Title: Caribbean reef magazine
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100862/00002
 Material Information
Title: Caribbean reef magazine
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: Caribbean Footprints
Place of Publication: Maraval, Trinidad & Tobago
Publication Date: July-September 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100862
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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CARIBBEAN


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T IB VILLAS



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P.O. Box 1079, Bon Accord, Black Rock, Tobago,
West Indies.
Tel.: +1 (868)-639-0361 Fax: +1 (868)-639-0102
Email : stonehav@tstt.net.tt

-u-u-TY~g~q0am @Thalsy@ m lllllO.Te


"If you are looking for comfort, leisure
and serenity, be sure to stay at the Vil-
las at Stonehaven, Tobago. As a 'Small
Luxury Hotel of the WorldM', the Villas
at Stonehaven are by no means petite in
their service to anyone who loves to ex-
perience such pleasures. Ideal for group
stays, each villa is equipped with a cheer-
ful resident housekeeper, allowing a very
relaxed atmosphere.
Each spacious villa has its own infin-
ity pool overlooking the Caribbean Sea,
and you can even expect to awaken each
morning to the delightful sounds of sing-
ing birds and humming birds hovering
amongst the trees.
Caribbean REEF Magazine's editorial
team can surely attest to the luxury of the
Villas at Stonehaven while on assignment
for Tobago's Underwater Carnival."

-Ife Smenkh-Ka-Ra,
Managing Editor
Caribbean REEF Magazine





FIATURiS


4 www.caribbeanreefmag.com







CARIBBEAN







Publisher
CARIBBEAN FOOTPRINTS
PUBLISHING CO. LTD.


Publication Design & Layout
cIFE SMENKH-KA-RA

Copy Editor
CHERYL NG FOON


Contributing Writers
RAYNARD BURNSIDE
ARIELLE ABERDEEN
LAURA-MARIE HANDS

ALANA BABB


Phone
1 (868) 732.5615


Skype

caribbean.reef.magazine


Sales

INFO@:CARIBBEANREEFMAG.COM


I:,I l -
l I I I. I I
( -1I I l:, :l i I I : "I I i l l I I II
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CONTRIBUTORS
Raynard Burnside is a free-diver from Rum Cay, Baha-
mas, which has a population of 57. As a young boy grow-
ing up, he explored the underwater sea world through
many recreational sports and aquatic activities, such as
non-competitive free-diving, water polo, free-diving
photography, water volleyball, non-competitive spear
fishing, underwater hunting other than spearfishing and
snorkeling. He studied agribusiness management in his
undergraduate work at the University of the West Indies,
St. Augustine Campus. He holds an advance Masters de-
gree in Tropical Animal Science and Production. After
completing his studies, he took up temporary residence
in Trinidad and Tobago where he continues to be in-
volved in his underwater adventures and is now a free-
lance writer for Caribbean REEF magazine.

Arielle Aberdeen is a 20 year old Advanced
Open Water diver and Trinbagonian resident,
fairly new to the world of diving. She is cur-
rently stuck on land as she completes her law
Degree. She is in a love affair with diving, the
ocean and yoga while dreaming about combin-
S ing all three. She is eagerly awaiting semester
break when she can get her fins back into the
water.

Laura Hands is a 24-year old Marine Biologist from Liv-
erpool, UK. She began diving in 2006 and has dived across
the world from Indonesia to Madagascar to Tobago in the
Caribbean, where she has worked with different conserva-
tion groups. She has also been involved with many Sea
Turtle conservation groups both in the Caribbean and Latin
America. She is currently employed at an aquatics centre
in the UK but regularly returns to the Caribbean to visit
friends and catch up on some diving.


6 www.caribbeanreefmag.com

















































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Tobagt United Auto Rentals


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Our dive adventures took us into the first
ever Tobago Under\\ater Carnival \\here
\\e metman\ dive and reef lovers from
around the Caribbean. US and UK. Carib-
bean REEF Mlag's team undertook some
wonderful dives \\ which extended from Ar-
nos Vale around Buccoo Reef to Stingrax
Alley on the south side of Tobago.

The oil spill hasn't left our region un-
scathed. so \\e share i ith l ou a poem by
Alana Babb which hig l.Wo[t e 'oil spill
in the G ulf of ,

We're iin a mlora\ eel mood for our marine
life pages So enjoy this sea cratreature roI
the comfort of your IPad screeC 111'

Our conservation corner allo\\s us to tra\-
el to Guatemala to experience turtle con-
servation efforts bI\ volunteers ofARCAS
Amlaziln conservation efforts are being
made throughout the region and \e're
excited to brinm them to \ ou


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Happy Diving :^)

Publisher and Manalinu Editor


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When it comes to dive
this issue, our corresp<
Dive Fest.

By RAYNARD BURN


getting wet
getting wet


Our editor, Ife about
fwr a dive at Sttngra!
--Fobago!
So _w--


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festivals, few have tempted the Caribbean dive Lovers. For
>ndent, Raynard Burnside takes us into Tobago's very first


SIDE


. or me, Tobago Under-
water Carnival was fun, sea
and adventure! As a non-diver
and snorkeller, the experience
was definitely thrilling. I arrived
in Tobago on Friday evening,
and checked in at the elegant
and exotic Villas at Stone-
Haven; from there, I went up
to Extra Divers Tobago where I
registered for the dive festival
with Master Scuba Diver Markus
Baumgartner who operates in
Crown Point. I had the option
of taking the shuttle or driving
my rental car to the eastern
de of the island to attend the
opening party. Our destination-
Speyside, was a beautiful and
scenic view, a hour and half
drive to the opening party that
was held at Blue Waters Inn. I


www.caribbeanreefmag.com


took many photos, capturing
Tobago's diverse fauna, flora
and spectacular bays along
the way.
When I arrived, I felt the ex-
citement in the air. I was curi-
ous as to what to expect from
my first Dive Festival. Local,
regional and international div-
ers and non-divers were in at-
tendance. There were opening
remarks from the Association of
Tobago Dive Operators (ATDO)
and Tobago Department of
Tourism representatives. SCU-
BAPRO, one of the sponsors,
gave a presentation on their
latest dive gear, and show-
cased their latest camera, the
SeaLife DC 1200 Underwater
camera which I got the oppor-
tunity to test underwater. I was
given a one-on-one demonstra-
tion of SeaLife DC 1200 under-
water camera by Fraser Purdon


Mon
w




me


W
U


g before




DIVE HOT SPOT // Tobago Underwater Carnival


into the warl
tered various
er aquatic I
graphed lots
life forms; so
able to idei
Coral, Brain
Sea Fan, Fec
French Grui
rotfish, Trumf
of the marin


(Caribbean Territory Respre-
sentative), which proved
to be very easy and enjoy-
able to use. My network skills
with other attendees were
effective, as I was able to
meet various individuals who
shared breath-taking under-
water world stories that cap-
tured my interest more and
more. The opening night was
not quite over, with expres-
sion of the islands' Trinbago-
nian steel pan sounds being
played in the background,
drinks and finger foods being


served; I was then presented
with a gift bag, filled with an
array of resourceful and use-
ful materials and gadgets.
On Saturday and Sunday
mornings the weather was
clear, the sea was calm and
I eagerly awaited some un-
derwater adventure. Our
boat captain, George of Ex-
tra Divers Tobago, was very
friendly and had lots of sea
stories, filled with adventure,
mystery and suspense. Our
first dive and snorkel site was
Arnos Vale Bay. As I plunged


12 www.caribbeanreefmag.com


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.ire




DIVE HOT SPOT // Tobago Underwater Carnival


n water, I immediately encoun-
s corals, schools of fish and oth-
ife forms. I photo-
of underwater sea "
me of which I was
itify were Lettuce
Coral, Fire Coral,
either Duster Worm,
it, Yellowtail Par-
)etfish and Squirrelfish, because
e sea life chart in my gift bag. I


was able to chat with some of the locals who
were also on the snorkelling expedition, as
they gave me a brief history
t <:t of the Bay.
S On Saturday evening, Linda
and Lynn Laymon of Dive
Training Magazine gave infor-
mative and practical dem-
onstrations on underwater
photography. Some key areas covered were
teamwork between the model and photogra-


www.caribbeanreefmag.com 13


i :




DIVE HOT SPOT // Tobago Underwater Carnival


pher, trusting the photographer, re-
specting the model and good com-
munication. I was enlightened and
ready to put those attributes into
practice.
On Sunday
evening,
Michelle
Cazabon-
Mannette,
a Turtle
Conserva-
tion Offi-
cer for Tur-
tle Village
Trust fea-
tured "Bi-
ology and
Conserva-
tion of Tur- Long Spined Squirrellfisl
ties". Her presenta-
tion was very interactive, allowing
us to participate in the discussion. I
learnt a lot about sea turtles, espe-
cially how to identify
them in Trinidad and (.
Tobago; only five (5) f!!S.i. li..
speciesarefoundinlo- n?
cal waters, all are en- .,
angered and there
are only seven to eight species in the
world! Of the two (2) most common


h,


sea turtles (Hawksbill and Green),
I'm now able to distinguish between
the two, all thanks to Mrs. Cazabon-
Mannette's interactive turtle iden-
tification
session.
For the
r r r eman-
ing week-
days,
there was
continu-
ous scuba
diving and
Sig f snorkeling
through-
out the
southern
side of
Photo By o Beverly Speed the island
boat captain
George of Extra Divers Tobago not-
ed that Stingray Alley, Buccoo Chan-
nel and Mount Irvine Wall are great
scuba diving sites. There
,L ESwas the Discover div-
,) t. ing for school kids held
J,, (n, ..- at the Rex Beach Hotel
,!" swimming pool; families
brought along their kids
who also participated in the under-
water fashion show in the swimming


14 www.caribbeanreefmag.com


I


~
r:




DIVE HOT SPOT // Tobago Underwater Carnival


pool. The underwater fashion wear
was provided by CoCo Cheznay-
nay (she-nay-nay) Suuz Martines
who added her array of watery
chimera of
beautiful
coloredScu-
baDoRagTM.
The kids
modelled
their attire
and they
too had the
opportunity .
to test SCU-
BAPRO@kids
snorkelling
gear during
the try-dive
sessions. I
was given
the oppor-
tunity to test
my photog-
raphy skills
with Seal- Trumpetfish, Photo
ife underwater cam-
eras and apply Lynn and Linda Lay-
mon's practical demonstrations and
Fraser Purdon's one-on-one use of
the SeaLife DC 1200 underwater
camera that they gave earlier in the


I


week; I took several shots of the kids
displaying their underwater fashion
gear while other attendees joined in
the fun.
The turtle
w a t c h i n g
watching
experience
took place in
the evening


Beach; be-
fore watch-






conservation
group in To-
bago core
member vol-
unteers and
staff gave a
talk on the
X ...' o- organic za-
tion'smission,
)y:Michael Ludwig scale and
scope of their activities
and on-going research projects. We
were also briefed on turtle-friendly
tips and encounter guidelines. After
the talk, we proceeded to the turtles'
nesting area on the beach, where a


www.caribbeanreefmag.com 15




-.. .- rare na Ixperiencee the natpur l r I~ ur o
Tobago S reefs and mar ine life



DPERU// TER
z a V,/y .IoI


gigantic leatherback turtle was lay-
ing its eggs. At the time, it measured
97 cm in carapace length. I count-
ed up to 77 eggs as it continued lay-
ing more. It was breathtaking to see
such a huge sea animal on shore
laying several eggs.
The closing reception of Tobago's
Underwater Carnival was held at
the Pigeon Point Heritage Park with
remarks from Tobago's Secretary of
Tourism and Planning, Assemblyman
IF


Oswald Williams, highlighting the
success of Tobago's first-ever Dive
Fest. President of ATDO, Alvin Doug-
las, spoke and shared his experience
of the dive fest. Ty Sawyer showed a
magnificent presentation on his un-
derwater photography photos. Ev-
eryone was fascinated by the marine
life he captured. The evening closed
off with a local steel drum pannist
starting the partying with a variety of
calypso and Caribbean music, with

/e of Scubapro -
nard Burnside


16 www.caribbeanreefmag.com


June 11th 18th, 2010.
22 )'/OU ye^u tnd t/K f-
F l n 'o Flre l nl L 9 -




DIVE HOT SPOT // Tobago Underwater Carnival


an all-inclusive open beach BBQ and bar
drinks. As I networked, everyone shared
how they all look forward to Tobago un-
derwater dive festival 2011!!!


www.carlbbeanreetmag.com 1/

































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CONSERVATION CORNER //Turtle Conservation in Guatemala

has b
of co
marir
The t
waii c
ed ar
of Mo
Haws















Sor this issue I would like to discuss the
work being done by ARCAS-ASOCIACION DE
RESCATE Y
CONSERVATION DE VIDA SILVESTRE (trans-
lated Wildlife Rescue and Conservation Associa-
tion) in Guatemala. ARCAS is a non-profit Gua-
temalan (Non-Governmental Organisation) NGO
that was formed in 1989 by a group of concerned
locals wanting to do something to protect their
environment and conserve their ever declining
wildlife populations. It was originally set up to
build a rescue centre to care for and rehabilitate
wild animals that were being confiscated on the
black market by the Guatemalan government.
Since its establishment, ARCAS has grown and
20 www.ca ribbea nreefmag.com




CONSERVATION CORNER //Turtle Conservation in Guatemala


ranched out into many different aspects
nservation including education and the
e turtle conservation site.
urtle hatchery is situated in Parque Ha-
in the Pacific coast, a 3-hectare protect-
aa on the beach 7km east from the town
nterrico and 2km west from the village of
lii. The park consists of a large comfort-


able rancho with volunteer quarters, a sepa-
rate volunteer house, kitchen, bathrooms and
a library/office. There are plenty of exhibits
inside the rancho to educate both the tourists
and local people about the threats to the lo-
cal environment. There is also crocodile and
iguana captive breeding on-site behind the
main rancho building. A mere one hundred































.' ..... ." .











... ... ...



























.H E:?,;: E : "








little bit of
jra's stay
iuatemala
lunteering
ithARCAS


I I


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.H / i p" ,{3


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HL- f
l.ff


- F




CONSERVATION CORNER //Turtle Conservation in Guatemala


metres away on the beach is the turtle
hatchery, turtle hospital and educational
tanks containing baby turtles.
The Parque Hawaii site was established
in 1993 to help improve turtle population
numbers after a swift decline. Despite
their endangered status, virtually all
turtle nests in Guatemala are raided of
their eggs. The local people believe that
turtle eggs have aphrodisiac qualities so
consid-
er them .
a deli-
c a cy.
ARCAS ... ...
runs the
most s
prod uc-
tive of
the 21
hatch-
eries in
G ua-
temala
with an
average
of 40,000 Olive Ridley and Leatherback
sea turtle eggs rescued every year.
This accounts for about 50% of all turtle
eggs collected in Guatemala.
Turtle eggs are collected by volunteers
walking in small teams along the beach
for anything up to 16km every night
(personal choice dependent upon fit-
24 www.caribbeanreefmag.


ness) during nesting season. The best
situation occurs when the turtle is ob-
served nesting and eggs can be collect-
ed easily without causing stress to the
animal and with minimum damage to the
eggs. It can be quite exhilarating racing
poachers to the turtle and claiming it as
your own. The sight of a female turtle
laying its eggs is one of the most memo-
rable moments of my life, especially on
Sthe oc-
c e, W casions
where I
p was able
c to place
m.: y hand
Sn under-
ne death
her to

the eggs
( and
warm
mucus)
as she
laid. In-
credible! When local egg collectors/
poachers get to the turtle first, they are
expected to give a 10% donation of all
collected eggs to ensure the continua-
tion of the population. All eggs are then
reburied in the secure hatchery and
around 50 days later the hatchlings re-
appear and are released into the sea




CONSERVATION CORNER //Turtle Conservation in Guatemala


with the help of the volunteers.
Community education is a major part
of the work at Parque Hawaii. ARCAS
ensures that economic, social and ed-
ucational needs of the community are
also met. They realise that for some
people the collection and sale of these
eggs is a major part of their income so
without it they would suffer to survive.


I would highly recommend this conser-
vation trip as it was so rewarding. To
feel like you have saved hundreds of
baby turtles gives you an incredible
sense of achievement and a feeling that
you are truly helping to save the envi-
ronment. The staff and locals are ex-
tremely friendly and it is an extremely
beautiful place to stay in.


Hawksbill turtle cruising above coral reef


Therefore as part of the programme,
they offer egg collectors the chance to
sell their eggs to the hatchery therefore
enabling the survival of the turtle eggs
along with providing the local commu-
nity with a source of income.


Although ARCAS is a conservation
group it is indirectly associated with
diving and reefs, I feel it is important to
include sea turtles in this magazine as
they are an extremely important aspect
of life on the coral reef and spend the


www.caribbeanreefmag.com 25




CONSERVATION CORNER //Turtle Conservation in Guatemala


majority of their lives there. So whether
you are a diver or not you can still fully
enjoy the good work of helping out a ma-
rine animal. If you would like to become
involved in this programme please visit
www.arcasguatemala.com for more infor-
mation.










































26


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CONSERVATION CORNER //Turtle Conservation in Guatemala


28 www.caribbeanreefmag.com





Whatty's HolIiday Apartiment


+(868) 355-0243 +(868) 355-0260
Whatty's Holiday Apartments are located at
Corner MotMot Ave and Blue Heron Drive,
Sou Sou Lands, Mt.Pleasant, Tobago.




REEF AWARENESS // Lion of the Sea


SDaIli


di


30 www.caribbeanreefmag.com


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%/ Ls you swim near a
rock crevice, you suddenly
notice this snake-like head,
with small beady eyes and
a mouth which opens and
closes menacingly, peeping
through a rock crevice, eyes
glued to you. Congratula-
tions! You have just seen our
marine creature of this issue,
the Moray Eel, which be-
longs to the
family of Mu- "[!("S.,I.!, "


raenidae.
These mys-
terious crea-
tures are the
snakes of
the ocean.


'i'." .
~c ,.
-'V .-
.jV r.Ji


There are
over 200 species, with the
Green Moray Eels (Gym-
nothorax funebris) and the
Spotted Moray Eels (Gym-
nothorax moringa) being
the most visible in the Carib-
bean, especially while div-
ing in Tobago.
Moray eels are
thick, elongated crea-


tures averaging around 3
m in length, with individu-
als growing up to be larger.
Their dorsal fins extend from
the back of their heads and
are joined with their caudal
and anal fins, with no pec-
toral and pelvic fins. They
have a narrow head, small
beady eyes, a strong jaw,
and a full set of sharp teeth.
These physical characteris-
tics give them their anacon-
da-like appearance. They
are nocturnal,
consume fish-
es and crusta-
C. ., ceans and like
warm waters;
they are found
.... ,m / i ..
mainly in the
tropics, near
reefs and make
rock crevices and small
caves their homes.
Despite their menacing and
intimidating appearance
and aura, these are rela-
tively shy and harmless crea-
tures. By that I mean they
won't attack divers, unless
provoked or we invade their
habitats. So proceed with


www.caribbeanreefmag.com


,,'
(.I


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a ,I




MARINE LIFE EXPLORED // Moray Eels

caution when swimming near any open-
ings. If bitten, seek medical attention im-
mediately since their bites can become
infected. They can usually be observed
safely from a distance, usually peeking
through the opening of their dwellings, and
rarely come out fully. But have no fear as
threateningly opening and closing of their
mouths, revealing their sharp teeth, is a
harmless movement to aid in respiration.
The Green Moray Eel which averages
around 2.5 m in length and can be found


up to 30 m in depth, have a green
ish appearance. I have encoun
of these magnificent creatures,
ing in Tobago: in Man-Of -War B
lotteville and the other, a loc<
called Tyson, in Pirate's Bay. Tyso
sake is fitting he is huge! My di
and I were pleasantly surprised
stumbled across his path, for h
tion made us curious to see him
This 8-foot giant is known to be
harmless towards divers. However


34 www.caribbeanreefmag.com




MARINE LIFE EXPLORED // Moray Eels


;n-yellow-
ered two
while div-
ay, Char-
al legend
-'s name-
ve buddy
when we
s reputa-
up close.
generally
,r, on that


c~ -..~


www.caribbeanreefmag.com 35




MARINE LIFE EXPLORED // Moray Eels


dive, when we accidently encoun-
tered him, a staring match erupt-
ed between us for a full minute, as
he kept charging towards us, be-
fore finally making a threatening
circle around us and disappearing
back into his home. Needless to
say, some fear was instilled with-


in me but it was a good reminder
that while moray eels don't attack
divers unless provoked, caution is
needed whenever you encounter
them and they are best observed
at a comfortable distance between
both parties.


36 www.caribbeanreefmag.com









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