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River weekly news ( July 12, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101363/00150

Material Information

Title: River weekly news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication: Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 08-09-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101363:00188

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101363/00150

Material Information

Title: River weekly news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication: Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 08-09-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101363:00188


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FREETake Me Home VOL. 12, NO. 31 AUGUST 9, 2013From the Beaches to the River District downtown Fort MyersRead Us Online at IslandSunNews.com Submarine Veterans Memorial: Part I of II From Dream T o Realityby Jeff LysiakWhen local members of the United States Submarine Veterans decided to restore the damaged memorial marker located adjacent to the Southwest Florida Vietnam Veterans Memorial at the intersection of Colonial and McGregor boulevards in Fort Myers they called upon one of the worlds most respected and talented artisans to perform some of the work on the new and improved monument. Sanibel sculptor Lucas Century, whose work on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall in Washington, DC gained him international acclaim, will etch the name of the 65 submarines lost in the line of duty, along with the United States Submarine Veterans logo and creed, on three black granite slabs. The brass plate on the original memorial had been destroyed by acid rain and tree sap, said Ken Jordan, a member of the local United States Submarine Veterans chapter, who collected $4,090 to erect a new monument. Donations came from friends, relatives, neighbors, local businesses, members of the American Legion and Elks Club of Cape Coral Post #2596. Members of the United States Submarine Veterans comprised of some 162 chapters across the country are active, retired, reserve or honorably discharged veterans of the elite fighting force of the continued on page 24 Ken Jordan and John Troia with the United States Submarine Veterans creed, which will be etched in black granite by Sanibel sculptor Luc CenturyEdison & Ford Winter Estates Programs And EventsAugust at the Edison & Ford Winter Estates is highlighted with the new Henry Ford Exhibit open in the Edison Ford Museum; Garden Talk and tour of the new Clara Ford Rose Garden; registration for Emerging Inventors; and Volunteer Meeting with author Carlene Brennen; as well as a variety of other special programs and activities throughout the month. The August schedule of programs and events includes: Growing Roses in Southwest Florida, August 10, 9 a.m. Mrs. Edison and Mrs. Ford both had a love for many flowers, but roses were among their favor ites. Tour the new Clara Bryant Ford Rose Garden at the Ford estate and the heirloom rose collection at the Edison estate with Historic Garden Manager Steve Hottovy and learn which varieties of roses grow best in Southwest Florida, as well as tips on planting, pruning and fertilizing. Edison Ford members are free; non-members are $5. Edison Ford Shoppe at Bell Tower Shoppes. In 1916, Thomas Edison said, The tar pon has put Fort Myers on the map as a fishing resort with the biggest sportsmen in the country. Edison enjoyed tarpon fishing when visiting his winter estate. Join Edison Ford Site Historian John Telischak and author Carlene Brennen, The Birth of Big Game Fishing, who will discuss the history of tarpon fishing in Southwest Florida, and Edisons 7419. The meeting is open to Edison Ford volunteers and potential volunteers. continued on page 6 Clara Bryant Ford Rose Garden Henry Ford Exhibit

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THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 20132 Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: V iew From G wynne, 1917by G erri R eaves, PhDNinety-six years ago, students filed out of the eastern side door of the Gwynne Institute at Second and Jackson to confront a much more open landscape than they would today. The 1917 photo meant to capture a moment in the lives of young people inadvertently captured a view that would not last for long. At that moment in history, Fort Myers was exchanging its identity as a pioneer settlement for that of a city on the verge of a boom that would peak in the late 1920s. Only six years before, the Florida State Legislature had incorporated Fort Myers as a city (versus the previous designation of town). And, very appropriately, the Gwynne Institute the countys first modern school also opened in 1911. Despite the progressiveness of the 19-teens, this historic photo mostly reflects Fort Myers pioneer past. Just across the street from Gwynne (photos left) is the Christian H. CH and Caroline E. Carrie Funck house. CH Funck had come to Fort Myers via Punta Rassa in December 1876. He was one of the fathers of Fort Myers, having been among the 45 electors who voted to incorporate the town on August 12, 1885. On the west side of the Funcks two-story house, mid-block (not visible in the photo) stood a bakery. The family was in the bakery business for almost half a century. Imagine how difficult it must have been for students to concentrate on their studies, as the smell of baking bread floated through the open windows at Gwynne. Only several years after the photo was taken, the Funcks moved and the bakery had become a cigar factory. The bakery was demolished just a few years after that, and by the late 1920s, new commercial buildings occupied half of the block on the Hendry Street end. Right-center in the photo and in the mid-distance is the two-story Rocco Pavese house situated on the east side of Jackson Street. That structure, later known as the Pavese-Hendry house, also harkens to the towns pioneer days. The 1920s also brought a filling station to the northeast corner of Jackson and Second, diagonally across from the Gwynne Institute. That harbinger of the automobile age has come and gone in the interval between the then and now photos a testament to just how quickly urban landscapes change. Only the stations foundation remains today, overarched by a once magnificent but now over-pruned live oak. The most notable change in the view from Gwynne in 1917, though, is the loss of the open sky and the residential feel of that corner of town. The large oak trees on the Gwynne grounds provide welcome shade, but the view down Jackson toward the river has closed in over the decades. The multi-story, city-owned parking garage now spans Jackson from Second all the way to Main Street, occupying the former site of the Funck house. However, two structures still tie the scene to early Fort Myers. The Pavese house, now a law firm, reminds us of a time when Jackson Street was facing more change that anyone could have foretold. And, the Gwynne Institute itself, now more than a century old and still in use, shows us that well-built structures endure and adapt to whatever is required of them. Walk down Second and Jackson and imagine what Gwynne students saw when they walked out of the east exit in 1917. Then take the short walk south to the Southwest Florida Museum of History, where you can learn more about the changes that the 19-teens brought to Fort Myers. For information, call 321-7430 or go to www.museumofhistory.org. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Then be sure to check out the favorite research center of local history buffs the Southwest Florida Historical Society, where you can see photos of the many students who studied at the towns first modern school. The all-volunteer non-profit organization is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Drop by on Wednesday or Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon, or call them at 939-4044. Sources: Archives of the Southwest Florida Historical Society and rootsweb. ancestry.com/~flswphs. The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, please call (239) 415-7732 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, FL 33901. Fax number: (239) 415-7702. E-mail: press@riverweekly.com. The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Co-Publishers Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Isabel Rasi Office Coordinator Graphic Arts/ProductionAnn Ziehl Photographer Michael Heider Writers Anne Mitchell Jeff Lysiak PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Contributing WritersRead Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com Click on The River Ed Frank Max Friedersdorf Tom Hall Todays northward view from Gwynne photo by Gerri Reaves When this photo was taken in 1917 at the Gwynne Institute, grades up to the sixth were taught there. Here, students exit the east doorway courtesy of the Southwest Florida Historical Society (Genevieve Smith Bowen Collection)

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3 THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 2013 Fort Myers Public Art: OPT Artist Brings Transference To Davis Art CenterTransference opened with a stylish reception at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center during Fort Myers Art Walk. In the ground-breaking solo exhibition of her vibrant and captivating paintings and sculpture, abstract artist Veron Ennis transformed the Davis Art Centers Grand Atrium into a haven of aesthetics. Enniss non-objective paintings and her abstracted cityscapes are saturated with bold modern colors and composed of countless interlacing layers. Her signature cube sculptures are free-standing constructions made of six paintings hinged together to close into a cube. They have the unique ability to unlock and hang in an open state on the wall. Both forms will be exhibited during Transference. Founder of the art movement OPT (Open Positive Transference), Ennis promotes and exhibits art that has the intention of transferring to viewers a positive and uplifting feeling, one of hope and balance. Also a founding member of MAMA (Movement of Aleatoric Modern Artists), part of Ennis technique depends on the chance application of her medium. Falling in and out of control of the work energizes the composition and pushes compositional boundaries, says Ennis. On Tuesday, August 13 at 6 p.m. and Wednesday, August 14 at 11 a.m., Ennis will give private walking tours of the exhibition, discuss the OPT Art Movement, and guide an open discussion on interpreting art and the effects art has on the viewer. Tickets for the lecture forums are $10 per person. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in the heart of the downtown Fort Myers River District. For more information, call 3331933 or visit www. sbdac.com. An arts advocate, Tom Hall guides weekly walking tours of the River Districts public art collection in Fort Myers. For more information, go to www.truetours. net. OPT founder and abstract artist Veron Ennis at an OPT exhibition in the Mercato earlier this year 33 Patio DeLeon, Downtown Fort Myers (239) 337-3377OPEN Tues-ur 11am-10pm, Fri 11am-11pm, Sat 3-11pm Closed Sun & Mon Lazy Flamingo, Inc. 6520-C Pine Avenue Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-5353 Lazy Flamingo 3, Inc. 16501 Stringfellow Rd Bokeelia, FL 33922 239-283-5959 Lazy Flamingo 2, Inc. 1036 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-6939 Lazy Flamingo 4, Inc. 12951 McGregor Blvd. Ft. Myers, FL 33919 239-476-9000 Four Great Locations! If Our Seafood Were Any Fresher, We Would Be Serving It Under Water! NOW SERVING FULL LIQUOR IN FORT MYERS Bring in This Coupon for $ 5 OFFPurchase of $30 or moreF M

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THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 20134 Calendar G irls PerformThe Calendar Girls performed at Pirate Fest in Punta Gorda on Saturday, July 27. The highlight of the performance was the introduction of Halo, the Calendar Girls 10th sponsored puppy for the Paws for Patriots Program of Southeastern Guide Dogs. Visit www.guidedogs.org. Since 2006, the Calendar Girls have been sponsoring what they like to call miracles with tails, and thanks to the generosity of Southwest Floridians, they have been able to name/sponsor 11 puppies. For more information about the Calendar Girls, visit www.calendargirlsflorida.com or call 850-6010. The Calendar Girls in Punta Gorda photo by Ron Cox rf ntbnrr bb bb rtttn Loved this restaurant. Fantastic experience. Food was exceptionally amazing. Service was outstanding. TripAdvisor Member, May 2013 Cattle Barons Ball R eturning I n 2014The American Cancer Society announced that for the second year in a row its signature fundraising event, the Wild West-themed Cattle Barons Ball, will be held at Harborside Event Center in the downtown River District. The gala will take place on January 18, 2014. The city and its team at Harborside provided us a spectacular venue for our 10th anniversary ball last season, said Todd Gates, president of Gates Construction, who is chairing the 2014 event with his wife, Angela. Were looking forward to working with them again to provide some new and exciting features to the event and transform the space into the imaginative environment that our supporters love. The Cattle Barons Ball is famous for its over-the-top western dcor and generous denim-clad sponsors. Next years event promises to be bigger than ever, featuring a night of unique cowboy-themed games, silent and live auctions, exquisite desserts and some special surprises. Ruths Chris Steakhouse will be back to provide a gourmet meal, and One Night Rodeo will once again entertain with their award-winning, bootstomping country music. The Harborside team is thrilled to be hosting the event again, said venue assistant general manager Andrew Thompson. We really enjoy being partners with the American Cancer Society for this event, because so much of what is raised goes back into the community. Were going to have a great time working together to make next years ball the best one yet. The Cattle Barons Ball is the signature fundraising event for the American Cancer Society of Lee County. Now in its 11th year, the event has raised more than $3.7 million for support services, research and education. Anyone interested in learning more or volunteering to help with the 2014 Cattle Barons Ball can contact the American Cancer Society at www.cancer.org or call Beth Hayes at 936-1113 ext. 3909. Forrest Banks H onored With 2013 H ome R ule H ero AwardThe Florida League of Cities has recognized City Councilman Forrest Banks with a 2013 Home Rule Hero Award. This prestigious award was presented to Banks for his tireless efforts to advance the leagues legislative agenda and help protect the home rule powers of Floridas cities during the 2013 legislative session. Home Rule Hero Award recipients are local government officials both elected and nonelected who consistently responded to the leagues request to reach out to members of the legislature and help give a local perspective to an issue. Councilman Banks embodies the definition of a Home Rule Hero. He is extremely dedicated and works hard for the citizens of Fort Myers, said Florida League of Cities Legislative Director Scott Dudley. He brings that same level of commitment and energy to helping the Florida League of Cities lobbying team and is always ready and willing to contact legislators and help advocate in support of home rule. Councilman Banks has and always will be a valuable asset to his city and the state of Florida, Dudley concluded. Councilman Banks was first elected as the Ward 5 City Council member in 2009 and was recently re-elected with no opposition. Strong home rule powers ensure government stays close to the people it serves, said Councilman Banks. Thats why I have been, and will continue to be, an advocate for the League to help eliminate unfunded mandates and preemptions, and protect cities right to home rule powers. LeeWay T ransponders Now Accepted I n North CarolinaAs part of Lee Countys interoperability with our Florida Toll Agency partners, LeeWay transponders are now accepted on North Carolina Toll Roads. Motorists from Florida and North Carolina are now able to travel toll roads in each state using their, LeeWay, E-PASS, Quick Pass or SunPass transponder to pay for tolls electronically. As of Tuesday, the electronic toll systems in Florida and North Carolina are functioning as one, providing seamless operations for motorists who pay their tolls electronically. Any toll road in Florida that accepts LeeWay, E-PASS or SunPass will now accept all Quick Pass transponders. Quick Pass motorists traveling in Florida will need to utilize the clearly marked, dedicated LeeWay, E-PASS or SunPass lanes located throughout Floridas toll road system. Conversely, all LeeWay, E-PASS or SunPass transponders will be accepted on North Carolinas Triangle Expressway located in the Research Triangle Park Region of North Carolina. The Triangle Expressway is an all-electronic system. This agreement marks the first of what promises to be many interoperable arrangements with other states in the region. LeeWay customers interested in finding out more information about LeeWay can call at 533-9297, visit www.LeeWayinfo.com or stop by the service center at 1366 Colonial Blvd. in Fort Myers.

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5 THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 2013 New Play Contest Winner Announcedby Di SaggauTheatre Conspiracys New Play Contest Fundraiser, held on August 3, brought friends and fans to an evening of food, libations and the opportunity to cast a vote on what new play they would like to see in October. Producing Artistic Director Bill Taylor said they received 412 entries for their 15th New Play Contest, coming from the United States, Canada and England. A trusted group of theater devotees read through the entries narrowing them down to 50, then 20, then 10 and finally the top three. The three finalists were Distant Neighbors by Patrick Gabridge, All My Raisins In The Sun by John M. Twomey and Jane The Plain by August Schulenberg. Local actors did a reading of a few scenes from each play and at the end of the evening, the audience cast their votes. The winner drum roll, please was All My Raisins In The Sun. It deals with an eager new teacher who continued on page 16 Bill Taylor, Lauren Drexler and Patricia Clopton Orlando Evans with his daughter, Camryn Kyle Kitchens, Annie Wagner and Jamie Carmichael Rick and Lindsey Scheinert with Pam and Chester Blackford FREE MARINA DOCKAGE with Dock Attendants Assistance RIV Nellies Upstairs Waterside Bar Where its Happy Hour all the time!!! 10% OFF Offer valid with Cash payments only ... No credit cards. ONE COUPON PER TABLE Can not be used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, Expires Aug. 16, 2013 Snacks in Between11am-10pm Snacks in Between11am-10pmwww.nervousnellies.net

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THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 20136 Hortoons August Pet Adoption CampaignAgood home is critical for nearly 10,000 homeless animals that enter Lee County Domestic Animal Services shelter each year. It is especially true during the summer when intake increases by 150 animals per month. Consequently, during August the shelter will be offering deep discounts on pet adoptions with a campaign called Theres No Place Like Home. Adult dogs may be adopted for just $25 and all cats and kittens are only $10. Adopters can get a second cat or kitten at no charge. Our shelter is packed with dogs and cats that need loving, responsible homes, said Donna Ward, LCDAS Director. June through August is our most difficult time of year with our average monthly intake increasing by 20 percent. Theres No Place Like Home adoption fees still include over $500 worth of veterinary and other services such as: license for pets over 3 monthscontinued on page 24 From page 1Estates ProgramsShoppe at Bell Tower Shops. Join the Edison Ford Wild Wizard to learn how liquids turn into gases, and make your own polymer. Ford Museum. In celebration of the 150th birthday of Henry Ford, the Edison & Ford Winter Estates has opened a Fords contributions to the automotive industry including several of his 161 patents, a collection of historic photographs, as well as artifacts and Ford inventions. highlights Fords interest in the Edison the antique American quilts from the Ford collection as well as other items that reflect the interests of the Ford family. The Edison Ford Museum is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Open at Ford Estate. Clara Bryant Ford, the wife of Henry Ford for 59 years, had a passion and love for roses. In honor of Clara Ford, garden staff has created a small historic rose garden at the Fords Florida estate. The new rose garden features antique and heirloom roses of the 1920s era, adapted to the Southwest Florida climate. Funding for the Clara gift from Peggy Campbell, great niece of Clara Bryant Ford. Homeschool Open (grades K-6). The Edison Ford Wild Wizard returns with a new series of engineering and science hands-on classes that will engage students, as well as new hands-on history classes with Professor Pearce. All Edison Ford homeschool classes are based on Standards as well as Florida Common Core Science Standards. For a list of topics and dates visit the website at www. edisonfordwinterestates.org or call) 3347419. Cost for Edison Ford members is $10; non-members are $20; $10 for each additional child. Open. Edison Ford Emerging Inventors Early Learning Program for oneto three-year-old children and their parents, grandparents and other family members will begin in October and will be held on the first and third Thursday of each 9 to 10:30 a.m. The program includes socializing, education activities, story time, gardens and museum at the Edison & Ford Winter Estates. Each session will introduce science through activities and time to tend the Emerging Inventors Members is $5 (one adult; one child); Edison Ford non members are $15 (one adult; one child); each additional child is is required by calling the Edison Ford Education Department at 334-7419. The Edison Ford is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Downtown Fort Myers (Post Oce Arcade Next to Hotel Indigo) 1520 Broadway For Takeout & Delivery Tel: 334-6991 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEKMon-urs 11am 10pm Fri-Sat 11am 11pm Sun 12pm 9pm www. ichiban-sushi-chinese.com Open Monday Saturday www.threecraftyladies.com Find us on WE WILL PAY YOUR TOLL!!!Spend $55 and bring us your toll receipt for a full refund! To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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7 THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 2013 Rotary AwardFort Myers South Rotary announced that Gwendolyn Howard, owner of Gwendolyns Caf and Catering Company, was awarded the Rotary International 4 Way Test Award at their June 24 meeting, which took place at the Crown Plaza Bell Tower. This prestigious award recognizes individuals in the community who exemplify Rotary values in their personal and business lives. These recipients emphasize service above self and conduct their lives and business in line with the four tenets of the Rotary Club: Howard is the owner of Gwendolyns Caf and Catering Co. located on 2400 1st Street in downtown Fort Myers. She has been in the hospitality industry for over 25 years. She earned her degree in Hotel and Restaurant Management and has worked in every level of food service to planning and staging extravagant weddings at Florida resorts as an event planCaf in Fort Myers. In addition to her merits as a business owner, Howard also works to help others in her community by giving those who have made mistakes in the past a second chance. She often hires people in addiction recovery programs, those that other businesses may pass by, giving them an opportunity to get their lives back on track. She offers her caf to the recovery community after hours by holding recovery support meetings, as well as, community awareness and social events that offer those in addiction recovery a safe space.In addition to Gwendolyn Howard, this years recipient, the nominees included Way), an institute which offers individualized education and support for students with special needs; Christine Cobie, a counselor with ACT Abuse Counseling and Treatment, a facility offering services to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault; Kurt Maurillo, CFP, a financial advisor with Wells Fargo (12140 Carissa Commerce Court, Suite 100); and Brett Southwest Florida, a multi-office practice. Calusa Blueway Paddling FestivalThe Calusa Blueway Paddling Festival is set to return to Southwest Florida November 1, 2 and 3 with more vendors and sponsors, increased activities and returning partners. Among the new offerings: Festival sigfor the Rehabilitation of Wildlife) will be hosting a Saturday afternoon micro-brew tent with a local brewery and live music on the Sanibel Causeway. The festival offers festival attendees and paddlers the wildlife and the areas natural beauty. KayakTrader.com will be a dynamic new media sponsor this year. The Georgia-based company is encouraging paddling clubs and paddlers to attend the festival, and in some cases is offering to transport their boats here free. Cabot Cheese of Vermont will be donating samples of their award-winning cheddar cheese as well as distributing literature promoting health and wellness. Relay races will be held for SUPs and kayaks on Sunday, November 3, coordinated by the SWFL SUP Club. A new will allow festival participants to compete with their canines prior to the main relay races. Also returning will be the Coast to Coast Expedition Challenge, a race from the Sanibel Causeway to Miami. The race is among the many VIVA Florida 500 events planned for 2013 as Florida celebrates the 500th anniversary of Juan Ponce de Lens arrival here. For the third year, Residence Inn by Marriott Fort Myers-Sanibel will be the festival signature host hotel, offering paddler-specific amenities. San Carlos RV Resort will again participate as a campground partner after having recently completed large improvement projects on the grounds and marina. Periwinkle Place on Sanibel Island will participate in the festival for the first time as a campground partner, offering special rates to paddling guests who prefer to stay on the barrier island. The festival will welcome back several popular sponsors, including gold-level Kayak. Also returning are silver-level sponsors and local supporters Naples Kayak Company, Tarpon Bay Explorers, Florida Weekly and many others. Find festival and trail information on Facebook by searching Great Calusa Blueway or clicking on www. facebook.com/TheGreatCalusaBlueway. Watch for updates soon on www. CalusaBluewayPaddlingFestival.com. To the Calusa Blueway smart-phone app at the Google Play or iTunes store. Gwendolyn Howard We Proudly Brew Tropial Outdoor Patio Seating Get Crabby At The Cow Get Crabby At The Cow with our Famous Stone Crabs1/2 lb & Best Prices On The Planet Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Come Try our NEW Cowlicious Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials Sanibels Most Award Winning Restaurant LIVE Famous Stone Crabs Famous Stone Crabs Always Fresh ...Always! ...Always! with our with our Always Fresh ...Always Fun! Always Fresh ...Always Fun!

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THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 20138 Along T he R iverExplore the hidden world beneath the waves with Scubavice Diving Center in Fort Myers. Beginners can earn their Open Water Scuba certification with classroom instructions and sessions in the shops pool. Experienced divers can obtain Advanced Open Water, Nitrox and Rescue certifications. Instructor Ramiro Palma teaches all levels of diving to National Association of Underwater Instructors (NAUI) and Scubavice standards. Regular spiny lobster season is always August 6 through March 31. If you are booking a trip to the Florida Keys to catch your own, Scubavice carries quality gear for rental and purchase. If you prefer to dive with a group of people who are fun and experienced, reserve space on the dive centers next lobster trips to West Palm Beach: Sunday, August 11 and Sunday, August 18. Scubavice Diving Center is located at 12600 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers. Call 481-4733 or go to www.scubavicedivers.com. On Saturday, August 10, The Edison & Ford Winter Estates is hosting Garden Talk: Growing Roses in Southwest Florida at 9 a.m. Mrs. Edison and Mrs. Ford both had a love for many flowers, but roses were among their favorites. Tour the new Clara Bryant Ford Rose Garden at the estates and the heirloom rose collection with Historic Garden Manager Steve Hottovy. Learn which varieties of roses grow best in Southwest Florida and receive tips on planting, pruning and fertilizing. The lecture is free for Edison Ford members and $5 for non-members. The Edison & Ford Winter Estates are located at 2350 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers. Call 334-7419 or go to www.edisonfordwinterestates.org. On August 12, The Fort Myers Film Festivals popular Missed It Mondays: Best of the 2013 Film Festival is featured at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center. The award-winning film Radio Love, directed by Hideyuki Tokigawa, begins at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and admission is $6. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is at 2301 First Street, in the heart of downtown Fort Myers historic River District. Call 333-1933 or go to www.fortmyersfilmfestival.com for a schedule of films. Nervous Nellies Crazy Waterfront Eatery is Fort Myers Beachs liveliest beach party destination, offering food, drinks and live music daily from the areas premier talent. Just upstairs from Nellies is Uglys Waterside Bar, the place where everyone gets prettier. Theres happy hour all day, every day at Uglys. Nellies is a casual, family-fun restaurant that boasts a large selection of appetizers, fresh seafood, over-stuffed sandwiches and entres. The friendly staff will magically satisfy everyone with the best food and drink without breaking the bank. Call ahead to reserve a spot in air-conditioned comfort or outside on the expansive waterfront patio. While relaxing on the outdoor patio, swing to the beats of live reggae, rock and island music. Go to www.nervousnellies.net for a daily listing of live music along with upcoming special events. Whether you arrive by land or sea, parking for patrons of Nellies and Uglys is free. If you are traveling by boat, marine dockage is available at the Snug Harbour Marina with dock attendants assistance. The GPS coordinates are 26.41 N 81.18 W. Nervous Nellies Crazy Waterfront Eatery is located at 1131 First Street, Fort Myers Beach in the historic Baywalk district. It is open for lunch, dinner and snacks in between. Call 463-8077. Its For The DOGS!The LEE COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY needs clean towels, sheets, blankets, beach towels, anything & everything that you are no longer using.These are for the dogs cages at The Lee County Humane Society. If you are cleaning out your closets, redesigning your bathroom or bedroom please donate your old things to the dogs that are now sleeping on cement oors! These Little Guys Need Your Help!Drop Off Point: PUBLIX at Sanibel Beach Place 20321 Summerlin Road, Fort Myers, FLConvenient to everyone on Sanibel ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President General Manager Personal Lines Agent 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Paradise. Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. We are HERE for all your insurance needs Florida lobster season is here! Catch your own on a dive trip with Scubavice Diving Center Stormy, stormy night at Uglys Waterside Bar above Nervous Nellies Please visit our River Weekly News online advertisers at www.islandsunnews.com. You can click through to their Web sites for more information about real estate, shopping, restaurants and services. Just click on the logos surrounding the front page.

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9 THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 2013

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Churches/TemplesALL F aA ITHS UNIT aA RI aA N CONGREG aA TION (UU A) Where diversity is treasured 2756 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers Summer program: Understanding the Faiths of Our Worlds June 2 to August 25 11 a.m. Interim Minister, Rev. Margaret Beard, begins on September 1 239-226-0900. www.allfaiths-uc.org A LLLL SS A INTSINTS BYZA NTINENTINE RITERITE CA THOLITHOLI C C HH U RR C HH 10291 Bayshore Rd., N. Fort Myers Divine Liturgy is on Sun. at 10:30 a.m.; Rosary begins at 10 a.m. Lenten services (Presanctied Liturgy) will be on Wed. evenings at 6 p.m. starting on Feb. 22. Administrator is Very Rev. Peter Lickman, ph. 305-651-0991. We are a Church of the Eastern Catholic or Byzantine Rite, 1.5 mi. east of Int. 75. A NNNN U NN C II A TIONTION GREEGREE K ORTHOORTHO D OO X C HH U RR C HH 8210 Cypress Lake Dr ive, Fort Myers Reverend Fr. George P. Savas Orthros Service Sunday 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy Sunday 10 a.m. www.annunciation.fl.goarch.org 239-481-2099 B ETHETH SHILOHSHILOH M ESSIESSI A NINI C SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 15675 McGregor Boulev ard, 437-3171 Rabbi: Judah Hungerman Friday Service, 8 p.m., Saturday Service, 11 a.m. Shabbat School Saturday Morning, Adult Hebrew Classes. Call for information on full program. B RERE AD OO F LILI F EE M INISTRIESINISTRIES C HH U RR C HH OO F GOGO D 16581 McGregor Boule vard, 267-3166 Just past the Tanger Outlet Mall Pastor: Barry Lentz, 281-3063 Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. C HH AP ELEL OO F CYP RESSRESS C OO V EE 10200 Cypress Cov e Circle Fort Myers 239-850-3943, Located at Cypress Cove Retirement Center on HealthPark Campus An ecumenical non-denominational community of believers. Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. Reverendt Ted Althouse, Pastor revtedalthouse@aol.com C HH U RR C HH OO F THETHE C ROSSR OSS 13500 Freshman Lane; 768-2188 Pastor: Bud Stephens; A nondemonimational church emphasizing a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Sunday Service: 9:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 Contemporary. CO vV EN aA NT PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937 Rev. Dr. Jeffrey DeYoe, Senior Pastor Reverend David Dietzel, Pastor Emeritus. Traditional Sunday service 10 a.m. Nursery available C ypYP RESS LakLAK E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H 8400 Cypress Lak e Drive, Fort Myers, 481-5442 Randy A. Alston, Reverend. Sunday Services: Bible study, 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship, 11 a.m., Evening Worship, 7 p.m., Wednesday Prayer Meeting, 6:30 p.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 481-3233. www.clpc.us. Clint Cottrell, pastor Prayer Service 8 a.m., Praise 9 a.m., Childrens Church 9 a.m., Traditional 11 a.m. Summer: Prayer Service 8 a.m. Combined Traditional/Praise 10 a.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E UNITE dD METHO dD IST CH uU R cC H 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 482-1250 8 and 11 a.m. Sunday Traditional Service 9:30 a.m. Praise Service Sunday School all times F aA ITH FELLOWSHI pP W ORL dD O uU TRE acA C H mM INISTRIES 6111 South P ointe Boulevard, Fort Myers, 278-3638. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Voice of Faith, WCRN 13.50 AM Radio, Sunday, 1:30 p.m.; Thursday Service, 7:30 p.m.; Friday Youth Service, 7:30 p.m. Nursery care for pre-school children and Childrens Church for ages 5-12 available at each service. F aA ITH uU NITE dD mM ETHO dD IST cC H uU R cC H 15690 McGregor Boule vard Fort Myers, 482-2030 Pastor: David Stauffer. Traditional services 8:45 a.m.; Contemporary, 10:30 a.m. Go south on McGregor Boulevard. The church is mile past the intersection of Gladiolus and San Carlos Boulevard on the way to Sanibel. FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF cC HRIST S cC IENTIST 2390 West First Street, next door to Edison Estates. Sunday Morning Service and Sunday School, 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday Evening Testimony Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Child care provided at all services. Visit our Reading Room for quiet study at: 2281 First Street, River District. www.time4thinkers.com, www.christiansciencefortmyers.com, www.christianscience.com FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF THE NazaNAZA RENE 13545 Amer ican Colony Boulevard off Daniels Parkway in the Colony, Fort Myers, 936-2511 Pastor: Reverend Joey Brummett Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Family Night, 7 p.m. F IRSTIRST U NITENITE D M ETHOETHO D ISTIST C HH U RR C HH in the Downto wn Fort Myers River District 2466 First Street, Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-332-1152, www.fumcftmyers.org Sunday: 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 5 p.m. Youth Program FORT M yY ERS CHRISTI aA N CH uU R cC H (DIS cC I pP LES O fF CHRIST) A SS TE pP HEN MINISTRIES CONGREG aA TION 5916 Winkler Road, F ort Myers, 437-4330 Reverend Mark Condrey, Pastor Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Church School: 9:15 a.m. FORT M yY ERS CONGREG aA TION aA L UNITE dD CH uU R cC H O fF CHRIST : 8210 College Parkway, Fort Myers, 482-3133. Philip White, pastor Morning Worship: 10 a.m. Church School: 10:15 a.m. Adult Forum: 11:30 a.m. HOLHOL Y THEOTOTHEO TO K OSOS M ONON A STERSTER Y 111 Ev ergreen Road, North Fort Myers, 997-2846 Eastern Orthodox mens monastery. Liturgical services conducted in the English, Greek and Church Slavonic languages, following the Julian (Old) Calendar. Liturgical Services: Sundays and Holy Days: The Third and Sixth Hours at 8:30 a.m.; Divine Liturgy at 9 a.m. II ON aA HH O pP E EpEP IS cC O paP A L cC ONGREG aA TION 9650 Gladiolus Dr ive, Fort Myers 4544778 The Reverend Dr. John S. Adler, pastor. Weekly services: Saturday 5 p.m., Eucharist with Healing Sunday 8 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite One; 9:30 a.m., Family Eucharist with Healing and Church School Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Morning Prayer (in Spanish); Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Eucharist with Healing. Child care available at Saturday 5 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m. services. JES uU S THE WW OR kK ER C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H: 881 Nuna Avenue, Fort Myers, 481-1143 Masses Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. K INGING D OO M LILI F EE C HH U RR C HH 2154 McGregor Boulev ard, Fort Myers, 218-8343 Pastor Randy and Anita Thurman 10:30 a.m. Sunday Service All are welcome. LambLAMB O fF GG O dD LuLU THER aA N/ EpEP IS cC O paP A L CH uU R cC H Corner Cypress View Drive and Koreshan Boulevard, Three Oaks area, Fort Myers, 267-3525 Walter Fohs, pastor; Becky RobbinsPenniman, associate pastor Sunday worship services: 8 a.m. Early Grace Traditional 9 a.m. Awesome Grace Contemporary 10:30 a.m. Classic Grace Traditional 8:45 & 10 a.m. Sunday School Gods Group NN EW BEGINNINGS CENTER Ne w Home Church, 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, North Fort Myers, 239-656-0416 Weekly Friday Meeting Meet & Greet: 6:30 p.m. Kingdom Teaching: 7 p.m. Fellowship and refreshments after service. nbcministry@embarqmail.com, www.facebook. com/nbcministry. Alex & Patricia Wiggins, Ministers NEWNEW C OO V ENEN A NTNT EE Y ESES C HH U RR C HH See Clearly Meeting monthly at 9 a.m. at the Elks Lodge. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, Fort Myers, FL 33907. 239-220-8519 Pastor Alan Bondar www.newcovenanteyes.com Wear what you want, rockin music, relevant teaching, LIFT Kidz program, free coffee & donuts, people who are real, church thats actually fun. NN EW HH O pP E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H O fF FOR T M yY ERS 16120 San Car los Boulevard, Unit 10 239-985-8503 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m Sunday Morning Worship. 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study NN EW HH O pP E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 3825 McGregor Boule vard. Fort Myers Pastors: Stu Austin and Howard Biddulph 8 & 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11 a.m. Contemporary Worship 8, 9:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School Youth and Childrens programming runs concurrent to Sunday services. Nursery care provided at all services 274-1230. For more information visit: www.newhopefortmyers.org P EE A C EE CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H Meets at F ort Myers Beach Masonic Lodge 17625 Pine Ridge Road, Fort Myers Beach 267-7400. Pastors Bruce Merton, Gail & RC Fleeman Adult Discussion Classes: 9-10 AM Countdown to Worship (praise music): 10:10 AM Amazing Grace Worship: 10:30 AM Phone 267-7400 Fax 267-7407 Web site: peacecommunitychurch.com e-mail: peace1265@aol.com P EE A C EE LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH Sunday Worship at 9:30am. Peace is a member of the ELCA. We celebrate weekly communion with traditional liturgy, organ and choir. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers On the way to Sanibel. 239-437-2599, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@peaceftmyers.com. RE dD EE mM ER L uU THER aA N cC H uU R cC H 3950 Winkler Ext., Fort Myers, 274-0143 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. Sunday Services Daily early learning center/day care RIRI V ERER OO F LILI F EE A SSESSE MB LL Y OO F GOGO D 21580 Riv er Ranch Rd, Estero 239-495-0400, Senior Pastor: Todd Weston 8 and 9:45 a.m Services; 11:30 a.m. Legacy Service, multi-generational S amudAMUD R abadAB AD R aA buddB UDD HIST cC ENTER Meditation classes All are welcome. Guided meditations offering many methods for relaxing the body and focusing the mind on virtuous objects to bring increasing peace and happiness into daily activity. For information, class times and locations call 567-9739 or visit www. MeditationInFortMyers.org. SS O uU THWEST bapB AP TIST cC H uU R cC H 16940 McGregor Boule vard, Fort Myers, 454-3336 Robert G. Kasten, Pastor Sunday Worship Service 11 a.m. Nursery available 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Junior Church grades one to five Wee Church Pre-K to K Evening Service 6 p.m. Wednsday Service 6 p.m. SaSA INT COL umbkUMBK ILLE C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H 12171 Iona Road, F ort Myers, off McGregor and north of Gladiolus. 489-3973 Father Joseph Clifford. Weekly masses: Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. Weekend masses: Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday: 7, 9,11, and 5:30 p.m. Reconciliation is available at the church on Saturdays at noon and by appointment SaSA INT JOHN THE A pP OSTLE METRO pP OLIT aA N CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H 3049 Mcg regor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 344-0012 Pastor Reverend Steve Filizzi An Affirming & Inclusive Congregation Sunday Services, 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Mid-Week Service, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. SaSA INT MI cC H aA EL LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H & ScSC HOOL ( LL CM SS ) 3595 Broadw ay, Fort Myers 239-939-4711, www.smlcs.org Wednesday Fellowship: 5:30 p.m. Dinner $5, 6:15 p.m. bible studies Worship: Saturday, 5:30 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. with 9:15 a.m. adult and childrens Bible Study, plus marriage enrichment studies. Divorce Care on Thursdays from 7 to 8:30 p.m. During Lent: Wednesday worship noon and 6:15 p.m. SaSA INT PETER LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H 3751 Estero Boule vard, Fort Myers Beach, 463-4251. Sunda y w orship at 9:30 a.m. Womens Bible Study is offered on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 9:30 a.m. www.stpeterfmb.com TETE MP LELE B ETHELETHEL SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 16225 Winkler Rd. 433-0018. Rabbi Jeremy Barras E-mail: rabbi.barras@templebethel.com Cantorial soloist: Lawrence Dermer Temple educator: Dale Cohen, MaEd, RJE Shabbat Services, Friday, 7:30 p.m. Torah Study, Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Religious Education; Sunday School and Midweek classes, Preschool Classes, Monday through Friday Web site: www.templebethel.com Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TETE MP LELE JUD EE A (C ONSERONSER VA TITI V EE ) 14486 A&W Bulb Road, F ort Myers, 433-0201, Rabbi: Rabbi Elyssa Auster President: Keith Grossman Minyan: Monday & Thursday at 9 a.m. Services: Friday night at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Religious School Sunday morning Web site: www.tjswfl.org Preschool director: JoAnn Goldman email templejudeapreschool@gmail.com 433-0201, Web site: www.tjswfl.org Affiliated: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism continued on page 11THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 201310

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11 THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 2013 From page 10Churches/TemplesTHE CHABAD LUBAVITCH OF SW FLORIDA ORTHODOX 5620 Winkler Road, Fort Myers Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz 433-7708, E-mail: rabbi@chabadswf.org Web site: www.chabadswf.org Services: Friday 6:30 p.m.; Saturday Kabbalah class 9 a.m.; Shacharit 10 a.m.; Kiddush at noon Minyan: Monday and Thursday 7 a.m. THE NEW CHURCH The New Church of SWFL is located 10811 Sunset Plaza Circ. #401, behind Zoomers. Rev. Gabriella Cahaley officiates worship services on Sundays at 11 a.m. during the season. Other worship events are held on the beach in Fort Myers Beach. See our webpage http://www.newchurchflorida.com/ or call for more information 239-481-5535. CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 1619 Llewellyn Drive Fort Myers Just off McGregor across from the Edison/ Ford Winter Estates 334-4978 Pastor: Douglas Kelchner Worship times Sundays 9 and 10:30 a.m. Website: www.taecc.com UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH FORT MYERS 13411 Shire Lane (off Daniels Parkway one mile west of I-75) Minister: The Reverend Allison Farnum Sunday services and religious education at 10:30 a.m. For information on all church events call 561-2700 or visit www.uucfm.org UNITY OF BONITA SPRINGS Family Service 10 to 11 a.m. Healing Circle 11 a.m. Hospitality and Fellowship, 11 a.m. Inspiring lesson, uplifting and dynamic music, meditation in a loving environment. Service held at 28285 Imperial Street, Bonita Springs. Call 947-3100. UNITY OF FORT MYERS 11120 Ranchette Rd., Fort Myers Summer Services: Sundays at 10 a.m. Childrens class at 10 a.m. Reverend Jim Rosemergy, Minister Our God is Love. Our Race is Human. Our Religion is Oneness. www.unityoffortmyers.org or 239-278-1511 WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 9065 Ligon Court, Fort Myers, across from HealthPark Hospital, 481-2125 Senior Pastor: Robert Brunson Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Blended Worship www.westminsterfortmyers.org WORD OF LIFE CHURCH 2120 Collier Ave, Fort Myers, 274-8881; Services: Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. Bishop Gaspar and Michele Anastasi ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH 7401 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, 481-4040, Interim Pastor Jim Eggert Pastor Peter Weeks Sunday Services: 8:30 a.m. Traditional; 10 a.m. Blended Traditional and Contemporary; 11:30 a.m. Contemporary. Childrens Sunday School, Adult /Teen Bible Classes, 10 a.m. Greeters Club August MeetingDoes this topic pique your interest: The Edible Landscape: Growing More Edibles Around The Yard. Master Gardner Adrian Diaz will be the guest speaker at the Greeters Club of Fort Myers luncheon on Thursday, August 15. This is your an opportunity to find out about our activities, meet members and enjoy this interesting program. Call today to make a luncheon reservation (cost is $20 per person) and to find out more about joining this dynamic group of Lee County women. Contact Marie Gaither at 791-8966 or email wmgaither@aol.com. Check us out on Facebook at Greeters of Fort Myers. Our luncheons are held on the third Thursday of the month at 11:30 a.m. at the Colonial Country Club, located at 9181 Independence Way in Fort Myers. CONTINENTAL CUISINEAT THEIR NEW HOME. 20351 SUMMERLIN ROAD, FORT MYERS. ACROSS FROM TANGER FACTORY OUTLETS. IN THE PUBLIX SHOPPING PLAZA. Courtneys has something for everyone. Come & see why Courtneys aims to please!239.466.4646HAPPY HOUR DAILY4PM-7PM IN OUR BEAUTIFUL LOUNGEREDUCED DRINK PRICES AND $2.00 OFF APPETIZERSLUNCH SERVED DAILY AT 11AM Buy One Lunch Get One for Half PriceWith the purchase of two beverages Half price applies to lowest priced lunch. Does not include tax or gratuity. Not valid on HolidaysExpires 10/31/2013 Dinner for 2 for $30.00 Includes glass of house wine or well drink or domestic beer eachChoose any entree from our SUNSET DINING MENUChoice of: soup or salad comes with potato, veggie, hot baked bread and fresh herb olive oil Available from 4pm-6pm(Does not include tax or gratuity. Not valid on Holidays)Expires 10/31/2013 Make your reservations today! JOIN US EVERY SUNDAY FOR BRUNCHFROM 10AM 2PMA DELICIOUS VARIETY OF BREAKFAST AND LUNCH ITEMS ON THE MENU Thank You for Voting Us Best Continental Cuisine To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 201312 The Sound Bounces To Life This Weekby Capt. Matt MitchellWith good daytime tides, generally calm conditions and thunderstorms holding off until late afternoon, this was a great week to be out fishing on Pine Island Sound. With such slick calm mornings it was amazing to see all the life in the sound. It ranged from schools of small bait getting chased by ladyfish, jacks and trout, to watching tarpon roll around these bait schools. Despite the water being so brown from the fresh water run-off, the bay was more alive with fish this week than I have seen it in months. From Chino Island to Captiva Rocks and most places in between, huge schools of small bait fish were easy to locate. All around these bait schools the whole food chain was in action. This set up is a great way to fish your way up the food chain while keeping a rod bent. You can start out by either throwing a small 1/4 inch mesh cast net on the bait schools or rig up with small spoons and jigs. I like to make one throw of the cast net then put the small white baits under a float. The variety of fish feeding in and around these bait schools was awesome. One cast would be a big trout, then mackerel, jacks, bluefish, mangrove snapper and on and on. While fishing around Redlight Shoal we even had a snook and a few small reds while fishing the inchlong white baits. After saving a few live ladyfish, it is time to move up the food chain and catch something bigger. Either hook a live ladyfish up under a float or cut it in to two large pieces and simply pitch out the large chunks on a big circle hook. Although we only had a few tarpon hook-ups doing this, the amount of rolling tarpon seen throughout the bay was very impressive with what seems like close to as many tarpon around as there was in May and June. Bull sharks and blacktip sharks of all sizes made up the majority of the action when fishing with ladyfish. Bull sharks were more of a problem while grouper fishing in Captiva Pass this week. Multiple times after fighting a quality gag grouper up from the bottom, a large bull shark would grab it whole right next to the boat. I did manage a few keeper sized gags out of the pass this week while dropping large pinfish down to the bottom. During calm conditions it was possible to hold the boat right on top of the good structure where the grouper live. Big morning high tides also had the redfish feeding well all over the sound. Ladyfish chunks and live pinfish were the baits of choice, skipped way back under the trees. One of my favorite ways to fish for redfish this time of year is out in open water on shallow flats around mullet schools. I rig with a live medium pinfish or grunt thats roughly two feet under a float. Most of the reds I have been catching in the southern sound by this method have been in the upper end of the slot with quite a few over the 27-inch max. The strikes you get fishing a pinfish like this are awesome; often you can watch the redfish chase the bait around before completely sticking its head out the water to inhale the bait. These are some of the most aggressive redfish bites you will ever see. Snook fishing in and around the passes this week was on fire if you managed to be in the right pass on the right part of the tide. The first few hours of the outgoing seemed to be the best action. Big live pinfish drifted on the bottom through the passes caught lots of snook over the 30-inch mark along with a few real monsters that could just not be turned before breaking off on the structure. After near record rainfall this past few months, our water is so dark you really would not think fishing would be as good as it is. Seeing so much fish life and so much happening out on the water this week was much-needed relief from what have been pretty tough conditions for anglers this past few weeks.Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions email captmattmitchell@aol.com. ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint Prices ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Your Bottom Your Bottom Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices 1 Send Us Your Fish TalesThe River Weekly would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include photographs with identification. Drop them at the River Weekly, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, Florida 33901, or email to press@riverweekly.com. Michael Cullen of Sanibel with a 36-inch snook he caught and released while fishing with Capt. Matt Mitchell this week 472-5800 481-4733 12600 McGregor Blvd, Ft Myers www.scubavicedivers.com Swim with the Fishes

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13 THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 2013 CROW Case Of The Week: Florida Mottled Ducklingby Patricia MolloyAn abandoned or orphaned mottled duckling was admitted to CROW last month. The tiny patient spent the first weeks of his stay in a warm incubator, eating four to six nutrient-rich meals per day. As one of the few non-migratory ducks in North America, the mottled duck (Anas fulvigula) has resided in Florida for thousands of years. It prefers coastal marshes and wetlands with shallow, fresh water and abundant vegetation. Unlike birds such as the mockingbird and blue jay, which raise their hatchlings in a nest for weeks, a female mottled duck will escort her babies to the water within 48 hours of hatching. Young mottled ducks will take their first flight between the ages of 60 and 70 days. One of the greatest concerns for avians at the clinic is the development of bumblefoot, a bacterial infection that patients can contract after spending too much time on their feet. Make sure you check the bottom of his feet every day, Dr. Heather cautioned the clinics staff and students. While rarely seen in the wild, bumblefoot most commonly affects captive or domesticated birds. It is the bane of wildlife rehabilitation, added Dr. Heather. As one valuable tool in preventing development of the condition, certain patients are prescribed a daily dose of tub time. CROW has several bathtubs to accommodate the hectic feeding and physical therapy schedules of its avian and reptilian patients. While undergoing supportive care at the wildlife hospital, the male mottled duckling grew by leaps and bounds. (He) is doing fine. He has moved to a cage and is no longer in a incubator, stated Dr. Kristen. The duckling will soon be transferred outside to one of the speciesspecific enclosures at CROW. When he is old enough to survive on his own, patient #1887 will be returned to the wetlands of his birth. Once there, it is hoped that he will find a mate and go on to be the proud papa of his own brood of fuzzy ducklings. If you would like to feed beautiful songbirds, graze gopher tortoises or help transport injured animals to the wildlife clinic, call 472-3644, ext. 229 or go to CROWs website. Training is provided. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to PO Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit: www.crowclinic.org. This Florida mottled duckling, patient #1887, splashing about during his daily tub time Yacht Club Sets August Meetingby Past Commodore Chris ChristensenThe monthly meeting of the Fort Myers Beach Yacht Club will be held on Wednesday, August 28 at Rumrunners Restaurant, located at 5848 Cape Harbor Drive in Cape Coral. Social hour begins at 5 p.m. Happy hour is from 3 to 6:30 p.m. Dinner is ordered individually off the menu at 7 p.m. Attendees will pay by separate checks. A short meeting may follow. Potential new members wishing to attend are invited to call Past Commodore Pete Oiderma for required reservations and additional information at continued on page 17Call for departure time CAPTIVACRUISES H T H E I S L A N D S H THE BEST WAY TO SEE THE ISLANDS IS FROM THE WATER Cruises depart from beautiful Captiva Island

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THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 201314 Caring For Your PlantsProperly T rimming A Coconut Palmby Justen DobbsWhether you trim your own coconut palms (Cocos nucifera) or pay a tree trimmer or landscape maintenance company to trim them, it should be done correctly in order to assure optimal health for the tree. Coconut clusters are the reproductive part of the palm. The clusters produce both male and female flowers making it a monoecious palm (each tree can reproduce on its own). The male flowers pollinate the female flowers with the help of some friendly honey bees and the female flowers then develop into coconuts. A lot of people are weary about cutting all of the flowers and coconuts off the tree, thinking that it will somehow harm the tree. This is false! In landscape settings, coconuts should be removed as early as possible to prevent them from potentially falling on people or cars. When growing in nature, the coconuts do not pose a problem to people or possessions, so they should be left to grow. While it is faster to remove the coconut clusters with a chain saw, it is ideal to remove them with a handsaw if possible; cut the clusters stem as close to the main trunk as you can. Or, rip the cluster off by hand if it is loose. Now to the fronds. They should be removed entirely if possible by tearing the entire frond off of the main trunk instead of cutting it at the base with a chainsaw. You may need to use a handsaw to help you remove or separate the frond from the palms trunk. If done correctly, your palm should look like the one in the picture. How many fronds should be removed? If you look at the picture, you will notice that all of the lower, hanging fronds have been removed. In the industry, this is called cutting the palm to nine-and-three. Think of the hands on a clock pointing to a time of 9:15. Those hands are the lowest fronds in relation to the coconut palm. You have undoubtedly heard of the hurricane cut, in which all of the fronds on a palm tree are cut except for the two newest and highest fronds. This is VERY bad for the long term health of any palm tree. A palm depends on its fronds to photosynthesize and produce healthy new fronds, a healthy stem, and a strong immune system. When you hurricane cut a palm, you are basically starving it for four to six months, making it look ugly, and weakening its immune system. Coconut palms can be cold sensitive, so you want to encourage a strong immune system, especially in winter months. A proper trimming job will put the palms fronds at nine-and-three or at 10-and-two if you want to trim less often. You will be surprised to know that after having read this article, you probably know more on the subject than most lawn maintenance companies in Southwest Florida! Justen Dobbs is a landscape architect in South Florida specializing in custom, upscale landscapes. He can be reached at seabreezenurseries@gmail. com. Notice there are no leaf boots or fibers left on this properly trimmed coconut palm Plant SmartR ed Powder Puffby G erri R eavesRed powder puff (Calliandra haematocephala) is a non-native flowering tree notable for pretty flowers and feathery foliage. It is a relative of the royal poinciana and mimosa and a member of the pea family. The bright blooms attract hummingbirds, butterflies and honeybees. Multi-trunked with low branches, it grows 12 to 15 feet tall with a spread of equal measure. Its a fast grower that develops an open rounded crown if not pruned back. The bipinnate leaves have an even number of shiny oblong leaflets, which make for fine-textured foliage. The flowers of two to three inches across range in color from deep red to watermelon pink. They bloom most profusely in the warmer months, with the fuzzy flowers bursting from buds that resemble a cluster of bright berries. Grow red powder puff in full sun to partial shade where it will receive plenty of moisture. Once established, it is very drought tolerant. It does not tolerate salt, however, so is not suitable for coastal landscapes. It can be used as a hedge, specimen or container plant. Propagate it with cuttings or with the seeds in the threeto six-inch brown fruit pods. Sources: Florida Landscape Plants by John V. Watkins and Thomas J. Sheehan, floridata.com, and edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Plant Smart explores sustainable gar dening practices that will help you create an environmentally responsible, low-maintenance South Florida landscape. Non-native red powder puffs flowers burst from buds resembling a cluster of berries photo by Gerri Reaves

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15 THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 2013 An Audubon Florida Special PlaceBald Point S tate Parkby E ric DraperAfter a month of recovery from a broken leg, I finally escaped the house with a birthday outing to Bald Point State Park. Just an hour drive from Tallahassee, the 4,000-acre state park is a favorite destination with its calm beaches, coastal pine forests and marshes. The trip was a cautious venture timed to catch a sweet spot between the July afternoon heat and bugs at sunset. Our goal was to test my crutch skills on the sugar sand beach in search of some solitude to picnic and watch shorebirds as the tide went out. Parking was easy and the boardwalk led us right to the shore, where we set up chairs and enjoyed an eastern view of the Gulf. Not far from our spot a family of five splashed in the water. A boy excitedly urged his father to come look at the horseshoe crab he found in the shallows. The scene reminded me of bringing our kids to this very beach years earlier. How wonderful that this family has access to a state park. The beach soon delivered a bounty of watchable wildlife. Brown pelicans gathered in small groups and loafed offshore. A willet and a Wilsons plover worked their way along the beach, searching the wet sand for dinner. Not far from where we sat, an osprey hit the water hard, emerging while struggling to fly off with a good size fish. I would have been fine with just these birds, but I knew that even in summer, Bald Point had much more to offer. The breeze lulled me into a memory about a visit to this park last fall, when a friend and I bicycled from nearby Alligator Point. We wandered into the new west park entrance and followed the road through some spectacularly beautiful coastal pine flatwoods. The road provides canoe and kayak access to Lake Tucker, which drains into Chaires Creek. The creek meanders through marshes and sparse forests before emptying into Ochlockonee Bay. I later learned that a photo taken of the creek that day graced my friends holiday card. Although patience was my birthday mantra, the memory of that cool weather made me wish that my broken leg would heal quickly so I could plan to explore more of this beautiful piece of wilderness by foot, bicycle and kayak. My daydream was broken when a dozen American oystercatchers flew just above the shoreline in formation. A species in general decline, these handsome birds with heavy, bright orange bills are the objects of a new national effort by Audubon and other organizations to better protect shorebird habitats along the Atlantic Flyway. Bald Point is near the edge of oystercatchers Florida range. Next, a Sandwich tern flew south along the beach and not long after, a royal tern flew north out over the water. Further up the shore, a snowy egret was joined by a pair of sanderlings, which promptly raced each other till they were right in front of us. The nearby family proved a bit scary for the birds and they took off in their distinctive flight. The day came to an end with the sinking sun and arrival of both gnats and acrobatic barn swallows. As reluctant as we were to leave the beautiful beach, we knew that hordes of hungry mosquitos would soon arrive. And, in spite of our nourishing, I hoped to grab a sandwich at one of the many fish houses lining the road back to Tallahassee. On the way back to the car, an earnest young ranger met us on the boardwalk. It was clear that he took great pride in being the steward of this special place along the Florida coast. I thanked him for his service. Leaving Bald Point and passing the intermittent beach houses that dot par cels sold for development before the park was created, we talked about the good fortune of having this land available for the public. The park was once part of the vast Northwest Florida holdings of the St. Joe Company. Funds from the states popular land acquisition program, Florida Forever, bought the land and helped pay for the modest entrances, parking lots, picnic pavilions and restrooms. This was at the heyday of Floridas park system expansion. Parks such as Bald Point are at risk of cutbacks in state funds for management of conservation lands. The fire dependent woods must be managed with prescribed burns, and the beaches themselves will only support birdlife if human disturbance and predators are managed. Even more risky are legislators who see the expense public parks as too much government. Our parks are most secure when we use them and when volunteers pitch in to help the park service to manage them well today and for future generations. This column is one in a series from AUDUBON FLORIDA. Eric Draper is Executive Director of Audubon Florida. For more information about Bald Point State Park, see www.floridastateparks.org/baldpoint/. For more about AUDUBON FLORIDA and its Special Places program, visit www. FloridasSpecialPlaces.org. All rights reserved by Florida Audubon Society, Inc. One of the Bald Point beaches bordered by pine flatland that volunteers help to maintain Canoeists and kayakers love Chaires Creek that flows from Lake Tucker to the Gulf JACARANDAThe Entertainment Nightly in Sanibels Social Scene1223 PERIWINKLE WAY, SANIBEL 472-1771 Happy Apps $5.95Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna, Crispy Fried Calamari, Chilled Oysters, Steamed Shrimp, BBQ Beef Satays, Mussels Marinara, Chicken WingsSanibels Best HAPPY HOUR5 7 p.m. Nightly in the lounge1/2 Price DrinksCall & Well Liquor, Draft Beer Selections, Select House Wine

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THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 201316 Back To S chool S howThe Art League of Fort Myers will present its August Show, Back to School, at 1451 Monroe Street August 2-27 The league will feature Erick Evans of Fort Myers with an exhibit in the gallery. Erick and his family attended the reopening of the Art League at the Friday Night Art Walk on August 2. Erick is nine years old and is pursuing his art interest by taking art lessons with Susan Mills, a long-standing league member. The public is invited to view the show; admission is free. The gallery and gift shop are open Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The community is invited to join league members on Wednesday mornings at the Monroe Street gallery from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for the free open painting session. Membership is open to all artists and friends of the arts. Annual memberships are available for children, adults, and families. For more information log onto www.artleagueoffortmyers.com. Erick Evans Tiger, by Erick Evans, graphite drawing Lego Car, by Erick Evans, assemblageFrom page 5Winnergets quite an education in the teachers lounge of a public school. Watch for more about this play when it is performed this October. Next up at Theatre Conspiracy is Red Herring, a Cold War comedy by Michael Hollinger. It opens on Friday, August 9 in the Foulds Theatre at the Alliance for the Arts and runs through August 24. Denise Scott, Mike Breen, Angel Duncan and Ken Johnson Noir Comedy By T heatre ConspiracyOn August 9, Theatre Conspiracys Red Herring, a comedy by Michael Hollinger, opens at the Foulds Theatre located at Lee County Alliance for the Arts In Fort Myers. Its 1952, and America is racing against the Russians for the secret of the H-bomb, Dwight Eisenhower is racing against Adlai Stevenson for the White House, and I Love Lucy is racing up the television ratings on Monday nights. Meanwhile, detective Maggie Pelletier has to find out who dumped the dead guy in the harbor or lose out on a honeymoon in Havana. And could the engagement of Senator McCarthys daughter to a suspected Soviet spy have anything to do with all of this? And the bombwhat about the bomb? Hollingers Red Herring is a fun and farcical look at Red Scare America. It is a love story, a murder mystery, and an espionage plot all rolled into a comedy about mar riage and other explosive devices. Red Herring was the winner of the 2000 Barrymore Award for Outstanding New Play. The show plays August 9 to 24. Thursday, Friday and Saturdays at 8 p.m. with one Sunday matinee at 2 p.m. on August 18. Tickets are $20 each. Opening night is pay what you will and Thursday nights are buy one get one half off. Tickets can be purchased by calling Theatre Conspiracys box office at 936-3239 or visiting www.theatreconspiracy.org. A scene from the Theatre Conpiracys production of Red Herring Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702or email press@riverweekly.com

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17 THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 2013 A lliance Member E xhibit Opens A ugust 9A mask can cover, conceal or protect. It can disguise, amuse and even frighten. A mask can be a physical object, or only an idea or concept. The Alliance for the Arts invited its member artists to submit artwork inspired by the theme Mask for its annual member exhibition, which opens with a public reception on Friday, August 9 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Refreshments will be provided by Costco. Paintings by Doug Patterson are featured in the Member Gallery. The exhibit runs August 9 through August 30. The Alliance for the Arts campus and galleries are open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays, located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard just south of Colonial Boulevard in Fort Myers. Visit exhibitions@artinlee.org. Snowflake by Joel Loeper Faade by Jordan Marshman E dgy Play A t Lab T heaterby Di S aggauTheres a hurricane brewing outside the house and inside during Laboratory Theaters production of The House of Yes. Talk about intriguing theater, this black comedy is about the Pascals, an amoral upper-class family in Virginia, who are fixated on their neighbors, the Kennedy clan. Its Thanksgiving l988 and everyone is awaiting the arrival of Marty (Todd Fleck), especially his twin sister Jackie-O (Kathleen Taylor.) She is taken aback big time when Marty arrives with his fianc Lesly (Tera Nicole Miller), a sweet tempered waitress who smells like powdered sugar. It soon becomes obvious Marty and Jackie share more than sibling love. In fact, its downright incestuous. There is another brother, Anthony, (Adam Kazmarz) the product of a different father. Hes enamored with the naive Lesly and manages to seduce her in the upstairs bedroom while Marty and Jackie-O do their snuggling downstairs. Jackie is a nutcase when not on her meds and her idea of what to wear to a costume party is absolutely unacceptable. I have no doubt you will agree with me on that one. Observing all the goings on is the family matriarch Mrs. Pascal (Nancy Antonio) who is also harboring a deep secret. This is one twisted family but in spite of it all the clever dialogue delivers quite a few laughs. I could not for the life of me figure out the plays title so I did some digging online and found out that the playwright Wendy MacLeod got the title from a grafitto she found in a New Haven bathroom. She felt it was the perfect title for a house of immorality where no one has ever said no to them. The Pascals are insulated by wealth and tare otally arrogant. Director Nykkie Rizley has put together a strong cast for this challenging production. It runs 85 minutes with no intermission and after the last scene you are left knowing for sure that money does not always buy happiness. Its a play well worth seeing and it will have you talking about it for some time. It you like cutting-edge theater, this ones for you. The House of Yes plays through August 24 at Laboratory Theater of Florida, 1634 Woodford Avenue in the Fort Myers River District. For tickets call 218-0481. From page 13Yacht Club463-6240 or mobile 415-328-5415. The Fort Myers Beach Yacht Club was formed in 1953 and incorporated as a not for profit organization for the pur pose of promoting safe, enjoyable boating and good fellowship. This community oriented club, with over 140 members and 60 boats, maintains a very active schedule of year-round activities, both on and off the water, for members and guests. Evening meetings are held once a month, usually on the fourth Wednesday. Because the club does not have the expense of maintaining their own water front facility, dues are only $100 per year per couple or $60 per single. Learn more about the club at www. FMBYachtClub.org. Nancy Antonio and Todd Fleck star in The House of Yes To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 201318 Hispanic Heritage Month At County Library SystemThe Lee County Library System will celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with a variety of programs for children and adults. Some of these events include: a foreign film, a Caribbean dance presentation, live Mariachi and a Naturalization Information Session featuring representatives from the U.S. Office of Citizenship and Immigration. We are excited about the great slate of programs we have planned for the community. We decided to offer a variety of programs that are fun, provide valuable information and seek to expose participants to the different cultural aspects of Hispanics, said Maria Palacio, Lee County Library System Outreach Services Manager. According to the Library of Congress Americans observe National Hispanic Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15, by celebrating the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. The observation started in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to cover a 30-day period starting on September 15 and ending on October 15. Hispanic Heritage Activities at the Libraries: South County Regional Library 21100 Three Oaks Pkwy., Estero, 533-4400 Latino Artwork for teens p.m. Foreign Film, The Colors of the Mountains, Spanish with English subtitles, drama, 93 minutes) Live Mariachi for the whole family Estero High School Latin Rhythm Club performance for the whole family Immigration Information Sessions for adults Zumba with Maribel for the whole family Guatemalan kites craft program for teens Northwest Regional Library 519 Chiquita Blvd. N., Cape Coral, Mexican Mummy Fiesta with Skippyjon Jones for children Immigration Information Sessions for adults East County Regional Library 881 Gunnery Road, Lehigh Acres, 533-4200 Celebramos! Hispanic Heritage Month Storytime for preschoolers Free, Year-Round Programs In addition to the special Hispanic Heritage Month activities listed above, the Lee County Library System also provides the following free, year-round programs: located at each branch to help adults improve their reading and writing skills in order to participate more fully in community life. These books, audio tapes, and videos have been gathered together and placed on distinctive Plexiglas shelving in each of our branch libraries. on learning common languages like Spanish, French and German as well as 30 other languages, from Arabic to Swahili. full-text on subjects such as: Business, Health, Technology and Culture, etc. learning program for learning Spanish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin Chinese and English (for Spanish speakers). learning program for English as a Second Language (ESL) learning of basic English grammar and basic English writing. The Lee County Library System serves Lee County with free books, downloadable e-books, digital content, Books-ByMail, a bookmobile, e-sources, music and films, programs and meeting space. library card? Getting one is free and easy. Visit www.leelibrary.net to apply online, or stop by any branch. Information about Lee County Library System is available brary.net where you can find out about library services, programs, locations, view an online events calendar or place a hold on library items. Telephone reference is White Book SigningHannah Smith returns in Deceived, a stunning new adventure novel from Randy Wayne White, the New York Times bestsellSanibel Bookshop will be hosting White Periwinkle Way (additional parking will be available across the street at VIP), on Thursday, September 5 starting at 6:30 p.m. White will give a short talk and question-and-answer session. The book signing will last about one hour, or until White has finished signing. Books must be purchased from the Sanibel Bookshop to receive a ticket for the signing line. In this gripping new novel, a 20-yearattention, but so does a more immediate problem. A private museum devoted pioneers has been announced, and many Sulfur Wells are being pressured to make contributions. The problem is, the whole thing is a scam, and when Hannah sets out to ers that things are even worse than she thought. The museum scam is a front for a real estate power play, her entire village forces behind it have no intention of letting anything, or anyone, stand in their way. like to purchase an autographed book, reserved for you. LIVE ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY!Happy Hour Daily Half Price 4-6:30pm & All Night Tuesday Online Reservations Available www.brattasristorante.com12984 S. Cleveland Ave., Fort Myers, 239-433-4449JULY NIGHTLY SPECIALS Sunday Any Two Dinner Entrees from our regular menu & a Bottle of House Wine for ONLY $50 Monday 1/2 Price Bottle of Wines(enjoy as many as you like) NO LIMITS Tuesday Happy Hour& $4.99 Appetizers all Night! Wednesday Italian Night!$9.99 Lasagna, Taylor Street Baked Ziti, Cappellini & Meatballs, & Eggplant & Chicken Parmesan $3.00 House Wines By e Glass Thursday Steak & Lobster Tail $14.99 Friday Seafood Extravaganza Pre Fixe Dinner $24.99 per person. $5.00 Martinis! Saturday Make Online Reservations & Receive 25% o Total Check (Regular Priced Items) -ALWAYS AT BRATTAS-EARLY DINING 2 for $20 Dinners daily until 5:30pm, Live Music, Online Discounts, Daily Happy Hour until 6:30pm, Dance Floor, Great Food, Fun & Service NIGHTLY SPECIALS Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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19 THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 2013 Isabella Rasi 239-246-47161101 Periwinkle Way #105, Sanibel, FL 239-472-0044 ENGEL & VLKERS Excellence in Real Estate A step above! International Client Base 600 Shops Worldwide Multi-Lingual Staff Your success is my aim. Panther A lumni Fishing T ournamentPanther Baseball Alumni Club is hosting its second annual fishing tournament on Saturday, September 7. Following a very successful event last year, the Panther Baseball Alumni Club, an organization that raises funds to support the Cypress Lake High School baseball team, has announced it will hold another tournament. Their support is integral to the ball clubs operations including paying for insurance, purchasing supplies and awarding scholarships to student athletes who have the grades and maturity to enroll in college. The tournament, being held at Doc Fords Rum Bar & Grille on Fort Myers Beach, will begin at 7 a.m. on Saturday, September 7. Scales will open at 2 p.m. and will close at 4 p.m. with a live weigh-in and results ceremony at Doc Fords. There will also be a celebratory dinner and drinks, included with registration, along with live music from 5 p.m. onwards at Doc Fords. Over $4,500 in cash and prizes will be awarded and there will be raffles, prizes and 50/50 drawing during dinner. This was such a great event last year, everyone had a lot of fun and we raised much needed funds for this worthy cause, said Chris Davison, president of the Panther Baseball Alumni Club. We are urging all our local fishermen and women to join us for this fun event on September 7. For complete details and registration for the tournament, visit www. PantherBaseballAlumni.org, where all major credit and debit cards are accepted. From left, Head Coach/Athletic Director Josh Corr, scholarship winner Rick Little, and Panther Baseball Club Vice President Rick Little Fom left: Joshua Tuyls, Marni Tuyls and Ryan Crown of last years Team Flippers on the Bay Major League Baseball Drug U sers Cheat T he Clean, H onest Players by E d FrankAmidst all the news that has been written and broadcast this past week over the suspension of 13 Major League Baseball players for their implication in the use of per formance enhancing drugs, seldom if ever is mentioned the unfairness these cheaters have inflicted on those who play the game straight. You read that these penalties are costing these drug users millions in lost salaries; that these suspensions could cripple teams fighting for post-season play; that some contend they are being punished unfairly. Isnt that too bad!?! We shouldnt shed a single tear for these cheaters who have tarnished the oncesacred game of baseball. Who we should feel sorry for are the vast majority of baseball players who have remained honest to the game and have had to compete on an unleveled playing field that being competing against players who have cheated the system. Perhaps you will recall a lengthy story several years ago in Sports Illustrated about four youngsters who played here for the Fort Myers Miracle baseball team. Three fought and scrapped their way through the minor leagues only never to make it to the Majors. The fourth was a drug user who did make it to the big show, even playing for a World Series champion. This incident typifies what this present scandal the worst in baseball history is all about. The 13 players named this week and those tagged as users of PEDs in the past and dozens more who have been suspected but never officially charged have stolen baseball records and obtained multi-million dollar contracts they were not entitled to. Too often it seems the players union has came to the defense of these rules violators rather than defending the majority of their members who have played the game clean. Through the years, baseball has been known as our national pastime. These cheaters, these drug users have unfairly changed the image of baseball for years to come. The games hope for redemption lies with the majority of honestcontinued on page 24 Baseball T ryoutsProStyle Baseball Academy is holding tryouts for Fall Youth Travel Baseball on Saturday, August 10, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at North Fort Myers Community Park, 2021 North Tamiami Trail. Youngsters can and try out to become a part of one of the most competitive and fun travel baseball teams in Lee County. Eligible are youngsters age 13 to 18. Admission is free. Each team will be allowed to create and vote on a team name. For more information on specific age group tryout time or to register call Coach Christian at 628-7838 or email Christian@ GoProStyle.com.

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THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 201320 Financial FocusAvoid Cramming For College S avingsby Jennifer BaseyIf you have children, youre keenly aware that its getting close to back-to-school time. Today, that might mean you need to go shopping for notebooks and pencils. But in the future, when back to school means off to college, your expenditures are likely to be significantly greater. Will you be financially prepared for that day? It could be expensive. The average cost for one year at an in-state public school is $22,261, while the comparable expense for a private school is $43,289, according to the College Boards figures for the 2012 academic year. And these costs will probably continue to rise. Still, theres no need to panic. Your child could receive grants or scholarships to college, which would lower the sticker price. But its still a good idea for you to save early and often. To illustrate the importance of getting an early jump on college funding, lets look at two examples of how you might fund a college education. A 529 plan is one way but not the only way to save for college. (The following examples are hypothetical in nature and dont reflect the performance of an actual investment or investment strategy.) Example 1: Suppose you started saving for your childs college education when she was 3 years old. If you contributed $200 a month, for 15 years, to a 529 plan that earned 7 percent a year, youd accumulate about $64,000 by the time your daughter turned 18. With a 529 plan, your earnings grow tax free, provided all withdrawals are used for qualified higher education purposes. (Keep in mind, though, that 529 plan distributions not used for qualified expenses may be subject to federal and state income tax and a 10 percent IRS penalty.) Example 2: Instead of starting to save when your child was 3, you wait 10 years, until she turns 13. You put in the same $200 per month to a 529 plan that earns the same 7 percent a year. After five years, when your daughter has turned 18, you will have accumulated slightly less than $15,000. Clearly, theres a big disparity between $64,000 and $15,000. So, if you dont want to be in a position where you have to start putting away huge sums of money each month to catch up on your college savings, youll be well advised to start saving as early as possible specifically, during the first few years of your childs life. Of course, given all your other expenses, you may find it challenging to begin putting away money for college. And with so many years to go until you actually need the money, its tempting to put off your savings for another day. But those other days can add up and before you know it, college may be looming. Consequently, you may want to put your savings on autopilot by setting up a bank authorization to move money each month into a college savings account. And, as your income rises, you may be able to increase your monthly contributions. Save early, save often: Its a good strategy for just about any investment goal and it can make an especially big difference when it comes to paying for the high costs of higher education. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@edwardjones.com. T op 10 R eal E state S ales Development City Year BuiltSquare FootageListing PriceSelling PriceDays on Market Gores A M Subdivision Captiva19902,606$3,750,000$2,895,000206 Fort Myers Fort Myers 19934,158$1,667,000$1,475,00089 Beachview Country Club Estates Sanibel20123,684$1,595,000$1,260,000500 Sanibel Isles Sanibel19872,666$1,075,000$960,000 358 Beachview Country Club Estates Sanibel20013,070$970,000$843,000 764 Cape Coral Cape Coral 20052,728$899,900$704,000 269 Fairview Isles Fort Myers Beach 19961,896$849,000$688,000 246 Bridgetown Fort Myers 20073,018$629,900 $626,000 81 The Forest Fort Myers 19893,460$599,900 $599,900 7 Rose Garden Cape Coral 19972,145$625,000$549,000 50Courtesy of Royal Shell Real Estate Read us online at IslandSunNews.com E conomic Development Job G oes OnlineLee County has launched a web page to begin its search for the next director of the Economic Development Office. The goal is to give potential applicants and the public information about the search and also allow people to submit questions for the candidates. Additional information included on the site are instructions on how to apply, a recruitment timeline, and a soon-to-be released Economic Development director profile. The site launched Monday and applications will be accepted starting the following Monday, August 12. Final inter views are tentatively scheduled to take place in early October. The current Economic Development director, Jim Moore, will retire September 1. Assistant to the County Manager Glen Salyer will be acting director until a per manent replacement is hired. Soon after the position formally opens August 12, the public will be able to compose and submit for consideration questions that the interview panel may present to the final candidates. This is similar to what the county did for its recently posted positions of county manager and county attorney. The link and guidelines for question submittal can be found at www.leegov. com/EcoDevRecruitment. People with questions about the site or the process can call Lee County Human Resources at 533-2245. S olid Waste Chief Lauded For AchievementsLee County Solid Waste Division Director Lindsey J. Sampson has been recognized with the Professional Achievement Award by the Florida State Chapter Solid Waste Association of North America. This award is the highest accolade the chapter can give to an individual. The chapter cited Sampsons leadership role in advancing cost-effective integrated solid waste management and excellence in operations, safety, customer service and environmental compliance for the benefit of Lee County residents. Sampson has been employed by Lee County for nearly 22 years. He was instrumental in the permitting and construction of the Lee County Waste To Energy Facility. He developed and directly manages one of the most comprehensive and successful solid waste management systems in the country. The Lee County Integrated Solid Waste System comprises the operation of a 1,836-ton-per-day waste to energy facility, a 700-ton-per-day single-stream material recycling facility, Class I and Class III landfill, 500-ton-per-day construction and demolition debris recycling facility, a household chemical waste drop-off facility, several transfer stations, and a 40,000 ton-per-year compost facility. The management of the franchise agreements for curbside collections of garbage, yard waste, single stream recycling, and electronics are part of the system. Sampson has a civil and environmental engineering degree from the University of Cincinnati and is a Florida Registered Professional Engineer.

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21 THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 2013 School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Shelley, My daughter is in fifth grade and her teacher has said that she has executive functioning problems that have caused her to have lower grades and do poorly in school. I am not really sure what this means. What kind of problem is this and what can I do to help my daughter? Jonas V., Fort Myers Jonas, Executive functions are basic self-regulating skills such as planning, organizing, making decisions, shifting between situations or thoughts, and controlling impulsivity. We all use these skills every day to accomplish just about everything we need to do. Kids rely on their executive functions for everything from brushing their teeth, to riding a bike and organizing a school report. Children who have poor executive functioning, including many children with ADHD and/or learning disabilities, are much more disorganized than other kids. Typically, any person with poor executive functioning take longer to do simple chores and often become overwhelmed while doing simple tasks. Schoolwork can often become a nightmare for these children because they forget assignments, books, regularly lose papers, dont know how to plan or start long term assignments until the night before they are due. Teaching organizational skills to children who have this difficulty are one of the best ways to help them according to learning specialists. Writer Rachel Ehmke, from the Child Mind Institute, provides some strategies used to teach kids and their parents to help them tackle school work as well as other responsibilities that take organization and follow-through. Checklists The steps necessary for completing a task often arent obvious to kids with executive dysfunction, and defining them clearly ahead of time makes a task less daunting and more achievable. Following a checklist of steps also minimizes the mental and emotional strain many kids with executive dysfunction experience while trying to make decisions. With a checklist, kids can focus their mental energy on the task at hand, said Ruth Lee, Med, educational therapist. Set Time Limits When making a checklist, many educational therapists also recommend assigning a time limit for each step, particularly if it is a bigger, longer-term project. Matt Cruger, PhD, director of the Child Mind Institute Learning and Development Center, likes to practice breaking down different kinds of homework assignments with kids to get them used to the steps required and how long they might take. Use A Planner Educational specialists also emphasize the critical importance of teaching children how to use a planner. Most schools require students to use a planner these days, but they often dont teach children how to use them, and it wont be obvious to a child who is overwhelmed by or uninterested in organization and planning. Establish A Routine This is particularly important for older kids, who typically struggle more to get started with their homework. Educational specialists recommend starting homework at the same time every day. Ideally, kids should come home, unpack their bag, have a snack, and then get started. Use Rewards For younger kids, putting a reward system in place to highlight the value of these new strategies. This may help kids see the connection between practicing their skills and working towards a reward. School is really hard for these kids and they will need to be encouraged to use these new strategies. These are a just a few strategies that may be helpful for your daughter. You may want to contact a school or clinical psychologist for a formal diagnosis and additional personalized strategies that will assist you and your child. Ms. Greggs is adjunct faculty at Edison State College where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also Nationally Certified School Psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. KidzArt Imagine & Explore ClassesTime to Power up your creative energy and embark on a virtual journey to explore the many elements of the visual arts! Beginning on August 16, Riverside Community Center will host Kidzart classes on Fridays from 6 to 8 p.m. Through interactive format, students learn how to use these tools to access the power of their imagination. They will be exposed to a variety of artistic styles, cultural interpretations and mediums. For the first hour of class, each student will be led through a drawing based art project using only artist quality materials. During the second hour, students will be led through a 3-D mixed media project. Each child is expected to finish each class with two wonderfully unique works of art. Offered for grades 1 through 5, classes includes all materials, guidance by a KidzArt certified instructor, and a total of five two-hour classes. Classes will begin at 6 p.m. sharp; doors will open at 5:50 p.m. For more information, visit www. capecoral.kidzart.com or call 458-0947. Classes are offered at the Riverside Community Center, 3061 E. Riverside Drive in Fort Myers. Scholarship AwardedArtFest Fort Myers announced that Associate Director Katie Afflerback is one of the scholarship recipients for the International Festival and Events Association (IFEA) Foundation Legacy Scholarship. This scholarship is offered to young professionals seeking to further their educational and career goals within the festival and events industry. Afflerback will attend the annual IFEA Convention this September in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where she will meet and network with the industrys most experienced professionals. Afflerback is currently planning her third festival with ArtFest Fort Myers and is eager to enhance the level of the festival. Katie Afflerback www.SeabreezeNurseries.com (239) 560-1422 WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY We can help! Ask about our Season Discount! Palms, Palms, natives, natives, crotons, crotons, bromeliads, bromeliads, buttery bushes, buttery bushes, & much more & much more Five-Year Anniversary Of Love That Dress!Love That Dress! (LTD!) is the feelgood girls night out shopping spree benefiting PACE Center for Girls. This year, Lee County is celebrating the five-year anniversary of LTD! A commemorative logo has been created by the original LTD! creator, Len Eckert of IconDo, Inc., to mark this milestone. This years five-year anniversary event will take place on Wednesday, August 28 from 5 to 9 p.m. at The Embassy Suites in Estero. An estimated 800 attendees are expected to stake their claim on thousands of new and gently worn dresses and accessories selling for nominal prices. There will be a silent auction, camaraderie, and cocktails. Major sponsors will have access to the VIP shopping offering private dressing rooms, clothing hold, express check-out service, complimentary adult beverages and hors doeuvres, and a private selection of chocolates. Many new surprises are being implemented for the celebration and White House Black Market is again the title sponsor, offering new dresses, accessories, shoes and handbags at bargain prices. There are several fun ways to support Love That Dress!: dresses are accepted at collection parties leading up to the main event. This month, several drop-off locations throughout Lee County will also be receiving dresses. All kinds of dresses are suitable, from sundresses to formal gowns to bridal. cards for products and services are also needed for the silent auction. Examples include jewelry, hotel stays, beauty baskets and gift cards for cosmetic services, retailers and restaurants. Items favorable to women are preferred. Donations of this type may qualify for an in-kind sponsorship. To make a donation, contact Kelsey Thompson by email at kthompson@markham-norton.com or call 229-8323 or email Kendra Sutton at LoveThatDress5@gmail.com or call 9106414. Cash and in-kind sponsorships are available ranging from $10,000 to $500. Sponsors receive a variety of perks in recognition of their generosity. per person and are based on availability. A limited amount of tickets will be sold. available in preparation for and on the day of the event. Contact Stefanie InkEdwards at stefanieink@gmail.com or 357-6837. To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 201322 H ospital Names Chief Nursing Officer Michael Evans, CEO of Park Royal Hospital, announced that Denise McNulty, DNP has been named chief nursing officer of Park Royal Behavioral Health Services. McNultys role will be to oversee all nursing per sonnel and activities in the facility. Her duties will include resource planning and clinical management on both a daily and long-term basis, as well as process improvement. Her primary goal is to ensure the welfare and success of both patients and nursing staff. She is the preeminent clinician in Southwest Florida and makes it her practice to elevate and promote success in every facility that has been lucky enough to have her, said David Edson, business development director for Park Royal Hospital. McNulty has an extensive background in both nursing practice and education. Among the many highlights of her career, McNulty was the director of mental health services of Doylestown Hospital in Pennsylvania where she directed the overall operation of the hospitals mental health departments and provided clinical oversight of medical and nursing staff. After seeing the need for nursing leadership and development in Florida, McNulty moved in 2000 and served in multiple nursing leadership positions, including director of nursing for The Willough at Naples, chief nursing officer for South Florida State Hospital/Atlantic Shores Healthcare, and director of ser vice excellence/patient satisfaction for the NCH Healthcare System. For the past two years, McNulty has served as the nurse administrator for Edison State College where she was responsible for directing overall operations for the nursing programs at the Collier, Lee and Port Charlotte campuses. We are very happy that she chose to return to nursing operations by joining the Park Royal team, said Evans. Denise McNulty Dunn Joins Community FoundationSarah Owen, president and CEO of the Southwest Florida Community Foundation, announced that Mindi Dunn has joined the foundation as Controller. Dunn is responsible for the financial and accounting operations of the foundation, including the preparation of financial statements, analyses and reporting. Dunn previously worked for Stroemer & Co. for eight years. She received a masters of science in accounting from Florida Gulf Coast University. We are thrilled to have someone with Mindis experience, expertise and compassion for our community join our team, said Owen. The Southwest Florida Community Foundation is celebrating its 36th year of supporting the communities of Lee, Charlotte, Collier, Glades and Hendry counties by connecting donors and their philanthropic aspirations with evolving community needs. With assets of more than $68 million, the Community Foundation has provided more than $54 million in grants and scholarships to the communities it serves. During its 2012 fiscal year, the SWFLCF granted more than $3 million to more than 100 differ ent organizations supporting education, animal welfare, arts and human services. For more information, call 274-5900 or visit www.floridacommunity.com. S ubway H elps Combat S ummer Blood S hortagesLee Memorial Blood Centers has partnered with Subway for the month of August. Anyone who donates blood on one of the purple bloodmobiles or at one of the blood centers during the month will receive a coupon good for a free six-inch sub and also receive a T-shirt. The need for blood locally remains constant and donations are needed to offset summer blood shortages. People can donate a pint of blood every 56 days. Donors are encouraged to eat a snack prior to giving blood and drink plenty of water. All blood collected remains in the Lee Memorial Health System to serve your community. Lee Memorial Health System uses 800+ units of blood each week. With both Golisano Childrens Hospital and the only trauma center within a five county area, the need for blood locally remains constant, and needs to be replenished daily. All blood types are currently needed. Blood Center hours and locations: Lee Memorial Hospital 2776 Cleveland Avenue Fort Myers 33901 343-2333 Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thursday, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Summerlin Crossing 15880 Summerlin Road Fort Myers 33908 (next to Publix) 437-5061 Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Cape Coral Hospital 636 Del Prado Blvd. Cape Coral 33990 424-2400 Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. To find out when the bloodmobile will be in your area, call 343-2333. For more information, visit www.leememorial.org. S troke A nd Osteoporosis S creeningsResidents living in and around the Fort Myers community can be screened to reduce their risk of having a stroke or bone fracture. Villas Wesleyan Church, located at 8400 Beacon Boulevard in Fort Myers, will host a Life Line Screening on Wednesday, August 21. Four key points every person needs to know: death and a leading cause of permanent disability. no apparent warning signs prior to their stroke. help you avoid a stroke. painless, affordable and convenient. Screenings identify potential cardiovascular conditions such as blocked arteries and irregular heart rhythm, abdominal aortic aneurysms and hardening of the arteries in the legs, which is a strong predictor of heart disease. A bone density screening to assess osteoporosis risk is also offered and is appropriate for both men and women. Packages start at $159. All five screenings take 60 to 90 minutes to complete. For more information regarding the screenings or to schedule an appointment, call 877-237-1287 or visit www. lifelinescreening.com. Pre-registration is required. Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702or email press@riverweekly.com

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23 THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 2013 deaRPharmacistFish Oil S upplements And Prostate Cancer by S uzy Cohen, R PhDear Pharmacist: What do you think about fish oil being linked to prostate cancer? I used to take it everyday but stopped after hearing about it in the news. Do you still recommend it? LD, Miami, Florida My opinion is that headlines which suggest fish oils raise risk for prostate cancer are nonsense. Some people cannot even think their way around this and have given up fish oils despite scientifically-sound literature that, if printed, could fill a football stadium. I hope youre sitting down. There is no evidence that anybody in this study took fish oil dietary supplements! Nowhere in the new study does it say fish oil, it says omega 3. In 2010, researchers evaluated ethyl esters of omega 3 fatty acids. Thats actually a drug. Repeat: When you talk about ethyl esters of omega 3s, you are talking about a patented prescription version of fish oils. It would never surprise me if scientists tied a pharmaceutical drug to higher cancer risk, but the headlines I keep reading say fish oil. High-quality fish oils causing prostate cancer? Au contraire! You cannot take something natural, morph it in a laboratory, patent it and expect health benefits. You cant mess with fish oils, or anything. Thats why natural progesterone protects a womans breasts, while the synthetic drug version (medroxyprogesterone) has dozens of potential side effects. Theres vitamin D3, a natural form as opposed to D2, a drug sold as a drug. Your body has to convert the D2 drug back to natural D3, why not just buy that to begin with? Benzodiazepines, like alprazolam or lorazepam, are highly addictive and have more risks compared to natural plant extracts that bind to GABA receptors and relax you naturally. Oh my goodness, margarine! A shmear of potent food additives, colorants and fat globules versus natural butter. Trust me, do not mess with mother nature! Why were plasma levels measured when they are meaningless? Red blood cell levels were never even obtained. Common sense now, the American Heart Association, the World Health Organization, the United States Institute of Medicines Food Nutrition Board and the 2010 Dietary Guidelines For Americans advise us to eat more fatty fish so as to obtain omega-3 fish oil benefits. Theres something fishy going on... do you think those organizations are in cahoots to induce prostate cancer in the male population? Fish oils primary components are EPA or DHA. Tight studies show DHA is protective for the prostate. In 2001, a study of 6,000 Swedish men found that high fish consumption significantly lowered prostate cancer rates. In New Zealand, men with the highest DHA markers slashed prostate cancer risk by almost 40 percent. A Japanese study found omega 3 blood levels correlated to a reduction in prostate cancer. So, my conclusion is omega 3s derived from fatty fish and fish oil supplements are safe and healthy, especially when taken with GLA. Supplement properly, directions on how to do so are posted at my website. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. dearpharmacist.com. Democratic Womens Club MeetingThe Democratic Womens Club of Lee County will have as its featured speaker at the September 14 meeting James R. Nathan, president and CEO of Lee Memorial Health Systems, speaking on the need for Medicaid expansion in Florida and explaining how it is good for business and people. He will also describe the various activities and contributions of LMHS locally. Nathan joined LMHS in 1975 and has had several leadership positions including president of Lee Memorial Hospital. After 22-years he left LMHS to play a role in national healthcare reform, testifying before the U. S. Senate and doing work for the American Hospital Association. He rejoined Lee Memorial in 2000. He oversaw the development of HealthPark Florida, the acquisition and turnaround of Cape Coral Hospital, the acquisition of Gulf Coast Hospital and Southwest Florida Regional Medical Center and the opening in March 2009 of Gulf Coast Medical Center. He holds masters degrees in Business Administration and Health Care Administration from Xavier University and an undergraduate degree from Miami University. He is also a fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives, past chairman of the Florida Hospital Association, former board member of the Foundation for Lee County Public Schools, past president of the Southwest Florida Community Foundation and is active with numerous other boards and civic/health care organizations. The meeting will begin at 10:30 a.m. at the Hilton Garden Inn, in South Fort Myers, at the northeast corner of College Parkway and Summerlin Road. Lunch will be served following the meeting at a cost of $18 and visitors may make reser vations for lunch by contacting Pat Fish at fishpatricia@yahoo.com or by calling 466-8381. Mom And Me by Lizzie and PryceLizzie and Pryce answer your questions and give advice about aging concerns from a two-generational perspective. A mother and daughter team, Lizzie is a retired RN and health educator, and Pryce is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in the care of elders and people with chronic illnesses. Dear Mom & Me, We always thought our daughter had a most unusual personality, and was difficult to be around. When she married, we enjoyed her husband and because of him we maintained a relationship. The years have passed, and being a widower and dependant on my daughter and her husband is troubling to me. He takes me grocery shopping and to my medical appointments, and without his help I could not stay in my own home. My daughter is still very difficult and now I must do as she says regardless of how I feel, and I always have to keep my mouth shut. It is dreadful to be in this position, but if I say anything, I know she will sell my house and put me in some cheap nursing home. I would really prefer to be relieved from the pain of living. How can I get out of this predicament? Lester Dear Lester, Having to depend on someone you do not feel comfortable with or you feel does not have your best interests in mind can be very difficult. Unless your daughter is your legal guardian (different from power of attorney), she can not sell your house from under you nor can she dump you into a cheap nursing home. If she was your guardian, she would have to justify to the court that her actions were in your best interest. If you feel you are at risk in your daughters care, call an attorney and explore what other options are available for your care and protection. Let a friend take you, take a taxi or some attorneys will come to the home if you are unable to go to the office. You do not have to live in fear of your daughter. There are options for you. Pryce Dear Lester, Pryce has outlined a very good plan for you. While you are well, get this resolved so you will no longer need to worry or be concerned about your future care. Lizzie Lizzie and Pryces email address is momandmeaging@hotmail.com. Conservancy Offers Free Admission For H ealth And S afety E mployeesConservancy of Southwest Florida Nature Center is offering free admission on Labor Day Weekend to all active and retired EMTs, firefighters and police on August 29, 30, 31 and September 2. Business ID card is required. Regular admission prices apply to all guests. This is just one small way we can express thanks to those who serve and protect our communities, said Rob Moher, interim chief operating officer at Conservancy of Southwest Florida. We invite all to enjoy the amenities of over $20 million in renovations made to the Conservancy Nature Center. The recently completed renovation offers abundant learning opportunities for the entire family and is designated as Site #69 on the Great Florida Birding Trail. In addition to the new entrance, new features include the Dalton Discovery Center, von Arx Wildlife Hospital nursery viewing area, Windfeldt Shorebird Pool viewing area, Shotwell Wavering Filter Marsh, Christopher B. Smith Preserve, Eaton Conservation Hall with Jeannie Meg Smith Theater, electric boat rides up the Gordon River from the Allyn Family Dock and Lagoon, and Ferguson Learning Lab. Kayak rentals and excursions are available for a fee. The Bradley Nature Store offers nature-inspired gifts, toys, jewelry, hats, art, cards and one of the best selections of environmental books available locally. The electric boat ride schedule changes seasonally and is subject to weather and tide conditions. The new entrance to Conservancy of Southwest Florida Nature Center, 1495 Smith Preserve Way, is located just south of the Naples Zoo off Goodlette-Frank Road. The old entrance is off 14th Avenue North, 1450 Merrihue Drive, Naples. Conservancy Nature Center is open from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday; closed on Sundays. Adult admission is $12.95. Admission for children ages 3 to 12 is $8.95. Children under 3 are free. More information is available at www.conservancy.org or by calling 239-262-0304. Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702 or email press@riverweekly.com

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From page 1From Dream To RealityUnited States Navy. Their mission includes sharing the history of submarines as protectors of the waters surrounding America over the past 113 years and the brave 35,002 men who have served aboard those vessels. According to John Troia, a member of the Cape Coral chapter of the United States Submarine Veterans, Solid Top Granite of Fort Myers gave the group a substantial discount on their products and services, which will include the cost of the final cuts and bevel work. However, more important to them is the increased visibility the new monument will receive. A lot of people didnt even know the (original) Submarine Veterans memorial was there, said Troia. With Luc Century adding the large logo on one side of the monument, people are going to be able to see it driving by or when theyre passing by on their bicycles. Its definitely going to increase our visibility. Century will etch the entire creed on a 30-inch by 20-inch black granite slab, which will become a prominent part of the United States Submarine Veterans Memorial. The United States Submarine Veterans creed is To perpetuate the memory of our shipmates who gave their lives in the pursuit of their duties while serving their country. That their dedication, deeds, and supreme sacrifice be a constant source of motivation toward greater accomplishments. Pledge loyalty and patriotism to the United States of America and its Constitution. The local chapter of the United States Submarine Veterans is scheduled to meet in early August to determine an unveiling date for the new memorial. (Next week, Part 2 of Submarine Veterans Memorial: From Dream To Reality) Ken Jordan, left, and John Troia hold the template for the United States Submarine Veterans logo, which will be etched into the memorial in Fort Myers Patch memorializing the USS Tullibee sunk on March 26, 1944 with 79 sailors lost. The lone survivor of the sunken sub was her lookout, who became a Japanese prisoner of war. Patch memorializing the USS Scorpion (SSN-589), sunk on May 22, 1968 with 99 sailors lost. The nuclear-powered sub was sunk under mysterious circumstances 50 miles south of the Azores Logo of the USS Thresher, a nuclear-powered sub which lost all hands (112 crew members and 17 civilian technicians) on April 10, 1963THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 201324 E xtension S ervice To H ost Fertilizer, Water Quality WorkshopLee County Extension Services will offer a class called UF/IFAS Fertilizer Research and Water Quality For Policymakers. The event is designed for people who are certified in fertilizer applications, HOA members, municipality workers and decision makers or those concerned with fertilizer use on lawns and turfs. It will be held from 1 to 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, August 22 at Lee County Extension Services, 3406 Palm Beach Blvd. in Fort Myers. During the last eight years, numerous local ordinances restricting the use of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers in the rainy season have been passed, said Extension Services Director Stephen Brown. The purpose of these ordinances is to help to improve water quality. The science on the use of nitrogen is now in. This workshop will bring you the latest University of Florida research on the fate of nitrogen fertilizers when applied to lawns and turfs. Go to the following link for the agenda and to register online: http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu/Hort/HortClasses/Policymakers_Agenda_0822B.pdf Lee County Extension agents offer educational services through a three-way cooperative arrangement between the Board of County Commissioners, the University of Florida and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Local extension agents are off-campus faculty members of the University of Florida. Extension Services falls under the umbrella of Lee County Parks & Recreation. For more information, call Stephen Brown at 533-7513, email brownsh@leegov. com or visit http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu. From page 6Pet Adoption cats months Photos and information about lost pets or pets for adoption are available on the agencys website at www.leelostpets.com. Pet information on the website updates hourly. Adoption applications may be completed online. Lee Republican Womens Club MeetingThe Lee Republican Womens Club (Chartered) will hold its monthly luncheon meeting at the Crowne Plaza Holiday Inn, 13051 Bell Tower Drive, Fort Myers, on Tuesday, August 13. Social hour begins at 11:30 a.m. with luncheon and program at noon. Featured speaker will be Florida State Representative Raymond Rodrigues, District 76. The public and guests are welcome. The cost of the luncheon is $17. For reservations or more information, call 573-6913. From page 19Major Leagueplayers. These are who we should cheer for. Miracle Home Thursday And Friday Against Charlotte The Fort Myers Miracle began the week with a second-half season record of 22-19, just two games behind first-place Charlotte in the Florida State League South Division. The Miracle hosts Charlotte this Thursday and Friday nights at Hammond Stadium at 7:05 p.m. The Minnesota Twins No. 2 prospect, center fielder Bryon Buxton, has returned to action for the Miracle after missing six games due to a toe injury. Buxton was promoted to the Advanced A Fort Myers last month after hitting .341 in 68 games for Low A Cedar Rapids. The talented youngster has handled the tougher pitching in the FSL, batting .278 in his first 30 games with the Miracle.

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PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF AUGUST 9, 2013ARIES (March 21 to April 19) There might still be some uncertainty about the decision you made. But a quick check of the facts should reassure you that youre doing the right thing. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) The tidy Taurean needs to be a little more flexible about accepting some changes to those carefully made plans. You might be pleasantly surprised by what follows. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Consider stepping away from your concentrated focus on your new project for a bit so you can get some perspective on what youve done and where you plan to take it. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) The understandably angry Crab might not want to accept the reason why someone might have tried to hurt you. But at least youll have an insight into why it happened. LEO (July 23 to August 22) There might be some facts you still need to know before leaping onto center stage. Best to move carefully at this time so that you can observe whats happening around you. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Its a good time to expand your outlook by getting out and around, whether you do some long-range traveling or just explore the great things to see closer to home. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Your wise counsel continues to be needed as that family situation works itself out. Meanwhile, the decisions you made on your job begin to pay off quite nicely. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Your job situation brightens thanks to all your hard work. Now, spend some time repairing a personal relationship you might have neglected for too long. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Aspects favor action in the workplace. Line up your facts and show your superiors why youre the one theyre looking for. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Your hard work pays off on the job. Personal relationships also can benefit from more of your time and atten tion. Spend the weekend with loved ones. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Early feedback on your project might be disappointing. But dont be discour aged. Use it to make needed adjustments, then submit it to your superiors again. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Flattery could lure the otherwise sensible Fish into making an unwise decision. Be careful. All that praise might be an attempt to reel you in before you can learn the facts. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a wonderful sense of who you are. You are a shining example to others, helping them believe in themselves and what they can do. restaurant owner, dies of yellow fever in Memphis, Tenn., after a man who had escaped a quarantined steamboat visited her restaurant. The disease spread rapidly, and by October, 20,000 people in the Southeast had died. he offers plans for relief of individuals and businesses affected by a series of devastat ing droughts. Though criticized later for not doing enough overall, he asked the War Department to provide artillery-range land to Montana cattle and sheep farmers for grazing. that the systematic murder of the mentally ill and handicapped be brought to an end because of protests within Germany. But it. It would be revived in occupied Poland. Ciccone, the entertainment icon later known around the world by her first name only, is born near Detroit. The provocative performer, who often tackled sexual and religious themes in her work, also became famous for her ever-changing hairstyles and fashion sense, as well as her personal life. Great Train Robbery, one of the biggest heists of its kind, escapes from Winson Green Prison in Birmingham, England. Several men broke into the maximumsecurity facility to free Wilson, who was Cardinals ace Bob Gibson throws the first no-hitter of his storied career. Gibsons heroics helped his team sail to an 11-0 vicGibson won his first World Series Most agrees to pay Gen. Colin Powell an to his autobiography, My American Journey. It became the fastest-selling made the following observation: The longer I live the more I see that I am never wrong about anything, and that all the pains that I have so humbly taken to verify my notions have only wasted my time. ing, raw vegetables have not always enjoyed the healthsome reputation they now have. In medieval times, in fact, veggies would always be cooked; raw ones were considered to be bad for the humors. things say that the Rolling Stones song Satisfaction is played on the radio in the U.S. more than 300 times every day. tricks performed by professionals is catch ing a bullet in the mouth. Its said to be cursed, due to the fact that, over the past have died in the attempt. Some of them mistakenly used live rounds instead of blanks, and one jealous wife swapped out the blanks for live rounds. One of the earliest attempters of the trick was beaten to death by a mob who believed he was in league with the devil. Cursed, though? If someone is trying to catch a bullet in the mouth, it hardly requires a curse to result in a violent end. have been named Boston, Oregon. The two men who named the town couldnt decide which city back east should be the namesake, so they flipped a coin. Portland came up the winner. posed to serve as a sort of armed guard, in case the bride needed to be kidnapped from her disapproving parents. Every American carries in his bloodstream the heritage of the malcontent and the dreamer. -Dorothy Fuldheim THIS WEEK IN HISTORY strSTR A nN G eE BU tT trTR U eE thoTHO UG htHT F orOR theTHE DA yY DID YOU KNOW25 THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 2013 1. ASTRONOMY: What are the Van Allen belts? 3. U.S. STATES: What is the only state that has a one-syllable name? creatures on earth that allow their children to come back home? 1 choice of choosy moms and dads? 8. U.S. PRESIDENTS: What was the only state that presidential candidate George TRIVI aA TES tT ANSWERS SpSP OR tT S QUIZ 1. In 2012, Mike Trout set an Angels franchise record for most runs scored in a season, with 129. Who had held the mark? 2. Which player led the National League the most times in both doubles and triples for a season? the playoffs the next season? for the first time and the second? ANSWERS

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THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 201326 BUILDING CONTRACTOR CONTRACTOR G I P M SR C D P D P CG D GrSince 2001, A Southwest Florida Paver Contractor www.gigicompanies.com 239-541-7282Schedule free estimates or visit our new show roomLic.# S3-12238 TREE & LAWN CARE Jesus Hernandez LANDSCAPING & TREE SERVICE 482-7350 We Service All your Landscape Needs FULL Landscaping SERVICES Over 20 years serving San-Cap & Ft. Myers PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY Orzo with Feta, Green Beans and Tomatoes 10 ounces haricot verts (thin French green beans) or green beans 1 cup orzo (rice-shaped pasta) 1 medium onion 2 garlic cloves 3 medium vine-ripened tomatoes 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon white-wine vinegar 1 tablespoon chopped fresh flatleafed parsley leaves 1 cup crumbled feta (about 6 ounces) Fill a 4-quart kettle three fourths full with salted water and bring to a boil for beans and orzo. Chop onion and mince garlic. Quarter and seed tomatoes. Cut quarters lengthwise into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Trim beans and cut into 1-inch pieces. In a large skillet cook onion and garlic in oil over moderate heat until onion is softened. Add tomatoes and cook, stirring, until tomatoes are softened, about 2 minutes. Remove skillet from heat. Have ready a bowl of ice and cold water. In boiling salted water blanch beans 1 minute. With a slotted spoon transfer beans to ice water to stop cooking. Drain beans well in a colander and pat dry. Add beans to tomato mixture and return water in kettle to a boil. Boil orzo until al dente and drain in colander. Add orzo to bean mixture with vinegar, parsley, feta, and salt and pepper to taste, tossing to combine well. Orzo with Feta, Green Beans and Tomatoes Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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27 THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 2013 answer on page 27 PUZZLE ANSWERS SUDOKU SCRAMBLERS COMPUTERS FIND AT LEAST SIX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PANELS FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the bene ts of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 FISHING CHARTER Light Tackle Sport Fishing CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.com CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING Read us online at IslandSunNews.com PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY

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THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 201328 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE ISABELLA RASiIHAPPY TO HELP Y YOUWithITH A ALL OOF Y YOUrRREAL EEStT At TE NEEDS! RS 1/4 NC TFN 1101 Periwinkle Way #105 SS anibel, F LL 33957 ISABELLA RASiI (239) 246-4716E ISABELLARASi I@AOL.COM MOBI LELE HOM EE P ERER IWINK LELE P ARAR K$115,000. 60 x 12 w/ metal roof-over plus 20 x 12 Florida room. Master BR has queen size bed & blt-in dresser & dbl closet. Master bath has combo bath/ shower & dbl sink vanity w/extra storage. Guest BR has dbl closet + blt-in drawers & private bath w/ shower. Eat-in-kit is open to LR which from K to FL room. Private 12 x 12 deck, picnic table and storage shed. One car carport with adjacent 2nd parking space. room & bathrooms. Carpeting in both bedrooms & LR. Home recently inspected & has all required tiedowns. New central air & heat system & stacked washer/dryer, all appliances louvered blinds throughout. Purchase completely furnished including all linens, dishes, pots & pans, tableware, 2 sleeper couches, recliner, 2 dining tables & chairs, 4 outdoor chairs & folding beach chairs, etc. Call owner 317-293-0915 or email LMSrealtor@aol.com for further information or to make offer. RS 8/9 CC 8/9 SS CAR nN AT oO LL A wnWN SS ERV iI CELawn Service, Shrubs and Tree Trimming Weeding, Installation of Plants, Trees and Mulch (one month free service available) Joe Scarnato (239) 849-6163 scarnatolawn@aol.comRS 1/25 BM TFN J imIM BEC kK ER A nN D SonSON SSpruce up your lawn !! No job to big/small Landscape packages/ irrigation systems Free estimates 239-340-0515NS 8/9 CC 8/9 S oO D A nN D LA nN DSCA pinPIN G SERV iI CES offOFF EREDHELLES CC LEA ninNIN G SS ERV iI CESResidential Cleaning to Satisfaction Sanibel Lic. #11412 Lee Co. Lic. #051047NS 1/4 PC TFN P AA IN TT IN GG GG O ATAT Professional Painting & Home Maintenance Free Estimates Fully Insured www.paintinggoat.com 239-271-2919RS 4/19 CC TFN C ommOMM ER iI CAL RE nN TALOFFI CECE / CC OMM ERCERC I ALAL SS P ACEACE FO RR RERE N TT PALM COURT CENTER SANIBEL, Florida HIGHLY VISIBLE 520 SQUARE FEET Landlord pays all common maintenance. Call 239-472-6543 or 973-726-3213NS 4/5 CC TFN Island VV acationsOf Sanibel & CaptivaMillion $ Views Await You! Cottages Condos Homes Miles of Beaches & Bike Paths239-472-72771-888-451-7277RS 1/4 BM TFN VACAT ionION RE nN TAL LL I GG H TT HOU SESE REALTREALT YPaul J. Morris, Broker VACATION RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT & SALES 359 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel Island 239-579-0511RS 1/4 CC TFN RR E nN TAL WA nN TED AnnuANNU AL RR E nN TAL WA nN TEDSingle 52 year old male gainfully employed non-smoking, no pets, no children, good credit. Looking for moderately priced 1B/1B or bigger rental. Sept. or later to occupy. Call Todd at 262-455-5860.NS 6/28 CC TFN A nnuNNU AL RE nN TALQUI ETET SASA NIB ELEL HOM EE W/P RR I VATEVA TE B EACEAC H P ATAT H3200 sq ft home in Gulf Pines, one of Sanibels most beautiful & sought after communities. One house from beach w/private beach path. Short walk to Gulf Pines 2 swimming pools & tennis courts; large landscaped lot provides privacy. 3-4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, large open living area, screened porch & several decks. $4,000/mo. + util. Annual rental only. Unfurnished. Landscaping & association fees paid by owner. Avail Oct 2013. Call 917-680-4440.NS 5/31 CC TFN A nnuNNU AL RE nN TAL DD I RECTLRECTL Y ACRACR O SSSS F RR OM B EACEAC H custom wood staircase, All High End appliances, separate bar, full custom large 3 car garage. A rare offering @ $3,500/mo. CACA N ALAL & DD O CC K Five Minutes to Sanibel T oll-Booth!! This UF ground level updated home offers 3 BR/2 BA + family room, double garage, screened in pool, 65 boat dock, + boat lift for boat. $2,800/mo. 472-6747 GG ulf Beach Properties, Inc. Paul H. Zimmerman, Broker/Ownersanibelannualrentals.comServing The Islands Rental Needs Since 1975 RS 7/26 BM TFN A nnuNNU AL RE nN TALS SS A nibNIB EL foFO RT myMY ERSF oO R RR E nN TCommunity Housing & Resources (CHR) has apartments for rent to individuals who work full time on Sanibel. Rent based on income. For information call 239-472-1189.RS 3/15 CC 8/30 RERE /M AA X OF TT H EE I SLASLA N DSDS Putting owners and tenants together www.remax-oftheislands.com 239-472-2311RS 1/4 BM TFN SERV iI CES offOFF ERED CompCOMP A nionNION SS ERV iI CE Sanibel-Captiva Care and Companion Service, LLC Medical appointments, general transportation, shopping, light meal preparations, and light cleaning. Our services are customized to meet our clients needs. Call 239-395-3591, or for an emergency call 239-472-0556.RS 1/4 BM TFN SASA NIB ELEL HOM EE W ATCATC HRetired Police Captain Lives on Sanibel Will Check Your Home Weekly Very Reasonable Rates (239) 728-1971RS 1/4 BM TFN RR O GERGER NO DRDR UFF ELECTRELECTR I CC Lic# EC12002788. Call Roger 239-707-7203. Aqualink Motor Controls. RS 6/7 CC TFN H omOM E/ CC ON DD O WATC hH C onON C iI ERGE SERV iI CES Full Range of Services Island Resident Licensed & Insured 24/7 Call Lisa or Bruce at 239-472-8875RS 1/4 BM TFN DD R umUM TT EAC hH ERAll Styles Rock Jazz Latin Reading Rudiments and more. Years of playing and teaching experience Full teaching studios in home off McGregor. 1st lesson FREE! 239-994-7846.NS 8/9 CC 8/23 hH EL pP wW A nN TED VV O LL UN TEERSTEERS N EEDEDEEDED Volunteers needed for the After School Program which runs Mon.-Th, 2:30 3:15 pm call Linda Reynolds 472-1617RS 1/4 NC TFN SS ERVERS AA SS iI STA nN T SS ERVERS LinLIN E C ookOOK IL Tesoro Ristorante, 751 tarpon Bay Rd. Sanibel Now hiring; Servers, Assistant Servers and Line cook Email resumes to: applications between 11-2 daily.NS 1/18 NC TFN 3883 Sanibel Captiva Road, Sanibel, Fl Phone: 239-472-3644, ext 1 Fax: 239-472-2334 www.crowclinic.orgH ELEL P U SS P LEASELEASE !!We need volunteers for: Clinic emergency patient admissions desk and baby animal feeders Visitor education center greeters and gift shop cashiers CROW (239) 472-3644, ext. 231 or volunteers@crowclinic.orgRS 1/4 NC TFN TT EC hniHNI CAL SuppoSUPPO RT SpSP EC iI AL iI ST I2 PT Temporary Positions available. Sanibel Public Library. Technical Support Specialist I. August 1 through November 15. $15./hour, 20 hours maximum per work week. Saturdays and evenings may be required. Opportunity for full time position. Respond by email to: Resume@sanlib.org.RS 8/2 CC 8/9 hH EL pP wW A nN TED Tolls Paid Call The Sanibel School @ 472-1617.NS 8/9 NC TFN

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29 THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 2013 CLASSIFIED DEADLINE FRIDAY AT NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS The Island Sun and The River Weekly NewsAlways on the table, and online, with everything you need to know about your community. NEWSPAPERSanibel & Captiva IslandsTHEIVER R r rf WEEKL Y NEWS Serving Sanibel, Captiva and Fort Myers since 1993 Phone 395-1213 or 415-7732 Pick up a copy or go to IslandSunNews.com. Click on Read the Island Sun or The River Weeklywww.IslandSunNews.com WANTED TO BUYCA SH P AID F OR MILITA RY I TEMSCash Paid For Old Military Items. Medals, Swords, Uniforms, helmets, old guns, awards & more. Local Toll Free 1-866-440-3280RS 6/7 CC 8/30 CA R FOR SALE2007 BUICK LACROSSE CLX16,500 miles, beige color, 4 door, all power, seldom driven off island, $14,000. Call Ken at 472-2012.RS 7/12 NC TFN BOATS C ANOES KAYAKSDOC KAGEHourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-5800RS 1/4 NC TFN 22-FOOT GLACIER BAY CATA MARANIn good condition. Needs some detailing and a high pressure fuel pump. $9,000 or best offer. The boat was donated to the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) for quick sale. Contact James Robinson at CROW at (239) 472-3644, ext. 221 or development@ crowclinig.org. Or contact Peg Albert at (239) 472-3644, ext. 232 or peg@ crowclinic.org. RS 7/26 NC TFN WANTED BOAT LIFT TO RENTNeed lift with elec. & water for 22 ft. outboard. Will sign annual lease and pay top dollar for good location, Sanibel or Captiva. Ph 239-565-0073.NS 8/2 CC 8/9 LOSTLost Ladies Watch Make: Brighton Area of Mucky Duck on Captiva Island Lost on Dec. 10, 2012 around noon If found call: 941-639-5395RS 1/4 NC TFN FOUNDPrescription sunglasses found in parking lot of Limetree Center on Wednesday, February 27. Claim at Island Sun newspaper, suite 2 in Limetree Center, or call 395-1213.NS 3/8 NC TFN LOS T AND F OUNDTOO L BOX WA SHES UP ON SANIBELThis tool box with motor parts washed up on shore Saturday morning, May 8 about 8:30 on the beach at Sundial Resort on Sanibel Island. To claim call Sundial Resort Security 239-472-4151.NS 6/14 CC TFN ADIRONDACK CHAIRSLost 2 large recycled plastic adirondack chairs. The chairs are blue and were last offered. Call Ed at 239/579-0598.NS 8/9 NC 8/9 GARAGE MOVING YARDSALES CAUTION GARAGE SALEGarage Sale Sat. August 10th, 8:30AM-1:30PM Furniture,Household 1824 Ibis Lane, SanibelNS 8/9 CC 8/9

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If you would like your club/organization listed in The River Calling Card, phone 415-7732Emergency ......................................................................................... 911 Lee County Sheriffs Of ce ........................................................ 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol ................................................................ 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol .............................................................. 278-7100 Poison Control ................................................................ 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center .......................................1-800-936-5321Ft. Myers Chamber of Commerce ............................................. 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare .............................................. 425-2685 Ft. Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce .................................. 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library ......................................................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library ............................................................ 533-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce .......................................... 931-0931 Post Of ce ..................................................................... 1-800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau ..................................................... 338-3500 ARTS Alliance for the Arts .................................................................. 939-2787 Art of the Olympians Museum & Gallery ................................... 332-5055 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio .................................................. 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers ......................................................... 275-3970 Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall ...................................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS ................................................................................ 395-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre ............................................... 278-4422 Cultural Park Theatre ................................................................ 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light ............................................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade .................................. 332-4488 Florida West Arts ...................................................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers ....................................... 472-0168 Gulf Coast Symphony ............................................................... 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres ..................................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic ........................................................... 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater ......................................................... 472-6862 S.W. Florida Symphony ............................................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy .................................................................. 936-3239 Young Artists Awards ................................................................ 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAngel Flight ................................................................ 1-877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center ............................................................... 731-3535 American Business Women Association ................................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL ..................................................................... 339-8046 Audubon Society ....................................................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR .................................................. 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society ................................................... 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus ................................. 1-855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club ............................................................ 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees ....................................................... 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists ............................................................ 415-2484 Ft Myers UDC Chapter 2614 (United Daughters of the Confederacy .................................. 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL ...................................................... 561-9164 The Horticulture and Tea Society ............................................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society ................................................................. 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society ............................................. 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation ........................................... 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees ............. 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America .......................................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL .................................................... 667-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans .................................................. 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy ........................................ 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association ........................................ 561-2118 Kiwanis Clubs: Fort Myers Beach ................................................. 765-4254 or 454-8090 Fort Myers Edison ..................................................................... 694-1056 Fort Myers South ...................................................................... 691-1405 Gateway to the Islands .............................................................. 415-3100 Iona-McGregor .......................................................................... 482-0869Lions Clubs:Fort Myers Beach ...................................................................... 463-9738 Fort Myers High Noon ............................................................... 466-4228 Estero/South Fort Myers ........................................................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County .............................................. 768-0417 POLO Club of Lee County ......................................................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers ......................................................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society ................................................ 472-6940 United Way of Lee County ........................................................ 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) ................................. 211 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews Shell Museum ................................................ 395-2233 Burroughs Home ...................................................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium ........................................ 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates ................................................... 334-3614 Fort Myers Skate Park .............................................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium ............................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge ................................ 472-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site .............................................. 239-992-0311 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center ....................... 765-8101 Skatium ...................................................................................... 321-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society ........................................ 939-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History ...................................... 321-7430 True Tours ................................................................................. 945-0405 SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 27THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 201330 Pets Of The Week My name is Rue and I am a female American bull dog mix. I am two years old and my color is blue merle. I was rescued a couple of months ago by an Animal Control Officer. I had second and third degree burns on my back, ears, and head. No one knows what happened to me but I went home with one of the vet techs while I recuperated. I loved playing with her other dogs and her kids. Sometimes I act a little goofy but thats part of my endearing charm. Im feeling much better and my wounds are almost all healed. My fairytale ending would be complete if I could just find a loving home. Adoption fee: $25 (regularly $75) during Animal Services Theres No Place Like Home adoption promo. My name is Mimi and I am a domestic short hair female gray and white tabby, age two. I may be a shelter cat but the folks at the Platinum Coast Cat Fanciers Show know a good kitty when they see one. I was selected to be in the Household Pet Competition and I won lots of ribbon. I showed everyone what a beautiful, docile and congenial cat I am. Wouldnt a special kitty like me make your life complete? Adoption fee: $10 (regularly $75) during Animal Services Theres No Place Like Home adoption promo. For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to Animal Services website at www.LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive, Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office, off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if three months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs six months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee, and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500. Mimi ID# 564005 Rue ID# 567428 photos by squaredogphoto.com

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BEACH CHAIR PASTIMEAnswers on page 2531 THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 2013

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NOW OPEN! NOW OPEN! Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! Live Music & Happy Hour Available Details online! 239-463-5505 | 1249 Estero Blvd. Live Music Wed-Sun! Happy Hour Mon-Fri 2-5pmTheBeachedWhale.com Ft. Myers BEach: Sept 18th : Sept 18th Book Signing Event!Meet The Author!Details Online12-2pm & 4-6pmSanibel : Sept 1ST & 2ND THE RIVER AUGUST 9, 201332