Holmes County times-advertiser

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Holmes County times-advertiser
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Newspaper
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Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
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Bonifay, FL
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June 19, 2013
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University of Florida
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PL AY Sp on so re d by 50 www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 3 2014 Volume 124, Number 21 For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM Phone: 850-547-9414 Website: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 INDEX Arrests ................................. A5 Opinion ................................ A4 Re ections ........................... A8 Community ........................... B3 Sports .................................. A7 Extra .................................... B1 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ......................... B7-8 IN BRIEF Hobby becomes legacy B1 Chipola Amateur Radio Club MARIANNA The Chipola Amateur Radio Club will host a peanut boil from 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 6, at Jennings Park, on State Road 73 in Marianna. The event is open to area ham radio enthusiasts, as well as those wishing to learn more about operating ham radio equipment and or obtaining their license through the Federal Communications Commission. Picnic in the park PONCE DE LEON Picnic in the Park will be from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 6, at Ponce de Leon Springs. There will be free entry into the springs. There will be free hamburgers, hot dogs, games and swimming. Two-Toed Tom yard sale ESTO The Two-Toed Tom Festival will be hosting a yard sale all day Saturday, Sept. 13, at the Esto Community Center. The cost to rent a table inside will be $10 and to rent a table outside the cost will be $5. For more information, call Darlene at 263-3201. imes imes imes T dvertiser imes imes imes imes T T dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser A HOLMES COUNTY County approves 4 percent pay raise By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT Cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Holmes County Board of County Commissioners approved a four percent pay raise for all non-union county employees and a county contribution of $35 per employee toward health insurance during called session Aug. 28. The same raise was offered to union employees, including those in the road department and ambulance service, but the union turned down the increase, which is still in separate negotiation. Union representative Allen Gregory had not return the TimesAdvertisers call at press time. There is an upcoming meeting to discuss bene ts and the upcoming payroll and how that will affect the 2014-2015 budget, County Attorney Jeff Goodman said. The board knows weve got a couple of things going on. Were in negotiations with the union in respect to wages and bene ts, and those negotiations are ongoing. We have yet to reach an agreement. Goodman explained that the non-union employees upcoming payment for their insurance for their upcoming scal year is coming due and needs to be paid that week. He also added that there was discussion on paying a See PAY RAISE A2 BACK YARD LIBRARY WHTC considers name change By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT Cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY WashingtonHolmes Technical Center Director Martha Compton gave a presentation at the recent meeting of Bonifay Kiwanis Club announcing a possible name change is in the works for the school to Florida Panhandle Technical College. Many years ago, Washington-Holmes Technical Center only served Washington and Holmes County, Compton said. But today, our enrollment has changed. We are serving from Escambia County all the way to Leon County. Weve got several students from downstate that are coming up that will spend eight weeks PHOTOS BY BETTY TREADWELL | Special to the Times-Advertiser Elizabeth Aunt Liz Kidd shows Aylana and Aliesa Brent all the books available at Once Upon a Time, a mini library located in Esto. Below Liz Kidd, the local who had the idea for a mini library, stands with the one who built the mini library, Jodi Moore, next to the completed product now known as Once Upon a Time. Mini library opens in Esto By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT Cspears@chipleypaper.com ESTO Elizabeth Aunt Liz Kidd said she always has been a child at heart and now her dream of giving back has become a reality as Esto was introduced to the very rst mini library. I wanted to nd a way for the community to give and receive books, especially since there isnt a library in Esto at the moment, Kidd said. Thats when I saw the idea of having a mini library in Parade Magazine through the local paper. It provided information to buy one through them and charter it as an of cial mini library. She said she didnt have to purchase one through the company thanks the generosity of residents Connie and Jodi Moore. Mr. Moore built a doublewalled unit to withstand the weather, Kidd said. They did this as a labor of love. There is nothing she treasures more than children and books, she said. I have treasured books since I was a child and I love children so it seems natural to share what I love with the children, Kidd said. Im also thinking of having a regular story time about once a month for the local children. The mini library is set up in her back yard on 4th Avenue. Her directions are take State Road 79 north of the Dollar General then take a right onto 4th Avenue and it will be one block down on the left. Kidd also said she will host a story time during the yard sale fundraiser for the Two Toed Tom Festival on Saturday, Sept. 13, at the Community Center. She will be set up at John Clark Park. Holmes County preliminary results are in By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT Cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Preliminary results are in for Holmes Countys primary election. Voter turnout was 34.7 percent. In local races, Republican Danny Powell will face off against Democrat Earl Stafford for position of County Commissioner District 4. Powell carried the vote with 54.84 percent of the vote against Kenneth Williams and Stafford overcame John Wayne Cartwright and L.T. Sonny Johnson with 53.5 percent of the votes for the seat of County Commissioner District 4. Powell over Williams with a vote of 874 to See WHTC A2 See ELECTIONS A2

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in our CDL program. Because of growth, Compton explained she has spending time in legislation involved with a movement of a bill to change the name and rebrand technical center. When I was in school in the 80s it was known as the Votech, she explained. Most of the people in my day didnt go to the Votech because it was a place to go when you didnt want or feel you needed to go to college. That has changed; we are no longer the Votech, so youll hear us say technical center. Thirty technical centers were favored by the House of Representatives for a title change from technical center to technical college in recent years. We got a little greedy, and we had some leaders in the technical centers that said we want to offer AAS degrees, Compton said. So you know whose toes we stepped on; we stepped on the colleges toes, and the colleges said oh no, this is our realm, so the Senate shut us down. Although legislation would not allow the technical center to provide AAS degrees, they did agree to the name change. Those 30 technical centers got together and said they wanted to be a uni ed body, she said. We dont want to be institutions, we dont want to be career centers, we dont want to be tech centers, we want to be technical colleges. I spoke with our Superintendent of Schools, we talked with our advisory group, talked with our partners, we talked with our school board members and at the next meeting we will ask for a name change to a technical college. Compton explained that people are not familiar with Washington or Holmes County, but they are familiar with the panhandle, so that played a factor in the new name selection process. 659 and the Democrats choice was Stafford with a staggering 1,149 votes to Johnson Jr.s 616 and Cartwrights 348. Monty Merchant lost his bid for re-election to the County Commissioner District 2 seat to challenger Mickey Locke who garnered 51.66 percent to Merchants 44.63 percent. Locke had a vote of 1,994, only 272 votes ahead of his opposition Merchant, who had 1,722 votes. There was no Democratic opposition. Jason Motley lost his position for re-election as school board member for District 3 to Alan Justice who had 54.62 percent of the votes; both are nonpartisans. Justice had a 444 vote lead against Motley with a vote of 2,107 to 1,663. Sidney M. Sid Johnson Jr. overcame Drew Kriser with 55.53 percent of the votes for the position of school board member District 5; both are nonpartisans. Johnson had a 511 vote lead against Kriser with a vote of 2,143 to 1,632. Early voting for the general election will be from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 20 through Saturday, Oct. 25; from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 26; and from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 27 through Saturday, Nov. 1. The early voting location is the Supervisor of Elections Of ce at Holmes County Courthouse at 201 North Oklahoma St., Suite 102 in Bonifay. For more information, visit Holmes County Supervisor of Elections home page at www.holmeselections.com. [Dispenser imprint and work ar ea] 2014 FREE Video Ear Exam Month XX XX, 2014 FREE Hearing Scr eening Month XX XX, 2014 Stay healthy with this FA ST CONVEN IENT and FREE hearing scr eening. Answer these qu estions an d bring th em with you to yo ur appointm ent: 1. Do you have ringing in your ears? YES NO 2. Does it seem like people mumble? YES NO 3. Do you have tr ouble hearing in noisy places, like a re staurant? YES NO 4. Have others said you have the TV volume too loud? YES NO 5. Is it dif cult to hear on the phone? YES NO CALL TODA Y Times ar e limit ed X Day s Onl y! Mon th XXXX, 2014 Sch edule your An nual HE ARING CHE CK-UP Ha ve yo u mad e your ap point ment yet? Benet s of hearing aids var y by type and degree of hea ring loss, noise env iro nment, accur acy of hearin g evalu ati on and pr oper t. Belton e He arin g Care Ce nte rs are inde pend ently ow ne d and ope r at ed. Pa rtic ipation ma y var y. 20 14 Belt one be lt on e. co m Most insurance plans accepted Benets expiring at the end of the year? We ll help you nd out! Benets o f hear ing aids var y by type and degree of hear ing los s, noi s e en vironment accu racy of he ari ng eva luation a nd pro per t Belt Par tici patio n may va ry 201 4 Beltone beltone. com FREE Hearing Scr eening Month XX XX, 2014 FREE Video Ear Exam Month XX XX, 2014 FREE Video Ear Exam Month XX XX, 2014 Most insurance plans accepted Benets expiring at the end of the year? We ll help you nd out! Ex pi re s Se pt 19 20 14 Ex pi re s: Sep te mb er 19 20 14 Ex pi re s Se pt 19 20 14 Ex pi re s Se pt 19 20 14 FR EE Be lt one Ba tt erie s Bu y On e Pa ck Ge t On e Eq ua l Si ze Pa ck Fr ee MARIANNA 30 25 6th ST REET (850) 260-0436 We dnesd ays & Fr idays CHIPLEY 1611 MA I N ST REET #4 (850) 260-0436 Monda y Fr iday Rachel Ruminski Hear ing Car e Pr actitioner Bill Fletcher HAS: BC-HIS Do ct or s Me mo ri al Ho sp it al We lc om es e Ch an gi ng Fa ce of Ad di ct io n! e Na ti on al In sti tu te on Dr ug Ab us e re cen tl y co nd uc te d a st ud y ab out th e in cr ea se of pre sc ri pt io n dr ug ab us e in th e U. S.A. Re su lt s fr om th e st ud y fo un d ov er 16 mi ll io n Ame ri ca ns re po rt ed usi ng pr es cr ipt io n dr ugs fo r no nm ed ic al re as on s. Fu rt he r re su lt s, in dic at e th er e s th re e ty pe s of dr ugs mo st o en ab us ed ; th es e ar e: Op io id s (p ai n re li ef ), CNS de pr ess an ts (S eda ti ve s or tr an qu il izer s), an d St im ul an ts (p re sc ri be d fo r AD HD sl ee p di so rd er ob esi ty na rc ol epsy). Ma ri ju an a, pr es cri pt io n, an d ov er -theco un te r me di ca ti on s pre ce de d th e li st of co mm on ly ab us ed dr ugs. es e nd in gs co ncl ude d pre sc ri pt io n dr ugs ar e no w ch ang in g th e face of addic ti on St oppi ng th e ep id em ic id e nt if yi ng th e face an d br ea ki ng th e cy cl e of addic ti on to pre sc ri pti on dr ugs is th e re as on wh y Ne w Vi si on at Do ct or s Me mo ri al Ho sp it al pl ay s a cr it ic al ro le du ri ng th e ini ti al st ag e of re co ve ry e Ne w Vi si on me th od of ma na ge d me dic al st ab il iza ti on du ri ng th e cr it ic al wi th dra wa l st ep o er s cl ar it y an d st re ng th to th os e wh o qu al if y. Pe op le se ek in g l i fe lo ng re co ve ry fr om su bs ta nc e dep en den cy ca n co un t on Ne w Vi si on to hel p th em st ar t th e pa th to a ne w lif e. Br ea k the Cy cl e to da y! 850-547-8092 or 800-939-2273 www .s pe ci al ca re co rp .c om /ne w-v is io n I t wa s go od to ge t ou t an d meet Ho lm es Co un ty c it iz ens an d to le ar n mo re ab ou t th ei r co nce rn s. We wa nt to exp re ss app re ci at io n to th os e se rv ing on th e boa rd an d en co ur ag e th em to co nt in ue to im pr ov e Ho lm es Co un ty ed uc at io n. Dr ew Kr ise r Dr ew Kr is er wo ul d li ke to tha nk co mm uni ty me mb er s fo r the ir su pp or t in his ca mp ai gn fo r Sc ho ol Bo ar d. Local A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, September 3, 2014 $35 payment toward their insurance deductible or insurance cost. They want to see if the board wants to go ahead and do $35 toward the nonunion employee insurance so payroll can get that out this week. As we go into next month they will start making payments in October for the upcoming 20142015 scal year, Goodman said. We can go ahead at this time and do any wage increase would like. We payout Octobers insurance in September and thats going out today. Commissioner Kenneth Williams motioned the board needed to go ahead and put it on the record to give their non-union employees a four percent pay raise and $35 for their insurance, effective the new budget year. Merchant also motioned they raise the supervisor of the Holmes County Recycling Centers hourly wage by $1, which she is budget neutral because she is grant funded, which also was approved. More approvals: Holmes County Recycling Center Supervisors request to use $3,000 to purchase a paper shredder. Roll over any extra money from inmate medical from the Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce funds to be used as contingency funds for inmate medical contingency. PAY RAISE from page A1 PHOTOS BY CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser Groups gathered around the Holmes County Supervisor of Elections of ce waiting for results to text to their friends and family. ELECTIONS from page A1 WHTC from page A1 CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser Washington-Holmes County Technical Center Director Martha Compton visits Bonifay Kiwanis Club to announce the centers effort to change the image and name of the center to a technical college. Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER Bonifay Garden Club kicking off new year Special to the Times-Advertiser Bonifay Garden Club is excited about the kick off of their new year. Members will be involved in several beauti cation projects. One large project they will be doing is planting wild owers. Holmes Board of Holmes County passed a wild ower resolution for Holmes County. Bonifay Garden Club wants everyone to come join our club so you can give us help and encourage this area of Holmes County to help the beauty of the county. Bonifay Garden Clubs the new year begins at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9, at First Baptist Church Annex. There will be a covered dish lunch served, and everyone is encouraged to bring a favorite dish. Matt Orwalt will be our speaker and will be giving everyone some wonderful information. Become more involved with the Four Fs: Food, fun, fellowship and owers. Call Judy Favor at 547-2088 with your name and how many will be attending.

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The ex am includes a pr es cr ip ti on fo r eye glasses and te sts fo r Glaucom a, Ca ta ra cts and other eye diseases FOR YO UR APPOINTMENT CA LL: 850-638-72 20 ELIGIBILI TY : U. S. Ci ti ze ns living in the Flor ida Pa nhand le 59 ye ar s and older not pr esentl y under our car e. Co upon Expir es: 9/1 5/20 14 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: WC00 Sm ar t Le ns es SM Ca n pr oduce clear vision without glasses at all dist ances www .m ullise ye .com MULLIS EYE INSTITUTE Chiple y Of fi ce 16 91 Main St., St e. 1 Chi ple y FL 3242 8 850-638-7220 We ar e locat ed dir ectl y acr oss the par king lot fr om the Wa lmar t in Chiple y To dd Ro binson, M.D Boar d Ce rt if ied Ey e Ph ys ician and Ca ta ra ct Sur geon TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y WA SHINGT ON I HOLME S I JA CKSON 2014 Reader s Ch oic e Flor ida Fa rm Bur eau has been ser vicing the people of Flor ida fo r ove r 60 ye ars Come by yo ur local Fa rm Bur eau Of ce and visit with yo ur agent. Isn't yo ur insur ance needs wo rt h mor e than that 1-800 nu mber? 1361 Ja ck son Av e. Chiple y, FL 32428 850-638-1756 1108 N Wa uk esha St. Bonif ay FL 32425 850-547-4227 Flor ida F ar m Bur eau has been ser vicing the people of Flor ida f or o ve r 60 y ears fa rm bu re au @a ol .c om By CHRIS OLWELL 747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY The sweeping reforms of the Affordable Care Act, widely referred to as Obamacare, have been a mixed bag for people in the Florida Panhandle, congressional candidate Gwen Graham said Thursday in an interview on the controversial law. Obamacare has been an issue in the closely watched race to represent Floridas 2nd District. Incumbent Rep. Steve Southerland, RPanama City, stood with local doctors last month to decry the law as one that is hurting patients and doctors. They said Grahams position on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) seemed to change with the prevailing winds, a charge Graham denied. Since the beginning of this race Ive taken the consistent position that we shouldve had an incremental approach to reforming health care, she said. There have been positives, she said. The law now prevents insurance companies from refusing coverage for pre-existing conditions, and it allows college-age dependents to remain covered by their parents health insurance. It prohibits insurers from charging women more for policies and increases access to preventive care. But the law also leaves much to be desired, Graham said. She said a recent visit to Campbellton-Graceville Hospital impressed on her the burden the law imposes on rural health care facilities with a mandate that medical records be kept electronically. The hospital spent millions to upgrade its records system, she said, which is ridiculous. Congress spent too much time in ghting and didnt make enough effort with the details in the law, Graham said. We needed to have a Congress that would have xed that so that our rural hospitals are not at a disadvantage, Graham said. Southerland and Graham actually overlap on some of these issues. For instance, Graham said she supported the Keep Your Health Plan Act, which Republicans put forward after people actually lost their health care coverage in the troublestricken rollout of the law, despite President Barack Obamas promise that you can keep it. Graham is opposed to the cuts in the law to Medicare Advantage, which has caused premium increases for policy holders. The ACA also includes a Medical Device Tax, which has been criticized on both sides of the aisle. Thats another area of the law that I would repeal, Graham said. Southerland has voted over and over to repeal the law, so why doesnt Graham support repealing the ACA? I dont really think theres much difference between repealing the law and the xes she supports, Graham said. Thats what Congress has normally done historically x laws. Candidate faces Steve Southerland in District 2 Gwen Graham favors incremental health reform GWEN GRAHAM Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

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OPINION www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, September 3, 2014 A Page 4 Section The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $13.30; 26-weeks: $19.90; 52 weeks: $32.00 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $17.70; 26 weeks: 26.50; 52 weeks: $43.00 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Carol Kent, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@ bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION clamb @chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 EDITOR Carol: ckent@ chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 ADVERTISING Bill Allard: wallard@ chipleypaper.com 850-547-9414 Please be courteous to our truckers Dear Editor, Most of us have homes and families that want us home as soon as possible and as safe as possible. We all need to get somewhere, either to pick up something you need or to deliver something you need. If you live in a house or drive any vehicle or eat food, somehow a truck driver helped get it to you. When we come through any town or city all we want to do is get on in and out so we can make our appointments on time. So when we come through your hometown please remember we are people like you. We have good days and bad days. We need to eat and move on. When you pull out of your drive and see a big truck coming give a few second to let it go on past you. I dont think any store or where you work is going to move. People who pull out in front of a big truck may cause the driver to slow down to be safe in case you werent then two block down you stop to mail a letter or something else. Think, did you get out on the street safely and allow the trucker to drive safely also? I cant say how much it help all of us if we use our turn signals. They put them on our vehicles for safety. It is no big secret where you are going. Turn signals help those behind you adjust to whats going on. And truck drivers appreciate it when you use them so they can take care of their loads and take care of you. I know everyone most likely can tell of bad encounters with a big truck. Well, for every time a truck driver offended you, the truck driver can tell of how a car driver has offended them. I guess I am saying we are all on the road together. We must share the road to be safe. So when you go to the store or a friends hose, share the road. Use your turn signals. Allow yourself time to get where you are going safely. Remember, be it a 18wheeler, semi or tractor trailer, these men and women have a load of freight to get somewhere. They arent being rude or ugly to you. They have a job to do and are trying to do it. Randall C. Tadlock Sr. Chipley LETTER TO THE EDITOR A wee bit of a rant OUR VIEW The Washington County Board of County Commissioners sent a message to local residents and potential new industries last week that the county is serious about investing in the local economy. Commissioners voted unanimously to earmark funds generated by a Northwest Florida Community Hospital loan repayment to the county to facilitate much-needed economic growth here. The annual repayment, due beginning December 2015, is anticipated to bring in about $96,000 a year during the next 30 years, and will serve as a negotiating jumping point to purchase back the formerly county-owned industrial park, as well as a source of securing property and infrastructure needed to attract new industry and jobs. These funds will help the county gain a better nancial position to compete for new jobs and industry. Commissioners were called upon last week to make an investment in the countys future. Given the countys current economic woes and the general toughness of economic times, it couldnt have been an easy decision but the boards investment into growing Washington County will pay big dividends. Currently, if an industry calls on Washington County wanting to know what property is available for relocating here, our economic leaders dont have much of anything to offer. Buying back the shovel-ready county industrial park and securing funds to improve infrastructure and other incentives for potential new business is a step in the right direction. Adventures in parenthood Why is there a birthday candle in my purse? The bewildered question came from long-time friend, Katie Moore, last Friday. Laughing, I couldnt resist reminding Katie odd purse contents are a sure sign shes a mom. Whats in Moms Purse has become a favorite game among members of my household. The range of items found has changed with the ages of my children, of course. Pocketbooks have contained everything from extra diapers, loose Fruit Loops, toy cars, doll heads (dont ask), Band-aids and a Nerf dart (Honestly, that last one might belong to me.) Before having children, my purse was all about me, lled with nothing but a wallet, makeup and ticket stubs. Funny how parents adapt to their new role, often doing things that would send a younger version of themselves running. If youre considering parenthood, heres fair warning of whats to come: A quiet house will frighten you. Moms will go weeks without shaving their legs because we understand it can be dangerous to take the extra time needed in the shower while there are children playing in the next room. You will memorize millions of books, songs and worthless facts, which is the reason your brain wont have room to retain memory of where you placed your car keys. Sure, you cant stand the Adventure Time theme song, but you will know every word of it and nd yourself humming the offensive tune at work. Your mothers voice will come out of your mouth. In fact, you will do several things you swore youd never do as a parent and not even feel bad about it. You also will nd yourself uttering strange phrases like, Stop licking the hymnal or Who put bologna in the DVD player? You will catch something disgusting in your hand, and it wont faze you. During the past 19 years, Im embarrassed to admit I have wiped toddler noses with my bare hands and put my hand out to catch something those same toddlers needed to spit out. I once even saved a relatives area rug from a sick child in this manner. You will be able to identify weird substances and smells in a single sniff. The sticky red mess in the bottom of the toy box is probably old Halloween candy, and that sour smell in your car is likely a lost sippy cup rolling around under the seat. Go ahead and throw it away. Its worth the three bucks to buy another cup to avoid opening the lid. Trust me. Phantom-like people will move into your home. Named Ida Know and Not Me, these folks are visible only to children and usually are responsible for all misdeeds committed in the house. You will have to peel something off the ceiling at least once. This can range from spaghetti to a failed science experiment. You also will nd something strange clogging the drain, such as a Mr. Potato Head in the toilet (true story). For those thinking of joining the ranks of parenthood, the above facts might seem scary, as its not a job for the faint of heart. It will, however, prepare you for most everything you will ever have to face except that fateful day when you nd yourself having to let your little ones go and wishing you could do it all again. CAROL KENT Editor HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper.com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Call 638-0212. Commissioners on right track for economic growth I try not to have solid opinions toward any subject until I get as much fact as possible, but as most will nd this is next to near impossible. This rant is solely based on my opinion, and I dont know all the facts yet. Thats like a disclaimer on the long rant I have following that statement. It is about regulations on charity becoming so stringent that people cannot provide the services they once did. Example being The Closet that is at the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce. I found out recently they no longer were able to provide prosthesis for those who have had a mastectomy because new regulations state they are required to have a professional prosthesis tter in order to have those items available at The Closet. Just a little background on The Closet real quick, so you can get an idea of what Im talking about. The Closet provides hats, scarves, work hats for both men and women, wigs of all kinds and colors, prosthetic breasts, bras of all kinds and colors specially made for prosthetic breasts, cammies/softies, handmade comfy pillows, makeup availability, drivers, gas money, hotel and motel vouchers, supplies, support groups and single support from those who have experienced cancer and much more. Elaine May eld, a volunteer with The Closet, said her volunteer work with The Closet has changed her life. I came in expecting to work with people who are dying, May eld said. Instead I found that Im working with people who are truly living. Julia Bullington, coordinator and volunteer with The Closet, said it puts things into perspective. You get to thinking that all lifes little issues are so important, Bullington said. Theres meetings and schedules and appointments and theyre all so very important until you gain perspective from some of these women who come in who are truly living their lives to the fullest each day and suddenly you see what in life truly matters. Bullington and May eld shared a story about an elderly woman in her mid-70s who came in after much cancer treatment and was looking to get a wig to replace the hair she had lost. Originally she had this neat salt and pepper hair and we tted her with hair that was really close to what she had before, Bullington said. Her husband was sitting in their vehicle with a magazine waiting and when she rst came out with her wig he just glanced up and said that it was nice and went on reading. Bullington said she went back in and decided to go with a wig much like 70s model and actress Farrah Fawcett. When she walked out with that wig on he put down his magazine, he came out of the car and his eyes lit up, Bullington said. The rst words that came out of his mouth were you are beautiful! May eld explained that the most that women are looking for when they come to The Closet is to feel normal again; to feel like a woman again. May eld said her rst experience was with a woman who had a radical mastectomy, which is where they surgically removal of one or both breasts, partially or completely. I wasnt prepared for what I saw, May eld said. It was horrible and I tried to be respectful and remain steady, but it was her to say they made a mess, didnt they? I never would have imagined just how courageous and strong they are, even with their frail bodies. She said after that experience she had made it her goal to help correct the messes cancer had made in the lives of these peoples lives. What people do is come here looking for simple things like a scarf or a wig and they end up nding so much more, Bullington said. I didnt realize how much I wouldve become involved and how much of me would be leaving with every person. Its an amazing feeling watching these women transform into beautiful, happy women; going from sad to joyful. May eld told about a young lady in her late 20s who had a double mastectomy came in and said can you just give me some boobs and a wig? and can we get those a couple sizes bigger? The most amazing part is when she said she felt like a woman again, May eld said. We got her into her wig and her new bra and she looked in the mirror and said Oh my gosh! Im kinda hot! Thats what makes this all worth while; giving back what cancer has stolen. May eld also added there was a program that gave free make-up makeovers for cancer patient,s which includes free make-up valued in the hundreds of dollars. They use top-of the line products to restore facial tissue and renew a womans appearance after it has been ravaged by countless cancer treatments, May eld said. The clinics are located in Dothan and Crestview and the patients do have to get there on their own, but it is more than worth it. Bullington wanted to clarify The Closet isnt there just for breast cancer patients and they do give replacement prosthetics, bras, etc. Its great when they get a wig and they ask how much it is and we can tell them it is free because of those who support their local Relay for Life and give to the American Cancer Society, Bullington said. So I say that if they want to repay them then when they get better they should give back by becoming a team member for Relay for Life and raise money for others just like them. Its a very rewarding challenge and it makes you appreciate what you have. I know it is necessary to have regulations because it keeps people honest, but it also is frustrating to think that a service wont be provided because of over-regulation. Instead of taking something away because of regulation, I think they should have added; such as adding a professional tter on certain days of the week or month or provide training to those who volunteer. If you want to learn more about The Closet in Holmes County, call the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce at 547-4682. Thanks again for sitting with me, even if it is just a rant, and Ill be happy to see you again next week. CECILIA SPEARS Cecilias Sit Down

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AUG. 17-24 Rachel Angerbrandt, 34, driving while license suspended or revoked with knowledge Ricardo Choc, 43, driv ing under the inuence, no drivers license, reckless driving, resisting arrest with violence Brian Clements, 30, hold for Hillsborough Shayla Lane Cub stead, 20, possession of drug paraphernalia, pos session of controlled sub stance meth, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams Anthony Dewayne Curry, 38, violation of pro bation on driving while license suspended or revoked Fagner Dias, 31, hold for outside agency Angela Farris, 30, pos session of controlled substance alprazolam, possession of drug para phernalia, tampering with evidence Louie Earnest Flowers, 49, violation of probation on driving while license suspended or revoked felony James Alan Floyd, 27, Burglary Shelia Fondo, 46, vio lation of probation on possession of controlled substance Joshua Forehand, 31, disorderly conduct Ronald Gell, 22, vio lation of probation on possession of controlled substance Carl Giliman, 52, do mestic battery by stran gulation, aggravated as sault with deadly weapon domestic violence George Jarrell, 46, possession of controlled substance adderall 30mg, possession of controlled substance meth, manu facture or delivery of drug paraphernalia Marreropadilla Jos ue, 31, hold for outside agency Kelvin Kidd, 37, viola tion of probation on driv ing while license suspend ed or revoked Jordan Russell King, 21, violation of probation on disorderly conduct Roger Lambert, 39, hold for outside agency Andrew Geoffrey Leavins, 46, trespass after warning Jeremy Troy Lewis, 45, grand theft Marcey Long, 34, driving while license sus pended or revoked Quintinn Lumpkin, 22, violation of probation on reckless driving Mickey McFayden, 34, written threats to kill Nakisha Meriel, 32, out of county warrant Shonda Moore, 38, fail ure to appear on issue worthless checks, viola tion of probation on worth less checks Anthony Newsome, 27, hold for outside agency Michael Reeves, 21,pe tit theft Dexter Robinson, 25, possession of burglary tools, burglary Trenton Rolling, 20, do mestic violence battery Jerry A Shields, 68, possession of meth, possession of paraphernalia Gary Treadway, 29, fail ure to appear Angela Trim, 36, out of county warrant Washing ton County Jason Matthew Veasey, 26, out of county warrant, domestic assault Ricky West, 50, violation of probation on driving while license suspended or revoked habitual Shannon Williams, 37, petit theft SEPT. 2 Joyce Ann Benavidez, Arraignment, 5/19/1972, knowingly operating while drivers license suspended Edward E. Campbell, Arraignment, 6/29/1966, driving while license suspended or revoked second offence Edward E. Campbell, Arraignment, 6/29/1966, expired drivers license more than six months Helmer A. Chirinos Gonzalez, Arraignment, 9/30/1994, no valid drivers license Ricky Zander Davis, Arraignment, 7/18/1968, driving while license suspended or revoked Ricky Zander Davis, Arraignment, 7/18/1968, drug possession marijuana under 20 grams, drug paraphernalia use or possession Diana Lynn Durko, Arraignment, 8/29/1985, reckless driving Diana Lynn Durko, Arraignment, 8/29/1985, driving under the inuence with property damage Lucas Glenn George, Arraignment, 12/13/1996, violation of drivers license restriction Claud David Grider, Arraignment, 11/12/1960, driving while license suspended or revoked Lawrence Godwin Haddaway II, Arraignment, 12/25/1978, driving while license suspended or revoked Joseph Martin Harding, Arraignment, 2/20/1982, reckless driving Kevin Lamar Hicks, Arraignment, 6/6/1975, driving under the inuence Robie Melvin Hughes, Arraignment, 6/11/1964, driving under the inuence Robie Melvin Hughes, Arraignment, 6/11/1964, careless driving Feliz Lopez Diaz, Arraignment, 11/20/1959, driving under the inuence Raymond Ralph Mallory, Arraignment, 10/27/1950, driving while license suspended James Wilfred Marker, Arraignment, 3/22/1961, driving under the inuence Jakee Martineze Monlyn, Arraignment, 12/8/1988, driving while license suspended or revoked Cesar Luis Morales, Arraignment, 8/17/1984, knowingly operating while drivers license suspended Corey Wayde Riley, Arraignment, 7/16/1989, driving while license suspended or revoked Jimmy Alanzo Shiver, Arraignment, 11/4/1952, driving while under the inuence Jimmy Alanzo Shiver, Arraignment, 11/4/1952, driving while license suspended or revoked Ashley Nicole Thompson, Arraignment, 7/24/1984, knowingly operating while drivers license suspended Tiffany Voncile Walker, Arraignment, 11/29/1986, expired drivers license more than six months Tracy Dorcl Walker, Arraignment, 8/28/1967, knowingly operating while drivers license suspended Michael James Williams, Arraignment, 8/29/1968, leaving the scene of accident with damage of more than $50 Jackson Alexander Wright, Arraignment, 1/21/1988, driving while license suspended or revoked Berry Charles Harberson, Arraignment, 12/6/1966, battery domestic violence Cecil Ray Howell, Arraignment, 12/2/1960, trespass other than structure or conveyance James Keith Kelley, Arraignment, 1/8/1960, violation of injunction on repeat sex date violence Bridgett Justine Kelly, Arraignment, 7/19/1976, battery touch or strike Billy Jack Mitchem, Arraignment, 11/27/1976, assault, trespass other than structure or conveyance Shonda Lee Moore, Violation of Probation, 7/7/1976, issue worthless check Shonda Lee Moore, Violation of Probation, 7/7/1976, issue worthless check Shonda Lee Moore, Violation of Probation, 7/7/1976, issue worthless check Shonda Lee Moore, Violation of Probation, 7/7/1976, issue worthless check William Waren Music, Arraignment, 7/14/1980, battery James Douglas Perkins, Arraignment, 1/7/1963, battery Daniel Jason Stanley, Arraignment, 6/28/1984, battery domestic violence Nancye Lee Sweeney, Arraignment, 10/14/1944, contribute to delinquency of minor Michael Wayne Thomas, Arraignment, 5/23/1980, violation of injunction for protection Patricia Ann Wilkerson, Arraignment, 10/14/1973, criminal mischief Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 Wednesday, September 3, 2014 So we ll Tra ctor Co ., Inc. 2841 Hwy 77 North, Pa nama City www .so we lltr actor co .com So we ll and Ku bota 40 Ye ars of Tr usted Pe rf or manc e We Tr ade for Any thin g That Don t Eat! Financing Arranged (W AC) Co me ask yo ur qu est io ns an d se e if th e an sw er s yo u se ek ca n b e fo und Do yo u ha ve que st ion s ab ou t va ri ou s is su es an d to pi cs su ch as : Where: Hickory Hill Baptist Church When: September 6, 2014 6:00 p.m. Speakers: Dr Robin Jumper Academic Dean The Baptist College of Florida Dr James Newell, Professor of Old Te stament The Baptist College of Florida Free dessert with coffee/tea after the service. Everyone welcome! We als o ta ke ca re of (850) 638-5885 Mo st Ve hicles Up to 5 qts syn thetic blend Mo st Ve hicles $ 19 95 + tax + tax 113-117 hea t inde x ra nge fo r the in te ri or Fl or ida Pa nhandle dur ing Au g. 2014 5 deg re es te mps we re on av er age 5 deg re es hott er in 2014 than this time last ye ar 40 kW h 60 kW h 80 kW h 100 kW h 120 kW h HIGHER THAN AV ER AG E TEMPS = HIGHER THAN AV ER AG E BILLS 8/18 8/19 8/20 8/21 8/22 8/23 8/24 Us age (kW h) 90 degr ees Te mper at ur e 94 degr ees 94 degr ees 97 deg re es 98 degr ees 99 deg re es 100 degr ees Example of a WFEC Me mber s Av er ag e kW h Us age fo r One We ek in Au gust 2014 54 per ce nt co oling co sts ac co un t fo r appr ox 54% of the ave ra ge home s elec tr ic usage 1 mon th yo u ar e billed in Se pt ember fo r kW h used in Au gust Ener gy Au dit ors ar e standing by to help yo u re solv e yo ur home s ecienc y issues 82.5 av er age te mper at ur e fo r Au gust 2014 20 kW h 40 kW h NON -E TH AN OL GAS NO W IN BO NI FA Y Co nv en ienc e St or e wi th Be er So da Lo tt er y & Sn ack s, CL EA N RE ST RO OM S, ON & O -R oa d Di es el Goo d Pa rk in g Jus t o I10 an d Hw y 79 40 5 St Joh ns Rd, Bo ni fa y, Fl Or Vi sit us at 29 55 Hw y 81 Po nc e De Le on Fl Holmes County DOCKETS Holmes County ARRESTS AUG. 25-29 MARRIAGES There were no marriages reported.DIVORCES Jerry Eldridge and Marla Greer Eldridge MA RRI A GE S A ND DIVORCE S Altrusa helps Chipola College From staff reports Altrusa International of Marianna recently do nated $2,500 to the Chipo la College Foundation for the clubs annual schol arship awards. Altrusa sponsors an annual award to a female student from Jackson County who is returning to Chipola in an effort to secure advance ments in her chosen ca reer. The scholarship can be applied toward tuition, books, and items required for coursework. The club also awards a renewable scholarship to a returning woman who is majoring in a literacyrelated eld.

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Local A6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, September 3, 2014 2014 Universal Uclick from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick To order, send $9.95 plus $3.50 postage and handling for each copy. Send check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to: Andrews McMeel Universal, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206 or call toll-free 1-800-591-2097. Please send ______ copies of The Mini Page Guide to the Constitution (Item #0-7407-6511-6) at $13.45 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.) www.smartwarehousing.com Name: _______________________________________________ _________________________ Address: ______________________________________________ ________________________ City: ____________________________________ _____ State: _________ Zip: _______________ The popular nine-part series on the Constitution, written in collaboration with the National Archives, is now packaged as a colorful 32-page softcover book. The series covers: the preamble, the seven articles and 27 amendments the big ideas of the document the history of its making and the signers Doe s yo u r fami ly ha ve a fa vor ite footb all team? As foo tbal l seas on he ats up Th e Mini Pa ge take s a cl os e look at ho w thi s popu lar Ame ric an sp ort is pla yed. Use thi s iss ue to gui de you as you wa tc h a ga me What is foo tball ? Fo otball is a com plex team sport pla yed in every corner of the United State s. It is pla yed by kids and adult s alike Many people begin pla ying football as kids and later pla y in high sc hool. Thousand s of athl etes recei ve scholars hips to pl ay in co ll e ge Many U. S. coll eges and univers ities large and small, ha ve footba ll progr ams that rep resent their sc hools Is there is a colle ge team near you? Foot ball s origins The fi rst foot ball games were playe d in the mid-180 0s by a number of colleges in the Unit ed State s and Canada. These versions of the game were often simila r to socc er or rugby. There was no passing, only runnin g and toss ing the ball. In 18 8 0, a coach and former pla yer, Walte r Camp, helped to set up many of the rules that are still a part of the sport today, including 11 men on the field, taki ng turns on offense, first downs and the line of scrimmag e. About 25 years late r, the forward pass was adde d to the game. Profes sional footbal l soon bec ame popular in many larger town s and citi es, but college footbal l was popular througho ut the nation. *A sch ola rshi p is an am oun t of mone y give n to pa y for a stud ent s educ atio n. Some sch ola rships cover all cost s of school, while other s pay for on ly pa rt of them The footb all is an ovalshaped ball filled with air. Even though it is made of cowhide leather, a footbal l is often referred to as a pigsk in. Footballs have a set of laces sewn in to make them easier to grip and throw The 1914 Washingt on & Jefferson Coll ege footbal l team played against Rutgers University at the Polo Grounds in New York Cit y on Nov. 28, 1914 Notice their uniform s. How are they different from today s uniform s? These players might have worn helmets, but they were not required for college players unt il 1939. photo courtesy Library of Congress Walter Ca mp pl a y ed footba ll at Yale Universit y in Connectic ut. Early play ers didnt use helmets or pads. Hundreds of player s were kill ed playin g the sport, and it was nearly outlawed. Camps rules helped ma ke it safer for players. Followi ng Football Ar e Yo u Re ad y? from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Mi ni Sp y Mini Spy and Alpha Mouse are enjoyin g a great footba ll game See if you can find : kite penci l broom scissors bandage needl e book word MINI owl sock ladder letter E ice cream cone questio n mark TM 1. Wash and cut up fruit into chunks. 2. Place all ingred ients in large blender. 3. Process until smooth and creamy. Makes 4 serv ings. You will need an adults help with this reci pe. TM Ro ok ie Co ok ie s Re ci pe Peach Ber ry Sm ooth ie from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Mee t Meg an Fox Megan Fo x star s as April in the new T eenage Mutan t Ninja Turtles movie She has modeled and acted in several TV shows and movie s, inc luding two Tra nsformers films and the Holida y in the Sun video Megan, 28, wa s born in Roc kwood Te nnessee She began taking acting and dance cl asses whe n she wa s 5 years old. She wa s in her elem entary sc hool ch oru s. When she wa s 10, she moved wit h her family to St. Pe tersb urg Florid a. She has one older sister She enjoys reading comic books and pl ay ing video games She loves anim als and has two goats a dog and a cat. photo 2014 by Paramount Pictures from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick The name Marcus Mariota is already showing up in a lot of record bo oks. The juni or quarterback for the Univer sity of Oregon Ducks achieved many feats in his first two seasons, including twice winning first-team allleague honors from the Pacific 12 Conference. In 2013, Marcus became the first Duck to amas s 4,000 yards of total offen se in a single season. His 77 care er touchd owns at Orego n are tied with the school s all-t ime mark. In just two season s, this mighty Duck already owns the programs record for most rushing yards by a quarterback with 1,467. For his hard work on the fiel d and off, Mari otas Orego n teamm ates voted him the team s most insp irational player. More awards and honors likely await Mari ota as his junio r campaign gets underw ay. He is consi dered an early front -runner for the Heisman Trophy, college foot balls highe st individu al award. TM Mar cu s Ma rio ta Gus Goo dsport s Super sport Height: 6-4 Birthd ate: 10-30 -1993 Home town: Hon olulu, Haw aii from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick In fo otba ll, the offense tries to put the ball in the oppo nents end zone (6 points) or kick it through the goal posts (3 point s). The defense tries to preve nt the offens e from doing so. To move cl oser to the end zone a team has four ch ances or dow ns to move the ball 10 yard s. If the offens e moves th e bal l at least 10 yards it gains a new set of down s. The li ne of scrim mage (SKRI Hmej) is an imagina ry line where the football is plac ed. The offense lines up on one side and the defense is on the other the ball into the end zone again for 2 extra points instead of kic king it. Field goal The offensive team ma y kic k the ball throu gh the goal posts for 3 points Safety If the def ense tac kles an opposin g pla yer in his own end zone it is given 2 points Scoring To uc hd own A team scores 6 points if the ball reac hes the opponent s end zone Extra point After a touc hdown, a ball kic ked through the goal posts adds 1 point. 2-point conver sion After a touc hdown, a team ma y try to move How the Game Is Played Hundreds of thousands of fans attend college football games each week during the season. The University of Nebraskas Memorial Stadium has been sold out for 333 straight games, dating back to 1962. photo by Randy Lewis from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick The Mini Pag e Staff Be tt y De bn am Foun ding Edit or and Edit or at Lar ge Lisa Tar ry Man agin g Edit or Lucy Li en Ass o cia te Edit or Wendy Dale y Ar tis t The re are three units or groups on eac h football team. Offe nse : The offe nse trie s to get the bal l into the en d zone fo r a tou ch do wn. Defense : The defense works to stop the other team s offens e. Special teams : These units come on the field for kic king pla ys: kic koffs punts and fiel d goal attempts The re ar e al wa ys 22 pla yers on a footb al l fiel d at once 11 for eac h tea m. Eac h pl ay er has a spe cif ic job to do In a game program, pla yers name s ma y be foll owed by abbrevi ations for their positio ns Some abbr eviations ma y be used for several pla yers Fo r example OL means offe nsive lineman and DL means defensiv e lineman. By the numbe rs A co llege footbal l pla yer s number ma y help you ide ntify his positi on. Profe ssiona l numberi ng is similar 1-49 : Bac ks (quar terbac k, running bac k, wide recei ver corne rbac k, safety linebac ker ) 50-59 : Centers 60-69 : Guards 70-79 : Ta ck les (offensive tac kle defen sive tac kle) 80-99 : Ends (tigh t end, defensive end) 40s and 90s : Kic kers and punt ers Defen se Ta ckle ( DT, DL) two tackles line up to the left and right of the footb all; they rush the quart erba ck, knock dow n passe s or try to slow down a runn ing ba ck. Ends (DE, DL) two ends line up outside the defen sive tackles ; they rush the quart erba ck and try to force runne rs to the mid dle of the field. Lineb acker (LB) insi de or midd le line backers are behind the linem en; out side lineb ackers move beyond the ends; they may bli tz or run, int o the back field to disr upt the offen ses play ; also de f en d sh o r t passe s. Cornerback (CB) two cor nerb acks defend the left an d right edges of t he d efe n si ve format ion; usual ly respon sibl e for gua rding the wid e rec eivers. Safety (S ) on e or two safeties are the las t lin e of def ense; fre e saf eties guard areas down the fie ld aga inst long passe s and running plays; stro ng safeties cover tigh t end s and help stop runne rs. Wh s Wh on the Field Off ens e Center (C OL) the first pers on to touch the footbal l; or s na p s, t he b all t hr o ugh h is leg s to the qua rterback; blo cks de f en si ve lin emen. Guard (G, OL) left and right guar ds block defe nsive line men to prot ect the quar terback and create hol es for runn ing back s to run through Tackle (OT, OL) left and right tackles block defenders for running backs; also responsible for protecting the quarterbacks blind side an area behind the thrower where he cant see. Tight end (T E) block s like an offensi ve line man on running plays ; can also catch pass es. Wide receiver (WR ) often very fast and able to catch passes far down the field. Running back (RB) takes a hand -off from the qua rterback, or may go out for a pass. Qu arterback (QB) the leader of the of fense; takes the snap from the ce nter and may hand off the ball to a runn ing back or throw a pa s s; may also run wit h the ball. Place kicke r (PK ) kicks the bal l off a te e to be gin the ga me or aft er a sco re; also kicks an extr a poin t aft er a touch dow n, or a fie ld go al fo r 3 poin ts Pu n te r (P) ki cks the bal l to t he other team on fou rth dow n if the of fense fail s to ge t a fir st do wn an d th e ball is too far aw ay to try for a fi eld goa l. Sp eci al tea ms pos itio ns do sp eci al job s Next week, The Mini Page finds out all about 3-D printing Lin e of scr immag e from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Nancy: How can you make the odd number seven an even number? Ned: Take away the s! All the fol lowing joke s have somethi ng in common. Can you guess the common them e or cate gory? TM Mighty Funny s Mi n i Jo ke s Nora: Whe n do 2 and 2 make more than 4? Nelson: When they make 22! Nuala: What numb er is bigger when you turn it upside down? Nelly: 6 it becomes 9! S N P I H S R A L O H C S S E L C W L Z E N E M M P J P T S L O R O A E L W G E A K O N N A F E I D Y T M O E R E R I E B F C Y M H E E E D L I T O F T E C V B M C R L T B L C P E O N O X D G A U G H J F O A D O S S Q N V U G O L T K R C N F E G K C A B R E T R A U Q Y Wor ds tha t remin d us of foot ball are hidde n in the bloc k abo ve. Som e words are hidd en backw ard or dia gona lly, and som e lette rs are used twi ce. See if yo u can fin d: AMER ICAN ATHLETE COLLE GE, DEFEN SE, DOW NS, FOOTBA LL, HEL MET, OFF EN SE, PLA YER, POINTS, QUART ERBACK RUGB Y, SCH OLARS HIP, SCRIM MAGE SOCCER SPO RT, TEA M, TOUC HDOW N. Footb all from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick TM Bas set Bro wns Tr y n Fin d Re ady Re so urc es from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick The Mini Page pro vides ide as for web sites, books or oth er resou rces that will help you learn more abou t this week s topi cs. On the Web: At the libr ary:

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We 'r e Ce le br at in g Ou r 20 th An ni ve rs ar y in Ch ip le y! Th ank Yo u to Al l of Ou r Ar ea Sh oppe rs & As so ci at es Wa lm ar t Su pe rc en te r 16 21 Ma in St re et Ch ip ley FL 32 42 8 85 0-6 38 -2 243 www .w al ma rt .c om (8 50 ) 63 847 08 Tu -F ri 8a m5p m | 69 9 2n d St Ch ip l ey FL www .D ow nH ome De nt al Ce nte r. co m CO SM ET IC GE NE RA L AN D FA MI LY DEN TI ST RY Tr ea tm en t of Sn ori ng an d Sl ee p Ap ne a. Ca ll for a co ns ult ati on Co nv en ien t Mo nt hl y Pa ym en t pl an s Bl oo m Bo ut iq ue We ha ve yo ur Gam e Da y att ire in sto ck Bl oo m is a uniq ue bo ut ique ca te rin g to t al l si ze s an d bu dg et s. 13 43 Br ic ky ar d Rd Sui te A Ch ip le y, FL 32 42 8. (8 50 ) 67 6493 8 13 43 B ri ck ya rd R d, Sui te A Al so of fe ri ng ma ss ag es 85 0-6 58 -4 18 2 Au gu st 30 th Wi nn er : Br an do n Tu ck er Bo nif ay Pe rf ec t Sc or e, Ti eBr ea ke r Yo u co ul d wi n $2 5 ea ch we ek by pi ck in g th e mo st wi nn in g ga me s. En te r on li ne at Ch ip le yp ap er .c om or Bo nif ay no w. co m! Arnold at Florida High Port St. Joe at Bay Bozeman at Graceville Mosley at Escambia South Walton at North Bay Haven Rutherford at East Gadsden Blountstown at FAMU High Cottondale at Wewahitchka Holmes County at Liberty County Marianna at Northview Sneads at Baker West Gadsden at Vernon Red Level (Ala.) at Franklin Co. Mosley 27, Leon 21 Arnold 41, Holmes County 13 Northview 49, Bozeman 7 Dickinson 26, Bay 0 Niceville 55, Rutherford 7 NBH 20, Rocky Bayou 19 Chipley 27, Vernon 16 Port St. Joe 41, Wewa 7 Liberty County 42, Maclay 3 Baker 30,Graceville 27 Freeport 24, Cottondale 6 Walton 16, Blountstown 6 SCORES NEXT UP 237 Port St. Joes Jarkeice Davis, a senior fullback, rushed for 237 yards and five touchdowns all in the first half and the Tiger Sharks cruised to a 41-7 victory over Wewahitchka. Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER Marlins put up 41 against Blue Devils By JASON SHOOT 747-5069 | @PCNHJasonShoot jshoot@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH Cody Saunders ability to make plays with his feet and his arm spelled the difference between Arnold and Holmes County on Friday night. Saunders ran for three touchdowns and passed for another, and he helped Arnold pull away in the second half of a 41-13 victory over the Blue Devils in a non-district high school football showdown at the Mike Gavlak Sports Complex. Saunders piled up 240 passing yards and 180 rushing yards in the game, which represented the season opener for both programs. Arnold, which competes in District 1-5A, enjoyed a numbers advantage over its Class 1A counterpart, Holmes County. The Marlins superior depth wore down Holmes County in the second half, and Saunders exploited that advantage as the game progressed. The two teams were tied at 13-13 at halftime, but an interception by Trentin Lewis gave Arnold possession at the Blue Devil 35. Six plays later, Saunders plunged into the end zone on a 1-yard run to put the Marlins on top 20-13 midway through the third quarter. Following a Holmes County punt, Saunders capped the Marlins next possession with a 13-yard romp to the end zone for a 27-13 advantage. Arnold boosted its lead to 34-13 when Jamonte Johnson raced 7 yards for a touchdown on the rst play of the fourth quarter. The Blue Devils seized a 7-0 lead on their opening drive of the game. Chad Leavins rumbled 40 yards on six carries on the possession, including a 15-yard touchdown run to give Holmes County the early lead. Saunders, who completed 11 of 19 passes and carried the ball nine times, raced 85 yards for a touchdown on Arnolds second play from scrimmage to tie the game at 7-7. Arnold receiver Jovanni Perea, who caught ve passes for 158 yards, hauled in a pass from Saunders in the second quarter, wriggled free from a pair of would-be tacklers and ran 79 yards for a touchdown and a 13-7 advantage. The Blue Devils evened the score at 13-13 just 52 seconds before halftime with Justice Bices 22-yard touchdown reception off a throw from quarterback Shane Sellers. Arnolds backup quarterback, freshman Gannon Powell, provided the games nal margin with a 25-yard touchdown run with 6 minutes left. Holmes County 7 6 0 0 13 Arnold 7 6 1414 41 HC: Leavins 15 run (Etheridge kick) Arn: Saunders 85 run (Peffers kick) Arn: Perea 79 pass from Saunders (kick failed) HC: Bice 22 pass from Sellers (kick failed) Arn: Saunders 1 run (Peffers kick) Arn: Saunders 13 run (Peffers kick) Arn: Johnson 7 run (Peffers kick) Arn: Powell 25 run (Peffers kick) 41 13 ARNOLD HOLMES CO. SPORTS www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, September 3, 2014 A Page 7 Section Chipley downs Vernon 27-16 From staff reports The Chipley Tigers outlasted the Vernon Yellow Jackets last Friday night in front of a huge crowd by a score of 27-16. Chipley started the scoring with a big opening kickoff return by Darren Stewart, followed by a toss sweep for a TD by Stewart. Vernon got on the scoreboard next on a safety by Marlon Stephens, and the rest of the Jacket defense at the 2:32 mark of the rst quarter. The score remained the same until Ryan Malloy scored to open the second quarter, and Vernon took the lead. Jacket Quarterback Tristan Porter went out with a knee injury in the middle of the second quarter, and a few plays later, a fumble recovery by Chipley was returned for a touchdown to give the Tigers back the lead. In the third quarter, the Jackets began to move the ball on offense and threatened to score until penalties negated their opportunity, and the Tigers recovered another Jacket fumble on their own 12 yard line to stop Vernons momentum. Early in the third quarter, Tristan Porter, playing injured, found Austin Brown down the sideline for a score to give the Jackets the lead. The lead would not last as a few plays later, following another good return, Darren Stewart would nd Carlon Smith on a reverse pass for the go ahead score. The Tigers would tack on another score following another Jacket turnover when quarterback Trey Thurman scrambled for the nal score of the night. Both teams still have district games ahead and have a chance to make a playoff run. The Jackets host West Gadsden in Vernon next week, and the Tigers will travel to play Northview Sept. 12. Holmes Countys Jesse Goodwin tackles Arnolds Cody Saunders. PATTI BLAKE | The News Herald

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Holmes County years ago ... REFLECTIONS www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, September 3, 2014 The Bonifay Garden Club, whose motto is Beautify the Land, is starting its 64th year as a civic club, and many new activities are planned. The executive board met recently and adopted some plans presented by program Chairman DiAnn Shores and President Adonna Bartlett. One event coming up soon is the Cowboys and Cowgirls contest to be held in conjunction with the upcoming Bonifay Rodeo. Patterned after Chipley Garden Clubs successful Scarecrow contest, Bonifay businesses are invited to make and dress a cowboy or cowgirl and place in front of their place of business by Saturday, Sept. 27. These will be left in place until Monday, Oct. 6. Judging will be Sept. 27. In order to be judged, a registration fee of $10 must be turned in with your application to a Garden Club member by that date. Dig out your high school oat building skills or go to Pinterest or Google how to build a scarecrow; then, use your imagination to dress your cowboy or cowgirl. It should be a lot of fun. October will be a full month for the club as it will again build a oat for the Rodeo Parade, which is Friday and Saturday, Oct. 3-4. Other activities for October include observation of Fire Prevention Week by visiting Bonifay Elementary and Ponce de Leon Elementary with Smokey the Bear. A video will be shown at Bethlehem and Poplar Springs schools, and students in all schools will be invited and encouraged to enter a poster contest. The Oct. 14 meeting at First Baptist Church Annex will feature information on the planting of daffodils. A planting of these springblooming bulbs will be at Bonifays only designated historical site, The Holmes County TimesAdvertiser building. Two activities are set for November. We will decorate the ag center for the Veterans Appreciation Banquet sponsored by the Holmes Countys Sheriffs Posse under the direction of Joe and Diane Hardy. In addition, our monthly meeting on Nov. 11 will feature Jane Brewer, past district II director of the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs, with a ower arranging demonstration. In addition, our own Nadine Hall will illustrate gourd painting, and a workshop to teach us how to paint a decorative gourd will be announced for a later date. The club has chosen for one of its community service projects for December the hosting of a party for residents of Dogwood Inn, with individual gifts for residents provided by club members. The other project is a long standing event of making live Christmas arrangements with all rst-grade students at Bonifay Elementary School. Edna McDonald has been the long-time chairman of this activity. A tour of lights around the lake with dinner at the Hotel in DeFuniak Springs is planned for Tuesday, Dec. 16. Activities planned for 2015 will include participating in the Down Home Street Festival with a promotional booth in March. In April, we plan to tour an amaryllis farm in Greenwood. In June, we will observe National Garden Week with downtown displays at the banks and library. A possible tour of gardens of some of Bonifay Garden Club members is also in the works for June. Keep these dates in mind: the fall District II meeting of Florida Federation of Garden Clubs will be in Chipley on Oct. 8 at the Washington County Ag Center, and we expect a good representation from Bonifay Garden Club to be there. Tuesday, Sept. 9, the rst meeting of the new club year will be at FBC Annex at 11:30 a.m. with a covered dish lunch. The program will be on wild owers. The president and vice-president have appeared before the County Commission to get approval for their planting with location to be announced. If you are interested in becoming a member or just want to check us out, attend our rst meeting and get more information. Or call a member: DiAnn Shores at 768-2766, Adonna Bartlett at 2596019, or me at 547-4696. Become a member of a club that has been active since 1951. 50 Years Ago, 1964 $20,000 IS IN BUDGET FOR RIVER STUDY Continued survey of Choctawhatchee River for the development of a barge system, has been assured by the inclusion of $20,000 in the new Federal budget. MAYO TAKES OATH AS UTILITIES MEMBER Using a Bible borrowed from the governor, William T. Mayo, took the oath of of ce as a member of Florida Public Utilities Commission. STATE MOVES TO 9TH PLACE IN POPULATION Floridas mushrooming population has boosted the state from 10th to No. 9 in census bureau listings. 20 Years Ago, 1994 CRTF REPS HOLD HEARING FOR FLOOD VICTIMS The second public hearing held by the Bonifay City Council for victims of the recent ooding in Bonifay brought more people, more complaints and more questions. HRS ANNOUNCES FAMILY SUPPORT SERVICES Of cials from the Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services (HRS) met with community leaders at the Bonifay Police and Fire Station. LOCAL AREA TOYS FOR TOYS DRIVE KICKED OFF In what is being described as a rst time event, two area service organizations will be working together to provide a merrier Christmas for some local families. Bonifay Garden Club starting new year with many activities HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison Page A8 Shadows caught In the Aug. 27 Chasing Shadows feature, we asked local residents to identify the respiratory therapist at right Thank you to Larry Smith for identifying himself in this photo. Smith sent this description with his identi cation: Smith, pictured by a life support unit, was director of Respiratory Services at Northwest Florida Community Hospital in Chipley for more than 30 years when he retired in July 2008. He has worked at Healthmark Regional Medical Center in DeFuniak Springs for the past ve years. Smith also said it looks like he was demonstrating the 7200 series ventilator as part of the department in the photo, or that it may have been Respiratory Care Week since a banner is pictured in the background. Bonifay businesses are invited to make and dress a cowboy or cowgirl and place in front of their place of business by Saturday, Sept. 27. These will be left in place until Monday, Oct. 6. Judging will be Sept. 27. Chasing shadows Can anyone identify the people in this photo enjoying a festival? This photo was found at the Holmes County Times-Advertiser of ce. Do you recognize these revelers? If so, please email wcnnews@chipleypaper.com. Your answer will appear in a future edition. Chasing Shadows is a new feature we hope to run each week. Do you have an old photo from Holmes County youd like to have identi ed? Ask your neighbors for help by submitting it for publication. Send email submissions to wcnnews@chipleypaper.com.

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How the art of china painting changed one womans life By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Bonifay resident Celedia Howell started her tale with awe that has not diminished over time, awe that what started as a hobby became a means to put her children through college and continues to give her great pleasure to this day. It started in the early 60s when Howells love of beautiful dishes lead her from a teacher in Opp, Ala., to classes in DeFuniak to starting classes in Bonifay. She described what started as a curiosity turned into a burning passion. She said she would make rings for her children, and as it became popular among the students, she realized she might have a market for her work. From there, she began taking her work to art shows and joined the Art Association near Quincy, with her and many other artists pushing to make china painting recognized as a form of ne art. I was at an art show in Macon, Ga., when an odd young couple approached me and asked me if I knew where I could sell my china, Howell said. I didnt know what to make of it, but I was amazed when the man said I should sell for Disney. On a Monday, they called for a visit, and it led to them not only buying every piece, but I was asked to sign a nine-year contract, making hundreds of pieces for them, which was an average of two to three pieces a day. She said it was work she enjoyed it, but it was still work. It was her work, though, that put two daughters through four years of college without having to put a dime in loans. Disney was the nicest place to work for, Howell said. Every time we visited, it was like a homecoming. She said one day she walked by the display of her work, and she was amazed to see her art lling the display windows. She mused over a story of telling someone she was the artist and the reaction being of absolute disbelief. Wealthy people would come and buy and buy and buy, Howell said. My work is all over the world now, and that makes me feel good because I put so much work in every piece. Her work continues even now, with her receiving blank china to paint and spending time with her husband, Frederic. There are so many talented artists around here that people just dont know about, Howell said. I just know that Im doing what I love and was blessed to be able to use it to help my family. Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) Where is it illegal to stick your tongue out at a sherman whos caught a bigger sh than you? Alaska, Maine, Utah, Hawaii 2) In the product WD40 what does WD stand for? Without drudgery, Water distilled, Without density, Water displacement 3) How many seasons were older TVs Beverly Hillbillies lmed in black and white before color? 0, 1, 2, 3 4) Which American city grew up around the colonial Sutters Fort? Oklahoma City, Sacramento, Anchorage, Richmond 5) Whose original name was Mission Dolores? San Francisco, Tina Turner, Miami Beach, Cyndi Lauper 6) What famous works rst line is, 1801I have just returned from a visit to my landlord? War and Peace, Wuthering Heights, Dracula, Walden 7) What was called No Mans Land before its areas statehood? Montana, Oklahoma Panhandle, Colorado, NW Territory 8) Vog is a Hawaiian word for a fog made up of? Car pollution, Volcanic ash, Freezing rain, Graf ti 9) How many children did George Washington biologically father? 0, 2, 4, 6 10) Generally speaking what percentage larger is the average male brain over the average females? 3, 7, 9, 14 11) Whose production company was named Shamley? Susan Hayward, Richard Boone, Denver Pyle, Alfred Hitchcock 12) Which year marked the deaths of Jim Croce, J R Tolkien, Lyndon Johnson, and Pablo Picasso? 1973, 1975, 1977, 1979 13) Who was Americas rst woman to win ve Olympic gold medals? Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Bonnie Blair, Wilma Rudolph, Babe Didrikson ANSWERS 1) Alaska. 2) Water displacement. 3) 3. 4) Sacramento. 5) San Francisco. 6) Wuthering Heights. 7) Oklahoma Panhandle. 8) Volcanic ash. 9) 0. 10) 14. 11) Alfred Hitchcock. 12) 1973. 13) Bonnie Blair. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com I was amazed when the man said I should sell for Disney. On a Monday, they called for a visit, and it led to them not only buying every piece, but I was asked to sign a nine-year contract, making hundreds of pieces for them, which was an average of two to three pieces a day. Celedia Howell artist PHOTOS BY CECILIA SPEARS | The News With loving care, Celedia Howell provides a story with each piece of china in such detail, one would believe she was describing the birth of her own children, with each piece having its own personality and story. At right are examples of Howells work up close. Her china ranges in size, shape and function, from dinner plates to vases to jewelry boxes. From hobby to Disney World Filling Celedia Howells home are more than 1,000 pieces of work, lling shelves and cupboards with beautiful works of amazing detail. Howell also paints portraits. Shown below are portraits she painted of her children. Below left a hobby that eventually put Howells children through college started with china rings similar to the ones pictured. Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 3 2014 B PAGE 1 Section EXTRA

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B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Extra Wednesday, September 3, 2014 To learn ho w yo u can suppor t our commun ity s univ ersity contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. FL ORIDA ST AT E UNIVE RSIT Y PA NAMA CIT Y THE CA MP AIGN FOR OUR CO MM UNIT Y S UN IVERS IT Y En do wment for To morr ow s Jo bs $4 ,500 ,0 00 $500 ,0 00 $1,500 ,0 00 $2,500 ,0 00 $3 ,500 ,0 00 $4 ,500 ,0 00 $0 $1, 000 ,0 00 $2, 000 ,0 00 $3 ,0 00 ,0 00 $4 ,0 00 ,0 00 $5 ,0 00 ,0 00 GO AL Business name: Rays Hitchin Post Business contact information: 1043 U.S. 90, Chipley, FL, 850-866-9735 Number of employees: 1 Owners or managers name: Raymond White Business services provided: Retail and thrift store Years in business: Newly Opened What you like most about your business: Helping the little children, as the business allows for donations to Saint Judes Childrens Hospital. Name of person completing this form: Susie The Washington County News wants to highlight our hometown businesses! Business Pro le is a new weekly feature designed to inform readers about the local business community. To participate, complete the above information like Susie did and email it, along with a photo, to news@ chipleypaper.com. If you need a business photo taken by our staff, contact us at 638-0212. Special to The News Good pets come in all shapes and sizes. More unique to the pet realm, but still wildly popular, are amphibians. For those pet owners who enjoy the company of frogs, salamanders and other slimy friends, here are the ins and outs of owning amphibians as pets. Owners should educate themselves regarding the speci c species or type of amphibian they are considering as a pet prior to purchasing them, said Dr. Laura Kleinschmidt, veterinary intern instructor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Depending on the species, they may have species-speci c requirements or traits that would be important to know. For example, some species secrete toxins from their skin or special glands that would make them a less than ideal pet. Amphibians can also have very delicate skin that functions in breathing and absorption and should not be handled more than absolutely necessary. It is also important to keep in mind that amphibians are dependent on their environment for temperature regulation, and the preferred optimal temperature zone may vary depending on the species and part of the world they originated from. To regulate this, owners should have an appropriate thermostat to determine the temperature, and temperature gradients should be maintained to allow the animal thermoregulation. Providing a type of water source will vary depending upon if the amphibian is aquatic or mainly terrestrial. Water should always be free of chlorine, ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, pesticides, heavy metals, etc., Kleinschmidt said. In captive settings, deionized bottled water is usually used, and water should be tested regularly for appropriate pH and lack of these elements. The speci c water temperature for your amphibian is also very important and should be closely monitored with an appropriate thermometer. Water heaters are a must in most species to provide lukewarm water, and all water should be changed regularly for cleanliness. As far as feeding requirements go, most amphibians eat invertebrates, such as insects and worms (usually live). The food and water youve provided must be changed daily, as well as the amphibians excrement. Most captive amphibians will need mineral and vitamin supplementation to prevent nutritional-de ciency diseases, Kleinschmidt said. It is imperative that rst-time amphibian owners thoroughly educate themselves on the prospective species before bringing one home. I would not recommend an amphibian as a pet for young children (especially without adult supervision) as they should not be handled regularly, and when they are handled, special considerations apply, Kleinschmidt said. They also can suffer trauma if handled too brusquely. Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed online at vetmed. tamu.edu/pet-talk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to editor@cvm.tamu.edu. Reports are for the week ending Aug. 29. At Georgia Livestock Auction, receipts totaled $10,656 compared to $11,152 last week and $11,373 one year ago. Compared to one week earlier, slaughter cows were $1 to $2 higher, bulls steady to $3 higher, feeder steers unevenly steady, heifers unevenly steady, bulls steady to $3 lower, steer calves unevenly steady, bull calves steady to $3 lower, heifer calves steady to $3 lower and replacement cows steady to $3 higher. At Alabama Livestock Auctions, total estimated receipts this week $16,100, compared to $15,150 last week and $14,720 one year ago. Compared to one week ago, slaughter cows sold steady to $3 higher and bulls sold steady to $3 higher. Replacement cows and pairs sold mostly steady. All feeder classes sold steady to $5 lower. Trade was moderate with good demand on feeders. FEEDER STEERS: MEDIUM AND LARGE FRAME NUMBER 1 AND 2 300 to 400 pounds: Georgia, $297 to $345; Alabama, $280 to $330 400 to 500 pounds: Georgia, $235 to $280; Alabama, $240 to $280 500 to 600 pounds: Georgia, $215 to $240; Alabama, $218 to $245 FEEDER HEIFERS: MEDIUM AND LARGE FRAME NUMBER 1 AND 2 300 to 400 pounds: Georgia, $245 to $310; Alabama, $250 to $280 400 to 500 pounds: Georgia, $215 to $248; Alabama, $215 to $246 500 to 600 pounds: Georgia, $195 to $225; Alabama, $199 to $225 SLAUGHTER COWS 90 percent lean 750 to 1,200 pounds: Georgia, $104 to $111; Alabama, $103 to $108 85 percent boner 1,250 to 1,500 pounds: Georgia, $111 to $118; Alabama, $111 to $116 SLAUGHTER BULLS Yield grade number 1 and 2 1,500 to 2,100 pounds: Georgia, $130 to $137; Alabama, $127 to $132 WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging has hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are 2 p.m. fourth Wednesdays. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise 10 a.m.: Two hour Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) class fourth Wednesdays at the Healthy Start Annex in Bonifay. Call 547-8684, ext. 16 or 18 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dinning; call 6386217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Dominoes, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Bible Study 5-7 p.m.: Holmes County Urgent Care Clinic. Call 547-8500. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast third Thursdays 9-11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution third Thursdays (Holmes County residents) 9 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Art Enthusiast 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 638-0093; third Thursdays 10 a.m.: Car Seat Safety Classes third Thursdays at the Ponce de Leon City Hall. Call 547-8684, ext. 16 or 18. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging has hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise 10 a.m.: Two hour Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) class fourth Thursdays at the Ponce de Leon City Hall. Call 547-8684, ext. 16 or 18. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at First Presbyterian Church on Fifth Street in Chipley 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dinning; call 6386217. Donations accepted. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets rst Thursdays at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society meets second Thursdays 5-7 p.m.: Holmes County Urgent Care Clinic. Call 547-8500. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A FRIDAY 6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m.: Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) exercise 11:30 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior dinning; call 6386217. Donations accepted. 3:30: Bead Class second Fridays at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery. Call 703-0347 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper fourth Fridays 5-7 p.m.: Holmes County Urgent Care Clinic. Call 547-8500. Livestock REPORTS BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS: Rays Hitchin Post PET TALK Do your research before adopting an amphibian Community CALENDAR Special to The News CHIPLEY The Friends of the Library will have their rst fall meeting from noon to 1 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 4, in the east conference room at the Ag Center. Bag lunches are provided for $7.50. Call Tara Sanders at 703380-0335 to place orders. The guest author will be a young Chipola college student who has written her rst book. Brittany Hawes fell in love with writing at a young age, when she rst discovered that she could make people laugh with words. She has been writing as a hobby for years. Twisted is the rst book she has nished. Her inspiration? Family. When the question, What would you do for someone you love? popped into her head, ideas started to bloom. Eventually, Harlot Rue and her journey to nd her missing parents were born. Although her rst book is geared toward young adults, Hawes also enjoys writing children and adult stories. Her favorite genre is ction, mainly because she loves using her imagination. When shes not writing, she enjoys spending time with her family and friends, dancing (poorly) with music videos and singing. Her future plans include nding a career in writing, traveling the world (starting with Los Angeles), and getting her own dog. She resides with her family in Florida and attends Chipola College, where she majors in communications. Chipola grad, author to speak in Chipley BRITTANY HAWES Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

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Extra Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Wednesday, September 3, 2014 GIGANTIC 2 DA Y AU CT ION 3475 Ashle y Rd Mon tg omer y, AL Se pt 10-11, 2014 Br ya nt Wo od AL LI C #1 13 7 (3 34) 264-3265 Online Bidding at ww w. jm wo od .c om Ov er 1,200 items to sell! Crossword PUZZLE SOLUTION ON PAGE B5 Learn about hanging baskets CHIPLEY Did you know you can plant more than just a fern in a hanging basket? At the rst meeting of the 2014-15 club year, Chipley Garden Club members Edwina Showers and Lyndal Pleas will share ideas on how to plant and maintain hanging baskets. The meeting will be at 10:30 a.m. today, Sept. 3, at the pavilion at Shivers Park. They will also be suggesting plants that will keep your baskets looking great and some interesting containers. The regular business meeting will follow a potluck luncheon. The Chipley Garden Club welcomes meeting visitors and new members at any time during the year. For more information about club activities, meeting times and dates, or projects, contact Club President Karen Roland at 638-9968 or blueorchidoasis@yahoo. com. KMS PTO and open house CHIPLEY An open house and a meeting of the Kate M. Smith Elementary School PTO will be at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11, at the school. For more information, call 638-6220. Guardian ad Litem seeking volunteers CHIPLEY Be a strong, dependable voice in court for abused and neglected children from Holmes and Washington counties. Guardian ad Litem is seeking volunteers to help these children. Training is scheduled to begin in Chipley in September. Call 747-5180 for more information and an application. Certi ed Pile Burners Course CRESTVIEW The Florida Forest Service in cooperation with UF/IFAS Extension is providing a Certi ed Pile Burners Course from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 12 at the Okaloosa County Extension Of ce. Pre-registration and payment are required by Friday, Sept. 5; space is limited. To pick up a registration packet, stop by the Washington County Extension Of ce. For more information, call Jennifer Bearden at 689-5850. Free hunter safety Internet-completion course offered in Washington County CHIPLEY The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a free hunter safety Internet-completion course in Washington County. The course will take place from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 6, at the Hard Labor Creek Plantation, 1963 Hard Labor Road in Chipley. Students must complete the Internet course before coming to class and bring a copy of the nal report from the online portion of the course. The nal report form does not have to be notarized. An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. Students should bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. Anyone born on or after June 1, 1975, must pass an approved hunter safety course and have a hunting license to hunt unsupervised. The FWC course satis es hunter-safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at MyFWC.com/ HunterSafety or by calling Hunter Safety Coordinator Will Burnett at the FWCs regional of ce in Panama City at 265-3676. Picnic in the park PONCE DE LEON A picnic in the park will be 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 6, at Ponce de Leon Springs. There will be free entry into the springs. There will be free hamburgers, hot dogs, games and swimming. 2014 soccer registration CHIPLEY The City of Chipley will have soccer registration from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Friday, Sept. 12, at City Hall. Any child between the ages of 4 and 14 as of Oct. 1 will be eligible to participate. Teams will be picked on Sept. 15; only head coaches will be allowed in the team draft. Practice will begin Sept. 22. If a coach has not contacted you by Sept. 19, call Guy Lane at 638-6348 or 6582773. Coast is $42 before Sept. 12 and $47 after. All payments are to be cash, check or money order. Two-Toed Tom yard sale ESTO The Two-Toed Tom Festival will have a yard sale all day Saturday, Sept. 13. at the Esto Community Center. The cost to rent a table inside will be $10 and $5 outside. For more information, call Darlene at 263-3201. Bingo fundraiser WESTVILLE The Pittman Volunteer Fire Department will host Bingo to raise money for the re department at 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 13. For more information, call Dottie Clark at 547-4040. 2014 Graceville Harvest Festival beauty pageant GRACEVILLE The 34th annual Harvest Festival Pageant will be at 6 p.m. Sept. 12-13, at the Graceville Civic Center. The entry fee is $60 with all proceeds going to the Graceville Harvest Day Celebration. Contestants may participate in photogenic for an additional $10. Photogenic entries will be limited to one photo per contestant. This is an open pageant. Winners will receive a large trophy, large crown and banner. Alternates and participants will receive trophies. Door admission is $5 per adult and applies to all individuals with the exception of contestants. Admission for children 3 and under will be free. For more information, call Teresa Bush at 263-4744 or 263-3072 or call Michelle Watkins at the City of Graceville at 263-3250. Chipola theatre showcase MARIANNA Charles Sirmon, Chipola College Director of Theatre, will begin his 16th season at the college with a Theatre Showcase at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept 18. Chipola theatre majors will present scenes and skits in a showcase that Sirmon says is a lot like Saturday Night Live on a Thursday. The production is general admission and allows all theatre majors the opportunity to share their talents, many for the rst time. Tickets are $10 and go on sale beginning Thursday, Sept. 4. They are available to purchase from theatre majors, at the Center for the Arts box Of ce or at www.chipola.edu. The Showcase is a fundraiser to help Chipola theatre students with their annual trip to Atlanta, where they will take a master class in improvisation and attend a performance with a professional theatre company. For more information, call 718-2420 or visit www.chipola.edu. 2014 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant BONIFAY Sponsored by the Holmes County High School Blue Pride Band Boosters, the 2014 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant will be Sept. 20 in the HCHS Auditorium. Boys and girls ages 4 to 8 will be at 4 p.m., and girls ages 8 to 20 will be at 6 p.m. It is an open pageant for girls age 4 to 20, boys age 4 to 8. Registration will be 5-7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 9, and 10 a.m. to noon Sept. 13 at HCHS Auditorium. Late registration will be 5-7 p.m. Sept 16. A $10 late fee will be added after Sept. 13. Rehearsals will take place during the registrations. Instructions on where to walk will be provided; lessons on how to pose or pageant skills will not be provided. Admission for pageant will be $5 for ages 10 and up and $2 for ages 9 and under. For more information, contact Anda Justice at anda@ hchsbluepride.com or 766-7569. Jacob city day JACOB The City of Jacob has slated Sept. 20 for its Jacob City Day Celebration. This year, Jacob City will celebrate 30 years of being a city. The theme for this years celebration is Through God, Forefathers, Prayers and Tears Jacob City is Celebrating 30 Years. Events will include a parade, entertainment, food and activities for all. The festivities will start at 11 a.m., with a parade along Jackson Road. Other activities will take place at the Jacob City Park on Highway 162. For more information, call Eula Johnson at 2632120 or Verloria Wilson at 263-6636. Superheroes chili sale CHIPLEY A Superheroes Chili sale will be 9 a.m. until it is gone Saturday, Sept. 20, at Tractor Supply. The chili will be $5 and will include a bowl of chili, crackers and a drink. All proceeds will go to the American Cancer Society. To preorder your Superheroes Chili, call Vicki at 3263319, Cathrine at 326-0121 or Cecilia at 658-4038. Fall into vegetable gardening CHIPLEY/BONIFAY UF/ IFAS will be conducting fall into gardening classes from 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays in September. On Sept. 9, the class will cover starting a home vegetable garden. On Sept. 16, the class will cover tips to use whether you are starting with seeds or transplants, and the Sept. 23 class will cover cool season crops. The cost for the course is $30 per person or $45 per couple. For more information, call 638-6180 or 547-1180. Senior health fair CHIPLEY Northwest Florida Community Hospital hold a Senior Health Fair, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 25, at the hospital. The target audience is 55 and older, they will be offering the Flu Vaccine, including the high dose for those 65 and older, the hospital will be accepting insurance and Medicare payments with no out of pocket expense. There will also be a free Spaghetti lunch to all attendees. For more information call 638-1610. Designer Purse Bingo CHIPLEY There will be a Designer Purse Bingo at 6 p.m. Saturday, September 27, at the Washington County Agricultural Center in Chipley. The cost to play is a $10 donation to the Gulf Coast Childrens Advocacy Center. There will be 12 opportunities to win a designer purse; all purses are valued at a minimum of $150 each. For more information call Cheryl Powell at 252-9065. Diabetic education classes BONIFAY The Florida Department of Health will be holding Diabetic Education Classes from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 15, Wednesday, Sept. 22 and Wednesday, Sept. 29. The instructor will be LPN LeAnn Jones. Participants who attend all three classes will be eligible for a $25 gift card. For more information call 547-8500. Pediatric death bereavement training CHIPLEY The Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Alliance will be facilitating pediatric death bereavement training from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 30 at PAEC in Chipley. The training is for professionals in social services/child welfare, law enforcement, EMTs, hospital staff, pastoral staff, home visitors, counselors and other professionals. This is a free training and lunch will be provided. A lot of us deal with infant and child deaths in the work environment and this will help educate on how to support the family after a loss. Please contact Chipola Healthy Start Coalition to register 482-1236. 5K Bull Run and Fun Run BONIFAY The Bonifay Kiwanis Club will host the annual 5K Bull Run and Fun Run at 8 a.m. Saturday Oct. 4 at Middlebrooks Park in Bonifay. The Entry fees will be as follows: if you pre-register before Sept. 30 the cost will be $15; day of run $20. The fun run is for children 12 years and under only and preregistration is $10 and race day registration is $15. For more information call 373-5003. Miss Florida Woodlands CHIPLEY The 2014 Miss Florida Woodlands and Miss Florida Timberlands Scholarship Pageant is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 11, at the Washington County Agriculture Center in Chipley. For more information please e-mail us at woodlands@yahoo. com. Website: http:// miss woodlands.tripod. com, or call 334-389-3927 or 256-306-4401. Cooking demonstration BONIFAY Florida Health will be holding will be holding a cooking demonstration at noon, Wednesday, Sept. 17, Oct. 22, Nov. 19 and Dec. 17, at the Holmes County Ag Center, located on East Highway 90 in Bonifay. For more information call LeAnn Jones at 547-8500. Community EVENTS YOUTH LIVESTOCK PROJECT WORKSHOP CHIPLEY Parents may have seen news articles and pictures of youth winning with the livestock projects at local fairs. They might have attended the Washington County Youth Fair with their kids and thought, You know, that might be good for my child or had their child ask them if they could raise a pig. But wanting to have a livestock project and actually being ready to care for a large animal at home are two different things. To help both parents and youth learn more about the large animal science projects with steers, heifers and swine, an informational workshop will be held by UF/IFAS Extension Washington County at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9, in the Washington County Ag Center East Wing to learn the basics of youth livestock projects, how to select the right animal, what to feed your animal, the equipment and facilities youll need and how to prepare for shows. The workshop is for both 4-H and FFA members ages 8 to 18 and their parents. To sign up for the workshop, RSVP at 638-6180 or menacof@u .edu. Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

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NO WO PEN in Ne wL oca tion Wa shington Square Shopping Center Main Street in Chiple y Factor yO utlet 638-9421 Fl or ida Mi cr o lm &O f ce Supply Inc. 6594 S. US 231, Dothan, AL 36301 (334) 677-3318 800-886-3318 Obar's Insurance Agency An Independen tI nsurance Agenc y Auto, Hom e, Fa rm, Com merc ial And Bonds Mobi le Homes ,L ife, Health Arthur P. W. Obar Jr AG ENT PO Box 594 5390 CLIFF ST Grace ville, FL 3244 0-059 4 Obar_i ns@bell sout h.net (850) 263-448 3V oice (850) 263-4 484 Fa x 1396 Jackson Av e (850) 638-1805 Home Folks serving Home Folks BR OW N FU NE RA LH OM E 10 68 Ma in St ., Ch ip le y, FL 32 428 Ph on e: 63 840 10 Do nald Br own -L FD ,O wn er MARIANNA TO YO TA Consumer & Commer cial Power Equipment Vi sit our website at www .lanesoutdoor .com 901 Hwy 277, Chipley 850.638.436 4 (850) 638-8376 Stephen B. Register ,C PA 15 52 Bric ky ard Ro ad Chipley ,F L PE RS ON AL TO UC H CA RC AR E "W ET AK EP RI DE IN CA RI NG FO RY OU RC AR 10 6W .E va ns ,B on if ay 54 7333 0 Fi rst Ba pi st Church Come as you are Fi rst B ap ist Church Come as you are Fi rst B ap ist Church Come as you are It s not wh at we do bu th ow we do it 98 2O ra ng eH il lR oad ,C hi pl ey 63 895 05 507 W. Hwy 90, Bonifay 13 57 Bric ky ard Rd., Chipley HA VE YOUR UNIT SER VICED TO SA VE ON YOUR ELECTRIC BILL (850) 263-2823 1075 N. HWY .7 9 BON IF AY ,F L P&P PROGRES SIVE REAL TY "See us for all your Realty needs" 850-638-8220 1046 Main St. |C hipley OB ER T FU NER AL HOM E (8 50) 63 821 22 15 56 Br ic ky ar dR d. Ch ip le y (850) 547-2163 219 N. Wa ukesha St. Bonifay ,F L Johnson sP harmacy 879 Us er yR oa d, Ch ip le y, Fl or id a3 2428 850-638-4654 Washington Rehabilitatio n& Nursing Center Mo or e Co Po rt er Pa in tS al es Ba it &T ac kl e 22 06 Hi gh wa y1 77 A, Bonif ay 850 -5 47 -9 51 1 Li ke us on Fa ce book @ Moo re Co of Bon if ay ,F lor ida 1254 Church Av e. Chipley FL 32438 850-638 -1751 Ser ving you since 1953 Friendly Hometown Ser vice 4242 Lafaye tte St. Marianna FL, 32446 850-482-4 043 O pen: M-F 8am-6p m, Sat 8am-6p m www .chipolaf or d.co m Ch ipo la For d 1882 Jac kson Av e. Chiple yF L 850-63 8-7445 www .aandb autosale s.net Shop With The Res tT hem Com eT oT he A&B AUTO SALES FAITH Wednesday, September 3, 2014 B Page 4 Section www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Faith EVENTS If you would like your churchs faith events included in this list, please email the information to: news@chipleypaper.com. Bluegrass CARYVILLE Caryville Baptist Church will host a bluegrass sing at 6 p.m. Friday, Sept. 5. All pickers and singers welcome. Music will be followed by a barbequed pork pot luck dinner. The church is at 4217 Old Bonifay Road in Caryville. Womens ministry yard sale BONIFAY Lighthouse Assembly of God Womens Ministry will host a yard sale from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday and Friday, Sept. 4 and 5, in the fellowship hall. The church is at 1201 Waukesha St. in Bonifay. For more information call 638-2027. Gospel Jam Christian Haven Church will host its monthly gospel jam Saturday, Sep. 6. Refreshments will be served starting at 6 p.m. and the jam immediately after. For more information, call 773-2602. Bluegrass and southern gospel sing HARTFORD, Ala. Victory Tabernacle will hold a bluegrass and southern gospel sing at 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 6. Special guests will be The Shepherd Family from Banks Ala., with host band Straight and Narrow. The church is at 10005 East State Highway 52 in Hartford, Ala. Dinner and a movie BETHLEHEM Bethlehem Baptist Church will host dinner and a movie at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 6. The movie that will be showing will be God is Not Dead. The church is at 1572 Highway 177 in Bonifay. To RSVP, for tickets or for more information, call 326-2189. Back to school youth rally WESTVILLE Mt. Pleasnt Assembly of God will host a Back to School Youth Rally at 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 13. The guest speaker will be Eric Gillis, ministries director of Auburn YFC. Worship music will be led by Joyful Noise. The church is at 1996 Mt. Pleasant Road, Westville. Food will be provided afterwards. RSVP if possible at www.facebook. com/mt.pleasantaog. Awanas auction BONIFAY Bethlehem Baptist Churchs Awanas will be hosting an auction at 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 20. Steak sandwich dinner plates will be available beginning at 5 p.m. The church is at 1572 Highway 177 in Bonifay. For more information, call 768-2574. Four Calvary GRACEVILLE Salem United Methodist Church will host the Four Calvary Mens Quartet at 6:30 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 27. Light appetizers will be served at 6 p.m. The church is on Tri-County Road in Graceville. Unity Baptist homecoming VERNON Unity Baptist church will host its 133 homecoming at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 12, with Bro. Forrest Smith as the guest speaker. The church is at 3274 River Road in Vernon. For more information, call 535-4669. On respecting tradition Remove not the ancient landmark, which thy fathers have set. Proverbs 22:28 Todays church faces a serious malady. The symptoms are spiritual complacency or boredom, which can be described as a restless impatience with protocol. This so permeates current Christian temperament that it cannot be blandly ignored. The cause can be linked to invading worldliness in the church. It is dif cult to think of a time when worldliness has been more prevalent. The inexcusable tragedy is that many accept this wretched condition as normal and are not seeking a remedy, but rather ways to justify it. Most do not know the difference for they have not seen a time when the Spirit of God moved mightily on a congregation. Everywhere you turn these days, the religious media is decrying the menace of tradition as though it alone bears the responsibility for the unprecedented decline in spirituality among us. Of course, there is a sense where tradition can hinder. No tradition is above the most vigorous scrutiny and never must it be permitted to regulate truth, which results in legalism. Someone has pointed out that history is an important part of life. If you have no history, you have no future. And, it is history that creates tradition. Tradition helps us evaluate personal experiences and circumstance, and the various movements that invade each generation. The present generation, however, nds history extremely boring and has no patience with it. As a result of this languid boredom with the past, mistakes of the past repeat themselves. In our feverish eagerness to be contemporary we have ignored historic perspective to our spiritual jeopardy. One important aspect of tradition is doctrine. We have all but completely disregarded doctrine. The average Christian today knows little Bible doctrine and its practical application to every day life. Many have replaced the systematic teaching of Bible doctrine with things more suited to a casual style of living. Drama, musicals, and entertainment is the acceptable fare of too many churches today. Few Christians are willing to be exposed to the reproof of Gods Word week after week. Only those with an insatiable desire for personal holiness will put up with the plain teaching of Gods Word and adjust their life and lifestyle accordingly. Numerous religious leaders view church goers as unwary consumers who have to be sold something they like. The pulpit must give what the people want to hear rather than what God wants proclaimed. Today the pollster has more in uence than the prophet; statistics are studied more devoutly than the scriptures; and the law-ofaverages is more prominent than the law of God. We want to know the latest trend so we can get aboard. Cultivating the depraved appetites of the esh has resulted in the spiritual decline of an entire generation. Religious leaders have been slick in disguising these carnal appetites and have always found an eager following. Just a little twist of the Scriptures and almost anything seems unquestionably permissible for the Christian. Even the gross sexual sins among religious leaders seem acceptable and glossed over as insigni cant. No one seems to object anymore. Forgiveness of sin has come to mean something other than what God intended. It has degenerated into some subtle magic spell that makes all consequence disappear. The idea of disobedience without consequence is totally foreign to the scriptures. Even though David found forgiveness for his sin, he still faced the repercussion of his action. The vogue these days is for people to despise tradition. Usually, it is some young fellow trying to impress others with his spunk, hoping to make a name for himself. There will always be those who think it their job to be a self-appointed iconoclast and do away with the traditions of the fathers. There is a time to throw off the yoke of the past. This calls for a discerning eye to know what needs to be set aside and when to set it aside. Our motives behind what we do are complicated. Dr. Tozer often said, I have to account to God not only for what I have done, See TRADITION B5 DR. JAMES L. SNYDER Out to Pastor

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Wednesday, September 3, 2014but for why I did it. The Bible points out that the heart is deceitful ... There are times when our heart will deceive us into thinking our motives are right and our interest in progress and truth is genuine. There are prevailing circumstances when certain traditions must be set aside. A tradition needs to be set aside when it has valiantly served its avowed purpose. Many passively accept a tradition handed down by the Fathers without any conscientious regard to the signicance behind it. The tradition then degenerates into a burdensome ritual because we feel some obligation to continue. We have no idea of the blood behind it nor the alarming conditions that brought it into being in the rst place. Many traditions handed down by the Fathers were a passionate reaction to some wrong in society or the church at the time. Long after dealing with that grievous wrong the tradition goes on, unnecessarily. At the time the tradition was a vigorous protest and witness used mightily by God. The battle is over now and most have forgotten the conict, but the tradition lingers on without life or purpose. There is a danger that in time the tradition will hinder the progress of the church in the task of world evangelism. People become comfortable with the tradition and take comfort in holding on to it. The test of acceptable fellowship becomes identied with that tradition. Confusion sets in because some do not understand the functional signicance of the tradition and, accordingly, do not support it. This brings them under suspect of the religious hierarchy. This prevailing attitude distinctly intimidates the old guard who take to defending the tradition as though it were an irrevocable part of Christianity. The tense confusion in the camp leads to internal conict and otherwise good and sane men begin attacking one another. A beautiful diversion tactic designed by the contemptuous enemy of the cross. Then a tradition hinders individual spiritual development, it must be dealt with. This is not an easy call to make, I assure you. What hinders one person in his spiritual development may effectively help another. The Apostle Paul said, If meat causeth my brother to stumble, I will eat no meat ... It must be acknowledged that some traditions are merely a matter of rote. The potential danger is it can, and often does, develop into a serious spiritual rut. The dangerous thing about the man in a spiritual rut is that he does not know it. He has come to that vulnerable place where going through certain rituals and motions make him feel comfortable. Motion satises him and any challenge to this is intimidating. Many confuse motion with progress. A small boy on a rocking horse has plenty of motion and noise, but there is virtually no progress. Some traditions afford much motion but actually hinder progress. Again, tradition must be set aside when through the passing down it has become distorted and no longer means what it originally meant. The words are the same but the denitions have changed. In making an unalterable stand, our fathers devised certain phrases and activities to express succinctly their protest. Those Church Fathers coined words and phrases that had tremendous power when rst used. Now, like spent cartridges, they are powerless to do what they once did. At one time they profoundly moved an entire generation toward God. Now the denition, altered and diluted, has lost its ability to offend. And then some Reformer comes along to challenge that word or phrase and the Defenders rise to the occasion. To challenge that phrase or word is, in their mind, to challenge established truth. Some have forgotten that a word or phrase is only an appropriate vehicle to convey an idea. The idea fades, yet the phrase remains in tact. The meaning becomes distorted so that the idea is lost amidst the verbiage. We have a fatally divided church now. On one side you have the Reformers and on the other side are the Defenders. How and why God puts up with this is a mystery of Divine patience. Some things are not worth ghting about. When a tradition has no scriptural authority it must be dealt with. Many extra-biblical things have come into the church and, in some instances, crowded out legitimate things. Each generation needs to have a spiritual garage sale to rid the accumulated religious junk impeding real spiritual progress. However, there comes a time to defend and preserve the traditions of the past. Simply because something is old does not mean it is outdated. Some things have a timeless quality. There comes a time unfalteringly to stand for the truth. Dr. A. W. Tozer once said in a sermon, There comes a time for every Christian, every church, every Christian organization to decide, shall we modify the truth in order to gain more adherents or shall we stand for the truth come what may. It is time for us to face this great decision in our own generation. Tradition must be preserved when it carries forward the invincible truth of Gods word. Most traditions came into existence because they expressed Gods truth to a generation. As long as that tradition can be used of God in presenting truth to a generation, it must be carefully preserved at all cost. Behind every tradition handed down is a potent reason for its existence. To discover that reason is the sacred obligation of each succeeding generation of Christians. Because we fail to do so does not invalidate the tradition. That tradition might foster holiness of living or enhance the operations of the Holy Spirit. The healthy existence of the church in every generation relies on the preservation of vital traditions handed down by the fathers. Gertrude Maria Shatas, 91, of Sunny Hills and formerly of Huntsville, Ala., passed peacefully on Sunday surrounded by the Vestiarki Sisters of Jesus and family. Gertrude was born in Bielsko-Biala, Poland, the oldest child of Jozef and Elzbieta (Krywult) Gawlas. In her early years, she lived through war and Nazi occupation, during which her close family was torn asunder. At 19, to escape an imminent Soviet invasion, she ed through snow and bombing runs with her youngest brother in tow to Tbingen, Germany, where she found employment with the United Nations Relief Organization (UNRA). She met and married Romualdas (Romas), a university student who ed the Soviet invasion of the Republic of Lithuania. With the help of the Red Cross, she located her family, and, when her brother Tadeusz was released from a Soviet gulag, she helped him make his way to Germany and then Canada. In 1950, Gertrude immigrated with husband and two infant sons to the U.S. She supported Romass career as a physicist and they settled in Huntsville, Ala., where Romas was employed by the Army at Redstone Arsenal. Gertrude and Romas retired to Sunny Hills in 1987 and they found joy and fellowship in the small Polish-Lithuanian community centered on St. Theresas Catholic Church. After Romass death, and as her health declined, Gertrude was cared for by the loving Vestiarki Sisters of Jesus. Gertrude embraced life in the U.S. but never forgot her family or homeland behind the Iron Curtain and aided them throughout her life. Gertrude was a devout Catholic, dedicated to home and family, and always ready to help others in need. Her family cherishes memories of her storytelling, gourmet Austrian dinners and many beautiful houseplants. She is predeceased by her beloved husband, Romas; son, George; sister, Elzbieta and brother, Johannes. Gertrude is survived by her daughter, Angela (Adrian); three grandchildren, Kristina, Luke and Paul, of Chapel Hill, NC.; son, Remigius (Sue) of Huntsville, Ala.; granddaughter, Mandy Shatas Nelson (Mike); three great-grandchildren, Melody, Marshall and Marisa of Huntsville, Ala.; granddaughter, Lara Shatas Lenard (Casey) of Birmingham, Ala.; son, Steven (Meiying); granddaughter, Sophia of Saratoga, Calif.; son, Thomas; grandson, Alex, of Sunny Hills; grandson, Michael Cairns of England; brother, Tadeusz Gawlas; nieces, Monica and Stephanie, of Canada; brother Klemens Gawlas; nieces and nephew, Beata, Brygida and Jurek, of Poland; nephew, Michael Gawlas of Australia. Funeral arrangements were through Brown Funeral Home. Visitation and rosary was Saturday, Aug. 30, 2014, at St. Theresas, followed by an 11 a.m., Mass, interment was in the family plot in Calvary Cementary, and a luncheon reception. Cards may be sent to 3919 Vistula Drive, Sunny Hills, FL 32428. In lieu of owers, memorial donations may be sent to St. Theresas, 2056 Sunny Hills Blvd., Sunny Hills, FL 32428. Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! W ith your paid obituar y family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos fr ee of charge. Find Obituaries. Shar e Condolences. In par tnership with Find obituaries, shar e condolences and celebrate a life at or TRADITION from page B4 OBITUARIES Rick Marco (Richard Martin Marcoguiseppe), age 56 of Chipley, passed away on Aug. 24, 2014, at Flowers Hospital in Dothan, Ala., surrounded by his loved ones, after a courageous battle with cancer. Rick was born in Berea, Ohio on July 26, 1958, and lived most of his life in Boynton Beach, prior to moving to Chipley in 2001, to open and operate the Florenata plant in Cottondale. Rick was best known as Skins at Skins & Bubbas Restaurant in Chipley. He was a loving husband and father and was a very active part of the local community and supporter of local youth in sports and clubs. Rick is preceded in death by his grandparents, Cesare and Stella Rocky, formerly of Port Charlotte and his uncle, Richard Engelland, previously of Chipley. Survivors include his loving wife, Katie; his devoted daughters, Allison (Josh) Hayes and Mary Kate (Phillip) Brininger of Chipley; one Godson, Christopher Krauser of Virginia Beach, Va; his mother, Kathy (Leon) Vance of Port Charlotte; his father Rocco (Helena) Marcoguiseppe of Katy, Texas; two brothers, Robert (Milisa) Marcoguiseppe and Ron (Chris) Marcoguiseppe; one sister, Sherie (Kevin) Enwright, all of Port Charlotte; two aunts, Noreen Engelland of Chipley and Eileen Haxton of Port Charlotte; three brothers-in-law, Peter (Eileen) Krauser of Clearwater, Richard Krauser of Boynton Beach and Chris (Linda) Krauser of Cottondale and numerous nephews and nieces. A funeral was at 3 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014, at First Baptist Church in Chipley, with the Rev. Mike Orr ofciating and Obert Funeral Home directing. The family received friends one hour before the service time at First Baptist Church, Chipley. Flowers are accepted or donations may be made to Washington County 4-H Livestock Club or Chipley High School Athletics in Ricks memory.Richard M. Marcoguiseppe Patricia Ann Scalise, 70, of Brentwood Tenn., died peacefully on Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014. Ann lived life to the fullest. She was a loving wife, devoted mom and proud grandmother who impacted everyone who met her. Ann was born on Dec. 12, 1943, in Chipley, to the late Cletus and Myrtle Taylor. She married Ted Scalise and they were blessed with two children. Ann had an adventurous spirit and loved to try new things. Ann opened up her heart and her home to any and all she could help, friends truly became family with Ann. She leaves behind her husband, Ted Scalise; son, Randy (Gina) Scalise; daughter, Lory (Steve) Warner and her four grandchildren Josiah and Aiden Rose Scalise and Jacob and Max Warner; her two brothers, Sidney (Barbara) Taylor and Gene (Kathy) Taylor; her sister, Sharron Taylor and many nieces, nephews, and extended family. Her funeral was at 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 30, 2014, at Salem United Methodist Church in Graceville with visitation from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. In lieu of owers, donations can be made to the missionaries support fund at Full Life Church in Mableton Georgia. Williamson Memorial Funeral Home & Cremation Services, 615-794-2289. www. williamsonmemorial.com. Patricia Scalise P ATRICIA SCALISE Walter F. Herndon, age 78 of Chipley, passed away Tuesday morning, Aug. 26, 2014 surrounded by his loving family. Walter was born Jan. 1, 1936, in Southport, to the late Joe and Floy (Miles) Herndon. He is a lifelong member of the Chipley area and a member of the Shiloh Baptist Church of Chipley. Walter is survived by his wife, Annie Stone-Herndon of Chipley; three sons, Chip Herndon and wife, Stacey, of Panama City Beach, Henry Stone of Chipley and Guy Pollard and wife, Bridgett, of Panama City Beach; one daughter, Joanne Young and husband, David, of Clarence, NY.; one sister, Dorothy Dot Ellis of Panama City; 12 grandchildren and one great grandchild. A funeral was at 3 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014, at Brown Funeral Home Chapel with Chaplin Ernie Gray ofciating. Interment followed at the Shiloh Baptist Cemetery in Chipley, with Brown Funeral Home directing. Flowers will be accepted but donations are requested and can be made to Emerald Coast Hospice 1330 South Blvd., Chipley, FL 32428 or Holmes County Council on Aging, 210 West Kansas Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh.net. Walter F. Herndon The Rev. Dolton Owens, age 87 of Alford, passed away Monday, Aug. 25, 2014, at his home, surrounded by his loving family. Dolton was born Sept. 16, 1926, in Wausau, to the late Henry and Neatie (Finch) Owens. He had retired as maintenance supervisor with the Florida Department of Transportation and was a member of the Wausau Assembly Of God Church in Wausau. In addition to his parents, he is predeceased by a brother, Henry Owens. Survivors include his wife, Neta (Melvin) Owens of Alford; a son, Drexel Owens and wife Stephanie of Panama City Beach; one special step son, Ronald Glaze and wife Hazel of Compass Lake; two daughters, Linda Morris and husband Sonny of Eufaula, Ala., and Vicki Howard and husband Lowell of Mississippi; two step daughters, Mary Butler and husband Neal of Goosecreek, S.C., and Glenda Lashley and husband Bunny of Compass Lake; ve brothers, Howard Owens of Grandridge, Ray Pettis of Albuquerque, New Mexico, T.D. Pettis, N.B. Pettis and A.D. Pettis, all of Wausau; four sisters, Minnie Rogers of Wausau, Lottie Glass of Southport, Exie Mills of Ebro and Vida Steverson of Vernon and numerous grandchildren and great grandchildren. A funeral was at 11 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014, at the Wausau Assembly Of God Church with the Rev. Danny Burns and Danny Jackson ofciating. The family received friends one hour prior to services at the church. The Wausau Assembly of God Adult Sunday School Class served as honorary pallbearers. Interment followed in Compass Lake Cemetery. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh.net.Dolton Owens Gertrude M. Shatas GERTRUDE SHATAS

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Local B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, September 3, 2014 Scene Scene around This page features photos, submitted by our staff, readers and guests, taken in and around Holmes and Washington counties. We hope to make this a weekly feature, so if you have a photo taken locally that highlights life as we know it in our community, please share. Submit photos, along with a brief description and location taken, to Ckent@chipleypaper.com. No time to email? Text it to Carol Kent at 703-9487. From staff reports JESSI COLLINS | The Extra Wayne McDaniel, of R&M Electric in Chipley, was caught in the middle of repairing a lighting xture. PHOTOS COURTESY OF TRESSIE BRACKIN Harley Brackin of Chipley was spotted representing for the four-legged football fans on the rst day of the college football season. CECILIA SPEARS | The Extra This garden tub was seen around in Bonifay. CECILIA SPEARS | The Extra This truck was seen around at Washington-Holmes Technical Center and is presumed to be the latest project for the technical centers auto body class. CECILIA SPEARS | The Extra This lone truck was seen off a Holmes County dirt road. It seems nature has made a home here. PHOTO COURTESY OF CATHLEEN PARKER This volunteer ower was found growing alone on the dirt roads of Bonifay. CECILIA SPEARS | The Extra This retired piece of farm equipment can be seen on one of the back roads of Holmes County. GET YOUR PHOTOS PUBLISHED To submit your photos, send them to ckent@chipleypaper.com or share them on our Facebook page.

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Wednesday, September 3, 2014 Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 8-3506 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 30-2014-CA-000038 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-20 Plaintiff, vs. WALTER ROYCE PHILLIPS A/K/A WALTER R. PHILLIPS A/K/A WALTER PHILLIPS, MAUREEN D. PHILLIPS A/K/A MAUREEN PHILLIPS, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:PAULETTE E. JOHNSON CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 1538 JACK JOHNSON LN PONCE DE LEON, FL 32455-6403 You are notified that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Holmes County, Florida: BEGIN AT THE NE CORNER OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE NW 1/4 OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND PROCEED SOUTH 1320 FEET; THENCE WEST 1650 FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE NORTH 1320 FEET; THENCE EAST 1650 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 50 ACRES, MORE OR LESS AND AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS TO THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED ABOVE: BEGIN AT THE SE CORNER OF THE SW 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN EAST 25 FEET; THENCE NORTH 630 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTH SIDE OF AN EXISTING ROAD; THENCE WEST 25 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 630 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. commonly known as 1524 JACK JOHNSON, PONCE DE LEON, FL 32455 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Ashley L. Simon of Kass Shuler, P.A., plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 800, Tampa, Florida 33601, (813) 229-0900, on or before September 20, 2014, (or 30 days from the first date of publication, whichever is later) and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Dated: July 31, 2014. CLERK OF THE COURT Honorable Kyle Hudson 201 N. Okalahoma Street Bonifay, Florida 32425By: Cindy Jackson Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. August 27, Sept 3, 2014 8-3508 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-CA-436 BANK OF THE OZARKS, as successor in interest by merger to THE CITIZENS BANK (GENEVA), Plaintiff, APRIL DAWN GIBSON and DONALD RAY GIB Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 7, 2014, and entered in Case No. 2013-CA-436 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Florida in which Bank of the Ozarks, as successor in merger with The Citizens Bank (Geneva), is the Plaintiff and April Dawn Gibson and Donald Ray Gibson are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 North Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Holmes County, Florida at 11:00 AM CST on the 9th day of October, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Commence at the intersection of the East line of the Northwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 31, Township 7 North, Range 15 West and the center line of a County Graded Road; thence go Westerly along centerline of said graded road 150 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence run South 210 feet; thence run West 210 feet; thence run North to the centerline of said graded road; thence Easterly along said centerline to the Point of Beginning. All lying and being in Section 31, Township 7 North, Range 15 West, Holmes County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Holmes County, Florida this 7th day of August, 2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court Holmes County, Florida By: Cindy Jackson Deputy Clerk (seal) Invoice and copy to: TONI R. KINNER Florida Bar No.: 0683221 Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 189 Geneva, Alabama 36340 Telephone: (334) 684-8524 Facsimile: (334) 684-8520 Email: trklaw2003@gmail.com In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration, ADA Liaison, Post Office Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402; telephone number (850) 747-5338; email ADARequests @jud14.flcourts.org; not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call 711. The above is to be published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser, Post Office Box 67, Bonifay, Florida 32425-0067. August 27, Sept 3, 2014 8-3515 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 2014CP27 IN RE: ESTATE OF JUDY WILLIAMS BEAL, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Judy Williams Beal, deceased, whose date of death was January 31, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 North Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 20, 2014. Attorney and Personal Representative: Steven E Quinnell Florida Bar Number: 586595 Quinnell ElderLawFirm 101 E Government St. Pensacola, Florida 32502 Telephone: (850)432-4386 Fax: (850)829-6329 EFILING@QLAWFLORIDA.COM August 27, Sept 3, 2014 8-3513 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2014-CA-123 JUDGE: PATTERSON IN RE: Forfeiture of: One (1) 1998 Oldsmobile Silhouette Van VIN: 1GHDX03E2WD234592 NOTICE OF FORFEITURE PROCEEDINGS ALL PERSONS who claim an interest in the following property, 1998 Oldsmobile Silhouette Van, VIN: 1GHDX03E2WD234592, which was seized because said property is alleged to be contraband as defined by sections 932.701 (2)(a)(1-6), Florida Statutes (2013), by the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, Division of Florida Highway Patrol, on or about March 30, 2014, in Holmes County, Florida: Any owner, entity, bona fide lienholder, or person in possession of the property when seized has the right within fifteen (15) days of initial receipt of notice, to contact Nicholas A. Merlin, Assistant General Counsel, Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, 2900 Apalachee Parkway, Room A-432, Tallahassee, Florida, 32399, by certified mail return receipt requested to obtain a copy of the Complaint and Order Finding Probable Cause filed in the above styled court. August 27, Sept 3, 2014 8-3510 INVITATION TO BID 14-11 REMOVING AND REPLACING HOLMES COUNTY COURTHOUSE CARPETING Holmes County, a political subdivision of the State of Florida, is intending to receive bids from interested vendors to take up and to replace the carpeting located at its County Courthouse, located at 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, FL 32425. The project bid package can be obtained by contacting the Holmes County Board of Commissioners office at 547-1119or sherrys@holmescountyfl.org. Proposals for the Project will be accepted until September 5, 2014, at 3:00 PM (CST) at the County Commissioner’s Office, 107 E. Virginia Avenue, Bonifay, FL 32425. Proposals shall be mailed or delivered to the following: Holmes County Attn: Sherry Snell 107 E. Virginia Ave. Bonifay, FL 32425 August 27, Sept 3, 2014 8-3511 Request for Proposals # 14-10 Holmes County, a political subdivision of the State of Florida, is intending to receive bids from interested vendors for the Catastrophic Insurance Coverage for the Inmate Medical Services. The project bid package can be obtained by contacting the Holmes County Board of Commissioners office at 547-1119 or sherrys@holmescountyfl.org. Proposals for the Project will be accepted until September 5, 2014, at 3:00 PM (CST) at the County Commissioner’s Office, 107 E. Virginia Avenue, Bonifay, FL 32425. Proposals shall be mailed or delivered to the following: Holmes County Attn: Sherry Snell 107 E. Virginia Ave. Bonifay, FL 32425 August 27, Sept 3, 2014 9-3513 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-13-DP IN THE INTEREST OF: K.R.C. DOB: 06/28/2012 MINOR CHILDREN (SEC.39.801 (b) FS) The State of Florida to JUSTIN SPIERS, natural father whose residence and address is unknown. You are hereby notified that a Petition under oath has been filed in the above styled Court for the Termination of Parental Rights in the case of K.R.C., minor child, to licensed child placement agency for subsequent adoption. You are hereby noticed that an Advisory Hearing and Adjudicatory hearing on the Involuntary Petition for Termination of Parental Rights will be held before the Honorable Christopher N. Patterson, Judge of the Circuit Court, Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, at the Washington County Courthouse Annex, 711 Third Street, Chipley, Florida 32428, on the 7th day of October 2014, at the hour of 9:00 a.m., CENTRAL TIME. You have the right to appear with counsel at this hearing. If you can not afford legal representation, the Court will appoint counsel for you at this hearing upon the determination of insolvency. You must either appear on the date and at the time specified or send a written response to the Court prior to that time. YOUR FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD OR CHILDREN. September 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014. 8-3516 NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Florida Department of Transportation Project Bids will be received by the Tallahassee Office until 10:30 A.M. on Wednesday, October 29, 2014, for Proposal ID T3411. The improvements under this contract consist of a bridge replacement project on Liberty School Road in Holmes County. This is a Business Development Initiative (BDI) project, and Certification of Qualification is not required for this project. Budget Estimate $614,089.00. Complete letting advertisement information for this project is available on our website at http://www.dot.state.fl.us/c c-admin/Lettings/Letting_Projec t_Info.shtm or by calling (850) 414-4000. August 27, September 3, 2014 9-3524 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 30-2013-CA-000456 CIVIL ACTION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, BARBOUR ALAN DEASON, DECEASED, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, BARBOUR ALAN DEASON, DECEASED Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Holmes County, Florida: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 21, DOGWOOD LAKES ESTATES, UNIT 5, AS PER PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PUBLIC RECORDS OF HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE NORTH 51 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 1548.16 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 77 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 191.70 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 375.40 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 06 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 80.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 06 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 40.00 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE SOUTH 82 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 165.43 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 40.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 165.43 FEET, THENCE NORTH 06 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 40.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, BEING IN AND A PART OF THE SOUTHEAST ONE FOURTH OF THE NORTHWEST ONE FOURTH OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST. A/K/A 1942 COUNTRY CLUB DR., BONIFAY, FL 32425 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before September 27, 2014, service on Plaintiff’s attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the Holmes County Times Advertiser. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 18 day of August, 2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 EF -13-116297 **See the Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. August 27 and September 3, 2014 9-3523 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No. 2014-CP-53 “PR” In Re:The Estate of RICKY DEAN BALLARD, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of RICKY DEAN BALLARD, deceased, whose date of death was May 19, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 N. Oklahoma St., Bonifay, FL 32425 and the mailing address of which is P.O. Box 397, Bonifay, FL 32425. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the Decedent’s Estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the Decedent’s Estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN § 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is Aug 27, 2014. Attorney for Personal Representative: Erin Burris Berg Florida Bar Number 86431 Law Office of Erin Berg, P.A. P.O. Box 274 Milton, FL 32572-0274 Phone (850) 366-2889 Fax (850) 462-9313 erin@lawofficeoferinberg.c om erinburrisberg@gmail.com Personal Representative: Barbara Jean Ballard 1115 Ann St. Monroe, NC 28112-6165 Sept 3, 10, 2014 9-3527 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PROBATE FILE NO. 14-55-PR In Re: The Estate of LEVEDA HOLIDAY, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of Leveda Holiday, deceased, whose date of death was May 27, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, File No. 14-55-PR; the address of which is Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representatives’ attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF. THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is August 27, 2014. Attorney for Personal Representatives: William H. Green GREEN & GREEN P.O. Box 609 DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435 (850) 892-7213 Florida Bar No. 199397 Personal Representatives: Angela R. Davis P.O. Box 890 DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435 Randy F. Holiday 1051 Brake Road Ponce de Leon, FL 32455 August 27, September 3, 2014. 9-3526 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA File No. 2013-11 PR Division Probate NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of HERBERT L. GUNN, deceased, whose date of death was December 20, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Post Office Box 397, Bonifay FL 32425. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 27, 2014. Attorney for Personal Representative: Timothy H Wells Attorney for Personal Representative Florida Bar Number: 0559806 Post Office Box 155 Bonifay, Fl 32425-0155 Telephone: (850)547-3644 Fax: (850)547-5555 E-Mail: wellslawfirm@bellsouth.ne t Secondary E-Mail: thw2@embarqmail.com Personal Representative: ALLISON C. HERNANDEZ 150 SE Golf Club Avenue Lake City, FL 32025 August 27, September 3, 2014. 9-3534 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 14-60 PR IN RE: ESTATE OF PROBATE DIVISION KARYL JANICE BROWN, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of Karyl Janice Brown, deceased, whose date of death was June 26, 2014, and whose social security number is XXX-XX-6648, File Number 14-60 PR is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Holmes County Courthouse, Post Office Box 397, Bonifay, Florida 32425. The name and address of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is Septembe 3, 2014. Personal Representative: OWEN CHUCK BROWN 2376 CORINTH ROAD PONCE DE LEON, FLORIDA 32455 Attorney for Personal Representative: RUSSELL S. ROBERTS ROBERTS, ROBERTS & ROBERTS 2879 MADISON STREET POST OFFICE BOX 1544 MARIANNA, FLORIDA 32447 (850) 526-3865 FLORIDA BAR NO. 0131441 ROBERTSLAWFIRMSERVICE@GMAIL.COM Septembe 3 and 10, 2014 9-3598 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA File No. 14-35PR PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF LEE ROY ALRED Division Probate Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Lee Roy Alred, deceased, whose date of death was December 30, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for HOLMES County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 North Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, FL 32425. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is September 3, 2014. Attorney for Personal Representative: Lucas N. Taylor Attorney for Alcie M. Alred Florida Bar No. 670189 122B S. Waukesha Street Bonifay, FL 32425 Telephone: (850) 547 7301 Fax: (850) 547 7303 Personal Representative: Alcie M. Alred -Personal Representative September 3 and 10, 2014

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B8| Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, September 3, 2014 BUSINESS GUIDE EasyCareLawn&TractorService TREEREMOVAL 850527-6291850849-3825LawnCare€DebrisRemoval TractorandBobcatWork PressureCleaningLicensed&InsuredFinancingAvailable5020104 MikeMoodyNorthFlorida’sPremierMetalRoong Fabrication&Installation LocallyOwned&Operated WAUSAU,FLORIDAOFFICECELL638-8999258-2923850 850Metalroongcuttolength,customtrim,hugevariety, deliveryorinstallationavailable.MetalRoofs€PoleBarns€Decks€AluminumAwningRoofsLicense#RC290275095020368 Aordable SelfStorage ALLSIZESOrangeHill Road SelfStorage897OrangeHillRd Chipley850-263-2817 850-768-29125020390 C&CBookkeeping andTaxService January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850)638-1483NotaryAvailable5020755 Servicingyourhome since2000Cell:850-209-3954 850-209-5816BILLYJONES Owner/Operator CottondalePEST BOYSPestControl Services5020105 4518504 THARP&SONS MINISTORAGEHwy.77S.,Chipley,FL(850)638-8183Hwy.177A,Bonifay,FL(850)547-07265x5$25.68 5x10$35.31 10x10$46.01 10x20$80.25Open24Hours,Self-Service, NoDeposit,UnitsareCarpeted 5019790Advertise your service or business for as little as $10 a week.Ad runs in the Washington County News, Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser638-0212 Summer Job Coming To An End?General Dynamics IT is Hiring Temporary Customer Service Representatives!General Dynamics offers company-paid bene ts and pays an extra 10 percent for night shifts and bilingual (English/Spanish) skills! General Dynamics Information Technology is an equal opportunity/af rmative action employer, supporting employment of quali ed minorities, females, disabled individuals, and protected veterans.The following positions are available: Temporary Customer Service Representatives English and Bilingual (English/Spanish) Apply Online: www.gdit.com/ jobsearch Job ID # 226219 (English) Job ID # 226145 (Bilingual English/Spanish) New hire classes starting throughout SeptemberWe seek candidates who possess the following: € A high school diploma or GED (or above) € Six months customer service experience € Ability to type a minimum of 20 WPM € Ability to speak and read English pro“ ciently € Previous call center experience preferred € Ability to successfully pass a background check € Bilingual (Spanish) skills a plus1129991 6520879I Buy Used Mobile Homes! Cash Paid Immediately.. 352.316.2434 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com 6520880Brand New3 Bed 16X80 $39,900 3 Bed Double Wide $48,900 Furnished 850.683.0858 6520881$0 Down To All Land Owners! Your Deed Is Your Down Payment 3 & 4 BR Homes Under $500 A Month. Call Today! 850.683.0035 Biggest Sale Ever All Homes 20% Off w/FREE Furniture Ends 8/1/2014 850.683.0035 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com6520882 6520883Brand New3 Bed 16X80 $39,900 3 Bed Double Wide $48,900 Furnished 850.683.0858 Human ResourcesHuman Resources DirectorHalifax Media Group is seeking a Human Resources Director based in Panama City, Florida. This position supports the east panhandle properties with approximately 195 employees. The position reports to the Central Region Publisher and consistently works in collaboration with the other Halifax Media newspapers in the region. As the Human Resources Director, the position conducts the recruitment effort for all exempt and nonexempt personnel and temporary employees; conducts new-employee orientations; writes and places advertisements. Other duties: Handles employee relations counseling and exit interviewing; monitors performance evaluation program; participates in administrative staff meetings and attends other meetings and seminars; maintains company organization charts and employee directory. The successful candidate will possess strong organizational, communication and computer skills (in particular Word, Excel and PowerPoint). Qualifications: A college degree in human resource management or business administration preferred, will substitute relevant work experience. PHR certification is a plus or must be willing to train and become certified. We offer competitive compensation and an outstanding benefits package with the opportunity for professional growth and development. Benefits include: vacation, sick Leave, 401(k) retirement savings program, medical, dental, and much more. If this sounds like the position for you please send resumes via email to: lgrimes@pcnh.com. Applications accepted until September 10, 2014. Hiring is contingent on a background check and pre-employment drug screen. Web ID#: 34298974 Security The Washington County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications forInmate Supervisorposition in the Parks and Recreation Department. The primary function of an Inmate Supervisor position will be to supervise the Department of Corrections inmates in the performance of maintenance activities such as cutting brush, limbs, trees and other vegetation grown at roadsides; utilizing power equipment such as “boom” mowers tractors, and chain saws; cleaning trash and debris, and/or moves trees or other obstructive objects from County right of way and hauling debris for deposit at specified locations. Salary is $10.00 hr. Minimum Training and Experience: Graduation from a standard high school or equivalent; Must possess a Florida Class E drivers license; Must pass a background check through the Department of Corrections; Must attend and satisfactorily complete Department of Corrections class for inmate supervisors; Carpentry skills preferred. Applications may be accessed on-line at www.washingtonfl.com. Applications and job descriptions may also be obtained at the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office located at 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428. All interested applicants MUST submit an Employment Application to the Human Resources Department in the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office by 4:00 PM on September 5, 2014. All questions regarding this position or other vacancies should be directed to the Human Resources Department, 850-415-5151. The selected applicant will be subject to a background check and pre-employment physical and drug screen. Veteran’s Preference is accepted in accordance with FS 295.08. Web Id 34298813 AUCTIONAnnual Fall Farm and Construction. Sept. 20, 2014. 8:00AM. Hwy 231 N., Campbellton. FL 32426. (3) Local farm dispersals, (2) Estates, Bank Repos, Sherriff Depts, City & County, Plus Consignments. MASON AUCTION & SALES LLC, FL #642. 850-623-0473, Office, 850-258-7652 Chad Mason, 850-849-0792 Gerald Mason www.masonauction.co m. In Door Yard Sale Air conditioned. Furniture, small appliances, glassware & collectibles, jewelry & clothing. 3 miles north Hwy 81, Ponce deLeon. Close to Vertex Springs. Look for signs. Sept 6, 7-till. Large multi-family Yard Sale Corner of Varner and Pennsylvania, Bonifay. Friday and Saturday, Sep. 5 and 6. Multi-Family Yard Sale. 9/6/14, 8am-till?. Hwy 2, 1 mile west of 79 N. We must sell everything! Tool Sale Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 8AM to Noon Various power tools, some household items. 2333 Sweetgum DR Bonifay NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE GUN SHOW FORTWALTON FAIRGROUNDSSeptember 6th and 7th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL98949 to 56654 Fresh From the Farm!Okra & squash. Call 850-956-4556. K&LFarm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 Now Open. U-Pick Grapes Muscadine & Scuppernongs $5.00 per Gallon. 1304-AClayton Rd. 7 Days aweek, 7:00AM-7:00PM. 850-638-2624. U-PICK GRAPES $4.00/Gallon (850)547-2326 Follow signs on Hwy 177Ato 1837 Flowing Well Rd., Bonifay. U-Pick 7 days, daylight Hay For Sale. Round & square bales. Will deliver. Call 850-836-4223. Hunting Land for Rent in Washington County. September to April. 300 Acres, 160 acres, 60 acres, 20 acres. For more information call 850-638-1911 or 326-0044. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Install/Maint/RepairMaintenance & Prop. ManagementFor mobile home park. Cottendale area. Call 850-209-8847 or email:charlo32431@gmail.com Commercial Building on Highway 79 Bonifay for rent. Parking, central air, kitchen, handicap accessible. Available immediately. Call/Text Cissy at 850-768-0320. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Office space for rent in Bonifay. 206 Harvey Ethridge St. Phone: (850)548-5045 or (850)307-3278. Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1 Bedroom Apartment, in Chipley, covenant location, no pets. 638-4640. SpaciousOne Bedroom Apartment $450.00 Two Bedroom $500.00 Stove/Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 2BR/1BA House. Dogwood Lakes. $550.00 + deposit. Call 850-777-0247. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. 2BR/1BA Mobile Home in Chipley 1 Block to elementary school. WD hookup, CHA. No pets. $425.00/mth+deposit. 850-763-3320 or 850-774-3034. 2BR/2BA MH in Chipley WD hookup. CH/A. 1 elementary school. No pets. $475/mth + deposit. 850-763-3320 or 850-774-3034. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/sewage/lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 3BR/2BA Mobile Home in Chipley 1 Block to elementary school. WD hookup, CHA. No pets. $475.00/mth+deposit. 850-763-3320 or 850-774-3034. 3BR/1BAMH in quite park between Bonifay and Chipley. W/G included. $450.00 plus deposit. 3BR/2BAMH $450.00 plus deposit 547-4232, 850-527-4911. Bonifay. 3BR/1BA MH $400.00/deposit, $450.00/rent. Large 3/2, $600.00/rent. 3/4 mile from elementary school on 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. Bonifay: 4bd/2ba, Double Wide, large shaded lot, near the school in Bonifay. Available Sept. 1st, $600mo Call: 850-699-9464 Text FL99320 to 56654 For Rent. Nice 2BR/2BA. Outside Chipley on Rattle Box Rd. Quiet area. Also 2BR/2BA on Corbin Rd, secluded area. Sorry no pets. Day phone, 850-638-4630. Night phone, 850-638-1434. For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $500/month plus $500/deposit. CH/A. No pets. Call 850-547-2043 or 850-768-9670. Nice 2BR MH for rent in a great location in Chipley. Sorry no pets. 638-4640. NO PETS 3BR/2BA in counrty Chipley area $650. NO PETS 2BR/2BA in Cottondale $450. LEAVE MESAGE FOR CALL BACK 258-1594. 5 Acres on Hwy 77 3 miles South of Chipley. Has well, septic tank, 14x48 MH, front & back deck. 24x36 Pole Barn. 638-1858, 850-326-9109. Lot For Sale. 1.1 acre in Hidden Pine Subdivision by Falling Waters State Park. $10,000.00. Call 850-866-8536. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. White Diamond CTS Cadillac, 4DR, loaded. 25,000 miles. One owner, like new. 326-9109. Truck Camper for sale 8 foot bed 1985 Air and heat sleeps 3-4. Very good condition. asking $695. call 547-3246. For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds.