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River weekly news ( July 12, 2013 )

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River weekly news
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Newspaper
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Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
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Fort Myers, Fla
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July 12, 2013
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University of Florida
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Title:
River weekly news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication:
Fort Myers, Fla
Creation Date:
July 12, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00101363:00184


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FREETake Me Home VOL. 12, NO. 27 JULY 12, 2013From the Beaches to the River District downtown Fort MyersRead Us Online at IslandSunNews.com ArtFest Puts Out Call To ArtistsArtFest Fort Myers announces an all new poster/T-shirt competition for the 2014 festival. This competition is open to all professional artists, said Sharon McAllister, executive director. Our commemorative poster and T-shirt always feature inspiring original artwork and we encourage any artist, not just those applying to participate in ArtFest Fort Myers 2014, to submit their artwork for poster/T-shirt consider ation. The artist whose work is selected for the poster/T-shirt will be featured in a broad range of print, online and VIP promotions preceding festival weekend, and continuing throughout the year, as well as a free booth space at ArtFest Fort Myers 2014, a complimentary three-night stay at our host hotel, plus an invitation to join us at ArtFest Fort Myers 2015 and much more. It has been a great honor to have participated twice as the poster artist for ArtFest Fort Myers, said Tim Parker. This was a tremendous opportunity to gain a significantly wider audience. The related advertising and promotion of my artwork provided priceless exposure and my great sales certainly were a reflection of the media attention. Submissions for this contest must represent original artwork in a theme that denotes Southwest Florida and appeals to a broad audience. Entries will be accepted through August 20 and images can be submitted by email. For more information, visit www.ArtFestFortMyers.com and click on Poster Contest or call 768-3602. Proceeds from the sales of the commemorative poster and T-shirt help to support the ArtFest Fort Myers art education outreach programs; The After School Art Clubs, the Boys and Girls Art Club at Shady Oaks, The Visiting Artist Program and Art Supply Grants. The annual juried fine art festival takes place February 1 and 2 in the Fort Myers River District. There will be 200 professional artists from across the county and around the world, the largest high school art exhibit and competition in south Florida and free interactive art experiences for children of all ages. The winning design for the ArtFest 2013 poster was created by Tim Parker Last years ArtFest T-shirts were designed by artist Tim Parker A Midsummer Nights Sing To Benefit Families In NeedHungry families and children out of school for the summer will benefit from an evening of music and fellowship at the 16th annual A Midsummer Nights Sing, presented by First Presbyterian Church of Fort Myers and sponsored by the Galloway Family of Dealerships. The event, planned for Tuesday, July 23, at First Presbyterian Church at 2438 Second Street in downtown Fort Myers, will be a 90-minute performance of hymns, instrumentalists and special guests beginning at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and admission is free, although voluntary cash donations and cans of non-perishable food will be accepted to benefit Community Cooperative Ministries (CCMI The Soup Kitchen). CCMI Executive Director Tracey Galloway said CCMI is delivering local, fresh, nutritious food this summer to Lee County families in need through mobile food pantries. About 2,000 children and families will benefit from the summer program. During the school year, children often receive their only meals of the day at school.continued on page 17Multicultural Centres Annual Big Backpack EventThe Multicultural Centre of Southwest Florida will host its 14th annual Big Backpack Event to celebrate back-to-school on Sunday, July 21 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Harborside Event Center in downtown Fort Myers. For the past 14 years, the Multicultural Centre of Southwest Florida has been hosting this community outreach event that to date has has provided new backpacks and school supplies to nearly 30,000 students over the years. The event lends a helping hand to students and families in need and celebrates the diversity in Southwest Florida with live multicultural entertainment on the main stage, including Irish step dance and salsa. The event draws an estimated crowd of 15,000 people each year. Although it begins at 11 a.m., the line begins to form around Harborside Event Center as early at 7 a.m. The first 2,000 students ages 5 to 12 will receive free backpacks and school supplies. Parents or guardians must bring their school age children in order to receive the free supplies. Thanks to sponsors and vendors, students may also receive eye exams, hair cuts and other giveaways while supplies last. Other festivities include face painting, an inflatable slide and bounce house, clowns and live entertainment. We are so very appreciative of the support we receive from local businesses and individuals who partner with us each year to support students and families in need, said Leonardo Garcia, co-founder of the Multicultural Centre of Southwest Florida. Thanks to the support of sponsors and our dedicated event committee, we hope to help more than 2,000 students with their back-to-school needs again this year. Sponsors for this years event include Walmart, Harborside Event Center, City of Fort Myers, Lee County Public School Principals, Pendas Law Firm, Jasons Deli, CONRIC PR & Marketing, Fuller Online Solutions, Univision, DLatinos, Nuevos Ecos, Lee Family News, News-Press Media Group, Beasley Broadcasting, Azteca America and HABA. From the 2012 A Midsummer Nights Sing: Rev. Paul deJong, minister of First Presbyterian Church; A Midsummer Nights Sing organizer Sam Galloway, Jr.; and song leader Doug Molloy

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THE RIVER JULY 12, 20132 Historic Downtown Fort Myers, Then And Now: EE speranza, Private TT rain Car Of Many Namesby Gerri RR eaves, PhDFirst In A SeriesThe private Pullman train car was the most comfortable mode of land travel during the era of widespread passenger rail service. Like a private yacht or todays private jet, the Pullman car could be docked or stored and connected to the rear of the train when it was time to travel to Florida or New York or to events like the Kentucky Derby. Campaigning politicians traveling on private Pullman cars spoke from the rear platforms, thus the term whistle stop. Today, this elegant form of travel might seem difficult to imagine, but sitting prominently in downtown Fort Myers is an exhibit that brings it to life. The Esperanza Pullman car rests on tracks where (until 1971) passengers could embark and disembark at the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad depot. That depot is now the Southwest Florida Museum of History, a Mission-style structure built in 1924. Featuring a spacious salon, three state rooms (bedrooms), a dining room, galley (kitchen) and servants quarters, the Esperanza is furnished with brass fittings and mahogany interior. The Esperanzas story began in March 1929, when Harry St. Francis Black, a wealthy capitalist, ordered an 84-foot private rail car from the Pullman Standard Car and Manufacturing Company. He named it after one of his many business concerns, the Delores Esperanza Company. It was to be one of the last of such cars the company built. Black never saw his new luxury car, for he died the following July. The company scrambled to find another buyer, which wasnt easy, given the stock-market crash of October 1929. But in July of 1930, AC Burrage became owner of the car, which he renamed Alicia, after his wife. In 1948, Burrage sold the car to Bruce Dodson, who renamed it Helma, after his wife. The next owner broke the naming pattern. Dan Taylor, president of the West India Fruit and Steamship Line, renamed the car Sea Level II for his birthplace in North Carolina. With the next change of ownership, the car began its office phase. The Seaboard Air Line Railway bought it in 1964 for use as an office car, renaming it Miami, a city that it did actually travel to. Just three years later, Florida Southern College purchased it as a presidents office for Dr. Charles T. Thrift. It wasnt until 1985 that the railcar with many names was acquired by the City of Fort Myers as part of the Centennial Celebration. The purchase was to be a special way to celebrate the citys past and future, something beyond the standard speeches, parades and time-capsule ceremonies. It was a true gift from the People of Fort Myers to the People of Fort Myers Future, according to railroad historian Jeanne Hickam, because much of the $50,000 to buy it was raised by public subscription. Re-christened its original name, Esperanza became one of the most fascinating and substantial exhibits of the (then) new museums collection. Brought to town via rail, the car was lifted by a crane to where it rests now, on a spot where many lines of tracks used to connect Fort Myers with all points in the vast U.S. The Esperanza is a regular part of the museum tour. Stop by the Southwest Florida Museum of History, where you can climb aboard the historic railcar and pretend youre off to adventure in style and privacy. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Call 321-7430 or go to www.museumofhistory.org for more info.continued on page 6 The River Weekly News will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, please call (239) 415-7732 or write to: The River Weekly News, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, FL 33901. Fax number: (239) 415-7702. E-mail: press@riverweekly.com. The River Weekly News reserves the right to refuse, alter or edit any editorial or advertisement.Co-Publishers Lorin Arundel Advertising Sales Isabel Rasi Office Coordinator Graphic Arts/ProductionAnn Ziehl Photographer Michael Heider Writers Anne Mitchell Jeff Lysiak PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Contributing Writers Read Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.com Click on The River Ed Frank Max Friedersdorf Tom Hall Esperanza awaits visitors who can glimpse how the well-off traveled decades ago photo by Gerri RR eaves The 1929 luxury Pullman car Esperanza shortly after arriving at the Southwest Florida Museum of History. The City of Fort Myers acquired it as part of the 1985 Centennial Celebration courtesy of the Southwest Florida Museum of HH istory

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3 THE RIVER JULY 12, 2013 Fort Myers Public Art: Reflections About Tootie McGregor Fountainby Tom HallThis time in history 100 years ago, materials were en route to Fort Myers for the construction of fountain that Dr. Marshall O. Terry had agreed to erect at Five Points, a broad intersection where Cleveland Avenue, Anderson Avenue (now Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard), McGregor Boulevard, Main and Carson streets all met. It was to be a memorial to Dr. Terrys wife, Tootie, who played a pivotal role in having Riverside Road converted from a sloppy mud cattle trail into the palm-lined paved thoroughfare we know today as McGregor Boulevard. The Fort Myers Press reported in its July 10, 1913 edition that nearly all the material for the McGregor memorial fountain is in the ground and ready to be set in place. Workmen who have been sent here by the designers of this beautiful granite shaft and fountain have placed the heavier pieces in position for erection, which work will be undertaken in the next few days. Dr. Terry and the workers were intent on completing the installation by the first anniversary of Tootie McGregor Terrys death on August 17, 1913. And they succeeded in this effort, for there appeared in the Press a brief note indicating that the Terry memorial fountain was draped by a beautiful bouquet of ferns and roses all day Sunday, it being the first anniversary of Mrs. T. McGregor Terrys death. According to Fort Myers resident and historian Jim Butler, the fountain served both as a turnabout in the Five Point intersection and a water trough for horses, which in 1913, represented the most common means of transportation for the folks living in the fledgling town of Fort Myers. But by 1952, the car had replaced horses and the fountain had become something of a anachronism in the increasingly busy intersection. One day, a fellow by the name of Ted Camp smashed his car into that fountain, recalls Frank Pavese. Sonny Cook had an insurance agency and he put a sign on the fountain that said, Committee to remove fountain. Ted Camp. Ted took down the sign as soon as he heard about it, but that put the idea in folks minds to move the fountain from Five Points. That opportunity came when it was time to construct the crossover to the new Caloosahatchee Bridge. The fountain was disassembled and the 24-ton granite base and palm tree were moved down McGregor to the Fort Myers Country Club. I saw the bronze snakes on the porch of Commissioner Hudsons house, reports Berne Davis, referring to the five venomous snakes that were attached to the mock ground at the base of the palm tree and which originally served as the fountains water spouts. Two were water moccasins (also known as cottonmouths), two were eastern diamondback rattlesnakes and the fifth was a coral snake. Its unclear how many of the snakes were on Commissioner Hudsons porch or where they went from there, but when the Fort Myers Beautification Advisory Board hired Fort Myers Don Wilkins in 1983 to reassemble the fountain, he only came across three. Wilkins speculates that the other two may have been stolen. You can see marks on the granite from continued on page 6 The Tootie McGregor Fountain is surrounded today by a 40-foot diameter reflection pool that was added in 1984 The Morgan House will reopen Tuesday July 16 after our annual vacation. Look for a New Menu and Ambiance with New Happy Hour Specials!239-337-3377 Lazy Flamingo, Inc. 6520-C Pine Avenue Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-5353 Lazy Flamingo 3, Inc. 16501 Stringfellow Rd Bokeelia, FL 33922 239-283-5959 Lazy Flamingo 2, Inc. 1036 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-6939 Lazy Flamingo 4, Inc. 12951 McGregor Blvd. Ft. Myers, FL 33919 239-476-9000 Four Great Locations! If Our Seafood Were Any Fresher, We Would Be Serving It Under Water! NOW SERVING FULL LIQUOR IN FORT MYERS Bring in This Coupon for $ 5 OFFPurchase of $30 or moreF M

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THE RIVER JULY 12, 20134 rf ntbnrr bb bb rtttn Loved this restaurant. Fantastic experience. Food was exceptionally amazing. Service was outstanding. TripAdvisor Member, May 2013 Democratic Womens Club To Meet August 10The Democratic Womens Club of Lee County will have as its featured speaker at the Saturday, August 10 meeting Dr. Maureen McKenna, Phd, candidate for President of the Democratic Womens Club of Florida. Dr. McKenna is retired from the Department of Veterans Affairs, where she worked as a Rehabilitation Counselor with veterans with service-connected disabilities as well as a nationwide trainer and training coordinator for the Central Office of the Veterans Benefits Administration. She received her doctorate at the University of Maryland in Counselor Education. In addition, she is Past-President of the Highlands County Democratic Womens Club, is a Precinct Captain and has initiated a College Democratic Club at the South Florida State College. Maureen has served the Democratic Womens Club of Florida by performing in the position of Credentialing Chair, Legislative Chair and is currently 1st Vice President. Maureen serves as board member on the Democratic Progressive Caucus of Florida. She has recently been appointed by Allison Tant, FDP Chair, to the FDP Legislative Committee. She lives in Highlands County with her father. The topic of Dr. McKennas speech will be on National Equality Day (August 26). The day is proclaimed each year by the U.S. President to commemorate the granting of the vote to women across the country through the adoption of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution on August 26, 1920. The meeting will begin at 10:30 a.m. at the Hilton Garden Inn in South Fort Myers, at the northeast corner of College Parkway and Summerlin Road. A lunch will be served following the meeting, available at a cost of $18 per person. Visitors may make reservations for lunch by contacting Pat Fish at fishpatricia@ yahoo.com or by calling 466-8381. The Democratic Womens Club of Lee County is a member of the DWC of Florida. It works year-round to organize the Democratic voters of Lee County, Florida. The DWC of Lee County brings together in common purpose all Democratic Women of Lee County, although men are members as well. The DWC strives to stimulate interest in civic affairs, encourage good citizenship and educate the public on questions of public interest. The DWC encourages the active participation of Democratic voters, seeks to increase Democratic voter registration and supports qualified Democratic candidates for public office. Free I mmigration I nformation Sessions Offered At T he L ibraryRepresentatives from the U.S. Office of Citizenship and Immigration (USCIS) will offer information on the naturalization process. Attendees will: learn the rights, responsibilities and importance of U.S. citizenship; gain an understanding of the naturalization process and citizenship preparation resources. The sessions may also include a mock naturalization interview. Registration is preferred. Times and locations are as follows: July 18 at 4 p.m. August 6 at 10:30 a.m. July 20 at 2 p.m. August 14 at 6 p.m. September 28 at 2 p.m. October 2 at 6 p.m. H armony In T he Streets With L ocal Y outhThe Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches is providing a free week-long day camp that allows children to par ticipate in various outdoor activities and develop positive esteem. Harmony In The Streets is a community program for boys and girls that emphasizes respect for others and promotes healthy relationships with local law enforcement officers. The Harmony In The Streets day camp will be held July 22 to 26, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at New Hope Presbyterian Church. A maximum number of 60 children can participate in the program. Funding for this local program is provided by dedicated individuals, community based groups, and a strong commitment from Lee County Sheriff Mike Scott. The mission of the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches is to prevent juvenile delinquency and develop lawful, productive citizens through a broad range of Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches has served thousands of boys, girls and their families. This charitable, non-profit corporation was founded by the Florida Sheriffs Association and operates four residential child-care campuses and two Youth Camps. Additionally, it provides community-based services and family counseling to as many of Floridas neglected, troubled children as funds will permit. Voluntary contributions are the primary source of funding, expecially gifts through special bequests in wills and trusts. For more information, visit www. youthranches.org. August Dinner Meeting Of L ee R epublican Women FederatedThe Lee Republican Women Federated will conduct their next monthly dinner meeting on Monday, August 12 at the Hilton Garden Inn, located at 12601 the program to follow. The guest speaker will be Lee County School Board member Jeanne Dozier. Her subject will be Common Core. Cost to attend the meeting is $20 all inclusive; cash bar available. To make reservations, call 432-9389 or email cindylignelli222@gmail.com. Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702or email press@riverweekly.com Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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5 THE RIVER JULY 12, 2013 River Cruises Return For Summer At Edison FordAs of Sunday, July 7 and Monday, July 8, the Edison & Ford Winter Estates and Captiva Cruises will offer short cruises on the Caloosahatchee River and tours of Edison Ford on Sundays and Mondays at 10 a.m., 11 a.m., noon and 1 p.m. The cruise and tour is a great way to learn about the ecology and history of the river that the Edison and Ford families explored and fished. In 1886, Thomas Edison purchased 15 acres along the Caloosahatchee and built Seminole Lodge, his stunning winter estate facing the river. He also built a 1,800 foot long wood pier with entertaining areas and a boathouse for his electric launch, the Reliance. Today, visitors to the Edison & Ford Winter Estates will also tour the Caloosahatchee on a modern flat-bottom vessel complete with awnings and the same leisurely travel agenda. The river cruises are a great way to experience the history of this important river and the ecology and environmental significance to Southwest Florida. Cost for Edison Ford members: adults are $20, children 12 and under are $15; non-members: adults are $40, children 12 and under are $30. Admission includes an audio tour of the Edison Ford homes, gardens, lab and museum as well as an historian-led boat cruise of the Caloosahatchee River. Contact Edison Ford for cruise times, ticket information, tour options and to arrange special times and dates for group reservations. River cruises are available on Sunday evenings for sunset cruises, family gatherings, private events and childrens dolphin parties. The Edison & Ford Winter Estates is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. For more information about the site, visit www.edisonfordwinterestates.org. River cruises from Edison Ford return for summer season and include tour of homes, gardens, lab and museum Historian-led river cruises are offered four times daily on Sundays and Mondays CONTINENTAL CUISINEAT THEIR NEW HOME. 20351 SUMMERLIN ROAD, FORT MYERS. ACROSS FROM TANGER FACTORY OUTLETS. IN THE PUBLIX SHOPPING PLAZA. Courtneys has something for everyone. Come & see why Courtneys aims to please!239.466.4646HAPPY HOUR DAILY4PM-7PM IN OUR BEAUTIFUL LOUNGEREDUCED DRINK PRICES AND $2.00 OFF APPETIZERSLUNCH SERVED DAILY AT 11AM Dinner for 2 for $30.00 Includes glass of house wine or well drink or domestic beer eachChoose any entree from our SUNSET DINING MENUChoice of: soup or salad comes with potato, veggie, hot baked bread and fresh herb olive oil Available from 4pm-6pm(Does not include tax or gratuity. Not valid on Holidays)Expires 10/31/2013 Make your reservations today! Buy One Lunch Get One for Half PriceWith the purchase of two beverages Half price applies to lowest priced lunch. Does not include tax or gratuity. Not valid on HolidaysExpires 10/31/2013 JOIN US EVERY SUNDAY FOR BRUNCHFROM 10AM 2PMA DELICIOUS VARIETY OF BREAKFAST AND LUNCH ITEMS ON THE MENU Chinese & Japanese Cuisine Downtown Fort Myers (Post Oce Arcade Next to Hotel Indigo) 1520 Broadway For Takeout & Delivery Tel: 334-6991 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEKMon-urs 11am 10pm Fri-Sat 11am 11pm Sun 12pm 9pm www. ichiban-sushi-chinese.com To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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Hortoons THE RIVER JULY 12, 20136 From page 2EsperanzaBe sure to explore the Southwest Florida Historical Societys research center, too, where you can learn more how people traveled in early Fort Myers. The all-volunteer non-profit organization is located at 10091 McGregor Boulevard on the campus of the Lee County Alliance for the Arts. Contact the society at 939-4044, or visit on Wednesday or Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon. Sources: Esperanza: Mr. Blacks Private Car by Jeanne Hickam, published by the Southwest Florida Museum of History; and the Miami Herald. Day T rip To Big M CasinoJoin the Kennedy Kruisers as they head to Fort Myers Beach for an excellent day of gaming fun on Thursday, September 19. All aboard to enjoy bingo, exciting slot machines as well as table games, and an all you can eat buffet lunch included. The Big M Casino is Southwest Floridas only luxurious 162-foot gambling ship. As an additional incentive, when you travel with the Kennedy Kruisers, you have the opportunity to enter the Entertainment Extra Raffle for a free ticket to an upcoming event. There is also a membership raffle as well. Preregistration is preferred by September 16. Participants should arrive by 8:45 a.m. and the bus will leave the Lake Kennedy Center at 9 a.m. Later, the bus will leave the casino at 4 p.m. and return to Cape Coral at approximately 5 p.m. Cost is $25 per member and $30 per non-member. For more information or to make reservations, call the Lake Kennedy Center at 574-0575. From page 3Fountaina tire iron or pry bar where the [missing] snakes were, says Wilkins. Operating from that premise, Wilkins decided not to risk placing the three original snakes back on the fountain. Instead, he cast fiberglass replicas using the originals as models. According to a recent conservation study commissioned by Fort Myers Public Art Committee, an additional new composite pipe/snake was added to the exterior south side to mask the plumbing at the base of the fountain where water is drawn up from the reflecting pool. After completing the reassembly, Wilkins placed the three original bronze snakes in storage at the Southwest Florida Museum of History, where they were forgotten until PAC member Bill Taylor discovered them a few weeks ago while investigating the work that needs to be done to restore the Tootie McGregor Fountain to its original state during its upcoming centenary. Taylor and the rest of the Public Art Committee would like to see the fountain placed back in its original state. That will mean removing the 40-foot reflection pool that Wilkins added in 1984 to cir cumscribe the fountain, and re-plumbing the water so that it once more flows into the trough at the base of the palm tree through the snakes mouths. But the cost of the work required to do this and fix and clean up the fountain could exceed $65,000, so a fundraising campaign is being planned. A commemoration of the fountains 100th anniversary is also under consideration. News of both will be forthcoming as decisions are made. You can see the Tootie McGregor Fountain at the Fort Myers Country Club on McGregor Boulevard. It graces the north parking lot that serves the Edison Restaurant, where it has stood since 1984. An arts advocate, Tom Hall guides weekly walking tours of the River Districts public art collection in Fort Myers. For more information, go to www.truetours.net. Arabian Nights Matinee T ripThe Kennedy Kruisers go north to Orlando to experience Arabian Nights on Tuesday, August 6. When the lights go down, the main event begins in the Palace of Horses, where guests of all ages will enjoy a magnificent Broadway-style show: The American Princess. Come and join us as we view the worlds greatest show on horses. Luxurious transportation, a great show and a wonderful lunch are included in the price of the ticket. Cost is $60 for members or $65 for non-members. Lunch includes a main dish, veggie, dessert and a beverage. Preregistration is preferred by July 24. Participants must arrive by 7:45 a.m. and will leave the Lake Kennedy Center at 8 a.m. The approximate return time is 6:30 p.m. For more information or to make reservations, call the Lake Kennedy Center at 574-0575. Read us online at IslandSunNews.com Our email address is press@riverweekly.com

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United Way Allocation Volunteers HonoredThe United Way of Lee, Hendry and Glades concluded its Allocation Process with a breakfast on June 21 honoring 351 Allocations Team members. The Allocation Process is the method by which the United Way ensures fiscal and program accountability for all 176 programs and initiatives that it funds in our community. At the same time, it helps assure that the real human service needs of our community are met. The event was hosted by Chicos and breakfast was provided by Publix Super Markets. Three new agencies became United Way Partner Agencies once the process was complete, and the Board of Directors accepted its recommendations. Our Mothers Home, Bonita Springs Lions Eye Clinic, and Blessings in a Backpack are the new partner agencies and, they join 68 current partner agencies. Tom Uhler, Allocations Committee Chair and principal in Uhler and Vertich Financial Planners described the process. Donors to great causes frequently ask themselves whether their money gets spent wisely, said Uhler. In an organization like the United Way, its one of the most important questions. How can we be as certain as possible that our dollars are used properly? At the United Way, the answer is simple. Hundreds of our peers look carefully at each program funded by the communitys generosity. Allocations teams examine financial reports, the results of the programs, and the cost effectiveness of each agencys efforts. In other words they ask Do our dollars go to the people who need it most? These all-volunteer teams consist of business owners, community volunteers, accountants, attorneys and others who care about getting it right. Ive served as an allocation team member, team leader and now, chair of the process, and I can say with confidence that it works. The United Way is spending your and my money in the best way possible, delivering services to those most in need. Its how our community gives efficiently and effectively, Uhler concluded. Carrie Smith of GEs Global Operations and a new member of one of the Allocations Teams talked about her experience. As a United Way contributor and leader for my organization over the past three years, I was very excited to join the Allocations team, said Smith. The experience far exceeded my expectations. The real impact was the site visits to the beneficiary organizations. Understanding firsthand the community need and the passion of those who provide support is invaluable. The decision to donate my time was a small sacrifice compared to those who give their lives to bettering our community. The experience will forever be with me, and I cannot wait to add to it next year. A total of 351 Allocations Volunteers were divided in 25 teams. They spent more than 3,500 hours visiting 90 agency locations, and reviewing over 176 programs in Lee, Hendry, and Glades Counties. This is an annual process at the United Way. Since the inception of United Way in 1957, over $120 million have been raised and distributed in our community. All money raised in the United Way campaign stays in the local community to help support the local human service network. United Way Partner Agencies and initiatives such as the Alvin A Dubin Alzheimers Resource Center, Childrens Advocacy Center, Harry Chapin Food Bank, The Salvation Army and United Way 211 serve a diverse range of needs in our community. In addition to raising funds for human service organizations in our community, the United Way promotes partnerships and collaborations among agencies and initiatives, helping them to work together focusing on issues and solutions that continue to improve lives. The United Way advances the common good by creating opportunities for a better life for everyone in our community. Tom Uhler, Allocations Committee Chair Cliff Smith, United Way President, at the Allocations Teams Breakfast held on June 217 THE RIVER JULY 12, 2013 WeProudlyBrew TropialOutdoorPatioSeating Get Crabby At The Cow Get Crabby At The Cow with our Famous Stone Crabs1/2 lb & Best Prices On The Planet Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Come Try our NEW Cowlicious Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials Sanibels Most Award Winning Restaurant LIVE Famous Stone Crabs Famous Stone Crabs Always Fresh ...Always! ...Always! with our with our Always Fresh ...Always Fun! Always Fresh ...Always Fun!

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THE RIVER JULY 12, 20138 Along The RiverHeading down to Fort Myers Beach this weekend? Jam to the beats of live music this Friday and Saturday nights at the Sunset Celebration. Friday features the band High Tide and Railhead will entertain on Saturday. The event is held from 5 to 10 p.m. both evening (weather permitting) at Times Square. For more information, call 463-5900. On July 13 and 14, Mango Mania returns to Pine Island. The tropical fruit fair is a casual, family-fun event celebrating the areas exotic produce. The festival includes mango and tropical fruit specialty food and beverages, a free mango tasting table, arts and crafts, activities for children, educational talks about tropical plants, trees and plants for sale and a mango recipe book for purchase. Mango Mania is Saturday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the German-American Social Club, 2101 Pine Island Road, Cape Coral. The price is $6 per person ($5 for advance purchase) and children 10 and under are free. For more information about Mango Mania, call the Greater Pine Island Chamber of Commerce at 283-0888 or go to www.floridascreativecoast.com. The Edison & Ford Winter Estates and Captiva Cruises have again joined forces to offer river cruises on the Caloosahatchee and tours of the Estates on Sundays and Mondays at 10 a.m., 11 a.m., noon and 1 p.m. The cruise and tour is a great way to learn about the ecology and history of the river that the Edison and Ford families explored and fished. In 1886, Thomas Edison purchased 15 acres along the Caloosahatchee and built Seminole Lodge, his stunning winter estate facing the river. He also built a 1,800 foot long wood pier with entertaining areas and a boathouse for his electric launch, the Reliance. Today, visitors to the Edison & Ford Winter Estates will also tour the Caloosahatchee on a modern flat-bottom vessel complete with awnings and the same leisurely travel agenda. The river cruises are a great way to experience the history of the important river and the ecology and environmental significance to southwest Florida. For Edison-Ford members, the cost is $20 per adult and $15 for children 12 and under. For non-members, the price is $40 per adult and $30 for children 12 and under. Admission includes an audio tour of the Edison-Ford homes, gardens, lab and museum as well as an historianled boat cruise of the Caloosahatchee. Contact Edison-Ford for cruise times, ticket information, tour options and to arrange special times and dates for group reservations. River cruises are available on Sunday evenings for sunset cruises, family gatherings, private events and childrens dolphin parties. Captiva Cruises is located at McCarthys Marine, 11401 Andy Rosse Lane, Captiva Island. The Edison & Ford Winter Estates are located at 2350 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers. For more information, call 334-7419 or visit www.edisonfordwinterestates.org. Southwest Florida is a great diving destination thanks to the recent sinking of the USS Mohawk. Scubavice Diving Center in Fort Myers offers day and night dive trips to the artificial reef located approximately 28 nautical miles west of Redfish Pass. The USS Mohawk is a 165-foot Coast Guard cutter launched in 1934 and serving U.S. naval forces in the North Atlantic during World War II. It was sunk with a lifeboat and replica guns. The propeller, anchor, tackle, original decks and the stacks are intact, making it a wreck divers dream. Starting around 35 feet, divers will see a wide variety of reef fish in a zone which still has enough natural sunlight to support phytoplankton. Dropping down to 90 feet, it provides numerous and changing environments for a multitude of specialized marine live. Scubavice also gives beginners the opportunity to earn their Open Water Scuba certifications with classroom instructions and sessions in the shops heated pool. Experienced divers can obtain Advanced Open Water, Nitrox and Rescue certifications. Instructor Ramiro Palma teaches all levels of diving to National Association of Underwater Instructors (NAUI) and Scubavice standards. Scubavice Diving Center is located at 12600 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers or visit their new Edison Mall location. Call 481-4733 or go to www.scubavicedivers. com. Pine Islands annual Tropical Fruit Fair, Mango Mania, returns this weekend Scubavice in Fort Myers offers certification classes and weekly dive trips to the USS Mohawk Memorial Reef off the coast of Sanibel Please visit our River Weekly News online advertisers at www.islandsunnews.com. You can click through to their Web sites for more information about real estate, shopping, restaurants and services. Just click on the logos surrounding the front page. www.SeabreezeNurseries.com (239) 560-1422 WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY or Sooty Mold? WHITEFLY We can help! Ask about our Season Discount! Palms, Palms, natives, natives, crotons, crotons, bromeliads, bromeliads, buttery bushes, buttery bushes, & much more & much more ISLAND INSURANCE SERVICE President General Manager Personal Lines Agent 703 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, FL (239) 472 3022 Paradise. Have an insurance question? Call our office today for a new Auto quote. We are HERE for all your insurance needs

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Churches/TemplesALL F aA ITHS UNIT aA RI aA N CONGREG aA TION (UU A) Where diversity is treasured 2756 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers Summer program: Understanding the Faiths of Our Worlds June 2 to August 25 11 a.m. Interim Minister, Rev. Margaret Beard, begins on September 1 239-226-0900. www.allfaiths-uc.org A LLLL SS A INTSINTS BYZA NTINENTINE RITERITE CA THOLITHOLI C C HH U RR C HH 10291 Bayshore Rd., N. Fort Myers Divine Liturgy is on Sun. at 10:30 a.m.; Rosary begins at 10 a.m. Lenten services (Presanctied Liturgy) will be on Wed. evenings at 6 p.m. starting on Feb. 22. Administrator is Very Rev. Peter Lickman, ph. 305-651-0991. We are a Church of the Eastern Catholic or Byzantine Rite, 1.5 mi. east of Int. 75. A NNNN U NN C II A TIONTION GREEGREE K ORTHOORTHO D OO X C HH U RR C HH 8210 Cypress Lake Dr ive, Fort Myers Reverend Fr. George P. Savas Orthros Service Sunday 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy Sunday 10 a.m. www.annunciation.fl.goarch.org 239-481-2099 B ETHETH SHILOHSHILOH M ESSIESSI A NINI C SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 15675 McGregor Boulev ard, 437-3171 Rabbi: Judah Hungerman Friday Service, 8 p.m., Saturday Service, 11 a.m. Shabbat School Saturday Morning, Adult Hebrew Classes. Call for information on full program. B RERE AD OO F LILI F EE M INISTRIESINISTRIES C HH U RR C HH OO F GOGO D 16581 McGregor Boule vard, 267-3166 Just past the Tanger Outlet Mall Pastor: Barry Lentz, 281-3063 Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. C HH AP ELEL OO F CYP RESSRESS C OO V EE 10200 Cypress Cov e Circle Fort Myers 239-850-3943, Located at Cypress Cove Retirement Center on HealthPark Campus An ecumenical non-denominational community of believers. Sunday Worship Service, 10 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study, 7 p.m. Reverendt Ted Althouse, Pastor revtedalthouse@aol.com C HH U RR C HH OO F THETHE C ROSSR OSS 13500 Freshman Lane; 768-2188 Pastor: Bud Stephens; A nondemonimational church emphasizing a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Sunday Service: 9:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 Contemporary. CO vV EN aA NT PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 2439 McGregor Boulevard, 334-8937 Rev. Dr. Jeffrey DeYoe, Senior Pastor Reverend David Dietzel, Pastor Emeritus. Traditional Sunday service 10 a.m. Nursery available C ypYP RESS LakLAK E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H 8400 Cypress Lak e Drive, Fort Myers, 481-5442 Randy A. Alston, Reverend. Sunday Services: Bible study, 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship, 11 a.m., Evening Worship, 7 p.m., Wednesday Prayer Meeting, 6:30 p.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 8260 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 481-3233. www.clpc.us. Clint Cottrell, pastor Prayer Service 8 a.m., Praise 9 a.m., Childrens Church 9 a.m., Traditional 11 a.m. Summer: Prayer Service 8 a.m. Combined Traditional/Praise 10 a.m. C ypYP RESS LakLAK E UNITE dD METHO dD IST CH uU R cC H 8570 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers, 482-1250 8 and 11 a.m. Sunday Traditional Service 9:30 a.m. Praise Service Sunday School all times F aA ITH FELLOWSHI pP W ORL dD O uU TRE acA C H mM INISTRIES 6111 South P ointe Boulevard, Fort Myers, 278-3638. Sunday Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Voice of Faith, WCRN 13.50 AM Radio, Sunday, 1:30 p.m.; Thursday Service, 7:30 p.m.; Friday Youth Service, 7:30 p.m. Nursery care for pre-school children and Childrens Church for ages 5-12 available at each service. F aA ITH uU NITE dD mM ETHO dD IST cC H uU R cC H 15690 McGregor Boule vard Fort Myers, 482-2030 Pastor: David Stauffer. Traditional services 8:45 a.m.; Contemporary, 10:30 a.m. Go south on McGregor Boulevard. The church is mile past the intersection of Gladiolus and San Carlos Boulevard on the way to Sanibel. FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF cC HRIST S cC IENTIST 2390 West First Street, next door to Edison Estates. Sunday Morning Service and Sunday School, 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday Evening Testimony Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Child care provided at all services. Visit our Reading Room for quiet study at: 2281 First Street, River District. www.time4thinkers.com, www.christiansciencefortmyers.com, www.christianscience.com FIRST CH uU R cC H O fF THE NazaNAZA RENE 13545 Amer ican Colony Boulevard off Daniels Parkway in the Colony, Fort Myers, 936-2511 Pastor: Reverend Joey Brummett Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship, 10:30 a.m.; Sunday Evening, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Family Night, 7 p.m. F IRSTIRST U NITENITE D M ETHOETHO D ISTIST C HH U RR C HH in the Downto wn Fort Myers River District 2466 First Street, Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-332-1152, www.fumcftmyers.org Sunday: 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship 9 a.m. and 10 a.m. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 5 p.m. Youth Program FORT M yY ERS CHRISTI aA N CH uU R cC H (DIS cC I pP LES O fF CHRIST) A SS TE pP HEN MINISTRIES CONGREG aA TION 5916 Winkler Road, F ort Myers, 437-4330 Reverend Mark Condrey, Pastor Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Church School: 9:15 a.m. FORT M yY ERS CONGREG aA TION aA L UNITE dD CH uU R cC H O fF CHRIST : 8210 College Parkway, Fort Myers, 482-3133. Philip White, pastor Morning Worship: 10 a.m. Church School: 10:15 a.m. Adult Forum: 11:30 a.m. HOLHOL Y THEOTOTHEO TO K OSOS M ONON A STERSTER Y 111 Ev ergreen Road, North Fort Myers, 997-2846 Eastern Orthodox mens monastery. Liturgical services conducted in the English, Greek and Church Slavonic languages, following the Julian (Old) Calendar. Liturgical Services: Sundays and Holy Days: The Third and Sixth Hours at 8:30 a.m.; Divine Liturgy at 9 a.m. II ON aA HH O pP E EpEP IS cC O paP A L cC ONGREG aA TION 9650 Gladiolus Dr ive, Fort Myers 4544778 The Reverend Dr. John S. Adler, pastor. Weekly services: Saturday 5 p.m., Eucharist with Healing Sunday 8 a.m., Holy Eucharist, Rite One; 9:30 a.m., Family Eucharist with Healing and Church School Tuesday 9:30 a.m., Morning Prayer (in Spanish); Wednesday 9:30 a.m., Eucharist with Healing. Child care available at Saturday 5 p.m. and Sunday 9:30 a.m. services. JES uU S THE WW OR kK ER C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H: 881 Nuna Avenue, Fort Myers, 481-1143 Masses Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday, 8 and 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. K INGING D OO M LILI F EE C HH U RR C HH 2154 McGregor Boulev ard, Fort Myers, 218-8343 Pastor Randy and Anita Thurman 10:30 a.m. Sunday Service All are welcome. LambLAMB O fF GG O dD LuLU THER aA N/ EpEP IS cC O paP A L CH uU R cC H Corner Cypress View Drive and Koreshan Boulevard, Three Oaks area, Fort Myers, 267-3525 Walter Fohs, pastor; Becky RobbinsPenniman, associate pastor Sunday worship services: 8 a.m. Early Grace Traditional 9 a.m. Awesome Grace Contemporary 10:30 a.m. Classic Grace Traditional 8:45 & 10 a.m. Sunday School Gods Group NN EW BEGINNINGS CENTER Ne w Home Church, 8505 Jenny Cae Lane, North Fort Myers, 239-656-0416 Weekly Friday Meeting Meet & Greet: 6:30 p.m. Kingdom Teaching: 7 p.m. Fellowship and refreshments after service. nbcministry@embarqmail.com, www.facebook. com/nbcministry. Alex & Patricia Wiggins, Ministers NEWNEW C OO V ENEN A NTNT EE Y ESES C HH U RR C HH See Clearly Meeting monthly at 9 a.m. at the Elks Lodge. 1900 Park Meadows Drive, Fort Myers, FL 33907. 239-220-8519 Pastor Alan Bondar www.newcovenanteyes.com Wear what you want, rockin music, relevant teaching, LIFT Kidz program, free coffee & donuts, people who are real, church thats actually fun. NN EW HH O pP E B apAP TIST CH uU R cC H O fF FOR T M yY ERS 16120 San Car los Boulevard, Unit 10 239-985-8503 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m Sunday Morning Worship. 7 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study NN EW HH O pP E PRES byBY TERI aA N CH uU R cC H 3825 McGregor Boule vard. Fort Myers Pastors: Stu Austin and Howard Biddulph 8 & 9:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 11 a.m. Contemporary Worship 8, 9:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School Youth and Childrens programming runs concurrent to Sunday services. Nursery care provided at all services 274-1230. For more information visit: www.newhopefortmyers.org P EE A C EE CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H Meets at F ort Myers Beach Masonic Lodge 17625 Pine Ridge Road, Fort Myers Beach 267-7400. Pastors Bruce Merton, Gail & RC Fleeman Adult Discussion Classes: 9-10 AM Countdown to Worship (praise music): 10:10 AM Amazing Grace Worship: 10:30 AM Phone 267-7400 Fax 267-7407 Web site: peacecommunitychurch.com e-mail: peace1265@aol.com P EE A C EE LL U THERTHER A NN C HH U RR C HH Sunday Worship at 9:30am. Peace is a member of the ELCA. We celebrate weekly communion with traditional liturgy, organ and choir. 15840 McGregor Boulevard, Fort Myers On the way to Sanibel. 239-437-2599, www.peaceftmyers.com, peace@peaceftmyers.com. RE dD EE mM ER L uU THER aA N cC H uU R cC H 3950 Winkler Ext., Fort Myers, 274-0143 8:15 and 10:15 a.m. Sunday Services Daily early learning center/day care RIRI V ERER OO F LILI F EE A SSESSE MB LL Y OO F GOGO D 21580 Riv er Ranch Rd, Estero 239-495-0400, Senior Pastor: Todd Weston 8 and 9:45 a.m Services; 11:30 a.m. Legacy Service, multi-generational S amudAMUD R abadAB AD R aA buddB UDD HIST cC ENTER Meditation classes All are welcome. Guided meditations offering many methods for relaxing the body and focusing the mind on virtuous objects to bring increasing peace and happiness into daily activity. For information, class times and locations call 567-9739 or visit www. MeditationInFortMyers.org. SS O uU THWEST bapB AP TIST cC H uU R cC H 16940 McGregor Boule vard, Fort Myers, 454-3336 Robert G. Kasten, Pastor Sunday Worship Service 11 a.m. Nursery available 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages Junior Church grades one to five Wee Church Pre-K to K Evening Service 6 p.m. Wednsday Service 6 p.m. SaSA INT COL umbkUMBK ILLE C aA THOLI cC CH uU R cC H 12171 Iona Road, F ort Myers, off McGregor and north of Gladiolus. 489-3973 Father Joseph Clifford. Weekly masses: Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. Weekend masses: Saturday 3 and 5 p.m.; Sunday: 7, 9,11, and 5:30 p.m. Reconciliation is available at the church on Saturdays at noon and by appointment SaSA INT JOHN THE A pP OSTLE METRO pP OLIT aA N CO mmuMMU NIT yY CH uU R cC H 3049 Mcg regor Boulevard, Fort Myers, 344-0012 Pastor Reverend Steve Filizzi An Affirming & Inclusive Congregation Sunday Services, 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Mid-Week Service, Wednesday 6:30 p.m. SaSA INT MI cC H aA EL LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H & ScSC HOOL ( LL CM SS ) 3595 Broadw ay, Fort Myers 239-939-4711, www.smlcs.org Wednesday Fellowship: 5:30 p.m. Dinner $5, 6:15 p.m. bible studies Worship: Saturday, 5:30 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. with 9:15 a.m. adult and childrens Bible Study, plus marriage enrichment studies. Divorce Care on Thursdays from 7 to 8:30 p.m. During Lent: Wednesday worship noon and 6:15 p.m. SaSA INT PETER LuLU THER aA N CH uU R cC H 3751 Estero Boule vard, Fort Myers Beach, 463-4251. Sunda y w orship at 9:30 a.m. Womens Bible Study is offered on the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 9:30 a.m. www.stpeterfmb.com TETE MP LELE B ETHELETHEL SS Y NN A GOGGOG U EE 16225 Winkler Rd. 433-0018. Rabbi Jeremy Barras E-mail: rabbi.barras@templebethel.com Cantorial soloist: Lawrence Dermer Temple educator: Dale Cohen, MaEd, RJE Shabbat Services, Friday, 7:30 p.m. Torah Study, Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Religious Education; Sunday School and Midweek classes, Preschool Classes, Monday through Friday Web site: www.templebethel.com Affiliated: Union for Reform Judaism TETE MP LELE JUD EE A (C ONSERONSER VA TITI V EE ) 14486 A&W Bulb Road, F ort Myers, 433-0201, Rabbi: Rabbi Elyssa Auster President: Keith Grossman Minyan: Monday & Thursday at 9 a.m. Services: Friday night at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday morning at 9 a.m. Religious School Sunday morning Web site: www.tjswfl.org Preschool director: JoAnn Goldman email templejudeapreschool@gmail.com 433-0201, Web site: www.tjswfl.org Affiliated: United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism continued on page 11THE RIVER JULY 12, 201310

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11 THE RIVER JULY 12, 2013 Savings Pop Up At Community Thrift Store SaleOn Friday, July 19 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., customers are invited to pop a balloon for a discount tag to receive additional savings off already well-priced items during The Community Thrift Stores second anniversary celebration. There also will be special popup surprises each hour for shoppers, along with complimentary theater-style popcorn and soda pop. The Community Thrift store is located in Miners Plaza, next to Planet Fitness, on the corner or McGregor Boulevard and Gladiolus Drive in the Iona area of South Fort Myers. Regular store hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call 225-6529. The store features home dcor, clothing, artwork, knick knacks and furniture as well as building supplies, construction materials, appliances and fixtures. When an individual or an organization donates items to the store, they receive a tax deductible receipt. Shell Point Retirement Community, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to serving seniors in Southwest Florida, opened The Community Thrift Store in 2011. Since the first year of operation was so successful, the store was expanded into a larger space in the same shopping center in 2012. We are so grateful that the residents of Fort Myers have been so supportive of our thrift store, said Patty Cox, store manager. Shoppers love the friendly staff, which is comprised of more than 75 Shell Point volunteers. To learn more about Shell Point, visit www.shellpoint.org or call 1-800-7801131. Volunteers for The Community Thrift Store From page 10Churches/TemplesTHE CHABAD LUBAVITCH OF SW FLORIDA ORTHODOX 5620 Winkler Road, Fort Myers Rabbi Yitzchok Minkowicz 433-7708, E-mail: rabbi@chabadswf.org Web site: www.chabadswf.org Services: Friday 6:30 p.m.; Saturday Kabbalah class 9 a.m.; Shacharit 10 a.m.; Kiddush at noon Minyan: Monday and Thursday 7 a.m. THE NEW CHURCH The New Church of SWFL is located 10811 Sunset Plaza Circ. #401, behind Zoomers. Rev. Gabriella Cahaley officiates worship services on Sundays at 11 a.m. during the season. Other worship events are held on the beach in Fort Myers Beach. See our webpage http://www.newchurchflorida.com/ or call for more information 239-481-5535. CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 1619 Llewellyn Drive Fort Myers Just off McGregor across from the Edison/ Ford Winter Estates 334-4978 Pastor: Douglas Kelchner Worship times Sundays 9 and 10:30 a.m. Website: www.taecc.com UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH FORT MYERS 13411 Shire Lane (off Daniels Parkway one mile west of I-75) Minister: The Reverend Allison Farnum Sunday services and religious education at 10:30 a.m. For information on all church events call 561-2700 or visit www.uucfm.org. UNITY OF BONITA SPRINGS Family Service 10 to 11 a.m. Healing Circle 11 a.m. Hospitality and Fellowship, 11 a.m. Inspiring lesson, uplifting and dynamic music, meditation in a loving environment. Service held at 28285 Imperial Street, Bonita Springs. Call 947-3100. UNITY OF FORT MYERS 11120 Ranchette Road, Fort Myers Winter services: Sundays at 9:15 and 11 a.m. Childrens class at 11 a.m. Reverend Jim Rosemergy, minister. Our God is Love; our Race is Human; our Religion is Oneness. www.unityoffortmyers.org or 239-278-1511 WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 9065 Ligon Court, Fort Myers, across from HealthPark Hospital, 481-2125 Senior Pastor: Robert Brunson Sunday Service: 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Blended Worship www.westminsterfortmyers.org WORD OF LIFE CHURCH 2120 Collier Ave, Fort Myers, 274-8881; Services: Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m. Bishop Gaspar and Michele Anastasi ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH 7401 Winkler Road, Fort Myers, 481-4040, Interim Pastor Jim Eggert Pastor Peter Weeks Sunday Services: 8:30 a.m. Traditional; 10 a.m. Blended Traditional and Contemporary; 11:30 a.m. Contemporary. Childrens Sunday School, Adult /Teen Bible Classes, 10 a.m. Golf Promotion Supports Chapin Food BankFor the fourth consecutive year, WCI Communities has partnered with Harry Chapin Food Bank to create a unique funding opportunity: Supporters who donate $100 to the food bank through the www.WCIGolf. com website will receive a complimentary foursome at one of three WCI golf courses in Southwest Florida. For each $100, the food bank can distribute $600 worth of food and supplies. In three years, the golf promotion has raised nearly $34,000, which has been leveraged into more than $200,000 in food products by enabling Harry Chapin Food Bank to access donated items from a variety of partners. The complimentary foursome certificates are valid for play June 1 through September 30 and are available for purchase May 1 through September 15. Tee time reservations are available two days in advance at the following WCI golf courses: Myers (www.PelicanPreserve.com) Springs (www.RaptorBayGolfClub.com) Bonita Springs (www.TheColonyGolfCC. com) For more information or to donate, visit www.WCIGolf.com or contact Bob Radunz at 390-4703 or BobRadunz@ wcicommunities.com. For additional information about or to contribute financially to the Harry Chapin Food Bank, call 334-7007 or visit www. harrychapinfoodbank.org. Our email address is press@riverweekly.com

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THE RIVER JULY 12, 201312 A Week Of Bad Weather Keeps Anglers Insideby Capt. Matt MitchellTrying to get out on the water for most of this week was made difficult by a steady stream of tropical moisture and thunderstorms moving in from the south. Storms could pop up at just about any time of day and with dangerous lightning, most days were just not safe to get out and wet a line. Things did clear up a little for the holiday weekend, which is the last busy weekend on the water until Labor Day in September. Most anglers seemed happy that the rains of the week had quit and they had a chance to get out and fish. Once back on the water, fishermen where greeted with stained dirty water throughout the sound and tough fishing conditions. We did manage a few quality fish over the weekend on my boat but, generally, fishing was much tougher than it had been before the winds and rains of days prior. Pass fishing for catch and release snook was the best bite going on although it was too close to the consistent action before the water got dirtied up. Snook up to 37 inches where caught but it was a matter of putting in your time and really working at it. As our water clears up and conditions get back to normal, fishing will gradually improve. The redfish bite on the higher daytime tides seemed to all happen in a very short tide window, basically the last hour of the high incoming tide. If you could find a shoreline that was not loaded up with other boats and grass, you could manage a few reds if you worked a whole shoreline. Redfish this week ranged in size from 23 to 30 inches. Live tail hooked pinfish thrown up under the roots was the method of choice. Out on the open flats, it was all about trout and blacktip sharks. Action was hit and miss on larger trout but lots of near keeper size trout made for good action if you just wanted to bend a rod. While catching these trout on small pinfish and grunts rigged under a popping cork, small blacktip sharks would crash the party, moving in swarms. Most of the blacktips were in the two-foot range. Gag grouper season opened up July 1 for our region of Florida. I have had reports of some keepers being caught drifting and trolling deep running stretches in and around Captiva and Redfish passes. This week, I plan on targeting the gags on some of my favorite structures in the sound. Large pinfish dropped to the bottom are hard to beat for bait. Most of us anglers have a few secret inshore grouper spots, usually located on manmade structures previously sunk in the bay. When targeting these hard fighting fish, heavy tackle is a must if you want to pull a hard hitting grouper from his home. I go with heavy spinning reels on short tuna style rods. Grouper battles are won and lost in the first 10 feet. After a week of just terrible weather, its just great to be back on the water. Although fishing has not been on fire, it will not take long for the action to rebound. Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions email captmattmitchell@aol.com. Send Us Your Fish TalesThe River Weekly would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include photographs with identification. Drop them at the River Weekly, 1609 Hendry Street, Suite 15, Fort Myers, Florida 33901, or email to press@riverweekly.com. Gillie Russel and granddaughter Jameson with a quality redfish caught fishing with Capt. Matt Mitchell ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint Prices ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Your Bottom Your Bottom Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices 1 481-4733 12600 McGregor Blvd, Ft Myers www.scubavicedivers.com Swim with the Fishes 472-5800 Fort Myers Beach Yacht Club Sets July 24 Meetingsubmitted by Past Commodore Chris ChristensenThe monthly meeting of the Fort Myers Beach Yacht Club will be held on Wednesday, July 24 at Chucks Last Stop, located at 2301 Estero Blvd. in Fort Myers Beach. Social hour begins at 5 p.m. and dinner is ordered individually off the menu at 6 p.m. Attendees will pay by separate checks. A short meeting may follow. Potential new members wishing to attend are invited to call Past Commodore Tom Swanbeck for required reservations and additional information at 292-6284. The Fort Myers Beach Yacht Club was formed in 1953 and incorporated as a not for profit organization for the purpose of promoting safe, enjoyable boating and good fellowship. This communityoriented club, with over 140 members and 60 boats, maintains a very active schedule of year-round activities, both on and off the water, for members and guests. Evening meetings are held once a month usually on the fourth continued on page 13

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13 THE RIVER JULY 12, 2013 CROW Case Of The Week: American Alligatorby Patricia MolloyA Sanibel resident noticed a twoto three-foot alligator on a sidewalk alongside a busy island road. Understanding that reptiles bask in the sun in order to maintain a healthy body temperature, but alarmed by the fact that the reptile was so close to traffic, the concerned citizen kept a close eye on it (at a safe distance). After two days without movement, he notified CROW, which promptly sent two first responders to the scene. We suspected a car hit her, said Jordan Donini, assistant wildlife rehabilitator. Dr. Heather Barron ordered radiographs be taken, which came back negative for bone fractures and hemorrhaging. We really didnt know what was wrong, Donini continued, but the patient was really anemic with a low protein count. As a precaution, we dewormed her and started her on antibiotics. A wild American alligator (Alligator mississippiensi) grows at a rate of approximately one foot per year based upon food availability, making the alligator currently at CROW a twoto threeyear-old female. Many scientists estimate the American alligator to be more than 150 million years old; an extraordinary feat when you consider that dinosaurs, their prehistoric contemporaries, became extinction 65 million years ago. Like all reptiles, alligators are ectothermic, more commonly referred to as cold-blooded. While convalescing at the clinic, she spends much of her time soaking in a shallow kiddie tub where she also takes her meals. The staff has built a ramp for her so that she can climb out of the tub and bask under a nearby heat lamp as needed. After a month at the wildlife clinic, her physical condition has begun to improve and her energy level is returning rapidly. She is eating like a pig on a diet of smelt, so shes doing a lot better. Shes extremely feisty, Donini added with a grin while she audibly hissed as I entered the reptile room. As soon as Dr. Heather feels assured that this patient, #1594, has fully regained her health, she will be placed into an educational facility; CROW is prohibited by federal law to release an alligator back into the wild. Dr. Heather is cur rently searching diligently for a reputable facility to accept this extraordinary reptile. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to PO Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit: www.crowclinic.org. This female alligator is currently kept in the reptile room of the clinic. The water in her kiddie tub must be drained and refilled daily to ensure that dangerous bacteria does not develop. She spends most of her time basking under a nearby heat lamp. D VIC Surf & T urf E xperienceDisabled Veterans Insurance Careers, Inc. (DVIC) will hold a very special fundraiser consisting of a dream weekend for outdoorsman and sports enthusiasts. The DVIC Surf & Turf Experience will take place from October 18 to 20 at the historic Tarpon Lodge on Pine Island. The field is limited to just 60 players that will comprise 20 teams. The competition includes a fishing and golfing component. Teams will fish with a licensed charter captain fishing for redfish in the backwaters of Pine Island Sound. Leaders will be determined by most aggregate inches of redfish recorded. After fishing, guests will be taken to South Seas Island Resort on Captiva to compete in the second element of the competition: golfing. The same teams will play nine holes of golf overlooking Redfish Pass. The leaderboard will be determined by the lowest gross team scores. The overall team champions will be determined by the aggregate score in both golf and fishing. Guests will enjoy all the amenities at Tarpon Lodge for the weekend and enjoy two cocktail hours, two gourmet dinners, two full breakfasts and lunch. In addition, every player will receive special, custom commemorative apparel and gift items. The field is limited to just 60 players. This niche event will be an experience of a lifetime. Net proceeds from the DVIC Surf & Turf Experience will help support the Mission of DVIC which is to train/educate, and generate meaningful employment opportunities for physically disabled veterans who will excel at pro-actively cross selling personal lines insurance products on behalf of leading independent insurance agencies. For more information, visit www.divc. us or call Ron Riley at 617-9347. From page 12Yacht Club Sets MeetingWednesday. Because the club does not have the expense of maintaining their own waterfront facility, dues are only $100 per year per couple or $60 per single. Learn more about the club at www. FMBYachtClub.org. JACARANDAThe Entertainment Nightly in Sanibels Social Scene1223 PERIWINKLE WAY, SANIBEL 472-1771 Happy Apps $5.95Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna, Crispy Fried Calamari, Chilled Oysters, Steamed Shrimp, BBQ Beef Satays, Mussels Marinara, Chicken WingsSanibels Best HAPPY HOUR4 7 p.m. Nightly in the lounge1/2 Price DrinksCall & Well Liquor, Draft Beer Selections, Select House Wine Reservations Required for All Cruises(239)472-5300Cruises depart from beautiful Captiva Islandwww.captivacruises.com Call for departure timeTHE BEST WAY TO SEE THE ISLANDS IS FROM THE WATER Share your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702or email press@riverweekly.com

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THE RIVER JULY 12, 201314 Plant SmartOleanderby Gerri R eavesOleander (Nerium oleander) is a multi-stemmed evergreen shrub commonly used as a screen or barrier. It has been a favorite of developers for decades because it fills landscape space for little investment. A native to coastal regions of the Mediterranean, this member of the dogbane family has high salt toler ance, another character istic that makes it adaptable to South Florida. A fast grower and easily propagated, it typically reaches about 15 feet with an almost equal width. It can be pruned to grow as a tree. Left unshaped, it becomes rather scraggly. The leaves are narrow, pointed and stiff. Up to 10 inches long, they usually grow in whorls of three. The showy clusters of flowers are white, pink, salmon, pale yellow or red. Some plants produce double-petaled flowers. Flowers measures two to three inches across and bloom most of the year, more plentifully in the warmer months and in full sun. The slender brown pods are about six inches long. Take caution with oleander: The entire plant, including the sap, is very toxic to both humans and animals if ingested. The glycosides it contains affect the heart with a digitalis-like effect and cause other alarming reactions as well. The deaths of horses, cows and even flamingoes from ingestion of oleander leaves have been recorded. Bees that gather a sufficient amount of nectar from the flowers produce poisonous honey. Care should be taken even with cuttings used for floral arrangements because of the sap. The fumes from the burning plant are toxic and food cooked over it is poisonous. Especially sensitive people are adversely affected by being in the same room as the flowers. Oleander is prone to several diseases, including aphids, scales, oleander caterpillar, witches broom and mushroom root-rot. Sources: Flowering Trees of Florida by Mark K. Stebbins; Waterwise: South Florida Landscapes by the South Florida Water Management District; Florida, My Eden by Frederic B. Stresau; Florida Landscape Plants by John V. Watkins and Thomas J. Sheehan; Plants Poisonous to People in Florida and Other Warm Areas by Julia F Morton; and floridata.com. Plant Smart explores sustainable gardening practices that will help you create an environmentally responsible, low-maintenance South Florida landscape. Multiple branches flare out from the base Oleanders clusters of flowers bloom most of the year photos by Gerri Reaves Caring For Your PlantsSummer Growing Seasonby Justen DobbsWe have one of the best growing climates in the U.S. due to our close proximity to the equator. During summer, Southwest Florida receives the majority of its rain, lightning, heat and humidity all conducive to rapid plant growth and optimal health. The only state that has a longer growing season than us is Hawaii. Southwest Florida receives an average of 55 inches of rain per year and has average summer temperatures of 70 to 90 degrees F. In addition to the amount of rain is the quality of our rain. Did you know our lightning storms actually add nitrogen to our rainwater and nitrogen is beneficial for plant appearance and health? Rain is the best form of water for plants because it is pure H2O. City water contains trace chemicals such as chlorine and fluoride and well water contains sulfur and other contaminants. This is why many Floridians keep a rainwater collector bin at their house in order to store rainwater for future use on landscape plants. This is generally a good practice, but make sure your collector tank isnt breeding additional mosquitoes as well. During winter, plants and trees gener ally go into a hibernation mode, meaning they conserve water, grow more slowly and dont uptake as many nutrients. When our temperature dips below 50 degrees F, a large number of our tropical and sub-tropical plants actually stop photosynthesizing. While this does not necessarily cause immediate damage to the plant, it can negatively affect the plants health if the cold is prolonged. Conversely, when our temperatures are in the low 90s and our humidity is high, cell reproduction and nutrient uptake are at their peak in most plants. This is the best time to apply liquid and granular fer tilizers, pot-up plants into larger containers, or plant your container plants in the ground. With regard to the health of plants, specifically their leaves, there are some drawbacks to being so close to the equator. Our Southwest Florida summer sun is the harshest in the nation. At times, it is even stronger here than in Miami and the Keys due to atmospheric conditions, moisture, etc. You may notice the fronds on your palm trees or leaves on your small ornamental plants become pale or even brown during summer. The best way to combat this is to make sure they are receiving plenty of rain water and/or irrigation in addition to good fertilizer. This will strengthen the plant or trees immune system and prevent sunburn. Another health issue some palm trees run into during summer is rot in their growth point where new leaves emerge. Some desert and Mediterranean palms we grow prefer to have a dry head and our constant summer rains can sometimes create soggy conditions which may lead to death. Unfortunately, there is nothing you can do to prevent this except try a more tropical species instead. Dobbs is a landscape architect in south Florida specializing in custom, upscale landscapes. He can be reached at seabreezenurseries@gmail.com. Lightning during rain storms is actually beneficial to our plant life

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15 THE RIVER JULY 12, 2013Troy Thomas Is Shaping Up And Shipping OutThe Union Artist Studios will host the opening reception of Shaping Up And Shipping Out on Friday, July 12 from 6 to 9 p.m. This exhibit will feature the art of Troy Thomas. Most of his newer artwork consists of pieces with circles or other geometric shapes. His older pieces, which will be sold at a discounted price during this exhibit, consists of geometric abstract and mixed-media works. Thomas, former Assistant Director at daas Gallery and Operation Iraqi Freedom veteran, has shown his creations at several locations around Southwest Florida continued on page 18 Painting by Troy Thomas & & & coverage for employees & dependents Applications will be accepted on Wednesdays from 9 a.m. and 12 noon and Thursdays from 1-4 p.m. in the Human Resources Oce at Sundial Beach Resort & Spa Announces Full & Part-time Employment Opportunities For Hospitality Positions Full-time Opportunities Part-time & Seasonal OpportunitiesH With his project The Sinking World, Andreas Franke brings a strange, forgotten underwater world back to life and stages realms of an unprecedented kind www.TheSinkingWorld.com Calendar Girls Seek New DancersLadies of Southwest Florida. You can join a choir, study French, prattle in a book club, paint a portrait, play hours of duplicate bridge... or you can become an award-winning member of The Calendar Girls! Open auditions held the on first Sunday of each month at OMNI Gym, located on Boy Scout Drive in Fort Myers. The group is always looking for new talent. For more information, visit www.calendargirlsflorida.com or call 850-6010. The Calendar Girls To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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THE RIVER JULY 12, 201316 Forward-T hinking E xhibition Of Optimist Abstract Paintings And Contemporary Cube SculpturesTransference opens on the evening of Friday, August 2 at 6 p.m., with a stylish reception during Fort Myers Art Walk at the Sidney and Berne Davis Art Center. The solo exhibition for artist Veron Ennis should not be missed as her vibrant, captivating paintings and sculpture will transform the Centers Grand Atrium into a haven of aesthetics. The Davis Art Center is located at 2301 First Street in the downtown Fort Myers River District. Veron Enniss non-objective paintings and her abstracted cityscapes are saturated with bold modern colors and composed of countless interlacing layers. Her signature cube sculptures are free-standing constructions made of six paintings hinged together to close into a cube. They have the unique ability to unlock and hang in an open state on the wall. Both forms will be exhibited during Transference. Enniss work is known for the positive effects it has on the viewer. Collectors, such as Jesse Uzzell from Riga, Latvia, have put it as simply as, Her paintings give me an unbounded sense of joy. Gerry McGee, referencing the cube, Quilt, that he and Ken Worthington acquired, remarks, This sculpture stands confidently among an eclectic collection of objects and with this sculpture I am captivated, and happily so. Its unlimited possibilities relating to light and position of observation are ever in transition and never static. This is painting and sculpture, and both elements are held in equal importance. In lesser hands this execution could feel disjointed or distracting. For me, therein lies the genius of the artist. Founder of the art movement, OPT (Open Positive Transference), Ennis promotes and exhibits art that has the intention to transfer a positive and uplifting feeling, one of hope and balance. Also a founding member of MAMA (Movement of Aleatoric Modern Artists), part of Ennis technique depends on the chance application of her medium. Falling in and out of control of the work energizes the composition and pushes compositional boundaries, said Ennis. In addition to Ennis paintings, a Creative Portrait of Veron Ennis by cutting edge photographer Mila Bridger will be featured, along with the elements specially painted by Ennis for the photo shoot. The adventurous collaboration captures the spirit of both the artist and photographer. Exquisite hors doeuvres by Chef Brian Roland of Crave Culinaire in Naples will be served early in the evening. Artist will be in attendance throughout the opening. Corresponding with the exhibition, Ennis will be hosting Transference in Art, a lecture forum during the month of August in the Grand Atrium. She will give private walking tours of the exhibition, discuss the OPT Art Movement, and guide an open discussion on interpreting art and the effects art has on the viewer. Lecture Forums will occur on Tuesday, August 6 at 6 p.m. and Wednesday, August 7 at 11 a.m., as well as on Tuesday, August 13 at 6 p.m. and Wednesday, August 14 at 11 a.m. Tickets for the lecture forums are $10 per person and are available through the box office at SBDAC. Pixel West, a water-based mixed medium on maple board created in 2013 by Veron Ennis photo courtesy of the artist Veron Ennis Concordian Return, 36x36, Water-based Mixed Medium on Maple Board, 2013 Veron Ennis 2013 (Photo courtesy of the Artist) photo by Joye Farrens Quilt, a water-based mixed medium on paper on board with hardware, created in 2013 by Veron Ennis photo courtesy of the artist Free Academy Of L ifelong L earning Course On American Portrait ArtistsThe Academy of Lifelong Learning at Shell Point Retirement Community welcomes the public to its American Portrait Artists course on Monday, July 22 from 10 to 11:30 a.m. in the Grand Cypress Room of The Woodlands. This course is free; however, space is limited and registration is required by calling 489-8472. Shell Point resident artist and lecturer Herb Sklar invites you for a lively, visual presentation that will trace American history through the work of various artists. Some portraits are done by painters, some by photographers. Some are amusing, others eccentric. All add up to an exciting look at the likes of historical figures from Pocahontas to George Washington to the many provided by todays contemporary American artists. Herb enjoys sharing his love of the arts with others, said Teri Kollath, manager of The Academy of Lifelong Learning and the Auxiliary. An accomplished artist in his own right, Herb is also a gifted presenter, she added. The Academy of Lifelong Learning at Shell Point is an educational initiative for the residents of the retirement community. The Academy provides approximately 80 classes each semester that encompass a well-rounded curriculum of educational oppor tunities for senior adults. The Academy of Lifelong Learning at Shell Point was named as one of 2008s most innovative active aging programs by the International Council on Active Aging, an association that supports professionals who develop wellness/fitness facilities and services for age 50-plus adults. To learn more about Shell Point, visit www.shellpoint.org or call 1-800-780-1131. Portrait of George Washington

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17 THE RIVER JULY 12, 2013 From page 1Midsummer Nights SingWe need to help The Soup Kitchen by donating as much canned goods and cash donations as we can to keep these pantries going, said First Presbyterians pastor Rev. Paul deJong. CCMI provided food and other services to 10,250 people last year. There are even more families who need our help. Do what God would want you to do and give what you can, Rev. deJong said. CCMI was started by First Presbyterian Church in 1984 to help alleviate hunger and suffering in Lee County. The church has continued to support its ministry there by providing volunteers in The Soup Kitchen and delivering hot meals to home-bound seniors. Hymn Sing organizer Sam Galloway, Jr., has made feeding the hungry part of his lifes work. Our community has done so much to help our neighbors, but we need to do even more. If we each just gave the equivalent of what we would spend on a meal either at home or in a restaurant those few dollars could feed a family of four for an entire week. Galloway said. He has arranged for refrigerated trucks to deliver food to neighborhoods that have the greatest food needs. Tracey Galloway said those trucks will be going to North Fort Myers this summer because of additional support from Lee County government. Galloway annually sponsors the popular Mrs. Edisons Hymn Sing as part of the Edison Festival of Light in February. Because more than 4,000 people attend Mrs. Edisons Hymn Sing in the winter, organizers planned A Midsummer Nights Sing to allow more local residents to experience the same type of activity during the less crowded summer months. The First Presbyterian Chancel Choir and friends will be featured during the evening, which will include sing-a-longs of well-known hymns. A Midsummer Nights Sing is the second of three hymn sings sponsored annually by the Galloway Family of Dealerships. The other two are Mrs. Edisons Hymn Sing in February and the Holiday Carol Sing in December. All three events benefit CCMI. For more information, call 334-2261 or visit www.fpcfortmyers.org. Soloist Beth Wininger sings Something Beautiful Alliance For The Arts Announces New Education DirectorThe Alliance for the Arts announced the addition of Brandi Couse as Education Director. Couse will be responsible for expanding youth and adult multidisciplinary arts programming at the Alliance. Her primary responsibilities include developing season classes and workshops, coordinating youth art camps, developing outreach programming and promoting arts education throughout the community. Couse received a bachelors degree in Music Education and a masters in Music Performance from the University of Florida. She is a certified K-12 instructor and was the music teacher at Westside Elementary in Clewiston for the past 11 years, where she was named Hendry County Teacher of the Year. Prior to that, she taught high school band, chorus and keyboard for six years in Gainesville, and was named a UF Distinguished Educator. Couse says she is proud to join the Alliance team. Art enriches our lives and everyone deserves to lead an enriched life, said Couse. I am so pleased to become a member of the Alliance family, a place where lives are enriched every day. A 29-year resident of Florida, Couse is an avid outdoorswoman who enjoys camping, fishing and birding. She also composes and plays music and is a visual artist who draws and paints. She lives in Fort Myers with her husband and their twin 6-year-old daughters. For more information about summer camps and classes, or if youre an instructor interested in proposing a new class or workshop, visit www.ArtInLee.org, call 9392787 or email education@artinlee.org. Brandi Couse Presented by: Michael B. Hill Craig R. HerschWill Power ColumnistFlorida Bar Board Certied | Wills, Trusts & Estates Attorneys9100 College Pointe Ct., Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.sbshlaw.com Have You Heard The Three Big Myths About Medicaid Eligibility? Myth #1: The new law has made it impossible to protect your assets from nursing home costs. Truth: While the rules have changed, good planning opportunities exist. Myth #2: Medicaid can take your home. Truth: With proper planning you may very well be able to save your home. Myth #3: If youre already in a nursing home, its too late to protect your assets. Truth: Even if youre in a nursing home, you can still protect the assets you have. Wednesday, July 31, 20132:00 p.m.Temple Beth El 16225 Winkler Rd. | Fort Myers 33908Reservations: 239-425-9379 Free Workshop. Seating is Limited.All attendees will receive a complimentary DVD describing long-term care planning issues.

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THE RIVER JULY 12, 201318 Celtics Future R ides With Y oung Brad Stevens, Who Coached Butler T o National Basketball Prominenceby E d FrankWhen we wrote last week about four major sports stories emanating out of the Boston area affecting the Red Sox, Celtics, Patriots and Bruins, we had no idea that the biggest story of all was to break just a few days later. That story of course was the shocking disclosure that the Boston Celtics, winners of a record 17 NBA championships, had dipped into the college ranks and signed 36-year-old Brad Stevens of the Butler Bulldogs to coach the storied franchise. With the departure of Doc Rivers to the Los Angeles Clippers, rumors were aplenty as to his possible replacement. But no one not one single person had mentioned the name of Stevens, the highly successful Butler coach who had taken the Bulldogs to back-to-back NCAA championship games and had built the small Indianapolis school into a major basketball powerhouse. The super-secret signing was explained by Danny Ainge, the Celtics President of Basketball Operations: Thought he is young, I see Brad as a great leader who leads with impeccable char acter and a strong work ethic, he said. The reported six-year, $22 million offer to coach at the highest level of basketball for an iconic basketball franchise obviously was too good a deal for Stevens to turn down. And he comes to Boston with the full package since his wife, Tracy, is a lawyer and also his agent. In Indianapolis, there logically was disappointment and some negative comments since Butler had signed Stevens to a 12-year contract extension in 2010, and he had turned down offers in the past from several schools, including Illinois and UCLA. But lets face it: How could any right-minded basketball coach reject the opportunity to coach the Boston Celtics? In his six years at the helm of the Bulldogs, his team never won less than 22 games in a season. And his marvelous coaching ability elevated his mid-major school to a Big East basketball membership this year. He comes to the Celtics facing a major rebuilding task. Ainge traded away Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett while stocking up on future high draft picks. Its probably going to be at least two or three seasons before the Celtics will challenge the likes of the Miami Heat, the Indiana Pacers and others. So be patient, Boston. My bet is that the studious, likeable, thorough Stevens will lead the Celtics back to their glory days. Just look what he did at Butler. Miracle Back In First Place After Winning Four Of Five The Fort Myers Miracle started the week back in first place in the Florida State League South Division after starting July winning four of five games. The team improved to 9-6 in the seasons second half with a 3-0 victory last Sunday over the St. Lucie Mets, which saw starter Matt Summers toss a complete game shutout. Summers had been returned to the Miracle from Double-A New Britain to bolster the Miracle starting pitching and after he had a rough three-game stint at the higher level New Britain. The Minnesota Twins top draft selection last year, Bryon Buxton, who recently was promoted to Fort Myers from Low-A Cedar Rapids, has played well for the Miracle. He was batting .364 with seven RBIs in his first 10 games with the Miracle. Fort Myers is home this weekend at Hammond Stadium hosting Lakeland for four games, Friday through Monday. Brad Stevens 19th Annual Gold R ibbon Classic Golf T ournamentCandlelighters of Southwest Florida is busy preparing for the 19th annual Gold Ribbon Classic Golf Tournament on Saturday, September 21. The golf outing is to be held at the exclusive Bonita Bay Club East, 3700 Wildwood Boulevard in Naples. This is the charities major fundraising event, providing the necessary dollars to support local children with cancer and/or blood disorders. The families partake in numerous free events and special activities organized by Candlelighters throughout the childs treatment which otherwise may be unaffordable during a time when support is so very important. The Gold Ribbon Classic Golf Tournament is open to the public. We are currently seeking various levels of tournament sponsorships as well as beverage carts, hole sponsors, players, cart sponsors ranging from $100 to $10,000. We encourage and welcome your generous support of this seasoned and professionally run event. Advance registration is required as the field is limited for the enjoyment of all our golfers. Entry fee is $150 for an individual player, which includes 18 holes of golf with cart, range balls, golfers goodie bags, buffet lunch with awards presentation immediately following play. For advance registration and additional information, visit www. CandlelightersSWFL.org. Check in begins at 7:30 a.m. followed by a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. There are challenging games on the course as well as a hole-in-one sponsored by Mercedes Benz of Naples and raffle prizes. Nongolfers can help Candlelighters by donating gift certificates, items for the raffle or golfers goodie bags. Its a great way to show your support of Candlelighters and promote your business and the special needs of children living in Southwest Florida. Contact Candlelighters at 432-2223 or visit www.CandlelightersSWFL.org or follow us on Twitter and Facebook. From page 15Shaping Up And Shipping Outand his artwork is in various collections around the world. The Union Artist Studios is located on the second floor of the Edwards Building on the campus of Alliance of the Arts. Viewing of this exhibit will also spill over onto the next day, Saturday the 13th, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., during the hours of the GreenMarket, also held on the Alliance campus. The artist will be available to give a private showing at various times during the week leading up to the opening reception. Please contact Troy Thomas at whoistroythomas@yahoo.com to schedule an appointment. Charity Classic Celebration 2013Donors are invited to follow the Pathways To Success: Voices Of The Future at The Immokalee Foundations 2013 Charity Classic Celebration on Saturday, November 16 at The Ritz-Carlton in Naples. The reception begins at 6 p.m., followed by dinner at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $550 per guest; underwriting and sponsorship opportunities are available. TIFs mission is to provide sustained educational opportunities that make aspirations come true for the youth of Immokalee with an extraordinary evening of fine dining, entertainment and auctions of once-in-a-lifetime experiences to benefit TIF students. Charity Classic Celebration includes Fund A Dream, a fund-a-need unique live bidding experience enabling donors to contribute to Immokalees children in a specific and tangible way. Fund A Dream is organized into specific categories that provide students with opportunities to grow, learn and advance such as attending a college success boot camp, studying abroad, attending their first professional baseball game, attending career and networking seminars, opportunity to attend a play, become involved in youth leader ship, attending a four-year college or vocational school. Donors may even provide students with college scholarships, literacy enhancement, career development, access to technology and experiences to build leadership and life skills. The Immokalee Foundation has a range of programs that focus on building pathways to success through college and post-secondary training, mentoring and tutoring, and opportunities for broadening experiences, life skills development and economic independence. To learn more about TIF, the Charity Classic Celebration, volunteering as a mentor or for additional information, call 430-9122 or visit www.immokaleefoundation.org. Charity Classic Pro-AmThe Immokalee Foundations 2013 Charity Classic Pro-Am Golf Tournament will pair two dozen of the worlds greatest golfers with Naples most philanthropic players on Monday, November 18 at Bay Colony Golf Club in Naples. The event will begin at 7:30 a.m. with breakfast and golf demonstrations, followed at 9:30 a.m. with the shotgun start. Lunch and awards presentation immediately following the tournament Entry fees begin at $5,000. All proam golfers will receive tickets to the 2013 Charity Classic Celebration dinner and auction Saturday, November 16 at The Ritz-Carlton in Naples. The Immokalee Foundation has a range of programs that focus on building pathways to success through college and post-secondary training, mentoring and tutoring, and opportunities for broadening experiences, life skills development and economic independence. To learn more about TIF, the Charity Classic Celebration, volunteering as a mentor or for additional information, call 430-9122 or visit www.immokaleefoundation.org.

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19 THE RIVER JULY 12, 2013 L ee Memorial H ealth System E mployees Spend Day Of Caring At T he H eights CenterVolunteers from Lee Memorial Health System selected the Heights Foundation for a United Way Day of Caring. Twenty five volunteers planted 50 coco plums around the Heights Centers new medical clinic and started an herb garden for the culinary center. The United Way Days of Caring connects groups with non-profit agencies to help people in need. The Heights Foundation works to build strong, self-sufficient families in the Harlem Heights neighborhood. Discounted supplies for the project were provided by All Native Garden Center. Volunteers from Lee Memorial Health System provided a total of 62 hours of service on the project. We place a high value on the volunteers who help us extend our resources, said Kathryn Kelly, President and CEO of The Heights Foundation. The United Way Days of Caring gives employees of businesses like Lee Memorial Health System a first-hand opportunity to learn more about us and have a direct impact on our programs. The Heights Foundation works to build strong, self-sufficient families in the Harlem Heights neighborhood. The foundations mission is to promote family and community development, support education, health and wellness, and provide the benefits of enrichment, expressive and cultural arts. The 14,000 square-foot Harlem Heights Cultural Arts and Community Center opened in February 2013. For more information, call 482-7706 or visit www.heightsfoundation.org. Lee Memorial Health System employees volunteered at the Heights Center as part of the United Way Days of Caring ENGEL & VLKERSCallIsabellaRasiat239-246-47161101 Periwinkle Way #105, Sanibel, FL 239-472-0044HIGH-VISIBILITY FORT MYERS BEAC H COMMERCIAL PROPERTY Featuring restaurant & private residences High traffic location on San Carlos Blvd Direct Gulf access$675,000 ENGEL & VLKERSCallIsabellaRasiat239-246-47161101 Periwinkle Way #105, Sanibel, FL 239-472-0044 HIGH-VISIBILITY FORT MYERS BEAC H COMMERCIAL PROPERTY Featuring restaurant & private residences High traffic location on San Carlos Blvd Direct Gulf access$675,000 PRICE REDUCTION $595,000 To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732

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THE RIVER JULY 12, 201320 Back T o School Backpack E ventEbenezer Christian Academy of Fort Myers, Inc. is hosting its 4th annual Enriching The Future Our Students Back To School Backpack event on Sunday, July 14 for the children in the after school tutor ing program, youth from Central Fort Myers, their families and friends of the Academy. At the event, stuffed backpacks are provided to each child going to school (elementary through high school). Also at the event, a barbeque is served along with refreshments, along with a bounce house and youth activities. A ceremony honoring the achievements of students (e.g. each student passing their FCAT or improving at school receives a Certificate of Achievement). Local government officials and friends of the Academy attend and speak to those in attendance. The fire department provides tours of a truck and to hose the children with water, and the City of Fort Myers police department will provide safety education. The event assists the Academy in reaching its mission of encouraging each child and teen to have a positive attitude in life, and to display their achievements to their families and others in the community. The event will begin at 2 p.m. at Ebenezer Christian Academy, 2420 Highland Avenue in Fort Myers, a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization with a goal of enriching the lives of children in grades K to 12. For more information, call 440-2669 or visit www.ecaswfl.org. Foundation Seeks Donations For School SuppliesThe Heights Foundation is seeking individuals, businesses, churches and organizations to provide school supplies for the foundations annual outreach program. The July 26 event provides supplies for nearly 400 low-income children living in the Harlem Heights neighborhood. Our goal is to ensure that every child has the necessary supplies to succeed in school, said Julie Workman, Chief Advocacy Officer for the Heights Foundation. The poverty rate for children in Harlem Heights is more than twice the county average. Many parents cannot provide all the things their student will need. We want to send children back to school ready to learn. The foundation has a wish list that groups can complete. We are looking for organizations whose members can band together to meet the need, added Workman. A local church can sponsor all the pencils we need, a business or philanthropic organization may be able to provide backpacks for all of the children. Donations may also be made online at our website. Individuals, businesses, churches or organizations interested in participating can contact Matt Wallace at 482-7706 or matt@heightsfoundation.org. All donations are tax deductible. Monetary donations can be made online at www.heightsfoundation.org/donate. E dison State R anked NationallyEdison State College ranked in the Top 100 across several categories for Community College Weeks annual Top 100 Associate Degree and Certificate Producers. The results cover the 2011-12 academic year. Its always nice to be included in a national ranking by a well-regarded publication like Community College Week, but we are more focused on the quality of the education our students receive, said Dr. Jeff Allbritten, president, Edison State College. We attribute our success first and foremost to our students. They work hard to achieve their academic goals. Just as important is the dedication of our faculty, who guide them along the way. In all the categories, Edison State moved up in the rankings, with the exception of the 72nd ranking for Associate Degrees, All Disciplines, Total Minority. New this year is Edison States 26th ranking nationally for its nursing program. The annual report divides its results into two-year and four-year institutions. Edison State Colleges rankings are included with four-year institutions as follows: Registered, Administration, Research & Clinical Disciplines Disciplines, Total Non-Minority Disciplines, Total Minority Disciplines, African-Americans Disciplines, Hispanics A Seahorse Dream T o Benefit Children Of Southwest FloridaThe Seahorse Dream, a not-forprofit fund raising public art project, has been created to help raise funds for construction of the new Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida. The Kickoff Celebration will feature a painting competition of seahorse statues. Adult, celebrity painters will be competing with area youngsters for a paint off using a couple of the unpainted seahorse statues. Even though the contest hasnt happened yet, you can almost be assured that the judges will be declaring the kids as the winners of this friendly competition. Additionally, the Seahorse Dream Team will be delivering the initial group of approximately 20 of the unpainted statues to the juried artists so that they can begin decorating and displaying them throughout southwest Florida later this year. Invited guests include Seahorse Dream Project artists and sponsors, city and county officials, business and nonprofit organization leaders and media personnel on Thursday, July 11 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Basin on Bay Street in the downtown Fort Myers River District. The Seahorse Dream Team is seeking organizations and individuals to sponsor one or more of the five-foot tall seahorse statues that will be creatively painted or decorated by a group of juried, local artists and prominently displayed throughout Collier, Charlotte, Glades, Hendry and Lee counties. The Seahorse Dream Project will continue through early 2014, ending with a gala dinner and auction of select seahorses at the Sanibel Harbour Resort on March 7, 2014. The project is being guided by a steering committee of seven volunteers working through the not-for-profit Lee Memorial Health System Foundation. According to Jack Thomas, a member of the steering committee, Because it takes money to provide for the quality health care our children deserve, the Seahorse Dream Team needs help now from residents throughout southwest Florida. The Seahorse Dream Teams goal is to sell 50 seahorses before next March. Information about the project is available at www.a-seahorse-dream.org or by calling 481-3907. T op 10 R eal E state Sales Development City Year BuiltSquare FootageListing PriceSelling PriceDays on Market No Subdivision Sanibel20062,811$1,995,000 $1,725,00052 Water Shadows Sanibel19863,787$1,498,000 $1,300,000200 No Subdivision Sanibel19973,485$1,100,000 $937,500 344 Beachview Country Club Estates Sanibel20042,224$989,000 $797,500 98 Renaissance Fort Myers 20052,831$575,000 $530,000 102 Caloosa Yacht & RacquetFort Myers 19932,603$499,500 $435,000 71 Laurel Meadow Bonita Springs 20002,150$449,000 $425,000 100 No Subdivision Cape Coral 20012,336$447,000 $380,000 1009 Willow Bend Fort Myers 20052,124$369,000 $360,000 23Bonita Springs Golf & Country ClubBonita Springs 20052,313$359,000 $355,000 79Courtesy of Royal Shell Real Estate

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21 THE RIVER JULY 12, 2013 School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Shelley, My high school daughter is pregnant and wants to continue at her current school. We are confused about her rights and need some information. Johanna G., Cape Coral Johanna, Staying in school is the single most important action that your daughter can take. She will need at least a high school diploma to achieve a satisfactory level of financial independence in adulthood. Pregnant and parenting students have always been protected under Title IX. A new letter from the U.S. Department of Education has now provided muchneeded clarification and concrete steps schools must take to support these students, said Lisa Maatz, the vice president of government relations for the American Association of University Women. In fact last month, the U.S. Department of Education said in a letter to school districts that pregnant students need to be treated the same as other students, shouldnt have to provide medical certification that they can be in school, and have absences related to their pregnancy excused. By ensuring that the student has the opportunity to maintain her academic status, we can encourage young parents to work toward graduation instead of choosing to drop out of school, wrote Seth Galanter, the acting assistant secretary of the office for civil rights. And when students return to school after pregnancy, they must be allowed to return to the same academic and extracurricular activities as before they left, Galanter said. The biggest educational issue for pregnant teens is that their risk of dropping out from high school increases dramatically. In the letter, Galanter said that 26 percent of young men and young women combined who had dropped out of public high schools, and a third of young women, said that becoming a parent was a major factor in their decision to leave school. Only 51 percent of young women who had a child before age 20 earned their high school diploma by age 22. And things only get worse from there: Only 2 percent of young women who had a child before turning 18 earned a college degree by 30. Most school districts have developed specific plans to address the special concerns of a pregnant student. I would recommend scheduling an appointment with your daughters guidance counselor to find out the particular programs that her school and the district provides for pregnant teens and their children. Ms. Greggs is adjunct faculty at Edison State College where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also Nationally Certified School Psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. Cattanach H onoredEmily Cattanach, a student at Armstrong Atlantic State University in Savannah, Georgia and a resident of Fort Myers, was honored during Armstrongs spring 2013 Student Awards Convocation. Cattanach received the Presidents Cup Award. Locals GraduateThe following graduates received a degree from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia at its 168th commencement ceremony on May 13: Megan DeFrancesco of Fort Myers received a Bachelor of Arts from Emory College of Arts and Sciences. Lucy Denholtz of Fort Myers received a Master of Science from the Graduate School of Emory University. Erica Eding of Fort Myers received a Doctor of Law from the School of Law of Emory University. Singh Named T o H onor R ollYuvraj Singh, a sophomore from Miromar Lakes, has been named to the Honor Roll at the Loomis Chaffee School in Windsor, Connecticut. Moyer T o Attend Florida T echCynthia Moyer, a resident of North Fort Myers, has announced an intent to begin studies at Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne beginning in the fall. Moyer graduated from Riverdale High School and plans to pursue a bachelors degree in Electrical Engineering. Weber Named T o Deans ListSarah Anne Weber, a resident of Fort Myers, was named to the Deans List at Howard Payne University during the spring 2013 semester. H amilton, Stafford Named T o Deans ListLocal residents Alison Hamilton and Brittany Stafford, both of Fort Myers, have been named to the Deans List at the Savannah College of Art and Design for the spring quarter 2013. Cute GraduatesKeith Cute, a resident of Cape Coral, participated in Berklee College of Musics 2013 commencement, held recently at Boston Universitys Agganis Arena. Cute received a Bachelor of Music degree in Contemporary Writing and Production. Odle GraduatesJohn Odle, a resident of Sanibel, received a Doctor of Law from the School of Law of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia at its 168th commencement ceremony on May 13. E dison Students Begin T heir FCSSGA T ermOn July 1, Edison State College students Jacob Winge and Joe Garita began their terms as the Florida College System Student Government Associations (FCSSGA) president and vice president, respectively. Winge and Garita were elected for the positions by their fellow students from Floridas 28 state and community colleges. During their terms, Winge and Garita will focus on issues that directly affect students in the Florida College System including keeping the cost of tuition and textbooks low and college funding higher. They will also work to help pass the Veterans Education Bill/Veterans In-State Residency Bill, which would allow veterans to enroll at any college in the state of Florida at an in-state tuition cost. The Florida College System has 860,000 students, Winge said. Thats more than Floridas university system. The economy isnt great right now, and if higher education is not affordable, we cant develop future professionals. Its important that the system and the students work together to keep the Florida College System strong, Garita added. Its our education, so as students, we should be concerned about the decisions that will affect us. Jacob and I will listen to the voice of the students and make sure their voices are heard. We are very excited about whats to come over the next year. FCSSGA represents the nearly one million students enrolled in the Florida College Systems 28 colleges. It promotes legislative advocacy and training, leader ship development, service learning, promotion of campus activities, and strong citizenship. The organization was created to unify the member colleges in order to best attend to the appropriate concerns of the students of the Florida Community College system and serve as a vehicle to communicate these concerns to the Florida Legislative Body. Joe Garita and Jacob Winge Peterson R eceives Chancellors AwardMesha Peterson, a resident of Fort Myers, received the Chancellors Award for the spring 2013 semester at University of Wisconsin-Stout. Peterson is majoring in human development and family studies.

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THE RIVER JULY 12, 201322 Financial FocusWhat Can All-Stars T each I nvestors? by Jennifer BaseyThis week, Major League Baseballs All-Star Game will be played at Citi Field in New York. If youre a baseball fan, youll enjoy the annual gather ing of the sports best players. And if youre an investor, you may be able to take away some valuable lessons from the All-Stars lessons that can prove valuable to you long after the games final out is recorded. So, what can you learn from the AllStars? Here are a few of their traits: include ballplayers who are having one great year amidst a mediocre career; typically, All-Star players perform well every season. As an investor, you also want to seek consistent performers those investments that, year in and year out, are likely to meet their objectives, whether those are growth, income or a combination of both. Of course, in the financial world, there are no sure things, so just like the best ballplayers, any investment can have an off year. Still, by sticking with quality investment vehicles, you should be able to improve the overall performance consistency of your portfolio. players (apart from pitchers) are typically superior hitters, but many of them also have superior defensive skills which means they make few errors in the field. And as an investor, you will definitely want to avoid as many errors as possible, because these mistakes can be costly. Some of the most common errors are chasing after hot stocks (they may have already cooled off by the time you hear about them), investing too aggressively and investing too conservatively. Baseball season is 162 games long, which means that, over the course of six months, ballplayers play almost every day. And since baseball is a physically demanding game, injuries are common yet, many All-Stars seem to make it through the entire season without missing more than a few games. When you invest, you will need plenty of durability as well. Over the course of decades, you will see some bumps in the road periods in which the financial markets are be tempted to take a time out from investing. But if you do, you could miss out on the beginning of a market rally. The best investors stay invested, through up and down markets, following a long-term strategy and keeping their focus on their goals. Major League Baseball players are big, strong men. However, in recent years, many ballplayers like other professional athletes have discovered that various types of training, including yoga, can greatly increase their flexibility, allowing them to reduce injuries and play more effectively. As an investor, you, too, need flexibility in the sense of being able to adjust your portfolio, as needed, in response to changes in your life or in your goals. As part of this flexibility, you need, among other things, enough liquidity in your accounts to take advantage of new investment opportunities as they arise. In all likelihood, you wont be swinging a bat or throwing a ball in front of a national audience but by following the above suggestions, you may be able to become an all-star investor. Jennifer Basey is a financial advisor in Fort Myers. She can be reached at jennifer.basey@edwardjones.com. Five Added To H arry Chapin Food Bank BoardFive Southwest Florida residents have been elected as members of the Harry Chapin Food Bank Anne Rose, Laura Worzella and Marianne Zuk. Vice President of Amenities and Real Estate Services, Chief Operating Officer, and President and Chief Executive Officer for WCI Communities. He currently serves of Lee, Hendry and Glades counties. President and Florida Market President for Busey Bank. He is the Immediate Past Chairman for The Foundation For Lee County Public Schools, Board Member of The Horizon Council Lee County Office the Fort Myers/Lee County Enterprise Zone, and Chairman of the Southwest Florida Enterprise Center Foundation. Anne Rose is the Vice President of Revenue Cycle for Lee Memorial Health System. She is a member of the Rotary Club of Fort Myers and has served on various board positions. She was a founding member of the Southwest Florida Wine Fest. She served five years on the Board dating back to its inception in 2006. She is also a member of the Florida Hospital Association of Managed Care Professionals (FAMCP) since its inception in 1995, serving in a variety of capacities. Laura Worzella is Gulf South Community Bank President for Wells Fargo, serving Charlotte, Collier and Lee counties. In addition to her involvement with the Harry Chapin Food Bank, she is involved with the Guadalupe Center of and Habit For Humanity of Collier and Lee counties. Marianne Zuk is General Counsel for Collier Family Office, Inc., a position she has held since 2008. She also served as President and CEO of Revere America, a Collier family member-founded, multi-million dollar national advocacy organization. For additional information about or to contribute financially to the Harry Chapin Food Bank, call 334-7007 or visit www. harrychapinfoodbank.org. E dison State College H as New WebsiteEdison State College launched a new website on June 20, an exciting new look and design. Visitors will be able to move through the new website with ease, by locating the site navigation tools that best fit what they need, said Jeff Stewart, Vice President for Research, Technology, & Accountability at Edison State College. It is now easier for potential students to learn about financial aid, the admissions process, academic offerings and more. For more information, visit www.edison.edu. David Fry Ken ODonnell Anne Rose Laura Worzella Marianne Zuk To advertise in The River Weekly News Call 415-7732 Small Business Owners Workshops T series of workshops in July designed for small business owners. The workshops will be held at various locations throughout Southwest Florida. Topics include Internet Marketing, Government, Business Chats, Frequently Asked Questions for Starting a Business, 30-minute Business Plan for Existing Businesses, and more. cial programs. A Town Hall Meeting with Congressman Trey Radel (FL-19) takes place on Saturday, July 13 from 9 to 11 a.m. in the Cohen Center at Florida Preparedness Seminar on Thursday, July 25 at Edison State College in LaBelle. For times and locations, or to learn more about these seminars and proat 745-3700. For further information, contact at 745-3704 or sspecht@fgcu.edu. Mom And Me by L izzie and PryceLizzie and Pryce answer your questions and give advice about aging concerns from a two-generational perspective. A mother and daughter team, Lizzie is a retired RN and health educator, and Pryce is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in the care of elders and people with chronic illnesses. Dear Mom & Me, I am fed up with the telephone systems that business and most professional offices use. When I call, I want to speak to someone to purchase something or make an appointment. Almost without fail, I get this runaround and finally have to leave a message on their voicemail. Yesterday, I called my stockbroker and his message said, Your message is important to me and I will call you back at my convenience. How about my convenience? I am the one spending mycontinued on page 23

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23 THE RIVER JULY 12, 2013 deaRPharmacistI ll T ake My Coffee Black... And I n T he Back by Suzy Cohen, R PhDear Pharmacist: I see a naturopathic doctor for chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia. She recommended coffee enemas. Suzy, Im a faithful reader, do you think this is safe?VA, Seattle, Washington Yes. Coffee enemas are used by holistic physicians for all sorts of conditions, including cancer. Lots of people find help with constipation, fatigue and liver detoxification concerns. I know this sounds bizarre because you prefer to taste your coffee, not insert it rectally. Agreed. You may be hearing about coffee enemas today, but they are nothing new and complications from coffee enemas are highly unusual. Hey, I just thought of a new franchise concept called Starbutts... entrance in the rear. Seriously, coffee enemas may help relieve constipation, insomnia and cognitive problems; they may eliminate (or control) parasites, candida and other pathogens (without disrupting intestinal flora). Coffee enemas are frequently used in natural cancer protocols such as the Gerson Therapy (www.gerson.org). Coffee enemas were outlined as a treatment in the revered Merck Manual, a thick book that physicians used as their primary reference for decades, until the mid-1970s. Its not the enema as much as it is the coffee that helps. You are exposed to a barrage of toxic compounds in your life, you can easily become overloaded. Some of you cannot detoxify properly. Coffee enemas help you make glutathione, an antioxidant and that sends poisons packing. More on that momentarily. Coffee enemas can be done at home inexpensively. You just need a comfortable spot on the floor of your bathroom, or bathtub. As the coffee is retained in your bowel, the fluid goes through your intestinal wall, through the portal vein to your liver. The stimulating effects and healing compounds of coffee jumpstart your liver and gallbladder. Bile flows. There are compounds in coffee like kahweol and cafestol which spark production of glutathione, and that is a strong cleansing compound in your body, one that consumers pay good money for when they buy glutathione as a dietary supplement, or get IV injections of it. To make more glutathione naturally (by using a coffee enema) is awesome. These enemas may allow for relaxation, a better mood, more energy, refreshing sleep and greater mental clarity. If you do too many enemas per week, you may experience electrolyte imbalances. Restoring your electrolytes is crucial, as coffee is a potent drug mugger of minerals. While the controversial cancer specialist Dr. Max Gerson suggested up to six per day, I think that is way too much for the aver age person. Doing a coffee enema weekly (even daily for awhile) is probably okay for most, but always follow your doctors recommendation. The recipe for a coffee enema is different than the beverage. Ive written an extended version of this column to teach you more about coffee enemas, the terrific health benefits, as well as the best coffee, enema equipment and safety concerns. To receive the article, go to my website www.DearPharmacist.com and sign up for your free newsletter. Your information is kept private. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. dearpharmacist.com. From page 22Mom And Memoney and when I call, I want to speak at my convenience and that is right now. I wonder are these people in business to help me, give me service, or am I really calling to help them? What has happened to service, or is that another old-fashioned, out-dated idea? Leslie W. Dear Leslie W., I am fed up also. I get so tired of their laundry list of options, and what I want usually falls between the tracks of their offerings. What annoys me even more is when I finally get to the right office and then I hear, I am sorry, I am out of my office, please leave your name, etc... I often wonder if they are just down the hall at the water cooler, having coffee or is this a deliberate technique to screen calls and just ignore the ones they do not think important. We older people are maybe just living beyond our time. So many younger people seem to think that we do nothing and have the time to just sit around and wait for their calls. Unfortunately, if you go to another broker, his telephone technique will probably be exactly the same. I hear this complaint very frequently from young and old, but it only seems to get worse with every passing day. Best of luck. Lizzie Dear Leslie W., Do not confuse new technology with poor customer service, and poor customer service with the younger generations. I am sure that before phone mail and voicemail routing technology, poor customer service existed. Poor customer service in the past was probably one of the reasons new technology was created. I agree with you, listening to long lists of phone selections because our options have changed is annoying. I believe improper use of voicemail is the current centurys example of poor customer ser vice. Pryce Lizzie and Pryces email address is momandmeaging@hotmail.com. Lee Mental H ealth, SWFAS Announce Agency MergerMore than one year of negotiation has culminated in the merger of Southwest Florida Addiction Services (SWFAS) and Lee Mental Health, forming the largest mental health and substance abuse treatment agency in Southwest Florida. The merger combines the resources of the two non-profit agencies, effective July 1, under the new name of SalusCare, Inc., drawing on the Latin roots of Salus, (pronounced Sail-us) meaning health, prosperity and safety, which reflects the focus of the new organization. SalusCare, Inc., will be led by CEO Kevin B. Lewis with Lee Mental Health Center President and CEO David Winters serving as Chief Administrative Officer (CAO). Other members of the management team are Dr. Don Baracskay, Chief Medical Officer (CMO) and Chief Operating Officer (COO), Susan Noble as Chief Financial Officer (CFO), and Tim Parham as Chief Information Officer (CIO). Members of the governing Board of Directors were selected from each of the not-for-profit agencies. Officers are Marshall Bower, President and CEO of The Foundation for Lee County Public Schools, Inc., chairman; Lee County Tax Collector Larry Hart, vice chair; Attorney William Keyes, secretary; and Ed Kleinow, treasurer. Other members of the Board of Directors are Sue Ackert; Mark S. Atkins, Lee Memorial Health System; Dena Geraghty, Lee County Dependency and Juvenile Drug Court; Dr. Judith Hartner, Lee County Health Department; Attorney Scot D. Goldberg, Goldberg, Racila, DAlessandro and Noone; Dr. Madelyn Isaacs, Florida Gulf Coast University; Jim Reilly; and Geoff Roepstorff, Edison National Bank. The SalusCare corporate office will be at 3763 Evans Avenue in Fort Myers, phone 332-6937. A new website has been created www.SalusCareFlorida.org with more information about the services offered. The SalusCare Board is enthused about the future of this new not-for-profit organization that we believe will give our community what it needs most a cohesive system of behavioral healthcare to address the needs of individuals with mental health and substance use issues, Bower said. Our first year plan is to implement electronic medical records to enable us to share information across campuses. When we do that, we can increase access points for care and serve more people in need of treatment. Approximately one in four individuals have or will have a mental health disorder at some time during their lives; the incidence of substance use affects one in eight individuals. Florida currently is 49th in the nation in per capita funding for mental health services. The aim is improved care for patients with a seamless system of behavioral health care and better access to care from multiple locations in Lee County, Lewis said. The boards of both companies see this as a key step to improve current services, and move toward a model of integrated care with other health providers in our community. There will be no disruption of services, Winters said. Patients who are accustomed to visiting the SWFAS Evans Avenue location will continue to receive services at that site. Patients of Lee Mental Health will continue to receive services at the Ortiz Avenue location, Winters said. While there may be some cost savings in the consolidation, Lewis and Winters said that is not the major reason for the merger and any potential savings will be invested in increased care. No layoffs or closing of offices are anticipated. Together, Lee Mental Health Center and SWFAS operate with annual budgets of just under $30 million and 450 employees serving 17,000 patients per year from seven locations in Lee County and one in Hendry County. The majority of programs offered by both companies are accredited by CARF, the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities. The merger brings the history of the two organizations full circle. Lee Mental Health was chartered in 1969. SWFAS traces its roots to 1972 when it was part of Lee Mental Health Center. The alcohol treatment program nearly closed in 1979 when Lee Mental Health felt that the state was underfunding this portion of the program. A volunteer citizens group chartered themselves as a separate 501(c)3 and Southwest Florida Alcoholism Services, Inc. (SWFAS) began active management in 1980. The name was changed to Southwest Florida Addiction Services in 1985 to encompass the dual addictions of drugs and alcohol. Email your editorial copy to: press@riverweekly.com

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UPS Delivers A Day Of Fun For Brightest Horizons ChildrenDrivers from United Parcel Service took students from Brightest Horizons Child Development Center fishing at Lakes Park on Saturday morning, June 22 and the fish were biting. Along with the help of Fish Florida, who supplied fishing rods and tackle boxes that the children got to take home with them, the kids got lots of help learning to fish from their UPS buddies. Kiwanis Gateway to the Islands volunteers were there to help, too. A representative from the Florida Extension Services, Lee County Marine Sea Grant was also on hand to help the children and their UPS buddies. The children were taught about casting for conservation, de-hooking, the proper way of handling a fish, determining whether or not you can keep the fish you catch, and catch and release techniques. Costco provided a kid friendly lunch of pizza and hot dogs. Special thanks goes out to United Parcel Service, Kiwanis Gateway to the Islands, Fish Florida, Florida Extension Services: Lee County, and Costco. The group gathers for a photo after a fun-filled day Volunteers get the rods ready Girls really can be fishermen Lunch is served Heading out to make a catch Finding the perfect spot along the lake Learning how to handle the fishing rod A happy young girl with her catch A happy fishermanShare your community news with us. Call 415-7732, Fax: 415-7702 or email press@riverweekly.com THE RIVER JULY 12, 201324

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PUZZLE ANSWERS My Stars FOR WEEK OF JULY 15, 2013ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Your persistence pays off as the information you demanded starts to come through. The pace is slow at first, but it begins to speed up as the week draws to a close. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) An unwelcome bit of news jolts the Bovine, who would prefer that things proceed smoothly. But its at most a momentary setback. A Leo brings more welcome tidings. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You need to pay close attention to the details before making a commitment. Dont accept anything that seems questionable, unless you get an answer that can be backed up. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Congratulations on getting that project up and running. But as exciting as it is, dont let it carry you away. Make sure you set aside time to spend with family and friends. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Be sure youre part of the discussion involving your suggestions. Your presence ensures that you can defend your work, if necessary. It also helps gain your colleagues support. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) A misunderstanding needs to be dealt with, or it can grow and cause more problems later on. Be the bigger person and take the first step to clear the air. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Set some strict guidelines for yourself so your heavier-than-usual work schedule doesnt overwhelm the time you need to spend relaxing with loved ones. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) You might feel a little uncomfortable being among people you hardly know. But remember that todays strangers can become tomorrows valuable contacts. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Reward yourself for all that youve accomplished despite some annoying situations that got in your way. Enjoy a well-earned getaway with someone special. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Realizing that someone else is taking credit for what you did is bound to get anyones goat, but especially yours. Be patient. The truth soon comes out. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Forget about opposites attracting. What you need is to find someone who thinks like you and will support your ideas, even if others say theyre too radical. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Workplace problems can affect your financial plans. Be prudent and avoid running up bills or making commitments until things begin to ease up by the 26th. BORN THIS WEEK: Your intuition helps you communicate easily with people and understand their needs. erupts on the Japanese island of Honshu, killing hundreds and burying many nearby villages in ash. The eruption left an 8,000foot crater in the earth. In the aftermath, the ash from Bandai dimmed the sun slightly worldwide for months. Hemingway, author of such novels as For Whom the Bell Tolls and The Old Man and the Sea, is born in Oak Park, Ill. The influential American literary icon became known for his straightforward prose and use of understatement. Swedish engineer and inventor responsible for the three-point lap-and-shoulder seatlap belts were available in automobiles, and for the most part, the only people who regularly buckled up were race-car drivers. Project comes to an explosive end as the first atom bomb is successfully tested in Alamogordo, N.M. The destructive power tons of TNT. The original $6,000 budget for the Manhattan Project ballooned to a total cost of $2 billion. John Foster Dulles announces that the United States is withdrawing its offer of financial aid to Egypt to help with the construction of the Aswan Dam on the Nile River. The Soviet Union rushed to Egypts aid, and the Aswan Dam officially opened ing a party on Chappaquiddick Island, Sen. Edward Ted Kennedy of Massachusetts drives an Oldsmobile off a wooden bridge into a tide-swept pond. Kennedy escaped the submerged car, but his passenger, 28-year-old Mary Jo Kopechne, did not. The senator did not report the fatal car accident for 10 hours. martial-arts expert Bruce Lee dies in Los Angeles at age 32 from a brain edema possibly caused by a reaction to a prescription painkiller. His film, Enter the Dragon, was released in the United States one month after his death. Schwarzenegger who made the following sage observation: Everybody pities the weak; jealousy you have to earn. than India has cows. If cows are sacred in India, what does that say about how Californians feel about their automobiles? time you spend blinking in one day adds up to about 30 minutes of shut-eye. holds the world record for the most world rently holds 160. Among his exploits are the longest yodel (more than 26 hours); the longest distance traveled via acrobatic somersaults (12 miles, 390 yards); jumping utes, 13 seconds); running the fastest mile popcorn sculpture (20 feet, 10 inches tall); underwater hula hooping (2 minutes, 38 seconds); the most candles burning simulrally while playing table tennis with an egg peeling and eating (3 oranges in 1 minute, wasnt just comfort food for those suffer ing from a cold; at the time, it was considered to be an aphrodisiac. developing a kind of space broom. The device will use a laser to sweep debris out of the way of the International Space Station. Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe. -H.G. Wells THIS WEEK IN HISTORY strSTR A nN G eE BU tT trTR U eE thoTHO UG htHT F orOR theTHE DA yY DID YOU KNOW25 THE RIVER JULY 12, 2013 1. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What was the name of the priest who founded Boys Town? 2. ANATOMY : What is the common name for horripilation? 3. LAW: What amendment to the U.S. Constitution gave women the right to vote? without blowing up? 6. GEOGRAPHY: The Douro River flows through which two countries? 8. MUSIC: How many copies does an album have to sell for it to go platinum? 9. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What kind of animal is a gerenuk? 10. MYTHOLOGY: How is the Roman god Janus often depicted? TRIVI aA TES tT nings, has two faces, each looking the opposite way. ANSWERS S portsPORTS quiQUI Z 1. Name the last catcher before San Franciscos Buster Posey in 2012 to win a National League batting title. 2. Among Whitey Ford, Ron Guidry and T ommy John, which pitcher won at least 20 games in a season the most times for the New York Yankees? 3. How many times has Bob Stoops won a Big 12 football conference championship 6. In the past five seasons, how many times has Joe Gibbs Racing won NASCARs Nationwide Series owners championship? A nswersNSWERS

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY THE RIVER JULY 12, 201326 Read us online at IslandSunNews.com CONTRACTOR G I P M SR C D P D P CG D GrSince 2001, A Southwest Florida Paver Contractor www.gigicompanies.com 239-541-7282Schedule free estimates or visit our new show roomLic.# S3-12238 CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING TREE & LAWN CARE Jesus Hernandez LANDSCAPING & TREE SERVICE 482-7350 We Service All your Landscape Needs FULL Landscaping SERVICES Over 20 years serving San-Cap & Ft. Myers PRESSURE WASHING Owner Matthew Ryan1-239-645-9834www.oneppw.comLicense & Insured Owner Owner Ask About Our$9900Specials!! Professional Pressure WashingFREE ESTIMATEQuality Service Guaranteed COMPUTERS Summer Sweet Pepper Fajitas 3 bell peppers (assorted colors), sliced thin 1/2 sweet onion, sliced thin 1/2 pound mushrooms, sliced thin 1 fresh tomato, diced into small pieces 1 yellow squash, sliced thin 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/4 cup fajita sauce (your favorite) 4 to 8 wheat flour tortillas Kosher salt and fresh ground pepper, to taste In a medium-sized saut pan, cook all vegetables in olive oil over medium-high heat, until almost tender. Add fajita sauce and stir until mixed well. Wrap tortillas in aluminum and warm in a 250 degree oven. Serve family-style with your favorite toppings. Topping ideas: cheese, guacamole, sour cream, salsa. Summer Sweet Pepper Fajitas

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answer on page 27 PUZZLE ANSWERS SUDOKU SCRAMBLERS27 THE RIVER JULY 12, 2013PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY FINANCIAL SERVICES THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE. To learn about the bene ts of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC To learn about the benefits of an Edward Jones IRA, call or visit today.THE RIGHT INVESTMENTS IN YOUR IRA CANMAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE.www.edwardjones.comMember SIPC Jennifer L BaseyFinancial Advisor.1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 Jennifer L Basey Financial Advisor1952-2 Park Meadows Dr Ft Myers, FL 33907 239-437-5900 FISHING CHARTER Light Tackle Sport Fishing CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.com BUILDING CONTRACTOR AIR CONDITIONING & REMODELING We are your One-Stop ContractorCall today for a free estimate!(239) 344-6883 Licensed & Insured: CBC1254276 and CAC1814724 AIR CONDITIONING REMODELING FIND AT LEAST SIX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PANELS

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REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATETHE RIVER JULY 12, 201328 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS TO PLACE AA CC LASSIFIED LL OG OO N tT O: IslandSunNews.com CLICK ON PLACE CLASSIFIED ANNUAL RENTALFOR RR ENTCommunity Housing & Resources (CHR) has apartments for rent to individuals who work full time on Sanibel. Rent based on income. For information call 239-472-1189.R SS 3/15 CCCC 8/30 ANNUAL RENTAL $1,795/MONTHQuiet, private setting, 3B/2B, stilt home. Living area, master bedroom & lg porch have lake view. Covered parking, enclosed storage. Avail. Aug. 1. 239-223-3536. NSNS 7/12 CCCC 7/12 SERVICES O ffFF ERED CC OMPANION SS ERVICE Sanibel-Captiva Care and Companion Service, LLC Medical appointments, general transportation, shopping, light meal preparations, and light cleaning. Our services are customized to meet our clients needs. Call 239-395-3591, or for an emergency call 239-472-0556.R SS 1/4 BM T FNFN SS CARNATO LL AWN SS ERVICELawn Service, Shrubs and Tree Trimming Weeding, Installation of Plants, Trees and Mulch (one month free service available) Joe Scarnato (239) 849-6163 scarnatolawn@aol.comR SS 1/25 BM T FNFN HH ELLES CC LEANING SS ERVICESResidential Cleaning to Satisfaction Sanibel Lic. #11412 Lee Co. Lic. #051047 NSNS 1/4 P CC T FNFN PAINTINGPAINTING GOATGOAT Professional Painting & Home Maintenance Free Estimates Fully Insured www.paintinggoat.com 239-271-2919R SS 4/19 CCCC T FNFN SERVICES O ffFF ERED ROGERROGER NODRUNODRU FF ELECTRICELECTRIC Lic# EC12002788. Call Roger 239-707-7203. Aqualink Motor Controls. R SS 6/7 CCCC T FNFN REMODELINGREMODELINGSS tan Boring GG ene ral CC ont ractor239-470-9991Over 40 Years Construction Experience. Remodeling, Cabinetry, Flooring, Carpentry. stanboring@gmail.com NSNS 6/7 CCCC T FNFN B EACHSIDEEACHSIDE ANIMALANIMALCLINIC CLINIC SANISANI B ELEL Itchy Pets? We Can Help.239-579-0804 NSNS 6/21 CCCC T FNFN HH OME/ CONDOCONDO WW ATCH CONCIERGE SERVICESDorado Property Management Full Range of Services Island Resident Licensed & Insured 24/7 Call Lisa or Bruce at 239-472-8875RS 1/4 BM TFN SANISANI B ELEL HOMEHOME WATCHWA TCH Retired Police Captain Lives on Sanibel Will Check Your Home Weekly Very Reasonable Rates (239) 728-1971R SS 1/4 BM T FNFN MOMO B ILEILE HOMEHOMEPERIWIN PERIWIN K LELE PARPAR K$115,000. 60 x 12 wl metal roof-over plus 20 x 12 Florida room. Master BR has queen size bed & blt-in dresser & dbl closet. Master bath has combo bath/ shower & dbl sink vanity w/extra storage. Guest BR has dbl closet + blt-in drawers & private bath w/ shower. Eat-in-kit is open to LR which from K to FL room. Private 12 x 12 deck, picnic table and storage shed. One car carport with adjacent 2nd parking space. room & bathrooms. Carpeting in both bedrooms & LR. Home recently inspected & has all required tiedowns. New central air & heat system & stacked washer/dryer, all appliances louvered blinds throughout. Purchase completely furnished including all linens, dishes, pots & pans, tableware,2 sleeper couches, recliner, 2 dining tables & chairs, 4 outdoor chairs & folding beach chairs, etc. Call owner 317-293-0915 or email LMSrealtor@aol.com for further information or to make offer. R SS 6/21 CCCC 7/12 ISABELLA RASiIHAPPY TO HELP Y YOUWithITH A ALL OOF Y YOUrRREAL EEStT At TE NEEDS! R SS 1/4 NCNC T FNFN 1101 PP eriwinkle WW ay #105 SS anibel, F LL 33957 ISABELLA RASiI (239) 246-4716E ISABELLARASi I@AOL.COM WW EST GG UL fF DD RIVE SS TILT HH OME3 BR/2 BA; 1600 Sq Ft; 110 x 180 Lot FSBO: $679,900, OBO 239-472-0692 www.4sanibel.com NSNS 6/21 CCCC T FNFN II sland VV acationsOf Sanibel & CaptivaMillion $ Views Await You! Cottages Condos Homes Miles of Beaches & Bike Paths239-472-72771-888-451-7277R SS 1/4 BM T FNFN VACATION RENTAL LIGHTHOUSELIGHTHOUSE REALTREALT YPaul J. Morris, Broker VACATION RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT & SALES 359 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel Island 239-579-0511RS 1/4 CCCC TF NN RR ENTAL WW ANTED AA NNUAL RR ENTAL WW ANTEDSWF, freelance writer seeking annual rental on Sanibel or Captiva (6 months or longer)quiet, clean, excellent credit and references. Call Diane at (804) 690-4757. NSNS 6/21 CCCC 7/12 AA NNUAL RR ENTAL WW ANTEDSingle 52 year old male gainfully employed non-smoking, no pets, no children, good credit. Looking for moderately priced 1B/1B or bigger rental. Sept. or later to occupy. Call Todd at 262-455-5860. NSNS 6/28 CCCC T FNFN COMMERICAL RENTAL OO FF ICEICE / COMMERCIALCOMMERCIAL SPACESPACE F OROR RENTRENT PALM COURT CENTER 2424 PALM RIDGE ROAD SANIBEL, Florida HIGHLY VISIBLE GROUND FLOOR SPACE 520 SQUARE FEET MOVE IN CONDITION IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY $750 / MONTH Landlord pays all common maintenance. Call 239-472-6543 or 973-726-3213 NSNS 4/5 CCCC T FNFN RERE / MAMA X OO F THETHE ISLANDSISLANDS Putting owners and tenants together Call Dustyn Corace www.remax-oftheislands.com 239-472-2311R SS 1/4 BM T FNFN Q UIETUIET SANISANI B ELEL HOMEHOME WW / PRIVATEPRIVA TE B EACHEACH PATHPA TH 3200 sq ft home in Gulf Pines, one of Sanibels most beautiful & sought after communities. One house from beach w/private beach path. Short walk to Gulf Pines 2 swimming pools & tennis courts; large landscaped lot provides privacy. 3-4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, large open living area, screened porch & several decks. W/D, 2nd fridge, Elevator, 2-car garage. $4,000/mo. + util. Annual rental only. Unfurnished. Landscaping & association fees paid by owner. Avail Oct 2013. Call 917-680-4440. NSNS 5/31 CCCC T FNFN ANNUAL RENTAL DIRECTLDIRECTL Y ACROSSACROSS F ROMROM B EACHEACH custom wood staircase, All High End appliances, separate bar, full custom large 3 car garage. A rare offering @ $3,500/mo. B AA Y F RONTRONT RESIDENCERESIDENCE This spectacular Bay Front home offers Panoramic Views of the Bay 4 bedrooms + maids quarters, large garage, pool on Bay and UF. $4,200/mo. CANALCANAL & DOCDOC K Five Minutes to T oll-Booth!! This UF ground level updated home offers 3 BR/2 BA + family room, double garage, screened in pool, 65 boat dock, + boat lift for boat. $2,800/mo. 472-6747 GG ulf Beach PP roperties, II nc. Paul H. Zimmerman, Broker/Ownersanibelannualrentals.comServing The Islands Rental Needs Since 1975 R SS 7/5 BM T FNFN ANNUAL RENTALS SS ANI bB EL fF ORT M yY ERS

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29 THE RIVER JULY 12, 2013 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS RR ead us online at II slan dSunNews.com PETSFR EEEE KI TTETTE N TT O GOOD HOM EE Free kitten to good, safe home. No de-clawing. Fiesty Bengal mix. Call 472-1788 after 5 p.m.NS 5/31 NC TFN A nN T iI QUE BUTC hH E rR BL oO C kK 24 x 32. Has holder for knives. $250 or best offer. 239-980-4236NS 6/14 CC TFN forFOR S aA LE W anAN TE dD T oO bB UY CC A SS H PP AID FOR MI LL I TT AR YY I TETE M SS Cash Paid For Old Military Items. Medals, Swords, Uniforms, helmets, old guns, awards & more. Local Toll Free 1-866-440-3280RS 6/7 CC 8/30 CC AR forFOR S aA LE2007 BU iI C kK LaCroLACRO SSE CLCL X16,500 miles, beige color, 4 door, all power, seldom driven off island, $14,000. Call Ken at 472-2012.RS 7/12 NC TFN boaBOA TS C anoANO ES kaKA Y akAK SD oO C kagKAG EHourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-5800RS 1/4 NC TFN 22-F ooOO T GL aA C iI E rR B aA Y CaCA T amaranAMARAN In good condition. Needs some detailing and a high pressure fuel pump. $12,500 or best offer. The boat was donated to the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) for quick sale. Contact James Robinson at CROW at (239) 472-3644, ext. 221 or development@ crowclinig.org. Or contact Peg Albert at (239) 472-3644, ext. 232 or peg@ crowclinic.org. RS 6/28 CC TFN L oO ST andAND foFO U ndND L oO STLost Ladies Watch Make: Brighton Area of Mucky Duck on Captiva Island Lost on Dec. 10, 2012 around noon If found call: 941-639-5395RS 1/4 NC TFN F oO U ndND Prescription sunglasses found in parking lot of Limetree Center on Wednesday, February 27. Claim at Island Sun newspaper, suite 2 in Limetree Center, or call 395-1213.NS 3/8 NC TFN TT OO LL BOX WW A SS H ESES UPUP ON SS ANIB ELEL This tool box with motor parts washed up on shore Saturday morning, May 8 about 8:30 on the beach at Sundial Resort on Sanibel Island. To claim call Sundial Resort Security 239-472-4151.NS 6/14 CC TFN hH ELP W anAN TE dD VO LULU N TEETEE R SS N EEEE D EE DAt The Sanibel School Call Michelle Wesley 239-910-8000RS 1/4 NC TFN 3883 Sanibel Captiva Road, Sanibel, Fl Phone: 239-472-3644, ext 1 Fax: 239-472-2334 www.crowclinic.orgH ELPELP USUS PLEPLE A SESE !!We need volunteers for: Clinic emergency patient admissions desk and baby animal feeders Visitor education center greeters and gift shop cashiers CROW (239) 472-3644, ext. 231 or volunteers@crowclinic.orgRS 1/4 NC TFN VO LULU N TEETEE R O PPPP OR TUTU NI TYTY The Sunshine Ambassador Program is a new and exciting volunteer opportunity offered at the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida located within HealthPark Medical Center. The Sunshine Ambassadors will greet, assist and be a families and visitors entering the hospital. The Ambassadors also make a difference to families by providing educational and healthful resources to assist in GRANDparenting for GRANDchildren. We are currently seeking year-round volunteers to work one 4-hour shift Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm or 12:00pm to 4:00 pm. If you would be interested in learning more about this wonderful new opportunity, please contact Lisa Ellinwood, Volunteer Resources Coordinator at 239-343-5062 at the Golisano Childrens Hospital.NS 2/8 CC TFN hH ELP W anAN TE dD VO LULU N TEETEE R SS N EEEE D EE DVolunteers needed for the After School Program which runs Mon.-Th, 2:30 3:15 pm call Linda Reynolds 472-1617RS 1/4 NC TFN SS E rvRV E rR S ASS iI ST anAN T SS E rvRV E rR S LinLIN E C ookOOK IL Tesoro Ristorante, 751 tarpon Bay Rd. Sanibel Now hiring; Servers, Assistant Servers and Line cook Email resumes to: applications between 11-2 daily.NS 1/18 NC TFN HELP WanWAN TE dD Do you enjoy making people happy? and professional? If youre at home in a retail environment and youre ready to become a long-term important part of a respected, quality focused team. Please fax resume to 239-472-3888 or email DCimeo@lilyjewelers.comNS 7/5 CC 7/12 H oO USE kK EEPE rR ParPAR TTimTIM EThe Robert Rauschenberg Foundations Rauschenberg Residency in Captiva seeks to engage a committed person in the role of Housekeeper. The successful and organized. Strong time management skills, a plus. S/he needs to be able to work independently, as well as perform as part of a team. An enthusiasm for the property and a willingness to learn and grow in the position are necessary. Position begins early September 2013. Flexible hours based on residency schedule, average 25 hours/week. $15/ interest and related experience or rsum, and three references should be sent to Employment@rauschenbergfoundation. org. No phone calls, please.NS 7/12 CC 7/26

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SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 27 Pets Of The Week THE RIVER JULY 12, 201330 If you would like your club/organization listed in The River Calling Card, phone 415-7732Emergency ......................................................................................... 911 ........................................................ 477-1200 Florida Marine Patrol ................................................................ 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol .............................................................. 278-7100 Poison Control ................................................................ 1-800-282-3171HealthPark Medical Center .......................................1-800-936-5321Ft. Myers Chamber of Commerce ............................................. 332-3624 Foundation for Quality Childcare .............................................. 425-2685 Ft. Myers Beach Chamber of Commerce .................................. 454-7500 Fort Myers Beach Library ......................................................... 463-9691 Lakes Regional Library ............................................................ 533-4000 Lee County Chamber of Commerce .......................................... 931-0931 ..................................................................... 1-800-275-8777 Visitor & Convention Bureau ..................................................... 338-3500 ARTS Alliance for the Arts .................................................................. 939-2787 Art of the Olympians Museum & Gallery ................................... 332-5055 Arts For ACT Gallery & Studio .................................................. 337-5050 Art League Of Fort Myers ......................................................... 275-3970 Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall ...................................... 481-4849 BIG ARTS ................................................................................ 395-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre ............................................... 278-4422 Cultural Park Theatre ................................................................ 772-5862 Edison Festival of Light ............................................................. 334-2999 Florida Repertory Theatre at the Arcade .................................. 332-4488 Florida West Arts ...................................................................... 948-4427 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers ....................................... 472-0168 Gulf Coast Symphony ............................................................... 489-1800 Harmony Chorus, Charles Sutter, Pres ..................................... 481-8059 Naples Philharmonic ........................................................... 239-597-1111 The Schoolhouse Theater ......................................................... 472-6862 S.W. Florida Symphony ............................................................. 418-0996 Theatre Conspiracy .................................................................. 936-3239 Young Artists Awards ................................................................ 574-9321CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSAngel Flight ................................................................ 1-877-4AN-ANGEL Animal Refuge Center ............................................................... 731-3535 American Business Women Association ................................... 357-6755 Audubon of SWFL ..................................................................... 339-8046 Audubon Society ....................................................................... 472-3156 Caloosahatchee Chapter DAR .................................................. 482-1366 Caloosahatchee Folk Society ................................................... 321-4620 Cape Chorale Barbershop Chorus ................................. 1-855-425-3631 Cape Coral Stamp Club ............................................................ 542-9153 duPont Company Retirees ....................................................... 454-1083 Edison Porcelain Artists ............................................................ 415-2484 Ft Myers UDC Chapter 2614 (United Daughters of the Confederacy .................................. 728-3743 Friendship Force Of SW FL ...................................................... 561-9164 The Horticulture and Tea Society ............................................. 472-8334 Horticultural Society ................................................................. 472-6940 Lee County Genealogical Society ............................................. 549-9625 Lee Trust for Historic Preservation ........................................... 939-7278 NARFE(National Active & Retired Federal Employees ............. 482-6713 Navy Seabees Veterans of America .......................................... 731-1901 Paradise Iowa Club of SWFL .................................................... 667-1354 Sons of Confederate Veterans .................................................. 332-2408 Southwest Florida Fencing Academy ........................................ 939-1338 Southwest Florida Music Association ........................................ 561-2118 Kiwanis Clubs: Fort Myers Beach ................................................. 765-4254 or 454-8090 Fort Myers Edison ..................................................................... 694-1056 Fort Myers South ...................................................................... 691-1405 Gateway to the Islands .............................................................. 415-3100 Iona-McGregor .......................................................................... 482-0869Lions Clubs:Fort Myers Beach ...................................................................... 463-9738 Fort Myers High Noon ............................................................... 466-4228 Estero/South Fort Myers ........................................................... 898-1921 Notre Dame Club of Lee County .............................................. 768-0417 POLO Club of Lee County ......................................................... 477-4906 Rotary Club of Fort Myers ......................................................... 332-8158 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society ................................................ 472-6940 United Way of Lee County ........................................................ 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline (24 hour) ................................. 211 or 433-3900AREA ATTRACTIONSBailey-Matthews Shell Museum ................................................ 395-2233 Burroughs Home ...................................................................... 337-9505 Calusa Nature Center & Planetarium ........................................ 275-3435 Edison & Ford Winter Estates ................................................... 334-3614 Fort Myers Skate Park .............................................................. 321-7558 Imaginarium Hands-On Museum & Aquarium ............................ 321-7420 JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge ................................ 472-1100 Koreshan State Historic Site .............................................. 239-992-0311 Ostego Bay Foundation Marine Science Center ....................... 765-8101 Skatium ...................................................................................... 321-7510 Southwest Florida Historical Society ........................................ 939-4044 Southwest Florida Museum of History ...................................... 321-7430 True Tours ................................................................................. 945-0405 Hello, my name is Chopper. I am a 5-month-old spayed female chocolate Stafforshire/hound mix. My owners packed up the car one day and just drove away. I ran after the car, but they never stopped or looked back. I dont understand because I am bright and lively and I do love people, especially when they play with me. I would make a great companion for someone who has time and energy to love me and train me. My adoption fee is $45 (regularly $95) during Animal Services Freedom Friends Adoption Promotion. Hello, our names are Tammi and Pebbles. We are both 1-year-old female domestic short hairs: Tammi is an orange tabby, while Pebbles is white with black markings on her head and tail. Pebbles came to the shelter pregnant and I arrived with a shattered rear leg, which had to be amputated. We were sent to the same foster home and it was the best thing that ever happened. Pebbles took one look at me and decided she would be my best friend. Both of us have quiet personalities and love to be groomed. Were talkative, come when called and even eat out of the same bowl. We recovered together and would like to stay together forever. Please come meet us to see if we could be the perfect pets for you. Our adoption fee is $10 for both of us (regularly $50) during Animal Services Freedom Friends Adoption Promotion. For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to Animal Services website at www. LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if three months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs six months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500. Tammi and Pebbles ID# 530167 (Tammi) 567231 (Pebbles) Chopper ID# 567295 photos by squaredogphoto.com

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BEACH CHAIR PASTIMEAnswers on page 2531 THE RIVER JULY 12, 2013

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THE RIVER JULY 12, 201332 Diving The USS Mohowk Memorial ReefTwenty-eight nautical miles west of Sanibel, with the main deck less than 60 feet below sea level, the USS Mohawk Memorial Reef is an ideal diving location for beginning and advanced divers photo by Michael Heider and Patricia Molloy FREE MARINA DOCKAGE with Dock Attendants Assistance RIV Nellies Upstairs Waterside Bar Where its Happy Hour all the time!!! 10% OFF Offer valid with Cash payments only... No credit cards. ONE COUPON PER TABLE Can not be used with any other offer. 18% Gratuity may be added to bill before discount. 11am 10pm, Expires July 19, 2013 Snacks in Between11am-10pmwww.nervousnellies.net