Holmes County times-advertiser

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Holmes County times-advertiser
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Newspaper
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English
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Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
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Bonifay, FL
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June 19, 2013
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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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UF00100549:00274


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C onnec t with us 24/7 G et br eak ing new s videos e xpanded st or ies phot o galler ies opinions and mor e ... @WCN_HC T bonifa yno w .c om 50 www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, JULY 2 2014 Volume 124, Number 12 For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM Phone: 850-547-9414 Website: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 INDEX Arrests ............................... A14 Opinion ................................ A4 Outdoors .............................. A9 Sports ................................ A13 Extra .................................... B1 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Reections ........................... A6 Classieds ......................... B7-8 IN BRIEF Holmes County candidate forum PITTMAN West Pittman Baptist Church will host a candidate forum at 6 p.m. Saturday, July 5, for all school board races and for the county commission District 2 seat. For more information, call the church ofce at 956-4100. Wausau Fourth of July parade WA U SA U Wausau will host its rst annual Fourth of July parade at 10 a.m. Friday, July 4. The parade will run right through the middle of historic Wausau. HCPL summer programs BONIFA Y The Holmes County Public Librarys summer programs are now underway and are at 10 a.m. every Friday through July 25. All programs are at the library with the exception of the program for July 25, which will be at the Holmes County Agricultural Center. Y outh summer workshop BONIFA Y Holmes County 4-H has a summer day workshop open for youth ages 8 and older this summer. 4-H MooLah Money Camp is scheduled from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, July 24, at the Holmes County Ag Center. The cost is $25 per youth. For more information about this event, call 547-1108, email ncrawson@u.edu or visit http://holmes.ifas.u.edu. imes T dvertiser A HOLMES COUNTY County approves gas tax ordinance By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFA Y Holmes County Board of County Commissioners approved the ordinance extending the county gas tax for another seven years af ter a public hearing held during the meeting of June 24. Theres limits on what we can tax and gas is one that we can, County Attorney Jeff Goodman said. Holmes County is not pursu ing and has no intention of pursuing the ELMS Nickel. We are estimating to collect anywhere between $55,000 and $60,000 to help with road and bridge and day to day operations. According to the Florida League of Cities, counties are allowed to levy a fuel tax of one to ve pennies, also called the ELMS Nickel, by a supermajority vote or referendum and then the revenues are distrib uted between cities and counties through an interlocal agreement or by a default formula. This default formula favors the county and as a result discourages any negotiation of an interlocal agreement between the county and the cities. The extended agreement pres ently used by the County since adoption in 2007 taxes a percentage of gas sold in the county allowing for the County to use a portion and the rest distributed among the cities See GAS TAX A2 Shaving to make a difference P HOTOS B Y D ENA M C CO R MIC K AND C ECI L IA S PEA R S From top left clockwise although she said she was nervous, Alexzandrea Allie Smith of Bonifay said she would have gone through the process of shaving her head all over again to help raise money for cancer research for children. Allie shows off her new cut proudly. Bonifay Fire Department helped raise money and shaved their heads in support of Allies efforts. 12-year-old Allie Smith raises money for cancer patient By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFA Y Even though 12year-old Alexzandrea Allie Smith is only in the seventh grade at Bonifay Middle School, she stood up to make a difference in the lives of children with cancer with her public declaration in front of hundreds on June 1. Smith said she was inspired to help a 6-year-old little girl named Carolyn Hendrix of Pensacola who was diagnosed with Ewing Sarcoma, a rare bone disease found in two of her ribs. I had been following her story on Facebook when I found out about the St. Baldricks Foundation Shave-A-Thon, Allie said. At rst, my mom said no, but then she agreed. St. Baldricks Foundation is a nonprot organization focusing exclusively on raising money and awareness for childhood cancer. Through her efforts, Smith raised $4,133, which included donations from the Bonifay Fire Department and Holmes County Emergency Management Services. To show their support, members of the Bonifay Fire Department even shaved their heads. It was amazing the amount of support we got from everyone, Allie said. I was See SHAVING A2 100 years of service By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFA Y The Holmes County UF/IFAS Extension agency is cel ebrating its 100th year of service. Extension Director Shep Eu banks is spreading the word about the notable milestone. The Smith-Lever Act of 1914 established the Cooperative Exten sion Service, a state-by-state na tional network of land-grant, public universities, whose educators ex tend research-based knowledge to the people, Eubanks said. I think Ive got the best job ever and I am in awe of the constant strength of our local farmers. These guys just never quit, they are the backbone of our country with less than two per cent of the U.S. being farming. A large majority of the land in Holmes County is agricultural with 6,000 acres of peanuts, 5,000 acres of cotton, 2,000 acres of soybeans, 1,000 acres of eld corn and just less than 100 acres of watermelon. The challenges were facing this Holmes County Extension agency celebrates centennial See 100 YEARS A2 Hooks in running for District 5 House seat From staff reports Walton County Realtor Jan Hooks is hoping to win the District 5 seat in the House of Representatives, which will be vacated this year by Rep. Marti Coley because of term limits. Hooks has lived in Northwest Florida for almost 35 years, starting a professional career as a bookkeeper and ofce manager in DeFuniak Springs. Since 1999, Jan has worked as a Realtor, and today is serving many of the counties in Northwest See HOOKS RUNNING A2 Holmes County celebrates God and country for Independence Day | B1

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Florida through her own real estate business. In the real estate industry, Jan was the 2013 President of the Emerald Coast Association of Realtors, a member of the Board of Directors of the National Association of Realtors and a Director of the Florida Realtors. Focusing much of her efforts on bettering her local community, Jan has volunteered in organizations like Habitat for Humanity, and chairs the Freeport Planning and Zoning Board. Jan lives in Walton County with her husband, John. They have been married for 33 years and have two children. Im a genuine conservative running to be State Representative because (voters) deserve someone in Tallahassee who is committed to serving them rst and always, not the special interests and party bosses, Hooks said. We need servant leaders who are dedicated to upholding the constitutional principles that have made our country great, not thwarting them and looking to personally gain off of their power. Hooks will face off with fellow Republican Brad Drake in the Republican primary. The winner of that election will face Libertarian Karen Schoen and Democrat Travis W. Pitts in November. spring is the fact that we had over 42 inches of rain in two months alone when the historic rainfall for Holmes County is 54 inches per year, Eubanks said. I cannot tell you how many emails I got from farmers who bogged down their tractors in elds that were just saturated from all the rain weve had. Livestock is another large portion of Holmes County with beef cattle numbers estimated at 8,900 brood cows and 19,700 total cows and calves; dairy cows number 1,224; value of beef cattle estimated at $5 million as of 2012; and value of milk produced is $4.4 million. Forages is another over looked commodity in Holm es County, stating that most of those visiting or driving through only see empty elds of grass when they more than likely are seeing forages. Eubanks said Holmes County has about 8,000 acres in forages planted for hay production with a farm gate value of $7.4 million. He added that of the 308,000 acres in Holmes County, 69 percent is for ested, giving 210,700 acres a value of standing timber es timated to be $123 million. Now you can say that it may not look it at times but Holmes County is a rich coun ty indeed, Eubanks said. So we ll Tra ctor Co ., Inc. 2841 Hwy 77 North, Pa nama City www .so we lltr actor co .com So we ll and Ku bota 40 Ye ars of Tr usted Pe rf or manc e We Tr ade for Any thin g That Don t Eat! Financing Arranged (W AC) NO HIDD EN CHA RGE S: It is our pol ic y that th e pa tien t an d an y othe r per so n re sp ons ib le fo r pa yment s has the ri gh t to re fus e to pa y, can cel pa yment or be re imb ur sed by pa yme nt or an y other ser vi ce ex aminat io n or tr eatm ent wh ich is perf or me d as a re sul t of and withi n 72 hou rs of re spo ndin g to the adv er tis eme nt fo r the fr ee dis co unt ed fe e or re duc ed fe e ser vice ex amina tion or tr eatm ent. "WE WELCOME NEW PA TIE NTS, CALL TODA Y FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PAT IENTS 59 AND OLDER This cer tif icat e is good fo r a complet e Medical Ey e Ex am with To dd Ro binson, M.D In Our Chiple y Of fi ce Boar d Ce rt if ied Ey e Ph ys ician and Sur geon. The ex am includes a pr es cr ip ti on fo r eye glasses and te sts fo r Glaucom a, Ca ta ra cts and other eye diseases FOR YO UR APPOINTMENT CA LL: 850-638-72 20 ELIGIBILI TY : U. S. Ci ti ze ns living in the Flor ida Pa nhand le 59 ye ar s and older not pr esentl y under our car e. Co upon Expir es: 715 -1 4 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: WC00 Sm ar t Le ns es SM Ca n pr oduce clear vision without glasses at all dist ances www .m ullise ye .com MULLIS EYE INSTITUTE Chiple y Of fi ce 16 91 Main St., St e. 1 Chi ple y FL 3242 8 850-638-7220 We ar e locat ed dir ectl y acr oss the par king lot fr om the Wa lmar t in Chiple y To dd Ro binson, M.D Boar d Ce rt if ied Ey e Ph ys ician and Ca ta ra ct Sur geon Local A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, July 2, 2014 GAS TAX from page A1 and towns throughout Hol mes County. In other business Board approved: Recommended appli cant for the position for Ad ministrator for the Holmes County Health Department, Holmes County resident and graduate, Karen Johnson. Consent Items: minutes for June 5 workshop, June 10 workshop and regular ses sion; Inter-Local Agreement for Town of Esto; Limited Right of Entry with Haith coat; Lease Agreement with Pine Log Volunteer Fire De partment; and EMPA and EMPG Grant for Emergency Management. EMS Director Greg Bartons request to use grant money to purchase a training mannequin in the amount of $5,175. Interlocal Agreement with the Town of Noma and the City of Bonifay. Merchant advertising for a new road foreman as his is retiring soon. The next scheduled meeting is set for 9 a.m. July 8. PHOTOS BY DENA MC COR M ICK AN D C ECILIA SP EARS 12-year-old Alexzandrea Allie Smith of Bonifay poses for her picture before she sits with more than 200 others to shave their heads in promotion of St. Baldricks Foundations Shave-A-Thon earlier this month. SHAVING from page A1 nervous, and the closer we got to Pensacola, the more nervous I became. Smith was one of more than 200 others to sit on the eld of the Pensacola Blue Wahoos before their game, with hundreds more lling the stands in support of this years Shave-A-Thon. Smith said knowing she wasnt alone on her date with the razor helped boost her courage. What Ive always told myself was that children with cancer dont have a choice about losing their hair, but I do, Allie said. I want to do all I can to help and I want to encourage others to do the same. On May 30, Carolyn Hendrixs family announced she was cancer free, all thanks to the help of St. Baldricks and the prayers and support of all those involved. For more information, visit www.stbaldricks.org. C ECILIA SP EARS | The Times-Advertiser Holmes County Board of County Commissioners approved Karen Johnson as administrator for the Holmes County Health Department during the June 24 meeting. 100 YEARS from page A1 Heres a brief history of the University of Floridas IF AS Extension Agency: 1906: Florida College of Agriculture moved to Gainesville to become part of the new University of Florida. 1908: Agnes Ellen Harris conducts a canning demonstration in Ocala, eventually leading to the creation of Extension Home Demonstration. 1909: J. J. Vernon, University of Florida Dean of Agriculture, organized the rst corn clubs for boys (a precursor to 4-H clubs) in Alachua, Bradford and Marion counties. 1912: First tomato clubs for girls (a precursor to 4-H clubs) organized through schools in Florida. 1914: U.S. Congress passes Smith-Lever Act, establishing national Agricultural Extension Service. 1921: North Florida Experiment Station Established at Quincy. Now named NFREC. 1922: First school lunches in Floridas rural schools organized by Extension Home Demonstration Agents in Orange and Osceola counties. 1924: 4-H name and clover emblem patented. 1926: Camp Timpoochee becomes the rst permanent 4-H camp in Florida. 1929: Great Depression begins. Florida Extension Home Demonstration agents respond by giving courses in canning, clothing repair and selling home-produced products. 1940: Extension begins work with USDAs Rural Electrication Administration to bring electrical power to Floridas farms and ranches. 1964: Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences established as the unifying administrative umbrella for UFs programs in agriculture, forestry and related programs, State Extension Home Demonstration headquarters move from Tallahassee to Gainesville, 4-H becomes co-educational. 1998: The Extension Data Information Source established as the online source for UF/IFAS Extensions research-based, up-to-date educational resources. 2004: Family Album Radio program debuts, covering such topics as nutrition, family relationships and communication. S HE P EU BANKS | Special to the Times-Advertiser Farm Demonstration Agent demonstrates the latest planters to local farmers. JAN HOOKS HOOKS RUNNING from page A1

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Ca nn ot be comb in ed with ot he r of fe rs Di sco un t of f MSR P. Tr ue 3 Op en Fit He ar in g Ai d Re gular ly SA LE Co mp le te ly wi re le ss ; sm all an d af fo rd ab le $1 95 0 $1 49 5 $1 000 OF F Bill Fletcher HAS: BC-HIS 24 Ye ars Experience Allen Barnes HAS: BC-HIS 24 Ye ars Expe rience MARIANNA 3025 6th STREET (850) 260-0436 We dnesdays & Fr idays CHIPLEY 1611 MAIN STREET #4 (850) 260-0436 Monday Fr iday CL OS ED 4T H OF JUL Y Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 Wednesday, July 2, 2014 County Commissioner District 2 MI C KEY LO C KEFI L E D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E F EB. 28: Feb. 1 Feb. 28: monetary contributions were $100; there were no expenditures reported for the reporting period; Contributions were from Mickey Locke $100. March 1 March 31: candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period: April 1 April 30: monetary contributions were $2,300: In-Kind contributions $13.70; expenditures were $2254.74; contributions were given by Mickey Locke $200, Mickey Locke $300 and Mickey Locke $1,800; In-kind contributions were Mickey Locke (petitions) $13.70: expenditures were for Supervisor of Elections (petitions)$13.70, Zan Byrd (donation) $200; Campground church (donation) $100, Bethlehem School (donation) $125, Ponce de Leon FCCLA (donation) $50 and Sims Signs (signs) $1,766.04. May 1 May 31: monetary contributions were $200: expenditures were $300; contributions were given by Mickey Locke $200; expenditures were for Bethlehem School (donation) $100, Holmes County All Stars (donation) $100 and Lance Groce (donation) $100. June 1 June 20: monetary contributions were $200: expenditures were $150; contributions were given by Mickey Locke $200; expenditures were for Holmes County Dixie Youth (donation) $50 and Bonifay City Hall (sign placement for the city) $100. MONTY MER C HANT FI L E D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E A PRI L 21: April 1 April 30: candidate led a notice of no activity. May 1 May 31: monetary contributions were $520: contributions were given by Monty Merchant $20 and Juanita Stanley $500: expenditures were $113.10; Supervisor of Elections (petition verication) $13.10 and City of Bonifay (placement of signs in city limits) $100. County Commissioner District 4 JOHN WAYNE CART W RIGHT FI L E D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E F EB. 24: Feb. 1 Feb. 28: candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. March 1 March 31: monetary contributions were $1,900: contributions were given by John Wayne Cartwright $1,900: expenditures were $15; Holmes County Supervisor of Election (petitions) $12.50 and Holmes County Supervisor of Elections (petitions) $2.50: April 1 April 30: led a report of no activity. May 1 May 31: monetary contributions were $0: expenditures were $866.70; Sims Signs (campaign cards and magnetic signs) $208.65 and Sims Signs (yard signs) $658.05. L. T S ONNY JOHNSON, JR. FI L E D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E JAN. 15: Jan. 1 Jan. 31 : Monetary Contributions were $2,000; Contributions given by: L.T. Sonny Johnson, Jr., $2,000; there were no expenditures for the reporting period. Feb. 1 Feb. 28: candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. March 1 March 31 : there were no monetary contributions for the reporting period; Expenditures were $1,615.10; Signs Etcetera, Inc. (sings) $1,515.10 and City of Bonifay (fee for placement of signs) $100: April 1 April 30: no monetary contributions were reported: In-Kind contributions $13; In-kind contributions were from Sonny Johnson (petitions) $13.00. May 1 May 31: candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. EDD IE P AU L FI L E D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E MAR C H 24: March 1 March 31 : candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period: April 1 April 30: monetary contributions were $250: expenditures were $14.90; contributions were given by Eddie O. Paul $250: expenditures were for Supervisor of Elections (petitions) $14.90. May 1 May 31: monetary contributions were $500: expenditures were $0; contributions were given by Mark S. Williams $200 and Edward O. Paul $300. June 1 June 23: monetary contributions were $300: expenditures were $874.19; contributions were given by Eddie Paul $300: expenditures were for Sims Signs (T-shirts, yard signs, door hangers) $874.19 and Eddie Paul (Close account) $160.93. DANNY P O W E LL FI L E D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E F EB. 6: Feb. 1 Feb. 28: candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. March 1 March 31: candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. April 1 April 30: monetary contributions were $2,069: expenditures were $706.20; contributions were given by Danny Powell $2,069: expenditures were for Sims Signs (signs) $706.20. May 1 May 31: monetary contributions were $0: expenditures were $113.10; expenditures were for Holmes County Supervisor of Elections (petitions) $13.10 and City of Bonifay (place signs in city limits) $100. E AR L S TAFFOR D FI L E D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E A PRI L 14: April 1 April 30: candidate led a report of no activity. May 1 May 31: monetary contributions were $100: In-Kind contributions $255; expenditures were $14.20; contributions were given by Earl Stafford $100; In-kind contributions were from Earl Stafford (political signs) $255: expenditures were for Supervisor of Elections (petition cards) $14.20. K ENNETH MARVE L WI LL IA M S FI L E D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E MAR C H 28: March 1 March 31: candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period: April 1 April 30: monetary contributions were $1,000: expenditures were $48.60; contributions were given by Kenneth Marvel Williams, $1,000: expenditures were for Supervisor of Elections (Petition) $13.60 and Doctors Memorial Foundation (tee box) $35. May 1 May 31: monetary contributions were $0: In-Kind contributions $1,000; expenditures were $539.77; In-kind contributions were from Kenneth Marvel Williams (old signs and posts) $1,000: expenditures were for Sims Signs (political signs) $439.77 and City of Bonifay (sign placement) $100. S chool B oard District 1 H R USSE LL ( R USTY) WI LL IA M S FI L E D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E A PRI L 11: April 1 April 30: candidate led a report of no activity. May 1 May 31: monetary contributions were $0: In-Kind contributions $15; expenditures were $0; In-kind contributions were from H. Russell Williams (payment for petition verication) $15. S chool B oard District 3 AL AN JUSTI C E FI L E D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E MAR C H 13: March 1 March 31: candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. April 1 April 30: led a report of no activity. May 1 May 31: monetary contributions were $630: In-Kind contributions $161.48; expenditures were $616.28; contributions were given by Alan Shane Justice $400, Alan Shane Justice $100, Alan Shane Justice $130; In-kind contributions were from Alan Shane Justice (petition fees) $14.50, Alan Shane Justice (lumber and screws for signs)$80.89, Alan Shane Justice (lumber for signs) $44.69 and Alan Shane Justice (solar spotlights for signs) $21.40: expenditures were for Sims signs (yard signs, large sign, set up for yard signs) $387.86, City of Bonifay (fee for placing signs within the city limits of Bonifay) $100 and Sims Signs (large signs) $128.40. JASON MOT L EY FIE LD INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E F EB. 4: Feb. 1 Feb. 28: candidate led a notication of no activity for reporting period. March 1 March 31: candidate led a notication of no activity for reporting period: April 1 April 30: monetary contributions were $400; no expenditures were reported; contributions were given by Jason Motley $400. May 1 May 31: monetary contributions were $490: expenditures were $800.10; contributions were given by Jason Motley $340 and Jason Motley $150: expenditures were for Supervisor of Elections (verify petition) $11.30, Smith Signs (signs) $688, Supervisor of Elections (verify petition) $.80 and City of Bonifay (political sign permit) $100. S chool B oard District 5 S I D NEY M. S I D JOHNSON FI L E D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E JAN. 24: Jan. 1 Jan. 31: candidate led a notication of no activity for reporting period. Feb. 1 Feb. 28: monetary contributions $3,000: monetary contributions are from: Sid Johnson $3,000; expenditures $1,332.15; Sims Signs (yard signs) $1,246.55 and Sims Signs (business cards) $85.60. March 1 March 31: monetary contributions for reporting period: expenditures $442.98; Sims Signs (T-shirts and Magnetic signs) $442.98. April 1 April 30: no monetary contributions reported: expenditures were $112.80; expenditures were for Campground church (donation) $100 and Supervisor of Elections (petitions) $12.80. DRE W ALL AN K RISER FI L E D INTENT TO SEEK OFFI C E JAN. 22: Jan. 1 Jan. 31: candidate led a notication of no activity for reporting period. Feb. 1 Feb. 28: In-Kind contributions were $4.91; there were no expenditures reported for the reporting period; In-kind contributions are from Drew Kriser (copies of candidate petitions) $4.91. March 1 March 31: monetary contributions $200; In-Kind contributions $8.99; there were no expenditures reported for the reporting period. Monetary contributions were from Tamra Kriser $200. In-Kind donations were from Drew Kriser (purchase of domain name) $8.99: April 1 April 30: monetary contributions were $700: In-Kind contributions $2,510.13; expenditures were $481.78; contributions were given by Tamra Kriser $200, Karen Strickland $500; In-kind contributions were from Tamra Kriser (T-shirts) $20, Drew Kriser (Advertising) $875, Drew Kriser (Supplies for booth at esto) $133, Drew Kriser (online domain) $8.99, Drew Kriser (create web page) $200, Drew Kriser (online promotion) $30, Drew Kriser (road signs) $532.50, Drew Kriser (road signs) $604.39 and Wynnton Melton (sign stands) $106.25: expenditures were for Brason English (T-shirts) $381.78 and the City of Bonifay (permit) $100. May 1 May 31: monetary contributions were $12.70: In-Kind contributions $960.92; expenditures were $159.16; contributions were given by Tamra Kriser $12.70; In-kind contributions were from Drew Kriser (banner buzz magnetic signs) $165.03, Drew Kriser (signs unlimited bumper stickers) $75.22 and Drew Kriser (i2imedia tri-folds and postcards) $720.66; expenditures were for Condently Creative designs (embroidered polo shirts) $57.76 and Branson English (T-shirts) $101.38. 2014 Holmes County CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS

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OPINI O N www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, July 2, 2014 A Page 4 Section The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County T imes-A dvertiser P. O Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USP S 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $13.30; 26-weeks: $19.90; 52 weeks: $32.00 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $17.70; 26 weeks: 26.50; 52 weeks: $43.00 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bareeld, Publisher Carol Kent, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bareeld: nbareeld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPOR TS OR OPINION news@ bonifaynow.com CLASSI F IED & C IR C ULA T IO N clamb @chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 EDITOR Carol: ckent@ chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 ADVER TISING Bill Allard: wallard@ chipleypaper.com 850-547-9414 B E MI N D F UL O F OUR C OU NT YS EDU C A T IO N N EEDS A T ELE CT IO N T IME Dear Editor, In terms of Charles Smiths recent letter emphasizing the importance of educational quality resulting from a well taught comprehensive curriculum, I fully agree. Regardless of the curriculums content, however, the act of learning and wanting to learn depends largely on the student. One might argue that inspiring a students desire to learn is a teachers fundamental role. The ability of a teacher to inspire relates to several questions and intimated that through the act of inspiring, a teacher may have the ability to teach beyond the realm of his or her knowledge. Coincidentally, as a scientist and inventor whose father was an exceptionally and technically talented person, Mr. Smith may be the product of at home and teacher lead inspiration. Holmes County has produced many such outstanding individuals who are successful farmers in a very challenged occupation. Some are attorneys; some are architects, specialized physicians, are contractors, social scientists, pharmacists, teachers, bankers, chemists, air trafc controllers, insurance agents, realtors, administrators, managers, housewives, nurses and caregivers. Some are enlisted and military ofcers, business women and men, manufacturers, morticians, building framers, electricians, chefs and bankers, cosmeticians, truck drivers and railroad workers, communications technicians, computer and data technicians, news media persons, ministers and politicians, all among others of such proclivities. Even so, Mr. Smiths advocacy for ever improving education with the opportunity for ongoing education is on point. So, let us all vote for those regardless of party politics who are dedicated to the best interest of the public. Hilton T. Meadows Holmes County resident and graduate of Bethlehem School CI T IZE N S DESERVE A N S W ERS F ROM ELE CT ED O FF I C IALS Dear Editor, The following quote The majority of what was said doesnt warrant a response, was attributed to Holmes County School Superintendent Eddie Dixon in the June 25, 2014 edition of the HCTA. Let me remind Mr. Dixon, as well as all elected ofcials, the people who elect you have every right to expect answers to their questions. Those in attendance and the speakers have valid concerns as to how the tax dollars going to the school system are used. We tax payers only get to voice our opinion every four years via the ballot box other than to attend meetings where we are ignored. How would you like it if you were informed? Some of you elected ofcials may soon get a chance to nd out. Dick Basht Bonifay Letters to the EDITOR By RO BB Y SO A VE Staff Editor, Reason.com W hen Gov. Bobby Jindal (R-La.) announced last wee k that he would pull his state out of Common Core, he may have been sounding the death knell of the national education standards. Though a conuence of pushy and powerful interest groups have promised that they invented the solution to the American education crisis, people just arent buying that more topdown standardization of Americas education system is the answer. The populist uprising against the national education standards is a dramatic and recent phenomenon, given that almost no one had even heard of Common Core until just two years ago. The standards were developed in 2009 by education policy bureaucrats at the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Ofcers. President Obamas Department of Education took an immediate interest, and the federal government encouraged state governors and legislatures to sign on to the standards by bribing them with Race to the Top grant money. This led 45 state governments to commit to Common Core implementation, even though hardly anyone knew what that would cost (lots of money) or require (retraining teachers, purchasing new technology). Since then, the American people have had ample time to learn about Common Coreand the more they hear, the less they like it. Fierce opposition to the standards is remarkably nonpartisan. Both conservative grassroots organizations and teachers unions are urging state legislatures to resist Core implementation. Thousands of parents and teachers have shown up to town hall meetings to demand that their school boards dont hand over curriculum sovereignty to regional or federal education authorities. The outrage among Tea Party groups is particularly problematic for Republican leaders and prospective candidates who signed on to the standards, including Jindal, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, a major Core cheerleader. It is very likely that being pro-Common Core will be a toxic position in any conservative presidential primary. Jindals denunciation of the standards last week is as good an indication as any that he wants to keep the base on his side. Still, the Core is not without its supporters. A confluence of powerful interest group s the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, textbook giant Pearson, and standardized testing partnerships PARCC and Smarter Balanced remain dedicated to the standards. As a nominally conservative think tank, the Fordham Institute has led the way in arguing that concerns about Common Core being a federal takeover of education are unfounded. According to Fordhams Michael Brickma n There are absolutely legitimate examples of federal overreach from the Obama administration. But I dont think Common Core is one of them because it was something that was led by the governors and the state education chiefs. People are unconvinced. While polling on Common Core varies wildly depending on how the questions are phrased, a recent poll release by pro-Core group Achieve, Inc. found tha t people who reported knowing something about the standards gave them an unfavorable review. Achieve, Inc. blamed Core opponents who in the past year have made their opposition known through all media outlets, leaving a more negative impression among voters. The opponents are winning, and if Jindals ip op is any indication, the momentum seems to be shifting against Common Core. Libertarians should see this as a triumph. Indeed, the populist uprising against Common Core is undeniably libertarian. It recognizes that there is no one answer to xing education in America. It understands that a new wave of fancy government-enforced solutions is likely to fall short of solving anything. Instead, government needs to get out of the way, stop trapping kids in failing public school s based on where they were born, and stop using them as conscripted labor for standardized testing companie s Efforts that empower parents to x their own local schools will always be more successful than cumbersome national initiatives. After decades of politicians trying to solve the education problem by spending more money and proposing more standardization, people of all political stripes are simply unconvinced that there is one magic x and that it will be invented in a federal laboratory. Instead, people are wising up to the demonstrable fact that more choice and local autonom y produce the conditions most favorable for students to discover and ourish in school environments that suit their individual needs. Robby Soave is a staff editor at Reason.com. This article originally appeared on Reason.com. Its almost the Fourth of July again, and more than any other celebration for our veterans and our independence, it reminds me of my father, Wayne Dean Spears. I dont remember much about my father, who passed away in 2007 after battling Multiple Sclerosis for decades. I think our distance was because he didnt have a father to teach him how to be a dad, but he used what he learned in the military to teach me how to live. It was in 153rd Calvary Bonifay National Guard that my dad found his freedom. I remember visiting him in the main building, playing basketball and then he would show me the different vehicles they used in the military. I think it was there that I found my love of tanks, trucks, military vehicles and machinery. It was at the 153rd Calvary that Ive never seen him happier. I think it was there that he found pride in what he did because he would teach those same lessons when he returned home. He taught me how to shine shoes, keep the carpet clean and wash dishes, which showed the importance of taking care of whats mine. He taught me to fold the bed to where you could bounce a quarter off of it, which showed me to take pride in all I did, no matter how big or small the task. He showed me how he took care of his uniform, which showed me I should always take pride in myself. It was funny though because there was a few months that we lived off of nothing but military rations just so that we could empathize with soldiers overseas who only had rations to eat. He always wanted us to be grateful for what we had. He had spent time at the Panama Canal and even in Grenada in 1983. He loved how he was able to serve his country and even long after his honorable discharge because he was diagnosed with MS he loved the Fourth of July the most. He had his ups and downs with what the sickness deprived him of but his eyes always lit up seeking the reworks, sometimes more brilliantly than the reworks themselves. He loved the summer, I think, just for the Fourth of July. He was also the one that taught me that it wasnt summer until you had a watermelon. In a way, each Fourth of July, I remember the pride and excitement he had to be an American and I cant help but to feel it too. Sometimes I forget to live in a way that wouldve made the dad I remembered proud. Strength, honor, pride and love for God and country. Im really looking forward to seeing those reworks again because to me its a reminder of just how big my God can be and how were free to express our joy, triumphs and pride as Americans. I want to thank you again for another chance to sit down with you and chat. See you next time and let Freedom ring. My fathers fatigues An uncommon alliance against a common problem CECILIA SPEARS Cecilias Sit Down HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for verication purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County TimesAdvertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. How to save lives in less than 30 seconds If youve been following local events, you know Holmes and Washington counties have had a rash of car accidents in the past month. In the majority of those accidents, seatbelts were not used. As a result of those accidents, at least three people had serious injuries, and two others have died. Most of us have heard national safety statistics on seatbelt use. All of us know its the law that we use them. So, why dont we? I know, I know: Im not your mother. But I do know the mother of the 20 year old who is currently spending his summer in Bay Medical Centers Intensive Care Unit instead of working or hanging out with his family and friends. Im sure his summertime plans didnt include multiple surgeries following his June 5 car accident near Sunny Hills. That split second left him with severe head trauma, a broken sternum, a shattered shoulder, and broken ribs and left his mother wondering if her son would make it to see his next birthday. Im sure that mother wouldnt have minded her child hearing someone speak about seatbelts from the proverbial soapbox if it meant a slight chance the outcome of that warm, June day could have been different. As a mother of ve, I know she would likely agree that we need to stress the importance of taking the extra few seconds to click our seatbelt before venturing onto roads which hold unknown dangers. We shouldnt justify our neglect to wear them based on our great driving skills or a short distance. In this young mans case, another driver ran a stop sign. Seatbelts are like car insurance in that we cant count on others to always pay attention, or discount that an unexpected hazard could cause us to crash. According to the National Highway Trafc Safety Administration (NHTSA), seatbelts are the single most effective trafc safety device for preventing death and injury, and wearing a seat belt can reduce the risk of crash injuries by 50 percent. Still not convinced? Lets turn to a few statistics from the NHTSA: Seat belts saved more than 75,000 lives from 2004 to 2008. Forty-two percent of passenger vehicle occupants killed in 2007 were unbelted. A 2009 NHTSA study estimates more than 1,600 lives could be saved and 22,000 injuries prevented if seat belt use was 90 percent in every state. The agency also reports those most likely to ignore their seatbelts are teens, commercial drivers, males in rural areas, pick-up truck drivers, people driving at night, and people who have been drinking. We all have things we could work on to better manage health risks and to make our mothers worry a little less. Why not start with always wearing your seatbelt and help both causes at once? CAROL KENT Editor

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By JACQUELINE BOSTICK 747-5081 | @PCNHJBostick jbostick@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY Imagine a campus where everyone is welcomed to carry rearms concealed in their vehicles. Its soon likely to be a local reality. As a wave of shootings has swept school campuses at every level, a state appel late court ruling has freed up Second Amendment rights by ruling that university and college campuses are not school districts and there fore are not eligible to waive students rights to carry weapons. The ruling will change the way campuses across the state are approaching gun rights. Gulf Coast State College and Florida State University Panama City are already on the bandwagon. At the last GCSC Board of Trustees meeting, the board approved the rst reading of a policy that permits anyone of at least 18 years of age, including students, faculty, staff and guests, to carry a weapon on GCSC campuses. The policy, which must be passed a second time to be ofcially approved, states the rearm or other weapon must be concealed and not readily accessible within a private vehicle. The law currently only allows for rearms and weapons to be carried inside a vehicle that is secured, di rector of campus safety and security David Thomasee wrote in an email Thursday. Florida State University Panama City campus is soon to adopt a similar policy, ac cording campus police of cer Lt. Steve Sellers. When asked about the kind of impact the policy change will have on campus, Major Jim Russell, FSUPC deputy chief of police and spokesman, gave an impar tial statement, saying the schools police department doesnt take an opinionated position, but uphold laws. Thomasee said active shooters are a possibility in Florida, but there are other things that will more likely cause death. Theres hundreds of thousands of res every year, storms, oods, torna does, hurricanes all of those things are more likely to happen here than an ac tive shooter, he said. But, we want to be prepared for the unthinkable, or the un imaginable, so thats what we do. And, for the most part, securing the campus is the same or similar for any emergency crisis situation, he said. Since the Sandy Hook shooting, active shooter in cidents have hit 35 college or university campuses across the country. FSUPC and GCSC cam puses have been relatively safe. According to data from both schools, weapons vio lations are rare. Since 2010, FSUPC has reported only one incident involving an il legal weapon on campus; GCSC reported one weapon incident for 2012. After Columbine in 1999, Maj. Russell wrote in an email, FSU Police Depart ment changed how they pre pared for and responded to emergencies. We understand disaster can strike anywhere and dedicate much time to inten sive and realistic training, the email stated. Both police agencies say they are committed to the mission of safe campuses and the policy will not affect the level of security. A lot of people are con cerned about active shooters ... its a situation that you cant control, Thomasee said. The people that are breaking the law already, dont care if you have a law that says they cant do it, he added. But, law abiding citi zens that are doing the right thing, keeping that rearm concealed in their vehicle, you would never know that they had a secured rearm. We als o ta ke ca re of (850) 638-5885 Mo st Ve hicles Up to 5 qts syn thetic blend Mo st Ve hicles $ 19 95 NO TI CE TO BI D P. T. SE RV IC ES Th e Ho lm es Di st ri ct Sc ho ol Bo ar d wi ll ac ce pt se al ed bi d pr op os al s fo r con tr ac te d se rv ic es fo r Ph ys ic al Th er ap y fo r th e 20 14 20 15 sc ho ol ye ar un ti l 3: 00 p. m. Ju ly 16 20 14 Bi ds wi ll be op en ed Ju ly 21 20 14 at 8: 00 a. m. at th e Ho lm es Di st ri ct Sc ho ol Bo ar d of c e lo ca te d at 70 1 Ea st Pen ns ylv an ia Av en ue Bo ni fa y, FL 32 42 5. Fo r mo re in fo rm at io n, pl ea se con tac t th e ESE De par tm en t at 54 766 74 ex t. 2 33 Ho lm es Di st ri ct Sc ho ol Bo ar d re se rv es th e ri gh t to wa iv e fo rm al it ie s an d to re je ct an y or al l bi d s. Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Band: No longer extra-curricular By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Holmes Coun ty High Schools Blue Pride Band Director Zach Dobos and Holmes County Band Booster President Ben Martin were at a recent Bonifay Kiwanis Meeting where they explained that music should no longer be labeled as an extra-curric ular activity in education today. The U.S. Department of Education is in full agreement on the need for access to quality mu sic and arts instruction in schools, Martin said. No Child Left Behind legisla tion denes the arts as a core academic subject. It is our job, in our commu nity, to uphold the intent of that law, to create access to a quality education that includes music and arts in struction and to work so all children have the opportu nity to learn and grow with music and the arts. He went on to show the link between music and the impact music makes on enhancing childrens learning capabilities. Music is a basic building block of intelligence and playing music helps critical neural connections, Martin explained, with music pro moting math and language skills showing evidence of raising IQ scores. Studies show that stu dents involved in music generally tested higher than those who had no mu sical involvement, he said. The test scores studied were not only standardized tests, such as the FCAT, but also reading procien cy exams. Martin went on to ex plain about the Blue Pride Band Director Zachary Dobos and about the Band Boosters. All bands of both Holm es County High School and Bonifay Middle School are under the direction of one man, Holmes County Dis trict School Board teacher Zachary Dobos, Martin said. Dobos is a graduate of Troy University with de grees in Music Education and Education Psychol ogy and accepted the posi tion with Holmes County schools four years ago. Martin explained that Dobos starts every day at Bonifay Middle School with a general study hall type class, then the sixth grade beginning band stu dents, followed by classes with seventh and eighth grade advanced band mu sicians, then travels to the high school to conduct the HCHS Blue Pride march ing band, HCHS concert band, HCHS color guard, as well as the HCHS jazz band who was recently featured at the annual Troyfest. His typical day starts at 7:30 a.m. and ends around 5 p.m. after the last group of students leave scheduled practices, though band trips, football games and festivals extend those hours to late at night and many on Saturdays. He explained that the students participating in band has grown in both the middle and high school since Dobos began in 2010. He started his career in 2010 with 48 middle school students and only 25 high school students and this school year those numbers have grown to 57 middle school students and 41 high school students, Martin said. The projec tions for the upcoming school year are 65 or more middle school students and 55 to 65 high school students that will take the eld as the 2014-2015 Blue Pride Band. With the increase in student participation there also will be an increase in demands for chaperones, volunteers and nan cial responsibilities, he explained. A group of volunteers known as the Band Boost ers fulll those needs and our goals are to promote excellence in the band pro grams at BMS and HCHS, to include but not limited to the BMS Beginning and Advanced Bands and the HCHS Marching Band, Color Guard Jazz Band and Concert Band, Martin said. To build constructive relationships and improve communication between parents, band students, school and community. To support activities of the Blue Pride Band through fundraising, mentoring, volunteering, participating in band, school and com munity events, develop and promote an understanding of quality band program and to enhance and enrich our childrens educational/ musical environment. Routine operations of the high school band costs $12,000 annually, which includes meals and transportation and $3,000 is provided by the school board each year, he said. The largest expenses come from instrument purchase and mainte nance as well as uniforms, which are due to be re placed since the current uniforms were purchased in 2005. PH OTO S BY BE N M A R TIN | Special to the Times-Advertiser HCHS Blue Pride Band auditions for 2013-2014 school year. Ruling allows rearms in vehicles at colleges ANDREW WA RDLOW | The News Herald Florida State University Police Ofcer Duane Gorey gets ready to patrol on Thursday.

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Holmes County years ago ... REFLECTIONS www.bonifaynow.com Page A6 Wednesday, July 2, 2014 5 years ago 2009 1 injured in bush hog accident: A member of the Holmes County Development Commission was badly injured in a bush hog accident Saturday morning. Dan Curry of New Hope appeared to be conscious and alert as he was being transferred to an AirHeart helicopter to be taken to a Tallahassee hospital. Bonifay celebrates AL Boswell Day: Bonifay Kiwanis Club and the City of Bonifay honored one of the citys most distinguished citizens Wednesday, June 24, with Al Boswell Day. The event took place before a large crowd at Simbos Restaurant in Bonifay. Holmes softball tops in academics: Holmes County High Schools softball team was the Class 3A Florida Athletic Association, academic team champion with a grade point average of 3.687, which beat the second-place winner Tampa Berkeley Prep. 10 years ago 2004 Stolen property recovered: Holmes and Walton county deputies, accompanied by agents with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, the FBI and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Department, raided the home of a Ponce de Leon couple early Thursday morning and remained on the premises for several hours. Sewer lines will be improved after CDBG project: Residents of Bonifay may have noticed several large white trucks working on Magnolia and Haddock streets recently, as well as behind the Piggly Wiggly and other locations. The trucks are part of a project to renew city sewer lines funded in large part by a federal grant. Rain failed to dampen spirits of Watermelon Festival goers: Rain came in torrents right in the middle of the parade, but it didnt seem to matter as everyone marched right on through and headed to the Ag Center for an afternoon of food and entertainment. 20 years ago 1994 Body identied: The human remains found in a cow pasture in Vernon have been positively identied to be those of a young woman who has been missing since 1991. According to Washington County Sheriff Danny Hasty, Forensic Odontologist Phillip Lavine positively identied the remains to be those of Barbara Marcum-Scarborough who has reportedly been missing since she was last seen on May 29, 1991. Bonifay residents to direct local petition drive: The Tax Committeee, a grass roots movement that is campaigning to amend the Florida Constitution to limit taxes and protect property rights, has named Hal Shute, Carlton Treadwell and Larry Howell of Bonifay Tax Cap County Administrators for Holmes County. Holmes County Courthouse gets new air conditioning system: Things began to cool off a little more at the Holmes County Courthouse after ofcials recently completed the installation of a new 60 ton air cooling system. 50 years ago 1964 Linda Holland crowned queen at rst Panhandle Produce Festival: Petite brown haired, 17 year old Linda Holland was crowned queen of the rst annual Panhandle Produce Festival here last Thursday afternoon. Bush named principal at Bethlehem High School: Cortez Bush, who has been principal at Poplar Springs for the last ten years, was transferred Monday to become principal at Bethlehem High School to ll the vacancy left by the death of Principle Victor Riddle which occurred several months ago. The gentleman, who is the topic of the column today, may have touched your life in some signicant way, especially if you lived in Jackson, Washington, Holmes or Walton counties during the era of his life, dating back 93 years. Todays writing is a synopsis of the life of John Edwin Baldwin, who was born in Graceville September 7, 1921 to Bartlett Augustus Baldwin and Mattie Baldwin. The story revolves around the young man who hitch-hiked to Gainesville in 1939, enrolled in the University of Florida and departed with a Masters Degree in Agriculture in 1944. He was hired at Ponce De Leon High School as a Vocational Agriculture Teacher soon afterwards. He was assigned hall duty along with a young Home Economics intern, Monetha Smithgall, whose parents, Benjamin Smithgall and Annie Neta Brigman Smithgall, lived at nearby Ponce De Leon Springs. This couple purchased this beautiful natural springs property in 1925 and proceeded to build a house, a wooden wall around the springs area for swimming. Two bath houses were added along with a concession stand, skating rink and sun sheds. This facility fast became an attraction for the young people in the area who enjoyed it as a recreational attraction until its closure in 1958. It is presently owned and operated by the Florida Park Service as a tourist park. Mr. Benjamin Smithgall met and married his wife, Miss Brigman, a Westville native, while he worked as a sawyer for the giant sawmill in Caryville in the late 1920s and early 1930s. His job was keeping the mammoth lumber cutting saws sharpened, oiled and maintained for the performance the machines were called upon to do daily. Factor in the Prattler becoming acquainted with James Jeral Smithgall, son of the above couple, when he entered the University of Florida as a freshman in 1949, with a determination to receive a Mechanical Engineering Degree. This he did in a timely manner with his rst job being with International Paper Company in Panama City. Guess who became next door neighbors soon after Jeral had married his Westville sweetheart, Delores Hicks, daughter of Lewis Hicks and Lee Artis Yates Hicks? You guessed it right and they have been our dear friends for almost 60 years! Lets rewind back to the story to the new young teachers in Ponce De Leon High School. As advisor to the Vocational Agriculture program at the school, John Edwin Baldwin borrowed a wash pot from Monethas father to boil peanuts for a Future Farmers of America social vent. The father, known for his quick wit, when loaning the wash pot, offered Mr. Baldwin anything else I have, except for my daughter. When he teacher returned the cooking utensil, he announced to the father that he come for his daughter. The father consented, Monetha said yes and the couple were married on a sunny day in December 1944. From that day until his death at her bedside on May 28, 2014, their love never wavered. She was the love of his life. Soon after the marriage, John and Monetha took full time teaching positions at Paxton High School. John served as the schools FFA sponsor and one of its rst basketball coaches. He named their team the Bobcats after noticing the word emblazoned on a discarded candy wrapper. He served as the towns Mayor from 19541955 and was a central gure in the towns incorporation. John served as Superintendent of Walton County Schools from 1961-1977. He was a driving force behind the creation of Okaloosa-Walton Junior College. John left public administration in 1977 and returned to the class room, teaching Vocational Agriculture until retirement. Amidst the demands of public service, John always found time to relax and recharge, enjoying frequent trips to the nearby woods and elds for hunting quail and dove in the company of friends and family. Johns inner strength was continually renewed by a lifelong faith in God. He was a dedicated congregant of the United Methodist Church of Paxton for six decades. He taught Sunday School there until declining health slowed his attendance in recent years. In addition to his devotion as an educator, public servant and follower of Christ, John was a model husband, father, grandfather and friend. John Edwin Baldwin is survived by his beloved wife of 69 tears, Monetha Smithgall Baldwin. His sons are John Rand Baldwin (Charlotte) of Madison, Alabama and Benjamin Edwin Baldwin (Lagram Saunders) of Tallahassee. There are two grandchildren, Dr. John Arthur Baldwin (Brittany) of Boston, MA and Dr. Marielle Christina Baldwin (Martin McDermott) of Birmingham, Ala.; and his twin great-grandsons, John Henry and Benjamin Arthur Baldwin of Boston, MA. Preceding him in death were his parents, six brothers, Robert, Douglas, Joseph, Bernard, Jim Ned and Buddy and sister, Mary Lou Tommey. Funeral Services were held Saturday, June 7, 2014, at the First United Methodist Church in Florala with interment following in Paxton Cemetery. Funeral arrangements were entrusted to Evans Funeral Home, 1972 North 6th St. in Florala, Alabama. It has been the Prattlers honor and privilege to write this tribute to John Edwin Baldwin, whom I knew only casually, saw very few times, but heard many glowing and complimentary comments from Jeral and Delores Smithgall as to his quality of character and his many efforts to lead those in his charge as teacher, mentor and role model. See you next week. John Edward Baldwin was a teacher, mentor and role model S PEC I AL TO T IM ES AD V ER TI SER Did you know Holmes County once hosted a Moonshine Festival? This photo of one past queen from that event was found at the Holmes County Times-Advertiser ofce. Do you recognize this young lady? If so, please email wcnnews@ chipleypaper.com Your answer will appear in a future edition. Chasing Shadows is a new feature we hope to run each week. Do you have an old photo from Holmes County youd like to have identied? Ask your neighbors for help by submitting it for publication! Email submissions to wcnnews@chipleypaper. com Who is this young lady? PERR YS PRA TTLE Perry Wells Shadows caught! In the June 25 Chasing Shadows feature, we asked local residents to identify these three Panhandle Watermelon Festival beauties from days gone by. Thank you to Leah Page-Pettis and Christi Powell for calling in to identify these beauties as (from left): Jamie Smith, Mindy Locke and Tisha Brock Allen. S PEC I AL TO T IM ES AD V ER TI SER John edwin Baldwin of Paxton, Fla., was born Sept. 7, 1921, and passed away May 28, 2014 HAVE SOMET H ING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for verication purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. O PINI O N www.chipleypaper.com Wednesday, June 18, 2014 A Page 4 Section Nana puts the break in summer break Summer vacation nally is here, and students and school staff get to enjoy several weeks from the daily routine of shaping young minds. For my children, that means summertime fun at Nana and Papas and their dads in Alabama. While preparing to send children on a visit isnt quite as daunting a task as actually taking them on a trip, there are certain steps parents should follow, especially if youngsters are on the way to grandmas house. S tep 1: Check the bags. Not in that extortion type way airlines have of tacking money onto airfare and sending random bags to Abu Dhabi, but rather in the manner of What were you thinking when you packed this bag? Excited anticipation is no doubt responsible for the mountainous pile of luggage recently sitting by my front door the one with at least three more bags than the number of children going, packed at least three days before the SS Nana was set to dock in the driveway. Not wanting to discourage the children from the I can do it myself spirit, but also knowing Nana had limited vehicle space, it seemed prudent to double check the kids packing skills. Sure enough, therein lay everything from inexplicable wardrobe choices to strange contraband, such as the orange trick-or-treat pail my son, Aidan, insisted he needs for the trip. Its for the treats, my 10year-old said seriously. Nana will have treats. His earnest insistence was so humorous, the pails jack-o-lantern face even seemed to widen its grin. S tep 2: After repacking the bags, reinforce home training. Of course, we parents like to think our offspring behave when were not around, but its best to reinforce some basics: OK, kids, be sure to say maam and sir. When its mealtime, use table manners and utensils. No ghting, and dont put Grandmas dachshund in the clothes dryer. (It happens.) S tep 3: Dont panic when the grandparents are late. This is when the children will ght over who gets to sit where, ask varied versions of When are we leaving?, and attempt to sneak trickor-treat pails back into their bags. Take a deep breath. Wipe your brow and repeat, Its only for a little while. Start counting the minutes. S tep 4: Take preemptive action. When Nana arrives, open the door slowly to protect her from the stampede of adoring grandchildren. She will distract them while you help Papa load the bags and listen to his tales of trafc terror. S tep 5: Review. Go over the list of any medications Nana might need for the visit both for her and the children. Make the rounds to get hugs, kisses and promises to be good from each child. Finally, let the noticeable silence settle while watching the tail lights fade. Take a deep breath. Wipe your eyes and repeat, Its only for a little while. Start counting the minutes. POSTMASTER: S end address change to: Washington County News P. O Box 627, Chipley, FL 32428 U S P S 667-360 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $20; 26 weeks: $28.70; 52 weeks: $48.60 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $24.30; 26 weeks: $36.40; 52 weeks: $60.70 The News is published every Wednesday and Saturday by Halifax Media Group, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428. Periodicals postage paid at Chipley, Florida. Copy right 2014, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. CO P Y R I GHT NO T I C E: T he entire contents of the Washington County News are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bareeld, Publisher Carol Kent, E ditor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WC N _HC T CONTACT US PUBLIS H ER Nicole Bareeld: nbareeld@chipleypaper.com N E W S, S P ORTS OR O P INION news@chipleypaper.com CLASSI F IED & C IR C ULATION 850-638-0212 clamb@ chipleypaper.com Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 EDITOR Carol Kent: ckent@ chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 A DVERTISING Jessica Collins: jcollins@chipley paper.com CAROL KENT Editor John Edward Baldwin was a teacher, mentor and role model The gentleman, who is the topic of the column today, may have touched your life in some signicant way, especially if you lived in Jackson, Washington, Holmes or Walton counties during the era of his life, dating back 93 years. Todays writing is a synopsis of the life of John Edwin Baldwin, who was born in Graceville September 7, 1921 to Bartlett Augustus Baldwin and Mattie Baldwin. The story revolves around the young man who hitchhiked to Gainesville in 1939, enrolled in the University of Florida and departed with a Masters Degree in Agriculture in 1944. He was hired at Ponce De Leon High School as a Vocational Agriculture Teacher soon afterwards. He was assigned hall duty along with a young Home Economics intern, Monetha Smithgall, whose parents, Benjamin Smithgall and Annie Neta Brigman Smithgall, lived at nearby Ponce De Leon Springs. This couple purchased this beautiful natural springs property in 1925 and proceeded to build a house, a wooden wall around the springs area for swimming. Two bath houses were added along with a concession stand, skating rink and sun sheds. This facility fast became an attraction for the young people in the area who enjoyed it as a recreational attraction until its closure in 1958. It is presently owned and operated by the Florida Park Service as a tourist park. Mr. Benjamin Smithgall met and married his wife, Miss Brigman, a Westville native, while he worked as a sawyer for the giant sawmill in Caryville in the late 1920s and early 1930s. His job was keeping the mammoth lumber cutting saws sharpened, oiled and maintained for the performance the machines were called upon to do daily. Factor in the Prattler becoming acquainted with James Jeral Smithgall, son of the above couple, when he entered the University of Florida as a freshman in 1949, with a determination to receive a Mechanical Engineering Degree. This he did in a timely manner with his rst job being with International Paper Company in Panama City. Guess who became next door neighbors soon after Jeral had married his Westville sweetheart, Delores Hicks, daughter of Lewis Hicks and Lee Artis Yates Hicks? You guessed it right and they have been our dear friends for almost 60 years! Lets rewind back to the story to the new young teachers in Ponce De Leon High School. As advisor to the Vocational Agriculture program at the school, John Edwin Baldwin borrowed a wash pot from Monethas father to boil peanuts for a Future Farmers of America social vent. The father, known for his quick wit, when loaning the wash pot, offered Mr. Baldwin anything else I have, except for my daughter. When he teacher returned the cooking utensil, he announced to the father that he come for his daughter. The father consented, Monetha said yes and the couple were married on a sunny day in December 1944. From that day until his death at her bedside on May 28, 2014, their love never wavered. She was the love of his life. Soon after the marriage, John and Monetha took full time teaching positions at Paxton High School. John served as the schools FFA sponsor and one of its rst basketball coaches. He named their team the Bobcats after noticing the word emblazoned on a discarded candy wrapper. He served as the towns Mayor from 1954-1955 and was a central gure in the towns incorporation. John served as Superintendent of Walton County Schools from 1961-1977. He was a driving force behind the creation of Okaloosa-Walton Junior College. John left public administration in 1977 and returned to the class room, teaching Vocational Agriculture until retirement. Amidst the demands of public service, John always found time to relax and recharge, enjoying frequent trips to the nearby woods and elds for hunting quail and dove in the company of friends and family. Johns inner strength was continually renewed by a lifelong faith in God. He was a dedicated congregant of the United Methodist Church of Paxton for six decades. He taught Sunday School there until declining health slowed his attendance in recent years. In addition to his devotion as an educator, public servant and follower of Christ, John was a model husband, father, grandfather and friend. John Edwin Baldwin is survived by his beloved wife of 69 tears, Monetha Smithgall Baldwin. His sons are John Rand Baldwin (Charlotte) of Madison, Alabama and Benjamin Edwin Baldwin (Lagram Saunders) of Tallahassee. There are two grandchildren, Dr. John Arthur Baldwin (Brittany) of Boston, MA and Dr. Marielle Christina Baldwin (Martin McDermott) of Birmingham, Ala.; and his twin great-grandsons, John Henry and Benjamin Arthur Baldwin of Boston, MA. Preceding him in death were his parents, six brothers, Robert, Douglas, Joseph, Bernard, Jim Ned and Buddy and sister, Mary Lou Tommey. Funeral Services were held Saturday, June 7, 2014, at the First United Methodist Church in Florala with interment following in Paxton Cemetery. Funeral arrangements were entrusted to Evans Funeral Home, 1972 North 6th St. in Florala, Alabama. It has been the Prattlers honor and privilege to write this tribute to John Edwin Baldwin, whom I knew only casually, saw very few times, but heard many glowing and complimentary comments from Jeral and Delores Smithgall as to his quality of character and his many efforts to lead those in his charge as teacher, mentor and role model. See you next week. John E dwin Baldwin of Paxton, Fla., was born Sept. 7, 1921, and passed away May 28, 2014. P ERRYS P RATTLE Were hearing from folks who think understaffed VA facilities have ignored veterans, yet they dont want Veterans Affairs to get another dime in funding. Similarly, some area residents want better roads and schools but think its unseemly to spend taxpayers dollars such as the nearly $2 billion that state Sen. Don Gaetz has snagged for Northwest Florida improving them. Were confused. We dont know how government can widen roads and build schools without spending money. And since government has no money of its own, it levies taxes. Taxation is burdensome and often unfair. Thats why, when state tax revenue is divvied up in Tallahassee, wed rather not see all of it go to Central and South Florida. Wed rather see a big chunk of it come back here, to Northwest Florida, so that it can buy infrastructure that will benet the people who surrendered those dollars in the rst place. This is called bringing home the bacon. Its what politicians do. Its what Sen. Gaetz of Niceville, the outgoing Senate president, did quite well in the legislative session just ended. In a couple of recent stories, the Daily News Tom McLaughlin outlined the state funding destined for our area. It ranges from $60,174 for the Sinfonia symphony to $440 million in Florida Education Finance Program dollars for Okaloosa, Walton and Santa Rosa county schools. I am particularly pleased with the increase in education funding to the K-12 districts, said Sen. Gaetz, himself a former school superintendent. Also set aside are $6.5 million to study options for bridges between Fort Walton Beach and Okaloosa Island; $4.4 million for a wastewater facility at Mossy Head Industrial Park; tens of millions of dollars for transportation projects and career technical education; and money for Destins East Pass dredging, a STEMM middle school and other worthy endeavors. Clearly, it helps when the Senate president is from your area. Thanks, Sen. Gaetz. Now lets hope the agencies and organizations receiving all this money will spend it wisely. Northwest Florida Daily News What shall we do with $2 billion OUR VIE W

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A7 Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Special to Times-Advertiser Three students from Bonifay ATA won the American Taekwondo As sociation Florida State Championship Title. The Laurel family from Chi pley traveled across the United States competing in regional, national and world events hosted by the American Taekwondo Association. Students must place rst second or third to earn points towards state champi onship standings. The Laurel family traveled to eight states across the U.S., Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, Tennessee and California earning points. Florida is one of the toughest states in America to win state championships due to the high level competition from areas like Miami, Orlando and Jacksonville. We are proud to have such dedicated students from this area that can com pete on a national level. Bonifay Taekwondo USA had three students win state titles and nine oth ers who nished in the top 10 for the State of Florida. State championship winners were: Anzli Laurel, rst in sparring; Kaliegh Laurel, rst in forms; Canyon Laurel rst in sparring and com bat weapons sparring Students nishing in the top 10 were: Italy Lau rel in forms, sparring and combat weapons; Amber Wing in sparring Jayla Kindelspire in forms and combat weap ons; Amber White in forms and sparring; Jan zen Kindelspire in forms, sparring and combat weapons; Josie Coleman in sparring, weapons and combat weapons; Lisa Hall in sparring; Han nah Cloeman in forms and combat weapons and Isabela Teck in combat weapons. Special to Times-Advertiser The weather is hot, but the lat est trend is ice cold. Sports teams across the country are dousing their coaches and college ofcials in ice cold water for charity. Its called #chillincharity, a friendly challenge in which coaches are called out by their peers before passing on the favor and receiving their arctic bath. All proceeds go to the Kay Yow Foundation, helping raise awareness for breast cancer and funds for research. The rules are simple. A coach calls out another coach before they receive an ice water shower. Called out people have 48 hours to respond by taking on the cold water chal lenge or paying up in donations. Those who fail to do so owe the Kay Yow Foundation $250. Assistants owe $100. To help the cause, those who take the ice bath are still asked to pony up a donation of $50 or $25 to the foundation. Chipola womens basketball coach Greg Franklin was the rst Chipola coach to take the challenge. He called out Chipola president Dr. Jason Hurst, athletic director Dr. Steve Givens, assistant athletic di rector Joc Calloway and cross coun try coach Rance Massengill. Chipola personnel issued chal lenges to Northwest Florida State President Ty Handy, Chipola Work force Dean Darwin Gilmore, local high school coaches Travis Blan ton, Steven Welch, Matt Anderson, Chris Obert and Pensacola Ad Bill Hamilton. The Chipola cheerleaders also re cently raised $200 in the challenge. Special to Times-Advertiser Chipola College will of fer several new programs of study in Computer In formation Technology and Network Systems this fall. Computer Information Technology Certicates are available in: Geograph ic Information Systems, Help Desk Support and IT Support Specialist. Network Systems Tech nology Certicates include Digital Forensics, Network Support Technician, Net work/Cyber Security and Server Administration. Students holding cur rent IT certications may be awarded credit for se lected courses based on certications. Programs emphasize various industry certications including the CompTIA A+, Security+, and Network+ as well as various Microsoft network certications. All courses taken may be counted to wards an AS degree in Computer Information Technology. Students who plan to pursue an AS or AA degree will need additional credit hours. Students may complete general educa tion requirements concur rently while completing the courses in these programs. July 30 is the deadline to have Financial Aid les complete to pay fall 2014 tu ition and fees. The college application deadline for the fall semester is Wednesday, Aug. 6. For information about these and other computer programs, visit www.chipo la.edu or call 718-2441. SPECIAL TO T IME S A DVERTI S ER Candidates in Chipola Colleges Fireghting Academy recently practiced their skills on the colleges liquid petroleum gas training system and vehicle re simulator. The LP system simulates a re in a residential gas tank. For information about the reghting program, call 718-2483. CHIPOLA FIREFIGHTERS LEARN ON LP GAS SYSTEM Special to Times-Advertiser Attorney General Pam Bondi, the Federal Trade Commission and the New York Attorney Gen erals Ofce have obtained nal judgments totaling $255 million in monetary relief against The Tax Club, Inc., a telemarketing operation, and its owners. The judgments also permanently en join The Tax Club and its owners from continuing certain telemar keting activities. The settlement resolves allegations that The Tax Club enterprise took more than $200 million from thousands of consumers, including Florida consumers, through an elabo rate small-business development telemarketing scheme that in volved 12 interrelated corporate entities, using dozens of different business names, all controlled by a small group of four individuals. While work-at-home careers are an attractive opportunity for many people, it is imperative that Florida consumers do their research and report any possible scams to my ofce, stated At torney General Pam Bondi. According to the complaint, The Tax Club enterprise relied on lead lists obtained from com panies in the business of selling business development products and services to identify potential customers who may be suscepti ble to the telemarketing scheme. The Tax Club sales representa tives then contacted consumers and gained their trust by falsely representing to the consumers that they were afliated with the companies. The sales represen tatives used high pressure sales tactics and false claims to sell thousands of dollars of addition al products and services to the consumers. The complaint fur ther alleges that consumers who bought the products and sought refunds did not get their money back when requested due to unworkable refund policies and were pressured not to cancel. Before you put money into a work-at-home business opportu nity, ask questions to determine if it is legitimate, said Jessica Rich, Director of the FTCs Bu reau of Consumer Protection, adding, We encourage consum ers to read our consumer infor mation to learn how to recognize schemes that promise more than they deliver. The permanent injunctions prohibit certain telemarketing activities, require compliance with the FTCs telemarketing sales rule, and ban The Tax Club defendants from advertising, marketing, promoting, or offer ing for sale any business coach ing services, credit development services, or work-at-home op portunities. The nal judgments require The Tax Club defendants to turn over various bank ac counts and other assets, and liq uidate and sell personal and real property to satisfy the monetary obligations of the judgments. Attorney Generals ofce obtains $225 million settlement Chipola to offer new computer networking, I.T. programs SPECIAL TO T IME S A DVERTI S ER From left, Chipola Cross Country Coach Rance Massengill, Assistant Athletic Director Joc Calloway, Athletic Director Dr. Steve Givens and college President Dr. Jason Hurst. Chipola coaches, ofcials chill for charity P HOTO S S PECIAL TO T IME S A DVERTI S ER Italy Laurel, Canyon Laurel, Anzli Laurel and Kaliegh Laurel Bonifay Taekwondo USA students win state championships Anzli Laurel, Canyon Laurel and Kaliegh Laurel

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By JAN WADDY 747-5072| @JanWaddy1 jwaddy@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY Whether you caught the sh yourself or purchased it from a seafood market, preparations should enhance the natural avors. Ferrucci Ristorante, 301 Harrison Ave., serves Pesce di Giorno, a fresh sh of the day served with the chefs own creation. We have a sh of the day, but its usually Snapper Piccata because that is what people want the most, said owner and chef Mike Ferrucci. Gulf recreational red snapper season is open through July 14 in Gulf state waters, but Ferrucci gets his fresh sh daily from Tarpon Dock Seafood Market, 234 E. Beach Drive. A native of Southern Italy, Mike Ferrucci was enjoying fresh snapper long before moving to the Gulf Coast, and its still one of the rst things he wants to eat when he returns to visit his Italian family. But, he said, the snapper tastes completely different in both places. Its due to the water itself and what the animals feed on, he said. Both are good, but I grew up on the avors of the Mediterranean, so to me that snapper has a richer avor. The Mediterranean waters are saltier than the Gulf. The saltiness of the Snapper Piccata recipe with lemon and capers complements the sh from both waters. I use extra virgin olive oil, only enough to cover the bottom of the pan, Ferrucci said. Some people dont use it because it is tricky. It has a low boiling point, so you dont want it on a full blast burner, but it has a much better avor. When the sh is completely cooked, add a little butter to the sauce, then pour on the sh and top with fresh basil. Ferrucci also has served Grouper al Cartoccio grouper dropped in a foil pouch with basil, white wine, olive oil and garlic. John Certo II, owner of Andys Flour Power Cafe & Bakery in Panama City Beach, grew up in an Italian family in New York, but he usually turns to a Spanish inuenced recipe for sh Fish Veracruz. We put the sh and lime in tin foil. Its a really simple recipe we make at home once a week. We love it simple and delicious, Certo said. The recipe can be made with red snapper or grouper, another Gulf Coast favorite. We are slammed. We have so much sh coming in right now, said Sean Lyon, co-owner of Uncle Ernies Bayfront Grill, 1151 Bayview Ave. We sell about 1,000 pounds of grouper a week. Richard Stewart, retired chairman of the Business and Technology Departments at Gulf Coast State College, supervised the colleges award-winning culinary program. His recipe for Cedar-planked Salmon can be made with any rm-eshed sh, such as grouper. These planks have been soaked in water, so I dont catch on re 30 minutes or over an hour and you can do it overnight, Stewart said during a recent cooking demonstration at Somethins Cookin, 93 E. 11th St. Thin cedar planks can be purchased from area stores, or Stewart said, have them made for you at a home supply store. Make sure they are untreated wood. If you decided to have them made you will need to submerge them in water and soak for several days changing water as it gets tannic, when it is clear I then soak the boards in Chardonnay and then freeze. He seasons the sh with Capt. Andersons House Seasoning. Its the best seasoning Ive ever found, Stewart said. I probably give 10 to 15 of these (bottles) away every Christmas. CEDAR-PLANKED SALMON Salmon or any firm-fleshed fish Cedar planks Chardonnay Extra Virgin Olive Oil Capt. Andersons House Seasoning Lemon slices Chopped red onion Soak planks for at least 30 minutes in Chardonnay or water. When ready to cook, cover the board in Extra Virgin Olive Oil and then cover the fish with olive oil and sprinkle Capt. Andersons House Seasoning on top of the filet. If you are cooking on the grill or in the oven, cook at 350 degrees for 24 minutes. Cook the fish to 125 degrees and then let it rest for five minutes covered with foil. Garnish with lemon slices and some chopped red onion. You can cook skin side down or skinless, however your filet was cleaned. Source: Richard Stewart, retired chairman of the Business and Technology Departments at Gulf Coast State College SNAPPER PICCATA Fresh snapper filet 1 tablespoon flour Extra virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon capers Juice of 1 lemon Splash white wine cup clam juice Salt and pepper to taste 1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon julienne basil Lightly flour snapper, then brown snapper in olive oil. Add a splash of wine, let it evaporate, then add lemon juice and capers. Add clam juice and simmer till cooked through. Salt and pepper to taste; finish with butter, pour sauce over snapper and top with fresh basil. Source: Mike Ferrucci, Ferrucci Ristorante Fresh catch Contributed photos Ferrucci Ristorante owner Mike Ferrucci shares his recipe for Snapper Piccata. BELOW : Richard Stewart, retired chairman of the Business and Technology Departments at Gulf Coast State College, likes to soak planks in Chardonnay and garnish fresh fish with lemon. FOOD www.chipleypaper.com Wednesday, July 2, 2014 A Page 8 Section

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A9 Wednesday, July 2, 2014 SCUBA WARRIOR Photos and story by PATTI BLAKE PANAMA CITY BEACH Antonio Cruz recently retired from the U.S. Army after 21 years of service. He lost his right leg below the knee during an explosion in August 2012 while serving in Afghanistan. He later was taken to San Antonio for treatment. A special program for wounded veterans there re-introduced him to scuba diving. When Im scuba diving its a whole relaxing world. Its a whole different mindset, Cruz said. The adaptive scuba program offered at The Center For The Intrepid (formerly the Brooke Army Medical Center) in San Antonio teaches veterans the scuba basics, and they eventually can be certified for open water dives. Cruz currently lives, works and goes to school in Panama City Beach. I just fell in love with the area, he said when recounting his first scuba trip two years ago. Cruz attends classes at Gulf Coast State College and volunteers at the Panama City Dive Center. Im thankful to God that he spared my life that day because I should have been dead, Cruz said. So from that moment that I realized that it could have been worse, I embraced every day. I have no time to worry about it or be sad about it. I just continue on every day. Antonio Cruz prepares to enter the water before a dive. He wears a special dive foot prosthetic that allows him to move with more ease in the water. Cruz looks over the water on May 20. Below, Cruz hangs on to a guide rope during a safety stop after a deep dive on a wreck May 21. Cruz lls a tank at the Panama City Dive Center on June 13. He volunteers at the local dive shop when he isnt attending classes at Gulf Coast State College. His yellow ns are visible below the surface as Cruz holds on to a guide rope on a May 19 scuba trip with Wounded Warriors Adaptive Scuba. Cruz stands among a pile of air tanks. Cruz checks out a wreck May 20. He uses a special dive foot prosthetic that allows him to lock the ankle in a downward position to allow him to swim with ease.

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Local A10 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, July 2, 2014 In Honor of the True Patriots Once again, we come to the time of year when we celebrate the Fourth of July in remembrance of all the wonderful things this country means to us. The celebration will include reworks, parades and picnics when the hot dog will be king for a day. It is a wonderful time of the year. Yet, in the midst of all of the celebrations, there are a few black clouds blocking the sunlight. Just the other day the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I were watching a news program where they featured somebody offended by the American ag displayed in a meeting they were attending. We both looked at each other and sadly shook our heads. What kind of nonsense is going on in this country? Peoples lives are so shallow that they have to try to think of something to be offended? I am not sure why the American ag offended them so, but I have the perfect solution. I am not sure why people do not think of solutions like this, but if the American ag offends you then go to a country that has a ag it does not offend you. Simple. Problem solved. No more offense. It would not offend me in the least if people would do this. The American ag reminds us of all the wonderful things we enjoy in this country. The Fourth of July is an opportunity to express our thanks for living in a country such as this. If this was such a terrible country, why are so many people trying to get in at all cost? We still have some freedoms here that the rest of the world is envious of. The ag represents the foundation of our country and the ongoing sacrice that has kept it free for so long. How can that be offensive to anybody? At the same time another story on the news caught our attention concerning the 9/11 museum in New York City. From some of the things I am seeing on TV most of the people in America have forgotten what happened on 9/11. Somebody walked in, saw the symbol of the cross and became physically ill by it. They claim the cross made them sick in the stomach. This was a little confusing to me. These are people who say they do not believe in God, personally, I do not believe a word they say. Here is this person, who does not believe in God, who does not believe in religion, sees a religious symbol and becomes offended and physically ill by it. They surely need help and I recommend a group of industrialstrength psychiatrists and therapists along with a team of military medical doctors to pump out their stomach. Now, what I want to know is, if they do not believe in religion, what does this religious symbol mean to them? If they really did not believe in religion, as they claim, the symbol would not mean anything to them, and furthermore, it would not affect them in any way or fashion. The fact that it offended them reveals to those who have at least two brain cells wandering around upstairs that here is a religious person. Only a religious person would react to a religious symbol. If I am not a religious person, none of this religious symbolism means anything to me and I look at it, then walk on. While I am on the topic, another matter really annoys me. Why is prayer so offensive to these people who say they do not believe in religion? The fact that it makes them angry and offends them tells me something about what they say they believe. Why is it that prayer offends them and why are they so afraid of prayer and of God? Their fear of God suggests that deep down somewhere, pass their stomach, they believed God just might exist. This brings to me Pascals wager. If God exists (and Christianity is true) and you choose not to believe, then you lose everything. But, if God exists (and Christianity is true) and you choose to believe, then you gain everything. I do not believe it could be stated any clearer than that. To date nobody has ever proven the Bible to be anything but true. For 2000 years, people have desperately attempted to destroy the Bible or at least discredit it and yet it is the number one seller in the world today. What if this Bible, that nobody can prove to be untrue, is absolutely and positively true? Are these people who say they do not believe willing to wager everything? Why is it I must accept what they do and say, but they do not have to accept what I do and say? Why do I have to respect them, but they do not have to respect me? Is that being a true red, white and blue American patriot? Jesus put it in the right perspective when he said, Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesars; and unto God the things that are Gods (Matthew 22:21). Our problem today is that we have confused Caesar with God and no longer understand the difference. The problem is, Caesar does not have all the answers, but God does. The reign of Caesar has collapsed, but God is still on the throne, Almighty God is He. If you do not respect the ag, at least respect those who do. The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@ att.net or website www. jamessnyderministries. com. DR. JAMES L. SNYDER Out to Pastor Berean Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7:30 p.m. The church is at 1438 Nearing Hills Drive in Chipley. Blue Lake Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 1405 Blue Lake Road in Chipley. Bonnett Pond Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 2680 Bonnett Pond Road in Chipley. Bethlehem Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The church is at 1572 Highway 177 in Bonifay. Bethany Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1404 North Highway 79 in Bonifay. Blessed Trinity Catholic Church Sunday Mass is at 9 a.m. Wednesday evening Mass is at 5:30 p.m. The church is at 2331 Highway 177A in Bonifay. Chipley Church of Christ Sunday morning bible study is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1295 Brickyard Road in Chipley. Christian Fellowship Center Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1458 Monroe Shefeld Road in Chipley. First United Pentecostal Church Morning Worship is at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1816 Highway 90 in Chipley. Gully Springs Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:40 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 7 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 2826 Highway 90 in Bonifay. Little Rock Assembly of God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1923 Highway 173 in Bonifay. Live Oak Assembly of God Services Discipleship Class is Sunday at 10 a.m., with Morning Worship at 10:45 a.m. and Evening Worship at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday Services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 2118 Live Oak Road in Bonifay. Northside Assembly of God Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Sunday School is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1009 North Rangeline St. in Bonifay. Shady Grove Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 1955 Highway 177A in Bonifay. Vernon Evangelistic Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is on U.S. Highway 79 in Vernon. West Bonifay Baptist Church Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 609 West Indiana Ave. in Bonifay. Wausau Assembly of God Sunday School is at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 3537 Washington St. in Wausau. Wausau First Baptist Church Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 3493 Washington St. in Wausau. Wausau Pentecostal Holiness Sunday School is at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are at 6 p.m. The church is at 2201 Pioneer Road in Wausau. Winterville Assembly of God Sunday School is at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is at 6 p.m. The church is at 1897 Highway 177A in Bonifay Y es Lord Deliverance Sunday School is at 10:30 a.m. Worship is at noon. Wednesday services are at 7 p.m. The church is at 739 7th St. in Chipley. Church LISTINGS INFORMA TION If you would like your church listed here please send information news@chipleypaper.com, Fax it to 638-4601 or mail it to P.O. Box 627: Chipley, FL 32428. Due to space limitations please only send regular church services. For special services please send separate submission. Presbyterian: Local same-sex weddings unlikely By BRIAN HUGHES 682-6524 | @cnbBrian brianh@crestviewbulletin.com CRESTVIEW The national Presbyterian Church General Assemblys decision June 19 to permit same-gender marriages wont immediately result in local weddings. The decisions to redene marriage and permit pastors to perform such weddings were difcult, church leaders said. Both decisions came with much thought, discussion and prayer, and clearly the entire body that is the PC (USA) will be interpreting these actions for some time, church leaders stated in a letter to congregations. Because Florida does not allow same-sex marriages, the vote is kind of a moot point, said the Rev. Mark Broadhead, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Crestview and the Laurel Hill Presbyterian Church. I think this a divisive issue within our denomination and has been for 40 years, actually, Broadhead said. I can understand both sides of the argument. Meeting in Detroit, the 221st General Assembly changed language in the Book of Order to say marriage involves a unique commitment between two people, traditionally a man and a woman, the church leaders letter stated. Presbyterian pastors now have the discretion to perform any such marriage they believe the Holy Spirit calls them to perform. Individual church governing boards, called Sessions, also can decide whether to allow weddings for same-gender couples in their churches, regardless of what pastors feel called to do. Like other controversial issues, Broadhead said same-sex marriage takes attention away from more important matters. Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A11 Wednesday, July 2, 2014 DR KENNETH L. AND ANN K. SHA W ENDO WED SCHOL ARSHIP In appr eciation of Dr Ke n Sh aw s 25 ye ars of ser vice to Fl orida St ate Un iv ersity Pa nama Ci ty the follo wing friends and colleagues hav e established the Dr Ke nneth L. and An n K. Sh aw En do we d Scholarship. is scholarship will assist students pursuing a degr ee at FSU Pa nama Ci ty honoring Dr Sh aw s s tudents rst philosophy To learn mor e about ho w yo u can suppor t FSU Pa nama City contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mb lo vingood@pc.fsu.edu Staff reports WASHINGTON, D.C. As promised in an April press conference at Chipleys WestPoint Home facility, U.S. Rep. Steve Souther land, II introduced legis lation (H.R. 4955) Wednes day to extend for 10 years a free-trade provision be tween the United States and Bahrain that is criti cal to keeping 260 North west Florida manufac turing jobs at WestPoint Home in Chipley. South erlands bill would keep in place a Tariff Preference Level (TPL) set to expire in January 2016, ensur ing WestPoint Home can continue accessing input materials imported from Bahrain. At a time when U.S. textile manufacturers are struggling to survive, WestPoint Home in Chi pley, Florida represents one of the few remain ing textile facilities in America, Southerland said. Unfortunately, this facility and its 260 highly skilled Washington Coun ty workers are at risk due to an expiring trade provi sion. I am proud to intro duce this legislation to en sure these jobs stay right here in Northwest Flori da, while also extending much-needed relief to an industry that has moved predominately overseas. As the President and CEO of the last major U.S. based home textiles producer, this is an issue my team has been very fo cused on, said Normand Savaria, president and CEO of WestPoint Home. The bottom line is that the proposed extension provides a mechanism to protect U.S. jobs. We ap preciate the recognition and focus of Congressman Steve Southerland on this critical issue. The Northwest Flori da Manufacturers Council supports the extension of the TPL program under the UBFTA in order to as sist the domestic textile industry and to secure jobs in Florida, said Greg Britton, president of the Northwest Florida Manu facturers Council. By creating a level playing eld, FTAs help Florida companies. The Mid-East region is an important trading block with Florida. The benets achieved under the USBahrain FTA are impor tant to creating opportu nities for manufacturers, small business and our goal to expand trade re lationships to global mar kets, said David Hart, executive vice president of the Florida Chamber of Commerce. SPE CIA L TO T I ME S -A D VER TIS ER Iris Mills Sherman will compete in National American Miss Pageant in Jacksonville Thursday, July 3 through Saturday, July 5. Iris is from Esto and is a stat nalist for the National American Miss Preteen pageant. By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Its that time of year again, with Bonifay Garden Club upping their ante with their 2014 Membership Campaign. Bonifay Garden Club has been known for their various projects throughout the community, such as planters at Doctors Memorial Hospital and down State Road 79 and 90 in Bonifay, celebrating arbor day with local children, memorial plantings like the one at Ponce de Leon Elementary School for Thomas Stanley, maintaining the Blue Star Marker, planters at Veterans Park, Christmas for residents at Dogwood Inn Assisted Living and Christmas ornament making with students at Bonifay Elementary School to name a few. Being a member of the garden club is about fellowship with fellow gardeners and learning more about becoming better at what we do, said Second Vice President and Membership Chair DiAnn Shores. We have classes at our meetings, which include cooking with herbs and art projects. We go on tours to different points of interest, such as the Dothan Botanical Garden and Fleming Day Lily Garden in South Port. Shores said that the club is trying new techniques for recruiting, such as the rst person to call Shores at 768-2766, become a member and pay the dues will get the second years membership for free. There will be a Membership Jamboree in August, which will be free to all residents in Holmes County to attend and the rst one to complete the application and join will get free membership for their spouse, children and grandchildren. Information about the Membership Jamboree has yet to be announced but for more information contact Shores at 768-2766. SPE CIA L TO T I ME S -A D VER TIS ER Rep. Steve Southerland visited Chipleys WestPoint Home in April to unveil his plan to introduce H.R. 4955, legislation that extends the current Tariff Preference Level, which is set to expire in January 2016. Legislation geared to protect 260 area jobs SHERMAN TO COMPETE IN NATIONAL P AGEANT D I A NN S HO RE S | Special to Times-Advertiser Bonifay Garden Club President Adonna Bartlett starting off this years membership campaign with a We Want You pose once popularly depicted in the J.M. Flaggs 1917 poster with Uncle Sam pointing to recruit soldiers for both World War I and World War II. Bonifay Garden Club rolling out green carpet for membership campaign 2014 Being a member of the garden club is about fellowship with fellow gardeners and learning more about becoming better at what we do. We have classes at our meetings, which include cooking with herbs and art projects. We go on tours to different points of interest, such as the Dothan Botanical Garden and Fleming Day Lily Garden in South Port. DiAnn Shores second vice president and membership chair Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

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Local A12 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, July 2, 2014

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SPORT S www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, July 2, 2014 A Page 13 Section Ebro: AJN Sweet Smoke readies for return The News Herald EBRO Mega Morris Stakes winner AJN Sweet Smoke has returned to Ebro Greyhound Park to resume his racing career among the best dogs at the track. AJN Sweet Smoke last appeared at Ebro on clos ing night in 2013 when he placed second to Randy Romero in the inaugu ral running of the Gold Collar. Most recently Smoke raced at Southland where he won 10 races and reached AA status. He schooled at Ebro on Tues day and won in a rather pedestrian time of 31.05 seconds, but is expected to regain form and assume a spot among the elite ani mals in the compound. AJN produced three schooling winners with Gabby Dee impressing with a 30.64 clocking. Shir run Kennels SEs Bar Star shined with a 30.41 and is a good bet to far surpass his 2013 season where he had six starts in B and C. He re cently competed in Grade A in Sarasota and could quickly assume that level at Ebro. RCK Big Red schooled in 30.76 after running last in his rst effort here. He will open in Grade D, and De N De Kennels Pat C Soft Touch should get a lot of attention in her maiden opener after win ning by 9 in a schooling run of 31.56. Thoroughbreds: Game On Dude, winner of the past two Hollywood Gold Cup races, seeks his third lifetime win in the 1-mile Grade I race today at Santa Anita. The $500,000 event will be run for the 75th time. The 7-year-old gelding Game On Dude will break from the rail and face six rivals, including Impera tive, who beat Dude by 1 lengths in the Grade II Charles Town Classic on April 19. A heavy 3-5 fa vorite, Game On Dude will seek his 17th career win from 33 starts and 32-16-71 overall with earnings of $6,408,893. Untapable, the easy win ner of the Kentucky Oaks, will make her rst start in New York when she com petes in the Grade I, $300,000 Mother Goose at Belmont Park. The 1 1/16-mile Mother Goose is race 4. Later today, the $100,000 Manila will be contested as race 8 and the Grade II, $200,000 New York will be race 9. Untapable is unbeaten in three starts this year. She was installed as the 1-5 favorite on the morning line and drew post posi tion 2. Untapables primary challenger is Stopcharg ingmaria, who is entering off a victory in the Grade II Black-Eyed Susan on May 16 at Pimlico. Whitson signs with Red Sox By BRAD MILNER 747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com Karsten Whitson took a longer route to the same destination. The former Chipley standout signed with the Boston Red Sox on Tuesday. The right-handed pitcher joins the Red Sox organization after four years with the Florida Gators after he turned down more than $2 million out of high school. San Diego selected Whitson ninth overall in 2010 and negotiations went on into late summer. The two sides were unable to agree on a contract and Whitson decided to pitch at Florida. He had a stellar freshman campaign for the Gators with eight victories before suffering a shoulder injury that erased his sophomore season. Whitson went in the 37th round to Washington last year. He pitched one more season at Florida, nishing 11 with a 3.86 ERA, 21 strikeouts and 23 walks in 14 appearances. Boston drafted him earlier this month and signed him for $100,000. It didnt quite work out the way that I would have wanted to with the master plan, but it worked out the way it was supposed to for me, Whitson told Masslive.com I feel great where Im at now and Ive got the degree in pocket so if this doesnt work out here in pro ball Ill have that to fall on. Whitson, who majored in family, youth and community services, has been assigned to Single-A Lowell, Mass., of the short-season New YorkPenn League. He has yet to appear in a game. Also in Lowell: Former Chipola star Danny Mars also is with Lowell after he signed with Boston as a sixth-round selection. Mars signed for $211,800 and also joined former teammate Palmer Betts in the pro ranks. Betts signed with Pittsburgh as a 36th-round choice. The righty has made two relief appearances for the Rookie League Bristol (Va.) Pirates. He made his pro debut June 19. Mars rst played on Tuesday for the Spinners, with three hits in his rst three at-bats. He had a double, triple, run scored and stolen base. He also played the following night and went 1 for 4. Mader debuts: Marianna and Chipola product Michael Mader made his pro debut in the Miami Marlins organization on Monday with SingleA Batavia, N.Y. The left-hander tossed two innings in a start with two strikeouts and three walks while not giving up any hits in a no-decision. He had one strikeout and no walks in one inning of a relief appearance on Wednesday. End of the road: Casey Rasmus, who competed for Gulf Coast, has retired from baseball at age 24. The catcher was added to the voluntarily retired list on June 11 with no reason reported. The brother of majorleaguer Colby Rasmus last played with Single-A Palm Beach and advanced as high as Double-A since being taken in the 36th round by St. Louis in 2011. AP Former Chipley standout Karsten Whitson, who played collegiately for the Florida Gators, signed with the Boston Red Sox last week. Tommy Oliver also home to Top 10 series Tommy Oliver Stadium has welcomed a number of compelling events since it opened in 1953. Among them have been high-prole track and eld meets, not to mention soccer games, high school graduations, band competitions and, of course, high school football regular season and playoff games. Therefore the urge to nalize a list of the 10 most memorable events to take place at the stadium located adjacent to the Bay High School campus. This is not intended to solicit nominations for what our readers might feel are shoe-ins for the 10 That Mattered series soon to be unveiled. The list already is complete, and surprise, it all came out of my head. So it isnt meant to be a rock-solid representation. Obviously there have been many more than 10 signicant occasions. And what might appear deserving one week, in another month might not seem so compelling. In short, there was no scientic process used in distilling more than 60 years of athletic excellence. Some of it represents individual brilliance, and other installments are more team specic. Yet others just seemed too damned important in retrospect to leave off the list. While not tipping the hand as to what is forthcoming, a sampling of what did not make the cut possibly is more revealing. Among them is the 0-0 football tie played by Bay and Rutherford in the rst meeting of the schools, which just happened to take place the evening of the day that JFK was assassinated in 1963. Likewise, the 446-yard rushing performance by Escambias Danikiee Hollowell didnt make it, merely because Rutherfords defense was unable to force a third down conversion the entire game when the teams met last September. The Gators either achieved a rst down or a touchdown on every rst down or second down snap. The lone exception was when Escambia spiked the ball on second down shortly before halftime so it could attempt a eld goal. So in a sense, Hollowell was penalized by Rutherfords lack of defense that evening in a 70-54 defeat. Neither did Derrick Brooks terric performance against Mosley in 1990 qualify. Nor did splendid sprinter T.J. Rush of Mosley in 1995, the year he won a national 200-meter title. Rushs greatest track and eld achievements actually took place away from Tommy Oliver Stadium. Also left off was Rutherfords shutout playoff performance against Merritt Island in 1997, the night the lights on the visitors side of the eld delayed the start of the game for more than an hour. It could be argued that the most signicant occasions at TOS came during high school graduations. Alas, dont expect to see them in this section. To recap, its just one mans opinion, and likely could be challenged for some of the memorable performances that took place prior to 1984, when a refugee from the Tundra rst landed here. They soon will appear daily starting with No. 10, until reaching a countdown to No. 1 more than a week later. The intention is to entertain, not to diminish some events that werent recognized. Sports Beat Pat McCann Executive Sports Editor pmccann@pcnh.com Local athletes on recruiting radar By PAT McCANN 747-5068 | Twitter: @patmccann pmccann@pcnh.com There hasnt been a large number of high-prole transfers of studentathletes from school to school in Bay County that sometimes punctuates the summer months here with rumor and innuendo. Thats not to say that everyone is staying put. But what has come under some scrutiny is a larger number than usual of local and area football talent showing up on major recruiters lists. Among them, in particular, are some football players at Bay and Vernon. Bay head football coach Jimmy Lon gerbeam said that ve Tornadoes al ready have received offers and another expects to play on the next level via an academic scholarship. A pair of rising juniors lead the way, with defensive end Janarius Robinson and offensive tackle Christion Gainer getting added attention off recent per formances at summer camps. Longerbeam said that Robinson, who currently is 6-foot-5 and weighs 231 pounds, has been offered by Florida State, North Carolina, North Carolina State, Tennessee, Michigan, Clemson, South Alabama and UAB. Gainer, who is 6-5, 285 and expected to add a couple of inches and 20 pounds by the time he graduates in spring 2016, is being recruited heavily by North Carolina and Tennessee and has more offers pending, Longerbeam said. Rising senior offensive lineman Ste ven Sain has North Carolina and West Florida on his radar, junior running back Raekwon Webb has been offered by Western Kentucky and senior run ning back Travion Turrell has commit ted to Alabama State. Longerbeam said wide receiver/ safety John Wallace will have an aca demic scholarship to Alabama State and is expected to play football there. Bobby Johns at Vernon said that senior linebacker Austin Brown has had 12-15 offers from Division I schools. Johns said the 6-4, 190-pounder is being recruited as an athlete, but probably projects as an outside linebacker. Junior middle linebacker Darrius Peterson, 6-1, 218, has been to camps in Kentucky and Georgia, and recently attended the USF camp. Johns expects quarterback Tristan Porter, 6-4, 195 to get attention and a pair of beefy linemen, Malik Sheppard, 326, and Alex Rosa, 308, may need to go the junior college route to play at the next level. Mosley coach Jeremy Brown said that Raekwon Jones, 6-2, 205, is getting a lot of attention as a hybrid linebacker or safety. His early list includes Florida Atlantic, Troy, South Alabama, Toledo and Buffalo. Tight end Trey Trzaska and quar terback Dillon Brown, could wind up playing in the Ivy League. Trzaska, 6-3, 200, also is used as an H-back and been offered by FAMU. Brown has been get ting some interest from Patriot League schools, and he could gain added atten tion if he adds a few inches on his 5-10 frame and has a solid senior season. He has the arm strength and doesnt make a lot of mistakes, Coach Brown said. He can make all of the throws. First-year Bozeman head coach Lyle Messer said that 6-3 quarterback David Elmore has been generating the most interest from colleges of Bucks players. This isnt intended as a complete list of local and area players gaining recruit ing recognition, but merely reective of the area head coaches who recently re turned calls. Vernons Rosa played at Bozeman the past few years, but originally trans ferred there from Vernon so in a sense is returning home. Bay has added a pair of former Rutherford Rams, but other wise the transfer season hasnt been especially busy thus far. Justin Davis, the younger brother of Bay County Offensive Player of the Year Dallas Davis, could be the highest prole athlete moving to a new school. Expected by some to assume the No. 1 quarterback duties for Rutherford, Justin Davis now attends Bay and could battle for that role in the fall. He has been joined at Bay by for mer Rams offensive lineman Kekoa Haiana-Scott. Liberty County coach Grant Grantham said his program has lost four players from families moving out of the area. Among them was starting guard Maze Holmes, but the other athletes were younger players, Grantham said. Longerbeam said that Javylon Wil son, who played mostly junior varsity football at Bay as a freshman, but was a key member of the Tornadoes basket ball varsity as a ninth-grader, will attend Mosley in the fall.

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Local A14 | Washington County News Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Car ol Kent: Family Advocate .H ometo wn Fan. Editor Carol re cently re tur ned home as editor for the News and Ti mes-Advertiser She sw ade d ri gh ti nt ot he task m aking sur ew ec ov er the good, bad and inter esting stuff that mak es living in small-to wn, rur al America so special. Family brought Carol home ,a nd it sw her es he wa nts her v ec hildr en to gr ow up ,i n the safe and nurturing environment she enjo ye d. Her efforts to ra ise aw ar eness about domestic violence and advocate for ch ildr en pro vides Carol aw ay to help other families in our community thrive as well. Because of our people ,w e deliver mor et han the news to Wa shington and Holmes counties. It sj ust another wa y that we re committed to our communities. No body deli ver sl ike w ed o. AH alif ax Media Group Compan y CE C ILIA SPEAR S | The Times-Advertiser Congressman Jeff Miller, Military/VA Liaison Steven Davis and intern A.J. Gamble along with Holmes Countys Director of Veterans Affairs Joseph Marsh were present for Millers veteran mobile ofce Thursday, June 19 at the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce. Jeff Miller veteran mobile ofce visits Bonifay By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIF A Y Rep. Jeff Millers veteran mobile of ce made a visit to Bonifay Thursday, June 19 at the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce with Represen tatives of Congress mem ber Jeff Miller, Military/VA Liaison Steven Davis and intern A.J. Gamble along with Holmes Countys Di rector of Veterans Affairs Joseph Marsh were pres ent to hear any concerns local veterans might be experiencing. This is just another way we can better serve our growing population in Northwest Florida, Miller said. We tried the mo bile ofce concept earlier and we had such an out standing turnout that we decided to expand the concept and add more dates and locations to the program. Marsh said he was pleased with the idea of working closely with the representatives from Congress, stating it helped smaller entities be held more accountable for the services they provide local veterans. With no one attending the rst half-hour of the visit Davis said it could be seen as a good sign that our veterans arent in need of assistance and the program is working as it should in Holmes County. For more information, questions or concerns visit www.house.gov/jeffmiller, call Davis at 479-1183 or Marsh at 547-2897. Holmes County ARRESTS JUNE 16 23 Jean Bielat, failure to appear on violation of probation on giving false name Daniel G. Bullard, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, possession of drug paraphernalia Charlie William Butler, child support Lisa Carrol, uttering a forged instrument Joseph Cox, housed for Hillsborough Jane Marie Creedon, violation of probation Terrick Crosby, hold for Hillsborough Kevin Eugene Cunningham, no charges listed Kevin Cunningham, aggravated battery Joel Fussell, violation of probation on controlled substance Cameron Garner, grand theft auto Edward James Hayman, driving under the inuence, driving while license suspended or revoked Eric Hensley, hold for Hillsborough Woodrow Wilson Johnson, out of county warrant Daniel Carey Jones, violation of probation on possession of marijuana, resist law enforcement ofcer without violence, obstruct crime Bryan Thomas Keough, violation of probation on possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, violation of probation on possession of drug paraphernalia Mark Anthony Land, driving while license suspended or revoked Joseph Lee, possession of meth Amber Nicole Maxwell, armed burglary Theresa Ann McCullough, failure to appear on petit theft Hunter Monday, grand theft James Ray Mullins, violation of probation on driving while license suspended or revoked Roman Pierce, out of county warrant Shenicka Pittman, violation of probation on issue of worthless checks Darrell Powell, violation of probation on driving while license suspended or revoked Melinda Faye Roberts, violation of probation on driving while license suspended or revokes Jamey Taylor, aggravated battery domestic violence Anthony Ray Turner, aggravated battery Warren Cody Ward, violation of probation on affray Kevin Welmon, out of county warrant Bryan Willis, hold for Hillsborough Holmes County DOCKET JUNE 23, 2014 Jeffery Shardon Morrill, trafcking in meth 200 grams or more; motion in limine, State of Floridas notice of intent to offer evidence pursuant to section, jury selection minutes Jamie Stuart Palmer, shooting into building or dwelling; defendant not present, referred to PTI program, case continued to July 9, 2014, for tracking purposes, mail notice Robin Elizabeth Weeks, grand theft motor vehicle; nolle prosequi led, defendant not present, court order a failure to appear capias issued with no bond, no action taken on surety bond To go or not to go that is the question Submitted by Roger Dale Hagen With the 2014 Hurri cane Season upon us one of the questions that is always in the back of our minds is whether or not we will evacuate if a storm is forecast to come near our community. Making the determination of what we will do makes the deci sion easier when the time comes. Holmes County Com mission Chairman Monty Merchant said, The deci sion to evacuate in the face of a whether It is a hurri cane, forest re, or ood is always a serious deci sion and should be made with the best information available to us. Leaving ones home not knowing what to expect can have a strong emotional impact on a person. That is why it is Important when making our personal protection plans we need to consider up front if evacuation is something we would consider. The board of county commissioners is making a concentrated effort to in sure the citizens and visi tors in Holmes County are protected and safe. Evacu ation is an option that many times could be a life saver. While strong ties to home and property some times cloud the decision of individuals the board wants every available op tion to be explored by the public. To move from the path of danger provides a better chance for survival than ignoring the warn ing and being injured or killed. Part of anyones plan ought to include the possi bility of evacuation, Mer chant said. Evacuation could mean moving to a newer sturdier building or it could mean leaving the area. Should a storm like Hugo, Andrew, Camille or Katrina come near the center of out county early and long distance evacu ation will give the better chance of survival. The board and our emergency management staff will never recommend evacu ation lightly. The weight of the evidence from reliable sources will always be con sidered before evacuation is called for The board encour ages that in the decision process anyone thinking about evacuation needs to decide early and leave early. While every effort will be made to Insure the safety of everyone, in a threat there comes a time when the staff and vol unteers have to seek and provide for their own safe ty. If an individual decides to evacuate after workers have taken refuge that de cision could end in tragic results. Commissioner Mer chant concluded by say ing, Anytime a threat presents itself to Holmes County the board and our staff will evaluate the im pact and severity of the threat. We will give early and frequent information to the public to assist the decision making. If evacu ation is a part of that de cision making we will be sure evacuation routes and shelters are clearly identied. Anyone needing infor mation on hurricane safe ty can contact the Holmes County Emergency Man agement Ofce at 547-1112 or by stopping in at 1001 E. U.S. Highway 90. You also can go online at http:// www.oridadisaster.org/ DEMpublic.asp and click on get a plan. Kiwanis to bring back the hype to Rodeo By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIF A Y The 70th Northwest Florida Cham pionship Rodeo is only a matter of months away and Bonifay Kiwanis Club President Sandy Spear said the club is working hard to make it one that no one will forget. Remember all the hype we used to get with Bad Company? Spear asked. We are recreat ing that same hype for the 70th anniversary of the Northwest Florida Cham pionship Rodeo. This year there will be a new scoreboard and new sound equipment as well as a nine foot by 11 foot screen which will pro vide video and advertising spots for sponsors. I also wanted to announce that we have secured the dog and mon key act that was so very popular, Spear said. Were also going through other ideas to get the hype back from our local folks so theyll come out and support one another. Were thinking of getting sponsors to have teams to compete in some fun activity, such as wild cow dressing or mutton busting. There will be increased efforts to have a large vari ety of memorabilia for the 70th anniversary such as shirts and rellable cups. Spear explained there are three things that make the rodeo successful sponsors, advertising and volunteers. Using volunteers helps put money back into what this rodeo is all about; the kids, she said. The more money we save the more we can put back into our children. Instead of four scholarships, we could have as many as ten, or more. Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

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Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, JULY 2, 2014 B P A GE 1 Section EXTRA By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com BONIFA Y Almost 10,000 people came out for the Panhandle Patriotic Celebration event Sunday, held at the Bonifay Recreation Field. That number is up from an attendance of about 7,000 last year. Presented by the Holmes County Ministerial Alliance, the event featured live gospel and contemporary music, vendors and the largest reworks display in Holmes or Washington counties. The Teen Challenge Color Guard opened the event with the presenting of the colors and with Amy Alderman singing the national anthem, followed by performances by Four Calvary, the Drummond Family and Ron Prince. This was the 11th year for the celebration, and more than 40 churches were on hand to give out free food and literature and provide games for the children. ChrisAnne Daniels had one of the best seats in the house for the reworks show when she sat on her dads shoulders (Ryan Daniels). P HOTO S B Y C A R O L KE NT | The Times-Advertiser More than 40 churches and organizations were on hand to offer free food, literature and cool treats to those in attendance. Holmes County celebrates God & country Racey English dressed in patriotic apparel in honor of the event. Live Oak Assembly of God gave out cotton candy at the event. See more photos on Page B2 Almost 10,000 people were in attendance of this years Panhandle Patriotic Celebration in Bonifay.

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Wednesday, July 2, 2014 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Panhandle Patriotic Celebration PHOTOS BY CAROL KENT | The Times-Advertiser Future Little Miss Holmes County Emma Fowler showed her patriotic pride. Ron Price was the last musical performance of the night. Cub Scout Pack #339 passed out free cookies. Bailey Bauer gives candy to Jaylynn Ingle at the Knights of Columbus tent. The Drummond Family was one of several to perform gospel songs for the crowd. Four Calvary performed several of their gospel hits. The bouncy house was available to help entertain area children. Amanda Ditto enjoyed cotton candy, given out by Live Oak Assembly.

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Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Crossword PUZZLE SOLUTION ON PAGE XX Commissioner arrested in Tallahassee in altercation By KARL ETTERS Tallahassee Democrat TALLAHASSEE A Jackson County commissioner was arrested at a Tal lahassee nightclub Tuesday after po lice say he abrupt ly punched another patron. Jeremy Branch, 31, was arrested by Tallahassee police on a charge of mis demeanor battery. He was taken to the Leon County Jail and later released on $500 bail. According to court records, two men ac cidentally bumped into Branch at Bajas Beach Club about 2 a.m. After they apologized, Branch punched one in the face without provocation. The victim contacted police, who observed dried blood on the mans shirt and nose. He told police he wanted to press charges because he was punched for no reason. Witnesses corroborated the victims story. Court records show Bajas secu rity staff escorted Branch out of the club. When he was confronted by police, he refused to give details of the incident and repeatedly said, Im a county commissioner in Jackson County, dont you put your hands on me. Branch said in an inter view, While Im certainly not the first North Florida man to get caught up in a barroom tussle, Im sorry it happened and Im em barrassed I put myself in that situation. Branch said he was at the bar for a birthday cel ebration and had drank alcohol, but not to the point of intoxication. His seat on the commis sion is up for re-election in November, but Branch announced prior to the incident he would not be running again. He has an August court date. The victim, Kevonte Ford of Tallahassee, said in an interview his nose was broken and he was having corrective surgery today. Branch is taking the in cident seriously. I lost my temper and I shouldnt have, he said. I understand that public officials are held to a high er standard than most. Thats not an excuse. I dont believe it will hinder my ability serve Jackson County. JEREMY BRANCH Summer Food Program HO LME S C O U NT Y The Holmes District School Summer Food Program is going on now and will end Thursday, July 3. This program is free to all school age students and will include breakfast and lunch. It will be offered at Bonifay Elementary, Ponce de Leon Elementary, Bethlehem and Poplar Springs schools. Wausau Fourth of July parade WA U SA U Wausau will hold its rst Fourth of July parade at 10 a.m., Friday, July 4. The parade will run right through the middle of historic Wausau. Varnum R eunion S U NN Y HI LL S The 27th annual Varnum reunion is at 11 a.m. on Saturday, July 5, at the Sunny Hills Community Center. Bring a covered dish and a healthy appetite for a day full of family, fellowship, food and fun. The center is 2.3 miles off Highway 77 on Challenger Boulevard in Sunny Hills. For more information or to RSVP, contact Gloria Clark (daughter of Evelyn Varnum) at 703-9840 or email her at gloriamclark@att.net. C ullifer R eunion W E STVI LLE The Cullifer reunion is at 11 a.m., Saturday, July 5, at Evergreen Baptist Church, 2156 Highway 179A in Westville. Please bring a covered dish to share. Also, bring any photos and family history to share. For more information, call Carol at 956-2752. B raves vs. New Y ork M ets WASHINGTON/HO LME S C O U NT Y The Krafty Katz Relay for Life team is holding fundraiser to see the Atlanta vs. New York Mets, Saturday, Sept. 20. Tickets are $100 and include the bus ride to and from Atlanta and eld level seats to the game. The bus will leave Chipley at 12:30 p.m. and return at about 1 a.m. To insure seat on the bus, call Vicki Lamb at 326-3319 or 638-1483 by July 15. Kolmetz Sing V ER NON The Kolmetz Sing is at 6:30 p.m. Friday, July 11, at Live Oak Baptist Church in Vernon. The church is on River Road. For more information, call Bertha Padgett at 535-2737. Holmes County 4-H offers youth summer workshop BONIFA Y Holmes County 4-H has a summer day workshop open for youth ages eight and up this summer. 4-H Moo-Lah Money Camp is scheduled from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursday, July 24, at the Holmes County Ag Center. The cost is $25 per youth. Snacks and drinks included. Children will need to bring a sack lunch. Youth can register at the University of Florida/IFAS Extension, Holmes County 4-H Ofce. Registration will remain open until July 11, 2014. For more information about this event, contact Niki Crawson, UF IFASHolmes County Extension 4-H Agent, at 547-1108, ncrawson@u.edu or check out our website at holmes.ifas.u.edu. Kolmetz Reunion VERNON The 50th Kolmetz Reunion is at 10 a.m. on Saturday, July 12, at the Hinson Crossroads Fire Department on Douglas Ferry Road in Vernon. Please bring a covered dish to share. For more information, call Bertha Padgett at 535-2737. Taylor Reunion GRACEVILLE William L. (Buddy) Taylor reunion will be held at noon on Saturday, July 12, at Salem United Methodist Church in Graceville. Bring a covered dish to share at lunch. Please bring any old pictures to share with the family. For more information, call Ruth Taylor at 415-1062. Fizz, boom, read WASHINGTON COUNTY Fizz, boom, read is sparking imaginations all across Washington County. Six weeks of radioactive fun is underway, the Chipley main branch, Sunny Hills and Country Oaks branches of the Washington County Library and at the Vernon City Hall are all laboratories for this summer fun. This event will be held at the Chipley branch every Monday at 10 a.m. for pre-K through second grade and at 3 p.m. for third through eighth grade, through Monday, July 14, at the Vernon City hall in room three every Tuesday at 3 p.m. through Tuesday, July 22: at the Country Oak branch every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. through Wednesday, July 23, and at the Sunny Hills branch every Wednesday at 3 p.m. through Wednesday July 23. If you would like to pictures of our summer reading mix, please check out the kids blog at wcplkidsrule. blogspot.com. For more information, call Zedra Hawkins at 638-1314. HCPL summer programs BONIFA Y The Holmes County Public Librarys summer programs are now underway and are being held every Friday through July 25. All programs will be held at the library except the program for Friday, July 25, which will be held at the Holmes County Agricultural Center. Programs will begin at 10 a.m. each day. On July 11 during the Mad Scientist program, children will have the chance to participate in games and activities that involve experiments. On July 18, Balloon Man will be at the library to make balloon animals and tell stories. The nal program on July 25 and will be a day of food, fun, and games with friends and family. Smoking Cessation BONIFA Y Big Bend AHEC along with the Florida Department of Health in Holmes County will be offering a free smoking cessation class from 4-6 p.m., Monday, July 28. Class will be held at the Florida Department of Health in Holmes County 603 Scenic Circle, Bonifay. Free nicotine replacement patches, gum and lozenges are available. Class covers all forms of tobacco. For more information, contact Leann Jones at 547-8500 ext. 240 or email jlewis@bigbendahec. org No person shall, on the grounds of age, color, disability, national origin, race, religion or sex be excluded from participation in, be denied benets of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity receiving or beneting from federal nancial assistance. Sensory impaired or limitedEnglish prociency patients will be provided with necessary aids and interpreters at no cost by calling Fran Amerson at 547-8500 ext. 234. Swimming lessons set at Chipola MARIANNA Chipola College will offer Childrens swimming lessons for ages 4 and older on the following dates: Monday, July 14 through Thursday, July 24, with a registration deadline of Thursday, July 10; Session 3: Monday, Aug. 4, through Thursday, Aug., 14, with a registration deadline of Thursday, July 31. Classes are available at 10 a.m. or 7 p.m. Sessions include eight 45-minute classes, which meet Monday through Thursday for two weeks. Lessons are based on a combination of nationally recognized methods. Cost of each twoweek session is $55. Preregistration is required, with a $5 late registration fee. For more information, call 718-2473 or visit www. chipola.edu. Free Family History Class SUNNY HILLS Whos your Daddys Daddy? For those who have wondered who they are and why theyre here, and how they can nd out free of charge: two sister missionaries from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are hosting a weekly class providing introduction, instruction, and assistance in using the Churchs free family history website, FamilySearch.org, from 4::30-6 p.m. every Wednesday at the Sunny Hills Library at 4083 Challenger Blvd. For more information, call the sister missionaries at 525-9768. If no one answers, be sure to leave a message. Healthy cooking demonstration classes BONIFA Y Join us for healthy cooking demonstration classes sponsored by the Florida Department of Health in Holmes County and University of Florida/ IFAS Extension. All classes are free. The classes will be held at 12 p.m., at the Holmes County Agriculture Center, 1173 E. U.S. 90, Bonifay, on the following dates: Wednesday, July 16, Wednesday, Aug. 20, Wednesday, Sept. 17, Wednesday, Oct. 22, Wednesday, Nov. 19 and Wednesday, Dec. 17. The classes will offer healthy cooking tips and alternatives for everyday meals. Food samples will be served. No registration is required. Extension programs are open to everyone. For persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations, contact the Holmes County Extension Ofce, 547-1108, (TDD, via Florida Relay Service, 1-800-955-8771) at least ve working days prior to the class so that proper consideration may be given to the request. For more information, contact Leann Jones at 547-8500 x240. Community EVENTS JACKSON COUNTY I lost my temper and I shouldnt have. I understand that public ofcials are held to a higher standard than most. Thats not an excuse. I dont believe it will hinder my ability serve Jackson County. Jeremy Branch Jackson County commissioner Staff Reports Emma Grace Fowler is the current Future Lit tle Miss Holmes County, but while shes a rein ing beauty queen, shes also showing others the beauty of giving back through civic service. Fowler recently held a food drive for the North west Florida Miss Heart of Freedom pageant in Panama City Beach. Recently crowned Northwest Florida Miss Heart of Freedom Queen of Hearts, Fowler collected and donated 697 non-perishable food items to the Rescue Mission in Panama City Beach. I like helping others and my community, she said. Fowler will be com pete at the pageants state level in September. To help her reach her goal of donating a total of 1000 non-perishable food items, visit http://www. gofundme.com/an0slw. All funds received will be used to buy the food items for donation. Local beauty queen shows inner beauty EMMA GRACE FOWLER

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Register ,C PA 15 52 Bric ky ard Ro ad Chipley ,F L 638-4251 PE RS ON AL TO UC H CA RC AR E "W ET AK EP RI DE IN CA RI NG FO RY OU RC AR 10 6W .E va ns ,B on if ay 54 7333 0 Fi rst Ba pi st Church Come as you are Fi rst B ap ist Church Come as you are Fi rst B ap ist Church Come as you are It s not wh at we do bu th ow we do it 98 2O ra ng eH il lR oad ,C hi pl ey 63 895 05 507 W. Hwy 90, Bonifay (850) 547 -1 877 13 57 Bric ky ard Rd., Chipley (850) 638-0424 HA VE YOUR UNIT SER VICED TO SA VE ON YOUR ELECTRIC BILL (850) 263-2823 1075 N. HWY .7 9 BON IF AY ,F L P&P PROGRES SIVE REAL TY "See us for all your Realty needs" 850-638-8220 1046 Main St. |C hipley OB ER T FU NER AL HOM E (850) 547-2163 219 N. Wa ukesha St. Bonifay ,F L Johnson sP harmacy 879 Us er yR oa d, Ch ip le y, Fl or id a3 2428 850-638-4654 Washington Rehabilitatio n& Nursing Center Mo or e Co Po rt er Pa in tS al es Ba it &T ac kl e 22 06 Hi gh wa y1 77 A, Bonif ay 850 -5 47 -9 51 1 Li ke us on Fa ce book @ Moo re Co of Bon if ay ,F lor ida 1882 Jac kson Av e. Chiple yF L 850-63 8-7445 www .aandb autosale s.net Shop With The Res tT hem Com eT oT he A&B AUTO SALES FAITH Wednesday, July 2, 2014 B Page 4 Section www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com From staff reports Fourth Sunday mission supper BONIFAY Red Hill United Methodist Church will host its Fourth Friday Mission Supper, Friday, June 27 at Red Hill United Methodist Church. The menu is fried catsh llets, smoked chicken, baked beans, cheese grits, coleslaw, hushpuppies and dessert. We will begin serving at 5:00 p.m. First Free Will to host One Heart BONIFAY The First Free Will Baptist Church of Bonifay will host the Christian band One Heart at 6 p.m., Saturday, June 28. Refreshments will follow the concert. The church is at the corner of Oklahoma and Kansas in Bonifay. Gospel sing WESTVILLE Limestone Community Church will host a Gospel Sing at 6 p.m., Saturday, June 28. The church is at 92 Beck Bridge Road, in Westville; in the Darlington Community area. For more information, call Pastor Randon Carroll 307-2609. Annual Panhandle patriotic celebration BONIFAY The Holmes County Ministerial Association, along with numerous area churches, businesses and individuals, will hosted the Annual Panhandle Patriotic Celebration from 6 to 9 p.m. Sunday, June 29, at the Recreation Complex in Bonifay. The event began with the Posting of the Flag by cadets from West Florida Teen Challenge. The National Anthem was presented by Amy Alderman, who then joined with the Chipola Shanakies for opening music. Additional musical entertainment for the night included Four Calvary, The Drummond Family and Chris Lauen and Friends. Immediately after the singing of the National Anthem, booths offered free food, games, desserts and other items will open. Later in the evening, a special patriotic video was presented. The event also had a spectacular reworks display. Christian Haven monthly gospel jam CHIPLEY Christian Haven Church will host their monthly gospel jam at 6 p.m., Saturday, July 5. The jam will begin immediately after refreshments. For more information call 773-2602. Bonifay Southern Gospel Sing The Bonifay Southern Gospel Sing will be at 5 p.m. Saturday, July 5, at Holmes County High School. This years lineup will include Kevin Williams (guitarist for the Gaither Vocal Band), Wes Hampton (Tenor for the Gaither Vocal Band), the Nelons, Four Calvary, and One Heart. Adult tickets are $15 in advance and $18 at the door, ages 6 to 12 are $5 advance and $8 at the door and admission is free for ages 5 and younger. For more information, or to purchase tickets, please call 547-1356 or email four_ calvary@yahoo.com. Art day camp CHIPLEY Chipley First Presbyterian Church will host an art day camp from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Monday, July 21 through Friday, July 25 at the church. At the art day camp, children will celebrate those gifts that are directly related to the visual arts, drawing, painting, sculpture and so on. The camp is limited to 20 students ages 8 to 14. Students must be registered by July 10. The church is at 658 5th St. in Chipley. For more information or to register call 638-1653. St. Anne to host Life Line Screening MARIANNA St. Anne Catholic Church at 3009 5th St., Marianna will host Life Line Screening, a leading provider of communitybased preventive health screenings Thursday, July 24. In order to register for this event and to receive a $10 discount off any package priced above $129, call 888-653-6441 or visit www.lifelinescreening. com/community-partners. Back to school clothes give away CHIPLEY Oakie Ridge Baptist Church will be giving away back to school clothes for all ages from 8 to 11:30 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 2 at the church. The church is 11 miles south of Chipley on the Orange Hill Highway. For more information, call Lori at 638-2340. Unity Faith Riders The Unity Faith Riders would like to invite everyone to its monthly community breakfast at 7 a.m. every fourth Saturday in the month, at the Vernon Fire Department. Breakfast is free, but donations to the ministry are accepted. For more information, call Johnathan Taylor at 768-2444. Northside Assembly of God VBS BONIFAY Northside Assembly of God will host Vacation Bible School from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. July 14 through July 18. This years theme is Sons Surf Beach Shop. Faith EVENTS People gather in Paxton to honor fallen law ofcers By TRISTA PRUETT 315-4445 | @TristaPnwfdn tpruett@nwfdailynews.com PAXTON Lakewood Park was almost si lent Saturday morning while the names of fallen law enforcement ofcers in Florida were read. Blue Knights motor cycle riders, ofcers and deputies, family, friends and residents were gath ered at the park for the 2014 Summit for Heroes, also known as Cops on Top. The annual summit is a nationwide event held the last Saturday in June. Law ofcers and other participants climb to the highest point in the state and hold a memorial cer emony to recognize those who have lost their lives in the past year. As we read those names, we are reminded that the safety we provide sometimes comes at a devastating price, Wal ton County Sheriffs Maj. Brian Schultz said during the ceremony. The names of the 11 men, women and K-9s killed in the line of duty in 2013 and so far this year were read. Because Floridas highest point is in Walton County, the Sheriffs Ofce spearheads the ceremony. Sheriffs Lt. Artie Ro driguez is the team leader for Cops on Top Team Florida. Id like to one day have a ceremony here where we dont have any names read, he said. However, he said law ofcers always know that they might go to work one day and not return home. He noted that Cops on Top often is confused with National Police Week in May. This is more of a me morial service, Rodri guez said. Thats more of appreciation. He said when the event started in Florida in 2010 it drew about 10 people. Now, thanks largely to the Blue Knights, who got involved in 2012, that number has more than quadrupled and con tinues to grow. The Blue Knights are made up of current and former law ofcers. Bill Brandenburg, president of Florida Chapter 31, said the riders are just there to help. We want to make sure it doesnt get forgotten, Brandenburg said. Its very near and dear to me. He said they hope to put some sort of monu ment at the park that rec ognizes the fallen ofcers year-round.

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Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! W ith your paid obituar y family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos fr ee of charge. Find Obituaries. Shar e Condolences. In par tnership with Find obituaries, shar e condolences and celebrate a life at or Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 OBITUARIES Kelly Scott Boyington, 44, of Caryville, died June 25, 2014. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Kelly S. Boyington KELLY BOYINGTON Mr. Comer White, 98 of Bonifay, went to be with the Lord on Monday, June 23, 2014, at Southeast Alabama Medical Center in Dothan, Ala. Born Monday, Aug. 30, 1915, in Geneva County, Ala. He is preceded in death by his parents, Samuel White and Mamie Lee White and by his wife of 71 years, Alma White. Surviving are sons, Larry White and wife Mary of Bonifay, Tommy White and wife Marie of Malvern, Ala., and Devon White and wife, Patsy, of Tallahassee; daughter, Carolyn Judd of Bonifay; seven grandchildren, Dwayne White, Bobby White, Ronnie Sellers, Donnie Sellers, Amanda White, Becky Harrison and Joy Herring and 13 great-grandchildren. A funeral was at 10 a.m. Thursday, June 26, 2014, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Ike Steverson and the Rev. Gary Taylor ofciating. Interment followed in St, Johns Cemetery, Bonifay, with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 9 to 10 a.m., on Thursday, June 26, 2014, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Comer White Broward Anderson Nunery, 64, of Vernon, died June 20, 2014. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Broward A. Nunery Mrs. Julia Munn Moore, 93, of Graceville, died on June 24, 2014, in her home at Hillview Assisted Living. Mrs. Moore was born in Jefferson, S.C., on July 4, 1921. She grew up on a farm, the youngest of nine children. She came to Sanford, in 1942 to work with her sister and brother-inlaw and later had the opportunity to work for the U.S. Weather Bureau and U.S. Army Air Corp in Lakeland. While in Lakeland she met her future husband, a chaplain in the U.S. Army Air Corp. Later she also worked in Tallahassee, and Meridian, Miss., for the Weather Bureau. After her marriage, she served alongside her husband in his positions as a pastor and director of missions in Florida and North Carolina. After their retirement, they made several volunteer mission trips, including a year in St. Vincent, Caribbean, and a year in Togo, West Africa. She was preceded in death by her husband, the Rev. John Moore; her parents, Thomas Franklin and Grover Sullivan Munn; eight brothers and sisters, and son-in-law, Irvin Murrell. She is survived by a daughter, Phoebe Murrell of Graceville; son, Philip Moore and wife, Karen, of Thompsons Station, Tenn.; son, Stephen Moore and wife, Jean, of Askewville, N.C.; grandsons, Trey Murrell, Greg Moore, Bryan Moore, David Moore, Mark Moore, Matthew Moore and Joshua Moore and 12 great-grandchildren. A celebration of life service was at 6 p.m. Friday, June 27, at First Baptist Church, with the Rev. Stephen Moore and the Rev. Tim Folds ofciating. Burial was at 2 p.m. EDT Saturday, June 28, 2014, in DeLand. James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Memorials may be made to the Mission Trust Fund at First Baptist Church, Graceville, or Covenant Hospice. Expressions of sympathy can be made at James & Lipford Funeral Home. Julia M. Moore George Dennis Hofmann, 52, of Esto, died, June 23, 2014. A memorial service was June 27, 2014, at Union Hill Baptist Church. Family received friends Friday at Union Hill Baptist Church. George D. Hofmann T ony A. Holley Sr. Tony Alton Holley Sr., 78 of Chipley, passed away peacefully at home surrounded by his loving family on June 11, 2014. Tony was born Oct. 11, 1935, in Ferndale to Lyman and Lois (Walker) Holley. He served in the United States Marine Corps Reserves and worked as a truck driver. He lived in Washington County, coming from Apopka in 1973. He was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Chipley Ward. He was preceded in death by his parents, Lyman and Lois Holley; son, Justin Holley and sister, Drenda Raines. He is survived by his loving wife of 43 years, Linda Kay Holley; ve sons, Tony Holley Jr. and wife, Elena, of Chipley, Lyman Holley and wife Shawndra of Chipley, Warren Holley of Apopka, Vincent Holley and wife Alice of Canandaigua, N.Y., John Bain and wife, Debbie, of Huson, Mont.; ve daughters, Toni Qualls and husband, Mike, of Vernon, Rhonda Klaas and husband, Doug, of Apopka, Linda Allen and husband, Shawn, of Lakeland, Nancy Gilbert and husband, John, of Chipley and Karen Dodd and anc, Steve White, of Chipley; brother, Victor Holley of Enterprise, Ala.; sister, Loretta Beier of Ocoee; 24 grandchildren and 18 great grandchildren. A funeral was at 4 p.m. Sunday, June 15, 2014, at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in Bonifay, with Bishop John Gilbert and Michael Kriser ofciating. The family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m., Saturday, June 14, 2014, at their home at 2440 Hard Labor Road, Chipley. Interment followed at Hard Labor Cemetery on Hard Labor Road in Chipley. Flowers accepted or donations can be made to Covenant Hospice, Marianna, FL. Obert Funeral Home of Chipley directing. Frances D. Lovett Frances Dykes Lovett, 88, died Saturday, June 22, 2014, at The Bridge at Bay Saint Joseph in Port St. Joe. She was born Jan. 18, 1926, to Josh S. and Nina Dykes in Holmes County. On July 4, 1942, she married Joel Byron Lovett, deceased. The pair, married for 63 years, lived in Port St. Joe from 1946 to 1977 before retiring to their farm in Washington County. Preceding her in death were one brother, Herbert Dykes, and two sisters, Minnie Lee Lovett and Patricia Lewis. Survivors include two children and their spouses, J. Howard Lovett and Penny Webb Lovett, and Paula Lovett Waller and Herschel Tucker (H.T.) Waller Jr., all of Panama City; a sister, Dorothy Haddock; a brother, Charles Lewis, both of Washington County; a sister, Mary Lou Stripling, of DeRidder, La.; four grandchildren, Van Lovett (Grace) of Tallahassee, India Waller Witte (David) of Tampa, Valerie Lovett Sale (Blair) of Panama City and Ashley Waller of Panama City and four great-grandchildren, Jack and Abby Lovett and Ingalls and Tucker Witte. Family received friends for visitation Tuesday, June 24, 2014 at 10 a.m., with funeral services beginning at 11 a.m. at Bonnett Pond Church with the Rev. Ricky Lovett ofciating with burial immediately following in the church cemetery. Funeral arrangements were coordinated by Browns Funeral Home of Chipley. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net. L IBRARY H OURS WAUSAU L IBRARY Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed HOL M ES COUNTY L IBRARY ( B ONI F AY) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed WAS H INGTON COUNTY L IBRARY (C H IPLEY) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed VERNON L IBRARY Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed S UNNY HILLS L IBRARY Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed M ON D AY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6 p.m.: Third Monday Holmes/Washington Relay For Life Meeting at Patillos 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach ofce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999. TUES D AY 8 to 9 a.m.: Tai Chi Class at the Washington County Public Library, Chipley Branch 8 to 10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 6:10 p.m..: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at speedball 6:10 p.m., Early bird 6:20, session 6:50 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-7654 or 638-7654 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A W E D NES D AY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Bible Study 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. T H URS D AY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. 11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 1 p.m.: Caregivers Meeting at Washington County Council on Aging in Chipley for more information, call 638-6216 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society second Thursday of each month. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Line Dancing Class for more information call 638-6216 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A. F RI D AY 6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper 4th Friday of every month January September. 6-8 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging 50+ dance club for more information call 638-6216 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a get-together for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Methodist Youth Center in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. SATUR D AY 8 a.m. North Bay Clan of The Lower Muskogee Creek Yard Sale rst Saturday of the month until 2 p.m. 1560 Lonnie Road. Free Medical Clinic in Graceville Opens 10am third and fth Saturday of the month. Call 263-6912 or 272-0101 for information. The Holmes County Community Health Clinic located at 203 W. Iowa St., Bonifay, will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., the rst and third Saturday. The Alford Community Health Clinic will be open the 2nd and 4th Saturdays of each month, from 10 a.m. until the last patient is seen. 10 a.m. noon: Childrens education day fourth Saturday of every month North Bay Clan Tribal Grounds, 1560 Lonnie Road. Community CALENDAR

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Wednesday, July 2, 2014 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Scene around From staff reports This page features photos, submitted by our staff, readers and guests, taken in and around Holmes and Washington counties. We hope to make this a weekly feature, so if you have a photo taken locally that highlights life as we know it in our community, please share. Submit photos, along with a brief description and location taken, to Ckent@chipleypaper.com. SUBMITTED BY LUTHER M OORE This snake decided Luther Moores chicken coop in Bonifay was the perfect place to nd a late afternoon snack. Some children ask for candy as a treat, but not Maverick Collins. Maverick says he likes the fresh apples from Chipleys Main Street Market. SUBMITTED BY D AVID CO LL IN S SUBMITTED BY CRY S TA L CARTER Lawson Carter gets a cool new summer do, courtesy of Lisa Maphis at Sassy Ladys Boutique in Chipley. Cullan and Coren Murray took a moment to stop and pick fresh blueberries at Gainer Blueberry Farm in Washington County. SUBMITTED BY CHRI S M URRAY SUBMITTED BY CRY S TA L CARTER Edible robots were spotted at the Chipley branch of the Washington County Library. CE C I L IA SPEAR S | The Extra The moon over Holmes County seemed extra special to Cecilia Spears last week. This photo was taken near her Bonifay home. SUBMITTED BY JAKE M IKE LL This unusual sky shot was taken near Ponce de Leon. Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

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Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B7 Wednesday, July 2, 2014 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 6-3379 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA IN RE: ESTATE OF ELLA T. SCOTT FILE NO. : 14-CP-55 DIVISION: PROBATE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ELLA T. SCOTT, deceased, whose date of death was on August 9, 2013, and whose social security number is XXX-XX-6355, is pending in the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit Court for Washington County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1331 South Blvd, Chipley, Florida 32428, file number 14 CP -55. The names and addresses of the person publishing this notice and attorney are set forth below..All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is June 25th, 2014. Beneficiary: THERESSA DIANNE ROGERS 7120 Ridgeglen Court, Jacksonville, Florida 32216-7113 Attorney: James J. Goodman, Jr. Jeff Goodman P.A. 946 Main Street, Chipley, FL 32428 850-638-9722 Florida Bar No. 0071877 June 25, July 2, 2014 7-3371 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given that Bob Forrest Germany, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 2602 Year of Issuance 2009 Parcel 06-0380-0049 Assessed to: Reuven Presser, Description of Property: LOT 49, BLOCK 0380, SUNNY HILLS UNIT 6, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 60-76. All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Washington County Government Complex main entrance, 1331 South Blvd, Chipley, Florida, on July 23, 2014 at 10:00 AM. Harold Bazzel, Clerk Ad Interim, Washington County, Florida. By: Kay Haddock, Deputy Clerk June 25, July 2, 9, 16, 2014 7-3372 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given that Business Evaluation Appraisal, Inc, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 1187 Year of Issuance 2007 Parcel 01-0031-0024 Assessed to: Jerome A and Arlene A Kolata, Description of Property: LOT 24, BLOCK 0031, SUNNY HILLS UNIT 1, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 9-27. All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Washington County Government Complex main entrance, 1331 South Blvd, Chipley, Florida, on July 23, 2014 at 10:00 AM. Harold Bazzel, Clerk Ad Interim, Washington County, Florida. By: Kay Haddock, Deputy Clerk June 25, July 2, 9, 16, 2014 7-3373 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice Is Hereby Given that Business Evaluation & Appraisal Inc, the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Parcel number, Certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number 1184 Year of Issuance 2007 Parcel 1-0031-0014 Assessed to: Chester and Emily Okon, Description of Property: LOT 14, BLOCK 0031, SUNNY HILLS UNIT 01, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 9-27. All of said property being located in the County of Washington, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such Certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Washington County Government Complex main entrance, 1331 South Blvd, Chipley, Florida, on July 23, 2014 at 10:00 AM. Harold Bazzel, Clerk Ad Interim, Washington County, Florida. By: Kay Haddock, Deputy Clerk June 25, July 2, 9, 16, 2014 7-3391 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WASHINGTON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 67-2012-CA-000132 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF FORREST S. SMITH A/K/A FOREST SCOTT SMITH A/K/A FORREST SMITH, DECEASED; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; CHERRY SMITH; FOREST SMITH; KEVIN SMITH Defendants AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF FORREST S. SMITH A/K/A FOREST SCOTT SMITH A/K/A FORREST SMITH, DECEASED Last Known Address UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 17, BLOCK 575, OF SUNNY HILL, UNIT TEN, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGES 108-118, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WASHINGTON COUNTY,FLORIDA a/k/a 17 LOT CHANNING DR., CHIPLEY, FL 32428 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of you written defenses, if any, to it, on Marinosci Law Group, P.C., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 100 W. Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 on or before July 16, 2014, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the THE STAR file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demand in the complaint. This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the folSpecial to Extra For the week ending June 27, 2014 At Georgia Livestock Auction, receipts totaled $11,721 compared to $9,764 last week and $8,473 one year ago. Compared to one week earlier, slaughter cows $2 to $3 higher, bulls to $1 to $2 higher, feeder steers and heifers steady to $3 higher and bulls $2 to $3 higher, steer calves $2 to $5 higher, bull calves $2 to $5 higher, heifer calves $1 to $4 higher and replacement cows were mostly steady to $3 higher. At Alabama Livestock Auctions, total estimated receipts this week $14,000, compared to $12,281 last week and $11,920 one year ago. Compared to one week ago slaughter cows sold $1 to $3 higher and bulls sold $1 to $3 higher. Replacement cows and pairs sold mostly steady. All feeder classes sold $2 to $6 higher. Trade active, with good demand on feeders. Livestock auction RESULTS With the Fourth of July holiday come celebrations and outdoor activities that can be fun for people, but sometimes harmful for our pets. Here are some tips to keep this day an enjoyable and safe holiday for the whole family, Fido included. Fireworks can frighten dogs and cause them to escape and become injured, said Dr. James Barr, assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Make sure your pet is supervised during the day and nighttime hours as well. The best idea is to keep dogs, particularly those with noise phobias, away from the commotion if at all possible. Another factor that can cause anxiety and stress in dogs is being around large crowds of unfamiliar people. If you know ahead of time that your dogs do not do well with large groups, it is better to leave them at home or board them for the day. If you do decide to bring them to the festivities, it is recommended to have a safe, calm area where the dogs can relax. Being outdoors in the hot humid environment may cause those pets not used to the heat to have problems with heat, Barr said. Allow the pets to be in a shaded area and have plenty of fresh water available at all times. Additionally, it is imperative that you closely supervise Fido or Fluffy throughout the day and night so that they arent tempted to indulge in the human food. July 4th celebrations bring with them many tasty human treats that might be toxic to animals, and with the large crowds of people, that can be easily and unnoticeably accessed by our pets. Accidental ingestion of rich foods and bones are common on July 4th, Barr said. Be careful about what your pets have access to and make sure to keep a close eye on them to avoid sickness. Another good rule of thumb is if you are going to be in a place where unvaccinated dogs might be, such as soccer elds, baseball elds, or parks; you want to make sure your dogs are up-to-date on their vaccinations. It isnt smart to take an unvaccinated puppy, or a dog that hasnt completed the whole vaccine series, to a place with potential transmittable diseases or threats. Keeping these tips in mind, you and your whole family can enjoy Fidos presence while celebrating this fun-lled holiday. R ESULTS Feeder S teers Medium and large frame No. 1 and 2 300-400 pounds Georgia: $265 to $312 Alabama: $270 to $318 400-500 pounds Georgia: $227 to $260 Alabama: $235 to $270 500-600 pounds Georgia: $205 to $240 Alabama: $210 to $239 Feeder Heifers Medium and large frame No. 1 and 2 300-400 pounds Georgia: $230 to $275 Alabama: $237 to $275 400-500 pounds Georgia: $208 to $237 Alabama: $212 to $245 500-600 pounds Georgia: $185 to $217 Alabama: $194 to $220 S laughter Cows 90 percent lean 750-,200 pounds Georgia: $98 to $104 Alabama: $97 to $102 85 percent boner 1,250-1,500 pounds Georgia: $105 to $112 Alabama: $105 to $110 S laughter Bulls Yield grade No. 1 and 2 1,500-2,100 pounds Georgia: $120 to $127 Alabama: $122 to $127 PETS OF THE WEEK PH OTOS SPE C IAL TO E XTRA These are just a couple animals looking for a good home. Animal Control of West Florida serves Washington, Holmes, and surrounding counties and has many more in need of adoption. For more information on how to adopt or volunteer, visit the shelter, located at 686 Highway 90 in Chipley, or call 638-2082. Hours of operation are from 9 a.m. to noon, Monday through Saturday. LEFT: Buddy is a 1-year-old neutered male lab/bully cross, about 75 pounds. He loves people, is good with other dogs and good on a leash. Buddy greets you with an adorable smile while his whole big body wiggles. Hes playful but gentle and knows basic commands. He recently helped save another dogs life by being a blood donor! Buddy is a big puppy at heart and will be a loyal and loving companion when he nds a new family to call his own. RIGHT: Sicily is a young adult female white with black short haired cat who arrived at the shelter with a 6-week-old kitten. Both mama and baby are very friendly and enjoy being petted and cuddled. These beautiful girls would make purr-fect pets and are hoping to nd a fur-ever home to share their love with. Pet Talk: Independence Day Safety PET T ALK

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, July 2, 2014 B USINESS G UIDE THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5$25.68 5x10$35.31 10x10$46.01 10x20$80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 20 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!638-3611HVAC Services Coolers & Freezers Service on all Makes & Models Heat Pumps, Electric & Gas Electrical Services Exterior Elevated Lighting & WiringResidential and Commerical Advertise your service or business for as little as $10 a week.Ad runs in the Washington County News, Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser638-0212 C & C Bookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm(850) 638-1483Notary Available Easy Care Lawn & Tractor Service TREE REMOVAL€ 850 527-6291 850 849-3825Lawn Care € Debris Removal Tractor and Bobcat Work Pressure CleaningLicensed & Insured5020312 Bldg/Const/Skilled TradeMetal Roofers and LaborersDwayne 850-849-7982orGene 850-849-0736WEB ID 34292612 1208.00-000-000-022.000 SEC: 08 TWN: 06 RNG: 16 BEG 340 FT S OF NW COR OF E1/2 OF SE1/4 & RUN E 1320 FT, TH S 100 FT, W 1320 FT, TH N 100 FT TO POB DES IN OR 139/285 And being further described as: Begin 340 feet South of the NW Corner of the E of SE and run East 1320 feet; thence South 100 feet; thence West 1320 feet; thence North 100 feet to the Point of Beginning, being in the Section 8, Township 6 North, Range 16 West, Holmes County, Florida. Name in which assessed: ELIZABETH D. STEELE Said property being in the County of Holmes, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on 7/22/14, at 11:00 A.M. DATED this 5/21/14. Kyle Hudson, Clerk of the Circuit Court Holmes County, Florida. June 18, 25, July 2, 9, 2014. 7-3407 Public Auction The following vehicle will be sold at public auction at Eastern Diesel & Auto Wrecker Service, Inc., 2005 S Waukasha, Bonifay, FL. at 8:00AM on July 30, 2014 for towing and storage. VIN# 2B4HB15Y3SK565553 95 Dodge 4DR Jennifer Talley 27355 HWY 59 N Robertsdale, AL 36567 July 2, 2014 7-3405 Public Auction The following vehicle will be sold at public auction at Eastern Diesel & Auto Wrecker Service, Inc., 2005 S Waukasha, Bonifay, FL. at 8:00AM on July 23, 2014 for towing and storage. VIN# 2GCEK19128V1114492 97 Chev PU Greg Allan Jenkins Po Box 670 Vernon, FL 32462-0670 July 2, 2014 Got Bad Credit? Buy here/ pay here. $99.00* ride today. Pass repos & past BK’s ok. VA & SSI ok. Call Steve 334-648-5302. *Call for more info. Older Man looking for female to spend time with. Go to dinner with, hang out, have conversations with. Call Gary, 850-388-2061. HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460www .noahslittleark.com BANKRUPTCY Auction Fri, June 13th @ 10am Online & Onsite 10950 N Kendall Dr, 2nd Fl, Miami, Fl 33176 Office Furniture & Equipment Cubicles Computers/Laptops o Phone System & more! www.moeckerauctions.com (800) 840-BIDS 13%-15%BP (3% cash discount), $100 ref. cash dep. Subj to confirm. Case No.: 14-18517-LMI AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin More Time Auction Services (407)466-2270 www.one-more-time.us. Fritz Real Estate & Auctions Licensed Real Estate Broker (800) -422-9155 AU2871AB2650 ONLINE ONLY 2-Day Auction, Furniture Liquidation including Rugs, Tables, Household Items, Furniture & More, Jamestown, NC, Guilford Co. 7/11 at 8am to 7/18 & 7/21 at 1pm. Iron Horse Auction Co., Inc. 800-997-2248. NCAL3936. www.ironhorseauction.co m LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE: Friday and Saturday, July 4th and 5th, 2014. 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Located on Maple Avenue, Geneva, Ala. Near Courthouse. GUN SHOWJuly 5 & 6 Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL92777 to 56654 K&L FarmHome grown Tomatoes. 1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley. Mon-Fri 8am-5pm & Saturday 8am-4pm. 850-638-5002 850-260-5003 & 850-527-3380 Are you writing a book?Do you need help in editing, illustrating or publishing your book? Call experienced published author at (850) 547-5244. Looking for maid for house cleaning, washing clothes, odd jobs around the house, cooking. 850-388-2061. Need Some Extra Cash? No Time for a yard sale? I buy anything of VALUE. Need Help around the house with any odd jobs? Call Mike, 850-326-9987. Domestic Care Taker needed in Bonifay. Call 334-793-1202. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Logistics/Transport CDL Examiners / Driving Instructors Nationwide truck driver training group seeks CDL Examiners / Driving Instructors for its Milton, FL training center. Candidates must have verifiable driving skills and good communication. No overnight travel. Please call David 1-800-370-7364, fax 478-994-0946 or email dabanathie@truck driverinstitute.com Web ID#: 34293631 Manuf/Prod/Op Personnel Resources has immediate openings in Geneva for welders. To apply, jgommo@prdothan.comor call (334) 794-8722. WEB ID 34293434 Medical/HealthNow Hiring for Multiple Positions!COPE Center in DeFuniak Springs is seeking: Licensed Team Leader (LMHC or LCSW) Masters level Clinician Bachelor level Case Manager Bachelor level Mentor Healthy Start Supervisor -RN Rehab Program Manager -Licensed (LCSW or LMHC) E-mail Resume To: lloyd@copecenter .org Web ID #: 34293509 Medical/HealthRegistered DieticianDavita Dialysis Center is looking for a registered Dietician willing to work 12 hrs per week in Chipley Florida area. Applicants must hold a state of Florida registered Dietician’s license with hemodialysis preferred. Please send all resumes to 877 3rd St, Ste 2 Chipley FL 32428 or fax to: 850-638-8550 to the attention of the administrator or drop it off in person at 877 3rd Street, Suite 2, Chipley FL 32428 Web ID 34293170 AIRLINE JOBS Start Here -Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Housing and Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 844-210-3935 AVERITT EXPRESS New Pay Increase For Regional Drivers! 40 to 46 CPM + Fuel Bonus! Also, Post-Training Pay Increase for Students! (Depending on Domicile) Get Home EVERY Week + Excellent Benefits. CDL-A req. 888-602-7440 Apply @ AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer -Females, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway. com EOE TRAIN FROM HOME MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASS’T CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709 BE THE 1st Medical Alert Company in your area! Owning your own local distributorship. We do 70% of the work! Unlimited $ return. Investment required. Free Call (844) 225-1200. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1 Bedroom Apartment, in Chipley, covenant location, no pets. 638-4640. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio And 2 bdrm $375-$500 Includes City Utilities (850)557-7732 SpaciousOne Bedroom Apartment $450.00 Stove/Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. 1BD/1BAHouse 901 Main St Chipley. Fenced yard. 1227 sqft. $625 mth. Security depo $600. Avldibale Ju1y 7 Call 850-482-4446. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO and up. Includes Garbage, sewage, and lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 2BR/2BA MH. Highway 179A Westville, FL. 850-956-1220. Mobile Homes For Rent 2 and 3 Bedrooms in Cottondale, Central Heat and Air. $400 -$500 a month. 850-258-1594 or 850-638-8570. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. 1980 ClassicAntique Mercedes 450 SL. like new interior, xtra clean, very low mile tires, always stored inside, looks/runs/drives great, 2-tops, Kelly BB high/$33K, great buy asking/$13K. 850-415-7119. Got Bad Credit? $0*, Ride Today!Buy Here/Pay Here Past Repos/BK’s SSI/VAok. Steve Pope 334-803-9550. *call for more details. 2010 Ford Escape XLT 46,300 miles excellent condition inside and out. Bells and whistles to numerous to mention $13,000. 850-547-3934 1988 GMC 6000 Farm/Moving Truck or potential billboard for business. was Supermover Uhaul. cranks/runs great. Very good watertight cargo box w/over cab also. Very low mile tires. Great for moving or hauling. Asking $3300. 850-415-7119. 1991 Harley Davidson Road King 9,000 miles, $6,500. Call 850-348-7780. For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. We Will Clean your house. Call 850-547-9147, 849-1950, 849-7047. Have references. Ask for Margaret. Check our cars and trucks in today’s classified section! Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane!