Holmes County times-advertiser

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Holmes County times-advertiser
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Bonifay, FL
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June 19, 2013
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50www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visitBONIFAYNOW.COM imes imes imes T dvertiser imes imes imes imes T T dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser AHOLMES COUNTY VOTENOW THROUGHJUNE4GOTOBONIFAYNOW.COMTOPTHREEWINNERS WILLBECHOSENVoteforyourfavorite businesses,people,restaurants, andothercategoriesforthe2014ReadersChoice BestofTri-CountyWASHINGTON I HOLMES I JACKSON TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY TRI-COUNTY 2014 READERSCHOICE INDEXOpinion ................................A4 Sports ..................................A7 Extra ....................................B1 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds .........................B6-8 IN BRIEFPSHS advisory meetingPOPLAR SPRINGS Poplar Springs High School will hold a school advisory meeting at 3 p.m. today, May 28, in the schools media center.Community Baby ShowerMARIANNA Chipola Healthy Start will host a community baby shower from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, May 30, at the Jackson County Agricultural Center. Open to anyone who is pregnant or who has children less than three years of age. Lunch, prizes, games and more will be provided. Call 482-1236 or 866-591-2852.Council on Aging health fairBONIFAY Holmes County Council on Aging will host their annual health fair for the senior citizens of Holmes County at 10 a.m. May 30 at the National Guard Armory in Bonifay. Call 547-2345.Relay For Life Wrap-Up PartyCHIPLEY Relay For Life of Holmes and Washington County will have its 2014 Wrap-Up Party at 6 p.m. Monday, June 2, at Pattillos restaurant, located on the campus of the WashingtonHolmes Technical Center. Call Connie Smelcer at 703-9977.By CECILIA SPEARS658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Holmes County District School Board approved of Superintendent Eddie Dixons personnel recommendation to rehire the entirety of last years teaching staff for the upcoming school year during their regularly scheduled meeting on May 20 with a vote of 4 to 1, with School Board member Debbie Kolmetz voting no. Board approved of Overnight/ Out-of-State trip for Ponce de Leon High Schools Future Business Leaders of America to attend the National Leadership Conference in Nashville, Tennessee on June 28 through July 3. Board approved of Consent Agenda, pulling the minutes from the previous meeting at the request of Kolmetz, with approval pending if the statement Superintendent Dixon will continue to make the decision on the agenda format is veri ed on the audio recording of that evenings meeting; otherwise it will be stricken from the minutes.Area students proactive in ght against bullyingBy CAROL KENT638-0212 | WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com The school year is coming to an end in Holmes and Washington counties, but local students and of cials say they will continue to step up efforts to combat bullying beyond the spanse of the academic year. Cyber bullying is one of the most dif cult issues we deal with in the schools today, said Holmes County Superintendent of Schools Eddie Dixon. It can occur anywhere and at any time of day. Our teachers and administrators are continuously reminded of the dangers of cyber bullying in an effort to keep all Holmes County students. Holmes County schools have begun reserving a week in the Spring to show age appropriate videos to all students and teachers about the dangers of cyber bullying. This week is promoted on our website and on posters in the schools, he said. (Bullying) is also addressed in our policies, code of conduct book, website, and personnel handbook. We have an anonymous online form available to report bullying and cyber bullying and tips available for students and parents on how to handle and prevent all forms of bullying. Holmes County schools have also teamed up with the Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce in preventing cyber bullying, which hosted a student created video contest initiated by School Resource Of cer Greg Johnson. Our students were very creative in conveying a positive message preventing cyber bullying, said Dixon. Holmes County Sheriff Tim Brown says prevention and education is a key priority for his of ce. The Legislature has addressed cyber bullying and is awaiting the vote for the law to pass, said Brown. The impact of bullying has been well documented, and studies have shown that dif culty making friends, loneliness, low self-esteem, depression, poor academic achievement, and truancy are all associated with being bullied. We must instill in our youth the ideals of civility and respect, and we must create environments that prevent bullying where our children live, learn and play. Washington County Sheriff Bobby Haddock shares Browns concerns and has also worked with the Washington County School District to provide education about the issue. Haddock says a key component of the success to any anti-bullying campaign is parental involvement, however. We have to start education at home, said Haddock. We need to teach our children that we are all different, and thats the way God intended it but we always need to Use of food stamps risesSpecial to the Times-AdvertiserThe use of food stamps in Holmes County increased during the recession, assisting families in stretching their food dollars, contributing to local spending and helping spark a national debate about the future of the federal nutrition program. The proportion of Holmes County residents receiving food stamps hit 27.0 percent in 2011, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Services. Thats an increase of 12.5 percentage points since 2007, the year the recession started. Across Florida, 17.2 percent of residents in 2011 received support from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, as the food stamp program is of cially known. Nationally, 14.8 percent of the population receives SNAP bene ts. Places like Holmes County, which are located outside metropolitan areas, tend to have a higher percentage of the population receiving SNAP bene ts. Thats because incomes are generally lower in nonmetropolitan counties. The in ation-adjusted median household income in Holmes County in 2011 was $34,397, compared to the Florida median of $45,830 and the national median of $52,306 (in 2013 dollars). Food stamps may play a larger role in the local economy in rural areas and small towns, according to federal data. In Holmes County SNAP Phone: 850-547-9414 Website: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418School board approves rehiresCECILIA SPEARS | Times-AdvertiserHolmes County District School Board held a short workshop before their regular scheduled meeting on May 20 to discuss items such as the agenda format and online publication. See REHIRES A2 See FOOD A2 Wednesday, MAY 28 2014Volume 124, Number 7Meet the Holmes County Class of 2014 | INSIDE Bethlehem High School Chipley High School Cottondale High School Grace & Glory Christian School Graceville High SchoolPresenting theGraduates of 2014 Bethlehem High School Chipley High School Cottondale High School Grace & Glory Christian School Graceville High School Presenting the Graduates of 2014 May 28, 2014 I Washington County News I Holmes County Times-AdvertiserHolmes County High School Ponce de Leon High School Poplar Springs High School Vernon High School Washington County Christian School HYPER BULLY DEFENSESPECIAL TO THE NEWSChristopher Golden is among area students pledging to help stop bullying. Golden signed the Hyper Bully Defense Pledge as a student at Trinity Martial Arts in Chipley. See BULLYING A2We need to teach our children that we are all different, and thats the way God intended it but we always need to provide as much education as possible through our school system and teach students to stand up and say no to bullying. Washington County Sheriff Bobby Haddock

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LocalA2 | Washington County News Wednesday, May 28, 2014provide as much education as possible through our school system and teach students to stand up and say no to bullying. Students in Roulhac Middle Schools 6th grad Critical Thinking Skills Classes are ahead of the game in that department. The students launched their own anti-bullying campaign, showing a video and providing education material for other students. Washington County School Superintendent Joseph Taylor says districts are monitored by the Department of Education for bullying. We just had a monitoring session on-site with a representative from the department to make sure that we are following law and to ensure that we have mechanisms in place for reporting and procedures to handle any and all allegations of bullying, said Taylor. As a district, we take bullying allegations seriously and want to make sure all schools are safe for everyone. During the monitoring on May 22, the representative was very impressed by the safeguards and procedures that we have in place. We are continuing to improve and implement safe procedures for our students and staff. When we do not have on-site reviews, we do self monitoring each school year. If we have bullying cases, they are reported to the state through the School Environmental Safety Incident Reporting (SESIR) System. Not just school systems and law enforcement are taking a stand. Other organizations, like Trinity Martial Arts in Chipley, are being proactive in the ght against bullying, too. TMA students recently signed the Hyper Bully Defense Pledge to do their best on a personal level to stop bullying when they see it happening. School owner and Head Instructor Jason Smith says nearly all of those enrolled took the pledge. Its a good thing to train them early in both right and wrong and compassion, said Smith. A bill intended to make bullying punishable by up to one year in jail was approved by a state Senate committee last month but died in the Criminal Justice Subcommittee on May 2. Some legislators have vowed to keep working on anti-bullying legislation similar passed. $39.0010lbsLegQuarters 5lbsGroundBeef 5lbsSmokedHamSteaks 2pkHotDogs$59.0020lbsLegQuarters 5lbsRiblets 5lbsPollock 5lbsGroundBeef 2pkHotDogs$89.0015lbsGroundBeef 20lbsLegQuarter 10lbsPorkChops 5lbsRiblets 2pkHotDogsHalf&Whole BeefAvailable CUSTOMPACKAGESAVAILABLE-Call1stUSDAInspectedHACCPFacilityCattle-Hogs-SheepProcessed 2965RMWardRd.(181-C)|Westville,Fl32464 Phone:(850)548-1201CustomPackagingAvailable Pleasecall24-48hrsforpackages.WestvilleMeats Board approved of 2014-2015 VPK Provider Agreement with Early Learning Coalition. Kolmetz requested an update on the on the progress of replacing the lights at Ponce de Leon High Schools parking lot, which Dixon said they are in process of replacing the bulbs. Kolmetz also requested that the light in the Ponce de Leon High Schools sign be xed. Kolmetz requested that the timer on the snack machine be xed so that the students cannot purchase snacks during lunch time. Kolmetz informed the Board that Washington-Holmes Technical Center had over 300 students recently complete their studies. Kolmetz also informed the Board that Wausau held a Veterans program recently where the Bethlehem High School Culinary Academy provided a meal to the visiting veterans. Now is a good time to be a student in Holmes County, said Chair Rusty Williams. Weve got so many talented students and teachers. Our students are going to go far. During the previous meeting on May 6, Kolmetz once again motioned to place audio recordings of the Board meetings on the district website, which died due to lack of a second, which makes the third time Kolmetz request for audio recordings on the district website has died without a second. Kolmetz also moved to change the agenda format and list unnished or new business on the agenda, which was passed and after discussion Kolmetz amended her motion to request the superintendent to place unnished or new business on the agenda, which passed. The next regularly scheduled meeting of the Holmes County District School Board is set for 9 a.m. on June 3. REHIRES from page A1benets are 1.1 percent of personal income. Nationally, the gure is 0.6 percent. In 2011, residents of Holmes County received a combined $8,040,242 in SNAP benets. The USDA reports that each $5 in SNAP benets generates $9.20 in spending. Places like Washington County, which are located outside metropolitan areas, tend to have a higher percentage of the population receiving SNAP benets. Thats because incomes are generally lower in nonmetropolitan counties. The ination-adjusted median household income in Washington County in 2011 was $36,254, compared to the Florida median of $45,830 and the national median of $52,306 (in 2013 dollars). Food stamps may play a larger role in the local economy in rural areas and small towns, according to federal data. In Washington County SNAP benets are 1.1 percent of personal income. Nationally, the gure is 0.6 percent. In 2011, residents of Washington County received a combined $7,388,779 in SNAP benets. The USDA reports that each $5 in SNAP benets generates $9.20 in spending. SNAP benets start to circulate in the economy quickly. Participants spend nearly all their food stamps within one month of receipt, according to a study by the University of New Hampshire Carsey Institute. Grocers say they feel the impact of SNAP and other USDA nutrition programs like Women, Infants and Children (WIC). Without SNAP and WIC, we wouldnt be able to make it, wrote the owner of the Mill City Market in the small town of Mill City, Ore., in a survey of rural grocers conducted by the Oregon Food Bank and Kansas State University Rural Grocery Initiative. Owners know they have to stock the shelves to prepare for more business when SNAP benets hit the streets, said David Procter with the Rural Grocery Initiative Its not just the mom-and-pop stores that see a bump from foodstamp spending in small towns and rural areas. Walmart reported in a recent Securities and Exchange Commission ling that a decrease in SNAP benets last year could affect the retail giants bottom line. Average SNAP benets nationally fell about $30 a month per family in November after a temporary increase that was part of the 2009 economic stimulus package. More funding decreases are on the way. This summer, Congress agreed to trim about $8 billion from SNAP over the next decade. Backers of the cuts said the program had expanded too much in recent years and was creating too much reliance on government assistance. SNAP expenditures increased 135 percent between 2007 and 2011. U.S. Rep. Eric Cantor (Va.-R) backed a measure that would have removed SNAP from the farm bill entirely. While [SNAP] is an important part of our safety net, our overriding goal should be to help our citizens with the education and skills they need to get back on their feet so that they can provide for themselves and their families, Rep. Cantor said during congressional debate. Food stamps have been part of the farm bill for the past 50 years. The legislations combination of farming and nutrition programs has helped ensure the bill receives broad backing from farmcountry representatives and more urban-based members who support anti-poverty programs. That alliance was tested but held with the passage of the 2014 farm bill. Data for this article came from USDA Food and Nutrition Services, the Bureau of Economic Analysis and the U.S. Census. The data was compiled and analyzed by Roberto Gallardo, Ph.D., associate Extension professor with the Mississippi State University Extension Service. Funding for this report came from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. The Daily Yonder (www.dailyyonder.com) is an independent rural news site published by the nonprot, nonpartisan Center for Rural Strategies. FOOD from page A1 BULLYING from page A1 Its a good thing to train them early in both right and wrong and compassion.Jason Smith, Head Start owner/instructor

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Eighty six of the graduating 342 students chose to walk the graduation ceremony and, accompanied to cheers from friends and family, proudly accepted their diplomas and certicates from their respective programs. You are going forth with the prospect of real jobs, said Joe Taylor, Superintendent of Schools for Washington County. We are proud of you and you should be proud of yourselves. Scott Crum, 201314 Vice-President of SkillsUSA Leaders addressed the graduates in a moving story about his challenges and his ultimate success made possible by the technical center. Welding Instructor Eddie Beckworth introduced his graduates, relating the story of one of his recent graduates returning to his shop and proudly displaying check stubs for over twenty dollars an hour. You can do this, proclaimed Beckworth, all you need is the desire and a little sweat equity. Students from Roulhac Middle School in Chipley, Blountstown High School and Altha High School recently visited WHTC, taking in the options available and the stories of really well-paid jobs available to qualied graduates. Recently returned from the Florida state SkillsUSA competition in Pensacola and currently preparing for national competition, several WHTC students were singled out for Outstanding Achievement awards. Each year, class Instructors select the best of the best from WHTC students based on their achievement and service, and this year the students included Austin Baxley, Michael Goodson, Kenneth Richter, Stephen Rowe and Anthony Smith. Our motto is One life, one year, one great career, proclaimed WHTC Director Martha Compton, and we furnish a viable alternative to a college education with the real prospect of real jobs. For over an hour, students were announced by their respective instructor and accepted their diplomas and certicates of completion, to the whistles and applause of the packed auditorium. At present WHTC offers over 35 degree and certication programs and enjoys a high placement rate for graduates from the various skilled programs, including welding, electrical, multimedia design, medical administrative assistant, culinary, cosmetology, IT, cyber security and networking, nursing, drafting, law enforcement and public safety, digital media and continuing adult education. For more information about Washington-Holmes Technical Center and over 35 certication and degree programs offered, visit www.WHTC.us. WHTC in Chipley graduates 342 studentsSPEc C IAL tT O Th H E NEws WS Joe Taylor, Washington County School Board Superintendent, presents graduates with their diplomas. Martha Compton, WHTC director, address the graduating class during the standing room only ceremony. Friends and family of the graduates pack the Washington County Agricultural center for the WHTC graduation. Eighty-six graduates wait to be presented with their diplomas.

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Hello again. Id like to start off with confessing that I was torn between apologizing about last weeks column about honoring your veterans because it seems that as the time draws near to all holidays involving veterans, theres a huge bombardment of information to get people to honor their veterans when most of the time, for citizens and other veterans, it is an everyday thing. I feel strongly about it, I think because some of the best people I know are military, law enforcement or emergency response. Though we are not blood, we are family. I also wanted to add that part about my grandfather failing in his duties to his family yet served his country was only a small part of a bigger issue. Family is always complicated, distinguishing between love and enabling, not to go all Dr. Phil on you. My grandfather had his issues, but we always knew when it came down to brass tacks, he would move Heaven and Earth for us. There was no doubt he loved us, it was just complicated. It took me a long time to realize that in spite of how everyone made it appear, everyone has complicated family issues. I was fortunate to have several families adopt me along the way: the Rif es in Martinsville, Ind.; the Manns and Mashburns in Chipley; the Lambs in Graceville; the Fenders in Vernon; the Holmes County Public Library staff in Bonifay; they all took me in as a part of their family at one time or another and treated me no different than one of their own. It is so very hard to stay down in the pits of despair when youve got such a wonderful community of people who make you feel at home. I wish I could name all the ones whove touched me so deeply; I never want to take advantage of the blessings Ive received from just knowing this people on a regular basis. Family is so much more than blood. We adopt one another, take each other in and love and support one another in times of need. Its funny, the ones who give us the most dont realize that they do. So many times I hear how people say they cant repay what someones done for them, not realizing that just being themselves is more than enough. Life is crazy, beautiful and messy, and people just enhance that by so much. The only thing I can say is to take it in stride. People are brought into your life for a reason, even if it is just to smooth you with their rough edges. Ive had a rough couple of weeks where nothing has made sense, but I wouldnt change it for anything because good or bad, Ive learned something about myself and about others. Its just like how youd deal with family. I dont know about you but family can bring out the best and worst of me. Its facing those things you dont like about yourself and setting the goal toward positive change, with a lot of practice in between. Thanks again for your time. See you next week. When the senior adults from First Baptist Church gathered last week, it was just to enjoy the beautiful spring weather and the hospitality of James and Iris Wells. Their lovely home grounds rival any park with its wellstocked sh ponds and manicured dams surrounded by stately pine trees. With the help of Jeep Sullivan, the senior adult minister and mens ministry coordinator at FBC, lawn chairs, shing tackle, wigglers and crickets were readily available as well as golf carts to transport those of us who needed help getting set up to sh in this idyllic setting. When lunch came, prepared by Jeep and his team of helpers including Sonny Johnson and Im not sure who else, not too many sh had been caught. But a sumptuous meal of fried bream supplied by Carlton Treadwell and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission along with all the trimmings and homemade desserts was enjoyed by almost 60 adults, mostly in the 60 or older age group. As Pastor Shelly Chandler visited among the best generation, he observed that ve Deacons Emeritus were in attendance. Those are men who have served as deacons for a number of years and because of in rmities of aging are no longer able to ful ll the duties of the of ce. The youngest among the group is 77-year-old C. Hildon Barton (Bart), a retired pharmacist who operated a drug store in Bonifay, worked for a number of years as a prison pharmacist and retired from Doctors Memorial Pharmacy. Hildons main area of service was in the ushering ministry. He was always there Sunday morning, Sunday night, Passion Play, special events, with a team of men ready to greet and seat and make comfortable our guests. Barts wife is a Bonifay girl, Marianne Dannelley. They have two sons, Scott Barton and wife, Babs, and Dr. Phillip Barton and wife, Tina. There are three granddaughters and one grandson. Bart served 38 years as a deacon. Doyle Taylor, 84, owner and operator of Jerkins Inc., often assisted Bart in ushering. He was on the nance committee, the prayer ministry and other places of service. His life mate is the former Betty Strickland of Bonifay, and they have two daughters, Terri McCormick, who is married to Shay, and Tracy, who is married to Tim Scott. They have two grandsons and one granddaughter. Doyle served as a deacon for 52 years. W.W. (Bill) Watson, 87, is a World War II veteran who spent most of his working years as a full-time employee of the Florida National Guard. He has been part of the usher committee, the nance committee and various other church activities. His wife, Margaret Williams Watson, is deceased. They have two children, Matt and Suzanne Durco, and two grandsons. Bill served 50 or more years as a deacon. Jack E. Tison, 88, also a WWII Veteran, spent 34 years teaching vocational agriculture in Bethlehem and Holmes County High School. As a deacon, Jack was involved with the nancial affairs of the church as well as ushering. He was also a pastoral con dent, as are many who served in this of ce. Jacks wife is the former Hazel Wells, and the couple has three children, Hiram and wife, Judy, Cindy Webb and husband, Orrin, and Glen and wife, Sheila. There are six granddaughters and one grandson. Jack served 58 years as a deacon. James A (Jim) Clemmons, the elder statesman, age 93, served in many capacities. We all looked to Jim in parliamentary matters. He has served as an usher, on the nance committee, as a teacher and in any capacity where a deacon can serve. Jims late wife was Dorothy Tobias, and this generous couple were involved in every phase of church life. Their children are Dr. James Clemmons and Edith Prescott. There are three grandsons and one granddaughter. Jim served as a pilot in WWII in the Army Air Corps. His career involved the operation of a large beef cattle operation. He served as a deacon for 63 years. These men represent 261 years of service to their Lord, their church and their community. All have been involved in family ministry, where they pay special attention to the needs of a given group of church families. They have responded to speci c needs as they have arisen. They have served as Sunday school and church training teachers. They have served on pastor search committees, on building and properties committees, on nominating committees, on youth committees, as church trustees or in any capacity within the church body. Younger men are now ful lling these responsibilities, but Pastor Shelly Chandler and the body of believers represented by the First Baptist Church are indebted to these ve men whose faithfulness sets an example for coming church and community leaders. Our thanks to James and Iris for sharing their lovely home so that we older adults may have an outing to enjoy the beautiful spring and fellowship with our friends. The champion shermen for the day were Ricky Thames and Mary Henry. Comedy writer Robert Orben once said a graduation ceremony is where a well known commencement speaker tells hundreds of graduates, all dressed exactly the same, that individuality is the key to their success. Despite a personal aversion to events involving tassels, I recently took a trip to Tallahassee to watch my younger sister, Marsha, graduate from college. As I lined up at 6 p.m. to wait for the doors to open (which were marked will open at 6:30) for the 7:30 ceremony, I thought of the impending graduation of the seniors in Holmes and Washington counties and longed for the simplicity of those ceremonies and more so, the shorter lines. A nostalgic atmosphere settles while members of a small community experience not only their childs graduation, but also that of friends, neighbors and co-workers. There is a sense of pride in the accomplishments of our neighbors grads because we recognize they were the communitys children yesterday and will be its leaders tomorrow. Because most colleges, like Marshas, hold only one commencement ceremony a year, that close-knit experience is hard to come by among so many strangers. Hundreds may be graduating from towns all over the state and nation. It isnt likely the spectators watched the graduates grow up, play ball or get in trouble together. At 6:28, the facilitys security guard, an elderly man armed with a radio and permanent marker, slowly walked to the rst of three sets of double doors and paradoxically penned :30 on each entryway. I had suspected he was wielding the power of his security status, and when he started back at the rst door to remove the signs (for it was 6:30 by time he had completed his rst task), I whispered to my dad, Now hes just messing with us. The ood gates opened, and a sea of proud family and friends were able to enter the arena, most of whom were ready to leave after watching their loved one shake hands with the dean and grab their diploma. Because Marsha graduated with honors, she was one of the rst to walk, but my parents and I stayed for the remaining two-and-a-half hours out of respect for those we didnt know, who also worked hard for this day to arrive. I watched them, grads both young and old, and wondered if there was a small community behind this latest milestone, if the graduate wished their guest list could have numbered in the thousands. Our communitys seniors will soon take their own graduation walk, hats balanced or pinned precariously on their heads, some silently praying they dont trip on their way to the podium. Like many before and many to come, the class of 2014 is a product of more than parental guidance. They are a product of their community, which has celebrated with them as theyve experienced academic and athletic victories, as well as personal triumph and tragedy. The support theyve received along the way has undoubtedly made a difference, and they will surely remember we have called them all sons and daughters. Soon, it will be time for them to give back what theyve received. For now, though, they will simply take this next step, perhaps thinking of the past, the future, and this strange moment in between. Congratulations, Class of 2014.The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $13.30; 26-weeks: $19.90; 52 weeks: $32.00 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $17.70; 26 weeks: 26.50; 52 weeks: $43.00The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Carol Kent, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION clamb @chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 EDITOR Carol: ckent@ chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 ADVERTISING Bill Allard: wallard@ chipleypaper.com 850-547-9414 OPINION www.bonifaynow.comWednesday, May 28, 2014 APage 4Section CAROL KENTEditorMy youngest brother and mom came to visit me this week. This is my zany brother, Joshua Alderman Spears. CECILIA SPEARS | Times-AdvertiserFamily: more than blood CECILIA SPEARSCecilias Sit Down The Class of 2014 is a product of community Senior adult sh fry celebrates many years of serviceHAPPY CORNERHazel Wells Tison

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A5Wednesday, May 28, 2014Chesnut Hill Art Studio Annual Art ExhibitCHIPLEY Winona C. VanLandingham, Art Instructor at the Washington County Public Library in Chipley, will host an art exhibit through Friday, May 30 during regular library hours. Students exhibiting art are: Noah Shaffett, Nathan Shaffett, Libby Shaffett, Hannah Shaffett, Meredith Deal, Mia Wilson, Mandolin Brown, Brody Paulk, Carrlee Harris, Emma Largacci, Emily Broom, Keegan Welch, Sydney Smith, Lena Tice, Bryan Barton, Briana Barton, and Taylin Crisp.Chamber committee meeting CHIPLEY Chamber Members with an interest or experience in Marketing are invited to join the 2014 Marketing Committee for the Chamber of Commerce.   T he committees mission is to: Support Chamber efforts to establish strong relationships with the publics it serves. Provide appropriate communication strategies and plans for engaging these publics. Act as an advisor, as requested, on marketing specic Chamber initiatives and activities. A few projects in our plan of work this year will be to: Review the chamber website for updating; develop a marketing plan for economic development initiatives; survey members on satisfaction with services and areas to focus for member development and to create a communications plan an operational guide to general communications The rst meeting will be at 3 p.m., Wednesday, May 28 at the Chamber ofce. If youre interested in attending, please contact Nicole Bareeld at nbareeld@chipleypaper. com, or 638-0212, x4001 by Tuesday, May 27. Poplar Springs High School advisory meetingPOPLAR SPRINGS Poplar Springs High School will hold a school advisory meeting, at 3 p.m., Wednesday, May 28, in the Media Center.Boston Butt SaleCHIPLEY/GRACEVILLE The family and friends of Julie Rustin Jeffries are holding a Boston butt sale. Pick up day for the Boston butts will be Friday, June 6. Cost is $25. There will be two pick up spots: one at the Washington County School Board Ofce in Chipley and the other in the Piggly Wiggly parking lot in Graceville. Tickets are available at C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service in Chipley. Deadline to order Boston butts is Friday, May 30. An account has also been set up at Peoples Bank in Graceville. Donations can be mailed or dropped off at the following address: PO Box 596, Graceville, FL 32440. Make all checks payable to the Julie Rustin Jeffries Benet. All proceeds from the sale and all donations will be used to help defray medical cost that have incurred with Julies diagnosis and treatment of Melanoma skin cancer. For more information, to make a donation, or to purchase a Boston butt call Vicki C. Lamb at 638-1483 or 326-0121.Community Baby ShowerMARIANNA Chipola Healthy Start will host a community baby shower from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, May 30, at the Jackson County Agricultural Center. The baby shower is open to anyone who is pregnant or who has children less than three years of age. Lunch, prizes games and more will be provided. For more information, call 482-1236 or 866-591-2852.Holmes County Council on Aging health fairBONIFAY Holmes County Council on Aging will host the Annual Health Fair for the senior citizens of Holmes County at 10 a.m., May 30 at the National Guard Armory in Bonifay. For more information call 547-2345.Partners for Pets poker runMARIANNA Partners for Pets will hold a poker run Saturday, May 31, at Jennings Field off Caladonia Street in Marianna. Bikers will meet beginning at 9 a.m. and ride out at 10 a.m. There is a $15 per bike charge with an option to buy and extra card at the end of the run for $5. Food and dinks will be available on site an along the route. For more information, call 482-4570.New Hope reunionNEW HOPE The New Hope School reunion will be held at 10 a.m. May 31, at New Hope Crossroads. Former students, relatives and friends are invited to attend. A covered dish lunch will be held at noon. Chicken and drinks will be provided. For more information, call Posie Vaughan at 956-2502 or Jeniece McKinnon at 956-2214.Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant CHIPLEY The 58th Annual Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant will be held at 6:30 p.m. Friday, June 6 and Saturday, June 7, at the Washington County Agricultural Center in Chipley. For more information call Teresa Bush at 263-4744 (daytime) or 263-3072 (evenings) or contact Sherry Saunders at 263-3554.Relay For Life Wrap-Up PartyCHIPLEY Relay For Life of Holmes and Washington County will have its 2014 Wrap-Up Party at 6 p.m. Monday, June 2, at Pattillos restaurant, located on the campus of the WashingtonHolmes Technical Center. For more information, call Connie Smelcer at 703-9977.Perry/Canzada Worley ReunionGRACEVILLE The annual Perry/Canzada Worley reunion will be held at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, June 8, at the Graceville Community Church. Lunch will be served at noon. Bring a covered dish to share with everyone also please bring any old photos you would like to share. Chipola to hold viewing of Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition lmMARIANNA Chipola College will host a screening of the Elam Stolzfus documentary lm, The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition: Everglades to Okefenokee, at 6 p.m. Thursday, June 12, in the Center for the Arts. The Emmy awardwinning lm has been shown nationwide on public television. Chipola graduate and 30-year veteran lmmaker Elam Stoltzfus will be on hand t o discuss the lm.  A reception will follow the screening of the lm. The 2012 lm documents the journey of four explorers who traveled 1,000 miles in 100 days, from the Everglades to Okefenokee Swamp in Southern Georgia. Their goal is to raise awareness of the real possibility to protect and restore connected landscapes throughout the Florida peninsula and create a viable corridor through Florida. For more information, about the event call 718-2277.AMVETS membership driveCHIPLEY AMVETS #7 will hold a membership drive and fundraiser at 3 p.m. Saturday, June 14. There will be a crawsh boil and live music. Plates will be $7 per person. CHIPOLA FORD WelcomesBack! BILLWHITTINGTON DAD/GRANDPA/GREATGRANDPAHAPPY98thBIRTHDAY!!!onMAY31st LOVE-Sabrina,Darrell, Dillon&Tristan AVAILABLEFORLEASE 495St.JohnsRoad,Bonifay,FlmileoffI-10(Bonifayexit) 18,000s/fBuildingw/LoadingDock 3phasepowerCONTACT:JACK@850-239-0039 Residents at Washington Rehabilitation and Nursing Center (WRNC) went shing in honor of National Nursing Home Week, Monday, May 5 through Friday, May 9. National Nursing Home Week is a way for todays care communities to proactively communicate that skilled care centers are light years ahead of what may be thought of as Grandmas nursing home. Residents at WRNC held week full of activities. Monday the residents had an all day cake walk, Tuesday was All American Competition Day, Wednesday residents attended an All Day Fishing Trip, Thursday was Specialty Day (Children, Gardening, Dancing, Karaoke and Cooking), and Friday was Fiesta Day. Special PECIAL toTO theTHE Times IMES -ADvertiser VERTISER ResiESIDentsENTS enENJoyOY NationalATIONAL NursingURSING HomeOME WeeEEK Community EVENTS

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LocalA6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, May 28, 2014 MONDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach ofce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999.TUESDAY8-10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 6:10 p.m..: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at speedball 6:10 p.m., Early bird 6:20, session 6:50 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-7654 or 638-7654 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AWEDNESDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Bible Study 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY9-11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society second Thursday of each month. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AFRIDAY6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 3:30 p.m.: Bead Class every second Friday at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery call 703-0347 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper 4th Friday of every month January to September. 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a get-together for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Methodist Youth Center in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. Osteosarcoma (OSA), the most common bone cancer, represents about 85 percent of bone tumors in dogs. These aggressive tumors spread rapidly, and once diagnosed, should be taken very seriously. OSA commonly affects the limbs of large or giant breed dogs, but can also occur in other parts of the skeleton, such as the skull, ribs, vertebrae and pelvis, said Dr. Rita Ho, veterinary intern instructor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Animals with limb osteosarcoma typically show signs of swelling at the affected side and associated lameness, depending upon the animals unique condition and tumor location. The tumors typically form at or near growth plates, and occasionally, the animal will exhibit a growth on their body or painful inammation near the site of the tumor. If swelling does exist, it is likely because of an extension of the tumor into the surrounding tissues. Depending on your pets specic condition, there are various treatment options you can consider, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Limb OSA commonly causes lameness and pain because of invasion and destruction of normal bone; therefore surgery is usually the rst recommendation, Dr. Ho said. The surgery serves two purposes: it removes the primary tumor, which is necessary for cancer control, but it also removes the source of pain and might therefore dramatically improve quality of life. Surgery often involves amputation of the diseased limb, which completely resolves the pain for your pet. However, for people who are reluctant to have this procedure done, there are other surgical methods to spare the limb if your pet is not a good candidate or if you arent comfortable with the surgery. Just keep in mind that amputation is almost always well tolerated with the dogs, and a threelegged dog can do virtually everything four-legged dogs can. Chemotherapy is administered to a pet following amputation to kill off any remaining cancer cells, and radiation is recommended primarily for relieving bone pain and discomfort. The average dog with OSA will live only four months if treated with only surgery, Dr. Ho said. With chemotherapy following surgery, usually the life expectancy is 10-12 months. As with any surgery, activity and mobility after the operation will be restricted and pain management programs as well as various medications are typically prescribed for the animal after surgery. However, it is important to remember that you should never administer any pain medication without Wealsotakecareof (850)638-5885 MostVehicles Upto5qts. syntheticblend MostVehicles $1995 5020829 SowellTractorCo.,Inc.2841Hwy.77North,PanamaCity www.sowelltractorco.com SowellandKubota 40YearsofTrustedPerformance WeTrade forAnything ThatDont Eat! Financing Arranged (WAC) Special to The News Jackson Hospital is now a provider for the Humana Medicare Advantage Plan as of Tuesday, April 1. Over 600 Jackson County citizens signed up with Humana this past en rollment season, Patient Financial Services Direc tor Sharon Dilmore said. We want our senior citi zens to be in-network when they come to Jackson Hos pital and not have to worry about the expense of trav eling a great distance. Another way Jackson Hospital says its trying to meet the needs of local citizens is by offering at least three preferred pro vider plans that may t the medical insurance needs of small businesses in the area. There have been many changes to health insurance options, and we want to help if at all pos sible, Dilmore said. Jackson Hospital con tracts with 31 different health insurance provid ers. For a complete list, go to jacksonhosp.com/about us/accepted insurances. aspx. For more information, call Dilmore at 718-2641.Special to The NewsThree leading military surveys have named Gulf Power Company and its parent company, Southern Company, a top employer for both active duty and military veterans. A longstanding leader in military recruitment, Southern Company is the top-ranked energy company and No. 3 overall in the 2014 DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Veterans. In addition, the company is the top-ranked energy company and No. 13 over all in the Military Times EDGE Best for Vets: Em ployers 2014 survey and has been named to the Most Valuable Employers for Military winners by CivilianJobs.com for the fth consecutive year. Veterans are very im portant to us at Gulf Power, said Stan Connally, Gulf Power President and CEO. They are a natural t for us because the cul tures of both the military and the utility industry exemplify dedication, commitment to safety, team work and excellence in all they do. About 15 percent of Gulf Powers 1,400 employees are veterans. Currently, 10 percent of the Southern Company systems 26,000 employees are veterans or serve in the National Guard or Reserve. Veter ans account for 14 percent of the systems new hires this year. Southern Companys ongoing support of mili tary personnel has earned broad recognition, includ ing the 2010 Secretary of Defense Employer Support Freedom Award the highest honor given by the Department of Defense for support of employees who serve in the National Guard or Reserve and the Pro Patria Award for leader ship in providing benets to military employees. G.I. Jobs has named South ern Company the nations highest-ranked utility in its Top 100 Military Friendly Employers listing for sev en consecutive years. As part of its commit ment to veterans, Southern Company also is a found ing partner of the Troops to Energy Jobs program, a recruiting source that links veterans to job openings in the energy industry. The company actively recruits members of the Navy as a Naval Nuclear Propul sion Program partner and has pledged to support the Joining Forces initia tive. In addition, Southern Company annually participates in more than 30 mili tary recruitment events and partners with military transition centers across the country.Special to The NewsAt about 1:08 p.m., Wednesday, May 21, the Jackson County Sheriffs Ofce responded to WalMart in Marianna to a re ported retail theft. Upon arrival, they learned that a member of Wal-Marts Asset Protec tion team had witnessed Shane Tolliver Whiteld, a 45-year-old male of Altha, pass the point of sale with 35 items in this buggy that had not been paid for. Among the items was a 32-inch at screen television that the anti-theft device had been removed from. The remain der of the items was cloth ing, household items, etc. Total value of the stolen items was $394.63, which classies it as grand theft. Whiteld was lodged in the Jackson County Correc tional Facility to await rst appearance on charges of grand theft and retail theft. Before the ofcers could get Whiteld secured in the County Jail, they re ceived another retail theft call from Wal-Mart. In that case, Zeno Scott Walther, a 21-year-old male of Mari anna, was arrested after he was observed changing clothes in the mens depart ment and leaving without paying for the merchandise he was wearing. Walther was lodged in the Jackson County Correctional Facil ity on a charge of petit retail theft. PetET Ta ALK Treatment options for osteosarcoma petPET taTALK Gulf Power named top employer for hiring veteransJCSO charges 2 with theft Jackson Hospital contracts with insurance companies CommunityOMMUNITY caCALendarENDAR rst consulting your veterinarian. Unfortunately, osteosarcoma has not been found to be preventable. With thorough examinations and early recognition of the symptoms, however, it can be caught soon enough to take the necessary measures to stop the cancer from spreading and to keep your pet healthy and happy for as long as possible. Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at vetmed.tamu. edu/pettalk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to editor@cvm. tamu.edu.

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SPORTs S www.bonifaynow.com ASection 5020827 By BRAD MILNER AND JASON SHOOTThe News Herald PANAMA CITY BEACH As is the case with any jamboree, there were mixed results among the four Bay County schools playing at the Mike Gavlak Sports Complex on Friday. Arnold hosted Bay, Mosley and Rutherford in four halves of play to close spring football practice. The Rams debuted new coach Rob Armstrong, while Jimmy Longer beam continued as the dean of county coaches at Bay. Arnold held back Bay 15-8 in the opener and Mosley blanked a struggling Rutherford 14-0 in the second half. Bay shut out Ruther ford 18-0 and Mosley bested Arnold 21-6 to complete the jamboree. The teams now enter summer drills with fall practices set to open in early-August. The four teams again are matched in District 1-5A with Mosley securing last seasons county title. Arnold 15, Bay 8 Torri Cotton set the tone for Ar nold with a 73-yard touchdown run on the rst quarters second play. He was held to minus-10 yards on his last four carries, but the Mar lins offense surged behind quar terback Cody Saunders. Saunders completed 9 of his 13 passes for 110 yards in help ing Arnold control the clock. Arnold added two Austin Pef fers eld goals, the long of 41 against a defense that wasnt allowed to rush. The Marlins also sacked Bay quarterback Xavier Longerbeam in the end zone for a second-quarter safety. Bay scored its touchdown on its last possession, Lon gerbeam nding Zavian Ever ett down the left sideline for a 35-yard score on rst down. Raekwon Webb added the 2point conversion run with 2:39 to play. Longerbeam nished 4 for 6 for 50 yards while adding 37 yards on the ground. Saunders spread out his completions to six receiv ers with Paul Patterson grabbing a team-high three recep tions for 23 yards. Nicholas Berg man gained 50 yards rushing on four carries in a reserve role. Mosley 14, Rutherford 0 Neither team impressed on of fense, with Mosley earning the victory on the strength of two big plays. Rutherford continued to run the Spread with Armstrong expect ed to install the Wing-T in the fall. Rams quarterback Justin Da vis attempted only three passes despite the wide formation. He completed two passes, one for no gain and the second a 42-yarder to Aaron Hamilton on the Rams third possession. Rutherford elected to punt ve times, with the decision resulting in added yardage rather than a live play. The Rams other possession ended on downs. Mosley chose to punt once, turned the ball over on downs an other time and lost a fumble on its rst possession. Ezra Gray provided the rst highlight when he took a screen pass from Dillon Brown and raced 48 yards for a score in the second quarter. Gray added 17 yards on four carries. Trey Trzaska also recorded a big gain for 37 yards on a reception on Mosleys next drive. Jimmy Daniel, who had 48 total yards, capped the march with a 12-yard score. Mosley used four quarterbacks, including rotating Peyton Calhoun and Scott Whitaker on the nal possession. Bay 18, Rutherford 0 Webb spotted the Tornadoes a 6-0 lead on the contests rst play, and Longerbeam and receiver Everett connected for two passing touchdowns as Bay cruised to the victory. Webb broke loose on the rst play from scrimmage for a 75-yard romp and a near-instant 6-0 lead. Longerbeam hit Everett with a 36-yard scoring strike late in the rst quarter. Everett wrestled a contested ball away from a defend er at the goal line, and he stepped into the end zone to double the Tor nadoes lead at 12-0. Longerbeam and Everett teamed up again for a 53-yard touchdown pass in the second quarter for an 18-0 lead with just over three minutes left. Everett used his speed to get behind a pair of defenders, and Longerbeams pass hit the receiver in stride for the touchdown. Davis delivered a 33-yard pass to EJ Foster in the rst quarter for the Rams biggest play. The Ram offense stalled at Bays 32yard line, however, and ultimately turned the ball over on downs. That was the rst of three Rutherford possessions that ended in Tornado territory. Bay endured three fumbles offensively and was fortunate it lost only one. Rutherford fumbled twice but recovere Mosley 21, Arnold 6 Mosleys offense began the matchup against Arnold with a game of keep-away before Brown and receiver James Lovett gave the Dolphins a lead they would not surrender. Facing fourth-and-25 at Arnolds 26-yard line, Brown heaved the ball down the left sideline. Lovett ran under the throw and jumped over a defender to cap the Dolphins 15-play drive. After an Arnold punt, Daniel raced 55 yards untouched through the middle of the Marlins defense for a touchdown and a 14-0 lead for Mosley with 4:38 left in the rst quarter. Peffers kicked a 32-yard eld goal on the Marlins ensuing possession. His attempt was set up by quarterback Cody Saunders 50yard pass to Jovanni Perea to the Mosley 15. Daniel posted his second touchdown with a 20-yard run and ex tended Mosleys lead to 21-3 with 10 1/2 minutes left. Peffers netted another 32-yard eld goal midway through the sec ond quarter to provide the games nal margin.SPRING FOOTBALL JAMBOREE Patti ATTI BLa A Ke E | The News HeraldRutherfords Quinn Jones tackles Mosleys Devontia Wilson. SPRING IN THEIR STEPMosley stands tall in county clashLet it be written that I have no doubt NFL teams supplied players with powerful painkillers and other drugs to keep them playing during their careers that have led to serious health complications later in life. Perry Mason couldnt make me waver on that. Not even in black and white. Also let it be written that I believe the basis of the lawsuit led last week on behalf of more than 500 explayers that the league put prots ahead of players health. Whereas I fully support the lawsuit led for the thousands of retired players accusing the NFL of concealing the risks of concussions and later debilitating life issues think that the $765 million settlement the league has agreed to pay is not enough Im not backing the former players on this one. It seems hypocritical to even write as much, but I cant get the image of two former players out of my head. Ronnie Lott and Jack Youngblood were warriors in a league of warriors. Although legend has it that Lott told a doctor to amputate his left pinky in the locker room, or maybe it was the defensive huddle, actually it was after the 1985 season when it was crushed while he tackled Dallas running back Timmy Newsome. When told by a doctor that bone graft surgery wouldnt have enabled Lott to be ready in time for the 1986 opener, he opted to have the tip of the nger amputated. Not quite the stuff that has morphed into lore in the decades since, but still representative of the culture that brackets the professional lives of NFL athletes. Youngblood not only went through the entire 1979 playoffs, which included the Super Bowl, but participated in the meaningless 1980 Pro Bowl with a fractured left bula. Thats called a broken leg in the real world. Which the NFL isnt. It is comprised of men who not only have incredible physical gifts, but a capacity to endure pain that dwarfs the average human. That they allegedly were given pain-killing drugs by their team doctors to remain on the eld comes as no surprise. Nor does this tidbit: A lot of them knew exactly what they were doing and would do so again. Thats where I take a left turn with the lawsuit. The shield of the warrior, the camaraderie of the teammate, the persona of the macho athlete all ties into this. As a result of masking their pain with drugs, the lawsuit alleges, players developed heart, lung and nerve ailments; kidney failure; and chronic injuries to muscles, bones and ligaments. Probably so. Its just in this case I dont know where the responsibility of the player ends, and the culpability of the team begins. Im sure that attorneys could better explain it to me, but Im not convinced that I still would get it. After receiving numbing injections and pills before kickoff, players got more drugs and sleep aids after games, to be washed down by beer, the lawsuit states. Again, probably so. And this much, too. How many times have you heard NFL players talk about the necessity of learning the difference between injury and pain upon entering the league, or fearing for their job if they didnt play when hurt? If the intention of the lawsuit is an attempt to change the prevailing culture in the NFL into a more cohesive vision of dealing with injury, then perhaps it is valid. More likely, teams and players always will seek an avenue for them to remain on the eld. What the athletes do need to be informed of, in a more positive manner, is the long-term effect of the drugs they are being given, and be granted better access to more detailed medical records of whatever their condition. They can afford a second opinion. Then they might be able to make a more informed choice. The bottom line is that a group of 20somethings probably would say, in large part, just give me something, doc. Sports BeatPat McCannExecutive Sports Editorpmccann@pcnh.comThe needle and the damage doneWednesday, May 28, 2014 Page 7 GOT SPORTS?We want to promote sports in Washington and Holmes counties! Whether its a little league or high school team, our young athletes are important to us and our communities. Please send sports news and schedules to news@ chipleypaper.com.

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LocalA8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, May 28, 2014 NicoleBareeld:CommunitySteward.UnitedWayChampion. Publisher.Managingthebusinessoperationsoftwoweekly newspaperskeepsNicoleplentybusymakingsurethe news,salesandproductionteamshavethetoolstheyneed tobestserveourreadersinterests. Nicole also invests her time in helping our communities growwithinvolvementincivicorganizations,Chamber initiativessuchaseconomicdevelopment, andUnitedWay.Shebelieveswehavea responsibilitytohelpourbusinessand communitymembersstrengthen andthrive,notjustfortoday,butfor long-termprosperity. Becauseofourpeople,wedeliver morethanthenewstoWashington andHolmescounties.Itsjust anotherwaythatwerecommitted toourcommunities.AHalifaxMediaGroupCompany Nobody deliverslikewedo. enewCollegeofAppliedStudiesatFSUPanamaCitywasapprovedbytheFSUBoard ofTrusteesinJune2010andallowsthecampustomoreeasilyrespondtoworkforceneeds inourarea.WeinviteyoutosupporteCampaignforOurCommunitysUniversityby helpingusbuildanendowmentfortomorrowsjobs.Ourgoalistoestablisha$5million endowmentfortheCollegeofAppliedStudiesby2017,whichwillallowFSUPanama Citytoestablishstudentscholarships,implementnewdegreeprogramsandprovidenew equipmentandtechnology. Tolearnhowyoucansupportourcommunitysuniversity,contactMaryBethLovingoodat (850)770-2108ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu.THECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL Help for teens who stutter is as close as your library Special to the Times-AdvertiserStuttering is a frustrating and embarrassing problem for millions of people, but it can be especially tough on teenagers. Help is available at the Holmes County Public Library in the form of a DVD Stuttering: Straight Talk for Teens. Its meant to encourage teens, to tell them that there is hope out there, said Professor Peter Ramig of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Ramig is one of three nationally recognized experts appearing in the DVD produced by the nonprot Stuttering Foundation. David Wilkins, a high school student who stutters, narrates the DVD. It features students from junior high school through college talking about their experiences with stuttering and what they found to be helpful. They talk openly about the ridicule they faced from classmates and how their stuttering affects their lives. We really try to emphasize the embarrassment and frustration factor, and we think teens will relate to that, adds Ramig. He appears in the DVD along with speech-language pathologists Dr. Barry Guitar of the University of Vermont and Dr. Hugo Gregory of Northwestern University. The three experts answer questions about stuttering, refute myths and misconceptions, and present examples of therapy sessions showing how stuttering can be reduced. More than three million Americans stutter, yet stuttering remains misunderstood by most people, said Jane Fraser, president of the Stuttering Foundation. Myths such as believing people who stutter are less intelligent or suffer from psychological problems still persist despite research refuting these erroneous beliefs. Books and DVDs produced by the 66year-old nonprot Stuttering Foundation are available free to any public library. A library that will shelve them can contact the Foundation at 1-800-992-9392, e-mail info@stutteringhelp.org, or visit www. stutteringhelp.org or www.tartarmudez.org. Special to the Times-AdvertiserWest Florida Electric Co operative held a meeting for emergency operations cen ter personnel, city person nel, re departments and law enforcement agencies in Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson and Washington Counties on Wednesday, May 21. During the meeting, at tendees toured the coopera tives service center and saw a rst-hand demonstration of how cooperative members can report outages. They also learned about how crews are dispatched and the various ways WFEC per sonnel communicates with members using Facebook, Twitter and media outlets. Electrical safety informa tion was also shared with all those in attendance, which is especially important for rst-responders. This annual gathering allows electric cooperative personnel, EOC and city per sonnel, re departments and law enforcement to collabo rate and share ideas about how to best handle power outages and emergency situ ations caused by storm dam age to the area. This workshop is vital to the success of restoration efforts when our distribu tion system sustains cata strophic damage caused by hurricanes, tornadoes, se vere thunderstorms, or other acts of nature. It allows us to discuss problems that weve encountered in the past and brainstorm about how we can best communicate with emergency personnel throughout the four counties we serve, said Gary Clark, Vice President, and Member Services. Mother Nature is unpre dictable, so the proper pre cautions should always be taken by coastal residents and others near the coast. With that thought in mind, WFEC encourages all its members to be weather aware and begin making their annual hurricane sea son preparations before its too late. The Atlantic Hurricane Season begins on June 1 and will last until November 30. The peak storm threat usu ally occurs from mid-August to late October. SPECIAL TO THE TT IMEs S -A A DVERTIs S ER Gary Clark, WFEC Vice President, Member Services & Penny Hagan, Manager, Member Services speak to meeting attendees about how the cooperative handles major outage situations caused by severe weather. Ty Peel, Vice President, Engineering speaks to EOC & city personnel, law enforcement and re department personnel about the importance of being aware of your surroundings and downed power lines when responding to emergencies. Hurricane preparedness workshop held

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Special to ExtraBONIFAY Students from every grade were able to ooh and ah from display to display as Bonifay Elementary School held their second annual Science Fair on May 23, with volunteer students participating from both third and fourth grade. With almost 30 participants, there were three who walked home with placings, while three had honorable mentions. First Place went to Landon Justice in the fourth grade, Second Place went to Kendall Rushing in the third grade, Third Place went to Haley Forehand in the fourth grade and honorable mentions went to Prana Patel in the fourth grade, Cheyenne Mitchell in the third grade and Tommy Coatney in the fourth grade. Honorable Mention went to Cheyenne Mitchell, third grade, for her display of Solar Cooking.BES holds 2nd annual Science FairFirst Place in this years Bonifay Elementary School Science Fair went to Landon Justice, fourth grade, with his display, Popcorn: Which Brand Pops Best. PHo O To O S byBY CEci CI Lia IA SpSP Ea A RS | ExtraTerry Pettys rst grade class was the rst of many to take a look at the many displays during this years science fair. Third Place went to Haley Forehand, fourth grade, for her display of Molecular Change from a Solid to a Liquid. Honorable Mention went to Tommy Coatney, fourth grade, for his display The Power of Color. Honorable Mention went to Prana Patel, fourth grade, for his display of Craters and Meteors. Second Place went to Kendall Rushing, third grade, for her display of Does Music Affect the Growth of Plants? WinnINNERS anAND HonoONORabABLE MEnNTionIONS Wednesday, MayMAY 28 2014 Washington County News H H olmes County T T imes-Advertiser B Pa A GE 1 Section EXTRATrivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) A Tisket, ATasket was whose rst major hit song in 1938? Artie Shaw, Ella Fitzgerald, Count Basie, Billie Holiday 2) What blood would a nurse measure with a sphygmomanometer? Sugar, Alcohol, Pressure, Count 3) John P. Holland is credited with the invention of the modern? Submarine, Refrigerator, Guitar, Padlock 4) Whats the youngest age one can become President of the United States? 32, 35, 40, 42 5) Which stone did early man primarily use for starting res? Slate, Marble, Quartz, Flint 6) Whose nest is the lookout platform on sailing ships? Boars, Eagles, Birds, Crows 7) What is the smallest area country in the United Kingdom? Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales, England 8) Refried beans are primarily made of what type of cooked beans? Garbanzo, Black, Kidney, Pinto 9) What name did blues singer McKinley Morganeld adopt? Muddy Waters, Bo Diddley, B. B. King, Fats Domino 10) Which city opened the rst aquarium in 1893? Boston, Chicago, Baltimore, Richmond 11) If youre astraphobic what are you afraid of? Lightning, Astroturf, Stars, Mountains 12) What white creature is Ursus Maritimus? Owl, Whale, Polar bear, Bunny 13) Of these battery types which is largest in size? AA, AAA, C, D 14) A semenier chest ordinarily has how many drawers? 5, 6, 7, 8 ANSWERS 1) Ella Fitzgerald. 2) Pressure. 3) Submarine. 4) 35. 5) Flint. 6) Crows. 7) Northern Ireland. 8) Muddy Waters. 9) Pinto. 10) Chicago. 11) Lightning. 12) Polar bear. 13) D. 14) 7. TT rivia Fun Wilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com

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Wednesday, May 28, 2014 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra and Special to The Times-Advertiser The Bonifay Book Club met at the home of Dianne Smith on May 13. Present at the meeting were Brenda Alford, Joyce Brannon, Cynthia Brooks, Medea Callahan, Barbara Howell, Terri McCormick, Nancy Riley, Kyla Rushing, DiAnn Shores and Dianne Smith. The meeting was called to order by President Cynthia Brooks. The minutes were read by Secretary Nancy Riley and approved as read. Medea Callahan reviewed The Husbands Secret by Liane Moriarty, published in July 2013. At the heart of this novel is a letter thats not to be read. Imagine that your husband wrote you a letter; it says to be opened only in the event of my death. John-Paul is very much alive, and Cecilia accidently stumbles across this letter. Cecilia Fitzpatrick has achieved it all: Shes an incredibly, successful businesswoman, a pillar of her small community and a devoted wife. Her life is as orderly and spotless as her home. Cecilia is a devoted mother who constantly volunteers at her daughters school while running a thriving Tupperware business. But that letter is about to change everything. The letter contains her husbands deepest, darkest secret, something with the potential to destroy not just the life they built together, but the lives of others as well. Rachel and Tess barely know Cecilia, or each other, but they, too, are about to feel the earthshattering repercussions of her husbands secret. Thirty-something Tess husband breaks the news that hes fallen in love with Tess rst cousin, best friend and business partner. Tess divorces her husband and moves to her mothers house in Sydney. Enrolling her 6-year-old son at St. Angelas, Tess runs into former lover Connor. Connor is now the schools hunky gym coach and is crushed on by students, teachers and parents like Cecilia. Rachel is the schools secretary and is one who does not have any adoration for Connor. She is still grief stricken over the death of her daughter, Janie, in 1984. Rachel is increasingly convinced Connor is involved in her daughters death. As Cecilia, Tess and Rachel confront the past and make hard decisions about their futures, their fates collide in unexpected ways. Delicious refreshments were served by Mrs. Smith at the conclusion of the meeting.Morrises celebrate 50 yearsJack and Angie Morris of Vernon will celebrate their golden wedding anniversary Wednesday, July 16. The couple was married in Miller County, Ga., just before midnight, in 1964. They will be honored by their children and grandchildren with a reception from 1-4 p.m. Saturday, June 7, at the Vernon Community Center.Stanton and Poole wedCaroline Rowan Poole of Tuscaloosa, Ala., and Lee Ellis Stanton of Chipley were married at 4 p.m. March 1, 2014, at Saint James Episcopal Church in Livingston, Ala., with the Rev. Richard Losch ofciating the ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Mrs. Marion Daniel Poole and Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Eugene Poole of Tuscaloosa, Ala. She is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Jackson Poole and the late Mr. and Mrs. John Marion Daniel, Jr., all of Tuscaloosa, Ala. Parents of the groom are Mr. and Mrs. Rual Kenneth Stanton of Chipley. He is the grandson of Samuel Burnett Stanton and the late Mrs. Dorothy Lowell Stanton, and the late Mrs. Johanna Scheid Ellis, all of Chipley. Given in marriage by her father, the bride wore a gown of French Alencon lace and silk charmeuse. The gown featured a lace bodice accented with lace cap sleeves and highlighted with a Tiffany train. The veil of Parisian tulle was bordered with French Alencon lace. The couple resides in Livingston, Ala. Wedding Anniversary Special to The Times-AdvertiserHonky Tonk Angels, written by Ted Swindley, creator of Always, Patsy Cline, directed by Jimmy Miller and Kevin Russell, will take the stage at 7 p.m. June 6-7 and 2 p.m. June 8. This production is rated PG-13 for adult themes and situations. Tickets will go on sale at the Spanish Trail Playhouse Box Ofce to the general public on June 2. Reserved seating tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors ages 65 and up and military with ID and $10 for students. In Honky Tonk Angels, Swindley combines more than 30 classic country tunes with a hilarious story about three gutsy gals who are determined to better their lives and follow their dreams to Nashville. The all-hit song list, complete with a live band and starring Casey Johns, Wendy White and Sierra Hill, includes Honky Tonk Angels, Coal Miners Daughter, to 5, Stand By Your Man, Ode to Billy Joe, Dont Come Home A Drinkin, The Pill, These Boots Are Made For Walking, I Will Always Love You, Paradise Road, Delta Dawn, Amazing Grace, Calling All Angels, Time For Me To Fly, Your Good Girls Gonna Go Bad, Night Life, Cleopatra, Queen of Denial, Harper Valley PTA, Fancy, Rocky Top, Barroom Habits, Cornell Crawford, Almost Persuaded, Sittin on the Front Porch Swing, Angels Among Us and Ill Fly Away. This production is presented in association with Ted Swindley Productions Inc. and originally produced by the American Theatre Company, Kitty Roberts, producer, Tulsa, Okla. The Spanish Trail Playhouse is at 680 Second St. in Chipley inside the historic Chipley High School. For reservations, call the box ofce at 638-9113. For more information, visit www.spanishtrailplayhouse. com.Tickets on sale for Honky Tonk Angels Special to The NewsThe Chipola Regional Workforce Development Board recently had its annual banquet, where Richard Williams, executive director, presented David Melvin, president of David H. Melvin Inc., Consulting Engineers, with the Boards 2012-2013 Employer of the Year Award. The Regional Workforce Board consists of a ve-county area comprising Jackson, Calhoun, Washington, Holmes and Liberty. Melvin Engineering was selected because of its commitment to the area to diligently participate in and work cooperatively with the economic development efforts that create opportunities for regional employment, Williams said. The list of projects is extensive and includes Green Circle, Ice River Springs, Family Dollar and HomeSource International. Kenny Grifn, business sedvices Director, praised Melvin Engineering for its availability and assistance in meeting the goals of Gov. Rick Scotts jobs creation initiative and the Workforce Development Board by their willingness to do everything asked of them and more. Melvin accepted the award on behalf of the entire team of DHM professionals, making reference to their character, quality of their performance and eagerness to serve their community. Melvin Engineering named Employer of the Year Sp P ECIAL TO TT HE TIm M Es S -ADVERTIs S ER David Melvin accepts the Chipola Regional Workforce Development Boards Employer of the Year award. Bonifay Book Club meets in May JEss SS I CCOLLINs S | Times-AdvertiserRogers Insurance celebrated 40 years of service to the community by hosting an open house at their ofce on Jackson Ave. in Chipley, Thursday, May 22. Scores of customers and other members of the community stopped in to extend well wishes and enjoy giveaways and a live broadcast by an area radio station. Rogers Insurance was rst opened by Gerald Pee Wee Rogers on May 26, 1974. From left are Donna Miller, Gerald Pee Wee Rogers, Ricky Miller and Craig Miller, representing three generations of Rogers Insurances service to the community. RROGERsS IINsSURANCE CELEBRATEsS 40 YEARsS

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Wednesday, May 28, 2014 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3By NIKI CRAWSONSpecial to Extra BONIFAY Students placing 1st at the county competition each received a scholarship in the amount of $250 to attend the legendary 4-H Camp Timpoochee in June, a camping tradition which has occurred since the 1930s. Florida 4-H is very proud of the 4-H/Tropicana Public Speaking Contest, which has been incorporated into the 4-H program for over forty years. Working with youth in grades 4-6, this contest helps thousands of young people annually learn how to write and deliver a speech. Over 2 million students have participated in this program since its beginning. Tropicana, Inc. has sponsored the contest since 1969 and provides classroom materials for teachers, certicates of participation, ribbons for classroom winners and medallions for school winners, plaques and summer camp scholarships to 4-H Camp Timpoochee for county winners. Tropicana Products, Inc., is a division of PepsiCo, Inc., the leading producer and marketer of branded fruit juices. 4-H is one of the largest youth development programs in America with more than 6.5 million young people, ages 5-18, and 540,000 youth and adult volunteers. 4-H programming offers more than just animals and barns. 4-Hs learning opportunities are designed around four essential elements necessary for positive youth development by providing youth with: supervised independence, a sense of belonging with a positive group, a spirit of generosity toward others and a wide variety of opportunities to master life challenges. A variety of fun, educational, social, and engaging activities are offered. These programs teach the fundamental 4-H ideal of practical, learn by doing experiences which encourages youth to experiment, innovate and think independently. For information on how you can get involved with 4-H as a youth, volunteer, or supporter, please contact Niki Crawson at 547-1108, ncrawson@u.edu or check out our website at http:// holmes.ifas.u.edu 4-H is a community of young people ages 518 across America who are learning leadership, citizenship and life skills. 4-H programs are available to young people in all 50 states, U.S. territories and U.S. military installations worldwide, regardless of gender, race, creed, color, religion, or disability. For more information on 4-H, please visit holmes.ifas.u. edu. 5020828 5020403 5020402 SPECia IA L To O EE XTRa A The Chipola College Cosmetology program recently held a Fantasy Makeup competition to increase students skills in makeup application. Pictured from left, are Ashley Toole as the Queen of Hearts, Sarah Shiver as Cleopatra, Brittany Burns as Jessica Rabbit, Allie Brock as an Avatar, Lindsay Hall as Katniss, Amanda Cooke as an Oompa Loompa and Kaily Chapel as Edward Scissorhands. SPECia IA L To O EE XTRa A Chipola president Dr. Jason Hurst was the guest speaker at the Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce, Tuesday, May 20, meeting. Dr. Hurst provided an overview of college programs, facilities and economic impact. Pictured from left, are Terri Waldron, Chair of the Chamber Board; Dr. Jason Hurst, and Danny Ryals, member of the Chipola College District Board of Trustees. HURsST sSPEaAKsS aA T CaCALhoHOUnN CoCOUnNTyY ChaHAMbBER ChiCHIPoOLaA CosCOSMEToOLoOGyY PPRoOGRaAM fanFANTasy ASY MaAKEUP CoOMPETiITionION Special to ExtraThe Chipola College welding program recently earned accreditation from the National Center for Construction Education & Research (NCCER) through the Southern Company/Gulf Power Accredited Training Sponsor (ATS) audit process. As the accrediting body for the industry, NCCER establishes the benchmark for quality training and assessments. By partnering with industry and academia, NCCER has developed a system for program accreditation similar to those found in institutions of higher learning. This process fosters national unity among the construction industry while providing a dened career path with industry-recognized credentials. The NCCER accreditation process assures that students and craft professionals receive quality training based on uniform standards and criteria. The Chipola welding program utilizes state-ofthe-art welding equipment, hybrid learning, mobile welding units and simulation technologies. The rst class of 20 students in the new program enrolled in January. New students may enter the program during Summer Session II which begins, Monday, June 23. Registration will be held, Thursday, June 19. The program is 1,170 clock-hours which can be completed in about one year. Classes are available Monday through Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Evening classes are expected to be added beginning in August. Chipolas welding program is made possible through a grant awarded to the Alabama/Florida Technical Employment Network (AF-TEN). Chipola, L. B. Wallace, Northwest Florida State, Pensacola State, and Wallace Community College formed the consortium that was awarded $10 million in a Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant. Each college shares a portion of the grant to implement a welding technology program on their campus. Darwin Gilmore, Chipola Dean of Workforce Development, says, Welding is a targeted occupation that offers excellent pay and benets. Workforce Florida projects annual growth of 13,500 jobs in advanced manufacturing and construction, with 75% requiring postsecondary training. The Alabama Department of Industrial Relations (ADIR) lists welding among Alabamas Hot 40 Jobs with expected annual growth of more than two percent through 2018. Byron Ward, Welding Career Coach, says, The job outlook is very good in the area and especially for those willing to travel or relocate. Starting pay for pipe welders in ship-building is $20 per hour and higher. Local manufacturing plants offer $14-$18 per hour. Eastern Ship Builders in Panama City hires numerous welders and is expected to expand their operation in the near future. Other local employers include Rolls Right Trailers and Anderson Columbia in Marianna. Welding jobs also are available in Tallahassee, Panama City, Jacksonville, Dothan and Mobile, Ala. Financial aid is available for students who qualify, with special consideration for veterans. Prospective welding students must earn a minimum score on the Test of Adult Basic Education. For information about Chipolas Welding program, call 850-718-2270, or visit www.chipola.edu. Ni I Ki I CC Ra A Wson SON | Special to ExtraSixth Grade Winners of this years Holmes County 4-H/Tropicana Public Speaking Contest was went to Lydia Dixon, Poplar Springs School with a speech titled Fear won First Place; Autumn FrutosCreamer of Poplar Springs School won Second Place; and Madison Curry of Poplar Springs School won third place.Holmes County 4-H/Tropicana Public Speaking ContestChipola welding program earns national accreditation Crossword PPUZZLE SOLUTLUTION ON PP AGEGE B5

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FAITH BSectionwww.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com 1055FowlerAve.,ChipleyBehindourChipleyfactory.FactoryOutletHours:Wed.Thurs.andFri.9AM-5PM Sat.9AM-3PM638-9421 FloridaMicrolm&OfceSupplyInc. 6594S.US231, Dothan,AL36301(334)677-3318 800-886-3318 Obar'sInsuranceAgencyAnIndependentInsuranceAgency Auto,Home,Farm,CommercialAndBonds MobileHomes,Life,HealthArthurP.W.ObarJr. AGENT POBox594 5390CLIFFST. 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A food drive will be held along with their regular festivities. Food donated will stay in the community in an effort to battle hunger. Any type of non-refrigerated, nonperishable food will be accepted as donation. WUTS will host a different drive each month, including a shoe drive, shoe box drive (shoe boxes lled with basic household supplies for the needy), and a toy drive in October to close out the year. For more information, call Cody Baker at 326-5217. Worship Under the Stars will be held at 1100 Main Street in Chipley (in the backyard of the Tabernacle of Praise church on Hwy 77).The Bradys in concertBONIFAY The Light House Assembly of God in Bonifay will host live in concert, from Dothan, Ala., Gospel recording artist The Bradys, at 5 p.m., Sunday, May 25. For more information, call 638-2027.New Bethany HomecomingVERNON New Bethany Assembly of God Church will hold homecoming services at 11 a.m. Sunday, May 25. Brother Darvin Glass will bring the message. Lunch will be served at 12:30 p.m. For more information, call Brother Leon Jenkins at 773-3003.Faith Covenant Fellowship to host Kevin WilsonCHIPLEY Faith Covenant Fellowship will host a gospel sing featuring Bro. Kevin Wilson from Kentucky at 7 p.m., Friday, May 30. The church is located on Highway 277 in Chipley. For more information call Pastor Cloys Joiner at 638-4031.Youth rallyWESTVILLE Mt. Pleasant Assembly of God will host a Youth Rally at 5 p.m., Saturday, May 31. Broken Chains, a gospel group, will be leading worship. Sister Crystal Crosby will be ministering in service. If possible, please RSVP. Food will be provided afterwards. Mt. Pleasant Assembly of God is located at 1996 Mt. Pleasant Rd. Westville. For more information, or to RSVP, contact mtpleasantassembly@gmail. com or https://www.facebook. com/mt.pleasantaog. Youth RallyMt. Pleasant Assembly of God will host a Youth Rally at 5 p.m., Saturday, May 31. Broken Chains student ministry will be leading worship. Sister Crystal Crosby will be ministering the service. Food will be provided afterwards. Mt. Pleasant Assembly of God is located at 1996 Mt. Pleasant Rd., Westville, FL 32464. For more information visit http://www.facebook. com/mt.pleasantaog East Mt. Zion SingBONIFAY East Mt. Zion will hold a fth Saturday night sing at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 31. The church is located on Highway 173 north of Bonifay.Red Hill Methodist Church VBSCHIPLEY at Red Hill United Methodist Church Vacation Bible School, at 6 p.m., Wednesday, June 11 through Saturday, June 14. The theme this year is Agency D3, discover, decide, defend. Come and be a special agent to search and defend the truth about who Jesus really is. The program will consist of bible study, activities, music, food and good Fellowship. Bible school will end Saturday morning with waterslides and food. For more information call Linda Yarbrough at 334-360-08ll.First Baptist Church VBSCHIPLEY First Baptist Church of Chipley will hold Agency D3 Vacation Bible School, from 8:15 a.m. to noon, Wednesday, June 16 through Friday, June 20. While investigating at Agency D3, kids will collect and log evidence about the life of Jesus. As special agents, they will examine eyewitness reports, physical proof, and biblical accounts to uncover and defend the truth about who Jesus really is. The church is located at 1300 South Boulevard in Chipley. For more information call 638-1830 or email at of ce@ rstbaptistchipley.com.Bethany Baptist Church VBSBONIFAY Bethany Baptist Church will hold Agency D3 Vacation Bible School from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Wednesday, June 18 through Friday, June 20. Dinner will be provided for participants. Bus pick up is available if needed. The church is located at 1404 N Hwy 79 Bonifay. For more information or bus pick up call 547-9272.Grace Assembly Golf Tournament BONIFAY Grace Assembly at Chipley will host a golf tournament Saturday, June 21, at Dogwood Lakes in Bonifay. Faith EVENTSEmerald Coast Hospice hosts bereavement camp Special to ExtraEmerald Coast Hospice has announced an upcoming camp for kids who are struggling with the dif cult emotions that accompany the bereavement process. Camp I Believe is ran by clinical experts who understand the healing process. Heal, play, grow is the camps focus. This year, the camp will be held in Marianna at Blue Springs Baptist Conference Center Friday, June 6 through Sunday, June 8. Camp I Believe is for children ages seven to 14 years old who are in mourning, need love and support, need time to heal and like to laugh and play. No prior experience with a hospice organization is required, and there is no charge to attend the camp. If you are interested in attending camp, you can download an application by going to www.gentiva. com/hospice. The application can be dropped off at the Emerald Coast Hospice of ce in Marianna. For further questions, please contact Margo Lamb, Manager of Volunteer Services at 526-3577.Bonnet Pond Community Church welcomes new pastorSpecial to ExtraBonnet Pond Community Church welcomes their new pastor, Bro. Mack Glover, along with his wife Carrie and their daughter Mackenzie. Pastor Glovers rst of cial day was Mothers Day, and he and his family celebrated with the congregation, Friday, May 23, with a sh fry at the church. Bonnet Pond Community Church extends a welcome to anyone currently without a church home to come out and enjoy worship services. Sunday School starts at 10 a.m., with church services at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m., and Wednesday night services at 6:30 p.m.

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Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B5 5-3532 BID NOTICE Notice is hereby given that Holmes County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids on #57 Stone Granite Rock & Alabama Class 2 Granite Rip Rap. If interested there is a mandatory Bid meeting May 29th at 1p.m. Bid packages can be picked up & returned at theOffice of the Holmes County Board of County Commission, FEMA-ROCK BID 1 #14-06 107 E. Virginia Ave.,Bonifay, FL 32425. Bids will be accepted until 3p.m. CST on June 10, 2014. For more info contact Wendel Whitehurst a t femacoordinator@holmes countyfl.orgor (850)547-1100 ext. 230. The Board reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids in part or full, or to accept the bid the Board deems to be in the best interest of Holmes County. May 21, 28, 2014. 5-3485 NOTICE OF TAX DEED APPLICATION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That ANITA L. SAFFORD, the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 474Year of Issuance 5/31/11 Description of Property: 1314.00-001-000-019.000 SEC: 14 TWN: 05 RNG: 16 LOT 19, WRIGHTS CREEK (UNRECORDED) MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST OF THE SOUTHWEST OF SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH RANGE 16 WEST OF HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 892719 EAST FOR 662.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING,(FOR MORE LEGAL REFER TO TAX R And being further described as: Lot 19, WRIGHTS CREEK (Unrecorded) more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest corner of the Northeast of the Southwest of Section 14, Township 5 North, Range 16 West of Holmes County, Florida, thence run North 892719East for 662.26 feet to the Point of Beginning, thence continue North 892719East for 606.90 feet to the Westerly Right-of-way line of a County Graded Road, thence run North 054247West along said Right of way line for 398.19 feet, thence departing said Right of way line on a bearing of South 892719West for 563.21 feet, thence South 003505West for 398.65 feet to the Point of Beginning. Name in which assessed: ROBERTO MARTIN, GIPSY MARTIN, A RIEL MORAQUEZ Said property being in the County of Holmes, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on 6/10/14, at 11:00 A.M. DATED this 4/24/14. Kyle Hudson, Clerk of the Circuit Court Holmes County, Florida May 7,14, 21, 28, 2014. 5-3486 NOTICE OF TAX DEED APPLICATION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That ANITA L. SAFFORD, the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 656 Year of Issuance 5/31/11 Description of Property: 1407.00-001-000-015.000 SEC: 07 TWN: 04 RNG: 16 LOT 15, REEDY CREEK CROSSING, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST OF THE NORTHWEST UploadyourLegacyguestbookphotosnowforFREE!Withyourpaidobituary,familyandfriendswillnow haveunlimitedaccesstouploadedphotosfreeofcharge. FindObituaries. ShareCondolences. Inpartnershipwith. Findobituaries,sharecondolencesand celebratealifeat or Jason Bruner of Bonifay, (Smith Crossroad Community Hwy 177A) passed away Sunday, May 18, 2014, in Latte, La. He was 41. Jason was born Feb. 24, 1973 and lived all of his life in Holmes County. He loved the outdoors and enjoyed working with horses. His father, William Paul Bruner and his brother, Paul Bryan Bruner, both preceded him in death. Survivors include his mother and step father, Joy (Smith) and Jimmy Kirkland of Black, Ala., and special aunt, uncles, cousins and other extended family and friends. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Thursday, May 22, 2014, in the chapel of Sorrells Funeral Home in Geneva, Ala., with the Rev. Jerry McAdams ofciating and James Martin delivering the eulogy. Jason was buried beside his brother, Paul, in the Smith Chapel Assembly of God Church Cemetery in Holmes County with Sorrells Funeral Home and Crematory of Geneva, Ala., directing. The family received friends at the funeral home, Wednesday, May 21, 2014, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva, 334684-9999, is in charge of arrangements. Jason Bruner JASON BRUNERBeloved husband, father, grandfather, brother, cousin, and friend, Clyde Stanley went to his nal home May 19, 2014. His unfailing love and devotion to his wife of 62 years, Greta, was an example to his children and grandchildren. To his wife, he was her world; his sons and grandsons, a genius with the ability to x anything or share his knowledge on any subject; to his daughter, daughtersin-law, granddaughters, and sister, he was their hero. Clyde was born Sept. 21, 1929 in Leonia, the only son of Marcus Charles and Emma Alberta Lynn Stanley. He had two sisters Anita (Jerry) Headley, who was so much more than a sister, and Mazie (deceased 1939). Married to Greta Barrow September 1951, this union brought a legacy of love through their children and following generations. Children: Diane Green, Joseph (Linda) Stanley, Mark (Dena) Stanley; grandchildren, Shanna Green, Cory (Kim) Green, Chelsea Burlison, Amber Ebersole, Ashley (Jeff) Briggs, Brydon Stanley, April (Ray Higuera) Stanley, and Marcus Stanley; step grandchildren Kevin and Brody Woodling, nine great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. Clyde was proud to have served his country retiring with 21 years active duty in the Air Force as a C124 (Ol Shakey) ight engineer and 21 years civil service retiring from Hill AFB, UT as an aircraft maintenance supervisor. Clyde was small in stature but a GIANT in the things that matter most, his endless love of God, family, friends, fellowman, and all animals. He was honorable, just, and fair. He was a humble man, true to his southern roots, and proud of his heritage. He was a quiet, wise man of few words but could speak volumes with a hug, a smile, a twinkle in his eyes or the raise of one eye brow. He enjoyed many activities; antique cars (having rebuilt a prize winning 56 Thunderbird), NASCAR, all sports (football being top of his list), riding ATVs on dirt or the sand dunes, even at age 84. Clyde died living where and doing what he loved. He continues to live on through the hearts of those who loved him. Memorial services were held at Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church, 1985 Pleasant Ridge Rd., Leonia on Friday, May 23, 2014 at 3 p.m. with Pastor Dale Paul ofciating and services will also be held at Aarons Mortuary, 1050 So. State St., Cleareld, UT on June 4, 2014 at 4:00pm with Pastor John Parsley ofciating. Full military honors will be presented. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.daviswatkins.com. Local arrangements are under the direction of DavisWatkins Funeral Home and Crematory. Clyde SStanley CLYDE SSTANLEY Clara Mae Chitty, 89, of Bonifay, died May 21, 2014. Funeral services were held May 24, 2014 at First Baptist Church. Interment will follow in the Mt. Olive Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Clara M. ChittyBarbara Dean Binkley, of Carrabelle, passed away Friday, May 16, 2014, along with her husband, Gregory Carl Binkley.Barbara Dean Binkley was born March 19, 1957 in Marion, Ala. She is preceded in death by her parents, Royce L. Grant and Marie Skinner Grant; her sister, Helen Harielson, and her grandson Grant Waring Reed. Survivors include her children, Kristy Jenkins Reed and anc Taylor Barbaree of Dothan, Ala., Henry Hauenstein of Quincy, David Hauenstein of Bonifay; her grandchildren, Jordis and Judson Reed, Gracelyn Hauenstein; her brothers and sisters, Lamar and Joann Grant of Bonifay, Lisa and Wayne Stephens of Ponce de Leon, Lynn and John Archer and Tanessa and Ricky Byrd of Ponce de Leon and numerous nieces, nephews, and friends. Flowers will be accepted or contributions can be made to the American Red Cross. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Friday, May 23, 2014 at the Ward Wilson Funeral Home Chapel. Barbara DD. Binkley Gregory Carl Binkley, of Carrabelle, passed away Friday, May 16, 2014 along with his wife, Barbara Dean Binkley. Gregory Carl Binkley was born June 11, 1952 in Louisville, Ky. He is preceded in death by his parents, John G. Binkley and Blanche Lois Nair. Survivors include his sister, Sharon (Bill) Lone, Mountville, SC; his brothers, James Binkley, SC and Ronald (Judy) Binkley, Leavenworth, IN; his best friend, Tim Murray, Carrabelle and numerous nieces, nephews, and friends. Flowers will be accepted and contributions can be made to The Wounded Warriors Project Association, Wounded Warrior Project, P.O. Box 758517, Topeka, Kansas 66675. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Friday, May 23, 2014 at the Ward Wilson Funeral Home Chapel.Gregory C. BinkleyJose Antonio Baez, 62, of Westville, died May 17, 2014. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Jose AA. Baez George Simuel Dodd, 81 of Graceville on to his Heavenly home, Sunday, May 18, 2014. Bro. George was born in Austell, Ga., on June 15, 1932 to the late Harry Lee and Mary Magdelene Smith Dodd. Retired SFC U.S. Army, Bro. George served over 20 years with two years in Korea receiving a Purple Heart and in Vietnam a Bronze Star, along with other various medals, badges and commendations. On Oct. 2, 1966 he became an Ordained Minister at Morgantown Baptist Church in Natchez, MS and was a 1972 graduate of Baptist Bible Institute (known today as the Baptist College of Florida) where he received his BA in Theology. He later received his Masters of Theology, serving churches in Mississippi and Florida. Bro. George was a member of Eastpoint Baptist Church in Apalachicola. He is predeceased by his parents, four brothers and two sisters. Bro. George is survived by his beloved wife, Gracie Dodd, Bonifay; two sons, Anthony Tony Dodd (Martha), Bonifay and Don Dodd (Colene), Richardson, Texas; daughter, Evelyn Chivers (Billy), Valdosta, Ga.; brother, James Snookie Dodd, Austell, Ga.; sister, Emma Lee, Gainesville, Ga.; six grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Tuesday, May 20, 2014 at Pleasant Grove Baptist Church with the Rev. Eddie Biss and the Rev. Jack Faircloth ofciating. Burial will follow in church cemetery with full military honors by Ft. Rucker Army Base, James & Lipford Funeral Home directing. George SS. DDodd Melissa Ann Thomas, 47, of Bonifay, died May 17, 2014. Funeral services were held May 21, 2014, at Church of God of Prophecy. Interment followed at Bonifay Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing. Melissa AA. TThomas Yvonne Whitaker, 69, of Bonifay, died May 14, 2014. Memorialization was by cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. YY vonne Whitaker ObituariesMalvin Donald Corbin, 63 of Chipley, passed from this life on May 18, 2014. Malvin was born Dec. 25, 1950 in Apalachicola, to Clarence and Ida (Morris) Corbin. He was a 1969 graduate of Cottondale High School and served in the United States Army. He owned and operated M&L Produce as well as Corbin Packing, and was a member of White Pond Baptist Church in Alford. He is preceded in death by his parents, Clarence and Ida Corbin. He is survived by his loving wife of 44 years, Elizabeth Kent Corbin of Chipley; son, Chad Corbin and wife Yarah of Chipley; daughter, Tracy Zick and husband William of Cottondale; brother, Buel Corbin of Westville; sister, Myrtice Lawrence of Cottondale and four grandchildren, Gracie Zick, Cooper Corbin, Mia Corbin, Bryson Corbin. Funeral services were held at 1p.m. Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at Cypress Creek Community Church in Alford with the Rev. Donnie Chancellor and Chad Corbin ofciating. The family received friends from 6-8 p.m., Tuesday, May 20, 2014 at Cypress Creek Community Church. Interment followed in Rockhill Church cemetery in Chipley. With Obert Funeral Home of Chipley directing. Malvin DD. Corbin Crossword SOLUTSOLUTIONON

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B6| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, May 28, 2014 B USINESS G UIDE THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5$25.68 5x10$35.31 10x10$46.01 10x20$80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted MMitchs CollisionQuality Collision Repair Automotive Renishing326-4104Mitch Gainer, Owner mitch_gainer@att.net 335 Alford Road Cottondale Three Chicks Cleaning Free Quotes Experienced References Available Flexible Hours (M-F) (850) 956-2408 Cell (850) 768-0022 HOLMES UNLIMITEDTREE SERVICETreats Trees Trimming Stump GrindingNo One Can Beat Our PricesLicensed & Insured Free EstimatesJohn Holmes (850) 326-5351 (850) 428-9264 Great Rate Tree ServiceHazardous Tree Removal Stump Grinding/Removal Aerial Bucket Work Trimming/Pruning Bobcat Work Small Tract Land Clearing Adam Williams Owner/Operator850-768-1734 Easy Care Lawn & Tractor Service Tree ServiceLawn Care Debris Removal Tractor and Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825 Advertise your service or business for as little as $10 a week.Ad runs in the Washington County News, Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser638-0212 Advertise your service or business for as little as $10 a week.Ad runs in the Washington County News, Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser638-0212 HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 20 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!638-3611HVAC Services Coolers & Freezers Service on all Makes & Models Heat Pumps, Electric & Gas Electrical Services Exterior Elevated Lighting & WiringResidential and Commerical 5020871 OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST OF HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN S89E FOR 1292.03 FEET; THENCE RUN S84E FOR (FOR MORE LEGAL REFER TO TAX R And being further described as: LOT 15, Reedy Creek Crossing, more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southeast corner of the Northwest of the Northwest of Section 7, Township 4 North, Range 16 West of Holmes County, Florida; thence run S89E for 1292.03 feet; thence run S84E for 1129.88 feet, thence run S89E for 818.84 feet to the Point of Beginning, thence run S49E for 454.71 feet, thence S21W for 716.77 feet, thence N89W for 154.02 feet, thence N01W for 913.48 feet to the Southerly Right of way line of a proposed road, thence N64E along said Right of way line for 111.03 feet to the Point of Beginning Name in which assessed: TADEUSAS TOMASEVICIUS, GINTAS BUTKEVICIUS Said property being in the County of Holmes, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on 6/10/14, at 11:00 A.M. DATED this 4/24/14. Kyle Hudson, Clerk of the Circuit Court Holmes County, Florida May 7,14,21,28, 2014 5-3531 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 13000189CAAXMX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. ALFRED L. VETZEL, JR.; BOBBIE D. VETZEL; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 13, 2014, and entered in Case No. 13000189CAAXMX, of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for HOLMES County, Florida, wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and ALFRED L. VETZEL, JR.; BOBBIE D. VETZEL; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE HOLMES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at 201 NORTH OKLAHOMA STREET, BONIFAY in HOLMES County, FLORIDA 32425, at 11:00 A.M., on the 19th day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST AND THENCE RUN N 89W ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION FOR 512.73 FEET TO THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY OF COUNTY ROAD #181, THENCE RUN N 56 W ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY FOR 220.07 FEET TO A POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE N 56W ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY FOR 179.80 FEET, THENCE RUN N 13E FOR 171.02 FEET, THENCE RUN S 67E FOR 205.41 FEET, THENCE RUN S 23W FOR 202.78 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 15th day of May, 2014. KYLE HUDSON As Clerk of said Court By Diane Eaton As Deputy Clerk This Notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486 Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com File No.: 13-01196 JPC May 21, 28, 2014. 5-3533 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 30-2013-CA-000311 REVERSE MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS INC., Plaintiff vs. HOWARD CURRY, HOLMES COUNTY WEST FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HOWARD CURRY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed on or about May 12, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 30-2013-CA-000311 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Bonifay, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Holmes County Courthouse, 201 North Oklahoma, Bonifay, FL. 32425, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 19 day of June, 2014, at 11:00 AM, on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot No. 2, beginning at the Southeast corner of Lot No. 1 and running West to L and N Railroad right-of-way; thence Southwest along said right-of-way 50 yards; thence East to line dividing the Northeast and the Northwest of the Southeast of Section 8, Township 4 North Range 16 West, Holmes County, Florida; thence North to the Point of Beginning; all lying and being in Section 8, township 4 North, Range 16 West, Holmes County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 16 day of May, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk May 21 and 28, 2014 5-3536 ATTENTION RENTERS The Northwest Florida Regional Housing Authority is now accepting applications for its Public Housing units in Bonifay, FL. Applications are being accepted for 1, 2, 3 and 4 bedroom apartments. For additional information, call 1-800-365-9527 ext 5302 or 5307. Equal Housing Opportunity. May 28, June 4, 11, 2014. 5-3523 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 302012CA000331CAAXM X BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. DEBRAJEAN FOSTER F/K/ADEBRAJ. SHANKS A/K/ADEBBIE SHANKS A/K/A DEBRAJ. FOSTER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: JOHN W. WILLIAMS, PAULINE WILLIAMS and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF EVELYN DAVIDSON whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in HOLMES County, Florida: APARCELOF LAND LYING IN THE NORTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP6 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING ATA 4 SQUARE CONCRETE MONUMENT ATTHE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP6 SOUTH, RANGE 14 WEST; THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 27 EASTALONG THE NORTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17, (THE NORTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17 IS ASSUMED TO BEAR SOUTH 88 DEGREES 27 EAST AND ALLBEARINGS ARE RELATIVE). A DISTANCE OF 1357.04 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 32 WESTALONG ALINE PERPENDICULAR TO THE NORTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17, ADISTANCE OF 3495.41 FEETTO THE POINTOF INTERSECTION OF ACURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, SAID CURVE BEING THE SOUTH LINE OF HIGHWAY160, A 100.00 FOOTRIGHT OF WAY, AS LAID OUTAND IN USE, WITH WESTLINE OF THE NORTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17, SAID POINTALSO BEING THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY 211.39 FEETALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 1960.08 FEET, ACENTRAL ANGLE OF 6 DEGREES 10 AND A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF NORTH 84 DEGREES 56 EAST, 211.29 FEETTO THE INTERSECTION WITH A PARALLELLINE 210.00 FEETEAST OF, AS MEASURED AT90 DEGREES 00 TO THE WEST LINE OF THE NORTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17; THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 17 WESTALONG SAID PARALLELLINE 210.00 FEETEAST OF, AS MEASURED AT90 DEGREES 00 TO THE WEST LINE OF THE NORTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17, A DISTANCE OF 397.79 FEETTO THE INTERSECTION WITH A PARALLELLINE 70.00 FEETNORTH OF, AS MEASURED AT90 DEGREES 00 TO THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17, ADISTANCE OF 105.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 17 WEST, ADISTANCE OF 70.00TO THE INTERSECTION WITH SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 18 WESTALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17; ADISTANCE OF 315.00 FEETTO THE SOUTHWESTCORNER OF THE NORTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 17 EASTALONG THE WESTLINE OF THE NORTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17, ADISTANCE OF 443.01 FEETTO THE PONTOF BEGINNING. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on TRIPPSCOTT, P.A., the Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 110 S.E. 6th Street, 15th Floor, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301, on or before June 21, 2014, (no later than 30 days from the date of the first publication of this Notice of Action) and file this original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at Holmes County, Florida, this 2nd day of April, 2014. KYLE HUDSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT BY: Diane Eaton TRIPPSCOTT, P.A. ATTN: FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 110 S.E. 6th STREET, 15TH FLOOR FORTLAUDERDALE, FL33301 foreclosures@trippscott.co m May 21, 28, 2014. 6-3548 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 13000149CA CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. ALLEN JOHN QUICK, SR. AND THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,, et. al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 6, 2014, and entered in 13000149CA of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Florida, wherein CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY is the Plaintiff and THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF ALLEN JOHN QUICK, SR., DECEASED; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; ALLEN J. QUICK, JR.; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s). Cody Taylor as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door 201 N. Oklahoma St., Bonifay, 32425, at 11:00 AM, on June 26, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE S.W. CORNER OF THE S.W. 1/4 OF N.E. 1/4 OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST; THENCE GO SOUTH 87 DEG. 47 00 EAST, 210 FEET; THENCE NORTH 02 DEG. 58 05 EAST 20 FEET FOR POINT OF BEGINNIG; THENCE GO SOUTH 87 DEG. 47 00 EAST, 122.63 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 02 DEG. 13 EAST, 131.0 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 87 DEG. 47 00 WEST 120.91 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 02 DEG. 58 05 WEST 131.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, BEING IDENTIFIED AS BLOCK B, LOT 1, OF AN UNRECORDED SURVEY, ALL LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 22 day of May, 2014. Kyle Hudson As Clerk of the Court By: Diane Eaton As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402, Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717, Hearing Impaired: Dial 711, Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcour ts.org Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Telephone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 RAS 13-03578 May 28, June 4, 2014. 6-3531 Notice Waddell Plantation, Inc. dba Royal American Construction Group hereby gives notice of completion of contract with the City of Bonifay, FL for Bonifay Infrastructure Improvements, Phase 2. All claims in connection with this project should be made during this time with the Engineer: Hatch Mott MacDonald, 11-C West 23rd Street, Panama City, FL 32405 May 21, 28, June 4, 11, 2014. 6-3541 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY CASE NO.: 2014CA13 HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking Corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, A Florida Banking Corporation, Plaintiff, vs CHARLES MICHAEL ANDREWS a/k/a CHARLES M. ANDREWS, CECILIA W. COOK and CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Holmes County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on June 19, 2014, at 11:00 am Central Time at the front door of the Holmes County Courthouse, at 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Holmes County, Florida, to-wit: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN SOUTH 630.00 FEET ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SOUTHEAST QUARTER TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE EAST 315 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 345 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 315 FEET TO SAID WEST LINE, THENCE RUN NORTH 345.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with 2003 WAYCR VIN# WHC012984GAA and VIN# WHC012984GAB(the Property). Commonly known as 1280 S. Weeks Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425-3280. This Notice dated this 16th day of May, 2014. Clerk of Circuit Court By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk cc:Denise H. Rowan, Esq. dhr@mccallaraymer.com jkb@mccallaraymer.com P.O. Box 15758 Panama City, FL 32406 Holmes County Times btaylor@chipleypaper.co m Attn: Legal Dept. Box 67 Bonifay, FL 32425-0067 May 28, June 4, 2014. 6-3543 PUBLIC SALE Tharp & Sons Mini Storage in Chipley, Fl. will hold a sale for these units for non-payment of rent in accordance with the FL Statute Act 83-801-83-809. Tenants will have until June 16, 2014 to pay in full. NO CHECKS.. 1.William Patrick-Bonifay, FL 2. Ashley Sullivan-Bonifay, FL 3. Danyele Martin-Bonifay, FL 4. Sarah Davis-Bonifay, FL 5. Unknown May 28, June 4, 2014. ADOPTION: ACreative Financially Secure Family, Music, LOVE, Laughter awaits 1st baby Trish. 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Are you pregnant? A childless loving married couple seeks to adopt. Will be hand on mom/dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592. Adam Sklar #0150789 Are you pregnant? Considering adoption? A childless, caring and loving, married couple seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON mom and devoted dad. Financial security and emotional stability. All expenses paid. Call/Text Diane & Adam 1-800-790-5260. FBN 0150789. For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8:00am-4:00pm. Call (850)638-1483

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Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 EMPLOYMENT TODAY!!! 1123147ClassACDLDriversNeededImmediatelyDumpTrailer Experience. $1000SignOn RetentionBonus Walton/Bay/ WashingtonCounties PanamaCityArea *HomeNightsApplyonline:www.perdidotrucking.com 1653MapleAvenuePanamaCity,Florida 32405 850-784-7940 We bI D#: 34284633 1124935TheHolmesCountyBoardofCountyCommissionersiscurrentlyaccepting applicationsforthefulltimepositionof EmergencyManagementDirector ForapplicationcontactSherrySnellin theHolmesCountyCommissioner's ofceat850-547-1119.Pleaseturnin completedapplicationstotheCounty Commissioner'sofcelocatedat107E VirginiaAve,Bonifay,FL32425,nolater than2:00pmonJune6,2014.Holmes CountyisaDrug-FreeWorkplaceand EqualOpportunityEmployer. WebID#:34289685 1125495 MedicalAssistantNeededforbusy medicalpractice. Faxresumeto 904-212-1773 112316025DRIVERTRAINEES NEEDEDNOW!Learntodrivefor WernerEnterprises!Earn$800perweek!Noexperienceneeded!LocalCDLTraining JobReadyin15days.1-888-379-3546WebID34284625 1122190TheTownofPoncedeLeon iscurrentlytakingapplicationsforthe positionof VolunteerFireChief. Thison-callpositionrequiresahigh energy,self-motivated,positiveattitude individual.Candidatemusthavepossession ofaFloridaFireghter1Certicateof Competencyandavaliddriver'slicense. Mustpassrandomdrugtestandcriminal backgroundcheck.Payis$125amonth. Applicationswillbeaccepteduntil4PMon June11,2014.Applicationscanbeturned intotheTownHallduringnormalbusiness hours,emailtotownpdl@gmail.comormail toPOBox214,PoncedeLeon,FL32455 1125204TheHolmesCountyBoardofCounty Commissionersiscurrentlyaccepting applicationsforthefulltimepositionof Litter/RecyclingTechnician ForapplicationcontactSherrySnellin theHolmesCountyComm-issioner's ofceat850-547-1119.Pleaseturnin completedapplicationstotheCounty Commissioner'sofcelocatedat107E VirginiaAve,Bonifay,FL32425,nolater than3:00pmonJune11,2014.Holmes CountyisaDrug-FreeWork-placeand EqualOpportunityEmployer. 1125202JobOpportunity:DeputyClerk,CityofVernon,FL Applicationscanbepickedupfrom Ve rn on Cit yH al ll ocat ed at 28 08 Ye ll ow Ja ck et Dr Resumeswillnotbeaccepted inlieuofapplications. TheCityofVernonisadrug-freeworkplace.Apreemploymentdrugscreen,criminalhistorybackground investigationandadriver'slicensevericationwillbe conducted. EQUALOPPORTUNITYEMPLOYER ApplicationDeadline:June2,2014at4pm. Rateofpayforthisposition: DependingonQualications 1124950Nowtakingapplicationsfor new KFC inCallaway. Applyat jobs.kfc.com or faxresumeto 334-702-0302 WebID34289468 TextFL89468to56654 ShiftManagers &TeamMembers 1125201 NursePractitionerorPAWantedforbusyfamily practice.Benetsavail.Send resumetoBlindBox3611co TheNewsHerald,P.O.Box 1940,PanamaCityFL32402 1125203JobOpportunity:LaborerCityofVernon,FLApplicationscanbepickedupfrom VernonCityHalllocatedat2808YellowJacket Dr.Resumeswillnotbeaccepted inlieuofapplications. TheCityofVernonisadrug-freeworkplace.A pre-employmentdrugscr een,criminalhistory backgroundinvestigationandadriver'slicense vericationwillbeconducted. EQUALOPPORTUNITYEMPLOYER ApplicationDeadline:June2,2014at4pm. Rateofpayforthisposition: DependingonQualications 1125227CHIPOLACOLLEGEisacceptingapplicationsforthefollowingfull-timepositions:ACCOUNTANT ASSESSMENTCENTERMANAGER(PublicService Program) DIRECTORofASSESSMENT,COMPLIANCE&GRANTS PROGRAMMANAGERforEMERGENCYMEDICALSVCS (EMS)PROGRAM INSTRUCTORofCOMPUTERSCIENCE INSTRUCTORofNURSING(DNP) INSTRUCTORofWELDINGPositionandapplicationinformationareavailableat www.chipola.edu/personnel/jobs.InquiriesmaybedirectedtoHumanResourcesat pippenw@chipola.eduor(850)718-2269.Candidatesmaybesubjecttobackgroundinvestigations. EQUALOPPORTUNITYEMPLOYER 1125221 NursePractitionerpositionavailableforbusyinternal medicinepractice.Onlyexperienced needapply.PleaseincludeCVand references.Sendresumesto BlindBox3618c/oTheNewsHerald, P.O.Box1940,PanamaCity,FL32402 HVACREFRIGERATIONMECHANIC (2positions)Withbenefits.5years documentedexper.inthefield. ToApply,goto:www.bay.k12.fl.us, EmploymentOpportunities,Support. Foradditionalassistance call850-767-4231. Deadlinetoapplyis: 4:30pmon5/26/2014 WebID#:342895651124951Janelle Rodabaugh 850-747-5013 or jrodabaugh@pcnh.com Jessica Branda 850-747-5019 or jbranda@pcnh.com Contact Us Directly For All Of Your Recruitment Needs! 1124913PilotSeekingCommercial,MELPilotwith militaryghterexperienceto SupportAirForceyingcontract. SendresumestoBlindBox3389 c/oTheNewsHerald,P.O.Box1940, PanamaCity,FL32402 WebID#:34283286 TRUCK DRIVER NEEDEDClassBCDLRequired RollOff/KnuckleBoom Experienceaplus. Local Emailresumeto:heather@emeraldcoastrecycling.comDFWP 1125470 Bldg/Const/Skill Job Opportunity:LaborerCity of Vernon, FL Applications can be picked up from Vernon City Hall located at 2808 Yellow Jacket Dr. Resumes will not be accepted in lieu of applications. The City of Vernon is a drug-free workplace. A pre-employment drug screen, criminal history background investigation and a drivers license verification will be conducted. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER Application Deadline: June 2, 2014 at 4pm. Rate of pay for this position: Depending on Qualifications Web Id 34289967 Auction-Waterfront Home, Lake Eufaula, 217 Cypress Cove Drive, Eufaula, Al, 5 Bedroom-4Bath, Executive, Great views. June 10, 1:00pm. Details, pictures GTAuc tions.com, 205.326. 0833 Granger, Thagard & Assoc, Inc. Jack F Granger, #873 Ceramic Kiln, molds, pouring table, alot of accessories, bulbs & lights for Christmas trees, many containers of paint!. 547-5244. Looking for maid for house cleaning, washing clothes, odd jobs around the house, cooking. 850-388-2061. Hospitality Night Auditor front desk. Apply at Chipley Days Inn Express. No phone calls. General Cable Manufacturing Business needs 1 person for various duties, including cable assembly. Starts off part-time, may go to full-time. Call Ezy Glide at 638-4403 for appointment. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Install/Maint/RepairHVAC Service Techswith experience. Now taking applications. 850-638-3611 Web Id 34288421 Other The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for the full time position ofEmergency Management DirectorFor application contact Sherry Snell in the Holmes County Commissioners office at 850-547-1119. Please turn in completed applications to the County Commissioners office located at 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, no later than 2:00 pm on June 6, 2014. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID#: 34289685 Other The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for the full time position ofLitter/Recycling TechnicianFor application contact Sherry Snell in the Holmes County Commissioners office at 850-547-1119. Please turn in completed applications to the County Commissioners office located at 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, no later than 3:00 pm on June 11, 2014. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID#: 34289968 Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com EOE Experienced Team, Solo, Recent Grad & Student Drivers needed for dedicated run in your area! Ask about our sign-on bonus and guaranteed hometime! Call 866-414-3402 TRAIN FROM HOM E MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASST CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Office BuildingFor Lease: 514 Florida Ave Space is plumbed for a medical/dental office but can be used for a variety of business types. Apprx. 2,184SF. Call For Details (850) 896-0609 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1 Bedroom Apartment, in Chipley, covenant location, no pets. 638-4640. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio And 2 bdrm $375-$500 Includes City Utilities (850)557-7732 House For Rent 2BR/1BA, Aproxx. 1500 sq ft 4 1/2 ies east of Chipley McDonalds. stove, fridge, DW, lawn maintenance, water and pest control included. Application required. No smoking. $625/month plus, $625/Deposit. 850-638-4228. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO and up. Includes Garbage, sewage, and lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 3BR/2BA Mobile Home in Chipley 1 Block to elementary school. WD hookup, CHA. No pets. $475.00/mth+deposit. 850-763-3320 or 352-284-2338. 3BR/2BA MH for rent in Chipley Area. Not far from town. $525.00 to $650.00. 850-638-8570 or 850-258-1594. NO PETS. Mobile Homes for rent in Chipley and Bonifay. Water and sewage included. Lease required. 850-638-2999. For Rent. Nice, almost new doublewide. 3/BR, 2 full baths, walk in closet & more. In a quiet secluded area just off Corbin Rd on Rudd Rd. Sorry no pets. Day phone, 8am-5pm, 638-4630, Night phone, 638-1434. Mobile Home for rent. South of Bonifay in Washington County. 3BR/2BA Doublewide. $600.00 per mo, $600.00 security deposit. Call Progressive Realty, 638-8220. Mobile Homes For Rent 2 and 3 Bedrooms in Cottondale, Central Heat and Air. $400 -$500 a month. 850-258-1594 or 850-638-8570. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. Property For Sale in Esto. Next to City Hall. 210-260-7381. Commercial and residential lots. Western NC New cabin on 2.51ac. w/2bdr, loft, large deck, covered porch, fpl, minutes from the lake $139,900. Call 828-2861666 Harley Sportster, 1993. Black, runs good, belt drive, spoke wheels. $4,200.00. 547-5244 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Spot Advertising works!

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50¢ www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM imes imes imes T dvertiser imes imes imes imes T T dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser A HOLMES COUNTY VO TE NO W THR OUGH JUNE 4 GO TO BONIF AY NO W. CO M TO P THREE WINNERS WILL BE CHOSEN Vo te fo r yo ur fa vo rit e businesses people re staur an ts and other ca te gories fo r the 2014 Reader ’s Ch oic e “B est of Tr iCo un ty ” WA SHINGT ON I HOLMES I JA CKSON TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y TRI -C OUNT Y 2014 READER ’S CHOICE INDEX Opinion ................................ A4 Sports .................................. A7 Extra .................................... B1 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ......................... B6-8 IN BRIEF PSHS advisory meeting POPLAR SPRINGS — Poplar Springs High School will hold a school advisory meeting at 3 p.m. today, May 28, in the school’s media center. Community Baby Shower MARIANNA — Chipola Healthy Start will host a community baby shower from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, May 30, at the Jackson County Agricultural Center. Open to anyone who is pregnant or who has children less than three years of age. Lunch, prizes, games and more will be provided. Call 482-1236 or 866-591-2852. Council on Aging health fair BONIFAY — Holmes County Council on Aging will host their annual health fair for the senior citizens of Holmes County at 10 a.m. May 30 at the National Guard Armory in Bonifay. Call 547-2345. Relay For Life Wrap-Up Party CHIPLEY — Relay For Life of Holmes and Washington County will have its 2014 Wrap-Up Party at 6 p.m. Monday, June 2, at Pattillo’s restaurant, located on the campus of the WashingtonHolmes Technical Center. Call Connie Smelcer at 703-9977. By CECILIA SPEARS 658-4038 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY — Holmes County District School Board approved of Superintendent Eddie Dixon’s personnel recommendation to rehire the entirety of last year’s teaching staff for the upcoming school year during their regularly scheduled meeting on May 20 with a vote of 4 to 1, with School Board member Debbie Kolmetz voting “no.” • Board approved of Overnight/ Out-of-State trip for Ponce de Leon High School’s Future Business Leaders of America to attend the National Leadership Conference in Nashville, Tennessee on June 28 through July 3. • Board approved of Consent Agenda, pulling the minutes from the previous meeting at the request of Kolmetz, with approval pending if the statement “Superintendent Dixon will continue to make the decision on the agenda format” is veri ed on the audio recording of that evening’s meeting; otherwise it will be stricken from the minutes. Area students proactive in ght against bullying By CAROL KENT 638-0212 | WCN_HCT Ckent@chipleypaper.com The school year is coming to an end in Holmes and Washington counties, but local students and of cials say they will continue to step up efforts to combat bullying beyond the spanse of the academic year. “Cyber bullying is one of the most dif cult issues we deal with in the schools today,” said Holmes County Superintendent of Schools Eddie Dixon. “It can occur anywhere and at any time of day. Our teachers and administrators are continuously reminded of the dangers of cyber bullying in an effort to keep all Holmes County students.” Holmes County schools have begun reserving a week in the Spring to show age appropriate videos to all students and teachers about the dangers of cyber bullying. “This week is promoted on our website and on posters in the schools,” he said. “(Bullying) is also addressed in our policies, code of conduct book, website, and personnel handbook. We have an anonymous online form available to report bullying and cyber bullying and tips available for students and parents on how to handle and prevent all forms of bullying.” Holmes County schools have also teamed up with the Holmes County Sheriff’s Of ce in preventing cyber bullying, which hosted a student created video contest initiated by School Resource Of cer Greg Johnson. “Our students were very creative in conveying a positive message preventing cyber bullying,” said Dixon. Holmes County Sheriff Tim Brown says prevention and education is a key priority for his of ce. “The Legislature has addressed cyber bullying and is awaiting the vote for the law to pass,” said Brown. “The impact of bullying has been well documented, and studies have shown that dif culty making friends, loneliness, low self-esteem, depression, poor academic achievement, and truancy are all associated with being bullied. We must instill in our youth the ideals of civility and respect, and we must create environments that prevent bullying where our children live, learn and play.” Washington County Sheriff Bobby Haddock shares Brown’s concerns and has also worked with the Washington County School District to provide education about the issue. Haddock says a key component of the success to any anti-bullying campaign is parental involvement, however. “We have to start education at home,” said Haddock. “We need to teach our children that we are all different, and that’s the way God intended it — but we always need to Use of food stamps rises Special to the Times-Advertiser The use of food stamps in Holmes County increased during the recession, assisting families in stretching their food dollars, contributing to local spending and helping spark a national debate about the future of the federal nutrition program. The proportion of Holmes County residents receiving food stamps hit 27.0 percent in 2011, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Services. That’s an increase of 12.5 percentage points since 2007, the year the recession started. Across Florida, 17.2 percent of residents in 2011 received support from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, as the food stamp program is of cially known. Nationally, 14.8 percent of the population receives SNAP bene ts. Places like Holmes County, which are located outside metropolitan areas, tend to have a higher percentage of the population receiving SNAP bene ts. That’s because incomes are generally lower in nonmetropolitan counties. The in ation-adjusted median household income in Holmes County in 2011 was $34,397, compared to the Florida median of $45,830 and the national median of $52,306 (in 2013 dollars). Food stamps may play a larger role in the local economy in rural areas and small towns, according to federal data. In Holmes County SNAP Phone: 850-547-9414 Website: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 School board approves rehires CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser Holmes County District School Board held a short workshop before their regular scheduled meeting on May 20 to discuss items such as the agenda format and online publication. See REHIRES A2 See FOOD A2 Wednesday, MAY 28 2014 Volume 124, Number 7 Meet the Holmes County Class of 2014 | INSIDE Bethlehem High School Chipley High School Cottondale High School Grace & Glory Christian School Graceville High School Presenting the Graduates of 2014 Bethlehem High School Chipley High School Cottondale High School Grace & Glory Christian School Graceville High School Presenting the Graduates of 2014 May 28, 2014 I Washington County News I Holmes County Times-Advertiser Holmes County High School Ponce de Leon High School Poplar Springs High School Vernon High School Washington County Christian School HYPER BULLY DEFENSE SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Christopher Golden is among area students pledging to help stop bullying. Golden signed the “Hyper Bully Defense Pledge” as a student at Trinity Martial Arts in Chipley. See BULLYING A2 “We need to teach our children that we are all different, and that’s the way God intended it — but we always need to provide as much education as possible through our school system and teach students to stand up and say no to bullying.” — Washington County Sheriff Bobby Haddock

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Local A2 | Washington County News Wednesday, May 28, 2014 provide as much education as possible through our school system and teach students to stand up and say no to bullying.” Students in Roulhac Middle School’s 6th grad Critical Thinking Skills Classes are ahead of the game in that department. The students launched their own anti-bullying cam paign, showing a video and providing education mate rial for other students. Washington County School Superintendent Jo seph Taylor says districts are monitored by the De partment of Education for bullying. “We just had a monitor ing session on-site with a representative from the de partment to make sure that we are following law and to ensure that we have mech anisms in place for report ing and procedures to han dle any and all allegations of bullying,” said Taylor. “As a district, we take bul lying allegations seriously and want to make sure all schools are safe for every one. During the monitoring on May 22, the representa tive was very impressed by the safeguards and pro cedures that we have in place.” “We are continuing to improve and implement safe procedures for our students and staff. When we do not have on-site re views, we do self monitoring each school year. If we have bullying cases, they are re ported to the state through the School Environmental Safety Incident Reporting (SESIR) System.” Not just school systems and law enforcement are taking a stand. Other or ganizations, like Trinity Martial Arts in Chipley, are being proactive in the ght against bullying, too. TMA students recently signed the “Hyper Bully Defense Pledge” to do their best on a personal level to stop bullying when they see it happening. School owner and Head Instructor Jason Smith says nearly all of those en rolled took the pledge. “It’s a good thing to train them early in both right and wrong and compassion,” said Smith. A bill intended to make bullying punishable by up to one year in jail was ap proved by a state Senate committee last month but died in the Criminal Jus tice Subcommittee on May 2. Some legislators have vowed to keep working on anti-bullying legislation similar passed. a V ]LUG R9 f } M^U B ] VW ]I[ BB bLUU B[\ bLQQ ;B =IV \BU GV ] V ;V ULD 9 fU V b ‘= VR V[ =I LWQBf W 9WB[ ‘= VR 9U? =QL =O VU ]IB ;B\] VD ][L =V^ U]f Q VGV ] V R9 OB f V^[ UVR LU 9 ]LVU \‘ [ B 9 ? 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')$ '(% %$ '(% /%%,* % +% ".,# • Board approved of 2014-2015 VPK Provider Agreement with Early Learning Coalition. • Kolmetz requested an up date on the on the progress of replacing the lights at Ponce de Leon High School’s parking lot, which Dixon said they are in pro cess of replacing the bulbs. • Kolmetz also requested that the light in the Ponce de Leon High School’s sign be xed. • Kolmetz requested that the timer on the snack machine be xed so that the students cannot purchase snacks during lunch time. • Kolmetz informed the Board that Washington-Holmes Techni cal Center had over 300 students recently complete their studies. • Kolmetz also informed the Board that Wausau held a Veter ans’ program recently where the Bethlehem High School Culinary Academy provided a meal to the visiting veterans. “Now is a good time to be a student in Holmes County,” said Chair Rusty Williams. “We’ve got so many talented students and teachers. Our students are going to go far.” During the previous meeting on May 6, Kolmetz once again mo tioned to place audio recordings of the Board meetings on the district website, which died due to lack of a second, which makes the third time Kolmetz’ request for audio recordings on the district website has died without a second. Kolmetz also moved to change the agenda format and list un nished or new business on the agenda, which was passed and after discussion Kolmetz amend ed her motion to request the su perintendent to place unnished or new business on the agenda, which passed. The next regularly scheduled meeting of the Holmes County District School Board is set for 9 a.m. on June 3. REHIRES from page A1 benets are 1.1 percent of per sonal income. Nationally, the g ure is 0.6 percent. In 2011, residents of Holmes County received a combined $8,040,242 in SNAP benets. The USDA reports that each $5 in SNAP benets generates $9.20 in spending. Places like Washington Coun ty, which are located outside metropolitan areas, tend to have a higher percentage of the popu lation receiving SNAP benets. That’s because incomes are gen erally lower in nonmetropolitan counties. The ination-adjusted median household income in Washington County in 2011 was $36,254, com pared to the Florida median of $45,830 and the national median of $52,306 (in 2013 dollars). Food stamps may play a larger role in the local economy in rural areas and small towns, according to federal data. In Washington County SNAP benets are 1.1 percent of personal income. Na tionally, the gure is 0.6 percent. In 2011, residents of Washing ton County received a combined $7,388,779 in SNAP benets. The USDA reports that each $5 in SNAP benets generates $9.20 in spending. SNAP benets start to circu late in the economy quickly. Par ticipants spend nearly all their food stamps within one month of receipt, according to a study by the University of New Hampshire Carsey Institute. Grocers say they feel the im pact of SNAP and other USDA nutrition programs like Women, Infants and Children (WIC). “Without SNAP and WIC, we wouldn’t be able to make it,” wrote the owner of the Mill City Market in the small town of Mill City, Ore., in a survey of rural grocers conducted by the Oregon Food Bank and Kansas State Uni versity Rural Grocery Initiative. Owners know they have to stock the shelves to prepare for more business when SNAP ben ets hit the streets, said David Procter with the Rural Grocery Initiative It’s not just the mom-and-pop stores that see a bump from foodstamp spending in small towns and rural areas. Walmart re ported in a recent Securities and Exchange Commission ling that a decrease in SNAP benets last year could affect the retail giant’s bottom line. Average SNAP benets na tionally fell about $30 a month per family in November after a tem porary increase that was part of the 2009 economic stimulus pack age. More funding decreases are on the way. This summer, Congress agreed to trim about $8 billion from SNAP over the next decade. Backers of the cuts said the pro gram had expanded too much in recent years and was creating too much reliance on government assistance. SNAP expenditures increased 135 percent between 2007 and 2011. U.S. Rep. Eric Cantor (Va.-R) backed a measure that would have removed SNAP from the farm bill entirely. “While [SNAP] is an impor tant part of our safety net, our overriding goal should be to help our citizens with the education and skills they need to get back on their feet so that they can provide for themselves and their families,” Rep. Cantor said dur ing congressional debate. Food stamps have been part of the farm bill for the past 50 years. The legislation’s combination of farming and nutrition programs has helped ensure the bill re ceives broad backing from farmcountry representatives and more urban-based members who support anti-poverty programs. That alliance was tested but held with the passage of the 2014 farm bill. Data for this article came from USDA Food and Nutrition Services, the Bureau of Econom ic Analysis and the U.S. Census. The data was compiled and analyzed by Roberto Gallardo, Ph.D., associate Extension pro fessor with the Mississippi State University Extension Service. Funding for this report came from the W.K. Kellogg Founda tion and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. The Daily Yonder (www.dailyyonder.com) is an independent rural news site published by the nonprot, nonpartisan Center for Rural Strategies. FOOD from page A1 BULLYING from page A1 “It’s a good thing to train them early in both right and wrong and compassion.” Jason Smith, Head Start owner/instructor

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 Wednesday, May 28, 2014 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our polic y that the patient and an y other per son r esponsib le f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimb ur sed b y pa yment or an y other ser vice e x amination or tr eatment which is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hour s of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee discount ed f ee or r educed f ee ser vice e x amination or tr eatment. "WE WELCOME NEW P A TIENTS, CALL TODA Y FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW P A TIENTS 59 AND OLDER This cer tif icat e is good f or a complet e Medical Ey e Ex am with T odd R obinson, M.D In Our Chiple y Of f ice Boar d C er tif ied Ey e Ph y sician and Sur geon. The e x am includes a pr escr iption f or e y e glasses and t ests f or Glaucoma, C at ar acts and other e y e diseases FOR Y OUR APPOINTMENT C ALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILI TY : U .S Citiz ens living in the Flor ida P anhandle 59 y ear s and older not pr esentl y under our car e C oupon Expir es: 6-1 5-1 4 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: WC00 S m ar t Le ns es SM C an pr oduce clear vision without glasses at all dist ances ww w .m ulli se y e .co m MULLIS EYE INSTITUTE Chiple y Of f ice 1 691 Main St., St e 1 Chiple y FL 32428 850-638-7220 W e ar e locat ed dir ectl y acr oss the par king lot fr om the W almar t in Chiple y T odd R obinson, M.D Boar d C er tif ied Ey e Ph y sician and C at ar act Sur geon Call or go online to request a quote today! Don’t Let This Happen to Yo u Fa lling trees and limbs can cause major damage to your property Protect your assets by calling the experts at CS I. ! J D O W E N S I NC C A R PE T & C E R A M I C O U T L E T Y O U R H OM E TO WN L O W P R I CE C A R P E T C E R A M IC P O R C E L A I N V I N Y L T I L E L AM I NA T E HAR D W O O D & AR E A R U G S Y E S W E D O L A Y A W A Y Ik G D d D V X : Xi h :T D T e x t u r e d P l u s h C a r p e t .......................................................... 75 ¢ / S F L o o s e L a y V i n y l ..................................................................... 6 9 ¢/ S F S u p e r T h i c k L o o s e L a y V i n y l ............................................... 9 9 ¢/ S F 1 2 X 9 6 12 X 12 12 X 12 12 X 12 3 12 X 13 7 12 X 13 1 2 X 1 4 12 X 15 4 1 2 X 1 6 3 1 2 X 1 8 5 1 2 X 1 9 3 1 2 X 2 1 7 Le v e l L oo p T a n F ri e z e Ru s t P l u sh T a n S p eck l e d T a n F ri e z e Br o wn P l u s h P a t t er n e d Lo o p B r o w n S p eck l e d G ol d F ri e z e M ed Br o wn T a n F ri e z e L t T a n F ri e z e $ 7 5 5 0 $ 1 3 5 5 0 $ 14 5 5 0 $ 14 5 5 0 $ 1 3 9 9 0 $ 1 3 5 5 0 $ 1 1 9 90 $ 1 6 5 5 0 $ 1 6 5 5 0 $ 2 1 9 90 $ 229 8 0 $ 2 4 5 5 0 S IZE C OL OR / S T Y L E P R ICE J D O W E N S C A R P E T & C E R A M I C O U T L E T M ari an na F L ( 8 5 0 ) 5 2 6 3 6 19 c ar p e t t i l e m ari an na c o m L O C A T E D B E T W E E N A r r o w h e a d C a m pg r ou n d s a n d H o p k i n s O n H w y 9 0 T he P l a c e T o S ho p I f M o n e y M a t t e r s OV E R 2 00 A R E A RU GS I N S TO C K Special to The News A standing-roomonly crowd packed the Washington County Agricultural Center in Chipley, Tuesday, May 12, as Washington-Holmes Technical Center proudly graduated several hundred students. Eighty six of the graduating 342 students chose to walk the graduation ceremony and, accompanied to cheers from friends and family, proudly accepted their diplomas and certicates from their respective programs. “You are going forth with the prospect of real jobs,” said Joe Taylor, Superintendent of Schools for Washington County. “We are proud of you and you should be proud of yourselves.” Scott Crum, 201314 Vice-President of SkillsUSA Leaders addressed the graduates in a moving story about his challenges and his ultimate success made possible by the technical center. Welding Instructor Eddie Beckworth introduced his graduates, relating the story of one of his recent graduates returning to his shop and proudly displaying check stubs for over twenty dollars an hour. “You can do this,” proclaimed Beckworth, “all you need is the desire and a little sweat equity.” Students from Roulhac Middle School in Chipley, Blountstown High School and Altha High School recently visited WHTC, taking in the options available and the stories of really well-paid jobs available to qualied graduates. Recently returned from the Florida state SkillsUSA competition in Pensacola and currently preparing for national competition, several WHTC students were singled out for ‘Outstanding Achievement’ awards. Each year, class Instructors select the best of the best from WHTC students based on their achievement and service, and this year the students included Austin Baxley, Michael Goodson, Kenneth Richter, Stephen Rowe and Anthony Smith. “Our motto is One life, one year, one great career”, proclaimed WHTC Director Martha Compton, “and we furnish a viable alternative to a college education with the real prospect of real jobs.” For over an hour, students were announced by their respective instructor and accepted their diplomas and certicates of completion, to the whistles and applause of the packed auditorium. At present WHTC offers over 35 degree and certication programs and enjoys a high placement rate for graduates from the various skilled programs, including welding, electrical, multimedia design, medical administrative assistant, culinary, cosmetology, IT, cyber security and networking, nursing, drafting, law enforcement and public safety, digital media and continuing adult education. For more information about Washington-Holmes Technical Center and over 35 certication and degree programs offered, visit www.WHTC.us WHTC in Chipley graduates 342 students SPEc C IAL tT O T h H E NEws WS Joe Taylor, Washington County School Board Superintendent, presents graduates with their diplomas. Martha Compton, WHTC director, address the graduating class during the standing room only ceremony. Friends and family of the graduates pack the Washington County Agricultural center for the WHTC graduation. Eighty-six graduates wait to be presented with their diplomas.

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Hello again. I’d like to start off with confessing that I was torn between apologizing about last week’s column about honoring your veterans because it seems that as the time draws near to all holidays involving veterans, there’s a huge bombardment of information to get people to honor their veterans when most of the time, for citizens and other veterans, it is an everyday thing. I feel strongly about it, I think because some of the best people I know are military, law enforcement or emergency response. Though we are not blood, we are family. I also wanted to add that part about my grandfather failing in his duties to his family yet served his country was only a small part of a bigger issue. Family is always complicated, distinguishing between love and enabling, not to go all Dr. Phil on you. My grandfather had his issues, but we always knew when it came down to brass tacks, he would move Heaven and Earth for us. There was no doubt he loved us, it was just … complicated. It took me a long time to realize that in spite of how everyone made it appear, everyone has complicated family issues. I was fortunate to have several families adopt me along the way: the Rif es in Martinsville, Ind.; the Manns and Mashburns in Chipley; the Lambs in Graceville; the Fenders in Vernon; the Holmes County Public Library staff in Bonifay; they all took me in as a part of their family at one time or another and treated me no different than one of their own. It is so very hard to stay down in the pits of despair when you’ve got such a wonderful community of people who make you feel at home. I wish I could name all the ones who’ve touched me so deeply; I never want to take advantage of the blessings I’ve received from just knowing this people on a regular basis. Family is so much more than blood. We adopt one another, take each other in and love and support one another in times of need. It’s funny, the ones who give us the most don’t realize that they do. So many times I hear how people say they can’t repay what someone’s done for them, not realizing that just being themselves is more than enough. Life is crazy, beautiful and messy, and people just enhance that by so much. The only thing I can say is to take it in stride. People are brought into your life for a reason, even if it is just to smooth you with their rough edges. I’ve had a rough couple of weeks where nothing has made sense, but I wouldn’t change it for anything because good or bad, I’ve learned something about myself and about others. It’s just like how you’d deal with family. I don’t know about you but family can bring out the best and worst of me. It’s facing those things you don’t like about yourself and setting the goal toward positive change, with a lot of practice in between. Thanks again for your time. See you next week. When the senior adults from First Baptist Church gathered last week, it was just to enjoy the beautiful spring weather and the hospitality of James and Iris Wells. Their lovely home grounds rival any park with its wellstocked sh ponds and manicured dams surrounded by stately pine trees. With the help of Jeep Sullivan, the senior adult minister and men’s ministry coordinator at FBC, lawn chairs, shing tackle, wigglers and crickets were readily available as well as golf carts to transport those of us who needed help getting set up to sh in this idyllic setting. When lunch came, prepared by Jeep and his team of helpers including Sonny Johnson and I’m not sure who else, not too many sh had been caught. But a sumptuous meal of fried bream supplied by Carlton Treadwell and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission along with all the trimmings and homemade desserts was enjoyed by almost 60 adults, mostly in the 60 or older age group. As Pastor Shelly Chandler visited among the “best generation,” he observed that ve Deacons Emeritus were in attendance. Those are men who have served as deacons for a number of years and because of in rmities of aging are no longer able to ful ll the duties of the of ce. The youngest among the group is 77-year-old C. Hildon Barton (Bart), a retired pharmacist who operated a drug store in Bonifay, worked for a number of years as a prison pharmacist and retired from Doctors Memorial Pharmacy. Hildon’s main area of service was in the ushering ministry. He was always there Sunday morning, Sunday night, Passion Play, special events, with a team of men ready to greet and seat and make comfortable our guests. Bart’s wife is a Bonifay “girl,” Marianne Dannelley. They have two sons, Scott Barton and wife, Babs, and Dr. Phillip Barton and wife, Tina. There are three granddaughters and one grandson. Bart served 38 years as a deacon. Doyle Taylor, 84, owner and operator of Jerkins Inc., often assisted Bart in ushering. He was on the nance committee, the prayer ministry and other places of service. His life mate is the former Betty Strickland of Bonifay, and they have two daughters, Terri McCormick, who is married to Shay, and Tracy, who is married to Tim Scott. They have two grandsons and one granddaughter. Doyle served as a deacon for 52 years. W.W. (Bill) Watson, 87, is a World War II veteran who spent most of his working years as a full-time employee of the Florida National Guard. He has been part of the usher committee, the nance committee and various other church activities. His wife, Margaret Williams Watson, is deceased. They have two children, Matt and Suzanne Durco, and two grandsons. Bill served 50 or more years as a deacon. Jack E. Tison, 88, also a WWII Veteran, spent 34 years teaching vocational agriculture in Bethlehem and Holmes County High School. As a deacon, Jack was involved with the nancial affairs of the church as well as ushering. He was also a pastoral con dent, as are many who served in this of ce. Jack’s wife is the former Hazel Wells, and the couple has three children, Hiram and wife, Judy, Cindy Webb and husband, Orrin, and Glen and wife, Sheila. There are six granddaughters and one grandson. Jack served 58 years as a deacon. James A (Jim) Clemmons, the elder statesman, age 93, served in many capacities. We all looked to Jim in parliamentary matters. He has served as an usher, on the nance committee, as a teacher and in any capacity where a deacon can serve. Jim’s late wife was Dorothy Tobias, and this generous couple were involved in every phase of church life. Their children are Dr. James Clemmons and Edith Prescott. There are three grandsons and one granddaughter. Jim served as a pilot in WWII in the Army Air Corps. His career involved the operation of a large beef cattle operation. He served as a deacon for 63 years. These men represent 261 years of service to their Lord, their church and their community. All have been involved in “family ministry,” where they pay special attention to the needs of a given group of church families. They have responded to speci c needs as they have arisen. They have served as Sunday school and church training teachers. They have served on pastor search committees, on building and properties committees, on nominating committees, on youth committees, as church trustees or in any capacity within the church body. Younger men are now ful lling these responsibilities, but Pastor Shelly Chandler and the body of believers represented by the First Baptist Church are indebted to these ve men whose faithfulness sets an example for coming church and community leaders. Our thanks to James and Iris for sharing their lovely home so that we older adults may have an outing to enjoy the beautiful spring and fellowship with our friends. The champion shermen for the day were Ricky Thames and Mary Henry. Comedy writer Robert Orben once said a graduation ceremony is where a well known commencement speaker tells hundreds of graduates, all dressed exactly the same, that individuality is the key to their success. Despite a personal aversion to events involving tassels, I recently took a trip to Tallahassee to watch my younger sister, Marsha, graduate from college. As I lined up at 6 p.m. to wait for the doors to open (which were marked “will open at 6:30”) for the 7:30 ceremony, I thought of the impending graduation of the seniors in Holmes and Washington counties and longed for the simplicity of those ceremonies — and more so, the shorter lines. A nostalgic atmosphere settles while members of a small community experience not only their child’s graduation, but also that of friends, neighbors and co-workers. There is a sense of pride in the accomplishments of our neighbors’ grads because we recognize they were the community’s children yesterday and will be its leaders tomorrow. Because most colleges, like Marsha’s, hold only one commencement ceremony a year, that close-knit experience is hard to come by among so many strangers. Hundreds may be graduating from towns all over the state and nation. It isn’t likely the spectators watched the graduates grow up, play ball or get in trouble together. At 6:28, the facility’s security guard, an elderly man armed with a radio and permanent marker, slowly walked to the rst of three sets of double doors and paradoxically penned “6:30” on each entryway. I had suspected he was wielding the power of his security status, and when he started back at the rst door to remove the signs (for it was 6:30 by time he had completed his rst task), I whispered to my dad, “Now he’s just messing with us.” The ood gates opened, and a sea of proud family and friends were able to enter the arena, most of whom were ready to leave after watching their loved one shake hands with the dean and grab their diploma. Because Marsha graduated with honors, she was one of the rst to walk, but my parents and I stayed for the remaining two-and-a-half hours out of respect for those we didn’t know, who also worked hard for this day to arrive. I watched them, grads both young and old, and wondered if there was a small community behind this latest milestone, if the graduate wished their guest list could have numbered in the thousands. Our community’s seniors will soon take their own graduation walk, hats balanced or pinned precariously on their heads, some silently praying they don’t trip on their way to the podium. Like many before and many to come, the class of 2014 is a product of more than parental guidance. They are a product of their community, which has celebrated with them as they’ve experienced academic and athletic victories, as well as personal triumph and tragedy. The support they’ve received along the way has undoubtedly made a difference, and they will surely remember we have called them all sons and daughters. Soon, it will be time for them to give back what they’ve received. For now, though, they will simply take this next step, perhaps thinking of the past, the future, and this strange moment in between. Congratulations, Class of 2014. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $13.30; 26-weeks: $19.90; 52 weeks: $32.00 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $17.70; 26 weeks: 26.50; 52 weeks: $43.00 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Carol Kent, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@ bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION clamb @chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 EDITOR Carol: ckent@ chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 ADVERTISING Bill Allard: wallard@ chipleypaper.com 850-547-9414 O PINION www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, May 28, 2014 A Page 4 Section CAROL KENT Editor My youngest brother and mom came to visit me this week. This is my zany brother, Joshua Alderman Spears. CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser Family: more than blood CECILIA SPEARS Cecilia’s Sit Down The Class of 2014 is a product of community Senior adult sh fry celebrates many years of service HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Chesnut Hill Art Studio Annual Art Exhibit CHIPLEY — Winona C. VanLandingham, Art Instructor at the Washington County Public Library in Chipley, will host an art exhibit through Friday, May 30 during regular library hours. Students exhibiting art are: Noah Shaffett, Nathan Shaffett, Libby Shaffett, Hannah Shaffett, Meredith Deal, Mia Wilson, Mandolin Brown, Brody Paulk, Carrlee Harris, Emma Largacci, Emily Broom, Keegan Welch, Sydney Smith, Lena Tice, Bryan Barton, Briana Barton, and Taylin Crisp. Chamber committee meeting CHIPLEY — Chamber Members with an interest or experience in Marketing are invited to join the 2014 Marketing Committee for the Chamber of Commerce.   The committee’s mission is to: “Support Chamber efforts to establish strong relationships with the publics it serves. Provide appropriate communication strategies and plans for engaging these publics. Act as an advisor, as requested, on marketing specic Chamber initiatives and activities.” A few projects in our plan of work this year will be to: Review the chamber website for updating; develop a marketing plan for economic development initiatives; survey members on satisfaction with services and areas to focus for member development and to create a communications plan – an operational guide to general communications The rst meeting will be at 3 p.m., Wednesday, May 28 at the Chamber ofce. If you’re interested in attending, please contact Nicole Bareeld at nbareeld@chipleypaper. com, or 638-0212, x4001 by Tuesday, May 27. Poplar Springs High School advisory meeting POPLAR SPRINGS — Poplar Springs High School will hold a school advisory meeting, at 3 p.m., Wednesday, May 28, in the Media Center. Boston Butt Sale CHIPLEY/GRACEVILLE — The family and friends of Julie Rustin Jeffries are holding a Boston butt sale. Pick up day for the Boston butts will be Friday, June 6. Cost is $25. There will be two pick up spots: one at the Washington County School Board Ofce in Chipley and the other in the Piggly Wiggly parking lot in Graceville. Tickets are available at C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service in Chipley. Deadline to order Boston butts is Friday, May 30. An account has also been set up at Peoples Bank in Graceville. Donations can be mailed or dropped off at the following address: PO Box 596, Graceville, FL 32440. Make all checks payable to the Julie Rustin Jeffries Benet. All proceeds from the sale and all donations will be used to help defray medical cost that have incurred with Julie’s diagnosis and treatment of Melanoma skin cancer. For more information, to make a donation, or to purchase a Boston butt call Vicki C. Lamb at 638-1483 or 326-0121. Community Baby Shower MARIANNA — Chipola Healthy Start will host a community baby shower from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, May 30, at the Jackson County Agricultural Center. The baby shower is open to anyone who is pregnant or who has children less than three years of age. Lunch, prizes games and more will be provided. For more information, call 482-1236 or 866-591-2852. Holmes County Council on Aging health fair BONIFAY — Holmes County Council on Aging will host the Annual Health Fair for the senior citizens of Holmes County at 10 a.m., May 30 at the National Guard Armory in Bonifay. For more information call 547-2345. Partners for Pets poker run MARIANNA — Partners for Pets will hold a poker run Saturday, May 31, at Jennings Field off Caladonia Street in Marianna. Bikers will meet beginning at 9 a.m. and ride out at 10 a.m. There is a $15 per bike charge with an option to buy and extra card at the end of the run for $5. Food and dinks will be available on site an along the route. For more information, call 482-4570. New Hope reunion NEW HOPE — The New Hope School reunion will be held at 10 a.m. May 31, at New Hope Crossroads. Former students, relatives and friends are invited to attend. A covered dish lunch will be held at noon. Chicken and drinks will be provided. For more information, call Posie Vaughan at 956-2502 or Jeniece McKinnon at 956-2214. Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant CHIPLEY — The 58th Annual Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant will be held at 6:30 p.m. Friday, June 6 and Saturday, June 7, at the Washington County Agricultural Center in Chipley. For more information call Teresa Bush at 263-4744 (daytime) or 263-3072 (evenings) or contact Sherry Saunders at 263-3554. Relay For Life Wrap-Up Party CHIPLEY — Relay For Life of Holmes and Washington County will have its 2014 Wrap-Up Party at 6 p.m. Monday, June 2, at Pattillo’s restaurant, located on the campus of the WashingtonHolmes Technical Center. For more information, call Connie Smelcer at 703-9977. Perry/Canzada Worley Reunion GRACEVILLE — The annual Perry/Canzada Worley reunion will be held at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, June 8, at the Graceville Community Church. Lunch will be served at noon. Bring a covered dish to share with everyone also please bring any old photos you would like to share. Chipola to hold viewing of Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition lm MARIANNA — Chipola College will host a screening of the Elam Stolzfus documentary lm, “The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition: Everglades to Okefenokee,” at 6 p.m. Thursday, June 12, in the Center for the Arts. The Emmy awardwinning lm has been shown nationwide on public television. Chipola graduate and 30-year veteran lmmaker Elam Stoltzfus will be on hand to discuss the lm.  A reception will follow the screening of the lm. The 2012 lm documents the journey of four explorers who traveled 1,000 miles in 100 days, from the Everglades to Okefenokee Swamp in Southern Georgia. Their goal is to raise awareness of the real possibility to protect and restore connected landscapes throughout the Florida peninsula and create a viable corridor through Florida. For more information, about the event call 718-2277. AMVETS membership drive CHIPLEY — AMVETS #7 will hold a membership drive and fundraiser at 3 p.m. Saturday, June 14. There will be a crawsh boil and live music. Plates will be $7 per person. Yˆ mz zŸ 9xˆv P•“ y~ ““x Ž / + #, '& + ., # + #,, & /% #'& 0./' ) /.&# #' # & #,,$'&'%0 ##0# '#%' ( ( BW7M< PT =MEMB ;=I=9W7 ZEPM " 0 0 /0' ''. /'" 0'-"& -' &" -+, / (( & %"" "0 "%, '' " .! "' '"/ "& /' ;mƒƒ yŠŽ Žx xŽ šm “~Šˆ ŠŽ qŽ ~ˆz ŸŠ •Ž Šœ ˆ qŠm“ -& (,-+ "0' & -' & ." & + '0"& + "0$+ "& 0-/ # CH IP OL A FORD We lcomes Back! !! !& ( (" ( (+(++ #. !* $# % $ * # ' !' '$ .#' & #' '' ). $ ' -! % '& #! ' BILL WHITTINGT ON DA D/ GR AN DP A/ GR EA T GR AN DP A HA PP Y 98 th BI RT HD AY !!! on MA Y 31 st LO VE Sa bri na Da rr el l, Di ll on & Tr is ta n A V AILABLE FOR LEASE 495 St. J ohns Road, Bonifay Fl mile of f I-10 ( Bonifay exit) 18,000 s/f Building w/Loading Dock 3 phase power CONT A C T : J A C K @ 850-239-0039 Residents at Washington Rehabilitation and Nursing Center (WRNC) went shing in honor of National Nursing Home Week, Monday, May 5 through Friday, May 9. National Nursing Home Week is a way for today’s care communities to proactively communicate that skilled care centers are light years ahead of what may be thought of as “Grandma’s nursing home”. Residents at WRNC held week full of activities. Monday the residents had an all day cake walk, Tuesday was All American Competition Day, Wednesday residents attended an All Day Fishing Trip, Thursday was Specialty Day (Children, Gardening, Dancing, Karaoke and Cooking), and Friday was Fiesta Day. S pecial PECIAL toTO theTHE T imes IMES -ADvertiser VERTISER R esiESI D entsENTS enEN J oyOY N ationalATIONAL N ursingURSING H omeOME W eeEE K Community EVENTS

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Local A6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, May 28, 2014 MONDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach ofce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999. TUESDAY 8-10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 6:10 p.m..: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at speedball 6:10 p.m., Early bird 6:20, session 6:50 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-7654 or 638-7654 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Bible Study 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 9-11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society second Thursday of each month. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A FRIDAY 6 a.m.: Men’s Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 3:30 p.m.: Bead Class every second Friday at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery call 703-0347 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper 4th Friday of every month January to September. 6-8 p.m.: Marianna’s Gathering Place Foundation has a get-together for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Methodist Youth Center in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. Osteosarcoma (OSA), the most common bone cancer, represents about 85 percent of bone tumors in dogs. These aggressive tumors spread rapidly, and once diagnosed, should be taken very seriously. “OSA commonly affects the limbs of large or giant breed dogs, but can also occur in other parts of the skeleton, such as the skull, ribs, vertebrae and pelvis,” said Dr. Rita Ho, veterinary intern instructor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Animals with limb osteosarcoma typically show signs of swelling at the affected side and associated lameness, depending upon the animal’s unique condition and tumor location. The tumors typically form at or near growth plates, and occasionally, the animal will exhibit a growth on their body or painful inammation near the site of the tumor. If swelling does exist, it is likely because of an extension of the tumor into the surrounding tissues. Depending on your pet’s specic condition, there are various treatment options you can consider, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. “Limb OSA commonly causes lameness and pain because of invasion and destruction of normal bone; therefore surgery is usually the rst recommendation,” Dr. Ho said. “The surgery serves two purposes: it removes the primary tumor, which is necessary for cancer control, but it also removes the source of pain and might therefore dramatically improve quality of life.” Surgery often involves amputation of the diseased limb, which completely resolves the pain for your pet. However, for people who are reluctant to have this procedure done, there are other surgical methods to spare the limb if your pet is not a good candidate or if you aren‘t comfortable with the surgery. Just keep in mind that amputation is almost always well tolerated with the dogs, and a threelegged dog can do virtually everything four-legged dogs can. Chemotherapy is administered to a pet following amputation to kill off any remaining cancer cells, and radiation is recommended primarily for relieving bone pain and discomfort. “The average dog with OSA will live only four months if treated with only surgery,” Dr. Ho said. “With chemotherapy following surgery, usually the life expectancy is 10-12 months.” As with any surgery, activity and mobility after the operation will be restricted and pain management programs as well as various medications are typically prescribed for the animal after surgery. However, it is important to remember that you should never administer any pain medication without W e als o t ak e c ar e of (850) 638-5885 V†‹ =…tƒ  [ ›t› ;t‹ t {  M ost V ehicles Up t o 5 qts syn thetic blend M ost V ehicles $ 19 95 ?H:<@^@] T[ X[T]^ :^ @ >:Q>@[* ) 0 % 022 3$02 /) 3) /$ ) ( /0 $( $ )) /0 ) /0 (22 $ %1 0() )'!2) '! + )" ) /0 %1 022 '/$. ) 20* ) /) 022 ) ) $ / ) $. ) $( /$(20 /) 2$ 02 2 ( 1 ) .$ ( 2) $. ) 3)(0' $2 /0 ) 0 )2* $( 2$( ) $( /0 %1 & $22 22 )) -/ $( 2)$ ) $3) $( $(( ) 2# 5020829 So we ll Tra ctor Co ., Inc. 2841 Hwy 77 North, Pa nama City www .so we lltr actor co .com So we ll and Ku bota 40 Ye ars of Tr usted Pe rf or manc e We Tr ade for Any thin g That Don’ t Eat! Financing Arranged (W AC) Special to The News Jackson Hospital is now a provider for the Humana Medicare Advantage Plan as of Tuesday, April 1. “Over 600 Jackson County citizens signed up with Humana this past en rollment season,“ Patient Financial Services Direc tor Sharon Dilmore said. “We want our senior citi zens to be in-network when they come to Jackson Hos pital and not have to worry about the expense of trav eling a great distance.“ Another way Jackson Hospital says its trying to meet the needs of local citizens is by offering at least three preferred pro vider plans that may t the medical insurance needs of small businesses in the area. “There have been many changes to health insurance options, and we want to help if at all pos sible,” Dilmore said. Jackson Hospital con tracts with 31 different health insurance provid ers. For a complete list, go to jacksonhosp.com/about us/accepted insurances. aspx. For more information, call Dilmore at 718-2641. Special to The News Three leading military surveys have named Gulf Power Company and its parent company, Southern Company, a top employer for both active duty and military veterans. A longstanding leader in military recruitment, Southern Company is the top-ranked energy compa ny and No. 3 overall in the 2014 DiversityInc Top 10 Companies for Veterans. In addition, the company is the top-ranked energy company and No. 13 over all in the Military Times EDGE Best for Vets: Em ployers 2014 survey and has been named to the Most Valuable Employers for Military winners by CivilianJobs.com for the fth consecutive year. “Veterans are very im portant to us at Gulf Pow er,” said Stan Connally, Gulf Power President and CEO. “They are a natural t for us because the cul tures of both the military and the utility industry exemplify dedication, com mitment to safety, team work and excellence in all they do.” About 15 percent of Gulf Power‘s 1,400 employees are veterans. Currently, 10 percent of the Southern Company system‘s 26,000 employees are veterans or serve in the National Guard or Reserve. Veter ans account for 14 percent of the system‘s new hires this year. Southern Company‘s ongoing support of mili tary personnel has earned broad recognition, includ ing the 2010 Secretary of Defense Employer Sup port Freedom Award — the highest honor given by the Department of Defense for support of employees who serve in the National Guard or Reserve — and the Pro Patria Award for leader ship in providing benets to military employees. G.I. Jobs has named South ern Company the nation‘s highest-ranked utility in its Top 100 Military Friendly Employers listing for sev en consecutive years. As part of its commit ment to veterans, Southern Company also is a found ing partner of the Troops to Energy Jobs program, a recruiting source that links veterans to job openings in the energy industry. The company actively recruits members of the Navy as a Naval Nuclear Propul sion Program partner and has pledged to support the Joining Forces initia tive. In addition, Southern Company annually partici pates in more than 30 mili tary recruitment events and partners with military transition centers across the country. Special to The News At about 1:08 p.m., Wednesday, May 21, the Jackson County Sheriff’s Ofce responded to WalMart in Marianna to a re ported retail theft. Upon arrival, they learned that a member of Wal-Mart’s Asset Protec tion team had witnessed Shane Tolliver Whiteld, a 45-year-old male of Altha, pass the point of sale with 35 items in this buggy that had not been paid for. Among the items was a 32-inch at screen television that the anti-theft device had been removed from. The remain der of the items was cloth ing, household items, etc. Total value of the stolen items was $394.63, which classies it as grand theft. Whiteld was lodged in the Jackson County Correc tional Facility to await rst appearance on charges of grand theft and retail theft. Before the ofcers could get Whiteld secured in the County Jail, they re ceived another retail theft call from Wal-Mart. In that case, Zeno Scott Walther, a 21-year-old male of Mari anna, was arrested after he was observed changing clothes in the men’s depart ment and leaving without paying for the merchandise he was wearing. Walther was lodged in the Jackson County Correctional Facil ity on a charge of petit retail theft. P etET T a A LK Treatment options for osteosarcoma petPET taTALK Gulf Power named top employer for hiring veterans JCSO charges 2 with theft Jackson Hospital contracts with insurance companies C ommunityOMMUNITY caCA L endarENDAR rst consulting your veterinarian. Unfortunately, osteosarcoma has not been found to be preventable. With thorough examinations and early recognition of the symptoms, however, it can be caught soon enough to take the necessary measures to stop the cancer from spreading and to keep your pet healthy and happy for as long as possible. Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at vetmed.tamu. edu/pettalk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to editor@cvm. tamu.edu.

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S PORTs S www.bonifaynow.com A Section ?H:<@^@] T[ X[T]^ :^ @ >:Q>@[* ) 0 % 022 3$02 /) 3) /$ ) ( /0 $( $ )) /0 ) /0 (22 $ %1 0() )'!2) '! + )" ) /0 %1 022 '/$. ) 20* ) /) 022 ) ) $ / ) $. ) $( /$(20 /) 2$ 02 2 ( 1 ) .$ ( 2) $. ) 3)(0' $2 /0 ) 0 )2* $( 2$( ) $( /0 %1 & $22 22 )) -/ $( 2)$ ) $3) $( $(( ) 2# 5020827 By BRAD MILNER AND JASON SHOOT The News Herald PANAMA CITY BEACH — As is the case with any jamboree, there were mixed results among the four Bay County schools playing at the Mike Gavlak Sports Complex on Friday. Arnold hosted Bay, Mosley and Rutherford in four halves of play to close spring football practice. The Rams debuted new coach Rob Armstrong, while Jimmy Longer beam continued as the dean of county coaches at Bay. Arnold held back Bay 15-8 in the opener and Mosley blanked a struggling Rutherford 14-0 in the second half. Bay shut out Ruther ford 18-0 and Mosley bested Arnold 21-6 to complete the jamboree. The teams now enter summer drills with fall practices set to open in early-August. The four teams again are matched in District 1-5A with Mosley securing last season’s county title. Arnold 15, Bay 8 Torri Cotton set the tone for Ar nold with a 73-yard touchdown run on the rst quarter’s second play. He was held to minus-10 yards on his last four carries, but the Mar lins’ offense surged behind quar terback Cody Saunders. Saunders completed 9 of his 13 passes for 110 yards in help ing Arnold control the clock. Arnold added two Austin Pef fers eld goals, the long of 41 against a defense that wasn’t allowed to rush. The Marlins also sacked Bay quarterback Xavier Longerbeam in the end zone for a second-quarter safety. Bay scored its touchdown on its last possession, Lon gerbeam nding Zavian Ever ett down the left sideline for a 35-yard score on rst down. Raekwon Webb added the 2point conversion run with 2:39 to play. Longerbeam nished 4 for 6 for 50 yards while adding 37 yards on the ground. Saunders spread out his completions to six receiv ers with Paul Patterson grabbing a team-high three recep tions for 23 yards. Nicholas Berg man gained 50 yards rushing on four carries in a reserve role. Mosley 14, Rutherford 0 Neither team impressed on of fense, with Mosley earning the victory on the strength of two big plays. Rutherford continued to run the Spread with Armstrong expect ed to install the Wing-T in the fall. Rams quarterback Justin Da vis attempted only three passes despite the wide formation. He completed two passes, one for no gain and the second a 42-yarder to Aaron Hamilton on the Rams’ third possession. Rutherford elected to punt ve times, with the decision resulting in added yardage rather than a live play. The Rams’ other possession ended on downs. Mosley chose to punt once, turned the ball over on downs an other time and lost a fumble on its rst possession. Ezra Gray provided the rst highlight when he took a screen pass from Dillon Brown and raced 48 yards for a score in the second quarter. Gray added 17 yards on four carries. Trey Trzaska also recorded a big gain for 37 yards on a reception on Mosley’s next drive. Jimmy Daniel, who had 48 total yards, capped the march with a 12-yard score. Mosley used four quarterbacks, including rotating Peyton Calhoun and Scott Whitaker on the nal possession. Bay 18, Rutherford 0 Webb spotted the Tornadoes a 6-0 lead on the contest’s rst play, and Longerbeam and receiver Ev erett connected for two passing touchdowns as Bay cruised to the victory. Webb broke loose on the rst play from scrimmage for a 75-yard romp and a near-instant 6-0 lead. Longerbeam hit Everett with a 36-yard scoring strike late in the rst quarter. Everett wrestled a contested ball away from a defend er at the goal line, and he stepped into the end zone to double the Tor nadoes’ lead at 12-0. Longerbeam and Everett teamed up again for a 53-yard touchdown pass in the second quarter for an 18-0 lead with just over three minutes left. Everett used his speed to get behind a pair of defenders, and Longerbeam’s pass hit the receiver in stride for the touchdown. Davis delivered a 33-yard pass to EJ Foster in the rst quarter for the Rams’ biggest play. The Ram offense stalled at Bay’s 32yard line, however, and ultimately turned the ball over on downs. That was the rst of three Rutherford possessions that ended in Tornado territory. Bay endured three fum bles offensively and was fortunate it lost only one. Rutherford fumbled twice but recovere Mosley 21, Arnold 6 Mosley’s offense began the matchup against Arnold with a game of keep-away before Brown and receiver James Lovett gave the Dolphins a lead they would not surrender. Facing fourth-and-25 at Arnold’s 26-yard line, Brown heaved the ball down the left sideline. Lovett ran under the throw and jumped over a defender to cap the Dolphins’ 15-play drive. After an Arnold punt, Daniel raced 55 yards untouched through the middle of the Marlins’ defense for a touchdown and a 14-0 lead for Mosley with 4:38 left in the rst quarter. Peffers kicked a 32-yard eld goal on the Marlins’ ensuing pos session. His attempt was set up by quarterback Cody Saunders’ 50yard pass to Jovanni Perea to the Mosley 15. Daniel posted his second touch down with a 20-yard run and ex tended Mosley’s lead to 21-3 with 10 1/2 minutes left. Peffers netted another 32-yard eld goal midway through the sec ond quarter to provide the game’s nal margin. SPRING FOOTBALL JAMBOREE P atti ATTI BLa A K e E | The News Herald Rutherford’s Quinn Jones tackles Mosley’s Devontia Wilson. SPRING IN THEIR STEP Mosley stands tall in county clash Let it be written that I have no doubt NFL teams supplied players with powerful painkillers and other drugs to keep them playing during their careers that have led to serious health complications later in life. Perry Mason couldn’t make me waver on that. Not even in black and white. Also let it be written that I believe the basis of the lawsuit led last week on behalf of more than 500 explayers that the league put prots ahead of players’ health. Whereas I fully support the lawsuit led for the thousands of retired players accusing the NFL of concealing the risks of concussions and later debilitating life issues — think that the $765 million settlement the league has agreed to pay is not enough — I’m not backing the former players on this one. It seems hypocritical to even write as much, but I can’t get the image of two former players out of my head. Ronnie Lott and Jack Youngblood were warriors in a league of warriors. Although legend has it that Lott told a doctor to amputate his left pinky in the locker room, or maybe it was the defensive huddle, actually it was after the 1985 season when it was crushed while he tackled Dallas running back Timmy Newsome. When told by a doctor that bone graft surgery wouldn’t have enabled Lott to be ready in time for the 1986 opener, he opted to have the tip of the nger amputated. Not quite the stuff that has morphed into lore in the decades since, but still representative of the culture that brackets the professional lives of NFL athletes. Youngblood not only went through the entire 1979 playoffs, which included the Super Bowl, but participated in the meaningless 1980 Pro Bowl with a fractured left bula. That’s called a broken leg in the real world. Which the NFL isn’t. It is comprised of men who not only have incredible physical gifts, but a capacity to endure pain that dwarfs the average human. That they allegedly were given pain-killing drugs by their team doctors to remain on the eld comes as no surprise. Nor does this tidbit: A lot of them knew exactly what they were doing and would do so again. That’s where I take a left turn with the lawsuit. The shield of the warrior, the camaraderie of the teammate, the persona of the macho athlete all ties into this. As a result of masking their pain with drugs, the lawsuit alleges, players developed heart, lung and nerve ailments; kidney failure; and chronic injuries to muscles, bones and ligaments. Probably so. It’s just in this case I don’t know where the responsibility of the player ends, and the culpability of the team begins. I’m sure that attorneys could better explain it to me, but I’m not convinced that I still would get it. After receiving numbing injections and pills before kickoff, players got more drugs and sleep aids after games, “to be washed down by beer,” the lawsuit states. Again, probably so. And this much, too. How many times have you heard NFL players talk about the necessity of learning the difference between injury and pain upon entering the league, or fearing for their job if they didn’t play when hurt? If the intention of the lawsuit is an attempt to change the prevailing culture in the NFL into a more cohesive vision of dealing with injury, then perhaps it is valid. More likely, teams and players always will seek an avenue for them to remain on the eld. What the athletes do need to be informed of, in a more positive manner, is the long-term effect of the drugs they are being given, and be granted better access to more detailed medical records of whatever their condition. They can afford a second opinion. Then they might be able to make a more informed choice. The bottom line is that a group of 20somethings probably would say, in large part, just give me something, doc. Sports Beat Pat McCann Executive Sports Editor pmccann@pcnh.com The needle and the damage done Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Page 7 GOT SPORTS? We want to promote sports in Washington and Holmes counties! Whether it’s a little league or high school team, our young athletes are important to us — and our communities. Please send sports news and schedules to news@ chipleypaper.com

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Local A8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Nicole Bar ee ld: Community Stewar d. United Wa yC hampion. Publisher Managing the business operations of two weekly newspapers keeps Nicole plenty busy —m aking sur et he news, sales and pr oduction teams have the tools they need to best serve our re aders’ inter ests. Nicole also invests her time in helping our communities gr ow with involvement in civic or ganizations, Chamber initiatives such as economic development, and United Wa y. She believes we have a re sponsibility to help our business and community members str engthen and thrive, not just for today ,b ut for long-term pr osperity Because of our people, we deliver mor et han the news to Wa shington and Holmes counties. It’ sj ust another way that we’r ec ommitted to our communities. AH al if ax Med ia Gr ou pC omp an y Nob ody del iv ers like we do. e ne w College of Ap plied St udies at FSU Pa nama City was appr ov ed by the FSU Boar d of Tr ustees in Ju ne 2010 and allo ws the campus to mor e easily re spond to wor kfor ce needs in our ar ea. We invite yo u to suppor t e Campaign for Ou r Community ’s Un iv ersity by helping us build an endo wment for tomorr ow ’s jobs. Ou r goal is to establish a $5 million endo wment for the College of Ap plied St udies by 20 17, which will allo w FSU Pa nama City to establish student scholarsh ips, impleme nt ne w degr ee pr ograms and pr ov ide ne w equipment and tech nology To learn ho w yo u can suppor t our community ’s univ ersity contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mb lo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR CO MMUN IT Y’ S UNIVER SIT Y En do wme nt for To morr ow ’s Jo bs % $ '# % # (# % (* *# # (# % & ) $ *# ## #! *# & ) $ & *# +' ( ( '# #! # * # # *# +' $4 ,500 ,0 00 $500 ,0 00 $1,500 ,0 00 $2,500 ,0 00 $3 ,500 ,0 00 $4 ,500 ,0 00 $0 $1, 000 ,0 00 $2, 000 ,0 00 $3 ,0 00 ,0 00 $4 ,0 00 ,0 00 $5 ,0 00 ,0 00 GO AL Help for teens who stutter is as close as your library Special to the Times-Advertiser Stuttering is a frustrating and embarrassing problem for millions of people, but it can be especially tough on teenagers. Help is available at the Holmes County Public Library in the form of a DVD Stuttering: Straight Talk for Teens. “It’s meant to encourage teens, to tell them that there is hope out there,” said Professor Peter Ramig of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Ramig is one of three nationally recognized experts appearing in the DVD produced by the nonprot Stuttering Foundation. David Wilkins, a high school student who stutters, narrates the DVD. It features students from junior high school through college talking about their experiences with stuttering and what they found to be helpful. They talk openly about the ridicule they faced from classmates and how their stuttering affects their lives. “We really try to emphasize the embarrassment and frustration factor, and we think teens will relate to that,” adds Ramig. He appears in the DVD along with speech-language pathologists Dr. Barry Guitar of the University of Vermont and Dr. Hugo Gregory of Northwestern University. The three experts answer questions about stuttering, refute myths and misconceptions, and present examples of therapy sessions showing how stuttering can be reduced. More than three million Americans stutter, yet stuttering remains misunderstood by most people,” said Jane Fraser, president of the Stuttering Foundation. “Myths such as believing people who stutter are less intelligent or suffer from psychological problems still persist despite research refuting these erroneous beliefs.” Books and DVDs produced by the 66year-old nonprot Stuttering Foundation are available free to any public library. A library that will shelve them can contact the Foundation at 1-800-992-9392, e-mail info@stutteringhelp.org, or visit www. stutteringhelp.org or www.tartarmudez.org Special to the Times-Advertiser West Florida Electric Co operative held a meeting for emergency operations cen ter personnel, city person nel, re departments and law enforcement agencies in Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson and Washington Counties on Wednesday, May 21. During the meeting, at tendees toured the coopera tive’s service center and saw a rst-hand demonstration of how cooperative members can report outages. They also learned about how crews are dispatched and the various ways WFEC per sonnel communicates with members using Facebook, Twitter and media outlets. Electrical safety informa tion was also shared with all those in attendance, which is especially important for rst-responders. This annual gathering allows electric cooperative personnel, EOC and city per sonnel, re departments and law enforcement to collabo rate and share ideas about how to best handle power outages and emergency situ ations caused by storm dam age to the area. “This workshop is vital to the success of restoration efforts when our distribu tion system sustains cata strophic damage caused by hurricanes, tornadoes, se vere thunderstorms, or other acts of nature. It allows us to discuss problems that we’ve encountered in the past and brainstorm about how we can best communicate with emergency personnel throughout the four counties we serve,” said Gary Clark, Vice President, and Member Services. Mother Nature is unpre dictable, so the proper pre cautions should always be taken by coastal residents and others near the coast. With that thought in mind, WFEC encourages all its members to be weather aware and begin making their annual hurricane sea son preparations before it’s too late. The Atlantic Hurricane Season begins on June 1 and will last until November 30. The peak storm threat usu ally occurs from mid-August to late October. SPECIAL TO THE TT IMEs S A A DVERTIs S ER Gary Clark, WFEC Vice President, Member Services & Penny Hagan, Manager, Member Services speak to meeting attendees about how the cooperative handles major outage situations caused by severe weather. Ty Peel, Vice President, Engineering speaks to EOC & city personnel, law enforcement and re department personnel about the importance of being aware of your surroundings and downed power lines when responding to emergencies. Hurricane preparedness workshop held

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Special to Extra BONIFAY – Students from every grade were able to “ooh and ah” from display to display as Bonifay Elementary School held their second annual Science Fair on May 23, with volunteer students participating from both third and fourth grade. With almost 30 participants, there were three who walked home with placings, while three had honorable mentions. First Place went to Landon Justice in the fourth grade, Second Place went to Kendall Rushing in the third grade, Third Place went to Haley Forehand in the fourth grade and honorable mentions went to Prana Patel in the fourth grade, Cheyenne Mitchell in the third grade and Tommy Coatney in the fourth grade. Honorable Mention went to Cheyenne Mitchell, third grade, for her display of Solar Cooking. BES holds 2nd annual Science Fair First Place in this year’s Bonifay Elementary School Science Fair went to Landon Justice, fourth grade, with his display, Popcorn: Which Brand Pops Best. PHo O T o O S byBY CEci CI L ia IA SpSP E a A RS | Extra Terry Petty’s rst grade class was the rst of many to take a look at the many displays during this year’s science fair. Third Place went to Haley Forehand, fourth grade, for her display of Molecular Change from a Solid to a Liquid. Honorable Mention went to Tommy Coatney, fourth grade, for his display The Power of Color. Honorable Mention went to Prana Patel, fourth grade, for his display of Craters and Meteors. Second Place went to Kendall Rushing, third grade, for her display of Does Music Affect the Growth of Plants? W innINN ERS anAN D H onoONO R abAB LE ME nN T ionION S Wednesday, MayMAY 28 2014 Washington County News z H H olmes County T T imes-Advertiser B P a A GE 1 Section E XTRA “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) “A Tisket, ATasket” was whose rst major hit song in 1938? Artie Shaw, Ella Fitzgerald, Count Basie, Billie Holiday 2) What “blood” would a nurse measure with a sphygmomanometer? Sugar, Alcohol, Pressure, Count 3) John P. Holland is credited with the invention of the modern? Submarine, Refrigerator, Guitar, Padlock 4) What’s the youngest age one can become President of the United States? 32, 35, 40, 42 5) Which stone did early man primarily use for starting res? Slate, Marble, Quartz, Flint 6) Whose “nest” is the lookout platform on sailing ships? Boar’s, Eagle’s, Bird’s, Crow’s 7) What is the smallest area country in the United Kingdom? Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales, England 8) Refried beans are primarily made of what type of cooked beans? Garbanzo, Black, Kidney, Pinto 9) What name did blues singer McKinley Morganeld adopt? Muddy Waters, Bo Diddley, B. B. King, Fats Domino 10) Which city opened the rst aquarium in 1893? Boston, Chicago, Baltimore, Richmond 11) If you’re astraphobic what are you afraid of? Lightning, Astroturf, Stars, Mountains 12) What white creature is Ursus Maritimus? Owl, Whale, Polar bear, Bunny 13) Of these battery types which is largest in size? AA, AAA, C, D 14) A semenier chest ordinarily has how many drawers? 5, 6, 7, 8 ANSWERS 1) Ella Fitzgerald. 2) Pressure. 3) Submarine. 4) 35. 5) Flint. 6) Crow’s. 7) Northern Ireland. 8) Muddy Waters. 9) Pinto. 10) Chicago. 11) Lightning. 12) Polar bear. 13) D. 14) 7. TT rivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com

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Wednesday, May 28, 2014 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra an d Special to The Times-Advertiser The Bonifay Book Club met at the home of Dianne Smith on May 13. Present at the meeting were Brenda Alford, Joyce Brannon, Cynthia Brooks, Medea Callahan, Barbara Howell, Terri McCormick, Nancy Riley, Kyla Rushing, DiAnn Shores and Dianne Smith. The meeting was called to order by President Cynthia Brooks. The minutes were read by Secretary Nancy Riley and approved as read. Medea Callahan reviewed “The Husband’s Secret” by Liane Moriarty, published in July 2013. At the heart of this novel is a letter that’s not to be read. Imagine that your husband wrote you a letter; it says to be opened only in the event of my death. John-Paul is very much alive, and Cecilia accidently stumbles across this letter. Cecilia Fitzpatrick has achieved it all: She’s an incredibly, successful businesswoman, a pillar of her small community and a devoted wife. Her life is as orderly and spotless as her home. Cecilia is a devoted mother who constantly volunteers at her daughters’ school while running a thriving Tupperware business. But that letter is about to change everything. The letter contains her husband’s deepest, darkest secret, something with the potential to destroy not just the life they built together, but the lives of others as well. Rachel and Tess barely know Cecilia, or each other, but they, too, are about to feel the earthshattering repercussions of her husband’s secret. Thirty-something Tess’ husband breaks the news that he’s fallen in love with Tess’ rst cousin, best friend and business partner. Tess divorces her husband and moves to her mother’s house in Sydney. Enrolling her 6-year-old son at St. Angela’s, Tess runs into former lover Connor. Connor is now the school’s hunky gym coach and is crushed on by students, teachers and parents like Cecilia. Rachel is the school’s secretary and is one who does not have any adoration for Connor. She is still grief stricken over the death of her daughter, Janie, in 1984. Rachel is increasingly convinced Connor is involved in her daughter’s death. As Cecilia, Tess and Rachel confront the past and make hard decisions about their futures, their fates collide in unexpected ways. Delicious refreshments were served by Mrs. Smith at the conclusion of the meeting. Morrises celebrate 50 years Jack and Angie Morris of Vernon will celebrate their golden wedding anniversary Wednesday, July 16. The couple was married in Miller County, Ga., just before midnight, in 1964. They will be honored by their children and grandchildren with a reception from 1-4 p.m. Saturday, June 7, at the Vernon Community Center. Stanton and Poole wed Caroline Rowan Poole of Tuscaloosa, Ala., and Lee Ellis Stanton of Chipley were married at 4 p.m. March 1, 2014, at Saint James Episcopal Church in Livingston, Ala., with the Rev. Richard Losch ofciating the ceremony. The bride is the daughter of Mrs. Marion Daniel Poole and Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Eugene Poole of Tuscaloosa, Ala. She is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Jackson Poole and the late Mr. and Mrs. John Marion Daniel, Jr., all of Tuscaloosa, Ala. Parents of the groom are Mr. and Mrs. Rual Kenneth Stanton of Chipley. He is the grandson of Samuel Burnett Stanton and the late Mrs. Dorothy Lowell Stanton, and the late Mrs. Johanna Scheid Ellis, all of Chipley. Given in marriage by her father, the bride wore a gown of French Alencon lace and silk charmeuse. The gown featured a lace bodice accented with lace cap sleeves and highlighted with a Tiffany train. The veil of Parisian tulle was bordered with French Alencon lace. The couple resides in Livingston, Ala. Wedding Anniversary Special to The Times-Advertiser “Honky Tonk Angels,” written by Ted Swindley, creator of “Always, Patsy Cline,” directed by Jimmy Miller and Kevin Russell, will take the stage at 7 p.m. June 6-7 and 2 p.m. June 8. This production is rated PG-13 for adult themes and situations. Tickets will go on sale at the Spanish Trail Playhouse Box Ofce to the general public on June 2. Reserved seating tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors ages 65 and up and military with ID and $10 for students. In “Honky Tonk Angels,” Swindley combines more than 30 classic country tunes with a hilarious story about three gutsy gals who are determined to better their lives and follow their dreams to Nashville. The all-hit song list, complete with a live band and starring Casey Johns, Wendy White and Sierra Hill, includes “Honky Tonk Angels,” “Coal Miner’s Daughter,” “9 to 5,” “Stand By Your Man,” “Ode to Billy Joe,” “Don’t Come Home ‘A Drinkin,” “The Pill,” “These Boots Are Made For Walking,” “I Will Always Love You,” “Paradise Road,” “Delta Dawn,” “Amazing Grace,” “Calling All Angels,” “Time For Me To Fly,” “Your Good Girl’s Gonna Go Bad,” “Night Life,” “Cleopatra,” “Queen of Denial,” “Harper Valley PTA,” “Fancy,” “Rocky Top,” “Barroom Habits,” “Cornell Crawford,” “Almost Persuaded,” “Sittin’ on the Front Porch Swing,” “Angels Among Us” and “I’ll Fly Away.” This production is presented in association with Ted Swindley Productions Inc. and originally produced by the American Theatre Company, Kitty Roberts, producer, Tulsa, Okla. The Spanish Trail Playhouse is at 680 Second St. in Chipley inside the historic Chipley High School. For reservations, call the box ofce at 638-9113. For more information, visit www.spanishtrailplayhouse. com. Tickets on sale for ‘Honky Tonk Angels’ Special to The News The Chipola Regional Workforce Development Board recently had its annual banquet, where Richard Williams, executive director, presented David Melvin, president of David H. Melvin Inc., Consulting Engineers, with the Board’s 2012-2013 Employer of the Year Award. The Regional Workforce Board consists of a ve-county area comprising Jackson, Calhoun, Washington, Holmes and Liberty. Melvin Engineering was selected because of its commitment to the area to diligently participate in and work cooperatively with the economic development efforts that create opportunities for regional employment, Williams said. The list of projects is extensive and includes Green Circle, Ice River Springs, Family Dollar and HomeSource International. Kenny Grifn, business sedvices Director, praised Melvin Engineering for its “availability and assistance in meeting the goals of Gov. Rick Scott’s jobs creation initiative and the Workforce Development Board by their willingness to do everything asked of them and more.” Melvin accepted the award on behalf of the entire team of DHM professionals, making reference to their character, quality of their performance and eagerness to serve their community. Melvin Engineering named Employer of the Year S p P ECIAL TO TT HE TIm M E s S -ADVERTIs S ER David Melvin accepts the Chipola Regional Workforce Development Board’s Employer of the Year award. Bonifay Book Club meets in May JEss SS I CC OLLINs S | Times-Advertiser Rogers Insurance celebrated 40 years of service to the community by hosting an open house at their ofce on Jackson Ave. in Chipley, Thursday, May 22. Scores of customers and other members of the community stopped in to extend well wishes and enjoy giveaways and a live broadcast by an area radio station. Rogers Insurance was rst opened by Gerald “Pee Wee Rogers” on May 26, 1974. From left are Donna Miller, Gerald “Pee Wee” Rogers, Ricky Miller and Craig Miller, representing three generations of Rogers Insurance’s service to the community. RR OGER sS II N sS URANCE CELEBRATEsS 40 YEAR sS

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Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 By NIKI CRAWSON Special to Extra BONIFAY — Students placing 1st at the county competition each received a scholarship in the amount of $250 to attend the legendary 4-H Camp Timpoochee in June, a camping tradition which has occurred since the 1930s. Florida 4-H is very proud of the 4-H/Tropicana Public Speaking Contest, which has been incorporated into the 4-H program for over forty years. Working with youth in grades 4-6, this contest helps thousands of young people annually learn how to write and deliver a speech. Over 2 million students have participated in this program since its beginning. Tropicana, Inc. has sponsored the contest since 1969 and provides classroom materials for teachers, certicates of participation, ribbons for classroom winners and medallions for school winners, plaques and summer camp scholarships to 4-H Camp Timpoochee for county winners. Tropicana Products, Inc., is a division of PepsiCo, Inc., the leading producer and marketer of branded fruit juices. 4-H is one of the largest youth development programs in America with more than 6.5 million young people, ages 5-18, and 540,000 youth and adult volunteers. 4-H programming offers more than just animals and barns. 4-H’s learning opportunities are designed around four essential elements necessary for positive youth development by providing youth with: supervised independence, a sense of belonging with a positive group, a spirit of generosity toward others and a wide variety of opportunities to master life challenges. A variety of fun, educational, social, and engaging activities are offered. These programs teach the fundamental 4-H ideal of practical, “learn by doing” experiences which encourages youth to experiment, innovate and think independently. For information on how you can get involved with 4-H as a youth, volunteer, or supporter, please contact Niki Crawson at 547-1108, ncrawson@u.edu or check out our website at http:// holmes.ifas.u.edu 4-H is a community of young people ages 518 across America who are learning leadership, citizenship and life skills. 4-H programs are available to young people in all 50 states, U.S. territories and U.S. military installations worldwide, regardless of gender, race, creed, color, religion, or disability. For more information on 4-H, please visit holmes.ifas.u. edu. ?H:<@^@] T[ X[T]^ :^ @ >:Q>@[* ) 0 % 022 3$02 /) 3) /$ ) ( /0 $( $ )) /0 ) /0 (22 $ %1 0() )'!2) '! + )" ) /0 %1 022 '/$. ) 20* ) /) 022 ) ) $ / ) $. ) $( /$(20 /) 2$ 02 2 ( 1 ) .$ ( 2) $. ) 3)(0' $2 /0 ) 0 )2* $( 2$( ) $( /0 %1 & $22 22 )) -/ $( 2)$ ) $3) $( $(( ) 2# 5020828 5020403 5020402 SPECia IA L T o O EE XTRa A The Chipola College Cosmetology program recently held a Fantasy Makeup competition to increase students’ skills in makeup application. Pictured from left, are Ashley Toole as the Queen of Hearts, Sarah Shiver as Cleopatra, Brittany Burns as Jessica Rabbit, Allie Brock as an Avatar, Lindsay Hall as Katniss, Amanda Cooke as an Oompa Loompa and Kaily Chapel as Edward Scissorhands. SPECia IA L T o O EE XTRa A Chipola president Dr. Jason Hurst was the guest speaker at the Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce, Tuesday, May 20, meeting. Dr. Hurst provided an overview of college programs, facilities and economic impact. Pictured from left, are Terri Waldron, Chair of the Chamber Board; Dr. Jason Hurst, and Danny Ryals, member of the Chipola College District Board of Trustees. HUR sS T sS PE aA K sS aA T CaCA L hoHO U nN CoCO U nN T yY C haHA M bB ER ChiCHI P oO L aA CosCOS MET oO L oO G yY PP R oO GR aA M fanFANT asy ASY M aA KEUP C oO MPET iI T ionION Special to Extra The Chipola College welding program recently earned accreditation from the National Center for Construction Education & Research (NCCER) through the Southern Company/Gulf Power Accredited Training Sponsor (ATS) audit process. As the accrediting body for the industry, NCCER establishes the benchmark for quality training and assessments. By partnering with industry and academia, NCCER has developed a system for program accreditation similar to those found in institutions of higher learning. This process fosters national unity among the construction industry while providing a dened career path with industry-recognized credentials. The NCCER accreditation process assures that students and craft professionals receive quality training based on uniform standards and criteria. The Chipola welding program utilizes state-ofthe-art welding equipment, hybrid learning, mobile welding units and simulation technologies. The rst class of 20 students in the new program enrolled in January. New students may enter the program during Summer Session II which begins, Monday, June 23. Registration will be held, Thursday, June 19. The program is 1,170 clock-hours which can be completed in about one year. Classes are available Monday through Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Evening classes are expected to be added beginning in August. Chipola’s welding program is made possible through a grant awarded to the Alabama/Florida Technical Employment Network (AF-TEN). Chipola, L. B. Wallace, Northwest Florida State, Pensacola State, and Wallace Community College formed the consortium that was awarded $10 million in a Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant. Each college shares a portion of the grant to implement a welding technology program on their campus. Darwin Gilmore, Chipola Dean of Workforce Development, says, “Welding is a targeted occupation that offers excellent pay and benets. Workforce Florida projects annual growth of 13,500 jobs in advanced manufacturing and construction, with 75% requiring postsecondary training. The Alabama Department of Industrial Relations (ADIR) lists welding among Alabama’s “Hot 40 Jobs” with expected annual growth of more than two percent through 2018.” Byron Ward, Welding Career Coach, says, “The job outlook is very good in the area and especially for those willing to travel or relocate. Starting pay for pipe welders in ship-building is $20 per hour and higher. Local manufacturing plants offer $14-$18 per hour.” Eastern Ship Builders in Panama City hires numerous welders and is expected to expand their operation in the near future. Other local employers include Rolls Right Trailers and Anderson Columbia in Marianna. Welding jobs also are available in Tallahassee, Panama City, Jacksonville, Dothan and Mobile, Ala. Financial aid is available for students who qualify, with special consideration for veterans. Prospective welding students must earn a minimum score on the Test of Adult Basic Education. For information about Chipola’s Welding program, call 850-718-2270, or visit www.chipola.edu. N i I K i I CC R a A W son SON | Special to Extra Sixth Grade Winners of this year’s Holmes County 4-H/Tropicana Public Speaking Contest was went to Lydia Dixon, Poplar Springs School with a speech titled “Fear” won First Place; Autumn FrutosCreamer of Poplar Springs School won Second Place; and Madison Curry of Poplar Springs School won third place. Holmes County 4-H/Tropicana Public Speaking Contest Chipola welding program earns national accreditation Crossword PP UZZLE SO LUTLUT ION ON PP A GEGE B5

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Any type of non-refrigerated, nonperishable food will be accepted as donation. WUTS will host a different “drive” each month, including a shoe drive, shoe box drive (shoe boxes lled with basic household supplies for the needy), and a toy drive in October to close out the year. For more information, call Cody Baker at 326-5217. Worship Under the Stars will be held at 1100 Main Street in Chipley (in the backyard of the Tabernacle of Praise church on Hwy 77). The Bradys in concert BONIFAY — The Light House Assembly of God in Bonifay will host live in concert, from Dothan, Ala., Gospel recording artist The Bradys, at 5 p.m., Sunday, May 25. For more information, call 638-2027. New Bethany Homecoming VERNON — New Bethany Assembly of God Church will hold homecoming services at 11 a.m. Sunday, May 25. Brother Darvin Glass will bring the message. Lunch will be served at 12:30 p.m. For more information, call Brother Leon Jenkins at 773-3003. Faith Covenant Fellowship to host Kevin Wilson CHIPLEY — Faith Covenant Fellowship will host a gospel sing featuring Bro. Kevin Wilson from Kentucky at 7 p.m., Friday, May 30. The church is located on Highway 277 in Chipley. For more information call Pastor Cloys Joiner at 638-4031. Youth rally WESTVILLE — Mt. Pleasant Assembly of God will host a Youth Rally at 5 p.m., Saturday, May 31. Broken Chains, a gospel group, will be leading worship. Sister Crystal Crosby will be ministering in service. If possible, please RSVP. Food will be provided afterwards. Mt. Pleasant Assembly of God is located at 1996 Mt. Pleasant Rd. Westville. For more information, or to RSVP, contact mtpleasantassembly@gmail. com or https://www.facebook. com/mt.pleasantao g Youth Rally Mt. Pleasant Assembly of God will host a Youth Rally at 5 p.m., Saturday, May 31. Broken Chains student ministry will be leading worship. Sister Crystal Crosby will be ministering the service. Food will be provided afterwards. Mt. Pleasant Assembly of God is located at 1996 Mt. Pleasant Rd., Westville, FL 32464. For more information visit http://www.facebook. com/mt.pleasantao g East Mt. Zion Sing BONIFAY — East Mt. Zion will hold a fth Saturday night sing at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 31. The church is located on Highway 173 north of Bonifay. Red Hill Methodist Church VBS CHIPLEY — at Red Hill United Methodist Church Vacation Bible School, at 6 p.m., Wednesday, June 11 through Saturday, June 14. The theme this year is Agency D3, discover, decide, defend. Come and be a special agent to search and defend the truth about who Jesus really is. The program will consist of bible study, activities, music, food and good Fellowship. Bible school will end Saturday morning with waterslides and food. For more information call Linda Yarbrough at 334-360-08ll. First Baptist Church VBS CHIPLEY — First Baptist Church of Chipley will hold Agency D3 Vacation Bible School, from 8:15 a.m. to noon, Wednesday, June 16 through Friday, June 20. While investigating at Agency D3, kids will collect and log evidence about the life of Jesus. As special agents, they will examine eyewitness reports, physical proof, and biblical accounts to uncover and defend the truth about who Jesus really is. The church is located at 1300 South Boulevard in Chipley. For more information call 638-1830 or email at of ce@ rstbaptistchipley.com. Bethany Baptist Church VBS BONIFAY — Bethany Baptist Church will hold Agency D3 Vacation Bible School from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Wednesday, June 18 through Friday, June 20. Dinner will be provided for participants. Bus pick up is available if needed. The church is located at 1404 N Hwy 79 Bonifay. For more information or bus pick up call 547-9272. Grace Assembly Golf Tournament BONIFAY — Grace Assembly at Chipley will host a golf tournament Saturday, June 21, at Dogwood Lakes in Bonifay. Faith EVENTS Emerald Coast Hospice hosts bereavement camp Special to Extra Emerald Coast Hospice has announced an upcoming camp for kids who are struggling with the dif cult emotions that accompany the bereavement process. Camp I Believe is ran by clinical experts who understand the healing process. Heal, play, grow is the camp’s focus. This year, the camp will be held in Marianna at Blue Springs Baptist Conference Center Friday, June 6 through Sunday, June 8. Camp I Believe is for children ages seven to 14 years old who are in mourning, need love and support, need time to heal and like to laugh and play. No prior experience with a hospice organization is required, and there is no charge to attend the camp. If you are interested in attending camp, you can download an application by going to www.gentiva. com/hospice The application can be dropped off at the Emerald Coast Hospice of ce in Marianna. For further questions, please contact Margo Lamb, Manager of Volunteer Services at 526-3577. Bonnet Pond Community Church welcomes new pastor Special to Extra Bonnet Pond Community Church welcomes their new pastor, Bro. Mack Glover, along with his wife Carrie and their daughter Mackenzie. Pastor Glover’s rst of cial day was Mother’s Day, and he and his family celebrated with the congregation, Friday, May 23, with a sh fry at the church. Bonnet Pond Community Church extends a welcome to anyone currently without a church home to come out and enjoy worship services. Sunday School starts at 10 a.m., with church services at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m., and Wednesday night services at 6:30 p.m.

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Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B5 5-3532 BID NOTICE Notice is hereby given that Holmes County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids on #57 Stone Granite Rock & Alabama Class 2 Granite Rip Rap. If interested there is a mandatory Bid meeting May 29th at 1p.m. Bid packages can be picked up & returned at theOffice of the Holmes County Board of County Commission, “FEMA-ROCK BID 1 #14-06” 107 E. Virginia Ave.,Bonifay, FL 32425. Bids will be accepted until 3p.m. CST on June 10, 2014. For more info contact Wendel Whitehurst a t femacoordinator@holmes countyfl.orgor (850)547-1100 ext. 230. The Board reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids in part or full, or to accept the bid the Board deems to be in the best interest of Holmes County. May 21, 28, 2014. 5-3485 NOTICE OF TAX DEED APPLICATION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That ANITA L. SAFFORD, the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 474Year of Issuance 5/31/11 Description of Property: 1314.00-001-000-019.000 SEC: 14 TWN: 05 RNG: 16 LOT 19, WRIGHT’S CREEK (UNRECORDED) MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST OF THE SOUTHWEST OF SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH RANGE 16 WEST OF HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 8927’19” EAST FOR 662.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING,(FOR MORE LEGAL REFER TO TAX R And being further described as: Lot 19, WRIGHT’S CREEK (Unrecorded) more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest corner of the Northeast of the Southwest of Section 14, Township 5 North, Range 16 West of Holmes County, Florida, thence run North 8927’19”East for 662.26 feet to the Point of Beginning, thence continue North 8927’19”East for 606.90 feet to the Westerly Right-of-way line of a County Graded Road, thence run North 0542’47”West along said Right of way line for 398.19 feet, thence departing said Right of way line on a bearing of South 8927’19”West for 563.21 feet, thence South 0035’05”West for 398.65 feet to the Point of Beginning. Name in which assessed: ROBERTO MARTIN, GIPSY MARTIN, ARIEL MORAQUEZ Said property being in the County of Holmes, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on 6/10/14, at 11:00 A.M. DATED this 4/24/14. Kyle Hudson, Clerk of the Circuit Court Holmes County, Florida May 7,14, 21, 28, 2014. 5-3486 NOTICE OF TAX DEED APPLICATION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That ANITA L. SAFFORD, the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No. 656 Year of Issuance 5/31/11 Description of Property: 1407.00-001-000-015.000 SEC: 07 TWN: 04 RNG: 16 LOT 15, REEDY CREEK CROSSING, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST OF THE NORTHWEST Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! W ith your paid obituar y family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos fr ee of charge. Find Obituaries. Shar e Condolences. 9u €un‹ju j F{ vu? M… xu CHQTM[;: ‡n{’j‹œ up{‡… ‡v ™™™ ?px{ˆ€uœˆjˆu‹ ?p‡‚ ‡‹ n‡…{vjœ…‡™ ?p‡‚ œ‡’ pj…S " In par tnership with t£¨›  p‡‚ Find obituaries, shar e condolences and celebrate a life at or Jason Bruner of Bonifay, (Smith Crossroad Community Hwy 177A) passed away Sunday, May 18, 2014, in Latte, La. He was 41. Jason was born Feb. 24, 1973 and lived all of his life in Holmes County. He loved the outdoors and enjoyed working with horses. His father, William Paul Bruner and his brother, Paul Bryan Bruner, both preceded him in death. Survivors include his mother and step father, Joy (Smith) and Jimmy Kirkland of Black, Ala., and special aunt, uncles, cousins and other extended family and friends. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Thursday, May 22, 2014, in the chapel of Sorrells Funeral Home in Geneva, Ala., with the Rev. Jerry McAdams ofciating and James Martin delivering the eulogy. Jason was buried beside his brother, Paul, in the Smith Chapel Assembly of God Church Cemetery in Holmes County with Sorrells Funeral Home and Crematory of Geneva, Ala., directing. The family received friends at the funeral home, Wednesday, May 21, 2014, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva, 334684-9999, is in charge of arrangements. Jason Bruner JASON BRUNER Beloved husband, father, grandfather, brother, cousin, and friend, Clyde Stanley went to his nal home May 19, 2014. His unfailing love and devotion to his wife of 62 years, Greta, was an example to his children and grandchildren. To his wife, he was her world; his sons and grandsons, a genius with the ability to x anything or share his knowledge on any subject; to his daughter, daughtersin-law, granddaughters, and sister, he was their hero. Clyde was born Sept. 21, 1929 in Leonia, the only son of Marcus Charles and Emma Alberta Lynn Stanley. He had two sisters Anita (Jerry) Headley, who was so much more than a sister, and Mazie (deceased 1939). Married to Greta Barrow September 1951, this union brought a legacy of love through their children and following generations. Children: Diane Green, Joseph (Linda) Stanley, Mark (Dena) Stanley; grandchildren, Shanna Green, Cory (Kim) Green, Chelsea Burlison, Amber Ebersole, Ashley (Jeff) Briggs, Brydon Stanley, April (Ray Higuera) Stanley, and Marcus Stanley; step grandchildren Kevin and Brody Woodling, nine great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. Clyde was proud to have served his country retiring with 21 years active duty in the Air Force as a C124 (Ol’ Shakey) ight engineer and 21 years civil service retiring from Hill AFB, UT as an aircraft maintenance supervisor. Clyde was small in stature but a GIANT in the things that matter most, his endless love of God, family, friends, fellowman, and all animals. He was honorable, just, and fair. He was a humble man, true to his southern roots, and proud of his heritage. He was a quiet, wise man of few words but could speak volumes with a hug, a smile, a twinkle in his eyes or the raise of one eye brow. He enjoyed many activities; antique cars (having rebuilt a prize winning ‘56 Thunderbird), NASCAR, all sports (football being top of his list), riding ATVs on dirt or the sand dunes, even at age 84. Clyde died living where and doing what he loved. He continues to live on through the hearts of those who loved him. Memorial services were held at Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church, 1985 Pleasant Ridge Rd., Leonia on Friday, May 23, 2014 at 3 p.m. with Pastor Dale Paul ofciating and services will also be held at Aaron’s Mortuary, 1050 So. State St., Cleareld, UT on June 4, 2014 at 4:00pm with Pastor John Parsley ofciating. Full military honors will be presented. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.daviswatkins.com. Local arrangements are under the direction of DavisWatkins Funeral Home and Crematory. Clyde SS tanley CLYDE SS TANLEY Clara Mae Chitty, 89, of Bonifay, died May 21, 2014. Funeral services were held May 24, 2014 at First Baptist Church. Interment will follow in the Mt. Olive Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Clara M. Chitty Barbara Dean Binkley, of Carrabelle, passed away Friday, May 16, 2014, along with her husband, Gregory Carl Binkley.Barbara Dean Binkley was born March 19, 1957 in Marion, Ala. She is preceded in death by her parents, Royce L. Grant and Marie Skinner Grant; her sister, Helen Harielson, and her grandson Grant Waring Reed. Survivors include her children, Kristy Jenkins Reed and anc Taylor Barbaree of Dothan, Ala., Henry Hauenstein of Quincy, David Hauenstein of Bonifay; her grandchildren, Jordis and Judson Reed, Gracelyn Hauenstein; her brothers and sisters, Lamar and Joann Grant of Bonifay, Lisa and Wayne Stephens of Ponce de Leon, Lynn and John Archer and Tanessa and Ricky Byrd of Ponce de Leon and numerous nieces, nephews, and friends. Flowers will be accepted or contributions can be made to the American Red Cross. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Friday, May 23, 2014 at the Ward Wilson Funeral Home Chapel. Barbara DD Binkley Gregory Carl Binkley, of Carrabelle, passed away Friday, May 16, 2014 along with his wife, Barbara Dean Binkley. Gregory Carl Binkley was born June 11, 1952 in Louisville, Ky. He is preceded in death by his parents, John G. Binkley and Blanche Lois Nair. Survivors include his sister, Sharon (Bill) Lone, Mountville, SC; his brothers, James Binkley, SC and Ronald (Judy) Binkley, Leavenworth, IN; his best friend, Tim Murray, Carrabelle and numerous nieces, nephews, and friends. Flowers will be accepted and contributions can be made to The Wounded Warriors Project Association, Wounded Warrior Project, P.O. Box 758517, Topeka, Kansas 66675. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Friday, May 23, 2014 at the Ward Wilson Funeral Home Chapel. Gregory C. Binkley Jose Antonio Baez, 62, of Westville, died May 17, 2014. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Jose AA Baez George Simuel Dodd, 81 of Graceville on to his Heavenly home, Sunday, May 18, 2014. Bro. George was born in Austell, Ga., on June 15, 1932 to the late Harry Lee and Mary Magdelene Smith Dodd. Retired SFC U.S. Army, Bro. George served over 20 years with two years in Korea receiving a Purple Heart and in Vietnam a Bronze Star, along with other various medals, badges and commendations. On Oct. 2, 1966 he became an Ordained Minister at Morgantown Baptist Church in Natchez, MS and was a 1972 graduate of Baptist Bible Institute (known today as the Baptist College of Florida) where he received his BA in Theology. He later received his Masters of Theology, serving churches in Mississippi and Florida. Bro. George was a member of Eastpoint Baptist Church in Apalachicola. He is predeceased by his parents, four brothers and two sisters. Bro. George is survived by his beloved wife, Gracie Dodd, Bonifay; two sons, Anthony “Tony” Dodd (Martha), Bonifay and Don Dodd (Colene), Richardson, Texas; daughter, Evelyn Chivers (Billy), Valdosta, Ga.; brother, James “Snookie” Dodd, Austell, Ga.; sister, Emma Lee, Gainesville, Ga.; six grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Tuesday, May 20, 2014 at Pleasant Grove Baptist Church with the Rev. Eddie Biss and the Rev. Jack Faircloth ofciating. Burial will follow in church cemetery with full military honors by Ft. Rucker Army Base, James & Lipford Funeral Home directing. George SS DD odd Melissa Ann Thomas, 47, of Bonifay, died May 17, 2014. Funeral services were held May 21, 2014, at Church of God of Prophecy. Interment followed at Bonifay Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing. Melissa AA TT homas Yvonne Whitaker, 69, of Bonifay, died May 14, 2014. Memorialization was by cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. YY vonne Whitaker Obituaries Malvin Donald Corbin, 63 of Chipley, passed from this life on May 18, 2014. Malvin was born Dec. 25, 1950 in Apalachicola, to Clarence and Ida (Morris) Corbin. He was a 1969 graduate of Cottondale High School and served in the United States Army. He owned and operated M&L Produce as well as Corbin Packing, and was a member of White Pond Baptist Church in Alford. He is preceded in death by his parents, Clarence and Ida Corbin. He is survived by his loving wife of 44 years, Elizabeth Kent Corbin of Chipley; son, Chad Corbin and wife Yarah of Chipley; daughter, Tracy Zick and husband William of Cottondale; brother, Buel Corbin of Westville; sister, Myrtice Lawrence of Cottondale and four grandchildren, Gracie Zick, Cooper Corbin, Mia Corbin, Bryson Corbin. Funeral services were held at 1p.m. Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at Cypress Creek Community Church in Alford with the Rev. Donnie Chancellor and Chad Corbin ofciating. The family received friends from 6-8 p.m., Tuesday, May 20, 2014 at Cypress Creek Community Church. Interment followed in Rockhill Church cemetery in Chipley. With Obert Funeral Home of Chipley directing. Malvin DD Corbin Crossword SOLUTSOLUT I ONON

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B6 | Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, May 28, 2014 B USINESS G UIDE THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183 Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5$25.68 5x10$35.31 10x10$46.01 10x20$80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted M Mitchs Collision Quality Collision Repair Automotive Renishing326-4104 Mitch Gainer, Owner mitch_gainer@att.net 335 Alford Road € Cottondale Three Chicks Cleaning Free Quotes Experienced References Available Flexible Hours (M-F) (850) 956-2408 Cell (850) 768-0022 HOLMES UNLIMITED TREE SERVICE Treats Trees € Trimming Stump Grinding No One Can Beat Our PricesLicensed & Insured Free EstimatesJohn Holmes (850) 326-5351 (850) 428-9264 Great Rate Tree ServiceHazardous Tree Removal Stump Grinding/Removal Aerial Bucket Work Trimming/Pruning Bobcat Work Small Tract Land Clearing Adam Williams Owner/Operator850-768-1734 Easy Care Lawn & Tractor Service Tree ServiceLawn Care Debris Removal Tractor and Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825 Advertise your service or business for as little as $10 a week.Ad runs in the Washington County News, Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser638-0212 Advertise your service or business for as little as $10 a week.Ad runs in the Washington County News, Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser638-0212 Hasty Heating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 20 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!638-3611 HVAC Services Coolers & Freezers Service on all Makes & Models Heat Pumps, Electric & Gas Electrical Services Exterior Elevated Lighting & WiringResidential and Commerical 5020871 &DOORQHRIRXU §DGYLVRUV¨DQGSXWWKH &ODVVLILHGVWR :25.)25<28 7/" "1 /9 7nxn‡"£" "-"1 /9 /-‡6,/-, nxx{‡™{£{ OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST OF HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN S8930’38”E FOR 1292.03 FEET; THENCE RUN S8422’23”E FOR (FOR MORE LEGAL REFER TO TAX R And being further described as: LOT 15, Reedy Creek Crossing, more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southeast corner of the Northwest of the Northwest of Section 7, Township 4 North, Range 16 West of Holmes County, Florida; thence run S8930’38”E for 1292.03 feet; thence run S8422’23”E for 1129.88 feet, thence run S8938’09”E for 818.84 feet to the Point of Beginning, thence run S4919’43”E for 454.71 feet, thence S2142’27”W for 716.77 feet, thence N8958’31”W for 154.02 feet, thence N0132’11”W for 913.48 feet to the Southerly Right of way line of a proposed road, thence N6424’22”E along said Right of way line for 111.03 feet to the Point of Beginning Name in which assessed: TADEUSAS TOMASEVICIUS, GINTAS BUTKEVICIUS Said property being in the County of Holmes, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on 6/10/14, at 11:00 A.M. DATED this 4/24/14. Kyle Hudson, Clerk of the Circuit Court Holmes County, Florida May 7,14,21,28, 2014 5-3531 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 13000189CAAXMX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. ALFRED L. VETZEL, JR.; BOBBIE D. VETZEL; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 13, 2014, and entered in Case No. 13000189CAAXMX, of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for HOLMES County, Florida, wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and ALFRED L. VETZEL, JR.; BOBBIE D. VETZEL; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE HOLMES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at 201 NORTH OKLAHOMA STREET, BONIFAY in HOLMES County, FLORIDA 32425, at 11:00 A.M., on the 19th day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST AND THENCE RUN N 8910’29”W ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION FOR 512.73 FEET TO THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY OF COUNTY ROAD #181, THENCE RUN N 5644’00” W ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY FOR 220.07 FEET TO A POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE N 5644’00”W ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY FOR 179.80 FEET, THENCE RUN N 1325’38”E FOR 171.02 FEET, THENCE RUN S 6735’08”E FOR 205.41 FEET, THENCE RUN S 2300’34”W FOR 202.78 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 15th day of May, 2014. KYLE HUDSON As Clerk of said Court By Diane Eaton As Deputy Clerk This Notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486 Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com File No.: 13-01196 JPC May 21, 28, 2014. 5-3533 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 30-2013-CA-000311 REVERSE MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS INC., Plaintiff vs. HOWARD CURRY, HOLMES COUNTY WEST FLORIDA REGIONAL PLANNING, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HOWARD CURRY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed on or about May 12, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 30-2013-CA-000311 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Bonifay, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Holmes County Courthouse, 201 North Oklahoma, Bonifay, FL. 32425, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 19 day of June, 2014, at 11:00 AM, on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot No. 2, beginning at the Southeast corner of Lot No. 1 and running West to L and N Railroad right-of-way; thence Southwest along said right-of-way 50 yards; thence East to line dividing the Northeast and the Northwest of the Southeast of Section 8, Township 4 North Range 16 West, Holmes County, Florida; thence North to the Point of Beginning; all lying and being in Section 8, township 4 North, Range 16 West, Holmes County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 16 day of May, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk May 21 and 28, 2014 5-3536 ATTENTION RENTERS The Northwest Florida Regional Housing Authority is now accepting applications for its Public Housing units in Bonifay, FL. Applications are being accepted for 1, 2, 3 and 4 bedroom apartments. For additional information, call 1-800-365-9527 ext 5302 or 5307. Equal Housing Opportunity. May 28, June 4, 11, 2014. 5-3523 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 302012CA000331CAAXM X BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. DEBRAJEAN FOSTER F/K/ADEBRAJ. SHANKS A/K/ADEBBIE SHANKS A/K/A DEBRAJ. FOSTER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: JOHN W. WILLIAMS, PAULINE WILLIAMS and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF EVELYN DAVIDSON whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in HOLMES County, Florida: APARCELOF LAND LYING IN THE NORTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP6 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING ATA 4” SQUARE CONCRETE MONUMENT ATTHE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP6 SOUTH, RANGE 14 WEST; THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 27’04” EASTALONG THE NORTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17, (THE NORTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17 IS ASSUMED TO BEAR SOUTH 88 DEGREES 27’04” EAST AND ALLBEARINGS ARE RELATIVE). A DISTANCE OF 1357.04 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 32’56” WESTALONG ALINE PERPENDICULAR TO THE NORTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17, ADISTANCE OF 3495.41 FEETTO THE POINTOF INTERSECTION OF ACURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, SAID CURVE BEING THE SOUTH LINE OF HIGHWAY160, A 100.00 FOOTRIGHT OF WAY, AS LAID OUTAND IN USE, WITH WESTLINE OF THE NORTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17, SAID POINTALSO BEING THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY 211.39 FEETALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 1960.08 FEET, ACENTRAL ANGLE OF 6 DEGREES 10’45” AND A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF NORTH 84 DEGREES 56’59” EAST, 211.29 FEETTO THE INTERSECTION WITH A PARALLELLINE 210.00 FEETEAST OF, AS MEASURED AT90 DEGREES 00’00” TO THE WEST LINE OF THE NORTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17; THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 17’51” WESTALONG SAID PARALLELLINE 210.00 FEETEAST OF, AS MEASURED AT90 DEGREES 00’00” TO THE WEST LINE OF THE NORTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17, A DISTANCE OF 397.79 FEETTO THE INTERSECTION WITH A PARALLELLINE 70.00 FEETNORTH OF, AS MEASURED AT90 DEGREES 00’00” TO THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17, ADISTANCE OF 105.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 17’51” WEST, ADISTANCE OF 70.00’TO THE INTERSECTION WITH SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 18’54” WESTALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17; ADISTANCE OF 315.00 FEETTO THE SOUTHWESTCORNER OF THE NORTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 17’51” EASTALONG THE WESTLINE OF THE NORTHEAST1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 17, ADISTANCE OF 443.01 FEETTO THE PONTOF BEGINNING. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on TRIPPSCOTT, P.A., the Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 110 S.E. 6th Street, 15th Floor, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301, on or before June 21, 2014, (no later than 30 days from the date of the first publication of this Notice of Action) and file this original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at Holmes County, Florida, this 2nd day of April, 2014. KYLE HUDSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT BY: Diane Eaton TRIPPSCOTT, P.A. ATTN: FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 110 S.E. 6th STREET, 15TH FLOOR FORTLAUDERDALE, FL33301 foreclosures@trippscott.co m May 21, 28, 2014. 6-3548 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 13000149CA CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. ALLEN JOHN QUICK, SR. AND THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,, et. al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 6, 2014, and entered in 13000149CA of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Florida, wherein CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY is the Plaintiff and THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF ALLEN JOHN QUICK, SR., DECEASED; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; ALLEN J. QUICK, JR.; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s). Cody Taylor as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door 201 N. Oklahoma St., Bonifay, 32425, at 11:00 AM, on June 26, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE S.W. CORNER OF THE S.W. 1/4 OF N.E. 1/4 OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST; THENCE GO SOUTH 87 DEG. 47’ 00” EAST, 210 FEET; THENCE NORTH 02 DEG. 58’ 05” EAST 20 FEET FOR POINT OF BEGINNIG; THENCE GO SOUTH 87 DEG. 47’ 00” EAST, 122.63 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 02 DEG. 13’00” EAST, 131.0 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 87 DEG. 47’ 00” WEST 120.91 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 02 DEG. 58’ 05” WEST 131.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, BEING IDENTIFIED AS BLOCK B, LOT 1, OF AN UNRECORDED SURVEY, ALL LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 22 day of May, 2014. Kyle Hudson As Clerk of the Court By: Diane Eaton As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402, Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717, Hearing Impaired: Dial 711, Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcour ts.org Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Telephone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 RAS 13-03578 May 28, June 4, 2014. 6-3531 Notice Waddell Plantation, Inc. dba Royal American Construction Group hereby gives notice of completion of contract with the City of Bonifay, FL for Bonifay Infrastructure Improvements, Phase 2. All claims in connection with this project should be made during this time with the Engineer: Hatch Mott MacDonald, 11-C West 23rd Street, Panama City, FL 32405 May 21, 28, June 4, 11, 2014. 6-3541 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY CASE NO.: 2014CA13 HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking Corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, A Florida Banking Corporation, Plaintiff, vs CHARLES MICHAEL ANDREWS a/k/a CHARLES M. ANDREWS, CECILIA W. COOK and CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Holmes County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on June 19, 2014, at 11:00 am Central Time at the front door of the Holmes County Courthouse, at 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Holmes County, Florida, to-wit: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN SOUTH 630.00 FEET ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SOUTHEAST QUARTER TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE EAST 315 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 345 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 315 FEET TO SAID WEST LINE, THENCE RUN NORTH 345.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with 2003 WAYCR VIN# WHC012984GAA and VIN# WHC012984GAB(the “Property”). Commonly known as 1280 S. Weeks Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425-3280. This Notice dated this 16th day of May, 2014. Clerk of Circuit Court By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk cc:Denise H. Rowan, Esq. dhr@mccallaraymer.com jkb@mccallaraymer.com P.O. Box 15758 Panama City, FL 32406 Holmes County Times btaylor@chipleypaper.co m Attn: Legal Dept. Box 67 Bonifay, FL 32425-0067 May 28, June 4, 2014. 6-3543 PUBLIC SALE Tharp & Sons Mini Storage in Chipley, Fl. will hold a sale for these units for non-payment of rent in accordance with the FL Statute Act 83-801-83-809. Tenants will have until June 16, 2014 to pay in full. NO CHECKS.. 1.William Patrick-Bonifay, FL 2. Ashley Sullivan-Bonifay, FL 3. Danyele Martin-Bonifay, FL 4. Sarah Davis-Bonifay, FL 5. Unknown May 28, June 4, 2014. j j ADOPTION: j j ACreative Financially Secure Family, Music, LOVE, Laughter awaits 1st baby Trish.j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Are you pregnant? A childless loving married couple seeks to adopt. Will be hand on mom/dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Dawn & Domenick 1(855)985-4592. Adam Sklar #0150789 Are you pregnant? Considering adoption? A childless, caring and loving, married couple seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON mom and devoted dad. Financial security and emotional stability. All expenses paid. Call/Text Diane & Adam 1-800-790-5260. FBN 0150789. For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8:00am-4:00pm. Call (850)638-1483

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Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 EMPLOYMENT TODAY!!! 1123147ClassACDLDriversNeededImmediatelyDumpTrailer Experience. $1000SignOn RetentionBonus Walton/Bay/ WashingtonCounties PanamaCityArea *HomeNightsApplyonline:www.perdidotrucking.com 1653MapleAvenuePanamaCity,Florida 32405 850-784-7940 We bI D#: 34284633 1124935TheHolmesCountyBoardofCountyCommissionersiscurrentlyaccepting applicationsforthefulltimepositionof EmergencyManagementDirector ForapplicationcontactSherrySnellin theHolmesCountyCommissioner's ofceat850-547-1119.Pleaseturnin completedapplicationstotheCounty Commissioner'sofcelocatedat107E VirginiaAve,Bonifay,FL32425,nolater than2:00pmonJune6,2014.Holmes CountyisaDrug-FreeWorkplaceand EqualOpportunityEmployer. WebID#:34289685 1125495 MedicalAssistantNeededforbusy medicalpractice. Faxresumeto 904-212-1773 112316025DRIVERTRAINEES NEEDEDNOW!Learntodrivefor WernerEnterprises!Earn$800perweek!Noexperienceneeded!LocalCDLTraining JobReadyin15days.1-888-379-3546 WebID34284625 1122190TheTownofPoncedeLeon iscurrentlytakingapplicationsforthe positionof VolunteerFireChief. Thison-callpositionrequiresahigh energy,self-motivated,positiveattitude individual.Candidatemusthavepossession ofaFloridaFireghter1Certicateof Competencyandavaliddriver'slicense. Mustpassrandomdrugtestandcriminal backgroundcheck.Payis$125amonth. Applicationswillbeaccepteduntil4PMon June11,2014.Applicationscanbeturned intotheTownHallduringnormalbusiness hours,emailtotownpdl@gmail.comormail toPOBox214,PoncedeLeon,FL32455 1125204TheHolmesCountyBoardofCounty Commissionersiscurrentlyaccepting applicationsforthefulltimepositionof Litter/RecyclingTechnician ForapplicationcontactSherrySnellin theHolmesCountyComm-issioner's ofceat850-547-1119.Pleaseturnin completedapplicationstotheCounty Commissioner'sofcelocatedat107E VirginiaAve,Bonifay,FL32425,nolater than3:00pmonJune11,2014.Holmes CountyisaDrug-FreeWork-placeand EqualOpportunityEmployer. 1125202JobOpportunity:DeputyClerk,CityofVernon,FL Applicationscanbepickedupfrom Ve rn on Cit yH al ll ocat ed at 28 08 Ye ll ow Ja ck et Dr Resumeswillnotbeaccepted inlieuofapplications. TheCityofVernonisadrug-freeworkplace.Apreemploymentdrugscreen,criminalhistorybackground investigationandadriver'slicensevericationwillbe conducted. EQUALOPPORTUNITYEMPLOYER ApplicationDeadline:June2,2014at4pm. Rateofpayforthisposition: DependingonQualications 1124950 Nowtakingapplicationsfor new KFC inCallaway. Applyat jobs.kfc.com or faxresumeto 334-702-0302 WebID34289468 TextFL89468to56654 ShiftManagers &TeamMembers 1125201 NursePractitionerorPA Wantedforbusyfamily practice.Benetsavail.Send resumetoBlindBox3611co TheNewsHerald,P.O.Box 1940,PanamaCityFL32402 1125203JobOpportunity:LaborerCityofVernon,FLApplicationscanbepickedupfrom VernonCityHalllocatedat2808YellowJacket Dr.Resumeswillnotbeaccepted inlieuofapplications. TheCityofVernonisadrug-freeworkplace.A pre-employmentdrugscr een,criminalhistory backgroundinvestigationandadriver'slicense vericationwillbeconducted. EQUALOPPORTUNITYEMPLOYER ApplicationDeadline:June2,2014at4pm. Rateofpayforthisposition: DependingonQualications 1125227 CHIPOLACOLLEGE isacceptingapplicationsforthefollowingfull-timepositions:ACCOUNTANT ASSESSMENTCENTERMANAGER(PublicService Program) DIRECTORofASSESSMENT,COMPLIANCE&GRANTS PROGRAMMANAGERforEMERGENCYMEDICALSVCS (EMS)PROGRAM INSTRUCTORofCOMPUTERSCIENCE INSTRUCTORofNURSING(DNP) INSTRUCTORofWELDINGPositionandapplicationinformationareavailableat www.chipola.edu/personnel/jobs.InquiriesmaybedirectedtoHumanResourcesat pippenw@chipola.eduor(850)718-2269.Candidatesmaybesubjecttobackgroundinvestigations. EQUALOPPORTUNITYEMPLOYER 1125221 NursePractitionerpositionavailableforbusyinternal medicinepractice.Onlyexperienced needapply.PleaseincludeCVand references.Sendresumesto BlindBox3618c/oTheNewsHerald, P.O.Box1940,PanamaCity,FL32402 HVACREFRIGERATIONMECHANIC (2positions)Withbenefits.5years documentedexper.inthefield. ToApply,goto:www.bay.k12.fl.us, EmploymentOpportunities,Support. Foradditionalassistance call850-767-4231. Deadlinetoapplyis: 4:30pmon5/26/2014 WebID#:342895651124951 Janelle Rodabaugh 850-747-5013 or jrodabaugh@pcnh.com Jessica Branda 850-747-5019 or jbranda@pcnh.com Contact Us Directly For All Of Your Recruitment Needs! 1124913 Pilot SeekingCommercial,MELPilotwith militaryghterexperienceto SupportAirForceyingcontract. SendresumestoBlindBox3389 c/oTheNewsHerald,P.O.Box1940, PanamaCity,FL32402 WebID#:34283286 TRUCK DRIVER NEEDED ClassBCDLRequired RollOff/KnuckleBoom Experienceaplus. Local Emailresumeto:heather@emeraldcoastrecycling.comDFWP 1125470 Bldg/Const/Skill Job Opportunity: Laborer City of Vernon, FL Applications can be picked up from Vernon City Hall located at 2808 Yellow Jacket Dr. Resumes will not be accepted in lieu of applications. The City of Vernon is a drug-free workplace. A pre-employment drug screen, criminal history background investigation and a driver’s license verification will be conducted. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER Application Deadline: June 2, 2014 at 4pm. Rate of pay for this position: Depending on Qualifications Web Id 34289967 Auction-Waterfront Home, Lake Eufaula, 217 Cypress Cove Drive, Eufaula, Al, 5 Bedroom-4Bath, Executive, Great views. June 10, 1:00pm. Details, pictures GTAuc tions.com, 205.326. 0833 Granger, Thagard & Assoc, Inc. Jack F Granger, #873 Ceramic Kiln, molds, pouring table, alot of accessories, bulbs & lights for Christmas trees, many containers of paint!. 547-5244. Looking for maid for house cleaning, washing clothes, odd jobs around the house, cooking. 850-388-2061. Hospitality Night Auditor front desk. Apply at Chipley Days Inn Express. No phone calls. General Cable Manufacturing Business needs 1 person for various duties, including cable assembly. Starts off part-time, may go to full-time. Call Ezy Glide at 638-4403 for appointment. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Install/Maint/Repair HVAC Service Techswith experience. Now taking applications. 850-638-3611 Web Id 34288421 Other The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for the full time position of Emergency Management Director For application contact Sherry Snell in the Holmes County Commissioner’s office at 850-547-1119. Please turn in completed applications to the County Commissioner’s office located at 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, no later than 2:00 pm on June 6, 2014. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID#: 34289685 Other The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for the full time position of Litter/Recycling TechnicianFor application contact Sherry Snell in the Holmes County Commissioner’s office at 850-547-1119. Please turn in completed applications to the County Commissioner’s office located at 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, no later than 3:00 pm on June 11, 2014. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID#: 34289968 Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com EOE Experienced Team Solo, Recent Grad & Student Drivers needed for dedicated run in your area! Ask about our sign-on bonus and guaranteed hometime! Call 866-414-3402 TRAIN FROM HOM E MEDICAL BILLING ACCOUNTING ASS’T CUSTOMER SERVICE NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709 Executive Office Space for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Office BuildingFor Lease: 514 Florida Ave Space is plumbed for a medical/dental office but can be used for a variety of business types. Apprx. 2,184SF. Call For Details (850) 896-0609 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1 Bedroom Apartment, in Chipley, covenant location, no pets. 638-4640. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio And 2 bdrm $375-$500 Includes City Utilities (850)557-7732 House For Rent 2BR/1BA, Aproxx. 1500 sq ft 4 1/2 ies east of Chipley McDonalds. stove, fridge, DW, lawn maintenance, water and pest control included. Application required. No smoking. $625/month plus, $625/Deposit. 850-638-4228. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO and up. Includes Garbage, sewage, and lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 3BR/2BA Mobile Home in Chipley 1 Block to elementary school. WD hookup, CHA. No pets. $475.00/mth+deposit. 850-763-3320 or 352-284-2338. 3BR/2BA MH for rent in Chipley Area. Not far from town. $525.00 to $650.00. 850-638-8570 or 850-258-1594. NO PETS. Mobile Homes for rent in Chipley and Bonifay. Water and sewage included. Lease required. 850-638-2999. For Rent. Nice, almost new doublewide. 3/BR, 2 full baths, walk in closet & more. In a quiet secluded area just off Corbin Rd on Rudd Rd. Sorry no pets. Day phone, 8am-5pm, 638-4630, Night phone, 638-1434. Mobile Home for rent. South of Bonifay in Washington County. 3BR/2BA Doublewide. $600.00 per mo, $600.00 security deposit. Call Progressive Realty, 638-8220. Mobile Homes For Rent 2 and 3 Bedrooms in Cottondale, Central Heat and Air. $400 -$500 a month. 850-258-1594 or 850-638-8570. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. Property For Sale in Esto. Next to City Hall. 210-260-7381. Commercial and residential lots. Western NC New cabin on 2.51ac. w/2bdr, loft, large deck, covered porch, fpl, minutes from the lake $139,900. Call 828-2861666 Harley Sportster 1993. Black, runs good, belt drive, spoke wheels. $4,200.00. 547-5244 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Spot Advertising works!

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