Holmes County times-advertiser

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Holmes County times-advertiser
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Bonifay, FL
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June 19, 2013
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50www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visitBONIFAYNOW.COM IN BRIEF imes imes imes T dvertiser imes imes imes imes T T dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser AHOLMES COUNTY HolmesCountyFarmBureauSupportsandsalutesHolmesCounty, Bethlehem,PoncedeLeonandPoplarSprings FFAChaptersandtheiraccomplishmentsin agriculturaleducationFormoreinformationgoto www.a.org orcall638-1756 NATIONAL FFAWEEKFebruary15-22,2014 HCHS FBLA students advance to compete in State | B3 Wednesday, FEBRUARY 19 2014Volume 123, Number 45Healthy cooking demonstration classesBONIFAY Free monthly healthy cooking demonstration classes are sponsored by the Holmes County Health Department and University of Florida/ IFAS Extension. The classes are at noon at the Holmes County Agriculture Center, 1173 E. U.S. 90, on the following dates: Feb. 19, March 19, April 23, May 21 and June 18. The classes will offer healthy cooking tips and alternatives for everyday meals, and food samples will be served. No registration is required. Extension programs are open to everyone. For persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations, contact the extension of ce, 5471108 (TDD, via Florida Relay Service, 1-800955-8771), at least ve working days before the class. For more information, call Leann Jones at 5478500, ext. 240.Community health walkBONIFAY In celebration of 125 years of Florida Public Health, the Holmes County Health Department is sponsoring a community health walk from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 20. The walk will be hosted by and located at Doctors Memorial Hospital. The walk is open to the public, and all are encouraged to attend. There is no registration required; gift bags will be distributed to the rst 100 to attend, as well as door prizes. The walk also coincides with American Heart Month. INDEXOpinion ................................A4 Sports ..................................A7 Extra ....................................B1 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries .......................B5-B6 Classi eds .......................B7-B8 Phone: 850-547-9414 Website: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY What would you do to save someone you love? This is the question that led young author Brittany Hawes through a series of ideas that would bloom to be her rst novel. Hawes is a 20-year old Chipola College student and a 2012 graduate of Vernon High School who recently had her rst novel, Twisted, published by Deep Sea Publishing in Herndon, Va. Having her book published by Deep Sea Publishing was part of Hawkins prize as the winner of the companys 2013 Young Author Contest.Young author publishes rst novel BRITTANY HAWESBy CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Attorney Brandon Young once again came before the Bonifay City Council during its Feb. 10 meeting as legal representative of a subdivision for which efforts are being made to develop on Grif th Circle in Bonifay. During the last meeting, you requested all of the appropriate signatures in order to carry this through, Young said. I am here with those signatures. Council member Richard Woodham said he didnt agree with the city taking in the subdivision until the road was repaired. Id like to see that road xed before we take it because then it becomes a liability, Woodham said. Young said construction trucks employed by the city for road repairs and repaving caused the recent damage to the main road through the subdivision. Ironically, no one should have been on that property to begin with because it is private property, Young said. After lengthy discussion, council members agreed to have a meeting with their contractor to discuss how repairs can be made, and the matter be tabled until the next council meeting. Tony Syfrett of Southeastern Surveying and Mapping Corporation came before the council during its Nov. 25 meeting with designs for a subdivision on Grif th Circle off State Road 79 in Bonifay, stating he was informed the subdivision was approved of in 2008. Grant Writer Bob Jones advised Syfrett the council needed clari cation of what was approved in 2008 before it could approve anything and move on. After Grif th subdivision tabled again Staff ReportBONIFAY A Holmes County re ghter is said to be recovering well after sustaining an injury while on the scene of a re at the Economy Lodge in Bonifay on Feb. 14. He is doing well and is expected to fully recover, said Travis Cook, assistant re chief for the Holmes County Fire Department. It was a knee injury, and there seems to be no long-term damage. The re ghter, who was not identi ed, suffered the injury on the roof during re suppression and was taken to a local hospital by Holmes County EMS where he was treated and released. The Holmes County Fire Department responded to a re at the Economy Lodge around 1:41 a.m. Staff ReportThe Holmes County Sheriffs Ofce has located Casey Jean Anderson, a 27-year-old Ponce de Leon who was reported missing by his mother from their home on the evening of Feb. 16. Earlier that evening, the sheriffs of ce received a call of a suspicious person in the area of Simmons Lane, south of Ponce de Leon. The caller reported the subject was knocking on their door asking for water and matched Andersons description. Anderson was located the morning of Tuesday, Feb. 18, after deputies spent two nights searching in a densely wooded area. He was transported for treatment by Holmes County EMS. Anderson reportedly was suffering from a brain injury and had not been taking his medication. Holmes County Sheriff Tim Brown would like to thank the Walton County Sheriffs Of ce, the Bay County Sheriffs Of ce and the Florida Department of Corrections K-9 teams from Holmes and Walton C.I. for their assistance.Missing PDL man foundCATHRINE LAMB | Times-AdvertiserThe Holmes/Washington County Relay for Life committee met on Feb. 17 and had a special Valentine for local cancer survivors. Committee members gave survivors candy and Valentines Day cards, made by local elementary school students, as a symbol of celebration. BONIFAY CITY COUNCILSee FIREFIGHTER A2 CASEY ANDERSONSee BONIFAY A2 See AUTHOR A2 Fire ghter recovering after injury RELAY FOR LIFE HAS A HEART FOR SURVIVORS SPECIAL TO TIMES-ADVERTISERMembers of the Holmes County Fire Department battled the blaze at the Economy Lodge last Friday, Feb. 14. Staff ReportThe Tallahassee Police Department Special Victims Unit is asking for help from residents in the Washington County area in a continued effort to locate Michael McNamara, a 17-yearold missing person. McNamara was last seen Jan. 13, in the area of Roberts Avenue in Tallahassee. McNamara is about 5 feet 8 inches tall and weighs about 150 pounds. McNamara might also use the name Michael Lopez. TPD has reason to believe McNamara is in the Chipley area. Anyone with information about McNamaras whereabouts is asked to call the Tallahassee Police Department at 606-5800, the Chipley Police Department at 638-6310, or the Washingotn County Sheriffs Of ce at 638-6111TPD search for missing teen MICHAEL MCNAMARA

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LocalA2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, February 19, 2014Im a Chipola sophomore with one more year to compete my associates degree in communication, Hawes said. I love to read, and that is why I wrote my own story. I got the idea when I was writing, and I thought, What would you do to save someone you love? Hawes then spun a tale about a homeless orphan living on Skid Row after her parents mysteriously vanished when she was 8 years old, leaving her to care for herself. The adventure begins when she dedicates to spend her every waking moment in the pursuit to nd her missing parents. She soon nds answers that only lead to more questions as the story develops into a spy novel. Hawes said her inspiration came from author Meg Cabot, who writes romance and paranormal ction. Her personality can be found in her books, and I like how you are able to resonate with the characters, she said. Family was also a big inspiration. I wondered what I would do to get them back. Hawes plans to transfer to Florida State University to continue her communication degree and to make Twisted the rst in a trilogy. Her book is now available in paperback and ebook format on Amazon. com. For more information on Twisted, visit www. brittanyhawes.com. much discussion, council members decided to table the issue until it could be reviewed further. Young said though the preliminary plot was approved in 2008 and construction had started and roads paved, the company that initiated the project fell apart because of the economy, and the project fell by the wayside. Everything was done to state standards, Young said. The roads were at Department of Transportation standards; theres a holding pond, the water lines have been pressure tested, and there are no lots less than half an acre, just in case they want septic there. In other actions taken, the council approved a measure for Charles Smith to return the deed to an alleyway near his house back to the city. City Attorney Lucas Taylor said the Bonifay City Council deeded Smith with an alleyway near his property in 1994, but for reasons unknown, Smith was never given the deed. Smith then came before the present council requesting a quitclaim deed, and the council only approved because they thought they were correcting a past mistake done by the council, Taylor said. What the council didnt know is that Mr. Smith had been in negotiations with another land owner. Smith came after the deal based on what he brought before in the 90s, and we have a policy not to deed alleyways. Taylor said the information he brought in was a Department of Transportation map showing the alleyway as 24 feet, which city of Bonifay adjusted from 20 feet to 24 feet on the deed, but it encroached into his neighbors property and delayed his neighbor from selling the property. Taylor said after much research into the citys alleyway, he found that all other alleyways are exactly 20 feet and concluded that the DOT made an error. The city cant do anything except make the correction back to 20 feet, Taylor said. This has become a private matter, and both parties need to survey their land. In taking back the alleyway deed, you are both basically back where you initially began. The next regularly scheduled meeting of the Bonifay City Council is 6 p.m. Feb. 24. FINDUS inPrint,OnlineandontheRoad!bonifaynow.com WeareallthingsLocal! 13Weeks26Weeks52Weeks$13.33$19.90$32.00 ItseasytosubscribeCall866-747-5050orsendfullpaymentandformbelow.*Pleasecallforout-of-countyrates.Getthebestsourceforlocalnews,interests andeventsinHolmesCountydelivered toyoueveryWednesday.Returnformto:HCT,112E.VirginiaAve,Bonifay,FL32425 Yes! Signmeupforanin-countysubscriptiontotheHolmesCountyTimesAdvertiser*13Weeks$13.3326Weeks$19.9052Weeks$32.00Name________________________________________________________________ Phone_______________________________________________________________ DeliveryAddress_______________________________________________________ City___________________________________State____Zip_________________ Paymentenclosed$____________Signature_______________________________Chargemycredit/debitcard.__Visa__MasterCard__AmEx__Discover CreditCard#__________________________________________Exp.Date_______ BONIFAY from page A1 AUTHOR from page A1 FIREFIGHTER from page A1Command was established by Deputy Chief L. Cook, and Bonifay FireRescue began an aggressive interior attack on the re, beginning in room 342, when the re began. Bonifay Police evacuated the rooms before Fire-Rescue arrival. The re quickly breached the attic space and spread through the attic above, eight rooms to the north of the origin. At 2:20 am, Incident Command requested mutual aid from Chipley Fire Department and Gritney Fire Department. Both departments responded and assisted Bonifay Fire-Rescue in containing the re. The re was 90 percent contained at 3:03 a.m., and all re units cleared the scene by 7:15 am. No motel patrons were injured, and the cause of the re is currently under investigation by the Ofce of the State Fire Marshall. Chief Shay McCormick extends his thanks to Chipley Fire Department and Gritney Fire Department for their response and hard work in assisting Bonifay Fire-Rescue in extinguishing this re, as well as the Bonifay Police Department, Holmes County Sheriffs Ofce and Holmes County EMS for their response and assistance. The re began in room 342 and quickly spread throughout.PHOTOS Sp P ECIAL TO TT IMES-A A DVERTISERA Bonifay reghter was injured while performing re suppression on the motels roof. FWC nal report: Speed, inattention blamed in boating deathsBy TOM McLAUGHLIN315-4435 | @TomMnwfdn tmclaughlin@nwfdailynews.com NICEVILLE ICEVILLE Former Bay High School basketball coach Robert Williams was an experienced driver especially knowledgeable in boating at night, and yet he likely was operating the vessel that ran into a MidBay Bridge piling, killing three people. Excessive speed and operator inattention are blamed in the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissions (FWC) nal report on the accident that killed Williams and two young women riding with him in his 2014 336 Cobalt boat early Dec. 6. The paint transfer on the bridge shows that the boat may have almost hit the piling head on. It is possible the operator may have made an evasive maneuver at the last moment, the report states. Bruising that Williams sustained in the collision with the Mid-Bay Bridge appeared to indicate he was driving the boat when it hit the piling, the report states. It said visibility at the time of the accident should have been 6 to 9 miles. The damage of the boat indicates the vessel was traveling at a high rate of speed, but that speed is not known, the investigative report states. It is unknown why Mr. Williams did not see the bridge piling. Efforts to determine the boats exact speed when it hit the bridge were unsuccessful, FWC investigators said. Williams, 47, died in the accident along with Taylor Evanoff, 18, and Jamilia Beltz, 21. All three were intoxicated at the time of the boat wreck, the report states. An autopsy found all three victims drowned. The FWC investigative report also reconstructed better the timing of the boat trip Williams and the two women embarked upon. Ofcers obtained surveillance video that showed Williams, Beltz and Evanoff arriving in Williams Cadillac Escalade at the Legendary Marine location in Destin at about 8:45 p.m. Dec. 5 and leaving by boat at 9 p.m., the report said. Williams and his passengers arrived at the Legendary Marine in Fort Walton Beach at an undetermined time after that, it said. At or around midnight a cab driver dropped the three back off at the Fort Walton Beach marina, the report states. This is possibly the last time anyone had seen any of the three alive. There are no known witnesses to the crash, the report states. FILE pP HOTOSearchers scour Choctawhatchee Bay near the Mid-Bay Bridge in early December after a boat collided with the bridge, killing three people.

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A3Wednesday, February 19, 2014 FREETOHOLMESCOUNTY RESIDENTSONLY Household HazardousWaste AmnestyDayMarch1,20148:00a.m.to12:00p.m. AtHolmesCountyRecyclingCenter ConditionallyExemptSmallQuantityGenerators(Small ReducedRate. By MATTHEW BEATON 522-5114 | @matthewbeaton mbeaton@pcnh.com TALLAHASSEE A state House panel was all about beer Feb. 11, advancing three malt beverage-related bills, including a measure to allow sales of 64ounce growlers. Among the three bills, an overarching committee bill would address several factors, including safety, tastings and growler sales. The bill would explicitly dene a growler as a 32-ounce, 64-ounce, 128-ounce, 1-liter or 2-liter container made to hold malt beverages. The 64-ounce size is standard for growlers, according to a staff analysis of the bill. The brewers have pushed for legalization of the larger size since last year. The bill also would allow beer manufacturers to run a tap room and sell beer to patrons without a vendors license. The beer could be sold for onand off-premise consumption. Phone or mail orders would not be allowed.The manufacturer would brew the beer sold in the tap room on site or ship it in from another brewery it owns. At least 70 percent of tap room sales a year would need to be brewed on site. Off-premise consumption sales would be limited to growlers and other authorized containers. The bill also would allow manufacturers and distributers to hold on-premise beer tastings. Brewers largely support the bill but want some minor adjustments.Were very much in favor of the work youre doing, said Craig Birkmaier, vice president of Florida Brewers Guild. Obviously, we have positions and would like to work with you to tweak the bill to meet all of those.The bill was opposed by an anti-drug and alcohol group. State Rep. Darryl Rouson noted both retailers and brewers still had concerns about the legislation. And even though the bill sailed through the Business & Professional Regulation Subcommittee, the Democratic ranking member from St. Petersburg indicated his caucus might have problems with it down the road. The bill impacts not just the distributors and the brewers, but also has impact on the consumer, who I think at the end of the day is the most important person that we need to be concerned about, Rouson said.Chairman Debbie Mayeld, R-Vero Beach, pointed out a growler bill was led last year, which the committee did not take up. She said it would have affected more than just growlers, affecting the states three-tier system for beer sales manufacturers with vendors licenses, tap rooms attached to a manufacturers premises and brew pubs that sell beer brewed on site.Mayeld said the bill was very difcult to craft and draws a very ne line. We were coming from the standpoint of trying to protect the three-tiered system at the same time of allowing an industry to grow, she said. The committee also passed a bill (HB 387), which would put more precise language on in-store tastings. The third bill the committee approved would let beer be sold in any size including any size growler at retail stores in the state.3 beer bills advance in House By Ca A Ro O L Kent ENT638-0212 | @WCN_HCT ckent@chipleypaper.com Weve gotten too far away from the Lord and the land. When you dont own land, you dont appreciate what it takes to put food on the table. That belief is what led to Dr. Bruce Christmas Sr.s dedication to educating future generations about the importance of agriculture and the role it plays in the economy, a life mission that recently earned the Jackson County native a spot in the Florida Agricultural Hall of Fame. As an agent with the University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Christmas is respected for his research in poultry science. But its his work to promote agriculture as a whole and educate children about its value for which the genial fth-generation farmer is perhaps best known. His message emphasizes the importance of American agriculture as the safest, least expensive food supply in the world and its connection to everything we have and do as Americans. Christmas spent seven years in Orange County as an extension agent, where he helped develop and run urban 4-H clubs. A lot of folks asked why I bothered, Christmas said. They said, Those city kids will never be farmers. I told them I wasnt trying to make them farmers; I was trying to teach them the value of agriculture and how it impacts their lives. These kids would be consumers one day, and they needed to understand and appreciate where their food came from. Christmas moved to Washington County in 1969, where he worked at Chipleys Poultry Evaluation Center. His eld research soon became widely published, helping earn him the Harms Publication Award for best poultry publication in 1983. Hes also been recognized by many organizations for his leadership and volunteer service to youth, having given more than 16,000 hours of volunteer service and traveled over 65,000 non-reimbursed miles to tell the story of agriculture. He was inducted into the Florida 4-H Hall of Fame, has served on the UF College of Agriculture and Life Science board for many years and was previously chosen National Volunteer of the Year for the National Agriculture Alumni and Development Association. Over the course of 20 years, more than 5,000 Washington County youth, teachers and parents have participated in eld days, Ag in the Classroom and Youth Fair events and activities in which Christmas was an integral part of planning, funding and teaching. Washington County 4-H youth development agent Julie Pigott Dillard, who helped nominate Christmas for his most recent honor, was among those students. I visited the egg-laying contest on school eld trips and was later coached as an FFA member on a state winning poultry team by (Christmas), Dillard said. His honors and awards speak for themselves, but its my obligation to speak on his dedication, love and respect for agriculture. You are likely to never meet someone so passionate for agriculture as Dr. Christmas. Throughout his life, he has been an outspoken advocate for the national and state food systems as safe, wholesome and the best value for the dollar, she adds. He is a tireless advocate for the rights of farmers and ranchers and is always willing to speak on their behalf. Although he is ofcially retired, he will never retire from his position as agricultural advocate. H. Fred Dietrich, also mentored by Christmas, took part in his nomination for the hall of fame honor as well. It was his example that encouraged me to go into agricultural youth work as a career and to be in leadership of many agricultural professional organizations, Dietrich said. Dr. Christmas has been married for more than 50 years to Addie Ann, and they have four sons: Stuart, Bruce, Jr., Jonathan and Scott. Hes an active member of First Baptist Church of Chipley, Chipley Kiwanis and president of the Washington County Farm Bureau, where he continues to give time to those who need him. Still, ensuring the success of agriculture here remains his passion. Agriculture allows us to have the standard of living that we do, Christmas said. We eat cheaper (in the United States) than any other country on Earth. Agriculture is the backbone of our economy, and its a foundation we can count on. Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam and the Florida Agricultural Hall of Fame Foundation made the announcement to induct Christmas and three other honorees into the 2014 Florida Agriculture Hall of Fame at the Florida State Fair in Tampa on Feb. 11. These individuals have made incredible contributions to agriculture in our state and beyond, Putnam said. The changes and improvements they have made will help ensure the strength of Floridas $100 billion agriculture for generations to come. sS Pe E CIal AL tT O The HE TIMes ES -ADVe E Rt T Ise SE RDr. Bruce Christmas Sr., right, was nominated in part by Washington County 4-H youth development agent Julie Pigott Dillard.Christmas inducted into Florida Agricultural Hall of Fame

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OPINION APage 4SectionThe views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $13.30; 26-weeks: $19.90; 52 weeks: $32.00 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $17.70; 26 weeks: 26.50; 52 weeks: $43.00The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Carol Kent, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION clamb @chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 ADVERTISING Stephanie Smith: ssmith@ chipleypaper. com 850-547-9414www.bonifaynow.comWednesday, February 19, 2014Agri-tourism is a term Ive been hearing for several years now, and I believe we have been somewhat involved in it from the beginning in 1987 at our blueberry business on Hwy 79. We are interested in capitalizing on our ideal location as much as possible. For that reason, when we were informed about a workshop in Quincy last week, I quickly made reservations for our son Glen, Jack and myself to attend. Our Extension agent, Shep Eubanks, Julia Bullington, Holmes County Chamber of Commerce Director, Mark and Carla Templeton of The Silver Door art studio all attended from Holmes County. Julia is on the Board of Directors for River Way South who sponsored the event. I learned much at the workshop, a new word, for one thing. Riparian. That is a term describing a geographic area whose boundary is a moving body of water. River Way South Apalachicola Choctawhatchee or RWSAC is counterpart to a parent organization started earlier to represent the interests of the Georgia, Alabama and Florida watershed. But RWSAC represents the interests of the riparian counties of Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Liberty, and Washington. Since Florida is a tourist state, we believe that tourists are missing some of this areas rich agricultural, cultural, historical, maritime, and nature based resources. Much of these resources are located in the rural areas: thus, agri-tourism is born. The leader of the workshop we attended at the U of F Research Center in Quincy was International Agri-tourism Specialist Jane Eckert who knows about the subject from personal experience. She is a sixth generation farmers daughter whose family operates an apple farm which has evolved over the years into an agri-tourist attraction that hosts 400,000 guests annually. She has a degree in business administration and left the family farm to work in agri-marketing for 15 years. Returning to the farm she guided the expansion into agri-tourism. She now operates an Agricultural Marketing Company. She is an approved speaker and consultant by Florida Department of Economic Development and the USDA. She has earned many honors including Hall of Fame by The Direct Marketing Association. Some notes from her workshop: People visit farm destinations for the scenery, to visit family and friends, participate in farm activities, and to buy products. The visitor wants things to see, things to do, things to buy, and things to taste. Eckert recommends starting with a commodity; adding value; deliver a service; provide an experience. To get started, she says Evaluate your familys commitment, evaluate the physical assets of your property, determine your nancial comfort level, and target your customers. Then she gave recommendations for expanding what you sell; services and activities you might offer; special events you might host. She emphasized that trained and friendly staff is crucial. She stressed that we are in the hospitality business! A portion of the workshop dealt with legal aspects of an on the farm enterprise. The Florida Legislature has passed legislation favorable to agri-tourism (570.96 and sub sections.) However each operator must be aware of possible risks and protect himself from liability. She highly recommends having a web site to keep the consumer aware of your business. Our experience over 25 plus years in limited agri-tourism has been most pleasant. We hope to continue and expand our services through this medium. We encourage others in our area to develop your opportunity. A trail of tours will be established in the future by the RWSAC and you may join the organization. Of cers are Pres. Homer Hirt, Lake Seminole, Vice President Betty Webb Apalachicola, Secretary John Thornton West Florida Electric Cooperative, and Treasurer Heather Lopez Washington County. The web site is www.rws .org. Not only was the information gained at this workshop, the networking with other entrepreneurs and information gained from them was invaluable. Not fooled by Southerlands deceptivenessDear Editor, As the polls show, and as many of you are aware, there is a growing disdain for our politicians in Washington. The 2013 Congress was dubbed the Do Nothing Congress. Their partisanship and obstructionism is sti ing our country and the wellbeing of our citizens. Our congressman is no exception. Congressman Steve Southerland voted with his extreme Tea Party colleagues to shut down the government last October, which cost the American taxpayers $24 billion. That money would have gone a long way toward feeding the poor. Then he voted with the same colleagues to keep the government shut down and not pay the bills he and the rest of Congress appropriated to begin with, all because he opposed Obamacare. He has not put forth an alternative to Obamacare, and when he signed up for it he took advantage of a federal subsidy provided by the taxpayers in order to lower his premiums, even though he says his $174,000 congressional salary is not so much. Southerland voted for the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 because the Republican leadership convinced most House Republicans to do so, to avoid another embarrassing shutdown. He is now against what he voted for, and is twisting it around to get votes from Tyndall Air Force Base. Within days after his vote he said, With two years remaining before these COLA changes are due to take effect, I am hopeful the House will address the concerns of our retirees between now and then. We did not send Southerland to Washington to be hopeful of what the House will do between now and then, we sent him there to be a leader and do what is right for us now. If he is so concerned about the COLA cuts, he should never have voted for the budget to begin with. In a News Herald article, Southerland stated, I voted against sequestration in 2011 because I knew it was wrong for North and Northwest Floridas military. Actually, he voted against a compromise bill that would lead to sequestration if Congress could not pass a budget. Sequestration was supposed to be so terrible it would force both parties to come together and pass a budget in the future. The compromise, as bad as it was, temporally funded the government and prevented a government shutdown. If all congressmen had voted against the compromise bill, like Southerland did, it would have led to another shutdown. Southerland attached an amendment to the Farm Bill cutting food stamps by $39 billion, which caused the much-needed bill our farmers depend on to fail for the rst time ever. Ironically, Southerland stated in his Christmas address, Dear Friend, as we gather with our loved ones and re ect upon our personal blessings this Christmas holiday season, let us be mindful of those who are less fortunate. Yet he is determined to make harsh slashes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. Is taking food away from 47 million poor people being mindful of those who are less fortunate? Southerland has fought against widely successful commercial shing programs since taking of ce in 2010, but a member of his staff told a commercial sherman last December at a shing meeting in Tampa that Southerland changed his mind and is now willing to work with commercial shermen. Is this because he is running against a formidable opponent for his house seat this November? It may be too late for him to garner support from commercial shermen since, through a grassroots effort, commercial shermen from Key West to Brownsville, Texas, who are not even in Southerlands district, have donated much more to his opponent, Mrs. Gwen Graham, than he has received from his dark-money billionaire contributors. As one of those shermen, I am not fooled by Southerlands deceptiveness, and I hope this letter sheds some light on his hypocrisy. Instead of a congressman who does photo ops and makes statements for personal political ambitions, we need a leader in Congress who will truly reach across the aisle and work with both parties and independents, not just for the bene t of our district, but for the sake of our country. That person is Mrs. Gwen Graham.Jim ClementsCarrabelle Letter to the EDITORDoctor Clinton Frederick (Fred) Lavender died, after a brief illness, on Nov. 5, 2013, in Panama City at the age of 91. Dr. Lavender was stricken while visiting his devoted wife, Jeanne Lavender, who was a patient in the hospital at the time. Dr. Lavender made his home in Chipley at 782 Third Street since his marriage to Jeanne Welin on Aug. 21, 1993. Their meeting and marriage presents a most interesting story. Jeanne came to make her home in Chipley in 1990 after retiring from her AT&T job in Bernardsville, N.J., her home state. This lady had come to know telephone employee, Ann Davis, a fellow telephone company employee, upon her transferring to New Jersey on her job. This was soon after the unfortunate death of son, Mark Davis, who was a student at West Point when stricken with a fatal disease. The friendship developed with Ann Davis and husband, Albert (Sonny) Davis, resulting in Jeanne purchasing a home in the Historic District of Chipley and moving here. Jeanne quickly became involved in church, civic, fraternal and other professional organizations, soon becoming fully immersed in the activities of her adopted home. After becoming established in Chipley, she attended a session of Elderhostel training in Feb. 1993 in Columbus, Ga. While there, she met Dr. Fred Lavender who was also an active member and participant in Elderhostel, Inc., the not-for-pro t world leader in lifelong learning since 1975. Jeanne described the purpose of the organizations as: A continuing education program designed for those age 50 years and older to participate. This lady learned that her new found friend was born in Mans eld, Ohio on Aug. 19, 1922, to a horse and buggy doctors family and that his wife, Mary Ann Lavender, had died recently and he was a father and grandfather of loving children. The friendship soon blossomed into a courtship and plans were soon made to have a private wedding at Holmes Creek Baptist Church with a mammoth reception held afterwards on the spacious yard at Jeannes Third Street Home. The couple honored your writer by requesting that I arrange for a bluegrass musical group to perform traditional music for the celebration. Addison and Ann Prescott were to cater a full lunch sitdown meal, serving soul foods prepared from vegetables grown in their garden. Marshall Smith, his wife, Linda and their daughter, Sophie, members of the bluegrass ensemble, Up The Creek from Panama City, did a beautiful rendition of appropriate songs for the event. Later, a second reception was held in Freds home state of Ohio where a oating vessel provided a two hour cruise, entertaining a host of the grooms friends, family and associates. Jeanne had already learned that her husband-to-be started his volunteering in his childhood, achieving Eagle Scout. He played in a dance band during high school, and met Frank Sinatra and Tommy Dorsey. During school, he achieved honors including Phi Beta Kappa for undergraduate and medical school recognition. Also revealed was that Dr. Lavender served in the U.S. Armys Occupation of Germany, achieving the rank of Captain. The new bride could not have been surprised when the doctor continued to volunteer for the Literacy and Library programs for children and adults in Florida as he had done in Ohio. His involvement in Music, Arts and the annual Cleveland Orchestra Concert Series in Sandusky Ohio were carried over to the Spanish Trail Playhouse in Chipley and similar programs at Chipola College. His support of environmental issues, local and state park docent and manual labor were performed in both Ohio and Florida. Other volunteer services were in Child advocacy, academics, legal, including expansion of Firelands Campus of Bowling Green State University, Guardian ad Litem in Ohio and Florida, foster kids in Ohio and Take Stock in Children in Florida. He was a medical volunteer-mental health, Indian Reservations (spent vacation time there with family), polio vaccine campaign and hospital boards expanding services. As the wife of Dr. Fred Lavender, Jeanne stood by his side, supported and participated with him in many of these volunteer efforts. Dr. Lavenders daily walk to the post of ce from his South Third Street allowed him to become acquainted with townspeople who observed his friendliness, gentle and sincere temperament and immediately regarded him as a friend. Dr. Fred Lavender and wife, Jeanne, were members of the Washington County Chamber of Commerce and were faithful to attend monthly First Thursday meetings. Dr. Jerry Kandzer, retired President of Chipola College, who gave the eulogy at Dr. Lavenders memorial service, outlined the laundry list of volunteer activities of Dr. Lavender. The memorial service, held at St. Matthews Episcopal Church of Chipley on Nov. 30, 2013, was presided over by Rev. Ward S. Clarke Jr., Vicar. Dr. Fred Lavender is the loving husband of Jeanne Lavender, devoted father of Jane/Bob, Mary/Milton and Patricia. His daughter, Anne, is deceased. He is also survived by his adored grandchildren, Anne and Beth/James, Emma, Clark/ Shanna and Nathan and great granddaughter, Madeline, and by his protg, Maya. Although Dr. Fred Lavander called Chipley, Florida his home for only the last 20 years of life, he established a name for himself as one ready to give his very best as a volunteer for any honorable and worthwhile community service. His life story would de nitely qualify for a special segment of the Heritage of Washington Book, A Washington County Favorite Son-by choice! The Prattler regrets that his story was not prepared for that popular publication. Hester and I count it a privilege to have known Dr. Fred Lavender and his wonderful wife, Jeanne. Our thoughts, love and prayers go out to Jeanne and family members in their loss. See you all next week. Fred Lavender was a friend to all mankindPERRYS PRATTLEPerry Wells Workshop with internationally known Jane Eckert very informativeHAPPY CORNERHazel Wells Tison

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A5Wednesday, February 19, 2014 FEB. 12Douglas Danley Alford, Jr., Carrying concealed rearm, possession of rearm with altered or removed serial number; nolle prosequi eld, case status set to closed Matthew Olin Bryan, aggravated battery on law enforcement ofcer, possession of rearm or weapon by convicted felon, ee and elude at high speed; attorney present for defendant, case continued to March 12, 2014 for motion hearing, notice given Dale Anthony Castro, sexual battery upon a child under 12; defendant present with attorney, withdrew motion to suppress, withdrew previous plea of not guilty, plea accepted by court, pled no contest as charged, stipulated to a factual basis, adjudicated guilty, 10 years department of corrections with credit for 397 days served, $1420 + $503.00 ne, civil judgment ordered for monetary obligations, states motion for order concerning disclosure and proposed order, defendant designated a sexual predator under Florida Statute 775.21 and advised o registration and reporting requirements, defendant advised that he is subject to the Jessica Lunsford and Jimmy Rice Acts, notice of intent to rely on child hearsay, trial set for February 24, 2014 Clayton Kyle Clemmons, armed robbery with rearm or deadly weapon, resist arrest without violence; defendant present with attorney, motion to suppress withdrawn, plea accepted by the court previous plea of not guilty withdrawn, plead no contest to amend count 1 charge of robbery with no rearm and count 2 as charged, sentencing scheduled for March 12, 204, notice given Zackual Wayne Clemmons, sale or delivery of a controlled substance; defendant present without attorney, motion to terminate probation heard, motion granted by the court, case status set to closed Christopher Dwight Ford, Carrying concealed rearm, assault; defendant present with attorney, case continued to March 19, 2014, notice given Melissa Diane Freeman, possession of controlled substance; defendant present with attorney, court was advised that defendant was not accepted into the Keeton Program, court ordered that the original sentence would stand and defendant would have to nd another inpatient drug treatment program, case status set to closed Olita Lynn Goodwin, grand theft of dwelling, conspiracy to commit grand theft; defendant present with attorney, court announced that the sentence for count one will remain the same but Re-sentenced defendant on count 2 as follows; adjudicated guilty, 67 days in the Holmes County Jail with credit for 67 days served, $125 ne reduced to civil judgment, case status set to closed Irene Elizabeth Harris, neglect of child, contribute to delinquency of minor, contribute to delinquency of minor, driving under the inuence third violation within 10 years; attorney present for defendant and requested clarication of imposition of the ignition interlock device requirement, court claried that the 2 year ignition interlock devise requirement would not go into effect until the defendant obtains a valid drivers license, case status set to closed Michael Anderson Harris, possession of cannabis more than 20 grams drug paraphernalia use or possess; attorney present, defendant referred to PTI, case continued to March 12, 2014 for tracking purposes, notice given Michael Shane Jackson, arson of occupied dwelling, possession or manufacture of re bomb, burglary of dwelling; defendant present without an attorney, case continued to March 19, 2014, notice given Clannie Davis Jennings II, possession of controlled substance; defendant present with attorney, defendant stated that he intended to hire a private attorney, court discharged public defender, evidentiary hearing continued to March 12, 2014, notice given Eric Cornelius Johnson, possession of controlled substance, drug paraphernalia use or possession; defendant present with attorney, withdrew previous plea of not guilty, pled no contest as charged, stipulated to factual basis, plea accepted by the court, count 1: adjudicated guilty, 24 months department of corrections with credit for 37 days served concurrent with present department of corrections sentence, $1520 ne, civil judgment ordered for monetary obligations, drivers license suspended for 2 years, count 2; court adjudicated guilty, 37 days Holmes County Jail with credit for 37 days severed, $125 ne, civil judgment ordered for monetary obligations Christopher Shawn Leis, possession of controlled substance; defendant present with attorney, stipulated to a factual basis, withdrew previous denial plea accepted by the court, admitted violation, $100 ne, community control revoked, adjudicated guilty 21 months department of corrections with credit for 96 days served, recommended housing at Bay corrections institute, request for furlough denied Charlie James Radford Jr., driving while license permanently revoked; defendant present with attorney, withdrew previous plea of not guilty, pled no contest as charged, stipulated to factual basis, sentencing scheduled for March 12, 2014, notice given Danny Ray Stevens Jr., manufacture of controlled substance; defendant present with attorney, defendant refused plea offer, evidentiary hearing remains set for March 12, 2014, demand for discovery Dalton Tyler Toole, cause cruel death pain and suffering to animals, eeing or attempting to elude police, cruelty to animals; defendant present with attorney, case continued to March 19, 2014, notice given Davis Mitchell Waddell, introduction of contraband into detention facility; defendants notice of cancelling depositions Katrina Dawn White, manufacture of controlled substance, possession of controlled substance, possession of listed chemicals, drug possession marijuana under 20 grams, drug paraphernalia use or possession, drug paraphernalia use or possession; defendant present, attorney not present, case set for March 5, 2014 for defendant to request services of public defender, notice given Trevor Tyler Gregory Yates, possession of cannabis more than 20 grams, drug paraphernalia use or possession, drug paraphernalia use or possession; defendant present with attorney, motion to reinstate bond heard, motion granted by court, bond set at original amount of $15,000, defendant surrendered by previous bondsman and must post a new bond, motion to withdraw as counsel heard, motion granted by court, court advised defendant that he does not qualify as indigent and must hire a private attorney, case continued to March 19, 2014, notice given FloridasHealthFinderCostComparison(www.oridahealthnder.gov): 2012 Inpatient Conditions& ProceduresBayMedical-SacredHeartTheonlyhospitalinNorthwest*Floridatobelisted amongthe100BestforCardiacGulfCoastMedicalCenterFloridaAverageVisits Lowest Charges Highest Charges ReadmitRateVisits Lowest Charges Highest Charges ReadmitRate Lowest Charges Highest ChargesAngioplasty726$40,420$55,477asexpected181$95,258$160,423worsethanexpected$62,634$110,306CardiacCath827$21,122$31,796asexpected202$51,902$77,132asexpected$31,182$60,991ChestPain654$5,974$13,466betterthanexpected114$18,626$33,842asexpected$13,277$27,830Coronary Bypass265$63,859$91,626asexpected servicenotoeredatGCMC $120,055$238,041HeartAttack120$18,127$30,573asexpected83$42,661$91,489asexpected$24,426$59,103HeartFailure692$9,505$20,868betterthanexpected181$26,993$55,727asexpected$18,069$45,162TheBestHeartCare,atthe BestPrices, itsthatSimple. 615N.BonitaAvenue PanamaCity,FL32401 (850)769-1511 www.baymedical.org BayMedicalSacredHeart *Healthgrades2013Analysis AnnouncestheOpeningofa GeneralLawPractice ServingHolmes,Washington, Jackson&WaltonCounties!RealEstate!Leases!Landlord/Tenant!BusinessLaw!Criminallaw!Appeals!Probate!Wills&Trusts!Guardianship!ProbateAdmin!ConstructionLaw Over23YearsExperience Martindale-HubbleRated: TM FormerCountyJudge Officesat:204N.EtheridgeStreet Bonifay,Florida32425 (850)614-1052 475HarrisonAvenue PanamaCity,Florida32401 (850)215-1800 mjhlaw@wowway.comThehiringofalawyerisanimportantdecisionthatshouldnotbe basedsolelyonadvertisements.Beforeyoudecide,askustosend youfreewritteninformationaboutourqualificationsand experience. Attorney MichaelJ.Hauversburk AnnouncestheOpeningofa GeneralLawPractice From Staff ReportsOne man is still at large in a connection with a Sunday burglary in Jackson County. At about 8:20 p.m., the Jackson County sheriffs deputies were dispatched to Cliff Road, south of Graceville, in reference to a burglary in progress. Upon arrival, the deputy discovered the property owner had a male and a female subject detained at gunpoint. The two suspects were detained until the incident could be investigated further. During the investigation, it was discovered the property owner had been the victim of a couple of burglaries, and a utility trailer had been stolen from the property the week before. The property owner and another male had concealed their vehicle in one of the barns on the property and hid in another barn in attempt to catch the thieves. Shortly after dark, a vehicle pulled onto the property and parked behind one of the barns. Two males exited the vehicle and entered the barn where the property owner was waiting but did not take anything. The two male suspects then went into the barn, where the property owner had hidden his vehicle. At this point the property owner and his friend confronted the two males and attempted to hold them for law enforcement. One male complied, and the other ed on foot into the wood behind the barn. A female was also discovered acting as a look out for the males. The male and female that had been detained were placed under arrest. The male that ed on foot was tracked by the K-9 teams from Jackson C.I. and A.C.I. until his track was lost on the dirt road, where he most likely was picked up by a vehicle. Jeremy Trey Smith, 24 of Graceville, was charged with burglary of structure and possession of meth. Kimberly Diane Carr, 33 of Graceville, was charged with violation of probation on robbery in Houston County, Ala., and burglary of structure. Timothy Derrick Shiver, 34, is still at large and is wanted for burglary of structure and warrants for violation of probation and failure to appear on trafc violations. JSCO arrests 2, on the lookout for 1 in Sunday burglary Holmes County coCOURT DocOCKETsS

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ServingallofHolmesCounty S&HSanitation,Ent. Residential MonthlyService WithoutCan$18WithOurCan$23 NoStart-up FeeWithUs!FORALLYOURGARBAGE NEEDSCALL547-1442 547-1591Chuck&Tammie(Hoover)Newsome 3094HooversMillRd.,Bonifay Wealsotakecareof (850)638-5885 MostVehicles Upto5qts. syntheticblend MostVehicles $1995 March1,2014 HolmesCounty HighSchoolEntryFee:$55.00 Admission:$5 ch 1, 2014arM yountolmes CH choolHigh S ee: $55.00y FtrnE dmission: $5A Formoreinformation: ContactKrystalCook(850)258-9569 BONIFAYS DOWNHOME and Special to The Times-AdvertiserJackson Hospital, celebrating 75 years of community service proudly announces the grand opening of the Infusion Center. The Infusion Center gives residents the opportunity to have their chemotherapy, antibiotic therapy, IV therapy, or blood transfusions locally performed. The center doubles the number of infusion chairs from seven to 14. As a result of the larger treatment area, Jackson Hospital is now able to better serve the needs of the community. Patients now appreciate that each chair is now equipped with its own television. Donations from the community allowed Jackson Hospital to increase the capability of the Infusion Center. This larger treatment area will enable the Hospital to better serve the needs of the community. The new Infusion Center is on the rst oor of the Hudnall Building. The community is invited to celebrate the renovation of this department and its medical outreach with its ribbon cutting at 5 p.m. Feb. 27. Attendees are also invited to tour the new area as well as join Hospital employees for refreshments. The Infusion Center project began November 2013 and reopened on Jan. 14, 2014. SPECIAL TO TT HE TT IMEs S -A A DVERTIs S EREmerald Coast Hospice honored its Outstanding Employee, Sharon Mayes, RN, and its Employee of the Year, Jessica Paul, Hospice Aide. Pictured left to right, Sharon Mayes, RN; Julie Pettis, executive director; Jessica Paul, hospice aide. EEMERALD CCOAsST HHOsSPICE HONORs S EMPLOYEEsS Jackson Hospital holds open house for Chemotherapy Infusion CenterSpecial to The Times-AdvertiserMARIANNAMARIANNA Former Chipola baseball players returned to their alma mater for the annual Chipola College Baseball Alumni Weekend Feb. 7-8. The college ofcially retired MLB All-Star Russell Martins number 12 Chipola jersey in a Feb. 8 ceremony. Martin hit a pair of solo home runs to lead his Pittsburgh Pirates to a 6-2 win over the Cincinnati Reds in a season-ending wild card game on Oct. 1, 2013, to lead the Pirates to their rst post-season appearance in 21 years. A native of Ontario, Canada, Martin led Chipola to a second place nish in the 2002 Florida College System State tournament. He was drafted by the Dodgers in the 17th round that year. The three-time MLB All Star has won the Gold Glove and Silver Slugger Awards. He spent ve years in L.A. before moving on the Yankees, where he was starting catcher in 2011-12. He was catching for the Yankees when Mariano Rivera broke the all-time save record in 2011. In November 2012, the Pittsburgh Pirates signed Martin for two years and $17 million. Mat Gamel, now a member of the Atlanta Braves, was the winner of the annual Alumni Home Run Derby. Jeff Mathis of the Miami Marlins, Jose Bautista of the Toronto Blue Jays, and former Chipola player, Charlie Dees captained teams for the derby. Visiting big-leaguers also donated thousands in memorabilia to support the Chipola program. Several returning players participated in an MLB/MiLB autograph session. An Alumni Social was hosted by Jason and Kim Barber at Circle S Ranch. An alumni dinner featured special guest speakers FSU assistant Mike Martin, Jr., and Troy head coach Bobby Pierce. Chipola head Coach Jeff Johnson and members of the Baseball Alumni Committee Nathan Marks (00), Andrew Gay (07) and Jason Barber (06) organized the weekends events. We appreciate all the fans and former players who came out to support our program. These guys are so generous with their time and resources. It means a lot to our program, Johnson said. For information about Chipola baseballs alumni happenings, email nathan@ marksinsurance.com, visit www.chipola.edu or call coach Johnson at 718-2237. PP HOTOs S SPECIAL TO THE TT IMEs S -A A DVERTIs S ERFrom left are Chipley baseball alumni Nathan Marks; Troy coach Bobby Pierce (former Chipola coach); Russell Martin, Pittsburgh Pirates; Chipola coach Jeff Johnson; Jose Bautista, Toronto Blue Jays; and former Chipola players Ivan Nacaratta and Charlie Dees. Chipola retires Russell Martins jersey From left are Chipola president Dr. Gene Prough, Russell Martin of the Pittsburgh Pirates and Chipola baseball coach Jeff Johnson. LocalA6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, February 19, 2014

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SPORTS www.bonifaynow.com ASection By JASON SHOOT747-5069 | @PCNHJasonShoot jshoot@pcnh.com BONIFAY Chipley has some un nished business at the Class 1A state girls basketball tournament. Amanda Paschal scored 24 points and received considerable help from her teammates as the Tigers clinched a second consecutive trip to the state tournament with a 72-62 victory Friday over host Holmes County in the Region 3-1A nals. Chipley (24-5) will face Hawthorne a 51-50 winner over Hamilton County in the state semi nals at The Lakeland Center today. The state championship is Thursday. It was a great experience, Paschal said of last years trip to state, which ended with a loss to South Walton in the championship game. Last year we had a lot of seniors, and everybody wanted to win. ... We have to play harder, play with heart. Holmes County (20-8) outlasted Chipley for the District 3-1A regularseason title and then defeated the Tigers by a point to win the district tournament. Chipley was the superior team in this matchup, but much like it was when the same teams met in the regional nals a year ago. Were trying to build a family, basically, Chipleys Essence Williams said. Jessica Belsers lay-in pulled Holmes County even at 40-40 with four minutes left in the third quarter, but a layup by Parisha Massaline sparked a 9-0 run in a 62-second span that gave the Tigers a 49-40 advantage. Chipley carried a 54-48 lead into the fourth quarter, and the Tigers scored eight of the rst 10 points to pull away. The Blue Devils got no closer than seven points thereafter. Holmes County was desperate to limit Paschal, double-teaming the Chipley standout every time she crossed halfcourt with the ball. That opened up scoring opportunities around the basket, however, and the Tigers pounded the ball inside to great effect. Everybody did great, Paschal said. Everybody stepped up tonight. Kimberly Tuel has been with the Chipley program for three years, she said, but this is her rst season as head coach. We put the bar up high, Tuel said, her voice hoarse from yelling for four quarters in a loud gymnasium. It took hard work to get here. Brittany Lee contributed 16 points for Chipley, and Williams and Karlisha Works chipped in 12 points apiece. Belser led Holmes County with 10 points, and Lenibel Concepcion added nine.CHIPLEY (72)Paschal 24, Lee 16, Works 12, Williams 12, Thomas 1, Massaline 7.HOLMES COUNTY (62)Davis 8, Prescott 8, Belser 10, J. Miles 7, Concepcion 9, J. Taylor 2, H. Taylor 6, Moses 4, D. Miles 2, Cross 3, Syfrett 3. Chipley 14 16 24 18 72 Holmes County 13 15 20 14 62Special to The NewsMARIANNA The Chipola Lady Indians captured their rst Panhandle Conference title since 1990 with a 69-30 win over Gulf Coast on Feb. 11. Evelyn Akhator led Chipola with 18 points, 15 rebounds and four steals. Khadijah Ellison had 11 points with ve assists. The Lady Indians are headed to the FCSAA State Tournament, March 5-8 in Ocala. The mens team held on for an 8382 overtime win over arch-rival Gulf Coast. Chipola had a 19-point lead in the rst half, but Gulf Coast came back to pull ahead in the second half and push the game into overtime. Jamaar McKays layup gave Chipola an 80-76 lead with 18 seconds left in OT, but Gulf Coast made a free throw to cut the lead to thee. With 13 seconds left, Sam Cassell Jr. broke free against the full-court press and was fouled while scoring on a layup. His threepoint play gave the Indians an 83-79 lead with eight seconds left. Chipola (6-4) is tied with Pensacola (6-4) for second place in the league, a half-game behind Northwest (6-3). The top two teams earn a berth to the FCSAA State Tournament in Ocala beginning March 5. The Indians lost to Pensacola 68-64 on Feb. 8. Carlos Morris poured in 27 points and pulled down seven rebounds for the Indians. The loss at Pensacola was the second for the week after falling to Northwest 90-83 on Feb. 5. Chipolas nal games of the regular season are Saturday, Feb. 22, when both the womens and mens teams hosting Northwest for Homecoming. Chipola president Dr. Gene Prough and his wife, Priscilla, will host an Alumni Reception beginning at 6 p.m. Alumni, retirees and friends of the college are invited. The homecoming court will be presented, and the Homecoming Queen and Mr. Chipola will be crowned, during halftime of the mens game.By BRAD MILNER747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com Two of the early boys selections for the Halifax All-Star Classic are still playing basketball. All four will take the court on April 5 in the quest to defeat the West. Malones Chai Baker, Vernons Alex Brown, Mosleys Nat Dixon and Rutherfords Khaliel Spearman have been chosen to represent the East in the 10th annual event to be played at the Billy Harrison Field House on the campus of Gulf Coast State College. Baker and Spearman prepped for respective regional basketball games. Browns season ended in the district round and Dixons before then to hit the football recruiting trail. The East boys will be coached by Mariannas Travis Blanton and Vernons Thomas Register, both of whom are making return appearances in the game. The East teams are chosen by the sports department of The News Herald from an eight-county coverage area. They oppose roster from the West is comprised from the three-county coverage area of the Northwest Florida Daily News stationed in Fort Walton Beach. Baker and Dixon have cemented college destinations, while Brown and Spearman test their options. Baker signed with Oregon State and Dixon is moving on with a football scholarship at Boston College. The duo continues a line of Division I talent playing in the Halifax Classic, dating back to Gracevilles Rashaad Singleton in the inaugural event in 2005. Baker, a 6-foot-3 guard, and Malone hosted Cottondale in the Region 1-1A semi nal on Tuesday. The Tigers were in search of a third consecutive regionalnal berth with the previous two ending in defeat. Baker led them into the contest with 22.7 points and 9.6 rebounds per game and will look to join his brother, Ty, in being a Halifax Classic winner, as the elder sibling was part of last years game. Spearman at 6-2 is Rutherfords leading scorer and has the Rams on the cusp of a second regional nal in three seasons. Rutherford hosted Tallahassee Rickards on Tuesday for the right to advance. The 6-3 Browns campaign ended with a loss to Cottondale in the District 2-1A semi nal. His 33 ppg helped Register guide the Yellow Jackets to a winning record in his rst season at the helm after Vernon amassed 16 losses in 2012-13. Dixon also is capable of scoring at a similar clip with more than 30 ppg as a junior. His production dipped some this season, but hes still one of the areas best shooters and hes not afraid to heave the ball at the basket. The 6-4 guards leaping ability also gives the East some length inside. Complete 12-player rosters for the East and West will be released in early-March. East girls coaches will be selected and announced in the coming weeks and the rst round of East girls player selections also are on the horizon. Player nominations are being accepted. Area coaches in the East coverage area are asked to send player name, position, height, statistics and other pertinent information to Brad Milner at The News Herald via e-mail at bmilner@pcnh. com or by calling (850) 747-5065. Halifax Media Group and its two Florida daily newspapers, The News Herald and the Daily News, again are lead sponsors along with GCSC. Additional sponsorship is provided by the Panama City Beach Convention and Visitors Bureau. Any individual or business with a desire to sponsor the event may contact GCSC Athletic Marketing Representative Teresa Beaver at (850) 769-1551 ext. 2813 or Milner, News Herald Writer Jason Shoot (jshoot@pcnh.com; (850) 747-5067) and Executive Sports Editor Pat McCann (pmccann@pcnh. com; (850) 747-5068). The event accepts any and all levels of sponsorships, from monetary support to in-kind donations. ON THE TEAMThe rst four players chosen for the East boys team in the 10th annual Halifax All-Star Classic: Chai Baker, G, Malone Alex Brown, G, Vernon Nat Dixon, G, Mosley Khaliel Spearman, G, Rutherford HEATHER LEIPHART | The News HeraldChipleys Amanda Paschal scored 24 points as the Tigers clinched a second consecutive trip to the state tournament. Below, Chipleys Diamond Potter battles for the ball with a Holmes County player.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTiffany Lewis tries to block a Commodores shot. At right, Sam Cassell Jr. goes up for a shot. Lady Indians capture 1st Panhandle Conference title First 4 players chosen for East boys Classic teamLady Devils season ends HALIFAX ALL-STAR CLASSICWednesday, February 19, 2014 Page 7

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LocalA8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, February 19, 2014 BillFletcherHAS:BC-HIS 24Years Experience AllenBarnesHAS:BC-HIS 24Years Experience MARIANNA30256thSTREET(850)260-0436Wednesdays&FridaysCHIPLEY1611MAINSTREET#4(850)260-0436Monday-FridayTHESOUNDSOFLIFEADIFFERENCEWORTHHEARINGABOUT!WEREINYOURNEIGHBORHOOD! zWIRELESSTECHNOLOGYAND i AND Regularly$1950CompletelyWireless,Smallandaffordable BELTONEISAMERICASMOSTTRUSTEDNAMEINHEARINGCARE.* True3OpenFitHearingAidSALE$1725 Thebenetsofhearinginstrumentsvarybytypeanddegreeofloss,noiseenironment,accuracyofhearingevaluationandpropert. *AmongAdultsover50.Cannotbecombinedwithanyotheroffers.DiscountsoffMSRPPreviouspurchasesexcluded.Foralimitedtime. SowellTractorCo.,Inc.2841Hwy.77North,PanamaCity www.sowelltractorco.com WeTrade forAnything ThatDont Eat! Financing Arranged (WAC) NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment."WEWELCOMENEWPATIENTS,CALLTODAYFORYOURPRIORITYAPPOINTMENT" FORNEWPATIENTS 59ANDOLDERThiscertificateisgoodforacomplete MedicalEyeExamwithToddRobinson,M.D. InOurChipleyOfficeBoardCertifiedEyePhysicianandSurgeon.Theexamincludesaprescriptionforeyeglassesandtestsfor Glaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases.FORYOURAPPOINTMENTCALL: 850-638-7220ELIGIBILITY:U.S.CitizenslivingintheFloridaPanhandle, 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. CouponExpires:2-28-14 FREEEYEEXAMCODE:WC00 SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances www.mulliseye.comMULLIS EYEINSTITUTEChipleyOffice1691MainSt.,Ste.1 ChipleyFL32428850-638-7220Wearelocateddirectlyacrosstheparking lotfromtheWalmartinChipleyToddRobinson, M.D.BoardCertifiedEyePhysicianand CataractSurgeon SALESREPRESENTATIVES HalifaxMediaGroupiscurrentlylooking foroutsidesalesrepresentative.Ifyou areinsalesandarecondentinyour salesabilities,thenthisopportunity maybeforyou.Wearelookingfor energeticSalesExecutiveswith2+ yearsofB2Boutsidesalesandbusiness developmentexperience. Responsibilities: Inourorganization,weofferthefollowingtoouroutsidesalesAccountExecutives: NewhireandongoingtraininganddevelopmentRequirements: Toapply:Sendresumetolgrimes@pcnh.comEOE,DrugFreeWorkplaceTerritoriesAvailableIn PortSt.Joe Special to The NewsFour new, free online lessons are available to household water well owners at the National Ground Water Association website, www.WellOwner. org. The lessons were developed by NGWA with support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Well owners can register for the following lessons by going to WellOwner.org: Arsenic in Well Water: What Is It and What Do You Do? Bacteria in Well Water: What Is It and What Do You Do? Nitrate in Well Water: What Is It and What Do You Do? Radon in Well Water: What Is It and What Do You Do? Other online well owner lessons previously made available cover what to test your water for, how to get a test and interpret the results and the basics of water treatment. Well owners also can access two recorded Webinars on water testing and water treatment. NGWA Public Awareness Director Cliff Treyens encourages household water well owners to take advantage of these new resources, as well as the toll-free Private Well Owner Hotline at 855-420-9355 and the free monthly emailed Private Well Owner Tip Sheet. Subscribe to the tip sheet at www.wellowner.org. Its never been easier for well owners to get the basic information they need to be good water well and groundwater stewards, Treyens said. These resources will help well owners to improve and protect their water quality.Special to The NewsIcy roads and downed power poles and lines were a few of the hazards Gulf Power Companys storm team encountered as they helped Georgia Power restore power to customers after last weeks winter storm. The 82-person crew was released from storm duty late Sunday afternoon and returned to Northwest Florida late Sunday night. They all worked safely and gave hope to customers who had lost power, said Jeff Rogers, Gulf Power Corporate Communications manager. Our crews continue to hone their skills working winter storms this year, and we were glad to help Georgia Powers customers get their power back on. The crews left Feb. 10, donned snow chains, and worked in Jonesboro, Ga., just south of Atlanta most of the week. Over the weekend, they went east to Waynesboro, Ga., to help complete restoration. Georgia Power restored power to more than 700,000 customers. It was the third time this winter Gulf Power crews were called on to restore power. In December, a team went to the Dallas area. And in late January, Gulf Power had to deal with its own winter storm. When the powers out, theres no better sight on your street than a bucket truck rolling up, Rogers said. The experience gained from being deployed to assist in these storms helps our crews be the best they can be right here at home. Gulf Power Company is an investor-owned electric utility with all of its common stock owned by Atlanta-based Southern Company. Gulf Power serves more than 436,000 customers in eight counties throughout Northwest Florida. The companys mission is to safely provide exceptional customer value by delivering reliable, affordable and environmentally responsible electricity while strengthening our communities. Visit GulfPower.com or nd the companys Facebook page, Gulf Power Company.Gulf Power storm team back home after week in GeorgiaOnline lessons available for well owners From Staff ReportsNews Herald Publisher Roger Quinn, a 48-year veteran of the newspaper business, announced Monday he is retiring at the end of the month. But he wont be going far. We love Panama City, Quinn said. We put down roots and were going to stay here. Quinn, who joined The Panama City News Herald in August 2012, shortly after its purchase by Halifax Media Group, plans to focus more time on his civic activities like his work with the Salvation Army, where he serves on the board. Halifax Media Group CEO Michael Redding, who was in Panama City for the announcement Monday, thanked Quinn for his hard work and attitude and said a nationwide search for a new publisher would begin immediately. Roger has a distinguished newspaper career, and we are going to miss him, Redding said. He is a great guy, as well as a friend, and we all wish him the best. Quinn began his career in 1966 in Gadsden, Ala., beginning a path that would lead him to a position as a New York Times Regional Media Group publisher. There, he oversaw a group of papers in North and South Carolina that included properties in Spartanburg and Hendersonville before those newspapers were purchased by Halifax late in 2011. After Halifax purchased The News Herald and other Freedom Communications newspapers in Florida and North Carolina in 2012, Quinn joined The News Herald as publisher but also served as regional publisher with responsibility over all the properties in Halifaxs central region, which includes Northwest Florida, Alabama and Louisiana. Halifax is headquartered in Daytona Beach and boasts a strong presence across the Southeast that includes newspapers in key Florida cities like Daytona Beach, Gainesville, Sarasota, Lakeland and Fort Walton Beach.Regional publisher announces retirement ROGER QUINN Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

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Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser BPAGE 1Section EXTRATrivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY Eastern Shipbuilding Group is one of three nalists vying for a $10.5 billion U.S. Coast Guard contract that could bring thousands of new jobs to Bay County. The 20-year contract is for the development of 25 nextgeneration offshore patrol cutters for the Coast Guard. This is a huge deal, not just for Eastern Shipbuilding, but for Bay County and Northwest Florida, said company President and CEO Brian DIsernia. Thats tremendous for jobs, for long-term jobs, so naturally were excited. Eastern is one of eight shipyards that submitted proposals for the project and will be competing with nalists in Lockport, La., and Bath, Maine, for the contract. As a nalist, Eastern was awarded about $22 million to design a prototype for the vessel, which must be submitted to the Coast Guard in the next year and a half. Each shipyard proposed a different vessel, and this award of $22 million will be put toward us completing a detailed design and submitting a nal price, DIsernia said. The nal award to the ultimate winner will be based on a combination of design of the vessel and cost. DIsernia said the nalists were chosen based on a conceptual design and proposal submitted to the Coast Guard, which represented more than three years of work. If awarded the project, DIsernia said it would add between 750 and 800 employees to Easterns team of 1,500 and would indirectly create many jobs for the area. With the multiplying effect in the area, thats easily 2,000 to 2,500 jobs, said DIsernia, who noted the contract is the largest the company has ever bid on. If Eastern were awarded the contract, DIsernia said it also could lead to facility expansion at one or both of the Panama City shipyards, depending on the companys other workload. U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson said in a press release Wednesday that he was con dent in Easterns capabilities in developing the vessels. I think Eastern makes a lot of sense given its facilities, capabilities of its workforce and solid track record in this industry, said Nelson, a senior member of the Senates Armed Services Committee and Commerce Committee, which has jurisdiction over the Coast Guard. U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland, R-Panama City, said the contract would bring a much needed boost to the regions economy. Should Eastern Shipbuilding win this contract, it will provide a tremendous boost to Northwest Floridas economy and bring hundreds of well-paying, highlyskilled construction jobs to our community, Southerland said. When asked if he had any concerns about nding enough skilled workers if Eastern wins the project, DIsernia said he was con dent in the companys capabilities. Weve managed, through hiring and training, to gainfully employ 1,500 skilled people, and we think we could cover this project as weve done in the past, DIsernia said. Were going to work like heck for a year and a half, and hope to win (the project). $10.5 billion deal?Eastern Shipbuilding nalist for Coast Guard contract HEATHER LEIPHART | File photoThe Bravante VI slides into the water during a launching ceremony at Eastern Shipbuilding Group on Aug. 5 in Panama City. Eastern is one of three nalists vying for a $10.5 billion contract to build 25 U.S. Coast Guard patrol cutters. This is a huge deal, not just for Eastern Shipbuilding, but for Bay County and Northwest Florida. Thats tremendous for jobs, for long-term jobs, so naturally were excited.Brian DIsernia Eastern Shipbuilding president and CEO ANDREW WARDLOW | The News HeraldA model of a Coast Guard offshore patrol cutter is on display Wednesday at Eastern Shipbuildings Nelson Street shipyard in Panama City. HEATHER LEIPHART | File photoThe HOS Red Dawn makes a splash as it enters the water at the Eastern Shipbuilding Groups Allanton shipyard on Feb. 15, 2013, in Panama City.Wednesday, FEBRUARY 19 2014Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) On being the largest carved one in the world, what main color is the Millennium Sapphire? Blue, Pink, Black, Yellow 2) The busiest international telephone route is between the U.S. and what country? Canada, Mexico, India, U.K. 3) Crocodile Hunter Steve Irwin died after being stung by what sea creature? Barracuda, Stingray, Tunicate, Oar sh 4) As created in 1866 whats the oldest brand of ginger ale still being sold? Canada Dry, Blenheim, Vernors, Schweppes 5) Which regions airport has the worlds largest terminal building? London, Chicago, Sydney, Hong Kong 6) Bill Klem and Bruce Froemming were the rst two umpires in MLB history to work how many games? 2,000; 3,000; 5,000; 7,000 7) In TVs Everybody Loves Raymond what was Rays last name? Martin, Simon, Calvo, Barone 8) Rip Van Winkle sleeps for 20 years in what authors story? Longfellow, Irving, Poe, Thoreau 9) Statistically whats the worst state for auto-deer collisions? S. Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Pennsylvania 10) Which of these means a long word? Sesquipedalian, Ratite, Concordant, Annatto 11) Whats the most losses in a season in which a MLB pitcher won the Cy Young Award (Gaylord Perry)? 7, 9, 13, 16 12) Which state eats twice as much ice cream per capita than the rest of the nation? Alaska, Florida, Arizona, New Jersey 13) What was the rst Western TV series to be televised in color? Ri eman, Gunsmoke, Bonanza, Laredo 14) Actress Teri Hatcher was at one time a cheerleader for which NFL team? Falcons, Broncos, 49ers, Seahawks ANSWERS 1) Blue. 2) Canada. 3) Stingray. 4) Vernors. 5) Hong Kong. 6) 5,000. 7) Barone. 8) Irving. 9) Pennsylvania. 10) Sesquipedalian. 11) 16. 12) Alaska. 13) Bonanza. 14) 49ers.

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Larry and Shirley Butler, of Bonifay, and Jacqueline Butler and Greg Adkins, of Chipley, are proud to announce the upcoming marriage of their daughter, Amanda Kate Butler, to Kyle Daniel Shull. Kyle is the son of Keith and Kathy Shull of Westville. Amanda is employed with The Health Clinic in Chipley and attends Northwest Florida State College pursuing a bachelors degree in Elementary Education. Kyle is the owner and carpenter of Kyle Shull LLC. The ceremony is at 4 p.m. March 1 at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. A reception is immediately following at the home of Kevin and Jennifer Shull. Some local invitations are being sent, but all family and friends are invited to attend. Odell and Julia McCarty will celebrate 50 years of marriage on April 15. Odell and Julia were married on April 15, 1964. They have two children, Linda Gail (McCarty) Wright and Timothy McCarty. Mr. and Mrs. McCarty have nine grandchildren, Juliette Wright, Toby Wright, twins Naomi and Mark Wright, Brianna, Odell, Elijah, Israel and Jeremiah McCarty. They also have three great-grandchildren. Mr. McCarty has three siblings Roberta Taylor, Tobias Taylor and Tory Taylor. They celebrated their anniversary with 100 guests at the Panhandle Shriners Club on Feb. 15, 2014. Wedding Anniversary Butler and Shull to wed50 years of bliss Community EVENTSIts a Family AffairMARIANN NN A Chipola College Black Student Union and The Association of United Professions Inc. would like to invite all surrounding communities to celebrate Black History Month. The program is from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Feb. 21 at the Culture Center at Chipola College. Dinner is provided. The guest speaker is Elder William McCray.Quilt S S howDE E FUN N IAK S S PRIN N GS S Quilting: Our Roots & Our Wings, featuring quilts made by members of the Chautauqua Quilters Guild Inc. and Holmes Valley Quilters, is from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 21-22 at the DeFuniak Springs Community Center, 361 N. 10th St. There will be several vendors, demos, antique quilts, an Opportunity quilt, door prizes and more. For more information, contact Lesa at Lesah51@yahoo.com or 585-2796, or visit www. chautauquaquiltersguild. com.BB Baseball League of Florida MeetingMARIANN NN A A meeting to explore the possibility of reactivating the BB Baseball League of Florida for the 2014 baseball season is at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 24 at the Oaks Restaurant in Marianna, in the Oaks Station Shopping Center at East U.S. 90. A minimum of six teams will be required to activate the League with regular season play beginning the rst week in April. For more information before this meeting, call 5083329 or 229-662-2066TT ri-S S tate Cucurbit Meeting MARIANN NN A The 2014 Tri-State Cucurbit Meeting is from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 24 at the Jackson County Agricultural Conference Center, 2741 Pennsylvania Ave. in Marianna. The meeting will feature morning refreshments and lunch. There are no registration fees for this sponsored event, however preregistration is required to gain an accurate count for lunch. To RSVP, contact Nikki or Cynthia at the Washington County Extension Ofce, 6386180. For more specic information or interest in sponsorship of the event, contact Matt Orwat, mjorwat@u.edu or 638-6180.Miss Black E E yed Pea PageantBON N IFAY Bonifays Downhome Street Festival proudly presents the sixth annual Miss Black Eyed Pea Pageant on March 1 at Holmes County High School. Early registration is at Holmes County High School from 4 to 6 p.m. on Feb. 24 the cost of registration is $50. Any participant registering after Feb. 24 will be charged a $10 Late Fee. Girls ages zero to ve are asked to register at 1 p.m. for the pageant to start at 2 p.m. on March 1. Girls 6 and older will register at 3 p.m., and the pageant will start at 4 p.m. on March 1. For more information call Krystal at 258-9569 or infor@bonifaystreetfestival. com or kcook82@ embarqmail.com or visit www.bonifaystreetfestival. com.Washington County Council on Aging Board MeetingsCHIPLE E Y The Washington County Council on Aging Board will hold meetings on the following dates in 2014: Feb. 25, March 25, April 22, May 27, June 24, July 22, Aug. 26, Sept. 23, Oct. 28 and Nov. 18. For more information, call 638-6216.SS unny Hills Utility Company Inc. to hold customer meetingTwo representatives of the Sunny Hills Utility Company will hold a customer meeting at the Sunny Hills Community Center at 6 p.m. Feb. 26 for those customers who wish to learn more about the company, the recent changes that have been made to the system and to ask any questions they might have with regards to the system and the utility. This meeting is scheduled to last from 6-7:30 p.m. If anyone has a specic question for the utility, they can email their question to RDerossett@uswatercorp. net. This will allow the utility representatives to prepare in advance to answer any question you might have.S S ound of Music at ChipolaMARIANN NN A Chipola College theater-goers are invited to enjoy dinner and a show for opening night of the college production of The Sound of Music on Feb. 26. Tickets for the Opening Night Gala are on sale now in the Center for the Arts Box Ofce. Gala dinner tickets are $30. Play tickets, $8, must be purchased separately and can be purchased at the same time as the Gala ticket. Deadline for dinner reservations is Feb. 19. No additional dinner seating will be available the night of the event. The Opening Night Gala will include dinner in the Center for the Arts Experimental Theatre and a pre-performance chat with Director Charles Sirmon before the show. Show tickets without the dinner are on sale to the public. The Center for the Arts Box Ofce is open Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon. All proceeds will go to the Chipola ACT Fund. For ticket information, call 718-2420.Basic Pistol ClassBON N IFAY The Holmes County Sheriffs Ofce and Impact Firearms of Bonifay will hold a Basic Pistol Class at 9 a.m. on March 1. The class will cost $75. Students will qualify for the Florida Concealed weapons permit. The class will cover lethal force, gun safety, basic marksmanship and the principles and fundamental concepts that relate to carrying a concealed weapon. Bring your handgun and a minimum of 25 rounds ammunition. All proceeds will benet the Relay For Life. For more information or to register, call Jeana Prescott or Tammy Bozeman at 5474421. Space is limited, so dont delay.14th annual Olan P. Johnson Memorial S S c holarship Golf T T ournamentBON N IFAY The 14th annual Olan P. Johnson Memorial Scholarship Golf Tournament is scheduled for March 1 at Dogwood Lakes Country Club in Bonifay. Registration and lunch begin at 7 a.m. with a shotgun start at 8 a.m. The $55 entry fee includes lunch, golf, two mulligans and a throw. Proceeds benet the scholarship established through the Chipola College Foundation. To register your four-person group or to sponsor a hole for $25, contact Dan Burdeshaw at 638-3243 or Don West at 263-4395.Chipola to offer Fireghters CourseMARIANN NN A The Chipola College Public Service Department has scheduled several reghting courses beginning next month. Fireghter I and II will be offered in a classroom setting weekdays, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The course begins March 3 and runs through June 16. Fireghter I and II are required to work as a professional reghter in Florida. Cost is $1,900, and nancial aid is available. A First Responder course will be offered Feb. 24-28, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., daily. The 40-hour class offers advanced rst aid techniques for emergencies. The course is included in the curriculum for most law enforcement, corrections and reghter programs. Online Fireghter I for volunteer reghters begins March 4 and ends June 26. The course includes First Responder, Forestry S130/190 and Fireghter I. Cost is $500, which includes use of bunker gear and live burn scenarios. Information about the courses is available at www. chipola.edu/reghting. Contact Martin Fowler, Fire Science Program manager, at 718-2483 or email fowlerm@chipola.edu.Panhandle Pride Beauty PageantGRACEV EV ILLE E The Panhandle Pride Beauty Pageant is at the Graceville Civic Center in Graceville. The entry fee is $55, with all proceeds going to the Two-Toe Tom Festival celebration. Contestants can participate in photogenic for an additional $10. Photogenic entries will be limited to one photo per contestant. The Panhandle Pride Beauty Pageant is an open pageant. Checks should be made payable to Two-Toe Tom Festival Pageant. Applications can be picked up at Bush Paint & Supply in Graceville or Esto Town Hall. Application, entry fee and photo must be delivered to Bush Paint & Supply or Esto Town Hall no later than March 7. Winners will receive a large trophy, large crown and banner. Alternates and participants will receive trophies. Door admission of $5 per adult applies to all individuals with the exception of contestants. Admission is free to children 3 years old and younger. Girls from Georgia, Alabama and Florida will be able to participate. There will be a Peoples Choice Award winner in each category. This has no effect on the overall winners. The contestants from each age category who collect the most money will win the Peoples Choice title for that age category and will receive a large trophy at the pageant. Winners will need to make plans on participating at the festival on April 12 at the John W. Clark Park in Esto. We are planning a fun-lled day of activities. Throughout the day, there will be a car show, arts and crafts, singing, lots of food and many more fun activities. The queens will also be required to ride in all parades that the Two-Toe Tom Festival oat enters unless excused by the Town of Esto. You will be notied ahead of time of the parades and dates. For more information, contact Teresa Bush, daytime 263-6345 or nighttime 263-3072, or Darlene Madden, daytime 263-6521 or nighttime 263-3201.

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 and soreness aches Two students from Bonifay Middle School participated in the 53rd Annual Three Rivers Regional Science and Engineering Fair of 2014 in Panama City. This was the rst time, in over 25 years, the Holmes District has participated in this regional fair. The eighth grade team of Elliott Gould and Christopher Ennger created a security robot constructed of plywood, scrap metal and spare computer parts. Their robot was designed to detect motion and respond with ashing lights and issue an audible warning. Out of 26 entries in the Junior Engineering category, Elliott and Chris won rst place. This team and their robot will now compete in the State Science and Engineering Fair of Florida, held in Lakeland, in April. They also received Certicate of Accomplishment from AUVSI (Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International), iTunes gift cards, cash award from the Bay Education Foundation, and an opportunity to participate in Broadcom Masters in Washington, DC. Congratulations Elliott Gould and Christopher Ennger, we are very proud of both of you; wishing you all the best at the state science fair. For more information on participating in the district and regional science fairs, contact a local science teacher.BMS students participate in Regional Science Fair FIRST PLACEBy LYNN MARSHAllLLHCHS FBLA Advisor MARIAARIANNAA Holmes County High Schools Future Business Leaders of America competed in District 2 events at Chipola College recently and will be eligible to compete in the State Leadership Conference on March 21 24 in Orlando. Students who place in State will be eligible to compete at the National Convention this Summer in Nashville, Tenn. HHCHSHS FBLAA students advance to compete in S StateIn Business Law Katie Mitchell placed fth; in Business Procedures Erica Hudson placed second; in FBLA Principles and Procedures Isabella Scott placed fourth and Tori Steverson placed fth; in Heath Care Administration Claire Segers placed fourth (not pictured); and in Insurance and Risk Management Tomorrow Lake placed third (not pictured).PP HOTOS SS PECIAL TO THE NEWS Holmes County High Schools Future Business Leaders of America who received rst place in District 2 events held at Chipola College recently are: in Business Communication, Savannah Messer; Business Law, John Etheridge; Business Procedures, Moneba Anees; Emerging Business Issues, Keylee Glover, Thomas Parish and Jeremy Worthing; Health Care Administration, Courtney Syfrett (not pictured); Impromptu Speaking, Rayanne Phelps; Insurance and Risk Management, Auburn Fisanick; Introduction to Information Technology, Aaron Stanford; Management Decision Making, Jennifer Holland, Lucy Jiang and Whitney White; Public Service Announcement, Cheyenne Berry, Kristin Gonzalez and Nic Luan; and Public Speaking I, Cassie Bell.The Panhandle Area Educational Consortium (PAEC) located in Chipley, Fla., partnered with the Florida Department of Transportation District Three Ofce to coordinate a STEM Scholar Parent/ Student night on Monday, Feb. 10. Parent/student meetings are designed to ensure parents and students learn about a variety of STEM careers available near their school and home. The goal is to help students make wellinformed career choices and understand the academic preparation the career requires. The parent/student meetings also function as a means of keeping communication open between parents, STEM Scholars and project personnel. Brenda Crouch, Project Manager for the FloridaLearns STEM Scholars initiative, introduced featured speakers from the Florida Department of Transportation District Three ofce who described the various career elds available, particular those related to science, technology, engineering and math. Steve Thames, Administrative Support Manager, welcomed the group and introduced the panelists. Professional Engineers Jared Perdue and April Williams spoke with students and parents about the requirements needed to become an engineer, benets of a career in the engineering eld and many of the opportunities available at the Department of Transportation. Erin Oliver, J.D. shared information about the role of lawyers at DOT while Donna Green, Public Information Specialist not only shared her journey to a career at DOT but encouraged the students to apply themselves in all areas of their high school career. The FloridaLearns STEM Scholars initiative was launched in July of 2011, with a vision to help Florida address its urgent and important STEM talent development challenge by focusing on some of Floridas most underserved students, its gifted and talented in the rural regions of the state.SSTEM SScholar Parent/SStudent NNight STESTEM STRESTRENGTHTH TESTTESTJack Craven, (left) of Marianna High, and Abagail Bridges, of Chipley High, test the strength of their balsa wood tower at a recent STEM meeting at Chipola College. Chipola professors and high school faculty led students in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) activities. The event was organized by the FloridaLearns STEM Scholars Project, in collaboration with the Panhandle Area Educational Consortium (PAEC) targeting gifted and talented students in grades 9-12. STEM is a multimillion dollar education campaign to encourage students attending Floridas rural schools to consider a career in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. SS PECIAL TO THE NEWS Pictured are FDOT speakers: April Williams, P.E., Donna Green, Public Information Specialist, Erin Oliver, J.D., and Jared Perdue, P.E.SS PECIAL TO THE NEWS Crossword PPUZZLESOLUTIOSOLUTION OON PAPAGEE B5

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Zion to host The PerrysESTO The Perrys will be in concert at 7 p.m., on Friday, Feb. 21, at Mt. Zion Independent Baptist Church. Everyone is invited to attend this night of worship and fellowship. There is no admission. A love offering will be taken during intermission. The church is at 3205 Highway 2, Esto.Area Wide Winter Camp MeetingBONIFAY An area wide winter camp meeting will take place at 6 p.m. Feb. 23 and at 7 p.m. Feb. 24 27, at Oak Grove Pentecostal Ministries at 1131 Highway 179 in Bonifay. The speaker will be Pastor Duke Downs Of Living Waters Church in Chino, California. For more information call 9564339, 956-2322 or 658-2828.Area Wide Youth MeetingBONIFAY An area wide youth meeting will take place at 7 p.m. Feb. 27 at Oak Grove Pentecostal Ministries at 1131 Highway 179 in Bonifay. The speaker will be Bro. Stephen McKay, missionary to the Middle East. For more information call 956-4339, 956-2322 or 658-2828.Ash Wednesday Mass ScheduleCHIPLEY St. Joseph the Worker Catholic Church will hold Ash Wednesday Mass from 5 to 6 p.m. on March 5. St. Ann will hold Mass and Ashes from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. on March 5. Fine Arts SeriesMARIANNA St. Lukes Episcopal Church will host Julee Glaub and Mark Weems, an Irish Vocal and Instrumental Duet at 4 p.m. on March 16. A meet the artist reception will follow. Donations will be accepted. For more information call 482-2431.Blessed Trinity Catholic Church welcomes all BONIFAY Blessed Trinity Catholic Church would like to invite everyone to attend services. Bible Study is held from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. on Sunday the Church Hall. Sunday Mass will be from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. and Wednesday evening Mass will be from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The church is at 2331 Highway 177A in Bonifay. Faith EVENTSLearning the great art of kneeologyGeorge Mueller had just nished spending some quality time with a young missionary headed for China. He was enthralled by the vision this young man had to reach an entire country for Christ. J. Hudson Taylor was going to China without any sponsorship of any kind, except God. Mueller found in Taylor a kindred spirit and his heart was stirred. If anyone understood the life of trusting God, it was George Mueller. After Taylor left, Mueller felt a burden upon his heart for this young missionary that he could not shake. Never once did Taylor ask Mueller for money or even talk about where the money would come from, but spoke excitedly about what God was going to do without any regard of who was going to pay the bill. Monies were needed to support the vision Taylor had for reaching the country of China. Without saying anything to anybody, Mueller begin praying and trusting God for 100,000 for the mission in China. He set a day when the monies needed to be in and told absolutely no one, On the appointed day, monies began coming in from everywhere. Even Mueller was a little shocked at the overwhelming response to his prayer. People really did not know what was behind all of this giving but were impressed by God to give. Mueller understood what was behind it. God was behind it. Before that day ended over 100,000, the amount Mueller was trusting God for, had come in. How do you explain that? Todays giving is predicated upon an advertising campaign. Thousands of dollars are spent hiring rms specializing in fundraising campaigns. Advertisements are created to lure people into giving. Celebrities are hired to plead the cause. Strategies are used to convince people that if they give they will get something back in return. This all in a ploy to raise money, supposedly to do kingdom work. Years ago, I ran across something Dr. Moody Stuart set down as rules, which guided his own prayer life. I put them in the front of my Bible constantly to remind me of these things. 1. Pray until you pray. 2. Pray until you are conscious of being heard. 3. Pray until you receive an answer. These three things will go a long way in turning our prayer life into a dynamic encounter with God that actually accomplishes great things for God. Kingdom work demands the employment of kingdom principles.EVERYBODY PRAYSIt is safe to say that everybody prays, even those who say they do not believe in prayer. All that needs to happen is some incident or an accident and people instinctively turned to prayer. Those who do not believe in prayer succumb to prayer in times of trouble. Remember 9/11 Everybody prays but few have a proper foundation upon which to build their prayer ministry. Prayer is not some magical formula that applies to both saved and unsaved alike. Some believe if you have the right formula, the right ritual or the right words that God has to answer that prayer. It does not matter if your life is contrary to the nature of God. It does not matter, or so they think, if you are not walking with God day by day. God has to answer your prayer. All you have to do is just say the magical formula in Jesus name in your prayer is on its way. Nothing could be further from the truth. There is no way anybody can back God into a corner and get Him to do something contrary to His will.THE PRIVILEGE OF PRAYERPrayer is the privilege of the believer. No greater honor could be laid upon the heart of the Christian. The foundation of a proper prayer life is none other than the Lord Jesus Christ. Apart from Him, we have no access to God the Father. The tragedy of this whole situation is that all of the prayers of the unsaved are baseless and get no higher than the ceiling. In order to penetrate the heavens and ascend to the Throne of God we must have an advocate, a mediator, which is none other than Jesus Christ. For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus (1 Timothy 2:5). Only through Christ will my prayers get through to God, the Father. Imagine spending your whole life praying to a God that does not exist. Imagine, after a life of hardship and toil you nd out you really were not praying at all but rather mumbling words and phrases that had no signi cance to it at all. The proper foundation for prayer is Jesus Christ. Even those with a proper foundation often misuse prayer. The apostle James pointed this out in his epistle, Ye ask, and receive not, because ye ask amiss, that ye may consume it upon your lusts. (James 4:3). This is praying contrary to Gods will. How much time is wasted on nonessentials and non-kingdom stuff? Relatively few have accepted the necessary discipline for this kind of work. Some have a reputation of being a prayer warrior, which is really an oxymoron. A prayer warriors work is covert spiritual work of which most people do not know is going on. These great Saints have no reputation but have found the secret place of spiritual potency and are being employed by the Holy Spirit to engage the enemy in spiritual warfare. No glamour No celebrity status No spotlight. Just wrestling with the powers of darkness. This is praying down the enemy and all his forces around him. These great saints that have populated each generation of Christendom have attended the school of prayer and learned the great art of kneeology. DR. JAMES L. SNYDEROut to Pastor

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5WEDNESDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. 11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday Community CALENDARIrene Geddie Fish, 77, of Bonifay, passed away on Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014. Irene was born in Tallahassee on April 22, 1936, to the late T. J. and Vera Irene Geddie. She graduated from Leon High School in Tallahassee in 1953. She married Percy Preston Pete Fish, on April 25, 1953. Irene was a beloved member of the First Baptist Church of Bonifay and was an active member of the church, but if you were to ask her What religion are you? she would reply Methodist. She was also an advocate for orphans and donated generously to the Baptist and Methodist Childrens Homes. Irene practiced real estate in Holmes County for approximately 40 years and was the rst female broker in Holmes County. She was a founding member of the Chipola Area Board of Realtors and also served one term on the Florida Real Estate Commission after being appointed by Governor Lawton Chiles. She was an avid Florida State Seminole football fan. She was preceded in death by her infant daughter, Rose Marie Fish. Irene is survived by her husband of 60 years, Percy Preston Pete Fish; ve children, Percy Preston Fish, Jr. (Audrey) of Tallahassee, Harold Anthony Fish of Bonifay, David Sterling Fish, Sr. (Leah) of Dillard, Ga., Charles Andrew Fish (Mandy) of Lake City, and Tabitha Fish Wichowski (Tommy) of Panama City Beach; 20 grandchildren; 13 great-grandchildren, and 15 nieces and nephews. A viewing was held at Sims Funeral Home at 6 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 15. The funeral service took place at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 16, at the First Baptist Church of Bonifay with the burial immediately following at New Effort Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing. In lieu of owers, donations to the Florida Baptist Childrens Home, 8415 Buck Lake Rd, Tallahassee, FL 32317 878-1458 or Seminole Boosters Inc. 225 University Ctr., Ste. C5100, Tallahassee, FL 32306 644-3484 are appreciated.Irene G. Fish IreneRENE G. Fish ISH UploadyourLegacyguestbookphotosnowforFREE!Withyourpaidobituary,familyandfriendswillnow haveunlimitedaccesstouploadedphotosfreeofcharge. FindObituaries. ShareCondolences. Inpartnershipwith. Findobituaries,sharecondolencesand celebratealifeat or Crossword SOLUTION Guidelines UIDELINESObituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the decease. The Washington County News/Holmes County TimesAdvertiser reserves the right to edit for AP style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is noon on Monday for the following Wednesday newspaper. Obituaries may be emailed to funerals@ chipleypaper.com or delivered to the Washington County News at 1364 North Railroad Ave, Chipley or Holmes County Times-Advertiser at 112 Eat Virginia Ave. in Bonifay.Juanita Jackson Ward was born on May 17, 1934, in Holmes County. She was the daughter of the late Nellie and Gillis Jackson and wife of the late J.E. Ward. Juanita passed away Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2014. Her occupations throughout her lifetime were a shoemaker and seamstress. But rst and foremost she was a wife and mother. Her main hobbies were gardening, taking care of her property, and spending time with family and friends. She passed away at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. She was living with her son and daughter-inlaw at the time. Juanita persevered faithfully and graciously through good times and adversity. She was a very seless woman who never complained. Her strength was a great inuence to everyone around her. She was and will always be loved dearly by her son, daughter-inlaw, grandchildren, and other family and friends. We want to thank Sims Funeral Home for their care in conducting the funeral as well as East Mount Zion United Methodist Church. It is with heartfelt thanks to the ofciating ministers, the Rev. David Cook, the Rev. Wesley Syfrett, and Dr. Edsel Bone; all family and friends who sent cards, owers, food, made donations on behalf of Juanitas wishes, and all other expressions of love. She is survived by her son, James Paul Ward (Cheryl) of Macclenny, Fla. Surviving grandchildren are, James Evan Ward of Macclenny and Carissa Ward Near (Cameron) of Jacksonville, N.C.; nieces, Brenda Lewis, Jackie Benton, Teresa Sheets, Cricket Worley, and Cindy Jackson; nephews, Frank Yates, Marty Taylor, Tony Jackson and Herman Taylor; cousins, Gordon Jackson, Roger Jackson, Watson Jackson, Martha English Johnson, James English, Charles English, Danny Pettis, Mike Pettis, Ken Hobbs, Gary Hobbs, and Janet Patterson. A funeral service was held at 2 p.m., on Friday, Feb. 14, 2014, at East Mt. Zion Methodist Church with the Rev. David Cook, the Rev. Wesley Syfrett and Dr. Edsel Bone ofciating. Interment followed in Bethany Cemetery, Bonifay with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m., on Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel.Juanita J. WardClyde J. Mills, 79, of Vernon, went home to be with the Lord Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014, at Bay Medical center in Panama City. Clyde was born Jan. 12, 1935, in Vernon to John Henry and Ida Blanche (Holland) Mills. A lifelong resident of the panhandle, Clyde traveled across the U.S. as a truck driver, and was also a member of Wausau Assembly of God He was preceded in death by his parents and siblings. He is survived by his wife of 14 years Exie Mills of Vernon; four step children, Travis Brock Sr. and wife Beverly of Vernon, Richard Brock and wife Kathy of Indiana, Deanna Brock of Illinois and Rhonda Romero and husband Fred of Illinois; nine grandchildren, Travis Brock Jr., Jonathan Brock, Amanda Scott, Richard Brock Jr., Alicia Brock, Seth Schweine, Noah Romero, Jared Romero and Tara Romero and eight step children by previous marriage. Services were held at 1 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014, at Wausau Assembly of God in Wausau, with the Rev. Danny Burns and the Rev. Danny Jackson ofciating. The family received friends from 5 to 8p.m. Monday, Feb. 17, 2014, at Wausau Assembly of God. Obert Funeral Home of Chipley in charge of arrangements.Clyde J. MillsAnn Sheppard Gordy (Grann), loving wife, mother, sister and grandmother, departed this earth on Feb. 13, 2014, at Westminster Oaks, in Tallahassee. Ann was born in Chipley, on Sept. 4, 1928, to Oscar Lee and Ethel Sheppard. Ann attended Washington County schools and was a 1946 graduate of Chipley High School and a 1950 graduate of the Florida State College for Women/ Florida State University (B.S. in Home Economics and M.S. in Library Science). After marrying the love of her life, Paul, she taught in the Washington County School System for 33 years. Her rst years were spent teaching Home Economics at Chipley High School before she transitioned to Kate M. Smith Elementary School where she taught the Fifth Grande and Elementary School Music. Ann ended her work career as the Media Specialist which was a natural t given her love of reading-as a fth grade teacher, she instilled the love of reading to her students by reading to them each day after their lunch break. As betting home economics major, Ann was an outstanding cook. She took great joy in keeping her friends and family well fed, particularly when family returned home for visits. Ann especially enjoyed cooking for her grandson, Casey, and she loved every minute she spent with her only grandchild. Ann was an extremely talented musician who played both the piano and organ, and her love of music was rst reected in her dedicated service as the accompanist for the Chipley High School Chorus during her high school career. Additionally, after singing in the choir as a youngster, Ann served as the organist for the First United Methodist Church of Chipley during her entire high school career. She later resumed her organist activities from 1960 to 1986, and also sang in the choir (1987-2007). Throughout her life, Ann served on multiple church committees and particularly loved her service to the United Methodist Women. Ann served as President of the UMW for several years and also served as a District Representative for the Pensacola West Florida District. In addition to being an amazingly talented person, Anns love and devotion to her family was second only to her love of God. Ann served as President of the Junior Womens Club in 1951 and 1952 and was an active member of the Spanish Trail Playhouse. As a member of the STP, she and her family were cast members in the musical productions of Carousel and Showboat. Ann was also an exceptionally talented seamstress who spent countless hours exercising her creativity by making clothing, accessories and anything else that was needed. During her retirement years, Ann spent hours making items such as tote bags, aprons and draperies, and she enjoyed taking sewing classes with her friends at the Washington County Area Vocational Technical School. Her creations were always made to serve as gifts for friends and/or to be sold in conjunction with a church bazaar. Ann and Paul loved to travel and upon their retirement, they took advantage of many opportunities to travel abroad as well as in the United States. Ann was an exceptionally talented vacation planner long before the Internet made it easy and she was responsible for planning all of their trips from the rst out of the country family vacation to Mexico in 1965, to Europe, Hawaii and most of the U.S. national parks. Ann experienced a major stroke in 2007 which changed everybodys world but especially Pauls. However, despite all of the difculties and lifestyle changes, Pauls constant devotion to his Ann was an inspiration to all and there was no doubt that he adored the prettiest girl in the world. She was predeceased by her parents, O.L. and Ethel Sheppard, and her nephew Greg Booth (Gayla). Ann is survived by her husband of 65 years, Paul Gordy; her daughter, Paula Gordy Cook (Skip); her son, Steve Gordy (Ruth); her grandson, Casey Cook (ance Shaunna Boggs); his sister, Sarah Sheppard Booth (Ormond); her sisterin-law, Molly Gordy, and her niece, Elizabeth Coley (Chuck). Funeral Services will be held on Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, at 11:30 a.m., CST at the Chipley First United Methodist Church sanctuary, preceded by a visitation beginning at 10 a.m. CST, with the Rev. Jerry May, ofciating. Burial will follow in the Glenwood Cemetery with Brown Funeral Home Directing. In Lieu of Flowers, donations can be made to the First United Methodist Church building fund, 1285 Jackson Street, Chipley, FL 32428. Family and Friends may sign the online register at Ann S. GordyThomas Danny Stanley, 64, of Bonifay, died Feb. 11, 2014. Funeral services were held Feb. 13, 2014. Interment followed in the Pleasant Hill Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing.Thomas D. StanleyHarold Foster Hewett, 63, of Grand Ridge died at his residence Friday, Feb. 7, 2014. He was a native and life-long resident of Jackson County. Foster spent his early adult life as an insurance agent in the area before becoming a re ghter and security ofcer at Florida State Hospital. He found great joy and satisfaction from the time he spent on the farm on which he was raised. His passions included spending time with family and friends while often hunting and shing. Survivors include his wife of 42 years, Ann; son, Jeffrey and wife, Amanda; daughter, Melanie and husband, Aden Southwell; grandchildren, Aaron, Jeremiah, Hannah, Jaden, and Elijah; brother, Bobby and wife, Edna Hewett; two aunts, Charlotte Brown and Cookie Bradley; two brothers-in-law and their wives; two sisters-in-law and numerous nieces, nephews, and cousins. Funeral services were at 2 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014, at Grand Ridge Baptist Church with Dr. Fred Hewett and the Rev. C.D. Harn ofciating. Interment was in Cypress Cemetery with James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. The family received friends from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday at James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel.Harold HewettIn loving memory of James Henery Smith, 52, was born on Aug. 25, 1961, and passed away on Jan. 17, 2014, at the Baptist Memorial Hospital in Huntington, Tenn. He was from Caryville. You will be greatly missed. He was preceded in death by his wife Joyce Smith and Father Loyd Smith. He is survived by his mother, Annie Mae Smith, Bonifay; three sons, Jimmy (Sabrina) Smith, Jeffery Smith and Josh Balentine all of Huntington, Tenn.; ve daughters, Ashley Smith, Lori Balentine and Ryan Balentine all of Huntington, Tenn., Hope (Vance) Franklin of Bartow and Faith (Tony) Gushlaw of Chipley; three sisters, Lois (Larry) Mathis, Caryville, Johann (Angus) Brock, Vernon, and Virginia (Danny), Geneva, Ala.; two brothers Allen (Sharie) Smith, Graceville and Frank Smith, Bonifay; 19 grandkids; nine great grandkids and several nieces and nephews. Services were at 11 a.m. for a dinner and the wake was at 1 p.m. on Feb. 15 at St. Johns Free Will Baptist Church, 975 St. Johns Rd, Bonifay, with the Rev. Leon Jenkins. James H. Smith Obituaries

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL enewCollegeofAppliedStudiesatFSUPanamaCitywasapprovedby theFSUBoardofTrusteesinJune2010andallowsthecampustomore easilyrespondtoworkforceneedsinourarea.WeinviteyoutosupporteCampaignforOurCommunitysUniversitybyhelpingusbuildan endowmentfortomorrowsjobs.Ourgoalistoestablisha$5million endowmentfortheCollegeofAppliedStudiesby2017,whichwillallow FSUPanamaCitytoestablishstudentscholarships,implementnew degreeprogramsandprovidenewequipmentandtechnology. Tolearnhowyoucansupportourcommunitysuniversity,contactMary BethLovingoodat(850)770-2108ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. THECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs SUPPORTOUR COMMUNITYS UNIVERSITY Special to ExtraOver the past 20 years, Goodwill Manasota has not only created thousands of jobs in its local region, but it has also helped increase revenues by the millions at other Goodwills around the globe. Goodwill Manasota, based in Sarasota, Fla., has developed an award winning business model that has been replicated all over the world. The powerhouse non-prot organization will take it one step further in 2014, when it opens a 29,000-square-foot international training center to provide its Mission Development Services program. Formalized in 2001, the MDS program teaches other Goodwill organizations how to rene and expand their enterprises, creating jobs and mission opportunities through improved business operations. We identify and partner with Goodwills around the country that are challenged or have territories that are being underserved, and teach them how to streamline their operations, said Bob Rosinsky, president and CEO of Goodwill Manasota. We train them on acquiring and retaining donors, managing staff and employees, and we provide them with expertise on managing real estate, he said. At a Goodwill in Northern Arizona, headquartered in Flagstaff, that assistance made a multi-million dollar difference between 2003-2012, and saved that Goodwill from disaster. The organization was barely able to keep its doors open, drifting towards bankruptcy, recalls David Hirsch, CEO of the once struggling Goodwill Industries of Northern Arizona. It didnt have the donations to justify its stores, and it wasnt properly handling the donations it did receive. It was losing community support and board members as a result, slowly sinking into oblivion, Hirsch said. This crisis led concerned board members to reach out to the highly successful Goodwill Manasota for advice. Goodwill Industries of Northern Arizona was then operating six retail centers without a single dedicated donation center. Its annual revenue was just under $1.6 million. It was losing over $30,000 each month. Goodwill Manasota worked with the Flagstaff team to develop a strategic plan and to provide operational guidance. When the Goodwill Manasota team arrived, one of the rst things they did was recommended closing one store. They got the board to see that they really needed to make tough decisions if we were to survive. They also recruited and retained me as the new CEO, said Hirsch. For several months, the MDS team, led by current Goodwill Manasota CEO Bob Rosinsky, provided training to staff and management on how to efciently move donations from the back room to the sales oor. Sales soon began to increase by double digits. As donor service improved, so did donations, said Hirsch. Fast-forward ten years, and Goodwill Industries of Northern Arizona currently operates six retail stores, nine donation centers and ve Job Connection centers. Annual revenues exceeded $5 million in 2012. It opened a 13,000square-foot store in Bullhead City in 2008, three hours away from Flagstaff. A new headquarters and Goodwill Good Neighbor Center was opened in 2012. The Goodwill of Northern Arizona plans on opening another Good Neighbor Center in Lake Havasu in 2014, and also plans to open four more donation centers. The growth and development activities continue to be a major part of our relationship with Goodwill Manasota today, explains Hirsch. Goodwill Manasota has had similar success stories in 11 territories across the United States including: Lafayette, La.; Tucson, Ariz.; Memphis, Tenn.; Reno, Nevada; Austin, Texas; Flagstaff, Ariz.; Houston, Texas; Tallahassee, Fla.; Mobile, Ala.; and Washington, D.C. Internationally, Goodwill Manasota has assisted several countries with technical assistance and it maintains partnerships in Alberta, Niagara, London, Montreal, Toronto and Sarnia, Canada. Goodwill Manasota also partners with others to develop part or all of a territory, using its own capital for development. The MDS program currently works in territories in Marinette, Wis. and Northern Mississippi for this purpose. It assists local staff to build out the territory and works with that staff to oversee the day-today operations. The goal of this strategy is to develop the territory and eventually turn a mature operation back to the partner Goodwill. The MDS partnerships create business-to-business relationships that ultimately benet both organizations, said Bob Rosinsky. When Goodwill Manasota assumed control of the Northern Mississippi territory in 2008, it had annual revenues of approximately $1.6 million, employed 30 people and was serving about 78,000 donors from its two retail locations. Annual revenues exceeded $12.7 million in 2012, 250 people were employed and 225,000 donors were assisted from 17 retail stores. The international training center in Bradenton, Florida is expected to open in the summer of 2014. It will be part of a new $13million, 65,000-square-foot corporate campus. The expansion effort will create more than 30 local jobs in a 36,000-square-foot retail operation. The new site will consolidate staff to enhance the productivity required to provide professional services, employment counseling and training for additional students. Goodwill Manasota currently operates 33 donation centers and 18 retail stores in Floridas Sarasota, Manatee, DeSoto and Hardee Counties. It employs over 750 people, nearly 100 of which are severely disabled. This year, it helped place more than 500 people into jobs and helped to provide more $30 million in wages.Goodwill to open international training centerSPECIAL TO EE XTRAEmployees of Goodwill Manasota are pictured with Bob Rosinsky, president and CEO.

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 B USINESS G UIDE HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson C ounties for 20 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!638-3611Advertise your service or business for as little as $10/week.Ad runs in the Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser. 638-0212 or 547-9414 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are CarpetedThree Chicks Cleaning Free Quotes Experienced References Available Flexible Hours (M-F) (850) 956-2408 Cell (850) 768-0022 You Create CeramicartClaymolding GlassfusionMetalart MosaicartT-shirtpainting Gallery UniqueGiftstore Book Your BirthdayParties BridalShowers FamilyEvents&Reunions CorporateTeamBuiding FieldTrips Walkinsarewelcome850 547 3321Join us at the Art FarmThe Silver Door Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HVAC Services Coolers & Freezers Service on all Makes & Models Heat Pumps, Electric & Gas Electrical Services Exterior Elevated LightingResidential and Commerical ALL YOUR PRINTING NEEDS SOLVEDFor Quote Call Kim 683-0212, x4004WE PRINT MORE THAN JUST NEWSPAPERS Washington County imes A dvertiserHOLMES COUNTY T Easy Care Lawn & Tractor ServiceLawn Care Tree Service Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825 5019672 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8:00am-5:00pm. Call (850)638-1483 Cleaning in Detail by Barbara. Its more than just a clean! Call 850-258-1204 If you didnt advertise here, youre missing out on potential customers. 2-3557 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 30-2013-CA-000392 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, MARY L. GARRETT ALSO KNOWN AS MARY LOU GARRETT ALSO KNOWN AS MARY LOU GARRET ALSO KNOWN AS MARY L. GARRET, DECEASED, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, MARY L. GARRETT ALSO KNOWN AS MARY LOU GARRETT ALSO KNOWN AS MARY LOU GARRET ALSO KNOWN AS MARY L. GARRET, DECEASED Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Holmes County, Florida: COMMENCE AT AN IRON PIN MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4, SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 804.19 FEET TO A ONE-HALF INCH IRON ROD BEARING CAP NO. 4979 FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN NORTH 68 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 256.40 FEET TO AN EXISTING ONE AND ONE-HALF INCH IRON PIPE; THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREE 05 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 51.70 FEET TO A ONE AND ONE-FOURTH INCH IRON PIPE; THENCE RUN IN A NORTHEASTERLY DIRECTION TO THE POINT OF INTERSECTION OF A WESTERLY EXTENSION OF THE NORTHERN RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF ALLEY NO. 2, AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT OF ADDITION TO OLD PONCE DE LEON, A COPY OF WHICH IS RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT OF HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH A LINE RUNNING NORTH 17 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID LINE A DISTANCE OF 240 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IT BEING THE INTENTION OF THE GRANTORS TO CONVEY TO THE GRANTEES ALL THAT PORTION LYING SOUTH OF THE WESTERLY EXTENSION OF SAID ALLEY NO. 2 OF THE ADDITION TO OLD PONCE DE LEON OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PARCEL OF REAL PROPERTY ACQUIRED BY SAMUEL E. CARR AND LEVOY M. CARR FROM MRS. FRANCES E. CARR BY DEED DATED MARCH 7, 1958:BEGINNING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE J. H. MANNING LOT AND RUN WEST ALONG DIRT ROAD 108 1/2 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 186 FEET TO IRON STOB CORNER; THENCE NORTHEAST DIRECTION 210 FEET; THENCE IN NORTHEAST DIRECTION ALONG WEST LINE OF MANNING LOT 192 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING ON SOUTH LINE OF J. H. MANNING LOT ON THE 40 SUBDIVISION LINE AND RUN SOUTH ALONG 40 LINE 260 FEET TO IRON STOB CORNER 100 YARDS FROM CREEK; THENCE NORTHWEST DIRECTION ALONG OLD FENCE ROW 200 FEET TO A STOB; THENCE NORTH 30 FEET TO IRON STOB CORNER; THENCE NORTHEAST DIRECTION 287 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING. ALL THE ABOVE BEING A PART OF SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SOUTHEAST 1/4 IN SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA.TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A PERMANENT FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO, DESCRIBED AS A 1992 FLEETWOOD DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME BEARING IDENTIFICATION NUMBERS AL28561927447A AND AL28561927447B AND TITLE NUMBERS 66008124 AND 66008125. A/K/A 1540 OAK ST, PONCE DE LEON, FL 32455 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the Holmes County Times Advertiser. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 3 day of February, 2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk **See the Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. February 12, 2014 and February 19, 2014 2-3569 NOTICE OF PUBLIC WORKSHOP On behalf of the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners, Preble-Rish, Inc., will hold a Fair Housing workshop for the general public and for area realtors and financial institutions: WHEN:T uesday, February 25, 2014 TIME: 6:00 PM WHERE:Holmes County Board of County Commissioners Board Room RE: Fair Housing Workshop. All persons are invited to attend these meetings. (Any person who decides to appeal any decision made by the County Commissioners with respect to any matter considered at said meeting will need a record of the proceedings, and for such purpose may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. The Board of County Commissioners for Holmes County, Florida will not provide a verbatim record of this meeting.) IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, Persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact Sherry Snell, Administrative Assistant, at Telephone No. (850) 547-1119. As published Feb. 19, 2014 2-3548 PUBLIC AUCTION The following vehicles will be sold at public auction at Eastern Diesel & Auto Wrecker Service, Inc. 2005 S. Waukesha, Bonifay, Fl. at 8:00 a.m. on March 19, 2014 for towing and storage: VIN # 3N1CB51D55L455848 2005 Nissan 4 DR Dothan Security or Clark A. Po Box 7163 Dothan, AL 36302 MidSouth Bank 2526 W. Main St. Dothan, AL 36304 EASTERN DIESEL AND AUTO WRECKER SERVICE, INC. February 19, 2014. 2-3566 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-329-CA M. P. BRIGMAN; and JERRY A. BIEHL, Plaintiffs, vs. LINDA J. MASSEY, Defendant. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 21, 2014, in Case No.: 13-329-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale on the front steps of the Court House at 11:00 a.m. CST on February 28, 2014 the following described property: All of the Northeast 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 35, Township 5 North, Range 16 West, lying North and East of Highway 179, Holmes County, Florida DATED: 1/22/14 KYLE HUDSON Clerk of the Court By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk February 19, 2014 and February 26, 2014. 2-3570 PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE 2ND PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners is applying to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO) for a grant under the Neighborhood Revitalization category in the amount of $630,000 under the Small Cities Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program. For each activity that is proposed, at least 51% of the funds must benefit low-and moderate-income persons. The activities, dollar amounts, and estimated percentage benefit to low-and moderate-income persons for which the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners are applying are as follows: ActivityAmount %LMI Street ImprovementsRepaving (Construction Costs)$544,261.00 Over 68% Base Fee $10,000.00 CDBG Administrative Fees $50,400.00 Resident Project Representative Inspection Fees $25,339.00 Total Funded CDBG Costs $630,000.00 *Improvement locations will be identified on a map at the hearing. The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners plan to minimize displacement of persons as a result of CDBG funded activities in the following manner: No displacement of persons will be necessary as part of this project. A public hearing to provide citizens an opportunity to comment on the application will be held at the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners Board Room, 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 5:30 p.m. A draft copy of the application will be available for review at that time. A final copy of the application will be made available at the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners Board Room, 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425 no later than February 26th and will be available for viewing between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. The application will be submitted to DEO by March 12, 2014. To obtain additional information concerning the application and the public hearing, contact Sherry Snell, Administrative Assistant, at Telephone (850) 547-1119. The public hearing is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location. Any handicapped person requiring an interpreter for the hearing impaired or the visually impaired should contact Sherry Snell, Administrative Assistant, at Telephone (850) 547-1119 at least 5 calendar days prior to the meeting and an interpreter will be provided. Any non-English speaking person wishing to attend the public hearing should contact Sherry Snell, Administrative Assistant, at Telephone (850) 547-1119 at least 5 calendar days prior to the meeting and a language interpreter will be provided. To access a Telecommunication Device for Deaf Persons (TDD) please call (850) 547-1119. Any handicapped person requiring special accommodation at this meeting should contact Sherry Snell, Administrative Assistant, at (850) 547-1119 at least 5 calendar days prior to the meeting. Pursuant to Section 102 of the HUD Reform Act of 1989, the following disclosures will be submitted to DEO with the application. The disclosures will be made available by the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners and DEO for public inspection upon request. These disclosures will be available on and after the date of submission of the application and shall continue to be available for a minimum period of 5 years. 1.Other government (federal, state, and local) assistance to the project in the form of a gift, grant, loan, guarantee, insurance payment, rebate, subsidy, credit, tax benefit, or any other form of direct or indirect benefit by source and amount; 2.The identities and pecuniary interests of all developers, contractors, or consultants involved in the application for assistance or in the planning or development of the project or activity; 3.The identities and pecuniary interests of any other persons with a pecuniary interest in the project that can reasonably be expected to exceed $50,000 or 10% of the grant request (whichever is lower); 4.For those developers, contractors, consultants, property owners, or others listed in Item 2 or Item 3 above which are corporations, or other entities, the identification and pecuniary interests by corporation or entity of each officer, director, principal stockholder, or other official of the entity; 5.The expected sources of all funds to be provided to the project by each of the providers of those funds and the amount provided; and 6.The expected uses of all funds by activity and amount. As published Feb. 19, 2014 3-3567 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-DP-16 IN THE INTEREST OF: J.L.N.B. DOB:07/12/2005 MINOR CHILDREN (SEC.39.801 (b) FS) The State of Florida to NICOLE BOVE-STEPHENS, natural mother whose residence and address is unknown. You are hereby notified that a Petition under oath has been filed in the above styled Court for the Termination of Parental Rights in the case of J.L.N.B. child, to licensed child placement agency for subsequent adoption. You are hereby noticed that an Advisory Hearing will be held before the Honorable Christopher N. Patterson, Judge of the Circuit Court, Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, at the Holmes County Courthouse, Second Floor Courtroom, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida, on the 8th day of April, 2014, at the hour of 9:00 a.m., CENTRAL TIME. You have the right to appear with counsel at this hearing. If you can not afford legal representation, the Court will appoint counsel for you at this hearing upon the determination of insolvency. You must either appear on the date and at the time specified or send a written response to the Court prior to that time. YOUR FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD OR CHILDREN. February 18, 2014, February 26, 2014, March 4, 2014 and March 12, 2014. 2-3560 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: _30-2014-CP-000006 IN RE: WILLIAM H. TURBEVILLE, Deceased. Division: PR-A_ NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of William H. Turbeville, deceased, whose date of death was September 9, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 N. Oklahoma St., Bonifay, FL32425. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is February 12, 2014. Attorney for Personal Representative: Imani A. Boykin, Esq. Florida Bar Number: 0017508 644 Cesery Boulevard, Suite 340 Jacksonville, FL32211 Telephone: (904) 632-4836 Facsimile: (904) 399-8348 Service E-Mail: Pleadings@ImaniBoykinP A.com Personal Representative: Barbara T. Holbert, Personal Represenative February 12, 2014 and February 19, 2014. ADOPTION: Adoring, Financially Secure couple await 1st baby. Allison & Hal 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Devoted, affectionate professional couple will help you, unconditionally love & be hands on with your baby; maintain contact. Allowed expenses paid. Doug & Liz 800-9184773.-Susan Stockman -FL# 0342521 Half Parson Russell Terrier, Half Rat Terrier, 3mos old, Beautiful Puppy Call 850-537-9985 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely.

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, February 19, 2014 EMPLOYMENT TODAY!!! 1121657 Janelle Rodabaugh 850-747-5013 or jrodabaugh@pcnh.com Jessica Branda 850-747-5019 or jbranda@pcnh.com AtBoozAllenHamilton EngineeringServices,LLC,youllhavethetoolstogrowyourcareerwhile buildinghighlysophisticatedsolutionsfortheUS DepartmentofDefense.Youllbeanimportantpart ofourteamofengineeringexpertswhoareagile andefcient,andprovidelife-cyclesolutionsfrom researchanddevelopmenttotestingandevaluation support. 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ToApply:www.correctioncare.com; clickonCareers Call:CynthiaDeMarco317-473-5705LookWhosNewInTown! 1126945 CUSTOMERRELATIONS POSITIONMustbemotivated,ENTHUSIASTICand possessoutstandingphoneskills.Thisunique opportunityisaperfecttforthepersonthat lovesinteractingwithpeopleandworkingin fastpacedenvironments.Positionwilloffer salaryplusbonusopportunities. SubmitapplicationtoChrisCramer. ApplyonlineatBillCramerGM.com orcall850-747-7613toschedule anappointment. BenetsInclude:401K,GroupMedicalInsurance,PaidHolidaysandVacationsplusmoreBillCramer ChevroletCadillacBuickGMC 2251W23rdSt,PanamaCity,FLDRUG-FREEWORKPLACE,DMVCHECKAND EOE. 1126936FACETOFACEINTERVIEWSFOROURMANAGEMENTTRAINEEPOSITIONS FRIDAYFEB21ST9:00am-2:00PM LOCATION:WORKFORCECENTER 625HIGHWAY231, PANAMACITY,FL32405 850-872-4340 WEAREHIRINGFORTHE FOLLOWINGLOCATIONS:PANAMACITY&MARIANNAMUSTBRINGRESUME*BADEGREEWITH1YEAREXPERIENCE ORASSOCIATESDEGREEWITH 2YEAREXPERIENCE ORHIGHSCHOOLDIPLOMAWITH 4YEARSEXPERIENCE(EXPERIENCEMUSTBEINSALES, RETAILORCUSTOMERSERVICE)www.enterprise.com/careers PLEASECALLKELLYMARSH WITHANYQUESTIONS. 850-479-7310,ext215 Kelly.Marsh@ERAC.comEnterpriseisanequalopportunityemployer EOE/M/F/D/V ENTERPRISE RENT-A-CAROPENHOUSE|CAREERFAIR! Contact Us Directly For All Of Your Recruitment Needs! TIRED OF SEARCHING FOR BUYERS?Placing a classied ad is an easy and affordable way to make your wares the focus of attention among potential buyers.What are you waiting for? C ontact us today and start turning the stuff you dont want into something you do want:CASH!GET THINGS MOVING WITH THE CLASSIFIEDS! GET THINGS MOVING WITH THE CLASSIFIEDS! Admin/Clerical Job Opportunity:Town Clerk,Town of Wausau, FL. The Town of Wausau will be accepting applications for Town Clerk; this is a highly responsible administrative and supervisory position. Responsibilities include but are not limited to, acting as the custodian of the Towns records and seal; Notary, Clerk to the Town Council. Work involves preparing Town Council meeting agendas, minutes of Town meetings, managing town contracts, receiving legal documents on the Towns behalf, and supporting the Mayor, Council Members and other personnel directly involved in the Towns management. Employee is also responsible for utility reading, billing, collections, depositing, and reporting for the water department, Employee is responsible for preparing monthly financial reports to the Council, preparing payroll, filing quarterly tax reports, monthly tax reports and deposits, end of year payroll tax reports and processing W-2 and 1099 tax forms. Employee will be required to work evenings for Council meeting and other Town Board meetings. Employee must maintain effective working relationships, exercise independent judgment, confidentiality, discretion and initiative in carrying out the daily operations of the Town. The Town Clerk is an appointed official. Work is performed under limited supervision under the direction of the Mayor and Town Council. Minimum Qualifications: Knowledge of effective budget processes, administrative principles, practices, procedures and methods. Working knowledge of legal advertising requirements, intergovernmental relations, election laws and procedures, and procurement laws and procedures. Considerable knowledge of the practice and methods, and state regulations for public records management, retention, and disposition. Ability to effectively organize, supervise, train, and direct employees. Proficient in computer applications, including Microsoft Office and Quick Books Pro Ability to communicate effectively orally and in writing. Knowledge of accounts receivable and payable Training & Experience High School Diploma or equivalent; prior city, town, or other governmental experience is a plus. Special Requirements Will be required to pass a Quick Books prove it test thru One Stop prior to interview. Notary Public of the State of Florida, or obtain license within three (3) months of employment. Valid Florida Drivers License. Ability to be bonded The Town of Wausau is a drug-free workplace. A pre-employment drug screen, criminal history background investigation and a drivers license verification will be conducted. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER Rate of Pay for this Position: Depending on Qualifications To apply please send cover letter and resume to: Town of Wausau, 1607 Second Avenue, PO Box 39, Wausau, FL 32463 Phone 850-638-1781 Deadline for applications is February 21, 2014 @ 4:00pm Web Id 34279720 Absolute Auction. Ponce de Leon, FL. 11+/-acres, 21,000+/sq. ft. of improvements near US Hwy 90, offered in 7 parcels. February 27, 1:00pm, gtauctions.com, 205. 326.0833, Granger, Thagard & Associates, Inc. G.W. Thagard AU2846, AB2100, BK3009116. GUN SHOW FORTWALTON FAIRGROUNDSFebruary 22nd & 23rd SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL79626 to 56654 Hitachi 10inch Jobsite table saw on portable stand. Used once, in box. Model C10FR. Paid $240.00, sale $175.00, OBO. 850-263-9998. DISH TV Retailer. Starting $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) Broadband Internet starting $14.95/ month (where available.) Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-980-6193 Liberation by American Standard Walk-In Bath -Dont Struggle Getting Out Of A Normal Bathtub. Stay in your home longer, safely, independently. Liberation Walk-In Baths Commended by the Arthritis Foundation. Best Lifetime Warranty in the industry. Hydrotherapy, Chromatherapy, Aromatherapy no extra cost. Installation Included! Get $1,000 Off -Call Toll-Free Today 1-866-583-1432. Wanted to Rent; Farm land or pasture in Chipley & suroundding areas for the year 2014. 850-718-1859. Food Svc/Hospitality Dishwasher Frenchs Restaurant is now accepting applications for a Dishwasher. Apply in person Hwy 90 Caryville, FL. 850-548-5800 Web ID#: 34280996 Education CHIPOLA COLLEGE is accepting applications for the following full time positions: Program Manager Emergency Medical Services Staff Assisant Central Cashier Coordinator Academic Center for Excellence Position information and application deadlines available at www.chipola.edu/ personnel/jobs Contact Human Resources at pippenw@chipola. edu or call (850)718-2269 for additional information. Candidates may be subject to background investigations. Equal Opportunity Employer Web Id 34279662 Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Logistics/TransJOB AnnouncementDRIVERS WANTED Tri-County Community Council, Inc., is accepting applications for the Transportation Program. Great Benefit Package. REQUIREMENTS: Must be 23 years of age and have an Operators Drivers License with at least 5 years driving experience without violations. Must agree to annual physical and background screening. DUTIES: Transport riders to a pre-determined schedule. Must be able to secure wheelchairs (will train); be a team player assisting other drivers when needed; enjoy working with elderly, disabled and other riders. Applications may be obtained at any of the Tri-County Community Council, Inc., offices or on the agency website www.tricountycommunitycouncil.com and submitted by Monday, February 24 at 4:00 p.m. For information call LeaAnn, Personnel Tech 850-547-3689 Successful applicant will be subject to pre-employment drug test. Only qualified applicants will be considered. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER AND DRUG AND SMOKE FREE WORKPLACE. Web Id 34280769 29 Serious People to Work From Anywhere Using a Computer Up To $1,500-$5,000 PT/FT www.amazing lifestylefromhome.com AIRLINE CAREERS begin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial Aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877741-9260 www.FixJets .com CDL-A Team Owner Operators: $2,500 Lease Incentive! Team Dedicated Routes. Great Revenue & Regular Weekly Home Time! 888-486-5946 NFI Industries nfi partners.com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com EOE Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible. 1-866362-6497 You can become an expert in HVAC installation and repair. Pinnacle Career Institute online HVAC education in as little as 12 months. Call us today: 1-877-651-3961 or go online: www.HVACOnline-Education.com Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 FOR RENT 1B/R apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 Mandi Lea Apartments in Vernon, 2/BR. Financial Assistance available if qualified. 638-4640. 2BR/1BA garage and carport, HWY 2, suitable for two adults, no pets, $500/MO, First, last and deposit, 6/MO lease 850-849-6444. 3BR/ Rental Home for small family $500/Month located in Bonifay. 850-768-9808. 3BR/2BA for rent. No pets. Deposit & references required. $695/mth Chipley. (850)638-1918. 3BR/1.5BA. 815 8th St., Chipley. CH&A, large lot, fruit trees. For rent or sale. Sale price reduced. 850-547-2091, 850-481-5352. House For Rent. Older House in Dogwood Lakes, fenced yard, on 8th fairway of golf course, 3BR/2BA Partiality furnished, 2733 Muir Lane. Available 3/1, $575/MO first and last 850-9565044. House for Rent near Downtown Chipley. 2BR/1BA. $550/MO. Call 850-849-1735. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO and up. Includes Garbage, sewage, and lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 2BR/1BAMobile Homes W/G included. $400 plus Deposit. 547-4232, 850-527-4911. 2BR/2BAMobile Homes W/G included. $425 plus Deposit. 547-4232, 850-527-4911. 3/2 doublewide $575/MO, 3/1.5 singlewide $425/MO, water included, section 8 accepted Chipley city limits. 850-260-9795 FOR RENT Nice mobile home excellent location in Chipley. No Pets. 850-638-4640 HUNTING LAND for rent or lease, 1 year or 5 years, 160 acres or 300 acres. For more information call (850)638-1911 or (850)326-0044. Mobile Home For Rent 3BR/2BA in Chipley Area $650 Very private w/Big Back Yard. NO PETS. Leave # for return Call 850-258-1594. Mobile Homes For Rent 2 and 3 Bedrooms in Cottondale, Central Heat and Air. $400 -$500 a month. 850-258-1594. Newly Renovated 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Call (850)547-3746. New Log Home* on 10+ acres only $89,900 3 Bed, 2 bath log home w direct river access. Convenient to downtown Jacksonville. Excellent financing. Call now 877-525-3033, x.19 *Constructed weather-tight log home shell. EHO Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 850-326-9109. Spectacular Blue Ridge Mtn View. 1+ Acre -only $14,900! Gorgeous corner parcel in prime No. Georgia location w/ spectacular Blue Ridge Mountain view. Next to U.S. National Forest. Paved roads, municipal water & underground power. Mild restrictions, RV friendly. Call & ask about our FREE overnight stay with tour. Excellent low rate financing. Call now 1866-952-5303, Ext. 169 Mobile Homes with acreage. Ready to move in. Seller Financing (subject to credit approval). Lots of room for the price, 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850308-6473 VMFhomes .com Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414



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50¢ www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM IN BRIEF imes imes imes T dvertiser imes imes imes imes T T dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser A HOLMES COUNTY H olmes C oun t y F arm Bur eau Suppor ts and salut es Holmes C oun t y B ethlehem, P onc e de L eon and P oplar Spr ings FF A Chapt ers and their ac c omplishmen ts in ag r icultur al educa tion F or mor e inf or ma tion go t o w w w .a.or g or call 638-1756 NA TIONAL FF A WEEK F ebr uar y 15-22, 2014 HCHS FBLA students advance to compete in State | B3 Wednesday, FEBRUARY 19 2014 Volume 123, Number 45 Healthy cooking demonstration classes BONIFAY — Free monthly healthy cooking demonstration classes are sponsored by the Holmes County Health Department and University of Florida/ IFAS Extension. The classes are at noon at the Holmes County Agriculture Center, 1173 E. U.S. 90, on the following dates: Feb. 19, March 19, April 23, May 21 and June 18. The classes will offer healthy cooking tips and alternatives for everyday meals, and food samples will be served. No registration is required. Extension programs are open to everyone. For persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations, contact the extension of ce, 5471108 (TDD, via Florida Relay Service, 1-800955-8771), at least ve working days before the class. For more information, call Leann Jones at 5478500, ext. 240. Community health walk BONIFAY — In celebration of 125 years of Florida Public Health, the Holmes County Health Department is sponsoring a community health walk from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 20. The walk will be hosted by and located at Doctor’s Memorial Hospital. The walk is open to the public, and all are encouraged to attend. There is no registration required; gift bags will be distributed to the rst 100 to attend, as well as door prizes. The walk also coincides with American Heart Month. INDEX Opinion ................................ A4 Sports .................................. A7 Extra .................................... B1 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ....................... B5-B6 Classi eds ....................... B7-B8 Phone: 850-547-9414 Website: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY — What would you do to save someone you love? This is the question that led young author Brittany Hawes through a series of ideas that would bloom to be her rst novel. Hawes is a 20-year old Chipola College student and a 2012 graduate of Vernon High School who recently had her rst novel, “Twisted,” published by Deep Sea Publishing in Herndon, Va. Having her book published by Deep Sea Publishing was part of Hawkins’ prize as the winner of the company’s 2013 Young Author Contest. Young author publishes rst novel BRITTANY HAWES By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY — Attorney Brandon Young once again came before the Bonifay City Council during its Feb. 10 meeting as legal representative of a subdivision for which efforts are being made to develop on Grif th Circle in Bonifay. “During the last meeting, you requested all of the appropriate signatures in order to carry this through,” Young said. “I am here with those signatures.” Council member Richard Woodham said he didn’t agree with the city taking in the subdivision until the road was repaired. “I’d like to see that road xed before we take it because then it becomes a liability,” Woodham said. Young said construction trucks employed by the city for road repairs and repaving caused the recent damage to the main road through the subdivision. “Ironically, no one should have been on that property to begin with because it is private property,” Young said. After lengthy discussion, council members agreed to have a meeting with their contractor to discuss how repairs can be made, and the matter be tabled until the next council meeting. Tony Syfrett of Southeastern Surveying and Mapping Corporation came before the council during its Nov. 25 meeting with designs for a subdivision on Grif th Circle off State Road 79 in Bonifay, stating he was informed the subdivision was approved of in 2008. Grant Writer Bob Jones advised Syfrett the council needed clari cation of what was approved in 2008 before it could approve anything and move on. After Grif th subdivision tabled again Staff Report BONIFAY — A Holmes County re ghter is said to be “recovering well” after sustaining an injury while on the scene of a re at the Economy Lodge in Bonifay on Feb. 14. “He is doing well and is expected to fully recover,” said Travis Cook, assistant re chief for the Holmes County Fire Department. “It was a knee injury, and there seems to be no long-term damage.” The re ghter, who was not identi ed, suffered the injury on the roof during re suppression and was taken to a local hospital by Holmes County EMS where he was treated and released. The Holmes County Fire Department responded to a re at the Economy Lodge around 1:41 a.m. Staff Report The Holmes County Sheriff’s Ofce has located Casey Jean Anderson, a 27-year-old Ponce de Leon who was reported missing by his mother from their home on the evening of Feb. 16. Earlier that evening, the sheriff’s of ce received a call of a suspicious person in the area of Simmons Lane, south of Ponce de Leon. The caller reported the subject was knocking on their door asking for water and matched Anderson’s description. Anderson was located the morning of Tuesday, Feb. 18, after deputies spent two nights searching in a densely wooded area. He was transported for treatment by Holmes County EMS. Anderson reportedly was suffering from a brain injury and had not been taking his medication. Holmes County Sheriff Tim Brown would like to thank the Walton County Sheriff’s Of ce, the Bay County Sheriff’s Of ce and the Florida Department of Corrections K-9 teams from Holmes and Walton C.I. for their assistance. Missing PDL man found CATHRINE LAMB | Times-Advertiser The Holmes/Washington County Relay for Life committee met on Feb. 17 and had a special Valentine for local cancer survivors. Committee members gave survivors candy and Valentine’s Day cards, made by local elementary school students, as a symbol of celebration. BONIFAY CITY COUNCIL See FIREFIGHTER A2 CASEY ANDERSON See BONIFAY A2 See AUTHOR A2 Fire ghter recovering after injury RELAY FOR LIFE HAS A HEART FOR SURVIVORS SPECIAL TO TIMES-ADVERTISER Members of the Holmes County Fire Department battled the blaze at the Economy Lodge last Friday, Feb. 14. Staff Report The Tallahassee Police Department Special Victims Unit is asking for help from residents in the Washington County area in a continued effort to locate Michael McNamara, a 17-yearold missing person. McNamara was last seen Jan. 13, in the area of Roberts Avenue in Tallahassee. McNamara is about 5 feet 8 inches tall and weighs about 150 pounds. McNamara might also use the name “Michael Lopez.” TPD has reason to believe McNamara is in the Chipley area. Anyone with information about McNamara’s whereabouts is asked to call the Tallahassee Police Department at 606-5800, the Chipley Police Department at 638-6310, or the Washingotn County Sheriff’s Of ce at 638-6111 TPD search for missing teen MICHAEL MCNAMARA

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Local A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, February 19, 2014 “I’m a Chipola sopho more with one more year to compete my associate’s degree in communication,” Hawes said. “I love to read, and that is why I wrote my own story. I got the idea when I was writing, and I thought, ‘What would you do to save someone you love?’” Hawes then spun a tale about a homeless orphan living on Skid Row after her parents mysteriously vanished when she was 8 years old, leaving her to care for herself. The ad venture begins when she dedicates to spend her ev ery waking moment in the pursuit to nd her missing parents. She soon nds answers that only lead to more questions as the story develops into a spy novel. Hawes said her inspira tion came from author Meg Cabot, who writes romance and paranormal ction. “Her personality can be found in her books, and I like how you are able to resonate with the charac ters,” she said. “Family was also a big inspiration. I wondered what I would do to get them back.” Hawes plans to transfer to Florida State Univer sity to continue her com munication degree and to make “Twisted” the rst in a trilogy. Her book is now avail able in paperback and ebook format on Amazon. com. For more information on “Twisted,” visit www. brittanyhawes.com. much discussion, council members decided to table the issue until it could be reviewed further. Young said though the preliminary plot was ap proved in 2008 and con struction had started and roads paved, the company that initiated the project fell apart because of the econo my, and the project “fell by the wayside.” “Everything was done to state standards,” Young said. “The roads were at Department of Transpor tation standards; there’s a holding pond, the water lines have been pressure tested, and there are no lots less than half an acre, just in case they want sep tic there.” In other actions taken, the council approved a measure for Charles Smith to return the deed to an al leyway near his house back to the city. City Attorney Lucas Taylor said the Bonifay City Council deeded Smith with an alleyway near his prop erty in 1994, but for reasons unknown, Smith was never given the deed. “Smith then came before the present council request ing a quitclaim deed, and the council only approved because they thought they were correcting a past mistake done by the coun cil,” Taylor said. “What the council didn’t know is that Mr. Smith had been in nego tiations with another land owner. Smith came after the deal based on what he brought before in the ’90s, and we have a policy not to deed alleyways.” Taylor said the informa tion he brought in was a Department of Transpor tation map showing the al leyway as 24 feet, which city of Bonifay adjusted from 20 feet to 24 feet on the deed, but it encroached into his neighbor’s property and delayed his neighbor from selling the property. Taylor said after much research into the city’s al leyway, he found that all other alleyways are exactly 20 feet and concluded that the DOT made an error. “The city can’t do any thing except make the cor rection back to 20 feet,” Taylor said. “This has be come a private matter, and both parties need to survey their land. In taking back the alleyway deed, you are both basically back where you initially began.” The next regularly scheduled meeting of the Bonifay City Council is 6 p.m. Feb. 24. ˆ qz Z n hƒ s } p s ˆ qz n% FIND US in P rin t O nline and on the R oad! b onifa yno w .c om W e a re all things L o c al! #" # # 13 W eeks 26 W eeks 52 W eeks $13.33 $19.90 $32.00 I t ’s e asy t o subscrib e – C all 866-747-5050 or send full pa ymen t and f or m belo w *P lease call f or out ofc oun t y r a t es G et the bes t sour c e f or local ne w s in t er ests and e v en ts in Holmes C oun t y deliv er ed t o y ou e v er y W ednesda y Return f orm t o: HC T 112 E V ir ginia A v e B onifa y FL 32425 Y es! Si gn me up f or an inc oun t y subscription t o the H olmes C oun t y T imesA dv er tiser* 13 W eeks – $13.33 26 W eeks – $19.90 52 W eeks – $32.00 Name ________________________________________________________________ P hone _______________________________________________________________ D eliv er y A ddr ess _______________________________________________________ Ci t y ___________________________________ S t a te ____ Zip _________________ P a ymen t enclosed $____________ Sig na tur e _______________________________ Char ge m y cr edit/debit car d __V isa __M ast erC ar d __ A m Ex __ Disc o v er C r edit C ar d # __________________________________________ Exp Da t e _______ BONIFAY from page A1 AUTHOR from page A1 FIREFIGHTER from page A1 Command was estab lished by Deputy Chief L. Cook, and Bonifay FireRescue began an aggres sive interior attack on the re, beginning in room 342, when the re began. Boni fay Police evacuated the rooms before Fire-Rescue arrival. The re quickly breached the attic space and spread through the attic above, eight rooms to the north of the origin. At 2:20 am, Incident Command requested mu tual aid from Chipley Fire Department and Gritney Fire Department. Both de partments responded and assisted Bonifay Fire-Res cue in containing the re. The re was 90 percent contained at 3:03 a.m., and all re units cleared the scene by 7:15 am. No motel patrons were injured, and the cause of the re is currently under investigation by the Ofce of the State Fire Marshall. Chief Shay McCormick extends his thanks to Chipley Fire Department and Gritney Fire Depart ment for their response and hard work in assist ing Bonifay Fire-Rescue in extinguishing this re, as well as the Bonifay Po lice Department, Holmes County Sheriff’s Ofce and Holmes County EMS for their response and assistance. The re began in room 342 and quickly spread throughout. PHOTOS Sp P ECIAL TO TT IMES-A A DVERTISER A Bonifay reghter was injured while performing re suppression on the motel’s roof. FWC nal report: Speed, inattention blamed in boating deaths By TOM McLAUGHLIN 315-4435 | @TomMnwfdn tmclaughlin@nwfdailynews.com N ICEVILLEICEVILLE — Former Bay High School basketball coach Robert Williams was an experienced driver “es pecially knowledgeable in boating at night,” and yet he likely was operating the vessel that ran into a MidBay Bridge piling, killing three people. “Excessive speed” and “operator inattention” are blamed in the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s (FWC) nal report on the accident that killed Williams and two young women riding with him in his 2014 336 Cobalt boat early Dec. 6. “The paint transfer on the bridge shows that the boat may have almost hit the piling head on. It is pos sible the operator may have made an evasive maneuver at the last moment,” the re port states. Bruising that Williams sustained in the collision with the Mid-Bay Bridge appeared to indicate he was driving the boat when it hit the piling, the report states. It said visibility at the time of the accident should have been 6 to 9 miles. “The damage of the boat indicates the vessel was traveling at a high rate of speed, but that speed is not known,” the investiga tive report states. “It is un known why Mr. Williams did not see the bridge piling.” Efforts to determine the boat’s exact speed when it hit the bridge were unsuc cessful, FWC investigators said. Williams, 47, died in the accident along with Taylor Evanoff, 18, and Jamilia Beltz, 21. All three were intoxicated at the time of the boat wreck, the report states. An autopsy found all three victims drowned. The FWC investigative report also reconstructed better the timing of the boat trip Williams and the two women embarked upon. Ofcers obtained sur veillance video that showed Williams, Beltz and Evanoff arriving in Williams’ Cadil lac Escalade at the Leg endary Marine location in Destin at about 8:45 p.m. Dec. 5 and leaving by boat at 9 p.m., the report said. “Williams and his pas sengers arrived at the Legendary Marine in Fort Walton Beach at an unde termined time” after that, it said. “At or around midnight” a cab driver dropped the three back off at the Fort Walton Beach marina, the report states. “This is pos sibly the last time anyone had seen any of the three alive.” There are no known wit nesses to the crash, the re port states. FILE pP HOTO Searchers scour Choctawhatchee Bay near the Mid-Bay Bridge in early December after a boat collided with the bridge, killing three people.

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 Wednesday, February 19, 2014 F R E E T O H O L M E S C O U N T Y R E SI D E N TS O N L Y H o u s e h old H a z a r d ou s W a st e A m n es t y D a y M a r c h 1 2 0 1 4 8 : 0 0 a m t o 1 2 : 0 0 p m A t H o l m e s C o u n t y R e c y c l i n g C e n t e r ( 5 3 3 0 $ 1 5 3 0 5 3 + 4 4 1 C on d i t i on a l l y E x e m p t Sm a l l Q u a nt i t y G e n e r a t or s ( Sm a l l 3 $ + 2 4 $ $ + ) % 3 4 4 + + * R e d u c e d R a t e 4 4 1 + 2 4 3 5 # & # % % & '% % & ' & . '# # # # # , # , # -' & ( ' ' + ' '# ' , + / % # / / + $ + # # & # ( # / / / ' . $' # % % & / # & # % & % ' $ # & % # ' % By MATTHEW BEATON 522-5114 | @matthewbeaton mbeaton@pcnh.com TALLAHASSEE — A state House panel was all about beer Feb. 11, advancing three malt bev erage-related bills, including a measure to allow sales of 64ounce “growlers.” Among the three bills, an overarching committee bill would address several factors, including safety, tastings and growler sales. The bill would explicitly dene a growler as a 32-ounce, 64-ounce, 128-ounce, 1-liter or 2-liter container made to “hold malt beverages.” The 64-ounce size is stan dard for growlers, according to a staff analysis of the bill. The brewers have pushed for legal ization of the larger size since last year. The bill also would allow beer manufacturers to run a tap room and sell beer to patrons without a vendor’s li cense. The beer could be sold for onand off-premise con sumption. Phone or mail or ders would not be allowed. The manufacturer would brew the beer sold in the tap room on site or ship it in from another brewery it owns. At least 70 percent of tap room sales a year would need to be brewed on site. Off-premise consump tion sales would be limited to growlers and other authorized containers. The bill also would allow manufacturers and distribut ers to hold on-premise beer tastings. Brewers largely support the bill but want some minor adjustments. “We’re very much in favor of the work you’re doing,” said Craig Birkmaier, vice presi dent of Florida Brewers Guild. “Obviously, we have positions and would like to work with you to tweak the bill to meet all of those.” The bill was opposed by an anti-drug and alcohol group. State Rep. Darryl Rouson noted both retailers and brew ers still had concerns about the legislation. And even though the bill sailed through the Business & Professional Regulation Subcommittee, the Democratic ranking member from St. Petersburg indicated his caucus might have prob lems with it down the road. The bill “impacts not just the distributors and the brew ers, but also has impact on the consumer, who I think at the end of the day is the most im portant person that we need to be concerned about,” Rou son said. Chairman Debbie May eld, R-Vero Beach, pointed out a growler bill was led last year, which the committee did not take up. She said it would have affected more than just growlers, affecting the state’s three-tier system for beer sales — manufacturers with vendor’s licenses, tap rooms attached to a manufacturers’ premises and brew pubs that sell beer brewed on site. Mayeld said the bill was “very difcult” to craft and draws a “very ne line.” “We were coming from the standpoint of trying to protect the three-tiered system — at the same time of allowing an industry to grow,” she said. The committee also passed a bill (HB 387), which would put more precise language on in-store tastings. The third bill the commit tee approved would let beer be sold in any size — includ ing any size growler — at re tail stores in the state. 3 beer bills advance in House By C a A R o O L Kent ENT 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT ckent@chipleypaper.com “We’ve gotten too far away from the Lord and the land. When you don’t own land, you don’t ap preciate what it takes to put food on the table.” That belief is what led to Dr. Bruce Christmas Sr.’s dedication to educating future generations about the importance of agricul ture and the role it plays in the economy, a life mission that re cently earned the Jackson County native a spot in the Florida Agri cultural Hall of Fame. As an agent with the University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Christmas is respected for his research in poultry science. But it’s his work to promote agri culture as a whole and educate children about its value for which the genial fth-generation farmer is perhaps best known. His mes sage emphasizes the importance of American agriculture as the safest, least expensive food sup ply in the world and its connection to “everything we have and do as Americans.” Christmas spent seven years in Orange County as an extension agent, where he helped develop and run urban 4-H clubs. “A lot of folks asked why I both ered,” Christmas said. “They said, ‘Those city kids will never be farm ers.’ I told them I wasn’t trying to make them farmers; I was trying to teach them the value of agricul ture and how it impacts their lives. These kids would be consumers one day, and they needed to un derstand and appreciate where their food came from.” Christmas moved to Wash ington County in 1969, where he worked at Chipley’s Poultry Eval uation Center. His eld research soon became widely published, helping earn him the Harms Publication Award for best poul try publication in 1983. He’s also been recognized by many orga nizations for his leadership and volunteer service to youth, hav ing given more than 16,000 hours of volunteer service and traveled over 65,000 non-reimbursed miles to tell the story of agriculture. He was inducted into the Flor ida 4-H Hall of Fame, has served on the UF College of Agriculture and Life Science board for many years and was previously chosen “National Volunteer of the Year” for the National Agriculture Alum ni and Development Association. Over the course of 20 years, more than 5,000 Washington Coun ty youth, teachers and parents have participated in eld days, Ag in the Classroom and Youth Fair events and activities in which Christmas was an integral part of planning, funding and teaching. Washington County 4-H youth development agent Julie Pigott Dillard, who helped nominate Christmas for his most recent honor, was among those students. “I visited the ‘egg-laying con test’ on school eld trips and was later coached as an FFA member on a state winning poultry team by (Christmas),” Dillard said. “His honors and awards speak for themselves, but it’s my obliga tion to speak on his dedication, love and respect for agriculture. You are likely to never meet some one so passionate for agriculture as Dr. Christmas.” “Throughout his life, he has been an outspoken advocate for the national and state food sys tems as safe, wholesome and the best value for the dollar,” she adds. “He is a tireless advocate for the rights of farmers and ranch ers and is always willing to speak on their behalf. Although he is of cially retired, he will never retire from his position as agricultural advocate.” H. Fred Dietrich, also men tored by Christmas, took part in his nomination for the hall of fame honor as well. “It was his example that en couraged me to go into agricultur al youth work as a career and to be in leadership of many agricul tural professional organizations,” Dietrich said. Dr. Christmas has been mar ried for more than 50 years to Ad die Ann, and they have four sons: Stuart, Bruce, Jr., Jonathan and Scott. He’s an active member of First Baptist Church of Chipley, Chipley Kiwanis and president of the Washington County Farm Bu reau, where he continues to give time to those who need him. Still, ensuring the success of agricul ture here remains his passion. “Agriculture allows us to have the standard of living that we do,” Christmas said. “We eat cheaper (in the United States) than any other country on Earth. Agricul ture is the backbone of our econ omy, and it’s a foundation we can count on.” Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam and the Florida Agricultural Hall of Fame Founda tion made the announcement to induct Christmas and three other honorees into the 2014 Florida Ag riculture Hall of Fame at the Flori da State Fair in Tampa on Feb. 11. “These individuals have made incredible contributions to agri culture in our state and beyond,” Putnam said. “The changes and improvements they have made will help ensure the strength of Florida’s $100 billion agriculture for generations to come.” sS P e E CIal AL tT O T he HE TIMes ES -ADVe E R t T I se SE R Dr. Bruce Christmas Sr., right, was nominated in part by Washington County 4-H youth development agent Julie Pigott Dillard. Christmas inducted into Florida Agricultural Hall of Fame

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O PINION A Page 4 Section The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $13.30; 26-weeks: $19.90; 52 weeks: $32.00 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $17.70; 26 weeks: 26.50; 52 weeks: $43.00 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Carol Kent, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@ bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION clamb @chipleypaper.com 850-638-0212 Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 ADVERTISING Stephanie Smith: ssmith@ chipleypaper. com 850-547-9414 www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, February 19, 2014 Agri-tourism is a term I’ve been hearing for several years now, and I believe we have been somewhat involved in it from the beginning in 1987 at our blueberry business on Hwy 79. We are interested in capitalizing on our ideal location as much as possible. For that reason, when we were informed about a workshop in Quincy last week, I quickly made reservations for our son Glen, Jack and myself to attend. Our Extension agent, Shep Eubanks, Julia Bullington, Holmes County Chamber of Commerce Director, Mark and Carla Templeton of The Silver Door art studio all attended from Holmes County. Julia is on the Board of Directors for River Way South who sponsored the event. I learned much at the workshop, a new word, for one thing. Riparian. That is a term describing a geographic area whose boundary is a moving body of water. River Way South Apalachicola Choctawhatchee or RWSAC is counterpart to a parent organization started earlier to represent the interests of the Georgia, Alabama and Florida watershed. But RWSAC represents the interests of the riparian counties of Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Liberty, and Washington. Since Florida is a tourist state, we believe that tourists are missing some of this area’s rich agricultural, cultural, historical, maritime, and nature based resources. Much of these resources are located in the rural areas: thus, agri-tourism is born. The leader of the workshop we attended at the U of F Research Center in Quincy was International Agri-tourism Specialist Jane Eckert who knows about the subject from personal experience. She is a sixth generation farmer’s daughter whose family operates an apple farm which has evolved over the years into an agri-tourist attraction that hosts 400,000 guests annually. She has a degree in business administration and left the family farm to work in agri-marketing for 15 years. Returning to the farm she guided the expansion into agri-tourism. She now operates an Agricultural Marketing Company. She is an approved speaker and consultant by Florida Department of Economic Development and the USDA. She has earned many honors including Hall of Fame by The Direct Marketing Association. Some notes from her workshop: People visit farm destinations for the scenery, to visit family and friends, participate in farm activities, and to buy products. The visitor wants things to see, things to do, things to buy, and things to taste. Eckert recommends starting with a commodity; adding value; deliver a service; provide an experience. To get started, she says “Evaluate your family’s commitment, evaluate the physical assets of your property, determine your nancial comfort level, and target your customers.” Then she gave recommendations for expanding what you sell; services and activities you might offer; special events you might host. She emphasized that trained and friendly staff is crucial. She stressed that we are in the hospitality business! A portion of the workshop dealt with legal aspects of an on the farm enterprise. The Florida Legislature has passed legislation favorable to agri-tourism (570.96 and sub sections.) However each operator must be aware of possible risks and protect himself from liability. She highly recommends having a web site to keep the consumer aware of your business. Our experience over 25 plus years in limited agri-tourism has been most pleasant. We hope to continue and expand our services through this medium. We encourage others in our area to develop your opportunity. A trail of tours will be established in the future by the RWSAC and you may join the organization. Of cers are Pres. Homer Hirt, Lake Seminole, Vice President Betty Webb Apalachicola, Secretary John Thornton West Florida Electric Cooperative, and Treasurer Heather Lopez Washington County. The web site is www.rws .org. Not only was the information gained at this workshop, the networking with other entrepreneurs and information gained from them was invaluable. Not fooled by Southerland’s deceptiveness Dear Editor, As the polls show, and as many of you are aware, there is a growing disdain for our politicians in Washington. The 2013 Congress was dubbed the “Do Nothing” Congress. Their partisanship and obstructionism is sti ing our country and the wellbeing of our citizens. Our congressman is no exception. Congressman Steve Southerland voted with his extreme “Tea Party” colleagues to shut down the government last October, which cost the American taxpayers $24 billion. That money would have gone a long way toward feeding the poor. Then he voted with the same colleagues to keep the government shut down and not pay the bills he and the rest of Congress appropriated to begin with, all because he opposed Obamacare. He has not put forth an alternative to Obamacare, and when he signed up for it he took advantage of a federal subsidy provided by the taxpayers in order to lower his premiums, even though he says his $174,000 congressional salary is “not so much.” Southerland voted for the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 because the Republican leadership convinced most House Republicans to do so, to avoid another embarrassing shutdown. He is now against what he voted for, and is twisting it around to get votes from Tyndall Air Force Base. Within days after his vote he said, “With two years remaining before these COLA changes are due to take effect, I am hopeful the House will address the concerns of our retirees between now and then.” We did not send Southerland to Washington to be “hopeful” of what the House will do between “now and then,” we sent him there to be a leader and do what is right for us now. If he is so concerned about the COLA cuts, he should never have voted for the budget to begin with. In a News Herald article, Southerland stated, “I voted against sequestration in 2011 because I knew it was wrong for North and Northwest Florida’s military.” Actually, he voted against a compromise bill that would lead to sequestration if Congress could not pass a budget. Sequestration was supposed to be so terrible it would force both parties to come together and pass a budget in the future. The compromise, as bad as it was, temporally funded the government and prevented a government shutdown. If all congressmen had voted against the compromise bill, like Southerland did, it would have led to another shutdown. Southerland attached an amendment to the Farm Bill cutting food stamps by $39 billion, which caused the much-needed bill our farmers depend on to fail for the rst time ever. Ironically, Southerland stated in his Christmas address, ”Dear Friend, as we gather with our loved ones and re ect upon our personal blessings this Christmas holiday season, let us be mindful of those who are less fortunate.” Yet he is determined to make harsh slashes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. Is taking food away from 47 million poor people being mindful of those who are less fortunate? Southerland has fought against widely successful commercial shing programs since taking of ce in 2010, but a member of his staff told a commercial sherman last December at a shing meeting in Tampa that Southerland changed his mind and is now willing to work with commercial shermen. Is this because he is running against a formidable opponent for his house seat this November? It may be too late for him to garner support from commercial shermen since, through a grassroots effort, commercial shermen from Key West to Brownsville, Texas, who are not even in Southerland’s district, have donated much more to his opponent, Mrs. Gwen Graham, than he has received from his dark-money billionaire contributors. As one of those shermen, I am not fooled by Southerland’s deceptiveness, and I hope this letter sheds some light on his hypocrisy. Instead of a congressman who does photo ops and makes statements for personal political ambitions, we need a leader in Congress who will truly reach across the aisle and work with both parties and independents, not just for the bene t of our district, but for the sake of our country. That person is Mrs. Gwen Graham. Jim Clements Carrabelle Letter to the EDITOR Doctor Clinton Frederick (Fred) Lavender died, after a brief illness, on Nov. 5, 2013, in Panama City at the age of 91. Dr. Lavender was stricken while visiting his devoted wife, Jeanne Lavender, who was a patient in the hospital at the time. Dr. Lavender made his home in Chipley at 782 Third Street since his marriage to Jeanne Welin on Aug. 21, 1993. Their meeting and marriage presents a most interesting story. Jeanne came to make her home in Chipley in 1990 after retiring from her AT&T job in Bernardsville, N.J., her home state. This lady had come to know telephone employee, Ann Davis, a fellow telephone company employee, upon her transferring to New Jersey on her job. This was soon after the unfortunate death of son, Mark Davis, who was a student at West Point when stricken with a fatal disease. The friendship developed with Ann Davis and husband, Albert (Sonny) Davis, resulting in Jeanne purchasing a home in the Historic District of Chipley and moving here. Jeanne quickly became involved in church, civic, fraternal and other professional organizations, soon becoming fully immersed in the activities of her adopted home. After becoming established in Chipley, she attended a session of Elderhostel training in Feb. 1993 in Columbus, Ga. While there, she met Dr. Fred Lavender who was also an active member and participant in Elderhostel, Inc., the not-for-pro t world leader in lifelong learning since 1975. Jeanne described the purpose of the organizations as: “A continuing education program designed for those age 50 years and older to participate.” This lady learned that her new found friend was born in Mans eld, Ohio on Aug. 19, 1922, to a horse and buggy doctor’s family and that his wife, Mary Ann Lavender, had died recently and he was a father and grandfather of loving children. The friendship soon blossomed into a courtship and plans were soon made to have a private wedding at Holmes Creek Baptist Church with a mammoth reception held afterwards on the spacious yard at Jeanne’s Third Street Home. The couple honored your writer by requesting that I arrange for a bluegrass musical group to perform traditional music for the celebration. Addison and Ann Prescott were to cater a full lunch sitdown meal, serving soul foods prepared from vegetables grown in their garden. Marshall Smith, his wife, Linda and their daughter, Sophie, members of the bluegrass ensemble, “Up The Creek” from Panama City, did a beautiful rendition of appropriate songs for the event. Later, a second reception was held in Fred’s home state of Ohio where a oating vessel provided a two hour cruise, entertaining a host of the grooms friends, family and associates. Jeanne had already learned that her husband-to-be started his volunteering in his childhood, achieving Eagle Scout. He played in a dance band during high school, and met Frank Sinatra and Tommy Dorsey. During school, he achieved honors including Phi Beta Kappa for undergraduate and medical school recognition. Also revealed was that Dr. Lavender served in the U.S. Army’s Occupation of Germany, achieving the rank of Captain. The new bride could not have been surprised when the doctor continued to volunteer for the Literacy and Library programs for children and adults in Florida as he had done in Ohio. His involvement in Music, Arts and the annual Cleveland Orchestra Concert Series in Sandusky Ohio were carried over to the Spanish Trail Playhouse in Chipley and similar programs at Chipola College. His support of environmental issues, local and state park docent and manual labor were performed in both Ohio and Florida. Other volunteer services were in Child advocacy, academics, legal, including expansion of Firelands Campus of Bowling Green State University, Guardian ad Litem in Ohio and Florida, foster kids in Ohio and Take Stock in Children in Florida. He was a medical volunteer-mental health, Indian Reservations (spent vacation time there with family), polio vaccine campaign and hospital boards expanding services. As the wife of Dr. Fred Lavender, Jeanne stood by his side, supported and participated with him in many of these volunteer efforts. Dr. Lavender’s daily walk to the post of ce from his South Third Street allowed him to become acquainted with townspeople who observed his friendliness, gentle and sincere temperament and immediately regarded him as a friend. Dr. Fred Lavender and wife, Jeanne, were members of the Washington County Chamber of Commerce and were faithful to attend monthly First Thursday meetings. Dr. Jerry Kandzer, retired President of Chipola College, who gave the eulogy at Dr. Lavender’s memorial service, outlined the laundry list of volunteer activities of Dr. Lavender. The memorial service, held at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church of Chipley on Nov. 30, 2013, was presided over by Rev. Ward S. Clarke Jr., Vicar. Dr. Fred Lavender is the loving husband of Jeanne Lavender, devoted father of Jane/Bob, Mary/Milton and Patricia. His daughter, Anne, is deceased. He is also survived by his adored grandchildren, Anne and Beth/James, Emma, Clark/ Shanna and Nathan and great granddaughter, Madeline, and by his protg, Maya. Although Dr. Fred Lavander called Chipley, Florida his home for only the last 20 years of life, he established a name for himself as one ready to give his very best as a volunteer for any honorable and worthwhile community service. His life story would de nitely qualify for a special segment of the Heritage of Washington Book, “A Washington County Favorite Son–-by choice!” The Prattler regrets that his story was not prepared for that popular publication. Hester and I count it a privilege to have known Dr. Fred Lavender and his wonderful wife, Jeanne. Our thoughts, love and prayers go out to Jeanne and family members in their loss. See you all next week. ‘Fred’ Lavender was a friend to all mankind PERRY’S PRATTLE Perry Wells Workshop with internationally known Jane Eckert very informative HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 Wednesday, February 19, 2014 FEB. 12 Douglas Danley Alford, Jr., Carrying concealed rearm, possession of rearm with altered or removed serial number; nolle prosequi eld, case status set to closed Matthew Olin Bryan, aggravated battery on law enforcement ofcer, possession of rearm or weapon by convicted felon, ee and elude at high speed; attorney present for defendant, case continued to March 12, 2014 for motion hearing, notice given Dale Anthony Castro, sexual battery upon a child under 12; defendant present with attorney, withdrew motion to suppress, withdrew previous plea of not guilty, plea accepted by court, pled no contest as charged, stipulated to a factual basis, adjudicated guilty, 10 years department of corrections with credit for 397 days served, $1420 + $503.00 ne, civil judgment ordered for monetary obligations, states motion for order concerning disclosure and proposed order, defendant designated a sexual predator under Florida Statute 775.21 and advised o registration and reporting requirements, defendant advised that he is subject to the Jessica Lunsford and Jimmy Rice Acts, notice of intent to rely on child hearsay, trial set for February 24, 2014 Clayton Kyle Clemmons, armed robbery with rearm or deadly weapon, resist arrest without violence; defendant present with attorney, motion to suppress withdrawn, plea accepted by the court previous plea of not guilty withdrawn, plead no contest to amend count 1 charge of robbery with no rearm and count 2 as charged, sentencing scheduled for March 12, 204, notice given Zackual Wayne Clemmons, sale or delivery of a controlled substance; defendant present without attorney, motion to terminate probation heard, motion granted by the court, case status set to closed Christopher Dwight Ford, Carrying concealed rearm, assault; defendant present with attorney, case continued to March 19, 2014, notice given Melissa Diane Freeman, possession of controlled substance; defendant present with attorney, court was advised that defendant was not accepted into the Keeton Program, court ordered that the original sentence would stand and defendant would have to nd another inpatient drug treatment program, case status set to closed Olita Lynn Goodwin, grand theft of dwelling, conspiracy to commit grand theft; defendant present with attorney, court announced that the sentence for count one will remain the same but Re-sentenced defendant on count 2 as follows; adjudicated guilty, 67 days in the Holmes County Jail with credit for 67 days served, $125 ne reduced to civil judgment, case status set to closed Irene Elizabeth Harris, neglect of child, contribute to delinquency of minor, contribute to delinquency of minor, driving under the inuence third violation within 10 years; attorney present for defendant and requested clarication of imposition of the ignition interlock device requirement, court claried that the 2 year ignition interlock devise requirement would not go into effect until the defendant obtains a valid drivers license, case status set to closed Michael Anderson Harris, possession of cannabis more than 20 grams drug paraphernalia use or possess; attorney present, defendant referred to PTI, case continued to March 12, 2014 for tracking purposes, notice given Michael Shane Jackson, arson of occupied dwelling, possession or manufacture of re bomb, burglary of dwelling; defendant present without an attorney, case continued to March 19, 2014, notice given Clannie Davis Jennings II, possession of controlled substance; defendant present with attorney, defendant stated that he intended to hire a private attorney, court discharged public defender, evidentiary hearing continued to March 12, 2014, notice given Eric Cornelius Johnson, possession of controlled substance, drug paraphernalia use or possession; defendant present with attorney, withdrew previous plea of not guilty, pled no contest as charged, stipulated to factual basis, plea accepted by the court, count 1: adjudicated guilty, 24 months department of corrections with credit for 37 days served concurrent with present department of corrections sentence, $1520 ne, civil judgment ordered for monetary obligations, drivers license suspended for 2 years, count 2; court adjudicated guilty, 37 days Holmes County Jail with credit for 37 days severed, $125 ne, civil judgment ordered for monetary obligations Christopher Shawn Leis, possession of controlled substance; defendant present with attorney, stipulated to a factual basis, withdrew previous denial plea accepted by the court, admitted violation, $100 ne, community control revoked, adjudicated guilty 21 months department of corrections with credit for 96 days served, recommended housing at Bay corrections institute, request for furlough denied Charlie James Radford Jr., driving while license permanently revoked; defendant present with attorney, withdrew previous plea of not guilty, pled no contest as charged, stipulated to factual basis, sentencing scheduled for March 12, 2014, notice given Danny Ray Stevens Jr., manufacture of controlled substance; defendant present with attorney, defendant refused plea offer, evidentiary hearing remains set for March 12, 2014, demand for discovery Dalton Tyler Toole, cause cruel death pain and suffering to animals, eeing or attempting to elude police, cruelty to animals; defendant present with attorney, case continued to March 19, 2014, notice given Davis Mitchell Waddell, introduction of contraband into detention facility; defendants notice of cancelling depositions Katrina Dawn White, manufacture of controlled substance, possession of controlled substance, possession of listed chemicals, drug possession marijuana under 20 grams, drug paraphernalia use or possession, drug paraphernalia use or possession; defendant present, attorney not present, case set for March 5, 2014 for defendant to request services of public defender, notice given Trevor Tyler Gregory Yates, possession of cannabis more than 20 grams, drug paraphernalia use or possession, drug paraphernalia use or possession; defendant present with attorney, motion to reinstate bond heard, motion granted by court, bond set at original amount of $15,000, defendant surrendered by previous bondsman and must post a new bond, motion to withdraw as counsel heard, motion granted by court, court advised defendant that he does not qualify as indigent and must hire a private attorney, case continued to March 19, 2014, notice given ?H:<@^@] T[ X[T]^ : ^@ >:Q>@[* ) 0 % 022 3$02 /) 3) /$ ) ( /0 $( $ )) /0 ) /0 (2 2$ % 1 0( ) )'!2) '! + )" ) /0 % 1 02 2 '/$. ) 20* ) /) 022 ) ) $ /) $. ) $( /$( 20 /) 2$ 02 2 ( 1 ). $ (2) $. ) 3)(0' $2 /0 ) 0 )2* $( 2$( )$( /0 % 1 & $22 22 )) -/ $( 2)$ ) $3) $( $(( ) 2# $ $ $ $ ) ) $ $ $ $ ) & & $ $ & ) $ $ $ % ( ( # $ F lorida ’ s H ealth F inder C ost C omparison (w w w .oridahealthnder .go v) : 2012 I npa tien t C onditions & P r o c edur es B a y M edic al-S acr ed H ear t T he only hospital in Nor th w est* F lorida t o b e list ed among the 100 B est for C ar diac G ulf C oast M edic al C en t er F lorida A v er age V isits L o w est C har ges H ighest C har ges Readmit R a t e V isits L o w est C har ges H ighest C har ges Readmit R a t e L o w est C har ges H ighest C har ges A ngioplast y 726 $40,420 $55,477 as e xpec t ed 181 $95,258 $160,423 w orse than e xpec t ed $62,634 $110,306 C ar diac C a th 827 $21,122 $31,796 as e xpec t ed 202 $51,902 $77,132 as e xpec t ed $31,182 $60,991 C hest P ain 654 $5,974 $13,466 bett er than e xpec t ed 114 $18,626 $33,842 as e xpec t ed $13,277 $27,830 C or onar y B ypass 265 $63,859 $91,626 as e xpec t ed ser vic e not o er ed a t GCMC $120,055 $238,041 H ear t A ttack 120 $18,127 $30,573 as e xpec t ed 83 $42,661 $91,489 as e xpec t ed $24,426 $59,103 H ear t F ailur e 692 $9,505 $20,868 bett er than e xpec t ed 181 $26,993 $55,727 as e xpec t ed $18,069 $45,162 T he Bes t Hear t Care, at the Bes t Pr ices, it’s that Simple. 615 N. Bonita A v enue P anama City F L 324 01 (85 0) 7 6 9-1511 www.baymedical.or g Ba y Medical Sacred Heart Healthgr ades 2013 A nalysis Announce s the Opening of a Gene ral L aw Pra ctice Serving Holmes, Washington, J ackson & Walton C ounties R e a l E sta te Leas es Land l o rd/T enant B us i nes s Law Cri mi nal l aw A p p e a ls P ro b a te W i l l s & T rusts G u a rd ia n sh ip P ro b a te A d m in C o ns t r uct i on Law O v e r 2 3 Y e a r s E x p e r i e n c e M a r t i n d a l e H u b b l e R a t e d : TM % $ & # # ! & & # F o r m er C o u n t y J u d g e O ff ic e s a t: 2 0 4 N E t h e r i d g e S t r e e t Bo nif ay F l o r ida 324 25 ( 850) 6141052 475 H ar r is o n A v e nue P ana ma C i ty F l o r ida 324 01 ( 850) 2151800 mj h l aw @ wow wa y com The h i r i n g o f a l aw y er i s an i mpor t an t deci si on t h at s h ou l d n ot b e b as ed s o l el y o n ad verti se m ents. B ef o re yo u d ec i d e, a sk us to s end yo u f ree w ri t t en i nf o rma t i o n ab o ut o ur qua l i f i ca t i o ns a nd ex per i en ce. Attorney Michael J. Hauversburk Announces the Opening of a General Law Practice From Staff Reports One man is still at large in a connection with a Sunday burglary in Jackson County. At about 8:20 p.m., the Jackson County sheriff’s deputies were dispatched to Cliff Road, south of Gracev ille, in reference to a bur glary in progress. Upon arrival, the deputy discovered the property owner had a male and a fe male subject detained at gunpoint. The two suspects were detained until the in cident could be investigated further. During the investigation, it was discovered the prop erty owner had been the vic tim of a couple of burglaries, and a utility trailer had been stolen from the property the week before. The property owner and another male had concealed their vehicle in one of the barns on the property and hid in another barn in attempt to catch the thieves. Shortly after dark, a ve hicle pulled onto the prop erty and parked behind one of the barns. Two males ex ited the vehicle and entered the barn where the property owner was waiting but did not take anything. The two male suspects then went into the barn, where the property owner had hidden his vehi cle. At this point the proper ty owner and his friend con fronted the two males and attempted to hold them for law enforcement. One male complied, and the other ed on foot into the wood behind the barn. A female was also discovered acting as a look out for the males. The male and female that had been detained were placed under arrest. The male that ed on foot was tracked by the K-9 teams from Jackson C.I. and A.C.I. until his track was lost on the dirt road, where he most likely was picked up by a vehicle. Jeremy Trey Smith, 24 of Graceville, was charged with burglary of structure and possession of meth. Kimberly Diane Carr, 33 of Graceville, was charged with violation of proba tion on robbery in Houston County, Ala., and burglary of structure. Timothy Derrick Shiv er, 34, is still at large and is wanted for burglary of structure and warrants for violation of probation and failure to appear on trafc violations. JSCO arrests 2, on the lookout for 1 in Sunday burglary Holmes County co CO URT DocOC KET sS

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S er ving all of H olmes County S & H S anita tion, Ent R esidential Monthl y S er vice W ithout Can $18 W ith O ur Can $23 N o S tar t-up F ee W ith U s! FOR ALL Y O U R GARBA GE N EED S C ALL 547-1442 547-1591 C huck & T ammie (H oo v er) N e w some 3094 H oo v ers Mill R d ., Bonifa y W e als o t ak e c ar e of (850) 638-5885 V†‹ =…tƒ  [ ›t› ;t‹ t {  M ost V ehicles Up t o 5 qts syn thetic blend M ost V ehicles $ 19 95 O‚”” ;‡pw† ?¤| X|p Xp~|pŒ M ar ch 1, 2014 H olmes C ount y High S chool E n tr y F ee: $55.00 A dmission: $5 O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ O‚””;‡pw†?¤| X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ X|pXp~|pŒ ch 1, 2014 ar M y ount olmes C H chool High S ee: $55.00 y F tr n E dmission: $5 A F or mor e inf orma tion: C ontac t K r y stal C ook (850) 258-9569 O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| O‚””;‡pw†?¤| D y t _ y u y d Ti BONIF A Y ’ S DO WN HOME a nd Special to The Times-Advertiser Jackson Hospital, cel ebrating 75 years of com munity service proudly announces the grand opening of the Infusion Center. The Infusion Cen ter gives residents the opportunity to have their chemotherapy, antibiotic therapy, IV therapy, or blood transfusions locally performed. The center doubles the number of in fusion chairs from seven to 14. As a result of the larger treatment area, Jackson Hospital is now able to better serve the needs of the community. Patients now appreciate that each chair is now equipped with its own television. Dona tions from the community allowed Jackson Hospital to increase the capabil ity of the Infusion Center. This larger treatment area will enable the Hospital to better serve the needs of the community. The new Infusion Center is on the rst oor of the Hudnall Building. The community is in vited to celebrate the reno vation of this department and its medical outreach with its ribbon cutting at 5 p.m. Feb. 27. Attendees are also invited to tour the new area as well as join Hospital employees for re freshments. The Infusion Center project began No vember 2013 and reopened on Jan. 14, 2014. SPECIAL TO TT HE TT IMEs S A A DVERTIs S ER Emerald Coast Hospice honored its Outstanding Employee, Sharon Mayes, RN, and its Employee of the Year, Jessica Paul, Hospice Aide. Pictured left to right, Sharon Mayes, RN; Julie Pettis, executive director; Jessica Paul, hospice aide. EE MERALD CC OA sS T HH O sS PICE HONOR sS EMPLOYEE sS Jackson Hospital holds open house for Chemotherapy Infusion Center Special to The Times-AdvertiserMARIANNAMARIANNA — Former Chipola baseball players re turned to their alma mater for the annual Chipola Col lege Baseball Alumni Week end Feb. 7-8. The college ofcially re tired MLB All-Star Russell Martin’s number 12 Chipola jersey in a Feb. 8 ceremony. Martin hit a pair of solo home runs to lead his Pitts burgh Pirates to a 6-2 win over the Cincinnati Reds in a season-ending wild card game on Oct. 1, 2013, to lead the Pirates to their rst post-season appearance in 21 years. A native of Ontario, Can ada, Martin led Chipola to a second place nish in the 2002 Florida College Sys tem State tournament. He was drafted by the Dodgers in the 17th round that year. The three-time MLB All Star has won the Gold Glove and Silver Slugger Awards. He spent ve years in L.A. before moving on the Yan kees, where he was starting catcher in 2011-12. He was catching for the Yankees when Mariano Rivera broke the all-time save record in 2011. In November 2012, the Pittsburgh Pirates signed Martin for two years and $17 million. Mat Gamel, now a mem ber of the Atlanta Braves, was the winner of the an nual Alumni Home Run Derby. Jeff Mathis of the Mi ami Marlins, Jose Bautista of the Toronto Blue Jays, and former Chipola player, Charlie Dees captained teams for the derby. Visiting big-leaguers also donated thousands in memorabilia to support the Chipola program. Several return ing players participated in an MLB/MiLB autograph session. An Alumni Social was hosted by Jason and Kim Barber at Circle S Ranch. An alumni dinner featured special guest speakers FSU assistant Mike Martin, Jr., and Troy head coach Bobby Pierce. Chipola head Coach Jeff Johnson and members of the Baseball Alumni Com mittee — Nathan Marks (’00), Andrew Gay (’07) and Jason Barber (’06) — orga nized the weekend’s events. “We appreciate all the fans and former players who came out to support our program. These guys are so generous with their time and resources. It means a lot to our program,” John son said. For information about Chipola baseball’s alumni happenings, email nathan@ marksinsurance.com, visit www.chipola.edu or call coach Johnson at 718-2237. PP HOTOs S SPECIAL TO THE TT IMEs S A A DVERTIs S ER From left are Chipley baseball alumni Nathan Marks; Troy coach Bobby Pierce (former Chipola coach); Russell Martin, Pittsburgh Pirates; Chipola coach Jeff Johnson; Jose Bautista, Toronto Blue Jays; and former Chipola players Ivan Nacaratta and Charlie Dees. Chipola retires Russell Martin’s jersey From left are Chipola president Dr. Gene Prough, Russell Martin of the Pittsburgh Pirates and Chipola baseball coach Jeff Johnson. Local A6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, February 19, 2014

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S PORTS www.bonifaynow.com A Section ?H:<@^@] T[ X[T]^ : ^@ >:Q>@[* ) 0 % 022 3$02 /) 3) /$ ) ( /0 $( $ )) /0 ) /0 (2 2$ % 1 0( ) )'!2) '! + )" ) /0 % 1 02 2 '/$. ) 20* ) /) 022 ) ) $ /) $. ) $( /$( 20 /) 2$ 02 2 ( 1 ). $ (2) $. ) 3)(0' $2 /0 ) 0 )2* $( 2$( )$( /0 % 1 & $22 22 )) -/ $( 2)$ ) $3) $( $(( ) 2# By JASON SHOOT 747-5069 | @PCNHJasonShoot jshoot@pcnh.com BONIFAY — Chipley has some un nished business at the Class 1A state girls basketball tournament. Amanda Paschal scored 24 points and received considerable help from her teammates as the Tigers clinched a second consecutive trip to the state tournament with a 72-62 victory Friday over host Holmes County in the Region 3-1A nals. Chipley (24-5) will face Hawthorne — a 51-50 winner over Hamilton County — in the state semi nals at The Lakeland Center today. The state championship is Thursday. “It was a great experience,” Paschal said of last year’s trip to state, which ended with a loss to South Walton in the championship game. “Last year we had a lot of seniors, and everybody wanted to win. ... We have to play harder, play with heart.” Holmes County (20-8) outlasted Chipley for the District 3-1A regularseason title and then defeated the Tigers by a point to win the district tournament. Chipley was the superior team in this matchup, but much like it was when the same teams met in the regional nals a year ago. “We’re trying to build a family, basically,” Chipley’s Essence Williams said. Jessica Belser’s lay-in pulled Holmes County even at 40-40 with four minutes left in the third quarter, but a layup by Parisha Massaline sparked a 9-0 run in a 62-second span that gave the Tigers a 49-40 advantage. Chipley carried a 54-48 lead into the fourth quarter, and the Tigers scored eight of the rst 10 points to pull away. The Blue Devils got no closer than seven points thereafter. Holmes County was desperate to limit Paschal, double-teaming the Chipley standout every time she crossed halfcourt with the ball. That opened up scoring opportunities around the basket, however, and the Tigers pounded the ball inside to great effect. “Everybody did great,” Paschal said. “Everybody stepped up tonight.” Kimberly Tuel has been with the Chipley program for three years, she said, but this is her rst season as head coach. “We put the bar up high,” Tuel said, her voice hoarse from yelling for four quarters in a loud gymnasium. “It took hard work to get here.” Brittany Lee contributed 16 points for Chipley, and Williams and Karlisha Works chipped in 12 points apiece. Belser led Holmes County with 10 points, and Lenibel Concepcion added nine. CHIPLEY (72) Paschal 24, Lee 16, Works 12, Williams 12, Thomas 1, Massaline 7. HOLMES COUNTY (62) Davis 8, Prescott 8, Belser 10, J. Miles 7, Concepcion 9, J. Taylor 2, H. Taylor 6, Moses 4, D. Miles 2, Cross 3, Syfrett 3. Chipley 14 16 24 18 — 72 Holmes County 13 15 20 14 — 62 Special to The News MARIANNA — The Chipola Lady Indians captured their rst Panhandle Conference title since 1990 with a 69-30 win over Gulf Coast on Feb. 11. Evelyn Akhator led Chipola with 18 points, 15 rebounds and four steals. Khadijah Ellison had 11 points with ve assists. The Lady Indians are headed to the FCSAA State Tournament, March 5-8 in Ocala. The men’s team held on for an 8382 overtime win over arch-rival Gulf Coast. Chipola had a 19-point lead in the rst half, but Gulf Coast came back to pull ahead in the second half and push the game into overtime. Jamaar McKay’s layup gave Chipola an 80-76 lead with 18 seconds left in OT, but Gulf Coast made a free throw to cut the lead to thee. With 13 seconds left, Sam Cassell Jr. broke free against the full-court press and was fouled while scoring on a layup. His threepoint play gave the Indians an 83-79 lead with eight seconds left. Chipola (6-4) is tied with Pensacola (6-4) for second place in the league, a half-game behind Northwest (6-3). The top two teams earn a berth to the FCSAA State Tournament in Ocala beginning March 5. The Indians lost to Pensacola 68-64 on Feb. 8. Carlos Morris poured in 27 points and pulled down seven rebounds for the Indians. The loss at Pensacola was the second for the week after falling to Northwest 90-83 on Feb. 5. Chipola’s nal games of the regular season are Saturday, Feb. 22, when both the women’s and men’s teams hosting Northwest for Homecoming. Chipola president Dr. Gene Prough and his wife, Priscilla, will host an Alumni Reception beginning at 6 p.m. Alumni, retirees and friends of the college are invited. The homecoming court will be presented, and the Homecoming Queen and Mr. Chipola will be crowned, during halftime of the men’s game. By BRAD MILNER 747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com Two of the early boys selections for the Halifax All-Star Classic are still playing basketball. All four will take the court on April 5 in the quest to defeat the West. Malone’s Chai Baker, Vernon’s Alex Brown, Mosley’s Nat Dixon and Rutherford’s Khaliel Spearman have been chosen to represent the East in the 10th annual event to be played at the Billy Harrison Field House on the campus of Gulf Coast State College. Baker and Spearman prepped for respective regional basketball games. Brown’s season ended in the district round and Dixon’s before then to hit the football recruiting trail. The East boys will be coached by Marianna’s Travis Blanton and Vernon’s Thomas Register, both of whom are making return appearances in the game. The East teams are chosen by the sports department of The News Herald from an eight-county coverage area. They oppose roster from the West is comprised from the three-county coverage area of the Northwest Florida Daily News stationed in Fort Walton Beach. Baker and Dixon have cemented college destinations, while Brown and Spearman test their options. Baker signed with Oregon State and Dixon is moving on with a football scholarship at Boston College. The duo continues a line of Division I talent playing in the Halifax Classic, dating back to Graceville’s Rashaad Singleton in the inaugural event in 2005. Baker, a 6-foot-3 guard, and Malone hosted Cottondale in the Region 1-1A semi nal on Tuesday. The Tigers were in search of a third consecutive regionalnal berth with the previous two ending in defeat. Baker led them into the contest with 22.7 points and 9.6 rebounds per game and will look to join his brother, Ty, in being a Halifax Classic winner, as the elder sibling was part of last year’s game. Spearman at 6-2 is Rutherford’s leading scorer and has the Rams on the cusp of a second regional nal in three seasons. Rutherford hosted Tallahassee Rickards on Tuesday for the right to advance. The 6-3 Brown’s campaign ended with a loss to Cottondale in the District 2-1A semi nal. His 33 ppg helped Register guide the Yellow Jackets to a winning record in his rst season at the helm after Vernon amassed 16 losses in 2012-13. Dixon also is capable of scoring at a similar clip with more than 30 ppg as a junior. His production dipped some this season, but he’s still one of the area’s best shooters and he’s not afraid to heave the ball at the basket. The 6-4 guard’s leaping ability also gives the East some length inside. Complete 12-player rosters for the East and West will be released in early-March. East girls coaches will be selected and announced in the coming weeks and the rst round of East girls player selections also are on the horizon. Player nominations are being accepted. Area coaches in the East coverage area are asked to send player name, position, height, statistics and other pertinent information to Brad Milner at The News Herald via e-mail at bmilner@pcnh. com or by calling (850) 747-5065. Halifax Media Group and its two Florida daily newspapers, The News Herald and the Daily News, again are lead sponsors along with GCSC. Additional sponsorship is provided by the Panama City Beach Convention and Visitors Bureau. Any individual or business with a desire to sponsor the event may contact GCSC Athletic Marketing Representative Teresa Beaver at (850) 769-1551 ext. 2813 or Milner, News Herald Writer Jason Shoot (jshoot@pcnh.com; (850) 747-5067) and Executive Sports Editor Pat McCann (pmccann@pcnh. com; (850) 747-5068). The event accepts any and all levels of sponsorships, from monetary support to in-kind donations. ON THE TEAM The rst four players chosen for the East boys team in the 10th annual Halifax All-Star Classic: Chai Baker, G, Malone Alex Brown, G, Vernon Nat Dixon, G, Mosley Khaliel Spearman, G, Rutherford HEATHER LEIPHART | The News Herald Chipley’s Amanda Paschal scored 24 points as the Tigers clinched a second consecutive trip to the state tournament. Below Chipley’s Diamond Potter battles for the ball with a Holmes County player. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Tiffany Lewis tries to block a Commodore’s shot. At right, Sam Cassell Jr. goes up for a shot. Lady Indians capture 1st Panhandle Conference title First 4 players chosen for East boys Classic team Lady Devils’ season ends HALIFAX ALL-STAR CLASSIC Wednesday, February 19, 2014 Page 7

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Local A8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, February 19, 2014 Bill Fletcher HAS: BC-HIS 24 Y ears Experience Allen Barnes HAS: BC-HIS 24 Y ears Experience MARIANNA 3025 6th STREET (850) 260-0436 W ednesdays & F ridays CHIPLEY 1611 MAIN STREET #4 (850) 260-0436 Monday F riday THE SOUNDS OF LIFE A DIFFERENCE WOR TH HEARING ABOUT! WE’RE IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD! $"$ $ $ !$ $ $ $ $ $ "$ # z WIRELESS TECHNOLOGY AND $!$ $ $ i $ "" "$ $!$ $$ !$ AND $! $ "$ $$ $ R e gu la r l y $ 19 5 0 C o mp le t e l y W i r e le s s S m a l l a n d a f f o rda b le BEL TONE IS AMERICA ’S MOST TRUSTED NAME IN HEARING CARE.* T r u e 3 O p e n F i t H e a r i n g A i d SA L E $ 17 2 5 The bene ts of hearing instruments var y by type and degree of loss, noise enironment, accurac y of hearing evalua tion and proper t. *Among Adults over 50. Cannot be combined with an y other offers. Discounts off MSRP Previous purchases exc luded. F or a limited time. So w ell T r actor Co ., Inc. 2841 Hwy 77 North, P anama City www .so w elltr actor co .com W e T rade for Anything That Don’ t Eat! Financing Arranged (W AC) NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our polic y that the patient and an y other per son r esponsib le f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimb ur sed b y pa yment or an y other ser vice e x amination or tr eatment which is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hour s of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee discount ed f ee or r educed f ee ser vice e x amination or tr eatment. "WE WELCOME NEW P A TIENTS, CALL TODA Y FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW P A TIENTS 59 AND OLDER This cer tif icat e is good f or a complet e Medical Ey e Ex am with T odd R obinson, M.D In Our Chiple y Of f ice Boar d C er tif ied Ey e Ph y sician and Sur geon. 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W e ar e looking for ener getic Sales Executives with 2+ y ears of B2B outside sales and business development e xperience Responsibiliti es: )$) $ .1) 00 $ )0 0'$0 $( .'$00 .-. $ 1.0) $(. * ') )) ($.0 .) 1$00 1)(.1 .)( &.)) .-) ,$0 1$/ )., $( )'., &.) ('., %0. &$)(% $ $'$0.*., ).$0 &.) ) $0) 0)$( &))) $ .1) $( (., )/., ..) $'., $0) (.$ .*))(&$'/ *1 $ .1) $( -$., ) &.) 0)$( ..) ).)., -) ($ '')) $( '-$00),) .$0) $$ ,) ,$.., $0) $ $ .$ ) $00 $(1..$ .) )0) -$ ) $ ))( .)) '') In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales Account Executives: New hire and ongoing training and development Requir ements: 0)$ )$ *$')*$') (.)' $0)! .() $0)! .) ))01) )).)') $'-)0 (),)) )*))( & )')$ ) .00 '.() -) .,)).)') ) $ (),)) .,-0 )0*1.$ )( $( )0*(.'.0. )( .$&.0. / )**)'.)0 .0.0) ) .. ,., )$0. .)).) $ ())0., )0$ .-.! $.'0$0 .&.) )! ).() $( ( '11.'$ )')00) 0.)., /.00 $( $&.0. **) 0. T o apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.c om EOE, Drug Fr ee W orkplace T erritories A v ailable In P ort St. Joe Special to The News Four new, free online lessons are available to household water well owners at the National Ground Water Association website, www.WellOwner. org. The lessons were developed by NGWA with support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Well owners can register for the following lessons by going to WellOwner.org: • Arsenic in Well Water: What Is It and What Do You Do? • Bacteria in Well Water: What Is It and What Do You Do? • Nitrate in Well Water: What Is It and What Do You Do? • Radon in Well Water: What Is It and What Do You Do? Other online well owner lessons previously made available cover what to test your water for, how to get a test and interpret the results and the basics of water treatment. Well owners also can access two recorded Webinars on water testing and water treatment. NGWA Public Awareness Director Cliff Treyens encourages household water well owners to take advantage of these new resources, as well as the toll-free Private Well Owner Hotline at 855-420-9355 and the free monthly emailed “Private Well Owner Tip Sheet.” Subscribe to the tip sheet at www.wellowner.org. “It’s never been easier for well owners to get the basic information they need to be good water well and groundwater stewards,” Treyens said. “These resources will help well owners to improve and protect their water quality.” Special to The News Icy roads and downed power poles and lines were a few of the hazards Gulf Power Company’s storm team encountered as they helped Georgia Power restore power to customers after last week’s winter storm. The 82-person crew was released from storm duty late Sunday afternoon and returned to Northwest Florida late Sunday night. “They all worked safely and gave hope to customers who had lost power,” said Jeff Rogers, Gulf Power Corporate Communications manager. “Our crews continue to hone their skills working winter storms this year, and we were glad to help Georgia Power’s customers get their power back on.” The crews left Feb. 10, donned snow chains, and worked in Jonesboro, Ga., just south of Atlanta most of the week. Over the weekend, they went east to Waynesboro, Ga., to help complete restoration. Georgia Power restored power to more than 700,000 customers. It was the third time this winter Gulf Power crews were called on to restore power. In December, a team went to the Dallas area. And in late January, Gulf Power had to deal with its own winter storm. “When the power’s out, there’s no better sight on your street than a bucket truck rolling up,” Rogers said. “The experience gained from being deployed to assist in these storms helps our crews be the best they can be right here at home.” Gulf Power Company is an investor-owned electric utility with all of its common stock owned by Atlanta-based Southern Company. Gulf Power serves more than 436,000 customers in eight counties throughout Northwest Florida. The company’s mission is to safely provide exceptional customer value by delivering reliable, affordable and environmentally responsible electricity while strengthening our communities. Visit GulfPower.com or nd the company’s Facebook page, “Gulf Power Company.” Gulf Power storm team back home after week in Georgia Online lessons available for well owners From Staff Reports News Herald Publisher Roger Quinn, a 48-year veteran of the newspaper business, announced Monday he is retiring at the end of the month. But he won’t be going far. “We love Panama City,” Quinn said. “We put down roots and we’re going to stay here.” Quinn, who joined The Panama City News Herald in August 2012, shortly after its purchase by Halifax Media Group, plans to focus more time on his civic activities like his work with the Salvation Army, where he serves on the board. Halifax Media Group CEO Michael Redding, who was in Panama City for the announcement Monday, thanked Quinn for his hard work and attitude and said a nationwide search for a new publisher would begin immediately. “Roger has a distinguished newspaper career, and we are going to miss him,” Redding said. “He is a great guy, as well as a friend, and we all wish him the best.” Quinn began his career in 1966 in Gadsden, Ala., beginning a path that would lead him to a position as a New York Times Regional Media Group publisher. There, he oversaw a group of papers in North and South Carolina that included properties in Spartanburg and Hendersonville before those newspapers were purchased by Halifax late in 2011. After Halifax purchased The News Herald and other Freedom Communications newspapers in Florida and North Carolina in 2012, Quinn joined The News Herald as publisher but also served as regional publisher with responsibility over all the properties in Halifax’s central region, which includes Northwest Florida, Alabama and Louisiana. Halifax is headquartered in Daytona Beach and boasts a strong presence across the Southeast that includes newspapers in key Florida cities like Daytona Beach, Gainesville, Sarasota, Lakeland and Fort Walton Beach. Regional publisher announces retirement ROGER QUINN Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

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Washington County News z Holmes County Times-Advertiser B PAGE 1 Section E XTRA Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — Eastern Shipbuilding Group is one of three nalists vying for a $10.5 billion U.S. Coast Guard contract that could bring thousands of new jobs to Bay County. The 20-year contract is for the development of 25 nextgeneration offshore patrol cutters for the Coast Guard. “This is a huge deal, not just for Eastern Shipbuilding, but for Bay County and Northwest Florida,” said company President and CEO Brian D’Isernia. “That’s tremendous for jobs, for long-term jobs, so naturally we’re excited.” Eastern is one of eight shipyards that submitted proposals for the project and will be competing with nalists in Lockport, La., and Bath, Maine, for the contract. As a nalist, Eastern was awarded about $22 million to design a prototype for the vessel, which must be submitted to the Coast Guard in the next year and a half. “Each shipyard proposed a different vessel, and this award of $22 million will be put toward us completing a detailed design and submitting a nal price,” D’Isernia said. “The nal award to the ultimate winner will be based on a combination of design of the vessel and cost.” D’Isernia said the nalists were chosen based on a conceptual design and proposal submitted to the Coast Guard, which represented more than three years of work. If awarded the project, D’Isernia said it would add between 750 and 800 employees to Eastern’s team of 1,500 and would indirectly create many jobs for the area. “With the multiplying effect in the area, that’s easily 2,000 to 2,500 jobs,” said D’Isernia, who noted the contract is the largest the company has ever bid on. If Eastern were awarded the contract, D’Isernia said it also could lead to facility expansion at one or both of the Panama City shipyards, depending on the company’s other workload. U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson said in a press release Wednesday that he was con dent in Eastern’s capabilities in developing the vessels. “I think Eastern makes a lot of sense given its facilities, capabilities of its workforce and solid track record in this industry,” said Nelson, a senior member of the Senate’s Armed Services Committee and Commerce Committee, which has jurisdiction over the Coast Guard. U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland, R-Panama City, said the contract would bring a much needed boost to the region’s economy. “Should Eastern Shipbuilding win this contract, it will provide a tremendous boost to Northwest Florida’s economy and bring hundreds of well-paying, highlyskilled construction jobs to our community,” Southerland said. When asked if he had any concerns about nding enough skilled workers if Eastern wins the project, D’Isernia said he was con dent in the company’s capabilities. “We’ve managed, through hiring and training, to gainfully employ 1,500 skilled people, and we think we could cover this project as we’ve done in the past,” D’Isernia said. “We’re going to work like heck for a year and a half, and hope to win (the project).” $10.5 billion deal? Eastern Shipbuilding nalist for Coast Guard contract HEATHER LEIPHART | File photo The Bravante VI slides into the water during a launching ceremony at Eastern Shipbuilding Group on Aug. 5 in Panama City. Eastern is one of three nalists vying for a $10.5 billion contract to build 25 U.S. Coast Guard patrol cutters. “This is a huge deal, not just for Eastern Shipbuilding, but for Bay County and Northwest Florida. That’s tremendous for jobs, for long-term jobs, so naturally we’re excited.” Brian D’Isernia Eastern Shipbuilding president and CEO ANDREW WARDLOW | The News Herald A model of a Coast Guard offshore patrol cutter is on display Wednesday at Eastern Shipbuilding’s Nelson Street shipyard in Panama City. HEATHER LEIPHART | File photo The HOS Red Dawn makes a splash as it enters the water at the Eastern Shipbuilding Group’s Allanton shipyard on Feb. 15, 2013, in Panama City. Wednesday, FEBRUARY 19 2014 “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) On being the largest carved one in the world, what main color is the “Millennium Sapphire”? Blue, Pink, Black, Yellow 2) The busiest international telephone route is between the U.S. and what country? Canada, Mexico, India, U.K. 3) “Crocodile Hunter” Steve Irwin died after being stung by what sea creature? Barracuda, Stingray, Tunicate, Oar sh 4) As created in 1866 what’s the oldest brand of ginger ale still being sold? Canada Dry, Blenheim, Vernor’s, Schweppes 5) Which region’s airport has the world’s largest terminal building? London, Chicago, Sydney, Hong Kong 6) Bill Klem and Bruce Froemming were the rst two umpires in MLB history to work how many games? 2,000; 3,000; 5,000; 7,000 7) In TV’s “Everybody Loves Raymond” what was Ray’s last name? Martin, Simon, Calvo, Barone 8) Rip Van Winkle sleeps for 20 years in what author’s story? Longfellow, Irving, Poe, Thoreau 9) Statistically what’s the worst state for auto-deer collisions? S. Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Pennsylvania 10) Which of these means a long word? Sesquipedalian, Ratite, Concordant, Annatto 11) What’s the most losses in a season in which a MLB pitcher won the Cy Young Award (Gaylord Perry)? 7, 9, 13, 16 12) Which state eats twice as much ice cream per capita than the rest of the nation? Alaska, Florida, Arizona, New Jersey 13) What was the rst Western TV series to be televised in color? Ri eman, Gunsmoke, Bonanza, Laredo 14) Actress Teri Hatcher was at one time a cheerleader for which NFL team? Falcons, Broncos, 49ers, Seahawks ANSWERS 1) Blue. 2) Canada. 3) Stingray. 4) Vernor’s. 5) Hong Kong. 6) 5,000. 7) Barone. 8) Irving. 9) Pennsylvania. 10) Sesquipedalian. 11) 16. 12) Alaska. 13) Bonanza. 14) 49ers.

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra "// "& '" ' "/. + !* ,#' ," + % 0 +,) )",$ ''$ # "//'& # $,' $&$ & ( $( $& % /( '% ''$. & *$ $ ''& .'$%., ,%$, ,$' & +' $ '/ & .'$&,* ,( ',/' $ $ /.' $..$ ,%.&'& $&' +' '/& $1/(' % ($2 2(2%( $ /2( ) &-$( & $& ( (&/ ( ( / ( # # !, ( '/& ( -(-1' /2( &-$( 1 /%( $ / % 2(/&$ $'$ / $ 1/& ((' % $' $' '& ) $) ( % 2$ $) ( % 2$ / $ $.1/$ (' & 2$ ) 2(/&$ $'$ $' ( 1 (1/+/%1( $ )11 / $11(' /%( $ / $10 $ /& (( ! Larry and Shirley Butler, of Bonifay, and Jacqueline Butler and Greg Adkins, of Chipley, are proud to announce the upcoming marriage of their daughter, Amanda Kate Butler, to Kyle Daniel Shull. Kyle is the son of Keith and Kathy Shull of Westville. Amanda is employed with The Health Clinic in Chipley and attends Northwest Florida State College pursuing a bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education. Kyle is the owner and carpenter of Kyle Shull LLC. The ceremony is at 4 p.m. March 1 at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. A reception is immediately following at the home of Kevin and Jennifer Shull. Some local invitations are being sent, but all family and friends are invited to attend. Odell and Julia McCarty will celebrate 50 years of marriage on April 15. Odell and Julia were married on April 15, 1964. They have two children, Linda Gail (McCarty) Wright and Timothy McCarty. Mr. and Mrs. McCarty have nine grandchildren, Juliette Wright, Toby Wright, twins Naomi and Mark Wright, Brianna, Odell, Elijah, Israel and Jeremiah McCarty. They also have three great-grandchildren. Mr. McCarty has three siblings Roberta Taylor, Tobias Taylor and Tory Taylor. They celebrated their anniversary with 100 guests at the Panhandle Shriners Club on Feb. 15, 2014. Wedding Anniversary Butler and Shull to wed 50 years of bliss Community EVENTS It’s a Family AffairMARIANN NN A — Chipola College Black Student Union and The Association of United Professions Inc. would like to invite all surrounding communities to celebrate Black History Month. The program is from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Feb. 21 at the Culture Center at Chipola College. Dinner is provided. The guest speaker is Elder William McCray.Quilt S S howD E E FUN N IAK S S PRIN N G S S — “Quilting: Our Roots & Our Wings,” featuring quilts made by members of the Chautauqua Quilters Guild Inc. and Holmes Valley Quilters, is from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 21-22 at the DeFuniak Springs Community Center, 361 N. 10th St. There will be several vendors, demos, antique quilts, an Opportunity quilt, door prizes and more. For more information, contact Lesa at Lesah51@yahoo.com or 585-2796, or visit www. chautauquaquiltersguild. com. BB Baseball League of Florida MeetingMARIANN NN A — A meeting to explore the possibility of reactivating the BB Baseball League of Florida for the 2014 baseball season is at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 24 at the Oaks Restaurant in Marianna, in the Oaks Station Shopping Center at East U.S. 90. A minimum of six teams will be required to activate the League with regular season play beginning the rst week in April. For more information before this meeting, call 5083329 or 229-662-2066TT ri-S S tate Cucurbit Meeting MARIANN NN A — The 2014 Tri-State Cucurbit Meeting is from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Feb. 24 at the Jackson County Agricultural Conference Center, 2741 Pennsylvania Ave. in Marianna. The meeting will feature morning refreshments and lunch. There are no registration fees for this sponsored event, however preregistration is required to gain an accurate count for lunch. To RSVP, contact Nikki or Cynthia at the Washington County Extension Ofce, 6386180. For more specic information or interest in sponsorship of the event, contact Matt Orwat, mjorwat@u.edu or 638-6180.Miss Black E E yed Pea PageantBON N IFAY — Bonifay’s Downhome Street Festival proudly presents the sixth annual Miss Black Eyed Pea Pageant on March 1 at Holmes County High School. Early registration is at Holmes County High School from 4 to 6 p.m. on Feb. 24 the cost of registration is $50. Any participant registering after Feb. 24 will be charged a $10 Late Fee. Girls ages zero to ve are asked to register at 1 p.m. for the pageant to start at 2 p.m. on March 1. Girls 6 and older will register at 3 p.m., and the pageant will start at 4 p.m. on March 1. For more information call Krystal at 258-9569 or infor@bonifaystreetfestival. com or kcook82@ embarqmail.com or visit www.bonifaystreetfestival. com. Washington County Council on Aging Board MeetingsCHIPLE E Y — The Washington County Council on Aging Board will hold meetings on the following dates in 2014: Feb. 25, March 25, April 22, May 27, June 24, July 22, Aug. 26, Sept. 23, Oct. 28 and Nov. 18. For more information, call 638-6216.SS unny Hills Utility Company Inc. to hold customer meeting Two representatives of the Sunny Hills Utility Company will hold a customer meeting at the Sunny Hills Community Center at 6 p.m. Feb. 26 for those customers who wish to learn more about the company, the recent changes that have been made to the system and to ask any questions they might have with regards to the system and the utility. This meeting is scheduled to last from 6-7:30 p.m. If anyone has a specic question for the utility, they can email their question to RDerossett@uswatercorp. net. This will allow the utility representatives to prepare in advance to answer any question you might have.‘ S S ound of Music’ at ChipolaMARIANN NN A — Chipola College theater-goers are invited to enjoy dinner and a show for opening night of the college production of “The Sound of Music” on Feb. 26. Tickets for the Opening Night Gala are on sale now in the Center for the Arts Box Ofce. Gala dinner tickets are $30. Play tickets, $8, must be purchased separately and can be purchased at the same time as the Gala ticket. Deadline for dinner reservations is Feb. 19. No additional dinner seating will be available the night of the event. The Opening Night Gala will include dinner in the Center for the Arts Experimental Theatre and a pre-performance chat with Director Charles Sirmon before the show. Show tickets without the dinner are on sale to the public. The Center for the Arts Box Ofce is open Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon. All proceeds will go to the Chipola ACT Fund. For ticket information, call 718-2420. Basic Pistol ClassBON N IFAY — The Holmes County Sheriff’s Ofce and Impact Firearms of Bonifay will hold a Basic Pistol Class at 9 a.m. on March 1. The class will cost $75. Students will qualify for the Florida Concealed weapons permit. The class will cover lethal force, gun safety, basic marksmanship and the principles and fundamental concepts that relate to carrying a concealed weapon. Bring your handgun and a minimum of 25 rounds ammunition. All proceeds will benet the Relay For Life. For more information or to register, call Jeana Prescott or Tammy Bozeman at 5474421. Space is limited, so don’t delay. 14th annual Olan P. Johnson Memorial S S cholarship Golf T T ournamentBON N IFAY — The 14th annual Olan P. Johnson Memorial Scholarship Golf Tournament is scheduled for March 1 at Dogwood Lakes Country Club in Bonifay. Registration and lunch begin at 7 a.m. with a shotgun start at 8 a.m. The $55 entry fee includes lunch, golf, two mulligans and “a throw.” Proceeds benet the scholarship established through the Chipola College Foundation. To register your four-person group or to sponsor a hole for $25, contact Dan Burdeshaw at 638-3243 or Don West at 263-4395. Chipola to offer Fireghters CourseMARIANN NN A — The Chipola College Public Service Department has scheduled several reghting courses beginning next month. Fireghter I and II will be offered in a classroom setting weekdays, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The course begins March 3 and runs through June 16. Fireghter I and II are required to work as a professional reghter in Florida. Cost is $1,900, and nancial aid is available. A First Responder course will be offered Feb. 24-28, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., daily. The 40-hour class offers advanced rst aid techniques for emergencies. The course is included in the curriculum for most law enforcement, corrections and reghter programs. Online Fireghter I for volunteer reghters begins March 4 and ends June 26. The course includes First Responder, Forestry S130/190 and Fireghter I. Cost is $500, which includes use of bunker gear and live burn scenarios. Information about the courses is available at www. chipola.edu/reghting. Contact Martin Fowler, Fire Science Program manager, at 718-2483 or email fowlerm@chipola.edu. Panhandle Pride Beauty PageantGRACEV EV ILLE E — The Panhandle Pride Beauty Pageant is at the Graceville Civic Center in Graceville. The entry fee is $55, with all proceeds going to the Two-Toe Tom Festival celebration. Contestants can participate in photogenic for an additional $10. Photogenic entries will be limited to one photo per contestant. The Panhandle Pride Beauty Pageant is an open pageant. Checks should be made payable to Two-Toe Tom Festival Pageant. Applications can be picked up at Bush Paint & Supply in Graceville or Esto Town Hall. Application, entry fee and photo must be delivered to Bush Paint & Supply or Esto Town Hall no later than March 7. Winners will receive a large trophy, large crown and banner. Alternates and participants will receive trophies. Door admission of $5 per adult applies to all individuals with the exception of contestants. Admission is free to children 3 years old and younger. Girls from Georgia, Alabama and Florida will be able to participate. There will be a People’s Choice Award winner in each category. This has no effect on the overall winners. The contestants from each age category who collect the most money will win the People’s Choice title for that age category and will receive a large trophy at the pageant. Winners will need to make plans on participating at the festival on April 12 at the John W. Clark Park in Esto. We are planning a fun-lled day of activities. Throughout the day, there will be a car show, arts and crafts, singing, lots of food and many more fun activities. The queens will also be required to ride in all parades that the Two-Toe Tom Festival oat enters unless excused by the Town of Esto. You will be notied ahead of time of the parades and dates. For more information, contact Teresa Bush, daytime 263-6345 or nighttime 263-3072, or Darlene Madden, daytime 263-6521 or nighttime 263-3201.

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 ?H:<@^@] T[ X[T]^ : ^@ >:Q>@[* ) 0 % 022 3$02 /) 3) /$ ) ( /0 $( $ )) /0 ) /0 (2 2$ % 1 0( ) )'!2) '! + )" ) /0 % 1 02 2 '/$. ) 20* ) /) 022 ) ) $ /) $. ) $( /$( 20 /) 2$ 02 2 ( 1 ). $ (2) $. ) 3)(0' $2 /0 ) 0 )2* $( 2$( )$( /0 % 1 & $22 22 )) -/ $( 2)$ ) $3) $( $(( ) 2# and sor enes s aches Two students from Bonifay Middle School participated in the 53rd Annual Three Rivers Regional Science and Engineering Fair of 2014 in Panama City. This was the rst time, in over 25 years, the Holmes District has participated in this regional fair. The eighth grade team of Elliott Gould and Christopher Ennger created a security robot constructed of plywood, scrap metal and spare computer parts. Their robot was designed to detect motion and respond with ashing lights and issue an audible warning. Out of 26 entries in the Junior Engineering category, Elliott and Chris won rst place. This team and their robot will now compete in the State Science and Engineering Fair of Florida, held in Lakeland, in April. They also received Certicate of Accomplishment from AUVSI (Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International), iTunes gift cards, cash award from the Bay Education Foundation, and an opportunity to participate in Broadcom Masters in Washington, DC. Congratulations Elliott Gould and Christopher Ennger, we are very proud of both of you; wishing you all the best at the state science fair. For more information on participating in the district and regional science fairs, contact a local science teacher. BMS students participate in Regional Science Fair FIRST PLACE By LYNN MARSHAllLL HCHS FBLA Advisor M ARIAARIA NN AA — Holmes County High School’s Fu ture Business Leaders of America competed in Dis trict 2 events at Chipola College recently and will be eligible to compete in the State Leadership Con ference on March 21 24 in Orlando. Students who place in State will be eligible to compete at the National Convention this Summer in Nashville, Tenn. HH C HSHS FBLAA students advance to compete in S S tate In Business Law Katie Mitchell placed fth; in Business Procedures Erica Hudson placed second; in FBLA Principles and Procedures Isabella Scott placed fourth and Tori Steverson placed fth; in Heath Care Administration Claire Segers placed fourth (not pictured); and in Insurance and Risk Management Tomorrow Lake placed third (not pictured). PP HOTOS SS PECIAL TO THE NEWS Holmes County High School’s Future Business Leaders of America who received rst place in District 2 events held at Chipola College recently are: in Business Communication, Savannah Messer; Business Law, John Etheridge; Business Procedures, Moneba Anees; Emerging Business Issues, Keylee Glover, Thomas Parish and Jeremy Worthing; Health Care Administration, Courtney Syfrett (not pictured); Impromptu Speaking, Rayanne Phelps; Insurance and Risk Management, Auburn Fisanick; Introduction to Information Technology, Aaron Stanford; Management Decision Making, Jennifer Holland, Lucy Jiang and Whitney White; Public Service Announcement, Cheyenne Berry, Kristin Gonzalez and Nic Luan; and Public Speaking I, Cassie Bell. The Panhandle Area Educational Consortium (PAEC) located in Chipley, Fla., partnered with the Florida Department of Transportation District Three Ofce to coordinate a STEM Scholar Parent/ Student night on Monday, Feb. 10. Parent/student meetings are designed to ensure parents and students learn about a variety of STEM careers available near their school and home. The goal is to help students make wellinformed career choices and understand the academic preparation the career requires. The parent/student meetings also function as a means of keeping communication open between parents, STEM Scholars and project personnel. Brenda Crouch, Project Manager for the FloridaLearns STEM Scholars initiative, introduced featured speakers from the Florida Department of Transportation District Three ofce who described the various career elds available, particular those related to science, technology, engineering and math. Steve Thames, Administrative Support Manager, welcomed the group and introduced the panelists. Professional Engineers Jared Perdue and April Williams spoke with students and parents about the requirements needed to become an engineer, benets of a career in the engineering eld and many of the opportunities available at the Department of Transportation. Erin Oliver, J.D. shared information about the role of lawyers at DOT while Donna Green, Public Information Specialist not only shared her journey to a career at DOT but encouraged the students to apply themselves in all areas of their high school career. The FloridaLearns STEM Scholars initiative was launched in July of 2011, with a vision to help Florida address its urgent and important STEM talent development challenge by focusing on some of Florida’s most underserved students, its gifted and talented in the rural regions of the state.SS TEM SS cholar Parent/ SS tudent NN ight STESTE M STRESTRE NG THTH TESTTEST Jack Craven, (left) of Marianna High, and Abagail Bridges, of Chipley High, test the strength of their balsa wood tower at a recent STEM meeting at Chipola College. Chipola professors and high school faculty led students in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) activities. The event was organized by the FloridaLearns STEM Scholars Project, in collaboration with the Panhandle Area Educational Consortium (PAEC) targeting gifted and talented students in grades 9-12. STEM is a multimillion dollar education campaign to encourage students attending Florida’s rural schools to consider a career in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. SS PECIAL TO THE NEWS Pictured are FDOT speakers: April Williams, P.E., Donna Green, Public Information Specialist, Erin Oliver, J.D., and Jared Perdue, P.E.SS PECIAL TO THE NEWS Crossword P P UZZLE SOLUTIOSOLUTIO N OO N PAPAG EE B5

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L E T US QU O T E YO U (850) 638-8376 Consumer & Commer cial Power Equipment V isit our website at www .lanesoutdoor .com 901 Hwy 277, Chipley 850.638.4364 MARIANNA T O Y O T A # ) ) $ $ $ % % # ( % ( ( # ( # $ $ $ $ & 125 4 Chu rch A ve. Chi ple y FL 324 38 850 -63 8-1 751 ‘Se r vin g you sin ce 195 3’ Fri end ly Hom eto wn Ser vic e B R OW N F U N E R A L HOM E 1 0 6 8 M a in S t C h i p l e y F L 3 2 4 2 8 Ph o n e : 63 8 4 0 1 0 D o n a l d B r o w n L F D O w n e r Page 4 Wednesday, February 19, 2014 www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Mt. Zion to host The Perrys ESTO — The Perrys will be in concert at 7 p.m., on Friday, Feb. 21, at Mt. Zion Independent Baptist Church. Everyone is invited to attend this night of worship and fellowship. There is no admission. A love offering will be taken during intermission. The church is at 3205 Highway 2, Esto. Area Wide Winter Camp Meeting BONIFAY — An area wide winter camp meeting will take place at 6 p.m. Feb. 23 and at 7 p.m. Feb. 24 – 27, at Oak Grove Pentecostal Ministries at 1131 Highway 179 in Bonifay. The speaker will be Pastor Duke Downs Of Living Waters Church in Chino, California. For more information call 9564339, 956-2322 or 658-2828. Area Wide Youth Meeting BONIFAY — An area wide youth meeting will take place at 7 p.m. Feb. 27 at Oak Grove Pentecostal Ministries at 1131 Highway 179 in Bonifay. The speaker will be Bro. Stephen McKay, missionary to the Middle East. For more information call 956-4339, 956-2322 or 658-2828. Ash Wednesday Mass Schedule CHIPLEY — St. Joseph the Worker Catholic Church will hold Ash Wednesday Mass from 5 to 6 p.m. on March 5. St. Ann will hold Mass and Ashes from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. on March 5. Fine Arts Series MARIANNA — St. Luke’s Episcopal Church will host Julee Glaub and Mark Weems, an Irish Vocal and Instrumental Duet at 4 p.m. on March 16. A meet the artist reception will follow. Donations will be accepted. For more information call 482-2431. Blessed Trinity Catholic Church welcomes all BONIFAY — Blessed Trinity Catholic Church would like to invite everyone to attend services. Bible Study is held from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. on Sunday the Church Hall. Sunday Mass will be from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. and Wednesday evening Mass will be from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The church is at 2331 Highway 177A in Bonifay. Faith EVENTS Learning the great art of kneeology George Mueller had just nished spending some quality time with a young missionary headed for China. He was enthralled by the vision this young man had to reach an entire country for Christ. J. Hudson Taylor was going to China without any sponsorship of any kind, except God. Mueller found in Taylor a kindred spirit and his heart was stirred. If anyone understood the life of trusting God, it was George Mueller. After Taylor left, Mueller felt a burden upon his heart for this young missionary that he could not shake. Never once did Taylor ask Mueller for money or even talk about where the money would come from, but spoke excitedly about what God was going to do without any regard of who was going to pay the bill. Monies were needed to support the vision Taylor had for reaching the country of China. Without saying anything to anybody, Mueller begin praying and trusting God for £100,000 for the mission in China. He set a day when the monies needed to be in and told absolutely no one, On the appointed day, monies began coming in from everywhere. Even Mueller was a little shocked at the overwhelming response to his prayer. People really did not know what was behind all of this giving but were impressed by God to give. Mueller understood what was behind it. God was behind it. Before that day ended over £100,000, the amount Mueller was trusting God for, had come in. How do you explain that? Today’s giving is predicated upon an advertising campaign. Thousands of dollars are spent hiring rms specializing in fundraising campaigns. Advertisements are created to lure people into giving. Celebrities are hired to plead the cause. Strategies are used to convince people that if they give they will get something back in return. This all in a ploy to raise money, supposedly to do kingdom work. Years ago, I ran across something Dr. Moody Stuart set down as rules, which guided his own prayer life. I put them in the front of my Bible constantly to remind me of these things. 1. Pray until you pray. 2. Pray until you are conscious of being heard. 3. Pray until you receive an answer. These three things will go a long way in turning our prayer life into a dynamic encounter with God that actually accomplishes great things for God. Kingdom work demands the employment of kingdom principles. EVERYBODY PRAYS It is safe to say that everybody prays, even those who say they do not believe in prayer. All that needs to happen is some incident or an accident and people instinctively turned to prayer. Those who do not believe in prayer succumb to prayer in times of trouble. Remember 9/11 Everybody prays but few have a proper foundation upon which to build their prayer ministry. Prayer is not some magical formula that applies to both saved and unsaved alike. Some believe if you have the right formula, the right ritual or the right words that God has to answer that prayer. It does not matter if your life is contrary to the nature of God. It does not matter, or so they think, if you are not walking with God day by day. God has to answer your prayer. All you have to do is just say the magical formula “in Jesus’ name” in your prayer is on its way. Nothing could be further from the truth. There is no way anybody can back God into a corner and get Him to do something contrary to His will. THE PRIVILEGE OF PRAYER Prayer is the privilege of the believer. No greater honor could be laid upon the heart of the Christian. The foundation of a proper prayer life is none other than the Lord Jesus Christ. Apart from Him, we have no access to God the Father. The tragedy of this whole situation is that all of the prayers of the unsaved are baseless and get no higher than the ceiling. In order to penetrate the heavens and ascend to the Throne of God we must have an advocate, a mediator, which is none other than Jesus Christ. “For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus” (1 Timothy 2:5). Only through Christ will my prayers get through to God, the Father. Imagine spending your whole life praying to a God that does not exist. Imagine, after a life of hardship and toil you nd out you really were not praying at all but rather mumbling words and phrases that had no signi cance to it at all. The proper foundation for prayer is Jesus Christ. Even those with a proper foundation often misuse prayer. The apostle James pointed this out in his epistle, “Ye ask, and receive not, because ye ask amiss, that ye may consume it upon your lusts.” (James 4:3). This is praying contrary to God’s will. How much time is wasted on nonessentials and non-kingdom stuff? Relatively few have accepted the necessary discipline for this kind of work. Some have a reputation of being a prayer warrior, which is really an oxymoron. A prayer warrior’s work is covert spiritual work of which most people do not know is going on. These great Saints have no reputation but have found the “secret place” of spiritual potency and are being employed by the Holy Spirit to engage the enemy in spiritual warfare. No glamour… No celebrity status… No spotlight. Just wrestling with the powers of darkness. This is praying down the enemy and all his forces around him. These great saints that have populated each generation of Christendom have attended the school of prayer and learned the great art of kneeology. DR. JAMES L. SNYDER Out to Pastor

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. – 11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday Community CALENDAR Irene Geddie Fish, 77, of Bonifay, passed away on Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014. Irene was born in Tallahassee on April 22, 1936, to the late T. J. and Vera Irene Geddie. She graduated from Leon High School in Tallahassee in 1953. She married Percy Preston “Pete” Fish, on April 25, 1953. Irene was a beloved member of the First Bap tist Church of Bonifay and was an active member of the church, but if you were to ask her “What religion are you?” she would reply “Methodist.” She was also an advocate for orphans and donated generously to the Baptist and Methodist Children’s Homes. Irene practiced real estate in Holmes County for ap proximately 40 years and was the rst female broker in Holmes County. She was a founding member of the Chipola Area Board of Re altors and also served one term on the Florida Real Estate Commission after being appointed by Gover nor Lawton Chiles. She was an avid Florida State Semi nole football fan. She was pre ceded in death by her infant daughter, Rose Marie Fish. Irene is survived by her husband of 60 years, Percy Preston “Pete” Fish; ve children, Percy Preston Fish, Jr. (Audrey) of Tal lahassee, Harold Anthony Fish of Bonifay, David Ster ling Fish, Sr. (Leah) of Dil lard, Ga., Charles Andrew Fish (Mandy) of Lake City, and Tabitha Fish Wichows ki (Tommy) of Panama City Beach; 20 grandchildren; 13 great-grandchildren, and 15 nieces and nephews. A viewing was held at Sims Funeral Home at 6 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 15. The funeral service took place at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 16, at the First Baptist Church of Bonifay with the burial immediately follow ing at New Effort Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing. In lieu of owers, donations to the Florida Baptist Children’s Home, 8415 Buck Lake Rd, Tal lahassee, FL 32317 878-1458 or Seminole Boosters Inc. 225 University Ctr., Ste. C5100, Tallahassee, FL 32306 644-3484 are appreciated. Irene G. Fish I reneRENE G. F ishISH Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! W ith your paid obituar y family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos fr ee of charge. Find Obituaries. Shar e Condolences. 9u €un‹ju j F{ vu? M… xu CHQTM[;: ‡n{’j‹œ up{‡… ‡v ™™™ ?px{ˆ€uœˆjˆu‹ ?p‡‚ ‡‹ n‡…{vjœ…‡™ ?p‡‚ œ‡’ pj…S " In par tnership with t£¨›  p‡‚ Find obituaries, shar e condolences and celebrate a life at or Crossword SOLUTION G uidelines UIDELINES Obituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the decease. The Washington County News/Holmes County TimesAdvertiser reserves the right to edit for AP style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is noon on Monday for the following Wednesday newspaper. Obituaries may be emailed to funerals@ chipleypaper.com or delivered to the Washington County News at 1364 North Railroad Ave, Chipley or Holmes County Times-Advertiser at 112 Eat Virginia Ave. in Bonifay. Juanita Jackson Ward was born on May 17, 1934, in Holmes County. She was the daughter of the late Nellie and Gillis Jackson and wife of the late J.E. Ward. Juanita passed away Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2014. Her occupations throughout her lifetime were a shoemaker and seamstress. But rst and foremost she was a wife and mother. Her main hobbies were gardening, taking care of her property, and spending time with family and friends. She passed away at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. She was living with her son and daughter-inlaw at the time. Juanita persevered faithfully and graciously through good times and adversity. She was a very seless woman who never complained. Her strength was a great inuence to everyone around her. She was and will always be loved dearly by her son, daughter-inlaw, grandchildren, and other family and friends. We want to thank Sims Funeral Home for their care in conducting the funeral as well as East Mount Zion United Methodist Church. It is with heartfelt thanks to the ofciating ministers, the Rev. David Cook, the Rev. Wesley Syfrett, and Dr. Edsel Bone; all family and friends who sent cards, owers, food, made donations on behalf of Juanita’s wishes, and all other expressions of love. She is survived by her son, James Paul Ward (Cheryl) of Macclenny, Fla. Surviving grandchildren are, James Evan Ward of Macclenny and Carissa Ward Near (Cameron) of Jacksonville, N.C.; nieces, Brenda Lewis, Jackie Benton, Teresa Sheets, Cricket Worley, and Cindy Jackson; nephews, Frank Yates, Marty Taylor, Tony Jackson and Herman Taylor; cousins, Gordon Jackson, Roger Jackson, Watson Jackson, Martha English Johnson, James English, Charles English, Danny Pettis, Mike Pettis, Ken Hobbs, Gary Hobbs, and Janet Patterson. A funeral service was held at 2 p.m., on Friday, Feb. 14, 2014, at East Mt. Zion Methodist Church with the Rev. David Cook, the Rev. Wesley Syfrett and Dr. Edsel Bone ofciating. Interment followed in Bethany Cemetery, Bonifay with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m., on Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Juanita J. Ward Clyde J. Mills, 79, of Vernon, went home to be with the Lord Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014, at Bay Medical center in Panama City. Clyde was born Jan. 12, 1935, in Vernon to John Henry and Ida Blanche (Holland) Mills. A lifelong resident of the panhandle, Clyde traveled across the U.S. as a truck driver, and was also a member of Wausau Assembly of God He was preceded in death by his parents and siblings. He is survived by his wife of 14 years Exie Mills of Vernon; four step children, Travis Brock Sr. and wife Beverly of Vernon, Richard Brock and wife Kathy of Indiana, Deanna Brock of Illinois and Rhonda Romero and husband Fred of Illinois; nine grandchildren, Travis Brock Jr., Jonathan Brock, Amanda Scott, Richard Brock Jr., Alicia Brock, Seth Schweine, Noah Romero, Jared Romero and Tara Romero and eight step children by previous marriage. Services were held at 1 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014, at Wausau Assembly of God in Wausau, with the Rev. Danny Burns and the Rev. Danny Jackson ofciating. The family received friends from 5 to 8p.m. Monday, Feb. 17, 2014, at Wausau Assembly of God. Obert Funeral Home of Chipley in charge of arrangements. Clyde J. Mills Ann Sheppard Gordy (Grann), loving wife, mother, sister and grandmother, departed this earth on Feb. 13, 2014, at Westminster Oaks, in Tallahassee. Ann was born in Chipley, on Sept. 4, 1928, to Oscar Lee and Ethel Sheppard. Ann attended Washington County schools and was a 1946 graduate of Chipley High School and a 1950 graduate of the Florida State College for Women/ Florida State University (B.S. in Home Economics and M.S. in Library Science). After marrying the love of her life, Paul, she taught in the Washington County School System for 33 years. Her rst years were spent teaching Home Economics at Chipley High School before she transitioned to Kate M. Smith Elementary School where she taught the Fifth Grande and Elementary School Music. Ann ended her work career as the Media Specialist which was a natural t given her love of reading-as a fth grade teacher, she instilled the love of reading to her students by reading to them each day after their lunch break. As betting home economics major, Ann was an outstanding cook. She took great joy in keeping her friends and family well fed, particularly when family returned home for visits. Ann especially enjoyed cooking for her grandson, Casey, and she loved every minute she spent with her only grandchild. Ann was an extremely talented musician who played both the piano and organ, and her love of music was rst reected in her dedicated service as the accompanist for the Chipley High School Chorus during her high school career. Additionally, after singing in the choir as a youngster, Ann served as the organist for the First United Methodist Church of Chipley during her entire high school career. She later resumed her organist activities from 1960 to 1986, and also sang in the choir (1987-2007). Throughout her life, Ann served on multiple church committees and particularly loved her service to the United Methodist Women. Ann served as President of the UMW for several years and also served as a District Representative for the Pensacola West Florida District. In addition to being an amazingly talented person, Ann’s love and devotion to her family was second only to her love of God. Ann served as President of the Junior Women’s Club in 1951 and 1952 and was an active member of the Spanish Trail Playhouse. As a member of the STP, she and her family were cast members in the musical productions of Carousel and Showboat. Ann was also an exceptionally talented seamstress who spent countless hours exercising her creativity by making clothing, accessories and anything else that was needed. During her retirement years, Ann spent hours making items such as tote bags, aprons and draperies, and she enjoyed taking sewing classes with her friends at the Washington County Area Vocational Technical School. Her creations were always made to serve as gifts for friends and/or to be sold in conjunction with a church bazaar. Ann and Paul loved to travel and upon their retirement, they took advantage of many opportunities to travel abroad as well as in the United States. Ann was an exceptionally talented vacation planner long before the Internet made it easy and she was responsible for planning all of their trips from the rst out of the country family vacation to Mexico in 1965, to Europe, Hawaii and most of the U.S. national parks. Ann experienced a major stroke in 2007 which changed everybody’s world but especially Paul’s. However, despite all of the difculties and lifestyle changes, Paul’s constant devotion to his Ann was an inspiration to all and there was no doubt that he adored “the prettiest girl in the world.” She was predeceased by her parents, O.L. and Ethel Sheppard, and her nephew Greg Booth (Gayla). Ann is survived by her husband of 65 years, Paul Gordy; her daughter, Paula Gordy Cook (Skip); her son, Steve Gordy (Ruth); her grandson, Casey Cook (ance Shaunna Boggs); his sister, Sarah Sheppard Booth (Ormond); her sisterin-law, Molly Gordy, and her niece, Elizabeth Coley (Chuck). Funeral Services will be held on Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, at 11:30 a.m., CST at the Chipley First United Methodist Church sanctuary, preceded by a visitation beginning at 10 a.m. CST, with the Rev. Jerry May, ofciating. Burial will follow in the Glenwood Cemetery with Brown Funeral Home Directing. In Lieu of Flowers, donations can be made to the First United Methodist Church building fund, 1285 Jackson Street, Chipley, FL 32428. Family and Friends may sign the online register at Ann S. Gordy Thomas Danny Stanley, 64, of Bonifay, died Feb. 11, 2014. Funeral services were held Feb. 13, 2014. Interment followed in the Pleasant Hill Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Thomas D. Stanley Harold “Foster” Hewett, 63, of Grand Ridge died at his residence Friday, Feb. 7, 2014. He was a native and life-long resident of Jackson County. Foster spent his early adult life as an insurance agent in the area before becoming a re ghter and security ofcer at Florida State Hospital. He found great joy and satisfaction from the time he spent on the farm on which he was raised. His passions included spending time with family and friends while often hunting and shing. Survivors include his wife of 42 years, Ann; son, Jeffrey and wife, Amanda; daughter, Melanie and husband, Aden Southwell; grandchildren, Aaron, Jeremiah, Hannah, Jaden, and Elijah; brother, Bobby and wife, Edna Hewett; two aunts, Charlotte Brown and “Cookie” Bradley; two brothers-in-law and their wives; two sisters-in-law and numerous nieces, nephews, and cousins. Funeral services were at 2 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014, at Grand Ridge Baptist Church with Dr. Fred Hewett and the Rev. C.D. Harn ofciating. Interment was in Cypress Cemetery with James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. The family received friends from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday at James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel. Harold Hewett In loving memory of James Henery Smith, 52, was born on Aug. 25, 1961, and passed away on Jan. 17, 2014, at the Baptist Memorial Hospital in Huntington, Tenn. He was from Caryville. You will be greatly missed. He was preceded in death by his wife Joyce Smith and Father Loyd Smith. He is survived by his mother, Annie Mae Smith, Bonifay; three sons, Jimmy (Sabrina) Smith, Jeffery Smith and Josh Balentine all of Huntington, Tenn.; ve daughters, Ashley Smith, Lori Balentine and Ryan Balentine all of Huntington, Tenn., Hope (Vance) Franklin of Bartow and Faith (Tony) Gushlaw of Chipley; three sisters, Lois (Larry) Mathis, Caryville, Johann (Angus) Brock, Vernon, and Virginia (Danny), Geneva, Ala.; two brothers Allen (Sharie) Smith, Graceville and Frank Smith, Bonifay; 19 grandkids; nine great grandkids and several nieces and nephews. Services were at 11 a.m. for a dinner and the wake was at 1 p.m. on Feb. 15 at St. Johns Free Will Baptist Church, 975 St. Johns Rd, Bonifay, with the Rev. Leon Jenkins. James H. Smith Obituaries

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL e ne w College of A pplied S tudies at FSU P anama City was appr o v ed b y the FSU Boar d of T r ustees in J une 2010 and allo ws the campus to mor e easily r espond to wor kfor ce needs in our ar ea. W e invite y ou to suppor t e Campaign for O ur Community ’ s U niv ersity b y helping us build an endo wment for tomorr o w ’ s jobs. O ur goal is to establish a $5 million endo wment for the College of A pplied S tudies b y 2017, which will allo w FSU P anama City to establish student scholarships, implement ne w degr ee pr ograms and pr o vide ne w equipment and technology T o learn ho w y ou can suppor t our community ’ s univ ersity contact M ar y B eth Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR COM MUN IT Y ’S UNIVE RSIT Y E ndo wment for T omorr o w ’ s J obs SUP POR T OU R C OM MU NIT Y ’ S UNI VER SIT Y Special to Extra Over the past 20 years, Good will Manasota has not only cre ated thousands of jobs in its local region, but it has also helped in crease revenues by the millions at other Goodwill’s around the globe. Goodwill Manasota, based in Sarasota, Fla., has developed an award winning business mod el that has been replicated all over the world. The powerhouse non-prot organization will take it one step further in 2014, when it opens a 29,000-square-foot international training center to provide its Mission Development Services program. Formalized in 2001, the MDS program teaches other Goodwill organizations how to rene and expand their enter prises, creating jobs and mission opportunities through improved business operations. “We identify and partner with Goodwill’s around the country that are challenged or have ter ritories that are being under served, and teach them how to streamline their operations,” said Bob Rosinsky, president and CEO of Goodwill Manasota. “We train them on acquiring and re taining donors, managing staff and employees, and we provide them with expertise on manag ing real estate,” he said. At a Goodwill in Northern Ari zona, headquartered in Flagstaff, that assistance made a multi-mil lion dollar difference between 2003-2012, and saved that Goodwill from disaster. “The organization was barely able to keep its doors open, drifting towards bankrupt cy,” recalls David Hirsch, CEO of the once struggling Goodwill In dustries of Northern Arizona. “It didn’t have the donations to jus tify its stores, and it wasn’t prop erly handling the donations it did receive. It was losing community support and board members as a result, slowly sinking into oblivi on,” Hirsch said. This crisis led concerned board members to reach out to the highly successful Goodwill Manasota for advice. Goodwill Industries of North ern Arizona was then operating six retail centers without a single dedicated donation center. Its an nual revenue was just under $1.6 million. It was losing over $30,000 each month. Goodwill Manasota worked with the Flagstaff team to develop a strategic plan and to provide operational guidance. “When the Goodwill Mana sota team arrived, one of the rst things they did was recommend ed closing one store. They got the board to see that they really needed to make tough decisions if we were to survive. They also recruited and retained me as the new CEO,” said Hirsch. For several months, the MDS team, led by current Goodwill Manasota CEO Bob Rosinsky, provided training to staff and management on how to efcient ly move donations from the back room to the sales oor. Sales soon began to increase by double dig its. “As donor service improved, so did donations,” said Hirsch. Fast-forward ten years, and Goodwill Industries of Northern Arizona currently operates six re tail stores, nine donation centers and ve Job Connection centers. Annual revenues exceeded $5 million in 2012. It opened a 13,000square-foot store in Bullhead City in 2008, three hours away from Flagstaff. A new headquar ters and Goodwill Good Neighbor Center was opened in 2012. The Goodwill of Northern Arizona plans on opening another Good Neighbor Center in Lake Havasu in 2014, and also plans to open four more donation centers. “The growth and development activities continue to be a ma jor part of our relationship with Goodwill Manasota today,” ex plains Hirsch. Goodwill Manasota has had similar success stories in 11 ter ritories across the United States including: Lafayette, La.; Tucson, Ariz.; Memphis, Tenn.; Reno, Nevada; Austin, Texas; Flag staff, Ariz.; Houston, Texas; Tal lahassee, Fla.; Mobile, Ala.; and Washington, D.C. Internationally, Goodwill Manasota has assisted several countries with techni cal assistance and it maintains partnerships in Alberta, Niagara, London, Montreal, Toronto and Sarnia, Canada. Goodwill Manasota also part ners with others to develop part or all of a territory, using its own capital for development. The MDS program currently works in territories in Marinette, Wis. and Northern Mississippi for this pur pose. It assists local staff to build out the territory and works with that staff to oversee the day-today operations. “The goal of this strategy is to develop the territo ry and eventually turn a mature operation back to the partner Goodwill. The MDS partnerships create business-to-business re lationships that ultimately ben et both organizations,” said Bob Rosinsky. When Goodwill Manasota as sumed control of the Northern Mississippi territory in 2008, it had annual revenues of approxi mately $1.6 million, employed 30 people and was serving about 78,000 donors from its two re tail locations. Annual revenues exceeded $12.7 million in 2012, 250 people were employed and 225,000 donors were assisted from 17 retail stores. The international training center in Bradenton, Florida is expected to open in the summer of 2014. It will be part of a new $13million, 65,000-square-foot cor porate campus. The expansion effort will create more than 30 local jobs in a 36,000-square-foot retail operation. The new site will consolidate staff to enhance the productivity required to provide professional services, employ ment counseling and training for additional students. Goodwill Manasota currently operates 33 donation centers and 18 retail stores in Florida’s Sara sota, Manatee, DeSoto and Hard ee Counties. It employs over 750 people, nearly 100 of which are severely disabled. This year, it helped place more than 500 peo ple into jobs and helped to pro vide more $30 million in wages. Goodwill to open international training center SPECIAL TO EE XTRA Employees of Goodwill Manasota are pictured with Bob Rosinsky, president and CEO.

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 B USINESS G UIDE Hasty Heating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson C ounties for 20 Years With Friendly and Reliable S ervice!638-3611 Advertise your service or business for as little as $10/week.Ad runs in the Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser. 638-0212 or 547-9414 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183 Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are CarpetedThree Chicks Cleaning Free Quotes Experienced References Available Flexible Hours (M-F) (850) 956-2408 Cell (850) 768-0022 You Create Ceramicart€Claymolding Glassfusion€Metalart Mosaicart€T-shirtpainting Gallery €UniqueGiftstore Book Your BirthdayParties BridalShowers FamilyEvents&Reunions CorporateTeamBuiding FieldTrips Walkinsarewelcome850 547 3321 Join us at the Art FarmŽ The Silver Door Advertise your business or service here for only $10.00 per week8 week minimum 638-0212 547-9414 HVAC Services Coolers & Freezers Service on all Makes & Models Heat Pumps, Electric & Gas Electrical Services Exterior Elevated LightingResidential and Commerical ALL YOUR PRINTING NEEDS SOLVEDFor Quote Call Kim 683-0212, x4004 WE PRINT MORE THAN JUST NEWSPAPERS Washington County imes A dvertiserHOLMES COUNTY T Easy Care Lawn & Tractor ServiceLawn Care Tree Service Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825 5019672 For Rent First in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8:00am-5:00pm. Call (850)638-1483 Cleaning in Detail by Barbara. It’s more than just a clean! Call 850-258-1204 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. 2-3557 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 30-2013-CA-000392 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, MARY L. GARRETT ALSO KNOWN AS MARY LOU GARRETT ALSO KNOWN AS MARY LOU GARRET ALSO KNOWN AS MARY L. GARRET, DECEASED, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, MARY L. GARRETT ALSO KNOWN AS MARY LOU GARRETT ALSO KNOWN AS MARY LOU GARRET ALSO KNOWN AS MARY L. GARRET, DECEASED Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Holmes County, Florida: COMMENCE AT AN IRON PIN MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4, SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 804.19 FEET TO A ONE-HALF INCH IRON ROD BEARING CAP NO. 4979 FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN NORTH 68 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 256.40 FEET TO AN EXISTING ONE AND ONE-HALF INCH IRON PIPE; THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREE 05 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 51.70 FEET TO A ONE AND ONE-FOURTH INCH IRON PIPE; THENCE RUN IN A NORTHEASTERLY DIRECTION TO THE POINT OF INTERSECTION OF A WESTERLY EXTENSION OF THE NORTHERN RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF ALLEY NO. 2, AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT OF ADDITION TO OLD PONCE DE LEON, A COPY OF WHICH IS RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT OF HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH A LINE RUNNING NORTH 17 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID LINE A DISTANCE OF 240 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IT BEING THE INTENTION OF THE GRANTORS TO CONVEY TO THE GRANTEES ALL THAT PORTION LYING SOUTH OF THE WESTERLY EXTENSION OF SAID ALLEY NO. 2 OF THE ADDITION TO OLD PONCE DE LEON OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PARCEL OF REAL PROPERTY ACQUIRED BY SAMUEL E. CARR AND LEVOY M. CARR FROM MRS. FRANCES E. CARR BY DEED DATED MARCH 7, 1958:BEGINNING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE J. H. MANNING LOT AND RUN WEST ALONG DIRT ROAD 108 1/2 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 186 FEET TO IRON STOB CORNER; THENCE NORTHEAST DIRECTION 210 FEET; THENCE IN NORTHEAST DIRECTION ALONG WEST LINE OF MANNING LOT 192 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING ON SOUTH LINE OF J. H. MANNING LOT ON THE 40 SUBDIVISION LINE AND RUN SOUTH ALONG 40 LINE 260 FEET TO IRON STOB CORNER 100 YARDS FROM CREEK; THENCE NORTHWEST DIRECTION ALONG OLD FENCE ROW 200 FEET TO A STOB; THENCE NORTH 30 FEET TO IRON STOB CORNER; THENCE NORTHEAST DIRECTION 287 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING. ALL THE ABOVE BEING A PART OF SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SOUTHEAST 1/4 IN SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA.TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A PERMANENT FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO, DESCRIBED AS A 1992 FLEETWOOD DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME BEARING IDENTIFICATION NUMBERS AL28561927447A AND AL28561927447B AND TITLE NUMBERS 66008124 AND 66008125. A/K/A 1540 OAK ST, PONCE DE LEON, FL 32455 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the Holmes County Times Advertiser. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 3 day of February, 2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: K. McDaniel Deputy Clerk **See the Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. February 12, 2014 and February 19, 2014 2-3569 NOTICE OF PUBLIC WORKSHOP On behalf of the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners, Preble-Rish, Inc., will hold a Fair Housing workshop for the general public and for area realtors and financial institutions: WHEN:T uesday, February 25, 2014 TIME: 6:00 PM WHERE:Holmes County Board of County Commissioners Board Room RE: Fair Housing Workshop. All persons are invited to attend these meetings. (Any person who decides to appeal any decision made by the County Commissioners with respect to any matter considered at said meeting will need a record of the proceedings, and for such purpose may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. The Board of County Commissioners for Holmes County, Florida will not provide a verbatim record of this meeting.) IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, Persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact Sherry Snell, Administrative Assistant, at Telephone No. (850) 547-1119. As published Feb. 19, 2014 2-3548 PUBLIC AUCTION The following vehicles will be sold at public auction at Eastern Diesel & Auto Wrecker Service, Inc. 2005 S. Waukesha, Bonifay, Fl. at 8:00 a.m. on March 19, 2014 for towing and storage: VIN # 3N1CB51D55L455848 2005 Nissan 4 DR Dothan Security or Clark A. Po Box 7163 Dothan, AL 36302 MidSouth Bank 2526 W. Main St. Dothan, AL 36304 EASTERN DIESEL AND AUTO WRECKER SERVICE, INC. February 19, 2014. 2-3566 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-329-CA M. P. BRIGMAN; and JERRY A. BIEHL, Plaintiffs, vs. LINDA J. MASSEY, Defendant. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 21, 2014, in Case No.: 13-329-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale on the front steps of the Court House at 11:00 a.m. CST on February 28, 2014 the following described property: All of the Northeast 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 35, Township 5 North, Range 16 West, lying North and East of Highway 179, Holmes County, Florida DATED: 1/22/14 KYLE HUDSON Clerk of the Court By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk February 19, 2014 and February 26, 2014. 2-3570 PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE 2ND PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners is applying to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO) for a grant under the Neighborhood Revitalization category in the amount of $630,000 under the Small Cities Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program. For each activity that is proposed, at least 51% of the funds must benefit low-and moderate-income persons. The activities, dollar amounts, and estimated percentage benefit to low-and moderate-income persons for which the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners are applying are as follows: ActivityAmount %LMI Street ImprovementsRepaving (Construction Costs)$544,261.00 Over 68% Base Fee $10,000.00 CDBG Administrative Fees $50,400.00 Resident Project Representative Inspection Fees $25,339.00 Total Funded CDBG Costs $630,000.00 *Improvement locations will be identified on a map at the hearing. The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners plan to minimize displacement of persons as a result of CDBG funded activities in the following manner: No displacement of persons will be necessary as part of this project. A public hearing to provide citizens an opportunity to comment on the application will be held at the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners Board Room, 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 5:30 p.m. A draft copy of the application will be available for review at that time. A final copy of the application will be made available at the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners Board Room, 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425 no later than February 26th and will be available for viewing between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. The application will be submitted to DEO by March 12, 2014. To obtain additional information concerning the application and the public hearing, contact Sherry Snell, Administrative Assistant, at Telephone (850) 547-1119. The public hearing is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location. Any handicapped person requiring an interpreter for the hearing impaired or the visually impaired should contact Sherry Snell, Administrative Assistant, at Telephone (850) 547-1119 at least 5 calendar days prior to the meeting and an interpreter will be provided. Any non-English speaking person wishing to attend the public hearing should contact Sherry Snell, Administrative Assistant, at Telephone (850) 547-1119 at least 5 calendar days prior to the meeting and a language interpreter will be provided. To access a Telecommunication Device for Deaf Persons (TDD) please call (850) 547-1119. Any handicapped person requiring special accommodation at this meeting should contact Sherry Snell, Administrative Assistant, at (850) 547-1119 at least 5 calendar days prior to the meeting. Pursuant to Section 102 of the HUD Reform Act of 1989, the following disclosures will be submitted to DEO with the application. The disclosures will be made available by the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners and DEO for public inspection upon request. These disclosures will be available on and after the date of submission of the application and shall continue to be available for a minimum period of 5 years. 1.Other government (federal, state, and local) assistance to the project in the form of a gift, grant, loan, guarantee, insurance payment, rebate, subsidy, credit, tax benefit, or any other form of direct or indirect benefit by source and amount; 2.The identities and pecuniary interests of all developers, contractors, or consultants involved in the application for assistance or in the planning or development of the project or activity; 3.The identities and pecuniary interests of any other persons with a pecuniary interest in the project that can reasonably be expected to exceed $50,000 or 10% of the grant request (whichever is lower); 4.For those developers, contractors, consultants, property owners, or others listed in Item 2 or Item 3 above which are corporations, or other entities, the identification and pecuniary interests by corporation or entity of each officer, director, principal stockholder, or other official of the entity; 5.The expected sources of all funds to be provided to the project by each of the providers of those funds and the amount provided; and 6.The expected uses of all funds by activity and amount. As published Feb. 19, 2014 3-3567 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-DP-16 IN THE INTEREST OF: J.L.N.B. DOB:07/12/2005 MINOR CHILDREN (SEC.39.801 (b) FS) The State of Florida to NICOLE BOVE-STEPHENS, natural mother whose residence and address is unknown. You are hereby notified that a Petition under oath has been filed in the above styled Court for the Termination of Parental Rights in the case of J.L.N.B. child, to licensed child placement agency for subsequent adoption. You are hereby noticed that an Advisory Hearing will be held before the Honorable Christopher N. Patterson, Judge of the Circuit Court, Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, at the Holmes County Courthouse, Second Floor Courtroom, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida, on the 8th day of April, 2014, at the hour of 9:00 a.m., CENTRAL TIME. You have the right to appear with counsel at this hearing. If you can not afford legal representation, the Court will appoint counsel for you at this hearing upon the determination of insolvency. You must either appear on the date and at the time specified or send a written response to the Court prior to that time. YOUR FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD OR CHILDREN. February 18, 2014, February 26, 2014, March 4, 2014 and March 12, 2014. 2-3560 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: _30-2014-CP-000006 IN RE: WILLIAM H. TURBEVILLE, Deceased. Division: PR-A_ NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of William H. Turbeville, deceased, whose date of death was September 9, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 N. Oklahoma St., Bonifay, FL32425. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is February 12, 2014. Attorney for Personal Representative: Imani A. Boykin, Esq. Florida Bar Number: 0017508 644 Cesery Boulevard, Suite 340 Jacksonville, FL32211 Telephone: (904) 632-4836 Facsimile: (904) 399-8348 Service E-Mail: Pleadings@ImaniBoykinP A.com Personal Representative: Barbara T. Holbert, Personal Represenative February 12, 2014 and February 19, 2014. j j ADOPTION: j j Adoring, Financially Secure couple await jjj 1st baby. jjj j Allison & Hal j j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Devoted, affectionate professional couple will help you, unconditionally love & be hands on with your baby; maintain contact. Allowed expenses paid. Doug & Liz 800-9184773.-Susan Stockman -FL# 0342521 Half Parson Russell Terrier, Half Rat Terrier, 3mos old, Beautiful Puppy Call 850-537-9985 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.

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B8 | Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, February 19, 2014 EMPLOYMENT TODAY!!! 1121657 Janelle Rodabaugh 850-747-5013 or jrodabaugh@pcnh.com Jessica Branda 850-747-5019 or jbranda@pcnh.com AtBoozAllenHamilton EngineeringServices,LLC,you’llhavethetoolstogrowyourcareerwhile buildinghighlysophisticatedsolutionsfortheUS DepartmentofDefense.You’llbeanimportantpart ofourteamofengineeringexpertswhoareagile andefcient,andprovidelife-cyclesolutionsfrom researchanddevelopmenttotestingandevaluation support. Thefollowingopportunitiesandmanyothers areavailableinthePanamaCity,FL,area: €Assemblers €CellularSystemsEngineers €FabricationSupervisors €ProductionControlSpecialists €SoftwareSystemsEngineersVisitboozallen.com/careersengineertalenttocreateand submitaprole. www.boozallen.com/careersWeareproudofourdiverseenvironment, EOE/M/F/D/V.Applicantsselectedwillbesubject toasecurityinvestigationandmayneedtomeet eligibilityrequirementsforaccesstoclassied information 1121827 1126937 Weareaprofessionalleadinghealthcare providerwithover250facilitiesnationwide! Wehavefull-time,part-timeandPRN opportunitiesintheCorrectionalHealthcare Field: Physician,Dentist,Psychiatrist,Nurse Practitioner,RegisteredNurse,Licensed PracticalNurse,LicensedMentalHealth Professional Toprovidequalitymedicalservicesatthe followingsites: BayCorrectionalFacilitylocatedat 5400BaylineDrive,PanamaCity,FL32404 GracevilleCorrectionalFacilitylocatedat 5168EzellRoad,Graceville,FL32440 HighlyCompetitivePay&GreatBenefits! ToApply:www.correctioncare.com; clickonCareers Call:CynthiaDeMarco317-473-5705LookWhosNewInTown! 1126945 CUSTOMERRELATIONS POSITION Mustbemotivated,ENTHUSIASTICand possessoutstandingphoneskills.Thisunique opportunityisaperfecttforthepersonthat lovesinteractingwithpeopleandworkingin fastpacedenvironments.Positionwilloffer salaryplusbonusopportunities. SubmitapplicationtoChrisCramer. ApplyonlineatBillCramerGM.com orcall850-747-7613toschedule anappointment. BenetsInclude:401K,GroupMedicalInsurance,PaidHolidaysandVacationsplusmoreBillCramer ChevroletCadillacBuickGMC 2251W23rdSt,PanamaCity,FLDRUG-FREEWORKPLACE,DMVCHECKAND EOE. 1126936 FACETOFACEINTERVIEWSFOROURMANAGEMENTTRAINEEPOSITIONS FRIDAYFEB21ST9:00am-2:00PM LOCATION:WORKFORCECENTER 625HIGHWAY231, PANAMACITY,FL32405 850-872-4340 WEAREHIRINGFORTHE FOLLOWINGLOCATIONS:PANAMACITY&MARIANNAMUSTBRINGRESUME*BADEGREEWITH1YEAREXPERIENCE ORASSOCIATESDEGREEWITH 2YEAREXPERIENCE ORHIGHSCHOOLDIPLOMAWITH 4YEARSEXPERIENCE(EXPERIENCEMUSTBEINSALES, RETAILORCUSTOMERSERVICE)www.enterprise.com/careers PLEASECALLKELLYMARSH WITHANYQUESTIONS. 850-479-7310,ext215 Kelly.Marsh@ERAC.comEnterpriseisanequalopportunityemployer EOE/M/F/D/V ENTERPRISE RENT-A-CAROPENHOUSE|CAREERFAIR! Contact Us Directly For All Of Your Recruitment Needs! TIRED OF SEARCHING FOR BUYERS?Placing a classied ad is an easy and affordable way to make your wares the focus of attention among potential buyers.What are you waiting for? C ontact us today and start turning the stuff you dont want into something you do want:CASH!GET THINGS MOVING WITH THE CLASSIFIEDS! GET THINGS MOVING WITH THE CLASSIFIEDS! Admin/Clerical Job Opportunity: Town Clerk,Town of Wausau, FL. The Town of Wausau will be accepting applications for Town Clerk; this is a highly responsible administrative and supervisory position. Responsibilities include but are not limited to, acting as the custodian of the Town’s records and seal; Notary, Clerk to the Town Council. Work involves preparing Town Council meeting agendas, minutes of Town meetings, managing town contracts, receiving legal documents on the Town’s behalf, and supporting the Mayor, Council Members and other personnel directly involved in the Town’s management. Employee is also responsible for utility reading, billing, collections, depositing, and reporting for the water department, Employee is responsible for preparing monthly financial reports to the Council, preparing payroll, filing quarterly tax reports, monthly tax reports and deposits, end of year payroll tax reports and processing W-2 and 1099 tax forms. Employee will be required to work evenings for Council meeting and other Town Board meetings. Employee must maintain effective working relationships, exercise independent judgment, confidentiality, discretion and initiative in carrying out the daily operations of the Town. The Town Clerk is an appointed official. Work is performed under limited supervision under the direction of the Mayor and Town Council. Minimum Qualifications: Knowledge of effective budget processes, administrative principles, practices, procedures and methods. Working knowledge of legal advertising requirements, intergovernmental relations, election laws and procedures, and procurement laws and procedures. Considerable knowledge of the practice and methods, and state regulations for public records management, retention, and disposition. Ability to effectively organize, supervise, train, and direct employees. Proficient in computer applications, including Microsoft Office and Quick Books Pro Ability to communicate effectively orally and in writing. Knowledge of accounts receivable and payable Training & Experience High School Diploma or equivalent; prior city, town, or other governmental experience is a plus. Special Requirements Will be required to pass a Quick Books prove it test thru One Stop prior to interview. Notary Public of the State of Florida, or obtain license within three (3) months of employment. Valid Florida Driver’s License. Ability to be bonded The Town of Wausau is a drug-free workplace. A pre-employment drug screen, criminal history background investigation and a driver’s license verification will be conducted. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER Rate of Pay for this Position: Depending on Qualifications To apply please send cover letter and resume to: Town of Wausau, 1607 Second Avenue, PO Box 39, Wausau, FL 32463 Phone 850-638-1781 Deadline for applications is February 21, 2014 @ 4:00pm Web Id 34279720 Absolute Auction. Ponce de Leon, FL. 11+/-acres, 21,000+/sq. ft. of improvements near US Hwy 90, offered in 7 parcels. February 27, 1:00pm, gtauctions.com, 205. 326.0833, Granger, Thagard & Associates, Inc. G.W. Thagard AU2846, AB2100, BK3009116. GUN SHOW FORTWALTON FAIRGROUNDSFebruary 22nd & 23rd SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL79626 to 56654 Hitachi 10inch Jobsite table saw on portable stand. Used once, in box. Model C10FR. Paid $240.00, sale $175.00, OBO. 850-263-9998. DISH TV Retailer. Starting $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) Broadband Internet starting $14.95/ month (where available.) Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-980-6193 Liberation by American Standard Walk-In Bath -Don’t Struggle Getting Out Of A Normal Bathtub. Stay in your home longer, safely, independently. Liberation Walk-In Baths Commended by the Arthritis Foundation. Best Lifetime Warranty in the industry. Hydrotherapy, Chromatherapy, Aromatherapy no extra cost. Installation Included! Get $1,000 Off -Call Toll-Free Today 1-866-583-1432. Wanted to Rent; Farm land or pasture in Chipley & suroundding areas for the year 2014. 850-718-1859. Food Svc/Hospitality Dishwasher French’s Restaurant is now accepting applications for a Dishwasher. Apply in person Hwy 90 Caryville, FL. 850-548-5800 Web ID#: 34280996 Education CHIPOLA COLLEGE is accepting applications for the following full time positions: Program Manager Emergency Medical Services Staff Assisant Central Cashier Coordinator Academic Center for Excellence Position information and application deadlines available at www.chipola.edu/ personnel/jobs Contact Human Resources at pippenw@chipola. edu or call (850)718-2269 for additional information. Candidates may be subject to background investigations. Equal Opportunity Employer Web Id 34279662 Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Logistics/TransJOB Announcement DRIVERS WANTED Tri-County Community Council, Inc., is accepting applications for the Transportation Program. Great Benefit Package. REQUIREMENTS: Must be 23 years of age and have an Operators Driver’s License with at least 5 years driving experience without violations. Must agree to annual physical and background screening. DUTIES: Transport riders to a pre-determined schedule. Must be able to secure wheelchairs (will train); be a team player assisting other drivers when needed; enjoy working with elderly, disabled and other riders. Applications may be obtained at any of the Tri-County Community Council, Inc., offices or on the agency website www.tricountycommunitycouncil.com and submitted by Monday, February 24 at 4:00 p.m. For information call LeaAnn, Personnel Tech 850-547-3689 Successful applicant will be subject to pre-employment drug test. Only qualified applicants will be considered. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER AND DRUG AND SMOKE FREE WORKPLACE. Web Id 34280769 29 Serious People to Work From Anywhere Using a Computer Up To $1,500-$5,000 PT/FT www.amazing lifestylefromhome.com AIRLINE CAREERS begin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial Aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877741-9260 www.FixJets .com CDL-A Team Owner Operators: $2,500 Lease Incentive! Team Dedicated Routes. Great Revenue & Regular Weekly Home Time! 888-486-5946 NFI Industries nfi partners.com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 1-888-368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: 843-266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com EOE Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible. 1-866362-6497 You can become an expert in HVAC installation and repair. Pinnacle Career Institute online HVAC education in as little as 12 months. Call us today: 1-877-651-3961 or go online: www.HVACOnline-Education.com Executive Office Space for rent downtown Chipley. (850)638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 FOR RENT 1B/R apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 Mandi Lea Apartments in Vernon, 2/BR. Financial Assistance available if qualified. 638-4640. 2BR/1BA garage and carport, HWY 2, suitable for two adults, no pets, $500/MO, First, last and deposit, 6/MO lease 850-849-6444. 3BR/ Rental Home for small family $500/Month located in Bonifay. 850-768-9808. 3BR/2BA for rent. No pets. Deposit & references required. $695/mth Chipley. (850)638-1918. 3BR/1.5BA. 815 8th St ., Chipley. CH&A, large lot, fruit trees. For rent or sale. Sale price reduced. 850-547-2091, 850-481-5352. House For Rent Older House in Dogwood Lakes, fenced yard, on 8th fairway of golf course, 3BR/2BA Partiality furnished, 2733 Muir Lane. Available 3/1, $575/MO first and last 850-9565044. House for Rent near Downtown Chipley. 2BR/1BA. $550/MO. Call 850-849-1735. 2/3/BR Mobile Homes For Rent $500/MO and up. Includes Garbage, sewage, and lawn service. Electric $57 turn on fee. www.charloscountryliving.com 850-209-8847 2BR/1BAMobile Homes W/G included. $400 plus Deposit. 547-4232, 850-527-4911. 2BR/2BAMobile Homes W/G included. $425 plus Deposit. 547-4232, 850-527-4911. 3/2 doublewide $575/MO, 3/1.5 singlewide $425/MO, water included, section 8 accepted Chipley city limits. 850-260-9795 FOR RENT Nice mobile home excellent location in Chipley. No Pets. 850-638-4640 HUNTING LAND for rent or lease, 1 year or 5 years, 160 acres or 300 acres. For more information call (850)638-1911 or (850)326-0044. Mobile Home For Rent 3BR/2BA in Chipley Area $650 Very private w/Big Back Yard. NO PETS. 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Excellent low rate financing. Call now 1866-952-5303, Ext. 169 Mobile Homes with acreage. Ready to move in. Seller Financing (subject to credit approval). Lots of room for the price, 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850308-6473 VMFhomes .com Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414