Holmes County times-advertiser

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Holmes County times-advertiser
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Bonifay, FL
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June 19, 2013
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50 www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM Phone: 850-547-9414 Website: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 IN BRIEF imes imes imes T dvertiser imes imes imes imes T T dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser A HOLMES COUNTY Merchant seeks District 2 re-election From staff reports District 2 Commissioner Monty Merchant is seeking re-election to the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners. A 1975 graduate of Holmes County High School, Merchant worked for the Florida Department of Transportation for 31 years before retiring. Since then, he has served his District 2 INDEX Arrests ................................. A7 Opinion ................................ A4 Extra .................................... B1 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B7 Wednesday, AUGUST 20 2014 Volume 124, Number 19 Johnson seeks District 4 position From Staff Reports Retired Holmes County native L.T. Sonny Johnson Jr. is among those hoping to be District 4 voters choice to represent them on the Holmes County Board of Commissioners. Before his retirement, Johnson lived and worked in central Florida as the owner of Johnson Crop Insurance Inc. Before that, he worked as the By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners approve the purchase of 40 acres of land from Continental Forest Inc. for $98,000 during their Aug. 12 meeting. The board became interested in purchasing more property as a dirt pit after studies showed one county pit running out. The county is in need of large dirt supplies for the upcoming Federal Emergency Management Agency work in repairing roads damaged by last year and this years heavy rains. The property located was 40 acres of clear-cut land owned by Continental Forest, which offered the land to the county in the amount of $104,000 on March 17. The county countered with $92,000, and Continental Forest countered again with the offer of $98,000. After tests came back showing the dirt was suitable for the countys needs, the county took into consideration purchasing the land, leading to the approval at the most recent meeting. There is no easy answer, but Im leaning toward this being our best option, Commissioner Kenneth Williams said. The money to pay for the property was agreed to be acquired using FEMA funds. Also approved: Accepting a $120,000 Department of Environmental Protection 319 grant with an $80,000 grant match to pave between 0.8 and 1.1 miles on Old Mount Zion Road, with $30,000 of the grant match being in-kind labor from the county. This grant was years in the making, with tests showing more than 1.4 million pounds of county dirt washing into the Jackson Spring after every big rain. County Engineer Cliff Knauer said it would By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Bonifay Elementary School fourth-grader Jayla Ryals recently was praised by Sen. Don Gaetz as being one of the highest performing students in our state and among the very best in Holmes County in regard to her FCAT scores. Jayla is the daughter of Jimmy and Stacie Ryals. I do well because my mom and dad help me, Jayla said. They tell me there is nothing more important than an education. They say Im not allowed to date until after college. Her father was beaming with pride for his daughters achievements. Education is the most important thing in the world, and for her it comes as easy as breathing, Jimmy said. Were not a rich family, but we are rich in love, and this is her ticket to a brighter future. Im so proud of her it makes my heart break. Jayla said reading is her favorite subject, and when she grows up, she wants to be a veterinarian or a lawyer. Id also like to thank my teacher, Mrs. Dawn Hersman, for teaching me with so much patience and kindness, Jayla said. Everyone can do it with help from family and the school. MONTY MERCHANT L.T. SONNY JOHNSON JR. County makes $98,000 land purchase Mayor Powell a District 4 hopeful From Staff Reports Esto Mayor Danny Powell has formally announced his candidacy for Holmes County Commissioner, District 4. Powell has resided in the town of Esto since 2001 and has served on the Esto Town Council since 2004. Esto is the home to Powells family-owned and operated heating and air conditioning business, P&P Heating and DANNY POWELL HOLMES COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS See JOHNSON A2 See MERCHANT A2 See POWELL A2 See LAND PURCHASE A2 Education is the most important thing in the world, and for her it comes as easy as breathing ... This is her ticket to a brighter future. Im so proud of her it makes my heart break. Jimmy Ryals, father of Jayla Ryals Ryals among top in state test scores FCATS FINEST Girl Scouts parent information session BONIFAY Girl Scouts of the Florida Panhandle will host a parent information session and story time from 5-6 p.m. Friday, Aug. 22, at the First United Methodist Church. To participate in Girl Scouts, girls must be in kindergarten through 12th grade. For more information, call Clarissa Medina at 209-1568. Noma Community reunion NOMA The annual Noma Community reunion will be Aug. 30 in the Noma Town Hall building. The town hall will open at 10 a.m., and lunch will be served at noon. All past and present residents and their friends are invited to attend. Attendees are asked to bring a well lled basket of their favorite dishes and tea if that is the beverage you prefer. Soft drinks, ice, cups, plates and eating utensils will be furnished. For more information, call Ludine Riddle at 974-8438. Bingo fundraiser WESTVILLE The Pittman Volunteer Fire Department with host a Bingo night to raise money for the re department at 6 p.m. Sept. 13. For more information, call Dottie Clark at 547-4040. INSIDE Holmes County students are back in school. See photos on Page A6 2014 Candidates answer your questions B1 C onnec t with us 24/7 G et br eak ing new s videos e xpanded st or ies phot o galler ies opinions and mor e ... @WCN_HC T bonifa yno w .c om

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Local A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, August 20, 2014 save the county substan tial money on road main tenance, with this section being one of the biggest maintenance expenditures for the road department. A resolution for Wild owers, presented by the Bonifay Garden Club and Florida Department of Transportation. This allows the FDOT to help beau tify certain areas of Holmes County to be maintained by the Bonifay Garden Club with the permission of the board. FDOTs experts also will address invasive plants in those areas. This benets the county to reduce costs of mowing and maintenance in those areas. Permanent drainage and maintenance easement at Arnold property. Accepting a portion of McCullough property to ad dress drainage issues. Wil liams suggested requesting the FDOT tie it in to their current paving project in that area. To sign up Commission ers Bobby Sasnett and Da vid Whitaker to attend FAC Policy Committee Confer ence with possible schol arship from Opportunity Florida. Removing mainte nance from county janito rial services agreement to keep under new budgeted amount of $30,000 for when it is up for rebid in October. In other business: Whitaker told the board the resurfacing of County Road 177 was 90 percent complete, including a turn lane at Bethlehem High School. Resident Judy Powell requested help from the county about possibly clean ing up the countys section of State Street in Bonifay. Knauer told the board the County Road 2 project is soon to be started, and State Streets repaving is complete with the excep tion of placing down sod. JOHNSON from page A1 County Executive Director of Polk Coun ty ASCS ofce. Born in Esto, Johnson attended Pop lar Springs School before furthering his education at Chipola Junior College and Troy State University. He then taught school for a few years and farmed in Hol mes County for 25 years. Johnson also served on the Holmes County School Board for six years and is a member of the First Baptist Church of Bonifay. I have always been a part of Holmes County and want to help our county tax payers get the most for their hard earned dollar, he said. I will be honest, avail able, hardworking and always a listener to the taxpayer. Johnson has been married to his wife, Mary, for 49 years, and they have ve children, 14 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. MERCHANT from page A1 County Commission seat full-time. It has been my privilege to serve the citizens of Holmes County, Mer chant said. I am proud of the accom plishments during my time in ofce, and there is still important work to be done. I am seeking re-election in order to continue that work. Among action taken during his ten ure, Merchant worked with local state legislators to repeal the mandate of unnecessary septic tank inspections (SB 550), worked to balance the budget without cutting essential services, low ered the millage rate and obtained grant funding for new roads and bridges. I have the experience needed to continue to lead our county in the right direction, Merchant said. As always, roads and bridges will be one of my highest priorities. During the past four years, Holmes County has received fed eral and state funding on several roads and bridges, and we will soon be adver tising for the reconstruction of County Road 2A and County Road 2 West, which will be funded from FDOT funds. County Road 177 will also be advertised for re construction in the near future, and we will soon receive federal FEMA monies to repair our roads from the ooding earlier this year. Holmes County has many challeng es ahead, he said. I have the experi ence, time and desire to deal with the issues and challenges we face in the future. Merchant is the son of Ralph and Jone Merchant of Bonifay. His wife, Lisa, who has served as a Holmes County teacher for 23 years, is the daughter of Juanita Stanley and the late Thomas Stanley of Ponce de Leon. They have two sons and reside in Ponce de Leon. POWELL from page A1 Cooling Specialists Inc. Heating and cooling has been his chosen career since he graduated from George C. Wallace Community College in Dothan, Ala., in 1983. Powell says his desire to work hard to support his family, better his life and grow in his community is what pushed him to further his profession by becom ing a licensed contractor for both Ala bama and Florida in 1996. Powell also said he hopes to apply the skills hes learned from his experience as a small business owner in helping Holm es County become the best it can be. I understand the importance of qual ity management skills and how these are important for the development, manage ment and maintenance of our beautiful county, he said. Powell also said the experience he brings with him from holding a position on the Esto Town Council will give him the knowledge and condence to apply himself to the fullest on the Board of County Commissioners. I have a vision of bettering the county as a whole, Powell said. I plan to work hard with the other departments of the county to get the best possible results. If (everyone) works together as a team, ghting for the same common good, we can better our county, our local econ omy and the overall infrastructure of this county not only for us in the here and now, but for our families and for our future. Together, we will bring improvement to Holmes County. Powell is also the father of two grown sons and four young grandchildren. LAND PURCHASE from page A1 Interim director: Land ideal for the county By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY The Holmes County Development Com mission had a special ses sion Aug. 14 and approved the Holmes County Real Estate Committees rec ommendation to purchase 272 acres of land with a purchasing cap of $1.25 million in preparation for possible growth because of the widening of State Road 79. HCREC rst met at a special session Aug. 13 to review the possible land purchase, designated Site 1, before presenting it in the form of a recommen dation to the development commission the next day. Interim Executive Di rector Raymon Thomas said it was ideal land for the county because all of the property was in an en terprise zone; they were allowed up to 20 acres of small land use change from rural or agricultural to industrial per year; trees made a natural noise buffer; it has direct access to State Road 90, railroad access and possible tim ber revenue to offset cost; and it is exible to be used industrially for future busi nesses or as a possible dirt pit if need be. Members of the real es tate committee presented the recommendation to the development commission on Aug. 14, and after much discussion, the commis sion approved. Vice Chairman Sandy Spear researched two pos sible methods of payment: to pay cash for the project their interest income would reduce from $93,893 to $52,000 or to invest $1.25 million into a local bank to draw interest to offset expense. The advantages of us ing nancing options are it would not deplete assets of HCDC for future purchas ing opportunities, interest expense is marginal for size of project and consid eration of maintenance, upgrades, capital improve ments is still an unknown factor, Spear said. Financing the property was approved, and the commission agreed to al low Spear to lead a small committee of two to nd out what local nancial branch would be most suitable for aiding in their endeavor. Also approved: Survey for both Site 1 and another site in the amount of $7,000. Hiring an administra tive assistant to replace the previous one at 30 hours per week at $10 per hour with a probation period of 90 days. Development commission moves forward on purchasing 272 acres FA LL FILL-UP SPECI AL!! MONTH OF SEPTEMBER ONL Y Like Us on Fa cebook www .tricountygasco.com Fill Up Yo ur Ta nk ( minimum 50 gallons ) And Receive 5 Gallons FREE! ( Payment Due on Deliver y ) Home Folks Serving Home Folks Since 1962 TRI-COUNTY GAS BONIF AY FL ORID A (850) 547-3696 VO TE Sh alene Gro ve r for Circuit Judge, 14th Judicial Circuit Fr iends and Ci tiz ens of Holmes & Wa shingt on Co un ties Judicial assig nmen ts in the 14th Ci rc uit tha t ser ve Ba y, Ca lhoun, Gulf Jackson, Holmes and Wa shingt on Co un ties ar e decided by senior it y. Mo st new cir cuit judges ar e assig ned to a rur al co un ty Sinc e eigh t of the elev en judges ar e fr om Ba y Co un ty these new judges usually aw ait the da y when another new judge is appoin te d or elec te d so they can re tur n to Ba y Co un ty Fr equen t re assig nmen t of judges can cause an in te rr uption in the qualit y of co ur t ser vic es to th e rur al co un ties and to Ba y Co un ty A change in judges of te n br ings a change in pr oc edur e. Th is can cause cases to be dela ye d and can cr ea te a back log of cases Not ha ving the same judge can also cr ea te a lack of co nsist enc y in co ur t decisions Re ducing fr equen t judicial co ur t assig nmen ts stabiliz es co ur t func tions in the rur al co un ties and pr omot es e cienc y in Ba y Co un ty I re side in a rur al co un ty and I wo uld co nsider it an honor to ser ve in Holmes & Wa shingt on Co un ties to ensur e a fair and e cien t co ur t. Yo ur vo te and supp or t ca n help achie ve this goal Th ank Yo u Sh alene Grover In this elec tion, Ho lmes & Wa shingt on Co un ties ca n mak e the di er enc e. Yo u ca n mak e the di er enc e. Po litic al adv er tisemen t paid fo r and appr ov ed by Shalene Gr ov er fo r Ci rc uit Ju dge 14th Ju dicial Ci rc uit Gr oup 10

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 Wednesday, August 20, 2014 By BEN KLEINE 522-5114 | @BenKleinepcnh bkleine@pcnh.com DeFUNIAK SPRINGS The one candidate in the House District 5 Repub lican primary with pre vious experience, Brad Drake, already has served two terms in the Florida House of Representatives, but his GOP challenger is trying to use that fact to her advantage. Voters are clearly sick of career politicians and the same dysfunction and corruption in govern ment, said candidate Jan Hooks, of DeFuniak Springs. We need more people who arent career politicians. Mr. Drake is more likely to stand up for the party line and special interests. However, Drake, also of DeFuniak Springs, has a considerable advantage in District 5, which includes northern Bay County and all of Jackson, Holmes, Walton and Washington counties. When Florida was re districted in 2011, Drake was thrown into the same district as Marti Coley, who was later named Speaker pro tem. Instead of engag ing in a contentious cam paign in 2012, Drake opted to bow out and wait until Coley reached her term limit. I felt like Rep. Mar ti Coley, being a senior member, shed be able to go back into ofce and be in a position of authority, Drake said. I thought she would be the best repre sentative of Northwest Florida. What Drake has done in the meantime, starting in 2011, is raise a consid erable amount of money: $334,223. One of Drakes contributors was Coley, for $150. She added her endorsement. Its absolutely neces sary to hit the ground run ning, Coley said. He will vote in the interest of his district always. Drake feels one of the key issues for his district is improving highways. Drake has experience in this area, previously serv ing as the chairman for the House Transporta tion and Highway Safety Committee. Transportation and in frastructure development are absolutely critical for encouraging big job cre ators to set up shop here, Drake said. The govern ment exists for a limited purpose: one, to provide public safety; two, educa tion; three, infrastructure. That is absolutely a con servative philosophy. You dont spend more than you take in, dont overextend yourself, but you make sure you have adequate resources available. With previous legisla tive experience, Drake can point to his voting record as proof of his con servative credentials. He cosponsored the Florida constitutional amendment opposing the individual mandate in the Affordable Care Act and currently opposes the expansion of Medicaid. As for oppos ing big government inter ference, Drake is proud of his role in the ght against septic tank regu lations and, when the bill was passed, the effort to reverse its effects. However, Hooks, also of Defuniak Springs, feels she is the more conserva tive candidate, pointing out Drake was a state rep resentative when a tax in crease passed in 2009. Its holding true to convictions even when fac ing unpopular options. Its not compromising prin ciples, Hooks said of the meaning of being a true conservative. We dont have enough true conser vatives in Tallahassee. Hooks works as a real estate agent and described herself and her husband as entrepreneurs. Although Hooks is a po litical outsider, she holds many of the same views as Drake. She is against government regulation, she wants to attract better paying jobs to District 5, stop the spread of Obam acare and improve educa tion in the district by end ing Common Core. One difference be tween the two candi dates is Hooks stance on immigration. We need to make sure we are not incentivizing illegal immigration with bad policy like in-state tu ition rates, Hooks said. Hooks has raised $134,535, almost exclu sively from individual contributors. The winner of the Re publican primary election, for which early voting is underway, will face Lib ertarian candidate Karen Schoen in the general Drake faces challenge from outsider By CHRIS OLWELL 747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.com MARIANNA A man is dead and three people were behind bars Sunday after a drug deal turned into an ambush, accord ing to the Jackson County Sher iffs Ofce. Patrick Register and Travis Marvin Locke, both of Sneads, were shot early Sunday morn ing on Dellwood Cypress Road, where they expected to purchase pseudoephedrine pills used to cook methamphetamine. The sheriffs ofce said Locke had arraigned the deal with Dayeisha Curry of Marianna, but Curry, Christopher Laster and Jordan Davis instead am bushed Locke and Register and attempted to rob them. After they were shot, Register and Locke went to Grand Ridge for help. Locke was treated and released from Jackson Hospital with non-life-threatening inju ries, but Register was rushed by helicopter to Bay Medical Cen ter, where he died. JCSO investigators identi ed Curry as a suspect and spotted her car driving through Marianna. Davis and Laster were pas sengers in her car when police stopped her. Evidence at the scene and statements from the three sus pects implicated them in Regis ters slaying, and all three were arrested. Curry and Laster were charged with principle in the rst degree to homicide and principle in the rst degree to attempted homicide. Davis faces an open count of murder and a count of attempt ed murder. 3 charged in fatal shooting JORDAN DA VIS DA YEISHA CURR Y CHRISTOPHER LASTER ST A TE HOUSE DISTRICT 5 The winner of the Republican primary election, for which early voting is underway, will face Libertarian candidate Karen Schoen in the general election Nov. 4. Republican Conservative Republican will: Brad Drake will: VOTE AU G. 26TH REPUBLICAN PRIMAR Y Pa id political advertisement paid for by the House Republican Campaign Committee, PO Box 311, Ta llahassee, FL 32302. The House Republican Campaign Committee endorses and urges you to vote for Brad Drake, Scott Plakon and Clay Ingram. NOR TH WEST FLORID A'S PRO VEN CO NSER VA TIV E WWW .BRADDRAKE .COM

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OPINION www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, August 20, 2014 A Page 4 Section The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $13.30; 26-weeks: $19.90; 52 weeks: $32.00 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $17.70; 26 weeks: 26.50; 52 weeks: $43.00 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Carol Kent, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@ bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION clamb @chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 EDITOR Carol: ckent@ chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 ADVERTISING Bill Allard: wallard@ chipleypaper.com 850-547-9414 Back to School shopping a parents lesson in patience Most of us belong to some sort of club. Oh, it doesnt have to be a sanctioned organization like the Lions Club or Kiwanis. In fact, I belong to several unof cial groups most recently the I Survived Back to School 2014 Society. With any luck, Ill make it into the 2015 group as well. Cmon, parents: Raise your voice with pride and submit your clothing size so T-shirts can be ordered. We deserve a pat on the back for not skipping Open House or being discovered in the school supply aisle rocking back and forth in the fetal position. Smart parents began back-to-school shopping last May when children came home on the last school day with helpful notes advising what items would be needed for the following year. Unfortunately, Im not among those wise moms and dads. Supply lists brought home by my children were lost sometime between the squeals of summer-time glee and the in ux of quality time that comes with the end of school. Things certainly have changed since Mama handled this chore for my siblings and me. Her shopping list consisted of at least ve new out ts, new sneakers and a few basics: pencils, paper, glue. Now, our budget-strapped schools request items like ash drives, dry erase markers, highlighters, Ziplock bags and more. When did this start, I wonder? Will our grandchildren be asked to bring desks, chairs and chalkboards? And how about those teacher wish lists? Kleenex. Lysol. Baby wipes. Our teachers have to work more and more with less and less, so this is understandable. But why not send things they can really use during the year, such as ear plugs, unused frequent ier miles, gift certi cates to a day spa or duct tape? (Not that Im implying our dedicated teachers would use duct tape to put over a childs mouth, mind you ... there are many other uses for duct tape I think.) Admittedly, I likely wouldnt be so bitter if it werent for unprecedented events, such as last years Quest for Pencil Top Erasers. As with the Lost City of Atlantis, there seems to be a theory these are mythical items that do not actually exist. Some parents have reported sightings, however. Following the leads of fellow shoppers after a search of Washington County was unsuccessful, I possibly burned $80 of gas seeking these $1 per pack erasers in surrounding counties. It was a perilous journey indeed. Other parents shuf ed wearily by, studiously checking off their lists as mischievous imps (disguised as energetic children) popped in and out of the shopping aisles, running over toes and loudly expressing valid reasons why the red Mario Brothers folders are superior to the plain ones. Traf c was shopping cart bumper to bumper while parents made mindnumbingly slow laps around the seasonal section in hopes the one item missing from their list was simply overlooked. My one item (the pencil top erasers, of course) remained elusive, their empty shelf slots mocking me with pictures of the colorful, triangular pieces. One photo showed a gradeschool girl holding the eraser pack up, smiling with joy as if to say, These erasers are the driving force of my good grades, and because you didnt buy any, your child wont be smiling or getting As. I left, defeated. Thankfully, a friend happened to have an extra pack to share, which were promptly divided evenly among my younger children. Despite the shopping woes, we parents have the easy part the part where we ask about how the day went and help with homework. Thank God for those who do the hard part the teachers who take what we send, both children and supplies and stretch them to their full potential. CAROL KENT Editor Meet the cops who gave their lives I f you have been watching cable news, reading Hollywood celebrities tweets and listening to race-hustling opportunists, you might think that every police of cer in America has a nger on the trigger, hunting for any excuse to gun down defenseless youths. This hysterical nonsense must be stopped. The Cirque du Cop-Bashing, with Al Sharpton as ringmaster, is working overtime to exploit the deadly incident in Ferguson, Mo. That means stoking antilaw enforcement res at all costs. Are there bad cops? Yes. Does the police state go overboard sometimes? Yes. Do the demagogues decrying systemic racism and braying about assassinations know what happened when teenager Mike Brown was tragically shot and killed last week? No. Heres a reality check. Although narcissistic liberal journalists and college students all are posting Hands Up sel es in hipster solidarity with Ferguson protesters, its law enforcement of cers who risk their lives in war zones every day across the country. The National Law Enforcement Of cers Memorial Fund reports that 1,501 law enforcement of cers died in the line of duty during the past 10 years, an average of one death every 58 hours or 150 per year. These include local and state police of cers, federal of cers, correctional of cers and military law enforcement of cers. Fact: Last year, 100 law enforcement of cers were killed. On average, during the past decade, there have been 58,261 assaults against law enforcement each year, resulting in 15,658 injuries. Fact: New York City has lost more of cers in the line of duty than any other department, with 697 deaths. Texas has lost 1,675 of cers, more than any other state. Just this week, the fund released preliminary fatality statistics from August 2013 to August 2014. Total fatalities are up 14 percent, from 63 last year to 72 this year. Five of cers were killed in ambushes, which continue to be a major threat to law enforcement safety, the group notes. Among the men in uniform who gave their lives this summer: Police Of cer Scott Patrick of the Mendota Heights Police Department in Minnesota. He was shot and killed while conducting a traf c stop July 30. Patrick leaves behind a wife and two teenage daughters. Police Of cer Jeffrey Wester eld of the Gary Police Department in Indiana. Wester eld was shot in the head and killed in a July 6 ambush while sitting in his police vehicle after responding to a 911 call. The suspect previously had been arrested for domestic violence and for kicking another of cer. Wester eld, a 19-year police department veteran as well as an Army veteran, leaves behind a wife and four daughters. Of cer Perry Renn of the Indianapolis Police Department. He was shot and killed while responding to reports of gun re on July 5. After 20 years on the job, Renn chose to serve in one of the citys most dangerous areas, even though his seniority would have allowed him to take a less dangerous role. He chose to work in patrol to make a difference in the eld, Police Chief Rick Hite said at Renns funeral. Every day, Perry got out of his police car. Renn is survived by his wife. Deputy Sheriff Allen Bares Jr. of the Vermilion Parish Sheriffs Of ce in Louisiana. The 15-year law enforcement veteran was shot and killed on June 23 while investigating two suspicious suspects. Bares had been mowing his lawn while off-duty when he witnessed a suspicious car crash. When he went to investigate, he was gunned down. The assailants stole his truck as he lay dying. Hes the type of person that would give his shirt off his back to anybody, a cousin said in tribute. Anyone that knows Allen will tell you that he was that kind of person. Bares leaves behind a wife and two children. Police Of cer Melvin Santiago of the Jersey City Police Department in New Jersey. Santiago, a proud rookie cop who loved his job, was ambushed on July 13 by a homicidal armed robber. Santiago was 23 years old. After Santiagos killer was shot dead by police, the violent Bloods street gang vowed to kill a Jersey City cop and not stop until the National Guard is called out. Al Sharpton, concocter of hate-crimes hoaxes and inciter of violent riots against police, had no comment. MICHELLE MALKIN Syndicated Columnist FROM THE LEFT FROM THE RIGHT By JIM HIGHTOWER Ah, August that time of year when the going gets tough ... and Congress gets going. On vacation that is. And, to be fair, maybe Congress needs a vacation. All the stress of not passing laws and constantly thwarting any attempt by President Obama to x Americas problems seems to be straining their sanity. For starters, if you thought that, surely, partisan posturing by far-right congress critters couldnt get any nuttier, youd be wrong. Last month, the GOP claimed that all the talk about impeaching President Barack Obama is being led by guess who? Barack Obama! If youll recall, the top Republican leader, John Boehner (having discovered that the larger public is appalled that his party would even consider wasting time on such extremist nonsense) tried to do a political back ip. Impeachment talk, he fumed, is a scam started by Democrats at the White House. No Republican lawmakers, he barked to the media, are even discussing it. Boehner, Boehner, Boehner! Apparently he didnt hear Rep. Steve Scalise of Louisiana, whos No. 2 on his own GOP leadership team, tell Fox News that he refuses to rule out impeachment. Or Rep. Kerry Bentivolio of Michigan, exult that it would be a dream come true to impeach Obama, and that he has pursued advice from experts on how to proceed. Or Iowas Rep. Steve King, saying atly, We need to bring impeachment hearings immediately. How about Randy Weber of Texas, who put it unequivocally: The president deserves to be impeached, plain and simple. And Georgias Jack Kingston con rmed that: Not a day goes by when people dont talk to us about impeachment. Still, Boehner did receive some backing on his claim that no one in the GOP has given a moments thought to impeachment. The always-insightful tea party radio ranter Glenn Beck, for example, waded in with this question to his audience on a recent broadcast: Have you spoken to one person (pushing such an idea)? he demanded. No one has used the I word, he snapped. But, in fact, Beck does know one person who has: Himself! Also, Sarah Palin! And at least a dozen other likeminded sparklies on the way-out far-right horizon. Right up to the time they departed Capitol Hill to enjoy vacations that will stretch through all of this month, much of September, and a good part of October, GOP howlers in Congress were pointing to several emergency issues that needed to be addressed such as the humanitarian crisis of immigrant children crossing the U.S.-Mexico border and the growing crisis of our nations crumbling infrastructure. But ... nothing. They simply adjourned and bolted off the job. These ideological zealots are nutty, but theyre clogging the roadway, preventing any of the progress that America desperately needs. As a result, not only is the public fed up with them but voter turnout is plummeting this year as people see that the hell no faction has turned democratic participation into a farce so why bother? Put away all hope for honesty or seriousness, ye who enter the nut house presently known as Boehners U.S. House of Representatives. Their antics could be laughed off except that theyre draining the vitality from Americas democracy. By MICHELLE MALKIN Wonder of wonders: The Washington press corps woke up. Finally, mainstream journalists are onto Barack Obamas game. Their breaking-news shocker? Turns out all that hope and change stuff was just hot air. A new report from the D.C.-based press shows that gasp the White House is infested with Beltway lobbyists. Good morning, sleepyheads! According to Politicos analysis published on Monday, the Obama administration has hired about 70 previously registered corporate, trade association and for-hire lobbyists. And many of these former lobbyists work at the highest levels of government. Wait, theres more. The most transparent administration ever is playing disclosure-dodging renaming games to hide lobbyists grubby paw prints. By of cially de-registering as corporate lobbyists and morphing into consultants, counselors or advisers, Obamas K Street operators can maintain the ction of upholding the Great Agent of Changes grand ethics pledge. Remember: Back in the day, candidate Obama assailed the K Street crowd with righteous (or rather, lefteous) zeal. I am in this race to tell the corporate lobbyists that their days of setting the agenda in Washington are over, he thundered in 2007. In one of his rst executive actions, he declared that the White House had closed the revolving door that allows government of cials to move to and from private sector jobs in ways that give that sector undue in uence over government. But the reform-peddling candidate soon found it impossible to practice what he so sanctimoniously preached. Now, Obama depends on their strategic advice and Beltway wisdom. The pledge does not bar anyone with prior lobbying experience from serving in this administration, an Obama spokesman told Politico.com. Broderick has substantial experience working in the Clinton administration, on the Hill and in the private sector in a variety of capacities, as well as on the presidents campaign. We welcome that mix of experience. That mix of experience also includes veteran Beltway lobbyist Cecilia Munoz, formerly of the National Council of La Raza and consultant to the Mexican government, who now is assistant to the president and director of the Domestic Policy Council along with revolving-door bene ciaries Melody Barnes, Marc Berejka, Bradley Gillen and Sean Kennedy, all lobbyists turned Obama bureaucrats turned lobbyists again. But now the K Street president is news? Like the old saying goes: There are none so blind as those who will not see. The most deluded people are those who choose to ignore what they already know. Whats wrong with the GOPs Hell no faction Press corps nds K Street president in Barack Obama

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 Wednesday, August 20, 2014 By JENNIFER HARWOOD 747-5073 | @PCNHJennHar wood jharwood@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY Demo cratic voters who turn out to cast a ballot in the pri mary election will nd two contrasting candidates in former Gov. Charlie Crist and former state Sen. Nan Rich. Both have been high in the ranks and served uniquely on the spectrum of social and scal matters. Rich is more liberal and steadfast in her stance on the issues, while Crist has been a political chameleon in his transition from a Republican governor to an independent and now the Democratic Party. With so much to consider by the Aug. 26 primary elec tion, Crist and Rich provide voters with a mashup of where each stands on big issues on their campaign websites. Crists campaign largely champions middle class growth by reducing the cost of higher education and added job creation. He imagines a future of bus tling infrastructure and opening Florida to interna tional commerce. Richs platform is driven to make public education and access to healthcare top priorities, as well as making progressive strides in womens reproduc tive rights and marriage equality. To gain faith from Democrats, Crist has had to clarify past ambiguous statements on certain is sues and emphasized past accomplishments that align with his evolving leftwing views. Rich is clearly the underdog, but she has maintained a strong race on a fraction of Crists cam paign budget. Both candidates favor hiking the minimum wage, but there are differences. According to her website, Rich is a proponent of rais ing minimum wage to from $7.93 to $10.10 an hour. Crist supports a wage increase, but on no specic terms. One feather in Crists cap is facilitating the larg est property tax cuts in Floridas history and other initiatives to keep insurance costs down for homeowners. The livelihood of Florid ians is paramount in both campaigns and has a strong correlation to health status. Both Crist and Rich want to accept the $50 billion in federal funding to expand state health insurance pro grams that the Republican controlled Legislature had declined. Both candidates approve medical marijua na for certain health condi tions, but have a different resolve on abortion. Rich is rmly pro-choice and Crist has elded criti cism for a wavering po sition on the matter. He maintains hes never really changed views on womens reproductive rights and claried in TV interviews that he is personally for life, but respects a wom ans right to choose. Pre viously as governor, Crist vetoed legislation requir ing an ultrasound before the procedure and voted against a bill requiring a 24-hour waiting period in the early 90s. Both candidates sup port funding Medicaid ex pansion and other options for Floridas uninsured and under-insured. Crist has sidestepped the rhetoric about his muddled view on Obamacare, and points out his achievements to in crease funding for autism treatments and access to services for the disabled. If elected, Rich will go after proper labeling of geneti cally modied foods. Rich and Crist both look out for Floridas ag ing population. Both had supported legislation and programs to give seniors options for independent liv ing and wider prescription drug coverage. According to his website, Crist had also pushed for increasing nutrition services, ghting fraud and bolstered nurs ing home availability for the elderly. Taking another vulner able population into consid eration, Rich and Crist are both proponents of grant ing immigrant children the right to in-state tuition, drivers licenses and ac cess to low-income state health insurance. Both candidates support marriage equality at differ ent volumes. Rich aggres sively sponsored legislation to allow adoption for samesex couples and domestic partnership rights. Crist sticks to his personal view that marriage is sacred be tween a man and woman, but says he respects the right of others to marry who they love. He supports same-sex unions for LGBT people to have equal rights in the workplace. Protecting basic hu man rights extends to the environment. Crist and Rich would both gladly try to recoup the $2.4 billion in federal money Scott passed on to get a high-speed rail system going and would continue to add to road and water transportation, but hopefully not at the ex pense of the landscape and water supply. Crist is now positioned for less depen dence on out-of-state en ergy suppliers and Rich is strongly against fracking. On justice issues, Crist restored the right of nonviolent felons in Florida to vote. Rich also supports voting rights for offenders whove fullled their pun ishment and plans to knock down restrictions to voter registration. Both say they will appoint even-keeled Supreme Court justices. Rich points out on her site that Crist gave these po sitions to the most right wing conservative judges in the past. Some of Bay Countys most elevated concerns re cently have been a streak of gun violence thats fanned the gun debate and poor performance by a handful of public schools. Crist, whod strongly supported the Second Amendment in his career, has been silent in this race about his stance on gun con trol, and according to po litical bloggers, has slipped from a long-standing A rat ing from the NRA to a D in the past week. Rich is con sistently anti-gun. On education, Crists website states he wants Florida students to be at the head of the class na tionally and globally by sup porting STEM education and putting funding back into schools that Gov. Scott had cut. Rich, too, wants tax dollars funneled back into public schools, but not into voucher programs that support private insti tutions. Rich wants highstakes standardized tests to be a thing of the past. The winner of the Dem ocratic primary will face the Republican nominee in November, most likely Scott, although two littleknown candidates Yinka Adeshina and Elizabeth Cuevas-Neunder also are on the GOP primary ballot. Crist, Rich spar in Democratic primary The winner of the Democratic primary will face the Republican nominee in November, most likely Scott, although two little-known candidates Yinka Adeshina and Elizabeth Cuevas-Neunder also are on the GOP primary ballot. FLORIDA GOVERNOR Qu ali ty Si nc e 19 58 CB C 05 79 33 CU C 05 69 75 85 078 546 75 www .g ac co nt ra ct or s. co m Ser vi ng Ba y, Ho lm es & Wa sh in gt on Co un ti es Fo r 56 Ye ar s NO HIDD EN CHA RGE S: It is our pol ic y that th e pa tien t an d an y othe r per so n re sp ons ib le fo r pa yment s has the ri gh t to re fus e to pa y, can cel pa yment or be re imb ur sed by pa yme nt or an y other ser vi ce ex aminat io n or tr eatm ent wh ich is perf or me d as a re sul t of and withi n 72 hou rs of re spo ndin g to the adv er tis eme nt fo r the fr ee dis co unt ed fe e or re duc ed fe e ser vice ex amina tion or tr eatm ent. "WE WELCOME NEW PA TIE NTS, CALL TODA Y FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PAT IENTS 59 AND OLDER This cer tif icat e is good fo r a complet e Medical Ey e Ex am with To dd Ro binson, M.D In Our Chiple y Of fi ce Boar d Ce rt if ied Ey e Ph ys ician and Sur geon. The ex am includes a pr es cr ip ti on fo r eye glasses and te sts fo r Glaucom a, Ca ta ra cts and other eye diseases FOR YO UR APPOINTMENT CA LL: 850-638-72 20 ELIGIBILI TY : U. S. Ci ti ze ns living in the Flor ida Pa nhand le 59 ye ar s and older not pr esentl y under our car e. Co upon Expir es: 8/31/20 14 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: WC00 Sm ar t Le ns es SM Ca n pr oduce clear vision without glasses at all dist ances www .m ullise ye .com MULLIS EYE INSTITUTE Chiple y Of fi ce 16 91 Main St., St e. 1 Chi ple y FL 3242 8 850-638-7220 We ar e locat ed dir ectl y acr oss the par king lot fr om the Wa lmar t in Chiple y To dd Ro binson, M.D Boar d Ce rt if ied Ey e Ph ys ician and Ca ta ra ct Sur geon

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Local A6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, August 20, 2014 Cecilia Spears: Relay for Life Vo lunteer .U nited Wa yS upporter .R eporter As ab eat re porter ,C ecilia is often at the center of news and events -- camer aa nd notepad in hand, ch ronicling the stories that impact the daily lives of our re aders. Ceci li a sn ot ju st an obs er ver ,h ow ever .S he s deepl yi nvo lve di nr ais ing fu nd sf or no n-pro t gr oup st hat ma ke li fe be tter for othe rs. She s ac om mitte em emb er and vo lun tee rf or th eA mer ica nC ancer Soc ie ty sR el ay for Li fe in bot hW ashi ngton an dH olm es cou nties ,a nd suppo rt so the rg ro up s, lik et he Un ite dW ay an dt he Pa ra ly zed Ve ter ans of Am er ica Beca use of our pe opl e, we del iver mor et ha nt he news to Wa sh in gto na nd Ho lm es coun ties .I t sj us ta no the rw ay th at we re commi tte dt oo ur commu ni tie s. No body de liv er sl ik ew ed o. AH alif ax Media Group Compan y SP98067 B ONIF AY NURS ING & RE HAB CENTER 306 We st Br ock Av enue Bo nifa y, FL 32425 850-547-9 289 www .B onifa yRehab .c om "I tru ly ad ore th e pl ac e I ca ll ho me an d I hope to co nv ey to th is ar ea th e sa me am ou nt of pa ss io n. I am ve ry ex ci ted to be jo in in g th e Bo ni fa y Nu rs in g an d Re ha b Te am as th e new Di rec to r of Ad mi ss io ns ." -J es si ca Zu ri ca Dir ec to r of Ad mi ss io ns "I look forward to building rela tionships and working with the families in my community ." Nikki Cullifer Admissions Coordina tor DA NN Y PO WELL fo r CO UNT Y CO MMISSIONER, DISTRIC T 4 ELEC T We Supp or t Ou r Pa Pa Da nn y Po we ll! To ge the r we wi ll br in g im pr ov em e nt to Ho lme s Co un ty Po litical adv er tisemen t paid fo r and appr ov ed by Dann y Po we ll Re publican fo r Co un ty Co mmissioner Distr ic t 4 Back to school 2014 By Carol Kent 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com HOLMES COUNTY Holmes County students and teach ers are back on local campuses this week after classes resumed here Monday. Heres a few rst day scenes as shared with us by local parents. P HOTOS SPEC IA L TO THE TI MES A DV E R T I SE R Madyson Toole struck a pose on her way to her rst day as a Bonifay Elementary School second-grader. Below Zachary Taylor was sure to document his rst day as a Bonifay Elementary School third-grader. Fifth-grader Sierra Gery and second-grader Evan Gery were packed and ready to start the day at Bethlehem School. From left, Corey Aaron Reynolds, Brooke Reynolds, and Madison Reynolds were ready to conquer the new school year at Bonifay Elementary School and Holmes County High School. Timber Bradley sports a unique Pokemon inspired backpack for his rst day at Ponce de Leon Elementary School.

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Be lt one Fi rs t Beltone Fi rst is compa tible with iPhone 5s, iPhone 5c, iPhone 5, iP ad Air iP ad (4th genera tion). iP ad mini with Retina display iP ad mini and iP od touch (5th genera tion) using iOS7.X or la ter Ap ple, the Ap ple logo, iPhone, iP ad and iP od touch are trademarks of Ap ple, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Pa rticipa tion may var y. See loca tion for details. Bene ts of hearing aids var y by type and degree of hearing loss, noise environment, accurac y of hearing evalua tion and proper t. Beltone Among Adults over 50. 2014 Beltone Experience Beltone First, revolutionar y Made for iPhone hearing aid: *Remembers pl aces you visit, and automa tically updates your settings What does this guy have to do with your electricity ? PowerSouth s Ener gy Sour ce s (2013) 64.8% NA TURA L GAS 5.3 % HY DRO 0.3 % RENE WA BLES 29.6% COAL In 2013, 95 per cent of our members electricity was made using fossil fuels like coal and natural gas. 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L o c a t e d a t L ig h t h o u s e M a r in a N ext t o B ud & A l le y's Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A7 Wednesday, August 20, 2014 HOLMES COUNTY ARREST REPORTSAUG. 10 18 Jerry Franklin Barbaree, 25, child abuse Joyce Benavidez, 42, no charges listed Wesley Birge, 27, failure to appear on grand theft Ladonte Lamont Bivens, 36, hold for Blackwater CI James Richard Bodie, 65, recommit hold for Department of Corrections Jeremy Clinton Brown, 27, violation of parole Shannon Lee Cardwell, 40, recommit for Department of Corrections James Daniels, 29, written threats to kill or do bodily harm, assault domestic violence, resisting without violence Victoria Keitzman Gajewski, 45, loitering and prowling James Gregory, 67, driving under the inuence, violation of state probation Jerry Helms, 44, violation of probation on grand theft Kristina Hollinsworth, 33, hold for court Arthur Hudson, 33, unlawful altercation of tag Elizabeth James, 28, theft James Keith Kelly, 54, violation of probation, battery domestic violence Thomas Land, 42, grand theft, burglary of a structure, driving while license suspended or revoked Ethan Lewis, 25, domestic violence battery Donald Lee Marsh, 45, burglary of a structure, grand theft, bond surrendered on driving while license suspended or revoked, bond surrendered on resist without violence, bond surrendered on theft, bond surrendered on eeing and eluding Rudy Castillo Minardo, 33, driving while license suspended habitual offender Jake Monlyn, 25, driving while license suspended or revoked Luis Morales, 20, hold for Hillsborough County William Warren Music, 34. child abuse domestic, battery domestic violence Jason Nettles, 31, recommit for court Teresa Nettles, 45, battery James Douglas Perkins, 51, battery James Douglas Perkins, 51, no charges listed Tony L. Railey, 52, battery domestic violence, aggravated assault with deadly weapon, armed burglary, grand theft Kevin Sanders, 45, hold for Blackwater CI Nicolas Joseph Sandora, 23, driving while license suspended or revoked Gerald Simmons, 25, possession of contraband Brady Skinner, 22, possession of certain drugs without prescription William Reed Spence, 37, violation of probation on reckless driving Michael Wayne Thomas, 34, violation of injunction, out of county warrant Gerald Thompson, 36, hold for Hillsborough County Charles Vincent, 20, violation of probation on possession of meth Dante Williams, 19, hold for Hillsborough County Lillie Nettles Williams, 43, abuse or neglect of a child Shannon Williams, 37, petit theft Charlie Spencer Wynn, 31, aggravated assault domestic violence+ HOLMES COUNTY DOCKETAUG. 20 Jacob Michael Dockery, Violation of Probation, 9/1/1983, driving while license suspended or revoked Dennis E. Pynes Jr., Violation of Probation, 10/2/1983, issue worthless check Dennis E. Pynes Jr., Violation of Probation, 10/2/1983, issue worthless check Dennis E. Pynes Jr., Violation of Probation, 10/2/1983, issue worthless check Dennis E. Pynes Jr., Violation of Probation, 10/2/1983, issue worthless check Dennis E. Pynes Jr., Violation of Probation, 10/2/1983, issue worthless check Dennis E. Pynes Jr., Violation of Probation, 10/2/1983, issue worthless check Dennis E. Pynes Jr., Violation of Probation, 10/2/1983, issue worthless check Dennis E. Pynes Jr., Violation of Probation, 10/2/1983, issue worthless check Nicholas Shannon Harrison, Motion Hearing, 9/9/1987, driving while license suspended or revoked Stefanie Anne Martin, Pretrial, 9/8/1991, reckless driving Stefanie Anne Martin, Pretrial, 9/8/1991, leaving the scene of accident without giving damage more than $50 Stefanie Anne Martin, Status Review, 9/8/1991, driver in possession of open container

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Local A8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, August 20, 2014 2014 Universal Uclick from The Mini Page 2014 Univ ersal Uclick To order, send $9.95 plus $3.50 postage and handling for each copy. Send check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to: Andrews McMeel Universal, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206 or call toll-free 1-800-591-2097. Please send ______ copies of The Mini Page Guide to the Constitution (Item #0-7407-6511-6) at $13.45 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.) www.smartwarehousing.com Name: _________ _______________ _______________ _______________ __________________ Address: __________________ ____________________ _________ _______________ ________ City: ___________ _______________ __________ _____ State: _________ Zip: ______________ __ The popular nine-part series on the Constitution, written in collaboration with the National Archives, is now packaged as a colorful 32-page softcover book. The series covers: the preamble, the seven articles and 27 amendments the big ideas of the document the history of its making and the signers from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Mi ni Sp y Mini Spy and her frien ds love reading new sto ries in the libra ry. See if you can find: word MINI sock kite letter T heart pocke t kni fe letter M axe lips band age pumpkin letter H mitt en numbe r 3 letter J letter D olive musi cal note ladder letter A acor n excl amat ion mar k 2014 Honor Book Aw ar ds Mee t Holly Bla ck Holly Black won a 2014 Newbery Honor Book award for Doll Bones. She has written several books for kids and young adults. She is best known for the books in The Spiderwick Chronicles series, which she co-wrote with Tony DiTerlizzi. A writing life Holly said that in eighth grade, she was lucky to be in a special class with a great teacher who required that each student write a novel. Her middle-school novel, a 60-page book with vampires and dragons, taught me I could finish something. I could make something, Holly said. After a pause in her writing during college, she told herself, If Im going to do this, I have to be serious about it. It took her about six years to write her first published book, Tithe: A Modern Faerie Tale. World of writing While working on her first published novel, Holly worked for a medical journal and wrote for a roleplaying gaming magazine. She met Tony DiTerlizzi when she interviewed him for that magazine. At the time, he was an artist for the role-playing game Dungeons and Dragons. Tony had an idea for a guide to fantastic creatures. Holly and Tony began writing about that world, creating The Spiderwick Chronicles. Holly writes in her home, but does much of her work away from home. She often travels to new places, holding writing retreats with friends. Some favorites Black, like my name. Its easy to wear black clothes because everything matches. But now my hair is aqua, and Im super into aqua. The Chronicles of Prydain by Lloyd Alexander Advice to kids When I was a kid, I did want to be a writer but didnt know anyone who did anything creative professionally. It seemed really unlikely. People always said to me, You have to believe in yourself if you want to do something. I knew I didnt really believe in myself and thought, I guess I cant do this then. But its OK if you dont believe it will work. You can do it anyway. Keep going forward, keep at it. Just keep going like you do believe. Photo by D. Williford Holly Black, 42, her husband, Theodor Black, and their 15-monthold son, Sebastian, live in New England. Theodor is an illustra tor, web designer and stay-a thome dad. They have three cats. jacket art 2013 by Eliza Wheeler, published by Simon & Schuster In Doll Bones, three kids use dolls and action figures to help them create a story-game that goes on for years. But as they grow up, things change. All of a sudden, their world becomes scary and weird. jacket art 2003 by Tony DiTerlizzi, published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers The Field Guide is the first book in The Spiderwick Chronicles. Three kids discover a guide to fairies, which pulls them into a world full of threatening danger and mystery. from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Youll need: What to do: 1. Combine first four ingredi ents in medium-size bowl. 2. Stir in lim e juice and pinch of salt 3. Chill for 30 minutes to combi ne flavors. 4. Serve with chips or with chicken, pork or fish as a side dish. You will need an adult s help wi th this recipe. Ro ok ie Co ok ie s Reci pe Mild Mango Salsa from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Meet Raffi Cavouki an Raf fi Ca voukia n, known simply as Raff i, is a singe r, wri ter and co mposer famous for his music for kid s, in cl uding the environ mental song Baby Beluga . His newest album is Lo ve Bu g. In the mid197 0s he wa s pe rfo rmin g at a fol k music fes tiv al when fe sti v al org anizers asked him to help with a sc hool pr ogram wher e he sang with kids .A t the same time his mother in-la w aske d him to sing at her pre sc ho ol. She sugge sted he make an alb um for kids and he took her advi ce Raffi has found ed The Ce ntre for Child Hono uri ng whic h works to help adul ts hon or kids as a firs t step to pro moti ng pe ace He also co-fou nde d the Red Hood Proje ct, a movement to mak e soc ial media safe for kids to use Raffi 66, wa s born in Cairo Egy pt, and moved with his fam ily to Cana da when he wa s 10 photo by Billie Woods from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick With the pres sure on, Germa n soccer playe r Mari o Gtze (GUTZ-ah ) made the mos t of his momen t in the spotligh t. Mari o came off the benc h late in the final mat ch of the 2014 FIFA World Cup with his team lock ed in a scor eless draw with Argenti na. His coach had a simple messag e for the 22-ye ar-old striker: Show to the world that you can dec ide the Worl d Cup. A star player for the prof ession al club Baye rn Munich, Mario had been fair ly quiet in the tournamen t up to that point net ting only one goal In overtime of the finals, however, Mario received a pass near the goal, control led the bal l off his chest and booted it past the opposing goal keeper. Marios goal gav e Germany its first World Cup title sin ce the country was reunifi ed almost 24 years ago. West Germa ny won titl es in 1954, 1974 and 1990. TM Ma ri o G tze Gus Goodsport s Supersport Height: 5-9 Birthdate: 6-3-1992 Hometown: Memmingen, Germany In Allegiant, the conclusion to the Divergent trilogy, Tris and her friends discover the secrets behind societys factions, or groups. from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Ch ild re n s Bo ok Aw ar ds Each year, the Childrens Book Council sponsors a survey to find out kids favorite books. Children across the country vote for their favorite books, authors and illustrators. Here are the kids top choices for 2014. Favorite author Kids voted for Rush Limbaugh as Author of the Year for Rush Revere and the Brave Pilgrims: TimeTravel Adventures With Exceptional Americans. Rush is an adult-level talk show host and has written one other book for kids. Bugs in My Hair! by David Shannon Rush Limbaugh jacket art 2013, published by Simon & Schuster In Rush Revere and the Brave Pilgrims, a substitute history teacher goes back in time with a talking horse to meet the Pilgrims coming over on the Mayflower in 1620. Favorite illustrator Kids voted for Grace Lee as Ill ustrato r of the Year for Sofia the First: The Floati ng Palac e by Cathe rine Hapka. Grace has worke d in movi e anima tion and as a kids boo k illu strat or. photo courtesy Simon & Schuster jacket art 2013 by Grace Lee, published by Disney Publishing Worldwide Grace Lee photo courtesy Disney Publishing Worldwide In The Floating Palace, Sofia helps save a mermaids kingdom and bring Sofias people together with the mermaids people. The Childrens Choice Book Award winners are: : The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt jacket art 2013 by Oliver Jeffers, published by Philomel jacket art 2013 by Joel Tipple, published by HarperCollins In The Day the Crayons Quit, the crayons refuse to keep coloring jacket art 2013 by David Shannon, published by Blue Sky Press Bugs in My Hair! is a funny tale about head lice. National Geographic Kids: Myths Busted jacket art 2013 by National Geographic Myth s Busted tells the truth about many moder n beliefs. For examp le, alligators do not live in New York sewers. Allegiant by Veronica Roth More Newbery Honor Books Kevin Henkes has written and illustrated about 50 books for kids. He received the 2005 Caldecott Medal for Kittens First Full Moon. Next week, The Mini Page is about the importance of sleep, especially as school starts. from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick 2 01 4 B o o k A w a rd W i n n er s The Min i Pa ge Staff B ett y Debna m Fo und ing Edito r an d Edi tor at Lar ge Li sa Tarry Man aging Edi tor Luc y Lien Ass oci ate Ed itor Wen dy Daley Ar tist Read books and journey through exciting new worlds! To be gin your exploration, ch ec k out some of this year s aw ard-winning books The Caldecott Medal is prese nted each year to the ill ustrato r of the most distingu ished picture book for chil dren. Thi s yea r there were also three Hon or Book winne rs. The John New bery Meda l is awa rde d each ye ar to the aut hor of the mos t out sta ndi ng ch ildre ns boo k. Thi s ye ar there wer e also fou r Honor Book win ner s, i nclu din g Do ll Bone s by Ho lly Bla ck. Kate DiCamillo won the 2014 Newbery Medal for Flora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures and the 2004 Newbery Medal for The Tale of Despereaux. jacket art (c) 2013 by K.G. Campbell, published by Candlewick Press In Flora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures, Flora rescues a squirrel after it is sucked into a vacuum cleaner. But the squirrel comes out with superpowers. jacket art 2013 by Kevin Henkes, published by HarperCollins In The Year of Billy Miller, Billy is anxious about starting second grade with a new teacher and a know-it-all desk partner. His teacher, father, sister and mother each tell parts of Billys story. Amy Timberlake has written two other books for kids and teaches writing to college students. jacket art 2013 by David Homer at Debaser, published by Alfred A. Knopf In One Came Home, 13-year-old Georgie does not believe her sister is dead. She and her sisters former boyfriend set out to track down the truth about her sister. Vince Vawter overcame his own stutter and became a newspaper publisher. This is his first novel. jacket art 2013 by Chris Sheban, published by Random House Childrens Books In Paperboy, an 11-year-old boy is great at baseball, but shy because of his stutter. When he takes over a friends paper route, he finds new friends and a scary enemy. Brian Floca won the 2014 Caldec ott Medal for Locomotive. He illustra tes his own and other authors books. jacket art 2013 by Brian Floca, published by Atheneum/ Simon & Schuster Locomotive is a view of the machinery, crew and passengers of the locomotive in 1869, when it was changing history. Caldecott Honor Books Aaron Becker has worked in film design. His second book, Quest, will be out this month. jacket art 2013 by Aaron Becker, published by Candlewick Press In Journey, a lonely girl creates a new world with her red crayon. Molly Idle has worked in movie animation and written and illustrated several books. jacket art Molly Idle, published by Chronicle Books LLC In Flora and the Flamingo, a girl and her flamingo friend explore their friendship through dance. David Wiesner has won three Caldecott Medals, for Tuesday, The Three Pigs and Flotsam. jacket art 2013 by David Wiesner, published by Clarion Books In Mr. Wuffles! a cat causes trouble for tiny aliens until they become allies of insects in the house. from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick All the following jokes have something in common. Can you guess the common theme or category? Philip: What did the professor have to do when he lost his pen again? Perry: Re-search! TM Mig hty Funn y s Mi ni Joke s Pamela: What is big enough to hold a pig, but small enough to hold in your hand? Polly: A pen! Paula: What does a baby write with? Percy: A playpen! Ready Resources from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick The Mini Page provides ideas for websites, books or other resources that will help you learn more about this weeks topics. On the Web: At the library: Carson Levine DL PNE LO YF DF OX LP TI OA ESSE HL IN VG I HC AW RT GIO VO LM AN UR BZ RKDA ETS CLN K RE YL EY RAH CA SA TN BE RA TN MS IT RUC OE EC DI SK CI NZ LE SS Y RH LL AH OL LI MA CI D GN IT NU BN NA MH TA R Words that remind us of past and current Newbery and Caldecott winners are hidden in the block above. See if you can find: BUNTING, BYRD, CREECH, CURTIS, DIAZ, DICAMILLO, DILL, ETS, FLOCA, FOX, GANTOS, HALL, HESSE, LAI, LOWRY, PARK, PINKNEY, RATHMANN, SACHAR, SELZNICK, STEAD, THURBER, VOIGT, YOLEN. Book Aw ar ds from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick TM Basset Browns Tr y n Fin d

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A9 Wednesday, August 20, 2014 Special to the Times-Advertiser A rare event recently occurred in our capital city. Finley Lamar McMillan, Florida resident and longtime resident of Ochlock nee Bay, was recognized with a Grandson medal from Finleys Brigade Camp 1614, Sons of Confed erate Veterans. Mr. McMil lans grandfather was An gus M. McMillan, Captain of Company K, 6th Florida Infantry. The Camps name reects the common Con federate leader, Jesse J. Finley, for whom Mr. Mc Millan and Finleys Bri gade is named. Mr. Finley McMillan, along with his daughter, Mi chelle McMillan Kirby, and grandson, Andy Gowan, both of Tallahassee, recent ly gave a presentation about Angus McMillan to Finleys Brigade where Mr. McMil lan and his grandson Andy are members. To Mr. Mc Millans complete surprise, the bestowal of the medal by Camp Commander Kel ly Crocker occurred after their presentation. Finley will be 86 years young this Oct. 27. He was born in Marianna with family an ecdotes of his grandfather Angus being friends and an advocate for Gov. John Milton, Floridas gover nor during the war. Mrs. Kirby serves as a district director for the Florida Panhandle Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and also Chapter president of R. Don McLeod 2469 in Crawfordville. It was such an honor to pin my father and to hear my son speak of honoring his grandfathers father, Kirby said. Its all about family. Angus M. McMillan saw plenty of action during the War Between the States at Chickamauga, Franklin, Resaca, Murfreesboro, At lanta and Nashville. Cap tain McMillan was captured on Shys Hill on Dec. 16, 1864, during the Battle of Nashville and taken prisoner and kept at John sons Island POW camp in Ohio until the end of the War. Upon return to the South, Angus was instru mental in the founding of Chipley. He was a gener ous man and donated land for the building of the Pres byterian Church in Chipley, was on the educational board of trustees, and was known to give land as wed ding presents. He fathered 11 children whose de scendants extend as far as the state Washington. More information about Angus can be found at www. rdonmcleod.org. HOL MES CO UN TY PU BL IC HE AR ING Th e Hol me s Co un ty Bo ar d of Co mm is si one rs wi ll hold a Pu bl ic He ar in g fo r th e cl osur e an d ab an do nm en t of th e fo ll ow in g de scr ib ed po rt io n of what is kn ow n as T W Mi ll er La ne . Th e So ut he as t qu ar te r of th e So ut he as t qu ar te r of Se ct io n 12 To wn sh ip 4 No rt h, Ra ng e 17 We st an d th e Nor th eas t qu ar te r of th e So ut he as t qu ar te r of Se ct io n 12 To wn sh ip 4 Nor th Ra nge 17 We st Al so ma y be de scr ib ed as th e Ea s t one ha lf of th e So ut he as t qu ar te r of Se ct io n 12 To wn sh ip 4 Nor th Ra nge 17 We st Sai d Pu bl ic He ar in g wi ll be he ld on Se pt em be r 9, 20 14 at 9: 00 am in th e Co un ty Co mm is si one r s Me et in g Ro om lo ca te d at 10 7 E Vi rg ini a Av e, Bo ni fa y, FL 32 42 5. Th e Bo ar d at th is He ar in g is au th or iz ed to cl os e, ab an don an d va ca te an y int er es t th e co un ty ha s, if an y, in th e ab ove de scr ib ed roa d. Th e He ar in g ma y be co nt inu ed fr om ti me to ti me as ma y be ne ce ss ar y. Th e publ ic is en co ur ag ed to at te nd Mon ty Me rc ha nt Cha ir ma n Hol me s Co un ty Bo ar d of Co mm is sion er s Spon sor ed by th e Hol me s Co un ty Hi gh Sc hool La di es Vo ll ey bal l Come o u t an d se e yo ur lo ca l le ade rs in ac tion. Th ey wil l be ta ki ng on ou r HCHS vo ll ey ba ll te am in a fun l le d vo ll ey ba ll gam e. Ou r sp ec ia l gues ts wi ll in clu de Sc ho ol Bo ar d Mem ber s, Co un ty Co mmis sioner s, an d Bus in ess Own er s. A ca ke auc t ion wi ll im me dia te ly fo ll ow th e gam e, an d conce ss ion s wi ll be ava il ab le Fo r Ad di ti ona l in fo rm at ion cont ac t: Hol ly Hod g e, HC H S Vo ll ey ba ll Coac h at 85 084 9-6 00 5 (c el l) or a t 85 054 7900 0 (w or k) NON -E TH AN OL GAS NO W IN BO NI FA Y Co nv en ienc e St or e wi th Be er So da Lo tt er y & Sn ack s, CL EA N RE ST RO OM S, ON & O -R oa d Di es el Goo d Pa rk in g Jus t o I10 an d Hw y 79 40 5 St Joh ns Rd, Bo ni fa y, Fl Or Vi sit us at 29 55 Hw y 81 Po nc e De Le on Fl We als o ta ke ca re of (850) 638-5885 Mo st Ve hicles Up to 5 qts syn thetic blend Mo st Ve hicles $ 19 95 + tax + tax LA BOR DA Y DEADLINES Deadlines fo r ALL We dnesda y, SEPTEMBER 3 Pu blic at ions Ou r oc es will be closed Protecting pets from predators As caring pet owners, we do everything possible to keep our pets out of harms way. However, with more wooded and natural areas being developed into neigh borhoods and businesses, wild animals have fewer places to reside. Birds of prey, such as hawks and eagles, can pose a serious threat to cats and other small animals, and depend ing on where you live, coy otes and mountain lions may also be a danger. Since we share our habitat with wild animals, learning how to prevent an attack can make all the difference. Supervising your pets when theyre outside is an effective way to deter predators. Even in local outlying neighborhoods, hawks, coyotes and other predators can harm pets, said Dr. Stacy Eckman, lecturer at the Texas A&M Col lege of Veterinary Medicine & Biomed ical Sciences. Stay away from nesting predators such as owls and hawks if you know where their nests are and keep your pets area clean and free of de bris or plant material that predators can hide in. Depending on the size of your pet and the area in which you live, keeping your pet in the backyard overnight might not be safe. If your pets are accustomed to being outdoors and are able to defend themselves, such as a larger dog breed, back yard housing can be suitable. However, keeping smaller animals in the backyard un supervised is not recommended. The caution with even larger dogs who encounter a predator is that they are still at risk for fatal diseases such as rabies, Eckman said. At a minimum, they will need a shelter of some sort. A good rule of thumb is to appropriately fence in your backyard or outdoor pet area to keep out un wanted visitors. Depending on the region you live in, this might include fencing with barbed wire or roll-bars on the top to make it harder for coyotes and other large predators to get over. Even raccoons have been known to attack small dogs in backyards in shel ters, Eckman said. Keep ing food bowls empty by discarding any leftover food to keep from attracting wild animals may also help. If you come face-to-face with a predator while on a walk or even in your own backyard, stay calm and never turn your back to run away. If you have a small dog or cat with you, pick them up and slowly back away. Grab the leash or col lar of a larger dog. Carrying a walking stick is a good weapon to help fend off an attack, as are sticks or rocks to throw at a preda tor if they look like theyre going to attack. Loud, frightening nois es may scare and deter predators, as will threaten ing body language, Eck man said. If your pet is at tacked while walking, seek medical care immediately. Even if there are no obvious wounds on your pet, your veterinarian will perform a thorough exam to nd any unnoticed injuries and vac cinate them for rabies. The best tip in protecting your pet from a predator is to let them outside only when you are with them, especially at night, and to keep pet food and water either inside or empty. All wildlife should be respect ed for their role in the envi ronment, and while healthy habitats need predators, you dont want your beloved pets to be the prey. Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at vetmed.tamu.edu/pet-talk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to editor@cvm.tamu.edu. PET T ALK Finley McMillan honoredP HOTOS SP ECIAL TO THE T IMESA DVERTISER Camp Commander, Kelly Crocker of Vernon, Finleys Brigade SCV Camp 1614, presents Finley McMillan with a Grandson certicate and medal. Also included are Mr. McMillans daughter, Michelle McMillan Kirby, and grandson, Andy Gowan. Survivors of Company K 6th Florida Infantry after a United Confederate Veterans reunion. The group had just gotten off the train in Chipley from the event and posed for the photography.

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If you would like your church listed here, please send information to: news@chipleypaper. com. Because of space limitation, please only send regular church services. For special services, send separate submission. ASSEMBLY OF GOD BONIF A Y FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is 116 Main St.FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Underwood Road behind Poplar Springs School.GRACE ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. LITTLE ROCK ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 567 North Main Street.LIVE OAK ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday Scool is Sunday at 10:00a.m., with Morning Worship at 11 a.m. and Evening Worship at 6 p.m. Wednesday Services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 2118 Live Oak Road in Bonifay.MT. OLIVE ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is on Highway 179-A off of Highway 2.NEW BETHANY ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is on Shaky Joe Road just off Highway 280 at Hinsons Crossroads.NEW LIFE FELLOWSHIP ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 695 5th St. in Chipley.NORTHSIDE ASSEMBLY OF GOD Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Sunday School is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1009 North Rangeline St. in Bonifay.SMITH CHAPEL ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is 2549 Smith Chapel Road, just off Highway 177-A.SWEET GUM ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Thursday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 105 Corbin Road.WAUSAU ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 3537 Washington St. in Wausau.WINTERVILLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. The church is at 1897 Highway 177A in BonifayBAPTIST ABIGAIL FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is on Dawkins Street in Vernon. BEREAN BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7:30 p.m. The church is at 1438 Nearing Hills Drive in Chipley.BLUE LAKE BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 1405 Blue Lake Road in Chipley.BETHLEHEM BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The church is at 1572 Highway 177 in Bonifay.BETHANY BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1404 North Highway 79 in Bonifay.BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m.BONIF A Y FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 311 N. Waukesha St.BONIF A Y FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at the corner of Kansas Avenue and Oklahoma Street. CHIPLEY FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 1300 South Blvd.CHIPLEY FIRST FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 1387 South Blvd.COUNTRY OAKS BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 574 Buckhorn Blvd.EAST PITTMAN FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is mile north of Highway 2 on Highway 179.EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at Highway 277 in Vernon.EVERGREEN MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is in Westville.GAP POND FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is at 1980 Gap Blvd., in Sunny Hills.GRACE BAPTIST CHAPEL MISSION Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:50 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 440 Lot E 2nd St., Chipley.GULLY SPRINGS BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 2826 Highway 90 in Bonifay.HICKORY HILL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1656 Hickory Hill Road in Westville.HOLMES CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Cope Road in Chipley.HOLYNECK MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is 3395 Cemetery Lane, Campbellton. JERUSALEM MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 614 Bennett Drive in Chipley.LEONIA BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is in northwest Holmes County.MCQUEENS TEMPLE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF LIVING GOD Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 5681 Highway 79 South, Vernon.MT. ARARA T MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 1233 Old Bonifay Road in Chipley.MT. ZION INDEPENDENT BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 6 p.m. The church is on Highway 2, 1 mile west of Highway 79 in Esto.NEW CONCORD FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on James Paulk Road off Highway 177.NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday morning Bible study is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at the intersection of Highway 2 and Highway 179A.NEW PROSPECT BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning worship services are at 11 a.m. Sunday evening services are at 5 p.m. Wednesday services supper is 5 p.m. Wednesday prayer meeting, bible study and childrens classes start at 5:45. The church is at 761 New Prospect Road in Chipley.NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Highway 177A, north of Highway 2.NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is at the intersection of Highway 81 and Highway 90 in Ponce de Leon.OAKIE RIDGE BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is at the corner of Orange Hill and Gilberts Mill Road.PINEY GROVE FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1783 Piney Grove Road south of Chipley.PLEASANT HILL FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is south of Bonifay at 1900 Pleasant Hill Road.POPLAR HEAD INDEPENDENT FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is on Poplar Head Road.POPLAR SPRINGS BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship Faith A10 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, August 20, 2014 Church LISTINGS See LISTINGS A11 To learn ho w yo u can suppor t our commun ity s univ ersity contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. FL ORIDA ST AT E UNIVE RSIT Y PA NAMA CIT Y THE CA MP AIGN FOR OUR CO MM UNIT Y S UN IVERS IT Y En do wment for To morr ow s Jo bs $4 ,500 ,0 00 $500 ,0 00 $1,500 ,0 00 $2,500 ,0 00 $3 ,500 ,0 00 $4 ,500 ,0 00 $0 $1, 000 ,0 00 $2, 000 ,0 00 $3 ,0 00 ,0 00 $4 ,0 00 ,0 00 $5 ,0 00 ,0 00 GO AL Ca ndida te s should ha ve prior ex perienc e in a sales en vir onmen t along with high school diploma or equiv alen t. Th e Ne ws He ra ld o e rs a co mpetitiv e bene t pack age including health, den tal lif e insur anc e, and 401(k) plan. Ca ndida te hir ed pending pr eemplo ymen t dr ug scr een and criminal back gr ound check St ro ng co mmunica tion sk ills and ve ry high at te nt ion to detail Ex ce llen t cust omer ser vic e, or ganiza tional sk ills and co mput er sk ills re quir ed Mu st be pr oc ess dr iv en and be able to fu nc tion e ec tiv ely and independen tly with asser tiv e, inno vat iv e and persuasiv e personalit y to ac hiev e sales objec tiv es on a re gular basis Th is position will wo rk co llabor at iv ely with the assig ned te am to en sur e ex ce ptional cust omer ser vic e to co mpan y s cur re nt an d pr ospec tiv e adv er tisers by helping set appoin tmen ts fo r sales te am and tak ing calls fr om clien ts SALES SUPPORT COORDINA TOR

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PL AY by pick ing the most winners each we ek! Faith Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A11 Wednesday, August 20, 2014 is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1098 Lovewood Road, 2 miles east of Highway 77.SAND HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:15 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 6758 Highway 77.SHADY GROVE BAPTIST Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. SHILOH BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is on Highway 277, 3 miles south of Highway 90 in Chipley.SHILOH MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:15 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 3013 Moss Hill Road in Vernon.ST. JOHN FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m.ST. MATTHEWS MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 4156 St. Matthews Road, Caryville.SALEM FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m., worship service at 11 a.m. Evening worship is at 6 p.m., and Wednesday service at 7 p.m. Church is at 2555 Kynesville Highway, Alford.SHADY GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1955 Highway 177A in Bonifay.SUNNY HILLS FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. UNITY BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 3274 River Road in Vernon.WAUSAU FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 3493 Washington St. in Wausau.WEST BONIF AY BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 609 West Indiana Ave. in Bonifay.CATHOLIC BLESSED TRINITY CATHOLIC CHURCH Sunday Mass is at 9 a.m. Wednesday; evening Mass is at 5:30 p.m. Adoration is the rst Friday at from noon to 3 p.m. Holy Hour is from 7 to 8 p.m. Tuesday. The church is at 2331 Highway 177A in Bonifay.ST. JOSEPH THE WORKER CATHOLIC CHURCH Sunday Mass is at 11 a.m. Tuesday Mass is at 9 a.m. The church is at 1664 Main St., in Chipley.ST. THERESA CATHOLIC CHURCH Sunday Mass is at 10 a.m. Monday through Friday Mass is at 8 a.m. Saturday Mass is at 5 p.m. Adoration is the rst Friday after 8 a.m. Mass. The church is at 2056 Sunny Hills Blvd., in Chipley.CHURCH OF CHRIST CHIPLEY CHURCH OF CHRIST Sunday morning Bible study is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1295 Brickyard Road in Chipley.SPIRIT-FILLED CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Tuesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is at 2128 Pate Pond Road in Caryville.EPISCOPAL GRANT T ABERNACLE AME Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m.. The church is at 577 Martin Luther King, Chipley.NEW BETHEL AME Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Highway 90 in Bonifay.ST. JOHN AME Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. ST. JOSEPH AME Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1401 Monroe Shefeld Road, Chipley.ST. LUKE AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH (AME) Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Jackson Community Road.ST. MATTHEWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH Morning worship is at 9 a.m. Wednesday worship service is at 12:15 p.m. The church is on Highway 90 west in Chipley.EVANGELISTIC VERNON EVANGELISTIC CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is on Highway 79 in Vernon.CARYVILLE EVANGELISTIC CENTER Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is on Wrights Creek Road in Caryville, just north of Highway 90.HOLINESS HARRIS CHAPEL HOLINESS CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Thursday services are at 7 p.m. The church is 8 miles north of Caryville on Highway 179.JOHNSON TEMPLE FIRST BORN HOLINESS Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. Friday services are at 6 p.m. The church is at 793 Orange Street, Chipley.MIRACLE V ALLEY SPIRIT OF HOLINESS Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is 3754 Bunyon Drive, off Highway 77 near Sunny Hills.LUTHERAN GRACE LUTHERAN Morning Worship is at 8:30 a.m. The church is on Highway 90 East in Bonifay.METHODIST BETHLEHEM BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is on Highway 177.BONIF AY FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Worship begins at 10:45 a.m. Youth Services are at 6 p.m. Wednesdays.CEDAR GROVE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6 p.m. The church is 2 miles west of Millers Crossroads on Highway 2.CHIPLEY FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:50 a.m. Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. (contemporary service) and 11 a.m. (traditional service). The church is at 1285 Jackson Ave.LAKEVIEW UNITED METHODIST Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is on Highway 279 near Five Points.MT. IDA CONGREGATIONAL METHODIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is at just off Highway 2 in Holmes Countys New Hope Community.NEW HOPE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. NEW BETHEL AME Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Highway 90 in Bonifay.ORANGE HILL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. The church is on Sunday Road just off Orange Hill Road.OTTER CREEK UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is north of Ponce de Leon off Highway 81.PLEASANT GROVE UNITED METHODIST Morning Worship is at 9 a.m. The church is near Hinsons Crossroads.POPLAR HEAD UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is 1.5 miles north of Highway 2 on Highway 163.RED HILL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on State Road, 2 miles west of State Road 79.ST. JOHN AME Morning Worship is at 11:30 a.m. ST. LUKE AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is on Jackson Community Road.VERNON UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m.WAUSAU UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m.. The church is on State Road 77.PENTECOSTAL FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1816 Highway 90 in Chipley.WAUSAU PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is at 2201 Pioneer Road in Wausau.OPEN POND PENTECOSTAL Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1885 Highway 179-A in Westville.TRINITY PENTECOSTAL T ABERNACLE Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. PRESBYTERIAN CHIPLEY FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Bible study is at 5 p.m. The church is at Fifth street and Watts Ave.SUNNY HILLS PRESBYTERIAN Sunday School is at 9 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. The church is at 3768 Country Club Blvd.OTHER BIBLEW AY LIGHTHOUSE Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is 7 p.m. The church is on U.S. Highway 90 East in ChipleyBONIF AY HOUSE OF PRAYER Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Friday services are at 6 p.m. The church is at 826 N. Caryville Road.BONIF AY SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Service is at 9:30 a.m. Saturday and at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The church is at 604 Mathusek St.BONNETT POND CHURCH Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 2680 Bonnett Pond Road in Chipley.CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP CENTER Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1458 Monroe Shefeld Road in Chipley.CHRISTIAN HAVEN Sunday school is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m.CHURCH OF GOD BY FAITH Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11:45 a.m. Tuesday service is at 7:30 p.m. The church is at 3012 Church St.CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1386 W. Jackson Ave., Chipley.COURTS OF PRAISE Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Wednesday service is at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 1720 Clayton Road, Chipley.CYPRESS CREEK Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 1772 Macedonia Road. LISTINGS from page A10

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When I was asked to write something for the Heritage History of Holmes County as the committee began the work about 2003, I had no idea the degree to which my agreement would lead. When Anna Padgett Wells was working on her Heart and History of Holmes County, I failed her because my participation in that work was minimal. But this week, I have been looking back at that volume and am amazed again at the amount of work that went into it and at the amount of valuable and interesting information it contains. With the help of her nephew Dan Padgett and Geraldine Kryder Clemmons, the work was self-published. An important date was omitted, the publication date, which must have been 1981. Visiting the pages of that tome this past week led me to offer some of the stories it contains as my column. Wells writes about the early families in Holmes County, which became a county in 1848. The earliest census, 1850, shows that half of the countys population was not born in Florida. This area is a pioneer area because of its late settlement. Therefore, our ancestors lived and struggled like the pioneers of an earlier era. One family my aunt writes about was neighbors of her family where she grew up in Leonia. The Ambrose Gillman and Amanda Ellis Gilman family was one of four families who moved in to the area before it was called Leonia. The Pagets, the Morrisons, the Broxsons and possibly the Greens were the other families. Mrs. Gillman was a midwife who became a great asset to the community. The nearest doctors were in Geneva, Ala., or DeFuniak Springs, a days journey there and back by ox and cart. Horseback was a little faster. Paget (Padgett)-Wells shares some of the Gillmans family stories as she was friends with their daughter, Hortie, and spent time in the home. Grandma Gillman told about moving to Florida from Alabama in an oxcart. For those of you who dont know what that is, it is a crude homemade wooden body attached to two heavy wheels pulled by an ox, or sometimes two. (The plural of ox is oxen.) Mrs. Gillman told of cutting a switch from a sycamore tree to encourage the ox to move along. When they reached their land claim, she stuck the switch in the ground, and it took root, grew and became a tree under which her grandchildren played in its shade. Another story is that they found an empty log cabin near their land and decided to move into it until they could erect their own. In a few days, they were frightened by a stranger who approached with a pointed gun. Peace? they asked. Peace, he replied. They learned that the building they were occupying was the school house. He made them welcome when Mrs. Gillman promised to keep it clean until the threemonth school term was scheduled to begin. She also told about the hard times after the Civil War. Ambrose Ira Gillman was a veteran of that war, on the souths side, I assume, since he was born in Georgia, though his family migrated from Connecticut. One couple had one coat between them. They took turns coming to church in Leonia; one would wear the coat on Saturday and the other on Sunday. Rural churches were served by a preacher who only came once a month, so services were held on Saturday and Sunday. The family would send 8-year-old Hortie to the Padgett familys grist mill on horseback with the shelled corn in a cloth bag slung across the horses back. She and Aunt Annie would play while the corn was being ground into meal. Then, Charles Padgett would divide the meal, placing the Gillmans portion back in the cotton sack. He would balance the bag on the horses back, lift Hortie into the saddle, and she would ride the mile back home with the familys supply of meal. Anna Padgett and Hortie Gillman attended Leonia School together. After schools had progressed to 4-month terms, some districts would stagger their terms so students could attend two different schools, thus getting in two terms in one year. The families allowed Anna and Hortie to walk the three or four miles to Belin School so they got to go to school eight months instead of four. Sometimes Hortie rode her horse. One day, its back was rubbed raw from the saddles slipping. Resourceful Hortie went to the outdoor toilet, took off her slip and placed it under the saddle before the ride home. She was 12 years old by then. Ambrose and Amanda Gillman are buried in Leonia Cemetery. She lived to be 96 and is probably the oldest person buried in that cemetery. Many other family stories are contained in the Heart and History of Holmes County by Anna Padgett Wells (out of print). Perhaps I will share some more of them in future Happy Corner columns. Holmes County years ago ... REFLECTIONS www.bonifaynow.com Page A12 Wednesday, August 20, 2014 50 years ago, 1964 ESTO MAN TO GET DOCTORS DEGREE: Max T. McKinney, son of Mrs. Minnie L. McKinney and the late Malcom D. McKinney of Esto, will receive the Doctorate of Education degree during graduation exercises at Auburn University. COTTON GROWERS SHOULD DEFOLIATE COTTON FIELDS: Chemical defoliation of cotton will pay on some elds every year, but it should pay on nearly all of them. COUNTY YOUTH RECORDS GOOD AT DAIRY SHOW: Holmes County entries at the annual West Florida Dairy Show and Judging Contest at Chipley made good records, although there were not as many Holmes County participants as expected. 20 years ago, 1994 HOLMES PROJECT CONTRACT EXTENDED: The Bonifay City Council held a special meeting to discuss the Holmes Project, the promise of an equipment company that is due to be constructed in Holmes County. ONE MONTH MARK: $30 MILLION FUNDED TO DISASTER AREA: Thirty days after President Clinton declared 12 Florida Panhandle counties a disaster area, nearly $30 million in assistance is owing to the ood damaged area. COMMITTEE WORKS ON ACTION PLAN: The Holmes County Healthy Start Committee began long hours of working on a plan to help improve problem areas for infants and pregnant mothers. 10 years ago, 2004 ARRESTS FOR NARCOTIC SALES MOUNT: Holmes County deputies have been extremely busy attempting to track down and arrest 32 individuals wanted for the illegal sale and distribution of a controlled substance. HURRICANE RELIEF UNDER WAY: When Poly Wells heard that a truck leaving Panama City was taking relief supplies to help victims of Hurricane Charley, she wasted little time organizing assistance in Holmes County. ROCHER IS CROWNED: Braleigh Page Rocher was crowned Little Miss Baby 2004 at the Fun Day Pageant. 5 years ago, 2009 RUCKER CAPTURED AFTER SEVEN HOUR MAN HUNT: A Holmes County youth was taken after a long chase. Eric Rucker, who turned 18 while a fugitive, was released from custody of the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice. PDL SCHOOL SHOOTING UNDER INVESTIGATION: Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce is investigating the shooting out of four windows at Ponce de Leon High School. BOB HOPES TO IMPROVE STATUS: The Bank of Bonifay will be healthy, bank of cials said. The bank failed to meet federal standards during the second quarter meaning the bank is inadequately capitalized. Looking back via The Heart and History of Holmes County HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison Special to the Times-Advertiser Can anyone identify the gentleman in this photo, possibly at a county or city meeting? This photo was found at the Holmes County Times-Advertiser of ce. Do you recognize this man? If so please email wcnnews@ chipleypaper.com. Your answer will appear in a future edition. Chasing Shadows is a new feature we hope to run each week. Do you have an old photo from Holmes County youd like to have identi ed? Ask your neighbors for help by submitting it for publication. Send email submissions to wcnnews@ chipleypaper.com. Do you know this gentleman?

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Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, AUGUST 20 2014 B PAGE 1 Section EXTRA Candidates kick off primary with answers to your questions Mickey Locke County Commissioner District 2 Compiled by Cecilia Spears | The Extra Question 1: What would you perceive the most prominent issue facing the county is and how would you go about addressing it? The one thing I see that is an issue to the county is being fair to all residents. In my eyes theres not one person better than another. Im all about treating everyone fair and equally. Question 2: What experience are you bringing to respective position and how do you feel it will aide in your endeavors? I have served the public for more than 13 years with the Holmes County Ambulance Service. I have a passion for helping the residents of Holmes County. Being a construction business owner and handling budget and nances for the last 10 years, I feel like I have the means of being a great asset to Holmes County. Danny Powell County Commissioner District 4 Question 1: What would you perceive the most prominent issue facing the county is and how would you go about addressing it? Since beginning my campaign trail, I have had the opportunity to speak with numerous Holmes County residence. During my many conversations, it appears that one of the most pertinent concerns has been the maintenance and repairs to our roads. I envision and hope for much economic growth in our future and improving our overall infrastructure as a whole. In order to achieve this, structurally sound roads are necessary. This can be accomplished with proper management and group effort. If elected, I look forward to working with all entities to ensure this vision comes to pass. Question 2: What experience are you bringing to respective position and how do you feel it will aide in your endeavors? Eighteen years ago, I set out on an endeavor to build a business that would not only bring my family nancial security, but also; to create employment opportunities in Holmes County. Holding a position of Esto Town Council since 2004, has given me great insight on the importance of group effort to accomplish our goals. If elected, I intend to utilize the nancial and personnel management skills that I have obtained as an owner of a successful business and as mayor of Esto, to continue to better improve Holmes County. Earl Stafford County Commissioner District 4 Kenneth Williams County Commissioner District 4 Question 1: What would you perceive the most prominent issue facing the county is and how would you go about addressing it? The most prominent nancial issue facing the county is the increase in Medicaid cost share the State of Florida is pushing onto Holmes County and other counties. This is happening with most people not being aware of its signi cance. This increase is supposed to happen gradually through the year 2019 but it will be an increase of 94 percent, meaning our cost will increase about $250,000 per year. This will be devastating to our budget, because this will be another unfunded mandate from the state. Being aware of the effect that this will have on our county, I have already been in contact with our legislatures and potential legislatures about this issue trying to work on a plan to lessen the effect of this legislation on the county. I have also been in contact with the Small County Coalition and our lobbyist through the coalition trying to get support for relief by increasing the pressure from other small counties on their legislatures by seeing the effect that this is having on other small counties. Question 2: What experience are you bringing to respective position and how do you feel it will aide in your endeavors? I have 18 years of managing a multi -million dollar parts and service business and managing my own farming operation. Both of these experiences have been integral to how I manage my job as commissioner. I understand that you have to govern like a business and that you cant govern like Santa Claus. That every dollar that we spend is some taxpayers money. I try to keep that in mind to get the most value out of every tax dollar that we spend. This is important to me, because decisions made as a commissioner has a direct effect on you, the tax payer, my neighbors and all county residents, people that I see every day. By using this philosophy in governing you can always be assured that Im doing what I feel is best for Holmes County. Drew Kriser School Board member District 5 Question 1: What would you perceive the most prominent issue facing the county is and how would you go about addressing it? As I have traveled around the county speaking to Holmes County citizens, one of the most prominent issues I have sensed is a feeling of low morale in regards to education. We need inspiration, enthusiasm, and leadership at the top to help inspire a vision of what Holmes County education can be. This inspiration and vision will raise the morale of administration, faculty, staff, parents, community members and nally students. We can create a culture of learning that has a sense of meaning, purpose, and ful llment. This will improve everything our reading programs, test scores, athletics and extra-curricular involvement and overall student performance. Question 2: What experience are you bringing to respective position and how do you feel it will aide in your endeavors? Some of the qualities I will bring to the School Board to help provide vision and real solutions for our students include open and honest communication, high moral character, business experience, strong work ethic, service-oriented leadership, and a commitment to excellence. True success can only be built on correct principles. The students of Holmes County have great potential and deserve our best efforts. Sid Johnson School Board member District 5 Question 1: What would you perceive the most prominent issue facing the county is and how would you go about addressing it? One of the main issues facing Holmes County schools will be nances. We as a board will have to evaluate all the options at our disposal to ensure that we have the very best curriculum for our students. This will mean that all positions will have to be evaluated to ensure that they are necessary and are not cost prohibitive for the end results our students need. Question 2: What experience are you bringing to respective position and how do you feel it will aide in your endeavors? To begin with we have had to x our nancial problem in the past by doing what I stated above. I also own my own business and have to operate within my means to experience a pro t. This takes planning and projecting what my future needs will be in equipment, employees, and raw materials. I have been very successful in this endeavor. I feel I have been a very conscientious board member always keeping not only the tax payer in mind, but the employees and most important, the students, when making nancial decisions. While on the board, we have maintained our fund balance that the state requires. Alan Justice School Board member District 3 Question 1: What would you perceive the most prominent issue facing the county is and how would you go about addressing it? One of the most prominent issues within our school district is the need to equip our faculty, staff and students with the tools and resources necessary to perform at their highest level. All schools within our district have the potential to achieve A status in regard to their school grade. I plan to work with the superintendent, fellow board members, and administration to do what is necessary to propel our schools forward to reach this goal. I will research and seek out solutions to pressing issues currently being faced by our district. You will nd me in the community, as well as our schools, talking with residemts, students, and educators gathering information about what we are doing well and what we can improve upon. Because our children are our future, I will always put the best interest of our students at the forefront of all decisions I make. Question 2: What experience are you bringing to respective position and how do you feel it will aide in your endeavors? My experience in leadership, administration, and public service has prepared me for the position of school board member. I graduated from the University of Florida in 1996 with a bachelors degree of Health Science in physical therapy. My job is analytical in nature and being on the board requires constant analysis of how we are functioning as a school district. We must make decisions that will move our schools forward. I have been in an administrative position for more than 10 years overseeing the day-to-day operations of an outpatient rehabilitation facility. Since May 2012, I have been a co-owner in this same business and am responsible for personnel, budgeting, payroll and making sure our business remains a successful and viable force within our community. I currently serve on the board at my church, the Wallace Community College Physical Therapist Assistant Advisory Board and the Bethlehem Advisory Committee. (All of these positions have) given me the experience needed to make the tough decisions sometimes necessary to ensure success. On Aug. 26, I humbly ask for your vote and, if elected, look forward to serving as your next school board member for District 3. Question 1: What would you perceive the most prominent issue facing the county is and how would you go about addressing it? The current availability of jobs in Holmes County for our children and grandchildren who are our Future is the most prominent issue we are facing. As our children graduate from High School about three out 10 stay in Holmes County. By bringing jobs in to the County our children will be able to continue to live and work in Holmes County. I would work diligently with our Chamber of Commerce, Development Commission, all Municipalities, Fellow Board Members, and search for grants that would aid in bringing in new businesses to Holmes County. Question 2: What experience are you bringing to respective position and how do you feel it will aide in your endeavors? I have worked in the Public Utilities eld for the past 40 years and for the past 20 years I have owned and operated my own business. I have served as your County Commissioner and served six years as your chairman. The knowledge and experience that I have gained through my years of service in the private sector and as an elected of cial will be invaluable in making informative decisions, balancing of budgets, appreciation of employees, ethical work practices, and policies to continue to make Holmes County a better place for our childrens future.

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B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Extra Wednesday, August 20, 2014 So we ll Tra ctor Co ., Inc. 2841 Hwy 77 North, Pa nama City www .so we lltr actor co .com So we ll and Ku bota 40 Ye ars of Tr usted Pe rf or manc e We Tr ade for Any thin g That Don t Eat! Financing Arranged (W AC) Special to Extra The Chipola College District Board of Trustees recently elected Danny Ryals of Blountstown to serve as chair of the board for the 2014-15 year. Ryals is a Realtor from Calhoun County. Gina Stuart, a Realtor from Marianna was elected vice-chair. Ryals assumed the chair from Gary Clark, vice president of West Florida Electric Cooperative. Nine trustees appointed by the Florida governor represent Chipolas ve-county district on the board. Other trustees include: Jan Page, CEO of Community South Credit Union in Chipley; Tommy Lassmann of Marianna, a commercial banker with Cadence Bank; Hannah Causseaux of Bristol, former Director of Appointments in the Executive Ofce of the Governor; John Padgett of Marianna, a retired Jackson County Commissioner; and Dr. Leisa Bailey, a physician in Holmes County. Special to Extra Business name: Mitchs Collision Business contact information: 335 Alford Road Cottondale, FL 32431, Phone: 326-4104 Fax: 638-9290 Number of employees: 2 Owners or managers name: Mitch Gainer Business services provided: Collision Repair, Paint & Body work Years in business: 1 years How you got into this business: Since I was young, I always had an interest in cars and trucks. It progressed to working in body shops in high school. Then, I attended the Nashville Auto Diesel College after high school, and now, Ive turned my interest and hobby into a small business. What you like most about your business: Taking a wrecked or damaged car and making it look brand new. Name of person completing this form: Mitch Gainer The Washington County News wants to highlight our hometown businesses! Business Profile is a new weekly feature designed to inform readers about the local business community. To participate, complete the above information like Mitch Gainer did and email it to news@ chipleypaper.com. SPECIAL T O E XTRA Ryals presents a plaque to outgoing chair Gary Clark. Gina Stuart was elected vice-chair. Ryals elected chair of Chipola College Board Special to Extra Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative Member Relations Specialist Lindsay Peak recently completed the Center for Development of Security Excellences JPAS/JCAVS Virtual Training for Security Professionals. The eight-hour course provided an overview of the Joint Personnel Adjudication System and a detailed explanation of its subsystem, the Joint Clearance and Access Verication System, used extensively by Department of Defense Personnel Security Managers and contractor Facility Security Ofcers. The target audience for the course is DoD civilian, military and contractor personnel who support the DoD Personnel Security Program. GCEC works with the Department of Defense through a utilities privatization contract at Tyndall Air Force Base. To successfully complete the course, Lindsay had to pass a nal exam. The Center for Development of Security Excellence provides security education and training to DoD security professionals through formal classroom and distributed learning methodologies (i.e., computer-based, web-based and tele-training). Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative is part of the Touchstone Energy national alliance of local, consumer-owned electric cooperatives providing high standards of service to members large and small. GCEC employees serve about 20,000 meters and 2,600 miles of line in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Jackson, Walton and Washington counties and in the municipalities of Wewahitchka, Ebro, White City, Fountain and Southport. LINDSA Y PEAK Lindsay Peak earns certicationSPECIAL T O TH E E XTRA From left, Mitchs Collision owner Mitch Gainer and Head Painter David Collins pose in front of the building that will soon be their new location on Brickyard Road in Chipley.SPOTLIGHT ON BUSINESS: Mitchs Collision BUSINESS SCHOOLS

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Extra Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Wednesday, August 20, 2014 Braves vs. New York Mets WASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY The Krafty Katz Relay for Life team is holding fundraiser to see the Atlanta vs. New York Mets, Saturday, Sept. 20. Tickets are $100 and include the bus ride to and from Atlanta and seats to the game. The bus will leave Chipley at 12:30 p.m. and return at approximately 1 a.m. To ensure seat on the bus, please call Vicki Lamb at 326-3319 or 638-1483. Fruit basket giveaway CHIPLEY In honor of National Senior Citizens Day, Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014, Washington Rehabilitation and Nursing Center will be giving away fruit baskets to senior citizens in the community. To reserve a basket, please call 6384654, by Friday, Aug. 15, 2014. Washington County Farm Bureau annual membership meeting CHIPLEY The annual meeting of the Washington County Farm Bureau is scheduled for Thursday, Aug. 21, at the Washington County Agricultural Center. The evenings activities will begin at 6:30 p.m. with dinner followed by a brief business meeting. The evening will feature a program by Royce Reagan and The Original Artists. In order that adequate preparation can be made, members are encouraged to conrm their attendance by notifying the Farm Bureau Ofce, 638-1756, no later than noon Monday, Aug. 18. Concerned American Patriots MARIANNA Concerned American Patriots of Jackson County will hold their monthly meeting at 6 p.m., Monday, Aug. 18, at the Ag Center on Highway 90 West) in Marianna. The meeting focus will be Jackson County School Board Forum with all candidates for School Board participating. Whether your district is on the ballot this year or not, whether you have children in school or not, the decisions of this board affect you, for example taxes and future generations, you need to know where these candidates stand on current vital education issues. Everyone is invited; there is no admission charge, and free child care will be provided at the meeting. Book Sale VERNON The Sam Mitchell Public Library in Vernon will hold a book sale starting, Tuesday, Aug. 19. The sale will be held during regular library hours. Book prices will be; paperbacks $0.50; hardcover $1; VHS taps $1 and DVD $2. For more information call 638-1314. Girl Scouts parent information session BONIFAY Girl Scouts of the Florida Panhandle will host a parent information session and story time from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., Friday, Aug. 22, at the First United Methodist Church in Bonifay. To participate in Girl Scouts girls must be in Kindergarten through 12 grade. For more information call Clarissa Medina at 209-1568. Muskogee history seminar VERNON The Lower Muskogee Creek Tribe will host a Muskogee history seminar from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 23 at Holmes Valley Church in Vernon. Topics of the seminar will be how the Muskogee survived in this area after removal, aspects of daily living, genealogy and treaties of the Muskogee. There is a $20 charge that will cover all materials and lunch. The church is located at 3685 Reno Drive in Vernon. For more information call 229-762-3355. Tobacco cessation class BONIFAY The Holmes County Health Department will be holding a Tobacco Cessation Class, from 4-6 p.m., Monday, Aug. 25. The class provides free nicotine replacement patches, gum and lozenges. For more information call 547-8500. Childbirth Education Class BONIFAY The Florida Department of Health in Holmes County will be offering free Childbirth Education Classes, Aug. 19 and Aug. 26. Classes will be held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Healthy Start Annex, 402 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay. Brianne Harrison from Group B Strep International will be speaking at the class held on the 12th concerning awareness and prevention of Group B Strep disease in babies before birth through early infancy. For more information or to register for classes, please contact 547-8684 ext. 16 or 18. No person shall, on the grounds of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion or sex be excluded from participation in, be denied benets of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity receiving or beneting from federal nancial assistance. Sensory impaired or Limited-English Prociency patients will be provided with necessary aids and interpreters at no cost by calling Fran Amerson at 547-8500 ext. 234 Noma Community reunion NOMA The annual Noma Community reunion will be held Saturday, Aug. 30 in the Noma Town Hall building. The town hall will open at 10 a.m. and lunch will be served at noon. All past and present residents and their friends are invited to attend. People planning to attend are asked to bring a well lled basket of their favorite dishes, also bring tea if that is the beverage you prefer. Soft drinks, ice, cups, plates, and eating utensils will be furnished. For more information call Ludine Riddle at 974-8438. Baxley family reunion LEONIA The William Baxley annual family reunion will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 30 at Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church. Bring a well lled basket of food enjoy a day with family and friends. The church is located ve miles south of Leonia on Road 181. For more information call Dolly Polston at 547-2913 or Edna Hill at 547-1602. Gillman family reunion LEONIA The Gillman family reunion will be held Saturday, Aug. 30, in the fellowship hall at Leonia Baptist Church in Westville. Doors will open at 10 a.m. Bring a covered dish to share at lunch. Tea, ice, plates and utensils will be furnished. All family and friends are invited. The church is located at 1124 Gillman Road in Westville. For more information call 547-9268 or 956-2877. Finch family reunion SUNNY HILLS The Finch family reunion for descendants and friends of the late William Dallas Finch will be held Saturday, Aug. 30, at the Sunny Hills Community Center, located on Challenger Blvd.. Relatives and friends are asked to arrive no later than 11 a.m. Bring a well lled basket to feed your family and to share with friends. Lunch will be served at noon. For more information call Kenneth Finch at 6385307 or Ruth Creamer at 638-4310. Two-Toed Tom yard sale ESTO The Two-Toed Tom Festival will be holding a yard sale all day Saturday, Sept. 13 at the Esto Community Center. The cost to rent a table inside will be $10 and to rent a table outside the cost will be $5. For more information call Darlene at 263-3201. 2014 Graceville Harvest Festival beauty pageant GRACEVILLE The 34th Annual Harvest Festival Pageant will be held at 6 p.m., Friday, Sept. 12 and Saturday, Sept. 13, at the Graceville Civic Center. The entry fee is $60 with all proceeds going to the Graceville Harvest Day Celebration. Contestants may participate in photogenic for an additional $10. Photogenic entries will be limited to one photo per contestant. This is an open pageant. Applications can be picked up at Bush Paint and Supply, Graceville City Hall and at Forget Me Not Photography in Bonifay. The deadline to submit applications is Friday, Aug 29. Winners will reveive a large trophy, large crown and banner. Alternates and participants will receive trophies. Door admission is $5 per adult and applies to all individuals with the exception of contestants. Admission for children three and under will be free. For more information call Teresa Bush at 2634744 or 263-3072 or call Michelle Watkins at the City of Graceville at 263-3250. Diabetic education classes BONIFAY The Florida Department of Health will be holding Diabetic Education Classes from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 15, Wednesday, Sept. 22 and Wednesday, Sept. 29. The instructor will be LPN LeAnn Jones. Participants who attend all three classes will be eligible for a $25 gift card. For more information call 547-8500. 2014 soccer registration CHIPLEY The City of Chipley will be holding soccer registration from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 28 through Friday, Sept 12, at City Hall. Any child between the ages of four and 14 as of Oct. 1 will be eligible to participate. Teams will be picked on Sept. 15; only head coaches will be aloud in the team draft. Practice will begin Sept. 22, if a coach has not contacted you by Sept 19; call Guy Lane at 638-6348 or 658-2773. If payment is made before Aug. 29 the cost is $37, be fore Sept. 12 $42, any one paying after Sept. 12 the registration is $r47. All payments are to be cash, check or money order. 2014 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant BONIFAY Sponsored by the Holmes County High School Blue Pride Band Boosters will be held Saturday, Sept. 20 in the HCHS Auditorium. Boys and girls ages four to eight will be held at 4 p.m., girls age eight to 20 will be held at 6 p.m. It is an open pageant for girls age four to 20, boys age four to eight. Registration will be held at HCHS Auditorium, from 5 to 7 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 9, and from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., Saturday, Sept 13. Late registration will be held from 5 to 7 p.m., Tuesday, Sept 16. A $10 late fee will be added after Sept 13. Rehearsals will take place during the registrations, instructions on where to walk will be provided, lessons on how to pose or pageant skills not provided. Admission for pageant will be $5 for ages 10 and up and $2 for ages nine and under. If you have questions you may contact Anda Justice by email anda@ hchsbluepride.com, phone 850-766-7569. 20 14 FLORIDA HER ITAGE BOOK FESTIVAL & WRITERS CONF ERENCE Lea rn more at fh boo kfest .com SPE CIAL TH ANKS TO OUR SPONSO RS RE AD IN G WI DE OP EN Crossword PUZZLE SOLUTION ON PAGE B5 Raymond and Shelia Lewis are proud to announce their son, Will Lewis, a 2008 graduate of Bethlehem High School, has completed his training at the Florida Highway Patrol Academy in Tallahassee. While training he earned the classication of Master Trooper and has been assigned to Troop A. He his wife Skyla and daughter Alexis have moved to Pensacola, where he will begin work with the FHP later this month. S PECIAL TO THE T IMES -A DVERTISER LEWIS COMPLETES TRAINING WITH FHP Community EVENTS

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FAITH Wednesday, August 20, 2014 B Page 4 Section www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com If you would like your churchs faith events included in this list, please email the information to: news@chipleypaper.com. Florida Baptist dental bus BONIFAY The Florida Baptist Dental Bus will be at Holmes County at Bethel Baptist Church from Aug. 25 through Aug. 29. Registration will be from 8 a.m. to noon today, Aug. 16, at Bethel Baptist Churchs Family Ministry Center. The church is at 1349 Highway 173 in the Poplar Springs School Community. For more information, call 263-7727 or 209-1723 to speak with the Rev. Kent Lampp. Pastor appreciation day CHIPLEY Faith Covenant Fellowship Church will hold a pastor appreciation day at 11 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 17. The church will be honoring the pastor and his wife brother and sister Cloys Joiner. The guest speaker will be brother Troy West. Lunch will follow the service. The church is on Highway 277 in Chipley. Otter Creek homecoming PONCE DE LEON Otter Creek Methodist Church will host homecoming services Sunday, Aug. 17. The church is 4 miles north of Ponce de Leon off Highway 81. Fellowship rally BONIFAY Oak Grove Pentecostal Ministries will host the ninth Annual Fellowship Rally at 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 22. The guest speaker will be Pastor Don Shoots from Central Pentecostal Ministries. Special music will be provided by the Central PM Choir. Dinner will be served after the service. For more information, call 956-4339, 956-2322 or 658-2828. Red Hill UMC mission supper BONIFAY Red Hill United Methodist Church will host its Fourth Friday Mission Supper, Aug. 22, All Proceeds from this Supper will go to our Project Son Fund. Project Son is a mission that we have in church that helps those in need in our community with house repairs, plumbing and etc. The menu will be cat sh llets, smoked chicken, cheese grits, baked beans, coleslaw, hushpuppies and dessert. Serving will begin at 5 p.m. Dine in or carry out. Pleasant Ridge sing LEONIA Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church will host its annual Hes Still in the Fire sing Sunday, Aug. 24. Sunday School will be at 10 a.m. with worship following at 11 a.m. A pot luck lunch will follow in the fellowship hall. The sing will begin at 1:30 p.m., with music by Four Calvary. Pleasant Ridge is off Highway 181 between Prosperity and Leonia. For more information, call 956-4654. Gospel sing First Free Will Church of Bonifay will host a gospel sing at 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 30. Refreshments will follow the sing. The church is at the corner of Oklahoma and Kansas in Bonifay. East Mount Zion sh fry and cake auction GRACEVILLE East Mount Zion United Methodist Church will host its fth Saturday sing will be at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 30. The church is at 1590 County Highway 173, Graceville. For more information, call 263-4610. New Bethany fth Sunday sing VERNON New Bethany Baptist Church will hot a fth Sunday Sing Aug. 30 Lunch will be served in the fellowship hall at 12:30 p.m. For more information, call Brother Leon Jenkins at 773-3003. Dinner and a movie BETHLEHEM Bethlehem Baptist Church will host dinner and a movie at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 6. The movie that will be showing will be God is Not Dead. The church is located at 1572 Highway 177 in Bonifay. To RSVP, for tickets or for more information, call 326-2189. Awanas auction BONIFAY Bethlehem Baptist Churchs Awanas will be hosting an auction a 6 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 20. Steak sandwich dinner plates will be available beginning at 5 p.m. The church is at 1572 Highway 177 in Bonifay. For more information, call 768-2574. Fatih EVENTS A short history lesson History is a record of the past that re ects the consequences that unfolded as a result of the choices that were made because of the world views that were held. History re ects how people behaved as a result of how they thought. History doesnt just happen. Its made. People make choices based on the predictable results or consequences of those choices which will unfold in the future but will eventually become history. Our present state of affairs is the consequences of past choices and our future is determined by the choices we make today. Ideas control the world, and history is an account of how certain ideals or world views propagated by individuals controlled the direction the masses were headed in. Such individuals would foretell the consequences or the utopia that would come if people would base their choices on their ideology. Their success or failure would rest on their power of persuasion or some crisis that caused the masses to cast off previous held world views and embrace theirs. Its ones world view or if you will ones philosophy of life that determines ones thinking process and behavior. We usually study history to re ect on our mistakes and our triumphs and the choices that caused them. To say that our history is good or bad is to agree or disagree with the choices those living during that time made that made it good or bad. And actually to agree or disagree with what in uenced their choices. History is an account of the ongoing battle over the minds of the masses and records what world view at any given time held sway and how it in uenced education, politics, the arts, science, economics and every other area of the citizens life. We can learn from history. Hindsight is 20/20. We can look at the bad consequences those in the past suffered for their bad choices and to keep history from repeating itself not make those same choices. History repeats itself every time we in the present make the same choices those in the past made and we experience the same consequences they experienced. The consequences of choices never change, but we can change our choices and get different consequences. Consequences are the guaranteed built in judgments that follow our choices. Consequences are conceived the moment we choose but we meet up with them when theyre full grown. This is also called the law of sowing and reaping. History points out that America rose to greatness because of her Biblical world view. And as she turned from this Biblical world view and Christian thought form, she has gone into decline. America can make her choices based on this Biblical world view and receive Gods continued blessings or we can kick down the ladder by which we rose and suffer the evil thats sure to come. James H. Cagle was born in Chipley in 1956 and still has family and friends in the area. He is now residing in Lakeland, Ga. JAMES H. CAGLE NO WO PEN in Ne wL oca tion Wa shington Square Shopping Center Main Street in Chiple y Factor yO utlet 638-9421 Fl or ida Mi cr o lm &O f ce Supply Inc. 6594 S. US 231, Dothan, AL 36301 (334) 677-3318 800-886-3318 Obar's Insurance Agency An Independen tI nsurance Agenc y Auto, Hom e, Fa rm, Com merc ial And Bonds Mobi le Homes ,L ife, Health Arthur P. W. Obar Jr AG ENT PO Box 594 5390 CLIFF ST Grace ville, FL 3244 0-059 4 Obar_i ns@bell sout h.net (850) 263-448 3V oice (850) 263-4 484 Fa x 1396 Jackson Av e (850) 638-1805 Home Folks serving Home Folks BR OW N FU NE RA LH OM E 10 68 Ma in St ., Ch ip le y, FL 32 428 Ph on e: 63 840 10 Do nald Br own -L FD ,O wn er 1126398 MARIANNA TO YO TA Consumer & Commer cial Power Equipment Vi sit our website at www .lanesoutdoor .com 901 Hwy 277, Chipley 850.638.436 4 (850) 638-8376 Stephen B. Register ,C PA 15 52 Bric ky ard Ro ad Chipley ,F L 638-4251 PE RS ON AL TO UC H CA RC AR E "W ET AK EP RI DE IN CA RI NG FO RY OU RC AR 10 6W .E va ns ,B on if ay 54 7333 0 Fi rst Ba pi st Church Come as you are Fi rst B ap ist Church Come as you are Fi rst B ap ist Church Come as you are It s not wh at we do bu th ow we do it 98 2O ra ng eH il lR oad ,C hi pl ey 63 895 05 507 W. Hwy 90, Bonifay (850) 547 -1 877 13 57 Bric ky ard Rd., Chipley (850) 638-0424 HA VE YOUR UNIT SER VICED TO SA VE ON YOUR ELECTRIC BILL (850) 263-2823 1075 N. HWY .7 9 BON IF AY ,F L P&P PROGRES SIVE REAL TY "See us for all your Realty needs" 850-638-8220 1046 Main St. |C hipley OB ER T FU NER AL HOM E (850) 547-2163 219 N. 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Extra Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Wednesday, August 20, 2014 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! W ith your paid obituar y family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos fr ee of charge. Find Obituaries. Shar e Condolences. In par tnership with Find obituaries, shar e condolences and celebrate a life at or William George Billy Tanner of Tanner Lane, Westville, passed away Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014. He was 40. Billy was born July 10, 1974, in Walton County. He enjoyed shing and spending time outdoors, as well as watching wrestling on television. He was a member of New Hope Baptist Church, but occasionally attended Hickory Hill. He was preceded in death by his father, Harold Clinton Tanner. Survivors include his mother, Meta Jean Tanner of Westville; ve sisters, Carolyn (Ron) Bell of Montgomery Ala., Linda (John) Shaw, Crestview, Pamela (Larry) Hall of Eclectic, Ala., Cynthia (Randall) Wilson of Westville and Crystal (Brad) Smith of Montgomery, Ala.; two brothers, James (Barbara) Tanner of Santa Rosa Beach, and Fred Tanner of Memphis, Tenn.; special friend, Liz Cooper of Caryville and several special nieces, nephews, other extended family and friends. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 14, in the New Hope Baptist Church with the Rev. John Hatcher and the Rev. Clay Hatcher ofciating. Burial followed in the church cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home and Crematory of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the church beginning at 10 a.m. and continued until service time. The family asked that owers be omitted and memorial contributions be made to Covenant Hospice in Marianna, or New Hope Baptist Church Youth Department. Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva, 334-684-9999, is in charge of arrangements. Express your condolences in our guest book at www. sorrellsfuneralhomes. com. William G. Tanner WILLIAM G. TANNER Michael Joseph Covington of Hollywood passed away Tuesday night Aug.12, 2014 at Bay Medical Center in Panama City. Michael was born in Jacksonville, Nov. 9, 1957, and He is survived by his parents, William and Diana Covington of Graceville; daughters, Michelle (Mike) Conaway of Gilbert, Ariz., and Melissa Covington of Johnston City, Ill.; three grandchildren, Paige, Riley and Liam; three brothers, Bill (Susan) Covington of Lynn Haven, David (Kristie) Covington of Rehobeth, Ala., and Scott (Elaine) Covington of Dothan Ala.; one sister, Debbie (Emory) Latta of Dothan Ala., and many nieces, nephews and cousins. Funeral services were held at 4 p.m., Friday, Aug. 15, 2014 at Poplar Springs Baptist Church in Graceville, with Pastor Tim Steele of Faith Journey Baptist Church ofciating. Burial followed with James & Lipford Funeral home in Graceville directing. Expressions of sympathy can be made at www.jamesandlipford.com.Michael J. Covington Dorothy Lucille Martin, age 87, passed form this life Thursday Aug. 14, 2014 at Northwest Florida Community Hospital. She was born in Chipley, on April 7, 1927 to Sterling and Katie (Pippin) Carter. Mrs. Martin worked in the cafeteria for the Washington County Schools, was a member of the First Freewill Baptist Church in Chipley and was a lifelong resident of Chipley. Lucille was survived by her son, Gene Martin and wife Ruth of Chipley; one daughter, Janet Spence and husband Jerry of Dothan, Ala.; grandchildren, Garett Martin and wife Blair, Tonia Hall, Valerie McClain and husband Jon, Greta Bruner and husband Ronnie, Shannon Andeisch, Kelley Betliskey, Whitney Nelson and Justin Smith; 15 great grandchildren and two great great grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 16, 2014 at Brown Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Mike Orr and the Rev. Shane Martin ofciating. Visitation was held one hour prior to service. Interment followed in the Glenwood Cemetery. Brown Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh.netDorothy L. Martin Joyce Smith Finch Dunphy, 76 of the Poplar Springs Community, Graceville, passed away Friday, Aug. 15, 2014 at Southeast Alabama Medical Center. Ms. Joyce was born in Holmes County, on June 5, 1938 to the late Eugene H. and Agnes Richardson Smith. She was a 1956 graduate of Poplar Springs High School where she played basketball in her high school years and was an avid Atomics fan. Ms. Joyce was retired with the Florida Department of Commerce and an active member of Bethel Baptist Church. Predeceased by her husband Ken Dunphy, daughter Felicia Kenyon, two brothers Jack Smith, James Marsh Smith. Survived by two sons, Paul Finch and Ben Finch (Jeanette), Graceville; daughter, Lisa Bryson, Sebring; two brothers, Jo Mack Smith(Robbie), Bonifay and Jerry Smith(Karen), Graceville; seven grandchildren, Billy Kenyon, Brian Kenyon, Kelly Finch Parrish(Scott), Chase Finch, Mariah Finch, Sierra Finch and Ayla Mowry; four great grandchildren, Billy Kenyon, III, Caleb Kenyon, Ethan Grace Zelner and William Liam Parrish and several nieces and nephews. Funeral service was held at 11 a.m., Monday, Aug.18, 2014, at Bethel Baptist Church with the Rev. Kent Lampp ofciating. Burial followed in church cemetery with James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family received friends at the funeral home Sunday, from 3 to 4 p.m. For those wishing memorials can be made in her memory to Poplar Springs High School Athletics 3720 Tillman Road Graceville, FL 32440. Expressions of sympathy can be made at www. jamesandlipford.com. Joyce S. Dunphy SUBMISSIONS Send obituaries to news@ chipleypaper.com People ask me questions all the time. Some of those questions I can answer, some I cannot answer and some I will not answer. I wish people would ask me questions I could answer and look good about it. However, it never happens. The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage asks me questions all the time. After 43 years, I have nally gured out her questions. Most usually require one word answers. For somebody like me who spends most of his time preaching and writing, boiling an answer down to one word is something that is quite difcult. The one great thing about my wife is, when she asks me a question, she does not really want an answer, because she already has the answer. I do not know how wives have developed this kind of intellectual mystique. I have just never had the opportunity to ask her. This probably would be the main question I would ask. Sometimes, living in the dark is okay. Some people ask questions to get information. Some people ask questions to show off how smart they think they are, which, merely proves how dumb they actually are. Do not let them know that I said this, or they may have some questions for me. Then some people ask questions in order to trick you. Questions are important. Sometimes my friends (both of them), will ask me a question. The primary question is simply, What is a shooy pie? This is the kind of question I like and furthermore, I like to answer it. The trouble with a question like this is, where do you begin? With something as marvelous and wonderful as a shooy pie, where do you start to explain all of its delicacies? To begin with, a shooy pie is a slice of heaven. I am quite sure that in heaven at supper time there will be shooy pies aplenty. I know quite a few Mennonite and Amish women who, I am quite sure, are in heaven, and if they are, they will insist on making shooy pie. I do not know if it is in their genes, but I do know it is in their aprons. If anybody has ever had the wonderful opportunity of eating a shooy pie, they will know exactly what I am talking about. It is hard to explain the experience without your mouth watering so much you need a towel. To start with, the bottom of a shooy pie is sheer liquid pleasure. Depending on the woman preparing the pie will depend on how thick that bottom layer is. Once that is laid down, the next layer is a delightful mix of our and sugar and other secret ingredients. That layer seems to oat on top of that liquid pleasure. On the top is a crust of munchable delight that has absolutely no equal. Then, to set it off, there is a circular crust that holds all of this together in one magnicent pie. I am not a baker so I do not know how they put all of this together and then put it in the oven and then bring out this awesome, classical dessert known as shooy pie. Some things are so wonderful that they cannot be fully explained. Personally, I would rather not spend much time trying to answer the question, What is a shooy pie? I would preferably utilize that time delving into eating a shooy pie. That is my greatest delight. Recently I indulged this marvelous delight in the center of shooy pie country. Everybody knows that to be Lancaster, Pennsylvania. A conference was going to be there that I wanted to go to but I had many things that prohibited me from going there. All I could think about was the wonderful shooy pies I could indulge in if I went to that conference. So, I worked hard to eliminate everything that would keep me from going there. Some things are, indeed, worth ghting for. About a month before the conference was to start, I had dealt with the nal obstruction and was able to make plans to go. All I could think about was, Shooy pie, here I come. As soon as my ight landed, I hurried off to the nearest restaurant and indulged in my rst slice of shooy pie for the weekend. I am happy to say it was not my last piece. At the conference, they had breakfast, lunch and dinner and for dessert, even at breakfast, was shooy pie. I cannot tell you how many pieces of shooy pie I ate, for the simple reason I cannot count that high without taking off my shoes. A slice of shooy pie highlighted every meal. I am happy to say that they had more shooy pie at this conference than I could consume although I did my very best, I assure you. I know that life sometimes has its hard paths and things can become very difcult. That is why we need to have something to really look forward to. The writer to the Hebrews understood this when he wrote, Looking unto Jesus the author and nisher of our faith; who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God (Hebrews 12:2). Celebrating the delicacies of life enable us to survive the adversities of life. The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@ att.net or website www. jamessnyderministries. com. It Was a Shooy Pie Celebration Weekend DR. JAMES L. SNYDER Out to Pastor ObituariesWAU S AU L IBRARY Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedHOLME S COUN T Y L IBRARY ( B ONIFAY) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: ClosedWA SH IN GT ON COUN T Y L IBRARY (C H IPLEY) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedVERNON L IBRARY Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedSUNNY HILL S L IBRARY Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Library hours Looking unto Jesus the author and nisher of our faith; who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God. Hebrews 12:2

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Local B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, August 20, 2014 Staff Report This page features photos, submitted by our staff, readers and guests, taken in and around Holmes and Washington counties. We hope to make this a weekly feature, so if you have a photo taken locally that highlights life as we know it in our community, please share. Submit photos, along with a brief description and location taken, to Ckent@chipleypaper.com. No time to email? Text it to Carol Kent at 703-9487. SUBMITTED BY JESSI COLLINS From left, David Collins and Mitch Gainer take a break after a busy day at Mitchs Collision. CECILIA SPEARS | The Extra Local venders Diana and Donald Yeager were seen near Veterans Memorial Park in Bonifay with their peanut cart for their mobile business, Hot Nutz. The couple can be seen around often in the area. SUBMITTED BY JESSI COLLINS Cousins Maverick Collins and Myia Miller swing together at their Nana & Pas house in Ponce De Leon. CECILIA SPEARS | The Extra This hot rod machine was seen in downtown Bonifay near Sons Tires. CECILIA SPEARS | The Extra A glance of the corner of State Roads 90 and 79 in Bonifay is a sure way to tell if its election time. Political signs can always be seen around that area. CECILIA SPEARS | The Extra This lovely walkway can be seen from Waukesha Street in Downtown Bonifay near the Piggly Wiggly. This walkway always has elaborate foliage throughout the year. GET YOUR PHOTOS PUBLISHED To submit your photos, send them to ckent@chipleypaper.com or share them on our Facebook page.

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Wednesday, August 20, 2014 Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 8-3497 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2012CA000362CAAXMX 2012-3 SFR VENTURE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. TRAVIS FRENCH A/K/A TRAVIS E. FRENCH, SHERRY FRENCH, MARGARET FRENCH, MILLARD FRENCH, TRI COUNTY GAS SERVICE, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed September 30, 2013 entered in Civil Case No. 2012CA000362CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Bonifay, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Holmes County Courthouse, 201 North Oklahoma, Bonifay, FL. 32425 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 11 day of September, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: All of the West of NW of NE of Section 16, Township 5 North, Range 16 West, lying west of county graded road. Lying and being in Holmes County, Florida. Less 2.5 acres in NW corner of NW of NE of Section 16, Township 5 North, Range 16 West; Being more particularly described as follows: (O.R. Book 263, Page 283) Begin at the NW Corner of the NW of the NE of Section 16, Township 5 North, Range 16 West and run East 435 feet; thence South 250 feet; thence West 435 feet; thence North 250 feet to P.O.B. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 5 day of August, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk Publish in: Holmes County Times-Advertiser Invoice: MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 110 SE 6TH STREET FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301 (407) 674-1850 PLEASE FAX A COPY OF THE FIRST INSERTION TO FAX (321) 248-0420 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 (fax 850-747-5717) at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. SERVICE LIST FOR NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE, CASE 2012CA000362CAAXMX MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC 110 SE 6TH STREET FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301 (407) 674-1850 Tri County Gas Service 415 S. Waukesha St Bonifay, FL 32425 Dennis L. Pratt, Esquire(Counsel of Travis French a/k/a Travis E. French ) 12276 San Jose Boulevard, Suite 429 Jacksonville, FL 32223 dennis@dennislpratt.com Dennis L. Pratt, Esquire(Counsel of Margaret French ) 12276 San Jose Boulevard, Suite 429 Jacksonville, FL 32223 dennis@dennislpratt.com Dennis L. Pratt, Esquire(Counsel of Millard French ) 12276 San Jose Boulevard, Suite 429 Jacksonville, FL 32223 dennis@dennislpratt.com Dennis L. Pratt, Esquire(Counsel of Sherry French ) 12276 San Jose Boulevard, Suite 429 Jacksonville, FL 32223 dennis@dennislpratt.com Unknown Tenant in Possession 1 2012 Pollard Harris Rd Bonifay, FL 32425 Unknown Tenant in Possession 2 2012 Pollard Harris Rd Bonifay, FL 32425 August 13, 20, 2014 8-3489 IN THE CIRCUIT COUNTY FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 14-164 CA GAYLE S. EVANS and JACKIE L. EVANS, Plaintis, HOSEA PEAK, JR. and others, Defendants TO: HOSEA PEAK, JR. (d. May 8, 2008) 1399 Peak Rd Westville FL 32464 JASON KYLE JOHNSON 5905 Highway 27 Lot 10 Enterprise AL 36630-6251 LEE NICOLE MILLER 5905 Highway 27 Lot 10 Enterprise AL 36630-6251 if alive, and if dead, their unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, or other persons claiming by, though, under, or against them, or any of them, and all unknown persons, if alive, and if dead or not known to be dead or alive, their unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees or other persons claiming by, through, under, or against the unknown persons YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to real property on the following property in Holmes County, Florida: ALL THAT PART OF NW OF NE & NE OF NE LYING E OF GR CO RD LESS 13 AC DES IN OR 45/262 LESS COMMENCE WHERE THE E R/W LINE OF A GRADED PUBLIC RD (PEAK RD) INTERSECTS THE N LINE OF THE NE OF SEC15, T6N, R17W, TH GO S 640FT SE ON THE E R/W LINE OF THE PUBLIC GRADED RD (PEAK RD) TOA POB, TH DUE E A DISTANCE OF 375 FT, TH N 120 FT TH DUE W TO THE E R/W LINE OF SAID GRADED PEAK RD A DISTANCE OF 380FT M/L, TH SE ALONG SAID R/W LINE OF PUBLIC GRADED RD-PEAK RD-120 FT TO POB WD-OR 316/469 WD-OR 406/585 WD-OR317/520 LESS ALL THAT PART OF THE NW OF NE AND THE NORTH 819 FEET OF THE NE , OF NE OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST LYING EAST OF GRADED COUNTY ROAD, LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING PARCELS: (1) TWO ACRES, IN THE NW CORNER OF THE NE OF NE WHICH RUNS 70 YARDS NORTH AND SOUTH AND 140 YARDS EAST AND WEST. (2) BEGIN AT THE NW COMER (Sic) OF THE NE OF NE OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, THENCE EAST 140 YARDS ALONG SAID FORTY LINE TO A POINT, SAID POINT BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE EAST 140 YARDS; THENCE SOUTH 70 YARDS; THENCE WEST 140 YARDS; THENCE NORTH 70 YARDS MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PROPERTY CONTAINING 2.0 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, (3) COMMENCE WHERE THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A GRADED PUBLIC ROAD (PEAK ROAD) INTERSECTS THE NORTH LINE OF THE NE OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST THENCE GO SOUTH 640 FEET SOUTHEAST ON THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF THE PUBLIC GRADED ROAD (PEAK ROAD) TO A POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE DUE EAST A DISTANCE OF 375 FEET, THENCE NORTH 120 FEET, THENCE DUE WEST TO THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID GRADED ROAD (PEAK ROAD) A DISTANCE OF 380 FEET M/L, THENCE SE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF PUBLIC GRADED ROAD (PEAK ROAD) 120 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING. ALL LYING AND BEING IN HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. (4) BEGIN AT THE NW CORNER OF THE NE OF NE OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, THENCE SOUTH 70 YARDS, MORE OR LESS, ALONG THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF PEAK ROAD TO A POINT, SAID POINT BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE PARCEL HEREIN DESCRIBED; THENCE EAST 140 YARDS; THENCE SOUTH 70 YARDS; THENCE WEST 140 YARDS, MORE OR LESS, TO THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF PEAK ROAD; THENCE NORTH 70 YARDS, MORE OR LESS, ALONG THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY-LINE OF PEAL (Sic)< (Sic) ROAD TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; SAID PROPERTY CONTAINING 2 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, WD OR430/728 And being further described as: Begin at the NW corner of the NE of NE of Section 15, Township 6 North, Range 17 West; thence East 140 yards along said forty line to a point; said point being the Point of Beginning; thence East 140 yards; thence South 70 yards; thence West 140 yards; thence North 70 yards, more or less to the Point of Beginning. Said property containing 2.0 acres, more or less. AND Begin at the NW corner of the NE of NE of Section 15, Township 6 North, Range 17 West, thence South 70 yards, more or less, along the East right-of-way line of Peak Road to a point, said point being the Point of Beginning of the parcel herein described; thence East 140 yards; thence South 70 yards; thence West 140 yards, more or less, to the East right-of-way line of Peak Road; thence North 70 yards, more or less, along the East right-of-way line of Peak Road to the Point of Beginning; said property containing 2 acres, more or less (pewII/thw) has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy H. Wells, Plaintiffs’ attorney, whose address is Post Office Box 155, Bonifay, Florida 32425-0155 on or before September 10, 2014 and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs’ attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint of petition. Dated July 25, 2014. KYLE HUDSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Diane Eaton As Deputy Clerk July 30 and August 6, 13, and 20 2014 DIRECTV 2 Year Savings Event! Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only DirecTV gives you 2 YEARS of savings and a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 1-800-481-2137 ADOPTloving married couple seeks to adopt, will be hands on mom and dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592, Adam Sklar #0150789 WE BUY ALL vehicles with or without title. Any condition, running or not, bank liens-no problem. We pay top dollar. 813-516-0847, 813-505-6939 FORECLOSURE NC Mountains. Handcrafted log cabin on 2 ac. w/stream. Lg loft open living area private setting needs work. Only $67,100 won’t last! 828-286-2981 GUN SHOW PENSACOLA FAIRGROUNDSAugust 23rd & 24th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL97098 to 56654

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B8| Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, August 20, 2014 5020248 1YEAR€12,000MILES PLATINUMWARRANTY 7YEAR€100,000MILES LIMITEDPOWERTRAINWARRANTY ZERO DOWN APPROVED CREDIT FRIENDLY STAFFNOGAMES€NOGIMMICKS€GREATDEALS COMPETITIVEINTERESTRATES€COMECHECKITOUT JorgeSays LetsDoBusinessWhere BusinessisDone!Ž 07TOYOTA YARISAutomatic,GreatMPGONLY $6,990!03TOYOTA AVALONXLSLeather,SunroofONLY $10,978!09TOYOTA YARISAutomatic,SpecialONLY $8,940! USEDTRANSPORTATIONSPECIALSOFTHEWEEKPLUSMORETOCHOOSEFROM!! 2961PENNAVENUE MARIANNA,FL 850-526-3511 1-800-423-8002 Remember,IfYouCan’tComeToUs,GiveUsACallandWE’LLDRIVEITTOYOU!www.mariannatoyota.com Allprices&dealerdiscountsafterdealercashexcludestax,tag,registration,title&includesdealerfee.2011ToyotaAVALONLTDEdition.........................Leather,Sunroof NOW$24,879 2013ToyotaTUNDRARegCabLWB............5.7ltV8,Automatic NOW$19,979 2011ToyotaTUNDRADblCabSR5....................V8,AlloyWheels SHARP! 2011ToyotaSIENNAVAN..................................RoomyFamilyVan NOW$19,949 2011ToyotaRAV4.................PowerPack,Automatic,Only24KMiles NOW$19,973 2011ToyotaCOROLLAS.................Automatic,AlloyWheels,Spoiler SUPERNICE! 2013ToyotaCOROLLALE.............................Automatic,PowerPack PRICEDTOGO! 2012ToyotaYARIS.......................................Automatic,Great“MPG” NOW$12,848 2011ToyotaTUNDRACrewMax............................................V8 DON’TMISSIT! 2010ToyotaCOROLLAS..........................Automatic,Sunroof,Alloys SHARP! 2011ToyotaCAMRYLE........................................Automatic,Alloys READYTOGO! 2012ToyotaCAMRYLE..................................LowMiles,Automatic SHARP! 2012ToyotaCAMRYSE.............................................Spoiler,Alloys SPECIALEDITION! 2013ToyotaTACOMAXCabPre-Runner............Only12KMiles WOW! 2013ToyotaTACOMADblCab4x4...TRDPackage,Only5KMiles WOW! was$29,473 was$24,979 was$25,747 was$22,948 was$15,995 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5$25.68 5x10$35.31 10x10$46.01 10x20$80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted C & C Bookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available Easy Care Lawn & Tractor Service TREE REMOVAL€ 850 527-6291 850 849-3825Lawn Care € Debris Removal Tractor and Bobcat Work Pressure CleaningLicensed & Insured Aordable Self Storage ALL SIZESOrange Hill Road Self Storage897 Orange Hill Rd Chipley850-263-2817 850-768-2912 BUSINESS GUIDE Mike MoodyNorth Florida’s Premier Metal Roong Fabrication & Installation Locally Owned & Operated WAUSAU, FLORIDA OFFICE CELL 638-8999 258-2923850 850Metal roong cut to length, custom trim, huge variety, delivery or installation available.Met al Roofs € Pole Barns € Decks € Aluminum Awning RoofsLicense #RC29027509 Advertise your service or business for as little as $10 a week.Ad runs in the Washington County News, Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser638-02125020705 € Top Compensation € Competitive & New In-DemandŽ Products€ Large Provider Network € Industry Leading Sales Support € State of the Art Lead Management System € Leads and Dialer System € Agent Support to place cases Join Florida Blues progressive agents successfully selling in the Medicare & Health Care Reform markets.Call 855-669-4625 or email resume to info@flhealthconnector.com.Qualified agents only. AGENCY SALES OPENING Florida Health Connector, Inc.16500 Panama City Beach Pkwy, Ste. A-1Panama City Beach, FL 32413If you are currently appointed to sell individual products with Florida Blue, please disregard this advertisement. Florida Blue is an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. 81806-0814/81387-0614 Agt 1131896 6519469Brand New 28X80 4 Bed Rm $59,900 28X60 3 Bed Rm $49,900 Set Up w/A/C, Steps & Skirt850.683.1777 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com Biggest Sale Ever All Homes 20% Off w/FREE Furniture Ends 8/1/2014 850.683.0035 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com6519470 6519471$0 Down To All Land Owners! Your Deed Is Your Down Payment 3 & 4 BR Homes Under $500 A Month. Call Today! 850.683.0035 6519472Brand New3 Bed 16X80 $39,900 3 Bed Double Wide $48,900 Furnished 850.683.0858 6519473I Buy Used Mobile Homes! Cash Paid Immediately.. 352.316.2434 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com BusinessVegetation Project ManagerMTN Resources Full-time position in Chipley, FL.Administer, develop, plan, and conduct a vegetation management program supporting FDOT. Education/Experience: H.S./GED + 6 yrs related exp. or A.S. degree in related technical field + 4 yrs related exp. or B.S./B.A. in Science field (Horticulture or Agronomy) or related field. Minimal exp required with directly related Bachelor’s degree. Salary experience based. EOE. Email or fax resume to: mnance@mtnresources.com 1-866-268-9253 WEB ID 34297387 K&LFarm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 U-PICK GRAPES $4.00/Gallon (850)547-2326 Follow signs on Hwy 177Ato 1837 Flowing Well Rd., Bonifay. U-Pick 7 days, daylight ATTENTION: VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! A cheaper alternative to high drugstore prices! 50 Pill Special -$99 FREE Shipping! 100 Percent Guaranteed. CALL NOW: 1-800943-8953 DISH TV RETAILER. Starting $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) Find Out How to SAVE Up to 50% Today! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL 1-800-605-0984 For Sale firewood 2 large fallen trees good for burning you cut and haul away small fee for wood. 547-5244. SAFE STEP WALK -In Tub Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 1-800605-6035 for $750 Off. EducationCoordinator for Preschool Home Instruction Program Needed .For more information, visit www.paec.org and click on Job Vacancies. Web ID#: 34297663 Text FL97663 to 56654 EducationHome Visitors for Preschool Instruction Program Needed .For more information, visit www.paec.org and click on Job Vacancies Web ID#: 34297665 Text FL97665 to 56654 Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Employment OpportunityThe Holmes County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for the position ofON CALL PARAMEDIC AND EMT .For application, log on www.holmescountyfl.organd click on job openings. For complete job description contact Greg Barton, EMS Director at the EMS Office, 949 East Hwy 90, Bonifay, FL 32425, or call (850) 547-4671. Please turn in an updated resume & application to the EMS Director’s office no later than 4:00 pm on September 5th, 2014. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer. Install/Maint/Repair The City of Chipley is accepting applications for aWater Crewman IMinimum Requirements: Limited knowledge of materials, methods, practices and equipment used in water facilities maintenance and repair activities. Education and Experience: High school diploma or possession of an acceptable equivalency diploma. Two (2) years of experience in heavy manual labor, and the use of hand and light power tools preferably in distribution systems. Must possess Class “B” CDL with air brakes endorsement. Job descriptions are available upon request on all positions. City participates in the Florida Retirement System (FRS). Mail or hand deliver application and/or resume to City Clerk, City of Chipley, 1442 Jackson Ave., P.O. Box 1007, Chipley, Florida 32428. Deadline: Open until filled. EOE/Drug Free Workplace. Web Id 34297911 Install/Maint/Repair The City of Chipley is accepting applications for aWater Crewman IIMinimum Requirements: Knowledge of materials, methods, practices and equipment used in water facilities maintenance and repair activities. Education and Experience: High school diploma or possession of an acceptable equivalency diploma. Two (2) years of experience in heavy manual labor, and the use of hand and light power tools preferably in distribution systems. Must possess Class “B” CDL. Job descriptions are available upon request on all positions. City participates in the Florida Retirement System (FRS). Mail or hand deliver application and/or resume to City Clerk, City of Chipley, 1442 Jackson Ave., P.O. Box 1007, Chipley, Florida 32428. Deadline: Open until filled. EOE/Drug Free Workplace. Web Id 34297912 “CAN YOU DIG IT”? Heavy Equipment Operator Training! 3 Wk Hands On Program. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. Lifetime Job Placement Assistance w/National Certifications. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866362-6497 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here-Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 DRIVERS -CDL-A. NEW REGIONAL OPPORTUNITIES. Great Home Time. Exp. Solos -40¢/mile. 1¢/mile increase each yr. NO CAP! Extra Pay for Hazmat! 888-928-6011 www.Drive4Total.com EXPERIENCED OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com EOE Commercial Building on Highway 79 Bonifay for rent. 290-465 SQFT, parking central air available immediately. Call/Text Cissy at 850-768-0320. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1 Bedroom Apartment, in Chipley, covenant location, no pets. 638-4640. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 3BR/2BA two-story house. References and Deposit required. Chipley, No Pets. 638-1918. 2BR/1BA Singlewide MH near Pate Pond. $300/mo plus deposit. Call 535-2657. Nice 2BR MH for rent in a great location in Chipley. Sorry no pets. 638-4640. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO up. Cottondale area. Includes Garbage/sewage/lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 Bonifay. 3BR/1BA MH $400.00/deposit, $450.00/rent. Large 3/2, $600.00/rent. 3/4 mile from elementary school on 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. Ceder Gardens Mobile Home Park, Bonifay, under new management. Now available 3BR/2BA homes beginning at $450.00/mo. No pets. Contact Dan at 850-583-6554. PCB: 3br/2ba Glades Subdivision, 2029 sqft, Open Floorplan, Updated Throughout, Enclosed Lanai & Pool $329,000 By Appt only. 850-814-0054 5 Acres on Hwy 77 3 miles South of Chipley. Has well, septic tank, 14x48 MH, front & back deck. 24x36 Pole Barn. 638-1858, 850-326-9109. Lot For Sale. 1.1 acre in Hidden Pine Subdivision by Falling Waters State Park. $10,000.00. Call 850-866-8536. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. White Diamond CTS Cadillac, 4DR, loaded. 25,000 miles. One owner, like new. 326-9109. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.