Holmes County times-advertiser

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Holmes County times-advertiser
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Bonifay, FL
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June 19, 2013
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50 www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM Phone: 850-547-9414 Website: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 IN BRIEF imes imes imes T imes imes imes imes T T imes imes imes imes T T T A HOLMES COUNTY 9/11 Remembrance and Patriot Day CHIPLEY A service in remembrance of the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001, will be at 10 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 11, in front of Chipley City Hall. This event, sponsored by Bugles Across America, will also commemorate Patriot Day and feature a message from the Rev. Jerry May, pastor of First United Methodist Church in Chipley. For more information, call Roger VanLandingham at 638-0061. Bingo BONIFAY The Pittman Volunteer Fire Department will have a bingo fundraiser at 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 13. Doors will open at 5 p.m. Packs start at $6. Players must be 18 years of age. For more information, call 768-0138. Two-Toed Tom yard sale ESTO The TwoToed Tom Festival will have a yard sale all day Saturday, Sept. 13, at the Esto Community Center. The cost to rent a table inside will be $10, and to rent a table outside, the cost will be $5. For more information, call Darlene at 263-3201. INDEX Opinion ................................ A4 Sports .................................. A7 Re ections ........................... A8 Extra .................................... B1 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B9 Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 10 2014 Volume 124, Number 22 A A A dvertiser Ponce de Leon qualifying Sept. 15-18 From Staff Reports PONCE de LEON The quali cation deadline for three seats on the Ponce de Leon Town Council is Sept. 15-18. The seats open for election are currently lled by Charlotte Montgomery, Denise Serigne and John Harrison. Those meeting requirements wishing to qualify as a candidate can pay the qualifying fee and le papers with the town clerk at Ponce de Leon Town Hall, 1580 State Road 90. Town Hall hours are 6 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Thursday. All candidates are required to subject to a drug screening. For more information, call the town clerk at 836-4361. By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Director of the Holmes County Public Library Susan Harris has announced new programs available through the Holmes County Public Library that are free to the public. The Panhandle Public Library Cooperative System provides services for four counties, Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson and Washington counties, Harris said. Now they are providing new databases such as Recorded Books EPrep, Universal Class, Signing Savvy, OneClick digital check out eBooks and eAudiobooks, Zinio, Indie ix, Rosetta Stone, axis360 and NoveList Plus. Recorded Books EPrep is for help prep for a variety of tests; Universal Class provides online classes; Signing Savvy and Rosetta Stone help learn different languages and sign language; OneClick, axis360 and NoveList Plus are ways to check out books for free for portable devises; and Zinio is the worlds largest newsstand. These are added to the services provided by the library for years, including free library cards, Internet services including wireless, Gale Databases provide by the State Library, genealogy searches and GED classes provided by the Washington-Holmes Technical Center. We are extremely proud of our library and the services that we offer, Harris said. Actually, apart from printouts from the computer and copies, everything is free, and as we move into the technological age, computers are a vital part of the library. We have Gale Databases provided by the state so all information is at your ngertips, and our staff is always happy to guide patrons to the correct resources. Holmes County Public Library is open Tuesday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to noon. For more information, check out the librarys website at www. myhcpl.org and PPLCS website at www.pplcs.net. By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY After working for several months on reducing the budget, Holmes County commissioners voted on a resolution during a called session Monday for a millage rate of 9.6605, which remains the same as last year and the lowest rollback rate in years at 9.4912. Suggestions for cuts after a line-by-line budget review include reducing the janitorial contract from last years amount of $36,000 to $30,000; cutting the Baker Act budget from $25,000 to $15,000; reducing funds earmarked for contracting with an animal control agency from $80,000 to $60,000; and cutting miscellaneous items by $39,000. Last year, the county approved a millage rate of 9.6605, with a rollback rate of 9.5777 mills. Board informed those in attendance the nal budget hearing will be at 5:01 p.m. Monday, Sept. 22. Bonifay to propose water rate increase for prison By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY During the regular scheduled meeting of Bonifay City Council on Sept. 8, city grant writer Bob Jones presented the council with a rate study showing the Holmes County Correctional Institution as the largest water user based on percentage, and the council voted to increase its yearly rate from $39,396 to $49,000. The prison uses a third of the treatment plants capacity per year, Jones said. The new rate schedule is a good re ection of the rate usage. Its been fourand-a-half years since the last increase, and this rate is fair backed by gures. The council agreed on presenting the institution with the new gures. The next scheduled meeting of the Bonifay City Council is set for 6 p.m. Sept. 22. CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners met at a special session to discuss and vote on a rollback on the rollback on the evening of Sept. 8. Rolling back the rollback BOB JONES City Grant Writer CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser Director of the Holmes County Public Library Susan Harris helps 13-year-old Zac Brown navigate the new features on the librarys website. HOLMES COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY Library expands its services C onnec t with us 24/7 G et br eak ing new s videos e xpanded st or ies phot o galler ies opinions and mor e ... @WCN_HC T bonifa yno w .c om

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Local A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, September 10, 2014 Bill Fletcher HAS: BC-HIS Rac hel Ruminski Hea ring Car e Pr actitioner MARIANNA 3025 6th ST REET (850) 260-0436 We dnesdays & Fr idays CHIPLEY 1611 MAIN ST REET #4 (850) 260-0436 Monday Fr iday THE SOUNDS OF LIFE A D IF FE REN CE W OR TH H EA RIN G AB OUT! WE RE IN YO UR NEI GHB ORH OOD! i AND BEL TONE IS AMERICA S MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEA RING CA RE.* b e s t b e s t 2013 2013 Be lt one Fi rs t Bene ts of hearing aids var y by type and degree of hearing loss, noise environment, accurac y of hearing evalua tion and proper t. Experience Beltone First, Hear cl early even in noisy places like restaurants. Be lt one Fi rs t FR EE IN -O FF IC E TR IA L $ 1000 OFF a pair of Beltone Fi rst TM hearing instruments Offer expires 9/19/2014 *Dis co un t o MS RP an d ap pl ie s to Be lt on e Fi rs t he ar in g ai ds $400 o si ng le he ar in g ai d. Ca nno t be co mb ine d wi th ot he r o er s, co up on s or ins ur an ce pl an s. Pr ev io us pu rc has es ex cl ude d. Po li ti ca l Ad ap pr ov ed an d pa id fo r by S idne y M. (S id)J oh ns on Ho lme s Co un ty Sc ho ol Bo ar d Me mb er Di st ric t 5 I would like to thank the voters of Holmes County for giving me the opportunity to serve you for the next four years as a Holmes County School Board Member I am very humbled and honored for this opportunity and will strive to live up to the high expectations I have and you have for this ofce. I know that the children are our future and I want to thank the teachers and staf f for the very excellent jobs that they do to educate our children. Again thank you for this opportunity Sidney M. Sid Johnson School Board Member District 5 Holmes County To learn ho w yo u can suppor t our commun ity s univ ersity contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. FL ORIDA ST AT E UNIVE RSIT Y PA NAMA CIT Y THE CA MP AIGN FOR OUR CO MM UNIT Y S UN IVERS IT Y En do wment for To morr ow s Jo bs $4 ,500 ,0 00 $500 ,0 00 $1,500 ,0 00 $2,500 ,0 00 $3 ,500 ,0 00 $4 ,500 ,0 00 $0 $1, 000 ,0 00 $2, 000 ,0 00 $3 ,0 00 ,0 00 $4 ,0 00 ,0 00 $5 ,0 00 ,0 00 GO AL By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY The Holmes District School Board approved insurance committees recommendation during Sept. 9 meeting to use Blue Cross and Blue Shield, which makes the second year in a row without an increase in insurance rates. The board also approved interagency agreement with Chipola College for Take Stock in Children and was told that of all schools that applied, two students were selected, one from Ponce de Leon High School and one from Holmes County High School, which makes the two selected the rst in the program from Holmes County in over 10 years. There was a brief discussion before approving the grant funding for the WINGS program after board member Debbie Kolmetz asked if the grant covers all expenses. The answer was whatever is not covered by the grant is reimbursable through the school. New additions to the program include eld trips, possibly for arts and crafts, and a summer eld trip bowling, which is also included in the grant. Also approved: Agreement with Bay County for securing educational services; ESE transportation agreements with parents wanting to transport their own children; and agreement with Accelify for Medicare and Medicaid services. Project application for Instructional Leadership and Development Grant, 21st Century Learning Center for Bonifay Elementary School, Bonifay Middle School, Poplar Springs School, Ponce de Leon Elementary School and Bethlehem High School. The next meeting of the Holmes District School Board is set for 6 p.m. Sept. 16. County marks 2nd year without health insurance increase By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com ESTO The Esto Town Council continues efforts to purchase land from a local resident for additional parking for the towns annual Two Toe Tom Festival, but Mayor Danny Powell told the council during its Sept. 2 meeting the owner was standing rm at $100,000. The town is offering $50,000. Someone should remind him of the project to widen the road, and the state is only going to offer him fair market value, council member Darlene Madden said. In other business: Dennis Dingman of Summit Professional Services Inc. discussed the towns scores for potential a Community Development Block Grant that will be affected by the 2010 census, which hasnt been released. Resident Bill Gray was present to address concerns about his water, letting the city know it was bright orange. The council agreed to do what they could to investigate the matter and advised that if anyone has issues with their water to call the town hall immediately. Resident Carla Bell was present to address issues she had with local volunteer re ghters, saying her children were involved in an automobile accident, and even though the reghters were the rst on the scene within minutes, no one asked the children if they were OK. Fire Chief Tom Murphy told the council the rst one on the scene said they did ask, but it was possible the children were in shock. Murphy also said most of the volunteer re ghters are undergoing rst responder courses. The Esto Town Council will meet again at 7 p.m. Oct. 7. Esto still bargains for land; owner standing rm Special to the Times-Advertiser CHIPLEY The Washington County Tourist Development Council will present the rst Caches, Critters & Cars at Falling Waters State Park. Come experience an eclectic mix of treasure hunting, wild animals, antique campers & cars and much more. Enjoy all of this in the backdrop of one of the Florida Panhandles most beautiful places. This event will be the of cial kickoff of the Washington County Heritage GeoTrail. Geocaching is an adult version of hide and go seek, where you use satellites by way of a GPS unit or your smartphone to nd caches hidden throughout historical Washington County. This new trail will be great fun for the entire family as you go explore the countys historic sites and ultimately win a set of trackables for your efforts. If youre an animal lover, then Falling Waters is the place to be on Oct. 11. There is everything: albino deer, owls, gators, rabbits, snakes and goats that will be on display along with other animals. Bet youve heard the statement They dont make them like they used to. During the event, youll be able to see rsthand how cars, trucks and campers were made long ago by taking a tram to the campgrounds and leisurely exploring the antique campers and cars and trucks open house. And if that wasnt enough there will be demonstrators sharing the unique history of the area including Creek Indians, Turpentining of the Longleaf Pine and much more. There will be many artists such as a blacksmith, chainsaw wood carver, int knappers with a variety of homemade crafts, artwork & jewelry for sale. All crafts at the event will be made locally in the USA! Plenty of great food and drinks and good old fashion fun for the whole family and while at the park enjoy the natural wonders that make Falling Waters so unique, the 73-foot waterfall and sinkholes. The event will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Oct. 11 at Falling Waters State Park, 2 miles south of Chipley, off State Road 77. Park entry fee is $5 per car load. There is still space available for anyone with an antique car or truck they would like to show off at this event. Please call the number below to RSVP. The TDC is also looking for folks that have unique talents whether it is demonstrating a skill that was once a necessity for every day living or makers that would like to sell their crafts. Contact 547-3192 or 326-8841 if you would like to participate. The TDC is always looking for volunteer help for park events. Contact the of ce at 638-6130 for more information. Inaugural Caches, Critters & Cars is Oct. 11 Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 Wednesday, September 10, 2014 So we ll Tra ctor Co ., Inc. 2841 Hwy 77 North, Pa nama City www .so we lltr actor co .com So we ll and Ku bota 40 Ye ars of Tr usted Pe rf or manc e We Tr ade for Any thin g That Don t Eat! Financing Arranged (W AC) 1127849 GE OR GE CO RE PA RK ON ST JO S EP H BA Y, PO RT ST JO E G EO RG E CO RE PA RK ON ST JO S E PH BA Y, PO RT ST JO E FO R MORE INF ORMA TION OR VENDOR RE GIS TRA TION CA LL 850-22 7122 3 OR STO P BY OUR NE W LO CA TION AT 308 REID AV ENUE IN DO WNT OW N POR T ST JOE 4518511 5019161 THANK YOU, Holmes County Residents, for your condence. Due to your support, I am on my way to the General Election. I am looking forward to seeing you on November 4 th Please, Remember to Vo te and TOGETHER, we will bring improvements to Holmes County Political Ad paid for and approved by Danny Powell, Republican for County Commissioner District 4. MARRIAGES: No marriages reported DIVORCES: Vanessa Lovin Gibson and Charles Gibson David Burl Ganey and Velma Ruth Ganey Alan Carnley and Vanda Delayne Carnley Aug. 25 to Sept. 1 Gregory Andrews, violation of probation on driving while license suspended or revoked Shaune M. Bane, violation of probation on littering, violation of probation on trespass Derrick Beard, Hillsborough Kenny Michael Bradley, out of county warrant Thomas Brosnan, violation of probation on driving under the inuence, violation of probation on driving while license suspended or revokes Thomas John Brosnan, violation of probation on driving under the inuence, violation of probation on driving while license suspended or revoked Dewayne Burns, domestic aggravated battery, aggravated assault, domestic battery Jeramy Carter, disorderly intoxication, resisting ofcer without violence Jeremy Davidson, violation of probation on felony battery Gabrielle Faulk, in for court Terry Glenn, hold for Volusia Melissa Goodwin, driving while license suspended or revoked with knowledge Chastity Marie Harrell, driving while license suspended or revoked Phillip Hayes, driving while license suspended or revoked third offence Michael George Helms, assault on police ofcer, disorderly intoxication Frances Gene Jefferies, violation of probation on disorderly conduct Dante Jefferson, Hillsborough Jennifer Johnson, marijuana possession less than 20 grams Lorraine Renee Kilzer, violation of probation on passing worthless checks three counts Vera Martin, violation of probation on battery, possession of meth bond surrender Theresa Ann McCullough, violation of probation on petit theft Chester Lance McIntosh, burglary, domestic violence by strangulation Vincent Lane McIntosh, burglary, battery, criminal mischief Jeffery Messer, violation of probation on leaving scene with injury, violation of probation on driving while license suspended or revoked Raymond Olsen, prohibited acts controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia Terry Peacock, violation of probation on possession of marijuana under 20 grams Laura Richter, failure to appear on introduction to contraband Mikecal Leon Simmons, recommit from court Christopher Smith, violation of probation on possession of methamphetamine April Steverson, violation of probation on worthless check Shirley Tapley, retail theft, violation of probation on issuing worthless checks three counts Tommie Tarver, Hillsborough Bud Eugene Thomas, possession of listed chemicals Christopher Tolbert, Hillsborough Robert Tyson, hold for Volusia Shawn Douglas Wicker, driving while license suspended or revoked Maximo Zenon, Hillsborough Thomas Lee Ziglar, recommit for Department of Corrections Marriages and DIVORCES Arrest REPORTSept. 1-5 C ounty C ommissioner District 2MICKEY LOCKE FI L E D INTENT TO SEEK OFFICE F EB. 28: F eb. 1-28: monetary contributions were $100; there were no expenditures reported for the reporting period; Contributions were from Mickey Locke $100. March 1-31: candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. A pril 1-30: monetary contributions were $2,300: In-Kind contributions $13.70; expenditures were $2254.74; contributions were given by Mickey Locke $200, Mickey Locke $300 and Mickey Locke $1,800; In-kind contributions were Mickey Locke (petitions) $13.70: expenditures were for Supervisor of Elections (petitions)$13.70, Zan Byrd (donation) $200; Campground church (donation) $100, Bethlehem School (donation) $125, Ponce de Leon FCCLA (donation) $50 and Sims Signs (signs) $1,766.04. May 1-31: monetary contributions were $200: expenditures were $300; contributions were given by Mickey Locke $200; expenditures were for Bethlehem School (donation) $100, Holmes County All Stars (donation) $100 and Lance Groce (donation) $100. June 1-20: monetary contributions were $200: expenditures were $150; contributions were given by Mickey Locke $200; expenditures were for Holmes County Dixie Youth (donation) $50 and Bonifay City Hall (sign placement for the city) $100. June 21 to July 4: candidate led waiver of report. July 5-18: monetary contributions were $1,000: expenditures were $986.87; contributions were given by Mickey Locke $100, Mickey Locke $300 and Mickey Locke $600; expenditures were for West Florida Electric (Ad) $200, Sims Sign (shirts) $86.87, Amanda Williams (donation) $100 and Sims Sign (shirts) $600. July 19-25: monetary contributions were $300: expenditures were $315; contributions were given by Mickey Locke $300; expenditures were for Washington County News (Ad) $315. July 26 to A ug. 1: candidate les waiver of report. A ug. 2-8: monetary contributions were $100: expenditures were $100; contributions were given by Mickey Locke $100; expenditures were for Poplar Springs High School (donation) $100. A ug. 9-21: monetary contributions were $120: expenditures were $180; contributions were given by Mickey Locke $120; expenditures were for Bonifay Police Department (donation) $105 and Holmes County High School (donation) $75. MONTY MERCHANT FI L E D INTENT TO SEEK OFFICE A PRI L 21:A pril 1-30: candidate led a notice of no activity. May 1-31: monetary contributions were $520: contributions were given by Monty Merchant $20 and Juanita Stanley $500: expenditures were $113.10; Supervisor of Elections (petition verication) $13.10 and City of Bonifay (placement of signs in city limits) $100. June 1-20: Candidate led a waiver of report. June 21 to July 4: candidate led waiver of report. July 5-18: monetary contributions were $300: expenditures were $449.40; contributions were given by Monty Merchant $300; expenditures were for Sims Signs (signs, business cards) $449.40. July 19-25: candidate led waiver of report. July 26 to A ug. 1: 2014 HOLMES COUNTY CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS See CAMPAIGN A6

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OPINION www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, September 10, 2014 A Page 4 Section The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $13.30; 26-weeks: $19.90; 52 weeks: $32.00 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $17.70; 26 weeks: 26.50; 52 weeks: $43.00 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Carol Kent, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@ bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION clamb @chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 EDITOR Carol: ckent@ chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 ADVERTISING Bill Allard: wallard@ chipleypaper.com 850-547-9414 They are often the rst voices we hear in an emergency. Our countys dispatchers are the hub of our emergency response system, quickly becoming a lifeline between us and responders when every second counts. With the Day of Remembrance quickly approaching to commemorate the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001, many of our law enforcement, paramedics, re ghters and other emergency responders are receiving recognition as they should for placing themselves in harms way to keep us safe. We should certainly be thankful for these heroes, but lets not forget the men and women who direct emergency responders to those in need, often using what is sketchy information at best: Caller: Please send help? Uncle Joe is stuck in the tree again. Dispatcher: What is that address, sir? Caller: I dont know, but its over here on Highway 90 where Steve used to live. Dispatcher: Sir, can you give me any more details? Caller: Steves old place! You know Steve, right? Although not verbatim, dispatchers have this sort of call more often than youd think. For someone who tends to get lost easily, even in the smallest of towns (and occasionally, my own house), the quick thinking of our emergency telecommunicators is awe-inspiring. The dispatch team receives every type call imaginable, from folks asking for the number to the probate of ce, to lost newspaper women asking which dirt road to take to get to the home of an interviewee (I did, at least, call the nonemergency number). Dispatch has even answered calls reporting cows in the roadway and others reporting wayward husbands getting on their spouses nerves. Perhaps these moments of levity help them deal with the more urgent, frightening calls. Can you imagine being responsible for cool, decisive action when the voice on the other line is panicked, perhaps facing a pivotal life or death moment for themselves or a loved one? An ef cient and caring voice can be a port in the stormy chaos for a caller tearfully pleading for someone to help them. Whatever the situation, dispatchers send the appropriate assistance, often staying on the line to offer reassurance, letting the caller know help is on the way, or offering emergency medical dispatch instructions until help can arrive. While we honor our emergency responders such as our Fire/EMS staff, police of cers and deputies, for the daily risks they take to keep us safe, lets take a moment to thank our local dispatchers who are often unsung heroes in successful endings to dif cult calls. While I may not always know where the heck I am, its good to know where they are. CAROL KENT Editor Dependable voices wait, ready, for our call in time of need I know that it was used a lot, the question of what people were doing when the events of Sept. 11, 2001 unfolded. I believe that most people remember exactly what they were doing when the world seemed to stop. I was in the eleventh grade at Chipley High School. I believe I was in Mrs. Morris class when someone came through the door to tell us to turn on the television. There was a moment of hesitation due to confusion, but the pale appearance and urgent tone prompted response. Before the television could be turned on, I heard distant wailing in the hallway before it was drowned out by the sound of the television. It didnt take long to nd the channel and the scene before us was just after the rst plane hit. Its odd because I remember not being able to understand what was going on, someone then said that the nation was under attack. I cant remember if it was a voice from the television or from the classroom but I remember thinking surely they must be mistaken, who would be dumb enough to attack America in our own home? It was unbelievable. Everything seemed to stop at that moment. It seemed like the whole world was watching and they very well could have. What I remember the most and what made a lasting impression was the valor and sacri ce of the New York Fire Department. I had heard about it in stories and read about it in books and on occasion someone did something heroic in the news. This was different. This made all the stories pale in comparison. So many were determined to save lives or die trying. It was then that I realized that it took a special kind of person to become emergency response and law enforcement. Throughout my years of working in Washington and Holmes County Ive come to see it more and more in even our local responders. This crazy drive to want to make a difference; to serve and protect. Our local guys never just stop with their nine to ve jobs, theyre at it 24/7. They volunteer for local events and fundraisers and even make toys for those children who might not have Christmas. They are all about their community. I cant tell you how many times our local guys have done something for the community and almost done so unnoticed. Come to nd out theyve done much more and was never recognized for it. Funny thing is, I came to the conclusion they werent doing it for the recognition and a lot of the time theyd rather go unnoticed. I, for one, cant stand it. I really think that they should be commended for what they do. Not just for the local charity but for what they do every day. They literally risk their lives for us every time they punch in for the day. I know that people should really keep that in consideration and pray for them. Every time I see someone in uniform I think back to that day and I just want them to know how appreciative I am of them and what they do. I touched on it before in an earlier column but Ill say it again. In my years of working Ive seen the hours they put in and the danger they face. Ive been to more res than I can count, though I still recall one where a re ghter went back in for a little old ladys cat. When he brought out the cat, the cat wasnt breathing. This guy actually resuscitated the cat and put the cat on oxygen. I really wish I could nd that photo to share. They love showing off to children because what child doesnt love a re truck? Maybe it is about taking an example from the children and have at least a little awe left for those who protect and serve. Its also good to keep an adult perspective that they are only human. They get tired, they worry about their family, they have bills to pay and yet here they are, day in and day out living in a way that they nd ful lling. I have yet to nd one who could only think of themselves. Most of the time they have trouble even thinking about themselves at all. I doubt that anyone would have trouble remembering those who gave their lives to try to save those in the twin towers but I also dont want to ever forget the sacri ces of those who gave their lives here, in Holmes and Washington Counties. I dont want to forget that every day our men and women put their lives at risk going to and from work. Im going to try to say thank you to at least one emergency responder. I really dont know what else to do aside from thanking them and honoring them every day with respect and courtesy. Maybe you have some ideas. I just thought of one where if I was in a convenient store and offered to buy a coffee for someone in uniform. Though, I usually only think of these things after the opportunity has already passed. I resolve to try to watch for that opportunity. Thank you for sitting with me again, I hope to see you again next week. Dear Editor, Thank you for the Sept. 3, 2014 article regarding economic growth. The county commission is to be commended for starting the process which will enhance the ability to attract meaningful jobs to Washington County. Those of us that have worked for years in the economic development arena understand that there must be leadership shown by the elected of cials to get the ball rolling. Sometimes we have to invest a little to gain a lot. The future is very bright for Washington County. We must all believe in ourselves and work together to achieve our goals. John S. Robbins President BAYSOLUTIONS HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. Letter to the EDITOR What where you doing when the world stopped? CECILIA SPEARS Cecilias Sit Down Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 Wednesday, September 10, 2014 News Herald staff report PANAMA CITY David Ian Challender pleaded guilty Friday to the mur der, robbery and burglary of an elderly Lynn Haven man and was sentenced to three consecutive life terms in prison. Challender, 28, was the last of three people to resolve their case in the torture and mur der of 90-year-old Wal lace Scott the night of April 4, 2013. Kevin Gene Jeffries and Challender killed Scott in his home while trying to get his ATM PIN. Scott was strangled to death and the two men, along with Ashley Nicole Grifn, 29, made off with guns, a clock and cash. Challenders plea spared him from a possible death sentence. He pleaded guilty to rst-degree murder, burglary of a dwelling while armed and armed robbery. Circuit Judge Brantley Clark Jr. sentenced him to three life terms without the possibility of parole. Challender was arrested at his fathers Caryville home in April of last year, bringing a close to a manhunt for the three suspects accused of Scotts violent death. Scott was bound and tortured in the trios effort to get the mans PIN, but he refused to give up the information before being mur dered and then robbed at his Lynn Haven home. Jeffries, 29, was convicted at trial and a jury recommended he be executed for his part in the crime. His sentencing is sched uled for later this year. Grifn has pleaded guilty to second-degree murder for her role in the slaying. She faces life in prison during her sentencing, scheduled for October. Man gets life for torture, murder DAVI D CHALLEN D ER By CHRIS OLWELL 747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY U.S. House candidates are trading barbs over domes tic violence in campaign ads, with challenger Gwen Graham accusing incum bent Steve Southerland of claiming support for a bill he voted against. Southerland has repeat edly claimed he voted for a ve-year extension of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), most recently in an advertisement re leased last week. On Wednesday, Gra ham red back with an ad accusing him of saying one thing and doing another. Its disturbing that Congressman Southerland isnt telling the truth about his record when it comes to protecting women and families from domestic violence, but sadly this is another example of how his Washington way of do ing things is out of touch with our North Florida val ues, Julia Gill Woodward, Grahams campaign man ager, said in an emailed statement. Congress man Southerland votes against protecting women in Washington, then says hes advocating for women when hes in the district during an election year. Heres the rub: South erland actually did vote for an extension of the act, which always had enjoyed bipartisan support when it came up for reauthori zation since it originally passed in 1994. The bill has been credited for sig nicant reductions in vio lence toward women. But he also voted against the VAWA that President Barack Obama signed into law last year. There were compet ing bills in the House and Senate. Southerland voted for the House bill, which never made it out of com mittee. The Senate bill in cluded new provisions that expanded the protections of the law to same-sex couples and undocument ed immigrants, and also gave tribes jurisdiction to try non-American Indian residents on tribal land. Those provisions werent in the House bill. They werent necessarily deal-breakers, said Matt McCullough, Souther lands spokesman, except Southerland never had an opportunity to debate their merits, and he voted against the Senate bill. McCullough blames Democrats for turning the issue into a political football. When VAWA was set to expire, Steve voted to extend each one of these critical programs protect ing women from domes tic violence and abuse, McCullough said in an emailed statement. When the Senate attached new provisions that were not part of VAWA, Steve thought they were worthy of consideration. Unfortu nately, (Senate Majority Leader) Harry Reid was not interested in a biparti san discussion of these is sues, and instead pushed through his own bill to score political points. The bill passed easily, 78-22, in the Democrat-con trolled Senate, while the Republicans in the House split. It passed 286-138, with 87 Republicans voting in favor of passage and 138 Republicans, in cluding Southerland, in opposition. Democrats are accus ing Republicans of waging a war on women. When an unusual story broke Wednesday after Buzzfeed obtained an invi tation to a men-only fund raiser in support of South erland, Grahams cam paign used it as evidence that his attitude toward women are degrading. The invitation included the line, tell the misses not to wait up because the after dinner whiskey and cigars will be smooth and the is sues to discuss are many. On Thursday after noon, Grahams campaign Facebook page posted an invitation to sign an on line petition demanding Southerland apologize for his degrading attitude toward women and his at tempts to mislead the vot ers of North Florida. Buzzfeed reported that Southerland campaign manager Luke Strickland downplayed the story. It is laughable that an issue is being made over an invitation to a private event hosted on Steves behalf six months ago, he said. We have also partici pated in events with wom en, young professionals, doctors, sportsmen. Domestic violence gets political Sept. 3 Christopher Ashley Bacon, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 8/27/1967, offence date 7/18/2014, driving while license suspended felony Christopher Michael Becker, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 2/24/1986, offence date 8/1/2014, possession of controlled substance Megan Anne Best, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 12/1/1979, offence date 7/26/2014, aggravated battery with deadly weapon Wesley N Birge, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 9/7/1986, offence date 3/22/2005, grand theft Christopher Terry Callahan, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 3/19/1971, offence date 7/27/2014, resisting ofcer with violence, battery domestic violence Madeline Ann Chance, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 11/7/1955, offence date 7/10/2014, felony child abuse David Ian Challender, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 4/29/1986, offence date 7/23/2014, escape Jacob Michael Dockery, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 9/1/1983, offence date 7/24/2014, introduction of contraband into detention facility Jamie Lawton Ellis, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 2/14/1991, offence date 7/19/2014, manufacture distribute or sell imitation drug, driving while license suspended or revoked, drug paraphernalia use or possession Girard Willie Greenwood, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 6/6/14965, offence date 7/7/2014, two counts carrying concealed rearm, drug possession marijuana under 20 grams, attaching improper tag James Clarin Gregory, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 12/31/1946, offence date 8/14/2014, driving under the inuence third violation within 10 years Chad Thomas Harmon, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 6/5/1984, offence date 7/10/2014, felony battery Anthony Scott Jordan, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 7/20/1981, offence date 7/24/2014, domestic violence battery strangulation Thomas G Land, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 4/21/1972, offence date 7/1/2013, burglary of structure, grand theft Thomas G Land, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 4/21/1972, offence date 3/11/2014, grand theft Joseph Fletcher Lee, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 9/5/1975, offence date 6/11/2014, armed robbery, grand theft from dwelling, dealing in stolen property Paul Robert Manseld, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 4/7/1964, offence date 7/23/2014, criminal mischief third degree felony, reckless driving, resist arrest without violence Donald Lee Marsh, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 4/7/1969, offence date 4/7/2014, eeing or attempting to elude police, driving while license permanently revoked, resist arrest without violence, petit theft rst offence Donald Lee Marsh, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 4/7/1969, offence date 7/1/2013, burglary of structure, grand theft Vera Sellers Martin, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 2/7/1970, offence date 8/1/2014, possession of controlled substance Matthew Benjamin McCombs, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 3/3/1992, offence date 7/28/2014, possession of controlled substance, resist arrest without violence Mickey Jason McFayden, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 10/28/1979, offence date 6/15/2014, written threats to kill or do bodily injury Sharon A Miller, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 12/5/1969, offence date 8/6/2014, aggravated assault with deadly weapon Rudy Castillo Minardo, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 9/28/1980, offence date 8/11/2014, drive while license suspended habitual offender Jeffery Shardon Morrill, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 6/11/1982, offence date 6/30/2014, escape, conspiracy to commit escape, aggravated assault on law enforcement ofcer, battery on law enforcement ofcer EMT or reghter, criminal mischief third degree William Waren Music, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 2/12/1992, offence date 8/9/2014, felony child abuse, battery domestic violence Katherine Elise Prince, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 2/12/1992, offence date, 8/9/2014, possession of cocaine Dennis E Pynes Jr., Arraignment Felony, date of birth 10/2/1983, offence date 6/23/2012, two counts uttering forged instrument Tony Lee Railey, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 8/10/1962, offence date 6/11/2014, armed burglary, grand theft Tony Lee Railey, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 8/10/1962, offence date 8/12/2014, aggravated assault with deadly weapon, battery domestic violence Ronnie William Richards Jr., Arraignment Felony, date of birth 4/19/1973, offence date 7/100/2014, possession of controlled substance Jeremiah Richardson, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 11/3/1971, offence date 7/25/2014, aggravated assault with deadly weapon, battery on law enforcement ofcer EMT or reghter, resisting with violence Laura Richter, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 4/7/1993, offence date 8/22/2013, introduction of contraband into detention facility Emmanuel Lee Shelton, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 1/28/1991, offence date 3/30/2014, felon in possession of rearm Jerry A Shields, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 2/5/1946, offence date 8/21/2014, possession of controlled substance, drug paraphernalia use or possession Charlie Spencer Wynn Jr., Arraignment Felony, date of birth 12/1/1982, offence date 8/1/2014, aggravated assault with deadly weapon Lester Brit York, Arraignment Felony, date of birth 6/23/1983, offence date 2/5/2014, fail to register as sex offender David Ian Challender, Arraignment Violation of Community Control, date of birth 4/29/1986, offence date 2/4/2012, grand theft Sheila Marie Fondo, Arraignment Violation of Community Control, date of birth 8/26/1968, offence date 12/6/2013, manufacture distribute or sell imitation drugs, possession of controlled substance Ronald Nunez Gell, Arraignment Violation of Community Control, date of birth 12/30/1991, offence date 7/25/2013, possession of controlled substance James Clarin Gregory, Arraignment Violation of Probation, date of birth 12/31/1946, offence date 7/18/2011, sale or delivery of controlled substance Jerry Dewayne Helmes, Arraignment Violation of Probation, date of birth 7/10/1970, offence date 1/1/2010, grand theft second degree Measha Marie Hendrix, Arraignment Violation of Probation, date of birth 6/16/1976, offence date 11/14/2012, introduction of contraband into detention facility Emmett Lewis Leverette Jr., Arraignment Violation of Probation, date of birth 8/7/1971, offence date 10/6/2013, possession of controlled substance Shane Anthony Locklear, Arraignment Violation of Community Control, date of birth 5/7/1985, offence date 11/29/2012, possession of controlled substance Rickey Lee West, Arraignment Violation of Probation, date of birth 3/7/1964, offence date 4/28/2013, drive while license suspended habitual offender Court DOCKETS Ca nd id at e Qu al if yi ng Da te s Qu al if yi ng fo r thr ee Po nc e de Le on To wn C ounc il se at s wi ll be Se pt em ber 15 20 14 th ro ug h Se pt em ber 18 20 14 An y per so n me et ing the qu al icat ions se t fo rt h in the To wn Ch ar te r an d de si ri ng to qu al if y as a ca nd ida te ma y pa y the qu al if yi ng fe e an d le the ir qu al if yi ng pa per s with th e To wn Cl er k at the Po nce de Le on To wn H al l lo ca te d at 15 80 Hw y 90 in Po nc e de Le on Ca nd ida te s ma y be re qu ir ed to un de rg o a dr ug sc r ee ning te st ba se d on th e To wn of Po nce de Le on s dr ug pol ic y. Th e bu si ne ss hou rs fo r the To wn H al l ar e 6: 00 AM to 4: 00 PM Mon da y th ro ug h Th ur sda y. Fo r mo re inf or mat io n ple as e co nt ac t the To wn Cler k at 85 083 643 61 NON -E TH AN OL GAS NO W IN BO NI FA Y Co nv en ienc e St or e wi th Be er So da Lo tt er y & Sn ack s, CL EA N RE ST RO OM S, ON & O -R oa d Di es el Goo d Pa rk in g Jus t o I10 an d Hw y 79 40 5 St Joh ns Rd, Bo ni fa y, Fl Or Vi sit us at 29 55 Hw y 81 Po nc e De Le on Fl

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Local A6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, September 10, 2014 NO HIDD EN CHA RGE S: It is our pol ic y that th e pa tien t an d an y othe r per so n re sp ons ib le fo r pa yment s has the ri gh t to re fus e to pa y, can cel pa yment or be re imb ur sed by pa yme nt or an y other ser vi ce ex aminat io n or tr eatm ent wh ich is perf or me d as a re sul t of and withi n 72 hou rs of re spo ndin g to the adv er tis eme nt fo r the fr ee dis co unt ed fe e or re duc ed fe e ser vice ex amina tion or tr eatm ent. "WE WELCOME NEW PA TIE NTS, CALL TODA Y FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PAT IENTS 59 AND OLDER This cer tif icat e is good fo r a complet e Medical Ey e Ex am with To dd Ro binson, M.D In Our Chiple y Of fi ce Boar d Ce rt if ied Ey e Ph ys ician and Sur geon. The ex am includes a pr es cr ip ti on fo r eye glasses and te sts fo r Glaucom a, Ca ta ra cts and other eye diseases FOR YO UR APPOINTMENT CA LL: 850-638-72 20 ELIGIBILI TY : U. S. Ci ti ze ns living in the Flor ida Pa nhand le 59 ye ar s and older not pr esentl y under our car e. Co upon Expir es: 9/30/20 14 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: WC00 Sm ar t Le ns es SM Ca n pr oduce clear vision without glasses at all dist ances www .m ullise ye .com MULLIS EYE INSTITUTE Chiple y Of fi ce 16 91 Main St., St e. 1 Chi ple y FL 3242 8 850-638-7220 We ar e locat ed dir ectl y acr oss the par king lot fr om the Wa lmar t in Chiple y To dd Ro binson, M.D Boar d Ce rt if ied Ey e Ph ys ician and Ca ta ra ct Sur geon Dear Citizens of Holmes and Wa shington Counties, I am ex tr emely gr ateful fo r the support man y of yo u ha ve pr ov ided during my re cent campaign. The people of Holmes and Wa shington Counties we re alw ay s kind and re cepti ve to me and my supporters. Being fr om Calhoun County I appr eciate yo ur style of hospitality and gr ace. Man y people ar e asking me if I intend to seek ofce again. The answ er is ye s! I thor oughly enjo ye d campaigning and belie ve that I ha ve much to offer as a public serv ant. Fo r those of yo u wh o supported me, I hope I can gain yo ur support again. Fo r those of yo u wh o we re unable to support me, I re spect yo ur decision and hope I can gain yo ur support in the futur e. In the meantime, I will continue to oper ate my la w ofce and serv e the needs of our local communities. Thanks again fo r yo ur support. Po li ti ca l adv er ti se me nt pa id fo r an d app r ov ed by Shalene Gr ov er fo r Circuit J ud ge 14 th Ju di cia l Ci rc ui t, Gr oup 10 Shalene Gr ov er candidate led waiver of report. Aug. 2-8: candidate led waiver of report. Aug. 821: monetary contributions were $300: expenditures were $0; contributions were given by Monty Merchant $300. County Commissioner District 4JOHN W A YNE C A RT W RIGHT FILE D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E F EB. 24:F eb. 1-28: candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. March 1-31: monetary contributions were $1,900: contributions were given by John Wayne Cartwright $1,900: expenditures were $15; Holmes County Supervisor of Election (petitions) $12.50 and Holmes County Supervisor of Elections (petitions) $2.50: April 1-30: led a report of no activity. May 131: monetary contributions were $0: expenditures were $866.70; Sims Signs (campaign cards and magnetic signs) $208.65 and Sims Signs (yard signs) $658.05. June 1-20: Candidate led a waiver of report. June 21 to July 4: candidate led waiver of report. July 5-18: candidate led waiver of report. July 19-25: c andidate led waiver of report. July 26 to Aug. 1: candidate led waiver of report. Aug. 2-8: monetary contributions were $0: expenditures were $100; expenditures were for City of Bonifay (sign placement) $100. Aug. 9-21: candidate led waiver of report. Aug. 22 to N ov. 24: monetary contributions were $0: expenditures were $557.50; expenditures were for Monty Lynn Merchant (closeout campaign account) $557.50. L T S ONNY JOHNSON, JR. FILE D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E J A N. 15: Jan. 1-31: Monetary Contributions were $2,000; Contributions given by: L.T. Sonny Johnson, Jr., $2,000; there were no expenditures for the reporting period. F eb. 1-28: candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. March 1-31: there were no monetary contributions for the reporting period; Expenditures were $1,615.10; Signs Etcetera, Inc. (sings) $1,515.10 and City of Bonifay (fee for placement of signs) $100: April 1-30: no monetary contributions were reported: In-Kind contributions $13; In-kind contributions were from Sonny Johnson (petitions) $13.00. May 1-31: candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. June 1-20: monetary contributions were $0: expenditures were $125; expenditures were for HCHS FBLA (shirts) $125. June 21 to July 4: candidate led waiver of report. July 5-18: candidate led waiver of report. July 1925: candidate led waiver of report. July 26 to Aug. 1: candidate led waiver of report. Aug. 2-8: candidate led waiver of report. Aug. 9-21: candidate led waiver of report.EDD IE P A UL FILE D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E M A R C H 24: March 1-31: candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period: April 1-30: monetary contributions were $250: expenditures were $14.90; contributions were given by Eddie O. Paul $250: expenditures were for Supervisor of Elections (petitions) $14.90. May 1-31: monetary contributions were $500: expenditures were $0; contributions were given by Mark S. Williams $200 and Edward O. Paul $300. June 1-23: monetary contributions were $300: expenditures were $874.19; contributions were given by Eddie Paul $300: expenditures were for Sims Signs (T-shirts, yard signs, door hangers) $874.19 and Eddie Paul (Close account) $160.93. (Did not qualify)D A NNY PO W ELL FILE D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E F EB. 6:F eb. 1-28: candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. March 1-31: candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. April 130: monetary contributions were $2,069: expenditures were $706.20; contributions were given by Danny Powell $2,069: expenditures were for Sims Signs (signs) $706.20. May 1-31: monetary contributions were $0: expenditures were $113.10; expenditures were for Holmes County Supervisor of Elections (petitions) $13.10 and City of Bonifay (place signs in city limits) $100. June 1-20: Candidate led a waiver of report. June 21 to July 4: candidate led waiver of report. July 5-18: candidate led waiver of report. July 19-25: monetary contributions were $0: expenditures were $84; expenditures were for WFECA (Ad) $84. July 26 to Aug. 1: monetary contributions were $0: expenditures were $595.46; expenditures were for Sims Signs (signs) $595.46. Aug. 2-8: candidate led waiver of report. Aug. 9-21: monetary contributions were $0: expenditures were $131.25; expenditures were for WCN (Ad) $131.25.EA RL S T A FFOR D FILE D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E A P RIL 14: April 1-30: candidate led a report of no activity. May 1-31: monetary contributions were $100: In-Kind contributions $255; expenditures were $14.20; contributions were given by Earl Stafford $100; Inkind contributions were from Earl Stafford (political signs) $255: expenditures were for Supervisor of Elections (petition cards) $14.20. June 1-20: Candidate led a waiver of report. June 21 to July 4: monetary contributions were $100: expenditures were $100; contributions were given by Earl Stafford $100; expenditures were for City of Bonifay (fee to place signs in city limits) $100. July 5-18: monetary contributions were $400: expenditures were $409.28; contributions were given by Earl Stafford $400; expenditures were for Sims Signs (signs) $409.28. July 19-25: candidate led waiver of report. July 26 to Aug. 1: candidate led waiver of report. Aug. 2-8: candidate led waiver of report. Aug. 9-21: candidate led waiver of report.K ENNETH M A RVEL WILLI AM S FILE D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E M A R C H 28: March 1-31: candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period: April 1-30: monetary contributions were $1,000: expenditures were $48.60; contributions were given by Kenneth Marvel Williams, $1,000: expenditures were for Supervisor of Elections (Petition) $13.60 and Doctors Memorial Foundation (tee box) $35. May 1-31: monetary contributions were $0: In-Kind contributions $1,000; expenditures were $539.77; In-kind contributions were from Kenneth Marvel Williams (old signs and posts) $1,000: expenditures were for Sims Signs (political signs) $439.77 and City of Bonifay (sign placement) $100. June 1-20: monetary contributions were $0: expenditures were $160; expenditures were for Lex Bynum (sign stands) $60 and HCMA (donation) $100. June 21 to July 4: monetary contributions were $1,011.67: expenditures were $623.81; contributions were given by Kenneth Marvel Williams, $800 and Kenneth Marvel Williams $211.67; expenditures were for Sims Signs (Tshirts and cups) $623.81. July 5-18: candidate led waiver of report. July 1925: candidate led waiver of report. July 26 to Aug. 1: candidate led waiver of report. Aug. 2-8: candidate led waiver of report. Aug. 9-21: candidate led waiver of report.S chool B oard District 1H R USSELL ( R USTY) WILLI AM S FILE D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E A P RIL 11: April 1-30: candidate led a report of no activity. May 1-31: monetary contributions were $0: In-Kind contributions $15; expenditures were $0;; Inkind contributions were from H. Russell Williams (payment for petition verication) $15. June 1-20: Candidate led a waiver of report. June 21 to Aug. 18: candidate led waiver of report. (Unopposed)S chool B oard District 3AL A N JUSTI C E FILE D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E M A R C H 13: March 1-31: candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. April 1-30: led a report of no activity. May 131: monetary contributions were $630: In-Kind contributions $161.48; expenditures were $616.28; contributions were given by Alan Shane Justice $400, Alan Shane Justice $100, Alan Shane Justice $130; In-kind contributions were from Alan Shane Justice (petition fees) $14.50, Alan Shane Justice (lumber and screws for signs)$80.89, Alan Shane Justice (lumber for signs) $44.69 and Alan Shane Justice (solar spotlights for signs) $21.40: expenditures were for Sims signs (yard signs, large sign, set up for yard signs) $387.86, City of Bonifay (fee for placing signs within the city limits of Bonifay) $100 and Sims Signs (large signs) $128.40. June 1-20: monetary contributions were $415: expenditures were $418.37; contributions were given by Alan Shane Justice $165 and Alan Shane Justice $250; expenditures were for Sims Signs (campaign cards and magnetic signs) $165.85 and Sims Signs (Tshirts) $252.52. June 21 to July 4 : candidate led waiver of report. July 5-18: monetary contributions were $60: InKind contributions $552.16; expenditures were $64.20; contributions were given by Alan Shane Justice $60; In-kind contributions were from Alan Shane Justice (spotlighting) $50, Alan Shane Justice (spotlighting)$57.49, Alan Shane Justice (lumber for signs) $35.31 and Alan Shane Justice (signs) $409.28: expenditures were for Sims Signs (sign) $64.20. July 19-25: monetary contributions were $0: In-Kind contributions $4.28; expenditures were $0; In-kind contributions were from Alan Shane Justice (signs) $4.28. July 26 to Aug. 1: monetary contributions were $200: expenditures were $0; contributions were given by Alan Shane Justice $200. Aug. 2-8: candidate led waiver of report. Aug. 9-21: monetary contributions were $0: In-Kind contributions $1,940.83; expenditures were $90; In-kind contributions were from Alan Shane Justice (postage) $1,511.49, Alan Shane Justice (postage)$429.34: expenditures were for Crossroads Publishing (ad) $90.J A SON MOTLEY FILE D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E F EB. 4: F eb. 1-28: candidate led a notication of no activity for reporting period. March 1-31: candidate led a notication of no activity for reporting period: April 130: monetary contributions were $400; no expenditures were reported; contributions were given by Jason Motley $400. May 1-31: monetary contributions were $490: expenditures were $800.10; contributions were given by Jason Motley $340 and Jason Motley $150: expenditures were for Supervisor of Elections (verify petition) $11.30, Smith Signs (signs) $688, Supervisor of Elections (verify petition) $.80 and City of Bonifay (political sign permit) $100. June 1-20: monetary contributions were $210: expenditures were $295.63; contributions were given by Jason Motley $210; expenditures were for Smith Signs (signs) 295.63. June 21 to July 4: monetary contributions were $335: expenditures were $323.25; contributions were given by Jason Motley $335; expenditures were for HCHS FBLA (shirts) $323.23. July 5-18: candidate led waiver of report. July 1925: candidate led waiver of report. July 26 to Aug. 1: candidate led waiver of report. Aug. 2-8: monetary contributions were $60: expenditures were $59.13; contributions were given by Jason Motley $60; expenditures were for Smith Signs (cards) 59.13. Aug. 9-21: monetary contributions were $262.50: expenditures were $262.50; contributions were given by Jason Motley $262.50; expenditures were for Holmes County TimesAdvertiser (Ad) 262.50.S chool B oard District 5S I D NEY M. S I D JOHNSON FILE D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E J A N. 24: Jan. 1-31: candidate led a notication of no activity for reporting period. F eb. 1-28: monetary contributions $3,000: monetary contributions are from: Sid Johnson $3,000; expenditures $1,332.15; Sims Signs (yard signs) $1,246.55 and Sims Signs (business cards) $85.60. March 1-31: monetary contributions for reporting period: expenditures $442.98; Sims Signs (Tshirts and Magnetic signs) $442.98. April 1-30: no monetary contributions reported: expenditures were $112.80; expenditures were for Campground church (donation) $100 and Supervisor of Elections (petitions) $12.80. June 1-20: monetary contributions were $0: InKind contributions were $1,007.29; expenditures were $556.36; In-Kind contributions are from Suzanne Johnson (novelty items) $607.29 and Sidney Johnson (large used signs) $400; expenditures were for Sims Signs (signs and T-shirts) $456.36 and Holmes County Ministerial Association (donation) $100. June 21 to July 4: monetary contributions were $0: expenditures were $175; expenditures were for Crossroads Publishing (political ad) $175. July 5-18: monetary contributions were $500: expenditures were $325.28; contributions were given by Sidney Johnson $500; expenditures were for Smith Signs (signs) $325.28. July 19-25: candidate led waiver of report. July 26 to Aug. 1: candidate led waiver of report. Aug. 2-8: candidate led waiver of report. Aug. 9-21: candidate led waiver of report. DRE W ALL A N K RISER FILE D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E J A NU A RY 22: Jan. 1-31: candidate led a notication of no activity for reporting period. F eb. 1-28: In-Kind contributions were $4.91; there were no expenditures reported for the reporting period; In-kind contributions are from Drew Kriser (copies of candidate petitions) $4.91. March 1-31: monetary contributions $200; In-Kind contributions $8.99; there were no expenditures reported for the reporting period. Monetary contributions were from Tamra Kriser $200. In-Kind donations were from Drew Kriser (purchase of domain name) $8.99: April 1-30: monetary contributions were $700: In-Kind contributions $2,510.13; expenditures were $481.78; contributions were given by Tamra Kriser $200, Karen Strickland $500; In-kind contributions were from Tamra Kriser (T-shirts) $20, Drew Kriser (Advertising) $875, Drew Kriser (Supplies for booth at Esto) $133, Drew Kriser (online domain) $8.99, Drew Kriser (create web page) $200, Drew Kriser (online promotion) $30, Drew Kriser (road signs) $532.50, Drew Kriser (road signs) $604.39 and Wynnton Melton (sign stands) $106.25: expenditures were for Brason English (T-shirts) $381.78 and the City of Bonifay (permit) $100. May 1-31: monetary contributions were $12.70: In-Kind contributions $960.92; expenditures were $159.16; contributions were given by Tamra Kriser $12.70; In-kind contributions were from Drew Kriser (banner buzz magnetic signs) $165.03, Drew Kriser (signs unlimited bumper stickers) $75.22 and Drew Kriser (i2imedia tri-folds and postcards) $720.66; expenditures were for Condently Creative designs (embroidered polo shirts) $57.76 and Branson English (T-shirts) $101.38. June 1-20: monetary contributions were $500: In-Kind contributions $561.39: expenditures were $58.02; In-Kind contributions were fro m Drew Kriser (banner buzz large signs) $365.35, Drew Kriser (promotion choice balloons) $126.04 and Drew Kriser (campaign meeting food and supplies) $70; contributions were given by Drew Kriser $500; expenditures were for Panhandle Lumber (boards for large signs) $58.02. June 21 to July 4: monetary contributions were $0: InKind contributions $123: expenditures were $72.23; In-Kind contributions were from Drew Kriser (supplies) $40 and Drew Kriser (helium) $83; expenditures were for Branson English (Tshirts) $72.23. July 5-18: monetary contributions were $500: expenditures were $0; contributions were from Karen Simmons $500. July 19-25: monetary contributions were $0: expenditures were $500; expenditures were for I2I Media (printing) $500. July 26 to Aug. 1: candidate led waiver of report. Aug. 2-8: candidate led waiver of report. Aug. 9-21: monetary contributions were $0: In-Kind contributions $1,333.09: expenditures were $330.54; In-Kind contributions were from Drew Kriser (postage) $859.61, Drew Kriser (Postage) $398.48 and Drew Kriser (food for event) $75; expenditures were for I2I Media (printing) $330.54. CAMPAIGN from page A3

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SPORTS www.bonifaynow.com A Section We 'r e Ce le br at in g Ou r 20 th An ni ve rs ar y in Ch ip le y! Th ank Yo u to Al l of Ou r Ar ea Sh oppe rs & As so ci at es Wa lm ar t Su pe rc en te r 16 21 Ma in St re et Ch ip ley FL 32 42 8 85 0-6 38 -2 243 www .w al ma rt .c om (8 50 ) 63 847 08 Tu -F ri 8a m5p m | 69 9 2n d St Ch ip le y, FL www .D ow nH ome Den ta lC en te r. co m TR EA TM EN T OF SN ORI NG AN D SL EEP AP NE A A de nt al de vice to tr ea t a me di ca l con di ti on Cal l fo r a co ns ult at ion Co nv en ien t Mo nt hl y Pa ym en t pl an s Bl oo m Bo ut iq ue We ha ve yo ur Gam e Da y att ire in sto ck Bl oo m is a uniq ue bo ut ique ca te rin g to t al l si ze s an d bu dg et s. 13 43 Br ic ky ar d Rd Sui te A Ch ip le y, FL 32 42 8. (8 50 ) 67 6493 8 13 43 B ri ck ya rd R d, Sui te A Al so of fe ri ng ma ss ag es 85 0-6 58 -4 18 2 Se pt em be r 6t h Sc or eb oa rd wi nn er : Al ma Va nn Ve rn on 2 mi sse s, Ti ebr e ak er Yo u co ul d wi n $2 5 ea ch we ek by pi ck in g th e mo st wi nn in g ga me s. En te r on li ne at Ch ip le yp ap er .c om or Bo nif ay no w. co m! 2014 Bethlehem High School Varsity Golf All home games are played at Dogwood Lakes Sept. 18, HCHS, 3:30 p.m. Sept. 23, @Marianna, 3:30 p.m. (Indian Springs) Sept. 25, Chipley, 3:30 pm. Sept. 30, @PDL, 3:30 p.m. (Dogwood Lakes) Oct. 2, @Walton, 3:30 p.m. (DeFuniak Springs) Oct. 7, All Teams, 1 p.m. (18 holes @ Dogwood Lakes or Sunny Hills) Oct 13/14, District 8 a.m. (Dogwood Lakes) Oct. 20/21, Regional, 8 a.m. (Pensacola) Nov. 4/5, State, TBA 2014-2015 Bethlehem Boys Basketball Schedule Nov. 13-14, Preseason Tourney, Pop. Springs, TBA, Varsity Nov. 17, Altha, Home, 6/7:30, JV/Varsity Nov. 18, South Walton, Away, 5:30/7, JV/Varsity Nov. 20, Malone, Home, 4/7, JV/Varsity Nov. 24-25, Geneva Tourney, Away, TBA, Varsity Dec. 2, Rocky Bayou, Home, 5:30/7, JV/Varsity Dec. 4, Malone, Away, 4/7, JV/Varsity Dec. 6, Central, Away, 7:30, Varsity Dec. 8, Geneva, Home, 7:30, Varsity Dec. 9, Paxton, Home, 2:30, Varsity Dec. 12-13, HCCT, Holmes Co., TBA, JV/Varsity Dec. 15, Laurel Hill, Away, 5:30/7, JV/Varsity Dec. 16, Ponce de Leon, Home, 4:30/7:15, JV/Varsity Dec. 18, Poplar Springs, Home, 5/7:30, JV/Varsity Jan. 8, Paxton, Away, 4:30/7:15, JV/Varsity Jan. 9, Poplar Springs, Away, 5/7:30, JV/Varsity Jan. 13, Ponce de Leon, Away, 4:30/7:15, JV/Varsity Jan. 15, Houston Academy, Home, 7:30, Varsity Jan. 17, Central, Home, 7:30, Varsity Jan. 20, Laurel Hill, Home, 5:30/7, JV/Varsity Jan. 22, Holmes County, Home, 5/6:30, JV/Varsity Jan. 27, Rocky Bayou, Away, 5/6:30, JV/Varsity Jan. 29, South Walton, Home, 5:30/7 JV/Varsity Jan. 30, Altha, Away, 6/7:30, JV/Varsity By JASON SHOOT 747-5069 | @PCNHJasonShoot jshoot@pcnh.com TALLAHASSEE Amp Lee just needs a helmet and some cleats and hes ready to rekindle his football career. Lee, whose birth name is Anthonia Wayne Lee, was inducted into Florida States Athletics Hall of Fame during a banquet Friday night at the schools University Center. Lee, a Chipley native, starred as a running back for the Seminoles from 1989 to 1991. Lee rushed for more than 2,000 yards in his career, and he added 30 rushing touchdowns and eight more through the air. He was one of two former football players inducted defensive lineman Aaron Carter was the other and one of seven FSU athletes overall. Before Saturdays game against The Citadel, Lee and Carter addressed assembled fans and onlookers from Florida States Sod Cemetery, where they relived some of their ner moments in a Seminole uniform. Lee was asked about FSUs trip to Michigan in 1991, when he ran for 120 yards and two touchdowns to help the then-No. 1 Seminoles beat the third-ranked Wolverines 51-31 in Ann Arbor, Mich. Lee, 42, listened to the play-by-play call from legendary broadcaster Keith Jackson, who described Lees 5-yard touchdown run that gave the Seminoles a 31-23 lead going into the locker room at halftime. Hearing Keith, Im emotional, Lee said. I remember being there. It makes me feel like I can suit up again and go. For good measure, Lee broke down into an athletic stance and showed fans the footwork that helped him carve out a nine-year career in the NFL. Lee was drafted in the second round by the San Francisco 49ers in 1992. He played in the Bay Area for two years before landing in Minnesota (199496) and ultimately in St. Louis (1997-99). Lee said he has lived for the last 15 years in Arizona, where he passes on his football knowledge to kids. He noted the Seminole name has been represented well everywhere Ive been. I was in the Starbucks line and had a lady in a car in front of me with a Gator tag on it. I started (doing) the chop, he said, motioning with his right arm. She paid for my Starbucks. Lee inducted into FSU Hall of Fame Page 7 BETHLEHEM HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS AP Chipley native Amp Lee, right, joined fellow Florida State Athletics Hall of Fame inductee Aaron Carter, left, to speak with fans from FSUs Sod Cemetery on Saturday. Wednesday, September 10, 2014 By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT ckent@chipleypaper.com VERNON Vernon outscored West Gadsden 38-7 Friday night despite losing quarterback Tristan Porter for the season from an injury he suffered during the Yellow Jackets season opener against Chipley. DVonta ONeal scored just 14 seconds into the rst quarter on a 75-yard run for Vernon, 1-1, and the rout was on. Ryan Malloy brought the score to 16-0 after another touchdown and two-point conversion seven minutes later. West Gadsden, 0-2, didnt control the ball much throughout the game. Traice Adams intercepted with a little over ve minutes left in the rst quarter for the Jackets and later passed to Darrius Peterson for another Vernon touchdown. Following a third two-point conversion it was 24-0. That was the score at halftime. Early in the third quarter West Gadsden nally scored on a 69-yard touchdown by Devante Gibson with 10:49 showing. Darrius Peterson had a 24-yard scoring run with 7:26 left in the fourth quarter. Vernon forced a West Gadsden turnover and the Yellow Jackets added their nal touchdown with 3:10 left in the game. Of cials then called the game early due to unsportsmanlike conduct by West Gadsdens sideline. We did what we had to do to survive, Vernon head coach Bobby Johns said. Losing Tristan Porter last week forced us to simplify some things, but we were able to do that. It was a good effort Vernon rolls despite loss of Porter CAROL KENT | Times-Advertiser Dvonta Oneal runs for the rst Vernon touchdown against West Gadsden, just 14 seconds into the game Friday night. tonight, and we look forward to a good game against Jay next week. FAMU 16, Blountstown 3 TALLAHASSEE Blountstown amassed its only points on a eld goal to open the game and the Tigers fell to 0-2. Derek Eberlys 30-yard eld goal gave Blountstown a lead that lasted until the nal quarter. FAMU erased the de cit following a missed Eberly try from 22 yards and the Baby Rattlers added a second touchdown and 2-point conversion to seal the win. Nathan Dunham rushed for 59 yards and Tristen Burke 44 for Blountstown. The Tigers passed for only 12 yards and gave up 207 total in defeat. Blountstown hosts Graceville next week. Wewahitchka 37, Cottondale 28 COTTONDALE Rashard Ranie rushed for 264 yards and three touchdowns to guide Wewahitchka to its rst win. Tad Gaskin hauled in a touchdown catch for the Gators (1-1), who host Liberty County next week. Liberty County-Holmes County postponed BRISTOL The game didnt begin, as lightning stopped the nondistrict contest. No makeup date was announced.

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SPECIAL TO T IME S A DVERTI S ER Can anyone identify the youngsters in this photo on Bonifays Main Street long ago? This photo was submitted by Dean Carroll. Do you recognize these youngsters? If so please email wcnnews@chipleypaper.com Your answer will appear in a future edition. Chasing Shadows is a new feature we hope to run each week. Do you have an old photo from Holmes County youd like to have identied? Ask your neighbors for help by submitting it for publication. Send email submissions to wcnnews@chipleypaper.com. SPECIAL TO T IME S A DVERTI S ER In the Sept. 3, Chasing Shadows feature we asked local residents to identify the people in this photo at a Festival. Thank you to Elizabeth Beth Arnold for identifying the two boys as her sons, Jacob and Seth Taylor. She says that they were about 4 and 8 years old in the photo, that was 18 years ago. Arnold also thanked the Holmes County Times for making her day. SHADOWS CAUGHT! This time of year I love to drive along rural highways and observe the peanut harvest, though for me it is the highest allergy season. Seeing endless stretches of the green elds, I am reminded that in my growing-up years, those endless rows of peanuts would not have been possible due to antiquated harvesting methods. Instead of huge harvesters you would have seen rows of haystacks. We only grew peanuts for green consumption (boiled) or home-dried for seed peanuts. But elds of haystacks were a common sight in my youth. Farmers limited the number of acres they planted due to the intensity of labor. After the crop was mature the rows were rst plowed up with a turning plow. Then every peanut plant had to be hand shaken to remove the loose dirt. When you saw a person who had been helping to Shake Peanuts, you saw a person who was black with dirt from head to toe. Drying them then took place on the stacks. A tall pole containing a cross piece was driven into the ground and men with pitchforks would then toss the shaken green plants with nuts over the pole to dry. At picking time, the stacks would be taken by ground slide to the picker. I remember my Uncle Alex growing enough peanuts one year to have the picker come. Getting the picker to the eld was an exciting day because we never saw any mechanized machinery, just mules and plows. I have been trying to picture what brought the picker to the eld, but it must have been brought by a log truck or skidder. A gasoline engine ran a series of belts on pulleys that separated the peanuts from the plant and then baled the plants into square bales of hay. The picker always left some peanuts on the plant so it was a treat when climbing in the hay loft in the barn to nd a dried peanut to eat. Before 1860, peanuts were considered food for animals and poor people. We, like many farmers, planted some to be hogged off. That is, they were left in the ground and the hogs were turned in on them to root them up and feed on them. Peanut fed bacon, however, is not as desirable as corn fed because it does not have as rm texture. Then, during the Civil War, soldiers from the north and the south fed on peanuts they were able to nd and found them to be a substantial food. They arent actually nuts, but are legumes like peas or beans. I remember someone asking my cousin Kathleen if Grandpa had planted any ground peas. She replied, I dont know. He planted some kind of peas. Ground pea was a common name for peanuts. It wasnt until around 1900 that equipment began to be developed to harvest, clean, and shell peanuts. Then Dr. George Washington Carver of Tuskegee Institute in Alabama recognized the nutritional value of peanuts and promoted the idea of rotating their growth with cotton in the south. He also developed many uses for the peanut. Today, peanuts add 4 billion dollars to our nations economy. American farmers produce 600 million pounds of peanuts annually and 700 million pounds of peanut butter annually. The top 4 states in peanut production are Alabama, Texas, Georgia, and North Carolina. The average acreage of a peanut farm is 100 acres. One acre will produce enough peanut butter to make 30,000 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. The peanuts we grew were picked off by hand for boiling or for selling green. Jack had a business arrangement with his Great-Aunt Fannie Young when he was about 12. She raised the peanuts, picked them off, boiled them and put them in small brown bags. Then on Saturday afternoon when everybody came to Bonifay, he sold boiled peanuts on the street corner for-a nickel a bag. He got half the proceeds and Aunt Fannie got half. Even though peanuts are grown elsewhere, boiled ones seem to be a local delicacy. Annie Lee Williams who ran the Greyhound Bus station on Highway 90 used to tell about a soldier who bought a bag of peanuts and got back on the bus. Then, he returned them, saying, Mam, these are wet. That is my Canadian brother-in-laws reaction to boiled peanuts. Whether its watching Gator Football at home with a bowl of salty boiled peanuts or eating roasted peanuts at a Bluegrass Festival, I am glad for Dr. Carver and for those companies that developed equipment to grow, harvest, and process peanuts so that they are readily available. Many college graduates are grateful too for the high protein peanut butter that sustained them through their college years. Holmes County years ago ... REFLECTIONS www.bonifaynow.com Page A8 Wednesday, September 10, 2014 50 years ago 1964 31 year-old man is charges in fatal beating: Billy McLendon, 31, of Bonifay Route 2, has been charged with rst degree murder in the death of Mary Predgen, 51, of Geneva, who died in the home of McClendons mother. City gets cigarette tax money from state: The City of Bonifay has received $2,968.93 in cigarette tax money collected in the city. Collector reports nearly perfect payment record: County Tax Collector Gordon Clemmons closed out the 1963 tax roll with a 99.66 percentage collection for a near perfect record. 20 years ago 1994 Stripling gets 20 years for murder: Former mayor of Westville was sentenced in Holmes County Circuit Court after being convicted of killing his stepdaughter/lover. Building inspector in works for City of Bonifay: City attorney Owen Powell ton the Bonifay City Council at the regular meeting the city has a tremendous need for a building inspector. County gets recycling grant: The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners recently received an additional $50,000 to enhance their recycling program. Producing, harvesting, processing of peanuts have changed drastically HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison

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By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT Cspears@chipleypaper.com PONCE de LEON Hundreds of adults and children alike took full advantage of free admission, food and fun at this years Picnic in the Park on Saturday, Sept. 6, at Ponce de Leon State Park and Springs. Picnic in the Park was sponsored by Holmes County Teen Court, Holmes County School Board, C.A.S.E. Coalition, Holmes County Law Enforcement and Florida Department of Environmental Protection in efforts to help keep our youth drug and crime free. Summer closes with a PHOTOS BY CECILIA SPEARS | Extra Volunteers help cook hamburgers and hot dogs, including Bonifays nest, Police Chief Chris Wells. Holmes County Department of Health volunteers hand out free items and literature to all visitors at the park. Helping hand out lunch is Superintendent of Schools for Holmes County, Eddie Dixon. Volunteers took time out of their busy weekend to give back, sharing more than just lunch but smiles. Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 10 2014 B PAGE 1 Section EXTRA Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) Whos been the only astronaut to enter space in the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs? Glenn, Aldrin, White, Schirra 2) Whats your problem if youre suffering from taresthesia? Crick in neck, Sleepy foot, Woozy brain, Muscle pain 3) Which state got its name from the Algonquin word for muddy water? Missouri, Mississippi, Iowa, Alabama 4) What is Brazils favorite pizza topping? Green peas, Squid, Curry, Pineapple 5) Which character of The Simpsons has a 13AA shoe size? Lisa, Homer, Marge, Abraham 6) Whats the depth of water to oat a boat called? Drogue, Draft, Freeboard, Trim 7) Which room do more housekeepers say is the hardest to keep clean? Bathroom, Den, Childs bedroom, Kitchen 8) What is chrysotile also known as? Velcro, Asbestos, Permanent Press, Nylon 9) Which vehicle rst made Lee Iacoccas reputation? Thomas Flyer, Chevy Bel Air, Dodge Comet, Ford Mustang 10) What U.S. item went on sale for the rst time in 1939 at $1.15? Plastic plate sets, Nylon stockings, Silk owers, TV snack tables 11) Of these which isnt one of the three chipmunks? Alvin, Franklin, Simon, Theodore 12) What was the original name of miniature golf? Putt-Putt, Tom Thumb Golf, Little Club, Roof Golf 13) Cats have about 100 vocal sounds, but what about dogs? 10, 25, 50, 75 ANSWERS 1) Schirra. 2) Sleepy foot. 3) Missouri. 4) Green peas. 5) Marge. 6) Draft. 7) Bathroom. 8) Asbestos. 9) Ford Mustang. 10) Nylon stockings. 11) Franklin. 12) Tom Thumb Golf. 13) 10. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com

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B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Extra Wednesday, September 10, 2014 We als o ta ke ca re of (850) 638-5885 Mo st Ve hicles Up to 5 qts syn thetic blend Mo st Ve hicles $ 19 95 + tax + tax Sewells celebrate 75 years The children of Mr. and Mrs. Earnest Sewell will hold a 75th wedding anniversary reception at noon Saturday, Sept. 13, at Live Oak Baptist Church. Earnest Fletcher Sewell was born to John Fletcher Sewell and Jennie Elizabeth Porter on Dec. 14, 1922. Clara Cornelia was born to John Gable Stephens and Ida Lavada Freeman on March 11, 1925. Earnest and Clara were united in marriage on Sept. 16, 1939, in Marianna. They have with ve children: Ernest Glenn Sewell, Ernest Carroll Sewell, Shirley Jeanette Pippin, Francis Yates Reeder and Ricky Sewell. The couple also has 13 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren. Crutcheld celebrates 1st birthday Sophia Crutcheld celebrated her 1st birthday in Monroeville, Pa., with her family on Aug. 2. She is the daughter of Brandon and Minnie Crutcheld of Monroeville, Pa. Sophias grandparents are Eddie and Jacqueline Crutcheld of Monroeville, Pa. Her great-grandparents are Jack and Marilyn Ulrich of Bonifay, Martha Bryant of Bonifay and the late Edward Eugene Crutcheld of Graceville. She is the niece of Eddie Crutcheld of Bonifay and the greatniece of John and Lisa Ulrich of Bonifay. MONDAY 9:30 a.m.: Car Seat Safety Classes rst and third Mondays at the Healthy Start Annex. Call 547-8684, ext 16 or 18. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dinning; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 5-7 p.m.: Holmes County Urgent Care Clinic. Call 547-8500. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach ofce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999. TUESDAY 8-10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 12:30 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Tuesday Group 5-7 p.m.: Holmes County Urgent Care Clinic. Call 547-8500. 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 6:10 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at speedball 6:10 p.m., Early bird 6:20, session 6:50 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-7654 or 638-7654. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum open. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise 10 a.m.: Two-hour Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) class on fourth Wednesdays at the Healthy Start Annex in Bonifay. Call 547-8684, ext: 16 or 18. 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Dominoes, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Bible Study 5-7 p.m.: Holmes County Urgent Care Clinic. Call 547-8500. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9-11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County residents only) 9 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Art Enthusiast 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m.: Car Seat Safety Classes third Thursdays at the Ponce de Leon City Hall. Call 547-8684, ext. 16 or 18. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise 10 a.m.: Two-hour Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) class on fourth Thursdays at the Ponce de Leon City Hall. Call 547-8684, ext. 16 or 18. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church on Fifth Street in Chipley 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets Thursdays at the Chipley Library. 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society meets second Thursdays. The public is invited to attend. 5-7 p.m.: Holmes County Urgent Care Clinic. Call 547-8500. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh-in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A FRIDAY 6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dining; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 3:30 p.m.: Bead Class second Fridays at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery. Call 703-0347. 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper fourth Fridays January to September. 5-7 p.m.: Holmes County Urgent Care Clinic. Call 547-8500. 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Methodist Youth Center in Marianna. Games, prizes and snacks. Call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. SATURDAY 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.: North Bay Clan of The Lower Muskogee Creek Yard Sale rst Saturdays at 1560 Lonnie Road. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Holmes County Community Health Clinic, 203 W. Iowa St., Bonifay, open rst and third Saturdays 10 a.m.: Alford Community Health Clinic open second and fourth Saturdays, until the last patient is seen. 10 a.m. to noon: Childrens education day fourth Saturdays at North Bay Clan Tribal Grounds, 1560 Lonnie Road. SUNDAY 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at Graceville-Campbellton Hospital in Graceville. SP ECIA L TO EX TRA BUSINESS W AUSAU LIBRARY Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed HOLMES COUNTY LIBRARY (BONIFAY) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed W ASHINGTON COUNTY LIBRARY (CHIPLEY) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed VERNON LIBRARY Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed SUNNY HILLS LIBRARY Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedSPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS: Ollie Maes Boutique SP ECIA L TO EX TRA Kolmetz appointed CSC chairman Community CALENDAR Birthday Anniversary Special to The Times-Advertiser Debbie Kolmetz of Ponce de Leon recently was appointed chairman of Career Source Chipola, formerly known as Chipola Workforce. Kolmetz previously had the position of co-chairman. Before that, she served as secretary to the board. Business name: Ollie Maes Boutique Business contact information: 612 West Highway 90 in Bonifay 850-547-3659 Number of employees: 3 Owners or managers name: Jacqueline Don Sims Business services provided: We sell boutique clothing thats unique and fun. We try to keep a price point thats tting for most people. We also sell shoes, jewelry, purses, Miss Me Jeans, leather and pearl jewelry, Mahlon Grace and Ashton Nichole jewelry. Years in business: 2 How you got into this business: I (Jacqueline Sims) opened the boutique upon graduating from FSU with a degree in history and being unable to nd a job. What you like most about your business: What I like most about our business would be the support of our customers. They have made our small business grow through their support and love and for that we are blessed and grateful. Ive always had an eye for fashion and I love being able to help women dress and feel great about themselves through their clothing. Name of person completing this form: Jacqueline Don Sims The Holmes County TImes-Advertiser wants to highlight our hometown businesses! Business Prole is a new weekly feature designed to inform readers about the local business community. To participate, complete the above information like Jacqueline Sims did and email it, along with a photo, to news@ chipleypaper.com. If you need a business photo taken by our staff, contact us at 638-0212. LIBRARY HOURS

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Extra Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Wednesday, September 10, 2014 Ca ll 7 da ys a we ek 8am 11pm EST Pr omo Co de: MB0614 1-800-831-1867 CA LL NO W LIMITED TIME SA VINGS! mo Pr omotional Pa ck ages Sta rt ing At. .. FOR 12 MONTHS Not elig ible fo r Hopper or HD Special to Extra Two Holmes County, ninth graders recently signed contracts with Take Stock in Children which will provide the scholarships to Chipola College. Paige Lumpkin, from Holmes County High school, and Ryan Eldridge, from Ponce de Leon High school, will earn the scholarships if they maintain above a C average, remain drug and crime free, have good behavior and maintain respectable attendance throughout high school. Funds to purchase these scholarships were raised through Take Stock in Children fundraisers held locally in Holmes County. Crossword PUZZLE SOLUTION ON PAGE B5 P H OTOS S P EC IA L TO E X T R A Paige Lumpkin, a ninth-grader from Holmes County High school, recently signed a contract with Take Stock in Children. From left, are Crystal Pearson, mother; scholarship recipient Paige Lumpkin; Mark Lumpkin, father; (back) Jim Goodman, Holmes County deputy superintendent; Matt Tate, assistant principal of PDLHS; Eddie Dixon, Holmes County superintendent; Cindi Davis, Take Stock mentor; Mary Helen Smith, Take Stock program manager; and Shawna Lumpkin, stepmother. Special to Extra Dianne Green, Chipola Colleges physical plant/ residence hall coordinator, has been named the colleges Career Employee of the Year for 2014. Green has worked at Chipola since January 2003. She has been very active in the Association of Florida Colleges and the Career Employees Association where she has served as chair/cochair on a number of various committees. In addition, she has served on several college committees including Residence Hall, Safety, Facilities/ Grounds Enhancement, Career Service Awards, and Budget Review/Development. The employee who nominated Green for the award said, Dianne spends a lot of time on the phone helping college staff or outside contractors. She always has a smile in her voice, and is very courteous and respectful. Dianne does a wonderful job of trying to help everyone solve their problems. She is very deserving of this award. Green and her husband, Thomas, both attended Chipola. Their children, Kimberly and Haley-Marie, also are alumni of the college, and her granddaughter, MacKenzie, is currently a student at Chipola. The family is active in the Welcome Assembly of God Church in Dellwood. The Employee of the Year award recognizes the exceptional work of Chipolas career service employees. Candidates are nominated by fellow employees for exhibiting courtesy, motivation and professionalism. Annual winners receive a $1,000 bonus, reserved parking for a year, a one-year membership in AFC, and a $100 gift certicate from the college Book Store. Green is Chipolas career employee of the year KMS PTO and open house CH IP LE Y Open House and a meeting of the Kate Smith Elementary School PTO will be held at 6 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 11, at the school. For more information, call 638-6220. Guardian ad L item seeking volunteers CH IP LE Y Be a strong, dependable voice in court for abused and neglected children from Holmes and Washington counties. Guardian ad Litem is seeking volunteers to help these children. Training is scheduled to begin in Chipley in September. Call 7475180 for more information and an application. 2014 soccer registration CH IP LE Y The city of Chipley will be holding soccer registration from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., through Friday, Sept 12, at City Hall. Any child between the ages of 4-14 as of Oct. 1 will be eligible to participate. Teams will be picked on Sept. 15; only head coaches will be aloud in the team draft. Practice will begin Sept. 22, if a coach has not contacted you by Sept 19; call Guy Lane at 638-6348 or 658-2773. If payment is made before Sept. 12 the cost is $42, any one paying after Sept. 12 the registration is $47. All payments are to be cash, check or money order. Two-Toed Tom yard sale E STO The Two-Toed Tom Festival will be holding a yard sale all day Saturday, Sept. 13, at the Esto Community Center. The cost to rent a table inside will be $10 and to rent a table outside the cost will be $5. For more information, call Darlene at 263-3201. Bingo BONIFAY The Pittman Volunteer Fire Department will hold a bingo fundraiser at 6 p.m., Sept. 13. Doors will open at 5 p.m. Packs start at $6. Players must be 18 years of age. For more information call 768-0138. Bingo Fundraiser W E STVI LLE Pittman Volunteer Fired Department with be hosting a Bingo to raise money for the re department at 6 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 13. For more information, call Dottie Clark at 547-4040. 2014 Graceville H arvest Festival beauty pageant G R A CE VI LLE The 34th annual Harvest Festival Pageant will be held at 6 p.m., Friday, Sept. 12 and Saturday, Sept. 13, at the Graceville Civic Center. The entry fee is $60 with all proceeds going to the Graceville Harvest Day Celebration. Contestants can participate in photogenic for an additional $10. Photogenic entries will be limited to one photo per contestant. This is an open pageant. Applications can be picked up at Bush Paint and Supply, Graceville City Hall and at Forget Me Not Photography in Bonifay. The deadline to submit applications is Friday, Aug 29. Winners will receive a large trophy, large crown and banner. Alternates and participants will receive trophies. Door admission is $5 per adult and applies to all individuals with the exception of contestants. Admission for children three and under will be free. For more information, call Teresa Bush at 263-4744 or 263-3072 or call Michelle Watkins at the City of Graceville at 263-3250. Mix it up! C onvenience mix class BONIFAY There will be a Mix it up! Convenience class from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 16, at Carmel Assembly of God Church at 1485 Carmel Church Road in Bonifay. Learn how to make your own baking mix, one-dish meal-type mix, and Cream of Whatever Soup mix plus many others. The registration fee is $5 and includes course materials. Pre-registration is requested by contacting the Holmes County Extension Ofce at 547-1108 or the Washington County Extension Ofce at 638-6265. Extension programs are open to everyone. For persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations, please contact 547-1108 (TDD, via Florida Relay Service, 1-800-955-8771) at least ve working days prior to the class so that proper consideration may be given to the request. H olmes C reek clean up V ER NON Holmes Creek clean up 2014 will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 16. Bring your gloves and grabbers. There will be free canoe rentals and prizes for the most trash collected. Prizes will include free canoe rentals and a two night stay at Top of the Gulf in Panama City Beach. The group will meet at Holmes Creek Canoe Livery located at 2899 Highway 79 in Vernon. Deer nutrition and management seminar CH IP LE Y There will be a deer nutrition and management seminar from 6:30-8:30 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 18, at the Washington County Agriculture Center in Chipley. The seminar will focus on management strategies to improve your deer herd and tips, techniques and recommendations for growing quality food plots and improving deer habitat. The seminar is free to the public. RSVP to the Washington County Extension ofce at 638-6180 or mdm83@u.edu. C hipola theatre showcase MA R IANNA Charles Sirmon, Chipola College Director of Theatre, will begin his 16th season at the college with a Theatre Showcase, at 7 p.m., Thursday, Sept 18. Chipola theater majors will present scenes and skits in a showcase that Sirmon says, Is a lot like Saturday Night Live on a Thursday. The production is general admission and allows all theatre majors the opportunity to share their talent and many for the rst time. Tickets are $10 and go sale beginning Thursday, Sept. 4, and are available to purchase from theatre majors, at the Center for the Arts box ofce or online at www.chipola.edu. The Showcase is a fundraiser to help Chipola theater students with their annual trip to Atlanta, where they will take a master class in improvisation and attend a performance with a professional theatre company. For more information, call 718-2420 or visit www.chipola.edu. Book Sale MA R IANNA The Jackson County Public Library in Marianna will hold its annual Friends of the Library Book Sale from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, Sept. 18-20. Prices begin at 25 cents. For more information call 482-9631 Community EVENTS D IANN E GREE N physical plant/ residence hall coordinator, Ryan Eldridge, a ninth-grader from Ponce de Leon High school, recently signed a contract with Take Stock in Children. From left, are (front) Keith Eldridge, father; scholarship recipient Ryan Eldridge; Amy Eldridge, mother; (back) Anna Taylor, TSIC regional director; Debbie Kolmetz, school board member; Buddy Brown, HCHS principal; Eddie Dixon, superintendent; and Mary Helen Smith, Take Stock program manager. HC students sign Take Stock in Children scholarships

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FAITH B Section 4242 Lafaye tte St. Marianna FL, 32446 850-482-40 43 Open: M-F 8am-6p m, Sat 8am-6pm www .chipolafor d.com Ch ip ola Fo rd BR OW N FU NE RA LH OM E 10 68 Mai nS t. ,C hi pl ey ,F L3 24 28 Ph one :6 38 -4 01 0 Do nald Br own -L FD ,O wne r 5020118 MARIANNA TO YO TA (850) 547-2163 219 N. Wa ukesha St. Bonifay ,F L Johnson sP harmacy (850) 638-8376 Come as you are Come as you are Come as you are 1126391 It s not wh at we do bu th ow we do it 98 2O ra ng eH il lR oad ,C hip le y 63 895 05 HA VE YOUR UNIT SER VICED TO SA VE ON YOUR ELECTRIC BILL (850) 263-2823 1075 N. HWY .7 9 BON IF AY ,F L P&P OB ER T FU NER AL HOM E (850) 547-2163 219 N. Wa ukesha St. Bonifay ,F L Johnson sP harmacy Owners: JD &D elisha Kilgore 1218 Main St. 638-4097 Mull is Ey eI nsti tute 16 91 Mai nS tr eet, Suite #1 Lo cated across from Wa lmar t Ch ip le y 85 0638 -7 22 0 1254 Churc hA ve .C hiple yF L3 2438 850 -63 8-1 751 Ser ving yo us ince 19 53 Frien dly Hometown Ser vice PROGRES SIVE REAL TY "See u sf or all your Realty needs" 850-638-8220 1046 Main St. |C hip ley Stephen B. Register ,C PA 15 52 Bric ky ard Ro ad Chipley ,F L 1396 Jackson Av e (850) 638-18 05 13 57 Bric ky ard Rd., Chipley Oxygen, CP APs, Mastecomy Supplies, Wheel Chairs, Hospital Beds, and many other home health aids. 879 Us er yR oa d, Ch ip le y, Fl ori da 32428 850-638-4654 Wednesday, September 10, 2014 www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Page 4 The basic tool for the manipulation of reality is the manipulation of words. If you can control the meaning of words, you can control the people who must use them. Philip K. Dick God gave man words and language to rst of all communicate with Him and secondly with others. Words are the way of expressing our ability to reason, or the lack thereof. Its with words that we understand, explain, and systematize the world we live in. Its with words that we communicate to others our inner world of thoughts and ideas. Words mean something because they have de nition and to understand what someone means we must know the de nition of the words being used. Its by all of us using the same language with words that mean the same thing to each of us that we are able to cooperate with each other, interact with each other, and become involved with each other in those things that impact us all. Its by this means that we can systematize our world and create order out of chaos. But if someone were to change the use of a few select words by changing their meaning and rede ning them to mean what they wanted them to mean to further their agenda, and would not allow anyone to use those words in their original meaning then they would be cutting themselves off from others and giving themselves some superiority over them. Only by accepting their new meanings to old words would others then be allowed to operate in this old arena with new meanings where old meanings are obsolete. By this individual or group controlling the meaning of words they are controlling the direction and progress of those parties involved as well as the impact made on members of society indirectly involved. This practice of rede ning words is used to cover ones real intentions and past actions. They are evasive and obscure the meaning of words to keep anyone from attaching any wrong doing to them. They use vague and ambiguous language. Their words take on new meaning with every new and different situation. This improper use of words is dishonest and exposes ones insincerity. Welcome to the political arena. This misuse of words explains the disconnect the masses have with their elected of cials. This is why the line of communication is broke and were never on the same page with them. They use the same words we use but they dont have the same meaning. Their misuse of words is a deliberate attempt to deceive. It is the same as falsifying information. They use words that we know the true meaning to but their new meaning excuses their wrong doing. This all sounds very silly but this is really how it works. Politicians use this tactic in a deliberate attempt to confuse us and cut us off from the political process that addresses so many of our Constitutional rights as citizens. If you would like your churchs faith events included in this list, please email the information to news@chipleypaper.co m Church yard sale CHIPLEY First Presbyterian Church in Chipley will hold a Yard and Bake Sale in the brick house behind the church. The sale will be from 8 a.m. to noon, Friday and Saturday Sept. 12 and 13 from 8 a.m. until noon. The church is located at 658 5th Street. For more information call 638-1629. Kent clean up ALFORD There will be a clean up day at the Kent Cemetery, Saturday, Sept. 13. Please come as early as possible and bring tools to work with. The cemetery is located three miles southwest of Alford. Following the cleaning there will be a sh fry. Please bring a covered dish and tea for lunch. For more information call Annie Toole at 638-1030. Back to school youth rally WESTVILLE MT. Pleasant Assembly of God will hold a Back to School Youth Rally at 6 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 13. The guest speaker will be Eric Gillis, Ministries Director of Auburn YFC. Worship music will be lead by Joyful Noise. The church is located at 1996 Mt. Pleasant Rd, Westville. Food will be provided afterwards. Please RSVP, if possible at www.facebook. com/mt.pleasantao g Senior womens ministry CHIPLEY The Senior Womens Ministry of Mt. Ararat First Missionary Baptist Church will observe Missionary Day, T 3 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 14. The program will feature Climbing the Eternal Ladder with 10 Christian ladies explaining each step. The church is located at 1233 Old Bonifay Road in Chipley. For more information call Sallie Johnson at 638-4035. Classical music concert BONIFAY Bonifay First United Methodist Church (FUMC), will present a classical music event at 3 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014, at 3 p.m. Music of Bach, Mozart, Widor, Purcell, Rutter, and others will be performed by Zachary Dobos on the French Horn, Cynthia Moses will sing and Roy Hoobler on the Keyboards. Zachary is the Band Director at Holmes County High School and Bonifay Middle School, Cynthia is a resident of Panama City Beach and Roy is the music director at Bonifay FUMC. Refreshments in the fellowship hall will follow the one hour concert. For more information, contact Roy Hoobler at royhoobler@yahoo.co m Convention Singers PONCE DE LEON The Convention Singers will be at Otter Creek Methodist Church, at 7 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 20. The Church is located four miles north of Ponce de Leon off Highway 81. Awanas auction BONIFAY Bethlehem Baptist Churchs Awanas will be holding an auction a 6 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 20. Steak sandwich dinner plates will be available beginning at 5 p.m. The church is located at 1572 Highway 177 in Bonifay. For more information call 768-2574. Saint Matthews Day CHIPLEY Saint Matthews Episcopal Church will celebrate Saint Matthews Day Sunday, Sept. 21. Holy Eucharist will begin at 9 a.m. and will be followed by a reception from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The church will also be celebrating Ward and Dorothy Clarks ministry. Ward will retire on Saint Matthews Day after more than 25 years as our Vicar. The church is located at 735 West Blvd., in Chipley. Missions convention WESTVILLE There will be an area wide missions convention Monday, Sept. 22 through Friday, Sept. 26 at Oak Grove Pentecostal Ministries. Serviced will be held at 7 p.m. nightly. All proceeds will go to fund missions around the world the Brother Daren and Living Waters Church of Chino, Calif. For more information call 956-4339, 956-2322 or 658-2828. Faith EVENTS JAMES CAGLE A word about our words

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Extra Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Wednesday, September 10, 2014 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! W ith your paid obituar y family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos fr ee of charge. Find Obituaries. Shar e Condolences. In par tnership with Find obituaries, shar e condolences and celebrate a life at or Crossword SOLUTION Mrs. Margaret Booth Wilson of North Highway 81, Westville, went home to be with her Lord and Savior on Friday, Aug. 29, 2014. She was 62. Margaret was born Dec. 21, 1951, in Geneva County, Ala., to the late James Robert and Annie Laura Clark Booth. She was a 1970 graduate of Geneva High School. For a number of years, she worked in the data processing department at Benson Wholesale/Fleming Foods. She was a very active member of West Pittman Baptist Church, where she served as the church pianist for 25 years. Margaret had a passion for church missions and gratefully served as the director of womens missions for West Pittman. She was a very loving and devoted wife, mother, grandmother and sister. Margaret will be greatly missed by everyone who knew her. In addition to her parents, a daughter, Lisa Callahan; a grandson, Ethan Callahan; one brother, Herman Booth; and three sisters, Ann Dixon, Virginia Booth and Martha Blocker, all preceded her in death. Survivors include her husband of 44 years, Earl Wilson; two daughters, Amy (Earnie) Somerset and Sonya (Jason) Motley, all of Westville; one son, Eric (Emily) Wilson of Lake Butler; son-inlaw, Chris Callahan of Ponce de Leon; nine grandchildren, Hunter and Forrest Somerset, Macie and Miley Wilson, Dalton Callahan, Jonathan and Kyle Owens and Lindy and Ford Motley; two sisters, Laura (Sammy) Messer of Samson, Ala., and Ellen Ferrell of Los Angeles; ve brothers, Terry Booth, Michelle Booth, Harlon (Betty) Booth, all of Geneva, Ala., Huey Booth of Denver and Wayne Booth of Miami; special sister-in-law, Martha Booth; and several nieces, nephews, other extended family and a host of friends. Funeral services were at 10 a.m., Monday, Sept. 1, 2014, in the West Pittman Baptist Church with the Rev. Eddie Eaton ofciating. Burial followed in the church cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home and Crematory of Geneva directing. The family received friends from 6-8 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 31, at the funeral home. At all other times the family will be at the home of a daughter, Amy (Earnie) Somerset, 1700 N. Highway 81, Westville. In lieu of owers, memorial contributions may be made to the West Pittman Baptist Church Building Fund or the WPBC Operation Christmas Child Shoebox Ministry, 1603 Bradley Road, Westville, FL 32464. Margaret B. Wilson MARGARET B. WILSON Evelaine Bowers Skarote, age 81, of Ponce de Leon, passed away Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2014, at her residence. She was born Sept. 11, 1932, in the Hickory Hill Community of Holmes County, to Walter Dee and Lillie Belle Denning Brownell. Evelaine enjoyed planting, gardening, cooking, and taking care of her family. She was a member of Pine View Holiness Church. She was preceded in death by her parents; husbands, Lawrence Leo Bowers and James Skarote; and infant son, Roger Dale Bowers. Evelaine is survived by her son, Robert Rob Bowers and wife, Sara, of Ponce de Leon; grandchildren, Walter, Michael and Kala; great-grandson, Robert Robbie Bowers; and extended family, Anna and Allen Chamberlin, Lisa and Ed Carr and their children, Gabriella and Jillian. Funeral services were held Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014, at Northside Baptist Church in Ponce de Leon, beginning at 11 a.m. with Minister Joel Davis ofciating. A time of visitation was held one hour prior to the service. Committal services followed at New Ponce de Leon Cemetery. Flowers are being accepted. The family would like to thank the staff at Covenant Hospice for the love and care given to Evelaine. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.daviswatkins. com. Arrangements and services are under the direction of Davis-Watkins Funeral Home. Evelaine B. Skarote EVELAINE B. SKAROTE Iris Dawn Williams, 75, of Vernon, died Sept. 6, 2014. Funeral services were held Monday, Sept. 8, 2014, at New Bethany Assembly of God Church. Interment followed in the Live Oak Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral home directing. Iris D. Williams James Benjamin Craven, Sr. expired Monday, Sept. 1, 2014, at his home after an extended illness. Dr. Craven was born April 19, 1930, in Chipley, to the late William Milton Craven and Marion Miner Craven. He graduated from Chipley High School in 1948. During their younger years, he and his brother Billy Craven operated the family dairy farm south of Chipley. After serving in the U.S. Army during the Korean Conict, he attended the University of Chattanooga and graduated from the University of Miami School of Medicine. Upon completing postgraduate training at The Medical Center in Columbus, Ga., he practiced medicine briey in DeFuniak Springs. He then returned to his hometown of Chipley, where he practiced medicine for more than 40 years. He was preceded in death by his wife, Virginia Wade Craven; his brother, William Miner Craven (Billy); and sister, Eloise Craven Shehee. His son, Dr. J. Benjamin Craven, Jr., and daughterin-law, Cynthia survive him. He has three grandchildren, Emily Ann, James Benjamin III (Trey) and Lauren Virginia. He is also survived by his sisterin-law, Barbara T. Craven, her daughters, Leola Brock and Kathy Rudd, as well as two nephews, Drs. Ed and Ron Shehee. An aunt, Mrs. Margaret Miner, also survives him. The family would like to express their appreciation to special friend and caregiver, Mrs. Martha Toole, as well as other caregivers, Dot Talton, Christeen Murphy, Shannon Murphy and Bonnie Kate Farrior. A special thanks also goes to Mr. Mark Garney, who provided invaluable care for him as well. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 3, 2014, graveside in Glenwood Cemetery in Chipley with the Rev. James Vickery ofciating. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to a charity of your choice. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh.net. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. James B. Craven, Sr. Mr. Charles Baine, 77, of Westville died Monday, Sept. 1, 2014, at his home in Westville. He was born Sunday, Jan. 31, 1937, in Geneva, Ala. He was preceded in death by his parents, Clifton Baine and the late Bama Lawson Baine; brothers, QP Baine and Danny Baine; sisters, Iris Biddle and Madease Benton; and son, Ewell Baine. He is survived by his wife, Ella Gillis Baine; sons, Steve Baine and wife, Diane, of Geneva, Ala., and Kevin Baine of Birmingham, Ala.; daughters, Sandrel Graham and husband, Chip, of Ozark, Ala., Elfrida Hughes of Jacksonville and Amy Bowers and husband, Chey, of Westville; stepsons, Earl Stafford and wife, Wanda, of Bonifay, Wayne Stafford and wife, Rhonda, of Westville, Pete Stafford and wife, Jeanine, of Westville, Wilmer Stafford and wife, Tami, of Westville and Jeffrey Stafford of Westville; stepdaughters, Murl Bruce and husband, Steve, of Bonifay and Brenda Jackson and husband, Tony, of Westville; sisters, Louise Mayhand of Samson, Ala., and Barbara Mock of Samson, Ala.; 26 grandchildren; and 31 great-grandchildren. A funeral service was held at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 3, 2014, at Westville Assembly of God Church with the Rev. Clyde Smith and Ronnie Baine ofciating. Interment was in Camp Ground Cemetery, Westville with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2014, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Charles Baine Thelma Jenkins Hartseld went home to her Lord and Savior on Aug. 29, 2014. Born Jan. 19, 1929, in Port St. Joe to the late Charles Mack and Norene Dunlap Jenkins, she was one of eight children raised by her loving mother after her father was killed when she was just 7 years old. She grew up in Holmes County and deeply loved Bonifay and her Jenkins family. Upon graduating from high school, she moved to Tallahassee after being offered a job by her former principal, Mr. Halley B. Lewis. There, she quickly found a church home at First Baptist Church and developed a network of lifelong friends. Five years later, she married her husband of 62 years, Albert C. Hartseld. Together, they were faithful members and contributors to the church. They raised their three sons fully in the life of the church, baptisms, marriage and funerals being commemorated there. She was a loving daughter, sister, wife, mother and grandmother. She had a servants heart, always putting the needs of her family and friends rst. She never met a stranger and was loved by all who knew her. She dedicated her life to serving her Lord, loving her husband and raising her three sons. She was a Godly woman whose heart was full of love and joy and brought joy to everyone who knew her; she never worried, placing her faith in God; she had the patience of Job; she had a kind and compassionate heart; and she had a gentle spirit. She opened her home and dinner table to many relatives and friends throughout the years. She displayed a generous spirit of hospitality and caring for others throughout her life. She worked for many years in the Florida Senate, rst working part-time during the legislative sessions for several senators, and then full-time as an Agriculture Committee administrative assistant. She is survived by her husband, Albert; her sons, Ron (Sally), Brent and Phil (Julie); grandson, Clint; granddaughters, Erin, Allison, Catherine, Caroline and Anna Beth; one brother, Thomas Jenkins; and one sister, Velma Stubbs. She was preceded in death by her parents, Charles Mack and Norene Dunlap Jenkins and ve brothers, Charlie, Jimmy, George, Bob and Jack. Visitation was at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 3, 2014, at First Baptist Church Tallahassee, with a Celebration of Life at 11 a.m. In lieu of owers, donations can be made to First Baptist Church, Tallahassee. Thelma J. Hartseld James Bolling Brooks of Graceville passed away Aug. 31, 2014. Mr. Brooks was born March 22, 1929, in Brewton, Ala., to Catherine Ryan Brooks and W.E. Brooks, Sr. Mr. Brooks graduated from the University of Alabama, where he was a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity. Mr. Brooks was the automobile dealer of Jones Motor Company in Graceville, as well as secretary-treasurer of the Jones Investment Company and director of the Bank of Jackson County. Mr. Brooks was a great supporter of many charitable foundations and helped many people with no thought of recompense. Mr. Brooks was a steward of the United Methodist Church and true son of the Episcopal Church. He was preceded in death by his sister, Catherine Brooks Champlin. Survived by his brother, W.E. Brooks, Jr. and their families, Mr. Brooks was a devoted husband and father. He is survived by his beloved wife of 60 years, Margaret Jones Brooks; his daughters, Catherine Brooks Connor (Chris) and Elizabeth Brooks Wilson (Jerry); his grandchildren, Bolling Campbell Jardine, Joseph Yauger Whealdon, III, Esquire and Katherine Isabel Wilson; and one great-grandson, Finn Campbell Jardine. The funeral service of Mr. Brooks was held at 2 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2014, at the First Untied Methodist Church, Graceville. Interment took place at Marvin Chapel Cemetery immediately following the service with James & Lipford Funeral Home directing. The Bolling Brooks family requests that donations be made to the First United Methodist Church, Graceville, Partners for Pets, Marianna or a charity you deem suitable in lieu of owers. Pallbearers are Manley L. Cummings, III, Scott Howell, Lee Miller, Bill Price, John Barker Turner, James Wright, Pat Burdeshaw and Dan Burdeshaw. Honorary Pallbearers are Finley McRae, Virgil Mixson, Charlie Martin, Waymer Bryan, Clyde Crutcheld, Bob Price, Dana Brock, Chuck Martin and Rob Martin. Expressions of sympathy can be made at www.jamesandlipford.com. James B. Brooks Daylon Lloyd Williams, 79, of Panama City, died Sept. 2, 2014. Funeral services were Sept. 5, 2014, at East Mt. Zion Methodist Church. Interment followed with military honors in the East Mt. Zion Methodist Church Cemetery. Peel Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Daylon L. Williams Mrs. Dorothy Mae Claville, age 77, passed away Aug. 29, 2014, at her home with family. She was born Dec. 31, 1936, in Plant City. Mrs. Claville was preceded in death by her husband, John Frank Claville; her parents, Herman and Merriem Bush; two daughters, Jill Cook and Sharon Keene; and two brothers, Bobby Bush and Pete Bush. Mrs. Claville is survived by a daughter, Gay Kirkland and husband, Scott, of Bonifay; along with eight grandchildren and numerous great-grandchildren. Memorialization was by cremation with a private family memorial service held at a later date. Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Dorothy M. Claville WWW .BONIF A YNOW.COM See OBITUARIES B7

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Extra B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, September 10, 2014 Staff Report This page features photos, submitted by our staff, readers and guests, taken in and around Holmes and Washington counties. We hope to make this a weekly feature, so if you have a photo taken locally that highlights life as we know it in our community, please share. Submit photos, along with a brief description and location taken, to: Ckent@chipleypaper. com. No time to email? Text it to Carol Kent at (850) 703-9487. JESSI COLLINS | The Extra David Brock of Brocks Auto Body & Towing was spotted repairing a customers vehicle. CECILIA SPEARS | The Extra Family, friends and members of the Grace Fellowship Christian Church in Caryville were seen around selling chicken lunches in Bonifay to help raise money for Zack Andrews, 26, who was diagnosed with a rare cancer. Grace Fellowship Christian Church in Caryville is helping raise money for medical and travel expenses. For more information, contact the church at 548-9024. KATIE ADAMS | The Extra Editor Carol Kent (at right) and assistant Katie Adams were spotted on the sidelines as the Vernon Yellow Jackets rolled over the West Gadsden Panthers Friday night. CECILIA SPEARS | The Extra This butter y doesnt seem to know that its not springtime in Holmes County. CECILIA SPEARS | The Extra These owers, spotted near a horse pasture in Holmes County, seem to be celebrating Patriot Day early with their coloring. CECILIA SPEARS | The Extra This turtle was seen around sampling the taste of roadside grass in Holmes County. CECILIA SPEARS | The Extra This shot of the Holmes County sky was taken just before dusk on a local dirt road.

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Extra Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B7 Wednesday, September 10, 2014 We Rememb er Th ose We Lo st As we ma rk th e so lemn an ni ve rs ar y of Se pt em be r 11t h te rr or is t at ta ck s, we re me mb er all of th e pe op le wh os e li ve s we re los t an d fo re ve r a ec te d by th e tr ag ic ev en ts of th at da y. Mo th er s, fa th er s, so ns da ug ht er s, br ot he rs si st er s an d fr ien ds th eir me mo ri es li ve on wi th lo ve d on es an d th eir fe ll ow Ame ri ca ns ir te en ye ar s la te r, the ir me mo ri es liv e on in ou r he ar t. We wi ll ne ve r fo rge t. 10 44 U. S. 90 Ch ip le y (8 50 )6 38 -8 37 6 17 20 SW au ke sh aS t, Bo ni fa y 85 054 722 60 1075 N. Hwy .7 9, Bo nifa y, FL Est o, FL (850) 263-28 23 Dann yP ow ell He nr yP ow ell FREE ESTIM AT ES Lic ense FL #C AC 1814302 AL #981 26 S er vi ng Yo uI sO ur Mo st Im por ta nt Pr od uc t 638-1805 11 15 48 6 Br own Funeral Home 1068 Main St. Chipley ,F L 638-4010 5019167 C&CC on st ru ct io n LI CENS ED &B ON DE D Ro o ng Sp eci al is t 690 E. Hw y9 0 Bo nifa y, FL 32425 1-850-547-1001 11 15 48 4 Ch ip ola Fo rd (850) 482-4043 M IC HE LL E B LA NK EN SH IP T AG ER T ,P .A 94 6M AI N S TR EE T C HI PL EY ,F LO RI DA 32 42 8 (8 50 )6 38 -9 68 9 5019163 Do ct or s Me mo ri al Ho sp it al 2600 Ho sp it al Dr iv e Bo nifa y, Fl or ida 1-850-547-8000 Joseph Joe Dunham Jenkins, age 84, of Cottondale passed away on Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014, in the Northwest Community Hospital. Joe was born in Westville on May 1, 1930, to the late Joe B. and Lucille Jenkins. In 1950, he joined the United States Army, where he fought on the front lines in the Korean Conict. He moved to Cottondale in 1964, where he worked installing heating and cooling systems and also was a store clerk at the local hardware store. Joe was a member of the First Baptist Church of Cottondale and had served as the senior Sunday school teacher from 1985 to 2013. He was a member of the American Legion Post 100. Joe enjoyed gardening and working with owers, but being with his wife, son, granddaughters and greatgrandchildren were the highlight of his life. He was preceded in death by his parents; his in-laws; one brother; and one great-granddaughter, Breanna Jenkins. Joe is survived by his loving wife of 58 years, Vivian F. Jenkins of Cottondale; son, Richard B. Jenkins and wife, Glenda, of Cottondale; brother, Murray Jenkins of Westville; sister, Hazel Foxworth of Chipley; granddaughters, Stephanie Jenkins (Billy) and Tiffanie Jenkins; and great-grandchildren, Skylar Adams and Aiden Adams. Services for Joe were held at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014, in the Marianna Chapel Funeral Home with the Rev. Jack Brock ofciating. Interment followed in the First Baptist Church of Cottondale Cemetery. A time of remembrance was held from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 8, 2014, in the Marianna Chapel Funeral Home. Family will accept owers, or donations may be made to the First Baptist Church of Cottondale Building Fund in Joes memory. Marianna Chapel Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Expressions of sympathy may be submitted online at www.mariannachapelfh. com. Joseph D. Jenkins Larry D. Harrison, age 57, of Round Lake passed away Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014, at his home. Larry was born Jan. 2, 1957, in Marianna to the late William E. Harrison and Faye A. (Fortune) Harrison. He was employed as an equipment operator in road construction. In addition to his family, Larry loved his friends, especially Lamar Golden and Johnny and Stacy Sullivan. He also loved shing and hunting. He was predeceased by his father, William E. Harrison. He is survived by his mother, Faye A. Harrison of Round Lake; two brothers, Danny W. Harrison and Gary M. Harrison of Round Lake; sister, Blenda S. Harrison of Round Lake; two nephews, Bene L. Harrison and wife, Lacie, and Christopher S. Harrison, all of Compass Lake; one great-nephew, Riley M. Harrison; and one great-niece, Ava Lee Harrison. Memorial services will be announced at a later date. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. Larry D. Harrison Mr. Oscar Durant Helms of Geneva, Ala., passed away Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2014. He was 87. Mr. Helms was born Jan. 8, 1927, in Holmes County, to the late Oscar and Callie LaDora McDonald Helms. He never talked about it much, but he was very proud of his service to his country by being a sailor on the USS Providence during World War II. He cruised the shores off of North Africa, Sicily and then Italy. He actually pulled shore patrol duty around the great coliseum in Rome. He spent most of his adult life working on helicopters and ghter jets. Another life accomplishment of his was that of a poet. After writing literally hundreds of poems, he was inducted into the International Society of Poetry. His poem entitled Gods Son was published in the book The Colors of Life and has been placed in libraries all across the United States and 40 other countries. He attended Mt. Olive Assembly of God Church for a number of years. In addition to his parents, two brothers, Carter and Carson Helms; three sisters, Dovie Lee Weeks, Daisy Byrd and Voncile Thomas; as well as the mother of his sons, Hazel Maringer, all preceded him in death. Survivors include two sons, Larry Dale Helms and wife, Susan, of Westville and Stanley Lavon Helms and wife, Pat, of Palm Beach Gardens; eight grandchildren; 10 great-great-grandchildren; and other extended family and friends. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014, in the Mt. Olive Assembly of God Church in Holmes County with the Rev. Thomas Ealum ofciating. Burial followed in the church cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home and Crematory of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the church on Saturday beginning at 10 a.m. and continued until service time. Oscar D. Helms OBITUARIES from page B5 Special to The Times-Advertiser Although the semester has just begun, the faculty and staff at The Baptist College of Florida in Graceville are already preparing for the upcoming Preview Day, which will be Oct. 24. Prospective students and their families will have an opportunity to visit the campus and determine if BCF is where they should start or continue their college education. Registration will begin at 9 a.m. CST in the BCF Wellness Center, which is located in the center of the campus. During a special meet and greet time, prospective students will be able to experience what life is like for BCF students; speak with faculty members and staff representatives; obtain information about all of the degree options, nancial aid and computer access; and meet the dorm advisers and division chairs. Before a time of student-led praise and worship in the R. G. Lee Chapel, Preview Day guests will have the opportunity to visit classes on selected majors in missions and theology, business, education, music and worship, and Christian counseling. Participants may also elect to attend the informative nancial aid brief to become familiar with the Free Application for Federal Student Aid and all of the tuition assistance and scholarship programs available to students. President Thomas A. Kinchen will offer a word of welcome and encouragement to Preview Day guests during the chapel service followed by lunch and performance by the BCF Jazz Band. After a time of fellowship and lunch, admissions counselors will be available for campus tours of the writing center, library, computer lab and Wellness Center, and BCF resident directors will offer dorm tours of on campus housing. The $25 application fee will be waived for students who apply on Preview Day, and all of the names of prospective students attending will be entered into a drawing to win one of the two $500 scholarships. If you are looking for a college to prepare you to change the world, Preview Day is the perfect time to see if BCF is that place! To register for Preview Day, call the Admissions Ofce at 3282660, ext. 513 or register online at www.baptistcollege.edu. SUBMISSIONS Send obituaries to news@chipley paper.com View obituaries and sign guesbooks at www.chipley paper.com. BCF Preview Day quickly approaching The BCF Teacher Education group poses at the photo booth during Spring Preview Day.SPEC I A L T O TH E T IM E S A D VERT IS ER

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B8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Extra Wednesday, September 10, 2014 2014 Unive rsal Uclick relea se date s: Sept 6-12 36-1 (14) from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Ucli ck Ple ase inclu de all of the app ropri at e reg ist ered trad ema rk symb ols and co pyr ight line s in any pu blica ti on of The Mini Page To order, Andrews McMeel Universal, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206 Please send ______ copies of (Item #0-7407-6511-6) at $13.45 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.) www.smartwarehousing.com Name : ___ _______ _______ _______ _______ _______ _______ _______ _______ _______ ______ Address: _______ _______ _______ _______ _______ _______ _______ _______ _______ ______ __ City: _______ _______ _______ _______ _______ __ ___ State : _____ ____ Zip : _______ ________ The popular nine-part series on the Constitution, written in collaboration with the National Archives, is now packaged as a colorful 32-page softcover book. The series covers: the preamble, the seven articles and 27 amendments the big ideas of the document the history of its making and the signers In Star Trek, if the crew wa nted anything blankets a special meal, gemstones the replicator could just pop it out. A few years ago this sounded like far -out science fiction. But toda y this tec hnology 3-D printing is just around the corner Pe ople are making houses toys jewelry airplane parts and exact copies of dinosaur fossils with 3-D printers NASA is running experiments on printing a moon base out of lunar soil, or any meal an astronaut wa nts It is sending a 3-D printer to the space station to learn how astronauts can create replacement parts and tools But the most exciting possibilities for 3-D printing are in medicine Scientists are testing hundreds of different wa ys 3-D printing could help heal people It could create exact artificial copies of a damaged arm or leg It could copy cancer tissue so doctors could figure out the best wa y to kill it. Someda y, we ma y even be able to re-create whole organs for people needing a new liver or heart. To le ar n more about this amazing new tec hnology ,T he Mini Pa ge talked with an expert on 3-D printing from the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. Whats the difference? In 2-D printing, the letters or pictures are printed on a flat sheet of paper. They are in two dimensions: length and width. In 3-D printing, objects have a third dimension: depth. Objects printed in 3-D are more like sculptures. A 2-D printer receives computer commands telling it where to place tiny bits of ink. One by one, these ink drops create letters or pictures. A 3-D print er recei ves compute r comman ds te llin g it where to plac e ti ny bits of mat eria ls. Th e mat eria ls can be almost an ything fr om plas tic, to livi ng cell s, to meta l. The 3D prin ter put s down the ma te ri als one laye r at a time buildin g up the object. Adding layers Objects can be made in almost any shape. Because material is added in layers, this type of printing is also called The first 3-D printers came out in the 1980s, but in the last few years, the equipment has become much better and much less expensive. New, inventive ways to use this technology are being discovered all over. Science Fiction Tu rn ing Into Fact Printi ng the Futur e in 3-D photo courtesy Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine A 3-D printer at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, prints an experimental kidney. In 2000, a medical researcher, Thomas Boland, invented the first general bioprinter by remodeling a regular inkjet printer. He replaced the ink in the cartridges with living cells. When 3-D printing uses living tissue, it is called The material used to print the living tissue is called photo by David McNally, RDECOM A 3-D printer hea d drops bits of plasti c to build lay ers of a tool. from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Artificial body parts Wi th 3-D printing making (prahs-THEH-tiks), or artificial body parts is muc h ch eaper Fo r example with traditional manufacturing a prosthetic ch ild s hand might cost $25,000 to $50,000. As the ch ild grows the hand would ha ve to be replaced over and over This could get very expensive Wi th 3-D printing a prosthetic hand might cost $5. Experts believe suc h inexpensive prosthetics will be easily av ailable within 10 years A 3-D printed part can be made to fit eac h person s body exactly .T his means the body part will work better and be more comfortable .A part could be built in a da y. Already people are using 3-Dprinted hands arms hips teeth, skulls knees and ears .T hese prosthetics are not living Printing live limbs is many years aw ay But prosthetic 3-D body parts that move well could be av ailable in a few years Printing with living ink It is much harder to print with living cells than with other material. Living material needs to be nourished and kept moist. Body cells act together in ways we dont always understand. Sometimes body parts are too complicated to print directly. For example, a blood vessel is hard to print. The printer makes a mold of the blood vessel first, then coats it with a special protein gel that needs to be kept alive. With this process, doctors saved a 2-year-old girls life by bioprinting a windpipe for her. Fr om Plastics to Living Tissu e Super models Doctors are printing exact copies of body parts to help them learn. For example, they feed images of an injured heart into a computer. It creates a 3-D model from the images and sends the data to the printer. Out comes an exact copy of the heart, letting the doctor practice on it without worrying about hurting the patient. This is especially valuable with unusual or tricky problems. photo by Rick Sargent of Sargent Illustration and Design This artist imagines a kidney being printed inside a special chamber on the left. To the right, a printer is putting down layers of cells to build a blood vessel at the Medical University of South Carolina. photo courtesy Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine Here, a researcher at Wake Forest tests the printing of muscle tissue. Re ad y Re sour ce s from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick The Mini Page provides ideas for websites, books or other resources that will help you learn more about this weeks topics. On the Web: At the library: Gifford Words that remind us of 3-D printing are hidden in the block above. Some words are hidden backward or diagonally. See if you can find: ARTIFICIAL, CARTRIDGES, CELL, COPY, DIMENSIONS, DOCTORS, FAT, FIT, HEAT, INK, LEG, MATERIALS, MEDICINE, MOLD, PRINTING, PROSTHETICS, SKIN, TECHNOLOGY, TISSUES, TRANSPLANT. 3-D Printing from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Basset Browns Tr y n Find from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Mi ni Sp y Mini Spy has created a 3-D print of her doll. See if you can find: spoon cheese letter A letter D knife flyswatter fork two fish pencil paperclip ladder letter E needle horse head seal from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Youll need: What to do: 1. In a medium saucepan, combine creamed corn, milk, bell pepper, bay leaves and dried onion. Cook over medium-high heat and bring to a simmer. Decrease the heat to medium and simmer for 10 minutes. serving. Serves 4. Youll need an adults help with this recipe. Andrew s McM eel Publishing (and rewsmcm eel.com ). Ro ok ie Co ok ie s Rec ip e Cr eamy Cor n Chowder from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Meet Cozi Zuehlsdorff Cozi Zuehlsdorff stars as Hazel in the movie Dolphin Tale 2. The movie is based on a true story about a rescued baby dolphin. When she was 8 years old, Cozi got the part of Annie in the musical of the same name at her community theater. She discovered that she loved performing. She has appeared in several other community musicals. She has also acted in TV commercials and shows and in the movie Dolphin Tale. She is a voice actor with the chorus that sings in TV animated shows such Cozi lives in Orange County, California, with her parents and older sister. She loves to sing, act, play the piano and make movies with her friends. She is home-schooled. from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Mary: Manny: Check to check! All the following jokes have something in common. Can you Maurice: What is the difference between an Monty: One is a mad bunny and the other is bad money! Mighty Funny s Mini Jokes photo by Wilson Webb, (c) 2014 Alcon Entertainment LLC. All Rights Reserved Moe: Millie: Because people milk them dry! from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Copying a community Doctors hope to be able to perform tests on 3-D prints of living tissue. For example, they could run tests on copies of a cancer tumor to target the exact medicine for killing the cancer. For years, doctors have been able to grow many copies of the same cell. But every living tissue is made from many types of cells. Cells talk to each other. They influence one anothers actions. Testing just one type of cell does not give a complete picture. With 3-D printing, researchers can duplicate the actual cell community. Medicines are tested on animals before being given to humans. The ability to test drugs on exact tissue copies would lessen animal testing. Beyond testing We are probably more than 50 years away from being able to print whole organs. But we are nearly able to print pieces of organs. If we could implant those pieces into a patient, the body could often heal itself. For example, if a patient had an injured kidney, doctors could take a sample of the part that was still healthy and print 3-D copies of it. They then would attach, or the printed tissue onto the kidney. After that, the body would be able to do the rest of the repairs itself. Transplants Transplanting copies of a persons own tissue is much safer than transplanting tissue from someone else. Your body wants to kill cells that arent part of you. But it would see 3-D tissue copies as being identical to its own parts. Doctors could transplant the new tissue with a (KA-the-ter), or special tube. Within a few years, doctors will probably be transplanting 3-D prints of simple tissues such as cartilage to repair joints such as knees. Writing on the body The U.S. military and Wake Forest Institute are working to treat burn patients with bioprinting. Now, doctors treat burns by removing healthy skin from a patients body. They use that skin to cover the burn. This is painful, and when a patient is badly burned, it can be hard to find enough healthy cells to graft. With 3-D printing, the patient would need to give up only a small amount of healthy skin, about half the size of a postage stamp. Printing to Heal Making bioink To make bioink, scientists would take cells from a persons own body. They wouldnt need a lot of original body cells. The printer could make as many copies as needed. Our bodies have a great ability to regrow living tissue. In most cases, scientists wouldnt even need special cells such as stem cells. In fact, they would probably just use fat cells. As with other body cells, fat cells could grow into other types of cells. Few people would be sad if they lost some fat cells! The Min i Page Staf f Bet ty De b na m Founding Edit or and Editor at Large Lisa Tarry Managing Editor Lucy Lien Associate Editor Wendy Dale y Arti st photo courtesy Medical University of South Carolina Printing a test pattern of living cells. photo courtesy Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine A researcher at Wake Forest works with an artificial hand to learn how to transplant 3-D skin onto a burn victims body. photo courtesy Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine A Wake Forest researcher works with a fake hand to learn how to print over a burn. The Mini Page thanks Dr. Mike Yost, science director of the biofabrication facility, Medical University of South Carolina, for help with this issue. Next week, The Mini Page is about how to behave when going online. from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Micha (MIK E-uh) Hancock is a sette r for the Penn State Nittany Lions women s vol leyba ll team. Her job is to make pinpoi nt passes or assi sts for her teamm ates to kill with smas hing hits over the net. On defen se, she is a dig specia list keep ing the opposing team s att acks in play. Micha s play is champion shi p cali ber, and she has the hardware to pro ve it. Last seaso n, Mic ha set the table as her Nit ta ny Li o n s de vo ur ed the comp eti tion, comp ili ng a 342 match record and cap turin g a recordtyi ng six th NCAA cham pio nship in progr am his tor y. Michas play in the postseason, including a championship game victory over conference rival Wisconsin, earned her the NCAA Tournament Most Outstanding Player honor. Now Micha and the Nittany Lions are poised to defend their national title as the 2014 season gets underwa y. Micha Hancock Goldie Goodsport s Supersport Hei ght: 5-11 Birthda te: 11-10-199 2 Hom etown : Edmon d, Oklaho ma

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Wednesday, September 10, 2014 Holmes County Times Advertiser | B9 BUSINESS GUIDE EasyCareLawn&TractorService TREEREMOVAL 850527-6291850849-3825LawnCare€DebrisRemoval TractorandBobcatWork FINANCINGAVAILABLELicensed&Insured5020104 MikeMoodyNorthFlorida’sPremierMetalRoong Fabrication&Installation LocallyOwned&Operated WAUSAU,FLORIDAOFFICECELL638-8999258-2923850 850Metalroongcuttolength,customtrim,hugevariety, deliveryorinstallationavailable.MetalRoofs€PoleBarns€Decks€AluminumAwningRoofsLicense#RC290275095020368 Aordable SelfStorage ALLSIZESOrangeHill Road SelfStorage897OrangeHillRd Chipley850-263-2817 850-768-29125020390 C&CBookkeeping andTaxService January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850)638-1483NotaryAvailable5020755 Servicingyourhome since2000Cell:850-209-3954 850-209-5816BILLYJONES Owner/Operator CottondalePEST BOYSPestControl Services5020105 4518504 THARP&SONS MINISTORAGEHwy.77S.,Chipley,FL(850)638-8183Hwy.177A,Bonifay,FL(850)547-07265x5$25.68 5x10$35.31 10x10$46.01 10x20$80.25Open24Hours,Self-Service, NoDeposit,UnitsareCarpeted 5019790Advertise your service or business for as little as $10 a week.Ad runs in the Washington County News, Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser638-0212 9-3513 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-13-DP IN THE INTEREST OF: K.R.C. DOB: 06/28/2012 MINOR CHILDREN (SEC.39.801 (b) FS) The State of Florida to JUSTIN SPIERS, natural father whose residence and address is unknown. You are hereby notified that a Petition under oath has been filed in the above styled Court for the Termination of Parental Rights in the case of K.R.C., minor child, to licensed child placement agency for subsequent adoption. You are hereby noticed that an Advisory Hearing and Adjudicatory hearing on the Involuntary Petition for Termination of Parental Rights will be held before the Honorable Christopher N. Patterson, Judge of the Circuit Court, Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, at the Washington County Courthouse Annex, 711 Third Street, Chipley, Florida 32428, on the 7th day of October 2014, at the hour of 9:00 a.m., CENTRAL TIME. You have the right to appear with counsel at this hearing. If you can not afford legal representation, the Court will appoint counsel for you at this hearing upon the determination of insolvency. You must either appear on the date and at the time specified or send a written response to the Court prior to that time. YOUR FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD OR CHILDREN. September 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014. 9-3523 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No. 2014-CP-53 “PR” In Re:The Estate of RICKY DEAN BALLARD, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of RICKY DEAN BALLARD, deceased, whose date of death was May 19, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 N. Oklahoma St., Bonifay, FL 32425 and the mailing address of which is P.O. Box 397, Bonifay, FL 32425. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the Decedent’s Estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the Decedent’s Estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN § 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is Aug 27, 2014. Attorney for Personal Representative: Erin Burris Berg Florida Bar Number 86431 Law Office of Erin Berg, P.A. P.O. Box 274 Milton, FL 32572-0274 Phone (850) 366-2889 Fax (850) 462-9313 erin@lawofficeoferinberg.c om erinburrisberg@gmail.com Personal Representative: Barbara Jean Ballard 1115 Ann St. Monroe, NC 28112-6165 Sept 3, 10, 2014 9-3534 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 14-60 PR IN RE: ESTATE OF PROBATE DIVISION KARYL JANICE BROWN, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of Karyl Janice Brown, deceased, whose date of death was June 26, 2014, and whose social security number is XXX-XX-6648, File Number 14-60 PR is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Holmes County Courthouse, Post Office Box 397, Bonifay, Florida 32425. The name and address of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is Septembe 3, 2014. Personal Representative: OWEN CHUCK BROWN 2376 CORINTH ROAD PONCE DE LEON, FLORIDA 32455 Attorney for Personal Representative: RUSSELL S. ROBERTS ROBERTS, ROBERTS & ROBERTS 2879 MADISON STREET POST OFFICE BOX 1544 MARIANNA, FLORIDA 32447 (850) 526-3865 FLORIDA BAR NO. 0131441 ROBERTSLAWFIRMSERVICE@GMAIL.COM Septembe 3 and 10, 2014 9-3554 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 302011CA000388CAAXM X WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2004-OPT1, ASSET BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-OPT1, Plaintiff, vs. JOSEPH PELLEGRIN, ET AL. Defendants RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 6, 2013, and entered in Case No. 302011CA000388CAAXMX, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for HOLMES County, Florida. WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2004-OPT1, ASSET BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-OPT1 (hereafter “Plaintiff”), is Plaintiff and JOSEPH PELLEGRIN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOSEPH PELLEGRIN; UNKOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE PROPERTY, are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT of the Courthouse; 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, at 11:00 a.m., on the 2 day of October, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST; RUN S00 30` 05W FOR 963.24 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN S89 31` 24” E FOR 1333.63 FEET; THENCE RUN S00 37`33”W FOR 326.85 FEET; THENCE RUN N89 16` 31” W FOR 1332.93 FEET; THENCE RUN N00 30` 05” E FOR 321.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL CONTAINS 9.92 ACRES MORE OR LESS AND IN A PART OF THE NORTHWEST OF THE NORTHEAST OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. A ONE HALF INTEREST INTO THE FOLLOWING PARCEL FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS : COMMENCE AT THE NW CORNER OF THE NE OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, THENCE RUN S 00 30` 05” W FOR 642.16 FEET, THENCE RUN S 89 46` 15” E FOR 1304.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE S 00 37` 32” FOR 326.72 FEET, THENCE S 89 31` 24” E 30 FEET, THENCE N 00 37` 32” N 326.72 FEET, THENCE N 89 46` 15” W 30 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. INCLUDING A 1994 HARBEN INC MOBILE HOME VIN NUMBER GAFLR54B74809HS AND TITLE NUMBER 67604887 AND MOBILE HOME VIN NUMBER GAFLR54A74809HS AND TITLE NUMBER 67604888 PERMANENTLY AFFIXED AND AN APPURTENANCE THERETO. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@jud14.flcour ts.org. Dated this 28 day of August, 2014. Kyle Hudson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY Diane Eaton As Deputy Clerk Van Ness Law Firm, PLC 1239 E. Newport Center Drive Suite #110 Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442 Phone (954) 571-2031 Fax (954) 571-2033 Pleadings@vanlawfl.com September 10 and 17, 2014 9-3552 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2014CA000006 2010-3 SFR VENTURE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. BRENDA JEAN HEMANES, DOUGLAS EARNEST HEMANES, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed on or about June 16, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 2014CA000006 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Bonifay, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Holmes County Courthouse, 201 North Oklahoma, Bonifay, FL. 32425 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 26 day of September, 2014, at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: From the Southwest Corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter Section 2, Township 4 North, Range 15 West, Holmes County, Florida, Go North along Forty Line 802.42 Feet, thence East 334 Feet for a Point of Beginning, thence continue East 292 Feet to the edge of County Road, thence North 150 Feet, thence West 292 Feet, thence South 150 Feet to the Point of Beginning. Together with, a 1998 Double Wide Redman/Brighton Mobile Home, Vin#`s 14720211A and 14720211B Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 18 day of June, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk September 10 and 17, 2014 9-3556 Howell Mini-Storage at 309 S. Waukesha St Bonifay Fl. 32425 will hold a private or public auction on the contents of these units, for nonpayment according to Statute 83. Tenant has until the October 4 ,2014 at 10:00 AM to pay in full. No checks. Items of general household goods storage in buildings listed below. Building 1 unit 6 Casey Long Building 2 unit 4 Mary Villacorta Building 2 unit 5 Mary Villacorta Building 2 unit 13 Jessica Spraque Building 3 unit 9 James Gregory Building 3 unit 11 Larissa Sole September 10 and 17, 2014. 9-3598 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA File No. 14-35PR PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF LEE ROY ALRED Division Probate Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Lee Roy Alred, deceased, whose date of death was December 30, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for HOLMES County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 North Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, FL 32425. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is September 3, 2014. Attorney for Personal Representative: Lucas N. Taylor Attorney for Alcie M. Alred Florida Bar No. 670189 122B S. Waukesha Street Bonifay, FL 32425 Telephone: (850) 547 7301 Fax: (850) 547 7303 Personal Representative: Alcie M. Alred -Personal Representative September 3 and 10, 2014 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460www .noahslittleark.com AUCTION -4 ESTATESIZE LOTS on Fort Loudon Lake, Lenoir City, Tennessee. Sept. 20, 10:30 AM. Furrow Auction Co. 1-8004FURROW or www. furrow.com. TN Lic. 62 AUCTIONAnnual Fall Farm and Construction. Sept. 20, 2014. 8:00AM. Hwy 231 N., Campbellton. FL 32426. (3) Local farm dispersals, (2) Estates, Bank Repos, Sherriff Depts, City & County, Plus Consignments. MASON AUCTION & SALES LLC, FL #642. 850-623-0473, Office, 850-258-7652 Chad Mason, 850-849-0792 Gerald Mason www.masonauction.co m. Huge 8 Family Yard Sale Saturday 13th 8am-2pm, Swiftly Lube in Bonifay on Hwy 90. Children and adult clothes, all sizes. Household items, furniture, Home Interior items, lots of misc items. Great prices. Multi-family Yard Sale. Saturday from 7:30 until on hwy 90 at the Bonifay Computer shop.Lots of household items, bed frame w/dresser, pedestal sink w/faucet, bassinette, lots of baby clothes & toys, ladies and juniors clothes, too much to list. Three family yard sale, Saturday, September 13 Robin Hood Lane at Dogwood Lakes. Children’s clothes, men’s tools, and much more. YARD SALE YARD SALE YARD SALE Friday and Saturday, September 12th & 13th, 7am until 3pm rain or shine. Located 814 Rattlebox Rd., 3 miles South of Chipley off Orange Hill Rd. Lots of items for men as well as women. GUN SHOW NORTH FLORIDA FAIRGROUNDSSeptember 13th & 14th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL99800 to 56654 Fresh From the Farm!Okra, squash, zucchini and pickling cucumbers. Call 850-956-4556. K&LFarm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 Now Open. U-Pick Grapes Muscadine & Scuppernongs $5.00 per Gallon. 1304-AClayton Rd. 7 Days aweek, 7:00AM-7:00PM. 850-638-2624. DIRECTV starting at $24.95/mo. Free 3-Months of HBO, Starz, SHOWTIME & CINEMAX. FREE RECEIVER Upgrade! 2014 NFL Sunday Ticket Included with Select Packages. Some exclusions apply -CALL 1-800-915-8620 DISH TV Retailer. Starting $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) Find Out How to SAVE Up to 50% Today! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL 1-800-605-0984 Hay For Sale. Round & square bales. Will deliver. Call 850-836-4223. For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. B&M Mower Repair & Service. Quality work at a fair price. Bill or Mary (850)638-4492 Brannon Family Day Care, located at 1525 Hwy 90, Ponce deLeon. Have immediate openings for 12mos up to school age. Please call 832-4067. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414

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B10| Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, September 10, 2014 5020295 6520883Brand New3 Bed 16X80 $39,900 3 Bed Double Wide $48,900 Furnished 850.683.0858 Biggest Sale Ever All Homes 20% Off w/FREE Furniture Ends 8/1/2014 850.683.0035 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com6520882 6520881$0 Down To All Land Owners! Your Deed Is Your Down Payment 3 & 4 BR Homes Under $500 A Month. Call Today! 850.683.0035 6520880Brand New3 Bed 16X80 $39,900 3 Bed Double Wide $48,900 Furnished 850.683.0858 6520879I Buy Used Mobile Homes! Cash Paid Immediately.. 352.316.2434 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com Summer Job Coming To An End?General Dynamics IT is Hiring Temporary Customer Service Representatives!General Dynamics offers company-paid bene ts and pays an extra 10 percent for night shifts and bilingual (English/Spanish) skills! General Dynamics Information Technology is an equal opportunity/af rmative action employer, supporting employment of quali ed minorities, females, disabled individuals, and protected veterans.The following positions are available: Temporary Customer Service Representatives English and Bilingual (English/Spanish) Apply Online: www.gdit.com/ jobsearch Job ID # 226219 (English) Job ID # 226145 (Bilingual English/Spanish) New hire classes starting throughout SeptemberWe seek candidates who possess the following: € A high school diploma or GED (or above) € Six months customer service experience € Ability to type a minimum of 20 WPM € Ability to speak and read English pro“ ciently € Previous call center experience preferred € Ability to successfully pass a background check € Bilingual (Spanish) skills a plus1129991 Hunting Land for Rent in Washington County. September to April. 300 Acres, 160 acres, 60 acres, 20 acres. For more information call 850-638-1911 or 326-0044. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Install/Maint/RepairMaintenance & Prop. ManagementFor mobile home park. Cottendale area. Call 850-209-8847 or email:charlo32431@gmail.com AIRLINE CAREERS Start Here -Get FAA certified with hands on training in Aviation Maintenance. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com. EOE Heavy Equipment Operators Needed Nationwide Get Hands-On training working Bulldozers, Excavators, Backhoes. Certifications also offered. Lifetime job placement assistance.VA Benefits Eligible! Call (904) 549-6055 Under Employed… Want A New Career? Become A Truck Driver! Must Have Good Driving Record No Drug or Criminal Past 5 years Earn $45,000+ In 4 Short Weeks. Carrier Sponsored Training. Call 888-693-8934 EARN EXTRA INCOMEAre you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in Bayou George, Fountain, Alford, Clarksville, Chipley, Bonifay Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Jennifer Greene jgreene@pcnh.com James Meadors jmeadors@pcnh.com or call 850-747-5098 Web ID#: 34299554 Commercial Building on Highway 79 Bonifay for rent. Parking, central air, kitchen, handicap accessible. Available immediately. Call/Text Cissy at 850-768-0320. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Office space for rent in Bonifay. 206 Harvey Ethridge St. Phone: (850)548-5045 or (850)307-3278. Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1 Bedroom Apartment, in Chipley, covenant location, no pets. 638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. SpaciousOne Bedroom Apartment $450.00 Two Bedroom $500.00 Stove/Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. 2BR/1BA House. Dogwood Lakes. $550.00 + deposit. Call 850-777-0247. 3BR/2BA two-story house. References and Deposit required. Chipley, No Pets. $795/MO. 638-1918. For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay city limits. $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/sewage/lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 3BR/1BAMH in quite park between Bonifay and Chipley. W/G included. $450.00 plus deposit. 3BR/2BAMH $450.00 plus deposit 547-4232, 850-527-4911. 3BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850-768-3508, 850-638-9933. Bonifay. 3BR/2BA, MH $600.00/mo, $600/deposit. Large master bedroom, large covered deck. 3/4 mile from elementary school on 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. Bonifay: 4bd/2ba, Double Wide, large shaded lot, near the school in Bonifay. Available Sept. 1st, $600mo Call: 850-699-9464 Text FL99320 to 56654 For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $500/month plus $500/deposit. CH/A. No pets. Call 850-547-2043 or 850-768-9670. Nice 2BR MH for rent in a great location in Chipley. Sorry no pets. 638-4640. NO PETS 3BR/2BA in counrty Chipley area $650. NO PETS 2BR/2BA in Cottondale $450. LEAVE MESAGE FOR CALL BACK 258-1594. 5 Acres on Hwy 77 3 miles South of Chipley. Has well, septic tank, 14x48 MH, front & back deck. 24x36 Pole Barn. 638-1858, 850-326-9109. COASTAL WATERFRONT LIQUIDATION SALE! Sat 9/13 ONLY. Ocean Access Homesite ONLY $29,900, was $149,900. World-class amenities all completed! Deep, dockable waterfront available. Best bargain in America! Low financing. Call 877-888-1416, x 138 Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. Foreclosure -NC Mtns. Handcrafted log cabin on 2 ac. w/stream. Lg loft open living area private setting needs work. Only $67,100 won’t last! 828-286-2981 Hunters Paradise 49,900 Own 40 to 350 acres From 1250 per acre Private road frontage, Creek frontage, Mountain views, Excellent hunting. Adjoins 347 acres state land Call 877-520-6719 or Remax 423-756-5700 White Diamond CTS Cadillac, 4DR, loaded. 25,000 miles. One owner, like new. 326-9109. 1999 Ford Ranger Extendedcab, 5 speed, good condition. Needs battery. $2,000 OBO. call Sandy at 850-326-8277. Truck Camper for sale 8 foot bed 1985 Air and heat sleeps 3-4. Very good condition. asking $695. call 547-3246. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414

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Wednesday, September 10, 2014 Holmes County Times Advertiser | B11 5020299

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B12 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Extra Wednesday, September 10, 2014 For the week ending Sept. 5, 2014 At Georgia Livestock Auction receipts totaled $9,450 compared to $10,656 last week and $9,658 one year ago. Compared to one week earlier, slaughter cows were $1 to $3 higher, bulls were $2 to $3 higher, feeder steers steady $3 higher, heifers were mostly steady to 2 higher and bulls were steady to $3 higher, steer calves $2 to $4 higher, bull calves were steady to $3 higher, heifer calves were unevenly steady to $3 higher and replacement cows were mostly steady to $2 higher. At Alabama Livestock Auctions total estimated receipts this week $13,900, compared to $15,913 last week and $17,689 one year ago. Compared to one week ago slaughter cows sold steady to $3 higher and bulls sold steady to $3 higher. Replacement cows and pairs sold mostly steady. All feeder classes sold $3 to $5 higher. Trade moderate with good de mand on feeders. XNS P112049 Parkway Motors Parkway Motors CHEVROLET AVA LANCHE $ 315 /mon th WA C, $1000 Do wn 4x4 HOND AA CCORD $ 235 /mo nth WA C, $1000 Do wn EX-6, Leather ,R oof ,L ow Miles! MINICOOPER $ 235 /mon th WA C, $1000 Do wn 26K Miles DODGE RAM $ 315 /mo nth WA C, $1000 Do wn 2t oc hoose fr om! CHEVROLET SUB URB AN $ 374 /mon th WA C, $1000 Do wn 271, 4x4, Th ir dR ow ,N AV CHEVROLET SIL VERADO $ 359 /mo nth WA C, $1000 Do wn GENESIS COUPE $ 316 /mon th WA C, $1000 Do wn R-Spec SU ZUKI ZL7 $ 9,991 S X4 $ 9,991 HOND AO DY SSEY EX-L $ 9,991 CHEVROLET MALIB U $ 9,991 HO ND AC R-V $ 9,991 PT CRUISER $ 4,995 BU ICK CENTUR YS ED AN $ 4,991 VW E0S $ 234 /mo nth WA C, $1000 Do wn Con ve rt ible Good Cr edit, Bad Cr edit NO PROBLEM! One ye ar on the job Yo u re Appr ove d!! 75 CA RS &T RUCKS TO CHOOSE FR OM!! Ref er aF ri end or Fa mily Member Receiv e $ 200 if the yb uy! We We lcome First Time Buy ers! HOND A OD YS SEY EX-L HOND A OD YS SEY EX-L HOND A OD YS SEY EX-L HO ND A CR-V Under $ 10,000 850-481-0148 4136 E. 15th St. |P an ama City www .pkwymot ors.com Cat scratch fever, or cat scratch disease (CSD), is a bacterial infection caused by Bartonella henselae. This disease is most commonly transmitted from infected cats to humans by way of biting or scratching, although it can also spread from the saliva of an infected cat getting into an open wound on your body. Bartonella henselae is the actual bacteria causing cat scratch fever, said Dr. Audrey Cook, associate professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. This is a bacterium that likes to live inside red blood cells and is very hard to culture using usual methods. It is difcult to tell whether your cat is a carrier of Bartonella henselae, as the cats themselves do not show any signs of illness from the bacteria. Regardless, a large percentage of cats carry this bacterium at some point in their lives, most commonly when they are kittens. As the bacterium is adapted to live in cats, they do not become ill, but can harbor the infection for prolonged periods, said Dr. Cook. It is usually spread from cat to cat by eas, and though other insect vectors may play a role, eas seem to be the most important vector. Cat scratch fever is usually not a serious illness in people with normal immune systems, and generally resolves on its own without specic treatment. Your doctor may perform a physical examination or blood test to determine whether youve been infected, and antibiotics may be prescribed if necessary. Clinical disease is very variable, and depends on the immune system of the person, said Dr. Cook. People are vulnerable to problems if they are on immunosuppressive drugs, have cancer, AIDS or are on chemotherapy. Some symptoms you can expect with cat scratch fever may include swollen lymph nodes, chills, vomiting, fever and fatigue. The best way to prevent cat scratch disease is to avoid situations in which you might be bitten or scratched by a cat. Dont play roughly with a cat, and dont force your attentions on a cat that clearly does not welcome them. It is also important not to allow a cat to lick an open sore or scratch on your skin. If you are bitten or scratched by a cat, wash the affected area well with soap and water and contact your healthcare provider. Even if the cat is not carrying Bartonella, a cat bite injury can cause major problems and prompt treatment is necessary. In addition to avoiding rough play, keeping your cats indoors as well as administering anti-ea medication can help reduce the risk of them contracting Bartonella henselae, which in turn lowers your chance of catching cat scratch fever. Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed online at vetmed.tamu.edu/pet-talk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to editor@cvm.tamu.edu. FEEDER STEERS: MEDIUM AND LARGE FRAME NUMBER 1 AND 2 300 to 400 lbs. Georgia $295 to $350 Alabama $290 to $330 400 to 500 lbs. Georgia $240 to $285 Alabama $241 to $280 500 to 600 lbs. Georgia $215 to $245 Alabama $220 to $245 FEEDER HEIFERS: MEDIUM AND LARGE FRAME NUMBER 1 AND 2 300 to 400 lbs. Georgia $245 to $300 Alabama $255 to $280 400 to 500 lbs. Georgia $217 to $245 Alabama $220 to $255 500 to 600 lbs. Georgia $198 to $225 Alabama $202 to $230 SLAUGHTER COWS 90% lean 750 to 1200 lbs. Georgia $105 to $112 Alabama $103 to $108 85% boner 1250 to 1500 lbs. Georgia $115 to $122 Alabama $114 to $119 SLAUGHTER BULLS Yield grade number 1 and 2 1500 to 2100 lbs. Georgia $134 to $140 Alabama $129 to $136 Livestock REPORTS PET T ALK Cat scratch fever a bacterial infection WWW.WEB P AT H OLOGY. COM Bartonella henselae seen under a microscope.