561-9164 The Horticulture and Tea Society ............................................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society ................................................................. 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society ............................................. 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation ........................................... 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees ............. 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America .......................................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL .................................................... 667-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans .................................................. 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy ........................................ 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association ........................................ 561-2118 Kiwanis Clubs: Fort Myers Beach ................................................. 765-4254 or 454-8090 Fort Myers Edison ..................................................................... 694-1056 Fort Myers South ...................................................................... 691-1405 Gateway to the Islands .............................................................. 415-3100 Iona-McGregor .......................................................................... 482-0869Lions Clubs:Fort Myers Beach ...................................................................... 463-9738 Fort Myers High Noon ............................................................... 466-4228 Estero/South Fort Myers ........................................................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County .............................................. 768-0417 POLO Club of Lee County ......................................................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers ......................................................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society ................................................ 472-6940 United Way of Lee County ........................................................ 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) ................................. 211 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews Shell Museum ................................................ 395-2233 Burroughs Home ...................................................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium ........................................ 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates ................................................... 334-3614 Fort Myers Skate Park .............................................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium ............................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge ................................ 472-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site .............................................. 239-992-0311 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center ....................... 765-8101 Skatium ...................................................................................... 321-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society ........................................ 939-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History ...................................... 321-7430 True Tours ................................................................................. 945-0405 Pets Of The Week SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 27 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 201330 Im Freckles, a Jack Russell terrier, and youd never guess my age by my vim and vigor. I am 6 years old, have lots of energy and cant wait to play every day. Id make a great tailgate partner. Whatever activity you choose, Ill be your best buddy. My adoption fee is only $25. My name is Montana, Im a patch tabby with white chest and socks. Im a very beautiful cat with gorgeous green eyes and a great personality. I love to meet and greet people and I will even put my head right in your hand to make sure you know I want to be petted. Then I will show you all my toys. Of course, I have to share them with all of the other cats here at the shelter until I find my forever home. How about your home? My adoption fee is $25 during Animal Services Fall Frenzy adoption promotion. For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to Animal Services website at www. LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive, Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office, off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if three months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs six months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee, and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500. Montana ID# 571509 Freckles ID# 271813 photos by squaredogphoto.com

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31 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 BEACH CHAIR PASTIMEAnswers on page 25

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NOW OPEN! NOW OPEN! Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! 239-463-5505 | 1249 Estero Blvd. Live Music Wed-Sun! Happy Hour Mon-Fri 2-5pmTheBeachedWhale.com Ft. Myers BEach:Sept 18th Ft. Myers BEach Ft. Myers BEach : : Book Signing Event!Meet The Author!Details Online12-2pm & 4-6pm Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 13, 201332