Island sun

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Island sun
Uniform Title:
Island sun (Sanibel, Fla.)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. (some col.) ; 36 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Lorin Visek & Ken Rasi
Place of Publication:
Sanibel, Fla
Sanibel, Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Sanibel (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Captiva (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Lee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Lee -- Sanibel
United States of America -- Florida -- Lee -- Captiva

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (July 2, 1993)-
General Note:
"Sanibel and Captiva Islands."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 36863761
lccn - sn 97027775
System ID:
UF00101362:00184


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JULY/AUGUST SUNRIS E/SUNSET: SANIBEL & CAPTIVA ISLANDS, FLORIDA 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 rfn PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAI D FT MYERS, FL PERMIT #5718 Postal Customer ECRWSS Read Us Online at IslandSunNews.com Invasive T oads Discovered Breeding Near Middle G ulf Drive On July 17, during monthly frog call surveys, conducted by the JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge and the Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation (SCCF) on Sanibel, a population of giant toads (Rhinella marinus), also known as cane toads or marine toads, were discovered breeding in a temporary wetland near Middle Gulf Drive and Fulgar Street. Like most other invasive amphibians and reptiles on the island, they did not migrate here by themselves. More likely, they were accidentally brought here in mulch, pine straw, sod, plants or even tadpoles hiding in a small pool of water on any object transported to the island. This species poses a serious threat to wildlife on Sanibel, as well as domestic pets. The large glands behind the eyes and above the shoulders (parotoid glands) produce a toxin (bufotoxin) that is both irritating and deadly to smaller wildlife. When a predator grabs a giant toad in their mouth, the toad inflates its body and the toxin oozes out of the parotoid glands into the mouth of the predator. It is well documented that the poison has killed pet dogs in south Florida. The literature and conversations with veterinarians and pet owners indicate it is a horrific death for the animal. There have even been human fatalities from this species from toad-licking. The tadpoles are continued on page 3 Cartoonist S hares Drawing S kills With Campersby Jeff L ysiakCampers at the Sanibel Recreation Center received a special visit last Friday afternoon from local car toonist and illustrator Dave Horton, who shared with them a few tricks of the trade during his presentation of how to draw action heroes. During two individual sessions one for teens and tweens and another for younger kids Horton described his process of drawing action heroes like their favorite comic book legends in several easy-toremember steps. Using a giant easel and pad of paper, Horton told the crowd that they should start their drawings using a pencil with a light touch, then go over the lines later in ink.continued on page 5 Cartoonist and illustrator Dave Horton and the second and third grade Summer Day Camp kids from the Sanibel Recreation Center dressed in their own hand-made superhero costumes during last Fridays special drawing demonstration and presentation photos by Jeff Lysiak Cane toad, left, and southern toad, right, with the parotoid gland, the source of the cane toads toxin, indicated on both. The gland is larger on the cane toadDDWS Meets Preservation Campaign G oalDing Darling Wildlife SocietyFriends of the Refuge (DDWS) has announced that it has meet its $1.8 million goal for its Refuge Preservation Campaign goal, which it began in January 2013. The campaign raised funds to purchase acreage at Woodring Point at the entrance to the refuges Tarpon Bay sea-life nursery and to add an elevator and other upgrades to the Ding Darling Education Center at J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge on Sanibel Island. The support has been just incredible, said Jim Sprankle, who chaired the continued on page 19 Above left, John McCabe and Jim Sprankle at the start of the refuge campaign mark early donations on the tracking thermometer. Now, the thermometers top mark has been exceeded

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 20132 Visitor Stories From The Sanibel Historical Museum And VillageThroughout the Sanibel Historical Museum and Villages buildings are binders inviting visitors to share their memories of Sanibel whether as long-time residents, as visitors of many years, as students at the Old Schoolhouse, or whatever moves them to record their Sanibel experiences. Loose-leaf pages (themselves a reminder of times past, having come into use around 1900) and pens are provided, and thats all one needs to bring the past alive. From Grace Benham Herst I spent two wonderful years here from 1939 to 1941. I loved the school, the beach, the remoteness of everything. We used to go to Fort Myers when we wanted ice cream there was none on the island because there was no electricity. From a Waterville, Ohio visitor From 1948 to 1952, we came to Fort Myers each year to visit my grandparents. We took the ferry out to Sanibel and a wagon pulled by a tractor or pickup truck took us to our accommodation. The cottage we stayed in was a clapboard bedroom with two double beds and a dresser thats it. Then there was a screened porch with a kerosene stove, table and chairs and sink (with pitcher and bowl, I think). We stayed two or three nights and hunted shells and swam and hunted shells some more. Then, the little cart took us back to the ferry, sunburned and carting our shells. From an unidentified visitor I can remember my husbands grandmother, Jesse Shipley, drove us to the beach down Donax Road, which was only dirt. We drove up on the beach and parked. You could look both ways on the beach and not see one building. From Ruby Singleton Sanders My father ran the mail boat Santiva from 1936 to 1952. I would ride with him in the summer on occasion and walk from Baileys store across to the beach using a palmetto swisher to keep off the mosquitoes. (Rubys father was Cleon Singleton.) Read more about peoples experiences living on and visiting Sanibel at the Sanibel Historical Museum and Village. In addition, the Old Bailey Store contains copies of old newspapers, and just about all the houses have plenty of reading material explaining their history. The Sanibel Historical Museum and Village is open from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday through August 3, and reopens November 6 on a full schedule, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. It is located at 950 Dunlop Road (next to BIG ARTS). There is handicap access to all buildings. For more information, call 472-4648 during business hours or visit www.sanibelmuseum.org. Picnic on the beach Old Island Inn Lets SHOP Till We Drop Enjoy a meal with us in our French Cafe atmosphere.Dine inside or out. Youll love our pet-friendly outdoor patio! Open Monday Saturday www.threecraftyladies.com Find us on WE WILL PAY YOUR TOLL!!!Spend $55 and bring us your toll receipt for a full refund! Island Winds CoiffuresHAIR SALON FOR WOMEN & MEN "Let us Pamper You!"LINDA MARISA JEANNE JOSEPHINE FEATURING FACIAL THREADING BY JOSEPHINE( ) NEW CUSTOMERS ALWAYS WELCOME!

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3 ISLAND SS UN JULY 26, 2013 From page 1Invasive Cane Toadalso toxic, which can lead to fatalities in many animals that consume them. Special care should be taken to prevent dogs, cats, etc. from biting or grasping these toads in their mouths. These are very large toads, reaching up to 5.5 inches in length and possibly near five pounds. They are voracious eaters. They will eat insects, snakes, baby turtles (including small sea turtles, gopher tor toises, box turtles, etc.), lizards, small mammals and birds. They will even eat pet food or any other kind of food left outside. It is highly unique for a frog to eat non-living food. These toads are attracted to bright lights at night because they attract insects. Giant toads are South American in origin. They were brought to Australia in the 1930s to control cane grubs in sugar cane fields. They did not control cane grubs and started eating smaller vertebrates. They have spread throughout northeastern Australia and are still a serious threat. They were released in sugar cane fields in Florida to control a larval form of a beetle as well, hence the name cane toad. Just like in Australia, they escaped from the area and became established. Also, there is a record of approximately 100 being accidentally released in the 1950s in Miami by a pet dealer. The best case scenario is that this is a small, isolated population. The removal of this species from Sanibel, if possible, is crucial to delicate species. SCCF needs help in identifying any other localities where these toads may be present. Sanibel (wildlife and citizens) cannot afford to have this species spread throughout the island. Please keep in mind that there is a similar native amphibian found on Sanibel. The southern toad (Anaxyrus terrestris) is also a true toad (Family Bufonidae). Southern toads are smaller continued on page 15 As of July 22, cane toads have been found at four more locations on Sanibel, with possible sightings at a two more Cassie Cook, intern from JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge and Stephanie Cappiello, intern for SCCF, in the temporary wetland where the toads were found One of the cane toads found on July 17 near Middle Gulf Drive and Fulgar StreetYou can see a live cane toad and southern toad and hear the cane toads call at SCCFs Nature Center. There will be an informal Tank Talk on Friday, July 26, Monday, July 29 and Wednesday, July 31 at 10 a.m., but the toads will be on view during regular Nature Center hours, Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. SCCFs Nature Center is at 3333 Sanibel-Captiva Road on Sanibel.

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 20134 Exploring Books At CECIThe Childrens Education Center of the Islands theme of the week was Exploring Books & Authors. The children designed and created their own books, with very interesting titles. Lots of classic books were shared and some new ones, too. Adian Buscher, Chloe Dreme, Tyler Lloyd and Dylan Stevens were caught reading from their favorite authors Kate Sawicki relaxing in the Reading Nook Something in the book Wesley Whiting is reading hit his funny bone MUSIC LESSONSJennifer ValiquettePrivate Instruction on Piano, Saxophone, & Flute Sanibel and Fort Myers www.SynergySportswear.com Supplying the islands with ART and Fine Framing for over 13 years. Thank You to our loyal customers. 630 Tarpon Bay Rd(near the Over Easy Cafe)Summer Hours : Monday thru Saturday 10am to 4pmwww.sanibelartandframe.com 239-395-1350 WOOSTER TVSERVING SANIBEL AND CAPTIVA FOR OVER 35 YEARS 2422 Palm Ridge Road, Sanibel FL 33957239-472-1133woostertv@embarqmail.com www.woostertv.com

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5 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 From page 1Cartoonist At Rec CenterMy mom said that when I was young, I was drawing everything in the house, said Horton. I used to get into trouble in school because I used to do a lot of drawing. With the older group of campers, Horton asked them to guess which superhero which he described was his favorite as a kid he was drawing. One teen quickly shouted Spiderman! Hey you didnt raise your hand, another camper protested. However, the guess happened to be correct. Horton demonstrated how to draw the eyes starting at the middle of the head, and on a muscular superhero, there are three sets of chest muscles. I dont have any of these muscles, Horton joked as he penned a six-pack of abs on the costumed Peter Parker. Later, Horton asked for random examples of expressions sadness, shock, embar rassment or fright which could be expressed in a few simple strokes of the pen as he drew several sets of eyes, then added a few expressive hints here and there a frowning or raised set of eyebrows as well as a droopy pair of eyelids as examples. But when one camper asked for happiness, Horton admitted, You really need the mouth to show happy. The cartoonist received a surprise of sorts when the second and third grade campers arrived for his demonstration dressed in their own homemade superhero costumes. As a thank you, Horton showed them how to draw one of his favorite characters from his newspaper comic strip, Super Raccoon. Youngsters used their new cartooning skills to draw a raccoon during the presentation Dave Horton shows how to make a variety of expressions using only the eyes Horton drew his favorite superhero Spiderman as part of his drawing demonstration D isaster Response Training ClassThe Sanibel Fire & Rescue District will be holding its next CERT class starting September 10. The class is part of a national program directed at getting the community involved with disaster response so that they can assist first responders when needed. At this time, Sanibel Fire & Rescue has 30 or so members of the CERT and is always looking for more. The training consists of eight modules including disaster preparedness, first-aid, light search and rescue, and hazard recognition. The training will take place on Tuesday evenings through November 5. Anyone interested in joining the CERT ranks may contact Assistant Chief Matthew Scott at 472-5525 or mscott@ sanibelfire.com for more information.

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INSIDE CITY HALL Independently Owned And Operated COPYRIGHT 2013 Island Sun USPS 18: Bulk Rate permit paid for at Sanibel, Florida, 33957 Postmaster: Send change of address to Island Sun, 1640 Periwinkle Way, Suite 2, Sanibel, FL 33957 Published every Friday for the people and visitors of Sanibel and Captiva Islands. Distribution: 10,000 12,000 per week (seasonal). Mailed free to Sanibel and Captiva residents every Friday. Subscription prices: Third Class U.S. $50 one year, $25 six months (Allow 2-3 weeks for delivery). First Class U.S. $115 one year, six months $58 (Allow 3-5 days for delivery). Prices include state sales tax. Send subscription requests to: Island Sun, 1640 Periwinkle Way, Suite 2, Sanibel, FL 33957. The Island Sun will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, please call (239) 395-1213, or write to: Island Sun, 1640 Periwinkle Way, Suite 2, Sanibel, FL 33957. FAX number: (239) 395-2299. E-mail: press@islandsunnews.comRead Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.comContributing WritersKimberley Berisford Constance Clancy, ED.D. Suzy Cohen Marcia Feeney Ed Frank Max Friedersdorf Priscilla Friedersdorf Jim George Shelley Greggs Bryan Hayes Dr. Dave Hepburn Craig R. Hersch Tanya Hochschild Jane Vos Hogg Shirley Jewell Audrey Krienen Patricia Molloy Cindy Malszycki Marge Meek Capt. Matt Mitchell Gerri Reaves Ph.D. Di Saggau Karen L. Semmelman Jeanie Tinch Mark Bird Westall PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER PRINTED WITH LOW-RUB, SOYBEAN INK Co-PublishersLorin Arundel & Ken RasiAdvertising George BeleslinGraphic Arts & ProductionAnn Ziehl Sarah Crooks Kris SeeReportersAnne Mitchell Jeff LysiakISLAND SUN JULY 26, 20136 Commissioners OK Variance For D eli Expansionby Jeff L ysiakDuring Tuesdays planning commission meeting, commissioners approved a variance application as well as a conditional use permit that will allow the Sanibel Deli and Coffee Factory located within the Palm Ridge Shopping Plaza to expand their business and add indoor seating for diners.The business, which opened five years ago this N ovember, according to owner Jeff Weigel, is currently a carry-out only restaurant. They are proposing to expand into a vacant space in an adjacent unit and provide 16 indoor seats for customers.During deliberations related to Weigels applications, commissioners questioned the conditions of the Palm Ridge Shopping Plaza, noting the poor physical appear ance of the parking lot and according to Dr. Philip Marks overfilled dumpsters that may be in violation of health codes. Although both items had no direct connection to Weigels business, members of the commission felt obligated to mention that the owner of the property should be held responsible for keeping the grounds of the shopping plaza in good order.Things are going in the right direction, said Weigel, noting that a new property manager for the shopping plaza has been hired. Regarding the variance application itself, Weigel added, Weve done everything to keep pushing this business for ward, and this is the next logical step.Chuck Ketteman motioned to approve the variance, which was seconded by John Talmage. Commissioners unanimously approved the variance, as well as the conditional use permit, 6-0, with Christopher Heidrick abstaining from the vote. A final vote on Weigels permit will be brought before the commission at their next meeting on August 13. D evelopment Permit A pproved A t Beachview by Jeff L ysiakA development permit which establishes a new parcel of land within Beachview Country Club Estates currently occupied by tennis courts was approved during Tuesdays planning commission meeting. Attorney Beverly Grady, representing property owners The End Golf Management, LLC, told commissioners that the purpose is to create a new parcel or Tract F in order that the existing tennis court facilities may at some point be owned and operated separately from the remaining golf course parcel. In addition, Tract F will also be allocated one unit of reserved residential density should it ever become desirable or necessary in the future to have the use of this parcel converted from recreational to residential. A number of concerned citizens who live in the Beachview neighborhood attended Tuesdays meeting, fearing that the owners of the property have imminent plans to remove the tennis courts and construct a single-family residence on the site. However, Grady told the audience that the property owners have no plans to remove the tennis courts. One homeowner requested that the commission postpone a vote on the matter until other Beachview residents many of whom are snowbirds and away during the summer months return in October or N ovember. Planning Director Jimmy Jordan told the audience that the commission works on a 12-month schedule, and that he sent out notifications to some 359 affected homeowners, receiving approximately 30 responses. Commissioner Chuck Ketteman made a motion to approve the development permit application, which was seconded by Holly Smith. The seven-member panel unanimously approved the permit, which will be returned for final approval on August 13. D iscussions On Permitted, Conditional U ses Continuesby Jeff L ysiakWith a little more guidance from one of the citys leaders, the planning commission on Tuesday received some additional direction in their discussions related to commercial redevelopment policies and procedures. During their last meeting on July 9, commissioners requested that staff examine the permitted and conditional permitted use of several communities like Sanibel across the country. Planning Department Director Jimmy Jordan collected information from six cities Aspen, Colorado; Carmel-by-the-Sea, California; Longboat Key, Florida; Rehoboth Beach, Delaware; Jackson, Wyoming and N ags Head, N orth Carolina and compared each citys zoning code, their process for receiving approval for permitted and conditionally permitted uses and a key for reading the matrix. Vice Mayor Doug Congress told the commission that their work on the commercial redevelopment policy was being done with the hopes of creating efficiencies, lowering costs and making sure the process flows. The heavy lifting, we thought, still needs to begin at the planning commission, added Congress, who also requested a timeline of work performed on creating the new policies and procedures. Chuck Ketteman told his fellow commissioners that they should consider taking a critical look at the entire permitted use/conditional use policy, noting that in other cities, restaurants are defined as permitted uses; on Sanibel, they are a conditional use. John Talmage also suggested providing an educational element as a means of gathering feedback from current and potential future business owners on the island. Jordan requested that the commission members return their matrix with comments in the next week to 10 days so that his department can ready an update before the next planning commission meeting on August 13. Commissioner Holly Smith, however, stated that she was disappointed that more work on the policy was not completed during Tuesdays session.

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CHILDRENS EDUCATION CENTER OF THE ISLANDSInvites You to OurOPEN HOUSEMonday August 5th5 to 7pm 350 Casa Ybel Road, Sanibel IslandThe mission of the Childrens Education Center of the Islands is to create, through our developmentally appropriate curriculum, a nurturing, exciting learning environment that creates happy, curious, confident children. 7 ISLAND SS UN J ULUL Y 26, 2013

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 20138 Hortoons American Legion Post 123 NewsStop by American Legion Post 123 this Sunday, July 28 for BBQ ribs and chicken, served from 1 to 8 p.m. Cost is $12. Enjoy live music with Robby Hutto from 5:30 p.m. until close. Come by Post 123 on Sunday, August 4 for spaghetti and meatballs served all day long. Nine-ball pool tournaments continue every Monday night at 6 p.m. throughout the summer. Texas Holdem is played every Thursday night at 7 p.m. and Saturdays at 4:30 p.m. New players are welcome but must be Legion members. Every Friday, Post 123 serves a six-ounce ribeye steak sandwich all day. Check out the daily specials and the entire menu. The halfpound burgers are a local favorite. Food is served all day, every day. The public is welcome. American Legion Post 123 is open Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 9 p.m., located at mile marker 3 on Sanibel-Captiva Road. For more information, call 472-9979. No need to leave the island... it's all right here!Bailey's Shopping Center (just right of the hardware store) Mark West Pinot Noir Great of Cigars and THE One of the Best Selections of Domestic and Imported Wines on the West CoastBest Liquor Selection on the IslandsSpecial Orders and Case Discounts Tanqueray Gin Crown Royal THE ONLY HEALTH FOOD STORE ON THE ISLAND! Let food be thy medicine & medicine be thy food. Hippocrates 460 BC The Sanibel Sprout Your place to thrive! Email editorial copy to: press@islandsunnews.com

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9 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013MARISSA S NOW R IZZOMarissa Rissa Snow Rizzo, 41, of Sanibel, Florida passed away on July 17, 2013. Marissa was born in Corpus Christi, Texas on January 5, 1972. She graduated from St. Edwards University in Austin, Texas with a bachelor of science degree in chemistry. On August 4, 1998, Marissa was married to Anthony Joseph Rizzo on a beach in St. Croix, USVI. Their marriage was blessed during a ceremony at St. Theresas Catholic Church in Austin, Texas on October 3, 1998. Marissa shared many passions in life. She loved spending time with her beloved husband, Tony; whether on one of their many travels together, spending time on their boat, listening to live music, or visiting with family or any one of their countless friends. Marissas passion for spending time with loved ones was her inspiration. Marissas other passions included horticulture and landscape design, specializing in tropical plantings. She had an incredible knack for blending color, size, and shape to maximize visual and emotional impact. For Marissa, her work in her yard on Sanibel was a labor of love. Marissa also loved taking care of her two Bengal cats Mei Li and Tong Yi. They were inseparable buddies for the past 12 years. Marissa also enjoyed music especially live music as her favorite artists were Jimmy Buffett, Bob Marley, Mishka and Jack Johnson. Marissas life was full, joyous and giving. She continually thought of others before herself, placing everyone elses needs above her own and could light up a room with just her presence. She will be forever missed, but never forgotten, by her loved ones. She is survived by her husband Tony Rizzo of Sanibel; parents Melody and James Lehrmann of Mathis, Texas; brother Derek (Kim) Curlee of Victoria, Texas and sister Molly (Kirk) Hall of Sharpsburg, Georgia. In addition, Marissa had numer ous nieces and nephews and grand nieces and nephews which she cherished deeply and enjoyed spending time with: Mary Curlee, Carlie Hall, Peyton Hall, BillieJo Rizzo, Danielle Reyes, Ryan Strout, Deidre Morrow, Jordan Anthony, Miriah Dial, Lia Dial, Kian Reyes, Elias Reyes, Cooper Westlake, Ashley Kitten, Jacob Vos Winkle, Jared Vos Winkle, Kendle Hansen, Carlee Hansen, Jolee Hansen and Sterling Cole McBride. She was preceded in death by her father, Billy Dumas Curlee, and her grandmother, Mary Francis Rees Koepsel, and grandfather, Anthony Wayne Koepsel. A mass will be held in Mathis, Texas on July 28. Memorial contributions may be made in Marissas memory to the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife on Sanibel. Donations can be made to www. crowclinic.org/support/memorial.php or via mail to P.O. Box 150 Sanibel, FL 33957. Please indicate In memory of Marissa Snow Rizzo on your donation form or check. OBI TUAR Y Physical Therapy, Massage Therapy & Pilates Phone # 239-395-5858 7am-9pm 7 days a week (Summer hours vary) 239-395-1919Hours: 8am-5pm Monday-Saturday Phone # 239-472-5777 Showroom Hours: 8am-4pm Monday-Friday Phone # 239-472-1101Administrative Ofces & Classrooms Phone # 239-472-9700 Conveniently located on Periwinkle Way across from Sanibel Community Park Share your community news with us.Call 395-1213 Fax: 395-2299or emailpress@islandsunnews.com

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201310 Churches/ TemplesANNUNCIA TION GREEK O RTHODOX C HURCH: 8210 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers Rev. Dr. Elias Bouboutsis Orthros Service Sunday 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy Sunday 10 a.m. Fellowship Programs, Greek School, Sunday School, Bible Study www.orthodox-faith.com, 481-2099 BA T Y A M-T EMPLE OF THE ISLA NDS: The Reform Congregation of Bat Yam Temple of the Islands meets for Friday night services at 8 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the United Congregational Church 2050 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel For more information call 239-472-5317 or email ADSilby@yahoo.com. CA PTIVA CHA PEL BY THE SEA: The Rev. George E. Morris Services every Sunday 11 a.m. November 10, 2013 thru April 27, 2014 11580 Chapin Lane on Captiva. 472-1646. FIRST CHURCH OF C HRIST, S CIENTIST : 2950 West Gulf Dr., Sunday 10:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10:30 a.m., Wednesday evening meeting 7:30 p.m.; Reading room open, Monday, Wednesday and Friday 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. (November through March), Friday 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. (summer hours). 472-8684. SA NIBEL COMMUNITY CHURCH 1740 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel, 472-2684 Dr. Daryl Donovan, Senior Pastor Sunday Worship Hours:8 a.m. Traditional Service with Communion9 a.m. Contemporary Service with Kids Church10:45 a.m. Adult and Youth Sunday School classes; 11 a.m. Traditional Service with Choir. Childcare available at all services. SANIBEL C ONG REGATIONAL U NITED C HURCH OF C HRIST: 2050 Periwinkle Way 472-0497 The Rev. Dr. John H. Danner, Sr. Pastor. The Rev. Deborah Kunkel, Associate Pastor Sunday Worship Services: 10 a.m. Full Service, with Sunday School and Nursery Care provided. Elevator access. S T. ISA BEL CATHOLIC C HURCH: 3559 San-Cap Rd., 472-2763 Pastor: Rev. Christopher Senk, Saturday Vigil Mass 5 p.m. Sunday Masses 9:30 a.m. Daily Mass Wed., Thurs., Fri. 8:30 a.m. Communion Service Mon. and Tues. 8:30 a.m. Coomunion Service Mon. and Tues. 8:30 a.m. Holy Days call. S T. M ICHA EL & ALL ANG ELS E PISCOP A L C HURCH: 2304 Periwinkle Way between the Bean and Baileys, 472-2173 Rev. Dr. Ellen Sloan, Rector www.saintmichaels-sanibel.org Sundays at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School (PreK-gr.5) at 9:30 a.m. Wednesdays at 9 a.m. Potluck Supper 1st Wednesday of the month 6:30 p.m. Morning Prayer Tuesdays at 9 a.m. UNIT A RIA N UNIV ERSA LISTS OF THE ISLA NDS: Meets on the first Sunday of each month from December through April at the Sanibel Congregational Church, 2050 Periwinkle Way at 5 p.m. A pot luck is held at a members home on the third Sunday of each month. For more information call 433-4901 or email ryi139@aol.com. a hip BoutiqueHUGE SUMMER CLEARANC E!20-60% OFFSelected ItemsSPECIAL SAVINGS ON MAXI DRESSES! Come See us & Save 472-1115 SALE SALE MEMORI AL P AT ST. CYR S TEVE F. W AT SONS OBITUARY Share your community news with us.Call 395-1213 Fax: 395-2299or emailpress@islandsunnews.com

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11 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Small, formerly of Lakeland and currently of Sanibel, announce the engagement of their daughter, Anna Elizabeth Small, to Austin Gregory Lohmann, son of Mr. and Mrs. Keith Lohmann of Lakeland. The future bride graduated from the University of Missouri and the State University of New York at Stony Brook with a bachelor of arts degree and a master of arts degree in Clinical Psychology, respectively. She is currently pursuing her doctoral degree at the State University of New York at Stony Brook in the same field. The future groom received a bachelor of science in architecture degree from the University of Missouri. He is currently employed as an engineer at Space/Craft Worldwide, Inc. in Edgewood, New York. A fall 2014 wedding is planned, and the couple will live in New York. ENGAGEME NT A NNOUNCEME NT Austin Lohmann and Elizabeth Small S ummit Christian Preschool A t S anibel Community ChurchFall registration packets are available for 2, 3, and 4 year olds and VPK for Summit Christian Preschool at Sanibel Community Church, 1740 Periwinkle Way. Kids eagerly anticipate once again enjoying the creative classrooms and playground. Leslie Celestin, the new preschool director, brings a wealth of experience and knowledge to the preschool program. She has a master degree in Early Childhood Education. Summit Christian Preschool will continue to offer a warm and loving community that seeks to identify and nurture all childrens unique gifts. For further information or to register, email info@summitchristianschool.org or call 482-7007. You may also stop by Sanibel Community Church for a tour, call Kathy at 472-2684. Rivkah and Korynn Livermon on the play ground Leslie Celestin, new preschool director of Summit Christian Schools SCC campus Happy Birthday Happy 50th Birthday, Sandy Messinger Love Scott, Scott Ryan, Justin and Christianna Cohn GraduatesAlec Cohn, son of Dan and Candy Cohn of Sanibel, graduated from the University of Miamis College of Arts and Sciences on May 9 with a dual major in political science and history. During his time at the University of Miami, Cohn was regularly on the Deans List and Provosts List. Prior to attending Miami, he graduated from the International Baccalaureate program at Fort Myers High School and was an Eagle Scout with Troop #140 in Fort Myers. Cohn is currently working for a nonprofit in Miami. Alec Cohn Shop Weekend August 2-4

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201312 1. Margaritaville Marauders 2. Big Smiles 3. The Wineaux 4. Karas Kruisers 5. Best in Show 6. Waterside Inn on the Beach 7. Grannys Gang 8. The Sanibel DDTS 9. American Legion Riders 10. Faster than Jesus 11. Kickin Asphalt 12. Moons Team tied with Terri r the Pirates 13. The 5 Blind Tourist (honorable mention-most cleverly decorated car) 14. The 5 Dribwons tied with The Archways 15. Buccaneers tied with Busty Bev and her Babes 16. The Patriot Act 17. The Crimson Wildcats in threeway tie with Mixed Nuts and Driving with(out) Miss Crazy 18. The Ya-Hoos 19. Myers Flyers 20. Dosinia Dynamos 21. Island Rats tied with Lentz Crew 22. The Jamin Swarts 23. Justins Favorite Ladies 24. Swagabys 25. The Illinois 3 ( voted best decorated car ) tied with Team Dewalt/Bastion 26. 100% Pure Sanibel 27. Jacks Crew tied with Witches of East Lake 28. Copy That 29. The Irish are Back 30. Quebbie 31. Beans 32. The High Rollers tied with The Fighting Conchs 33. Sexy Sanibelians 34. Fast and Sassy 35. Fab 4 36. Team Kelly 37. Tech & Savvy 38. Fantastic Four Coveted Last Place: Red Solo Cups. JACARANDAThe Entertainment Nightly in Sanibels Social Scene1223 PERIWINKLE WAY, SANIBEL 472-1771 Happy Apps $5.95Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna, Crispy Fried Calamari, Chilled Oysters, Steamed Shrimp, BBQ Beef Satays, Mussels Marinara, Chicken WingsSanibels Best HAPPY HOUR4 7 p.m. Nightly in the lounge1/2 Price DrinksCall & Well Liquor, Draft Beer Selections, Select House Wine Third place team, The Wineaux, from left, Ken Waseneak, Dani Howard, Stan Howard, Rudy Zahorchak, Sandy Zahorchak, Susan Wener, Dr. Steven Wener, Mark Steger and Randy Carson First and second place winners of the July 4th Optimist Club Road Rally, Margaritaville Marauders and Big Smiles. From left, runners-up Ann Potter, Birgie Vertesch, Kurt Miller and Liz Kennedy; winners, Allen Dunham, Tootie Monnett, Gary Rogers, Erin White, Cheryl Italiano, Tony Italiano and, holding the sign, Ken Waseneak. Not pictured Jess Fisher. The 34th Independence D ay Road Rally Results Thanks To Our S ponsorsThe 2013 Optimist Club Road Rally Committee, in memory of Francis Bailey, would like to give special thanks to our sponsors for their ever-continuing support. You make our ambition to provide assistance for children at all levels a success. Thank you all. Sanibel~Captiva Community Bank, The Timbers/Sanibel Grille, Sanibel Island Seahorse Cottages, Tween Waters Inn, John and Martha Wolf, Doc Fords Sanibel Rum Bar & Grille, Baileys General Store, Island BarBQ, Waterside Inn, Tarpon Bay Explorers, Nu Way Concrete Forms, The Cedar Chest~Fine Jewelry, American Legion Post 123, West Wind Inn, Over Easy Caf, Sanibel-Captiva Trust Company, Pinocchios Original Italian Ice Cream, T-Shirt Hut Tuttles Seahorse Shop, Mon Reve Lawn Care Inc., Lighthouse Caf of Sanibel, Islander/The Breeze Newspapers, Island Sun, Lifeline Designs, Island Graphics, Captiva Island Store and CHR. This years rally was in memory of Francis P. Bailey. Many thanks to all the hard working volunteers and our wonderful participants. We look forward to seeing you next year. Share your community news with us. Call 395-1213, Fax: 395-2299or email press@islandsunnews.com

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201314 Employee Gives Shell Museum A FaceliftEvery single day, The BaileyMatthews Shell Museum prides itself for the dedicated passion and help of its many volunteers who commit their free time in helping the museum in its mission. However, the museum is also home to a handful of staff members who help ensure that the day to day operations run as smoothly and efficiently as possible. From light fixtures to collections management, to proper staffing, someone is there to ensure that the visitors experience is always world class as it should be for the only accredited museum dedicated solely to shells in North America. This brings to focus one of the newest staff members to join the museum in recent months Harry Ridenour. Ridenour is the museums maintenance person who in just three months of work has taken it upon himself to clean and update all of the museum exhibits. In reality, he is more like a maintenance aficionado with skills that go beyond simple repairs, for instance, he plans to redesign display motors in rotating parts of the central globe exhibit to better suit the heavy weight of the fixture. Not surprising for a man who is part of a race crew and a car enthusiast in his spare time. There is lots of work still left to do, like lifting all the really heavy glass off the displays which requires suction and cleaning the exhibits under there, Ridenour said, gently lifting a delicate queen helmet shell the museums newest Shell of the Moment specimen from its case to wipe away the dust. But whatever I could access without special tools, I went ahead and cleaned so we can keep it in great shape for the visitors. Details are very important to Ridenour, who took special trips to several marinas to find a piece of wood that needed to be replaced in the Sailors Valentines display. He said it took a while to find, but he proudly pointed out the near perfectly matched plank, that one would never spot without having been told, is not part of the original piece of a dock that houses the Valentines on display. Some displays, like the Mangrove Estuaries, which recreates a scene of a mangrove at low tide and complete with bared mangrove roots, a raccoon, exposed mollusks and skittering crabs, takes up a large space and requires a lot of care and caution not to break or disturb its delicate inhabitants. Walking carefully and using compressed air, Ridenour dusted and cleaned the entire display. The job is delicate and challenging, taking many hours to complete, but Ridenour isnt done. From switching all the display lighting to LED bulbs (and those seem countless) to figuring out how to dust the delicate Calusa shell mannequins on display, to simply wiping fingerprints off the glass, he is on a mission to ensure that nothing escapes his attention. Harry Ridenour cleans the Queen Helmet, which is part of the newest Shell of the Moment exhibit 1975-2019 periwinkle way ShopOnSanibel.com Something for Everyone Lazy Flamingo, Inc. 6520-C Pine Avenue Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-5353 Lazy Flamingo 3, Inc. 16501 Stringfellow Rd Bokeelia, FL 33922 239-283-5959 Lazy Flamingo 2, Inc. 1036 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-6939 Lazy Flamingo 4, Inc. 12951 McGregor Blvd. Ft. Myers, FL 33919 239-476-9000Four Great Locations! If Our Seafood Were Any Fresher, We Would Be Serving It Under Water!

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15 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013JOSEPH P. GARIANO, SR.Joseph P. Gariano, Sr., 55, of North Fort Myers, died suddenly on July 6, 2013. He was born on April 25, 1958 in Camden, New Jersey, a son of Frank and Margaret (Hodson) Gariano, Sr. Formerly of Pennsauken, New Jersey, he lived locally for the past 25 years and was the owner of a demolition company until his illness. He is survived by his wife of 30 years, Terry Lynn (Palmer), sons, Joseph P., Jr. and Anthony, both of North Fort Myers, daughters, Roselie of Medford, New Jersey and Lisa of Pennsauken, New Jersey, stepson, John Palmer of New Jersey, daughter-inlaws, Tiffany and Jennifer, grandchildren Joseph III, John Jr, Justin, James, Torii, Jeramiah and Lillyana, sisters, Rose (Harold) Hill of Medford Lakes, New Jersey and Margaret (Frank) Santo of Monroeville, New Jersey, brothers, Frank B. Gariano, Jr. of Asheboro, North Carolina and Gary Gariano of Mountaintop, Pennsylvania, nieces, Margaret (Sean) Phipps of Bellmawr, New Jersey, Theresa (Sean) Cairns of Maple Shade, New Jersey and Heather of Mountaintop, Pennsylvania, nephews, Jason Hill, Frankie, Michael, Robert, Gustin, Max, great nieces, Taylor, Michaela and Elizabeth and a great nephew, Michael. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his sister, Theresa, and a granddaughter, Jasmine. A memorial service will be held privately by the family. For details, please contact them at tgariano3@comcast.net. In lieu of flowers, donations to the family would be greatly appreciated. Friends may sign the guest book at www.horizonfunerals.com. From page 3Invasive Cane Toadthan giant toads (averaging around three inches in length). Young giant toads and adult southern toads are similar in appearance and size. A major difference between the two toads is the size of the parotoid glands. Southern toads have small parotoid glands as opposed to the very large glands on giant toads. Southern toads also have toxin (more of an irritant) in their parotoid glands. It is nowhere near as potent as cane toads. Many animals eat these toads, but that toxin is a deterrent to certain wildlife species. If you hold a southern toad and they are threatened, they will ooze the toxin; if you get it in your eyes, they will burn and water for 20 to 30 minutes. You can find a recording of the cane toads mating call at http://graptemys. com/giant_toad.wav. If you see or hear a giant toad on Sanibel or Captiva, please report it to SCCFs Wildlife Habitat Management office at 472-3984. First, and foremost, please take a picture of the toad if you can, so it can be verified. For more information on cane toad, contact Chris Lechowicz, SCCF Herpetologist and Director, Wildlife Habitat Management at 472-3984 or email clechowicz@sccf.org. OBITUARY (239) 472-1111 2330 Palm Ridge Rd. Across from CVS SanBeautys@aol.com www.SanibelBeautySalon.comSanibel Beauty Salon Free OPI polish and Heavenly Silk hand lotion with Mani/Pedi and coupon Sanibels First Beauty/Barber est. 1951 I CANNOT TELL A LIE...IT'S SIMPLY THE BEST... I CANNOT TELL A LIE...IT'S SIMPLY THE BEST...I CANNOT TELL A LIE...IT'S SIMPLY THE BEST... I CANNOT TELL A LIE...IT'S SIMPLY THE BEST... I CANNOT TELL A LIE...IT'S SIMPLY THE BEST... I CANNOT TELL A LIE...IT'S SIMPLY THE BEST... Are YOU a Beach Foodie? A market for people who love good food!A market for people who love good food!Are YOU a Beach Foodie? Are YOU a Beach Foodie? A market for people who love good food! 2012 Best of Islands 2012 Taste of Islands 362 Periwinkle Way Original Italian Ice Cream Gotta Love Our TANGERINE SHERBET To advertise in the Island Sun Call 395-1213

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201316 Snowy Plover Presentation At CROWSnowy plover breeding season is well under way on Sanibel Island. Take a walk on the beach and you may be lucky enough to see tiny chicks running around, looking for food. Like most shorebirds, snowy plovers nest right on the beach and are potential prey for a host of predators. Their main defense is camouflage, and they blend so well with the color of Sanibels sand that its almost impossible to see them unless theyre moving. Because snowy plovers have declined in numbers over the years, theyre listed as threatened by the State of Florida. In 2002, the Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation (SCCF) initiated their Snowy Plover Project, along with the JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge and the City of Sanibel, to study and protect these vulnerable ground nesters. On Friday, July 26 at 11 a.m., Joel Caouette, SCCFs shorebird monitoring coordinator, will partner with Claudia Burns, longtime Snowy Plover Project volunteer, to present The Secret Lives of Snowy Plovers at the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW). The presentation will feature photos of these cryptic birds along with insights into their behavior, which is often completely different than that of birds who nest in trees. This is a rare opportunity to learn about a threatened species that depends on Sanibels beach for its continued survival, as well as to tour CROWs Healing Winds Visitor Education Center and learn more about their efforts to save wildlife through compassion, care and education. CROW is located at 3883 SanibelCaptiva Road, across from The Sanibel School. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for teens and free for members and children 12 and under. For more information, call 472-3644 ext. 228 or visit www.crowclinic.org. Free Parking At County Sites This WeekendLee County commissioners have designated Saturday, July 27 and Sunday, July 28 as dates during which parking fees will be waived at Lee County-managed boat ramps and regional parks, and admission will be waived at the countys swimming pools in recognition of National Park and Recreation Month. There will be 24 sites at which no fees will be applied, including: Manatee Park, Hickeys Creek Mitigation Park, Caloosahatchee Regional Park, Six Mile Cypress Slough Preserve, Caloosahatchee Creeks Preserve No. 1 and No. 10, Bonita Beach Park, Bowditch Point and Lynn Hall Memorial Park, Bunche Beach, Bowmans Beach and Turner Beach (north side only of Blind Pass). Alva, Davis, Pine Island Commercial Marina and Imperial River. North Fort Myers Community Pool, Pine Island Community Pool and San Carlos Community Pool. Not included in the free parking weekend are sites within city limits of other governments, including Barefoot Beach, beach access points managed by the Town of Fort Myers Beach, City of Sanibel sites including the south side of Blind Pass, and any Cape Coral parks. Lee County is pleased to be a part of the nationwide celebration and help recognize the value and benefits of parks and recreation, said Dave Harner, Lee County Parks & Recreation director. Enjoy a free summer weekend at our facilities. Directions and more information are at www.leeparks.org. Call 533-7275 or email leeparks@leegov.com. Adult snowy plover carrying an egg shell photo by Hugh McLaughlin Adult snowy plover with chick photo by Heather PorterCall for departure time CAPTIVACRUISES H T H E I S L A N D S H THE BEST WAY TO SEE THE ISLANDS IS FROM THE WATER Cruises depart from beautiful Captiva Island 1551 Periwinkle Way I 472-7242 Lunch 113 I Happy Hour 36 I Dinner 59:30Dinner reservations suggested DINING SHOPPING COCKTAILS AWARD-WINNING BISTRO CUISINE JEWELRY, CLOTHING, BOOKS & GIFTS FINE WINES, BEERS & HAPPY HOUR MENU Live! Danny Morgan & Friends! TUESDAYS & THURSDAYS, 8PM UNTI L... IslandSun_MAY06 5/17/06 1:35 PM Page 1 1551 Periwinkle Way 472-7242 Lunch 11-3 Happy Hour 3-6 Dinner 5-9 Chris Workman Every Wed. 7-10pm Danny Morgan & Friends Tues. & Thurs. 7-10pm Live Music

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17 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 CROW Case Of The Week: Florida RedBellied Turtlesby Patricia MolloyT wo Florida red-bellied turtles are currently being treated at CROW after being hit by reckless drivers. The incidents caused extensive damage to their shells. The Florida red-bellied turtle (Pseudemys nelsoni) is found primarily in the Sunshine State. Ranging from 11 to 12 inches in length, the freshwater turtles are quite large and are most often seen basking in the warm sun. Adults consume an energyrich herbivorous diet, which is whey they prefer areas with abundant aquatic plants: marshes, sloughs, mangrove-bordered creeks, lakes and ponds. Females make their nests away from the water, frequently selecting ones already established by alligators. Male red-bellies could be considered romanticsat-heart: they court females by swimming backwards in a display of aquatic prowess followed by a gentle stroking of the side of a females face with their long, front claws. Turtle shells are comprised of two parts: the carapace, which is the domeshaped upper shelling, and the plastron, the flat shelling on the bottom. Dr. Heather treated both patients carapacial fractures by gluing grommets to the defects and tying in place with lacing. The lacing is comprised of an absorbent material that will eventually degrade. While a nonabsorbent suture material is preferable, she used what was available: lacing made from natural materials that was kindly donated to the wildlife clinic. The first turtle, patient #1545, also suffered fractures to his plastron. He is doing well now and we have discontinued all of his pain medications, said Dr. Heather. While he does take his meals while swimming, he must be dry-docked afterward under a heat lamp to avoiding rapid decomposition of the lacing. When patient #1988 arrived, it also had a barnacle on its head and a fish hook in its mouth which is ironic for a freshwater herbivore. The fish hook was surgically extracted promptly as it posed the most immediate danger. Both turtles are well on the road to recovery and will be released back into the wild as soon as Dr. Heather deems them healthy. If you would like to know more about the clinics wildlife patients, go to CROWs Visitor Eduction Center on Wednesday, July 31 at 11 a.m. The program Rescues & Releases of CROWs Patients is presented by members of the CROW team. Learn about rescues and releases of some interesting patient cases and an insiders look at CROWs efforts to save wildlife. For more information, call 472-3644 ext. 228 or go to www. crowclinic.org for a complete schedule of events. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to P.O. Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit www.crowclinic.org. This male Florida red-bellied turtle, patient #1545, is pictured basking under a red heat lamp. While adult females tend to be larger, males possess longer claws and stouter tails S D Taste of the Islands Peoples Choice Award Winner Seven Continuous Years Lunch & Dinner 472-8138 SANIBEL MARINA SANIBEL THRILLER CRUISES SANIBEL THRILLER CRUISES

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201318 Jesse Alexander and Jordan Crabb, both age 17 from Ormond Beach, Florida, caught a sawfish off the coast of Sanibel on July 17 around 9:30 p.m. as a crowd of about 100 people looked on from the beach at West Gulf Drive. Approximately 14 feet long and weighing over 300 pounds, the sawfish was released unharmed and reported to the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). Jesse Alexander and Jordan Crabb pose with their catch photo by Jessy Crabb Fish Caught Ben Arensman, going into the fifth grade at The Sanibel School caught this 14.5-inch pompano off the beach on West Gulf Drive. Ben used a sand flea as bait, which he dug up from the beach just below the water line. Pompanos are excellent eating. Fish Caught Ben Arensmann with his catch Since 1976 A Captiva Island Tradition Since 1976 Captivas Finest Waterfront Restaurant Come by Land.... or Come by Sea... TUE.SAT 4PM CLOSECALL AHEAD 472-2555~ OPEN ~ 10 $99 MEAT! Sanibel Deli & CoffeeF A C T O R Y Lee Parks & Rec To Garner Input About 40-Acre ParcelBird-watchers, hikers, nature photographers and Pine Islanders can help Lee County Parks & Recreation staff select a concept plan for a 40-acre wooded parcel on the island in Northwest Lee County. The public is invited to stop by the Matlacha Community Center between 4 and 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 30. This will be an informal open house workshop with no formal presentation provided. Residents can see two versions of plans for the parcel, which is located just west of the islands four-way stop cattycorner to Phillips Park. One plan calls for passive recreation with a half-mile loop trail, nature observation platform, limited parking and a small pavilion and restrooms. Another plan has an additional amenity an open-space area that could be used for events. Staff will be on hand to receive verbal and written comments about the concept plans and will use information gathered July 30 as they continue plans for the parcel, on which construction is not expected to begin until 2014. This is the third phase of garnering input; two public meetings previously have been held. For more information, call 533-7446, or visit www.leeparks.org for directions to the Matlacha Community Center.

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19 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 From page 1Preservation Campaign Goalcampaign committee. Thanks goes to the hardworking committee and everyone who pledged a contribution to the crucial project. Thanks to Jim and his committee for making this happen, said DDWS president John McCabe. His mangrove cuckoo alone brought in $60,000 toward our goal. The entire community and Ding family really went to bat for us on this one. The final push for the campaign came when an anonymous donor, as a result of touring the Woodring property during the Zonta Clubs Peek at the Unique homes tour in March, pledged a challenge contribution of $200,000, said Sprankle. Immediately, island communities and people from around the country responded with donations of all sizes. We are particularly appreciative of the support from community organizations such as Zonta, COTI, SCCF and the local Audubon chapter, said Sprankle. I cant even begin to thank all the individual contributors -from the young girl who gave us $5 at the Sanibel Farmers Market to the amazing $200,000 challenge donation. The Woodring propertys preservation is a cooperative effort between DDWS and Lee Countys Conservation 20/20 program. Each is purchasing part of the land, and the refuge will restore and manage both parcels. The Woodring family, who homesteaded the property in the late 1800s, currently owns the property, which is adjacent to the refuge and privately owned conservation lands. The purchase of the Woodring property will add to the refuge a key parcel for re-creating an intact habitat and wildlife corridor on the point. It prevents further development and ensures the protection of a vital habitat and feeding grounds for a variety of at-risk species and other fauna and precludes further residential development there. Members of the Refuge Preservation Committee Campaign included Chairman Sprankle, Mary Lou Bailey, Chauncey Goss, Porter Goss, Doris Hardy, Jon Heinrich, Chip Lesch, McCabe, Mike Mullins and Bill Vanderbilt. As a non-profit 501(c)3 organization, DDWS works to support JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuges mission of conservation, wildlife and habitat protection, research and public education through charitable donations and Refuge Nature Shop proceeds. To support DDWS and the refuge with a tax-deductible gift, visit www.dingdarlingsociety.org or contact Birgie Vertesch at 292-0566 or director@dingdarlingsociety.org. Share your community news with us. Call 395-1213, Fax: 395-2299or email press@islandsunnews.com For your entertainment enjoyment, Sanibel & Captivas own Danny Morgan Band Live entertainment in Sea Breeze Caf every Friday and Saturday from 7-10 and at Turtles every Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 1-4 Two fun-filled Happy Hours daily Celebrate the opening of our new restaurants, Turtles, Sea Breeze Caf and Waterview. After Happy Hour, join us for a delicious dinner!Register to WIN a complimentary weekend for two at Sundial Beach Resort & Spa during Sanibel Summerfest. Visit www.SundialResort.com for complete entertainment schedule. For additional information, Sundial Beach Resort & Spa NOW OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Celebrating Sanibel Summerfest Island Join us for our BBQ Blowout every Saturday until Labor Day from 12-4 poolside at Turtles Beach & Pool Bar S S W A M S, F M Brf, FLFLORIDAPIRATECRUISE.COM 800-776-3258S C P P Cf F Sr B$5 OFFWITH THE PURCHASE OF 2 FARES. NO OTHER OFFERS APPLY LIMIT 4 PEOPLE EXPIRES: 08/09/13 SUN13

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201320 Birds Eye ViewShould Wolves Be Hunted?by Mark Bird WestallIn 2011, just as the wolf was beginning to make a remarkable comeback from the brink of extinction in the lower 48 states, Congress, in its wisdom, voted to remove it from the Endangered Species List. Today, hunting seasons have been established in several western states and the argument is given that the recovery of the wolf was so successful and predation by the species on livestock and game has increased to such a high level that hunting is now justified and necessary. I wonder! At the very beginning of my canoe trips into the refuge, I tell my customers that my father has never really understood me because I respect all life and his philosophy has always been, If you cant eat it or hunt with it, what good is it? Then I point out that our government basically agrees with my father when I make the observation that most of our State and Federally Endangered Species are non-game species like wood storks, condors, whooping cranes, manatees, etc. I then go on to shock people when I throw out the idea that if we really wanted to bring manatee populations back up to a stable level, we should probably hunt them! Now, Im not really promoting the idea that we hunt manatees, but if that species was one that we wanted to hunt in the first place and there was a possibility that their population could reach a level that hunting was a sustainable option, I guarantee there would be speed limits everywhere the manatee could be found and the existence of those speed limits would be less controversial. I make this statement because if we hunted the manatee, then even the fishermen could understand why the government was forcing them to slow their flat boats down. They could justify slowing down for a group of people that wanted to hunt the manatee. They find it next to impossible to slow down for some animal lovers that only want to protect the manatee because it is so ugly its cute! Case in point: the American alligator. This species was almost extirpated in Florida by the 1960s because of its valuable hide and meat. But once the government understood that the alligator could possibly go the way of the passenger pigeon and the Carolina parakeet, serious efforts were undertaken to bring the species back. Today, the state estimates that we have over 1.3 million alligators living in Florida, most of them being found living in our residential ponds. Think how many people living along those neighborhood ponds want the alligators there? But because of its valuable hide, the state manages those alligators, so there will always be alligators in our residential ponds. The management policies will limit the individual size of the animals (gators under six feet are less dangerous to humans), but the alligator will survive as a species in Florida; it has value. But this concept that hunted species will fare better than non-game species may not work so well for the gray wolf. Humans have hated this species ever since we started domesticating potential farm animals for our own personal use. The wolf was probably the first animal we domesticated, but once those animals that remained wild began eating our livestock, we developed a hatred of the wolf that has been passed down through the generations to this day. Now, I do not believe our hatred of the wolf stems from some genetic trait that has been passed down through the generations because this species is a dangerous predator of humans; like our fear of crocodilians. Wolves are generally very reclusive around humans. As a matter of fact, there has never been a verified attack of a wolf on a human in North America unless it was rabid, or possibly if it had become too habituated to being around humans. I believe our hatred is purely a cultural hatred. We hate the wolf because he eats our livestock and competes against us when he kills the game species we want to kill. Therefore, forever and ever, we have sat around the evening fires telling stories about Little Red Riding Hood and the Three Little Pigs... and come up with horror stories about werewolves. So the problem is, if we had the possibility of hunting a species like manatees, there would be greater support for their survival because there would be little possibility that increased numbers of manatees would cause more problems for humans and their interests. But that is not the case with wolves. The real reason to hunt wolves is to eliminate them so they wont compete with us. It is not realistic to believe that the government wildlife agencies will ever seriously manage a species so that it can effectively compete on an equal footing with the human farmer and hunter. Unfortunately, the way that the governments management of wolves has evolved doesnt really surprise me. One of my lifes goals was to just hear a wolf howl in the wild someday. I was lucky enough to not only hear the wolf, but get to watch the pack come jogging out of the woods on the way to their evening hunt whenever I want to when I owned my lodge in Alaska. That was one of the best experiences of my life, one that many Americans, Im afraid, will never get to experience. And I think thats a pity! A former city council member and mayor, Mark Bird Westall has owned and operated Canoe Adventures, Inc. on Sanibel for over 33 years. Visit www.canoewithbirdwestall.com for more information. New Business of the Year 3111 West Gulf Drive, Sanibel Gift Cards Available Call 239472 -4559 TraditionsOnTheBeach.com Specializing in weddings, private parties and corporate events

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21 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013Plant SmartWhite Crownbeardby Gerri ReavesWhite crownbeard (Verbesina virginica) is a native Florida vine and member of the aster family. Found in the wild in wet hammocks, coastal shell middens and alongside marshes and streams, it grows to six feet or more. It is suited to a natural garden or as a background to other plants. In summer to fall, flat clusters of wavy white flowers up to a foot across bloom. Each small flower in the cluster consists of the ray flowers, which are three to five oval petals, and the tubular disk flowers, which make up a white and green center disk. The flowers attract butterflies, including the monarch, as well as native bees. The hairy lance-like or ovate leaves are up to eight inches long and vary from lobed to toothed to smooth-edged. The plants winged stems are known for a characteristic that gives the vine other common names in less temperate parts of its growing range: frostweed, iceplant and frost flower. In freezing temperatures, the water in the winged stems freezes and ruptures them. Because the stems continue to draw moisture from the soil, the water and water vapor emits into the air, freezes, and forms ribbon-like ice sculptures to beautiful effect. White crownbeard grows in moist or well-drained soil and even in partial shade. However, full sun and somewhat dry conditions make for a compact plant and more plentiful flowering. It is drought tolerant and easily self-sows. White crownbeard has several medicinal uses, including as an eye treatment and emetic. Sources: Wildflowers of Florida Field Guide by Jaret C. Daniels and Stan Tekiela, Everglades Wildflowers by Roger L. Hammer, A Gardeners Guide to Floridas Native Plants by Rufino Osorio, and edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Plant Smart explores sustainable gardening practices that will help you create an environmentally responsible, low-maintenance South Florida landscape. White crownbeard, a Florida native, is low-maintenance and wildlife friendly photo by Gerri Reaves To advertise in the Island Sun Call 395-1213 rf rf ntb bb f b b bbnbb r rfntn b bfnnfnt bbr ff ffbb 2013-07-25_SAN_Print.indd 1 7/19/13 4:08 PM

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201322 Despite Dirty Water, The Fish Are Still Feedingby Capt. Matt MitchellDirty water and huge high tides greeted anglers this week. This dirty water came after all the rains of the past few weeks along with fresh water discharges from Lake O. This coffee-colored water throughout the sound is certainly not pretty to look at but it has not shut down our fishing. Catch-and-release snook fishing in and around the passes continued to go off. Drift after drift through the passes resulted in hook-up after hook-up. Though most of these snook are in the mid 20-inch range, its awesome to find so many. Small pinfish and grunts have been the baits of choice simply rigged with a split shot to bounce off the bottom during the drift. Once you locate the fish on a certain part of the drift, make this drift over and over. This resulted in many double header hook-ups. The passes also held some bigger snook with a few fish over 30 inches caught just about every trip. Several times this week we hooked into and even caught a few a real monsters right around that magical 40-inch mark all snook fisherman strive for. For the next few months Southwest Florida snook fishing will be about as good as it ever gets. To get away from the crowd in the passes this week Im planning a few night trips. With the snook bite so good in the day time its not hard to imagine how this bite must go off at night. More on the night trips in next weeks report. Redfish have also been starting to show up in the passes too, often as a surprise while drifting for snook. Mangrove fishing on these giant high tides this week for redfish was not as great as I would have expected. I did catch redfish up to 30 inches but it was one here one there with no one area really being on fire. Mangrove shorelines in the northern sound seemed to hold more fish. This I suspect is because of all the fresh water in the southern end of the sound. Tail hooked medium to large pinfish flipped back up under the trees was what they ate for me this week. One day mid-week I had clients who wanted to catch and release sharks. Setting up in Rocky Channel in the northern sound it did not take us long to get our first bite. The strong incoming tide was the perfect set-up to soak large mullet chunks on the bottom. This is really a fun way to fish and about as easy as fishing gets. Large chunks of fresh cut mullet are hooked on a large circle hook, cast out and placed in the rod holders. When a shark picks up the bait, the drag starts screaming. Then its as easy as lifting the rod out of the holder and handing it to the client. This area offers a great variety of species of sharks from bulls to lemons, spinners and blacktips of all different sizes. Sharks really like to come into this deep natural channel. Anchor up with a float buoy on your anchor so you can quickly drop the anchor and chase these bigger sharks when needed. During calm periods, I did spot a few rolling tarpon in the sound. Although I did not fish for them, I had a few reports from other guides of several tarpon hookups. Most of the hooked fish came one of two ways: sight-fishing rolling fish, or while anchored up soaking cut baits. I still bring a few tarpon rods along on every trip as you never know when you will run into them. A few places I spotted tarpon this week included west of Maciever Keys, west of Cork Key and south of Cabbage Key. Summertime fishing is all about options. Have the right gear on board and rigged as you never know when an opportunity will present itself. Being ready really increases your odds as most of the time you will have a very short window to present your bait to that fish that will make a days fishing trip.Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions email captmattmitchell@aol.com. Send Us Your Fish TalesThe Island Sun would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include photographs with identification. Drop them at the Island Sun, 1640 Periwinkle Way, Suite 2, Sanibel, or email to islandsuncity@aol.com; or call Anne Mitchell at 395-1213. Capt. Matt Mitchell with a 30-inch redfish caught and released during a day off this week ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint Prices ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Your Bottom Your Bottom Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices 1 472-5800

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23 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 S CCF S ea Turtle S tatisticsThis week, we officially broke Sanibel and Captivas standing records for green turtle nests laid in a season. There are now nine green turtle nests on Sanibel and two on Captiva. Below is the total amount of sea turtle activity as of July 19, and the previous two years for comparison. As of July 19, 2013: Sanibel East 44 nests, 88 false crawls, 0 hatches Sanibel West 250 nests, 333 false crawls, 8 hatches Captiva 115 nests, 71 false crawls, 9 hatches As of July 19, 2012: Sanibel East 65 nests, 135 false crawls, 0 hatches Sanibel West 221 nests, 469 false crawls, 15 hatches Captiva 75 nests, 100 false crawls, 7 hatches As of July 19, 2011: Sanibel East 35 nests, 79 false crawls, 2 hatches Sanibel West 219 nests, 328 false crawls, 24 hatches Captiva 70 nests, 50 false crawls, 26 hatches For more information, call 472-2329 or visit www.sccf.org. SCCF Living with Wildlife Educator Dee Serage staking a loggerhead nest photo courtesy Kathy Boyd ZAGATZAGAT.COMRated by: Fish Tacos! Alexa Strussion from Columbus, Ohio found an alphabet cone on July 22 while staying at Sanibel Arms West. Top Ten Books On The Island1. My 92 Years On Sanibel by Francis Bailey 2. Dry Grass Of August by Anna Jean Mayhew 3. Ten Thousand Islands by Randy Wayne White 4. Orphan Masters Son by Adam Johnson 5. Sanibel and Captiva Islands by Deborah Gleason and Charles LeBuff 6. Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh 7. Good In Bed by Jennifer Weiner 8. Theres A Secret On Sanibel and Captiva by Karen Richards 9. Zombie Survival Guide by Max Brooks 10. A Bubble Moment by Katie GardeniaCourtesy of Sanibel Island Bookshop S hell Found Alexa Strussion

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201324 An Audubon Florida Special PlaceKissimmee Prairie State Parksubmitted by Marianne KorosyThe last recorded nests of the nowextinct Carolina parakeet, the only member of its genus native to the U.S., were raided by an egg collector on April 30, 1927 deep in a south Florida swamp called Gum Slough. What surrounds Gum Slough is a vast landscape of native prairie, shady hammocks, and shallow sloughs that rises to meet the sky somewhere far in the distance. This largest publicly-owned tract of Floridas dry prairie ecosystem Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park is one of my special places. Dry prairie is found nowhere else in the world and it is home to more than 40 species of plants per square meter, uncountable insects, diamondback rattlesnakes as thick as a tugboat rope, gopher tortoises, spotted skunks, and the occasional Florida panther. It is a wildflower and butterfly paradise to native plant aficionados and a destination for some of the most sought-after bird sightings in the state: crested caracara, white-tailed kite, burrowing owl, and Floridas only endemic sparrow, the Florida grasshopper sparrow, listed as an endangered species by the federal government. Although the dry prairie is indeed dry much of the year, it is a flat landscape riddled with depressions marshes and a spgdery network of shallow sloughs that fill with rainfall annually in late summer and early autumn. The prairie acts as a mileswide-and-deep freshwater reservoir that feeds water slowly into the Kissimmee River, helping nourish and rejuvenate Lake Okeechobee and the Everglades vast river of grass downstream. Audubons history of safeguarding waterbirds in south Florida began at the turn of the 19th century. Lake Okeechobee and the Kissimmee River came quickly into focus as critical to protection of the unique greater Everglades ecosystem, home to millions of nesting waterbirds that were being decimated by the international plume trade. In the early 1980s, the Florida Audubon Society purchased land 25 miles northwest of Lake Okeechobee to form Audubons 7,315acre Kissimmee Prairie Sanctuary. The 54,000-acre Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park was established in 2001 when the State of Florida purchased both the Audubon Sanctuary and an adjacent, lightly-grazed ranch. Today, a new chapter in dry prairie conservation has begun with more than 30 ranchers cooperating to form the Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge. And Kissimmee Prairie Preserve is a lynchpin of biodiversity for the new refuge. For millennia, lightning-ignited fire combined with annual flooding kept the dry prairie treeless and prevented the native saw palmetto from crowding out grasses and flowering plants, said Paul Miller, preserve biologist for the past 10 years. But with fire-suppression policies in place throughout much of the 20th century trees invaded and saw palmetto grew A male Florida grasshopper sparrow sings from a twig perch in Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park photo by Christina Evans Blooming pitcher plants inhabit a bog within the surrounding drier prairie photo by Marianne Korosy George & Wendys Seafood Grille Corner of Periwinkle & Tarpon Bay Road in the Baileys Plaza Lunch, Dinner & Late Night Menu Only All Day Happy Hour on the Island Outdoor Seating (239) 395-1263 for reservations or take-out LIVE ENTERTAINMENT Friday, July 26thRobby Hutto & The Absent-MindedFriday, August 2nd Slow Deal Every Thursday Karaoke Ladies Night-SaturdaysJuly 27th The Troublestarters 9pm-12am 1/2 Price Drinks for LadiesTil We Run Out*Every Tuesday Nite $18 Prime Rib* Every Wednesday Nite $18 Snow Crab Legs* Robby Hutto & The Absent-Minded FREEDRINK*11am-4pm Daily Through July 31stYour Choice of Beverage FREE w/purchase of lunch entre & coupon* George & Wendys Seafood Grille George & Wendys Seafood Grille Your Choice of Beverage FREE w/purchase of lunch entre & coupon* w/purchase of lunch entre & coupon* George & Wendys Seafood Grille George & Wendys Seafood Grille w/purchase of lunch entre & coupon* w/purchase of lunch entre & coupon* great food good timesJean Le Boeuf food PLACEIsland Restaurant 239-472-0223 Full Bar

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25 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013thick and tall. Highways, row crops, and cattle ranches fragmented the dry prairie into ever smaller blocks; less than 20 percent of a landscape that once covered 3.5 million acres remained by the turn of the 21st century. Since the Preserve was established in 2001, Miller added, we burn the dry prairie every two to three years to benefit the Florida grasshopper sparrow, a bird that nests and feeds in the open spaces among lush grasses and sparse shrubs. Even with Floridas finest sparrow experts meeting regularly to discuss best management practices this multicolored little bird is in trouble. In a place where one could stand between earth and sky at first light and hear tip-tup-bzzzzzzz from every quarter of the prairie, there is growing silence. Surveys this spring on publicly-owned lands turned up 14 singing males at Kissimmee Prairie Preserve, down from more than 150 males 10 years ago. Nearby sites reflected the same trend and the experts are baffled. Will there come a day when our spar row sings its last song or can we pull together and prevent this tragic extinction?This column is one in a series from AUDUBON FLORIDA. Marianne Korosy, PhD candidate, is Audubon Floridas jay watch and important bird area coordinator. For more information about Kissimmee Prairie Preserve see www. floridastateparks.org/kissimmeeprairie and www.kissimmeeprairiefriends.org. Three months after a spring-season fire, wildflowers and lush grasses abound at Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park photo by Marianne KorosyCoyote S ighted In The D unes L eaves Paw Printsubmitted by Gillian McBainWe are a family from Scotland who have been coming to Sanibel Island on vacation for a couple of months every summer for the last four years. While my husband and I were sitting out on our back deck on Monday night just after 7 p.m., we heard movement in the undergrowth behind our house. We are renting in The Dunes this year with the property backing onto the dense undergrowth of the SCCF Apple Pond Park. To our enormous surprise, the noise was coming from a coyote running right through our back garden. It was a large specimen who was mostly red in color, with a large, bushy tail. Upon hearing our children playing in the pool, he ran back off into the bushes. Sadly, I didnt have my camera in hand. We came across some scat earlier last week that had a purple color to it and deposits of fur in it; at that point, we never considered it could have come from a coyote. We have only ever seen a coyote once before and that was in Yosemite National Park some time ago. He was a tatty underfed creature while the one we saw this week on Sanibel was very healthy looking. This morning in our back garden next to the lime trees, we noticed a large animal track in the dirt. On closer inspection, it is a large dog-like footprint that must have been left through the night from our coyote. I can only assume he hides in Apple Pond Reserve through daylight hours, then ventures closer to the more populated areas once the sun goes down. We are staying another three weeks on the island, so I will be a bit more prepared while watching the sun go down of an evening and have my camera at the ready to try to catch him next time! The coyote footprint, photographed with a quarter to show the scale

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201326 Sanibel-Captiva Art League A rt L eague Members S how PaintingsLocal tropical and nautical scenes are always a favorite with visitors to the Sanibel-Captiva Art League Annual Summer Art Exhibit currently on view through September at Sanibel Public Library. Many nature studies are included in the exhibit along with still life, architecture, portraits and abstract paintings in a variety of media and sizes The beautiful changing color of the waters of the Gulf of Mexico along with the lush vegetation and delicate flowers provide wonderful subject matter during the Art Leagues weekly Paint-outs. The Library staff and volunteers invite residents and visitors to visit the Library Paint out at Sanibels Walsh Landscaping Martha Graham Carolyn Jones Dorothy Ault Helen Copeland Neil Glaser rf ntbnrr bb bb rtttn Loved this restaurant. Fantastic experience. Food was exceptionally amazing. Service was outstanding. TripAdvisor Member, May 2013

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27 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013and see the new books, CDs and DVDs as well as all the other services such as computers, internet connections and eBook availability. The changing educational and interesting monthly themes often specialize in a variety of subjects that are unique to this area. The Library is located on Dunlop Road. next to Sanibel City Hall. For hours and information call 472-2483 or log on to www.sanlib.org. For Art League information write to PO Box 1192, Sanibel FL 33957 or log on to www.sancapart.com. Randon Eddy Mary Jane Keys Sherry Collier David King Leslie Cornelisen Betty Weise We Proudly Brew Tropial Outdoor Patio Seating Get Crabby At The Cow Get Crabby At The Cow with our Famous Stone Crabs1/2 lb & Best Prices On The Planet Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Come Try our NEW Cowlicious Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials Sanibels Most Award Winning Restaurant LIVE Famous Stone Crabs Famous Stone Crabs Always Fresh ...Always! ...Always! with our with our Always Fresh ...Always Fun! Always Fresh ...Always Fun!

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201328 BIG ARTS Offers New Workshops For Next SeasonBIG ARTS has opened enrollment for the 2013-14 season of workshops. The new season will feature a variety of new classes, such as stained glass, Zentangle (drawing), art appreciation, opera appreciation, oil painting, acrylic painting, book crafting and a mystery/thriller writing critique group. Thats in addition to the return of popular workshops in art, technology, fine crafts, foreign language, music lessons, painting, drawing, pottery, writing as well as discussion groups. BIG ARTS is also adding several new wellness classes, such as Using SelfHypnosis to Improve Health. The new workshops: Odorless Oil Painting: Instructor Sherri Collier will teach a variety of odorless oil painting classes, including beginner and intermediate level classes. These new courses include Sun, Sea and Air Sanibel and Captiva Beaches in Oil; Birds of Ding Darling in Oil; Its all GREEN to Me: Adding Variety to Florida Landand Swamp-scapes in Oil; and Florida Water: Paint it Still, Paint it Choppy, with Oils. Collier will also teach a class analyzing the rules and principles of composition with ways to break these rules, to reflect the artists individuality, energy, emotion, and personality. She has taught and exhibited in Florida and in Europe. She attended Kent Institute of Art in Canterbury, U.K. and is now most inspired by Floridas landscapes and its wild inhabitants. She paints in a loosely representational style and is determined to give class and workshop participants all the personal attention they need to achieve their painterly goals. Stained Glass Classes: Ken Casola will teach new stained glass classes for beginner and intermediate levels. Casola is a master craftsman with 30 years experience in creating stained glass windows for churches, homes and restaurants in one of the biggest stained glass studios in Southwest Florida. He will explain the different types of decorative glass to be used, the process of cutting, laying out a stained glass panel, and the different structural methods using copper foil and lead. Mystery/Thriller Critique Group: Retired television executive producer, lecturer, researcher and author Nancy Bialy Daversa will lead this group whose members will share writing advice and Daversa will review methods to submit works for publication. Oil Painting, Intermediate with Quick-Drying Odorless Alkyd Oil: Lois Ferguson will teach this painting class. She says, If you have always wanted to paint with oils but dislike the strong odor of linseed oil and turpentine and the slow drying of regular oils, alkyd oil is a great alternative. If you have painted with regular oils you will not notice any difference in the mixing qualities and ease of applying. Ferguson moved to Sanibel in 1997 and opened The Artisans Touch, specializing in interior and exterior murals, trompe-lil, faux finishes and decorative furniture painting. She has been teaching decorative furniture painting and oil painting classes at BIG ARTS since 1998. From 2001 to 2006 she was with The Tower Gallery, an artist cooperative on Sanibel, where she sold hundreds of oils, watercolor and pastel paintings. Her paintings are displayed in Sanibel homes, across the U.S. and abroad. Fine Arts Create a Book: Martha Graham will teach Create a Book using Folding Techniques and Create a Book from Small Paper Bags. Graham holds art history and occupational therapy degrees, studied at Parsons, and exhibits on Sanibel at Hirdie Girdie Gallery. Graham first saw a handmade book 15 years ago and was smitten. She has published two books on the subject and has exhibited her paper folded books in art exhibits. She also teaches at the Ward Museum, the Art Institute and Gallery in Salisbury, Maryland. Acrylic Painting for Beginners: Jane Hudsons new beginner acrylic painting class includes a getting started demonstration, including color mixing, preparing the canvas, choosing subject matter, sketching on the canvas/paper, and applying paint. Her goal is to nurture each beginning artist in discovering the joy and satisfaction of creating beautiful art with acrylic paint, and complete a painting with confidence. Group Voice Classes: Soprano Lynn Martindale will be teaching two Instructor Jane Hudson painting at an event at BIG ARTS Instructor Martha Graham Voice Instructor Lynn Martindale LIVE ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY!Happy Hour Daily Half Price 4-6:30pm & All Night Tuesday Online Reservations Available www.brattasristorante.com12984 S. Cleveland Ave., Fort Myers, 239-433-4449JULY NIGHTLY SPECIALS Sunday Any Two Dinner Entrees from our regular menu & a Bottle of House Wine for ONLY $50 Monday 1/2 Price Bottle of Wines(enjoy as many as you like) NO LIMITS Tuesday Happy Hour& $4.99 Appetizers all Night! Wednesday Italian Night!$9.99 Lasagna, Taylor Street Baked Ziti, Cappellini & Meatballs, & Eggplant & Chicken Parmesan $3.00 House Wines By e Glass Thursday Steak & Lobster Tail $14.99 Friday Seafood Extravaganza Pre Fixe Dinner $24.99 per person. $5.00 Martinis! Saturday Make Online Reservations & Receive 25% o Total Check (Regular Priced Items) -ALWAYS AT BRATTAS-EARLY DINING 2 for $20 Dinners daily until 5:30pm, Live Music, Online Discounts, Daily Happy Hour until 6:30pm, Dance Floor, Great Food, Fun & Service

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group voice classes at BIG ARTS, one for adults and one for children. Martindale is known internationally as a singer, pedagogue, adjudicator and workshop clinician. She has performed in operas at the Music Academy of the West; Euterpe Opera; San Diego Opera; Zurich Opera; and Stadt Theater Bielefeld and appeared in concerts and lieder recitals in the U.S., Switzerland and Germany. While working on her masters degree at NYU, she was recruited by Lee Strasberg Institute to teach vocal performance to actors. The next year, she moved to the Musical Theater program at NYU Tisch School of the Arts where she taught private and class voice for 13 years. She has also taught voice at Manhattan School of Music and at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. In 2012 Martindale moved to Fort Myers and opened the Linhart Voice Studio. She served as a judge for the 2013 Young Artist Competition, and continues to serve on the panel of experts for Career Bridges, a New York-based foundation that provides feedback and study awards to young opera singers; as well as on the Advisory Board for Encompass New Opera Theater. Self-Hypnosis for Health Learn the basics of this alternative treatment and its place in wholistic medicine with Dr. William Morrow, a Florida licensed mental health provider with 30 years of private practice experience. He also holds a doctoral degree in pastoral psychology. He regularly teaches adult education courses in mind-body-spiritual health and hypnosis, including at the Chautauqua Institute. He is a member of the Florida Society of Clinical Hypnosis and author of The Rain Doesnt Fall Straight Down: A Positive Slant on Marriage Relationships. Morrow says, The irony of mainstream medicine is that drugs and surgery keep us alive for subsequent, more complex illnesses. Self-hypnosis can be an alternative or supplement to your regular medical treatment. Mind-body management of the symptoms of many illnesses and complex diseases is the pathway to better health and wholeness. Art You Can Hang, All Levels with Patricia OKane is a project-oriented art workshop focusing on complex backgrounds and simple subjects. Artist discussion regarding principles in color theory, mixed media (outsider art/recycled art) resources will be followed by color mixing, support prep, backgrounds, found objects, texture, and composition. No prior experience is required and veteran artists will have opportunities to further embellish beyond simple steps. This new course is also designed to be helpful for the art teacher looking for new projects to teach. OKane is the owner/ instructor for ArtIsIn Studio and Gallery in Princeville, Illinois. A former public school and home school co-op art teacher, she teaches a variety of classes from childrens to enrichment classes for adult artists. OKane considers herself a mixed media artist, but loves drawing, collage, painting with watercolor, acrylics and oils. She has memberships with and has taught for both the Illinois Art League and the Fort Myers Beach Art Association. Introduction to Zentangle: This is an easy-to-learn, relaxing and fun way to create beautiful images by drawing structured patterns. This meditative practice increases focus and creativity, builds artistic confidence along with promoting a sense of well-being. Zentangle also offers a valuable tool to enhance arts and crafts projects; scrapbooking, journaling, and greeting cards. Meg Scotts zentangle course is suitable for a wide range of skills, interests and ages, no previous art experience is needed. Next season brings back BIG ARTS favorites Jack Bailey, who will teach the History of the Swing Era in Jazz, as well as Gisela Damandl who will teach Fun with Gourds, Pine Needle Basketry and Cool Coils basket techniques. BIG ARTS added a new session to the schedule for Ginnie Petersons Encaustic Workshop; a fall session this year for Applied Drawing Basics with Ann McCarty Sickels; as well as new sessions for Ellie Gauses Open Studio: Clothed Model or Still Life. The fourth season of BIG ARTS Winter Academy is also open for enrollment and will feature new courses in art, music, economics, international law and religion. Winter Academy classes delve into subjects on a more in-depth basis than a single lecture but less than a full college course. Led by experts in their field, many of the Winter Academy instructors are retired university faculty in addition to being accomplished speakers. A comprehensive list of workshop and Winter Academy classes and schedules is available online at www.BIGARTS.org. There is a 20 percent discount on workshops for BIG ARTS members. Contact BIG ARTS office or website for class locations. For further information about workshops, classes and events or to become a member, stop by BIG ARTS, 900 Dunlop Road, Sanibel, call 395-0900, e-mail info@BIGARTS.org or log on to www.BIGARTS.org. 29 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 1200 Periwinkle Way (239) 472-1998 Full Liquor Sanibels Italian Kitchen $2.50 OFFPresent this ad to your server. Must be seated prior to 5:30 p.m. Not valid on Wine Wednesday or with any other coupon or discount. Expires 7/31/13The purchase of each adult entree. $8.00 OFF $25 or more. CHEFS SPECIALST-Bone Angelo Grouper Granchiofinished with a sherry mushroom sauce sauted local grouper, encrusted with crabmeat stuffing. Sanibel Grill 22nd Anniversary Special July 22 July 28 we will be celebrating the 22nd Anniversary of The Sanibel Grill! During this time, in addition to our regular nightly specials we will be offering Two Dinners for $22 in addition we will o er Budweiser & Bud Light Drafts for $2.22! Budweiser & Bud Light Drafts for $2.22! Budweiser & Bud Light Drafts for $2.22! Entree choices include Orange Salmon Blackened Tilapia Shrimp Scampi ai Shrimp w/beans & rice Petite Sirloin Steak Crunchy Grouper Sandwich Mahvelous Meatloaf Crunchy Shrimp Basket Opening Day 1991

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201330 D iving The USS Mohowk Memorial ReefMichael Heider of The River Weekly and Island Sun viewing the artwork by Andreas Franke that was deployed on the reef in June. It will be brought back to the surface in September in preparation for a special exhibit at the Alliance for the Arts photo by Patricia Molloy & & & Applications will be accepted on Wednesdays from 9 a.m. and 12 noon and Thursdays from 1-4 p.m. in the Human Resources Oce at Sundial Beach Resort & Spa Announces Full & Part-time Employment Opportunities For Hospitality Positions Full-time OpportunitiesAssistant Housekeeping Manager Part-time & Seasonal OpportunitiesAdministrative Coordinator

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31 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 Poets Corner selected by Tanya HochschildEnough Is Enoughby Susan StuartWe all know when enough is enough. The heat wont let up. The newspaper depresses and demoralizes. Struggle on top of struggle and then that final Straw gets loaded on your back and you know youve had it. You lose it. Enough is enough! But some days, like yesterday, the mighty straw Becomes light as a feather And tickles your fancy till you cant help but smile And know you are lucky to have enough of what it takes For it to be enough. I was sitting on the porch watching the dog parade At the end of the work day; Bassetts and beagles, dingos to doodles. Wine in hand, a perfect Minnesota ending To a pretty perfect day. Quiet, peaceful time. Suddenly a man Id never seen before Came racing across the yard. Seen my chicken? Ive lost my chicken. By any chance have you seen my chicken? There could only be one response. Why did the chicken cross the road? Susan Stuart is a member of Writers Group 5. She lives on Captiva and loves reading, writing, dogs and kids. Mother Writes Parenting BookMotivational speaker, author and talk show host Lisa Hein has released her newest book, titled Manifesting Gods Love In Your Family. Copies of the book are on the shelves of the Sanibel Island Bookshop, located at 1571 Periwinkle Way. Hein has lived in the Tampa Bay area for 15 years and has been invited to share her parenting expertise on national television and radio talk shows, asked to speak at numerous conferences, and hosted a national/international radio talk show called, Everyday Parenting. Her dynamic ability to embrace what is happening within the family dynamics leaves her audiences inspired to want to make some positive changes in their lives. She takes her past experiences in parentdom and shares helpful parenting tidbits that may bring families closer together in their spiritual walk. For more information about Lisas experience, visit her website at www. LisaRHein.com. We invite submissions from local poets. Anyone interested may submit their work via email to tutsie@ comcast.net. Each week, individual work will be showcased. New York CityFine Italian Cuisine FINE ITALIAN CUISINEIL TESORO RISTORANTEinspired by Island Fare in a bistro style Fresh ingredients, simplicity, love... the recipe for a treasured dining experience Chef/Owner AJ Black751 Tarpon Bay Road Sanibel Island, FL Reservations Suggested www.iltesoro.net 239-395-4022 Summer Happy Hour Daily 4:30-62 For 1 Glasses Of House Wine or Bottle Beer HAPPY HOUR ITALIAN TAPAS APPETIZERS STARTING AT $5TASTE OF THE ISLANDS IRON CHEF WINNERVOTED BEST CHEFBEST OF THE ISLANDS AWARD (HAPPY HOUR CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER PROMOTION OR DISCOUNT VOUCHERTIP AND TAX ARE NOT INCLUDED)Share your community news with us. Call 395-1213, Fax: 395-2299or email press@islandsunnews.com

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rfn BUSINESS REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS VOL. 21, NO. 5 SANIBEL & CAPTIVA ISLANDS, FLORIDA JULY 26, 2013 BSECTION F amilys Roots Run D eep At S outh S eas Resortby Jeff L ysiakWhen Ken Sushil thinks about spending his childhood living on the grounds of South Seas Plantation, as it was called back in those days, he thinks fondly about a place where he and his siblings fished, swam, raised chickens and ran carefree around the island paradise. Sushil, whose father, Gerald Sr., was the plantation manager during the 1940s, lived for more than a decade on the grounds of South Seas in a modest, threebedroom wooden frame cottage along with his parents, brother Gerald, Jr. and sisters Laura, Betty and Rita. My dad was born in Austria and emigrated through Ellis Island, said Sushil, who currently lives in Fort Myers. And like a lot of people from Europe, he learned on the job and he was great with his hands. He could fix anything. Training on the railroads, Gerald Sushil Sr. made his way to Florida, eventually landing a job managing a nursery on Pineland for Jean Stewart. That eventually led to the longtime gig on Captiva, where Ken grew up. Ive written a book about those days its called Tales From The Rain Barrel, said Sushil, who is self-publishing the autobiography, with a release date still to be determined. Its filled with stories from my childhood and life lessons that people can share with their own children. One story he shared involved Ken and his sister Rita being sent out in the morning to hunt chickens and collect their eggs. On their way back to the house, Ken who was carrying all of the eggs tripped on a tree root and spilled their entire mornings collection. When they arrived at the house and told their mother all of the eggs had been broken, she simply told her children that they had learned a very important lesson: Dont put all of your eggs in one basket. Following Gerald Sr.s tenure at South Seas, the Sushil family relocated to Pine Island, where the patriarch became a hor ticulturalist. Recently, Sushil discovered a number of family photographs taken during their time there and contacted the management team at what is now South Seas Island Resort. Because his father served in a prominent position at the facility for more than a decade, Sushil thought that Southcontinued on page 2B Ken Sushil stands next to a framed collage of family photographs taken while his father Gerald Sushil was plantation manager at South Seas during the 1940s photos by Jeff Lysiak by Jeff LysiakA manatee whose internal systems had been suffering from the effects of red tide was released back into the wild last Wednesday afternoon at the South Seas Island Resort Yacht Harbour boat ramp, three months after rehabilitating at Tampas Lowry Park Zoo. The male manatee, which had originally been nicknamed Nicky Bubbles, had been discovered by a family on vacation from Wyckoff, New Jersey on April 10. The Thompson family alerted Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission officers that they had found a manatee which appeared to be in severe distress. Kristy at the (FWC) emergency number asked us many questions about the manatee. She advised us that it appeared as though the manatee had red tide poisoning, said Carrie Thompson. The animal was unable to put its nose above the water to breathe, and unless we held it up, he would drown.So, until FWC official could arrive on Captiva, the Thompson family assisted local wildlife law enforcement for nearly two hours in keeping the manatees head above the water. The 900-pound, 10-foot long mammal was transported to the Tampa zoo for assessment, treatment and recovery.According to Denise Boyd, FWC research assistant, the manatee subsequently nicknamed Cap due to the location where he was rescued from was treated at the zoo for Karenia brevis, a toxic strain of zooplankton. Lowry Park Zoo is the only critical care facility which treats manatees affected by red tide. continued on page 8BManatee Released A t S outh S eas Boat Ramp A 10-foot, 900-pound manatee called Cap was released back into the wild on July 17 at South Seas Island Resorts Yacht Harbour boat ramp photos by Jeff Lysiak

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2B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013From page 1BFamilys Roots At South SeasSeas might want the photos for their records. According to Daniel Smock, marketing and communications manager for the resort, South Seas managers not only wanted the photos for their records but for display in the lobby. History is a big part of South Seas, said Smock. I see guests stop and read these historical artifacts. So many of our guests keep coming back, year after year, so they have their own history here. The concierge desk and reception area is decorated with recently-discovered historic photographs of South Seas, including Clarence Chadwick. Just a few steps away from Chadwicks framed photo and biography is the Sushil photo collection. It includes nine images, including a portrait of Gerald Sushil Sr., a family outing to Bowmans Beach taken in the late 1940s and one picture of the Chadwick House. They had a pool behind the house it had saltwater in it, because Mr. Chadwick had bad arthritis, added Sushil. Im happy that they found a home for these photographs. And Im glad somebody was interested in looking at them besides me. A closeup of the framed photo collection A portrait of the Sushil family Gerald and Agnes with children Gerald Jr., Laura, Betty and Ruth The concierge desk and reception area is decorated with recently-discovered historic photographs of South Seas Plantation The Sushil family on a picnic at Bowmans Beach in the 1940s A CPA spends years preparing for moments just like these.Call 239.472.1323When my business was impacted by the BP oil spill, I turned to my CPA rst to help me organize the nancial records needed to make an accurate claim.

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OUR FAMILY HAS CALLED SOUTHWEST FLORIDA HOME FOR MORE THAN 100 YEARS. IT HAS BEEN AN HONOR WORKING WITHIN THE SAN-CAP COMMUNITY OVER THE PAST 18 MONTHS TO BRING QUALITY REPRESENTATION TO THOSE IMPACTED BY THE ACTS OF BP. WE ARE BLESSED TO CALL OURSELVES NATIVES, GRATEFUL TO BE WELCOMED BY THE SANIBEL AND CAPTIVA COMMUNITIES AND PRIVILEGED TO CONTINUE TO OFFER REPRESENTATION TO THOSE IMPACTED BY THE BP OIL SPILL. wilburlaw.com | 239.334.7696SAWYER C. SMITH ESQ. OF THE WILBUR SMITH LAW FIRM IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE CONTENT OF THIS ADVERTISEMENT695 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, Fla 33957 | 1415 Hendry St, Ft. Myers, Fla 339013B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013

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4B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013How Your Chamber Meets Communication Challengessubmitted by the Sanibel and Captiva Chamber of CommerceEvery year the Sanibel and Captiva Chamber of Commerce has over 1.5 million unique website visitors, 190,000 visitors in person to the Islands Visitor Center and up to 30 special business events organized for our members and their partners, clients, customers and friends. Our first priority in communication to our members is to make as much of it as personal as possible. There is nothing better than face to face. No matter how clever, how extraordinary, how revolutionary modern electronics techniques have become, it is the personal touch that really matters. Of course we cannot talk every day to our 600-plus members face to face. We do however organize every year up to 30 events where our members can enjoy the company of their business colleagues who share something special in that all or some important part of their business activities are carried out on Sanibel and Captiva Islands. We have two annual events: our Chamber Retail Expo, typically in January/ February, when all our members are invited to showcase their businesses for the benefit of residents and visitors. The Retail Expo is followed later in the year by the Luminary trail, a magical, evocative and memorable event occurring in the first week of December. Our islands are illuminated by thousands of candles placed by businesses and island clubs in our shopping centers and along our roads. The many hundreds of people who come to the islands especially for luminary are an eloquent testimony to the enjoyment that they get from this occasion. It enables many to engage in conversation with our members at a traditional time of good fellowship. Such conversations between members and their guests at the Retail Expo and during Luminary build camaraderie and foster good communications. The chamber also arranges business lunches 12 times a year where members can meet and talk about the business climate as well as hear selected speakers on current topics important to our islands. Up to 200 members can attend these lunches and speakers include all the islands nonprofits, such as CROW, FISH, Sanibel Sea School, the Bailey-Matthews Shell Museum and SCCF. Less formal but equally well attended are the monthly after hours, hosted by a chamber member, where members meet socially and discuss the day in a relaxed environment. Direct written communication with members is a key part of our communication program. Every week the chamber emails a detailed program of members and island events for the following week to both members and to residents who have joined the mailing list. The chamber also distributes an attractively produced quarterly magazine and a monthly electronic newsletter of notable events. The chamber has been at the forefront of the electronic communication revolution. Its website is one of the most effective of all sites in the Florida tourist industry. More than a million and a half people visit the site annually and it is is regularly the number one source of bookings for island resorts and restaurants. One of the remarkable features of chamber communications, and a great insight into the changes that technology has created, is the way in which we communicate through social media. It has become an inescapable part of our everyday lives. Facebook, Linked In, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest, Flickr these are social media tools we use to engage with others. Social media is changing not only the way we communicate but also the way in which we think about our customers, members and our business audiences. No longer does the message stop with the listener, the viewer or the reader. Anyone using social media can retransmit the message to any or all of their contacts. One picture sent to 10 Facebook friends can be sent to 10 of each of their friends and so on. In just a couple of steps, our message can reach 1,000 or more individuals. The chamber has a structure into which original content is placed: this content is shared with the chambers over 5,600 Facebook friends: if each of them shares it with just an average Facebook group it will be immediately reposted to an audience of 800,000 plus. For example, one of the most influential methods the chamber used to counteract negative media coverage during the oil spill in 2010 was to post on Facebook beautiful beach photos and videos of clear, blue waters and fine, white sandy beaches. The power of these photos and videos gave proof that Sanibel and Captiva remained unspoiled during this difficult time. Content quality is of course key to the likelihood of retransmittal: it is both an art and a science. The art lies in the selection of great pictures and language that communicate the beauty of our surroundings. The science lies in the careful use of trigger words and images words and images that immediately create happy memories of wonderful locations and good times. The chamber has a great team of professional communicators, technically and verbally skilled, whose daily task it is to keep a large and interested audience informed about members businesses and the opportunities they are creating. The chamber knows that good communication is the key to meeting its long standing mission: To promote the prosperity of our members and preserve the quality of life in our Community. Some examples of social media used by the chamber An island beach scene posted on social medial photo by David Meardon With his project The Sinking World, Andreas Franke brings a strange, forgotten underwater world back to life and stages realms of an unprecedented kind www.TheSinkingWorld.com

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5B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013Rotary Happenings submitted by S hirley JewellYou certainly know we are deep into the summer mode here on the islands. Road traffic has somewhat diminished, restaurant tables are available at peak hours, water temperature at the beach is somewhere around 85 degrees and tradewinds and daily rains continue to keep the heat at bay. Summer here, also, is the time many of our friends and neighbors go up north or elsewhere for their vacations, leaving behind just a precious few to hold down the fort. Our Rotarian Club attendance dwindles down, but the clubs executive board and committee chairs hold most of their planning sessions during this time. If any of our fellow non-profits or service clubs have any projects that they would like San-Cap Rotary to explore partnering up with or need some financial support for, please contact us now. We are in the process of evaluating future plans for the upcoming year. Future planning is part of life and planning for a healthy financial future in all stages of our life is extremely important. In most cases, that is when we need to bring in the professionals. Steve Hall, SunTrust Senior Vice President Investment Strategist/Portfolio Manager is one of those professional that Rotary invited to speak to us. Steve has spent the last 30-plus years in the investment industry. He worked for the large investment firms, EF Hutton and Prudential Bache. Regional brokerage firms, Hanifen, Imhoff Securities and Boettcher & Company and established his own investment company where he was a managing partner for 11 years. In 2008, he joined US Trust/ Bank of America Private Wealth and in November 2012, he accepted his position at SunTrust. Hall really didnt have a lot of time to delve into investment strategies in depth with about 15 minutes at our podium, but did touch on a few financial components of todays financial marketplace. Today economic factors are driven by a global-base economy with fragile and changing financial factors happening all around the world. The U.S. is muddling through, but we have a weaken economy from past dangerous government policies. There is a triple effect felt in real estate markets, the auto industry and energy sectors. The industrial nations of the world China, Brazil, and India along with developed economies of Russia and Eastern Europe are feeling the effects of bad government oversight and the lack of consumer confidence. There has been six quarters of bad news regarding sales factors out of Europe. Although there has been a lot of bad news in recent years, there is cautious optimism for the U.S. economy. Banks have adjusted to the new discipline processes. U.S. firms and businesses are investing in their companies once again. The threat of rising interest rates caused the bond market to drop and a switch to stock investment. The U.S. Stock Market is the strongest in the world right now. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernankes recent speech put new optimism and life back into investing, the problem is where? Hall said, Not to look for just stock yields, but increased earnings plus yield over time. No fad buying, dont buy what everyone else is, dont buy low wait for uplift when stocks are trending upward. Its not about just return look at risk. Return on bonds will be depressed and forecasted returns are low. Keep watch on commodities and emerging markets; they affect many aspects of trading. Transparent Hedge Funds and Mutual funds have a broader mandate and diversified portfolios. Financial investing is a disciplined process. Obviously, Hall said quite a deal more, but as the writer of this article, my understanding on this topic is lacking. If you have any questions regarding this subject, call Steve at SunTrust. The Sanibel-Captiva Rotary Club meets at 7 a.m. every Friday at The Dunes Golf and Tennis Club, 949 Sand Castle Road. If you have any questions regarding Rotary, e-mail President Scot Congress at scot@scongress.com. Steve Hall Read us online at IslandSunNews.com rf ntbnr nnrrr tb nrf f rff bnbf nrrrrrfrf frntbffb ttr brrr r

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6B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 The Arsenic Arresters Win A Trip To SanibelIn the spring of 2013, The Discovery Channel posted a contest called Explore the Blue Water Challenge. Middle school teams from all over the country competed and the Arsenic Arresters from Whiteface, Texas were declared the winners. In West Texas, there are very high concentrations of arsenic in the soil, both naturally occurring and as a result of pesticide use. The Arsenic Arresters found a plant that takes up arsenic and converts it to a non-toxic form. The team of three won an all expenses paid three-night, four-day stay on beautiful Sanibel Island. The contest was sponsored by the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation (RBFF). The tour of the JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuges Education Center was provided by the US Fish & Wildlife Service and all of the water activities including a kayak tour through Commodore Creek, the Nature & Sea Life Cruise and a private fishing charter in Tarpon Bay were all provided at no cost to the team or contest sponsors by Tarpon Bay Explorers, the official refuge concessionaire. Front row from left, teacher Laura Wilbanks, Brett Wilson, George Fehr, Hudson Sanders and ranger Toni Westland. Back row, Shawn Wilson, David Maloney from RBFF, Paige Heskamp from Discovery Channel Brett Wilson shows off his catch Hudson Sanders and his catch The Arsenic Arresters with their cruise guides Mari Hanley and Captain Dave Johns Phone: (239)489.0442 State Certi ed General Contractor License # CGC A05420One Builder Serving Sanibel & Captiva for over 35 years Zurbriggen Financial Investment Management Asset Protection Wealth Transfer Perpetual Income Strategies Helping Build A Bridge To Financial Freedom Securities o ered through Securities America, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC Rick Zurbriggen, Registered Representative. Advisory services o ered through Securities America Advisors, Inc., Rick Zurbriggen, Investment Advisor Representative. Zurbriggen Financial and the Securities America companies are not a liated. 20% OFF

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7B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 The groups fishing charter with Capt. Steve Maddix The team has supper at Matzalunas with refuge manager Paul Tritaik along with Wendy and George Schnapp and Margie Klein of Tarpon Bay Explorers rfrntrb rfrntrb rfrntrb rfrntrb nr nrn nrn The Springs Assisted Living is part of Shell Points Integrated Healthcare System. Shell Point is a non-profit ministry of The Christian and Missionary Alliance Foundation, Inc. Shell Point. All rights reserved. SPG-130-13 rfrntrb rfrntrb nrn System. Shell Point is a non-profit ministry of Shell Point. All rights reserved. SPG-130-13 Navigating the myriad decisions in determining if Assisted Living is right for you or your loved one is just plain difficult. Levels of care. Different facilities. Quality. Affordability. All factors in ensuring an optimized quality of life. If youve got a question or a whole list of them meet with our assisted living experts, If youve got a question or a whole list of them meet with our assisted living experts, McKenzie or Vivian, today. With the well being of the individual as their highest priority, McKenzie or Vivian, today. With the well being of the individual as their highest priority, theyll give you answers that can assist you in making the most informed decisions possible. theyll give you answers that can assist you in making the most informed decisions possible. When you do, we also invite you to tour Shell Points newest assisted living facility, When you do, we also invite you to tour Shell Points newest assisted living facility, When you do, we also invite you to tour Shell Points newest assisted living facility, When you do, we also invite you to tour Shell Points newest assisted living facility, The Springs. With beautiful surroundings and Shell Points proven reputation, The Springs. With beautiful surroundings and Shell Points proven reputation, The Springs. With beautiful surroundings and Shell Points proven reputation, The Springs offers an affordable option on a month-to-month basis. The Springs offers an affordable option on a month-to-month basis. The Springs offers an affordable option on a month-to-month basis. The Springs offers an affordable option on a month-to-month basis. Meet with our experts and visit The Springs today! Meet with our experts and visit The Springs today! Meet with our experts and visit The Springs today! Meet with our experts and visit The Springs today! Appointments and tours can be Appointments and tours can be arranged by calling (239) 454-2077 arranged by calling (239) 454-2077 MK M V C M O A L E (r f f n f n t n ) Wilbur Smith Law Firm Becomes 10K SponsorFISH of Sanibel, Inc. announced that The Wilbur Smith Law Firm, through its BP Claim office on Sanibel, has become one of the Silver Sponsors for the 5th annual 10K Race 4 FISH. The race is scheduled to take place on Sanibel on Saturday, October 19. This is the second year that the law firm chose to become a Silver Sponsor. In addition to their support, Zachary Smith, son of Wilbur Smith and younger brother of Sawyer Smith, has been a regular in the FISH 10K, taking first place overall in the 2011 race. Our family has been in Southwest Florida for over 100 years and has always believed in family and community. We appreciate the work that FISH is doing to support those who need assistance on the islands, said Sawyer Smith. We are pleased to do our part by contributing to FISH in hosting this race to continue its mission in helping others. We would like to welcome The Wilbur Smith Law Firm as a returning sponsor of the FISH 10K this year, said John Pryor, co-chairman of the FISH 10K committee. Their support and participation in the race is greatly appreciated. We thank them for their ongoing support and dedication to our organization.More than 50 island businesses and organizations sponsored the 10K last continued on page 19B Sponsorship co-chairs Pete and Nancy Bender, Sawyer Smith of The Wilbur Smith Law Firm, John Pryor, FISH vice president, and Ed Ridlehoover, co-chairman of the FISH 10K Race Committee

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8B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 From page 1BManatee ReleasedIts really a great feeling to be able to be here today and celebrate this release with you, said Boyd, who noted that the release had to be timed when the threat of red tide in local waterways had passed. Shortly after 1 p.m., a cargo truck containing the manatee and several FWC and zoo workers arrived at the boat ramp, where more than 150 resort guests had gathered in anticipation of witnessing the wildlife release. It took nearly a dozen people to help maneuver the animal into position, where following a few last-minute tests, measurements and photographs to commemorate the occasion one final farewell to the great grey beast was called for. And when Nicky Bubbles or Cap entered the water and slowly began swimming away, the crowd broke out in a celebratory cheer. We know that manatees really seem to like this area, said Boyd, who added that this would be the zoos final manatee release. Seven other manatees were released in Cape Coral the week prior. The manatee, originally nicknamed Nicky Bubbles, had been rescued on April 10 Several tests and measurements were taken before the manatee was finally released FWC research assistant Denise Boyd speaks to the local media More than 150 onlookers gathered to watch the wildlife release at South Seas Island Resort Top ProducersJohn R. Wood Real Estate announces its top producers for June: Top Listings Carolyn Tongyai Top Pending Sales Pat Messerich and Mike Newes Top Closed Sales Phaidra McDermott ISLAND SUN BUSINESS NEWSMAKERS Carolyn Tongyai Mike Newes Pat Messerich Phaidra McDermott

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Visit our newest ofce location at Sundial Beach Resort 1451 Middle Gulf Drive 239/472-1478Serving the Islands Since 1975 t r t illa s f sc t a wlar N aptiva Driv G K t rrac ra b r Gar s at ac wal a ra a H K H G lf Harb r Na t c t r s D H t as s rt ac illa Ol a r ial p cial ial O w isti w isti w isti w isti w isti 9B ISLAND SS UN JULY 26, 2013

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10B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013SWAT Swim Team Resultssubmitted by Coach Curt McIntyre, Head Coach, Swat Swim TeamLed by Cameron Dolly and Savannah Nippa, SWAT Swim Team members swam away with Tuesday nights (July 16) Swim Florida Summer meet. All together SWAT swimmers collected six firsts, two thirds, three fourths, five fifths and two sixths. Swimmers and their places were as follows: Cameron Dolly (12) 1st in the 50 freestyle (29.31), 1st in the 50 breaststroke (41.22), and 1st in the 50 backstroke and in doing so lowered his FLAG (Florida Age Group) state qualifying time by 1.5 seconds (31.60); Savannah Nippa (11) 1st in the 50 freestyle (31.82), 1st in the 50 breaststroke (43.32), and 1st in the 50 backstroke (39.56); Jason Perkins (11) 3rd in the 50 breaststroke (48.18), 3rd in the 50 backstroke (46.28), and 5th in the 50 freestyle (35.75); Jacob Lemmon (12) 4th in the 50 freestyle (34.43), 4th in the 50 backstroke (48.44), and 5th in the 50 breaststroke (50.31); and Grace Kearns (11) 5th in the 50 freestyle (36.72), 5th in the 50 breaststroke (51.34), and 5th in the 50 backstroke (50.06). Also scoring for Swat were Anicca Sivsov (9) 4th in the 50 backstroke (53.68) and 6th in 50 freestyle (43.23), and Patrick Martin (9) 6th in the 50 backstroke (54.03). Way to go SWAT swimmers! Read us online at IslandSunNews.com Philanthropy: The Love of Humanityby Steven V. Greenstein, Executive Vice President, The Sanibel Captiva Trust CompanyToday, more women than ever are recognized as major philanthropic donors as a result of both their vast wealth and their desire to bring about meaningful change in the world around them. Through philanthropic giving, women continue to engage in issues of public interest, build civic and social connections, and help shape family values. Women now control more than 50 percent of the wealth in the United States and are empowered to change society for the better. Their strong support of increasingly important issues helps to inspire others and generate heightened visibility for causes that matter. Whether through an outright gift, bequest, charitable lead trust, charitable remainder trust, creation of a donoradvised fund at a community foundation, or a private family foundation, todays women truly can make a difference. Philanthropy is more than just giving away money; it is about helping to solve problems and make the world a better place for generations to come. Indeed, the cost of philanthropy may be easily measured in dollar terms, but the results are always beyond calculation. This summer, why not take some time out to give careful consideration to your philanthropic commitment? The Sanibel Captiva Trust Company is committed to helping women who are involved in philanthropic endeavors on the local, national and global level to achieve their goals. Over the past decade, the company donated over $1 million to nonprofit organizations in order to help them make a difference in the world and deepen roots in the local community. We are fortunate to have a number of firstrate charitable organizations on Sanibel/ Captiva that are dedicated to meeting the needs of our residents and visitors. Whether you have a passion for the arts, nature, family and youth organizations, healthcare or other areas, there is surely a group that would benefit from your time and generosity. We look forward to helping you create and realize opportunities to support your most important causes for generations to come. Airport Reports June TrafficDuring the month of June, 473,208 passengers traveled through Southwest Florida International Airport, an increase of 4.2 percent compared to June 2012. Yearto-date, passenger traffic is up 6.5 percent from the same period last year. The traffic leader in June was Delta with 120,410 passengers traveling to and from Fort Myers. Rounding out the top five airlines were AirTran (86,167), JetBlue (56,797), US Airways (47,585) and Southwest (42,273). Southwest Florida International Airport had 5,079 aircraft movements (takeoffs and landings), an increase of 3.5 percent compared to June 2012. Page Field saw 5,512 movements, a 9.8 percent decrease from June 2012. In addition, more than 2.2 million pounds of air freight moved through Southwest Florida International Airport in June 2013, a decrease of 17.3 percent compared to June 2012. Southwest Florida International Airport served more than 7.3 million passengers in 2012 and is one of the top 50 U.S. airports for passenger traffic. No ad valorem (property) taxes are used for airport operation or construction. For more information, visit www.flylcpa.com or Like us on Facebook at www. facebook.com/flyRSW. BUYING, SELLING OR JUST WANT TO CHAT... TALK TO CHUCK! Sandalfoot 3B2 Fully Furnished 1 BR/1 BA w/Gulf and Pool Views. Weekly Rentals. $28,000 Rental Income in 2012. $499,000 Pine Cove 1A Gorgeous 2 BR/2 BA Gulf Front Corner Unit. Beautifully Furnished! Great Weekly Rentals. $799,900 9319 Kincaid Court Elevated 3 BR/2 BA with a River View. Brand New and Gorgeous. All New Kitchen, Baths, Floors! Huge Lot! $525,000 4203 Dingman Drive Beautifully Renovated 4 BR/3 BA on Approx. 1 Acre on West Gulf Dr. Across from the Beach. $2,495,000 Sunset South 9D Beautiful River & Sanctuary Views from Two Large Lanais! Furnished Top Floor 2 BR/2 BA. Only Steps to the Beach and Pool. $449,000CHUCK BERGSTROM Originally from Chicago, Chuck has been an Island visitor since the late 70s, and over the years was continually drawn to the Islands special magic... Sanibel became home in 2000 and Chuck became a full time Realtor assisting buyers and sellers on these special Islands. Buying or selling... Chucks energy, knowledge and expertise continue to provide a positive experience for his clients.RE/MAX of the Islands2400 Palm Ridge Road, Sanibel, FL 33957Direct: (239) 209-6500 Toll Free: (800) 388-2311 Chuck BergstromIsland Resident, Award Winning RealtorPlease visit my web site,

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11B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 Near-beach river-view updated 2nd floor condo $264K Corner condo at Sundial Beach Resort & Spa $349.9K Gulf-front 2 bedroom grosses ~$60K/yr with low fees $699K Real estate blog at SanibelSusan.wordpress.com 2242 Periwinkle Way Sanibel Square #3 Near-beach home with sunny saltwater pool $449,000 Gumbo Limbo delight with 3 bedrooms & den $499,000 472-HOME (4663) 888-603-0603 Income-producing Island Beach Club 2-bedroom $474K This view at Loggerhead Cay $599.9K with income Bay-view 3 bedroom with dock lease opportunity $599.9K Loggerhead Cay condo with straight view to beach $499K Mariner Pointe 2 bedroom with this bay view $549K The SanibelSusan Team (left to right) Susan Andrews, Realtor Broker; David Anderson, Realtor Lisa Murty, Realtor Elise Carnes, Licensed Assistant & Notary Pointe Santo bright updated 2nd floor 2 bedroom $649.9K Oversized Shell Harbor lot overlooking intersecting canals $885K Over 1/2 acre near end of Umbrella Pool Rd cul-de-sac $399K One of the last undeveloped lots in Island Woods $224K Tropical nicely treed lot overlooking water in Sanibel Bayous $199.9K Double-sized parcel next to cons ervation land on Dimmick Dr $199.9K Single-family home lot in The Dunes golf/tennis community $199K Just Listed 2nd floor Loggerhead Cay 2-bedroom end-unit $599.9K Michelsons Final Round At Murfield One Of The Greatest In Golf Annalsby Ed FrankIf you love golf or if you love sports in general you have to be inspired by the phenomenal final round feat of lefty Phil Mickelson last Sunday in winning the 142nd British Open. The nice guy of golf, the devoted family man, Michelson tamed the brutal links of Scotlands Murfield to win his fifth Major title and perhaps his most coveted. He started the day five strokes back and two over par for the first three rounds. But on the home stretch he birdied four of the last six holes, to end three under par and win by four strokes. He was the only golfer in the illustrious field to finish under par for the tournament. Today was as good as I can play, the smiling, dimpled Michelson said. It was one of my best rounds ever. You bet it was a great round and heres why: The final round 66 tied for low round in the entire four-day tournament. The four birdies in the last six holes were sandwiched with a fabulous par save on 16. He had 31 one-putt greens and he climbed into the elite group of only 15 champions who have won three different Major tournaments in their careers. He hit two shots for the ages on the brutal par 5 17th hole to reach the green in two. Both three woods, the second carried more than 300 yards against a strong wind. He barely missed an eagle putt, but his birdie four all but sealed his hold on the coveted Claret Jug. At age 43, Michelson is the second oldest to win this famous tournament. While the Brits naturally were pulling for their native heroes, Michelson walked the 18th fairway to a roaring ovation that turned thunderous when he sank that curling birdie putt on the final hole. A three-time Masters winner and a one-time PGA winner, Michelson admitted he often doubted whether he had the links shots to win The Open. Links golf is so different, so demanding that he said afterwards, I never knew if Id be equipped. But now the golf world knows he does have the talent to win in Scotland. Michelson has long graced the professional tour in taste, politeness and humor. And his devotion to family and to charitable causes is legendary. When he raised his arms and pumped his fists in victory at Murfield, and when his wife and children fell into his embrace, it was a scene of joy long remembered. Tiger Woods is ranked No. 1 in the world. But surely Phil Michelson has to be ranked No. 1 in admiration and fan popularity. Miracle Begin Seven Game Home Stand This Weekend The Fort Myers Miracle baseball team faces two North Division rivals in a seven-game home stand that begins tonight, Thursday, against Clearwater. After a disappointing sevengame losing streak, the Miracle began the week having won five of their last six games while improving their second-half season record to 15-14. The four-game Clearwater series has 7:05 p.m. starts tonight and Friday, 6:05 p.m. Saturday and a Sunday matinee at 4:05 p.m. The Daytona Cubs ,which had a first-place hold in the North Division early this week, provide the opposition for three games beginning Monday. The first pitch for all three games will be 7:05 p.m. Having losses in eight of their last 13 games, the Miracle dropped into fifth-place in the Florida State League North, but still only three games out of first. Phil Michelson Getty Images Read us online at IslandSunNews. com

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12B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 Doc Fords Joins Galloway Captiva Tri Doc Fords is bringing its signature mix of fresh food, fun and friends to Captiva this summer, both at its new location at Chadwicks Square and as a major new sponsor of the Galloway Captiva Tri. Not only has the well-known local restaurant group signed on as the triathlons new adult event sponsor, but the Captiva management team has signed up for the tri itself as a relay team Raynauld Benyley leading off with the swim, followed by Clark Hill on the bike and topped off with general manager Jean Crenshaw on the run. We are excited about our upcoming participation in the first of many community events on Captiva. Our new venture with South Seas Island Resort is a major opportunity that has our entire team at Doc Fords very excited, owner Marty Harrity said. We are so thrilled to have Doc Fords be part of this amazing event, bringing families and fitness together in our community, said Angie Ferguson, one of the race directors. The Galloway Captiva Triathlon at South Seas Island Resort returns to South Seas for its 3rd annual triathlon on the weekend of September 14 and 15. The timed adult sprint triathlon will be held on Sunday, September 15, while the soldout kids triathlon is Saturday morning, September 14. Proceeds from the event will benefit CCMI Community Cooperative Ministries, Inc. and its School Backpack Program providing emergency food more than 2,000 local children each school year. 2nd Annual South Florida Mud RunSouthwest Florida couple, Dustin Edwards and Stephanie-Ink Edwards, announced the date for the 2nd annual South Florida Mud Run to benefit the new Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida. The event will take place on January 11, 2014 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Redneck Yacht Club in Punta Gorda. Participants can sign up as individuals or teams, and the event is open to children and adults ages 4 and up. One hundred percent of the proceeds benefit the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida. For more information or to register, send an email to southfloridamudrun@ gmail.com or visit http://southfloridamudrun.com. Last year, we decided to organize the South Florida Mud Run as a unique fundraising event to raise money for local charities and promote active family friendly lifestyles, said Stephanie Ink-Edwards. After seeing the fantastic show of support and attendance of almost 2,600 participants last year, we knew we had to keep this going. The South Florida Mud Run features three-miles of challenging and fun obstacle courses designed for all ages of degrees of athleticism. Participants will run, jump, crawl and climb through obstacles in the mud. This year, organizers plan the make one of the two adults course even more challenging and extreme, while keeping the other course more fun for beginners. There will also be two child-friendly courses a half-mile course and a one-mile obstacle run. Both of our children were born at the Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida and admitted to the NICU due to health complications, so raising funds for the new hospital is just one way we can give back and show them how much we appreciate the quality care we received for our children, added Dustin Edwards. All gifts to the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida Capital Campaign support the construction of a new state-of-the-art, 128-bed, comprehensive pediatric health care facility on the grounds of Health Park Medical Center. B. Thomas Golisano, a resident of Naples and noted philanthropist, pledged to match dollar-for-dollar all Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida Capital Campaign contributions up to $20 million. This gift comes as my personal commitment to help Lee Memorial Health System build a hospital where all children in Southwest Florida will receive the best possible care close to home, Mr. Golisano said. I hope this gift helps leverage support from others in the region and motivates everyone to contribute in a meaningful way to this endeavor. Dustin Edwards and Stefanie InkEdwards founded the South Florida Mud Run in early 2012. The Mud Run was created as a unique fundraising event that not only would raise money for a worthy cause, but also promote an active lifestyle in a family friendly way. This event will contribute 100 percent of its net proceeds to the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida to help build a new tower for the hospital. The Doc Fords Tri Team, from left, Raynauld Benyley, Jean Crenshaw and Clark Hill O ces in Sanibel, Fort Myers & Punta Gorda E M J H C DC HOLTZ MAHSH IE DECOSTAATTORNEYS AT LAW Barrier Island Title Services, Inc. (239) 472-3688Youll Appreciate the Difference

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13B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013Blue Ribbon Golf Classic Returns To The SanctuaryThe 2nd annual Blue Ribbon Golf Classic benefitting The Sanibel School Fund will be held at The Sanctuary Golf Club on Saturday, October 5. The event will begin with a 12:30 p.m. shotgun and will include a buffet dinner at the club. Last year, the event raised almost $35,000 for The Sanibel School Fund. Money raised by the School Funds Blue Ribbon Classic helps to provide many resources and enhancements that the shortfalls in the Lee County School System budget cannot, including educational software, classroom computers, the foreign language program, musical instruments, supplies for classrooms and much more. Parent and community support for these programs have helped The Sanibel School earn the Blue Ribbon designation, as well as an A rating, for the past 11 years. The National Blue Ribbon is awarded by the U.S. Department of Education to public and non/public elementary, middle and high schools. The program sets a standard of excellence for all schools striving for the highest level of achievement. This year, the Blue Ribbon golf tournament will feature an 18-hole Florida scramble, the famous helicopter ball drop, a long drive exhibition, an opportunity to win a new Lexus by making a hole-in-one and many other prizes. The Sanctuary Golf Club has a long history of supporting The Sanibel School, beginning over a decade ago by contributing to the computer and media centers, said Art Cassell, Sanctuary Golf Club member and member of The Sanibel School Fund. Sponsorship opportunities begin at $300. The cost for golf and dinner is $200 per person, or $800 per foursome. For information on how to be a sponsor or to sign up for this event, contact Paige Babcock at phbabcock@gmail.com. View of The Sanctuary Golf Club from the helicopter during the 2012 Golf Ball Drop SPORTS QUIZ 1. Name the only switch-hitter to compile at least 300 home runs and 300 stolen bases in his career. 2. Which was the last major-league team to use six different starting pitchers in a World Series? 3. Name the two schools that played in the first college football game, in 1869. 4. When was the last time in franchise history before the 2012-13 season that the Los Angeles Clippers had at least an 11-game winning streak? 5. In 2013, brothers Jared, Eric and Jordan Staal played together for Carolina, the fourth brother trio to do so in a game in NHL history. Name two of the first three. 6. Who was the last male athlete before Will Claye of the U.S. in 2012 to medal in both the Olympic long jump and the triple jump? 7. How many times did golfer Greg Norman finish either second or third at the Masters? ANSWERS 1. Carlos Beltran, who reached the mark in 2012. 2. Pittsburgh, in 1971. 3. Rutgers defeated Princeton. 4. It was the 1974-75 season, when the franchise was based in Buffalo. 5. The Bentleys (Chicago, 1940s), the Plagers (St. Louis, 1970s) and the Stastnys (Quebec, 1980s). 6. Japans Naoto Tajima, in 1936. 7. Six times second in 1986, and ; third in and To advertise in the Island Sun Call 395-1213 10 to 40% OFFH SLEEPERS H MATTRESS SETS H PICTURES H LAMPS H PATIO DINING SETS H RECLINERS H DINING SETS H BEDROOM SETS H LIVING ROOM H TABLES Large Selection of Rattan & Wicker I fell in love with Furniture World the 1st time I went in. They had the SW Florida style furniture I was looking for. The staff made me feel very comfortable and helped me with my questions. Mary Weeks, Ft. Myers I appreciated the personal service I received at Furniture World. The location is convenient and I found what I wanted at a price I wanted to pay. Chris Myers, Sanibel ...Our Promise to You...GUARANTEED (*$500 Min. Purchase) Our Friendly staff is here to help you when you want it. Youre free to look through our store. Family Owned and Operated489-3311

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The variety of dining options on Sanibel and Captiva just keeps getting better. For their size, the islands offer an extensive culinary array all making the most of the areas fresh and abundant seafood and local produce. Youll find everything from burgers to barbecue, bistro style, Italian, Mexican, American, classic deli fare, organic, vegan, gluten-free, caf food and Caribbean. In this column, each week you will be able to stay updated on our local dining establishments and what theyre offering and get the scoop on the island dining scene, whether its fine or casual, take-out or frozen desserts. ISLAND FAREDine Your Way Around Sanibel And Captiva With Anne MitchellFor more information, check out our advertisers in this week's Island Sun RESTAURANTS 14B ISLAND SS UN JULY 26, 2013Wade Craft, manager The Green Flash Read us online at Island SS un NN ews. com Chips Sanibel Steakhouse has many great options for locals and tourists alike. It is open seven nights a week with daily happy hour from 5 to 6 p.m., featuring two-for-one drinks and $4.95 appetizers. For early diners, theres a three-course prix fixe menu for $35 including a cocktail. In addition to an updated wine list, seasonal house-infused liquors such as strawberry-jalapeo tequila, blood orange vodka and cucumber gin are available. The menu features steaks and seafood, including a six-ounce filet mignon topped with jumbo lump crabmeat finished with Hollandaise and served with of asparagus and choice of potato; Parmesan-crusted seabass served with mushroom risotto and finished with a creamy dill sauce. Save room for dessert though, because whether you are a chocolate lover or Key lime pie fan, Chips has something for every sweet tooth. CHIPS SS ANIBEL SS TEAKHOUSE BAILEYS GENERAL STOREBaileys General Store has a full deli, bakery, daily lunch specials, take out and catering for cook-outs, picnics and parties. This is the oldest supermarket on the islands, established long before a causeway linked Sanibel to the mainland. The bakery has freshly made donuts, scones and breads. The deli offers a variety of hot foods for breakfast, lunch and dinner, as well as catering services for special events. Services include shopping for your groceries and delivering them to your home or vacation destination. If you are on a gluten-free diet, pick up the extensive list of gluten-free products near the entrance to the supermarket. The Coffee Bar at Baileys serves espresso based drinks, hot chocolate, smoothies and specialty coffees. BLUE GIRAFFEBlue Giraffe serves breakfast, lunch and dinner from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. This restaurant offers casual island dining seven days a week from a menu featuring fresh local seafood, chowders, salads and steaks. Besides dessert choices, you can get hand-dipped Edys Grand Ice Cream. Dine outside on the boardwalk or inside at handpainted tables decorated by a local artist, or sit at the full liquor bar for a mixed drink, glass of wine or cold beer. DO cC FORD'S RUM BAR & GRILLEDoc Fords Rum Bar & Grille is named for the Doc Ford character in local best-selling author Randy Wayne Whites mystery novels. Its a well known gathering place and tropical theme sports bar with indoor and outdoor patio seating. The combined menu offers all the lunch and dinner items from 11 a.m. until closing. It includes cedar plank salmon topped with a mango chipotle glaze or a marinated grilled chicken sandwich. The fish tacos are an island favorite and theres a well provisioned raw bar. Tropical drinks are a specialty, notably the signature rum drink, Island Mojito. C RORO W' SS NESTNEST AT T wW EEN wW ATERS INNThe Crows Nest at Tween Waters Inn is a more casual place than its sister the Old Captiva House. Its home to the famed Captiva Crab Races and a popular venue for live entertainment. Menu specials include: Tuesday, Prime Rib for Two; Wednesday, Surf & Turf; Friday, Fish Fry; Sunday, Barbecue. Theres live music and nightly happy hour. CIPS PLA cC E Cips Place is named for the late Jimmy Cipriani, a longtime islander and owner of the property on which the restaurant sits. Jimmy always made time for a good conversation, good company and great food. In Jimmys memory, Cips styles itself as a local watering hole. A mural that takes up an entire wall shows lots of islanders through the ages including Cip and if you dont recognize them all, ask to see the key. Food choices range from comfort to culinary with some Caribbean and island favorites as well. And do try the home-made potato chips, the fried buttermilk chicken with sage gravy and the snapper tacos. Choose between the outdoor garden patio or front porch. Indoor seating and full bar are also available. Hours are 11:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. daily with happy hour from 4 to 6 p.m. GEORGE & wW ENDY'S SEAFOOD GRILLEGeorge & Wendys Seafood Grille features live music Fridays and Saturdays with Karaoke on Thursdays. The spacious and modern interior is decorated with original tropical paintings. Eight for $8 lunch specials are available daily from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. through June 30. Offerings include sandwiches, wraps, fried shrimp and tacos. Specials include prime rib Tuesdays for $18, Wednesdays, snow crab legs, $18, and Thursdays, pasta $15. Happy hour is celebrated all day at George & Wendys. The full bar has an extensive wine list, 10 beers on tap, local, domestic and craft beer, mojitos, martinis and other tropical favorites. Hours are 11 a.m. to midnight seven days a week with live piano music. GE PP PETTO'S BB EA cC H FF OODIESThe little market on the east end of Sanibel offers grab and go beach cuisine. The breakfast menu includes sweet and savory croissants, three-cheese egg tartans, muffins and cakes, key lime tarts, cookies and macarons. Seasonal lunch and light dinners include sandwiches prepared on your choice of freshly baked artisan breads, NYC bakery style pizza, stromboli, pasta, salads, Foodie Dogs and now introducing the Foodie Knish. Daily sweets include Pinocchios Original Italian Ice Cream to accompany Cuban roasted coffee drinks, espresso, latte, cappuccino and teas. New to the menu is the GBF London Fog drink. Geppettos accommodates small catering events, brunches, family gatherings and beach picnics. Bakery hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Ice cream, frozen yogurt, gelato and sorbet is served until 9 p.m. GRAMMA DOTSGramma Dots, the only dockside dining on Sanibel, offers a lunch and dinner menu seven days a week from Sanibels only Seaside Saloon where you can leisurely dine at the Sanibel Marina in view of luxury yachts and modest fishing boats and watch the comings and goings of seagoing folk and fishermen. The menu features a full line of only fresh seafood, salads, sandwiches and more. Appropriate dress is required. If youre arriving by boat, check in with dockmaster for a lunch slip, monitor VHF 16. You can tie up for a night or two at the available dockage if you wish. Gramma Dots is open daily at 11:30 a.m. For dinner, arrive before 8 p.m. ISLAND cC O wW The Island Cow is a family favorite with its colorful indoor and outdoor seating and live entertainment. Come as our guests leave as our friends! is the motto. The Cow serves breakfast, lunch and dinner featuring fresh local seafood and meats and has an extensive childrens menu. Starbucks coffee is also on the menu. Hand over The Cows coupon from the Island Suns Sun Dollars coupon book this summer and receive 10 percent off breakfast between 7 and 11 a.m. Hours are 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. GREEN FLASHThe Green Flash has marvelous waterfront views of Captivas bayside and Pine Island Sound. The Green Flash was built on the site of the historic Timmys Nook, opened in 1950. Fittingly, seafood dominates the menu, although other options are offered as well. The Green Flash is easily navigable by boat and is located southwest of Marker 38 on the Intracoastal Waterway. Hours are daily from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. for lunch and 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. for dinner. ILIL TESOROIl Tesoro serves authentic Italian food with the taste and feel of a Tuscan holiday, according to owner Chef AJ Black. He infuses flavors from the old world to the new world of cooking using only fresh seasonal ingredients to bring his dishes to life. Daily specials focus on pairing authentic meals with a bold array of fine Italian wines. Il Tesoro is offering a $25 per person prix fixe 3-course menu for two before 6 p.m. through September. Bottles of house wine are two-for-the-price of one from 4:30 to 6 p.m. and happy hour appetizers are $5. A special Italian tapas (or small plate) menu is available as well. Two-for-one wine and beer is served during happy hour from 5 to 6 p.m. when you present the coupon from the Island Suns Sun Dollars coupon book. Il Tesoro (The Treasure) serves dinner seven nights a week from 5 to 10 p.m. GREAT wW HITE GRILLThe Great White Grill is a sports bar featuring 29 beers on tap and a good wine list. Its home of The Steel Curtain Pizza and has Mexican Night Tuesdays. Theres free pizza delivery too. The Great White carries the Baseball Package for sports enthusiasts and has arcade games for kids of all ages. The regular menu includes hand-cast fresh dough pizza, wings, fries, chicken fingers, salads, gyros, sandwiches and burgers. Check out the Pittsburgh Salad, which consists of grilled chicken, French fries, cheddar cheese, cucumbers, tomatoes and onions on a bed of lettuce.

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15B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 JACARANDAThe Jacaranda Restaurant & Patio Lounge presents "Summer Break" Sunday through Thursday. For one low price, choose an appetizer, entree and dessert for $29.95. This week's featured menu is: Appetizer Pickeled Herring in Sour Cream with Crudite or Blackened Prime Rib with Cajun BBQ Sauce; Main Course Jumbo Coconut Shrimp with Plum Sauce or Petitie Filet Mignon with Baby Portabella Mushroom Sauce; Dessert Choices Turtle Pie, Creme Brulee, Key Lime Pie, Tiramisu, Fresh Berries and Cream. Be sure to ask your server about specialty drinks and bottled wine specials. Theres live music nightly in the patio lounge, which serves a selection of happy apps for $5.95 each during happy hour. LAZY FLAMINGOThe Lazy Flamingo is a famed island hang-out with two Sanibel locations: one at 1036 Periwinkle Way, the other the original at 6520 Pine Avenue, near Blind Pass. If our seafood were any fresher, we would be serving it under water! is the Flamingos motto. And that includes, shrimp, grouper, oysters, conch fritters and chowder as well as chicken. The Flamingo Bread and the Caesar Salad are signature items. Pull up a stool to the rustic bar or take a high or low table. The interior feels like the inside of an old pirate ship with its portholes and hewn wood surfaces. The atmosphere is definitely casual and beer is available by the bottle, on draft or by the pitcher. Jerrys Restaurant and Deli in Jerrys Market is the next best thing to dining in a tropical garden. This family-style restaurant has large windows to view the lush garden with caged tropical birds that are favorites with visitors and residents. Daily specials are offered in the spacious restaurant or you can order a sandwich or hot food from the deli or help yourself at the wellstocked salad bar to take out or eat in. The restaurant is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. JERRYS RESTAURANT AND DELI LIGHTHOUSE CAFEThis long-established island restaurant on Sanibels east end claims to be Home of the worlds best breakfast. Seems customers think so too because this place often has lines of hungry people outside waiting for tables. Youll find hearty choices to start your day such as hotcakes, French toast, Benedicts, omelettes and frittatas, colossal muffins, bagels and berries. Theres also a big lunch menu that includes homemade soups, salads and sandwiches. The Lighthouse Caf is open year-round for breakfast and lunch from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dinner is served from December 15 through April. IL CIELOIL Cielo features eclectic fine dining as well as the more casual Cloud 9 Grille. The happy-hour menu includes specially priced appetizers and drink specials from 4:30 to 6 p.m. and patrons can enjoy appetizers priced at $6 each and two-for-one drink specials on all domestic bottled beer, well drinks and house wine selections. A three-course $35 per person price-fixed menu, complete with one bottle of house wine per couple, is available Tuesday through Thursday evenings from 5 to 6 p.m. In addition to the two dining areas, Il Cielos interior also allows space separate from the main dining room for private functions or community events as well as outdoor patio dining. Il Cielo features a full liquor bar with a wide selection of wines as well as homemade desserts. continued on page 16B PINOCCHIOS ORIGINAL ITALIAN ICE CREAMA Sanibel tradition for 33 years and home of the World Famous Sanibel Krunch and Dirty Sand Dollar Ice Creams, this popular little green shop is located on the east end of Sanibel near the lighthouse in the Seahorse Shopping Center. Named in National Geographic Travel Guides Top 10 Best Ice Creams in Gulf Coast America, all ice cream, frozen yogurt, gelato, sorbet, sorbetto and custards are made fresh every day from the finest and freshest ingredients. Pinocchios is famous for generous portions in unique flavors inspired by the beaches of Southwest Florida. Pinocchios displays 37 from a130+ repertoire of signature flavors. Come see why theres always a crowd at Pinocchios. Next door in sister shop Geppettos Beach Foodies. Hours 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. or until the last person is served. Outdoor dining. Also offering sundaes, shakes, malts, smoothies, frozen coffee drinks, sundaes and hurricanes. Over Easy Caf is a pet-friendly place with indoor and outdoor dining for breakfast and lunch. The covered patio is a popular spot. Choose from 22 different Eggs Benedict, scramblers and omelettes, 11 pancakes and French toast choices, 15 egg specialties and wraps, eight salads and 26 sandwiches and burgers, plus baked goods. Beer and wine is available. Breakfast is served all day. Summer hours are 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. OVER EASY CAF MATZALUNA ITALIAN KITCHENIn the mood for pizza? Matzaluna Italian Kitchen has a wood-fired oven to bake authentic pizzas. Thats in addition to a big selection including over 20 combinations of pasta dinners from $11.95 (including soup or salad and fresh baked bread), affordable veal, tender chicken, choice steaks and seafood (Italian style) in a casual market-like setting. Gluten-free pizza is also available. Wine Wednesdays at Matzaluna means every bottle priced $25 and over will be discounted by $8 all evening. Hours are 4:30 to 9:30 p.m. daily. RC OTTER'S, CANTINA CAPTIVA, SUNSHINE SEAFOOD, KEYLIME BISTRO AND CAPTIVA PIZZA, YOGURT & GIFTSFive Captiva eateries under the same ownership RC Otter's, Cantina Captiva, Sunshine Seafood, Keylime Bistro and Captiva Pizza, Yogurt & Gifts offer a fun and casual dining experience with a tropical flair reminiscent of Key West. RC Otter's and Keylime Bistro have live music outdoors most of the day. Cantina Captiva serves Mexican food. Sunshine Seafood Cafe Wine Bar specializes in fine dining with a very respectable wine list. You have your choice of dining inside or outdoors. All five eateries will take 10 percent off your purchase when you present the coupon from the Island Suns Sun Dollars coupon book this summer. Old Captiva House at Tween Waters Inn, Captiva, offers romantic sunset dining in an historic setting with live piano music. Executive Chef Jason Miller prepares New Florida island favorites, tropical seafoods, classic meats and daily fresh-baked breads and pastries, served with an extensive selection of wines, liquors and coffees. First built as a one-room school for children of Captivas pioneer settlers, the Old Captiva House still reflects much of its original charm from white French doors to hardwood floors to the Gulf of Mexico sunset that streams through the western windows. Its collection of famed cartoonist JN Ding Darlings 1930s whimsical vacation illustrations has led to its designation as a landmark in Southwest Florida. OLD CAPTIVA HOUSE AT TWEEN WATERS INN Presented by: Michael B. Hill Craig R. HerschWill Power ColumnistFlorida Bar Board Certied | Wills, Trusts & Estates Attorneys9100 College Pointe Ct., Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.sbshlaw.com Have You Heard The Three Big Myths About Medicaid Eligibility? Myth #1: The new law has made it impossible to protect your assets from nursing home costs. Truth: While the rules have changed, good planning opportunities exist. Myth #2: Medicaid can take your home. Truth: With proper planning you may very well be able to save your home. Myth #3: If youre already in a nursing home, its too late to protect your assets. Truth: Even if youre in a nursing home, you can still protect the assets you have. Wednesday, July 31, 20132:00 p.m.Temple Beth El 16225 Winkler Rd. | Fort Myers 33908Reservations: 239-425-9379 Free Workshop. Seating is Limited.All attendees will receive a complimentary DVD describing long-term care planning issues. To advertise in the Island Sun Call 395-1213

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16B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 From page 15BRestaurants SANIBEL BEANThe Sanibel Bean coffee shop is java central on Sanibel Island. With its indoor and outdoor seating and free wi-fi, its a popular venue for laptop-toting coffee lovers to relax and check their inboxes, have breakfast or lunch or recharge the batteries in the afternoon. Besides a big selection of coffee from around the globe and a variety of coffee drinks, The Bean has tea and other beverages and a variety of hearty sandwiches, pastries and muffins, plus other light fare. ROS IES CAF & GRILLRosie's repertoire includes crab cakes, grouper and shrimp entrees and steaks with all the trimmings, Southwestern dishes such as burritos and fajitas, soup and sandwich combos, and salads. Among the most popular items is Rosies Famous Cheese Steak made from shaved rib eye, grilled mushrooms, onions and green peppers, Ultimate Cuban and Classic Reuben, home-made muffins and cinnamon rolls and Key lime pie, root beer floats and banana splits. A childrens menu and carry-out are also available. Breakfast is served from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. and happy hour is from 3 to 6 p.m. seven days a week with two-for-one draft beer and wine and a menu that starts at $4.50 for items such as nachos with cheese and salsa and $5.50 wings and chicken tenders. The ice cream bar has 20+ flavors of locally made Royal Scoop ice cream. The Sanibel Fish House is completely renovated. It sports pastel colored interior dcor in the dining room, which looks out to Periwinkle Way. There is also a large bar area with TVs tuned to sports channels. This is the third in the Fish House group. True to its name, the Fish House offers fresh seafood along with meat and poultry dishes. Try the blackened tuna bites and the blue crab and shrimp dip. Present the coupon from the Island Suns Sun Dollars coupon book this summer and receive a free slice of Key lime pie. SANIBEL FISH HOUSE SANIBEL SPRO UTThe Sanibel Sprout is the islands only health food store and eatery, serving gourmet vegan takeout, organic juice and smoothies, organic produce, gluten-free products and supplements and nutraceuticals. The juice bar attracts a lively crowd of healthconscious islanders and visitors and the daily lunch specials are highly popular. The Sanibel Sprout will take 10 percent off your entire purchase when you present the coupon from the Island Suns Sun Dollars coupon book this summer. Sanibel Deli & Coffee Factory offers a gluten free menu in addition to regular choices, along with pizza and wings, Boars Head meats, frozen yogurt and ice cream. There are outdoor tables shaded with umbrellas and free wi-fi. During June, use the coupon from Sun Dollars in the Island Sun to buy a breakfast sandwich and a medium coffee and get one free; the same bogo deal applies to any ice cream product. And from 3 to 8 p.m., a large cheese pizza is just $9.99 with $1 for each additional topping. S ANIBEL DELI & COFFEE FA CT OR Y SANIBEL GRILLThe Sanibel Grill has 16 big screen TVs with satellite TV tuned to every televised sporting event. The Grill shares a kitchen with The Timbers, serving the same fresh seafood, along with burgers, sandwiches, pizzas and salads. Crunchy Grouper and Crunchy Shrimp are signature dishes. To celebrate its 22nd anniversary, the grill is serving two dinners for $22 July 22 -28. The Jacaranda has entertainment nightly. On Friday and Saturday, various artists are featured starting at 8:30 p.m. Weekdays, music is from 7 to 11 p.m. On Monday, its Renata, playing jazz, contemporary music and dance; Tuesday, David Christian, funk, pop and top '40s; Wednesday, Trevor with contemporary top '40s and reggae; Thursday, Malibu Duo, contem -porary, reggae and dance; Sunday, Jamaica Dave & Co., reggae and dance. George & Wendys Seafood Grille has live music tonight, Friday, by Robby and The AbsentMinded rock band; Saturday its Anthony Wayne, guitar and vocals; Sunday is Hospitality Night with happy hour pricing from 8 p.m. to close. Karaoke is Thursdays from 9 p.m. to midnight. This weeks lineup at Traditions on the Beach at the Island Inn includes: Friday and Saturday, Mike Arnone and Kathy Buda, pop pianist and vocalist, performing everything from The Rat Pack to Motown; Wednesday and Thursday, Sanibel's own Pianoman Joe McCormick plays popular favorites and smooth vocal stylings, R&B, jazz and pop. Traditions is closed on Sunday. Scott McDonald plays piano every Friday and Saturday at Il Cielos Cloud 9 Grill from 7 to 9 p.m. McDonald, a Sanibel resident, has had a long music career including being pianist for singer Andy Williams. The Crows Nest at Tween Waters Inn has live entertainment on Fridays and Saturdays from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Crab races take place Mondays and Thursdays. Traders Store & Cafe features music by Chris Workman on Sundays and Wednesdays from 7 to 10 p.m. and Danny Morgan and Friends on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7 to 10 p.m. The Mucky Duck on Andy Rosse Lane, Captiva, features music by Mark Dupuy on Mondays; Rich Lancaster, Wednesdays; Gene Federico, Thursdays and Saturdays; and Buckeye Ken, Fridays. Sea Breeze Cafe at Sundial Beach Resort features the Danny Morgan Band Fridays from 7 to 10 p.m. as well as live entertainment on Saturdays at the same time. Turtles Beach & Pool Bar at Sundial Beach Resort features live entertainment every Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. with Danny Morgan performing on Fridays. The Island Cow on Periwinkle Way has live entertainment on Friday with Dan Confrey; Saturday, Diana Lynn; and Sunday, Buckeye Ken. RC Otters on Andy Rosse Lane, Captiva has live music daily with dining inside and out. Keylime Bistro on Andy Rosse Lane, Captiva features live music days and nights seven days a week with Ken Limeri playing jazz sax from 6 to 10 p.m. every Tuesday. Restaurant owners/managers, please email or fax your entertainment schedule to press@islandsunnews.com or 395-2299. S anibel Grill Celebrates 22 Y earsOpened in July of 1991, the Sanibel Grill, is Sanibels only true sports bar. The Grill as it is known by locals offers the same fresh fish that made the Timbers famous along with burgers, sandwiches, pizzas and salads, in a casual atmosphere featuring 20 TVs with DirectTV satellite and is the islanders favorite place to watch their favorite sporting event. The Sanibel Grill is the home of the largest personal collection of authentic sports memorabilia in Southwest Florida. Autographed photos of owner Matt Asen with sports and TV celebrities adorn the walls, including pictures with regular customers such as Chris Berman, Ted Koppel, Willard Scott, Brooks Robinson and Bobby Hull. In honor of 22 years, the Sanibel Grill will be offering two dinners for $22 from July 22 to 28. Choices from their menu include orange salmon, blackened tilapia. shrimp scampi, Thai shrimp with beans and rice, petite sirloin steak, crunchy grouper sandwich, Mahvelous Meatloaf and crunchy shrimp basket. Wine Spectator A wardSanibel Islands Il Cielo has received an Award of Excellence from Wine Spectator for 2013 honoring the restaurant as having one of the most outstanding wine lists in the world. Wine Spectators Restaurant Wine List Awards recognize restaurants whose wine lists offer interesting selections, are appropriate to their cuisine and appeal to a wide range of wine lovers. To qualify for an award, the list must include vintages and appellations for all selections, including wines available by the glass. The Award of Excellence is awarded for lists that offer a well-chosen selection of quality producers, along with a thematic match to the menu in both price and style. Typically, these lists offer at least 100 selections. LIVE ON THE ISLANDS Traders is unique in that is combines a bustling restaurant with a large shopping emporium selling casual clothing, jewelry, accessories, home decorating and gift items, books and lamps. The restaurant serves bistro style food with an island flair with offerings such as black beans and rice, blackened fish and fresh salads from an open kitchen. Theres no fryer in this place! The tables are freshly wrapped in white paper for each party and theres a pot of colored crayons for doodling, whether youre an adult or a child. Traders has been around long enough to have become a favored local hang-out. Lunch is served from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., happy hour 3 to 6 p.m. and dinner 5 to 9 p.m. Theres live music from 7 to 10 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays with Danny Morgan and Wednesdays with Chris Workman. TRADERS ST ORE & CAFE TIMBERS RESTAU RANT & FISH MARKETThe Timbers Restaurant & Fish Market and the adjoining Sanibel Grill are mainstays of the island dining scene, boasting 35 years of fresh fish on Sanibel Island. The restaurant offers 13 dinners for $13 daily before 6 p.m. plus a large selection of local seafood such as grilled shrimp, fried grouper, oysters, clams and crab cakes. Besides specializing in fresh local seafood, the restaurant has a seafood market that opens at 11 a.m. (except Sunday, when its 2 p.m.) TRADITIONS ON THE BEA CHTraditions on the Beach is one of the few Sanibel restaurants with beachfront dining. The menu features Italian and Mediterranean cuisine based on fresh local seafood, meats and produce. Dining is from 5 p.m. until late and there is live entertainment most nights for listening and dancing. Besides fish and steaks, youll find Moroccan Lamb, roast duck, Texas Wild Boar Saddle and veal. Pasta, grilled items and a raw bar round out the menu. Theres an attractive bar area also serving food and an extensive wine and cocktail list. S UNDIAL BEA C H RE SOR T & S PASundial Beach Resort & Spa's bar and restaurants have enjoyed a $5 million renovation and are now open to the public. Diners may choose from the sophisticated Waterview for an elegant dinner or the more casual Turtles Beach & Pool Bar and Sea Breeze Cafe. All have panoramic beach and Gulf views. Waterview serves dinner Wednesday through Sundays in August. Be sure to try their signature dish: Clay Pot Baked Mediterranean Gulf Grouper. Sea Breeze Caf serves breakfast, lunch and dinner. If you'd like to dine pool side, Turtles provides live music by island troubadour Danny Morgan from 1 to 4 p.m. on Fridays with live entertainment at the same time on Saturdays and Sundays. Danny also performs Fridays in Sea Breeze Cafe from 7 to 10 p.m. Happy Hour is twice daily from 3 to 5 p.m. at Turtles and 5 to 7 p.m. in the Sea Breeze Cafe. Sundial Beach Resort presents a pool side BBQ Blowout every Saturday until Labor Day from 12 to 4 p.m. with live entertainment. The buffet includes grilled hot dogs, hamburgers, chicken, and mahi-mahi along with fresh salads, corn on the cob and baked beans, plus a selection of fresh fruits. Price is $19 for adults and $12 for children 5 years and older.. Our email address is press@islandsunnews.com

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17B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Readers, Picture books are one of lifes great literary pleasures, and summertime usually allows us to slow down a bit and take the opportunity to enjoy a picture book. Picture books come in all shapes and sizes, for every kind of reader in a wide range of subjects and they provide a host of benefits. They are for everyone. I recently came across an article on picture books written by Rick Walton, author of more than 90 works for children. I really liked what he had to say about the benefits of picture books and wanted to share his wisdom with you. In regard to picture books, Mr. Walton says: 1. They are the first books that children fall in love with, that turn children into lifetime readers. Lifetime readers become lifetime learners. Lifetime learners become lifetime contributors. 2. Picture book language is often more sophisticated than the first chapter books that children read, and therefore an excellent way for children to learn language. It is here that children, and others, can learn vocabulary, imagery, rhythm, shape, structure, conciseness and emotional power. 3. The picture book is the most flexible of all literary formats. You can do almost anything in a picture book. This flexibility encourages creativity, in both writer and reader. It broadens the mind, and the imagination. And given todays challenges, we desperately need more creativity, broadened minds and imagination. 4. The picture book, with its interaction between text and illustration, allows the reader to analyze that interaction and find meaning in the visual. And since most of us are surrounded by, and inundated by visual images our whole lives, visual intelligence is an important skill. 5. Some of the best art being created today is found in picture books. Picture books are a great resource for art education. 6. The picture book appeals to more learning styles than any other format. It is read out loud for audible learners. It is written and illustrated for visual learners. It often asks you to interact with it physically for kinesthetic learners. 7. In fact, the picture book, of all formats, is probably the best format for teaching an idea, getting across a point. Because picture books are short, all messages, knowledge and ideas expressed in a picture book must be boiled down to their essence. They must be presented in a way that is impossible to misunderstand. If you want to learn a difficult subject, start with a picture book. If you want to express a powerful message, a picture book is one of the most powerful media for doing so. Many middle, upper grade and even college instructors have recognized the value of using picture books in their teaching. 8. The picture book does more than any other literary format for bonding people one with another. As a child sits on a lap and is read to, as a parent, a grand parent, a teacher or a librarian reads to a child, extremely important connections are made, bonds are formed and generations are brought together. 9. The picture book also has the broadest possible age range of audience. Few four-year-olds will appreciate a novel. But many grandparents enjoy a good picture book. 10. The picture book is short, and can fit easily into the nooks and crannies of our lives. Five minutes here, 10 minutes there, plenty of time for a complete literary experience. Picture books are poetry, adventure, imagination, language, interaction, precision and so much more. Picture books are not books that children should be encouraged to graduate from. For picture books have something important to say, to give, to all ages, all generations. Ms. Greggs is adjunct faculty at Edison State College where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also Nationally Certified School Psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. FISH Scholarship Program Reports High DemandThe Youth Summer Scholarship Program offered by FISH of Sanibel, Inc. has had one of the busiest summers on record. The program allows us to assist qualifying families with their summer child care needs, covering a portion of their expenses so that the parents may continue to work. Some of our summer scholarships include lunch; those that do not may be eligible for our year-round backpack program. The amount of assistance that FISH can provide is based on a sliding scale, according to household income. This year, FISH helped children of all ages to attend one of the many island summer programs, as follows: Five children attended the Childrens Education Center of the Islands (age 2 to 5) program. Twelve children were able to attend the Sanibel Recreation Center (first to eighth grade) program. And three children were able to attend the BIG ARTS program (kindergarten to eighth grade). In addition to helping with summer program costs, FISH provided daily lunch continued on page 19B Isabella Rasi 239-246-47161101 Periwinkle Way #105, Sanibel, FL 239-472-0044 ENGEL & VLKERS Excellence in Real Estate A step above! International Client Base 600 Shops Worldwide Multi-Lingual Staff Your success is my aim. Choosing e Right Insurance Agent Makes All e Di erencemmeek@rosierinsurance.com 239-472-1152 Marge MeekLong-time Island Resident Call me anytime for your business and personal insurance needs. Serving Florida for over 55 years with a team of over 35 professionals. Pool Service & Supply FL Lic. #CPC1457804 472-4100BANNER POOL SERVICE

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My Stars FOR WEEK OF JULY 29, 2013ARIES (March 21 to April 19) With new facts to work with, you should feel more confident in moving ahead. But continue to do so at an unhurried pace so you can spot details you might otherwise miss. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Taking on that new workplace project could be one of your smarter career moves. Expect a surprising show of support from someone who had always been a critic. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You might feel youre too busy to undertake a new responsibility. But check it out before making any decisions. What you learn could persuade you to change your mind. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) You feel quite content enjoying all the comforts of home right now. But the urge to travel grows stronger, and by weeks end, you could begin packing your bags. LEO (July 23 to August 22) A hectic period begins to ease up, but that doesnt mean the Fine Feline can do much catnapping these days. You need to finish those old tasks and prepare for new ones. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Expect to get some good news about your financial situation by weeks end. But it could still be too early to rush out with a long shopping list of things to buy. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Your management skills make an impression on some workplace VIPs who might be looking for someone like you to take on an upcoming project. Good luck. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Meeting a former adversary might be unsettling at first. But time has softened hard feelings, and you could be on the brink of starting a new relationship. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A troubling situation close to home might cause you to change your travel plans. But getting all the facts before you act might cause you to reconsider. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) You might be quite alone right now in deciding to support a major workplace shift. But others will join you as new information supports your bold move. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A former co-worker returns with news that could persuade you to reassess recently made plans. Be sure to consult with a trusted colleague before you act. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your motives behind a recent decision could be called into question by a rival. But once you present the facts, all doubts will be resolved. Enjoy an arts-rich weekend. BORN THIS WEEK: While you love being the center of attention, your generous heart allows you to share the attention with others. port of Palos, Italian explorer Christopher Columbus sets sail in command of three ships -the Nina, the Pinta and the Santa Maria -on a journey to find a western sea route to China, India and Asia. In October, Columbus sighted Cuba, which he thought was mainland China. General Motors Corporation acquires the countrys leading luxury automaker, the million. Cadillac was founded out of the ruins of automotive pioneer Henry Fords second failed company. His third effort, the Ford Motor Company, finally succeeded. erupts in Europe, President Woodrow Wilson formally proclaims the neutrality of in France to begin training for combat. Hitler becomes absolute dictator of Germany under the title of Fuhrer, or Leader. The Fuhrer assured his people that the Third Reich would last for a thousand years, but Nazi Germany collapsed just 11 years later. rams an American PT (patrol torpedo) boat, No. 109, slicing it in two. The destruction is so massive that other American PT boats in the area assume the crew is dead. Two crewmen were, in fact, killed, but 11 survived, including Lt. John F. Kennedy, who would later become president. Johnson signs Medicare, a health insurance program for elderly Americans, into law. At the bill-signing ceremony, former President Harry Truman was enrolled as Medicares first beneficiary and received the first Medicare card. president Jimmy Hoffa is reported missing in Detroit. He was last seen alive in a parking lot outside the Machus Red Fox restaurant the previous afternoon. Authorities have never been able to confirm what really happened to Hoffa. He was declared legally dead in 1982. made the following sage observation: The man who is incapable of making a mistake is incapable of anything. once decided to test several varieties of Coca-Cola to determine their effectiveness, if any, as a spermicide. The results? Diet Coke was the most effective, while New Coke was the least. Upon hearing of the tests, a representative for the company issued the following statement: We do not promote Coca-Cola for medical purposes. It is a soft drink. in its mouth; theyre found in the throat. blurb to indicate a short summary or promotional piece accompanying a creative work? At a trade association dinner attendees with a limited edition of one of his books. It was customary to have a brief summary included on the dust jacket of such books, along with a picture of an attractive woman. Burgess followed this custom with a twist. On the cover of his piece was an image of a woman with her hand held to her mouth, as if shouting. The caption for this image was Belinda Blurb, in the act of blurbing, and bold letters at the top of the dust jacket declared, Yes, this is a Blurb! The name stuck. States, there will be 10 reported UFO sightings. pioneered the paint-by-numbers style of art. He would sketch a piece, then number certain sections for his assistants to paint. People demand freedom of speech to make up for the freedom of thought which they avoid. -Soren Kierkegaard THIS WEEK IN HISTORY STRANGE BUT TRUE THOUGHT FOR THE DAY BEST TAKE-OUT ON THE ISLANDS CALL FOR DAILY SPECIALS472-9300 Jerrys FoodsRestaurant & Deli FULL DELI, BAKERY DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS COLD BEVERAGESCall us for your cookout, picnic and party needs. Well take care of you!Corner of Periwinkle Way & Tarpon Bay Road472-1516 BOARS HEAD MEAT! FROZEN YOGURT & ICE CREAM Sanibel Deli & CoffeeF A C T O R Y Across from CVS in Palm Ridge PlacePIZZA & WINGS CALL AHEAD 472-2555~ OPEN ~ Mon. 7am-3pm Tues. Wed. & Thurs. 7am-8pm Fri & Sat. 7am-9pm Sun. Seasonal FINE ITALIAN CUISINEIL TESORO RISTORANTEwww.iltesoro.netOpen 7 days a week 751 Tarpon Bay Road 239.395.4022 Get The Word Out About Your Take-Out!~Advertise Here~18B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013

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19B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 Superior InteriorsLight Up Your Life With The Right Lightingby Cindy MalszyckiIn addition to knowing which colors are the most flattering to you, its also important to take into consideration how natural and artificial light will affect your desired color scheme. First, consider how much natural light enters the room, and for how long a period during the day. In sunny rooms with a southern exposure, cool colors will be more pleasing than warm ones; hot yellows and reds will produce an unpleasant glare during a large part of the day. These colors are more effectively used in rooms that face north and need the warming effect of sunny colors. Darkening the room by covering the windows doesnt help; it just makes all the colors in your room look dark and gloomy. The window treatment you use will definitely affect the amount and quality of natural light in your room, and therefore your color scheme. Artificial light can affect colors even more dramatically. Generally, standard incandescent bulbs give off a yellowish light. Standard fluorescents create a cold and harsher light. However, many different tints of bulbs are available in both types of lights. Using the right tint in the bulbs you select will definitely help you control the way your colors look in artificial light: walls look grey; blue tinted light makes them look purple; yellow light makes them look red-orange. look grey; red light makes them look purple; yellow light gives them a greenish cast. look grey; red light makes them look orange; blue toned light makes them look unpleasantly greenish. grey; yellow light makes them look bluish green; blue light makes them look yellowish green. As you can see, the effect of different colors is not always predictable, but throwing a light of one color on a wall of the same color will always tend to neutralize that color and ultimately make the wall look dull and grey. Definitely not a pretty picture! So, once you select your color scheme, be sure to carry through with a lighting plan that will enhance and compliment the effect you have in mind. The right light will make or break your decor.Cindy Malszycki is an interior designer on Sanibel/Captiva Islands. She can be reached at cindy@decden.net. FISH Scholarshipto the children in our scholarship proprogram. During the school year, FISH continues to provide scholarship assistance for qualified families so that children may attend programming on the days school is not in session, and assists families in need with funding for off-campus field trips for their children. Summer programs play a crucial role in the development of school-age children. The experiences and structure provided are invaluable to the child and their take responsibility, develop creative skills, build independence and self-reliance, and Giving children an opportunity to participate in these programs while giving the family an opportunity to prosper is one of the most rewarding aspects of what our agency does. To find out if you qualify and receive calling 472-4775. Wilbur Smith Sponsoshipyear, and over 120 people volunteered their support to make it a huge success. The race will begin at 7:30 a.m. at again follow a marked 10K circuit around House for the finish line. There will also be a trade fair, aimed at the runners and their families and friends, as well as refreshment tables and water stations around the island for runners. Email your editorial copy to: press@islandsunnews.com Larry NorrisSanibel 1025 Periwinkle Way Mon Sat. 10 5 Evenings & Sundays by appointmen t 579.0412 Designer CONDO Choose from over 50 fabrics 50 fabrics 50 and 20 wood samples at the same price! NorrisHomeFurnishings.com Complete condo packages starting from $10,999!SANIBEL PA CKAGES P eriwinkle Way Causeway B lvd B aily Rd. E xit I sland

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20B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 Many retirees figure that once they are past the raising children stage of their lives that they can throttle back on many of the expenses that theyve been carrying for many years. Life insurance might not seem so important once youve accumulated some savings and have enough for your own retirement and that of your spouse if she or he survives you. Often, retirees will downsize their home to save on those carrying costs, including high homeowners insurance rates. But theres one insurance policy that retirees (or people still in the middle of their working careers) shouldnt scrimp on. Umbrella insurance policies. For those of you unfamiliar, umbrella insurance policies cover above and beyond what your homeowners and automobile policies may not cover. The typical highest liability coverage that standard automobile policies cover is 300/500/100, which translates to $300,000 of bodily injury per person, $500,000 of bodily injury per accident and $100,000 of property damage. But what if you are involved in a ter rible automobile accident and cause per manent injury to someone? Even though those liability protections seem like a lot of money, they are probably insufficient to protect you from catastrophic accidents. While you may believe that you are immune to such an occurrence, consider what liability you may have if you were to run into a surgeon and cause him permanent loss of the use of his hand. It doesnt take a death or disfiguring injury to create significant liability. If you were to be involved in an accident where your liability exceeded your coverage, then the insurance company might just settle the claim for their policy limits and let you handle the rest. This may also mean that you would have to incur significant defense attorney costs as well as subject your hard earned net worth to the possible reaches of the claimant. This is where umbrella liability protection kicks in. An umbrella policy will cover you for liability in excess of your car, homeowners, boat and other liability policies up to the umbrella limit. Typically, one can purchase umbrella policies totaling $1 million, $2 million or even $5 million of coverage. Unless you have a claims history, the cost of the coverage is relatively inexpensive. It might be a few hundred dollars annually or perhaps a little more if you want the higher cover age amounts. While there is no requirement that you purchase the umbrella policy from the same carrier that underwrites your other insurance, I would suggest that you use the same carrier as the one that you have for your automobile policy. You dont want to have a situation where the insurance carriers argue over who is liable for what, including your attorney defense costs. Since an incident involving your automobile is the most likely to create large liability problems, having that carrier underwrite the umbrella policy is probably your best choice, even if the umbrella is slightly more expensive. No matter who you choose to under write your umbrella policy, you should ensure that your other coverages meet the umbrellas stated requirements. In other words, once I purchase an umbrella policy, I usually cant drop my automobile coverage limits to the state minimum. Usually, the umbrella policy requires that I maintain at least a 300/500/100 threshold on my automobile policy. Similar requirements may apply to my homeowners and boat coverage as well, for example. The final tidbit to know about umbrella coverage is the uninsured motorist or UM rider addition. While the standard umbrella pays someone that you may be liable to for negligence, the UM cover age pays you if someone injures you but doesnt carry sufficient coverage of their own. Many motorists in Florida carry the bare minimum of coverage, and if they cause you significant injury and if they have little or no assets (personal injury attorneys call these individuals judgment proof, since even if you get a large judgment against them there is little or nothing to collect against), then you cant get compensated for your losses. Unless, that is, you carry UM coverage on your umbrella. Then you can go against your own policy to the extent that the person who injures you is uninsured or underinsured. Most underwriters will only sell up to $1 million of UM coverage, and that will typically add several hundred dollars to the premium, but I believe it is well worth it. So dont give up that umbrella policy if you have any degree of net worth. If you have already dropped your umbrella coverage, or if you dont have it, please consider speaking about it with your liability insurance carrier. Craig R. Hersch. Learn more at www.sbshlaw.com. Will PowerU mbrellas N ot Just For Rainy D aysby Craig R. Hersch, Florida Bar Board Certified Wills, Trusts & Estates A ttorney; CPA VASANTA S ENERAT CPA, P. A.CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT 472-6000 418-0008 A ccounting and T ax Preparation for Non Residents Island Real Estate Welcomes N ew A gentsJohn R. Wood Island Real Estate announced that Robb and Robyn Moran have joined their company. Robyn and Robb are full-time realtors and year-round Sanibel residents. Both have been awarded the Realtor Associations Sanibel and Captiva Islands Specialist designation. By combining their skills and the extensive resources of the John R. Wood Agency, the Moran Teams goal is to minimize your stress while bringing people together in mutually successful transactions. They believe that the stress that so often accompanies real estate transactions can largely be eliminated through knowledge, excellent service and ongoing rapport with their clients. We welcome Robb and Robyn to our company and know they will continue to provide top service to their customers while utilizing the many resources that John R. Wood Island Real Estate offers, said Jay Richter, Managing Broker. Robyn and Robb Moran S treets A live Partners With D OH-L ee To Promote Health, Funsubmitted by Kate GooderhamStreets Alive is opening the streets for play in the process of making healthiness fun and its coming to downtown Fort Myers soon. Streets Alive of Lee County Inc. announces its founding sponsorship with the Florida Department of Health in Lee County. The support of this highly respected public health agency has helped fund the non-profit start-up to create the first Streets Alive event. Streets Alive is the perfect venue for Lee County families to enjoy exploration of healthy lifestyles, said Judith Hartner, M.D., director of the Florida Department of Health in Lee County. We cant wait to get out on the streets and have fun, eat and drink healthier food and beverages, and check out the local businesses.continued on page 22B Top ProducersJohn R. Wood Real Estate announces its top producers for June: Top Listings Carolyn Tongyai Top Pending Sales Pat Messerich and Mike Newes Top Closed Sales Phaidra McDermott Carolyn Tongyai Pat Messerich Mike Newes Phaidra McDermott ISLAND SUN BUSINESS NEWSMAKERS

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21B ISLAND SS UN JULY 26, 2013 Palmer The Turtle Helping YY oung Cancer PatientsA dear friendship between Cypress Cove residents Bob Storms and Frank Haskell has sparked the creation of Palmer the Turtle. Palmer is a unique character designed to entertain, comfort and educate cancer patients at the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida, and has been instrumental in helping them come out of their shell as they receive treatment. Palmer is one of the many ways these two big-hearted men contribute their talents to the community and honor the memory of their beloved daughters. Palmer gives kids a special club to belong to, explains Storms. And its wonderful for someone at my age to feel like I am doing something useful with my life. Ninety-year-old Storms, a retired illustrator who has worked for the likes of Disney, Warner Bros. and American Greetings, was living at Cypress Cove retirement community when the Haskells moved in next door. They quickly became friends and discovered that each had lost a daughter to cancer. I cant just be retired, playing golf and napping, said Haskell. I want to remain active and both Bob and I wanted to do something to honor our daughters. Stacie Kmetz, Child Life Specialist at Golisano Childrens Hospital, mentioned to Haskell the idea of creating a char acter, a mascot of sorts, to help young patients who are quiet and scared when they first arrive for treatment. We agreed that a turtle seemed the perfect fit, explained Kmetz. The kids always love turtles and we needed something they could relate to, someone who could help them, come out of their shell, and open up. And I knew just where to turn for help! said Haskell. Storms was more than happy to oblige. Blessed with a gift that he says, flows and just comes naturally, Storms created Palmer the Turtle. He is a very unique character and was very purposefully put together, explained Storms. He has this large zipper down his front and I make it a point for him to come out of his shell every time he visits the hospital. Palmer wears white gloves, just like the people who care for him. He also has no hair, something many of these children can relate to. Storms hopes to familiarize children and their families with various procedures they will experience during treatment by creating a collection of childrens medical books featuring Palmer as a patient. He has created a Palmer Club coloring book, Palmer and his Port, an illustrated paperback. Another paperback featuring an operation on Palmer has gone to print and a third book about radiation treatment is under development. When children arrive to begin treatment, Kmetz and other child life specialists give the children a certificate to join the Palmer the Turtle Club. They also receive copies of Storms books and Turtle Bucks they can use for frosty treats in the cafeteria after treatment. Many of these children face adversity while in school or other settings where other kids bully them for being different. The Palmer Club gives them somewhere to fit in, and something to belong to, explained Kmetz. This isnt the first time Storms has used his talents to comfort others during dismal times. Storms was wounded and captured in Germany while serving in the Army during World War II. Prisoners would sneak him art supplies and keep watch as he would draw cartoons and recreate images of their loved ones from small pocket photos. They were very much living in the present and it gave them something to hold on to, said Storms. Storms continues to raise spirits today, not only for young cancer patients, but for fellow residents at Cypress Cove. He says there is something hidden in every Palmer picture and friends will drive themselves crazy trying to find it. More importantly, they are excited and inspired by Storms creations because of what they do for the children. continued on page 23B Bob Storms and Frank Haskell deaRPharmacistPalpitations AA nd LL eg Cramps DD ue To DD rug Muggersby SS uzy Cohen, RPhDear Pharmacist: I take a reflux medication daily as well as a chewable antacid. In the last two months, Ive dealt with severe Charlie horses, toe tingling and occasional heartbeat skips or runs. My doctor prescribed leg cramp medication and referred me to a cardiologist. I know youre a columnist, but I intuitively feel you can help me. Ive been fine for eight months. GW, Peoria, Illinois My 23 years as a pharmacist (plus six years of schooling) comes in handy sometimes. Let me first say, do everything your doctor suggests because Im not advising, just educating you in my opinion column. The scientific literature proves your medication depletes nutrients needed to make your leg muscles and heart muscle perform perfectly. Scientifically termed drug-nutrient depletion is what I call the drug mugging effect because drugs mug your body of essential nutrients. If you need these medications, nutrient restoration is critical. A failure to understand or accept the drug mugging effect costs you because you will get diagnosed with a disease you dont have, take unnecessary medications and get sent away for expensive or invasive tests. Im so passionate about this, thats why I wrote the book on it, called Drug Muggers. Its really a life-saving book and it helps you stay off the medication merry-go-round. Acid blockers block acid, thats their job. When acid goes down, gastric pH rises. This blocks your ability to digest food and absorb nutrients. Common sense right? Medications that suppress acid include PPIs or proton pump inhibitors, H2 antagonists and simple antacids. Those categories include every acid blocking drug sold by your local pharmacy. The problem is that the human body runs on nutrients. Dont let drug commercials convince you otherwise. Its vitamins and minerals that drive metabolic reactions which support muscle and cardiac health. Momentarily Ill share key nutrients mugged by your medications. There are more than I can list here, so to receive the expanded version of my article (and natural heartburn pain relief options), sign up for my free newsletter at www. DearPharmacist.com. Ill email it later this month. Now, let me show you drug mugging at its best, and how it leads to leg cramps, neuropathy and heart rhythm glitches. Folic acid and B12acid blockers change pH in your gut so you cant continued on page 22B

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22B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 From page 21BPalpitations And Leg Crampsabsorb these B vitamins. Deficiencies absolutely cause nerve tingling or numbness, muscle weakness, leg cramps, confusion, memory loss, depression, cardiac palpitations and fatigue. Magnesium is so critical to the heart that ER doctors give it to heart attack victims. Shocker, but certain acid blockers are strong drug muggers of mag. The FDA knows and insists on the strongest black box warning for PPIs because of the magnesium steal. Severe magnesium deficiency is associated with seizures, muscle spasms, arrhythmias, hypoparathyroidism and depression. Restoring nutrients is much simpler than taking medications and installing pacemakers; its certainly worth a try before invasive costly procedures. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. dearpharmacist.com. Mom A nd Me by L izzie and PryceLizzie and Pryce answer your questions and give advice about aging concerns from a two-generational perspective. A mother and daughter team, Lizzie is a retired RN and health educator, and Pryce is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in the care of elders and people with chronic illnesses. Dear Mom & Me, As soon as he was successful, my husband wanted a luxury car. Then a few years later, he bought one for me. Years passed and we both always had the biggest and the best. After my husband passed away, I sold both cars and I started driving something small and economical. Suddenly one day while at exercise class, I decided I deserved to have a luxury car again, so I went directly to a dealer without changing my clothes. The salesman ignored me. Finally, he came over and in a ho-hum attitude answered my questions. Then, when I asked for a test drive, his attitude was appalling. I know he was saying to himself, This old grandma just wants to go for a car ride. As I left, I said that I would think about it, and I might have my son come in and see my selection. Two days later, I went in again after exercise class. This time I said, I want the gray one. His teeth almost fell out. Then, he brought out all of the paper work and talked about financing. Finally I said, Financing? Oh no, Ill just write you a personal check. He nearly turned white, stammered a bit, then said, Ill get it ready and deliver it to you in two days. My check cleared and he brought it to me. I love my new car and it seems to love me because it drives beautifully. I am too old to ever need another new car, but if I change my mind, I think I will go to the new young gal at the car agency. Charlotte P.S. I thought you two would be inter ested in my experience. Dear Charlotte, Thank you for your letter. The first lesson sales people should learn is never pre-judge your client. Older peoples bank accounts can never be judged by how they look, but this also applies to young people. Companies are always trying to invent new ways to get older people to spend. Many companies realize that the greatest portion of private wealth in this country is owned by women. This sales person pre-judged your ability to pay and was prejudiced against the elderly. He also had a wonderful story to tell his wife and friends about you. Lizzie Dear Charlotte, Way to go! Keep challenging the stereotypical behavior about living as a mature adult. Thanks for your letter. Pryce Lizzie and Pryces email address is momandmeaging@hotmail.com. Eden Energy MedicineClear Physical S ludge Reset Ileocecal/ Houston Valvesby Karen L. Semmelman, Certified EEM, JD, AAML(03-12)Since last week we cleared etheric sludge, it seemed apropos to clear our physical sludge, too. So, if you are prone to diarrhea, constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, Crohns disease, have digestive issues or feel you are holding onto unwanted waste, behavior or ideas, this exercise will help. The Ileocecal valve is located between the small and large intestines on the right side of the body. Governed by the kidney meridian, its function is to open and close in order to process wastes from food, chemicals and hormones that flow through your bloodstream. If not working properly, then waste backs up into your system, which can result in digestive issues, toxic overload in the kidneys, bronchitis or many other illnesses that may diminish or disappear after clearing these valves. So, if you have a chronic condition that just does not want to heal, this is a worthwhile exercise to consider. The Houston valve is not a real valve, but serves a similar role to the Ileocecal valve. It is located between the descending colon of the large intestine and the rectum inside the left hipbone. To make certain your body releases unnecessary material for evacuation, reset the Ileocecal and Houston valves as follows: Step 1. Place the right hand on right hip bone and left hand on left hip bone with little fingers at the inside edge of the hip bones. Under right hand is on the Ileocecal valve and left hand over the Houston valve. Correcting both together creates symmetry between them. Step 2. As you begin a deep inhalation, push in with pressure through your fingers as you slowly drag the fingers of each hand up six to seven inches, ending at your hip bones. Step 3. Shake the hands to remove the energy. Step 4. Start at position in Step 1 and repeat at least four times. Step 5. Return to original position, but this time drag the thumbs down from the waist to the hipbones. You are done. Not only have you reset these two valves, but since they are linked with all the other valves in the body, you have effectively reset those valves as well. If after doing this exercise you find you still have constipation or diarrhea or remain unsettled, then lay down. Push the fingers from both hands into the Ileocecal valve while lifting your right knee slowly toward the trunk of your body to a 90 degree angle. Continue holding the pressure with your fingers while straightening the leg. You now have changed the sludge of energy in this sluggish valve. Have fun with your energy! Next weeks topic is Seeking Inspiration? Let Heaven Rush In. If you have a questions for Karen, email her at ksemmelmanenergy@ gmail.com. Learn more at www.semmelmanenergy.com. EEM does not diagnose or cure illness, but working with subtle energies of the body has been shown to help many conditions. From page 20BStreets AliveStreets Alive Lee will use the temporarily closed public streets to offer free activities such as walking, biking, skating, Zumba, hopscotch, dance and more from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday, November 10 in the downtown Fort Myers River District. Streets Alive features instructors offer ing a buffet of free and accessible games, sports, dance and other movement for attendees to try. There will be several activity villages where a variety of activities and instructions will be offered, along with a series of events taking advantage of the traffic-free downtown streets. Participants of all ages and abilities are encouraged to participate, with the focus particularly being on easy-to-learn activities to get people moving. The family-friendly Streets Alive will have local restaurants and outlets along the route offering food and beverages, highlighting their most delicious and nutritious menu items. A range of other vendors will also be participating in the festivities.For more event information or sponsorship options, go to www.streetsalivelee. org. ISLAND PHARMACY(Voted Best Pharmacy on The Island 6 years)CARING FOR YOU AND ABOUT YOU2330 Palm Ridge Rd. #12, Sanibel Share your community news with us.Call 395-1213 Fax: 395-2299or emailpress@islandsunnews.com

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23B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 Free Autism Screening For Young ChildrenGolisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida, in partnership with the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southwest Florida, offers a free monthly autism spectrum disorder screening for toddlers 18 months to 5 years of age. The next screening on the Ronald McDonald Care Mobile will be held on Friday, July 26 from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at McDonalds, 13741 N. Cleveland Avenue in North Fort Myers. It is estimated that one in every 88 children is diagnosed with some form of Autism Spectrum Disorder, making it more common than childhood cancer, juvenile diabetes and pediatric AIDS combined. Medical consultants for the project stress that an early diagnosis can make a vast difference for toddlers and their families. They say early intensive behavioral intervention can make an immense difference not just in the development of the child, but in their families as well. The ASD screening is conducted by the Neurosciences Center at Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida. The screenings are administered by an Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner, who has extensive training and experience in typical child development and developmental disorders. A physician referral is not required. To schedule a screening, call 343-6838. From page 21BPalmer The TurtleA stuffed version of Palmer is available at the gift shops of HealthPark Medical Center, Lee Memorial Hospital and the Lexington Country Club Pro Shop for a donation of $20 to Barbaras Friends, the Golisano Childrens Hospital Cancer Fund. Palmer can be taken home or donated to a patient. He even has a special tag on his back to hang him on IV poles and golf bags. In 1994, Haskell and his wife Betty founded the Boston Red Sox Childrens Hospital Celebrity Golf Classic and a year later established Barbaras Friends, both in memory of their daughter Barbara. During her four year battle with cancer, Barbara was amazed by the children she encountered who were also coping with the disease. The Haskells have raised more than $22 million through their fundraising efforts. Despite its rarity and impressive strides in treatment and care, cancer is still a leading cause of death in children under age 15, second only to accidents. One hundred percent of funds donated to Barbaras Friends go to help children with cancer and blood disorders. To make a donation, call 343-6950. Got A Problem? Dr. Connie Is Inby Constance ClancyQ: How is lifestyle related to illness?A: Many illnesses are related to lifestyle. The human body ages more slowly and has less illness and disease when optimal living conditions are present. We can create those optimal conditions. We seem to maintain our automobiles better than our bodies. Many people who neglect to take care of themselves may end up in the hospital unnecessarily. While there are advances in modern medicine and technology that can help prolong life, there is nothing better than taking good care of yourself to prevent illness. Case in point. I knew a man in the 1960s who lived the high life. He chainsmoked Camel filter cigarettes; he drank Manhattans, about five or six per day; he partied hard. In the 1970s, when this man was in his 50s, he began not to feel well. His doctor told him he had to stop smoking and drinking, start a healthy diet and lose weight. He was an avid golfer and really did not exercise in other ways. As time went on, he not only ended up getting a quadruple by-pass, but also years later he suffered a major stroke. He survived, with much rehabilitation. However, his life and his health continued to deteriorate. Why did he smoke, abuse alcohol, party too much? He used them as coping mechanisms for stress. This man chose to continue to live the lifestyle that contributed heavily to the cause of his poor health. People who sustain a healthy lifestyle find much fulfillment in their later years. What is it worth to you? You might be thinking that you know someone who chain-smoked and drank and lived to be in their 90s. Yes, there are exceptions, but few. It would be better to start healthy and stay healthy. Do not wait until you have your first health crisis or some other type of wake up call. I see that too many times in my counseling practice. Very seldom do people come to me pre-crisis to work on learning proper stress management. They are usually already in crisis and desperate for help. For example, theyve been told to stop smoking. I ask if they want to stop smoking, and often they look at me as if I were crazy. They really dont want to stop; rather they were told they have to quit for health reasons. I am hesitant to take the case of a person who truly does not want to make the necessary change for improving his or her health. To be successful, people truly have to want to change and release current behavior. When someone really does not want to make a change, it will not be effective. SANIBEL CAPTIVA SANIBEL CAPTIVA properties.com Tracy Walters REALTOR 239.994.7975 Connie Walters REALTOR 239.841.4540 FEATURED OFFERINGS John Naumann & Associates1149 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel, FL 33957Let us help you become part of them too We are part of the Islands Bring your bathing suit and your sunscreen, thats all you need. Outstanding 2000 sq ft Gulf of Mexico front property. 3 bedroom, 2 bath with Florida room. Quiet neighborhood street with cul de sac. This Bayfront beauty is ready for you! Main oor Master bedroom with private of ce and en suite bath. Upper oor with 2 Guest Suites, Living Area, and Breakfast bar. Open balconies and screened lanai with inground pool. Bay views from almost every room!! Outstanding condo complex offers great rental history and lots of amenities. A Gulf of Mexico front getaway with rental revenue. 2 bedroom, 2 bath ground oor unit with tile throughout. UNDER CONTRACT

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 24B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 PET SITTING Island Pet SittingKelly TyrrellIsland Resident395-9999kellyatyrrell@me.com AIR CONDITIONING & REMODELING We are your One-Stop ContractorCall today for a free estimate!(239) 344-6883 Licensed & Insured: CBC1254276 and CAC1814724 AIR CONDITIONING REMODELING INTERIOR DESIGN Sanibel Design Center NEW HOMES, REMODELING & ADDITIONS P.O. Box 143 Sanibel Island, FL Phone: 239-472-2601 Fax: 239-472-6506 LAWN MAINTENANCE Rock Shrimp Coconut Curry with Mango-Papaya Salsa Rock Shrimp Coconut Curry 1 teaspoon olive oil 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, peeled and chopped 1/2 cup onion, chopped 1 cup zucchini, julienned 1 cup yellow squash, julienned 1 cup unsweetened coconut milk 1/4 cup dry white wine 1 teaspoon turmeric 1/2 cup mango chutney 1 1/2 pounds rock shrimp, peeled 1/2 cup half and half 1/2 teaspoon Thai red curry paste 2 teaspoons parsley, chopped Sea salt to taste Fresh ground pepper to taste Heat olive oil in a heavy saucepan over medium-high heat. Add ginger, onion and julienned squash; saut until soft. Stir in coconut milk, wine, turmeric and chutney; bring to a boil. Add shrimp and reduce heat to medium. Simmer sauce 5 to 6 minutes until shrimp are cooked through and sauce is slightly thickened. Stir in half and half, curry paste, parsley, salt and pepper. Heat through and serve with Florida Mango-Papaya Salsa. Florida Mango Papaya Salsa 1 cup ripe papaya, cut into 1/2-inch cubes 2 cups ripe mango, cut into 1/2-inch cubes 3 tablespoons cilantro, finely chopped 1 to 2 jalapeo peppers, seeded and minced 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice, or to taste 1 tablespoon light brown sugar, or more to taste Place all ingredients in a mixing bowl; chill. Toss together 5 minutes before ready to serve. Taste for seasoning, adding more lime juice and/or brown sugar as needed. Rock Shrimp Coconut Curry with Mango-Papaya Salsa Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY answer on page 27B25B ISLAND SUN JULY 26 2013 CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING BUILDING CONTRACTOR PRESSURE WASHING Owner Matthew Ryan1-239-645-9834www.oneppw.comLicense & Insured Owner Owner Ask About Our$9900Specials!! Professional Pressure WashingFREE ESTIMATEQuality Service Guaranteed TREE & LAWN CARE Sanibel Family Owned & Operated Licensed & Insured / www.enviromow.com Complete Landscaping Services 239-896-6789 CONTRACTOR G www.gigicompanies.com 239-541-7282 Lic.# S3-12238SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 27B FIND AT LEAST SIX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PANELS

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FAMILY MEDICINE 239-233-5835Experienced in all ages including geriatricsDr. Maria BadamiBoard Certified Family Medicine, F.A.AFP, DO, MBA, MTHouse call visits IMMEDIATE CARE NEEDS CHRONIC CARE DM2, HTN & MORE PREVENTATIVE MEDICINE WEIGHT MANAGEMENT OSTEOPATHIC MANIPULATIONFamily Medicine Physician Read us online at IslandSunNews.com PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 26B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 TREE & LAWN CARE Jesus Hernandez LANDSCAPING & TREE SERVICE 482-7350 We Service All your Landscape Needs FULL Landscaping SERVICES Over 20 years serving San-Cap & Ft. Myers PAINTING Residential & Commercial Painting COLOR SCHEMES on request fromSanibel Home FurnishingsPower Washing Wallpaper Hanging Faux Finishing Free Estimates Interior & Exterior Dependable Reliable Licensed & InsuredLic #S3-11944 395-3928 Cell: 841-4302 CUSTOM HOME BUILDER New DeCorte Four GLASS 2416 Palm Ridge Road Sanibel Island, FL 33957 Phone: (239) 472-0032 Fax: (239) 472-0680Insured Licensed# S2-11975 Stevens & Sons GlassReplacement Impact Windows & Sliding Doors, Mirrors, Tub & Shower Enclosures, Store Fronts, Porch Enclosures, French Doors, Plate Glass Specialists in impact condo complex replacement COSMETICS MAGGIE BUTCHER Career information available Gift ideas available Call for Summer Specials! POOL SERVICE & REPAIR PAINTING Islands Premier Pool Service Professional Weekly Service Fast Expert Equipment Repair and Replacement Specializing in Gulfstream Pool Heaters239-699-6279 Deep-EndPool Service Top 10 Real Estate Sales Development City Year BuiltSquare FootageListing PriceSelling PriceDays on Market Harbour Preserve Cape Coral 200313,603$6,950,000 $5,300,000216 Magnolia Bend Bonita Springs 20043,532$1,485,000 $1,235,000203 Edgewater At Gulf HarbourFort Myers 19993,408$1,095,000 $960,000 84 Deep Lagoon Estates Fort Myers 19954,101$989,000 $850,000 120 Cape Coral Cape Coral 20014,649$744,900 $698,000 114 Lakemont Bonita Springs 19982,637$649,000 $616,500 86 Cape Coral Cape Coral 20063,287$630,000 $585,000 81 Cape Coral Cape Coral 19792,351$550,000 $545,000 145 Cape Coral Cape Coral 20032,427$569,900 $537,500 141 Dunes Sanibel Island Sanibel19803,320$699,000 $530,000 345Courtesy of Royal Shell Real Estate

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY PUZZLE ANSWERS SUDOKU KING CROSSWORD MAGIC MAZE SUPER CROSSWORD 27B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 COMPUTER SERVICES CONTRACTORS HOME BUILDINGA full service contractor dedicated to exceptional quality at a reasonable price.Voted Best of the Islands 10 times since 1999New Construction Remodeling Commercial(239)472-0200Michael J. ValiquetteGENERAL CONTRACTORIsland Resident Lic. #CGC056909 Hurricane Protection Consultant SLIDING GLASS DOORS Replacing Sliding Glass Door Rollers, Locks, Tracks and More 2393397355www.SliderMedic.comLicensed & InsuredServing Lee & Collier Counties Replacing Sliding Glass Door Rollers, UPHOLSTERY A Friendly Personalized Service From Owner-Operator Steven CservenyakPARAMOUNT DECORATOR & UPHOLSTERYsince 1974 Complete line of quality upholstery work by European CraftsmanWe work with the finest imported silk, satin, damask, brocades, velvets, hand-loomed crewel, embroidered tapestries from Italy, Belgium & India.Antique Furniture Restoration We also do boat cushions & down feather cushions472-8086Island COMPUTERS CONSTRUCTION 239-472-6711 MILLS BROTHERS BUILDING CONTRACTORS FISHING CHARTER Light Tackle Sport Fishing CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.com SCRAMBLERS

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REAL ESTATE 28B ISLAND SS UN JULY 26, 2013 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS Read us online at Island SS un NN ews. com ANNUAL RENTAL DI RERE C TLTL Y AA C RR O SSSS F RR OM B EAEA CH C ANALANAL & DOCK This UF ground level updated home offers 472-6747Gulf Beach Properties, Inc. RS 7/26 BM TFN ANNUAL RENTALS SS AN ibIB EL foFO RT myMY ERS ISABELLA RASiIHAPPY TO HELP Y YOUWithITH A ALL OOF Y YOUrRREAL EEStT At TE NEEDS! RS 1/4 NC TFN 1101 Periwinkle Way #105 SS anibel, F LL 33957 ISABELLA RASiI (239) 246-4716E ISABELLARASi I@AOL.COM MOBI LELE HOM EE P ERER IWI NN K LELE P ARAR K carport with adjacent 2nd parking space. information or to make offer. RS 7/26 CC 7/26 RR ENTAL WANTE dDAA NNUAL RR ENTAL WANTE dD NS 6/28 CC TFN F oO R RR ENT has apartments for rent to individuals RS 3/15 CC 8/30 ANNUAL RENTALQ UU I ETET SANSAN IB ELEL HOM EE W/P RR IV ATEATE B EAEA CH P ATAT H NS 5/31 CC TFN RERE /M AA X OF TT H EE I SLANSLAN D SS Putting owners and tenants together RS 1/4 BM TFN C ANALANAL -F RR O NTNT NS 7/19 CC 7/26 SER vicVIC ES offOFF ERE dD C ompOMP AN ioIO N SS ER vicVIC E RS 1/4 BM TFN ScSC ARNAT oO LL A wW N SS ER vicVIC E RS 1/25 BM TFN HELLES CLEAN iI N gG SS ER vicVIC ES NS 1/4 PC TFN GI RLRL F RR ID AA Y HO USEUSE K EEEE P ERER wishing to work for someone in need of a housekeeper... and or plus much more... NS 7/26 CC 7/26 commCOMM ER icIC AL RENTALOFFIC EE / COMM ERER CI ALAL SS P AA C EE FO RR RENTRENT NS 4/5 CC TFN REAL ESTATEWEST GUL fF DR ivIV E SS T iI LT H omOM E NS 6/21 CC TFN 3B RR 2B AA RARA I SESE D RANRAN CH w/POO LL Call for details NS 7/19 CC 8/2 Island VacationsMillion $ Views Await You! Cottages Condos 239-472-72771-888-451-7277RS 1/4 BM TFN vV A cC AT ioIO N RENTAL LL IGH TT HO USEUSE REALTREALT Y 239-579-0511RS 1/4 CC TFN VO LUNTEERSLUNTEERS NEENEE D EE D RS 1/4 NC TFN hH EL pP wW ANTE dD www.crowclinic.orgH ELEL P USUS P LEASELEASE !! shop cashiers RS 1/4 NC TFN SER vicVIC ES offOFF ERE dDSANSAN IB ELEL HOM EE W ATAT CH RS 1/4 BM TFN RR OG ERER NN OD RURU FF ELEELE C TRTR IC RS 6/7 CC TFN H omOM E/CO NN DO WAT chCHco CO N ciCI ER gG E SER vicVIC ES P AA I NTNT I NN G GO ATAT www.paintinggoat.com RS 4/19 CC TFN

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29B ISLAND SS UN JULY 26, 2013 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS TO PLACE AA CC LASSIFIED LL OG OO N tT O: IslandSunNews.com CLICK ON PLACE CLASSIFIED LOST AND FOUND TOOLTOOL B OO X W ASAS HE SS UU P ONON SANSAN IBE LL This tool box with motor parts washed up on shore Saturday morning, May 8 about 8:30 on the beach at Sundial Resort on Sanibel Island. To claim call Sundial Resort Security 239-472-4151. NSNS 6/14 CCCC T FNFN pePE TS FF REE KI TTTT E NNTO TO G OODOOD H OO MEFree kitten to good, safe home. No de-clawing. Fiesty Bengal mix. Call 472-1788 after 5 p.m. NSNS 5/31 NCNC T FNFN wW ANT eE D TO bB UYC ASAS H P AA I DD FOFO R MI LL I TATA R YY I TT EM SS Cash Paid For Old Military Items. Medals, Swords, Uniforms, helmets, old guns, awards & more. Local Toll Free 1-866-440-3280R SS 6/7 CCCC 8/30 C AA R FO rR SAL eE 2007 BU ickICK LL AC rR OSS eE C LL X16,500 miles, beige color, 4 door, all power, seldom driven off island, $14,000. Call Ken at 472-2012.R SS 7/12 NCNC T FNFN heHE L pP wW ANT eE DHOUS ekeeperEKEEPER PA rR TTimeTIME The Robert Rauschenberg Foundations Rauschenberg Residency in Captiva seeks to engage a committed person in the role of Housekeeper. The successful and organized. Strong time management skills, a plus. S/he needs to be able to work independently, as well as perform as part of a team. An enthusiasm for the property and a willingness to learn and grow in the position are necessary. Position begins early September 2013. Flexible hours based on residency schedule, average 25 hours/week. $15/ interest and related experience or rsum, and three references should be sent to Employment@rauschenbergfoundation. org. No phone calls, please. NSNS 7/12 CCCC 7/26 V OLUNTOLUNT EER SS NN EE DD E DD Volunteers needed for the After School Program which runs Mon.-Th, 2:30 3:15 pm call Linda Reynolds 472-1617R SS 1/4 NCNC T FNFN ServerSERVER S AA SS iI STANT ServerSERVER S LiLI N eE cC OO kK IL Tesoro Ristorante, 751 tarpon Bay Rd. Sanibel Now hiring; Servers, Assistant Servers and Line cook Email resumes to: applications between 11-2 daily. NSNS 1/18 NCNC T FNFN V OLUNTOLUNT EER OO PP OO R TUNTUN I TYTY The Sunshine Ambassador Program is a new and exciting volunteer opportunity offered at the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida located within HealthPark Medical Center. The Sunshine Ambassadors will greet, assist and be a families and visitors entering the hospital. The Ambassadors also make a difference to families by providing educational and healthful resources to assist in GRANDparenting for GRANDchildren. We are currently seeking year-round volunteers to work one 4-hour shift Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm or 12:00pm to 4:00 pm. If you would be interested in learning more about this wonderful new opportunity, please contact Lisa Ellinwood, Volunteer Resources Coordinator at 239-343-5062 at the Golisano Childrens Hospital. NSNS 2/8 CCCC T FNFN bB OATS cC ANO eE S kK AYA kK S DD O ckCK A geGE Hourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-5800R SS 1/4 NCNC T FNFN 22FF OOT GLA cierCIER BAY CATA mM A rR ANIn good condition. Needs some detailing and a high pressure fuel pump. $9,000 or best offer. The boat was donated to the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) for quick sale. Contact James Robinson at CROW at (239) 472-3644, ext. 221 or development@ crowclinig.org. Or contact Peg Albert at (239) 472-3644, ext. 232 or peg@ crowclinic.org. R SS 7/26 CCCC T FNFN LOST AND FOUNDLOSTLost Ladies Watch Make: Brighton Area of Mucky Duck on Captiva Island Lost on Dec. 10, 2012 around noon If found call: 941-639-5395R SS 1/4 NCNC T FNFN FF OUNDPrescription sunglasses found in parking lot of Limetree Center on Wednesday, February 27. Claim at Island Sun newspaper, suite 2 in Limetree Center, or call 395-1213. NSNS 3/8 NCNC T FNFN

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rfnCALLING CARD 239-395-1213Emergency................................................911 Sanibel Police .......................................... 472-3111 Lee County Sheriffs Office ............................... 477-1200 On Call Captiva Deputy ................................. 477-1000 Fire Department Sanibel ................................................ 472-5525 Captiva ................................................ 472-9494 Florida Marine Patrol ..................................... 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol ................................... 278-7100 Poison Control ..................................... 1-800-282-3171 Chamber of Commerce ................................... 472-1080 City of Sanibel .......................................... 472-4135 Administrative Office ................................... 472-3700 Building Department ................................... 472-4555 Community Housing and Resources ...................... 472-1189 Planning Department ................................... 472-4136 Library Sanibel .............................................. 472-2483 Captiva .............................................. 472-2133 Post Office Sanibel .............................................. 472-1573 Sanibel (toll free) .................................. 800-275-8777 Captiva .............................................. 472-1674 Sanibel Community Association ........................... 472-2155 Senior Center ........................................... 472-5743ARTSArcade Theater .......................................... 332-4488 Art League Of Fort Myers ................................. 275-3970 BIG ARTS (Barrier Island Group for the Arts) ................ 395-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre ............................ 278-4422 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers. . . . . . 472-0168 Gulf Coast Symphony .................................... 472-6197 Lee County Alliance for the Arts ........................... 939-2787 Naples Philharmonic ..................................... 597-1111 The Herb Strauss Schoolhouse Theater ..................... 472-6862 Sanibel Music Festival . . . . . . . . .336-7999 Sanibel-Captiva Art League ............................... 472-4258 S.W. Florida Symphony ................................... 418-0996CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSABWA (American Business Womens Assoc.) ..... 565-7872 or 433-7798 American Legion Post 123 ................................ 472-9979 Angel Flight SE ................................. 1-877-4AN-ANGELAudubon Society ........................................ 472-3744 Sanibel Bike Club ........................... sanibelbicycleclub.org Community Foundation of Sanibel-Captiva .................. 274-5900 CROW (Clinic For The Rehabilitation of Wildlife) .............. 472-3644 FISH of Sanibel (Friends in Service Here) ................... 472-0404 Sanibel Island Fishing Club ............................... 472-8994 Horticultural Society of the Islands ......................... 472-6940 Horticulture and T ea Society of Sanibel and Captiva .......... 472-8334 Kiwanis Club ........................................... 677-7299 League of Women Voters .................... sanibelLWV@gmail.com Lions Club (T om Rothman) ............................... 395-3248 Master Gardeners of the Islands ........................... 472-6940 Newcomers ............................................ 472-9332 Notre Dame Club of Southwest Florida ..................... 768-0417 Optimist Club ...........................................472-0836PAWS ................................................. 472-4823 Rotary Club ................................. 472-7257 or 472-0141 Sanibel Beautification Inc. ................................ 470-2866 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society ............................ 472-6940 Sanibel-Captiva Power Squadron .......................... 472-3828 Sanibel-Captiva Shell Club ................................ 395-1770 Sanibel Youth Soccer .................................... 395-2040 www.sanibelsoccer.org The Military Officers Assc. of America (MOAA, Alex MacKenzie). ............................... 395-9232 United Way of Lee County ................................ 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline ...... (24 hour information line) 211 or 433-3900 Zonta Club ............................................. 671-6381ISLAND ATT RAC TIONSBailey-Matthews Shell Museum ............................ 395-2233 J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge ................. 472-1100 Sanibel Historical Museum & Village ....................... 472-4648 SCCF (Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation) ............. 472-232930B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 Pets Of The Week T-S hirt S ales A id Heartworm Care For D ogsHazel For Heartworm Prevention T-shirts are on sale. Proceeds will benefit Lee County Domestic Animal Services Animal Care Trust Fund for the heartworm treatment of pets whose owners receive public assistance. The idea came from Trasi Sharp and Liza Clouse, owners of Island Paws and the Over Easy Caf, both on Sanibel. Last year, the ladies rescued a heartworm-positive great Dane named Hazel and saw first-hand how the disease affects dogs. Trasi and Liza were concerned that many dogs would suffer from the disease because their owners could not afford the treatment, said Donna Ward, director of animal services. The funds will allow us make this treatment available for these dogs, she added. We also hope it will bring about awareness of the importance of heartworm prevention.The T-shirts are available for $25 each. They come in four colors and in crew neck and ladies V-neck. They are on sale at Island Paws, 630 Tarpon Bay Road on Sanibel, or at Animal Services, 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers. To place an order, email islandpaws@embarqmail. com. My name is Dolly and I am a five-year-old female fawn Labrador retriever. Labs love water and I certainly am true to my breed. If I was part of your family we could go to Dog Beach and play lots of games. I also love to fetch. You wont find a more social dog than me. Adoption fee: $10 (regularly $75) during Animal Services Freedom Friends adoption promo. My name is Liz and I am a female black and white domestic short hair cat age four months. If you are looking for a sweet adorable baby kitty, Im your girl. I love to cuddle and couldnt look cuter with my black and white tuxedo coloring. Dont forget cats and kittens are two for one in case youd like to take home a pair of cuties. Adoption fee: $25 (regularly $75) during Animal Services Freedom Friends adoption promo. For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to www. LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive, Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office, off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/ neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if three months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs six months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee, and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500. Liz ID# 566805 Dolly ID# 568814 photos by squaredogphoto.com

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BEACH CHAIR PASTIMEAnswers on page 27B31B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013

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We make it easy. You make it home. RoyalShellSales.com | RoyalShellRentals.com239.472.0078 | 800.805.0168 Florida: Bonita Springs, Fort Myers/Cape Coral, Naples, Captiva and Sanibel Islands North Carolina: Cashiers, Franklin, Highlands, Lake Glenville, Lake Toxaway and Sapphire Valley Come out of your shell and into one of ours. Captiva Beach Gem $4,850,000 Sarah Ashton 239.691.4915 Barefoot Way $4,995,000 Burns Family Team 239.464.2984 Bayfront Beauty $2,695,000 John & Denice Beggs 239.357.5500 Gorgeous Gumbo Limbo Home $634,000 McMurray & Nette 239.281.4435 Key West Style Hideaway Sanibel $893,000 Jane Weaver & Cathy Rosario 239.464.2249 Gulf Harbour Luxury Condo $995,000 McMurray & Nette, 239.292.7533 Sanibel Harbours $1,395,000 Burns Family Team 239.464.2984 Pet Friendly For Owners $498,000 Sally Davies 239.691.3319 Captiva Island Lure $3,699, 000 John and Denice Beggs 239.357.5500 Popular Dunes Subdivision $849,000 Burns Family Team 239.464.2984 Sanctuary Bayfront $3,495,000 McMurray & Nette 239.281.4435 Best Priced Beach Home-Sanibel Island $1,690,000 Bob Radigan 239.691.6240 Prime Commercial Space $2,299,000 McMurray & Nette 239.850.7888 Mediterranean Beauty on Captiva $1,899,000 Fred Newman or Vicki Panico 239.826.2704 Gulf Front Captiva Estate $3,995,000 Jim Branyon 239.565.3233 Prime Loggerhead Location $695,000 Burns Family Team 239.464.2984 NEW PRICE NEW LISTING NEW PRICEISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201332B



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JULY/AUGUST SUNRIS E/SUNSET: SANIBEL & CAPTIVA ISLANDS, FLORIDA 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 rfn PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAI D FT MYERS, FL PERMIT #5718 Postal Customer ECRWSS Read Us Online at IslandSunNews.com Invasive T oads Discovered Breeding Near Middle G ulf Drive On July 17, during monthly frog call surveys, conducted by the JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge and the Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation (SCCF) on Sanibel, a population of giant toads (Rhinella marinus), also known as cane toads or marine toads, were discovered breeding in a temporary wetland near Middle Gulf Drive and Fulgar Street. Like most other invasive amphibians and reptiles on the island, they did not migrate here by themselves. More likely, they were accidentally brought here in mulch, pine straw, sod, plants or even tadpoles hiding in a small pool of water on any object transported to the island. This species poses a serious threat to wildlife on Sanibel, as well as domestic pets. The large glands behind the eyes and above the shoulders (parotoid glands) produce a toxin (bufotoxin) that is both irritating and deadly to smaller wildlife. When a predator grabs a giant toad in their mouth, the toad inflates its body and the toxin oozes out of the parotoid glands into the mouth of the predator. It is well documented that the poison has killed pet dogs in south Florida. The literature and conversations with veterinarians and pet owners indicate it is a horrific death for the animal. There have even been human fatalities from this species from toad-licking. The tadpoles are continued on page 3 Cartoonist S hares Drawing S kills With Campersby Jeff L ysiakCampers at the Sanibel Recreation Center received a special visit last Friday afternoon from local car toonist and illustrator Dave Horton, who shared with them a few tricks of the trade during his presentation of how to draw action heroes. During two individual sessions one for teens and tweens and another for younger kids Horton described his process of drawing action heroes like their favorite comic book legends in several easy-toremember steps. Using a giant easel and pad of paper, Horton told the crowd that they should start their drawings using a pencil with a light touch, then go over the lines later in ink.continued on page 5 Cartoonist and illustrator Dave Horton and the second and third grade Summer Day Camp kids from the Sanibel Recreation Center dressed in their own hand-made superhero costumes during last Fridays special drawing demonstration and presentation photos by Jeff Lysiak Cane toad, left, and southern toad, right, with the parotoid gland, the source of the cane toads toxin, indicated on both. The gland is larger on the cane toadDDWS Meets Preservation Campaign G oalDing Darling Wildlife SocietyFriends of the Refuge (DDWS) has announced that it has meet its $1.8 million goal for its Refuge Preservation Campaign goal, which it began in January 2013. The campaign raised funds to purchase acreage at Woodring Point at the entrance to the refuges Tarpon Bay sea-life nursery and to add an elevator and other upgrades to the Ding Darling Education Center at J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge on Sanibel Island. The support has been just incredible, said Jim Sprankle, who chaired the continued on page 19 Above left, John McCabe and Jim Sprankle at the start of the refuge campaign mark early donations on the tracking thermometer. Now, the thermometers top mark has been exceeded

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 20132 Visitor Stories From The Sanibel Historical Museum And VillageThroughout the Sanibel Historical Museum and Villages buildings are binders inviting visitors to share their memories of Sanibel whether as long-time residents, as visitors of many years, as students at the Old Schoolhouse, or whatever moves them to record their Sanibel experiences. Loose-leaf pages (themselves a reminder of times past, having come into use around 1900) and pens are provided, and thats all one needs to bring the past alive. From Grace Benham Herst I spent two wonderful years here from 1939 to 1941. I loved the school, the beach, the remoteness of everything. We used to go to Fort Myers when we wanted ice cream there was none on the island because there was no electricity. From a Waterville, Ohio visitor From 1948 to 1952, we came to Fort Myers each year to visit my grandparents. We took the ferry out to Sanibel and a wagon pulled by a tractor or pickup truck took us to our accommodation. The cottage we stayed in was a clapboard bedroom with two double beds and a dresser thats it. Then there was a screened porch with a kerosene stove, table and chairs and sink (with pitcher and bowl, I think). We stayed two or three nights and hunted shells and swam and hunted shells some more. Then, the little cart took us back to the ferry, sunburned and carting our shells. From an unidentified visitor I can remember my husbands grandmother, Jesse Shipley, drove us to the beach down Donax Road, which was only dirt. We drove up on the beach and parked. You could look both ways on the beach and not see one building. From Ruby Singleton Sanders My father ran the mail boat Santiva from 1936 to 1952. I would ride with him in the summer on occasion and walk from Baileys store across to the beach using a palmetto swisher to keep off the mosquitoes. (Rubys father was Cleon Singleton.) Read more about peoples experiences living on and visiting Sanibel at the Sanibel Historical Museum and Village. In addition, the Old Bailey Store contains copies of old newspapers, and just about all the houses have plenty of reading material explaining their history. The Sanibel Historical Museum and Village is open from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday through August 3, and reopens November 6 on a full schedule, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. It is located at 950 Dunlop Road (next to BIG ARTS). There is handicap access to all buildings. For more information, call 472-4648 during business hours or visit www.sanibelmuseum.org. Picnic on the beach Old Island Inn Lets SHOP Till We Drop Enjoy a meal with us in our French Cafe atmosphere.Dine inside or out. Youll love our pet-friendly outdoor patio! Open Monday Saturday www.threecraftyladies.com Find us on WE WILL PAY YOUR TOLL!!!Spend $55 and bring us your toll receipt for a full refund! Island Winds CoiffuresHAIR SALON FOR WOMEN & MEN "Let us Pamper You!"LINDA MARISA JEANNE JOSEPHINE FEATURING FACIAL THREADING BY JOSEPHINE( ) NEW CUSTOMERS ALWAYS WELCOME!

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3 ISLAND SS UN JULY 26, 2013 From page 1Invasive Cane Toadalso toxic, which can lead to fatalities in many animals that consume them. Special care should be taken to prevent dogs, cats, etc. from biting or grasping these toads in their mouths. These are very large toads, reaching up to 5.5 inches in length and possibly near five pounds. They are voracious eaters. They will eat insects, snakes, baby turtles (including small sea turtles, gopher tor toises, box turtles, etc.), lizards, small mammals and birds. They will even eat pet food or any other kind of food left outside. It is highly unique for a frog to eat non-living food. These toads are attracted to bright lights at night because they attract insects. Giant toads are South American in origin. They were brought to Australia in the 1930s to control cane grubs in sugar cane fields. They did not control cane grubs and started eating smaller vertebrates. They have spread throughout northeastern Australia and are still a serious threat. They were released in sugar cane fields in Florida to control a larval form of a beetle as well, hence the name cane toad. Just like in Australia, they escaped from the area and became established. Also, there is a record of approximately 100 being accidentally released in the 1950s in Miami by a pet dealer. The best case scenario is that this is a small, isolated population. The removal of this species from Sanibel, if possible, is crucial to delicate species. SCCF needs help in identifying any other localities where these toads may be present. Sanibel (wildlife and citizens) cannot afford to have this species spread throughout the island. Please keep in mind that there is a similar native amphibian found on Sanibel. The southern toad (Anaxyrus terrestris) is also a true toad (Family Bufonidae). Southern toads are smaller continued on page 15 As of July 22, cane toads have been found at four more locations on Sanibel, with possible sightings at a two more Cassie Cook, intern from JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge and Stephanie Cappiello, intern for SCCF, in the temporary wetland where the toads were found One of the cane toads found on July 17 near Middle Gulf Drive and Fulgar StreetYou can see a live cane toad and southern toad and hear the cane toads call at SCCFs Nature Center. There will be an informal Tank Talk on Friday, July 26, Monday, July 29 and Wednesday, July 31 at 10 a.m., but the toads will be on view during regular Nature Center hours, Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. SCCFs Nature Center is at 3333 Sanibel-Captiva Road on Sanibel.

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 20134 Exploring Books At CECIThe Childrens Education Center of the Islands theme of the week was Exploring Books & Authors. The children designed and created their own books, with very interesting titles. Lots of classic books were shared and some new ones, too. Adian Buscher, Chloe Dreme, Tyler Lloyd and Dylan Stevens were caught reading from their favorite authors Kate Sawicki relaxing in the Reading Nook Something in the book Wesley Whiting is reading hit his funny bone MUSIC LESSONSJennifer ValiquettePrivate Instruction on Piano, Saxophone, & Flute Sanibel and Fort Myers www.SynergySportswear.com Supplying the islands with ART and Fine Framing for over 13 years. Thank You to our loyal customers. 630 Tarpon Bay Rd(near the Over Easy Cafe)Summer Hours : Monday thru Saturday 10am to 4pmwww.sanibelartandframe.com 239-395-1350 WOOSTER TVSERVING SANIBEL AND CAPTIVA FOR OVER 35 YEARS 2422 Palm Ridge Road, Sanibel FL 33957239-472-1133woostertv@embarqmail.com www.woostertv.com

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5 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 From page 1Cartoonist At Rec CenterMy mom said that when I was young, I was drawing everything in the house, said Horton. I used to get into trouble in school because I used to do a lot of drawing. With the older group of campers, Horton asked them to guess which superhero which he described was his favorite as a kid he was drawing. One teen quickly shouted Spiderman! Hey you didnt raise your hand, another camper protested. However, the guess happened to be correct. Horton demonstrated how to draw the eyes starting at the middle of the head, and on a muscular superhero, there are three sets of chest muscles. I dont have any of these muscles, Horton joked as he penned a six-pack of abs on the costumed Peter Parker. Later, Horton asked for random examples of expressions sadness, shock, embar rassment or fright which could be expressed in a few simple strokes of the pen as he drew several sets of eyes, then added a few expressive hints here and there a frowning or raised set of eyebrows as well as a droopy pair of eyelids as examples. But when one camper asked for happiness, Horton admitted, You really need the mouth to show happy. The cartoonist received a surprise of sorts when the second and third grade campers arrived for his demonstration dressed in their own homemade superhero costumes. As a thank you, Horton showed them how to draw one of his favorite characters from his newspaper comic strip, Super Raccoon. Youngsters used their new cartooning skills to draw a raccoon during the presentation Dave Horton shows how to make a variety of expressions using only the eyes Horton drew his favorite superhero Spiderman as part of his drawing demonstration D isaster Response Training ClassThe Sanibel Fire & Rescue District will be holding its next CERT class starting September 10. The class is part of a national program directed at getting the community involved with disaster response so that they can assist first responders when needed. At this time, Sanibel Fire & Rescue has 30 or so members of the CERT and is always looking for more. The training consists of eight modules including disaster preparedness, first-aid, light search and rescue, and hazard recognition. The training will take place on Tuesday evenings through November 5. Anyone interested in joining the CERT ranks may contact Assistant Chief Matthew Scott at 472-5525 or mscott@ sanibelfire.com for more information.

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INSIDE CITY HALL Independently Owned And Operated COPYRIGHT 2013 Island Sun USPS 18: Bulk Rate permit paid for at Sanibel, Florida, 33957 Postmaster: Send change of address to Island Sun, 1640 Periwinkle Way, Suite 2, Sanibel, FL 33957 Published every Friday for the people and visitors of Sanibel and Captiva Islands. Distribution: 10,000 12,000 per week (seasonal). Mailed free to Sanibel and Captiva residents every Friday. Subscription prices: Third Class U.S. $50 one year, $25 six months (Allow 2-3 weeks for delivery). First Class U.S. $115 one year, six months $58 (Allow 3-5 days for delivery). Prices include state sales tax. Send subscription requests to: Island Sun, 1640 Periwinkle Way, Suite 2, Sanibel, FL 33957. The Island Sun will correct factual errors or matters of emphasis and interpretation that appear in news stories. Readers with news, tips, comments or questions, please call (239) 395-1213, or write to: Island Sun, 1640 Periwinkle Way, Suite 2, Sanibel, FL 33957. FAX number: (239) 395-2299. E-mail: press@islandsunnews.comRead Us Online: www.IslandSunNews.comContributing WritersKimberley Berisford Constance Clancy, ED.D. Suzy Cohen Marcia Feeney Ed Frank Max Friedersdorf Priscilla Friedersdorf Jim George Shelley Greggs Bryan Hayes Dr. Dave Hepburn Craig R. Hersch Tanya Hochschild Jane Vos Hogg Shirley Jewell Audrey Krienen Patricia Molloy Cindy Malszycki Marge Meek Capt. Matt Mitchell Gerri Reaves Ph.D. Di Saggau Karen L. Semmelman Jeanie Tinch Mark Bird Westall PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER PRINTED WITH LOW-RUB, SOYBEAN INK Co-PublishersLorin Arundel & Ken RasiAdvertising George BeleslinGraphic Arts & ProductionAnn Ziehl Sarah Crooks Kris SeeReportersAnne Mitchell Jeff LysiakISLAND SUN JULY 26, 20136 Commissioners OK Variance For D eli Expansionby Jeff L ysiakDuring Tuesdays planning commission meeting, commissioners approved a variance application as well as a conditional use permit that will allow the Sanibel Deli and Coffee Factory located within the Palm Ridge Shopping Plaza to expand their business and add indoor seating for diners.The business, which opened five years ago this N ovember, according to owner Jeff Weigel, is currently a carry-out only restaurant. They are proposing to expand into a vacant space in an adjacent unit and provide 16 indoor seats for customers.During deliberations related to Weigels applications, commissioners questioned the conditions of the Palm Ridge Shopping Plaza, noting the poor physical appear ance of the parking lot and according to Dr. Philip Marks overfilled dumpsters that may be in violation of health codes. Although both items had no direct connection to Weigels business, members of the commission felt obligated to mention that the owner of the property should be held responsible for keeping the grounds of the shopping plaza in good order.Things are going in the right direction, said Weigel, noting that a new property manager for the shopping plaza has been hired. Regarding the variance application itself, Weigel added, Weve done everything to keep pushing this business for ward, and this is the next logical step.Chuck Ketteman motioned to approve the variance, which was seconded by John Talmage. Commissioners unanimously approved the variance, as well as the conditional use permit, 6-0, with Christopher Heidrick abstaining from the vote. A final vote on Weigels permit will be brought before the commission at their next meeting on August 13. D evelopment Permit A pproved A t Beachview by Jeff L ysiakA development permit which establishes a new parcel of land within Beachview Country Club Estates currently occupied by tennis courts was approved during Tuesdays planning commission meeting. Attorney Beverly Grady, representing property owners The End Golf Management, LLC, told commissioners that the purpose is to create a new parcel or Tract F in order that the existing tennis court facilities may at some point be owned and operated separately from the remaining golf course parcel. In addition, Tract F will also be allocated one unit of reserved residential density should it ever become desirable or necessary in the future to have the use of this parcel converted from recreational to residential. A number of concerned citizens who live in the Beachview neighborhood attended Tuesdays meeting, fearing that the owners of the property have imminent plans to remove the tennis courts and construct a single-family residence on the site. However, Grady told the audience that the property owners have no plans to remove the tennis courts. One homeowner requested that the commission postpone a vote on the matter until other Beachview residents many of whom are snowbirds and away during the summer months return in October or N ovember. Planning Director Jimmy Jordan told the audience that the commission works on a 12-month schedule, and that he sent out notifications to some 359 affected homeowners, receiving approximately 30 responses. Commissioner Chuck Ketteman made a motion to approve the development permit application, which was seconded by Holly Smith. The seven-member panel unanimously approved the permit, which will be returned for final approval on August 13. D iscussions On Permitted, Conditional U ses Continuesby Jeff L ysiakWith a little more guidance from one of the citys leaders, the planning commission on Tuesday received some additional direction in their discussions related to commercial redevelopment policies and procedures. During their last meeting on July 9, commissioners requested that staff examine the permitted and conditional permitted use of several communities like Sanibel across the country. Planning Department Director Jimmy Jordan collected information from six cities Aspen, Colorado; Carmel-by-the-Sea, California; Longboat Key, Florida; Rehoboth Beach, Delaware; Jackson, Wyoming and N ags Head, N orth Carolina and compared each citys zoning code, their process for receiving approval for permitted and conditionally permitted uses and a key for reading the matrix. Vice Mayor Doug Congress told the commission that their work on the commercial redevelopment policy was being done with the hopes of creating efficiencies, lowering costs and making sure the process flows. The heavy lifting, we thought, still needs to begin at the planning commission, added Congress, who also requested a timeline of work performed on creating the new policies and procedures. Chuck Ketteman told his fellow commissioners that they should consider taking a critical look at the entire permitted use/conditional use policy, noting that in other cities, restaurants are defined as permitted uses; on Sanibel, they are a conditional use. John Talmage also suggested providing an educational element as a means of gathering feedback from current and potential future business owners on the island. Jordan requested that the commission members return their matrix with comments in the next week to 10 days so that his department can ready an update before the next planning commission meeting on August 13. Commissioner Holly Smith, however, stated that she was disappointed that more work on the policy was not completed during Tuesdays session.

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CHILDRENS EDUCATION CENTER OF THE ISLANDSInvites You to OurOPEN HOUSEMonday August 5th5 to 7pm 350 Casa Ybel Road, Sanibel IslandThe mission of the Childrens Education Center of the Islands is to create, through our developmentally appropriate curriculum, a nurturing, exciting learning environment that creates happy, curious, confident children. 7 ISLAND SS UN J ULUL Y 26, 2013

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 20138 Hortoons American Legion Post 123 NewsStop by American Legion Post 123 this Sunday, July 28 for BBQ ribs and chicken, served from 1 to 8 p.m. Cost is $12. Enjoy live music with Robby Hutto from 5:30 p.m. until close. Come by Post 123 on Sunday, August 4 for spaghetti and meatballs served all day long. Nine-ball pool tournaments continue every Monday night at 6 p.m. throughout the summer. Texas Holdem is played every Thursday night at 7 p.m. and Saturdays at 4:30 p.m. New players are welcome but must be Legion members. Every Friday, Post 123 serves a six-ounce ribeye steak sandwich all day. Check out the daily specials and the entire menu. The halfpound burgers are a local favorite. Food is served all day, every day. The public is welcome. American Legion Post 123 is open Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 9 p.m., located at mile marker 3 on Sanibel-Captiva Road. For more information, call 472-9979. No need to leave the island... it's all right here!Bailey's Shopping Center (just right of the hardware store) Mark West Pinot Noir Great of Cigars and THE One of the Best Selections of Domestic and Imported Wines on the West CoastBest Liquor Selection on the IslandsSpecial Orders and Case Discounts Tanqueray Gin Crown Royal THE ONLY HEALTH FOOD STORE ON THE ISLAND! Let food be thy medicine & medicine be thy food. Hippocrates 460 BC The Sanibel Sprout Your place to thrive! Email editorial copy to: press@islandsunnews.com

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9 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013MARISSA S NOW R IZZOMarissa Rissa Snow Rizzo, 41, of Sanibel, Florida passed away on July 17, 2013. Marissa was born in Corpus Christi, Texas on January 5, 1972. She graduated from St. Edwards University in Austin, Texas with a bachelor of science degree in chemistry. On August 4, 1998, Marissa was married to Anthony Joseph Rizzo on a beach in St. Croix, USVI. Their marriage was blessed during a ceremony at St. Theresas Catholic Church in Austin, Texas on October 3, 1998. Marissa shared many passions in life. She loved spending time with her beloved husband, Tony; whether on one of their many travels together, spending time on their boat, listening to live music, or visiting with family or any one of their countless friends. Marissas passion for spending time with loved ones was her inspiration. Marissas other passions included horticulture and landscape design, specializing in tropical plantings. She had an incredible knack for blending color, size, and shape to maximize visual and emotional impact. For Marissa, her work in her yard on Sanibel was a labor of love. Marissa also loved taking care of her two Bengal cats Mei Li and Tong Yi. They were inseparable buddies for the past 12 years. Marissa also enjoyed music especially live music as her favorite artists were Jimmy Buffett, Bob Marley, Mishka and Jack Johnson. Marissas life was full, joyous and giving. She continually thought of others before herself, placing everyone elses needs above her own and could light up a room with just her presence. She will be forever missed, but never forgotten, by her loved ones. She is survived by her husband Tony Rizzo of Sanibel; parents Melody and James Lehrmann of Mathis, Texas; brother Derek (Kim) Curlee of Victoria, Texas and sister Molly (Kirk) Hall of Sharpsburg, Georgia. In addition, Marissa had numer ous nieces and nephews and grand nieces and nephews which she cherished deeply and enjoyed spending time with: Mary Curlee, Carlie Hall, Peyton Hall, BillieJo Rizzo, Danielle Reyes, Ryan Strout, Deidre Morrow, Jordan Anthony, Miriah Dial, Lia Dial, Kian Reyes, Elias Reyes, Cooper Westlake, Ashley Kitten, Jacob Vos Winkle, Jared Vos Winkle, Kendle Hansen, Carlee Hansen, Jolee Hansen and Sterling Cole McBride. She was preceded in death by her father, Billy Dumas Curlee, and her grandmother, Mary Francis Rees Koepsel, and grandfather, Anthony Wayne Koepsel. A mass will be held in Mathis, Texas on July 28. Memorial contributions may be made in Marissas memory to the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife on Sanibel. Donations can be made to www. crowclinic.org/support/memorial.php or via mail to P.O. Box 150 Sanibel, FL 33957. Please indicate In memory of Marissa Snow Rizzo on your donation form or check. OBI TUAR Y Physical Therapy, Massage Therapy & Pilates Phone # 239-395-5858 7am-9pm 7 days a week (Summer hours vary) 239-395-1919Hours: 8am-5pm Monday-Saturday Phone # 239-472-5777 Showroom Hours: 8am-4pm Monday-Friday Phone # 239-472-1101Administrative Ofces & Classrooms Phone # 239-472-9700 Conveniently located on Periwinkle Way across from Sanibel Community Park Share your community news with us.Call 395-1213 Fax: 395-2299or emailpress@islandsunnews.com

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201310 Churches/ TemplesANNUNCIA TION GREEK O RTHODOX C HURCH: 8210 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers Rev. Dr. Elias Bouboutsis Orthros Service Sunday 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy Sunday 10 a.m. Fellowship Programs, Greek School, Sunday School, Bible Study www.orthodox-faith.com, 481-2099 BA T Y A M-T EMPLE OF THE ISLA NDS: The Reform Congregation of Bat Yam Temple of the Islands meets for Friday night services at 8 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall of the United Congregational Church 2050 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel For more information call 239-472-5317 or email ADSilby@yahoo.com. CA PTIVA CHA PEL BY THE SEA: The Rev. George E. Morris Services every Sunday 11 a.m. November 10, 2013 thru April 27, 2014 11580 Chapin Lane on Captiva. 472-1646. FIRST CHURCH OF C HRIST, S CIENTIST : 2950 West Gulf Dr., Sunday 10:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10:30 a.m., Wednesday evening meeting 7:30 p.m.; Reading room open, Monday, Wednesday and Friday 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. (November through March), Friday 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. (summer hours). 472-8684. SA NIBEL COMMUNITY CHURCH 1740 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel, 472-2684 Dr. Daryl Donovan, Senior Pastor Sunday Worship Hours:8 a.m. Traditional Service with Communion9 a.m. Contemporary Service with Kids Church10:45 a.m. Adult and Youth Sunday School classes; 11 a.m. Traditional Service with Choir. Childcare available at all services. SANIBEL C ONG REGATIONAL U NITED C HURCH OF C HRIST: 2050 Periwinkle Way 472-0497 The Rev. Dr. John H. Danner, Sr. Pastor. The Rev. Deborah Kunkel, Associate Pastor Sunday Worship Services: 10 a.m. Full Service, with Sunday School and Nursery Care provided. Elevator access. S T. ISA BEL CATHOLIC C HURCH: 3559 San-Cap Rd., 472-2763 Pastor: Rev. Christopher Senk, Saturday Vigil Mass 5 p.m. Sunday Masses 9:30 a.m. Daily Mass Wed., Thurs., Fri. 8:30 a.m. Communion Service Mon. and Tues. 8:30 a.m. Coomunion Service Mon. and Tues. 8:30 a.m. Holy Days call. S T. M ICHA EL & ALL ANG ELS E PISCOP A L C HURCH: 2304 Periwinkle Way between the Bean and Baileys, 472-2173 Rev. Dr. Ellen Sloan, Rector www.saintmichaels-sanibel.org Sundays at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School (PreK-gr.5) at 9:30 a.m. Wednesdays at 9 a.m. Potluck Supper 1st Wednesday of the month 6:30 p.m. Morning Prayer Tuesdays at 9 a.m. UNIT A RIA N UNIV ERSA LISTS OF THE ISLA NDS: Meets on the first Sunday of each month from December through April at the Sanibel Congregational Church, 2050 Periwinkle Way at 5 p.m. A pot luck is held at a members home on the third Sunday of each month. For more information call 433-4901 or email ryi139@aol.com. a hip BoutiqueHUGE SUMMER CLEARANC E!20-60% OFFSelected ItemsSPECIAL SAVINGS ON MAXI DRESSES! Come See us & Save 472-1115 SALE SALE MEMORI AL P AT ST. CYR S TEVE F. W AT SONS OBITUARY Share your community news with us.Call 395-1213 Fax: 395-2299or emailpress@islandsunnews.com

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11 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Small, formerly of Lakeland and currently of Sanibel, announce the engagement of their daughter, Anna Elizabeth Small, to Austin Gregory Lohmann, son of Mr. and Mrs. Keith Lohmann of Lakeland. The future bride graduated from the University of Missouri and the State University of New York at Stony Brook with a bachelor of arts degree and a master of arts degree in Clinical Psychology, respectively. She is currently pursuing her doctoral degree at the State University of New York at Stony Brook in the same field. The future groom received a bachelor of science in architecture degree from the University of Missouri. He is currently employed as an engineer at Space/Craft Worldwide, Inc. in Edgewood, New York. A fall 2014 wedding is planned, and the couple will live in New York. ENGAGEME NT A NNOUNCEME NT Austin Lohmann and Elizabeth Small S ummit Christian Preschool A t S anibel Community ChurchFall registration packets are available for 2, 3, and 4 year olds and VPK for Summit Christian Preschool at Sanibel Community Church, 1740 Periwinkle Way. Kids eagerly anticipate once again enjoying the creative classrooms and playground. Leslie Celestin, the new preschool director, brings a wealth of experience and knowledge to the preschool program. She has a master degree in Early Childhood Education. Summit Christian Preschool will continue to offer a warm and loving community that seeks to identify and nurture all childrens unique gifts. For further information or to register, email info@summitchristianschool.org or call 482-7007. You may also stop by Sanibel Community Church for a tour, call Kathy at 472-2684. Rivkah and Korynn Livermon on the play ground Leslie Celestin, new preschool director of Summit Christian Schools SCC campus Happy Birthday Happy 50th Birthday, Sandy Messinger Love Scott, Scott Ryan, Justin and Christianna Cohn GraduatesAlec Cohn, son of Dan and Candy Cohn of Sanibel, graduated from the University of Miamis College of Arts and Sciences on May 9 with a dual major in political science and history. During his time at the University of Miami, Cohn was regularly on the Deans List and Provosts List. Prior to attending Miami, he graduated from the International Baccalaureate program at Fort Myers High School and was an Eagle Scout with Troop #140 in Fort Myers. Cohn is currently working for a nonprofit in Miami. Alec Cohn Shop Weekend August 2-4

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201312 1. Margaritaville Marauders 2. Big Smiles 3. The Wineaux 4. Karas Kruisers 5. Best in Show 6. Waterside Inn on the Beach 7. Grannys Gang 8. The Sanibel DDTS 9. American Legion Riders 10. Faster than Jesus 11. Kickin Asphalt 12. Moons Team tied with Terri r the Pirates 13. The 5 Blind Tourist (honorable mention-most cleverly decorated car) 14. The 5 Dribwons tied with The Archways 15. Buccaneers tied with Busty Bev and her Babes 16. The Patriot Act 17. The Crimson Wildcats in threeway tie with Mixed Nuts and Driving with(out) Miss Crazy 18. The Ya-Hoos 19. Myers Flyers 20. Dosinia Dynamos 21. Island Rats tied with Lentz Crew 22. The Jamin Swarts 23. Justins Favorite Ladies 24. Swagabys 25. The Illinois 3 ( voted best decorated car ) tied with Team Dewalt/Bastion 26. 100% Pure Sanibel 27. Jacks Crew tied with Witches of East Lake 28. Copy That 29. The Irish are Back 30. Quebbie 31. Beans 32. The High Rollers tied with The Fighting Conchs 33. Sexy Sanibelians 34. Fast and Sassy 35. Fab 4 36. Team Kelly 37. Tech & Savvy 38. Fantastic Four Coveted Last Place: Red Solo Cups. JACARANDAThe Entertainment Nightly in Sanibels Social Scene1223 PERIWINKLE WAY, SANIBEL 472-1771 Happy Apps $5.95Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna, Crispy Fried Calamari, Chilled Oysters, Steamed Shrimp, BBQ Beef Satays, Mussels Marinara, Chicken WingsSanibels Best HAPPY HOUR4 7 p.m. Nightly in the lounge1/2 Price DrinksCall & Well Liquor, Draft Beer Selections, Select House Wine Third place team, The Wineaux, from left, Ken Waseneak, Dani Howard, Stan Howard, Rudy Zahorchak, Sandy Zahorchak, Susan Wener, Dr. Steven Wener, Mark Steger and Randy Carson First and second place winners of the July 4th Optimist Club Road Rally, Margaritaville Marauders and Big Smiles. From left, runners-up Ann Potter, Birgie Vertesch, Kurt Miller and Liz Kennedy; winners, Allen Dunham, Tootie Monnett, Gary Rogers, Erin White, Cheryl Italiano, Tony Italiano and, holding the sign, Ken Waseneak. Not pictured Jess Fisher. The 34th Independence D ay Road Rally Results Thanks To Our S ponsorsThe 2013 Optimist Club Road Rally Committee, in memory of Francis Bailey, would like to give special thanks to our sponsors for their ever-continuing support. You make our ambition to provide assistance for children at all levels a success. Thank you all. Sanibel~Captiva Community Bank, The Timbers/Sanibel Grille, Sanibel Island Seahorse Cottages, Tween Waters Inn, John and Martha Wolf, Doc Fords Sanibel Rum Bar & Grille, Baileys General Store, Island BarBQ, Waterside Inn, Tarpon Bay Explorers, Nu Way Concrete Forms, The Cedar Chest~Fine Jewelry, American Legion Post 123, West Wind Inn, Over Easy Caf, Sanibel-Captiva Trust Company, Pinocchios Original Italian Ice Cream, T-Shirt Hut Tuttles Seahorse Shop, Mon Reve Lawn Care Inc., Lighthouse Caf of Sanibel, Islander/The Breeze Newspapers, Island Sun, Lifeline Designs, Island Graphics, Captiva Island Store and CHR. This years rally was in memory of Francis P. Bailey. Many thanks to all the hard working volunteers and our wonderful participants. We look forward to seeing you next year. Share your community news with us. Call 395-1213, Fax: 395-2299or email press@islandsunnews.com

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201314 Employee Gives Shell Museum A FaceliftEvery single day, The BaileyMatthews Shell Museum prides itself for the dedicated passion and help of its many volunteers who commit their free time in helping the museum in its mission. However, the museum is also home to a handful of staff members who help ensure that the day to day operations run as smoothly and efficiently as possible. From light fixtures to collections management, to proper staffing, someone is there to ensure that the visitors experience is always world class as it should be for the only accredited museum dedicated solely to shells in North America. This brings to focus one of the newest staff members to join the museum in recent months Harry Ridenour. Ridenour is the museums maintenance person who in just three months of work has taken it upon himself to clean and update all of the museum exhibits. In reality, he is more like a maintenance aficionado with skills that go beyond simple repairs, for instance, he plans to redesign display motors in rotating parts of the central globe exhibit to better suit the heavy weight of the fixture. Not surprising for a man who is part of a race crew and a car enthusiast in his spare time. There is lots of work still left to do, like lifting all the really heavy glass off the displays which requires suction and cleaning the exhibits under there, Ridenour said, gently lifting a delicate queen helmet shell the museums newest Shell of the Moment specimen from its case to wipe away the dust. But whatever I could access without special tools, I went ahead and cleaned so we can keep it in great shape for the visitors. Details are very important to Ridenour, who took special trips to several marinas to find a piece of wood that needed to be replaced in the Sailors Valentines display. He said it took a while to find, but he proudly pointed out the near perfectly matched plank, that one would never spot without having been told, is not part of the original piece of a dock that houses the Valentines on display. Some displays, like the Mangrove Estuaries, which recreates a scene of a mangrove at low tide and complete with bared mangrove roots, a raccoon, exposed mollusks and skittering crabs, takes up a large space and requires a lot of care and caution not to break or disturb its delicate inhabitants. Walking carefully and using compressed air, Ridenour dusted and cleaned the entire display. The job is delicate and challenging, taking many hours to complete, but Ridenour isnt done. From switching all the display lighting to LED bulbs (and those seem countless) to figuring out how to dust the delicate Calusa shell mannequins on display, to simply wiping fingerprints off the glass, he is on a mission to ensure that nothing escapes his attention. Harry Ridenour cleans the Queen Helmet, which is part of the newest Shell of the Moment exhibit 1975-2019 periwinkle way ShopOnSanibel.com Something for Everyone Lazy Flamingo, Inc. 6520-C Pine Avenue Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-5353 Lazy Flamingo 3, Inc. 16501 Stringfellow Rd Bokeelia, FL 33922 239-283-5959 Lazy Flamingo 2, Inc. 1036 Periwinkle Way Sanibel, FL 33957 239-472-6939 Lazy Flamingo 4, Inc. 12951 McGregor Blvd. Ft. Myers, FL 33919 239-476-9000Four Great Locations! If Our Seafood Were Any Fresher, We Would Be Serving It Under Water!

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15 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013JOSEPH P. GARIANO, SR.Joseph P. Gariano, Sr., 55, of North Fort Myers, died suddenly on July 6, 2013. He was born on April 25, 1958 in Camden, New Jersey, a son of Frank and Margaret (Hodson) Gariano, Sr. Formerly of Pennsauken, New Jersey, he lived locally for the past 25 years and was the owner of a demolition company until his illness. He is survived by his wife of 30 years, Terry Lynn (Palmer), sons, Joseph P., Jr. and Anthony, both of North Fort Myers, daughters, Roselie of Medford, New Jersey and Lisa of Pennsauken, New Jersey, stepson, John Palmer of New Jersey, daughter-inlaws, Tiffany and Jennifer, grandchildren Joseph III, John Jr, Justin, James, Torii, Jeramiah and Lillyana, sisters, Rose (Harold) Hill of Medford Lakes, New Jersey and Margaret (Frank) Santo of Monroeville, New Jersey, brothers, Frank B. Gariano, Jr. of Asheboro, North Carolina and Gary Gariano of Mountaintop, Pennsylvania, nieces, Margaret (Sean) Phipps of Bellmawr, New Jersey, Theresa (Sean) Cairns of Maple Shade, New Jersey and Heather of Mountaintop, Pennsylvania, nephews, Jason Hill, Frankie, Michael, Robert, Gustin, Max, great nieces, Taylor, Michaela and Elizabeth and a great nephew, Michael. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his sister, Theresa, and a granddaughter, Jasmine. A memorial service will be held privately by the family. For details, please contact them at tgariano3@comcast.net. In lieu of flowers, donations to the family would be greatly appreciated. Friends may sign the guest book at www.horizonfunerals.com. From page 3Invasive Cane Toadthan giant toads (averaging around three inches in length). Young giant toads and adult southern toads are similar in appearance and size. A major difference between the two toads is the size of the parotoid glands. Southern toads have small parotoid glands as opposed to the very large glands on giant toads. Southern toads also have toxin (more of an irritant) in their parotoid glands. It is nowhere near as potent as cane toads. Many animals eat these toads, but that toxin is a deterrent to certain wildlife species. If you hold a southern toad and they are threatened, they will ooze the toxin; if you get it in your eyes, they will burn and water for 20 to 30 minutes. You can find a recording of the cane toads mating call at http://graptemys. com/giant_toad.wav. If you see or hear a giant toad on Sanibel or Captiva, please report it to SCCFs Wildlife Habitat Management office at 472-3984. First, and foremost, please take a picture of the toad if you can, so it can be verified. For more information on cane toad, contact Chris Lechowicz, SCCF Herpetologist and Director, Wildlife Habitat Management at 472-3984 or email clechowicz@sccf.org. OBITUARY (239) 472-1111 2330 Palm Ridge Rd. Across from CVS SanBeautys@aol.com www.SanibelBeautySalon.comSanibel Beauty Salon Free OPI polish and Heavenly Silk hand lotion with Mani/Pedi and coupon Sanibels First Beauty/Barber est. 1951 I CANNOT TELL A LIE...IT'S SIMPLY THE BEST... I CANNOT TELL A LIE...IT'S SIMPLY THE BEST...I CANNOT TELL A LIE...IT'S SIMPLY THE BEST... I CANNOT TELL A LIE...IT'S SIMPLY THE BEST... I CANNOT TELL A LIE...IT'S SIMPLY THE BEST... I CANNOT TELL A LIE...IT'S SIMPLY THE BEST... Are YOU a Beach Foodie? A market for people who love good food!A market for people who love good food!Are YOU a Beach Foodie? Are YOU a Beach Foodie? A market for people who love good food! 2012 Best of Islands 2012 Taste of Islands 362 Periwinkle Way Original Italian Ice Cream Gotta Love Our TANGERINE SHERBET To advertise in the Island Sun Call 395-1213

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201316 Snowy Plover Presentation At CROWSnowy plover breeding season is well under way on Sanibel Island. Take a walk on the beach and you may be lucky enough to see tiny chicks running around, looking for food. Like most shorebirds, snowy plovers nest right on the beach and are potential prey for a host of predators. Their main defense is camouflage, and they blend so well with the color of Sanibels sand that its almost impossible to see them unless theyre moving. Because snowy plovers have declined in numbers over the years, theyre listed as threatened by the State of Florida. In 2002, the Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation (SCCF) initiated their Snowy Plover Project, along with the JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge and the City of Sanibel, to study and protect these vulnerable ground nesters. On Friday, July 26 at 11 a.m., Joel Caouette, SCCFs shorebird monitoring coordinator, will partner with Claudia Burns, longtime Snowy Plover Project volunteer, to present The Secret Lives of Snowy Plovers at the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW). The presentation will feature photos of these cryptic birds along with insights into their behavior, which is often completely different than that of birds who nest in trees. This is a rare opportunity to learn about a threatened species that depends on Sanibels beach for its continued survival, as well as to tour CROWs Healing Winds Visitor Education Center and learn more about their efforts to save wildlife through compassion, care and education. CROW is located at 3883 SanibelCaptiva Road, across from The Sanibel School. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for teens and free for members and children 12 and under. For more information, call 472-3644 ext. 228 or visit www.crowclinic.org. Free Parking At County Sites This WeekendLee County commissioners have designated Saturday, July 27 and Sunday, July 28 as dates during which parking fees will be waived at Lee County-managed boat ramps and regional parks, and admission will be waived at the countys swimming pools in recognition of National Park and Recreation Month. There will be 24 sites at which no fees will be applied, including: Manatee Park, Hickeys Creek Mitigation Park, Caloosahatchee Regional Park, Six Mile Cypress Slough Preserve, Caloosahatchee Creeks Preserve No. 1 and No. 10, Bonita Beach Park, Bowditch Point and Lynn Hall Memorial Park, Bunche Beach, Bowmans Beach and Turner Beach (north side only of Blind Pass). Alva, Davis, Pine Island Commercial Marina and Imperial River. North Fort Myers Community Pool, Pine Island Community Pool and San Carlos Community Pool. Not included in the free parking weekend are sites within city limits of other governments, including Barefoot Beach, beach access points managed by the Town of Fort Myers Beach, City of Sanibel sites including the south side of Blind Pass, and any Cape Coral parks. Lee County is pleased to be a part of the nationwide celebration and help recognize the value and benefits of parks and recreation, said Dave Harner, Lee County Parks & Recreation director. Enjoy a free summer weekend at our facilities. Directions and more information are at www.leeparks.org. Call 533-7275 or email leeparks@leegov.com. Adult snowy plover carrying an egg shell photo by Hugh McLaughlin Adult snowy plover with chick photo by Heather PorterCall for departure time CAPTIVACRUISES H T H E I S L A N D S H THE BEST WAY TO SEE THE ISLANDS IS FROM THE WATER Cruises depart from beautiful Captiva Island 1551 Periwinkle Way I 472-7242 Lunch 113 I Happy Hour 36 I Dinner 59:30Dinner reservations suggested DINING SHOPPING COCKTAILS AWARD-WINNING BISTRO CUISINE JEWELRY, CLOTHING, BOOKS & GIFTS FINE WINES, BEERS & HAPPY HOUR MENU Live! Danny Morgan & Friends! TUESDAYS & THURSDAYS, 8PM UNTI L... IslandSun_MAY06 5/17/06 1:35 PM Page 1 1551 Periwinkle Way 472-7242 Lunch 11-3 Happy Hour 3-6 Dinner 5-9 Chris Workman Every Wed. 7-10pm Danny Morgan & Friends Tues. & Thurs. 7-10pm Live Music

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17 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 CROW Case Of The Week: Florida RedBellied Turtlesby Patricia MolloyT wo Florida red-bellied turtles are currently being treated at CROW after being hit by reckless drivers. The incidents caused extensive damage to their shells. The Florida red-bellied turtle (Pseudemys nelsoni) is found primarily in the Sunshine State. Ranging from 11 to 12 inches in length, the freshwater turtles are quite large and are most often seen basking in the warm sun. Adults consume an energyrich herbivorous diet, which is whey they prefer areas with abundant aquatic plants: marshes, sloughs, mangrove-bordered creeks, lakes and ponds. Females make their nests away from the water, frequently selecting ones already established by alligators. Male red-bellies could be considered romanticsat-heart: they court females by swimming backwards in a display of aquatic prowess followed by a gentle stroking of the side of a females face with their long, front claws. Turtle shells are comprised of two parts: the carapace, which is the domeshaped upper shelling, and the plastron, the flat shelling on the bottom. Dr. Heather treated both patients carapacial fractures by gluing grommets to the defects and tying in place with lacing. The lacing is comprised of an absorbent material that will eventually degrade. While a nonabsorbent suture material is preferable, she used what was available: lacing made from natural materials that was kindly donated to the wildlife clinic. The first turtle, patient #1545, also suffered fractures to his plastron. He is doing well now and we have discontinued all of his pain medications, said Dr. Heather. While he does take his meals while swimming, he must be dry-docked afterward under a heat lamp to avoiding rapid decomposition of the lacing. When patient #1988 arrived, it also had a barnacle on its head and a fish hook in its mouth which is ironic for a freshwater herbivore. The fish hook was surgically extracted promptly as it posed the most immediate danger. Both turtles are well on the road to recovery and will be released back into the wild as soon as Dr. Heather deems them healthy. If you would like to know more about the clinics wildlife patients, go to CROWs Visitor Eduction Center on Wednesday, July 31 at 11 a.m. The program Rescues & Releases of CROWs Patients is presented by members of the CROW team. Learn about rescues and releases of some interesting patient cases and an insiders look at CROWs efforts to save wildlife. For more information, call 472-3644 ext. 228 or go to www. crowclinic.org for a complete schedule of events. CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native and migratory wildlife from our local area. The hospital accepts patients seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations to P.O. Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call 472-3644 or visit www.crowclinic.org. This male Florida red-bellied turtle, patient #1545, is pictured basking under a red heat lamp. While adult females tend to be larger, males possess longer claws and stouter tails S D Taste of the Islands Peoples Choice Award Winner Seven Continuous Years Lunch & Dinner 472-8138 SANIBEL MARINA SANIBEL THRILLER CRUISES SANIBEL THRILLER CRUISES

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201318 Jesse Alexander and Jordan Crabb, both age 17 from Ormond Beach, Florida, caught a sawfish off the coast of Sanibel on July 17 around 9:30 p.m. as a crowd of about 100 people looked on from the beach at West Gulf Drive. Approximately 14 feet long and weighing over 300 pounds, the sawfish was released unharmed and reported to the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). Jesse Alexander and Jordan Crabb pose with their catch photo by Jessy Crabb Fish Caught Ben Arensman, going into the fifth grade at The Sanibel School caught this 14.5-inch pompano off the beach on West Gulf Drive. Ben used a sand flea as bait, which he dug up from the beach just below the water line. Pompanos are excellent eating. Fish Caught Ben Arensmann with his catch Since 1976 A Captiva Island Tradition Since 1976 Captivas Finest Waterfront Restaurant Come by Land.... or Come by Sea... TUE.SAT 4PM CLOSECALL AHEAD 472-2555~ OPEN ~ 10 $99 MEAT! Sanibel Deli & CoffeeF A C T O R Y Lee Parks & Rec To Garner Input About 40-Acre ParcelBird-watchers, hikers, nature photographers and Pine Islanders can help Lee County Parks & Recreation staff select a concept plan for a 40-acre wooded parcel on the island in Northwest Lee County. The public is invited to stop by the Matlacha Community Center between 4 and 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 30. This will be an informal open house workshop with no formal presentation provided. Residents can see two versions of plans for the parcel, which is located just west of the islands four-way stop cattycorner to Phillips Park. One plan calls for passive recreation with a half-mile loop trail, nature observation platform, limited parking and a small pavilion and restrooms. Another plan has an additional amenity an open-space area that could be used for events. Staff will be on hand to receive verbal and written comments about the concept plans and will use information gathered July 30 as they continue plans for the parcel, on which construction is not expected to begin until 2014. This is the third phase of garnering input; two public meetings previously have been held. For more information, call 533-7446, or visit www.leeparks.org for directions to the Matlacha Community Center.

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19 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 From page 1Preservation Campaign Goalcampaign committee. Thanks goes to the hardworking committee and everyone who pledged a contribution to the crucial project. Thanks to Jim and his committee for making this happen, said DDWS president John McCabe. His mangrove cuckoo alone brought in $60,000 toward our goal. The entire community and Ding family really went to bat for us on this one. The final push for the campaign came when an anonymous donor, as a result of touring the Woodring property during the Zonta Clubs Peek at the Unique homes tour in March, pledged a challenge contribution of $200,000, said Sprankle. Immediately, island communities and people from around the country responded with donations of all sizes. We are particularly appreciative of the support from community organizations such as Zonta, COTI, SCCF and the local Audubon chapter, said Sprankle. I cant even begin to thank all the individual contributors -from the young girl who gave us $5 at the Sanibel Farmers Market to the amazing $200,000 challenge donation. The Woodring propertys preservation is a cooperative effort between DDWS and Lee Countys Conservation 20/20 program. Each is purchasing part of the land, and the refuge will restore and manage both parcels. The Woodring family, who homesteaded the property in the late 1800s, currently owns the property, which is adjacent to the refuge and privately owned conservation lands. The purchase of the Woodring property will add to the refuge a key parcel for re-creating an intact habitat and wildlife corridor on the point. It prevents further development and ensures the protection of a vital habitat and feeding grounds for a variety of at-risk species and other fauna and precludes further residential development there. Members of the Refuge Preservation Committee Campaign included Chairman Sprankle, Mary Lou Bailey, Chauncey Goss, Porter Goss, Doris Hardy, Jon Heinrich, Chip Lesch, McCabe, Mike Mullins and Bill Vanderbilt. As a non-profit 501(c)3 organization, DDWS works to support JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuges mission of conservation, wildlife and habitat protection, research and public education through charitable donations and Refuge Nature Shop proceeds. To support DDWS and the refuge with a tax-deductible gift, visit www.dingdarlingsociety.org or contact Birgie Vertesch at 292-0566 or director@dingdarlingsociety.org. Share your community news with us. Call 395-1213, Fax: 395-2299or email press@islandsunnews.com For your entertainment enjoyment, Sanibel & Captivas own Danny Morgan Band Live entertainment in Sea Breeze Caf every Friday and Saturday from 7-10 and at Turtles every Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 1-4 Two fun-filled Happy Hours daily Celebrate the opening of our new restaurants, Turtles, Sea Breeze Caf and Waterview. After Happy Hour, join us for a delicious dinner!Register to WIN a complimentary weekend for two at Sundial Beach Resort & Spa during Sanibel Summerfest. Visit www.SundialResort.com for complete entertainment schedule. For additional information, Sundial Beach Resort & Spa NOW OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Celebrating Sanibel Summerfest Island Join us for our BBQ Blowout every Saturday until Labor Day from 12-4 poolside at Turtles Beach & Pool Bar S S W A M S, F M Brf, FLFLORIDAPIRATECRUISE.COM 800-776-3258S C P P Cf F Sr B$5 OFFWITH THE PURCHASE OF 2 FARES. NO OTHER OFFERS APPLY LIMIT 4 PEOPLE EXPIRES: 08/09/13 SUN13

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201320 Birds Eye ViewShould Wolves Be Hunted?by Mark Bird WestallIn 2011, just as the wolf was beginning to make a remarkable comeback from the brink of extinction in the lower 48 states, Congress, in its wisdom, voted to remove it from the Endangered Species List. Today, hunting seasons have been established in several western states and the argument is given that the recovery of the wolf was so successful and predation by the species on livestock and game has increased to such a high level that hunting is now justified and necessary. I wonder! At the very beginning of my canoe trips into the refuge, I tell my customers that my father has never really understood me because I respect all life and his philosophy has always been, If you cant eat it or hunt with it, what good is it? Then I point out that our government basically agrees with my father when I make the observation that most of our State and Federally Endangered Species are non-game species like wood storks, condors, whooping cranes, manatees, etc. I then go on to shock people when I throw out the idea that if we really wanted to bring manatee populations back up to a stable level, we should probably hunt them! Now, Im not really promoting the idea that we hunt manatees, but if that species was one that we wanted to hunt in the first place and there was a possibility that their population could reach a level that hunting was a sustainable option, I guarantee there would be speed limits everywhere the manatee could be found and the existence of those speed limits would be less controversial. I make this statement because if we hunted the manatee, then even the fishermen could understand why the government was forcing them to slow their flat boats down. They could justify slowing down for a group of people that wanted to hunt the manatee. They find it next to impossible to slow down for some animal lovers that only want to protect the manatee because it is so ugly its cute! Case in point: the American alligator. This species was almost extirpated in Florida by the 1960s because of its valuable hide and meat. But once the government understood that the alligator could possibly go the way of the passenger pigeon and the Carolina parakeet, serious efforts were undertaken to bring the species back. Today, the state estimates that we have over 1.3 million alligators living in Florida, most of them being found living in our residential ponds. Think how many people living along those neighborhood ponds want the alligators there? But because of its valuable hide, the state manages those alligators, so there will always be alligators in our residential ponds. The management policies will limit the individual size of the animals (gators under six feet are less dangerous to humans), but the alligator will survive as a species in Florida; it has value. But this concept that hunted species will fare better than non-game species may not work so well for the gray wolf. Humans have hated this species ever since we started domesticating potential farm animals for our own personal use. The wolf was probably the first animal we domesticated, but once those animals that remained wild began eating our livestock, we developed a hatred of the wolf that has been passed down through the generations to this day. Now, I do not believe our hatred of the wolf stems from some genetic trait that has been passed down through the generations because this species is a dangerous predator of humans; like our fear of crocodilians. Wolves are generally very reclusive around humans. As a matter of fact, there has never been a verified attack of a wolf on a human in North America unless it was rabid, or possibly if it had become too habituated to being around humans. I believe our hatred is purely a cultural hatred. We hate the wolf because he eats our livestock and competes against us when he kills the game species we want to kill. Therefore, forever and ever, we have sat around the evening fires telling stories about Little Red Riding Hood and the Three Little Pigs... and come up with horror stories about werewolves. So the problem is, if we had the possibility of hunting a species like manatees, there would be greater support for their survival because there would be little possibility that increased numbers of manatees would cause more problems for humans and their interests. But that is not the case with wolves. The real reason to hunt wolves is to eliminate them so they wont compete with us. It is not realistic to believe that the government wildlife agencies will ever seriously manage a species so that it can effectively compete on an equal footing with the human farmer and hunter. Unfortunately, the way that the governments management of wolves has evolved doesnt really surprise me. One of my lifes goals was to just hear a wolf howl in the wild someday. I was lucky enough to not only hear the wolf, but get to watch the pack come jogging out of the woods on the way to their evening hunt whenever I want to when I owned my lodge in Alaska. That was one of the best experiences of my life, one that many Americans, Im afraid, will never get to experience. And I think thats a pity! A former city council member and mayor, Mark Bird Westall has owned and operated Canoe Adventures, Inc. on Sanibel for over 33 years. Visit www.canoewithbirdwestall.com for more information. New Business of the Year 3111 West Gulf Drive, Sanibel Gift Cards Available Call 239472 -4559 TraditionsOnTheBeach.com Specializing in weddings, private parties and corporate events

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21 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013Plant SmartWhite Crownbeardby Gerri ReavesWhite crownbeard (Verbesina virginica) is a native Florida vine and member of the aster family. Found in the wild in wet hammocks, coastal shell middens and alongside marshes and streams, it grows to six feet or more. It is suited to a natural garden or as a background to other plants. In summer to fall, flat clusters of wavy white flowers up to a foot across bloom. Each small flower in the cluster consists of the ray flowers, which are three to five oval petals, and the tubular disk flowers, which make up a white and green center disk. The flowers attract butterflies, including the monarch, as well as native bees. The hairy lance-like or ovate leaves are up to eight inches long and vary from lobed to toothed to smooth-edged. The plants winged stems are known for a characteristic that gives the vine other common names in less temperate parts of its growing range: frostweed, iceplant and frost flower. In freezing temperatures, the water in the winged stems freezes and ruptures them. Because the stems continue to draw moisture from the soil, the water and water vapor emits into the air, freezes, and forms ribbon-like ice sculptures to beautiful effect. White crownbeard grows in moist or well-drained soil and even in partial shade. However, full sun and somewhat dry conditions make for a compact plant and more plentiful flowering. It is drought tolerant and easily self-sows. White crownbeard has several medicinal uses, including as an eye treatment and emetic. Sources: Wildflowers of Florida Field Guide by Jaret C. Daniels and Stan Tekiela, Everglades Wildflowers by Roger L. Hammer, A Gardeners Guide to Floridas Native Plants by Rufino Osorio, and edis.ifas.ufl.edu. Plant Smart explores sustainable gardening practices that will help you create an environmentally responsible, low-maintenance South Florida landscape. White crownbeard, a Florida native, is low-maintenance and wildlife friendly photo by Gerri Reaves To advertise in the Island Sun Call 395-1213 rf rf ntb bb f b b bbnbb r rfntn b bfnnfnt bbr ff ffbb 2013-07-25_SAN_Print.indd 1 7/19/13 4:08 PM

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201322 Despite Dirty Water, The Fish Are Still Feedingby Capt. Matt MitchellDirty water and huge high tides greeted anglers this week. This dirty water came after all the rains of the past few weeks along with fresh water discharges from Lake O. This coffee-colored water throughout the sound is certainly not pretty to look at but it has not shut down our fishing. Catch-and-release snook fishing in and around the passes continued to go off. Drift after drift through the passes resulted in hook-up after hook-up. Though most of these snook are in the mid 20-inch range, its awesome to find so many. Small pinfish and grunts have been the baits of choice simply rigged with a split shot to bounce off the bottom during the drift. Once you locate the fish on a certain part of the drift, make this drift over and over. This resulted in many double header hook-ups. The passes also held some bigger snook with a few fish over 30 inches caught just about every trip. Several times this week we hooked into and even caught a few a real monsters right around that magical 40-inch mark all snook fisherman strive for. For the next few months Southwest Florida snook fishing will be about as good as it ever gets. To get away from the crowd in the passes this week Im planning a few night trips. With the snook bite so good in the day time its not hard to imagine how this bite must go off at night. More on the night trips in next weeks report. Redfish have also been starting to show up in the passes too, often as a surprise while drifting for snook. Mangrove fishing on these giant high tides this week for redfish was not as great as I would have expected. I did catch redfish up to 30 inches but it was one here one there with no one area really being on fire. Mangrove shorelines in the northern sound seemed to hold more fish. This I suspect is because of all the fresh water in the southern end of the sound. Tail hooked medium to large pinfish flipped back up under the trees was what they ate for me this week. One day mid-week I had clients who wanted to catch and release sharks. Setting up in Rocky Channel in the northern sound it did not take us long to get our first bite. The strong incoming tide was the perfect set-up to soak large mullet chunks on the bottom. This is really a fun way to fish and about as easy as fishing gets. Large chunks of fresh cut mullet are hooked on a large circle hook, cast out and placed in the rod holders. When a shark picks up the bait, the drag starts screaming. Then its as easy as lifting the rod out of the holder and handing it to the client. This area offers a great variety of species of sharks from bulls to lemons, spinners and blacktips of all different sizes. Sharks really like to come into this deep natural channel. Anchor up with a float buoy on your anchor so you can quickly drop the anchor and chase these bigger sharks when needed. During calm periods, I did spot a few rolling tarpon in the sound. Although I did not fish for them, I had a few reports from other guides of several tarpon hookups. Most of the hooked fish came one of two ways: sight-fishing rolling fish, or while anchored up soaking cut baits. I still bring a few tarpon rods along on every trip as you never know when you will run into them. A few places I spotted tarpon this week included west of Maciever Keys, west of Cork Key and south of Cabbage Key. Summertime fishing is all about options. Have the right gear on board and rigged as you never know when an opportunity will present itself. Being ready really increases your odds as most of the time you will have a very short window to present your bait to that fish that will make a days fishing trip.Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing local waters since he moved to Sanibel in 1980. He now lives in St. James City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or questions email captmattmitchell@aol.com. Send Us Your Fish TalesThe Island Sun would like to hear from anglers about their catches. Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch, species and weight, and include photographs with identification. Drop them at the Island Sun, 1640 Periwinkle Way, Suite 2, Sanibel, or email to islandsuncity@aol.com; or call Anne Mitchell at 395-1213. Capt. Matt Mitchell with a 30-inch redfish caught and released during a day off this week ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Specialist Call on Paint Prices ISLAND MARINE SERVICES, INC. MERCURY MARINER JOHNSON EVINRUDE SUZUKI YAMAHA OMC I/O'S MERCRUISER Serving Sanibel & Captiva For Life Your Bottom Your Bottom Your Bottom Specialist Specialist Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices Call on Paint Prices 1 472-5800

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23 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 S CCF S ea Turtle S tatisticsThis week, we officially broke Sanibel and Captivas standing records for green turtle nests laid in a season. There are now nine green turtle nests on Sanibel and two on Captiva. Below is the total amount of sea turtle activity as of July 19, and the previous two years for comparison. As of July 19, 2013: Sanibel East 44 nests, 88 false crawls, 0 hatches Sanibel West 250 nests, 333 false crawls, 8 hatches Captiva 115 nests, 71 false crawls, 9 hatches As of July 19, 2012: Sanibel East 65 nests, 135 false crawls, 0 hatches Sanibel West 221 nests, 469 false crawls, 15 hatches Captiva 75 nests, 100 false crawls, 7 hatches As of July 19, 2011: Sanibel East 35 nests, 79 false crawls, 2 hatches Sanibel West 219 nests, 328 false crawls, 24 hatches Captiva 70 nests, 50 false crawls, 26 hatches For more information, call 472-2329 or visit www.sccf.org. SCCF Living with Wildlife Educator Dee Serage staking a loggerhead nest photo courtesy Kathy Boyd ZAGATZAGAT.COMRated by: Fish Tacos! Alexa Strussion from Columbus, Ohio found an alphabet cone on July 22 while staying at Sanibel Arms West. Top Ten Books On The Island1. My 92 Years On Sanibel by Francis Bailey 2. Dry Grass Of August by Anna Jean Mayhew 3. Ten Thousand Islands by Randy Wayne White 4. Orphan Masters Son by Adam Johnson 5. Sanibel and Captiva Islands by Deborah Gleason and Charles LeBuff 6. Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh 7. Good In Bed by Jennifer Weiner 8. Theres A Secret On Sanibel and Captiva by Karen Richards 9. Zombie Survival Guide by Max Brooks 10. A Bubble Moment by Katie GardeniaCourtesy of Sanibel Island Bookshop S hell Found Alexa Strussion

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201324 An Audubon Florida Special PlaceKissimmee Prairie State Parksubmitted by Marianne KorosyThe last recorded nests of the nowextinct Carolina parakeet, the only member of its genus native to the U.S., were raided by an egg collector on April 30, 1927 deep in a south Florida swamp called Gum Slough. What surrounds Gum Slough is a vast landscape of native prairie, shady hammocks, and shallow sloughs that rises to meet the sky somewhere far in the distance. This largest publicly-owned tract of Floridas dry prairie ecosystem Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park is one of my special places. Dry prairie is found nowhere else in the world and it is home to more than 40 species of plants per square meter, uncountable insects, diamondback rattlesnakes as thick as a tugboat rope, gopher tortoises, spotted skunks, and the occasional Florida panther. It is a wildflower and butterfly paradise to native plant aficionados and a destination for some of the most sought-after bird sightings in the state: crested caracara, white-tailed kite, burrowing owl, and Floridas only endemic sparrow, the Florida grasshopper sparrow, listed as an endangered species by the federal government. Although the dry prairie is indeed dry much of the year, it is a flat landscape riddled with depressions marshes and a spgdery network of shallow sloughs that fill with rainfall annually in late summer and early autumn. The prairie acts as a mileswide-and-deep freshwater reservoir that feeds water slowly into the Kissimmee River, helping nourish and rejuvenate Lake Okeechobee and the Everglades vast river of grass downstream. Audubons history of safeguarding waterbirds in south Florida began at the turn of the 19th century. Lake Okeechobee and the Kissimmee River came quickly into focus as critical to protection of the unique greater Everglades ecosystem, home to millions of nesting waterbirds that were being decimated by the international plume trade. In the early 1980s, the Florida Audubon Society purchased land 25 miles northwest of Lake Okeechobee to form Audubons 7,315acre Kissimmee Prairie Sanctuary. The 54,000-acre Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park was established in 2001 when the State of Florida purchased both the Audubon Sanctuary and an adjacent, lightly-grazed ranch. Today, a new chapter in dry prairie conservation has begun with more than 30 ranchers cooperating to form the Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge. And Kissimmee Prairie Preserve is a lynchpin of biodiversity for the new refuge. For millennia, lightning-ignited fire combined with annual flooding kept the dry prairie treeless and prevented the native saw palmetto from crowding out grasses and flowering plants, said Paul Miller, preserve biologist for the past 10 years. But with fire-suppression policies in place throughout much of the 20th century trees invaded and saw palmetto grew A male Florida grasshopper sparrow sings from a twig perch in Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park photo by Christina Evans Blooming pitcher plants inhabit a bog within the surrounding drier prairie photo by Marianne Korosy George & Wendys Seafood Grille Corner of Periwinkle & Tarpon Bay Road in the Baileys Plaza Lunch, Dinner & Late Night Menu Only All Day Happy Hour on the Island Outdoor Seating (239) 395-1263 for reservations or take-out LIVE ENTERTAINMENT Friday, July 26thRobby Hutto & The Absent-MindedFriday, August 2nd Slow Deal Every Thursday Karaoke Ladies Night-SaturdaysJuly 27th The Troublestarters 9pm-12am 1/2 Price Drinks for LadiesTil We Run Out*Every Tuesday Nite $18 Prime Rib* Every Wednesday Nite $18 Snow Crab Legs* Robby Hutto & The Absent-Minded FREEDRINK*11am-4pm Daily Through July 31stYour Choice of Beverage FREE w/purchase of lunch entre & coupon* George & Wendys Seafood Grille George & Wendys Seafood Grille Your Choice of Beverage FREE w/purchase of lunch entre & coupon* w/purchase of lunch entre & coupon* George & Wendys Seafood Grille George & Wendys Seafood Grille w/purchase of lunch entre & coupon* w/purchase of lunch entre & coupon* great food good timesJean Le Boeuf food PLACEIsland Restaurant 239-472-0223 Full Bar

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25 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013thick and tall. Highways, row crops, and cattle ranches fragmented the dry prairie into ever smaller blocks; less than 20 percent of a landscape that once covered 3.5 million acres remained by the turn of the 21st century. Since the Preserve was established in 2001, Miller added, we burn the dry prairie every two to three years to benefit the Florida grasshopper sparrow, a bird that nests and feeds in the open spaces among lush grasses and sparse shrubs. Even with Floridas finest sparrow experts meeting regularly to discuss best management practices this multicolored little bird is in trouble. In a place where one could stand between earth and sky at first light and hear tip-tup-bzzzzzzz from every quarter of the prairie, there is growing silence. Surveys this spring on publicly-owned lands turned up 14 singing males at Kissimmee Prairie Preserve, down from more than 150 males 10 years ago. Nearby sites reflected the same trend and the experts are baffled. Will there come a day when our spar row sings its last song or can we pull together and prevent this tragic extinction?This column is one in a series from AUDUBON FLORIDA. Marianne Korosy, PhD candidate, is Audubon Floridas jay watch and important bird area coordinator. For more information about Kissimmee Prairie Preserve see www. floridastateparks.org/kissimmeeprairie and www.kissimmeeprairiefriends.org. Three months after a spring-season fire, wildflowers and lush grasses abound at Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park photo by Marianne KorosyCoyote S ighted In The D unes L eaves Paw Printsubmitted by Gillian McBainWe are a family from Scotland who have been coming to Sanibel Island on vacation for a couple of months every summer for the last four years. While my husband and I were sitting out on our back deck on Monday night just after 7 p.m., we heard movement in the undergrowth behind our house. We are renting in The Dunes this year with the property backing onto the dense undergrowth of the SCCF Apple Pond Park. To our enormous surprise, the noise was coming from a coyote running right through our back garden. It was a large specimen who was mostly red in color, with a large, bushy tail. Upon hearing our children playing in the pool, he ran back off into the bushes. Sadly, I didnt have my camera in hand. We came across some scat earlier last week that had a purple color to it and deposits of fur in it; at that point, we never considered it could have come from a coyote. We have only ever seen a coyote once before and that was in Yosemite National Park some time ago. He was a tatty underfed creature while the one we saw this week on Sanibel was very healthy looking. This morning in our back garden next to the lime trees, we noticed a large animal track in the dirt. On closer inspection, it is a large dog-like footprint that must have been left through the night from our coyote. I can only assume he hides in Apple Pond Reserve through daylight hours, then ventures closer to the more populated areas once the sun goes down. We are staying another three weeks on the island, so I will be a bit more prepared while watching the sun go down of an evening and have my camera at the ready to try to catch him next time! The coyote footprint, photographed with a quarter to show the scale

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201326 Sanibel-Captiva Art League A rt L eague Members S how PaintingsLocal tropical and nautical scenes are always a favorite with visitors to the Sanibel-Captiva Art League Annual Summer Art Exhibit currently on view through September at Sanibel Public Library. Many nature studies are included in the exhibit along with still life, architecture, portraits and abstract paintings in a variety of media and sizes The beautiful changing color of the waters of the Gulf of Mexico along with the lush vegetation and delicate flowers provide wonderful subject matter during the Art Leagues weekly Paint-outs. The Library staff and volunteers invite residents and visitors to visit the Library Paint out at Sanibels Walsh Landscaping Martha Graham Carolyn Jones Dorothy Ault Helen Copeland Neil Glaser rf ntbnrr bb bb rtttn Loved this restaurant. Fantastic experience. Food was exceptionally amazing. Service was outstanding. TripAdvisor Member, May 2013

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27 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013and see the new books, CDs and DVDs as well as all the other services such as computers, internet connections and eBook availability. The changing educational and interesting monthly themes often specialize in a variety of subjects that are unique to this area. The Library is located on Dunlop Road. next to Sanibel City Hall. For hours and information call 472-2483 or log on to www.sanlib.org. For Art League information write to PO Box 1192, Sanibel FL 33957 or log on to www.sancapart.com. Randon Eddy Mary Jane Keys Sherry Collier David King Leslie Cornelisen Betty Weise We Proudly Brew Tropial Outdoor Patio Seating Get Crabby At The Cow Get Crabby At The Cow with our Famous Stone Crabs1/2 lb & Best Prices On The Planet Fun "new" Moo Wear for all ages Come Try our NEW Cowlicious Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials Sanibels Most Award Winning Restaurant LIVE Famous Stone Crabs Famous Stone Crabs Always Fresh ...Always! ...Always! with our with our Always Fresh ...Always Fun! Always Fresh ...Always Fun!

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201328 BIG ARTS Offers New Workshops For Next SeasonBIG ARTS has opened enrollment for the 2013-14 season of workshops. The new season will feature a variety of new classes, such as stained glass, Zentangle (drawing), art appreciation, opera appreciation, oil painting, acrylic painting, book crafting and a mystery/thriller writing critique group. Thats in addition to the return of popular workshops in art, technology, fine crafts, foreign language, music lessons, painting, drawing, pottery, writing as well as discussion groups. BIG ARTS is also adding several new wellness classes, such as Using SelfHypnosis to Improve Health. The new workshops: Odorless Oil Painting: Instructor Sherri Collier will teach a variety of odorless oil painting classes, including beginner and intermediate level classes. These new courses include Sun, Sea and Air Sanibel and Captiva Beaches in Oil; Birds of Ding Darling in Oil; Its all GREEN to Me: Adding Variety to Florida Landand Swamp-scapes in Oil; and Florida Water: Paint it Still, Paint it Choppy, with Oils. Collier will also teach a class analyzing the rules and principles of composition with ways to break these rules, to reflect the artists individuality, energy, emotion, and personality. She has taught and exhibited in Florida and in Europe. She attended Kent Institute of Art in Canterbury, U.K. and is now most inspired by Floridas landscapes and its wild inhabitants. She paints in a loosely representational style and is determined to give class and workshop participants all the personal attention they need to achieve their painterly goals. Stained Glass Classes: Ken Casola will teach new stained glass classes for beginner and intermediate levels. Casola is a master craftsman with 30 years experience in creating stained glass windows for churches, homes and restaurants in one of the biggest stained glass studios in Southwest Florida. He will explain the different types of decorative glass to be used, the process of cutting, laying out a stained glass panel, and the different structural methods using copper foil and lead. Mystery/Thriller Critique Group: Retired television executive producer, lecturer, researcher and author Nancy Bialy Daversa will lead this group whose members will share writing advice and Daversa will review methods to submit works for publication. Oil Painting, Intermediate with Quick-Drying Odorless Alkyd Oil: Lois Ferguson will teach this painting class. She says, If you have always wanted to paint with oils but dislike the strong odor of linseed oil and turpentine and the slow drying of regular oils, alkyd oil is a great alternative. If you have painted with regular oils you will not notice any difference in the mixing qualities and ease of applying. Ferguson moved to Sanibel in 1997 and opened The Artisans Touch, specializing in interior and exterior murals, trompe-lil, faux finishes and decorative furniture painting. She has been teaching decorative furniture painting and oil painting classes at BIG ARTS since 1998. From 2001 to 2006 she was with The Tower Gallery, an artist cooperative on Sanibel, where she sold hundreds of oils, watercolor and pastel paintings. Her paintings are displayed in Sanibel homes, across the U.S. and abroad. Fine Arts Create a Book: Martha Graham will teach Create a Book using Folding Techniques and Create a Book from Small Paper Bags. Graham holds art history and occupational therapy degrees, studied at Parsons, and exhibits on Sanibel at Hirdie Girdie Gallery. Graham first saw a handmade book 15 years ago and was smitten. She has published two books on the subject and has exhibited her paper folded books in art exhibits. She also teaches at the Ward Museum, the Art Institute and Gallery in Salisbury, Maryland. Acrylic Painting for Beginners: Jane Hudsons new beginner acrylic painting class includes a getting started demonstration, including color mixing, preparing the canvas, choosing subject matter, sketching on the canvas/paper, and applying paint. Her goal is to nurture each beginning artist in discovering the joy and satisfaction of creating beautiful art with acrylic paint, and complete a painting with confidence. Group Voice Classes: Soprano Lynn Martindale will be teaching two Instructor Jane Hudson painting at an event at BIG ARTS Instructor Martha Graham Voice Instructor Lynn Martindale LIVE ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY!Happy Hour Daily Half Price 4-6:30pm & All Night Tuesday Online Reservations Available www.brattasristorante.com12984 S. Cleveland Ave., Fort Myers, 239-433-4449JULY NIGHTLY SPECIALS Sunday Any Two Dinner Entrees from our regular menu & a Bottle of House Wine for ONLY $50 Monday 1/2 Price Bottle of Wines(enjoy as many as you like) NO LIMITS Tuesday Happy Hour& $4.99 Appetizers all Night! Wednesday Italian Night!$9.99 Lasagna, Taylor Street Baked Ziti, Cappellini & Meatballs, & Eggplant & Chicken Parmesan $3.00 House Wines By e Glass Thursday Steak & Lobster Tail $14.99 Friday Seafood Extravaganza Pre Fixe Dinner $24.99 per person. $5.00 Martinis! Saturday Make Online Reservations & Receive 25% o Total Check (Regular Priced Items) -ALWAYS AT BRATTAS-EARLY DINING 2 for $20 Dinners daily until 5:30pm, Live Music, Online Discounts, Daily Happy Hour until 6:30pm, Dance Floor, Great Food, Fun & Service

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group voice classes at BIG ARTS, one for adults and one for children. Martindale is known internationally as a singer, pedagogue, adjudicator and workshop clinician. She has performed in operas at the Music Academy of the West; Euterpe Opera; San Diego Opera; Zurich Opera; and Stadt Theater Bielefeld and appeared in concerts and lieder recitals in the U.S., Switzerland and Germany. While working on her masters degree at NYU, she was recruited by Lee Strasberg Institute to teach vocal performance to actors. The next year, she moved to the Musical Theater program at NYU Tisch School of the Arts where she taught private and class voice for 13 years. She has also taught voice at Manhattan School of Music and at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. In 2012 Martindale moved to Fort Myers and opened the Linhart Voice Studio. She served as a judge for the 2013 Young Artist Competition, and continues to serve on the panel of experts for Career Bridges, a New York-based foundation that provides feedback and study awards to young opera singers; as well as on the Advisory Board for Encompass New Opera Theater. Self-Hypnosis for Health Learn the basics of this alternative treatment and its place in wholistic medicine with Dr. William Morrow, a Florida licensed mental health provider with 30 years of private practice experience. He also holds a doctoral degree in pastoral psychology. He regularly teaches adult education courses in mind-body-spiritual health and hypnosis, including at the Chautauqua Institute. He is a member of the Florida Society of Clinical Hypnosis and author of The Rain Doesnt Fall Straight Down: A Positive Slant on Marriage Relationships. Morrow says, The irony of mainstream medicine is that drugs and surgery keep us alive for subsequent, more complex illnesses. Self-hypnosis can be an alternative or supplement to your regular medical treatment. Mind-body management of the symptoms of many illnesses and complex diseases is the pathway to better health and wholeness. Art You Can Hang, All Levels with Patricia OKane is a project-oriented art workshop focusing on complex backgrounds and simple subjects. Artist discussion regarding principles in color theory, mixed media (outsider art/recycled art) resources will be followed by color mixing, support prep, backgrounds, found objects, texture, and composition. No prior experience is required and veteran artists will have opportunities to further embellish beyond simple steps. This new course is also designed to be helpful for the art teacher looking for new projects to teach. OKane is the owner/ instructor for ArtIsIn Studio and Gallery in Princeville, Illinois. A former public school and home school co-op art teacher, she teaches a variety of classes from childrens to enrichment classes for adult artists. OKane considers herself a mixed media artist, but loves drawing, collage, painting with watercolor, acrylics and oils. She has memberships with and has taught for both the Illinois Art League and the Fort Myers Beach Art Association. Introduction to Zentangle: This is an easy-to-learn, relaxing and fun way to create beautiful images by drawing structured patterns. This meditative practice increases focus and creativity, builds artistic confidence along with promoting a sense of well-being. Zentangle also offers a valuable tool to enhance arts and crafts projects; scrapbooking, journaling, and greeting cards. Meg Scotts zentangle course is suitable for a wide range of skills, interests and ages, no previous art experience is needed. Next season brings back BIG ARTS favorites Jack Bailey, who will teach the History of the Swing Era in Jazz, as well as Gisela Damandl who will teach Fun with Gourds, Pine Needle Basketry and Cool Coils basket techniques. BIG ARTS added a new session to the schedule for Ginnie Petersons Encaustic Workshop; a fall session this year for Applied Drawing Basics with Ann McCarty Sickels; as well as new sessions for Ellie Gauses Open Studio: Clothed Model or Still Life. The fourth season of BIG ARTS Winter Academy is also open for enrollment and will feature new courses in art, music, economics, international law and religion. Winter Academy classes delve into subjects on a more in-depth basis than a single lecture but less than a full college course. Led by experts in their field, many of the Winter Academy instructors are retired university faculty in addition to being accomplished speakers. A comprehensive list of workshop and Winter Academy classes and schedules is available online at www.BIGARTS.org. There is a 20 percent discount on workshops for BIG ARTS members. Contact BIG ARTS office or website for class locations. For further information about workshops, classes and events or to become a member, stop by BIG ARTS, 900 Dunlop Road, Sanibel, call 395-0900, e-mail info@BIGARTS.org or log on to www.BIGARTS.org. 29 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 1200 Periwinkle Way (239) 472-1998 Full Liquor Sanibels Italian Kitchen $2.50 OFFPresent this ad to your server. Must be seated prior to 5:30 p.m. Not valid on Wine Wednesday or with any other coupon or discount. Expires 7/31/13The purchase of each adult entree. $8.00 OFF $25 or more. CHEFS SPECIALST-Bone Angelo Grouper Granchiofinished with a sherry mushroom sauce sauted local grouper, encrusted with crabmeat stuffing. Sanibel Grill 22nd Anniversary Special July 22 July 28 we will be celebrating the 22nd Anniversary of The Sanibel Grill! During this time, in addition to our regular nightly specials we will be offering Two Dinners for $22 in addition we will o er Budweiser & Bud Light Drafts for $2.22! Budweiser & Bud Light Drafts for $2.22! Budweiser & Bud Light Drafts for $2.22! Entree choices include Orange Salmon Blackened Tilapia Shrimp Scampi ai Shrimp w/beans & rice Petite Sirloin Steak Crunchy Grouper Sandwich Mahvelous Meatloaf Crunchy Shrimp Basket Opening Day 1991

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ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201330 D iving The USS Mohowk Memorial ReefMichael Heider of The River Weekly and Island Sun viewing the artwork by Andreas Franke that was deployed on the reef in June. It will be brought back to the surface in September in preparation for a special exhibit at the Alliance for the Arts photo by Patricia Molloy & & & Applications will be accepted on Wednesdays from 9 a.m. and 12 noon and Thursdays from 1-4 p.m. in the Human Resources Oce at Sundial Beach Resort & Spa Announces Full & Part-time Employment Opportunities For Hospitality Positions Full-time OpportunitiesAssistant Housekeeping Manager Part-time & Seasonal OpportunitiesAdministrative Coordinator

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31 ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 Poets Corner selected by Tanya HochschildEnough Is Enoughby Susan StuartWe all know when enough is enough. The heat wont let up. The newspaper depresses and demoralizes. Struggle on top of struggle and then that final Straw gets loaded on your back and you know youve had it. You lose it. Enough is enough! But some days, like yesterday, the mighty straw Becomes light as a feather And tickles your fancy till you cant help but smile And know you are lucky to have enough of what it takes For it to be enough. I was sitting on the porch watching the dog parade At the end of the work day; Bassetts and beagles, dingos to doodles. Wine in hand, a perfect Minnesota ending To a pretty perfect day. Quiet, peaceful time. Suddenly a man Id never seen before Came racing across the yard. Seen my chicken? Ive lost my chicken. By any chance have you seen my chicken? There could only be one response. Why did the chicken cross the road? Susan Stuart is a member of Writers Group 5. She lives on Captiva and loves reading, writing, dogs and kids. Mother Writes Parenting BookMotivational speaker, author and talk show host Lisa Hein has released her newest book, titled Manifesting Gods Love In Your Family. Copies of the book are on the shelves of the Sanibel Island Bookshop, located at 1571 Periwinkle Way. Hein has lived in the Tampa Bay area for 15 years and has been invited to share her parenting expertise on national television and radio talk shows, asked to speak at numerous conferences, and hosted a national/international radio talk show called, Everyday Parenting. Her dynamic ability to embrace what is happening within the family dynamics leaves her audiences inspired to want to make some positive changes in their lives. She takes her past experiences in parentdom and shares helpful parenting tidbits that may bring families closer together in their spiritual walk. For more information about Lisas experience, visit her website at www. LisaRHein.com. We invite submissions from local poets. Anyone interested may submit their work via email to tutsie@ comcast.net. Each week, individual work will be showcased. New York CityFine Italian Cuisine FINE ITALIAN CUISINEIL TESORO RISTORANTEinspired by Island Fare in a bistro style Fresh ingredients, simplicity, love... the recipe for a treasured dining experience Chef/Owner AJ Black751 Tarpon Bay Road Sanibel Island, FL Reservations Suggested www.iltesoro.net 239-395-4022 Summer Happy Hour Daily 4:30-62 For 1 Glasses Of House Wine or Bottle Beer HAPPY HOUR ITALIAN TAPAS APPETIZERS STARTING AT $5TASTE OF THE ISLANDS IRON CHEF WINNERVOTED BEST CHEFBEST OF THE ISLANDS AWARD (HAPPY HOUR CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER PROMOTION OR DISCOUNT VOUCHERTIP AND TAX ARE NOT INCLUDED)Share your community news with us. Call 395-1213, Fax: 395-2299or email press@islandsunnews.com

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25 UNIQU E STORES I N A T ROPICA L SETTING 2075 P eriwinkle Way 2 Miles West of C auseway R d. on P eriwinkle Way P eriwinkleP lace.com L SETTING L SETTING L SETTING eriwinkle Way eriwinkle Way P P eriwinkle eriwinkle eriwinkle eriwinkle eriwinkle P P lace.com lace.com L SETTING L SETTING L SETTING L SETTING Find us on Facebook 239 472 2525mybluegiraffe.comNOW O RDER TAKE-OUT ONLINE NOW WITH FULL L IQUOR BAR JOIN US FOR OUR 4 5 6 HAPPY HOUR 4-6PM A ppetizers at $4, $5 and $6 D rinks from $3 JOI JOI N N US FOR OUR US FOR OUR US FOR OUR US FOR OUR A A ppetizers at $4, $5 and $6 ppetizers at $4, $5 and $6 ppetizers at $4, $5 and $6 ppetizers at $4, $5 and $6 (239) 395-2220 mm#2782$5.00 OFF$50.00 purchase$10.00 OFF$100.00 purchase On any Services or Products(restrictions apply!) Exp. 08-02-13www.SanibelDaySpa.com (239) 472-4206 and more! Indulge in Color and Fun! Upscale casual clothing, Sandals & accessories Sanibel PerfumePeriwinkle Place Shopping Center Ranked Sanibels # 1 Shopping Destination by the Lee County Convention and Visitors Bureau C L S F M W(239) 472-4600Island Pursuit ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201332

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rfn BUSINESS REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS VOL. 21, NO. 5 SANIBEL & CAPTIVA ISLANDS, FLORIDA JULY 26, 2013 BSECTION F amilys Roots Run D eep At S outh S eas Resortby Jeff L ysiakWhen Ken Sushil thinks about spending his childhood living on the grounds of South Seas Plantation, as it was called back in those days, he thinks fondly about a place where he and his siblings fished, swam, raised chickens and ran carefree around the island paradise. Sushil, whose father, Gerald Sr., was the plantation manager during the 1940s, lived for more than a decade on the grounds of South Seas in a modest, threebedroom wooden frame cottage along with his parents, brother Gerald, Jr. and sisters Laura, Betty and Rita. My dad was born in Austria and emigrated through Ellis Island, said Sushil, who currently lives in Fort Myers. And like a lot of people from Europe, he learned on the job and he was great with his hands. He could fix anything. Training on the railroads, Gerald Sushil Sr. made his way to Florida, eventually landing a job managing a nursery on Pineland for Jean Stewart. That eventually led to the longtime gig on Captiva, where Ken grew up. Ive written a book about those days its called Tales From The Rain Barrel, said Sushil, who is self-publishing the autobiography, with a release date still to be determined. Its filled with stories from my childhood and life lessons that people can share with their own children. One story he shared involved Ken and his sister Rita being sent out in the morning to hunt chickens and collect their eggs. On their way back to the house, Ken who was carrying all of the eggs tripped on a tree root and spilled their entire mornings collection. When they arrived at the house and told their mother all of the eggs had been broken, she simply told her children that they had learned a very important lesson: Dont put all of your eggs in one basket. Following Gerald Sr.s tenure at South Seas, the Sushil family relocated to Pine Island, where the patriarch became a hor ticulturalist. Recently, Sushil discovered a number of family photographs taken during their time there and contacted the management team at what is now South Seas Island Resort. Because his father served in a prominent position at the facility for more than a decade, Sushil thought that Southcontinued on page 2B Ken Sushil stands next to a framed collage of family photographs taken while his father Gerald Sushil was plantation manager at South Seas during the 1940s photos by Jeff Lysiak by Jeff LysiakA manatee whose internal systems had been suffering from the effects of red tide was released back into the wild last Wednesday afternoon at the South Seas Island Resort Yacht Harbour boat ramp, three months after rehabilitating at Tampas Lowry Park Zoo. The male manatee, which had originally been nicknamed Nicky Bubbles, had been discovered by a family on vacation from Wyckoff, New Jersey on April 10. The Thompson family alerted Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission officers that they had found a manatee which appeared to be in severe distress. Kristy at the (FWC) emergency number asked us many questions about the manatee. She advised us that it appeared as though the manatee had red tide poisoning, said Carrie Thompson. The animal was unable to put its nose above the water to breathe, and unless we held it up, he would drown.So, until FWC official could arrive on Captiva, the Thompson family assisted local wildlife law enforcement for nearly two hours in keeping the manatees head above the water. The 900-pound, 10-foot long mammal was transported to the Tampa zoo for assessment, treatment and recovery.According to Denise Boyd, FWC research assistant, the manatee subsequently nicknamed Cap due to the location where he was rescued from was treated at the zoo for Karenia brevis, a toxic strain of zooplankton. Lowry Park Zoo is the only critical care facility which treats manatees affected by red tide. continued on page 8BManatee Released A t S outh S eas Boat Ramp A 10-foot, 900-pound manatee called Cap was released back into the wild on July 17 at South Seas Island Resorts Yacht Harbour boat ramp photos by Jeff Lysiak

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2B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013From page 1BFamilys Roots At South SeasSeas might want the photos for their records. According to Daniel Smock, marketing and communications manager for the resort, South Seas managers not only wanted the photos for their records but for display in the lobby. History is a big part of South Seas, said Smock. I see guests stop and read these historical artifacts. So many of our guests keep coming back, year after year, so they have their own history here. The concierge desk and reception area is decorated with recently-discovered historic photographs of South Seas, including Clarence Chadwick. Just a few steps away from Chadwicks framed photo and biography is the Sushil photo collection. It includes nine images, including a portrait of Gerald Sushil Sr., a family outing to Bowmans Beach taken in the late 1940s and one picture of the Chadwick House. They had a pool behind the house it had saltwater in it, because Mr. Chadwick had bad arthritis, added Sushil. Im happy that they found a home for these photographs. And Im glad somebody was interested in looking at them besides me. A closeup of the framed photo collection A portrait of the Sushil family Gerald and Agnes with children Gerald Jr., Laura, Betty and Ruth The concierge desk and reception area is decorated with recently-discovered historic photographs of South Seas Plantation The Sushil family on a picnic at Bowmans Beach in the 1940s A CPA spends years preparing for moments just like these.Call 239.472.1323When my business was impacted by the BP oil spill, I turned to my CPA rst to help me organize the nancial records needed to make an accurate claim.

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OUR FAMILY HAS CALLED SOUTHWEST FLORIDA HOME FOR MORE THAN 100 YEARS. IT HAS BEEN AN HONOR WORKING WITHIN THE SAN-CAP COMMUNITY OVER THE PAST 18 MONTHS TO BRING QUALITY REPRESENTATION TO THOSE IMPACTED BY THE ACTS OF BP. WE ARE BLESSED TO CALL OURSELVES NATIVES, GRATEFUL TO BE WELCOMED BY THE SANIBEL AND CAPTIVA COMMUNITIES AND PRIVILEGED TO CONTINUE TO OFFER REPRESENTATION TO THOSE IMPACTED BY THE BP OIL SPILL. wilburlaw.com | 239.334.7696SAWYER C. SMITH ESQ. OF THE WILBUR SMITH LAW FIRM IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE CONTENT OF THIS ADVERTISEMENT695 Tarpon Bay Rd, Sanibel, Fla 33957 | 1415 Hendry St, Ft. Myers, Fla 339013B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013

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4B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013How Your Chamber Meets Communication Challengessubmitted by the Sanibel and Captiva Chamber of CommerceEvery year the Sanibel and Captiva Chamber of Commerce has over 1.5 million unique website visitors, 190,000 visitors in person to the Islands Visitor Center and up to 30 special business events organized for our members and their partners, clients, customers and friends. Our first priority in communication to our members is to make as much of it as personal as possible. There is nothing better than face to face. No matter how clever, how extraordinary, how revolutionary modern electronics techniques have become, it is the personal touch that really matters. Of course we cannot talk every day to our 600-plus members face to face. We do however organize every year up to 30 events where our members can enjoy the company of their business colleagues who share something special in that all or some important part of their business activities are carried out on Sanibel and Captiva Islands. We have two annual events: our Chamber Retail Expo, typically in January/ February, when all our members are invited to showcase their businesses for the benefit of residents and visitors. The Retail Expo is followed later in the year by the Luminary trail, a magical, evocative and memorable event occurring in the first week of December. Our islands are illuminated by thousands of candles placed by businesses and island clubs in our shopping centers and along our roads. The many hundreds of people who come to the islands especially for luminary are an eloquent testimony to the enjoyment that they get from this occasion. It enables many to engage in conversation with our members at a traditional time of good fellowship. Such conversations between members and their guests at the Retail Expo and during Luminary build camaraderie and foster good communications. The chamber also arranges business lunches 12 times a year where members can meet and talk about the business climate as well as hear selected speakers on current topics important to our islands. Up to 200 members can attend these lunches and speakers include all the islands nonprofits, such as CROW, FISH, Sanibel Sea School, the Bailey-Matthews Shell Museum and SCCF. Less formal but equally well attended are the monthly after hours, hosted by a chamber member, where members meet socially and discuss the day in a relaxed environment. Direct written communication with members is a key part of our communication program. Every week the chamber emails a detailed program of members and island events for the following week to both members and to residents who have joined the mailing list. The chamber also distributes an attractively produced quarterly magazine and a monthly electronic newsletter of notable events. The chamber has been at the forefront of the electronic communication revolution. Its website is one of the most effective of all sites in the Florida tourist industry. More than a million and a half people visit the site annually and it is is regularly the number one source of bookings for island resorts and restaurants. One of the remarkable features of chamber communications, and a great insight into the changes that technology has created, is the way in which we communicate through social media. It has become an inescapable part of our everyday lives. Facebook, Linked In, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest, Flickr these are social media tools we use to engage with others. Social media is changing not only the way we communicate but also the way in which we think about our customers, members and our business audiences. No longer does the message stop with the listener, the viewer or the reader. Anyone using social media can retransmit the message to any or all of their contacts. One picture sent to 10 Facebook friends can be sent to 10 of each of their friends and so on. In just a couple of steps, our message can reach 1,000 or more individuals. The chamber has a structure into which original content is placed: this content is shared with the chambers over 5,600 Facebook friends: if each of them shares it with just an average Facebook group it will be immediately reposted to an audience of 800,000 plus. For example, one of the most influential methods the chamber used to counteract negative media coverage during the oil spill in 2010 was to post on Facebook beautiful beach photos and videos of clear, blue waters and fine, white sandy beaches. The power of these photos and videos gave proof that Sanibel and Captiva remained unspoiled during this difficult time. Content quality is of course key to the likelihood of retransmittal: it is both an art and a science. The art lies in the selection of great pictures and language that communicate the beauty of our surroundings. The science lies in the careful use of trigger words and images words and images that immediately create happy memories of wonderful locations and good times. The chamber has a great team of professional communicators, technically and verbally skilled, whose daily task it is to keep a large and interested audience informed about members businesses and the opportunities they are creating. The chamber knows that good communication is the key to meeting its long standing mission: To promote the prosperity of our members and preserve the quality of life in our Community. Some examples of social media used by the chamber An island beach scene posted on social medial photo by David Meardon With his project The Sinking World, Andreas Franke brings a strange, forgotten underwater world back to life and stages realms of an unprecedented kind www.TheSinkingWorld.com

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5B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013Rotary Happenings submitted by S hirley JewellYou certainly know we are deep into the summer mode here on the islands. Road traffic has somewhat diminished, restaurant tables are available at peak hours, water temperature at the beach is somewhere around 85 degrees and tradewinds and daily rains continue to keep the heat at bay. Summer here, also, is the time many of our friends and neighbors go up north or elsewhere for their vacations, leaving behind just a precious few to hold down the fort. Our Rotarian Club attendance dwindles down, but the clubs executive board and committee chairs hold most of their planning sessions during this time. If any of our fellow non-profits or service clubs have any projects that they would like San-Cap Rotary to explore partnering up with or need some financial support for, please contact us now. We are in the process of evaluating future plans for the upcoming year. Future planning is part of life and planning for a healthy financial future in all stages of our life is extremely important. In most cases, that is when we need to bring in the professionals. Steve Hall, SunTrust Senior Vice President Investment Strategist/Portfolio Manager is one of those professional that Rotary invited to speak to us. Steve has spent the last 30-plus years in the investment industry. He worked for the large investment firms, EF Hutton and Prudential Bache. Regional brokerage firms, Hanifen, Imhoff Securities and Boettcher & Company and established his own investment company where he was a managing partner for 11 years. In 2008, he joined US Trust/ Bank of America Private Wealth and in November 2012, he accepted his position at SunTrust. Hall really didnt have a lot of time to delve into investment strategies in depth with about 15 minutes at our podium, but did touch on a few financial components of todays financial marketplace. Today economic factors are driven by a global-base economy with fragile and changing financial factors happening all around the world. The U.S. is muddling through, but we have a weaken economy from past dangerous government policies. There is a triple effect felt in real estate markets, the auto industry and energy sectors. The industrial nations of the world China, Brazil, and India along with developed economies of Russia and Eastern Europe are feeling the effects of bad government oversight and the lack of consumer confidence. There has been six quarters of bad news regarding sales factors out of Europe. Although there has been a lot of bad news in recent years, there is cautious optimism for the U.S. economy. Banks have adjusted to the new discipline processes. U.S. firms and businesses are investing in their companies once again. The threat of rising interest rates caused the bond market to drop and a switch to stock investment. The U.S. Stock Market is the strongest in the world right now. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernankes recent speech put new optimism and life back into investing, the problem is where? Hall said, Not to look for just stock yields, but increased earnings plus yield over time. No fad buying, dont buy what everyone else is, dont buy low wait for uplift when stocks are trending upward. Its not about just return look at risk. Return on bonds will be depressed and forecasted returns are low. Keep watch on commodities and emerging markets; they affect many aspects of trading. Transparent Hedge Funds and Mutual funds have a broader mandate and diversified portfolios. Financial investing is a disciplined process. Obviously, Hall said quite a deal more, but as the writer of this article, my understanding on this topic is lacking. If you have any questions regarding this subject, call Steve at SunTrust. The Sanibel-Captiva Rotary Club meets at 7 a.m. every Friday at The Dunes Golf and Tennis Club, 949 Sand Castle Road. If you have any questions regarding Rotary, e-mail President Scot Congress at scot@scongress.com. Steve Hall Read us online at IslandSunNews.com rf ntbnr nnrrr tb nrf f rff bnbf nrrrrrfrf frntbffb ttr brrr r

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6B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 The Arsenic Arresters Win A Trip To SanibelIn the spring of 2013, The Discovery Channel posted a contest called Explore the Blue Water Challenge. Middle school teams from all over the country competed and the Arsenic Arresters from Whiteface, Texas were declared the winners. In West Texas, there are very high concentrations of arsenic in the soil, both naturally occurring and as a result of pesticide use. The Arsenic Arresters found a plant that takes up arsenic and converts it to a non-toxic form. The team of three won an all expenses paid three-night, four-day stay on beautiful Sanibel Island. The contest was sponsored by the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation (RBFF). The tour of the JN Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuges Education Center was provided by the US Fish & Wildlife Service and all of the water activities including a kayak tour through Commodore Creek, the Nature & Sea Life Cruise and a private fishing charter in Tarpon Bay were all provided at no cost to the team or contest sponsors by Tarpon Bay Explorers, the official refuge concessionaire. Front row from left, teacher Laura Wilbanks, Brett Wilson, George Fehr, Hudson Sanders and ranger Toni Westland. Back row, Shawn Wilson, David Maloney from RBFF, Paige Heskamp from Discovery Channel Brett Wilson shows off his catch Hudson Sanders and his catch The Arsenic Arresters with their cruise guides Mari Hanley and Captain Dave Johns Phone: (239)489.0442 State Certi ed General Contractor License # CGC A05420One Builder Serving Sanibel & Captiva for over 35 years Zurbriggen Financial Investment Management Asset Protection Wealth Transfer Perpetual Income Strategies Helping Build A Bridge To Financial Freedom Securities o ered through Securities America, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC Rick Zurbriggen, Registered Representative. Advisory services o ered through Securities America Advisors, Inc., Rick Zurbriggen, Investment Advisor Representative. Zurbriggen Financial and the Securities America companies are not a liated. 20% OFF

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7B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 The groups fishing charter with Capt. Steve Maddix The team has supper at Matzalunas with refuge manager Paul Tritaik along with Wendy and George Schnapp and Margie Klein of Tarpon Bay Explorers rfrntrb rfrntrb rfrntrb rfrntrb nr nrn nrn The Springs Assisted Living is part of Shell Points Integrated Healthcare System. Shell Point is a non-profit ministry of The Christian and Missionary Alliance Foundation, Inc. Shell Point. All rights reserved. SPG-130-13 rfrntrb rfrntrb nrn System. Shell Point is a non-profit ministry of Shell Point. All rights reserved. SPG-130-13 Navigating the myriad decisions in determining if Assisted Living is right for you or your loved one is just plain difficult. Levels of care. Different facilities. Quality. Affordability. All factors in ensuring an optimized quality of life. If youve got a question or a whole list of them meet with our assisted living experts, If youve got a question or a whole list of them meet with our assisted living experts, McKenzie or Vivian, today. With the well being of the individual as their highest priority, McKenzie or Vivian, today. With the well being of the individual as their highest priority, theyll give you answers that can assist you in making the most informed decisions possible. theyll give you answers that can assist you in making the most informed decisions possible. When you do, we also invite you to tour Shell Points newest assisted living facility, When you do, we also invite you to tour Shell Points newest assisted living facility, When you do, we also invite you to tour Shell Points newest assisted living facility, When you do, we also invite you to tour Shell Points newest assisted living facility, The Springs. With beautiful surroundings and Shell Points proven reputation, The Springs. With beautiful surroundings and Shell Points proven reputation, The Springs. With beautiful surroundings and Shell Points proven reputation, The Springs offers an affordable option on a month-to-month basis. The Springs offers an affordable option on a month-to-month basis. The Springs offers an affordable option on a month-to-month basis. The Springs offers an affordable option on a month-to-month basis. Meet with our experts and visit The Springs today! Meet with our experts and visit The Springs today! Meet with our experts and visit The Springs today! Meet with our experts and visit The Springs today! Appointments and tours can be Appointments and tours can be arranged by calling (239) 454-2077 arranged by calling (239) 454-2077 MK M V C M O A L E (r f f n f n t n ) Wilbur Smith Law Firm Becomes 10K SponsorFISH of Sanibel, Inc. announced that The Wilbur Smith Law Firm, through its BP Claim office on Sanibel, has become one of the Silver Sponsors for the 5th annual 10K Race 4 FISH. The race is scheduled to take place on Sanibel on Saturday, October 19. This is the second year that the law firm chose to become a Silver Sponsor. In addition to their support, Zachary Smith, son of Wilbur Smith and younger brother of Sawyer Smith, has been a regular in the FISH 10K, taking first place overall in the 2011 race. Our family has been in Southwest Florida for over 100 years and has always believed in family and community. We appreciate the work that FISH is doing to support those who need assistance on the islands, said Sawyer Smith. We are pleased to do our part by contributing to FISH in hosting this race to continue its mission in helping others. We would like to welcome The Wilbur Smith Law Firm as a returning sponsor of the FISH 10K this year, said John Pryor, co-chairman of the FISH 10K committee. Their support and participation in the race is greatly appreciated. We thank them for their ongoing support and dedication to our organization.More than 50 island businesses and organizations sponsored the 10K last continued on page 19B Sponsorship co-chairs Pete and Nancy Bender, Sawyer Smith of The Wilbur Smith Law Firm, John Pryor, FISH vice president, and Ed Ridlehoover, co-chairman of the FISH 10K Race Committee

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8B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 From page 1BManatee ReleasedIts really a great feeling to be able to be here today and celebrate this release with you, said Boyd, who noted that the release had to be timed when the threat of red tide in local waterways had passed. Shortly after 1 p.m., a cargo truck containing the manatee and several FWC and zoo workers arrived at the boat ramp, where more than 150 resort guests had gathered in anticipation of witnessing the wildlife release. It took nearly a dozen people to help maneuver the animal into position, where following a few last-minute tests, measurements and photographs to commemorate the occasion one final farewell to the great grey beast was called for. And when Nicky Bubbles or Cap entered the water and slowly began swimming away, the crowd broke out in a celebratory cheer. We know that manatees really seem to like this area, said Boyd, who added that this would be the zoos final manatee release. Seven other manatees were released in Cape Coral the week prior. The manatee, originally nicknamed Nicky Bubbles, had been rescued on April 10 Several tests and measurements were taken before the manatee was finally released FWC research assistant Denise Boyd speaks to the local media More than 150 onlookers gathered to watch the wildlife release at South Seas Island Resort Top ProducersJohn R. Wood Real Estate announces its top producers for June: Top Listings Carolyn Tongyai Top Pending Sales Pat Messerich and Mike Newes Top Closed Sales Phaidra McDermott ISLAND SUN BUSINESS NEWSMAKERS Carolyn Tongyai Mike Newes Pat Messerich Phaidra McDermott

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Visit our newest ofce location at Sundial Beach Resort 1451 Middle Gulf Drive 239/472-1478Serving the Islands Since 1975 t r t illa s f sc t a wlar N aptiva Driv G K t rrac ra b r Gar s at ac wal a ra a H K H G lf Harb r Na t c t r s D H t as s rt ac illa Ol a r ial p cial ial O w isti w isti w isti w isti w isti 9B ISLAND SS UN JULY 26, 2013

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10B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013SWAT Swim Team Resultssubmitted by Coach Curt McIntyre, Head Coach, Swat Swim TeamLed by Cameron Dolly and Savannah Nippa, SWAT Swim Team members swam away with Tuesday nights (July 16) Swim Florida Summer meet. All together SWAT swimmers collected six firsts, two thirds, three fourths, five fifths and two sixths. Swimmers and their places were as follows: Cameron Dolly (12) 1st in the 50 freestyle (29.31), 1st in the 50 breaststroke (41.22), and 1st in the 50 backstroke and in doing so lowered his FLAG (Florida Age Group) state qualifying time by 1.5 seconds (31.60); Savannah Nippa (11) 1st in the 50 freestyle (31.82), 1st in the 50 breaststroke (43.32), and 1st in the 50 backstroke (39.56); Jason Perkins (11) 3rd in the 50 breaststroke (48.18), 3rd in the 50 backstroke (46.28), and 5th in the 50 freestyle (35.75); Jacob Lemmon (12) 4th in the 50 freestyle (34.43), 4th in the 50 backstroke (48.44), and 5th in the 50 breaststroke (50.31); and Grace Kearns (11) 5th in the 50 freestyle (36.72), 5th in the 50 breaststroke (51.34), and 5th in the 50 backstroke (50.06). Also scoring for Swat were Anicca Sivsov (9) 4th in the 50 backstroke (53.68) and 6th in 50 freestyle (43.23), and Patrick Martin (9) 6th in the 50 backstroke (54.03). Way to go SWAT swimmers! Read us online at IslandSunNews.com Philanthropy: The Love of Humanityby Steven V. Greenstein, Executive Vice President, The Sanibel Captiva Trust CompanyToday, more women than ever are recognized as major philanthropic donors as a result of both their vast wealth and their desire to bring about meaningful change in the world around them. Through philanthropic giving, women continue to engage in issues of public interest, build civic and social connections, and help shape family values. Women now control more than 50 percent of the wealth in the United States and are empowered to change society for the better. Their strong support of increasingly important issues helps to inspire others and generate heightened visibility for causes that matter. Whether through an outright gift, bequest, charitable lead trust, charitable remainder trust, creation of a donoradvised fund at a community foundation, or a private family foundation, todays women truly can make a difference. Philanthropy is more than just giving away money; it is about helping to solve problems and make the world a better place for generations to come. Indeed, the cost of philanthropy may be easily measured in dollar terms, but the results are always beyond calculation. This summer, why not take some time out to give careful consideration to your philanthropic commitment? The Sanibel Captiva Trust Company is committed to helping women who are involved in philanthropic endeavors on the local, national and global level to achieve their goals. Over the past decade, the company donated over $1 million to nonprofit organizations in order to help them make a difference in the world and deepen roots in the local community. We are fortunate to have a number of firstrate charitable organizations on Sanibel/ Captiva that are dedicated to meeting the needs of our residents and visitors. Whether you have a passion for the arts, nature, family and youth organizations, healthcare or other areas, there is surely a group that would benefit from your time and generosity. We look forward to helping you create and realize opportunities to support your most important causes for generations to come. Airport Reports June TrafficDuring the month of June, 473,208 passengers traveled through Southwest Florida International Airport, an increase of 4.2 percent compared to June 2012. Yearto-date, passenger traffic is up 6.5 percent from the same period last year. The traffic leader in June was Delta with 120,410 passengers traveling to and from Fort Myers. Rounding out the top five airlines were AirTran (86,167), JetBlue (56,797), US Airways (47,585) and Southwest (42,273). Southwest Florida International Airport had 5,079 aircraft movements (takeoffs and landings), an increase of 3.5 percent compared to June 2012. Page Field saw 5,512 movements, a 9.8 percent decrease from June 2012. In addition, more than 2.2 million pounds of air freight moved through Southwest Florida International Airport in June 2013, a decrease of 17.3 percent compared to June 2012. Southwest Florida International Airport served more than 7.3 million passengers in 2012 and is one of the top 50 U.S. airports for passenger traffic. No ad valorem (property) taxes are used for airport operation or construction. For more information, visit www.flylcpa.com or Like us on Facebook at www. facebook.com/flyRSW. BUYING, SELLING OR JUST WANT TO CHAT... TALK TO CHUCK! Sandalfoot 3B2 Fully Furnished 1 BR/1 BA w/Gulf and Pool Views. Weekly Rentals. $28,000 Rental Income in 2012. $499,000 Pine Cove 1A Gorgeous 2 BR/2 BA Gulf Front Corner Unit. Beautifully Furnished! Great Weekly Rentals. $799,900 9319 Kincaid Court Elevated 3 BR/2 BA with a River View. Brand New and Gorgeous. All New Kitchen, Baths, Floors! Huge Lot! $525,000 4203 Dingman Drive Beautifully Renovated 4 BR/3 BA on Approx. 1 Acre on West Gulf Dr. Across from the Beach. $2,495,000 Sunset South 9D Beautiful River & Sanctuary Views from Two Large Lanais! Furnished Top Floor 2 BR/2 BA. Only Steps to the Beach and Pool. $449,000CHUCK BERGSTROM Originally from Chicago, Chuck has been an Island visitor since the late 70s, and over the years was continually drawn to the Islands special magic... Sanibel became home in 2000 and Chuck became a full time Realtor assisting buyers and sellers on these special Islands. Buying or selling... Chucks energy, knowledge and expertise continue to provide a positive experience for his clients.RE/MAX of the Islands2400 Palm Ridge Road, Sanibel, FL 33957Direct: (239) 209-6500 Toll Free: (800) 388-2311 Chuck BergstromIsland Resident, Award Winning RealtorPlease visit my web site,

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11B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 Near-beach river-view updated 2nd floor condo $264K Corner condo at Sundial Beach Resort & Spa $349.9K Gulf-front 2 bedroom grosses ~$60K/yr with low fees $699K Real estate blog at SanibelSusan.wordpress.com 2242 Periwinkle Way Sanibel Square #3 Near-beach home with sunny saltwater pool $449,000 Gumbo Limbo delight with 3 bedrooms & den $499,000 472-HOME (4663) 888-603-0603 Income-producing Island Beach Club 2-bedroom $474K This view at Loggerhead Cay $599.9K with income Bay-view 3 bedroom with dock lease opportunity $599.9K Loggerhead Cay condo with straight view to beach $499K Mariner Pointe 2 bedroom with this bay view $549K The SanibelSusan Team (left to right) Susan Andrews, Realtor Broker; David Anderson, Realtor Lisa Murty, Realtor Elise Carnes, Licensed Assistant & Notary Pointe Santo bright updated 2nd floor 2 bedroom $649.9K Oversized Shell Harbor lot overlooking intersecting canals $885K Over 1/2 acre near end of Umbrella Pool Rd cul-de-sac $399K One of the last undeveloped lots in Island Woods $224K Tropical nicely treed lot overlooking water in Sanibel Bayous $199.9K Double-sized parcel next to cons ervation land on Dimmick Dr $199.9K Single-family home lot in The Dunes golf/tennis community $199K Just Listed 2nd floor Loggerhead Cay 2-bedroom end-unit $599.9K Michelsons Final Round At Murfield One Of The Greatest In Golf Annalsby Ed FrankIf you love golf or if you love sports in general you have to be inspired by the phenomenal final round feat of lefty Phil Mickelson last Sunday in winning the 142nd British Open. The nice guy of golf, the devoted family man, Michelson tamed the brutal links of Scotlands Murfield to win his fifth Major title and perhaps his most coveted. He started the day five strokes back and two over par for the first three rounds. But on the home stretch he birdied four of the last six holes, to end three under par and win by four strokes. He was the only golfer in the illustrious field to finish under par for the tournament. Today was as good as I can play, the smiling, dimpled Michelson said. It was one of my best rounds ever. You bet it was a great round and heres why: The final round 66 tied for low round in the entire four-day tournament. The four birdies in the last six holes were sandwiched with a fabulous par save on 16. He had 31 one-putt greens and he climbed into the elite group of only 15 champions who have won three different Major tournaments in their careers. He hit two shots for the ages on the brutal par 5 17th hole to reach the green in two. Both three woods, the second carried more than 300 yards against a strong wind. He barely missed an eagle putt, but his birdie four all but sealed his hold on the coveted Claret Jug. At age 43, Michelson is the second oldest to win this famous tournament. While the Brits naturally were pulling for their native heroes, Michelson walked the 18th fairway to a roaring ovation that turned thunderous when he sank that curling birdie putt on the final hole. A three-time Masters winner and a one-time PGA winner, Michelson admitted he often doubted whether he had the links shots to win The Open. Links golf is so different, so demanding that he said afterwards, I never knew if Id be equipped. But now the golf world knows he does have the talent to win in Scotland. Michelson has long graced the professional tour in taste, politeness and humor. And his devotion to family and to charitable causes is legendary. When he raised his arms and pumped his fists in victory at Murfield, and when his wife and children fell into his embrace, it was a scene of joy long remembered. Tiger Woods is ranked No. 1 in the world. But surely Phil Michelson has to be ranked No. 1 in admiration and fan popularity. Miracle Begin Seven Game Home Stand This Weekend The Fort Myers Miracle baseball team faces two North Division rivals in a seven-game home stand that begins tonight, Thursday, against Clearwater. After a disappointing sevengame losing streak, the Miracle began the week having won five of their last six games while improving their second-half season record to 15-14. The four-game Clearwater series has 7:05 p.m. starts tonight and Friday, 6:05 p.m. Saturday and a Sunday matinee at 4:05 p.m. The Daytona Cubs ,which had a first-place hold in the North Division early this week, provide the opposition for three games beginning Monday. The first pitch for all three games will be 7:05 p.m. Having losses in eight of their last 13 games, the Miracle dropped into fifth-place in the Florida State League North, but still only three games out of first. Phil Michelson Getty Images Read us online at IslandSunNews. com

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12B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 Doc Fords Joins Galloway Captiva Tri Doc Fords is bringing its signature mix of fresh food, fun and friends to Captiva this summer, both at its new location at Chadwicks Square and as a major new sponsor of the Galloway Captiva Tri. Not only has the well-known local restaurant group signed on as the triathlons new adult event sponsor, but the Captiva management team has signed up for the tri itself as a relay team Raynauld Benyley leading off with the swim, followed by Clark Hill on the bike and topped off with general manager Jean Crenshaw on the run. We are excited about our upcoming participation in the first of many community events on Captiva. Our new venture with South Seas Island Resort is a major opportunity that has our entire team at Doc Fords very excited, owner Marty Harrity said. We are so thrilled to have Doc Fords be part of this amazing event, bringing families and fitness together in our community, said Angie Ferguson, one of the race directors. The Galloway Captiva Triathlon at South Seas Island Resort returns to South Seas for its 3rd annual triathlon on the weekend of September 14 and 15. The timed adult sprint triathlon will be held on Sunday, September 15, while the soldout kids triathlon is Saturday morning, September 14. Proceeds from the event will benefit CCMI Community Cooperative Ministries, Inc. and its School Backpack Program providing emergency food more than 2,000 local children each school year. 2nd Annual South Florida Mud RunSouthwest Florida couple, Dustin Edwards and Stephanie-Ink Edwards, announced the date for the 2nd annual South Florida Mud Run to benefit the new Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida. The event will take place on January 11, 2014 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Redneck Yacht Club in Punta Gorda. Participants can sign up as individuals or teams, and the event is open to children and adults ages 4 and up. One hundred percent of the proceeds benefit the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida. For more information or to register, send an email to southfloridamudrun@ gmail.com or visit http://southfloridamudrun.com. Last year, we decided to organize the South Florida Mud Run as a unique fundraising event to raise money for local charities and promote active family friendly lifestyles, said Stephanie Ink-Edwards. After seeing the fantastic show of support and attendance of almost 2,600 participants last year, we knew we had to keep this going. The South Florida Mud Run features three-miles of challenging and fun obstacle courses designed for all ages of degrees of athleticism. Participants will run, jump, crawl and climb through obstacles in the mud. This year, organizers plan the make one of the two adults course even more challenging and extreme, while keeping the other course more fun for beginners. There will also be two child-friendly courses a half-mile course and a one-mile obstacle run. Both of our children were born at the Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida and admitted to the NICU due to health complications, so raising funds for the new hospital is just one way we can give back and show them how much we appreciate the quality care we received for our children, added Dustin Edwards. All gifts to the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida Capital Campaign support the construction of a new state-of-the-art, 128-bed, comprehensive pediatric health care facility on the grounds of Health Park Medical Center. B. Thomas Golisano, a resident of Naples and noted philanthropist, pledged to match dollar-for-dollar all Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida Capital Campaign contributions up to $20 million. This gift comes as my personal commitment to help Lee Memorial Health System build a hospital where all children in Southwest Florida will receive the best possible care close to home, Mr. Golisano said. I hope this gift helps leverage support from others in the region and motivates everyone to contribute in a meaningful way to this endeavor. Dustin Edwards and Stefanie InkEdwards founded the South Florida Mud Run in early 2012. The Mud Run was created as a unique fundraising event that not only would raise money for a worthy cause, but also promote an active lifestyle in a family friendly way. This event will contribute 100 percent of its net proceeds to the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida to help build a new tower for the hospital. The Doc Fords Tri Team, from left, Raynauld Benyley, Jean Crenshaw and Clark Hill O ces in Sanibel, Fort Myers & Punta Gorda E M J H C DC HOLTZ MAHSH IE DECOSTAATTORNEYS AT LAW Barrier Island Title Services, Inc. (239) 472-3688Youll Appreciate the Difference

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13B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013Blue Ribbon Golf Classic Returns To The SanctuaryThe 2nd annual Blue Ribbon Golf Classic benefitting The Sanibel School Fund will be held at The Sanctuary Golf Club on Saturday, October 5. The event will begin with a 12:30 p.m. shotgun and will include a buffet dinner at the club. Last year, the event raised almost $35,000 for The Sanibel School Fund. Money raised by the School Funds Blue Ribbon Classic helps to provide many resources and enhancements that the shortfalls in the Lee County School System budget cannot, including educational software, classroom computers, the foreign language program, musical instruments, supplies for classrooms and much more. Parent and community support for these programs have helped The Sanibel School earn the Blue Ribbon designation, as well as an A rating, for the past 11 years. The National Blue Ribbon is awarded by the U.S. Department of Education to public and non/public elementary, middle and high schools. The program sets a standard of excellence for all schools striving for the highest level of achievement. This year, the Blue Ribbon golf tournament will feature an 18-hole Florida scramble, the famous helicopter ball drop, a long drive exhibition, an opportunity to win a new Lexus by making a hole-in-one and many other prizes. The Sanctuary Golf Club has a long history of supporting The Sanibel School, beginning over a decade ago by contributing to the computer and media centers, said Art Cassell, Sanctuary Golf Club member and member of The Sanibel School Fund. Sponsorship opportunities begin at $300. The cost for golf and dinner is $200 per person, or $800 per foursome. For information on how to be a sponsor or to sign up for this event, contact Paige Babcock at phbabcock@gmail.com. View of The Sanctuary Golf Club from the helicopter during the 2012 Golf Ball Drop SPORTS QUIZ 1. Name the only switch-hitter to compile at least 300 home runs and 300 stolen bases in his career. 2. Which was the last major-league team to use six different starting pitchers in a World Series? 3. Name the two schools that played in the first college football game, in 1869. 4. When was the last time in franchise history before the 2012-13 season that the Los Angeles Clippers had at least an 11-game winning streak? 5. In 2013, brothers Jared, Eric and Jordan Staal played together for Carolina, the fourth brother trio to do so in a game in NHL history. Name two of the first three. 6. Who was the last male athlete before Will Claye of the U.S. in 2012 to medal in both the Olympic long jump and the triple jump? 7. How many times did golfer Greg Norman finish either second or third at the Masters? ANSWERS 1. Carlos Beltran, who reached the mark in 2012. 2. Pittsburgh, in 1971. 3. Rutgers defeated Princeton. 4. It was the 1974-75 season, when the franchise was based in Buffalo. 5. The Bentleys (Chicago, 1940s), the Plagers (St. Louis, 1970s) and the Stastnys (Quebec, 1980s). 6. Japans Naoto Tajima, in 1936. 7. Six times second in 1986, and ; third in and To advertise in the Island Sun Call 395-1213 10 to 40% OFFH SLEEPERS H MATTRESS SETS H PICTURES H LAMPS H PATIO DINING SETS H RECLINERS H DINING SETS H BEDROOM SETS H LIVING ROOM H TABLES Large Selection of Rattan & Wicker I fell in love with Furniture World the 1st time I went in. They had the SW Florida style furniture I was looking for. The staff made me feel very comfortable and helped me with my questions. Mary Weeks, Ft. Myers I appreciated the personal service I received at Furniture World. The location is convenient and I found what I wanted at a price I wanted to pay. Chris Myers, Sanibel ...Our Promise to You...GUARANTEED (*$500 Min. Purchase) Our Friendly staff is here to help you when you want it. Youre free to look through our store. Family Owned and Operated489-3311

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The variety of dining options on Sanibel and Captiva just keeps getting better. For their size, the islands offer an extensive culinary array all making the most of the areas fresh and abundant seafood and local produce. Youll find everything from burgers to barbecue, bistro style, Italian, Mexican, American, classic deli fare, organic, vegan, gluten-free, caf food and Caribbean. In this column, each week you will be able to stay updated on our local dining establishments and what theyre offering and get the scoop on the island dining scene, whether its fine or casual, take-out or frozen desserts. ISLAND FAREDine Your Way Around Sanibel And Captiva With Anne MitchellFor more information, check out our advertisers in this week's Island Sun RESTAURANTS 14B ISLAND SS UN JULY 26, 2013Wade Craft, manager The Green Flash Read us online at Island SS un NN ews. com Chips Sanibel Steakhouse has many great options for locals and tourists alike. It is open seven nights a week with daily happy hour from 5 to 6 p.m., featuring two-for-one drinks and $4.95 appetizers. For early diners, theres a three-course prix fixe menu for $35 including a cocktail. In addition to an updated wine list, seasonal house-infused liquors such as strawberry-jalapeo tequila, blood orange vodka and cucumber gin are available. The menu features steaks and seafood, including a six-ounce filet mignon topped with jumbo lump crabmeat finished with Hollandaise and served with of asparagus and choice of potato; Parmesan-crusted seabass served with mushroom risotto and finished with a creamy dill sauce. Save room for dessert though, because whether you are a chocolate lover or Key lime pie fan, Chips has something for every sweet tooth. CHIPS SS ANIBEL SS TEAKHOUSE BAILEYS GENERAL STOREBaileys General Store has a full deli, bakery, daily lunch specials, take out and catering for cook-outs, picnics and parties. This is the oldest supermarket on the islands, established long before a causeway linked Sanibel to the mainland. The bakery has freshly made donuts, scones and breads. The deli offers a variety of hot foods for breakfast, lunch and dinner, as well as catering services for special events. Services include shopping for your groceries and delivering them to your home or vacation destination. If you are on a gluten-free diet, pick up the extensive list of gluten-free products near the entrance to the supermarket. The Coffee Bar at Baileys serves espresso based drinks, hot chocolate, smoothies and specialty coffees. BLUE GIRAFFEBlue Giraffe serves breakfast, lunch and dinner from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. This restaurant offers casual island dining seven days a week from a menu featuring fresh local seafood, chowders, salads and steaks. Besides dessert choices, you can get hand-dipped Edys Grand Ice Cream. Dine outside on the boardwalk or inside at handpainted tables decorated by a local artist, or sit at the full liquor bar for a mixed drink, glass of wine or cold beer. DO cC FORD'S RUM BAR & GRILLEDoc Fords Rum Bar & Grille is named for the Doc Ford character in local best-selling author Randy Wayne Whites mystery novels. Its a well known gathering place and tropical theme sports bar with indoor and outdoor patio seating. The combined menu offers all the lunch and dinner items from 11 a.m. until closing. It includes cedar plank salmon topped with a mango chipotle glaze or a marinated grilled chicken sandwich. The fish tacos are an island favorite and theres a well provisioned raw bar. Tropical drinks are a specialty, notably the signature rum drink, Island Mojito. C RORO W' SS NESTNEST AT T wW EEN wW ATERS INNThe Crows Nest at Tween Waters Inn is a more casual place than its sister the Old Captiva House. Its home to the famed Captiva Crab Races and a popular venue for live entertainment. Menu specials include: Tuesday, Prime Rib for Two; Wednesday, Surf & Turf; Friday, Fish Fry; Sunday, Barbecue. Theres live music and nightly happy hour. CIPS PLA cC E Cips Place is named for the late Jimmy Cipriani, a longtime islander and owner of the property on which the restaurant sits. Jimmy always made time for a good conversation, good company and great food. In Jimmys memory, Cips styles itself as a local watering hole. A mural that takes up an entire wall shows lots of islanders through the ages including Cip and if you dont recognize them all, ask to see the key. Food choices range from comfort to culinary with some Caribbean and island favorites as well. And do try the home-made potato chips, the fried buttermilk chicken with sage gravy and the snapper tacos. Choose between the outdoor garden patio or front porch. Indoor seating and full bar are also available. Hours are 11:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. daily with happy hour from 4 to 6 p.m. GEORGE & wW ENDY'S SEAFOOD GRILLEGeorge & Wendys Seafood Grille features live music Fridays and Saturdays with Karaoke on Thursdays. The spacious and modern interior is decorated with original tropical paintings. Eight for $8 lunch specials are available daily from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. through June 30. Offerings include sandwiches, wraps, fried shrimp and tacos. Specials include prime rib Tuesdays for $18, Wednesdays, snow crab legs, $18, and Thursdays, pasta $15. Happy hour is celebrated all day at George & Wendys. The full bar has an extensive wine list, 10 beers on tap, local, domestic and craft beer, mojitos, martinis and other tropical favorites. Hours are 11 a.m. to midnight seven days a week with live piano music. GE PP PETTO'S BB EA cC H FF OODIESThe little market on the east end of Sanibel offers grab and go beach cuisine. The breakfast menu includes sweet and savory croissants, three-cheese egg tartans, muffins and cakes, key lime tarts, cookies and macarons. Seasonal lunch and light dinners include sandwiches prepared on your choice of freshly baked artisan breads, NYC bakery style pizza, stromboli, pasta, salads, Foodie Dogs and now introducing the Foodie Knish. Daily sweets include Pinocchios Original Italian Ice Cream to accompany Cuban roasted coffee drinks, espresso, latte, cappuccino and teas. New to the menu is the GBF London Fog drink. Geppettos accommodates small catering events, brunches, family gatherings and beach picnics. Bakery hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Ice cream, frozen yogurt, gelato and sorbet is served until 9 p.m. GRAMMA DOTSGramma Dots, the only dockside dining on Sanibel, offers a lunch and dinner menu seven days a week from Sanibels only Seaside Saloon where you can leisurely dine at the Sanibel Marina in view of luxury yachts and modest fishing boats and watch the comings and goings of seagoing folk and fishermen. The menu features a full line of only fresh seafood, salads, sandwiches and more. Appropriate dress is required. If youre arriving by boat, check in with dockmaster for a lunch slip, monitor VHF 16. You can tie up for a night or two at the available dockage if you wish. Gramma Dots is open daily at 11:30 a.m. For dinner, arrive before 8 p.m. ISLAND cC O wW The Island Cow is a family favorite with its colorful indoor and outdoor seating and live entertainment. Come as our guests leave as our friends! is the motto. The Cow serves breakfast, lunch and dinner featuring fresh local seafood and meats and has an extensive childrens menu. Starbucks coffee is also on the menu. Hand over The Cows coupon from the Island Suns Sun Dollars coupon book this summer and receive 10 percent off breakfast between 7 and 11 a.m. Hours are 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. GREEN FLASHThe Green Flash has marvelous waterfront views of Captivas bayside and Pine Island Sound. The Green Flash was built on the site of the historic Timmys Nook, opened in 1950. Fittingly, seafood dominates the menu, although other options are offered as well. The Green Flash is easily navigable by boat and is located southwest of Marker 38 on the Intracoastal Waterway. Hours are daily from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. for lunch and 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. for dinner. ILIL TESOROIl Tesoro serves authentic Italian food with the taste and feel of a Tuscan holiday, according to owner Chef AJ Black. He infuses flavors from the old world to the new world of cooking using only fresh seasonal ingredients to bring his dishes to life. Daily specials focus on pairing authentic meals with a bold array of fine Italian wines. Il Tesoro is offering a $25 per person prix fixe 3-course menu for two before 6 p.m. through September. Bottles of house wine are two-for-the-price of one from 4:30 to 6 p.m. and happy hour appetizers are $5. A special Italian tapas (or small plate) menu is available as well. Two-for-one wine and beer is served during happy hour from 5 to 6 p.m. when you present the coupon from the Island Suns Sun Dollars coupon book. Il Tesoro (The Treasure) serves dinner seven nights a week from 5 to 10 p.m. GREAT wW HITE GRILLThe Great White Grill is a sports bar featuring 29 beers on tap and a good wine list. Its home of The Steel Curtain Pizza and has Mexican Night Tuesdays. Theres free pizza delivery too. The Great White carries the Baseball Package for sports enthusiasts and has arcade games for kids of all ages. The regular menu includes hand-cast fresh dough pizza, wings, fries, chicken fingers, salads, gyros, sandwiches and burgers. Check out the Pittsburgh Salad, which consists of grilled chicken, French fries, cheddar cheese, cucumbers, tomatoes and onions on a bed of lettuce.

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15B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 JACARANDAThe Jacaranda Restaurant & Patio Lounge presents "Summer Break" Sunday through Thursday. For one low price, choose an appetizer, entree and dessert for $29.95. This week's featured menu is: Appetizer Pickeled Herring in Sour Cream with Crudite or Blackened Prime Rib with Cajun BBQ Sauce; Main Course Jumbo Coconut Shrimp with Plum Sauce or Petitie Filet Mignon with Baby Portabella Mushroom Sauce; Dessert Choices Turtle Pie, Creme Brulee, Key Lime Pie, Tiramisu, Fresh Berries and Cream. Be sure to ask your server about specialty drinks and bottled wine specials. Theres live music nightly in the patio lounge, which serves a selection of happy apps for $5.95 each during happy hour. LAZY FLAMINGOThe Lazy Flamingo is a famed island hang-out with two Sanibel locations: one at 1036 Periwinkle Way, the other the original at 6520 Pine Avenue, near Blind Pass. If our seafood were any fresher, we would be serving it under water! is the Flamingos motto. And that includes, shrimp, grouper, oysters, conch fritters and chowder as well as chicken. The Flamingo Bread and the Caesar Salad are signature items. Pull up a stool to the rustic bar or take a high or low table. The interior feels like the inside of an old pirate ship with its portholes and hewn wood surfaces. The atmosphere is definitely casual and beer is available by the bottle, on draft or by the pitcher. Jerrys Restaurant and Deli in Jerrys Market is the next best thing to dining in a tropical garden. This family-style restaurant has large windows to view the lush garden with caged tropical birds that are favorites with visitors and residents. Daily specials are offered in the spacious restaurant or you can order a sandwich or hot food from the deli or help yourself at the wellstocked salad bar to take out or eat in. The restaurant is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. JERRYS RESTAURANT AND DELI LIGHTHOUSE CAFEThis long-established island restaurant on Sanibels east end claims to be Home of the worlds best breakfast. Seems customers think so too because this place often has lines of hungry people outside waiting for tables. Youll find hearty choices to start your day such as hotcakes, French toast, Benedicts, omelettes and frittatas, colossal muffins, bagels and berries. Theres also a big lunch menu that includes homemade soups, salads and sandwiches. The Lighthouse Caf is open year-round for breakfast and lunch from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dinner is served from December 15 through April. IL CIELOIL Cielo features eclectic fine dining as well as the more casual Cloud 9 Grille. The happy-hour menu includes specially priced appetizers and drink specials from 4:30 to 6 p.m. and patrons can enjoy appetizers priced at $6 each and two-for-one drink specials on all domestic bottled beer, well drinks and house wine selections. A three-course $35 per person price-fixed menu, complete with one bottle of house wine per couple, is available Tuesday through Thursday evenings from 5 to 6 p.m. In addition to the two dining areas, Il Cielos interior also allows space separate from the main dining room for private functions or community events as well as outdoor patio dining. Il Cielo features a full liquor bar with a wide selection of wines as well as homemade desserts. continued on page 16B PINOCCHIOS ORIGINAL ITALIAN ICE CREAMA Sanibel tradition for 33 years and home of the World Famous Sanibel Krunch and Dirty Sand Dollar Ice Creams, this popular little green shop is located on the east end of Sanibel near the lighthouse in the Seahorse Shopping Center. Named in National Geographic Travel Guides Top 10 Best Ice Creams in Gulf Coast America, all ice cream, frozen yogurt, gelato, sorbet, sorbetto and custards are made fresh every day from the finest and freshest ingredients. Pinocchios is famous for generous portions in unique flavors inspired by the beaches of Southwest Florida. Pinocchios displays 37 from a130+ repertoire of signature flavors. Come see why theres always a crowd at Pinocchios. Next door in sister shop Geppettos Beach Foodies. Hours 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. or until the last person is served. Outdoor dining. Also offering sundaes, shakes, malts, smoothies, frozen coffee drinks, sundaes and hurricanes. Over Easy Caf is a pet-friendly place with indoor and outdoor dining for breakfast and lunch. The covered patio is a popular spot. Choose from 22 different Eggs Benedict, scramblers and omelettes, 11 pancakes and French toast choices, 15 egg specialties and wraps, eight salads and 26 sandwiches and burgers, plus baked goods. Beer and wine is available. Breakfast is served all day. Summer hours are 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. OVER EASY CAF MATZALUNA ITALIAN KITCHENIn the mood for pizza? Matzaluna Italian Kitchen has a wood-fired oven to bake authentic pizzas. Thats in addition to a big selection including over 20 combinations of pasta dinners from $11.95 (including soup or salad and fresh baked bread), affordable veal, tender chicken, choice steaks and seafood (Italian style) in a casual market-like setting. Gluten-free pizza is also available. Wine Wednesdays at Matzaluna means every bottle priced $25 and over will be discounted by $8 all evening. Hours are 4:30 to 9:30 p.m. daily. RC OTTER'S, CANTINA CAPTIVA, SUNSHINE SEAFOOD, KEYLIME BISTRO AND CAPTIVA PIZZA, YOGURT & GIFTSFive Captiva eateries under the same ownership RC Otter's, Cantina Captiva, Sunshine Seafood, Keylime Bistro and Captiva Pizza, Yogurt & Gifts offer a fun and casual dining experience with a tropical flair reminiscent of Key West. RC Otter's and Keylime Bistro have live music outdoors most of the day. Cantina Captiva serves Mexican food. Sunshine Seafood Cafe Wine Bar specializes in fine dining with a very respectable wine list. You have your choice of dining inside or outdoors. All five eateries will take 10 percent off your purchase when you present the coupon from the Island Suns Sun Dollars coupon book this summer. Old Captiva House at Tween Waters Inn, Captiva, offers romantic sunset dining in an historic setting with live piano music. Executive Chef Jason Miller prepares New Florida island favorites, tropical seafoods, classic meats and daily fresh-baked breads and pastries, served with an extensive selection of wines, liquors and coffees. First built as a one-room school for children of Captivas pioneer settlers, the Old Captiva House still reflects much of its original charm from white French doors to hardwood floors to the Gulf of Mexico sunset that streams through the western windows. Its collection of famed cartoonist JN Ding Darlings 1930s whimsical vacation illustrations has led to its designation as a landmark in Southwest Florida. OLD CAPTIVA HOUSE AT TWEEN WATERS INN Presented by: Michael B. Hill Craig R. HerschWill Power ColumnistFlorida Bar Board Certied | Wills, Trusts & Estates Attorneys9100 College Pointe Ct., Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.sbshlaw.com Have You Heard The Three Big Myths About Medicaid Eligibility? Myth #1: The new law has made it impossible to protect your assets from nursing home costs. Truth: While the rules have changed, good planning opportunities exist. Myth #2: Medicaid can take your home. Truth: With proper planning you may very well be able to save your home. Myth #3: If youre already in a nursing home, its too late to protect your assets. Truth: Even if youre in a nursing home, you can still protect the assets you have. Wednesday, July 31, 20132:00 p.m.Temple Beth El 16225 Winkler Rd. | Fort Myers 33908Reservations: 239-425-9379 Free Workshop. Seating is Limited.All attendees will receive a complimentary DVD describing long-term care planning issues. To advertise in the Island Sun Call 395-1213

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16B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 From page 15BRestaurants SANIBEL BEANThe Sanibel Bean coffee shop is java central on Sanibel Island. With its indoor and outdoor seating and free wi-fi, its a popular venue for laptop-toting coffee lovers to relax and check their inboxes, have breakfast or lunch or recharge the batteries in the afternoon. Besides a big selection of coffee from around the globe and a variety of coffee drinks, The Bean has tea and other beverages and a variety of hearty sandwiches, pastries and muffins, plus other light fare. ROS IES CAF & GRILLRosie's repertoire includes crab cakes, grouper and shrimp entrees and steaks with all the trimmings, Southwestern dishes such as burritos and fajitas, soup and sandwich combos, and salads. Among the most popular items is Rosies Famous Cheese Steak made from shaved rib eye, grilled mushrooms, onions and green peppers, Ultimate Cuban and Classic Reuben, home-made muffins and cinnamon rolls and Key lime pie, root beer floats and banana splits. A childrens menu and carry-out are also available. Breakfast is served from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. and happy hour is from 3 to 6 p.m. seven days a week with two-for-one draft beer and wine and a menu that starts at $4.50 for items such as nachos with cheese and salsa and $5.50 wings and chicken tenders. The ice cream bar has 20+ flavors of locally made Royal Scoop ice cream. The Sanibel Fish House is completely renovated. It sports pastel colored interior dcor in the dining room, which looks out to Periwinkle Way. There is also a large bar area with TVs tuned to sports channels. This is the third in the Fish House group. True to its name, the Fish House offers fresh seafood along with meat and poultry dishes. Try the blackened tuna bites and the blue crab and shrimp dip. Present the coupon from the Island Suns Sun Dollars coupon book this summer and receive a free slice of Key lime pie. SANIBEL FISH HOUSE SANIBEL SPRO UTThe Sanibel Sprout is the islands only health food store and eatery, serving gourmet vegan takeout, organic juice and smoothies, organic produce, gluten-free products and supplements and nutraceuticals. The juice bar attracts a lively crowd of healthconscious islanders and visitors and the daily lunch specials are highly popular. The Sanibel Sprout will take 10 percent off your entire purchase when you present the coupon from the Island Suns Sun Dollars coupon book this summer. Sanibel Deli & Coffee Factory offers a gluten free menu in addition to regular choices, along with pizza and wings, Boars Head meats, frozen yogurt and ice cream. There are outdoor tables shaded with umbrellas and free wi-fi. During June, use the coupon from Sun Dollars in the Island Sun to buy a breakfast sandwich and a medium coffee and get one free; the same bogo deal applies to any ice cream product. And from 3 to 8 p.m., a large cheese pizza is just $9.99 with $1 for each additional topping. S ANIBEL DELI & COFFEE FA CT OR Y SANIBEL GRILLThe Sanibel Grill has 16 big screen TVs with satellite TV tuned to every televised sporting event. The Grill shares a kitchen with The Timbers, serving the same fresh seafood, along with burgers, sandwiches, pizzas and salads. Crunchy Grouper and Crunchy Shrimp are signature dishes. To celebrate its 22nd anniversary, the grill is serving two dinners for $22 July 22 -28. The Jacaranda has entertainment nightly. On Friday and Saturday, various artists are featured starting at 8:30 p.m. Weekdays, music is from 7 to 11 p.m. On Monday, its Renata, playing jazz, contemporary music and dance; Tuesday, David Christian, funk, pop and top '40s; Wednesday, Trevor with contemporary top '40s and reggae; Thursday, Malibu Duo, contem -porary, reggae and dance; Sunday, Jamaica Dave & Co., reggae and dance. George & Wendys Seafood Grille has live music tonight, Friday, by Robby and The AbsentMinded rock band; Saturday its Anthony Wayne, guitar and vocals; Sunday is Hospitality Night with happy hour pricing from 8 p.m. to close. Karaoke is Thursdays from 9 p.m. to midnight. This weeks lineup at Traditions on the Beach at the Island Inn includes: Friday and Saturday, Mike Arnone and Kathy Buda, pop pianist and vocalist, performing everything from The Rat Pack to Motown; Wednesday and Thursday, Sanibel's own Pianoman Joe McCormick plays popular favorites and smooth vocal stylings, R&B, jazz and pop. Traditions is closed on Sunday. Scott McDonald plays piano every Friday and Saturday at Il Cielos Cloud 9 Grill from 7 to 9 p.m. McDonald, a Sanibel resident, has had a long music career including being pianist for singer Andy Williams. The Crows Nest at Tween Waters Inn has live entertainment on Fridays and Saturdays from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Crab races take place Mondays and Thursdays. Traders Store & Cafe features music by Chris Workman on Sundays and Wednesdays from 7 to 10 p.m. and Danny Morgan and Friends on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7 to 10 p.m. The Mucky Duck on Andy Rosse Lane, Captiva, features music by Mark Dupuy on Mondays; Rich Lancaster, Wednesdays; Gene Federico, Thursdays and Saturdays; and Buckeye Ken, Fridays. Sea Breeze Cafe at Sundial Beach Resort features the Danny Morgan Band Fridays from 7 to 10 p.m. as well as live entertainment on Saturdays at the same time. Turtles Beach & Pool Bar at Sundial Beach Resort features live entertainment every Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. with Danny Morgan performing on Fridays. The Island Cow on Periwinkle Way has live entertainment on Friday with Dan Confrey; Saturday, Diana Lynn; and Sunday, Buckeye Ken. RC Otters on Andy Rosse Lane, Captiva has live music daily with dining inside and out. Keylime Bistro on Andy Rosse Lane, Captiva features live music days and nights seven days a week with Ken Limeri playing jazz sax from 6 to 10 p.m. every Tuesday. Restaurant owners/managers, please email or fax your entertainment schedule to press@islandsunnews.com or 395-2299. S anibel Grill Celebrates 22 Y earsOpened in July of 1991, the Sanibel Grill, is Sanibels only true sports bar. The Grill as it is known by locals offers the same fresh fish that made the Timbers famous along with burgers, sandwiches, pizzas and salads, in a casual atmosphere featuring 20 TVs with DirectTV satellite and is the islanders favorite place to watch their favorite sporting event. The Sanibel Grill is the home of the largest personal collection of authentic sports memorabilia in Southwest Florida. Autographed photos of owner Matt Asen with sports and TV celebrities adorn the walls, including pictures with regular customers such as Chris Berman, Ted Koppel, Willard Scott, Brooks Robinson and Bobby Hull. In honor of 22 years, the Sanibel Grill will be offering two dinners for $22 from July 22 to 28. Choices from their menu include orange salmon, blackened tilapia. shrimp scampi, Thai shrimp with beans and rice, petite sirloin steak, crunchy grouper sandwich, Mahvelous Meatloaf and crunchy shrimp basket. Wine Spectator A wardSanibel Islands Il Cielo has received an Award of Excellence from Wine Spectator for 2013 honoring the restaurant as having one of the most outstanding wine lists in the world. Wine Spectators Restaurant Wine List Awards recognize restaurants whose wine lists offer interesting selections, are appropriate to their cuisine and appeal to a wide range of wine lovers. To qualify for an award, the list must include vintages and appellations for all selections, including wines available by the glass. The Award of Excellence is awarded for lists that offer a well-chosen selection of quality producers, along with a thematic match to the menu in both price and style. Typically, these lists offer at least 100 selections. LIVE ON THE ISLANDS Traders is unique in that is combines a bustling restaurant with a large shopping emporium selling casual clothing, jewelry, accessories, home decorating and gift items, books and lamps. The restaurant serves bistro style food with an island flair with offerings such as black beans and rice, blackened fish and fresh salads from an open kitchen. Theres no fryer in this place! The tables are freshly wrapped in white paper for each party and theres a pot of colored crayons for doodling, whether youre an adult or a child. Traders has been around long enough to have become a favored local hang-out. Lunch is served from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., happy hour 3 to 6 p.m. and dinner 5 to 9 p.m. Theres live music from 7 to 10 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays with Danny Morgan and Wednesdays with Chris Workman. TRADERS ST ORE & CAFE TIMBERS RESTAU RANT & FISH MARKETThe Timbers Restaurant & Fish Market and the adjoining Sanibel Grill are mainstays of the island dining scene, boasting 35 years of fresh fish on Sanibel Island. The restaurant offers 13 dinners for $13 daily before 6 p.m. plus a large selection of local seafood such as grilled shrimp, fried grouper, oysters, clams and crab cakes. Besides specializing in fresh local seafood, the restaurant has a seafood market that opens at 11 a.m. (except Sunday, when its 2 p.m.) TRADITIONS ON THE BEA CHTraditions on the Beach is one of the few Sanibel restaurants with beachfront dining. The menu features Italian and Mediterranean cuisine based on fresh local seafood, meats and produce. Dining is from 5 p.m. until late and there is live entertainment most nights for listening and dancing. Besides fish and steaks, youll find Moroccan Lamb, roast duck, Texas Wild Boar Saddle and veal. Pasta, grilled items and a raw bar round out the menu. Theres an attractive bar area also serving food and an extensive wine and cocktail list. S UNDIAL BEA C H RE SOR T & S PASundial Beach Resort & Spa's bar and restaurants have enjoyed a $5 million renovation and are now open to the public. Diners may choose from the sophisticated Waterview for an elegant dinner or the more casual Turtles Beach & Pool Bar and Sea Breeze Cafe. All have panoramic beach and Gulf views. Waterview serves dinner Wednesday through Sundays in August. Be sure to try their signature dish: Clay Pot Baked Mediterranean Gulf Grouper. Sea Breeze Caf serves breakfast, lunch and dinner. If you'd like to dine pool side, Turtles provides live music by island troubadour Danny Morgan from 1 to 4 p.m. on Fridays with live entertainment at the same time on Saturdays and Sundays. Danny also performs Fridays in Sea Breeze Cafe from 7 to 10 p.m. Happy Hour is twice daily from 3 to 5 p.m. at Turtles and 5 to 7 p.m. in the Sea Breeze Cafe. Sundial Beach Resort presents a pool side BBQ Blowout every Saturday until Labor Day from 12 to 4 p.m. with live entertainment. The buffet includes grilled hot dogs, hamburgers, chicken, and mahi-mahi along with fresh salads, corn on the cob and baked beans, plus a selection of fresh fruits. Price is $19 for adults and $12 for children 5 years and older.. Our email address is press@islandsunnews.com

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17B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 School Smartby Shelley M. Greggs, NCSPDear Readers, Picture books are one of lifes great literary pleasures, and summertime usually allows us to slow down a bit and take the opportunity to enjoy a picture book. Picture books come in all shapes and sizes, for every kind of reader in a wide range of subjects and they provide a host of benefits. They are for everyone. I recently came across an article on picture books written by Rick Walton, author of more than 90 works for children. I really liked what he had to say about the benefits of picture books and wanted to share his wisdom with you. In regard to picture books, Mr. Walton says: 1. They are the first books that children fall in love with, that turn children into lifetime readers. Lifetime readers become lifetime learners. Lifetime learners become lifetime contributors. 2. Picture book language is often more sophisticated than the first chapter books that children read, and therefore an excellent way for children to learn language. It is here that children, and others, can learn vocabulary, imagery, rhythm, shape, structure, conciseness and emotional power. 3. The picture book is the most flexible of all literary formats. You can do almost anything in a picture book. This flexibility encourages creativity, in both writer and reader. It broadens the mind, and the imagination. And given todays challenges, we desperately need more creativity, broadened minds and imagination. 4. The picture book, with its interaction between text and illustration, allows the reader to analyze that interaction and find meaning in the visual. And since most of us are surrounded by, and inundated by visual images our whole lives, visual intelligence is an important skill. 5. Some of the best art being created today is found in picture books. Picture books are a great resource for art education. 6. The picture book appeals to more learning styles than any other format. It is read out loud for audible learners. It is written and illustrated for visual learners. It often asks you to interact with it physically for kinesthetic learners. 7. In fact, the picture book, of all formats, is probably the best format for teaching an idea, getting across a point. Because picture books are short, all messages, knowledge and ideas expressed in a picture book must be boiled down to their essence. They must be presented in a way that is impossible to misunderstand. If you want to learn a difficult subject, start with a picture book. If you want to express a powerful message, a picture book is one of the most powerful media for doing so. Many middle, upper grade and even college instructors have recognized the value of using picture books in their teaching. 8. The picture book does more than any other literary format for bonding people one with another. As a child sits on a lap and is read to, as a parent, a grand parent, a teacher or a librarian reads to a child, extremely important connections are made, bonds are formed and generations are brought together. 9. The picture book also has the broadest possible age range of audience. Few four-year-olds will appreciate a novel. But many grandparents enjoy a good picture book. 10. The picture book is short, and can fit easily into the nooks and crannies of our lives. Five minutes here, 10 minutes there, plenty of time for a complete literary experience. Picture books are poetry, adventure, imagination, language, interaction, precision and so much more. Picture books are not books that children should be encouraged to graduate from. For picture books have something important to say, to give, to all ages, all generations. Ms. Greggs is adjunct faculty at Edison State College where she teaches psychology and education courses. She is also Nationally Certified School Psychologist and consultant for School Consultation Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication may be addressed to smgreggs@gmail.com. Not all questions submitted can be addressed through this publication. FISH Scholarship Program Reports High DemandThe Youth Summer Scholarship Program offered by FISH of Sanibel, Inc. has had one of the busiest summers on record. The program allows us to assist qualifying families with their summer child care needs, covering a portion of their expenses so that the parents may continue to work. Some of our summer scholarships include lunch; those that do not may be eligible for our year-round backpack program. The amount of assistance that FISH can provide is based on a sliding scale, according to household income. This year, FISH helped children of all ages to attend one of the many island summer programs, as follows: Five children attended the Childrens Education Center of the Islands (age 2 to 5) program. Twelve children were able to attend the Sanibel Recreation Center (first to eighth grade) program. And three children were able to attend the BIG ARTS program (kindergarten to eighth grade). In addition to helping with summer program costs, FISH provided daily lunch continued on page 19B Isabella Rasi 239-246-47161101 Periwinkle Way #105, Sanibel, FL 239-472-0044 ENGEL & VLKERS Excellence in Real Estate A step above! International Client Base 600 Shops Worldwide Multi-Lingual Staff Your success is my aim. Choosing e Right Insurance Agent Makes All e Di erencemmeek@rosierinsurance.com 239-472-1152 Marge MeekLong-time Island Resident Call me anytime for your business and personal insurance needs. Serving Florida for over 55 years with a team of over 35 professionals. Pool Service & Supply FL Lic. #CPC1457804 472-4100BANNER POOL SERVICE

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My Stars FOR WEEK OF JULY 29, 2013ARIES (March 21 to April 19) With new facts to work with, you should feel more confident in moving ahead. But continue to do so at an unhurried pace so you can spot details you might otherwise miss. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Taking on that new workplace project could be one of your smarter career moves. Expect a surprising show of support from someone who had always been a critic. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You might feel youre too busy to undertake a new responsibility. But check it out before making any decisions. What you learn could persuade you to change your mind. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) You feel quite content enjoying all the comforts of home right now. But the urge to travel grows stronger, and by weeks end, you could begin packing your bags. LEO (July 23 to August 22) A hectic period begins to ease up, but that doesnt mean the Fine Feline can do much catnapping these days. You need to finish those old tasks and prepare for new ones. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Expect to get some good news about your financial situation by weeks end. But it could still be too early to rush out with a long shopping list of things to buy. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Your management skills make an impression on some workplace VIPs who might be looking for someone like you to take on an upcoming project. Good luck. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Meeting a former adversary might be unsettling at first. But time has softened hard feelings, and you could be on the brink of starting a new relationship. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A troubling situation close to home might cause you to change your travel plans. But getting all the facts before you act might cause you to reconsider. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) You might be quite alone right now in deciding to support a major workplace shift. But others will join you as new information supports your bold move. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A former co-worker returns with news that could persuade you to reassess recently made plans. Be sure to consult with a trusted colleague before you act. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your motives behind a recent decision could be called into question by a rival. But once you present the facts, all doubts will be resolved. Enjoy an arts-rich weekend. BORN THIS WEEK: While you love being the center of attention, your generous heart allows you to share the attention with others. port of Palos, Italian explorer Christopher Columbus sets sail in command of three ships -the Nina, the Pinta and the Santa Maria -on a journey to find a western sea route to China, India and Asia. In October, Columbus sighted Cuba, which he thought was mainland China. General Motors Corporation acquires the countrys leading luxury automaker, the million. Cadillac was founded out of the ruins of automotive pioneer Henry Fords second failed company. His third effort, the Ford Motor Company, finally succeeded. erupts in Europe, President Woodrow Wilson formally proclaims the neutrality of in France to begin training for combat. Hitler becomes absolute dictator of Germany under the title of Fuhrer, or Leader. The Fuhrer assured his people that the Third Reich would last for a thousand years, but Nazi Germany collapsed just 11 years later. rams an American PT (patrol torpedo) boat, No. 109, slicing it in two. The destruction is so massive that other American PT boats in the area assume the crew is dead. Two crewmen were, in fact, killed, but 11 survived, including Lt. John F. Kennedy, who would later become president. Johnson signs Medicare, a health insurance program for elderly Americans, into law. At the bill-signing ceremony, former President Harry Truman was enrolled as Medicares first beneficiary and received the first Medicare card. president Jimmy Hoffa is reported missing in Detroit. He was last seen alive in a parking lot outside the Machus Red Fox restaurant the previous afternoon. Authorities have never been able to confirm what really happened to Hoffa. He was declared legally dead in 1982. made the following sage observation: The man who is incapable of making a mistake is incapable of anything. once decided to test several varieties of Coca-Cola to determine their effectiveness, if any, as a spermicide. The results? Diet Coke was the most effective, while New Coke was the least. Upon hearing of the tests, a representative for the company issued the following statement: We do not promote Coca-Cola for medical purposes. It is a soft drink. in its mouth; theyre found in the throat. blurb to indicate a short summary or promotional piece accompanying a creative work? At a trade association dinner attendees with a limited edition of one of his books. It was customary to have a brief summary included on the dust jacket of such books, along with a picture of an attractive woman. Burgess followed this custom with a twist. On the cover of his piece was an image of a woman with her hand held to her mouth, as if shouting. The caption for this image was Belinda Blurb, in the act of blurbing, and bold letters at the top of the dust jacket declared, Yes, this is a Blurb! The name stuck. States, there will be 10 reported UFO sightings. pioneered the paint-by-numbers style of art. He would sketch a piece, then number certain sections for his assistants to paint. People demand freedom of speech to make up for the freedom of thought which they avoid. -Soren Kierkegaard THIS WEEK IN HISTORY STRANGE BUT TRUE THOUGHT FOR THE DAY BEST TAKE-OUT ON THE ISLANDS CALL FOR DAILY SPECIALS472-9300 Jerrys FoodsRestaurant & Deli FULL DELI, BAKERY DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS COLD BEVERAGESCall us for your cookout, picnic and party needs. Well take care of you!Corner of Periwinkle Way & Tarpon Bay Road472-1516 BOARS HEAD MEAT! FROZEN YOGURT & ICE CREAM Sanibel Deli & CoffeeF A C T O R Y Across from CVS in Palm Ridge PlacePIZZA & WINGS CALL AHEAD 472-2555~ OPEN ~ Mon. 7am-3pm Tues. Wed. & Thurs. 7am-8pm Fri & Sat. 7am-9pm Sun. Seasonal FINE ITALIAN CUISINEIL TESORO RISTORANTEwww.iltesoro.netOpen 7 days a week 751 Tarpon Bay Road 239.395.4022 Get The Word Out About Your Take-Out!~Advertise Here~18B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013

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19B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 Superior InteriorsLight Up Your Life With The Right Lightingby Cindy MalszyckiIn addition to knowing which colors are the most flattering to you, its also important to take into consideration how natural and artificial light will affect your desired color scheme. First, consider how much natural light enters the room, and for how long a period during the day. In sunny rooms with a southern exposure, cool colors will be more pleasing than warm ones; hot yellows and reds will produce an unpleasant glare during a large part of the day. These colors are more effectively used in rooms that face north and need the warming effect of sunny colors. Darkening the room by covering the windows doesnt help; it just makes all the colors in your room look dark and gloomy. The window treatment you use will definitely affect the amount and quality of natural light in your room, and therefore your color scheme. Artificial light can affect colors even more dramatically. Generally, standard incandescent bulbs give off a yellowish light. Standard fluorescents create a cold and harsher light. However, many different tints of bulbs are available in both types of lights. Using the right tint in the bulbs you select will definitely help you control the way your colors look in artificial light: walls look grey; blue tinted light makes them look purple; yellow light makes them look red-orange. look grey; red light makes them look purple; yellow light gives them a greenish cast. look grey; red light makes them look orange; blue toned light makes them look unpleasantly greenish. grey; yellow light makes them look bluish green; blue light makes them look yellowish green. As you can see, the effect of different colors is not always predictable, but throwing a light of one color on a wall of the same color will always tend to neutralize that color and ultimately make the wall look dull and grey. Definitely not a pretty picture! So, once you select your color scheme, be sure to carry through with a lighting plan that will enhance and compliment the effect you have in mind. The right light will make or break your decor.Cindy Malszycki is an interior designer on Sanibel/Captiva Islands. She can be reached at cindy@decden.net. FISH Scholarshipto the children in our scholarship proprogram. During the school year, FISH continues to provide scholarship assistance for qualified families so that children may attend programming on the days school is not in session, and assists families in need with funding for off-campus field trips for their children. Summer programs play a crucial role in the development of school-age children. The experiences and structure provided are invaluable to the child and their take responsibility, develop creative skills, build independence and self-reliance, and Giving children an opportunity to participate in these programs while giving the family an opportunity to prosper is one of the most rewarding aspects of what our agency does. To find out if you qualify and receive calling 472-4775. Wilbur Smith Sponsoshipyear, and over 120 people volunteered their support to make it a huge success. The race will begin at 7:30 a.m. at again follow a marked 10K circuit around House for the finish line. There will also be a trade fair, aimed at the runners and their families and friends, as well as refreshment tables and water stations around the island for runners. Email your editorial copy to: press@islandsunnews.com Larry NorrisSanibel 1025 Periwinkle Way Mon Sat. 10 5 Evenings & Sundays by appointmen t 579.0412 Designer CONDO Choose from over 50 fabrics 50 fabrics 50 and 20 wood samples at the same price! NorrisHomeFurnishings.com Complete condo packages starting from $10,999!SANIBEL PA CKAGES P eriwinkle Way Causeway B lvd B aily Rd. E xit I sland

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20B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 Many retirees figure that once they are past the raising children stage of their lives that they can throttle back on many of the expenses that theyve been carrying for many years. Life insurance might not seem so important once youve accumulated some savings and have enough for your own retirement and that of your spouse if she or he survives you. Often, retirees will downsize their home to save on those carrying costs, including high homeowners insurance rates. But theres one insurance policy that retirees (or people still in the middle of their working careers) shouldnt scrimp on. Umbrella insurance policies. For those of you unfamiliar, umbrella insurance policies cover above and beyond what your homeowners and automobile policies may not cover. The typical highest liability coverage that standard automobile policies cover is 300/500/100, which translates to $300,000 of bodily injury per person, $500,000 of bodily injury per accident and $100,000 of property damage. But what if you are involved in a ter rible automobile accident and cause per manent injury to someone? Even though those liability protections seem like a lot of money, they are probably insufficient to protect you from catastrophic accidents. While you may believe that you are immune to such an occurrence, consider what liability you may have if you were to run into a surgeon and cause him permanent loss of the use of his hand. It doesnt take a death or disfiguring injury to create significant liability. If you were to be involved in an accident where your liability exceeded your coverage, then the insurance company might just settle the claim for their policy limits and let you handle the rest. This may also mean that you would have to incur significant defense attorney costs as well as subject your hard earned net worth to the possible reaches of the claimant. This is where umbrella liability protection kicks in. An umbrella policy will cover you for liability in excess of your car, homeowners, boat and other liability policies up to the umbrella limit. Typically, one can purchase umbrella policies totaling $1 million, $2 million or even $5 million of coverage. Unless you have a claims history, the cost of the coverage is relatively inexpensive. It might be a few hundred dollars annually or perhaps a little more if you want the higher cover age amounts. While there is no requirement that you purchase the umbrella policy from the same carrier that underwrites your other insurance, I would suggest that you use the same carrier as the one that you have for your automobile policy. You dont want to have a situation where the insurance carriers argue over who is liable for what, including your attorney defense costs. Since an incident involving your automobile is the most likely to create large liability problems, having that carrier underwrite the umbrella policy is probably your best choice, even if the umbrella is slightly more expensive. No matter who you choose to under write your umbrella policy, you should ensure that your other coverages meet the umbrellas stated requirements. In other words, once I purchase an umbrella policy, I usually cant drop my automobile coverage limits to the state minimum. Usually, the umbrella policy requires that I maintain at least a 300/500/100 threshold on my automobile policy. Similar requirements may apply to my homeowners and boat coverage as well, for example. The final tidbit to know about umbrella coverage is the uninsured motorist or UM rider addition. While the standard umbrella pays someone that you may be liable to for negligence, the UM cover age pays you if someone injures you but doesnt carry sufficient coverage of their own. Many motorists in Florida carry the bare minimum of coverage, and if they cause you significant injury and if they have little or no assets (personal injury attorneys call these individuals judgment proof, since even if you get a large judgment against them there is little or nothing to collect against), then you cant get compensated for your losses. Unless, that is, you carry UM coverage on your umbrella. Then you can go against your own policy to the extent that the person who injures you is uninsured or underinsured. Most underwriters will only sell up to $1 million of UM coverage, and that will typically add several hundred dollars to the premium, but I believe it is well worth it. So dont give up that umbrella policy if you have any degree of net worth. If you have already dropped your umbrella coverage, or if you dont have it, please consider speaking about it with your liability insurance carrier. Craig R. Hersch. Learn more at www.sbshlaw.com. Will PowerU mbrellas N ot Just For Rainy D aysby Craig R. Hersch, Florida Bar Board Certified Wills, Trusts & Estates A ttorney; CPA VASANTA S ENERAT CPA, P. A.CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT 472-6000 418-0008 A ccounting and T ax Preparation for Non Residents Island Real Estate Welcomes N ew A gentsJohn R. Wood Island Real Estate announced that Robb and Robyn Moran have joined their company. Robyn and Robb are full-time realtors and year-round Sanibel residents. Both have been awarded the Realtor Associations Sanibel and Captiva Islands Specialist designation. By combining their skills and the extensive resources of the John R. Wood Agency, the Moran Teams goal is to minimize your stress while bringing people together in mutually successful transactions. They believe that the stress that so often accompanies real estate transactions can largely be eliminated through knowledge, excellent service and ongoing rapport with their clients. We welcome Robb and Robyn to our company and know they will continue to provide top service to their customers while utilizing the many resources that John R. Wood Island Real Estate offers, said Jay Richter, Managing Broker. Robyn and Robb Moran S treets A live Partners With D OH-L ee To Promote Health, Funsubmitted by Kate GooderhamStreets Alive is opening the streets for play in the process of making healthiness fun and its coming to downtown Fort Myers soon. Streets Alive of Lee County Inc. announces its founding sponsorship with the Florida Department of Health in Lee County. The support of this highly respected public health agency has helped fund the non-profit start-up to create the first Streets Alive event. Streets Alive is the perfect venue for Lee County families to enjoy exploration of healthy lifestyles, said Judith Hartner, M.D., director of the Florida Department of Health in Lee County. We cant wait to get out on the streets and have fun, eat and drink healthier food and beverages, and check out the local businesses.continued on page 22B Top ProducersJohn R. Wood Real Estate announces its top producers for June: Top Listings Carolyn Tongyai Top Pending Sales Pat Messerich and Mike Newes Top Closed Sales Phaidra McDermott Carolyn Tongyai Pat Messerich Mike Newes Phaidra McDermott ISLAND SUN BUSINESS NEWSMAKERS

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21B ISLAND SS UN JULY 26, 2013 Palmer The Turtle Helping YY oung Cancer PatientsA dear friendship between Cypress Cove residents Bob Storms and Frank Haskell has sparked the creation of Palmer the Turtle. Palmer is a unique character designed to entertain, comfort and educate cancer patients at the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida, and has been instrumental in helping them come out of their shell as they receive treatment. Palmer is one of the many ways these two big-hearted men contribute their talents to the community and honor the memory of their beloved daughters. Palmer gives kids a special club to belong to, explains Storms. And its wonderful for someone at my age to feel like I am doing something useful with my life. Ninety-year-old Storms, a retired illustrator who has worked for the likes of Disney, Warner Bros. and American Greetings, was living at Cypress Cove retirement community when the Haskells moved in next door. They quickly became friends and discovered that each had lost a daughter to cancer. I cant just be retired, playing golf and napping, said Haskell. I want to remain active and both Bob and I wanted to do something to honor our daughters. Stacie Kmetz, Child Life Specialist at Golisano Childrens Hospital, mentioned to Haskell the idea of creating a char acter, a mascot of sorts, to help young patients who are quiet and scared when they first arrive for treatment. We agreed that a turtle seemed the perfect fit, explained Kmetz. The kids always love turtles and we needed something they could relate to, someone who could help them, come out of their shell, and open up. And I knew just where to turn for help! said Haskell. Storms was more than happy to oblige. Blessed with a gift that he says, flows and just comes naturally, Storms created Palmer the Turtle. He is a very unique character and was very purposefully put together, explained Storms. He has this large zipper down his front and I make it a point for him to come out of his shell every time he visits the hospital. Palmer wears white gloves, just like the people who care for him. He also has no hair, something many of these children can relate to. Storms hopes to familiarize children and their families with various procedures they will experience during treatment by creating a collection of childrens medical books featuring Palmer as a patient. He has created a Palmer Club coloring book, Palmer and his Port, an illustrated paperback. Another paperback featuring an operation on Palmer has gone to print and a third book about radiation treatment is under development. When children arrive to begin treatment, Kmetz and other child life specialists give the children a certificate to join the Palmer the Turtle Club. They also receive copies of Storms books and Turtle Bucks they can use for frosty treats in the cafeteria after treatment. Many of these children face adversity while in school or other settings where other kids bully them for being different. The Palmer Club gives them somewhere to fit in, and something to belong to, explained Kmetz. This isnt the first time Storms has used his talents to comfort others during dismal times. Storms was wounded and captured in Germany while serving in the Army during World War II. Prisoners would sneak him art supplies and keep watch as he would draw cartoons and recreate images of their loved ones from small pocket photos. They were very much living in the present and it gave them something to hold on to, said Storms. Storms continues to raise spirits today, not only for young cancer patients, but for fellow residents at Cypress Cove. He says there is something hidden in every Palmer picture and friends will drive themselves crazy trying to find it. More importantly, they are excited and inspired by Storms creations because of what they do for the children. continued on page 23B Bob Storms and Frank Haskell deaRPharmacistPalpitations AA nd LL eg Cramps DD ue To DD rug Muggersby SS uzy Cohen, RPhDear Pharmacist: I take a reflux medication daily as well as a chewable antacid. In the last two months, Ive dealt with severe Charlie horses, toe tingling and occasional heartbeat skips or runs. My doctor prescribed leg cramp medication and referred me to a cardiologist. I know youre a columnist, but I intuitively feel you can help me. Ive been fine for eight months. GW, Peoria, Illinois My 23 years as a pharmacist (plus six years of schooling) comes in handy sometimes. Let me first say, do everything your doctor suggests because Im not advising, just educating you in my opinion column. The scientific literature proves your medication depletes nutrients needed to make your leg muscles and heart muscle perform perfectly. Scientifically termed drug-nutrient depletion is what I call the drug mugging effect because drugs mug your body of essential nutrients. If you need these medications, nutrient restoration is critical. A failure to understand or accept the drug mugging effect costs you because you will get diagnosed with a disease you dont have, take unnecessary medications and get sent away for expensive or invasive tests. Im so passionate about this, thats why I wrote the book on it, called Drug Muggers. Its really a life-saving book and it helps you stay off the medication merry-go-round. Acid blockers block acid, thats their job. When acid goes down, gastric pH rises. This blocks your ability to digest food and absorb nutrients. Common sense right? Medications that suppress acid include PPIs or proton pump inhibitors, H2 antagonists and simple antacids. Those categories include every acid blocking drug sold by your local pharmacy. The problem is that the human body runs on nutrients. Dont let drug commercials convince you otherwise. Its vitamins and minerals that drive metabolic reactions which support muscle and cardiac health. Momentarily Ill share key nutrients mugged by your medications. There are more than I can list here, so to receive the expanded version of my article (and natural heartburn pain relief options), sign up for my free newsletter at www. DearPharmacist.com. Ill email it later this month. Now, let me show you drug mugging at its best, and how it leads to leg cramps, neuropathy and heart rhythm glitches. Folic acid and B12acid blockers change pH in your gut so you cant continued on page 22B

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22B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 From page 21BPalpitations And Leg Crampsabsorb these B vitamins. Deficiencies absolutely cause nerve tingling or numbness, muscle weakness, leg cramps, confusion, memory loss, depression, cardiac palpitations and fatigue. Magnesium is so critical to the heart that ER doctors give it to heart attack victims. Shocker, but certain acid blockers are strong drug muggers of mag. The FDA knows and insists on the strongest black box warning for PPIs because of the magnesium steal. Severe magnesium deficiency is associated with seizures, muscle spasms, arrhythmias, hypoparathyroidism and depression. Restoring nutrients is much simpler than taking medications and installing pacemakers; its certainly worth a try before invasive costly procedures. This information is not intended to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Suzy Cohen is the author of The 24-Hour Pharmacist and is a registered pharmacist. To contact her, visit www. dearpharmacist.com. Mom A nd Me by L izzie and PryceLizzie and Pryce answer your questions and give advice about aging concerns from a two-generational perspective. A mother and daughter team, Lizzie is a retired RN and health educator, and Pryce is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in the care of elders and people with chronic illnesses. Dear Mom & Me, As soon as he was successful, my husband wanted a luxury car. Then a few years later, he bought one for me. Years passed and we both always had the biggest and the best. After my husband passed away, I sold both cars and I started driving something small and economical. Suddenly one day while at exercise class, I decided I deserved to have a luxury car again, so I went directly to a dealer without changing my clothes. The salesman ignored me. Finally, he came over and in a ho-hum attitude answered my questions. Then, when I asked for a test drive, his attitude was appalling. I know he was saying to himself, This old grandma just wants to go for a car ride. As I left, I said that I would think about it, and I might have my son come in and see my selection. Two days later, I went in again after exercise class. This time I said, I want the gray one. His teeth almost fell out. Then, he brought out all of the paper work and talked about financing. Finally I said, Financing? Oh no, Ill just write you a personal check. He nearly turned white, stammered a bit, then said, Ill get it ready and deliver it to you in two days. My check cleared and he brought it to me. I love my new car and it seems to love me because it drives beautifully. I am too old to ever need another new car, but if I change my mind, I think I will go to the new young gal at the car agency. Charlotte P.S. I thought you two would be inter ested in my experience. Dear Charlotte, Thank you for your letter. The first lesson sales people should learn is never pre-judge your client. Older peoples bank accounts can never be judged by how they look, but this also applies to young people. Companies are always trying to invent new ways to get older people to spend. Many companies realize that the greatest portion of private wealth in this country is owned by women. This sales person pre-judged your ability to pay and was prejudiced against the elderly. He also had a wonderful story to tell his wife and friends about you. Lizzie Dear Charlotte, Way to go! Keep challenging the stereotypical behavior about living as a mature adult. Thanks for your letter. Pryce Lizzie and Pryces email address is momandmeaging@hotmail.com. Eden Energy MedicineClear Physical S ludge Reset Ileocecal/ Houston Valvesby Karen L. Semmelman, Certified EEM, JD, AAML(03-12)Since last week we cleared etheric sludge, it seemed apropos to clear our physical sludge, too. So, if you are prone to diarrhea, constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, Crohns disease, have digestive issues or feel you are holding onto unwanted waste, behavior or ideas, this exercise will help. The Ileocecal valve is located between the small and large intestines on the right side of the body. Governed by the kidney meridian, its function is to open and close in order to process wastes from food, chemicals and hormones that flow through your bloodstream. If not working properly, then waste backs up into your system, which can result in digestive issues, toxic overload in the kidneys, bronchitis or many other illnesses that may diminish or disappear after clearing these valves. So, if you have a chronic condition that just does not want to heal, this is a worthwhile exercise to consider. The Houston valve is not a real valve, but serves a similar role to the Ileocecal valve. It is located between the descending colon of the large intestine and the rectum inside the left hipbone. To make certain your body releases unnecessary material for evacuation, reset the Ileocecal and Houston valves as follows: Step 1. Place the right hand on right hip bone and left hand on left hip bone with little fingers at the inside edge of the hip bones. Under right hand is on the Ileocecal valve and left hand over the Houston valve. Correcting both together creates symmetry between them. Step 2. As you begin a deep inhalation, push in with pressure through your fingers as you slowly drag the fingers of each hand up six to seven inches, ending at your hip bones. Step 3. Shake the hands to remove the energy. Step 4. Start at position in Step 1 and repeat at least four times. Step 5. Return to original position, but this time drag the thumbs down from the waist to the hipbones. You are done. Not only have you reset these two valves, but since they are linked with all the other valves in the body, you have effectively reset those valves as well. If after doing this exercise you find you still have constipation or diarrhea or remain unsettled, then lay down. Push the fingers from both hands into the Ileocecal valve while lifting your right knee slowly toward the trunk of your body to a 90 degree angle. Continue holding the pressure with your fingers while straightening the leg. You now have changed the sludge of energy in this sluggish valve. Have fun with your energy! Next weeks topic is Seeking Inspiration? Let Heaven Rush In. If you have a questions for Karen, email her at ksemmelmanenergy@ gmail.com. Learn more at www.semmelmanenergy.com. EEM does not diagnose or cure illness, but working with subtle energies of the body has been shown to help many conditions. From page 20BStreets AliveStreets Alive Lee will use the temporarily closed public streets to offer free activities such as walking, biking, skating, Zumba, hopscotch, dance and more from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday, November 10 in the downtown Fort Myers River District. Streets Alive features instructors offer ing a buffet of free and accessible games, sports, dance and other movement for attendees to try. There will be several activity villages where a variety of activities and instructions will be offered, along with a series of events taking advantage of the traffic-free downtown streets. Participants of all ages and abilities are encouraged to participate, with the focus particularly being on easy-to-learn activities to get people moving. The family-friendly Streets Alive will have local restaurants and outlets along the route offering food and beverages, highlighting their most delicious and nutritious menu items. A range of other vendors will also be participating in the festivities.For more event information or sponsorship options, go to www.streetsalivelee. org. ISLAND PHARMACY(Voted Best Pharmacy on The Island 6 years)CARING FOR YOU AND ABOUT YOU2330 Palm Ridge Rd. #12, Sanibel Share your community news with us.Call 395-1213 Fax: 395-2299or emailpress@islandsunnews.com

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23B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 Free Autism Screening For Young ChildrenGolisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida, in partnership with the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southwest Florida, offers a free monthly autism spectrum disorder screening for toddlers 18 months to 5 years of age. The next screening on the Ronald McDonald Care Mobile will be held on Friday, July 26 from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at McDonalds, 13741 N. Cleveland Avenue in North Fort Myers. It is estimated that one in every 88 children is diagnosed with some form of Autism Spectrum Disorder, making it more common than childhood cancer, juvenile diabetes and pediatric AIDS combined. Medical consultants for the project stress that an early diagnosis can make a vast difference for toddlers and their families. They say early intensive behavioral intervention can make an immense difference not just in the development of the child, but in their families as well. The ASD screening is conducted by the Neurosciences Center at Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida. The screenings are administered by an Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner, who has extensive training and experience in typical child development and developmental disorders. A physician referral is not required. To schedule a screening, call 343-6838. From page 21BPalmer The TurtleA stuffed version of Palmer is available at the gift shops of HealthPark Medical Center, Lee Memorial Hospital and the Lexington Country Club Pro Shop for a donation of $20 to Barbaras Friends, the Golisano Childrens Hospital Cancer Fund. Palmer can be taken home or donated to a patient. He even has a special tag on his back to hang him on IV poles and golf bags. In 1994, Haskell and his wife Betty founded the Boston Red Sox Childrens Hospital Celebrity Golf Classic and a year later established Barbaras Friends, both in memory of their daughter Barbara. During her four year battle with cancer, Barbara was amazed by the children she encountered who were also coping with the disease. The Haskells have raised more than $22 million through their fundraising efforts. Despite its rarity and impressive strides in treatment and care, cancer is still a leading cause of death in children under age 15, second only to accidents. One hundred percent of funds donated to Barbaras Friends go to help children with cancer and blood disorders. To make a donation, call 343-6950. Got A Problem? Dr. Connie Is Inby Constance ClancyQ: How is lifestyle related to illness?A: Many illnesses are related to lifestyle. The human body ages more slowly and has less illness and disease when optimal living conditions are present. We can create those optimal conditions. We seem to maintain our automobiles better than our bodies. Many people who neglect to take care of themselves may end up in the hospital unnecessarily. While there are advances in modern medicine and technology that can help prolong life, there is nothing better than taking good care of yourself to prevent illness. Case in point. I knew a man in the 1960s who lived the high life. He chainsmoked Camel filter cigarettes; he drank Manhattans, about five or six per day; he partied hard. In the 1970s, when this man was in his 50s, he began not to feel well. His doctor told him he had to stop smoking and drinking, start a healthy diet and lose weight. He was an avid golfer and really did not exercise in other ways. As time went on, he not only ended up getting a quadruple by-pass, but also years later he suffered a major stroke. He survived, with much rehabilitation. However, his life and his health continued to deteriorate. Why did he smoke, abuse alcohol, party too much? He used them as coping mechanisms for stress. This man chose to continue to live the lifestyle that contributed heavily to the cause of his poor health. People who sustain a healthy lifestyle find much fulfillment in their later years. What is it worth to you? You might be thinking that you know someone who chain-smoked and drank and lived to be in their 90s. Yes, there are exceptions, but few. It would be better to start healthy and stay healthy. Do not wait until you have your first health crisis or some other type of wake up call. I see that too many times in my counseling practice. Very seldom do people come to me pre-crisis to work on learning proper stress management. They are usually already in crisis and desperate for help. For example, theyve been told to stop smoking. I ask if they want to stop smoking, and often they look at me as if I were crazy. They really dont want to stop; rather they were told they have to quit for health reasons. I am hesitant to take the case of a person who truly does not want to make the necessary change for improving his or her health. To be successful, people truly have to want to change and release current behavior. When someone really does not want to make a change, it will not be effective. SANIBEL CAPTIVA SANIBEL CAPTIVA properties.com Tracy Walters REALTOR 239.994.7975 Connie Walters REALTOR 239.841.4540 FEATURED OFFERINGS John Naumann & Associates1149 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel, FL 33957Let us help you become part of them too We are part of the Islands Bring your bathing suit and your sunscreen, thats all you need. Outstanding 2000 sq ft Gulf of Mexico front property. 3 bedroom, 2 bath with Florida room. Quiet neighborhood street with cul de sac. This Bayfront beauty is ready for you! Main oor Master bedroom with private of ce and en suite bath. Upper oor with 2 Guest Suites, Living Area, and Breakfast bar. Open balconies and screened lanai with inground pool. Bay views from almost every room!! Outstanding condo complex offers great rental history and lots of amenities. A Gulf of Mexico front getaway with rental revenue. 2 bedroom, 2 bath ground oor unit with tile throughout. UNDER CONTRACT

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 24B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 PET SITTING Island Pet SittingKelly TyrrellIsland Resident395-9999kellyatyrrell@me.com AIR CONDITIONING & REMODELING We are your One-Stop ContractorCall today for a free estimate!(239) 344-6883 Licensed & Insured: CBC1254276 and CAC1814724 AIR CONDITIONING REMODELING INTERIOR DESIGN Sanibel Design Center NEW HOMES, REMODELING & ADDITIONS P.O. Box 143 Sanibel Island, FL Phone: 239-472-2601 Fax: 239-472-6506 LAWN MAINTENANCE Rock Shrimp Coconut Curry with Mango-Papaya Salsa Rock Shrimp Coconut Curry 1 teaspoon olive oil 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, peeled and chopped 1/2 cup onion, chopped 1 cup zucchini, julienned 1 cup yellow squash, julienned 1 cup unsweetened coconut milk 1/4 cup dry white wine 1 teaspoon turmeric 1/2 cup mango chutney 1 1/2 pounds rock shrimp, peeled 1/2 cup half and half 1/2 teaspoon Thai red curry paste 2 teaspoons parsley, chopped Sea salt to taste Fresh ground pepper to taste Heat olive oil in a heavy saucepan over medium-high heat. Add ginger, onion and julienned squash; saut until soft. Stir in coconut milk, wine, turmeric and chutney; bring to a boil. Add shrimp and reduce heat to medium. Simmer sauce 5 to 6 minutes until shrimp are cooked through and sauce is slightly thickened. Stir in half and half, curry paste, parsley, salt and pepper. Heat through and serve with Florida Mango-Papaya Salsa. Florida Mango Papaya Salsa 1 cup ripe papaya, cut into 1/2-inch cubes 2 cups ripe mango, cut into 1/2-inch cubes 3 tablespoons cilantro, finely chopped 1 to 2 jalapeo peppers, seeded and minced 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice, or to taste 1 tablespoon light brown sugar, or more to taste Place all ingredients in a mixing bowl; chill. Toss together 5 minutes before ready to serve. Taste for seasoning, adding more lime juice and/or brown sugar as needed. Rock Shrimp Coconut Curry with Mango-Papaya Salsa Read us online at IslandSunNews.com

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY answer on page 27B25B ISLAND SUN JULY 26 2013 CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING BUILDING CONTRACTOR PRESSURE WASHING Owner Matthew Ryan1-239-645-9834www.oneppw.comLicense & Insured Owner Owner Ask About Our$9900Specials!! Professional Pressure WashingFREE ESTIMATEQuality Service Guaranteed TREE & LAWN CARE Sanibel Family Owned & Operated Licensed & Insured / www.enviromow.com Complete Landscaping Services 239-896-6789 CONTRACTOR G www.gigicompanies.com 239-541-7282 Lic.# S3-12238SUDOKUTo play Sudoku: Complete the grid so that every row, column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 (the same number cannot appear more than once in a row, column or 3x3 box.) There is no guessing and no math involved, just logic.answer on page 27B FIND AT LEAST SIX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PANELS

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FAMILY MEDICINE 239-233-5835Experienced in all ages including geriatricsDr. Maria BadamiBoard Certified Family Medicine, F.A.AFP, DO, MBA, MTHouse call visits IMMEDIATE CARE NEEDS CHRONIC CARE DM2, HTN & MORE PREVENTATIVE MEDICINE WEIGHT MANAGEMENT OSTEOPATHIC MANIPULATIONFamily Medicine Physician Read us online at IslandSunNews.com PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 26B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 TREE & LAWN CARE Jesus Hernandez LANDSCAPING & TREE SERVICE 482-7350 We Service All your Landscape Needs FULL Landscaping SERVICES Over 20 years serving San-Cap & Ft. Myers PAINTING Residential & Commercial Painting COLOR SCHEMES on request fromSanibel Home FurnishingsPower Washing Wallpaper Hanging Faux Finishing Free Estimates Interior & Exterior Dependable Reliable Licensed & InsuredLic #S3-11944 395-3928 Cell: 841-4302 CUSTOM HOME BUILDER New DeCorte Four GLASS 2416 Palm Ridge Road Sanibel Island, FL 33957 Phone: (239) 472-0032 Fax: (239) 472-0680Insured Licensed# S2-11975 Stevens & Sons GlassReplacement Impact Windows & Sliding Doors, Mirrors, Tub & Shower Enclosures, Store Fronts, Porch Enclosures, French Doors, Plate Glass Specialists in impact condo complex replacement COSMETICS MAGGIE BUTCHER Career information available Gift ideas available Call for Summer Specials! POOL SERVICE & REPAIR PAINTING Islands Premier Pool Service Professional Weekly Service Fast Expert Equipment Repair and Replacement Specializing in Gulfstream Pool Heaters239-699-6279 Deep-EndPool Service Top 10 Real Estate Sales Development City Year BuiltSquare FootageListing PriceSelling PriceDays on Market Harbour Preserve Cape Coral 200313,603$6,950,000 $5,300,000216 Magnolia Bend Bonita Springs 20043,532$1,485,000 $1,235,000203 Edgewater At Gulf HarbourFort Myers 19993,408$1,095,000 $960,000 84 Deep Lagoon Estates Fort Myers 19954,101$989,000 $850,000 120 Cape Coral Cape Coral 20014,649$744,900 $698,000 114 Lakemont Bonita Springs 19982,637$649,000 $616,500 86 Cape Coral Cape Coral 20063,287$630,000 $585,000 81 Cape Coral Cape Coral 19792,351$550,000 $545,000 145 Cape Coral Cape Coral 20032,427$569,900 $537,500 141 Dunes Sanibel Island Sanibel19803,320$699,000 $530,000 345Courtesy of Royal Shell Real Estate

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PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY PUZZLE ANSWERS SUDOKU KING CROSSWORD MAGIC MAZE SUPER CROSSWORD 27B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 COMPUTER SERVICES CONTRACTORS HOME BUILDINGA full service contractor dedicated to exceptional quality at a reasonable price.Voted Best of the Islands 10 times since 1999New Construction Remodeling Commercial(239)472-0200Michael J. ValiquetteGENERAL CONTRACTORIsland Resident Lic. #CGC056909 Hurricane Protection Consultant SLIDING GLASS DOORS Replacing Sliding Glass Door Rollers, Locks, Tracks and More 2393397355www.SliderMedic.comLicensed & InsuredServing Lee & Collier Counties Replacing Sliding Glass Door Rollers, UPHOLSTERY A Friendly Personalized Service From Owner-Operator Steven CservenyakPARAMOUNT DECORATOR & UPHOLSTERYsince 1974 Complete line of quality upholstery work by European CraftsmanWe work with the finest imported silk, satin, damask, brocades, velvets, hand-loomed crewel, embroidered tapestries from Italy, Belgium & India.Antique Furniture Restoration We also do boat cushions & down feather cushions472-8086Island COMPUTERS CONSTRUCTION 239-472-6711 MILLS BROTHERS BUILDING CONTRACTORS FISHING CHARTER Light Tackle Sport Fishing CAPT. MAT T MI TCHELL USCG Licensed & InsuredC: (239) 340-8651www.captmattmitchell.com email: captmattmitchell@aol.com SCRAMBLERS

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REAL ESTATE 28B ISLAND SS UN JULY 26, 2013 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS Read us online at Island SS un NN ews. com ANNUAL RENTAL DI RERE C TLTL Y AA C RR O SSSS F RR OM B EAEA CH C ANALANAL & DOCK This UF ground level updated home offers 472-6747Gulf Beach Properties, Inc. RS 7/26 BM TFN ANNUAL RENTALS SS AN ibIB EL foFO RT myMY ERS ISABELLA RASiIHAPPY TO HELP Y YOUWithITH A ALL OOF Y YOUrRREAL EEStT At TE NEEDS! RS 1/4 NC TFN 1101 Periwinkle Way #105 SS anibel, F LL 33957 ISABELLA RASiI (239) 246-4716E ISABELLARASi I@AOL.COM MOBI LELE HOM EE P ERER IWI NN K LELE P ARAR K carport with adjacent 2nd parking space. information or to make offer. RS 7/26 CC 7/26 RR ENTAL WANTE dDAA NNUAL RR ENTAL WANTE dD NS 6/28 CC TFN F oO R RR ENT has apartments for rent to individuals RS 3/15 CC 8/30 ANNUAL RENTALQ UU I ETET SANSAN IB ELEL HOM EE W/P RR IV ATEATE B EAEA CH P ATAT H NS 5/31 CC TFN RERE /M AA X OF TT H EE I SLANSLAN D SS Putting owners and tenants together RS 1/4 BM TFN C ANALANAL -F RR O NTNT NS 7/19 CC 7/26 SER vicVIC ES offOFF ERE dD C ompOMP AN ioIO N SS ER vicVIC E RS 1/4 BM TFN ScSC ARNAT oO LL A wW N SS ER vicVIC E RS 1/25 BM TFN HELLES CLEAN iI N gG SS ER vicVIC ES NS 1/4 PC TFN GI RLRL F RR ID AA Y HO USEUSE K EEEE P ERER wishing to work for someone in need of a housekeeper... and or plus much more... NS 7/26 CC 7/26 commCOMM ER icIC AL RENTALOFFIC EE / COMM ERER CI ALAL SS P AA C EE FO RR RENTRENT NS 4/5 CC TFN REAL ESTATEWEST GUL fF DR ivIV E SS T iI LT H omOM E NS 6/21 CC TFN 3B RR 2B AA RARA I SESE D RANRAN CH w/POO LL Call for details NS 7/19 CC 8/2 Island VacationsMillion $ Views Await You! Cottages Condos 239-472-72771-888-451-7277RS 1/4 BM TFN vV A cC AT ioIO N RENTAL LL IGH TT HO USEUSE REALTREALT Y 239-579-0511RS 1/4 CC TFN VO LUNTEERSLUNTEERS NEENEE D EE D RS 1/4 NC TFN hH EL pP wW ANTE dD www.crowclinic.orgH ELEL P USUS P LEASELEASE !! shop cashiers RS 1/4 NC TFN SER vicVIC ES offOFF ERE dDSANSAN IB ELEL HOM EE W ATAT CH RS 1/4 BM TFN RR OG ERER NN OD RURU FF ELEELE C TRTR IC RS 6/7 CC TFN H omOM E/CO NN DO WAT chCHco CO N ciCI ER gG E SER vicVIC ES P AA I NTNT I NN G GO ATAT www.paintinggoat.com RS 4/19 CC TFN

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29B ISLAND SS UN JULY 26, 2013 CLASSIFIED D DEADLINE F FRIDAY AT N NOON CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS TO PLACE AA CC LASSIFIED LL OG OO N tT O: IslandSunNews.com CLICK ON PLACE CLASSIFIED LOST AND FOUND TOOLTOOL B OO X W ASAS HE SS UU P ONON SANSAN IBE LL This tool box with motor parts washed up on shore Saturday morning, May 8 about 8:30 on the beach at Sundial Resort on Sanibel Island. To claim call Sundial Resort Security 239-472-4151. NSNS 6/14 CCCC T FNFN pePE TS FF REE KI TTTT E NNTO TO G OODOOD H OO MEFree kitten to good, safe home. No de-clawing. Fiesty Bengal mix. Call 472-1788 after 5 p.m. NSNS 5/31 NCNC T FNFN wW ANT eE D TO bB UYC ASAS H P AA I DD FOFO R MI LL I TATA R YY I TT EM SS Cash Paid For Old Military Items. Medals, Swords, Uniforms, helmets, old guns, awards & more. Local Toll Free 1-866-440-3280R SS 6/7 CCCC 8/30 C AA R FO rR SAL eE 2007 BU ickICK LL AC rR OSS eE C LL X16,500 miles, beige color, 4 door, all power, seldom driven off island, $14,000. Call Ken at 472-2012.R SS 7/12 NCNC T FNFN heHE L pP wW ANT eE DHOUS ekeeperEKEEPER PA rR TTimeTIME The Robert Rauschenberg Foundations Rauschenberg Residency in Captiva seeks to engage a committed person in the role of Housekeeper. The successful and organized. Strong time management skills, a plus. S/he needs to be able to work independently, as well as perform as part of a team. An enthusiasm for the property and a willingness to learn and grow in the position are necessary. Position begins early September 2013. Flexible hours based on residency schedule, average 25 hours/week. $15/ interest and related experience or rsum, and three references should be sent to Employment@rauschenbergfoundation. org. No phone calls, please. NSNS 7/12 CCCC 7/26 V OLUNTOLUNT EER SS NN EE DD E DD Volunteers needed for the After School Program which runs Mon.-Th, 2:30 3:15 pm call Linda Reynolds 472-1617R SS 1/4 NCNC T FNFN ServerSERVER S AA SS iI STANT ServerSERVER S LiLI N eE cC OO kK IL Tesoro Ristorante, 751 tarpon Bay Rd. Sanibel Now hiring; Servers, Assistant Servers and Line cook Email resumes to: applications between 11-2 daily. NSNS 1/18 NCNC T FNFN V OLUNTOLUNT EER OO PP OO R TUNTUN I TYTY The Sunshine Ambassador Program is a new and exciting volunteer opportunity offered at the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida located within HealthPark Medical Center. The Sunshine Ambassadors will greet, assist and be a families and visitors entering the hospital. The Ambassadors also make a difference to families by providing educational and healthful resources to assist in GRANDparenting for GRANDchildren. We are currently seeking year-round volunteers to work one 4-hour shift Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm or 12:00pm to 4:00 pm. If you would be interested in learning more about this wonderful new opportunity, please contact Lisa Ellinwood, Volunteer Resources Coordinator at 239-343-5062 at the Golisano Childrens Hospital. NSNS 2/8 CCCC T FNFN bB OATS cC ANO eE S kK AYA kK S DD O ckCK A geGE Hourly, Daily, Weekly and Monthly. Captiva Island 472-5800R SS 1/4 NCNC T FNFN 22FF OOT GLA cierCIER BAY CATA mM A rR ANIn good condition. Needs some detailing and a high pressure fuel pump. $9,000 or best offer. The boat was donated to the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) for quick sale. Contact James Robinson at CROW at (239) 472-3644, ext. 221 or development@ crowclinig.org. Or contact Peg Albert at (239) 472-3644, ext. 232 or peg@ crowclinic.org. R SS 7/26 CCCC T FNFN LOST AND FOUNDLOSTLost Ladies Watch Make: Brighton Area of Mucky Duck on Captiva Island Lost on Dec. 10, 2012 around noon If found call: 941-639-5395R SS 1/4 NCNC T FNFN FF OUNDPrescription sunglasses found in parking lot of Limetree Center on Wednesday, February 27. Claim at Island Sun newspaper, suite 2 in Limetree Center, or call 395-1213. NSNS 3/8 NCNC T FNFN

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rfnCALLING CARD 239-395-1213Emergency................................................911 Sanibel Police .......................................... 472-3111 Lee County Sheriffs Office ............................... 477-1200 On Call Captiva Deputy ................................. 477-1000 Fire Department Sanibel ................................................ 472-5525 Captiva ................................................ 472-9494 Florida Marine Patrol ..................................... 332-6966 Florida Highway Patrol ................................... 278-7100 Poison Control ..................................... 1-800-282-3171 Chamber of Commerce ................................... 472-1080 City of Sanibel .......................................... 472-4135 Administrative Office ................................... 472-3700 Building Department ................................... 472-4555 Community Housing and Resources ...................... 472-1189 Planning Department ................................... 472-4136 Library Sanibel .............................................. 472-2483 Captiva .............................................. 472-2133 Post Office Sanibel .............................................. 472-1573 Sanibel (toll free) .................................. 800-275-8777 Captiva .............................................. 472-1674 Sanibel Community Association ........................... 472-2155 Senior Center ........................................... 472-5743ARTSArcade Theater .......................................... 332-4488 Art League Of Fort Myers ................................. 275-3970 BIG ARTS (Barrier Island Group for the Arts) ................ 395-0900 Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre ............................ 278-4422 Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers. . . . . . 472-0168 Gulf Coast Symphony .................................... 472-6197 Lee County Alliance for the Arts ........................... 939-2787 Naples Philharmonic ..................................... 597-1111 The Herb Strauss Schoolhouse Theater ..................... 472-6862 Sanibel Music Festival . . . . . . . . .336-7999 Sanibel-Captiva Art League ............................... 472-4258 S.W. Florida Symphony ................................... 418-0996CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONSABWA (American Business Womens Assoc.) ..... 565-7872 or 433-7798 American Legion Post 123 ................................ 472-9979 Angel Flight SE ................................. 1-877-4AN-ANGELAudubon Society ........................................ 472-3744 Sanibel Bike Club ........................... sanibelbicycleclub.org Community Foundation of Sanibel-Captiva .................. 274-5900 CROW (Clinic For The Rehabilitation of Wildlife) .............. 472-3644 FISH of Sanibel (Friends in Service Here) ................... 472-0404 Sanibel Island Fishing Club ............................... 472-8994 Horticultural Society of the Islands ......................... 472-6940 Horticulture and T ea Society of Sanibel and Captiva .......... 472-8334 Kiwanis Club ........................................... 677-7299 League of Women Voters .................... sanibelLWV@gmail.com Lions Club (T om Rothman) ............................... 395-3248 Master Gardeners of the Islands ........................... 472-6940 Newcomers ............................................ 472-9332 Notre Dame Club of Southwest Florida ..................... 768-0417 Optimist Club ...........................................472-0836PAWS ................................................. 472-4823 Rotary Club ................................. 472-7257 or 472-0141 Sanibel Beautification Inc. ................................ 470-2866 Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society ............................ 472-6940 Sanibel-Captiva Power Squadron .......................... 472-3828 Sanibel-Captiva Shell Club ................................ 395-1770 Sanibel Youth Soccer .................................... 395-2040 www.sanibelsoccer.org The Military Officers Assc. of America (MOAA, Alex MacKenzie). ............................... 395-9232 United Way of Lee County ................................ 433-2000 United Way 211 Helpline ...... (24 hour information line) 211 or 433-3900 Zonta Club ............................................. 671-6381ISLAND ATT RAC TIONSBailey-Matthews Shell Museum ............................ 395-2233 J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge ................. 472-1100 Sanibel Historical Museum & Village ....................... 472-4648 SCCF (Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation) ............. 472-232930B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013 Pets Of The Week T-S hirt S ales A id Heartworm Care For D ogsHazel For Heartworm Prevention T-shirts are on sale. Proceeds will benefit Lee County Domestic Animal Services Animal Care Trust Fund for the heartworm treatment of pets whose owners receive public assistance. The idea came from Trasi Sharp and Liza Clouse, owners of Island Paws and the Over Easy Caf, both on Sanibel. Last year, the ladies rescued a heartworm-positive great Dane named Hazel and saw first-hand how the disease affects dogs. Trasi and Liza were concerned that many dogs would suffer from the disease because their owners could not afford the treatment, said Donna Ward, director of animal services. The funds will allow us make this treatment available for these dogs, she added. We also hope it will bring about awareness of the importance of heartworm prevention.The T-shirts are available for $25 each. They come in four colors and in crew neck and ladies V-neck. They are on sale at Island Paws, 630 Tarpon Bay Road on Sanibel, or at Animal Services, 5600 Banner Drive in Fort Myers. To place an order, email islandpaws@embarqmail. com. My name is Dolly and I am a five-year-old female fawn Labrador retriever. Labs love water and I certainly am true to my breed. If I was part of your family we could go to Dog Beach and play lots of games. I also love to fetch. You wont find a more social dog than me. Adoption fee: $10 (regularly $75) during Animal Services Freedom Friends adoption promo. My name is Liz and I am a female black and white domestic short hair cat age four months. If you are looking for a sweet adorable baby kitty, Im your girl. I love to cuddle and couldnt look cuter with my black and white tuxedo coloring. Dont forget cats and kittens are two for one in case youd like to take home a pair of cuties. Adoption fee: $25 (regularly $75) during Animal Services Freedom Friends adoption promo. For information about this weeks pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log on to www. LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer to the animals ID number. The website updates every hour so you will be able to see if these or any other pets are still available. The shelter is open for adoptions from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The shelter is located at 5600 Banner Drive, Fort Myers, next to the Lee County Sheriffs Office, off Six Mile Cypress Parkway. All adoptions include spay/ neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations, rabies vaccination and county license if three months or older, flea treatment, worming, heartworm test for dogs six months and over, feline AIDS and leukemia test for cats, training DVD, 10-day health guarantee, and a bag of Science Diet pet food. The adoption package is valued at $500. Liz ID# 566805 Dolly ID# 568814 photos by squaredogphoto.com

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BEACH CHAIR PASTIMEAnswers on page 27B31B ISLAND SUN JULY 26, 2013

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We make it easy. You make it home. RoyalShellSales.com | RoyalShellRentals.com239.472.0078 | 800.805.0168 Florida: Bonita Springs, Fort Myers/Cape Coral, Naples, Captiva and Sanibel Islands North Carolina: Cashiers, Franklin, Highlands, Lake Glenville, Lake Toxaway and Sapphire Valley Come out of your shell and into one of ours. Captiva Beach Gem $4,850,000 Sarah Ashton 239.691.4915 Barefoot Way $4,995,000 Burns Family Team 239.464.2984 Bayfront Beauty $2,695,000 John & Denice Beggs 239.357.5500 Gorgeous Gumbo Limbo Home $634,000 McMurray & Nette 239.281.4435 Key West Style Hideaway Sanibel $893,000 Jane Weaver & Cathy Rosario 239.464.2249 Gulf Harbour Luxury Condo $995,000 McMurray & Nette, 239.292.7533 Sanibel Harbours $1,395,000 Burns Family Team 239.464.2984 Pet Friendly For Owners $498,000 Sally Davies 239.691.3319 Captiva Island Lure $3,699, 000 John and Denice Beggs 239.357.5500 Popular Dunes Subdivision $849,000 Burns Family Team 239.464.2984 Sanctuary Bayfront $3,495,000 McMurray & Nette 239.281.4435 Best Priced Beach Home-Sanibel Island $1,690,000 Bob Radigan 239.691.6240 Prime Commercial Space $2,299,000 McMurray & Nette 239.850.7888 Mediterranean Beauty on Captiva $1,899,000 Fred Newman or Vicki Panico 239.826.2704 Gulf Front Captiva Estate $3,995,000 Jim Branyon 239.565.3233 Prime Loggerhead Location $695,000 Burns Family Team 239.464.2984 NEW PRICE NEW LISTING NEW PRICEISLAND SUN JULY 26, 201332B