Holmes County times-advertiser

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Holmes County times-advertiser
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Newspaper
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English
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Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
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Bonifay, FL
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June 19, 2013
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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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50¢ www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM Phone: 850-547-9414 Website: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 IN BRIEF imes T dvertiser A HOLMES COUNTY C onnec t with us 24/7 G et br eak ing new s videos e xpanded st or ies phot o galler ies opinions and mor e ... @WCN_HC T ‘n hƒ s } p s ˆ qz n% bonifa yno w .c om By ZACK McDONALD 747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com BONIFAY — Holmes County school board mem bers Tuesday stalled on lling a position that would give half its student body a chance at a popular state scholarship. In the district, 248 stu dents are expected to be taking a rst or second year Spanish course in the coming school year. The base requirement to qualify for Florida’s Bright Futures scholarship, a lot tery-funded scholarship which can pay for the en tirety of a four-year univer sity education, is two years of a high school foreign lan guage course. School board members were split Tues day 3-2 on hiring a teacher for 140 of Holmes County students. While Holmes County School has one full-time Spanish teacher for its 120 students, Holmes County High School Superinten dent Eddie Dixon made the suggestion board members approve hiring a second for a salary of $40,000 to teach the remaining 128 students expected to take Spanish in the district. However, board member Shirley Owens moved that the board table the item to look at whether a computer program would be a better decision. “This estimate was based on a $40,000 salary gure which could vary de pending on the number of years they teach,” Owens said. “Then there’s health insurance that we absorb. I don’t think we should jump into it quickly.” Spanish courses from Florida Virtual School cost $650 per student — coming out to $83,200, according to Dixon’s projections. A new teacher and use of Ed geunity, another education software, could come out to cost $66,300. Board members Jason Motley and Sid Johnson, who held the dissenting votes, said even if the cost of a teacher increases the experience of having a live person to bounce questions or concepts off of has a value. “I like the hands on experience of having the teacher present,” Johnson said. The $40,000 estimate used by Dixon is derived from estimates of a rstyear teacher’s salary, but factors other than money could determine the board’s nal decision. Though the virtual class may not have an educational edge, other than being standardized, over a live teacher; com puter programs do not have a preference or decision in where they relocate. “This could be a moot point,” Dixon said. “We may advertise it and not be able to nd someone who wants the job. We’re a small coun ty and our neighbors pay more than we do.” Even if the district could nd a fresh-out-of-college teacher, a teacher’s con tract is also required to be renewed annually. “The shiniest penny gets the most attention,” Dixon added. Board chairman Rusty Williams cast the deciding vote in favor of tabling the decision. He was clear that he wanted a decision by the end of the board’s next meeting in July to meet the scheduling deadline for the approaching school year. C ecilia ECILIA S pea PEA R s S | Times-Advertiser Kicking off summer is the Holmes County Public Library’s rst of many events during their Summer Reading Program. Local children participated in Touch-A-Truck on June 27, where local agencies volunteered their heavy equipment such as re trucks, mail trucks, ambulances, bulldozers, etc. for the children to look at and explore while learning about the vehicles and the services they provide. Here the Florida Forest Service is showing the children the water truck used to help extinguish wild res. See Page B1 for more information. Summer Fun School board debates live vs. virtual Spanish teacher Wednesday, J uly ULY 9 2014 Volume 124, Number 13 By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com WESTVILLE — West Pitt man Baptist Church host ed the first in a series of local political forums Sat urday, July 5. About 20 local residents came out for the opportu nity to ask questions of candidates for the school board’s District 1, 3 and 5 seats and candidates for the District 2 Holmes County Board of Commis sioners (HCBOCC) seat. Candidates in atten dance were school board candidates for District 5, incumbent Sid Johnson and challenger Drew Kris er; District 2 incumbent Jason Motley; District 1 incumbent Rusty Williams (unopposed), and District 2 HCBOCC incumbent Monty Merchant. Mer chant’s challenger, Mick ey Locke, did not respond to the church’s invitation, and District 2 school board challenger, Alan Justice, sent his regrets that he was out of town on the day C a A R ol OL K ent ENT | Times-Advertiser Monty Merchant, incumbent for the Holmes County Board of Commissioners’ District 2 seat answers questions at the recent political forum as candidates for the school board’s District 1, 3, and 5 seats look on. Holmes County political forum held ‘Touch a Truck’ | B1 See foFO R umUM A2 INDEX Court Docket . ........................ A3 Opinion . ................................ A4 Outdoors . .............................. A7 Reections . ........................... A8 Extra . .................................... B1 Faith . .................................... B4 Obituaries . ............................ B5 Classieds . ....................... B7-B8 Travel ball try-outs Travel ball tryouts will be held Saturday, July 12, at Jennings Field in Marianna. The league is called Jackson County Baseball, but the league is open for all neighboring counties, too. Times are 9-11 a.m. for age 9 and 2-5 p.m. for age 10. Tryouts for ages 8 and younger will be held Saturday, July 19, at 9 a.m. at the same location. Job Fair M aA R iannaIANNA — CareerSource Chipola will host a regional job fair from 2-6 p.m. Thursday, July 17, at the National Guard Armory in Marianna. Veterans will be provided priority of service, with the rst 30 minutes reserved for veterans. For more information, call 633-4419. Bethlehem PeeWee football and cheerleading Sign up for Bethlehem PeeWee football and cheerleading is at 6 p.m. every Monday and Friday at Esto Park for ages 5-13. Registration is $50 per child. For information about helping raise funds for these young athletes, visit their Facebook page, Bethlehem PeeWee Fundraising.

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Local A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, July 9, 2014 of the forum. Moderating the event was West Pittman Bap tist Church Pastor Eddie Eaton, who asked candi dates to introduce them selves before beginning the question and answer session by asking about each candidate’s spiritual beliefs. All proclaimed Christain faith, and school board candidates ex pressed a desire to pro mote Creationism in Hol mes County schools as opposed to evolution. School board can didates also answered questions about Common Core, and all stated they are opposed to students here participating in the program. “I don’t know if any one understand Common Core, and I definitely op pose it,” said Williams. “I want our students to be exposed to the best pos sible education they can get, and Common Core isn’t it.” “I’m opposed as well,” Kriser said. “It’s another example of the federal government getting too much involvement. De cisions about education should be handled on the local level.” Motley added that Com mon Core is now referred to as Florida Higher Stan dards and can have an af fect on teachers’ effective ness. “Not every student who comes through our door learns the same way, and our teachers need to be able to adapt.” he said. Johnson agreed. “I don’t know what the (best curriculum) is for out students, but it’s not Common Cree,” Johnson said. When asked how they would respond to recent accusations made in a board meeting that school staff was hired through nepotism or favoritism, candidates had a defini tive answer as to how res idents could ensure this wasn’t the case. “We are held to Sun shine Law ethics,” Motley said. “It specifically says in our guidelines that we can’t vote for (the hiring of a family member). Any one with concerns about a teacher or administrator’s qualifications can look it up on the (Florida De partment of Education’s) website.” “Guidelines are in place,” Williams said. “It is our duty and moral obli gation to have a legal and ethic reason to vote yes or no for someone’s hiring.” Johnson weighed in, saying he practiced the board’s guidelines by re cusing himself from a vote that would employ his niece’s husband. “We stick to the rules,” he said. Monty Merchant was the sole Board of County Commissioners candi date present but still took questions. Merchant mainly ad dressed questions about upcoming road projects, including the replacement of 17 bridges in the county, which will be funded by federal money. When asked how the county would provide checks and balances for funds to ensure Holmes County didn’t find itself in a situation similar to neighboring Washington County, which recently approved a five cents fuel levy to help bring the county out of debt, he said it was all about paying attention. “The board closely monitors every dime in and out,” Merchant said. “We are not a rich county, and the majority of our funds come from grants. When we receive financial reports, we review them carefully.” West Pittman Baptist Church will host two more forums before the Prima ry Election. The next forum is set for 6 p.m. Saturday, July 26, with candidates for County Commission Dis trict 4 and District 5 State Representative. Another will be held at 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 16, with candidates for Cir cuit Judge, Commissioner of Agriculture, Attorney General, and Chief Finan cial Officer. The church is located 1599 Bradley Road in Westville. For more infor mation, call the church of fice at 956-4100. Lo ca ls Su nd ays Loc al s wi th a Fl or id a ID re ce iv e 50 % of f Ge ne ra l Pa rk ad mi ss io n on ev er y Su nd ay Da il y sh ow s fe at uri ng do lp hi ns se a li on s, tr op ic al bi rd s an d mu ch mo re Op en da il y ra in or sh in e 15 41 2 Fr on t Be ac h Rd Pa nama Ci ty Be ac h www .g ul fw or ld ma ri nep ar k. co m e O ce rs an d St a of Pe op le s Ba nk of Gr ac ev il le Co rd ia ll y In vi te Yo u to At te nd Ou r 40 th An ni ve rs ar y Ce le br at io n Fr id ay Ju ly 11 20 14 9: 00 a. m. 11 :0 0 a. m. Pe op le s Ba nk of Gr ac ev ill e 53 06 Br ow n St re et Gr ac ev il le Fl or id a TH AN K YO U FO R AL LO WI NG US TO BE YO UR LO CA L CO MM UN IT Y BA NK FO R 40 YE AR S. We 'r e Ba nk in g On Se rv ice! Yo ur Lo ca ll y Ow ne d, Ind ep en de nt Com mu ni ty Bank 40 Ye ar s 19 74 -2 01 4 C e l e b r a t i n g Pe op le s Ba nk of Gr ace vi ll e NO HIDD EN CHA RGE S: It is our pol ic y that th e pa tien t an d an y othe r per so n re sp ons ib le fo r pa yment s has the ri gh t to re fus e to pa y, can cel pa yment or be re imb ur sed by pa yme nt or an y other ser vi ce ex aminat io n or tr eatm ent wh ich is perf or me d as a re sul t of and withi n 72 hou rs of re spo ndin g to the adv er tis eme nt fo r the fr ee dis co unt ed fe e or re duc ed fe e ser vice ex amina tion or tr eatm ent. "WE WELCOME NEW PA TIE NTS, CALL TODA Y FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PAT IENTS 59 AND OLDER This cer tif icat e is good fo r a complet e Medical Ey e Ex am with To dd Ro binson, M.D In Our Chiple y Of fi ce Boar d Ce rt if ied Ey e Ph ys ician and Sur geon. The ex am includes a pr es cr ip ti on fo r eye glasses and te sts fo r Glaucom a, Ca ta ra cts and other eye diseases FOR YO UR APPOINTMENT CA LL: 850-638-72 20 ELIGIBILI TY : U. S. Ci ti ze ns living in the Flor ida Pa nhand le 59 ye ar s and older not pr esentl y under our car e. Co upon Exp ir es : 730-1 4 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: WC00 Sm ar t Le ns es SM Ca n pr oduce clear vision without glasses at all dist ances www .m ullise ye .com MULLIS EYE INSTITUTE Chiple y Of fi ce 16 91 Main St., St e. 1 Chi ple y FL 3242 8 850-638-7220 We ar e locat ed dir ectl y acr oss the par king lot fr om the Wa lmar t in Chiple y To dd Ro binson, M.D Boar d Ce rt if ied Ey e Ph ys ician and Ca ta ra ct Sur geon www westorida .coop PowerSouth’ s Ener gy Sour ces (2013) 64.8% NA TURAL GAS 5. 3% HYDRO 0. 3% RENE WA BLES 29.6% COAL In 2013, 95 per cent of our membe rs’ el ectr icit y was made usi n g f o s s il fuels like coal and natural gas. Yo ur electricity doesn’t just come out of the wall. FORUM from page A1 “The board closely monitors every dime in and out. We are not a rich county, and the majority of our funds come from grants. When we receive nancial reports, we review them carefully.” Monty Merchant District 2 HCBOCC incumbent

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 Wednesday, July 9, 2014 PU BL IC NO TI CE Th e Fe de ra l Em er ge nc y Ma na gem en t Ag en cy (F EM A) he re by gi ve s no ti ce t o th e pub li c of i ts in te nt t o re im bu rs e e l ig ib le a ppl ic an ts fo r el ig ib le cos ts to re pa ir or re plac e fac ili tie s da ma ge d by the Se ve re St or ms Fl ood in g, To rn ad oe s, an d St ra ig ht -l in e Wi nd s occ ur ri ng Ap ri l 2 8 to Ma y 6 20 14 Th is no tic e ap pl ie s to the Pu bl ic As si st an ce ( PA ), I nd iv id ua l As si st an ce (I A) an d Ha za rd M it ig at i on Gr an t (H MG P) pr og ra ms im pl em en te d un de r th e au th or it y of the Ro be rt T Sta ff or d Di sa st er Re li ef a nd E me rg en cy A ss is tan ce Ac t, 42 U. S. C. §§ 51 21 -5 20 7. Und er a ma jo r di sa st er de cl ar atio n FE MA D ISA ST ER D R41 77 -F L si gn ed by the Pr es id en t on Ma y 6, 20 14 an d am en de d Ma y 12 20 14 Ma y 14 20 14 Ma y 21 20 14 an d Ju ne 13 20 14 the fo ll ow in g co un tie s ha ve be en de si gn at ed adv er sely af fe ct ed by the dis as te r an d el ig ib le f or I A an d PA : E sc am bia Ja ck so n, O ka lo os a, S an ta Ros a an d Wa lt on Co un ti es ; Ba y, Ca lh ou n, Hol me s an d Wa sh in gt on Co un tie s are a va il ab le f or P A. A dd it io na l co un tie s ma y be de si gn at ed at a la te r da te wit ho ut fu rt he r pub li c no ti ce Th e Ha zar d Mit ig a t io n Gr an t P ro gr am ( HM GP ) i s a va il ab le s ta te wid e. Th is pu bl ic no t ic e con ce rn s ac tiv it ie s th at ma y af fe ct hi st or ic pr op er tie s, ac t iv i ti es t ha t are l oc at ed i n or a ff ec t we tl an d are as or th e 10 0ye ar o od pla in, an d cr it ic al ac tio ns with in th e 50 0ye ar ood pla in Su ch a ct iv it ie s ma y adv er sel y af fe ct t he h is to ri c pr op er ty an d o od pla in or we tl an d, or ma y re su lt in co nti nuin g vu ln er ab ili ty t o oo d d am ag e. Pr es id en ti al Ex ec ut iv e Or de rs 11 98 8 an d 11 99 0 re qu ir e th at al l fe de ra l ac t i on s in o r af fe ct in g th e o od pla in o r we tla nd s be re vi ew ed fo r op po rt un it ie s to re lo ca te an d ev al ua te d fo r soc ia l, ec on omi c, his to ri ca l, e nv ir onme nt al le ga l, a nd s af et y co ns id er atio ns W he re the re is no opp or tu nit y to re lo ca te FE MA is req ui re d to un de rt ak e a de tai le d re vi ew t o de te rm in e wha t me as ur es m ay b e ta ke n to mi ni mi ze fu tu re da ma ges Th e pu bl ic is in vi te d to pa rt ici pat e in th e pr oc es s of i de nt if yi ng a lt er na tiv es a nd a na ly zi ng t he ir i mp ac ts FE MA ha s de te rm in ed that fo r ce rt ai n ty pes of fa ci li ti es th er e ar e no rm al ly no a lt er na ti ve s to r es to ra tio n in t he ood pla in o r we tla n d. Th es e are fa ci li ti es th at m ee t al l of th e fo ll ow in g cr it er ia: 1) FE MA ’s es ti ma te of th e co st of re pa ir s is le ss tha n 50 % of the co st to re plac e the en ti re faci li ty an d is le ss tha n $1 00 ,0 00 ; 2) the fa c ili ty is no t lo ca te d in a o od way ; 3) the fac ili ty ha s no t su st ai ne d ma jo r st ru ct ur al da ma ge in a pr ev io us Pr es id en tia ll y de cl ared o od in g di sa st er or em er ge nc y; an d 4) the fa ci li ty is no t cr it ic al (e .g ., th e fac ili ty is no t a ho sp it al gen er ati ng pl an t, em er ge nc y op er atio ns ce nt er or a fa ci li ty that con tai ns da n ge ro us ma te ri al s) FE MA in te nds to pr ov id e as si st an ce fo r th e re st or atio n of the se fac ili tie s to th ei r pr edi sa st er con di tio n, ex ce pt th at ce rt ai n me as ur es to mit ig at e the ef fe ct of fu tu re o od in g or ot he r ha zar ds ma y be in cl ud ed in the wo rk Fo r ex am pl e, a br id ge or cul ve rt re st or atio n ma y in cl ud e a la rg er wa te rw ay op en in g to de cr ea se th e ri sk of fu tu re wa sh ou ts EDITOR’S NOTE: Due to early holiday deadline, court dockets for July 2, 2014 were unable to run. To look up the result of cases on this docket, please visit www. holmesclerk.com. July 2 Christopher Michael Carey, ArraignmentFelony, possession of controlled substance Syrena Nicole Crone, Pretrial-Felony, grand theft motor vehicle Kevin E. Cunningham, Arraignment-Felony, aggravated battery victim pregnant Phillip L. Davis, Arraignment-Felony, batty on law enforcement ofcer EMT or reghter, criminal mischief over $200 under $1000 Phillip Lloyd Davis, Arraignment-Felony, resisting ofcer with violence, battery Richard Jay Emond, Arraignment-Felony, abuse or neglect of elderly or disabled person, exploitation of an elderly person Danyel Witt Evans, Status Conference, fraudulent use of credit cards Robert William Fusco, Arraignment-Felony, battery on person 66 years of age or older Melinda Louise Griggs, Arraignment-Felony, burglary of dwelling Melinda Louise Griggs, Arraignment-Felony, burglary of dwelling Mark Alan Hudson, Plea-Felony, sale or delivery of a controlled substance Greg Allen Jenkins, Arraignment-Felony, ee or elude at high speed, driving while license suspended or revoked Timmy Ray Jordan, Arraignment-Felony, armed burglary, grand theft Joseph Fletcher Lee, Arraignment-Felony, possession of controlled substance Amber Nicole Maxwell, Arraignment-Felony, armed burglary, grand theft William Morua, Arraignment-Felony, possession of controlled substance, driving while license suspended or revoked Jeffery Dan Pitts, Motion Hearing, felon in possession of rearm Teddy Bruce Polston, Arraignment-Felony, possession of controlled substance Teddy Bruce Polston, Arraignment-Felony, possession of controlled substance Teddy Bruce Polston, Arraignment-Felony, possession of controlled substance Teddy Bruce Polston, Arraignment-Felony, dealing in stolen property John Harvey Reynolds, Arraignment-Felony, driving while license suspended habitual offender Timmy Eugene Steverson, ArraignmentFelony, burglary of structure while armed Anthony Ray Turner, Arraignment-Felony, aggravated battery victim pregnant Jason Mathew Veasey, Arraignment-Felony, fail to register as sex offender Katrina Dawn White, Pretrial-Felony, manufacture of controlled substance, trafcking in meth over 28 grams but less than 200 grams, possession of listed chemicals, possession of marijuana under 20 grams, two counts of drug paraphernalia use or possession Katrina Dawn White, Arraignment-Felony, escape Amanda Kay Whitehurst. ArraignmentFelony, two counts of possession of controlled substance Nathan Daniel Wood, Arraignment-Felony, ee or elude law enforcement ofcer with lights and siren active Trevor Tyler Gregory Yates, ArraignmentFelony, burglary of dwelling Jean Rebecca Bielat, Arraignment-Violation of Probation, giving false name causing adverse affect Tyler Lee Chandler, Arraignment-Violation of Probation, burglary of structure Gary Cobia III, Arraignment-Violation of Probation, manslaughter, two counts of felony reckless driving Kevin E. Cunningham, Arraignment-Violation of Probation, unlawful sexual activity with minor Dewey N. Denton, Arraignment-Violation of Probation, driving under the inuence third degree felony, driving while license suspended or revoked habitual second Jacob Michael Dockery, Arraignment-Violation of Community Control, possession of controlled substance Jacob Michael Dockery, Arraignment-Violation of Community Control, dealing in stolen property, manufacture distribute or sell imitation drugs Joel Phillip Fussell, Arraignment-Violation of Probation, possession of controlled substance Troy Jacob Gayman, Arraignment-Violation of probation, felony battery John Gregory Gilmore, Arraignment-Violation of Probation, manslaughter with rearm Edward Hutchins, Arraignment-Violation of Community Control, burglary of structure, grand theft Nicholas Earl Jimmerson, ArraignmentViolation of Probation, possession of controlled substance Daniel Carey Jones, Arraignment-Violation of Probation, drug possession marijuana under 20 grams, resist arrest without violence, tampering with physical evidence, introduction of contraband into detention facility Demetruis Deshaun McGhee Jr., ArraignmentViolation of Probation, burglary of structure Demetruis Deshaun McGhee Jr., ArraignmentViolation of Probation, dealing in stolen property Rocky Allen Miller, Arraignment-Violation of Probation, grand theft Robert Allen Platt, Arraignment-Violation of Community Control, unemployment Brent Oneal Williams, Arraignment-Violation of Probation, possession of controlled substance Johnathan Brandon Williams, ArraignmentViolation of Probation, grand theft H oO LM esES C oO U ntNT Y coCO U rtRT docDOC K etsETS By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Y — About 250 people came out for this year’s Southern Gospel Sing, a stark contrast to the thousands that once attended the more than 60-year Holmes County tradition. The event, held annually during the weekend of July 4, took place Saturday at Holmes County High School. Known locally as the “granddaddy of all sings,” the event once lasted all night, but in recent years has ended around 10:30 p.m. due to decreasing attendance. Despite the drop in numbers, event goers reported enjoying this year’s lineup, which included Kevin Williams (guitarist for Bill Gaither and the Gaither Vocal Band), Wes Hampton (tenor for the Gaither Vocal Band), The Nelons, Four Calvary, and One Heart. June 30 to July 4 D iI V orcesORCES Melisa Nicole Reddick and Matthew Saxey Teleena Monhollen and Curtis Monhollen Mary Zwicker Bowman and Danny Lee BowmanMarriaMARRIA G esES There were no marriages led for the week of June 30 to July 4. Marriages and di DI V orcesORCES C aro ARO L KentKENT | The Times-Advertiser Family music group The Nelons performed many of their popular hits. At right Grammy Award-winning artist Wes Hampton was among those performing. Low attendance doesn’t stop Bonifay Southern Gospel Sing

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O PINIo O N www.bonifaynow.com A Page 4 Section Life is crazy, even under the best of circumstances. It’s hard not to get caught up in the moments, the drama. It is funny how the term “drama” has become taboo in the last few years. According to Dictionary.com drama is “any situation or series of events having vivid, emotional, conicting, or striking interest or results.” Basically, drama is what makes life interesting and it is what makes us human. On the other hand there is a such thing as too much drama and getting caught up in those roles, emotionally and physically is something that I’ve strived hard to avoid. It’s just good to have fresh perspective from time to time. Fresh perspective is important in my line of work because I have to maintain neutrality and stress is one of the biggest factors in getting caught up in these moments. Stress was one of the many things I learned about in the many classes taken in psychology. There’s good stress, hard to believe, I know. This is kind of stress is what motivates someone to work hard and push to be better than themselves. However, too much stress will lower your IQ, your cognitive skills and your ability to reason. The majority of life’s mistakes can be attributed to the inability to properly manage stress. First, I found selfmanagement is the rst step to take. Finding quite places to calm and relax the mind, something to zone out the chaos around you. Music was my rst outlet. Putting on a headset and focusing on a place that made me calm and put the world in perspective. For me, that was the beach or to be more “in depth” it would be the ocean. I would picture the beach, which for me was the perfect icon for life. The way the tide rolls in and out, like people who come in and out of my life. There’s a whole life process shown at the beach. The way water is cycled, water taken from the sea to create rain and rain back to the water. The way rock is broken and cycled through to make the sand on the beach. The remains of ocean life on the beach in the form of sea shells and sand dollars. It helped to focus on the details of the beach. What does it smell like? Is there a breeze? Can you feel the beach sand on your toes? Is it sunny or overcast? These are details that help immerse you deeper in the feel of isolation. If things are really bad I nd a quiet place and completely submerge my mind in the ocean, nding a deep, deep place, picturing myself in a dome, a place where I’m removed from the situation so that I can gain an outside perspective. This just gives me the ability to see things that I normally wouldn’t have if I were just sitting inside my own corner. I’m able to consider what my coworkers may be going through or my supervisor. If someone is being unreasonable, it is more than likely that they are operating under extreme or prolonged stress and it is very easy to be brought into their level of stress by reacting to their irrationality immediately. Taking a deep breath and walking away is recommended if you cannot react in a calm and rational manner. It took me years of practice and I’m still striving hard to keep in practice. Once a year I try to take a week off. Somewhere far away, preferably next to a real beach. I panicked the rst year because I felt overwhelmed being away from work, which is a 24-7 job and isn’t something easily turned off. In the end I nd I am a much better worker after I’m able to spend some time to regain perspective and recuperate. Thank you again for taking time to sit with me. See you again next week. POSTMASTER: SS end address change to: Holmes County TT imesAA dvertiser P.O O Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 U SS P S S 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $13.30; 26-weeks: $19.90; 52 weeks: $32.00 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $17.70; 26 weeks: 26.50; 52 weeks: $43.00 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. CO pP Y rR I ghtGHT NO tT I ceCE : T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bareeld, Publisher Carol Kent, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. Wednesday,July 9, 2014 We need to protect our waterways By Dan Tonsmeire Apalachicola Riverkeeper Early this year, the picturesque Dan River in North Carolina was hit by a devastating toxic spill that spread 70 miles downstream, poisoning the water and everything in it. Why am I telling you about an environmental disaster which happened hundreds of miles away from us? Because our own Apalachicola River is vulnerable to the same series of events, and we need to do everything we can to prevent this from happening here. The hazardous coal ash that fouled the Dan River was stockpiled at a Duke Energy coal-red power plant site. Like other power companies, Duke Energy stores the hazardous ash that’s left over from burning coal in huge, unlined pits. When a pipe at the Duke Energy plant failed, 140,000 tons of coal ash and contaminated wastewater went into the river. We have toxic coal ash stockpiled along the Apalachicola, at Gulf Power Company’s Scholz Generating Plant near Sneads. And it is leaking into the river. In June 2013, samples of bright orange contamination leaking out of the pits contained arsenic at levels 300 times the amount considered safe for drinking water. Besides poisonous arsenic, the coal ash also contains toxics like cadmium, and chromium – well known carcinogens – as well as aluminum, barium, beryllium, copper, lead, nickel, zinc, selenium, and the neurotoxin mercury. This is a public hazard. On June 4, Apalachicola Riverkeeper, The Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, and Waterkeeper Alliance led a federal lawsuit against Gulf Power under the Clean Water Act. The public-interest law rm Earthjustice is representing us in the suit. Before we led the lawsuit, we informed Gulf Power of the illegal pollution we documented, and then gave the company four months to begin addressing the problems. We also asked for documentation to support Gulf’s claim that the leaking impoundment at the Scholz plant is not at risk of failing. The utility refused to do either, and we were forced to go to court to protect the Apalachicola and the people who use it. Gulf Power has a federal Clean Water Act permit, which allows the corporation to discharge limited amounts of treated wastewater from a specic outfall directly into the Apalachicola River. But, as our lawsuit points out, untreated contaminants are leaking at other places at the site, and those discharges are not covered by the permit. These toxic chemical leaks – and the company’s failure to report them – violate Gulf Power’s federal permit requirements under the Clean Water Act. Coal ash impoundments are the number one source of toxic water pollution in the United States dumping more heavy metals and other harmful substances into our waterways than the next nine most polluting industries, combined. While the Clean Water Act does protect waterways from many forms of pollution, there are no federal safeguards specic to coal ash pollution. Household garbage, in fact, is better regulated than toxic coal ash. Coal ash has already contaminated more than 200 lakes, streams, rivers and drinking water aquifers across the country. We need to remedy this dangerous situation. In Washington, eleven public-interest groups and a Native American tribe are involved in a legal agreement to compel the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to nalize new federal regulations dealing with the handling and disposal of coal ash waste. Powerful energy corporations managed to avoid these regulations for decades, and have aggressively fought to weaken the new standards proposed by the EPA. Meanwhile, here along the Apalachicola, Gulf Power needs to stop polluting our public waterway with its toxic waste. It isn’t fair for a corporation to risk our common resource as if it were a private dumping ground. On June 6, the day before the National Trails Day, the National Park Service and the U.S. Department of the Interior ofcially designated the Apalachicola River Blueway as a national recreation trail. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and National Park Service Director Jonathan Jarvis called the Apalachicola “a rare gem” that “ows through one of the nation’s richest hotspots of biodiversity … a tapestry of wild landscapes and vanishing cultures.” We know how special the Apalachicola is, and we are so very grateful for its gifts. That’s why we took the big step of going to court to stop this dangerous pollution that affects us all. After 61 years of electricity generation at the Scholz plant, Gulf Power has announced that it will stop burning coal at the Scholz facility next year. But as the disaster on the Dan River taught us, coal ash lagoons are dangerous regardless of whether the power plant is still operating. Duke Energy closed the Dan River plant in 2011, but years-worth of coal ash remained in the lagoon that collapsed in February. Unless Gulf Power starts taking responsibility for its mess, its coal ash pits will continue polluting the Apalachicola for years to come. It is essential that when Gulf Power permanently shutters its plant, that the corporation’s hazardous waste does not continue to threaten the health of local residents, or the users of the river, or the sheries of Apalachicola Bay. It is essential that the cleanup does not become the taxpayers’ problem. And it is essential that the cleanup costs do not fall on the ratepayers: the local residents who have no choice but to buy electricity from Gulf Power, a subsidiary of the $38billion Southern Company. We are doing all that we can to prevent a disaster like Duke Energy’s hazardous waste spill on the Dan River from happening here. Let’s hope Gulf Power will, too. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bareeld: nbareeld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, S pP ORTS OR OpP I nN IO nN news@ bonifaynow.com CLASSIf F IED & cC IRc C ULATIOn N clamb @chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 EDITOREDITOR Carol: ckent@ chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 AA DVERTISInN G Bill Allard: wallard@ chipleypaper.com 850-547-9414 We all have them: things which might seem insignicant to others but send us from rational human being to raving lunatic in .02 seconds. Commonly known as “pet peeves,” these annoyances can go deeper than simply making us want to gnash our teeth. Number one on my list? Cigarette butts. Any of my Facebook friends can testify this annoyance is a number one rant for me – a non smoker. Family and friends also know this fact, which is why it’s number one on my list: If you know it irritates your host to throw cigarette butts on their lawn, then doesn’t the disregard of this knowledge also indicate a disregard of respect for your host? Discarded remnants of the unhealthy habit has led to one family spat, countless trips around the yard in which I’ve picked up the items – and a worry that deer frequenting my yard will get cancer (I’m pretty sure they’re hanging out in the rocking chairs on the back porch smoking the free cigarettes at night). Solution? I have a new hobby – collecting and sorting cigarette butts by brand and lipstick presence. I hope to have enough to put in gift boxes soon so that I may return them to their rightful owners, as I’ve decided the butts are not discarded, but merely lost. College Humor recently conducted a survey of other popular pet peeves, many of which resonated with me. Here are a few more of my own, as well as some from that list: • Mistreatment of A A nimals In addition to cigarette butts, folks also seem to like discarding their unwanted animals in my yard. In this case, I do my best to care for and nd homes for these precious animals. I do not collect them and return them to the ones I suspect left them in my yard, however. That individual clearly doesn’t deserve them. • U U nnecessarily S S hortened W W ords While there’s nothing wrong with progress, there’s absolutely everything wrong with the perversion of the English language. Yes, Shakespeare made up words all the time, but when you write some of the most important literary works of all time, then you can start saying “totes”, which is a kind of bag. • People Not T T urning T T he V V olume O O ff T T heir Keyboard W W hile T T exting The keyboard noise: for people who aren’t quite convinced of this “texting” thing unless it’s stimulating one more sense, or for people who don’t get to text that often and want everybody to know when they do. • W W hen S S omebody S S ays L L iterally and D D oes Not L L iterally Mean I I t Here’s a quick lesson for you now so that someone doesn’t shout it in your face: literally means literally. If the number of people in the world who’d said they were “literally scared out of my mind” or “literally dead” were being accurate, then we’d have a whole lot more to worry about than an inaccurate vocabulary. • Forms W W ithout E E nough S S pace for A A nswers Form makers: It’s probably a good idea to be very liberal in your allocation of writing space, because you never want to cut someone off right before they make a great point or gure out how to end a paragraph that doesn’t seem to be going anywh • L L itter There’s nothing nearly as obnoxious as wanting to get rid of something, and deciding throwing it on the ground will do as a means of disposal. We get it, people, you once owned something you no longer want. Quit showing off and nd a trash can. • People W W ho A A sk Questions D D uring Movies Dear people who ask questions during movies: We get it. Some movies are confusing. We know that guy’s talking, and no, we don’t know who he is, either, or why they’re now asking that guy who works at a dock. If you just hush up for half a second, maybe we can both nd out. Love, everyone. • People W W ho Make Noise in Movie T T heaters Going to the movies is expensive, which is why it’s almost inexplicable some people go and spend the whole time texting and laughing and asking stupid questions (see above). Maybe the low lights, loud volume and the fact everyone else is shutting up is a sign that everyone should shut up. Read the room, guys. • T T he D D uck Face One day, not long ago, some girl was pranked into thinking if she made a specic stupid face she’d look even more attractive in photos. Somehow, she believed this, and soon everyone she knew was inexplicably ruining every picture taken of them. The rest is history, documented thoroughly by your facebook feed. • T T hat annoying paper towel hangy-down thingy OK ... I don’t know what the proper term would be, but I simply can’t walk by a roll of paper towels and see an uneven edge without stopping to yank off the offending scrap. Understandably, this is less like a pet peeve and perhaps a testimony of my general strangeness. I’m curious to know the pet peeves of my friends and neighbors. Perhaps you share some of mine – with the added annoyance at the whiney newspaper woman who felt the need to put hers in writing? Whatever they may be, I wish my Holmes and Washington County neighbors an annoyance free week. Literally. ‘My yard is not an ashtray’ and other pet peeves CAROL KE nN T Editor CEc C ILIA SpSP EARS | Tne News A surprise trip to Panama City Beach with my mother about a year ago. CE cC ILIA S pP EARS Cecilia’s Sit Down Life’s a beach

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 Wednesday, July 9, 2014 2014 Universal Uclick releas e dates: Ju ly 5-11 27-1 (14) from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick To order, send $9.95 plus $3.50 postage and handling for each copy. Send check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to: Andrews McMeel Universal, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206 or call toll-free 1-800-591-2097. Please send ______ copies of The Mini Page Guide to the Constitution (Item #0-7407-6511-6) at $13.45 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.) www.smartwarehousing.com Name: ____________________________________________________ ____________________ Address: ________________________________________________________ ______________ City: ____________________________________ _____ State: _________ Zip: _______________ The popular nine-part series on the Constitution, written in collaboration with the National Archives, is now packaged as a colorful 32-page softcover book. The series covers: the preamble, the seven articles and 27 amendments the “big ideas” of the document the history of its making and the signers An Old Ide a Ta kes Root in Ci ti es Fa rm ing Fo o d For es ts Imagine growing forests full of free food right in the middle of cities Nutritious tasty food would be av ailable for the pic king Fo rest areas would help cl ean and cool the city air Wi ldlife would find a safe habitat. \rm‰ or city dwellers could enjoy the beauties of nature The Mini Pa ge talked with experts on food forests to learn more about this growing idea. What is a food fore st? A z‹‹w z‹y‘• imitates the ecosystem of a natural forest. The difference is that people ch oose eac h type of plant in a food forest. Eac h plant produces something that helps people or helps keep the forest going Layer s of food A forest ecosystem is built of layers of trees, shrubs and other plants. Experts say that in a food forest, these layers are: 1. The tm‰‹Œ¡ (KAN-uh-pe a), or the tops of branches and trees. Only the tallest trees, such as mature nut and fruit trees, create the canopy. 2. Shorter trees, such as younger nut and fruit trees, or fruit trees that don’t grow as high. 3. Shrubs such as berry bushes. 4. Vegetables and herbs. 5. Root vegetables such as carrots or Jerusalem artichoke s. 6. A layer of edible growth closer to the ground, such as mushrooms or strawberrie s. 7. Vines such as grapes or beans that climb trees or other structures. Many jobs Food forest designers look for plants that do a variety of jobs. Besides providing food or medicine, the plants might attract helpful insects, return nutrients to the soil or supply †—„t| *. Filling every part of the forest with food-produci ng plants helps keep down weeds. Food forests provide more than a variety of foods. Dave Jacke, a food forest researcher, says the ideal food forest would produce the seven F’s: ( )2 /&) ./'. '% &) )( clothing and building z‹wwy or food for animals )/2/) %3%')/'%2 )%22 )22)( pharmaceutical s), or medicines *Mulch is decay ing plant matter that protect s and enriche s soil and plants. photo by Lamphay Inthakoun, courtesy UN Women weed their rice field s in a food forest in Laos in Southeast Asia. In many tropica l countries, peopl e have been tending fo o d forests for hundre ds of years. photo courtesy Beacon Food Forest This woman picks a bunch of Jerusalem artichokes. This was one of the first food crops harvested by the Seattle Beacon Food Forest last year. from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Mi ni Sp y Mini Spy and her friends are work ing in her garde n. See if you can find: arrow dragon head butter fly kite lion face squir rel word MINI number 3 net lette r E star puppy face mug funny face heart sock snake elep hant head lette r O exclam atio n mar k TM from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick You’ll need : !')$ % '1%-) &%& '% 2/') 2)3 )% &) %&2) & -% What to do: 1. Bring 3 cups of water to boil in a large nonstick saucepan. Add carrots and return to boil. 2. Reduce heat to medium and cook uncovered for 8 to 9 minutes until carrots are tender. 3. Drain carrots well and set aside. Melt butter in same pan. 4. Return carrots to pan; add lemon slices and sprinkle with brown sugar. Stir to coat carrots. 5. Cover, reduce heat to low, and cook for additional 3 minutes. You will need an adult’s help with this recipe. TM Ro ok ie Co ok ie ’s Rec ip e Sweet Lemon Carr ots from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Mee t Cate Blan chett Cate Blanc hett is the voice of Va lka in the movie “How to Train Yo ur Dragon 2. ” She starred as Galadriel in the “Lord of the Rings” and “Hobbit” trilogies and acted in “Indiana Jo nes and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. ” Cate 45, grew up in Melbourne ,V ictoria, Australia, wit h an older brother and a younger sister She graduated from a college for dramatic arts She has also appeared in many pla ys and wa s co-artistic director of a theater company in Sydney ,A ustralia. She first appeared in a movie as an extra. She go t th at job when she wa s tra veling in Egypt when she wa s 18. A movie wa s being filmed there and a fellow hotel guest encouraged her to apply for the job She supports environmental, arts and women’ s rights causes She lives near Sydney with her family photo by Nick Wall from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Lacrosse player Jordan Wolf belongs to a winning pack. He and his teammates from Duke University captured back-to-ba ck national titles when the Blue Devils knocked off Notre Dame 10-9 in the NCAA championsh ip game on Memorial Day in Baltimore, Maryl and. Wolf tallied two goals and four assists in the final game, and his six points (each goal or assist is a “point”) led all scorers. The senior attackman had 103 total points for the season — setti ng new school and Atlantic Coast Conference records — and finished his career as Duke’s second-all-timeleading scorer. Jordan also was named the NCAA Champi onships Most Outstandin g Player, and was voted to his second NCAA All-Tournam ent Team. In addition to his many accomplishme nts on the lacrosse fi el d, Jo rd an ex ce l l e d in th e classroom. A threetime All-ACC Academic honoree, he graduated in May with a bachelor’s degree in history. TM J or dan W o lf Gus Goods port’ s Supersport Height: 5-9 Birthda te: 12-271991 Hometown : Wynnewood Pennsylvani a from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Retur ning on their own A big differe nce betwee n food forests and common crops is that plants in the forests are Œyy ‰‰m „‘ (puh-RENee-uhls) This means the plants come back year after year. Today most of our food crops are m‰‰—m„‘ or plants such as corn that must be replante d from seeds each year. Most of our food now comes from only 20 varieti es of annual plants. Food forests help increas e food wœy ‘•¡ or kinds of food availab le. Seattle’ s food fore st The Beacon Food Forest in Seattle has set aside the largest area for a public food forest in the United States. Hundreds of volunteers have worked to plant two of its seven acres. It will have its first full growing season this year, five years after the project began in 2009. As the years go by, the forest will become self-sustain ing, and more food will be planted throughout all seven acres. Gr owing on Its Own Lear ning from nat ure People design food forests to be ‘y„z ‘—‘•m‰‰{ This means that once the forests get started, they will keep growing and producing on their own. The forests will basically take care of themselves. People will need to do some work, such as cutting back branches. The biggest amount of work comes at the beginning People must find the land, clear it, enrich the soil, figure out what to grow and plant it. photo courtesy Beacon Food Forest The Washington Conserv ation Corps cleans out cattails and weeds from the site of the Beaco n Food Forest in Seattle. Seattle volunte ers built the Beacon Food Fores t from the groun d up. The area was covered with grass and wild plant s. The dirt was hard and packed. Volunt eers had to prepare the soil before they could plant. Workers plant the first fruit tree in the Seattle food forest in 2013. Fruit trees may take from two to five years before they begin producing fruit. photo courte sy Beaco n Food Forest The Mini Page than ks Glenn Herlihy, co-foun der, Beacon Food Forest in Seattle, and Dave Jacke, author of the adult-leve l book set “Edible Forest Gardens,” f or help with this issue. Next week, The Mini Page is about the rodeo. from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick The Mini Page Sta ff Be tt y De bn am Fo und ing Edi tor and Edi tor at La rg eL is a Ta rry Ma na gin g Ed it or Lu cy Lie n As soc ia te Ed it or We ndy Dale y Ar tist art by Alois Lunzer Enoug h for everyon e Cities often plant food forests to serve the community. For example, “giving gardens” in the Seattle forest have been put aside to grow food for the needy. In Johnson City, Tennessee, a church has donated land to form a food forest. The forest, which is being planted next to a food pantry, will offer free food to the community. Similar food forests are being planned all over Johnson City. In Philadelphi a, volunteers are planting orchards and food forests in low-income neighborhoods where fresh fruit is hard to get. They are planting food forests in vacant lots, schoolyards and other public lands. In Boston volun teers are plant ing a public orc hard that in cl ud es ra re apple ancest ors, or |y„ ‹‹† (AIR-l oom) apple variet ies. They ar e plantin g fruit types that hav e almost dis appea red Part of th eir miss ion is to ma intain divers ity in our food suppli es. Suppl ying many needs Experts say that growing our own food helps us be more connected to our surroundings. When food is transported over long distances, it can lose some of its nutritional value. It isn’t picked at its top ripeness, so it doesn’t taste as good as locally grown produce. It takes a lot of energy to transport our food. Experts say the average plate of food in the United States travels 1,200 miles from the field to the table. It takes 10 calories of energy to grow and transport every one calorie we eat, experts say. This is not an efficient system. Playing and working outside in nature help people relax, grow healthier and become happier. Public food forests encourage community spirit. You can have the rewards of growing mini food forests in your own backyard or in containers on a patio or balcony. You don’t need a big space. Fru itful For est s Bac kup plan Local food forests give us a backup for our food supplies. This is especially important now that climate change is causing an increase of storms, drought, fires and other dangers that may harm crops. Droughts and storms can hit close to home, too. It is important to have a mixture of food sources. Food forests might survive problems better than field crops. Trees are hardier during droughts. They have much longer roots and have more energy stored to get them through a crisis. Trees will often survive disasters such as floods, whereas annual food crops would have to be completely replanted the next season. photo courtesy Beacon Food Forest Beacon Food Forest co-foun der Glenn Herlihy raises up one of the first cabbage s harvest ed from the food forest. Growing our own food is excitin g. photo courtesy Beacon Food Forest Seattle volunteers learn beekeep ing. Bees are important in a sustaina ble food forest. They help plants r eproduce. This heirloo m apple, the Grimes Golden, is the parent of the Golden Delicious. It is being planted in Boston food forests from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick Gary: How is a ga rde n lik e a gr eat story? Grace: It has a good plot! All the followi ng jokes have something in common. Can you guess the common theme or category? Gretch en: What is the difference between a laundr yman and a gardener? Ginger: One keeps the lawn dry and the other keeps the lawn wet! TM Migh ty Funny ’s Mi ni Jok es Mr. Green: You have been workin g a long time in your garden. What are you growing? Mrs. Green: T ired! Ready Resources from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick The Mini Page provides ideas for websites, books or other resources that will help you learn more about this week’s topics. On the Web: %')&1'3" &)%'*(* ) & /2"!0( ( & /2"2 At the library: .) %'1%( 3))%(+ & %2)) %(/-% %() %&2) /(# /() 2%/Growing and Preparing Food” by Katherine Hengel PME FI LDL IW FSF LF EG UL LA UNN AF RE UG RTR LA YP ON AC OU EN EC ROC NT SE RO FO ID NI BE WH DL ST UN WD T NT EME TAT IB AHA VS II ER EE TN UL OV TI O AES US TA ININ GE NI LS SE LB ATE GE VR EL Words that remind us of food fores ts are hidden in the block above. Some words are hidden backw ard or diagona lly. See if you can find: ANNUAL, BEE, CANOPY, CITIES, FO OD, FOREST, FRUIT, FUN, GROW, HABITAT, LAND, MULCH, NUTS, PERENNIAL, SEE D, SO IL, SUSTAINING, TREE, VEGETABLES, VINE, VOLUNTEER, WATER, WILDLIFE. Food For ests from The Mini Page 2014 Universal Uclick TM Basset Brown’s Tr y ’n ’ F in d

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A6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, July 9, 2014 I must confess to a severe case of poverty. I never took a vow of poverty; it just seems to have worked out that way for me. I am so poor the church mice have packed their bags and moved on. If I knew where they moved to, I might join them. Being poor can have its advantages, but I have yet to run across any. I am so poor I am not able to pay attention, especially when watching some television program with the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. This has caused no small problem with my wife. We love an evening of unwinding before the TV watching some of our favorite programs. I must confess those programs are getting less and less each year. Soon we are going to have to go back to reading books. Together we will be watching a program, and when I say “we,” I do it with certain modications. My wife will get up and go to the kitchen for something and when she returns, she asks me a question, “What happened?” I look at her with one of my infamous quizzical looks and respond, “Where?” She then explains she is talking about what happened on the TV program while she was away. I then tell her, “I’m sorry, I wasn’t paying attention.” This seems to be a source of real frustration for her. “If you can’t afford to pay attention,” she will say sarcastically while rolling her eyes, “couldn’t you at least rent some attention some time?” I tried explaining to her that old age is making me a little more forgetful. She, however, is not buying it, so there goes my income stream. For me, watching television is not an obsession; it is more like a distraction. I do not follow every little bit on the television screen. For me it is not a matter of life or death, it is just a matter of recreation. I know that nothing on TV is real. We can be in the middle of the next program and I do not realize that the rst program has ended. Talk about confusing! When something does catch my attention, boy does it have my attention. “Did you,” I ask my wife, “hear that?” Then it is role reversal in prime time. I will not say she acts like me, just that it comes pretty close to it. Not quite Oscar material, but close. “What?” She said with a very confused look on her face. So I had to explain the news story that I just happened to catch. I do not know all of the details, I was not paying that much attention, just that someone was red from their job for saying to a customer, “Have a blessed day.” I have met many customer service people that said things that I would want them to be red from, but this has never been on my list. My wife then asked the question I was thinking. “What is wrong with telling someone to have a blessed day?” I could not gure it out. It is like at Christmas time some places do not want their employees to say to the customer, “Merry Christmas.” The reasoning is, it might offend someone. What about us who are offended when somebody does not say Merry Christmas to us? This matter of being offended can go both ways. There should be an equal offended person law. There is a law for everything else. I just would like to meet the person who is offended by somebody saying to them, “Have a blessed day.” Later that evening I was watching a new crime/detective story on TV and all of a sudden, I heard some words that were offensive. They were saying curse words that I have never heard on TV before. I have always believed that if you have to use curse words, it is because your vocabulary is drastically lacking in intellectual responses to the world around you. Here is my dilemma. Why can you say curse words on TV, which everybody knows is scripted, but you cannot say, “Have a blessed day,” without getting red? If I was in business I would want my employees to greet my clients with a cheerful, “Have a blessed day” and not some awful curse words. I was complaining about this to a friend of mine who explained to me that curse words on television are considered “literary license.” Who is paying for that license I am wondering. All of this has to do with the PC syndrome in our country today. The problem is what was PC yesterday is no longer PC today. Who knows what tomorrow’s PC will be. What I cannot accept is the fact that being crude and rude is PC and saying something nice is not. Have we reverted to the caveman mentality? Is being nice is no longer acceptable behavior? I like what David says, “Bless the LORD, O my soul: and all that is within me, bless his holy name” (Psalms 103:1). Perhaps the reason people are offended by that phrase is because they know that only God has the power to bless. If I am being blessed by God, I am going to turn around and bless people around me. The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.netor website www. jamessnyderministries. com. If you would like your church listed here, please send information to: news@chipleypaper.com. Due to space limitation, please only send regular church services. For special services, please send separate submission. Berean Baptist Church Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7:30 p.m. The church is at 1438 Nearing Hills Drive in Chipley. Blue Lake Baptist Church Sunday School is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 1405 Blue Lake Road in Chipley. Bonnett Pond Church Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 2680 Bonnett Pond Road in Chipley. Bethlehem Baptist Church Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The church is at 1572 Highway 177 in Bonifay. Bethany Baptist Church Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 1404 North Highway 79 in Bonifay. Blessed Trinity Catholic Church Sunday Mass is held at 9 a.m. Wednesday evening Mass is held at 5:30 p.m. The church is at 2331 Hwy 177A in Bonifay. Chipley Church of Christ Sunday morning bible study is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 5 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 1295 Brickyard Road in Chipley. Christian Fellowship Center Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 1458 Monroe Shefeld Road in Chipley. First United Pentecostal Church Morning Worship is held at 10 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 1816 Highway 90 in Chipley. Gully Springs Baptist Church Sunday School is held at 9:40 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 7 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is located at 2826 Highway 90 in Bonifay. House of Prayer Worship Center Sunday School and Children’s Church is held at 9 a.m. Morning Worship at 11 a.m. Youth activities on Wednesday begin at 4:30 p.m. Praise and worship services are at 6:30 p.m. on Friday. The church at 763 West Blvd. in Chipley. Little Rock Assembly of God Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 1923 Highway 173 in Bonifay. Live Oak Assembly of God Services Discipleship Class is held Sunday at 10 a.m., with Morning Worship at 10:45 a.m. and Evening Worship at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday Services are at 6:30 p.m. The church is at 2118 Live Oak Road in Bonifay. Northside Assembly of God Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Sunday School is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 1009 North Rangeline Street in Bonifay. Salem Free Will Baptist Church Sunday School is held at 10 a.m., and worship services are at 11 a.m. Evening worship begins at 6 pm. Wednesday service is at 7 p.m. The church is at 2555 Kynesville Highway in Alford. Shady Grove Baptist Church Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 1955 Highway 177A in Bonifay. Vernon Evangelistic Church Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is on Highway 79 in Vernon. West Bonifay Baptist Church Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 609 West Indiana Ave. in Bonifay. Wausau Assembly of God Sunday School is held at 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 3537 Washington St. in Wausau. Wausau First Baptist Church Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 3493 Washington St. in Wausau. Wausau Pentecostal Holiness Sunday School is held at 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 10:55 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. Wednesday services are held at 6 p.m. The church is at 2201 Pioneer Road in Wausau. Winterville Assembly of God Sunday School is held at 10 a.m. Morning Worship is held at 11 a.m. Evening Worship is held at 6 p.m. The church is at 1897 Highway 177A in Bonifay Yes Lord Deliverance Sunday School is held at 10:30 a.m. Worship is held at noon. Wednesday services are held at 7 p.m. The church is at 739 Seventh St. in Chipley. NO TI CE TO BI D P. T. SE RV IC ES Th e Ho lm es Di st ri ct Sc ho ol Bo ar d wi ll ac ce pt se al ed bi d pr op os al s fo r con tr ac te d se rv ic es fo r Ph ys ic al Th er ap y fo r th e 20 14 20 15 sc ho ol ye ar un ti l 3: 00 p. m. Ju ly 16 20 14 Bi ds wi ll be op en ed Ju ly 21 20 14 at 8: 00 a. m. at th e Ho lm es Di st ri ct Sc ho ol Bo ar d of c e lo ca te d at 70 1 Ea st Pen ns ylv an ia Av en ue Bo ni fa y, FL 32 42 5. Fo r mo re in fo rm at io n, pl ea se con tac t th e ESE De par tm en t at 54 766 74 ex t. 2 33 Ho lm es Di st ri ct Sc ho ol Bo ar d re se rv es th e ri gh t to wa iv e fo rm al it ie s an d to re je ct an y or al l bi d s. 1254 Church Av e. Chipley FL 32438 850-638-1751 ‘Ser ving you since 1953’ Friendly Hometown Ser vice We als o ta ke ca re of (850) 638-5885 V†‹ =…tƒ . [ ›t › ;t‹t{ . Mo st Ve hicles Up to 5 qts syn thetic blend Mo st Ve hicles $ 19 95 Church l L I stST I ngsNGS Faith D rR J aA M esES l L snyderSNYDER Out to Pastor Have a blessed day; now re me if you dare! Here is my dilemma. Why can you say curse words on TV, which everybody knows is scripted, but you cannot say, “Have a blessed day,” without getting red? If I was in business I would want my employees to greet my clients with a cheerful, “Have a blessed day” and not some awful curse words.

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-' + ', &'% %' + % -' ) % ' % ' ' % "' ''% ' -' + + # -', !% '% # !$ '% -' + ', &'% %' ( "+ !%' ( '' %', '' % %' '' % "-, To learn ho w yo u can suppor t our commun ity ’s univ ersity contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. FL ORIDA ST AT E UNIVE RSIT Y PA NAMA CIT Y THE CA MP AIGN FOR OUR CO MM UNIT Y’ S UN IVERS IT Y En do wment for To morr ow ’s Jo bs $4 ,500 ,0 00 $500 ,0 00 $1,500 ,0 00 $2,500 ,0 00 $3 ,500 ,0 00 $4 ,500 ,0 00 $0 $1, 000 ,0 00 $2, 000 ,0 00 $3 ,0 00 ,0 00 $4 ,0 00 ,0 00 $5 ,0 00 ,0 00 GO AL Bill Fletcher HAS: BC-HIS 24 Ye ars Experience Allen Barnes HAS: BC-HIS 24 Ye ars Expe rience MARIANNA 3025 6th ST REET (850) 260-0436 We dnesdays & Fr idays CHIPLEY 1611 MAIN ST REET #4 (850) 260-0436 Monday Fr iday THE SOUNDS OF LIFE A D IF FE REN CE W OR TH H EA RIN G AB OUT! WE ’RE IN YO UR NEI GHB ORH OOD! $" $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ "$ # z WIRE LESS TECHNOLO GY AND $! $ $ $ i $ " "$ $ !$ $ $ !$ AND $! $ "$ $$ $ BEL TONE IS AMERICA ’S MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEA RING CA RE.* b e s t b e s t 2013 2013 Be lt one Fi rs t FR EE IN -O FF IC E TR IA L $800 OFF $800 OFF a pair of Beltone Fi rst TM hearing instruments Offer expires 7/31/2014 *Dis co un t o MS RP an d ap pl ie s to Be lt on e Fi rs t he ar in g ai ds $400 o si ng le he ar in g ai d. Ca nno t be co mb ine d wi th ot he r o er s, co up on s or ins ur an ce pl an s. Pr ev io us pu rc has es ex cl ude d. Be lt one Fi rs t ™ Beltone Fi rst is compa tible with iPhone 5s, iPhone 5c, iPhone 5, iP ad Air iP ad (4th genera tion). iP ad mini with Retina display iP ad mini and iP od touch (5th genera tion) using iOS7.X or la ter Ap ple, the Ap ple logo, iPhone, iP ad and iP od touch are trademarks of Ap ple, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Pa rticipa tion may var y. See loca tion for details. Bene ts of hearing aids var y by type and degree of hearing loss, noise environment, accurac y of hearing evalua tion and proper t. Beltone Among Adults over 50. 2014 Beltone Experience Beltone First, revolutionar y Made for iPhone hearing aid: *Remembers pl aces you visit, and automa tically updates your settings By F RANK SARGEANT Frankmako1@outlook.com The gag grouper season opened July 1 in the Gulf of Mexico, and continues to Dec. 3. By all accounts, it should be one of the best in Panhandle waters in recent years, with lots of legal-sized sh, more than 22 inches long, available. Most anglers report that there are loads of “eating size” gag grouper in the Gulf these days, but scientists are still concerned that there appear to be low numbers of the largest adult males that are responsible for most successful spawning. Like many shes, gags ( Mycteroperca microlepis ) change sex as they age, with the males evolving from mature females. Thus, unless a lot of females escape hooks and natural predators to an advanced age — about 11 years in this case when they’re over three feet long — there are few males on the deep reefs at spawning time. Gags can get huge: Angler Billie Currie caught one that went 62 pounds, 6 ounces off St. Pete in 2003, a sh that still holds the 50-pound-test IGFA record for men. The all-tackle record scaled 80 pounds, 6 ounces, and was caught off Destin in 1993. These giant sh — more than 50 inches long — might be as much as 30 years old, according to NOAA scientists. In mid-summer most gags are still in relatively deep water, 60 feet and more due to the warm water, but as the cold fronts begin to arrive they pull nearer shore. Mid-October to November can offer action at depths as shallow as 30 feet, and some anglers will nd the gags by towing a large diving plug like the Mann’s Plus 25 to reach down close to the structure. The classic method of catching gags is to nd a rockpile or ledge with sonar and GPS and drop down a live bait. Seasoned reef anglers have hundreds of these spots xed in their GPS units and can return to them accurately time after time. Less expert anglers can buy lists of “community holes,” well-known outcroppings that are starting points for bottom shing. While these commercialized numbers rarely hold many keepers, they are often part of much longer chains of rock that do, so provide a good general guide of where to start searching. IT’S GAG GROUPER TiI ME FRANK SARGEANT | Special to Times-Advertiser Gags are a favorite target for anglers because of their tasty llets and tough ghting abilities. The limit is two sh per angler per day, 22 inches or longer. Florida’s favorite grouper is again on the menu O UTDoo OO RS Wednesday, July 9, 2014 Page 7 www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Send your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com A Section

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Holmes County years ago ... R EFLECTIONS www.bonifaynow.com Page A8 Wednesday, July 9, 2014 Growing up on the farm, Guano was an important part of our lives. That is what we called all “bought” crop fertilizer and Guano was used for most crops unless you were using “lot fertilizer.” That was the manure from the cow and mule stalls that had “cured” to compost. Guano came in heavy cloth bags which we called gu-aner sacks and that might explain the term gunny sack. These bags were often used for other things around the home. After they were emptied, they were washed in the tubs following the laundry which I have described in previous columns. After selecting sound white ears of corn to take to the grist mill and shelling it on the handturned corn sheller, it would be placed in a clean Guano sack to take to the mill and then the miller would place the ground meal back in the same bag. From there we placed it in a lard can for home use or we weighed it into paper bags to sell. The Guano bags were sometimes used to make men’s under drawers, quilt linings, everyday hand towels, or even men’s work shirts though its course fabric was kinda scratchy and dingy looking. But what is this guano and why don’t we see it now a days? Guano is bat droppings and is a highly nutritious plant food supplement. In fact it is highly prized by organic farmers. In the 1800s, it was the foundation of the economy in some island nations, particularly Peru. Their Guano was especially high in nutrients as their climate is rather arid and the droppings of bats as well as sh-eating sea birds dried quickly so that the nutrients were maintained. The droppings also are often found in caves. I remember my Mama telling us that it was called guano because it came from the Guano Islands. That was partially correct. The term Guano comes from the Inca Indians where it was highly prized possession. This valuable natural resource led the United States Congress to pass the Guano Islands act in 1856 that allowed anyone to take possession on any island, key, atoll, or rock that contained guano and was not the possession of any other country. Some notable guano islands include Baker Island, Jarvis Island, Howland Island, Christmas Island, Johnson Atoll, Navassa Island and Midway Island. The fertilizer company that my dad bought guano from was Cartledge Fertilizer Company in Cottondale. Daddy also hauled bags of the fertilizer to other farmers and collected from them. On occasion, Mr. Raymond Cartledge would come to our gate. We understood when this well-dressed polite man came to our house, he was collecting money for the fertilizer Daddy had delivered for him. That company later produced chemical fertilizer and was a big employer for the area. Later it was cited for its damage to the environment and now is shut down. The commercial fertilizer that we use for the blueberries lists among its sources for nutrients activated sewage sludge along with a list of chemical elements. Blood from packing houses is also incorporated into plant food. I remember when there was a Florida company called Florida Renderers who would come to your farm and pick up dead animals to be used in plant fertilizer-making processed. In early 1950 when we lived in Gainesville while Jack was nishing his degree at U of F, we went to see a movie at the old Florida Theater on University Ave. I don’t recall the name of the movie, but it involved a race horse who died at the nish line as he won the big race. It was quite emotional and a lot of people were snifing. Then from the back of the theater came the solemn voice of a university student, “Call Florida Renderers.” Today we hear a lot about organic products versus those grown with commercially produced chemical fertilizer. Guano and compost supply elements necessary for a crop to be considered organic. I am not sure what the objection to commercially produced chemical fertilizer, but I know that the American Farmer is able to produce all the food and ber needed to sustain our population through the use of commercial fertilizers. Those wishing to eat organic are now able to nd a variety of organic products at a price. Whichever you choose, American Grown Agricultural products are the safest in the world. 50 Years Ago: 1964 CITy Y GETS S S H a A RE OF CIga GA RETTE Ta TA X • The City of Bonifay has received a check for $2,467.65 from Richard B. Keating, director of State Beverage Department, for state cigarette taxes collected within the city during the month of May. This check was a little more than $100 less than the April check. Mrs. Eula Belser, city clerk, said. COMMISSIONERS GRa A NT ASSESSOR E E XTRa A 30 Day AY S • The Board of County Commissioners Tuesday granted Mrs. Claudine Slay an extension of 30 days to complete the 1964 tax roll. Mrs. Slay asked for the time extension because of the extra work that had been placed upon the ofce and the delay caused by the death of her husband. BIgga GGA RT IS SIg G NEd D by BY Ka A NSa A S CITy Y ATHLETIc C S • Gary Biggart, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Biggart of Bonifay, who was an outstanding pitcher on the University of Florida baseball team for the past three seasons, has been signed by the Kansas City Athletics and has been optioned to Quincy, Illinois, in the Mid West League 20 Years Ago: 1994 CVA PIck CK ETS c C OUNTy Y c C OURTHOUSE • “We don’t want a landll here!” said Holmes County resident Eloise LaBarre explaining the parade of local people carrying picket signs outside the Holmes County Courthouse in Bonifay July 5. CHILES NO HELP TO H H OLMES COUNTy Y • “Gov. Lawton Chiles has let Bonifay and the people of Holmes County down,” were the words spoken by Bonifay Mayor James Sims in an inter view following the June 27 Bonifay Council meeting. PP ONc C E d D E L L EON Pa A IR a A RRESTEd D • Dollie Mae Bogans, 63, and Robert Lee Clemmons, 45, both living on North Hagan Loop in Ponce de Leon, were arrested June 26 and charged with domestic violence and abuse of an aged person. 10 Years Ago: 2004 PP D L L FIRE c C HIEF RESIg G NS • Ponce de Leon is looking for a new re chief. J. R. Brookshire resigned Thursday night, July 1, at the regular monthly meeting of Ponce de Leon City Council at City Hall Who knows what Guana is or where it comes from? HaHA PP yY cC ORNER Hazel Wells Tison SS PEc C I a A L TO TT IMES-Adv DV ERTISER These fellows seem to be enjoying food and fellowship, possibly at a church or school event. This photo was found at the Holmes County Times-Advertiser ofce, and its only clue was written on the back, handwriting that said, “Smyrna School.” Do you recognize these gentlemen? If so, please email: wcnnews@ chipleypaper.com. Your answer will appear in a future edition. Chasing Shadows is a new feature we hope to run each week. Do you have an old photo from Holmes County you would like to have identied? Ask your neighbors for help by submitting it for publication. Email submissions to: wcnnews@chipleypaper.com. Who are these men?

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By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY — Horns blaring, sirens screaming and the sounds of boisterous laughter could be heard throughout down town Bonifay as the Holmes County Public Library celebrated their rst summer reading program with Touch-A-Truck. Local children participated in TouchA-Truck on June 27, with local agencies volunteering their heavy equipment such as re trucks, mail trucks, ambulances, bulldozers, etc. for the children to look at and explore while learning about the vehicles and the services they provide. The summer reading program continues on through the month of July. JUL y Y 11 Mad Scientist will start at 10 a.m. at the Holmes County Public Library Annex. Children will have the chance to participate in games and activities that will involve experimentation. JUL y Y 18 Balloon man will be at the Holmes County Public Library Annex at 10 a.m. to make balloon animals and tell stories. JUL y Y 25 Free Family Fun will be a free day at the Holmes County Agricultural Center starting at 10 a.m. It will be a day of food, fun and games with friends and family. PHo O T o O S byBY CEci CI L ia IA SpSP E a A RS | Times-Advertiser The Holmes County Public Library kicked of its summer reading program with Touch-A-Truck on June 27, where local agencies volunteered their heavy equipment for the children to look at and explore while learning about the vehicles and the services they provide. Here, children excitedly gathered around the Bonifay Fire Department’s Engine One re truck. Summer reading made fun with ‘TOUCH-A-TRUCK’ Library program lets kids get up close to heavy equipment Kids get a good look on the inside of the Holmes County Emergency Management’s ambulance Some got to feel like they were already grown up as they sat behind the wheel of heavy equipment. Children get a higher view of a cement mixer. Washington County News z H H olmes County T T imes-Advertiser Wednesday, JULy Y 9 2014 B P a A GE 1 Section E XTRA “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) Of these whose ancestor signed the Declaration of Independence? Reese Witherspoon, Tori Spelling, Kate Hudson, Teri Hatcher 2) Which character is referred to as the “Ghost Who Walks”? Casper, Phantom, Shadow, Dracula 3) Of these which was not a 20th century Pope? Benedict XV, Paul VI, Pius XI, Leo VIII 4) How did Vincent Van Gogh sign his paintings? Didn’t, Gog, V.V., Vincent 5) Which is not an element of the “re triangle”? Oxygen, Heat, Moisture, Fuel 6) What “Martian” is/was a Looney Toons character? Milton, Marion, Marvin, Monroe 7) What was Dwight D. Eisenhower’s favorite card game? Gin, Bridge, Poker, Crazy Eights 8) Where is Qualcomm Stadium located? Denver, Cleveland, Buffalo, San Diego 9) What year marked the death of Thomas Edison? 1874, 1899, 1910, 1931 10) Who is the sister of George W. Bush? No sister, Janet, Dorothy, Rita 11) Statistically which of these has the “lowest percentage of winning” as the home team? Soccer, Basketball, Football, Baseball 12) Which U.S. city is approximately the same latitude as Mexico City? Hilo, HI; Minneapolis, MN; Boise, ID; Vineland, NJ 13) Who said he considered wine “a necessity of life”? Galileo, Jefferson, Edison, Einstein 14) Where is the Russell Cave? Washington, Florida, Alabama, Michigan 15) Biblical Is the book of Proverbs in the Old or New Testament or neither? 16) What did Moses sprinkle toward heaven to produce boils on the Egyptians? Water, Locusts, Ashes, Manna ANSWERS: 1) Reese Witherspoon 2) Phantom 3) Leo VIII 4) Vincent 5) Moisture 6) Marvin 7) Bridge 8) San Diego 9) 1931 10) Dorothy 11) Baseball 12) Hilo, HI 13) Jefferson 14) Alabama 15) Old 16) Ashes TT rivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra BUILDING A bB ASIC PANTRY/ COOKING WITH PRESERVED FOODS CLASS WAUSAUWAUSAU — A class on building a basic pantry and cooking with preserved foods class will be offered from 6-8 p.m. on Tuesday, July 15, at the Wausau Town Hall, 1607 Second Ave. Participants will learn how to set up a basic, well-equipped pantry and ways to use preserved foods in everyday meals. Registration fee is $5 and includes class materials. Space is limited, so preregistration is required. To register, contact the Washington County Extension Ofce at 6386265 or the Holmes County Extension Ofce at 5471108. Extension programs are open to everyone. For persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations, call 850638-6265 (TDD, via Florida Relay Service, 1-800-9558771) at least ve working days before the class so that proper consideration may be given to the request. TT RAVEL b B ALL TRY-OUTS Travel ball tryouts will be held Saturday, July 12, at Jennings Field in Marianna. The league is called Jackson County Baseball, but the league is open for all neighboring counties, too. Times are 9-11 a.m. for age 9 and 2-5 p.m. for age 10. Tryouts for ages 8 and younger are Saturday, July 19, at 9 a.m. at the same location. JObB FF AIR MARIANNA — CareerSource Chipola will host a regional job fair from 2-6 p.m. Thursday, July 17, at the National Guard Armory in Marianna. Veterans will be provided priority of service, with the rst 30 minutes reserved for veterans. For more information, call 850-633-4419. BETHLEHE mM PP EE WW EE FOOT bB ALL AND CHEERLEADING Sign up for Bethlehem PeeWee football and cheerleading is at 6 p.m. at Esto Park every Monday and Friday for ages 5-13. Registration is $50 per child. For information about helping raise funds for these young athletes, visit their Facebook page, Bethlehem PeeWee Fundraising. BRAVES VS. N N EW Y Y ORK METS WASHINGTONWASHINGTON / HOL HOL M ES ES COUNTYCOUNTY — The Krafty Katz Relay for Life team is holding fundraiser to see the Atlanta vs. New York Mets, Saturday, Sept. 20. Tickets are $100 and include the bus ride to and from Atlanta and eld level seats to the game. The bus will leave Chipley at 12:30 p.m. and return at about 1 a.m. To ensure seat on the bus, call Vicki Lamb at 326-3319 or 6381483 by July 15. KK OLm M ETZ S S ING VERNONVERNON — The Kolmetz Sing will be held at 6:30 p.m. Friday, July 11, at Live Oak Baptist Church in Vernon. The church is on River Road. For more information, call Bertha Padgett at 535-2737. HH OLm M ES C C OUNTY 4-H H OFFERS YOUTH SUmm MM ER WORKSHOP B ONIFAY ONIFAY — Holmes County 4-H has a summer day workshop open for youth ages 8 and older this summer. 4-H MooLah Money Camp is scheduled from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Thursday, July 24, at the Holmes County Ag Center. The cost is $25 per youth. Snacks and drinks included. Children will need to bring a sack lunch. Youth can register at the University of Florida/IFAS Extension, Holmes County 4-H Ofce. Registration will remain open until July 11, 2014. For more information about this event, contact Niki Crawson, UF IFASHolmes County Extension 4-H Agent, at 547-1108, ncrawson@u.edu or check out our website at holmes.ifas.u.edu Fo r yo ur health. Fo r yo ur co nv en ie nc e. Fo r yo ur peac e of mind It ’s yo ur Hospital yo ur choic e and yo ur co mmunit y! Nor th we st F lorida Co mmuni ty Hosp ital Nor th we st F lorida Co mmuni ty Hosp ital Nor th we st F lorida Co mmuni ty Hosp ital Nor th we st F lorida Co mmuni ty Hosp ital Ca rd iology Se rv ic es Or thopedic Se rv ic es Emer genc y Se rv ic es Sur gi cal Se rv ic es Sw ing Be d Re habilita tion Co mmunit y Home Health Wo men ’s Health TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y TRICO UNT Y WA SHI NGT ON I HO LMES I JA CKSON 2014 Reader ’s Ch oic e In pa tien t Se rv ic es Ra diology/I mag ing Ph ys ician Re fe rr al Lo ng Te rm Ca re Re hab Se rv ic es Se nior Se rv ic es Ed uca tion & Ou tr each Lab Se rv ic es Ou tpa tien t Se rv ic es Ph ys ician Se rv ic es Re spir at or y Se rv ic es Ce nt ra liz ed Sc heduling Wo und Healing In stitut e to ou r pa ti en ts an d co mm uni ty fo r yo ur tr us t an d gr ea t sup po rt 1360 Br ick ya rd Ro ad I Chipley Fl or ida 32428 I (850) 638-1610 I www .nf ch.or g He re ar e so me of th e re aso ns we we re vo te d THE BES T MED IC AL FA CILIT Y in the Re ad er ’s Ch oi ce Be st of Tr iCo un ty CC ounty CC ommissioner DD istrict 2 MICKEY LL OCKE — FILED INTENT TO SEEK OFFICE FF E bB 28: FF eb. 1-28: Monetary contributions were $100; there were no expenditures reported for the reporting period; Contributions were from Mickey Locke $100. March 1-31: Candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. AA pril 1-30: Monetary contributions were $2,300: In-Kind contributions $13.70; expenditures were $2254.74; contributions were given by Mickey Locke $200, Mickey Locke $300 and Mickey Locke $1,800; In-kind contributions were Mickey Locke (petitions) $13.70: expenditures were for Supervisor of Elections (petitions)$13.70, Zan Byrd (donation) $200; Campground church (donation) $100, Bethlehem School (donation) $125, Ponce de Leon FCCLA (donation) $50 and Sims Signs (signs) $1,766.04. May 1-31: Monetary contributions were $200: expenditures were $300; contributions were given by Mickey Locke $200; expenditures were for Bethlehem School (donation) $100, Holmes County All Stars (donation) $100 and Lance Groce (donation) $100. June 1-20: Monetary contributions were $200: expenditures were $150; contributions were given by Mickey Locke $200; expenditures were for Holmes County Dixie Youth (donation) $50 and Bonifay City Hall (sign placement for the city) $100. MONTY MERCHANT — FILED INTENT TO SEEK OFFICE AA PRIL 21: AA pril 1-30: Candidate led a notice of no activity. May 1-31: Monetary contributions were $520: contributions were given by Monty Merchant $20 and Juanita Stanley $500: expenditures were $113.10; Supervisor of Elections (petition verication) $13.10 and City of Bonifay (placement of signs in city limits) $100. CC ounty CC ommissioner DD istrict 4 JOHN WW AYNE CC ARTWRIGHT — FILED INTENT TO SEEK OFFICE FF E bB 24: FF eb. 1-28: Candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. March 1-31: Monetary contributions were $1,900: contributions were given by John Wayne Cartwright $1,900: expenditures were $15; Holmes County Supervisor of Election (petitions) $12.50 and Holmes County Supervisor of Elections (petitions) $2.50: AA pril 1-30: led a report of no activity. May 1-31: Monetary contributions were $0: expenditures were $866.70; Sims Signs (campaign cards and magnetic signs) $208.65 and Sims Signs (yard signs) $658.05. LL TT “ SS ONNY” JOHNSON, JR. — FILED INTENT TO SEEK OFFICE JAN. 15: Jan. 1-31: Monetary Contributions were $2,000; Contributions given by: L.T. “Sonny” Johnson, Jr., $2,000; there were no expenditures for the reporting period. FF eb. 1-28: Candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. March 1-31: There were no monetary contributions for the reporting period; Expenditures were $1,615.10; Signs Etcetera, Inc. (signs) $1,515.10 and City of Bonifay (fee for placement of signs) $100: AA pril 1-30: No monetary contributions were reported: In-Kind contributions $13; In-kind contributions were from Sonny Johnson (petitions) $13.00. May 1-31: Candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. EE DDIE PP AUL — FILED INTENT TO SEEK OFFICE MARCH 24: March 1-31: Candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. AA pril 1-30: Monetary contributions were $250: expenditures were $14.90; contributions were given by Eddie O. Paul $250: expenditures were for Supervisor of Elections (petitions) $14.90. May 1-31: Monetary contributions were $500: expenditures were $0; contributions were given by Mark S. Williams $200 and Edward O. Paul $300. June 1-23: Monetary contributions were $300: expenditures were $874.19; contributions were given by Eddie Paul $300: expenditures were for Sims Signs (T-shirts, yard signs, door hangers) $874.19 and Eddie Paul (Close account) $160.93. DD ANNY PP OWELL — FILED INTENT TO SEEK OFFICE FF E bB 6: FF eb. 1-28: Candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. March 1-31: Candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. AA pril 1-30: Monetary contributions were $2,069: expenditures were $706.20; contributions were given by Danny Powell $2,069: expenditures were for Sims Signs (signs) $706.20. May 1-31: Monetary contributions were $0: expenditures were $113.10; expenditures were for Holmes County Supervisor of Elections (petitions) $13.10 and City of Bonifay (place signs in city limits) $100. EE ARL SS TAFFORD — FILED INTENT TO SEEK OFFICE AA PRIL 14: AA pril 1-30: Candidate led a report of no activity. May 1-31: Monetary contributions were $100: In-Kind contributions $255; expenditures were $14.20; contributions were given by Earl Stafford $100; In-kind contributions were from Earl Stafford (political signs) $255: expenditures were for Supervisor of Elections (petition cards) $14.20. KK ENNETH MARVEL WW ILLIA mM S — FILED INTENT TO SEEK OFFICE MARCH 28: March 1-31: Candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. AA pril 1-30: Monetary contributions were $1,000: expenditures were $48.60; contributions were given by Kenneth Marvel Williams, $1,000: expenditures were for Supervisor of Elections (Petition) $13.60 and Doctors Memorial Foundation (tee box) $35. May 1-31: Monetary contributions were $0: InKind contributions $1,000; expenditures were $539.77; In-kind contributions were from Kenneth Marvel Williams (old signs and posts) $1,000: expenditures were for Sims Signs (political signs) $439.77 and City of Bonifay (sign placement) $100. SS chool Board DD istrict 1 HH RR USSELL ( RR USTY) WW ILLIA mM S — FILED INTENT TO SEEK OFFICE AA PRIL 11: AA pril 1-30: Candidate led a report of no activity. May 1-31: Monetary contributions were $0: In-Kind contributions $15; expenditures were $0; In-kind contributions were from H. Russell Williams (payment for petition verication) $15. SS chool Board DD istrict 3 AA LAN JUSTICE — FILED INTENT TO SEEK OFFICE MARCH 13: March 1-31: Candidate led a notication of no activity for the reporting period. AA pril 1-30: Candidate led a report of no activity. May 1-31: Monetary contributions were $630: InKind contributions $161.48; expenditures were $616.28; contributions were given by Alan Shane Justice $400, Alan Shane Justice $100, Alan Shane Justice $130; In-kind contributions were from Alan Shane Justice (petition fees) $14.50, Alan Shane Justice (lumber and screws for signs)$80.89, Alan Shane Justice (lumber for signs) $44.69 and Alan Shane Justice (solar spotlights for signs) $21.40: expenditures were for Sims signs (yard signs, large sign, set up for yard signs) $387.86, City of Bonifay (fee for placing signs within the city limits of Bonifay) $100 and Sims Signs (large signs) $128.40. JASON MOTLEY — FILED INTENT TO SEEK OFFICE FF E bB 4: FF eb. 1-28: Candidate led a notication of no activity for reporting period. March 1-31: Candidate led a notication of no activity for reporting period: AA pril 1-30: Monetary contributions were $400; no expenditures were reported; contributions were given by Jason Motley $400. May 1-31: Monetary contributions were $490: expenditures were $800.10; contributions were given by Jason Motley $340 and Jason Motley $150: expenditures were for Supervisor of Elections (verify petition) $11.30, Smith Signs (signs) $688, Supervisor of Elections (verify petition) $.80 and City of Bonifay (political sign permit) $100. SS chool Board DD istrict 5 SS IDNEY M. ‘ SS ID’ JOHNSON — FILED INTENT TO SEEK OFFICE JAN. 24: Jan. 1-31: Candidate led a notication of no activity for reporting period. FF eb. 1-28: Monetary contributions $3,000: monetary contributions are from Sid Johnson $3,000; expenditures $1,332.15; Sims Signs (yard signs) $1,246.55 and Sims Signs (business cards) $85.60. March 1-31: Monetary contributions for reporting period: expenditures $442.98; Sims Signs (T-shirts and Magnetic signs) $442.98. AA pril 130: No monetary contributions reported: expenditures were $112.80; expenditures were for Campground church (donation) $100 and Supervisor of Elections (petitions) $12.80. DD REW A A LLAN K K RISER — FILED INTENT TO SEEK OFFICE JAN. 22: Jan. 1-31: Candidate led a notication of no activity for reporting period. FF eb. 128: In-Kind contributions were $4.91; there were no expenditures reported for the reporting period; In-kind contributions are from Drew Kriser (copies of candidate petitions) $4.91. March 1-31: Monetary contributions $200; In-Kind contributions $8.99; there were no expenditures reported for the reporting period. Monetary contributions were from Tamra Kriser $200. In-Kind donations were from Drew Kriser (purchase of domain name) $8.99: AA pril 1-30: Monetary contributions were $700: In-Kind contributions $2,510.13; expenditures were $481.78; contributions were given by Tamra Kriser $200, Karen Strickland $500; Inkind contributions were from Tamra Kriser (T-shirts) $20, Drew Kriser (Advertising) $875, Drew Kriser (Supplies for booth at Esto) $133, Drew Kriser (online domain) $8.99, Drew Kriser (create web page) $200, Drew Kriser (online promotion) $30, Drew Kriser (road signs) $532.50, Drew Kriser (road signs) $604.39 and Wynnton Melton (sign stands) $106.25: expenditures were for Brason English (Tshirts) $381.78 and the City of Bonifay (permit) $100. May 1-31: Monetary contributions were $12.70: In-Kind contributions $960.92; expenditures were $159.16; contributions were given by Tamra Kriser $12.70; In-kind contributions were from Drew Kriser (banner buzz magnetic signs) $165.03, Drew Kriser (signs unlimited bumper stickers) $75.22 and Drew Kriser (i2imedia trifolds and postcards) $720.66; expenditures were for Condently Creative designs (embroidered polo shirts) $57.76 and Branson English (T-shirts) $101.38. 2014 HH OL mM ES CC OUNTY CC A mM PAIGN CC ONTRI bB UTIONS Community EVENTS

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Spiers named to President’s List Special to Extra Chelsea Spiers of Ponce de Leon has been named to the President’s List at the Baptist College of Florida in Graceville for the Spring 2014 semester. The President’s List is published each semester to honor those students who maintain a 4.0 or higher grade point average. Spiers is a sophomore and is pursuing an Associates of Arts in Christian Education. She is the daughter of Jesse and Lydia Spiers of Ponce de Leon and a 2010 home school graduate. She is also a member of the First Baptist Church in Ponce de Leon. CareerSource Chipola to host job fair Special to Extra CareerSource Chipola is inviting job seekers to meet with multiple employers at the Regional Job Fair, set for Thursday, July 17, in Marianna. The job fair will be held at the National Guard Armory, located on Highway 90 West in Mari anna. Military veterans are welcome to attend starting at 2 p.m., with the doors open to the general public at 2:30 p.m. Military veterans will be given priority entrance for the entire event. Multiple companies representing a wide va riety of available jobs and needed skills will be in attendance, and most will be taking applica tions on site. The variety of positions available will range from entry level to more skilled positions re quiring advanced education or industry certi cations. Those attending should bring multiple copies of their resume to share with the em ployers present. Anyone needing help prepar ing a resume can visit one of the career centers in Blountstown, Chipley or Marianna. Registration with Employ Florida will be re quired to enter. Registration will be available on-site; however, individuals are encouraged to register in advance to avoid being delayed the day of the event. Anyone can register with Em ploy Florida in advance by going to www.employ orida.com Proper dress will also be required enter the Job Fair. Individuals not properly dressed will not be allowed to enter the event. Some employers expected at the job fair are: Anderson Columbia, Rex Lumber, Federal Cor rectional Institution, Lowes, Florida Highway Patrol, Melvin Engineering, Northwest Florida Hospital, Family Dollar Distribution, Green Circle Bio Energy, Department of Corrections, GEO Group and Zaxby’s. For more information, call 850-633-4419 or visit www.careersourcechipola.com Chipola students should apply now for nancial aid Special to Extra MARIANNA — Students planning to enroll in Fall classes at Chipola College are encouraged to apply for nancial aid as soon as possible. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) application should be completed and all re quired documents must be received in the Chipola College Financial Aid Ofce by July 21 in order to use Fed eral Financial Aid to cover Fall tu ition and fees. Dr. Jayne Roberts, vice president of Student Affairs, says, “Students should be sure to provide a correct mailing address and to check email accounts assigned by the college. Those who miss the deadline will be required to pay tuition and fees up front, but may be reimbursed once nancial aid is awarded.” Chipola is no longer participat ing in the Federal Direct Loan Pro grams which include Federal Direct Subsidized, Federal Direct Unsub sidized and Federal Direct Plus Loans. For information about the FAF SA, call the Federal Student Aid In formation Center 1-800-433-3243 or visit www.fafsa.ed.gov BUS inIN ESS Farm Credit of NW FL names Homoney Corporate Services, Operations Coordinator Special to Extra MARIANNA — Farm Credit of Northwest Florida recently announced that Jackie Homoney has been promoted to Corporate Services & Operations Coordinator. Homoney has been employed by the organization since May 2006. She most recently served as an accountant in the organization’s Loan Operations Department. In her new role, Homoney will be responsible for implementing and monitoring various operational and compliance programs, serve as the association’s Corporate Secretary, as well as providing high level support to the association’s CEO and COO. “The skills Jackie has acquired during her tenure have made her a valuable asset to our team,” said DeAndrea Barber, Chief Operations Ofcer of FCNF. “Jackie has a broad range of knowledge regarding the Association’s business operations and I am condent that she will leverage that knowledge in her new role to improve our internal processes which will benet our member owners.” Homoney is a graduate of Penn State University with a Bachelor’s degree in business. Most recently, she graduated from the Jackson County Leadership Program. She grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and resides in Marianna. A bB OUT F arm ARM C rR ED iI T O fF NO rR THWEST FLO riRI D aA Farm Credit of Northwest Florida is a member-owned nancial cooperative headquartered in Marianna that serves 18 counties throughout the Florida panhandle. J acAC K iI E HH O mM O nN EY Special to Extra MARIANNA — Jackson Hospital recently welcomed Patrick M. Kelley, M.D. to its active medical staff. Dr. Kelley provides patients at Jackson Hospital all aspects of Cosmetic and Reconstructive Plastic Surgery at 3030 4th Street in Marianna. Dr. Kelley is American Board Certied in Plastic Surgery and is a member of the American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons, the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, the Florida Society of Plastic Surgeons, the American Association for Hand Surgery, the American Medical Association, the Florida Medical Association, and Bays Medical Society. Dr. Kelley completed a Bachelor’s degree at the University of Illinois in Urbana before graduating with a Medical degree from Loyola School of Medicine in Maywood, Illinois. He then completed three years of internship and General Surgery Residency at University of Illinois College of Medicine in Peoria, Illinois. He then undertook a six months fellowship in Burn Management followed by a three year Plastic Surgery Residency at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, Virginia. This training included a six months rotation as Plastic Surgery Registrar at Canniesburn Plastic Surgery Unit in Glasgow, Scotland. His extensive training allows him to provide patients with state-of-theart care both Cosmetic and Reconstructive. Dr. Kelley represents one of 32 physicians on the Medical Staff at Jackson Hospital. The hospital provides a wide variety of medical, surgical, and emergency care services from its main location in Marianna at 4250 Hospital Drive. For more information, call 866-769-8991. Dr. Patrick M. Kelley joins Jackson Hospital staff Crossword PUZZLE SOLUTSOLUT I OO N OO N PAGEE B5

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F AITH B Section www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com NO WO PEN in Ne wL oca tion Wa shington Square Shopping Center Main Street in Chiple y Factor yO utlet 638-9421 Fl or ida Mi cr o lm &O f ce Supply Inc. 6594 S. US 231, Dothan, AL 36301 (334) 677-3318 800-886-3318 Obar's Insurance Agency An Independen tI nsurance Agenc y Auto, Hom e, Fa rm, Com merc ial And Bonds Mobi le Homes ,L ife, Health Arthur P. W. Obar Jr AG ENT PO Box 594 5390 CLIFF ST Grace ville, FL 3244 0-059 4 Obar_i ns@bell sout h.net (850) 263-448 3V oice (850) 263-4 484 Fa x 1396 Jackson Av e (850) 638-1805 (, Home Folks serving Home Folks -$ &.! )*! $($-( BR OW N FU NE RA LH OM E 10 68 Ma in St ., Ch ip le y, FL 32 428 Ph on e: 63 840 10 Do nald Br own -L FD ,O wn er 1126398 MARIANNA TO YO TA Consumer & Commer cial Power Equipment Vi sit our website at www .lanesoutdoor .com 901 Hwy 277, Chipley 850.638.436 4 (850) 638-8376 Stephen B. Register ,C PA 15 52 Bric ky ard Ro ad Chipley ,F L 638-4251 PE RS ON AL TO UC H CA RC AR E "W ET AK EP RI DE IN CA RI NG FO RY OU RC AR 10 6W .E va ns ,B on if ay 54 7333 0 Fi rst Ba pi st Church “Come as you are” $ ( Fi rst B ap ist Church “Come as you are ” Fi rst B ap ist Church “Come as you are ” It ’s not wh at we do bu th ow we do it 98 2O ra ng eH il lR oad ,C hi pl ey 63 895 05 507 W. Hwy 90, Bonifay (850) 547 -1 877 13 57 Bric ky ard Rd., Chipley (850) 638-0424 !.!%& & # -$ )*! + $ $-($HA VE YOUR UNIT SER VICED TO SA VE ON YOUR ELECTRIC BILL (850) 263-2823 1075 N. HWY .7 9 BON IF AY ,F L P&P PROGRES SIVE REAL TY "See us for all your Realty needs" 850-638-8220 1046 Main St. |C hipley OB ER T FU NER AL HOM E (850) 547-2163 219 N. Wa ukesha St. Bonifay ,F L Johnson’ sP harmacy 879 Us er yR oa d, Ch ip le y, Fl or id a3 2428 850-638-4654 Washington Rehabilitatio n& Nursing Center Mo or e Co Po rt er Pa in tS al es Ba it &T ac kl e 22 06 Hi gh wa y1 77 A, Bonif ay 850 -5 47 -9 51 1 Li ke us on Fa ce book @ Moo re Co of Bon if ay ,F lor ida 1254 Church Av e. Chipley FL 32438 850-638 -1751 ‘Ser ving you since 1953’ Friendly Hometown Ser vice 4242 Lafaye tte St. Marianna FL, 32446 850-482-4 043 O pen: M-F 8am-6p m, Sat 8am-6p m www .chipolaf or d.co m Ch ipo la For d 1882 Jac kson Av e. Chiple yF L 850-63 8-7445 www .aandb autosale s.net Shop With The Res tT hem Com eT oT he A&B AUTO SALES Wednesday, July 9, 2014 Page 4 Bonifay FUMC welcomes new pastor Special to Extra Bonifay First United Methodist Church welcomed Rev. Jean Tippit as their new Pastor Sunday, July 6. Jean is the wife of Keith Tippit and the mother of two girls, Ashley and Amy. Keith owns his own production company in Mobile, Ala.; Amy works in the television industry in Georgia; and Ashley will be a college freshman at Birmingham Southern in the fall. Jean served the Lord through youth ministry and ministry in the inner city of New Orleans and Mobile for over 20 years. In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Jean left youth ministry to assist full time in the recovery work in the coastal regions of southwest Alabama and Mississippi. In 2008, she felt called to ordination in the United Methodist Church. Jean is a recent graduate of Asbury Seminary in Wilmore, KY, where she received a Masters of Divinity. Most recently she has served as the pastor of Grace UMC and has coordinated the work of the college missional internship, Quad W in the inner city of Mobile. She has a great heart for God, the church and the world. Everyone is invited to come to morning worship service Sunday, at 10:45 a.m. to meet Rev. Tippit. Indoor yard sale Live Oak Assembly of God Church will hold an indoor yard sale from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, July 11 and from 8 a.m. to noon, Saturday July 12. The sale will be at the church, located at 2118 Live Oak Rd., just off Hwy 177A in Bonifay. Homecoming at Caryville Evangelistic Center CARYVILLE — Caryville Evangelistic Center will have Homecoming services Sunday, July 13, followed by a three-night revival with Gene Keene from Lynn Haven. Pastor Charles Barton and the congregation invite all to attend. VBS at West Bonifay Baptist Church BON iI F ay AY — West Bonifay Baptist Church will host Vacation Bible School from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. July 13 through 16.   West Bonifay Baptist Church is located at 609 W. Indiana Ave. in Bonifay. For more information, call 547-3230. Art day camp CHIPLEY — Chipley First Presbyterian Church will hold an art day camp from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Monday, July 21 through Friday, July 25 at the church. At the art day camp kids will celebrate those gifts that are directly related to the visual arts, drawing, painting, sculpture, and so on. The camp is limited to 20 students ages eight to 14. Students must be registered by July 10. The church is located at 658 5th Street in Chipley. For more information or to register call 638-1653. NN orthside Assembly of God VBS B ONON I FF AY — Northside Assembly of God will host Vacation Bible School from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., July 14 through July 18. This year’s theme is “Son’s Surf Beach Shop.” St. Anne to host Life Line Screening MARIA NNNN A — St. Anne Catholic Church located at 3009 5th St., Marianna will host Life Line Screening, a leading provider of community-based preventive health screenings Thursday, July 24, 2014.   In order to register for this event and to receive a $10 discount off any package priced above $129, please call 888-653-6441 or visit www.lifelinescreening. com/community-partner s Back to school clothes give away CHIPLEY — Oakie Ridge Baptist Church will be giving away back to school clothes for all ages from 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 2 at the church. The church is located 11 miles south of Chipley on the Orange Hill Highway. For more information, call Lori at 638-2340. Unity FF aith Riders The Unity Faith Riders would like to invite everyone to their monthly community breakfast, held at 7 a.m. every fourth Saturday in the month, at the Vernon Fire Department. Breakfast is free, but donations to the ministry are accepted. For more information, call Johnathan Taylor at 768-2444. If you would like your church’s faith events included in this list, please email the information to: news@chipleypaper. com Faith EVE NN TS

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! W ith your paid obituar y family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos fr ee of charge. Find Obituaries. Shar e Condolences. 9u €un‹ju j F{ vu? M… xu CHQTM[;: ‡n{’j‹œ up{‡… ‡v ™™™ ?px{ˆ€uœˆjˆu‹ ?p‡‚ ‡‹ n‡…{vjœ…‡™ ?p‡‚ œ‡’ pj…S " In par tnership with t£¨›  p‡‚ Find obituaries, shar e condolences and celebrate a life at or Mr. Kelly Scott Boyington, 44, of Caryville died June 25, 2014. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Kelly S. Boyington Mr. Comer White, 98 of Bonifay, Florida went to be with the Lord on Monday, June 23, 2014, at Southeast Alabama Medical Center in Dothan Ala. Born Monday, Aug. 30, 1915, in Geneva County, Ala. He is preceded in death by his parents, Samuel White and Mamie Lee White and by his wife of 71 years, Alma White. Surviving are sons, Larry White and wife Mary of Bonifay, Tommy White and wife Marie of Malvern, Ala. and Devon White and wife Patsy of Tallahassee; daughter, Carolyn Judd of Bonifay; seven grandchildren, Dwayne White, Bobby White, Ronnie Sellers, Donnie Sellers, Amanda White, Becky Harrison and Joy Herring and 13 great-grandchildren. A Funeral service was held at 10 a.m., on Thursday, June 26, 2014 at Sims Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Ike Steverson and the Rev. Gary Taylor ofciating. Interment followed in St, John’s Cemetery Bonifay with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 9 to 10 a.m. on Thursday, June 26, 2014, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Comer White COMER WHITE Broward Carmichael Jr., age 62, of Bonifay, passed away Thursday, June 26, 2014 at his residence. He was born May 29, 1952 to Broward and Pleeta Sims Carmichael in Bonifay. Broward was a devoted Florida Gator Football fan. He also loved farm life, gardening, and serving his community as a small business owner. He had a special love for his grandchildren and always looked forward to visiting them. The Family would like to thank Emerald coast Hospice, Baycare, Dr. Murshed, Dr. Johnson and Doctors Memorial Hospital for their loving care and kindness to Broward and his family. He is preceded in death by his parents and two brothers, Billy Ray Carmichael and Joe Earl Carmichael. Broward is survived by his wife, Darlene; one son, Murray Mitchell; one daughter, Lee Ann Bollon and husband Benny of Bonifay and Montana Carmichael in which he raised of Bonifay; one brother, James Carmichael of Bonifay; three sisters, Dorothy Bryant, Doris Padgett and husband Rio, and Deloris Smith all of Bonifay; two grandchildren, Marissa and Alexandra Bollon and numerous nieces, nephews, and extended family. A time of visitation was held Monday, June 30, 2014 at the Lighthouse Assembly of God Church in Bonifay, from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. Funeral services took place Tuesday, July 1, 2014 at the Lighthouse Assembly of God Church in Bonifay, beginning at 11 a.m. with the Rev. Michael Presley and Danny Carnley ofciating. Committal services followed at Live Oak Assembly of God Cemetery. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.daviswatkins. com. Arrangements and services are under the direction of Davis-Watkins Funeral Home. Broward Carmichael Jr. BRO wW ARD CARMI cC HAEL JR. Mrs. Abbie Jane Melonee Marsh Brown of Curry Ferry Road (Izagora Community) Bonifay went home to be with the Lord Tuesday, July 1, 2014. She was 91. Mrs. Brown was born Aug. 13, 1922, in Holmes County, to the late Johnny Wayne and Abbie Jane Gilley Marsh. She enjoyed the outdoors, working in her owers and her vegetable garden, but she had a passion for shing. She loved her family dearly and was a very devoted mother and grandmother. She always met you with a smile and a laugh and always made you feel good about yourself. She will be greatly missed by everyone who knew her. In addition to her parents her husband, Hubert Wilson Brown; grandson, Robert Brown, as well as seven siblings, Claudie Harris, Lorene Harris, Dois King, Audie, Dowling, Huie and Dewey Marsh, all preceded her in death. Survivors include six children, Fred Brown (Diane) of Bonifay, Wilson Brown (Ruth) of Westville, Janice French (Elton), Lawrence Brown and Herbert Brown (Roxanne) all of Bonifay and Vivian Wike (Kenneth) of Geneva; one sister, Lois Dillworth (Joe) of Gainesville; 18 grandchildren; 26 greatgrandchildren; 10 greatgreat-grandchildren and several special nieces, nephews, other extended family friends. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m. Friday, July 4, 2014 in the chapel of Sorrells Funeral Home in Geneva with Bro. Chuck Grantham ofciating. Burial followed in the East Pittman Freewill Baptist Church Cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home and Crematory of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Thursday, July 3, 2014, from 6 to 8 p.m. Flowers will be accepted or memorial contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association. Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva, 334-684-9999, is in charge of arrangements. Express your condolences in our guest book at www. sorrellsfuneralhomes.com. AA bbie J. Brown Earnest Horton, 71 of Graceville, went home to be with the Lord on June 27, 2014 at the CampbelltonGraceville Hospital surrounded by loved ones. Earnest was born in Graceville, on Feb. 2, 1943 to Isaac and Dorothy (Smith) Horton. He was a lifelong resident of the Florida Panhandle, and he owned and operated Horton’s Construction Company. He was preceded in death by his parents, Isaac and Dorothy Horton; wife, Deborah Horton; brother, Isaac Horton and sister, Betty Horton. He is survived by his son, Michael Horton and wife Paige of Chipley; three brothers, Tom Horton and wife Theresa, Elton Horton and wife Louise, David Horton and wife Jean all of Graceville; granddaughter, Macie Horton of Chipley and special little buddy, Ashton Watson of Graceville. Funeral services were held 2 p.m., Sunday, June 29, 2014 at Graceville Assembly of God in Graceville, with the Rev. Raymond Oquinn ofciating. The family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m., Saturday, June 28, 2014 at Graceville Assembly of God. Interment followed in Marvin Chapel Cemetery in Graceville. Obert Funeral Home of Chipley directed. EE arnest HH orton Mrs. Lady Euline Brown Curry, 87, of Bonifay, died June 28, 2014. Funeral services were held, June 30, 2014 at Izagora Congregational Methodist Church. Interment followed in the Izagora Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. LL ady EE Curry Mr. Albert Urquhart, Jr., age 84, of Bonifay, passed away June 30, 2014 peacefully at his home. He was born Aug. 7 1929 in Holmes County to the late Albert Urquhart Sr. and Linnie Messer Urquhart. In addition to his parents, Mr. Urquhart was preceded in death by a son, Travis Urquhart; two brothers, Mack Urquhart and Vaughn Urquhart. Mr. Urquhart is survived by his wife, Mary Gibson Urquhart of Bonifay; one son, Kelley Edsel Urquhart and wife Crystal of Hartford, AL; three grandchildren, Raven Jane Booth and husband Jason of Bonifay, Ian Urquhart of Hartford, AL, Jessica Bowser and husband Rick of Bonifay; two great-grandchildren, Darcy Booth, Shyloh Bowser; one step-greatgrandson, Alex Bowser; one brother, Jerry Urquhart of Hermitage, TN; two sisters, Pollie Stamis and husband Tony of Franklin Lakes, NJ, Daphin Holsombach and husband Ray of Bonifay, FL; several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 3:00 PM Thursday, July 3, 2014 at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. James Lamb ofciating. Interment followed in the New Zion Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends from 5-7 PM Wednesday at Peel Funeral Home. The family would like to thank Hartford Healthcare and Emerald Coast Hospice for dedication. AA lbert Urquhart, Jr. Katherine (Duncan) Simmons, age 70, of Montgomery, Alabama passed from this life on July 3, 2014. She was born on Aug.5, 1943 in Chipley, to Bill and Bernie Lou (Lee) Duncan. She was employed by the State of Alabama. She held a great love for spending time with her grandchildren and serving the Lord. She was preceded in death by her parents, Bill and Bernie Lou Duncan; sister: Mary Louise Duncan Alday. She is survived by her son, Tommy L. Tharp Jr. (Natalie) of Huntersville, North Carolina; two daughters, Tina Russell (Charles) of Mathews, Alabama, Gina Bell (Scott) of Hopehull, Alabama; brothers, Gus Duncan (Faye) and Joe Duncan (Glenda) of Cottondale; sisters, Betty Clark (Dwight) of Quincy, Florida, Margaret White (Winford) of Bonifay and seven grandchildren A visitation was held on Monday, July 7, 2014, at 9 a.m. at Piney Grove Free Will Baptist Church in Chipley with the funeral service following at 10 a.m. with her nephew Tim Duncan and the Rev. Tim Owens officiating. Interment followed at Piney Grove Free Will Baptist Church Cemetery in Chipley. Expressions of sympathy can be made at obertfuneralhome.com. Arrangements are under the direction of Obert Funeral Home of Chipley. Katherine Simmons Mrs. Elwyn Marguerite Dennis, 80 of Dahlonega, Georgia died on Sunday, June 29, 2014, at Northeast Georgia Medical Center in Gainesville, Ga. Born Saturday, December 23, 1933 in Bonifay, she was the daughter of the late Peter Weeks and the late Cora Andrews Weeks. Surviving are son, Douglas Dennis of Milford, OH; one grand child and several nieces and nephews. A Funeral service was held at 11:00 AM on Wednesday, July 2, 2014 at Sims Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Stephen Chitty ofciating. Interment followed in Live Oak Cemetery, Bonifay, with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 6:00 to 8:00 PM on Tuesday, July 1, 2014, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. EE lwyn MM DD ennis Mrs. Rosemary Veader Austin, age 75, of Vernon, passed away June 26, 2014 in the Covenant Hospice Inpatient and Palliative Care Center at Bay Medical Center. She was born Aug. 16, 1938 in Providence, Rhone Island to the late Joseph and Maria Viera. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Austin was preceded in death by her husband, Reubin Austin and a daughter, Julie Renee Austin. Mrs. Austin is survived by her children, James Austin, Rosemarie Compton and Steven Austin; grandchildren, Crystal, Robert, Micah, Sway, Katie, Ryan, Adam, Kyle, Sheila, Jennifer and Emily and greatgrandchildren, Karmin, Joshua, Tristen, Ryker, Kaylen, Trenton, Kayden and Luke. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Sunday, June 29, 2014 at Unity Baptist Church with the Rev. Lindsey Martin ofciating. Interment followed in the Unity Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends one hour prior to service. RR osemary V. AA ustin Mr. Jasper Alan Mears, age 59, of Panama City, passed away July 1, 2014 in the Covenant Hospice Inpatient and Palliative Care Center at Bay Medical Center in Panama City. Mr. Mears was born July 20, 1954 in Bonifay. He was preceded in death by his father, Addison Clinton Mears and mother, Elouise Justice Lambert. Mears is survived by one son, Jason Hatch of Dexter, ME; one daughter, Misty Jo Mears of Brunswick, MO; two sisters, Jo Ann Mixon and husband Coy of Bonifay, and Gale Sanders and husband Benny of Panama City; two nieces, Lacie Sanders and Sherry Myers; one nephew, George Goodson; wife, Renee Mears of Panama City. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. Saturday, July 5, 2014 at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. Deborah Sapp ofciating. Interment followed in the Bethlehem Methodist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family will receive friends one hour prior to service. Jasper AA MM ears subSUB MI ssSS ION sS Send obituaries to news@ chipleypaper.com Obituaries Crossword S OLOL U TIONTION

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra PHOTO COURTESY OF CC INDY JOHNSON BROWN Olivia Brown makes a splash during her recent swimming lesson in Chipley. Staff Report This page features photos, submitted by our staff, readers and guests, taken in and around Holmes and Washington counties. We hope to make this a weekly feature, so if you have a photo taken locally that highlights life as we know it in our community, please share. Submit photos, along with a brief description and location taken, to ckent@ chipleypaper.com PHOTO COURTESY OF CC HIEF CC HRIS WW ELLS Bonifay Police Chief Chris Wells and his helper, son Jasper Wells, were spotted at the Holmes County Public Library’s recent “Touch a Truck” event in Bonifay. PHOTO COURTESY OF JAMIE WW HITE Twins Easton and Weston Morris were seen “tubing” during their rst vist to Cypress Springs. CC AROL KENT | The News Chad Street and his band were seen at the Panhandle Shrine Club recently, playing for the annual Watermelon Dance. PHOTO COURTESY OF JAN BOSSERT Perry and Vannah Porter, Maverick Collins, and Mikey Rutland were “seen around” Falling Waters State Park, enjoying a day of friendship and fellowship. PHOTO COURTESY OF ApAP RIL SS ELUGA The Bethlehem PeeWee football players and cheerleaders were spotted at Walmart fundraising for their organization. Pictured are Wildcat football player Aaron Seluga and Wildcat cheerleader Harley Seluga. PHOTO COURTESY OF JAMIE WW HITE Julianna Baker found a way to beat the heat with a family outing to Cypress Springs.

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 7-3410 Public Auction The following vehicle will be sold at public auction at Eastern Diesel & Auto Wrecker Service, Inc., 2005 S Waukasha, Bonifay, FL. at 8:00AM on July 23, 2014 for towing and storage. VIN# 478TE1509VA818785 1997 Honda ATV July 9, 2014 7-3410 NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Florida Department of Transportation Project Bids will be received by the Tallahassee Office until 10:30 A.M. on Wednesday, July 30, 2014, for Proposal ID T3448. The improvements under this contract consist of the removal of existing Bridge No. 524137 and replacing it with three 48-inch pipes on East-West Parkway in Holmes County. This is a Business Development Initiative (BDI) project, and Certification of Qualification is not required. Budget Estimate $73,381.00. Complete letting advertisement information for this project is available on our website at http://www.dot.state.fl.us/c c-admin/Lettings/Letting_Proje ct_Info.shtm or by calling (850) 414-4000. July 2, 9, 2014. 7-3417 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 30-2014-CA-000020 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,Plaintiff, vs. GREGORY S. MCDONALD ALSO KNOWN AS GREGORY MCDONALD, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 17, 2014, and entered in Case No. 30-2014-CA-000020 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, NA, is the Plaintiff and Gregory S. McDonald also known as Gregory McDonald, Cheryl S. McDonald also known as Cheryl McDonald, are defendants, the Holmes County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on at the front door of the Holmes County Courthouse, Holmes County, Florida at on the 24 day of July, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST, ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST ONE-QUARTER FOR A DISTANCE OF 664.97 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION OF SAID NORTH LINE AND WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD #179 (HAVING A 70 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY) BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE EAST; THENCE ALONG SAID CURIVING RIGHT OF WAY LINE HAVING A RADIUS OF 3854.83 FEET, FOR AN ARC LENGTH OF 399.11 FEET THROUGHT A CENTRAL ANGLE OF O5 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 56 SECONDS (SAID CURVE HAVING A CHORD BEARING OF SOUTH 33 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST FOR A CHORD DISTANCE OF 398.93 FEET) TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID CURVING RIGHT OF WAY HAVING A RADIUS OF 3854.83 FEET FOR AN ARC LENGTH OF 72.00 FEET THROUGHT A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 13 SECONDS (SAID CURVE HAVING A CHORD BEARING OF SOUTH 29 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST FOR A CHORD DISTANCE OF 72.00 FEET) TO A POINT OF TAGENCY; THENCE CONTINUE ON WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE RUN SOUTH 29 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 100.00 FEET ; THENCE DEPARTING SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN NORTH 60 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 253.25 FEET; THENCE NORTH 29 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 172.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 60 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 253.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.. A/K/A 1456 HIGHWAY 179A WESTVILLE FL 32464-3039 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Holmes County, Florida this 18 day of June, 2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court Holmes County, Florida By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 facsimile eService: servealaw@albertellilaw.co m MA -018513F01 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. The above is to be published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser 112 E. Virginia Avenue, Bonifay, FL 32425 July 9, 16, 2014 7-3439 INVITATION TO BID #14-09 7-3425 Meeting Notice Tri-County Airport Authority will move their regularly scheduled monthly meeting from July 10, 2014 to July 17, 2014 at 6:00 pm local time. The meeting will be held in the Tri-County Airport Terminal building. July 9, 2014

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B8 | Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, July 9, 2014 B USINESS G UIDE THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183 Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5$25.68 5x10$35.31 10x10$46.01 10x20$80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted C & C Bookkeeping and Tax Service January-April Monday-Friday 8am-5pm Saturday 8am-Noon May-December Monday-Friday 8am-4pm (850) 638-1483 Notary Available Easy Care Lawn & Tractor Service TREE REMOVAL € 850 527-6291 850 849-3825 Lawn Care € Debris Removal Tractor and Bobcat Work Pressure CleaningLicensed & Insured Advertise your service or business for as little as $10 a week.Ad runs in the Washington County News, Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser638-0212 5020322 A MarkNet Alliance Member € AAL 743 €10% Buyers PremiumRowell Auctions, Inc. | 800-323-8388 RowellAuctions.com Saturday -:July 26th -:9:00 a.m. (CDT) Beautiful Homesites & PasturelandCovington County, AL 106 AcresOffered Divided ONSITE €8,400SFMetalBarnwithBeautiful1,800SF Living Quarters Perfect for Entertaining €ExcellentCommercial/IndustrialPotential €FrontageonUSHighway331 €Fenced&Cross-FencedPastureland 127 Adams Road, Opp, AL 2105546 Travel/TransportationPilot Needed in Destin Private equity firm in Destin area is seeking a contract pilot to fly its refurbished Piper PA-31T1. Pilot must hold a commercial pilot certificate with multi-engine land and instrument ratings, have logged at least 4,000 hours total time, including at least 2,000 hours multi-engine land and at least 1,000 hours in multi-engine turbo prop aircraft, of which at least 200 hour being logged in Cheyenne I model aircraft, and who has attended and successfully completed ground and flight (or simulator) training for the Cheyenne I conducted by FLIGHTSAFETY or SIMCOM within the last 12 calendar months. Send resume and cover letter to info@pcpaviation.com. Web ID#: 34293919 Bldg/Const/Skilled TradeMetal Roofers and Laborers Dwayne 850-849-7982 or Gene 850-849-0736 WEB ID 34292612 SP83742 WHEEL DEAL Have a car, truck, van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers.To place your ad, call850-638-0212 800-345-8688 The 8 WEEKS FOR $23.99 A SAVINGS OF $34.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE Add a black and white photo for only $5! 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price! Washington County News Holmes County Times Advertiser Weekly Advertiser REPAIR OF COURTHOUSE FACILITIES FROM FLOODING AND RELATED WATER DAMAGES Sealed bids for the for the repairs of the Holmes County Courthouse, located at 201 N Oklahoma Ave, Bonifay, Florida, due to various flooding which occurred during the Summer of 2013. A walk through will be held July 21, 2014 at 10:00 am. Proposals for the repairs will be accepted until Monday, July 28, 2014 at 3:00 PM CST at the Holmes County Commissioner’s Office, 107 E. Virginia Avenue, Bonifay, FL 32425. Proposals shall be mailed or delivered to the following: Holmes County BOCC, Attn: Sherry Snell, 107 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. For more information contact Sherry at 850-547-1119 or sherrys@holmescountyfl.o rg July 9, 16, 2014 7-3424 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NUMBER: 14-145 CA PEOPLES BANK OF GRACEVILLE, Plaintiff, vs. MERICA ANN CARROLL, DANNY LEE CARROLL, HSBC BANK NEVADA, N.A., a dissolved legal entity, and its unknown assigns, successors in interest, trustees, or any other party claiming by, through, under, or against any named corporation or legal entity, as successor in interest to DIRECT MERCHANTS CREDIT CARD BANK, N.A., CITIBANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, as successor by merger to CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA), N.A., and ATLANTIC CREDIT & FINANCE, INC., as successor in interest to CAPITAL ONE, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:HSBC BANK NEVADA, N.A., a dissolved legal entity, and its unknown assigns, successors in interest, trustees, or any other party claiming by, through, under, or against any named corporation or legal entity, as successor in interest to DIRECT MERCHANTS CREDIT CARD BANK, N.A., and all others having an interest in the subject property: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Complaint seeking to foreclose a mortgage with respect to the following described property, to-wit: Commence at the Southeast corner of the Northeast of Southwest of Section 35, Township 7 North, Range 15 West and run North 105 feet for a Point of Beginning; thence continue North 105 feet; thence run West 420 feet; thence run South 105 feet; thence run East 420 feet to the Point of Beginning, Holmes County, Florida. Less road rights of way. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses to it, if any, on Plaintiff’s Attorney, Frank E. Bondurant, whose address is Post Office Box 1508, Marianna, Florida 32447, on or before 30 days from the first date of publication. You must file the original of your written defenses with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma Street (Post Office Box 397), Bonifay, Florida 32425, either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately after service. Otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded DATED this the 25th day of June, 2014. KYLE HUDSON, CLERK Holmes County, Florida By: Diane Eaton As Deputy Clerk PUBLISH ONCE A WEEK FOR TWO (2) CONSECUTIVE WEEKS: RETURN PROOF OF PUBLICATION TO: Frank E. Bondurant Bondurant & Fuqua, P.A. Post Office Box 1508 Marianna, Florida 32447 July 9, 16, 2014 7-3413 Public Auction The following vehicle will be sold at public auction at Eastern Diesel & Auto Wrecker Service, Inc., 2005 S Waukasha, Bonifay, FL. at 8:00AM on July 23, 2014 for towing and storage. VIN# 1GNCS13W212212988 2001 Chev Trailblazer Eva Maria Wilson 2286 Boswell RD Bonifay, FL 32425 Sunbelt Credit 1414 Main ST Ste 7 Chipley, Fl 32428 Wayne Carey Auto Sales Po Box 715 Bonifay, FL 32425 SWorilmns Auto INS Com. PO Box 54845 Los Angeles, CA 90054-0845 July 9, 2014 7-3406 Public Auction The following vehicle will be sold at public auction at Eastern Diesel & Auto Wrecker Service, Inc., 2005 S Waukasha, Bonifay, FL. at 8:00AM on July 23, 2014 for towing and storage. VIN# 2G4WS52JX31222704 2003 Buick 4DR James Kyle Givens 211 Hatcher DR. Bonifay, FL July 9, 2014 7-3426 TRI-COUNTY AIRPORT AUTHORITY NOTICE TO BIDDERS The Tri-County Airport Authority has changed the due date for bids on the Construct Runway and Taxiway Extension that was advertised on June 18, 2014 from July 10, 2014 until July 17, 2014, 4:00 pm local time. There will be a pre-bid meeting held on July 10, 2014, 10:00 am local time at the Tri-County Airport terminal building. Dated: June 30, 2014 By: Tri-County Airport Authority July 9, 2014 ADOPTloving married couple seeks to adopt, will be hands on mom and dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592, Adam Sklar #0150789 Older Man looking for female to spend time with. Go to dinner with, hang out, have conversations with. Call Gary, 850-388-2061. Chipley 2118 Live Oak Rd, Bonifay, FL 32425, From HWY 79, take HWY 177A North 4.7 miles. Church on the Left. 07/11 & 07/12 7am Fri, 8 to noon SatLive Oak Church Big Yard SaleHousehold Items, Kid’s toys and accessories, furniture, clothing, breakfast. txt FL94252 to 56654 Fresh From the Farm!Sweet corn, squash cucumbers, peas, cream 40, & pink-eye purple hull. Call 850-956-4556. K&L FarmHome grown Tomatoes. 1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley. Mon-Fri 8am-5pm & Saturday 8am-4pm. 850-638-5002 850-260-5003 & 850-527-3380 Domestic Care Taker needed in Bonifay. Call 334-793-1202. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Manuf/Prod/Op Personnel Resources has immediate openings in Geneva for welders. To apply, jgommo@prdothan.com or call (334) 794-8722. WEB ID 34293434 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 EXPERIENCED OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com EOE TRAIN FROM HOME MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASS’T CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709 WANT A CAREER Operating Heavy Equipment? Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. “Hands On Training” & Certifications Offered. National Average 18-22 Hourly! Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497 Executive Office Space for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1 Bedroom Apartment, in Chipley, covenant location, no pets. 638-4640. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio And 2 bdrm $375-$500 Includes City Utilities (850)557-7732 1BD/1BAHouse 901 Main St Chipley. Fenced yard. 1227 sqft. $625 mth. Security depo $600. Avldibale Ju1y 7 Call 850-482-4446. 2BR/1BAHouse. Large back yard, newly remodeled. Reference required. 497 MLK, Chipley. $500/mth, deposit. 850-535-4842. 2BR/1BA, CH/A, garage, screened porch. Appliances & water included. On golf course. $500.00/mth, 2749 Muir Lane, Dogwood Country Club. 334-468-2880. Nice cleanhouses, apartments & mobile homesfor rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, homes for sale, owner financing with good credit. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO and up. Includes Garbage, sewage, and lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 2BR/2BA MH. Highway 179A Westville, FL. 850-956-1220. For Rent 3BD/1BA House $275/mo. 2BR/1BA trailer $250/month.. Ponce De Leon area. (850)226-4656. Mobile Home for Rent in the Bethlehem area. 2BR, furnished, single wide, includes washer & dryer. Call 850-547-2068. Mobile Homes For Rent 2 and 3 Bedrooms in Cottondale, Central Heat and Air. $400 -$500 a month. 850-258-1594 or 850-638-8570. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. Home with lots of character. Corner lot, convenient to Historic downtown Chipley. Family-orented neighborhood, great for walking and biking. 3/BR, two full baths. One bath has tiled shower that is handicap/wheel chair accessibility. Hallways are 4ft wide. Livingroom has working fireplace, built in bookcases and shelving. Crown molding thru out. Hardwood floors through out, except kitchen and one bath, which has tiled flooring. Kitchen has breakfast nook, stainless steel appliances, new gas stove. Master suite includes laundry room/walk in closet with handicap bath. 1 year old A/C system, 3 ton 13 SEER Rheem. Termite bond with Brock Pest Control. Very nice yard with lots of trees for shade. Privacy fenced area on side. Built in storage room at back door. DIRECTIONS: Take Hwy 90 W to Chipley. Turn right at light onto Hwy 77. Go past Piggly Wiggly to Old Bonifay Rd, turn left. House is 2nd on right. See signs. $89,900.00. Florida Showcase Realty, LLC, licensed Realtor, 850-573-1572. MSL 249783. SUNNY HILLS. Great ranch, fantastic condition. 3BR/2BA, 3 living areas, appliances incl. $89,000.00. Counts Real Estate. Barbara, 850-814-9414. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. NC MOUNTAINS near Lake Lure. New log cabin on 1.59 acres, huge covered porches, vaulted ceilings, EZ to finish, $74,900, add’l acreage available. 828-286-1666 1980 ClassicAntique Mercedes 450 SL. like new interior, xtra clean, very low mile tires, always stored inside, looks/runs/drives great, 2-tops, Kelly BB high/$33K, great buy asking/$13K. 850-415-7119. Got Bad Credit? $0*, Ride Today!Buy Here/Pay Here Past Repos/BK’s SSI/VAok. Steve Pope 334-803-9550. *call for more details. 2010 Ford Escape XLT 46,300 miles excellent condition inside and out. Bells and whistles to numerous to mention $13,000. 850-547-3934 1988 GMC 6000 Farm/Moving Truck or potential billboard for business. was Supermover Uhaul. cranks/runs great. Very good watertight cargo box w/over cab also. Very low mile tires. Great for moving or hauling. Asking $3300. 850-415-7119. 1991 Harley Davidson Road King 9,000 miles, $6,500. Call 850-348-7780. Spot Advertising works! For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.