Citation
Holmes County times-advertiser

Material Information

Title:
Holmes County times-advertiser
Place of Publication:
Bonifay, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Nicole P Barefield - Publisher, Carol Kent Wyatt- Editor
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2010
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Holmes -- Bonifay
Coordinates:
30.79287 x -85.678207

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Holmes County Advertiser. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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** Volume 128 Number 13 Phone: 850-547-9414 Fax: 850-638-4601 Opinion ....................A4 Local & State ..............A5 Kids Activitie .............A6 Sports......................A12 Faith .........................B4 Obituaries ..................B5 A4Happy column with Hazel TisonA5Sheriffs Corner BACK 2 SCHOOL GIVEWAY IS FRIDAY | B3 @WCN_HCT facebook.com/WashingtonCountyNews.HolmesCountyTimes50 ¢ chipleypaper.com Wednesday, July 11, 2018 imes A dvertiser HOLMES COUNTY T From staff reportsWASHINGTON AND HOLMES COUNTIES „ Jacqueline Bostick has been selected as editor of Washington County News and Holmes County Times-Advertiser. She stepped into the role effectively June 2.Im pleased to announce Jacqueline Bostick as the full-time editor of The News and Times-Advertiser,Ž said The News and Times-Advertiser Publisher Nicole Barefield. As interim editor and active reporter and writer, Jacqueline has demonstrated her ability to manage news operations print and digital in two counties, while sustaining strong coverage of the news, activities and issues that are important to our communities.ŽI have great confidence in Jacqueline and her team to provide excellent, local coverage of news and issues relevant to Washington and Holmes counties, and encour-age our readers to reach out to her with their ideas or concerns,Ž she added.Bostick, who has served as a reporter for both papers since August 2017, received her first print journalism experience with The Panama City News Herald.In 2014, Florida Press Club acknowledged Bosticks work at The News Herald with two second-place awards in the categories of hard feature and health care.She operated as interim editor for nearly four months following the March 9 depar-ture of former editor Carol Kent Wyatt.The communities of Washington and Holmes counties have allured me to the concerns and celebrations of agricultural industry and life,Ž Bostick said. Beyond that, its a special time to be a part of your growing communities.ŽFrom the development of the 79 Corridor and its budding economic growth and potential to educational milestones in safety and suc-cess, Im excited to play a role in saying yes, that happened right here in Washington and Holmes.ŽBostick is an avid traveler who aims to report news from all sides.Her love for traveling abroad has brought home her love for the nation and its democracy, which reflects in her insatiable desire to cover human interest stories.When away from the news-room, Bostick enjoys anything local „ restaurants, books by local authors, networking, and the beauty of the areas natural resources.She is a graduate of Florida State University. Bostick may be reached by emailing: jbostick@ chipleypaper.com.Jacqueline Bostick named editor of The News and Times-AdvertiserBostick From staff reportsWESTVILLE „ A hus-band and wife have been charged with forging sev-eral checks belonging to a 71-year-old Westville woman, according to a report from the Holmes County Sheriffs Office. An HCSO deputy first responded to the complaint on June 22.The victim stated her son, David H. Ammons, 34, and his wife, Natalie E. Ammons, 33, were taking her checks without her permission and forg-ing her signature.The victim advised that her signature had been forged on checks totaling nearly $500 and written to a store in Ponce de Leon.She went on to tell an investigator that the suspects had previously been verbally abusive toward her and had also made threats of physical harm.Both David Ammons and Natalie Ammons are charged with exploita-tion of the elderly, check fraud, and theft.Couple charged with exploiting the elderlyD. Ammons N. Ammons By Diane M. RobinsonTimes Advertiser | @HCTA_ Diane Drobinson@chipleypaper.comBONIFAY … Bonifay City Council is eyeinggrant funding for the beautifica-tion of downtown.Dewberry Engineering came before the council when they met in regular session July 9 to seek approval for seeking grant funds from the Florida Department of Transporta-tion andits beautification of state roadway projects. The council directed Alyssa Pate with Dewberry Engineers to get with the Downtown Revitalization Committee to apply for as many areas as possible.Each area is eligible to receive up to $100,000 if approved for the funds.In other business, invoices to be paid to Carr, Riggs and Ingram Accounting Firm were approved for payments totaling $19,216.00 form audit services rendered. The monies will come from gen-eral funds.Bids for surplus vehicles were opened during the meeting last night and totaled $2,805 for various cars, trucks and heavy equipment with the proceeds being put back into the general fund.In other items, the ordinance concerning code enforcement was tabled until the next regular session meeting when the city attor-ney will be in attendance.The Bonifay City Council will meet again in regular session at 6 p.m. on July 23.Bonifay council eyes beautifucation grants By Jacqueline BostickTimes-Advertiser 850-630-6167 | @_JBostick jbostick@chipleypaper.comPOPLAR SPRINGS When a leading robotics team was robbed of a few items while on its way to a national STEM competi-tion last month, individuals from throughout the region responded with financial gifts of support.We raised over $2,600 through the GoFundMe page and other small donations,Ž said Laura Wells, teacher at Poplar Springs High School and assistant robotics coach.In addition to the funds from the crowd-fundraising page, a donation of $3,000 provided immediate relief and toppled the $4,000 goal.Community support is everything to robotics teamPictured on day one of competition in Dartmouth, Mass., at the SeaPerch International Competition. From left: Bryson Potts, Coach Trey Paul and Joseph Godwin. [SPECIAL TO TIMESOn behalf of regional businessman and politician Allan Bense, Holmes County TimesAdvertiser editor Jacqueline Bostick presents a $3,000 check last month to the Poplar Springs robotics team Laura Wells, teacher at Poplar Springs High School and assistant robotics coach. [TIMES-ADVERTISER] Donations help regional SeaPerch team purchase back stolen laptopsSee TEAM, A2

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** A2 Wednesday, July 11, 2018 | Holmes County Times-AdvertiserBy Danica Coto The Associated PressYABUCOA, Puerto Rico „ Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands braced for heavy rains and strong winds Monday as rem-nants of the new seasons first hurricane provided an initial test of how far theyve recovered from last years devastating storms.Tropical Storm Beryl disintegrated after rush-ing over Dominica and into the eastern Caribbean, but the U.S. National Hurricane Center said the remnants still could bring 2 to 3 inches (5 to 8 centimeters) of rain pounding down on homes still damaged by Septembers Hurricane Maria. Forecasters said this could unleash flooding and landslides in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.Outages were already reported across Puerto Rico early Monday as Gov. Ricardo Rossello urged people without sturdy roofs to move in with rel-atives or go to one of 14 government shelters that have opened.Some 60,000 people in the U.S. territory still have only tarps for roofs blown off by Maria, and more than 1,500 custom-ers are still without power more than nine months after the storm.The Category 5 hurri-cane caused more than an estimated $100 billion in damage, killed dozens of people by the most conservative estimates and destroyed up to 75 percent of electricity transmission lines.The National Weather Service issued an alert warning that heavy show-ers and winds of more than 50 mph (80 kph) were approaching Puerto Ricos east coast Monday morning. The storms center was expected to pass just south of the island.The U.S. Virgin Islands, meanwhile, announced that schools and govern-ment offices would be closed in St. Croix.Beryl, which had been the Atlantic seasons first hurricane, was losing tropical storm status late Sunday when it crossed Dominica, another island that had been battered by Hurricane Maria, which hit as a Category 5 storm and killed dozens of people.Marshall Alexander, with Dominicas Meteorological Service, told The Associated Press that no landslides or wide-spread flooding have been reported. A curfew also has been lifted.Definitely, we were spared the worst,Ž he said.The storms remnants were expected to pass just south of Puerto Rico, which could see sustained winds of 15 to 25 mph (25 to 40 kph) and gusts of up to 50 mph (80 kph), forecasters said. It also dumped torrential rain in the U.S. Virgin Island of St. Croix, with the National Weather Service warning of winds of more than 30 mph and fallen trees and light posts.Those living near Puerto Ricos south coast, the first region hit by Maria, were wary of the new storm even if it was no longer a hurricane.Were a little bit scared because of what weve been through,Ž said Jose Bultron, a delivery man in the southeast town of Humacao. This brings back memories ... but we forge ahead.ŽFlooding is a big concern for those still living in homes that have not been fully rebuilt since Maria. Lourdes De Jesus, who traveled from West Springfield, Massachusetts, to help repair her mothers house in south-east Yabucoa, said the roof consists of tarp and recycled zinc and leaks even during a light storm.I dont know what were going to do,Ž she said. We dont have the money to spend on zinc roofing.ŽMeanwhile, Tropical Storm Chris was squat-ting on Monday about 215 miles (345 kilometers) off the coast of the Carolinas. Forecasters expect it will gain hurricane strength before moving up Gulfstream waters on a path that could cause lifethreatening surf on East Coast beaches this week.Chris had top winds of 60 mph (95 kph) Monday morning, and was expected to remain nearly stationary through Tuesday before moving northeastward as a hurricane. It was far enough out to sea that no coastal watches or warnings were in effect, even for the closest point of land, Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.Puerto Rico, USVI expect heavy rain from Beryl remnantsSpecial to Times-AdvertiserMy name is Milton TadŽ Wilson, better known as just TadŽ. I am a candidate for Holmes County School Board D istrict 1.I am a life long Holmes County resident. I gradu-ated in 1981 from Holmes County High School. I have been married to my wife Pat Carnley Wilson for 36 years. We have two children and 7 grandchildren.Ive been a member of West Bonifay Baptist Church for over 50 years and have been doing music and youth for more than 30 years. As you can see, I am well-vested in the future of our childrens education.Please vote for and elect me as your next School Board member for District 1. May God bless Holmes County and America, for me and my house we will serve the Lord.Tad Wilson runs for School Board District 1 Wilson A story that ran on A2 in our July 11 edition incorrectly stated for which seat Milton TadŽ Wilson is running for. It is Holmes County School Board District 1.Setting It Straight This just means the world,Ž she said, glanc-ing down at the check. It really does. These boys and Mr. Paul theres nobody that works harder than them.ŽWells launched the campaign after Poplar Springs High School recent graduates Joseph Godwin, Bryson Potts and their robotics coach Trey Paul, discovered their laptops had been stolen out of their vehicle while at a stop in Atlanta on their way to the International SeaPerch competition last month being held at the Uni-versity of Massachusetts Dartmouth.SeaPerch is an under-water remotely operated vehicle (ROV) competition, in which, the students have won at the regional level for three consecutive years.I thought maybe the community would come out again for this, and it did,Ž Wells said.The lump sum donation came from area business-man and politician Allan Bense.Its always gratify-ing to try and help people who are doing everything they can to better themselves and make their community a better place,Ž Bense said. Here you have students going out of their way on their own time to participate in high-level tech activities with teachers willing to help them, and someone steals their equipment.We all know there are some bad people out there but we really want them to know and remember that there are also a lot of good people around, and that people who work hard and do the right thing are more likely to have things go their way,Ž he added. The community had already pitched in, were just reinforc-ing that the path theyve chosen is a good one.ŽWells said the feedback from the team was one of gratitude and surprise. And, although the team did not win in the robot-ics competition, Wells said everyone was glad because despite the robbery they were able to successfully operate their robot and represent their school, region and state with pride. The community came out and the really helped us,Ž Wells said. This means everything to them, it means every-thing to me.Ž TEAMFrom Page A1Joseph Godwin placed 5th overall in the Agriculture Exam category at the National BETA Convention in Savannah, Georgia. He also competed nationally in woodworking, after winning the Florida state competition. [SPECIAL TO TIMES-ADVERTISER] We all know there are some bad people out there but we really want them to know and remember that there are also a lot of good people around, and that people who work hard and do the right thing are more likely to have things go their way. The community had already pitched in, were just reinforcing that the path theyve chosen is a good one.Ž … Allan Bense

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Wednesday, July 11, 2018 A3

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** A4 Wednesday, July 11, 2018 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser OPINION ANOTHER VIEW Have something to say?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri“ cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by GateHouse Media LLC at 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright Notice: The entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of GateHouse Media LLC. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or GateHouse Media. Postmaster: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES In county Out of county 13 weeks: $13.30 $17.70 26 weeks: $19.90 $26.50 52 weeks: $32.00 $43.00 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US Publisher: Nicole Bare“ eld nbare“ eld@chipleypaper.com Interim Editor: Jacqueline Bostick jbostick@chipleypaper.com, 850-638-0212 News, sports, opinion: news@bonifaynow.com Classi“ ed: 850-638-0212, clamb@chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service: 1-850-522-5197 Copyright 2018, GateHouse Media LLC. All Rights Reserved. imes A dvertiser HOLMES COUNTY T PUBLISHER Nicole P. Bare“ eld INTERIM EDITOR Jacqueline Bostick PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR Cameron Everett Wednesday this nation celebrated an act of political radicalism that proved to be, yes, revolutionary. On July 4, 1776, the Second Continental Congress approved a Declaration of Independence. It was not a governing document, nor did it compel England to renounce its claim to the 13 American colonies. Instead, it was an exposition of first principles followed by a recitation of grievances against the British crown, all employed to justify the colonialists revolt. Our independence was not secured until five years later, after numerous military battles that climaxed with the British defeat at Yorktown and concluded with the Treaty of Paris that recognized the United States. However, we celebrate the Fourth because the Declaration represents the ideals on which this nation was founded. The documents themes of natural law, individual freedom and self-government are what make it timeless: € All men are created equal. € We are born with natural, Godgiven rights that cannot be abrogated by man-made government. € When government tramples on those rights the people have a responsibility to change it or end it. Thus does government earn its legitimacy only from the consent of the governed. How those principles are applied remains an ever-evolving subject of debate. Our national politics are more divisive than they have been in generations, and that is reflected in our culture. Civil discourse has eroded as Americans retreat into tribalism, often displaying their political preferences in their lifestyle choices „ where they shop and eat, what they read and watch. Although freedom often is viewed as something to be protected from outside threats „ be they from a British empire or terrorist organizations operating overseas „ it also can be eroded from within. Increasingly, our First Amendment freedoms of speech and press are under attack from the left and the right in attempts to sow distrust and silence opponents. Spirited debate using good-faith arguments to advocate for preferred policy prescriptions is essential to the health of the republic. Demonizing political foes and poisoning the marketplace of ideas pave the way for national decline. Among Americas greatest strengths are its blessings of individual freedom. Yet we cannot lose sight of the fact that these separate threads are to be woven together into a cohesive tapestry. Right now, it is fraying at the edges and requires repair. Author Isabel Paterson, in her seminal work God of the Machine,Ž wrote that the establishment of the United States was the first time a nation was ever founded on reasoned political principles, proceeding from the axiom that mans birthright is freedom. Whoever is fortunate enough to be an American citizen came into the greatest inheritance man has ever enjoyed.Ž Do not squander that legacy. (A version of this editorial first appeared in the Daytona Beach News-Journal)A legacy of freedom The conflict on the Mexican border is continuing and about to get worse. While a problem for decades, everything may ratchet upwards with a new president of Mexico. For the past decade or more, the focus has been on drugs and illegals. Most of those killed have been in Mexico, whether tortured, dismembered, hung from bridges or simply shot by cartels. The statistics are staggering. Mexico had over 29,000 murdered in 2017 with some estimates much higher, mostly cartel induced. But Brazil and Columbia also had much higher murder rates, nearly double. While in the U.S., combined with opiate drug use, over 60,000 were killed in 2017 from overdoses. Unfortunately, the situation is complicated by some legitimate pharmaceutical firms like Purdue, contributing massively to the opiate problem. Drug smuggling Central and South American countries are considered the most dangerous in the world with Mexico more dangerous than the worlds war zones. The growing, refinement, and shipment of drugs includes marijuana and more lethal crackcocaine, pure heroin, opiates and a list of methamphetamines and derivatives which flood the U.S. But the election of Lopez Obrador will change the dynamics dramatically and should raise the problem at the border to a whole new level. With Enrique Nieto as president of Mexico, the fight continued against the cartels with a cooperative spirit with U.S. authorities. But the results were disappointing. Obrador, an avowed leftist, says he will take a different approach. He will end the war against the cartels and legalize drugs. He says he will attack corruption and may offer amnesty and support to farmers. He will support any person from any country to pass through his country to the United States as he believes it is a natural right of all humans to do so. Borders be damned. Can you imagine a Mexico with legalized drugs? Recently the news has been consumed by as many at 50,000 illegal immigrants coming across our southern border costing the U.S. over $1 billion a year for housing and food for them in detention camps. Imagine facing an increase by five or tenfold? Broadcast news media and liberals in the U.S. have been screaming about children torn from mothers by ICE. Nobody wants to admit this is about to get worse.The real border war is just beginning J o h n S h o e m a k e r John ShoemakerLast week was a momentous celebration for a long time employee of Doctors Memorial Hospital. Bertha Kolmetz Padgett was honored with a surprise retirement party in the board room at the hospital. Family members, fellow employees and community supporters gathered with their covered dishes of country cooking to honor this country girl from Millers Ferry/Shell Landing. A large cake prepared by the cafeteria staff proclaiming the retirement of this beloved coworker, affectionately known as Bert, was prominent among the colorful decorations. Neighbors had assisted in bringing this busy lady to the surprise celebration. Following graduation from Vernon High School in 1952, Bertha did like so many of us did in that time and married soon after graduation and she and husband R.J. Padgett began her family soon after. It wasnt until 1968 that she graduated from Chipola with her LPN certification. Her first job was at Jackson Hospital in Marianna where she worked until she returned to school to earn her R.N. Degree. At that time she worked in Mercy Hospital in Champaign, Illinois. In 1981 she earned the R.N. Degree and returned home to Washington County and worked at Gulf Coast Hospital in Panama City. She joined the staff at DMH in 1999 and has been here ever since. In the last couple of years, she has been on as neededŽ status, but her daughter Patty who is an R.N. in the operating room at DMH says that Bert is most happy when working. She said that shell be moping about the house until she gets that call to come to work; then she gets her uniform on, prances about the house, putting on her make-up and her walking shoes and she is ready to go.Ž Bertha was born March 29, 1934 to the late John and Mittie (Jenkins) Kolmetz. She now lives on land homesteaded by her paternal grandfather, Fredrick Nicholas Kolmetz in the mid 1800s... The youngest child of 13 from the second marriage of her father, Bertha is the only one that survives. She is the mother of one daughter and three sons. At one time all her children were associated with DMH. Rick worked in dietary, Scott has a mobile nuclear medicine unit that services DMH, and Patty Seal, of course, is an OR nurse. She was working at Bay Medical in Panama City and was by our side when our dad, Hugh Wells died there in 1999. Bertha is confident that she will be well cared for in her old age (if she ever gets there) because all her children are married to nurses. I have known Bert Padgett for most of my and her life. When I was about eight, I had my first visit to Millers Ferry. I had gone home with my Dads cousins, the Bryant children whom I had never met. I rode with them in a two-mule wagon from our home on Bonifay Route One to that area where the Kolmetz also lived. On Wednesday, the Bryants were going to Prayer Meting and I was expected to go with them. Since Primitive Baptists didnt have prayer meeting, I was nervous because I thought I would have to pray out loud, but they assured me that I would not. Bertha and her brother Delbert sang a solo, Oh, Be Careful Little Hands What you do.Ž I would gladly have sung with them had I known the song. Later, attending Vernon School, I knew Delbert and Bertha. Her family still loves singing. She also loves to travel and she loves her home and gardening. She still enjoys canning and freezing products from her garden. Living near Holmes Creek and the Choctawhatchee River, Bert loves fishing in this natural habitat. But she loves best of all her work as a nurse and her favorite time to look back on was when she worked in Labor and Delivery. Helping bring those new lives into the world and seeing the promise in them was a real joy. However, she wont be at a loss for something to fill her time as she loves helping people. Her Christian faith sustains her and leads her to helping others. Although she has experienced a lot of adversity and tragedy: twice she lost her home to fire; in 1994 she lost her home to the flooding of the Choctawhatcheee and Holmes Creek; she lost her youngest son in an accident when he was 18; and her youngest grandson died of cancer at age 28, Bert is confident of the Blood of Jesus and His ability to carry her through all these things. Her life reminds her of the song Some through the fire; Some through the flood; Some through great trials, But all through the blood.Ž She is a shining example of the optimism her faith brings. The staff of Doctors Memorial will certainly miss the optimistic attitude of Bertha Kolmetz Padgett.Retirement party honors Bertha Kolmetz Padgett Hazel Tison

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Wednesday, July 11, 2018 A5 LOCAL & STATEIts all about kids in this months Sheriffs Corner! We are gearing up for our summer camp, set to take place next week, July 16-20 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Holmes CountyAgricultural Center.There are some spots still open for children ages 6-12 for this fun-packed day camp, which will offer various outdoor activities, as well as team and self-esteem-building exercises.Lunch, snacks, and transportation (if needed) will be provided.This is a collaborative effort between the Holmes County Sheriffs Office and Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches. Pick up a registration form at the Holmes County Sheriffs Office, located at 211 N. OklahomaStreet in Bonifay, or give us a call at 850547-4421, and we are happy to email one to you. Please return the form by end of day Friday, July 13.We are also looking forward to participat-ing in this years back to school event at DoctorsMemorial Hospital on August 3, as well as another school supply event set for July 27 at oursubstation on Highway 90 in Ponce de Leon.Both events will be held from 9 a.m. until noon on their respective days and will feature freeschool supplies and lots of fun for Holmes County children.Look for more on these events in your local news media and on our social media pages and enjoythe rest of your summer safely.If you would like to submit general questions about Sheriffs Office related topic to Sheriff JohnTate, email: askthesheriff@ holmescosheriff.org.Sheri 's Corner By Staff ReportWESTVILLE … A Geneva, Alabama man was arrested for drug pos-session by Holmes County Sheriffs Office according to a news release.A HCSO deputy responded to a report of a suspicious person in the area of Lake Victor Road in Westville on July 3. The deputy made contact with the subject, identified as Andrew A. Townsend, 37, and after a search of the subject he was found to be in posses-sion of a smoking pipe and a bag containing residue which tested positive for methamphetamine.Townsend is charged with possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.Geneva man arrested for drug possessionHolmes County Sheri John TateStaff ReportBONIFAY Two Boni-fay men were arrested Monday, in separated narcotic stings, for the sale of drugs.A news release from Holmes County Sheriff's Office stated the first sting was with Derrick J. Johanson, 31, and then with Daniel Joseph Still, 38.Johanson exchanged methamphetamine for cash in the first transaction, the release stated. During his sub-sequent arrest, Johanson had another bag of meth-amphetamine, as well as drug paraphernalia.During the second controlled buy, Still also exchanged a bag containing methamphet-amine for cash, according to the news release. As investigators were taking him into custody, Still had five additional bags of methamphetamine.Johanson was charged with the sale of metham-phetamine, possession of methamphetamine, and possession of drug paraphernalia.Still was charged with the sale of methamphetamine, possession of methamphetamine.2 men arrested in drug stingJune 2018Jackson Alexander Wright and Sherry April Foster Jonathan Joey Hall and Mallorie Lane Shirley Samuel Isaiah Shirah and Meagan Lorraine Peacock Michael Lewis Wolfe and Christina Michele Blackburn Larry Edward Self and Catherine Lou Hamlin Carl Henry Beech Jr and Susie Dean Stricklan Chevalier Kenyatta Paul and Stacy Lavette Rivers Tilman Douglas Mears and Taylor Christine Basford Zachary Cyrus Birge and Sierra Dawn Newsome Jeremy Scott Chambers and Julia Erin Estes Stetson Kyle Edwards and Brooke Leighann TroutHOLMES COUNTY MARRIAGESTownsend Still Johanson By Lloyd DunkelbergerNews Service FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ Floridas $160.4 billion state pension fund showed a preliminary return of 8.99 percent for the fiscal year that ended June 30, marking the ninth straight year the retirement fund has shown a positive gain.Ash Williams, executive director of the State Board of Administration, which oversees the fund that pays retirement benefits for teachers, county workers, law enforcement officers, state workers and highereducation employees, said he expects the final number to be even higher.Preliminary figures for the Florida Retirement System pension plan project returns for fiscalyear 2017-18 just shy of 9 percent,Ž Williams said. Fiscal year-end valua-tions for our private market assets „ real estate, private equity, etc. „ have not yet been posted, which should further improve the return.ŽThe initial estimate, according to the State Board of Administration, was .71 percent above the various indexes and benchmarks the financial managers use to gauge the performance of the investments, which include domestic and foreign stocks, bonds, real estate, other financial instruments and cash.The nine-year positive run began after the fund plunged more than 19 percent in 2008-09 as Florida was dealing with the impact of the Great Recession. Since then, the fund had two years where the return was less than 1 percent, but there were also five years of double-digit returns, including a 13.77 percent return in 2016-17.Over the last 33 years, the fund has only had five negative years and has had 21 years of double-digit returns. The investment return is important because the fund pays out more than $9 billion in benefits to retirees each year. That is only partially offset by some $3.3 billion in contributions from the government agencies that participate in the fund and from active employees, who have been contribut-ing 3 percent of their annual salaries since 2011.Pension fund keeps positive streak alive

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** A6 Wednesday, July 11, 2018 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Wednesday, July 11, 2018 A7 COMMUNITYIf you would like a recurring event included in this list, please email the information to news@ chipleypaper.comMONDAY9:30 a.m.: Car Seat Safety Classes (“ rst Monday of each month); Florida Department of Health Holmes County. For more information, call 850-5478500 ext 248. 9:30 a.m.: Car Seat Safety Classes (third Monday of each month); Florida Department of Health Washington County. For more information, call 850638-6240, Ext 144. 10 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging senior Bingo. For more information, call 850-547-2345. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise. For more information, call Andrea at 850-638-6216 11 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging senior lunch. For more information, call 850-547-2345 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining. For reservations, call 638-6216. Donations accepted. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach of“ ce. For more information, call Emma or Jess at 415-5999. 8 p.m.: Al-Anon meeting Blessed Trinity Church 8 p.m.: AA meeting Blessed Trinity ChurchTUESDAYWashington County Council on Aging Tuesday Group. For more information, call Kim at 850-638-6216 8-10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 9a.m.: Washington County Community Traf“ c Safety Team Meeting (Third Tuesday of each month) in the WCBOCC conference room. For more information call Renae Rountree at 850-638-1314 or Lynne Abel at 850-638-6203 10 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging Movie Day. For more information, call 850-547-2345 10 a.m. Home Extension Club Meeting/Luncheon; Hinsons Crossroads Fire Department. 10:30 a.m.: Letter Learners; Washington County Public Library. For more information, call 850-638-1314 11 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging senior lunch. For more information, call 850-547-2345 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; For reservations, call 638-6216. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. 12:30 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) Tuesday Group. For more information call Andrea at 638-6216 5:30 p.m.: Chemical Addiction Recovery Effort group; Caryville Baptist Church Fellowship Hall, For more information, call 850-326-0886. 6:10 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church; Games start at 6:10 p.m. For more information, call Peg Russ at 638-7654 or 638-7654. 7 p.m.: "A Drop of Faith" Narcotics Anonymous meeting; Blessed Trinity Catholic Church.WEDNESDAY10 a.m.: Holmes Council on Aging Games and Activities. For more information, call 850-547-2345 10 a.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are held the fourth Wednesday of the month at 2 p.m. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise. For more information, call Andrea at 850-638-6216 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes County Healthy Start Safe Beds Make Safe Babies SIDS class (fourth Wednesday of each month) at Florida Department of Health in Bonifay. For more information call 850-5478500 EXT 248. 10 a.m. to noon: Washington County Healthy Start Safe Beds Make Safe Babies SIDS class (fourth Wednesday of each month) at Florida Department of Health in Chipley. For more information call 850-6386240 ext 144 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.: Holmes County Healthy Start Parenting 101 classes (“ rst, second and third Wednesday of each month) at Florida Department of Health in Bonifay 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.: Washington County Healthy Start Parenting 101 classes (“ rst, second and third Wednesday of each month) at Florida Department of Health in Chipley 11 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging senior lunch. For more information, call 850-547-2345 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; For reservations, call 638-6216. Donations accepted. 12:30 p.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) Games and Activities. For more information, Call Andrea at 850-638-6216 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.: Holmes County Tobacco Cessation Classes, (second Wednesday of every month) at Doctors Memorial Hospital. For more information, call James Lewis at 850-224-9340 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Bible Study 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY9 a.m. to 11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution, every third Thursday (Holmes County residents only). For more information, call 547-0190. 9 a.m. to noon: Washington County Council on Aging Advanced Portrait Art Class. For more information call Kim at 850-638-6216 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; all 6380093; every third Thursday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: First Thursday Bene“ ts program staff will be at Washington County Council on Aging. For more information, call 850-638-6216. 10 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging Games and Activities. For more information, call 850-547-2345 11 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging senior lunch. For more information, call 850-547-2345 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; For reservations, call 638-6216. Donations accepted. Noon: Washington County Chamber of Commerce luncheon (every third Thursday) at Northwest Florida Community Hospital Specialty Center. Noon to 2 p.m.: Holmes County Tobacco Cessation Classes fourth (“ rst Thursday of every month) at Holmes County Health Department. For more information, call James Lewis at 850-224-9340 12:30 p.m. Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) BINGO. For more information, call Andrea at 850-638-6216 1 p.m.: Care Givers Support group, third Thursday of each month at the First Presbyterian Church on 5th Street in Chipley. For more information, call Recie Culpepper at 850-566-2553. 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the “ rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 3 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society (second Thursday of each month). The public is invited to attend. 5:30 p.m.: Chemical Addiction Recovery Effort group Caryville Baptist Church Fellowship Hall. For more information, call 850-326-0886. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.: Washington County Tobacco Cessation Classes (second Thursday of each month) at Washington County Health Department. For more information, call James Lewis at 850-224-9340 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church in Bonifay 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.: Washington Council on Aging in Chipley Advanced Line dancing. For more information, call Kim at 850-638-6216 7 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Library Annex Building 330 Harvey Etheridge Street in Bonifay. Call Linda Fowler for more information at 547-3655 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting at Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A 7 p.m.: William Dunaway Chapter of the National Society Sons of the American Revolution (“ rst Thursday of each month) at Jim Buffet and Grill in MariannaFRIDAY6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals, and socialization. For more information call 850-547-2345. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise. For more information call Andrea at 850-638-6216. 10:30 a.m.: Washington County Public Library (Chipley) "Knitting with Looms" third Friday every month. For more information call 850-638-1314. 11 a.m.: Holmes County Council on Aging senior lunch for more information call 850-547-2345 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; For reservations, call Andrea at 850-638-6216. Donations accepted. 12:30 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) Games and Activities. For more information call Andrea at 850-638-6216 3:30 p.m.: Bead Class every second Friday at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery. For more information, call 703-0347. 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper (fourth Friday of every month, January to September) 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.: 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced meet on the last Friday of the month at Eastside Baptist Church. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks. For more information, call 850-272-6611. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church.SATURDAYUSDA (third Saturday of January, March, May, July September and November) at Shepherds Gate Church. For more information, call James Guy at 850-258-5854 or John Williamson at 850-703-9681 7 a.m.: Farm Share (second Saturday of each month) at Shepherds Gate Church. For more information, call James Guy at 850-258-5854 or John Williamson at 850-703-9681 8 a.m.: North Bay Clan of The Lower Muskogee Creek Yard Sale (“ rst Saturday of each month until 2 p.m.) Location is 1560 Lonnie Road in Chipley. 9 a.m. to noon: Mobile Food Pantry (fourth Saturday of each month) at Cypress Creek Church in Chipley. For more information, call James Guy at 850-258-5854 or John Williamson at 850-703-9681. 9 a.m.: Food Pantry (second Saturday of each month) at 808 E. Highway 90. For more information call Dr. Yunus of“ ce at 850-547-4284. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: The Holmes County Community Health Clinic at 203 W. Iowa St., Bonifay will be open the “ rst and third Saturday. 9 a.m.: Emergency Food Pantry is open Monday Wednesday and Friday at Shepherds Gate Church in Chipley. For more information, call James Guy at 850-258-5854 or John Williamson at 850-703-9681 10 a.m.: The Alford Community Health Clinic will be open the fourth Saturdays of each month until the last patient is seen. For more information, call 850-272-0101 or 850-209-5501 10 a.m. to noon: Childrens education day (fourth Saturday of each month) at the North Bay Clan Tribal Grounds, located at 1560 Lonnie Road in Chipley SUNDAY 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting board room at GracevilleCampbellton Hospital in Graceville.COMMUNITY CALENDARIf you would like your events included in this list, email information to: news@chipleypaper. com Library to host a Battle of the Bands BONIFAY … The Holmes County Public Library will host a Battle of the Bands at 9 a.m. Thursday, July 12 at the Bonifay K-8 School. The program is part of the 2018 FLYP Summer Program. For more information call 850-547-3573. IFAS to host Meals Under Pressure BONIFAY … UF/IFAS will hold a Meals Under Pressure, Pressure Cooking Class from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, July 12, at the Holmes County Ag Center located at1173 E. Highway 90 Bonifay. Participants will learn the basics of pressure cooking, including the InstantPot, to save time in the kitchen. Registration fee is $5 and includes class materials. Space is limited. Preregistration is required by contacting the Holmes County Extension Office, 850-547-1108, or the Washington County Extension Office, 850-638-6265. The University of Florida is an Equal Opportunity Institution. For persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations, please contact 850-5471108 or 850-638-6265 (TDD, via Florida Relay Service, 1-800955-8771) at least five working days prior to the class so that proper consideration may be given to the request.COMMUNITY EVENTS

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** A8 Wednesday, July 11, 2018 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser NATION & WORLDBy Tassanee Vejpongsa and Kaweewit KaewjindaThe Associated PressMAE SAI, Thailand „ Expert divers Sunday rescued four of 12 boys from a flooded cave in northern Thailand where they were trapped with their soccer coach for more than two weeks, as a dangerous and complicated plan unfolded amid heavy rain and the threat of rising water underground.Eight of boys and the coach remained inside the Tham Luang Nang Non cave complex as authorities paused the inter-national effort until Monday to replenish air tanks along the treacherous exit route.But the success of the initial evacuation raised hopes that all will be out soon, although offi-cials said could it take up to four days to complete.The operation went much better than expected,Ž said Chiang Rai acting Gov. Narongsak Osatanakorn, who is overseeing the mission.He told reporters that four boys were brought out and taken to the hospital in the town of Chiang Rai, the provin-cial capital, for evaluation, and the next phase of the operation will resume after about 10-20 hours.The names of the rescued boys were not released.His announcement, at a news conference more than an hour after helicopters and ambu-lances were seen rushing from the cave area, drew cheers and applause.Narongsak had dubbed Sunday to be D-dayŽ as the complicated effort was launched in the morning.He said 13 foreign divers and five Thai navy SEALs were taking part in the key leg of the rescue: taking the boys from where they have been shelter-ing and through dark, tight and twisting passageways filled with muddy water and strong currents.Two divers were to accompany each of the boys, all of whom have been learning to dive only since July 2, when the first searchers found them.Cave rescue experts consider an underwater escape to be a last resort, especially with people untrained in diving.The death Friday of a former Thai navy SEAL, Saman Gunan, underscored the risks. The diver, the first fatality of the rescue effort, was working in a volunteer capacity and died on a mission to place oxygen can-isters along the route.But Narongsak said earlier that mild weather and falling water levels in recent days had created optimal conditions for an underwater evacuation. Those conditions wont last if the rain resumes, he said.After the four boys were removed from the cave, heavy rain started falling.Authorities have said the monsoons could cause water to rise in the cave. That along with dwindling oxygen levels, added to the urgency of getting the team out. Earlier efforts to pump water out of the cave have been set back by heavy downpours.Narongsak said Saturday that experts told him new rain could shrink the unflooded space where the boys are sheltering to just 10 square meters (108 square feet). The next phase of the opera-tion would start Monday after rescue teams replenish the supply of oxygen tanks along the route to ensure the safety of the journey, which takes several hours.On Sunday night, Thai navy SEALs posted a celebratory note on their Facebook page, saying: Have sweet dreams everyone. Good night. Hooyah.ŽThe boys and their coach, whose team is known as the Wild Boars, became stranded when they were exploring the cave after a practice game on June 23.Monsoon flooding cut off their escape route and prevented rescuers from finding them for almost 10 days.The ordeal has riveted Thai-land and captured the worlds attention. The search and rescue operation has involved dozens of international experts and rescuers, including a U.S. military team.Elon Musks Space X rocket company plans to send a tiny kid-sized submarineŽ in case its needed. A spokesman for Musks Boring Co. tunneling unit, which has four engineers at the cave, said in an email Sunday that Thai officials had requested the device and that divers have determined it could potentially help the children through narrow, flooded cave passageways.Musk said on Twitter the aluminum sub would be tested until Sunday midafternoon California time before being placed on a 17-hour flight to Thailand. He posted a video of a diver testing the device in a pool.President Donald Trump tweeted Sunday: The U.S. is working very closely with the Government of Thailand to help get all of the children out of the cave and to safety. Very brave and talented people!ŽFour rescued from Thai caveNine remain inside a er risky operation; o cials say evacuation may take up to four days to completeAn ambulance leaves the cave hours after operations began to rescue the trapped youth soccer players and their coach, Sunday in Mae Sai, Chiang Rai province, in northern Thailand. [SAKCHAI LALIT/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Catherine Lucey, Zeke Miller and Mark ShermanThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ After days of frenzied lobbying and speculation, President Donald Trump decided on federal appeals Judge Brett Kavanaugh for his second nominee to the Supreme Court, setting up a ferocious confirmation battle with Democrats as he seeks to shift the nations highest court further to the right.Trump chose Kavanaugh to replace retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy.With customary fanfare, Trump planned to unveil his choice on prime-time TV. His final options were all young federal judges who could help remake the court for decades to come with precedentshattering rulings on issues such as abortion, guns and health care.Top contenders had included federal appeals judges Raymond Kethledge, Amy Coney Barrett and Thomas Hardiman, as well as Kavanaugh, who is currently a federal appellate judge in the District of Columbia.Relishing the guessing game beyond the White House gates, Trump had little to say about his choice before the announcement.Some conservatives have expressed concerns about Kavanaugh „ a longtime judge and a former clerk for Kennedy „ questioning his commitment to social issues like abortion and noting his time serving under President George W. Bush as evidence he is a more establishment choice. But his supporters have cited his experience and wide range of legal opinions.Ahead of his announcement, Trump tweeted about the stakes: I have long heard that the most important deci-sion a U.S. President can make is the selection of a Supreme Court Justice Will be announced tonight at 9:00 P.M.ŽWith Democrats determined to vigorously oppose Trumps choice, the Senate confirmation battle is expected to dominate the months leading up to Novem-bers midterm elections. Senate Republicans hold only a 51-49 majority, leaving them hardly any margin if Democrats hold the line. Democratic senators run-ning for re-election in states Trump carried in 2016 will face pressure to back his nominee. Republican Sen. John Ken-nedy of Louisiana said he was bracing for a tough confirmation battle as Democrats focus on abortion. Kennedy, a member of the Judiciary Committee, which will get the first chance to question the nominee, predicted a rough, tough, down in the dirt, ear-pulling, nose-biting fight.ŽTrumps success in con-firming conservative judges, as well as a Supreme Court justice, has cheered Republi-cans amid concerns about his limited policy achievements and chaotic management style. Of the courts liberal justices, Ruth Bader Ginsburg is 85 and Stephen Breyer turns 80 next month, so Trump may well get another oppor-tunity to cement conservative dominance of the court for years to come.Kavanaugh is likely to be more conservative than Justice Kennedy on a range of social issues. At the top of that list is abortion. A more conservative majority could be more willing to uphold state restrictions on abortion, if not overturn the 45-yearold landmark Roe v. Wade decision that established a womans constitutional right.Kennedys replacement also could be more willing to allow states to carry out executions and could support undoing earlier court holdings in the areas of racial discrimination in housing and the workplace. Kennedy pro-vided a decisive vote in 2015 on an important fair housing case.While the president has been pondering his choice, his aides have been preparing for what is expected to be a tough confirmation fight. The White House said Monday that former Arizona Sen. Jon Kyl would guide Trumps nominee through the gruel-ing Senate process.Kyl, a former member of Republican leadership, served on the Senate Judiciary Com-mittee before retiring in 2013. He works for the Washington-based lobbying firm Covington & Burling. The White House hopes Kyls close ties to Senate Republicans will help smooth the path for confirmation.Trump is hoping to replicate his successful nomi-nation of Justice Neil Gorsuch last year. The president has spent the days leading up to his announcement discussing the pros and cons of various contenders with aides and allies. In addition to Kavanaugh, in recent days he expressed renewed interest in Hardiman, the runner-up when Trump nominated Gor-such, said two people with knowledge of his thinking.The White House invited a number of senators to attend the Monday night announce-ment, including Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, and com-mittee member Kennedy.Trump picks Kavanaugh for Supreme CourtPresident Donald Trump shakes hands with Judge Brett Kavanaugh, his Supreme Court nominee, Monday in the East Room of the White House in Washington. [EVAN VUCCI/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** A10 Wednesday, July 11, 2018 | Holmes County Times-AdvertiserFeb. 11: Clash at Daytona (Brad Keselowski) Feb. 15: Can-Am Duel at Daytona (Ryan Blaney and Chase Elliott) Feb. 18: Daytona 500 (Austin Dillon) Feb. 25: Folds of Honor 500 at Atlanta (Kevin Harvick) March 4: Kobalt 400 at Las Vegas (Kevin Harvick) March 11: Camping World 500(k) at Phoenix (Kevin Harvick) March 18: Auto Club 400 at Fontana (Martin Truex Jr.) March 26: STP 500 at Martinsville (Clint Bowyer) April 8: OReilly Auto Parts 500 at Texas (Kyle Busch) April 15: Food City 500 at Bristol (Kyle Busch) April 21: Toyota Owners 400 at Richmond (Kyle Busch) April 29: Geico 500 at Talladega (Joey Logano) May 6: AAA 400 at Dover (Kevin Harvick) May 12: Go Bowling 400 at Kansas (Kevin Harvick) May 19: All-Star Race at Charlotte (Kevin Harvick) May 27: Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte (Kyle Busch) June 3: Pocono 400 (Martin Truex Jr.) June 10: FireKeepers Casino 400 at Michigan (Clint Bowyer) June 24: Toyota/Save Mart 350 at Sonoma (Martin Truex Jr.) July 1: Chicago 400 at Chicagoland (Kyle Busch) July 7: Coke Zero 400 at Daytona (Erik Jones) July 14: Quaker State 400 at Kentucky July 22: New Hampshire 301 July 29: Pennsylvania 400 at Pocono Aug. 5: 355 at the Glen, at Watkins Glen Aug. 12: Pure Michigan 400 Aug. 18: Night Race at Bristol Sept. 2: Southern 500 at Darlington Sept. 9: Brickyard 400 at Indianapolis Sept. 16: Las Vegas 400 Sept. 22: Federated Auto Parts 400 at Richmond Sept. 30: Bank of America 500(k) at Charlotte road course Oct. 7: Delaware 400 at Dover Oct. 14: Alabama 500 at Talladega Oct. 21: Hollywood Casino 400 at Kansas Oct. 28: First Data 500 at Martinsville Nov. 4: Texas 500 Nov. 11: Can-Am 500(k) at Phoenix Nov. 18: Ford EcoBoost 400 at Homestead NASCAR THIS WEEKFEUD OF THE WEEK SPEED FREAKSA few questions we had to ask ourselvesCUP STANDINGS WHATS ON TAP QUESTIONS & ATTITUDECompelling questions ... and maybe a few actual answersGODWINS PICKS FOR KENTUCKY 2018 SCHEDULE AND WINNERS 12345678910 KEN WILLIS TOP 10 NASCAR DRIVER RANKINGSKYLE BUSCH No changes here after plate races KEVIN HARVICK Middle name is Michael MARTIN TRUEX JR. Mr. Hunch likes him at Kentucky CLINT BOWYER Feels at home in Kentucky boondocks BRAD KESELOWSKI Has added William Byron to his list KYLE LARSON Avoided runner-up “ nish at Daytona KURT BUSCH Turns 40 in a few weeks JOEY LOGANO Turns 40 in 2030 ERIK JONES Makes Logano look old The Daytona Beach News-Journals Godwin Kelly & Ken Willis have covered NASCAR for nearly 60 years combined. godwin.kelly@ news-jrnl.com ken.willis@news-jrnl.comMOTOR MOUTHS PODCASTThe plates are off, the gloves are off, the microphones are on. Tune in online at www.news-journalonline.com/ daytonamotormouths ARIC ALMIROLA Pointsracing to playoff spot THREE THINGS TO WATCHDAYTONA THREE THINGS WE LEARNED Does Erik Jones win again this year? GODSPEAK: Of course he will win again this year. He knows the path to Victory Lane now. Maybe two more wins. KENS CALL: Normally, you should never fall in love with “ rst-time winners at a plate race, but he was seventh and sixth the previous two weeks. So ... never mind, I still say no.Will Ricky Stenhouse Jr. recover? GODSPEAK: Last year Stenhouse was aggressive and won two plate races. This time he was overaggressive. Hell be OK after he gets all those apology notes in the mail. KENS CALL: He was already down as he entered Daytona. He needs a Pick-Me-Up Bouquet, and soon, or hes at a career crossroads. BRAD KESELOWSKI VS. WILLIAM BYRON: Keselowski had a head of steam and was going to blow past Byron, but Byron made a late block in Turn 3, which ignited a 20-car crash on Lap 54. GODWIN KELLYS TAKE: While others pointed the “ nger at Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Keselowski said it was Byrons fault. Well go to Talladega and wreck everybody that throws a bad block like that,Ž he said. WINNER: Denny Hamlin REST OF TOP 5: Martin Truex Jr., Kevin Harvick, Kyle Busch, Chase Elliott FIRST ONE OUT: Alex Bowman DARK HORSE: Jimmie Johnson DONT BE SURPRISED IF: Hamlin responds to what Joe Gibbs said Saturday. (Denny) knows we need to win races for FedEx. We need to get that done,Ž Gibbs said.On the Erik Jones bandwagon?On, but not because of this past Saturday night at Daytona. Surely, weve all learned by now that plate-race success doesnt translate to more legitimate tests of team and driver. Were high on Erik literally because of his track record. Remember, last year as little brotherŽ to Martin Truex Jr. at Furniture Row, in the “ nal six races of the regular season he put together “ nishes of 8th, 10th, 3rd, 2nd, 5th and 6th. Only after that, as Truexs No. 78 and the championship run became the teams major focus, Eriks results slipped. And theres been enough decent weeks this year to maintain that warranted promise.So, more wins for him this year?Its very, very possible, but hes probably a year away from being a weekly threat to win races. Front-pack presence on a near-weekly basis is the current goal, youd think, and likely attainable.„ Ken Willis, ken.willis@ news-jrnl.com1. Kyle Busch 749 2. Kevin Harvick 692 3. Martin Truex Jr. 629 4. Joey Logano 618 5. Brad Keselowski 596 6. Clint Bowyer 594 7. Kurt Busch 566 8. Kyle Larson 544 9. Denny Hamlin 538 10. Aric Almirola 503 11. Ryan Blaney 496 12. Jimmie Johnson 461 13. Erik Jones 448 14. Chase Elliott 444 15. Alex Bowman 426 16. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. 407 17. Paul Menard 371 18. Austin Dillon 347 19. Ryan Newman 332 20. Daniel Suarez 318 CUP SERIES: Quaker State 400 SITE: Kentucky Speedway (1.5-mile oval) TV SCHEDULE: Friday, practice (NBC Sports Network, noon and 2 p.m.), qualifying (NBC Sports Network, 6:30 p.m.). Saturday, race (NBC Sports Network, coverage begins at 6 p.m.; green ” ag, 7:30 p.m.) XFINITY: Alsco 300 SITE: Kentucky Speedway SCHEDULE: Friday, qualifying (NBC Sports Network, 5 p.m.), race (NBC Sports Network, 8 p.m.) CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS: Buckle Up In Your Truck 225 SITE: Kentucky Speedway TV SCHEDULE: Thursday, race (Fox Sports 1, 7:30 p.m.)1. Horses, bourbonKentucky is synonymous with horse racing (Kentucky Derby), bourbon (Jim Beam, Wild Turkey) and college basketball (Kentucky, Louisville), but has little to do with racing. Kentucky Speedway was built in Sparta, which is an hour south from Cincinnati, and hosted its “ rst Cup Series race in 2011. Brad Keselowski and Kyle Busch have combined for “ ve wins in seven Cup races there.2. Chevy, young gunsBoth Chevrolet and young drivers fared well at Daytona. Chevrolet had seven cars crowded into the top-10 “ nishers in the Coke Zero Sugar 400, while 22-year-old Erik Jones, wheeling a Toyota, won the race. Both were solid developments for each camp. Chevy scored only one win in the “ rst half of the 2018 Cup Series season, but is beginning to show more life as teams “ gure out the new Camaro body.3. Slide job!Dale Earnhardt Jr.s debut as a racing announcer was a hit at Chicagoland Speedway with his Slide job! Slide job!Ž hollering on the last lap of that race. Earnhardt was quick to say before the race at Daytona not to look for more catchphrases. We are going to have different on-track action every week, and Im going to hopefully have a genuine reaction to it,Ž he said. Whatever happens, happens.Ž„ Godwin Kelly, godwin. kelly@news-jrnl.comWhen you think Bluegrass State and racing, the Kentucky Derby springs to mind, not motorsports at Kentucky Speedway. [AP/DARRON CUMMINGS] 1. Into the grinderRestrictor-plate racing at Daytona has turned into a demolition derby. It has gone from ifŽ it happens to whenŽ it happens. Sometimes youre in the half of the “ eld that “ nishes; sometimes youre in half of the “ eld that doesnt “ nish it,Ž Joey Logano said after climbing from his wreck.2. New facesThere is one interesting thing about Daytona and Talladega races. Fans get to see fresh faces at the front of the “ eld. Erik Jones scored his “ rst Cup win, and other top-“ ve “ nishers included AJ Allmendinger, Kasey Kahne and Chris Buescher. Top three was a good day,Ž Allmendinger said.3. Out of boundsThanks to Justin Haleys exploits in Daytonas X“ nity Series race, the Cup drivers stayed away from the out-ofbounds line. Haley got the checkered ” ag, but was penalized for dipping below the yellow line and was denied the win by NASCAR. He was scored 18th. Ouch!„ Godwin Kelly, godwin. kelly@news-jrnl.comJust another day at the of“ ce for NASCAR at Daytona. [NEWS-JOURNAL/NIGEL COOK]

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** A12 Wednesday, July 11, 2018 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser SPORTS TICKER IN BRIEFEMERSON, GA. Players, refs trade punches in Georgia basketball gameA video shows players and referees trading punches at an Amateur Athletic Union basketball game in an Atlanta suburb.News outlets report the video has been shared on social media thousands of times. It shows the Sunday morning brawl in the AAU game between Chicago-based R.A.W. Athletics and the Houston Raptors at the LakePoint sports facility in Emerson.R.A.W. Athletics coach Howard Martin tells WSB-TV he thinks one of his players had complained to a referee about a call before he was ejected from the game. Martin says the player was walking toward the bench when the referee pushed him.Raptors coach Bobby Benjamin says he saw a player bump into the ref-eree, but hes not exactly sure what started the fight.KANSAS CITY, MO.Royals sign 16-year-old Japanese pitcher for $322K Kaito Yuki is headed to the Kansas City Royals organization instead of attending high school in Japan.The 16-year-old pitcher agreed Sunday to a minor league contract with a $322,500 signing bonus. He is thought to be the first Japanese junior high school player to sign with a major league club.I wanted to play in the United States as soon as possible, rather than playing high school ball at Koshien Stadium (in Japans iconic national championship),Ž Yuki said in statement issued by the Royals.Yuki is listed at 6-foot-2, 170 pounds and the right-handers fastball has been clocked at 87-88 mph. He was born on May 12, 2002.My goal is to do well in the majors. Not every-body is given that chance, so I want to do my best,Ž he said at a news confer-ence in his hometown of Osaka.MADRIDSpain appoints Luis Enrique as coachFormer Barcelona coach Luis Enrique has signed a two-year deal to take charge of Spain.He replaces Julen Lop-etegui, who was sacked on the eve of the World Cup after accepting the job at Real Madrid.Fernando Hierro took temporary control for the finals, where 2010 world champion and 2008 and 2012 European Championship winner Spain was knocked out 4-3 on pen-alties by host Russia in the last 16 The decision has been unanimous,Ž Spanish federation president Luis Rubiales said on Luis Enriques appointment. I like his commitment. He has let better financial opportunities pass in order to be national team coach.This coach fulfills all the parameters to take charge of the team. Luis Enrique is bringing his backroom staff, but this is a matter he will speak about next week.Ž The Associated Press By Luke MeredithThe Associated PressNEWTON, Iowa „ Stock car racing team Venturini Motorsports has had a tradition of employing women that stretches back for decades.On June 29, the ARCA outfit made history „ starting three female drivers in the same race for the first time in the modern era of the sport.Natalie Decker, Leilani Mnter and Toni Breidinger finishing 12th, 18th and 20th respectively at Chicagoland Speedway. By starting as a trio, they helped raise the profile of women in a sport long dominated by men. Were not trying to bill ourselves as this team that is championing female drivers by any means. It just so happens that weve had a number of females come through,Ž team spokes-man Tom Venturini said. Were a championship-caliber team. Were putting the best drivers in the seat, male or female.ŽVMS push to use women as both crew members and drivers came long before recently retired Cup series driver Danica Patrick set foot on a race track.Team owner Bill Ven-turini won Automobile Racing Club of America titles in 1987 and 1991, the first coming with an all-female pit crew „ known as the Ultra Blue CrewŽ „ led by his wife and team co-owner Cathy Venturini. When that happened, the whole idea of it was, were competitors first. It was not a publicity stunt,Ž Tom Venturini said. We had the best physically fit women to do that job. They outper-formed the men. It really just happened to be that they were women on the crew.ŽIn subsequent years, the team has given seats to the likes of Milka Duno, Alli Owens, Johanna Long, Nicole Behar and others. Breanna OLeary is a member of VMS pit crew this season as a tire changer.The latest woman hoping to prove shes worthy of a top-tier ride with the help of VMS is 21-year-old Decker, a Wisconsin native in her first full season in ARCA.Father Chuck Decker was both a race car and snowmobile racer. He also owns the Eagle Grove Derby Track in Wisconsin, which hosts the annual World Cham-pionship Snowmobile Derby. Chuck tried to get Nat-alie into snowmobiling, though it never stuck. He took her to a go-kart track when she was 6, and it ignited a passion for racing cars. Decker soon started watching NASCAR races every week with her father, who got his daughter her first go-kart when she was 9. Girl power Serena Williams returns the ball to Russias Evgeniya Rodina during their womens singles match on day seven of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships, on Monday in London. [TIM IRELAND/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] By Howard FendrichThe Associated PressLONDON „ Serena Williams figures this statistic needs an asterisk: For the first time since Wimbledon started seeding players in the 1920s, none of the top 10 women reached the quarterfinals. Its also the only Grand Slam tournament in the half-cen-tury professional era with zero top-10 seeds in the womens final eight.I dont think this has hap-pened to this extreme. But also, Ive never been ranked where I am,Ž Williams said Monday after her fourth straight-set victory of the fortnight. Usu-ally, Im one of those few seeds left thats still fighting and still in the tournament. Now that Im not, it kind of happened.ŽBidding for an eighth cham-pionship at the All England Club, Williams will be back on court Tuesday, but she is seeded only 25th, and that actually represents a big bump up from her ranking of No. 181. As she keeps reminding folks, this is just her fourth tourna-ment since missing more than a year of action because she was pregnant and gave birth to a daughter last September.I feel like Im getting to where I want to be,Ž Williams said. For me, theres so much farther I want to go to get back where I was „ and hopefully go beyond that.ŽThat might sound a tad scary to opponents. The 36-yearold American, who has spent more than 300 weeks ranked No. 1, looks superb so far. Wil-liams latest match required only 62 minutes and was not much of a contest, a 6-2, 6-2 win in which she compiled a 30-5 edge in winners against Evgeniya Rodina, a qualifier from Russia ranked 120th who was dealing with a bothersome left thigh.Williams hit serves up to 118 mph, delivering 10 aces, including four in one game. Its speed and placement,Ž Rodina said about what makes Williams serve so effective. Its 115, and she puts the ball close to the line.Ž The one time Williams lost a service game, cutting her second-set lead to 3-2, she broke right back at love to start a three-game streak that ended things.Williams hasnt faced a seeded player yet, and she wont on Tuesday, either, instead facing 52nd-ranked Camila Giorgi of Italy.Asked what she likes the most about the way Williams plays, Giorgi responded: I dont follow tennis.ŽHeres a hint, Camila: Williams is now just three vic-tories from a 24th Grand Slam title, which would add to her own professional-era record and equal Margaret Courts all-time mark. Consider, too, that the other 15 women in fourth-round action Monday own a combined three major trophies: Angelique Kerber has two, Jelena Ostapenko the other.On Tuesday, No. 11 Kerber will play No. 14 Daria Kasatkina, and No. 12 Ostapenko faces 2014 Australian Open runner-up Dominika Cibulkova. No. 7 Karolina Pliskovas wait for a major title will con-tinue. She was the lone top-10 womens seed still around at this upset-filled tournament, and now shes also gone. Plis-kova was beaten 6-3, 7-6 (1) by No. 20 Kiki Bertens, who eliminated Williams sister, Venus, last week.Bertens now faces No. 13 Julia Goerges, who beat Donna Vekic 6-3, 6-2. I didnt expect it, hon-estly,Ž said Goerges, who lost in the first round at the All England Club each of the past five years.Giorgi, Kasatkina, Bertens and Goerges will each be making her debut in the Wim-bledon quarterfinals. Its the first time making it to the final eight at any major for Giorgi and Goerges.Predictably, Pliskova was asked why there have been so many surprises. And, just as predictably, she was in no mood to provide an answer.I dont want to talk about this anymore. I answered this question, like, 10 times,Ž the 2016 U.S. Open runner-up said. I dont know why all the seeds are gone.ŽDown but not outSerena knows Wimbledons top-10 seeds stat needs asteriskKiki Bertens serves to Karolina Pliskova during their womens singles match Monday at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Bertens has beaten seventh-ranked Pliskova and ninth-ranked Venus Williams so far this tournament. [BEN CURTIS/ THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] Karolina Pliskova sits in her chair in a game break during the womens singles match Monday at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Pliskova, the “ nal top-10 seed remaining in the tournament, lost Monday. [BEN CURTIS/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] Stock car racing team makes history, starts three female drivers

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Wednesday, July 11, 2018 A13By Ari LeVauxMore Content NowThe summer solstice has snuck by, again. Depressing, I know, but as our hemisphere prepares for its date with winter, there is no need to overthink the situation. The roses are still fragrant, and the tomatoes are still ripening, because the heat has only just begun, and we cant lose sight of the big picture: This is a very good time to drink sangria. By sangria, I mean a spectrum of wine-and-fruit-based cold drinks, some of which have more merit than others. At one end is sangria itself, the famous Spanish punch made of wine, fruit, juice and liquor thats adored by sun worshippers, tourists and underage drinkers. This end of the spectrum is one of incomprehensible complexity, as there are too many permutations of all of these ingredients, plus shots of simple syrup, 7 Up and the like to keep track of. One popular variation, for example, is the Italian-American version of the Eastern Seaboard, which contains brandy, triple sec and peach schnapps, along with the fruit. You will find these ingredients in the awardwinning sangria pitchers of Spain Restaurant in Cranston, Rhode Island, and in the shared kitchen of a certain Cape Cod vacation spot, where a certain clan of Italian families shows up every solstice like clockwork to share a kitchen with my family (long story). One of the clan matriarchs, Diane, told me her recipe and shared this nugget: While most recipes call for merlot or cabernet, she advises a red burgundy. Its drier, she says, and has that woody taste.Ž I enjoyed the fact that a celebrated French wine is the secret ingredient in the Italian-American version of a Spanish drink, and filed it away just in case. But to be honest, I was having trouble getting excited about her sangria. It was both too delicious and too alcoholic. This may sound like a win-win, but I find it counterproductive to add extra sugar so you can add extra booze. Summer may be gone in the blink of an eye, but its also a grind, and I want to keep cool, keep hydrated and keep going. I prefer the other end of the sangria spectrum. The side thats bitter, simple and bubbly. Its called tinto de verano, which translates to red wine of summer.Ž In Spain, its what the locals have settled on as the ideal antidote for the Iberian heat. Credit for its creation is given to Andalusian restaurateur and bullfight promoter Federico Vargas, but credit is hardly due. Its such a simple recipe that its creation was inevitable. Tinto de Verano€ Red wine € Sprite (or the Spanish equivalent) Open both items, mix and serve chilled. The lemon and lime fine-tune the flavor, as the cold and bubbles do their things. Its numbing and stimulating. Pleasantly exhilarating. This simple drink can be doctored in many ways. Ice, for example, is a great way to chill it if your glass and ingredients were not already frigid. Squeezed slices of lemon and lime, meanwhile, will significantly enhance the citrus pizzazz. A shot of lemonade here, a dash of vermouth there „ to the point that you have basically made sangria. And as the Italians and others have shown, there is plenty of room for exploration on the busy, fruity side of this continuum. Drying out Here is my recipe for extra-dry tinto de verano. It is optimized for maximum hydration, minimal added sugars and just the right level of buzz to keep you going. I call it Verano Seca, which means dry summer.Ž If you have access to unsprayed roses, wild or domestic, I recommend harvesting some petals and using them in this drink. Verano Seca€ Burgundy € Bubbly water (unsweetened) € Lemon and lime slices € Ice € Rose petals (optional but highly recommended) Add ice “ rst, then bubbles, followed by the squeezed citrus slices. Finally, add the wine. When added in this order, the wine stays atop the bubbly. HEALTHY EATINGDIET FADS TO AVOIDHere are a few health fads that arent as nutritious as you may have heard: Cooking with coco nut oil: A recent study by MB Clinical Research found that coconut oil increases cholesterol. Juice diets and cleanses: A diet limited to coldpressed juices wont provide enough essential vitamins and minerals for a healthy diet. Granola bars: They are packed with whole grains, but many contain an unhealthy amount of sugar. EASY RECIPEGRILLED CORN ON THE COB€ 4 ears of corn € 1/4 cup hot wing sauce € 1/2 cup crumbled Salemville Blue Cheese Heat grill over low heat. Peel and clean corn. Brush each ear with hot wing sauce and wrap in aluminum foil, being careful to fully seal corn in foil. Place on the top rack of the grill and close the lid, cooking until fork tender, about 15 to 20 minutes. Remove from the grill, carefully open the aluminum foil and brush with additional hot wing sauce. Place on plates and sprinkle each ear with blue cheese. SURVEYMOMS QUIET KIDS WITH PIZZAAccording to a survey of 1,000 U.S. moms of children ages 3-17 by Wake eld Research, 80 percent of mothers believe pizza would quiet their kids quicker than an air horn. FOODFLASH IN THE PANSangriasummerVerano Seca is optimized for maximum hydration and minimal added sugars. [ARI LEVAUX] Experimenting with the spectrum of sweet, dry, bubbly and bitter

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** A14 Wednesday, July 11, 2018 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Wednesday, July 11, 2018 B1CELEBRATE Staff ReportWASHINGTON AND HOLMES COUNTIES … Both Washington and Holmes counties celebrated Independence Day last week with festivities held in Chipley, Bonifay and Vernon. The Patriotic Fest in Bonifay featured music, vendors and fireworks. Vernon held its annual Firecraker Fest with a parade, vendors, kids activities, and a concert by local country artist Christon Birge. Chipley held a fireworks display at Pals Park on July 3. Celebrating Independence DayAmelia, Aleah, Abigail and Aryana Weintraub were all ready to celebrate Independence day at the Vernon Firecracker Festival. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS] Crowds gathered for the Chipley Fireworks display. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS] Gia Martin, 2, waited patiently in 90-degree heat for the Vernon Fourth of July parade to begin. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS] Vada Hutchings was full of holiday spirit and didnt let a little rain dampen her excitement at the Bonifay Patriotic Celebration. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS] Fireworks light up the sky during Chipleys display. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS] Visitors to the Bonifay Patriotic Fest found a way to wait out the rain in anticipation of the Independence Day festivities. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS] Country Artist Christon Birge performs a sound check at his hometown of Vernons Firecracker fest. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS] Chipley “ reworks lit up the night sky. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS] Caiden Goodyear, 4 months, took a little nap while waiting for the “ reworks show in Bonifay. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS]

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** B2 Wednesday, July 11, 2018 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser By Stan ChoeThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ Never mind the trade war. Here comes earnings season.U.S. stocks climbed with other markets on Monday as concerns about trade tensions between the United States and the rest of the world took a back seat. The calendar for upcoming weeks is full of companies telling inves-tors how much profit they made during the spring, and the expecta-tion is for another quarter of gangbusters growth.That plus Fridays report showing U.S. hiring remains strong have helped to support markets despite the worlds two larg-est economies imposing dueling tariffs on each other at the end of last week.The S&P 500 rose 24.35 points, or 0.9 percent, to 2,784.17. The Dow Jones industrial average jumped 320.11, or 1.3 percent, to 24,776.59, and the Nasdaq composite gained 67.81, or 0.9 percent, to 7,756.20. Stocks jump as trade-war worries stay cool MARKET WATCHDow 24,776.59 320.11 Nasdaq 7,756.20 67.81 S&P 2,784.17 24.35 Russell 1,704.60 10.55 NYSE 12,776.92 112.04COMMODITIES REVIEWGold 1,258.10 3.80 Silver 16.053 .072 Platinum 849.00 4.80 Copper 2.8390 .0260 Oil 73.85 0.05MARKET MOVERS€ Groupon Inc.: Up 47 cents to $4.83 „ Recode reported that the online coupon company is looking for a buyer. € Twitter Inc.: Down $2.51 to $44.14 „ The Washington Post reported that the company suspended more than 70 million suspicious accounts in May and June.BRIEFCASEWASHINGTONUS consumer borrowing up $24 billion in MayAmericans increased their borrowing in May at the fastest pace in a year and a half, boosted by a big increase in credit card borrowing.Consumer debt rose $24.5 billion in May after an increase of $10 billion in April, the Federal Reserve reported Monday. It was the biggest monthly increase since a rise of $24.8 billion in November 2016. The Associated PressBy Joe McDonaldThe Associated PressBEIJING „ In his trade war with China, President Donald Trump wields one seeming advantage: The United States could slap tariffs on more than $500 billion in imported Chinese goods. Beijing has much less to tax: It imported just $130 billion in U.S. goods last year.Yet that hardly means China would be powerless to fight back once it ran out of U.S. goods to penalize. It possesses a range of other weapons with which to inflict pain on the U.S. economy.Indeed, Chinas Commerce Ministry has warned of compre-hensive measuresŽ it could take against the U.S. „ from harass-ing automakers, retailers or other American companies that depend on China to drive revenue to selling U.S. government debt or disrupting diplomatic efforts over North Korea.Some of those steps might hurt Chinas own interests. But Beijing might still be willing to deploy them, at least temporarily, if its trade war with Washington were to drag on.On Friday, Washington imposed its first tariffs in response to complaints Beijing steals or pressuring companies to hand over technology. China swiftly announced retaliatory tariffs on a similar amount of U.S. goods.A look at some of Chinas options: Target American companiesChinas state-dominated and heavily regulated economy gives authorities an arsenal of tools to disrupt U.S. companies by with-holding licenses or launching tax, anti-monopoly or other investigations.Also open to retaliation are services such as engineering and logistics in which the United States runs a trade surplus.The U.S. focus is on goods, while China could very well look at services, as well as the operation of U.S. companies in China,Ž said Taimur Baig, chief economist for DBS Group.In one prominent case, U.S. chipmaker Qualcomm Inc. has waited for months for word on whether Chinese regulators will accept its proposed $44 billion acquisition of NXP Semiconduc-tors. All other major governments have approved the deal.Chinas entirely state-con-trolled media have encouraged consumer boycotts against Jap-anese, South Korean and other products during previous dis-putes with those governments.Last year, Beijing destroyed Korean retailer Lottes business in China after the company sold land in South Korea to the Seoul government for an anti-missile system opposed by Chinese leaders. Beijing closed most of Lottes 99 supermarkets and other outlets in China. Seoul and Beijing later mended relations, but Lotte gave up and sold its China operations. Financial leverageNationalists point to Chinas $1.2 trillion holdings of U.S. government debt as leverage. Beijing might suffer losses if it sold enough to influence U.S. debt financing costs „ but such sales might become necessary.Chinas yuan has sagged against the dollar this year, which might require the central bank to intervene in currency markets.To get the dollars it needs, the Peoples Bank of China might become a net seller of U.S. Treasurys,Ž said Carl B. Weinberg of High-Frequency Economics in a report.Punishing the U.S. Trea-sury market is one of the tactics China has available to retaliate against unilateral U.S. tariffs,Ž said Weinberg. Diplomatic pressureBeijing can appeal for sup-port to U.S. allies that are miffed by Trumps America firstŽ approach and the U.S. withdrawal from the Paris climate pact. Trumps actions have allowed China to position itself as a defender of free trade despite its status as the most-closed major economy. That could help Beijing win over countries that have crit-icized Trump for acting outside the World Trade Organization.China could strike a common ground with the EU, Canada, Japan and other economies impacted by the U.S. tariffs,Ž said Citigroup economists Li-Gang Liu, Xiaowen Jin and Xiangrong Yu in a report.Drastic measuresHow China could hurt US once it ran out of imports to tax BUSINESS

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Wednesday, July 11, 2018 B3 SCHOOLS & SOCIETY CROSSWORD By Melissa Erickson More Content NowTalking to a child about why its important to get good grades in school can be met with nods of agreement or rolled eyes. It doesnt matter if kids know you want them to succeed, they have to have the motivation to do it for themselves. Motivation is one of the biggest challenges in education. Many factors combine to encourage us to work hard, pursue goals or aim for success, or to do the opposite,Ž said Joan M. Rooney, vice president for instructor management at The Princeton Review and Tutor.com. External factors like income level, subjects being taught, the ability of the teacher and other social influences play a role but dont make a big difference. The one factor that is most influential in helping us to succeed is confidence,Ž said Rooney, a former classroom teacher and parent of an adult son. Shes not referring to an unrealistic sense of selfworth but rather a belief that if students work hard and do their best, they are capable of succeeding. A student needs to have the knowledge that he will not succeed at everything, but if he doesnt try, how will he know what he is capable of, she said. I would advise parents to do whatever they can to foster in their children this perspective: that what is important is that I work hard and that I try,Ž Rooney said. Foster this attitude toward their studies, school and life in general. In current terms, this is what is known as promoting a growth mindset and sense of self-efficacy.Ž Fail until you succeed We need to help our kids understand that failure is a stepping stone on a journey and not an end result. Everybody fails, and not just once. What is great about failure (although it does not seem so at the time) is that we learn from it and we try again,Ž Rooney said. Sharing past stories of failures in and out of school and failure stories of famous people helps children understand that failure can be a helpful part of life, Rooney said. Avoid bad attitudes What is not helpful for kids is if a parent says, I was never good at math, eitherŽ or I am terrible at foreign languages.Ž These types of statements create a fixed mindset, which sets us up for failure rather than success,Ž Rooney said. Make it relevant Relevance is a critical part of successful learning. We achieve deeper learning when what we are learning has some meaning for us,Ž Rooney said. Stay abreast of what your child is studying in class and find ways to incorporate what you can into everyday activities. Activities such as these help kids see that there is in fact a real-world connection to what they are learning, and they also make learning fun and often inspire a desire to learn more,Ž Rooney said.Tips to motivate your child to learnTrivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy.com 1. Studies have shown that people who live in what geographic location of the U.S. wash their clothes the most often?South, East coast, North, West coast2. Who was the first attempted presidential assassination against when a painter took two shots but missed?George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, Andrew Jackson3. What Andy Griffith ShowŽ star previously had a regular part on Search For TomorrowŽ?Don Knotts, Jim Nabors, Frances Bavier, Howard McNear4. Which is considered a cousin of the weasel?Badger, Skunk, Beaver, Raccoon5. Of these, whats commonly measured in reams?Cloth, Silver, Paper, Concrete6. Which is not a form of necktie or knot?Windsor, Cravat, Dickie, Four-in-hand ANSWERS: 1. South, 2. Andrew Jackson, 3. Don Knotts, 4. Badger, 5. Paper, 6. DickieTRIVIA GUY W i l s o n C a s e y Wilson Casey August1: Pre-School Begins for Teachers and Non-Instructional working teacher days 10: Classes Begin for StudentsSeptember3: Labor Day (Students and All Personnel Out/Paid Holiday for Teachers)October5: Students and All Personnel Out 12: End of First Grading Period 18:Report Cards Go Home 26 … 29: Fall Break (Students, Teachers and 10 Month NonInstructional Personnel out) 30: Classes ResumeNovember19-23: Students, Teachers and 10 Month Non-Instructional Personnel Out 22: Paid Holiday for Teachers 21-23: 12 Month Personnel outDecember21: End “ rst Semester Student Early Release Day/Professional Development 24-Jan. 4, 2019:Students, Teachers and 10 Month NonInstructional Personnel out 25: Paid Holiday for Teachers 24-Jan 1, 2019: 12 Month Personnel outJanuary 20197: Classes Resume for Students and all Personnel return to work 10: Report Cards Go Home 21: Students and All Personnel out/Paid Holiday for TeachersFebruary18: Students and all Personnel out/Paid Holiday for teachersMarch15: End Third Grading Period 21: Report Cards Go Home 25-29: Spring Break (Students and All Personnel Out)April1: Classes ResumeMay20: Ponce de Leon High School Graduation 21: Poplar Springs High School Graduation 23: Bethlehem High School Graduation 24: Holmes County High School Graduation 24: End of Second Semester/ Student Early Release Day/Professional Development 27: All Personnel Out/Paid Holiday For Teachers 28-30: Post-School for Teachers and Non-Instructional Teacher Working Days2018 2019 HOLMES COUNTY SCHOOL CALENDAR If you have a school activity or news event you'd like covered, please send information to: news@chipleypaper.com. Already have photos or an article you'd like to share? We'd love to have those submissions as well. Help us get the word out about all the good news in our local school system!GOT SCHOOL NEWS?Special to Times-AdvertiserBONIFAY A local combination grade school is holding a back-to-school giveaway and is looking for your support. Bonifay K-8, 140 Blue Devil Drive, is asking the public to donate items for the giveaway by Thursday, July 12. Donations are needed for clothes, shoes, backpacks, lunchboxes, school supplies and nonperishable goods for the backpack program. Pick-up day for the items is Friday, July 13 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Bonifay K-8 cafeteria. Donations are not necessary in order to receive items for your child. For questions, call Melissa Hudson 850-547-3631 ext. 5107.Back to School giveaway is Friday

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** B4 Wednesday, July 11, 2018 | Holmes County Times-AdvertiserIf you would like to include an event in this list, email information to: news@chipleypaper.com Caryville Evangelistic Center to hold homecoming services CARYVILLE … There will also be a revival at 7 p.m. nightly through Friday, July 13. Dinner will be served on Sunday. The church is located at 731 Wrights Creek Road in Caryville. Klondyke Gospel Music Center to host concerts in July OZARK, ALABAMA … The following gospel music ministries will appear in concert during the month of July as indicated, at the Klondyke Gospel Music Center. All concerts begin at 7 p.m. There is no admission charge. Saturday, July 14, James P Hear and The Amazing Gospel Songbirds from Headland, Alabama; Friday, July 20, Heart to Heart from Knoxville, Tennessee; Saturday, July 21, Chosen Witness Quartet from Alabaster, Alabama and Saturday, July 28, Rickey Ward of the 4 Calvary Quartet from Bonifay. The center is located half way between Newton, Alabama and Ozark, Alabama at 3885 Highway 123 South. For more information call Ron Jeffers at 334-797-9862. Victory Tabernacle to host revival HARTFORD, ALABAMA … Victory Tabernacle in Hartford, Alabama will host a revival Thursday, July 12 through Sunday, July 15. The revival will be at 7 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and at 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. on Sunday. The revival will be led by Missionary/Evangelist Fred Wynn. The church is located at 10005 East State Highway 52 in Hartford, Alabama. For more information visit victory tabernacle.com Bonifay First United Methodist to host USDA Food Distribution BONIFAY … Bonifay First United Methodist Church will host a USDA Food Distribution at 9 30 a.m. at the church on the following Wednesdays: August 15, October 17 and December 19. This is for Holmes County residence only. The church is located at 202 N Oklahoma Street across from the courthouse.FAITH EVENTS FAITHIf you would like your Holmes County church listed here, please send information to:news@chipleypaper.com. Due to space limitation, please only send regular church services. For special services, please send separate submission. ASSEMBLY OF GODBonifay First Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located 116 Main Street in Bonifay. Faith Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located on Underwood Road behind Poplar Springs School. Lighthouse Assembly of God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday night Bible study is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1201 South Waukesha Street in Bonifay. Live Oak Assembly of God Sunday School is Sunday at 10:00a.m.; with Morning Worship at 11 a.m. and Evening Worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 2118 Live Oak Road in Bonifay. Mt. Olive Assembly of God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Highway 179-A off of Highway 2. New Smyrna Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located approximately one mile down Adolph Whitaker Road just off Highway 177 in Bonifay. Noma Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service and youth are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 1062 Tindell Street in Bonifay. Northside Assembly of God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 1009 North Rangeline Street in Bonifay. Smith Chapel Assembly of God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located 2549 Smith Chapel Road, just off Highway 177-A. The Sanctuary Assembly of God Sunday Connection Life groups 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship 10:45 a.m. Free Community Breakfast “ rst and third Wednesday mornings at 8 a.m. The church is located at 6688 South Highway 79 in Ebro. Westville First Assembly of God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Service is at 10:45 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 2513 Cypress Street in Westville. Winterville Assembly of God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1897 Highway 177A in BonifayBAPTISTBethlehem Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1572 Highway 177 in Bonifay. Bethany Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1404 North Highway 79 in Bonifay. Bethel Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. Bonifay First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 311 North Waukesha Street. Bonifay Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Kansas Avenue and Oklahoma Street. East Pittman Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located mile north of Highway 2 on Highway 179. HOLMES COUNTY CHURCH LISTINGSSee CHURCHES, B6

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Wednesday, July 11, 2018 B5 OBITUARIESJames Walter Shirley, age 57, of Bonifay, Florida died June 29, 2018. Memorializationwas by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.JAMES W. SHIRLEYLinda JoyceŽ Seley, age 58, a lifelong resident of Ponce de Leon, Florida passed away Friday, June 29, 2018 at her residence. She was born to John James and Mavis Lorine Roberts on September 11, 1959 in Crestview, Florida. Joyce enjoyed going to church and spending time with family and friends. She loved going fishing with her husband Elige, even though she didnt eat the fish, the time spent with him, doing what made him happy, was precious to her. She is preceded in death by her husband, Elige Seley; parents, John James and Mavis Lorine Roberts; two brothers, Billy Ray and Max Roberts. Joyce is survived by two sisters, Elisa Gail Deming and husband Mike of Alford, Florida, and Sheila Lewis and husband Rodger of Panama City, Florida; five brothers, Lonnie Wayne Roberts and wife Margo of Mossy Head, Florida, Johnny Mack Roberts of DeFuniak Springs, Florida, Clay Neal Roberts and wife Charlene of DeFuniak Springs, Florida, Rex Roberts and wife Fran of Crestview, Florida, and Gene Roberts of Mossy Head, Florida. Having no children, she always loved and thought of April Byrd and Haley Curry as her own daughters. Joyce is also survived by many nieces and nephews whom she loved dearly. Those ask to serve as pallbearers: John Roberts, Mike Deming, Dewy Roberts, Marshall Roberts, Johnny Roberts, and Travis Byrd. Funeral services were held Tuesday, July 3, 2018 in the chapel of Davis-Watkins Funeral Home, 1474 Highway 83 North, DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32433, beginning at 11 a.m. with Chaplain Ernie Grey officiating. A time of visitation will be held one hour prior to the service. Flowers are being accepted. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.daviswatkins. com Arrangements and services are under the direction of DavisWatkins Funeral Home.LINDA SELEY Mrs. Lucille (Brown) Tomblin, of Chipley, Florida, went home to be with the Lord on Tuesday, July 3, 2018 in the Bay Medical Center of Panama City, Florida. She was 76 years old. Lucille was born on April 10, 1942 to the late Buford & Mary (Callins) Brown in Chipley, Florida. She served as a Dietary Aide for the Washington County Hospital for numerous years and for Sunland in Marianna Florida for 20+ years. She leaves to cherish her memories two daughters: Erica Butler of Panama City, Florida, and Beverly Butler of Tallahassee, Florida; one son: Anthony Tomblin of Bradenton, Florida; two granddaughters: Christina Tomblin of Jacob City, Florida, and Jermaine Lewis of Tallahassee, Florida; one great-grandsons: Miles Anthony Libert of Jacob City, Florida; two sisters: Phyllis Brown of Panama City, Florida and Ethel Brown-Oney (Gene) of Vernon, Florida; two brothers: Isaac Brown (Dorothy) of Vernon, Florida, and Ferman Brown, Jr. of Bonifay, Florida; along with a host of nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. A Celebration of Lucilles Life was held 11 AM CST, Saturday, July 7, 2018 from the sanctuary of the Johnson Temple First Born Church with pastor, Elder Floyd Harper, Rev. Larry Brown, Rev. Earl Cooke, and Dea Isaac Brown, officiating. Committal Service followed in the St. Joseph Cemetery of Chipley, Florida with Cooper Funeral Home of Chipley, Florida, directing. Public Viewing was held Friday, July 6, 2018 from 12 Noon until 9 PM in the Cooper Funeral Home Chapel of Chipley, Florida. The remains were in repose at the church on Saturday, 1hr. prior to services. Friends may sign the guestbook online at www.cooperf hchipley.com.LUCILLE TOMBLINJohn D. Owens, age 90, passed from this life to be with his Savior, Sunday, July 1, 2018, at his home. He was born in Crystal Lake, FL, on January 23, 1928 to John W. and Cora Dee Atwell Owens. John D. lived his life as a public servant, working as a service member of the United States Navy where he retired at the rank of E7, and worked as an employee of the United States Post Office in Chipley, where he also retired. As a member of the Wausau Assembly of God Church, John D. enjoyed singing in the choir. Because of his expert cooking skills, his dishes were popular at all the fellowship dinners … especially his chicken and dumplings, perfectly baked hams, and crispy fried fish and hushpuppies. He was a Sunday School teacher and a board member of the church for many years. At home he enjoyed outdoor activities such as fishing in his pond, gardening, mowing his grass, and tending to the flower beds. He and his wife Imogene loved to travel with family and friends … most often to the Great Smokey Mountains. John D. loved his Lord Jesus, family, and friends so much. His gracious spirit, which was demonstrated through his sincere concern for others, will be remembered by all who knew him. He is preceded in death by his loving grandson, Jason Brande; his beautiful wife, Imogene; granddaughter, Amy Owens; two brothers, Roland Owens and Newman Owens; and his parents. He is survived by one son Stanley Owens, two daughters: Sheila Tracy and husband, Dan; Sabra Shores and husband Phillip, two brothers: Julian Owens and Doris Owens and wife Juanell; two sisters: Iris Land and Shirley Ramer and husband, Joel; six grandchildren: Amber Owens, Crystal Carter and husband, Ambers, Jacob Swindle, John Swindle, Bethany Shores, and Byron Shores; one greatgrandchild, Klayton Carter; along with many nieces and nephews. The Funeral Service were held on Thursday, July 5, 2018 at Wausau Assembly of God Church. Visitation was held at 10:00 A.M. with the Service starting at 11:00 A.M. with Reverend Danny Burns officiating. Interment followed at the Wausau Memorial Gardens Cemetery with Brown Funeral Home of Chipley, FL officiating. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh.netJOHN D. OWENSDorothy Angelyn Kelly (Cozart), Age 75 of Bonifay, Florida, left this earth on June 10, 2018. At the time of her passing, she was in Moreno Valley, California, fighting terminal cancer. She was joined there by her husband, Charles O. Kelly also of Bonifay, FL and her dearest friend, Deborah Zero, of Chipley, FL and Moreno Valley, CA. Angelyn (Dorothy) was many amazing characters rolled into one. She was Granny Clampett, Betty Crocker, Hollywood Bling, Space Explorer and all the sides of Scarlett OHare. She believed in and loved books because she said, they allow you to dream that you are whatever you want to be. Education of any kind, but especially reading, was what she valued and promoted. As a pioneer for the future, she loved space and even owned a star or two; she always hoped she would see people living in space. Her family was at the center of who she was and what she cherished most. She spent many hours with her great grand-daughter listening to the music of today, sharing songs of her era and stories of days gone by. She worked in the transportation industry for most of her life and owned her own trucking company. One of her proudest achievements was being a part of and helping to start a local Youth Ranch and Rescue, The 10 Buck 2 Youth Ranch of Bonifay, Florida; It was the pet project of her daughter. It began on family land that was blackberry bushes and gourds. Dreamed, designed and built by Jeff and Mishca Randall, Meadow E. Martin, Kenny Krause and Charles and Angelyn Kelly or as she was better known Gunsmoke Granny. It quickly became known in the horse world as one of the best outdoor competition courses in Cowboy Racing. The ranch was known for promoting education, camaraderie, responsibility and commitment in Equine Ownership and competition. Angelyn was born on June 5, 1943, in Graceville, Florida. She grew up in Bonifay and in Montverde, Florida. She married her High School sweetheart, Charles O. Kelly and had recently celebrated 58 years of marriage. She is survived by her husband Charles O. Kelly of Bonifay; her daughter and son in law Ardea Mishca and Jeff Randall of Bonifay; Her Grandson Nicholas Martin of Tangent, Oregon; Great Grand-daughter Meadow E. Martin of Bonifay and Great Grand-daughter Charlie Laney of Dawsonville, GA. Extended Family: Siblings: Elizabeth Ann (Cozart) and Bill Bevil; Junior and Susan Cozart; Shirley (Yeager) and Ronald Lee; Edward Money (deceased). In Laws: Carolyn and Clark Gable; Jimmy and Dianne Kelly; Judy Martin; Joan Wilson; Kathryn and Danny Barber; Vickie and Gary Hayes. Special family consideration is given to the following as they meant as much to her as her closest kin: Kenneth (Kenny) W. Krause, Bonifay (deceased); Cameran Duffell, Bonifay; Justina Krause Laney, Dawsonville, GA; Jessica Beaudoin, Sneads, FL. A remembrance of her life will be held on July 15, 2018, 1pm at John Clark Park (Rec. Center), Esto, Florida. Any and all who knew her are welcome. Sandwich foods and drinks will be available. The family asks that in lieu of flowers please make a donation to the National Eye Institute in her name. The address is listed below or you can visit the website at https://nei.nih.gov/. Budget Officer National Eye Institute Building 31, Room 6A16 31 Center Drive MSC 2510 Bethesda, MD 208922510. In 3 little words I can sum up what Ive learned about life: It goes on.DOROTHY A. KELLY Thomas Rufus Homan, 84, of Graceville,died Tuesday, July 03, 2018. Funeral services were held Friday, July 6, 2018.Interment followed at Bonifay Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing.THOMAS R. HOMANTommy Lee Davis, 55, died Friday, June 15, 2018. Memorialization wasby cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangementsTOMMY L. DAVISCONTINUED ON B6 Floyd Nathan Skinner, 89, of Ponce De Leon,died Thursday, June 28, 2018. Funeral services were held Monday, July 2, 2018.Interment followed at Campground Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing.FLOYD N. SKINNERGenell Tate, age 73, of Westville, Florida passed away Sunday, July 1, 2018 at her residence. She was born December 8, 1944 in Walton County, the daughter of Walter T. and Ida Slay Carroll. Genell was a member of Reedy Assembly of God Church and was known as a person who was more concerned about other people than herself, always ready and willing to serve others. She enjoyed listening to gospel music, sewing, and cooking family meals. A loving wife, mother, and grandmother, she will truly be missed. She is preceded in death by her parents; two brothers, Ed and Leroy Carroll; three sisters, Shirley and Donna Louise Carroll and Lunell Hattaway. Genell is survived by her husband of 49 years, Charles ChickŽ Tate; one daughter, Veronica Jackson and husband Jeff of DeFuniak Springs, Florida; five brothers, Ronnie, Wilton, and Donald Lee Carroll, all of Westville, Florida, Roger Carroll of DeFuniak Springs, Florida, and Jimmy Ray Carroll and wife Linna of Ponce de Leon, Florida; three grandchildren, Charmayne, Cierra, and Allen Jackson; numerous nieces and nephews; and her canine companion, Happy. Funeral services were held Thursday, July 5, 2018 in the chapel of Davis-Watkins Funeral Home, 1474 Highway 83 North, DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32433 beginning at 11:00 a.m. with visitation one hour prior. Committal services followed in Reedy Assembly of God Cemetery. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.daviswatkins. com. Arrangements and services are under the direction of DavisWatkins Funeral Home.GENELL TATE

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** B6 Wednesday, July 11, 2018 | Holmes County Times-AdvertiserEdith Hill Hussey, 75, of Marianna died Tuesday, July 3, 2018 at Jackson Hospital. She was a native and lifelong resident of Jackson County, a homemaker and a longtime member of Damascus Free Will Baptist Church in Marianna. Mrs. Hussey was preceded in death by her husband, Thomas Hussey, her parents, Everett & Daisy Hill, brothers, Ernest, Earl, Durward, James, and Baby Sweet Jim Hill, and sisters, Alyne Singletary and Annie Lou Hill. Survivors include her children, Penny, Kenneth, and Carl Hussey and Jan of Marianna, FL, sisters, Patricia Gable of Marianna and Nadine Joyner of Texas, several nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends. Funeral services were held at 10:00 AM, Friday, July 6, 2018 at Damascus Free Will Baptist Church with Reverend Allan Austin and Reverend Otis Whitehead officiating. Interment followed in the church cemetery with James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. The family received friends from 5:00 to 7:00 PM on Thursday, July 5, 2018 at James & Sikes Maddox Chapel. www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.comEDITH H. HUSSEYOlis L. NannaŽ Sage, 80, of Panama City Beach, passed away on Sunday, July 1, 2018. She was born January 10, 1938 in Chipley, FL. She was preceded in death by her parents, Willie Alonzo Lasiter and Mary Magalene Wilson Lasiter, two brothers and three sisters. She is survived by three daughters, Penny Renee Witt (Kenny); Mellissa Lynette Purswell (Dwain); Amy Denise Sage; nine grandchildren, four great grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Graveside services were held on Friday at 10 a.m. in the Piney Grove Church Cemetery, Chipley, FL with Rev. Thurman Vinson officiating. The family received friends at the funeral home on Thursday from 5-7 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family request memorial donations be made to Covenant Care Hospice, 107 W. 19 th St., Panama City, FL 32405 in memory of Myrtle Olis Sage.OLIS L. SAGEMrs. Gina Lynn Crawson Akridge of Manchester, GA passed away Monday, July 2, 2018 at her home surrounded by her loving family. She was 53. Gina came into this world on Monday, October 26, 1964 to a young couple with big extended families that loved her immediately. Her family doted on her since she was the couples first child and the first grandchild on her mothers side of the family. Gina graduated in the Class of 1982 from Holmes County High School, attended WashingtonHolmes Vocational School and Auburn University. She remained a devoted Auburn fan throughout her life. She enjoyed being a cosmetologist in Bonifay for several years along with giving many free haircuts to friends and family. Gina also babysat children in her home and had a significant impact on those childrens lives. In 1999, Gina became a US Postal Service employee, working in Marianna and Chipley until 2016 when she became the Postmaster for the Hamilton and Pine Mountain, GA Post Offices. The most enjoyable part of her life was being a wife for 31 years to John Akridge and a mother to daughter, Brittany, and son, Ethan. If Gina was in the room and having a good time, her strong, clear laughter made it evident. Close friends and family gave her the nickname Precious.Ž She was a wonderful cook, loved traveling to the mountains, and always put her family first. In 2016, Gina was diagnosed with Anaplastic Astrocytoma, a Grade III brain cancer. She valiantly fought this cancer. The family would like to thank the staff at UAB, Dr. Andrew Pippas, and the staff at the Amos Cancer Center for their concern and care. She was preceded in death by her grandparents Jack and Katreen White and Henry and Earline Crawson and cousin, Micah White. Survivors include her husband, John Thomas Akridge, Manchester, GA; her daughter, Brittany Nicole Coleman and her husband Andrew, Opelika, AL; her son, Ethan Cole Akridge, Manchester, GA; parents, Alvin J. and Jean White Crawson, Bonifay, FL; two brothers: Eric Crawson and his wife DeeAnn, Concord, NC and Duane Crawson and his wife Niki, Bonifay, FL; nieces: Kimberly Crawson and, Ericka Rea, her husband Tyler, and their daughter, Laken; nephew, Corey Crawson; along with many extended family members. Funeral services were held at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, July 5, 2018 in the chapel of Sorrells Funeral Home in Slocomb with Rev. Johnny Strickland officiating. Interment will follow in the Fadette Pentecostal Ministries Cemetery. The family received friends at the funeral home on Thursday beginning at 12:30 p.m. and continuing until service time. Donations in memory of Gina may be made to the Amos Cancer Center, 18315 5th. Ave., Columbus, GA 31904 or the Hope Lodge at 1104 Ireland Way, Birmingham, AL 35205-7001.GINA L. AKRIDGECharles T. Cooley, 87 of Graceville passed away, Wednesday, July 4, 2018 at his residence. Mr. Charles was born in Graceville on January 5, 1931 to the late David and Vela Miller Cooley. A U.S. Navy Veteran, Mr. Charles lived in Ft. Meade then to Bartow from 1950-1993. During that time he started and owned several businesss, Cooley TV & Repair, Cooleys Tire & Hardware, Charlies Steak House and Whites Auto 1968-1992. Moving back to Graceville after his retirement he was a member of New Home Baptist Church where he and his wife Kathleen spearheaded the Bluegrass Gospel Jam. He was a pilot and instrumental in several things with the Tri-county Airport where he served as a board member for several years. Mr. Charles was a Fiddler and played with the Bluegrass Pickers. Predeceased by his wife Kathleen Cooley, grandson-in-law Michael McHan, brother David Cooley and sister Claudia McMackin. Survived by three children James Cooley(Cindy), Diane Geiger, Steve Cooley(Monette Castro), Graceville, FL; companion Ida M. Cook, Dothan, AL; six grandchildren, Bo Cooley, Misty Kilgore Lord, Kimberly Howze, Charlie Cooley, Cassie McHan, Stephanie Cooley; thirteen great grandchildren; a host of nieces, nephews and cousins. Home-going service were held at 12 p.m., Saturday, July 7, 2018 at New Home Baptist Church with Revs. Buddy Shumaker and Brian Taylor officiating. Burial followed in church cemetery with James & Lipford Funeral Home directing. Family received friends at the church on Saturday, 11 a.m. until time of service. Expressions of sympathy can be made at www. jamesandlipford.comCHARLES T. COOLEY Mr. Dan Allen Gray, 52 of Bonifay, Florida died on Monday, July 2, 2018, at Flowers Hospital in Dothan, Alabama. Born Sunday, December 26, 1965 in Ft. Belvoir, Virginia, he was the son of the late Dan Allen Gray. He served in the United States Navy. Surviving is his mother, Priscilla Plott and husband Michael of Arnold Maryland, wife, Pamela Holley Gray of Bonifay, FL, son, Devin Gray of Bonifay, FL, daughters, Alexis Olech and husband Ben of Oceanside, CA and Jenna Gray of Bonifay, FL, brothers, Michael John Gray of Longmont, CO, Brian Christopher Gray of Long Beach, CA and Patrick Arthur Gray of North Royalton, OH. A memorial service was held at 11:00 AM on Saturday, July 7, 2018 at First Baptist Church with the Dr. Shelly Chandler officiating with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.DAN A. GRAY OBITUARIES CONTINUED FROM B5Evergreen Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 2156 Highway 179A in Westville Gully Springs Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 2826 Highway 90 in Bonifay. Hickory Hill Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1656 Hickory Hill Road in Westville. Leonia Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located in northwest Holmes County. Mt. Zion Independent Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located on Highway 2 one mile west of Highway 79 in Esto. New Concord Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located on James Paulk Road off Highway 177. New Hope Baptist Church Sunday morning bible study is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at the intersection of Highway 2 and Highway 179A. New Zion Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located on Highway 177A north of Highway 2. Noma Baptist Church Noma Baptist Church, Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship 5 p.m. Wednesday Services at 6 p.m. The church is located at 3471 E Kelly Avenue in Noma. Northside Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at the intersection of Highway 81 and Highway 90 in Ponce de Leon. Sandy Creek Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Worship Service is at 11 a.m. Church Training is at 5:30 p.m. Evening Service is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1125 Line Road in Ponce de Leon. Shady Grove Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1955 Highway 177A in Bonifay. Union Hill Baptist Church Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Discipleship Training is at 5 p.m. Evening Worship is at 6 pm. Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7 p.m. Choir at 7:45 p.m. The church is located at 2759 Union Hill Church Road. West Bonifay Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 609 West Indiana Avenue in Bonifay. CATHOLICBlessed Trinity Catholic Church Sunday Mass is at 9 a.m. Wednesday evening Mass is at 5:30 p.m. Adoration is the “ rst Friday at from noon to 3 p.m. Holy Hour is Tuesday from 7 to 8 p.m. The church is located at 2331 Highway 177A in Bonifay. EPISCOPALNew Bethel AME Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located on Highway 90 in Bonifay. Holiness Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 2533 Rail Road Avenue across from the Post Of“ ce in Westville. LUTHERANGrace Lutheran Morning Worship is at 8:15 a.m. The church is located on Highway 90 East in Bonifay. METHODISTBethlehem United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1622 Bethlehem Church Road. Bonifay First United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Worship begins at 10:45 a.m. Youth Services are on Wednesdays at 6:00 p.m. Cedar Grove United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located two miles west of Millers Crossroads on Highway 2. Mt. Ida Congregational Methodist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at just off Highway 2 in Holmes Countys New Hope Community. New Bethel AME Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located on Highway 90 in Bonifay. Otter Creek United Methodist Church Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located four miles north of Ponce de Leon off Highway 81. Poplar Head United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located 1.5 miles north of Highway 2 on Highway 163. Red Hill United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located on State Road 2 two miles west of State Road 79. OTHERAmazing Grace Faith Fellowship Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Service is a 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3253 Highway 2 a half mile west of Highway 79. Bonifay House of Prayer and Praise Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. After a brief break Morning Worship follows. The church is CHURCHESFrom Page B4 See CHURCHES, B7

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Wednesday, July 11, 2018 B7 B7 7-3415 PUBLIC NOTICE ITB No. 18-002 MILK BID June 26, 2018 at 7:30 a.m. local time Sealed bids for milk will be received from eligible bidders at the School District of Holmes County (hereinafter the District), 701 E. Pennsylvania Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425, until July 19, 2018 12:00 p.m. The purpose and intent of this invitation to bid is to secure firm prices for 23 days after date of opening. All bids submitted shall be on Attachment A, Bid Response Form,Ž included in the bid specifications, a copy of which may be reviewed or obtained from the District or by downloading from Holmes County School Districts website at: www.hdsb.org. Questions: Questions regarding specifications shall be submitted in writing to the District, at 701 E Pennsylvania Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Questions are due no later than July 16, 2018. The District does not discriminate based on age, race, color, gender, religion, national origin, disability or marital status. The School District of Holmes County 701 E. Pennsylvania Ave. Bonifay, FL 32425 By: Carmen Bush July 4, 11, 2018 7-3416 PUBLIC NOTICE ITB No. 18.001 BREAD BID June 26, 2018 at 7:30 a.m. local time Sealed bids for bread will be received from eligible bidders at the School District of Holmes County (hereinafter the District), 701 E Pennsylvania Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425, until July 19, 2018 12:00 p.m. The purpose and intent of this invitation to bid is to secure firm prices for 23 days after date of opening. All bids submitted shall be on Attachment A, Bid Response Form,Ž included in the bid specifications, a copy of which may be reviewed or obtained from the District or by downloading from Holmes County School Districts website at: www .hdsb.org. Questions: Questions regarding specifications shall be submitted in writing to the District, at 701 E Pennsylvania Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Questions are due no later than July 16, 2018. The District does not discriminate based on age, race, color, gender, religion, national orgin, disability or marital status. The School District of Holmes County 701 E Pennsylvania Ave. Bonifay, FL 32425 BY: Carmen Bush July 4, 11, 2018 7-3424 Howell U-Rent It at 309 S. Waukesha St. Bonifay, FL 32425 will hold a private or public auction on the contents of these units for non-payment according to Florida Statute 83. Tenants have until Friday, July 20, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. to pay in full. Auction will be held Saturday, July 21, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. No checks. Items of general household goods stored in buildings listed below: Building 1 Unit 5 Kenneth Mingo JR Building 1 Unit 14 Melinda Page Building 3 Unit 15 Lisa Kuehner Mitchell July 11, 2018 7-3430 Public Auction The following vehicle will be sold at Public Auction at El Sankary Towing, 1600 Pirate Cove Rd, Ponce deLeon, Fl 32455 at 8:00 a.m. on July 21, 2018. VIN#KNAGE22839530 0904 2009 KIAOPTIMA Santander Consumer USA 1601 Elm St. Dallas, TX. 75201 July 11, 2018 7-3548 NOTICE OF TAX DEED APPLICATION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That MTAG AS CST FOR EB 1EMIFL LLC, the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 642 Year of Issuance 5/31/12 Description of Property: 1432.00-000-000-010.000 SEC: 32 TWN: 04 RGN: 16 4 A IN SW COR OF SW1/4 OF SW1/4 OR 283 / 67 Name in which assessed: RUTH RUSSELL COMMANDER & KENNETH MICHAEL LANGFORD. Said property being in the County of Holmes, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on 7/24/18, at 11:00 A.M. DATED this 5/10/18. KYLE HUDSON Clerk of the Circuit Court Holmes County, Florida By: Angie Jonas Deputy Clerk June 20, 27, July 4, 11, 2018 7-3708 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PROBATE FILE NO. 18-78 PR In Re: The Estate of WILLIAM GERALD ALFORD, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of William Gerald Alford, deceased, whose date of death was February 28, 2018, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, File No. 18-78 PR; the address of which is Holmes County Courthouse, P.O. Box 397, Bonifay, Florida 32425. The name and address is located at 826 North Caryville Road. Bonifay Seventh Day Adventist Service is on Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 604 Mathusek Street. Grace Fellowship Christian Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Bible Study is at 5 p.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 2249 Highway 179 in Bonifay. New Bayview Church of God of Prophecy Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located off Highway 2 on New Bayview Church Road. Pine Log Worship Center Sunday Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Sunday night Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday night worship is as 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 1604 N. Highway 81 north of Prosperity. CHURCHESFrom Page B6During the past year we have made the transition from parenting a teenager to parenting an adult. It wasnt our choice to make that change which made it all the harder. I have shared my struggle to make that leap for a simple reason: writing is an outlet for me and a way to work through my journey to find the Lord in the process. When our daughter planted her rebellion flag, my immediate instinct was grief. I was mourning the loss of what I thought our relationship was. I was deep in all the blame of what I had done wrong to allow this to happen. How did a kid who had the entire world in the palm of her hand, walk away and put a wall between her family and her wants? Turns out it was amazingly easy, she put one foot in front of the other and didnt even look back. Blind panic and an impulsive nature can put you in a bind. However, it was my blind spot that turned out to be the struggle that hurt me so badly. I let the struggle become about me. I was wrapped up in my faults, my doubts and my confusion. A simple part of me felt like it was the ultimate betrayal. A precious and loved child who hits you where it hurts the most „ your ego. My entire life has been about the roles that I have had. Im a great wife but I was prideful of being an amazing mom. Yet here I was, now a candidate for The Worst Mom in the World award, and the hurt was a living thing that made it hard to breathe at times. I was missing the forest for the trees. Its been a year of firsts. The first time we went on vacation without our oldest. The first holidays spent wishing she was here but celebrated without her. The first birthday, mine and hers, without her. It began slowly ... we fell back on our faith and we knew that there was one solid truth throughout all of the process ... God had us in his hands. We live in a world where bad things happen and we constantly face temptation so it was so easy to be clouded by the details. I simply got to a point where I was exhausted physically and mentally from the pain so I changed up my prayer. I asked God to heal my heart from the pain and to just love her through the process. I would find myself getting set back in my progress so I wrote my little prayer, Lord heal my heart,Ž on sticky notes, stashing them in a few places to remind me throughout the day. It didnt come overnight. It was well over a year into the process when one day my phone rang and I saw her name pop up and, in complete surprise to me, it didnt hurt. Instead I was filled with happiness at the idea of her call. We would go on to establish an open line of communication. Nothing has changed in how we treat her, how we talk to her, how we love her, but the meŽ in the situation was gone. I let go of the hurt of what her actions did to ME. I stopped focusing on what MY actions could have caused. By taking the meŽ out, I could just love her and be there when she was ready. Will we ever be close again? I believe we have already started down that path. Will we forgive each other of the hurts? Yes, because frankly we must show each other the grace that God shows us. I have no doubts that we wont forget, its human nature not to. Instead of looking back, Im stubbornly looking forward. I have learned so much over the path our family has walked this past year but the simple joy that I feel when I see her face or hear her voice reminds me that regardless of anything else, Im still her mom. No one can wound you like those closest to you yet no one can love you like they can either.Seeds grow K a l y n n B r a z e a l Kalynn Brazeal More Content NowFor the first time in the nations history, a Canadian judge recently ruled that three adults living in a polyamorous relationship can be the legal parents of a child.The Newfoundland and Lab-rador court ruled that the two men living with a woman „ the mother of a child born in 2017 „ can be legally recognized as the parents."Society is continuously changing and family structures are changing along with it," Justice Robert Fowler wrote. "This must be recognized as a reality and not as a detriment to the best interests of the child."The parents filed suit against the province after being told that only two parents could be listed on the birth certificate of the child. STUDY SAYS: Multiracial churches on the riseAccording to a new study published in the journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, multiracial congregations nearly doubled from 19982012 in the U.S. According to the report, multiracial congre-gations rose from 6.4 percent to 12 percent during that time frame. Researchers also found that the percentage of U.S. congregants attending interracial churches rose from 12.7 to 18.3 percent. GOOD BOOK?"Pursue, Overtake, Recover" by Kerry Kirkwood Many Christians understand that Jesus redeemed them from their sins, and because of this, they are right with God. But there is more...much more! Redemption is not just a ticket into Heaven. The redemptive work of Jesus brings restoration, healing, and recovery in every area of your life that has been broken or damaged. Kerry Kirkwood is a pastor and reve-latory writer whose passion is to help believers access the secret power of their redemp-tive privileges in God.€ Destiny Image IncorporatedWEEK IN RELIGION

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B B 8 8 Wednesday, July 11, 2018 | Holmes County Times Advertiser NF-5036053 NF-5032797 3 3 NF-503 3 2797 2 2 2 Lawn Maint., Irrigation, Pressure Wash, Pavers & Paver Repair, Tree Trimming, Fertilization, Spring Clean-Ups, Etc.Arturo Luebano 2455 N Hwy. 81, Ponce De Leon, FL 32455 850.658.6189 arthurluebano@yahoo.comWe have been in business since 2007. We are licensed and insured. Luebano Lawn Service, LLC. (850) 638-3611 HastyHeating & Cooling NF-5028471 NF-5032729 C & CBookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE OR BUSINESS FOR AS LITTLE AS $10 A WEEK!*Reach thousands of potential customers with your Business Guide ad in the:WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY-TIMES ADVERTISER WEEKLY ADVERTISER CALL TODAY! 850-638-0212*Minimum 8-week contract. NF-5036305 NF-5032769 Hazardous Aerial Tree Removal € Stump Grinding Trimming & Pruning € Emergency Tree Service € Lot Clean UpDow Morris,Owner/Operator 850-527-6291 € 850-849-3825 Readers’ Choice2017WASHINGTON HOLMES JACKSON of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is July 4, 2018. Attorney for Personal Representative: William H. Green GREEN & GREEN P.O. Box 609 DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435 (850) 892-7213 Florida Bar No. 199397 Personal Representative: Earl Alford 1159 Alford Rd Ponce de Leon, FL 32455 July 4, 11, 2018 7-3412 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 30-2017-CA-000199 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v. VICKI HENDERSON; DONNA H. DAVIS; RONALD HENDERSON; GERALD WESLEY HENDERSON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DONNA H. DAVIS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RONALD HENDERSON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GERALD WESLEY HENDERSON; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; WEST FLORIDA ELECTRIC Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on March 21, 2018, and the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale, in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Holmes County, Florida, the clerk shall sell the property situated in Holmes County, Florida, described as: ALL THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE CITY OF GRACEVILLE, HOLMES COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SE CORNER OF THE N 1/2 OF NE 1/4 OF SW 1/4 OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 7 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, AND RUNNING NORTH 105 FEET; THENCE WEST 315 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 105 FEET; THENCE EAST 315 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING a/k/a 1166 HIGHWAY 171, GRACEVILLE, FL 32440-7010 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, on the front steps of the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 North Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, FL 32425, on August 02, 2018 beginning at 11:00 AM. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Dated this 21st day of June, 2018. Kyle Hudson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Jennifer Maples Deputy Clerk Please Publish in: Holmes County Times PUBLICATION DATES: Invoice to: eXL Legal, PLLC 12425 28TH STREET NORTH, SUITE 200 ST. PETERSBURG, FL 33716 EFILING@EXLLEGAL.C OM Fax No. (727) 539-1094 -fax proof copy to SALES DEPARTMENT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@jud14.flc ourts.org. July 4, 11, 2018 7-3460 Public Sale Tharp & Sons Mini Storage in Bonifay, FL will hold a sale on these units for non-payment of rent, in accordance with the Fl. Statue Act 83-801-83-809. Tenants will have until July 27, 2018 to pay in full. NO CHECKS 1. Daniel Wittington of Bonifay, FL 2. Wesley White of Bonifay, FL 3. Taylor Purvis of Bonifay, FL 4. Teresa Peacock of Bonifay, FL 5. Nicole Peacock of Caryville, FL 6. Ernest Hall of Bonifay, FL 7. UNKNOWN RENTERS July 11, 2018 7-3463 BIDS ITB #18-07 The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners will receive bids from interested vendors for the procurement of Gasoline & Diesel. Bid deadline is July 31, 2018, at 3:00 PM (CST) at the County Commissioners Office. For complete bid package contact: Holmes County Board of County Commissioners Office, Attn: Hannah Benton, 107 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425, 850-547-1119 or hcadmin@holmescount yfl.org. July 11, 2018 7-3413 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 18-82PR Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF CLEVELAND EUGENE KEITH AKA GENE KEITH Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Cleveland Eugene Keith aka Gene Keith, deceased, whose date of death was April 21, 2017, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 N Oklahome Street. Suiet 205, Bonifay, FL 32425. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SECTION 733.702 WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is July 4, 2018. Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles M. Wynn Attorney Florida Bar Number: 0241695 4436 Clinton Street PO Box 146 Marianna, FL 32447 Telephone: (850) 526-3520 Fax: (850) 526-5210 E-Mail: Court@Wynnlaw-fl.com Secondary E-Mail: Charles@Wynnlaw-fl.co m Personal Representative: Robert Keith 1810 Claremont Drive San Bruno, California 94066 July 4, 11, 2018 7-3548 NOTICE OF TAX DEED APPLICATION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That BONNITA FAYE MCBROOM, the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 790 Year of Issuance 5/31/16 Description of Property: 2201.00-000-000-013.000 SEC: 01 TWN: 03 RGN: 18 COMM AT THE NW COR OF SW1/4 OF NE1/ TH S 395.9 FT TH E 144.68 FT TH SE 115.3 FT TO POB TH E 293.41 FT TH S 148.77 FT TH W 293.32 FT TH N 149.68 FT TO POB SUBJECT TO A 50 FT EASEMENT AS SHOWN IN OR 282/555 OR 288/901 OR 288/903 WD-OR306/563 QCOR431/848 WD-OR431/851 Name in which assessed: CHRISTOPHER D. & ALLISON D. FORD. Said property being in the County of Holmes, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on 7/24/18, at 11:00 A.M. DATED this 5/10/18. KYLE HUDSON Clerk of the Circuit Court Holmes County, Florida By: Angie Jonas Deputy Clerk June 20, 27, July 4, 11, 2018 Polar Blast!! VBSMt. Pleasant A/G Church 1996 Mt. Pleasant Rd. Westville, Fl. Phone: (850)956-4300 July 21-22 21st -From 10:00 am. to 3:00 pm. 22nd -5:00 Public Apology to Jim Smith, former owner of High Plumbing, for the stupid comments I, John Henry Block, made to you last year. So Sorry. AKC Lab RetreiversBlack, male and female puppies. Home raised, vet checked and health certificate. $500 -$550. 8 Weeks June 1st! Call: 850-547-9291 Estate Sale of Mr. John Curtis1744 Sorrells Rd Chipley, FL Fri & Sat July 13 & 14 8 AM -4 PM Directions : From Hwy 90 in Chipley, FL -take Hwy 277 South to Sorrells Rd, follow signs, 2nd house on rightThis is the 2nd phase of the Curtis Estate.Lots of mens stuff don’t miss out. Some furniture is available as well as linens, kitchen glassware, dishes and lots of misc. Everything needs to go! Please be prepared to load and move your items. Hope to see you there. T&C Estate Sales Looking for Laborers and Painters with at least 2 years experience. Call (850)849-07 36 or (850)849-79 82 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 For Rent 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments in Vernon. Clean, stove, refrigerator, central heat/air, convenient to Panama City Beach, section 8, Rental assistance. 850-638-4640 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. Rooms For Rent By Week.Comfortable rooms with microwave & refrigerator. All utilities paid. Cable and internet. Pet friendly at extra charge. Economy Lodge, Bonifay. 850-547-4167. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-638-1858 or 326-9109 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. D & E Tile and Remodeling Tile and flooring installation. Kitchen and Bathroom remodels, Licensed and Insured. Call Daniel or Elizabeth 850-768-6611 or 850-768-4327 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you.