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River weekly news ( July 12, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101363/00150

Material Information

Title: River weekly news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication: Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 09-06-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101363:00192

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101363/00150

Material Information

Title: River weekly news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication: Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 09-06-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101363:00192


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FREETake Me Home VOL. 12, NO. 35 SEPTEMBER 6, 2013From the B eaches to the R iver District downtown Fort M yersRead Us Online at IslandSunNews.com Sunday Afternoon B luegrass And Acoustic M usic R eturnsThe Acoustic Music Society of Southwest Florida will present three hours of live music on the theater stage at the Alliance for the Arts on Sunday, September 8 from 2 to 5 p.m. The show features the local bluegrass favorites The Bug Tussle Ramblers and Captain Joe & the Bottom Feeders, as well as Bill Metts with his acoustic guitar. This is the first in a series of Sunday afternoon concerts, which continue in the theater on October 13, November 3 and December 8.continued on page 16 The Bug Tussle Ramblers Captain Joe & the Bottom Feeders Ghostbird T heatre Company Opens New SeasonGhostbird Theatre Company begins its second season with Miss Julie, a play by the Swedish playwright August Strindberg, running from September 11 to 15 at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center in Fort Myers. Doors open at 7 p.m., with cocktails at 7:30 p.m. and curtain at 8 p.m. Miss Julie is the culmination of Strindbergs achievement in naturalistic drama. Written in 1888, the play exposes the battles between the sexes and the classes at their most vulnerable and viscer al, battles that continue to resonate today. Miss Julie is the unruly daughter of a count who is too stuck up in some ways and not proud enough in others. While her father is away, Miss Julie celebrates Midsummers Eve with the servants, dancing in the barn. She takes to Jean, her fathers valet, and they spend the rest of the evening seducing one another. At times, they smolder for each other and other times they burn, but inevitably, this dangerous game of playing with fire ends in a pile of ash. The play contains adult language and sexual content. Director Brittney Brady says that the design of the play centers around fire. I want to use warm side lighting to throw shadows and give the feeling that the show is lit with flame. Midsummers Eve is celebrated in the play with a bonfire. And fire is sexy and dangerous, and there is a lot of talk about fire in the play. So its going to be warm, dark, steamy, sexy, all of those good things. Her aim is for the audience to feel the intimacy and rawness of Jeans and Julies night. Playing Miss Julie is Ghostbird veteran Dana Lynn Griffin, and debuting as Jean is Drew Scott Dietsch. Completing the triangle is Katelyn Gravel, who plays Christine, Jeans fiance. Ghostbird Theatre Company is the resident theater company of the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center. Ghostbird will be featuring three more plays this season as well as a special fundraising cabaret in December. Ghostbird Theatre Company continued on page 17R egistration Open For 3rd Annual P ath T o Wellness 5K R un/WalkRegistration is now open for walkers and runners to participate in the 3rd annual Path To Wellness 5K Run/Walk planned for Saturday, October 5 at Lakes Park in Fort Myers. The event will benefit the Lee County Chapter of NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) and SalusCare, the new not-for-profit formed by the merger of Lee Mental Health and Southwest Florida Addiction Services (SWFAS). More than 300 people are expected to turn out for the race, which begins at 8:30 a.m., rain or shine. Race results and timing will be provided by 3D Racing, Inc. of Cape Coral. Registration is $20 for walkers and $25 for runners and may be made online at www.active.com through October 4. Same day registration is available at Lakes Park for an additional $5. T-shirts are guaranteed to the first 200 registrants. Awards will be given to the top three finishers in each age division for both males and females. Major sponsors of the Path To Wellness are the Fort Myers Police Department and Park Royal Hospital, with support from Genoa Healthcare, Lee Memorial Health System and Susan Bennett Marketing & Media. NAMI is the nations largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to continued on page 23 Overall winner from 2012, Timo Weckmann of Germany, crosses the finish line at last years Path To Wellness race Dana Lynn Frantz as Miss Julie

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Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: Local Artifactsby Gerri Reaves, PhDExamining objects from the past can give us a feel for the everyday lives of people in previous decades. While the ones pictured here probably wouldnt have seemed the least bit out of the ordinary, today they might evoke some curiosity. Take, for example, the Neverout insulated kerosene safety lamp, which belonged to Bob Halgrim, the first president of the Southwest Florida Historical Society and the first curator of the Edison home and museum. Designed to be mounted on handlebars with the sturdy bracket, the lamp was meant to prevent accidents. In fact, the promise prevents accidents is actually stamped into the metal. Red and green glass faceted jewels light the sides, perhaps indicating the bicyclists port and starboard, or left and right sides, respectively, as he navigated the streets of Fort Myers. When the light grew dim, a bicyclist had to take on the messy job of refilling the lamp. How much easier it is today, when we just pop in new batteries when the light wanes. The circa 1914 bicycle lamp was patented by the Rose Manufacturing Company in Philadelphia, which also made carriage lights in the pre-automobile age, and later, stop and parking lights that could be installed on autos. What could be more unremarkable than a throwaway paper cup? Not much, in todays disposable society that consumes untold volumes of paper products as a matter of course. But imagine a time when a common drinking cup was just that common, as in everyone drank from the same cup without cleaning it between uses. Unless train passengers, for instance, brought along their own private cup, they would be forced to use the common cup provided. But a little more than a century ago, increased under standing about the consequences of sharing germs spurred public health officials to push for hygienic standards enforced by law. The deadly 1918 influenza epidemic only increased the publics new-found awareness about the unwitting spread of disease and the need for general cleanliness. On October 30, 1912, the federal government banned the common cup aboard interstate train carriers. The cup-less modern drinking fountain also gained prominence in this era. The paper drinking cup made by the Baldwin Finback Cup Company dates most likely from 1913. Baldwin was one of many cup manufacturers competing in the bur geoning cup business spawned by the banning of the common cup. In fact, the well-known Dixie Cup Company became one of the most successful competitors. Public health was the ultimate winner. Among the biggest accounts at stake were railroads, who dispensed countless cups per year from the well-designed dispensers on passenger cars. This finback has The Pullman Co. printed on the other side. The directions look simple: open the cup, hold by the fin or handle, and fill. Lets hope it didnt leak. Ask most young people what a strop is and you might get a puzzled look as they rush to Google the word. Today, when a razor blade becomes dull, its thrown away and replaced by a sharp continued on page 23 The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, please call (239) 415-7732 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, FL 33901. Fax number: (239) 415-7702. E-mail: press@riverweekly.com. The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Co-Publishers Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Isabel Rasi Office Coordinator Graphic Arts/ProductionAnn Ziehl Photographer Michael Heider Writers Anne Mitchell Jeff Lysiak PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Contributing Writers Read Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com Click on The River Ed Frank Max Friedersdorf Tom Hall This Neverout insulated kerosene safety lamp, circa 1914, was once the best bicycle light around collection of the Southwest Florida Historical Society, photos by Gerri Reaves Countless drinking cups, such as this one made by the Baldwin Finback Cup Company for the Pullman Company, were used on passenger rail cars after the federal government banned the disease-spreading common cup in 1912 The Extra Fine Kodiak Combination Strop, number 7, was patented on July 17, 1883T hH E rR IVE rR S EE P TETE MB EE R 6, 20132

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3 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 Edison & Ford Winter Estates September Programs And EventsSeptember at the Edison & Ford Winter Estates is highlighted with the Garden Talk and Tour of Edisons Rubber Research Plants; registration for Emerging Inventors; and Quilting and Stitchery Demonstrations in the Edison Caretakers House, as well as a variety of other special programs and activities throughout the month. The September schedule of programs and events includes: and trees in his Fort Myers Laboratory. Many of these varieties can be found on his winter estate. Historic Garden Manager Steve Hottovy will give a tour of the gardens, where you will learn the history of Edisons botanical research and how to make rubEdison Ford Garden Shoppe. Cost for members is free; non-members are $5. Coordinator Bobby Feldman will discuss Charles Edison, son of Thomas and Coordinator Holly Shaffer will discuss Thomas Edison and baseball. The American Red Cross will discuss tips on how to react in the event of an emergency. If you are intervolunteer opportunities, visit the website at www.edisonfordwinterestates.org. Edison Ford Shoppe at Bell Tower Shops. Join the Edison Ford Wild Wizard and learn The Edison Ford banyon tree. Edison Ford Garden Talks are held on the second Saturday of the month in the Edison Ford Garden Shoppe photo by Jim McLaughlin Quilting and stitchery demonstrations The Morgan House is closed September 8-16 for cleaning & maintenance. Stop in Tuesday the 17 th for our monthly Wine & Tapas Tasting! Reservations Required239-337-3377 Lazy Flamingo, Inc. 6520-C Pine Avenue Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-5353 Lazy Flamingo 3, Inc. 16501 Stringfellow Rd Bokeelia, FL 33922 239-283-5959 Lazy Flamingo 2, Inc. 1036 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-6939 Lazy Flamingo 4, Inc. 12951 McGregor Blvd. Ft. Myers, FL 33919 239-476-9000 Four Great Locations! We have the NFL Ticket Package and the BIG TEN Network NOW SERVING FULL LIQUOR IN FORT MYERS 20 Wings & Domestic Pitcher for $20 during all College and Pro GamesF M

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 20134 Goodwill LIFE Academy Burying A Little Bit Of History For Future StudentsThe Goodwill LIFE Academy is burying a time capsule on September 9. The time capsule burial is part of the schools move from a previously leased location to its new, permanent home at 5100 Tice Street in Fort Myers. The time capsule was suggested by the students, said LIFE Academy Principal Lynn Pottorf. The students have come up with so many ideas about what to put in it, we are having trouble narrowing the list! The time capsule will hold items like the LIFE Academys newsletter Tiger Tales and letters from the students to the future classes. The time capsule will not be dug up until 2063, 50 years after its burial. They want students in the future to know who they were, said Pottorf. To know what their school was like. The Goodwill LIFE Academy is a tuition-free Lee County charter school for students with intellectual disabilities ages 11 through 22. The new location features seven classrooms, a bus ramp area, a large kitchen, dedicated library and computer lab. The schools curriculum is designed to promote self-advocacy and develop life skills for independent living by focusing on academic skills, daily life skills and vocational/workforce skills. A ribbon cutting for the new location was held earlier in the summer. Principal Lynn Pottorf and Goodwill Board Member William McDaniel cut the ribbon at the new Goodwill LIFE Academy Goodwill CEO Tom Feurig addresses the crowd at the Goodwill LIFE Academy ribbon cutting Wesley Memorial United Methodist ChurchFellowship Hall, 4141 DeLeon Street, Fort Myers, FL9:30 am Doors Open 10:00 am Business Meeting, Refreshments and ProgramLee County Genealogical SocietySeptember 14, 2013 Saturday Quarterly Meeting Genealogyin the Clouds Open Monday Saturday www.threecraftyladies.com Find us on WE WILL PAY YOUR TOLL!!!Spend $55 and bring us your toll receipt for a full refund! Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Downtown Fort Myers (Post Oce Arcade Next to Hotel Indigo) 1520 Broadway For Takeout & Delivery Tel: 334-6991 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEKMon-urs 11am 10pm Fri-Sat 11am 11pm Sun 12pm 9pm www. ichiban-sushi-chinese.com Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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5 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 Fort Myers Public Art: Leoma Lovegrove Retrospectiveby Tom HallThe Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is celebrating its fiveyear anniversary this season, and for its September exhibit, SBDAC is presenting a retrospective including many of the artists who have exhibited at the Davis over the years. Among the 50 artists represented in the show is Leoma Lovegrove. Leoma Lovegrove is thrilled to exhibit her painting called Matlacha Spoken Here during the Celebrating Five Years of the Arts exhibition, the Art Center states in its press release announcing the show. The painting is one of over 30 in her Good Day Sunshine series, part of an exclusive collection for Bealls Department Store. Bealls is using Lovegroves latest series to produce her second Resort Collection, which is comprised of products for home such as Melamine dishware, rugs, luggage, travel bags, beach chairs and towels, along with apparel and ladies accessories. Bealls is also introducing a Little Leoma brand of childrens clothing. This new and exciting collection is bursting with tropical, vibrant colors. It incorporates Lovegroves impressionist paintings of Florida flora and fauna and will be unveiled statewide on December 15. Also on display during the September 6 Art Walk opening and reception will be Lovegroves colorful Mobile Studio, a fanciful trailer that allows her to take the materials of her art on the road. Lovegrove is an impressionist/expressionist painter known worldwide for her colorful depictions of her environment. Her paintings of Florida subjects have been instrumental in encouraging tourism to the state from all over the world. Throughout the year, thousands visit her waterfront gallery and gardens on Matlacha Island, where she shares her island life with author husband Mike Silberg, Solomon the cranky macaw, and three feral cats which include Fred, the rising feline star. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is part art gallery, part performing arts center and part art, music and theater school. During its inaugural 2009-10 season, over 65,000 guests visited the Art Center. In addition, its outreach programs were presented to thousands of children through area schools, at-risk organizations and hospitals. Today, SBDAC regularly recruits award-winning artists who have performed worldwide at such prestigious venues as Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center in its ongoing mission to provide elite programming to all of Southwest Florida which includes concerts, theatrical performances, dance, independent film, art exhibits and cotillion. For more information, call 333-1933 or visit www.sbdac.com. An arts advocate, Tom Hall guides weekly walking tours of the River Districts public art collection in Fort Myers. For more information, go to www.truetours.net. Leoma Lovegrove preparing a few paintings to display in the Hertz corporate office in New Jersey RIV Nellies Upstairs Waterside Bar Where its Happy Hour all the time!!! 10% OFF Offer valid with Cash payments only ... No credit cards. ONE COUPON PER TABLE Can not be used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, Expires Sept. 13, 2013 Lunch, Dinner Snacks in Between11am-10pm used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, www.nervousnellies.net FREE MARINA DOCKAGE with Dock Attendants Assistance NERVOUS NELLIES WILL BE OPEN ALL OF SEPTEMBER

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 20136 rf ntbnrr bb bb rtttn Loved this restaurant. Fantastic experience. Food was exceptionally amazing. Service was outstanding. TripAdvisor Member, May 2013 Greeters Club Meeting If you sometimes wonder if the family legends passed down over generations are accurate, then the speaker for the September 19 luncheon meeting of the Greeters Club of Greater Fort Myers might start you on a path of historical discovery. Carolyn Ford is the education chairperson for the Lee County Genealogical Society and has spent hundreds of hours assisting residents with tracing their family lineage. Her topic will be Genealogy Basics: How to Climb Your Family Tree. She will give an overview on how to get started and will be able to answer more difficult questions for those who are already climbing the tree but have run into a weak branch. The cost for the luncheon meeting is $20. To make a reservation, contact Marie Gaither at 791-8966 or email wmgaither@aol.com. Luncheons are held on the third Thursday of the month at 11:30 a.m. at the Colonial Country Club, 9181 Independence Way, Fort Myers. Classes Held At Veterans ParkVeterans Park Recreation Center, located at 55 Homestead Road South in Lehigh Acres, will host a number of upcoming classes at the facility. Strength Training And Toning Adults 18 and older.Safely build muscles and tone your body through a variety of techniques and stretches.This one-hour class will teach you basics techniques, such as squats, lunges, bicep curls, push-ups and more. You will improve your muscle mass, bone density and metabolism with simple exercises that yield big results. (Bring ankle weights, if desired) Classes fill up quickly, register early. (12 people maximum) Cost: $28 for eight classes or $15 for four classes. Drop-in $4 per class. Tuesdays and Fridays, 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Register online at www.leeparks.org, activity #124216. Call Christine at 369-1521 for more information. Home School Recreation Open to children ages 5 to 16 years old. This is your opportunity for your homeschooled child to get out, get active and make new friends. Physical games and lots of activities played inside and outdoors. Bring a water bottle; wear comfortable clothing and tennis shoes. Cost: $10 for four classes Located across the street from Gulf Harbour 15065 McGregor Blvd, Ste 104, Fort Myers Tuesdays, 10:45 to 11:45 a.m. Register online at www.leeparks.org, activity #124402. Call Christine at 369-1521 for more information. September Programs Looking for an opportunity for your homeschool child to get out and make new friends? The Alva Community Center is offering a program with numerous physical activities in a non-competitive environment. Session I runs Thursday, September 12 to October 10 from 1 to 2 p.m. for children ages 5 to 16. Cost is $10 per child. Participants should expect to be outdoors for this program. Bring a water bottle, wear tennis shoes, sunscreen, sunglasses and hat. Moms Morning Out will be on Friday, September 13 from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Program includes games, play time, small lunch/snack, short movies, playground, and arts and crafts for 3to 5-year-olds. Potty training and pre-registration required. Cost is $10 per child. This program may be cancelled if the minimum of six participants is not met. Baton, Jazz and Dance Gymnastic sessions are offered for children ages 5 to 15. Learn the basics of gymnastics, baton, jazz, dance while gaining confidence and self esteem. Skills progress as participants advance and may include instruction in various maneuvers such as cartwheels, back-walkovers, and flips. Baton and Jazz session is Thursday, September 19 from 6 to 6:45 p.m. Registration is $40. Dance Gymnastic is Thursday, September 19 from 6:45 to 7:30 p.m. Registration is $40. For more information call Susan Katz at 239-369-0404.

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7 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 Rotary Donates To Veterans OrganizationDisabled Veterans Insurance Careers (DVIC), dedicated to helping disabled U.S. veterans by providing new opportunities for training and employment in the insurance industry, has received a $2,500 donation from Fort Myers Sunrise Rotary Club. The Fort Myers Sunrise Rotary Club welcomes the opportunity to help DVIC assist disabled veterans in starting a new career in the insurance industry, said David Gallentine, the Rotary Clubs president. The donation will assist DVIC with program capabilities, including the development of state-of-the-art training techniques that will prepare disabled veterans with skills for sales support and crossselling personal insurance products for careers in the insurance industry. We are grateful to the Fort Myers Sunrise Rotary Club, said Gary Bryant, DVIC president and chief executive officer. Thanks to an anonymous benefactor who is matching civic club contributions, this donation to DVIC is now $5,000. The Fort Myers Sunrise Rotary Club meets every Wednesday at 7:30 a.m. at the Hilton Garden Inn at the corner of Summerlin Road and College Parkway. For more information, visit https://www. facebook.com/FMRotarySunrise. John McGowan, Fort Myers Sunrise Rotary past president; Gary Bryant and Gary V. Tripp of Disabled Veterans Insurance Careers Summer Fun For CampersSummer camp at both the Shady Oaks Boys & Girls Club and the Stars Complex guaranteed that over 100 children had an opportunity to be creative. We are happy to be able to provide so many children with unique opportunities to express themselves in a fun and relaxed atmosphere, said Sharon McAllister, ArtFest executive director. It is such a pleasure to experience the no fear attitude of youngsters as they get creative. This is an age where confidence and imagination can spark some colorful and amazing results! Shady Oaks campers signed up for seven action packed weeks that included field trips, indoor and outdoor game time, and art projects to make and take home. Creating huge watercolor flowers, learning how to draw your favorite truck, decorating paper mache boxes and crafting super hero masks are a sampling of the art projects that campers had the opportunity to participate in. Children let their creativity flow during summer camp We Proudly Brew Tropial Outdoor Patio Seating Get Crabby At The Cow Get Crabby At The Cow with our Famous Stone Crabs1/2 lb & Best Prices On The Planet Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Come Try our NEW Cowlicious Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials Sanibels Most Award Winning Restaurant LIVE Famous Stone Crabs Famous Stone Crabs Always Fresh ...Always! ...Always! with our with our Always Fresh ...Always Fun! Always Fresh ...Always Fun!

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THE RIVER S EE P TETE MB ERER 6, 20138 Along TT he RR iverLooking for a great lunch and dinner spot in downtown Fort Myers? Stop at local favorite Ichiban, in the historic Post Office Arcade. The Chinese and Japanese restaurant has been a downtown fixture for more than nine years. Owned by Meng Chong, it has flourished thanks to the loyal customer base that values Ichibans balance of great quality, affordable prices and the friendly service from Chongs family and faithful employees. Some of the restaurants most popular dishes include shrimp with lobster sauce served with fried rice and egg roll, seaweed salad, General Tsos chicken (or tofu for vegetarians) and chicken Chow Mein served with white rice. Ichiban offers a quick combination lunch menu served until 3 p.m. along with an extensive dinner menu that includes Bento boxes served with shrimp and vegetable tempura and Japanese rice. Just need a quick late-night snack? Order the sweet and smoky BBQ Ribs or fried shrimp appetizer, best enjoyed with an ice-cold Kirin Ichiban beer. Ichiban has introduced several great sushi rolls to its menu including the Ichiban Special Roll. It features two tempura shrimps, avocado, cucumber and krab stick topped with cooked, spicy white fish, tempura crunch and eel sauce. It is best enjoyed with warm or cold sake. There are multiple ways to get to Ichiban: enter through the main Post Office Arcade entrance on Broadway, through the lobby of Hotel Indigo on Main Street or from First Street courtyard across from the City of Palms parking garage. Ichiban is located at 1520 Broadway, Fort Myers. Hours are Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 9 p.m. Free delivery is available within the River District with a $10 minimum order. For more information, call 334-6991. On Friday, September 9 from 6 to 10 p.m., meet Austrian artist Andreas Franke at the USS Mohawk Sinking World Project Lift Event during Art Walk at the Hotel Indigo in downtown Fort Myers. Joe Weatherby from Reef Makers will also be on hand to answer questions about the stunning art project that has been accessible only to underwater enthusiasts. The reef is located just off the coast of Sanibel and Captiva. Frankes images were mounted on the 165-foot World War II warship, now a living reef, by local dive enthusiasts. At the end of the underwater exhibition, The Sinking World images will rise to the surface for display at the Lee County Alliance for the Arts galleries in Fort Myers at an opening night reception on October 4. The collection will remain on display until October 26. Hotel Indigo is located at 1520 Broadway, Fort Myers. On Sunday, The Edison Ford Estates presents Inside the Edison Lab/Museum Hands-on Science at 2 p.m. The insider program includes demonstrations with inventions inside the museum with hands-on activities featuring the phonograph, ediphone, movies, making rubber polymer, batteries, the assembly line and other inventive activities. The price is a $10 donation per family for members. For non-members, the price is $30 per adult and $5 for children six to 12 years of age, audio wand included. One adult required for every two children. Participants will receive a 10 percent discount on all invention items, including books, science kits and toys. Groups can register for special times and rates with advance reservation. The Edison Ford Winter Estates is located at 2350 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers. Call 334-7419 or go to www.edisonfordwinterestates.com. Now through September 17 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., the Robert Butler Art Exhibit is on display at the Harborside Event Center in downtown Fort Myers historic River District. His first exhibit in 20 years, Butlers show features previous and recent artwork of Billys Creek by the Florida Highwaymen artist. The Florida Highwaymen are a group of 26 African-American artists who broke convention to paint beautiful iconic landscapes originating in the mid 1950s, an era marked by racism and poverty. These self-taught entrepreneurs mentored each other while they painted on basic materials like Upson board in lieu of canvasses, and used crown molding for more expensive gilded frames. Because local galleries shunned their work, states the Highwaymens website, continued on page 22 Vintage work by Florida Highwaymen artist Robert Butler. See more of his work at Harborside Event Center in downtown Fort Myers. The show is free to the public The River Weekly News staff photographer Michael Heider viewing the artwork of Andreas Franke located on the USS Mohawk Memorial Reef

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9 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 E xposed: Face & Figure E xhibition Opens September 6Come face to face with the human form during the month long invitational exhibition, Exposed: Face & Figure, which opens to the public on Friday, September 6 at the Alliance for the Arts in Fort Myers. Exposed offers viewers a chance to engage provocative depictions created by 32 local and international artists. It opens to the public with a reception on Friday, September 6 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. and remains on display until September 28. Exposed: Face & Figure is sponsored by Suncoast Photo Solutions. The Exposed exhibition features David Acevedo, Cesar Aguilera, Todd Babb, Carol Broman, Andy Browne, Jerry Churchill, Pat Collins, Tracy Cullimore, Geoffrey Hammel, Lily Hatchett, Raymond Hernandez, Doug Heslep, Marcus Jansen, Krista Johnson, Leo Johnson, Jonathan Kane, Bryon Paul McCartney, Kellen Beck Mills, Dale and Jeff Ocasio, Darryl Pottorf, Sherry Rohl, Diana Rutherford, Arturo Samaniego, Ellen Sayet, Jeffrey Scott Lewis, Alicia Schmidt, Carl Schwartz, Ellen Sheppard, Michelle Tricca, Lawrence Voytek, Gordon Warren and Peter Zell. The Alliance fundraiser Take A Nude Home on Saturday, September 21 is tied into the Exposed exhibit. It will feature live music, fine tapas, interactive art installations and a silent auction. Participants will have a chance to take home one of dozens of additional mini nudes created for the event by artists including Darryl Pottorf and Marcus Jansen. Visit www.artinlee.org or call 939-2787 for more information about the exhibition or to purchase tickets to the Take A Nude Home fundraiser. The Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard, just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Consequentially Aloof by Darryl Pottorf Lora-Conte by Alicia Schmidt Defiance by Arturo Samaniego September Workshops And Classes At T he AllianceThe Alliance for the Arts announces its expanded 2013-14 Education Season featuring a wide variety of classes and workshops. Experienced instructors will lead youth and adults as they explore the visual and performing arts with classes on diverse topics including drawing and painting, fused glass, fiber, photography and yoga. And now it is possible to register for all Alliance classes and workshops online at www. ArtInLee.org. Upcoming September classes include Fine Art Acrylics, Painting Studio, Expressive Landscape Painting, Drawing from Observation, Intro to Fused Glass, Batik Workshop, Yoga at Work and DSLR Operation. Young artists can try their hand at Modern Painting, Paper Mache, Mixed Media: Eco Art, The Amazing Science of Art, The School of High Drama, Piano and Guitar. Class descriptions and instructor bios are available on the Alliance website. Consider an Alliance membership to receive 20 percent off all classes, as well as other benefits including exhibition opportunities, and gift shop and ticket discounts. For more infor mation, or to register, visit ArtInLee.org or call 939-2787. The Alliance for the Arts campus and galleries are open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays during GreenMarket, located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Art classes for youth Workshops are offered in various mediums

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Churches/TemplesALL F aA ITHS UNIT aA RI aA N CONGREG aA TION (UU A) Where diversity is treasured 2756 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers Summer program: Understanding the Faiths of Our Worlds June 2 to August 25 11 a.m. Interim Minister, Rev. Margaret Beard, begins on September 1 239-226-0900. www.allfaiths-uc.org A LLLL SS A INTSINTS BYZA NTINENTINE RITERITE CA THOLITHOLI C C HH U RR C HH 10291 Bayshore Rd., N. Fort Myers Divine Liturgy is on Sun. at 10:30 a.m.; Rosary begins at 10 a.m. Lenten services (Presanctied Liturgy) will be on Wed. evenings at 6 p.m. starting on Feb. 22. Administrator is Very Rev. Peter Lickman, ph. 305-651-0991. We are a Church of the Eastern Catholic or Byzantine Rite, 1.5 mi. east of Int. 75. A NNNN U NN C II A TIONTION GREEGREE K ORTHOORTHO D OO X C HH U RR C HH 8210 Cypress Lake Dr ive, Fort Myers Reverend Fr. George P. Savas Orthros Service Sunday 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy Sunday 10 a.m. www.annunciation.fl.goarch.org 239-481-2099 B ETHETH SHILOHSHILOH M ESSIESSI A NINI C SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 15675 McGregor Boulev ard, 437-3171 Rabbi: Judah Hungerman Friday Service, 8 p.m., Saturday Service, 11 a.m. Shabbat School Saturday Morning, Adult Hebrew Classes. Call for information on full program. B RERE AD OO F LILI F EE M INISTRIESINISTRIES C HH U RR C HH OO F GOGO D 16581 McGregor Boule vard, 267-3166 Just past the Tanger Outlet Mall Pastor: Barry Lentz, 281-3063 Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. C HH AB AD LL UB AV ITIT C HHO O F SS W F LORILORI D A ORTHOOR THO D OO X 5620 Winkler Road, F ort Myers Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz 433-7708, E-mail: rabbi@chabadswf.org Web site: www.chabadswf.org Services: Friday 6:30 p.m.; Saturday Kabbalah class 9 a.m.; Shacharit 10 a.m.; Kiddush at noon Minyan: Monday and Thursday 7 a.m. C HH AP ELEL OO F CYP RESSRESS C OO V EE 10200 Cypress Cov e Circle Fort Myers 239-850-3943, Located at Cypress Cove Retirement Center on HealthPark Campus An ecumenical non-denominational community of believers. Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. Reverendt Ted Althouse, Pastor revtedalthouse@aol.com C HH U RR C HH OO F THETHE C ROSSR OSS 13500 Freshman Lane; 768-2188 Pastor: Bud Stephens; A nondemonimational church emphasizing a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Sunday Service: 9:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 Contemporary. CONGREG aA TION aA L CH uU R cC H 1619 Lle wellyn Drive Fort Myers Just off McGregor across from the Edison/ Ford Winter Estates 334-4978 Pastor: Douglas Kelchner Worship times Sundays 9 and 10:30 a.m. Website: www.taecc.com CO vV EN aA NT PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937 Rev. Dr. Jeffrey DeYoe, Senior Pastor Reverend David Dietzel, Pastor Emeritus. Traditional Sunday service 10 a.m. Nursery available C ypYP RESS LakLAK E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H 8400 Cypress Lak e Drive, Fort Myers, 481-5442 Randy A. Alston, Reverend. Sunday Services: Bible study, 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship, 11 a.m., Evening Worship, 7 p.m., Wednesday Prayer Meeting, 6:30 p.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 481-3233. www.clpc.us. Clint Cottrell, pastor Prayer Service 8 a.m., Praise 9 a.m., Childrens Church 9 a.m., Traditional 11 a.m. Summer: Prayer Service 8 a.m. Combined Traditional/Praise 10 a.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E UNITE dD METHO dD IST CH uU R cC H 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 482-1250, 8 and 11 a.m. Sunday Traditional Service 9:30 a.m. Praise Service Sunday School all times F aA ITH FELLO wW SHI pP wW ORL dD O uU TRE acA C H mM INISTRIES 6111 South P ointe Boulevard, Fort Myers, 278-3638. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Voice of Faith, WCRN 13.50 AM Radio, Sunday, 1:30 p.m.; Thursday Service, 7:30 p.m.; Friday Youth Service, 7:30 p.m. Nursery care for pre-school children and Childrens Church for ages 5-12 available at each service. F aA ITH uU NITE dD mM ETHO dD IST cC H uU R cC H 15690 McGregor Boule vard Fort Myers, 482-2030 Pastor: David Stauffer. Traditional services 8:45 a.m.; Contemporary, 10:30 a.m. Go south on McGregor Boulevard. The church is mile past the intersection of Gladiolus and San Carlos Boulevard on the way to Sanibel. FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF cC HRIST S cC IENTIST 2390 West First Street, next door to Edison Estates. Sunday Morning Service and Sunday School, 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday Evening Testimony Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Child care provided at all services. Visit our Reading Room for quiet study at: 2281 First Street, River District. www.time4thinkers.com, www.christiansciencefortmyers.com, www.christianscience.com FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF THE NazaNAZA RENE 13545 Amer ican Colony Boulevard off Daniels Parkway in the Colony, Fort Myers, 936-2511 Pastor: Reverend Joey Brummett Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Family Night, 7 p.m. F IRSTIRST U NITENITE D M ETHOETHO D ISTIST C HH U RR C HH in the Downto wn Fort Myers River District 2466 First Street, Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-332-1152, www.fumcftmyers.org Sunday: 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 5 p.m. Youth Program FORT M yY ERS CHRISTI aA N CH uU R cC H (DIS cC I pP LES O fF CHRIST) A SS TE pP HEN MINISTRIES CONGREG aA TION 5916 Winkler Road, F ort Myers, 437-4330 Reverend Mark Condrey, Pastor Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Church School: 9:15 a.m. FORT M yY ERS CONGREG aA TION aA L UNITE dD CH uU R cC H O fF CHRIST : 8210 College Parkway, Fort Myers, 482-3133. Philip White, pastor Morning Worship: 10 a.m. Church School: 10:15 a.m. Adult Forum: 11:30 a.m. II ON aA HH O pP E EpEP IS cC O paP A L cC ONGREG aA TION 9650 Gladiolus Dr ive, Fort Myers 4544778 The Reverend Dr. John S. Adler, pastor. Weekly services: Saturday 5 p.m., Eucharist with Healing Sunday 8 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite One; 9:30 a.m., Family Eucharist with Healing and Church School Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Morning Prayer (in Spanish); Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Eucharist with Healing. Child care available at Saturday 5 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m. services. JES uU S THE WOR kK ER C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H: 881 Nuna Avenue, Fort Myers, 481-1143 Masses Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. K INGING D OO M LILI F EE C HH U RR C HH 2154 McGregor Boulev ard, Fort Myers, 218-8343 Pastor Randy and Anita Thurman 10:30 a.m. Sunday Service All are welcome. LambLAMB O fF GG O dD LuLU THER aA N/ EpEP IS cC O paP A L CH uU R cC H Corner Cypress View Drive and Koreshan Boulevard, Three Oaks area, Fort Myers, 267-3525 Walter Fohs, pastor; Becky RobbinsPenniman, associate pastor Sunday worship services: 8 a.m. Early Grace Traditional 9 a.m. Awesome Grace Contemporary 10:30 a.m. Classic Grace Traditional 8:45 & 10 a.m. Sunday School Gods Group NN E wW BEGINNINGS CENTER Ne w Home Church, 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, North Fort Myers, 239-656-0416 Weekly Friday Meeting Meet & Greet: 6:30 p.m. Kingdom Teaching: 7 p.m. Fellowship and refreshments after service. nbcministry@embarqmail.com, www.facebook. com/nbcministry. Alex & Patricia Wiggins, Ministers NENE W C OO V ENEN A NTNT EE Y ESES C HH U RR C HH See Clearly Meeting monthly at 9 a.m. at the Elks Lodge. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, Fort Myers, FL 33907. 239-220-8519 Pastor Alan Bondar www.newcovenanteyes.com Wear what you want, rockin music, relevant teaching, LIFT Kidz program, free coffee & donuts, people who are real, church thats actually fun. NN E wW HH O pP E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H O fF FOR T M yY ERS 16120 San Car los Boulevard, Unit 10 239-985-8503 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m Sunday Morning Worship. 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study NN E wW HH O pP E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 3825 McGregor Boule vard. Fort Myers Pastors: Stu Austin and Howard Biddulph 8 & 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11 a.m. Contemporary Worship 8, 9:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School Youth and Childrens programming runs concurrent to Sunday services. Nursery care provided at all services 274-1230. For more information visit: www.newhopefortmyers.org P EE A C EE CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H Meets at F ort Myers Beach Masonic Lodge 17625 Pine Ridge Road, Fort Myers Beach 267-7400. Pastors Bruce Merton, Gail & RC Fleeman Adult Discussion Classes: 9-10 AM Countdown to Worship (praise music): 10:10 AM Amazing Grace Worship: 10:30 AM Phone 267-7400 Fax 267-7407 Web site: peacecommunitychurch.com e-mail: peace1265@aol.com P EE A C EE LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH Sunday Worship at 9:30am. Peace is a member of the ELCA. We celebrate weekly communion with traditional liturgy, organ and choir. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers On the way to Sanibel. 239-437-2599, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@peaceftmyers.com. RE dD EE mM ER L uU THER aA N cC H uU R cC H 3950 Winkler Ext., Fort Myers, 274-0143 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. Sunday Services Daily early learning center/day care RIRI V ERER OO F LILI F EE A SSESSE MB LL Y OO F GOGO D 21580 Riv er Ranch Rd, Estero 239-495-0400, Senior Pastor: Todd Weston 8 and 9:45 a.m Services; 11:30 a.m. Legacy Service, multi-generational S amudAMUD R abadAB AD R aA buddB UDD HIST cC ENTER Meditation classes All are welcome. Guided meditations offering many methods for relaxing the body and focusing the mind on virtuous objects to bring increasing peace and happiness into daily activity. For information, class times and locations call 567-9739 or visit www. MeditationInFortMyers.org. SaSA INT COL umbkUMBK ILLE C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H 12171 Iona Road, F ort Myers, off McGregor and north of Gladiolus. 489-3973 Father Joseph Clifford. Weekly masses: Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. Weekend masses: Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday: 7, 9,11, and 5:30 p.m. Reconciliation is available at the church on Saturdays at noon and by appointment SaSA INT JOHN THE A pP OSTLE METRO pP OLIT aA N CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H 3049 Mcg regor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 344-0012 Pastor Reverend Steve Filizzi An Affirming & Inclusive Congregation Sunday Services, 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Mid-Week Service, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. SS A INTINT M II C HH A ELEL LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH & SS C HOOLHOOL ( LL CM SS ) 3595 Broadw ay, Fort Myers, 239-939-1218, Worship: Saturday 5:30 p.m., Sunday 8 & 10:45 a.m. Bible Study for adults and children Sunday at 9:15 a.m. Phone for other dates & times. Plus Marriage Enrichment, Divorcecare, Griefshare. SaSA INT PETER LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H 3751 Estero Boule vard, Fort Myers Beach, 463-4251. Sunday worship at 9:30 a.m. Womens Bible Study is offered on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 9:30 a.m. www.stpeterfmb.com SaSA INT NN I cC HOL aA S MON aA STER yY Church and Bookstore:111 Everg reen Road (southwest corner of Evergreen Road and Gail Street.) Liturgical services conducted in English and Church Slavonic; following the Julian (Old) Calendar. Liturgical Services: Sundays and Holy Days: Hours at 9:30 a.m. Holy Liturgy at 10 a.m. Call to confirm service schedule: 239-997-2847; Bookstore: 239-691-1775 or visit www.saintnicholasmonastery.org SS T VIN cC ENT DE P auAU L C aA THOLI cC CO mmuMMU NIT yY 13031 Palm Beach Blvd (3 miles east of I75) East Fort Myers (across from Ft Myers Shores) 239 693 0818 Weekday masses: 9 a.m. Tuesday-Friday Weekend masses: 4 p.m. Saturday Sunday 9 & 11 a.m. All Are Welcome! SS O uU TH wW EST bapB AP TIST cC H uU R cC H 16940 McGregor Boule vard, Fort Myers, 454-3336 Robert G. Kasten, Pastor Sunday Worship Service 11 a.m. Nursery available 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Junior Church grades one to five Wee Church Pre-K to K Evening Service 6 p.m. Wednsday Service 6 p.m. TETE MP LELE B ETHELETHEL SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 16225 Winkler Rd. 433-0018. Rabbi Jeremy Barras E-mail: rabbi.barras@templebethel.com Cantorial soloist: Lawrence Dermer Temple educator: Dale Cohen, MaEd, RJE Shabbat Services, Friday, 7:30 p.m. Torah Study, Saturday, 9:15 a.m.continued on page 11THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 201310

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11 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 2013Film Series Opens September 9 At Davis Art CenterThe Fort Myers Film Festivals 4th season of TGIM (Thank God for Indie Mondays) will begin on Monday, September 9 at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center. The community is invited to watch the judging of short indie films submitted to the festival. Every Monday, from September 9 to February 24, those attending will help decide whether or not films make the grade for final programming during the festival, which will be held March 19 to 23. Festival organizers are kicking off the season with a special one-week-only offer: TGIM fans will receive half off their gala ticket for the March 19 opening night. General admission tickets (usually $20), will be $10 and VIP tickets (usually $99), will be $50 for the week of September 10 to 17 only. Log on to Barbara B. Manns website at http:// bbmannpah.com during this week and use the pass code FMFF to get your discount. Regular prices will resume after September 17. There is a special offer to all TGIM attendees for the opening night September 9. Check in for this night only at the Fort Myers Film Festival on Facebook and receive a buy one-get one ticket for the evening. Individual tickets are $6. You can check in at www.facebook.com/fortmyersfilmfestival. The first 20 attendees of TGIM will receive another perk: advance tickets to Ron Howards independent film Rush, which hits the theaters September 27. Advanced tickets are for the September 12 and 17 showings. The first 20 who get tickets to TGIM September 9 will receive an advanced ticket. There will be a season-wide talent competition every Monday night, with competitors vying for a prize to be given to a winner at the TGIMMYs February 24. Bring in your indie film for the All About Closets indie film intermission where you can swap films with other attendees. Beginning September 9, you will get a chance to be a part of the filming of a TV pilot and web series. More information on how to support this project will be announced opening night. Happy hour begins at 6:30 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are $6. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is at 2301 First Street in the downtown Fort Myers River District. For more information go to www. fortmyersfilmfestival.com or join www. facebook.com/fortmyersfilmfestival for updates and events. From page 10Churches/TemplesReligious Education; Sunday School and Midweek classes, Preschool Classes, Monday through Friday Web site: www.templebethel.com Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TEMPLE JUDEA (CONSERVATIVE) 14486 A&W Bulb Road, Fort Myers, 433-0201, Rabbi: Rabbi Elyssa Auster President: Keith Grossman Minyan: Monday & Thursday at 9 a.m. Services: Friday night at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Religious School Sunday morning Web site: www.tjswfl.org Preschool director: JoAnn Goldman email templejudeapreschool@gmail.com 433-0201, Web site: www.tjswfl.org Affiliated: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism THE NEW CHURCH The New Church of SWFL is located 10811 Sunset Plaza Circ. #401, behind Zoomers. Rev. Gabriella Cahaley officiates worship services on Sundays at 11 a.m. during the season. Other worship events are held on the beach in Fort Myers Beach. See our webpage http://www.newchurchflorida.com/ or call for more information 239-481-5535. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH FORT MYERS 13411 Shire Lane (off Daniels Parkway one mile west of I-75) Minister: The Reverend Allison Farnum Sunday services and religious education at 10:30 a.m. For information on all church events call 561-2700 or visit www.uucfm.org. UNITY OF BONITA SPRINGS Family Service 10 to 11 a.m. Healing Circle 11 a.m. Hospitality and Fellowship, 11 a.m. Inspiring lesson, uplifting and dynamic music, meditation in a loving environment. Service held at 28285 Imperial Street, Bonita Springs. Call 947-3100. UNITY OF FORT MYERS 11120 Ranchette Rd., Fort Myers Summer Services: Sundays at 10 a.m. Childrens class at 10 a.m. Reverend Jim Rosemergy, Minister Our God is Love. Our Race is Human. Our Religion is Oneness. www.unityoffortmyers.org or 239-278-1511 WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 9065 Ligon Court, Fort Myers, across from HealthPark Hospital, 481-2125 Senior Pastor: Robert Brunson Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Blended Worship www.westminsterfortmyers.org WORD OF LIFE CHURCH 2120 Collier Ave, Fort Myers, 274-8881; Services: Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. Bishop Gaspar and Michele Anastasi ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH 7401 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, 481-4040, Interim Pastor Jim Eggert Pastor Peter Weeks Sunday Services: 8:30 a.m. Traditional; 10 a.m. Blended Traditional and Contemporary; 11:30 a.m. Contemporary. Childrens Sunday School, Adult /Teen Bible Classes, 10 a.m. rfrntrb nrnrnThe Springs Assisted Living is part of Shell Points Integrated Healthcare System. Shell Point is a non-profit ministry of The Christian and Missionary Alliance Foundation, Inc. Shell Point. All rights reserved. SPG-160-13 rfrntrb rfrntrb nrn System. Shell Point is a non-profit ministry of Shell Point. All rights reserved. SPG-160-13 Navigating the myriad decisions in determining if Assisted Living is right for you or your loved one is just plain difficult. Levels of care. Different facilities. Quality. Affordability. All factors in ensuring an optimized quality of life. If youve got a question or a whole list of them attend a FREE Assisted Living Seminar with our assisted living experts, McKenzie & Vivian on September 20. Theyll give you answers that can assist you in making the most informed decisions possible. While there, we also invite you to tour Shell Points newest assisted living facility, The Springs. Meet with our experts and visit The Springs today! MK M V C M O A L E(r f f n f n t n ) nrrrnnnb nnnrbfntbnt nntrr Navigating the myriad decisions in determining if Assisted Living is (r f f n optimized quality of life. If youve got a question or a whole list of them attend a FREE Assisted Living M O A L Different facilities. Quality. Affordability. All factors in ensuring an optimized quality of life. Different facilities. Quality. Affordability. All factors in ensuring an optimized quality of life. ft ft t n rr rnnnb fttrr

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 201312 ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint Prices ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Your Bottom Your Bottom Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices 1 September Offers Anglers Best Of SWFLby Capt. Matt MitchellLabor Day marks the last busy weekend of the summer on the water for us. Now that its behind us, traffic on the local waterways will slow down drastically until the middle of October. September has always been my favorite month of the year to fish our waters as it offers local anglers the widest verity of the year along with the least boat pressure on the fish. If you like having all the best areas to fish all to yourself, then this is your month too. Most of my last really busy week for a while was spent targeting and catching redfish. With big high tides during the morning hours the bite was very consistent on redfish of all sizes. Some days were better than others, often finding one little mangrove shoreline that was loaded with redfish and catching then just every cast, then other days we had to work harder to catch our reds with only one or two coming out of a spot before we had to move on. There are lots of upper slot-sized fish out there along with many over the 27-inch max. Tail-hooked live pinfish and grunts flipped up under the trees was the bait of choice for these reds. Redfish were caught all over the sound though the majority of the ones I caught came while fishing the southern end, from Regla Island to the mouth of the river and into the very southern end of Matlacha Pass. Action was fast-paced and if you tried fishing a shoreline for more than five minutes without a bite, it was time to move on. Look for our redfishing only to get better and better from now until November. Along with the redfish, many of our mangrove shorelines are also holding some very respectable mangrove snapper up to 15 inches. Smaller free-lined pinfish caught these tasty treats throughout the area. Feeding birds thoughout the southern sound made for fast and furious fishing for anglers who just wanted to stay busy with plenty of action. Schools of hungry jacks, Spanish mackerel and ladyfish are feeding on small white baits and are an easy target for anglers just looking to bend a rod. Small white jigs and livebaits drew strikes every cast. Often these feeding fish would have some larger predators around them with tarpon even popping up in these bait pods during the calmer periods. My opening day of snook season was spent chasing redfish with long-time clients the Jolly family from Lake Placid. Both boys had snook hook-ups but we did not manage to land that keeper snook we were hoping for. Everyone caught redfish over the slot along with a few slotsized reds and one nice big flounder for the dinner table. The amount of boat traffic on the water over the holiday weekend was crazy with boats everywhere. Im very happy to see the holiday over and things getting back to being quiet on the water with very few boats and lots of fish to catch. This month is as good as it gets for anglers, so if you get the chance while things are slow for most people, get out and take advantage of it and bend a rod.Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions email captmattmitchell@aol.com. Send Us Your Fish TalesThe River Weekly would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include photographs with identification. Drop them at the River Weekly, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, Florida 33901, or email to press@riverweekly.com. Hunter Jolly from Lake Placid, Florida, with a 29-inch redfish caught fishing with Capt. Matt Mitchell over the holiday weekendCall for departure time CAPTIVACRUISES H T H E I S L A N D S H THE BEST WAY TO SEE THE ISLANDS IS FROM THE WATER Cruises depart from beautiful Captiva Island

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13 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 CROW Case Of The Week: Wildlife Daycareby Patricia MolloyStudents and a limited number of volunteers are working around the clock to feed the youngsters currently in the nurseries at CROW. It is critical that babies are fed every two hours. By the time volunteers finish a round of feedings, its time to start all over again. Right now, the raccoon (Procyon lotor) room contains a staggering 32 little bandits that chatter day and night. They are generally orphaned and are tube fed and/or bottle fed a milk supplement until they transition to solid food. The baby squirrel room, which also contains birds, is full of incubators to keep the youngsters warm and comfortable. Once the healthy squirrels are weened and can eat soaked monkey biscuits, vegetables and fruit, they will be transferred outside. CROW hopes to release them within three months of their arrivals. Sadly, baby animals are brought to the wildlife hospital by well-meaning citizens after discovering what they believe to be an abandoned nest. While it is easy to understand the desire to help a seemingly defenseless little creature, resist the urge. Instead of scooping-up a wild bird or mammal and rushing it to the clinic, stop and observe. As Dr. Heather noted, it is very likely that its mother is nearby and will return within 24 hours. If you find a baby that is in immanent danger of a predator attack while waiting for its mom to return, it may be acceptable to intervene. CROW suggests placing the little one in a faux nest (cardboard box or pet carrier), making sure that it is well ventilated, and attaching it to a nearby tree. If you have questions, contact the clinics call center and speak with one of its knowledgeable staff members, such as Gareth Johnson, a first responder in patient admissions. As skilled as the wildlife rehabilitators at CROW are, nothing can replace moms tender loving care. Use common sense before breaking up a happy, healthy home. If you love the islands diverse and exotic wildlife, please donate your time during this critical period. Four-hour shifts are available and training is provided. For more information, call the volunteer coordinator at 472-3644 ext. 229 or go to CROWs website to download an application. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to P.O. Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit www.crowclinic.org. There are so many babies at CROW that the staff uses creative tactics, like placing a small dot of liquid paper on the head of this raccoon, to identify individuals Distinctl norris.com furniture that appeals to your heart... Sanibel 1025 Perwinkle Way Mon Sat. 10 5Evenings & Sundays by appointment 579.0412 Naples & Fort MyeLIMITED T IME SAVINGS ON SEL ECT I TEMS! $1199 $ $ 1199 1199 COMPLETE CONDO PACKAGES STARTING AT

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 201314 Plant SmartShrubby False Buttonweedby Gerri R eavesShrubby false buttonweed (Spermacoce verticillata) is a member of the madder family, the same family as the native buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis). A native of the West Indies and Central and South America, the wildflower was first documented in Florida in the 1960s. Other common names include white-head broom and botn blanco, which means white button in Spanish. This tough perennial blooms all year long in South Florida. Commonly found along roadsides, in fields and disturbed sites, it grows eight to 16 inches high. Round flower clusters measure less than an inch across and are composed of very tiny four-petalled white flowers. The clusters appear at the ends of the stems and at nodes along the stalk. The clusters encircle the stem and appear at the leaf axils of the smaller (upper) pair of leaves. The effect resembles pom-poms on a stalk. The plant is naturalized in Florida, successfully self-cultivating in the wild. Fortunately, it is not invasive, nor is it toxic. And, despite its non-native status, it is beneficial, so think twice before pulling this weed or spraying it with herbicide. The flowers attract a variety of insects that feed on the plants nectar. In fact, scientists actually encourage the public to cultivate this wildflower and have given it another common name, southern lar raflower. Why? Shrubby false buttonweed is one of two wildflowers that feed the short-tongued Larra bicolor wasps, which are generally non-aggressive but do attack the mole cricket, a pest that causes damage to turf grass. In the late 1980s, the University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences imported the wasp from Bolivia. The institutes Mole Cricket Research Program released them in Alachua County, hoping they would spread to other counties and states to provide free biological control of mole crickets. The program has had some success. Maintaining non-native turf grass in South Florida exacts costs in money, time, and effort. For homeowners devoted to high-maintenance turf grass and reluctant to convert to low-maintenance groundcovers, its useful to know that a volunteer wildflower can help control pests and minimize pesticide application. Shrubby false buttonweed has medicinal uses too, including the treatment of skin conditions and diarrhea, and as a diuretic. Sources: Wildflowers of Florida by Jaret C. Daniels and Stan Tekiela, Everglades Wildflowers by Roger L. Hammer, plantbook.org, entnemdept.ufl. edu, issg.org, and ifas.ufl.edu. Plant Smart explores sustainable gar dening practices that will help you create an environmentally responsible, lowmaintenance South Florida landscape. Shrubby false buttonweed is common throughout most of the state photos by Gerri Reaves The spherical flowers appear at the ends of the stems and at nodes along the stems Caring For Your PlantsNo I rrigation? No ProblemBy Justen DobbsThere are many homes in Southwest Florida that have never had any irrigation installed. Rather than pay for a sprinkler company to come install an irrigation system, which will cost thousands of dollars, there are other options you can explore. Now, the most common solution for a zeroirrigation yard is to plant all native. This is not absolutely necessary! Did you know that our average annual rainfall is about 55 inches? The only cities in the continental U.S. that get more annual rainfall than Fort Myers are Miami, New Orleans and Mobile, Alabama. What does this mean for us? Our relatively high rainfall allows us to grow many more types of plants and trees that can simply live off our rain and not just native species. There are lots of plants and trees that grow naturally in Subtropical and Mediterranean climates around that world that happen to grow equally as well here. I prefer to stay away from using too much grass (even if its native grass) because although it can survive yearround here, it tends to get yellow or brown during our driest winter monthsMarch and April. So, better alternatives to a landscape full of grass include using rock, vine, mulch or sand. Less grass means less use of water, fertilizer, trimming and pest control. You can expect all Florida native plants and trees to survive our driest months and look good most of the year, but the problem is, many of our native plants and trees are simply green or brown. This makes for a very dull landscape in my opinion. So, here are some non-native plants and trees that thrive here year-round and dont require any irrigation or fertilizer: 1. Bromeliads tropical air plants from South America 2. Crotons tropical plants from Indonesia with year-round color 3. Bismark palms silver leaved palms from Madagascar 4. Date palms from the Middle East and Asia 5. Agave succulents from the Americas 6. Cycads all of them are good except for Sago palms 7. Chinese fan palms can be planted singularly or in clusters 8. Areca palms make good hedges and are low-maintenance 9. Variegated vine a pretty, easy-togrow groundcover The plants in the list above are just a small fraction of what we have at our disposal in Southwest Florida with regard to good landscape plants. What constitutes a good landscape plant? Again, they all have the same basic traits in common (once theyve established a good root system): drought-tolerant, cold-tolerant, no fertilizer regiments, and very little trimming or maintenance. Plants to avoid due to cold-sensitivity and high maintenance: Christmas Palms, fountain grass, sensivaria, Mexican petuna, ixora, Indian hawthorne, seagrape, Bahia grass, and gold Malayan coconut palms. Dobbs is a landscape architect in south Florida specializing in custom, upscale landscapes. He can be reached at seabreezenurseries@gmail.com. A landscape without irrigation can be colorful and exotic if done correctly A native landscape can survive without irrigation, but lacks color and extravagance

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15 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 2013An Audubon Florida Special PlaceCorkscrew Swamp Sanctuarysubmitted by Allyson WebbThe term sanctuary was originally used to reference buildings set apart for worship, but through time, the word has come to encompass places of safety, protection and peace. It is this third word, peace, that springs to mind when I think of Audubons Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary. A sense of calm infused me the first time I walked around the 2.25-mile-long boardwalk through the wondrous variety of habitats. But it was when I reached the magnificent old growth bald cypress that I felt... FOUND. It was then that I knew I would strive to maintain this wondrous place, first as a volunteer and now as a resource manager. During the 1940s into the 1950s, old growth bald cypress forests were being logged at an alarming rate, largely to help Europe rebuild after World War II. These behemoth trees, relatives of the famous redwoods, can grow to heights of 100 to 150 feet and gain diameters of six feet! Some of the trees that can be seen from the boardwalk are 500 years old. National Audubon was already protecting birds that roosted in Corkscrew Swamp including wood storks, great egrets and other wading birds. Locals afraid of losing this natural heritage started a campaign to save the swamp. Working with National Audubon Society and other organizations, the swamp was saved. Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary became a reality in 1954. Initially, this treasure spanned over 5,680 acres, including the largest stand of virgin bald cypress forest at about 700 acres. Today, Corkscrew has grown to include approximately 13,000 acres at the heart of the Corkscrew Watershed. Wetlands are the lifeblood of Southwest Florida, and the protection Corkscrew gives allows our aquifers to recharge for clean drinking water, offers surrounding areas natural flood protection, and purifies the waters. All of these things are essential to people and animals in the area. The neighborhood around the swamp has seen many changes through the years. Roads have been built; wetlands were drained and turned into developments. Human encroachment on our natural areas continues. But Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary stands amidst this development as an island oasis not only for native plants and animals but for the people of our community. It does not, however, stand apart. Aldo Leopold once wrote: Conservation is a state of harmony between men and land. By land is meant all of the things on, over, or in the earth. Harmony with land is like harmony with a friend; you cannot cherish his right hand and chop off his left. That is to say, you cannot love game and hate predators; you cannot conserve the waters and waste the ranges; you cannot build the forest and mine the farm. The land is one organism. Its parts, like our own parts, compete with each other and co-operate with each other. The competitions are as much a part of the inner workings as the co-operations. You can regulate them cautiously but not abolish them. Through community interaction and education, Corkscrew works with people to conserve our natural heritage for all. Initially, I sought a place to bury my sorrows and grief as my mother fought cancer, but instead I found a place of renewal, healing, peace and the daily celebration of life a true sanctuary. This column is one of a series from AUDUBON FLORIDA. Allyson L. Webb is a resource manager for Audubon Florida. For more information about the Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary, visit corkscrew.audubon.org. For more about AUDUBON FLORIDA and its Special Places program, visit www.FloridasSpecialPlaces.org. All rights reserved by Florida Audubon Society Inc. Big Cypress fox squirrel Barred owl chick Alligator in the middle of foraging wood storks Sunrise over Corkscrews Panther Island 481-4733 12600 McGregor Blvd, Ft Myers www.scubavicedivers.com Swim with the Fishes BOAT RENTALS 472-5800

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Alliance Launches Monthly Member Gallery Book ClubThe Alliance for the Arts is launching a members only Gallery Book Club featur ing art related titles on Tuesday, September 17. Join fellow Alliance members to explore literature revolving around art, artists, art history and art appreciation. Join in thoughtful group discussions and expand your appreciation and knowledge of the art world. The group will meet from 7 to 9 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month. Club members are responsible for purchasing their own copy of each months selection. Discussion guides will be available for download at artinlee. org beginning on September 1. Pre-registration is encouraged. The first title, a favorite of many art book clubs, is Provenance: How a Con Man and a Forger Rewrote the History of Modern Art by Laney Salisbury and Aly Sujo. This astonishing narrative of one of the most far-reaching and elaborate cons in the history of art forgery tells the story of the infamous con man John Drewe and his accomplice, the affable artist John Myatt. The duo exploited the archives of British art institutions to irrevocably legitimize the hundreds of pieces they forged, many of which are still considered genuine and hang in prominent museums and private collections today. Emile Zolas The Masterpiece is the October title and Clara and Mr. Tiffany by Susan Vreeland is in November. Alliance memberships covering individuals are $50 per year and the whole family can join for just $75 per year. Membership benefits also include 20 percent discounts on all classes and workshops, a wide variety of free class Try It sessions, discounts on theatre tickets and youth camps, special exhibition opportunities and the satisfaction of knowing youre supporting a strong and growing community of artists and art enthusiasts here in southwest Florida. Visit www.artinlee.org or call 939-2787 to become a member today. THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 201316 V ocalists To P erform At Art Walk On Friday, September 6, Young Artists Awards vocalists Carley Levy and Hannah Steele will be performing at Ocasiocasa Studio Gallery from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in conjunction with September Art Walk in downtown Fort Myers. Levy is a student at Fort Myers High School and Steele is a freshman attending North Fort Myers High. The Young Artists Awards, in its 11th year of programming, is a not-for-profit education, performance, audition and scholarship program for students from throughout Southwest Florida. The organization is also a monthly partner with Art Walk. Ocasiocasa Studio Gallery is located at 1540 Broadway in the downtown Fort Myers River District. The performance is free and open to the public. For more information on the Young Artists Awards, visit www.youngartistsawards.org or Young Artists Awards on Facebook. Carley Levy Hannah Steele From page 1Afternoon BluegrassTickets are $7 at the door or $5 for Alliance members. Seating is open and first come, first serve. Children 12 and under are free if accompanied by an adult. Doors open at 1:30 p.m. Visit www.artinlee.org or call 939-2787 for more information. The Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard, just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Bill Metts Selecting T he P erfect P ot For Your BonsaiSelecting appropriate pots for your bonsai trees to enhance their presentation will be the program for the Saturday, September 21 meeting of the Bonsai Society of Southwest Florida. Mike Knowlton, a member of the Society and President of Bonsai Societies of Florida, will be the featured speaker. The meeting, which begins at 9 a.m., will be held at the SPALC Building, 6281 Metro Plantation Drive in Fort Myers. The public is invited to attend and experienced members will be available to answer questions about bonsai trees brought to the meeting. There is no fee to attend. The Bonsai Society of Southwest Florida, incorporated in 1973, will hold its annual Bonsai Show at the Lee Election Center in Fort Myers on November 16 and 17. The public is invited to attend; parking and admission are free. Additional information about the Bonsai Society and the upcoming show are available at www.bonsaiswfl.org or by calling Jim Bremer at 482-7543. Call For ArtistsArtists are invited to submit work for display and sale for the Inspired Artworks Exhibition, planned for November 7 to 13 in Naples. The annual juried exhibit is part of the 4th annual Storytellers Creative Arts Conference, held to inspire creativity in art, music, performance, film, writing and media. The exhibition will be on public display in the lobby of Covenant Church of Naples PCA, located at 6926 Trail Boulevard, across from Pelican Bay in Naples. Sunday, September 29 is the deadline for artists to submit photos of their work online at www.storytellerscreativearts. com. The $25 entry fee covers three pieces, which may include framed illustrations, abstracts, photos and representational and graphic works, sculptures or crafts. Curators Mary Lee Gutwein and Susan L. Conner will lead the review committee to select pieces for exhibition, based on the Inspired Artworks theme and Psalm 19:1, The heavens declare the glory of God and the sky above proclaims His handiwork. Gutwein is an author and illustrator, and Conner is a photographer and publisher. Exhibition jurors also include painter and watercolor artist Emily James, pastel artist and silversmith Cheri Dunnigan, photographer Hans Schmidt, portraiture artist Frances Golden Bussing and painter Marty Keddie. This exhibition provides both an entry point for young artists to present their best work in a curated setting and a dynamic venue for experienced artists, said event organizer Bill Barnett. We are soliciting works that reflect beauty, inspiration, originality and creativity. The exhibition will benefit, in part, the Center for the Arts of Bonita Springs scholarships for at-risk youth. The Storytellers Creative Arts Conference, scheduled for November 7 to 9, provides emerging and professional artists, as well as people with a passion for the arts, to connect, share ideas and build mentor relationships. Literary, visual and performing arts leaders will gather to share their expertise for using creativity to positively impact culture. The conference includes performances, keynote speakers, workshops and small group sessions plus an evening of talent, food, film and networking. Early registration is $79 per person; group and student discounts are available. The conference is sponsored by Storytellers Creative Arts, Inc., founded in 2010 to inspire and develop creative people to use their artistic gifts to influence culture. Learn more at www.storyteller screativearts.com, call 250-1822 or email artexpo@storytellerscreativearts.com.

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17 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 B roadway Star Added T o BIG ARTS Season LineupBIG ARTS announced that Broadway sensation Susan Egan has joined its 2013-2014 season of stars. Nominated for Tony and Drama Desk awards for her performance as the original Belle in Beauty and the Beast, Egan is scheduled to perform her Belle of Broadway concert at 8 p.m. on Saturday, February 1. The critically acclaimed singer/actress has also played Millie in Thoroughly Modern Millie, Sally Bowles in Cabaret and as the original Leonide in Triumph of Love, and she has recorded more than 40 songs on six solo CDs, including The Secret of Happiness. Egans screen credits include the popular Jennifer Garner film 13 Going on 30 and guest starring roles on the hit television series, House, Numb3rs and Arli$$. A feel-good show for the entire family, The Belle of Broadway concert features classic songs by Cole Porter, George and Ira Gershwin, and Rodgers and Hammerstein. The concert will be held at BIG ARTS Schein Performance Hall. Tickets are $47 for loge seats, $42 for general seating and $5 for students with a valid student ID or children 17 and under when accompanied by a paying adult. The Susan Egan concert is eligible for a variety of new discount ticket offers cur rently available for series sampler subscriptions, special packages and individual tickets. Season tickets are on sale now and can be purchased online at www.BIGARTS.org, by calling BIG ARTS Marks Box Office at 395-0900 or Herb Strauss Theater Box Office at 472-6862 and in person at BIG ARTS, 900 Dunlop Road. The 2013-2014 season of events at BIG ARTS Schein Performance Hall, Founders Gallery, Phillips Gallery and Herb Strauss Theater includes wide-ranging programming that covers more than 250 performances of theater, dance, music of all kinds, educational lectures, film series and productions for young people. Celebrating its 35th anniversary, BIG ARTS continues its commitment to producing and presenting the best of national and international arts to residents and visitors of Sanibel, Captiva and surrounding Southwest Florida regions. From page 3Estates September Programsabout Edisons work with electricity through light bulb demonstrations and static electricity. Admission is free. the Edison and Ford families collected handmade quilts, embroidered linens and other Southwest Embroidery Guild meet monthly at Edison Ford to demonstrate their work and answer questions. In the warmer months, the members meet inside the Edison Caretakers House and in the more temperate months, activity moves outdoors to the porches of the historic homes. The demonstration is included in Edison Ford Complete Tour admission and is free to members. Items will be available for purchase. Wild Wizard returns with a new series of engineering and science hands-on classes that will engage students, as well as new hands-on history classes with Professor Pearce. All Edison Ford homeschool classes are based on Florida Next Generation Sunshine State Standards as well as Florida Common Core Science Standards. For a list of topics and dates, visit the website at www.edisonfordwinterestates.org or call 334-7419. Cost for members is $10; non-members are $20; $10 for each additional child. Learning Program classes for oneto three-year-old children and their parents, grandparents and other family members will begin in October and will be held on the first The program includes socializing, educational activities, story time, singing, crafts and exploring the homes, gardens and museum at the Edison Ford Winter Estates. Each session will introduce science through activities and time to tend the Emerging Registration is required by calling 334-7419. McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information, call 334-7419 or visit the website at www.edisonfordwinterestates.org. Susan Egan photo by Javier Nadal B roadway P alm Open AuditionsBroadway Palm is holding open auditions for adults and children for numerous productions in their upcoming 21st season on Saturday, September 14. Ages 7 to 17 will audition at 10 a.m. Ages 18 and up will audition at 1 p.m. Auditions are on a first-come, first-served basis. A sign-up sheet will be available at 9 a.m. for ages 7 to 17 and at noon for ages 18 and up. No appointments will be taken. The following are the productions and Swingin Christmas, plays November 28 to December 25. 1. Small Boy to play Mr. and Mrs. Clauses grandson. Must sing well. 2. Small Girl to play Mr. and Mrs. Clauses granddaughter. Must sing well. South Pacific, plays December 28 to February 15. 1. Small Boy to play the role of Jerome. Looking for Asian, African American or Hispanic ethnicities. Must sing well. 2. Small Girl to play the role of Ngana. Looking for Asian, African American or Hispanic ethnicities. Must sing well. Les Miserables, plays February 20 to April 12. 1. Gavroche, boy, strong singer age 9 to 12. 2. Cosette, girl, strong singer age 7 to 9. The Music Man, plays April 17 to May 24. 1. Boys and Girls of River City, ages 7 to 17. Must sing well. The following are the productions and roles that are available for ages 18 and South Pacific, plays December 28 to February 15. 1. Ensemble Seabees and Nurses. Les Miserables, plays February 20 April 21. 1. All Roles The Music Man, plays April 17 to May 24. 1. *All Roles *This show travels to Dutch Apple in Pennsylvania June 12 to August 9, so all adults must be available for that production as well. Mid-Life The Crisis Musical, plays May 29 to June 21. 1. Three Men and Three Women. Age 40-plus. Must sing well. Also casting for The Off Broadway Nanas Naughty Knickers, plays Dixie Swim Club, plays March 20 to 1. Male and Female actors. Ages 25 to 60. Please have a comic monologue prepared for your audition. Anyone interested in auditioning should bring a current headshot and resume and be prepared to sing 16 bars in the proper key that best shows off your vocal range. Please bring sheet music in the proper key, an accompanist will be After the vocal audition actors/actresses may be asked to attend a dance and/or reading audition after the singing audition. Please allow yourself enough time to be seen and possibly be called back to read and/or dance. Broadway Palm and The Off Broadway Palm are professional theatres. Productions require a two-week rehearsal process with rehearsals daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tech rehearsals are the three days prior to the opening date with selected hours between 1 and 11 p.m. Anyone interested must be available for the two-week rehearsal process and all performances. Performances are Tuesday through Sunday Evenings with selected matinees on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday or Sunday. We will do our best to work around school hours for children. All childrens roles are double cast and will alternate performances. Performance schedules are available at www.BroadwayPalm.com. Auditions will be held on Saturday, September 14 at Broadway Palm, 1380 Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. For more information, visit www. BroadwayPalm.com. From page 1Miss Julieis dedicated to bringing new and magical performances to Fort Myers and beyond. Tickets are $10 each, and are available through the Sidney & Berne Davis Arts Center ticket office or online at www.sbdac.com. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in downtown Fort Myers.

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 201318 Calendar Girls 2014 CalendarsThe Calendar Girls 2014 calendars go on sale September 1 for $5. The entire calendar was shot in the Historic River District of Fort Myers by photographer Crae Clements, and the proceeds will go the Paws for Patriots Program of Southeastern Guide Dogs located in Florida. Since 2006, the Calendar Girls have been supporting Paws for Patriots and have sponsored 11 puppies. The program identifies blinded and wounded soldiers from all wars and gives them a guide dog or a veteran assistant dog at no charge. The Calendar Girls would like to thank the Southwest Florida community for its generosity and support in helping change the lives of veterans. To purchase a calendar, call 850-6010. photo by Crae Clements September P rograms At NFM P ublic LibraryNext months roster of activities at North Fort Myers Public Library offers topics for all ages. The following activities are free to the public: ADULTS Buddhism for Dummies 2 p.m. Saturday, September 7 One premise of Buddhism is to help people find happiness in their lives. Meet a Buddhist nun who will happily answer the many questions about Buddhism such as: Is Buddha a God? Why do they shave their heads? Enjoy live music at this tongue-in-cheek presentation. Books n Bites 10:30 a.m. Monday, September 9 Discuss any books in any format, or movies of interest. Whether given a rant or a rave it will be fun to talk about. We provide the coffee and refreshments, you provide your enthusiasm. Registration is required. Book Discussion: Last Train To Paradise by Les Standiford 2 p.m. Thursday, September 19 Les Standifords Last Train To Paradise details the spectacular creation of the railroad that crossed an ocean From the incredible construction of the Key West Railroad to the disastrous conclusion when the railroad meets The Storm of the Century. Small Business Series: Understanding Financial Statements 2 p.m. Monday, September 23 This program is geared toward current small businesses. Learn more about the Profit & Loss Statement, Balance Sheet, Cash Flow, Breakeven, Forecasting and how to use them. Registration is required. FAMILY Family Storytime 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays, September 11, 18 and 25 This program is for the whole family and lasts about 30 minutes. Registration is required. Baby-Parent Rhyme Time 11 a.m. Thursday, September 5 Be prepared to tickle, jump and fly with your baby! These rhymes and songs are for infants, up to 24 months, accompanied by an adult. This 20-minute program is filled with songs designed to introduce rhyming and movement to infants. Registration is required. CHILDREN Library Scavenger Hunt September 30 Available during normal library oper ating hours: Monday, Wednesday and Friday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Tuesday: Noon to 8 p.m.; Friday, Saturday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Learn to find materials at the library and earn a free book with a fun, interactive scavenger hunt. Ask for a participation form at the library in September. For grades K to 5. Kids Read Down Fines 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday, September 14 Children and teens can earn a $2 coupon for every 15 minutes of reading, during the allotted time. A total of $8 per day may be earned. For ages 18 and younger. Credit may be applied to cards issued to patrons age 18 and under only. READ to Dogs 11 a.m. Saturday, September 28 Independent readers can practice reading in a fun way. A Reading Education Assistance Dog will be on hand to listen to you read. Theyre great listeners! For grades K and up. TEENS Playstation 3 Games for Teens 2 p.m. Thursday, September 5 Stop in and enjoy Playstation 3s Ultimate Sports Challenge. Bring a friend or meet new ones. Middle and high school students are welcome. Kids Read Down Fines 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday, September 14 Children and teens can earn a $2 coupon for every 15 minutes of reading, during the allotted time. A total of $8 per day may be earned. For ages 18 and younger. Credit may be applied to cards issued to patrons age 18 and under only. The North Fort Myers Public Library is located at 2001 N. Tamiami Trail NE in North Fort Myers. For more information about a program or to register, call the library at 533-4320. A sign language interpreter is available with five business days notice to library staff. Assistive listening system available; request at desk. Check the Lee County Library Systems website at www.leelibrary.net to find out about programs at other locations. Call the host library, or Telephone Reference at 479-INFO (4636), for more information about a specific program. JACARANDAThe Entertainment Nightly in Sanibels Social Scene1223 PERIWINKLE WAY, SANIBEL 472-1771 Happy Apps $5.95Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna, Crispy Fried Calamari, Chilled Oysters, Steamed Shrimp, BBQ Beef Satays, Mussels Marinara, Chicken WingsSanibels Best HAPPY HOUR5 7 p.m. Nightly in the lounge1/2 Price DrinksCall & Well Liquor, Draft Beer Selections, Select House Wine

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19 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 2013E xhibit Surfaces At T he Alliance For T he ArtsSince June, 12 large surreal images encased in steel-framed Plexiglas have been attached to a World War II era U.S. Coast Guard Cutter sunk off the coast of Sanibel. The Mohawk was scuttled there in 2012 to serve as an artificial reef, beneficial to sea life and attractive to divers. This temporary art gallery, created by Austrian photographer Andreas Franke, features photographs he took of the sunken ship, combined with images of actors dressed in 1940s costumes. The Sinking World exhibition has only been available to divers, but that will change on Friday, October 4 when it will be unveiled at the Alliance for the Arts in Fort Myers during an opening reception from 5 to 7:30 p.m. This is Frankes second such exhibition in the United States. He also created images for the 1950s era USS Vandenberg about a mile offshore from Key West. He will be on hand at the opening reception, and will host a Gallery Walk on Saturday, October 5 at 10 a.m., during which hell answer questions about his process and inspiration. The Sinking World exhibition is on display in the Main Gallery from October 4 through October 28. Artwork by Beverly Taht is featured in the Member Gallery. Visit ArtInLee.org or call 939-2787 for more information, or to become an Alliance member. The Alliance for the Arts galleries are open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays during GreenMarket. The Alliance is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. The Mohawk, teeming with sealife and art Frankes works depict the 1940s-era Divers viewing the works

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 201320 B roadway P alm Opens Season With T imeless M usic Of B urt B acharachBroadway Palm opened its 21st season with Burt & Me, playing through October 5. This romantic, musical comedy features the incredible music of the legendary duo, Burt Bacharach and Hal David. Burt & Me features 20 of the most popular Bacharach/David songs. Burt & Me tells the story of high school sweethearts, Joe and Lacey, who met over their love of basketball and the music of Burt Bacharach. After separating in college, their paths cross several years later and Joe tries to rekindle their romance with the help of Burt Bacharach. Along with the charming and funny story, youll hear such classics as Do You Know The Way To San Jose, This Guys In Love With You, The Look of Love, Always Something There To Remind Me, A House Is Not A Home, Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head, Ill Never Fall In Love Again and Close To You The stellar cast includes many returning cast members from Broadway Palms recent hit Shrek The Musical. Kate Marshall, who played Princess Fiona, will be playing the role of Lacey Turner and audience favorite John Ramsey, who played one of the Three Little Pigs, will be playing the role of Joe Madson. Also appearing in Burt & Me will be Chuck Caruso (Shrek in Shrek), Rendell Debose (Donkey in Shrek), Sheira Feurstein (Gingy in Shrek), Sami Doherty (Ugly Duckling in Shrek) and making his Broadway Palm debut, Taylor Murphy Hale. Performances are Wednesday through Sunday evenings with selected matinees. Broadway Palm is offering a Season Opener Special and all tickets are just $45 for dinner and the show. If you purchase four or more tickets, youll also receive a house appetizer and a cocktail in a souvenir glass (valid through September 8). Tickets are now on sale and can be reserved by calling 278-4422, by visiting www. BroadwayPalm.com or by stopping by the box office at 1380 Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Joe and Lacey meet in Burt & Me One of the musical numbers during Burt & Me features a high school scene Joe and Lacey reconnect later in life Networking E vent At T he Davis The next Connect Networking event at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center will be on Thursday, September 12, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. This months guest speaker is Amy Emme, a performance hypnocoach and director of the AHA Center of Cape Coral. The topic is On Target for Life. Connect Networking is open to everyone and is an encouraging and positive group where people can get to know each other, expand business and personal relationships, and connect in their community. Emmes sole mission in life is to bring out the best in every person she meets. She is a fully certified and qualified hypnocoach of the National Guild of Hypnotists and a member of the International Hypnosis Federation. She is also an avid athlete. Her love of archery helped her become an expert archer, and she grew the small town archery business she started into the largest archery training center in the world. Over the years, Emme has coached and prepared numerous U.S. athletes for the Olympics, supporting each high performance athlete through intensive twoto three-year performance hypnosis training programs. Emme decided to offer her wealth of skills, experience and passion to enhancing the performance and success of amateurs seeking to become professional in any field, regardless of their backgrounds. She is dedicated to helping her clients achieve their full potential and live the life of their dreams. Past topics at Connect Networking Thursdays have included: What are you excited in life about? What are you thankful for? What do you love in life? What is your dream? For the love of business, Reach for your goals and never give up! Finding success in being grounded, Be the best You that you can be, The Power of Focus, and The Art of Positivity. Connect events take place the second Thursday of every month at the Davis Art Center, 2301 First Street in the downtown Fort Myers River District. Admission is $6. Networking promo table space is available for $25. For more information, contact Melissa DeHaven at Melissa.sbdac@gmail.com. Amy Emme Davis Art Center September CalendarUpcoming calendar of events at the Sidney and Berne Davis Art Center, located at 2301 First Street in downtown Fort Myers, includes: Friday, September 6 Art Walk: 5 Years of Celebrating the Arts at SBDAC. A retrospective of the many artists who have exhibited at the Davis over the years. 6 to 10 p.m. Free. Wednesday, September 11 through Sunday, September 15 Miss Julie, a Ghostbird Theatre play. Doors open at 7 p.m.; performances at 8 p.m. All tickets $10. Thursday, September 12 Connect Networking Mixer. Expand your business and personal relationships. Get to know each other and connect in your community. Raffle prizes, music and mingling. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. All tickets $6. Friday, September 20 No Music Walk at SBDAC (Private Event) Thursday, September 26 Art & Poetry Networking Mixer. 8 to 11 p.m. All tickets $10. Every Monday, the SBDAC hosts the Fort Myers Film Festivals TGIM Intellectualization. Come watch and discuss short films that are in consideration for the Fort Myers Film Festival. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.; films start at 7 p.m. Admission is $6. ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President General Manager Personal Lines Agent 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Paradise. Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. We are HERE for all your insurance needs To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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21 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 Lee County Sports Development Scores Record Results With Spring And Early Summer Amateur Sports EventsDespite near-record rainfall, the Lee County Sports Development Office experienced historic economic results through amateur sporting events held in Lee Countys five county-owned complexes during April, May and June 2013. The 30 amateur sports events held in Lee County during this three-month period brought in 34,904 room nights sold with a direct economic impact totaling more than $13.3 million. Sporting events are a key driver for tourism in Lee County during the off-season months when it can be more challenging to draw northerners to Southwest Florida, said Tamara Pigott, executive director, Lee County Visitors & Convention Bureau. While theyre in Lee County, the athletes, coaches and families fill our hotel rooms, eat in local restaurants, visit our attractions and shop in our stores, all the while helping ensure that the 52,000 people who are employed locally in the tourism industry have jobs during these slower months. The exposure to our region also encourages repeat visitation among travelers who might not otherwise have given us a try. During the month of April, sporting events such as the National College Roller Hockey Championships held at the Fort Myers Skatium helped fill 7,252 hotel room nights and generate more than $3.3 million in direct economic impact. With the return of the popular Perfect Game Memorial Day Classic and non-traditional, amateur sports events, May was an historic month generating 16,132 room nights sold and a direct economic impact of more than $5.4 million. And in June, amateur sports generated 11,521 room nights sold and direct economic impact of $4.5 million. In addition to events held during spring and early summer, July was also a successful month for sports tourism. Julys Perfect Game World Series has grown to the point of expansion into Charlotte County, as we exhausted use of every Lee County facility, said Jeff Mielke, executive director, Lee County Sports Development. Roller hockey in Fort Myers and the state BMX championships in Cape Coral are also among the growing non-traditional sports activities that drew visitors to Lee County this summer, and helped contribute to the economic impact that we experienced during these wet and traditionally slower months for tourism and spending. Also in July, more than 300 youth soccer players with Futbol Club Barcelona youth program, their coaches and families converged on JetBlue Park. This is the first year the club, among the highest profile soccer groups worldwide, has staged a camp in Fort Myers. Other non-traditional sports events held this year included the National High School Gymnastics Associations Girls National Championships at the Estero Recreation Center, USA Badminton Masters Championships at the Estero Recreation Center and the Florida Firefighter Games at multiple locations locally. Operated by Lee County Parks and Recreation, Lee Countys five county-owned baseball complexes play host to more than 200 days of amateur baseball tournaments a year when they arent being used for spring training games. The estimated economic impact of these events is $50 million annually. For more information, call 344-5201or visit www.leeparks.org. Pre-Season Predictions For The Red Sox And Twins Prove Half Rightby Ed FrankWe dug back into the papers archives for the April 5 edition which was just a few days after the Boston Red Sox and the Minnesota Twins had departed here following spring training. We reported in that edition that the baseball experts predicted last-place finishes for both teams predictions by Sports Illustrated, by Phil Rogers of the Chicago Tribune and others. The Sports Illustrated predictions were for a 77-85 season for the Red Sox and a 60-102 record for the Twins that would lead to the firing of Twins manager Ron Gardenhire. And Rogers wrote: that Red Sox manager John Farrell, who left Toronto to take the Boston job, will be sorry he left Toronto as the next few years look miserable for the Red Sox organization. How wrong they were, at least when it comes to the Red Sox. The fact is that Farrell is a strong candidate for American League Manager of the Year for the job he has done to revitalize a team that has been atop the American League Eastern Division for the vast majority of the season. As we entered the Labor Day Weekend, the Red Sox were 79-55, having won four straight, seven of 10 and riding a three-game first-place lead over Tampa. Sure, plenty can happen in the last five weeks of the season (we remember the September meltdown of the Bosox two years ago), but it appears this team is hitting its stride at the most important time of the season. Starting pitching had been the big question at the seasons start, but the rotation anchored by John Lackey and Jon Lester had a combined 2.90 ERA for the month of August and the Red Sox rotation had compiled a 3.81 ERA, second-best in the league only behind Detroit. In addition, the shrewd move by General Manager Ben Cherrington to acquire pitcher Jake Peavy just before the trade deadline further solidified the Red Sox mound. Peavy had a solid 3.31 ERA in five starts for his new team. Boston is a playoff-bound team, a team far different from the team a year ago that was demoralized, splintered and confused under manager Bobby Valentine who was wisely fired after just one season. Its hard to believe that after losing 93 games last season and cutting payroll, Boston appears headed for that magic last to first finish this year. As for the Twins, what can we write that hasnt been written nearly the entire season? They lost 99 games in 2011, 96 games in 2012, and appear destined to lose more than 90 again this season. And the way they have been playing of late, they may well lose the 102 games predicted by Rogers. Heading into the Labor Day Weekend, the Twins were 57-75 having lost five straight and seven of the last 10. They were just one game ahead of the last-place Chicago White Sox in the AL Central. As we all know, predicting the outcome of anything in sports is a risky business. But in the case of the Boston Red Sox and the Minnesota Twins, the pre-season prognostications appear half correct. After all, 50 percent isnt half bad. Isabella Rasi 239-246-47161101 Periwinkle Way #105, Sanibel, FL 239-472-0044 ENGEL & VLKERS Excellence in Real Estate A step above! International Client Base 600 Shops Worldwide Multi-Lingual Staff Your success is my aim. www.SeabreezeNurseries.com (239) 560-1422 WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY We can help! Ask about our Season Discount! Palms, Palms, natives, natives, crotons, crotons, bromeliads, bromeliads, buttery bushes, buttery bushes, & much more & much more

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 201322 School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Shelley, I have a middle school daughter and we have had our fair share of mean girl stuff at her school. I want my daughter to enjoy school and feel that she is a valuable member of her class but these negative situations are really hard on her. Is there anything I do to help her cope with the negative and often cruel behaviors that she sees and sometimes has to personally experience at school? Glenna L., Cape Coral, Florida Glenna, As a parent, I empathize with you. Middle school is a very difficult time period for children. They are experiencing enormous physical and emotional development as well as intense academic and social demands and pressures. The good news is that most kids are resilient and get through middle school relatively unscathed, however, it is important for adults to serve as role models and also teach kids how to cope. Here is some new information that might be helpful to you, your daughter and her school. A recent study has provided some new information about middle school students and what they value in their peers and about themselves and the data indicated that kindness is linked to popularity among middle-schoolers. While being popular does not necessarily protect one from bullying, it does increase a students circle of friends and provides more socializing opportunities. Dr. Kristin Layous, a psychologist at the University of California, Riverside, observed 415 students ages 9 to 11 in 19 classrooms in Vancouver, BC over four weeks. They began observations in the second half of the school year, when most students knew one another and friendships were more solidified. At the beginning of this study, students reported on their own life satisfaction, happiness, and positivity, and then marked on a school roster the classmates they would like to be in school activities and spend time with, a gauge researchers found associated with peer acceptance. For the next four weeks, students were asked to either visit three places of interest to them or to perform three acts of kindness each week for anyone they knew. At the end of the trial, students again reported on their own happiness, and were again asked to mark a roster of classmates they considered friends. Researchers found that both groups, either by visiting places of interest or doing kind acts, were slightly happier and more satisfied by the end of the study, and in both groups students reported wanting to engage with more classmates. However, the students who had per formed kind acts garnered significantly more new friends than those who had visited places; about 1.6 new friends on average compared with 0.7 for the other group. These findings, while limited and based on one study, do present an additional focus and another way for school personnel, student groups, parent groups and others interested in helping young adolescents cope with bullying and other negative behaviors. Promoting activities that encourage and reward kindness may really help to reduce the negativity and mean behaviors at the middle school level. There are many ways that a school could promote kindness. Parent groups could also encourage kindness activities, as could student groups. This message could also be shared on an individual basis between parent and child. Random acts of kindness, an idea that has been popular for some time, is a great resource to help with explaining what kindness is and how to grow this attitude in children and adults. This website is designed specifically for Random Acts of Kindness at the school setting and has lots of good ideas and resources: http://www. randomactsofkindness.org/school-activityideas. Ms. Greggs is adjunct faculty at Edison State College where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also Nationally Certified School Psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. Financial FocusCan E xcess R etirement Dollars H elp Your Grandchildren?by Jennifer B aseyNational Grandparents Day is observed on September 8. And although this Day is not as widely known as Mothers Day or Fathers Day, it does remind us of the importance of grandparents. If youre a grandparent yourself, you may be thinking of ways to help your grandchildren on their journey through life. One of the greatest gifts you can give them may be financial support for their college education and one way you can help provide this support could be found in the distributions you receive from your retirement accounts. To understand how this technique might work, youll need to be familiar with the required minimum distribution (RMD) rules governing various retirement accounts. Actually, theyre pretty straightforward: Once you turn 70 youll generally have to start taking withdrawals from your traditional IRA and your 401(k) or other employer-sponsored retirement plan such as a 457(b) plan, if you work for a state or local government, or a 403(b) plan, if you work for an educational institutions or nonprofit group. (If you have a Roth IRA, you are not required to take withdrawals at any age.) Your required minimum distribution is calculated by dividing the prior December 31 balance of your retirement account by a life expectancy factor published by the Internal Revenue Service. As the word minimum suggests, you can take out more than this amount, but not less. You can use the money you withdraw for any purpose you choose. It may be that you need all of it to help support your retirement lifestyle. But if you have enough money coming in from other sources such as Social Security and any investments held outside your retirement accounts you may find that you dont really need to use every dollar from your RMDs. And if thats the situation, you might want to devote some of this money to a college fund for your grandchildren. Or you could simply give the funds to your grandchildrens parents and let them decide how best to employ it for college. But you do have other options. For example, you could establish a 529 plan and name your grandchildren as beneficiaries. With a 529 plan, any potential earnings accumulate tax free, provided they are used for qualified higher education expenses. (Keep in mind, though, that 529 plan distributions not used for qualified expenses may be subject to federal and state income tax and a 10 percent IRS penalty.) Furthermore, your 529 plan contributions may be deductible from your state taxes if you participate in your home states plan. However, 529 plans vary, so check with your tax advisor regarding deductibility. In all likelihood, youll be able to contribute as much as you want to a 529 plan, because the lifetime contribution limits are generous although these limits vary by state. Plus, a 529 plan is flexible: If your grandchild decides against an eligible college or vocational school, you can generally transfer the unused funds to an eligible family member. A 529 plan is not the only college savings vehicle available to help your grandchildren; for other possibilities, you may want to consult with your financial advisor. In any case, once you start taking your RMDs from your retirement accounts, think about putting any excess amounts to work for your grandchildrens college education. Your generosity could provide benefits for a lifetime. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@edwardjones.com. From page 8Along The Riverthey peddled their art from car trunks along area roadways, hence their name. Their art freed them from work in citrus groves and labor camps, and they created a body of work that has become not only a timeless collection of a natural environment, but a symbol of determination and belief in oneself. The Harborside Event Center is located at 1375 Monroe Street, Fort Myers. Call 321-8110. For more information about Robert Butler, go to www.robertbutler.com. B arrow Named T o Deans ListApproximately 9,600 Purdue University students were named to the deans list for the spring semester. Included in the list is Michael Barrow of Fort Myers. To be named to the deans list, a student must have completed at least 12 credit hours, be enrolled at least half-time, have a semester grade point average of at least 3.0 and have at least a 3.5 cumulative GPA. College Admissions P anel NightFirst Baptist Academy (FBA) is holding its first annual College Admissions Panel Night on Monday, September 16 at 6:30 p.m. in the student center. FBA will be hosting the University of Florida, Florida Atlantic University, Florida Gulf Coast University, Southeastern University, University of Alabama, and Samford University. Any parent who has a student in 9th to 12th grade is welcome. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Sarah Crain, FBA guidance counselor at 239597-2233 ext. 658. First Baptist Academy is located at 3000 Orange Blossom Drive, on the corner of Orange Blossom Drive and Livingston Road, in Naples. First Baptist Academy is a ministry of First Baptist Church Naples, under the leadership of Dr. Hayes Wicker, senior pastor. To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732 NARFE M eetingThe NARFE (National Active and Retired Federal Empoyees Association) will meet on Thursday, September 19 at 11:30 a.m. at the Golden Corral Restaurant, 4690 Colonial Blvd. in Fort Myers. All working and retired federal employees are invited to attend. For additional information, call 482-6713.

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23 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 deaRPharmacistOsteoarthritisby Suzy Cohen, RPhDear Pharmacist: I am 60 years old, and now Im told I have osteoarthritis. My doctor said that there is no known cure for this. I need to know the best natural treatments. OW, Melbourne, Florida There isnt a quick magical fix for osteoarthritis, you have to treat the cause and its not always easy to figure that out. Osteoarthritis has always been considered a wear and tear disease. But tick bites can cause painful, swollen joints (Lyme disease) and that is actually how Lyme was discovered; kids with joint pain were popping up all over Lyme, Connecticut. There are many prescription drugs that ease pain, such as Celebrex or Relafen. They are not always tolerated. For the most severe cases, physical ther apy, injections of cortisone and surgery may be options. These, of course, have their own risks. Lets talk about simple things! Capsaicin Lets hear it for peppers. Commercial capsaicin products are sold nationwide in patch form, gel, cream and roll-on. You apply it externally and, with repeated applications, it helps block pain signals. Wash your hands after applications (or use gloves). The last thing you want to do is apply capsaicin, then get it on yourself in the bathroom. Talk about a hot tamale! Astaxanthin This protective antioxidant is best known for vision health, however, it suppresses COX 2 enzyme, prostaglandins, interleukins, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a). Simply put, astaxanthin helps painful situations that end in itis like arthritis, bursitis, tendonitis, etc. You may need 6 to 12mg daily. Glucosamine sulfate You make this if you have healthy cartilage, but you can also supplement. I think its well toler ated, even though the studies are mixed. Glucosamine may be helpful, but only if combined with other substances. Ginger A natural spice that has antiinflammatory properties, also sold as a supplement. I eat this with sushi all the time, but you can buy it as a powdered spice, or fresh root in the produce section, and turn it into a tea. It reduces pain by blocking prostaglandins (thats what ibuprofen does too). Ginger is selective, it only blocks the bad prostaglandins, not the ones that benefit your body. DMSO This is used on race horses, externally. Many Internet sites sell it, and health food stores. People use it all the time for joint pain, including myself but because it is technically for horses, unless youre a horse, I cant really tell you anything more. Methylsulfonylmethane (or you can just say MSM, phew!) is a natural sulfur compound related to DMSO (see above), and its been shown to improve pain symptoms, and although it is present in trace amounts in a variety of food, it is much more efficient to take as a supplement. I can send you a longer, detailed ver sion with more remedies and treatment options. Sign up for my newsletter at www.DearPharmacist.com to get it. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. dearpharmacist.com. M om And Me by Lizzie and P ryceLizzie and Pryce answer your questions and give advice about aging concerns from a two-generational perspective. A mother and daughter team, Lizzie is a retired RN and health educator, and Pryce is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in the care of elders and people with chronic illnesses. Dear Mom & Me, My mother-in-law hated me from the first day she met me. She thought I wasnt good enough for her daughter. I guess I wasnt then, but as luck would have it, I have been extremely successful. She hated our son, but adored our daughter. After my wife mentioned it to her, she disliked them both. Years have passed and when my mother-in-laws health started to go, I asked her to come and live in our home. She lived with us for six years and not a day passed that she didnt tell me how she still hated me. Please tell me why would a person be so hurtful to us when we have been so good to her? Erick Dear Erick, Treating others well regardless of how you are treated by them well done! I wish many would watch and learn from your example. It is a difficult road and at times, I am sure, seems impossible, but it screams a lot about your character. Your mother-in-law sounds like a self-centered individual, interested only in her own feelings. I am sure she can justify everything she says, feels and does. I do not know why she acts the way she does. One thing is for sure: she is not going to change. She is getting her needs met by being mean. If and when her presence in the home affects your familys health and happiness, making a change is OK and not throwing in the towel. In some families due to personalities, past history, etc., strong and wide boundaries are needed. You can still care, but care from a distance. Pryce Dear Erick, Congratulations on your success. Some people would never ever admit that they could do anything wrong. Their opinions are right, regardless of the facts. You were kind and generous people to give her a home. Her mental impairment in later life just compounded the problem. Some people seem to be nasty individuals, regardless of the kindness of others. Nasty when they were young and even worse when they are older. Lizzie Lizzie and Pryces email address is momandmeaging@hotmail.com. M emory Care R esidence ApprovedThe Cypress Cove at HealthPark Florida Board of Directors have approved plans to construct a 44-unit Memory Care Residence on their South Fort Myers campus. Doug Dodson, President of Cypress Coves parent corporation, Lee Healthcare Resources, anticipates groundbreaking for the new residence will take place next summer. The memory care residence project underscores our continued commitment to provide both our Cypress Cove residents and the general community with a full complement of state of the art retirement services, stated Dodson. Cypress Cove has retained SFCS, Inc. as project architect. This firm has been recognized nationally for their memory care design expertise. GMK Associates have been selected as the projects interior design group. The Memory Care Residences will be built adjacent to The Lodge at Cypress Cove, the communitys 64 private room skilled nursing center. The new structure is expected to be completed in 2016. From page 2Local Artifactsone. If the fancy kitchen knives seem a little dull, we get out the state-of-the-art electric sharpener. But well back into the 1800s, the Howard Strop Co. of Boston marketed an amazing variety of strops designed to polish a razor or knifes cutting edge. The number 7 Extra Fine Kodiak Combination Strop shown here was patented on July 17, 1883. This strop made of metal, leather and wood has its own protective box. Its well worn, and probably works as well as it did heaven knows how long ago when someone in Fort Myers used it to sharpen a razor for a close morning shave. Want to see these objects for real? Visit the Southwest Florida Historical Societys research center. Take an upclose look and get answers to questions about local history. The all-volunteer non-profit organization is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Drop by on Wednesday or Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon, or call them at 939-4044. Youll also find lots of historic everyday objects at the Southwest Florida Museum of History at 2031 Jackson Street. For information, call 321-7430 or go to www.museumofhistory.org. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Sources: directiques.com and thisdayinwaterhistory.wordpress.com. From page 1Path To Wellness 5Kimproving the lives of persons living with serious mental illness and their families. Founded in 1979, NAMI has become the nations voice on mental illness, a national organization including NAMI organizations in every state and in over 1100 local communities across the country who join together to meet the NAMI mission through advocacy, research, support, and education. For more information, visit www.namilee.org SalusCare was formed on July 1 with the merger of Lee Mental Health and Southwest Florida Addiction Services into one new non-profit organization. SalusCare offers outpatient and residential treatment for individuals with mental illness and substance use disorders from seven locations in Lee County and one in Hendry County. The multi-faceted agency also offers detoxification services for adults, prevention programming and an Employee Assistance Program for about 60 area companies. The majority of programs are accredited by CARF, the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities. SalusCare is a United Way agency. For more infor mation, call 332-6937 or visit www. SalusCareFlorida.org. Share your community news with us.Call 395-1213 Fax: 395-2299 or email press@islandsunnews.com

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 201324 B owl For Kids Sake A B ig SuccessLee County Sheriffs Office and Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Sun Coast bowled to raise $6,200. Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Sun Coast, in partner ship with the Lee County Sheriffs Office, raised $6,200 from its inaugural Bowl for Kids Sake. Two hundred and fifty Lee County Sheriffs Deputies participated at Gator Lanes on August 3 to help raise money for Big Brothers Big Sisters. Sponsors of the event were Headquarters Mens Haircuts in Fort Myers and The Training Box Crossfit in Estero. Fowler Firearms, Shoot Straight, The Beacon Beachfront Inn and Cruise Naples were in-kind sponsors, offering prizes to the best bowlers. It started with a call from Deputy Mike Elkady earlier this year. I want to help the kids in Big Brothers Big Sisters, said Elkady. In a matter of months, he recruited hundreds of his colleagues to bowl, with all of the money going to help support one-to-one mentoring in Lee County. I had never planned an event like this before, Elkady added. All I knew was that I wanted to do something to help. Elkady recruited 40 team captains from the Sheriffs Office who formed teams of six players each. Mentors and their littles in the Big Brothers Big Sisters program also came out to bowl. This first year surpassed our expectations, said Big Brothers Big Sisters Lee County Community Resource Director Angela Melvin. We ended up selling out the last shift and couldnt handle any more bowlers. More than money was raised at the event. A total of nine volunteers stepped up and said they wanted to be mentors to children in the Big Brothers Big Sisters program. The highlight of the day was the interaction between the children and some of the deputies, Melvin said. We hope this is the beginning of a solid partnership with the Lee County Sheriffs Office. Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Sun Coast provides one-to-one mentoring relationships to children ages 6 to 18 years old throughout the Gulf Coast of Florida in Sarasota, Manatee, DeSoto, Highlands, Hardee, Charlotte, Lee, Collier, Glades and Hendry counties. Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Sun Coast holds itself accountable for children in its program to achieve measurable outcomes, such as educational success; avoidance of risky behaviors; and higher aspirations, greater confidence and better relationships. The organization provides children facing adversity, often those of single or low-income households or families, with strong and enduring, professionally supported one-to-one mentoring relationships that change their lives for the better, forever. For more information, visit www.bbbssun.org. From left, Laura Allard, Big Brothers Big Sisters; Chris Everette, Big Brother and BB&&T; Michael Lee, Little Brother; Matthew Lee, Little Brother; and Providence Nagy From left, Angela Melvin, Big Brothers Big Sisters; Craig Sherwood, Gator Lanes; Kevin Walsh, Gator Lanes; and Deputy Mike Elkady, Lee County Sheriffs Office From left, Nehymiah Newman; Mariah Newman; Kaylan Chaney; and Sherika Newman, BBBS Board Member Little Brother Edisson Bernadel and Big Brother Neil Lewis Mary Jo Hayes, one of the Little Sisters From left, Mary Gentile, Mary Jo Hayes, Draven Hayes and Niki Panio Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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25 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF S eE PT eE MB erER 9, 2013ARIES (March 21 to April 19) With your Arian charm quotient at an almost all-time high this week, plus all the facts to back you up, you just might win over the last doubters to your proposal. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) You might be in line for that job change you applied for. But be advised that you could be called on to defend your qualifications against supporters of other applicants. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Creating a new approach to an old idea is one way to get beyond that workplace impasse. No such problems in your personal life, where things continue to flow smoothly. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Be more forthcoming about your feelings concerning a proposed change either in your workplace or in your personal life. Your opinions are valuable. Dont keep them hidden. LEO (July 23 to August 22) A changing situation in your life needs more patience than you appear to be willing to offer. Allowing it to develop at its own pace is the wisest course you can take at this time. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) With more stability in your life -on both personal and professional levels -this could be a good time to strengthen relationships with both friends and colleagues. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) People have always relied on your integrity not only to get the job done, but to get it done right. So dont be pressured by anyone into cutting corners to save time. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) While others might get rattled over unexpected changes, your ability to adapt calmly and competently helps you make a positive impression during a crucial period. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A changing environment might be daunting for some, but the adventurous Sagittarian takes it all in stride. A friend from the past could awaken some meaningful memories. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) With your self-assurance rising to full strength, the bold Goat should feel confident about opening up to new ventures as well as new relationships. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Reaching out to someone who has been unkind to you might not be easy. But in the long run it will prove to have been the right thing to do. A friend offers moral support. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your keen insight once again helps you work through a seemingly insoluble problem in your workplace. The weekend offers a good chance to develop new relationships. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a knack for finding details that others would overlook. You would make a fine research scientist. William McKinley dies after being shot twice by a deranged anarchist. One bullet deflected off a suit button, but the other entered his stomach, passed through the kidneys and lodged in his back. When he was operated on, doctors failed to find the bullet, and gangrene soon spread throughout his body. stripped of their citizenship, reducing them to mere subjects of the state. German Jews were excluded from a host of highprofile vocations, from public office to journalism, radio, theater, film and teaching -even farming. Jews found it difficult to buy food, as stores would not admit Jewish customers. Japanese floatplane drops incendiary bombs on Oregons Mount Emily, setting fire to a state forest. The president immediately called for a news blackout for the sake of morale. weight champion Sugar Ray Robinson defeats Randy Turpin to win back the belt at the Polo Grounds in New York City. Robinson, a New York City native, had lost the belt to Turpin two months prior in Turpins native London. in Marseille, France, Hamida Djandoubi, a Tunisian immigrant convicted of murder, becomes the last person executed by guillotine. In 1981, France abandoned the guillotine forever. approaches the Leeward Islands. Over Guadeloupe to South Carolina. The environmental toll in the Carolinas was severe, of its trees. Express commuter plane crashes near people. Short of workers, an inspector had been drafted to assist the afternoon maintenance crew. The inspector worked on putting the screws on the planes horizontal stabilizer, but did not finish the job. Bierce (sometimes known as Bitter Bierce for his acerbic wit) who made the following sage observation: It is by the goodness of God that we have in our country three unspeakably precious things: freedom of speech, freedom of conscience and the prudence never to practice either. had pierced ears? It seems that the belief at the time was that wearing an earring improved eyesight. there is a world record for the tallest recorded hairdo. Even more surprising is the fact that the record-holders beehive measured a whopping 6 feet, 6 inches tall. larity all over the country, both at fairs and at stand-alone food-truck bazaars. You might be surprised to learn that the origin of the food truck goes all the way back to the restaurants closed at 8 every night, leaving factory workers who got off late without a place to eat. At the time, a man named Walter Scott (obviously not Sir Walter Scott) was working as a pushcart peddler, selling odds and ends out of a glorified wheelbarrow. Like a true American entrepreneur, Scott saw a need and moved to fill it. He put a small stove in a horse-drawn wagon and began roaming the streets late at night, selling sandwiches, hard-boiled eggs and coffee. His success spurred imitators, and soon the city was teeming with the after-hours lunchwagons. I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying THIS WEEK IN HISTORY strSTR A nN G eE BU tT trTR U eE thoTHO UG htHT F orOR theTHE DA yY DID YOU KNOW 1. GEOGRAPHY: Where are the Maldive islands located? 2. COMICS: What is Supermans dog named? 3. TELEVISION: When did MTV go on the air? dippy weatherman. 6. SCIENCE: What is the softest known mineral in the world? 10. ANATOMY : What is a sarcoma? TRIVI aA TES tT nective tissue, bone or muscle. ANSWERS SpSP OR tT S QUIZ 1. When was the last time before 2012 (Washington Nationals) that a baseball team from W ashington, D.C., made the playoffs? 2. Baseball great Hank Aaron never had a T riple Crown season, but he led the N.L. in each of the three categories at least twice. Which one did he lead in the most? in 2012? more NBA championships -Eastern or Western? 6. Who was the last gymnast before Gabby Douglas in 2012 to be named The Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year? LPGA season. Who was the other? ANSWERS 1. It was 1933 (Washington Senators). 2. He led in home runs and RBIs four times each, and in batting average twice.

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THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 201326 PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY Read us online at IslandSunNews.com CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING CONTRACTOR G I P M SR C D P D P CG D GrSince 2001, A Southwest Florida Paver Contractor www.gigicompanies.com 239-541-7282Schedule free estimates or visit our new show roomLic.# S3-12238 TREE & LAWN CARE Jesus Hernandez LANDSCAPING & TREE SERVICE 482-7350 We Service All your Landscape Needs FULL Landscaping SERVICES Over 20 years serving San-Cap & Ft. Myers FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the bene ts of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Zucchini and Tomatoes with Edamame 1 large zucchini, diced into medium-sized pieces 2 medium tomatoes, diced into medium-sized pieces 2 tablespoons fresh basil leaves, hand-torn 2 cloves fresh garlic, minced 1 cup shelled edamame, thawed 1 tablespoon grated Parmesan cheese Kosher salt and fresh ground pepper to taste In medium-sized saucepan, heat 1 cup of lightly salted water to a boil. Add zucchini and edamame; simmer 3 to 5 minutes or until desired tenderness. Completely drain vegetables and return to saucepan. Stir in remaining ingredients except cheese. Cook and stir 1 minute or until heated thoroughly. Serve warm in a dish or on plates and garnish with cheese. Zucchini and Tomatoes with Edamame

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27 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 answer on page 27 PUZZLE ANSWERS SUDOKU SCRAMBLERS FIND AT LEAST SIX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PANELS PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY COMPUTERS BUILDING CONTRACTOR FISHING CHARTER Light Tackle Sport Fishing CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.com To advertise in The River Weekly NewsCall 415-7732

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REAL ESTATE ISABELLA RASiIHAPPY TO HELP Y YOUWithITH A ALL OOF Y YOUrRREAL EEStT At TE NEEDS! RS 1/4 NC TFN 1101 Periwinkle Way #105 SS anibel, F LL 33957 ISABELLA RASiI (239) 246-4716E ISABELLARASi I@AOL.COM Island VacationsOf Sanibel & CaptivaMillion $ Views Await You! Cottages Condos Homes Miles of Beaches & Bike Paths239-472-72771-888-451-7277RS 1/4 BM TFN vV ACAT iI ON RENTAL LL IGH TT H OO U SESE REALTREALT YPaul J. Morris, Broker VACATION RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT & SALES 359 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel Island 239-579-0511RS 1/4 CC TFN SER viVI CES O ffFF ERED hH EL pP wW ANTEDV OLOL U NTEERSNTEERS NEEDEDNEEDED Volunteers needed for the After School Program which runs Mon.-Th, 2:30 3:15 pm call Linda Reynolds 472-1617RS 1/4 NC TFN P RETTRETT I ESTEST SANSAN IB ELEL RENTALRENTAL 2 BR/2 BA house off Sanctuary Golf house spaces. Beautiful views, quiet neighborhood. No smoking. Available now. $1,800 mo inc landscaping/garbage/sewer. NS 8/30 CC TFN ANN uU AL RENTAL LL ON gG TT ERM RR ENTAL2BR 2Bath 1,500 Sq. Ft. Executive Condo in Sanctuary available for long term rental. 6 month minimum, multi-year available. No pets, no smoking. $2,200 per month plus utilities. Call 407-227-3554.NS 8/30 CC 9/20 CC OM pP AN iI ON SS ER viVI CE Sanibel-Captiva Care and Companion Service, LLC Medical appointments, general transportation, shopping, light meal preparations, and light cleaning. Our services are customized to meet our clients needs. Call 239-395-3591, or for an emergency call 239-472-0556.RS 1/4 BM TFN SER viVI CES O ffFF ERED SANSAN IB ELEL H OMEOME W ATCATC HRetired Police Captain Lives on Sanibel Will Check Your Home Weekly Very Reasonable Rates (239) 728-1971RS 1/4 BM TFN RORO G ERER NODRNODR UFF ELECTRELECTR I CC Lic# EC12002788. Call Roger 239-707-7203. Aqualink Motor Controls. RS 6/7 CC TFN HOME/ CONDOCONDO WATC hH CONC iI ER gG E SER viVI CESDorado Property Management Full Range of Services Island Resident Licensed & Insured 24/7 Call Lisa or Bruce at 239-472-8875RS 1/4 BM TFN hH EL pP wW ANTEDV OLOL U NTEERNTEER OO PP ORTORT U NN I TT YThe Sunshine Ambassador Program is a new and exciting volunteer opportunity offered at the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida located within HealthPark Medical Center. The Sunshine Ambassadors will greet, assist and be a families and visitors entering the hospital. The Ambassadors also make a difference to families by providing educational and healthful resources to assist in GRANDparenting for GRANDchildren. We are currently seeking year-round volunteers to work one 4-hour shift Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm or 12:00pm to 4:00 pm. If you would be interested in learning more about this wonderful new opportunity, please contact Lisa Ellinwood, Volunteer Resources Coordinator at 239-343-5062 at the Golisano Childrens Hospital.NS 2/8 NC TFN V OLOL U NTEERSNTEERS NEEDEDNEEDED At The Sanibel School Call Michelle Wesley 239-910-8000RS 1/4 NC TFN H ELEL P W ANTEDANTED Norris Home Furnishings is a fast growing company that is seeking a motivated, cheerful and experienced part time sales person. This person should enjoy meeting new people and helping them make their dream homes a reality. Being good with colors and textures is a plus. Stop by store for application, or send resume to dulrich@norrishomefurnsihings.comNS 8/30 BM 9/6 ThTH E SS AN ibIB EL BEAD ShSH O pP PT sales. Jewelry making exp. preferred. Will train reliable person with strong retail sales experience. Apply in person. 1101 Periwinkle Way, Mon.-Sat, 11-5 p.m.NS 9/6 CC 9/13 ANN uU AL RENTALQUI ETET SANSAN IB ELEL H OMEOME W/P RR IV ATEATE B EACEAC H P ATAT H3200 sq ft home in Gulf Pines, one of Sanibels most beautiful & sought after communities. One house from beach w/private beach path. Short walk to Gulf Pines 2 swimming pools & tennis courts; large landscaped lot provides privacy. 3-4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, large open living area, screened porch & several decks. W/D, 2nd fridge, Elevator, 2-car garage. Unfurnished. Landscaping & association fees paid by owner. Avail Oct 2013. Call 917-680-4440.NS 5/31 CC TFN RERE / MAMA X OO F TT H EE I SLANDSSLANDS Putting owners and tenants together Call Dustyn Corace www.remax-oftheislands.com 239-472-2311RS 1/4 BM TFN RivRIV ER DiDI STR iI CT H iI STOR iI C DD EAN PARK 1924 Pristine 2 story 2700 sq ft Tudor, 3-2.5-2, newly done kit (w/granite), MBR, breakfast/sun rm, den, DR, storage area, walk to downtown. Special. No pets. $1,500. 239-543-4278.NS 8/30 CC 9/6 ANN uU AL RENTALS SS AN ibIB EL 472-6747Gulf Beach Properties, Inc. Paul H. Zimmerman, Broker/Ownersanibelannualrentals.comServing The Islands Rental Needs Since 1975 RS 9/6 BM TFN LAKELAKE F RONTRONT This Old Florida Style piling home has a Great view over the large heated pool to the Lake! Of fering 3 bedrooms/two baths, two car garage plus storage. Short distance to the beach. $3,000/mo. CANALCANAL & DOCKDOCK Five Minutes to Sanibel Toll-Booth!! This UF ground level updated home of fers garage, screened in pool, 65 boat $2,800/mo. fF ORT M yY ERSTO PLA cC E AA CLA ssSS I fF IED LL OG OntONT O: II slandSunNews.com cCLIcCK OnN PLAc CE cCLAssSSIfFIED SS CARNATO LL A wW N SS ER viVI CELawn Service, Shrubs and Tree Trimming Weeding, Installation of Plants, Trees and Mulch (one month free service available) Joe Scarnato (239) 849-6163 scarnatolawn@aol.comRS 1/25 BM TFN HELLES CC LEAN iI N gG SS ER viVI CESResidential Cleaning to Satisfaction Sanibel Lic. #11412 Lee Co. Lic. #051047NS 1/4 PC TFN P AA I NTNT I NN G G OATOAT Professional Painting & Home Maintenance Free Estimates Fully Insured www.paintinggoat.com 239-271-2919RS 4/19 CC TFN RESORTRESORT MANAMANA G EMENTEMENT Retired couple seeks position as small resort management team. Both have 30 years of Sanibel familiarity. On-site residence desired; salary negotiable. 231-421-9194 / jcrounds11@charter.net.NS 8/23 CC 9/13 HO uU SEKEE pP ER G iI RL FR iI DA yY Experienced Housekeeper. Excellent References, Reliable, I will also help with light cooking and errands. Call Heather (239) 826-1045 Sanibel & Lee Co. LicenseRS 8/30 CC 9/6 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 201328 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS

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BOATS CANOES KAYAKSDOCKAGEHourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-5800RS 1/4 NC TFN 22-FOOT GLACIER BAY CATAMARANIn good condition. Needs some detailing and a high pressure fuel pump. $9,000 or best offer. The boat was donated to the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) for quick sale. Contact James Robinson at CROW at (239) 472-3644, ext. 221 or development@ crowclinig.org. Or contact Peg Albert at (239) 472-3644, ext. 232 or peg@ crowclinic.org. RS 7/26 NC TFN HELP WANTED3883 Sanibel Captiva Road, Sanibel, Fl Phone: 239-472-3644, ext 1 Fax: 239-472-2334 www.crowclinic.orgHELP US PLEASE!!We need volunteers for: Clinic emergency patient admissions desk and baby animal feeders Visitor education center greeters and gift shop cashiers CROW (239) 472-3644, ext. 231 or volunteers@crowclinic.orgRS 1/4 NC TFN SERVERS ASSISTANT SERVERS LINE COOKIL Tesoro Ristorante, 751 tarpon Bay Rd. Sanibel Now hiring; Servers, Assistant Servers and Line cook Email resumes to: applications between 11-2 daily.NS 1/18 NC TFN PETSFREE KITTEN TO GOOD HOMEFree kitten to good, safe home. No de-clawing. Fiesty Bengal mix. Call 472-1788 after 5 p.m.NS 5/31 NC TFN WANTED TO B UYCASH PAI D FOR MILITARY ITEMSCash Paid For Old Military Items. Medals, Swords, Uniforms, helmets, old guns, awards & more. Local Toll Free 1-866-440-3280RS 9/6 CC 11/29 LOSTLost Ladies Watch Make: Brighton Area of Mucky Duck on Captiva Island Lost on Dec. 10, 2012 around noon If found call: 941-639-5395RS 1/4 NC TFN FOUNDPrescription sunglasses found in parking lot of Limetree Center on Wednesday, February 27. Claim at Island Sun newspaper, suite 2 in Limetree Center, or call 395-1213.NS 3/8 NC TFN TOOL BOX WASHES UP ON SANIBELThis tool box with motor parts washed up on shore Saturday morning, May 8 about 8:30 on the beach at Sundial Resort on Sanibel Island. To claim call Sundial Resort Security 239-472-4151.NS 6/14 CC TFN LOST AND FOUND F OR SALEEMERGENCY GENERATOR COLEMAN PROPANE 1500 POWER STATIONIncludes ASCO 165 Power Transfer switch. Great Condition Never Been Outside. Power When You Need It. 423-291-9831.NS 9/6 CC 9/6 29 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 CLASSIFIED DEADLINE FRIDAY AT NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS The Island Sun and The River Weekly NewsAlways on the table, and online, with everything you need to know about your community. NEWSPAPERSanibel & Captiva IslandsTHEIVER R r rf WEEKL Y NEWS Serving Sanibel, Captiva and Fort Myers since 1993 Phone 395-1213 or 415-7732 Pick up a copy or go to IslandSunNews.com. Click on Read the Island Sun or The River Weeklywww.IslandSunNews.com

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If you would like your club/organization listed in The River Calling Card, phone 415-7732Emergency ......................................................................................... 911 Lee County Sheriffs Of ce ........................................................ 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol ................................................................ 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol .............................................................. 278-7100 Poison Control ................................................................ 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center .......................................1-800-936-5321Ft. Myers Chamber of Commerce ............................................. 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare .............................................. 425-2685 Ft. Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce .................................. 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library ......................................................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library ............................................................ 533-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce .......................................... 931-0931 Post Of ce ..................................................................... 1-800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau ..................................................... 338-3500 ARTS Alliance for the Arts .................................................................. 939-2787 Art of the Olympians Museum & Gallery ................................... 332-5055 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio .................................................. 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers ......................................................... 275-3970 Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall ...................................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS ................................................................................ 395-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre ............................................... 278-4422 Cultural Park Theatre ................................................................ 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light ............................................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade .................................. 332-4488 Florida West Arts ...................................................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers ....................................... 472-0168 Gulf Coast Symphony ............................................................... 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres ..................................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic ........................................................... 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater ......................................................... 472-6862 S.W. Florida Symphony ............................................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy .................................................................. 936-3239 Young Artists Awards ................................................................ 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAngel Flight ................................................................ 1-877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center ............................................................... 731-3535 American Business Women Association ................................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL ..................................................................... 339-8046 Audubon Society ....................................................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR .................................................. 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society ................................................... 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus ................................. 1-855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club ............................................................ 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees ....................................................... 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists ............................................................ 415-2484 Ft Myers UDC Chapter 2614 (United Daughters of the Confederacy .................................. 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL ...................................................... 561-9164 The Horticulture and Tea Society ............................................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society ................................................................. 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society ............................................. 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation ........................................... 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees ............. 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America .......................................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL .................................................... 667-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans .................................................. 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy ........................................ 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association ........................................ 561-2118 Kiwanis Clubs: Fort Myers Beach ................................................. 765-4254 or 454-8090 Fort Myers Edison ..................................................................... 694-1056 Fort Myers South ...................................................................... 691-1405 Gateway to the Islands .............................................................. 415-3100 Iona-McGregor .......................................................................... 482-0869Lions Clubs:Fort Myers Beach ...................................................................... 463-9738 Fort Myers High Noon ............................................................... 466-4228 Estero/South Fort Myers ........................................................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County .............................................. 768-0417 POLO Club of Lee County ......................................................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers ......................................................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society ................................................ 472-6940 United Way of Lee County ........................................................ 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) ................................. 211 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews Shell Museum ................................................ 395-2233 Burroughs Home ...................................................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium ........................................ 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates ................................................... 334-3614 Fort Myers Skate Park .............................................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium ............................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge ................................ 472-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site .............................................. 239-992-0311 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center ....................... 765-8101 Skatium ...................................................................................... 321-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society ........................................ 939-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History ...................................... 321-7430 True Tours ................................................................................. 945-0405 Pets Of The Week SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 27 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 201330 Hello, my name is Bobby. Im a 1-year-old male brown and white labrador retriever mix. Im an energetic young boy that loves to play. Smart is my middle name, because Im so eager to learn. In fact, Im so interested in what anyone and everyone can teach me that I come with two free training lessons from K-9 Connections. My adoption fee is $40 (regularly $75) during Animal Services Fall Frenzy Adoption Promotion. Hello, my name is Vibrum. Im a 4-month-old male black tabby domestic shorthair. Im one of many adorable babies in the free-roam cat room at Animal Services. I love to play with all of my other fellow felines. Sometimes we like to just curl up in a ball together and snooze. You can adopt just me or take home me and one of my buddies because cats are 2-for1! My adoption fee is $75. For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to Animal Services website at www. LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if three months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs six months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500. Bobby ID# 570122 photos by squaredogphoto.com Vibrum ID# 570122

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31 THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 BEACH CHAIR PASTIMEAnswers on page 25

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NOW OPEN! NOW OPEN! Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! 239-463-5505 | 1249 Estero Blvd. Live Music Wed-Sun! Happy Hour Mon-Fri 2-5pmTheBeachedWhale.com Ft. Myers BEach:Sept 18th Ft. Myers BEach : Book Signing Event!Meet The Author!Details Online12-2pm & 4-6pm Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! THE RIVER SEPTEMBER 6, 201332