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River weekly news ( July 12, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101363/00150

Material Information

Title: River weekly news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication: Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 08-02-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101363:00187

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101363/00150

Material Information

Title: River weekly news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication: Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 08-02-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101363:00187


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FREETake Me Home VOL. 12, NO. 30 AUGUST 2, 2013From the Beaches to the River District downtown Fort MyersRead Us Online at IslandSunNews.com A Midsummer Nights S ing Nets Canned G oods, Cash For CharityResidents who attended the 16th annual A Midsummer Nights Sing at First Presbyterian Church in downtown Fort Myers on July 23 opened their hearts and their wallets by contributing 1,000 pounds of food to benefit the Everyday Caf and Marketplace (The Soup Kitchen), operated by Community Cooperative Ministries (CCMI). Attendees also made cash contributions to help the charity, which serves more than 14,000 meals each month through their Everyday Caf and Marketplace and Home Delivered Meals programs. CCMI also educates 40 children in their Community Montessori, offers homeless and comprehensive case management services through the United Way Resource House, and oversees an emergency mobile food pantry. More than 500 people attended the performance, sponsored by the Galloway Family of Dealerships. continued on page 24 Businesses Hold T eddy Bear Drives For Local ChildrenGoodwill Industries of Southwest Florida, Inc. announces that the following local businesses are holding public Teddy Bear Drives for Goodwills 7th annual Festival of Trees: ArtFest Fort Myers, GMA Architects and TDM Consulting, Imaginarium Science Center, Kelly Road Self Storage, Puddy n Pearl II, Rnells Tuxedos, and Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center are all hosting teddy bear drives for the festivals A Very Beary Christmas tree. Goodwill hopes to collect 300 bears by November, in time for the start of the Festival of Trees on November 29 at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center in the Fort Myers River District. Goodwills bear tree has been a staple of Goodwills annual Festival of Trees since the events inception in 2006. Made up from bears donated by the community, the tree is one of 25 decorated trees that is auctioned off at the festivals signature event, the Tux & Trees Gala, on December 7. Auction guests gather around this special tree to raise money for The Southwest Florida Goodwill Foundation. The tree is then traditionally donated to a childrens hospital.continued on page 5 Young Artists To Perform During August Art WalkOn Friday, August 2, Young Artists Awards vocalists Sarah Daigle, Elisabeth Best and Sarah Best will be performing at Ocasiocasa Studio Gallery from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in conjunction with Augusts Art Walk in downtown Fort Myers. Sarah Daigle, 18, is a recent graduate of North Fort Myers High School. Elisabeth Best is a freshman at North Fort Myers High, and her sister Sarah attends Trafalgar Elementary School. The Young Artists Awards, in its 11th year of programming, is a not-for-profit education, performance, audition and scholarship program for students from throughout Southwest Florida. The organization is also a monthly partner with Art Walk. Ocasiocasa Studio Gallery is located at 1540 Broadway in the downtown Fort Myers River District. The perfor mance is free and open to the public. For more information on the Young Artists Awards, visit www.youngartistsawards. org or search Young Artists Awards on Facebook. Sarah Daigle Elisabeth Best Sarah Best Teddy Bear Tree at the Childrens Hospital Rev. Paul deJong of First Presbyterian Church of Fort Myers with A Midsummer Nights Sing sponsor Sam Galloway, Jr. Soloist Beth Wininger sings Something Beautiful

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THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 20132 Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: Brazies Furniture & Paint S hopby G erri R eaves, PhDSoon after Cecil L. Bennett took this photo in 1949, the diminutive Brazies Furniture & Paint Shop on Hendry would be gone. Also demolished would be the two-story building on the photos left, the Carl F. Roberts Building, which dated from the 1890s. The catalyst for the demolitions was the planned construction of a modern Thrifty Drugs on the southeast corner of Main and Hendry. Bennett and pharmacist LF Batastini would partner in constructing the drug store. Sue Bennett Grimes says that her father took this photo when the Western Auto Store he managed in the Roberts Building was having its close-out sale. Notice the words removal sale on the window. Earl O. Brazie had set up shop in this location the late 1930s. During the 1940s, he apparently lived there too, although its difficult to imagine that the small structure also contained residential quarters. Look closely through Brazies shop and youll see clear out the window on the back wall in the direction of the Central Hotel at Main and Jackson. The open-air, somewhat ramshackle look seems a bit out of place when just a few doors down stood the Robb & Stucky furniture store and the Richards Building, which contained many professional offices. Fort Myers native Tom Tinker Stewart vividly remembers Brazies. Stewarts father owned Stewarts Drug Store around the corner on Main Street, and as a young man, he used to explore the area bounded by Main, Hendry, Second and Jackson. He recalls the many odors mostly pleasant that wafted through the air in that neighborhood, such as the wonderful leather and polish smells of Tom Taminosians shoe repair shop, the delightful fragrance of Mr. Crews barbershop, and the exotic food smells from the Groceteria (once located in the Roberts Building). But it was Brazies open paint shop that provided the maximum assault on his senses, the nose-pounding odor of paint solvents, he writes in an email from Oregon. When Stewart passed by the shop on his exploration of the neighborhood, Mr. Brazie, who was always dressed in paint spattered gray-on-gray overalls, would exchange a nod of hello with him. After the demolition of the shop, Brazies moved to the neighboring Starnes Arcade (also called the Reynolds Arcade). That 1924 arcade is visible on the right in both the 1949 and now photos. Coley Westbrook Mens Ware was constructed on the former Brazies site and Thrifty Drugs opened on the corner at Main. Today, the renovated Coley Westbrook building is home to a planning and engineering firm, and the former Thrifty Drugs is a law office. The Starnes Arcade now bears the name Peeples Court and The River Weekly News office is located there. Walk down Hendry Street to a site where a little shop made big olfactory impressions. Then travel a few blocks to the Southwest Florida Museum of History, where you can learn more about the many businesses that have been located on Hendry through the decades. For information, call 321-7430 or go to www.museumofhistory.org. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Then be sure to check out the favorite research center of local history buffs the Southwest Florida Historical Society. The all-volunteer non-profit organization is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Drop by on Wednesday or Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon, or call them at 939-4044. Sources: Archives of the Southwest Florida Historical Society. The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, please call (239) 415-7732 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, FL 33901. Fax number: (239) 415-7702. E-mail: press@riverweekly.com. The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Co-Publishers Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Isabel Rasi Office Coordinator Graphic Arts/ProductionAnn Ziehl Photographer Michael Heider Writers Anne Mitchell Jeff Lysiak PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Contributing WritersRead Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com Click on The River Ed Frank Max Friedersdorf Tom Hall Brazies Furniture & Paint Shop moved to the Starnes Arcade (right) soon after this 1949 photo courtesy of the Southwest Florida Historical Society (Sue Bennett Grimes Collection) The Coley Westbrook Building, renovated several years ago, was built on the site of Brazies shop photo by Gerri Reaves

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3 THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 2013 Fort Myers Public Art: Art League Re-Opens For August Art WalkArt Walk returns to downtown Fort Myers on Friday, August 2. Come join the monthly self-guided tour of new art exhibits and streetside craft demonstrations taking place in the River Districts art galleries and boutiques from 6 to 10 p.m. After being closed in June and July for renovations, the Art League of Fort Myers will be open for Art Walk on August 2 with Back To School, a twodimensional show open to members of the Art Council of Southwest Florida that will feature oils, acrylics, watercolors, pastels, collages, original prints (including etching, lithographs and wood block), photography and fiber art. This is a Peoples Choice show, so Art Walkers get to choose the recipients of the coveted red, blue and yellow ribbons. In addition to providing support, encouragement and educational opportunities in the arts to both children and adults, it is the mission of the Art League of Fort Myers to contribute to the cultural life of the local community and surrounding areas by promoting the appreciation, enjoyment and distribution of fine art. The Art League of Fort Myers was organized in 1956 and has been in continuous operation for 57 years. From 1974 through 1992, the Art League of Fort Myers was located on Crawford Street. In September of the latter year, the league moved into the old Schultz farm house at the corner of Colonial and McGregor. When the farm house was demolished to make way for the Midpoint Bridge, the league moved into the Edwards Building, which was moved to replace the Shultz farm. The league remained there until it decided to become a more integral part of the sizzling River District art scene a few years ago. The Art League is located at 1451 Monroe Street, on the ground floor of the City of Palms Parking Garage. For more information, visit www.artleagueoffortmyers. org or call 275-3970. An arts advocate, Tom Hall guides weekly walking tours of the River Districts public art collection in Fort Myers. For more information, go to www.truetours.net. Pina Colada is Bill Gendeys latest acrylic painting. I enjoyed how this one turned out. I caught the hot, misty summer sky right before dusk. See the work of Gedney, and other local artists, at the newly renovated Art League of Fort Myers during this months Art Walk Lazy Flamingo, Inc. 6520-C Pine Avenue Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-5353 Lazy Flamingo 3, Inc. 16501 Stringfellow Rd Bokeelia, FL 33922 239-283-5959 Lazy Flamingo 2, Inc. 1036 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-6939 Lazy Flamingo 4, Inc. 12951 McGregor Blvd. Ft. Myers, FL 33919 239-476-9000 Four Great Locations! If Our Seafood Were Any Fresher, We Would Be Serving It Under Water! NOW SERVING FULL LIQUOR IN FORT MYERS Bring in This Coupon for $ 5 OFFPurchase of $30 or moreF M 33 Patio de Leon Ft Myers River District 337-3377 or www.MorganHouseRestaurant.comTasty Tuesday1/2 price craft beers$6 burgersThrifty Thursday$4 Martinis 1/2 price selected shotsSalty Saturday1/2 price margaritas & 1/2 tequila shootersWino Wednesday 1/2 price house wine 1/2 price appetizersFreebie FridayBOGO house wines & select drafts Free buffet (upstairs only) Happy Hour 4-7pm & All Day Saturday

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THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 20134 Shell Point Residents Help Students Start The School Year Off RightResidents of Shell Point Retirement Community hosted their annual summer school supply distribution event to benefit the children and grandchildren of the communitys employees. A total of 600 bags brimming with school supplies for children attending kindergarten through fifth grade were distributed to Shell Point employees. All the supplies were donated by Shell Point residents, many of whom also volunteered to hand out the bags. Several staff members brought their children to the event to thank the residents in person. Committee chair Janet Bendall said Shell Point residents enjoy coordinating this event each year for the communitys employees. We like to help ensure their children have a great start to their school year, she said, adding that the group distributed 100 bags more than last years total of 500. We are so fortunate that our residents have continued this tradition, said Karen Anderson, Shell Points assistant vice president of human resources. Our employees truly appreciate our residents generosity. Victoria Phippin and Janel Bendall Glorimel Rodriquez with her granddaughtersArea Businesses Can Now Make Pitch To HertzHertz has established a dedicated email for businesses and individuals to contact them if they want to propose their products or services. The email address is monitored by the companys procurement department and then given to the appropriate department within Hertz. The email address is supplierinfo@hertz.com. The Hertz Corporation announced in May it would relocate its corporate headquarters to Estero. Fridays announcement about the Hertz procurement contact follows an announcement that a website has been launched to help local businesses with job openings connect with Hertz employees trailing spouses. That website is www.SWFLWorks.org; click on the Hertz Family Relocation Assistance Program portal. For more information, contact Lee Countys Economic Development office also called the Fort Myers Regional Partnership at 338-3161. Call for departure time CAPTIVACRUISES H T H E I S L A N D S H THE BEST WAY TO SEE THE ISLANDS IS FROM THE WATER Cruises depart from beautiful Captiva Island Located across the street from Gulf Harbour 15065 McGregor Blvd, Ste 104, Fort Myers Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Downtown Fort Myers (Post Oce Arcade Next to Hotel Indigo) 1520 Broadway For Takeout & Delivery Tel: 334-6991 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEKMon-urs 11am 10pm Fri-Sat 11am 11pm Sun 12pm 9pm www. ichiban-sushi-chinese.com

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5 THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 2013 From page 1Teddy Bear DriveWe truly appreciate the support of local businesses, said Madison Mitchell, spokesperson at Goodwill. Its such a magical moment when the tree gets put together and you just see the finished result. Coming together for two wonderful causesit really feels like Christmas. If you are interested in hosting a teddy bear drive, or have new bears that you would like to donate contact Madison Mitchell at 9952106 ext. 2213 or email MadisonMitchell@goodwillswfl.org. For more information on the Festival of Trees and Tux & Trees Gala visit www. tuxandtrees.com Last years Festival and Gala raised $93,000 to support the Southwest Florida Goodwill Foundation, which provides long-term financial support to programs and services of Goodwill Industries of Southwest Florida. In 2012, Goodwill helped 30,000 Southwest Floridians with disabilities and other disadvantages become more independent. Previous years Teddy Bear Tree FREE MARINA DOCKAGE with Dock Attendants Assistance RIV Nellies Upstairs Waterside Bar Where its Happy Hour all the time!!! 10% OFF Offer valid with Cash payments only ... No credit cards. ONE COUPON PER TABLE Can not be used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, Expires Aug. 16, 2013 Snacks in Between11am-10pm Snacks in Between11am-10pmwww.nervousnellies.net Calendar Girls Sponsor 10th Guide Dog PupThe Calendar Girls would like to introduce Halo, the 10th puppy they have sponsored for the Paws For Patriots program of Southeastern Guide Dogs, located in Palmetto, Florida. Since 2006, The Calendar Girls have been sponsoring what they like to call miracles with tails for Paws For Patriots; to date, they have named/sponsored 11 puppies. The program identifies blinded and wounded soldiers from all wars, and give to them at no charge either a guide dog or veteran service dog. The school receives no government funding, all the funding comes from the community, and it now costs $60,000 to raise up one guide dog team. For more information, call Katherine at 850-6010 or visit www. calendargirlsflorida.com. HaloEmail your editorial copy to: press@islandsunnews.com

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THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 20136 Hortoons Lee R epublican Womens Club MeetingThe Lee Republican Womens Club (Chartered) will hold its monthly luncheon meeting at the Crowne Plaza Holiday Inn, 13051 Bell Tower Drive, Fort Myers, on Tuesday, August 13. Social hour begins at 11:30 a.m. with luncheon and program at noon. Featured speaker will be Florida State Representative Raymond Rodrigues, District 76. The public and guests are welcome. The cost of the luncheon is $17. For reservations or more information, call 573-6913. Learn H ow To Live A Little I n Lee County The Lee County Library System in partnership with the Lee County Visitor and Convention Bureau will showcase places in Lee County where family and friends can explore and enjoy this beautiful area on a budget. The Vacation In Your Own Backyard exhibit will run from August 8 to September 18 at the Northwest Regional Library, 519 Chiquita Blvd. in Cape Coral. In addition to the exhibit, the library will offer related programs. Why take a stay-cation in your own backyard? Stay-cations are a great way to take a break and explore what tourists from out of town come here to experience and see. It is an excellent way to rejuvenate and relax without the hassle of packing, airport travel, time changes, rental cars and a big bill. Lee County has so much to offer and many people who live here rarely get a chance to get out of their normal routine and live a little, said Sheldon Kaye, Lee County Library System Director. Consider venturing out of ones comfort zone and trying something exciting in Lee County, or take a break from the nonstop activity and let yourself sleep in since you dont have far to travel for beautiful beaches, parks or water activities! The exhibit is available during open hours. Vacation in Your Own Backyard Programs: Recreation Saturday, August 10 1 to 2 p.m. Discover the treasures of Lee County informative introduction and overview of The opportunities are endless. Diving in Lee County Wednesday, August 14 2 to 3 p.m. Mike Campbell, with the Lee County Marine Services Artificial Reef Program will share opportunities for diving and fishing on the 20 artificial reefs located in Lee County. Of special interest is the USS Mohawk Veterans Memorial underwater diving destination because of its variety of marine life including whale sharks. This summer, the Mohawk will double as an underwater art gallery featuring the photography of Andreas Franke. Saturday, August 17 2 to 3 p.m. Nancy MacPhee of the Lee County information on the bureaus efforts in strengthening the local tourism experience. Highlighting restaurants that serve locally sourced produce and seafood not only makes a community more sustainable, but highlights agriculture, Floridas second most important economic driver. Attendees at this presentation will enjoy a taste of Lee and be entered in a drawing to win Simply Florida, a cookbook of favorite recipes by Floridians. Recreation Saturday, September 7 1 to 2 p.m. Discover the treasures of Lee County informative introduction and overview of The opportunities are endless. The Northwest Regional Library is located at 519 Chiquita Blvd. N. in Cape Coral and is open Monday, Wednesday and Thursday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Tuesday from noon to 8 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The library is closed on Sundays. The exhibit is available during all open hours and the interactive presentation dates and times can be found above. All programs are free and open to the public. A sign language interpreter is available with five business days notice to library staff. For more information on the exhibit, go to www.leelibrary.net or call Telephone Reference at 479-INFO (4636). The Board of Directors of Art of the Olympians (AOTO) has determined it is time to reorganize and restructure the foundation. A new direction focused on National and International Exhibits and Educational Programs will further the vision of the founder, Al Oerter. AOTO appreciates the support of the City of Fort Myers and the Lee County Commissioners to bring quality events and worldwide outreach promoting our home. As we close the doors to the museum, we intend to continue educational and outreach programs in Southwest Florida. We thank all of our supporters and volunteers who have faithfully upheld the Olympic standard of excellence. It is an honor to be a part of this Olympic family. This is an exciting time as we embark on a new journey. ANNOUNCEMENT H umane Society E arns Challenge Grant For Clinic X-R ay MachineThe Gulf Coast Humane Society (GCHS) received a $25,000 challenge grant for a veterinary clinic x-ray machine. New gifts received prior to December 31, 2013 will be matched, up to $25,000, for the GCHS Veterinary Clinic. Donations can be made in person, by mail or on the website at www.gulfcoasthumanesociety.org, through PayPal. The GCHS clinic is a full-service veterinary clinic open to the public six days a week. All funds above operating costs go directly back to support the shelter pets of the Gulf Coast Humane Society. Having a digital x-ray machine in the clinic will allow staff to diagnose and treat sick and injured pets right away. No longer will a pet have to be transported to another hospital for x-rays. With the addition of this x-ray machine, GCHS will be able to provide high quality care to hundreds more dogs and cats each year in its modernized clinic. This is a great opportunity for Gulf Coast Humane Society supporters to double their investment. For more information about the Gulf Coast Humane Society, call 332-0364 or 2010 Arcadia Boulevard in Fort Myers. Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702 or email press@riverweekly.com

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7 THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 2013 Pioneer Day H eld In H onor Of Church H istoryThe Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Cape Coral recently celebrated Pioneer Day with cow milking, apple bobbing, cow flop, water balloon and ring toss, a scripture question game, old fashioned pioneer photos with costumes and props, tractor rides, handcart building, and pie eating contests. A chili cook-off lunch was served with baked potatoes, cornbread, biscuits, cake, pie and molasses cookies. The annual celebration is held in honor of the first group of Mormon pioneers who entered the Salt Lake Valley between July 22 and July 24, 1847. Latter-day Saints went west to escape religious persecution. They left behind comfortable homes and profitable farms and braved the 1,300-mile journey across the plains under sweltering sun and in freezing winter storms. Brigham Young led the Latter-day Saints from Nauvoo, Illinois, to the Rocky Mountains, where he was instrumental in settling not only Salt Lake City but also cities and towns in Utah and throughout the West. He served as church president from 1847 to 1877 and served for a time as territorial governor and Indian agent. The historic trek of the Mormon pioneers in the mid to late 1840s was an event that helped shape the development of the American West. The church was formally organized in a small log cabin in 1830 in Upstate New York with six members. The current worldwide church membership is 14,782,473 with 29,014 congregations. The church is located at 1928 Chiquita Boulevard S. in Cape Coral. Services are held every Sunday at 10 a.m., followed by Sunday School. All are welcome. Kids and handcarts Pioneer stick-pull Learning to milk the cows Pie eating contest rf ntbnrr bb bb rtttn Loved this restaurant. Fantastic experience. Food was exceptionally amazing. Service was outstanding. TripAdvisor Member, May 2013 Tractor trailer ride Water balloon toss V olunteer Mentors Needed The Foster Grandparent Program of SW Florida is seeking seniors, 55 and over to tutor/mentor children in elementary schools, Head Start centers and after school programs,. Volunteers serve 15 to 20 hours a week and receive a tax-free stipend of $2.65 and hour plus transportation reimbursement of 40 cents a mile, a free physical and vacation, sick and holiday pay, plus other perks. Orientation starts soon. To volunteer, call Joan Willoughby at The Dr. Piper Center, 332-5346.

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THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 20138 Along The RiverStart your weekend with happy hour specials at The Morgan House, located in the heart of downtown Fort Myers historic River District. Fridays feature buy one, get one free house wines and select draft beers along with a free buffet for patrons of their upstairs bar. On Saturday, margaritas and tequila shooters are half-price. Ol! The restaurant and bar features 14 beers on tap with a full liquor bar. Casual dining is available either inside in air-conditioned comfort, outside on the terrace, upstairs at the rooftop bar or in the posh Miami-style Red Corner. The Morgan House is located at 33 Patio de Leon. It is open Tuesday through Saturday. Call 337-3377 or go to www.morganhouserestaurant.com. On Saturday, August 3, Alliance for the Arts presents Earthworms, The Magic Garden Workers: Vermiculture In The Urban Farm as part of its Urban Farming Workshop Series held on the first and third Saturdays of this summers GreenMarket. Instructions begin at 10:30 a.m. and end at 11:45 a.m. The suggested donation is $5. Every summer, the Alliance for the Arts GreenMarket invites the public to participate in free farming and gardening workshops conducted by local growers, master gardeners, homesteaders and educators. The result has been an increase in local homes and communities growing food organically in the area. It is the time and place to learn how to produce food in small areas around homes, businesses and community centers in cities and towns using organic, bio-intensive methods. Explore ways to contribute to the communitys sustainability and long-term food security. Pre-registration is not required and the workshops are free, but a $5 donation is appreciated and will help support the market and future educational programs. The workshops will be conducted outside, under the shade of the trees, but in case of rain they will be moved into a classroom. Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers near Colonial Boulevard. Call 939-2787 or go to www.artinlee.org. Need a change of scenery but dont want to spend all day driving? Get moooovin to Sanibel for udderly great food, drinks and desserts at the Island Cow. The bistro is airy with french doors out to the front and patios in the back. Breakfast is served Monday through Saturday from 7:30 to 11 a.m. Sunday brunch runs until noon. Lunch begins daily at 11 a.m. At dinner time, dine under the stars while you listen to live music on one of Sanibels only al fresco eating porches. Dinner service closes when the music ends. For large parties or when youre in a hurry, feel free to call ahead for reservations. Stop in at the bar anytime for a snack or take away orders. Island Cow is located at 2163 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel. Call 472-0606 or go to www.sanibelislandcow.com. On Mondays through August 26, The Fort Myers Film Festival popular Missed It Mondays: Best of the 2013 Film Festival is featured at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center (SBDAC). The event has showcased more than four-dozen local filmmakers living in Lee, Collier and Charlotte counties and is a must attend for cineasts who love independent film and film festivals. On August 5, Love At A Certain Age, directed by Logan Hendricks, is playing. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the film begins at 7 p.m. Admission is $6. The regular season of short films begins September 9. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. Call 333-1933 or go to www.fortmyersfilmfestival.com for a schedule of films. On Friday, August 9 at 7:30 p.m., Shell Point Retirement Community welcomes The BUZZ as part of its Summer Concert Series. Already well-medaled individually before they got together as a true super group, Nancy Cloeter, Debbie Cleveland, Karen Breidert and Jeannie Froelich and The BUZZ won several Sweet Adelines International Quartet championships. They have been delighting audiences and happily living their Four Parts, One Voice motto ever since. The Village Auditorium at Shell Point is located at 15100 Shell Point Boulevard, Fort Myers. Single event tickets are $16 and are a available in advance or at the venue one hour before the program begins. Call 800-780-1131 or go to www.shellpoint.org. The Morgan House offers casual dining and happy hour specials, along with live music this weekend from the Rachel Hughes Band and jazz musicians Touch of Class Calves love the Island Cow, so gather your herd up and come on over to Sanibel for a tasty breakfast, lunch, dinner or snack Please visit our River Weekly News online advertisers at www.islandsunnews.com. You can click through to their Web sites for more information about real estate, shopping, restaurants and services. Just click on the logos surrounding the front page. www.SeabreezeNurseries.com (239) 560-1422 WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY We can help! Ask about our Season Discount! Palms, Palms, natives, natives, crotons, crotons, bromeliads, bromeliads, buttery bushes, buttery bushes, & much more & much more Open Monday Saturday www.threecraftyladies.com Find us on WE WILL PAY YOUR TOLL!!!Spend $55 and bring us your toll receipt for a full refund!

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Churches/TemplesALL F aA ITHS UNIT aA RI aA N CONGREG aA TION (UU A) Where diversity is treasured 2756 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers Summer program: Understanding the Faiths of Our Worlds June 2 to August 25 11 a.m. Interim Minister, Rev. Margaret Beard, begins on September 1 239-226-0900. www.allfaiths-uc.org A LLLL SS A INTSINTS BYZA NTINENTINE RITERITE CA THOLITHOLI C C HH U RR C HH 10291 Bayshore Rd., N. Fort Myers Divine Liturgy is on Sun. at 10:30 a.m.; Rosary begins at 10 a.m. Lenten services (Presanctied Liturgy) will be on Wed. evenings at 6 p.m. starting on Feb. 22. Administrator is Very Rev. Peter Lickman, ph. 305-651-0991. We are a Church of the Eastern Catholic or Byzantine Rite, 1.5 mi. east of Int. 75. A NNNN U NN C II A TIONTION GREEGREE K ORTHOORTHO D OO X C HH U RR C HH 8210 Cypress Lake Dr ive, Fort Myers Reverend Fr. George P. Savas Orthros Service Sunday 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy Sunday 10 a.m. www.annunciation.fl.goarch.org 239-481-2099 B ETHETH SHILOHSHILOH M ESSIESSI A NINI C SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 15675 McGregor Boulev ard, 437-3171 Rabbi: Judah Hungerman Friday Service, 8 p.m., Saturday Service, 11 a.m. Shabbat School Saturday Morning, Adult Hebrew Classes. Call for information on full program. B RERE AD OO F LILI F EE M INISTRIESINISTRIES C HH U RR C HH OO F GOGO D 16581 McGregor Boule vard, 267-3166 Just past the Tanger Outlet Mall Pastor: Barry Lentz, 281-3063 Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. C HH AP ELEL OO F CYP RESSRESS C OO V EE 10200 Cypress Cov e Circle Fort Myers 239-850-3943, Located at Cypress Cove Retirement Center on HealthPark Campus An ecumenical non-denominational community of believers. Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. Reverendt Ted Althouse, Pastor revtedalthouse@aol.com C HH U RR C HH OO F THETHE C ROSSR OSS 13500 Freshman Lane; 768-2188 Pastor: Bud Stephens; A nondemonimational church emphasizing a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Sunday Service: 9:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 Contemporary. CO vV EN aA NT PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937 Rev. Dr. Jeffrey DeYoe, Senior Pastor Reverend David Dietzel, Pastor Emeritus. Traditional Sunday service 10 a.m. Nursery available C ypYP RESS LakLAK E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H 8400 Cypress Lak e Drive, Fort Myers, 481-5442 Randy A. Alston, Reverend. Sunday Services: Bible study, 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship, 11 a.m., Evening Worship, 7 p.m., Wednesday Prayer Meeting, 6:30 p.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 481-3233. www.clpc.us. Clint Cottrell, pastor Prayer Service 8 a.m., Praise 9 a.m., Childrens Church 9 a.m., Traditional 11 a.m. Summer: Prayer Service 8 a.m. Combined Traditional/Praise 10 a.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E UNITE dD METHO dD IST CH uU R cC H 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 482-1250 8 and 11 a.m. Sunday Traditional Service 9:30 a.m. Praise Service Sunday School all times F aA ITH FELLOWSHI pP W ORL dD O uU TRE acA C H mM INISTRIES 6111 South P ointe Boulevard, Fort Myers, 278-3638. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Voice of Faith, WCRN 13.50 AM Radio, Sunday, 1:30 p.m.; Thursday Service, 7:30 p.m.; Friday Youth Service, 7:30 p.m. Nursery care for pre-school children and Childrens Church for ages 5-12 available at each service. F aA ITH uU NITE dD mM ETHO dD IST cC H uU R cC H 15690 McGregor Boule vard Fort Myers, 482-2030 Pastor: David Stauffer. Traditional services 8:45 a.m.; Contemporary, 10:30 a.m. Go south on McGregor Boulevard. The church is mile past the intersection of Gladiolus and San Carlos Boulevard on the way to Sanibel. FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF cC HRIST S cC IENTIST 2390 West First Street, next door to Edison Estates. Sunday Morning Service and Sunday School, 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday Evening Testimony Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Child care provided at all services. Visit our Reading Room for quiet study at: 2281 First Street, River District. www.time4thinkers.com, www.christiansciencefortmyers.com, www.christianscience.com FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF THE NazaNAZA RENE 13545 Amer ican Colony Boulevard off Daniels Parkway in the Colony, Fort Myers, 936-2511 Pastor: Reverend Joey Brummett Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Family Night, 7 p.m. F IRSTIRST U NITENITE D M ETHOETHO D ISTIST C HH U RR C HH in the Downto wn Fort Myers River District 2466 First Street, Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-332-1152, www.fumcftmyers.org Sunday: 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 5 p.m. Youth Program FORT M yY ERS CHRISTI aA N CH uU R cC H (DIS cC I pP LES O fF CHRIST) A SS TE pP HEN MINISTRIES CONGREG aA TION 5916 Winkler Road, F ort Myers, 437-4330 Reverend Mark Condrey, Pastor Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Church School: 9:15 a.m. FORT M yY ERS CONGREG aA TION aA L UNITE dD CH uU R cC H O fF CHRIST : 8210 College Parkway, Fort Myers, 482-3133. Philip White, pastor Morning Worship: 10 a.m. Church School: 10:15 a.m. Adult Forum: 11:30 a.m. HOLHOL Y THEOTOTHEO TO K OSOS M ONON A STERSTER Y 111 Ev ergreen Road, North Fort Myers, 997-2846 Eastern Orthodox mens monastery. Liturgical services conducted in the English, Greek and Church Slavonic languages, following the Julian (Old) Calendar. Liturgical Services: Sundays and Holy Days: The Third and Sixth Hours at 8:30 a.m.; Divine Liturgy at 9 a.m. II ON aA HH O pP E EpEP IS cC O paP A L cC ONGREG aA TION 9650 Gladiolus Dr ive, Fort Myers 4544778 The Reverend Dr. John S. Adler, pastor. Weekly services: Saturday 5 p.m., Eucharist with Healing Sunday 8 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite One; 9:30 a.m., Family Eucharist with Healing and Church School Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Morning Prayer (in Spanish); Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Eucharist with Healing. Child care available at Saturday 5 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m. services. JES uU S THE WW OR kK ER C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H: 881 Nuna Avenue, Fort Myers, 481-1143 Masses Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. K INGING D OO M LILI F EE C HH U RR C HH 2154 McGregor Boulev ard, Fort Myers, 218-8343 Pastor Randy and Anita Thurman 10:30 a.m. Sunday Service All are welcome. LambLAMB O fF GG O dD LuLU THER aA N/ EpEP IS cC O paP A L CH uU R cC H Corner Cypress View Drive and Koreshan Boulevard, Three Oaks area, Fort Myers, 267-3525 Walter Fohs, pastor; Becky RobbinsPenniman, associate pastor Sunday worship services: 8 a.m. Early Grace Traditional 9 a.m. Awesome Grace Contemporary 10:30 a.m. Classic Grace Traditional 8:45 & 10 a.m. Sunday School Gods Group NN EW BEGINNINGS CENTER Ne w Home Church, 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, North Fort Myers, 239-656-0416 Weekly Friday Meeting Meet & Greet: 6:30 p.m. Kingdom Teaching: 7 p.m. Fellowship and refreshments after service. nbcministry@embarqmail.com, www.facebook. com/nbcministry. Alex & Patricia Wiggins, Ministers NEWNEW C OO V ENEN A NTNT EE Y ESES C HH U RR C HH See Clearly Meeting monthly at 9 a.m. at the Elks Lodge. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, Fort Myers, FL 33907. 239-220-8519 Pastor Alan Bondar www.newcovenanteyes.com Wear what you want, rockin music, relevant teaching, LIFT Kidz program, free coffee & donuts, people who are real, church thats actually fun. NN EW HH O pP E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H O fF FOR T M yY ERS 16120 San Car los Boulevard, Unit 10 239-985-8503 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m Sunday Morning Worship. 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study NN EW HH O pP E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 3825 McGregor Boule vard. Fort Myers Pastors: Stu Austin and Howard Biddulph 8 & 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11 a.m. Contemporary Worship 8, 9:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School Youth and Childrens programming runs concurrent to Sunday services. Nursery care provided at all services 274-1230. For more information visit: www.newhopefortmyers.org P EE A C EE CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H Meets at F ort Myers Beach Masonic Lodge 17625 Pine Ridge Road, Fort Myers Beach 267-7400. Pastors Bruce Merton, Gail & RC Fleeman Adult Discussion Classes: 9-10 AM Countdown to Worship (praise music): 10:10 AM Amazing Grace Worship: 10:30 AM Phone 267-7400 Fax 267-7407 Web site: peacecommunitychurch.com e-mail: peace1265@aol.com P EE A C EE LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH Sunday Worship at 9:30am. Peace is a member of the ELCA. We celebrate weekly communion with traditional liturgy, organ and choir. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers On the way to Sanibel. 239-437-2599, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@peaceftmyers.com. RE dD EE mM ER L uU THER aA N cC H uU R cC H 3950 Winkler Ext., Fort Myers, 274-0143 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. Sunday Services Daily early learning center/day care RIRI V ERER OO F LILI F EE A SSESSE MB LL Y OO F GOGO D 21580 Riv er Ranch Rd, Estero 239-495-0400, Senior Pastor: Todd Weston 8 and 9:45 a.m Services; 11:30 a.m. Legacy Service, multi-generational S amudAMUD R abadAB AD R aA buddB UDD HIST cC ENTER Meditation classes All are welcome. Guided meditations offering many methods for relaxing the body and focusing the mind on virtuous objects to bring increasing peace and happiness into daily activity. For information, class times and locations call 567-9739 or visit www. MeditationInFortMyers.org. SS O uU THWEST bapB AP TIST cC H uU R cC H 16940 McGregor Boule vard, Fort Myers, 454-3336 Robert G. Kasten, Pastor Sunday Worship Service 11 a.m. Nursery available 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Junior Church grades one to five Wee Church Pre-K to K Evening Service 6 p.m. Wednsday Service 6 p.m. SaSA INT COL umbkUMBK ILLE C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H 12171 Iona Road, F ort Myers, off McGregor and north of Gladiolus. 489-3973 Father Joseph Clifford. Weekly masses: Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. Weekend masses: Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday: 7, 9,11, and 5:30 p.m. Reconciliation is available at the church on Saturdays at noon and by appointment SaSA INT JOHN THE A pP OSTLE METRO pP OLIT aA N CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H 3049 Mcg regor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 344-0012 Pastor Reverend Steve Filizzi An Affirming & Inclusive Congregation Sunday Services, 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Mid-Week Service, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. SaSA INT MI cC H aA EL LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H & ScSC HOOL ( LL CM SS ) 3595 Broadw ay, Fort Myers 239-939-4711, www.smlcs.org Wednesday Fellowship: 5:30 p.m. Dinner $5, 6:15 p.m. bible studies Worship: Saturday, 5:30 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. with 9:15 a.m. adult and childrens Bible Study, plus marriage enrichment studies. Divorce Care on Thursdays from 7 to 8:30 p.m. During Lent: Wednesday worship noon and 6:15 p.m. SaSA INT PETER LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H 3751 Estero Boule vard, Fort Myers Beach, 463-4251. Sunda y w orship at 9:30 a.m. Womens Bible Study is offered on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 9:30 a.m. www.stpeterfmb.com TETE MP LELE B ETHELETHEL SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 16225 Winkler Rd. 433-0018. Rabbi Jeremy Barras E-mail: rabbi.barras@templebethel.com Cantorial soloist: Lawrence Dermer Temple educator: Dale Cohen, MaEd, RJE Shabbat Services, Friday, 7:30 p.m. Torah Study, Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Religious Education; Sunday School and Midweek classes, Preschool Classes, Monday through Friday Web site: www.templebethel.com Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TETE MP LELE JUD EE A (C ONSERONSER VA TITI V EE ) 14486 A&W Bulb Road, F ort Myers, 433-0201, Rabbi: Rabbi Elyssa Auster President: Keith Grossman Minyan: Monday & Thursday at 9 a.m. Services: Friday night at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Religious School Sunday morning Web site: www.tjswfl.org Preschool director: JoAnn Goldman email templejudeapreschool@gmail.com 433-0201, Web site: www.tjswfl.org Affiliated: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism continued on page 11THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 201310

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11 THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 2013WILLIAM ALLEN NICKOLDSWilliam Allen Nickolds, formerly of Sanibel, Florida, was born in Taunton, Massachusetts on November 22, 1917 to William and Matilda (Metcalf) Nickolds. He passed away on July 17, 2013 in Fort Myers, Florida. He attended Taunton public schools, graduated high school, briefly attended Springfield College in Springfield, Massachusetts before being inducted into the AUS. He was commissioned 2nd lieutenant, was detailed to a DUKW Battalion overseas and participated in the first DUKW landings on Utah Beach in France. Upon his discharge, Nickolds completed his undergraduate studies at Canterbury College in Danville, Indiana, with an AB in 1948, then entering government service again and retiring from the Postal Service in 1984. Nickolds was married to Norma Jean Adams, with whom he owned and operated real estate on Newbury Street in Boston, and who died in 1968 leaving their daughter, Ann Adams Nickolds, who lives in Salem, Massachusetts. In 1975, he married Nancy C. Santeusanio with whom he moved to Sanibel Island in 1999. They and their black standard poodle made it their permanent home. A communicant, vestryman, and usher at the Anglican Church of the Advent in Boston, Massachusetts, he was a life member in the Guild of Saint Vincent, the Guild of All Souls, and a founding and charter member of the National Museum of the American Indian. In Sanibel, he attended St. Michael and All Angels Church. William is survived by his wife Nancy C. Santeusanio, his daughter Ann Adams of Salem, Massachusetts, his sister Jane Stockwell of Bremerton, Washington, and stepson Peter Santeusanio and family of Hampton Falls, New Hampshire. A memorial mass will be celebrated on Tuesday, September 24 at the Saint Michael and All Angels Church beginning at 10 a.m.Memorials may be made in his memory to the Saint Michael and All Angels Church, 2304 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel, FL 33957. Visit www.harvey-engelhardt. com to leave a condolence to the family. From page 10Churches/TemplesTHE CHABAD LUBAVITCH OF SW FLORIDA ORTHODOX 5620 Winkler Road, Fort Myers Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz 433-7708, E-mail: rabbi@chabadswf.org Web site: www.chabadswf.org Services: Friday 6:30 p.m.; Saturday Kabbalah class 9 a.m.; Shacharit 10 a.m.; Kiddush at noon Minyan: Monday and Thursday 7 a.m. THE NEW CHURCH The New Church of SWFL is located 10811 Sunset Plaza Circ. #401, behind Zoomers. Rev. Gabriella Cahaley officiates worship services on Sundays at 11 a.m. during the season. Other worship events are held on the beach in Fort Myers Beach. See our webpage http://www.newchurchflorida.com/ or call for more information 239-481-5535. CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 1619 Llewellyn Drive Fort Myers Just off McGregor across from the Edison/ Ford Winter Estates 334-4978 Pastor: Douglas Kelchner Worship times Sundays 9 and 10:30 a.m. Website: www.taecc.com UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH FORT MYERS 13411 Shire Lane (off Daniels Parkway one mile west of I-75) Minister: The Reverend Allison Farnum Sunday services and religious education at 10:30 a.m. For information on all church events call 5612700 or visit www.uucfm.org. UNITY OF BONITA SPRINGS Family Service 10 to 11 a.m. Healing Circle 11 a.m. Hospitality and Fellowship, 11 a.m. Inspiring lesson, uplifting and dynamic music, meditation in a loving environment. Service held at 28285 Imperial Street, Bonita Springs. Call 947-3100. UNITY OF FORT MYERS 11120 Ranchette Rd., Fort Myers Summer Services: Sundays at 10 a.m. Childrens class at 10 a.m. Reverend Jim Rosemergy, Minister Our God is Love. Our Race is Human. Our Religion is Oneness. www.unityoffortmyers.org or 239-278-1511 WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 9065 Ligon Court, Fort Myers, across from HealthPark Hospital, 481-2125 Senior Pastor: Robert Brunson Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Blended Worship www.westminsterfortmyers.org WORD OF LIFE CHURCH 2120 Collier Ave, Fort Myers, 274-8881; Services: Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. Bishop Gaspar and Michele Anastasi ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH 7401 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, 481-4040, Interim Pastor Jim Eggert Pastor Peter Weeks Sunday Services: 8:30 a.m. Traditional; 10 a.m. Blended Traditional and Contemporary; 11:30 a.m. Contemporary. Childrens Sunday School, Adult /Teen Bible Classes, 10 a.m. OBITUARY JUAN C. MEJIAJuan C. Mejia, 48, received his wings on July 20, 2013. Beloved husband of Jeannette; proud and loving father of Anny, Katie, Malenie and Archie. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Craig Hospital Foundation, 3425 S. Clarkson Street, Englewood, CO 80113. Please share condolences at www.HoranCares.com. OBITUARY Human Trafficking Prevention Classes HeldHuman Trafficking Awareness Partnerships (HTAP) reports that four local ARTREACH programs have been conducted since May at local afterschool and summer camp programs. One program was held at Our Mothers Home, a foster home for young girls with babies. This is the second year in a row that HTAP has conducted the program there. Two programs were held at the Heights Foundation Community Center one in the spring afterschool program and one in the Summer Camp program. Another was a first-time venture with the Boys and Girls Club of Lee County, held at the Pueblo Bonito Clubhouse in Bonita Spring. About 40 children attended these programs and they created 10 large paintings. At each of the programs, the girls are taught about the dangers of human trafficking to themselves and others. They are taught the lures used to draw girls into trafficking and the ways they can avoid becoming a victim. They are also taught how art has been used for centuries as a tool of social change. They then create large paintings (3 feet x 4 feet) which are later available for exhibition. Over the past 3.5 years, a total of 37 paintings have been created as well as a play and photography and poetry projects. Boys have participated in the TIPS program (Trafficking Interactive Prevention Simulation) and earlier ARTREACH programs. HTAPs mission is to build awareness continued on page 21 Paintings are brought into the Boys and Girls Club of Lee County in Bonita Springs

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THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 201312 Conditions Made For Some Tough Days Fishingby Capt. Matt MitchellNasty brown water and strong northwest winds really did a number on the fishing action for a few days this week. Add to that slow moving outgoing tides being held up by the wind and I cant think of any time recently when I struggled quite so badly to catch very few fish. Once the winds relaxed and the tides got better, fishing picked right back up with catch and release snook action being the most consistent bite. Snook could be caught most days this week in good numbers in the passes. With this being the best bite in town and not many other options with poor tides and windy conditions, the amount of boat traffic in the passes has been a little crazy. If everyone is on the same page drifting the passes, its been manageable and can be fun watching other boats hook up. With 10 to 20 boats all making the same drift of a pass, it can quickly be wrecked by one boat not sticking to the program. Late afternoon incoming tides did produce a few days of good mangrove snook action. The key for me was finding a deeper windblown shoreline that had the tide moving in the same direction as the wind. The big snook of the week caught on my boat was a 17-pound 37-inch snook that was taken on the first cast on such a shoreline. One little windblown mangrove point produced three slot or better sized snook which quickly jumped on the large tail hooked pinfish we were pitching up under the bushes. With poor daytime redfish tides, this week I really did not target them. We did catch a few reds in the mid to upper 20-inch class while drifting the passes for snook. As morning high tides improve, the morning redfish bite should get a whole lot better this week. Trout fishing this week was just about impossible with the dirty stirred up water. Even when I did find some clearer water around the inside of the passes, we just could not get it going. Running as far north as Cayo Costa on a tough day of fishing this week, there was no clean or even clearer water to be found anywhere in the sound. After a few more calm days though, our water color should gradually start to improve. Another option during the calmer days this week was gag grouper fishing in and around the deeper passes. Drifting across the drop offs and structure with a large pinfish hooked up on a 7/0 circle caught limits of gags up to 28 inches. When the tide was moving fast, often it would take as much as a sixto eight-ounce weight to keep the bait straight up and down on the bottom. Heavy tackle is a must for this if you hope to pull these hard fighting grouper away from the underwater structure. One plus of the dirty water is you could use 80-pound leader and still get bites. Strong northwest winds put an end to this action in the passes as it simply got too rough for a few days. There are several of my trips this week that I would like to forget ever happened. We never got skunked but action was very slow. Days like this are tough when basically everything is going against you and the conditions give you very few options. As a fishing guide on days like this, you work so much harder and just feel beat up at the end of a trip, as you always want your clients to catch fish. Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions email captmattmitchell@aol.com. Send Us Your Fish TalesThe River Weekly would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include photographs with identification. Drop them at the River Weekly, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, Florida 33901, or email to press@riverweekly.com. A 37-inch snook caught and released while mangrove fishing with Capt. Matt Mitchell this week ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint Prices ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Your Bottom Your Bottom Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices 1 472-5800 Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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13 THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 2013 R ecognizing T he Need For (And Benefit Of) Coastal Protectionsubmitted by Ken and Kate GooderhamA new study has attempted to quantify the risks inherent in climate change from rising tides and stronger storms, as a means to encourage preservation of the natural resources that can help protect coastal ecosystems and communities a refreshing way to reframe to coastal debate that, if prudent voices prevail, should be taken even further to guide future coastal policy and planning. The study, outlined in an article published in the Nature Climate Change jour nal, cites the risk posed to the U.S. coastlines from the higher seas and more severe storms many expect as a consequence of climate change, putting real numbers on the people and populations which could be at risk if projections turn into reality. The authors then posit how natural habitats sand dunes, coral reefs, sea grasses, mangrove fringes, etc. could offer significant coastal protections at a lower cost if they are not allowed to dwindle and die as seas rise and shorelines harden. Using real numbers and actual science to frame this issue (which is too often debated with emotions and politics as the main drivers), is welcome, as is recognizing the value of the coast (such as 23 of the 25 most densely populated counties are coastal) and the need to better acknowledge the protective value of any coastal habitat that puts more distance between storm waves and upland infrastructure. Developing a Coastal Hazards Index that can graphically portray the countys coastlines at greatest risk is also useful, quickly communicating both the breadth and severity of any areas risk in a way the lay person can grasp. But the presumption that the only choices are shoreline hardening or habitat preservation is too black and white for our real coastal world. Many coastal communities (and their governmental entities) have taken hardening out of the coastal toolbox, having lived through the destructive days of seawalls and groins as the lone coastal solution to sand loss. In some areas, coastal structures of any stripe are banned; in others, they are allowed only as part of an engineered solution that capitalizes on their strengths and mitigates their other impacts. Also, the focus on preservation of existing habitats needs to be joined with a drive to restore lost habitats, so we dont just draw a line in the sand policy-wise but work to replace any beneficial protections lost over time. And lets add wide beaches as another appropriate coastal protection worthy of preservation and restoration, recognizing their value in keeping storm waves at bay and adding more elevation in response to rising seas. (The habitat benefit which wide beaches offer is just icing on continued on page 16 CROW Case Of The Week: Coyote Pupsby Patricia MolloyCoyotes (Canis latrans) are most commonly associated with the American West, however, their presence in Southwest Florida is becoming more commonplace. According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, coyotes successfully expanded their natural range to the Southeast in the 1960s, reaching northern Florida in the 1970s. One study indicates that by 1988, 48 out of 67 Florida counties reported having coyote populations. Two beautiful, shy female coyote pups are being treated at CROW. Each was found off-island. One of the pups, patient #1754, arrived with a fractured hind leg, likely the result of being hit by a motorist. As a youngster growing at a very rapid pace, Dr. Heather initially implemented a schedule to change the injured pups cast every two weeks. However, Dr. Heather or Dr. Kristen quietly walk outside to the coyotes enclosure daily to sneak a quick peak at the cast to ensure that it is holding up to the elements. We would totally stress her out if we took her out each day; we would stress her out and the other one out, noted Dr. Kristen. Both coyotes have been vaccinated against distemper, a viral infection that affects the respiratory, gastrointestinal and central nervous system of many car nivorous species of wildlife and certain domestic animals. They were also vaccinated against parvovirus, canine adenovirus and dewormed, making them parasite free. Dr. Heather will soon vaccinate them against rabies. As an invasive species with a large territorial range, there is a concern about the impact that coyotes may have on indigenous species of the Sunshine State; they are either potential competitors for food or predators. Dr. Heather is currently searching for a qualified wildlife educational facility to adopt both coyotes, as federal law prohibits CROW from releasing them into the wild due to their invasive species status. Once the two coyote pups have fully recovered from their injuries and are relocated, they will serve as examples to people interested in learning about wild animals, their habitats and the role each creature (and human) plays in maintaining a healthy, balanced ecosystem. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to PO Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit: www. crowclinic.org. This female pup, patient #1754, has a fractured hind leg. Her head is covered with a towel during the changing of bandages to ease the patients stress level. PLIGHT OF THE BEES Speaker : Paul Shannon Come join us for an educational program about honey bees. Local beekeeper Paul Shannon will discuss lifecycles, pollination, colony collapse disorder and production of honey LOCATION: CALUSA NATURE CENTER & PLANETARIUM AUGUST 15, 2013 7:00 PM 3450 Ortiz Ave Fort Myers, FL 33905 (239) 2753435 *There is no charge for this program Audubon of Southwest Florida P.O. Box 61041 Fort Myers, FL 33906 1041 E-mail: A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL -FREE (800 -435 7352) WITHIN THE STATE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. THE FLORIDA REGISTRATION NUMBER FOR AUDUBON OF SOUTHWEST FLORIDA IS CH30193.

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THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 201314 Plant SmartCreeping Charlieby Gerri R eavesIf creeping Charlies (Phyla nodiflora) flowers were larger, the common weed of the verbena family might be cultivated for the gorgeous flower heads. But each of the flowers is only one-sixteenth of an inch across, so they go largely unnoticed, except by butterflies and bees. The native mat-forming wildflower is a larval food for the common buckeye, White peacock, and phaon crescent butterflies and a nectar source for other species. The plants prosaic common names, which include capeweed, mat-grass, and turkey tangle fogfruit, do nothing to enhance its appeal. Each flower stalk is topped by a cylindrical flowerhead with a rich purple center. Yellow-throated white to lavender flowers encircle the center and bloom throughout the year. The term nodiflora, which means knotted, refers to this tight structure. The plant spreads by rooted nodes, with the flower stalks growing up to six inches tall. The narrow toothed leaves measure about an inch long. Creeping Charlie is credited with a host of medicinal benefits. It is used as a tea, leaf paste, and root juice in treating wounds, hookworm, fever, ulcers, and other ailments. This groundcover is common in lawns, disturbed sites, and roadsides. If it creeps into your yard, consider letting it flourish for the butterflies. Propagate it by dividing the rootball, with stem cuttings, or from seeds. It can even be used as a hanging plant. Sources: Everglades Wildflowers by Roger L. Hammer, Florida Wild Flowers and Roadside Plants by C. Ritchie Bell and Bryan J. Taylor, plantbook.org, davesgarden. com, and fnps.org. Plant Smart explores sustainable gardening practices that will help you create an environmentally responsible, low-maintenance South Florida landscape. Creeping Charlie is a native mat-forming wildflower that will tolerate a range of conditions Caring For Your PlantsProper T rimmingby Justen DobbsI find that most landscape maintenance crews here in SW Florida do not know how to properly trim a lot of our common trees and bushes. Improper trimming can invite unwanted pests, restrict growth, increase cold sensitivity, and make some plants and trees look just plain ratty. Often times, the problem is with the homeowner or HOA who instructs the landscape maintenance crew to box cut or hurricane cut everything. Now, I understand that most of these landscapes are situated in a commercial setting where everything needs to have neat, straight lines and a congruent appearance, but this necessitates certain species to be used that thrive with weekly trimming. Plants that do not make good box bushes include Macho Fern, Fountain Grass, Hibiscus, Juiper, Areca Palms (yes, Ive seen people trim them into hedges), Crotons, and Cordylines. All of these plants need to be allowed to grow freely in order to be healthy and have a proper bloom cycle. If any branches on these die from old age, they should be allowed to decompose underneath or they should be removed at the base of the branch (not trimmed with hedge trimmers). There are two reasons that landscapers use these plants improperlylack of knowledge and low cost. If you already have some of these plants in your landscape and your landscape maintenance company trims them weekly, just tell them to reduce the trimming to bi-weekly or monthly (while still keeping up with mowing the grass obviously). Hibiscus trees should be trimmed heavily in early summerbefore you go back up north. By fall when most of the snow birds return, the Hibiscus trees will have pushed all new growth and likely new bloom. When this particular tree is trimmed on a bi-weekly basis, it stunts growth and inhibits blooming. If you do want to create a nice, neat hedge that can be cut often and kept in that box look, you will want to stick with Variegated Arboricola, Plumbago, Ixora, Indian Hawthorne, Ficus, Seagrape, Buttonwood, or Podocarpus. All of these produce a thick cluster of branches and lots of leaves. They do not mind being hedge-trimmed often and are all fairly cold hardy and drought-tolerant (except for the Seagrape and Ixora). Or, if you want plants that require little to no trimming at all, go with bromeliads (tropical air plants), cycads, self-cleaning or clustering palm trees, and cordylines (Ti plants). These maintain year-round color and require a few fronds or leaves to be removed about once or twice a year! Dobbs is a landscape architect in south Florida specializing in custom, upscale landscapes. He can be reached at seabreezenurseries@gmail.com. Hibiscus trees should be allowed to grow freely and trimmed just once or twice a year E nglish Country DancingLearn the social dances of the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries at the Wa-ke Hatchee Recreation Center. Lessons are offered on Tuesdays from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. all year round. Dress is casual, and participants should wear flat shoes with non-slip soles. Partners are not necessary, and beginners are welcomed. Lessons are free after a one-time payment of $10, which covers lifetime membership to Wa-Ke Hatchee Recreation Center. Contact Gillian Carney at 6039828 or email fortmyersdancers@hotmail.com. Also, visit http://dancefl.us/ ecd/FtMyersECD.shtml. Wa-ke Hatchee Recreation Center is located at 16760 Bass Road in Fort Myers. Call 432-2154 for more information. This often overlooked plant is the larval host for several native butterflies photos by Gerri Reaves

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15 THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 2013 Jesse Alexander and Jordan Crabb, both age 17 from Ormond Beach, Florida, caught a sawfish off the coast of Sanibel on July 17 around 9:30 p.m. as a crowd of about 100 people looked on from the beach at West Gulf Drive. Approximately 14 feet long and weighing over 300 pounds, the sawfish was released unharmed and reported to the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). Jesse Alexander and Jordan Crabb pose with their catch photo by Jessy Crabb Fish Caught Introduction To BeekeepingThe UF/IFAS Lee County Extension, in collaboration with the Beekeepers Association of Southwest Florida offers a four-week beekeeping class this summer. Classes begin at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, August 9 and continue on Friday, August 16, 23 and 30. Space is limited to only 40 students. Pre-registration is necessary for inclusion in the class. Deadline for registration is Monday, August 5. Cost of the course is $225. Students receive our advanced beekeeping startup kit including a bee veil for face protection, a professional bee-smoker, educational resource books, visual hands-on training in a bee yard and your very own bee hive box. Live bees are NOT provided as part of any package. Please make your check payable to BASF and mail your check to Beekeeping Class, UF/IFAS Lee County Extension, 3406 Palm Beach Blvd., Fort Myers, FL 33916. For details about the class, call either Don Murray (BASF President) at 2679776 or Rebecca at 247-7352 or send an email to don@hphoney.com. Classes will be held at the Lee County Extension Office at 3406 Palm Beach Boulevard in Fort Myers. Practical sessions will be conducted at the apiary of a BASF member beekeeper, or at the BASF bee yard. We Proudly Brew Tropial Outdoor Patio Seating Get Crabby At The Cow Get Crabby At The Cow with our Famous Stone Crabs1/2 lb & Best Prices On The Planet Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Come Try our NEW Cowlicious Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials Sanibels Most Award Winning Restaurant LIVE Famous Stone Crabs Famous Stone Crabs Always Fresh ...Always! ...Always! with our with our Always Fresh ...Always Fun! Always Fresh ...Always Fun! Email editorial copy to: press@riverweekly.com

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THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 201316 An Audubon Florida Special PlaceMatheson H ammock Parkby R oger L. H ammerThe National Gold Medal Award-winning Miami-Dade Parks & Recreation Department was formed in 1930 with Matheson Hammock as its very first park. The initial 80 acres was a gift to Dade County by a wealthy pioneer, William J. Matheson. The park was developed by the Civilian Conservation Corps and designed by William Lyman Phillips, the famed architect who would later design Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Bok Tower Gardens and McKee Botanical Gardens. This was for tunate because Phillips penned, in longhand, The mangrove swamp is to most humans a hateful hostile growth. Yet, as a forest type, mangrove [habitat] is unique; and where in a given situation such as this [Matheson Hammock Park], the swamp can be assigned an important role in the total parks effect, and can be regarded and managed sympathetically. The preservation and passing down of it to posterity would seem an act of considerable cultural significance. Matheson Hammock Park now spans 630 acres and harbors a popular marina, restaurant, picnic areas and open shorelines along Biscayne Bay, where park visitors come to fish, canoe, kayak, sailboard or simply relax. But theres a lesser-visited part of the park that even local residents scarcely know exists. On the west side of Old Cutler Road, across from the bustling marina, is Matheson Hammock, the forest. Hammocks are islands of hardwood forest trees, surrounded by a differing vegetation type, and there are more than 100 hammocks on Long Pine Key in Everglades National Park. Matheson Hammock was visited by some of South Floridas earliest botanists, most notably John Kunkel Small, an eminent authority on the flora of the southeastern states. Small once noted that there were vastly more wild clamshell orchids in Matheson Hammock than hed seen anywhere else. Although the clamshell orchids have entirely disappeared due to collecting, periodic freezes and hurricanes, the hammock remains floristically rich. A loop trail leads visitors through the hammock and the trailhead is directly across the street from the entrance to the marina side of the park. Some of my fondest memories of Matheson Hammock Park are birding there with my friend, next-door neighbor and fellow rum connoisseur John Ogden. He was working on the Bird Oases Project spearheaded by Florida Audubon Society, and later transferred to Tropical Audubon Society. John and I would spend several hours once a day each week during spring and fall migration. Our task was to not only identify migratory songbirds but also identify the trees and shrubs they were visiting, and what the birds were doing. The outcome of the project is that we now have a much better understanding of which migratory birds utilize which specific plants the most, and why. Some birds, we learned, were seeking insects, while others were feasting on fruits, sipping nectar, or gulping down entire flowers bugs, nectar, pollen and all. Johns passing in March 2012 was a great loss to the birding world, and to anyone who had the good fortune to know him. Matheson Hammock is regarded as one of the hot birding spots in the Miami area for local birders and migratory birders as well. When migratory birds fly over metropolitan Miami, green spaces such as Matheson Hammock stand out as inviting stopovers; a place to rest, feed and rejuvenate for the long trip south, or north, depending on the season. It should come as no surprise that Matheson Hammock is included along the Great Florida Birding Trail, a self-guided 2,000-mile highway trail established by the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission. Make Matheson Hammock one of your stops where you can find an exciting array of birds as well as a peaceful place among the hustle and bustle of Miami. This column is one in a series from AUDUBON FLORIDA. Roger L. Hammer is an award winning professional naturalist, author and photographer. For more information about the Matheson Hammock Park, see www.miamidade.gov/parks/. John Ogden, Lynn Scarlett, former Deputy Secretary, U.S. Department of the Interior, and Roger Hammer birding at Matheson Hammock photos by Roger Hamme Rare clamshell orchid Painted Bunting: A real crowd pleaserFrom page 13Coastal Protectionthe natural cake.) Finally, every coastal professional can join in the studys implied call for further research into the impacts and options in coastal protection particularly work that balances the needs and demands of all coastal stakeholders in an effort to task science and sense to develop sustainable solutions in anticipation of whatever changes climate ends up blowing our way. The same measures that can protect coastal communities from storm damage will also build a buffer against any rise in sea level, allowing us to implement protections that address the inevitable (such as storms) as well as the unknown (such as rising seas). A good first step is to acknowledge the need for and benefit of coastal protection, with the imperative that science (rather than emotion) leads the way. This study appears to be a good start. For more information, visit www. asbpa.org.

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17 THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 2013 10 to 40% OFFH SLEEPERS H MATTRESS SETS H PICTURES H LAMPS H PATIO DINING SETS H RECLINERS H DINING SETS H BEDROOM SETS H LIVING ROOM H TABLES Large Selection of Rattan & Wicker I fell in love with Furniture World the 1st time I went in. They had the SW Florida style furniture I was looking for. The staff made me feel very comfortable and helped me with my questions. Mary Weeks, Ft. Myers I appreciated the personal service I received at Furniture World. The location is convenient and I found what I wanted at a price I wanted to pay. Chris Myers, Sanibel ...Our Promise to You...GUARANTEED (*$500 Min. Purchase) Our Friendly staff is here to help you when you want it. Youre free to look through our store. Family Owned and Operated(239)489-3311 Featured ArtistBorn and raised in the Midwest, Joe LeMay made the move down to Southwest Florida in 1998. In 2004, he went to study art in Savannah, Georgia where he graduated from the Savannah College of Art and Design. After getting his Bachelor of Fine Arts, he returned to Fort Myers and began working in freelance illustration. His freelance work has included childrens book illustration, logo design, poster design and comic strip illustration. The majority of this work is typified by oddball characters both fictional and right out of pop culture, infused with a humorous and satirical tone. His gallery work blends elements of his illustration background with an abstract expressionistic style. Subjects in the paintings exist within a world of bleeding colors that serve as a virtual playground for a variety of characters and creatures. It is a take on illustration that places some traditional subject matter and characters in a non traditional physical environment. LeMay is currently living and working out of Fort Myers. Smelly Cat by Joe LeMay Support Locals At The Alliance Gift Shop This SummerThe next time youre faced with finding something for that impossible to shop for family member or friend, why not stop by the Alliance for the Arts in Fort Myers? Open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays, the Alliance Gift Shop is stocked year round only with a wide variety of items created by local artists. Find truly unique jewelry, handbags, sculptures, paintings, photographs... even fabric art and furniture. And its contents are always changing, as items are sold and new works are created by local, independent artists. It really is the best place in town to find something for the person who has one of everything. While you are visiting browse the 24th annual All Florida Juried Exhibition on display in the Main Gallery until August 2. It features work in a variety of mediums by more than 30 visual artists from across the state. Artwork by Alliance youth artists is on display in the Member Gallery. Or if you come on Saturday you can also shop the Alliance GreenMarket, where you can find locally grown and produced items from local vendors. Its every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the grass next to the Alliance main building. The Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard, just south of Colonial Boulevard. Clay Mushroom by Shirley Litman

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THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 201318 Lakes RR egional Library ProgramsNext months roster of activities at Lakes Regional Library offers topics for all ages. The following activities are free to the public: Adults English Caf 6 p.m. Mondays, August 5, 12, 19 and 26 Practice your English with English Cafe, a free, conversation session for adult ESOL and ESL students. Each 90-minute session provides adult learners an opportunity to practice speaking English with native speakers. Participants may start at any time. Advanced registration is not necessary. Book Discussion: The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg 2 p.m. Tuesday, August 20 Read and discuss The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg. Duhigg argues that one of the keys to exercising regularly, losing weight, raising exceptional children, becoming more productive, building revolutionary companies and social movements and achieving success is to understand how habits work. Registration is required. Families Baby-Parent Rhyme Time 10 a.m. Mondays, August 19 and 26 Be prepared to tickle, jump and fly with your baby! These rhymes and songs are for infants, up to 24 months, accompanied by an adult. This 20-minute program is filled with songs designed to introduce rhyming and movement to infants. Registration is required. Toddler Storytime 10 a.m. Wednesdays, August 21 and 28 Children 2 years old and their caregivers participate in song, fingerplays and short stories. The success of this age group depends on adult participation and encouragement. Toddler storytime lasts approximately 30 minutes. Family Storytime 11 a.m. Wednesdays, August 21 and 28 This program is for the whole family and lasts about 30 minutes. Registration is required. Children Preschool Lego Storytime 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, August 6 Calling all preschoolers get ready to read, build and play at the library. Well combine storytelling, music and building with Lego Duplo bricks for a fun new experience. This hands-on playtime will foster creativity and early literacy. For ages 2 to 5. Registration is required. Kids Read Down Fines 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday, August 10 Children and teens can earn a $2 coupon for every 15 minutes of reading during the allotted time in the designated area of the library. For ages 18 and younger. Coupons may be applied to cards issued to patrons age 18 and under only. Preschool Science Lab 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, August 14 Curious preschoolers and their caregivers are invited to the Preschool Science Lab. Well explore and investigate with hands-on science. This interactive event will include stories, simple science games and a craft. Sponsored by the Friends of Lakes Regional Library. Registration is required. Library 101: The Hunt for Dewey 4:30 p.m. Monday, August 19 Have your kids ever found the Dewey Decimal System confusing? Join us as we break down how the Dewey Decimal System works and how to track down books in the library. Then well go on a scavenger hunt through the stacks to find those elusive Dewey numbers. For grades K to 5. Registration is required. Preschool Storytime 11 a.m. Mondays, August 19 and 26 Preschoolers (ages 3 to 5) attend this storytime independently while parents or caregivers wait nearby in the library building. This storytime includes activities that require more participation and a longer attention span. Each preschool storytime lasts about 30 minutes. Registration is required. Reading Academy 4:30 p.m. Wednesdays, August 21 and 28 Books + puppets + drawing = fun! Well bring out the puppets and mini drawing boards for this interactive event. Join us each week for new stories and games. This program is designed for children who can read and write. Sponsored by the Friends of Lakes Regional Library. For children in first to fifth grade. Registration is required. Teens Kids Read Down Fines 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday, August 10 Children and teens can earn a $2 coupon for every 15 minutes of reading during the allotted time in the designated area of the library. For ages 18 and younger. Coupons may be applied to cards issued to patrons age 18 and under only. The Lakes Regional Library is located at 15290 Bass Road in Fort Myers. For more information about a program or to register, please call the library at 5334000. A sign language interpreter is available with five business days notice to library staff. Assistive listening system available; request at desk. Check the Lee County Library Systems website at www.leelibrary.net to find out about programs at other locations. Call the host library, or Telephone Reference at 479-INFO (4636), for more information about a specific program. Northwest RR egional Library ProgramsNext months roster of activities at Northwest Regional Library offers topics for all ages. The following activities are free to the public: Adult English Caf 10:30 a.m. Thursdays, August 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29 Practice your English with English Cafe, a free, conversation session for adult ESOL and ESL students. Each 90-minute session provides adult learners an opportunity to practice speaking English with native speakers. Participants may start at any time. Advanced registration is not necessary. Exhibit: Vacation In Your Own Backyard August 8 to 31 Available during normal library oper ating hours: Monday, Wednesday and Thursday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Tuesday, Noon to 8 p.m.; Friday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In partnership with the Lee County Tourism and Convention Bureau, the exhibit showcases places in our community where family and friends can explore and enjoy our beautiful area on a budget. Discover Lee County Parks & Recreation 1 p.m. Saturday, August 10 Discover the treasures of Lee County Parks & Recreation. Join us for a fun, informative introduction and overview of all that Lee County Parks & Recreation has to offer. The opportunities are endless! The Mohawk Project & Scuba Diving in Lee County 2 p.m. Wednesday, August 14 Mike Campbell, with the Lee County Marine Services Artificial Reef Program shares opportunities for diving and fishing on the 20 artificial reefs located in Lee County. Of special interest is the USS Mohawk Veterans Memorial Reef, sunk in July of 2012, which has become an underwater diving destination due to its variety of marine life including whale sharks. This summer, the Mohawk will double as an underwater art gallery featuring the photography of Andreas Franke. Taste DeliciousLee 2 p.m. Saturday, August 17 Nancy MacPhee of the Lee County Visitor & Convention Bureau shares information on the bureaus efforts in strengthening the local tourism experience. Highlighting restaurants that serve locally sourced produce and seafood not only makes a community more sustainable, but highlights agriculture, Floridas second most important economic driver. Attendees at this presentation will enjoy a taste of Lee and be entered in a drawing to win Simply Florida, a cookbook of favorite recipes by Floridians. Family Baby-Parent Rhyme Time 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays, August 21 and 28 Be prepared to tickle, jump and fly with your baby! These rhymes and songs are for infants, up to 24 months, accompanied by an adult. This 20-minute program is filled with songs designed to introduce rhyming and movement to infants. Registration is required. Family Storytime 10:30 a.m. Thursdays, August 22 and 29 This program is for the whole family and lasts about 30 minutes. Registration is required. Children Kids Read Down Fines 10 a.m. to noon Saturdays, August 3 and 17 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays, August 13 and 27 Children and teens can earn a $2 coupon for every 15 minutes of reading, during the allotted time. A total of $8 per day may be earned. For ages 18 and younger. Coupons may be applied to cards issued to patrons age 18 and under only. Turn On Your Brain 6 p.m. Tuesday, August 6 Rev up your brain power at this funfilled program. Have a brilliantly good time with stories, games and crafts designed to make you think. Registration is requested. Teen On The Table: Locker Tube Blast August 1 to 16 Available during normal library oper ating hours: Monday, Wednesday and Thursday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Tuesday, Noon to 8 p.m.; Friday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Want to keep your locker organized this year? Stop by On-The-Table located in the Teen Zone and create an organizer tube using duct tape and recycled materials. Bring a friend and create. Kids Read Down Fines 10 a.m. to noon Saturdays, August 3 and 17 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays, August 13 and 27 Children and teens can earn a $2 coupon for every 15 minutes of reading, during the allotted time. A total of $8 per day may be earned. For ages 18 and younger. Coupons may be applied to cards issued to patrons age 18 and under only. Gamen 3 p.m. Wednesday, August 14 Play Wii, board games, relay races or Minute To Win It. Join in the fun and light snacks. Registration is required. The Northwest Regional Library is located at 519 Chiquita Boulevard N. in Cape Coral. For more information about a program or to register, call the library at 533-4700. A sign language interpreter is available with five business days notice to library staff. Assistive listening system available; request at desk. Check the Lee County Library Systems website at www.leelibrary.net to find out about programs at other locations. Call the host library, or Telephone Reference at 479-INFO (4636), for more information about a specific program. RR ead us online at II sland SS unNews.com

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19 THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 2013 Experience The Positive At The Davis Art CenterTransference opens on the evening of Friday, August 2 at 6 p.m., with a stylish reception during Fort Myers Art Walk at the Sidney and Berne Davis Art Center. The solo exhibition for artist Veron Ennis should not be missed as her vibrant, captivating paintings and sculpture will transform the Centers Grand Atrium into a haven of aesthetics. Also during Art Walk, SBDAC will host a Love That Dress! 5 Collection Party. Bring your new or gently worn dresses during Art Walk and help support PACE Center For Girls. The Davis Art Center is located in the historic downtown River District, at 2301 First Street. Veron Enniss non-objective paintings and her abstracted cityscapes are saturated with bold modern colors and composed of countless interlacing layers. Her signature cube sculptures are free-standing constructions made of six paintings hinged together to close into a cube. They have the unique ability to unlock and hang in an open state on the wall. Both forms will be exhibited during Transference. Founder of the art movement, OPT (Open Positive Transference), Ennis promotes and exhibits art that has the intention to transfer a positive and uplifting feeling, one of hope and balance. Also a founding member of MAMA (Movement of Aleatoric Modern Artists), part of Ennis technique depends on the chance application of her medium. Falling in and out of control of the work energizes the composition and pushes compositional boundaries, said Ennis. Love That Dress! is the ultimate feelgood girls night out shopping spree of the year benefitting PACE Center For Girls. An estimated 800 fashionistas (and a few brave men) are expected to stake their claim on thousands of new and gently worn dresses and accessories selling for nominal prices. Guests will enjoy the events popular silent auction, camaraderie and cocktails. This years event will take place on Sunday, August 28 from 6 to 9 p.m., at the Embassy Suites in Estero. Proceeds will benefit PACE Center For Girls, Inc., which provides girls and young women an opportunity for a better future through education, counseling, training and advocacy. Paddles In Paradise ReleasedLocal residents and authors Ed and Deb Higgins have just released their first book, Paddles In Paradise, to rave reviews from the kayaking community. Until I paddled with Deb and Ed, I was unaware of the magical places that were within easy reach through kayaking. Their tireless research and expert teaching affords new and wondrous adventures on the water for those who follow their lead. Howard Spielman, author of A Good Day: Confessions of a Reformed Pessimist and creator of the awardwinning MGM/Showtime hit series Dead Mans Gun. Paddles In Paradise highlights 25 scenic recreational paddles within three hours of Punta Gorda, from Ocala to the Everglades, and includes GPS address and driving instructions, where to launch, which way to go, facilities available, trail maps and more. If you are looking for a few hours of peace, tranquility and natural beauty, this book will certainly take you there The book is currently available at Amazon.com, Copperfish Books in Punta Gorda, Sandman Book Co. in Punta Gorda, O-Sea-D Aquatic Adventures in Punta Gorda, Linger Lodge in Bradenton, Calusa Ghost Tours in Bonita Springs, West Wall Boat Works in Port Charlotte and on the authors website, located at www.paddlesinparadise.com. Concordian Return by Veron Ennis Veron Ennis Take Part In Read Around Florida, Enter To Win A Brand New iPad 2The Lee County Library System invites readers to participate in their new Read Around Florida program to learn more about the states rich literary tradition, along with a chance to win a new iPad 2. This new adult reading program, part of the librarys Viva Florida 500 celebration, encourages readers to read books of their choice, either written by a Florida author or featuring a Florida theme. After submitting a brief review of each book, they will be entered into a drawing to win the popular Apple tablet device. Read Around Florida reviews may be submitted online at www.leelibrary.net/ viva500 or at any county library location. Multiple entries will be allowed, but they must be reviews of different books. The deadline to submit a review will be Monday, December 16, with the iPad2 drawing to take place shortly thereafter.continued on page 23 LIVE ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY!Happy Hour Daily Half Price 4-6:30pm & All Night Tuesday Online Reservations Available www.brattasristorante.com12984 S. Cleveland Ave., Fort Myers, 239-433-4449JULY NIGHTLY SPECIALS Sunday Any Two Dinner Entrees from our regular menu & a Bottle of House Wine for ONLY $50 Monday 1/2 Price Bottle of Wines(enjoy as many as you like) NO LIMITS Tuesday Happy Hour& $4.99 Appetizers all Night! Wednesday Italian Night!$9.99 Lasagna, Taylor Street Baked Ziti, Cappellini & Meatballs, & Eggplant & Chicken Parmesan $3.00 House Wines By e Glass Thursday Steak & Lobster Tail $14.99 Friday Seafood Extravaganza Pre Fixe Dinner $24.99 per person. $5.00 Martinis! Saturday Make Online Reservations & Receive 25% o Total Check (Regular Priced Items) -ALWAYS AT BRATTAS-EARLY DINING 2 for $20 Dinners daily until 5:30pm, Live Music, Online Discounts, Daily Happy Hour until 6:30pm, Dance Floor, Great Food, Fun & Service NIGHTLY SPECIALS

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THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 201320 T op 10 R eal E state S ales Development City Year BuiltSquare FootageListing PriceSelling PriceDays on Market Edgewater At Gulf HarbourFort Myers 20074,666$1,100,000$825,000 352 Wildcat Run Estero20063,316$789,000$730,000 212 Wildcat Run Estero19913,669$699,000 $615,000 211 Cape Coral Cape Coral 20012,400$620,000 $577,500 46 No Subdivision Fort Myers Beach 19833,842$589,000 $530,000 9 Hamptons Greens Fort Myers 19973,457$545,000 $511,250 138 Four Mile Cove Cape Coral 19962,959$489,500 $480,000 330 Cape Coral Cape Coral 19981,896$499,900 $478,000 38 Shell Mound ParkFort Myers Beach 19642,084$539,000 $475,000 252 Belle Meade Sanibel20111,808$599,999$475,000 180Courtesy of Royal Shell Real Estate Financial FocusCan You Benefit From Municipal Bonds? by Jennifer BaseyOver the past couple of years, the economic picture has brightened for many cities and states but some of them are still facing potential financial problems. As a citizen, you may well have concerns about these issues. And as an investor, these financial woes may affect your thinking about one particular type of investment vehicle: municipal bonds. Specifically, given the difficulties faced by a few municipalities, should you consider adding munis to your to the fixedincome portion of your portfolio? It is true that municipal defaults, though still rare, rose in 2012. But we havent experienced any sharp increases in defaults in 2013. Overall, default rates for municipal bonds are low much lower than for corporate bonds of comparable quality, according to Moodys Investor Services. Of course, there are no guarantees, but if you stick with investment-grade municipal bonds those that receive the highest grades from independent rating agencies you can reduce the chances of being victimized by a default. And municipal bonds offer these benefits: interest payments are free from federal taxes, and possibly state and local taxes, too. (However, some munis are subject to the alternative minimum tax, as well as means you would have to earn a much higher yield on other types of bonds to match the taxable equivalent yield of municipal bonds. municipal bonds to your portfolio, you can help support worthwhile projects in your community, such as construction of schools and hospitals. you will receive a regular, predictable income stream for as long as you own your municipal bonds. However, if you currently own many long-term munis, you may want to consider reducing your overall position. Eventually, rising inter est rates will push down bond prices, and long-term bonds carry added risk because their prices will decline more as interest rates rise. Work with your financial advisor to determine the most appropriate approach for your situation. can help you diversify the fixed-income portion of your portfolio if its heavily weighted toward corporate bonds. And you can even diversify your municipal bond holdings by building a ladder consisting of munis of varying maturities. Once youve built such a ladder, you can gain benefits in all interest-rate environments when rates are low, youll still have your longer-term bonds working for you (longer-term bonds generally pay higher rates than shorter-term ones), and when interest rates rise, you can reinvest the proceeds of your shorter-term bonds at the higher rates. Consult with your financial advisor to determine if municipal bonds can be an appropriate addition to your portfolio, as investing in bonds involves risks, including credit risk and market risk. Bond investments are also subject to interest rate risk such that when inter est rates rise, the prices of bonds can decrease, and the investor can lose principal value if the investment is sold prior to maturity. Investors should evaluate whether a bond ladder and the securities held within it are consistent with their investment objectives, risk tolerance and financial circumstances. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@edwardjones.com. Family Child Care Business T raining Course he Goodwill SWFL MicroEnterprise Institute and the Early Learning Coalition (ELC) of Southwest Florida are partnering to Care Business, a nine-week training course for family child care providers. specific information on family child care, along with small business training and education. cover the basics of starting a small business, from determining its feasibility to developing a strategic business plan, class will also help child care practitioners with their industry-specific needs, like developing a comprehensive parent handbook the critical policy and procedure manual for a child care business. a curriculum developed by the Kauffman foundation and used nationally in small business education programs. Officials hope that the small business curriculum, in combination with industry-specific education, will provide the keys to success for future child care practitioners. viders is that they are nurturing and are more apt to have skills related to caregiving, said Susan E. Block, CEO of ELC. component that contributes to the level of quality care providers. Graduates of the class will be eligible to receive 3.0 Continuing Education Units (CEUs) for an additional $100 processing fee, which is $50 off the usual price. All participants, regardless of CEU will pay a $50 fee for classroom materials. MicroEnterprise classes, according to Child Care of Southwest Florida ELC officials, is to ensure there are more licensed child care providers in low-income neighborhoods. Quality, accessible child care is important to the vibrancy of low-income chief operations officer program quality for ELC. Safe care for children allows parents to go to work without anxiety about the well-being of their children, and allows children to learn more and have experiences that help them to be ready for school. Classes will start August 24 with a full day session and then move to Monday schedule will allow for existing providers to attend the meetings, as well as those who want to start their own family child care practices. Potential students may visit the Early Learning Coalitions website at www.elcofswfl.org to register or call Jill Corbett at 935-6167. Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702or email press@riverweekly.com

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21 THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 2013 S chool S martby S helley M. G reggs, NCSPDear Shelley, My child will be going to kindergarten in August. I am just not sure that he is ready to go. We have the option of going to a great daycare for another year. What are some things I should look for so I am sure that he will do well in kindergarten? April N., Fort Myers Beach April, It is a difficult decision to enroll your child in kindergarten when you still have some doubts about his readiness. Although your child has now reached the age when he is allowed to begin school, it is important to also be assured that your child is cognitively and emotionally ready to start kindergarten. Listed below are a few helpful hints from Virginia Academy of School Psychologists the school to help you assess if your child is developmentally ready for this big step. Cognitive Skills words in a sentence low, red, blue, orange and phone number and a few numbers (if taught) objects Language Skills names simple direction tions correctly ing with others plurals, pronouns and tenses Gross Motor Skills able to start, stop and turn ping, hopping and swinging Fine Motor Skills and designs lished assistance Social/Emotional Skills toys for pretend play, but may confuse fantasy and reality at times wrong doesnt always want to own, but still have fears of things like loud noises, the dark, animals and some people may still act them out Remember that each child grows at his/her own pace. Therefore, the infor mation in this section is based on what the average kindergarten child is able to do. You know your child best. If you feel that your child may have some delays in his development, it is important to speak to your childs pediatrician or school per sonnel about your concerns. Ms. Greggs is adjunct faculty at Edison State College where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also Nationally Certified School Psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. S alusCare Board Of Directors AnnouncedS formed by the merger of Lee Florida Addiction Services (SWFAS), has announced its inaugural Board of Members of the governing Board of Directors were selected from each of the not-for-profit agencies. Officers are Other members of the Board of Directors are Sue Ackert; Mark S. Atkins, Scot D. Goldberg, Goldberg, Racila, DAlessandro and Noone; Dr. Madelyn National Bank. about the future of this new not-for-profit our community what it needs most a cohesive system of behavioral healthcare to address the needs of individuals with mental health and substance use issues, Bower said. Our first year plan is to implement electronic medical records to enable us to share information across campuses. When we do that, we can increase access points for care and serve more people in need of treatment. The merger of the two non-profits was mental health and substance abuse treatment agency in Southwest Florida with patients per year. For more information, visit www. Marshall Bower Human Trafficking Preventionof human trafficking to all, to provide trainings for professionals and to develop programs and resources which which have been duplicated through Train The Training programs around the counare reproduced in banner form which are often displayed locally or lent for display at awareness events or conferences around the country. A banner is made for each facility which hosts a program and postcards featuring the artwork and paintings which are used for training purposes. Foundation and by generous donations from individuals in the Sanibel community. It currently operates from an office on Sanibel and one in Fort Myers. For more information, send an email to info@ humantraffickingawareness.org or call To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732 JACARANDAThe Entertainment Nightly in Sanibels Social Scene1223 PERIWINKLE WAY, SANIBEL 472-1771 Happy Apps $5.95Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna, Crispy Fried Calamari, Chilled Oysters, Steamed Shrimp, BBQ Beef Satays, Mussels Marinara, Chicken WingsSanibels Best HAPPY HOUR5 7 p.m. Nightly in the lounge1/2 Price DrinksCall & Well Liquor, Draft Beer Selections, Select House Wine

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THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 201322 Salvation Army Announces 2013-14 Advisory BoardAt its June meeting, The Salvation Armys local Advisory Board inducted seven new members, and the newly elected officers were installed. The 2013-14 Salvation Army Advisory Board officers are well-known community leaders: Chair William M. Blevins, Encore Bank Vice Chair Hank Hendry, Hendry Law Firm Secretary Georg Koszulinski, Koszulinski Group, Inc. Treasurer Stan Stouder, CRE Consultants The Advisory Board Chair, William Blevins, with the help of Majors Tom and Julie Louden, Area Commanders for The Salvation Army of Lee, Hendry & Glades Counties, inducted the following new members: Nick Chlumsky, Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC Pastor Tito Gonzalez, First Assembly of God Ron Kraus, Kraus Foods Brad Miller, Interior Plant Scapes Stephen Page, Thermal Dynamics Daniel Regelski, Small Business Development Center at FGCU Sharon Thompson, Hughes, Snell & Co. The mission of The Salvation Army is to preach the Gospel of Jesus Christ and to meet human need without discrimination, and were living in a time when the need is great, said Major Tom Louden, Area Commander for The Salvation Army of Lee, Hendry & Glades Counties. It is a tremendous blessing to have such committed individuals come alongside us to accomplish this mission. With the help of these new Advisory Board members, The Salvation Army will continue working every day to meet the needs of the most vulnerable in our community. The new board is excited about expanding the reach of The Salvation Army within our community, said William Blevins, Salvation Army Advisory Board Chair. While the economy is getting better in Southwest Florida, there are many friends and neighbors that still need the services of The Salvation Army. The Salvation Army local Advisory Board is an all-volunteer group, comprised of business people and civic leaders who provide advice and support. They are familiar with the organizations operations in the community and help by formulating plans for the improvement of the facilities and programs, and by making recommendations with respect to fundraising, community relations, program and expenditures. Advisory Board members serve as ambassadors for The Salvation Army in the local community. The new members and officers join the following existing members of The Salvation Armys Advisory Board: Joseph R. Catti, FineMark National Bank James D. English (retired) B. Pat ORourke Jerry Schmall, former program participant Don Strang, Sr., Strang Corporation Dr. William H. Truax (retired) Life Members Mayor Randy Henderson, City of Fort Myers Lloyd Hendry (retired) Tom Smoot, Jr. (retired) Emeritus Members Helen L. McClary (retired) E. Bruce Strayhorn, Strayhorn and Persons, P.L. Dr. Samuel Watkins (retired) The Salvation Army brings help and hope to people experiencing homelessness, hunger, addiction and other major life challenges. The Red Shield Lodge, a 182-bed shelter, is located at 2400 Edison Avenue in Fort Myers. The comprehensive programs offered at the social services campus provide participants in-residence and from the community with skills that encourage self-sufficiency. The Salvation Army Corps Community Center, which includes administrative offices, is located at 10291 McGregor Boulevard. Donations of clothing, furniture and household items are welcome at the Family Thrift Stores, which fully fund The Salvation Armys drug and alcohol rehabilitation program. The Thrift Store still makes house calls with a regularly scheduled route truck, and pickups can be scheduled at 337-0955. Alzheimers Caregivers Support MeetingsThe Alvin A. Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center offers monthly support group meetings for caregivers throughout Lee County and neighboring areas. The caregivers support group meetings include an opportunity for caregivers to meet others who are facing similar challenges and to learn more about Alzheimers disease and effective coping strategies. Select meeting locations feature a guest speaker as well as an informal time for sharing. Fort Myers Tuesday, August 13 at 2 p.m. Broadway Community Church 3309 Broadway Avenue 437-3007 Wednesday, August 14 at 9:45 a.m. Westminster Presbyterian Church 9065 Ligon Court 437-3007 Wednesday, August 28 at 9:45 a.m. Westminster Presbyterian Church 9065 Ligon Court Stress and Caregiver Wellbeing Speaker: Mary Freyre, RN Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center 437-3007 Wednesday, August 21 at 10 a.m. Fort Myers Congregational United Church of Christ 8210 College Parkway 437-3007 Tuesday, August 22 at 1 p.m. Dunbar United Way House 3511 Martin Luther King Jr Blvd. 437-3007 North Fort Myers Thursday, August 22 at 2 p.m. Pine Lakes Country Club 10200 Pine Lakes Blvd. 3.5 miles north of Shell Factory on U.S. 41 437-3007 Cape Coral Thursday, August 1 at 2 p.m. Gulf Coast Village 1333 Santa Barbara Blvd. 437-3007 Thursday, August 15 at 2 p.m. Gulf Coast Village 1333 Santa Barbara Blvd. 437-3007 Stress and Caregiver Wellbeing Speaker: Mary Freyre, RN Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center 437-3007 Pine Island Thursday, August 1 at 10:30 a.m. Pine Island United Methodist 5701 Pine Island Road, Bokeelia 437-3007 Lehigh Acres Monday, August 5 at 2 p.m. Lehigh Acres United Way House 201 Plaza Drive, Suite 3 Stress and Caregiver Wellbeing Speaker: Mary Freyre, RN Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center 437-3007 Monday, August 19 at 2 p.m. Lehigh Acres United Way House 201 Plaza Drive, Suite 3 437-3007 Bonita Springs Monday, August 26 at 10:30 a.m. Hope Lutheran Church 25999 Old 41 437-3007 Sanibel Wednesday, August 28 at 1:30 p.m. Sanibel Congregational United Church of Christ 2050 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel 437-3007 Labelle Wednesday, August 7 at 1 p.m. First Christian Church 89 Ford Avenue, Labelle 437-3007 Punta Gorda Thursday, August 8 at 2 p.m. The Palms of Punta Gorda 2295 Shreve Street, Punta Gorda 437-3007 CPR T rainingAmerican Heart Association BLS CPR Training will be offered in Lehigh Acres. Stella Toomey of On The Spot CPR Training will offer twoyear American Heart Association BLS CPR certification training at the Lehigh Acres Veterans Park Recreation Center, located at 55 Homestead Avenue South. Preregistration is required and class size is limited to 12 students. The course is open to those ages 16 and up. Classes are offered once a month from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays from August 17, 2013 through August 16, 2014. The registration fee is $70. In this classroom-based course using the newest AHA guidelines, healthcare professionals learn to recognize several life-threatening emergencies, provide CPR to victims of all ages, use an AED and relieve choking in a safe, timely and effective manner. Instructor-led format provides students with an enhanced learning environment, and video-based instruction ensures consistency. Additionally, the hands-on class format solidifies skills taught during the course. The complete training schedule is as follows: August 17, September 21, October 19, November 16, December 21, January 18, 2014, February 15, March 15, April 19, May 17, June 21, July 19 and August 16. To make your reservation for training, contact Stella Toomey of On The Spot CPR Training at 560-4613 or email onthespotcprtraining@gmail.com. More information is available at www.onthespotcprtraining.com. Stella Toomey of On The Spot CPR Training

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23 THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 2013 Isabella Rasi 239-246-47161101 Periwinkle Way #105, Sanibel, FL 239-472-0044 ENGEL & VLKERS Excellence in Real Estate A step above! International Client Base 600 Shops Worldwide Multi-Lingual Staff Your success is my aim. deaRPharmacistS elenium H elps H ashimotos A nd G raves Diseaseby S uzy Cohen, R PhDear Pharmacist: I have Hashimotos thyroid disease, and my husband has Graves. We are a perfect match because he makes too much and I make too little. Advice? BL, Dallas, Texas Youre little thyroid is a small gland with a big function. Located at the base of your throat, your thyroid produces hormones that control your metabolism (as in fat-burning ability) and regulates the rhythm of your heart and your body temperature. That explains why you eat like a bird and gain weight, while your husband eats a horse and stays thin. People like that either have a healthy thyroid and good metabolism, or they have intestinal parasites! Well, anyway, point is, one glitch in your thyroid and dangerous consequences can ensue, ranging from encephalopathy to heartbeat irregularities. Most people think hypothyroidism is strictly about fatigue, cold sensitivity and weight gain. But news flash: it causes misery head to toe. The opposite of hypothyroidism is hyperthyroidism, where excessive thyroid hormone is produced causing weight loss, rapid heartbeat and heat intolerance (and 100 more symptoms). Hyperthyroidism is often referred to as Graves disease and auto-immune condition where the body attacks its own thyroid gland. A goiter in the neck can occur. Whether you have hypo or hyperthyroidism, selenium is one trace mineral that may help. There are others which Ive written about in the past (see my article archives). Selenium has been shown in clinical trials to either slow the progression of or reduce symptoms of thyroid conditions, meaning any imbalance (hyper or hypo). Selenium is directly tied to the health of your thyroid gland, so discuss this mineral with your doctor. Your precious stash of selenium may be mugged by... wait for it... your medication! Surprised? Well, unfortunately its true. Your medicine might be crashing your thyroid over time, and this was covered in the selenium chapter in my book, Drug Muggers. Here are some common muggers of selenium: If you take any of those, selenium supplementation may be critical for you. And just FYI, its not just medicine, certain medical conditions and beverages affect selenium status. Recently, scientists discovered a certain gene is associated with thyroid cancer. This gene usually stops tumor growth, and when lifestyle factors turn it off in your body, thyroid tumors are more apt to grow. Im approaching my word count, so if youd like more details about thyroid disease, this cancer gene, how to switch it back on or anything else, sign up for my health tips newsletter at my website, in the banner, upper right-hand corner. One more thing, selenium-rich foods include walnuts, tuna (not too much, mer cury!), shrimp, eggs, cheese, turkey, beef and oatmeal. I like Brazil nuts because eating four per day gives you about 200 micrograms of selenium. Do not make home-made Brazil nut milk like I did... you will overload! This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. dearpharmacist.com. Mom A nd Me by Lizzie and PryceLizzie and Pryce answer your questions and give advice about aging concerns from a two-generational perspective. A mother and daughter team, Lizzie is a retired RN and health educator, and Pryce is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in the care of elders and people with chronic illnesses. Dear Mom & Me, I am not the grandmother my family would like me to be, but I try to do my best. For years, I devoted my time to our kids and their activities. We went to their games; their lives were the center of our focus, but now we think these retirement years are our time time to have fun and enjoy and do the things we werent able to do when we were raising kids. We are a part of the grandkids lives, but not as involved as the parents think we should be. What do other grandparents do? Aubrey Dear Aubrey, Recently, I read parts of a new book The New Face Of Grandparenting by Donald Schmitz, a former teacher who holds graduate degrees in education and human development. Schmitz talks about the three varieties of grandparenting: First, been there done that; second, help when asked grandparents; and third, the parents forever grandparents. My personal experience, and with friends, some are so involved they want to micro-manage their grandchildrens lives and make up to them what they did not do or regret not doing for their own children. Others are less involved and dont want to interfere, then others are so fed up with their own kids and the grandchildren, they now want a totally different life. Time to do the things they couldnt do before. We all probably fall somewhere in between. It seems that so many adult children are shocked when their parents dont act like they did when they were in their 40s and dont seem to realize their parents are in their horizon years and have differ ent emotional needs. Lizzie Dear Aubrey, The role of grandparent can take on very different shapes. What I think is important is that the role of grandpar ent remain flexible and meets the needs of everyone, including the person in the grandparent role. Not all grandparents want or can be a grandparent for a variety of reasons. Not all adult children can or want their parents involved with their children for a variety of reasons. Not all children want or can have their grandpar ents around. You and your family need to deter mine the grandparenting expectations. At first blush, it is great to have grandchildren that want you around and adult children that want you around as well. That is something very good to work with. So work with it and enjoy family time as well as free retirement time. Pryce Lizzie and Pryces email address is momandmeaging@hotmail.com. Our email address is press@riverweekly.com From page 19Read AroundViva Florida 500 is the year-long multicultural commemoration of Floridas 500th anniversary, dating back to Juan Ponce de Lens landing on Florida shores in 1513. Throughout 2013, communities across the state are participating in planned activities to commemorate Floridas unique heritage and cultural System has scheduled an assortment of programs to highlight elements of Floridas treasured history and landscape. Reading enthusiasts are invited to round up the family and join the book discussions, excavations, archaeological presentations, poetry readings, storytelling activities and other programs on tap at library locations throughout the county. able e-books, digital content, Books-ByMail, a bookmobile, e-sources, music and films, programs and meeting space. For more information, visit www.leelibrary.net or call 479-4636.

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THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 201324 Jenna Mann accompanies Arts Grande Dame Barbara B. Mann to A Midsummer Nights Sing Local philanthropist Berne Davis at A Midsummer Nights Sing Song Leader Doug Molloy with his wife Charity Matthew McRoberts, Roseanne Constantinople, Vonceil Franklin and James Franklin First Presbyterian Church members Harriet Hart, Sheryl deJong and Ruth Moon sell cookbooks with a special recipe from the family of Sam Galloway, Jr.From page 1Midsummer Nights SingThe popular event featured performances by pianist Barbara Peterson, organist Eddygrace Bernhard, Choral Director Rev. Roger Peterson, soloists Beth Wininger, Dick Kuieck and Lalai Hamric, and the First Presbyterian Church Choir and Friends. A Midsummer Nights Sing is the second of three hymn sings sponsored annually by the Galloway Family of Dealerships. The other two are Mrs. Edisons Hymn Sing in February and the Holiday Carol Sing in December. All three events benefit CCMI. Sam Galloway, Jr. with his mother-in-law Theresa Kellum and wife Kathy Galloway Shell Point E arns AwardShell Point Retirement Communitys Hospitality Services Department received an award for Overall Excellence during National Nutrition Month 2013 from the Florida Dietetic Association. Assistant Director of Hospitality Services Linda Rakos, RD, LD and Nutrition Services Manager Sandi Brower, DTR, accepted the award on behalf of Shell Point at the associations annual symposium held this month in Orlando. This award confirms our teams dedication to serving the residents of Shell Point, said Hospitality Services Director Al Slickers. We are continually challenging ourselves to engage our residents with useful information about how dining choices affect health. The Hospitality Services team organized a series of activities and presentations for residents during nutrition month and highlighted the healthy foods featured on the menu. Throughout the year, Rakos presents nutrition topics at the communitys Health Connection seminars, and she is a regular contributor to the communitys monthly Shell Point Life magazine and neighborhood newsletters. Linda Rakos Sandi BrowerShare your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702or email press@riverweekly.com

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PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF AUGUST 5, 2013 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) A longtime situation starts to move into a new phase. The question for the uncertain Lamb right now is whether to move with it. Facts emerge by midmonth to help you decide. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A talent for organizing your priorities allows the Divine Bovine to enjoy a busy social life and not miss a beat in meeting all workplace and/ or family commitments. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) What began as a dubious undertaking has now become one of your favorite projects. Your enthusiasm for it rallies support from other doubters-turned-believers. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Accept the help of friends to get you through an unexpectedly difficult situation. Therell be time enough later to investigate how all this could have happened so fast. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Change is a major factor for the Big Cat through midmonth. Be prepared to deal with it on a number of levels, including travel plans and workplace situations. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) You might not like all the changes that have begun to take place around you. But try to find something positive in at least some of them that you can put to good use. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A family members unsettling experience could create more problems if its not handled with care and love. And whos the best one to offer all that? You, of course. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) It might not be the right time for you to start a new venture. But its a good time to start gathering facts and figures so youll be set when the GO! sign lights up. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) The sagacious Sagittarius should have no trouble deciding between those who can and those who cannot be trusted to carry out a workplace commit ment. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Surprise, surprise. It looks as if that one person you once thought you could never hope to win over to your side suddenly just might choose to join you. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) You might have to set aside your pride for now and accept a change that isnt to your advantage. Cheer up. Therell be time later to turn this around in your favor. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your creative self emerges as dominant through midmonth. This should help you restart that writing or arts project youve left on the shelf for far too long. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a way of encouraging others by example to come out from the shadows and enjoy life to the fullest. Isle Derniere, a resort community on the Louisiana coast, killing more than 400 people. The storm first brought blinding and torrential rain, then storm surges and finally carried off with the wave, with some bodies New York, the first execution in history by electrocution is carried out against William Kemmler. It didnt go as planned. With the first charge, the current failed. A second charge was required for two minutes before Kemmler was declared deceased. Allied bombing during World War II, the German car manufacturer Volkswagen halts production of the Beetle. Volkswagen, under the control of the British military, began turning out Beetles again in December show American Bandstand goes national with teens dancing and rating records on a across the country. Dick Clark was host, a Mansons cult kill five people in movie the cult leaders intended target. Manson, an because he had once unsuccessfully tried to get a recording deal from a producer who used to live there. from behind by a van and bursts into flames. axle, was particularly vulnerable to damage by rear-end collisions. director Spike Lees first feature-length aters around the United States. The movie launched Lees career and established his reputation as an outspoken filmmaker who often tackled controversial subjects. who made the following sage observation: All my humor is based on destruction and despair. If the whole world were tranquil, without disease and violence, Id be standing in the breadline. flamingo cannot eat unless its head is upsidedown. ing the funeral for Congressman Warren B. Jackson was the victim of an assassination house painter, pointed two revolvers at the president and fired. In an incredible stroke of luck, both weapons misfired, at which point with his cane. a lake. found the inspiration for his hit song Mother and Child Reunion in a chickenand-egg dish he was eating in a Chinese restaurant. common words in the English language contain three or fewer letters. per capita than citizens of any other country in the world. stimulate passion. Chinas official news agency called it a nauseating craze, and the Soviets declared the toy to be a symbol of the emptiness of American culture (despite Australia). to 100 miles in a single day. I dont know anything about music. In THIS WEEK IN HISTORY strSTR A nN G eE BU tT trTR U eE thoTHO UG htHT F orOR theTHE DA yY DID YOU KNOW 2. ASTRONOMY: What is the sixth planet from the sun? album? 9. FAMOUS QUOTES: What Irish playwright once said, If you cannot get rid of the family skeleton, you may as well make it dance? TRIVI aA TES tT ANSWERS25 THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 2013 SpSP OR tT S QUIZ Rangers left-hander. Who else holds the record? 3. In 2012, Washington s Robert Griffith III had the fourth-highest passing yards (320) by a quarterback in his NFL debut. Name two of the top three. team? ANSWERS 1. Kenny Rogers won 18 in 2004. 2. Tom Browning tossed a perfect game against the Dodgers in 1988. 3. Cam

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 201326 CONTRACTOR G I P M SR C D P D P CG D GrSince 2001, A Southwest Florida Paver Contractor www.gigicompanies.com 239-541-7282Schedule free estimates or visit our new show roomLic.# S3-12238 FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the bene ts of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 TREE & LAWN CARE Jesus Hernandez LANDSCAPING & TREE SERVICE 482-7350 We Service All your Landscape Needs FULL Landscaping SERVICES Over 20 years serving San-Cap & Ft. Myers Seared Florida Grouper with Snap Beans and Three Pepper Relish 4 six-ounce grouper fillets 1 pound snap beans, snapped at the end that was attached to the vine and blanched 3 bell peppers (red, yellow and green), diced small 2 cloves fresh garlic, minced 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped 1 cup low-sodium soy sauce Olive oil for cooking Sea salt to taste Fresh ground pepper to taste Pre heat a small saut pan over medium-high heat. Add 1 teaspoon of oil to the pre heated pan. Add the diced peppers and garlic to the pan. Cook peppers and garlic until just crisp tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Season the pepper mixture to taste with salt and pepper and remove from the pan. Using the same pan, add the soy sauce and reduce by half. Once the soy sauce is reduced by half, remove it from the heat and set aside. Pre heat a large saut pan over medium-high heat. Add 1 tablespoon of oil to the preheated pan. Lightly season each grouper fillet with salt and pepper. Carefully add the fillets to the preheated pan. Cook fillets for 3 minutes on each side or until fish is just barely done all the way through. Remove fillets from pan and let them rest. Add the blanched snap beans to the pan used for the fillets. Cook snap beans until hot and lightly browned. Season the snap beans to taste with salt and pepper. To plate up dish, add an even amount of snap beans to each plate. Place a grouper fillet over the snap beans. Garnish the top of each fillet with the pepper relish saut. Drizzle each plate with the reduced soy sauce. Garnish each plate with the chopped parsley. Seared Florida Grouper with Snap Beans and Three Pepper Relish Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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27 THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 2013 answer on page 27 PUZZLE ANSWERS SUDOKU SCRAMBLERS BUILDING CONTRACTOR COMPUTERS FIND AT LEAST SIX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PANELS FISHING CHARTER Light Tackle Sport Fishing CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.com CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY

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THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 201328 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE ISABELLA RASiIHAPPY TO HELP Y YOUWithITH A ALL OOF Y YOUrRREAL EEStT At TE NEEDS! RS 1/4 NC TFN 1101 Periwinkle Way #105 SS anibel, F LL 33957 ISABELLA RASiI (239) 246-4716E ISABELLARASi I@AOL.COM MOBI LELE HOM EE P ERER IWINK LELE P ARAR K$115,000. 60 x 12 w/ metal roof-over plus 20 x 12 Florida room. Master BR has queen size bed & blt-in dresser & dbl closet. Master bath has combo bath/ shower & dbl sink vanity w/extra storage. Guest BR has dbl closet + blt-in drawers & private bath w/ shower. Eat-in-kit is open to LR which from K to FL room. Private 12 x 12 deck, picnic table and storage shed. One car carport with adjacent 2nd parking space. room & bathrooms. Carpeting in both bedrooms & LR. Home recently inspected & has all required tiedowns. New central air & heat system & stacked washer/dryer, all appliances louvered blinds throughout. Purchase completely furnished including all linens, dishes, pots & pans, tableware, 2 sleeper couches, recliner, 2 dining tables & chairs, 4 outdoor chairs & folding beach chairs, etc. Call owner 317-293-0915 or email LMSrealtor@aol.com for further information or to make offer. RS 8/2 CC 8/2 C ommOMM ER iI CAL RE nN TALOFFI CECE / CC OMM ERCERC I ALAL SS P ACEACE FO RR RERE N TT PALM COURT CENTER SANIBEL, Florida HIGHLY VISIBLE 520 SQUARE FEET Landlord pays all common maintenance. Call 239-472-6543 or 973-726-3213NS 4/5 CC TFN REAL ESTATEWEST GUL fF DR iI VE SS T iI LT H omOM E3 BR/2 BA; 1600 Sq Ft; 110 x 180 Lot FSBO: $679,900, OBO 239-472-0692 www.4sanibel.comNS 6/21 CC TFN 3B RR 2B AA RARA I SESE D RARA N CC H w/POO LL Totally Updated FSBO $576,000 Call for details 814-360-1526 or 814-777-3910NS 7/19 CC 8/2 Island VV acationsOf Sanibel & CaptivaMillion $ Views Await You! Cottages Condos Homes Miles of Beaches & Bike Paths239-472-72771-888-451-7277RS 1/4 BM TFN VACAT ionION RE nN TAL LL IGH TT HO USEUSE REALTREALT YPaul J. Morris, Broker VACATION RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT & SALES 359 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel Island 239-579-0511RS 1/4 CC TFN SERV iI CES offOFF ERE dDCompCOMP A nionNION SS ERV iI CE Sanibel-Captiva Care and Companion Service, LLC Medical appointments, general transportation, shopping, light meal preparations, and light cleaning. Our services are customized to meet our clients needs. Call 239-395-3591, or for an emergency call 239-472-0556.RS 1/4 BM TFN SS CAR nN AT oO LL A wnWN SS ERV iI CELawn Service, Shrubs and Tree Trimming Weeding, Installation of Plants, Trees and Mulch (one month free service available) Joe Scarnato (239) 849-6163 scarnatolawn@aol.comRS 1/25 BM TFN HELLES CC LEA ningNING SS ERV iI CESResidential Cleaning to Satisfaction Sanibel Lic. #11412 Lee Co. Lic. #051047NS 1/4 PC TFN SASA NIB ELEL HOM EE W ATCATC HRetired Police Captain Lives on Sanibel Will Check Your Home Weekly Very Reasonable Rates (239) 728-1971RS 1/4 BM TFN RR OG ERER NOD RURU FF ELECTRELECTR I CC Lic# EC12002788. Call Roger 239-707-7203. Aqualink Motor Controls. RS 6/7 CC TFN H omOM E/ CC ONDO WATC hH C onON C iI ER gG E SERV iI CES Full Range of Services Island Resident Licensed & Insured 24/7 Call Lisa or Bruce at 239-472-8875RS 1/4 BM TFN P AA IN TT ING GO ATAT Professional Painting & Home Maintenance Free Estimates Fully Insured www.paintinggoat.com 239-271-2919RS 4/19 CC TFN DI RECTLRECTL Y ACRACR O SSSS F RR OM B EACEAC H custom wood staircase, All High End appliances, separate bar, full custom large 3 car garage. A rare offering @ $3,500/mo. CACA N ALAL & DO CC K Five Minutes to Sanibel T oll-Booth!! This UF ground level updated home offers 3 BR/2 BA + family room, double garage, screened in pool, 65 boat dock, + boat lift for boat. $2,800/mo. 472-6747Gulf Beach Properties, Inc. Paul H. Zimmerman, Broker/Ownersanibelannualrentals.comServing The Islands Rental Needs Since 1975 RS 7/26 BM TFN A nnNN UAL RE nN TALS SS A nibNIB EL foFO RT myMY ERS RR E nN TAL WA nN TE dDAnnANN UAL RR E nN TAL WA nN TE dD Single 52 year old male gainfully employed non-smoking, no pets, no children, good credit. Looking for moderately priced 1B/1B or bigger rental. Sept. or later to occupy. Call Todd at 262-455-5860.NS 6/28 CC TFN F oO R RR E nN TCommunity Housing & Resources (CHR) has apartments for rent to individuals who work full time on Sanibel. Rent based on income. For information call 239-472-1189.RS 3/15 CC 8/30 A nnNN UAL RE nN TALQ UU I ETET SASA NIB ELEL HOM EE W/P RR I VATEVA TE B EACEAC H P ATAT H3200 sq ft home in Gulf Pines, one of Sanibels most beautiful & sought after communities. One house from beach w/private beach path. Short walk to Gulf Pines 2 swimming pools & tennis courts; large landscaped lot provides privacy. 3-4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, large open living area, screened porch & several decks. $4,000/mo. + util. Annual rental only. Unfurnished. Landscaping & association fees paid by owner. Avail Oct 2013. Call 917-680-4440.NS 5/31 CC TFN RERE /M AA X OF TT H EE I SLASLA ND SS Putting owners and tenants together www.remax-oftheislands.com 239-472-2311RS 1/4 BM TFN hH EL pP wW A nN TE dDVV O LULU N TEERSTEERS N EEEE D EE DVolunteers needed for the After School Program which runs Mon.-Th, 2:30 3:15 pm call Linda Reynolds 472-1617RS 1/4 NC TFN SS ERVERS AA SS iI STA nN T SS ERVERS LinLIN E C ookOOK IL Tesoro Ristorante, 751 tarpon Bay Rd. Sanibel Now hiring; Servers, Assistant Servers and Line cook Email resumes to: applications between 11-2 daily.NS 1/18 NC TFN VV O LULU N TEERSTEERS N EEEE D EE DAt The Sanibel School Call Michelle Wesley 239-910-8000RS 1/4 NC TFN 3883 Sanibel Captiva Road, Sanibel, Fl Phone: 239-472-3644, ext 1 Fax: 239-472-2334 www.crowclinic.orgH ELEL P USUS P LEASELEASE !!We need volunteers for: Clinic emergency patient admissions desk and baby animal feeders Visitor education center greeters and gift shop cashiers CROW (239) 472-3644, ext. 231 or volunteers@crowclinic.orgRS 1/4 NC TFN TT EC hniHNI CAL SS U ppoPPO RT SpSP EC iI AL iI ST I2 PT Temporary Positions available. Sanibel Public Library. Technical Support Specialist I. August 1 through November 15. $15./hour, 20 hours maximum per work week. Saturdays and evenings may be required. Opportunity for full time position. Respond by email to: Resume@sanlib.org.NS 8/2 CC 8/2

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29 THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 2013 CLASSIFIED DEADLINE FRIDAY AT NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS BOATS CANOES KAYAKSDOCKAGEHourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-5800RS 1/4 NC TFN 22-FOOT GLACIER BAY CATAMARANIn good condition. Needs some detailing and a high pressure fuel pump. $9,000 or best offer. The boat was donated to the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) for quick sale. Contact James Robinson at CROW at (239) 472-3644, ext. 221 or development@ crowclinig.org. Or contact Peg Albert at (239) 472-3644, ext. 232 or peg@ crowclinic.org. RS 7/26 NC TFN LOST AND F OUNDTOOL BOX WASHES UP ON SANIBELThis tool box with motor parts washed up on shore Saturday morning, May 8 about 8:30 on the beach at Sundial Resort on Sanibel Island. To claim call Sundial Resort Security 239-472-4151.NS 6/14 CC TFN P ETSFREE KITTEN TO GOOD HOMEFree kitten to good, safe home. No de-clawing. Fiesty Bengal mix. Call 472-1788 after 5 p.m.NS 5/31 NC TFN W ANTED TO BUYCASH P AID FOR MILITARY ITEMSCash Paid For Old Military Items. Medals, Swords, Uniforms, helmets, old guns, awards & more. Local Toll Free 1-866-440-3280RS 6/7 CC 8/30 CAR F OR SALE2007 BUICK LACROSSE CLX16,500 miles, beige color, 4 door, all power, seldom driven off island, $14,000. Call Ken at 472-2012.RS 7/12 NC TFN F OR SALEOUT DOOR PORCH SET BY LLOYD FLANDERSLove Seat, 2 Side Chairs, 4 Table Chairs. Table sixty inches in diameter. New cushions. Asking $1,500. Call 239-472-3884.NS 8/2 CC 8/2 WANTED BOAT LIFT TO RENTNeed lift with elec. & water for 22 ft. outboard. Will sign annual lease and pay top dollar for good location, Sanibel or Captiva. Ph 239-565-0073.NS 8/2 CC 8/9 The Island Sun and The River Weekly NewsAlways on the table, and online, with everything you need to know about your community. NEWSPAPERSanibel & Captiva IslandsTHEIVER R r rf WEEKL Y NEWS Serving Sanibel, Captiva and Fort Myers since 1993 Phone 395-1213 or 415-7732 Pick up a copy or go to IslandSunNews.com. Click on Read the Island Sun or The River Weeklywww.IslandSunNews.com GARAGE MOVING YARDSALES CAUTION HUGE MOVING SALESat. 9 1, Aug. 3 3168 Twin Lakes, Lake Murex Furniture, lamps, garden furn., push mover, all must go!NS 8/2 CC 8/2

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If you would like your club/organization listed in The River Calling Card, phone 415-7732Emergency ......................................................................................... 911 Lee County Sheriffs Of ce ........................................................ 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol ................................................................ 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol .............................................................. 278-7100 Poison Control ................................................................ 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center .......................................1-800-936-5321Ft. Myers Chamber of Commerce ............................................. 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare .............................................. 425-2685 Ft. Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce .................................. 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library ......................................................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library ............................................................ 533-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce .......................................... 931-0931 Post Of ce ..................................................................... 1-800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau ..................................................... 338-3500 ARTS Alliance for the Arts .................................................................. 939-2787 Art of the Olympians Museum & Gallery ................................... 332-5055 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio .................................................. 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers ......................................................... 275-3970 Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall ...................................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS ................................................................................ 395-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre ............................................... 278-4422 Cultural Park Theatre ................................................................ 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light ............................................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade .................................. 332-4488 Florida West Arts ...................................................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers ....................................... 472-0168 Gulf Coast Symphony ............................................................... 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres ..................................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic ........................................................... 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater ......................................................... 472-6862 S.W. Florida Symphony ............................................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy .................................................................. 936-3239 Young Artists Awards ................................................................ 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAngel Flight ................................................................ 1-877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center ............................................................... 731-3535 American Business Women Association ................................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL ..................................................................... 339-8046 Audubon Society ....................................................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR .................................................. 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society ................................................... 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus ................................. 1-855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club ............................................................ 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees ....................................................... 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists ............................................................ 415-2484 Ft Myers UDC Chapter 2614 (United Daughters of the Confederacy .................................. 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL ...................................................... 561-9164 The Horticulture and Tea Society ............................................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society ................................................................. 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society ............................................. 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation ........................................... 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees ............. 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America .......................................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL .................................................... 667-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans .................................................. 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy ........................................ 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association ........................................ 561-2118 Kiwanis Clubs: Fort Myers Beach ................................................. 765-4254 or 454-8090 Fort Myers Edison ..................................................................... 694-1056 Fort Myers South ...................................................................... 691-1405 Gateway to the Islands .............................................................. 415-3100 Iona-McGregor .......................................................................... 482-0869Lions Clubs:Fort Myers Beach ...................................................................... 463-9738 Fort Myers High Noon ............................................................... 466-4228 Estero/South Fort Myers ........................................................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County .............................................. 768-0417 POLO Club of Lee County ......................................................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers ......................................................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society ................................................ 472-6940 United Way of Lee County ........................................................ 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) ................................. 211 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews Shell Museum ................................................ 395-2233 Burroughs Home ...................................................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium ........................................ 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates ................................................... 334-3614 Fort Myers Skate Park .............................................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium ............................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge ................................ 472-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site .............................................. 239-992-0311 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center ....................... 765-8101 Skatium ...................................................................................... 321-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society ........................................ 939-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History ...................................... 321-7430 True Tours ................................................................................. 945-0405 SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 27THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 201330 Pets Of The Week My name is Cabella and I was a lucky dog to be chosen to participate in the Cell Dog Program through the Lee County Sheriffs Office. While there, a special inmate became my handler. We did everything together! We walked together. We played together. I even slept in a crate right next to his cot. As a team, we both learned valuable lessons. I am house trained, leash trained and know voice commands. Would you consider giving me the loving home I deserve? I am two years old and my adoption fee is only $25 (regularly $75) during Animal Services Theres No Place Like Home adoption promotion. They call me Tiptoe and I was only two weeks old when I came to the shelter with my littermates. We went to a wonderful foster home where we learned to be sociable, loving little kitties. My foster mom says Im outgoing and playful and will make an excellent lap kitty. If you want cute and lovable, Id be perfect! My adoption fee is only $10 Animal Services promotion. For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to Animal Services website at www.LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive, Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office, off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if three months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs six months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee, and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500. Tiptoe ID# 566462 Cabella ID# 552848 photos by squaredogphoto.com

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BEACH CHAIR PASTIMEAnswers on page 2531 THE RIVER AUGUST 2, 2013

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