<%BANNER%>

River weekly news ( July 12, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101363/00150

Material Information

Title: River weekly news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication: Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 08-30-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101363:00191

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101363/00150

Material Information

Title: River weekly news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication: Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 08-30-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101363:00191


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

FREETake Me Home VOL. 12, NO. 34 AUGUST 30, 2013From the Beaches to the River District downtown Fort MyersRead Us Online at IslandSunNews.com Fort Myers Beach Veterans Club Hosts Memorial EventOn Saturday, September 7, the Veterans Club of America #1 hosts its annual Beach Bash to remember all victims of September 11. The event runs from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and includes music, food, drinks and drawings. The 4th annual event is a fundraising effort for the causes the veterans organization supports: Wounded Warriors, Ronald McDonald House, Cape Coral Veterans Clinic, Toys For Tots and other needy veterans and local fire departments. The Veterans Club of America #1 is located at 16701 San Carlos Boulevard in Fort Myers Beach. For more information, call 466-3177. Arts For ACT G allery Opening New Exhibit During Art Walk Arts for ACT Gallery is hosting an opening reception September 6 from 6 to 10 p.m. during Art Walk. This month, ACT Gallery will feature Sacred Ladies by Dr. Kyra Belan in the main gallery. Also exhibiting in the main gallery will be Lynne Reinas and Suzanne Mikulka. Dr. Kyra Belan, an artist, author, scholar and resident of Cape Coral, will exhibit her oil and acrylic paintings, drawings, digital art and mixed media artworks. She has been continued on page 5Art Center Celebrating Five YearsThis season, the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center will celebrate its 5th anniversary with an exhibition titled Celebrating 5 Years of the Arts. The September exhibit, a retrospective of the many artists who have exhibited at the Davis over the years, will mark the beginning of the anniversary season. Among the 50 artists represented in the show are Marcus Jansen, Leoma Lovegrove, David Acevedo, Ronnie Ford, Lawrence Voytek, Michael St. Amand, Cesar Aguilar, David and Lily Hatchett, and Daniel Vendetti. There will also be entertainment by performing artists who have presented at the Davis in past years. The celebratory opening will take place during Art Walk on September 6 from 6 to 10 p.m. The Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street, in the downtown Fort Myers River District. Born in 1968 in Manhattan, New York City, Marcus Jansen was educated in Europe during his young adult years. He studied design and commercial painting at the Berufskolleg fur Technik ind Medien, Monchengladbach, Germany in 1985. After his first year, he rejected the schools teaching methods and instead joined the U.S. Armed Forces in 1989. He was discharged in 1997 and transformed his life from soldier to one of Americas leading expressionist painters on the international art scene. Jansen returned from his first combat tour in the Gulf War in 1991 and was diagnosed with PTSD in 1992. Fourteen years ago, after eight years in the military, he started selling his paintings on Prince Street and Broadway in Manhattan. Art historian Jerome A. Donson discovered Jansen in 2003. Donson worked on traveling exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA), New York and worked closely with action painters including Jackson Pollack, Willem de Kooning, Robert Rauschenberg and continued on page 15 Untitled by Suzanne Mikulka Matlacha Spoken Here by Leoma Lovegrove Encounter by Lawrence Voytek

PAGE 2

THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 20132 Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: Boom-T ime Bank V anishesby G erri R eaves, PhDWhen Citizens Bank opened in East Fort Myers, the local and national economy was booming. It was 1926, and the building on the northwest corner of Palm Beach Boulevard and Superior Street symbolized a promising future for the small but vibrant business district. When it opened, the bank built by Charles L. CL Starnes sported a stylish look and striped awnings. It contrasted architecturally with the surrounding structures, most of them dating from the turn of the 20th century. The major exception was the multi-storefront building Starnes Building just across Superior, constructed shortly before the bank was. Starnes two buildings anchored the commercial district in the East End. East Fort Myers had been annexed to the City of Fort Myers in 1925, and those in the know predicted that it would soon overtake Fort Myers economically especially given two advantages: the first bridge over the Caloosahatchee River at Freemont Street (1924) and the Seaboard Airline Railway depot scheduled to open in 1927. The small commercial district served neighborhoods like the Edgewood subdivision with grocery stores, general stores, barbershops, a movie theater, marine shops, a drugstore, lumber supply, and other businesses. Terry Park and a public swimming pool were just down the boulevard, and the modern brick Edgewood School (1924) were nearby. Unfortunately, the organizers of the bank had bad timing. Only a month after it opened, the famous Hurricane of hit on September 18, bringing with it an early start on the Great Depression. The bank survived only a short time, and although the building itself survived 87 years, it seems that it never recovered from that early economic slap. Instead of a financial institution, it was destined to house everything from churches to billiard parlors. The bank building was vacant during much of the 1930s, but then served as the Church of the Nazarene well into the World War II era. As seen in the late-1950s photo, the Economy Corner general merchandise store had a long run there during that decade, followed by the Western Auto store in the 1960s. The 1970s and 1980s brought variety aplenty to make up for the short tenures: Shop-a-Rama, Cycle and Chopper, as well as various taverns and pool rooms. Recently, the Citizens Bank building was demolished. Its actual history differed so much from the original intended use that few people associated the defaced structure with the hopeful 1920s, much less lamented its demise. Visit the corner of Palm Beach Boulevard and Superior Street. Imagine that its 1926 and everythings looking up for the thriving East End. Then head west to the Southwest Florida Museum of History at 2031 Jackson Street, where you can learn more about the history of that era. For information, call 321-7430 or go to www.museumofhistory.org. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Do you have questions about local history? Then head to the Southwest Florida Historical Societys research center to get answers. The all-volunteer non-profit organization is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Drop by on Wednesday or Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon, or call them at 939-4044. Sources: Archives of the Southwest Florida Historical Society and the Story of Fort Myers by Karl H. Grismer. The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, please call (239) 415-7732 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, FL 33901. Fax number: (239) 415-7702. E-mail: press@riverweekly.com. The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Co-Publishers Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Isabel Rasi Office Coordinator Graphic Arts/ProductionAnn Ziehl Photographer Michael Heider Writers Anne Mitchell Jeff Lysiak PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Contributing WritersRead Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com Click on The River Ed Frank Max Friedersdorf Tom Hall The Economy Corner variety store occupied the former bank building for most of the 1950s, by which time the 1920s stylistic features had already disappeared courtesy of the Southwest Florida Historical Society The Citizens Bank building was recently demolished photo by Gerri Reaves

PAGE 3

3 THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 2013 Fort Myers Public Art: Lorelei May Have New Homeby Tom HallAfter months of uncertainty, headless siren Lorelei may have finally found a new home. While the details have yet to be worked out, it appears that Fort Myers oldest public artwork will soon take up residency atop a new pedestal in the Bromeliad Garden at the Fort Myers-Lee County Garden Council. It seems like Lorelei is coming home, Garden Council Corresponding Secretary Kay Holloway told the Fort Myers Public Art Committee on August 20. Loreleis donor, Evelyn D. Rea, was a member of the Periwinkle Garden Club, which is one of the 20 area garden clubs and eight plant societies that make up the garden council. When Lorelei arrived by boat from Italy in 1930, Rea placed the finely-carved sculpture in her own welltended garden at her residence on the Caloosahatchee not far from the garden councils location on Virginia Street. Thomas and Mina Edison were among the first to see the 1880 marble statue during its ensuing 30-year stay in Reas garden. When Rea drew up her last will and testament on July 20, 1955, she bequeathed Lorelei to the Fort Myers Public Library, which received the gift the year after Reas death in 1959. However, the library wasnt immediately sure what it wanted to do with the comely German siren. According to local resident and historian Jim Butler, the statue languished in storage until 1961. Thats when he borrowed it for senior prom at the exhibition hall. There was so much dirt and dust on the piece that it was a muddy grey, Butler recalls. But Butlers prom committee did such a nice job of cleaning and shining the Italian marble that the library proudly placed the sculpture in the landscaping bed outside the front entrance. Lorelei has been there ever since. But the library is relocating in September, and wont be taking Lorelei to its new 40,000-square-foot location on First and Royal Palm. Holloway promises that the garden council will not only provide Lorelei with a safe home, but will stabilize and conserve her as well. Were not sure well replace its missing head. After all, the damage is part of its history now, Holloway stated, echoing the recommendation of the conservation team hired by the public art committee to evaluate the sculptures condition earlier this year. But the 133-year-old sculpture will be protected by fencing, lighting and more than 1,200 caring members once she arrives at her new home. Lorelei will remain part of Fort Myers public art collection and can viewed by the public during the garden councils hours of operation. Located at 2166 Virginia Avenue, off McGregor, the garden council is within easy walking distance of the Edison & Ford Winter Estates. Its a piece of the past that will enhance the future, Holloway added moments before the public art committee approved the sculptures relocation. (From her new home at the garden council), Lorelei will teach people about the connection between history and art. An arts advocate, Tom Hall guides weekly walking tours of the River Districts public art collection in Fort Myers. For more information, go to www.truetours.net. Garden Council Corresponding Secretary Kay Holloway presents the case for Lorelei to the Fort Myers Public Art Committee. A photograph of the statue is on her right. Lazy Flamingo, Inc. 6520-C Pine Avenue Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-5353 Lazy Flamingo 3, Inc. 16501 Stringfellow Rd Bokeelia, FL 33922 239-283-5959 Lazy Flamingo 2, Inc. 1036 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-6939 Lazy Flamingo 4, Inc. 12951 McGregor Blvd. Ft. Myers, FL 33919 239-476-9000 Four Great Locations! If Our Seafood Were Any Fresher, We Would Be Serving It Under Water! NOW SERVING FULL LIQUOR IN FORT MYERS Bring in This Coupon for $ 5 OFFPurchase of $30 or moreF M 33 Patio DeLeon, Downtown Fort Myers (239) 337-3377OPEN Tues-ur 11am-10pm, Fri 11am-11pm, Sat 3-11pm Closed Sun & Mon

PAGE 4

THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 20134 State Rep Caldwell Presents Check To Boys & Girls Clubs of Lee CountyAs part of the recent $9 million statewide appropriation for the Florida Alliance of Boys & Girls Clubs (representing 45 Boys & Girls Club organizations in Florida), State Representative Matt Caldwell presented the Boys & Girls Clubs of Lee County with a symbolic check for the total Florida appropriation. We are very grateful to receive $148,000 as part of the statewide appropriation, said Boys & Girls Clubs of Lee County Chief Professional Officer Shannon Lane. This is double the amount of state funding we received last year, so were excited to create even greater opportunities for our local youth. Boys & Girls Clubs provide safe places where children can learn, grow, receive help with homework and develop coping skills that assist them in avoiding destructive influences in a fast-paced, complex world. By placing an emphasis on programs like Boys & Girls Clubs that positively influence at-risk youth, we are minimizing their chances of becoming delinquent, thus creating safer, stronger communities more equipped to produce a generation of successful Floridians, said Caldwell during his visit to the Lehigh branch of the Boys & Girls Club Lee County. According to Florida TaxWatch, taxpayers also benefit from Boys & Girls Club programs. For every youth who is diverted from criminal activities, $5,000 in public costs is avoided, and for every youth diverted from incarceration, the state saves $45,000. While this is very exciting news for Clubs all around the state, there is still a great need for local community support, said Lane. The need for our services continues to grow with waiting lists not getting any shorter. The Club at Lehigh is a perfect example, having 65 children registered in the afterschool program and 78 on the waiting list. According to Florida TaxWatch, taxpayers also benefit from Boys & Girls Club programs. For every youth who is diverted from criminal activities, $5,000 in public costs is avoided, and for every youth diverted from incarceration, the state saves $45,000. The mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs is to inspire and enable young people to realize their full potential as productive, responsible and caring citizens. Membership dues are $10 per school year so that all children can have access to our programs. The Boys & Girls Clubs of Lee County relies upon the philanthropic support of individuals, corporations and foundations in order to sustain and grow its services. State Rep. Matt Caldwell and CPO Shannon Lane with members of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Lee County JACARANDAThe Entertainment Nightly in Sanibels Social Scene1223 PERIWINKLE WAY, SANIBEL 472-1771 Happy Apps $5.95Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna, Crispy Fried Calamari, Chilled Oysters, Steamed Shrimp, BBQ Beef Satays, Mussels Marinara, Chicken WingsSanibels Best HAPPY HOUR5 7 p.m. Nightly in the lounge1/2 Price DrinksCall & Well Liquor, Draft Beer Selections, Select House Wine Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Downtown Fort Myers (Post Oce Arcade Next to Hotel Indigo) 1520 Broadway For Takeout & Delivery Tel: 334-6991 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEKMon-urs 11am 10pm Fri-Sat 11am 11pm Sun 12pm 9pm www. ichiban-sushi-chinese.com Open Monday Saturday www.threecraftyladies.com Find us on WE WILL PAY YOUR TOLL!!!Spend $55 and bring us your toll receipt for a full refund!

PAGE 5

5 THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 2013 RIV 10% OFF Offer valid with Cash payments only ... No credit cards. ONE COUPON PER TABLE Can not be used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, Expires Sept 6, 2013 Lunch, Dinner, Snacks in Between11am-10pm COUPON PER TABLE Can not be used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, www.nervousnellies.net FREE MARINA DOCKAGE with Dock Attendants Assistance FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE MARINA DOCKAGE MARINA DOCKAGE MARINA DOCKAGE MARINA DOCKAGE MARINA DOCKAGE MARINA DOCKAGE MARINA DOCKAGE MARINA DOCKAGE MARINA DOCKAGE MARINA DOCKAGE MARINA DOCKAGE MARINA DOCKAGE MARINA DOCKAGE MARINA DOCKAGE MARINA DOCKAGE MARINA DOCKAGE with Dock Attendants with Dock Attendants with Dock Attendants with Dock Attendants with Dock Attendants with Dock Attendants with Dock Attendants with Dock Attendants with Dock Attendants Where its Happy Hour all the time!!! NERVOUS NELLIES WILL BE OPEN ALL OF SEPTEMBER From page 1September Opening Receptionexhibiting across the country and abroad for over two decades, as well as writing her books, articles in journals, creating installations and performance art, while teaching studio art and art history classes at Broward College. This artist received her BFA from Arizona State University, her MFA from Florida State University, and her EdD from Florida International University in fine arts, art history, and higher education. She travels to research, lecture or exhibit within the United States and abroad. Raised in Argentina, Dr. Belan is an American citizen. Dr. Belan has developed a style for her two-dimensional works that she calls magic realism. She also researches world mythologies, and is inspired by sacred ladies featured in legends from prehistoric to contemporary times. She believes that myths, symbols and archetypes enrich our lives, and should be present in the arts. Inspired by the beauty of nature, and the tales of the divine women, she believes that Mother Earth is sacred. During the September 6 opening, the artist will sign copies of her recently published book, Lucid Future. Lynn Reinas filled her first sketchbook with drawings at age 8, but her lifelong love of art was not fully explored until retirement, allowed her the opportunity to pursue it. In 1975, she completed the course requirement to teach decorative ceramics, a phase of art she pursued for 10 years. Much experimentation with other surfaces and mediums furniture, gourds, fabric, walls fulfilled her insatiable appetite for artistic expression. Her works in watercolors, colored pencil, acrylics, pen and oils depicts locations and creatures native to Florida as she sees them. Reinas is currently working on a series of works entitled Conserve, Preserve & Protect to promote environmental consciousness. You will find the words Conserve, Preserve & Protect embedded somewhere in each painting in the series. Reinas artwork has been purchased and hangs in many residences throughout Southwest Florida. Suzanne Mikulka is an artist, teacher and a breast cancer survivor. Eight years ago, she moved here to begin a quiet retirement of sun and sand. With brushes in hand, she had a purpose and a reason to get up, create and work through her battle with breast cancer. She paints every day and teaches many times during the week. She enjoys working with her students and shares their joy when their paintings are complete. Mikulkas paintings reflect the spirit and hope she experiences with every day she is given. These exhibits will be on view through September 30. Arts for ACT Gallery is at 2265 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. Mary M by Kyra Belan Untitled by Lynne Reinas

PAGE 6

THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 20136 Hortoons the tournament. The event is cosponsored by Elias Brothers GroupContracting Division and Sherwin Williams; other sponsorships opportunities are available. Were proud to be part of this community, and this is just a small way to give back after so much has been given to us, said Shannon ONeill of Dry Zone, Inc. The Harry Chapin Food Bank is a great cause, and were thrilled to have a chance to support it. Registration and payment for the Water Ball Classic may be made by sending checks, payable to Dryzone, Inc. 3960 Radio Road, Suite 202, Naples, FL 34104. For more information about the event, contact Shannon ONeill at 643-1990. Lee R epublican Womens Club MeetingThe Lee Republican Womens Club (Chartered) will hold its September dinner meeting at the Crowne Plaza Holiday Inn, located at 13051 Bell Tower Drive in Fort Myers, on Tuesday, September 3. Social hour begins at 6 p.m., with dinner and the program to follow at 6:30 p.m. The featured speaker will be the Honorable Gary Lee, Lee Country Republican Committeeman and former member of the U.S. House of Representatives. The public and guests are welcome to attend the meeting. The cost of the dinner is $20. To make reservations or for additional information, call 573-6913. Continental Womens ClubLadies who may be interested in joining other women in various group activities, both social and philanthropic, are invited to consider joining the Continental Womens Club of Fort Myers. Luncheon meetings are held the first Thursday of every month at 11:30 a.m. at Colonial Country Club in Fort Myers. The club offers numerous activities including lunch bunch, dining out, bridge, book club and more. For additional information about becoming a member, call Margie Connor at 561-8973. Benacquisto, E agle Featured S peakersFollowing a three-month summer hiatus, the featured speakers at the monthly luncheon of the Fort Myers Republican Womens Club on Tuesday, September 17 will be State Senator Lizbeth Benacquisto and State Representative Dane Eagle. They will discuss actions taken during the 2013 Legislature and will take questions from the audience. The public is invited to attend the luncheon and the program being held at The Helm Club, The Landings in South Fort Myers. A social hour begins at 11:15 a.m. The noon lunch, business meeting and program follow. The luncheon cost is $16 per person. Reservations are required by Thursday, September 12 and may be made by contacting Tina Laurie and 489-4701. Additional information about the club may be obtained by contacting the president, Gaile Anthony, at 292-5212. T ickets On S ale Now For Charity Beach BallThe Fort Myers Beach Community Foundations 2nd annual Charity Beach Ball will take place on Saturday, November 2 at DiamondHead Beach Resort. The Beach Ball is a black-tie optional silent auction with an open bar from 6 to 8 p.m., dinner and dancing with The Marc Vee Band. Tickets are $95 per person, or buy a table of 10 for $875 and save $75. Tickets are available online at www.charitybeachball.com or by mail at the address below. Thanks to all the supporters and attendees last year, the foundation was able to support many local causes and provide scholarships to three outstanding students. The foundations is looking for donations and sponsors for the event. For more information, go to http://www. fmbeachfoundation.org/ or call Nicole at 849-1460 Downtown R evitalization T ourTrue Tours will be having a Downtown Revitalization Tour with tour guide Jared Beck on Saturday, September 7 at 10:30 a.m. The tour will last 60 minutes and the cost is $10 per person. This tour showcases the growth of historic downtown from its decline in the early 1960s to recent multi-award winning redevelopment and revitalization projects that have returned Fort Myers Downtown River District to a truly unique destination. Reservations are required and may be made by calling 945-0405 or by visiting www.truetours.net.. Water Ball ClassicDry Zone, a local fire and water cleanup and restoration business, announced that it will be hosting the inaugural Water Ball Classic, a charity golf tournament, on Friday, October 11. The event will benefit the Harry Chapin Food Bank and will be held at the beautiful West Bay Club in Estero. The charity event is open to the public. The entry for each player is $100, which includes cart and green fees, two beverages on the course, and the Scoreboard Party following the tournament. Registration will begin at 8 a.m., with a shotgun start at 9 a.m. All monetary proceeds will benefit the Harry Chapin Food Bank. Non-perishable food items will also be collected prior to Day T rip Of G ambling FunJoin the Kennedy Kruisers on September 19 as they head to Fort Myers Beach for a day of gaming fun aboard the 162-foot Big M Casino. Bingo, slot machines, table games and an all-you-can-eat buffet lunch are included in the price of $25 for members and $30 for non-members. Departure from the center is at 9 a.m. (arrive by 8:45) and return is approximately 5 p.m. When you travel with the Kennedy Kruisers, you have the opportunity to enter the Entertainment Extra Raffle for a free ticket to an upcoming event. There is also a membership raffle. Pre-registration is preferred by September 16. The Lake Kennedy Center is at 400 Santa Barbara Boulevard in Cape Coral. For reservations, call 5740575. Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702 or email press@riverweekly.com

PAGE 7

7 THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 2013 Calendar Girls Walk The Catwalk For PawsThe Calendar Girls danced and walked the catwalk for Paws for Patriots during Pachingtons fashion event at the Bell Tower Shops on Friday, August 16. Since 2006, the Calendar Girls have supported Paws for Patriots, a program of Southeastern Guide Dogs, which enables wounded warriors to receive a guide dog or veteran assistance dog at no charge. Thanks to the generosity of Southwest Florida, the Calendar Girls have sponsored 11 guide dog puppies. The Calendar Girls at Bell Tower Shops Cartooning WorkshopThe Art League of Fort Myers is offering a Childrens Cartooning Class given by instructor Helen Ding. The workshop will be held September 5 at the Art League Gallery from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Children will learn to apply skills, techniques and processes to create, perform and present their own personal cartooning. The cost is $30 per student. For registration or more information, call 275-3970. Helen DingSend your editorial copy to: press@riverweekly.com We Proudly Brew Tropial Outdoor Patio Seating Get Crabby At The Cow Get Crabby At The Cow with our Famous Stone Crabs1/2 lb & Best Prices On The Planet Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Come Try our NEW Cowlicious Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials Sanibels Most Award Winning Restaurant LIVE Famous Stone Crabs Famous Stone Crabs Always Fresh ...Always! ...Always! with our with our Always Fresh ...Always Fun! Always Fresh ...Always Fun!

PAGE 8

THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 20138 Along The RiverMonday is Labor Day, a holiday that constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Celebrate your contribution to this great nation by relaxing at one of these Lee County destinations. Every Saturday morning, The Alliance for the Arts GreenMarket offers an exclusive selection of locally grown, caught and cultivated foods and other products available to sample and purchase. There is live entertainment by local musicians and activities for kids, gardening classes and live cooking by local chefs. Feel free to bring your fourlegged friends. Eating locally grown and produced foods is good for the area economy and great for your health. Vendors at the GreenMarket offer chemical-free and organic produce, along with fresh baked goods, native plants and all-natural products. Alliance of the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard near the Colonial intersection. It is open year-round from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Call 939-2787 or go to ww.artinlee.org. Relax with your friends and family at Nervous Nellies Crazy Waterfront Eatery in Fort Myers Beach. The restaurant with the fun-loving crew is a lively destination offering food, drinks and live music daily from the areas premier talent. Go to its website for a calendar of live performances. Just upstairs from Nellies is Uglys Waterside Bar, the place where everyone gets prettier. Happy hour specials are served all day, every day. On October 11 to 13, the 8th annual Fort Myers Beach Pirate Fest returns. On Saturday afternoon, watch from Nellies expansive patio as large galleons go to battle with cannons ablaze. Later than evening, dance in the moonlight at the Pirates Ball. Dress in your best pirate garb and win the bounty fair at the Pirate Costume Contest. Fair winds me mateys and see ye thar! Nervous Nellies and Uglys are located at 1131 First Street, Fort Myers Beach. Whether you arrive by land or sea, parking is free for patrons. The GPS coordi81.18 W. Call 463-8077 or go to www.nervousnellies.net. Surround yourself with beautiful butterflies at downtown Fort Myers only eco-attraction called The Butterfly Estates. The crowning jewel of The Butterfly Estates is the 3,614-square-foot Glazed Glass Butterfly Conservatory. Its cascading waterfalls and lush tropical nectar plants house thousands of butterflies that delight guests with their astounding color variations. The fully automated glass structure was commissioned by the project owners in 2006 to create the best possible environment for the sole purpose of protecting and conserving Florida native butterfly species. The Butterfly Estates is located at 1815 Fowler Street. The park is open 365 days a year and convenient hours of operation can be found on the iInternet at www.thebutterflyestates.com. Call 690-2359 for more information. Ahoy mateys! Enjoy a swashbuckling adventure aboard Pieces of Eight pirate ship. Climb aboard the 65-foot replica of a Spanish galleon for an authentic pirate themed cruise for buccaneers young and old. Experience a real-life pirate voyage back through the golden age of piracy. The friendly and sometimes downright scurvy crew of costumed pirates entertains guests while they sail around the areas intracoastal islands and pristine beaches of the Gulf of Mexico. For little pirates, theres face painting, interactive pirate history, games, a limbo dance party and, aye mateys, secret maps and treasure. Parents, sit back, relax and watch your childs excitement while having a little pirate grog and grub. Seasoned seadogs and grown-up pirates can also book adult-only or private charter cruises, sure to bring out the pirate in everyone. The Pieces of Eight pirates are always looking to sign new crew to the account with piratical fun, music, merriment and a full bar. Pirate cruises aboard Pieces of Eight last 90 minutes and depart from Salty Sams Marina, 2500 Main Street, Fort Myers Beach. Reservations are required by calling 765-7272. Go to www.piecesofeight.com for more information. www.SeabreezeNurseries.com (239) 560-1422 WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY We can help! Ask about our Season Discount! Palms, Palms, natives, natives, crotons, crotons, bromeliads, bromeliads, buttery bushes, buttery bushes, & much more & much more Young scallywags stage a mutiny aboard Pieces of Eight pirate cruise The Butterfly Estates is downtown Fort Myers only eco-attraction Please visit our River Weekly News online advertisers at www.islandsunnews.com. You can click through to their Web sites for more information about real estate, shopping, restaurants and services. Just click on the logos surrounding the front page.

PAGE 9

9 THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 2013

PAGE 10

Churches/TemplesALL F aA ITHS UNIT aA RI aA N CONGREG aA TION (UU A) Where diversity is treasured 2756 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers Summer program: Understanding the Faiths of Our Worlds June 2 to August 25 11 a.m. Interim Minister, Rev. Margaret Beard, begins on September 1 239-226-0900. www.allfaiths-uc.org A LLLL SS A INTSINTS BYZA NTINENTINE RITERITE CA THOLITHOLI C C HH U RR C HH 10291 Bayshore Rd., N. Fort Myers Divine Liturgy is on Sun. at 10:30 a.m.; Rosary begins at 10 a.m. Lenten services (Presanctied Liturgy) will be on Wed. evenings at 6 p.m. starting on Feb. 22. Administrator is Very Rev. Peter Lickman, ph. 305-651-0991. We are a Church of the Eastern Catholic or Byzantine Rite, 1.5 mi. east of Int. 75. A NNNN U NN C II A TIONTION GREEGREE K ORTHOORTHO D OO X C HH U RR C HH 8210 Cypress Lake Dr ive, Fort Myers Reverend Fr. George P. Savas Orthros Service Sunday 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy Sunday 10 a.m. www.annunciation.fl.goarch.org 239-481-2099 B ETHETH SHILOHSHILOH M ESSIESSI A NINI C SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 15675 McGregor Boulev ard, 437-3171 Rabbi: Judah Hungerman Friday Service, 8 p.m., Saturday Service, 11 a.m. Shabbat School Saturday Morning, Adult Hebrew Classes. Call for information on full program. B RERE AD OO F LILI F EE M INISTRIESINISTRIES C HH U RR C HH OO F GOGO D 16581 McGregor Boule vard, 267-3166 Just past the Tanger Outlet Mall Pastor: Barry Lentz, 281-3063 Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. C HH AB AD LL UB AV ITIT C HHO O F SS W F LORILORI D A ORTHOOR THO D OO X 5620 Winkler Road, F ort Myers Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz 433-7708, E-mail: rabbi@chabadswf.org Web site: www.chabadswf.org Services: Friday 6:30 p.m.; Saturday Kabbalah class 9 a.m.; Shacharit 10 a.m.; Kiddush at noon Minyan: Monday and Thursday 7 a.m. C HH AP ELEL OO F CYP RESSRESS C OO V EE 10200 Cypress Cov e Circle Fort Myers 239-850-3943, Located at Cypress Cove Retirement Center on HealthPark Campus An ecumenical non-denominational community of believers. Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. Reverendt Ted Althouse, Pastor revtedalthouse@aol.com C HH U RR C HH OO F THETHE C ROSSR OSS 13500 Freshman Lane; 768-2188 Pastor: Bud Stephens; A nondemonimational church emphasizing a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Sunday Service: 9:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 Contemporary. CONGREG aA TION aA L CH uU R cC H 1619 Lle wellyn Drive Fort Myers Just off McGregor across from the Edison/ Ford Winter Estates 334-4978 Pastor: Douglas Kelchner Worship times Sundays 9 and 10:30 a.m. Website: www.taecc.com CO vV EN aA NT PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937 Rev. Dr. Jeffrey DeYoe, Senior Pastor Reverend David Dietzel, Pastor Emeritus. Traditional Sunday service 10 a.m. Nursery available C ypYP RESS LakLAK E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H 8400 Cypress Lak e Drive, Fort Myers, 481-5442 Randy A. Alston, Reverend. Sunday Services: Bible study, 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship, 11 a.m., Evening Worship, 7 p.m., Wednesday Prayer Meeting, 6:30 p.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 481-3233. www.clpc.us. Clint Cottrell, pastor Prayer Service 8 a.m., Praise 9 a.m., Childrens Church 9 a.m., Traditional 11 a.m. Summer: Prayer Service 8 a.m. Combined Traditional/Praise 10 a.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E UNITE dD METHO dD IST CH uU R cC H 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 482-1250, 8 and 11 a.m. Sunday Traditional Service 9:30 a.m. Praise Service Sunday School all times F aA ITH FELLO wW SHI pP wW ORL dD O uU TRE acA C H mM INISTRIES 6111 South P ointe Boulevard, Fort Myers, 278-3638. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Voice of Faith, WCRN 13.50 AM Radio, Sunday, 1:30 p.m.; Thursday Service, 7:30 p.m.; Friday Youth Service, 7:30 p.m. Nursery care for pre-school children and Childrens Church for ages 5-12 available at each service. F aA ITH uU NITE dD mM ETHO dD IST cC H uU R cC H 15690 McGregor Boule vard Fort Myers, 482-2030 Pastor: David Stauffer. Traditional services 8:45 a.m.; Contemporary, 10:30 a.m. Go south on McGregor Boulevard. The church is mile past the intersection of Gladiolus and San Carlos Boulevard on the way to Sanibel. FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF cC HRIST S cC IENTIST 2390 West First Street, next door to Edison Estates. Sunday Morning Service and Sunday School, 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday Evening Testimony Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Child care provided at all services. Visit our Reading Room for quiet study at: 2281 First Street, River District. www.time4thinkers.com, www.christiansciencefortmyers.com, www.christianscience.com FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF THE NazaNAZA RENE 13545 Amer ican Colony Boulevard off Daniels Parkway in the Colony, Fort Myers, 936-2511 Pastor: Reverend Joey Brummett Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Family Night, 7 p.m. F IRSTIRST U NITENITE D M ETHOETHO D ISTIST C HH U RR C HH in the Downto wn Fort Myers River District 2466 First Street, Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-332-1152, www.fumcftmyers.org Sunday: 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 5 p.m. Youth Program FORT M yY ERS CHRISTI aA N CH uU R cC H (DIS cC I pP LES O fF CHRIST) A SS TE pP HEN MINISTRIES CONGREG aA TION 5916 Winkler Road, F ort Myers, 437-4330 Reverend Mark Condrey, Pastor Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Church School: 9:15 a.m. FORT M yY ERS CONGREG aA TION aA L UNITE dD CH uU R cC H O fF CHRIST : 8210 College Parkway, Fort Myers, 482-3133. Philip White, pastor Morning Worship: 10 a.m. Church School: 10:15 a.m. Adult Forum: 11:30 a.m. II ON aA HH O pP E EpEP IS cC O paP A L cC ONGREG aA TION 9650 Gladiolus Dr ive, Fort Myers 4544778 The Reverend Dr. John S. Adler, pastor. Weekly services: Saturday 5 p.m., Eucharist with Healing Sunday 8 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite One; 9:30 a.m., Family Eucharist with Healing and Church School Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Morning Prayer (in Spanish); Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Eucharist with Healing. Child care available at Saturday 5 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m. services. JES uU S THE WOR kK ER C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H: 881 Nuna Avenue, Fort Myers, 481-1143 Masses Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. K INGING D OO M LILI F EE C HH U RR C HH 2154 McGregor Boulev ard, Fort Myers, 218-8343 Pastor Randy and Anita Thurman 10:30 a.m. Sunday Service All are welcome. LambLAMB O fF GG O dD LuLU THER aA N/ EpEP IS cC O paP A L CH uU R cC H Corner Cypress View Drive and Koreshan Boulevard, Three Oaks area, Fort Myers, 267-3525 Walter Fohs, pastor; Becky RobbinsPenniman, associate pastor Sunday worship services: 8 a.m. Early Grace Traditional 9 a.m. Awesome Grace Contemporary 10:30 a.m. Classic Grace Traditional 8:45 & 10 a.m. Sunday School Gods Group NN E wW BEGINNINGS CENTER Ne w Home Church, 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, North Fort Myers, 239-656-0416 Weekly Friday Meeting Meet & Greet: 6:30 p.m. Kingdom Teaching: 7 p.m. Fellowship and refreshments after service. nbcministry@embarqmail.com, www.facebook. com/nbcministry. Alex & Patricia Wiggins, Ministers NENE W C OO V ENEN A NTNT EE Y ESES C HH U RR C HH See Clearly Meeting monthly at 9 a.m. at the Elks Lodge. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, Fort Myers, FL 33907. 239-220-8519 Pastor Alan Bondar www.newcovenanteyes.com Wear what you want, rockin music, relevant teaching, LIFT Kidz program, free coffee & donuts, people who are real, church thats actually fun. NN E wW HH O pP E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H O fF FOR T M yY ERS 16120 San Car los Boulevard, Unit 10 239-985-8503 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m Sunday Morning Worship. 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study NN E wW HH O pP E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 3825 McGregor Boule vard. Fort Myers Pastors: Stu Austin and Howard Biddulph 8 & 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11 a.m. Contemporary Worship 8, 9:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School Youth and Childrens programming runs concurrent to Sunday services. Nursery care provided at all services 274-1230. For more information visit: www.newhopefortmyers.org P EE A C EE CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H Meets at F ort Myers Beach Masonic Lodge 17625 Pine Ridge Road, Fort Myers Beach 267-7400. Pastors Bruce Merton, Gail & RC Fleeman Adult Discussion Classes: 9-10 AM Countdown to Worship (praise music): 10:10 AM Amazing Grace Worship: 10:30 AM Phone 267-7400 Fax 267-7407 Web site: peacecommunitychurch.com e-mail: peace1265@aol.com P EE A C EE LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH Sunday Worship at 9:30am. Peace is a member of the ELCA. We celebrate weekly communion with traditional liturgy, organ and choir. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers On the way to Sanibel. 239-437-2599, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@peaceftmyers.com. RE dD EE mM ER L uU THER aA N cC H uU R cC H 3950 Winkler Ext., Fort Myers, 274-0143 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. Sunday Services Daily early learning center/day care RIRI V ERER OO F LILI F EE A SSESSE MB LL Y OO F GOGO D 21580 Riv er Ranch Rd, Estero 239-495-0400, Senior Pastor: Todd Weston 8 and 9:45 a.m Services; 11:30 a.m. Legacy Service, multi-generational S amudAMUD R abadAB AD R aA buddB UDD HIST cC ENTER Meditation classes All are welcome. Guided meditations offering many methods for relaxing the body and focusing the mind on virtuous objects to bring increasing peace and happiness into daily activity. For information, class times and locations call 567-9739 or visit www. MeditationInFortMyers.org. SaSA INT COL umbkUMBK ILLE C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H 12171 Iona Road, F ort Myers, off McGregor and north of Gladiolus. 489-3973 Father Joseph Clifford. Weekly masses: Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. Weekend masses: Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday: 7, 9,11, and 5:30 p.m. Reconciliation is available at the church on Saturdays at noon and by appointment SaSA INT JOHN THE A pP OSTLE METRO pP OLIT aA N CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H 3049 Mcg regor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 344-0012 Pastor Reverend Steve Filizzi An Affirming & Inclusive Congregation Sunday Services, 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Mid-Week Service, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. SS A INTINT M II C HH A ELEL LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH & SS C HOOLHOOL ( LL CM SS ) 3595 Broadw ay, Fort Myers, 239-939-1218, Worship: Saturday 5:30 p.m., Sunday 8 & 10:45 a.m. Bible Study for adults and children Sunday at 9:15 a.m. Phone for other dates & times. Plus Marriage Enrichment, Divorcecare, Griefshare. SaSA INT PETER LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H 3751 Estero Boule vard, Fort Myers Beach, 463-4251. Sunday worship at 9:30 a.m. Womens Bible Study is offered on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 9:30 a.m. www.stpeterfmb.com SaSA INT NN I cC HOL aA S MON aA STER yY Church and Bookstore:111 Everg reen Road (southwest corner of Evergreen Road and Gail Street.) Liturgical services conducted in English and Church Slavonic; following the Julian (Old) Calendar. Liturgical Services: Sundays and Holy Days: Hours at 9:30 a.m. Holy Liturgy at 10 a.m. Call to confirm service schedule: 239-997-2847; Bookstore: 239-691-1775 or visit www.saintnicholasmonastery.org SS T VIN cC ENT DE P auAU L C aA THOLI cC CO mmuMMU NIT yY 13031 Palm Beach Blvd (3 miles east of I75) East Fort Myers (across from Ft Myers Shores) 239 693 0818 Weekday masses: 9 a.m. Tuesday-Friday Weekend masses: 4 p.m. Saturday Sunday 9 & 11 a.m. All Are Welcome! SS O uU TH wW EST bapB AP TIST cC H uU R cC H 16940 McGregor Boule vard, Fort Myers, 454-3336 Robert G. Kasten, Pastor Sunday Worship Service 11 a.m. Nursery available 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Junior Church grades one to five Wee Church Pre-K to K Evening Service 6 p.m. Wednsday Service 6 p.m. TETE MP LELE B ETHELETHEL SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 16225 Winkler Rd. 433-0018. Rabbi Jeremy Barras E-mail: rabbi.barras@templebethel.com Cantorial soloist: Lawrence Dermer Temple educator: Dale Cohen, MaEd, RJE Shabbat Services, Friday, 7:30 p.m. Torah Study, Saturday, 9:15 a.m.continued on page 11THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 201310

PAGE 11

11 THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 2013 From page 10Churches/TemplesReligious Education; Sunday School and Midweek classes, Preschool Classes, Monday through Friday Web site: www.templebethel.com Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TEMPLE JUDEA (CONSERVATIVE) 14486 A&W Bulb Road, Fort Myers, 433-0201, Rabbi: Rabbi Elyssa Auster President: Keith Grossman Minyan: Monday & Thursday at 9 a.m. Services: Friday night at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Religious School Sunday morning Web site: www.tjswfl.org Preschool director: JoAnn Goldman email templejudeapreschool@gmail.com 433-0201, Web site: www.tjswfl.org Affiliated: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism THE NEW CHURCH The New Church of SWFL is located 10811 Sunset Plaza Circ. #401, behind Zoomers. Rev. Gabriella Cahaley officiates worship services on Sundays at 11 a.m. during the season. Other worship events are held on the beach in Fort Myers Beach. See our webpage http://www.newchurchflorida.com/ or call for more information 239-481-5535. UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH FORT MYERS 13411 Shire Lane (off Daniels Parkway one mile west of I-75) Minister: The Reverend Allison Farnum Sunday services and religious education at 10:30 a.m. For information on all church events call 561-2700 or visit www.uucfm.org. U NITY OF B ONITA S PRINGS Family Service 10 to 11 a.m. Healing Circle 11 a.m. Hospitality and Fellowship, 11 a.m. Inspiring lesson, uplifting and dynamic music, meditation in a loving environment. Service held at 28285 Imperial Street, Bonita Springs. Call 947-3100. UNITY OF FORT MYERS 11120 Ranchette Rd., Fort Myers Summer Services: Sundays at 10 a.m. Childrens class at 10 a.m. Reverend Jim Rosemergy, Minister Our God is Love. Our Race is Human. Our Religion is Oneness. www.unityoffortmyers.org or 239-278-1511 WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 9065 Ligon Court, Fort Myers, across from HealthPark Hospital, 481-2125 Senior Pastor: Robert Brunson Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Blended Worship www.westminsterfortmyers.org W ORD O F L IFE C HURCH 2120 Collier Ave, Fort Myers, 274-8881; Services: Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. Bishop Gaspar and Michele Anastasi Z ION L UTHERAN C HURCH 7401 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, 481-4040, Interim Pastor Jim Eggert Pastor Peter Weeks Sunday Services: 8:30 a.m. Traditional; 10 a.m. Blended Traditional and Contemporary; 11:30 a.m. Contemporary. Childrens Sunday School, Adult /Teen Bible Classes, 10 a.m. T imeless Music At Broadway Palmby Di S aggauIf you like the timeless music of Burt Bacharach, I suggest you make a beeline for Broadway Palm to see Burt and Me. All the incredible songs of the legendary duo, Burt Bacharach and Hal David, are featured in the musical. Songs like Close to You, The Look of Love, What the World Needs Now, Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head and the list continues. The songs are set to a cute story that follows a young couple from high school who meet over their love of basketball and the music of Burt Bacharach. They are separated during college, meet again several years later, and try to rekindle their romance. John Ramsey is Joe, and Kate Marshall is Lacey. They make a charming couple and make beautiful music together. Ramsey has great stage presence and has long been a Broadway Palm favorite. Marshall, who played Princess Fiona in Shrek, again captures hearts in this role. Their best friends Jerry (Rendell DeBose) and Sally (Sheira Feuerstein) add greatly to the cast. DeBose broke me up playing the donkey in the recent production of Shrek and he is doing the same in the role of Jerry. The cast is a Shrek reunion of sorts. Feuerstein also plays the eccentric music teacher Mrs. Bernstein, with comic finesse.continued on page 24 A scene from Burt and Me LORETTA DOROTHY BEAUL IEULoretta Dorothy (Ginther) Beaulieu was born on September 17, 1920 to her parents John and Marie (Petrowski) Ginther in East Chicago, Indiana. She passed away peacefully on August 26, 2013 under the care of Hope Hospice. She attended Roosevelt High School and graduated in 1938 and began working at the Continental Can Company and later for Kraft Foods. She met her late husband and the love of her life, John (Jack) Beaulieu and married him on October 9, 1944. Loretta was an active member of St. Catherine Laboure Guild in Glenview, Illinois and volunteered her time helping others at St. Catherine Laboure Elementary School and later at Holy Family Hospital in DesPlaines, Illinois. She was a Rotary Ann in both Glenview and Cape Coral where she and Jack moved to in 1982. She was a past member of the North Shore Country Club in Glenview and Palmetto Pine Country Club. She was an avid bridge player who enjoyed reading, solving crossword puzzles, and long walks. Survivors include her sister Mary Ann (Ginther) Dobbs; her children Jack (Rosemary) Beaulieu, Peggy (Richard) Schrom, Jeffrey Beaulieu, Nancy Cheyney, and Mark (Jane) Beaulieu; grandchildren John (Shelley) Beaulieu, Alisa (Terry) Cartwright, Christine Beaulieu, Andrew Schrom, Michael (Danielle) Schrom, William, Charles, and Eliza Cheyney, Matthew Beaulieu, Elizabeth Benso, Jake and Sara Beaulieu; great grandchildren Bryce, Cole, Natalie Grace Beaulieu, Teagan and Alexandra Cartwright, Jessica and AJ Schrom, and Vincent Benso. She is preceded in death by her husband of 68 years, her parents, her brothers Robert and John Ginther, and many loving friends. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Friday, August 30, 2013 beginning at 11 a.m. at St. Andrew Catholic Church, Cape Coral, Florida. The family will receive friends at the Fuller Metz Funeral Home, Cape Coral, Florida on Friday, August 30, 2013 from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in memory of Loretta to Hope Hospice, 9470 HealthPark Cir., Ft. Myers, FL 33908. Visit www.fullermetz. com to leave the family a condolence. OB ITUARY STEPHEN P AUL STOS H O NDREJKA, J R.Stephen Paul Ondrejka passed away peacefully in his home surrounded by family and friends on August 22, 2013 after a courageous battle with lung cancer. He was born July 17, 1944 in Cleveland, Ohio to the late Stephen P. Ondrejka Sr. and Eleanor Ondrejka. He is survived by his loving wife Judy, his children Steve (Andrea) of North Fort Myers, Tracy (Jason) Phenes of The Woodlands, Texas, along with five grandchildren; Haley, Cole, Skyler, Addison and Reagan; and his two sisters Sharon (Jerry) Phillips of North Fort Myers, and Jeannie (Clay) Murphy of Wild Rose, Wisconsin. Stosh moved his family from Cleveland, Ohio to Cape Coral, Florida in the early 1970s where he established S.P.O. Construction, Inc. in 1976. He and his son worked alongside each other for many years until his retirement a few years ago. He loved gambling, spending time on his boat fishing and hunting in Alabama. He will be greatly missed by many loving relatives and close friends. A celebration of life open house will be held in his honor on Sunday, September 1, 2013 at the Edison Restaurant, 3583 McGregor Boulevard, from 1 to 5 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Hope Hospice in memory of Stosh. Visit www.fullermetz.com to leave the family a condolence. OB ITUARY Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

PAGE 12

THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 201312 Linesider Time Is Hereby Capt. Matt MitchellAs of September 1, snook season will reopen in Southwest Florida for the first time in over three years, since the major cold fronts of January 2010 caused a huge snook kill. The September opening of snook season has always brought excitement to anglers for as long as I can remember. I have great memories while growing up of being set up and ready to fish while watching the clock on opening night of season. Often this would turn into pulling an all-night shift to get that first keeper snook of the season. Among the many reasons snook are so highly prized among inshore anglers is because of their great fighting ability and the fact they are hard to catch. Snook are the ultimate ambush feeder, which makes landing one much harder than just hooking one. Pulling a big, hard-charging snook out from against structure with fast moving current takes skill, often brute force, and even a little luck sometimes. Landing a big snook is a worthy challenge to any angler with any type of tackle they choose. Snook will eat live bait, dead bait, artificials and flies so they appeal to all types of anglers. Add to that the fact you need to work out their pattern of what tide phase and what type of bait they want to feed on to even get that bite and you have one of the ultimate saltwater gamefish. Catching big snook is addictive and there are many nocturnal fanatics out there who base their sleeping schedule around the best tides during snook season. The common snook, which is one of five species that live in Florida waters, is the largest and most common of the five varieties and can grow to around 40 pounds. The Florida record is 44 pounds 3 oz. but stories of legendary 50-pound-plus fish are all over and just part of the local folk lore. Female snook live longer and grow larger than males; a female snook reaches the minimum 28-inch slot size at four years, while males require five to six years to reach this same size. Females have been documented to live to be 21 years old. In order to harvest a snook in Florida, first off you will need a snook permit for your recreational fishing license. Snook are managed by the region in Florida Gulf and Atlantic with slightly different size limits and seasons on the two coasts. Snook can only be caught by hook and line and must measure between 28 and 33 inches on the Gulf coast to be legal. The bag limit is one per harvester per day. Season is open here from September 1 through December and March 1 through April. With no snook being harvested in our area for three years, we have really good numbers of them around and this season should be very productive. I personally think the Florida Wildlife Commission should have erred more on the side of caution, looking more at the long term picture, and kept the snook fishery on the gulf coast closed for another few years. Snook are no doubt much more valuable to our area than just as a meat fish, and after my first keeper of season hits the hot grease, I choose to release the majority of my slot-sized fish. Being the first of your fishing buddies to get that keeper on the opening day of season is more of a challenge than anything else and will bring bragging rights until next season. With strong falling afternoon tides for the first day of season, the bite should be on and my panko breading and grease will be ready for the first snook filets I have eaten in three years.Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions email captmattmitchell@aol.com. ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint Prices ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Your Bottom Your Bottom Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices 1 Send Us Your Fish TalesThe River Weekly would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include photographs with identification. Drop them at the River Weekly, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, Florida 33901, or email to press@riverweekly.com. Jim White from Gainesville with a 40-inch-plus snook caught this spring while fishing with Capt. Matt Mitchell 472-5800

PAGE 13

13 THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 2013CROW Case Of The Week: Brown Pelicanby Patricia MolloyA wonderful bird is the pelican, His bill will hold more than his belly can. So begins the famous limerick by Dixon Lanier Merritt (1879 to 1972), American humorist and editor of The Tennessean. The brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), a comically elegant seabird native to North and South America, first appeared nearly one hundred million years ago. It has a long lifespan; the oldest recorded brown pelican lived to be 43 years of age. In North America, brown pelicans are listed as endangered due to pesticide pollution, which damages their eggs. Possessing an oversized bill, long curvy neck and short legs, the pelican appears awkward on land but dazzles the spectator with superior aerial maneuvers. Gliding gracefully through the air, a brown pelican can spot bait fish from a height of 50 feet. When it plunge-dives into the water, it stuns the fish, allowing the avian to scoop them up in its giant, expandable throat sac. CROW is currently treating a brown pelican with an injury to one of its webbed feet. The damage is so severe that veterinarian Dr. Heather Barron is weighing the possibility that one of its middle toes may have to be amputated. The biggest concern is whether or not such a surgery will affect its maneuverability. Its not an ideal situation. They are very heavy-bodied birds. When they take off out of the water, they use their feet like little skies, said Dr. Heather. But it is possible that it will do OK. In order to better assess the pelicans condition, it has been moved to the Pelican Complex on CROWs campus, where the bird can move around more freely than inside the clinic. If it is deemed that amputation is necessary, the wildlife veterinarians will carefully stitch the webbing together to minimize the impact on the pelican. The areas rich wildlife cannot afford its own insurance and medical care is very expensive. To help CROW treat sick and injured bald eagles, gopher tortoises, rabbits and of course, this brown pelican (patient #2383), be a good steward of the environment and make a donation. The clinic relies 100 percent on the philanthropic support of individuals, corporations and foundations. Go to CROWs website for more information. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to PO Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit: www.crowclinic. org. Call for departure time CAPTIVACRUISES H T H E I S L A N D S H THE BEST WAY TO SEE THE ISLANDS IS FROM THE WATER Cruises depart from beautiful Captiva Island This brown pelican, patient #2383, is perching in the Pelican Complex where its maneuverability can be assessed

PAGE 14

THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 201314 S electing T he Perfect Pot For Your BonsaiSelecting appropriate pots for your bonsai trees to enhance their presentation will be the program for the Saturday, September 21 meeting of the Bonsai Society of Southwest Florida. Mike Knowlton, a member of the Society and President of Bonsai Societies of Florida, will be the featured speaker. The meeting, which begins at 9 a.m., will be held at the SPALC Building, 6281 Metro Plantation Drive in Fort Myers. The public is invited to attend and experienced members will be available to answer questions about bonsai trees brought to the meeting. There is no fee to attend. The Bonsai Society of Southwest Florida, incorporated in 1973, will hold its annual Bonsai Show at the Lee Election Center in Fort Myers on November 16 and 17. The public is invited to attend; parking and admission are free. Additional information about the Bonsai Society and the upcoming show are available at www.bonsaiswfl.org or by calling Jim Bremer at 482-7543. Plant SmartS upermarket Or Food Desert?by G erri R eavesWhether birds regard your yard as a supermarket or a food desert is deter mined by which plant species are there. Pictured are three lowmaintenance readily available shrubs that can transform a barren yard into a supermarket for birds. Hungry and tired migratory birds, in particular, will appreciate a well-stocked yard when they arrive in South Florida. All three of these popular native shrubs do best in natural gardens where they wont be repeatedly overtrimmed. After all no flowers, no berries. Each is easy to propagate with seeds or cuttings. Those dark green crenellated leaves and deep red berries belong to wild coffee (Psychotria ner vosa), a native of Florida hammocks. The beautiful foliage has made it one of the most popular of native landscape shrubs. Its a fast grower, usually reaching about five feet high, often much higher. The clusters of white flower are followed by those berries birds love. Seedlings sprout near the parent plant. Rouge plant (Rivina humilis) is also native to hammocks. This member of the pokeweed family can grow to a height of six feet or more. It produces spikes of pinkish white flowers throughout the year. The shiny red berries attract many species of birds and the flowers attract butterflies. It easily reseeds. Beauty berrys (Callicarpa americana) swirls of magenta ber ries are a food source for more than 40 species of songbirds. The pale pinkish flowers that attract butterflies will be followed by clusters of fruit that remain on the branches all year. This fast-growing member of the verbena family usually reaches five to six feet tall. Give it a welldrained spot in partial sun to full shade. It is droughtand coldtolerant but not salt-tolerant. The diminishment of wild habitat makes it all the more important to make wildlife friendliness a priority when choosing new plants. What good is a visually pretty landscape if its a food desert? Another tip: Avoid using pesticides, herbicides, and chemical fertilizers so those ber ries are safe for birds to eat. Visit lee.ifas.ufl.edu/FYN/FYNHome.shtml for more help on making your yard wildlifeand Florida-friendly. Plant Smart explores sustainable gardening practices that will help you create an environmentally responsible, low-maintenance South Florida landscape. Beauty berry photos by Gerri Reaves Rouge plant Wild coffee Caring For Your PlantsJoin A Plant S ocietyby Justen DobbsDid you know that there is a society for just about every type of plant and tree you can think of? I have a friend in California who is a member of 12 different local and international societies, including the Bamboo Society, International Palm Society, and Bromeliad Society. If you consider your self an avid gardener or feel like you could improve your greenthumb, you should think about joining a local society. I am a member of the International Palm Society (IPS) and the Palm Society of Southern California (PSSC) and I am thinking about joining the Bromeliad Society International (BSI). Each of these has a website, a network of members locally and worldwide, and also a fun newsletter that comes out quarterly. They are for me a fun, addicting way to spend my free time and some extra spending money on things I enjoy, namely tropical plants. Most societies are not-for-profit and cost around $30 to $40 per year. Some of them, like the IPS, host biennials which are meetings every two years in a different part of the world. The BSI hosts a World Bromeliad Conference every two years as well. This is an opportunity to meet other plant enthusiasts, purchase new species and hybrids, and hear guest speakers tell tales of their expeditions into the jungles of the world. I find it very exciting! Many communities within Fort Myers have their own garden club. I have given presentations at a couple of garden club meetings locally and they are a lot of fun. In my opinion, being a part of a local club or an international society is a great way to escape the stresses of life; email, board meetings, deadlines, bills, etc. In fact, even if you are not a plant enthusiast, joining a garden club or plant society is a great way to develop a network of friends. You can never have too many friends! Many small garden clubs ended up evolving to international societies. You never know what could happen. The Internet has opened up a lot of opportunities with regard to developing networks of people with similar likes and interests. The world is a much smaller place these days because of the Internet, phones and other technology. Make sure you are taking advantage of the technology we have to enrich your life and the lives of those around you. Many not-forprofit societies support field work and graduate studies in their fields and they use donations to fund this work. This can be a great tax write-off if you are in need of one. (I know, tax season is far, far away.) Justen Dobbs is a landscape architect in south Florida specializing in custom, upscale landscapes. He can be reached at seabreezenurseries@gmail. com. Palm societies usually hold meetings at members homes to showcase their gardens To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

PAGE 15

15 THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 2013 From page 1SBDAC Celebrates Five YearsJasper Johns. In his forward to Jansens first book, Donson describes Jansens work as reminiscent of the Ash-Can School, while referring to Jansen as the innovator of Modern Expressionism. Jansens work has been published in Art News, Art in America, The Boston Globe and The New York Times. It has been exhibited at international art fairs including Art Chicago, Art Basel in Miami Beach and Art Verona in Italy. His museum collections include the PERMM Museum of Contemporary Art, the New Britain Museum of American Art, the Moscow Museum of Modern Art (MMOMA), the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art and the Smithsonian Institution. He is also one of the Absolut Vodka artists, alongside names like Damien Hirst, Andy Warhol, and Keith Haring. Jansen had a solo exhibition at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center in May, 2011, titled A Painters Allegory. He is the founder of Unit A Contemporary Art Space in downtown Fort Myers, and his work will be at the international auction house Phillips de Pury, Moscow and Geneva in 2014. Leoma Lovegrove will be exhibiting her painting called Matlacha Spoken Here dur ing the Celebrating 5 Years of the Arts exhibition. The painting is one of over 30 in her Good Day Sunshine series, part of an exclusive collection for Bealls Department Store. With this latest series, Bealls will produce Lovegroves second Resort Collection comprised of products for home such as melamine dishware, rugs, luggage, travel bags, beach chairs and towels, along with apparel and ladies accessories. Bealls will also introduce the Little Leoma brand of childrens clothing. This new collection is bursting with tropical, vibrant colors. It incorporates Lovegroves impressionist paintings of Florida flora and fauna and will be unveiled statewide on December 15. Also on display on September 6 will be Lovegroves colorful Mobile Studio, a fanciful trailer which allows her to take the materials of her art on the road. Lovegrove is an impressionist/expressionist painter known worldwide for colorful depictions of her environment. Her paintings of Florida subjects have been instrumental in encouraging tourism to the state from all over the world. Through the years, thousands visit her waterfront gallery and gardens on Matlacha Island. She shares her island life with author husband Mike Silberg, Solomon the cranky macaw, and three feral cats which include Fred, the rising feline star. David Acevedo was born in Arecibo, Puerto Rico in November, 1975. He graduated cum laude in 1998, with a bachelors degree in visual arts, from the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus. He moved to Southwest Florida in 2000 and has held various positions with the U.S. government, currently supervising a unit of 12 employees. In 2007, he opened his first professional art studio in Fort Myers. In 2008, he moved his studio and transformed it into the well known daas Gallery in downtown Fort Myers. Together with other gallery and business owners, he founded the Fort Myers Art Walk. As a gallery owner and director, Acevedo curated several exhibitions and produced a steady body of work for other galleries and events. In 2009, he received the title of Visual Artist of the Year at Lee Countys Angel of the Arts Awards. The following year, he presented the same award to internationally renowned Marcus Jansen. In collaboration with Scottish artist Ronnie Ford, he founded the Vibrant Arts movement, which allowed him to show his work in different parts of Europe, including Scotland and Germany. In 2011, Mayor Randall Henderson recommended Acevedo into the Fort Myers Public Arts Committee. Also in 2011, the Hotel Indigo in downtown Fort Myers commissioned a mural entitled The Heart of the Citys Sky, which now adorns the Phy in the Sky rooftop lounge. In July of 2012, daas Gallery closed its doors allowing Acevedo to return to the production of art. He opened his second professional studio at the Alliance for the Arts Campus, which he shares with other artists under the name of The Union Artists Studio. Ronnie Ford was born in Dunoon, Scotland and studied at the prestigious Glasgow School of Art, where he graduated BA with honors in sculpture in 1974. After a teaching career spanning almost three decades and two continents, he has been a full-time professional artist for the last 10 years and launched his career with sell-out shows in Hong Kong and London. He has built a strong international presence with regular group and solo shows in Europe, Hong Kong, Singapore, Kuala Lumpur and the U.S. His work is shown widely in European, Asian and American galleries and in art fairs worldwide. Ford is the founder, along with David Acevedo, of the Vibrant Arts Movement, an international, multi-racial, interdisciplinary and ever-growing group, where the arts provide a spiral of inspiration for each other. Fords work has appeared on television several times and was used as a major feature of an MTV music video by Sammie Cheng (Asias number one female Canto pop star). It has been featured several times in Elle Decoration, Eve International, Boutique, The Tatler, Homes and Interiors Scotland, and Scottish Field. His work has been reviewed in Ming Tao, South China Sunday Post, Hong Kong Standard, HK Magazine, Uptown Magazine, Saturday Herald, and Cover Magazine (Hong Kong). Lawrence Voytek has a BFA from Rhode Island School of Design and was Robert Rauschenbergs fabricator from 1982 until Rauschenberg passed away in 2008. The history of art and the business of making art have been my focus in life, says Voytek. He has consulted for art installation, fabrication and restoration with renowned national and international museums and galleries, and his work can be found in many corporate and private collections. Currently, he says, I continue my studies of what matters in life through the arts. The celebratory opening will include many more artists and will feature a variety of performers that have presented at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center. Celebrating 5 Years of the Arts will be on display through September 26. Work by Cesar Aguilar Work by David Acavedo rf ntbnrr bb bb rtttn Loved this restaurant. Fantastic experience. Food was exceptionally amazing. Service was outstanding. TripAdvisor Member, May 2013

PAGE 16

School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Readers, There is a yearlong celebration to honor the progress of and mark the 23rd anniversary of ADA or The Americans with Disabilities Act. President George H.W. Bush signed the ADA into law on July 26, 1990. The ADA prohibits discrimination against any qualified individual with a disability. For those who have a handicap or know someone with a handicap, this law was a huge victory and step forward in providing an equal opportunity to this population. Recently in the Washington Post, there was an article written by Ron Charles about this celebration. Mr. Charles has a 23-year-old daughter with cerebral palsy so the 23rd anniversary of ADA was met with special enthusiasm by Mr. Charles and his family. In his article, he said that, some of the great sources of solace and encour agement over the years have been novels that portray people with special needs sensitively, respectfully and most impor tant realistically. So as part of his recognition of this anniversary, his article contained a list of his top 10 books that have helped the Charles family through the years. Personally knowing the power of words as well as knowing how effective bibliotherapy is, I contacted Mr. Charles and asked if I could pass along his list to my readers. He replied with an enthusiastic Yes! Here are his top ten enjoy. 1. Under the Eye of the Clock by Christopher Nolan (Skyhorse, 1987). This autobiographical novel by the late Irish poet Christopher Nolan, who had cerebral palsy, is a gorgeous and insightful book about the expansive life of a man who seemed entirely trapped in his chair. He pecked out this story with a pencil attached to his forehead. My wife and I have given away more copies than we can count. 2. Lark and Termite by Jayne Anne Phillips (Vintage, 2009). This powerful, complex novel moves between two stories: the No Gun Ri massacre during the Korean War in 1950 and a devastating flood that confronts a West Virginia family in 1959. Termite, a profoundly and multiply handicapped boy, is cared for by his aunt and his devoted 17-year-old half-sister, Lark. Theirs is one of the most affecting sibling relationships in American literature. 3. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon (Vintage, 2003). In this quirky novel from England, a boy with autism tries to figure out the mystery of the death of his neighbors dog. 4. The Revised Fundamentals Of Caregiving by Jonathan Evison (Algonquin, 2012). In this warm-hearted novel, Evison, who once worked as a caregiver, describes the friendship between a down-on-his-luck personal aide and a teen with muscular dystrophy. 5. The Story of Beautiful Girl by Rachel Simon (Grand Central, 2011). Simon, who wrote a celebrated memoir about her sister with special needs, here presents the harrowing adventure of a mentally disabled white woman and a deaf African American man. 6. The Center of Everything by Laura Moriarty (Hyperion, 2003). The 10-year-old narrator of Moriartys wonderful debut novel lives with a frustratingly irresponsible mother and a little brother whose special needs should break this family but dont. 7. Up High in the Trees by Kiara Brinkman (Grove, 2007). Brinkmans narrator, an 8-year-old with Aspergers syndrome, describes his familys efforts to survive in the wake of his mothers death. For anyone bravely grasping for order and solace amid unspeakable loss. 8. Lamb in Love by Carrie Brown (Algonquin, 1999). A delightful novel about the late-in-life romance between a postmaster and a woman who cares for a young man with special needs. 9. Good Kings Bad Kings by Susan Nussbaum (Algonquin, 2013). Winner of the PEN/Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction, Nussbaums novel is about a group home for young people with special needs. 10 My Index of Slightly Horrifying Knowledge by Paul Guest (Ecco, 2008). Okay, Im cheating. This isnt a novel; its a collection of poems. But Guest, paralyzed from a bike accident when he was 12, writes courageous, funny, angry verse that shows what human beings and poetry can do. Ms. Greggs is adjunct faculty at Edison State College where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also Nationally Certified School Psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. Demetre GraduatesEmily Diana Demetre, a resident of Fort Myers, earned an Associate in Arts and Science degree from Illinois Central College. Graduation cer emonies were held on May 18, 2013 in the ICC CougarPlex on the East Peoria, Illinois campus. Clemson GradEvan R. Schreiner of Fort Myers graduated from Clemson University August 9 with a Master of Science degree in Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. Schreiner was among more than 800 students who crossed the stage at Littlejohn Coliseum to get their degrees and congratulations from President James F. Barker.. Winterburn Makes Deans ListWashington College in Chestertown, Maryland, has announced its Deans List for the Spring 2013 semester. Rebecca Winterburn of North Fort Myers, class of 2013, English major, was recognized for academic excellence and achieving a grade point average of 3.5 or higher for the semester. Founded in 1782 under the patronage of George Washington, Washington College is a private, independent college of liberal arts and sciences located in historic Chestertown on Marylands eastern shore. Isabella Rasi 239-246-47161101 Periwinkle Way #105, Sanibel, FL 239-472-0044 ENGEL & VLKERS Excellence in Real Estate A step above! International Client Base 600 Shops Worldwide Multi-Lingual Staff Your success is my aim. Canterbury School Wins Two Golden Image AwardsOn August 6, Canterbury School of Fort Myers was awarded two Golden Image Awards from The Florida Public Relations Association (FPRA) for its Grandparent Annual Fund Appeal Brochure. The first award Canterbury won was the Golden Image Award, which is the highest honor presented by the FPRA. The Golden Image Award was received in the Printed Tools of Public Relations category for the brochures design and content. The Judges Award was presented to the organization that achieves maximum results on a limited budget. Canterbury created a customized personal brochure for each grandparent featuring a photo of their grandchild(ren). It was a huge success. Our grandparents absolutely loved receiving a photo(s) of their grandchild(ren) on the brochure. This accomplishment was truly a team effort, working collaboratively with Carolyn Rogers, Simply PR and Mrs. Sunny Lubner, Canterburys grandparent chair. It was extremely gratifying to have reached our grandparents in a way that so touched their hearts, said Deborah Johnson, director of development. The Golden Image Awards have become a standard of public relations excellence in the state of Florida. Winners demonstrate the best examples of innovation, planning and design. To advertise in the Island Sun Call 395-1213 THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 201316

PAGE 17

17 THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 2013

PAGE 18

THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 201318 S eptember At Lakes R egional LibraryNext months roster of activities at Lakes Regional Library offers topics for all ages. The following activities are free to the public: ADULTS English Caf, Mondays, September 9, 16, 23 Practice your English with English Cafe, a free, conversation session for adult ESOL and ESL students. Each 90-minute session provides adult learners an opportunity to practice speaking English with native speakers. Participants may start at any time. Advanced registration is not necessary. Book Discussion: The Art Forger by B.A. Shapiro, 2 p.m. Tuesday, September17 Read and discuss Shapiros novel based on the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Heist in 1990. Registration is required. FAMILIES Toddler Storytime, 10 a.m. Wednesdays, September4, 11, 18, 25 Children two years old and their caregivers participate in song, fingerplays and short stories. The success of this age group depends on adult participation and encouragement. Toddler storytime lasts approximately 30 minutes. Family Storytime, 11 a.m. Wednesdays, September 4, 11, 18, 25 This program is for the whole family and lasts about 30 minutes. Registration is required. Baby-Parent Rhyme Time, 10 a.m. Monday, September 9, 16, 23 Be prepared to tickle, jump and fly with your baby! These rhymes and songs are for infants, up to 24 months, accompanied by an adult. This 20-minute program is filled with songs designed to introduce rhyming and movement to infants. Registration is required. CHILDREN Reading Academy, 4:30 p.m. Wednesdays, September 4, 11, 18, 25 Books + puppets + drawing = fun! The library provides the puppets and mini drawing boards for this interactive event. Join the gr oup each week for new stories and games. This program is designed for children who can read and write. For children in first to fifth grade. Sponsored by the Friends of Lakes Regional Library. Registration is required. Preschool Storytime, 11 a.m. Mondays, September 9, 16, Preschoolers (ages 3 to 5) attend this storytime independently while parents or caregivers wait nearby in the library building. This storytime includes activities that require more participation and a longer attention span. Each preschool storytime lasts about 30 minutes. Registration is required. You Can Make a Graphic Novel!, 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, September 10 Do you love reading about Spiderman, Baby Mouse, or Big Nate? Ever wanted to draw your own graphic novels? Discover the ins and outs of comic books and learn how to create your own. For grades K-5. Sponsored by the Friends of Lakes Regional Library. Registration is required. Pirate Week at Lakes Library, Monday, September 16 21 Available during normal library hours: Monday Wednesday: 9 a.m. 8 p.m.; Thursday: 9 a.m. 6 p.m.; Friday, Saturday: 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Ahoy, landlubbers! Sail into the library for a pirate-themed activity each day this week. No registration necessary. For ages 2-12. Kids Read Down Fines, 2 3 p.m. Saturday, September 21Children and teens can earn a $2 coupon for every 15 minutes of reading, dur ing the allotted time. A total of $8 per day may be earned. For ages 18 and younger. Credit may be applied to cards issued to patrons age 18 and younger only.Fall Fest!, 6 p.m. Wednesday, September25 Here in Florida, there may not be falling leaves and a chill in the air, but one can still celebrate fall. Take part in autumn-themed crafts, games and trivia. Professional balloon artist Jonathon Simpson will be on hand to make a balloon animal for each child. Sponsored by the Friends of Lakes Regional Library. For grades K-5. Registration is required. TEENS Kids Read Down Fines, 2 3 p.m. Saturday, September 21 Children and teens can earn a $2 coupon for every 15 minutes of reading, during the allotted time. A total of $8 per day may be earned. For ages 18 and younger. Credit may be applied to cards issued to patrons age 18 and under only. The Lakes Regional Library is located at 15290 Bass Road in Fort Myers. For more information about a program or to register, call 533-4000. A sign language interpreter is available with five business days notice to library staff. Assistive listening system available; request at desk. White Book SigningHannah Smith returns in Deceived, a stunning new adventure novel from Randy Wayne White, the New York Times bestselling author of the Doc Ford series. The Sanibel Bookshop will be hosting White for a book signing, taking place at 1571 Periwinkle Way (additional parking will be available across the street at VIP), on Thursday, September 5 starting at 6:30 p.m. White will give a short talk and question-and-answer session. The book signing will last about one hour, or until White has finished signing. Books must be purchased from the Sanibel Bookshop to receive a ticket for the signing line. In this gripping new novel, a 20-yearold unsolved murder from Floridas pothauling days gets Hannah Smiths attention, but so does a more immediate problem. A private museum devoted solely to the states earliest settlers and pioneers has been announced, and many of Hannahs friends and neighbors in Sulfur Wells are being pressured to make contributions. The problem is, the whole thing is a scam, and when Hannah sets out to uncover whoevers behind it, she discovers that things are even worse than she thought. If you cant attend the event but would like to purchase an autographed book, please call 472-5223 to pre-pay and well have one or more copies signed and reserved for you. Mientkiewicz Named Manager Of T he Year As H is Playoff-Bound Miracle S eek League T itleby E d FrankIn the 22 years that the Fort Myers Miracle baseball franchise has been here, weve seen dozens of youngsters who went on to become Major League stars. But its doubtful there has been a single season with as much talent as this years playoffbound Miracle. And dont be surprised if rookie Miracle Manager Doug Mientkiewicz someday is a Big League manager himself having just been named Florida State League Manager of the Year. Thats quite an honor for a first-year manager. The popular and colorful Mientkiewicz guided seven Miracle players to the FSL All-Star game in June plus he has the distinction of managing two of the three top prospects in all of baseball. In addition, his Miracle squad won the South Division Championship for the seasons first-half in a runaway fashion. Bryon Buxton, the current Miracle center fielder, is rated No. 1 by both Baseball America and MLB.com. Last Fridays performance proved why he is No. 1. He reached base seven times and scored three runs in a Miracle double-header sweep over St. Lucie. In the month of August, he is hitting over .400. Just 19 years old, he is certain to be playing at a higher level next season. If you want to see Buxton in action, you had better attend the final two home games of the regular season today, Friday, or Sunday or next Wednesdays playoff game against the Miracles likely opponent, the Charlotte Stone Crabs. Miquel Sano is the second top prospect that Mientkiewicz guided this year. Ranked No. 3 by Baseball America, the 20-year-old third-baseman began the year with the Miracle where his power (22 home runs) quickly earned him a promotion to Double A New Britain where in the last 34 games he is hitting .276 with 11 more home runs. Last Sunday he belted two monster home runs, the third time this season he has had multi-homer games. When Mientkiewicz got the Miracle position, his only previous managing experience had been as a batting coach for a rookie level team in the Los Angeles Dodger organization. We questioned Minnesota Twins General Manager Terry Ryan why he named the former Twins first-baseman to a relatively high minor league position in his first managing job. Hes a winner, thats why, Ryan answered. How right he was. Miracle Playoff ScheduleBy virtue of winning the division championship in the first half of the season, the Miracle had the choice of either beginning the best-of-three first-round playoff series on the road or home. By selecting to start on the road, the Miracle will have home field advantage for Game Two and Game Three if the third game is necessary.The first game will be Wednesday, most likely in Charlotte as the Stone Crabs had a 3-1/2game first-place lead beginning the final week of the regular season. The series then moves here to Hammond Stadium for Game Two Thursday and Game Three, if necessary, Friday. The division winner will play the North Division Champion for the FSL title. Playoff tickets can be purchased at the Miracle offices in Hammond Stadium. County Once Again Courts Washington Nationals for City of Palms Park Once again, Lee County is attempting to lure the Washington Nationals to the vacant City of Palms Park in downtown Fort Myers after Osceola County rejected a proposal to build a $98 million spring training facility for the team. The last time the county went-a-courting the Nationals, the team asked the county for $36 million to fix up the ballpark. It has been little used since being vacated by the Boston Red Sox in 2011 when the county built Boston a new $80 million facility on East Daniels Parkway. Since tourism tax dollars are not available, the county said it will seek a private partnership for the possible project. Doug Mientkiewicz

PAGE 19

19 THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 2013 Annual Celebrity Basketball FundraiserOn Saturday, August 31, Make Moves Records presents the 5th annual James Brunson Celebrity Basketball Game. Doors open at 4 p.m. The fundraiser benefits the James Boosie Brunson Youth Development Educational Foundation (JBF). Celebrity participants include Javarris James, Cadillac Williams, Earnest Graham, Richard Washington, Mario Henderson, Andrew Lavton, Lil Kee and Jeremy Ware. Music will be provided by Dreamteam Rad and J-Style. The JBFs mission is to create universal understanding through educational scholarships to recipients who are trying to make a better life for themselves and their families. With an education, local youth can achieve their goals and the foundation continues to assist students in making their dreams come true. Tickets are a $10 per person or $25 for VIPs. The event is family-friendly and admission for the first 50 kids is free. The James Brunson Celebrity Basketball game takes place in the gym at Dunbar High School, 3800 Edison Avenue, Fort Myers. Call 334-7388. Canterbury Students See Steady ACT Scoressubmitted by Lauren Shipes, Director of Strategic Communications for Canterbury SchoolACT scores are in, and Canterburys High School students have once again demonstrated academic excellence though the schools scores. With above average scores in all testing areas, including a score of 27 in English, 26 in Math, 27.5 in Reading and 25.3 in Science, Canterburys scores are evidence of our focus on academic excellence, college preparedness and our students readiness for the academic rigor they will find in college. In addition to excellent grades in rigorous courses, explained Canterbury Director of College Guidance Melissa Wilson, ACT scores are highly scrutinized in the admissions process. While most colleges report a range of scores for admitted students, suffice it to say that with higher scores come more acceptances to highly competitive universities. Canterbury Schools SAT averages will be released in September. The James Brunson Celebrity Basketball game is held at the Dunbar High School gym Sponsors Sought For Cops & Joggers 5K EventHodges University, Sprint and Suncoast Beverages have signed on to sponsor this years Cops & Joggers 5K and Family Fun Night to be held at Centennial Park, located at 2000 West First Street in downtown Fort Myers, on Saturday, September 28 from 6 to 10 p.m. Sponsorship opportunities are still available from $150 to $1,000. Sponsorships should be reserved no later than September 1. For more information about sponsorships or to become a sponsor, contact either Office Jesus Ramos at jramos@fmpolice.com or 851-0040, or Denise Egolf at degolf@fmpolice.com or 321-7723. Benefitting fallen police officers and firefighters, this years event will take place during the evening hours with the glow of first responders lights lining the race path. Each runner will also be given two glow bracelets to wear during the race, while glow sticks, necklaces and bracelets will be available for sale. Featuring DJ Nestor Barreiro, the event will include a silent auction, food vendors and a childrens fun area with bounce houses and family activities. Our goal for this years race is to have 716 runners, each runner representing an officer who was killed in the line of duty during the past five years since weve hosted this event, said Lt. Jeffrey Bernice of the Fort Myers Police Department. It is an honor that we run for the memories of these fallen warriors who have made the ultimate sacrifice. Beginning at 7:45 p.m., the 3.1mile run begins and ends at Centennial Park and will cross the Edison Bridge. Participating joggers may register online with the Fort Myers Track Club at www. ftmyerstrackclub.com. The early registration fee is $20 per adult and $15 per youth, 17 years old or younger, on or before September 26. Fees increase to $25 per person on September 27 and $30 per person on September 28 for all participants. The Fort Myers Cops & Joggers 5K was first established in 2008 to assist the family of officer Andrew Widman who was shot and killed in the line of duty on July 18, 2008. Proceeds from this years event will benefit the FMPD Fallen Officers Memorial Fund and The Brotherhood Ride, both organizations aid the families of fallen police officers and firefighters who have been injured or killed in the line of duty. For more information about the event, contact Lt. Jeffrey Bernice at jbernice@ fmpolice.com or 321-7698. Time to Refurnish Your Home or Condo? QUALITY PRODUCTS FROM: CARLTON, CAPRIS, LANE, FLEXSTEEL, SUMMIT DESIGN, DOUGLAS, QUALITY WICKER, SEA WINDS, SIMMONS, RESTONIC, BODY REST, REBWOOD, FOREST DESIGN, SHAW, PATIO DESIGN, BEST AND MORE.LARGE SELECTION OF WICKER & RATTANOur Experienced Staff Will Help You Coordinate Delivery While Youre Here or Away OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FURNITURE WORLD CAN HANDLE ALL YOUR NEEDS! Special in i Sof Sleeper CONDO PACKAGE3 OR MORE ROOMS OF FURNITURE$6162CALL FOR DETAILS15631 SAN CARLOS BLVD, FORT MYERSCONVENIENT LOCATION FROM SANIBEL & FT. MYERS BEACH239-489-3311 www.furniture-world.net PLUMBING $ 35 OFF ON ANY SERVICE Call 935-5058Voted e Best Plumbing Co. 10 straight years! 35 OFF ON ANY SERVICE www.AztecPlumbing.net FREE Estimates

PAGE 20

THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 201320 Financial FocusE xplore T he World Of I nternational I nvestments by Jennifer BaseyYoure probably accustomed to measuring the progress of your investments, and the overall condition of the investment world, by checking on indexes such as the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500. And since these types of benchmarks focus almost exclusively on American companies, you might get the idea that the best investments are located right here in the United States. But that impression would be false because there are, literally, a world of investment opportunities beyond the U.S. borders. In fact, as of the end of 2010, U.S. stock markets constituted less than a third of the total global stock market value, according to the World Bank. And you can probably just look around at the products you use in your daily life to identify many successful foreign companies. Why invest a portion of your portfolio internationally? Here are a couple of reasons to consider: States is a mature, highly developed that we have no upside here. However, you can also find considerable growth potential in emerging markets countries such as China, India, Brazil and Mexico that are characterized by younger, less mature economies. cial markets are somewhat dependent on one another, but that doesnt mean they constantly move in unison. In any given year, the U.S. markets may be down, but international markets might be doing better. Consequently, if during that year, you had invested only in U.S. companies, your portfolio may have taken a hit. Its important to diversify your portfolio by investing in many different vehicles, but you can also boost your diversification through geography. (Keep in mind, though, that diversification cant guarantee a profit or protect against loss.) While international investing can be beneficial, it does not come without risks. For one thing, when you invest overseas, you may encounter political instability, which could threaten the financial mar kets of a country or region. Conversely, financial problems, such as the European debt crisis, can result in loss of confidence in individual governments. Also, you might experience currency risk, which means that changes in the value of the U.S. dollar relative to foreign currencies could harm the value of your investments. And in any given year, any market, for eign or domestic, may be down. Ultimately, you should probably limit your exposure to international investments to no more than 20% to 25% of your overall portfolio, with the exact amount, if any, depending on your situation your goals, risk tolerance, time horizon, financial situation and other factors. You may also want add an international flavor to your portfolio by investing in quality U.S. companies that do a considerable amount of business abroad. In any case, given the more complex nature of international investing, youll want to consult with a financial professional before writing a check. Still, consider the international investment world. With a little exploring, you may discover some good possibilities out there. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@edwardjones.com. T op 10 R eal E state S ales Development City Year BuiltSquare FootageListing PriceSelling PriceDays on Market Bonita Beach Bonita Springs 20034,180$3,750,000$3,375,00097 Woodmont Bonita Springs 20033,021$889,000$828,000 123 No Subdivision Sanibel19952,485$1,200,000$825,000 241 Shadetree Pointe Fort Myers 20063,449$812,000$759,000 49 Renaissance Fort Myers 20123,280$775,000$700,000 189 Sanibel Bayous Sanibel19872,276$559,000$520,000 394 Everest Cape Coral 20042,203$495,000$475,000 91 Porto Romano Miromar Lakes 20082,407$550,000$460,000 195 Palm Acres First AdditionFort Myers 19862,695$599,900 $430,000 68 Sands Estates Cape Coral 20132,553$439,750$405,000 183Courtesy of Royal Shell Real Estate Canterbury H osts Chinese S tudentssubmitted by Lauren S hipes, Director of S trategic Communications for Canterbury S choolOn Saturday, August 21, Canterbury School of Fort Myers welcomed five Chinese exchange brought to Canterbury School in partnership with the Cambridge Institute of International Education, to provide them opportunities to study in the United States alongside American students, and learn more about the American culture. Southwest Florida, while attending Canterbury School for three years until they graduate in 2016. by families who guide them on their cultural and educational journey. the globe for the privilege of studying with us, and we are excited to show them the unique opportunities Canterbury School has to offer, said Julie Peters, director of admission. Sophomore exchange student Bohan first time in America, Bohan said. I love Florida. Fort Myers is a very developed town. My host family is very kind, and has shown me much of the local culture. and have helped me with the transition. Mrs. Julie Peters has helped me acclimate to my new school life. will enrich learning for Canterburys exchange program allows us to broaden our cultural diversity, strengthen our ability to educate students of different backgrounds, foster meaningful cultural exchanges, and increase global exposure program enriches their perspective on the world, says Peters. Students work on research projects together, both in and ized perspective to our students. International Education has worked with over 180 schools in 40 states to create meaningful and sustainable international programs, bringing diverse groups of students to high schools across the United States. Its goal is to increase the international profile of American educational institutions and to promote cultural exchange by cultivating relationships among youth in countries with mature, burgeoning, and rapidly changing economies. S WFL I nternal Auditors Meetinghe September meeting of the Southwest Florida Chapter of the Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA) and will feature State Representative Ray will be held at the Holiday Inn, 9931 Interstate Commerce Drive in Fort Myers.Elected to the Florida House in 2012, Rodrigues serves as the Vice Chair of the Higher Education & Workforce Subcommittee, is a member of the Joint Legislative Audit Committee and Operations Appropriations and the Healthy Families Subcommittees. Registration starts at 5 p.m. on September 3, followed by dinner and the bers, $35 for non-members and $25 for students. Meeting attendees are eligible for 1.0 hour CPE credit. sions global voice, recognized authority, acknowledged leader, chief advocate and principal educator. Members work in internal auditing, risk management, governance, internal control, information technology audit, education and security. For additional information, contact Cyndi Ralph at iia.swfchapter@gmail.com or visit the Southwest Florida IIA Chapter website at https://chapters.theiia.org/ southwest-florida/Pages/default.aspx.

PAGE 21

a le i e a e S S S aite lan Drive nchor Dr K 239/699-9597 aptiva Drive S D ay i e illa S lfert S K in er Dr S in ren D prey t S n ial Special Enjoy your Labor Day!A celebration of the American Worker new i tin t re ce 21 THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 2013

PAGE 22

THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 201322 Adam Putnam, Commissioner Of Agriculture, TT ours Food Bank On August 13, Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services Commissioner Adam Putnam thanked the agriculture community and toured the Harry Chapin Food Bank. Putnam thanked growers and packers for helping the Harry Chapin Food Bank improve the nutritional value of the food it distributes to Southwest Floridians in need through their collaborative efforts to glean and provide the food bank with produce that is unsalable through normal channels. During a tour of the food bank, Putnam and Robin Safley, director of the school food and nutrition program, shared some innovative ways that they work with school districts to improve the health and wellness of students through better nutrition. Putnam said that, although Florida has plenty of food, getting it to those in need requires setting up systems and processes. He also thanked farmers for participating in the Farmers Feeding Florida program to get food from Floridas farms to hungry children, seniors and families throughout the state. The Farmers Feeding Florida program was developed in 2009 to partner with the agriculture community to feed Floridas continued on page 24 The group tours the Harry Chapin Food Bank facility on August 13 Putnam speaking to the audience Aaron Troyer, Al Brislain and Heather Fitzenhagen Rebecca Brislain, Robin Safley and Kim Jamerson Dr. Bernie Lester and Dan Casper Dr. Wilson Bradshaw, Liesa Priddy and Russell Priddy Robin Safely and Ron Hamel

PAGE 23

23 THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 2013deaRPharmacistProtect E yesightby S uzy Cohen, R PhDear Pharmacist: I need more options to protect my vision. I take prescription eye drops, but Im steadily declining. RJ, Decatur, Illinois Im sorry to hear that. Im always researching ways to protect eyesight because it is so precious, and often taken for granted. Even if you use prescription drops like Timolol, Xalatan, Restasis, Zaditor, Travatan, Acular, or the eyelash growing Latisse, supplements are usually OK. Numerous multi-tasking formulas are sold at pharmacies, and they contain all the key eye-nourishing ingredients like minerals, omega 3 fatty acids and B vitamins. These lay a good foundation, but may not be enough. So even if you take Ocuvite or I-caps, for example, its probably alright to take one of the nutrients I list below, or both for that matter. Since we are dealing with your eyes, get your ophthalmologists blessings for any new supplements, even if they are sold without a prescription. Astaxanthin Sold nationwide, it gets my stamp of approval for macular degeneration and glaucoma-based upon my research. This is a soft-gel, it is not an eye drop. Astaxanthin can be thought of as a cousin of beta carotene. Because it can reduce Asthenopia or eye fatigue by 54 percent, and I work on a computer, I take this. Astaxanthin is a protective antioxidant, it never goes prooxidant like other nutrients. Forget your eyes, studies prove it helps joint pain, supports healthy cholesterol levels, eases fine lines and improves endurance. Since I take 12mg BioAstin every day myself, I can vouch for these benefits from my own personal experience. Being both lipophilic and hydrophilic, it slides easily into every single cell, your brain too. Do the studies prove it? Yes. Astaxanthin is helpful for diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, eye strain and seeing things in fine detail. A new study, published in Molecular Vision, July 25, 2013, found that the natural astaxanthin reduced oxidative stress on retinal pigment epithelial cells which just so happen to play a crucial role in the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration. That study concurs with dozens of others. Astaxanthin supplements are sold at health food stores nationwide. Hyaluronic acid I think this supplement is perfect for dry eye. Its naturally found in your vitreous humor, which is the gel-like liquid in your eye. It may help floaters, glaucoma, a detached retina or diabetic retinopathy. Doctors sometimes suggest taking hyaluronic acid supplements to improve recovery and minimize scarring after cataract surgery. It is fabulous for bones (think osteoporosis) and skin. Hyaluronic acid is the star ingredient in skin fillers like Restylane and Juvederm. Supplements are touted to restore hair color (not sure about that one!) and disorders that damage the vocal cords. Since my focus is on eyes, Ill tell you that hyaluronic acid can be taken as an oral supplement, and its sold at health food stores. I havent tried any brands myself. I found eye drops with it. One is AMO Blink Contacts Lubricating Drops and the other is Oxyal. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. dearpharmacist.com. Mom And Me by Lizzie and PryceLizzie and Pryce answer your questions and give advice about aging concerns from a two-generational perspective. A mother and daughter team, Lizzie is a retired RN and health educator, and Pryce is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in the care of elders and people with chronic illnesses. Dear Mom & Me, I have been a widow for over 40 years, a widow longer than I was married. My friends are always asking me when am I going to give up my apartment and go to a retirement living complex. I am happy living alone; I drive my own car, walk a mile each day and play bridge at least three times a week. I am not ready to go and live around all those old people. I know I am 92 years old because my one knee tells me so. But I am going to have that replaced in three weeks, and when it heals I will be able to walk two miles each day. Why do others go into all of these places? Agnes Dear Agnes, I wish I could meet you! You are an inspiration and younger people should listen to your philosophy of life. Some people find aging to be a very difficult adventure and depend on others to meet their needs. I wish there were more people like you! Lizzie Dear Agnes, Hats off to you! Living as you want without caving in to the pressures of society that if you are of a certain age you should do or not do certain things or live in a certain place blah, blah, blah. Life is meant to be lived continue living and setting a wonderful example for younger generations. Pryce Lizzie and Pryces email address is momandmeaging@hotmail.com. Care For T he Care G ivers PresentationFeeling overwhelmed and drained by the weight you bear as a caregiver? Busy attending to others, caregivers often neglect their own needs. Awardwinning author and life coach Yosaif August will visit Cape Coral Hospital to discuss innovative strategies that help to effectively manage responsibilities so you can also focus on caring for yourself. We are honored to welcome Yosaif and learn from his personal experience as a caregiver, explained Joany Odorizzi, RN, nursing director of Progressive Care and Vascular Access Nursing at Cape Coral Hospital. Caregivers often dont realize the toll it takes on them. The skills and understanding August provides can benefit personal or professional caregivers, as well as their loved ones, by working to improve the experience for everyone involved. August will present Care For The Care Givers from 11 a.m. until noon on Wednesday, September 11 at Cape Coral Hospital, highlighting concepts and tools from his new book, Coaching for Caregivers: How to Reach Out Before You Burn Out. Meet August during a book signing, which will follow from noon until 1 p.m. According to the CDC, more than 34 million unpaid caregivers provide care to someone age 18 and older who is ill or has a disability. Caregivers report having difficulty finding time for ones self, managing emotional and physical stress, and balancing work and family responsibilities. August offers valuable insight on how to make time for yourself by beginning a process that will share the caregiver load and shorten your to do list. August is a health care innovator who acquired insight and perspective through his experience as a patient and later as a caregiver for his father. He is the founder of Healing Environments, International (HEI), a company that promotes patientcentered care and healing environments. He co-wrote Help Me to Heal with Dr. Bernie Siegel; and, as a life coach, focuses on helping people with medical issues and their caregivers. August also created Bedscapes, the award-winning concept of using nature inspired images and sounds to create a comfort zone for patients in an otherwise sterile environment. For more information, visit www. coachingforyourhealth.com. Yosaif August Lecture On Metabolic S yndromeLee Memorial Health System introduces a new monthly lecture series designed to cover a variety of health care topics to help improve your physical and mental well-being. These interactive and informative lectures are presented by Dr. Sal Lacagnina, vice president of health and wellness and medical director of the wellness centers in Cape Coral and Fort Myers. This months topic is Prevent the Perfect Storm of Disease: Metabolic Syndrome, to be held on Tuesday, September 3 at 12:30 p.m. in the Auxiliary Meeting Room at Cape Coral Hospital, 636 Del Prado Blvd. in Cape Coral. Metabolic syndrome is a preventable disorder which involves elevations in blood pressure, glucose, triglycerides, weight and a decrease in HDL. These medical problems increase the risk of cardiovascular disease as well as diabetes and other chronic medical problems. With lifestyle modification, most of these problems can be avoided. Dr. Lacagnina is board certified in internal medicine and has been in practice since 1993. He is passionate about preventive health care and shares his knowledge of simple and effective ways to age gracefully and healthfully. Seating is limited and reservations are requested. Call 573-4508. Salvatore Lacagnina Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

PAGE 24

THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 201324 R asmussen College Faculty And E mployees V olunteer For U nited Way Day Of CaringRasmussen College faculty and employees participated in a United Way Day of Caring that assisted Brightest Horizons Childcare and the JH Messina Childrens Center. This United Way Day of Caring was conducted in conjunction with Rasmussen Colleges annual Community Service Day. At Brightest Horizons, the volunteers refurbished flower beds with mulch, sanitized childrens play areas and interacted with children in different classrooms. At the JH Messina Childrens Center, a facility of Child Care Southwest Florida, volunteers sanded, repaired and painted furniture in classrooms. Rasmussen College is dedicated to making the communities it serves a better place to live, grow and learn. Throughout the day on Friday, July 19, staff and students from its six Florida campuses teamed up with organizations throughout Florida, offering more than 840 hours of service as part of the Rasmussen College Community Service Day. With the help of United Way of Lee, Hendry and Glades, Rasmussens Fort Myers campus had an opportunity to serve its community, said Tom Toner, Campus Director. The volunteer hours given by the Rasmussen College employees and faculty have made a big difference for two United Way Partner Agencies. Rasmussens Colleges Community Service Day shows their great commitment to making our community a better place to live, said Cliff Smith, President of the United Way of Lee, Hendry and Glades. The United Ways Days of Caring is a year-round program that connects businesses with nonprofit agencies in need of assistance. Businesses have many choices as they select projects as needed by the agencies, including the type of project, location in our community, degree of physical labor, and time commitment. The United Way Volunteer Center connects individuals and companies to volunteer opportunities throughout our community. You can reach The United Way Volunteer Center by calling 433-2000 ext. 260. Rasmussen College volunteers at Child Care of Southwest Floridas Messina Center Rasmussen College volunteers at Brightest Horizons Child Care From page 22Putnam Tours Food Bankhungry. Growers and packers commonly have a surplus of produce that may not be harvested or distributed because of market conditions or other factors, such as size of produce or blemishes on fruits and vegetables. The Florida Association of Food Banks, along with the Harry Chapin Food Bank, works with farmers and packers to recover these wholesome foods and to distribute them to hungry people in Florida The food bank tour offered the agriculture community an opportunity to ask questions and to see firsthand how important their nutritious donations are for the health of families in our community. Thanks to these farmers, the Harry Chapin Food Bank distributed 4.8 million pounds of fresh vegetables and fruit last year. The Harry Chapin Food Bank solicits, collects and stores quality food for distribution to families in need through a network of 150 nonprofit agencies in Lee, Collier, Hendry, Charlotte and Glades counties that provide food to more than 30,000 people monthly. The food bank distributes more than one million pounds of food each month. For each $1, the food bank can distribute $6 worth of food and groceries. In the past fiscal year, the Harry Chapin Food Bank distributed more than 16.6 million pounds of food and other grocery items valued at more than $27 million. This is roughly the equivalent of 13.8 million meals to people in need. Others who participated in the tour were Al Brislain, CEO, Harry Chapin Food Bank; Wilson and Jo Anna Bradshaw, FGCU; Rebecca Brislain and Chip Hinton, Florida Association of Food Banks; Aaron Troyer, Troyer Farm; Kim Jamerson, Jamerson Farms; Triston Chapman, Chapman Farms; Ron Hamel, Bernadette Rashford, Ashley Timpter and Wayne Simmons, Gulf Citrus Growers Association; Sam Jones, Duda Farms; Max Press, Lipman Produce; Dave Nicely, Sun Harvest Citrus; Carrie and Charles Lucas, King Ranch; Dan Casper, Southern Gardens Citrus; Tom Boe, J & J Produce; Kayley Miller and Heather Nedley, The Mosaic Company; Gene McAvoy, Hendry County Farm Agent; Jorge Pang, Gary Winrow and Peter Anthony, Selovita; Aaron McKinney, State Senator Bullards office; Colin Clyne, Commissioner Putnams office; Dr. Bernie and Elaine Lester; State Rep. Heather Fitzenhagen; Rep. Dane Eagle, District Secretary Brad Davison and Legislative Assistant Paige Ann LeBoutillier; Kim Hamilton, Rep. Matt Hudsons office; Bruce Schultz, First Bank; Kate Gooderham, Streets Alive; Liesa and Russell Priddy, J B Ranch; Daisy Ellis and Joanne Herrada, The Salvation Army. Ron Hamel, Adam Putnam and Ray Pavelka From page 11Burt And MeThen theres Chuck Caruso playing several roles, including Joes father George and Father DeJoseph. He even plays a nun in one scene. Caruso played the leading role in Shrek. Hes a versatile actor, in fact they all are. Taylor Hale and Sami Doherty complete the cast. Loren Strickland and his band, as always, add their considerable talents to the production. Snappy choreography by Amy Marie McCleary keeps everything moving along. This is a fun production with a stellar cast. I thoroughly enjoyed it from start to finish. It brought back a lot of memories. In the last scene, dont miss the hat that Ramsey wears in honor of his father. That was a neat sentimental touch. Burt and Me plays through October 5 at Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre. For tickets, call 278-4422, visit www. BroadwayPallm.com or stop by the box office at 1380 Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702 or email press@riverweekly.com

PAGE 25

PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF S eE PT eE MB erER 2, 2013ARIES (March 21 to April 19) A little wool-gathering for the usually productive Lamb is all right if it helps you unwind. But be careful; too much daydreaming can put you behind schedule in your work. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A work problem is close to being resolved. Now you can go ahead and celebrate the week, accepting invitations from friends who enjoy your company. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Getting your new plan accepted wont be a major hassle if you have the facts to back it up. Your supporters are also prepared to help you make your case. Good luck. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Dealing with a pesky job problem might be timeconsuming but necessary. The sooner you get this situation settled, the sooner you can move on to other matters. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Career advancement is favored thanks to your impressive work record. On the personal side, you should soon hear some good news about an ailing family member. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) There might be mixed signals from a cer tain someone who doesnt seem all that cer tain about his or her intentions. Best to sort it all out before it becomes more confusing. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Get all the facts about that investment opportunity before you put even one dollar into it. There could be hidden problems that could prove to be costly. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Compromising on a matter you feel strongly about not only ends the impasse, but can be a win-win deal for all. Remember: Scorpios do well with change. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) With all the demands you currently have to deal with, accepting the help of family and friends could be the wisest course to take at this time. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Recent upsetting incidents might have left you with a big gap in your self-assur ance. Refill it by spending time with those who know how worthy you really are. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A dispute about money needs to be resolved quickly, before it festers into something more serious. Consider asking an impartial colleague to mediate the matter. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A soft approach could be more effective than making a loud demand for the information you need. You might even find yourself with more data than you expected. BORN THIS WEEK: Youre sought out for the wonderful advice youre able to offer to others. And sometimes you even take it yourself. London begin blowing up homes in a desperate attempt to halt the spread of a great fire through the city. By the time the fire was finally snuffed out the following day, more than 100,000 people had been left homeless. Revolutionary War, the 8-foot-long American submersible craft Turtle attempts to attach a time bomb to the hull of British Admiral Richard Howes flagship Eagle in New York Harbor. It was the first use of a submarine in warfare. nicknamed Little Willie rolls off the assembly line in England. It weighed 14 tons, got stuck in trenches and crawled over rough terrain at only 2 mph. For secrecy, production workers were told the vehicles would be used to carry water on the battlefield. The new vehicles were shipped in crates labeled tank, and the name stuck. record is set by Britains Sir Malcolm Campbell. On the Bonneville Salt Flats of car Bluebird made two runs over a 1-mile course at speeds averaging 301 mph. Korea to begin their postwar occupation of the southern part of that nation, almost exactly one month after Soviet troops had entered northern Korea to begin their own occupation. Although the U.S. and Soviet occupations were supposed to be temporary, the division of Korea quickly became per manent. matic teller machine (ATM) makes its public debut, dispensing cash to customers at Chemical Bank in Rockville Center, N.Y. It multiple functions, including providing customers account balances. Spitz wins his seventh gold medal at the Summer Olympics in Munich and establishes new world records in all the events. The record would stand until Michael Phelps took home eight gold medals at the Beijing Games in 2012. executive Samuel Goldwyn who made the following sage observation: The most important thing in acting is honesty. Once youve learned to fake that, youre in. stage and early film, who was often referred to as the most famous actress the world has ever known and the divine Sarah, often slept in a coffin. She said it helped her to better understand tragic roles. If youve had a pus-containing discharge from your ear, you have. of the false ears worn by Leonard Nimoy in the role of Spock would last only three to five days of shooting before they had to be replaced. Richard Nixon was sometimes called Tricky Dick, especially toward the end of his troubled career, but you may not be familiar with other nicknames he had. In college his perceived lack of a sense of humor prompted the name Gloomy Gus, and his tendency to spend long hours sitting and studying earned him the moniker Iron Butt. seven months of Elvis Presleys life, he had him. a prediction that, in hindsight, turns out to have been rather egregiously off the mark: Few scientists foresee any serious or practical use for atomic energy. They regard the atom-splitting experiments as useful steps in the attempt to describe the atom more accurately, not as the key to the unlocking of any new power. Success usually comes to those who are too busy to be looking for it. -Henry David Thoreau THIS WEEK IN HISTORY strSTR A nN G eE BU tT trTR U eE thoTHO UG htHT F orOR theTHE DA yY DID YOU KNOW25 THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 2013 8. GAMES: What is the board-game version of the outdoor game known as Capture TRIVI aA TES tT ANSWERS SpSP OR tT S QUIZ 1. In 2012, Philadelphias Jimmy Rollins became the fourth player in major-league history to do it. 3. Entering the 2013 NFL season, who is the Atlanta Falcons all-time leader in quarterback 4. Beginning in 2004, a No. 1 overall seed for mens basketball was named for the NCAA national play. ANSWERS

PAGE 26

THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 201326 Read us online at IslandSunNews.com PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY COMPUTERS CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING CONTRACTOR G I P M SR C D P D P CG D GrSince 2001, A Southwest Florida Paver Contractor www.gigicompanies.com 239-541-7282Schedule free estimates or visit our new show roomLic.# S3-12238 TREE & LAWN CARE Jesus Hernandez LANDSCAPING & TREE SERVICE 482-7350 We Service All your Landscape Needs FULL Landscaping SERVICES Over 20 years serving San-Cap & Ft. Myers Florida Cucumber and Sweet Pepper Salad 2 bell peppers (or 12 small sweet peppers), seeds removed and sliced thin (a variety of colored peppers is recommended) 2 cucumbers 1 red onion 1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped fine 1 tablespoon fresh herbs (basil, thyme, oregano or mint) 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar 1 tablespoon olive oil Sea salt to taste Fresh ground pepper to taste Add all ingredients except the salt and pepper to a medium-sized mixing bowl. Lightly toss all ingredients to coat. Taste salad and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. Keep refrigerated and serve cold. Chef tip: Add 1 cup of feta cheese to this recipe for extra flavor. Florida Cucumber and Sweet Pepper Salad

PAGE 27

27 THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 2013 answer on page 27 PUZZLE ANSWERS SUDOKU SCRAMBLERS FIND AT LEAST SIX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PANELS PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY BUILDING CONTRACTOR FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the bene ts of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 FISHING CHARTER Light Tackle Sport Fishing CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.com To advertise in The River Weekly NewsCall 415-7732

PAGE 28

THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 201328 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE SERVICES OFFERED REAL ESTATE ISABELLA RASiIHAPPY TO HELP Y YOUWithITH A ALL OOF Y YOUrRREAL EEStT At TE NEEDS! RS 1/4 NC TFN 1101 Periwinkle Way #105 SS anibel, FLFL 33957 ISABELLA RASiI (239) 246-4716E ISABELLARASi I@AOL.COM II sland VV acationsOf Sanibel & CaptivaMillion $ Views Await You! Cottages Condos Homes Miles of Beaches & Bike Paths239-472-72771-888-451-7277RS 1/4 BM TFN VACATION RENTAL LILI GH TT H OO U SESE REALTREALT YPaul J. Morris, Broker VACATION RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT & SALES 359 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel Island 239-579-0511RS 1/4 CC TFN M OO B ILEILE H OO M EE P ERIERI W ININ K LELE P ARAR K$115,000. 60 x 12 w/ metal roof-over plus 20 x 12 Florida room. Master BR has queen size bed & blt-in dresser & dbl closet. Master bath has combo bath/ shower & dbl sink vanity w/extra storage. Guest BR has dbl closet + blt-in drawers & private bath w/ shower. Eat-in-kit is open to LR which from K to FL room. Private 12 x 12 deck, picnic table and storage shed. One car carport with adjacent 2nd parking space. room & bathrooms. Carpeting in both bedrooms & LR. Home recently inspected & has all required tiedowns. New central air & heat system & stacked washer/dryer, all appliances louvered blinds throughout. Purchase completely furnished including all linens, dishes, pots & pans, tableware, 2 sleeper couches, recliner, 2 dining tables & chairs, 4 outdoor chairs & folding beach chairs, etc. Call owner 317-293-0915 or email LMSrealtor@aol.com for further information or to make offer. RS 8/9 CC 8/9 CC ONDO FOR SS ALE M ILLIONILLION DOLLARDOLLAR VIEVIE W ONON TT H EE W ATERATER Why pay Sanibel prices when right across the bridge on San Carlos Bay looking over at the island is Punta Rassa, a peninsula with gorgeous views every direction you look. This 2 bedroom 2 bath condo has tile in living areas and master bedroom, open cabinets, hurricane shutters on lanai and views. Priced at $335,000 and buyer will give $10,000 credit for anything buyer wants to add to unit. Call Karen Wojnar, Re/Max Realty Group, 239-292-7012.NS 8/16 CC 8/30 SS CARNATO LL A wW N SS ERVICELawn Service, Shrubs and Tree Trimming Weeding, Installation of Plants, Trees and Mulch (one month free service available) Joe Scarnato (239) 849-6163 scarnatolawn@aol.comRS 1/25 BM TFN HELLES CC LEANIN gG SS ERVICESResidential Cleaning to Satisfaction Sanibel Lic. #11412 Lee Co. Lic. #051047NS 1/4 PC TFN P AINTINAINTIN G G OATOAT Professional Painting & Home Maintenance Free Estimates Fully Insured www.paintinggoat.com 239-271-2919RS 4/19 CC TFN CC O mpMP ANION SS ERVICE Sanibel-Captiva Care and Companion Service, LLC Medical appointments, general transportation, shopping, light meal preparations, and light cleaning. Our services are customized to meet our clients needs. Call 239-395-3591, or for an emergency call 239-472-0556.RS 1/4 BM TFN RESORTRESORT M ANAANA G EE M ENTENT Retired couple seeks position as small resort management team. Both have 30 years of Sanibel familiarity. On-site residence desired; salary negotiable. 231-421-9194 / jcrounds11@charter.net.NS 8/23 CC 9/13 DD R umUM TT EAC hH ERAll Styles Rock Jazz Latin Reading Rudiments and more. Years of playing and teaching experience Full teaching studios in home off McGregor. 1st lesson FREE! 239-994-7846.NS 8/9 CC 8/23 HO uU SE kK EE pP ER GIRL FF RIDA yY Experienced Housekeeper. Excellent References, Reliable, I will also help with light cooking and errands. Call Heather (239) 826-1045 Sanibel & Lee Co. LicenseNS 8/30 CC 9/6 QU IETIET SANISANI B ELEL H OO M EE W/P RIVATERIVA TE B EACEAC H P ATAT H3200 sq ft home in Gulf Pines, one of Sanibels most beautiful & sought after communities. One house from beach w/private beach path. Short walk to Gulf Pines 2 swimming pools & tennis courts; large landscaped lot provides privacy. 3-4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, large open living area, screened porch & several decks. $4,000/mo. + util. Annual rental only. Unfurnished. Landscaping & association fees paid by owner. Avail Oct 2013. Call 917-680-4440.NS 5/31 CC TFN P RETTIESTRETTIEST SANISANI B ELEL RENTALRENTAL 2 BR/2 BA house off Sanctuary Golf living space. Large parking area + 2 under house spaces. Beautiful views, quiet neighborhood. No smoking. Available now. $1,800 mo inc landscaping/garbage/sewer. 1st+last+security. 472-0297.NS 8/30 CC TFN ANN uU AL RENTAL LL ON gG TT ER mM RR ENTAL2BR 2Bath 1,500 Sq. Ft. Executive Condo in Sanctuary available for long term rental. 6 month minimum, multi-year available. No pets, no smoking. $2,200 per month plus utilities. Call 407-227-3554.NS 8/30 CC 9/20 SERVICES OFFERED SANISANI B ELEL H OO M EE W ATCATC HRetired Police Captain Lives on Sanibel Will Check Your Home Weekly Very Reasonable Rates (239) 728-1971RS 1/4 BM TFN RORO G ERER NODRNODR U FFFF ELECTRICELECTRIC Lic# EC12002788. Call Roger 239-707-7203. Aqualink Motor Controls. RS 6/7 CC TFN HO mM E/ CONDOCONDO WATC hH CONCIER gG E SERVICES Full Range of Services Island Resident Licensed & Insured 24/7 Call Lisa or Bruce at 239-472-8875RS 1/4 BM TFN ANN uU AL RENTAL 472-6747Gulf Beach Properties, II nc. Paul H. Zimmerman, Broker/Ownersanibelannualrentals.comServing The Islands Rental Needs Since 1975 RS 8/30 BM TFN ANN uU AL RENTALS SS ANI bB EL DIRECTLDIRECTL Y ACROSSACROSS FROFRO M B EACEAC H custom wood staircase, All High End appliances, separate bar, full custom large 3 car garage. A rare offering @ $3,500/mo. LALA K EE FRONTFRONT This Old Florida Style piling home has a Great view over the large heated pool to the Lake! Offering 3 bedrooms/two baths, two car garage plus storage. Short distance to the beach. $3,000/mo. CANALCANAL & DOCDOC K Five Minutes to Sanibel T oll-Booth!! This UF ground level updated home offers 3 BR/2 BA + family room, double garage, screened in pool, 65 boat dock, + boat lift for boat. $2,800/mo. FORT myMY ERS RERE /M AA X OFOF TT H EE ISLANDSISLANDS Putting owners and tenants together www.remax-oftheislands.com 239-472-2311RS 1/4 BM TFN FF OR RR ENTCommunity Housing & Resources (CHR) has apartments for rent to individuals who work full time on Sanibel. Rent based on income. For information call 239-472-1189.RS 3/15 CC 8/30 RR IVER DD ISTRICT HISTORIC DD EAN PAR kK 1924 Pristine 2 story 2700 sq ft Tudor, 3-2.5-2, newly done kit (w/granite), area, walk to downtown. Special. No pets. $1,500. 239-543-4278.NS 8/30 CC 8/30 OO P ENEN H OO U SESE 1:00 PM TO 4:00 PM COLONY BEACH ESTATES 428 BELLA VISTA WAY, SANIBEL BEACH! THIS THREE LEVEL WITH IS ALL ABOUT! PREMIER SOTHEBYS INTERNATIONAL REALTY AUGUSTINA HOLTZ, BROKER ASSOCIATE AUGUSTINA.HOLTZ@ SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM (914) 648-8888NS 8/30 CC 8/30

PAGE 29

29 THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 2013 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS HELP WANTED HELP WANTED PETSFR EEEE KI TTENTTENT T O GOO DD HH OM EE Free kitten to good, safe home. No de-clawing. Fiesty Bengal mix. Call 472-1788 after 5 p.m.NS 5/31 NC TFN WANTED T oO BUYC ASHASH PAPA I DD FOR MI LL I TATA R YY I TETE M SS Cash Paid For Old Military Items. Medals, Swords, Uniforms, helmets, old guns, awards & more. Local Toll Free 1-866-440-3280RS 6/7 CC 8/30 C AA R forFOR SALE2007 BB U ickICK LL AC roRO SSE C LL X16,500 miles, beige color, 4 door, all power, seldom driven off island, $14,000. Call Ken at 472-2012.RS 7/12 NC TFN B oO ATS cC AN oO ES kK AYA kK S DockDOCK A gG EHourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-5800RS 1/4 NC TFN 22-F ooOO T GLA ciCI E rR BB AY CATA mM A rR ANIn good condition. Needs some detailing and a high pressure fuel pump. $9,000 or best offer. The boat was donated to the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) for quick sale. Contact James Robinson at CROW at (239) 472-3644, ext. 221 or development@ crowclinig.org. Or contact Peg Albert at (239) 472-3644, ext. 232 or peg@ crowclinic.org. RS 7/26 NC TFN L oO STLost Ladies Watch Make: Brighton Area of Mucky Duck on Captiva Island Lost on Dec. 10, 2012 around noon If found call: 941-639-5395RS 1/4 NC TFN F oO UNDPrescription sunglasses found in parking lot of Limetree Center on Wednesday, February 27. Claim at Island Sun newspaper, suite 2 in Limetree Center, or call 395-1213.NS 3/8 NC TFN L oO ST AND foFO UND TT OO LL BB OX WASHESWASHES UPUP O NN SANSAN I BELBEL This tool box with motor parts washed up on shore Saturday morning, May 8 about 8:30 on the beach at Sundial Resort on Sanibel Island. To claim call Sundial Resort Security 239-472-4151.NS 6/14 CC TFN L oO ST AND foFO UNDVO LUNTEELUNTEE R SS NEEDEDNEEDED At The Sanibel School Call Michelle Wesley 239-910-8000RS 1/4 NC TFN HELPHELP WANTEDWANTED Norris Home Furnishings is a fast growing company that is seeking a motivated, cheerful and experienced part time sales person. This person should enjoy meeting new people and helping them make their dream homes a reality. Being good with colors and textures is a plus. Stop by store for application, or send resume to dulrich@norrishomefurnsihings.comNS 8/30 CC 8/30 HELP WANTEDED Para 6hrs. Tolls Paid Call The Sanibel School @ 472-1617.NS 8/9 NC TFN 3883 Sanibel Captiva Road, Sanibel, Fl Phone: 239-472-3644, ext 1 Fax: 239-472-2334 www.crowclinic.org HELPHELP USUS PLEASEPLEASE !!We need volunteers for: Clinic emergency patient admissions desk and baby animal feeders Visitor education center greeters and gift shop cashiers CROW (239) 472-3644, ext. 231 or volunteers@crowclinic.orgRS 1/4 NC TFN VO LUNTEELUNTEE R SS NEEDEDNEEDED Volunteers needed for the After School Program which runs Mon.-Th, 2:30 3:15 pm call Linda Reynolds 472-1617RS 1/4 NC TFN SS E rvRV E rR S AA SS iI STANT SS E rvRV E rR S LiLI NE cookCOOK IL Tesoro Ristorante, 751 tarpon Bay Rd. Sanibel Now hiring; Servers, Assistant Servers and Line cook Email resumes to: applications between 11-2 daily.NS 1/18 NC TFN VO LUNTEELUNTEE R O PPPP OR TUNTUN I TYTY The Sunshine Ambassador Program is a new and exciting volunteer opportunity offered at the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida located within HealthPark Medical Center. The Sunshine Ambassadors will greet, assist and be a families and visitors entering the hospital. The Ambassadors also make a difference to families by providing educational and healthful resources to assist in GRANDparenting for GRANDchildren. We are currently seeking year-round volunteers to work one 4-hour shift Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm or 12:00pm to 4:00 pm. If you would be interested in learning more about this wonderful new opportunity, please contact Lisa Ellinwood, Volunteer Resources Coordinator at 239-343-5062 at the Golisano Childrens Hospital.NS 2/8 CC TFN TO PLA cC E AA CLA ssSS I fF IED LL OG OntONT O: IslandSunNews.com CLICK ON PLACE CLASSIFIED

PAGE 30

If you would like your club/organization listed in The River Calling Card, phone 415-7732Emergency ......................................................................................... 911 Lee County Sheriffs Of ce ........................................................ 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol ................................................................ 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol .............................................................. 278-7100 Poison Control ................................................................ 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center .......................................1-800-936-5321Ft. Myers Chamber of Commerce ............................................. 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare .............................................. 425-2685 Ft. Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce .................................. 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library ......................................................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library ............................................................ 533-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce .......................................... 931-0931 Post Of ce ..................................................................... 1-800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau ..................................................... 338-3500 ARTS Alliance for the Arts .................................................................. 939-2787 Art of the Olympians Museum & Gallery ................................... 332-5055 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio .................................................. 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers ......................................................... 275-3970 Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall ...................................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS ................................................................................ 395-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre ............................................... 278-4422 Cultural Park Theatre ................................................................ 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light ............................................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade .................................. 332-4488 Florida West Arts ...................................................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers ....................................... 472-0168 Gulf Coast Symphony ............................................................... 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres ..................................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic ........................................................... 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater ......................................................... 472-6862 S.W. Florida Symphony ............................................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy .................................................................. 936-3239 Young Artists Awards ................................................................ 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAngel Flight ................................................................ 1-877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center ............................................................... 731-3535 American Business Women Association ................................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL ..................................................................... 339-8046 Audubon Society ....................................................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR .................................................. 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society ................................................... 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus ................................. 1-855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club ............................................................ 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees ....................................................... 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists ............................................................ 415-2484 Ft Myers UDC Chapter 2614 (United Daughters of the Confederacy .................................. 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL ...................................................... 561-9164 The Horticulture and Tea Society ............................................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society ................................................................. 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society ............................................. 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation ........................................... 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees ............. 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America .......................................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL .................................................... 667-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans .................................................. 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy ........................................ 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association ........................................ 561-2118 Kiwanis Clubs: Fort Myers Beach ................................................. 765-4254 or 454-8090 Fort Myers Edison ..................................................................... 694-1056 Fort Myers South ...................................................................... 691-1405 Gateway to the Islands .............................................................. 415-3100 Iona-McGregor .......................................................................... 482-0869Lions Clubs:Fort Myers Beach ...................................................................... 463-9738 Fort Myers High Noon ............................................................... 466-4228 Estero/South Fort Myers ........................................................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County .............................................. 768-0417 POLO Club of Lee County ......................................................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers ......................................................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society ................................................ 472-6940 United Way of Lee County ........................................................ 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) ................................. 211 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews Shell Museum ................................................ 395-2233 Burroughs Home ...................................................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium ........................................ 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates ................................................... 334-3614 Fort Myers Skate Park .............................................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium ............................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge ................................ 472-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site .............................................. 239-992-0311 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center ....................... 765-8101 Skatium ...................................................................................... 321-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society ........................................ 939-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History ...................................... 321-7430 True Tours ................................................................................. 945-0405 SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 27 Pets Of The Week THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 201330 Hello, my name is Rush. Im a 2-year-old male black and tan chihuahua mix. Even though Im adorable, cute and very photogenic, Im a little timid. Do you have a quiet home where I could thrive? I have lots of love and attention to give. My adoption fee is $25 (regularly $75) during Animal Services Theres No Place Like Home adoption promotion. Hello, my name is Tobago. Im a 5-month-old black male domestic shorthair. There are still lots of us adorable little babies at the shelter waiting for homes. Im active, playful and could provide hours of entertainment for you. My adoption fee is $10 (regularly $75) during Animal Services Theres No Place Like Home adoption promotion. For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to Animal Services website at www.LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if three months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs six months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee, and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500. Tobago ID# 562535 Rush ID# 570714 photos by squaredogphoto.com

PAGE 31

BEACH CHAIR PASTIMEAnswers on page 2531 THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 2013

PAGE 32

NOW OPEN! NOW OPEN! Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! 239-463-5505 | 1249 Estero Blvd. Live Music Wed-Sun! Happy Hour Mon-Fri 2-5pmTheBeachedWhale.com Ft. Myers BEach: Sept 18th : Sept 18th Book Signing Event!Meet The Author!Details Online12-2pm & 4-6pmSanibel : Sept 1ST & 2ND Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! THE RIVER AUGUST 30, 201332