• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Frontispiece
 Introduction
 Main
 Appendix
 Bibliography
 Plates














Title: A Survey of selected North Central Florida railroad architecture
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100883/00001
 Material Information
Title: A Survey of selected North Central Florida railroad architecture
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: Bessette, Ted
Publisher: Ted Bessette and David E. Ferro
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Copyright Date: 1975
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100883
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Introduction
        Page 4
    Main
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
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        Page 46
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        Page 53
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        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Appendix
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
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        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
    Bibliography
        Page 112
    Plates
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
Full Text










A SURVEY OF SELECTED NORTH CENTRAL

FLORIDA RAILROAD ARCHITECTURE


















PREPARED BY:
Ted Bessette
D. E. Ferro


University of Florida
Fall 1975


AE 581
























Central and Peninsular Railroad. Ocala, located at the intersection of two
of the greatest railway systems in the South, (the Plant System and the Flor-
ida Central and Peninsular System), grew quickly into a great commercial and
industrial metropolis, the largest city in Central peninsular Florida.

Suwannee County has always been a farming county, formed in December 1858,
as part of the original East Florida Territory. A few years proceeding the
Civil War, began considerable growth as builders moved in to cut timber and
obtain turpentine and rosin. Suwannee Springs began to attract considerable
tourist attraction and a hotel was built to serve tourists needs.

Two railroads were built to Perry during the 1880's, the Suwannee and San
Pedro (later the Florida Railroad), and the Live Oak, Perry and Gulf by the
Dowling Bark Lumber Company, both the Florida Central and Peninsular Rail-
road (later the S.A.L.) and the Savannah, Florida, and Western Railroad (the
Plant System and later, the A.C.L.).

The trees were sapped steadily until the timber and turpentine programs played
out and growth slowed. In 1925, the town of Live Oak became known as a tobacco
market and soon established one of the largest flue-cured tobacco markets in
Florida.Today, Suwannee County is one of the principle counties in Florida,
for producing cotton.













INTRODUCTION






This study is of railroad depot structures in the North-Central Florida area,

and is primarily concerned with representative styles of pre-1940 railroad

architecture. It concentrates on an area within 75 miles of Gainesville, and

on structures which have not undergone extensive investigation prior to this

survey. There are five such stations within this radius which furnish a fair

cross-section of the architecture of area depots. All of these structures are

located along either the main North-South route or main East-West route of the

former Seaboard Air Line Railroad.


The stations on the North-South route are:

Lawtey (1932), and Ocala (1917).

The stations on the East-West route are:

Macclenny (1924), Glen St. Mary (1915),
and Live Oak (1909).


The report includes prints of original contract documents of three of the

structures (Macclenny, Ocala, and Live Oak). Historical information was

collected from local libraries. Building descriptions and supplemental mater-

ial were obtained from the Interstate Commerce Commission and Seaboard Coast

Line Railroad Company records.












THE SIGNIFICANCE OF RAILROAD DEVELOPMENT IN NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA


Many of the early railroads that later became part of the S.A.L. and A.C.L.
were strictly community or sectional enterprises, built by local capital,
augmented in some cases by state funds, and officered and run by local peo-
ple. From the outset, they were essential parts of the economic life of
their respective communities.

In the events of the early history of Baker County, the completion of the
Florida Atlantic and Gulf Central Railroad (incorporated in 1851), affected
more individuals and their way of life, than any other singular event. Tracks
reached Macclenny, in this agricultural area, which once produced vast quanti-
ties of long staple sea cotton, during August 1858, with construction proceeding
at the rate of two miles per month. The Line was purchased by the Florida
Central Railroad Company in 1868, following the devastation of the Civil War,
and was sold at public auction for $395,000 in 1886 to the Florida Central and
Western Railroad Company. The line was taken over by the Florida Central and
Peninsular Railroad Company in 1889 and in 1903, it became part of the Seaboard
Air Line Railroad system. Macclenny became noted for its timber, naval stores,
cigar factory, mills, lumber, and farming largely due to its proximity to Jack-
sonville and the efficient rail service it experienced.

After the Civil War, a number of railroads in the Alabama, Florida and Georgia
area, having suffered a long period of extreme depression, were brought together
through the efforts of Henry B. Plant under the name of the Savannah, Florida
and Western Railway Company, otherwise known as the "Plant System". In 1887,
this forerunner of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, established the "Florida
Special", the first de luxe tourist train in the world. In 1902, the "Plant
System" was acquired by the A.C.L. Railroad Company. This purchase gave the
A.C.L. substantially the form it took until its consolidation with the Sea-
board Air Line Railroad Company in 1967, which produced the Seaboard Coast
Line Railroad. The line between Ocala and Gainesville serving a busy agri-
cultural community, was originally a part of the narrow-gauged Florida Southern
Railroad Company, which became part of the Plant System and in 1902, became a
part of the A.C.L. system.

McIntosh, on this line was, for a time, the largest vegetable shipping point
in Florida.

Marion County and Ocala, located at the geographical center of the state, and
near the tourist attraction of Silver Springs, began to grow rapidly when the
railroad lines came. In 1879, trains were moving over wooden rails from Ocala
to Silver Springs. The first main rail line entered Ocala in June, 1881, and
the first station was located immediately west of the present grade crossing
on north Magnolia Street. A merger of several lines in 1885 produced the
Florida Railroad and Navigation Company, which, in 1889, became the Florida



























































G,,V L OF



Ml BIs r C


Map of the Florida Central & Peninsular RR as of 1895.




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*~-c~t MAMT ORNE LAEGOESeIIH


n. n, ur~~,I A. rpILr~ m
P-~~,aalldedr o mepar Manager !118'1 goo?
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Trafe Manager,- O-n I Pae'r Ag?, 1 Genl li
WALTER G. COLEMAN. OGe'l rraueInjAeni "
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LIVE OAK, FLORIDA

Ohio Street and North East Conner Street
Live Oak, Suwannee County, Florida


LIVE


W 1wo -


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I


The Live Oak Station was constructed in 1909, jointly by the Seaboard Air Line
Railroad and the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Companies. The tile-roofed type
VII passenger station is of brick construction and was constructed and furnished
at a cost of $13,129.00. In 1919, the original toilet facilities and wood floor
were replaced by modern facilities and a concrete floor. In 1926, a flower garden
and plant screening was added. The S.A.L. purchased the A.C.L.'s half interest
in the passenger station in 1947, and in 1959, the passenger station was converted
to a combination passenger/freight station. In 1971, the station became part of
the Amtrak system. The structure was originally designed by the S.A.L. Office of
the Chief Engineer at Portsmouth, Va., in August, 1907.

A type IV frame freight station, originally constructed in 1893, was retired and
demolished in 1975.


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LIVE OAK S.A.L./A.C.L. Combination Passenger/Freight station (1909) South elevation (fold-out)


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LIVE OAK, FLORIDA


Ohio Street and Haynes Avenue
Live Oak, Suwannee County, Florida


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A large brick Atlantic Coast Line Freight station stands partially abandoned
to the north of the existing Live Oak Passenger/Freight station. Thus far,
we have not been able to determine the date of construction of this structure.

HAINES AVE.


A.C.L. FREIGHT STATION I



- I l-A i i a I I I Ai A A I1 1 ,, I I Atl a ,I .


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~EMAISSENGER STATION





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GLEN ST. MARY, FLORIDA


Glen Avenue
Glen St. Mary, Baker County,


Florida


The Glen St. Mary's station was constructed in 1915 by the Seaboard Air Line
Railroad Company. The type IV combination passenger and freight station was
of the frame construction, with a galvanized shingle roof, and was constructed
and furnished at a cost of $2,723.00. Elevated on brick and wood piers, the stat-
ion was irregularly shaped on its passenger end and 21' x 34.5' x 15.5' high on
its freight end. In 1926, double toilets (4' x 8' x 7' high) and a fenced garden
were added. The station was retired and salvaged in November 1975.

























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detail of brick pier and timber framing




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detail of toilet facilities


__












THE BAKER COUNTY PRESS, Thursday, November 27, 1975, Page Four


















go









I
















BROKEN GLASS AND PIECES OF THE ROOF On the loading dock
are part of this scene through the stationmaster's window of the old
Glen St. Mary depot. The 75 year old structure is being torn down
this week and salvage wood hauled to the Joe Crow farm where it
will be used to build a storage house there. The railroad let bids on
raizing of the old station recently. Two years ago the Seaboard
Coastline authorized destruction of a similar building in Sanderson.
Neither has been used in recent years.















OCALA, FLORIDA

531 North East First Avenue
Ocala, Marion County, Florida


The Ocala Station was constructed in 1917, jointly by the Seaboard Air Line Rail-
road and the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Companies. The "Special" passenger
station (designed ny the S.A.L. Office of Engineering and Building in Norfolk, Va.)
was constructed of brick with an asphalt shingle roof at a cost of $20,203. In
1927, planting was added on the station grounds and in 1947, a 1200' passenger
landing of asphalt and concrete was added. In 1949, two 7' x 10' concrete block
waiting booths were constructed north of the passenger station. The station still
is in service and became part of the Amtrak system in 1971.

































OCALA, S.A.L./A.C.L. Passenger station (1917) general view from the North-east



















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OCALA, S.C.L./A.C.L. Passenger station (1917) detail of passenger platform canopy structure


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OCALA, S.A.L./A.C.L. Passenger station (1917)
waiting room


- detail of fireplace in white


























































OCALA, S.A.L./A.C.L. Passenger station (1917) detail of fireplace in colored
waiting room (now baggage room)










OCALA, FLORIDA

531 North East First Avenue
Ocala, Marion County, Florida


"17 ^ Z-Wi

iT


The old railway express building at Ocala was constructed in 1917, by the Sea-
board Air LineRailroad at a cost of $4,654.00, and is similar in materials and
detail to the passenger station. The building is currently being leased to the
Ocala Cab Company.


LAUNDROMAT


A.C.L. & S.A.L.
PASSENGER STATION



-I


EXPRESS
BUILDING


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NORTH
















































































































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OCALA, S.A.L. Railway express building (1917) west elevation


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OCALA, FLORIDA

North East First Avenue
Ocala, Marion County, Florida


Another building adjacent to the passenger station is this building which current-
ly houses a laundromat. It is similar in detail and materials to the other two
structures on the site. We have been able to fine no record of its construction,
although according to a local man, we learned that this building was once a rail-
road cafeteria.


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OCALA, LAUNDER-IT LAUNDROMAT (


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A.C.L. Depot, in the long ago. On the track is a once familiar
sight-the two-car train known as the "Dunnellon Short", or
"Sunny Jim." View from corner of Broadway and Osceola St.












S.A.L. Depot. Undated other than by the fringed topped
"hacks" and conveyances which gathered at train time. Site.
of today's Union Station.

OCALA















CENTRAL FLORIDA REGIONAL LIBRARY, 8CALA


OCALI COUNTRY

Kingdom of the Sun
A History of Marion County, Florida



Part One by
ELOISE ROBINSON OTT

Part Two by
LOUIS HICKMAN CHAZAL

4c.- 8s


Emblem designed by artist Robert Camp for Marion County
historical markers. Symbolizing an ancient tradition, a kneel-
ing Indian offers gifts of the soil to the sun. Adapted by
Conrad Straub for the jacket of this book.



















RAILROAD BOOM
Ocala and Marion County began to grow rapidly when
the rail lines came.
Henry W. Long of Martel, E. J. Harris and other citi-
zens had organized a company in 1878 to build the Silver
Springs, Ocala and Gulf Railroad, under supervision of
Samuel Agnew, from the Springs to the town.
Scantlings were used as rails. John F. Dunn, of Ocala,
was sent to Jacksonville to purchase a locomotive, "The
Pioneer" and by the end of 1879, trains were moving over
the newly laid wooden track. All went well except that the
small engine set the track on fire now and again.
But the short line was unprofitable and was leased to
Agnew for a tramway. On it, flat cars pulled by mules were
used until the Peninsula Railroad was in operation with a
branch serving Silver Springs. Agnew transported goods
for his large mercantile business from the river landing
to his warehouse in Ocala, and there distributed them lo-
cally and by wagons to the central part of the State.
Before the War, the Florida Railroad had been built
from Fernandina to Cedar Key on the West Coast. This
cross-state road's name was changed in 1872 to the Atlantic,
Gulf and West India Transit Company. Four years later,
construction was begun on a connecting line from Waldo
to Ocala.
Bishop, Hoyt and Company, and James A. Harris,
owner of citrus properties and packing houses on the south
side of Orange Lake, cleared the right-of-way, and prepared
the grade between Hawthorne and Citra. From Citra to
Ocala the road bed was graded by E. W. Agnew (son of
Samuel Agnew) who laid crossties and rails to the county
seat by April 1881. Trains operated daily to a point north-
east of town, from which passengers, baggage and freight,
were conveyed the remaining few miles to Ocala in wagons.
By the middle of May, freight from New York, shipped
to Fernandina, was delivered in Ocala within five days.
Several weeks later the rails had all been laid, and a
depot built immediately west of the present grade crossing
on North Magnolia Street. The railroad entered Ocala. With

















a big picnic, and a ball, completion of the line was cele-
brated on June 3. To meet the first train, men of the town
turned out in their holiday derbies and stove-pipe hats,
frock coats or Prince Alberts. The women wore their best
summer bonnets, bustles, pongees, or cashmeres.
Garlands were hung on the locomotive, and the Ocala
Band played aboard one of the flat cars. What did it mat-
ter if this was but a worktrain? There was great excitement
and predictions for future prosperity to be brought by the
railroad to Marion County.
"Ocala is in an ecstasy of delight Ocala is whirling
along on the crest of a tidal wave boom," proclaimed the
Banner.
Ocala was the terminus of the rail line only until Tropi-
cal Florida Railroad Company constructed the line south-
ward to Wildwood, in the summer of the following year.
A company in which General John B. Gordon of Con-
federate Army fame and a distinguished Southern orator,
was a prime mover, proposed to build a railroad to connect
Ocala and Tampa.
Several projected lines merged in 1885 and became part
of the Florida Railroad and Navigation Company, which
boasted of its "Elegant Monarch Sleeping and Palace Day
Cars." Four years afterwards, this became the Florida
Central and Peninsular Railroad, and by 1902, as was a
part of the Seaboard Air Line Railway system.
Meanwhile a narrow gauge transportation line, the
Florida Southern Railroad, was built to Ocala in 1882 from
Palatka and Gainesville via Rochelle.
This provided a second route over which tourists and
new residents were brought into the county, and by which
products of farms and groves, forests and mines, were
moved to outside markets.
On the southwest corner of Osceola and Fourth Streets,
the railroad's first passenger station was located. Sleeping
cars that came through the town on the narrow-gauge line
had to have their trucks changed before they moved in and
out of the state over wide-gauged tracks.
Extending its route southward by way of the eastern
shore of beautiful Lake Weir to Leesburg and Brooksville,
















the Florida Southern was afterwards to become a part of
the Plant System of Railways as a wide gauge line. And
still later, in 1902, it was merged in the Atlantic Coast Line
Railroad system.
In the same decade a short line was built from Ocala,
via Dunnellon to Homosassa near the Gulf. It also was
given the name Silver Springs, Ocala and Gulf Railroad,
although it never reached the Springs. And it, too, was to
become a part of the Atlantic Coast Line System.
The "Dunnellon Short," as this was familiarly called,
was built by a company organized in Ocala by local men
who obtained a charter in 1879, and planned originally to
extend it down the West Coast to Pinellas Point. Officers
of the company included Solomon and Simon Benjamin,
relatives of Judah P. Benjamin, Secretary of State of the
Confederacy, Louis Fox, Samuel Agnew, E. W. Agnew,
John F. Dunn, S. M. G. Gary, and E. J. Harris.
The Benjamins and Fox established, at the crossing of
the Florida Central and Peninsular Railroad and the Flori-
da Southern Railroad, the first ice manufacturing plant in
Ocala and one of the first in the State.
In Ocala the first depot of the short line was just west
of where today's Pine Street Highway passes over the Sea-
board Air Line tracks. This depot was abandoned when the
line joined the Plant System, which had its station on Osce-
ola Street between Silver Springs Boulevard and Broadway.
Until the railroads were built mail had been brought
into the county by stage from Gainesville, by stage or pony
express from Palatka, or by steamers on the rivers. The
stage road came by Ocala's northwest limits through Tuck-
er Hill, named for W. M. Tucker, for decades to come, the
county's last Republican Superintendent of Public Instruc-
tion.
Driving up the sand road which was Fremont Street,
and afterward Magnolia, the stage drew up at the Ocala Post
Office, then in a wooden structure near the southwest corner
of Magnolia and South Street, now Broadway.
The South Florida Stage Company continued-to make
its frame-shaking runs for a short period after the railroad
came. Freight was transported by rail from Savannah to
Ocala, then by stage to Sumter, Hernando, and Hillsborough
counties. For a time, also, the first rail line began opera-
tion, mail was dispatched from Ocala by pony express to
Cotton Plant, Camp Izard, Fantville, and Fellowship in
western Marion County.






MORE RAILROADS
The Gainesville and Gulf Railroad was extended as far
south as Fairfield in the northwestern part of the county.
Two other rail lines were built the Ocala and Southwest-
ern and the Ocala Northern. The first was between Ocala
and Dunnellon, and the second was from Ocala via Silver
Springs through the valley of the Ocklawaha to the deep
water of the St. Johns at Palatka.
Clark, Ray and Johnson, who engaged in extensive tim-
ber and sawmill operation in the southwestern section of
the county, built the Ocala and Southwestern. E. P. Rentz,
head of the E. P. Rentz Lumber Company, which had a
large sawmill a short distance north of Silver Springs, built
the Ocala Northern. The first train on his railroad made its
run to Palatka on January 23, 1912, using the rails of the
Seaboard Air Line between Ocala and the springs.
Heavier rails were being laid through Ocala by the two
trunk-line railroads serving the community. Coal-burning
locomotives were gradually replacing the wood-burners of
the A. C. L. and S. A. L., and vestibule coaches came into
use in place of those having open platforms.
Bitterness toward the railroads was stirred anew as
the fight to obtain lower freight rates continued. Merchants,
and others, raised funds for operating a freight boat be-
tween Silver Springs and Jacksonville. Public docks at the
Springs were advocated, also the location there of Ocala's
municipally-owned electric light and power plant. In 1913
the town's incorporated area was extended to the Springs
in the form of a panhandle. Plans for docks and power plant
were soon dropped, however, and later the panhandle was
abrogated. Operation of the freight boat was begun but
lower freight rates based on water competition with the
rail lines did not materialize.

TRANSPORTATION GAINS
Before all links in the county's trunk line highways
were completed, faster railroad trains shortened the dis-
tance between the nation's big Eastern population centers
and Ocala. In the meantime, two short line railroads, the
Ocklawaha Valley, and the Ocala Southwestern, had passed
out of existence.
There was consolidation of several other short lines,
and rail service between Ocala and Homosassa, and between
Ocala and Lakeland, was discontinued.
During the winter of 1924-25, the Seaboard Air Line's
"Orange Blossom Special," a luxurious tourist train, made
its initial New York-Miami run through Ocala, and sub-
stantial transportation advantages were gained in its open-
ing, January 25th, 1925, of a new line from Wildwood to the
lower East Coast. This gave fast connections with both of
the lower coasts of Florida and the scenic highlands of the
southern ridge of the peninsula.
The Burlington's streamlined and air-conditioned diesel-
electric train of stainless steel, "The Zephyr," brought south
for exhibition was displayed in Ocala on March 26, 1935. On
November 17, h138, the city welcomed the Seaboard's own
diesel-electric locomotive, pulling a streamlined train of
coaches, with dining cars of the latest type. On December
16th, the "Orange Blossom Special" rolled through Ocala
only twenty-four hours and thirty minutes out of New York's
Pennsylvania Station, the first regularly scheduled diesel-
electric train between the metropolis and Florida. And a few
weeks later, on February 3, 1939, the "Silver Meteor," S.A.L.
streamliner between New York and Miami, would cover the
distance to Ocala in nineteen hours and forty-three minutes.
Then later "The Silver Star" went into service, and the
Atlantic Coast Line's "Champion" began serving Ocala.













MACCLENNY, FLORIDA

East Railroad Avenue and South College Avenue
Macclenny, Baker County, Florida


The Macclenny station was constructed in 1924 for the Seaboard Air Line Rail-
road Company, by contractor C. V. York. It was constructed to replace an earlier
type IV frame building constructed in 1885 by the Florida Central Railroad Com-
pany. The existing 1924 structure, designed in the S.A.L. Office of Engineering
and Buildings in Norfolk, Va., was constructed as a combination passenger and
freight station at a cost of $6,514.00. It is a brick veneer structure, origin-
ally constructed with a 20' covered platform. In 1926, a fenced flower garden was
added, and in 1930 the platform was extended, and a 20' x 80' shed was constructed.
Modern toilet facilities were added in 1944.

Today, the station is utilized as a switch equipment repair station by the Seaboard
Coast Line Railroad. The open platform has been enclosed with metal siding and is
being leased as a storeroom.





























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MACENY S.A.L Cobnto asne/rih tto 12)-gnrlve rmtesuhes











































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MACCLENNY, S.A.L. Combination Passenger/Freight station (1924) west elevation


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MACCLENNY, S.A.L. Combination Passenger/Freight station (1924) -elevation
detail at agents office


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MACCLENNY, S.A.L. Combination Passenger/Freight station (1924) detail of roof overhang support bracket


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'Photo From The. Pais
74 0 -
V'


.. ... -

Macclenny Depot C. 1915 on the occasion of Mrs. Mattie Rhoden
Green's departure when she moved to Tallahassee. The.depot
sat on the same spot as the brick one today. Courtesy Mrs. Effle
Rhoden Wolfe, Macd enny.















LAWTEY FLORIDA

State Road 225 and U.S. 103
Lawtey, Bradford County, Florida




I,: ".. '.[ .


-* i Ni


The Lawty depot was constructed in 1932 by the Seaboard Air Line Railroad Com-
pany at a cost of $1,897.00 to replace a type IV frame combination passenger and
freight station which was constructed in 1910. The building is a standard type
III depot reduced in length to 44'. The structure is supported on a brick pier
foundation and is roofed with tile shingles. The platform was removed in 1940.
In recent years, asbestos shingles have been applied over the original wood siding
and a concrete block skirt was constructed to replace perimeter brick piers.


























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LAWTY, SA.L. Cominaton Pssener/Feigh sttionLA (1932) nort elvaio










































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freight dock


Passenger/Freight station (1932) elevation at



































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LAWTEY, S.A.L., Combination Passenger/Freight station (1932)
original interior brick pier.


- detail of











APPENDIX I



Appendix I is a survey of the contemporary utilization of depot

structures on the Gainesville Ocala section of the Seaboard Coast

Line Railroad.



MICANOPY JUNCTION

The depot at Micanopy Junction has been relocated and now houses

the Micanopy Welding Shop.



EVINSTON

The depot at Evinston was sold and relocated in 1956 and a portion

of it is currently being utilized as a feed storage building.



















1 'I ;' ,


r.. ,











McINTOSH


The McIntosh station was purchased in July, 1975 and moved off the
S.C.L.right-of-way by the "Friends of McIntosh". After rehabilita-
tion, it will be used as a community center and square-dance hall.


.'^ ^ ^ ^ .... .- ^ 1^ .'/ .^I ;~ R ;
-r -



McINTOSH, A.C.L., Combination Passenger/Freight
the north west


station general view from


In,


McINTOSH, A.C.L., Combination Passenger/Freight station general view from
the sough-west


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REDDICK

The combination passenger/freight depot at Reddick is still maintained
for freight service, although, the freight platform has been enclosed
and is being leased as storage.


4 IWO Ill :, %~ar' I I !0,

REDDICK, A.C.L., Combination Passenger/Freight depot general view from
the north-east


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REDDICK, A.C.L., Combination Passenger/Freight depot- general view from

the south-east
















KENDRICK



Kendrick was purchased, relocated and the depot at Kendrick is currently

being utilized as a residence.


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ZI. LL"'aiE 1



New England Colony and Winter Home


---THE HIGHLANDSci--
----OF-----

Tlarion Gountg, Florida.


/ n qion noted for its Beauty of Scenery, Dryness of Atmos-
phere and Salubrity of Climate.
FOUNDED BY THE
MARION LAND AND IMPROVEMENT CO.,
G-x'IN 1884.-f/
OFFICERS OF THE COMPANY:
/ion. C. L. Robinson, Jacksonville, Fla., President.
E. W. Agnew Esq.. Ocala, Fla Vice President.
Co/ John F. Dunn, Ocala, Fla., Treasurer.
Rev. H. Woodward, Bel/eview, Fla., Secretary.
FOR FULL INFORMATION APPLY TO

Rev. j. Woodward, Secretary,
-OR TO-
KNIGHT & BABB, GENERAL LAND AGENTS,
Belleview, Marion County, Fla.


.' 1886:
I.E-VIa o WINSHIP, PKAPNTERS,
LYNN, MASS.


The railroad facilities are first-class, as the Town
is directly on the line of the Florida Railway and
Navigation Co., which send cars without change to
:11 parts of the country. There are three passenger
trains each way daily at all seasons of the year, and
during the past winter the road run an additional
fast express.






















In 1882 the Florida Railroad and Navigation Company

went through Belleview heading south tow-rd Wildwood. This

Company absorbed by the Florida Central and Penisula Railroad

Company was later taken over by the Seaboard Air Line

Railway in the mid 1890's, giving rail service from Belleview

to New York. Three passenger trains each wa\ daily traveled

the Belleview tracks at all seasons of the year. During the

busy winter months, there would be an additional express.

To cater to the desires of the passengers the train

would stop in Belleview for twenty minutes so they could

walk to the hotel known as "The Seminole" for a good hot meal,

then they would make their way b.ck to the station, board the
9
train and continue their journey. whilee talking to

Mr. Frank Gale, a life-long resident of Belleview, he answered

the question as to how the passengers could walk to a hotel,

eat, and return to the train in twenty minutes. "The Seminole",

which faced the tracks, was onl fifty yards from the train

station.



























APPENDIX II








Appendix II includes a chronology of representa-

tive locomotives and rolling stock operational

on North Central Florida railroads from 1900 to

the early 1940's.




























A Study in the Development of Locomotives


The Everglades Limited Changing Locomotives at South lRcky Mount, N. C.
Baldwin -Locomotive Works, Philadelphia


.....: ....- ------ -~--.--~ .---- -

Wood Burning Locomotive. 1886
Baldwin Locomotive Works, Philadeltphia


A First Class Passenger Locomotive Built for the VWlmingtou & Weldon R. R.
Sin 1859
Baldwin Locomotive Wor|ks, Plhiltdelpitia


.


















1892


tI-- -ir- 7-~


CLA53- G~? RATIO HATIO HT/N' SURFACE TO GYLIIYDEf? VOLUNE- Z 03 TO
6/UM0BERS 6(3 & 664 DF/IVI/t1 AXLES -
WEiQHT FRONT TRUCK ----------- -- /O LBS. ( COAL 3 TOA/S
CAPACITY OF TENDEIj-
nF/S T DR IVEF ------- ------ --- fAAWATT 3 400 qALLS.
3ECOnO ---------- VALVE CGEAR--STE-PHEiSOIN.
TH --- -
F 'ON'T TEIODER TIUCK- --- e4.0 S.
RE AR .
TOT4L WE//CHT DfI/VERS--5 /3 13."0 "-TorT ,//S'oo .BS .
OF EN/IPIC ANtD TEN'DEFR-- I500-L.
57;AtP-r; PPE-.55UE -145 LBS. PER SQ. I/.
C YL I/Y: DR5 / I 24 -
TrA.CTVr v F-oWER-- /7//D LBS.
ATI/0 OF ADHES/OI -- / TO .3
QCRfrTE APEA -- /!.2 5Q. FT.
TL/UBS -fo.24Z ,DIA. Z" LEtQTH 1O0-4i
,,.'EAT/lcQ sU/efFACE OF TUBES ----/3 !5S FT.
FiFE OX--b--,2 "
TOTAL HEAT/INg SUFRFACE---- /477"
A'/AT/O CffATE AREA TO HEAT/NYC SURFACE -I TO /
i^ P


"~-""I"-"I---~--~-"--n'~-ll---~,"I, ----
















i 7-27'" -"


CLASS L-2


1911 I


TEYDEhe. JroU,(RZtLS 5"x9'


TRI/Cl ITOU'RHAL





8/IT SY 4ZLD1/// /9//


____ /2'2'(4-/ --^7"-4--9'S-- -'i
/'- 4'-7" --
--------9 "/3/ COUPlE-R P-ZLI/1 F-AC-
eS' gJ^" 8~ErWf{ CrOUPIE PIU-LIHG~ F^CS ---------------


GE h'ERAL DATA
/ CYL/NDEYIPS, D/4. X 2 VALVe Ge" W ZLSCH/ feT
3. VAL/ Vs, SJ/z & k/'O 6"P/ jTON
4. V 1u YL-, /AX//MU/ T7Pi4VEL 534
5. V4 z VYE, STEAI/ LAP /"
6. VAL/ VS, fX//&, UJ T Czi.e,4.A/iC
7 V,4'/ VE, /Ze4D //I f/LL GeAR
8. YAL V,S, CUT-OFF /// U/LL G FR 85%
9. ,A, reD Tc' cr/vE Po WER 3 7,/50s Zj.
/0. ~PAT/O Ofr AvrstOti fi'WT O/l?)/VGES + T7,RCT/V. Po/fi f) 4.//
//. J//RpEr CUPVE /18
WEIGHT
12. LeA/ m 7Teuc/, /0, 000 Les.
/3. Da'/ e, /.7-T 37,0 0 0 Las.
/4. D1/VER. JECO,/o 3 7, 600 0s.
/5. D/v~. T/f 4 0, / 0 0 1as.
/6. )oR/v#, foue-RT 3, /0 Z s.
/7 TOTAL ZDRiVERp /52,6 00 1,s.
/8. TOTAIL E NG/,t /70, 800ZLs.
/9. TOTAL Te/iD fEforTR1icS70 COOP0R 63,000) /20, 0 aIBS.
20. TOTArL F/GI/// & T7ENDE, 2 9 0, 00 BS3.
5 0 / L E q
2/ W/op~/k'G PR-.ssS/u, AM4A. 200 Zas.
22. /f/EBox, LZ-EGTH X h'//7TH /0 7" x 65-/,4"
23. TuESs, /H, O.D. & G4. /60- 2" ~ HP // A. /.G.
24. FLIU S, /y-, 0 D. & GA. 26 -J-5" //9 9 B. I.,
25. TUBE7 & FLUES, ZELCwrgfOuT ro0 U7T oFTp TaSHE JE7Ts) /S6"
26. H/,E47/A G 'Su-cE, Tue~ s & FLuES /,SGG C s Q.F
27 HEA T//OG U'L/FC, F-//-/EOX & ApRl 7Cf S i8 7 co.f.


.28. HEAT/NOG JSuFACE, TOTArL 753 -.s. Fr.
29. IHEAT//o 1yQRFACE,JUi/P HEATEe 392 sQ. f7:
30. EAT/ffG SoRuFAce, fQU/VALErT TOTAL 2,341/ J. FT
3/ G/ATEs, AR4 49 Jl, F-T
32. /,CH TUBES, A//, O.D. & GA. 4-3"-/' 7.i.'
33. Srok'EA 'i
A / B A /
34. JCHEoDULE Wi.i& Co. TYPE G-LT7
35 6aAf POWER
36. PULMP (W AB.Ca) A/9 720 .-8Q" CRos CoMPout Y OT/7r.ks 2 91"
7E LDEQ
37. F RAME f// 7,C/T SjT7EiL
36. DRAFT GEAR &/!/ER A2X8
39. BA/4,,E SCHEDULE 14' B. C. TYPE 6-F7T
40. BRA'E PowE
4/ TRUcK, TYPE /Y/27/7 & 7/68 fUAL/-zR #S 7/9 &7204 AecH 8,
M /5 CELL .-A E 0 U
42. //~trEcroe -/ 7/9 .f-/ 9-A & ./-I/O/ OTH.SAw Z-t//Acc~'/-/'/A
43. LUB /cAcrTOe )D 7 O/T // 42
44. Powek cEVe s /I.? 720 LEW/S- 5TOHrPS 41ico &- 66 77
45. DP/v/IGo Box Lusecro fRAAI .z
46. f/RE DooR of *RAH//n TYPE 8-A9
47j. SUPERHEATrEe fLEsCO TYPC "f"
48. HEADLIGHT T GOLDE/Y GLOW
49. GENERATOR /9. 7/7,7/8,7/9 /OO N 4-B3 /ff 720 PYLE E
50. TRA/I CONTROL /'o0'
5/1 A/R PUMP LUBR/CATro W.A.. Cup
52. F/ED h/AT7ER /EATFE/ ./oYE


_ I__ __ __ __ __ ____ ___ ___
I- 1- ----- -- -- ----


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a" X/02"


MAl/N D//YING
AXLE /0 -Z"
FROIT & BACX'
AXLES 9 "12/"
BUILT /922 BY BALDW/t1


27

/ 10 4.5

CL ASS A'-16-J'


1922


t rEWe j'O&/P/1YLJ 4;'x/l/


G iERAL DA TA
/ CYLINDERS, D/A. XJSTr7P 23" x26
2. VALVE GEACP /WA L S CHEPT
,. VA4 VES, 3ZE & '>/ND /2" P/sTOn/
4. ViL VE3, M/AX/MUM T7lAVEL J3/4"
5 VA1vis$, JSTrEAIW p L^"
6. V1Z VE., fCXHAeU ST CIA,/RACE
7 VALVES, LzEAD /// FULL GE AR ,4"
6. VztL ES. CUT-OFF /Y FULL GEq./ d685
9 .,A TD TrACr/ VE Powr 36, 6 0 0 L.
/0. AT7/ Or /ADHE.S/O /IM f/ of De/vERS T7RACT/VE POWER) 4. 23
I/. SH4)PEST CUR VE /I D3PLES
W E / G H T
/2. LEADI/-N TeuckC 52., /0 lZs.
/3 DP/VE~,, Flsr 5/, 9 00 ZBs.
/4. Dp/vER, J~coNoL 52, 70 Lsj.
/5 D)//ivee, 7;/,D 5/, 0 70 1 s.
/6. To TAz DP/Vles /55, 14 0 Las.
/7 TOTAL tNG/t/E 20 7300 las.
/8. T7-NoE,, fPoNr Tauc, C 0,300 ZBs.
/9. TErDEP, PEA TR7uc' 89 O,300LBas.
20 TOTAL TE/7D-E /G 0,/6 000L5s.
2/. TorT, ENI/YNE &e TENDER 3 7,9 00 ZBs.
BO /L E Q
22. WO/RK/G Po SURE MAx. 20 L s.
23. /IEB oX, LErGTH X /IDTH /02 6"'x 76 '"
24 T/BES, t/o., O.D. & GA. 2/2 2" tL, // .. i
25. FUEs, YNo., O.D. & GA. 34- 5''--/ 9 B.WG.
26. TUaES & Ft UES, IE HTH /Ouz o Ou~J OF 7T/E SiHEETS) /73"
27 I/EAT/I/G SUPFACF, 7TUS.S -& FLUES 2292 sQ. Fr


2. HEAT/IG SURFACE, F/R BOX, /RCH TUBES
29. //EAT/HOG SURFACE,TOTAL
30. /EATING SL/RFACE, L/PEPHEA TEQ
3l /iEAT/YG SUPFA CE, f QUIVL ENT TOTiL
32. GPQ TES, LENGTH X W/DTH
33. GnTE /4 E
34. ACH" TUBES, 0..., G,., F/,.GTrf. OVER ED.
35. STOK'E
A/ p B R A ..
36. SCHEDULE
37 6/1/E SCHEDULE
38. PuMPS
T E / D E
39 FRAME
40. ADRAF GEAR
4/. Bar'E JSCHtDULE
42. B/mtAE POWER
43. Teuc, TYP7E
M C EL LA H/ 0 U .
44. /,j- crTOe
45. Lu//cAroeP DrETpo/
46. PowER E. VERSE
47. DRe/ivm Box Lute/icA ro
46. f/ee Dooe
49. SUPEPHEATEQ
50. //EAD L/G T
5/. GENERA TOR
52. T7h/// CO /TReoO
53 A/ P/uM/p LuB/eCAT ro


Z OSaQ. fT
24 97 Q. fT.
5973s. Fr
3392 .9?. .E:
/02$1 '75'"
S3.3 SQ. f.
4-3"~/~ 7. -
//No/,

WEST'G. JcSCEDU)LE 6-T

n0e 8'3" Co-ss CoMPouYo
C_ s r Jr-EL
CAST ,jT'F

h'Wsr'G. ScH. G-IT

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?A GO, N/ T

I.txnf Sr)

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GQ.S. SC.//a2
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:- s "_176"2 -1776" 4

,AL /6 TO/J 5-
70/Y"7/ COAZ MPAC6)
e /o0oo0 GALS.
,oo-- 1925
-- /- -------------- 3 '-0"-t/


- 4'-9 -'- 6" 6'-" /O o" "//-44"
0!-- 0- 6'4o 4----- 24-0" -!4'-
73'o" o-9" / ---- 'o

80O-9" TrWEEN COUPLE P'LL//fHO FACEJ
MA IG ,X //"x13' '/Ys/G 9/ & /693 9 O//PPE0D W/IT/H MA// D/SC D'/V/fO r//EELS
JDFOD O' &/Do COII ECT/o P/TT WI FT/G iJ/f/G f /1 92, 93 &A /69 5 /PPlED W//ED W'TER /"3Te
J51EROD 1111DOlZ CONYECT/O1 FlrTTD WMIT FLOATING BIJJ11Jf &,' /G 92, /G 93 & 169,5- ZreIPPfD WIT# #eFD ,47AT-fk /tiYTPe


/o-29-4g



0

































03


28. /HEAT//G /S3FACE, TUBES & FLUES
29. HEA7T/G JUeFACE, f/EBox, ARC/ TeUaJ, COMB. CHAMA.
30. //EAT/f/G JURpF CE, TOTAL
3/7 /lAT/NG I5U/FACE, ,UPE//HEATre
32. HAT/l/G JUIeFACE, EQU/YAiEHT TOTAL
33. CGATeE, LHGTHX W /ITH
34. G5ATES,mAPEA
3j. A4eCH TUBEJ. O.D., GA., f/1 ZIOT/I ove Bo. 4-,
36. &Tro'Ee
A / B a 4A k
37 CHEULDE
38. BlAKE POWER
39. PUMPS &
TENDER
40. /eAM' COMMON HW
41/ De4FT GiRr
42 BeAK SCHLED UL/f
43 BReqk PoWER
44. Teuce TYPE /At~ .
M/ / C L LL A/E 0 UJ
45 /,YrECTOR
46 LUBe/CA TOR
47 POWER QEVE'RSE
44. //V/IYG Box LuaB/CArTO
49. F/Rp Dooe
50. JUPER/H,E TE4
5f/ 1/ADL/GHT
52. GEMEPATOe PYLE
53. TeA/H CoNrTOL
54. 4 / PUMP UBR/CA T7oe


2,922 JQ../x
26 9 JQ. /
3,/ 9 / JQ. /
794 sQ. F.
4,36 2 ;o. 7e.
//4 '"x 8 4 Y4
6 6.7 sQ, 7.
3- T-V 7Bd O-
JrT/AwoTp HT617

W/ESz'. TYPE C-f7

CRoss CO/mPOU/D/

EAL TI CAST rSJ7E

WIsr'G. TYPE 6-L

-sA/.C CZAS 7- 40

/YA THrAN
//a/ T/AN
?A rGOf//T O Ai4CO
J~4ANAL//L
FRAttL '/c.
../-. H. Co.
GoLO'DN GLolW
-/'7T/O/iAL O? I/oor/

________ /f/T 77 /,7"


GENERAL DATA
CYL /IDES2, D//. x STROe
V4Lz v GEA
V/jL VES. S/i & ///YD
VA/ veS, AX/AfMUM TP/AVEL
VAL VES, JT7rAM LAP
V,/VLS, fXhIUSJT CLEAPA/HCE
V//L VEY, ZL3.D // f/L/L GEAR,
VAL vES, CUT-OFf //fil///I GL
,07ATE TPACT/VE PowER
47/IO oFA DHE/O// h/70 oN Ay/V TeACT/VE POWER)
JHARPfST CURVYE
WV E EIGHT P/in iN FoNr H/o P/ /N/NH, DC//o
LEAD/IG TlucF/ 46,/45 LAB 52,145 I.
DRI/VER, F/RCTO


TorT.L DP/vl/e 190,3001,B. /79,600L
7T-,/L/z Teuce 49,300 LsS 54,0001


/8 TOT-AL /, W/,/o 285,74S Bas.
/9. TorOL NE / 8 78 0 las.
20 TOTqAL l/oG/l & T/73YDST 473,525 Zs.
2/ L/GHTWE/GH7T OF G/1L0/ 2 5 0, 8 0 0 ZBs.
22. /IGHTWE/GHT OF TENDEo 72,440 LOs.
O / L E L
23 k/oRK//rG P>ESSw u~E, /f4. 2/0 l/s.
24 F/EBOX, E/iGT/H X f/MT// /1/4'-7" '1xQ44"
25, TuL&,/Y, /o, D. & GO. /76- 2"--N//// B.W..
26. f/Ias, H/, 0.D. & Ga. 3~1 5"'- // 9 &B.G.
27. TUaBE & FL U/. Z E/GTH 7O//Tr TO OUF oF TUBE J//CETsr) 2 26 "


I'OOD WARD


BV/LT BY BALDW/IN /925


25" x 2"
WALJCHAEPT
PiJ To


64"
Y'4"
55%
45, 275 L.s.
392 oe 4./7
/60
P!//N /IN C/I(/ HOLE
S7, 455. 1.5.

Ls.
LAS.
/ 8,700 L/S.
59, 4 0 0 las.


tS


1s
1


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- -I I -- -~-C- I - I IY~-i---IICIU


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S3 G- O'VER SH1ATH///G -
i4


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A. C. L. P
OFFICE G. S. 4'. P


0


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k.. '-~,-A\^^-~- -"'- z .---------'--..-------.. 40- 2.-"---------- --~ 1~\- 67,-


^i- &Y J Pti'G-_l H -, ?C, T- c0.K S- C-.S.C- c.ST 7SEL. iT Lt'i-GR T -t GAI.. T Ks JOUNL ,- S" -9. b9"- 6 PRCTIO '
TF R''.f __sIEF- Ht*'.'P. PKKK5- NY.AB.CP SCH. SC-I-a !) -VPPEr Zg p R- FLUSH _____ -_ l HYATT RLR D
T ST MA IP TA OrCr c 22 oft.CK- vIN C.APY 45- 48. 85 TIMKE-RoLLE.P
c. T -C 2 ASPE PC 5 6,V 84. LA, D 8KE _FIELD ________
. -.. i_ .. ,--.. -. -. 5S--C.c ?.BL, S I NGLE ____ _______________-
. -- -: --_ "___ i -- -, T.. s _- ER .--i -- ~~- 2. CULL..- 5TD. CL__
,F'i-_-'';_ II -J-L^ i'_K- I*X.-. ."'.. *_' HElTEs- PV.C.H.C5. EXCELSO ______
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~-- -- r.___________ __
uTT-, .-TC-!p L; 'L-'<--P rPROV.D I POLLY- W," OD.___ I AItR. CONDITIONING PULLMiN MCH'IL 1935
owR- V1AU6 3__- __2___7 OAL -8"D\.-O4"FCE--cRo' ____________ CT CENTER
L__FP.M_ TDR_- N_ II (I I DRIVE- SPICER 5



1930


























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~ Z i 1 r~CLR ~i D3J5 STE :Z -'L F OQM '3 WASHST-NTAN- FOLDING I AF W, Ni a751
-LA(~bCT~ tI NCY P3 DiFING 217-)arA
~~- 7it21VAl ~~.-~'fl~ L1-ViF --r!~~ py~IF~~F, p$ESV~ L- GI7~ 7 [?-T1 i,7?1cr?~~E5-7~ CELL ED~s NA--iO-N.W
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C- 5P 'v~c~ -rn~ K-~:m-CiVAic l. C.INTIOrIc~i.NG PULLhlCVXM
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7Jt39 LhyE APOPK~ 'V IC-' -'--


1925


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hm~t..twil 6avirw .h RJ.C..(6 rnc.h5C h rten .R .CC.
O*wmolwk Woetern R.R..C.. (rvmewlRk AIbey R, &C&Abrawiok& Flovi A s R. Co.

ThAtlo.arn. Mileadn Ry.Ce. o.yth~esLtar fMontigoiery fTho Montlomery
4Fl;.Uc. Florida R.R.Ce. 1 Southsrn Rfk.Co
t The 5outh Wsotern A tabmeo Ry. Co.
d LuvOaLa,Tarp.5.Chai'lotto l4.r rR.R.C __
C Live Oak& Rewlornje Bluff R.R.Co. Sc heme
4 Th&S;lv.r Spr;njo,Qoala &Gulf R.R.Co. thewlnj the
Aibievills. Sovuhon Ry.Co.
Waycroso IL Florida R.R.Co. Reorgamizt ion and Ca ioliclotions
% The East Floriaa Ry.Ce. of Roads merlinj Intathe A.C.L.RR.Ce.
a Tompa &The noto**us es.R.C.t
I( Ahltoy River R.R.Co. (U _______ord road& i____ic____ornt _
o ChNetteho..hoa. P.ass Ry.C..
= 3ocheo.rtvlle G~oscnv.U.Tamps ~Nripsm P.oooCvsk&51.1ohn R;vor Ry.Co.
0. a Ke W. PelatkLu& Indron River Ry Co.
8*.106ne Rove r C (oy WoI tRj. Ce. toIond&5t.3ohns R. Ry.C4)ranq. RMdol sD.hd&Atl.lAR-Ce.

h<5ovennehA)lleany R.R.Co.
~tiortt---f faiana b A Ibrar u 4 Glf R.R.Co. (Sovonrt~h&Atbe~y F.C..
Pensacolo&Gvetrit R.R.Co.
9ru~k rl~rl R..C 14-,d& lrodind~n River R.R.Ce.
S 17 ACIsvJuifjar [)*It RY.Co.
w~t BachilWo Ct#rb.r. Ve S. r d ,W tar & Brarohvdle R.R.C.. ko Brernehville RyC.
ulrn'ro %on R Dr;Ajs~o.
Z T" W,41.114 Nyalrth Carolin Ry.Co,
C CIn en&Woreiw RR.Co.
SWipt It R,&00Ro~esj ..R..RC.. 44aliCfna Wal den R.RC..
T loo A I Ur T 1 5-abo rd & eW6loao
&RDlsi6R.R.Co. t Roleqh RR.Co. A Tarboro PR.F.
CT lbCm" lob R.Re Wa .t
d W lm~nqton J w;lm;aqtkn,we~vb~rn j~~ilmr..qt.AOnsl~wi L .Crl RR.Ca.
a.Nowbei RRC.*. &Norfolk RR.Co.lEostCorel&ro Lond&Ry.Ce.
Fl~ Atloitc. pCope Feord Yedd.in fFay tlev;Ile 6 ri.,.r.. R.RC.
i nRVa 10ll R.R.C.. U .
-a- j South Corelipla, Po ifio RY-CQ
Northeastrer R.P.Co. (Centr I R.R.Co. oar 5*uth Carol;o ChCro 6 (Cher-aw aSolisbury .R.R.Co. (Chorow&.C*O.F ~Folds R.R.Co.
DoripwtetnR.R.Co. f ntovts;1Ivs R.RCo.
U (T Wim;Q9t. & C~or.Ii R.RCo. (W; I rn j1en& Manehste R.R.C..
4; W~r;fC~mH J W lminqtor.& fWuImte;ncknC ho~horn W, 1mg4ton,Ch.J beers.
Co.rnwwayR.R.Co. -_-&Cmvwoy RRCo. (&Canvaoybow RRC..
R.A.. fTile Cooembma 8.5unoter R.R.Co.
t Central R.R.Co. of 6.C.5 r.,l w
F fIorence R.R.Co.
d ~ ~ ~ f~YlwI1*C.& N.,lhar. R R.C6. 4*10wv;1irc. (rtril Ry.Co.
Aviujto R.R.C*. 1&N*Vrthern R.R.C.
I SAL N C6 0 ;r Y .C(T1heIIbsh..ii R.94C..
Richmond fi/e,.burq [Peter.bv & n R Ce Pd*eroivjRPRC& 1 p. R.Co. k\menev;ile& Rer.ake R.R.Co(The M;dlont Notj kCaroHNOR U
Southeastern R.R.o.
Norfelk & Carol;n. RR.Cehow.sr. & Souttern R.R.Co (W..tern Broneh Ry.Co.
6o6 b.rqE h rhor1& Wa Iterba f R.Co
Flow;" Central R.R.Co.
Sonford & EvevqleIos R.R.Co.
FIorido M;dland Ry.Co
The onfore(& Lake eust;s R. R.Co
St.3rshns Lake Eustis R.R.Co. (k.2Ihns& Lake E st;s SyCo
-Tuekaa v. yl & $eutothwstpwn R.R.Co.
Ti, Flfo;dr hT Florida Southern Ry.Ce.-inaev$leOtols CharlsttlHabor R.RCo.
Southern R.R.Co. kYalahoa Wrpe.rn R.R.Co.
evmrvyt t& Wte.-s !Zi. c.C(Ce"way Sealshow* RaR.Cs
Wtdt*Zpw& P.Rne Valloy R.R.Co.
Soefei'd S. St. Patersburj Ry.C.(Ovaw. SBelt y.Co.
Lew;svilkeN.S.ahu;Iie R.R.Ce. (51%of stockowrMd by A.C.LR.R.Co


































APPENDIX III













FLORIDA, ATLANTIC AND GULF CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY


Chart No. 8


Place No. 104


INCORPORATION.


Laws of Florida 1851-Page
37Chapter317 No. 6. Book
of Charters Page 731 Law
Library Q. C.



Laws of Florida 1853-Page
22 Chapter 481 No. 2. Book
of Charters Page 745 Law
Library U. C.



United States Statutes at
Large 1841 Chap. 16-Vol. 5
Page 453. Minutes Trustees
Improvement Fund Vol. I.


U. S. Statutes at Large-
1850 Chap. 84-Vol. 9 Page
519. Minutes Trustees Im-
provement Fund Vol. I

U. S. Statutes at Large-
1856 Chap. 31- Vol. II Page
S. Minutes Trustees Im-
provement Fund Vol. 1




Laws of Florida 1855-Chap.
610 (No. I) Amended 1855
Chapter 734 (No. 135)
Amended 1855 Chapter 874
(No. 16) Amended 1859
Chapter 1015 (No. 20)
Amended 1861 Chapter
1110 (No. 17) Minutes
Trustees Improvement
Fund Volume I.















Minutes Trustees Im-
rovement Fund Vol. 1-
Pae 9.


A Special Act of the Legislature of Florida, approved January 24th, 1851, incor-
porated the Florida, Atlantic and Gulf Central Railroad Company, to construct and
operate a railroad from the St. Mary's River or the Atlantic Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico
in West Flor'da as located by the State Engineer.

A Special Act of the Legislature of Florida, approved January 7th, 1853, authorized
construction from some navigable river in East Florida to a point on the Gulf Coast west
of the Apalachicola River. Operation was required to be commenced on each twenty-
five mile section as completed.

The United States Government, by Act approved September 4th, 1841, granted to
the Territory of Forida five hundred thousand acres of public lands to be sold, and the
proceeds applied for internal improvement.

The United States Government, by Act approved September 28th 1850 granted to
the State, the swamp and overflow lands in Florida owned by the Federal Government.

The United States Government, by Act approved May 17, 1856, granted to the
State every alternate odd numbered section of land for six sections in width on each
side of the railroads from Jacksonville to Pensacola; from Amelia Island to Tampa Bay,
with branch to Cedar Key; and from Pensacola to the Alabama State Line; to be used
in aid of the construction of those railroads.

The Internal Improvement Act of Florida, approved January 6th, 1855 (and amend-
ments), place the public lands granted to the State by the Federal Government under
the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund. The railroad companies were granted
the alternate-odd numbered sections within six miles of the line of the road. The
railroad companies were granted a right of way 200 feet wide. Railroads already chart-
ered were required to give notice to the Trustees of the Fund of their acceptance of the
provisions of the Act, within six months, on penalty of losing their charter rights for
unconstructed portions of the line On the completion of the first twenty miles and
each addition' ten miles the railroad companies were permitted to issue first mortgage
7 per cent bonds at the rate of eight thousand dollars per mile, for construction, and two
thousand dollars additional per mile for equipment, which would be guaranteed as to
principal and interest by the Trustees on behalf of the State. As a sinking fund each
road was required to pay to the Trustees one-half of one per cent semi-annually on out-
standing bonds. No bonds could be issued for work not completed within eight ycars
of the passage of the Act. For bridges over certain large rivers an additional guaranteed
bond issue was authorized.

By letter dated May 2nd, 1855, from A. S. Baldwin, President, to the Trustees,
the provisions of the Act were accepted by the Florida, At'antic and Gulf Central Rail-
road Company.




























An Act of the Legislature of Florida, approved December 3rd, 1863, amended the
voting rights of stockholders.

ORGANIZATION.

The date of organization is not known. The principal office of the Company was
at Jacksonville, Florida.
CONSTRUCTION.

Construction was commenced in 1857 and completed:

Jacksonville, Fla., to Whitehouse, Fla., 11.5 miles, December 1st, 1858;
Whitehouse, Fla. to Baldwin, Fla., 8.5 miles, April 1st, 1859;
Baldwin, Fla., to Mattox, Fla., 3.0 miles May 1st, 1859;
Mattox, Fla. to Olustee, Fla., 23.0 miles, October 1st, 1859;
Olustee, Fla., to Lake City, Fla, 13.3 miles, May 1st, 1860.

The line was built with a five foot gauge and laid w;th 50 and 52 pound iron rail.

OPERATION

From the close of construction to March 4th, 1868, the road was operated by the
Company under its own management. From March 4th, 1868, to July 29th, 1868, it
was operated by William E. Jackson and associates, purchasers at foreclosure sale.

For failure to pay the one-half of one per cent semi-annually to the Internal Im-
provement'Sinking Fund, on March 4th, 1868, the railroad property and franchises were
sold by the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund to William E. Jackson and
associates. Deed was executed and possession given.June 29th, 1868.

A Special Act of the Legislature of Florida approved July 29th, 1868, incorporated
the purchasers as the Florida Central Railroad Company.


Laws of Florida 1863-Paec
30 Chapter III No. 28.
Book of Charters Page 758
Law Library 0. C.


Minutes Trustees Im-
provement Fund Volume I
Page 104
Page 1231
Page 126
Page 149
Page 178
Page 185


Minutes Trustees Im-
rovement Fund Vol. I-
age 321.



Minutes Trustees Im-
provement Fund Vol. I-
Page 323
Page 344
Comptroller's Contract
No. 12052.

Laws of Florida 1868-Page
145 Chapter 1646 No. 22.
Book of Charters Page 759
Law Library G. C.















FLORIDA RAILROAD COMPANY


Place No. 103


INCORPORATION.

The Florida Railroad Company was incorporated in Florida by a special Act, ap-
proved January 8th 1853, to construct and operate a railroad across the Peninsula of
Florida from the Atlantic Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico, south of the Suwanee River.

The United States Government, by Act approved September 4, 1841, granted to
the Territory of Florida, five hundred thousand acres of public lands to be sold and the
proceeds applied for internal improvements.

The United States Government, by Act approved Sept. 28, 1850, granted to the
State the swamp and overflow lands in Florida owned by the Federal Government.

The United States Government, by Act approved May 17th, 1856, granted to the
State every alternate section of odd numbered sections for six sections in width on each
side of the railroad from Jacksonville to Pensacola; from Amelia Island to Tampa Bay,
with branch to Cedar Key; and from Pensacola to the Alabama State Line; to be used
in a'd of the construction of.these railroads.

The Internal Improvement Act of Florida, approved January 6th, 1855 (and amend-
ments), placed the public lands granted to the State by the Federal Government under
the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund. The railroad companies were granted
the alternate odd numbered sections within six miles of the line of the road. The'rail-
road companies were granted a right of way 200 feet wide. Railroads already chartered
were required to give notice to the Trustees of the Fund of their acceptance of the pro-
visions of the Act, within six months, on penalty of losing their charter rights for
unconstructed portions of the line. On the completion of the first twenty miles and
each additional ten miles the railroad companies were permitted to issue first mortgage
7 per ceit bonds at the rate of sight thousand dollars per mile, for construction, and two
thousand dollars additional per mile for equipment, guaranteed as to principal and in-
terest by the Trustees on behalf of the State. As a sinking fund each road was required
to-pay to the Trustees one-half of one per cent semi-annually on outstanding bonds.
For all bond interest paid by the Trustees the railroad companies were required to de-
liver to the Trusteesan equal amount of capital stock. No bonds could be issued for
work not completed within eight years of the passage of the Act. For bridges over cer-
tain large rivers an additional guaranteed bond issue was authorized. Exemption from
taxation was granted for 35 years.

By letter dated March 6th, 1855, from D. L. Yulee, President, to the Trustees, the
provisions of the Act were accepted by the Florida Railroad Company.

A Special Act of the Legislature of Florida approved December 4th, 1855, authorized
construction from Amelia Island to Tampa Bay, with a branch to Cedar Key, under the
Internal Improvement Act, and authorized the company to own and operate vessels.
By this Act the Directors were authorized to set off any portion of the line to a corpora-
tion having a distinct organization and different name, which would succeed to all the
rights of the Florida Railroad Company, for the portion set off.


Laws of Florida 1953-Page
31 Chap. 482-No. 3. Book
of Charters Page 701 Law
Library General Counsel.

U. S. Statutes at Large-
1841 Chap. 16-Vol. 5 Page
453. MinutesTrustees Im-
provement Fund Vol. I.


U. S. Statutes at Large-
1850 Chap. 84- Vol. 9 Page
519. Minutes Trustees Im-
provement Fund Vol. I.

U. S. Statutes at LarEe-
1856 Chap. 31- Vol. II Page
15. Minutes Trustee. Im-
provement Fund Vol. I




Laws of Florida 1855-Chap.
610 (No. I) Amended 1855
Chapter 734 (No. 125)
Amended 1855 Chapter
874 (No. 16). Amended 1859
Chapter 1015 (No. 20)
Amended 1861 Chapter
1110 (No. 17) Minutes
Trustees Improvement
Fund Volume I.

















Minutes Trustees Im-
rovement Fund Vol. I,
age T.

Laws of Florida 1855-Page
16-Chap. 729 (No. 120).
Book of Charters Page 711
Law Library O. C.


Chart No. 10










Laws of Florida 1869-Page
29 Chapter 1716 (No. 4).
Book of Charters Page 798
Law Library 0. C.








Laws of Florida 1870-Page
III Chap. 1795 (No. 65).
Book of Charters Page 713
Law Library 0. C. Minute
Book Florida R. R. Co.
Page 10-27.






Laws of Florida 1873-Page
0JOChap. i960-No. 26. [lok
of Charters Page 825 Law
Library Q. C.


Minute Book Florida R. R.
Co.


An Act, approved June 24th, 1869, which incorporated the Jacksonville, Pensacola
and Mobile Railroad Company, authorized the issuance by the Florida Railroad Com-
pany, or its successor, of 7 per cent bonds amounting to fourteen thousand dollars per
mile of completed road between Amelia Island and Tampa Bay, which would be guaran-
teed as to principal and interest by the Governor on behalf of the State or exchanged for
a like amount of State bonds. In case of default, the Governor could sell the railroad
property and the purchasers would succeed to all rights and franchises of the Florida'
Railroad Company.

By an Act of the Florida Legislature, approved February 7th, 1870, the Florida
Railroad Company was required to commence construction from the then constructed
line towards Tampa within twelve months and to construct as far as Ocala within two
years. The charter of the Company was extended to cover construction to Charlotte
Harbor and authorization was given for a separate issue of capital stock for this portion.
The amount of State guaranteed bonds which could be issued was increased to sixteen
thousand dollars per mile. The provisions of this act were accepted by letter dated
January 4, 1870, from John Hedges, Secretary, to Governor Harrison Reed.

An Act, approved February 24th, 1873, repealed the Acts authorizing Statp in-
dorsement of bonds or issue of State bonds in exchange for railroad bonds. No bonds of
the Florida Railroad Company had been issued under the act of June 24th, 1869.

.ORGANIZATION.

The stockholders effected the organization at a meeting held at Jacksonville, Fla.,
March 6th, 1855. The principal office of the Company was at Fernandina, Fla.


CONSTRUCTION.

Construction was commenced in 1855, and was completed from:
Fernandina to Lofton, 10 miles, August 1, 1856;
Lofton to Crawford, 20 miles, November 1, 1856;
Crawford to Fiftone, 20 miles, August 1, 1857; \c
Fiftone to Reynolds, 24 miles, March 1, 1858; P/
SReynolds to Hampton, 6 miles, January 1, 1859; '
Hampton to Gainesville, 17.5 miles, February 1, 1859;
Gainesville to Venables, 20 miles, June 1, 1859;
Venables to Sumner, 30.5 miles, January 1, 1860;
Sumner to Cedar Key, 7.5 miles, March 1, 1861.
The line, 155.5 miles long, was constructed with a five foot ga
58 pound iron rail.


VC


uge and laid with


OPERATION.
Minutes Trustees Im- The railroad was operated by its own organization from the close of construction
provement Fund Voi.-I
Page 287 until October 6, 1866.
Page 289
Page 22 For failure to pay since November 5th, 1863, the one-half of one per cent semi-an-
Page 326
Minute Book Fla. R. R. nually for sinking fund on the State guaranteed bonds, the Trustees of the Improvement
Fund took possession October 6th, 1866, and operated the line until November 3rd,
Comptroller's Contract 1866. The property was sold at Public Auction at Gainesville, Fla., on November 1st,
1866, to Isaac K. Roberts for 6323,400, and at the request of the purchaser was, by deed
dated November 3rd, 1866, conveyed to Edward N. Dickerson and associates.

The Florida Railroad Company was reorganized by the purchasers and operated
under its own management from November 3rd, 1866, to January 18th, 1872.


Florida Laws 1872-Page 80
Chapter 1918 No. 56. Book
of Charters Page 715 Law
Library (. C.


A Special Act of the Legislature of Florida, approved January 18th, 1872, changed
the name of the Company to Atlantic, Gulf and West India Transit Company.


Minutes Trustees Im-
provement Fund Volume I.













PENSACOLA AND GEORGIA RAILROAD COMPANY


Chart No. 11


Place No. 105


INCORPORATION.


A Special Act of the Legislature of Florida, approved January 8, 1853, incorporated
the Pensacola and Georgia Railroad Company to construct and operate a railroad from
Pensacola to a point on the State Line between Georgia and Florida.
Construction was required to be commenced in five years and completed in twenty
years.

The United States Government, by Act approved September 4, 1841, granted to
the Territory of Florida five hundred thousand acres of public lands to be sold and the
proceeds applied for internal improvements.

The United States Government, by Act approved September 28th, 1850, granted to
the State the swamp and overflow lands in Florida owned by the Federal Government.

The United States Government, by Act approved May 17, 1856, granted to the
State every alternate odd numbered section of land for six sections in width on each
side of the railroads from Jacksonville to Pensacola; from Amelia Island to Tampa Bay,
with branch to Cedar Key; and from Pensacola to the Alabama State Line; to be used
in aid of the construction of these railroads.

The Internal Improvement Act of Florida approved January 6th, 1855 (and amend-
ments) placed the public lands granted to the State by the Federal Government under
the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund. The railroad companies were granted
the alternate odd numbered sections within six miles of the line of the road. Thp rail-
road companies were granted a right of way 200 feet wide. Railroads already chartered
were required to give notice to the Trustees of the Fund of their acceptance of the provi-
sions of the Act, within six months, on penalty of losing their charter rights for uncon-
structed portions of the line. The railroad companies, were permitted to issue first
mortgage 7 per cent bonds at the rate of eight thousand dollars per mile, for construc-
tion, and two thousand dollars additional per mile for equipment, guaranteed as to
principal and interest by the Trustees on behalf of the State. As a sinking fund each
road was required to pay to the Trustees one-half of one per cent semi-annually on out-
standing bonds. No bonds could be issued for work not completed within eight years
of the passage of the Act. For bridges over certain large rivers an additional guaranteed
bond issue was authorized.

By letter dated February 12th, 1855 from Benjamin F. Whitner, Secnetary, to the
Trustees, the provisions of the Act were accepted by the Pensacola and Georgia Rail-
road Company.

An Act, approved December 15th, 1855, authorized construction to Lake City.
The company was authorized to set off any portion of the line to a corporation having
distinct organization and different name which would succeed to all the charter rights
of the Pensacola and Georgia Railroad Company for the portion so set off.


Lawva at Floiulda 1l13-Iate
41 Chapter 484 No.8. Book
of Chargers Page 76W Law
Library 0. C.


U. S. itatutea at Lage-
1841 Chap, It-Val. q Palm
453 Minutea Trusteea Im
provenmnt tFund VOL I,


U. S. Statutes at Large.
1850 Chap. 84-Vol. 9 Page
S19 Minutes Trustees Im-
provement Fund Vol. I.

U. S. Statutes at Large-
1856 Chap. 31-Vol. II Page
15 Minutes Trustees Im-
provement Fund Vol. 1.




Laws of Florida 1855-Chap.
610 (No. I) Amended 1855
Chapter 734 (No. 125)
Amended 1855 Chapter 874
(No. 16). Amended 1859
Chapter 1015 (No. 20)
Amended 1861 Chapter
1110 (No. 17) Minutes
Trustees Improvement
Fund Vol. 1.













Minutes Trustees Im-
rovement Fund Vol. I-
age 4.



Laws of Florida 1855-Page
15 Chapter 728 No. 119 Book
of Charters Page 769 Law
Library Geneial Counsel.











Laws of Florida .,,5-5-
Page 120 Chapter 948-N..
90 Ia8s-lPage 3 Chapter
1021-No. 26. Book of Chart-
ers Page 772 Law Library
General Counsel.


Laws of Florida 18L6-Page
45 Chapter 1573 No. 40.
Book of Charters Page 776
Law Library U e n e r a I
Counsel.



Laws of Florida 1866-Page
47 Chapter 1574 No. 41.
Book of Charters Page 779
Law Library U. C.


Minutes Trustees Im-
provement Fund Vol. i
Page 64
Page 69
Page 86
Page 161
Page 176
Page 184
Page 186
Page 187
Page 199
Page 200
Page 201
Page 229
Page 239
Page 241


Minutes Trustees Im-
provement Fund Volume I
Page 360
Page 370
Page 376

Comptroller's Contract
No. 120s5







Laws of Florida 1869-Page
40 Chapter 171l No. 6.
Book of Charters Page 798
Law Library (U. C.


An Act, approved January, 15th, 1859, authorized the construction of a branch
line from Quincy, Tallahassee or ;onic point on the Tallahassee Railroad to the Gulf
of Mexico. By an Act approved December 22nd, 1859, this was re-enacted to cure
errors in original enactment.

An Act, approved December 13th, 1866, authorized the sale of a branch line, between
Live Oak and the State Line between Georgia and Florida, to the Atlantic and Gulf
Railroad Company of Georgia. Cash from the sale was directed to be expended for
construction between Quincy and Pensacola.

An Act, approved December 14th, 1866, provided for the detention of goods for
non-payment of freight charges.

ORGANIZATION.

The date of organization is not known. The principal office of the Company was
at Tallahassee, Fla.

CONSTRUCTION.

Construction was commenced in March, 1856 at Tallahassee and in May, 1860 at
Lake City and completed :

Tallahassee to Capitola, 13 miles, November 1st, 1857;
Capitol to Brasswells, 12 miles, February 1st, 1858;
Brasswells to Drifton, 2.7 miles, January 1st, 1860;
Drifton to Monticello, 4.4 miles, January 1st, 1860;
Drifton to Greenville, 15 miles, March 1st, 1860;
Greenville to Madison, 10 miles, July 1st, 1860;
Lake City to Welborn, 10 miles, July 1st, 1860;
Welborn to Madison, 43.1 miles, January 1st, 1861;
Tallahassee to Norfleet, 7 miles, January 1st, 1861;
Norfleet to Midway, 8.5 miles, May 1st, 1862;
Midway to Quincy, 8.4 miles, February 1st, 1863.
The line was constructed with a five foot gauge and laid with 52 lb. iron rail.

OPERATION.

The railroad was operated by the Company inder its own management from the
close of construction to April 8th, 1869 and by F. Dibble and associates from April 8th,
1869 to June 24th, 1869.

For failure to pay the one-half of one per cent semi-annually to the sinking fund
on the State guaranteed bonds, the property and franchises of the company were sold
at public auction by the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund at Tallahassee,
Fla., March 20th, 1869, to Franklin Dibble and associates. Deed was executed and pos-
session given on April 8th, 1869. A portion of the purchase money was not paid and
formed a basis for much litigation with successor corporations.

By an Act, approved June 24th, 1869, the purchasers of the Pensacola and Georgia
Railroad and of the Tallahassee Railroad were incorporated to form the Tallahassee
Railroad Company, a new and distinct corporation.












FLORIDA CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY


Chart No. 16


Place No. 99


INCORPORATION.


A Special Act of the Legislature of Florida, approved July 29th, 1868, incorporated
the purchasers of the Florida, Atlantic and Gulf Central Railroad Company as the
Florida Central Railroad Company with all of the charter rights of the former Company.

A Special Act of the Legislature of Florida, approved January 28th, 1870, which
amended the charter of the Jacksonville, Pensacola and Mobile Railroad Company,
authorized the exchange of first mortgage 7 per cent bonds, to the amount of sixteen
thousand dollars per mile, for State bonds of like character and amount.


ORGANIZATION.

The date of organization is not known. The principal office of the Company was
at Jacksonville, Florida.
CONSTRUCTION.


No new lines were constructed by the Florida Central Railroad Company.
OPERATION.

The line from Jacksonville, Fla., to Lake City, Fla., 59.3 miles, was operated from
July 29th, 1868, to June 1st, 1870, by the Company under its own management.
From June 1st, 1870, to October 2nd, 1871, the line was operated by the Jackson-
ville, Pensacola and Mobile Railroad Company.

On October 2nd, 1871, the line was leased for a period of two years to Chase, Gor-
don and Ambler, of Jacksonville, Fla. It was operated by the lessees until March
20th, 1872.
An action was commenced in Duval County Circuit Court by the Trustees of the
Internal Improvement Fund against the Jacksonville, Pensacola and Mobile Railroad
Company for amount unpaid on the purchase price at the sale of March 20th, 1869, and
the Florida Central Railroad Company was made a party, being claimed as a por-
tion of the Jacksonville, Pensacola and Mobile Railroad Company. On March 20th,
1872, J. C. Greeley was appointed Receiver of the entire line from Jacksonville to River
Junction.
From March 20th,1872, to May 31st,1872, the FloridaCentral Railroad was operated
by J. C. Greeley, Receiver.
On May 31st, 1872, by order of the Circuit Court of Duval County, J. C. Greeley
was discharged and J. M. Baker was appointed Receiver.
From May 31st, 1872, to March 26th, 1875, the line was operated by J. M. Baker,
Receiver. On March 26th, 1873, the Receiver was discharged.
From May 26th, 1873, to November 18th, 1873, the line was operated by the company
under its own management.
"C


Laws of Florida 186$-lPa'ge
145 Chapter 16A16 No. 22.
Book of Charters Page 759
Law Library U. C.


Laws of Florida 1870-1Page
9 Chapter 1731 No. I Sec-
tion 4. Book of Charters
Page 814 Law Library G. C.


Florida Supreme Court
Reports Volume XV Page
240 Law Library 0. C.










Florida Supreme Court
Reports Volume XV Page
690 Law Library General
Counsel.


Comptrofler's Contract


oi otr's Coatiact


On November 18th, 1875, a judgment was rendered in the Circuit Court of Duval
County in behalf of the State against the Florida Central Railroad Comlpany for $368,000,
and Joseph H. Durkee was appointed Special Master to sell the property. Appeal
was taken and in the June terln, 187(, of the Supreme Court of Florida the judgment
was reversed and the-Special Master was directed to return the property to the officers
of the railroad company.

From November 18th, 1875, to November 1, 1876, the line was operated by Joseph
H. Durkee, Special Master.
From November 1, 1876, to May 31st, 1879, the line was operated by the company
under its own management.
By decree of the U. S. Circuit Court, May 31st, 1879, in the ease of J. Fred Schutte,
A. B. Hawkins and S. Conant, Special Masters, took possession.
From May 31st, 1879, to January 18th, 1882, the line was operated by A. B. Hawkins
and S. Conant, Special Masters.

On January 6th, 1882,:the line was sold at public auction to Sir E. J. Reed for
$395,000. Deed was executed and possession given to the purchaser January 18th,
1882.
From January 18th, 1882, to March 4th, 1882, the line was operated by Sir E. J.
Reed.

By deed dated March 4th, 1882, Sir E. J. Reed conveyed the railroad from Jackson-
ville to Lake City to the Florida Central and Western Railroad Company.














Chart No. 17


TALLAHASSEE RAILROAD COMPANY

Place No. 100


INCORPORATION.


A Special Act of the Legislature of Florida, approved June 24th, 1869, incorporated
the purchasers of the property of the Pensacola and Georgia Railroad Company and the
Tallahassee Railroad Company as the Tallahassee Railroad Company, a new and dis-
tinct corporation. The Act provided that the new Company should succeed to all of
the charter rights of the. two former companies.


Laws of Florida 1869-Page
40 Chapter 1718 No. 6.
Book of Charters Page 794
Law Library 0. C.


ORGANIZATION.

The date of organization is not known. The principal office of the Company was
at Tallahassee, Fla.






CONSTRUCTION.

No new lines were constructed by the Tallahassee Railroad Company. (1869.)







OPERATION


From June 24th, 1869, to May 25th, 1870, the lines from :
Lake City to Quinyi, 129.7 miles;
Tallahassee to St. Marks, 20.5 miles, and from Drifton to Monticello,4.4 miles,
were operated by the Company under its own management.


On May 25th, 1870, the propertyy of the Company was sold to and merged ilto the u. s. Supreme Court Re-
ports 26 Law Edition No.
Jacksonville, Pensacola and.i Mobile Railroad Company. 327 Law Library 0. C.
Comptroller's Contract
No. 12070.












JACKSONVILLE, PENSACOLA AND MOBILE RAILROAD COMPANY


Chart No. 18


Place No. 94


(NCORPORATION.


Laws of Florida 186I-Page
29 Chapter 1716 No. 4.
Book of Charters Page 798
Law Library 0. C.
/









Laws of Florida 1874-Page
9Chapter 1731 No. 1. Book
of Charters Page 814 Law
Library 0. C.




Laws of Florida Extra Ses-
sion 1870 Page 16 Chapter
1823 No. 9. Book of Chart-
ers Page 823 Law Library
(. C.

Laws of Florida l7J-Page
30 Chapter 1966-No. 20.
Book of Charters Page 825
Law Library G. C.

Laws of Florida 1877-Page
156. Book of Charters Page
.826 Law Library G. C.


Laws of Florida 1881-Page
122 Chapter J325 No.. 107.
Book of Charters Page 827
Law Library 0. C.


A Special Act of the Legislature of Florida, approved June 24th, 1869, incorporated
the Jacksonville, Pensacola and Mobile Railroad Company to construct and operate a
railroad from Quincy to the Alabama State Line in the direction of Mobile. A 200 ft.
right of way was granted through all State land. Seven per cent first mortgage thirty
year bonds, at the rate of fourteen thousand dollars per mile, guaranteed as to principal
and interest by the Governor on behalf of the State, and exchange of same for State
bonds of like character and amount, were authorized Merger with the Tallahassee
Railroad Company was authorized. Construction to River Junction was required to
be completed by January 1st, 1870, and the remaining portion within three years.

A Special Act of the Legislature of Florida, approved January 28th, 1870, required
that the line should not be built within fifteen miles of the north line of the State. State
guaranteed bonds were authorized to be issued at the rate of sixteen thousand dollars
per mile instead of fourteen thousand. The required date of completion to River
Junction was extended to July 1st, 1870, and for the remaining portion to 1875.

A Special Act of the Legislature of Florida, approved June 6th, 1870, extended the
required date of completion to River Junction to January 1st, 1871, and for the remain-
ing portion to January 28th, 1875.

A Special Act of the Legislature of Florida, approved February 24th, 1873, repealed
the State endorsement of bonds.

A joint resolution of the Legislature of Florida, in 1877, declared all State bonds,
issued in exchange for bonds of the Jacksonville, Pensacola and Mobile Railroad Com-
pany void, and prohibited payment of principal or interest.

A Special Act of the Legislature of Florida, approved March 7th, 1881, authorized
the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund, in case of foreclosure sale of the Jack-
sonville, Pensacola and Mobile Railroad Company, to purchase the road and then sell,
lease or operate for the benefit of holders of the first mortgage bonds of the Pensacola
and Georgia Railroad Company and the Tallahassee Railroad Company.


ORGANIZATION.

The date of organization is not known. The principal office of the company was
at Tallahassee, Florida.

CONSTRUCTION. \

Construction was commenced in April, 1870, and completed March 20th, 1872>
from Quincy, Fla., to River Junction, Fla., 20.1 miles.
SThe road was built with a five foot gauge, and laid with 56 lb. iron rail.










OPERATION.


On May 25th, 1870, the property of the Tallahassee Railroad Company was sold
to and merged into the Jacksonville, Pensacola and Mobile Railroad Company.
The line from Tallahassee, Fla. to St. Marks, Fla., 20.5 miles, was operated by the
Company under its own management from May 25th, 1870, to October 2nd, 1871.
The lines from :
Lake City, Fla. to Quincy, Fla., 129.7 miles;
Drifton, Fla. to Monticello, Fla., 4.4 miles;
were operated by the Company under its own management from May 25th, 1870, to
November Ist, 1870.
The line of the Florida Central Railroad Company 'from :
Jacksonville, Fla. to Lake City, Fla., 59.3 miles.;
was operated 'from June 1st, 1870, to October 2nd, 1871.

Rail for'construction of the line west of Tallahassee was in 'the St. Marks Custom
House at the commencement of the 'Civil War. When the Custom House was seized
by Confederate Authorities the Pensacola and Georgia Railroad 'Company received the
rail. After the close of the war, action was brought by the Federal Government in
the U. S. 'Orcuit Court against the Pensacola and 'Georgia Railroad Company and
judgment secured. The railroad from Lake 'City to Quincy, including the Monti-
cello Branch, was sold by the U. S. Marshdl November 1st, 1870, to J. B. Clark.
From November 1st, 1870, to May 18th, 1871, thce line ;rom Lake City to Quincy
and the Monticello Branch were operated :by J. B. "Olaik.

On May 18th, 1871, the line from .Lake City toQuincy and the Monticello Branch
were sold by I. B. Clark to the Jacksonville, Pensacdla and Mobile Railroad Company.
From May 18th, 1871, to October 2nd, 1871, the lines from :
Lake City, Fla., to Quincy, Fla., 129.7 TmiCes;
Drifton, Fla., to Morticello, Pla., 4.4 miles;
were operated by the company under its own management.

On October 2nd, 1871, the lines from :
Jadksonville, Fla., to Quincy, Fla., 189 miles;
Drifton, Fla., to Monticello, Fla., 4.4 miles;
Tallahassee, Fla., to St. Marks, Fla., 20.5 miles;
were leased for a term of two years to Chase, Gordon and Ambler, Trustees, for the
Fldrida Construction Company, which company was constructing the line west of
Quincy.
These lines were operated by the-lessees from October 2nd, 1871, to March 20th,
1872.
An action was commenced in Duval County Circuit Court by the Trustees of the
Internal Improvement Fund for the balance due on the purchase price of the Pensa-
cola and Georgia and the Tallahassee Railroads at the sale of March 20th, 1869. On
March 20th, 1872, J. C. Greely was appointed Receiver.
From March 20th, 1872, to May 15th, 1873, the lines west of Lake City, Fla.
were operated by J. C. Greeley, Receiver.

In an action in the U. S. Circuit Court, judgment for 860,000. was secured by D.
P. Holland December 2nd, 1872, against the Jacksonville, Pensacola and Mobile Rail-
road Company. The railroad was sold to D. P. Holland May 5th, 1873, and deed
executed May 11th, 1873.
The lines west of Lake City were operated by D. P. Holland from May 15th, 1873,
to April 14th, 1874.


Comptroller's Contract
No. 12070.



















Comptroller's Contract
No. 12047.




Comptroller's Contract
No. 12046.


Florida Supreme Court
Reports Volume XV Pages
234. 26.. 4. 497.
Comptroller's Contract
No. 12045.










On May 31st, 1872, Francis B. Papy was appointed R.eceiver, in a suit brought in
Leon County C(-ircuit Court by the holders of the first mortgage h)o (ls of the Pensacola
and Georgia Railroad C(ompany and of the Tallahassee Railroad (Co0mpany. F. 1.
Papy was an employee of J. C. (Greeley and never had actual possession although in
charge of the offices at Tallahassee. He was discharged by Court Order of January
21st, 1873.
In July, 1872, other bondholders had brought suit in the U. S. Circuit Court and
on December 19th, 1872, a decree was secured and the property was advertised for sale
by the U. S. Marshall July 7th, 1873,'postponed to January 1st, 1874, and sale enjoined
by the U. S. Supreme Court December 27th, 1873.
On April 2nd, 1874, the Circuit Court of Duval County directed the removal of
D. P. Holland from possession of the lines west of Lake City and the return of the rail-
road to Receiver J. C. Greeley.
From April 14th, 1874, to February 1st, 1875, the lines west of Lake City were
operated by J. C. Greeley, Receiver.
At the January Term, 1875, of the Florida Supreme Court, J. C. Greeley was dis-
charged and the lines west of Lake City were returned to D. P. Holland.
From February 1st, 1875, to January 1st, 1877, the lines west of Lake City were
operated by D. P. Holland.


Book of Charters Page 4 On December 13th, 1876, the Governor of Florida appointed Dennis Eagan to take
law Library G. C.
possession and sell the railroad property for defaulted interest on bonds held by the
State. This order was superceded by an order of the U. S. Circuit Court which, on
January 1st, 1877, appointed S. Conant and A. B. Hawkins, Receivers.

ComptroI*r'a Contract By decree dated May 31st, 1879, of the U. S. Circuit Court, in the case of J. Fred
Schuette, on September 25th, 1879, the line from Lake City to Quincy, with branch to
Monticello, and the line from Tallahassee to St. Marks, were sold separately by the re-
ceivers to Jackson, Simonton and Engler, purchasing trustees. The sale was confirmed
by the Court July 8th, 1881, and on that date the purchasers took possession.

Comptroler's Contract By deed dated February 4th, 1882, the property was sold by the Purchasing Trust-
No. 12072.
ees to Sir E. J. Reed.
From January 1st, 1877, to July 8th, 1881, the lines west of Lake City were operated
by S. Conant and A. B. Hawkins, Receivers.
From July 8th; 1881, to March 4th, 1882, the lines west of Lake City were operated
by the Purchasing Trustees and Sir E. J. Reed.

Comptroller' Contract On March 4th, 1882, Sir E. J. Reed conveyed the entire railroad west of Lake City
No.lo a Central and Western Railroad Company.58.
ti h, Florida Central and Western Railroad Comppany.












ATLANTIC, GULF AND WEST INDIA TRANSIT COMPANY


Chart No. 21


Florida Laws 1872-Page 89
Chapter 1918 (No. 56).
Book of Charters Page 715
Law Library i. C.


Comptroller's Contract
No. 12073.





Comptroller's Contract
No. 12074.



Comptroller's Contract
No. 1207S.






Comptroller's Contract
No. 12041.


Comptroller's Con-
tracts No. 1204 and No.
12043.


Place No. 102


INCORPORATION.
By a Special Act of the Legislature of Florida, approved January 18th, 1872, the
name of Florida Railroad Company was changed to Atlantic, Gulf and West India
Transit Company.

ORGANIZATION.
Organization of the Company was effected January 29th, 1872. The principal
office of the Company was at Fernandina, Fla.


CONSTRUCTION.

No new lines were constructed by this Company.

OPERATION.
The line from Fernandina, Fla., to Cedar Key, was operated by the Company under
its own management from January 18th, 1872, to February 12th, 1881. By indenture,
dated April 15th, 1876, authorized November 5th, 1875, the franchise covering tile
construction of the line from Waldo to Ocala was set off to the Peninsular Railroad
Company.

By indenture dated January 21st, 1881, authorized November 5th, 1875, the fran-
chise covering the construction of the line from Ocala to Tampa Bay and to Char-
lotte Harbor was set off to The Tropical Florida Railroad Company.

For failure to pay interest on the 7 per cent bonds secured by a deed of trust to
John A. Steward and Frederick A. Conkling, dated May 26th, 1869, an action was
brought in the U. S. Circuit Court by the Trustees of the bond issue. Phillip Walter
was appointed Special Master, November 27th, 1880. The property was sold at public
auction February 7th, 1881, to Edward N. Dickerson and Charles Willard, and deed
executed February 12th, 1881.

For failure to pay the one-half of one per cent semi-annually as a sinking fund on
the uncancelled guaranteed bonds of the Florida Railroad Company, action was com-
menced in the U. S. Circuit Court by Aristides Doggett, Receiver of the Trustees of the
Internal Improvement Fund. By decree dated February 23rd, 1881, J. B. C. Drew
was appointed Special Master and on April 4th, 1881, sold the property at public auc-
tion to Edward N. Dickerson and Charles Willard. Deed was executed April 14th,
1881.

From February 12th, 1881, to May 10th, 1881, the line was operated by Edward
N. Dickerson and Charles Willard, Purchasing Trustees.

By two deeds dated May 10th, 1881, Edward N. Dickerson and Charles Willard
conveyed the railroad property and franchises to the Florida Transit Railroad Company.












PENINSULAR RAILROAD COMPANY


Chart No. 24


Place No. 98


INCORPORATION.


Florida R. R. Co. Minute
Book Page 65 Treasurer's
Vault. Florida Laws 1855
Page 16-Chap. 729 (No.120s.
Book of Charters Page 711
Law Library 0. C.







Minutes Trustees Im-
provemerit Fund Vol. 2-
Page 135
Page 273


By Deed of Set-Off from the Atlantic, Gulf and West India Transit Company,
dated April 15th, 1876, the Peninsular Railroad Company was incorporated in Florida
as successor to the franchise rights of the Florida Railroad Company, covering the line
from Waldo, Fla., to Ocala, 'la.
Under an Act of the Legislature of Florida, dated December 14th, 1855, the parties
to' whom a portion of the line was set off became a distinct corporation with full charter
rights covering the portion so set off.



The deed of set-off was filed with the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund
May 11th, 1876.


ORGANIZATION.

The date of organization is not known. The principal office was at Fernandina,


CONSTRUCTION.


Minutes Trustees Im-
grovement Fund Vol. 2-
PaSg 502.


Comptroller's Contract
No. 12076.


Construction was commenced in 1879 and completed July 4th, 1880, from
Waldo to Ocala, 45 miles, and from
Silver Springs Junction to Silver Springs, 2 miles.
The road was constructed with a five foot gauge and laid with thirty-five pound
iron rail.


OPERATION.

Under the terms of the deed of set-off the road, on completion, was operated by the
Atlantic, Gulf and West India Transit Company and its successor, the Florida Transit
Railroad Company to January 3rd, 1883.



On January 3rd, 1883, the Peninsular Railroad Company was consolidated with the
Florida Transit Railroad Company and The Tropical Florida Railroad Company to
form the Florida Transit and Peninsular Railroad Company.












THE TROPICAL FLORIDA RAILROAD COMPANY


Chart No. 28


Place No. 97


INCORPORATION.


By l)eed of Set-Off from the Atlantic, Gulf and West India Transit Company,
dated January 21st, 1881, The Tropical Florida Railroad Company was incorporated in
Florida as successor to the franchise rights of the Florida Railroad Company covering
the line from Ocala, Fla., to Tampa and Charlotte Harbor, Fla.


Under an Act of the Legislature of Florida, dated December 14th, 1855, the parties
to whom a portion of the line was set off became a distinct corporation with full charter
rights covering the portion so set-off.


The deed of set-off was filed with the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund
January 28th, 1881.


Florida R. R. Co. Minute
Book 'Pae s7 Treasunr's
Vault. Minutes Trustees
Improvement Fund Vol, 2-
Page 434.




Florida Laws 1855 Page 16-
Chap. 729 (No. 120). Book
of Charters Page 711 Law
Library Q. C.



Mirlutes Trustees im-
provement Fund Vol. 2-
Page 434.


ORGANIZATION.


The date of organization is not known. The principal office was at Fernandina,


CONSTRUCTION.


Construction was commenced in 1881 and completed
Ocala, Fla., to Wildwood, Fla., 26 miles, June 1st, 1882;
Wildwood, Fla., to Panasoffkee, Fla., 8 miles, January 1st, 1883.
The road was constructed with a five foot gauge and laid with 40 pound steel rail.




OPERATION.

From the close of construction to January 3rd, 1883, completed portions of the road
were operated by the Florida Transit Railroad Company.


On January 3rd, 1883, The Tropical Florida Railroad Company was consolidated
witl the Florida Transit Railroad Company and the Peninsular Railroad Company to
form the Florida Transit and Peninsular Railroad Company.


Minutes Trustees Im-
provement Fund Vol. 3-
age iSO.


Comptroller's Contract
No. 12076.











FLORIDA TRANSIT RAILROAD COMPANY


Chart No. 30


Place No. 96


INCORPORATION.


The Florida Transit Railroad Company was incorporated April 27th, 1881, by
Edward N. Dickerson and Charles D. Willard, Purchasing Trustees of the Atlantic,
Gulf and West India Transit Company. No new charter was secured as under an Act
of the Legislature of Florida, approved June 24th, 1869, the purchasers at foreclosure
sale could organize and become incorporated as successors to the franchises of the Com-
pany whose property had been sold.


ORGANIZATION.

The organization of the Company was effected at a meeting of the stockholders
April 27th, 1881. The principal office of this Company was at Fernandina, Fla.




CONSTRUCTION.

No new lines were constructed by the Florida Transit Railroad Company.




OPERATION.

By two deeds, dated May 10th, 1881, the railroad property, and franchises were
acquired from Edward N. Dickerson and Charles D. Willard.
The Company operated the railroad between Fernandina and Cedar Key under its
own management from May 10, 1881, to January 3rd, 1883.
Under the terms of the deed of set-off the Peninsular Railroad Company, upon
completion, was operated by the Atlantic, Gulf and West India Transit Company and
its successor, the Florida Transit Railroad Company, to January 3rd, 1883.


Plorida Laws INO Pai* 2
Chapter 1716 No. 4.Soc, 09.
Book of Charters Pale 7W
Law Library O. C.


Comptroller' Contracts
No. 1'41.
No. 1304J.


On January 3rd, 1883, the Florida Transit Railroad Company was consolidated Copgtoller's contract
with the Peninsular Railroad Company and The Tropical Florida Railroad Company
to form the Florida Transit and Peninsular Railrpad Company.












FLORIDA CENTRAL AND WESTERN RAILROAD COMPANY
Chart No. 35 Place No. 93



INCORPORATION.


Under the.General Railroad Incorporation Act of Florida, Laws of 1874, letters
patent were issued February 20th, 1882, incorporating the Florida Central and Western
Railroad Company to operate the railroads formerly owned by the Jacksonville, Pensa-
cola and Mobile Railroad Company and the Florida Central Railroad Company.


Lawsof Florida 1874-Chap.
1987-1879-Chap. 3166. Mc-
Clellan's Digest 1881-Chap.
39. Book o( Charters Page
849 Law Library 0. C.


ORGANIZATION.

The date of organization is not known. The principal office of the company was
at Jacksonville, Fla.

CONSTRUCTION.

No new lines were constructed by the Florida Central and Western Railroad Company.


OPERATION.

By deed, dated March 4th, 1882, Sir E. J. Reed, conveyed to the Company the rail- Comptrler's Contract
roads formerly owned by the Jacksonville, Pensacola and Mobile Railroad Company
and the Florida Central Railroad Company.
From March 4th, 1882, to March 5th, 1884, the lines from
Jacksonville, Fla., to River Junction, Fla., 209.1 miles;
Tallahassee, Fla., to St. Marks, Fla., 20.5 miles;
Drifton, Fla., to Monticello, Fla., .4.4 miles,
were operated by the Company under its own management.


For failure to pay the full amount due to the Trustees of the Internal Improvement
Fund, in accordance with the decree of the U. S. Circuit Court, at the foreclosure sale of
a predecessor corporation, the line from Tallahassee, Fla., to St. Marks, Fla., was sold
by Joseph H. Durkee, Special Master, on October 9th, 1883, to Edward Lewis for $25,000.
The sale was confirmed October 18th, 1883, and deed executed June 24th, 1885.

By agreements between Florida Transit and Peninsular Railronad Company and
Florida Central and Western Railroad Company, dated March 5th, 1884, between
Florida Transit and Peninsular Railroad Company and Lcesburg and Indian River
Railroad Company, dated March 5th, 1884, and between Florida Transit and Penin-
sular Railroad Company andt Fernandina and Jacksonville Railroad Company, dated
March 4th, 1884, all of which were filed in the office of the Secretary of State of Florida
on January 19th, 1885, the Florida Transit and Peninsular Railroad Company, Fern-
aiudina and Jacksonville Railroad Company, Florida Central and Western Railroad
Company, and the Lcesburg and Indian River Railroad Company were consolidated to
form the Florida Railway and Navigation Company.


Comptroller's Contract
No. 12049.





Book of Charters
Page 685
Page 872
Page 878
Law Library 0. C.
Comptroller's Contract
No. 12081.












FLORIDA TRANSIT AND PENINSULAR RAILROAD COMPANY


Chart No. 39


Place No. 91


INCORPORATIQN*


Under the generall Railroad Incorporation Act of Florida, approved February
19th, 1874, the Florida Transit and Peninsular Railroad Company was formed January
3rd, 1883, by consolidation of the Florida Transit Railroad Company, the Peninsular
Railroad Company and The Tropical Florida Railroad Company. The articles of'agree-
ment were not filed with the Secretary of State of Florida until January 19th, 1885, but
the incorporation was effected January 3rd, 1883.



ORGANIZATION.

The organization of the Company was effected at a meeting of the stockholders
January 3rd, 1883. The principal office of the Company was at Fernandina, Fla.


CONSTRUCTION.

No new lines were constructed by the Florida Transit and Peninsular Railroad
Company.


OPERATION.
The lines from;
Fernandina, Fla., to Cedar Key,. Fla., 155.5 miles;
Waldo, Fla., to Panasoffkee, Fla., 79.5 miles;
Silver Springs Junction, Fla., to Silver Springs, 2.0 miles,
were operated by the Company under its own management from January 3rd, 1883,
to March 5th, 1884.


By agreements between Florida Transit and Peninsular Railroad Company and
Florida Central and Western Railroad Company, dated March 5th, 1884, between Flor-
ida Transit and Peninsular Railroad Company and Leesburg and Indian River Rail-
road Company, dated March 5th, 1884, and between Florida Transit and Peninsular
Railroad Company and Fernandina and Jacksonville Railroad Company, dated March
4th, 1884, all of which were filed in the office of the Secretary of State of Florida on
January 19th, 1885, the Florida Transit and Peninsular Railroad Company, Fernandina
and Jacksonville Railroad Company, Florida Central and Western Railroad Company,
and the Leesburg and Indian River Railroad Company were consolidated to form the
Florida Railway and Navigation Company.


SMcClellan's Diges 1881-
Chap. 39. Book of Chart-
era
Pages U835 and 842.


Book of Charters
Page 858
Page 866
Page 873
Law Library Q. C.
Comptroller's Con-
tracts
12077
12078
12081




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