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River weekly news ( July 12, 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101363/00150

Material Information

Title: River weekly news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication: Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 07-26-2013

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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101363:00186

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00101363/00150

Material Information

Title: River weekly news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication: Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date: July 12, 2013
Publication Date: 07-26-2013

Subjects

Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00101363:00186


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FREETake Me Home VOL. 12, NO. 29 JULY 26, 2013From the Beaches to the River District downtown Fort MyersRead Us Online at IslandSunNews.com Arts For ACT Gallery August Opening Exhibit Join Arts for ACT Gallery, located at 2265 First Street in downtown Fort Myers, on Friday, August 2 from 6 to 10 p.m. for the opening reception and art walk for August 2013. This month, ACT Gallery will feature the art of illustrator Joe LeMay, photographer and nave painter Cheryl Hucke and the mother and daughter duo exhibit of Christina and Carol Machula. LeMay will be the featured artist in the main gallery room. He graduated from Cypress Lake High School and the Savannah School of Art & Design. He is part of the group from the Union Artist Studio at the Alliance for the Arts. He works as a commercial artist. LeMay will display new works of illustration in his style of abstract, surrealism with a whimsical yet cutting edge. Hucke has a degree in graphic design. She worked for many years as a floral designer. She is greatly inspired by nature. She mainly paints with acrylics and enjoys photography. Hucke will be featured off the main gallery, this exhibit will feature both photography and nave paintings. This exhibit continues through Monday, July 29. A mother and daughter duo exhibit, Christina and Carol Machula, will be featured in the white gallery room. Christina is a new artist to Southwest Florida. From Evansville, Indiana, she received her Bachelors degree in Art from Kentucky Wesleyan College in 2006. She has always found inspiration in music. Over the years, Christina has experimented with a wide variety of mediums and subject matter, but has found that she enjoys using acrylic on canvas the most due to her rapid method of painting. She uses a bold color palette to transform even the continued on page 24 Free Parking At County Sites This WeekendLee County commissioners have designated Saturday, July 27 and Sunday, July 28 as dates during which parking fees will be waived at Lee County-managed boat ramps and regional parks, and admission will be waived at the countys swimming pools in recognition of National Park and Recreation Month. There will be 24 sites at which no fees will be applied, including: Park, Hickeys Creek Mitigation Park, Caloosahatchee Regional Park, Six Mile Cypress Slough Preserve, Caloosahatchee Creeks Preserve No. 1 and No. 10, Bonita Beach Park, Bowditch Point and Lynn Hall Memorial Park, Bunche Beach, Bowmans Beach and Turner Beach (north side only of Blind Pass). Alva, Davis, Pine Island Commercial Marina and Imperial River. North Fort Myers Community Pool, Pine Island Community Pool and San Carlos Community Pool. Not included in the free parking weekend are sites within city limits of other governments, including Barefoot Beach, beach access points managed by the Town of Fort Myers Beach, City of Sanibel sites including the south side of Blind Pass, and any Cape Coral parks. Lee County is pleased to be a part of the nationwide celebration and help recognize the value and benefits of parks and recreation, said Dave Harner, Lee County Parks & Recreation director. Enjoy a free summer weekend at our facilities. Directions and more information are at www.leeparks.org. Call 533-7275 or email leeparks@leegov.com. Lizard by Carol Machula Flowers by Christina Machula Morning Meander At L akes ParkTake an easy walk along clear paths and see birds in their native vegetation with experienced bird patrol guides pointing out the many species in Lakes Regional Park, a Lee County birding hot spot and crucial nesting area for many birds. The next Morning Meander will be held on Saturday, August 3 at Lakes Regional Park, 7330 Gladiolus Drive in Fort Myers. Please meet at Shelter A7. Enter Lakes Park gate from Gladiolus Drive and turn right. Drive to the end of the road and continue through the parking lot. Shelter A7 is located near the Train Station. Participants should arrive a few minutes after 8 a.m. for a brief introduction and to sign waivers. Tours start promptly at 8:30 a.m. Please wear comfortable shoes and dress to be outside. Bring water, sunscreen and binoculars.continued on page 17 Eastern Phoebe photo by Meg Rousher

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THE RIVER JULY 26, 20132 Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: E dna Grady R oberts At H omeby Gerri R eaves, PhDLook closely at the 1957 photo and youll see a woman looking out from behind the screen door on the front porch. The woman is unidentified, but its likely that she is Edna F. Grady Roberts, who noted on the photo not only the address and date, but the fact it was our last home. The word our refers to herself and her second husband, David, who died in 1951. They had lived there together from 1949 to 1950, she also noted on the photo. It was the second time that Roberts had been widowed in her long life of 98 years, the first time by Dr. Hal W. Grady. The little white house with the big screened-in front porch once stood on the north side of Second, just east of the Royal Palm Avenue intersection. Mid-20th century, that neighborhood had more residents and activity than it does today. On the block between Royal Palm and Fowler were private homes, apartments and businesses. Most of the residential structures in Roberts neighborhood including ones around the corner on Royal Palm have been demolished. If they existed today, some would be as old as a century. The Crescent Building (former public school) across the street from the house in the photo housed numerous businesses, professional offices and agencies. Several businesses were located near the south corner at Fowler. Roberts would have had an easy walk down Royal Palm to her church on First Street, the First United Methodist Church. One of her most outstanding achievements in a life largely dedicated to community and civic work was honoring Gen. Robert E. Lee, for whom Lee County was named, with a downtown monument. The plan for an imposing monument had been initiated in 1913 by the newly formed Laetitia Ashmore Nutt Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. At least twice, the effort was delayed because the chapter sacrificed its monument funds for other community needs: first to equip the first Lee Memorial Hospital, which opened in 1916, and second, to endow a nursery-maintenance fund when a new hospital was built by the WPA on Cleveland Avenue in 1943. Decades later, Roberts revived the plan and, as the chair of the monument-fund committee, ran a successful campaign that culminated, at last, when a monument to Lee was dedicated on Monroe Street on January 19, 1966. It stands there today. She also worked in real estate sales, at least for a time. In the 1920s, Roberts was a member of one of Fort Myers most vibrant civic clubs, the Business and Professional Womens Club, which, in those heady days after women finally gained the right to vote, advocated contemporary-sounding principles such as equal work for equal pay. When Roberts died in 1984, she was remembered for her tireless activism, particularly the mission work that she pursued for more than 40 years. Today, the area where Roberts once lived looks poised for redevelopment. Much of the block has been cleared of reminders that any human history ever took place there. But who knows? The construction of the new library complex is sending ripples of energy to that end of town. Walk down Second Street to Roberts former home and imagine a downtown in which almost all needs, from church to shopping to visiting, could be fulfilled within walking distance. Then stroll over to the Southwest Florida Museum of History, where you can learn more about downtown in the 1950s. For information, call 321-7430 or go to www.museumofhistory.org. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Be sure to visit the Southwest Florida Historical Societys research center to learn more about women like Roberts, who set out to accomplish something in Fort Myers and did it. The all-volunteer non-profit organization is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Contact the society at 939-4044, or visit on Wednesday or Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon. Sources: Archives of the Southwest Florida Historical Society and the Fort Myers News-Press. The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, please call (239) 415-7732 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, FL 33901. Fax number: (239) 415-7702. E-mail: press@riverweekly.com. The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Co-Publishers Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Isabel Rasi Office Coordinator Graphic Arts/ProductionAnn Ziehl Photographer Michael Heider Writers Anne Mitchell Jeff Lysiak PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Contributing WritersRead Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com Click on The River Ed Frank Max Friedersdorf Tom Hall Today, no sign of Roberts or her neighbors houses remains on the north side of the street between Royal Palm and Fowler photo by Gerri Reaves Edna Grady Roberts lived in this house on Second Street, pictured here in 1957 courtesy of the Southwest Florida Historical Society

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3 THE RIVER JULY 26, 2013 Fort Myers Public Art: The Spirit Of Fort Myersby Tom HallJust past the entrance to the Edison-Ford Estates on McGregor Boulevard is a sculpture of a comely Greek maiden pouring water from an urn into a basin at her feet. Its part of the stately entrance that developer James D. Newton designed for Edison Park, which was the most elite community in Fort Myers back in the pre-Depression 1920s. Most know her as Rachel at the Well, but the name given to the sculpture by its creator was actually The Spirit of Fort Myers. Many years later, Newton would write a book titled Uncommon Friends, which paid tribute to the unique bonds of friendship enjoyed by Fort Myers famous winter residents, Thomas Edison, Henry Ford and Harvey Firestone. But at the time he started his development across the street from Edisons two-story home, he did not know any of the men or their spouses. That quickly changed. One morning, Newton was summoned to the Edison home, not by Tom, but by his wife, Mina. Newtons excitement over finally getting to meet the grand dame of Fort Myers quickly turned to dread when the front door opened and she came out with a stern look etched into the features of her face. It seems that Mina and a number of the towns ladies were upset with Newton because the sculpture he was having carved for the entrance to Edison Estates was nude! I was amazed. How had they known?, wrote Newton in Uncommon Friends. The sculptor, Helmut von Zengen, had been doing his work behind a heavy canvas tarpaulin carving a Greek maiden of some two thousand years ago. I asked, How do you know the statue doesnt have clothes? The ladies went with a flashlight one night and looked underneath the canvas, Edison readily admitted. Newton was more a businessman than an arts benefactor. He immediately went to von Zengen, who just about tore his hair out, but finally worked out a way to create a veil with powdered marble. His compromise won the enduring friendship of Mina and her husband, and both agreed to do the unveiling at the sculptures dedication on April 7, 1926. The Spirit of Fort Myers is located at 2404 McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. It is part of the City of Fort Myers public art collection and is administered by the Fort Myers Public Art Committee, whose nine volunteer members serve staggered three-year terms. Cypress Lake High Center for the Arts teacher Ava Roeder currently serves as Chair of the PAC. An arts advocate, Tom Hall guides weekly walking tours of the River Districts public art collection in Fort Myers. For more information, go to www. truetours.net. A west view of The Spirit of Fort Myers, more commonly referred to as Rachel at the Well 33 Patio de Leon Ft Myers River District 337-3377 or www.MorganHouseRestaurant.comTasty Tuesday1/2 price craft beers$6 burgersThrifty Thursday$4 Martinis 1/2 price selected shotsSalty Saturday1/2 price margaritas & 1/2 tequila shootersWino Wednesday 1/2 price house wine 1/2 price appetizersFreebie FridayBOGO house wines & select drafts Free buffet (upstairs only) Happy Hour 4-7pm & All Day Saturday Lazy Flamingo, Inc. 6520-C Pine Avenue Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-5353 Lazy Flamingo 3, Inc. 16501 Stringfellow Rd Bokeelia, FL 33922 239-283-5959 Lazy Flamingo 2, Inc. 1036 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-6939 Lazy Flamingo 4, Inc. 12951 McGregor Blvd. Ft. Myers, FL 33919 239-476-9000 Four Great Locations! If Our Seafood Were Any Fresher, We Would Be Serving It Under Water! NOW SERVING FULL LIQUOR IN FORT MYERS Bring in This Coupon for $ 5 OFFPurchase of $30 or moreF M

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THE RIVER JULY 26, 20134 Junior Achievement Teacher And Volunteer Awarded Scholarships Two of the 15 full-tuition scholarships offered nationwide by Apollo Group/ University of Phoenix in partnership with Junior Achievement USA were awarded to a teacher and a volunteer nominated by Junior Achievement of Southwest Florida. The local recipients, Valerie McFadden, teacher at Seacrest Country Day School, and Carrie Santinelli, volunteer at Three Oaks Elementary, can choose to complete their degree at an on-ground campus or online through University of Phoenix, the largest private university in North America. McFadden has served Junior Achievement of Southwest Florida in a multitude of capacities over the past seven years, including hosting classroom volunteers for the fifth grade JA Our Nation program, coordinating all second through eighth grade JA classes held at Seacrest Country Day School, coordinating students and chaperoing for the Business Hall of Fame event and serving as her schools liaison for Junior Achievements signature CEO Academy, Business Leadership Camp. With the scholarship, McFadden will pursue a masters degree in adult education. I am honored and humbled to receive this scholarship which will greatly impact my life. Im consistently looking to learn new things, especially strategies that will enhance my classroom, said McFadden. Like Junior Achievement, I believe every child can be an entrepreneur. Santinelli has volunteered with Junior Achievement for nearly four years as a classroom volunteer. Beyond her dedication to Junior Achievement, she is also devoted to a number of other community causes such as the Make-a-Wish Foundation and the Guadalupe Center in Immokalee. Unable to afford college after graduating high school, Santinelli has been working full-time since the age of 18. In addition to educating students on business and economics, as the manager at Talbots clothing store, Santinelli frequently mentors her employees on financial literacy. Junior Achievement made me realize how much I love to teach and how much I enjoy seeing others get excited about learning, said Santinelli. I have never given up on my dream of a college education, and I plan to earn a bachelors degree in elementary education. This is the second year that Junior Achievement USA has offered this scholarship opportunity to the organizations staff, volunteers and educators. In addition to McFaddens and Santinellis completed applications and essay questions, the staff at Junior Achievement of Southwest Florida supported the candidates through diligent communication and letters of recommendation. Were here for our students, but our impact often goes beyond to our teachers and volunteers, said Anne Frazier, president and CEO of Junior Achievement of Southwest Florida. Together, we will inspire and prepare all people to succeed in a global economy. Carrie Santinelli, Junior Achievement volunteer and scholarship winner, and Anne Frazier, executive director for Junior Achievement of Southwest Florida Valerie McFadden, teacher at Seacrest Country Day School, and Anne Frazier, executive director for Junior Achievement of Southwest Florida Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Downtown Fort Myers (Post Oce Arcade Next to Hotel Indigo) 1520 Broadway For Takeout & Delivery Tel: 334-6991 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEKMon-urs 11am 10pm Fri-Sat 11am 11pm Sun 12pm 9pm www. ichiban-sushi-chinese.com Love That Dress! Dress Drop-Off LocationsKendra Sutton, chair for Love That Dress! 5, is pleased to announce there are six convenient Fort Myers locations accepting dress donations to benefit PACE Center For Girls Lee. These locations will be collecting dresses until Saturday, August 24. White House Black Market in the Bell Tower Shops (13499 S. Cleveland Avenue, Suite 127) will be accepting donations Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. You can also drop off your dresses at Royal Shell Real Estate Fort Myers/Cape Coral (1870 Clayton Court) or Henderson Franklin Law Firm (1715 Monroe Street) from Monday through Friday during normal operating hours. Spada Salon and Day Spa (13161 McGregor Blvd.) is also accepting donations on Monday, Tuesday and Friday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Additionally, Nu Image Dry Cleaners has two locations where you can drop off your donations (3722 Cleveland Avenue in the Edison Mall area and 8911 Daniels Parkway, Suite 1). In the months of July and August, dress drop locations across Lee County will be accepting new and gently worn dresses of all styles and colors. Formal, casual and even bridal dresses will be collected at these donation sites and later sold at the Love That Dress! event to benefit the Lee PACE Center For Girls. In addition to dresses, shoes, purses and accessories are also being accepted. Your gracious donations will later be up for sale at this years Love That Dress! event, which will take place on Wednesday, August 28 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Embassy Suites Hotel in Estero located at 10450 Corkscrew Commons Drive. This event also includes a silent auction which helps to raise money for PACE, who also accepts donations of specialty goods, as well as cash and inkind sponsorships. www.SeabreezeNurseries.com (239) 560-1422 WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY We can help! Ask about our Season Discount! Palms, Palms, natives, natives, crotons, crotons, bromeliads, bromeliads, buttery bushes, buttery bushes, & much more & much more

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5 THE RIVER JULY 26, 2013 Lab Theater Presents The House Of YesYou think your familys Thanksgiving has drama? The House of Yes by Wendy MacLeod opens at the Laboratory Theater of Florida on Friday, August 2. This dark comedy is the story of a seemingly normal young man, Marty Pascal, who decides to take his fianc home to meet his family for the first time. As Marty and his fiance Lesly arrive home for Thanksgiving, both literal and figurative hurricanes loom. Fresh out of a psychiatric hospital, Martys twin sister Jackie-O shares an obsession with the Kennedy family and is intent on rekindling the incestous relationship with her twin brother. The enabling Mrs. Pascal and the twins brother Anthony run interference and heighten the raging storm. The play has received strong critical acclaim. The San Francisco Chronicle noted the witty family politics and menacing political allegory, and commended the playwrights grip on the art of conversation. ... MacLeod writes funny, frightening dialogue, and she touches the nerve of our cozy, vicarious involvement with acts of public violence. Nykkie Rizley (a founding member of the Lab Theater) is set to direct the play. She describes the show as quick-witted, spunky, dark, chic and disturbing. The show is dripping wet with dry humor. This show is about love, family, politics (both in the home and within the government), violence, and protecting our children in a way that more than flirts with enabling. Yes questions our roles in society the place we come from how we view ourselves which one is correct? does it really matter? This production stars a quintet of Lab Theater stage veterans. Nancy Antonio plays the family matriarch, Kathleen Taylor as Jackie-O, Todd Fleck as twin brother Marty, Adam Kazmarz plays little brother Anthony and Tera Nicole Miller plays Lesly. The House of Yes is onstage at The Laboratory Theater, Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., August 2 to 24. Tickets are between $12 and $22 and are available online at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/391340 or call 2180481. Stay up to date with its news and events on Facebook and Twitter @ LabTheaterFL. The theater is located at 1634 Woodford Avenue in Fort Myers. Cape Mormons Honor Pioneers On Saturday, July 27, from 9 a.m. to noon at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the Mormons will host a morning with pioneer games followed by a lunch of chili, pie and ice cream. Everyone is invited to attend and join in the festivities. There is no charge and parking is free. The church is at 1928 S. Chiquita, Cape Coral. Nancy Antonio and Todd Fleck star in The House of Yes Charity Beach Ball Returning In November The Fort Myers Beach Community Foundation is pleased to announce our 2nd Annual Charity Beach Ball will take place on Saturday, November 2 at DiamondHead Beach Resort. The Beach Ball is a black-tie optional silent auction to include an open bar from 6 to 8 p.m., dinner and dancing with The Marc Vee Band. Tickets are $95 per person or buy a table of 10 for $875, a savings of $75. Tickets are available online at www.charitybeachball.com or by mail at Fort Myers Beach Community Foundation Charity Beach Ball, P.O. Box 2834, Fort Myers Beach, FL 33931. Last years Beach Ball was a huge success; thanks to all our generous supporters and attendees. The foundation was able to support many local causes and provide scholarships to three outstanding students. With your continued support, we hope to make this event more memorable than the last. At this time, we are also seeking donations and sponsorship for the event. Contact information is available at www. fmbeachfoundation.org. FREE MARINA DOCKAGE with Dock Attendants Assistance RIV Nellies Upstairs Waterside Bar Where its Happy Hour all the time!!! 10% OFF Offer valid with Cash payments only ... No credit cards. ONE COUPON PER TABLE Can not be used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, Expires Aug. 2, 2013 Snacks in Between11am-10pm Snacks in Between11am-10pmwww.nervousnellies.net Send your editorial copy to: press@riverweekly.com

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THE RIVER JULY 26, 20136 Hortoons Greeters Club August MeetingDoes this topic pique your interest: The Edible Landscape: Growing More Edibles Around The Yard. Master Gardner Adrian Diaz will be the guest speaker at the Greeters Club of Fort Myers luncheon on Thursday, August 20 at the Colonial Country Club, 9181 Independence Way in Fort Myers. This is an opportunity to find out about the clubs activities, meet members and enjoy this interesting program. Call today to make a luncheon reservation (cost $20 per person) and to find out more about joining this dynamic group of Lee County women. Contact Marie Gaither at 791-8966 or wmgaither@aol.com to make reservations or for more details. Check us out on Facebook at Greeters of Fort Myers. Our luncheons are held on the third Thursday of the month at 11:30 a.m. at the Colonial Country Club in Fort Myers. Lee Parks & Rec To Garner Input About 40-Acre ParcelBird-watchers, hikers, nature photographers and Pine Islanders can help Lee County Parks & Recreation staff select a concept plan for a 40-acre wooded parcel on the island in Northwest Lee County. The public is invited to stop by the Matlacha Community Center between 4 and 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 30. This will be an informal open house workshop with no formal presentation provided. Residents can see two versions of plans for the parcel, which is located just west of the islands four-way stop cattycorner to Phillips Park. One plan calls for passive recreation with a half-mile loop trail, nature observation platform, limited parking and a small pavilion and restrooms. Another plan has an additional amenity an open-space area that could be used for events. Staff will be on hand to receive verbal and written comments about the concept plans and will use information gathered July 30 as they continue plans for the parcel, on which construction is not expected to begin until 2014. This is the third phase of garnering input; two public meetings previously have been held. For more information, call 533-7446, or visit www.leeparks.org for directions to the Matlacha Community Center. Call for departure time CAPTIVACRUISES H T H E I S L A N D S H THE BEST WAY TO SEE THE ISLANDS IS FROM THE WATER Cruises depart from beautiful Captiva Island CONTINENTAL CUISINEAT THEIR NEW HOME. 20351 SUMMERLIN ROAD, FORT MYERS. ACROSS FROM TANGER FACTORY OUTLETS. IN THE PUBLIX SHOPPING PLAZA. Courtneys has something for everyone. Come & see why Courtneys aims to please!239.466.4646HAPPY HOUR DAILY4PM-7PM IN OUR BEAUTIFUL LOUNGEREDUCED DRINK PRICES AND $2.00 OFF APPETIZERSLUNCH SERVED DAILY AT 11AM Dinner for 2 for $30.00 Includes glass of house wine or well drink or domestic beer eachChoose any entree from our SUNSET DINING MENUChoice of: soup or salad comes with potato, veggie, hot baked bread and fresh herb olive oil Available from 4pm-6pm(Does not include tax or gratuity. Not valid on Holidays)Expires 10/31/2013 Make your reservations today! Buy One Lunch Get One for Half PriceWith the purchase of two beverages Half price applies to lowest priced lunch. Does not include tax or gratuity. Not valid on HolidaysExpires 10/31/2013 JOIN US EVERY SUNDAY FOR BRUNCHFROM 10AM 2PMA DELICIOUS VARIETY OF BREAKFAST AND LUNCH ITEMS ON THE MENU Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702or email press@riverweekly.com

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7 THE RIVER JULY 26, 2013 So You Think Youre Thrifty Contest ReturnsAfter a two-year hiatus, Goodwill Industries of Southwest Floridas popular contest, So You Think Youre Thrifty, is returning. For the next several weeks, Goodwill will search for Southwest Floridas best bargain hunter. The winner will receive prizes, including a $250 Visa gift card and tickets to Goodwills Tux & Trees Gala. The winner also will appear in a future Goodwill advertisement or promotion. We havent done the contest for two years, but people still ask me about it to this day, said Goodwill Vice President of Communications Carolyn Johnson. Were excited to be able to bring it back. Goodwill officials have made a few changes to the contest format to make it easier to enter. In previous years, contestants were asked to audition at a Goodwill store in order to be eligible. With the new web-based competition, entrants can upload a video with their contest submission. The in-person auditions were a hardship for folks who worked full-time or had other responsibilities and time constraints, said Kirsten ODonnell, director of public relations. By allowing people to enter online, we believe the contest will be more convenient to enter. Entries are currently being accepted and contest hopefuls can submit through August 2. Entrants must be adult residents of Charlotte, Collier, Lee, Hendry, or Glades counties in order to be eligible. More official rules, along with the contest entry form, can be viewed through Goodwills website (www.goodwillswfl. org/thrifty). In past years, weve had finalists from Naples up to Port Charlotte and from Sanibel across to Clewiston, said ODonnell. Goodwill Industries of Southwest Florida, Inc. operates 27 retail and donation centers in Southwest Florida, in order to support its mission of helping people with disabilities and disadvantages overcome their barriers to employment and independence. Programs include JobLink centers, income-sensitive housing for people with disabilities and senior citizens, the Four Wheels for Work vehicle assistance program, and the LIFE Academy Charter School. Rachell Skerlec of Cape Coral receives the 2011 award from Carolyn Johnson of Goodwill Amy Burns of Sanibel won the 2009 Thriftiest Shopper in Southwest Florida title We Proudly Brew Tropial Outdoor Patio Seating Get Crabby At The Cow Get Crabby At The Cow with our Famous Stone Crabs1/2 lb & Best Prices On The Planet Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Come Try our NEW Cowlicious Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials Sanibels Most Award Winning Restaurant LIVE Famous Stone Crabs Famous Stone Crabs Always Fresh ...Always! ...Always! with our with our Always Fresh ...Always Fun! Always Fresh ...Always Fun!

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THE RIVER JULY 26, 20138 Along The RiverOn Friday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., The Mound House in Fort Myers Beach offers kids kayaking. An environmental educator and kayak instructor will lead the group during a morning of kayaking fun for children ages 10 to 14. The program includes introduction to basic kayak handling, paddling and water safety skills. After a break for lunch, participants will depart from Mound House for a guided tour of the estuary system with and opportunity to explore a tidal creek in the mangrove forests of Estero Bay. Registration is required in advance and is limited. Participants must be able to swim and wear water shoes or sneakers. Everyone should bring a packed lunch, bottle of water, sunscreen and insect repellant. The Mound House is the site of a 2,000-year-old Calusa Indian Shell Mound and the William H. Case house, which represents the oldest standing structure on Estero Island dating 1906 to 1921. Through archaeology and history 2,000 years of island life are revealed in a variety of tours and educational programs. Situated on Estero Bay, the site is accessible by boat and motor traffic and visitors are encouraged to picnic on the park grounds and enjoy the beautiful view. The Mound House is owned and operated by the Town of Fort Myers Beach. The Mound House is located at 451 Connecticut Street, Fort Myers Beach. Call 765-0865 or go to www.moundhouse.org. Listen to live music from the areas premier talent at the Sunset Celebration in Fort Myers Beach. Jam to island beats with High Tide on Friday. Railhead entertains the crowd on Saturday. The concerts are held from 5 to 10 p.m. both evening (weather permitting) at Times Square. For more information, call 463-5900. On Saturday night, join Fort Myers car enthusiasts at the Downtown Car Cruise-In in the historic River District. Held on the fourth Saturday of every month, the event features vintage, modern and unique cars from 5 to 8 p.m. along with a DJ spinning classic rock with trivia. All cars welcome and the event is free for all ages. For more information, call 1-855-7323836. On Mondays through August 26, The Fort Myers Film Festival Summer Series: Best of the 2013 Film Festival is featured at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center (SBDAC). On July 29, the 82 minute movie Waterhole Cove, directed by Brett Ryan Bonowicz, is playing. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the film begins at 7 p.m. Admission is $6. The regular season of short films begins September 9. The Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in downtown Fort Myers. Call 333-1933 or go to www.sbdac.com. If you appreciate the beauty of downtown Fort Myers historic River District, take a tour of one of Fort Myers oldest homes The Burroughs Home. Walk among live oaks and lush gardens, relax in a rocking chair on the verandah as you watch the river roll gently by... but, first, join Mona and Jettie Burroughs as they share the history and colorful tales of living in the home. Built in 1901, this Georgian Revival mansion was the scene of many social events that hosted the Fort Myers elite including the Edisons, Fords, and Firestones. Antique furnishings, historical artifacts, and delightful tales of growing up as the privileged daughters of wealthy businessman Nelson Burroughs and his wife Adeline await visitors who want to take a step back in time. Tours are offered on Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Prices are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors and $5 for children 6 to 12 years old. No need for reservations unless you have a groups of 10 or more. Box lunches are offered at $10 and require 24 hour advance notice. The Burroughs Home is located at 2505 First Street, Fort Myers in the historic River District. Call 337-0706 or go to www.burroughshome.com. On Wednesdays, take the Working Waterfront Walking Tour with Ostego Bay Marine Science Center in Fort Myers Beach. The Working Waterfront Walking Tour runs from 10 a.m. and includes a one-and-a-half hour guided visit at the museum which contains a touch tank, a hands-on beach area and several aquariums and exhibits. The tour continues with a visit to the commercial fishing industry, including Erickson & Jensen Supply House, Trico Shrimp loading dock and Beach Seafood. See how the boats are unloaded, the trawl doors are build, the shrimp nets are hand-sewn, the seafood is processed, and other important factors used in this unique million dollar industry; a memorable experience. The cost for the tour is $15 per adult and $10 for children seven years of age and older. Reservations are required. Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center located at 718 Fishermans Wharf on San Carlos Island in Fort Myers Beach. Call 765-8101 or go to www.ostegobay.org. Marco Cordero on the set of Waterhole Cove, Mondays featured film at the SBDAC photo courtesy of Heppe Waterhole Cove Photography The Burroughs Home was host to Fort Myers elite including Edison, Ford and Firestone ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President General Manager Personal Lines Agent 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Paradise. Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. We are HERE for all your insurance needs Open Monday Saturday www.threecraftyladies.com Find us on WE WILL PAY YOUR TOLL!!!Spend $55 and bring us your toll receipt for a full refund! To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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9 THE RIVER JULY 26, 2013

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Churches/TemplesALL F aA ITHS UNIT aA RI aA N CONGREG aA TION (UU A) Where diversity is treasured 2756 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers Summer program: Understanding the Faiths of Our Worlds June 2 to August 25 11 a.m. Interim Minister, Rev. Margaret Beard, begins on September 1 239-226-0900. www.allfaiths-uc.org A LLLL SS A INTSINTS BYZA NTINENTINE RITERITE CA THOLITHOLI C C HH U RR C HH 10291 Bayshore Rd., N. Fort Myers Divine Liturgy is on Sun. at 10:30 a.m.; Rosary begins at 10 a.m. Lenten services (Presanctied Liturgy) will be on Wed. evenings at 6 p.m. starting on Feb. 22. Administrator is Very Rev. Peter Lickman, ph. 305-651-0991. We are a Church of the Eastern Catholic or Byzantine Rite, 1.5 mi. east of Int. 75. A NNNN U NN C II A TIONTION GREEGREE K ORTHOORTHO D OO X C HH U RR C HH 8210 Cypress Lake Dr ive, Fort Myers Reverend Fr. George P. Savas Orthros Service Sunday 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy Sunday 10 a.m. www.annunciation.fl.goarch.org 239-481-2099 B ETHETH SHILOHSHILOH M ESSIESSI A NINI C SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 15675 McGregor Boulev ard, 437-3171 Rabbi: Judah Hungerman Friday Service, 8 p.m., Saturday Service, 11 a.m. Shabbat School Saturday Morning, Adult Hebrew Classes. Call for information on full program. B RERE AD OO F LILI F EE M INISTRIESINISTRIES C HH U RR C HH OO F GOGO D 16581 McGregor Boule vard, 267-3166 Just past the Tanger Outlet Mall Pastor: Barry Lentz, 281-3063 Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. C HH AP ELEL OO F CYP RESSRESS C OO V EE 10200 Cypress Cov e Circle Fort Myers 239-850-3943, Located at Cypress Cove Retirement Center on HealthPark Campus An ecumenical non-denominational community of believers. Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. Reverendt Ted Althouse, Pastor revtedalthouse@aol.com C HH U RR C HH OO F THETHE C ROSSR OSS 13500 Freshman Lane; 768-2188 Pastor: Bud Stephens; A nondemonimational church emphasizing a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Sunday Service: 9:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 Contemporary. CO vV EN aA NT PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937 Rev. Dr. Jeffrey DeYoe, Senior Pastor Reverend David Dietzel, Pastor Emeritus. Traditional Sunday service 10 a.m. Nursery available C ypYP RESS LakLAK E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H 8400 Cypress Lak e Drive, Fort Myers, 481-5442 Randy A. Alston, Reverend. Sunday Services: Bible study, 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship, 11 a.m., Evening Worship, 7 p.m., Wednesday Prayer Meeting, 6:30 p.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 481-3233. www.clpc.us. Clint Cottrell, pastor Prayer Service 8 a.m., Praise 9 a.m., Childrens Church 9 a.m., Traditional 11 a.m. Summer: Prayer Service 8 a.m. Combined Traditional/Praise 10 a.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E UNITE dD METHO dD IST CH uU R cC H 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 482-1250 8 and 11 a.m. Sunday Traditional Service 9:30 a.m. Praise Service Sunday School all times F aA ITH FELLOWSHI pP W ORL dD O uU TRE acA C H mM INISTRIES 6111 South P ointe Boulevard, Fort Myers, 278-3638. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Voice of Faith, WCRN 13.50 AM Radio, Sunday, 1:30 p.m.; Thursday Service, 7:30 p.m.; Friday Youth Service, 7:30 p.m. Nursery care for pre-school children and Childrens Church for ages 5-12 available at each service. F aA ITH uU NITE dD mM ETHO dD IST cC H uU R cC H 15690 McGregor Boule vard Fort Myers, 482-2030 Pastor: David Stauffer. Traditional services 8:45 a.m.; Contemporary, 10:30 a.m. Go south on McGregor Boulevard. The church is mile past the intersection of Gladiolus and San Carlos Boulevard on the way to Sanibel. FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF cC HRIST S cC IENTIST 2390 West First Street, next door to Edison Estates. Sunday Morning Service and Sunday School, 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday Evening Testimony Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Child care provided at all services. Visit our Reading Room for quiet study at: 2281 First Street, River District. www.time4thinkers.com, www.christiansciencefortmyers.com, www.christianscience.com FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF THE NazaNAZA RENE 13545 Amer ican Colony Boulevard off Daniels Parkway in the Colony, Fort Myers, 936-2511 Pastor: Reverend Joey Brummett Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Family Night, 7 p.m. F IRSTIRST U NITENITE D M ETHOETHO D ISTIST C HH U RR C HH in the Downto wn Fort Myers River District 2466 First Street, Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-332-1152, www.fumcftmyers.org Sunday: 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 5 p.m. Youth Program FORT M yY ERS CHRISTI aA N CH uU R cC H (DIS cC I pP LES O fF CHRIST) A SS TE pP HEN MINISTRIES CONGREG aA TION 5916 Winkler Road, F ort Myers, 437-4330 Reverend Mark Condrey, Pastor Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Church School: 9:15 a.m. FORT M yY ERS CONGREG aA TION aA L UNITE dD CH uU R cC H O fF CHRIST : 8210 College Parkway, Fort Myers, 482-3133. Philip White, pastor Morning Worship: 10 a.m. Church School: 10:15 a.m. Adult Forum: 11:30 a.m. HOLHOL Y THEOTOTHEO TO K OSOS M ONON A STERSTER Y 111 Ev ergreen Road, North Fort Myers, 997-2846 Eastern Orthodox mens monastery. Liturgical services conducted in the English, Greek and Church Slavonic languages, following the Julian (Old) Calendar. Liturgical Services: Sundays and Holy Days: The Third and Sixth Hours at 8:30 a.m.; Divine Liturgy at 9 a.m. II ON aA HH O pP E EpEP IS cC O paP A L cC ONGREG aA TION 9650 Gladiolus Dr ive, Fort Myers 4544778 The Reverend Dr. John S. Adler, pastor. Weekly services: Saturday 5 p.m., Eucharist with Healing Sunday 8 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite One; 9:30 a.m., Family Eucharist with Healing and Church School Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Morning Prayer (in Spanish); Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Eucharist with Healing. Child care available at Saturday 5 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m. services. JES uU S THE WW OR kK ER C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H: 881 Nuna Avenue, Fort Myers, 481-1143 Masses Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. K INGING D OO M LILI F EE C HH U RR C HH 2154 McGregor Boulev ard, Fort Myers, 218-8343 Pastor Randy and Anita Thurman 10:30 a.m. Sunday Service All are welcome. LambLAMB O fF GG O dD LuLU THER aA N/ EpEP IS cC O paP A L CH uU R cC H Corner Cypress View Drive and Koreshan Boulevard, Three Oaks area, Fort Myers, 267-3525 Walter Fohs, pastor; Becky RobbinsPenniman, associate pastor Sunday worship services: 8 a.m. Early Grace Traditional 9 a.m. Awesome Grace Contemporary 10:30 a.m. Classic Grace Traditional 8:45 & 10 a.m. Sunday School Gods Group NN EW BEGINNINGS CENTER Ne w Home Church, 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, North Fort Myers, 239-656-0416 Weekly Friday Meeting Meet & Greet: 6:30 p.m. Kingdom Teaching: 7 p.m. Fellowship and refreshments after service. nbcministry@embarqmail.com, www.facebook. com/nbcministry. Alex & Patricia Wiggins, Ministers NEWNEW C OO V ENEN A NTNT EE Y ESES C HH U RR C HH See Clearly Meeting monthly at 9 a.m. at the Elks Lodge. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, Fort Myers, FL 33907. 239-220-8519 Pastor Alan Bondar www.newcovenanteyes.com Wear what you want, rockin music, relevant teaching, LIFT Kidz program, free coffee & donuts, people who are real, church thats actually fun. NN EW HH O pP E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H O fF FOR T M yY ERS 16120 San Car los Boulevard, Unit 10 239-985-8503 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m Sunday Morning Worship. 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study NN EW HH O pP E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 3825 McGregor Boule vard. Fort Myers Pastors: Stu Austin and Howard Biddulph 8 & 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11 a.m. Contemporary Worship 8, 9:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School Youth and Childrens programming runs concurrent to Sunday services. Nursery care provided at all services 274-1230. For more information visit: www.newhopefortmyers.org P EE A C EE CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H Meets at F ort Myers Beach Masonic Lodge 17625 Pine Ridge Road, Fort Myers Beach 267-7400. Pastors Bruce Merton, Gail & RC Fleeman Adult Discussion Classes: 9-10 AM Countdown to Worship (praise music): 10:10 AM Amazing Grace Worship: 10:30 AM Phone 267-7400 Fax 267-7407 Web site: peacecommunitychurch.com e-mail: peace1265@aol.com P EE A C EE LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH Sunday Worship at 9:30am. Peace is a member of the ELCA. We celebrate weekly communion with traditional liturgy, organ and choir. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers On the way to Sanibel. 239-437-2599, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@peaceftmyers.com. RE dD EE mM ER L uU THER aA N cC H uU R cC H 3950 Winkler Ext., Fort Myers, 274-0143 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. Sunday Services Daily early learning center/day care RIRI V ERER OO F LILI F EE A SSESSE MB LL Y OO F GOGO D 21580 Riv er Ranch Rd, Estero 239-495-0400, Senior Pastor: Todd Weston 8 and 9:45 a.m Services; 11:30 a.m. Legacy Service, multi-generational S amudAMUD R abadAB AD R aA buddB UDD HIST cC ENTER Meditation classes All are welcome. Guided meditations offering many methods for relaxing the body and focusing the mind on virtuous objects to bring increasing peace and happiness into daily activity. For information, class times and locations call 567-9739 or visit www. MeditationInFortMyers.org. SS O uU THWEST bapB AP TIST cC H uU R cC H 16940 McGregor Boule vard, Fort Myers, 454-3336 Robert G. Kasten, Pastor Sunday Worship Service 11 a.m. Nursery available 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Junior Church grades one to five Wee Church Pre-K to K Evening Service 6 p.m. Wednsday Service 6 p.m. SaSA INT COL umbkUMBK ILLE C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H 12171 Iona Road, F ort Myers, off McGregor and north of Gladiolus. 489-3973 Father Joseph Clifford. Weekly masses: Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. Weekend masses: Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday: 7, 9,11, and 5:30 p.m. Reconciliation is available at the church on Saturdays at noon and by appointment SaSA INT JOHN THE A pP OSTLE METRO pP OLIT aA N CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H 3049 Mcg regor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 344-0012 Pastor Reverend Steve Filizzi An Affirming & Inclusive Congregation Sunday Services, 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Mid-Week Service, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. SaSA INT MI cC H aA EL LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H & ScSC HOOL ( LL CM SS ) 3595 Broadw ay, Fort Myers 239-939-4711, www.smlcs.org Wednesday Fellowship: 5:30 p.m. Dinner $5, 6:15 p.m. bible studies Worship: Saturday, 5:30 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. with 9:15 a.m. adult and childrens Bible Study, plus marriage enrichment studies. Divorce Care on Thursdays from 7 to 8:30 p.m. During Lent: Wednesday worship noon and 6:15 p.m. SaSA INT PETER LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H 3751 Estero Boule vard, Fort Myers Beach, 463-4251. Sunda y w orship at 9:30 a.m. Womens Bible Study is offered on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 9:30 a.m. www.stpeterfmb.com TETE MP LELE B ETHELETHEL SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 16225 Winkler Rd. 433-0018. Rabbi Jeremy Barras E-mail: rabbi.barras@templebethel.com Cantorial soloist: Lawrence Dermer Temple educator: Dale Cohen, MaEd, RJE Shabbat Services, Friday, 7:30 p.m. Torah Study, Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Religious Education; Sunday School and Midweek classes, Preschool Classes, Monday through Friday Web site: www.templebethel.com Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TETE MP LELE JUD EE A (C ONSERONSER VA TITI V EE ) 14486 A&W Bulb Road, F ort Myers, 433-0201, Rabbi: Rabbi Elyssa Auster President: Keith Grossman Minyan: Monday & Thursday at 9 a.m. Services: Friday night at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Religious School Sunday morning Web site: www.tjswfl.org Preschool director: JoAnn Goldman email templejudeapreschool@gmail.com 433-0201, Web site: www.tjswfl.org Affiliated: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism continued on page 11THE RIVER JULY 26, 201310

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11 THE RIVER JULY 26, 2013 From page 10Churches/TemplesTHE CHABAD LUBAVITCH OF SW FLORIDA ORTHODOX 5620 Winkler Road, Fort Myers Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz 433-7708, E-mail: rabbi@chabadswf.org Web site: www.chabadswf.org Services: Friday 6:30 p.m.; Saturday Kabbalah class 9 a.m.; Shacharit 10 a.m.; Kiddush at noon Minyan: Monday and Thursday 7 a.m. THE NEW CHURCH The New Church of SWFL is located 10811 Sunset Plaza Circ. #401, behind Zoomers. Rev. Gabriella Cahaley officiates worship services on Sundays at 11 a.m. during the season. Other worship events are held on the beach in Fort Myers Beach. See our webpage http://www.newchurchflorida.com/ or call for more information 239-481-5535. CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 1619 Llewellyn Drive Fort Myers Just off McGregor across from the Edison/ Ford Winter Estates 334-4978 Pastor: Douglas Kelchner Worship times Sundays 9 and 10:30 a.m. Website: www.taecc.com UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH FORT MYERS 13411 Shire Lane (off Daniels Parkway one mile west of I-75) Minister: The Reverend Allison Farnum Sunday services and religious education at 10:30 a.m. For information on all church events call 561-2700 or visit www.uucfm.org. UNITY OF BONITA SPRINGS Family Service 10 to 11 a.m. Healing Circle 11 a.m. Hospitality and Fellowship, 11 a.m. Inspiring lesson, uplifting and dynamic music, meditation in a loving environment. Service held at 28285 Imperial Street, Bonita Springs. Call 947-3100. UNITY OF FORT MYERS 11120 Ranchette Rd., Fort Myers Summer Services: Sundays at 10 a.m. Childrens class at 10 a.m. Reverend Jim Rosemergy, Minister Our God is Love. Our Race is Human. Our Religion is Oneness. www.unityoffortmyers.org or 239-278-1511 WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 9065 Ligon Court, Fort Myers, across from HealthPark Hospital, 481-2125 Senior Pastor: Robert Brunson Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Blended Worship www.westminsterfortmyers.org WORD OF LIFE CHURCH 2120 Collier Ave, Fort Myers, 274-8881; Services: Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. Bishop Gaspar and Michele Anastasi ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH 7401 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, 481-4040, Interim Pastor Jim Eggert Pastor Peter Weeks Sunday Services: 8:30 a.m. Traditional; 10 a.m. Blended Traditional and Contemporary; 11:30 a.m. Contemporary. Childrens Sunday School, Adult /Teen Bible Classes, 10 a.m. rfrntrb rfrntrb rfrntrb rfrntrb nr nrn nrn The Springs Assisted Living is part of Shell Points Integrated Healthcare System. Shell Point is a non-profit ministry of The Christian and Missionary Alliance Foundation, Inc. Shell Point. All rights reserved. SPG-130-13 rfrntrb rfrntrb nrn System. Shell Point is a non-profit ministry of Shell Point. All rights reserved. SPG-130-13 Navigating the myriad decisions in determining if Assisted Living is right for you or your loved one is just plain difficult. Levels of care. Different facilities. Quality. Affordability. All factors in ensuring an optimized quality of life. If youve got a question or a whole list of them meet with our assisted living experts, If youve got a question or a whole list of them meet with our assisted living experts, McKenzie or Vivian, today. With the well being of the individual as their highest priority, McKenzie or Vivian, today. With the well being of the individual as their highest priority, theyll give you answers that can assist you in making the most informed decisions possible. theyll give you answers that can assist you in making the most informed decisions possible. When you do, we also invite you to tour Shell Points newest assisted living facility, When you do, we also invite you to tour Shell Points newest assisted living facility, When you do, we also invite you to tour Shell Points newest assisted living facility, When you do, we also invite you to tour Shell Points newest assisted living facility, The Springs. With beautiful surroundings and Shell Points proven reputation, The Springs. With beautiful surroundings and Shell Points proven reputation, The Springs. With beautiful surroundings and Shell Points proven reputation, The Springs offers an affordable option on a month-to-month basis. The Springs offers an affordable option on a month-to-month basis. The Springs offers an affordable option on a month-to-month basis. The Springs offers an affordable option on a month-to-month basis. Meet with our experts and visit The Springs today! Meet with our experts and visit The Springs today! Meet with our experts and visit The Springs today! Meet with our experts and visit The Springs today! Appointments and tours can be Appointments and tours can be arranged by calling (239) 454-2077 arranged by calling (239) 454-2077 MK M V C M O A L E (r f f n f n t n ) STEVE F. WATSONSteve Flaherty Watson, known to his loved ones as Boppy, 69, passed away July 9, 2013. He was born August 18, 1943 in Elgin, South Carolina to the late James D. and Clementine (Flaherty) Watson. In addition to his parents, he is preceded in death by his brothers, Robert and Don and sisters, Grace and Ann. Steve served our country in Vietnam in the US Air Force. He received his Bachelors of Engineering from Clemson University and loved to fish, golf, travel and spend time with his grandson. Steve moved to Lee County 15 years ago from Chicago. Left to cherish his memory are his wife of 13 years, Starr; stepchildren, Megan Flagg and Scott Dingle, both of Fort Myers; grandson, Brennon; sister-inlaw, Jean Watson and nieces, Donna and Lisa. There will be a Celebration of Life to be announced. Contributions may be made in Steves honor to the American Cancer Society at www.donate.cancer. org. Memories and condolences may be left at www.fortmyersmemorial.com. OBITUARY Hair Design at Snipitz Salon Ursula SahakianHair Design 239-462-1075 Adel PimpignanoHair Design 239-454-3683(Next to Citgo on McGregor Blvd.) Summer Special $7500

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THE RIVER JULY 26, 201312 Despite Dirty Water, The Fish Are Still Feedingby Capt. Matt MitchellDirty water and huge high tides greeted anglers this week. This dirty water came after all the rains of the past few weeks along with fresh water discharges from Lake O. This coffee-colored water throughout the sound is certainly not pretty to look at but it has not shut down our fishing. Catch-and-release snook fishing in and around the passes continued to go off. Drift after drift through the passes resulted in hook-up after hook-up. Though most of these snook are in the mid 20-inch range, its awesome to find so many. Small pinfish and grunts have been the baits of choice simply rigged with a split shot to bounce off the bottom during the drift. Once you locate the fish on a certain part of the drift, make this drift over and over. This resulted in many double header hook-ups. The passes also held some bigger snook with a few fish over 30 inches caught just about every trip. Several times this week we hooked into and even caught a few a real monsters right around that magical 40-inch mark all snook fisherman strive for. For the next few months Southwest Florida snook fishing will be about as good as it ever gets. To get away from the crowd in the passes this week Im planning a few night trips. With the snook bite so good in the day time its not hard to imagine how this bite must go off at night. More on the night trips in next weeks report. Redfish have also been starting to show up in the passes too, often as a surprise while drifting for snook. Mangrove fishing on these giant high tides this week for redfish was not as great as I would have expected. I did catch redfish up to 30 inches but it was one here one there with no one area really being on fire. Mangrove shorelines in the northern sound seemed to hold more fish. This I suspect is because of all the fresh water in the southern end of the sound. Tail hooked medium to large pinfish flipped back up under the trees was what they ate for me this week. One day mid-week I had clients who wanted to catch and release sharks. Setting up in Rocky Channel in the northern sound it did not take us long to get our first bite. The strong incoming tide was the perfect set-up to soak large mullet chunks on the bottom. This is really a fun way to fish and about as easy as fishing gets. Large chunks of fresh cut mullet are hooked on a large circle hook, cast out and placed in the rod holders. When a shark picks up the bait, the drag starts screaming. Then its as easy as lifting the rod out of the holder and handing it to the client. This area offers a great variety of species of sharks from bulls to lemons, spinners and blacktips of all different sizes. Sharks really like to come into this deep natural channel. Anchor up with a float buoy on your anchor so you can quickly drop the anchor and chase these bigger sharks when needed. During calm periods, I did spot a few rolling tarpon in the sound. Although I did not fish for them, I had a few reports from other guides of several tarpon hookups. Most of the hooked fish came one of two ways: sight-fishing rolling fish, or while anchored up soaking cut baits. I still bring a few tarpon rods along on every trip as you never know when you will run into them. A few places I spotted tarpon this week included west of Maciever Keys, west of Cork Key and south of Cabbage Key. Summertime fishing is all about options. Have the right gear on board and rigged as you never know when an opportunity will present itself. Being ready really increases your odds as most of the time you will have a very short window to present your bait to that fish that will make a days fishing trip.Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions email captmattmitchell@aol.com. Send Us Your Fish TalesThe River Weekly would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include photographs with identification. Drop them at the River Weekly, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, Florida 33901, or email to press@riverweekly.com. Capt. Matt Mitchell with a 30-inch redfish caught and released during a day off this week ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint Prices ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Your Bottom Your Bottom Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices 1 472-5800 481-4733 12600 McGregor Blvd, Ft Myers www.scubavicedivers.com Swim with the Fishes Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702 or email press@riverweekly.com

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13 THE RIVER JULY 26, 2013 CROW Case Of The Week: Florida RedBellied Turtlesby Patricia MolloyT wo Florida red-bellied turtles are currently being treated at CROW after being hit by reckless drivers. The incidents caused extensive damage to their shells. The Florida red-bellied turtle (Pseudemys nelsoni) is found primarily in the Sunshine State. Ranging from 11 to 12 inches in length, the freshwater turtles are quite large and are most often seen basking in the warm sun. Adults consume an energyrich herbivorous diet, which is whey they prefer areas with abundant aquatic plants: marshes, sloughs, mangrove-bordered creeks, lakes and ponds. Females make their nests away from the water, frequently selecting ones already established by alligators. Male red-bellies could be considered romanticsat-heart: they court females by swimming backwards in a display of aquatic prowess followed by a gentle stroking of the side of a females face with their long, front claws. Turtle shells are comprised of two parts: the carapace, which is the domeshaped upper shelling, and the plastron, the flat shelling on the bottom. Dr. Heather treated both patients carapacial fractures by gluing grommets to the defects and tying in place with lacing. The lacing is comprised of an absorbent material that will eventually degrade. While a nonabsorbent suture material is preferable, she used what was available: lacing made from natural materials that was kindly donated to the wildlife clinic. The first turtle, patient #1545, also suffered fractures to his plastron. He is doing well now and we have discontinued all of his pain medications, said Dr. Heather. While he does take his meals while swimming, he must be dry-docked afterward under a heat lamp to avoiding rapid decomposition of the lacing. When patient #1988 arrived, it also had a barnacle on its head and a fish hook in its mouth which is ironic for a freshwater herbivore. The fish hook was surgically extracted promptly as it posed the most immediate danger. Both turtles are well on the road to recovery and will be released back into the wild as soon as Dr. Heather deems them healthy. If you would like to know more about the clinics wildlife patients, go to CROWs Visitor Eduction Center on Wednesday, July 31 at 11 a.m. The program Rescues & Releases of CROWs Patients is presented by members of the CROW team. Learn about rescues and releases of some interesting patient cases and an insiders look at CROWs efforts to save wildlife. For more information, call 472-3644 ext. 228 or go to www. crowclinic.org for a complete schedule of events. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to P.O. Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit www.crowclinic.org. This male Florida red-bellied turtle, patient #1545, is pictured basking under a red heat lamp. While adult females tend to be larger, males possess longer claws and stouter tails With his project The Sinking World, Andreas Franke brings a strange, forgotten underwater world back to life and stages realms of an unprecedented kind www.TheSinkingWorld.com rf ntbnrr bb bb rtttn Loved this restaurant. Fantastic experience. Food was exceptionally amazing. Service was outstanding. TripAdvisor Member, May 2013

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THE RIVER JULY 26, 201314 Plant SmartWhite Crownbeardby Gerri R eavesWhite crownbeard (Verbesina virginica) is a native Florida vine and member of the aster family. Found in the wild in wet hammocks, coastal shell middens and alongside marshes and streams, it grows to six feet or more. It is suited to a natural garden or as a background to other plants. In summer to fall, flat clusters of wavy white flowers up to a foot across bloom. Each small flower in the cluster consists of the ray flowers, which are three to five oval petals, and the tubular disk flowers, which make up a white and green center disk. The flowers attract butterflies, including the monarch, as well as native bees. The hairy lance-like or ovate leaves are up to eight inches long and vary from lobed to toothed to smooth-edged. The plants winged stems are known for a characteristic that gives the vine other common names in less temperate parts of its growing range: frostweed, iceplant and frost flower. In freezing temperatures, the water in the winged stems freezes and ruptures them. Because the stems continue to draw moisture from the soil, the water and water vapor emits into the air, freezes, and forms ribbon-like ice sculptures to beautiful effect. White crownbeard grows in moist or well-drained soil and even in partial shade. However, full sun and somewhat dry conditions make for a compact plant and more plentiful flowering. It is drought tolerant and easily self-sows. White crownbeard has several medicinal uses, including as an eye treatment and emetic. Sources: Wildflowers of Florida Field Guide by Jaret C. Daniels and Stan Tekiela, Everglades Wildflowers by Roger L. Hammer, A Gardeners Guide to Floridas Native Plants by Rufino Osorio, and edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Plant Smart explores sustainable gardening practices that will help you create an environmentally responsible, low-maintenance South Florida landscape. White crownbeard, a Florida native, is low-maintenance and wildlife friendly photo by Gerri Reaves Caring For Your PlantsR are Fruit T reesby Justen DobbsOur subtropical climate here in Southwest Florida is conducive to rapid growth for many species of rare fruit trees. My definition of a rare fruit is one that you wont find at your local Publix supermarket. Some rare fruits from other countries are high in nutrients and antioxidants and can be grown with ease here in the ground or in a pot. Other than the common coconut palm, there are other palm trees that produce edible fruit. One of them is the jelly palm (Butia capitata), which gets its name because you can make a delicious jelly out of its fruit. Or, you can eat its fruit right off the tree when dark orange. The last time I was in Las Vegas, I found a couple of jelly palms with ripe fruit on Las Vegas Boulevard and decided to eat them right off the tree. Needless to say, there were plenty of bewildered onlookers. Another palm with edible fruit is the true date palm (Phoenix dactylifera or Medjool). The best dates come out of inland Southern California, where the palms enjoy the mild, desert climate, but the dates produced here in Southwest Florida can also be eaten once they are fully ripe. Lychee nut trees (Litchi chinensis) also grow well here and produce small, sweet fruits that can be enjoyed while in season. Star fruit trees ( Averrhoa carambola) can be found in some yards in Fort Myers. These trees get quite large and produce lots of long, yellow fruits about the size of a banana. The fruit is sweet and tangy. Our native cocoplum (Chrysobalanus icaco) also produces edible fruits which are, of course, the shape and color of plums, albeit much smaller. I have not personally tried one of these yet, but our native Indian ancestors ate them. Another favorite of mine is the tangelo tree, which is a hybrid between a tanger ine and a pomelo. Tangelo fruit is a very juicy and sweet citrus that is in season here from November to April. If you havent tried one yet, I highly recommend it. Small trees can be purchased at most nurseries that carry citrus. As a general rule, dont eat any berries or fruits that you find around Southwest Florida unless you are absolutely sure what they are. There are people who collect rare fruit trees as a hobby and if you are lucky enough to meet one of them, they can educate you further by giving you a tour of their garden. I have personally met a few and they are almost always very nice people who just want to share their love of nature. Dobbs is a landscape architect in south Florida specializing in custom, upscale landscapes. He can be reached at seabreezenurseries@gmail.com. U rban Farming For Profit CourseThe University of Florida, IFAS Lee County Extension is offer ing a four-week (one evening per week) course called Urban Farming For Profit on Thursday August 1, 8, 15 and 22 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Lee County Extension Office, 3406 Palm Beach Blvd. in Fort Myers. This course will introduce participants to urban agricultural systems including organic, low-input, alternative, biodynamic, holistic, permaculture and other farming systems that are ecologically sound, economically viable and socially responsible. Cost is $40 per person, payable by check and made to LCEOAB. Mail to Urban Farming Class, 3406 Palm Beach Blvd., Fort Myers, FL 33916. Visit the UF/IFAS Lee County Calendar (August 2013) for more details on weekly sessions at http://lee.ifas.ufl. edu/calendar.shtml. Fruit off a Jelly palm, a native to South America, is tasty and high in Vitamin C

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15 THE RIVER JULY 26, 2013An Audubon Florida Special PlaceKissimmee Prairie State Parksubmitted by Marianne KorosyThe last recorded nests of the nowextinct Carolina parakeet, the only member of its genus native to the U.S., were raided by an egg collector on April 30, 1927 deep in a south Florida swamp called Gum Slough. What surrounds Gum Slough is a vast landscape of native prairie, shady hammocks, and shallow sloughs that rises to meet the sky somewhere far in the distance. This largest publicly-owned tract of Floridas dry prairie ecosystem Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park is one of my special places. Dry prairie is found nowhere else in the world and it is home to more than 40 species of plants per square meter, uncountable insects, diamondback rattlesnakes as thick as a tugboat rope, gopher tortoises, spotted skunks, and the occasional Florida panther. It is a wildflower and butterfly paradise to native plant aficionados and a destination for some of the most sought-after bird sightings in the state: crested caracara, white-tailed kite, burrowing owl, and Floridas only endemic sparrow, the Florida grasshopper sparrow, listed as an endangered species by the federal government. Although the dry prairie is indeed dry much of the year, it is a flat landscape riddled with depressions marshes and a spgdery network of shallow sloughs that fill with rainfall annually in late summer and early autumn. The prairie acts as a mileswide-and-deep freshwater reservoir that feeds water slowly into the Kissimmee River, helping nourish and rejuvenate Lake Okeechobee and the Everglades vast river of grass downstream. Audubons history of safeguarding waterbirds in south Florida began at the turn of the 19th century. Lake Okeechobee and the Kissimmee River came quickly into focus as critical to protection of the unique greater Everglades ecosystem, home to millions of nesting waterbirds that were being decimated by the international plume trade. In the early 1980s, the Florida Audubon Society purchased land 25 miles northwest of Lake Okeechobee to form Audubons 7,315acre Kissimmee Prairie Sanctuary. The 54,000-acre Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park was established in 2001 when the State of Florida purchased both the Audubon Sanctuary and an adjacent, lightly-grazed ranch. Today, a new chapter in dry prairie conservation has begun with more than 30 ranchers cooperating to form the Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge. And Kissimmee Prairie Preserve is a lynchpin of biodiversity for the new refuge. For millennia, lightning-ignited fire combined with annual flooding kept the dry prairie treeless and prevented the native saw palmetto from crowding out grasses and flowering plants, said Paul Miller, preserve biologist for the past 10 years. But with fire-suppression policies in place throughout much of the 20th century trees invaded and saw palmetto grew thick and tall. Highways, row crops, and cattle ranches fragmented the dry prairie into ever smaller blocks; less than 20 percent of a landscape that once covered 3.5 million acres remained by the turn of the 21st century. Since the Preserve was established in 2001, Miller added, we burn the dry prairie every two to three years to benefit the Florida grasshopper sparrow, a bird that nests and feeds in the open spaces among lush grasses and sparse shrubs. Even with Floridas finest sparrow experts meeting regularly to discuss best management practices this multicolored little bird is in trouble. In a place where one could stand between earth and sky at first light and hear tip-tup-bzzzzzzz from every quarter of the prairie, there is growing silence. Surveys this spring on publicly-owned lands turned up 14 singing males at Kissimmee Prairie Preserve, down from more than 150 males 10 years ago. Nearby sites reflected the same trend and the experts are baffled. Will there come a day when our sparrow sings its last song or can we pull together and prevent this tragic extinction? This column is one in a series from AUDUBON FLORIDA. Marianne Korosy, PhD candidate, is Audubon Floridas jay watch and important bird area coordinator. For more information about Kissimmee Prairie Preserve see www. floridastateparks.org/kissimmeeprairie and www.kissimmeeprairiefriends.org. A male Florida grasshopper sparrow sings from a twig perch in Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park photo by Christina Evans Blooming pitcher plants inhabit a bog within the surrounding drier prairie photo by Marianne Korosy Three months after a spring-season fire, wildflowers and lush grasses abound at Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park photo by Marianne Korosy

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THE RIVER JULY 26, 201316 Monday I ndie Film Nights Are BackThe Fort Myers Film Festival has revived its popular Missed It Mondays series, screening award-winning films that you may have missed dur ing the festival. The evenings will take place at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center, located at 2301 First Street in the downtown Fort Myers River District, at 7 p.m. Tickets are $6 each. The remaining schedule is as follows: Monday, July 29: Waterhole Cove, directed by Brett Ryan Bonowicz. 82 minutes. Monday, August 5: Love At A Certain Age, directed by Logan Hendricks. Monday, August 12: Radio Love, directed by Hideyuki Tokigawa. Monday, August 19: Dislecksia: The Movie, directed by Harvey Hubbell V. Monday, August 26: The Invisible Man, directed by Yariv Mozer. Monday, September 2: Off Labor Day. Then, starting on Monday, September 9, the popular indie series TGIM will begin, with judges and films in consideration for our 2014 year. Come watch us judge films submitted to the Fort Myers Film Festival and have your say as to whether or not it makes the grade. Be sure to grab dinner first at Firestones or Fords and hit the afterbuzz at Twisted Vine Bistro. The Fort Myers Film Festival is an intelligent independent filmmakers preferred event to create, unite and showcase the finest artistic cinematic works. The Fort Myers Film Festival is known for world-class swagger and support of local filmmakers. The festival event offers the most vibrant intellectual and edgy crowd to grace Lee County in decades. The event has featured over four dozen local filmmakers is a must attend for cineasts who love indie film and film festivals living in Lee, Collier and Charlotte counties. For more information, go to www.fortmyersfilmfestival.com or join www.facebook. com/fortmyersfilmfestival for updates and events. Alliance L aunches Monthly Member Gallery Book ClubAttention art enthusiasts and book lovers! Beginning in September, the Alliance for the Arts is launching a monthly members only Book Club featuring art related titles. Join fellow Alliance members in the Main Gallery to explore literature both fiction and non-fiction revolving around art, artists, art history and art appreciation. Participate in thoughtful group discussions that will expand your appreciation and knowledge of the world of art. This is yet another great benefit of membership at the Alliance! The group will meet from 7 to 9 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month starting on Tuesday, September 17. Club members are responsible for purchasing their own copy of each months selection. Discussion guides will be available for download at www.artinlee.org beginning on September 1. Pre-registration is encour aged. The first title, a favorite of many art book clubs, is Provenance: How a Con Man and a Forger Rewrote the History of Modern Art by Laney Salisbury and Aly Sujo. This astonishing narrative of one of the most far-reaching and elaborate cons in the history of art forgery tells the story of the infamous con man John Drewe and his accomplice, the affable artist John Myatt. The duo exploited the archives of British art institutions to irrevocably legitimize the hundreds of pieces they forged, many of which are still considered genuine and hang in prominent museums and private collections today. Alliance memberships covering individuals are $50 per year and the whole family can join for just $75 per year. Membership benefits also include 20 percent discounts on all classes and workshops, a wide variety of free class Try It sessions, discounts on theatre tickets and youth camps, special exhibition opportunities and the satisfaction of knowing youre supporting a strong and growing community of artists and art enthusiasts here in Southwest Florida. Visit www.artinlee.org or call 939-2787 to become a member today. The Alliance for the Arts is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard, just south of Colonial Boulevard. New Play Contest FundraiserTheatre Conspiracy will host its third annual New Play Contest Fundraiser on Saturday, August 3 in the Foulds Theatre at the Alliance for the Arts in Fort Myers. The evening will begin at 7 p.m. with a preshow reception featur ing food, wine and drink. Following the reception at 8 p.m., there will be selected readings from the top three plays of Theatre Conspiracys 15th annual New Play Contest. After the readings, there will be a talk-back with Producing Artistic Director Bill Taylor and the audience will vote for their pick as winner of the contest. Theatre Conspiracy received 412 entries from across the United States, Canada and England for this years contest. Tickets to the fundraiser are $50 and include a voucher good for one ticket to a performance of the winning play in October. They are available online at www.theatreconspiracy.org or by calling 936-3239. The top three plays are: Distant Neighbors by Patrick Gabridge is a fun space-age love story about a group of suburban neighbors who dont know each other until an alien spaceship crashes into their backyards. After its arrival, they get to know each other a lot better, and a lot faster, than they ever expected (or wanted to). Jane The Plain by August Schulenberg tells the story of teenage Jane who saves a mysterious glowing girl from death, her social status at school takes a dangerous rise in this fairy tale about beauty, death and popularity. All My Raisins In The Sun by John Twomey. An eager new teacher gets quite the education when confronted with the quirky personalities and deadly serious politics of the public high school teachers lounge. Theatre Conspiracy is celebrating its 20th anniversary this fall and is proud to continue its mission to produce and promote the work of the next generation of talented American playwrights. The theatre is a very difficult business for everyone involved, but even more so for playwrights. The opportunities to have new work produced that were once present have, over time, continually declined. By producing new works, Theatre Conspiracy is not only providing a venue that will bring them to life, but also creating a more promising future for theatre in America by providing a more nurturing environment for the greatest asset theatre can have great playwrights. Arts For ACT Cabaret H as French T hemeA dinner, cabaret and live and silent auctions will be held Saturday, August 10, by Abuse Counseling and Treatment, Inc. with a Moulin Rouge theme. Jenna Persons, Larry Hart and Krista Fogelsong will attend this gala to mark the 25th year for Arts for ACT. This annual fundraiser is named Moulin Rouge, An Evening at the Cabaret. Doors open at 5 p.m. Stephanie Davis and Joe Posa will act as Joan Rivers Live on the Red Carpet. Dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m. Jenna Persons and Larry Hart are the chairs for this years event. Attendees will be able to bid on over 50 live auction items such as art, trips, music and sports memorabilia. An art trip to Paris or two seats at the American Music Awards, a signed guitar by James Taylor and one from Slash of Guns N Roses will be up for auction. Other items include a 3D TV, an iPad Mini, jewelry, art workshops and season tickets for two to the Florida Rep.Works by this years Six Artists of ACT, David Belling, Cheryl Fausel, Pat Cleveland, Lisa Freidus, Honey Costa and Doug Heslep, will also go under the hammer. Belling and Fausel are the featured artists for 2013 and each has a poster created of their original works for sale to raise money for ACT, price $10 notecards made of their original pieces will sell for $10.continued on page 17

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17 THE RIVER JULY 26, 2013 From page 16Arts For ACT CabaretThe cabaret will include musical enter tainment by Joe Posa as Liza Minnelli. The full course dinner will have a French theme. Tickets are available by calling Abuse Counseling and Treatment, Inc. at 9392553 or logging onto www.artsforactfineartauction.com Tickets are $125 and proceeds go to support our clients the victims and survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault and human trafficking and their children in Lee, Hendry and Glades counties. The event will take place at Harborside Event Center on Monroe Street in downtown Fort Myers. Sponsors are Florida Weekly, NBC-2, Naples Guide, Robb & Stucky International, Rauschenberg Gallery, Pulse Business Solutions, Stilwell Enterprises, Chicos, Iberiabank, Scanlon Auto Group, The Happenings Art & Entertainment Magazine, and Dr. and Mrs. Mark Mintz. For more information on this event contact Jennifer Benton at jbenton@actabuse.com or Claudia Goode at cgoode@ actabuse.com. Davis Art Center August CalendarThe upcoming schedule of events for the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center, located at 2301 First Street in Fort Myers: Ennis, Transference, a forward-thinking exhibition of optimist abstract paintings and contemporary cube sculptures. Love That Dress! Collection Party, gently-worn dresses to SBDAC for the 5th anniversary Love That Dress! benefit, and help support PACE Center For Girls. (For more information, visit www. lovethatdress.org.) 6 to 10 p.m. Free 6 p.m. $10 Transference in Art Lecture Forum 11 a.m. $10 Connect Networking Mixer Expand your business and personal relationships. Get to know each other and connect in your community. Raffle prizes, music and mingling All tickets $5. Transference in Art Lecture Forum 6 p.m. $10 Transference in Art Lecture Forum 11 a.m. $10 Free Art & Poetry Networking Mixer $5 Mondays, beginning on July 22 The Fort Myers Film Festival Summer Series, Best of the 2013 Film Festival, continuing through August 26. The regular season of short films begins September 9. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.; films start Admission is $6. From page 1Morning Meander This tour is provided in cooperation with Lee County Parks and Recreation. Its free with paid parking. Parking is $1 birdpatrol.org for more information. ZAGATZAGAT.COMRated by: Fish Tacos! To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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THE RIVER JULY 26, 201318 Isabella Rasi 239-246-47161101 Periwinkle Way #105, Sanibel, FL 239-472-0044 ENGEL & VLKERS Excellence in Real Estate A step above! International Client Base 600 Shops Worldwide Multi-Lingual Staff Your success is my aim. Michelsons Final Round At Murfield One Of The Greatest In Golf Annalsby Ed FrankIf you love golf or if you love sports in general you have to be inspired by the phenomenal final round feat of lefty Phil Mickelson last Sunday in winning the 142nd British Open. The nice guy of golf, the devoted family man, Michelson tamed the brutal links of Scotlands Murfield to win his fifth Major title and perhaps his most coveted. He started the day five strokes back and two over par for the first three rounds. But on the home stretch he birdied four of the last six holes, to end three under par and win by four strokes. He was the only golfer in the illustrious field to finish under par for the tournament. Today was as good as I can play, the smiling, dimpled Michelson said. It was one of my best rounds ever. You bet it was a great round and heres why: The final round 66 tied for low round in the entire four-day tournament. The four birdies in the last six holes were sandwiched with a fabulous par save on 16. He had 31 one-putt greens and he climbed into the elite group of only 15 champions who have won three different Major tournaments in their careers. He hit two shots for the ages on the brutal par 5 17th hole to reach the green in two. Both three woods, the second carried more than 300 yards against a strong wind. He barely missed an eagle putt, but his birdie four all but sealed his hold on the coveted Claret Jug. At age 43, Michelson is the second oldest to win this famous tournament. While the Brits naturally were pulling for their native heroes, Michelson walked the 18th fairway to a roaring ovation that turned thunderous when he sank that curling birdie putt on the final hole. A three-time Masters winner and a one-time PGA winner, Michelson admitted he often doubted whether he had the links shots to win The Open. Links golf is so different, so demanding that he said afterwards, I never knew if Id be equipped. But now the golf world knows he does have the talent to win in Scotland. Michelson has long graced the professional tour in taste, politeness and humor. And his devotion to family and to charitable causes is legendary. When he raised his arms and pumped his fists in victory at Murfield, and when his wife and children fell into his embrace, it was a scene of joy long remembered. Tiger Woods is ranked No. 1 in the world. But surely Phil Michelson has to be ranked No. 1 in admiration and fan popularity. Miracle Begin Seven Game Home Stand This Weekend The Fort Myers Miracle baseball team faces two North Division rivals in a sevengame home stand that begins tonight, Thursday, against Clearwater. After a disappointing seven-game losing streak, the Miracle began the week having won five of their last six games while improving their second-half season record to 15-14. The four-game Clearwater series has 7:05 p.m. starts tonight and Friday, 6:05 p.m. Saturday and a Sunday matinee at 4:05 p.m. The Daytona Cubs ,which had a first-place hold in the North Division early this week, provide the opposition for three games beginning Monday. The first pitch for all three games will be 7:05 p.m. Having losses in eight of their last 13 games, the Miracle dropped into fifth-place in the Florida State League North, but still only three games out of first. Phil Michelson Getty Images LIVE ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY!Happy Hour Daily Half Price 4-6:30pm & All Night Tuesday Online Reservations Available www.brattasristorante.com12984 S. Cleveland Ave., Fort Myers, 239-433-4449JULY NIGHTLY SPECIALS Sunday Any Two Dinner Entrees from our regular menu & a Bottle of House Wine for ONLY $50 Monday 1/2 Price Bottle of Wines(enjoy as many as you like) NO LIMITS Tuesday Happy Hour& $4.99 Appetizers all Night! Wednesday Italian Night!$9.99 Lasagna, Taylor Street Baked Ziti, Cappellini & Meatballs, & Eggplant & Chicken Parmesan $3.00 House Wines By e Glass Thursday Steak & Lobster Tail $14.99 Friday Seafood Extravaganza Pre Fixe Dinner $24.99 per person. $5.00 Martinis! Saturday Make Online Reservations & Receive 25% o Total Check (Regular Priced Items) -ALWAYS AT BRATTAS-EARLY DINING 2 for $20 Dinners daily until 5:30pm, Live Music, Online Discounts, Daily Happy Hour until 6:30pm, Dance Floor, Great Food, Fun & Service

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19 THE RIVER JULY 26, 2013 Stilwell Takes Helm Of PACE Center BoardPACE Center For Girls, Inc. announced Sandy Stilwell as the incoming Chair of the Board of Directors of The PACE Center for Girls, Lee County. Stilwell is a committed community leader and a successful entrepreneur. She is owner and CEO of Stilwell Enterprises & Restaurant Group, owning eight restaurants and the Captiva Island Inn. Stilwell has served on the PACE Lee board since 2009 and most recently served as vice-chair to Gail Markham, co-founder of PACE Lee. Stilwell has received a multitude of awards, including Men and Women of the Year and Philanthropist of the Year by Gulfshore Life magazine. Stilwell also serves her community by holding various positions on a number of advisory boards. PACE Lee is one of 18 centers located throughout Florida, opening its doors in February of 2007 under the leadership of Gail Markham and Judge James H. Seals. PACE (Practical, Academic, Cultural, Education) Center For Girls provides girls and young women an opportunity for a better future through education, counseling, training and advocacy. The center offers year round counseling and academic services for girls, ages 12 to 18, who are facing challenges such as foster care, domestic violence abuse and neglect, death of a parent, substance abuse and/or family history of incarceration. Since opening its doors, the Lee Center has helped nearly 600 girls find success in school, generate a positive relationship with their families and peers, and become productive members of our community. Markham has served as the founding chairwoman of the Board of Directors and during her seven-year tenure, hundreds of at-risk girls have overcome difficult circumstances, resulting in emotional healing and academic enhancement. One of Markhams most notable accomplishments was her vision for a state of the art educational facility for the PACE Lee girls. Under her direction, more than $700,000 has been raised towards the $1.3 million dollar goal from the local community towards the capital campaign. Two signature community events were also created: Love that Dress! and The Grande Dames Tea. As Stilwell prepares to lead the PACE Lee Board of Directors, she reflects on the legacy Markham has made on this young agency. She has been the most remarkable leader. Gail is responsible for bringing us to the level we are at today. Her commitment and dedication to this [PACE] center is beyond outstanding. Thank you, Gail, said Stilwell, who began her term on July 1, along with newly appointed Executive Director, Meg M. Geltner. This leadership transition at PACE Lee will allow the center to continue building on the foundation that Gail was instrumental in creating said President and CEO of PACE Center For Girls, Inc. Mary Marx. Sandys talents and strong passion for the community will ensure that center not only thrives but expands to provide more services to more girls. For more information about PACE, visit www.pacecenter.org/lee. MicroEnterprise Helps Aspiring EntrepreneursThe Goodwill Southwest Florida MicroEnterprise Institute graduated its latest class on Monday, July 22. The institute is a training program to help emerging entrepreneurs start new ventures and grow small businesses. Graduates complete a six-week, 12-module business and management training course and work with mentors who are successful businesspersons. Coaches for the most recent session were Eric Granham and Terri Sobeck. Ingrid Molina facilitated the class. Graduates Kelly Catlett, Michelle Daniel, Omar Guerra, Michael Jenkins, Harold Linton, Susan Linton, Debra Mathias, and Derrick Middlebrooks all received graduation certificates. We look at the feasibility of participants business ideas, said Dorothy Browning, program manager. We guide them through the start-up process. This program creates opportunities for people. Gulfshore Lifes 2011 Woman of the Year and local entrepreneur, Gail Markham delivered the commencement speech. She started her own, successful accounting practice at jage 28 and has become a vital member of the Southwest Florida community throughout her 30 years of business. Other awards include the 2010 Business Ethics Award from the Uncommon Friends Foundation. She is also a volunteer at PACE Center for Girls. The next MicroEnterprise Institute session will be held in Naples starting July 29. To learn more, visit www.goodwillswfl.org/microenterprise or call 995-2106 ext. 2219. Some of the graduates of the Goodwill MicroEnterprise Institute Presented by: Michael B. Hill Craig R. HerschWill Power ColumnistFlorida Bar Board Certied | Wills, Trusts & Estates Attorneys9100 College Pointe Ct., Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.sbshlaw.com Have You Heard The Three Big Myths About Medicaid Eligibility? Myth #1: The new law has made it impossible to protect your assets from nursing home costs. Truth: While the rules have changed, good planning opportunities exist. Myth #2: Medicaid can take your home. Truth: With proper planning you may very well be able to save your home. Myth #3: If youre already in a nursing home, its too late to protect your assets. Truth: Even if youre in a nursing home, you can still protect the assets you have. Wednesday, July 31, 20132:00 p.m.Temple Beth El 16225 Winkler Rd. | Fort Myers 33908Reservations: 239-425-9379 Free Workshop. Seating is Limited.All attendees will receive a complimentary DVD describing long-term care planning issues.

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THE RIVER JULY 26, 201320 Financial FocusT ips For Setting And Pursuing Financial Goalsby Jennifer BaseyYou can get lucky by finding a parking meter with time left on it. You can luck out by having nice weather on your vacation. You can even be lucky at love. But when it comes to financial matters, youre better off not counting on Lady Luck and focusing instead on setting and pursuing goals. Here are some suggestions for establishing and pursuing your financial objectives: of ideas about what you want to do, but if youre going to turn these wishes into reality, you need to get specific. So, for example, instead of telling yourself that you want to retire early, set a goal of retiring at, say, 62. You can then use this target number to help guide your overall investment strategy. To illustrate: You can determine that you need to invest a certain amount of money each year, and earn a certain rate of return, to be able to retire at 62. You can also estimate about how much money you can afford to withdraw from your investment accounts each year to sustain a retirement that begins at 62. you want to achieve all your financial goals and you can have a better chance of doing so if you rank these goals in terms of both importance and timing. For example, you may want to send your kids to college, purchase a vacation home and still be able to retire at age 62. How should you allocate your resources to each of these goals? Should you invest more at any given time for a specific goal? What types of investments are best goals can help you answer these and other questions and help direct your overall investment strategy. circumstances can change considerably which means you shouldnt be surprised, or alarmed, if you have to change your goals accordingly. And youll find it easier to maintain this flexibility if youve worked diligently to create an investment portfolio with sufficient resources to allow you to change direction, as needed. youre going to eventually achieve your goals, you absolutely need to measure your progress along the way. Are your investments performing the way you had anticipated? Are your goals becoming more expensive than you had initially envisioned? To achieve these goals, are you taking on too much or too little risk? To answer these types of questions, its a good idea to review your overall progress at least once a year and then make whatever adjustments may be necessary. As you can see, it will take consider able effort to set, review and (hopefully) achieve your goals. And it can be somewhat complex, too, so you may want to work with a financial professional someone who takes time to talk with you about your goals, understands your risk tolerance and family situation, and has the training and experience necessary to help you work toward your objectives. But in any case, think hard about your goals and how you might accomplish them. And dont delay in taking action because goals are generally easier to attain if you have time on your side. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@edwardjones.com. T op 10 R eal E state Sales Development City Year BuiltSquare FootageListing PriceSelling PriceDays on Market Cape Coral 200313,603$6,950,000 $5,300,000216 Magnolia Bend Bonita Springs 20043,532$1,485,000 $1,235,000203 Edgewater At Gulf HarbourFort Myers 19993,408$1,095,000 $960,000 84 Deep Lagoon Estates Fort Myers 19954,101$989,000 $850,000 120 Cape Coral Cape Coral 20014,649$744,900 $698,000 114 Lakemont Bonita Springs 19982,637$649,000 $616,500 86 Cape Coral Cape Coral 20063,287$630,000 $585,000 81 Cape Coral Cape Coral 19792,351$550,000 $545,000 145 Cape Coral Cape Coral 20032,427$569,900 $537,500 141 Sanibel19803,320$699,000 $530,000 345Courtesy of Royal Shell Real Estate Community Foundations Womens L egacy Fund Selects Focus AreaContributors of the Womens Legacy Fund of the Southwest Florida Community Foundation recently voted to select mentoring high-school seniors for post-secondary opportunities and career planning as its next focus area. A cornerstone of the WLF is contributors taking an active and engaged role in choosing their annual grant focus area each year. At the annual spring luncheon held in May, contributors voted for the next focus area from the issues of mentoring highschool seniors for post-secondary opportunities and career planning, funding a regional online scholarship and financial-aid hub to funding high-school STEM initiatives. The role of our mentors can be as changing as the students they are working allowing the students to make well-informed decisions on who they want to be, where they want to be and how to get there. seniors has the potential to change the lives of many Southwest Florida students. We are doing more together than we could ever do alone. fund, they will be able to distribute nearly $20,000 in grants to local agencies that are developing innovative programs to impact mentoring for high-school seniors. to benefit people and communities in Southwest Florida. Currently, the Fund has more than $225,000 in endowed funds that will continue to help fund local issues now and in the future. The Womens Legacy Fund is a fund of the Southwest Florida Community Foundation, created to enable women in Southwest Florida to direct their giving in focused, strategic ways. The Funds mission is to engage women in affecting change in our community through collective philanthropy. The Southwest Florida Community Foundation is celebrating its 36th year of supporting the communities of Lee, Charlotte, Collier, Glades and Hendry counties by connecting donors and their philanthropic aspirations with evolving community needs. With assets of more than $69 million, the Community Foundation has provided more than $55 million in grants and scholarships to the communities it serves. During its 2012 fiscal year, the SWFLCF granted more than $3 million to more than 100 differ For more information, visit www.floridacommunity.com or call 274-5900. Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702or email press@riverweekly.com

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21 THE RIVER JULY 26, 2013 School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Readers, Picture books are one of lifes great literary pleasures, and summertime usually allows us to slow down a bit and take the opportunity to enjoy a picture book. Picture books come in all shapes and sizes, for every kind of reader in a wide range of subjects and they provide a host of benefits. They are for everyone. I recently came across an article on picture books written by Rick Walton, author of more than 90 works for children. I really liked what he had to say about the benefits of picture books and wanted to share his wisdom with you. In regard to picture books, Mr. Walton says: 1. They are the first books that children fall in love with, that turn children into lifetime readers. Lifetime readers become lifetime learners. Lifetime learners become lifetime contributors. 2. Picture book language is often more sophisticated than the first chapter books that children read, and therefore an excellent way for children to learn language. It is here that children, and others, can learn vocabulary, imagery, rhythm, shape, structure, conciseness and emotional power. 3. The picture book is the most flexible of all literary formats. You can do almost anything in a picture book. This flexibility encourages creativity, in both writer and reader. It broadens the mind, and the imagination. And given todays challenges, we desperately need more creativity, broadened minds and imagination. 4. The picture book, with its interaction between text and illustration, allows the reader to analyze that interaction and find meaning in the visual. And since most of us are surrounded by, and inundated by visual images our whole lives, visual intelligence is an important skill. 5. Some of the best art being created today is found in picture books. Picture books are a great resource for art education. 6. The picture book appeals to more learning styles than any other format. It is read out loud for audible learners. It is written and illustrated for visual learners. It often asks you to interact with it physically for kinesthetic learners. 7. In fact, the picture book, of all formats, is probably the best format for teaching an idea, getting across a point. Because picture books are short, all messages, knowledge and ideas expressed in a picture book must be boiled down to their essence. They must be presented in a way that is impossible to misunderstand. If you want to learn a difficult subject, start with a picture book. If you want to express a powerful message, a picture book is one of the most powerful media for doing so. Many middle, upper grade and even college instructors have recognized the value of using picture books in their teaching. 8. The picture book does more than any other literary format for bonding people one with another. As a child sits on a lap and is read to, as a parent, a grand parent, a teacher or a librarian reads to a child, extremely important connections are made, bonds are formed and generations are brought together. 9. The picture book also has the broadest possible age range of audience. Few four-year-olds will appreciate a novel. But many grandparents enjoy a good picture book. 10. The picture book is short, and can fit easily into the nooks and crannies of our lives. Five minutes here, 10 minutes there, plenty of time for a complete literary experience. Picture books are poetry, adventure, imagination, language, interaction, precision and so much more. Picture books are not books that children should be encouraged to graduate from. For picture books have something important to say, to give, to all ages, all generations. Ms. Greggs is adjunct faculty at Edison State College where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also Nationally Certified School Psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. Mentors Needed The Foster Grandparent Program of SW Florida is seeking seniors, 55 and over to tutor/mentor children in elementary schools, Head Start centers and after school programs,. Volunteers serve 15 to 20 hours a week and receive a tax-free stipend of $2.65 and hour plus transportation reimbursement of 40 cents a mile, a free physical and vacation, sick and holiday pay, plus other perks. Orientation starts soon. To volunteer, call Joan Willoughby at The Dr. Piper Center, 332-5346. Griffin Named To Deans ListPamela Griffin, a resident of Fort Myers and a member of the class of 2014, has been named to the Deans List for the spring 2013 semester at Assumption College in Worcester, Massachusetts. Pogin GraduatesDavid Pogin of Fort Myers graduated from Bethel University, located in St. Paul, Minnesota following the spring 2013 semester. Pogin earned a BS in Computer Science. He is the son of Richard and Margaret Pogin of Fort Myers. 10 to 40% OFFH SLEEPERS H MATTRESS SETS H PICTURES H LAMPS H PATIO DINING SETS H RECLINERS H DINING SETS H BEDROOM SETS H LIVING ROOM H TABLES Large Selection of Rattan & Wicker I fell in love with Furniture World the 1st time I went in. They had the SW Florida style furniture I was looking for. The staff made me feel very comfortable and helped me with my questions. Mary Weeks, Ft. Myers I appreciated the personal service I received at Furniture World. The location is convenient and I found what I wanted at a price I wanted to pay. Chris Myers, Sanibel ...Our Promise to You...GUARANTEED (*$500 Min. Purchase) Our Friendly staff is here to help you when you want it. Youre free to look through our store. Family Owned and Operated489-3311

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THE RIVER JULY 26, 201322 Palmer T he T urtle H elping Y oung Cancer PatientsA dear friendship between Cypress Cove residents Bob Storms and Frank Haskell has sparked the creation of Palmer the Turtle. Palmer is a unique character designed to entertain, comfort and educate cancer patients at the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida, and has been instrumental in helping them come out of their shell as they receive treatment. Palmer is one of the many ways these two big-hearted men contribute their talents to the community and honor the memory of their beloved daughters. Palmer gives kids a special club to belong to, explains Storms. And its wonderful for someone at my age to feel like I am doing something useful with my life. Ninety-year-old Storms, a retired illustrator who has worked for the likes of Disney, Warner Bros. and American Greetings, was living at Cypress Cove retirement community when the Haskells moved in next door. They quickly became friends and discovered that each had lost a daughter to cancer. I cant just be retired, playing golf and napping, said Haskell. I want to remain active and both Bob and I wanted to do something to honor our daughters. Stacie Kmetz, Child Life Specialist at Golisano Childrens Hospital, mentioned to Haskell the idea of creating a char acter, a mascot of sorts, to help young patients who are quiet and scared when they first arrive for treatment. We agreed that a turtle seemed the perfect fit, explained Kmetz. The kids always love turtles and we needed something they could relate to, someone who could help them, come out of their shell, and open up. And I knew just where to turn for help! said Haskell. Storms was more than happy to oblige. Blessed with a gift that he says, flows and just comes naturally, Storms created Palmer the Turtle. He is a very unique character and was very purposefully put together, explained Storms. He has this large zipper down his front and I make it a point for him to come out of his shell every time he visits the hospital. Palmer wears white gloves, just like the people who care for him. He also has no hair, something many of these children can relate to. Storms hopes to familiarize children and their families with various procedures they will experience during treatment by creating a collection of childrens medical books featuring Palmer as a patient. He has created a Palmer Club coloring book, Palmer and his Port, an illustrated paperback. Another paperback featuring an operation on Palmer has gone to print and a third book about radiation treatment is under development. When children arrive to begin treatment, Kmetz and other child life specialists give the children a certificate to join the Palmer the Turtle Club. They also receive copies of Storms books and Turtle Bucks they can use for frosty treats in the cafeteria after treatment. Many of these children face adversity while in school or other settings where other kids bully them for being different. The Palmer Club gives them somewhere to fit in, and something to belong to, explained Kmetz. This isnt the first time Storms has used his talents to comfort others during dismal times. Storms was wounded and captured in Germany while serving in the Army during World War II. Prisoners would sneak him art supplies and keep watch as he would draw cartoons and recreate images of their loved ones from small pocket photos. They were very much living in the present and it gave them something to hold on to, said Storms. Storms continues to raise spirits today, not only for young cancer patients, but for fellow residents at Cypress Cove. He says there is something hidden in every Palmer picture and friends will drive themselves crazy trying to find it. More importantly, they are excited and inspired by Storms creations because of what they do for the children. A stuffed version of Palmer is available at the gift shops of HealthPark Medical Center, Lee Memorial Hospital and the Lexington Country Club Pro Shop for a donation of $20 to Barbaras Friends, the Golisano Childrens Hospital Cancer Fund. Palmer can be taken home or donated to a patient. He even has a special tag on his back to hang him on IV poles and golf bags. In 1994, Haskell and his wife Betty founded the Boston Red Sox Childrens Hospital Celebrity Golf Classic and a year later established Barbaras Friends, both in memory of their daughter Barbara. During her four year battle with cancer, Barbara was amazed by the children she encountered who were also coping with the disease. The Haskells have raised more than $22 million through their fundraising efforts. Despite its rarity and impressive strides in treatment and care, cancer is still a leading cause of death in children under age 15, second only to accidents. One hundred percent of funds donated to Barbaras Friends go to help children with cancer and blood disorders. To make a donation, call 343-6950. American R ed Cross L aunches New App T o R ecruit V olunteersThe American Red Cross today launched the Team Red Cross App, which allows people to sign up to help, get an overview on basic tasks and receive notifications about Red Cross disaster volunteer opportunities in their community. When people see an emergency happening in their community, they often want to help but may not know how, said John Cain, director of volunteer services, Florida Southern Gulf Region. The Team Red Cross App provides an easy and quick way for people to sign up to help the Red Cross and support their community. Once users download the app, they create an account. Then they learn about different jobs, such as working in a warehouse, handing out supplies or assisting with feeding. When the Red Cross has a need for volunteers, the app will notify users based on their location. Potential volunteers can instantly accept or decline the opportunity. The Red Cross is encouraging the public to download the app before a disaster strikes in Collier, Lee, Hendry or Glades Counties so volunteers can help immediately. The app is free and designed for iPhone and Android smart phones and tablets. Additional features include: at the touch of a button. This is the seventh in a series of highly successful Red Cross apps, which are now on more than three million mobile devices across the country. A recent Red Cross sur vey shows that apps are now tied with social media as the fourth most popular way to get information during emergencies behind TV, radio and online news sites. Nearly one-fifth of Americans say theyve received some kind of emergency information from an app theyve downloaded, making the Red Cross apps an important way for the public to get ready for disasters. The app can be found in the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store by searching for American Red Cross or by going to redcross.org/mobileapps. Bob Storms and Frank Haskell Airport R eports June T rafficDuring the month of June, 473,208 passengers traveled through Southwest Florida International Airport, an increase of 4.2 percent compared to June 2012. Yearto-date, passenger traffic is up 6.5 per cent from the same period last year. The traffic leader in June was Delta with 120,410 passengers traveling to and from Fort Myers. Rounding out the top five airlines were AirTran (86,167), JetBlue (56,797), US Airways (47,585) and Southwest (42,273). Southwest Florida International Airport had 5,079 aircraft movements (takeoffs and landings), an increase of 3.5 percent compared to June 2012. Page Field saw 5,512 movements, a 9.8 percent decrease from June 2012. In addition, more than 2.2 million pounds of air freight moved through Southwest Florida International Airport in June 2013, a decrease of 17.3 percent compared to June 2012. Southwest Florida International Airport served more than 7.3 million passengers in 2012 and is one of the top 50 U.S. airports for passenger traffic. No ad valor em (property) taxes are used for airport operation or construction. For more information, visit www.flylcpa.com or Like us on Facebook at www. facebook.com/flyRSW. To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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23 THE RIVER JULY 26, 2013 Mom And Me by Lizzie and PryceLizzie and Pryce answer your questions and give advice about aging concerns from a two-generational perspective. A mother and daughter team, Lizzie is a retired RN and health educator, and Pryce is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in the care of elders and people with chronic illnesses. Dear Mom & Me, As soon as he was successful, my husband wanted a luxury car. Then a few years later, he bought one for me. Years passed and we both always had the biggest and the best. After my husband passed away, I sold both cars and I started driving something small and economical. Suddenly one day while at exercise class, I decided I deserved to have a luxury car again, so I went directly to a dealer without changing my clothes. The salesman ignored me. Finally, he came over and in a ho-hum attitude and answered my questions. Then, when I asked for a test drive, his attitude was appalling. I know he was saying to himself, This old grandma just wants to go for a car ride. As I left, I said that I would think about it, and I might have my son come in and see my selection. Two days later, I went in again after exercise class. This time I said, I want the gray one. His teeth almost fell out. Then, he brought out all of the paper work and talked about financing. Finally I said, Financing? Oh no, Ill just write you a personal check. He nearly turned white, stammered a bit, then said, Ill get it ready and deliver it to you in two days. My check cleared and he brought it to me. I love my new car and it seems to love me because it drives beautifully. I am too old to ever need another new car, but if I change my mind, I think I will go to the new young gal at the car agency. Charlotte P.S. I thought you two would be inter ested in my experience. Dear Charlotte, Thank you for your letter. The first lesson sales people should learn is never pre-judge your client. Older peoples bank accounts can never be judged by how they look, but this also applies to young people. Companies are always trying to invent new ways to get older people to spend. Many companies realize that the greatest portion of private wealth in this country is owned by women. This sales person pre-judged your ability to pay and was prejudiced against the elderly. He also had a wonderful story to tell his wife and friends about you. Lizzie Dear Charlotte, Way to go! Keep challenging the stereotypical behavior about living as a mature adult. Thanks for your letter. Pryce Lizzie and Pryces email address is momandmeaging@hotmail.com. deaRPharmacistPalpitations And Leg Cramps Due T o Drug Muggersby Suzy Cohen, R PhDear Pharmacist: I take a reflux medication daily as well as a chewable antacid. In the last two months, Ive dealt with severe Charlie horses, toe tingling and occasional heartbeat skips or runs. My doctor prescribed leg cramp medication and referred me to a cardiologist. I know youre a columnist, but I intuitively feel you can help me. Ive been fine for eight months. GW, Peoria, Illinois My 23 years as a pharmacist (plus six years of schooling) comes in handy sometimes. Let me first say, do everything your doctor suggests because Im not advising, just educating you in my opinion column. The scientific literature proves your medication depletes nutrients needed to make your leg muscles and heart muscle perform perfectly. Scientifically termed drug-nutrient depletion is what I call the drug mugging effect because drugs mug your body of essential nutrients. If you need these medications, nutrient restoration is critical. A failure to understand or accept the drug mugging effect costs you because you will get diagnosed with a disease you dont have, take unnecessary medications and get sent away for expensive or invasive tests. Im so passionate about this, thats why I wrote the book on it, called Drug Muggers. Its really a life-saving book and it helps you stay off the medication merry-go-round. Acid blockers block acid, thats their job. When acid goes down, gastric pH rises. This blocks your ability to digest food and absorb nutrients. Common sense right? Medications that suppress acid include PPIs or proton pump inhibitors, H2 antagonists and simple antacids. Those categories include every acid blocking drug sold by your local pharmacy. The problem is that the human body runs on nutrients. Dont let drug commercials convince you otherwise. Its vitamins and minerals that drive metabolic reactions which support muscle and cardiac health. Momentarily Ill share key nutrients mugged by your medications. There are more than I can list here, so to receive the expanded version of my article (and natural heartburn pain relief options), sign up for my free newsletter at www. DearPharmacist.com. Ill email it later this month. Now, let me show you drug mugging at its best, and how it leads to leg cramps, neuropathy and heart rhythm glitches. Folic acid and B12acid blockers change pH in your gut so you cant absorb these B vitamins. Deficiencies absolutely cause nerve tingling or numbness, muscle weakness, leg cramps, confusion, memory loss, depression, cardiac palpitations and fatigue. Magnesium is so critical to the heart that ER doctors give it to heart attack victims. Shocker, but certain acid blockers are strong drug muggers of mag. The FDA knows and insists on the strongest black box warning for PPIs because of the magnesium steal. Severe magnesium deficiency is associated with seizures, muscle spasms, arrhythmias, hypoparathyroidism and depression. Restoring nutrients is much simpler than taking medications and installing pacemakers; its certainly worth a try before invasive costly procedures. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. dearpharmacist.com. JACARANDAThe Entertainment Nightly in Sanibels Social Scene1223 PERIWINKLE WAY, SANIBEL 472-1771 Happy Apps $5.95Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna, Crispy Fried Calamari, Chilled Oysters, Steamed Shrimp, BBQ Beef Satays, Mussels Marinara, Chicken WingsSanibels Best HAPPY HOUR4 7 p.m. Nightly in the lounge1/2 Price DrinksCall & Well Liquor, Draft Beer Selections, Select House Wine Support Group For Adult Children Of Alzheimers PersonsA support group specifically for adults who have a parent with Alzheimers disease or a related disorder will meet at the Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center, 12468 Brantley Commons Court in Fort Myers. Interested caregivers can attend on Tuesday, August 6 at 6:15 p.m. Meetings are held each month on the first Tuesday at 6:15 p.m. The meetings are sponsored by the Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center. The focus of this support group meeting is issues, concerns, and questions adult children face as they provide care to a parent with memory loss or strive to learn more about Alzheimers disease. The group is open to all interested individuals at no charge. The Alvin A. Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center, a United Way partner agency, provides informational, educational, and supportive assistance to individuals with Alzheimers disease and related disorders and their caregivers. For more information, the Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center can be contacted at 437-3007. Free Autism Screening For Young ChildrenGolisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida, in partnership with the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southwest Florida, offers a free monthly autism spectrum disorder screening for toddlers 18 months to 5 years of age. The next screening on the Ronald McDonald Care Mobile will be held on Friday, July 26 from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at McDonalds, 13741 N. Cleveland Avenue in North Fort Myers. It is estimated that one in every 88 children is diagnosed with some form of Autism Spectrum Disorder, making it more common than childhood cancer, juvenile diabetes and pediatric AIDS combined. Medical consultants for the project stress that an early diagnosis can make a vast difference for toddlers and their families. They say early intensive behavioral intervention can make an immense differ ence not just in the development of the child, but in their families as well. The ASD screening is conducted by the Neurosciences Center at Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida. The screenings are administered by an Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner, who has extensive training and experience in typical child development and developmental disorders. A physician referral is not required. To schedule a screening, call 343-6838.

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THE RIVER JULY 26, 201324 Shell Point Retirement Community has broken ground on the first custom home design that will be offered in the communitys new neighborhood, The Estuary. The home, featuring the Useppa floor plan design, will be located near the entrance to The Island at Shell Point and, when complete, will be easily accessible to Welcome Center visitors who will be able to tour the home by appointment on weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Planned completion for the Useppa is currently scheduled for October. The Estuary at Shell Point will be the planned communitys fourth neighbor hood and will include 50 residences in a combination of single-family signature homes and twin villa homes, along with a community center and pool. Entrance fees for the homes will start at approximately $687,000 and will include all of the amenities and services available at Shell Point including complete lifecare and a 75 percent or 90 percent refundable contract. Lifecare provides a form of long term care insurance that includes access to assisted living and skilled nursing if needed. Bob Southern, assistant to the president for project development at Shell Point, explained that he and his team selected Aubuchon Homes to build the first home because of the companys solid reputation in Southwest Florida. Aubuchon is known for quality construction and professionalism, he said. Shell Point President Peter Dys said plans to develop The Estuary evolved as a response to an improved economy. The Estuary at Shell Point will give us an opportunity to provide new facilities and services to both our existing and future residents, said Dys. We are responding to what fits naturally and what makes sense to Shell Point long-term. Carl Schmidt, Aubuchons vice president of construction, said they were pleased to be selected to build this home at Shell Point. Its also heartening to see an uptick in the local market and a demand for new construction, he added. The Aubuchon Team of Companies includes Aubuchon Homes, Miloff Aubuchon Realty Group, The Sterling Collection, and Evalutions by Aubuchon. This team of companies has been doing business in Southwest Florida since 1992. Site work preparation, roads, and cutting out a lake, as well as construction of the new community building and pool, is scheduled to commence after the first 16 homes or villas are pre-sold. The first residents could move in as early as mid to late 2014. Shell Point is also planning a 35,000 square foot clubhouse to expand the social and lifestyle opportunities for residents of the entire community. In addition to serving the 18-hole championship golf course, the clubhouse will include a pro shop, dining rooms, a health club, a salon and meeting rooms. The Estuary Signature Homes will offer 2,300-2,700 square feet of airconditioned living space including a great room, dining room, kitchen with morning room, master suite and two additional bedrooms with shared bath. With entry, lanai, and two-car garage, plus an additional space for a golf cart, the footprint will total 3,500 to 3,900 square feet. The Estuary Twin Villa homes are 1,600 to 2,000 square feet of airconditioned living space. Each attached home offers a great room, dining room, kitchen, master suite, second bedroom, and laundry room. Each villa will offer an expansive lanai and two-car garage with additional golf cart parking. Reservations on specific home sites offering views of the golf course or lake will be taken in the near future. Shell Point currently offers numer ous retirement residence options among three neighborhoods: The Island, The Woodlands, and Eagles Preserve. The Estuary will be the fourth Shell Point neighborhood. For more information on Shell Point or The Estuary, visit www.shellpoint.org or call the Shell Point Sales Center at 466-1131 or 800-780-1131. Shell Point And Aubuchon H omes Break Ground On A Custom H ome Shell Points Ted Benjamin, Director of Sales; David Moreland, VP of Sales and Marketing; Bob Southern, Assistant to the President for Project Development; and Peter Dys, President with Aubuchons Carl Schmidt, Vice President of Construction; Justin Einstein, Director of Operations; Jeff Miloff, Partner, Miloff Aubuchon Realty Group; and Diane VanArsdale, Director of Marketing and Sales From page 1August Exhibitmost somber, dark or dilapidated subject matter into vibrantly colored pieces. Carol Machuca has been experimenting with art since childhood. She has exhibited in several galleries in southern Indiana. She has found much pleasure and inspiration from all the masters, as well as fellow local artists, but the most inspiring have been her daughter Christina. Carols favorite medium is acrylic on canvas. Though her passion is flowers, she also enjoys lizards, birds and occasionally an abstract thrown into the mix. These exhibits continue through September 2. Puppeteer by Joe LeMay Glassy Waters by Cheryl Hucke E nglish Country DancingLearn the social dances of the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries at the Wa-ke Hatchee Recreation Center. Lessons are offered on Tuesdays from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. all year round. Dress is casual, and participants should wear flat shoes with non-slip soles. Partners are not necessary, and beginners are welcomed. Lessons are free after a one-time payment of $10, which covers lifetime membership to Wa-Ke Hatchee Recreation Center. Contact Gillian Carney at 6039828 or email fortmyersdancers@hotmail.com. Also, visit http://dancefl.us/ ecd/FtMyersECD.shtml. Wa-ke Hatchee Recreation Center is located at 16760 Bass Road in Fort Myers. Call 432-2154 for more information. To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF JULY 29, 2013ARIES (March 21 to April 19) With new facts to work with, you should feel more confident in moving ahead. But continue to do so at an unhurried pace so you can spot details you might otherwise miss. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Taking on that new workplace project could be one of your smarter career moves. Expect a surprising show of support from someone who had always been a critic. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You might feel youre too busy to undertake a new responsibility. But check it out before making any decisions. What you learn could persuade you to change your mind. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) You feel quite content enjoying all the comforts of home right now. But the urge to travel grows stronger, and by weeks end, you could begin packing your bags. LEO (July 23 to August 22) A hectic period begins to ease up, but that doesnt mean the Fine Feline can do much catnap ping these days. You need to finish those old tasks and prepare for new ones. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Expect to get some good news about your financial situation by weeks end. But it could still be too early to rush out with a long shopping list of things to buy. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Your management skills make an impression on some workplace VIPs who might be looking for someone like you to take on an upcoming project. Good luck. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Meeting a former adversary might be unsettling at first. But time has softened hard feelings, and you could be on the brink of starting a new relationship. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A troubling situation close to home might cause you to change your travel plans. But getting all the facts before you act might cause you to reconsider. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) You might be quite alone right now in deciding to support a major workplace shift. But others will join you as new information supports your bold move. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A former co-worker returns with news that could persuade you to reassess recent ly made plans. Be sure to consult with a trusted colleague before you act. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your motives behind a recent decision could be called into question by a rival. But once you present the facts, all doubts will be resolved. Enjoy an arts-rich weekend. BORN THIS WEEK: While you love being the center of attention, your gener ous heart allows you to share the attention with others. port of Palos, Italian explorer Christopher Columbus sets sail in command of three ships -the Nina, the Pinta and the Santa Maria -on a journey to find a western sea route to China, India and Asia. In October, Columbus sighted Cuba, which he thought was mainland China. General Motors Corporation acquires the countrys leading luxury automaker, the million. Cadillac was founded out of the ruins of automotive pioneer Henry Fords second failed company. His third effort, the Ford Motor Company, finally succeeded. erupts in Europe, President Woodrow Wilson formally proclaims the neutrality of the United States. However, by June landed in France to begin training for combat. Hitler becomes absolute dictator of Germany under the title of Fuhrer, or Leader. The Fuhrer assured his people that the Third Reich would last for a thousand years, but Nazi Germany collapsed just 11 years later. destroyer rams an American PT (patrol torpedo) boat, No. 109, slicing it in two. The destruction is so massive that other American PT boats in the area assume the crew is dead. Two crewmen were, in fact, killed, but 11 survived, including Lt. John F. Kennedy, who would later become president. Johnson signs Medicare, a health insur ance program for elderly Americans, into law. At the bill-signing ceremony, former President Harry Truman was enrolled as Medicares first beneficiary and received the first Medicare card. president Jimmy Hoffa is reported missing in Detroit. He was last seen alive in a parking lot outside the Machus Red Fox restaurant the previous afternoon. Authorities have never been able to confirm what really happened to Hoffa. He was declared legally dead in 1982. who made the following sage observation: The man who is incapable of making a mistake is incapable of anything. once decided to test several varieties of Coca-Cola to determine their effectiveness, if any, as a spermicide. The results? Diet Coke was the most effective, while New Coke was the least. Upon hearing of the tests, a representative for the company issued the following statement: We do not promote Coca-Cola for medical pur poses. It is a soft drink. in its mouth; theyre found in the throat. blurb to indicate a short summary or promotional piece accompanying a creative work? At a trade association dinner attendees with a limited edition of one of his books. It was customary to have a brief summary included on the dust jacket of such books, along with a picture of an attractive woman. Burgess followed this custom with a twist. On the cover of his piece was an image of a woman with her hand held to her mouth, as if shouting. The caption for this image was Belinda Blurb, in the act of blurbing, and bold let ters at the top of the dust jacket declared, Yes, this is a Blurb! The name stuck. States, there will be 10 reported UFO sightings. pioneered the paint-by-numbers style of art. He would sketch a piece, then number certain sections for his assistants to paint. People demand freedom of speech to make up for the freedom of thought which they avoid. -Soren Kierkegaard THIS WEEK IN HISTORY strSTR A nN G eE BU tT trTR U eE thoTHO UG htHT F orOR theTHE DA yY DID YOU KNOW 1. MEDICAL: The condition called nephrolithiasis is more commonly referred to as what? 2. CONGRESS: What did the acronym HUAC stand for? 3. INVENTIONS: What 19th-century ranching aid did Joseph Glidden invent? known as? 8. FOOD AND DRINK: What product is advertised as Vermonts Finest? 9. SCIENCE: What is the chemical symbol for mercury? 10. GEOGRAPHY: Where are the Pillars of Hercules? TRIVI aA TES tT Jerrys ice cream 9. Hg (hydrargyrum) 10. Strait of Gibraltar. ANSWERS25 THE RIVER JULY 26, 2013 SpSP OR tT S QUIZ 1. Name the only switch-hitter to compile at least 300 home runs and 300 stolen bases in his career. 2. Which was the last major-league team to use six different starting pitchers in a W orld Series? Angeles Clippers had at least an 11-game winning streak? brother trio to do so in a game in NHL history. Name two of the first three. Olympic long jump and the triple jump? ANSWERS

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THE RIVER JULY 26, 201326 CONTRACTOR G I P M SR C D P D P CG D GrSince 2001, A Southwest Florida Paver Contractor www.gigicompanies.com 239-541-7282Schedule free estimates or visit our new show roomLic.# S3-12238 COMPUTERS PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the bene ts of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 TREE & LAWN CARE Jesus Hernandez LANDSCAPING & TREE SERVICE 482-7350 We Service All your Landscape Needs FULL Landscaping SERVICES Over 20 years serving San-Cap & Ft. Myers CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING Rock Shrimp Coconut Curry with Mango-Papaya Salsa Rock Shrimp Coconut Curry 1 teaspoon olive oil 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, peeled and chopped 1/2 cup onion, chopped 1 cup zucchini, julienned 1 cup yellow squash, julienned 1 cup unsweetened coconut milk 1/4 cup dry white wine 1 teaspoon turmeric 1/2 cup mango chutney 1 1/2 pounds rock shrimp, peeled 1/2 cup half and half 1/2 teaspoon Thai red curry paste 2 teaspoons parsley, chopped Sea salt to taste Fresh ground pepper to taste Heat olive oil in a heavy saucepan over medium-high heat. Add ginger, onion and julienned squash; saut until soft. Stir in coconut milk, wine, turmeric and chutney; bring to a boil. Add shrimp and reduce heat to medium. Simmer sauce 5 to 6 minutes until shrimp are cooked through and sauce is slightly thickened. Stir in half and half, curry paste, parsley, salt and pepper. Heat through and serve with Florida Mango-Papaya Salsa. Florida Mango Papaya Salsa 1 cup ripe papaya, cut into 1/2-inch cubes 2 cups ripe mango, cut into 1/2-inch cubes 3 tablespoons cilantro, finely chopped 1 to 2 jalapeo peppers, seeded and minced 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice, or to taste 1 tablespoon light brown sugar, or more to taste Place all ingredients in a mixing bowl; chill. Toss together 5 minutes before ready to serve. Taste for seasoning, adding more lime juice and/or brown sugar as needed. Rock Shrimp Coconut Curry with Mango-Papaya Salsa Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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27 THE RIVER JULY 26, 2013 answer on page 22 PUZZLE ANSWERS SUDOKU SCRAMBLERSPROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY AIR CONDITIONING & REMODELING We are your One-Stop ContractorCall today for a free estimate!(239) 344-6883 Licensed & Insured: CBC1254276 and CAC1814724 AIR CONDITIONING REMODELING BUILDING CONTRACTOR FIND AT LEAST SIX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PANELS FISHING CHARTER Light Tackle Sport Fishing CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.com Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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THE RIVER JULY 26, 201328 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE RR ead us online at II sland SunNews.com ANNUAL RENTAL DI RERE C TLTL Y AA C RR O SSSS F RR OM B EAEA CH C ANALANAL & DOCK This UF ground level updated home offers 472-6747Gulf Beach Properties, Inc. RS 7/26 BM TFN ANNUAL RENTALS SS AN ibIB EL foFO RT myMY ERS ISABELLA RASiIHAPPY TO HELP Y YOUWithITH A ALL OOF Y YOUrRREAL EEStT At TE NEEDS! RS 1/4 NC TFN 1101 Periwinkle Way #105 SS anibel, F LL 33957 ISABELLA RASiI (239) 246-4716E ISABELLARASi I@AOL.COM MOBI LELE HOM EE P ERER IWI NN K LELE P ARAR K carport with adjacent 2nd parking space. information or to make offer. RS 7/26 CC 7/26 RR ENTAL WANTE dDAA NNUAL RR ENTAL WANTE dD NS 6/28 CC TFN F oO R RR ENT has apartments for rent to individuals RS 3/15 CC 8/30 ANNUAL RENTALQ UU I ETET SANSAN IB ELEL HOM EE W/P RR IV ATEATE B EAEA CH P ATAT H NS 5/31 CC TFN RERE /M AA X OF TT H EE I SLANSLAN D SS Putting owners and tenants together RS 1/4 BM TFN C ANALANAL -F RR O NTNT NS 7/19 CC 7/26 SER vicVIC ES offOFF ERE dD C ompOMP AN ioIO N SS ER vicVIC E RS 1/4 BM TFN ScSC ARNAT oO LL A wW N SS ER vicVIC E RS 1/25 BM TFN HELLES CLEAN iI N gG SS ER vicVIC ES NS 1/4 PC TFN GI RLRL F RR ID AA Y HO USEUSE K EEEE P ERER wishing to work for someone in need of a housekeeper... and or plus much more... NS 7/26 CC 7/26 commCOMM ER icIC AL RENTALOFFIC EE / COMM ERER CI ALAL SS P AA C EE FO RR RENTRENT NS 4/5 CC TFN REAL ESTATEWEST GUL fF DR ivIV E SS T iI LT H omOM E NS 6/21 CC TFN 3B RR 2B AA RARA I SESE D RANRAN CH w/POO LL Call for details NS 7/19 CC 8/2 Island VacationsMillion $ Views Await You! Cottages Condos 239-472-72771-888-451-7277RS 1/4 BM TFN vV A cC AT ioIO N RENTAL LL IGH TT HO USEUSE REALTREALT Y 239-579-0511RS 1/4 CC TFN VO LUNTEERSLUNTEERS NEENEE D EE D RS 1/4 NC TFN hH EL pP wW ANTE dD www.crowclinic.orgH ELEL P USUS P LEASELEASE !! shop cashiers RS 1/4 NC TFN SER vicVIC ES offOFF ERE dDSANSAN IB ELEL HOM EE W ATAT CH RS 1/4 BM TFN RR OG ERER NN OD RURU FF ELEELE C TRTR IC RS 6/7 CC TFN H omOM E/CO NN DO WAT chCHco CO N ciCI ER gG E SER vicVIC ES P AA I NTNT I NN G GO ATAT www.paintinggoat.com RS 4/19 CC TFN

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29 THE RIVER JULY 26, 2013 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS TO PLACE AA CC LASSIFIED LL OG OO N tT O: IslandSunNews.com CLICK ON PLACE CLASSIFIED LOST AND FOUND TOOLTOOL B OO X W ASAS HE SS UU P ONON SANSAN IBE LL This tool box with motor parts washed up on shore Saturday morning, May 8 about 8:30 on the beach at Sundial Resort on Sanibel Island. To claim call Sundial Resort Security 239-472-4151. NSNS 6/14 CCCC T FNFN pePE TS FF REE KI TTTT E NNTO TO G OODOOD H OO MEFree kitten to good, safe home. No de-clawing. Fiesty Bengal mix. Call 472-1788 after 5 p.m. NSNS 5/31 NCNC T FNFN wW ANT eE D TO bB UYC ASAS H P AA I DD FOFO R MI LL I TATA R YY I TT EM SS Cash Paid For Old Military Items. Medals, Swords, Uniforms, helmets, old guns, awards & more. Local Toll Free 1-866-440-3280R SS 6/7 CCCC 8/30 C AA R FO rR SAL eE 2007 BU ickICK LL AC rR OSS eE C LL X16,500 miles, beige color, 4 door, all power, seldom driven off island, $14,000. Call Ken at 472-2012.R SS 7/12 NCNC T FNFN heHE L pP wW ANT eE DHOUS ekeeperEKEEPER PA rR TTimeTIME The Robert Rauschenberg Foundations Rauschenberg Residency in Captiva seeks to engage a committed person in the role of Housekeeper. The successful and organized. Strong time management skills, a plus. S/he needs to be able to work independently, as well as perform as part of a team. An enthusiasm for the property and a willingness to learn and grow in the position are necessary. Position begins early September 2013. Flexible hours based on residency schedule, average 25 hours/week. $15/ interest and related experience or rsum, and three references should be sent to Employment@rauschenbergfoundation. org. No phone calls, please. NSNS 7/12 CCCC 7/26 V OLUNTOLUNT EER SS NN EE DD E DD Volunteers needed for the After School Program which runs Mon.-Th, 2:30 3:15 pm call Linda Reynolds 472-1617R SS 1/4 NCNC T FNFN ServerSERVER S AA SS iI STANT ServerSERVER S LiLI N eE cC OO kK IL Tesoro Ristorante, 751 tarpon Bay Rd. Sanibel Now hiring; Servers, Assistant Servers and Line cook Email resumes to: applications between 11-2 daily. NSNS 1/18 NCNC T FNFN V OLUNTOLUNT EER OO PP OO R TUNTUN I TYTY The Sunshine Ambassador Program is a new and exciting volunteer opportunity offered at the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida located within HealthPark Medical Center. The Sunshine Ambassadors will greet, assist and be a families and visitors entering the hospital. The Ambassadors also make a difference to families by providing educational and healthful resources to assist in GRANDparenting for GRANDchildren. We are currently seeking year-round volunteers to work one 4-hour shift Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm or 12:00pm to 4:00 pm. If you would be interested in learning more about this wonderful new opportunity, please contact Lisa Ellinwood, Volunteer Resources Coordinator at 239-343-5062 at the Golisano Childrens Hospital. NSNS 2/8 CCCC T FNFN bB OATS cC ANO eE S kK AYA kK S DD O ckCK A geGE Hourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-5800R SS 1/4 NCNC T FNFN 22FF OOT GLA cierCIER BAY CATA mM A rR ANIn good condition. Needs some detailing and a high pressure fuel pump. $9,000 or best offer. The boat was donated to the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) for quick sale. Contact James Robinson at CROW at (239) 472-3644, ext. 221 or development@ crowclinig.org. Or contact Peg Albert at (239) 472-3644, ext. 232 or peg@ crowclinic.org. R SS 7/26 CCCC T FNFN LOST AND FOUNDLOSTLost Ladies Watch Make: Brighton Area of Mucky Duck on Captiva Island Lost on Dec. 10, 2012 around noon If found call: 941-639-5395R SS 1/4 NCNC T FNFN FF OUNDPrescription sunglasses found in parking lot of Limetree Center on Wednesday, February 27. Claim at Island Sun newspaper, suite 2 in Limetree Center, or call 395-1213. NSNS 3/8 NCNC T FNFN

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If you would like your club/organization listed in The River Calling Card, phone 415-7732Emergency ......................................................................................... 911 Lee County Sheriffs Of ce ........................................................ 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol ................................................................ 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol .............................................................. 278-7100 Poison Control ................................................................ 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center .......................................1-800-936-5321Ft. Myers Chamber of Commerce ............................................. 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare .............................................. 425-2685 Ft. Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce .................................. 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library ......................................................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library ............................................................ 533-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce .......................................... 931-0931 Post Of ce ..................................................................... 1-800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau ..................................................... 338-3500 ARTS Alliance for the Arts .................................................................. 939-2787 Art of the Olympians Museum & Gallery ................................... 332-5055 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio .................................................. 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers ......................................................... 275-3970 Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall ...................................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS ................................................................................ 395-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre ............................................... 278-4422 Cultural Park Theatre ................................................................ 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light ............................................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade .................................. 332-4488 Florida West Arts ...................................................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers ....................................... 472-0168 Gulf Coast Symphony ............................................................... 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres ..................................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic ........................................................... 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater ......................................................... 472-6862 S.W. Florida Symphony ............................................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy .................................................................. 936-3239 Young Artists Awards ................................................................ 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAngel Flight ................................................................ 1-877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center ............................................................... 731-3535 American Business Women Association ................................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL ..................................................................... 339-8046 Audubon Society ....................................................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR .................................................. 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society ................................................... 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus ................................. 1-855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club ............................................................ 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees ....................................................... 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists ............................................................ 415-2484 Ft Myers UDC Chapter 2614 (United Daughters of the Confederacy .................................. 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL ...................................................... 561-9164 The Horticulture and Tea Society ............................................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society ................................................................. 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society ............................................. 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation ........................................... 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees ............. 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America .......................................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL .................................................... 667-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans .................................................. 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy ........................................ 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association ........................................ 561-2118 Kiwanis Clubs: Fort Myers Beach ................................................. 765-4254 or 454-8090 Fort Myers Edison ..................................................................... 694-1056 Fort Myers South ...................................................................... 691-1405 Gateway to the Islands .............................................................. 415-3100 Iona-McGregor .......................................................................... 482-0869Lions Clubs:Fort Myers Beach ...................................................................... 463-9738 Fort Myers High Noon ............................................................... 466-4228 Estero/South Fort Myers ........................................................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County .............................................. 768-0417 POLO Club of Lee County ......................................................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers ......................................................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society ................................................ 472-6940 United Way of Lee County ........................................................ 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) ................................. 211 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews Shell Museum ................................................ 395-2233 Burroughs Home ...................................................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium ........................................ 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates ................................................... 334-3614 Fort Myers Skate Park .............................................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium ............................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge ................................ 472-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site .............................................. 239-992-0311 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center ....................... 765-8101 Skatium ...................................................................................... 321-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society ........................................ 939-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History ...................................... 321-7430 True Tours ................................................................................. 945-0405 SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 27THE RIVER JULY 26, 201330 My name is Dolly and I am a five-year-old female fawn Labrador retriever. Labs love water and I certainly am true to my breed. If I was part of your family we could go to Dog Beach and play lots of games. I also love to fetch. You wont find a more social dog than me. Adoption fee: $10 (regularly $75) during Animal Services Freedom Friends adoption promo. My name is Liz and I am a female black and white domestic short hair cat age four months. If you are looking for a sweet adorable baby kitty, Im your girl. I love to cuddle and couldnt look cuter with my black and white tuxedo coloring. Dont forget cats and kittens are two for one in case youd like to take home a pair of cuties. Adoption fee: $25 (regularly $75) during Animal Services Freedom Friends adoption promo. For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to www.LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive, Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office, off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if three months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs six months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee, and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500. Liz ID# 566805 Dolly ID# 568814 photos by squaredogphoto.com Pets Of The Week T-Shirt Sales Aid Heartworm Care For DogsHazel For Heartworm Prevention T-shirts are on sale. Proceeds will benefit Lee County Domestic Animal Services Animal Care Trust Fund for the heartworm treatment of pets whose owners receive public assistance. The idea came from Trasi Sharp and Liza Clouse, owners of Island Paws and the Over Easy Caf, both on Sanibel. Last year, the ladies rescued a heartworm-positive great Dane named Hazel and saw first-hand how the disease affects dogs. Trasi and Liza were concerned that many dogs would suffer from the disease because their owners could not afford the treatment, said Donna Ward, director of animal services. The funds will allow us make this treatment available for these dogs, she added. We also hope it will bring about awareness of the importance of heartworm prevention.The T-shirts are available for $25 each. They come in four colors and in crew neck and ladies V-neck. They are on sale at Island Paws, 630 Tarpon Bay Road on Sanibel, or at Animal Services, 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers. To place an order, email islandpaws@embarqmail.com.

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BEACH CHAIR PASTIMEAnswers on page 2531 THE RIVER JULY 26, 2013

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Visit our newest ofce location at Sundial Beach Resort 1451 Middle Gulf Drive 239/472-1478Serving the Islands Since 1975 t r t illa s f sc t a wlar N aptiva Driv G K t rrac ra b r Gar s at ac wal a ra a H K H G lf Harb r Na t c t r s D H t as s rt ac illa Ol a r ial p cial ial O w isti w isti w isti w isti w isti THE RIVER JULY 26, 201332