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River weekly news ( July 12, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101363/00150

Material Information

Title: River weekly news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication: Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 08-16-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101363:00189

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101363/00150

Material Information

Title: River weekly news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication: Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 08-16-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101363:00189


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FREETake Me Home VOL. 12, NO. 32 AUGUST 16, 2013From the Beaches to the River District downtown Fort MyersRead Us Online at IslandSunNews.com Submarine Veterans Memorial: Part II of II From Dream T o Realityby Jeff LysiakWhen Luc Century, the Sanibel sculptor best known for his work on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall in Washington, DC, was first contacted by members of the United States Submarine Veterans to perform work on their memorial monument in Fort Myers, he immediately began thinking about submarines the way he used to when he was young. When I was a child, I was always curious about submarines, said Century. They capture the imagination, whether its dur ing wartime or not, of being encased in a large metal chamber. Theres a little curiosity about what your comfort zone would be, as much as there is a neurosis about being in a small space, of what it would be like to live inside a submarine. Last winter, the United States Submarine Veterans decided to replace their prematurely aging monument located adjacent to the Southwest Florida Vietnam Veterans Memorial at the inter section of Colonial and McGregor boulevards in Fort Myers with a new and improved monument. After some discussions, they agreed to erect a memorial comprised of black granite. Black granite is so powerfully reflective in its nature, said continued on page 5 June T ourism Numbers Are UpThe June tourism numbers are in and they look good. Smith Travel Research, consultants to the Lee County Visitor & Convention Bureau, recorded a 54.4 percent occupancy rate in June, reflecting a 4.3 percent increase for The Beaches of Fort Myers & Sanibel. Thats up from 52.1 percent in June 2012. Revenue per average room (RevPar) June figures increased by 7.2 percent over June 2012. Year-to-date, occupancy is up 6.7 percent and RevPar is up 10.1 per cent over the same period in 2012. Similar increases were reported at Southwest Florida International Airport. During the month of June, 473,208 passengers traveled through the Fort Mtyers airport. Figures represent an increase of 4.2 percent compared to June 2012 and a year-to-date increase in passenger traffic of 6.5 percent over the same period last year. U.S. News & World Report recently ranked Sanibels Bowmans Beach #10 on its list of 12 Best Beaches of the World in 2013. Sanibel sculptor Luc Century, pictured with the black granite slab etched with the United States Submarine Veterans logo. It was installed at a Fort Myers veterans monument. photo by Jeff Lysiak Luc Century in his workshop, where he etched the names of the 65 U.S. Navy submarines that served the country over the past 113 years photo by Ken Rasi T ootie McG regor Fountain 100th AnniversaryA celebration of the 100th anniversary of the dedication of the Tootie McGregor Fountain will be held on Saturday, August 17 at 11 a.m. at the site of the fountain in front of the Edison Restaurant along McGregor Boulevard. Refreshments will be served. The public is invited. The Tootie McGregor Fountain was donated to the city in 1912 and was dedicated on August 17, 1913. The fountain was commissioned by Dr. Marshall O. Terry in honor of his wife. Tootie was one of the most influential people in the City of Fort Myers. Among many of her contributions, she was responsible for the construction of the roadway named for her first husband, McGregor Boulevard, opening up the expansion of residential and commercial growth in southwest Lee County. She also donated the land now named Terry Park that eventually became the site of the Philadelphia As spring training camp, beginning the long tradition of baseball spring training in Lee County. One of the goals of the Public Art Committee and the Historic Preservation Commission is to repair and restore the fountain close to its original state when it continued on page 18 The Tootie McGregor Fountain at the Edison RestaurantPreparing T he Fall G ardenThe 2013 Urban Farming Workshop Series concludes on Saturday, August 17 at the Alliance for the Arts GreenMarket with Preparing The Fall Garden in SWFL. The discussion will focus on ways to prepare gardens so they will begin producing in October, including building beds, amending the soil and starting seedlings in pots prior to planting. Fall and winter are the prime growing seasons here in Southwest Florida. The 2013 Urban Farming Workshop Series has been very successful, with hundreds of people attending throughout the summer, learning about topics including composting, growing fruit trees, herb gardens and backyard beekeeping. Many attendees have been inspired to convert their yards from pesticide and fertilizer hungry lawns into vegetable plots, kitchen gardens and permaculture projects. The large attendance numbers demonstrate a growing interest in more sustainable practices in the community. Urban farming has many benefits, like reducing carbon footprints, eating healthier, exercising more, keeping old skills alive, saving money and building community.continued on page 4 Urban farmer Bob Donnelly conducts an outdoor Urban Farming workshop at the Alliance for the Arts GreenMarket in August 2013

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THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 20132 Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: Changes On Clevelandby GG erri RR eaves, PhDFew people today would describe Cleveland Avenue and Johnson Street as a walkable neighbor hood, but a few decades ago, things were different, as seen in this photo from the early 1950s. Center right is the Dairy Queen at the Johnson corner, where people are seated at an outdoor table and enjoying ice cream cone or sandwich in the open air. Just a short stroll away were the Caloosahatchee River and city park. Another sign of the times that 1949 Studebaker parked near the Dairy Queen driveway. But just imagine stopping for an ice cream cone on Cleveland today. Somehow, the ambience just doesnt promote outdoor relaxation. Anyway, a bank has usurped the Dairy Queens location. A diverse mixture of residential and commercial buildings made up that section of Cleveland in the mid-20th century. Within a few steps of that Dairy Queen table were a fruit stand, a metal and roofing company, the Trading Post, and a used car dealership. Across Cleveland Avenue and in the early 1950s, one could actually dare to cross it on foot were several apartment houses, a patio furniture store, a sign business, a dry cleaners and more. The St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church and rectory also were on the east side of Cleveland. The churchs sign stands by the sidewalk (left center). St. Francis is still located on that property today, but even it has undergone major changes since the photo was snapped. In the early 1960s, the 1910 church building was replaced with a new one. But it was the construction of the Caloosahatchee Bridge in the 1960s that refigured the terrain for blocks around. In retrospect, the 1950s street scene looks almost cozy compared to the high-speed complex of multiple lanes, ramps, medians, and overpasses that gobbled up the walkable streets. The bridge project certainly has its advantages, but some locals still lament the sacrifice of the nearby landscape. Transportation progress triumphed, but it also spawned a less user-friendly landscape where the Dairy Queen once beckoned. Cautiously take a stroll to see the drastic changes on Cleveland over the last six decades. Then take to the sidewalk and visit the Southwest Florida Museum of History at 2031 Jackson Street, where you can learn about one of Fort Myers oldest thoroughfares. For information, call 321-7430 or go to museumofhistory. org. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday.continued on page 6 The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, please call (239) 415-7732 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, FL 33901. Fax number: (239) 415-7702. E-mail: press@riverweekly.com. The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Co-Publishers Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Isabel Rasi Office Coordinator Graphic Arts/ProductionAnn Ziehl Photographer Michael Heider Writers Anne Mitchell Jeff Lysiak PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Contributing Writers Read Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com Click on The River Ed Frank Max Friedersdorf Tom Hall A bank has replaced ice cream at Johnson Street and Cleveland, and no one would even consider walking across the street photo by GG erri RR eaves In the early 1950s, Cleveland Avenue at Johnson Street was a walkable neighborhood with a mix of residential and commercial buildings courtesy of the SS outhwest Florida HH istorical SS ociety

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3 THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 2013 Lazy Flamingo, Inc. 6520-C Pine Avenue Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-5353 Lazy Flamingo 3, Inc. 16501 Stringfellow Rd Bokeelia, FL 33922 239-283-5959 Lazy Flamingo 2, Inc. 1036 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-6939 Lazy Flamingo 4, Inc. 12951 McGregor Blvd. Ft. Myers, FL 33919 239-476-9000 Four Great Locations! If Our Seafood Were Any Fresher, We Would Be Serving It Under Water! NOW SERVING FULL LIQUOR IN FORT MYERS Bring in This Coupon for $ 5 OFFPurchase of $30 or moreF M Every 3rd Tue Wine Tapas Tasting Fort Myers Public Art Marcus Jansens Revelations In Reality In NYCby Tom HallMarcus Jansen recently returned from New York City after attending a group show opening in conjunction with the release of Revelations in Reality, a book that features one of Jansens urban landscapes on the cover. Curated by Tamara Del Estal and Sana Afsar and published by Creative Concept Inc., Revelations in Reality is being distributed this summer at most major international art fairs including Art Basel Switzerland. The exhibition at Manhattans 287 Spring Gallery was well attended, with first visitors pouring in at 7 p.m. sharp. Also titled Revelations in Reality, the group show presents a selection of artists whose enigmatic visions respond to issues surrounding the human experience. Broadly composed yet intricately detailed, each artists work renders a realistic depiction of the human condition that conveys an atmosphere of personal history, hope and intuitive vision. Presented in a sequence of portraits, scenes, and narratives, Revelations in Reality tells a story of everyday existence, relationships, and experience. The exhibition captures moments of tranquillity, which contrast with uneasy oneiric elements. With works that blend unusual color combinations and unexpected compositions, this collection of artist works create a magic realist feel. Infinitely variable and full of interest and personality, this theme expresses itself in different ways through the hands of each talented artist. Delightful, diverse, and sometimes even daring, these remarkable works will stay with you long after you first view them. Jansens art career began in 1999, when he started selling his work on the corner of Prince Street and Broadway in downtown Manhattan, long before any of the area galleries expressed an interest in displaying them or representing Jansen. But last week, Jansens Dog House, a 108 x 72 oil enamels on canvas took center stage in New York with collectors extending their first bids for the painting at opening night. But thats not all. Jansen will be entering the secondary market after a professional career now spanning over 16 years where his first showcase was held at Madison Square Gardens Film and Art Festival in 1999. The prestigious Phillips de Pury International Art Auction House in Moscow and Geneva, Switzerland will include some of Jansens first works at auction in 2014. Jansen was also invited to Portugal to show in an exhibition at the Berardo Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Lisbon, and later this year during Art Basel Miami Beach. Dates for each will be announced later this year. Jansen spoke to several Lee County residents who attended the opening and had the excitement of seeing Jansens work in a New York setting. It was great to see some Fort Myers people in town that night, Jansen said. It almost felt like a family reunion. Jansen maintains his studio in Fort Myers and opened his international headquarters at UNIT A Contemporary Art Space in the Downtown River District in March 2012. For more information about Jansen and his work, contact his agent, Terry Tincher, at terryunitaspace@gmail.com or visit www.unitaspace.com. An arts advocate, Tom Hall guides weekly walking tours of the River Districts public art collection in Fort Myers. For more information, go to truetours.net. Artist Marcus Jansen

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THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 20134 Love That Dress! Tickets On SaleLove That Dress! 5 is on the count down to the ultimate shopping spree of the year! With less than two weeks to go, the dress donations and silent auction items have been pouring in. This year marks the five year anniversary, with exciting new additions to the event such as a VIP Auction room that consists of a NAPA Valley trip, a womans Dream Closet donated by All About Closets filled full of surprises and more. Centurylink will present the inaugural Founders Ceremony Awards honoring the founding LTD! Committee of 2009. In addition, light hor doeuvres will be offered as well as drink specials. Make your bid on swanky silent auction items like weekend stays, exclusive Vintner wine lots, over 3,000 dresses Gap to Gucci with name brands and designers that include BCBG, Evan Piccone, Nicole Miller, Theory, DKNY, Tahari, BeBe, Dolce & Gabbana, Juicy Couture, J Crew, WHBM, Banana Republic, Jones NY, Talbot, Kenneth Cole, Free People, Chicos, Express, Boston Proper, Anne Taylor, Antonio Melani, GAP and more, all priced from $10 to $30 per item. Brand new designer, hand-beaded couture gowns donated from House of Wu that normally retail for thousands will be sold for $50 each. A local favorite chocolatier, Justin Schaffer of Irresistible Confections, will be there with their famous girls best friend chocolate champagne fountain, chocolate high heels and his delectable milk chocolate covered grapes. Local DJ Robert McDonald of New Beginnings Events will provide the music and top dancing hits.Tickets to Love That Dress! 5 are limited and tend to sell out fast. Fashionistas, and the men who adore their spectacularly dressed women, do not miss this event! This is a wonderful girls nite out opportunity to shop, network, and support a great organization. For tickets to Love That Dress! 5, visit www.LoveThatDress.org. There are several fun ways to support Love That Dress! Donations of new or gently worn dresses are accepted at drop off collection sites leading up to the main event. Drop-off locations throughout Lee County can be found on www.pacecenter. org/centers/lee/lee-ltd/donation-sites. All kinds of dresses are suitable, from sundresses to suits, formal gowns to bridal. For the latest details, pre-parties and events, follow Love That Dress! on Facebook.Donations of specialty goods, services and gift cards are also needed for the silent auction. Examples include jewelry, hotel stays, beauty baskets and gift cards for cosmetic services, retailers and restaurants. Items favorable to women are preferred. Donations of this type may qualify for an in-kind sponsorship. To help, contact Kelsey Thompson at kthompson@markham-norton.com. In addition, cash and in-kind sponsorships are available ranging from $10,000 to $500. Sponsors receive a variety of perks in recognition of their generosity by contacting Kendra Sutton at kendra.sutton@ fmbcmail.com. JACARANDAThe Entertainment Nightly in Sanibels Social Scene1223 PERIWINKLE WAY, SANIBEL 472-1771 Happy Apps $5.95Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna, Crispy Fried Calamari, Chilled Oysters, Steamed Shrimp, BBQ Beef Satays, Mussels Marinara, Chicken WingsSanibels Best HAPPY HOUR5 7 p.m. Nightly in the lounge1/2 Price DrinksCall & Well Liquor, Draft Beer Selections, Select House Wine Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Downtown Fort Myers (Post Oce Arcade Next to Hotel Indigo) 1520 Broadway For Takeout & Delivery Tel: 334-6991 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEKMon-urs 11am 10pm Fri-Sat 11am 11pm Sun 12pm 9pm www. ichiban-sushi-chinese.com Call for departure time CAPTIVACRUISES H T H E I S L A N D S H THE BEST WAY TO SEE THE ISLANDS IS FROM THE WATER Cruises depart from beautiful Captiva Island From page 1Preparing The Fall GardenSaturdays final workshop will be presented by Millisa Bell, known as The Unruly Gardener. Shes a master gardener and urban farmer well known in the community. The workshop is free, but a $5 donation is suggested to help the Alliance continue bringing these kinds of programs to the public. For more information, visit www. artinlee.org, search for Alliance for the Arts GreenMarket on Facebook, or call 939-2787. While youre at the market be sure to visit the Alliance Gift Shop and Gallery, both of which remain open every Saturday. Urban farmer Millisa Bell

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5 THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 2013 From page 1From Dream To RealityCentury. The contrast and the colors of it will change throughout the day, so every time you visit the monument, its going to appear to be just a little bit different. For this project, Century was contracted to artistically etch three black granite slabs two measuring approximately 60 inches by 30 inches and another approximately 30 inches by 20 inches with the United States Submarine Veterans logo, creed and the names of the 65 submarines that have served the U.S. Navy over the past 113 years. According to Ken Jordan, a member of the local United States Submarine Veterans chapter, more than 35,002 men and women have been lost while serving this country aboard submarines. However, due to the limited amount of space available for the monument, they decided to memorialize only the names of the vessels (along with their service dates) on one of the large slabs. Among the famous submarines memorialized on the monument is the USS Shark, which became the first American submarine sunk by enemy surface craft in the Pacific on February 11, 1942; the USS Gudgeon, lost on April 18, 1944, the first submarine to go on patrol following the attack on Pearl Harbor; the USS Snook, sunk by undetermined causes during her ninth war patrol on April 8, 1945; and the USS Bullhead, sunk by a depth charge dropped by a Japanese Army plane on August 6, 1945, the final submarine lost during World War II. John Troia, a member of the Cape Coral chapter of the United States Submarine Veterans, noted that more than $4,000 in private donations has been collected to complete the new monument. Donations came from friends, relatives, neighbors, local businesses, members of the American Legion and Elks Club of Cape Coral Post #2596. He also thanked Century and Solid Top Granite of Fort Myers for offering their services and support. I saw (Centurys) work, and Im very, very happy with it, said Troia. The local chapter of the United States Submarine Veterans are scheduled to meet in early September to determine an unveiling date for the new memorial. Troia estimated that date may be around Veterans Day, in November. Alexi Zayas, left, and George Montealegre install the U.S. Submarine Veterans Memorial monument on August 5 photo by Luc Century FREE MARINA DOCKAGE with Dock Attendants Assistance RIV FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE MARINA DOCKAGE MARINA DOCKAGE MARINA DOCKAGE MARINA DOCKAGE Nellies Upstairs Waterside Bar Where its Happy Hour all the time!!! 10% OFF Offer valid with Cash payments only ... No credit cards. ONE COUPON PER TABLE Can not be used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, Expires Aug. 23, 2013 Lunch, Dinner Snacks in Between11am-10pm used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, www.nervousnellies.net

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PLUMBING $ 35 OFF ON ANY SERVICE Call 567-9210 Voted e Best Plumbing Co. 10 straight years! 35 OFF ON ANY SERVICE www.AztecPlumbing.net FREE Estimates Hortoons THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 20136 From page 2Cleveland Avenue Then be sure to check out the favorite research center of local history buffs the Southwest Florida Historical Society. Explore the archives and peruse historic photos of streets through the decades. The all-volunteer non-profit organization is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Drop by on Wednesday or Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon, or call them at 939-4044. Sources: Archives of the Southwest Florida Historical Society. T ickets On S ale Now For Charity Beach BallThe Fort Myers Beach Community Foundations 2nd annual Charity Beach Ball will take place on Saturday, November 2 at DiamondHead Beach Resort. The Beach Ball is a black-tie optional silent auction with an open bar from 6 to 8 p.m., dinner and dancing with The Marc Vee Band. Tickets are $95 per person, or buy a table of 10 for $875 and save $75. Tickets are available online at www.charitybeachball.com or by mail at the address below. Thanks to all the supporters and attendees last year, the foundation was able to support many local causes and provide scholarships to three outstanding students. The foundations is looking for donations and sponsors for the event. For more information, go to http://www. fmbeachfoundation.org/ or call Nicole at 849-1460. G reeters Club A ugust MeetingDoes this topic pique your interest: The Edible Landscape: Growing More Edibles Around The Yard. Master Gardner Adrian Diaz will be the guest speaker at the Greeters Club of Fort Myers luncheon on Thursday, August 20 at the Colonial Country Club, 9181 Independence Way in Fort Myers. This is an opportunity to find out about the clubs activities, meet members and enjoy this interesting program. Call today to make a luncheon reservation (cost $20 per person) and to find out more about joining this dynamic group of Lee County women. Contact Marie Gaither at 791-8966 or wmgaither@aol.com to make reservations or for more details. Check us out on Facebook at Greeters of Fort Myers. Our luncheons are held on the third Thursday of the month at 11:30 a.m. at the Colonial Country Club in Fort Myers. Yacht Club S ets A ugust Meetingby Past Commodore Chris ChristensenThe monthly meeting of the Fort Myers Beach Yacht Club will be held on Wednesday, August 28 at Rumrunners Restaurant, located at 5848 Cape Harbor Drive in Cape Coral. Social hour begins at 5 p.m. Happy hour is from 3 to 6:30 p.m. Dinner is ordered individually off the menu at 7 p.m. Attendees will pay by separate checks. A short meeting may follow. Potential new members wishing to attend are invited to call Past Commodore Pete Oiderma for required reservations and additional information at 463-6240 or mobile 415-328-5415. The Fort Myers Beach Yacht Club was formed in 1953 and incorporated as a not for profit organization for the purpose of promoting safe, enjoyable boating and good fellowship. This community oriented club, with over 140 members and 60 boats, maintains a very active schedule of year-round activities, both on and off the water, for members and guests. Evening meetings are held once a month, usually on the fourth Wednesday. Because the club does not have the expense of maintaining their own waterfront facility, dues are only $100 per year per couple or $60 per single. Learn more about the club at www.FMBYachtClub.org. Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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C G D for B P 11 a.m. 10 p.m. Daily Reservations & Private Functions239.489.2233www.SunshineGrilleFM.com 8700 Gladiolus Drive (Winkler & Gladiolus) Across from Sweetbay Supermarket GLUTEN-FREE OPTIONS DELECTABLE DESSERTS DAILY HAPPY HOUR LIVE MUSIC GLUTEN-FREE GLUTEN-FREE DELECTABLE GLUTEN-FREE DAILY LIVE DELECTABLE Fiesta MondaysSteak or Chicken Tostadas $8.95Steak or Chicken Burritos $9.95-10.95Steak or Chicken Chimichanga $9.95-10.95Steak or Chicken Fajitas $11.95-13.95 Margaritas & Sangria $5.00**not to be combined with other offers or promotions SUNDAY BUFFET BRUNCH$15.95 All You Can Eat 10 AM 2 PM7 THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 2013

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THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 20138 Along The RiverKick back under a sunbrella at Doc Fords Fort Myers Beach any Friday, Saturday or Sunday with an Island Mojito or an ice-cold beer and relax to the sounds of music playing live from the outdoor, waterfront stage. Go to Doc Fords website for a schedule. Wednesday is country music night from 6 to 10 p.m. Wear your cowboy hat and enjoy live entertainment from local bands such as Buckshot. With a convenient combined menu, all of Doc Fords delicious lunch and dinner items are available from 11 a.m. until closing. Whether youre in the mood for cedar plank salmon topped with a mango chipotle glaze at noon, or a late-night marinated grilled chicken sandwich washed down with a tropical drink, Doc Fords aims to please. Doc Fords is located at 708 Fishermans Wharf, Fort Myers Beach. It is open daily from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Call 765-9660 or go to www.docfordsfortmyersbeach.com. On Saturday and Sunday, your entire family may enjoy a trip to The Great Train Expo at Harborside Event Center in downtown Fort Myers. The event runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. Admission is $7 for adults, ticket good for both show days, while children under 12 get in free. The Great Train Expo is a national, traveling show that caters to the model railroad enthusiast. The show features 200 to 500 tables of train dealers, who offer everything from: HO Scale, N Scale, Lionel (O Gauge), G Gauge, Z Scale, American Flyer (S Gauge), hobby tools, die-cast vehicles, train whistles, scenery items, Railroadiania Slides, T-shirts, videos, railroad gift items, books, and photos. The show offers a variety of operating model railroad and toy layouts for the entire family in many different scales and gauges. Check them out and get some great ideas for your own layout! If youre interested in joining a local model railroading club, the Great Train Expo is a great place to learn about some of the different clubs in your area. If youre looking to sell an old toy train, The Great Train Expo is the perfect place. You can get appraisals and offers from multiple dealers under the same roof. Go to www.greattrainexpo.com for more information The Harborside Event Center is located at 1375 Monroe Street, Fort Myers. Call 321-8110 or go to www.harborsideevents.com. The best way to see Sanibel and Captiva islands is from the water. Why not take a scenic boat trip with Captiva Cruises? The dolphin watch and wildlife cruise is the perfect family adventure. There is nothing more exciting than seeing playful dolphins jumping in the wake of the boat. Captiva Cruises reports seeing dolphins on approximately 95 percent of their cruises. The trip runs from 4 to 5:30 p.m. and is narrated by volunteers from the SanibelCaptiva Conservation Foundation. Captiva Cruises also offers sailing adventure cruises, sunset cruises and trips to Cayo Costa Beach, Cabbage Key, the Edison & Ford Winter Estates and Boca Grande. Prices vary and reservations are required. Captiva Cruises is located at 11401 Andy Rosse Lane, Captiva Island. Call 4725300 or go to www.captivacruises.com. On Mondays through August 26, The Fort Myers Film Festival Summer Series: Best of the 2013 Film Festival is featured at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center (SBDAC). On August 19, Dislecksia: The Movie, directed by Harvey Hubbell V, is playing. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the film begins at 7 p.m. Admission is $6. The regular season of short films begins September 9. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. Call 333-1933 or go to www.fortmyersfilmfestival.com. On Tuesday, August 20, The Morgan House offers a special wine and tapas menu prepared by chef Corry Blanton from 6 to 8 p.m. The event occurs on the third Tuesday of each month and reservations are required. The Morgan House is open Tuesday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., and Saturday 3 to 11 p.m. It is closed Sunday and Monday. The restaurant and bar features 14 beers on tap, full liquor bar and daily happy hour. Casual dining is available either inside in air-conditioned comfort, outside on the terrace, or upstairs overlooking the historic Patio de Leon. The Morgan House is located at 33 Patio de Leon in downtown Fort Myers River District. Call 337-3377 or go to www.morganhouserestaurant.com. Waterfront dining at Doc Fords Fort Myers Beach Pelicans skimming the water of the estuary during Captiva Cruises scenic boat trip www.SeabreezeNurseries.com (239) 560-1422 WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY We can help! Ask about our Season Discount! Palms, Palms, natives, natives, crotons, crotons, bromeliads, bromeliads, buttery bushes, buttery bushes, & much more & much more Open Monday Saturday www.threecraftyladies.com Find us on WE WILL PAY YOUR TOLL!!!Spend $55 and bring us your toll receipt for a full refund! Please visit our River Weekly News online advertisers at www.islandsunnews.com. You can click through to their Web sites for more information about real estate, shopping, restaurants and services. Just click on the logos surrounding the front page.

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Churches/TemplesALL F aA ITHS UNIT aA RI aA N CONGREG aA TION (UU A) Where diversity is treasured 2756 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers Summer program: Understanding the Faiths of Our Worlds June 2 to August 25 11 a.m. Interim Minister, Rev. Margaret Beard, begins on September 1 239-226-0900. www.allfaiths-uc.org A LLLL SS A INTSINTS BYZA NTINENTINE RITERITE CA THOLITHOLI C C HH U RR C HH 10291 Bayshore Rd., N. Fort Myers Divine Liturgy is on Sun. at 10:30 a.m.; Rosary begins at 10 a.m. Lenten services (Presanctied Liturgy) will be on Wed. evenings at 6 p.m. starting on Feb. 22. Administrator is Very Rev. Peter Lickman, ph. 305-651-0991. We are a Church of the Eastern Catholic or Byzantine Rite, 1.5 mi. east of Int. 75. A NNNN U NN C II A TIONTION GREEGREE K ORTHOORTHO D OO X C HH U RR C HH 8210 Cypress Lake Dr ive, Fort Myers Reverend Fr. George P. Savas Orthros Service Sunday 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy Sunday 10 a.m. www.annunciation.fl.goarch.org 239-481-2099 B ETHETH SHILOHSHILOH M ESSIESSI A NINI C SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 15675 McGregor Boulev ard, 437-3171 Rabbi: Judah Hungerman Friday Service, 8 p.m., Saturday Service, 11 a.m. Shabbat School Saturday Morning, Adult Hebrew Classes. Call for information on full program. B RERE AD OO F LILI F EE M INISTRIESINISTRIES C HH U RR C HH OO F GOGO D 16581 McGregor Boule vard, 267-3166 Just past the Tanger Outlet Mall Pastor: Barry Lentz, 281-3063 Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. C HH AP ELEL OO F CYP RESSRESS C OO V EE 10200 Cypress Cov e Circle Fort Myers 239-850-3943, Located at Cypress Cove Retirement Center on HealthPark Campus An ecumenical non-denominational community of believers. Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. Reverendt Ted Althouse, Pastor revtedalthouse@aol.com C HH U RR C HH OO F THETHE C ROSSR OSS 13500 Freshman Lane; 768-2188 Pastor: Bud Stephens; A nondemonimational church emphasizing a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Sunday Service: 9:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 Contemporary. CO vV EN aA NT PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937 Rev. Dr. Jeffrey DeYoe, Senior Pastor Reverend David Dietzel, Pastor Emeritus. Traditional Sunday service 10 a.m. Nursery available C ypYP RESS LakLAK E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H 8400 Cypress Lak e Drive, Fort Myers, 481-5442 Randy A. Alston, Reverend. Sunday Services: Bible study, 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship, 11 a.m., Evening Worship, 7 p.m., Wednesday Prayer Meeting, 6:30 p.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 481-3233. www.clpc.us. Clint Cottrell, pastor Prayer Service 8 a.m., Praise 9 a.m., Childrens Church 9 a.m., Traditional 11 a.m. Summer: Prayer Service 8 a.m. Combined Traditional/Praise 10 a.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E UNITE dD METHO dD IST CH uU R cC H 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 482-1250 8 and 11 a.m. Sunday Traditional Service 9:30 a.m. Praise Service Sunday School all times F aA ITH FELLOWSHI pP W ORL dD O uU TRE acA C H mM INISTRIES 6111 South P ointe Boulevard, Fort Myers, 278-3638. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Voice of Faith, WCRN 13.50 AM Radio, Sunday, 1:30 p.m.; Thursday Service, 7:30 p.m.; Friday Youth Service, 7:30 p.m. Nursery care for pre-school children and Childrens Church for ages 5-12 available at each service. F aA ITH uU NITE dD mM ETHO dD IST cC H uU R cC H 15690 McGregor Boule vard Fort Myers, 482-2030 Pastor: David Stauffer. Traditional services 8:45 a.m.; Contemporary, 10:30 a.m. Go south on McGregor Boulevard. The church is mile past the intersection of Gladiolus and San Carlos Boulevard on the way to Sanibel. FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF cC HRIST S cC IENTIST 2390 West First Street, next door to Edison Estates. Sunday Morning Service and Sunday School, 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday Evening Testimony Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Child care provided at all services. Visit our Reading Room for quiet study at: 2281 First Street, River District. www.time4thinkers.com, www.christiansciencefortmyers.com, www.christianscience.com FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF THE NazaNAZA RENE 13545 Amer ican Colony Boulevard off Daniels Parkway in the Colony, Fort Myers, 936-2511 Pastor: Reverend Joey Brummett Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Family Night, 7 p.m. F IRSTIRST U NITENITE D M ETHOETHO D ISTIST C HH U RR C HH in the Downto wn Fort Myers River District 2466 First Street, Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-332-1152, www.fumcftmyers.org Sunday: 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 5 p.m. Youth Program FORT M yY ERS CHRISTI aA N CH uU R cC H (DIS cC I pP LES O fF CHRIST) A SS TE pP HEN MINISTRIES CONGREG aA TION 5916 Winkler Road, F ort Myers, 437-4330 Reverend Mark Condrey, Pastor Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Church School: 9:15 a.m. FORT M yY ERS CONGREG aA TION aA L UNITE dD CH uU R cC H O fF CHRIST : 8210 College Parkway, Fort Myers, 482-3133. Philip White, pastor Morning Worship: 10 a.m. Church School: 10:15 a.m. Adult Forum: 11:30 a.m. HOLHOL Y THEOTOTHEO TO K OSOS M ONON A STERSTER Y 111 Ev ergreen Road, North Fort Myers, 997-2846 Eastern Orthodox mens monastery. Liturgical services conducted in the English, Greek and Church Slavonic languages, following the Julian (Old) Calendar. Liturgical Services: Sundays and Holy Days: The Third and Sixth Hours at 8:30 a.m.; Divine Liturgy at 9 a.m. II ON aA HH O pP E EpEP IS cC O paP A L cC ONGREG aA TION 9650 Gladiolus Dr ive, Fort Myers 4544778 The Reverend Dr. John S. Adler, pastor. Weekly services: Saturday 5 p.m., Eucharist with Healing Sunday 8 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite One; 9:30 a.m., Family Eucharist with Healing and Church School Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Morning Prayer (in Spanish); Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Eucharist with Healing. Child care available at Saturday 5 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m. services. JES uU S THE WW OR kK ER C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H: 881 Nuna Avenue, Fort Myers, 481-1143 Masses Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. K INGING D OO M LILI F EE C HH U RR C HH 2154 McGregor Boulev ard, Fort Myers, 218-8343 Pastor Randy and Anita Thurman 10:30 a.m. Sunday Service All are welcome. LambLAMB O fF GG O dD LuLU THER aA N/ EpEP IS cC O paP A L CH uU R cC H Corner Cypress View Drive and Koreshan Boulevard, Three Oaks area, Fort Myers, 267-3525 Walter Fohs, pastor; Becky RobbinsPenniman, associate pastor Sunday worship services: 8 a.m. Early Grace Traditional 9 a.m. Awesome Grace Contemporary 10:30 a.m. Classic Grace Traditional 8:45 & 10 a.m. Sunday School Gods Group NN EW BEGINNINGS CENTER Ne w Home Church, 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, North Fort Myers, 239-656-0416 Weekly Friday Meeting Meet & Greet: 6:30 p.m. Kingdom Teaching: 7 p.m. Fellowship and refreshments after service. nbcministry@embarqmail.com, www.facebook. com/nbcministry. Alex & Patricia Wiggins, Ministers NEWNEW C OO V ENEN A NTNT EE Y ESES C HH U RR C HH See Clearly Meeting monthly at 9 a.m. at the Elks Lodge. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, Fort Myers, FL 33907. 239-220-8519 Pastor Alan Bondar www.newcovenanteyes.com Wear what you want, rockin music, relevant teaching, LIFT Kidz program, free coffee & donuts, people who are real, church thats actually fun. NN EW HH O pP E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H O fF FOR T M yY ERS 16120 San Car los Boulevard, Unit 10 239-985-8503 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m Sunday Morning Worship. 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study NN EW HH O pP E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 3825 McGregor Boule vard. Fort Myers Pastors: Stu Austin and Howard Biddulph 8 & 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11 a.m. Contemporary Worship 8, 9:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School Youth and Childrens programming runs concurrent to Sunday services. Nursery care provided at all services 274-1230. For more information visit: www.newhopefortmyers.org P EE A C EE CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H Meets at F ort Myers Beach Masonic Lodge 17625 Pine Ridge Road, Fort Myers Beach 267-7400. Pastors Bruce Merton, Gail & RC Fleeman Adult Discussion Classes: 9-10 AM Countdown to Worship (praise music): 10:10 AM Amazing Grace Worship: 10:30 AM Phone 267-7400 Fax 267-7407 Web site: peacecommunitychurch.com e-mail: peace1265@aol.com P EE A C EE LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH Sunday Worship at 9:30am. Peace is a member of the ELCA. We celebrate weekly communion with traditional liturgy, organ and choir. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers On the way to Sanibel. 239-437-2599, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@peaceftmyers.com. RE dD EE mM ER L uU THER aA N cC H uU R cC H 3950 Winkler Ext., Fort Myers, 274-0143 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. Sunday Services Daily early learning center/day care RIRI V ERER OO F LILI F EE A SSESSE MB LL Y OO F GOGO D 21580 Riv er Ranch Rd, Estero 239-495-0400, Senior Pastor: Todd Weston 8 and 9:45 a.m Services; 11:30 a.m. Legacy Service, multi-generational S amudAMUD R abadAB AD R aA buddB UDD HIST cC ENTER Meditation classes All are welcome. Guided meditations offering many methods for relaxing the body and focusing the mind on virtuous objects to bring increasing peace and happiness into daily activity. For information, class times and locations call 567-9739 or visit www. MeditationInFortMyers.org. SS O uU THWEST bapB AP TIST cC H uU R cC H 16940 McGregor Boule vard, Fort Myers, 454-3336 Robert G. Kasten, Pastor Sunday Worship Service 11 a.m. Nursery available 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Junior Church grades one to five Wee Church Pre-K to K Evening Service 6 p.m. Wednsday Service 6 p.m. SaSA INT COL umbkUMBK ILLE C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H 12171 Iona Road, F ort Myers, off McGregor and north of Gladiolus. 489-3973 Father Joseph Clifford. Weekly masses: Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. Weekend masses: Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday: 7, 9,11, and 5:30 p.m. Reconciliation is available at the church on Saturdays at noon and by appointment SaSA INT JOHN THE A pP OSTLE METRO pP OLIT aA N CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H 3049 Mcg regor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 344-0012 Pastor Reverend Steve Filizzi An Affirming & Inclusive Congregation Sunday Services, 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Mid-Week Service, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. SaSA INT MI cC H aA EL LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H & ScSC HOOL ( LL CM SS ) 3595 Broadw ay, Fort Myers 239-939-4711, www.smlcs.org Wednesday Fellowship: 5:30 p.m. Dinner $5, 6:15 p.m. bible studies Worship: Saturday, 5:30 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. with 9:15 a.m. adult and childrens Bible Study, plus marriage enrichment studies. Divorce Care on Thursdays from 7 to 8:30 p.m. During Lent: Wednesday worship noon and 6:15 p.m. SaSA INT PETER LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H 3751 Estero Boule vard, Fort Myers Beach, 463-4251. Sunda y w orship at 9:30 a.m. Womens Bible Study is offered on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 9:30 a.m. www.stpeterfmb.com TETE MP LELE B ETHELETHEL SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 16225 Winkler Rd. 433-0018. Rabbi Jeremy Barras E-mail: rabbi.barras@templebethel.com Cantorial soloist: Lawrence Dermer Temple educator: Dale Cohen, MaEd, RJE Shabbat Services, Friday, 7:30 p.m. Torah Study, Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Religious Education; Sunday School and Midweek classes, Preschool Classes, Monday through Friday Web site: www.templebethel.com Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TETE MP LELE JUD EE A (C ONSERONSER VA TITI V EE ) 14486 A&W Bulb Road, F ort Myers, 433-0201, Rabbi: Rabbi Elyssa Auster President: Keith Grossman Minyan: Monday & Thursday at 9 a.m. Services: Friday night at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Religious School Sunday morning Web site: www.tjswfl.org Preschool director: JoAnn Goldman email templejudeapreschool@gmail.com 433-0201, Web site: www.tjswfl.org Affiliated: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism continued on page 11THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 201310

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11 THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 2013 From page 10Churches/TemplesTHE CHABAD LUBAVITCH OF SW FLORIDA ORTHODOX 5620 Winkler Road, Fort Myers Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz 433-7708, E-mail: rabbi@chabadswf.org Web site: www.chabadswf.org Services: Friday 6:30 p.m.; Saturday Kabbalah class 9 a.m.; Shacharit 10 a.m.; Kiddush at noon Minyan: Monday and Thursday 7 a.m. THE NEW CHURCH The New Church of SWFL is located 10811 Sunset Plaza Circ. #401, behind Zoomers. Rev. Gabriella Cahaley officiates worship services on Sundays at 11 a.m. during the season. Other worship events are held on the beach in Fort Myers Beach. See our webpage http://www.newchurchflorida.com/ or call for more information 239-481-5535. CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 1619 Llewellyn Drive Fort Myers Just off McGregor across from the Edison/ Ford Winter Estates 334-4978 Pastor: Douglas Kelchner Worship times Sundays 9 and 10:30 a.m. Website: www.taecc.com UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH FORT MYERS 13411 Shire Lane (off Daniels Parkway one mile west of I-75) Minister: The Reverend Allison Farnum Sunday services and religious education at 10:30 a.m. For information on all church events call 561-2700 or visit www.uucfm.org. UNITY OF BONITA SPRINGS Family Service 10 to 11 a.m. Healing Circle 11 a.m. Hospitality and Fellowship, 11 a.m. Inspiring lesson, uplifting and dynamic music, meditation in a loving environment. Service held at 28285 Imperial Street, Bonita Springs. Call 947-3100. UNITY OF FORT MYERS 11120 Ranchette Rd., Fort Myers Summer Services: Sundays at 10 a.m. Childrens class at 10 a.m. Reverend Jim Rosemergy, Minister Our God is Love. Our Race is Human. Our Religion is Oneness. www.unityoffortmyers.org or 239-278-1511 WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 9065 Ligon Court, Fort Myers, across from HealthPark Hospital, 481-2125 Senior Pastor: Robert Brunson Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Blended Worship www.westminsterfortmyers.org WORD OF LIFE CHURCH 2120 Collier Ave, Fort Myers, 274-8881; Services: Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. Bishop Gaspar and Michele Anastasi ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH 7401 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, 481-4040, Interim Pastor Jim Eggert Pastor Peter Weeks Sunday Services: 8:30 a.m. Traditional; 10 a.m. Blended Traditional and Contemporary; 11:30 a.m. Contemporary. Childrens Sunday School, Adult /Teen Bible Classes, 10 a.m. Contest Winner Reveals Unique Connection To CaptivaTween Waters Inn Island Resort announced that the winner of the Vacation of a Lifetime contest was Deborah Tilson of St. Paul Park, Minnesota. In a Hollywood-like twist, this mother who lost her 19-year-old daughter, Kristine, to domestic violence, now gets to return to the very beach where she spread her daughters ashes once a year for the next 25 years as part of a promotion that generated more than 12,000 entrants. In January, Tween Waters Inn of Captiva Island revealed the Vacation of a Lifetime contest, an opportunity to win a lifetime of free vacation, including one three-night vacation for two at Tween Waters Inn for 25 consecutive years. The resort randomly selected a winner among 12,000 entries. Although Tilson was randomly selected, she has a touching connection to Tween Waters Inn. Tilsons daughter, 19-year-old Kristine Larson, was tragically murdered by her boyfriend Zachery Matthews. Her strangled body was found in a burning car after Larson had attempted to collect her two-year-old son, Darion, from Matthews. In 2008, Matthews was sentenced to life in prison for the murder of Kristine Larson. While cleaning her patio three months later, Tilson discovered Kristines notebook stashed under a chair cushion. Before her death, Kristine had begun scribbling notes and creating a budget that would allow her to treat her mother to a vacation the destination, Tween Waters Inn Island Resort. Tilson was unaware of the plans, had never heard of the resort and, to this day, doesnt know how Kristine came to fall in love with this particular location. To honor her daughter, in 2010 Tilson and her family finally made the journey Kristine had always wanted to Tween Waters Inn where they released Kristines ashes on the beach. When asked about the coincidence in the story, Tilson stated, Without my daughters planning to visit Tween Waters Inn, I would never have experienced such awesome beauty. Now having won a lifetime of vacation at Tween Waters Inn, Tilson is able to return each year and visit Kristines final resting spot. 10 to 40% OFFH SLEEPERS H MATTRESS SETS H PICTURES H LAMPS H PATIO DINING SETS H RECLINERS H DINING SETS H BEDROOM SETS H LIVING ROOM H TABLES Large Selection of Rattan & Wicker I fell in love with Furniture World the 1st time I went in. They had the SW Florida style furniture I was looking for. The staff made me feel very comfortable and helped me with my questions. Mary Weeks, Ft. Myers I appreciated the personal service I received at Furniture World. The location is convenient and I found what I wanted at a price I wanted to pay. Chris Myers, Sanibel ...Our Promise to You...GUARANTEED (*$500 Min. Purchase) Our Friendly staff is here to help you when you want it. Youre free to look through our store. SERVING LEE COUNTY COMMUNITIES FOR OVER 20 YEARSCONVENIENT LOCATION FROM SANIBEL & FORT MYERS BEACH!Family Owned and Operated(239)489-3311Furniture-World.net FLOOR SAMPLE SALEShare your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702or email press@riverweekly.com

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THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 201312 ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint Prices ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Your Bottom Your Bottom Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices 1 August Offers So Many Angling Optionsby Capt. Matt MitchellAugust fishing offers anglers in Southwest Florida just so many options. This week I really enjoyed catching clients a wide variety of fish. Over the last two weeks the bay has really bounced back to life with tons of baitfish and feeding birds. Despite all the nasty looking brown water out there, the fish are feeding. For non-stop, rod bending action both Redlight Shoal and Captiva Rocks have been stacked up with giant schools of small bait fish along with an assortment of predators feeding on the schools of bait. Look for the feeding birds to catch trout, mackerel, jacks, ladyfish and bluefish. This smorgasbord of species will keep anglers busy while fishing around these bait schools. Grouper fishing in our deeper passes remains consistent with the best bite coming while bottom fishing with big live pinfish on the incoming tide. Finding the good bottom structure is key to this. When we do hook a grouper, I like to put a quick mark on the GPS and continue to work this same area. While fishing for grouper with Jennifer and John Oatley of Sanibel this week, Jennifer had two really nice keeper gags with the largest being a solid 29-incher. If youre looking for a fresh fish dinner, it does not get much better than a gag grouper. Shark fishing in Rocky Channel this week was the hottest big shark bite I have found so far this summer. During a two-hour period we had roughly a dozen hook-ups on what were some really big sharks. Even using heavy single strand wire we lost many more of these sea monsters than we caught. Average size of the sharks we did get to the boat was six feet plus. Many that we hooked made these six-footers look small, often making 300-yard-plus runs before parting ways. Soaking big chunks of fresh mullet on the low outgoing tide had these sharks all fired up. During low tide periods this is shark central and one place I would never swim! Early in the week, big mid-day high tides had the redfish bite going on. While fishing with Gary Pankonien of Austin, Texas this week, Gary caught a 16-pound, 35-inch redfish in the southern sound. After targeting snook for most of the morning, once the tide got up high enough we switched gears and moved on to redfish. This beast of a redfish ate a big pinfish tail hooked and flipped deep under the mangroves around the mouth of the river. Low water snook fishing in the passes was still happening and was a good option for anglers on the lower stages of the tide. Big pinfish drifted through the passes caught lots and lots of fish. Mangrove fishing for snook was also going on during the flood tide. Many of these mangrove fish are sat out from the trees in sand holes. A 37-incher was the big snook of the week. caught and released on my boat while mangrove fishing With so many options out there despite the blazing summer heat, this is a great time of year to be on the water fishing. To make the most of any given day, bring a variety of tackle and be prepared to switch it up as you never really know what the day will bring.Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions email captmattmitchell@aol.com. Send Us Your Fish TalesThe River Weekly would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include photographs with identification. Drop them at the River Weekly, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, Florida 33901, or email to press@riverweekly.com. Jennifer Oatley of Sanibel with her 29-inch gag grouper Gary Pankonien of Austin, Texas with a 35-inch redfish caught this week while fishing with Capt Matt Mitchell 472-5800

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13 THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 2013 We Proudly Brew Tropial Outdoor Patio Seating Get Crabby At The Cow Get Crabby At The Cow with our Famous Stone Crabs1/2 lb & Best Prices On The Planet Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Come Try our NEW Cowlicious Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials Sanibels Most Award Winning Restaurant LIVE Famous Stone Crabs Famous Stone Crabs Always Fresh ...Always! ...Always! with our with our Always Fresh ...Always Fun! Always Fresh ...Always Fun! CROW Case Of The Week: Gopher Tortoisesby Patricia MolloyThe gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) is an ancient species, originating more than 60 million years ago in western North America. CROW is treating five gopher tortoises at its wildlife hospital. The trait that makes these tortoises so extraordinary is their willingness to share the burrows that they construct which average six-and-a-half feet deep by 15 feet long with other creatures, such as indigo snakes, burrowing owls, frogs, rabbits and opossums. This gracious act of tolerance has earned them the name of keystone species. If a single gopher tortoise abandons its home due to injury or death, the burrow would fall into disrepair, causing the other wildlife inhabitants that rely on it for survival to disappear. A turtles shell is comprised of two parts: the carapace, which is the domeshaped upper shelling, and the plastron, the flat shelling on the bottom. Both gopher tortoises were admitted to CROW with carapacial fractures, likely caused by careless drivers. The wildlife veterinarian staff treated each patients shell injuries by gluing grommets to the defects and tying them in place with lacing. They are doing really well, said Dr. Heather about patients #1310 and #1363. The clinic has a policy of monitoring all patients with shell fractures for a minimum of three months. It can take up to six depending on how bad the injury was, how stable it was after repairing it, and how old it was when it arrived. All those things factor in for me, she added. With all patients, one of Dr. Heathers biggest concerns is pain management. When discussing the severely injured #1310, she said, I just want to make sure she is comfortable and doesnt have any pain. Hopefully, both patients will continue to fare well on their road to recovery and be released back in the wild. Once liberated, they will use their shovel-like front feet and elephantine hind feet to build new burrows. Once their homes are established, the gopher tortoises will soon welcome other roommates and their families to move in. As was once famously stated in a Kevin Costner film,If you build it, they will come. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to PO Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit: www.crowclinic.org. This gopher tortoise, patient #1363, makes its way slowly to a grassy field on CROWs campus for a bit of exercise and grazing. These ancient creatures can live to be 40 to 60 years old in the wild.

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THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 201314 Plant SmartWhitetop S edgeby G erri R eavesWhitetop sedge (Rhynchospora colorata) is a semi-aquatic plant native to Florida. Found in virtually every county, it grows along roadsides, in fields, marshes, wet pinelands, swales and ditches, and even in brackish sites. When not in bloom, this wildflower resembles other common grasses or weeds, but when in bloom, which is most of the year in South Florida, its noticed for the drooping green and white flowers. But what appear to be slender white and green petals are actually bracts, modified leaves at the base of the flowers. The rather inconspicuous inflorescence in the center of the bracts is composed of a round cluster of cone-shaped spikelets of small white flowers. The inflorescence and bracts appear to have been dipped in bright white paint, because the tipped ends of the bracts are green. This feature earns the plant the common name painted sedge. Those half-white-half-green bracts attract insect pollinators, which is rare among the usually wind-pollinated sedges. The downward curving bracts, of which there are usually three to seven, create a drooping star effect, thus the sedge is also known as star-rush. The real leaves that grow from the plants base measure four to 16 inches long and only about a quarter of an inch wide. They taper to a point and have parallel veins. The slender stems are triangular to round. Whitetop sedge can grow up to three feet high but is usually no more than two. Plant it in wet areas of the landscape in full sun or partial shade. Use it as a groundcover in a natural garden or include it in a bog garden. It spreads via rhizomes, or underground stems. Propagate it by clump division or with the beaked seeds that give it yes, another name! beak rush. Sources: Wildflowers of Florida by Jaret C. Daniels and Stan Tekiela, plants.ifas. ufl.edu, plantbook.org and wildflower.org. Plant Smart explores sustainable gardening practices that will help you create an environmentally responsible, low-maintenance South Florida landscape. The drooping tapered petals are actually bracts that surround the inconspicuous inflorescence photos by Gerri Reaves Whitetop sedge is a common freshwater wildflower Caring For Your PlantsOrchid Care 101by Justen DobbsOrchids come from tropical and sub-tropical rainforests in North, Central, and South America. They are air plants that grow on living trees and plants without harming the tree or plant they live on. There are thousands of species, they bloom one to three times a year, and some are fragrant. I find that people fall into two categories when it comes to orchids: those who love to collect and grow orchids and those who say they killed every single one theyve had. In this article, I will be speaking to the latter. I always tell people that orchids are a thrive with neglect plant. This essentially means that they dont receive much care in habitat (where theyre found in nature), so they shouldnt be overly cared for in cultivation (anywhere outside of habitat). Orchids do best when planted in an orchid blend a special soil made up of bark, charcoal, and perlite. This mixture allows lots of airflow through the roots and encourages root growth. You can also pot up orchids in coarse bark or tree bark nuggets, which will work just as well. Do not pot up your orchids into potting soil, palm and cactus soil, or any other mixtures! Watering your orchids is actually fairly simple. Orchid roots are like tiny white sponges. If you hold a dry, new sponge and pour water over it, most of the water is going to run down the side of it and into the sink. If you submerge a sponge in a sink full of water, it will soak up all the water it can. The same is true for orchid roots if you just run water from the hose over them, it will just wet them a little and is not an effective way to keep the plant healthy (except for Vanda sp. which need fresh water frequently). Instead, fill a small bowl (or your kitchen sink) with fresh tap water and submerge the entire orchid for 30 to 90 minutes. Remove the orchid, allow all excess water to drain, and place it back where it was. This should be done every three to four weeks, or when the leaves begin to wrinkle. Lighting for your orchids is the second most important factor. Most orchids will not grow in direct sunlight (even ground orchids get yellow), but instead require filtered sunlight, either through a canopy tree, mosquito screen, or blinded window. Keep in mind where they grow in nature attached to huge branches high up in the jungles and rainforests.) Airflow is also important for orchids since their fragile leaves, flowers, and roots are susceptible to mold and fungus. Orchids should be grown outdoors most of the time where they get ample airflow, but can be brought indoors while blooming. By following these simple rules, you should be able to enjoy your orchids for many years. Dobbs is a landscape architect in south Florida specializing in custom, upscale landscapes. He can be reached at seabreezenurseries@gmail.com. Phalaenopsis orchids are the easiest to grow and their blooms last for months This hanging basket receives filtered sunlight and lives off rainwater

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15 THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 2013 An Audubon Florida Special PlaceSanibels Ding Darling National Wildlife Refugeby Stuart LangtonArthur Frommer, the noted travel author, lists Sanibel Island first among his 10 favorite travel destinations, adding bird watching at Sanibels Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge is one of the great natural sights of wildlife in America. That is how I felt first visiting the refuge with my family. After catching snook on a fly rod, seeing alligators, roseate spoonbills, white pelicans, wood storks and 27 other bird species in an hour, my son said, Dad, this would be the coolest place to live. Little did I know in 25 years, I would own a house abutting the refuge and it would become my neighbor and favorite special place in Florida.Today, Sanibel is renowned for seashell beaches and conservation areas that cover over half the island. The refuge was established by President Harry Truman in 1945 with support from citizens concerned about development threats. An avid supporter was Jay Norwood Darling, a winter resident of nearby Captiva, and an influential political cartoonist who signed his cartoons Ding. In 1967, the refuge was renamed the J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge. The original refuge included 2,900 acres of mangroves, hammocks and estuary that were dredged for shallow ponds to control mosquitoes and attract birds. The spoil was used for the five mile long Wildlife Drive, the most popular refuge attraction, now visited by up to 800,000 annually. To manage visitor impact, Wildlife Drive is closed Fridays, no commercial buses are allowed, and people are encouraged to hike, bike or take a guided trolley tour. Another attraction is the 950-acre Tarpon Bay that encompasses mangrove islands, a canoe trail and a series of tidal lakes that provide good opportunities to fish and view birds, manatees and dolphins. Tarpon Bay Explorers offers guided tours as well as canoe and pontoon boat rentals. There is much to discover in both places as 272 bird species, 51 reptiles and amphibians, and 32 mammals have been observed. In recent years, the refuge complex expanded to 7,600 acres by including four nearby refuges, mostly islands and marine areas. This stretches the current 15 member staff in an era of budget constraints. Yet, Refuge Manager Paul Tritaik is upbeat, noting the value of volunteer leadership and partnerships. Our big challenges, he says, are managing visitor pressure, especially through education, and assuring adequate amounts and quality of water to maintain the health of our estuary. So, Everglades Restoration and control of high nutrient continued on page 18 Roseate spoonbill, a Ding Darling Refuge favorite photo by Terry Baldwin Volunteer helping visitors identify birds Yellow-crowned night heron with a crab photo by Jan Master rf ntbnrr bb bb rtttn Loved this restaurant. Fantastic experience. Food was exceptionally amazing. Service was outstanding. TripAdvisor Member, May 2013

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THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 201316 Ding U nveils Wildlife E ducation Boardwalkby Jeff LysiakNearly 15 years in the making, the new Wildlife Education Boardwalk which connects The Sanibel School property with the JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge was unveiled on Monday afternoon, with several classes of school children, project donors, local officials and honored guests attending the ribbon-cutting and dedication ceremonies. Paul Tritaik, manager of the refuge, explained that the idea behind the boardwalk began in 1999 under the leadership of then-refuge manager Lou Hinds. However, the project got sidetracked for several years. What was originally envisioned as a bridge is now a beautiful boardwalk, said Tritaik, who noted that discussions with the Ding Darling Wildlife Society in 2010 reignited the idea to build the boardwalk, two-story covered pavilion and observation tower. We are very excited to see this finally come to fruition. From the back of the school, the boardwalk is only steps away, but is cleverly hidden by a natural forest of mangroves. In fact, one of the gates that separates the school from the pavilion features a mangrove motif. The boardwalk will be open to the public on Thursdays, beginning August 22 and is expected to be open every day beginning October 1. It may be accessed through the refuge via the Indigo Trail. Its a three-quarters-of-a-mile, round-trip hike between the Education Center and the Wildlife Education Boardwalks pavilion, where walkers, bikers and hikers will have a restful stop amongst the mangroves. There, they may spot an alligator swimming by or see a wide variety of wading birds the refuge is famous for. This is great, said Marilyn Kloosterman, one of the most fervent supporters of the project, upon seeing the pavilion for the first time. I love what theyve done here for the school and the children. I just think this is fabulous, added Millie Ford, one of the founding members of the Ding Darling Wildlife Society. I think this would make a wonderful spot to hold weddings, too. Barbara Von Harten, principal of the school, noted that the boardwalk amenity would allow her students to see Sanibels eco-systems up close. Vice Mayor Doug Congress added that it was a phenomenal project for the city, the school and the refuge to work on together. Donations for the $170,000 project came from the Jim Sprankle Duck Decoy Exhibit sponsorships, the George and Miriam Martin Foundation, and memorials to the late Win Kloosterman. According to Supervisory Refuge Ranger Toni Westland, teacher training that will allow any school to use the Wildlife Education Boardwalk will begin at the end of September at the refuge. Phase 2 of the eco-friendly boardwalk, which is anticipated to be completed by November, includes interpretive Scat & Track as well as teacher-use panels for hands-on learning. Birgie Vertesch, executive director of the Ding Darling Wildlife Society, thanked the project partners, donors and sponsors, including Amy Nowacki, architect and project manager; Travis Pritchett of Artistic Structures; Tim McLaughlin of On Site Services of Mid-Florida; Rob Watson of Grounds by Greenways; Mike Delate and Grady Minor, civil engineers; the Lee County School System, The Sanibel School and Von Harten, Sanibel Recreation Center, Ding Darling Wildlife Society and the entire refuge staff, including Tritaik, Westland, Joyce Palmer, Becky Wolff and Jeremy Conrad. Cutting the ribbon at the new Wildlife Education Boardwalk at the JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge are, from left, Amy Nowacki, Marilyn Kloosterman, Barbara Von Harten, Paul Tritaik, Doug Congress and Carol Strange photos by Jeff Lysiak Refuge Manager Paul Tritaik talked about the history of the boardwalk project, which began in 1999 The two-story covered pavilion and observation tower Ranger Toni Westland, right, leads refuge visitors across the new boardwalk One of the four interpretive panels found along the Wildlife Education Boardwalk

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17 THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 2013 Art League Artist Of The Month Is Portia WrightThe Art League of Fort Myers is presenting the work of Portia Wright as Artist of the Month for August. Wright, a native of Indianapolis, Indiana, remembers her art beginning at an early age. The sculptured horse she made, in her first art class at age 10 is displayed in her home with her other prized early productions. She soon discovered a love of drawing when she sketched portraits of famous singers taken from her parents record covers. Her favorite sketch was one she did of Nat King Cole. Another, fond memory as a child was sitting on her grandpas lap while he instructed her on how to draw a barn out in the field. He showed her how to draw trees and the perspective of a curved path to the door. Sometimes he would add other elements such as a red fence or clouds that looked like cotton candy. Wright uses watercolor as a medium. Moving to Fort Myers five years ago has given her the opportunity to study under many accomplished artists. She has served as secretary of the Art Council, chair for the Reception Committee at the Art League of Fort Myers, and has volunteered and worked at Art Fest in downtown Fort Myers. She loves to encourage children and adults to pursue their passion for art. The Art League of Fort Myers has been an active part of the Fort Myers art community since 1956. The public is invited n Wednesdays from 9:30 a.m. to noon for free open painting sessions at the Gallery on Monroe Street. Membership is open to all artists and friends of the arts. Annual memberships are available for children, adults, and families. The artwork of Portia Wright Rotarians Donate $500 To Music Foundation Of SWFLRoger Mercado, President of Fort Myers South Rotary, announced that Rotary Club of Fort Myers South has donated $500 to The Music Foundation of Southwest Florida to help fund scholarships. The donated scholarship funds will help The Music Foundation continue to encourage young people in Southwest Florida to become and remain involved in music programs. The Music Foundation offers two different scholarships to young musicians in Southwest Florida. The Scott Knipe Memorial Scholarship helps a high school student in Lee County attend a summer music program outside of Lee County. The student must apply and be accepted to the program to receive the scholarship funds. Scholarship finalists are then asked to perform in front of the scholarship committee. The Music Foundation also offers a college scholarship to one Southwest Florida high school senior to Edison State College to major in music. The recipients audition for and are accepted to the program through the Music Department at Edison College. The Music Foundation of Southwest Florida does great work in our community. Fort Myers South Rotary was happy to present them with funds in order to help them continue to offer scholarship opportunities for students in Lee County, said Mercado. The Music Foundation of Southwest Florida is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization dedicated to encouraging and supporting interest in music among Southwest Floridas youth. They support their mission through summer camps, a traveling instrument program that brings instruments to all Lee County elementary schools and through grants and scholarship programs. For more information on The Music Foundation of Southwest Florida, visit www. music-foundation.org. LIVE ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY!Happy Hour Daily Half Price 4-6:30pm & All Night Tuesday Online Reservations Available www.brattasristorante.com12984 S. Cleveland Ave., Fort Myers, 239-433-4449JULY NIGHTLY SPECIALS Sunday Any Two Dinner Entrees from our regular menu & a Bottle of House Wine for ONLY $50 Monday 1/2 Price Bottle of Wines(enjoy as many as you like) NO LIMITS Tuesday Happy Hour& $4.99 Appetizers all Night! Wednesday Italian Night!$9.99 Lasagna, Taylor Street Baked Ziti, Cappellini & Meatballs, & Eggplant & Chicken Parmesan $3.00 House Wines By e Glass Thursday Steak & Lobster Tail $14.99 Friday Seafood Extravaganza Pre Fixe Dinner $24.99 per person. $5.00 Martinis! Saturday Make Online Reservations & Receive 25% o Total Check (Regular Priced Items) -ALWAYS AT BRATTAS-EARLY DINING 2 for $20 Dinners daily until 5:30pm, Live Music, Online Discounts, Daily Happy Hour until 6:30pm, Dance Floor, Great Food, Fun & Service NIGHTLY SPECIALS Find out why BRATTAS was voted Best Casual Fine Dining Two Years in a Row!SUNDAYAny Two Dinner Entrees from our regular menu & a Bottle of House Wine for ONLY $50MONDAY1/2 Price Bottles of Wine(enjoy as many as youd like) NO LIMITSSteak & Lobster $14.99TUESDAYHappy Hour& $4.99 Appetizers all Night!W EDNESDAYItalian Night!$9.99 Lasagna, Taylor Street Baked Ziti, Cappellini & Meatballs, & Eggplant & Chicken Parmesan$3.00 House Wines By e GlassT HURSDA YSteak & Lobster $14.99F RIDAYSeafood Extravaganza Pre Fixe Dinner $24.99 per person. $5.00 Martinis!SATURDAYMake Online Reservations & Receive25% o Total Check(Regular Priced Items) Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702or email press@riverweekly.com

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THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 201318 Spy Games At T heatre Conspiracyby Di SaggauTheatre Conspiracy begins its 2013-14 season with a Cold War romantic farce, Red Herring by Michael Hollinger. Its set in 1952, the year Dwight D. Eisenhower was elected president and Senator Joseph McCarthy was on the hunt for Communists. The production is fun and fast-paced, with solid performances from the whole cast. A special shoutout is in order for the amazing Lauren Drexler, who portrays the prim s housewife Mrs. McCarthy, the boardinghouse matron Mrs. Kravitz and the hilariously unflappable wedding boutique hostess. Theres an FBI man, Frank (Mike Breen), wooing a police detective, Maggie (Katie Pankow), until a dead body pops up. Theres Lynn (Erica Wagner), McCarthys daughter, and her fiancee, the nuclear physicist James Appel (Steven Coe), an I Like Ike guy who is idealistically passing secrets to the Soviets. Then theres Andrei (Scott Thompson), the Russian boyfriend of Mrs. Kravitz, who has a thing for Rogers and Hammerstein, and delights the audience with his mannerisms when he pretends to be mute. The action shifts between Boston, Wisconsin and the South Pacific as each couple faces their own romantic and, at times, political crises. Most of the actors play more than one role. Wagner was a riot as the gal in charge of the marriage license bureau. Another hilariously improbable scene is at the confessional where Lynn and Andrei make a priests job a living nightmare. Breen handles the priests job with aplomb. Snappy dialogue and lots of wisecracks make the play a pleasant romp and a fun experience. I enjoyed the large billboard advertising Ogilby Kippers. Put a fish in your pocket, featuring two men in a fishing boat. The Dragnet sound effects were also amusing. There are lots of plots and romantic entanglements that eventually are resolved. Not to mention a package of Velveeta cheese, or is it really cheese? Red Herring plays through August 24 at Theatre Conspiracy, in the Foulds Theatre at the Alliance for the Arts in Fort Myers. For tickets call 936-3239 or go online at www.theatreconspiracy. org. Scott Thompson and Katie Pankow Naples Players Add Comedy To Season Lineup The Naples Players have added A.R. Gurneys Black Tie to the 2014 season lineup. Running January 15 through February 8, Black Tie is an endearing comedy centered around father of the groom Curtis, who tries to prove that a touch of class never goes out of style as he prepares to make a memorable toast at his only sons wedding rehearsal dinner. Cultures clash when Curtis family urges him to stop living in the past and start embracing change. Black Tie takes a perceptive look at how each generation navigates their past in the ever changing present. Black Tie will be directed by John McKerrow, who last directed Leading Ladies at the Players. Other new season performances in Blackburn Hall include The Great American Trailer Park Musical by David Nehls and Betsy Kelso, October 9 through November 2, Our Town by Thornton Wilder, November 27 through December 21, The Drowsy Chaperone by Bob Martin and Don McKellar with music and lyrics by Lisa Lambert and Greg Morrison, March 5 through April 5, and Moon Over Buffalo by Ken Ludwig, April 23 through May 17. Tobye theatre performances include The Mystery of Irma Vep by Charles Ludlam, October 30 through November 23, Good People by David LindsayAbaire, February 5 through March 1, and Distracted by Lisa Loomer, March 26 through April 19. Performances are Wednesdays through Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Tickets to The Naples Players Blackburn shows are $35 per person and Tobye shows are $25. Students to age 18 are $10. A subscription for the five Blackburn performances is $150. A three-show Tobye subscription is $60. Subscriptions are now on sale and can be purchased at the box office by calling 263-7900 or by visiting www.naplesplayers.org. E nglish Country DancingLearn the social dances of the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries at the Wa-ke Hatchee Recreation Center. Lessons are offered on Tuesdays from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. all year round. Dress is casual, and participants should wear flat shoes with non-slip soles. Partners are not necessary, and beginners are welcomed. Lessons are free after a one-time payment of $10, which covers lifetime membership to Wa-Ke Hatchee Recreation Center. Contact Gillian Carney at 6039828 or email fortmyersdancers@hotmail.com. Also, visit http://dancefl.us/ ecd/FtMyersECD.shtml. Wa-ke Hatchee Recreation Center is located at 16760 Bass Road in Fort Myers. Call 432-2154 for more information. From page 15Ding Darlingrunoff are important to our future. He praises the contributions of their friends group, the Ding Darling Wildlife Society and 255 volunteers who provide the equivalent of 13 full-time staff. They educate, raise money for outreach, assist with research, organize programs, help obtain land, run much of our 12,000 square foot Education Center (for which they raised $3 million), and they are our best advocates. Collaborating with the City of Sanibel, the Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation, and Florida Gulf Coast University are also very important, he says, particularly in coordinating and sharing research. We need good information to protect our ecosystem. In a generation, I have seen a tenfold increase in visitors to Sanibel and the Refuge; but Ding Darling NWR is well managed and maintains its charm. I was reminded of this when my grandson last visited. After a wonderful day of canoeing, bird watching and fishing in the refuge, he pointed to a flock of two dozen roseate spoonbills and said, Papa Stu, this is a cool place to live. I agree, and that is why I am committed to helping support it and the many other special places in Florida.This column is one in a series from Audubon Florida. Stuart Langton, PhD, is an Audubon Florida Board member and Senior Fellow, Florida State University. For more information about the Ding Darling Refuge, see www.fws. gov/dingdarling and www.dingdarlingsociety.org. For more about Audubon Florida and its Special Places program, visit www.FloridasSpecialPlaces.org. All rights reserved by Florida Audubon Society, Inc. From page 1Tootie McGregor Fountainwas dedicated to the City in 1913. The anniversary dedication will also serve as an awareness of the need to ensure that the legacy of Tootie McGregor remains for the next century. Significant deterioration is noted on the fountains structure and repairs estimated at $65,000 are needed to stabilize this beautiful fountain. A fundraising campaign will be launched in the near future. R epublican Womens LunchThe Lee Republican Women Federated will meeting Monday, September 9. The meeting begins with a social hour at 11:15 a.m. followed by lunch and the program. The speaker will be Florida State Representative for District 79, Matthew Caldwell. It will take place at the Hilton Garden Inn, 12601 University Drive, Fort Myers. Cost is $16. For reservations, call 432-9389 or email: cindylignelli222@gmail.com. Contact: Michele Duryea, Publicity Chair LRWF michelemduryea@embarqmail.com or call 239-280-7653.

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19 THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 2013 S teve S tricker No. 1 G ood G uy A mong Professional G olfersby E d FrankIn the midst of the recent fallout from the scandalous suspension of 13 baseball players for using performance enhancing drugs, this week we are reversing the course of professional sports and taking a positive spin. For a brief moment, lets turn away from drugs, arrests and seemingly endless acts of violence by athletes reports that dominate newspapers, television and radio on a daily basis and discuss some good deeds by athletes. Many of you no doubt watched last weeks thrilling PGA championship won by 36-year-old Jason Dufner who played nearly flawless golf. In the mix for the entire tournament was the popular Steve Stricker, who finished in the top 12 and who started the final round just four strokes off the pace. If he had won, Stricker, at age 46, would have been the oldest player to have won the famed event. But even more important is the fact that just recently Stricker had been voted the Number One Good Guy among active PGA tour players, based on voting by tour nament directors, locker room attendants, players, caddies, media members, golf executives and tournament volunteers. When told of the honor, Strickers response was, to play golf for a living is a dream so its not hard to want to give back however I can, as reported in the recent issue of Golf Digest. The article chronicles incident after incident of Strickers good deeds, but, in this writers opinion, the following tells it best: Wally Ulhlein, chairman and CEO of Acushnet Company, received a letter from Sam Wells, a promising junior golfer who was suffering from lung cancer while still in high school. Steve Stricker is my hero, the youngster said, explaining that he and his mother had met Stricker, and that Stricker had flown the two of them to The Barclays to watch the first round of the FedEx Cup playoffs an event that Stricker ended up winning. The teenager said that it was this gesture by Stricker that had given him the courage to undergo additional surgery and chemotherapy. That story is all you need to know about Steve Stricker, Ulhlein said in the article. Here are the other top 10 good guys according to the survey: Brandt Snedeker, Rickie Fowler, Matt Kutchar, Graeme McDowell, Joe Durant, Adam Scott, Bo Van Pelt, Rory McIlroy and Zach Johnson. Former Miracle Players Sano And Rosario Perform Well At Higher Level Its a known fact that if a Minor League Baseball player can hit pitching in Double A baseball, he is just a step away from Major League Baseball. Miquel Sano and Eddie Rosario, who led the Fort Myers Miracle to a division championship in the seasons first half, and then were quickly promoted to Double A New Britain, have continued their hot hitting at this higher level. Sano started slowly at New Britain, but as the week began he had upped his batting average to .253 with 12 home runs and 40 RBIs in 46 games there. Rosario, in 49 games, was batting .295 with 24 RBIs. Miracle Just 1.5 Games Out Of First Place Fort Myers began the week with a second-half season record of 25-22, just 1-1/2 games behind first-place St. Lucie in the Florida State League South Division. Despite losing several of their top players to promotions, the Miracle has remained in contention in the seasons second half. By contrast, Dunedin, who won the FSL North Division in the first half, is mired in last place the second half, 10 games out of first. Fort Myers is home for only one game this weekend, that being Saturday night at Hammond Stadium against the 21-26 Brevard County Manatees. First pitch is at 6:05 p.m. Steve Stricker S wings For T he S ox G olf T ournamentAs part of its continuing community outreach efforts, the Red Sox Foundation will hold its 2nd annual Swings For The Sox golf tournament on Friday, October 25. The tournament will take place at Plantation Golf & Country Club, located at 10500 Dartington Drive in Fort Myers. A scramble format golf tournament with prizes for the longest drive, putting, closest to the pin and more will begin at 8:30 a.m. Following the tournament, participants will head to JetBlue Park at Fenway South, the Red Soxs 106-acre Spring Training and Player Development Complex located at 11500 Fenway South Drive, for the Party in the Park including lunch courtesy of Rib City on the Green Monster. The afternoon will also include self-guided tours, a silent auction, raffle prizes and opportunities for golfers to take batting practice swings from home plate for the chance to win 2014 Spring Training season tickets. All funds raised will be used by the Red Sox Foundation to support the Foundation for Lee County Public Schools, Inc. Last years inaugural event raised more than $23,000, and two local nonprofits, the Heights Foundation and the Childrens Home Society, each received $10,000 from the tournament proceeds. We were very excited that our first local Red Sox Foundation golf tournament not only sold out but raised $20,000 for local nonprofits, said Katie Haas, senior director of Florida business operations. The Boston Red Sox organization naturally understands the meaning of team work and how it takes a team working together to succeed. The same concept applies to making sure our public-school students achieve at their highest potential, said Marshall T. Bower, president and CEO of the Foundation for Lee County Public Schools, Inc. Working together, our community can help students and teachers excel, and the Foundation for Lee County Public Schools is proud to work with the Boston Red Sox to help us succeed in our mission of enhancing and enriching public education. The Hertz Corporation has signed on as this years presenting sponsor. Additional sponsors include Lee Memorial Health System, CVS Caremark and Rib City. As one of our first sponsorships since we announced our relocation to Lee County, we are pleased to support the Red Sox Foundation and the Foundation for Lee County Public Schools, said Richard Broome, executive vice president of corporate affairs and communications at Hertz Corporation. Additional tournament sponsorships are available from $100 to $2,000. Foursome player packages begin at $600, and nonplayer Party in the Park passes, which include entry into the park, lunch and batting practice swings, are $50 per person. Raffle items that can be used to aid in raising more money for the foundation and additional funds for those in need throughout Southwest Florida are also being accepted. For more information, call 226-4783 or e-mail redsoxgolf@redsox.com.

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THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 201320 Book ReviewH umorous Beach R eadby Di SaggauA sense of humor is always appreciated, and Sanibel author Jess Fisher definitely has one. Not only is it obvious in his latest book, Desire, but in the letter he sent to the Island Sun requesting a review. He wrote ... you were kind enough to interview me about my novel, Dangerous, and you wrote a wonderful article which I had framed and now show to every person I meet, even though it is difficult to carry a framed newspaper story everywhere I go. Especially when Im in the mens room. During our conversation, I eluded to my next novel, which toyed with the idea that pirate Black Ceasars treasure was buried on Sanibel Island and the man who had control of the treasure map was intending to sell it on eBay. Well that new book has been released titled wait now, I know you cant bear the tension created by the new book by a Sanibel author here it is: Desire. I have already sold two copies I bought one and my mother returned hers. Youll chuckle over and over traveling with reporter Jack Tyler as he searches pristine Sanibel Island for the treasure reportedly buried by pirate Black Ceasar. Its estimated to be worth $70 million, so it attracts the attention of many treasure hunters, including Milton Bradley, Bing Cherry, Morton Salt and a number of unsavory characters. Fisher has fun naming his characters. Nothing is sacred in the wild hunt for fortune and fame its an expedition to the dark side of human nature a journey of unrestrained sexual attraction, greed, backstabbing, lying, taking without permission and the surprised Why me? Its the world of Wilkerson Blade, an evil corporate hatchet man, a heavy named Ron Crete, who lives on Casa Ybel Road, and a wiry wise guy Taco Styen who controls one-half of a really old and possibly authentic treasure map. Jack, along with his cohort of dubious character, Reno Fox, slithers into the underworld and snakes his way between Sanibels coconut trees to be the first to uncover the lost loot. The book begins with: A long time ago, a derelict pirate ship, leaky and with torn sails, meandered past the bay side of Sanibel Island. The rogue vessel, named Senora de la Alta Mar, was manned by a motley crew who were in desperate need of a dental hygienist, a shower stall and a skilled tailor. They were not a par ticularly handsome group, but they were loyal to their dirty ship, one-eyed captain and feisty parrot. The book continues along the roads of Sanibel, Captiva and other known locations in our area as everyone races to find the treasure. This is a fun read. Fisher even makes his epilogue a treat for the reader. Desire is available at island book stores. Laugh Out Loud Dinner ShowAre you meeting your laughing quota? The average 4-yearold laughs 300 times a day; a 40-year-old, only four. Laughter is healthy and good for the soul. Comedians David Sayh and BJ Odom are just what the doctor ordered. Join your friends from the Lake Kennedy Senior Center in Cape Coral as we enjoy a night full of laughter, fun, food and friends on Friday, September 27. Dinner features BBQ chicken, baked beans, potato salad, rolls and butter. Dessert includes apple cobbler. This event is courtesy of our caring community partner, Advanced Pain Solutions, Dr. Stephen Stokes. Preregistration is required. Cost to attend the Laugh Out Loud Dinner Show is $18 per member and $23 per non-member. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and dinner starts at 7 p.m. For more information or to make reservations, contact the Lake Kennedy Senior Center at 574-0575. Lee County Library T o Close T emporarilyThe existing Fort Myers Lee County Library located at 2050 Central Avenue, in downtown Fort Myers will close on September 1. The last day to visit this library will be Saturday, August 31. The book drop will be open until September 30. The new Fort Myers Regional Library relocated at 2450 First Street in downtown Fort Myers will open Saturday, October 26 at 10 a.m. The Bookmobile will be at the existing library location (2050 Central Avenue) to serve the public on the following Fridays: September 6, 13, 20 and 27 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Beginning August 15 and continuing through October 25 when placing a hold on books for pickup borrowers will need to choose a location other than the existing Fort Myers Library. Borrowers may change the pickup location on any existing hold online. Assistance may be obtained from library staff or by calling Telephone Reference at 479-4636. If the pickup location is not changed the hold will be filled after the new Fort Myers Regional Library opens October 26 at the new location. This new library is truly state of the art and will be a wonderful asset to the City of Fort Myers, Lee County and all residents, said Sheldon Kaye, Library System Director. The Fort Myers Regional Library is a joint venture between the City of Fort Myers and Lee County and will encompass approximately 43,135 square feet. This space nearly triples the size of the existing one-story library which opened June 18, 1979 and is divided between a two story building of 37,401 square feet on the north part of the site and a one story building of 5,734 square feet on the south part of the site. There will be a caf in the north building and an outdoor plaza with a wireless Internet and a variety of seating, perfor mance and exhibit spaces. The estimated construction cost is approximately $20 million and funding for the library comes from existing library fund balances. The City of Fort Myers owns the land. The new Fort Myers Regional Library will provide services to meet the growing and changing needs of the population in Fort Myers and North Fort Myers and provide services that are compatible with those of other regional libraries. The new regional library will utilize building materials and native landscaping and is being built to meet high standards of energy efficiency and sustainability and will be the first LEED-certified building in the Fort Myers River District. The building is expected to be a community destination and will further complete the citys 2003 master plan created by new-urban designer Andres Duany. The new regional library will provide books, downloadable e-books, audio books, magazines, digital content, e-sources, music, videos, programs and multiple meeting spaces. More information about the new Fort Myers Regional Library can be found at http://leelibrary. net/FMinfo. Dont have a Lee County Library System library card? Getting one is free and easy. Visit www.leelibrary.net to apply online, or stop by any branch. Information about Lee County Library System is available for your convenience 24/7 at www.leelibrary.net where you can find out about library services, programs, locations, view an online events calendar or place a hold on library items. Telephone reference is available at 479INFO (4636). Symphonic Chorale AuditionsThe Symphonic Chorale of Southwest Florida will hold auditions for volunteer singers on August 24, 26 and 28 at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 2439 McGregor Blvd. in Fort Myers. Appointments will be available all day on the indicated Saturday and both Monday and Wednesday evenings. The chorale is embarking on its third season as an independent organization under the direction of Timothy McDonnell. As such, it produces its own concerts with professional instrumentalists. The first of these is scheduled for February 8, 2014, and will include the Requiem in C Minor by Michael Haydn as well as Vivaldis Gloria. The second concert of choral masterworks is April 5, 2014. This program includes the Lord Nelson Mass by Joseph Haydn, Michaels elder brother. Other works will be by Beethoven and Mendelssohn. The chorale was previously affiliated with the Southwest Florida Symphony Orchestra. The two organizations continue to collaborate successfully. The chorale will perform as part of the Symphonys Holiday Pops concerts on December 14 and 16 and its Movie Musicals Pops on March 7 and 8, 2014. Interested singers age 15 and older may contact chorale Vice President Jackie Ferguson at 283-2353 or JFerg8@aol. com to schedule a time. Auditions are 15 minutes in length. Singers should bring two copies of a vocal selection and be prepared to sing scales and to sight read. The chorale rehearses on Tuesday evenings from 7 until 9:30 p.m. at Canterbury School, 8141 College Parkway in Fort Myers. Several paid positions are also available for degreed singers and those pursuing professional music careers. Please contact Dr. McDonnell at musicmcd@ gmail.com for complete details on those positions only. Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702 or email press@riverweekly.com Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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21 THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 2013 Isabella Rasi 239-246-47161101 Periwinkle Way #105, Sanibel, FL 239-472-0044 ENGEL & VLKERS Excellence in Real Estate A step above! International Client Base 600 Shops Worldwide Multi-Lingual Staff Your success is my aim. School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Readers, As your children begin a new school year that will probably be filled with emotional ups and downs, its important to pay attention to their psychological well being as well as their academics. Here are some tips from the National Association of School Psychologists to promote and support positive mental health for your children. Have a great new school year! Create a sense of belonging Feeling connected and welcomed is essential to childrens positive adjustment, self-identification, and sense of trust in others and themselves. Building strong, positive relationships among students, school staff, and parents is important to promoting mental wellness. Promote resilience Adversity is a natural part of life and being resilient is important to overcoming challenges and good mental health. Connectedness, competency, helping others and successfully facing difficult situations can foster resilience. Develop competencies Children need to know that they can overcome challenges and accomplish goals through their actions. Achieving academic success and developing individual talents and interests helps children feel competent and more able to deal with stress positively. Social competency is also important. Having friends and staying connected to friends and loved ones can enhance mental wellness. Ensure a positive, safe school environment Feeling safe is critical to students learning and mental health. Promote positive behaviors such as respect, responsibility and kindness. Prevent negative behaviors such as bullying and harassment. Teach children to work together to stand up to a bully, encourage them to reach out to lonely or excluded peers, celebrate acts of kindness, and reinforce the availability of adult support. Teach and reinforce positive behaviors and decision making Provide consistent expectations and support. Teaching children social skills, problem solving and conflict resolution supports good mental health. Catch them being successful. Positive feedback validates and reinforces behaviors or accomplishments that are valued by others. Encourage helping others Children need to know that they can make a difference. Pro-social behaviors build selfesteem, foster connectedness, reinforce personal responsibility and present opportunities for positive recognition. Helping others and getting involved in reinforces being part of the community. Encourage good physical health Good physical health supports good mental health. Healthy eating habits, regular exercise and adequate sleep protect kids against the stress of tough situations. Regular exercise also decreases negative emotions such as anxiety, anger and depression. Educate the school community and students on symptoms of and help for mental health problems Information helps break down the stigma surrounding mental health and enables adults and students recognize when to seek help. School mental health professionals can provide useful information on symptoms of problems like depression or suicide risk. These can include a change in habits, withdrawal, decreased social and academic functioning, erratic or changed behavior and increased physical complaints. Ms. Greggs is adjunct faculty at Edison State College where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also Nationally Certified School Psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. GraduationJacob Albion, a resident of Fort Myers, graduated from Lake Forest College on May 11 with a bachelor of arts degree in sociology and anthropology. Albion is a graduate of The Canterbury School in Fort Myers. Welcome WeekEdison State College announced that its welcome week for the students, staff and faculty will be August 21 through 29 Welcome week is a great chance for our students to become acclimated to the campus. It allows them to socialize and connect with other students, faculty and staff, said Michael Beane, Student Life Coordinator for the Charlotte Campus. During the week, Student Life will be hosting activities such as Open for Business and Speed Dating, where students will get a chance to connect, network, and socialize beyond the classroom with each other and with business leaders from the county. On Thursday, August 29, players from the Charlotte Stone Crabs will be on campus to meet, greet, and sign autographs. For more information about welcome week, contact Michael Beane, Student Life Coordinator for Charlotte Campus at mbeane@edison.edu or by calling 941637-5634. GraduationBibi Alli of Fort Myers graduated from Fairleigh Dickinson Universitys Metropolitan Campus this May. The university is located in Teaneck, New Jersey. Deans ListNeel Natarajan of Fort Myers made the Deans List for the spring semester at the Georgia Institute of Technology. This designation is awarded to undergraduate students who have a 3.0 or higher academic average for the semester. Order Of The Engineer AwardedPatrick OConnell, a resident of Fort Myers, was awarded the Order of the Engineer at a ceremony at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) in May. The Order of the Engineer, a national recognition, is given to graduates and registered engineers to foster the spirit of pride and responsibility in the engineering profession. OConnell is working toward a degree in mechanical engineering from RITs Kate Gleason College of Engineering. Harvey Palmer, dean of the engineering college, bestowed the order onto 105 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral students, and administered the oath. The designation is recognized nationally and graduates are invited to accept the Obligation of the Engineering to practice integrity and fair dealing, tolerance and respect, and to uphold devotion to the standards and dignity of the profession. Dont Invest One Cent Of Your Money In Bank CDs Until You Check Out is Guide!CD, IRA & Annuity Interest Rates Are at an All Time low. Is ere a Safe, Guaranteed Alternative To Increase Your Income?Call now for your FREE Guide 10 Secrets Your Banker Doesnt Want You To KnowCall 24 Hrs 800-771-4423CALL NOW QUANTITIES LIMITED

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THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 201322 Financial FocusWhat Do New I nvestors R eally Need T o Know?by Jennifer BaseyIf youre starting out as an investor, you might be feeling over whelmed. After all, it seems like theres just so much to know. How can you get enough of a handle on basic investment concepts so that youre comfortable in making well-informed choices? Actually, you can get a good grip on the investment process by becoming familiar with a few basic concepts, such as these: stocks, or stock-based investments, you are buying ownership shares in companies. Generally speaking, its a good idea to buy shares of quality companies and to hold these shares for the long term. This strategy may help you eventually over come short-term price declines, which may affect all stocks. Keep in mind, though, that when buying stocks, there are no guarantees you wont lose some or all of your investment. bonds, you arent becoming an owner default, you can expect to receive regular interest payments for as long as you own your bond, and when it matures, you can expect to get your principal back. However, bond prices do rise and fall, typically moving in the opposite direction a bond before it matures, and interest rates have recently risen, you may have to offer your bond at a price lower than its face value. For the most part, stocks are pur chased for their growth potential (although many stocks do offer income, in the form of dividends), while bonds are bought for the income stream provided by interest payments. Ideally, though, it is important to build a diversified portfolio containing stocks, bonds, certificates of deposit (CDs), government securities and other investments designed to meet your goals and risk tolerances. Diversification is a strategy designed to help reduce the effects of market volatility on your portfolio; keep in mind, however, that diversification, by itself, cant guarantee a profit or protect against loss. can decline in value, while investments such as CDs can lose purchasing power over time. One important thing to keep in mind is that, generally, the greater the potential reward, the higher the risk. need to set goals for your investment portfolio, such as providing resources for retirement or helping pay for your childrens college educations. accept more risk in the hopes of greater rewards, while others are not comfortable with risk at all. Its essential that you know your investment personality when you begin investing, and throughout your years as an investor. It generally takes decades of patience, perseverance and good decisions for investors to accumulate the substantial financial resources theyll need for their long-tem goals. as your begin your journey through the investment world, youll be better prepared for the twists and turns youll encounter along the way as you pursue your financial goals. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@edwardjones.com. Dys R eappointed T o Governors Advisory Councilhell Point President Peter Dys has been reappointed to the Continuing Care Advisory Council by Governor It has been my honor to serve on the Governors Continuing Care Advisory leged to take part in another productive year with the CCAC and help continue its important mission of ensuring high standards of care for Floridas seniors. Dys has provided consistent involvement and assistance to Florida regarding senior care. The Continuing Care Advisory Council acts in an advisory capacity to the Office of Insurance to the office any changes in statutes and rules pertaining to Continuing Care upon the request of the office, the council assists with any corrective action, rehabilitation or cessation of business plan for a provider. He previously served as the founder he was responsible for a broad array of community-based services to assist older persons to remain as independent and autonomous as possible. the Aging for his outstanding achievements in the retirement and life care industry. Peter Dys Law Firm Supports Youth SportsG ticipated in the Cape Coral Proceeds from the purchased meals help support the boys and girls Cyclones soccer program. The firm continually supports local happy to support an effort like youth sports that helps teach children life skills, the firm. whose mission is to foster the physical, mental and emotional growth and development of Cape Corals youth through the sport of soccer at all ages and levels of competition. For more information, visit www.capecoralsoccer.com. T op 10 R eal E state Sales Development City Year BuiltSquare FootageListing PriceSelling PriceDays on Market Fort Myers Fort Myers Kelly Greens Fort Myers Masters Cape Coral Cape Coral Hercules Park Cape Coral Cape Coral Caloosa Creek Fort Myers Courtesy of Royal Shell Real Estate

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Visit our newest ofce location at Sundial Beach Resort 1451 Middle Gulf Drive 239/472-1478Serving the Islands Since 1975 a arl s a riv la tati illa arvi w riv G ardi m lf rt d hisk r k r s rv N r sc t sla d s t aptiva G arb r a is illas t bb a O dial p cial 23 THE RIVER AUGUS TT 16, 2013

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THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 201324 deaRPharmacistH igh I nsulin Is Worse T han H igh Blood S ugarby S uzy Cohen, R PhDear Pharmacist: I am now up to 14 medications for the following problems: High cholesterol, heart disease, pre-diabetes, cataracts, arrhythmias, allergies, memory problems and enlarged prostate (BPH). The medications make me sick and sleepy. I need some fresh perspective. CP, Kansas City, Kansas Fresh perspective is my middle name. You take a lot of medicine for many conditions, which makes me wonder why they call it the golden years. In the note you sent me, it appears that no one has measured your serum insulin! Chronically elevated insulin hormone has also been associated with Parkinsons disease, nerve pain and autoimmune diseases like lupus and cancer. Yes... cancer! Breast cancer and pancreatic cancer are connected to high insulin. And according to an August 2009 study published in The Journal of The National Cancer Institute elevated insulin. You should ask your doctor to measure this for you. There are many well designed, clinical trials published in respected journals that show an association to high insulin and the very disorders that you have. Insulin is a pancreatic hormone that reduces blood sugar (which rises after you eat a meal). All physicians know to measure your blood glucose, but many do not bother with insulin. You should measure both glucose and insulin. The ratio of glucose to insulin is more valuable than the level of either one alone. Just because your blood glucose is normal does not mean that everything is hunky dory. The ratio of glucose to insulin should be less than 10:1. The following information is hard to find, unless you have my Diabetes Without Drugs book. If you dont, Ill tell you now: A persons insulin levels may be sky high because the pancreas is working on overdrive to push the blood sugar into the cell. Remember, insulin puts sugar into the cell, so if you have a lot of sugar in your system, then your insulin can be very high for many years while your blood sugar remains normal. This is a dangerous place to be because your being told that you do not have diabetes (and Im saying you might). The insulin can be high because the pancreas is pumping it out all day long to push the sugar into the cell. Good time to tell you that insulin makes a person fat! The higher your insulin, the more weight gain. So as a side note, if you are dealing with stubborn weight that refuses to come off, you may have high insulin. Some people are perfect when a fasting blood glucose test is performed, but when they eat, their insulin goes haywire. You wouldnt see this on a fasting blood sugar test so a post prandial blood glucose test is important, too. Ive expanded this column to include the proper ranges for all your labs, as well as supplements that lower blood sugar. If youd like to read this, just sign up for my free newsletter at my website, upper right hand corner. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. dearpharmacist.com. Mom A nd Me by Lizzie and PryceLizzie and Pryce answer your questions and give advice about aging concerns from a two-generational perspective. A mother and daughter team, Lizzie is a retired RN and health educator, and Pryce is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in the care of elders and people with chronic illnesses. Dear Mom & Me, My husband retired at 55 and he was in very good health. Since he had worked his 30 years and he was eligible for retirement, he decided to take it, but I thought it was entirely too early. He has puttered around the house, but hasnt really done much and I think I deserve a halo for keeping my sanity. He is now 85 years old and his health is beginning to fail and what lies ahead for us is not good. Please tell others that retirement takes planning and adjustment. It isnt much fun unless you are self motivated. I think it is better to work until you drop. What do you think? Tessy Dear Tessy, A few years ago, many people like your husband were eager to retire. They may have been bored with their job, tired and a little depressed, so they thought all of their problems would be over if they just left. Many found that after just three months, they were still bored, tired and a little depressed. Retirement takes exactly what you have said and only now, many want to stay working for as long as possible. The shuffleboard mentality seems to be over. Personally, as long as my health is good, I will stay working... and I do think you do deserve a halo. Lizzie Dear Tessy, Individuals can live approximately a quarter of their lives in retirement. It is critically important to begin planning for retirement when one starts working save, develop interest, create a social network and take care of your health. Individuals I have had the pleasure of meeting who have planned all aspects of their retirement report retirement as joyous and engaging. Pryce Lizzie and Pryces email address is momandmeaging@hotmail.com. E nvironmental Links T o CancerOn August 1, Susan G. Komen announced $4.5 million in research funding to more fully understand the role that environmental issues play in breast cancer development. The grants will be part of Komens $42 million 2013 research portfolio, which includes $225,000 in new funding to researchers at one Florida institution. The new environmental grants will build on research that Komen has already funded to more fully understand the role of toxins and other environmental factors that may contribute to breast cancer. Komen Chief Mission Officer Chandini Portteus said that the environmental grants are just one element in Komens more than $790 million research program the largest breast cancer research investment of any nonprofit outside of the U.S. government. These environmental studies will add to our understanding of how breast cancer develops, Portteus said. At the same time, Komen will continue to fund research along the entire cancer spectrum from prevention, to better screening, more personalized treatments for metastatic disease, and ending disparities in outcomes for women of color and those without adequate access to healthcare. Coalition Puts Focus On Child H omelessnessAs the new school year begins, the Lee County Homeless Coalition encourages the community to consider the many children in our community facing homelessness. According to Project ACCESS, a program for all homeless children and youth referred through the Lee County School District, there were 1,450 children reported as homeless in Lee County dur ing the 2012-13 school year. Posted to YouTube.com and currently airing on numerous local networks, the Lee County Homeless Coalitions public service announcement (PSA) aims to bring awareness and encourage the community to join the cause against child homelessness. According to the National Center on Family Homelessness, children experiencing homelessness are sick four times more often than other children. In addition, they have four times as many respiratory infections, twice as many ear infections, five times more gastrointestinal problems, and are four times more likely to have asthma. Children that are homeless have high rates of obesity due to nutritional deficiencies and have three times the rate of emotional and behavior al problems compared to non-homeless children. Aside from health issues, homeless children are four times more likely to show delayed development and are twice as likely to have learning disabilities as non-homeless children. By the age of 12, 83 percent of homeless children have been exposed to at least one serious violent event, and almost 25 percent have witnessed acts of violence within their families. Children who are homeless also go hungry at twice the rate of other children. In Lee County, 70 percent of all children are eligible for free or reduced lunch, with some areas as high as 98 percent. The school district, along with Project ACCESS, assists children and families struggling with homelessness by providing free uniforms and clothing vouchers, school supplies, public transportation passes and referrals to more than 70 human service agencies, including the Lee County Homeless Coalition. To be successful at educating our students, we must first help them in times of crisis. No child should wonder where they are going to sleep at night or when they will have their next meal, said Mary Fischer, chairman of the school board. The Homeless Coalitions PSA on child homelessness is one of three commercials produced by the agency. The other two, focusing on veteran homelessness and the new face of homelessness, can also be found on the Lee County Homeless Coalitions YouTube.com channel, as well as the coalitions Facebook page and on local television networks. If you or anyone you know in Lee County is suffering from homelessness or challenges that could lead to homelessness, call 211 or contact the Lee County Homeless Coalition at 332-6600 or visit www.LeeHomeless.org for help. Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702 or email press@riverweekly.com

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PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF AUGUST 19, 2013ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Impatience with those who dont keep up with you can cause resistance, which, in turn, can lead to more delays. Best to be helpful and supportive if you want results. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A sur prise announcement from a colleague could put you on the defensive. Gather your facts and respond. Youll soon find the situation shifting in your favor. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Time spent away from a project pays off with a new awareness of options you hadnt considered before. Weigh them carefully before deciding which to choose. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Consider confronting that personal conflict while theres still time to work things out. A delay can cause more problems. A longtime colleague might offer to mediate. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Some emerging matters could impede the Lions progress in completing an important project. Best advice: Deal with them now, before they can create costly delays. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Your aspect continues to favor an expanding vista. This could be a good time to make a career move, and taking an out-oftown job could be a good way to do it. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Disruptive family disputes need to be settled so that everyone can move on. Avoid assuming this burden alone, though. Ask for -no, demand -help with this problem. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Patience is called for as you await word on an important workplace situation. A per sonal circumstance, however, could benefit by your taking immediate action. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Dont lose confidence in yourself. Those doubters are likely to back off if you demand they show solid proof why they think your ideas wont work. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) A temporary setback might cause the usually sure-footed Goat some unsettling moments. But keep going. The path ahead gets easier as you move for ward. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Theres welcome news from the workplace. There also could be good news involving a relationship that has long held a special meaning for you. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) You might still need to cut some lingering ties to a situation that no longer has the appeal it once held. In the meantime, you can start to explore other opportunities. BORN THIS WEEK: Your sense of whats right can inspire others if you remember not to push too hard to make your case. Moderation works best for you. at Long Island -between Gravesend and New Utrecht -with 24,000 men, and on Sept. 15 captured New York City. It would remain in British hands until the end of the war. editor Horace Greeley publishes a blistering editorial, The Prayer of Twenty Millions, calling on President Abraham Lincoln to declare emancipation for all slaves. Unbeknownst to Greeley, Lincoln was already moving in the direction of emancipation. Jackson becomes the first person to photograph Colorados elusive Mount of the Holy Cross, providing reliable proof of its existence. Two deep snow-filled ravines at 90-angles form a large cross on the steep northeast face of a 14,000-foot mountain peak. at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indiana, now the home of the Indianapolis 500. The tracks surface of crushed rock and tar proved a disaster, breaking up and causing the deaths of two drivers, two mechanics and two spectators. begins with Benny Goodmans triumphant Palomar Ballroom performance in Los Angeles. When his relatively staid arrangements began to lose the young crowd, Goodman pulled out upbeat, syncopated rhythm arrangements -to the crowds immense delight -and swing was born. of a crippling strike by railroad workers, President Harry Truman issues an executive order putting Americas railroads under the control of the U.S. Army. The railroad strike lasted for 21 months. He used the same justification for seizing control of steel plants when the United Steel Workers union struck later in the year. for betting on baseball, Cincinnati Reds manager Pete Rose accepts a settlement that includes a lifetime ban from the game. Rose continued to proclaim his innocence, but in 2004, Rose published My Prison Without Bars, in which he finally confessed to gambling on the Reds. and poet Oscar Wilde who made the following sage observation: A thing is not necessarily true because a man dies for it. Washington with mischief on your mind, youll need to keep in mind this state law: A motorist with criminal intentions (must) stop at the city limits and telephone the chief of police as he (or she) is entering the town. Ill bet that one has been really effective in stopping crime. only 3 percent of all mammal species actually mate for life. average dream, it will last about 20 minutes. designed the Oscar statuette given to the recipients of the annual Academy Awards. Interestingly, Gibbons moved to Hollywood and worked for MGM as an art director and set designer, and his work earned him 11 of the Oscars that he himself designed. bats always turn to the left when exiting a cave. bears love honey -after all, popular culture is full of images of bears going after a hive. The bears do, in fact, eat the honey, but theyre really after the bees, their pupae and their larvae. plants that contain some form of cyanide. that the word obstreperous means noisy and difficult to control. You probably dont realize, though, that the noun most likely to follow the word obstreperous is teenager. But I doubt youll be surprised. Some editors are failed writers, but so THIS WEEK IN HISTORY strSTR A nN G eE BU tT trTR U eE thoTHO UG htHT F orOR theTHE DA yY DID YOU KNOW25 THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 2013 4. CARTOONS: Which animated superheros theme song contains the lyrics, TRIVI aA TES tT ANSWERS SpSP OR tT S QUIZ 1. In 2012, Jered Weaver became the seventh pitcher in Angels history to win at least 20 games in a season. Name four of the six others to do it. 2. Mike Schmidt is first on the list of most home runs hit during the decade of the 1980s (313). 3. When was the last time before 2012 that the Denver Broncos had a pair of 1,000-yard receiv Coach of the Year award. Name the first two. ANSWERS 1. Nolan Ryan (twice), Clyde Wright, Bartolo Colon, Dean Chance, Andy Messersmith and Bill Singer. 2. Dale Murphy, with 308. 3. Rod Smith (1,144 yards) and Ashley Lelie (1,084), in 2004. 4. Larry Brown (1988) and

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THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 201326 Read us online at IslandSunNews.com BUILDING CONTRACTOR COMPUTERS CONTRACTOR G I P M SR C D P D P CG D GrSince 2001, A Southwest Florida Paver Contractor www.gigicompanies.com 239-541-7282Schedule free estimates or visit our new show roomLic.# S3-12238 FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the bene ts of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY Florida Three Pepper Salad 1 red sweet pepper, cored and seeded 1 yellow sweet pepper, cored and seeded 1 orange sweet pepper, cored and seeded 1 small sweet onion, peeled 1/4 cup fresh parsley or fresh basil leaves, chopped Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 1 tablespoon rice vinegar 1 tablespoon sesame oil 1/4 cup crumbled feta cheese Slice sweet peppers into matchsticksize pieces and place in a large bowl. Slice onion into matchstick-size pieces and add to the bowl. Add parsley or basil. Sprinkle with coarse salt and pepper. Add rice vinegar and sesame oil, stirring to mix well. Cover and refrigerate approximately 1 hour before serving. To serve, toss salad again and sprinkle with crumbled feta cheese. Florida Three Pepper Salad

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27 THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 2013 answer on page 27 PUZZLE ANSWERS SUDOKU SCRAMBLERS FIND AT LEAST SIX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PANELS FISHING CHARTER Light Tackle Sport Fishing CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.com TREE & LAWN CARE Jesus Hernandez LANDSCAPING & TREE SERVICE 482-7350 We Service All your Landscape Needs FULL Landscaping SERVICES Over 20 years serving San-Cap & Ft. Myers CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY To advertise in The River Weekly NewsCall 415-7732

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THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 201328 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATETO PLACE AA CC LASSIFIED LL OG OO N tT O: IslandSunNews.com CLICK ON PLACE CLASSIFIED ISABELLA RASiIHAPPY TO HELP Y YOUWithITH A ALL OOF Y YOUrRREAL EEStT At TE NEEDS! R SS 1/4 NCNC T FNFN 1101 Periwinkle Way #105 SS anibel, F LL 33957 ISABELLA RASiI (239) 246-4716E ISABELLARASi I@AOL.COM SS CARNATO LL A wW N SS ERVICELawn Service, Shrubs and Tree Trimming Weeding, Installation of Plants, Trees and Mulch (one month free service available) Joe Scarnato (239) 849-6163 scarnatolawn@aol.comR SS 1/25 BM T FNFN JIM BECKER AND SS ONSSpruce up your lawn !! No job to big/small Landscape packages/ irrigation systems Free estimates 239-340-0515 NSNS 8/9 CCCC 8/16 SOD AND LANDSCA pP INGHELLES CC LEANING SS ERVICESResidential Cleaning to Satisfaction NSNS 1/4 P CC T FNFN P AINTINGAINTING GOATGOAT Professional Painting & Home Maintenance Free Estimates Fully Insured www.paintinggoat.com R SS 4/19 CCCC T FNFN II sland VV acationsOf Sanibel & CaptivaMillion $ Views Await You! Cottages Condos Homes Miles of Beaches & Bike Paths239-472-72771-888-451-7277R SS 1/4 BM T FNFN VACATION RENTAL LIGLIG H TT H OO U SESE REALTREALT YPaul J. Morris, Broker VACATION RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT & SALES 359 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel Island 239-579-0511RS 1/4 CCCC TF NN RR ENTAL WANTED AA NN uU AL RR ENTAL WANTEDSingle 52 year old male gainfully employed non-smoking, no pets, no children, good credit. Looking for moderately priced 1B/1B or bigger rental. Sept. or later to occupy. Call Todd at 262-455-5860. NSNS 6/28 CCCC T FNFN SERVICES O ffFF ERED CC OM pP ANION SS ERVICE Sanibel-Captiva Care and Companion Service, LLC Medical appointments, general transportation, shopping, light meal preparations, and light cleaning. Our services are customized to meet our clients needs. Call 239-395-3591, or R SS 1/4 BM T FNFN SANISANI B ELEL H OMEOME W ATCATC HRetired Police Captain Lives on Sanibel Will Check Your Home Weekly Very Reasonable Rates R SS 1/4 BM T FNFN ROGERROGER NODRNODR UFF ELECTRICELECTRIC Aqualink Motor Controls. R SS 6/7 CCCC T FNFN HOME/ CONDOCONDO WATC hH CONCIERGE SERVICESDorado Property Management Full Range of Services Island Resident Licensed & Insured RS 1/4 BM TFN DD R uU M TT EAC hH ERAll Styles Rock Jazz Latin Reading Rudiments and more. Years of playing and teaching experience Full teaching studios in home off McGregor. 1st lesson FREE! NSNS 8/9 CCCC 8/23 HO uU SEKEE pP ER GG IRL FRIDA yY Experienced Housekeeper. Excellent References, Reliable, I will also help with light cooking and errands. Call Heather (239) 826-1045 Sanibel & Lee Co. License NSNS 8/16 CCCC 8/16 MOMO B ILEILE H OMEOME P ERIERI W INKLEINKLE P ARKARK $115,000. 60 x 12 w/ metal roof-over plus 20 x 12 Florida room. Master BR has queen size bed & blt-in dresser & dbl closet. Master bath has combo bath/ shower & dbl sink vanity w/extra storage. Guest BR has dbl closet + blt-in drawers & private bath w/ shower. Eat-in-kit is open to LR which from K to FL room. Private 12 x 12 deck, picnic table and storage shed. One car carport with adjacent 2nd parking space. room & bathrooms. Carpeting in both bedrooms & LR. Home recently inspected & has all required tiedowns. New central air & heat system & stacked washer/dryer, all appliances louvered blinds throughout. Purchase completely furnished including all linens, dishes, pots & pans, tableware, 2 sleeper couches, recliner, 2 dining tables & chairs, 4 outdoor chairs & folding beach chairs, etc. email LMSrealtor@aol.com for further information or to make offer. R SS 8/9 CCCC 8/9 REAL ESTATE CC ONDO fF OR SS ALE MILLIONMILLION DOLLARDOLLAR VIEVIE W ONON TT H EE W ATERATER Why pay Sanibel prices when right across the bridge on San Carlos Bay looking over at the island is Punta Rassa, a peninsula with gorgeous views every direction you look. This 2 bedroom 2 bath condo has tile in living areas and master bedroom, open cabinets, hurricane shutters on lanai and views. Priced at $335,000 and buyer will give $10,000 credit for anything buyer wants to add to unit. Call Karen Wojnar, NSNS 8/16 CCCC 8/16 VOLVOL U NTEERNTEER OO PP ORTORT U NITNIT YThe Sunshine Ambassador Program is a new and exciting volunteer opportunity offered at the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida located within HealthPark Medical Center. The Sunshine Ambassadors will greet, assist and be a families and visitors entering the hospital. The Ambassadors also make a difference to families by providing educational and healthful resources to assist in GRANDparenting for GRANDchildren. We are currently seeking year-round volunteers to work one 4-hour shift Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm or 12:00pm to 4:00 pm. If you would be interested in learning more about this wonderful new opportunity, please contact Lisa Ellinwood, Volunteer Resources Coordinator at 239-343-5062 at the Golisano Childrens Hospital. NSNS 2/8 CCCC T FNFN hH EL pP wW ANTEDED Para 6hrs. Tolls Paid NSNS 8/9 NCNC T FNFN TT H ERAERA PY TECTEC H NICIANNICIAN / OO FF ICEICE ASSISTANTASSISTANT needed for physical therapy clinic on Periwinkle Way. Must have excellent communication and multi-tasking skills, Windows. Experience in medical or therapy part-time off-season, Mon-Fri. Please e-mail resume/cover letter to rachel@islandtherapycenter.com, or bring to 2242 Periwinkle Way, Suite 2. NSNS 8/16 CCCC 8/16 hH EL pP wW ANTEDQU IETIET SANISANI B ELEL H OMEOME W/P RIVATERIVA TE B EACEAC H P ATAT H3200 sq ft home in Gulf Pines, one of Sanibels most beautiful & sought after communities. One house from beach w/private beach path. Short walk to Gulf Pines 2 swimming pools & tennis courts; large landscaped lot provides privacy. 3-4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, large open living area, screened porch & several decks. W/D, 2nd fridge, Elevator, 2-car garage. $4,000/mo. + util. Annual rental only. Unfurnished. Landscaping & association fees paid by owner. Avail Oct 2013. NSNS 5/31 CCCC T FNFN ANN uU AL RENTAL DIRECTLDIRECTL Y ACROSSACROSS F ROMROM B EACEAC H custom wood staircase, All High End appliances, separate bar, full custom large 3 car garage. A rare offering @ $3,500/mo. CANALCANAL & DOCKDOCK Five Minutes to Sanibel Toll-Booth!! This UF ground level updated home of fers 3 BR/2 BA + family room, double garage, screened in pool, 65 boat dock, + boat lift for boat. $2,800/mo. 472-6747 GG ulf Beach Properties, II nc. Paul H. Zimmerman, Broker/Ownersanibelannualrentals.com R SS 7/26 BM T FNFN ANN uU AL RENTALS SS ANI bB EL fF ORT M yY ERSFOR RR ENTCommunity Housing & Resources (CHR) has apartments for rent to individuals who work full time on Sanibel. Rent based on income. R SS 3/15 CCCC 8/30 RERE / MAMA X OO F TT H EE ISLANDSISLANDS Putting owners and tenants together Call Dustyn Corace www.remax-oftheislands.com R SS 1/4 BM T FNFN

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29 THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 2013 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS PETSFR EEEE KI TTETTE N TT O GOOD HOM EE Free kitten to good, safe home. No de-clawing. Fiesty Bengal mix. Call 472-1788 after 5 p.m.NS 5/31 NC TFN WA nN TE dD T oO BUYC ASAS H PAPA ID FOR MILI TATA R YY I TETE M SS Cash Paid For Old Military Items. Medals, Swords, Uniforms, helmets, old guns, awards & more. Local Toll Free 1-866-440-3280RS 6/7 CC 8/30 C AA R forFOR SA lL E2007 BB U ickICK LAC roRO SSE CLX16,500 miles, beige color, 4 door, all power, seldom driven off island, $14,000. Call Ken at 472-2012.RS 7/12 NC TFN B oO ATS cC A noNO ES kK AYA kK SD ockOCK A gG EHourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-5800RS 1/4 NC TFN 22-F ooOO T G lL A ciCI E rR BB AY CATA mM A rR A nN In good condition. Needs some detailing and a high pressure fuel pump. $9,000 or best offer. The boat was donated to the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) for quick sale. Contact James Robinson at CROW at (239) 472-3644, ext. 221 or development@ crowclinig.org. Or contact Peg Albert at (239) 472-3644, ext. 232 or peg@ crowclinic.org. RS 7/26 NC TFN hH E lL P WA nN TE dD VOL UU N TEETEE R SS N EEEE D EE DAt The Sanibel School Call Michelle Wesley 239-910-8000RS 1/4 NC TFN VOL UU N TEETEE R SS N EEEE D EE DVolunteers needed for the After School Program which runs Mon.-Th, 2:30 3:15 pm call Linda Reynolds 472-1617RS 1/4 NC TFN SS E rvRV E rR S AA SS iI STA nN T SS E rvRV E rR S L inIN E cookCOOK IL Tesoro Ristorante, 751 tarpon Bay Rd. Sanibel Now hiring; Servers, Assistant Servers and Line cook Email resumes to: applications between 11-2 daily.NS 1/18 NC TFN 3883 Sanibel Captiva Road, Sanibel, Fl Phone: 239-472-3644, ext 1 Fax: 239-472-2334 www.crowclinic.orgH EE L PP USUS PP L EASEEASE !!We need volunteers for: Clinic emergency patient admissions desk and baby animal feeders Visitor education center greeters and gift shop cashiers CROW (239) 472-3644, ext. 231 or volunteers@crowclinic.orgRS 1/4 NC TFN loLO STLost Ladies Watch Make: Brighton Area of Mucky Duck on Captiva Island Lost on Dec. 10, 2012 around noon If found call: 941-639-5395RS 1/4 NC TFN F oO U ndND Prescription sunglasses found in parking lot of Limetree Center on Wednesday, February 27. Claim at Island Sun newspaper, suite 2 in Limetree Center, or call 395-1213.NS 3/8 NC TFN loLO ST A ndND foFO U ndNDTT OOL BB OX WASWAS H ESES UPUP ON SASA NI BEBE LThis tool box with motor parts washed up on shore Saturday morning, May 8 about 8:30 on the beach at Sundial Resort on Sanibel Island. To claim call Sundial Resort Security 239-472-4151.NS 6/14 CC TFN AA DIROND AA CK CH AA IR SS Lost 2 large recycled plastic adirondack chairs. The chairs are blue and were last offered. Call Ed at 239/579-0598.NS 8/16 NC 8/16 loLO ST A ndND foFO U ndND RR ead us online at II sland SS unNews.com TT o advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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If you would like your club/organization listed in The River Calling Card, phone 415-7732Emergency ......................................................................................... 911 Lee County Sheriffs Of ce ........................................................ 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol ................................................................ 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol .............................................................. 278-7100 Poison Control ................................................................ 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center .......................................1-800-936-5321Ft. Myers Chamber of Commerce ............................................. 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare .............................................. 425-2685 Ft. Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce .................................. 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library ......................................................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library ............................................................ 533-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce .......................................... 931-0931 Post Of ce ..................................................................... 1-800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau ..................................................... 338-3500 ARTS Alliance for the Arts .................................................................. 939-2787 Art of the Olympians Museum & Gallery ................................... 332-5055 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio .................................................. 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers ......................................................... 275-3970 Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall ...................................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS ................................................................................ 395-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre ............................................... 278-4422 Cultural Park Theatre ................................................................ 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light ............................................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade .................................. 332-4488 Florida West Arts ...................................................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers ....................................... 472-0168 Gulf Coast Symphony ............................................................... 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres ..................................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic ........................................................... 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater ......................................................... 472-6862 S.W. Florida Symphony ............................................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy .................................................................. 936-3239 Young Artists Awards ................................................................ 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAngel Flight ................................................................ 1-877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center ............................................................... 731-3535 American Business Women Association ................................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL ..................................................................... 339-8046 Audubon Society ....................................................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR .................................................. 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society ................................................... 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus ................................. 1-855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club ............................................................ 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees ....................................................... 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists ............................................................ 415-2484 Ft Myers UDC Chapter 2614 (United Daughters of the Confederacy .................................. 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL ...................................................... 561-9164 The Horticulture and Tea Society ............................................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society ................................................................. 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society ............................................. 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation ........................................... 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees ............. 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America .......................................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL .................................................... 667-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans .................................................. 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy ........................................ 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association ........................................ 561-2118 Kiwanis Clubs: Fort Myers Beach ................................................. 765-4254 or 454-8090 Fort Myers Edison ..................................................................... 694-1056 Fort Myers South ...................................................................... 691-1405 Gateway to the Islands .............................................................. 415-3100 Iona-McGregor .......................................................................... 482-0869Lions Clubs:Fort Myers Beach ...................................................................... 463-9738 Fort Myers High Noon ............................................................... 466-4228 Estero/South Fort Myers ........................................................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County .............................................. 768-0417 POLO Club of Lee County ......................................................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers ......................................................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society ................................................ 472-6940 United Way of Lee County ........................................................ 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) ................................. 211 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews Shell Museum ................................................ 395-2233 Burroughs Home ...................................................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium ........................................ 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates ................................................... 334-3614 Fort Myers Skate Park .............................................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium ............................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge ................................ 472-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site .............................................. 239-992-0311 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center ....................... 765-8101 Skatium ...................................................................................... 321-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society ........................................ 939-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History ...................................... 321-7430 True Tours ................................................................................. 945-0405 SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 27THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 201330 Pets Of The Week Hi, my name is Styles and Im a two-yearold American Staffordshire terrier. Im handsome, reserved, patient, loyal and intelligent. I guess you could call me the strong silent type. You will fall in love with me within minutes. My adoption fee is $25 (regularly $75) during Animal Services Theres No Place Like Home adoption promotion. For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to Animal Services website at www.LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive, Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office, off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if three months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs six months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee, and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500. Styles ID# 566341 photos by squaredogphoto.com

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BEACH CHAIR PASTIMEAnswers on page 2531 THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 2013

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NOW OPEN! NOW OPEN! Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! 239-463-5505 | 1249 Estero Blvd. Live Music Wed-Sun! Happy Hour Mon-Fri 2-5pmTheBeachedWhale.com Ft. Myers BEach: Sept 18th : Sept 18th Book Signing Event!Meet The Author!Details Online12-2pm & 4-6pmSanibel : Sept 1ST & 2ND Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! THE RIVER AUGUST 16, 201332