• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Purpose of the project
 Why expand the Orlando Public...
 Historic development
 Site location and description
 General design approach
 Aesthetic considerations
 Design considerations fir the building...
 Departmental organization
 Alterations to the present...
 Structural considerations
 Codes
 Space allocation requirements
 Bibliography
 Documents






Title: Expansion of the Orlando Public Library
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100891/00001
 Material Information
Title: Expansion of the Orlando Public Library
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Knott, A. Dean
Publisher: A. Dean Knott
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Copyright Date: 1977
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Caribbean Area   ( lcsh )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100891
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page i
    List of Illustrations
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Purpose of the project
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Why expand the Orlando Public Library?
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Historic development
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Site location and description
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 34a
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 41a
        Page 42
    General design approach
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Aesthetic considerations
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Design considerations fir the building type
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Departmental organization
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Alterations to the present library
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Structural considerations
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Codes
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Space allocation requirements
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
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        Page 109
        Page 110
    Bibliography
        Page 111
    Documents
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
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Full Text
TABLE OF CONTENTS


Page

List of Illustrations................................. ii

Purpose of the Project............................... 1

Why Expand the Orlando Public Library................ 4

Historic Development ................................. 8

Site Location and Description ......................... 21

General Design.Approach..... ....................... 43

Aesthetic Considerations............................. 53

Design Considerations for the Building Type.......... 57

Departmental Organization............................. 62

Alterations to the Present Library................... 67

Structural Considerations............................. 69

Codes.................................... ............. 71

Space Allocation Requirements...... .................. 73

Bibliography. ...................................... 111

Appendix: Documents ............................... ...112




LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS


Illustration Page

1. View of Orange Groves at Present
Library Site......................... ...... ..10

2. Albertson Public Library...................... 10

3.. Orlando Public Library ......................... 12

4. Site in 1897 from a Sanborn Map............... 14

5. Site in 1913 from a Sanborn Map............... 15

6. Site in 1919 from a Sanborn Map................ 16

7. Site in 1925 from a Sanborn Map............... 17

8. First Building of Orlando First Church
of Christ Scientist ........................... 19

9. First Orlando Chamber of Commerce
Building....................................... 19

10. Location of Orlando within Florida............. 22

11. Location of Site within Orlando...... ........ 23

12. Location of Site within Orlando............... 24

13. Site at Present................................ 25

14. Traffic Flow around the Site.................... 26

15. Site with Proposed Redevelopment.............. 29

16. Site with Topography......................... 30

17. Site Indicating Buildings to be Removed........ 31

18. First Christian Church........................ 32

19. Frame House on Wall Street.................... 32

20. Office Building on Wall Street................ 33

21. Law Offices at Rosalind and Washington........ 34




Illustration Page

22. Photo Sequence of Orlando Public
Library and the St. Goerge Greek
Orthodox Church (Foldout)..................... 35

23. The Original Orlando Chamber of
Commerce and Adjacent Parking Lot............. 36

24. Orange County Courthouse...................... 37

25. Commercial Buildings on E. Central............ 37

26. Commercial Building and Parking Lot
on E. Central................................... 39

27. Offices at E. Central and Rosalind ............ 40

28. Photo Sequence of Rosalind Club
and Eola Park (Foldout) ....................... 41

29. Kahler Plaza................................... 42

30. First Proposal for Redevelopment.............. 46

31. Model of First Proposal ................. ..... 47

32. Photo of St. George Greek Orthodox Church..... 47

33. Photo of St. Goerge Greek Orthodox Church,
Detail of Construction........................ 48

34. Orlando Public Library and St. George
Greek Orthodox Church.......................... 48

35. Photo of Orlando Public Library and St.
George Greek Orthodox Church................... 49

36. Flow Chart of Departmental Organization
for the Orlando Public Library ................ 110


iii




PURPOSE OF THE PROJECT


This program provides a guide to the design of the

Orlando Public Library expansion. Developed simultaneously

with the design, this report gives verbal reasons and re-

quirements for the building and its design. It is a verbal

record of the design process as well as an explanation of

the structure.

The project consists of a new contemporary wing

designed to harmonize and function with the present Orlando

Public Library (OPL). This may appear unusual as a termi-

nal project for a student in the preservation sequence;

however, it does fit within the broad concept or preserva-

tion. First are the obvious considerations of the older

buildings on the site that are to be retained, and used

as aesthetic parameters for the new wing. These buildings

alone would give the project a preservation slant. In

addition to retaining the older structures is the idea of

trying to harmonize and expand a building, regardless of

the fact that it is fairly new, like the OPL. This is a

basic preservation tenet, because restoration and rehab

are valid concepts for reusing any structure, especially

one of historic or architectural merit.

Though the OPL is only about eleven years old, it

is considered to be an excellent example of its style.




It should be expanded carefully to harmonize with the

original building, and not copy it. It is generally felt

that, when the required age (fifty years) has been ac-

quired, the OPL itself will be nominated for National

Register status as its neighbors now are. This project

merely recognizes the potential status of the OPL and the

merit of the other buildings, the St. George Greek Ortho-

dox Church, and the old Chamber of Commerce building, and

will propose a solution which will take all the present

architectural influences into consideration and work

within these design limitations without being a slavish

imitation of any style, either contemporary or classic.

The selection of this project over others was made

after visits to several sites and reviewing proposals

and ideas for my terminal project. I selected a.library

because I hoped to expand my knowledge about the building

type, which I knew little about, never having designed

a library before. This would give me the opportunity to

experiment with a new building type and add the knowledge

gained by the experience to my professional skills,

the problems of book circulation, security, comfort, at-

tractiveness, versatility and storage all being special to

this type of building and providing a challenging problem.

This particular library was selected because ex-

pansion was already proposed, making the project very real,




and the scale and complexity of the new wing is larger

than anything I have previously tackled. Also, the

design limitations of site, structure, older buildings

to work around, and restrictions of the asthetics made

the project even more desirable from the preservation

aspect.




WHY EXPAND THE ORLANDO PUBLIC LIBRARY?


The concept for the new wing to the OPL was

developed out of necessity, of course. A major capital

outlay of over $10,000,000 would not be made by the city

unless there had been a demonstrated need. The present

building has approximately 60,000 square feet from which

originates a number of services to 130,000 card holders,

95,000 of them within the Orlando/Orange County limits.

The original program for the existing building projected

that the building would be outdated by 1971 and an estimated

100,000 to 150,000 additional square feet would be needed

to carry the needs of the library and the public through

to 1982, when the population was expected to reach a half

million. This was before the introduction of Disney World

and the subsequent population explosion. The current

population is over 400,000 and the projected population

for 1982 is about 50,000 over the original estimates.

The following statistics were taken from a study

by a committee for the expansion of the library:


1966 1975

Circulation 447,315 756,347

People coming in (main) 502,462
1,650/day

Reference questions asked
or called in 77,966 164,570




The above numbers indicate the use of the library has in-

creased dramatically, yet the available space has not.

The expansion of service and use also mean an expansion

of the collection. These books take up space and the space

has to be provided or the new books cannot be made avail-

able or older but still useful volumes will have to be

retired to make room for the newer ones. So far the

space has been taken from the public reading and lounging

areas. Also, storage space for retired books and periodi-

cals and work space to process new acquisitions has been

obtained outside the library building. The present building

has only 1,754 square feet for book storage and a projected

30,300 square feet is required. To make up part of the

deficit the top floors of the old Chamber of Commerce

Building on E. Central are used for the storage area.

Eight thousand square feet of work space for forty staff

members are being leased on N. Orange Avenue. These fa-

cilities have the disadvantages of being away from the main

builidng and library operations besides costing tax monies

to lease and operate them, which could be spent on the

operation of the library system.

Another reason for expansion is the growth and

proposed addition of services the library offers to the

community. The first and most basic, other than provid-

ing books, is the bookmobile. The OPL was the first library




in the state to offer this service and now needs to expand

the area served by the bookmobile and have enough room

to store and service at least three of the vehicles. An-

other new function would be to provide public meeting rooms,

to alleviate the shortage of this type of space in the

downtown area. Other programs the library offers are cir-

culation of films for clubs, talking books for the blind,

book service to jails, the geneology department, books

by mail, and most important, a telephone reference service.

All of these programs are in desperate need of expansion

and to do this, on the average, from two to three times

the space is needed than presently allocated. Programs,

services, and departments which are not presently found

in the library but are proposed are television studios,

an adult community education coordinator, typing rooms,

first-aid room, a rare-book room, microfilming, network

offices (for coordination of all the branches and their

programs), and data processing. All of these are necessary

to enable the OPL to serve the public more fully and have

the library function more efficiently. To introduce these

agencies into the present structure would be impossible,

therefore, the new addition is required to contain them.

The microfilming department will eventually become a very

important area because it will increase the amount of in-

formation the library can hold while reducing the storage

space necessary for the information.




The overall goal of the library, by expansion of

the present services and introduction of new ones, is to

become a research and information center for the central

Florida area. Its network offices would control present

branches in Orange and Osceola counties and future branches

in other surrounding counties. It is also concievable that

it could serve, by mail or telephone, the universities

and colleges in the area as far away as Gainesville and

Tampa. Also, with the present population growth rate,

the estimated population of Orlando will be over 700,000 by.

1990 and a new wing will be needed to serve this increased

public.




HISTORIC DEVELOPMENT


Before settlement by Europeans the Orlando area was

the hunting grounds for the Timucas Indians. In the six-

teenth century several Spanish missions were established

to convert the Indians to Christianity; however, by the

late seventeenth century these missions and the Indians

were almost completelywiped out. In 1826 the area was

turned into a large Indian Reservation by Andrew Jackson

after his defeat of the Seminoles, and had army encampments

scattered throughout. By 1842 the first settlers, Aaron

Jernigan, had settled in Orlando and brought his family

down in 1844. One year later Florida became a state. Other

families settled in the area in 1855 and in 1856 Orlando

was made the country seat. By 1875 the village was incor-

porated as a city complete with a two-story brick city hall.

The city is said to have derived its name from two

sources. The first theory is that the postmaster, being

a student of Shakespeare, named the post office in 1855

after the hero in the play "As You Like It." The other

theory, and the most popular, is that an army soldier

"Orlando Reeves," who died in an Indian attack, was buried

on the shores of Lake Eola and the town was named after him.

Until 1875, when the city was incorporated, the

staple of the economy was agriculture and cattle. In that




year the citrus industry was introduced into Orlando with

a nursery on the shores of Lake Eola, indeed there were

even groves there as ahown in old views (Illustration 1).

The majority of people doing the orange growing were the

English who came over to make their fortune. By 1880, the

railroad had come to Orlando, and the city was experiencing

growth and a healthy economy. Clubs, teams, and social or-

ganizations popular in larger cities were also established

in the town. In 1887 the area around Lake Eola was made

into a fairgrounds. Though not affected, the city was

surrounded by the yellow fever epidemic of 1888 and the

Board of Trade tried to counteract the resulting economic

slowdown by a vigorous advertising campaign. By 1891

Orlando recovered and had a population of 50,000. In 1895

the bubble was burst by the great freeze which destroyed

most of the Englishmen's orange groves. The English sold

their groves for a fraction to the value to people who

intended to stay and salvage what remained. The industry

now surrounds Orlando and is one of Florida's most import-

ant exports.

By the turn of the century Orlando was a well

developed small city, having all the modern amenities of

electric street lights, water, and paved streets; however,

it had no public library though other civic improvements

were quickly undertaken by the city fathers to attract














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growth. Library services were made available by a ladies'

society called Sorosis and the public was expected to pay

a fee for this service, but the fee and the collection were

insufficient for the city's usage and overtaxed the club's

resources. In the early 20s a movement was started, by

Sorosis, for the city to build a public library. In May

of 1920 a bond issue was passed for this purpose, and in

November of 1923, after the gift of a large collection by

Captain Albertson and one by the Sorosis Club, the Albertson

Public Library, designed by Murray King, was opened to the

public. This building was in the Greek Doric style and

was located on the corner of E. Central and N. Rosalind

facing Central (Illustration 2). Of white limestone, it was

a very handsome building, having room for over 100,000

volumes, and a separate children's library. The Albertson

collection was the basis for the present library's geneologi-

cal reference department.

By 1963, the building had become outgrown and anti-

quated, and had developed leaks and cracks, and the decision

was made to replace the building rather than add to it.

A bond issue was passed for $1,000,000 for the present

library's construction, and by 1964 demolition of the

original library was finished and groundbreaking for the

present building, on the same site, was begun. In 1966,

the building (Illustration 3) was dedicated with a proposed















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150,000 square-foot addition to be made under Orlando's

five-year capital-improvements plan, though this wing has

yet to be built.

The land on which the library now stands was origin-

ally owned by Jacob Summerlain, a land and cattle baron from

the area who, in 1874, built the largest private home in

Orlando. Since many newcomers had no place to stay, Summer-

lain converted the house to a boarding house called the

Summerlain (Illustration 4) which remained on the site

until the late 30s. By the early 1900s the adjacent proper-

ty was sold and turned into a subdivision by Grannis & Sperry

and divided by Summerlain Place, now Wall Street. The prop-

erty was divided into lots and sold .off (Illustrations 5 and

6). Since the area was so close to the downtown there were

never very many private residences developed. Instead,

most of the property was developed by churches, public

buildings, and the Chamber of Commerce and utilities build-

ings (Illustration 7). This was logical since on the west

side of N. 'Main (Magnolia) which bordered the area was the

Orange County Courthouse and the beginning of the commercial

development of the city. At this time the streets surround-

ing the block were Main (Magnolia), Central, and Washington.

By 1919 the street to the east of the area called West

was changed to Rosalind Avenue (Illustration 6), for the

Rosalind Club, which still maintains its clubhouse directly








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across from the present library. Also, in 1919 the mayor

realized the impending need for a public library and how

it should be centrally located downtown, and he purchased

the property at the corner of Rosalind and Central for this

purpose, and was later reimbursed by the city. In 1923

the library was finished and located on the subsequent San-

born maps (Illustration 7). Also, located on the 1925 map

(the last map in the University of Florida's Sanborn map

collection on Orlando) is the First Church of Christ Scien-

tist (Illustration 8). This was a long, narrow building

in a classic style, which was not used long, for in the

next year, 1926, a new building, now occupied by the St.

George Greek Orthodox Church, was built for the congrega-

tion on the adjacent property at the corner of Summerlain

Place and Rosalind Avenue. This building, along with

a house, the adjacent law offices, and the old Chamber of

Commerce building, are the.only original structures on the

two-block area.

In 1973, the congregation of the First Church of

Christ Scientist decided to move their church to the sub-

urbs of Orlando, as this is where most of the congrega-

tion now lives. They sold the building at Rosalind and

Wall to the law firm due west of the church. The firm

had originally intended to expand their offices into the

building, but this proved to be impractical. It was to be

torn down for their new building when the library announced





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their intention to expand on this property thus giving

the lawyers no reason to tear the building down, and giving

it a stay of execution. At present, the church is leased

to the Greek Orthodox church which would like to buy the

building and restore it; however, they lack the funds.

The Chamber of Commerce building on E. Central (Il-

lustration 9) was also abandoned in the early 70s because

the Chamber wanted larger quarters and a more contemporary

image. Presently, the moorish style, stucco and tile

building is being used as the Jaycee Community Center and

as a storage depository for the library. The building is

in excellent condition and could easily be rehabilitated

into a permanent downtown community center.




SITE LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION


The site is in Orlando, Florida, the largest in-

land city in the state (Illustration 10). The city was

developed on a separate econmoy from the rest of the urban

centers relying on cattle and citrus instead of tourists,

until the recent addition of the Disney tourist attraction,

which has spurred a dramatic growth in the city.

The actual site is in the heart of the downtown

and is included in many of the downtown redevelopment

proposals (Illustrations 11 and 12). The city was laid

out on an east-west north-south axial grid and the site is

two blocks due east of Orange Avenue, the major downtown

artery, and five blocks east of Interstate 4, and just

west of Lake Eola Park, the major park in the area. The

two-block site is bordered by E. Central Avenue on the

south, which is the dividing street between north and south

denotations for all streets running in that direction,

on the east by N.. Rosaland Avenue, on the west by N. Mag-

nolia, and by E. Washington on the north. The blocks are

divided by Wall Street, which will be removed partially

by the expansion illustrations s 13 and 14).

Magnolia Avenue is a major north-south artery going

one way to the north. E. Central is also one way running

east, and both Rosalind and Washington are two-way streets.










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This situation dictates where the major entrance of the

new wing should be and where the service drives will be

located and where will be the entrance to the new parking

garage. The parking garage will have its pedestrian and

vehicular entrance together at the east end of the building

from the plaza developed on the west side of the existing

library. This plaza will also connect the new entrance of

the library to the entrance of the garage. Wall Street

will dead-end at this garage entrance and be used for ac-

cess to the garage and as a holding lane to get waiting

cars out of the mainstream of traffic. This street will

connect onto Magnolia facilitating access to the garage.

The service entrance and loading and receiving dock for

the library will be from an extension of Palmetto between

the telephone company building and the new wing and will

be fed by E.,Washington. The new east entrance between

the two wings of the library will be recessed from Rosalind

and will be affected little by vehicular traffic and rela-

tively unimportant, but will be there for the few people

who might walk from the east side of Lake Eola, where

there are several condominiums and large residences of

middle-aged to elderly people.

The site for the wing is roughly a quarter of a city

block; however, the entire development including the plaza,

parking garage, the library and its wing and the church will




cover about three-quarters of a city block (Illustration 15).

The dimensions of the actual construction site for the new

wing are 208' x 256' less the 81' x 104' taken out by the

church. The topography slopes down to the northeast diagon-

ally from the southwest and the elevation changes from 105'

at the highest point at E. Central and N. Magnolia to 92'

at the lowest point at E. Washington and N. Rosalind (Illus-

tration 16).

The buildings on the site to be removed because of

lack of architectural merit or historic value (Illustration

17) are the church and parish house on E. Central (Illus-

tration 18), the frame house on Wall (Illustration 19) and

the office building directly north of it (Illustration 20),

and the law offices to the north of the church on Rosalind

(Illustration 21). The remaining elements on the site are:

The OPL, the St. Goerge Greek Orthodox Church (Illustration

22), the old Chamber of Commerce Building (Illustration 23),

and the municipal parking lot which will be developed into

a multilevel parking garage, and the phone company build-

ing.

The area surrounding the site is composed of a

variety of functions and buildings from surface parking

lots, and low-density commercial building to parks and

high-rise civic and utility buildings. To the west, along

N. Magnolia, is the Orange County Courthouse (Illustration 24)










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to the south along Central are three commercial structures

and two surface parking lots (Illustrations 25 and 26),

east along Rosalind is a low office building (Illustration

27), the Rosalind Club and Lake Eola Park (Illustration 28)

and north of the site is the Krahler Plaza, a mid-60s

modern building about five stories high (Illustration 29).

The Krahler Plaza does not have the impact of a high-rise

on the street, however, because it is fairly recessed from

the edge of the street and tends to recede behind land-

caping on the Washington Street elevation. The only other

high-rise development around the site is the courthouse,

eight stories. The rest is either flat or no more than

three stories. This gives us a low-rise scale on three

sides of the site with .a high-rise scale on the west, which

will block the late afternoon sun.








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GENERAL DESIGN APPROACH


In the original 1964 plan for the expansion of the

OPL the area to the west of the existing building along

E. Central and Wall Streets and facing the Magnolia Avenue

elevation of the Orange County Courthouse was designated

for the new wing. Even the floor plans of the present lib-

rary are arranged with this direction for the expansion in

mind, but expansion in this direction would have the new

wing creating a "canyon" effect of tall buildings on rela-

tively narrow streets. Also, the new wing would have had

to either work around or go on top of the old Chamber of

Commerce building. Since the west site is fairly limited

this building would have had to be removed to make room

for the new wing or the new wing would have to be developed

into, a high-rise. The old Chamber of Commerce building

is very good architecturally and sound structurally, and

in all cases should be retained. This locks the new wing

into a higher development than desirable. Finally, the site

slopes up dramatically behind the existing library and to

continue the present floor levels straight back to Magnolia

would demand a great deal of excavation which would put

the present first floor either partially or completely

underground.




In the 1973 study on the proposed expansion, it was

recommended that the west site would be most effectively

used for a multilevel parking structure. This would alle-

viate the critical shortage of parking in this area of

downtown Orlando and would serve theemployees and visitors

of both the courthouse and the library. The garage would

be very conveniently located between both buildings and

within walking distance of the downtown shopping district.

Also, the garage would not require the destruction of the

Chamber of Commerce building as it could easily be "wrapped"

around the side and back of the older building without in-

fringing on its facade architecture.

This same report also recommended a plaza develop-

ment between this garage and the west elevation of the

existing library and locating the new wing to the north

of the existing library, bridging Wall Street and going

up Rosaline Avenue to E. Washington Street (Illustrations

30 and 31). This provides several advantages. First and

most important is the new wing would have a view of Lake

Eola and Eola Park, which would be very appropriate and

restful for the people in the library and would contribute

to the overall library atmosphere. Secondly, the building

could spread out and develop a lower profile, stepping

up toward the west side of the wing to hide the telephone

company building. Also, the site slopes down gradually




from the existing building and would require less excava-

tion for the construction of the present floor levels and

would put the present basement partially above grade.

There is a major drawback to this site, the domed,

classic revival old First Church of Christ, now the St.

George Greek Orthodox Church (Illustration 32). This build-

ing, according to the preliminary proposals would have to

be removed for the north wing's construction. This would

be a grave mistake. Its threatened destruction is the basis

for this project. The church is very good architecturally

and adds variety as well as character to the streetscape.

Built in 1926 of brick with a finish surface and ornament

of terracotta *(Illustration 33), this building has been a

major landmark in the downtown Orlando area and should re-

main because it helps define Orlando's individuality over

other southern or Florida cities. Also the building is

in very good condition, and would require only minor re-

novation of the roof and mechanical systems and some

restoration of its decorative elements.

The architect of the existing library building

realized the importance of the church building and was

sensitive to it, and related his building by aligning

the cornices (Illustration 34), and, to a degree, relating

the colors of the building to the colors of the church

(Illustration 35). Also, in the original designs for the























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library, the architect tried massing similar to the pro-

jections of the church. These elements were deleted be-

cause a variance to the easement was not granted and the

library could not project as far out as the church. Be-

cause of the sensitivity the architect showed in his

design to the surroundings of his building, the present

library works very well within the existing vocabulary of

architectural development.

The overall problem is to expand the OPL to

170,000 square feet, and allow for future expansion, to

provide area for a multilevel parking garage and to save

the old Chamber of Commerce on E. Central and the St. George

Greek Orthodox Church on N. Rosalind. The method of working

the garage around the Chamber of Commerce has already been

mentioned. To save the church, two alternatives are avail-

able. First, one could wrap the new wing around the-.church

without incorporating it as part of the library. The

second concept would be to wrap the building around and

incorporate the church as auditorium space for the library

making the new wing, church, and present library a more

complete civic center.

The advantages of the incorporation idea over just

wrapping around are tremendous. First, duplicat construc-

tion of auditorium space will not have to be made in the

new wing. Also, using the church could allow for broader




uses than any auditorium built in the library because it

could accommodate more people and be versatile enough to

allow for a small symphony, or theater in the round, or

a PTA meeting. Also, the inclusion of the church as an

active, viable civic building will strengthen its future

and reason its continued maintenance, otherwise it might

be torn down and a parking lot facing the blank wall of

the new wing would be built.

However, either idea would be preferable to the

original concept of tearing the church down. The advan-

tages of my proposals over the demolition of the church

and filling the entire block with the new wing is that,

instead of creating a monolithic facade along Rosalind

Avenue, the wrapping of the new wing and incorporation

with the church will provide the opportunity to add variety

to the streetscape by using the existing library, new

wing, and the church as separate visual elements along the

street; though in reality, they will all be a part of the

entire complex.

Though it will not be reflected in any great detail

in the drawings because the project is concerned with the

library wing alone, the rehabilitation of the church will

be a major premise for the feasibility of the design.

It is assumed from now on out that the church will be

developed into an auditorium which could serve as a theater/




concert hall with the lower levels being conference room

and museum display space. The church should work with

the library and serve it but it will not necessarily be a

part of the day-to-day operation though films and lectures

could be made there in connection with library activities.

The actual remodeling of the church will consist

of little other than redesigning the existing service core

at the rear of the building, which abuts the new wing, to

contain fire stairs which will connect the differing levels

of the two buildings and hold projection rooms, bathrooms,

and other service facilities necessary for the new func-

tions of the church building as a theater/auditorium.




ASTHETIC CONSIDERATIONS


Factors mentioned earlier have predetermined the

shape of the new wing. First is the L-shape which would

develop from leaving the church intact on the southeast

corner of an otherwise rectangular lot. Secondly, the

dimension limitations of the property, keeping the building

to a size of less than 210' wide, though if additional

width is necessary the building can expand over Wall Street

(since it will be closed) with little problem. On the

north side the building will not be as deep as the lot or

go all the way to Rosalind Avenue, because the Rosalind

Avenue elevation of the new wing should not become more

dominant than the church's Rosalind Avenue elevation. Nor

can the north elevation extend out so far as to totally

block the three large windows in the north elevation of

the church. This would destroy any light derived from

these windows and would ruin the effect of the church's

north elevation in general, which is quite decorative and

adds a great deal to the building and the streetscape.

This will reduce the size of the "L" in the plan to as

minimal as possible.

Also, the new wing will have to be stepped back

above the second floor from its east elevation, again to

avoi-d overpowering the east elevation of the church or block




its north side. This will reduce the impact these upper

floors would have on the church's dome, and the impact

of the new wing itself on the street. The upper floors

will recede and be almost invisible from the street thus

giving the new wing a low profile like the present build-

ing and make it appear smaller than it really is. This

stepping back will also help transfer the low mass of the

new wing to the greater bulk of the telephone company and

help hide the phone building from the street and the park.

Also, these floors are necessary to fulfill the space

requirements which will be set forth later in the program.

As I stated in my opening remarks, I must attempt

to harmonize my design not only with the OPL building,

but also, with the 1926 Classic Revival church. Both

buildings are strong architectural statements in them-

selves; however, they work well together, because the de-

signer of the OPL took the church into consideration in

his arrangement of the library's cornices and its overall

treatment which harmonized with the older building. There-

fore, the new wing cannot be completely free from the ar-

chitectural influences of its surroundings.

The original design concept proposed for the wing

was to match the existing library's architecture. This

would be a mistake, because the library and its form were

carefully evolved by the architect to meet the specific




requirements of a program which was quite different from

the program for the expansion, and would not apply to the

new wing in that the scale is much larger and the functions

more complex. Also, the library and church were both

derived from architectural vocabularies peculiar to their

designer and period. While one might borrow inspiration

or allow himself to be influenced by an existing building,

to copy a building's architecture would produce only a

mundane, watered-down version of the original which would

please neither the architect nore the client.

Thus the keyword in this aspect of my proposal is

harmony. To borrow such things as cornice heights, pro-

portions, colors or tones, and details from both build-

ings and combine them in another building, which will be

its own statement architecturally, is the challenge. The

new wing must be strong enough to stand on its own, but

anonymous enough to serve as a backdrop to the other struc-

tures.

In the areas nearest the library where the direct

interface of the two buildings is involved, the new wing

will have to copy architectural details of the library,

but the further from the library the less the building

should imitate and the more it should harmonize its Rosa-

lind Avenue elevation with that of the church. The pro-

portions and color can be picked up from the church. Since




it does not connect directly to the church on this side,

the library wing need not copy any architectural details

of the church, only relate. On the north elevation of

the new wing the building can become completely independent

of the previously mentioned architectural influences other

than respecting the interior floor heights and exterior

levels required for physical continuity. At this eleva-

tion the building can resemble a separate building which

would give the street a great deal of vitality, thus making

the street a more interesting place for the pedestrian

and encouraging people to walk around in the downtown area.




DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE BUILDING TYPE


The most important aspect of any library is the

security. First, there must be security in the checkout

system of books as to reduce to the minimum loss through

theft or carelessness. This demands that the building have

only one main public entrance, which should be centrally

located with little or no level change leading to it to

aid in accessibility for the handicapped. This will pre-

clude keeping the existing entrance to the library, though

it is well known to the public, because it would not be

centrally located to both wings, and using it in.conjunc-

tion with another entrance would double the staff and

equipment required for controlling the visitor flow. The

desk at the checkout should be located in the lobby/

entrance with an open view of the exits and next to the

circulation workroom where the books are processed back

to the shelves after being returned.

The security of the entire building should also

be considered by making the public areas as open as pos-

sible to the view of the staff with few bends and corners

so surveillance will be easy.

Storage space is the next most important considera-

tion for a library, poth storage for circulating books,

called the stacks, and for retired books and magazines.




The storage for retired volumes must be large and as far

from the public spaces as possible but close to the work

spaces and loading areas of the library. The stacks must

be in large open areas which can contain all of a particular

category of information. The stacks can be grouped together

with all the reading areas in one place or they can be

interspersed with reading areas and lounges all through.

The second arrangement puts the reader closer to the books

and creates a more vital and cozy library atmosphere,

however this system reduces visual control of the visitors

in the building.

There should be as few fixed partitions as possible

to insure easy expansion, especially in the workrooms. This

is presently a problem in the existing building because

the workrooms are encased with poured-in-place concrete

walls, which reduce the ability to expand them without

adding on temporary partitions which destroy the effect of

the interior architecture.

The categories and relationships oftdepartments and

literature is generally left up to the librarians, however

there are basic rules which should be remembered. First,

the young-adult section should never be totally separated

from the adult reading; rather it should be in an area ad-

jacent to or within the adult reading areas. On the other

hand, the children's library should be separated if the

staff is large enough to handle this arrangement.




The basic dimension module to consider during the

spacing of the structural elements is three feet. This

is the standard, smallest breakdown of shelving, which is

the most important piece of furniture in the library taking

up the majority of the space.

The work areas should be divided into different

categories depending on the job to be done, but all of

them should be closely related and accessible to each other

as much as possible.

Light in a library is very important, and the levels

may vary depending on the area in the building. The lowest

levels are for circulation of people, medium to high levels

for casual reading, and high levels for close study, the

stacks, and workrooms. Skylights should not be used since

the light they provide is seldom sufficient or of the right

quality for a library. Exterior light can be used as much

as possible from the windows, but in favor of energy conser-

vation the windows on the east and north would be the only

ones left open to the sun while the west and south should be

as protected as possible.

This may be the only way to reduce energy consumption

for the building which must be air-conditioned and heated

fully to provide a dry, fixed climate for the books and the

people using them.

Sound should be as muffled as possible. This will

preclude use of escalators for vertical circulation as they




are too noisy, and the finished on most of the wall, floor

and ceiling surfaces should be sound-absorbant, which the

walls in the present building are not. Loud and distracting

operations like copying machines and typing-should be iso-

lated into separate rooms, or corners away from the main

reading areas.

Meeting rooms should be grouped together and be

served by a common lobby. These rooms would have sound

control for privacy and the capability of total light con-

trol so film or slide presentations can be made. Also,

they need not be provided with views because the occupants

will be there for a purpose and should not be distracted

by outside activities. Since the rooms could be used beyond

library hours, the common lobby must have its own controlled

entrance.

The landscape surrounding the building should pro-

vide good looks with little maintenance. It should not be

so dense as to overpower the building, or hide it, or pro-

vide lurking places at night, especially in a downtown

area. The landscape should be able to withstand heavy use

by the public without showing signs of wear. If planting

is to be placed on the roofs it should be minimal and

require little maintenance, because of the weight and acces-

sible factors.

Parking should be closely related to the building.

The most direct access of the parking to the library will




usually dictate the entry location or vice versa. As

mentioned in earlier sections the parking for the library

will be a multistory garage to the southwest of the new

wing which will have its pedestrian and vehicular entrance

at the east end of the west half of Wall Street, directly

across from the new entrance to the library. This garage

will also service the Orange County Courthouse across

Magnolia Avenue and the downtown commercial district. Wall

Street will dead-end at this entrance providing access to

Magnolia, holding lanes and dropoff and pickup for library

patrons.

As this parking garage will tie down one side of

the proposed plaza it should work with the present Jaycee

Center to "liven" the space at the plaza level. This level

could contain a small cafe for coffee and doughnuts where

office workers in the courthouse could lounge on their

banks and the Jaycee Center could become a civic center for

senior citizens and daycare center for working women's child-

ren in the downtown area. All of these things would help

the plaza come alive with activity. The plaza itself could

contain library activities and functions which would generate

interest in not only the plaza but the library, and even

the entire downtown.




DEPARTMENTAL ORGANIZATION


With the addition of the new wing being separated

for the existing building by the proposed lobby space,

careful consideration must be made about which departments

and literature will go into the new wing and what will

remain in the existing building. The present library

will retain as many of the programs as it was specifically

designed for, and carry the overflow of others from the

new wing, and provide room for some new departments.

The basement will still contain the Children's

Department, but it will be expanded to take up the area

presently covered by the workroom. The equipment rooms

and auditorium will still function as they do now.

The first floor will be designated for the general

information and reference overflow from the new wing with

the new wing taking the bulk of the material. The second

floor of the present library will still retain the business

administrations through the glass wall dividing it from

the rest of the floor will be removed to allow for the ex-

pansion of the clerical area. In keeping wtih this general

administration usage, the present workrooms on this floor

and stack areas will contain the graphic arts department

data processing, network offices, adult community education

coordinator, typing, and copying rooms.




The roof presently contains the staff lounge. This

will be expanded to the north over the new lobby area.

Departments in the new building will be arranged

by floor according to what departments should be directly

accessible to each other. The basement will not have a

direct connection to the present basement. The bulk of the

retired book storage and mechanical equipment will be

located on this floor.

The first floor will be the most visible and acces-

sible and the largest, thus it should contain the largest

category of reading material, the general information and

reference. Also, on this floor will be the lobby, checkout,

book return, and workrooms. The receiving area and dock

will be on the northwest side of this floor. Around this

receiving area will be the extension division, technical

services, and materials office, all of which deal with

the bulk of receiving and dispersal of books to and from

the library.

The second floor will have the Business, Science

and Technology and the Audio/Visual departments with the

television studio next to the audio-visual section. The

audio-visual and studios should especially be on this

floor so they can be used by the administration on the

same floor level in the existing building. Also this loca-

tion would be central to the entire building and other




departments, thus they would be able to use the audio-

visual equipment and the studios. The microfilm and dark-

room should also be nearby to relate to the audio-visual

section and the studios as well as the graphic arts de-

partment in the old wing.

The third floor will contain fine arts with a sec-

tion set aside for the young adults. This area will con-

tain posters for loan and music listening areas. Also,

local history and geneology will be on this floor with the

rare book collection being a secure area within this de-

partment. This might be placed too close to the young

adults in that the noise level might bother the scholars

perusing the documents in the history collection; however,

the two could be separated by distance or perhaps a wall

to define the limits of each department and prevent one

from disturbing the other. The local history is best

suited for the third floor in that it is not heavily used,

and the people who do use it are there for long periods

thus it can be somewhat isolated from the other floors and

activities.

The fourth floor is for more storage and future

expansion. Upon completion of the new wing, there will be

no more room for a horizontal expansion of the library

without spreading to separate buildings on adjacent sites,

which would cause a disunification of the information and




confusion as to where to go on the part of the library

patrons. Therefore, all future expansion will have to

be vertical. This is acceptable by folloiwng the setbacks

proposed and "piling" the building (in effect) against the

telephone company building. This will allow for a larger

building without ruining the low scale of the new wing.

The fourth floor need not be built during the initial con-

struction, but should be planned for in the initial design

proposals. It could be staged later with the plans and

elevations already prepared so no delay would be made when

construction started. The roof area should have a section

for more mechanical rooms which would not be in the way of

future vertical expansion.

Other minor storage areas, maintenance rooms, public

restrooms, and auxiliary support functions will be placed

throughout the building as to the most convenient locations

Workrooms will be located on the first, second and third

floors as needed and connected by their own elevators and

stairs to provide vertical access without disturbing the

public areas. This will reduce the public awareness of

the inner workings of the library.

The proposed meeting rooms and auditorium will be in

the church, which will eventually be incorporated with the

library. This use by the library does not exclude the use

of the building as a church, however, since the present




congregation of the church only uses the building on Sun-

days and early weekday mornings, the two functions could

be carried on simultaneously with little or no conflict.




ALTERATIONS TO THE PRESENT LIBRARY


The present building is divided into spaces by thick

concrete walls thus precluding any major modification ex-

pansion of them. The new uses put into these spaces will

have to fit into the existing area. However, in several

areas changes must be made. These all involve glass walls

which should be easy to alter. The major exterior changes

will come on the east elevation at the present entrance

to the library and on the west where the new wing will con-

nect to the present building.

The ramp up to the entrance will be taken off and

replaced with a terrace which will stretch almost the entire

length of the original ramp. This will keep people from

thinking the entrance would be in its present location

after it was moved. The initial effect of this alteration

will be a temporary confusion, but, since their new parking

garage will face onto the new plaza and entry, many library

visitors will use this entrance and the confusion will last

for only a short time. Also, there will still be an en-

trance on Rosalind Avenue and the people who come from

the east will only have to go a little north of the present

entrance to get inside the building from Rosalind.

The next major exterior alteration will be the re-

moval of a section of the central glass wall on the north




elevation so the lobby can connect the two wings at this

point. Since this area has no structural elements and

the concrete in other areas would be difficult to breach,

this is the only area the two buildings could connect

without great difficulty or damaging the architecture of

either the library or the church. The entire wall should

not be removed because this would move the new lobby for-

ward to too great an extent on the south elevation of the

church and the north elevation of the library, and would

close off the main service entry to the church.

The last alteration to be discussed here is an

interior one --the removal of the glass partitions be-

tween the present business office and the public area.

Since the whole floor will become a business area, it will

not be necessary and its partial or total removal will

allow for easy expansion of the secretarial and clerical

area, which would combine with other operational functions

of the library administration. However, since the de-

tailing of this wall is quite handsome and could be easily

and accurately copied, the structural elements and details

should be saved and reused elsewhere, and expanded if neces-

sary.




STRUCTURAL CONSIDERATIONS


The present structural system of a concrete waffle

slab and columns seems to function very well. The draw-

backs are that the system is really more for a small build-

ing like the present library in that it does not allow

for large spans of the structural members, the largest

being 39'. The architect used this to his advantage by

integrating the structural system with the architecture

of the building thus making it fairly innocuous, but he

also does not-have any spans over 39'. Though it does not

work for very long spans and other systems are more suited

for buildings on the scale of the new wing, the present

system does offer consolations in that it is a very solid

system with a great compressive strength and capable of

bearing great dead loads, like books. Also, concrete is

very plastic and can be shaped into any form; it will not

require heavy maintenance and it is fireproof.

Therefore, I have decided to continue the present

structural system especially since the first three floor

levels must match the present levels. This will enable me

to match the color of the existing building and change

colors on the north and east elevations to blend with the

church. However, I shall adapt a fairly regular 39' grid

for the interior columnar spacing with load-bearing exterior




walls. The interior walls will be of concrete block with

a rough plaster finish to imitate concrete. These walls

will be able to be breached in the future when expansion

of the enclosed spaces is required.




CODES


The building shall meet all code requirements as

set forth in the Southern Standard Building Codes under

the sections applying to the occupancy classification in

Sec. 404. This section states that the classification

for a public library is Assembly and the construction is

of Type I. Both of these classifications are the easiest

to deal with in terms of the codes.

The sub-classification of the building is large

occupancy with a nonworking stage. Specific restrictions

for this classification are in Sec. 404.6--Interior Finishes,

Sec. 404.8--Supplementary Lighting System, and Sec. 404.9--

Nonworking State. The new wing will not require sprinklering

because enough exits will be provided within the area.

Specific restrictions for the fire exists under

Chapter XI are listed as follows:

1103.2(b): There shall be at least four

exit ways

1104.7(b): Above 75' at least one smokeproof

exit is required

1105.1: 50 square feet net per person

occupancy

1106(c): The walls must have a two-hour

fire resistance




The rest of Chapter XI merely provides standards for fire

exits, which will all be complied with and need not be

set forth here.

In Chapter XII the structural requirements for the

building are set forth. The live load in stack areas is

125 lbs/square foot and 60 lbs/square foot in reading areas.

This concludes all specific code requirements which need

to be pointed out in this section.




SPACE ALLOCATION REQUIREMENTS


Circulation Control/Entry

Circulation Work Space

General Information and Reference

Extension Division

Technical Services

Materials Office

Receiving Dock

Receiving Area, Sorting

Children's Department

Community Relations

Meeting Rooms

Storage

Business Science and Technology

Audio-Visual

T.V. Studio

Microfilming, Darkroom

Fine Arts

Local History

Rare Book Room

Young Adults

Administration,

Staff Facilities


Present
NSF

1,147

1,320

8,476

1,054

1,466

329

264

311

3,026

335

3,058

1,754

2,834

1,389

0

0

2,486

1,767

0

844

1,418

1,634


Proposed
NSF

2,480

2,120

36,382

4,220

4,225

1,000

600

1,210

10,126

635

12,050

30,300

19,770

6,000

2,800

400

15,200

7,660

1,200

4,600

2,915

2,900







Network Offices

Copy Machines

Data Processing

Adult Community Education Coordinator

Typing Rooms

First Aid Room-

Graphic Arts

Storage

Custodial

Equipment Rooms

Toilets


Present
NSF

0

80

0

0

0

0

676

620

400

3,300

535

37,553


Proposed
NSF

300

200

60'0

300

200

150

1,450

2,900

800

8,600

1,500

185,793





37,553 185,793


DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION


Present Building
(NSF)


Circulation/Entry

Circulation Workroom

General Information and
Reference

Extension Division

Technical Services

Materials Office

Receiving Dock

Receiving Area

Children's Department

Community Relations

Meeting Rooms

Books Storage

Business, Science and
Technology

Audio-Visual

Television Studios

Darkroom and Microfilm

Fine Arts

Rare Book Room

Young Adult


New Wing
(NSF)

2,480

2,120


24,888

4,220

4,225

1,000

600

1,210



635



30,300


19,770

6,000

2,800

400

7,660

1,200

466


11,494












10,126



3,058


148,240




Present Building
(NSF)

2,915

2,900

300

80

600

300


200



1,450

620

400

3,300

535

37,278


New Wing
(NSF)


Administration

Staff

Network Offices

Copy Machines

Data Processing

Adult Community/Ed. Co-
ordinator

Typing Room

First Aid Room

Graphic Arts

Storage

Maintenance

Equipment

Toilets


120








150



2,280

400

5,300

965

123,325





CIRCULATION CONTROL/ENTRANCE


*Extremely important. First
impression of the service,
must have adequate space
but remain integral to
library

*Should seriously consider
automatic sliding doors
for space and traffic
considerations

*Air-lock incorporated in
order to conserve heat
and air-conditioning

*Entry and Exit. Should flow
easily with proper considera-
tion for peak areas and
queing space

*Materials control system
will be present and control
must be reasonable during
exiting process

*Book-retur function must
provide easy disposition of
returned books


Space
Allocation

Entry

Check-out

Book return

Registration


Present Proposed


1,500


600


180


144

1,147


180

2,480


*Registration will be
dated at a 2-3 place
service type desk or


accommo-
public
counter


*2-4 entry lanes

*In person circulation will
probably be at rate of
750,000-1,000,000. (Unsup-
ported) traffic will be
300+ people/day

*Start from here, public
service areas should have
best access from circulation/
entry area

*Must have access for the
handicapped





CIRCULATION WORK SPACE


*The clerical, procedural
operations of overdues
and registration

*Maximum staff utliization
suggests that the area be
immediately adjacent to
circulation lobby as
personnel are interchangeable

*Switchboard needs to be in
area for the same reason,
maximum staff utilization even
for operating schedule

*Area as in all supervisor's
offices, the office should
permit private conversation
for supervisory effectiveness

*Sorting area--there are some
supervisory proven utilization
advantages to having this close
to circulation, but space re-
quirements may outweigh that.
Obviously there must be direct
access to return area of
circulation


Space
Allocation

Supervisory,
Office

Overdue process

Switchboard


Work space

Sorting area


Present Proposed


160

100


900

1,320


1,500

2,120





GENERAL INFORMATION AND REFERENCE


*GIR is the broadest subject
area. Reference department ac-
commodates more informational/
directorial questions than any
other department

*Handles questions received both
by phone and in person

*Complete cross section of users

*Desk should be directly
visible from main entry

*Equal access to shelving from
service desk

*Immediate access to Reference
shelving from service desk

*General visual control over
stacks and lounge area

*Special relationships:
*Immediately adjacent to main
entry and circulation department
*In close proximity to other
public service reference de-
partments: FA, BST, LH, AV
*Direct access to AV

*Staff--Superv.--Libns.--Clerks
1973 1 8 2
1990 1 12 4


Space
Allocation

Service desk

Reader seating

Lounge seating

Shelving, books

Other, vertical
files

Newspapers

Periodical display

Reference

Paperbacks

Maps/Atlases

Card Catalog

Index tables

Display

Workspace, staff

Office, sup.

Special project
space


Present


2,676


3,244


Proposed


6,600

1,500

12,000


120

250


2,000


150

900


150


150

36,382


8,476





EXTENSION DIVISION


*Increasingly important
role in overall operations.
Interlibrary loan, books by
mail and Talking books
are major operations and
require adequate space and
location to minimize cost

*Supervisor and support for
all branches and bookmobiles

*Direct involvement with most
"Extension" type services

*Easy close access to loading
dock-bookmobile materials
branch delivery
shut-in librarian
books by mail (heavy quantity)
Talking books by mail (heavy
quantity)

*Proximity to acquisitions de-
partment. Shelf list for ILL
finding locations of materials.
Shelf list for "quick catalogue"
of gifts and transfer records


Space
Allocation

Office head

Secretary

Clerk, sec. pool

Office, Sup.

Bookmobiles

Branch, joint
reserves

Books by mail

Talking books

Interlibrary Loan

Special projects


Present


Proposed


120


480


140


1,200


800

400


80

1,054


120

4,220





TECHNICAL SERVICES


*Technical services. Incor-
porates all of the behind-
the-scenes preparation of
books (ordering, acquisi-
tion, cataloging, receiving,
physical preparation)

*These space requirements
assume that a significant
proportion of the process-
ing needs (printing, cata-
loging, collating, typing,
etc.) will be accommodated
by outside contract)

*Easy direct access from
receiving desk constant
influx of heavy boxes of
books

*Comparatively the Extension
quantity (Talking books and
books by mail) coming and go-
ing each day to and from load-
ing dock is and will be greater
than technical processes

*Shelf list is a tool used by
numerous other functions
within the library and so
must be reasonably accessible
by corridors and vertical
transportation


Space
Allocation

Office, Sup.

Order functions

Cataloging

Periodicals

Processing

Shelving

In-process
holdings

Shelf list


Mending

Work space,
general


Present


Proposed


1,500


1,446


500

4,225





MATERIALS OFFICE


*Staff function which (1)
advises Director on matters
concerning library resources,
(2) handles advance book plans
and coordinates book acquisi-
tion process as it involves
outside lists, (3) performs
troubleshooting role when
assigned in various areas of
materials handling or service

*Fairly constant relationship to
technical services and so should
be located in immediate proximity

*This office should also handle
gifts


Space
Allocation

Coordinator

Workspace

Books review
table space

Shelving


Present


Proposed


150

200


134


300

1,000





RECEIVING DOCK


*Remarkable amount of
activity takes place here

*3-4 trucks simultaneous
tailgate access

*Covered loading area

*Variable heights or ad-
justable dock

*Ample maneuvering space

*Receiving/sorting/mail
room

*Extension

*Acquisitions

*Vertical, lateral trans-
portation access


Space
Allocation

Receiving dock


Present

264


Proposed

600





RECEIVING AREA, SORTING, MAIL


*Must be ample room to
accommodate in an orderly
fashion all the routine
delivery and mail plus
shipments of materials and
goods into the library


Space
Allocation

Receiving
work area

Sorting area
delivery

Holding area,
receiving and
delivery

Mail station

Storage containers


Present Proposed


84 300


300


400

150


60

1,210





CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT


*Central service desk

*Service desk.must have
visual control of entire
area

*Collection here backs up
whole system

*Easy access by children

*Visual control of all
access

*No service relationships to
other departments except
audio-visual

*Access should be direct from
circulation control area so
juvenile routes don't conflict
with other functions

*Restrooms designed exclusively
for kids

*Good access to parking-loading
area as program necessitates
daily out-of-building program
activities that require
equipment

*Staff--Superv.--Libns.--Clerks
1973 1 5 1
1 8 2


Space
Allocation

Service desk


Tables

Lounge


Shelving


Present Proposed


912


1,500


600


1,053


Vertical files

Periodicals
display

Reference

Paperbacks

Maps, atlases

Card catalog

Display

Presentations

Work space, staff

Office, supervisor


6,000


400


300


800


3,026


150

10,126





COMMUNITY RELATIONS


*Public/community relations
function plus scheduling
and controlling public
meeting rooms. With addi-
tional facilities staff will
have to be present all
open hours to accommodate
users/groups

*Supervisor of meeting rooms
requires direct access and
so should be in area of
meeting rooms, assuming meet-
ing rooms are generally
together


Space
Allocation

Coordinator

Clerk/steno

Fol. materials

Handout storage

Reception seating


Present Proposed


150


100


50


50

635


*Should be good public access
to community relations as
users will regularly be di-
rected there for program
assistance of matters relating
to public relations

*Staff--Superv.--Clerk/steno--Clerks
1973 1 1 -
1990 1 1 2





MEETING ROOMS


*A generally accepted'
plus for the Library's
ability to give public
service is the meeting
rooms. The frequent
inability to schedule
because of conflicts
suggests a real need.
The library itself is often
stymied by prior commit-
ments to the limited space

*-Some of the space could be
made more versatile by
movable soundproof parti-
tions. It is assumed that
use of miscellaneous spaces
would be.optimized by group-
ing most of the meeting
spaces. These are more than
empty rooms requiring sound
systems, variable lighting,
antennae and video cables
and jacks, screens, chalk
boards, etc.

*Should be generally together

*Should have common lobby
spaces

*Should have independent
exit/entry separate from Cir-
culation lobby but one which
would have optional use (op-
tional to library, not patron)

*Should have direct access from
Circulation/Lobby without noise
incursion upon Public Service/
Reference departments

*Should have visual control
of entry areas of all rooms

*Must have equal access by all
(blind, wheel-chair, etc.)


Space
Allocation

Auditorium

Multipurpose


Present


2,080


Conference room


Lobby space
Lobby space


Toilets

Kitchen

Backstage

Storage


Projection booths


3,058


Proposed


3,000

2,050


900

900

900

300


1,200


600

200

450


1,000

200

12,050





STORAGE, BOOKS, AND PERIODICALS


*Storage area which should
have reasonable access from
public service desk

*Long term, however, will see
them serviced by non-public
service staff

*Maximum storage capability
(maximum height, minimum
aisles)

*No specific requirements

*Reasonable near vertical
transportation

*Initially could be left
with shelving partially
installed to use space
differently (main shelving
will accommodate most every-
thing for some time)


Space
Allocation

Storage, books

Storage, periodi-
cals


Present Proposed


904


850

1,754


15,000


15,300

30,300





BUSINESS, SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY


*Principally serious adult
users (proportionally more
men than other departments)

*Handles information and
reference questions both by
phone and in person, princi-
pally by serious adult users

*Functional relationships:
*Direct access to audio-visual
*In close proximity to other
public service departments
*Service desk clearly visible
from stairs and elevator
access
*Visual control regulated
from service desk
*Immediate access to card
catalogue and reference
shelving from service desk

*Staff--Superv.--Libns--Clerks
1973 1 4 1
1990 1 7 3


Space
Allocation

Service desk


Seating

Shelving


Vertical files

Periodical dis-
play, ref.

Paperbacks

Maps/atlases

Index tables

Card catalogue

Display

Work space, staff

Office, sup.

Special projects


Present


800

1,092


Proposed

150

4,050

12,000


1,600


150

19,770


2,834





AUDIO-VISUAL


*Service, maintain and dis-
pense equipment: video,
recorders, players, projectors

*Service and maintain micro-
film collection and equipment

*Service and maintain selected
resources based upon format:
records, film strips, slides,
films--16mm, 8mm

*Wet Carrell grouping and con-
trol to feed programming to
individuals with audio-visual
priority of formats

*Central to all public service
departments (if there is a
primary orientation, it is to
Fine Arts)

*Easy physical access to meeting
room area

*Close proximity to video and
audio studio

*Staff--Superv.-Libns.--Clerks
1973 1/3 3
1990 1 Technician-1 5


Space
Allocation

Service desk

Vertical files


Microfilm

Records, film-
strips

Audio-visual car-
rells and control

Equipment for
microfilm

Card catalog

Display

Workspace, staff

Office, superv.

Preview room


Present Proposed


160


230


2,620


1,000


468


150

200

6,000


1,389





TELEVISION STUDIO


*Not a full-production type
studio. There will continue
to be production facilities
in the community with better
economics for producing
quality programs

*Will involve some reference
work with video

*Origination of programs via
cable at Library. From tape
or film connection

*Origination of programs
via cable to branch libraries

*Audio studio for creating
original tapes and dubbing
in audio and video work

*Library will be circulating
audio tapes as freely as we
now circulate records

*Outside wall (assumption of
ease of technical adjustments)

*Close to audio-visual area.
There will be many trade-offs of
equipment and personnel (con-
ceivably these functions will be
under a single supervisor)

*Antennae and/or cable feeds
must be considered throughout
building


Space
Allocation

Studio, tv

Studio, audio

Work space

Tape storage

Equipment stor-
age/repair


Present Proposed


1,500


250

2,800





MICROFILMING, DARKROOM


*A dual-purpose room which is
used (internally) for:
1. Copying records which
must be saved
2. Copying library materials
which are no longer
available commercially
3. Copying materials and
discarding originals to
conserve space
4. Photographic darkroom for
internal use (graphic arts,
community relations, pro-
gram documentation, etc.)

*No specific requirement

*No public service access
necessary

*Most logical function or rela-
tionship will be with graphic
arts and/or audio visual depart-
ment


Space
Allocation

Microfilming
darkroom


Present


Proposed


400




FINE ARTS


*Reference service: visual
control of stacks and reading
space from service desk

*Reference service by phone and
in person

*Spatial relationships
*Close proximity to other
public service departments
*Service desk clearly visible
from stairs and elevator
*Visual control of stacks and
reading area from service to
desk
*Service desk access to card
catalogue and reference

*Staff--Superv--Libns.--Clerks
1973 2/3 2 1
1990 2/3 4 2


Space
Allocation

Service desk

Table carrels

Lounge

Shelving

Periodical dis-
play

Paperbacks

Maps/atlases

Index tables

Card Catalog


Display


Workspace, staff

Office, Sup.

Special projects


2,486


Present


Proposed


3,250


600


8,000


2,800


600


150

150

15,200





LOCAL HISTORY


*Local history and geneology
users are generally mature
adults and are regular
visitors or stay for extended
periods (several hours at a
time)

*Out of main traffic

*Easy elevator access

*Special area needed for
Florida collection (possibly
the Rare Book Room)

*Staff--Superv.--Libns.--Clerks
1973 1 2 1
1990 1 3 2


Space
Allocation Present

Service desk 80

Tables and car-
rells 544

Lounge --

Shelving 484

Vertical files 90

Periodicals,
reference 30

Microfilm 60

Maps/atlases 24

Microfilm equip-
ment 44

Card catalog 70

Display 8

Workspace, staff 325

Office, Supervisor --

1,767


Proposed

80


1,500

300

4,000

200


400

150

30


100

70

30

500

150

7,660





RARE BOOK ROOM


*The Library probably will not
acquire and maintaiA a rare
book collection in the normal
sense (searching, bidding,
buying to create a valuable col-
lection for its own sake).
But would render access to the
community interest in generic
books to the degree that gifts
and unusual items would have a
place for display, storage and
stimulation of the idea that
books are valuable records of
society

*No specific requirement

*Local history would get depart-
mental location, other things
being equal

*Could contain the Florida col-
lection and should be related
to the local history department


Space
Allocation


Present Proposed


Rare book room


1,200




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