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River weekly news ( July 12, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101363/00150

Material Information

Title: River weekly news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication: Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 08-23-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101363:00190

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101363/00150

Material Information

Title: River weekly news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication: Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 08-23-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101363:00190


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FREETake Me Home VOL. 12, NO. 33 AUGUST 23, 2013From the Beaches to the River District downtown Fort MyersRead Us Online at IslandSunNews.com Exposed Exhibit Opens S eptember 6In September, the Alliance for the Arts opens Exposed: Face & Figure. The monthlong invitational exhibition features twoand three-dimensional artwork created by 31 local and international artists. It offers an opportunity for viewers to come face to face with engaging and provocative depictions of the human form. Exposed: Face & Figure opens to the public with a reception on Friday, September 6 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. and remains on display until September 30. The exhibition is sponsored by Suncoast Photo Solutions. The Alliance fall fundraiser on September 21, Take A Nude Home, is tied into the Exposed exhibit. The featured artists are David Acevedo, Todd Babb, Carol Broman, Andy Browne, Jerry Churchill, Pat Collins, Tracy Cullimore, Geoffrey Hammel, David Hatchett, Lily Hatchett, Raymond Hernandez, Doug Heslep, Marcus Jansen, Krista Johnson, Leo Johnson, Jonathan Kane, Bryon Paul McCartney, Kellen Beck Mills, Dale and Jeff Ocasio, Darryl Pottorf, Sherry Rohl, Diana Rutherford, Arturo Samaniego, Ellen Sayet, Alicia Schmidt, Jeffrey Scott Lewis, Ellen Sheppard, Michelle Tricca, Lawrence Voytek, Gordon Warren and Peter Zell. Visit www.artinlee.org or call 9392787 for more information about the exhibit and other opportunities provided by the Alliance. The Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard, just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Jill by Michelle Tricca Free Bunche Beach Birding T ourBunche Beach is an excellent spot for viewing both migrant and resident waders and shorebirds working the mudflats at low tide due to the diversity of microinvertebrates. Waterfowl, raptors and warblers also gather there. The next free Bunche Beach Birding Tour will be held on Saturday, August 24 from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Participants should meet on the beach. Located in South Fort Myers, off Summerlin Road, drive south of John Morris Road until it deadends. Bring binoculars, sun protection, shoes that can get wet, a bottle of drinking water, your curiosity and love of nature. For more information, call 707-3015. This event is free with the parking fee of $1 per hour (tour is approximately two hours long). Restrooms are in the building at the first parking lot. Provided in cooperation with Lee County Parks and Recreation. Piping plover photo by Meg Rousher Captiva T riathlon: Family, Fitness And Funding HungerThe Galloway Captiva Tri, Southwest Floridas premier sprint triathlon, helps athletes and their families have a three-F weekend: Family, Fun and Fitness. However, now that both the adult and kids races are sold out with waiting lists, that means the tri will be able to donate to its charity, Community Cooperative Ministries Inc. (CCMI), for the fourth and fifth F: Food and Funding. According to CCMI CEO Tracey Galloway, CCMIs Backpack and School Pantry Program provides emergency food for Lee County school children and their families who are food insecure and chronically hungry. Just $100 per child per school year provides food to keep these children and families fed. The proceeds from the Captiva Tri will effectively fund a school for the year. What a great feeling for the participants and sponsors of this event to know that in addition to the sport and camaraderie of the weekend, they are ensuring that children in our very own community will not have to go to school hungry. Another reason the Galloway Captiva Tri is able to fund this program is the generosity of its sponsors. We are lucky here in Southwest Florida that we have companies that not only have great products, but who want to do great things for the community, said Ken Gooderham, one of the race directors. Their support for this race means more money can be donated to CCMI; $6,500 was donated the first year and $15,000 the second, so in the races third year we hope to do even better the same goal as all the tri athletes. One of those great companies that supports healthy food, healthy activity and the community is Jasons Deli, the tris food sponsor. Jasons Deli is committed to the work CCMI does in our community. The Captiva Tri is the perfect opportunity to share our healthy food, healthy lifestyle, allowing us to align our food focus where are hearts are, said Diana Willis, owner of Jasons Deli. Other 2013 tri sponsors include: Title sponsor Galloway Family of Dealerships Benefiting charity CCMIs (Community Cooperative Ministries Inc.) Backpack Program Adult race sponsor Doc Fords Rum Bar & Grille on Captiva Kids race sponsor Jason Gunter Attorney at Law Race portion sponsors: swim and run courses tions photography General sponsors: Lee Memorial Health System, Lee County Sports Development, Billys Bicycles, LCEC, Tween Waters Inn, Jensens Twin Palms Marina, Jensens on the Gulf, Trek Bicycles, Florida Weekly, All Star Vacation Homes, News-Press Media Group Product/bag sponsors RS Walsh Landscaping, RC Otters/Key Lime Bistro, Publix. The sprint triathlon, which will be held on September 14 and 15, is a family, fun, fitness weekend held at South Seas Island Resort in Captiva. The first day includes children fun races: the 6to 9-year-olds compete in a 100-yard swim, 1.5-mile bike and 0.5-mile run, while the 10to 13-year-old racers face a 200-yard swim, three mile bike and a one mile run. The next day, adults will swim a quarter mile, bike 10 miles and run 3.1 miles. For the first time, elite amateur athletes (who tioned event) will be sent off first in their own wave. The triathlon, which is sanctioned by Florida Events, a tax-exempt Florida notfor-profit corporation. Information is available online at www.captivatri.org or on Facebook under Captiva Tri.

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Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: Stop! At First And Jacksonby Gerri Reaves, PhDWorries about traffic regulation are nothing new in Fort Myers. Concerns such as horses galloping too fast through town and the inevitable conflict between automobiles and horses, pedestrians and bicycles were among the problems that confronted the young settlement. By the 1920s, the spike in automobile traffic presented an even sticker problem on streets originally plotted to accommodate horses and wagons. Look closely in the foreground of the historic photo and youll see a rather mundane object outlined by an oval. That sturdy cast-iron stop sign bolted to the street helped regulate the evergrowing traffic of the early 20th century in Fort Myers. Pictured in the circa 1925 to 1930 photo is the southeast corner of First and Jackson. In the background stands the classic Mediterranean-revivalist structure that housed Barron G. Colliers bus terminal, the Garden Spot Restaurant and many other businesses and second floor offices over the years. That busy intersection was a perfect example of the type noted by renowned city planner Herbert S. Swan in his 1926 city plan for Fort Myers. The plan states that in 1925, the traffic congestion and danger at pedestrian crossings had so increased that the stop signs were necessary on certain streets in the main business district. Such stops allowed major east-west streets such as First to be a through street, or an arterial thoroughfare. This was a widely adopted system of traffic control in the United States at that time. The signs were painted red, according to Swan, and were bolted to the street on the center line. Motorists on Jackson who approached First Street saw the stop side of the sign. Underneath those large letters was the word arterial in smaller letters. Conversely, traffic that turned onto Jackson from First saw the other side of the sign, which warned Safety, keep to right. Should anyone not see the sign and run over it, the devices low-angled slant delivered an alarming jolt without damaging the vehicle. One of these vintage stop signs resides in the collection of the Southwest Florida Historical Society. The close-up photo of it reveals that the paint has faded but the large word STOP is nevertheless discernible. Who knows could the societys artifact be the very one that appears in the historic photo of the bus terminal? Today, the busy intersection of First and Jackson is a four-way stop, but the signs continued on page 6 The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, please call (239) 415-7732 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, FL 33901. Fax number: (239) 415-7702. E-mail: press@riverweekly.com. The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Co-Publishers Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Isabel Rasi Office Coordinator Graphic Arts/ProductionAnn Ziehl Photographer Michael Heider Writers Anne Mitchell Jeff Lysiak PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Contributing Writers Read Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com Click on The River Ed Frank Max Friedersdorf Tom Hall Today, traditional octagonal stop signs keep traffic order at the four-way stop photo by Gerri Reaves The Cretney Traffic Guide Co. of Madison, Wisconsin manufactured the cast-iron stop signs once found at downtown intersections. This one can be found at the Southwest Florida Historical Societys research center photo by Gerri Reaves The stop sign bolted to the street (within oval) at First and Jackson helped regulate traffic during the early 20th century courtesy of the Southwest Florida Historical SocietyT hH E rR IVE rR AU gG U sS T 23, 20132

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3 THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 2013 Fort Myers Public Art Fall For The Arts At The Allianceby Tom HallThe 11th annual Fall for the Arts free family festival will take place at the Alliance for the Arts on Saturday, October 19 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fall for the Arts is a campus-wide event showcasing the many fun and enriching ways community members can get involved with the local arts community. Local arts organizations, theaters, galleries, museums, art schools and individual artists will distribute information about their upcoming seasons during the festival, and area performing groups will dance, sing, play instruments and act in mini-performance on the outdoor amphitheater stage. Visual artists will demonstrate their talents in painting, drawing, sculpting and mixed media, while area authors sign and sell their books in the literary area. Finally, there will be interactive art stations for kids and a dunk tank featuring local elementary school principals and teachers. Fall for the Arts will also feature an artist zone where attendees can find a great selection of truly one-of-a-kind, handmade pieces. The Alliances weekly GreenMarket will be open on the north side of campus offering sustainable products that have been locally grown, caught and cultivated. The Lee County Alliance for the Arts proudly supports artists and arts organizations in our area as the state designated Local Arts Agency for Lee County. The Alliance for the Arts galleries are open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturdays. The Alliances galleries, theaters and 10-acre campus are located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard, just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Please visit www.artinlee. org for more details. An arts advocate, Tom Hall guides weekly walking tours of the River Districts public art collection in Fort Myers. For more information, go to www. truetours.net. John Robinson and his daughter, Leah, at the 2012 Fall for the Arts at Alliance for the Arts Lazy Flamingo, Inc. 6520-C Pine Avenue Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-5353 Lazy Flamingo 3, Inc. 16501 Stringfellow Rd Bokeelia, FL 33922 239-283-5959 Lazy Flamingo 2, Inc. 1036 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-6939 Lazy Flamingo 4, Inc. 12951 McGregor Blvd. Ft. Myers, FL 33919 239-476-9000 Four Great Locations! If Our Seafood Were Any Fresher, We Would Be Serving It Under Water! NOW SERVING FULL LIQUOR IN FORT MYERS Bring in This Coupon for $ 5 OFFPurchase of $30 or moreF M 33 Patio DeLeon, Downtown Fort Myers (239) 337-3377OPEN Tues-ur 11am-10pm, Fri 11am-11pm, Sat 3-11pm Closed Sun & Mon

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THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 20134 Tan by day. Rattan by night. www.furniture-world.net239.489.3311FREE DELIVERY FREE SET UP FREE REMOVAL Furniture to t your Florida lifestyle San Carlos FURN-10674 ISRW 3_1.indd 1 3/6/13 9:26 AM Call for departure time CAPTIVACRUISES H T H E I S L A N D S H THE BEST WAY TO SEE THE ISLANDS IS FROM THE WATER Cruises depart from beautiful Captiva Island Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Downtown Fort Myers (Post Oce Arcade Next to Hotel Indigo) 1520 Broadway For Takeout & Delivery Tel: 334-6991 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEKMon-urs 11am 10pm Fri-Sat 11am 11pm Sun 12pm 9pm www. ichiban-sushi-chinese.com Rotary Club Of Fort Myers South Gives $2,000 To Fund New Dock Roger Mercado, President of Rotary Club of Fort Myers South, announced that the club has given $2,000 to Rotarys Camp Florida to help build a new dock. The new dock is one of many improvements Camp Florida is planning to make to better accommodate future campers. Rotarys Camp Florida is a non-profit organization catering to children with special needs and challenges. Located in Brandon, Florida, the 21-acre camp can accommodate 50 to 100 occupants and is used by various groups for camp programs. Among the many amenities Rotarys Camp Florida offers to camp groups are cabins with air conditioning and heat, a kitchen fully equipped for cooks or caterers, fully equipped archery range, 25-yard Junior Olympic-size pool with a lift for wheelchairs, adaptive golf program, medevac helicopter landing area, and an infirmary that is chemotherapy and radiation capable. Rotarys Camp Florida is a wonderful organization that offers a variety of activities for children with special needs. Rotary South is happy to be able to give them the funds they need to renovate the dock, said Mercado. Rotarys Camp Florida was acquired by Rotary clubs throughout Florida in 1991. Rotary then began a restoration program to make the camp meet the full standards of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Camp Floridas goal is to provide the necessary facilities for campers to have fun in a safe environment that can accommodate any special needs they may have. Rotarys Camp Florida, Inc. is a registered 501(c)(3) Florida Corporation and accepts donations in many forms. For more information on Rotarys Camp Florida, visit www.rotaryscampflorida. com. September Classes And Workshops Offered At The Alliance For The ArtsThe Alliance for the Arts begins to ramp up its fall season of classes and workshops in September. Adult offerings are Oil & Acrylic Painting, Drawing, Intro To Fused Glass, Batik and even Yoga. Youth classes include Piano, Guitar, Drawing, Painting, Paper Mache, Mixed Media Eco Art, The Amazing Science of Art, Improv and Acting. The complete fall & winter educational season will feature more than 40 classes for kids and adults. Visit the Alliance website at www.artinlee. org for class descriptions and to register, or call 939-2787 for more information. The Alliance campus and galleries are open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays, located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard, just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Visit www.artinlee.org for additional details. A pair of girls having fun painting at one of the Youth Workshops Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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5 THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 2013 Art In Flight At Heights ElementaryHeights Elementary IB World School is participating in the Art In Flight program, a partnership between the Lee County Alliance for the Arts and the Lee County Port Authority. This program brings art to public spaces at Southwest Florida International Airport. This years theme Oh, The Places We Will Go! encourages travel to learn and grow, to challenge ourselves, stretch our limits and foster an appreciation of both the world at large and the chair waiting back home. Susan Sweetland, art teacher at Heights Elementary IB World School, is working with all students on their designs. Pictured from left are fifth graders Amanda Johnson, Grace Gerlach, Ellette Schneider, Rasarqui Gamboa and Alexandra Polk River Cruises Offered For GroupsAt the Edison & Ford Winter Estates, the summer regular river tours are over but groups may still schedule river cruises throughout the year as well as in the upcoming months. The Edison & Ford winter cruise season will resume its regular schedule at Edison Ford in November. For groups, the river cruises are a great option as they combine being out on the river for a program about its history and nature as well as a tour at the historic Edison & Ford Winter Estates. There are several options to add on including refreshments and lunch for groups who want to gather at Edison Ford. For information on scheduling a river cruise at Edison Ford, contact the Edison Ford museum office at 334-7419. The minimum group size is 20 to reserve the cruise and reservations are available seven days a week and evenings. The Edison Ford is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. For additional information, call 334-7419 or visit www.edisonfordwinterestates.org. Historic Edison and Ford shoreline and unique river experience that is part of the river cruise program at Edison Ford Winter Estates RIV Nellies Upstairs Waterside Bar Where its Happy Hour all the time!!! 10% OFF Offer valid with Cash payments only ... No credit cards. ONE COUPON PER TABLE Can not be used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, Expires Aug. 30, 2013 Lunch, Dinner Snacks in Between11am-10pm used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, www.nervousnellies.net Make your plans to join us for a special Labor Day Weekend Party!!! FREE MARINA DOCKAGE with Dock Attendants Assistance

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THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 20136 Hortoons From page 2Stop!are traditional red octagons, not cast-iron signs bolted to the street. The beautiful building where buses came and went and businesses flourished has long been gone. A grassy patch awaits the next development at one of downtowns most historic corners. Walk to First and Jackson and do your own traffic and safety study by comparing todays four-way stop to the intersection of around 90 years ago. Then continue the history adventure a few blocks away at the Southwest Florida Museum of History at 2031 Jackson Street. For information, call 321-7430 or go to www.museumofhistory.org. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Be sure to visit the Southwest Florida Historical Society to see the now-drab sign that once stopped traffic dead in historic downtown. Explore the archives for historic photos of more street corners with cast-iron stop signs. The all-volunteer non-profit organization is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Drop by on Wednesday or Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon, or call them at 939-4044. Sources: Archives of the Southwest Florida Historical Society and the Fort Myers Plan by Herbert S. Swan. Greeters Club Meeting If you sometimes wonder if the family legends passed down over generations are accurate, then the speaker for the September 19 luncheon meeting of the Greeters Club of Greater Fort Myers might start you on a path of historical discovery. Carolyn Ford is the education chairperson for the Lee County Genealogical Society and has spent hundreds of hours assisting residents with tracing their family lineage. Her topic will be Genealogy Basics: How to Climb Your Family Tree. She will give an overview on how to get started and will be able to answer more difficult questions for those who are already climbing the tree but have run into a weak branch. The cost for the luncheon meeting is $20. To make a reservation, contact Marie Gaither at 791-8966 or email wmgaither@aol.com. Luncheons are held on the third Thursday of the month at 11:30 a.m. at the Colonial Country Club, 9181 Independence Way, Fort Myers. CorrectionIn the Submarine Veterans Memorial story that ran in the August 16 issue, Ken Jordan, a member of the local United States Submarine Veterans chapter, noted that more than 4,000 men have been lost while serving this country aboard submarines. That statistic was incorrect in the story. Also, the Fort Myers memorial to be dedicated in the near future contains the names of the 65 submarines (along with the dates the sub was put into service and when it was sunk) who have been lost over the past 113 years. That information was incomplete in the story. Yacht Club Meetingsubmitted by Past Commodore Chris ChristensenThe monthly meeting of the Fort Myers Beach Yacht Club will be held Wednesday, August 28 at Rumrunners Restaurant in Cape Coral, 5848 Cape Harbor Drive. Social hour begins at 5 p.m. Happy hour is from 3 to 6:30 p.m. Dinner is ordered individually off the menu at 7 p.m. Attendees will pay by separate checks. A short meeting may follow. Potential new members wishing to attend are invited to call Past Commodore Pete Oiderma for required reservations and more information at 463-6240 or 415328-5415. The Fort Myers Beach Yacht Club was formed in 1953 and incorporated as a not-for-profit organization for the purpose of promoting safe, enjoyable boating and good fellowship. This community oriented club, with over 140 members and 60 boats, maintains an schedule of year-round activities, both on and off the water, for members and guests. Evening meetings are held once a month, usually on the fourth Wednesday. Dues are only $100 per year per couple or $60 per single. Visit the website at www. FMBYachtClub.org. Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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7 THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 2013 Gulf Coast Pageant Crowns WinnersThe Miss Gulf Coast Pageant was held at The Atrium in Fort Myers on August 17. The new Miss Gulf Coast U.S. International is Kasey Conn. Alexander Burgos was crowned Mr. SW Florida. Also, the new Jr. Miss Gulf Coast is Karina Wang and the new Jr. Miss Crystal River is Kayci Suskind. The new Mr. SW Florida is Alexander Burgos and the new Miss Gulf Coast U.S. International is Kasey Conn photos by Suzi Hosfeld The new Jr. Miss Gulf Coast is Karina Wang and the new Jr. Miss Crystal River is Kayci Suskind CONTINENTAL CUISINEAT THEIR NEW HOME. 20351 SUMMERLIN ROAD, FORT MYERS. ACROSS FROM TANGER FACTORY OUTLETS. IN THE PUBLIX SHOPPING PLAZA. Courtneys has something for everyone. Come & see why Courtneys aims to please!239.466.4646HAPPY HOUR DAILY4PM-7PM IN OUR BEAUTIFUL LOUNGEREDUCED DRINK PRICES AND $2.00 OFF APPETIZERSLUNCH SERVED DAILY AT 11AM Buy One Lunch Get One for Half PriceWith the purchase of two beverages Half price applies to lowest priced lunch. Does not include tax or gratuity. Not valid on HolidaysExpires 10/31/2013 Dinner for 2 for $30.00 Includes glass of house wine or well drink or domestic beer eachChoose any entree from our SUNSET DINING MENUChoice of: soup or salad comes with potato, veggie, hot baked bread and fresh herb olive oil Available from 4pm-6pm(Does not include tax or gratuity. Not valid on Holidays)Expires 10/31/2013 Make your reservations today! JOIN US EVERY SUNDAY FOR BRUNCHFROM 10AM 2PMA DELICIOUS VARIETY OF BREAKFAST AND LUNCH ITEMS ON THE MENU Thank You for Voting Us Best Continental Cuisine Symphonic Chorale AuditionsThe Symphonic Chorale of Southwest Florida will hold auditions for volunteer singers on August 24, 26 and 28 at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 2439 McGregor Blvd. in Fort Myers. Appointments will be available all day on the indicated Saturday and both Monday and Wednesday evenings. The chorale is embarking on its third season as an independent organization under the direction of Timothy McDonnell. As such, it produces its own concerts with professional instrumentalists. The first of these is scheduled for February 8, 2014, and will include the Requiem in C Minor by Michael Haydn as well as Vivaldis Gloria. The second concert of choral masterworks is April 5, 2014. This program includes the Lord Nelson Mass by Joseph Haydn, Michaels elder brother. Other works will be by Beethoven and Mendelssohn. The chorale was previously affiliated with the Southwest Florida Symphony Orchestra. The two organizations continue to collaborate successfully. The chorale will perform as part of the Symphonys Holiday Pops concerts on December 14 and 16 and its Movie Musicals Pops on March 7 and 8, 2014. Interested singers age 15 and older may contact chorale Vice President Jackie Ferguson at 283-2353 or JFerg8@aol. com to schedule a time. Auditions are 15 minutes in length. Singers should bring two copies of a vocal selection and be prepared to sing scales and to sight read. The chorale rehearses on Tuesday evenings from 7 until 9:30 p.m. at Canterbury School, 8141 College Parkway in Fort Myers. Several paid positions are also available for degreed singers and those pursuing professional music careers. Please contact Dr. McDonnell at musicmcd@ gmail.com for complete details on those positions only. Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 20138 Along The RiverOn Saturday night, join Fort Myers car enthusiasts at the Downtown Car Cruise-In in the historic River District. Held on the fourth Saturday of every month, the event features vintage, modern and unique cars from 4 to 8 p.m. along with a DJ spinning classic rock with trivia. All cars welcome to the free event. For more information, call 1-855-7323836. Sunshine Grille Wood Fired Steaks & Seafood is one of South Fort Myers best kept culinary secrets. Executive chef Roger Chastain brings more than three decades of professional culinary experience to the restaurant, having honed his craft at some of Southwest Floridas top restaurants. Serving lunch and dinner daily from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., the menu features soups, salads, appetizers, wood-fired flatbreads and a large selection of homemade comfort foods, wood-grilled steaks and fresh seafood. Theres something for every taste, from the all American grilled hamburger to sesame crusted salmon and duck breast Mae Ploy, all prepared on the wood fired grill. On Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Sunshine Grilles serves an array of delectable dishes at its all-youcan-eat brunch buffet. Sunshine Grille also offers daily happy hour with a special bar menu and live music. Go to www.sunshinegrillefm.com for a schedule of nightly performances. Sunshine Grille is located at 8700 Gladiolus Drive in Fort Myers. For operating hours or more information, call 4892233. Monday, August 26 is the last night for The Fort Myers Film Festivals popular Missed It Mondays: Best of the 2013 Film Festival at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center. The awardwinning documentary The Invisible Man, directed by Israeli filmmaker Yariv Mozer, begins at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and admission is $6. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in the heart of downtown Fort Myers historic River District. Call 333-1933 or go to www. fortmyersfilmfestival.com for a schedule of films. For audiences who missed seeing the films screened during last springs seventh annual Fort Myers Beach Film Festival, the Fort Myers Beach Friends of the Arts Summer Film Series will show a series of short, locally produced independent films on Tuesday, August 27 at Bay Oaks Recreation Center. They are: Stuck, directed by Mitch Glass; Gary, directed by Mitch Glass; Lovers Key: A Journey Through Floridas Carl E. Johnson State Park, directed by John Bennett with original music by Miami native and frequent Fort Myers performer Marc Vee; The Right Friend, directed by Gail Kowatch; The Plan Has Changed, directed by Ted Souppa and Dale Metz; and Love Letter, directed by Taylor Hill. The film screening starts at 7 p.m. with popcorn and sodas available for purchase. Tickets are $5 per person for ages 12 years and older. Bay Oaks Recreation Center is located at 2731 Oak Street, Fort Myers. Call 463-3600 ext. 242. Also on Tuesday, the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) presents CROWs Aquatic Patients: Freshwater and Sea Turtles as part of its Wonders of Wildlife (WOW) series. Led by members of the CROW team, participants will learn about sea turtle patients that come from the coastal waters between Sarasota and Miami and why these wild animals are admitted to the clinic. The program begins 11 a.m. in CROWs Visitor Education Center. CROW is located at 3883 SanibelCaptiva Road, Sanibel. For more information, call 472-3644 ext. 228 or go to www.crowclinic.org. On Wednesday, take the Working Waterfront Walking Tour with Ostego Bay Marine Science Center in Fort Myers Beach. The Working Waterfront Walking Tour runs from 10 a.m. and includes a one-and-a-half hour guided visit at the museum which contains a touch tank, a hands-on beach area and several aquariums and exhibits. The tour continues with a visit to the commercial fishing industry; see how the boats are unloaded, the trawl doors are build, the shrimp nets are handsewn, the seafood is processed and other important factors used in this unique million dollar industry. The cost for the tour is $15 per adult and $10 for children 7 years of age and older. Reservations are required. Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center located at 718 Fishermans Wharf on San Carlos Island in Fort Myers Beach. Call 765-8101 or go to www.ostegobay.org. It is a great week for indie film lovers! Above is a scene from the award-winning documentary The Invisible Man, the feature film at the Davis Art Center on Monday This juvenile green sea turtle was rehabilitated at CROW and returned to its home in the Gulf waters. On Tuesday, the wildlife clinic presents a program about its aquatic patients JACARANDAThe Entertainment Nightly in Sanibels Social Scene1223 PERIWINKLE WAY, SANIBEL 472-1771 Happy Apps $5.95Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna, Crispy Fried Calamari, Chilled Oysters, Steamed Shrimp, BBQ Beef Satays, Mussels Marinara, Chicken WingsSanibels Best HAPPY HOUR5 7 p.m. Nightly in the lounge1/2 Price DrinksCall & Well Liquor, Draft Beer Selections, Select House Wine Open Monday Saturday www.threecraftyladies.com Find us on WE WILL PAY YOUR TOLL!!!Spend $55 and bring us your toll receipt for a full refund! Please visit our River Weekly News online advertisers at www.islandsunnews.com. You can click through to their Web sites for more information about real estate, shopping, restaurants and services. Just click on the logos surrounding the front page.

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9 THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 2013

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Churches/TemplesALL F aA ITHS UNIT aA RI aA N CONGREG aA TION (UU A) Where diversity is treasured 2756 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers Summer program: Understanding the Faiths of Our Worlds June 2 to August 25 11 a.m. Interim Minister, Rev. Margaret Beard, begins on September 1 239-226-0900. www.allfaiths-uc.org A LLLL SS A INTSINTS BYZA NTINENTINE RITERITE CA THOLITHOLI C C HH U RR C HH 10291 Bayshore Rd., N. Fort Myers Divine Liturgy is on Sun. at 10:30 a.m.; Rosary begins at 10 a.m. Lenten services (Presanctied Liturgy) will be on Wed. evenings at 6 p.m. starting on Feb. 22. Administrator is Very Rev. Peter Lickman, ph. 305-651-0991. We are a Church of the Eastern Catholic or Byzantine Rite, 1.5 mi. east of Int. 75. A NNNN U NN C II A TIONTION GREEGREE K ORTHOORTHO D OO X C HH U RR C HH 8210 Cypress Lake Dr ive, Fort Myers Reverend Fr. George P. Savas Orthros Service Sunday 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy Sunday 10 a.m. www.annunciation.fl.goarch.org 239-481-2099 B ETHETH SHILOHSHILOH M ESSIESSI A NINI C SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 15675 McGregor Boulev ard, 437-3171 Rabbi: Judah Hungerman Friday Service, 8 p.m., Saturday Service, 11 a.m. Shabbat School Saturday Morning, Adult Hebrew Classes. Call for information on full program. B RERE AD OO F LILI F EE M INISTRIESINISTRIES C HH U RR C HH OO F GOGO D 16581 McGregor Boule vard, 267-3166 Just past the Tanger Outlet Mall Pastor: Barry Lentz, 281-3063 Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. C HH AP ELEL OO F CYP RESSRESS C OO V EE 10200 Cypress Cov e Circle Fort Myers 239-850-3943, Located at Cypress Cove Retirement Center on HealthPark Campus An ecumenical non-denominational community of believers. Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. Reverendt Ted Althouse, Pastor revtedalthouse@aol.com C HH U RR C HH OO F THETHE C ROSSR OSS 13500 Freshman Lane; 768-2188 Pastor: Bud Stephens; A nondemonimational church emphasizing a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Sunday Service: 9:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 Contemporary. CO vV EN aA NT PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937 Rev. Dr. Jeffrey DeYoe, Senior Pastor Reverend David Dietzel, Pastor Emeritus. Traditional Sunday service 10 a.m. Nursery available C ypYP RESS LakLAK E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H 8400 Cypress Lak e Drive, Fort Myers, 481-5442 Randy A. Alston, Reverend. Sunday Services: Bible study, 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship, 11 a.m., Evening Worship, 7 p.m., Wednesday Prayer Meeting, 6:30 p.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 481-3233. www.clpc.us. Clint Cottrell, pastor Prayer Service 8 a.m., Praise 9 a.m., Childrens Church 9 a.m., Traditional 11 a.m. Summer: Prayer Service 8 a.m. Combined Traditional/Praise 10 a.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E UNITE dD METHO dD IST CH uU R cC H 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 482-1250 8 and 11 a.m. Sunday Traditional Service 9:30 a.m. Praise Service Sunday School all times F aA ITH FELLOWSHI pP W ORL dD O uU TRE acA C H mM INISTRIES 6111 South P ointe Boulevard, Fort Myers, 278-3638. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Voice of Faith, WCRN 13.50 AM Radio, Sunday, 1:30 p.m.; Thursday Service, 7:30 p.m.; Friday Youth Service, 7:30 p.m. Nursery care for pre-school children and Childrens Church for ages 5-12 available at each service. F aA ITH uU NITE dD mM ETHO dD IST cC H uU R cC H 15690 McGregor Boule vard Fort Myers, 482-2030 Pastor: David Stauffer. Traditional services 8:45 a.m.; Contemporary, 10:30 a.m. Go south on McGregor Boulevard. The church is mile past the intersection of Gladiolus and San Carlos Boulevard on the way to Sanibel. FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF cC HRIST S cC IENTIST 2390 West First Street, next door to Edison Estates. Sunday Morning Service and Sunday School, 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday Evening Testimony Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Child care provided at all services. Visit our Reading Room for quiet study at: 2281 First Street, River District. www.time4thinkers.com, www.christiansciencefortmyers.com, www.christianscience.com FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF THE NazaNAZA RENE 13545 Amer ican Colony Boulevard off Daniels Parkway in the Colony, Fort Myers, 936-2511 Pastor: Reverend Joey Brummett Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Family Night, 7 p.m. F IRSTIRST U NITENITE D M ETHOETHO D ISTIST C HH U RR C HH in the Downto wn Fort Myers River District 2466 First Street, Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-332-1152, www.fumcftmyers.org Sunday: 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 5 p.m. Youth Program FORT M yY ERS CHRISTI aA N CH uU R cC H (DIS cC I pP LES O fF CHRIST) A SS TE pP HEN MINISTRIES CONGREG aA TION 5916 Winkler Road, F ort Myers, 437-4330 Reverend Mark Condrey, Pastor Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Church School: 9:15 a.m. FORT M yY ERS CONGREG aA TION aA L UNITE dD CH uU R cC H O fF CHRIST : 8210 College Parkway, Fort Myers, 482-3133. Philip White, pastor Morning Worship: 10 a.m. Church School: 10:15 a.m. Adult Forum: 11:30 a.m. HOLHOL Y THEOTOTHEO TO K OSOS M ONON A STERSTER Y 111 Ev ergreen Road, North Fort Myers, 997-2846 Eastern Orthodox mens monastery. Liturgical services conducted in the English, Greek and Church Slavonic languages, following the Julian (Old) Calendar. Liturgical Services: Sundays and Holy Days: The Third and Sixth Hours at 8:30 a.m.; Divine Liturgy at 9 a.m. II ON aA HH O pP E EpEP IS cC O paP A L cC ONGREG aA TION 9650 Gladiolus Dr ive, Fort Myers 4544778 The Reverend Dr. John S. Adler, pastor. Weekly services: Saturday 5 p.m., Eucharist with Healing Sunday 8 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite One; 9:30 a.m., Family Eucharist with Healing and Church School Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Morning Prayer (in Spanish); Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Eucharist with Healing. Child care available at Saturday 5 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m. services. JES uU S THE WW OR kK ER C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H: 881 Nuna Avenue, Fort Myers, 481-1143 Masses Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. K INGING D OO M LILI F EE C HH U RR C HH 2154 McGregor Boulev ard, Fort Myers, 218-8343 Pastor Randy and Anita Thurman 10:30 a.m. Sunday Service All are welcome. LambLAMB O fF GG O dD LuLU THER aA N/ EpEP IS cC O paP A L CH uU R cC H Corner Cypress View Drive and Koreshan Boulevard, Three Oaks area, Fort Myers, 267-3525 Walter Fohs, pastor; Becky RobbinsPenniman, associate pastor Sunday worship services: 8 a.m. Early Grace Traditional 9 a.m. Awesome Grace Contemporary 10:30 a.m. Classic Grace Traditional 8:45 & 10 a.m. Sunday School Gods Group NN EW BEGINNINGS CENTER Ne w Home Church, 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, North Fort Myers, 239-656-0416 Weekly Friday Meeting Meet & Greet: 6:30 p.m. Kingdom Teaching: 7 p.m. Fellowship and refreshments after service. nbcministry@embarqmail.com, www.facebook. com/nbcministry. Alex & Patricia Wiggins, Ministers NEWNEW C OO V ENEN A NTNT EE Y ESES C HH U RR C HH See Clearly Meeting monthly at 9 a.m. at the Elks Lodge. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, Fort Myers, FL 33907. 239-220-8519 Pastor Alan Bondar www.newcovenanteyes.com Wear what you want, rockin music, relevant teaching, LIFT Kidz program, free coffee & donuts, people who are real, church thats actually fun. NN EW HH O pP E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H O fF FOR T M yY ERS 16120 San Car los Boulevard, Unit 10 239-985-8503 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m Sunday Morning Worship. 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study NN EW HH O pP E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 3825 McGregor Boule vard. Fort Myers Pastors: Stu Austin and Howard Biddulph 8 & 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11 a.m. Contemporary Worship 8, 9:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School Youth and Childrens programming runs concurrent to Sunday services. Nursery care provided at all services 274-1230. For more information visit: www.newhopefortmyers.org P EE A C EE CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H Meets at F ort Myers Beach Masonic Lodge 17625 Pine Ridge Road, Fort Myers Beach 267-7400. Pastors Bruce Merton, Gail & RC Fleeman Adult Discussion Classes: 9-10 AM Countdown to Worship (praise music): 10:10 AM Amazing Grace Worship: 10:30 AM Phone 267-7400 Fax 267-7407 Web site: peacecommunitychurch.com e-mail: peace1265@aol.com P EE A C EE LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH Sunday Worship at 9:30am. Peace is a member of the ELCA. We celebrate weekly communion with traditional liturgy, organ and choir. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers On the way to Sanibel. 239-437-2599, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@peaceftmyers.com. RE dD EE mM ER L uU THER aA N cC H uU R cC H 3950 Winkler Ext., Fort Myers, 274-0143 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. Sunday Services Daily early learning center/day care RIRI V ERER OO F LILI F EE A SSESSE MB LL Y OO F GOGO D 21580 Riv er Ranch Rd, Estero 239-495-0400, Senior Pastor: Todd Weston 8 and 9:45 a.m Services; 11:30 a.m. Legacy Service, multi-generational S amudAMUD R abadAB AD R aA buddB UDD HIST cC ENTER Meditation classes All are welcome. Guided meditations offering many methods for relaxing the body and focusing the mind on virtuous objects to bring increasing peace and happiness into daily activity. For information, class times and locations call 567-9739 or visit www. MeditationInFortMyers.org. SS O uU THWEST bapB AP TIST cC H uU R cC H 16940 McGregor Boule vard, Fort Myers, 454-3336 Robert G. Kasten, Pastor Sunday Worship Service 11 a.m. Nursery available 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Junior Church grades one to five Wee Church Pre-K to K Evening Service 6 p.m. Wednsday Service 6 p.m. SaSA INT COL umbkUMBK ILLE C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H 12171 Iona Road, F ort Myers, off McGregor and north of Gladiolus. 489-3973 Father Joseph Clifford. Weekly masses: Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. Weekend masses: Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday: 7, 9,11, and 5:30 p.m. Reconciliation is available at the church on Saturdays at noon and by appointment SaSA INT JOHN THE A pP OSTLE METRO pP OLIT aA N CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H 3049 Mcg regor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 344-0012 Pastor Reverend Steve Filizzi An Affirming & Inclusive Congregation Sunday Services, 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Mid-Week Service, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. SaSA INT MI cC H aA EL LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H & ScSC HOOL ( LL CM SS ) 3595 Broadw ay, Fort Myers 239-939-4711, www.smlcs.org Wednesday Fellowship: 5:30 p.m. Dinner $5, 6:15 p.m. bible studies Worship: Saturday, 5:30 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. with 9:15 a.m. adult and childrens Bible Study, plus marriage enrichment studies. Divorce Care on Thursdays from 7 to 8:30 p.m. During Lent: Wednesday worship noon and 6:15 p.m. SaSA INT PETER LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H 3751 Estero Boule vard, Fort Myers Beach, 463-4251. Sunda y w orship at 9:30 a.m. Womens Bible Study is offered on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 9:30 a.m. www.stpeterfmb.com TETE MP LELE B ETHELETHEL SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 16225 Winkler Rd. 433-0018. Rabbi Jeremy Barras E-mail: rabbi.barras@templebethel.com Cantorial soloist: Lawrence Dermer Temple educator: Dale Cohen, MaEd, RJE Shabbat Services, Friday, 7:30 p.m. Torah Study, Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Religious Education; Sunday School and Midweek classes, Preschool Classes, Monday through Friday Web site: www.templebethel.com Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TETE MP LELE JUD EE A (C ONSERONSER VA TITI V EE ) 14486 A&W Bulb Road, F ort Myers, 433-0201, Rabbi: Rabbi Elyssa Auster President: Keith Grossman Minyan: Monday & Thursday at 9 a.m. Services: Friday night at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Religious School Sunday morning Web site: www.tjswfl.org Preschool director: JoAnn Goldman email templejudeapreschool@gmail.com 433-0201, Web site: www.tjswfl.org Affiliated: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism continued on page 11THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 201310

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11 THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 2013 From page 10Churches/TemplesTHE C H ABAD LUBAVITCH OF SW FLORIDA ORTH ODOX 5620 Winkler Road, Fort Myers Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz 433-7708, E-mail: rabbi@chabadswf.org Web site: www.chabadswf.org Services: Friday 6:30 p.m.; Saturday Kabbalah class 9 a.m.; Shacharit 10 a.m.; Kiddush at noon Minyan: Monday and Thursday 7 a.m. T HE N E W CH URCH The New Church of SWFL is located 10811 Sunset Plaza Circ. #401, behind Zoomers. Rev. Gabriella Cahaley officiates worship services on Sundays at 11 a.m. during the season. Other worship events are held on the beach in Fort Myers Beach. See our webpage http://www.newchurchflorida.com/ or call for more information 239-481-5535. C ONGR EGATIONAL CHURCH 1619 Llewellyn Drive Fort Myers Just off McGregor across from the Edison/ Ford Winter Estates 334-4978 Pastor: Douglas Kelchner Worship times Sundays 9 and 10:30 a.m. Website: www.taecc.com UNITARIAN UNIVE RSALIST CH URCH FORT MYE RS 13411 Shire Lane (off Daniels Parkway one mile west of I-75) Minister: The Reverend Allison Farnum Sunday services and religious education at 10:30 a.m. For information on all church events call 561-2700 or visit www.uucfm.org. U NITY OF B ONITA SPRINGS Family Service 10 to 11 a.m. Healing Circle 11 a.m. Hospitality and Fellowship, 11 a.m. Inspiring lesson, uplifting and dynamic music, meditation in a loving environment. Service held at 28285 Imperial Street, Bonita Springs. Call 947-3100. UNITY OF FORT MYE RS 11120 Ranchette Rd., Fort Myers Summer Services: Sundays at 10 a.m. Childrens class at 10 a.m. Reverend Jim Rosemergy, Minister Our God is Love. Our Race is Human. Our Religion is Oneness. www.unityoffortmyers.org or 239-278-1511 WE STMINSTE R PRE SBYTE RIAN CH URCH 9065 Ligon Court, Fort Myers, across from HealthPark Hospital, 481-2125 Senior Pastor: Robert Brunson Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Blended Worship www.westminsterfortmyers.org W ORD O F L IFE CHURCH 2120 Collier Ave, Fort Myers, 274-8881; Services: Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. Bishop Gaspar and Michele Anastasi Z ION L UTHERAN CHURCH 7401 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, 481-4040, Interim Pastor Jim Eggert Pastor Peter Weeks Sunday Services: 8:30 a.m. Traditional; 10 a.m. Blended Traditional and Contemporary; 11:30 a.m. Contemporary. Childrens Sunday School, Adult /Teen Bible Classes, 10 a.m. H ealth System Foundation Announces Q3 Funding Allocations Over $433KLee Memorial Health System Foundation announces that its Board has approved $433,741 in allocations for patient care at Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida. Approvals were finalized at the LMHS Foundation Board meeting on August 2. The LMHS Foundation Board approved $88,741 in support of the Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Psychology Program (Yawkee Counseling Center) at Golisano Childrens Hospital. The program provides support for children and their families facing emotional and behavioral stresses surrounding diagnosis and treatment of pediatric cancer and blood disorders. An additional $345,000 was approved for purchase of a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) ambulance to provide specialized pediatric care on wheels to children being transported to or from Golisano Childrens Hospital. The ambulance funding was provided by the Sanibel-Captiva Cares event which took place this past spring. R andy Wayne White Book SigningsRandy Wayne Whites new novel Deceived will be released on September 3, kicking off numerous national signing events. Local book signings will take place on September 1, 2 and 18 at Doc Fords Rum Bar & Grille locations on Sanibel and Fort Myers Beach. In the 1980s, Randy led fishing expeditions at Tarpon Bay Marina on Sanibel; when it closed in 1987, he wrote Sanibel Flats, propelling himself from unemployed fishing guide to New York Times bestselling author. Deceived is his second Hannah Smith novel. The tale begins with a hundred pound tarpon landing in the fishing guides boat, knocking two paying clients overboard. Hannah works fast to retrieve the men as a 12-foot hammerhead works to retrieve a meal. Is the unusual incident an omen? Will there be death, injury or lawsuit? Buy the book and find out. Theyll be available for purchase at all three Doc Fords locations. White begins each signing event with a 15-minute question-and-answer session. Fans are invited to make an afternoon or evening of it. Enjoy Island Mojitos while savoring award-winning flavors from the Caribbean rim; theyre inspired by Randys favorite rural tropics cuisine full of sauces, spice and passion. The Sanibel event is an opportunity to purchase the book pre-release. Join fellow White fans and followers on Sunday, September 1 and Monday, September 2 from noon to 2 p.m. and 4 to 6 p.m. at Doc Fords Rum Bar & Grille Sanibel, 975 Rabbit Road. Call 472-8311 or visit www.docfordssanibel.com for more details. The Fort Myers Beach event will be held on Wednesday, September 18 from noon to 2 p.m. and 4 to 6 p.m. at Doc Fords Rum Bar & Grille Fort Myers Beach, 708 Fishermans Wharf. Call 765-9660 or visit www.docfordsfortmyersbeach.com for more information. Copies of Deceived may also be purchased at Doc Fords newest location on Captiva Island. Take the South Seas Plantation entrance to Chadwicks Square North. Learn more at www.DocFords.com. Our email address is press@riverweekly.com

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THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 201312 Fishing Getting A Bad Rapby Capt. Matt MitchellThese past few weeks, all I seem to see on the local TV news are stories about the water releases from Lake O and how bad our water quality is. Add to that some polluted water shots from near stagnant Cape Coral canals, where over-fertalized lawns and grass clippings are blown into the canals, then switch the story to a fishing guide giving an interview about how slow business and fishing are. It just drives me nuts. None of these reports are good for anyone who makes there living in or around the water and worse yet, its simply not the truth. Im not a fan of all this fresh water being dumped on us, but it does not appear to have affected our fishing as drastically as is being reported. Sure, everyones business has slowed down... its just that time of year. As you know, I spend lots of time on our local waters and have not found our water conditions worse than basically any other rainy summer. When the water coming down the river gets really nasty, all the bait and fish in the southern sound disappear. This has not happened; in fact, some of the best fishing action has been aound St James City and in the mouth of the river over the past few weeks. This area has been on fire with big redfish and snook. Local commercial fisherman fishing for blue crabs are experiencing some of the best blue crab fishing they have seen in 10 years as the crabs are getting flushed out of the river by the fresh water releases. Basically, visiting Southwest Florida in the summer months and expecting crystal clear water will not ever happen. Its like going to the Everglades and expecting to see clear mountain streams. Fishing kept going strong this week with redfish, snook and even some really big trout caught throughout the Sound. The first really large schools of redfish were reported in the northern sound, or to be more specific, around Useppa and Cabbage Key. These big, over-sized redfish patrol this area every year and with some of the schools numbering hundreds of fish during calm conditions, they can be easy to spot. Big schools of redfish will be more numerous as we move into September and October. This marks the prime time for redfish action in our area. Just about any bait or artifical pitched out in front of these schools will get inhaled. Look for these redfish to start showing up on Redlight Shoal, Captiva Rocks and in Redfish and Captiva Passes any day now. While working the flats in areas of feeding birds between Chino Island and Red Light Shoal this week, anglers caught some of the largest trout I have seen in months. Bait of choice was a small live pinfish or grunt rigged a few feet under a popping cork. Some of these trout are well over the 20-inch max. Our big one of the week went 26 inches and was pushing five pounds. Along with lots of smaller trout, expect ladyfish, mackerel, bluefish and jacks to keep you busy. The larger trout seem to be on and around the smaller grass humps in three to four feet of water and just out from the big baitfish schools. This whole area is loaded up with massive schools of small whitebait. Snook action slowed a little for me in the passes this week. I think this was partly because of the higher day time stages of the tide. Mangrove shorelines held snook of all sizes during the higher water periods, with these snook feeding best while the water was flooding in. Big pinfish tail hooked and pitched to mangrove points caught snook up to 40 inches. Look for these snook to be on or around mangrove shorelines and points with fast moving currents. Often, the bigger snook will be out in sandholes 10 to 20 feet from the shorelines. Docks around the mouth of the river were also a good bet on a strong falling tide to hook into a giant snook. In this black water, the bigger the live bait, the more vibration it puts out, and that vibration is what will draw that snook in to strike. Several times while fishing this week, we had bull sharks crash our party. After releasing a smaller snook while fishing in the mouth of the river, we saw a big swirl about 20 feet behind the boat that was no dolphin. Putting on another bait as I walked back to the bow of the boat to recast, I did not think anything of it. To my surprise, the likely culprit: a five to six foot bull shark was just sitting there, hanging out under the bow of the boat Then the following day while on a good redfish bite in the Wulfert Keys area, we had a big bull shark come out of nowhere and charge right down the shoreline, finning and spooking our fish. Once the shark went through, the sandhole bite was over. Sharks can be encountered just about anywhere through our area this time of year. Some of the best fishing I can ever remember this time of year was in the two months following Hurricane Charley. After the hurricane, the amount of water coming out of Lake O was at an all time continued on page 24 ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint Prices ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Your Bottom Your Bottom Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices 1 481-4733 12600 McGregor Blvd, Ft Myers www.scubavicedivers.com Swim with the Fishes 472-5800 Send Us Your Fish TalesThe River Weekly would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include photographs with identification. Drop them at the River Weekly, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, Florida 33901, or email to press@riverweekly.com. Todd Dutro from Chicago with a 34-inch snook he caught while fishing with Capt. Matt Mitchell this week

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13 THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 2013 CROW Case Of The Week Eastern Gray Squirrels In The Nurseryby Patricia MolloyHe is a little guy that came in with a knot on his head, said one of CROWs students regarding patient #2254. With no history available, it was surmised that the injury was possibly caused by a cat attack. As the most commonly seen mammal east of the Mississippi River, the Eastern gray squirrel (Sciurus carlinensis) delights audiences with its playful antics. They scurry along telephone lines before leaping through the air and landing on the nearest tree limb. They are known to chatter loudly to warn their furry friends of the impending danger posed by a prowling tom cat or a family dog. Despite their name, gray squirrels may have coats of varying colors: reddish, cream and black. Preferring nut-bearing trees such as hickory and oak, a squirrel will spend its days gnawing on berries, grains and nuts or nibbling on flower blossoms. With a territory ranging two to seven acres, the highly-developed olfactory system of an adult gray squirrel helps it locate cached food. While two other species of squirrels the fox squirrel (Sciurus niger) and the Southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans) are also found in Florida, the Eastern gray is the one which is most familiar to the American urbanite. Has anyone listened to him lately? asked Dr. Heather. When I listened to his chest, the left side was OK like a mild crackle but the right side sounded really bad. Its definitely all in his nose, so some of that may be causing the upper respiratory noise. The student responded, Hes on antibiotics right now. We are watching him and he seems to be doing OK. Students and volunteers work around the clock to care for the patients in the nursery, as youngsters must be feed every two hours. Currently, the clinic has a staggering 32 baby Eastern gray squirrels, in addition to dozens of little raccoons, Virginia opossums and a wide variety of tiny songbirds. If you love the islands diverse and exotic wildlife, please donate your time during this critical period. Fourhour shifts are available. For more information, call 472-3644 ext. 229 or go to CROWs website. Training is provided. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to P.O. Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit www.crowclinic.org. The nursery at CROW has dozens of baby squirrels, opossums, raccoons and songbirds. This Eastern gray squirrel, patient #2347, munches on a nutritional biscuit. It arrived at the clinic as an abandoned or orphaned baby rf ntbnrr bb bb rtttn Loved this restaurant. Fantastic experience. Food was exceptionally amazing. Service was outstanding. TripAdvisor Member, May 2013 Extension Service To Host Fertilizer, Water Quality WorkshopLee County Extension Services will offer a class called UF/IFAS Fertilizer Research and Water Quality For Policymakers. The event is designed for people who are certified in fertilizer applications, HOA members, municipality workers and decision makers or those concerned with fertilizer use on lawns and turfs. It will be held from 1 to 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, August 22 at Lee County Extension Services, 3406 Palm Beach Blvd. in Fort Myers. During the last eight years, numerous local ordinances restricting the use of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers in the rainy season have been passed, said Extension Services Director Stephen Brown. The purpose of these ordinances is to help to improve water quality. The science on the use of nitrogen is now in. This workshop will bring you the latest University of Florida research on the fate of nitrogen fertilizers when applied to lawns and turfs. Go to the following link for the agenda and to register online: http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu/Hort/HortClasses/Policymakers_Agenda_0822B.pdf Lee County Extension agents offer educational services through a three-way continued on page 14 www.SeabreezeNurseries.com (239) 560-1422 WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY We can help! Ask about our Season Discount! Palms, Palms, natives, natives, crotons, crotons, bromeliads, bromeliads, buttery bushes, buttery bushes, & much more & much more

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THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 201314 Plant SmartV arigated Flax Lilyby G erri R eavesVarigated flax lily (Dianella tasmanica varigata) is an erect grass-like groundcover widely used in South Florida. Although native to Southeastern Australia and Tasmania, it is classified as Florida-friendly because it is highly drought tolerant and non-invasive. The plants ornamental value comes from the strap-like keeled leaves of neutral white and green, not from the pretty but insignificant flowers. The panicles of star-like flowers have pale blue downward curving petals and yellow stamens and anthers. They dangle from long stems and bloom mostly in spring and summer, followed by tiny inedible berries of metallic blue. The aboriginal people of Australia use those berries as dye in basket-making. This hardy and versatile plant does best in full sun but will tolerate shade. It grows to a height of one to three feet with an equal breadth. Typical uses are as a border or accent plant, or to add volume to the landscape. The muted color of the white-banded leaves contrasts attractively with more vividly colored plants. Flax lily is also a popular indoor or outdoor pot plant. It spreads via underground stems called rhizomes, which can be divided for propagation. If you are in search of low-maintenance groundcovers, consider including Florida natives, too. For example, blue-eyed grass ( Sisyrinchium angustifolium), like flax lily, has blue flowers and yellow centers, and muhly grass (Muhlenbergia capillaris) delivers soft pink plumes of flowers as well as cover for wildlife. Sources: floridafriendlyplants.com, gcrec.ifas.ufl.edu, anbg.gov.au, and en.wikipedia.org. Plant Smart explores sustainable gardening practices that will help you create an environmentally responsible, low-maintenance South Florida landscape. Low-maintenance varigated flax lily is a native of Southeastern Australia and Tasmania The panicles of metallic-blue and yellow flowers often go unnoticed next to the leaves banded in white photos by Gerri Reaves Caring For Your PlantsNeed A H edge?by Justen DobbsWhat is the best way to create a barrier between your yard and the neighbors yards? There are many advantages to planting a hedge of bushes or trees instead if a fixed fence or wall. A living hedge can be allowed to grow to the height that you want. It provides some lush greenery for your yard, and with the proper knowhow, it can require little to no maintenance. There are two basic living hedges you can choose from: hardwood and palm. Some popular hardwood trees that are used to make hedges are Ficus, Mahoe, Buttonwood, Eugenia, Seagrape, Clusia and Olive. The only species that I would recommend using out of this group is the Clusia (also called Autograph Tree or Pitchapple) because it is drought-tolerant, requires little fertilizer, is not prone to pests, and requires little trimming and maintenance. The rest of the trees on the list are either messy, too fast growing, cold-sensitive or high in fertilizer and water requirements. So, why do landscapers plant these trees, you might ask? It is because they also make money on landscape maintenance and the more maintenance required (superfluously), the more money they make on the homeowner. Now, some homeowners enjoy and prefer the hard-wood tree hedge and this is fine... as long as the homeowner is educated on what is or her options are. Unfortunately, this is usually not the case and the homeowner is stuck with the trees because they were either there when they bought the house or put in by one of the past landscape maintenance companies that worked for them. If you do have a choice on what to use for a living hedge, I strongly suggest you go with clustering palm trees. I have some recommendations here: 1. Cat palms (Chamaedorea sp. bushy and low maintenance; grow to six to eight feet) 2. Dwarf sugar palms (Arenga engleri fragrant blooms; cold-hardy; grow to 10 to 12 feet) 3. Fishtail palms (Caryota mitis very bushy and low maintenance; grow to 25 to 30 feet) 4. Areca palms (the most popular hedge; grow to 30 to 35 feet) Each of the palm trees in the list above requires removal of dead fronds just one to four times per year. Other than that, they can live off rainwater once established and require no fertilizer, pest control or trimming. If you have a large property, you can also use clustering bamboo (not the running type), which is fairly low maintenance. If you are tired of maintaining your current hedge or hate to see it get hit by frost every few years, you can always have it removed and a new palm tree hedge installed in its place. It may save you lots of money in the long run. Dobbs is a landscape architect in south Florida specializing in custom, upscale landscapes. He can be reached at seabreezenurseries@gmail.com. From page 13Water Quality Workshopcooperative arrangement between the Board of County Commissioners, the University of Florida and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Local extension agents are off-campus faculty members of the University of Florida. Extension Services falls under the umbrella of Lee County Parks & Recreation. For more information, call Stephen Brown at 533-7513, email brownsh@ leegov.com or visit http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu. Clustering fishtail palms create a lush, tropical hedge and require little maintenance

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15 THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 2013An Audubon Florida Special PlaceJonathan Dickinson State Parkby Greg BraunNestled as a gateway between the megalopolis of Southeast Florida and the less-intensively developed Treasure Coast, 11,500-acre Jonathan Dickinson State Park (JDSP) provides easy access for nature and history enthusiasts. Named after a survivor of a 1696 hurricane-related shipwreck in the area, Jonathan Dickinson has evolved into an environmentally valuable mosaic of natural communities that provide habitat for over 150 species of birds and 35 species of threatened and endangered species. Attractions of the park are as varied as the personalities of its visitors: birders who appreciate the largest population of Florida Scrub-Jays in Southeast Florida; canoeists and kayakers who explore miles of the Loxahatchee River (Floridas first federally designated Wild and Scenic River); hikers, equestrians and off-road bicyclists who enjoy dozens of miles of mixed-use trails; campers who use backcounty, full-service campsites or rental cabins; historians interested in the sites use as Camp Murphy a World War II military training camp or Trapper Nelsons camp; native plant enthusiasts in search of rarities such as the federallyendangered four-petal pawpaw and dancing lady orchids; and wildlife watchers who enjoy seeing and photographing bald eagles, river otters, colorful lubber grasshoppers and butterflies. The parks stewardship of fire-dependent sand pine scrub and pine flatwoods communities is constantly tested by challenges to manage continued on page 24 We Proudly Brew Tropial Outdoor Patio Seating Get Crabby At The Cow Get Crabby At The Cow with our Famous Stone Crabs1/2 lb & Best Prices On The Planet Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Come Try our NEW Cowlicious Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials Sanibels Most Award Winning Restaurant LIVE Famous Stone Crabs Famous Stone Crabs Always Fresh ...Always! ...Always! with our with our Always Fresh ...Always Fun! Always Fresh ...Always Fun! Some of JDSPs scrub-jays are banded as part of a multi-year study that helps land managers understand the effects of their fire management activities photo by Marta Gordon Several miles of the Florida Trail extend through JDSP and provide recreational opportunities, including the annual Ocean-toLake hike photo by Greg Braun

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THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 201316 Fall For T he Arts Family FestivalThe Alliance for the Arts is planning its 11th annual Fall for the Arts, a free family festival, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, October 19. It will feature art, music, dance, theater, education and community events. Fall for the Arts is a campus-wide event showcasing the many fun and enriching ways people can get involved with the local arts community. Local arts organizations, theaters, galleries, museums, art schools and individual artists will distribute information about their upcoming seasons. Area performing groups will dance, sing, play instruments and act in mini-performances on the outdoor amphitheater stage. Visual artists will demonstrate their talents in painting, drawing, sculpting and other mixed media, while area authors will sign and sell their books in the literary area. There will be interactive art stations for kids and a dunk tank featuring local elementary school principals and teachers. Fall for the Arts will also feature an artist zone where attendees can find a great selection of one-of-a-kind, handmade pieces. The Alliances weekly GreenMarket will be open on the north side of campus offering sustainable products that have been locally grown, caught and cultivated. New participants are welcome. For information about participating in Fall for the Arts as a vendor, organization or artist visit www.ArtInLee.org, call 9392787 or email education@artinlee.org. The Lee County Alliance for the Arts supports artists and arts organizations in the area as the state designated Local Arts Agency for Lee County. The galleries are open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturdays, located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard, just south of Colonial Boulevard. Visit www.artinlee. org for more details. V olunteer Mentors Needed The Foster Grandparent Program of SW Florida is seeking seniors, 55 and over to tutor/mentor children in elementary schools, Head Start centers and after school programs,. Volunteers serve 15 to 20 hours a week and receive a tax-free stipend of $2.65 and hour plus transportation reimbursement of 40 cents a mile, a free physical and vacation, sick and holiday pay, plus other perks. Orientation starts soon. To volunteer, call Joan Willoughby at The Dr. Piper Center, 332-5346. Dancers perform at last years festival Craft sessions The dunk tank Attendees at last years event There was a big attendance last year Pumpkin carving class

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THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 201318 Calendar G irls S eeking New MembersSince 2006, the Calendar Girls have served the community through dance and have sponsored 11 guide dogs for veter ans. The group is always looking for new members. For more information, go to www.calendargirlsflorida.com or call Katherine at 850-6010. The Calendar Girls invite local dancers to join the teamCraft G uild All Member S how Opens August 30The Southwest Florida Fine Craft Guild presents its All Member Show, Dimensions In Art, at the Naples Art Association at the Von Liebig Art Center, 585 Park Street in Naples. The show opens August 30 and closes on October 4. A reception and awards presentation is set for Friday, September 5 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The awards will be presented at 6:30 p.m. Judging the show is Naples resident and batik artist Muffy Clark Gill. Work ranges from mixed media to jewelry to woodworking, ceramics and fiber art. Southwest Florida Fine Craft Guild is the only area organization dedicated solely to fine crafts and three-dimensional works. Over the past 33 years, the guild has become a well known dynamic and evolving organization of local artists, craftsmen and craftswomen. The guilds members combine old world craftsmanship with contemporary techniques to produce unique works of art. Many members are award winners on local, regional and national levels. The guilds is located at the Cape Coral Arts Studio, 4533 Coronado Parkway in Cape Coral. For information on exhibits and membership, visit www.swflcraftguild.org or on Facebook. FineMark Bank S ponsoring G oodwills Festival Of T reesFineMark National Bank & Trust will be this years Presenting Sponsor for Goodwill Industries of Southwest Florida, Inc.s Festival of Trees. This is the second year FineMark will be the Presenting Sponsor of the event. The weeklong festival will feature more than two dozen beautifully decorated holiday trees, as well as elaborate wreaths and other holiday fare. We are so happy that FineMark is returning to sponsor the festival, said Madison Mitchell, spokesperson for Goodwill. We are looking forward to another successful year, in part, because of their support. Highlights of the festival, which begins November 29 and continues through December 6, include a Brunch with Santa and an outdoor family festival on Saturday, November 30. The Festival of Trees culminates with the black tie affair, Tux & Trees Gala, an evening of festivities, drinks and fundraising, which will be held in the evening on Saturday, December 7. Specific dates and hours for other Festival of Trees activities will be announced. Last years festival and gala raised $93,000 to support the Southwest Florida Goodwill Foundation, which provides long-term financial support for programs and services of Goodwill Industries of Southwest Florida. For more information on sponsor ships, or to purchase gala tickets, visit www.tuxandtrees.com or call 995-2106 ext. 2213. Broadway Palm Opens 21st S eason With T he Music Of Burt BacharachBroadway Palm opens its 21st thrilling season with Burt & Me, playing August 22 through October 5. This romantic, musical comedy features the incredible music of the legendary duo, Burt Bacharach and Hal David, featuring 20 of the most popular Bacharach/David songs. Burt & Me tells the story of high school sweethearts, Joe and Lacey, who met over their love of basketball and the music of Burt Bacharach. After separating in college, their paths cross several years later and Joe tries to rekindle their romance with the help of Burt Bacharach. Along with the charming and funny story, youll hear such classics as Do You Know the Way to San Jose, This Guys in Love with You, The Look of Love, Always Something There To Remind Me, A House is Not a Home, Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head, Ill Never Fall In Love Again and Close To You The stellar cast includes returning cast members from Broadway Palms recent hit Shrek The Musical. Kate Marshall, who played Princess Fiona, will be playing the role of Lacey Turner and audience favorite, John Ramsey, who played one of the Three Little Pigs, will be playing the role of Joe Madson. Also appearing in Burt & Me will be Chuck Caruso (Shrek in Shrek), Rendell DeBose (Donkey in Shrek), Sheira Feurstein (Gingy in Shrek), Sami Doherty (Ugly Duckling in Shrek) and making his Broadway Palm debut, Taylor Murphy Hale. Performances of Burt & Me are Wednesday through Sunday evenings with selected matinees. Broadway Palm is offering a season opener special and all tickets are just $45 for dinner and the show. If you purchase four or more tickets, youll also receive a house appetizer and a cocktail in a souvenir glass (valid through September 8). Tickets are now on sale and can be reserved by calling 278-4422, by visiting www. BroadwayPalm.com or by stopping by the box office at 1380 Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Edgewood tree Sidney and Berne Davis Art Center, Peoples Choice Award

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19 THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 2013Artist Donates Works T o S outhwest Florida Community FoundationAward-winning artist Zaki Knapen has donated four of his works to the Southwest Florida Community Foundation to benefit the Fund for the Arts in Southwest Florida. The four pieces include three paintings: Survive (36-inch x 48-inch mixed media), Testament of an Artist (24-inch x 48-inch mixed media) and When She Smiled (36inch x 48-inch mixed media). A sculpture entitled The Spike Jumper has also been donated to the foundations permanent art collection. Knapen wanted to donate the pieces after learning more about the foundations mission and work in the community. The Spike Jumper is about overcoming adversity and not being afraid to jump from spike to spike and reaching out to give,said Knapen. Most people give up just when theyre about to achieve success, quitting at the one-yard line. The best way to tread obstacles is to use them as stepping-stones. Laugh at them, tread on them and let them lead you to something better. As an artist, I used the naysayers and nonbelievers as motivation, adding fuel to my creative fire. This community has the great fortune of being the home to many incredible artists whose work has shaped both Southwest Florida and the nation, said Sarah Owen, president and CEO of the SWFLCF. Our theme this year has been give differently and this is such an incredible example of that. While many of us dont think of our selves as philanthropists or even wealthy, the fact is that there are ways just like Zakis donation that we can all give and that will help others in our community. Knapen was one of 32 artists whose work was included in the Community Foundations art exhibit displayed in its offices public spaces this past year. The various works ranged from photography and carved wood to textiles, fused glass and various sculptures, as well as traditional acrylic, watercolor and medium paintings. The exhibit was open to all artists from the foundations five-county service area including Lee, Charlotte, Collier, Glades and Hendry. A share of the proceeds of artwork sales funded the Fund for the Arts in Southwest Florida that supports nonprofit art organizations in the area. One-hundred percent of the proceeds from Knapens donated artwork will go toward the fund. My paintings are a product of my obsession process, he said. Applying paint to a surface and the experiences that occur while creating an image are the purest form of motivation. The paintings themselves diagram the process of paint application and the interpretation of how these influences manifest themselves in the form of shape, color, texture and space. Each painting becomes an experience of constantly juxtaposing elements and forms within a composition attempting to arrive at a relationship between balance, tension and harmony. The ideas of the placement of forms within a picture plane are crucial in the picture-making process and expose themselves in the form of hard-edged compositions that suggest a complete and precise control of both medium and image. Knapen was born in Antwerp, Belgium in 1953 and has lived in the U.S. since 2001. He owns Art Studio La Palette, Inc. in Lehigh Acres. He has won many national and international awards and competitions and appeared in many publications including the August 2007 edition of ARTnews. The Southwest Florida Community Foundation is celebrating its 36th year of supporting the communities of Lee, Charlotte, Collier, Glades and Hendry counties by connecting donors and their philanthropic aspirations with evolving community needs. With assets of more than $69 million, the Community Foundation has provided more than $55 million in grants and scholarships to the communities it serves. During its 2012 fiscal year, the SWFLCF granted more than $3 million to more than 100 differ ent organizations supporting education, animal welfare, arts and human services. For more information, visit the Community Foundations website at www.floridacommunity.com or call 274-5900. When She Smiled by Zaki Knapen Testament of an Artist by Zaki Knapen Zaki Knapen Survive by Zaki Knapen

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THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 201320 Sports Illustrated A rticle Details T he T alents Of S ano A nd Buxton T he Promise Of A Franchise R ebirthby E d FrankFor suffering Minnesota Twins fans the team is headed for its third straight season of 90-plus losses pick up a copy of last weeks Sports Illustrated and your hopes will rise with every word of the lengthy story proclaiming that the Twins own the top two prospects in all of baseball. The prospects, of course, are third baseman Miquel Sano and outfielder Bryon Buxton, both with deep roots right here in Fort Myers. Every adjective, every superlative imaginable is written to describe these two phenoms. Buxton, just 19 years old, currently patrolling center field for the Fort Myers Miracle, is described by his manager Doug Mientkiewicz as follows: What he is doing at his age, its comical. He looks like a god wearing a baseball uniform. If he were playing centerfield in the majors, hed be a Gold Glover right now. The Twins No. 1 draft pick a year ago (his signing bonus was $6 million), Buxton began this season at Low A Cedar Rapids where he hit .341 with 55 RBIs in 68 games. Quickly promoted here to High A Fort Myers, the youngster began the week hitting .314 in his first 42 games at this higher level. He likely will remain here for the remainder of the season for the playoff-off bound Miracle, but hes certain to move up to Double A or Triple A next season. In fact, some predict that both Buxton and Sano will be wearing a Twins uniform by next year. Heres another paragraph about Buxton, the second youngest player in the Florida State League, in the Sports Illustrated story: Barely a year removed from his senior prom, Buxton is already being called, among other things, a baseball phenomenon, the savior of Minnesota baseball, the next Mike Trout. As good as he is, the article says, he may not be the most talented prospect in the Twins system. That lofty title may belong to Sano, the multi-talented third baseman presently with Double A New Britain after starting the season here with the Miracle. Double A pitching is considerably tougher than Single A, but in 54 games with New Britain, Sano already had hit 15 home runs and driven in 44 runs. At 6-foot, 4-inches and 200 pounds, Sano, the article says, is the kind of physical specimen that would have SEC football coaches breaking NCAA recruiting rules. The lack of home run power has been a major factor in the three-year demise of the Twins. In fact, Minnesota hasnt had a player hit more than 35 home runs in a season since 1970. Sano is the middle-of-the-order masher the franchise is starving for, the article said. Whether youre a Twins fan or just a baseball fan in general, you will find the article fascinating. Only five other teams in the history of baseball have had two players ranked as high as Buxton and Sano at the same time. Miracle Playoff Tickets Now On Sale The Fort Myers Miracle baseball team is headed to post-season play for the first time since 2009, and playoff tickets are now on sale. By virtue of winning the South Division Championship of the Florida State League in the seasons first half, the Miracle will host Game Two and Game Three, if necessary, in the first round of the three-game playoffs that begin on September 3. Tickets are available at the Miracle offices on the third floor of Hammond Stadium. With just 15 games remaining in the seasons second half, the Miracle begin a seven-game homestand starting tonight, Friday. The first four games are against Charlotte and the final three against St. Lucie. Miquel Sano Bryon Buxton Celebrity Basketball FundraiserOn Saturday, August 31, Make Moves Records presents the 5th annual James Brunson Celebrity Basketball Game. Doors open at 4 p.m. The fundraiser benefits the James Boosie Brunson Youth Development Educational Foundation (JBF). Celebrity participants include Javarris James, Cadillac Williams, Earnest Graham, Richard Washington, Mario Henderson, Andrew Lavton, Lil Kee and Jeremy Ware. Music will be provided by Dreamteam Rad and J-Style.continued on page 24 The James Brunson Celebrity Basketball game is held at the Dunbar High School gym ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President General Manager Personal Lines Agent 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Paradise. Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. We are HERE for all your insurance needs

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21 THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 2013 S chool S martby S helley M. G reggs, NCSPDear Shelley, I am an aide at an elementary school and I love the kids but I dont like all the drama at recess. I try to get the kids to use the school rules to help resolve their issues when they have their meltdowns but they dont seem to want to use the school plan. I dread facing all those playground arguments again this school year. Mary B., Cape Coral, Florida Mary, Its great to hear that your school has a specific plan to help students resolve their conflicts but playground clashes will always be a part of life. However, I can understand your dread at having to face these conflicts on a daily basis. While schools are very proficient at tackling academic problems, the type of problem you are describing is more related to emotional development that is often not well addressed at school. When children are involved in conflict situations and are flooded with strong emotions, its crucial that these feelings are acknowledged and validated. Neuroscientist Daniel Seigel, MD, author of The Whole-Brain Child, says that when children are flooded with emotions, it does not allow them to access the problem solving part of their brain. He says that children (and adults) need to work through their emotions first before they can fully access their logical thinking skills. He relates this to the two hemispheres of our brain, where the right side is dominant in creativity, non-verbal communication, emotion and creative expression, and the left hemisphere tends to dominate linear, literal and logical thinking. Dr. Seigel emphasizes that no task, action or thinking process is conducted only in one hemisphere, each hemisphere has an expertise, or a type of processing which it dominates and, of course, these hemispheres are connected through a pathway of nerves. Dr. Seigel suggests using a strategy that he calls connect and redirect. One can connect to the student in need by acknowledging and empathizing with the students feelings and with the situation. A simple statement is all that is needed here. Something like, its hard to be a good friend or its hard to argue with friends, would be appropriate. An empathetic statement will allow the student to feel that they have been heard and the calming process will begin. After the student has calmed down (which might take a while) and is no longer overwhelmed by emotions is the time to re-direct the child to their logical thinking side and begin the problem solving discussion. Dr. Seigel suggests that when a child is flooded with emotions such as a playground struggle, the right brain takes over, leaving little chance for the left brain to do its logical work. He suggests that it is only when the child has calmed down that he/she has access to the left-brain and is able to utilize logic and problem solving. He says that by connecting empathetically with the right brain and later redirecting to the left, integration of both sides of the brain occurs, training the neuropathways to do this independently as the child matures. We can all remember experiencing a situation of being upset and flooded with emotions and then having a good friend or relative try to explain the situation logically. It probably didnt work for you then and it doesnt work for kids now. Hopefully, understanding why we need to acknowledge emotions first before proceeding to the problem solving will help reduce some of the issues you face on the playground. Ms. Greggs is adjunct faculty at Edison State College where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also Nationally Certified School Psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. Niebuhr Named T o Deans ListDanielle Niebuhr, a resident of Fort Myers, has been named to the Deans List for the spring 2013 semester at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island. Niebuhr is a sophomore majoring in Elementary Education. College G raduateAntony Mathew graduated cum laude from Siena College with a bachelors degree in biology on May 19. The college awarded 805 bachelors degrees and 52 masters of science in accounting degrees at this years commencement ceremony. PLUMBING $ 35 OFF ON ANY SERVICE Call 935-5058Voted e Best Plumbing Co. 10 straight years! 35 OFF ON ANY SERVICE www.AztecPlumbing.net FREE Estimates Isabella Rasi 239-246-47161101 Periwinkle Way #105, Sanibel, FL 239-472-0044 ENGEL & VLKERS Excellence in Real Estate A step above! International Client Base 600 Shops Worldwide Multi-Lingual Staff Your success is my aim.E dison S tate R eceives AccreditationEdison State Colleges competency-based, associate in science in Health Information Technology degree has received accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM). The accreditation, which is granted after extensive reviews based on industry-developed standards, helps increase certification eligibility and job marketability for graduates of Edisons Health Information Technology (HIT) program. Graduates are eligible to sit for the national Registered Health Information Technician (RHIT) credential. Earning CAHIIM accreditation for our Health Information Technology associate degree program helps ensure that our graduates are gaining the professional knowledge they will need to be successful in the health information technology field, said Deborah Howard, RHIA, CCS, Program Director The A.S. in Health Information Technology is very affordable at less than $10,000 for the two-year degree. This makes it ideal for healthcare or IT professionals who wish to move into this high-demand career field. Edison offers the only public college CAHIIM accredited associate degree in Health Information Technology in the Southwest Florida region. Edisons A.S. in Health Information Technology combines concepts in healthcare, information technology, medical coding, legislation and leadership practice and includes hands on instruction in the use of the EPIC electronic health record system currently in use at all Lee Memorial Health System facilities. The program, which is part of Edisons School of Health Professions, is one of several allied health degree programs. An independent accrediting organization, CAHIIM was created to evaluate the quality and integrity of health informatics and health information management programs. The accreditation process includes an extensive self-study process, voluntary peer review, an onsite visit, and a review of degree requirements that evaluate the course of study using CAHIIM standards. It also incorporates ongoing improvement reports and periodic reviews to assess program performance over time. Program accreditation by CAHIIM is necessary to be eligible for the Registered Health Information Technician (RHIT) certification exam, a highly respected credential in the healthcare industry. For more information about Edisons Health Information Technology associate degree program, go to www.edison.edu/academics/programs/ashim or call the HIT Program Office at 489-9419.

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THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 201322 Financial FocusWork T o Become A Better I nvestorby Jennifer BaseyNext week, we observe Labor Day. A federal holiday since 1894, Labor Day celebrates the achievements of American workers people, like yourself, who work hard for their money. But to make progress toward your long-term financial goals, you need to do more than just earn money you have to invest it wisely. And that takes work, too. Fortunately, theres no real mystery to the types of labor in which youll need to engage to become a good investor. Here are a few suggestions: Many people delay investing until they have a better handle on their finances. But these good intentions frequently go unfulfilled because there will always be something else on which to spend ones money. To work toward your important goals, such as a comfortable retirement or a childs education, you need to put away some money regularly. If youre just starting out in your career, you might not be able to afford much, but even a small amount can help. And when your salary increases, so can your investment contributions. To make it easier on yourself, consider arranging for your bank to automatically move money each month from your checking or savings account into an investment account. portfolio. Some investors arent certain about what investments they own and this uncertainty can lead to poor decisionmaking if it becomes necessary to make changes. So make sure you know whats in your portfolio and why. with your goals. Even if you know why you initially purchased certain investments and how they fit into your portfolio, you cant put things on autopilot. Over time, your goals may evolve, which means youll need to be vigilant in working with your financial advisor to adjust your portfolio accordingly. matter where you are in your life, you will still need to diversify your portfolio by owning a variety of investments stocks, bonds, government securities and other vehicles. Consequently, youll need to review your portfolio regularly to ensure that its still properly diversified. Diversification is a strategy designed to help reduce the effects of volatility on your holdings, but keep in mind that even a diversified portfolio cant guarantee profits or protect against loss. spective. No matter what you might hear from anyone else, theres no shortcut to investment success. Many people hope they will hit on that one investment that will make them rich quickly but thats pretty much a fantasy. To help achieve your goals, you will need to invest for many years, through good markets and bad. And during those inevitable downturns, youll need to focus on your longterm objectives and follow a consistent investment strategy, making only those adjustments that make sense for your situation. As you can see, youll need to work on many aspects of investing to stay on the road toward success. But you dont have to work alone: Investing can be complex, so you may want to get help from a financial professional someone who knows both the investment world and your individual needs, goals and risk tolerance. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@edwardjones.com. Shell Point I nformational MeetingsResidents of Southwest Florida who would like to learn about resort-style retirement options and lifecare are invited to attend one of several informational meetings at Shell Point Retirement Community. One of Shell Points retirement counselors will explain the benefits of becoming a Shell Point resident. The meetings will be held at 10 a.m. in the main Commons located in The September 4, 10, 18 and 24 October 2, 8, 16 and 29 November 6, 12, 20 and 26 December 4, 10 and 18 During the casually-structured meeting, guests will learn about lifecare and the retirement options and amenities available at Shell Point. Guests can also tour two of Admission to these sessions is free, however, seating is limited so reservations are required and may be made by calling Maureen Thomson at 466-1131 or 1-800-7801131. Shell Point Retirement Community is located in Fort Myers just off Summerlin Road and McGregor Boulevard, two miles before the Sanibel Causeway. Scholarship AwardedT Florida received a $300 scholarship from the Community Foundation of Collier County. The scholarship will tion at The Fundraising School at Indiana University Developing Major Gifts on September 23 to 25 at Hodges University Center for Nonprofit Excellence. Knowledge gained from this seminar will be invested in empowering women in Southwest Florida. Our 2013 projects to establish a regional anti-slavery resource center to combat human trafficking, a matched savings program for low-moder ate income women and a revolving loan fund for women owned businesses will benefit, said Deborah Johnson, repreFlorida at the three day seminar. of Southwest Florida is to raise money through federal and state grants, and relationships with individual and corporate donors, and employ a strategic grant-making model to fund programs and organizations that address the special, critical needs of women and girls in Southwest Florida. Florida Board of Directors include Brenda Tate, President; Linda Uhler, Secretary/ Treasurer; Lalai Hamric, Vice Chair and Lou Pontius, Chair, Amanda Cross, Director, and Helen Athan, Director. For more information and to view the executive summary of The Status of www.womensfundflorida.org or email contact@womensfundflorida.org. Follow com/floridawomen and on twitter.com/ twfofswfl. Deborah Johnson T op 10 R eal E state Sales Development City Year BuiltSquare FootageListing PriceSelling PriceDays on Market Hyde Park Fort Myers Beach 19403,880$1,995,000$2,010,00030 No Subdivision Sanibel19882,900$2,250,000$1,750,00049 Pinehurst Estates Fort Myers 19834,317$995,000$995,000 158 Edgewater At Gulf HarbourFort Myers 20053,449$899,000$869,000 43 No Subdivision Bokeelia19691,584$824,500$575,000 381 The Forest Fort Myers 19923,313$645,000$557,000 162 Heritage Palms Estates Fort Myers 20012,714$559,900$545,000 13 No Subdivision Cape Coral 20132,600$524,900$530,000 92 Heritage Palms Estates Fort Myers 20033,430$585,000 $525,000 65 No Subdivision Cape Coral 20132,488$499,900$524,530 145Courtesy of Royal Shell Real Estate

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23 THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 2013Mom And Me by Lizzie and PryceLizzie and Pryce answer your questions and give advice about aging concerns from a two-generational perspective. A mother and daughter team, Lizzie is a retired RN and health educator, and Pryce is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in the care of elders and people with chronic illnesses. Dear Mom & Me, We retired from the cold north to the warmth of the south. There are thousands of people just like us living in this area. It is very disturbing to read in the newspaper complaints from the younger people about our driving and what a menace we are on the roads. I am sorry that they feel this way, but we who are driving have passed the required licensing procedure. What is disturbing to us is why we should have to pay school taxes for your children when our children are long gone and we dont benefit from the schools. Have you ever thought that maybe you have jobs because of our needs? What do you think, Lizzie and Pryce? Seymour Dear Seymour, Young people have a very valid complaint about some older citizens driving. I am amazed at how some seniors were able to pass the licensing procedure. Older people hate to give up their wheels and independence. Stricter tests, I personally think, should be enforced. However, taxes for schools is a different matter. Our new longevity is directly related to more educated people. Dentists, doctors, engineers, pharmacists and therapists have all made their contribution, and they all got their start in grade school. Each generation has their own physical and emotional needs. Try if you can to show an example of a person aging with dignity and grace. Lizzie Dear Seymour, Who cares what the younger generation is saying about your driving. Everyone has something or someone to complain about. Let the comments go in one car door and out the other. I absolutely do not agree with agebased driving tests. I think it is discriminatory. Also, before there is a wholesale retraction of older individuals driving privilege, there needs to be more thought into how dependent individuals will become, not being able to go to the grocery store, the drug store or for their appointments. Pryce Lizzie and Pryces email address is momandmeaging@hotmail.com. Local Acupuncture Physician Achieves National CertificationBrian Healy, acupuncture physician, doctor of oriental medicine and licensed massage therapist, has recently been awarded full board certification by the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM). In addition to passing comprehensive board exams in both acupuncture and oriental medicine, the NCCAOM also requires a passing grade on a comprehensive Western biomedicine exam. This exam includes questions on diagnosis and treatment strategies for many common and not so common syndromes and diseases, both physical and psychiatric. In addition, there is heavy emphasis on the topics of herb-drug interactions and vitamin deficiencies and toxicities. The state of Florida recognizes Oriental Medical Doctors (DOM) as primary care practitioners able to treat a wide variety of disorders such as colds and flu, allergies, osteoarthritis, headaches and migraines, digestive disorders and chronic pain. Last December Dr. Healy graduated from the East West College of Natural Medicine in Sarasota after completing a five-year, 3,000-hour program in Western Biomedicine, Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. His training included an eight month internship at the HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital in Sarasota. Dr. Healy has been a medical massage therapist for over 20 years and a certified Kripalu Yoga Teacher for almost 25 years. For more information, log onto www. SanibelWellness.com.. Brian Healy deaRPharmacistT he I nsomniacs Dream Come T rueby S uzy Cohen, R PhDear Pharmacist: I have trouble with prescribed sleeping pills. They make me do crazy things like sleepwalk, eat and wake up family members in the middle of the night just to chat. What are natural options? AA, Superior, Colorado It depends on what kind of insomniac you are. About one fifth of Americans experience insomnia every night. Women versus men, and seniors versus younger folks tend to have sleep disturbances. I wrote an entire chapter about insomnia and natural remedies in my first book, The 24-Hour Pharmacist. Heres a summary: Creepy Crawlers You fall asleep just fine, but somewhere around 3 a.m., you wake up and cant get back to sleep. You consider putting away dishes, folding laundry or vacuuming. Dont! Make enough noise at that hour and your spouse will likely duct tape you to the bed post. For Creepy Crawlers, I recommend Melatonin. It increases the number of hours that you sleep. You may be wondering if its okay with Ambien, Xanax other medications. It should be fine since we make melatonin in our brains anyway, some people just run short. Ive read research that suggests it might dampen your mood slightly, however, it is terrific for people who have autoimmune disorders. Ask your physician if its right for you. Antenna Heads You climb into bed at a reasonable hour, but your brain becomes an antenna for every thought on the planet. Some of you go into rewind mode thinking about the day and what you should have done, should have said, and needed to accomplish but didnt! When youre fully maddened and start cursing the sheep, you drift off at 2 in the morning! Antenna heads will do well with a relaxing herb about an hour before for bed, such as chamomile and lavender tea. Take two teaspoonfuls of dried chamomile herb, and one half teaspoon dried lavender and steep that for two to three minutes, sweeten if necessary and enjoy. These herbs will settle your brain down, and calm a nervous stomach. They are also available as liquid herbal extracts. Bed Bugger You fall asleep fine, even staying asleep through the night, but you thrash or wake up a lot; maybe you have bizarre dreams. The hallmark is fitful sleep. Bed buggers do extremely well on the couch (just kidding). My husband used to be a bed bugger, and steal the sheets in one roll over but luckily, hes fine now. Bed buggers respond to supplements that relax the central nervous continued on page 24 Beyonc Is Lending H er V oice For G oodBeyonc Knowles-Carter will lend her voice to help raise awareness about Goodwills mission of transforming lives through the power of work. The announcement came just as Beyonc got ready to kick off The Mrs. Carter Show World Tour. Goodwill helps people get back to work by providing education, job training and placement. I wanted to team up with an organization that puts people first and works every day to help them improve and re-establish their lives, said Beyonc. Beyonc is encouraging fans to support Goodwill by promoting donation drives at her North American concerts that began on June 28 in Los Angeles. Goodwill is hosting mobile donation center onsite at 28 tour venues in 24 North American cities, collecting clothing, electronics and small household goods. The revenue from the sale of these donations will directly benefit local Goodwill agencies in their work to help people with disabilities and disadvantages, and anyone facing challenges to finding employment. The Goodwill Southwest Florida area is not a tour stop, but the public can still donate online at www.goodwill.org and establish the funds for Goodwill Industries of Southwest Florida. Beyonc is also helping build awareness of Goodwills mission through in-concert education, social media and online ticket auctions. Global charity auction site www.charitybuzz.com will auction special ticket packages for The Mrs. Carter Show World Tour, with the revenue benefitting Goodwill. Every 38 seconds of every business day, a person served by Goodwill is placed in employment. Goodwill promotes independence and dignity for people who need support to provide for themselves and their families. When people donate to their local Goodwill, they play a vital role in fulfilling this mission. Financial donations and the revenue generated from the sale of used goods helps to sustain skills training, career placement services and job opportunities, and support services such as career counseling, access to free tax preparation and financial coaching. Members of the public can do their part to support Beyoncs efforts by giving goods, giving financially, or giving their voice to increase awareness of Goodwills mission of transforming lives through the power of work. Beyonc is also supporting and advocating on behalf of other local charitable agencies involved in job creation and employment services during the overseas portion of her tour, to bring to light the importance of economic independence and an increased quality of life for those in need around the globe. We face a jobs crisis in the U.S. and around the world that threatens the future and the potential of our families and communities. Through Beyoncs platform, continued on page 24

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THE RIVER AUGUS TT 23, 201324 From page 15Jonathan Dickinson State Parkfire in an increasingly wildland-urban interface. With I-95 and the Florida Turnpike bordering the parks western boundary, highly-travelled US 1 serving as the parks eastern boundary, and residential development to the north and south, the need for precise smoke management makes conducting fire prescriptions a complex and strategic combination of weather, fuel loads and public relations. To visitors though, the fruits of these burns are self-evident the bright new re-growth of wiregrass, saw palmetto, rosemary and vibrant blooms of meadow beauty, grass-pink orchids and coreopsis. The 4.2-mile Park Drive leads visitors through a cross-section of several of the natural communities of the park from sand pine scrub near the entrance ( on the west side of US 1 between Jupiter and Hobe Sound), through pine flatwoods, across cypress-dominated wetland strands, around shallow, seasonallyflooded depression marsh wetlands to the Loxahatchee River frontage and the recently-opened Elsa Kimbell Education Center. The excursion may take 10 minutes for motorists, a half-hour for bicyclists, two days for backpackers, or untold hours for birders, plant enthusiasts and photographers.Ecologically, Jonathan Dickinson State Parks value is evidenced by detailed investigations into local populations of flora and fauna. As fledglings from the first bald eagle nest documented in Martin County in the late 1970s have returned to raise future generations, the eagle population has now grown to over a dozen nests in the county a tribute to a combination of the tenacity and adaptability of the species, the protections of the Endangered Species Act and Martin Countys wellearned reputation for habitat preservation and strong commitment to protecting the urban services boundary. In these financially-challenging and uncertain times, Audubon members and our partners, including the Friends of Jonathan Dickinson State Park and the governmental and NGO partners on the Loxahatchee River Management Coordinating Council, remain vigilant in the need to advocate for environmentallyconscious management as exemplified by the public outcry that was necessary to thwart a recent legislative attempt to site a golf course, resort and RV park at JDSP.This column is one of a series from Audubon Florida. Author Greg Braun is a professional avian and estuarine ecologist and environmental advocate who has taught bird ID courses and led field trips at Jonathan Dickinson and was the principal author of Martin Countys Manatee Protection Plan. For more information about Jonathan Dickinson State Park, see www.floridastateparks.org/jonathandickinson. For more about Audubon Florida and its Special Places program, visit www.FloridasSpecialPlaces.org. All rights reserved by Florida Audubon Society, Inc. From page 12Fishing Getting A Bad RR aphigh and was as brown and nasty looking as I can ever remember. Yes, all this dark water is far from pretty and not the best thing for the eco-system, but dont let a few poorly informed people fool you... fishing for the month of August is still about as good as it gets.Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions, email captmattmitchell@aol.com. From page 23Beyonc Partners With Goodwillwe will be able to increase knowledge of the positive impact Goodwill has on communities, the environment and the lives of the millions of people we serve each year through education and skills training, many of whom have been unemployed or underemployed for long periods of time, said Jim Gibbons, president and CEO of Goodwill Industries International. We cannot begin to express our sincere gratitude to Beyonc for her generous support of Goodwill and for showcasing Goodwills far-reaching programs and ser vices that change lives each day. To learn more about the partnership, visit http://goodwill.org/give. From page 23 TT he II nsomniacs Dreamsystem, for example, magnesium, a natural chill pill and muscle relaxant. Two other great choices are glycine and Chinese skullcap. Please look in your medicine cabinet. Thyroid medicine, blood pressure drugs, cold medicine and asthma inhalers are stimulating, so take them earlier in the day. If youre craving more information and remedies for sleep, sign up for free newsletter (at my website) and Ill send you more choices to help you fall asleep. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. dearpharmacist.com. From page 20FundraiserThe JBFs mission is to create universal understanding through educational scholarships to recipients who are trying to make a better life for themselves and their families. With an education, local youth can achieve their goals and the foundation continues to assist students in making their dreams come true. Tickets are a $10 per person or $25 for VIPs. The event is family-friendly and admission for the first 50 kids is free. The James Brunson Celebrity Basketball game takes place in the gym at Dunbar High School, 3800 Edison Avenue in Fort Myers. Call 334-7388 for more details. Love TT hat Dress! 5 TT ickets Going Fast Love That Dress! 5 is on the countdown to the ultimate shopping spree of the year. With less than eight days to go, the dress donations and silent auction items have been pour ing in. This year marks the five year anniver sary, with exciting new additions to the event such as a VIP Auction Room that consists of a NAPA Valley trip, a womans Dream Closet donated by All About Closets filled full of surprises and more. Centurylink will present the inaugural Founders Ceremony Awards honoring the founding LTD! Committee of 2009. In addition, light hor doeuvres will be offered as well as drink specials. Make your bid on swanky silent auction items like weekend stays, exclusive Vintner wine lots, over 3,000 dresses Gap to Gucci with name brands and designers that include BCBG, Evan Piccone, Nicole Miller, Theory, DKNY, Tahari, BeBe, Dolce & Gabbana, Juicy Couture, J Crew, WHBM, Banana Republic, Jones NY, Talbot, Kenneth Cole, Free People, Chicos, Express, Boston Proper, Anne Taylor, Antonio Melani, GAP, and more, most all priced from $10 to $30 per item. Brand new designer, hand-beaded couture gowns donated from House of Wu that normally retail for thousands will be sold for $50 each. For tickets to Love That Dress! 5, visit www.LoveThatDress.org or stop by PACE Center For Girls at 3760 Schoolhouse Road in Fort Myers to purchase on site. For the latest details and event information, follow Love That Dress! on Facebook. Proceeds from Love That Dress! 5 benefit PACE Center For Girls, a nonresidential juvenile delinquency prevention and intervention program targeting the unique needs of girls, ages 12 to 18, facing challenges such as physical and sexual abuse, domestic violence, substance abuse, foster care, neglect, death of a parent, family history of incarceration and declining grades. VV oices For Kids Of Southwest Florida Celebrates 30th YearNow in its 30th year of supporting the abused, neglected and abandoned children of Southwest Florida, Voices for Kids of Southwest Florida, Inc., a 501(c)(3), has a newly designed website developed by Atilus LLC. The new website www.voicesforkids.org strategically designed and easily navigable, offers information, statistics, volunteer opportunities and ways to support and is updated on a regular basis. Zach Katkin, President of Tails LLC, stated, Its been an honor to work on the Board, and to assist our organization by developing this new website. I cant take any credit though it was the whole team at Tails that put this together and I am so proud to be a part of a team that can execute projects like this successfully to better our community. There are still a lot of children in the welfare system that need assistance, and hopefully this update will help close that gap. Darlene Ann Grossman, Executive Director of Voices for Kids, added, We are so very fortunate to have the expertise of Zach and the entire Atilus staff. Our new website is a creative tool for telling our story as well as describing ways the community can support our most vulnerable children. Voices for Kids of Southwest Florida, Inc.s major focus for the past 30 years has been: who become the childs voice in court, in school and in the community. a sense of normalcy by providing a cozy bed, happier birthdays, emergency/supplemental clothing, participation in sports, the arts and social clubs, academic tutoring, summer camps and medical needs. For further information, visit www.voicesforkids.org or call 533-1435. TT ickets On Sale Now For Charity Beach BallThe Fort Myers Beach Community Foundations 2nd annual Charity Beach Ball will take place on Saturday, November 2 at DiamondHead Beach Resort. The Beach Ball is a black-tie optional silent auction with an open bar from 6 to 8 p.m., dinner and dancing with The Marc Vee Band. Tickets are $95 per person, or buy a table of 10 for $875 and save $75. Tickets are available online at www.charitybeachball.com or by mail at the address below. Thanks to all the supporters and attendees last year, the foundation was able to support many local causes and provide scholarships to three outstanding students. The foundations is looking for donations and sponsors for the event. For more information, go to http://www. fmbeachfoundation.org/ or call Nicole at 849-1460

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PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF AUGUST 26, 2013ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Your honesty might upset some people, but you inevitably win more admirers for having the courage to tell the truth when others are more likely to scramble for cover. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Your efforts to defend your project begin to show favorable results. You should soon be able to win over even the most determined detractors who had lined up against it. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You win praise for your selfless efforts in a very difficult situation. But be careful not to allow your generous nature to be exploited by those who have their own agenda. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A trusted colleague sheds light on a recent spate of puzzling workplace situations. This should give you the information you need to bring to your superiors attention. LEO (July 23 to August 22) A shift in workplace management could be helpful for talented Leos and Leonas who have been waiting to have their accomplishments rewarded by receptive leadership. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) A misunderstanding between you and someone you care for should be corrected immediately. This relationship is too important to lose over a bruised ego. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A welcome piece of good news helps clear the air in a family situation. A job-related incident also eases as more information provides a clearer focus on the problem. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Quick action to heal bruised feelings pays off in a big way. Now youll be able to move forward with your plans without that problem holding you back. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Your creativity combined with a positive attitude should give you a considerable edge in finding a way to get around the negativity youve run into. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) That sudden streak of stubbornness could cause some problems. Try to be more open to helpful suggestions and more flexible in making needed changes. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Now that that special relationship appears to be well and truly restored, you can spend more time dealing with those long-needed workplace changes. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A new opportunity sounds promising. But watch out for any conditions that might be attached. Before making a decision, ask that each one be explained in detail. BORN THIS WEEK: You can be distracted by promises of good times, yet you ultimately reach the goals you set for yourself. and Mark Antony, takes her life following the defeat of her forces against Octavian, the future first emperor of Rome. She committed suicide possibly by means of an asp, a poisonous Egyptian serpent and symbol of divine royalty. Kettering, inventor of the electric selfstarter, is born in Loundonville, Ohio. Ketterings inventions spread far beyond the automotive industry: He helped develop the refrigerant Freon, and took an active role in the medical industry, inventing a treatment for venereal disease, an incubator for premature infants and artificial fever therapy. Lyndon Baines Johnson is born on a farm near Stonewall, Texas. As president, Johnson pushed through the creation of Medicare/Medicaid, Head Start, the and the Department of Housing and Urban Development. small, affordable Mark I Mini. The Mini went on to become one of the best-selling British cars in history. At only 10 feet long, the $800 Mini could sit four adults and had a trunk big enough for a reasonable amount of luggage. Murakami becomes the first Japanese man to play in U.S. baseballs major leagues. Murakami was a teenage baseball prodigy in Japan, and his left-handed sidearm delivery proved an asset in the United States. Force gets its first ace designation since S. Ritchie and his backseater (radar DeBellevue, shoot down his fifth MiG near Hanoi. the notorious Night Stalker, is captured and nearly killed by a mob in East Los from a photograph shown on television and in newspapers. Ramirez was pulled from the enraged mob by police officers. Marty Alvey, lost nearly all his sight, due (unsurprisingly) to age-related causes. This is not noteworthy. However, three years later, the same man became faint and dizzy, so he called 911. He began to feel better on the ambulance ride to the hospital, but he wanted to be checked out anyway. By the time the doctor made it to his room, Alveys sight had been restored. Even after thorough examinations by two ophthalmologists, no cause was found. dont tell anyone the name you plan to give your baby; its considered to bring bad luck. find creative ways to transport illicit goods from one part of the world to another. In lizards out of New Zealand in his underwear; it seems that he had sewn special pockets in his undergarments specifically for the creatures. begin to glow. tures of bioluminescent lagoons, but the bacteria that cause this phenomenon are not limited to small bays and inlets. In fact, there is a bioluminescent patch of ocean to be found off the horn of Africa. Patch may not be quite the right word to describe it, though; the area that glows is the sweatiest part of the human body is not the armpits; its the palms of the hands. I hate women because they always know where things are. -Voltaire THIS WEEK IN HISTORY strSTR A nN G eE BU tT trTR U eE thoTHO UG htHT F orOR theTHE DA yY DID YOU KNOW25 THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 2013 1. ENTERTAINERS: What are the first names of the comedian duo Abbott and TRIVI aA TES tT ANSWERS SpSP OR tT S QUIZ 1. Who was the last player before Texas Adrian Beltre in 2012 to hit three home runs in a game two of the other three. ANSWERS

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THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 201326 Read us online at IslandSunNews.com PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY BUILDING CONTRACTOR COMPUTERS FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the bene ts of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING Feta, Tomato and Caper Potato Salad 1 1/2 pounds potatoes, peeled or unpeeled Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved 1 small sweet onion, thinly sliced 1/3 cup black olives, pitted and halved (preferably kalamata olives) 2 tablespoons capers, drained 1/3 cup chopped fresh basil Pinch crushed red pepper flakes for heat 8 ounces feta cheese, crumbled 1 teaspoon dried oregano, or 1 table-spoon fresh oregano 1/4 cup olive oil Place the potatoes in a pot, cover with cold water by at least an inch, add a good pinch of salt and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium and cook until the potatoes are almost tender. Drain on a rack set in the sink and leave them there until cool enough to handle. Cut potatoes into 1/3-inch cubes. Drop them into a mixing bowl, separating the cubes as you go. Add the tomatoes, onion, olives, capers, basil, feta and red pepper flakes. Toss gently. Crumble the oregano over the top, pour in the oil and toss gently. Feta, Tomato and Caper Potato Salad

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27 THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 2013 answer on page 27 PUZZLE ANSWERS SUDOKU SCRAMBLERS FIND AT LEAST SIX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PANELS PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY CONTRACTOR G I P M SR C D P D P CG D GrSince 2001, A Southwest Florida Paver Contractor www.gigicompanies.com 239-541-7282Schedule free estimates or visit our new show roomLic.# S3-12238 FISHING CHARTER Light Tackle Sport Fishing CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.com TREE & LAWN CARE Jesus Hernandez LANDSCAPING & TREE SERVICE 482-7350 We Service All your Landscape Needs FULL Landscaping SERVICES Over 20 years serving San-Cap & Ft. Myers To advertise in The River Weekly NewsCall 415-7732

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Cottages Condos Homes Miles of Beaches & Bike Paths239-472-72771-888-451-7277R SS 1/4 BM T FNFN VACATION RENTAL LIGLIG H TT H OO U SESE REALTREALT YPaul J. Morris, Broker VACATION RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT & SALES 239-579-0511RS 1/4 CCCC TF NN RR ENTAL WANTED AA NN uU AL RR ENTAL WANTED non-smoking, no pets, no children, good credit. Looking for moderately priced 1B/1B or bigger rental. Sept. or later to occupy. NSNS 6/28 CCCC T FNFN SERVICES O ffFF ERED CC OM pP ANION SS ERVICE Sanibel-Captiva Care and Companion Service, LLC Medical appointments, general transportation, shopping, light meal preparations, and light cleaning. Our services are customized to meet R SS 1/4 BM T FNFN SANISANI B ELEL H OMEOME W ATCATC HRetired Police Captain Lives on Sanibel Will Check Your Home Weekly Very Reasonable Rates R SS 1/4 BM T FNFN ROGERROGER NODRNODR UFF ELECTRICELECTRIC Aqualink Motor Controls. R SS 6/7 CCCC T FNFN HOME/ CONDOCONDO WATC hH CONCIERGE SERVICESDorado Property Management Full Range of Services Island Resident Licensed & Insured RS 1/4 BM TFN DD R uU M TT EAC hH ERAll Styles Rock Jazz Latin Reading Rudiments and more. Years of playing and teaching experience Full teaching studios in home off McGregor. 1st lesson FREE! NSNS 8/9 CCCC 8/23 MOMO B ILEILE H OMEOME P ERIERI W ININ K LELE P ARAR K size bed & blt-in dresser & dbl closet. Master bath has combo bath/ shower & dbl sink vanity w/extra storage. Guest BR has dbl closet + blt-in drawers & private bath w/ shower. Eat-in-kit is open to LR which from K to FL room. Private 12 x 12 deck, picnic table and storage shed. One car carport with adjacent 2nd parking space. room & bathrooms. Carpeting in both bedrooms & LR. Home recently inspected & has all required tiedowns. New central air & heat system & stacked washer/dryer, all appliances louvered blinds throughout. Purchase completely furnished including all linens, dishes, pots & pans, tableware, 2 sleeper couches, recliner, 2 dining tables & chairs, 4 outdoor chairs & folding beach chairs, etc. email LMSrealtor@aol.com for further information or to make offer. R SS 8/9 CCCC 8/9 REAL ESTATE CC ONDO fF OR SS ALE MILLIONMILLION DOLLARDOLLAR VIEVIE W ONON TT H EE W ATERATER Why pay Sanibel prices when right across the bridge on San Carlos Bay looking over at the island is Punta Rassa, a peninsula with gorgeous views every direction you look. This 2 bedroom 2 bath condo has tile in living areas and master bedroom, open cabinets, hurricane shutters on lanai and wants to add to unit. Call Karen Wojnar, NSNS 8/16 CCCC 8/30 QU IETIET SANISANI B ELEL H OMEOME W/P RIVATERIVA TE B EACEAC H P ATAT H Sanibels most beautiful & sought after communities. One house from beach w/private beach path. Short walk to Gulf Pines 2 swimming pools & tennis courts; large landscaped lot provides privacy. 3-4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, large open living area, screened porch & several decks. W/D, 2nd fridge, Elevator, 2-car garage. Unfurnished. Landscaping & association NSNS 5/31 CCCC T FNFN ANN uU AL RENTAL DIRECTLDIRECTL Y ACROSSACROSS F ROMROM B EACEAC H custom wood staircase, All High End appliances, separate bar, full custom large 3 car garage. A rare offering @ CANALCANAL & DOCDOC K Five Minutes to Sanibel T oll-Booth!! This UF ground level updated home offers 3 BR/2 BA + family room, double dock, + boat lift for boat. 472-6747 GG ulf Beach Properties, II nc. Paul H. Zimmerman, Broker/Ownersanibelannualrentals.com R SS 7/26 BM T FNFN ANN uU AL RENTALS SS ANI bB EL fF ORT M yY ERSFOR RR ENTCommunity Housing & Resources (CHR) has apartments for rent to individuals who work full time on Sanibel. Rent based on income. R SS 3/15 CCCC 8/30 RERE / MAMA X OO F TT H EE ISLANDSISLANDS Putting owners and tenants together Call Dustyn Corace www.remax-oftheislands.com R SS 1/4 BM T FNFN RESORTRESORT MANAGEMENTMANAGEMENT Retired couple seeks position as small resort management team. Both have residence desired; salary negotiable. 231-421-9194/jcrounds11@charter.net. NSNS 8/23 CCCC 9/13 SERVICES O ffFF EREDHO uU SE kK EE pP ER GG IRL FRIDA yY Experienced Housekeeper. Excellent References, Reliable, I will also help with light cooking and errands. Sanibel & Lee Co. License NSNS 8/16 CCCC 8/23 COMM uU NIT yY MEETING CC OMM uU NIT yY II N fF ORMATIONAL MM EETING ON VV ARIANCE A ppPP LICATION fF OR 16163 CC A pP TIVA DD RIVE, CC A pP TIVA, F LL This is an invitation to attend a community meeting regarding an informational session for 16163 Captiva Drive, to hear and provide information about the request for a variance for an accessory structure setback (pool and porch located between right of way and home) from the right of way. The meeting will be held at TwWEEnN WAt TErRS InnNN 15951 CC aptiva DD r, CC aptiva, F LL 33924Any questions regarding the meeting please call NSNS 8/23 CCCC 8/23

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29 THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 2013 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS Chamber mail collection boxes relocated to Public Boat RR amp SS extant Drive PETSFR EEEE KI TTETTE N TT O GOOD HOM EE Free kitten to good, safe home. No de-clawing. Fiesty Bengal mix. Call 472-1788 after 5 p.m.NS 5/31 NC TFN WA nN TE dD T oO BUYC ASAS H PAPA ID FOR MILI TATA R YY I TETE M SS Cash Paid For Old Military Items. Medals, Swords, Uniforms, helmets, old guns, awards & more. Local Toll Free 1-866-440-3280RS 6/7 CC 8/30 C AA R forFOR SA lL E2007 BB U ickICK LAC roRO SSE CLX16,500 miles, beige color, 4 door, all power, seldom driven off island, $14,000. Call Ken at 472-2012.RS 7/12 NC TFN B oO ATS cC A noNO ES kK AYA kK SD ockOCK A gG EHourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-5800RS 1/4 NC TFN 22-F ooOO T G lL A ciCI E rR BB AY CATA mM A rR A nN In good condition. Needs some detailing and a high pressure fuel pump. $9,000 or best offer. The boat was donated to the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) for quick sale. Contact James Robinson at CROW at (239) 472-3644, ext. 221 or development@ crowclinig.org. Or contact Peg Albert at (239) 472-3644, ext. 232 or peg@ crowclinic.org. RS 7/26 NC TFN hH E lL P WA nN TE dD VOL UU N TEETEE R SS N EEEE D EE DAt The Sanibel School Call Michelle Wesley 239-910-8000RS 1/4 NC TFN VOL UU N TEETEE R SS N EEEE D EE DVolunteers needed for the After School Program which runs Mon.-Th, 2:30 3:15 pm call Linda Reynolds 472-1617RS 1/4 NC TFN SS E rvRV E rR S AA SS iI STA nN T SS E rvRV E rR S L inIN E cookCOOK IL Tesoro Ristorante, 751 tarpon Bay Rd. Sanibel Now hiring; Servers, Assistant Servers and Line cook Email resumes to: applications between 11-2 daily.NS 1/18 NC TFN 3883 Sanibel Captiva Road, Sanibel, Fl Phone: 239-472-3644, ext 1 Fax: 239-472-2334 www.crowclinic.orgH EE L PP USUS PP L EASEEASE !!We need volunteers for: Clinic emergency patient admissions desk and baby animal feeders Visitor education center greeters and gift shop cashiers CROW (239) 472-3644, ext. 231 or volunteers@crowclinic.orgRS 1/4 NC TFN VOL UU N TEETEE R O PPPP OR TUTU NI TYTY The Sunshine Ambassador Program is a new and exciting volunteer opportunity offered at the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida located within HealthPark Medical Center. The Sunshine Ambassadors will greet, assist and be a families and visitors entering the hospital. The Ambassadors also make a difference to families by providing educational and healthful resources to assist in GRANDparenting for GRANDchildren. We are currently seeking year-round volunteers to work one 4-hour shift Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm or 12:00pm to 4:00 pm. If you would be interested in learning more about this wonderful new opportunity, please contact Lisa Ellinwood, Volunteer Resources Coordinator at 239-343-5062 at the Golisano Childrens Hospital.NS 2/8 CC TFN hH E lL P WA nN TE dD ED Para 6hrs. Tolls Paid Call The Sanibel School @ 472-1617.NS 8/9 NC TFN TT H EE R APYAPY TETE CHNICI AA N/ OFFIC EE ASSASS I STASTA N TT needed for physical therapy clinic on Periwinkle Way. Must have excellent communication and multi-tasking skills, Windows. Experience in medical or therapy part-time off-season, Mon-Fri. Please rachel@islandtherapycenter.com, or bring to 2242 Periwinkle Way, Suite 2.NS 8/16 CC 8/30 hH E lL P WA nN TE dDloLO STLost Ladies Watch Make: Brighton Area of Mucky Duck on Captiva Island Lost on Dec. 10, 2012 around noon If found call: 941-639-5395RS 1/4 NC TFN F oO U ndND Prescription sunglasses found in parking lot of Limetree Center on Wednesday, February 27. Claim at Island Sun newspaper, suite 2 in Limetree Center, or call 395-1213.NS 3/8 NC TFN loLO ST A ndND foFO U ndNDTT OOL BB OX WASWAS H ESES UPUP ON SASA NI BEBE LThis tool box with motor parts washed up on shore Saturday morning, May 8 about 8:30 on the beach at Sundial Resort on Sanibel Island. To claim call Sundial Resort Security 239-472-4151.NS 6/14 CC TFN AA DIROND AA CK CH AA IR SS Lost 2 large recycled plastic adirondack chairs. The chairs are blue and were last NS 8/16 NC 8/23 loLO ST A ndND foFO U ndND

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If you would like your club/organization listed in The River Calling Card, phone 415-7732Emergency ......................................................................................... 911 Lee County Sheriffs Of ce ........................................................ 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol ................................................................ 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol .............................................................. 278-7100 Poison Control ................................................................ 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center .......................................1-800-936-5321Ft. Myers Chamber of Commerce ............................................. 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare .............................................. 425-2685 Ft. Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce .................................. 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library ......................................................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library ............................................................ 533-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce .......................................... 931-0931 Post Of ce ..................................................................... 1-800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau ..................................................... 338-3500 ARTS Alliance for the Arts .................................................................. 939-2787 Art of the Olympians Museum & Gallery ................................... 332-5055 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio .................................................. 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers ......................................................... 275-3970 Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall ...................................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS ................................................................................ 395-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre ............................................... 278-4422 Cultural Park Theatre ................................................................ 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light ............................................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade .................................. 332-4488 Florida West Arts ...................................................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers ....................................... 472-0168 Gulf Coast Symphony ............................................................... 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres ..................................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic ........................................................... 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater ......................................................... 472-6862 S.W. Florida Symphony ............................................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy .................................................................. 936-3239 Young Artists Awards ................................................................ 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAngel Flight ................................................................ 1-877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center ............................................................... 731-3535 American Business Women Association ................................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL ..................................................................... 339-8046 Audubon Society ....................................................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR .................................................. 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society ................................................... 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus ................................. 1-855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club ............................................................ 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees ....................................................... 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists ............................................................ 415-2484 Ft Myers UDC Chapter 2614 (United Daughters of the Confederacy .................................. 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL ...................................................... 561-9164 The Horticulture and Tea Society ............................................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society ................................................................. 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society ............................................. 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation ........................................... 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees ............. 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America .......................................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL .................................................... 667-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans .................................................. 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy ........................................ 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association ........................................ 561-2118 Kiwanis Clubs: Fort Myers Beach ................................................. 765-4254 or 454-8090 Fort Myers Edison ..................................................................... 694-1056 Fort Myers South ...................................................................... 691-1405 Gateway to the Islands .............................................................. 415-3100 Iona-McGregor .......................................................................... 482-0869Lions Clubs:Fort Myers Beach ...................................................................... 463-9738 Fort Myers High Noon ............................................................... 466-4228 Estero/South Fort Myers ........................................................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County .............................................. 768-0417 POLO Club of Lee County ......................................................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers ......................................................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society ................................................ 472-6940 United Way of Lee County ........................................................ 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) ................................. 211 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews Shell Museum ................................................ 395-2233 Burroughs Home ...................................................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium ........................................ 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates ................................................... 334-3614 Fort Myers Skate Park .............................................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium ............................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge ................................ 472-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site .............................................. 239-992-0311 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center ....................... 765-8101 Skatium ...................................................................................... 321-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society ........................................ 939-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History ...................................... 321-7430 True Tours ................................................................................. 945-0405 SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 27THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 201330 Pets Of The Week Shiro ID# 570231 Galaxy ID# 568117 photos by squaredogphoto.com Hello, my name is Galaxy. Im a 1-year-old male brindle hound mix. Im a young, gorgeous guy who loves attention. My ideal home would be one where I get to run and play a lot. Do you lead an active lifestyle? We could be a perfect match! My adoption fee is $25 (regularly $75) during Animal Services Theres No Place Like Home adoption promotion. Hello, my name is Shiro. Im a 2-yearold white female domestic shorthair. My foster mom thinks Im the cats meow! She says Im a super sweet lap cat that loves people and kids. In fact, I love people so much Id prefer to be your only kitty. That way, you can lavish all your attention on me! My adoption fee is $25 (regularly $75) during Animal Services Theres No Place Like Home adoption promotion. For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to Animal Services website at www. LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if three months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs six months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500.

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BEACH CHAIR PASTIMEAnswers on page 2531 THE RIVER AUGUST 23, 2013

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C G D for B P 11 a.m. 10 p.m. Daily Reservations & Private Functions239.489.2233www.SunshineGrilleFM.com 8700 Gladiolus Drive (Winkler & Gladiolus) Across from Sweetbay Supermarket GLUTEN-FREE OPTIONS DELECTABLE DESSERTS DAILY HAPPY HOUR LIVE MUSIC GLUTEN-FREE GLUTEN-FREE DELECTABLE GLUTEN-FREE DAILY LIVE DELECTABLE Fiesta MondaysSteak or Chicken Tostadas $8.95Steak or Chicken Burritos $9.95-10.95Steak or Chicken Chimichanga $9.95-10.95Steak or Chicken Fajitas $11.95-13.95 Margaritas & Sangria $5.00**not to be combined with other offers or promotions SUNDAY BUFFET BRUNCH$15.95 All You Can Eat 10 AM 2 PMTHE RIVER AUGUST 23, 201332