Holmes County times-advertiser

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Holmes County times-advertiser
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Newspaper
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Bonifay, FL
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June 19, 2013
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50www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visitBONIFAYNOW.COM IN BRIEF imes imes imes T dvertiser imes imes imes imes T T dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser AHOLMES COUNTY Phone: 850-547-9414 Website: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 INDEXOpinion ................................A4 Sports ..................................A7 Extra ....................................B1 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B6 Healthy Cooking Demo ClassesBONIFAY Free monthly healthy cooking demonstration classes are being sponsored by the Holmes County Health Department and University of Florida/ IFAS Extension. The classes will be held at noon at the Holmes County Agriculture Center, 1173 E. U.S. 90, on the following dates: March 19, April 23, May 21 and June 18. The classes will offer healthy cooking tips and alternatives for everyday meals, and food samples will be served. No registration is required. Extension programs are open to everyone. For persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations, contact the extension of ce, 547-1108, (TDD, via Florida Relay Service, 1-800955-8771) at least ve working days before the class. For more information, call Leann Jones at 5478500, ext. 240.Area Wide Youth MeetingBONIFAY An area wide youth meeting will take place at 7 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 27 at Oak Grove Pentecostal Ministries, located at 1131 Highway 179 in Bonifay. The speaker will be Bro. Stephen McKay Missionary to the Middle East. For more information, call 956-4339 or 9562322 or 658-2828. Ponce de Leon High School celebrates Homecoming Royalty A5Wednesday, FEBRUARY 26 2014Board reviews baseball scheduleBy CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Superintendent of Holmes County District Schools Eddie Dixon agreed to hold a review of the baseball schedules for middle school baseball during the Feb. 18 meeting after a review of the 2013-2014 salary schedule revealed coaches received supplemental wages for managing middle school baseball. Supplemental wages is de ned as anything considered payment for compensation received in addition the regular salary or wages. School board member Debbie Kolmetz initiated the conversation by asking about the supplemental wages to the coaches. The question also arose as to if the schools, aside from Bonifay Middle School, had enough players and played enough games to be considered a full-time team with a full-time schedule, which would then validate the supplemental wages to the coaches. There is a large interest in baseball, especially in Poplar Springs and Bethlehem and includes sixth, seventh and eighth grade eligibility to play, said Dixon. Well check with the game schedules to be sure theyre full time, but I can almost guarantee they are because there is Volume 123, Number 46CECILIA SPEARS | Times-AdvertiserHolmes County District School Board held a brief discussion about supplement wages to coaches of middle school baseball during their Feb. 18 meeting. See BASEBALL A2 Connectwithus24/7Getbreakingnews,videos,expandedstories,photo galleries,opinionsandmore...@WCN_HCT bonifaynow.com By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Business owner and pastor Ryan Helms came before the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce during their monthly breakfast Thursday, Feb. 20 to talk about his new business in downtown Bonifay, called the Medical Gallery. Ive been in just about every medical practice and every eld helping them reinvigorate their practice, train employees, (improve) documentation and really try to keep them out of trouble with the government (by ensuring) they have great compliance, said Helms. That business about six years ago brought me into the durable equipment department arena where I helped physicians. Not many physicians know theres durable equipment products they can sell and bill insurances out of their of ce without any more credential-Mayor Cloud announces to run for re-electionBy CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT Cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Mayor Lawrence Cloud announced his intentions to run again for mayor during the upcoming elections after the Bonifay City Council approved of Resolution 14-10 during their meeting on Monday evening, which noti es the public of the upcoming election and all the details. The qualifying applicants will be accepted from 8 a.m. on Monday, March 3, until 4:30 p.m. Friday, March 7. On the ballot will be the position of Mayor, seat two and seat four. The election will be held from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 25, at Bonifay City Hall. Council approved of a residents request to put a streetlight on Clifford Street between two existing lights that are spaced far apart, leaving two residents in the dark. Council also approved of Resolution 14-15 and 1420, which allows the city to apply for a Community Development Block Grant to provide assistance in continuing in their Waste Water Treatment Facility. Grant Writer Bob Jones read the Fair Housing Ordinance. The purpose it to read to the public that the City of Bonifay has a Fair Housing Ordinance and hold a brief discussion with the opportunity for the members of the public to asks questions, said Jones. On March 5, we will discuss it again if the public has any interest in learning more about the Fair By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY State Representative Steve Southerland visited Bonifay last Wednesday and Monday as part of his recent campaign to reconnect with voters and clear the air of potential misunderstandings caused by his political rival Bob Grahams daughter, Gwen Graham. The rst visit was to the Bonifay Kiwanis Club during their Wednesday meeting. I do not believe this is a perfect nation, said Southerland. Its kind of like perfect churches. My dad told me long ago son, if you nd a perfect church, dont join it because youre going to ruin it. He said his father told him when you get to a church, you roll up your sleeves, you get to work, you treat people with kindness, let people know you love them and you care for them, dont ever get so prideful that you that you dont say Im sorry, I made a mistake, will you forgive me? Faith is important; faith is critical, said Southerland. George Washington said it is impossible to rightly govern a people without God and the Bible. That was our found-Steve Southerland attempts to clear the airSee SOUTHERLAND A2See CLOUD A2 CECILIA SPEARS | Times AdvertiserBusiness owner Ryan Helms came before the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce during their monthly breakfast to talk about Medical Gallery, his new business in downtown Bonifay.THE MEDICAL GALLERY Pastor presents new business with a Biblical causeSee BUSINESS A2

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LocalA2 | Washington County News Wednesday, February 26, 2014 SowellTractorCo.,Inc.2841Hwy.77North,PanamaCity www.sowelltractorco.com WeTrade forAnything ThatDont Eat! Financing Arranged (WAC) NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment."WEWELCOMENEWPATIENTS,CALLTODAYFORYOURPRIORITYAPPOINTMENT" FORNEWPATIENTS 59ANDOLDERThiscertificateisgoodforacomplete MedicalEyeExamwithToddRobinson,M.D. InOurChipleyOfficeBoardCertifiedEyePhysicianandSurgeon.Theexamincludesaprescriptionforeyeglassesandtestsfor Glaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases.FORYOURAPPOINTMENTCALL: 850-638-7220ELIGIBILITY:U.S.CitizenslivingintheFloridaPanhandle, 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. 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School board member Sherley Owens also voiced concerns that Poplar Springs High Schools gymnasium bleachers arent equipped with handrails. I wouldnt be so worried if those bleachers werent so very steep, said Owens. Dixon agreed to see if the bleachers could be retrotted with a type of handrail. In other business, Kolmetz gave a glowing review of students who excel on the recent Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test. I just want to say that Im very proud of the students that scored a 5 on the FCAT, said Kolmetz. Im proud of them and I think theyll do great again this year. The next scheduled meeting of the Holmes County District School Board is set for 9 a.m. on March 4. BASEBALL from page A1ing father; that was his statement, and in our family, we grew up and we are raising our children to understand that the rst and most important priority in your life is your faith. Then, from that, you have the luxury and belief that the greatest blessing on this side of Heaven is family. Im always proud to talk about my second greatest priority of my life. I had the privilege of coming home and checking in on Mom and Dad every week, said Southerland. I promise, the more I go to D.C. and come back, the smarter my Mom and Dad get. I go over there and see the craziness that goes on, and I cant wait to run home and say thank you, thank you so much for teaching us the lessons that you taught us in our home. You cant believe as I believe and do as I do and stand on these values and go to Washington D.C. and not make enemies, said Southerland. The reason (a reporter) is following me around is not because I am loved and embraced in D.C. Its because these values that I talk about, many people disagree with. Southerland said that Margie Menzel of the News Service of Florida was following him because a year ago Nancy Pelosi chose ten targets in the United States. Four hundred and thirty ve seats in the United States House of Representatives, Speaker Nancy Pelosi targeted ten Districts to go after and win in her desire to once again become Speaker of the House, said Southerland. There was one seat east of the Mississippi, south of the Mason-Dixon Line, and that seat is ours. Its a great privilege to be on that list, but it comes with some challenges. He said many of the other targets have zzled out. There have been some (legislator) retirements. Some have said some things, sticking their foot in their mouths, so some people have really disqualied themselves. We have now slid into what the National Journal said last week is the top three race in the country, said Southerland. Because of that, the Democrats also recruited a pretty high prole name to run against us. They went to two-term governor; three-term United States Senator Bob Graham and they recruited his eldest daughter to run against us and did a very good job of clearing the eld that she will be unopposed. He said the was elected through a primary process, facing ve opponents in the process, however this isnt how the Democrats selected their candidate. We are running against a very experienced family, and since we are also going to be on the target list, everything imaginable is coming to North and Northwest Florida, said Southerland. We have never seen a congressional race like the one you are about to see. Estimations of enormous amounts of money are coming into this district in this battle. Not only will it include the money raised from Southerlands campaign and Grahams campaign, said Southerland, but it will be pouring in from outside organizations. There will be a lot of stuff that we dont know about, said Southerland. As candidates, were not allowed to coordinate with outside organizations. So when you see an advertising video, and you see the tag showing who owns or purchases that ad, it would be illegal and against Federal Election Laws for us to coordinate and know about and to participate in that ad. He said there are going to be a ton of groups coming into this district in the next year battling it out to win this seat. Southerland also addressed the continuing debate over the health care law. Ive been very clear that the last thing I want in the relationship between me and my doctor is someone like the government standing in between me and that doctor, said Southerland. We have fought that, but health care is here, the presidents signature piece of legislation, and I can disagree with the presidents decision without being mean-spirited. Our faith dictates that its okay to disagree, but you must disagree properly. He said he does not go after him personally and he does not talk about him individually. ing, he said. Insurance companies will not tell them this. It is a great stream of revenue for them when they develop that. He said he helped physicians with equipment and was involved with pharmacy chains and business owners in Jacksonville to start durable equipment companies. We set up several of them, but I was really tired of traveling, and my kids were getting to where they needed me home more, so I thought many times that Bonifay doesnt really have a full comprehensive DME company there, said Helms. Theres a lot of little niches here, but we wanted to bring a company in that wouldnt compete with those niches, work alongside them, but not directly compete with them, and so thats why the idea of the Medical Gallery was born. Helms been married to his wife for 21 years, and they have three children. Hes served as pastor of New Zion Baptist Church for 13 years. Thats really the passion of my life, said Helms. To be honest with you, I really dont care about making a lot of money. What I desire to do is to get Bible translations into the hands of unrich peoples. Helms went on to explain the need he sees for translated Bibles. As unbelievable as it may seem, there are 35,000 people groups in the different nations that dont have a Bible in their language, he said. Pastoring a small rural church, the funds are limited. The Baptist Convention were associated with (also has limited funds), so its hard to get money to put in translation work, said Helms. One of the things we want to do with the store is to pour money into translation work. Those are my motivations: to help the needs of our Holmes County folks and surrounding counties, but also help the translation work. Helms said there were some initial concerns his business, located in the old Movie Gallery, would compete with his business neighbor, Johnsons Pharmacy. Many people thought Id directly compete with Johnsons Pharmacy. I would never do that, said Helms. Mason and I have been friends as long as I can remember; we were in kindergarten together. I ran the idea by Mason and talked about even being business partners, but Mason said he thought I really didnt need him and we would do well as complementary businesses. They really gave up their Medicare number several years ago because they were tired of the regulations. The reason being that regulations for that kind of business are very strict, he said. Youve got to have a stout heart to be able to jump through all the hoops of all the regulatory issues and stay up on compliance, but thats the side of my consulting business that Im very good at, said Helms. Were going to come up alongside them and hopefully help them in some aspect. Weve given the building a facelift. If you havent been inside that building yet, I encourage you to. He assured everyone that it looks nothing like it did when it was the Movie Gallery, describing it as totally beautiful. I have everything I have invested in this, and if we go under, Masons going to a great store to move into because its fully set up for pharmacy, said Helms. Really what the idea is that you have everything right there under one roof, any equipment you might need, which includes semi-electric hospital beds. One thing we do differently at the Medical Gallery replace (the standard mattress that comes with the bed) with a nice pressure mattresses so the patient gets the best quality mattress. It costs them a little more to do it that way, he said, but in the long run the patients wont get diabetic sores or even the cumulous ulcers. He said there will also be accommodations for those women who have recently undergone a mastectomy. Were going to have a top shelf mastectomy tting room where ladies can come in, theres a private room and our staff will be trained for mastectomy tting, said Helms. Its going to be top shelf stuff with Victoria Secret quality bras and ttings. Alongside that, were going to do high quality wigs. When a lady comes in who has had a mastectomy, were going to treat her like royalty. Were going to give her a free manicure and pedicure from Vos, and were going to give her a book thats just meant so much to friends of ours by Jerry Bridges called What to Do When Life Hurts. Its just a Biblical overview of suffering, explained Helms, of why people suffer and how they can keep a right mindset in the mist of suffering. I just really try to love on these ladies, encourage them and develop a friendship with them in the ministry, said Helms. BUSINESS from page A1CEc C ILIA SPEARs S | Times AdvertiserBonifay City Council members review Resolution 1410, which is a Notice of City Election, approved of during their regular meeting on Monday night.Housing Ordinance. Council approved of advertising for another inmate supervisor because of the recent opening left by the former inmate supervisor. The next meeting of the Bonifay City Council is set for 6 p.m. Monday, March 10. CLOUD from page A1 CEc C ILIA SPEARs S | Times Advertiser Southerland visits with the residents of Bonifay Nursing and Rehabilitation Center Monday, Feb. 24. SSOUTHERLAND from page A1

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A3Wednesday, February 26, 2014 FREETOHOLMESCOUNTY RESIDENTSONLY Household HazardousWaste AmnestyDayMarch1,20148:00a.m.to12:00p.m. AtHolmesCountyRecyclingCenter ConditionallyExemptSmallQuantityGenerators(Small ReducedRate. FINDUS inPrint,OnlineandontheRoad!bonifaynow.com WeareallthingsLocal! 13Weeks26Weeks52Weeks$13.33$19.90$32.00 ItseasytosubscribeCall866-747-5050orsendfullpaymentandformbelow.*Pleasecallforout-of-countyrates.Getthebestsourceforlocalnews,interests andeventsinHolmesCountydelivered toyoueveryWednesday.Returnformto:HCT,112E.VirginiaAve,Bonifay,FL32425 Yes! Signmeupforanin-countysubscriptiontotheHolmesCountyTimesAdvertiser*13Weeks$13.3326Weeks$19.9052Weeks$32.00Name________________________________________________________________ Phone_______________________________________________________________ DeliveryAddress_______________________________________________________ City___________________________________State____Zip_________________ Paymentenclosed$____________Signature_______________________________Chargemycredit/debitcard.__Visa__MasterCard__AmEx__Discover CreditCard#__________________________________________Exp.Date_______ Special to the Times-AdvertiserHolmes County High School JROTC competed in the Pre-Area 11 Drill Competition at Chipley High School Saturday, February 15. Six teams from Holmes County High School arrived in Chipley fierce and ready to compete. Although the competition was tough, Holmes County JROTC came out among the top. Male color Guard, commanded by C/LTC DJ Rock, placed 1st. The Male Color Guard consisted of C/LTC DJ Rock, C/LTC Christian Grimes, C/1LT Blake Mancill, and C/1LT Hunter Paterson. C/LTC Christian Grimes placed 1st in Exhibition Male Armed Individual. Holmes County JROTC came in 2nd place in Regulation Unarmed Male/Mix Squad. The Male/Mix Squad consisted of the following: C/LTC Christian Grimes, C/ LTC DJ Rock, C/SGM Ashley Eberhardt, C/1LT Laurel Murley, C/SGT Bethany Jones, C/1LT Density Martinez, and C/1LT Blake Mancill. C/1LT Destiny Martinez placed 2nd in Exhibition Female Armed Individual. Holmes County JROTC came in 3rd place in Regulation Unarmed Platoon. The Unarmed Platoon consisted of C/1LT Laurel Murley, C/ SGT Bethany Jones, C/1LT Becky Padgett, C/1LT Hunter Paterson, C/1LT Destiny Martinez, C/CPL Joshua Brown, C/CPL Alexandria Sanders, C/LTC Christian Grimes, C/SGM Ashley Eberhardt, C/1LT Blake Mancill, C/CPL Jonce Palmer, and C/CPL Zachery Williams. Female Color Guard, commanded placed 3rd. Female Color Guard included C/SGM Ashley Eberhardt, C/1LT Laurel Murley, C/1LT Destiny Martinez, and C/ CPL Alexandria Sanders. At the end of the competition, each school gathered into a platoon formation for an Unarmed Knockout Drill. A Knockout Drill is a competition where cadets perform basic stationary movements. The main goal of the Knockout Drill is for each cadet to perform the stationary command that is called out correctly while maintaining a military bearing. The final three cadets that remain received a certificate. C/LTC DJ Rock placed 3rd in the Knockout Drill. Todays widespread animal overpopulation is a direct effect of the failure of many pet owners to spay or neuter their pets. With myths such as behavioral changes and health complications resulting from the procedure circulating, it can be difficult to tell if spaying/ neutering is the right choice for Fido or Fluffy. In order to save millions of homeless animals lives, as well as keep your animal in the best health possible, these myths should be put to rest once and for all. It is a popular misconception that spaying or neutering your pet can negatively affect their health or even alter their personality. In addition to helping to reduce pet overpopulation, spaying or neutering your pet reduces and can even eliminate the risk of hormone-associated cancer and diseases, said Dr. Bethany Schilling, clinical instructor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. It may also reduce or eliminate unwanted behavioral problems associated with sex hormones. If high costs are major a deterrent of spaying or neutering your pet, then youre in luck. There are numerous low-cost spaying/ neutering services found in various regions of the United States, and some areas have spay/neuter assistance programs that help subsidize the cost of the procedure at local clinics, Schilling said. It is important to remember there is also cost associated with providing for a litter of puppies or kittens, and more often than not, they are turned over to an animal shelter when the owner realizes this. Many loving pet owners are wary of spaying/neutering their pets as they do not want to cause them pain or harm. Most of the risk in spaying or neutering your pet is associated with the anesthesia for the procedure, Schilling said. This is why a good physical exam and blood work are performed to help detect underlying issues prior to the procedure. You can have your pet safely spayed or neutered at as early as 4 to 6 months of age. Prior to the onset of sexual maturity is most beneficial, Schilling said. This is both healthy for your pet and effectively helps to reduce pet overpopulation. It also beneficial in that it can eliminate various uncomfortable behaviors for Fido or Fluffy, such as nervous pacing while in heat and even male aggression. As adorable as a litter of puppies or kittens are, there are just as many wonderful pets at a nearby animal shelter that are in need of forever loving homes. Whether the previous owners lacked the time or the funds to care for them, most animals brought into shelters are loving and sweet, and no less deserving of a home than any other animal. If it is a purebred pet you desire, according to the American Humane Society one out of every four animals brought into an animal shelter are purebred. By adopting a loving dog or cat from an animal shelter, you can find the pet of your dreams as well as save a deserving animals life. Spaying or neutering your pets will not only provide longterm benefits for their health and happiness, but will also help to save the lives of homeless animals and ultimately reduce the widespread epidemic of animal overpopulation in our world today. About Pet Talk Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at vetmed.tamu. edu/pettalk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to editor@ cvm.tamu.edu.The Importance of Spaying and Neutering Your Pet PET TT ALK Sp P ECIAL TO THE TT IMEs S -A A DVERTIs S ERHolmes County JROTC was among area drill teams to place at the top in the recent competition held at Chipley High School.Holmes Countys JROTC Drill Teams successful at Pre-Area 11 Competition

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Readers of the Panama City News-Herald and viewers of other news outlets, possibly know of the recent death of Charles Whitehead, noted business man, political leader and a laundry list of civic service and a recognized life long philanthropist for worthwhile causes. Charles Whitehead died at his home on February 1, 2014 surrounded by his family. An early news release of his death listed his date of birth as January 19, 1931 in Caryville, Fla. His parents were listed as James J. Whitehead and Pally (Polly) Hodges Whitehead. The passing of this extremely well known and highly respected individual can not slip by without some mention of his humble roots in Washington County with parents emerging from pioneer families on both sides. James J. (Jimmy) Whitehead was born in the Hartford, Alabama He came to Washington County in the early 1920s probably seeking a job in the Caryville saw mill, a source of employment in the booming area. He may have come here to be near his brother, Ivan I. Whitehead, who moved from Alabama to Florida after being released from military service at the end of World War I. Ivan met and married Perry Lee Collins here. He was the Chevrolet Agent in Bonifay from 1927-30, before establishing a home near Pate Lake. This couple reared two daughters, Ivalee and Reba. Marriage Records in Washington County show the marriage of James J. Whitehead and Polly Hodges as April 3, 1927. Jimmy and Ivan Whitehead also had a sister, Mamie Whitehead, who was in Florida when she met and married C.Y. Johns on August 18, 1925. Their children were Clara Johns Roberts, Ruth Johns Givens, and Sonny, who died in early childhood. Charles Whiteheads mother, Polly Hodges Whitehead, was the offspring of a large family who settled in Caryville and followed the lumber industry of the 1930s and 40s. Her brother, Early A. Hodges, established a general mercantile business in Caryville. He also became heavily involved in the buying and selling of livestock. He married Dora Somerset and their only child, Earl Hodges, reached adulthood, before passing away. A second brother, Spurgeon Hodges, settled in Vernon and married Dora Dean Taylor and developed a successful business in his livestock venture. Their only son, Gary Hodges, married Mary Eleanor Hudson and reared Patricia and Stephen, before his death. A third brother, Crawford Hodges, chose DeFuniak Springs to establish his Lumber producing business and reared a family there. Henry Hodges, a fourth brother became a cattleman in Graceville and also established a lumber supply business. A fth brother, established Hodges Lumber and Supply Company in Panama City. His two sons, Paul and Silas, started the rst outdoor storage building, the Handi-House, in the area. Polly Hodges Whiteheads sisters include Cumi Hodges Williams who married Valery Williams. Their only child, Edna Francis Williams, married Jeff Webb of Chipley. After her untimely death, the grandparents moved to Chipley and provided a home for Penny, Jebby, Dilly and the twins, John Cole and Corey, the Webbs children. Sister Alma Hodges Johnson married Otley S. Johnson of Chipley. He served on the Washington County Commission. Their only child, ONeil Johnson (now deceased) and wife, Ann reared their family in Chipley. Dutchie Hodges Brown, a third sister, married Herman Brown. They remained in Caryville. Herman had an automotive repair business. Larry and Diane, were reared in Caryville. Many of the ancestors of Charles Whitehead were known personally by the Prattler. Other knowledge of them came from my dad, Hugh Wells, who knew the family well as he did much of his produce and mullet peddling in the thriving town of Caryville during the sawmill era. It was the writers privilege to accompany my father when he moved the Jimmy Whitehead family from Auburndale, Fla., to Panama City on December 31, 1949, to accept the position of Shop Foreman with Cook Motor Company. This is the same rm that Charles Whitehead later became a partner as CookWhitehead Ford and, in its last years, was fully owned by him. A more recent source of background information on the Hodges Family came from Jewett Harris Tadlock, who has lived in Chipley since ooding forced her and husband, Cleston William Tadlock, to vacate Caryville after the 1994 devastating ood. Jewett Harris went to work in the Early Hodges store in Caryville at the age of 18 in 1947. After her marriage, she left for two years. Upon returning, she continued to operate the business after Mr. Hodges death. At the death of Mrs. Hodges, she inherited the business, later selling the property in 1994. She accepted the job of Clerk in Caryville City Hall and continues her employment there. She told me of having Bay County Sheriff Frank McKeithen, a Vernon native, and Charles Whitehead, drop in for an unexpected visit at the City Hall just before Christmas in 2013. She commented that the two Washington County Native Sons were happy to visit Caryville. Upon Charles seeing an old photograph on the wall at City Hall of Caryvilles Ball Team back in the depression years, he immediately identi ed his dad, Jimmy Whitehead, as one of the players. My last time of seeing and visiting Charles was at the Bay County Fair ten years ago. Hester and I encountered him as he came in for the Senior Citizens Day. We sat with him as a group from a nearby church sang Hymns of the past in honor to the Seniors. It has been my privilege to add this short narrative of a Washington County Favorite Son, who made his positive mark in life in adjoining Bay County. I join Mayor Greg Brudnicki and a host of dignitaries, who paid a much deserved tribute to the life of this extra-ordinary Washington County Native during his funeral service in Panama City. See you all next week. Since Jack and I live on the Tison Family home place which was part of the Meeker Homestead Land, we are the custodians of family records. And Pearl Meeker Tison as well as her mother Mary Young Meeker were keepers. Nothing is in any kind of order, but over the years I have tried to put together a list of all the schools where Pearl taught. In the process I learned that Mary Young Meeker also taught. I thought I remembered my grandmother Hannah Brock Wells going to school to Mary Young. After nding her Long Bay contract, I con rmed that. I wrote about that last week. I had always known that my mother-in-law taught my parents. In fact, I said once four generations of my family were taught by four generations of Jacks family. In addition to my grandma and my parents, Ruth Helms, Jacks sister, taught Kenneth Harris, my rst cousin, and Hiram our son taught Jonathon Harris, my cousin Howards son. When I mentioned the Harcus name last week, I was planning to write about another school, New Prospect, which I suspected the Harcus children attended. However if they did it was not when Pearl taught there. New Prospect was located south of what we always called Wilcox Crossing on Highway 90 west before Caryville. I have a picture and a printed program of all the students in New Prospect School in 1913. These pictures and teaching certi cates tell a lot about how the educational system has changed in one hundred years. Pearl nished 8th grade at Bonifay and passed the teaching exam with a third grade certi cate in June of 1909. She would have been 15. I am not sure what she was certi ed to teach, but she had to score no lower than 40% on the following subjects: agriculture, orthinography, reading, arithmetic, English grammar, composition, history, geography, physiology, theory and practice of teaching. She achieved an overall average of 65% (60% was required.) a year later, she took the exam again and raised her overall average to 74%. There were rst, second and third grade certi cates but I cant nd the requirements for each. GOOD MORAL CHARACTER is emphasized above all. Mr. C.A. Fulford was Superintendent of Public Instruction in Holmes County. The certi cate is good for two years and was issued by the county in which the person taught. However, New Prospect was in Washington County. She began her teaching career at age 16 and I believe it was in Jackson Count. Teachers usually lived in the home of some of the school patrons. New Prospect went from grades one through 8 as did most, if not all, of the country (rural) schools of that day. Even though we lived no more than 3 or 4 miles from New Prospect, I dont recall ever having seen the building. We went to Caryville frequently, but usually went by St. Marys the black school, as we often had produce or mullet to peddle on the way. I do remember that Elder Carlton Todd was the teacher there at least one year and engaged our Mama Marie Wells to teach one day. How excited she was to be a substitute teacher! We heard a lot about her experiences that day. I have pieced together Pearls teaching career from photos she took and labeled with her Kodak Brownie Box camera. The souvenir program which I found listing all the students must have been done by a professional, however, because Pearl is pictured on the front. I cant identify the ones in the picture, but perhaps family members can identify some of them. They are Maggie, Lizzie, & Katie Burke, Bessie & Nellie Daniels, Maxie, Lucinda, & Anna Sims, Lola & Arbell Crosby, Laura Wilcox, Perlia & Minnie Anderson, Willie, Evie & Allie Jones. Vera Elliot, Esther, John, & Letcher Wilcox, Carl Marshall, Alto Anderson, Bertilee Crosby, Alice Elliot, Columbus Burke, Albert & Hubberd Crosby, George Daniel, Mallie Elliott, Laury Wilcox, and Harvey Jones. I believe Miss Pearl as her students knew her lived with the Elliot family when she taught at New Prospect, although I know she lived with the Cleatus Bush family for a time. I know who some of the people in the picture are or were and perhaps you will be able to recognize some of them. I hope family members and relatives can enjoy this glimpse of the past.HAPPY CORNERHazel Wells Tison Old teaching certi cates tell story of 100 years of educationPERRYS PRATTLEPerry Wells With partisan gridlock all too prevalent in todays Washington, I have worked hard to break through those barriers and join with Republicans and Democrats who are as interested as I am in growing jobs and restoring certainty for hardworking families. The recently-passed Farm Bill is an example of what can be accomplished by putting partnership above partisanship. For more than a year, Congress debated the latest reauthorization of the Farm Bill, which sets national agriculture and food policy for the next ve years. With Florida being a national leader in agricultural production and the second largest specialty cropproducing state in America, I was committed to doing all I could to advance a common sense Farm Bill that restored certainty for North and Northwest Florida farmers and strengthened our rural communities. I was honored to be the only Floridian in Congress appointed to the bipartisan conference committee tasked with ironing out the nal Farm Bill agreement. It was a tremendous, hard-earned victory when both parties and both chambers came together for the good of the American people and passed a ve-year Farm Bill that provides much-needed relief to our hardworking farming families and saves taxpayers $23 billion while allowing us to nally move past the costly, big government policies passed under then-Speaker Nancy Pelosis Farm Bill six years ago. I am also pleased Republicans and Democrats came together to support a provision in the Farm Bill I introduced to empower vulnerable families with a renewed opportunity for earned success. By including a 10-state pilot program for work, job training, and community volunteerism for healthy, working age food stamp bene ciaries, weve now put nutrition assistance on the same proven path of success that helped change a culture for the better during welfare reform in the 1990s. As the rst reforms to the food stamp program since the successful welfare reforms of 1996, the Farm Bill takes important steps to empower families in need with a renewed opportunity at earned success. Additionally, the Farm Bill includes several provisions I crafted to sustain the economies of our rural communities. The bipartisan Building Rural Communities Act ensures that small, rural areas have access to the technical assistance and training necessary to enhance vital infrastructure including police and re stations and community health clinics all at no additional cost to Americas taxpayers. Another provision I advanced strengthens our forestry communities by ensuring that wood products qualify under the USDAs Biobased Marketing Program. I also fought to guarantee the long-term viability of citrus production in Florida by helping secure $125 million to research remedies for citrus greening, a disease decimating citrus groves in Florida and nationwide. Updating the Farm Bill is never easy, but this bill represents the good that can come out of both parties and both chambers rising above politics to do what is right for the American people. Our farmers and rural families deserve real solutions not political mud ghts and this bipartisan Farm Bill is a big step in the right direction.Southerland urges putting partnership above partisanship STEVE SOUTHERLANDCharles Whitehead gave of himself to local residents and beyond HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. OPINION www.bonifaynow.comWednesday, February 26, 2014 APage 4SectionThe views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $13.30; 26-weeks: $19.90; 52 weeks: $32.00 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $17.70; 26 weeks: 26.50; 52 weeks: $43.00The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Carol Kent, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION clamb @chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 ADVERTISING Stephanie Smith: ssmith@ chipleypaper. com 850-547-9414

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A5Wednesday, February 26, 2014 Youplayamajorrolewhenyoureportanelectricoutagein yourarea.Ourcustomerresponsecenterisavailable24/7 toansweryourcallandhundredsmorelikeit.Behindthe scenes,weassociatephonenumberswithaccountnumbers, pinpointoutagelocationsanddispatchcrewstorestore powerquicklyandsafely.You helpusputtechnologytowork. Togetherwepoweryourlife. Weputtechnologytowork.Toreportanoutageto WestFloridaElectriccall(800)342-7400 or1-855-mywfeca(1-855-699-3322) March1,2014 HolmesCounty HighSchoolEntryFee:$55.00 Admission:$5 ch 1, 2014arM yountolmes CH choolHigh S ee: $55.00y FtrnE dmission: $5A Formoreinformation: ContactKrystalCook(850)258-9569 BONIFAYS DOWNHOME TheCharteroftheCityofBonifay,Floridaprovides foranannualelectionofofcerstobeheldonthe fourth(4th)TuesdayinMarchofeveryyear. CityClerkofBonifayannouncesthattheCityof BonifayelectionwillbeheldonTuesday,March 25,2014withthepollsopeningfrom 7a.m.to7p.m. TheMayorandtwoCounculMembersinseats two(2)andfour(4)willbeelectedfortwo(2)years. QualifyingofCandidateswillbeacceptedform 8:00a.m.Monday,March3,2014until4:30p.m. Friday,March7,2014.OfcehoursatCityHallare 8:00a.m.-4:30p.m.VOTINGANNOUNCEMENT CLOSINGSALERADIOSHACKofCHIPLEYMITCHELLSIGHT&SOUNDWILLBECLOSING asofMarch31,2014WillRemainOpen!!! ComeintoRadioShackofChipleyforaCLOSINGSALE upto 50%OFF onsomeitems TheNewStorewillbeLocatedat11515Hwy90, Chipley,Florida,acrossfromTownsends BuildingSupply. NewStoreHours Monday-Friday8:00amto5:00pmand Saturday8:00amto2:00pm. 5019449 Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 MARIANNA Chipola College ofcials held an Open House and RibbonCutting, Tuesday, Feb. 18, to celebrate the opening of the colleges new welding program. Members of the Chipola District Board of Trustees, welding students and college personnel were on hand for tours of the lab. Chipola has a full class of 20 students currently enrolled in the 1,170 clockhour course which can be completed in approximately one year. Byron Ward, the Welding Career Coach who helped establish the program, says, We have an excellent training facility and a great rst class of students. The program features state-ofthe-art welding equipment in a clean lab environment. Hybrid learning, simulation technologies, and open education resources are used in the curriculum. Chipola welding instructor Patrick Kennedy holds multiple certications as a Pipe Welder and is a Certied Welding Inspector. He has worked in the nuclear power and gas pipeline industry for more than 20 years. Dr. Jason Hurst, Chipola executive vice president, said, We are excited about the opportunities this new welding program will provide for the citizens in our district. Welding is a targeted occupation that offers high wages and excellent benets. The welding program is made possible through a grant awarded to the Alabama/Florida Technical Employment Network (AF-TEN). Chipola, L. B. Wallace, Northwest Florida State, Pensacola State, and Wallace Community College formed the consortium that was awarded a $10 million grant by the U.S. Department of Labors Employment and Training Administration. The grant supports colleges that provide training for advanced manufacturing jobs. Each college shares a portion of the grant. Chipolas share is $1.6 million. SPECIAL TO THE NEWs SCollege ofcials cut ribbon to mark the opening of Chipolas new welding program.Chipola Holds Welding Open House and Ribbon Cutting PP HOTOs S BY BB ILL MILLERPonce de Leon High Schools Homecoming Court includes: King and Queen Trace Brannon and Hannah Howell; Senior Court Attendants August Brown, Austin Shaw, Kole Hicks and Chasity Wilson; Junior Attendants Dalton Thames and Nikki DeMauro; Sophomore Attendants Hossam El Sankary and Chelsea Watson; Freshmen Attendants Christian Frutos Creamer and Chambleigh Webster; Eighth Grade Attendants Sam Harcus and Mahaley Owen; Seventh Grade Attendants Tanner McKinley and Mackenzie Hicks; and Sixth Grade Attendants Timothy Thomas and Chloe Weavers. Left, Ponce de Leon High School 2014 Homecoming royalty is King Trace Brannon and Queen Hannah Howell. PPOnNCE DE LEOnN HOmMECOmMInNG

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A6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, February 26, 2014 $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL enewCollegeofAppliedStudiesatFSUPanamaCitywasapprovedby theFSUBoardofTrusteesinJune2010andallowsthecampustomore easilyrespondtoworkforceneedsinourarea.WeinviteyoutosupporteCampaignforOurCommunitysUniversitybyhelpingusbuildan endowmentfortomorrowsjobs.Ourgoalistoestablisha$5million endowmentfortheCollegeofAppliedStudiesby2017,whichwillallow FSUPanamaCitytoestablishstudentscholarships,implementnew degreeprogramsandprovidenewequipmentandtechnology. Tolearnhowyoucansupportourcommunitysuniversity,contactMary BethLovingoodat(850)770-2108ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. THECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs SUPPORTOUR COMMUNITYS UNIVERSITY LocalState releases scores for teachersTALLAHASSEE (AP) Florida parents may get a chance for the rst time to see how more than 100,000 teachers across the state performed under a complex formula designed to help evaluate how well students are learning. The Florida Department of Education on Monday reluctantly released performance scores for about two-thirds of the states teachers after losing a lawsuit over whether the information was public. The Florida Times-Union in October 2012 rst asked for the information, which the state had planned to use as part of a contentious new evaluation system for teachers. An appeals court sided with the newspaper late last year. The teacher scores are meant to measure how much a teacher either helped or detracted a student from learning. The teacher scores are based primarily on how well students did on standardized tests such as the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test or FCAT. The education department released scores dating back to 2011. Education Commissioner Pam Stewart told teachers the department would not post the individual teacher scores on its website, but told them the news media likely would release them. State education ofcials as well as school district superintendents tried to caution against drawing conclusions based on the data, since the scores make up only 50 percent of the information used to annually evaluate teachers. Andy Ford, president of the Florida Education Association, went further and called it awed and meaningless. The teachers union had joined with the state in trying to block the release of the scores. Once again the state of Florida puts test scores above everything else in public education and once again it provides false data that misleads more than it informs, Ford said. The Florida Times-Union did its own analysis of the released data and reported that last year 58 percent of school districts in Florida saw a majority of their teachers receive scores below statewide norms.By MATTHEW BEATON 522-5114 | @matthewbeaton mbeaton@pcnh.com TALLAHASSEE Its ofcial: Slots are on the table in the upcoming state legislative session. A measure to allow the six Florida counties that already approved the Las Vegas-style games is part of a three-bill package that the state Senate Gaming Committee unveiled Monday. The likelihood of passage, however, is unclear as the Legislature heads into session March 4. The 453-page primary bill (SPB 7052) contains a veritable catchall of gaming recommendations made in the past year after the Senate panel went barnstorming across the state to collect public comment. In addition to putting slots at six pari-mutuel facilities, including Ebro Greyhound Park, the bill would create a gaming commission, pave the way for two South Florida destination casinos, require greyhound injury reporting and cut down on overall greyhound races. Slot machines would be allowed at pari-mutuel facilities that held a countywide referendum after July 6, 2010. Washington County approved slots for Ebro Greyhound Park in 2012, when residents passed the measure by 57 percent. The state attorney general blocked their installation, however, a move that long has vexed Ebro president and general manager Stockton Hess, who said the voters should be outraged if this bill doesnt pass. It was a binding referendum; it was not a straw ballot, Hess said Monday. The voters should not be ignored or disenfranchised. Hess said he has no crystal ball and wouldnt handicap the likelihood of the bill passage, but he gave assurances it would be a very political process. He pointed out its no secret the pari-mutuel facilities need other options to lure in players, particularly now that dog racing is a losing venture. One surprise in the bill package, though, is the absence of a decoupling provision. Decoupling is the effort to remove the requirement for tracks to run a minimum number of greyhound races to operate a card room. Many were confident decoupling was a shoe-in, but the bill only includes a provision that would cut tracks required races down to 100 performances a year. (A performance is eight races.) Ebro currently is required to run 167 performances annually. Committee Chairman Garrett Richter, R-Naples, who decided what went into the bill, pushed hard for the idea in committee but faced opposition from influential state Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, who said such a move would mean picking winners and losers. The current proposal would reduce greyhound races overall, but it likely will disappoint tracks and animalwelfare advocates who sought to break the ties between dog races and card rooms altogether. The other two bills in the package are significantly smaller. One would create a list of public records exemptions, mostly for the proposed gaming commission, and would require further gambling expansion be put to a vote by state constitutional amendment. The Senate panel will discuss the bills at its March 3 meeting but will not vote to introduce them. Richter said in a memo that he wants a thorough, deliberate process so members can fully vet the legislation. Richter said plenty of good measures failed to make the initial draft, but the committee can consider such proposals as amendments. That way, any proposed substantive changes will be transparent, and committee members will have ample opportunities to debate policy implications, he said. Meanwhile, the anti-gaming group No Casinos trashed the bill package, calling it Christmas in February for out-ofstate gambling interests. This legislation reeks of gambling interest influence, said John Sowinski, No Casinos president. I have yet to find any major provision that isnt there at the request of somebody in the gambling industry. Gaming bill sets table for slots The current proposal would reduce greyhound races overall, but it likely will disappoint tracks and animal-welfare advocates who sought to break the ties between dog races and card rooms altogether. By MATTHEW BEATON 522-5114 | @matthewbeaton mbeaton@pcnh.com TALLAHASSEE Proposed state legislation could deal pay-to-remove mugshot websites a fatal blow, but some worry the action would restrict access to public records. Companion bills have passed unanimously through initial committee stops in both chambers, but take different approaches to solving the problem. The Senate version (SB 298) would go after the websites directly, outlawing payment for removal, or modication, of online mugshots. The House version (HB 265) would bar law enforcement agencies, including jails, from electronically publishing and disseminating mugshots. They still would be publicly accessible, but interested parties, like the media and commercial websites devoted to displaying mugshots, would need an individual public records request for each one and law enforcement could require payment. That could make the records costly, time-consuming and paperwork-intensive, critics argue. The Florida Press Association, of which The News Herald is a member, has grave concerns about shutting down electronic dissemination. The bill creates a newsgathering issue because someone must go to the jail in person to pick up a hard copy of the mugshot, said Sam Morley, the groups general counsel. Jim McGuire, the groups outside counsel, went a step further, ripping lawmakers for trying to impede access to public records. Its the idea that the state constitution says government records are open, but lets keep them closed by denying the easy means of access, he said. McGuire pointed out the workaround that anyone with the time can go to the jail in person each day and make the request, print out the records and post them online. Local media have the resources to go to police stations, he said, but not the 9-to-5 working public, the disabled and the homebound. Additionally, getting mugshots from another part of the state would require hours in the car or waiting for days by the mailbox, which makes no sense, McGuire said. The House bill just creates an unnecessary inconvenience and it assumes that public records generally are going to be used for a bad purpose rather than a good purpose, he said. And to me thats counter to what the Florida Constitution stands for. Both lawyers sympathize with the Legislatures effort to crack down on the pay-to-remove sites, but McGuire called it a sledgehammer approach to a small problem. Any solution which is going to deny convenient access to government records is a bad solution, he said.Enforcement issuesSenate Criminal Justice Committee Chairman Greg Evers, R-Baker, gave the Senate version a hearing already and stands behind outlawing payment for the removal of mugshots. Some, however, have pointed out Florida could not force websites outside the state to comply. There could possibly be enforcement problems, but were looking at the different opportunities and the different avenues that are available, Evers said, adding: Were still working and tweaking the language. Evers hinted a provision similar to the House language removing electronic uploading and dissemination could be included in the Senate bill, but he didnt elaborate. In order for them to get the mugshots, they have to be generated out of the state of Florida, he said.Bills target online mugshots

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SPORTs S www.bonifaynow.com ASection By ERIC JORGENSENHalifax Media Group CORAL GABLES Chipley graduate Karsten Whitson returning to the mound for the Florida Gators this season after missing all of last year with an injury had a four-run lead before threw his rst pitch Sunday. Combined with a tworun fourth inning, it turned out to be enough, as the 20th-ranked Gators beat the 17th-ranked Miami Hurricanes 6-4 in the series nale on Sunday afternoon. Whitson, making his second start of the season, allowed two runs on three hits and one walk in three innings. He struck out one in an outing where he threw 54 pitches. Every time he goes out there he needs to learn something new and obviously, he needs to be good for us to be good, said Florida head coach Kevin OSullivan. And he will. But, to expect him to come out and throw seven shutout innings in his second start after missing almost two years is unrealistic, so well build on that and get better for the next outing. Whitsons outing Sunday was an improvement over his rst one this year, when he allowed three runs on four hits in two innings. Whitson could be a key to Floridas success this year. In 2011, he was named national freshman pitcher of the year by Perfect Game, and was named a freshman all-American by Baseball America, Louisville Slugger and the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association. He was also on the Southeastern Conferences all-freshman team, having nished 8-1 with a 2.40 ERA as a regular member of Floridas weekend rotation. In 2012, he appeared in 14 games and was 4-0 with a 3.51 ERA. Sunday, the Gators scored four runs on six hits in the rst inning, and added two more in the fourth inning, giving Florida a 6-2 lead when Whitson gave way to the rst of six relief pitchers. The rst of those, A.J. Puk, was awarded the win, since Whitson did not pitch enough innings as the starter to qualify for the victory. I told the players before the game to be a gritty team and get out with a win no matter how we have to do it, OSullivan said. Our strength is our depth. Weve got a lot of young guys to work in: We started four freshmen in the lineup. John Sternagel got his rst start and got a couple of hits. A.J. Puk came in and did a nice job. Logan Shore did a nice job. Kirby Snead came in and did a nice job. This is a different environment. Its one thing to pitch at this level, but now you have to pitch on the road against a quality team. Were young. Were not nearly a nished product yet and weve got a lot of work to do, but I liked the ght we showed today and hopefully well look back down the road and think, thats kind of what got us going. Florida tied its Saturday night output of six hits in the first inning alone Sunday after batting through the order and putting up four runs, courtesy of three singles, two doubles and a triple. The Gators return home to McKethan Stadium to face Florida Gulf Coast on Thursday with the first pitch slated for 7 p.m. local time. Whitson solid in UF victory By JASON SHOOT747-5069 | @PCNHJasonShoot jshoot@pcnh.com CHIPLEY If Chipleys victory over West Gadsden could be summarized in two words, they would be preparation and composure. The Tigers shrugged off West Gadsdens concerted efforts to create a chaotic environment on the basketball court Friday night and pulled away for a 73-53 victory in the Region 2-1A nals. Chipley will play Hamilton County, a 79-69 winner over Hawthorne on Friday night, in the Class 1A state seminals on Wednesday at The Lakeland Center. The game tips off at 11 a.m. CST. Chipley, 22-2, and West Gadsden,19-4, operated at a frenetic pace early on, but the Tigers assumed control with six straight points to close the rst quarter and another 12 points to start the second. Trent Forrest capped the run with a 3-pointer to put Chipley on top 30-14 four minutes before halftime. Chipley remained composed in the face of the Panthers full-court press and halfcourt traps, and the Tigers maintained a double-digit lead for the rest of the game. Chipley ultimately led by as many as 22 points and held a comfortable 60-38 cushion going into the nal quarter. Chipleys Tyrome Sharpe, who scored 18 points to complement Forrests game-high 24, said coach Joel Orlando had the Tigers ready to counter the Panthers aggressive defense. Coach talked about them at practice and he said it was going to be like that, Sharpe said. He let us go at it. Coach had the whistle. There were no fouls. None. West Gadsden ran into foul trouble early and had difficulty keeping Chipley corralled. The Panthers clawed within 60-46 in the fourth quarter, but West Gadsden coach Andrew Moten was assessed with a technical foul with 5 minutes left. Sharpe made both free throws to push the lead back to 16 and ultimately put the outcome out of reach. Lajarous Davis and Archie Albritton scored 12 points apiece for the Panthers. Adrian Sims, a Chipley freshman who scored 10 points, echoed Sharpes thoughts that the practice leading up to the game was crucial. Now the Tigers are returning to state in the hunt for their second state championship in three years. We played with heart, Sims said. Logan Justice is a senior who is one of only two holdovers Sharpe is the other from the team that collected a state title in 2012. Justice said the Tigers have played with a target on our back and have work ahead of them to bring home a state championship next week. We cant go down there bigheaded, Justice said. We have to feel like everyone is at our level and our competition. WEST GADSDEN (53) Davis 12, Albritton 12, Brown 7, Sweet 8, Bradwell 6, Kenon 3, Gibson 4, Johnson 1. CHIPLEY (73) Forrest 24, Sims 10, Z. Campbell 8, J. Campbell 6, Sharpe 18, Justice 4, Floyd 1, S. Swint 2. West Gadsden 14 10 14 15 53 Chipley 18 22 20 13 73Chipley cruisesTigers overcome Panthers pressure BOysYS basBASKetballETBALL classCLASS 1aA RegiEGIOnN FinalsINALS CARO RO L KK ENT | TIMES ADVERTISER From staff reportsThe 2014 Vernon Yellow Jackets boys weightlifting team competed in their rst meet of the year Feb. 11 against Bozeman. The Jackets walked away with a sound 70-10 victory. This is the rst full season of Vernon having a competitive team since Coach Johns arrived last Spring. With several lifters who have a great opportunity to qualify for the State Weightlifting Finals in April, this looks to be an exciting year for the Jacket lifters. Competitive weightlifting is the cornerstone for the progression the Jacket Football program is hoping to continue building into the future. Individual winners from the meet include Zack Wiesner in the 129 pound class, Ryan Malloy in the 139 pound class, Brandon Malloy in the 154 pound class, Joey Gimenez in the 169 pound class, Traice Adams in the 183 pound class, JT Padgett in the 199 pound class, Darrion Peterson in the 219 pound class, and Marlon Stephens in the 238 pound class. The next meet for the Jackets will be at Rutherford Thursday, Feb. 27. The Jackets will also be hosting one of the sectional state qualiers at VHS at 11:30 a.m. Monday, March 24. This past week also marked another step for the Yellow Jacket athletic department as they competed in the rst boys track meet on many years at Chipley High School. Austin Brown took top honors in the long jump with a 19 feet 2 inch jump and Tristan Porter took rst place in the discus. Runners also competed well in the running events for the Jackets. Coach Johns is coaching the track team as well and a girls team is in the works as well. Many people are not aware but VHS elded its rst girls weightlifting team this year as well coached by Coach Chaz Johns. 5 girls competed the entire season as well as the state qualier. By this time next year VHS will eld both boys and girls track and boys and girls weightlifting teams. Vernon High School reps add they would like to congratulate all the athletes who are dedicating their time to building these programs.CATHR R INE LAMB | TIMES ADVERTISERSarah Gilbert signed with Alabama Southern University on Feb. 21, 2014 in the Chipley High School Library. Pictured from Left to Right: Front Row: Lana Gilbert (mom), Sarah Gilbert, Grace Gilbert (sister) and Bill Gilbert (dad). Back Row: Kirby Baxter (Alabama Southern Coach), Brooke Powell (Alabama Southern Coach) and Sacher Dickson (Chipley High School Coach).VHS dominates first weightlifting meet This past week also marked another step for the Yellow Jacket athletic department as they competed in the rst boys track meet on many years at Chipley High School. MOOVingING UpPWednesday, February 26, 2014 Page 7

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LocalA8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, February 26, 2014 1120327 FloridaSmallBusiness DevelopmentCenterLearnhowour300plusyearsofindustry experiencecanbenetyourbusiness.OFFERINGCONFIDENTIAL,NOCOSTCONSULTINGVisitnorthoridabiz.com orcall850.747.3204 AnnouncestheOpeningofa GeneralLawPractice ServingHolmes,Washington, Jackson&WaltonCounties!RealEstate!Leases!Landlord/Tenant!BusinessLaw!Criminallaw!Appeals!Probate!Wills&Trusts!Guardianship!ProbateAdmin!ConstructionLaw Over23YearsExperience Martindale-HubbleRated: TM FormerCountyJudge Officesat:204N.EtheridgeStreet Bonifay,Florida32425 (850)614-1052 475HarrisonAvenue PanamaCity,Florida32401 (850)215-1800 mjhlaw@wowway.comThehiringofalawyerisanimportantdecisionthatshouldnotbe basedsolelyonadvertisements.Beforeyoudecide,askustosend youfreewritteninformationaboutourqualificationsand experience. Attorney MichaelJ.Hauversburk AnnouncestheOpeningofa GeneralLawPractice Wealsotakecareof (850)638-5885 MostVehicles Upto5qts. syntheticblend MostVehicles $1995 WeSteam forFree!*NotAllitems canbesteamed. By CHRIS OLWELL747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.com CHIPLEY The oods of the past summer caused of millions of dollars of damage to Washington County infrastructure, and when rainwater leaked into the county courthouse, it alerted ofcials to problems that led to the buildings condemnation. Not long after ofcials noticed the standing water in the basement, they also began to notice problems with the exterior of the building. Then, a roughly 800-pound chunk of stone fell from the top of the courthouse. Then they found rotten wood, water damage, peeling paint and mold. We got back at least a dozen different strains of mold, ve of which were deemed to be immediate health risks, said Circuit Judge Christopher Patterson, who spearheads a committee tasked with solving the courthouse dilemma. When air quality tests of the Washington County Courthouse came back in December, ofcials shut it down and moved into temporary locations at an annex next door that also houses the Sheriffs Ofce and the county building a few blocks away. The move resolved health concerns, but it created a raft of new problems. Evidence in criminal cases had to be relocated, as did tens of thousands of ofcial records, some of which were coated with a visible layer of mold and will need to be cleaned. People are safe. We dont have any immediate risk, except for people who may walk by that courthouse and things fall on their head, Patterson said. And Im not being facetious.Sec EC URi I Ty Y c C ONce CE RNs SThe move also created security concerns because the new digs were never intended for holding court, at least not felony criminal court. Judges wait outside in their cars before taking the bench because there are no chambers. Prisoners wait for their hearings locked in the back of squad cars because there are no holding cells. We are in a wonderfully more secure place than we were a month ago, Patterson said. Were making good progress. Court workers have scrambled to install locks, cameras and other security measures to at least reduce the risk, but Patterson, who earlier this month locked himself in a bathroom because he had nowhere else to wait for attorneys and a defendant in a criminal case to enter the courtroom, said in an interview that, under the current circumstances, its not a matter of if security will be breached; its a matter of when. Certain aspects of the transition to what ofcials hope is a temporary courtroom next door in the Sheriffs Ofce have been relatively simple. Transferring computers, phones, metal detectors and other equipment was accomplished quickly, but moving a holding cell to secure prisoners waiting to see a judge? Thats not happening, and its causing security risks for everyone involved. Most everyone whos in custody is appearing via video from the jail with their attorney there at the jail with them, said County Judge Colby Peel. But, he said, eventually a trial requires the defendant to be present in the courtroom, so thats what were struggling with right now.SKi I N i I N The HE GAMe E Thats not the only struggle Washington County leaders are having. The Board of County Commissioners has decided that demolishing the old courthouse and rebuilding in the same location is the best solution. An architect estimated it would cost more than $4.75 million to renovate the old courthouse and more than $8.8 million to build a new, 30,000-square-foot facility with two courtrooms. Washington County doesnt have $4.75 million, let alone $8.8 million. Ofcials are looking to Tallahassee for help and trying to scrape together what money they can. I believe that the county is going to have to put some skin in this game, said County Attorney Jeff Goodman. Were not going to walk with our hat to Tallahassee, and theyre going to give us $8.5 million and tell us to have a good time. That will be a problem for Washington County, which is already more than $6 million in debt and has operated at a decit for the past two years. Goodman said hes hopeful the county might be able to renance that loan, but he was not optimistic about securing another loan to pay for a courthouse. Our initial plan was to pay for this ourself, but it just exploded on us, Goodman said. Washington County had set aside about $700,000 to repair the courthouse, but that was before ofcials learned the extent of the problems with the building. They thought it was just rainwater getting into the building, but the water spawned mold that got into the buildings air-handling units, particularly the one that feeds the courtroom on the second oor. Ofcials are discussing increasing the surcharge on trafc citations by $30, but even that would generate only about $115,000 a year, said interim Clerk of Courts Harold Bazzel. Bazzel said he thinks the only way the county could raise the money would be to increase property taxes, but he didnt expect that idea to be popular with county commissioners, especially in an election year. MARIANNA Chipola College ofcials held an Open House and RibbonCutting, Tuesday, Feb. 18, to celebrate the opening of the colleges new welding program. Members of the Chipola District Board of Trustees, welding students and college personnel were on hand for tours of the lab. Chipola has a full class of 20 students currently enrolled in the 1,170 clockhour course which can be completed in approximately one year. Byron Ward, the Welding Career Coach who helped establish the program, says, We have an excellent training facility and a great rst class of students. The program features state-ofthe-art welding equipment in a clean lab environment. Hybrid learning, simulation technologies, and open education resources are used in the curriculum. Chipola welding instructor Patrick Kennedy holds multiple certications as a Pipe Welder and is a Certied Welding Inspector. He has worked in the nuclear power and gas pipeline industry for more than 20 years. Dr. Jason Hurst, Chipola executive vice president, said, We are excited about the opportunities this new welding program will provide for the citizens in our district. Welding is a targeted occupation that offers high wages and excellent benets. The welding program is made possible through a grant awarded to the Alabama/Florida Technical Employment Network (AF-TEN). Chipola, L. B. Wallace, Northwest Florida State, Pensacola State, and Wallace Community College formed the consortium that was awarded a $10 million grant by the U.S. Department of Labors Employment and Training Administration. The grant supports colleges that provide training for advanced manufacturing jobs. Each college shares a portion of the grant. Chipolas share is $1.6 million. Speci PECI Al L TO The HE NeNE Ws SCollege ofcials cut ribbon to mark the opening of Chipolas new welding program.Chipola Holds Welding Open House and Ribbon CuttingOfcials seek solution after Washington courthouse condemnationPeople are safe. We dont have any immediate risk, except for people who may walk by that courthouse and things fall on their head. And Im not being facetious.Circuit Judge Christopher Patterson

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Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser BPAGE 1Section EXTRATrivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) A person would gain an extra how many pounds each year by drinking an extra can of sugarladen soda each day? 5, 10, 15, 20 2) What work did Typhoid Mary hold that allowed her to infect so many people of the disease? Cook, Nurse, Prostitute, Maid 3) In the U.S. approximately what percent of men ask for parent approval for their brides hand in marriage? 4, 6, 8, 10 4) Whom did Erle Stanley Gardner introduce in a series of books? Luke Skywalker, Perry Mason, Lone Ranger, Tarzan 5) When was the rst pay-per-view television system? 1951, 1960, 1972, 1983 6) Where is the country of Djibouti? Europe, Asia, S. America, Africa 7) From older TVs The Big Valley what was the name of Heaths (Lee Majors) horse? Beauty, Hilltop, Charger, Maggie 8) Each year American dentists use about how many tons of gold for llings? 9, 13, 17, 21 9) What do American moms say they need more of the most? Time, Love, Patience, Money 10) Whose original name was the Elgins? Spinners, Temptations, Drifters, Stylistics 11) What is deglutition the medical term for? Sneezing, Blinking, Swallowing, Sprain 12) Who was president when Minnesota, Oregon, and Kansas were admitted to the Union? Buchanan, Pierce, Grant, Taylor 13) Of these 1990s TV series, which aired the most original episodes at 202? Party of Five, Spin City, Ally McBeal, X-Files 14) Which bird hovers like a helicopter? Wren, Finch, Hummingbird, Robin ANSWERS 1) 15. 2) Cook. 3) 4 percent. 4) Perry Mason. 5) 1951. 6) Africa. 7) Charger. 8) 13. 9) Time. 10) Temptations. 11) Swallowing. 12) Buchanan. 13) X-Files. 14) Hummingbird. Wednesday, FEBRUARY 26 2014 More than 100 participants wore red and hit the pavement as Doctors Memorial Hospital and Holmes County Health Department joined for Doctors Memorial Hospitals annual Heart Healthy Walk on Feb. 20 to celebrate 125 years of Public Hearth and raise awareness for those who have battled heart disease. Heart Healthy Walk raises awarenessPHOTOS BY CECILIA SPEARS | Times-AdvertiserLined up, one by one, walkers grabbed their bags, donned their red shirts and lined up for this years annual Heart Healthy Walk. At right, the Holmes County Health Department was presented with literature for tips on healthy living in celebration of 125 years of Public Health. Below, one by one or in groups, many came out to show their support to the cause.

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra and Anders welcome Colton DavidDerek and Kristin Anders would like to announce the birth of their son, Colton David Anders. Colton was born Dec. 26, 2013, weighing 6 pounds, 14 ounces and measuring 20 inches in length. Maternal grandparents are David and Pam Hutchinson of Bonifay. Paternal grandparents are Wanda Jones of Bonifay and the late Wayne Anders of Bonifay. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO EXTRABonifay Kiwanis Club made a $500 donation to Bethlehem High Schools Junior Beta Club to assist them in their travel to compete in Nationals, slated to be held in Virginia in June. Bonifay Kiwanis Club made a $500 donation to Bethlehem Elementary Schools fth grade class to help fund their upcoming class trip to St. Augustine.Businesses unite to raise funds for Andrea WrightLocal businesses have networked together to raise money to help Andrea Wright, a Washington County teen who lost her leg after a January hunting accident. A basket containing more than $1,000 of gift certi cates from local merchants will soon be raf ed off, with Andrea herself drawing the winning ticket around Tuesday, April 8. Tickets for $10 each and are available in Bonifay at The Bead Garden (849-4616) and The Silver Door (547-3321) and in Vernon at South Bridge Styles (535-2866). Please make checks payable to: Bene t for Andrea Wright, Acct. # 216680 Participating merchants include:The Bead Garden Pats Electrical Contracting Inc. The Silver Door Bush Paint Auto Graphix Sims Insurance Avon Products Perfect Pool Supplies KC PIZZA Main Street Market Docs Market Bonifay Athletic Taylor Chiropractic Townsend Building supply Colonial Restaurant Brock Furniture & Gifts Modern Tech Squad Permanent Makeup by Elsie A Plus pharmacy Pho Noodle & Kaboodle Southern Comfort Ollie Maes Boutique South Bridge Styles Soapy Bliss Piggly Wiggly (Bonifay) Dees Restaurant Bonifay Seafood Market Heavenly Hair Panhandle Lumber & Supply Dog Dayz Spa Bonifay Athletic x 2 Gift Certi cates All Star TiresSunny Hills Utility Company, Inc. to be a Customer MeetingTwo representatives of the Sunny Hills Utility Company will be holding a Customer Meeting at the Sunny Hills Community Center, at 6 p.m., Feb. 26, for those customers who wish to stop by and learn more about the company, the recent changes that have been made to the system, and to ask any questions they may have with regards to the system and the utility. This meeting is scheduled to last from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. If anyone has a speci c question for the utility, they can email their question to: RDerossett@uswatercorp. net. This will allow the utility representatives to prepare in advance to answer any question you may have.Sound of Music at ChipolaMARIANNA Chipola College theatre-goers are invited to enjoy dinner-and-a-show for opening night of the college production of The Sound of Music, Wednesday, Feb. 26. Tickets for the Opening Night Gala are on sale now in the Center for the Arts Box Of ce. Gala dinner tickets are $30. Play tickets$8must be purchased separately and can be purchased at the same time as the Gala ticket. Deadline for dinner reservations is Feb. 19. No additional dinner seating will be available the night of the event. The Opening Night Gala will include dinner in the Center for the Arts Experimental Theatre and a pre-performance chat with Director Charles Sirmon before the show. Show tickets without the dinner go on sale to the public, Wednesday, Feb. 12. The Center for the Arts Box Of ce is open Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Friday, from 9 a.m. to noon. All proceeds will go to the Chipola ACT Fund. For ticket information, call 718-2420.Washington County Farm Bureau annual Spaghetti SupperCHIPLEY The Washington County Farm Bureau will hold their annual Spaghetti Supper in conjunction with the Washington County Youth Fair again this year. The supper will be at the Washington County Agricultural Center from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., Feb. 28. Tickets are $6 for adults and $3 for children under 12. Advanced tickets can be purchased at the Washington County Farm Bureau of ce, the Ag Center or from any Washington County Farm Bureau Board Member. WCFB will also have their Saturday morning sausage biscuit sale on March 1. The proceeds from both of the events go to support Washington County Farm Bureau youth projects such as Ag in the Classroom and AgVenture for Washington County elementary schools. Bene t For Andrea WrightGREENHEAD There will be a Turkey Shoot at 12 noon on March 1 at 5725 Highway 77 in Greenhead. There will be hamburgers and hotdogs. All proceeds will go to Andreas medical bills that have accrued from her accident.Basic Pistol ClassBONIFAY The Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce and Impact Firearms of Bonifay will be holding a Basic Pistol Class at 9 a.m. on March 1. The class will cost $75. Students will qualify for the Florida Concealed weapons permit. The class will cover lethal force, gun safety, basic marksmanship, and the principles and fundamental concepts that relate to carrying a concealed weapon. Bring your handgun and a minimum of 25 rounds ammunition. All proceeds will bene t the Relay For Life. For more information or to register call Jeana Prescott or Tammy Bozeman at 547-4421. Space is limited please dont delay.14th annual Olan P. Johnson Memorial Scholarship Golf TournamentBONIFAY The 14th annual Olan P. Johnson Memorial Scholarship Golf Tournament has been scheduled for Saturday, March 1, at Dogwood Lakes Country Club in Bonifay. Registration and lunch begin at 7 a.m. with a shotgun start at 8 a.m. The entry fee of $55 includes lunch, golf, 2 mulligans, and a throw. Proceeds bene t the scholarship established through the Chipola College Foundation. To register your 4-person group or sponsor a hole for $25, contact Dan Burdeshaw at 638-3243 or Don West at 263-4395.Chipola to offer Fire ghters CourseMARIANNA The Chipola College Public Service Department has scheduled several re ghting courses beginning next month. Fire ghter I and II will be offered in a classroom setting weekdays, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The course begins March 3 and runs through June 16. Fire ghter I and II are required to work as a professional re ghter in Florida. Cost is $1,900 and nancial aid is available. A First Responder course will be offered Feb. 24-28, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., daily. The 40hour class offers advanced rst aid techniques for emergencies. The course is included in the curriculum for most law enforcement, corrections and re ghter programs. Online Fire ghter I for volunteer re ghters begins March 4 and ends June 26. The course includes First Responder, Forestry S130/190 and Fire ghter I. Cost is $500, which includes use of bunker gear and live burn scenarios. Information about the courses is available at www. chipola.edu/ re ghting Contact Martin Fowler, Fire Science Program Manager, at 718-2483 or email fowlerm@chipola.edu.BMS Advisory Council MeetingBONIFAY Bonifay Middle School Advisory Council will hold a meeting at 3 p.m., March 5, in the BMS Media Center. The meeting is open to any BMS shareholder who wishes to attend.Panhandle Pride Beauty PageantGRACEVILLE The Panhandle Pride Beauty Pageant will be held at the Graceville Civic Center, in Graceville. The entry fee is $55, with all proceeds going to the TwoToe Tom Festival celebration. Contestants may participate in photogenic for an additional $10. Photogenic entries will be limited to one photo per contestant. The Panhandle Pride Beauty Pageant is an open pageant. Checks should be made payable to Two-Toe Tom Festival Pageant. Applications can be picked up at Bush Paint & Supply in Graceville or Esto Town Hall. Application, entry fee and photo must be delivered to Bush Paint & Supply or Esto Town Hall no later than Friday, March 7. Winners will receive a large trophy, large crown and banner. Alternates and participants will receive trophies. Door admission of $5 per adult applies to all individuals with the exception of contestants. Admission is free to children three years and under. This is for girls from Georgia, Alabama and Florida will be able to participate. There will be a Peoples Choice Award winner in each category. This has no effect on the overall winners. The contestants from each age category that collects the most money will win the Peoples Choice title for that age category and will receive a large trophy at the pageant. Winners will need to make plans on participating at the Festival on April 12 at the John W. Clark Park in Esto. We are planning a funlled day of activities. Throughout the day we will have a car show, arts and crafts, singing, lots of food and many more fun activities. The Queens will also be required to ride in all parades that the TwoToe Tom Festival oat enters, unless excused by the Town of Esto. You will be noti ed ahead of time of the parades and dates. If you need further information, please feel free to contact Teresa Bush, daytime 263-6345 or nighttime 263-3072, or Darlene Madden daytime 263-6521 or nighttime 263-3201.Friday Fish Frys During LentBONIFAY The Knights of Columbus, Child of Prague Council 10513, will be hosting Friday Fish Frys during Lent, from 4 to 7 p.m. on March 7, March 14, March 21, March 28, April 4 and April 11 at Blessed Trinity Catholic Church. Plates are $10 and include all the sh you can eat as well as sides, sweet tea, and a desert. Carryouts are available. The church is located at 2331 Highway 177A in Bonifay.Spaghetti For RelayCHIPLEY Emerald Coast Hospice will be selling spaghetti plates starting at 11 a.m. on March 12. Plates will be $5 and will include spaghetti, bread and a dessert. They will deliver is there are 10 or more plates ordered. Pick up will be at the Emerald Coast Of ce on South Blvd. For more information call 638-8787. KIWANIS DONATIONS Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER Community EVENTS

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Special to ExtraFloridas top performing STEM students were recently recognized as Sunshine State Scholars and given the opportunity to attend a two-day event in Orlando Feb. 13-14. It was an event that could possibly change the course of their future as they learned why Florida is the best place to learn and pursue an exciting career. Each school district throughout Florida selected their top 11th-grade student based on their academic achievement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). These students, along with their parents and a teacher chosen by each student, were invited to participate in the annual Sunshine State Scholars program. The Sunshine State Scholars program is sponsored by the Florida Education Foundation in collaboration with the State University System of Florida, the Florida College System and the Florida Department of Education. It began in 1997 to recognize excellence in mathematics and science. Among those being honored this year were 19 students from the small rural school districts participating in the FloridaLearns Stem Scholars Initiative for Gifted and Talented Students. In addition to recognizing their academic success, the Sunshine State Scholars program gave these STEM students the opportunity to meet directly with highly successful professionals from STEM-related industries in Florida and with recruiters from Floridas nest colleges and universities. During the event, the students heard about special programs of study and industry internship opportunities, learned about some of the latest innovations and discoveries in STEM-related research, were inspired by personal success stories from leaders in Floridas STEM industry and were actively recruited to become part of Floridas future talented workforce. The scholars also enjoyed meeting with students from around the state who had similar interests in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The following students currently enrolled in the FloridaLearns STEM Scholars Initiative that were honored as Sunshine State Scholars include: Blountstown High School: Donavan Ebersole Columbia County High School: Priyanka Patel DeSoto County High School: Eve Pence Franklin County High School: Chaseon Taranto East Gadsden High: Jewelisia Fagg Moore Haven Jr/Sr High: Bronson Bass Wewahitchka High: Justin Barrier Hardee Senior High: Allison Farr La Belle High: Magali Salinas Bethlehem High: Erin Dady Jefferson County High: Stefan Roberts Liberty County High: William Hosford Madison County High: Courtney Strickland Okeechobee High: Michael Daniel Palatka High: Carlie Dennard Taylor County High: Rohan Patel P.K. Yonge Development Research High: Abigail Austin South Walton High: Wes Fegely Vernon High: Sarah Boullard Exciting futures are ahead for all of the STEM Scholars. Special congratulations go to those who were named as 2014 Sunshine State Scholars. Special to ExtraChelsea Spires has been named to the Presidents List at the Baptist College of Florida in Graceville for the fall 2013 semester. The Presidents List is published each semester to honor those students who maintain a 4.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale. Spires is a sophomore at the Baptist College of Florida pursuing an associate in Christian education. Spires is the daughter of Jesse and Lydia Spiers of Ponce de Leon and a 2010 home school graduate. The honor student is a member of First Baptist in Ponce de Leon.Special to ExtraChipola College students in the Automotive Technology and Cosmetology programs picked up several awards in the recent Skills USA competition. In automotive, Michael Bramblett won rst place and Brandon Evers came in third. The students completed a 100-question exam and performed a live demonstration on automotive diagnostics and repairs. The students are all ASE Certied. They will compete in the state competition for a chance to go to the Skills USA Nationals. In cosmetology, three Chipola students won awards. Jocelin Sukanec nished rst in nail care. In addition to a written exam, she completed a set of sculptured nails, nail wraps and a nail art design. Alice Rabion won rst place in esthetics. Her competition included a basic facial with massage, a day-time make-up look and an Avatar fantasy-themed make-up on a live model. Kaleigh Clark nished second in womens haircutting and long hair design. From a photograph, she was asked to recreate a design by cutting and coloring on a mannequin head. The Chipola students will compete at the Skill USA state competition in April.Special to ExtraMARIANNA Some 125 students from 10 area high schools competed in writing, reading, speech, oral interpretation, literature, humanities, grammar and Spanish contests at Chipola College on Feb. 14. The occasion was the 24th annual Throssell Literature/Language Festival hosted by Chipolas Letters Department. The purpose of the festival is to recognize and encourage academic excellence. Prizes were awarded to rst, second and third places, as well as two honorable mentions, in each category. The winner of the Presidents Reading Contest received a special medallion as well as a cash award. Contest winners from participating schools are listed below. Presidents Reading Award: Faith Plazarin of Blountstown High School. Writing: rst Andrew Goff of Liberty County High School; second Sarah Peterman of Marianna High School, third Gabrielle Simpson of Marianna High School; honorable mentions Brooke Coleman of Altha Public School and David Horton of Graceville High School Speech: rst Maddie Craven of Marianna High School; second Brianna Morris of Graceville High School; third Mallory Myhill of Sneads High School; honorable mentions Kourtnie Richardson of Cottondale High School and Jabe Rosier of Liberty County High School. Oral Interpretation: rst Elyn Sapp of Marianna High School; second Mark Thrower of Graceville High School; third Shayli Tharpe of Marianna High School; honorable mentions Ashlyn Jeffries of Chipley High School and Haley Hales of Bethlehem High School. Literature: rst Faith Plazarin of Blountstown High School; second Rachael Spooner of Vernon High School; third Hunter Powell of Sneads High School; honorable mentions Turner McCroan of Cottondale High School and Emaleigh Munn of Chipley High School. Humanities: rst Jerryd Perry of Vernon High School; second Joelina Armke of Graceville High School; third Tristan Edeneld of Sneads High School; honorable mentions Genny Kunkel of Vernon High School and Patrick Fortunato of Cottondale High School. Grammar: rst Cole Hamilton of Sneads High School; second Brianna McCaffrey of Sneads High School; third Roseanna Moore of Liberty County High School; honorable mentions Katy Gramling of Cottondale High School and J. P. Leonard of Blountstown High School. Spanish Language Contest: rst Blanca Bescos of Graceville High School; second Milli Beall of Bethlehem High School; third Cristina Ramirez of Graceville High School; honorable mentions Andy Faria of Sneads High School and Elizabeth Martinez of Chipley High School.Special PECIAL toTO EXtra TRAJackson County Sheriffs employees Deputy Jessica Weathersbee and Sgt. Sammy Efurd practice their CPR skills at a Chipola College Public Service class for local ofcers. JCSO practicesPRACTICES CPR atAT ChipolaHIPOLASpires named to Presidents ListChipolas Literature and Language winners Special PECIAL toTO EXtra TRASarah Boullard of Vernon High School stands with Pam Stewart, Florida Department of Education commissioner. Top performing STEM students selected as Sunshine State ScholarsSpecial PECIAL toTO EXtra TRAAutomotive students from left, Trent Jackson, Michael Bramblett, Chipola automotive instructor Chase Vlieg and Brandon EversChipola auto, cosmetology students win at Skills USACosmetology Students front, Alice Rabion, 1st place Esthetics; Kaleigh Clark, 2nd place Haircutting & Long Hair Design; Jocelin Sukanec, 1st place in Nail Care (back) Michael Bramlett 1st place Automotive and Brandon Evers 3rd place Automotive. Crossword PUZZleLESOLUUTION ON PAGE XXXX

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The speaker will be Bro. Stephen McKay Missionary to the Middle East. For more information call 956-4339 or 956-2322 or 658-2828.Christian Haven Jam SessionCHIPLEY Christian Haven Church will be holding their monthly Jam Session on March 1. Refreshments will be at 6 p.m. and singing shortly after. For more information call 638-0836 or 773-2602.Chili Cook OffWinterville Assembly of God Church will be hosting a Chili Cook Off Contest at 11 a.m. on March 1. All proceeds bene t Wintervilles Young Single Adult Ministries. There is a $10 entry fee for each contestant and a $5 charge to dine in. Contestants and children under three eat for free. A basket of assorted prizes will be awarded to rst place winner. Basket will include gift certi cates from Mane Street Salon, Nikki Elmore Photography, Fashion Frenzy, Momma Ts Tasty Treats and Catering, and much more. To RSVP or for more info please contact Jennifer Maples at 260-7054.Ash Wednesday Mass ScheduleCHIPLEY St. Joseph the Worker Catholic Church will be holding Ash Wednesday Mass from 5 to 6 p.m. on March 5. St. Ann will hold Mass and Ashes from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., on March 5.McChapel AME Prayer BreakfastMARIANNA McChapel AME Church will be holding a prayer breakfast at 8:30 a.m., on March 8 in the fellowship hall. The speaker will be Sister Dona Pittman. For more information call 594-6061 or 569-5883. Faith EVENTSA reporter from the New York Journal once tried to pin A. B. Simpson down on the matter of Christs return. The reporter asked him, Do you know when the Lord is coming? Yes, he replied, and I will tell you if you promise to print just what I say, references and all. The reporters poised notebook gave the ready promise. Then put this down: This gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world for a witness unto the nations and then shall the end come. Matthew 24:14. Have you written the reference? Yes, what more? Nothing more. The reporter lowered his pencil and said, Do you mean to say that you believe that when the Gospel is preached in all the nations Jesus will return? Just that. I think I begin to see the daylight, answered the reporter. I see the motivation and the motive power in the movement. Then, Simpson said, You see more than some of the doctors of divinity. It is so easy to get caught up in the minutia of eschatology we forget the real reason of it. To have something as precious as the coming of the Lord dividing believers has to be something hatched in the boiling cauldron of Hell. I am wondering if this is what our Lord had in mind when he encouraged us to look for his coming. Does all of this religious rhetoric passing for eschatology today really please the Lord? Take a picture of a father going away on a trip. He sits his young family down and tells them he is soon going on a trip. He does not tell them when he is coming back; it is to be a surprise for them. But when he does return he will have special gifts for each one of them. Then he leaves for his trip. After he is gone, the children begin arguing. Fathers coming back before lunch, one insists. No, no, no, another argues. Hes coming after lunch. And the squabbling goes on and on and on. Soon the only thing that really matters to these children is which one has the right view on the returning father. Each one holds his view of their returning father, as the correct one and the others are all wrong. They have exchanged the joy of their returning father for the smug satisfaction in their own minds that their view of his return is the correct one. They had forgotten that the real joy is the returning father. I believe this carries over into the church life. We hear doctrinal debates on this view and that view of eschatology. And in it all, we have lost the simple joy that Jesus is coming. Many people are going to be disappointed when Jesus does not come, according to their schedule. Some have mapped out the return of the Lord in such minute detail that if Jesus should come contrary to their expectations they will be rather disappointed. Even Jesus said, But of that day and hour knoweth no man, no, not the angels of heaven, but my Father only (Matthew 24:36 KJV). When Jesus said this, I think one of the things he had in his mind was that we should not get all caught up with the day or the hour. The most signi cant part is the personal return of Jesus Christ. The early church believed in the imminent return of Christ. That is, they believed Christ would come at any moment. They lived their lives so as to conform to this wonderful expectation. Now, some have called into doubt the word imminent, because all the early church believers have died and Christ has not returned yet. Enter the professional doctrinal slicing and dicing. And boy, have they gone to work on this. But very simply, imminent means that I should so live my life as to expect the Lord to return now. He may come today, or it may be another thousand years. The time element is not the signi cant aspect here. What is signi cant is the fact that I am living a life totally in harmony with the imminent return of Christ. Some have made it their full-time job to talk about prophecy and eschatology, which might not be so bad except for the fact that they make it an end in itself. The thing that permeated Dr. Simpsons teaching on the second coming of Christ was its relationship to world evangelism. It might be noted here, Simpson did not differentiate between homeeld or foreign eld. The world was his parish, and the world needed to be reached with the gospel of Jesus Christ. His teaching on the second coming spurred his passion to reach this world for Jesus Christ. In a magazine article Dr. Simpson wrote, Instead of looking for Christ, multitudes are looking for the millennium, the conversion of the world, the regeneration of the nations... His charge was, Watch not for the millennium, but for the Lord. (A. B. Simpson, That Blessed Hope, WWW, 1, no. 4, May 1882). When Jesus ascended into heaven, the Angel gave this instruction to the wondering disciples. Which also said, Ye men of Galilee, why stand ye gazing up into heaven? this same Jesus, which is taken up from you into heaven, shall so come in like manner as ye have seen him go into heaven (Acts 1:11 KJV). It is this same Jesus, that we are to be watching for. I suppose it would be impossible to tell how many commentaries there are on the book of Revelation. Most miss the rst ve words of this book, The Revelation of Jesus Christ. It is not a book simply of last day events and personalities. It is a book exclusively of Jesus Christ and the unfolding of him in these last days. Everything else is immaterial. Why not just concentrate on bringing back the King?On bringing back the King DR. JAMES L. SNYDEROut to Pastor

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 UploadyourLegacyguestbookphotosnowforFREE!Withyourpaidobituary,familyandfriendswillnow haveunlimitedaccesstouploadedphotosfreeofcharge. FindObituaries. ShareCondolences. Inpartnershipwith. Findobituaries,sharecondolencesand celebratealifeat or Mrs. Lillie Faye Tate, age 73, of Bonifay passed away Feb. 19, 2014 at her daughters home in Midland City, Ala. She was born April 12, 1940, in Bonifay to the late Coy Gus Harris and Lennie Nancy Retherford Harris. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Tate was preceded in death by her husband, David Mark Tate; one daughter, Marilyn Duffell Thompson; ve brothers, Coy Harris, Gene Harris, Ralph Harris, Rex Harris and Fred Harris and one sister, Carolyn Denmark. Mrs. Tate is survived by one daughter, Jackie Paul and husband, William, of Midland City, Ala.; one son, Jeff Duffell of Bradenton; two brothers, Russell Harris of Cantonment and William Harris of Bunnell; two sisters, Ruth McGowan of Bonifay and Ann Heinen and husband, Phillip, of Orlando; nine grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, at Bethlehem Methodist Church with the Rev. Jack Wingate ofciating. Interment followed in the Bethlehem Methodist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends from 6-8 p.m., Friday at Peel Funeral Home.Lillie F. TateAnder Lee Brown, 91, of Bonifay died Feb. 20, 2014. Funeral services were held, Feb. 22, 2014. Interment followed in the Bethany Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing.Ander L. BrownCynthia Katrice Johnson C.K., age 26, of Westville, was called to heaven on the night of Jan. 11, 2014. She was born May 5, 1987, to William and Cindy Mixon Pyles in Dothan, Ala. She graduated from Ponce de Leon High School in 2005. C.K. is the beloved mother of Richard Johnson, III, R.J., age 5, and Tasia Rayn Johnson, age 3. God, we understand that your angels are special. We get that you were in need of an angel, and C.K. was the one you called. You needed an angel with untouched beauty and a radiant smile. An angel with a bright personality to help light the skies. You wanted an angel with laughter that was simply sweet. You wanted an angel that would dance on your golden streets; one with the love and compassion that only a mother could possess. Her halo will always hang somewhat different than the rest. You know she will love a set of wings, she will say, Oh my goodness, check these out. So as you place the halo upon her head, remind her that we love her and that letting her go, even for you, was the hardest thing to do. The family would like to thank Holmes, Walton, Washington, Bay, and Houston counties for all the time and effort put into the search and rescue. They pray that your families are truly blessed. They would also like to say thank you to Leonia Baptist Church for allowing them to use the church for the services and for the dinner that was prepared for the family. Most of all, they would like to thank everyone for all the prayers, love and hope that surrounded the family in such a hard time. They are grateful for each and every one of you. She is survived by her sons; her father, William Kenneth Pyles and wife, Susan; her mother, Cindy Burch and husband, Johnny; Tenicia Pyles; Brandon Pyles; Tony Urdialas; Joshua Burch; William Yates; and numerous other family members. Memorial services were held Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014, at Leonia Baptist Church beginning at 6 p.m. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www. daviswatkins.com.Cynthia K. JohnsonBarbara A. Waldron, age 66, of Bonifay passed away Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014, at the Washington County Nursing and Rehab Center in Chipley surrounded by her loving family. Barbara was born July 16, 1947, in Pensacola to the late Robert and Leona (Sherwood) Wilkes. She has been a resident of the Holmes and Washington County area since 1976 coming from Bradenton. Barbara is one of 19 children. Barbara is survived by her loving husband of 50 years, Jerry Waldron Sr.; two daughters, Sheila Sloan-Garland and husband, Steve, of Bonifay and Angela Capps and husband, Billy, of Vernon; one son, Jerry Waldron Jr. of Bonifay; six grandchildren, Ashley and Michael Holley, Shana Sloan, Thomas and Danielle Capps and Luke Capps; two great-grandchildren, James and Lily Capps; six sisters and one brother. Family received friends for visitation from 5-7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014, at Brown Funeral Home, Main Street Chapel. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Feb. 21, 2014, at Brown Funeral Home, Main Street Chapel with the Rev. Cloys Joiner and John Waldron ofciating. Interment followed in the Pleasant Hill Cemetery with Brown Funeral Home directing. Family and friends can sign the online register at www. brownfh.net.Barbara A. WaldronVivian Everett Harden, 82, of Chipley passed away Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014, at the Northwest Florida Community Hospital surrounded by her loving family. She was born in Washington County to Henry Lloyd and Flossie Powell Everett. She graduated from Bay High School in 1950 and from the Florida State Hospital School of Nursing in 1953. She had a long career as a registered nurse and as a social worker. She was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Chipley Ward. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Denton D.D. Harden; brothers, Jimmy and Ederson Lee Everett and grandson, Jacob. She is survived by four daughters, Cecilia Mongoven (Barry) of Chipley, Cyndi Brown (Tim) of Chipley, Celeste Pullen of Tallahassee, and Celita Harden of Chipley; brother, Franklin Everett of Southport; sister, Catherine Kirkland of Wausau; eight grandchildren, Jami, Leigh, Michael, Tori, Jo-L, Bret, Celie and Cole; 14 greatgrandchildren and many other family members and special friends. Graveside service was held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, at Wausau Memorial Gardens Cemetery with Bishop John Gilbert ofciating. Obert Funeral Home of Chipley directed. In lieu of owers, donations can be made to the Humanitarian Aid Fund at ldsphilanthropies.org.Vivian E. HardenCharles A. Lent, age 78 of Chipley, passed away Monday, Feb. 17, 2014, in the Washington County Nursing and Rehab. Charles was born Aug. 26, 1935, in Madison, Conn., to the late Edward Leemon and Doris Arlene (Cunningham) Lent. He had been a resident of Chipley since 1979 coming from Pulteney, N.Y. He loved animals and was a farrier by trade (horseshoes). Survivors include his wife of 58 years, Madalyn (Pascarelli) Lent of Chipley; two sons, Duane Edward Lent (Sally Ann) of Surrey, England, and Mark Allen Lent of Chipley; one daughter, Lisa Ann Antognoli (Michael) of Scotts Township, Penn.; six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Memorialization was by cremation, and private memorial services will be held at a later date.Charles A. Lent GUIDelELINeES aAND DeaDEADlLINeESObituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the deceased. The Washington County News/Holmes County Times-Advertiser reserves the right to edit for AP style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is noon on Monday for the following Wednesday newspaper. There is a $25 charge for obituaries. Obituaries can be emailed to funerals@chipleypaper.com or delivered to the Washington County News at 1364 North Railroad Ave. in Chipley or Holmes County Times-Advertiser at 112 E. Virginia Ave. in Bonifay.Jimmy Walsingham, 50, of Southport, passed away Saturday, Feb. 15, 2014. Mr. Walsingham is preceded in death by his brother, Duran R. Walsingham; paternal grandparents, Joseph E. and Annie Marie Walsingham and maternal grandparents, Omer D. and Mazie Worley. He is survived by his mother, Lynda Walsingham of Panama City; father, Jimmy D. Walsingham (Elaine) of Atlanta, Ga.; sister, Tonya Walsingham Roberts (Terry) of Panama City; nephew, Taryn Roberts of Orlando and two nieces, Alden and Sophia Roberts, both of Panama City. A celebration of life service will be held on Saturday, April 12, 2014, with the Rev. Steve Watson ofciating. For a specic time and location you can text or email tonyar494@ gmail.com or check Facebook. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Jimmy D. Walsingham Benet Memorial Fund at Wells Fargo Bank to assist the family. Those wishing to extend a word of condolence can do so at www.heritagefhllc.com.Jimmy WalsinghamAlbert E. Sikora III, age 76 of Graceville, passed away Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014, at the Northwest Florida Community Hospital in Chipley. Albert was born Aug. 19, 1937, in Orange, N.Y., to the late Albert Jr. and Ruthann (Tunstead) Sikora. He has been a resident of the Graceville area since 2006, coming from Cottondale and is a member of the Holmes Creek Baptist Church. Albert is survived by two sons, Dan Sikora and wife, Misty, of Chipley and Chris Sikora and wife, Dianna, of North Carolina; one daughter, Bonnie Plastow of Maryland; eight grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. A memorial service was at 10 a.m., Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, at the Holmes Creek Baptist Church in Chipley with the Rev. Clint Ellis ofciating. Memorialization was by cremation. Brown Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net. Albert E. SSikora IIIIII JIMMY Wal ALSINghaGHAM ObituariesWEDN DN ESD SD AY Y10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Bible Study 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THU U RSD SD AY Y7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9-11a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 1 p.m.: Caregivers Meeting at Washington County Council on Aging in Chipley for more information call 638-6216 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society 2nd Thursday of each month. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Line Dancing Class for more information call 638-6216 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AFRID ID AY Y6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper 4th Friday of every month January September. 6-8 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging 50+ dance club for more information call 638-6216 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Methodist Youth Center in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. cCOMMUNItTY caleCALENDarAR Crossword SOSOLUUTIONION

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B6| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, February 26, 2014 2-3584 Datapath Tower LLC proposes to construct a 195-foot (199-foot overall height) monopole telecommunications tower. The tower would not be lit. The tower would be located off McCarnley Road, Bonifay, Holmes County, FL 32425 (30 53 48.0 N, 85 36 51.9 W). The FCC Form 854 File Number is A0893450. Interested parties may raise environmental concerns about the proposed structure by filing a Request for Environmental Review (RER) with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The FCC strongly encourages interested parties to file RER online; instructions can be found at www.fcc.gov/asr/environmentalrequest. However, if an online request is not possible, interested parties may mail their request to: FCC Requests for Environmental Review, Attn: Ramon Williams, 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20554. February 26, 2014 2-3566 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-329-CA M. P. BRIGMAN; and JERRY A. BIEHL, Plaintiffs, vs. LINDA J. MASSEY, Defendant. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 21, 2014, in Case No.: 13-329-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale on the front steps of the Court House at 11:00 a.m. CST on February 28, 2014 the following described property: All of the Northeast 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 35, Township 5 North, Range 16 West, lying North and East of Highway 179, Holmes County, Florida DATED: 1/22/14 KYLE HUDSON Clerk of the Court By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk February 19, 2014 and February 26, 2014. 3-3578 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 13000149CA CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. ALLEN JOHN QUICK, SR. AND THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 6, 2014, and entered in 13000149CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Florida, wherein CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, is the Plaintiff and THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF ALLEN JOHN QUICK, SR., DECEASED; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; ALLEN J. QUICK, JR.; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s). Cody Taylor as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the Front Door 201 N. Oklahoma St., Bonifay, FL 32425, at 11:00 AM on March 20, 2014 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE S.W. CORNER OF THE S.W. 1/4 OF N.E. 1/4 OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST; THENCE GO SOUTH 87 DEG. 47 00 EAST, 210 FEET; THENCE NORTH 02 DEG. 58 05 EAST 20 FEET FOR POINT OF BEGINNIG; THENCE GO SOUTH For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8:00am-5:00pm. Call (850)638-1483 Cleaning in Detail by Barbara. Its more than just a clean! Call 850-258-1204 If you didnt advertise here, youre missing out on potential customers.

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for the position of Facilities Maintenance Technician. For application contact Sherry Snell in the Holmes County Commissioners ofce at 850-547-1119. Please turn in completed applications to the County Commissioners ofce located at 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, no later than 9:00 am on March 6, 2014. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer.Employment OpportunityFacilities Maintenance Tech 5019442Employment OpportunityFEMA COORDINATORThe Holmes County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for the position of FEMA Coordinator. For application contact Sherry Snell in the Holmes County Commissioners ofce at 850-547-1119. Please turn in completed applications to the County Commissioners ofce located at 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, no later than 9:00 am on March 6, 2014. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer. SOUTH COUNTRY MOTORS.COMCartier', V-8, Automatic, Leather, Alloy's, Multi-CD Premium Sound, and P/W, P/S, P/B. MUST SEE ONLY $5,1952000 LINCOLN TOWNCAR 2004 FORD RANGER XLT Reg. Cab 2.3L I-4 EFI, ABS, P/B, P/S, AM/FM Stereo with C/D & Cassette. Manual. GOOD MILES & ECONOMY JUST $5,5952000 FORD EXPEDITION XLT EDDIE BAUER EDITION 5.4L V-8, Automatic, Cruise, Leather, A/C, Dual Pwr. Seats, Roof Rack, Fog Lights, R/W Defogger/Wiper & Power Accessories. ALL THIS FOR JUST $3,3951701-A S. Waukesha St. Bonifay, Fl 32425 1-850-547-1398 5019447 Logistics/TransportationCIRCULATION DISTRICT MANAGERThe Panama City News Herald has an opening for District Manager. The District Manager oversees independent distributors in the delivery of newspapers to subscribers within a defined geographical area. Individuals will handle route management aspects such as audits, analysis, and contract negotiations. The ideal candidate will have a focus on customer service. High school diploma or equivalent required. Prior newspaper experience in circulation as well as a management background is preferred. Must be able to evaluate current and prospective Independent Contractors and provide feedback and a course of action: Basic computer skills (Excel. Word) a must. Must own and operate a motor vehicle. Must have valid Florida Drivers License, proof of car insurance, and must successfully complete a background check. Must have ability to read and understand a road map. Must be able to work a very flexible schedule. Excellent benefits, drug-free workplace, EOE Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com or fill out an application at 501 W. 11th Street, Panama City, FL. No phone calls. Accepting applications until March 15, 2014 Web ID#: 34281509 Text FL81509 to 56654 Logistics/Transportation The Washington County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for aHeavy Equipment Operator III, Grader Operatorposition for the Public Works Department. The primary function of the Heavy Equipment Operator III will be to operate machinery in connection with the construction, repair and maintenance of roads and right-of-ways within Washington County. Starting salary is $12.52 per hour. Minimum Training and Experience: Graduation from a standard high school or general education degree (GED) is required. Must possess a Florida Class A CDL license and have five (5) years of verifiable experience in the operation of heavy equipment. Applications may be accessed on-line at www.washingtonfl.com. Applications and job descriptions may also be obtained at the Washington County Board of County Commissioners office located at 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428. All interested applicants MUST submit an Employment Application to the Human Resources Department in the Washington County Board of County Commissioners office by 4:00 PM on March 6, 2014. All questions regarding this position or other vacancies should be directed to the Human Resources Department, 850-415-5151. The selected applicant will be subject to a pre-employment physical and drug screen. Veterans Preference is accepted in accordance with FS 295.08. Web Id 34281479 87 DEG. 47 00 EAST, 122.63 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 02 DEG. 13 EAST, 131.0 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 87 DEG. 47 00 WEST 120.91 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 02 DEG. 58 05 WEST 131.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, BEING IDENTIFIED AS BLOCK B, LOT 1, OF AN UNRECORDED SURVEY, ALL LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 11 day of February, 2014. Kyle Hudson As Clerk of the Court By: Diane Eaton As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402, Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717, Hearing Impaired: Dial 711, Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcour ts.org February 26, 2014 and March 5, 2014 3-3567 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-DP-16 IN THE INTEREST OF: J.L.N.B. DOB:07/12/2005 MINOR CHILDREN (SEC.39.801 (b) FS) The State of Florida to NICOLE BOVE-STEPHENS, natural mother whose residence and address is unknown. You are hereby notified that a Petition under oath has been filed in the above styled Court for the Termination of Parental Rights in the case of J.L.N.B. child, to licensed child placement agency for subsequent adoption. You are hereby noticed that an Advisory Hearing will be held before the Honorable Christopher N. Patterson, Judge of the Circuit Court, Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, at the Holmes County Courthouse, Second Floor Courtroom, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida, on the 8th day of April, 2014, at the hour of 9:00 a.m., CENTRAL TIME. You have the right to appear with counsel at this hearing. If you can not afford legal representation, the Court will appoint counsel for you at this hearing upon the determination of insolvency. You must either appear on the date and at the time specified or send a written response to the Court prior to that time. YOUR FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD OR CHILDREN. February 18, 2014, February 26, 2014, March 4, 2014 and March 12, 2014. 3-3575 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 30-2013-CA-000225 CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR LEHMAN XS TRUST MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-15, Plaintiff, vs. STEPHEN HUNTER et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated February 11, 2014 and entered in Case NO. 30-2013-CA-000225 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HOLMES County, Florida wherein CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR LEHMAN XS TRUST MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-15, is the Plaintiff and STEPHEN HUNTER; SANDRA V HUNTER; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT STEPS OF THE HOLMES COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 20th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS 1, 2, 6, AND 7, BLOCK 4, MOSS ADDITION IN SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, ALL LYING AND BEING IN HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 2842 PONCE DE LEON SPRINGS ROAD #12, PONCE DE LEON, FL 32555 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on February 12, 2014. Kyle Hudson Clerk of the Circuit Court By:Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@jud14.flcour ts.org. February 26, 2014 and March 5, 2014. 3-3577 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 12-CA-000303 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND OTHER UKNOWN PERSONS OR UNKNOWN SPOUSES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THOMAS O. CREAMER; ROBIN LANGFORD; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBIN LANGFORD; STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND OTHER UKNOWN PERSONS OR UNKNOWN SPOUSES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THOMAS O. CREAMER LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit: Commence at the Southeast corner of Section 8, Township 6 North, Range 17 West; thence North 89 49 42 West for a distance of 803.69 feet to the Northernmost right of way of State Road #2, and the Point of Beginning, thence North 89 49 42 West for a distance of 404.50 feet; thence North 42 52 28 East for a distance of 934.41 feet; thence south 41 30 00 east for a distance of 315.00 feet to the Northernmost right of way of State Road #2; thence along a curve to the right having a radius of 2814.93 feet and an arc length of 630.73 feet, being subtended by a chord of South 44 05 West for a distance of 629.42 feet along said right of way to the point of Beginning. said parcel is a part of the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 8, Township 6 North, Range 17 West, Holmes County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Monica D. Shepard, Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 South Conway Road, Suite E, Orlando, Florida 32812 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 19 day of February, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Cindy Johnson Deputy Clerk February 26, 2014 and March 5, 2014 BILOXI BOUND!Red Eye Feb 28th, 2 Casinos, $45 Back in Free Play. $40 Per Person, Pick up @ Chipley Walmart 8:45pm or Bonifay, FL9pm Call for more info Aventure Tours by Pat 334-701-1103 Older gentleman seeking to date a older woman in her 60s. Must be honest, healthy and believe in God. 850-638-9643. STOLEN: Stand-up Bass Fiddle, Cermona, SB-2, 3/4 size, taken from pickup truck at local restaurant on Tuesday, 2/18,2014, in Chipley. Has identifying marks that owner can verify. Call with any information. (850)638-8220 Max Wells Mixed Breed Guard Dogs. Also good with children. Call 850-768-9591. Ten Holiday Barbies $150, Love seat sage green good shape $100, glider rocker $20, Leather recliner $100, 26 inch ladies bicycle $50. 850-535-2585, 850381-7157 For Sale like new 4-piece King size bedroom set, Handmade, cherry stain fine hard wood, $700/OBO. 638-9643 4 Family Yardsale, Sat, March 1, 8am-until. Corner of Hwy 90&7th St. Parking lot of Dr Taylors office. Household goods, toys, summer clothes, much more. Estate Sale 3083 Main Street. Vernon Florida. February 28 through March 8 except on Sunday. Moving Sale Feb 27, Thursday afternoon & 28, Friday 9am-7pm. 1280 Old Church Rd, Chipley. To much to list. Call 726-0396, 726-0395. Multi-Family yard sale. Fri. Feb 28 & Sat March 1. Across from Bonifay Armory, behind elementary school. Yard Sale March 3rd&4th. Various items, 9-5 daily. 607 E. Nebraska Ave, Bonifay. GUN SHOWMarch 1&2 Natl Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL81163 to 56654 Gym Size Eliptical. Excellent condition. Nordic track CX1055. $350.00 firm. Paid much more. 547-3801. Hitachi 10inch Jobsite table saw on portable stand. Used once, in box. Model C10FR. Paid $240.00, sale $175.00, OBO. 850-263-9998. Stihl Ht-Km chainsaw SH-KM trimmer Combi tools with pole extender. Fits Stihl weed eater pro series $175/OBO 263-9998 Wanted to Rent; Farm land or pasture in Chipley & suroundding areas for the year 2014. 850-718-1859. Deep Red Amarylalla bulbs for sale. Ready for spring planting. 547-2563. Food Svc/Hospitality Dishwasher Frenchs Restaurant is now accepting applications for a Dishwasher. Apply in person Hwy 90 Caryville, FL. 850-548-5800 Web ID#: 34280996 Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. HospitalityReservationistFront desk position. Must work weekends & Holidays, must have good phone etiquette. Able to handle high call volume. & computer knowledgeable but will train. Must have a pleasant personality for working with vacationers. Stop in at Dunes of Panama 7025 Thomas Drive, Bldg. C or fax 850-235-8210 or email to: reservations@dunes ofpanama.com Web Id 34281593 Text 81593 to 56654 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 FOR RENT 1B/R apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 Mandi Lea Apartments in Vernon, 2/BR. Financial Assistance available if qualified. 638-4640. 2BR/1BA garage and carport, HWY 2, suitable for two adults, no pets, $500/MO, First, last and deposit, 6/MO lease 850-849-6444. House for Rent near Downtown Chipley. 2BR/1BA. $550/MO. Call 850-849-1735. Newly renovated 3BR/2BA Home with large family room, new exterior and interior paint, flooring and kitchen appliances, located in Bonifay $600/MO. NO PETS. 547-2936 or 768-0394. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO and up. Includes Garbage, sewage, and lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 2BR/1BAMobile Homes W/G included. $400 plus Deposit. 547-4232, 850-527-4911. 2BR/2BAMobile Homes W/G included. $425 plus Deposit. 547-4232, 850-527-4911. 3BR/1.5BA In country setting. $375.00/mth + $350.00 deposit. 850-956-2113. FOR RENT Nice mobile home excellent location in Chipley. No Pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Leave message. HUNTING LAND for rent or lease, 1 year or 5 years, 160 acres or 300 acres. For more information call (850)638-1911 or (850)326-0044. Mobile Home For Rent 3BR/2BA in Chipley Area $650 Very private w/Big Back Yard. NO PETS. Leave # for return Call 850-258-1594. Mobile Homes For Rent 2 and 3 Bedrooms in Cottondale, Central Heat and Air. $400 -$500 a month. 850-258-1594. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. Rent. 14x70 MH. 3BR/1BA, large back yard. 3 people. $400.00/mth. 6 miles north Bonifay. Out side pet. 547-1493. Rental Business for sale. 3 houses in Chipley. Recently updated. Continually rented. 638-1483, 850-481-5352. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. 2000 Lincoln Town Car-Cartier. Low miles, loaded. V-8, automatic, leather, alloys, multi-CD, premium sound and P/S, P/W, P/B. MUST SEE! Call John @ 850-547-1398 DLR. B USINESS G UIDE HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 20 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!638-3611Advertise your service or business for as little as $10/week.Ad runs in the Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser. 638-0212 or 547-9414 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are CarpetedThree Chicks Cleaning Free Quotes Experienced References Available Flexible Hours (M-F) (850) 956-2408 Cell (850) 768-0022HVAC Services Coolers & Freezers Service on all Makes & Models Heat Pumps, Electric & Gas Electrical Services Exterior Elevated LightingResidential and Commerical ALL YOUR PRINTING NEEDS SOLVEDFor Quote Call Kim 683-0212, x4004WE PRINT MORE THAN JUST NEWSPAPERS Washington County imes A dvertiserHOLMES COUNTY T 5019410 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, February 26, 2014 1117192 INCENTIVES GOOD THRU 03/06/2014 PRICES GOOD THRU 03/06/2014



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50¢ www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM IN BRIEF imes imes imes T dvertiser imes imes imes imes T T dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser A HOLMES COUNTY Phone: 850-547-9414 Website: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 INDEX Opinion ................................ A4 Sports .................................. A7 Extra .................................... B1 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B6 Healthy Cooking Demo Classes BONIFAY — Free monthly healthy cooking demonstration classes are being sponsored by the Holmes County Health Department and University of Florida/ IFAS Extension. The classes will be held at noon at the Holmes County Agriculture Center, 1173 E. U.S. 90, on the following dates: March 19, April 23, May 21 and June 18. The classes will offer healthy cooking tips and alternatives for everyday meals, and food samples will be served. No registration is required. Extension programs are open to everyone. For persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations, contact the extension of ce, 547-1108, (TDD, via Florida Relay Service, 1-800955-8771) at least ve working days before the class. For more information, call Leann Jones at 5478500, ext. 240. Area Wide Youth Meeting BONIFAY – An area wide youth meeting will take place at 7 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 27 at Oak Grove Pentecostal Ministries, located at 1131 Highway 179 in Bonifay. The speaker will be Bro. Stephen McKay Missionary to the Middle East. For more information, call 956-4339 or 9562322 or 658-2828. Ponce de Leon High School celebrates Homecoming Royalty A5 Wednesday, FEBRUARY 26 2014 Board reviews baseball schedule By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY — Superintendent of Holmes County District Schools Eddie Dixon agreed to hold a review of the baseball schedules for middle school baseball during the Feb. 18 meeting after a review of the 2013-2014 salary schedule revealed coaches received supplemental wages for managing middle school baseball. Supplemental wages is de ned as anything considered payment for compensation received in addition the regular salary or wages. School board member Debbie Kolmetz initiated the conversation by asking about the supplemental wages to the coaches. The question also arose as to if the schools, aside from Bonifay Middle School, had enough players and played enough games to be considered a full-time team with a full-time schedule, which would then validate the supplemental wages to the coaches. “There is a large interest in baseball, especially in Poplar Springs and Bethlehem and includes sixth, seventh and eighth grade eligibility to play,” said Dixon. “We’ll check with the game schedules to be sure they’re full time, but I can almost guarantee they are because there is Volume 123, Number 46 CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser Holmes County District School Board held a brief discussion about supplement wages to coaches of middle school baseball during their Feb. 18 meeting. See BASEBALL A2 C onnec t with us 24/7 G et br eak ing new s videos e xpanded st or ies phot o galler ies opinions and mor e ... @WCN_HC T ‘n hƒ s } p s ˆ qz n% bonifa yno w .c om By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY — Business owner and pastor Ryan Helms came before the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce during their monthly breakfast Thursday, Feb. 20 to talk about his new business in downtown Bonifay, called the Medical Gallery. “I’ve been in just about every medical practice and every eld helping them reinvigorate their practice, train employees, (improve) documentation and really try to keep them out of trouble with the government (by ensuring) they have great compliance,” said Helms. “That business about six years ago brought me into the durable equipment department arena where I helped physicians. Not many physicians know there’s durable equipment products they can sell and bill insurances out of their of ce without any more credentialMayor Cloud announces to run for re-election By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT Cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY — Mayor Lawrence Cloud announced his intentions to run again for mayor during the upcoming elections after the Bonifay City Council approved of Resolution 14-10 during their meeting on Monday evening, which noti es the public of the upcoming election and all the details. The qualifying applicants will be accepted from 8 a.m. on Monday, March 3, until 4:30 p.m. Friday, March 7. On the ballot will be the position of Mayor, seat two and seat four. The election will be held from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 25, at Bonifay City Hall. Council approved of a resident’s request to put a streetlight on Clifford Street between two existing lights that are spaced far apart, leaving two residents in the dark. Council also approved of Resolution 14-15 and 1420, which allows the city to apply for a Community Development Block Grant to provide assistance in continuing in their Waste Water Treatment Facility. Grant Writer Bob Jones read the Fair Housing Ordinance. “The purpose it to read to the public that the City of Bonifay has a Fair Housing Ordinance and hold a brief discussion with the opportunity for the members of the public to asks questions,” said Jones. “On March 5, we will discuss it again if the public has any interest in learning more about the Fair By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY — State Representative Steve Southerland visited Bonifay last Wednesday and Monday as part of his recent campaign to reconnect with voters and “clear the air” of potential misunderstandings caused by his political rival Bob Graham’s daughter, Gwen Graham. The rst visit was to the Bonifay Kiwanis Club during their Wednesday meeting. “I do not believe this is a perfect nation,” said Southerland. “It’s kind of like perfect churches. My dad told me long ago ‘son, if you nd a perfect church, don’t join it because you’re going to ruin it.’” He said his father told him “when you get to a church, you roll up your sleeves, you get to work, you treat people with kindness, let people know you love them and you care for them, don’t ever get so prideful that you that you don’t say ‘I’m sorry, I made a mistake, will you forgive me?’” “Faith is important; faith is critical,” said Southerland. “George Washington said ‘it is impossible to rightly govern a people without God and the Bible’. That was our foundSteve Southerland attempts to ‘clear the air’ See SOUTHERLAND A2 See CLOUD A2 CECILIA SPEARS | Times Advertiser Business owner Ryan Helms came before the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce during their monthly breakfast to talk about Medical Gallery, his new business in downtown Bonifay. THE MEDICAL GALLERY Pastor presents new business with a Biblical cause See BUSINESS A2

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Local A2 | Washington County News Wednesday, February 26, 2014 So w ell T r actor Co ., Inc. 2841 Hwy 77 North, P anama City www .so w elltr actor co .com W e T rade for Anything That Don’ t Eat! Financing Arranged (W AC) NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our polic y that the patient and an y other per son r esponsib le f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimb ur sed b y pa yment or an y other ser vice e x amination or tr eatment which is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hour s of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee discount ed f ee or r educed f ee ser vice e x amination or tr eatment. "WE WELCOME NEW P A TIENTS, CALL TODA Y FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW P A TIENTS 59 AND OLDER This cer tif icat e is good f or a complet e Medical Ey e Ex am with T odd R obinson, M.D In Our Chiple y Of f ice Boar d C er tif ied Ey e Ph y sician and Sur geon. The e x am includes a pr escr iption f or e y e glasses and t ests f or Glaucoma, C at ar acts and other e y e diseases FOR Y OUR APPOINTMENT C ALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILI TY : U .S Citiz ens living in the Flor ida P anhandle 59 y ear s and older not pr esentl y under our car e C oupon Expir es: 3-1 5-1 4 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: WC00 S m ar t Le ns es SM C an pr oduce clear vision without glasses at all dist ances ww w .m ulli se y e .co m MULLIS EYE INSTITUTE Chiple y Of f ice 1 691 Main St., St e 1 Chiple y FL 32428 850-638-7220 W e ar e locat ed dir ectl y acr oss the par king lot fr om the W almar t in Chiple y T odd R obinson, M.D Boar d C er tif ied Ey e Ph y sician and C at ar act Sur geon SALES REPRESENT A TIVES Halifax Media Group is curr ently looking for outside sales r epr esentative If you ar e in sales and ar e con dent in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. W e ar e looking for ener getic Sales Executives with 2+ y ears of B2B outside sales and business development e xperience Responsibiliti es: )$) $ .1) 00 $ )0 0'$0 $( .'$00 .-. $ 1.0) $(. * ') )) ($.0 .) 1$00 1)(.1 .)( &.)) .-) ,$0 1$/ )., $( )'., &.) ('., %0. &$)(% $ $'$0.*., ).$0 &.) ) $0) 0)$( &))) $ .1) $( (., )/., ..) $'., $0) (.$ .*))(&$'/ *1 $ .1) $( -$., ) &.) 0)$( ..) ).)., -) ($ '')) $( '-$00),) .$0) $$ ,) ,$.., $0) $ $ .$ ) $00 $(1..$ .) )0) -$ ) $ ))( .)) '') In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales Account Executives: New hire and ongoing training and development Requir ements: 0)$ )$ *$')*$') (.)' $0)! .() $0)! .) ))01) )).)') $'-)0 (),)) )*))( & )')$ ) .00 '.() -) .,)).)') ) $ (),)) .,-0 )0*1.$ )( $( )0*(.'.0. )( .$&.0. / )**)'.)0 .0.0) ) .. ,., )$0. .)).) $ ())0., )0$ .-.! $.'0$0 .&.) )! ).() $( ( '11.'$ )')00) 0.)., /.00 $( $&.0. **) 0. T o apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.c om EOE, Drug Fr ee W orkplace T erritories A v ailable In P ort St. Joe a process you must go through to even be considered a team.” School board member Sherley Owens also voiced concerns that Poplar Springs High School’s gymnasium bleachers aren’t equipped with handrails. “I wouldn’t be so worried if those bleach ers weren’t so very steep,” said Owens. Dixon agreed to see if the bleachers could be retrotted with a type of handrail. In other business, Kolmetz gave a glow ing review of students who excel on the re cent Florida Comprehensive Assessment Tes t “I just want to say that I’m very proud of the students that scored a 5 on the FCAT,” said Kolmetz. “I’m proud of them and I think they’ll do great again this year.” The next scheduled meeting of the Hol mes County District School Board is set for 9 a.m. on March 4. BASEBALL from page A1 ing father; that was his statement, and in our family, we grew up and we are raising our children to understand that the rst and most important priority in your life is your faith. Then, from that, you have the luxury and belief that the greatest blessing on this side of Heaven is family.” “I’m always proud to talk about my sec ond greatest priority of my life. I had the privilege of coming home and checking in on Mom and Dad every week,” said South erland. “I promise, the more I go to D.C. and come back, the smarter my Mom and Dad get. I go over there and see the crazi ness that goes on, and I can’t wait to run home and say ‘thank you, thank you so much for teaching us the lessons that you taught us in our home.’” “You can’t believe as I believe and do as I do and stand on these values and go to Washington D.C. and not make enemies,” said Southerland. “The reason (a reporter) is following me around is not because I am loved and embraced in D.C. It’s because these values that I talk about, many people disagree with.” Southerland said that Margie Menzel of the News Service of Florida was follow ing him because a year ago Nancy Pelosi “chose ten targets in the United States.” “Four hundred and thirty ve seats in the United States House of Representa tives, Speaker Nancy Pelosi targeted ten Districts to go after and win in her de sire to once again become Speaker of the House,” said Southerland. “There was one seat east of the Mississippi, south of the Mason-Dixon Line, and that seat is ours. It’s a great privilege to be on that list, but it comes with some challenges.” He said many of the other “targets have zzled out.” “There have been some (legislator) re tirements. Some have said some things, sticking their foot in their mouths, so some people have really disqualied themselves. We have now slid into what the National Journal said last week is the top three race in the country,” said Southerland. “Because of that, the Democrats also re cruited a pretty high prole name to run against us. They went to two-term gov ernor; three-term United States Senator Bob Graham and they recruited his eldest daughter to run against us and did a very good job of clearing the eld that she will be unopposed.” He said the was elected through a pri mary process, facing ve opponents in the process, however this isn’t how the Demo crats selected their candidate. “We are running against a very experi enced family, and since we are also going to be on the target list, everything imag inable is coming to North and Northwest Florida,” said Southerland. “We have never seen a congressional race like the one you are about to see. Estimations of enormous amounts of money are coming into this dis trict in this battle.” Not only will it include the money raised from Southerland’s campaign and Graham’s campaign, said Southerland, but it will be “pouring in from outside organizations.” “There will be a lot of stuff that we don’t know about,” said Southerland. “As candi dates, we’re not allowed to coordinate with outside organizations. So when you see an advertising video, and you see the tag showing who owns or purchases that ad, it would be illegal and against Federal Elec tion Laws for us to coordinate and know about and to participate in that ad.” He said there are going to be “a ton of groups” coming into this district in the next year “battling it out to win this seat.” Southerland also addressed the con tinuing debate over the health care law. “I’ve been very clear that the last thing I want in the relationship between me and my doctor is someone like the government standing in between me and that doctor,” said Southerland. “We have fought that, but health care is here, the president’s sig nature piece of legislation, and I can dis agree with the president’s decision with out being mean-spirited. Our faith dictates that it’s okay to disagree, but you must dis agree properly.” He said he does not “go after him” per sonally and he does not “talk about him” individually. ing,” he said. “Insurance companies will not tell them this. It is a great stream of revenue for them when they develop that.” He said he helped physicians with equip ment and was involved with pharmacy chains and business owners in Jacksonville to start durable equipment companies. “We set up several of them, but I was really tired of traveling, and my kids were getting to where they needed me home more, so I thought many times that Boni fay doesn’t really have a full comprehensive DME company there,” said Helms. “There’s a lot of little niches here, but we wanted to bring a company in that wouldn’t compete with those niches, work alongside them, but not directly compete with them, and so that’s why the idea of the Medical Gallery was born.” Helms been married to his wife for 21 years, and they have three children. He’s served as pastor of New Zion Baptist Church for 13 years. “That’s really the passion of my life,” said Helms. “To be honest with you, I really don’t care about making a lot of money. What I de sire to do is to get Bible translations into the hands of unrich peoples.” Helms went on to explain the need he sees for translated Bibles. “As unbeliev able as it may seem, there are 35,000 people groups in the different nations that don’t have a Bible in their language,” he said. “Pastoring a small rural church, the funds are limited. The Baptist Convention we’re associated with (also has limited funds), so it’s hard to get money to put in translation work,” said Helms. “One of the things we want to do with the store is to pour money into translation work. Those are my motivations: to help the needs of our Holm es County folks and surrounding counties, but also help the translation work.” Helms said there were some initial con cerns his business, located in the old Movie Gallery, would compete with his business neighbor, Johnson’s Pharmacy. “Many people thought I’d directly com pete with Johnson’s Pharmacy. I would nev er do that,” said Helms. “Mason and I have been friends as long as I can remember; we were in kindergarten together. I ran the idea by Mason and talked about even being busi ness partners, but Mason said he thought I really didn’t need him and we would do well as complementary businesses. They re ally gave up their Medicare number several years ago because they were tired of the regulations.” The reason being that regulations for that kind of business are very strict, he said. “You’ve got to have a stout heart to be able to jump through all the hoops of all the regu latory issues and stay up on compliance, but that’s the side of my consulting business that I’m very good at,” said Helms. “We’re going to come up alongside them and hope fully help them in some aspect. We’ve given the building a facelift. If you haven’t been in side that building yet, I encourage you to.” He assured everyone that it looks “noth ing like it did” when it was the Movie Gal lery, describing it as “totally beautiful.” “I have everything I have invested in this, and if we go under, Mason’s going to a great store to move into because it’s fully set up for pharmacy,” said Helms. “Really what the idea is that you have everything right there under one roof, any equipment you might need, which includes semi-electric hospital beds. One thing we do differently at the Medical Gallery replace (the standard mattress that comes with the bed) with a nice pressure mattresses so the patient gets the best quality mattress.” It costs them a little more to do it that way, he said, but in the long run the patients won’t get diabetic sores or even the cumu lous ulcers. He said there will also be ac commodations for those women who have recently undergone a mastectomy. “We’re going to have a top shelf mastec tomy tting room where ladies can come in, there’s a private room and our staff will be trained for mastectomy tting,” said Helms. “It’s going to be top shelf stuff with Victoria Secret quality bras and ttings. Alongside that, we’re going to do high quality wigs. When a lady comes in who has had a mas tectomy, we’re going to treat her like royalty. We’re going to give her a free manicure and pedicure from Vo’s, and we’re going to give her a book that’s just meant so much to friends of ours by Jerry Bridges called What to Do When Life Hurts.” It’s just a Biblical overview of suffering, explained Helms, of why people suffer and how they can “keep a right mindset in the mist of suffering.” “I just really try to love on these ladies, encourage them and develop a friendship with them in the ministry,” said Helms. BUSINESS from page A1 CEc C ILIA SPEARs S | Times Advertiser Bonifay City Council members review Resolution 1410, which is a Notice of City Election, approved of during their regular meeting on Monday night. Housing Ordinance.” Council approved of advertising for another in mate supervisor because of the recent opening left by the former inmate supervisor. The next meeting of the Bonifay City Council is set for 6 p.m. Monday, March 10. CLOUD from page A1 CEc C ILIA SPEARs S | Times Advertiser Southerland visits with the residents of Bonifay Nursing and Rehabilitation Center Monday, Feb. 24. SS OUTHERLAND from page A1

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 Wednesday, February 26, 2014 F R E E T O H O L M E S C O U N T Y R E SI D E N TS O N L Y H o u s e h old H a z a r d ou s W a st e A m n es t y D a y M a r c h 1 2 0 1 4 8 : 0 0 a m t o 1 2 : 0 0 p m A t H o l m e s C o u n t y R e c y c l i n g C e n t e r ( 5 3 3 0 $ 1 5 3 0 5 3 + 4 4 1 C on d i t i on a l l y E x e m p t Sm a l l Q u a nt i t y G e n e r a t or s ( Sm a l l 3 $ + 2 4 $ $ + ) % 3 4 4 + + * R e d u c e d R a t e 4 4 1 + 2 4 3 5 # & # % % & '% % & ' & . '# # # # # , # , # -' & ( ' ' + ' '# ' , + / % # / / + $ + # # & # ( # / / / ' . $' # % % & / # & # % & % ' $ # & % # ' % ˆ qz Z n hƒ s } p s ˆ qz n% FIND US in P rin t O nline and on the R oad! b onifa yno w .c om W e a re all things L o c al! #" # # 13 W eeks 26 W eeks 52 W eeks $13.33 $19.90 $32.00 I t ’s e asy t o subscrib e – C all 866-747-5050 or send full pa ymen t and f or m belo w *P lease call f or out ofc oun t y r a t es G et the bes t sour c e f or local ne w s in t er ests and e v en ts in Holmes C oun t y deliv er ed t o y ou e v er y W ednesda y Return f orm t o: HC T 112 E V ir ginia A v e B onifa y FL 32425 Y es! Si gn me up f or an inc oun t y subscription t o the H olmes C oun t y T imesA dv er tiser* 13 W eeks – $13.33 26 W eeks – $19.90 52 W eeks – $32.00 Name ________________________________________________________________ P hone _______________________________________________________________ D eliv er y A ddr ess _______________________________________________________ Ci t y ___________________________________ S t a te ____ Zip _________________ P a ymen t enclosed $____________ Sig na tur e _______________________________ Char ge m y cr edit/debit car d __V isa __M ast erC ar d __ A m Ex __ Disc o v er C r edit C ar d # __________________________________________ Exp Da t e _______ Special to the Times-Advertiser Holmes County High School JROTC competed in the Pre-Area 11 Drill Competition at Chipley High School Saturday, February 15. Six teams from Holmes County High School arrived in Chipley “fierce and ready to compete.” Although the competition was tough, Hol mes County JROTC came out among the top. Male color Guard, com manded by C/LTC DJ Rock, placed 1st. The Male Color Guard consisted of C/LTC DJ Rock, C/LTC Chris tian Grimes, C/1LT Blake Mancill, and C/1LT Hunter Paterson. C/LTC Chris tian Grimes placed 1st in Exhibition Male Armed Individual. Holmes County JROTC came in 2nd place in Regu lation Unarmed Male/Mix Squad. The Male/Mix Squad consisted of the following: C/LTC Christian Grimes, C/ LTC DJ Rock, C/SGM Ash ley Eberhardt, C/1LT Lau rel Murley, C/SGT Bethany Jones, C/1LT Density Marti nez, and C/1LT Blake Man cill. C/1LT Destiny Martinez placed 2nd in Exhibition Female Armed Individual. Holmes County JROTC came in 3rd place in Regula tion Unarmed Platoon. The Unarmed Platoon consisted of C/1LT Laurel Murley, C/ SGT Bethany Jones, C/1LT Becky Padgett, C/1LT Hunt er Paterson, C/1LT Destiny Martinez, C/CPL Joshua Brown, C/CPL Alexandria Sanders, C/LTC Christian Grimes, C/SGM Ashley Eb erhardt, C/1LT Blake Man cill, C/CPL Jonce Palmer, and C/CPL Zachery Wil liams. Female Color Guard, commanded placed 3rd. Fe male Color Guard included C/SGM Ashley Eberhardt, C/1LT Laurel Murley, C/1LT Destiny Martinez, and C/ CPL Alexandria Sanders. At the end of the compe tition, each school gathered into a platoon formation for an Unarmed Knockout Drill. A Knockout Drill is a competition where cadets perform basic stationary movements. The main goal of the Knockout Drill is for each cadet to perform the stationary command that is called out correctly while maintaining a military bearing. The final three cadets that remain received a cer tificate. C/LTC DJ Rock placed 3rd in the Knockout Drill. Today’s widespread animal overpopulation is a direct effect of the failure of many pet owners to spay or neuter their pets. With myths such as behavioral changes and health complications resulting from the procedure circulating, it can be difficult to tell if spaying/ neutering is the right choice for Fido or Fluffy. In order to save millions of homeless animals’ lives, as well as keep your animal in the best health possible, these myths should be put to rest once and for all. It is a popular misconception that spaying or neutering your pet can negatively affect their health or even alter their personality. “In addition to helping to reduce pet overpopulation, spaying or neutering your pet reduces and can even eliminate the risk of hormone-associated cancer and diseases,” said Dr. Bethany Schilling, clinical instructor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. “It may also reduce or eliminate unwanted behavioral problems associated with sex hormones.” If high costs are major a deterrent of spaying or neutering your pet, then you’re in luck. There are numerous low-cost spaying/ neutering services found in various regions of the United States, and “some areas have spay/neuter assistance programs that help subsidize the cost of the procedure at local clinics,” Schilling said. It is important to remember there is also cost associated with providing for a litter of puppies or kittens, and more often than not, they are turned over to an animal shelter when the owner realizes this. Many loving pet owners are wary of spaying/neutering their pets as they do not want to cause them pain or harm. “Most of the risk in spaying or neutering your pet is associated with the anesthesia for the procedure,” Schilling said. “This is why a good physical exam and blood work are performed to help detect underlying issues prior to the procedure.” You can have your pet safely spayed or neutered at as early as 4 to 6 months of age. “Prior to the onset of sexual maturity is most beneficial,” Schilling said. This is both healthy for your pet and effectively helps to reduce pet overpopulation. It also beneficial in that it can eliminate various uncomfortable behaviors for Fido or Fluffy, such as nervous pacing while in heat and even male aggression. As adorable as a litter of puppies or kittens are, there are just as many wonderful pets at a nearby animal shelter that are in need of forever loving homes. Whether the previous owners lacked the time or the funds to care for them, most animals brought into shelters are loving and sweet, and no less deserving of a home than any other animal. If it is a purebred pet you desire, according to the American Humane Society one out of every four animals brought into an animal shelter are purebred. By adopting a loving dog or cat from an animal shelter, you can find the pet of your dreams as well as save a deserving animal’s life. Spaying or neutering your pets will not only provide longterm benefits for their health and happiness, but will also help to save the lives of homeless animals and ultimately reduce the widespread epidemic of animal overpopulation in our world today. About Pet Talk Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at vetmed.tamu. edu/pettalk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to editor@ cvm.tamu.edu. The Importance of Spaying and Neutering Your Pet PET TT ALK S p P ECIAL TO THE TT IMEs S A A DVERTIs S ER Holmes County JROTC was among area drill teams to place at the top in the recent competition held at Chipley High School. Holmes County’s JROTC Drill Teams successful at Pre-Area 11 Competition

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Readers of the Panama City News-Herald and viewers of other news outlets, possibly know of the recent death of Charles Whitehead, noted business man, political leader and a laundry list of civic service and a recognized life long philanthropist for worthwhile causes. Charles Whitehead died at his home on February 1, 2014 surrounded by his family. An early news release of his death listed his date of birth as January 19, 1931 in Caryville, Fla. His parents were listed as James J. Whitehead and Pally (Polly) Hodges Whitehead. The passing of this extremely well known and highly respected individual can not slip by without some mention of his humble roots in Washington County with parents emerging from pioneer families on both sides. James J. (Jimmy) Whitehead was born in the Hartford, Alabama He came to Washington County in the early 1920’s probably seeking a job in the Caryville saw mill, a source of employment in the booming area. He may have come here to be near his brother, Ivan I. Whitehead, who moved from Alabama to Florida after being released from military service at the end of World War I. Ivan met and married Perry Lee Collins here. He was the Chevrolet Agent in Bonifay from 1927-30, before establishing a home near Pate Lake. This couple reared two daughters, Ivalee and Reba. Marriage Records in Washington County show the marriage of James J. Whitehead and Polly Hodges as April 3, 1927. Jimmy and Ivan Whitehead also had a sister, Mamie Whitehead, who was in Florida when she met and married C.Y. Johns on August 18, 1925. Their children were Clara Johns Roberts, Ruth Johns Givens, and Sonny, who died in early childhood. Charles Whitehead’s mother, Polly Hodges Whitehead, was the offspring of a large family who settled in Caryville and followed the lumber industry of the 1930s and 40s. Her brother, Early A. Hodges, established a general mercantile business in Caryville. He also became heavily involved in the buying and selling of livestock. He married Dora Somerset and their only child, Earl Hodges, reached adulthood, before passing away. A second brother, Spurgeon Hodges, settled in Vernon and married Dora Dean Taylor and developed a successful business in his livestock venture. Their only son, Gary Hodges, married Mary Eleanor Hudson and reared Patricia and Stephen, before his death. A third brother, Crawford Hodges, chose DeFuniak Springs to establish his Lumber producing business and reared a family there. Henry Hodges, a fourth brother became a cattleman in Graceville and also established a lumber supply business. A fth brother, established Hodges Lumber and Supply Company in Panama City. His two sons, Paul and Silas, started the rst outdoor storage building, the Handi-House, in the area. Polly Hodges Whitehead’s sisters include Cumi Hodges Williams who married Valery Williams. Their only child, Edna Francis Williams, married Jeff Webb of Chipley. After her untimely death, the grandparents moved to Chipley and provided a home for Penny, Jebby, Dilly and the twins, John Cole and Corey, the Webb’s children. Sister Alma Hodges Johnson married Otley S. Johnson of Chipley. He served on the Washington County Commission. Their only child, O’Neil Johnson (now deceased) and wife, Ann reared their family in Chipley. Dutchie Hodges Brown, a third sister, married Herman Brown. They remained in Caryville. Herman had an automotive repair business. Larry and Diane, were reared in Caryville. Many of the ancestors of Charles Whitehead were known personally by the Prattler. Other knowledge of them came from my dad, Hugh Wells, who knew the family well as he did much of his produce and mullet peddling in the thriving town of Caryville during the sawmill era. It was the writer’s privilege to accompany my father when he moved the Jimmy Whitehead family from Auburndale, Fla., to Panama City on December 31, 1949, to accept the position of Shop Foreman with Cook Motor Company. This is the same rm that Charles Whitehead later became a partner as CookWhitehead Ford and, in it’s last years, was fully owned by him. A more recent source of background information on the Hodges Family came from Jewett Harris Tadlock, who has lived in Chipley since ooding forced her and husband, Cleston William Tadlock, to vacate Caryville after the 1994 devastating ood. Jewett Harris went to work in the Early Hodges store in Caryville at the age of 18 in 1947. After her marriage, she left for two years. Upon returning, she continued to operate the business after Mr. Hodges’ death. At the death of Mrs. Hodges, she inherited the business, later selling the property in 1994. She accepted the job of Clerk in Caryville City Hall and continues her employment there. She told me of having Bay County Sheriff Frank McKeithen, a Vernon native, and Charles Whitehead, drop in for an unexpected visit at the City Hall just before Christmas in 2013. She commented that the two Washington County Native Sons were happy to visit Caryville. Upon Charles seeing an old photograph on the wall at City Hall of Caryville’s Ball Team back in the depression years, he immediately identi ed his dad, Jimmy Whitehead, as one of the players. My last time of seeing and visiting Charles was at the Bay County Fair ten years ago. Hester and I encountered him as he came in for the Senior Citizens Day. We sat with him as a group from a nearby church sang Hymns of the past in honor to the Seniors. It has been my privilege to add this short narrative of a Washington County Favorite Son, who made his positive mark in life in adjoining Bay County. I join Mayor Greg Brudnicki and a host of dignitaries, who paid a much deserved tribute to the life of this extra-ordinary Washington County Native during his funeral service in Panama City. See you all next week. Since Jack and I live on the Tison Family home place which was part of the Meeker Homestead Land, we are the custodians of family records. And Pearl Meeker Tison as well as her mother Mary Young Meeker were keepers. Nothing is in any kind of order, but over the years I have tried to put together a list of all the schools where Pearl taught. In the process I learned that Mary Young Meeker also taught. I thought I remembered my grandmother Hannah Brock Wells going to school to Mary Young. After nding her Long Bay contract, I con rmed that. I wrote about that last week. I had always known that my mother-in-law taught my parents. In fact, I said once four generations of my family were taught by four generations of Jack’s family. In addition to my grandma and my parents, Ruth Helms, Jack’s sister, taught Kenneth Harris, my rst cousin, and Hiram our son taught Jonathon Harris, my cousin Howard’s son. When I mentioned the Harcus name last week, I was planning to write about another school, New Prospect, which I suspected the Harcus children attended. However if they did it was not when Pearl taught there. New Prospect was located south of what we always called Wilcox Crossing on Highway 90 west before Caryville. I have a picture and a printed program of all the students in New Prospect School in 1913. These pictures and teaching certi cates tell a lot about how the educational system has changed in one hundred years. Pearl nished 8th grade at Bonifay and passed the teaching exam with a third grade certi cate in June of 1909. She would have been 15. I am not sure what she was certi ed to teach, but she had to score no lower than 40% on the following subjects: agriculture, orthinography, reading, arithmetic, English grammar, composition, history, geography, physiology, theory and practice of teaching. She achieved an overall average of 65% (60% was required.) a year later, she took the exam again and raised her overall average to 74%. There were rst, second and third grade certi cates but I can’t nd the requirements for each. GOOD MORAL CHARACTER is emphasized above all. Mr. C.A. Fulford was Superintendent of Public Instruction in Holmes County. The certi cate is good for two years and was issued by the county in which the person taught. However, New Prospect was in Washington County. She began her teaching career at age 16 and I believe it was in Jackson Count. Teachers usually lived in the home of some of the school patrons. New Prospect went from grades one through 8 as did most, if not all, of the country (rural) schools of that day. Even though we lived no more than 3 or 4 miles from New Prospect, I don’t recall ever having seen the building. We went to Caryville frequently, but usually went by St. Mary’s the black school, as we often had produce or mullet to peddle on the way. I do remember that Elder Carlton Todd was the teacher there at least one year and engaged our Mama Marie Wells to teach one day. How excited she was to be a substitute teacher! We heard a lot about her experiences that day. I have pieced together Pearl’s teaching career from photos she took and labeled with her Kodak Brownie Box camera. The souvenir program which I found listing all the students must have been done by a professional, however, because Pearl is pictured on the front. I can’t identify the ones in the picture, but perhaps family members can identify some of them. They are Maggie, Lizzie, & Katie Burke, Bessie & Nellie Daniels, Maxie, Lucinda, & Anna Sims, Lola & Arbell Crosby, Laura Wilcox, Perlia & Minnie Anderson, Willie, Evie & Allie Jones. Vera Elliot, Esther, John, & Letcher Wilcox, Carl Marshall, Alto Anderson, Bertilee Crosby, Alice Elliot, Columbus Burke, Albert & Hubberd Crosby, George Daniel, Mallie Elliott, Laury Wilcox, and Harvey Jones. I believe “Miss Pearl” as her students knew her lived with the Elliot family when she taught at New Prospect, although I know she lived with the Cleatus Bush family for a time. I know who some of the people in the picture are or were and perhaps you will be able to recognize some of them. I hope family members and relatives can enjoy this glimpse of the past. HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison Old teaching certi cates tell story of 100 years of education PERRY’S PRATTLE Perry Wells With partisan gridlock all too prevalent in today’s Washington, I have worked hard to break through those barriers and join with Republicans and Democrats who are as interested as I am in growing jobs and restoring certainty for hardworking families. The recently-passed Farm Bill is an example of what can be accomplished by putting partnership above partisanship. For more than a year, Congress debated the latest reauthorization of the Farm Bill, which sets national agriculture and food policy for the next ve years. With Florida being a national leader in agricultural production and the second largest specialty cropproducing state in America, I was committed to doing all I could to advance a common sense Farm Bill that restored certainty for North and Northwest Florida farmers and strengthened our rural communities. I was honored to be the only Floridian in Congress appointed to the bipartisan conference committee tasked with ironing out the nal Farm Bill agreement. It was a tremendous, hard-earned victory when both parties and both chambers came together for the good of the American people and passed a ve-year Farm Bill that provides much-needed relief to our hardworking farming families and saves taxpayers $23 billion – while allowing us to nally move past the costly, big government policies passed under then-Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s Farm Bill six years ago. I am also pleased Republicans and Democrats came together to support a provision in the Farm Bill I introduced to empower vulnerable families with a renewed opportunity for earned success. By including a 10-state pilot program for work, job training, and community volunteerism for healthy, working age food stamp bene ciaries, we’ve now put nutrition assistance on the same proven path of success that helped change a culture for the better during welfare reform in the 1990s. As the rst reforms to the food stamp program since the successful welfare reforms of 1996, the Farm Bill takes important steps to empower families in need with a renewed opportunity at earned success. Additionally, the Farm Bill includes several provisions I crafted to sustain the economies of our rural communities. The bipartisan Building Rural Communities Act ensures that small, rural areas have access to the technical assistance and training necessary to enhance vital infrastructure – including police and re stations and community health clinics – all at no additional cost to America’s taxpayers. Another provision I advanced strengthens our forestry communities by ensuring that wood products qualify under the USDA’s Biobased Marketing Program. I also fought to guarantee the long-term viability of citrus production in Florida by helping secure $125 million to research remedies for citrus greening, a disease decimating citrus groves in Florida and nationwide. Updating the Farm Bill is never easy, but this bill represents the good that can come out of both parties and both chambers rising above politics to do what is right for the American people. Our farmers and rural families deserve real solutions – not political mud ghts – and this bipartisan Farm Bill is a big step in the right direction. Southerland urges putting partnership above partisanship STEVE SOUTHERLAND Charles Whitehead gave of himself to local residents and beyond HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. O PINION www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, February 26, 2014 A Page 4 Section The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $13.30; 26-weeks: $19.90; 52 weeks: $32.00 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $17.70; 26 weeks: 26.50; 52 weeks: $43.00 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Carol Kent, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@ bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION clamb @chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 ADVERTISING Stephanie Smith: ssmith@ chipleypaper. com 850-547-9414

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 Wednesday, February 26, 2014 Y ou pla y a major r ole when y ou r epor t an elec tr ic outage in y our ar ea. Our cust omer r esponse cent er is a vailable 24/7 t o answ er y our call and hundr eds mor e lik e it. Behind the scenes w e associat e phone numbers with account numbers pinpoint outage locations and dispat ch cr e ws t o r est or e po w er quick ly and saf ely Y ou help us put t echnology t o w or k T ogether w e po w er y our lif e W e put t echnology t o w or k T o r epor t an outage t o W est F lorida E lec tric c all (800) 342-7400 or 1-855-m y wf ec a (1-855-699-3322) O‚”” ;‡pw† ?¤| X|p Xp~|pŒ M ar ch 1, 2014 H olmes C ount y High S chool E n tr y F ee: $55.00 A dmission: $5 O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ ch 1, 2014 ar M y ount olmes C H chool High S ee: $55.00 y F tr n E dmission: $5 A F or mor e inf orma tion: C ontac t K r y stal C ook (850) 258-9569 O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| D y t _ y u y d Ti BONIF A Y ’ S DO WN HOME T h e C h a r t e r o f t h e C i t y o f B on if a y Fl or id a p r o v id es f or a n a n n u al e l ec t i on o f o f ce r s t o b e h e ld on t h e f o u r t h ( 4 t h ) T u es d a y i n M a r c h o f e v e r y y e a r C i t y C l e r k o f B on if a y a n no u nces t h a t t h e C i t y o f B on if a y e l ec t i on w i l l b e h e ld on T u es d a y M a r c h 2 5 2 0 1 4 w i t h t h e p o l l s ope n i n g f r o m 7 a m t o 7 p m T h e M a y or a n d t w o C o u nc u l M e m b e r s i n se a t s t w o ( 2 ) a n d f o u r ( 4 ) w i l l b e e l ec t e d f or t w o ( 2 ) y e a r s Q u al if y i n g o f C a n d id a t es w i l l b e a c ce p t e d f or m 8 :0 0 a m M on d a y M a r c h 3 2 0 1 4 u n t i l 4 : 3 0 p m F r id a y M a r c h 7 2 0 1 4 O f ce ho u r s a t C i t y H al l a r e 8 :0 0 a m 4 : 3 0 p m VO T I N G A N N OU N CE M E N T C L O SIN G S A L E R A D IO S H A CK o f CHI P L E Y M I T CH E L L SI G H T & S O U ND W I L L B E CL O SI NG a s of M ar c h 31 2 0 1 4 W ill R e m ai n O p e n ! C o m e i n t o R a d i o S h a c k o f C h i p l e y f o r a “ C L OS I N G SA L E ” u p t o 50 % O F F o n s ome i t e ms T h e N e w S t o re w i l l b e L oca t e d a t 1 1 5 1 5 H w y 9 0 C h i p l e y F l o r i d a acr o s s f r om T o w n s en d ’ s B u i ld i n g S u p ply N e w S t o re Ho u r s M o n d a y F r i d a y 8 : 0 0 a m t o 5 : 0 0 p m a n d S a t u r d a y 8 : 0 0 a m t o 2 : 0 0 p m 5 0 19 4 4 9 Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 MARIANNA —Chipola College ofcials held an Open House and RibbonCutting, Tuesday, Feb. 18, to celebrate the opening of the college’s new welding program. Members of the Chipola District Board of Trustees, welding students and college personnel were on hand for tours of the lab. Chipola has a full class of 20 students currently enrolled in the 1,170 clockhour course which can be completed in approximate ly one year. Byron Ward, the Welding Career Coach who helped establish the program, says, “We have an excellent training facility and a great rst class of students. The program features state-ofthe-art welding equipment in a clean lab environment. Hybrid learning, simulation technologies, and open ed ucation resources are used in the curriculum.” Chipola welding instruc tor Patrick Kennedy holds multiple certications as a Pipe Welder and is a Certi ed Welding Inspector. He has worked in the nuclear power and gas pipeline industry for more than 20 years. Dr. Jason Hurst, Chipola executive vice president, said, “We are excited about the opportunities this new welding program will pro vide for the citizens in our district. Welding is a target ed occupation that offers high wages and excellent benets.” The welding program is made possible through a grant awarded to the Alabama/Florida Techni cal Employment Network (AF-TEN). Chipola, L. B. Wallace, Northwest Flori da State, Pensacola State, and Wallace Community College formed the con sortium that was awarded a $10 million grant by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration. The grant supports colleges that pro vide training for advanced manufacturing jobs. Each college shares a portion of the grant. Chipola’s share is $1.6 million. SPECIAL TO THE NEWs S College ofcials cut ribbon to mark the opening of Chipola’s new welding program. Chipola Holds Welding Open House and Ribbon Cutting PP HOTOs S BY BB ILL MILLER Ponce de Leon High School’s Homecoming Court includes: King and Queen Trace Brannon and Hannah Howell; Senior Court Attendants August Brown, Austin Shaw, Kole Hicks and Chasity Wilson; Junior Attendants Dalton Thames and Nikki DeMauro; Sophomore Attendants Hossam El Sankary and Chelsea Watson; Freshmen Attendants Christian Frutos Creamer and Chambleigh Webster; Eighth Grade Attendants Sam Harcus and Mahaley Owen; Seventh Grade Attendants Tanner McKinley and Mackenzie Hicks; and Sixth Grade Attendants Timothy Thomas and Chloe’ Weavers. Left, Ponce de Leon High School 2014 Homecoming royalty is King Trace Brannon and Queen Hannah Howell. PP O nN CE DE LEO nN HO mM ECO mM I nN G

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A6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, February 26, 2014 $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL e ne w College of A pplied S tudies at FSU P anama City was appr o v ed b y the FSU Boar d of T r ustees in J une 2010 and allo ws the campus to mor e easily r espond to wor kfor ce needs in our ar ea. W e invite y ou to suppor t e Campaign for O ur Community ’ s U niv ersity b y helping us build an endo wment for tomorr o w ’ s jobs. O ur goal is to establish a $5 million endo wment for the College of A pplied S tudies b y 2017, which will allo w FSU P anama City to establish student scholarships, implement ne w degr ee pr ograms and pr o vide ne w equipment and technology T o learn ho w y ou can suppor t our community ’ s univ ersity contact M ar y B eth Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR COM MUN IT Y ’S UNIVE RSIT Y E ndo wment for T omorr o w ’ s J obs SUP POR T OU R C OM MU NIT Y ’ S UNI VER SIT Y Local State releases scores for teachers TALLAHASSEE (AP) — Flori da parents may get a chance for the rst time to see how more than 100,000 teachers across the state performed under a com plex formula designed to help evaluate how well students are learning. The Florida Department of Education on Monday reluc tantly released performance scores for about two-thirds of the state’s teachers after los ing a lawsuit over whether the information was public. The Florida Times-Union in October 2012 rst asked for the information, which the state had planned to use as part of a con tentious new evaluation system for teachers. An appeals court sided with the newspaper late last year. The teacher scores are meant to measure how much a teacher either helped or detracted a stu dent from learning. The teacher scores are based primarily on how well students did on stan dardized tests such as the Flor ida Comprehensive Assessment Test or FCAT. The education de partment released scores dating back to 2011. Education Commissioner Pam Stewart told teachers the department would not post the individual teacher scores on its website, but told them the news media likely would release them. State education ofcials as well as school district su perintendents tried to cau tion against drawing con clusions based on the data, since the scores make up only 50 percent of the informa tion used to annually evaluate teachers. Andy Ford, president of the Florida Education Associa tion, went further and called it “awed” and “meaningless.” The teacher’s union had joined with the state in trying to block the release of the scores. “Once again the state of Flor ida puts test scores above every thing else in public education and once again it provides false data that misleads more than it informs,” Ford said. The Florida Times-Union did its own analysis of the released data and reported that last year 58 percent of school districts in Florida saw a majority of their teachers receive scores below statewide norms. By MATTHEW BEATON 522-5114 | @matthewbeaton mbeaton@pcnh.com TALLAHASSEE — It’s ofcial: Slots are on the table in the up coming state legislative session. A measure to allow the six Florida counties that already approved the Las Vegas-style games is part of a three-bill package that the state Senate Gaming Committee unveiled Monday. The likelihood of pas sage, however, is unclear as the Legislature heads into session March 4. The 453-page primary bill (SPB 7052) contains a veritable catchall of gaming recommen dations made in the past year after the Senate panel went barnstorming across the state to collect public comment. In addition to putting slots at six pari-mutuel facilities, in cluding Ebro Greyhound Park, the bill would create a gaming commission, pave the way for two South Florida destination casinos, require greyhound in jury reporting and cut down on overall greyhound races. Slot machines would be al lowed at pari-mutuel facilities that held a countywide referen dum after July 6, 2010. Washington County approved slots for Ebro Greyhound Park in 2012, when residents passed the measure by 57 percent. The state attorney general blocked their installation, how ever, a move that long has vexed Ebro president and general manager Stockton Hess, who said the voters should be “out raged” if this bill doesn’t pass. “It was a binding referen dum; it was not a straw ballot,” Hess said Monday. “The vot ers should not be ignored or disenfranchised.” Hess said he has no crystal ball and wouldn’t handicap the likelihood of the bill passage, but he gave assurances it would be a “very political” process. He pointed out it’s no secret the pari-mutuel facilities need other options to lure in play ers, particularly now that dog racing is a losing venture. One surprise in the bill package, though, is the ab sence of a decoupling provi sion. Decoupling is the effort to remove the requirement for tracks to run a minimum num ber of greyhound races to op erate a card room. Many were confident decou pling was a shoe-in, but the bill only includes a provision that would cut tracks’ required rac es down to 100 performances a year. (A performance is eight races.) Ebro currently is required to run 167 performances annually. Committee Chairman Gar rett Richter, R-Naples, who decided what went into the bill, pushed hard for the idea in committee but faced opposi tion from influential state Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, who said such a move would mean picking winners and losers. The current proposal would reduce greyhound races overall, but it likely will dis appoint tracks and animalwelfare advocates who sought to break the ties between dog races and card rooms altogether. The other two bills in the package are significantly smaller. One would create a list of public records exemptions, mostly for the proposed gaming commission, and would require further gambling expansion be put to a vote by state constitu tional amendment. The Senate panel will discuss the bills at its March 3 meeting but will not vote to introduce them. Richter said in a memo that he wants a thorough, delib erate process so members can fully vet the legislation. Richter said plenty of good measures failed to make the initial draft, but the committee can consider such proposals as amendments. “That way, any proposed substantive changes will be transparent, and committee members will have ample op portunities to debate policy im plications,” he said. Meanwhile, the anti-gaming group No Casinos trashed the bill package, calling it “Christ mas in February for out-ofstate gambling interests.” “This legislation reeks of gambling interest influence,” said John Sowinski, No Ca sinos’ president. “I have yet to find any major provision that isn’t there at the request of somebody in the gambling industry.” Gaming bill sets table for slots The current proposal would reduce greyhound races overall, but it likely will disappoint tracks and animal-welfare advocates who sought to break the ties between dog races and card rooms altogether. By MATTHEW BEATON 522-5114 | @matthewbeaton mbeaton@pcnh.com TALLAHASSEE — Proposed state legislation could deal pay-to-remove mugshot websites a fatal blow, but some worry the action would restrict access to public records. Companion bills have passed unanimously through initial committee stops in both chambers, but take different approaches to solving the problem. The Senate version (SB 298) would go after the websites directly, outlawing payment for removal, or modication, of online mugshots. The House version (HB 265) would bar law enforcement agencies, including jails, from electronically publishing and disseminating mugshots. They still would be publicly accessible, but interested parties, like the media and commercial websites devoted to displaying mugshots, would need an individual public records request for each one and law enforcement could require payment. That could make the records costly, time-consuming and paperwork-intensive, critics argue. The Florida Press Association, of which The News Herald is a member, has grave concerns about shutting down electronic dissemination. The bill creates a “newsgathering issue” because someone must go to the jail in person to pick up a hard copy of the mugshot, said Sam Morley, the group’s general counsel. Jim McGuire, the group’s outside counsel, went a step further, ripping lawmakers for trying to impede access to public records. “It’s the idea that the state constitution says government records are open, but let’s keep them closed by denying the easy means of access,” he said. McGuire pointed out the workaround — that anyone with the time can go to the jail in person each day and make the request, print out the records and post them online. Local media have the resources to go to police stations, he said, but not the 9-to-5 working public, the disabled and the homebound. Additionally, getting mugshots from another part of the state would require hours in the car or waiting for days by the mailbox, which “makes no sense,” McGuire said. The House bill “just creates an unnecessary inconvenience and it assumes that public records generally are going to be used for a bad purpose rather than a good purpose,” he said. “And to me that’s counter to what the Florida Constitution stands for.” Both lawyers sympathize with the Legislature’s effort to crack down on the pay-to-remove sites, but McGuire called it a “sledgehammer approach to a small problem.” “Any solution which is going to … deny convenient access to government records is a bad solution,” he said. Enforcement issues Senate Criminal Justice Committee Chairman Greg Evers, R-Baker, gave the Senate version a hearing already and stands behind outlawing payment for the removal of mugshots. Some, however, have pointed out Florida could not force websites outside the state to comply. “There could possibly be enforcement problems, but … we’re looking at the different opportunities and the different avenues that are available,” Evers said, adding: “We’re still working and tweaking the language.” Evers hinted a provision similar to the House language — removing electronic uploading and dissemination — could be included in the Senate bill, but he didn’t elaborate. “In order for them to get the mugshots, they have to be generated out of the state of Florida,” he said. Bills target online mugshots

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S PORTs S www.bonifaynow.com A Section ?H:<@^@] T[ X[T]^ : ^@ >:Q>@[* ) 0 % 022 3$02 /) 3) /$ ) ( /0 $( $ )) /0 ) /0 (2 2$ % 1 0( ) )'!2) '! + )" ) /0 % 1 02 2 '/$. ) 20* ) /) 022 ) ) $ /) $. ) $( /$( 20 /) 2$ 02 2 ( 1 ). $ (2) $. ) 3)(0' $2 /0 ) 0 )2* $( 2$( )$( /0 % 1 & $22 22 )) -/ $( 2)$ ) $3) $( $(( ) 2# By ERIC JORGENSEN Halifax Media Group CORAL GABLES — Chi pley graduate Karsten Whitson — returning to the mound for the Florida Ga tors this season after missing all of last year with an injury — had a four-run lead before threw his rst pitch Sunday. Combined with a tworun fourth inning, it turned out to be enough, as the 20th-ranked Gators beat the 17th-ranked Miami Hurri canes 6-4 in the series nale on Sunday afternoon. Whitson, making his second start of the season, allowed two runs on three hits and one walk in three in nings. He struck out one in an outing where he threw 54 pitches. “Every time he goes out there he needs to learn something new and obvi ously, he needs to be good for us to be good,” said Florida head coach Kevin O’Sullivan. “And he will. But, to expect him to come out and throw seven shutout innings in his second start after missing al most two years is unrealistic, so we’ll build on that and get better for the next outing.” Whitson’s outing Sunday was an improvement over his rst one this year, when he allowed three runs on four hits in two innings. Whitson could be a key to Florida’s success this year. In 2011, he was named national freshman pitcher of the year by Perfect Game, and was named a freshman all-Ameri can by Baseball America, Louisville Slugger and the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association. He was also on the Southeastern Conference’s all-freshman team, having nished 8-1 with a 2.40 ERA as a regular member of Florida’s week end rotation. In 2012, he appeared in 14 games and was 4-0 with a 3.51 ERA. Sunday, the Gators scored four runs on six hits in the rst inning, and added two more in the fourth inning, giv ing Florida a 6-2 lead when Whitson gave way to the rst of six relief pitchers. The rst of those, A.J. Puk, was award ed the win, since Whitson did not pitch enough innings as the starter to qualify for the victory. “I told the players before the game to be a gritty team and get out with a win no matter how we have to do it,” O’Sullivan said. “Our strength is our depth. We’ve got a lot of young guys to work in: We started four freshmen in the lineup. John Sternagel got his rst start and got a couple of hits. A.J. Puk came in and did a nice job. Logan Shore did a nice job. Kirby Snead came in and did a nice job. “This is a different envi ronment. It’s one thing to pitch at this level, but now you have to pitch on the road against a quality team. We’re young. We’re not nearly a n ished product yet and we’ve got a lot of work to do, but I liked the ght we showed today and hopefully we’ll look back down the road and think, ‘that’s kind of what got us going.’ ” Florida tied its Saturday night output of six hits in the first inning alone Sunday after batting through the order and putting up four runs, courtesy of three singles, two doubles and a triple. The Gators return home to McKethan Stadium to face Florida Gulf Coast on Thurs day with the first pitch slated for 7 p.m. local time. Whitson solid in UF victory By JASON SHOOT 747-5069 | @PCNHJasonShoot jshoot@pcnh.com CHIPLEY — If Chipley’s vic tory over West Gadsden could be summarized in two words, they would be preparation and composure. The Tigers shrugged off West Gadsden’s concerted efforts to create a chaotic environment on the basketball court Friday night and pulled away for a 73-53 vic tory in the Region 2-1A nals. Chipley will play Hamilton County, a 79-69 winner over Hawthorne on Friday night, in the Class 1A state seminals on Wednesday at The Lakeland Cen ter. The game tips off at 11 a.m. CST. Chipley, 22-2, and West Gads den,19-4, operated at a frenetic pace early on, but the Tigers as sumed control with six straight points to close the rst quarter and another 12 points to start the second. Trent Forrest capped the run with a 3-pointer to put Chipley on top 30-14 four minutes before halftime. Chipley remained composed in the face of the Panthers’ full-court press and halfcourt traps, and the Tigers maintained a double-digit lead for the rest of the game. Chi pley ultimately led by as many as 22 points and held a comfortable 60-38 cushion going into the nal quarter. Chipley’s Tyrome Sharpe, who scored 18 points to complement Forrest’s game-high 24, said coach Joel Orlando had the Tigers ready to counter the Panthers’ aggres sive defense. “Coach talked about them at practice and he said it was going to be like that,” Sharpe said. “He let us go at it. Coach had the whistle. There were no fouls. None.” West Gadsden ran into foul trouble early and had difficulty keeping Chipley corralled. The Panthers clawed within 60-46 in the fourth quarter, but West Gadsden coach Andrew Moten was assessed with a techni cal foul with 5 minutes left. Sharpe made both free throws to push the lead back to 16 and ultimately put the outcome out of reach. Lajarous Davis and Archie Albritton scored 12 points apiece for the Panthers. Adrian Sims, a Chipley fresh man who scored 10 points, echoed Sharpe’s thoughts that the practice leading up to the game was crucial. Now the Ti gers are returning to state in the hunt for their second state championship in three years. “We played with heart,” Sims said. Logan Justice is a senior who is one of only two holdovers — Sharpe is the other — from the team that collected a state title in 2012. Justice said the Tigers have played with “a target on our back” and have work ahead of them to bring home a state championship next week. “We can’t go down there bigheaded,” Justice said. “We have to feel like everyone is at our level and our competition.” WEST GADSDEN (53) Davis 12, Albritton 12, Brown 7, Sweet 8, Bradwell 6, Kenon 3, Gibson 4, Johnson 1. CHIPLEY (73) Forrest 24, Sims 10, Z. Campbell 8, J. Campbell 6, Sharpe 18, Justice 4, Floyd 1, S. Swint 2. West Gadsden 14 10 14 15 — 53 Chipley 18 22 20 13 — 73 Chipley cruises Tigers overcome Panthers’ pressure BO ysYS basBAS K etballETBALL classCLASS 1 aA R egiEGI O nN F inalsINALS CARO RO L KK ENT | TIMES ADVERTISER From staff reports The 2014 Vernon Yel low Jackets boy’s weight lifting team competed in their rst meet of the year Feb. 11 against Bozeman. The Jackets walked away with a sound 70-10 vic tory. This is the rst full season of Vernon having a competitive team since Coach Johns arrived last Spring. With several lift ers who have a great op portunity to qualify for the State Weightlifting Finals in April, this looks to be an exciting year for the Jacket lifters. Competi tive weightlifting is the cornerstone for the pro gression the Jacket Foot ball program is hoping to continue building into the future. Individual winners from the meet include Zack Wiesner in the 129 pound class, Ryan Malloy in the 139 pound class, Brandon Malloy in the 154 pound class, Joey Gimenez in the 169 pound class, Traice Adams in the 183 pound class, JT Padgett in the 199 pound class, Darrion Peterson in the 219 pound class, and Marlon Stephens in the 238 pound class. The next meet for the Jackets will be at Ruth erford Thursday, Feb. 27. The Jackets will also be hosting one of the sec tional state qualiers at VHS at 11:30 a.m. Mon day, March 24. This past week also marked another step for the Yellow Jacket ath letic department as they competed in the rst boy’s track meet on many years at Chipley High School. Austin Brown took top honors in the long jump with a 19 feet 2 inch jump and Tristan Porter took rst place in the discus. Runners also competed well in the running events for the Jackets. Coach Johns is coaching the track team as well and a girl’s team is in the works as well. Many people are not aware but VHS elded its rst girl’s weightlift ing team this year as well coached by Coach Chaz Johns. 5 girls competed the entire season as well as the state qualier. By this time next year VHS will eld both boy’s and girls’ track and boys’ and girl’s weightlifting teams. Vernon High School reps add they would like to congratulate all the ath letes who are dedicating their time to building these programs.CATHR R INE LAMB | TIMES ADVERTISER Sarah Gilbert signed with Alabama Southern University on Feb. 21, 2014 in the Chipley High School Library. Pictured from Left to Right: Front Row: Lana Gilbert (mom), Sarah Gilbert, Grace Gilbert (sister) and Bill Gilbert (dad). Back Row: Kirby Baxter (Alabama Southern Coach), Brooke Powell (Alabama Southern Coach) and Sacher Dickson (Chipley High School Coach). VHS dominates first weightlifting meet This past week also marked another step for the Yellow Jacket athletic department as they competed in the rst boy’s track meet on many years at Chipley High School. M OO V ingING U pP Wednesday, February 26, 2014 Page 7

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Local A8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, February 26, 2014 11 2 0 3 2 7 F l o r i d a S m a l l B u s i n e ss D e v e l o p m en t C en t e r L e a r n h o w o u r 3 0 0 p l u s y e a r s o f i n d u s t r y e x pe r i e n c e c a n be n e t y o u r b u s i n e s s O F F E R I N G CO N F I D E N T I A L N O CO S T CO N S U L T I N G V i s i t n o r t h o ri d a b i z. c o m or c a l l 8 5 0 7 47 3 2 0 4 ?H:<@^@] T[ X[T]^ : ^@ >:Q>@[* ) 0 % 022 3$02 /) 3) /$ ) ( /0 $( $ )) /0 ) /0 (2 2$ % 1 0( ) )'!2) '! + )" ) /0 % 1 02 2 '/$. ) 20* ) /) 022 ) ) $ /) $. ) $( /$( 20 /) 2$ 02 2 ( 1 ). $ (2) $. ) 3)(0' $2 /0 ) 0 )2* $( 2$( )$( /0 % 1 & $22 22 )) -/ $( 2)$ ) $3) $( $(( ) 2# Announce s the Opening of a Gene ral L aw Pra ctice Serving Holmes, Washington, J ackson & Walton C ounties R e a l E sta te Leas es Land l o rd/T enant B us i nes s Law Cri mi nal l aw A p p e a ls P ro b a te W i l l s & T rusts G u a rd ia n sh ip P ro b a te A d m in C o ns t r uct i on Law O v e r 2 3 Y e a r s E x p e r i e n c e M a r t i n d a l e H u b b l e R a t e d : TM % $ & # # ! & & # F o r m er C o u n t y J u d g e O ff ic e s a t: 2 0 4 N E t h e r i d g e S t r e e t Bo nif ay F l o r ida 324 25 ( 850) 6141052 475 H ar r is o n A v e nue P ana ma C i ty F l o r ida 324 01 ( 850) 2151800 mj h l aw @ wow wa y com The h i r i n g o f a l aw y er i s an i mpor t an t deci si on t h at s h ou l d n ot b e b as ed s o l el y o n ad verti se m ents. B ef o re yo u d ec i d e, a sk us to s end yo u f ree w ri t t en i nf o rma t i o n ab o ut o ur qua l i f i ca t i o ns a nd ex per i en ce. Attorney Michael J. Hauversburk Announces the Opening of a General Law Practice W e als o t ak e c ar e of (850) 638-5885 V†‹ =…tƒ  [ ›t› ;t‹ t {  M ost V ehicles Up t o 5 qts syn thetic blend M ost V ehicles $ 19 95 ''J U $& b)% ]& C 9W'1 WJ=W &#" (6 #(, 2 ,#% (:W e Steam for F ree! *Not All items can be steamed. (, : =(6 6 ,6 # #6 # /0,6 # # / -(( 2# / /( 6) /( 6 # 2 %(4 $ #=: 4 $ ,( # / 4 <; 5 ;17 9 >3 ?7 9 1 !;. ;
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Washington County News z Holmes County Times-Advertiser B PAGE 1 Section E XTRA Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) A person would gain an extra how many pounds each year by drinking an extra can of sugarladen soda each day? 5, 10, 15, 20 2) What work did “Typhoid Mary” hold that allowed her to infect so many people of the disease? Cook, Nurse, Prostitute, Maid 3) In the U.S. approximately what percent of men ask for parent approval for their bride’s hand in marriage? 4, 6, 8, 10 4) Whom did Erle Stanley Gardner introduce in a series of books? Luke Skywalker, Perry Mason, Lone Ranger, Tarzan 5) When was the rst pay-per-view television system? 1951, 1960, 1972, 1983 6) Where is the country of Djibouti? Europe, Asia, S. America, Africa 7) From older TV’s “The Big Valley” what was the name of Heath’s (Lee Majors) horse? Beauty, Hilltop, Charger, Maggie 8) Each year American dentists use about how many tons of gold for llings? 9, 13, 17, 21 9) What do American moms say they need more of the most? Time, Love, Patience, Money 10) Whose original name was the Elgins? Spinners, Temptations, Drifters, Stylistics 11) What is deglutition the medical term for? Sneezing, Blinking, Swallowing, Sprain 12) Who was president when Minnesota, Oregon, and Kansas were admitted to the Union? Buchanan, Pierce, Grant, Taylor 13) Of these 1990s TV series, which aired the most original episodes at 202? Party of Five, Spin City, Ally McBeal, X-Files 14) Which bird hovers like a helicopter? Wren, Finch, Hummingbird, Robin ANSWERS 1) 15. 2) Cook. 3) 4 percent. 4) Perry Mason. 5) 1951. 6) Africa. 7) Charger. 8) 13. 9) Time. 10) Temptations. 11) Swallowing. 12) Buchanan. 13) X-Files. 14) Hummingbird. Wednesday, FEBRUARY 26 2014 More than 100 participants wore red and hit the pavement as Doctors Memorial Hospital and Holmes County Health Department joined for Doctors Memorial Hospital’s annual Heart Healthy Walk on Feb. 20 to “celebrate 125 years of Public Hearth and raise awareness for those who have battled heart disease.” Heart Healthy Walk raises awareness PHOTOS BY CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser Lined up, one by one, walkers grabbed their bags, donned their red shirts and lined up for this year’s annual Heart Healthy Walk. At right, the Holmes County Health Department was presented with literature for tips on healthy living in celebration of 125 years of Public Health. Below, one by one or in groups, many came out to show their support to the cause.

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra a nd Anders welcome Colton David Derek and Kristin Anders would like to announce the birth of their son, Colton David Anders. Colton was born Dec. 26, 2013, weighing 6 pounds, 14 ounces and measuring 20 inches in length. Maternal grandparents are David and Pam Hutchinson of Bonifay. Paternal grandparents are Wanda Jones of Bonifay and the late Wayne Anders of Bonifay. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO EXTRA Bonifay Kiwanis Club made a $500 donation to Bethlehem High School’s Junior Beta Club to assist them in their travel to compete in Nationals, slated to be held in Virginia in June. Bonifay Kiwanis Club made a $500 donation to Bethlehem Elementary School’s fth grade class to help fund their upcoming class trip to St. Augustine. Businesses unite to raise funds for Andrea Wright Local businesses have networked together to raise money to help Andrea Wright, a Washington County teen who lost her leg after a January hunting accident. A basket containing more than $1,000 of gift certi cates from local merchants will soon be raf ed off, with Andrea herself drawing the winning ticket around Tuesday, April 8. Tickets for $10 each and are available in Bonifay at The Bead Garden (849-4616) and The Silver Door (547-3321) and in Vernon at South Bridge Styles (535-2866). Please make checks payable to: Bene t for Andrea Wright, Acct. # 216680 Participating merchants include: The Bead Garden Pat’s Electrical Contracting Inc. The Silver Door Bush Paint Auto Graphix Sims Insurance Avon Products Perfect Pool Supplies KC PIZZA Main Street Market Doc’s Market Bonifay Athletic Taylor Chiropractic Townsend Building supply Colonial Restaurant Brock Furniture & Gifts Modern Tech Squad Permanent Makeup by Elsie A Plus pharmacy Pho Noodle & Kaboodle Southern Comfort Ollie Mae’s Boutique South Bridge Styles Soapy Bliss Piggly Wiggly (Bonifay) Dee’s Restaurant Bonifay Seafood Market Heavenly Hair Panhandle Lumber & Supply Dog Dayz Spa Bonifay Athletic x 2 Gift Certi cates All Star Tires Sunny Hills Utility Company, Inc. to be a Customer Meeting Two representatives of the Sunny Hills Utility Company will be holding a Customer Meeting at the Sunny Hills Community Center, at 6 p.m., Feb. 26, for those customers who wish to stop by and learn more about the company, the recent changes that have been made to the system, and to ask any questions they may have with regards to the system and the utility. This meeting is scheduled to last from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. If anyone has a speci c question for the utility, they can email their question to: RDerossett@uswatercorp. net. This will allow the utility representatives to prepare in advance to answer any question you may have. Sound of Music at Chipola MARIANNA — Chipola College theatre-goers are invited to enjoy dinner-and-a-show for opening night of the college production of “The Sound of Music,” Wednesday, Feb. 26. Tickets for the Opening Night Gala are on sale now in the Center for the Arts Box Of ce. Gala dinner tickets are $30. Play tickets—$8—must be purchased separately and can be purchased at the same time as the Gala ticket. Deadline for dinner reservations is Feb. 19. No additional dinner seating will be available the night of the event. The Opening Night Gala will include dinner in the Center for the Arts Experimental Theatre and a pre-performance chat with Director Charles Sirmon before the show. Show tickets without the dinner go on sale to the public, Wednesday, Feb. 12. The Center for the Arts Box Of ce is open Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Friday, from 9 a.m. to noon. All proceeds will go to the Chipola ACT Fund. For ticket information, call 718-2420. Washington County Farm Bureau annual Spaghetti Supper CHIPLEY — The Washington County Farm Bureau will hold their annual Spaghetti Supper in conjunction with the Washington County Youth Fair again this year. The supper will be at the Washington County Agricultural Center from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., Feb. 28. Tickets are $6 for adults and $3 for children under 12. Advanced tickets can be purchased at the Washington County Farm Bureau of ce, the Ag Center or from any Washington County Farm Bureau Board Member. WCFB will also have their Saturday morning sausage biscuit sale on March 1. The proceeds from both of the events go to support Washington County Farm Bureau youth projects such as Ag in the Classroom and AgVenture for Washington County elementary schools. Bene t For Andrea Wright GREENHEAD — There will be a Turkey Shoot at 12 noon on March 1 at 5725 Highway 77 in Greenhead. There will be hamburgers and hotdogs. All proceeds will go to Andrea’s medical bills that have accrued from her accident. Basic Pistol Class BONIFAY — The Holmes County Sheriff’s Of ce and Impact Firearms of Bonifay will be holding a Basic Pistol Class at 9 a.m. on March 1. The class will cost $75. Students will qualify for the Florida Concealed weapons permit. The class will cover lethal force, gun safety, basic marksmanship, and the principles and fundamental concepts that relate to carrying a concealed weapon. Bring your handgun and a minimum of 25 rounds ammunition. All proceeds will bene t the Relay For Life. For more information or to register call Jeana Prescott or Tammy Bozeman at 547-4421. Space is limited please don’t delay. 14th annual Olan P. Johnson Memorial Scholarship Golf Tournament BONIFAY — The 14th annual Olan P. Johnson Memorial Scholarship Golf Tournament has been scheduled for Saturday, March 1, at Dogwood Lakes Country Club in Bonifay. Registration and lunch begin at 7 a.m. with a shotgun start at 8 a.m. The entry fee of $55 includes lunch, golf, 2 mulligans, and “a throw.” Proceeds bene t the scholarship established through the Chipola College Foundation. To register your 4-person group or sponsor a hole for $25, contact Dan Burdeshaw at 638-3243 or Don West at 263-4395. Chipola to offer Fire ghters Course MARIANNA —The Chipola College Public Service Department has scheduled several re ghting courses beginning next month. Fire ghter I and II will be offered in a classroom setting weekdays, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The course begins March 3 and runs through June 16. Fire ghter I and II are required to work as a professional re ghter in Florida. Cost is $1,900 and nancial aid is available. A First Responder course will be offered Feb. 24-28, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., daily. The 40hour class offers advanced rst aid techniques for emergencies. The course is included in the curriculum for most law enforcement, corrections and re ghter programs. Online Fire ghter I for volunteer re ghters begins March 4 and ends June 26. The course includes First Responder, Forestry S130/190 and Fire ghter I. Cost is $500, which includes use of bunker gear and live burn scenarios. Information about the courses is available at www. chipola.edu/ re ghting Contact Martin Fowler, Fire Science Program Manager, at 718-2483 or email fowlerm@chipola.edu. BMS Advisory Council Meeting BONIFAY — Bonifay Middle School Advisory Council will hold a meeting at 3 p.m., March 5, in the BMS Media Center. The meeting is open to any BMS shareholder who wishes to attend. Panhandle Pride Beauty Pageant GRACEVILLE — The Panhandle Pride Beauty Pageant will be held at the Graceville Civic Center, in Graceville. The entry fee is $55, with all proceeds going to the TwoToe Tom Festival celebration. Contestants may participate in photogenic for an additional $10. Photogenic entries will be limited to one photo per contestant. “The Panhandle Pride Beauty Pageant is an open pageant.” Checks should be made payable to Two-Toe Tom Festival Pageant. Applications can be picked up at Bush Paint & Supply in Graceville or Esto Town Hall. Application, entry fee and photo must be delivered to Bush Paint & Supply or Esto Town Hall no later than Friday, March 7. Winners will receive a large trophy, large crown and banner. Alternates and participants will receive trophies. Door admission of $5 per adult applies to all individuals with the exception of contestants. Admission is free to children three years and under. This is for girls from Georgia, Alabama and Florida will be able to participate. There will be a People’s Choice Award winner in each category. This has no effect on the overall winners. The contestants from each age category that collects the most money will win the People’s Choice title for that age category and will receive a large trophy at the pageant. Winners will need to make plans on participating at the Festival on April 12 at the John W. Clark Park in Esto. We are planning a funlled day of activities. Throughout the day we will have a car show, arts and crafts, singing, lots of food and many more fun activities. The Queens will also be required to ride in all parades that the TwoToe Tom Festival oat enters, unless excused by the Town of Esto. You will be noti ed ahead of time of the parades and dates. If you need further information, please feel free to contact Teresa Bush, daytime 263-6345 or nighttime 263-3072, or Darlene Madden daytime 263-6521 or nighttime 263-3201. Friday Fish Frys During Lent BONIFAY — The Knights of Columbus, Child of Prague Council 10513, will be hosting Friday Fish Frys during Lent, from 4 to 7 p.m. on March 7, March 14, March 21, March 28, April 4 and April 11 at Blessed Trinity Catholic Church. Plates are $10 and include “all the sh you can eat” as well as sides, sweet tea, and a desert. Carryouts are available. The church is located at 2331 Highway 177A in Bonifay. Spaghetti For Relay CHIPLEY — Emerald Coast Hospice will be selling spaghetti plates starting at 11 a.m. on March 12. Plates will be $5 and will include spaghetti, bread and a dessert. They will deliver is there are 10 or more plates ordered. Pick up will be at the Emerald Coast Of ce on South Blvd. For more information call 638-8787. KIWANIS DONATIONS Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER Community EVENTS

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 ?H:<@^@] T[ X[T]^ : ^@ >:Q>@[* ) 0 % 022 3$02 /) 3) /$ ) ( /0 $( $ )) /0 ) /0 (2 2$ % 1 0( ) )'!2) '! + )" ) /0 % 1 02 2 '/$. ) 20* ) /) 022 ) ) $ /) $. ) $( /$( 20 /) 2$ 02 2 ( 1 ). $ (2) $. ) 3)(0' $2 /0 ) 0 )2* $( 2$( )$( /0 % 1 & $22 22 )) -/ $( 2)$ ) $3) $( $(( ) 2# Special to Extra Florida’s top performing STEM students were recently recognized as Sunshine State Scholars and given the opportunity to attend a two-day event in Orlando Feb. 13-14. It was an event that could possibly change the course of their future as they learned why Florida is the best place to learn and pursue an exciting career. Each school district throughout Florida selected their top 11th-grade student based on their academic achievement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). These students, along with their parents and a teacher chosen by each student, were invited to participate in the annual Sunshine State Scholars program. The Sunshine State Scholars program is sponsored by the Florida Education Foundation in collaboration with the State University System of Florida, the Florida College System and the Florida Department of Education. It began in 1997 to recognize excellence in mathematics and science. Among those being honored this year were 19 students from the small rural school districts participating in the FloridaLearns Stem Scholars Initiative for Gifted and Talented Students. In addition to recognizing their academic success, the Sunshine State Scholars program gave these STEM students the opportunity to meet directly with highly successful professionals from STEM-related industries in Florida and with recruiters from Florida’s nest colleges and universities. During the event, the students heard about special programs of study and industry internship opportunities, learned about some of the latest innovations and discoveries in STEM-related research, were inspired by personal success stories from leaders in Florida’s STEM industry and were actively recruited to become part of Florida’s future talented workforce. The scholars also enjoyed meeting with students from around the state who had similar interests in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The following students currently enrolled in the FloridaLearns STEM Scholars Initiative that were honored as Sunshine State Scholars include: Blountstown High School: Donavan Ebersole Columbia County High School: Priyanka Patel DeSoto County High School: Eve Pence Franklin County High School: Chaseon Taranto East Gadsden High: Jewelisia Fagg Moore Haven Jr/Sr High: Bronson Bass Wewahitchka High: Justin Barrier Hardee Senior High: Allison Farr La Belle High: Magali Salinas Bethlehem High: Erin Dady Jefferson County High: Stefan Roberts Liberty County High: William Hosford Madison County High: Courtney Strickland Okeechobee High: Michael Daniel Palatka High: Carlie Dennard Taylor County High: Rohan Patel P.K. Yonge Development Research High: Abigail Austin South Walton High: Wes Fegely Vernon High: Sarah Boullard Exciting futures are ahead for all of the STEM Scholars. Special congratulations go to those who were named as 2014 Sunshine State Scholars. Special to Extra Chelsea Spires has been named to the President’s List at the Baptist College of Florida in Graceville for the fall 2013 semester. The President’s List is published each semester to honor those students who maintain a 4.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale. Spires is a sophomore at the Baptist College of Florida pursuing an associate in Christian education. Spires is the daughter of Jesse and Lydia Spiers of Ponce de Leon and a 2010 home school graduate. The honor student is a member of First Baptist in Ponce de Leon. Special to Extra Chipola College students in the Automotive Technology and Cosmetology programs picked up several awards in the recent Skills USA competition. In automotive, Michael Bramblett won rst place and Brandon Evers came in third. The students completed a 100-question exam and performed a live demonstration on automotive diagnostics and repairs. The students are all ASE Certied. They will compete in the state competition for a chance to go to the Skills USA Nationals. In cosmetology, three Chipola students won awards. Jocelin Sukanec nished rst in nail care. In addition to a written exam, she completed a set of sculptured nails, nail wraps and a nail art design. Alice Rabion won rst place in esthetics. Her competition included a basic facial with massage, a day-time make-up look and an Avatar fantasy-themed make-up on a live model. Kaleigh Clark nished second in women’s haircutting and long hair design. From a photograph, she was asked to recreate a design by cutting and coloring on a mannequin head. The Chipola students will compete at the Skill USA state competition in April. Special to Extra MARIANNA — Some 125 students from 10 area high schools competed in writing, reading, speech, oral interpretation, literature, humanities, grammar and Spanish contests at Chipola College on Feb. 14. The occasion was the 24th annual Throssell Literature/Language Festival hosted by Chipola’s Letters Department. The purpose of the festival is to recognize and encourage academic excellence. Prizes were awarded to rst, second and third places, as well as two honorable mentions, in each category. The winner of the President’s Reading Contest received a special medallion as well as a cash award. Contest winners from participating schools are listed below. President’s Reading Award: Faith Plazarin of Blountstown High School. Writing: rst — Andrew Goff of Liberty County High School; second — Sarah Peterman of Marianna High School, third — Gabrielle Simpson of Marianna High School; honorable mentions — Brooke Coleman of Altha Public School and David Horton of Graceville High School Speech: rst — Maddie Craven of Marianna High School; second — Brianna Morris of Graceville High School; third — Mallory Myhill of Sneads High School; honorable mentions — Kourtnie Richardson of Cottondale High School and Jabe Rosier of Liberty County High School. Oral Interpretation: rst — Elyn Sapp of Marianna High School; second — Mark Thrower of Graceville High School; third — Shayli Tharpe of Marianna High School; honorable mentions — Ashlyn Jeffries of Chipley High School and Haley Hales of Bethlehem High School. Literature: rst — Faith Plazarin of Blountstown High School; second — Rachael Spooner of Vernon High School; third — Hunter Powell of Sneads High School; honorable mentions — Turner McCroan of Cottondale High School and Emaleigh Munn of Chipley High School. Humanities: rst — Jerryd Perry of Vernon High School; second — Joelina Armke of Graceville High School; third — Tristan Edeneld of Sneads High School; honorable mentions — Genny Kunkel of Vernon High School and Patrick Fortunato of Cottondale High School. Grammar: rst — Cole Hamilton of Sneads High School; second — Brianna McCaffrey of Sneads High School; third — Roseanna Moore of Liberty County High School; honorable mentions — Katy Gramling of Cottondale High School and J. P. Leonard of Blountstown High School. Spanish Language Contest: rst — Blanca Bescos of Graceville High School; second — Milli Beall of Bethlehem High School; third — Cristina Ramirez of Graceville High School; honorable mentions — Andy Faria of Sneads High School and Elizabeth Martinez of Chipley High School.S pecial PECIAL toTO EXtra TRA Jackson County Sheriff’s employees Deputy Jessica Weathersbee and Sgt. Sammy Efurd practice their CPR skills at a Chipola College Public Service class for local ofcers. JCSO practicesPRACTICES CPR atAT C hipolaHIPOLA Spires named to President’s List Chipola’s Literature and Language winners S pecial PECIAL toTO EXtra TRA Sarah Boullard of Vernon High School stands with Pam Stewart, Florida Department of Education commissioner. Top performing STEM students selected as Sunshine State ScholarsS pecial PECIAL toTO EXtra TRA Automotive students from left, Trent Jackson, Michael Bramblett, Chipola automotive instructor Chase Vlieg and Brandon Evers Chipola auto, cosmetology students win at Skills USA Cosmetology Students front, Alice Rabion, 1st place Esthetics; Kaleigh Clark, 2nd place Haircutting & Long Hair Design; Jocelin Sukanec, 1st place in Nail Care (back) Michael Bramlett 1st place Automotive and Brandon Evers 3rd place Automotive. Crossword PUZZ leLE SOL UU TION ON PAGE XXXX

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FAITH B Section PE R S O N A L T O U C H CA R CA R E W E T A KE P R I D E I N C A R I N G F O R Y O U R C A R" 1 0 6 W Ev a n s B o n i f a y 5 4 7 3 3 3 0 F l or i d a M i cr o l m & Of ce Supply Inc. 6594 S. US 231, Dothan, AL 36301 (334) 677-3318 800-886-3318 F irst Bap ist Church Come as you are F Church p ist irst Ba Come as you are F Church p ist irst Ba Come as you are N E W N A ME S A M E G OOD S E RV I CE 1 0 6 9 M a i n S t r ee t C h i p l e y F L 3 2 4 2 8 ( 85 0 ) 6 3 8 7 85 5 Stephen B. Register CP A 1 552 Bric k yard R oad Chipley FL L E T US QU O T E YO U (850) 638-8376 Consumer & Commer cial Power Equipment V isit our website at www .lanesoutdoor .com 901 Hwy 277, Chipley 850.638.4364 1114336 MARIANNA T O Y O T A I t s n o t w h a t w e d o b ut h o w w e d o i t 9 8 2 Or a n g e H i l l R o a d C h i p l e y 6 3 895 0 5 507 W Hwy 90, Bonifay 1 357 Bric k yard Rd., Chipley 1055 F o wler A v e ., C hiple y B ehind our Chipley f ac t or y H ours: T hur and F ri. 9 A M 5 PM S a t 9 A M 3 PM 638-9421 WE S T P OIN T HOME F ACTOR Y OUTLET 879 U se r y R o ad C h i p le y F lo r id a 32428 850-638-4654 Washington Re habilit at ion & Nursing Cente r C HIPLEY H ARD W ARE HA VE YOUR U NIT SER VICED TO SA VE ON Y OUR ELECTRIC BILL (850) 263-2823 1075 N HW Y 79 B ONIF A Y FL P&P C ircle H Gas & Deli Come to the Mullis Eye Institute & let us tak e Great Care of Y ou! T odd Robinson, M.D Board Cer tied Eye Ph ysician & Surgeon Mullis Ey e Institute 1 691 Main Street, Suite #1 L ocated across from W almar t Chiple y 850-638-7220 Ey e Care f or S enior s 4242 Lafayette St. Marianna FL, 32446 850-482-4043 Open: M-F 8am-6pm, Sat 8am-6pm www .chipolaford. c om Chipola Ford 1254 Church A ve. Chipley FL 32438 850-638-1751 Ser ving you since 1953 Friendly Hometown Ser vice 1882 Jackson A ve. Chipley FL 850-638-7445 www .aandbautosal e s.net Shop With The Rest Them Come T o The Best A & B AUTO SALES B R OW N F U N E R A L HOM E 1 0 6 8 M a in S t C h i p l e y F L 3 2 4 2 8 Ph o n e : 63 8 4 0 1 0 D o n a l d B r o w n L F D O w n e r Wednesday, February 26, 2014 www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Page 4 Area Wide Youth Meeting BONIFAY An area wide youth meeting will be taking place at 7 p.m. on Feb. 27 at Oak Grove Pentecostal Ministries located at 1131 Highway 179 in Bonifay. The speaker will be Bro. Stephen McKay Missionary to the Middle East. For more information call 956-4339 or 956-2322 or 658-2828. Christian Haven Jam Session CHIPLEY Christian Haven Church will be holding their monthly Jam Session on March 1. Refreshments will be at 6 p.m. and singing shortly after. For more information call 638-0836 or 773-2602. Chili Cook Off Winterville Assembly of God Church will be hosting a Chili Cook Off Contest at 11 a.m. on March 1. All proceeds bene t Wintervilles Young Single Adult Ministries. There is a $10 entry fee for each contestant and a $5 charge to dine in. Contestants and children under three eat for free. A basket of assorted prizes will be awarded to rst place winner. Basket will include gift certi cates from Mane Street Salon, Nikki Elmore Photography, Fashion Frenzy, Momma Ts Tasty Treats and Catering, and much more. To RSVP or for more info please contact Jennifer Maples at 260-7054. Ash Wednesday Mass Schedule CHIPLEY St. Joseph the Worker Catholic Church will be holding Ash Wednesday Mass from 5 to 6 p.m. on March 5. St. Ann will hold Mass and Ashes from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., on March 5. McChapel AME Prayer Breakfast MARIANNA McChapel AME Church will be holding a prayer breakfast at 8:30 a.m., on March 8 in the fellowship hall. The speaker will be Sister Dona Pittman. For more information call 594-6061 or 569-5883. Faith EVENTS A reporter from the New York Journal once tried to pin A. B. Simpson down on the matter of Christs return. The reporter asked him, Do you know when the Lord is coming? Yes, he replied, and I will tell you if you promise to print just what I say, references and all. The reporters poised notebook gave the ready promise. Then put this down: This gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world for a witness unto the nations and then shall the end come. Matthew 24:14. Have you written the reference? Yes, what more? Nothing more. The reporter lowered his pencil and said, Do you mean to say that you believe that when the Gospel is preached in all the nations Jesus will return? Just that. I think I begin to see the daylight, answered the reporter. I see the motivation and the motive power in the movement. Then, Simpson said, You see more than some of the doctors of divinity. It is so easy to get caught up in the minutia of eschatology we forget the real reason of it. To have something as precious as the coming of the Lord dividing believers has to be something hatched in the boiling cauldron of Hell. I am wondering if this is what our Lord had in mind when he encouraged us to look for his coming. Does all of this religious rhetoric passing for eschatology today really please the Lord? Take a picture of a father going away on a trip. He sits his young family down and tells them he is soon going on a trip. He does not tell them when he is coming back; it is to be a surprise for them. But when he does return he will have special gifts for each one of them. Then he leaves for his trip. After he is gone, the children begin arguing. Fathers coming back before lunch, one insists. No, no, no, another argues. Hes coming after lunch. And the squabbling goes on and on and on. Soon the only thing that really matters to these children is which one has the right view on the returning father. Each one holds his view of their returning father, as the correct one and the others are all wrong. They have exchanged the joy of their returning father for the smug satisfaction in their own minds that their view of his return is the correct one. They had forgotten that the real joy is the returning father. I believe this carries over into the church life. We hear doctrinal debates on this view and that view of eschatology. And in it all, we have lost the simple joy that Jesus is coming. Many people are going to be disappointed when Jesus does not come, according to their schedule. Some have mapped out the return of the Lord in such minute detail that if Jesus should come contrary to their expectations they will be rather disappointed. Even Jesus said, But of that day and hour knoweth no man, no, not the angels of heaven, but my Father only (Matthew 24:36 KJV). When Jesus said this, I think one of the things he had in his mind was that we should not get all caught up with the day or the hour. The most signi cant part is the personal return of Jesus Christ. The early church believed in the imminent return of Christ. That is, they believed Christ would come at any moment. They lived their lives so as to conform to this wonderful expectation. Now, some have called into doubt the word imminent, because all the early church believers have died and Christ has not returned yet. Enter the professional doctrinal slicing and dicing. And boy, have they gone to work on this. But very simply, imminent means that I should so live my life as to expect the Lord to return now. He may come today, or it may be another thousand years. The time element is not the signi cant aspect here. What is signi cant is the fact that I am living a life totally in harmony with the imminent return of Christ. Some have made it their full-time job to talk about prophecy and eschatology, which might not be so bad except for the fact that they make it an end in itself. The thing that permeated Dr. Simpsons teaching on the second coming of Christ was its relationship to world evangelism. It might be noted here, Simpson did not differentiate between homeeld or foreign eld. The world was his parish, and the world needed to be reached with the gospel of Jesus Christ. His teaching on the second coming spurred his passion to reach this world for Jesus Christ. In a magazine article Dr. Simpson wrote, Instead of looking for Christ, multitudes are looking for the millennium, the conversion of the world, the regeneration of the nations... His charge was, Watch not for the millennium, but for the Lord. (A. B. Simpson, That Blessed Hope, WWW, 1, no. 4, May 1882). When Jesus ascended into heaven, the Angel gave this instruction to the wondering disciples. Which also said, Ye men of Galilee, why stand ye gazing up into heaven? this same Jesus, which is taken up from you into heaven, shall so come in like manner as ye have seen him go into heaven (Acts 1:11 KJV). It is this same Jesus, that we are to be watching for. I suppose it would be impossible to tell how many commentaries there are on the book of Revelation. Most miss the rst ve words of this book, The Revelation of Jesus Christ. It is not a book simply of last day events and personalities. It is a book exclusively of Jesus Christ and the unfolding of him in these last days. Everything else is immaterial. Why not just concentrate on bringing back the King? On bringing back the King DR. JAMES L. SNYDER Out to Pastor

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! W ith your paid obituar y family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos fr ee of charge. Find Obituaries. Shar e Condolences. 9u €un‹ju j F{ vu? M… xu CHQTM[;: ‡n{’j‹œ up{‡… ‡v ™™™ ?px{ˆ€uœˆjˆu‹ ?p‡‚ ‡‹ n‡…{vjœ…‡™ ?p‡‚ œ‡’ pj…S " In par tnership with t£¨›  p‡‚ Find obituaries, shar e condolences and celebrate a life at or Mrs. Lillie Faye Tate, age 73, of Bonifay passed away Feb. 19, 2014 at her daughter’s home in Midland City, Ala. She was born April 12, 1940, in Bonifay to the late Coy Gus Harris and Lennie Nancy Retherford Harris. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Tate was preceded in death by her husband, David Mark Tate; one daughter, Marilyn Duffell Thompson; ve brothers, Coy Harris, Gene Harris, Ralph Harris, Rex Harris and Fred Harris and one sister, Carolyn Denmark. Mrs. Tate is survived by one daughter, Jackie Paul and husband, William, of Midland City, Ala.; one son, Jeff Duffell of Bradenton; two brothers, Russell Harris of Cantonment and William Harris of Bunnell; two sisters, Ruth McGowan of Bonifay and Ann Heinen and husband, Phillip, of Orlando; nine grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, at Bethlehem Methodist Church with the Rev. Jack Wingate ofciating. Interment followed in the Bethlehem Methodist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends from 6-8 p.m., Friday at Peel Funeral Home. Lillie F. Tate Ander Lee Brown, 91, of Bonifay died Feb. 20, 2014. Funeral services were held, Feb. 22, 2014. Interment followed in the Bethany Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Ander L. Brown Cynthia Katrice Johnson “C.K.”, age 26, of Westville, was called to heaven on the night of Jan. 11, 2014. She was born May 5, 1987, to William and Cindy Mixon Pyles in Dothan, Ala. She graduated from Ponce de Leon High School in 2005. C.K. is the beloved mother of Richard Johnson, III, “R.J.”, age 5, and Tasia Rayn Johnson, age 3. God, we understand that your angels are special. We get that you were in need of an angel, and C.K. was the one you called. You needed an angel with untouched beauty and a radiant smile. An angel with a bright personality to help light the skies. You wanted an angel with laughter that was simply sweet. You wanted an angel that would dance on your golden streets; one with the love and compassion that only a mother could possess. Her halo will always hang somewhat different than the rest. You know she will love a set of wings, she will say, “Oh my goodness, check these out.” So as you place the halo upon her head, remind her that we love her and that letting her go, even for you, was the hardest thing to do. The family would like to thank Holmes, Walton, Washington, Bay, and Houston counties for all the time and effort put into the search and rescue. They pray that your families are truly blessed. They would also like to say thank you to Leonia Baptist Church for allowing them to use the church for the services and for the dinner that was prepared for the family. Most of all, they would like to thank everyone for all the prayers, love and hope that surrounded the family in such a hard time. They are grateful for each and every one of you. She is survived by her sons; her father, William Kenneth Pyles and wife, Susan; her mother, Cindy Burch and husband, Johnny; Tenicia Pyles; Brandon Pyles; Tony Urdialas; Joshua Burch; William Yates; and numerous other family members. Memorial services were held Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014, at Leonia Baptist Church beginning at 6 p.m. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www. daviswatkins.com. Cynthia K. Johnson Barbara A. Waldron, age 66, of Bonifay passed away Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014, at the Washington County Nursing and Rehab Center in Chipley surrounded by her loving family. Barbara was born July 16, 1947, in Pensacola to the late Robert and Leona (Sherwood) Wilkes. She has been a resident of the Holmes and Washington County area since 1976 coming from Bradenton. Barbara is one of 19 children. Barbara is survived by her loving husband of 50 years, Jerry Waldron Sr.; two daughters, Sheila Sloan-Garland and husband, Steve, of Bonifay and Angela Capps and husband, Billy, of Vernon; one son, Jerry Waldron Jr. of Bonifay; six grandchildren, Ashley and Michael Holley, Shana Sloan, Thomas and Danielle Capps and Luke Capps; two great-grandchildren, James and Lily Capps; six sisters and one brother. Family received friends for visitation from 5-7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014, at Brown Funeral Home, Main Street Chapel. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Feb. 21, 2014, at Brown Funeral Home, Main Street Chapel with the Rev. Cloys Joiner and John Waldron ofciating. Interment followed in the Pleasant Hill Cemetery with Brown Funeral Home directing. Family and friends can sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. Barbara A. Waldron Vivian Everett Harden, 82, of Chipley passed away Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014, at the Northwest Florida Community Hospital surrounded by her loving family. She was born in Washington County to Henry Lloyd and Flossie Powell Everett. She graduated from Bay High School in 1950 and from the Florida State Hospital School of Nursing in 1953. She had a long career as a registered nurse and as a social worker. She was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Chipley Ward. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Denton “D.D.” Harden; brothers, Jimmy and Ederson Lee Everett and grandson, Jacob. She is survived by four daughters, Cecilia Mongoven (Barry) of Chipley, Cyndi Brown (Tim) of Chipley, Celeste Pullen of Tallahassee, and Celita Harden of Chipley; brother, Franklin Everett of Southport; sister, Catherine Kirkland of Wausau; eight grandchildren, Jami, Leigh, Michael, Tori, Jo-L, Bret, Celie and Cole; 14 greatgrandchildren and many other family members and special friends. Graveside service was held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, at Wausau Memorial Gardens Cemetery with Bishop John Gilbert ofciating. Obert Funeral Home of Chipley directed. In lieu of owers, donations can be made to the Humanitarian Aid Fund at ldsphilanthropies.org. Vivian E. Harden Charles A. Lent, age 78 of Chipley, passed away Monday, Feb. 17, 2014, in the Washington County Nursing and Rehab. Charles was born Aug. 26, 1935, in Madison, Conn., to the late Edward Leemon and Doris Arlene (Cunningham) Lent. He had been a resident of Chipley since 1979 coming from Pulteney, N.Y. He loved animals and was a farrier by trade (horseshoes). Survivors include his wife of 58 years, Madalyn (Pascarelli) Lent of Chipley; two sons, Duane Edward Lent (Sally Ann) of Surrey, England, and Mark Allen Lent of Chipley; one daughter, Lisa Ann Antognoli (Michael) of Scotts Township, Penn.; six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Memorialization was by cremation, and private memorial services will be held at a later date. Charles A. Lent GUID elEL IN eE S aA ND DeaDEA D lL IN eE S Obituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the deceased. The Washington County News/Holmes County Times-Advertiser reserves the right to edit for AP style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is noon on Monday for the following Wednesday newspaper. There is a $25 charge for obituaries. Obituaries can be emailed to funerals@chipleypaper.com or delivered to the Washington County News at 1364 North Railroad Ave. in Chipley or Holmes County Times-Advertiser at 112 E. Virginia Ave. in Bonifay. Jimmy Walsingham, 50, of Southport, passed away Saturday, Feb. 15, 2014. Mr. Walsingham is preceded in death by his brother, Duran R. Walsingham; paternal grandparents, Joseph E. and Annie Marie Walsingham and maternal grandparents, Omer D. and Mazie Worley. He is survived by his mother, Lynda Walsingham of Panama City; father, Jimmy D. Walsingham (Elaine) of Atlanta, Ga.; sister, Tonya Walsingham Roberts (Terry) of Panama City; nephew, Taryn Roberts of Orlando and two nieces, Alden and Sophia Roberts, both of Panama City. A celebration of life service will be held on Saturday, April 12, 2014, with the Rev. Steve Watson ofciating. For a specic time and location you can text or email tonyar494@ gmail.com or check Facebook. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Jimmy D. Walsingham Benet Memorial Fund at Wells Fargo Bank to assist the family. Those wishing to extend a word of condolence can do so at www.heritagefhllc.com. Jimmy Walsingham Albert E. Sikora III, age 76 of Graceville, passed away Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014, at the Northwest Florida Community Hospital in Chipley. Albert was born Aug. 19, 1937, in Orange, N.Y., to the late Albert Jr. and Ruthann (Tunstead) Sikora. He has been a resident of the Graceville area since 2006, coming from Cottondale and is a member of the Holmes Creek Baptist Church. Albert is survived by two sons, Dan Sikora and wife, Misty, of Chipley and Chris Sikora and wife, Dianna, of North Carolina; one daughter, Bonnie Plastow of Maryland; eight grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. A memorial service was at 10 a.m., Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, at the Holmes Creek Baptist Church in Chipley with the Rev. Clint Ellis ofciating. Memorialization was by cremation. Brown Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net. Albert E. SS ikora IIIIII JIMMY W al AL SIN ghaGHA M ObituariesWEDN DN E SD SD A Y Y 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 5 p.m.: New Hope United Methodist Church Bible Study 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THU U R SD SD A Y Y 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9-11a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 1 p.m.: Caregivers Meeting at Washington County Council on Aging in Chipley for more information call 638-6216 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society 2nd Thursday of each month. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Line Dancing Class for more information call 638-6216 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AFRID ID A Y Y 6 a.m.: Men’s Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper 4th Friday of every month January – September. 6-8 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging 50+ dance club for more information call 638-6216 6-8 p.m.: Marianna’s Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Methodist Youth Center in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. cC OMMUNI tT Y caleCALE ND arAR Crossword SO SO L UU T IONION

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B6 | Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, February 26, 2014 2-3584 Datapath Tower LLC proposes to construct a 195-foot (199-foot overall height) monopole telecommunications tower. The tower would not be lit. The tower would be located off McCarnley Road, Bonifay, Holmes County, FL 32425 (30 53’ 48.0” N, 85 36’ 51.9” W). The FCC Form 854 File Number is A0893450. Interested parties may raise environmental concerns about the proposed structure by filing a Request for Environmental Review (RER) with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The FCC strongly encourages interested parties to file RER online; instructions can be found at www.fcc.gov/asr/environmentalrequest. However, if an online request is not possible, interested parties may mail their request to: FCC Requests for Environmental Review, Attn: Ramon Williams, 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20554. February 26, 2014 2-3566 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-329-CA M. P. BRIGMAN; and JERRY A. BIEHL, Plaintiffs, vs. LINDA J. MASSEY, Defendant. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 21, 2014, in Case No.: 13-329-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale on the front steps of the Court House at 11:00 a.m. CST on February 28, 2014 the following described property: All of the Northeast 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 35, Township 5 North, Range 16 West, lying North and East of Highway 179, Holmes County, Florida DATED: 1/22/14 KYLE HUDSON Clerk of the Court By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk February 19, 2014 and February 26, 2014. 3-3578 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 13000149CA CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. ALLEN JOHN QUICK, SR. AND THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 6, 2014, and entered in 13000149CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Florida, wherein CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, is the Plaintiff and THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF ALLEN JOHN QUICK, SR., DECEASED; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; ALLEN J. QUICK, JR.; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s). Cody Taylor as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the Front Door 201 N. Oklahoma St., Bonifay, FL 32425, at 11:00 AM on March 20, 2014 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE S.W. CORNER OF THE S.W. 1/4 OF N.E. 1/4 OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST; THENCE GO SOUTH 87 DEG. 47’ 00” EAST, 210 FEET; THENCE NORTH 02 DEG. 58’ 05” EAST 20 FEET FOR POINT OF BEGINNIG; THENCE GO SOUTH For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8:00am-5:00pm. Call (850)638-1483 Cleaning in Detail by Barbara. It’s more than just a clean! Call 850-258-1204 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for the position of Facilities Maintenance Technician. For application contact Sherry Snell in the Holmes County Commissioner’s ofce at 850-547-1119. Please turn in completed applications to the County Commissioner’s ofce located at 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, no later than 9:00 am on March 6, 2014. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer.Employment OpportunityFacilities Maintenance Tech 5019442Employment OpportunityFEMA COORDINATORThe Holmes County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for the position of FEMA Coordinator. For application contact Sherry Snell in the Holmes County Commissioner’s ofce at 850-547-1119. Please turn in completed applications to the County Commissioner’s ofce located at 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, no later than 9:00 am on March 6, 2014. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer. SOUTH COUNTRY MOTORS.COM Cartier', V-8, Automatic, Leather, Alloy's, Multi-CD Premium Sound, and P/W, P/S, P/B. MUST SEE ONLY $5,1952000 LINCOLN TOWNCAR 2004 FORD RANGER XLT Reg. Cab 2.3L I-4 EFI, ABS, P/B, P/S, AM/FM Stereo with C/D & Cassette. Manual. GOOD MILES & ECONOMY JUST $5,5952000 FORD EXPEDITION XLT EDDIE BAUER EDITION 5.4L V-8, Automatic, Cruise, Leather, A/C, Dual Pwr. Seats, Roof Rack, Fog Lights, R/W Defogger/Wiper & Power Accessories. ALL THIS FOR JUST $3,395 1701-A S. Waukesha St. Bonifay, Fl 32425 1-850-547-1398 5019447 Logistics/TransportationCIRCULATION DISTRICT MANAGER The Panama City News Herald has an opening for District Manager. The District Manager oversees independent distributors in the delivery of newspapers to subscribers within a defined geographical area. Individuals will handle route management aspects such as audits, analysis, and contract negotiations. The ideal candidate will have a focus on customer service. High school diploma or equivalent required. Prior newspaper experience in circulation as well as a management background is preferred. Must be able to evaluate current and prospective Independent Contractors and provide feedback and a course of action: Basic computer skills (Excel. Word) a must. Must own and operate a motor vehicle. Must have valid Florida Drivers License, proof of car insurance, and must successfully complete a background check. Must have ability to read and understand a road map. Must be able to work a very flexible schedule. Excellent benefits, drug-free workplace, EOE Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com or fill out an application at 501 W. 11th Street, Panama City, FL. No phone calls. Accepting applications until March 15, 2014 Web ID#: 34281509 Text FL81509 to 56654 Logistics/Transportation The Washington County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for a Heavy Equipment Operator III, Grader Operator position for the Public Works Department. The primary function of the Heavy Equipment Operator III will be to operate machinery in connection with the construction, repair and maintenance of roads and right-of-ways within Washington County. Starting salary is $12.52 per hour. Minimum Training and Experience: Graduation from a standard high school or general education degree (GED) is required. Must possess a Florida Class A CDL license and have five (5) years of verifiable experience in the operation of heavy equipment. Applications may be accessed on-line at www.washingtonfl.com. Applications and job descriptions may also be obtained at the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office located at 1331 South Boulevard, Chipley, FL 32428. All interested applicants MUST submit an Employment Application to the Human Resources Department in the Washington County Board of County Commissioners’ office by 4:00 PM on March 6, 2014. All questions regarding this position or other vacancies should be directed to the Human Resources Department, 850-415-5151. The selected applicant will be subject to a pre-employment physical and drug screen. Veteran’s Preference is accepted in accordance with FS 295.08. Web Id 34281479 87 DEG. 47’ 00” EAST, 122.63 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 02 DEG. 13’00” EAST, 131.0 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 87 DEG. 47’ 00” WEST 120.91 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 02 DEG. 58’ 05” WEST 131.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, BEING IDENTIFIED AS BLOCK B, LOT 1, OF AN UNRECORDED SURVEY, ALL LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 11 day of February, 2014. Kyle Hudson As Clerk of the Court By: Diane Eaton As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402, Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717, Hearing Impaired: Dial 711, Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcour ts.org February 26, 2014 and March 5, 2014 3-3567 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-DP-16 IN THE INTEREST OF: J.L.N.B. DOB:07/12/2005 MINOR CHILDREN (SEC.39.801 (b) FS) The State of Florida to NICOLE BOVE-STEPHENS, natural mother whose residence and address is unknown. You are hereby notified that a Petition under oath has been filed in the above styled Court for the Termination of Parental Rights in the case of J.L.N.B. child, to licensed child placement agency for subsequent adoption. You are hereby noticed that an Advisory Hearing will be held before the Honorable Christopher N. Patterson, Judge of the Circuit Court, Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, at the Holmes County Courthouse, Second Floor Courtroom, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida, on the 8th day of April, 2014, at the hour of 9:00 a.m., CENTRAL TIME. You have the right to appear with counsel at this hearing. If you can not afford legal representation, the Court will appoint counsel for you at this hearing upon the determination of insolvency. You must either appear on the date and at the time specified or send a written response to the Court prior to that time. YOUR FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD OR CHILDREN. February 18, 2014, February 26, 2014, March 4, 2014 and March 12, 2014. 3-3575 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 30-2013-CA-000225 CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR LEHMAN XS TRUST MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-15, Plaintiff, vs. STEPHEN HUNTER et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated February 11, 2014 and entered in Case NO. 30-2013-CA-000225 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HOLMES County, Florida wherein CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR LEHMAN XS TRUST MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-15, is the Plaintiff and STEPHEN HUNTER; SANDRA V HUNTER; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT STEPS OF THE HOLMES COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 20th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS 1, 2, 6, AND 7, BLOCK 4, MOSS ADDITION IN SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, ALL LYING AND BEING IN HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 2842 PONCE DE LEON SPRINGS ROAD #12, PONCE DE LEON, FL 32555 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on February 12, 2014. Kyle Hudson Clerk of the Circuit Court By:Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@jud14.flcour ts.org. February 26, 2014 and March 5, 2014. 3-3577 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 12-CA-000303 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND OTHER UKNOWN PERSONS OR UNKNOWN SPOUSES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THOMAS O. CREAMER; ROBIN LANGFORD; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBIN LANGFORD; STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND OTHER UKNOWN PERSONS OR UNKNOWN SPOUSES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THOMAS O. CREAMER LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit: Commence at the Southeast corner of Section 8, Township 6 North, Range 17 West; thence North 89 49’ 42” West for a distance of 803.69 feet to the Northernmost right of way of State Road #2, and the Point of Beginning, thence North 89 49’ 42” West for a distance of 404.50 feet; thence North 42 52’ 28” East for a distance of 934.41 feet; thence south 41 30’ 00” east for a distance of 315.00 feet to the Northernmost right of way of State Road #2; thence along a curve to the right having a radius of 2814.93 feet and an arc length of 630.73 feet, being subtended by a chord of South 4421’ 05” West for a distance of 629.42 feet along said right of way to the point of Beginning. said parcel is a part of the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 8, Township 6 North, Range 17 West, Holmes County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Monica D. Shepard, Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 South Conway Road, Suite E, Orlando, Florida 32812 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 19 day of February, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Cindy Johnson Deputy Clerk February 26, 2014 and March 5, 2014 BILOXI BOUND! Red Eye Feb 28th, 2 Casinos, $45 Back in Free Play. $40 Per Person, Pick up @ Chipley Walmart 8:45pm or Bonifay, FL9pm Call for more info Aventure Tours by Pat 334-701-1103 Older gentleman seeking to date a older woman in her 60’s. Must be honest, healthy and believe in God. 850-638-9643. STOLEN: Stand-up Bass Fiddle, Cermona, SB-2, 3/4 size, taken from pickup truck at local restaurant on Tuesday, 2/18,2014, in Chipley. Has identifying marks that owner can verify. Call with any information. (850)638-8220 Max Wells Mixed Breed Guard Dogs. Also good with children. Call 850-768-9591. Ten Holiday Barbies $150, Love seat sage green good shape $100, glider rocker $20, Leather recliner $100, 26 inch ladies bicycle $50. 850-535-2585, 850381-7157 &DOORQHRIRXU §DGYLVRUV¨DQGSXWWKH &ODVVLILHGVWR :25.)25<28 7/" "1 /9 7nxn‡"£" "-"1 /9 /-‡6,/-, nxx{‡™{£{ For Sale like new 4-piece King size bedroom set, Handmade, cherry stain fine hard wood, $700/OBO. 638-9643 4 Family Yardsale Sat, March 1, 8am-until. Corner of Hwy 90&7th St. Parking lot of Dr Taylor’s office. Household goods, toys, summer clothes, much more. Estate Sale 3083 Main Street. Vernon Florida. February 28 through March 8 except on Sunday. Moving Sale Feb 27, Thursday afternoon & 28, Friday 9am-7pm. 1280 Old Church Rd, Chipley. To much to list. Call 726-0396, 726-0395. Multi-Family yard sale Fri. Feb 28 & Sat March 1. Across from Bonifay Armory, behind elementary school. Yard Sale March 3rd&4th. Various items, 9-5 daily. 607 E. Nebraska Ave, Bonifay. GUN SHOW March 1&2 Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL81163 to 56654 Gym Size Eliptical. Excellent condition. Nordic track CX1055. $350.00 firm. Paid much more. 547-3801. Hitachi 10inch Jobsite table saw on portable stand. Used once, in box. Model C10FR. Paid $240.00, sale $175.00, OBO. 850-263-9998. Stihl Ht-Km chainsaw SH-KM trimmer Combi tools with pole extender. Fits Stihl weed eater pro series $175/OBO 263-9998 Wanted to Rent; Farm land or pasture in Chipley & suroundding areas for the year 2014. 850-718-1859. Deep Red Amarylalla bulbs for sale. Ready for spring planting. 547-2563. Food Svc/Hospitality Dishwasher French’s Restaurant is now accepting applications for a Dishwasher. Apply in person Hwy 90 Caryville, FL. 850-548-5800 Web ID#: 34280996 Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Hospitality Reservationist Front desk position. Must work weekends & Holidays, must have good phone etiquette. Able to handle high call volume. & computer knowledgeable but will train. Must have a pleasant personality for working with vacationers. Stop in at Dunes of Panama 7025 Thomas Drive, Bldg. C or fax 850-235-8210 or email to: reservations@dunes ofpanama.com Web Id 34281593 Text 81593 to 56654 Executive Office Space for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 FOR RENT 1B/R apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 Mandi Lea Apartments in Vernon, 2/BR. Financial Assistance available if qualified. 638-4640. 2BR/1BA garage and carport, HWY 2, suitable for two adults, no pets, $500/MO, First, last and deposit, 6/MO lease 850-849-6444. House for Rent near Downtown Chipley. 2BR/1BA. $550/MO. Call 850-849-1735. Newly renovated 3BR/2BA Home with large family room, new exterior and interior paint, flooring and kitchen appliances, located in Bonifay $600/MO. NO PETS. 547-2936 or 768-0394. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO and up. Includes Garbage, sewage, and lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 2BR/1BAMobile Homes W/G included. $400 plus Deposit. 547-4232, 850-527-4911. 2BR/2BAMobile Homes W/G included. $425 plus Deposit. 547-4232, 850-527-4911. 3BR/1.5BA In country setting. $375.00/mth + $350.00 deposit. 850-956-2113. FOR RENT Nice mobile home excellent location in Chipley. No Pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Home Bonifay area. $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Leave message. HUNTING LAND for rent or lease, 1 year or 5 years, 160 acres or 300 acres. For more information call (850)638-1911 or (850)326-0044. Mobile Home For Rent 3BR/2BA in Chipley Area $650 Very private w/Big Back Yard. NO PETS. Leave # for return Call 850-258-1594. Mobile Homes For Rent 2 and 3 Bedrooms in Cottondale, Central Heat and Air. $400 -$500 a month. 850-258-1594. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. Rent. 14’x70’ MH. 3BR/1BA, large back yard. 3 people. $400.00/mth. 6 miles north Bonifay. Out side pet. 547-1493. Rental Business for sale. 3 houses in Chipley. Recently updated. Continually rented. 638-1483, 850-481-5352. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. 2000 Lincoln Town Car-Cartier. Low miles, loaded. V-8, automatic, leather, alloys, multi-CD, premium sound and P/S, P/W, P/B. MUST SEE! Call John @ 850-547-1398 DLR. B USINESS G UIDE Hasty Heating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 20 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!638-3611 Advertise your service or business for as little as $10/week.Ad runs in the Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser. 638-0212 or 547-9414 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183 Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are CarpetedThree Chicks Cleaning Free Quotes Experienced References Available Flexible Hours (M-F) (850) 956-2408 Cell (850) 768-0022 HVAC Services Coolers & Freezers Service on all Makes & Models Heat Pumps, Electric & Gas Electrical Services Exterior Elevated LightingResidential and Commerical ALL YOUR PRINTING NEEDS SOLVEDFor Quote Call Kim 683-0212, x4004 WE PRINT MORE THAN JUST NEWSPAPERS Washington County imes A dvertiserHOLMES COUNTY T 5019410 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414

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B8 | Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, February 26, 2014 1117192 INCENTIVES GOOD THRU 03/06/2014 PRICES GOOD THRU 03/06/2014