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Holmes County times-advertiser

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Title:
Holmes County times-advertiser
Place of Publication:
Bonifay, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Nicole P Barefield - Publisher, Carol Kent Wyatt- Editor
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2010
Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )
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Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Holmes -- Bonifay
Coordinates:
30.79287 x -85.678207

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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Copyright Holmes County Advertiser. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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PAGE 1

** Volume 128 Number 6 Phone: 850-547-9414 Fax: 850-638-4601 Opinion ....................A4 Local & State ..............A5 Nation ......................A6 NASCAR ...................A11 Faith .........................B4 Obituaries ..................B5 @WCN_HCT facebook.com/WashingtonCountyNews.HolmesCountyTimes50 ¢ See our special graduation section inside | C1 chipleypaper.com A4Happy column with Hazel TisonB1Library kicks off summer programs Wednesday, May 23, 2018 imes A dvertiser HOLMES COUNTY T By Diane M. RobinsonTimes Advertiser | @HCTA_Diane Drobinson@chipleypaper.comBONIFAY …Controversial recommendations made by Superintendent Terry Mears were met with dismay concerning a coach and an administrator at Poplar Springs School not being asked to return for next school year in their respective positions.Holmes County School Board met in regular session May 15.Vice Principal Stacey Thompson was not asked to return to the position but instead as that of a teacher for the 2018-2019 school year. Parent, Teri McPhail, addressed the board concern-ing this issue saying that after losing long-time Principal Gordon Wells last year they will now be have two more losses in Thompson and Coach Eric Smith. My children have faced two major losses this year, and you mean to tell me that more may be ripped from them,Ž said McPhail. School board mem-bers, our children have been scarred by the events that have transpired already. We implore you to hear our voice, we want our coach back.ŽAnother parent, Benny Bollon Jr., spoke of trying to understand why people who are doing excellent jobs are being removed from their positions.By all accounts our vice principal has been doing excellent jobs in his current position,Ž said Bollon. So its hard for me to understand why he is being removed from that position.ŽBollon took the opportunity to remind Mears of one of his campaign statements.If elected, I promise to place the students above politics, Mears quoted to a newspaper,Ž said Bollon. Im not saying that politics are playing a role but I would like to remind the superintendent that this was a promise he made to us.ŽAccording to Chairperson Shirley Owens, Thompson was not asked to come back as vice principal because of lack of leadership certifications, not because of job performance.The superintendent can require administrators to have certain levels of leadership cer-tifications for an administrative position,Ž said Owens. Should one not have that, theymay not be asked to return to that posi-tion. Mr. Thompson has done an outstanding job as Vice Principal, he simply doesn't hold the certifications Mears wants his administartors to hold."Poplar Springs Basketball Coach Eric Smith was suspended without pay for 30 in April for misconduct stem-ming from a verbal altercation between him and Principal Matt Tate.Smith has not been asked to return for next school year; however, if he undergoes a psychological evaluation, he will have another opportunity to return, according to Owens.Any teacher that shows any signs of aggression is asked to undergo an evaluation for the safety of the students,Ž said Owens. It is a standard practice.ŽSmith has appealed the deci-sion and the board approved moving forward with an administrative judge to hear the case.In other business, the board approved payment of annual Florida School Board Association dues of $10,000. The funds will come from the gen-eral fund.Holmes County School Board will meet again in regu-lar session at 6 p.m. on June 5.Parents question school board employee decisionsBy Staff ReportBETHLEHEM Three juve-niles are facing multiple charges following a string of burglary and vandalism occurrences that culminated Wednesday, May 16 with the theft and arson of a Holmes School District van, according to the Holmes County Sheriffs Office.Ethan Riley Lewis, 17, Dillon Travis Leavins, 16, and Cam-eron Lassiter, 17, are charged in connection to the most recent series of incidents, which began Sunday, May 13, after deputies responded to the report of criminal mischief at Union Hill Baptist Church, where two doors had been damaged in an apparent failed burglary attempt, according to the report.On May 17, Holmes County Sheriffs Office responded to Bethlehem School, where a school van had been burglarized, taken, and returned over the weekend, according to surveillance footage. School officials recovered a small amount of marijuana from the van and noted the vehicle had logged 90 miles more than what had been recorded at end of day, May 11, stated a release from HCSO.Juveniles to be charged as adults Three ducks took advantage of the sunny weather at John CLark Park in Esto on Friday. The park, located at 999 Commerce Street, has playground equipment and a “ shing pier to enjoy during a visit. [DIANE M. ROBINSON | TIMES-ADVERTISER] By Jim Saunders News Service Florida TALLAHASSEE In a major move in the states utility industry, the parent company of Florida Power & Light said Monday it will buy Northwest Floridas Gulf Power as part of a $6.475 billion deal.NextEra Energy Inc. plans to buy Gulf Power, the Florida City Gas natural-gas company and ownership interests in two power plants from The South-ern Company. The purchase of Gulf Power and the stakes in the power plants, which are subject to federal approval, are expected to close during the first half of 2019, while the Florida City Gas purchase is slated for the third quarter of 2018, according to a NextEra Energy announcement.This transaction was just announced today and with any transaction of this type, there will be many questions that will be answered as we as a company and our employees move through this process,Ž said Rick Delahya, spokesperson at Gulf Power.FPL parent to buy gulf power in multibilliondollar deal SUNBATHINGBy all accounts our vice principal has been doing excellent jobs in his current position,Ž said Bollon. So its hard for me to understand why he is being removed from that position.ŽBenny Bollon Jr.Youth face charges of grand the arson, and burglarySee JUVENILES, A2 See POWER, A2

PAGE 2

** A2 Wednesday, May 23, 2018 | Holmes County Times-AdvertiserBy Eryn Dion News Herald Reporter PANAMA CITY BEACH „ A dramatic water rescue followed a late night boat crash at the St. Andrews State Park jettiesthe night of May 13with Florida Fish and Wildlife Officers still trying to piece together the details a day later.Eight people were rescued after a 30-foot Hydrocat owned by Logan and Megan Dezan of Westville, F la. struck the east side of the jetties around 8:45 p.m. with enough force to cut down through the fiber-glass plating and splinter the wooden hull, sinking the vessel shortly after emergency crews arrived.Also rescued were Brandon Donaldson, Jacob Martin, Joshua Waite and Hannah Waite of Bonifay, Travis Fondren of Slocomb, Ala., and Jonathon Griffin of Westville. Martin and two other passengers were transported to local hospitals, according to the U.S. Coast Guard, and their conditions were not immediately known.Bay County Sheriffs Deputy Alex Young was one of the first on scene, according to the BCSO incident report, arriving on the parks beach and climbing over the jetty rocks to find several passengers clinging to the jetty rocks, as well as several more passen-gers on board the quickly sinking vessel. Young helped pull some of the passengers up over the rocks, moving them toward land, noting that one was sporting a laceration on their head and two more had other minor injuries.While Young helped the passengers on the jetties, the U.S. Coast Guard dispatched a 45-foot response boat and crew, pulling five of the passengers off the boat before it sank down into the pass.Back on the jetties, Young and a Bay County firefighter that had joined him spotted Martin on the last rock before the jetties give way to open water. With a noticeable arm injury, Young wrote that the firefighter determined Martin to be a critical patient and his condition was deteriorating rapidly to the point where couldnt support himself on the rock any longer. At 50-yards away, the Coast Guard boat couldnt move in any closer because of the shallow water, and Young yelled for them to toss a rope, which unfortunately fell short of Youngs position.Handing over a duty belt, Young then deployedŽ into the water, according to the report, grabbing the rope and swimming to Mar-tins location on the rock. Young then adjusted Martins life jacket so it was on him correctly and advised him I had him as he gained trust in me,Ž Young wrote.Life jacket on and trust established, the two went back into the water, Young holding Martins body close to the surface and his head above water until they could be pulled out of the water by the Coast Guard crew.It should be noted throughout the incident my agency uniform, boots and bullet proof vest were completely submerged in water,Ž Young wrote at the clos-ing of the report. As my duty belt was possibly submerged in water, which resulted in my radio and taser getting wet.ŽThe five passengers on the Coast Guard boat were brought back to the Panama City Marina, while the remaining three were brought back to shore by BCSO. The boat was retrieved by Sea Tow and brought to the Treasure Island Marina.The cause of the crash remains under investigation.St. Andrews State Park boat wreck under investigationEight people were rescued after a 30-foot Hydrocat struck the east side of the jetties around 8:45 p.m. Sunday night, prompting responses from BCSO, US Coast Guard, Bay County Fire and Panama City Police. [SPECIAL TO TIMESADVERTISER] The Sheriffs Office again responded to the theft of the van, this time gaining an admission from two of the boys that they had taken the van from school property and drove down several dirt roads until stopping at a JJ Whitaker residence on May 16.The three juveniles allegedly entered the residence and took and unknown amount of paint, which they poured into the van before set-ting it on fire, according to the news release.The teens were arrested and charged with arson, grand theft, multiple counts of burglary, and criminal mischief. They have been transported to a juvenile detention facility but are expected to face the charges as adults.Two of the juveniles were also previously arrested and transported to a juvenile detention facility in Panama City after being charged in connection with the April 27 burglary of Bethlehem School. The third juvenile will additionally be charged in connection with that same burglary, accord-ing to the Holmes County Sheriffs Office. JUVENILESFrom Page A1We want our customers to know that our people will continue to be focused on serving our customers who are our friends, family and neighbors and serving our communities in Northwest Florida,Ž he later added in a statement Monday.The deal would expand NextEra Energys already-massive footprint in the state. Its Florida Power & Light subsidiary is by far the largest electric utility in Florida, serving nearly 5 million customers. Gulf Power, with about 450,000 customers in eight counties, is the largest utility in the Panhandle.Florida City Gas has about 110,000 residential and commercial natural-gas customers in Miami-Dade, Brevard, St. Lucie and Indian River counties. NextEra said it will buy a 100 percent ownership interest in a power plant near Cocoa known as Plant Oleander, which has contracts to sell electricity to the Florida Municipal Power Agency and Seminole Electric Cooperative. It also will buy a 65 percent stake in a generating unit, known as Stanton A, at the Stanton Energy Center complex near Orlando. The unit is jointly owned by The Southern Company, the Orlando Utilities Commission, the Kissimmee Utility Authority and the Florida Municipal Power Agency, according to information on The Southern Company website."These transactions will provide meaningful benefits for the state of Florida, and Gulf Power and Florida City Gas customers, as well as NextEra Energy shareholders,Ž Jim Robo, chairman and chief exec-utive officer of NextEra Energy, said in a prepared statement. Importantly, these transactions are consistent with our long-standing, disciplined approach of maintaining the strength of our balance sheet and credit ratings, both of which are among the strongest in the industry.ŽNextEra Energy plans to finance the deal through the issuance of new debt, according to the announcement. The $6.475 billion total includes NextEra Energy assuming $1.4 billion of Gulf Power debt.Subsidiaries of The Southern Company, which is based in Atlanta, operate in numerous states. In addition to Gulf Power, the subsidiaries include Alabama Power, Georgia Power and Mississippi Power. The Florida Public Ser-vice Commission last year approved a settlement agreement that set base rates for Gulf Power.In the announcement, NextEra Energy said that with the addition of Gulf Power, Florida City Gas and the power plants, the Juno Beach-based com-pany will be even better positioned to generate long-term shareholder value through a more robust financial profile, greater scale and an expanded platform for growth.ŽBut the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, which frequently intervenes in utility cases in Florida, expressed concern Monday about the purchase."While Southern Alliance for Clean Energy is still reviewing this deal, it raises concerns that any one monopoly utility would control such a significant percentage of Floridas energy market," the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy said in a prepared statemet. "Such consolidation of control may limit competition at a time when we need more and not less." The News Jacqueline Bostick contributed to this report. POWERFrom Page A1

PAGE 3

** Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Wednesday, May 23, 2018 A3

PAGE 4

** A4 Wednesday, May 23, 2018 | Holmes County Times-AdvertiserOPINION ANOTHER VIEW Have something to say?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri“ cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by GateHouse Media LLC at 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright Notice: The entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of GateHouse Media LLC. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or GateHouse Media. Postmaster: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES In county Out of county 13 weeks: $13.30 $17.70 26 weeks: $19.90 $26.50 52 weeks: $32.00 $43.00 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US Publisher: Nicole Bare“ eld nbare“ eld@chipleypaper.com Interim Editor: Jacqueline Bostick jbostick@chipleypaper.com, 850-638-0212 News, sports, opinion: news@bonifaynow.com Classi“ ed: 850-638-0212, clamb@chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service: 1-850-522-5197 Copyright 2018, GateHouse Media LLC. All Rights Reserved. imes A dvertiser HOLMES COUNTY T PUBLISHER Nicole P. Bare“ eld INTERIM EDITOR Jacqueline Bostick PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR Cameron Everett We love football here in the South. Really love it. And thats only fitting, because the State of the SouthŽ dossier by MDC, a North Carolina-based nonprofit, is like reading an extensive scouting report on a football team. The areas of strength are noted: € The South is more racially and ethnically diverse than ever before in history, and has shifted from a biracial to a multi-ethnic region.Ž €The South has been able to reinvent itself as a region with hubs of excellence and innovation in medicine, health and science, providing the benefits of modern medicine.Ž €The South has more affluence, a more diverse economy with a potent corporate sector, a stronger middle class (blacks and Latinos as well as whites) ... than it did 50 years ago.Ž €Major Southern cities Charleston, South Carolina, Biloxi, Mississippi,and New Orleans have all largely recoveredŽ from massive weather-related devastation during the last 15 years; meanwhile, Houston has made strides rebuilding after Hurricane Harvey last fall. But just as a football scouting report also focuses on a teams weaknesses, State of the SouthŽ identifies the regions vulnerabilities, too. And this one clearly stands out in the MDC report: Most Southern states still lag the national average in K-12 achievement. ...Ž Ignoring it could have stark consequence for the South: (The) pattern of increasing divestment in public institutions could affect long-term upward economic mobility prospects in the region.Ž This is no trivial area of vulnerability, but its clear how we in the South should be addressing it: € Southern states „ including Florida „ must make investing in education an equally high priority for all students, instead of pitting public schools against charters, urban districts vs. rural ones, etc., in some Hunger Games-style survival of the fittestŽ battle for funding and resources. € As the State of the SouthŽ report suggests, our region will need the talents of all of our residents to achieve sustainable prosperity. That means all Southern states have to provide levels of funding that will enable all Southern students to flourish. €Stop rewarding the buffoonish antiintellectualism embraced by many of our lawmakers and power brokers to justify starving educational systems of needed money. They justify it by throwing around pandering words and phrases like elitist,Ž snowflakes,Ž failing urban schools,Ž so-called expertsŽ and powerful teachers unions.Ž And they get away with it because we let them. Clearly, thats a big reason why there isnt a single state in the South where native residents have as many bachelors degrees as fellow residents who were born elsewhere. If we want tomorrows South to keep moving the chains and putting up the points, we need to demand that our leaders make education a bigger part of the playbook. A version of this editorial first appeared in the Florida Times-Union, a sister paper with GateHouse Media.Make education a bigger priority This is a reprint (mostly) of an article that appeared in my column December 6, 2006 At a recent family funeral, my sister Muriel and I were discussing family with our cousin, Judy Harris Erinfield. She had recently done the Ancestry.com DNA test which showed a strong Irish influence. Our granddaughter had done it last year and found an Irish link in her DNA. That brought to mind this article which I was able to resurrect. All my Harris uncles are deceased now, but in 2006 my Mamas half brother Arlie was still living. I asked him if he remembered his grandfather Harris who would of course have been my great-grandfather, John Wesley Harris. He remembered his grandfather setting him on his lap and singing him a little song. He even remembered a couple of lines of the song. (I wish I had recorded them.) It sounded Irish to me and I asked my uncle if he knew whether the Harrises were Irish. He replied, Yes, Black Irish.Ž I dont recall ever hearing that term, but it struck a chord with me because my mother said that her Grandmother Cook called her fathers people them old Black Harrisses.Ž I had just assumed that she called them that because they were dark skinned, dark eyed and dark haired and she hated them since her daughter, Minnie Eliza Cook Harris had died from neglectŽ following childbirth. So I went in search of information on the Black Irish. My Google search turned up a lot about the Black IrishŽ myth. There are several explanations. One is that they are offspring from African slaves either shipwrecked or run-aways from ships who fathered children with Irish peasant women. The late Mrs. Jean Werkheiser a native of Ireland who emigrated here when her daughter Eileen married a Bonifay citizen, Dr. Jeff Swindle, disagrees. She said that Black Irish are the descendants of Spanish sailors who were shipwrecked off the southern coast of the Emerald Isle. Historians offer numerous reasons why Spanish-Irish progeny from the Spanish Armada of the 1500s is more popular with poor Irish than with anyone else. The Spanish would have been of royal background, fighting to preserve the Catholic Church in Ireland against the Protestantism of the English Crown. The Irish peasants would have also been loyal to the church and hating the English, but having no social standing. Finding ties with the Royal Spanish Navy would certainly raise the status of the coastal Irishmen who were little more than barbarians. Today, according to Mrs. Werkheiser, they are still considered renegades. Over the centuries, many were taken from prison and deported. My Canadian Brother-inlaw Roy Turner knew about the Donnelly massacre which Mrs. Werkheiser also knew about. The Donnellys had managed to save seed potatoes before the British introduced the potato blight in an attempt to starve the Catholics. He shared seed with other Catholics saving their lives. As a result the whole Donnelly family were massacred. Dont know what this has to do with Black Irish and my Harris family. Probably I will never know if we have an Irish connection. I never knew my greatgrandfather and never heard my mother mention him. But Mr. Turl Creel told me a story about him. A local myth, back in that time according to Mr. Creel, was that if a person ate a quail a day for 30 days it would kill him. Great-grandpa Harris owed a large bill to the N.D.Miller Company. Mr. Miller wanted to prove whether or not the myth was true. So he told Mr. Harris that if he ate a quail a day for 30 days and lived, hed cancel his debt. Mr. Miller provided the quail and Mr. Harris ate it every day for 30 days. At the end of the time, he became very ill, but overcame it and his debt was cancelled. Mr. Creel also told me that John Wesley Harris was the one who planted the oaks that lined Waukesha St for so many years. He said the city paid him $15 each and he went into the surrounding woods, dug them up and planted them. I dont know what year that was, but I seriously doubt that Bonifay had a water system at that time, so somebody had to do a lot of watering. John Harris came to Holmes County about the same time as Mr. Yarborough Chance the father of Jim and John Chance. Harris had two sons near the same age, my grandfather Jim and his brother Henry. They became good friends with the Chance family. Jim is a former Holmes County Sheriff and the father of J.N. (Son) Chance that we all know and John is the father of John Yarborough, local minister. Whether or not we trace our roots back to the Black Irish of Ireland, it is interesting to speculate where our ancestors may have come from.Happy Corner: Harris family connection to black irish Hazel Tison My Canadian Brother-in-law Roy Turner knew about the Donnelly massacre which Mrs. Werkheiser also knew about. The Donnellys had managed to save seed potatoes before the British introduced the potato blight in an attempt to starve the Catholics. He shared seed with other Catholics saving their lives. As a result the whole Donnelly family were massacred. Dont know what this has to do with Blac k Irish and my Ha rris f amily. Probably I will never know if we have an Irish connection SEE MORE ONLINE AT CHIPLEYPAPER.COM

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Wednesday, May 23, 2018 A5By Katie Landeck 522-5114 | @PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ As K-9 units swept through the Panama City Mall looking for what would turn out to be a non-exis-tent bomb, several dozen employees from various stores waited in patches of shade at the perimeter of the parking lot.They told us to get the hell out,Ž said Isaac Loberger, an employee at Bennigans. I hope they let us in soon, I left sandwich stuff on the counter.ŽAll my stuff is in there. I dont even have my cell phone,Ž added co-worker Ashley Wilhite. I dont even think there is a bomb.ŽPanama City Police later arrested Nicholas Whitehead, 31, in connection with the threat and charged him with making a hoax bomb threat, a second degree felony.At 10:40 a.m., an anon-ymous threat was called into the Bay County Emergency Operations Center about a bomb located in the Panama City Mall. The threat was vague, triggering a mas-sive multi-agency search as law enforcement offi-cials combed through one of the largest public buildings in the city.The search „ which was run by Panama City Police Department and included the Florida Highway Patrol, Bay County Sheriffs Depart-ment, Bay County EMS and Panama City Fire Department „ took over two hours. The entire mall parking lot, as well as Red Lobster and Best Buy, was cordoned off by police, but some employ-ees worried about being late for work kept slipping in through the nearby Starbucks parking lot.Most were shocked when they learned was going on. While they found it hard to believe there was a bomb in the mall, many were unsettled.This happens every-where else, but you never expect it to happen here,Ž said Katlyn Davis, an employee at Dillards.I dont want to go in later,Ž said Autumn Barlow. What if its in the one shoebox they didnt search?ŽOne arrested in connection to PC Mall bomb threatSeveral law enforcement agencies responded to a bomb threat at the Panama City Mall on Sunday. Whitehead Employees huddled under the shade to escape the 80-degree heat while waiting for law enforcement to clear the Panama City Mall of a bomb threat Sunday. [PHOTOS BY KATIE LANDECK/NEWS HERALD] Florida Press AssociationSena-tor Bill Nelson (D-Flor-ida) and a group of bi-partisan legislators have asked Secretary Ross of the U.S. Depart-ment of Commerce for a review ofthe pending antidumping and countervailing duty case involving imports of uncoated groundwood paper (newsprint) from Canada. The letter states the damaging effects of the tariffs on Floridas economy and public discourse, and asks the secretary to take these concerns into consider-ation as a final decision is made.The severity of the tariffs, ranging from a combined total of 28.25 to 32.09 percent, could eviscerate the newspaper industry and dry up demand for the product, making it harder for domestic newsprint papers to stay afloat,Ž Nelson wrote. At a time when cred-ible and responsible reporting is needed most, devastating new tax on the newspaper industry would be a grave mistake,Ž he later stated in the letter.The antidumping and countervailing duty has increased the cost of newsprint up to 32 per-cent. As newsprint prices have also been increas-ing recently, the impact of these tariffs has been significant.Senator Bill Nelson leads e ort to repeal tari s on newsprintNelson (D-Florida) Christine Sexton News Service FloridaTALLAHASSEE „ Premiums for health insurance plans sold on the federal marketplace are expected to increase by nearly 16.9 percent in Florida next year due to changes in the Afford-able Care Act, according to a new analysis released Friday.Released by the Center for American Progress, the analysis estimates that a decision by Congress and President Donald Trump to repeal the mandate that people buy health insurance, coupled with proposed changes to the types of policies that can be sold, will increase premiums for Floridians by $1,011. The report by the left-leaning group estimates that the average unsub-sidized health insurance premium for a 40-year-old male buying a marketplace policy in 2019 will be $6,995.The Affordable Care Act has provided subsidies for many people buying coverage, reduc-ing their costs. More than. 1.7 million Floridi-ans enrolled in the health insurance marketplace this year, with more than 1.5 million receiving sub-sidies either in the form of advanced premium tax credits or additional cost-sharing reductions that help lower co-pay-ments and co-insurance requirements.The new analysis accounts for the impact of repealing the Affordable Care Acts requirement that individuals buy healthinsurance policies as well as a Trump admin-istration proposed rule to rescind limits on the sale of short-term insurance plans.The individual mandate, one of the most-controversial parts of the federal healthcare law commonly known as Obamacare, was repealed as part of a tax overhaul that passed in December.In a prepared statement, Topher Spiro, vice president for health policy at the Center for American Progress, blasted Trump and Con-gress for what he called sabotage of the insur-ance marketplaces.ŽFirst they passed massive tax cuts for the wealthy and corporations, and now theyre asking middle-class Americans and people with pre-existing condi-tions to pick up the tab,Ž Spiro said. They should be focused on lowering health care costs, not increasing them and intentionally undermin-ing the stability of the insurance marketplaces that millions of Ameri-cans benefit from.ŽReport says changes will increase health premiums

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** A6 Wednesday, May 23, 2018 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser NATION & WORLD By Zeina KaramThe Associated PressBEIRUT „ Syrias mili-tary on Monday captured an enclave in southern Damascus from Islamic State militants following a ruinous monthlong battle, bringing the entire capital and its far-flung suburbs under full government control for the first time since the civil war began in 2011.The gains freed President Bashar Assads forces to move with allied militiamen on remaining rebel-held territory in the south near the border with Israel, as Syrias chief ally Iran comes under growing pressure from the Trump administration to withdraw its troops from the country.Iranian-backed militias, including the Lebanese group Hezbollah, have been instrumental in help-ing Assads over-stretched forces recapture huge areas around Damascus and in the countrys center and north, building a military presence that has alarmed Israel and its U.S. ally, which is now looking to constrain Irans activities.Iranian officials have vowed to stay on in Syria for as long as needed, setting the stage for a potential confrontation as Washington seeks to tighten the screws on Tehran following the U.S. withdrawal from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal brokered with Iran under President Barack Obama and world powers.U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo threatened Iran with the strongest sanctions in historyŽ if Tehran doesnt change course. In his first major foreign policy speech since taking the post as the top U.S. diplomat, he issued a list of demands that he said should be included in any new nuclear treaty with Iran, including that it withdraw all forcesŽ from Syria, halt support for Hezbollah and stop threatening Israel.Iran and Russia have joined forces in Syria, providing crucial military support to Assads forces and giving them the upper hand in the civil war.Russian President Vladi-mir Putin told Assad at a meeting last week that a political settlement in Syria should encourage foreign countries to with-draw their troops from Syria. Putins envoy to Syria, Alexander Lavrentyev, said Putin was referring to Iranian forces, among others.Iran says it is in Syria at the behest of the Assad government and says it is fighting terrorismŽ in the form of Islamic extremists, including the Islamic State group and al-Qaida.Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman Bahram Ghasemi told reporters that no one can force Tehran to do anything it doesnt want to do.Our presence in Syria has been based on a request by the Syrian government and Iran will continue its support as long as the Syrian government wants,Ž he said, speaking shortly before Pompeo made his remarks.The recapture of IS-held pockets in the Palestinian refugee camp of Yarmouk and the nearby Hajar al-Aswad district in southern Damascus came after a massive bombing campaign that has all but decimated what was left of the residential area on the edge of the capital, once home to about 200,000 Palestinian refugees.The camp has been deserted by most of its inhabitants following years of siege, and the few remaining residents fled to nearby areas in the last days of the bombardment.The last push on the Yarmouk camp came after a group of civilians was evacuated overnight. State TV showed images of troops moving in, waving the Syrian flag and flashing victory signs atop wrecked buildings in the destroyed neighbor-hood. Some fired in the air in celebration.The move boosts morale and security in Assads seat of power, putting it out of range of insurgents mortar fire and shells for the first time in nearly seven years.Syrian government declares capital fully under its controlBy Mark ShermanThe Associated PressWASHINGTON „ A divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that businesses can prohibit their workers from banding together in disputes over pay and conditions in the workplace, a decision that affects an estimated 25 million non-unionized employees. With the courts five conservative members in the majority, the justices held that individual employees can be forced to use arbitration, not the courts, to air complaints about wages and overtime. Four dissenting liberal justices said the decision will hit low-wage, vulnerable workers especially hard.While the complaints in Mondays decision involved pay issues, the out-come also might extend to workplace discrimination and other disputes if employee contracts specify that they must be dealt with in one-on-one arbitration.Workers who want to take action against sexual harassment, pay discrimination, pregnancy discrimi-nation and racial discrimination may now be forced behind closed doors into an individual, costly „ and often secret „ arbitration process,Ž said Fatima Goss Graves, president and CEO of the National Womens Law Center.Lawyers representing management said the decision protects businesses from endless, costly litigation.The outcome does not affect people represented by labor unions, but an estimated 25 million employees work under contracts that prohibit collec-tive action by employees who want to raise claims about some aspect of their employment.The ruling reflected a years-long pattern at the Supreme Court of limiting class actions and favoring employer-favored arbitration over lawsuits in the courts, generally pre-ferred by workers.The Trump administration backed the businesses, reversing the posi-tion the Obama administration took in favor of employees.The courts task was to reconcile federal laws that seemed to point in different directions. On the one hand, New Deal labor laws explicitly give workers the right to band together. On the other, the older Federal Arbitration Act encourages the use of arbitration, instead of the courts.Justice Neil Gorsuch, writing for the majority, said the contracts are valid under the arbitration law. As a matter of policy these questions are surely debatable. But as a matter of law the answer is clear,Ž Gorsuch wrote.Mondays ruling is in line with earlier decisions, he said. In many cases over many years, this court has heard and rejected efforts to conjure conflicts between the Arbitration Act and other federal statutes. In fact, this court has rejected every such effort to date (save one temporary exception since overruled),Ž Gor-such wrote.In dissent for the courts liberals, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg called the decision egregiously wrongŽ and likely to lead to huge underen-forcement of federal and state stautes designed to advance the well-being of vulnerable workers.Ž Ginsburg said that the individual complaints can be very small in dollar terms, scarcely of a size warranting the expense of seek-ing redress alone.ŽGinsburg, who read a summary of her dissent aloud to stress her dis-agreement, said employees do not really have a choice about whether to sign such agreements, labeling them arm-twisted, take-it-or-leave-it contracts.ŽShe said congressional action is urgently in order,Ž echoing her call in 2007 for Congress to address pay discrimination following a high court ruling from which she dissented.Kristen Clarke, president of the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, said she fears the decision will have far-reaching effects. Todays decision will make it easier for employers to escape liability for widespread discrimination and harassment. No American should be forced to sign away their right to invoke the meaningful protections afforded by our nations critical civil rights laws,Ž Clarke said.The National Labor Relations Board, breaking with the administration, argued that contracts requiring employees to waive their right to collective action violate the labor laws.Business interests were united in favor of the contracts. Gregory Jacob, a former high-ranking Labor Department official in the Bush administration, said the court got it right Monday. This decision thus will not see a huge increase in the use of such provisions, but it does protect employers settled expectations and avoids placing our nations job providers under the threat of additional burdensome litigation drain,Ž Jacob said.Lower courts had split over the issue. The high court considered three cases „ two in which appeals courts ruled that such agreements cant be enforced and a third in which an appeals court said they are valid.Divided Supreme Court sides with businesses over workersThe Supreme Court is seen on April 20 in Washington. The Supreme Court says employers can prohibit their workers from banding together to complain about pay and conditions in the workplace. [J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Wednesday, May 23, 2018 A7 COMMUNITYSpecial to Times-AdvertiserBONIFAY The former Bonifay Elementary School campus recently served as an ideal site for Holmes County Sher-iffs Office to hold active shooter training for School Resource Depu-ties (SRDs).The training consisted of classroom hours, as well as time spent in simulated active shooter scenarios.Major Michael Raley led the training, stating that while HCSO has held similar training for years, the Sheriffs Office implemented the most recent training to ensure both quality and consistency. With the recent addi-tion of two new SRDs within Holmes County District Schools, we just want to be sure that everyone is on the same page with our proce-dures,Ž said Major Raley.SRDs take part in active shooter training Kid Safety Expo announces datesCHIPLEY/ LYNN HAVEN „ Kid Safety Expo will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the fol-lowing Saturdays: at the June 2 and June 16; at the Lynn Haven Walmart on May 26, June 9 and June 30. The expo will also be at the Panhandle Water-melon Festival Saturday, June 23. For more infor-mation call 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. Annual New Hope School reunion to be heldBONIFAY … The 26th Annual New Hope School Reunion will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 26 at the New Hope Church social hall. Former stu-dents, teachers, personnel and friends are invited. Bring a covered dish for lunch at noon. Drinks, supplies, chicken and ice will be provided. The church is located at the New Hope Crossroads at the intersection of High-way 2 and North Highway 179-A. For more informa-tion call Posie Vaughn at 850-956-2502, Kim Lee at 850-768-3369 or Emmy Masser at 850-547-3468.WCPL to host summer read program WASHINGTON COUNTY … The Washington County Public Library will host a summer reading program beginning Tuesday, May 29. A calendar of events may be picked up at any library location. The library is also participat-ing in the USDA summer feeding program. For more information about the reading program or the USDA summer feeding program call 850-638-1314. Tickets on sale for The Hallelujah GirlsCHIPLEY Tickets are on sale for The Hal-lelujah Girls, directed by Tina Goodman. The show takes the stage Friday, June 1 through Sunday, June 3. Show times are at 7 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and at 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $12 for adults and $10 for seniors (65+) and military (with active or retired ID). To purchase your tickets visit www.span-ishtrailplayhouse.com or call 850-638-9113, MondayThursday from 8:00 a.m. to noon. WCCOA to host cake auctionCHIPLEY … The Wash-ington County Council on Aging will hold a cake auction from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, June 1. Bids can be made via Facebook or by coming into the Council. All bids start at $15. Cakes that are being donated for the auction need to be delivered no later than 8 a.m. on the day of the auction. If you win a cake they may be picked up from 3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at WCCOA. For more information call 850-638-6216. HCPL to host book signingBONIFAY … Holmes County Public Library will hold a book sign-ing with Holmes County author Nancy Springer from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, June 5. Springer will be signing and selling her latest book "The Oddling Prince". She is a member of the Holmes County Friends of the Library group and the proceeds from the sell of her book will go to the Holmes County Public Library. This new book, The Oddling Prince was included in Publisher's Weekly Top 10 list of science/fiction/fantasy/horror for Spring 2018. Legendary Entertainment has made a deal with Emmy-nominated Millie Bobby Brown to star in and produce a fea-ture film series based on Nancy Springer's EnolaCOMMUNITY EVENTS See EVENTS, A9

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Wednesday, May 23, 2018 A9 Holmes Mysteries novel series. Wausau to host photography exhibitWAUSAU Wausau Public Library and the Town of Wausau will host a photography exhibit at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, June 7 in the Town Hall located at 1607 2nd Avenue, in Wausau, Florida. Avery Wood, who grew up in the Wausau area, has spent many years photographing local people and their surroundings. There will be a display of his work and a short slide presentation during the exhibit. Those interested in people and home-steads of old Wausau are encouraged to attend. There will also be Wausau Fun Day slides from the 1980s. Help is requested to identify faces of those who participated in those events. 2018 Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant to be heldCHIPLEY „ The 62nd Annual Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant will be held at the Washington County Agriculture Center, located at 1424 Jackson Avenue (Highway 90) in Chipley at 6:30 p.m. Friday, June 8 and at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, June 9. For more information call Teresa Bush at 850-263-4744 or 850-263-3072 or 850415-0692 or Melissa Miles at 850-260-4323. Jackson County Republican Party to host Reagan Day dinnerMARIANNA … The Jackson County Republican Party will host the 2018 Reagan Day Dinner at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 13 at the Jackson County Agriculture Complex in Marianna. The keynote speaker will be Governor Rick Scott. There will be a social time from 5:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. and the dinner and program will begin at 6 p.m. Tickets are $50 per person. There will also be a silent auction. For more information or to purchase tickets call Clint Pate at 850-527-3900. Library to host Tampa TaikoCHIPLEY … The Wash-ington County Library will host Tampa Taiko at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 13 at the Washington County Agriculture Center. This is an interac-tive program that covers the history of Taiko, the music of Japan, modern drumming performance and drum making using discarded barrels that have been recycled in to Taiko Drums. For more information call 850-638-1314.Library to host Mrs. Kate Singin and SmilinBONIFAY … The Holmes County Public Library will host Mrs. Kate Singin and Smilin at 9 a.m. Thurs-day, June 14 at the Bonifay K-8 School. The program is part of the 2018 FLYP Summer Program. For more information call 850-547-3573. Vernon to host 40th annual Miss Firecracker PageantVERNON … The City of Vernon will host the 40th Annual Miss Firecracker Pageant at 4 p.m. Satur-day, June 16 at the Vernon Community Center. The pageant is a fundraiser that is held each year on the third Saturday in June. All funds raised go toward paying for the City of Vernons Free Firework Display held on the 4th of July at the Vernon Sportsplex. For more information call 850-326-8738. HCSO to offer concealed weapons classBONIFAY … The Holmes County Sheriffs Office will hold a Concealed Weapons Class at 10 a.m., Saturday, June 16, at Bethel Baptist Church, located at 1349 Highway 173 in Graceville (Poplar Springs Community). Sheriff John Tate will instruct the class, which is expected to last about two hours. This class will meet the firearms training class requirement mandated by the Florida Department of Agriculture concealed weapon permit application. The class is open to ages 18 and up; however the minimum age to be granted a permit from the state is 21. Par-ticipants ages 21 and up may bring their own gun and rounds or use those provided by the sheriffs office. Participants under the age of 21 are asked to use the provided gun and rounds. No pre-registra-tion is required, and the cost is $25 per person. Annual Padgett ReunionLEONIA „ The annual Padgett Reunion of the descendants of Elijah Padgett (1891-1960) will be held at Leonia Baptist Church in Holmes County, Florida on Sat-urday, June 16, beginning at 10 a.m. Extensive research recently has been conducted to iden-tify descendants of all 16 of Elijahs children and printouts of informa-tion found about each of them will be available at the reunion. All relatives and friends have a warm invitation to attend. Bring food of your choice to share with others as we socialize at noontime. Library to host Atlanta Coastal TheatreBONIFAY … The Holmes County Public Library will host Atlanta Coastal Theatre at 9 a.m. Thursday, June 21 at the Bonifay K-8 School. The program is part of the 2018 FLYP Summer Program. For more information call 850-547-3573. Chipley Library host Movie MondaysCHIPLEY … The Wash-ington County Library Chipley Branch will host Movie Mondays at 10:30 a.m. each Monday in June. Monday June 4 the move will be An American Tail; Monday June 11 the movie will be The Land Before Time; Monday June 18 will be The Secret Nimh and Monday, June 25 will be The Wizard of Oz. For more information call 850-638-1314. Library to host Dr. Magical BalloonsCHIPLEY … The Wash-ington County Library will host Dr. Magical Bal-loons at 10 a.m. Monday, July 16 at the Washington County Agriculture Center. This show is a mix of balloon shenanigans, magic and comedy. This program is designed for all ages. For more informa-tion call 850-638-1314. Library to host HCHS BandBONIFAY … The Holmes County Public Library will host the Holmes County High School Band at 9 a.m. Thursday, June 28 at the Bonifay K-8 School. The program is part of the 2018 FLYP Summer Program. For more information call 850-547-3573. Services Available for Caregivers WASHINGTON COUNTY … Funds are currently available to provide a variety of services to persons 60 and above who live with a caregiver and need assis-tance with self-care, nutrition and/or home-making activities because of chronic health condi-tions or other problems of aging. A small stipend for the caregiver is part of the benefit. Income and asset restrictions apply. Funds are currently available to provide respite services to caregivers of persons 18+ who have memory-loss related to Alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia. The caregiver must provide care on a regular basis to qualify. For more information or to access the services provided under the Home Care for the Elderly program or the Alzheimer's Disease Initiative program, through the Washington County Council on Aging, pleasecontact the ElderHelpline at 1-800-963-5337. Library to host Animal TalesBONIFAY … The Holmes County Public Library will host Animal Tales at 9 a.m. Thurs-day, July 5 at the Bonifay K-8 School. The program is part of the 2018 FLYP Summer Program. For more information call 850-547-3573. Chipley Farmers Markey now openCHIPLEY … The Chipley Farmers Market is now open for the 2018 season from noon to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays and from 8 a.m. to noon on Saturday. The market is located at 685 Seventh Street at the "Train Depot" between Highway 90 and the Amtrak Station and behind the Histori-cal Society. For more information call Ruby Wilkenson at 850-638-0473, the Extension Office at 850-638-6180 or Elaine Milton at 334-405-1408. Library to host a Battle of the BandsBONIFAY … The Holmes County Public Library will host a Battle of the Bands at 9 a.m. Thursday, July 12 at the Bonifay K-8 School. The program is part of the 2018 FLYP Summer Program. For more information call 850-547-3573. EVENTSFrom Page A7 MORE NEWS AND INFORMATION AT CHIPLEYPAPER.COM

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Wednesday, May 23, 2018 A11 NASCAR THIS WEEKThe Daytona Beach News-Journals Godwin Kelly & Ken Willis have covered NASCAR for nearly 60 years combined. godwin.kelly@news-jrnl.com ken.willis@news-jrnl.comALLSTAR RACETHREE THINGS WE LEARNED1. When youre hotDont look now, but Kevin Harvick is riding another three-race winning streak following his All-Star Race victory. Harvick needed a push from Joey Logano to notch this win since the Cup cars were running restrictor plates. That is just the way that most of us do it from Ford,Ž Harvick said.2. Charlotte platesThere was very little blowback from the garage area after the All-Star Race was staged with a restrictorplate package. Yeah, I actually had some fun, really,Ž said Chase Elliott, driver of the No. 9 Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet. It was different for sure, but it wasnt all bad.Ž3. No carry-overIn years past, the savvy crew chiefs would use the All-Star Race as a test run for the Coke 600. Since NASCAR used a plate setup Saturday night, there was nothing for the mechanics notebooks. We will come back next week to a normal program and go for it there,Ž Jimmie Johnson said. „ Godwin Kelly, godwin.kelly@news-jrnl.com THREE THINGS TO WATCH1. Defending champOddly enough, Austin Dillons “ rst two NASCAR Cup Series wins came in crown-jewel events „ last years Coca-Cola 600 and this seasons Daytona 500. Now it is time to defend his Charlotte title. Im really pumped about the 600,Ž said Dillon, who won on one of them fuel-mileage dealsŽ in 2017. If fuel mileage is the way we do it, we will do it that way again, it doesnt matter,Ž he said.2. Plate debateSteve ODonnell, who carries the title of executive vice president and chief racing development of“ cer, made an appearance after the All-Star Race. Apparently, NASCAR hopes to use this same package at some tracks next season. For us, we've got to take the time, be smart about this, really look at it, see where we can go from here,Ž he said. But I think it's fair to say that this is something we absolutely want to look at.Ž3. No. 47 sparked?AJ Allmendinger won the NASCAR Cup Series race that everyone soon forgets about „ the Monster Energy Open. The victory got Allmendinger into the spotlight AllStar Race, but may have also sparked up the No. 47 Chevrolet team and driver. The “ rst stage was pretty awesome to go 18th to fourth in a couple of laps,Ž Allmendinger said of AllStar Segment 1. Really competitive and proud of the guys.Ž„ Godwin Kelly, godwin. kelly@news-jrnl.comAustin Dillon climbs from the No. 3 Chevrolet. He hopes to take that team back to Victory Lane in Sundays Coca-Cola 600. [NEWS-JOURNAL/PETER BAUER] CUP STANDINGS WHATS ON TAP QUESTIONS & ATTITUDECompelling questions ... and maybe a few actual answers 1. Kyle Busch 503 2. Joey Logano 491 3. Kevin Harvick 484 4. Brad Keselowski 396 5. Kurt Busch 393 6. Clint Bowyer 386 7. Denny Hamlin 380 8. Martin Truex Jr. 376 9. Ryan Blaney 365 10. Aric Almirola 342 11. Kyle Larson 336 12. Jimmie Johnson 286 13. Erik Jones 285 14. Alex Bowman 271 15. Chase Elliott 266Whos Jonathan Marshall, why should I know him?Marshall is the guy just hired by the NASCAR team owners who make up the Race Team Alliance. As the new executive director, he will obviously be a key “ gure in upcoming discussions (battles?) with NASCAR leadership over the direction of the sport. RTA chairman Robert Kauffman said it was time to have a full-time executive who wakes up every day thinking of how to move the collective interests of the RTA member teams forward.ŽShould we care?Only in the eventual changes to the business model, as it pertains to future schedules, race-day logistics, etc. Its somewhat interesting that Marshall was formerly an upper executive with the World Surf League, so if theres anyone who knows how to get back on the wave, it should be him.„ Ken Willis, ken.willis @news-jrnl.comCUP SERIES: Coca-Cola 600 SITE: Charlotte Motor Speedway (1.5 -mile quad-oval) TV SCHEDULE: Thursday, practice (Fox Sports 1, 2:30 p.m.), qualifying (Fox Sports 1, 7 p.m.). Saturday, practice (Fox Sports 1, 9 a.m. and 11 a.m.). Sunday, (Fox, coverage begins at 5:30 p.m.; green ” ag, 6:15 p.m.) XFINITY: Alsco 300 SITE: Charlotte Motor Speedway SCHEDULE: Thursday, practice (Fox Sports 1, 4 p.m.). Saturday, qualifying (Fox Sports 1, 10 a.m.), race (Fox Sports 1, 1 p.m.) FEUD OF THE WEEK SPEED FREAKSA few questions we had to ask ourselves Was slower better at All-Star Race? GODSPEAK: There was passing, side-by-side racing, and the “ eld could see the winner at the “ nish. It worked. KENS CALL: The general consensus says yes, so who am I to argue? Prepare for more blue-plate specials in 2019.Where does Danica “ nish at Indy? GODSPEAK: Maybe a bit cautious at “ rst, then she sneaks up through the “ eld for a top-10 “ nish. KENS CALL: If she doesnt “ nd a wreck, Ill say a solid 12th. JOEY LOGANO VS. KYLE LARSON: Near the end of the All-Star Race, Larson bumped into Logano, who skimmed the wall, then immediately turned Larson around off Turn 4. GODWIN KELLYS TAKE: Since this was a no-points race, both drivers shrugged it off. As Larson said: He got into the wall, got mad at me and retaliated. It is what it is.Ž

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** A12 Wednesday, May 23, 2018 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser SPORTS TICKER IN BRIEFGoodell details NFLs stance on sports gamblingNFL commissioner Roger Goodell says Congress should enact uniform standards for any states that plan to legislate sports betting.Goodell detailed the leagues position in a statement Monday that reiterated the NFLs stance that legalized sports gambling in the United States should be governed by federal law rather than state law. The Supreme Court ruled last week to strike down a 1992 law that barred most state-authorized sports gambling.In suggesting four core principles that should be maintained for any form of legalized sports betting, Goodell stressed that leagues can protect our content and intel-lectual property from those who attempt to steal or misuse it.Ž He also said guidelines must provide substantial consumer protections; ensure fans will have access to official, reliable league data; and that law enforcement will have the resources, monitoring and enforcement tools necessary to protect our fans and penalize bad actors here at home and abroad.Ž By W.G. RamirezThe Associated PressLAS VEGAS „ Welcome to Impossible.Those words have been projected onto the ice in big, bold letters at T-Mobile Arena before each game during the Stanley Cup Playoffs. Well, the Vegas Golden Knights are turning impossible into possible.The stunningly successful expansion squad is headed to the Stanley Cup Final after beating the Winnipeg Jets 2-1 on Sunday to win the Western Conference final series in five games.I remember eight months ago, when we won against Dallas (in the season opener), we had that unbe-lievable feeling,Ž Vegas center Pierre-Edouard Bellemare said. Doesnt feel like were satisfied. Its a good feeling when you know the guys are excited for the next one.ŽThe Golden Knights are the third franchise in NHL history to clinch a berth in the Stanley Cup Final in its inaugural season, joining the Toronto Arenas in 1918 in the leagues early days, and St. Louis Blues in 1968, when all six expan-sion teams were in the same division and one of them had to make the final round.Vegas will play either Tampa Bay or Washington on hockeys biggest stage. The Lightning lead the Eastern Conference final 3-2, but the Capitals host Game 6 on Monday night.Either way, were not going to be favorites,Ž said Jonathan Marchessault, who leads Vegas with 18 points in the postseason. Thats been the case all year. Tampa has been the best team all year. Washington, (theyre) playing great hockey right now. Either way, were not going to be favorites, and thats fine with us. We went all year like that and were going to keep going.ŽHence, The Golden MisfitsŽ tag.Nobody could have scripted Vegas, a 500-1 long shot at the start of the season, making the playoffs „ let alone earning a shot at Lord Stanleys Cup.But the Golden Knights, who finished fifth in the league during the regular season, just knocked off the No. 2 team in the regular season in Winnipeg, which in the conference semifinals knocked off the No. 1 team in the regular season, Nashville.Vegas clinched all three of its Western Conference series on the road, becom-ing the seventh team in NHL history to accomplish such a feat. Everybody on this team has something to prove,Ž said Winnipeg native Ryan Reaves, who scored the winning goal Sunday in his hometown. We call our-selves The Golden Misfits for a reason. Were doing a good job of proving every-body wrong.ŽJust as they have all season, they are living in the moment.Vegas, which had just two players under contract at this time last year, heads into the final round with a 12-3 playoff record after outscoring its West-ern Conference opponents 42-27.Its a credit to coach Gerard Gallants philosophy of having a well-conditioned, confident group of forwards who work well together, focus on short effective shifts, and exude confidence on the ice all while, as he reiterates it daily, playing 200 feet of hockey.And while the Golden Knights havent necessarily been a high-scoring threat, scoring just three or fewer goals in 12 of their 15 playoff games, their defensemen have played exceptional to this point. Vegas has allowed the least amount of goals in the playoffs, among teams that have played 10 games. It was a stifling and disruptive defense that helped propel the Golden Knights past the Jets on Sunday, with their sixth win in eight road games during the postseason.Everybodys stepping up at different times during the season,Ž said goalie Marc-Andre Fleury, who has 12 wins, four shutouts, a .947 save percentage and 1.68 goals against average. Thats a big reason why weve been playing consistently.ŽThe key cog in Vegas engine has been Fleury, whose remarkable play has translated into a careerbest postseason. He has allowed two or fewer goals in 10 of 15 playoff games, and is heading to the Stanley Cup final for a third consecutive year. And whether he admits it or not, the 14-year veteran still bears the scars of being left exposed by Pittsburgh last summer after spending the first 13 years of his career with the Penguins.Gallant, who remained coy about his teams aspi-rations during the regular season, made it clear the Golden Knights havent reached their goal.Its been an awesome ride so far,Ž said Gallant, who some might also consider a misfitŽ after Florida fired him follow-ing a road game at Carolina last season, then left him and his luggage on the curb outside PNC Arena. Were going to the Stanley Cup Final, but again, this isnt what we want. We want to win. Its great to win tonight and its great to be the (conference) champions,Ž Gallant added, but thats not what were here for.ŽEven as i mpossible as that all seemed just a few months ago.Welcome to ImpossibleStanley Cup-bound Vegas turning impossible into possible Vegas Golden Knights James Neal (18), Deryk Engelland (5), goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury (29) and the rest of the team celebrate after defeating the Winnipeg Jets during NHL Western Conference Finals, game 5, on Sunday in Winnipeg. [PHOTOS BY TREVOR HAGAN/THE CANADIAN PRESS VIA THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** A14 Wednesday, May 23, 2018 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser A tonetime,food chemistSichaya Sittipodpaid littlemindtowhatwas inhercoffeecup. IwouldjustgotoStarbucksandgetthesame thing,Žshesaid.Im muchmoreintunetothe differentflavorsandthe smallnuancesnow.Ž Thefourth-yeardoctoral studentinfoodscience atOhioStateUniversity usesthechemicalmakeup ofgreencoffeebeansto predicttheirflavorwhen brewedintocoffee. It'spossible,shesaid,to readabean'scomposition likeabookandlearnwhat chemicalmarkerscorrelate with,say,bitter,sweet, freshorfruityflavors. Itsnotjustaroma; itsnotjusttaste,ŽSittipodsaid.Itsa nuancedcombination. Wegetachemicalfingerprintoffeach ofthesebeans.Ž Thechemicalidentity ofspecialtycoffeebeans alsocanpredictthescore ofacoffee'sgradeonthe SpecialtyCoffeeAssociationofAmericas100pointcupping"scale. WyattBurk,owner oftheBitterBaristaand LittleGhostCoffeeRoaster inColumbus,Ohio,is atrainedandcertified professionalcupper. Tomaintainconsistent grading,theassociation laysoutspecificguidelinesforcuppersabout thegoldenŽgrounds-towaterratiotouse,how besttosip,andtheideal temperatureandtimingforroasting,brewing andsamplingthecoffee. Cuppingisoneofmany measuresusedtograde acoffee'ssweetness, body,cleanness,acidityflavorandfragrance, saidBurk,whouses itregularlytoexperimentwithnewroasts. Ifyouweretryingto developanewcookie recipe,youdtryoutnew recipesandtweakitevery time,Žhesaid.Itsthe samewithcoffee.Ž Throughherresearch, Sittipodsaidshehas learnedtoconsiderhow differenttechniques „Frenchpress,drip, espresso,forexample„ achievedifferentflavors. Burksaidcoffeedrinkers have,inthepastdecade, beguntounderstandand appreciatethechemical complexityofacupofjoe. Theoptimallyroasted bean,groundtoanideal sizeandsteepedinwater ofacertaintemperature foraspecificnumberof minutes,isasspecialas anyhigh-falutincraft cocktail,hesaid. Weviewcoffeeasa beverage,notadrink,Ž Burksaid.Youcant drivearoundandsipona cocktail.Thatsthedifference.Butthereisa growingappreciation." FOODFACTSSOYBEANS AMONGTOP EXPORTSSoybeans,which areamongthetop veagricultural exportsfrom theU.S.,arethe largestsource ofproteinin agriculture. Theyarealso usedtomakea varietyofnonfoodproducts, includingcrayons, candlesandhaircareproducts. TheU.S.exports abouthalfofits soybeanstoother countries. EASYRECIPEWHITE SANGRIAMakepartyplanningeasier withthisdrink ideathatisbetter whenitsmadea dayinadvance. Therecipecomes fromthenest.com. €4bottleswhite wine €Mixtureof: slicedgreen seedlessgrapes, greenapples, Asianpearsand starfruit €Onecanoflychee nuts(intheir syrup) €Smallbottle lemonlime… avoredseltzer Letallofthe ingredientsexcept seltzersoak overnight.When yourereadyto serve,addinthe seltzer. SEAFOODCELEBRATE SHRIMPHerearesome reasonstolove shrimpfrom SeaPak: €Shrimpismade upofseveralgoodfor-younutrients: selenium, calcium,zincand potassium. €Nomatterthe occasion,shrimp packstheperfect avorpunchfor anymeal. €Easytomake, shrimpts seamlesslyinto yourmealprep schedule. „Brandpoint MATTERSOFTASTE Science,sensesndnuancesincoee MarionRenault FOOD ByCharlenePetersMoreContentNow T hefamedBarossa Valleywineregion ofAustraliaisabout anhoursdrivefrom theexoticandbustlingcity ofAdelaide.Asexpected,I wascaptivatedbythebeauty ofrollinghillscoveredin rowsofgreenandyellowing grapeleaves,telltalecolors tosignaltheendofharvest season.ButwhatIdidnt expectwastoseeakangaroo hoppingthroughthevineyard atSt.Hugowinery.Wow. Kangaroo-spottingwas notonmyitineraryfor anotherthreedays,pendingahalf-hourflightover toKangarooIsland.Yet, thereonewas,rightbefore myeyes.ThatsAustralia. Now,ontoKangarooIsland. In1802,Britishexplorer MatthewFlinderslandedon thisisland70milessouthwestofAdelaideandnamed itforitsprimaryinhabitants, kangaroos.Thisthird-largest islandofftheAustralian coastattractedEuropean sealhuntersandwhalersin theearly19thcentury.Back onland,theseseamenwere onamissiontopreventthe extinctionofanAustralianicon,thekoala.They introduced18koalastothe islandandplanted100speciesofeucalyptustrees. Today,thekoalapopulationisarobust30,000,and thefuzzycreatureschoose todineononlyfivetypes ofeucalyptus.Ibecame soobsessedwithkoalaspottingthatIalmostforgot aboutseeingkangaroos,but thatwouldsoonchange. Onthisisland,kangaroosfaroutnumber thehumanpopulationof 4,500.Thisplaceisalmost azoowithoutcages. Isoonarrivedattheremote andultra-luxuriousSouthernOceanLodge,21modern roomslocatedinthebushŽ andonthewatersedgewhere theSouthPacificandIndian oceansmeet,withviews (andamenities)todiefor.I enjoyedalunchofcrisped localgarfishwithacaper anddillemulsion,accompaniedbyfriedpotatoes, whilesippingacrispCorioleCheninBlancfromthe McLarenValewineregion. Asapost-lunchworkout, Isignedupforthehotels afternoonexplorationofthe cliffsoverlookingthebeach. Spectacularcrashingwaves illustratewhytheislandhasa longhistoryofshipwreckson thisspot.Ialsogotalessonon bushplantssurroundingand leadingtothehotelscurved, panoramiclobby.Iwasfascinatedwithsamphire,orsea bean,whichgrowsasbeaded shootsinshadesofgreen, purpleandred.Thissalty succulentisprizedbysouthernAustralianchefs,whoadd itasatoppingtomanydishes. WildAustralia TASTEOFTRAVEL ABOVE:ThestunningstretchofruggedcoastlinehuggingSouthern OceanLodge,oneoftheworldstophotels.RIGHT:Theseabean,or samphire,g rowsfromarockbythe sea.[CHARLENEPETERSPHOTOS] SucculentsandsceneryDownUnder SamphireSpaghettiServes4 €2/3cupsamphire(orderonlineifyoucant“ndin alocalspecialtystore) €2cupsspaghetti €Seasaltandfreshlygroundpepper,totaste €Oliveoil €Afewknobsofbutter €2salmon“llets €redpepper,“nelychopped(moreorless,to taste) €1-2clovesgarlic(totaste),crushed €1lemon,juiceandzest Plungeyourspaghettiintoapotofboilingwater. Addagoodpinchofsaltandasplashofoliveoil. Cookfor12minutesoruntilaldente. Whileitcooks,getafryingpanhot.Seasonyour “sh.Addaknobofbutter.Lowerheattomedium. Cookskinsidedownuntilyoucanseethe“sh startingtocookthroughalittle,about5minutes. Flip.Cookforanother3-5minutes.The”eshwill easily”akeawayfromtheskinwhenitsdone. Tosstheredpepperandthegarlicinthepanto cookalittleintheresidualheat. Addthesamphiretothepastawaterrightbefore drainingit.Tossdrainedpastaandsamphirewith aknobofbutter.Flakethesalmonawayfrom theskinandtossthe”eshandthegarlicandred pepperinwiththepasta. Addagoodhitoffreshpepperandthejuiceand zestofthelemon.Taste.Adjustseasoningas needed.Servewarm.

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Wednesday, May 23, 2018 A15By Courtney JespersenNerdWallet.comGrab a movie ticket, snacks and a seat. As the lights dim in the theater, take a look around. Spoiler alert: The person sitting next to you might have paid less to see the same movie. How did they do it? Here are eight ways to lower the price of going to the movies.Before you go 1. JOIN A LOYALTY PROGRAMMovie theater loyalty programs reward frequent patrons with discounts. For example, for $15 a year, AMC Stubs Premiere members enjoy bene“ ts like $5 Ticket Tuesdays and free upgrades on popcorn and fountain drinks. Youll also earn points that can be redeemed for monetary rewards: Get a $5 reward for every 5,000 points. Rewards can be redeemed on things like food and tickets. Many theater chains offer rewards programs. Check with your local theater to see the cost of a membership, then do some quick calculations to “ gure out how many movies you would have to see each year to make up the cost of joining. When you sign up for a membership, “ ll in personal information like your birthday, and some theaters will send you celebratory deals to use during your birthday month. You could get a free tub of popcorn, for example. 2. CHECK OUT COSTCODid you know Costco sells movie tickets and gift cards for movie tickets? We found a pack of four $25 gift cards to MovieTickets.com for $74.99 (a $100 value). 3. LEVERAGE YOUR DINNERRestaurant.com has a movie section on its website with special gift card deals. We spotted a bundle with a $25 Regal Cinemas gift card and a $25 Restaurant.com e-gift card for $30. Thats $20 in savings. 4. JOIN MOVIEPASSMoviePass is a subscription service that currently costs $9.95 a month for one person (the price can change, so check online before you sign up). This unlimited plan allows you to see a movie every day. Once you register, youll receive a debit card in the mail that youll use to purchase your ticket at the box of“ ce. Use the MoviePass app to “ nd participating theaters near you. Note: Only select theaters allow you to reserve a same-day ticket in the app before you arrive.At the box of“ ce 5. GO ON THE RIGHT DAYYou could save money simply by seeing a movie on a certain day of the week. Go online and “ nd the theaters near you, then b rowse any available discount days. Weve seen several theaters that offer cheaper prices on Tuesdays, for example. 6. CASH IN ON SENIOR AND MILITARY DISCOUNTSAt Cinemark, for example, discounts include military, student, senior and early bird (for the “ rst matinee of the day that starts before 1 p.m.). Go to cinemark.com/discounts to see if there is a theater near you that participates. Discounts typically apply only on certain days, for speci“ c showtimes or at certain theaters, so plan your visit accordingly. 7. REDEEM A COUPONJust like you can “ nd coupons for retail stores, you can use coupon websites and apps to “ nd deals for movie theaters. Just search for moviesŽ or by theater name. Deals could include offers such as a dollar amount off, a percentage off or a free concession with purchase. 8. TAKE KIDS TO SUMMER MOVIESFor example, Cinemark offers Summer Movie Clubhouse, a 10-week program of recently released G and PG “ lms for kids,Ž according to James Meredith, senior vice president for Marketing and Communications at Cinemark. The cost is $5 for 10 movies or $1 per movie. And while the movies are tailored to kids, the price is the same for guests of all ages. Timing of the series is determined by local theaters. Pay less at the MOVIES 8 ways to get cheap tickets PERSONAL FINANCEA TARGET-DATE RETIREMENT FUND CHECK-IN Avoid brain freezeA brain freeze is what happens when cold food touches a bundle of nerves in the back of the palate. To avoid brain freeze, eat cold food much more slowly so that your mouth can warm up the food. Keep it in the front of your mouth: The furtherback stimulation is what triggers the brain freeze.Yard sale 101How to shop a garage sale: Bring cash. Negotiate to bundle a few items and round up to a nearest $10 or $20. Only purchase necessities, or items that are refurbishable for re-sale or gifting. Bring bags and a vehicle with room to haul treasures home.More tips on EchoGet tips every day through your Amazon Echo. Enable the Smart Tip of the Day skill at http://amzn. to/2FKw5c4 or by asking Alexa for a Smart Tip of the Day.ŽGet deals in your inboxGo to time andmoney. com to sign up for our Thursday newsletter, full of deals and tips to make life easier. Click on Get deals in your inboxŽ in the upper right.A-peeling way to stop pestsIf you have ants or other pests coming in through door frames, windows or other cracks, place citrus peels in their path and they will run in the other direction.„ More Content Now TIP S & TRICK S BIGSTOCK IMAGES p es t s a ve h er ng e s, r k s, s ei r h ey th ro A D h t tp t/2FK5 4

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** A16 Wednesday, May 23, 2018 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Wednesday, May 23, 2018 B1CELEBRATE By Diane M. RobinsonTimes Advertiser | @HCTA_Diane Drobinson@chipleypaper.comBONIFAY The Holmes County Public Library will be hosting its annual summer program starting June 14.The Florida Youth Program theme for this year is Librar-ies RockŽ with each program showing how libraries rock and teaching children the importance of the library system by way of music.Each week will see various groups using music encourage children to utilize their local library. Atlantic Coastal Theatre will use plays drawn from books to do just that, just as Mrs. Kate Singin and Smilin will do the same.The finale of the program will have a Battle of the Bands which is exactly what is sounds like. Bands from local high schools will gather at Bonifay K-8 to battle each other for the children.The programs are open to the public and completely free of charge. Signing up is not a requirement and parents are asked to stay with their children for the programs. Local daycare centers will bring their students to the events as well.Holmes County Public Library Assistant Director Becky Marsh says this program is for the community and for kids to have some-thing to do with their time.We give them something to do for entertainment when some of them cant afford other activities,Ž said Marsh. We support the children and the parents by giving them something to do.ŽStarting on June 7 with a movie at the library, every Thursday from June 14 until July 12, programs will be held at Bonifay K-8 The programs begin at 9 a.m.We encourage everyone to come out and enjoy,Ž said Marsh.Holmes County Library hosts Libraries RockAnimal Tales is just one of the many activities happening during the summer programs at the Holmes County Public Library. [FILE PHOTO] These young men practice their honing their music skills during last years summer program at the Holmes County Public Library.[SPECIAL TO TIMES-ADVERTISER] Assistant Library Director Becky Marsh gets the kids revved up for the start of one of the exhibitions during their summer prog ram. [SPECIAL TO TIMES-ADVERTISER] The following is the schedule of events: € June 14 … Mrs. Kate Singin and Smilin € June 21 … Atlanta Coastal Theatre € June 28 … Holmes County High School Band € July 5 … Animal Tales € July 12 … Battle of the Bands

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** B2 Wednesday, May 23, 2018 | Holmes County Times-AdvertiserBy Marley JayThe Associated PressNEW YORK „ Indus-trial and technology companies led stocks to solid gains Monday after the U.S. and China appeared to make sig-nificant progress in trade talks. That helped ease concerns among inves-tors that the worlds two biggest economies might be headed for a trade war.After another round of talks, the two countries agreed not to place tariffs on goods imported from the other. The Chinese government said it will buy more U.S. goods, including energy and agricultural products, while Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said the U.S. postponed its proposal to put tariffs on up to $150 billion in goods from China. The two sides gave no indication of how much progress they had made toward ending their dispute entirely and both said hostilities could increase again.Mark Hackett, chief of investment research at Nationwide Investment Management, said inves-tors overreacted to the possibility of a trade war and they may be slowly learning to take a more patient approach with statements by the Trump administration and other nations, which is a good thing, Hackett says, because future administrations may borrow from Trumps aggressive style.Treating Trump literally is destructive for investors,Ž he said. Theres a lot of these issues where there are going to be hyperbolic statements made in the public sphere by both sides.ŽThe S&P 500 index climbed 20.04 points, or 0.7 percent, to 2,733.01. The Dow Jones industrial average rose as much as 371 points during the morning and finished with a gain of 298.20 points, or 1.2 percent, to 25,013.29. The Nasdaq composite gained 39.70 points, or 0.5 percent, to 7,394.04. The Russell 2000 index of smallercompany stocks set another record close as it jumped 10.81 points, or 0.7 percent, to 1,637.44.All 11 sectors in the S&P 500 index finished higher. Among industrials, Boeing gained 3.6 percent to $363.92 and construction equipment maker Caterpillar rose 2.1 percent to $158.92. In the financial sector, Bank of New York Mellon added 1.3 percent to $57.72 and JPMorgan Chase rose 0.9 percent to $112.15.Trade disputes have occupied a lot of inves-tors attention for the last two months. Stocks have rallied on signs progress was being made, only to fall back when the situa-tion appeared to worsen. Hackett said Wall Street could get over its trade worries relatively quickly if talks go well.If that happens, he said stocks could be set for further gains because they are still below their early 2018 highs and analysts expect stronger earnings growth, which makes stock prices seem less expensive.General Electric rose 1.9 percent to $15.26 after announcing that its train engine division will combine with railroad equipment maker Westinghouse Air Brake Technologies in deal worth $11.1 billion. Its the latest step by GEs CEO, John Flannery, to break off parts of the conglom-erate. GE will get $2.9 billion in cash and will own 50.1 percent of the combined company, and the deal will help it narrow its business down to the aviation, health care and energy industries.Hope for USChina progress boosts stocksBy Danica KirkaThe Associated PressLONDON „ Lisa Mey-ers hair salon is a cozy place where her mother serves homemade macaroons, children climb on chairs and customers chat above the whirr of hairdryers.Most of the time Meyer is focused on hairstyles, color trends and keeping up with appointments. But now shes worried about how the European Unions new data protection law will affect her business as she contacts customers to seek permission to store their details. Even though she supports the law, Meyer fears it may cut her mailing list by 90 percent as people choose to withhold their data or simply over-look her emails.It will be difficult to market upcoming events,Ž she said at her shop, Lisa Hauck Hair & Beauty in London.Businesses from pizza parlors to airlines across the EUs 28 countries are bom-barding customers with emails seeking consent to use personal data as they rush to comply with the blocs General Data Protection Regulation, which takes effect Friday. The new rules called GDPR for short, are designed to make it easier for EU residents to give and withdraw permission for companies to use personal information, requiring consent forms that are written in simple language and no more than one page long. Companies that already hold such data have to reach out to customers and ask for permission to retain it. Authorities can fine companies up to 4 percent of annual revenue or 20 million euros ($23.6 million), whichever is higher, for breaching the rules. Regulators say the law applies to anyone who collects, uses or stores personal data. That can be a burden for small businesses that are forced to hire out-side lawyers or consultants because they dont have the staff or expertise to deal with the law.The EUs one-size-fits-all approach is one of the flaws in the law, according to Max Schrems, an Aus-trian privacy advocate who has formed a non-profit to take action against big companies that deliber-ately violate the new rules.When the rules were being discussed, industry lobbyists sought to weaken the law by creating uncer-tainty, and as a result there are no clear guidelines that exempt small companies, Schrems told the BBC recently. GDPR is a prime exam-ple of corporate law gone wrong, because its helpful for big companies,Ž he said. They have to do all of this anyways and they can use the uncertainty in the law to kind of get around things. But it leaves small companies that dont ... have a law department, or something like that, in a situation with a lot of uncertainty.ŽMeyer falls under the new rules jurisdiction because she keeps data. Like many hair colorists, she keeps a card on each of her clients that notes whether they are allergic to any chemicals used in the dyes. Thats considered personal medical informa-tion that must be protected. I find it actually quite scary how data is being used so carelessly,Ž Meyer said. Its a good wake-up call. Its made me more aware.ŽData con rmationThe Associated PressBRUSSELS „ Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has agreed to have his meeting Tuesday with the leaders of the European parlia-ment about data privacy be broadcast publicly through web streaming.The evening meeting with leaders of the polit-ical groups and a justice and civil rights expert was long expected to be private.But many in the European Parliament had been calling for an on-air grilling for Zuckerberg to explain his companys role in a scandal about the misuse of customer data.European Parliament President Antonio Tajani said in a state-ment Monday that after discussing the issue with Zuckerberg I am glad to announce that he has accepted this new request.Ž Tajani called it great news for EU citizens. I thank him for the respectŽ shown for the EU legislature.Zuckerberg meeting with EU parliament leaders to be webcast BRIEFCASENEW YORKGeneral Electric announces $11B rail dealGeneral Electric will tie its train engine division to the railroad equipment maker Wabtec in deal worth about $11 billion as GE CEO John Flannery con-tinues to break off parts of the conglomerate.Wabtec CEO Raymond Betler will lead the combined company and its chairman, Albert Neupaver, will be executive chairman.Under the deal announced Monday and approved by the boards of both companies, General Electric Co. will get $2.9 billion in cash. The deal is expected to close early next year. ST. LOUISAmeren Missouri plans 400-megawatt wind farmAmeren Missouri announced plans Monday for a 400-megawatt wind farm in rural northeast Missouri, creating enough power to serve 120,000 homes within two years.St. Louis-based Ameren said its High Prairie Wind Farm near Kirksville will be the largest in the state. Ajay Arora, vice president of power operations and energy management at Ameren Missouri, called it a significant step toward Amerens goal of reducing carbon emissions 80 percent by 2050.Whats most important for our customers is to have a balanced energy mix,Ž Arora said in an interview. That would be a combination of hydro, nuclear, natural gas, coal, wind, solar. Our portfolio has it all. And that provides the affordability and reliability that our cus-tomers expect.Ž The Associated PressFacebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg makes the keynote speech at F8, Facebooks developer conference, May 1 in San Jose, Calif. [MARCIO JOSE SANCHEZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO] From airlines to pizza parlors, EU businesses adopt info retention law BUSINESS Lisa Meyer blow drys the hair of a client at her Hair and Beauty shop Wednesday in London. [FRANK AUGSTEIN/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS]

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Wednesday, May 23, 2018 B3 CROSSWORD Trivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy.com 1. From fun surveys, whats the most popular response when asked to name something that squeaks? Floor, Mouse, Chair, Door 2. Of these, which is not a member of the rose family? Apple, Banana, Pear, Peach 3. How old was Benjamin Franklin when he died (1790)? 49, 62, 77, 84 4. What country has a region called LaplandŽ? Canada, Finland, Ireland, Japan 5. Who coined the word virusŽ? Ben Franklin, John Viruson, Edward Jenner, Jonas Salk 6. What do you call a group of rattlesnakes? Rhumba, Crash, Bevy, Wisp ANSWERS: 1. Mouse, 2. Banana, 3. 84, 4. Finland, 5. Edward Jenner, 6. RhumbaTRIVIA GUY W i l s o n C a s e y Wilson Casey SCHOOLS & SOCIETYMay24: Poplar Springs High School graduation 25: Bethlehem High School graduation 28: Students and all personnel outJune1: End of second semester student early release day/ Professional development 4 … 6: Post-school for teachers and non-instructional working teachersJuly4: All Personnel OutAugust1: Pre-School Begins for Teachers and Non-Instructional working teacher days 10: Classes Begin for StudentsSeptember3: Labor Day (Students and All Personnel Out/Paid Holiday for Teachers)October5: Students and All Personnel Out 12: End of First Grading Period 18:Report Cards Go Home 26 … 29: Fall Break (Students, Teachers and 10 Month NonInstructional Personnel out) 30: Classes ResumeNovember19-23: Students, Teachers and 10 Month Non-Instructional Personnel Out 22: Paid Holiday for Teachers 21-23: 12 Month Personnel outDecember21: End “ rst Semester Student Early Release Day/ Professional Development 24-Jan. 4, 2019:Students, Teachers and 10 Month NonInstructional Personnel out 25: Paid Holiday for Teachers 24-Jan 1, 2019: 12 Month Personnel outJanuary 20197: Classes Resume for Students and all Personnel return to work 10: Report Cards Go Home 21: Students and All Personnel out/Paid Holiday for TeachersFebruary18: Students and all Personnel out/Paid Holiday for teachersMarch15: End Third Grading Period 21: Report Cards Go Home 25-29: Spring Break (Students and All Personnel Out)April1: Classes ResumeMay20: Ponce de Leon High School Graduation 21: Poplar Springs High School Graduation 23: Bethlehem High School Graduation 24: Holmes County High School Graduation 24: End of Second Semester/ Student Early Release Day/ Professional Development 27: All Personnel Out/Paid Holiday For Teachers 28-30: Post-School for Teachers and Non-Instructional Teacher Working Days2018 2019 HOLMES COUNTY SCHOOL CALENDARIf you would like to see your summer camp or vaca-tion bible school on this list email them to news@chipleypaper.com WCSO to annual host summer campCHIPLEY … The Washington County Sheriffs Office will hold their annual summer camp Monday, June 4 through Friday, June 8. The camp is designed for boys and girls ages 13 to 18. WCSO would like to see all the familiar faces and some new faces this summer. There is no cost for the camp. Lunch will be provided each day by WCSO and camp sponsors. Those attending will be CPR certified at the completion of camp. Call 850-638-6111 and speak to Daryl White, Program Director, to pre-register a spot for your child. Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch to host summer campINGLIS Summer is just around the corner, and the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch, Inc. is offering a free summer camp featuring numerous recreational activ-ities. The camp is designed for children ages 10 to 15. Camp will be held Sunday, June 24 through Friday, June 29, be held at Caruth Camp in Inglis (Levy County). Caruth Camp will feature activities such as kayaking, canoeing, swimming, archery, and other outdoor recreation. The camp also offers free transportation through a designated pick up and drop off location in the Panhandle, to be announced later. FSYR does require an application, and spots will be filled on a first come, first served basis. To apply for camp, visit https://floridasheriffscamps.campmanagement.com/enroll or call Caruth Camp at 352-447-2259. BCF to host Elevate Worship Arts CampGRACEVILLE … Baptist College of Florida will host Elevate Worship Arts Camp Monday, July 9 through Friday, July 13 at the college. The camp is designed for stu-dents who have completed sixth through the 12th grade. Areas of interest will include but are not limited to vocals, guitar, bass, keyboard and drums. Classes will also be offered in drama, sign lan-guage and illusion. Students will have the opportunities to participate in bible stud-ies, youth-oriented worship services, devotional time as well as recreation opportuni-ties each day as well as a trip or two to local water attrac-tions. Participants will get a glimpse f residential college life as they stay in the dorms and eat in the college dining hall throughout the week. The camp is $200 and includes lodging, meals and all of the activities. BCF is offering an early bird dis-counted fee of $180 through Thursday, May 31. For more information call 800-328-2660 ext. 427.SUMMER CAMPS AND VACATION BIBLE SCHOOLS Melissa Erickson More Content NowIf you want your teen to be a better driver, skip the video games and get them involved in organized sports, according to a new study. That was one of a few surprises in a University of California Los Angeles study that also found that new, male teen drivers handle the car better than do new male drivers in their 20s. In the study novice drivers; each with less than five hours of driving experience before their first driving lesson; participated in a two-hour lesson focused on car control and traffic maneuvers. Students drove in Los Angeles, ranked by the 2017 INRIX Global Traffic Scorecard as having the worst traffic in the world. The group was evenly split by gender, and the students average age was 18. Instructors considered students driving skills against four factors: age, gender, sports participation and video game experience. The results were surprising, said Nancy Wayne, associate vice chancellor for research and a professor of physiology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California Los Angeles. Among the findings was that new female students on average reported feeling less confident than did their male counterparts, but the male and female groups received almost the same driving scores from instructors. Also, a history of playing any kind of organized sport was linked to better driving skills among both men and women. We were surprised at how robust the impact of organized athletics; any type of athletic activity ; was on driving skills. It didnt matter if it was sports involving a ball or yoga. It didnt matter if the driving students were currently involved in athletics or had been in the past. Compared to driving students who were not ever involved in an organized athletic activity, their driving skills were significantly greater,Ž Wayne said. Previous studies focused on elite athletes such as members of a Division I sports team. Our study showed that you dont have to be one of the elite to get benefits of athletics; any kind of organized athletic activity is associated with better driving skills in novice drivers,Ž Wayne said. If you want your son or daughter to be a better driver, encourage your children and teens to get involved in any athletic activity they enjoy. There are many benefits to athletics, including that it is associated with better driving skills in novice drivers. Second, dont put off those driving lessons until your children are in their late teens or older. Waiting too long just makes it harder for novice drivers to reach a solid level of competence,Ž said Greg Miller, an instructor at Westwood Driving School, near the UCLA campus. Playing video games showed no relationship to driving abilities. The authors expected the opposite, because earlier research had shown that playing action video games improves spatial cognition.Driven to succeedStudy nds athletic activity makes for better teen drivers

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** B4 Wednesday, May 23, 2018 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser FAITHBy Kalynn BrazealAs I have taken the first few steps on my journey of parenting an adult, I have realized that my spirit and my heart are fighting a constant battle. The heart wants to make it all better. I tend to lead with my heart which Im learning is not necessarily in alignment with what the Bible tells me. Mercy and grace are some things that I want in my everyday life, that I have in my everyday life. Gods mercy and grace is upon us. That said, I struggle with smoothing everything over in the name of mercy and grace. An episode of That 70s ShowŽ comes to mind. In it, the parents finally catch the kids behaving inappropriately and the father brings down the hammer. Nailing windows shut, doing bed checks, sitting guard over curfew at the doors. The whole process brings about absolute misery in the house. Finally the mother announces that she wants her house back, her life back, and to do that they are going to pretend like nothing wrong happened and everyone is going back to normal. Then within a few seconds, everything goes back to normal and the credits run. How I wish my life was like a television show. Except you cant pretend like nothing happened. You cant parent with your eyes closed and you certainly cant force everything to go back the way it was. In Jesus parable of The Prodigal Son, we are reminded that it is always possible to come home. The father held his arms open wide and with such devotion and love announced a feast to celebrate the homecoming of his wayward child. A true testimony to Gods love for us and his grace. Notice however that when the father addressed his other son, who was upset and concerned, the father assured him that he remembered that he was always with him. That he had never left him and that all the father had was his. While the father welcomed home his wayward son, he wasnt ignoring the consequences of the sons actions. This is a reminder that regardless of what choices we make, we can always go home, we can always get a fresh start, but we arent free from the consequences of our actions. When I dig into the subject, its hard as a parent. Having one child come to you and demand their inheritance, which is given upon ones death typically, must hurt. I cant imagine standing before my parent and basically wishing they were dead so that I could have money to do as I wanted. But this is the reality that the father had. Instead of saying, no, go clean out the camel shed and think twice about being rude,the father gave his son what he asked for. Again I cant imagine that father watching as his son left „ my heart breaks just thinking of it. Yet we are all that son in one way or another. We have all stood before God, our Father, and shamed him. We have asked for things that arent ours, done things that we knew better than to do... and yet his arms are wide open and his grace is good. We will constantly find ourselves on the wrong side of this parable. Because while God gave us free will and forgiveness... he does not protect us from the consequences of our actions. We reap what we sow. These are the battles we face in life. So as a parent, I have to base my approach on how our Father deals with us when we are wayward and disobedient... I need to follow what my spirit tells me versus what my heart says. My spirit says to hold strong to the Lord in my time of need. That everyone has to learn their own path. That you can love someone and not approve or accept their current path. Just like the father in the parable, you can send one out with love and know that one day, they will repent and return to the fold. My spirit says that one day we come to our senses and return to our Fathers fold... just like the Prodigal Son.Fighting the heart If you would like your Washington County church listed here, please send information to: news@chipleypaper. com. Due to space limitation, please only send regular church services. For special services, please send separate submission.ASSEMBLY OF GODCorbin Road Assembly of God Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 105 Corbin Road in Chipley. Cords of Love Assembly of God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study is a 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 2060 Bethlehem Road in Cottondale. Grace Assembly of God @ Chipley Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 567 North Main Street, Chipley New Bethany Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Shaky Joe Road just off Highway 280 at Hinsons Crossroads. New Life Fellowship Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 695 5th Street, Chipley. Wausau Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 3537 Washington Street in Wausau. Baptist Abigail Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located on Dawkins Street in Vernon.WASHINGTON COUNTY CHURCH LISTINGSSee CHURCH, B6

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Wednesday, May 23, 2018 B5 OBITUARIESVERNON New Hope United Methodist will host its annual Memorial Day service on Monday, the holiday, at 9 a.m.The church is located at 3676 FL-79, just south of Vernon.The service includes a short ministerial service, veterans names reading and light refreshments.Church to honor fallen for Memorial DayAva L. Barker, age 85 of Chipley, FL passed from this life on Thursday morning, May 10, 2018 at Bay Medical Center in Panama City, FL. She was born on September 6, 1932 in St. Augustine, FL. Ava has been a resident of Chipley for the past 12 years moving from Melbourne, FL. She worked alongside her husband Charles as a secretary for their family business Barkers Alignment. She is survived by her loving husband of 64 years, Charles R. Barker of Chipley, FL, one son, Charles T. Barker and wife Marizete of Wausau, FL, one grandson, Justin Barker, two sisters, Vera Bell and Mary K. Tindell, and she leaves a host of nieces and nephews. Family received friends for visitation on Monday, May 14, 2018 at Brown Funeral Home from 5:00-7:00 P.M. Funeral Services were held on Tuesday, May 15, 2018 at Brown Funeral Home at 10:00 A.M. Interment followed at Piney Grove Cemetery with Brown Funeral Home directing. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh.netAVA L. BARKERThomas Warren Burnham, age 72, died May 12, 2018. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.THOMAS W. BURNHAMMrs. Barbara Ann Cathey, 80 of Westville, Florida died peacefully on Saturday, May 12, 2018, at her home in Westville, Florida. Born Saturday, December 4, 1937 in Westville, Florida, Barbara "Bob" Cooey grew up in Westville and was the daughter of the late Bill Cooey and the late Robbie Bush Cooey. Barbara was Valedictorian of her graduation class at Holmes County High School, member of the Basketball team, cheerleader and class favorite. She married George Cathey in 1956 and traveled extensively with his military career in the Air Force abroad and across the US. Upon returning home to Westville, she enjoyed a bookkeeping position at Tri-County Gas. She was a life long member of Westville Community Baptist Church which hosted services prior to final rest at Campground Cemetery next to her late husband George. Surviving are sons, Billy Cathey of Panama City Beach, FL and Rory Cathey of Cocoa Beach, FL, daughter, Patricia Radford of Adrian, GA, sister, Sue Wood of Panama City, FL; 6 grand children; 9 great grandchildren. A Memorial service was held at 11:00 AM on Thursday, May, 17, 2018 at Westville Community Church with Rev. Hal Wilson officiating and Gregg Cooey delivering the Eulogy with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM on Thursday, May 17, 2018, at Westville Community Church.BARBARA A. CATHEYJames Houston (Jim) Joiner died peacefully in Holmes County Florida on May 12that his home at the age of 90. Jim was born on August 3rd, 1927 in Holmes County Fl. to John A and Corine Joiner. He graduated from Poplar Springs High School. After graduation, he joined the Navy and served in World War II in the Pacific Theater aboard the USS Arkansas. After serving his country, he received degrees from the University of Florida and Troy University. He taught school in the Holmes County school system for 38 years. A man of great integrity, you typically knew where he stood on an issue. He enjoyed discussion of politics and societal matters until his passing. Known as a tireless worker, Jim farmed peanuts and cattle into his 80s. He maintained his interest in agriculture until his death, last visiting family land and cattle a week before his passing. He married Betty Bolden of Slocomb AL in 1955. They settled in the Poplar Springs community where they raised their family. He was a long time active member of Bethel Baptist Church, where he served in many capacities. Jim is survived by his wife of 62 years Betty of Holmes County Fla, by daughters Maria Allen of Morton IL, Beverly Joiner, Penny Woodham, and Karon Mattox of Holmes County, son and daughter in law Brad and Staci Joiner, son Chad of Holmes County. 12 grandchildren, several great and great-great grandchildren. Sister and brother in law Sue and Al Nix of Huntsville AL. Brother in law Herman Bolden of Birmingham AL and Sister in law Jo Ann Roney of Dothan AL. Jim is preceded in death by brother John A Joiner of Pensacola FL, Joe W Holman of Virginia. Sisters Willie Hall of Lynn Haven FL, Janice Corbitt of Panama City, FL, Hassie Stewart of Graceville FL. son in law Keith Woodham of Holmes County FL, and the twin daughter of Brad and Staci Joiner. Visitation was held from 6 to 8pm Monday May 14th, with funeral Tuesday May 15 at 11am at Bethel Baptist Church.JAMES H. JOINERMarilyn Rose Ann Peterson, 60, of Bonifay,died Thursday, May 03, 2018. Memorialization was by cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.MARILYN R. PETERSONMrs. Patricia Ann Williams, age 69, of Vernon, Florida passed away May 16, 2018 at Doctors Memorial Hospital in Bonifay, Florida. She was born March 17, 1949 in Middletown, New York to the late Albert and Mary Mydosh. Mrs. Williams is survived by one son, John Williams Jr. and wife Connie of Vernon, FL; two daughters, Cindy Marker and husband Jeff of Panama City, FL and Brittney Williams of Vernon, FL; four brothers, Frank Mydosh and wife Joyce, Albert Mydosh, George Mydosh and wife Lori and Tommy Mydosh and wife Tammy all of Otisville, NY; two sisters, Mary Mydosh of Vernon, FL and Helen Ryan of Otisville, NY; four grandchildren, three great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.PATRICIA A. WILLIAMSWilliam Lee Williams Sr., age 47, of Bonifay, Florida died May 5, 2018. A memorial service was held Wednesday, May 16, 2018. Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.WILLIAM L. WILLIAMS SR.Jennie Belle Zornes, 88, of Bonifay,died Saturday, May 12, 2018. Memorialization was by cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.JENNIE B. ZORNES By Diane M. RobinsonThe News | @HCTA_Diane Drobinson@chipleypaper.comGRACEVILLE The Baptist College of Florida recently dedicated a new building in honor of the college's President and his wife, Thomas and Ruthann Kinchen for their 29 years of service to the school.The new facil-ity donated by the Board of Trustees cost just over $1,000,000 to construct thesite that is to be used as the teacher education building. Teacher offices, a conference room and lecture rooms are housed inside.Built in the style of an 1870's school house, Kinchen says it to remind students of their heritage and where they came from.BCF dedicates new building[DIANE M. ROBINSON | THE NEWS] If you would like to include an event in this list, email information to: news@chipleypaper.com Red Hill to host Fourth Friday Mission SupperBONIFAY … Red Hill United Methodist Church will host a Fourth Friday Mission Supper at 5 p.m. Friday, May 25. The menu will be fried catfish fillets, smoked chicken, cheese grits, baked beans, cole-slaw, hushpuppies and dessert. All proceeds go to local missions. For more information call Linda Yarbrough at 334-684-3106, after 6 p.m. WCSO and JCSO to host a Faith in Recovery eventBONIFAY … The Holmes County Sher-iffs Office, Washington County Sheriffs Office, Jackson County Sheriffs Office and the Florida Department of Children and Families will host a Faith in Recovery Event from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, June 28 at the Holmes County Agriculture Center. The key note speaker will be Sean Wyman, a Tallahassee Police Officer, trauma informed care speaker and a best sell-ing author. Special guest will be Rafe Lamb, youth pastor at Grace Fellowship Christian Church and Jennifer Williams a peer specialist with the Department of Children Families Northwest Region. This event is an opportunity for the faith community and professional community to unite and create a unified message and mission to share within the recov-ery communities served and to empower youth. There will be a meal provided door prize and networking. For more information call Missy Lee at 850-251-7350.FAITH EVENTSMore Content NowWEEK IN RELIGIONA recent college grad-uate won her battle to mention Jesus and the Bible in her graduation speech last week. Colorado Mesa Uni-versity student Karissa Erickson was initially told by the university that "speeches should be free of any one religious slant." But thanks to a letter sent to the university by the Alliance Defending Freedom to appeal the rule prohibiting religious content in schoolrelated speeches, Erickson was allowed to give her speech on May 11. Despite the school allowing Erickson to give her speech, some university officials said she could face "reper-cussions" by leaving the references to Jesus and the Bible in her speech.University graduate allowed to mention Jesus, Bible in commencement speech

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** B6 Wednesday, May 23, 2018 | Holmes County Times-AdvertiserBerean Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1438 Nearing Hills Drive in Chipley. Blue Lake Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 1405 Blue Lake Road in Chipley. Chipley First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship Service is at 9 a.m. Contemporary Worship Service is at 10:30 a.m. Discipleship Training is at 5 p.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday AWANA is at 5:15 p.m. Wednesday, Prayer Meeting Is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1300 South Boulevard Country Oaks Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 574 Buckhorn Boulevard Eastside Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at Highway 277 in Vernon. First Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1387 South Boulevard. Gap Pond Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 1980 Gap Boulevard in Sunny Hills. Grace Baptist Chapel Mission Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:50 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 440 Lot E Second Street, Chipley. Holmes Creek Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service AWANA is at 5:30 p.m. and Bible Study is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 335 Cope Road in Chipley. Holyneck Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located 3395 Cemetery Lane, Campbellton. Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 614 Bennett Drive in Chipley. Mt. Ararat Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1233 Old Bonifay Road in Chipley. New Orange Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located on Alford Road in Washington County. New Prospect Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship services are at 11 a.m. Sunday evening services are at 5 p.m. Wednesday services supper is at 5 p.m. Wednesday prayer meeting, bible study and childrens classes start at 5:45. The church is located at 761 New Prospect Road in Chipley. Oakie Ridge Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Orange Hill Road and Gilberts Mill Road. Orange Hill Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday prayer and Bible Study is as 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3485 Gainer Road in Chipley. Orange Hill Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship on the “ rst and third Sunday of the month is at 11 a.m. Wednesday night prayer meeting is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 816 Sunday Road in Chipley. Piney Grove Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1783 Piney Grove Road south of Chipley. Pleasant Hill Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located south of Bonifay at 1900 Pleasant Hill Road. Poplar Springs Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1098 Lovewood Road two miles east of Highway 77. Poplar Head Independent Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located on Poplar Head Road. Sand Hills Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 6758 Hig hway 77. Shiloh Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 5:45 p.m. The church is located on Hig hway 277, three miles south of Hig hway 90 in Chipley. Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:15 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 3013 Moss Hill Road in Vernon. St. John Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. St. Matthews Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 4156 St. Matthews Road in Caryville. Salem Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Worship service is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Church is located at 2555 Kynesville Highway in Alford. Sunny Hills First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Unity Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3274 River Road in Vernon. Vernon First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2888 Church Street in Vernon. Wausau First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 3493 Washington Street in Wausau.CATHOLICSt. Joseph The Worker Catholic Church Sunday Mass is at 11 a.m. Tuesday Mass is at 9 a.m. The church is located at 1664 Main Street in Chipley. St. Theresa Catholic Church Sunday Mass is at 9 a.m. Monday through Friday Mass is at 8 a.m. Saturday Mass is at 5 p.m. Adoration is the “ rst Friday after 8 a.m. Mass. The church is located at 2071 Sunny Hills Blvd and the Rectory is located at 2056 Sunny Hills Boulevard in Sunny Hills.CHURCH OF CHRISTChipley Church of Christ Sunday morning bible study is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1295 Brickyard Road in Chipley. Spirit-Filled Church of God in Christ Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Tuesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2128 Pate Pond Road in Caryville. Episcopal Grant Tabernacle AME Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 577 Martin Luther King Boulevard in Chipley. St. John AME Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. St. Joseph AME Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1401 Monroe Shef“ eld Road, Chipley. St. Luke African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME) Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located on Jackson Community Road. St. Mary African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME) Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 1035 St. Mary Road, in Caryville. St. Matthews Episcopal Church Morning worship is at 9 a.m. The church is located on Highway 90 west in Chipley. Evangelistic Vernon Evangelistic Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Highway 79 in Vernon. Caryville Evangelistic Center Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Wrights Creek Road in Caryville, just north of Highway 90.HOLINESSHarris Chapel Holiness Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located eight miles north of Caryville on Highway 179. Johnson Temple First Born Holiness Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. Friday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 793 Orange Street, Chipley. Miracle Valley Spirit of Holiness Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located 3754 Bunyon Drive, off Hig hway 77 near Sunny Hills.METHODISTChipley First United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 9:50 a.m. Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. (contemporary service) and 11 a.m. (traditional service). The church is located at 1285 Jackson Avenue East Mount Zion United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday fellowship meal and Bible study is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1590 Highway 173 in Graceville. Lakeview United Methodist Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. Thursday morning Bible Study 9 a.m. The church is located on Highway 279 near Five Points. New Hope United Methodist Church Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study is at 10 a.m. The church is located at on Highway 79 in New Hope. New Vision United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday night supper is at 5:45. Wednesday Bible Study is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Highway 77 and BlockerChurch Road in Greenhead. Orange Hill United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located on Sunday Road just off Orange Hill Road. Vernon United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wausau United Methodist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located on State Road 77PENTECOSTALFirst United Pentecostal Church Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1816 Highway 90 in Chipley. Wausau Pentecostal Holiness Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is located at 2201 Pioneer Road in Wausau. Rock Hill Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Friday Night Worship is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 339 Rockhill Church Road in Chipley. Trinity Pentecostal Tabernacle Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Turnin Point Home of the First United Pentecostal Church Sunday School is at 1 p.m. Worship Service is at 2 p.m. Bible Study Thursday is at 7 p.m. Presbyterian Chipley First Presbyterian Church Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday, night sing-along is at 6 p.m. The church is located at Fifth Street and Watts Avenue Sunny Hills Presbyterian Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. Sunday School is at 10:30 a.m. The church is located at 3768 Country Club Boulevard Other Bonnett Pond Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 2680 Bonnett Pond Road in Chipley. Christian Fellowship Center Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1458 Monroe Shef“ eld Road in Chipley. Christian Haven Sunday school is h at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. Church of God by Faith Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:45 a.m. Tuesday service is at 7:30 p.m. The church is located at 3012 Church Street. Church of God of Prophecy Morning Worship is at 9:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1386 W. Jackson Avenue in Chipley. Courts of Praise Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 1720 Clayton Road in Chipley. Cypress Creek Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at1772 Macedonia Road. Faith Covenant Fellowship Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located on Hig hway 277 mile south of I-10. Family Worship Center Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located 531 Rock Hill Church Road, Chipley. Graceville Community Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 1005 E. Prim Avenue Grahams Chapel Morning worship at 11 a.m. Tuesday Bible Study at 7 p.m. The chapel is located ate 1218 Campbellton Avenue in Chipley. Hard Labor Creek Community Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 1705 Pioneer Road three miles east of caution light. Holmes Valley Community Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located at 3550Fannig Branch Road in Vernon. House of Prayer Worship Center Sunday School and Children's Church is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Youth activities on Wednesday begin at 4:30 p.m. Praise and worship services are at 6:30 p.m. on Friday. The church is located at 763 West Boulevard in Chipley. Impact Worship Center Sunday. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Thursday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3006 New Hope Road Marianna. Liberty Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 3983 Creek Road in Vernon. McQueens Temple First Born Church of Living God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 5681 Highway 79 South, Vernon. New Faith Temple Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is located at 841 Orange Hill Road. New Foundation Fellowship Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located on Rock Hill Church Road. Northwest Florida Christian Church Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. The church is located at 4465 Highway 77. Rhema Praise and Worship Center Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Thursday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located 763 West Boulevard in Chipley. Sunny Hills Chapel Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located at 4283 Highway 77. Pleasant Grove Church Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. The church is located at 2430 Shakey Joe Road in the Hinsons Crossroads Community. Tabernacle of Praise Church of God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is located on Highway 77 South. The Living Word Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is located at the corner of Highway 77 and Blocker Road in Greenhead. White Double Pond Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is located on Creek Road in Vernon. Yes Lord Deliverance COGIC Sunday School is at 10:30 a.m. Worship is at noon. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is located at 739 Seventh Street in Chipley. CHURCHFrom Page B4

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Wednesday, May 23, 2018 B7 QUIT SMOKINGFIND HELP ONLINEMore than 12 million U.S. adults „ a third of all smokers „ turn to the internet for help quitting each year, according to a new Truth Initiative study. Published in Nicotine & Tobacco Research, the study found that the number of smokers who searched online for information on quitting tobacco more than doubled over the past 12 years, from 16.5 percent in 2005 to 35.9 percent in 2017. BecomeAnEX. org, a digital quitsmoking program developed by Truth Initiative in collaboration with Mayo Clinic, demonstrates the e ectiveness of online programs „ research shows that following the EX program quadruples a smokers chance of quitting. ENVIRONMENTIMPROVE INDOOR AIR QUALITYAloe vera is a plant that will love you back in more ways than one. Its a great sunburn remedy, and in your home it puri es the air. Aloe vera monitors air quality by displaying brown spots if something isnt quite right. MS TREATMENTADDRESS DISEASE EARLY ONMany people with multiple sclerosis have delayed using MS drugs for as long as possible, but according to Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, new ndings show it may be better for patients to take drugs early on in order to ght the disease. „ Brandpoint HEALTH By JoAnne Viviano More Content NowKristy Whaley was grieving. Her 25-year-old son, Kyle, had been struggling for years to fight the grip that opioids had on his life. Whaley was mourning the loss of the dreams and hopes she had held for her son. The pain led the Westerville, Ohio, woman to a grief recovery program, where she found support from others and learned techniques to manage the loss. She finished the program on Aug. 31. Sixteen days later, Kyle died of a drug overdose. Since then, Whaley, 49, has turned to those grief-recovery tools to help cope with the devastation. I dont buy into the notion that Kyle died before his time,Ž she told people gathered at his funeral. Our stories and journeys are written before we are born, and this was Kyles journey.Ž Lois Hall taught the Grief Recovery Method course that Whaley attended. She has seen more and more people coming to the courses after being affected by the opioid crisis. A public health issue But grief recovery isnt just for coping with the death of loved ones, she said. It can help after any loss, including divorce or retirement, the deployment or incarceration of a loved one or the diagnosis of a serious illness. One hundred percent of us are grievers, and nothing is being done to address this,Ž said Hall, who was certified in the Grief Recovery Method by the Oregon-based Grief Recovery Institute in 1998. The whole community needs to be involved in teaching people tools to get hope back in their lives.Ž People living with unresolved grief, Hall said, might turn to unhealthy habits that can lead to premature deaths „ smoking, overeating, gambling, violence and, increasingly, drugs. As such, she contends that addressing grief „ essentially building resiliency and hope „ is a growing public health issue as the overdose death count continues to rise. Hall references a report issued in November by the Trust for Americas Health, a Washington, D.C.based health policy group. Its authors refer to fatalities caused by drugs, alcohol and suicide as deaths of desperation,Ž with 1 million from 2006 to 2015, and an expected 1.6 million more from 2016 to 2025. Hall, former executive director of the Ohio Public Health Association, also points to the Franklin County Public Health Department, where the concept of hope provides a framework for a Community Health Improvement Plan expected to be released soon. The department also has submitted a proposal to the philanthropic Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to fund a project that would seek to determine whether certain communication and empathy skills and strategies will increase community resiliency in the face of natural disasters or ongoing stress. Post-traumatic growth Resiliency can also be referred to as post-traumatic growth, said Ken Yeager, clinical director of the Stress, Trauma and Resilience Program at Ohio State Universitys Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio. While some people might be paralyzed by a loss such as a job layoff, others will look at it as an opportunity for positive change. Connecting people with their coping mechanisms and helping them put together action plans is possible, Yeager said. But implementing that in the public health arena will take the creation of a network that connects people in crisis to those who can help them work through it. Sarah Barnett of Mount Sterling, Ohio, attended a grief-recovery course after the December 2016 overdose death of her longtime partner, 33-year-old Joe Kuhn. He was the father of her three children, now ages 6, 5 and 3. She is now raising the children on her own. Hall said the program transformed Barnett from a woman who was broken to one who has plans to foster change in her community. Barnett, 30, was so struck by the griefrecovery courses that she became certified as a Grief Recovery Method facilitator. I knew how much it helped me and I knew how much Ive been through,Ž she said. Whaley, as part of her grief journey, turned to Facebook to connect with groups of parents who also had lost children. Shes working to create awareness about the opioid epidemic and to get a sober home opened. Shes also part of a group of addicts parents who put together blessing bagsŽ of toiletries for people who are homeless or entering rehab.Resiliency, hope key to overcoming loss of all kindsWhat is complicated grief?According to Psychology Today, when acute grief gains a foothold and becomes a chronic, debilitating mental health condition that worsens over time, rather than gets better, it becomes complicated grief. An estimated 12-15 percent of bereaved people develop this condition. € Find out if you may suffer from complicated grief via this questionnaire: https://complicatedgrief.columbia.edu/ for-the-public/resources/ € Find a grief support specialist via https://www.griefrecoverymethod.com/grief-support-groups/Dealing with griefSarah Barnett stands by the memorial she created in her garden to honor her partner Joseph Kuhn, who died of a drug overdose in December 2016. [TOM DODGE/DISPATCH]

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B B 8 8 Wednesday, May 23, 2018 | Holmes County Times Advertiser NF-5036304 NF-5031562 Hazardous Aerial Tree Removal  Stump Grinding Trimming & Pruning  Emergency Tree Service  Lot Clean UpDow Morris,Owner/Operator 850-527-6291  850-849-3825 Readers’ Choice2017WASHINGTON HOLMES JACKSON (850) 638-3611 HastyHeating & Cooling NF-5028471 ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE OR BUSINESS FOR AS LITTLE AS $10 A WEEK!Reach thousands of potential customers with your Business Guide ad in the:WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS HOLMES COUNTY-TIMES ADVERTISER WEEKLY ADVERTISER CALL TODAY! 850-638-0212 NF-5036305 NF-5031560 C & CBookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available SANDWICHES SALADS SOUPSandwich Platters Available Call to order!Check our Daily special!Open Mon day Saturday 10-8 Sunday 11-3 1370-A N. Railroad Ave. | Chipley, FL850-676-4163 SlicedDeliChipley NF-5032762 TOWN OF CARYVILLEThe Town of Caryville has an immediate opening for a part-time maintenance worker. Primary responsibilities will include, but are not limited to: assisting with the garbage truck route, mowing grass along the roadways, maintaining the parks, and assisting with general maintenance. Requirements – Valid Driver’s License; ability to lift 50 lbs.; ability to operate zero-turn riding lawn mower, tractor, chain saw, and weed eater; ability to work in inclement weather and after regular hours; experience in general maintenance a plus. Salary : $10.00 per hour Hours: approx. 24 per week Applications are available at the Caryville Town Hall, 4436 Old Spanish Trail, Caryville, FL 32427. Applications are due into the Town Hall by Wed., June 6, 2018. If you have any questions, please contact the Town Clerk at 850 548 5571 or townofcaryville@gmail.com The Town of Caryville is an EOE. 5-3537 NOTICE TO BIDDERS BOX HANGARS AND ACCESS TAXIWAY at TRI-COUNTY AIRPORT BONIFAY, FLORIDA Notice is hereby given that the Tri-County Airport Authority will receive sealed bids at the Tri-County Airport, 1983 Tri-County Airport Road, Bonifay, Florida 32425 (850-547-6519) until 2:00 pm local time on Friday, June 12, 2018 for the Box Hangars and Access Taxiway project at Tri-County Airport, Bonifay, Florida. Bids must be submitted in a sealed enveloped clearly marked “BID ENCLOSED: BOX HANGARS AND ACCESS TAXIWAY; TRI-COUNTY AIRPORT.” Bids will be opened at the Tri-County Airport in the Airport Terminal Building on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 at 2:00 pm CT. Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. The project consists of providing all labor, materials, machinery, tools, equipment and other means of construction necessary and incidental to the completion of the work shown on the plans and described in these specifications including, but not necessarily limited to the following: Construction of a new asphalt access taxiway with edge lights and up to five new aircraft box hangars. The work shall include grading and drainage improvements, asphalt paving, metal building, taxiway edge lighting, and related improvements. Beginning on Wednesday, May 16, 2018 drawings, specifications, and project documents may be examined by appointment at the Airport Terminal Building of the Tri-County Airport at 1983 Tri-County Airport Road, Bonifay, Florida 32425. Appointments may be made by calling 850-547-6519. Digital copies of the above documents may be obtained from the offices of AVCON, INC., 320 Bayshore Drive, Suite A, Niceville, Florida, 32578, (850) 678-0050, upon payment of a non-refundable fee of thirty dollars ($30.00) payable to AVCON, INC. for each set of project documents obtained. Printed copies may be provided at an additional charge. Funding for this project is being provided by the Federal Aviation Administration and the Florida Department of Transportation and will be subject to all applicable requirements of the Federal Aviation Administration and U.S. Department of Transportation grant assurances. The Tri-County Airport Authority has a Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program for Airport Improvement Program projects which the successful contract must comply with. The DBE participation goal for this project is 10.0% and compliance requirements are listed in the project documents. A non-mandatory Pre Bid Conference will be conducted at the Terminal Building of the Tri-County Airport at 1983 Tri-County Airport Road, Bonifay, Florida 32425 on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 at 9:30 a.m. local time (EDT). Questions relating to the Project Documents will be answered at that time. Attendance by prospective prime contractors is strongly recommended. OWNER’S CONTACT: Robert Baker Airport Manager Tri-County Airport Authority 1983 Tri-County Airport Road Bonifay, Florida 32425 Tel: 850-547-6519 Cell: 623-694-1730 ENGINEER’S CONTACT: John Collins, P.E. Project Manager AVCON, INC. 320 Bayshore Drive, Suite “A” Niceville, Florida 32578 Tel: 850-678-0050 All bids should be addressed as follows: BID ENCLOSED: BOX HANGARS AND ACCESS TAXIWAY-TRI-COUNTY AIRPORT Tri-County Airport Authority Airport Terminal 1983 Tri-County Airport Road Bonifay, Florida 32425 May 16, 23, 2018 5-3564 Cellco Partnership and its controlled affiliates doing business as Verizon Wireless (Verizon Wireless) proposes to build a 255-foot Self-Support Communications Tower at the approx. vicinity of 1464 Line Road, Ponce De Leon, Holmes County, FL 32455. Public comments regarding potential effects from this site on historic properties may be submitted within 30 days from the date of this publication to: Trileaf Corp, Jackson Reagan, j.reagan@trileaf.com, 1051 Winderley Place, Suite 201, Maitland, FL 32751, 407-660-7840. May 23, 2018 5-3568 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 18000054CAAXMX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. JOSHUA L. GREENE; KAYLA C. GREENE A/K/A KAYLA GREENE; HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): JOSHUA L. GREENE 2231 HWY 177A BONIFAY, FLORIDA 32425 KAYLA C. GREENE A/K/A KAYLA GREENE 2231 HWY 177A BONIFAY, FLORIDA 32425 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: COMMENCE AT THE NW CORNER OF THE NE 1/4 OF SW 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4, SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, AND RUN N 88 33’ E ALONG THE FORTY LINE A DISTANCE OF 200 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE S 1 27’ E 443.20 FEET TO THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO 177A; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID LINE 360 FEET; THENCE N 1 27’ W 652.17 FEET TO THE FORTY LINE, THENCE S 88 33’ W 293.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LYING AND BEING A PART OF THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND THAT PART OF THE SW 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4, SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NW CORNER OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4, SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, THENCE N 88 33’ E 493.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE N 88 33’ 00” E 64.82 FEET, THENCE S 01 27’ 00” E 691.05 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF STATE ROAD 177A SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A DELTA OF 01 2’ 22” AND A RADIUS OF 3239.17 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY AN ARC DISTANCE OF 75.72 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY RUN N 01 027’ W 651.90 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LYING AND BEING IN HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 2231 HWY 177A, BONIFAY, FLORIDA 32425 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Kahane & Associates, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 8201 Peters Road, Suite 3000, Plantation, FLORIDA 33324 on or before a date which is within File No.: 18-00029 JPC thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the HOLMES COUNTY TIMES and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This Notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this day 11 of May, 2018. KYLE HUDSON As Clerk of the Court By Jennifer Maples As Deputy Clerk Publish: (Please publish in HOLMES COUNTY TIMES) Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486 Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com May 23 and May 30, 2018 5-3570 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 2015-CA-000192 REGIONS BANK, Plaintiff, v. LINDA K. FLEMING, deceased, PHILIP T. FLEMING a/k/a Philip T. Fleming, Jr., deceased,UNKNOWN SPOUSE, if any, of Linda K. Fleming, TENANT #1 and TENANT #2, representing tenants in possession, UNKNOWN HEIRS and UNKNOWN PARTIES, of Linda K. Fleming, deceased, and Philip T. Fleming a/k/a Philip T. Fleming, Jr., deceased, including if defendants are deceased, any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against that defendant, and the several and respective unknown assigns, successors in interest, trustees or other persons claiming by, through, under or against any corporation or other legal entity named as a defendant and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above-named or described defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Judgment and Order on Report and Recommendation on Plaintiff’s Verified Motion for Summary Judgment, entered in the above-styled cause on May 16, 2018, in the Circuit Court of Holmes County, Florida, the Clerk of Holmes County will sell the property situated in Holmes County, Florida, described as: Description of Mortgaged Property Commence at the Northeast corner of Section 16, Township 5 North, Range 17 West, and run West 1,109.20 feet along the centerline of a county graded road; thence South 25.00 feet to an iron rod and the Point of Beginning; thence continue South 210.00 feet to an iron rod; thence West 210.00 feet to an iron rod; thence North 210.00 feet to an iron rod; thence East 210.00 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 1.0 acres more or less, Holmes County, Florida. The street address of which is 1578 Hudson Road, Westville, Florida 32464. at a Public Sale, the Clerk shall sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder, for cash, except as set for the hereinafter, on June 21, 2018, at 11:00 a.m. (Central Time), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, at the front door of the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425, in accordance with Chapter 45, section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner, as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: May 21, 2018. Kyle Hudson Clerk of the Circuit Court Holmes County, Florida By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk In accordance with the American Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 or email ADARequest@jud14.flc ourts.org. May 23, 30, 2018 5-3571 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statues NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of STC located at 2280 Boswell Road, in the county of Holmes, in the City of Bonifay, Florida 32425 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Bonifay, Florida, this 21 day of May, 2018. Michael Stevenson May 23, 2018 5-3567 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 30-2018-CA-000023 DIVISION: PINGORA LOAN SERVICING, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES A. RILEY, JR., et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 8, 2018, and entered in Case No. 30-2018-CA-000023 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Florida in which Pingora Loan Servicing, LLC, is the Plaintiff and James A. Riley, Jr., Kristan Riley, Unknown Party#1 N/K/A Rebecca Godbold, are defendants, the Holmes County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on at the front door of the Holmes County Courthouse, Holmes County, Florida at 11:00am on the 19 day of July, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOTS 7, 8 AND 9 IN BLOCK 134, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT OF THE MAP OF BONIFAY DRAWN BY G.W. BANFILL, A COPY OF WHICH IS UPON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID PREMISES BEING A PART OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST. A/K/A 205 E WISCONSIN AVE, BONIFAY, FL 32425 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Holmes County, Florida this 9 day of May, 2018. Kyle Hudson Clerk of the Circuit Court Holmes County, Florida By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 facsimile eService: servealaw@albertellila w.com CN -17-027873 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. The above is to be published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser 112 E. Virginia Avenue, Bonifay, FL 32425 May 23, 30, 2018 5-3572 Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statues NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Kiersten Srevenson Photography located at 2280 Boswell Road, in the county of Holmes, in the City of Bonifay, Florida 32425 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Bonifay, Florida, this 21 day of May, 2018. Kiersten Stevenson May 23, 2018 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 Apartment For Rent In Bonifay for retirees. $450 a month includes cable and water. With private entrance, living room, free cable and free water. Contact 850-547-5244. For more information. For Rent 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments in Vernon. Clean, stove, refrigerator, central heat/air, convenient to Panama City Beach, section 8, Rental assistance. 850-638-4640 For Rent One Bedroom apartments for rent in Chipley. Convenient location. Stove and refrigerator furnished. No Pets. Smoke free environment. Call 850-638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. Rooms For Rent By Week.Comfortable rooms with microwave & refrigerator. All utilities paid. Cable and internet. Pet friendly at extra charge. Economy Lodge, Bonifay. 850-547-4167. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/ sewage/ lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 Bonifay, 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from school on Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $600 rent/$600 deposit. 850-547-3746. For Sale Two acre plot and one acre plot in Jacob City, FL. Call 850-849-9338. Highway 77 2 miles south of Chipley 4-8 acre tract Bedie Road. Call Milton Peel at 850-638-1858 or 326-9109 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds!

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** C2 Wednesday, May 23, 2018 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Washington County NewsClass Colors: Black and Gold Class Flower: White Rose Class Song: Laughed Until We Cried: Jason Aldean Graduation: 7 p.m. Friday, May 25, 2018 in the Bethlehem High School Gymnasium Baccalaureate: 3p.m. Sunday, May 20, 2018 at Carmel ChurchBETHLEHEM HIGH SCHOOL CHIPLEY HIGH SCHOOL Class Motto: Learn from yesterday, live for today, dream for tomorrow. Class Motto: Never, never, never, never quit.Ž Winston Churchill Jessie Marie Barnes Mikayla Sharilyn Morgan Christopher Gavin Bland James Jeremiah Paul William Clayton Boyett Grady Willard Peacock Roman Brasher Brown Zachary Charles Phillips Alecsander Jacob Daniels Kross Jackson Smith Tilman James Calhoun Trevor Michael Samuels Joshua Michael Duke William Blake Smith Sherman Shane Champion James Martin Shortnacy Leon Howard Eldridge Abagail Alissa Watford Daniel Allen Covell Jonathan Daniel Skinner Ryan Allen Eldridge James Michael Zauner Katelyn Nicole Elrod Jeremiah Colby French Parker James Gentry Kobe Lane Hendrix Daya Destiny Jackson Christian Aubrey Knight Keegan Gabriel Justice Dillon Coy Lee Taylor Paige Killingsworth Hunter Gage Lowe Dallas Jamison Kirkland Jaycelyn Alexandra Merchant Macy Rae Miller Dylan Adams Tucker Alderman Travis Baxley Khushi Bhakta Dominic Bouton Hudson Black Pacey Boyett Eryn Boname Breanna Brackin Phillip Bridges Sierra Brock Alexandria Brown Dustin Brown Joshua Bruner McKayla Christmas Ashley Bunting Gauge Carter Nathan Collins Lila Chan Kaci Compton Addie Cook Mason Cook Andrew Cope Chandler Corbin Christopher Cota Jordan Crum Evan Creamer Christian Davis Veronica Creech Austin Dixon Joseph Crook Kayla Drummond Austin Duvall Kaitlyn Elkins Tony Futch Alfonso Galvan Cheyenne Gass William Gravely Brooklynn Hayes Jamie Hunter Marshall Kneiss Dawner Lopez Lindsay Gatlin NaToya Guilford Katie Hinote Kyndal Jackson Will Kolmetz Aleya Louderback Parker Gatlin Snyzianna Guster Tinsley Hodges Dakota James Joseph Kuechler Cierra Mayo Jeremiah Gravely Shelby Hanshaw Kahliya Hooks Tatiana Jones Hannah Laursen Selena Gutiezzez Jameila Hogan Andrew Jeffries Hailey Land Malcom Mayo Brian Hall Kaylee Jeffries Eric Lanplay Madison McGhee Graduation: 8 p.m. Thursday, May 24, 2018 at Philip Rountree Stadium at Memorial Field Baccalaureate: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 23, 2018 at Shiloh Baptist Church Class Colors: Queen's Royal Azure (Deep Royal Blue) and Sun” ower Yellow Flower: Sun” ower Song: We Are All in This Together (High School Musical 1) written by Matthew Gerrard and Robbie Nevil Joseph Meredith Ariann Neighoff Anna Ortiz Levi Paige

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Washington County News | Wednesday, May 23, 2018 C3COTTONDALE HIGH SCHOOL Class Motto: And now go, and make interesting mistakes, make amazing mistakes, make glorious and fantastic mistakes. Break rules. Leave the world more interesting for your being here.ŽNeil Gaiman Andrea Please Gabriela AguillonTovar Caleb Sloan Taylor Corbin Joshua Glass Brian Williams Dylan Williams Haylee Williams Frantavious Woods ENaj Reed Tanner Andress Jessica Sly Alyssa Cowart Lila Taylor Dante Glover Collin Williams Dylan Williams Angela Willis Travis Williams Destiny Worley Jeremy Worley Jamison York Cody Register Grayson Ball Emilie Smith Haley Curry Mackenzie Thompson Tiyana Gray Amari Banks Mackenzie Smith Kyle Cutchins Katelynn Thorpe Summer Hayes Gabrielle Patterson Jacob Seaborn Xavier Brown Heather Stephens Andy Figueroa Autumn Wells Justin Jackson Kimberly Reyes Whit Brooks Taquwan Sorey Levi Davis Caroline Wall Shawn Hill Megan Patterson Jack Shelley Clinton Bryant Charles Stevens Aaron Gates Chase Western Bailey Johnson Nicole Reyes Christopher Brown Richard Spencer Logan Deese Hunter Walsingham Fashan Hudson Wyatt Patterson Skylar Shipes Dylan Cassatt Jaqueline Stewart Jantzen Gates Dylan White Meagan Justice Rishi Patel Skylar Ritcher Tyric Brown Baylee Steele Brittany Dominguez Briton Watson Luther Hudson Haylee Patton William Shiver Christopher Corbin Anastasia Stoker Nikkie Gibson Jacob Whitehead Kyle Kelley Yumyiah Patton Jordyn Corbin Kyndal Syfrett Terrisina Gibson Dallas Wilkinson Malik Khadir Graduation: 8 p.m. Tuesday, May 22, 2018 at the Cottondale High School Football Field Baccalaureate: 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 16, 2018 at First Assembly in Cottondale Class colors: Blue and Silver Flower: Blue Iris Song: Five More MinutesŽ by Scotty McCreeryChipley High School Continued from Page C2

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** C4 Wednesday, May 23, 2018 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Washington County NewsAustin Livingston Justin Addison Caleb Reed Korbin Haller James White Timothy Lockhart Jared Beechum Cydney Rivera Mylasha Henderson Jephri White Vincent Manzella Denzeal Brown Colby Roland Tyler Jones Raven Williams Angel Martinez Kaiyla Broxton Tyler Sallas Jeneva Jordan Gracie Zick Caitlyn Parker Matthias Davis Leighann Springer Javon Lawson Maryann Mills Thomas Broxton Andrea Sampson Chayil Kelly Jeffery Price Clark Dohrenwend Mykenzi Straw Cameron McClain Daisha Moore Justin Carter Khalil Shackelford Caroline King William Price Chris Gilbert Joshua Tindall Conner McQueen Holly Morris Kimberly Cato Bethany Sistrunk Justin Kirkland Tanya Prieto Nekayla Gillette Amber Vickery Fredrico Nettles Troi Prieto JaDarius Gray Brandon Watson Alexis Parks GRACE AND GLORY CHRISTIAN SCHOOL GRACEVILLE HIGH SCHOOL Class Verse: Jeremiah 29:11: For I know the plans I have for youŽ declares the Lord, plans to prosper you and not to harm you plans to give you hope and a future. Class Motto: Life is a picture, paint it wellŽ Class Color: Orange Class Flower: Sun” ower Class Song: Dont Stop Believing Graduation Information Date: May 22, 2018 Time: 6 p.m. Location: Grace and Glory Worship Center Kaylie Renee Cobble Ty Daniel Dorsey Graduation: 6 p.m. Tuesday, May 22, 2018 at Graceville High School Football Field Baccalaureate: 6 p.m. Sunday, May 20, 2018 at Baptist College of Florida Chapel Class Colors: Orange, Black and White Class Song: Rise UpŽ by Andra Day Class Flower: Gold Dipped White RoseCottondale High School Continued from Page C3

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** Darren Perry Zayla Ard Brittany Cade Ashley Furlong Lyndsey Hartzog Paige Lumpkin Bethany Miller Maura Watford Ashley Pippin Darian Aronhalt Taylor Carroll Kevin Gardner Stormi Hight Esmear Major Katelynn Mims Maleek Watson Juliana Rezek Adrianna Bass James Carter Bradley Gary Hayley Holman Joshua Mancill Kendall Mitchell Foster Wertenberger Satin Salaam Colton Bassett Suzanna Carter Austin Gibson Shauni Hooper Kevin Martinez Claudia Monk Samuel Wesley Leanndra Swain Christopher Brooks Hunter Duffell Caleb Gunnels Kodie King Sierra Miles Hannah Neitsch Joshua Yates Mary Beth Sasser Brooke Birge Taylor Chestnut William Gould Shawn Hull Kye Maty Hunter Moran Donovan White Breanna Tiller Maison Brown Christopher En“ nger Carly Harless Ean Kirkland Julian Severson Jessica Bomann Makenzy Cooey Cameron Grif“ n Kaitlin Jordan Justin Melancon Jacob Murley Lakresha Wilson Antonio Villeda William Brunk Megan Erickson Jasmine Harris Korlena Lashley Lauryn Smith Alexis Bradley Caleb Cooley Rosa Guerrero Destiny Justice Zachary Messer Jacob Music Tayala Wilson Mike Walker Tori Burk Alaina French Cameron Harrison Rory Long Suzanne Ward Davis Bush Nina Fuller Laura Hartzog Tyler Losee HOLMES COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL Class Motto: A persons true character is not necessarily de“ ned by how much they are admired, but their ability to stand up in the face of adversity. … John Cena Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Washington County News | Wednesday, May 23, 2018 C5Graduation: 7:30 p.m. Monday, May 21, 2018 at Memorial Field Baccalaureate: 6 p.m. Sunday, May 20, 2018 at First Baptist Church of Bonifay Class Colors: Navy Blue and Vegas Gold Class Song: My Wish by Rascal Flatts Class Flower: Sun” ower Not Pictured Linsey Parmer Ana Powell Jeri Bryant Brianna ValdezGraceville High School Continued from Page C4

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** C6 Wednesday, May 23, 2018 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Washington County NewsSierra Newton Sydney Shugars Kelby Ammons Christopher Hudson Mahaley Owen Jonathan Pridgen James Westbrook Alexander Parson Samantha Slay Darah Blackwelder Melanie JohnsonBarber Johnathan Ponds Jennifer Raley Katie Wilcox Savannah Pate Nikea Smith Savannah Burgess Noah Kumpe Madison Powell Kassidy Raley Dessa Williams Michael Paul Victoria Smith Devyn Butorac Emily Lawson John Powers Sidney Revels Tyfany Williams Victoria Pike Elijah Thompson Mohamed El-Sankary Justin Messer Colton Short Taylor Sasnett Austin Pauley Halie Steverson Jade Covington Dylan Mayberry James Reeves Rebecca Roberts Summer Pippin Sabrina Tillis Zachary Flick Trinity Miller Bryson Slay Randi Sellers Isaac Perez Martina Steverson Allyson Dady Gracie McLean Amanda Rushing Carlisha Robertson Hailee Powell Cynthia Vallejos Brooke George Marissa Moran Charlenna Stephens Juwan Shack Michael Perkins Colin Strickland Chase Edwards Ashley Meeks Shelby Sewell Rodlisha Robertson Jackie Powell Makayla Wells Olivia Hall Joshua Moulton Montana CarsonTurner Akacea Weavers Emily Shelby Raymond Powell Perry Wells Ronnie Hall Aubrey Niles James Waddell Taylor West MaCayla Sherrouse Graduation: 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 22, 2018, Ponce de Leon High School Gym Baccalaureate: 2 p.m. Sunday, May 20, 2018, in the Ponce de Leon High School Gym Class Song: N/A Class Flower: Red RosePONCE de LEON HIGH SCHOOL Class Motto: You will have failures in your life, but it is what you do during those valleys that will determine the heights o f your peaks.Ž Rahm Emanuel Holmes County High School Continued from Page C5

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Washington County News | Wednesday, May 23, 2018 C7Leanna Rose Bell Megan Allen Ruben ChavezCarmona Roy Foreman Alexys Holley Garrett Wayne Sillings William Tyler Lee Burger Callie Batey Jaden Clark Zoie Gainey Marisol Holley Bobby Jordan Smith Ansa Lynn Campbell Makenzie Bear Skylar Cobart Carlie Gilbert William Holley Tiffany Nicole Smith Joel Holland Ealum Frances Beasley Dylan Costales Kara Grippo McKenzie Hunter Tyler Lee Steverson Alexis Rae Hall Maylin Brock Dana Douglas Lucas Hanke Joshua Lunsford Kassyn Ann Williams Colton Bryce Gillespie Brittany Bell Olivia Cotton Kody Hagan Mathew Isenhoff Miranda Lynn Strickland Jonathan Andrew Jones Keellis Brown Crystal Dubose John Harcus Destiny McDonald Alexa Brooke Glasgow Zion Bell Halea Cushman Canaan Hall Jakob Jackson Robin Karlie Tate Cynthia Ann Marie Peters Kevin Burch Elizabeth Eastling Maia Harmon Iyana McDonald Joseph Christian Godwin Brett Brock Dycarrius Davis Trenton Hammack Teleah Jackson Matthew Alan Wake“ eld Avary Bryson Potts James Burnham Makayli Edwards Destiny Hennion Keyerra Mcgregory Stanley Swifteagle Sharpe Tanner Carter Jacob Fisher Anna Hogue Savannah Moore POPLAR SPRINGS HIGH SCHOOL VERNON HIGH SCHOOL Class Motto: God has planted greatness in you. Let today be the beginning of a great adventure as you step into the gifts Hes given you. … Joyce Meyer Class Motto: You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. Youre on your own. And you know what you know. You are the guy wholl decide where to go. „ Dr. Seuss Graduation: 7 p.m. Thursday, May 24, 2018 in the Poplar Springs High School Gymnasium Baccalaureate: 3 p.m. Sunday, May 20, 2018 at Bethel Baptist Church Class Song: Five More Minutes … Scotty McCreery Class Flower: daisy Baccalaureate: 4 p.m. Sunday, May 20, 2018 at Vernon High School Auditorium Graduation: 7 p.m. Friday, May 25, 2018 at the Football Field. Class Song: See You Again Charlie Puth Class Flower: White Rose Class Colors: Black & Silver

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** C8 Wednesday, May 23, 2018 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Washington County NewsSelena Murray Nicholas Smith Cameron Parks Riley Spittler Richard Parsons Dameion Stephens Jasmine Peterson Tailor Stricklen Shelby Redmon Dalton Webb Laquasha Peterson Megan Terry Christopher Robinson Joshua Webb Kyle Porter Janiqwa Underwood Antonio Rodriguez Racheal Wetherbee Trinitee Potter Clint Vaugh Kaylee Scott Brittany White Kayleb Shaw Michael Williams Eric Wright No matter how much the world changes, putting on a cap and gown and marching in formation to pick up your high school diploma is still a big deal. If you are one of millions of high school graduates crossing the threshold into adulthood this spring, know that completing your high school education means something. Every day, local newspapers, including ours, extol extraordinary teens who did well all the way through school with help from stable and supportive families. They have their lives and goals mapped out. The odds are betterthan-even they will go on to do well. Experts have said if a person can manage to graduate from high school and can avoid having a child before turning 20, then the chances for a good life increase substantially. But perhaps we need to expand our definition of extraordinaryŽ to include those of you who had to dodge a lot of shrapnel to get to graduation day.You persisted You, who persisted through the trauma of poverty and chaos it can bring; who often had more responsibility than a kid should have; who had to ignore the naysayers and doubters in your own families who have nothing to show for their cynicism. There ought to be recognition of those of you who never told even your closest friends of the struggles and abuse youve endured yet still managed to graduate. You, who put up with being bullied almost every day because you look, think, act or see the world differently than the herd. Those of you who thought about suicide but didnt do it, perhaps because of something a teacher said, or because of a song lyric, or because you saw a pinpoint of hope in the distance. That you made it through to the other side confirms you are extraordinary. In the days to come, youll hear a lot of advice about what you should do with the life that awaits you. For one, dont go into unnecessary debt. It sounds silly, but debt is a form of slavery.Find your tribe Secondly, find the courage to be true to who you are, even if it means you must put some distance between yourself and others. You would be amazed at the adults who never embrace who they really are, who have settled for the safety and sameness of days rather than the thrilling uncertainty that comes with the truth. If you remain faithful to yourself, you will find your tribe. Everyone has a talent. Dont let fear, or what if,Ž or other people talk you out of pursuing yours. Develop and hone it, and make it pay so that you never have to go to workŽ a day in your life. Understand that what you plan and where you end up probably wont be the same destination. See as much of the world as you can. It will open your mind „ putting you ahead of most Americans „ and you will find that humans essentially are the same. Were all looking for love, friendship and acceptance. Lastly, find a way to make the world a better place. Dont let the cares of this world cloud your vision. Show us how it should be done.Congratulations, graduate, you did it! Dont stop now C h a r i t a G o s h a y Charita Goshay By ZipRecruiter.comTheres a misconception that the only way to make a decent living is to earn a college degree. But if you can offer a service that most people cant do on their own „ repairing and maintaining equipment and appliances, fixing cars or wiring a home „ you could stand to make a nice living. Best of all, most training happens on the job. So rather than going into debt for your education, youre actually earning money. Here are some tips on getting started in a skilled trade career. Pick your trade The great thing about trade careers is that they often correspond with your hobbies. Do you like fixing cars or creating elaborate meals? Consider a career as an auto mechanic or chef. Do you love gardening or working with wood? Perhaps a career as a horticulturist or cabinetmaker will suit you. After youve narrowed down your choices to three or four, learn more about them by talking to people in the field and researching job opportunities, pay and longterm possibilities for growth. Many skilled trade jobs are more mentally demanding than physically demanding. Stamina, dexterity and good problem-solving skills are usually more useful than brute strength. If youre someone who prefers being creative and active or working with your hands to sitting at a desk, the skilled trades could be an ideal choice for you. Become an apprentice The next step is finding an employer whos interested in hiring and training you. You can find potential contacts through trade unions, professional associations or training institutions, as well as local employment offices, programs and agencies. Or you can apply for a registered apprenticeship. Operated by the private and public sectors, registered apprenticeship programs combine on-the-job training with theoretical and practical classroom instruction. Sponsors include employers, employer associations and joint labor/management organizations. Program sponsors pay most of the training costs while simultaneously increasing wages as your skill levels increase. These standards-based programs generally range from one to six years depending on the needs of the program sponsor. A great resource is the U.S. How to start in a skilled trade careerSEE Trade, C12Vernon High School Continued from Page C7

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Washington County News | Wednesday, May 23, 2018 C9Chipola offers scholarships in the arts The deadline to apply for a music or theatre audition or an art interview for a 2018-19 Chipola College Fine Arts scholarship is Friday, June 1.The scholarships are available to high school graduates with acceptable academic records and aptitude in music, theatre, and art. Applicants who plan to pursue studies as music, theatre or art majors are eligible to apply for scholarships. Online scholarship applications and information concerning the audition process and requirements are available on the colleges website at www.chipola.edu, Select Fine Arts and then Scholarships. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018. For more information, contact the Fine and Performing Arts Department at 850-718-2257. Robert and Kathryn McRae/ Rex Lumber Scholarships The Robert and Kathryn McRae/Rex Lumber Scholarships will be awarded to multiple students toward 30 semester hours of tuition and an allocation for books. Applicants must plan to enroll and pursue and Associate of Science degree in Engineering Technology specializing in Advanced Manufacturing: Pneumatics, Hydraulics and Motors Certification at Chipola College. Consideration will be given to current or recent graduated of Graceville High School, Poplar Springs High School, Holmes County High School, Cottondale High School, Chipley High School, Liberty County High School, Blountstown High School and Altha High School. Children of Rex Lumber Company employees, employed for at least one year, are eligible for to apply for t he scholarship to enroll in the Engineering Technology program. Applicants must have a minimum of a 2.5 high school GPA and maintain a minimum of a 2.5 GPA at Chipola College. Application must be received by 4 p.m. Wednesday June 6. To apply visit the Chipola College Foundation located at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. James A. and Louise B. Davis Memorial Scholarship The James A. and Louise B. Davis Memorial Scholarships is a partial tuition and or books scholarship awarded to a Holmes County student with at least a 3.0 GPA from high school that plans to pursue either an AA or AS degree at Chipola. Students must maintain a 2.0 GPA each semester at Chipola and follow standard college requirements. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018.To apply go to the Chipola College Foundation at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. Albert A. Robinson Teacher Scholarship Memorial Fund The Albert A. Robinson Teacher Scholarship Memorial Fund is a partial tuition and or books will be awarded to a graduating senior from Chipley High School or Vernon High School. Applicants must have minimum 2.0 high school GPA, be an African American resident of Washington County for at least three years who wish to pursue a degree in elementary or secondary education, be a person of character and discipline and an active resident of the community in good standing, agree to teach in Washington County for at least four years, must attend classes regularly and follow standard college requirements. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018. To apply go to the Chipola College Foundation at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. Lee Shook Theater Scholarship The Lee Shook Theater Scholarship is a partial theatre tuition and or books scholarship available to high school graduated planning to major in Theatre. Applicants are required to attend an interview and an audition, maintain a 2.0 GPA each semester at Chipola and follow standard college requirements. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018.To apply go to the Chipola Director of Fine and Performing Arts at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. Joan B. Stadsklev Fine and Performing Arts Scholarship The Joan B. Stadsklev Fine and Performing is a partial tuition and or books scholarship available to high school graduate planning to major in Music, Art or Theater. Applicants must maintain a 2.0 GPA each semester at Chipola, must attend an interview, submit and art portfolio or attend an audition and must follow standard college requirements. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018.To apply go to the Chipola Director of Fine and Performing Arts at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. Wesler Endowment The Wesler Endowment is a partial tuition and or books scholarship awarded to a student majoring in journalism, sports information or sports related fields. The applicant must be willing to assist baseball and or basketball programs with scorekeeping and or statistics etc. The scholarship can not be used as an athletic scholarship. Applicant must maintain a 2.0 GPA at Chipola and follow standard college requirements. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018.To apply visit the Chipola College Foundation located at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. Anna K. Williams Memorial Scholarship The Anna K. Williams Memorial Scholarship is a partial tuition and or books scholarship with preference given to theater majors. Applicant should outline financial need in the application form and letter, must maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA each semester at Chipola and follow standard college requirements. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018.To apply visit the Chipola College Foundation located at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. Workforce Development Scholarship The Workforce Development Scholarship is a partial tuition scholarship for a student pursuing a Workforce Development Program. Applicant must maintain a 2.0 GPA at Chipola and follow standard college requirement. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018.To apply visit the Chipola College Foundation located at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. McLendon Music Scholarships The McLendon Music Scholarship are partial tuition music scholarships awarded to high school graduates planning to major in music. Applicants must maintain a 2.0 GPA at Chipola and follow Standard College requirements. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018.For more information and application deadline contact Chipola Direction of Fine and Performing Arts located at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. Florida Nurses Association District 15 Scholarship The Florida Nurses Association District 15 Scholarship is a partial tuition and or books scholarship awarded to a resident of Calhoun, Jackson, Walton, Washington or Holmes counties. The applicant must be either accepted and entering the Associate in Science Nursing Program or Bachelor of Science Nursing Program to be a retuning nursing program student. The applicant must maintain a minimum 2.5 GPA each semester at Chipola College and have a minimum 2.5 high school GPA and follow standard college requirement. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018.To apply contact the director of Health Science at Chipola located at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. Vivian Ford Memorial Scholarship The Vivian Ford Memorial Scholarship is a partial tuition and or books scholarship awarded to a resident of Chipola Colleges five district service area. First priority will go to applicants that are majoring in agriculture or agriculturally related fields and second priority will go to applicants majoring in education. Applicant must maintain a minimum 3.0 high school GPA and a minimum 3.0 GPA each semester a Chipola. Applicant must demonstrate good citizenship and be socially responsible and must follow standard college requirements. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018.To apply visit the Chipola College Foundation located at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. L.E. McMullian Jr. Farm Bureau Scholarship The L.E. McMullian Jr. Farm Bureau Scholarship is a partial tuition and or books scholarship awarded to a student with a 2.0 or better high school GPA and maintain a 2.0 GPA each semester at Chipola. The applicant and or family member must be a member of Farm Bureau for at leas three years before applying for the scholarship. Applicants must put Farm Bureau member number on the scholarship application. Scholarship will consider applications from Chipolas bachelors degree programs. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018.To apply visit the Chipola College Foundation at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. Papoose Newspaper Scholarship The Papoose Newspaper Scholarship is a partial tuition and or book scholarship awarded to a student with an interest in journalism. Applicants must have excellent communication and computer skills and previous experience in yearbook and newspaper production is preferred. Applicants may be requested to submit writing sample and must follow standard college requirements. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018.To apply visit the Director of Public Relations located at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. Fredrick B. Peters Scholarship Endowment The Fredrick B. Peters Scholarship Endowment is a partial tuition and or book scholarship awarded to a business major that is a resident of Chipolas five county service district or Gadsden County. Applicants must be a full-time student and maintain a 2.0 GPA each semester at Chipola and must have a part-time job during the school year, must have a 2.0 high school GPA and have a financial need for the SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIESfor Washington and Holmes countiesSEE Scholarship, C10

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** C10 Wednesday, May 23, 2018 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Washington County Newsscholarship and follow standard college requirements. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018.To apply visit the Chipola College Foundation located at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. Jackson County Dairy Herd Improvement Association Scholarship The Jackson County Dairy Herd Improvement Association Scholarship is a partial tuition and or books scholarship awarded to children of dairy families in Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson and Washington counties. If there are no applicants from dairy families, children of families working for a dairy related business will be considered. Applicant must maintain a 2.5 GPA for each semester enrolled at Chipola. On addition to completed scholarship application the applicant must submit a list of any activities or honors related to the dairy industry and you leadership. The scholarship will consider applications from Chipolas Bachelors degree programs. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018.To apply visit the Chipola College Foundation located at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. Jackson County Hospital Medical Staff/Glenn E. Padgett M.D. Memorial Scholarship The Jackson County Hospital Medical Staff/ Glenn E. Padgett M.D. Memorial Scholarship is a partial tuition and or books scholarship awarded to a graduating senior with a 3.0 GPA or a student currently enrolled at Chipola. Applicants must reside in the Chipola five district service area, maintain a t3.0 GPA at Chipola, major in a medically related field and follow standard college requirements. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018. E.T. Denmark Scholarship The E.T. Denmark Scholarship is a partial tuition and or books scholarship to a Chipola College student during the upcoming Fall 2018 semester. Applicant must be a high school graduate from within Chipolas five-county district. Applicants will be judged on merit only and preference will be given to students that have already completed Calculus I. Applicants must also maintain a 2.0 GPA each semester at Chipola and follow standard college requirements. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018.To apply visit the Chipola College Foundation located at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. Paula A. Donofro Architect Scholarship The Paula Donofro Architect Scholarship is a partial tuition and or books scholarship available for an architecture major, second consideration will go to a visual arts major is no qualified architecture majors are identified. Applicant must be a resident of Chipolas five county service district, have a minimum 2.5 high school GPA, maintain a 3.0 GOP each semester at Chipola and follow standard college requirements. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018. To apply visit the Chipola College Foundation located at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. Railey Efurd Memorial Nursing Scholarship The Railey Efurd Memorial Nursing Scholarship is a partial tuition and or books scholarship to a student that is in the Chipola College RN program or has been accepted into the program for the fall 2018 semester. Applicant must have a minimum 3.0 GPA to apply and maintain a minimum 2.5 GPA each semester at Chipola. Applicant must be of good character, very disciplined and have a strong work ethic, be highly motivated to succeed in the nursing field and be passionate about helping others. The applicant must outline in the application letter why they should be chosen to receive the scholarship and outline a past employment history. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018.To apply visit the Chipola College Foundation located at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. Mildred H. Keen Scholarship The Mildred H. Keen Scholarship is a partial tuition scholarship awarded to a full-time student from the Chipola district five county service area. The applicant must have a 2.0 GPA, be majoring in Library Science or English, maintain a 2.0 GPA at Chipola, reapply for scholarship to be considered for continued funding for second year and follow standard college requirements. Scholarship Applications and required attachments are due by 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 6, 2018.To apply visit the Chipola College Foundation located at 3094 Indian Circle in Marianna. FPPA offers scholarship The Florida Peanut Producers Association will award two $1,200 scholarships will be awarded to deserving high school seniors and/or college students. The applicant or someone in the applicants family must be an actively producing peanut grower, not necessarily a member of the FPPA. Each winner will receive $600 when the scholarship winners are announced. The remaining $600 will be awarded after the completion of one semester and documentation of passing grades is submitted to the FPPA Office. "The Florida Peanut Producers Association is committed to helping further the education of young people in Florida and the scholarship program is evidence of our commitment" said Ken Barton, Executive Director of the FPPA." The FPPA welcomes all applicants. The final selection will be made by the committee and all applicants will be notified by mail, as will the scholarship winners, said Barton. For an application contact the FPPA Office at 2741 Penn Ave., Suite 1 Marianna, FL 32448, call (850) 526-2590 or you can print the application off the FPPA website www.flpeanuts. com. The scholarship applications must be postmarked no later than July 1, 2018. Judge R. Robert Brown Endowed Scholarship The Judge R. Robert Brown Endowed Scholarship is a partial tuition scholarship is awarded to a student in a Workforce Development program of study. The student must have financial need, maintain a 2.0 GPA at Chipola and follow standard college requirements. Apply at the First United Methodist Church in Marianna. 4th Annual Ronald Regan Scholarship The Holmes County Republican Party announces the 4th Annual Ronald Regan Scholarship Award Program. The Holmes County Republican Executive Committee will award a $500 scholarship to each of the four Holmes County high schools, for the graduating Class of 2018. Students interested in the scholarship can obtain the criteria and the application from the schools. The goal of the program is to encourage students to become more involved in the county, state and national government. Les Jolie Dames Civic Club Teacher Scholarship The Les Jolie Dames Civic Club Teacher Scholarship is a partial tuition and or books scholarship with first consideration given to an African American high school graduate from Washington County majoring in Education and will to teach in a Washington County School for the first two years after graduation. Applicant must have a 2.5 high school GPA and maintain a 2.5 GPA each semester at Chipola. Applicant must have a financial need, submit an essay detailing while the scholarship is needed, submit a list of high school activities and community involvement a follow standard college requirements. Apply to Les Jolie Dames Civic Club Scholarship, 1290 Merry Acres Drive, Chipley FL 32428. Houyoux Family First Generation College Scholarship The Houyoux Family First Generation College Scholarship is a partial tuition and or books scholarship awarded to first generation college students, which is defined as neither parent having earned a college bachelors degree. First consideration will be given to student who received this scholarship during the spring 2018 semester. The applicant must outline their financial need in the application letter, must maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA each semester at Chipola College. The recipient will communicated periodically with a mentor via email or telephone and follow standard college requirements. Apply to Houyoux Gamily First Generation in College Scholarship Committee, 7797 Grand Oak Circle, Sebastian, FL 32958. Irene Blaine Memorial Scholarship The Irene Blaine Memorial Scholarship is a partial tuition and or book scholarship awarded to a resident of Jackson or Washington County. The student must be an education major and have a minimum of a 2.5 GPA at Chipola. Applicant must outline in the required application letter his or her future hopes in the area of education and follow the standard college requirements. Apply to the Irene Blaine Scholarship Committee at 3639 Blaine Drive in Marianna. SCHOLARSHIPFrom Page C9 By ZipRecruiter.comYou did it. You finally walked across that stage in a goofy looking hat, wrapped your fingers around that diploma, and sprinted off your college campus. Now, youre ready to take that running leap into the real worldŽ and get started with the career youve been working toward your entire life. But landing a job right out of college is going to require some serious elbow grease and legwork on your end. You already know youre going to be spending hours filling out application after application. However, there are plenty of other things you can do to boost your professional reputation and increase your chances of landing a job as soon as possible. 1 Clean up your social media pro les Whats one of the first things recruiters and hiring managers do when they see your resume slide across their desk? Chances are, they look you up on social media. You absolutely do not want them to be welcomed by whiny posts complaining about your old boss or sloppy photos of you winning a beer pong competition. Go through all of your existing social media accounts and remove any posts or photos that could be even remotely incriminating or offensive. Heres some social media advice for you to live by: If you wouldnt want your grandma to see it, you probably shouldnt post it. 2 Dust o your resume and LinkedIn pro le Next, its time to polish up the materials specifically related to your career. Start with your resume. Ensure that all of the information is current and that its completely free of any typos or errors. Also, identify any areas where it could be improved. Next, turn your attention to your LinkedIn profile. If you dont have one, its time to set one up. Hiring managers will definitely look for it. If you do have one, make sure your profile picture is professional and clearly shows your face, then double-check that your education information and previous job 5 things new grads can do for their careersSEE Careers, C11

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** Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Washington County News | Wednesday, May 23, 2018 C11By Diane M. RobinsonThe News | @HCTA_Diane Drobinson@chipleypaper.comCHIPLEY … The house was packed as students received diplomas from Florida Panhandle Technical College in various fields of study. William Futch, who earned certification in applied information technology, was the student speaker. The campus graduated 316 students, according to FPTC Director Martha Compton. The ceremony was held at First Baptist Church in Chipley. Graduates participating in the commencement ceremony and their fields of study are as follows:Adult Education: Daniele Adams, Catherine Austin, Brianna Baxley, Morgan Dilmore, Stephany Grant, Lee Grenhoff, Jordan Hasty, Renee Jennings, Antwan Johnson, Paje Menfi, Candace Morris, Betty Pettingill, Cody Williams. Architecture and Construction: Jonathan Davis and Aaron Doss. A/V Technology & Communication: ZiAndra Boston, Erica Gell, Pedro R. W. Martinez, Carol Silberman, Hannah Brock, Christina Forehand, Kris Wilson. Business, Management and Administration: Shannon Cooper, Kayla Evans, Ariel Groomes, Tatiana Jones, Lia Schermer. Health Science: Callie Batey, Antonio Miguel Souza, Olivia Cotton, Elizabeth Howard, Bhinda Morado, Terrica Lloyd, Armanii Patton, Carolyn Pullin, Kaylee Scott, Jaqueline Stewart, Chadsity Ward. Katlyn Allen, Meghan Beasley, Pamela Butler, Emilee Crawford, Madison Curry, Kayla Davis, Heidi Grenhoff, Kristien Hall, Bethany Knight, Margie Maloy, Melissa Sapp, Amber Tharp, Michaela Truett, Lauren Wymes, Ira Clark, Karena Bell, Sylvia Brown, Marilyn Byrd, Addie Cook, Elizabeth Eastling, Nikkie Gibson, Terrisina Gibson, Joshua Glass, Cameron Harrison, Tyler Mayo, Savannah Pate, Taylor Sasnett, Reaunna Spencer, Anitria Spires, Kyndal Syfrett, Breanna Tiller, Charlene Walker, Dallas Wilkinson, Katlyn Allen, Lorena Menses-Carrillo. Information Technology: William Futch. Human Services: Cora Morris. Law, Public Safety & Security: Amanda Burnham, Shenesi Beard, Andrea Bowen, Pablo Buduen, Thomas Corbett, Starlynn Daugherty, Timothy Elmore, Lavance Gonzalez, Selena Gutierrez, Ronnie Jones, Aaron Martinez, Kasie MacConnell, Melissa Myrick, Kyle Pearce, Jeannifer Powell, Kimberly Spence, Kaylinda Wilkinson, Anjerica Young, Dustin Brown, Josephine Coleman, Hunter Hallman, Johnathan Helmes, Steven Hutchins, Chaise Jones, Stephen Pettijohn, Caleb Segers, Trey Troupe, Bruce Coker, Kathleen Pouncey, Breanna Taylor. Manufacturing: Noah Collins, Jonathan Howell, Justin Sanders, Collin Williams, Robert Rushing, Brandon Stanley. Transportation, Distribution & Logistics: Edward Harris, Deric Bailey, Jonathan Drake, Johnathan Kirkland, Cody Yeager.Started out with a dreamSpecial to WCN/HCTAWASHINGTON AND HOLMES COUNTIES Chipola College recognized the outstanding achievements of its students at the recent annual Awards Ceremony. Awards were presented for academics, athletics and extracurricular activities. The following Holmes and Washington County students received academic awards: Connie Land of Bonifay, Accounting … BSBA and Strategic Management … BSBA and Joel McKinnie of Chipley, Social and Behavioral Sciences Holmes and Washington County students in Workforce Development programs received the following awards: Hossameldin Elsankary of Ponce De Leon, Automotive Technology and Daniel Galvan of Chipley, Welding. The following Washington County student received an award for participation in extracurricular activities: Ansleigh Walters of Chipley, SGA.Students honored at awards ceremonydescriptions are updated. Finally, craft a polished and personality-filled summary. Its your chance to expand on those cut-and-dried facts already in your resume. 3 Schedule informational interviews Whats one of the things thats the most frustrating about the jobhunting and interview process? You feel like you have no control over what happens. You simply submit your information and cross your fingers that you hear back about an interview. However, with informational interviews, the ball is in your court. Reach out to a few professionals that you admire via email or LinkedIn to see if you could get together for a cup of coffee. Its a great opportunity to meet new people, as well as learn more about a particular company or industry youre interested in. Plus, an expanded network is never a bad thing. 4 Network, network, network Speaking of an expanded web of professional contacts, networking needs to be toward the top of your priority list after graduating. Meeting new contacts is your chance to get connected with people who could benefit your job search, as well as potentially help you get your foot in the door for some new opportunities. Volunteer with a local shelter. Attend a community networking event. Join a professional association or organization. Put yourself out there and make an effort to expand your group of connections. 5 Know your career goals Chances are, you dont just want a job. You want a job in a specific field or industry. You want a position that makes you feel fulfilled and satisfied. Or, maybe you want experience in order to get to the next rung of the career ladder. If you have the ability, take the time to sit down and outline your shortterm and long-term career goals, and then base your job search decision on those. Itll help you to ensure your first job is a step in the right direction „ and not just a hasty decision made out of desperation. CAREERSFrom Page C10 Florida Panhandle Technical Colleges Class of 2018. [DIANE ROBINSON | THE NEWS] Florida Panhandle Technical College graduates 316 studentsAll of us here tonight started out with a dream,and have taken the steps to make that dream come to pass, tonight we have arrived,Ž said student speaker William Futch. Futch earned his certi“ cation in applied information technology. Kaylinda Wilkinson stands with Washington County School Superintendent Joe Taylor after receiving her correctional of“ cer certi“ cation.

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** C12 Wednesday, May 23, 2018 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Washington County News By Melissa EricksonMore Content Now S tress runs high for both parents and students when thoughts turn to college. According to The Princeton Reviews 2017 College Hopes & Dreams Survey, 76 percent of the over 10,000 respondents reported high levels of stress „ 4 percent more than last years survey respondents, and 20 percent more than in the surveys initial year, 2003. One surefire way to reduce stress and anxiety is through knowledge. Before heading to school this fall, get to know some college lingo and terminology, provided by the U.S. Department of Educations glossary. Academic year This is the amount of the academic work you must complete each year, and the time period in which you are expected to complete it, as defined by your school. For example, your schools academic year may be made up of a fall and spring semester, during which a fulltime undergraduate student is expected to complete at least 24 semester hours (usually called credits or credit hours) over the course of 30 weeks of instructional time. Academic years may change from school to school and even from educational program to educational program at the same school. Associate degree An undergraduate academic degree granted after completion of two years of study. Community colleges and career colleges generally award associate degrees. Award letter An offer from a college or career school that states the type and amount of financial aid the school is willing to provide if you accept admission and register to take classes at that school. Bachelors degree An undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course of study that generally lasts four years. Colleges or universities generally award bachelors degrees. Early action A college admission policy that allows applicants to apply and receive notice of their admission early. Applicants accepted under early action are not under a binding agreement to attend that school and may submit applications to other schools. Early decision A college admission policy that allows applicants who commit to attend that school to apply and receive notice of their admission early. If the applicant is accepted, he or she agrees to attend that school and must withdraw all other applications. Elective A class that is not required for your major or minor. Generally, electives are taken for fun or interest. Examples could be public speaking, art history or a fitness class. FAFSA Stands for Free Application for Federal Student Aid and is the form used to apply for grants, loans and work-study. General education course Gen EdŽ courses cover the core academic subjects such as science, math and literature. Students must take one or more of these in major academic disciplines. Merit-based Based on a students skill or ability. Example: A merit-based scholarship might be awarded based on a students high grades. Need-based Based on a students financial need. Example: A need-based grant might be awarded based on a students low income. O ce hours These are the times when a professor or teaching assistant is available to discuss material covered in class, related interests or offer guidance. Room and board An allowance for the cost of housing and food while attending college or a career school.TO THE WISE WORDS Terms to know before applying to schoolBy Melissa EricksonMore Content Now E xcept for mortgages, student loans constitute the largest component of household debt for Americans, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Americans owe even more on their student loans than on their credit card debt. Spread out among about 44 million borrowers, national student loan debt is over $1.4 trillion, while credit card debt is $779 billion, according to the New York Fed Consumer Credit Panel and the Federal Reserve. The average Class of 2016 graduate carries a student loan debt of $37,173, up 6 percent from last year, according to student loan expert Mark Kantrowitz and based on federal student-loan data and other factors. Despite the evidence that income potential rises and chances of joblessness decline with more schooling, many graduates entering the labor market are learning the hard way that a college degree cant guarantee financial security. College grads have an unemployment rate of 5.6 percent compared to 17.9 percent for people with only high school diplomas, according to the Economic Policy Institute. Student loan debt has huge consequences on the economy, said Frank Kelley, associate dean for undergraduate business programs at the University of Houstons Bauer College of Business. At a very micro-level, students who graduate with a large debt may not be able to afford to buy a house for many years, in spite of having a job with a professional wage,Ž Kelley said. To help minimize college debt, Kelley offers the following tips: Plan ahead Before you go to college, start an educational savings plan and find out how it may be tax-sheltered. Choose your college or university based on value for the price, and take courses in high school that provide college credit. Look for the money Apply for scholarships and grants that do not have to be paid back. Check for external scholarships as well as university scholarships and those through the college of your major. If you take out a loan, only take out what you really need. Be informed During your time in college, meet regularly with your academic adviser and career counselor to select a major that is a good fit for your skills and interests and leads to a viable career path or graduate school. Take the courses you need for that major.COLLEGE DEBT How to minimizeDepartment of Labors Registered Aprenticeship program. ApprenticeshipUSA offers opportunities to earn a salary while learning the skills necessary to succeed in high-demand careers. Go to doleta.gov/OA/ occupations.cfm for a list of the programs available occupations. To search available Department of Labor registered apprenticeship and non-registered apprenticeship opportunities near you, visit the Glassdoor Apprenticeship Finder on the USDOL website, dol.gov/featured/ apprenticeship/findopportunities, or Careeronestop.org. Becoming certi ed Career-training program participants receive national industry certification upon graduation. This certification is applicable anywhere in the United States. information about becoming certified, contact your trade union. For information about apprenticeships, visit dol.gov/general/topic/ training/apprenticeship. TRADEFrom Page C8