<%BANNER%>

Holmes County times-advertiser ( June 19, 2013 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Holmes County times-advertiser
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
Place of Publication:
Bonifay, FL
Creation Date:
June 19, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00100549:00223

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Holmes County times-advertiser
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
Place of Publication:
Bonifay, FL
Creation Date:
June 19, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00100549:00223


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

50¢ www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM Phone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 IN BRIEF imes imes imes T dvertiser imes imes imes imes T T dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser A HOLMES COUNTY By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY — The Holmes County District Schools welcomed 11 new school buses into their eet on Thursday. “All these buses are state of the art and have superior marks in safety,” said Superintendent Eddie Dixon. “The buses are longer, holding four more children and have seats that are a foot taller to protect the children’s heads and necks. There are also four digital cameras throughout the bus for increased security.” Dixon said the buses cost $106,000 each, and if not for the funds provided by the Ebro Greyhound Track’s additional funding, the district would not have been able to afford the buses. “Right now, we’ve got enough to have one provided By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY — Holmes County Board of County Commissioners discussed preparations for the arrival of Federal Emergency Management Agency representatives with the Director of Emergency Operations Center Wanda Stafford during a special session on Thursday. “We met with the FEMA director yesterday at the EOC,” Stafford said. “The kick-off meeting will be held in a couple of weeks, and FEMA representatives will want to meet with us to go with the Holmes County road foremen to assess damages. Our project worksheets will be written at that time, and we’ll work out all the small and large projects.” Stafford said 75 percent of the funding will be paid at the beginning for the small projects. However, for the large projects, they will ask for a 12 percent match from the county. “We’re going to ask for a waiver,” Stafford said. “In 2009 we asked for a waiver, and we had half of the match waived.” She said the EOC would also ask for vector control, which is a countywide mosquito spraying. “I’m requesting a county engineer to make sure that all FEMA funds are captured,” Stafford said. “These representatives may come in as soon as next week, and they’ll want to be ready to get started.” Stafford also requested two temporary positions be opened speci cally for documentation upkeep and organization. “This is a critical point,” she said. “Documentation determines if we get funding or not, and if one little detail is out of order, we risk not By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com ESTO — Esto Town Council held the rst reading of its new proposed mobile home ordinance during their Aug. 6 meeting. “All mobile homes must meet the following requirements for Esto prior to being placed on real property in the town,” Council member Teresa Harrison read. “All mobile homes must be structurally sound, clean, sanitary, well-maintained and approved by council. Council may give a 90-day extension, if needed. “All mobile homes must meet all U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards and the Florida Manufactured Building Act. All mobile homes must meet all requirements on Application for Town of Esto. “If any mobile home is moved onto the property without council approval, a $250 ne will be assessed and a lien will be placed on the property. An additional $10 per day will be charged until it is moved off the property.” Council member Darlene Madden asked about the purpose of the 90-day extension. “Sometimes a good mobile home will be moved in, but it still isn’t inhabitable,” Town Council President Danny Powell said. “The 90 days gives anyone a reasonable amount of time to complete necessary nishing touches, like putting on the skirting, hooking up the water, etc. After that, the nes will start, and I will add that the 90-day extension is still based on council approval.” John Little came before the council to ask that they sign an ordinance against granting illegal immigrants amnesty and bene ts. The council approved of the resolution of support. “I realize we have illegals, and they’ve been here for a long time,” Powell said. “I just don’t think that it’s fair to those of us who are paying our dues and that can’t get ahead because they’re taking the burden of these illegals.” The council approved of paying a local man $2,115 to repair and refurbish the kitchen and inside of the Esto Community Center. Madden said there will be a yard sale on Sept. 14 to raise money for next year’s Two-Toe Tom Festival. She said they are accepting donations to sell at the yard sale to help raise funds. She said anything will be accepted as a donation, from clothes to furniture, and if anyone was interested in making a donation or would like more information to contact her at 263-3201. Esto approves rst reading of mobile home ordinance See FEMA A2 County preps for FEMA CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser Superintendent Eddie Dixon introduces 11 new buses into the Holmes County District Schools’ eet on Thursday. School district welcomes 11 new buses NEW WHEELS See BUSES A3 Bethlehem Elementary Open House BETHLEHEM — Bethlehem Elementary will hold its Open House from 8:3010:30 a.m., on Friday, Aug. 16. Open House will be for pre-k through fth grade. Bonifay Middle School Orientation BONIFAY — Orientation for the 2013-14 school year is at the Bonifay Middle School cafeteria as follows: fth grade, Aug. 14 at 8:30 a.m.; Sixth grade, Aug. 14 at 10 a.m.; Seventh grade, Aug. 15 at 8:30 a.m.; Eighth grade, Aug 15. at 10 a.m. Ponce De Leon Elementary School free breakfast PONCE DE LEON — The Holmes County School Board has announced an amendment to its policy for serving meals to students in the National School Breakfast Program for the 2013-14 school year. All students will be served breakfast at no charge at Ponce de Leon Elementary School For more information, call the Gail Anderson, food service administrator, at 5479341 ext. 256. Alpaca farming is one local family’s golden eece | B1 By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY — Assistant State Attorney Brandon Young came before the Bonifay City Council on behalf of the Bonifay Kiwanis Club to renegotiate a 50-year contract between the city and the club for the use of Memorial Field during the council meeting on Monday. “There is a 50-year agreement between the Bonifay Kiwanis Club and the City of Bonifay for the use of Memorial Field that was renewed in 1995,” Young said. “Before the Kiwanis Club would receive numerous bills to pay various people for jobs, and this contract was arranged between the club and the city so that the club would pay one lump sum to the city to cover all the expenses associated with using Memorial Field for two events.” The contract agreed on a payment of $5,000 per year, which covered the yearly rodeo and all-night gospel sing, with a cost of living reassessment, he said. “Over the past few years, they’ve been receiving a few bills in addition to the $5,000,” Young said. “Since the club has done away with the allnight gospel sing; there’s only one event. Also, at the time, garbage was a large expense to the city, which was around $2,000. However, for the last few years, the club has a contract dealing directly with Waste Management, so that is no longer an expense of the city.” Young proposed the 50year contract be reduced to a ve-year contract and the lump amount be held at $6,000. “I can admit, in 18 years $5,000 may not seem to be the appropriate amount any more, and I don’t feel that handing you $5,000 and saying we’re done because of a 50-year contract is going to leave us in very good standings with one another,” Kiwanis requests contract change BONIFAY CITY COUNCIL Volume 123, Number 18 See BONIFAY A2 Wednesday, AUGUST 14 2013 INDEX Opinion ................................ A4 Outdoors .............................. A6 Sports .................................. A7 Extra .................................... B1 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B7

PAGE 2

Local A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, August 14, 2013 Young said. “We need to be able to renegotiate the contract every ve years so that it’s still fresh with those who can remember when the contract renego tiated last. We appreciate all that the city has done, but there’s something that needs to be done about this contract.” Council member Rich ard Woodham suggested a workshop be held to nego tiate the terms of the new contract. The council approved of City Engineer Amir Zafar’s request for a change order that would speed up the progress being made on several streets in Bonifay, which includes Varner and Virginia Avenue. The council also ap proved of allowing Stantec Engineering Firm to clean up Middlebrooks Park on Sept. 10. The council approved of grant writer Bob Jones putting in an application for a $50,000 grant to x the water park at Middle brooks Park. “We’ve got to do some thing additional to the play ground and picnic area to do what we need to do for additional points,” Jones said. “We also need a new recreational committee. The old one has been in active for so long that it’s considered non-existent.” Mayor Lawrence Cloud agreed to come up with at least two additional mem bers in the next few days and appointed council member Micah McCor mick chairman. City Clerk Jeri Gibson read the First Reading of the city’s Capital Assets Policy, which she indicated was deemed necessary by the city’s auditor. “All purchase of real and personal property with an original cost of $1,000 and an expected life of one year or more shall be designat ed by the City as a capital asset,” read Gibson. “All purchases of capital as sets shall be subject to the purchasing, cash disburse ment and procurement procedures currently ad opted by the Council at the time of purchase.” Cloud informed the council he and Public Works Supervisor Jack Marell spent hours with a representative from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to assess 37 different proj ects throughout the city because of the damage caused by the recent rains. Marell said those indi viduals wanting to check to see if FEMA would help reimburse or pay for dam age caused by the recent excessive rains during the State of Emergency can contact Wanda Stafford at the Emergency Opera tions Center at 547-5114. The next scheduled meeting of the Bonifay City Council is set for 6 p.m. on Aug. 26. getting funded at all.” Commissioner David Whitaker said he had spoke with the Director of Chipola Work Force and said there is additional manpower and funding to help with just that. Stafford agreed to look into the Chipola Work Force and the Board approved of giving Stafford the authority to head the FEMA project. The board approved of the resolution stating the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners was in support of Walton Coun ty’s RESTORE Act, which was presented to the Board at the last meeting. “They were wanting us to join forces with them be fore, but we didn’t have the chance to review it fully,” Chairman Monty Merchant said. During the last Board of County Commissioners’ meeting, Larry Jones and Billy McKee with Walton County presented a reso lution to the Board stating the Board was in support of Walton’s upcoming RE STORE Act Project. “We’re working on two projects pertaining to the RESTORE Act,” Jones said. “The rst is an inven tory of all unpaved roads that would affect the Choc tawhatchee River water shed with sediment. So far we’ve got over 800 listed in Holmes, Washington and Walton counties.” Jones said the second project was a study on bank erosion. “These studies are just the rst step in getting grants to pave these roads, so that sedimentation off of these roads can be greatly reduced,” he said. “We’re moving on with the studies, and this resolution is just saying that Holmes County supports our project.” County Attorney Jeff Goodman advised the board that this was an ideal opportunity. “These restoration claims go all the way up to Washington,” Goodman said. “We’re talking billions, not millions, of dollars in funding.” County Engineer Cliff Knauer added the studies would help them in future grant pursuits as well. Goodman requested the new Garbage Franchise Agreement be tabled until the next meeting. “The one that was given to you is the rst draft, not the nal draft,” Goodman said. “There’s only very few changes between the rst and last, but I just want to make sure you’re signing the right agreement.” Goodman gave an up date on the Holmes County Fair Board. “I had a conversation with Clint Erickson, and he has informed me that the Fair Board has agreed to dissolve and has sought counsel with Attorney Lucas Taylor,” Goodman said. “I must admit that at rst I was very uneasy to hear they’ve taken counsel with another attorney, but when I heard it was Lucas, I could rest assured know ing they’re in very capable hands. They’ve got a lot to do to dissolve the Fair Board in the proper fashion, but Taylor will be more than able to help them in this transition.” Greg Barton, Director of Emergency Management Services, gave a report on the success of the EMS Col lections, saying they were over their projected amount and more successful than surrounding agencies. “We’ve had 1,665 ac counts come in,” Barton said. “Everyone goes to collections now, regardless of being late on payments, as to the approval of the council.” Barton said he was hav ing an issue with the New Hope Fire Station. “We rent it out for the community to hold their family reunions, community functions and fundraisers. However, we’ve got one who wants to come in to train drug and attack dogs,” Bar ton said. “The main prob lem is that we don’t have a lease agreement, and this is the rst time we’ve encoun tered something like this.” The board agreed Bar ton should politely reject the person’s request because of liability and the upcoming hurricane season, which the re station is also used as an emergency shelter. The board also agreed Goodman should write up a lease agreement. “If you’re going to rent the building out then you must have a lease agree ment, otherwise you run into the problem Washing ton County had with their Agricultural Center, when people were coming in and holding raves there,” Good man said. “There was ex tensive damage and drugs left there from these people who preyed on those with weak lease agreements.” Commissioner Bill Par ish wanted to stress the State of Emergency has been lifted, and county poli cies are back in place. FEMA from page A1 LxœP ic tur ed: B obb y H ilt on, M ichael Jo y c e T im, E ddie; not pic tur ed: S t ev en and P auline P RO P ANE r ells and tank e x change TO P LINE A PP LIANCES w ashers dr y ers and r efriger a t ors GRILLS AND C OOKERS O ut door c ook ing c en t er with all the xin ’ s f or a family f east AS Pr op an e & Ap pl ia nc e Ce nt er O ur e xp erienc e d st a pro vides p ersonal ser vic e with a smile – st op b y t o day a nd y ou ’ll se e wh y! Ž•  u • Meet the faces of H yT emp G as L ocal f olks who ’ v e pr oudly ser v ed y ou f or man y y ears! Y E T I C o olers and man y c ook ing ac c essories M ember FDIC 3 3 W e s t G a r d e n S t r e e t P e n s a c o l a F L 3 2 5 0 2 850.202.9900 or 1.877.962.3224 1 7 S E E g l i n P a r k w a y F t W a l to n B e a c h F L 3 2 5 4 8 850.244.9900 or 1.866.362.3224 w w w .beachc ommunit ybank .c om w  Y • Ÿ s §   y    w y §• p ’ § • b £ Y l uiY Y • ¦  ¦ ua] s § p ¦ s •£ ’Ž ƒ £b Ž x £ Ž x Ž e £ ’§¦ s $ ƒ¡ C $ m { Ž £ m h • Ž § ¨ £’ ] • £§ § £ e ] ¦ ¦ s Ž £ ƒ Ž § ] m em bb b $ ] ? | {y { F e ]O J eg RZg je CZGJ C O J ZGq RZG N “ S er ving Y ou Is O ur Most Imp or tant P r o duc t ” *P r oper t y Insur anc e is not a v ailable in the sta t e of F lorida fr om A ut o O wners Insur anc e BONIFAY from page A1

PAGE 3

Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 Wednesday, August 14, 2013 D r H a wk i n s, M eg T a yl o r a n d s t a wo u l d l i k e t o i n v i t e yo u t o j o i n u s f o r o u r O p e n H o us e a nd Back t o S cho o l C e l e b r a t i o n F ri d a y A ug us t 16th f r o m 12-2p m. C o m e j o in t h e ce le b ra t io n w i t h f o o d f un a n d f r e e s c h o o l s u p p lies Dr Ha wkins and Meg opened at a ne w location and ar e e x cit ed t o contin ue t o pr o vide y ou and y our f amil y with e x ceptional medical car e W e ar e locat ed at 31 0 E. Byr d A v e ., Suit e B Bonif a y W e ar e accepting patients and most insur ance C a l l f o r a n a p p o in t me n t a t (850) 547-4440. G o d B l ess yo u f o r yo ur c o n t in u e d s u p p o r t a nd p r a ye rs. P A TRI CK H A WKINS, M.D MEG T A YL O R ARNP W O MEN'S HEAL TH KE Y T OPICS Y OU NEED T O KNO W ABOUT AD VER TISING ONLINE FREE DIGIT AL AD VERTISING SEMINAR FOR L OC AL BUSINESS O WNERS/REPRESENT A TIVES E VER YBOD Y L O VES FREE GIVE AWA Y S B ring y our business c ar d f or a chanc e t o win gr ea t priz es! A ug 19 a t 4 pm ( C T ) a t the W ashingt on C oun t y Chamber 672 5th S tr eet Chipley S eating is limit ed RSVP t o: 850-638-0212 O nline adv er tisin g is a k e y elemen t of an y adv er tising or mar k eting pr omotion. I f y ou ar en ’ t using dig ital adv er tising t o r each y our cust omer base someone else pr obably is I f y ou ar e adv er tising online g r ea t! W e ’ r e going t o c o v er best pr ac tic es t o help both seasoned dig ital adv er tisers and beg inners alike By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY — Holmes Coun ty District School Board reviewed and approved administrative programs for the 2013-14 school year during the Board’s Aug. 6 meeting. At the top of their agenda, the board approved its con tract with the Holmes Coun ty Sheriff’s Ofce to provide local law enforcement for school board meetings and school-related functions. “It’s very economical,” Chairman Rusty Williams said. “We get more than what we pay for.” The board also ap proved the Code of Student Conduct. “The only thing that has changed is that we’ve done away with requiring students to make up days that are missed, and we’ve added verbiage against bul lying,” District Administra tor Jean West said. “Though the change in requiring stu dents to make up missed days is more like reverting back to the old code, before they were required to make up days on Saturday morn ings beginning at 6 a.m.” The board approved of a personnel handbook. “This is the rst time we’ve had a district hand book,” Superintendent Ed die Dixon said. “It’s a per sonnel handbook that goes to every employee within the district, which included custodians, bus drivers, etc. It is a collaboration of board policies and state statutes that not only gives our per sonnel answers to their questions but the reasons behind them.” The board approved of an Interagency Agreement with Chipola College for the Take Stock in Children Program. “This program has been around for years, raising money for scholarships, and then about three years ago it just kind of stalled out,” Dixon said. “Chipola College has volunteered to adminis trate this program for us at no cost. This program is for at-risk children who won’t receive academic scholar ships and just fall between the cracks.” School board member Debbie Kolmetz said she was happy that the Take Stock in Children scholar ship was returning to Hol mes County schools. The board also approved of Project Application for 21st Century Community Learn ing Center to help fund the local WINGS program. “This is a wonderful pro gram that has been very benecial to our commu nity,” Williams said. Other items the board approved included Service Agreement for Applied Be havior Analysis through Florida State University’s Early Childhood Autism Program; Performance Contract with Spectrum Counseling rst year exten sion; Performance Contract for Occupational Therapy Services second year ex tension; July 29 meeting minutes; and Project Appli cation for IDEA Part B, En titlement and IDEA, Part B and Preschool. “We’re getting ready for a new school year,” Dixon said. “We’ve visited all the facilities, and we’ve got the air conditioning for Ponce de Leon High School almost ready. Thursday, teachers will be returning to all the schools in Holmes County, and then the students will be back on Monday.” Board Member Shirley Owens wanted to remind everyone several of their bus drivers had went out to pick up the district’s 11 new school buses. The next meeting of the Holmes County District School Board is set for 6 p.m. on Aug. 20. School District preps for new school year The bene ts of hearing instruments var y by type and degree of loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Discounts off MSRP Previous purchases excluded. For a limited time. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Clean,clear natur al sound Y our Hearing Aids communicate with each other automatically adjusting themselves. Ear -to-Ear Synchronization: Settings are automatically transferred to the other aid. Beltone Pr omise™ Hearing Aid System $1000 off Applies to 2 Hearing Aids at Pr emier Level. $800 off Adv antage Level. MARIANNA 3025 6th STREET (850)387-4931 W ednesdays & F ridays Allen Barnes HAS: BC-HIS 24 Y ears Experience Bill Fletcher HAS: BC-HIS 24 Y ears Experience WE’RE IN Y OUR NEIGHBORHOOD! CHIPLEY 1611 MAIN STREET #4 (850)387-4931 Monday F riday The bene ts of hearing instruments var y by type and degree of loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Discounts off MSRP Previous purchases excluded. For a limited time. Cannot be combined with any other offers. IŸ Rt£ ]†Œ It f • L  •t { ; =…t ƒ } W•†} †ƒ f  b†›… Yt‹†› £ \• †{ 9› 9 Dt†• W•†{ [‹} 9< \’ •†• x £ 9R ;› [t›†ƒ 1361 Jackson A v e C hiple y 638-1756 w ashingt on@bic .c om 1108 N. W aukesha S t B onifa y 547-4227 holmes@bic .c om T rust in y our local F ar m Bur eau agenc y W e ha v e been her e f or 60 y ears and ar e her e t o sta y Q{ t‹ 9ƒ › ‰ Q{ t‹ V‚ ‚†{ ‰ Q{ t‹ \ • †{‰ Q{ t‹ 9} ˆ › • ‰ BUSES from page A1 to each school,” Dixon said. “I would like to look into getting additional buses fairly soon. We still have buses that are 13 to 18 years old, and that’s just not going to hack it.” He explained the pro posed funding was es tablished into the millage increase to help purchase the buses. “These new buses get over 11 miles to the gallon, which is almost double the amount of the old ones, which only get six miles to the gallon,” Dixon said. “The money we’re saving in gas is going to take care of most of the interest rate in and of itself. This is a great investment for the safety of our students as well as economically for the school district.”

PAGE 4

Chipley seeks growth The Chipley City Council is to be commended for their proactive work toward extending city water lines south of Interstate 10. The process back in February when Mayor Linda Cain invited Consultant Doug Bruce to explain to the council what the city could do to seek grants to fund the expansion of the utilities beyond the I-10 boundary. Getting utilities south of the interstate would open up properties for new businesses such as restaurants and hotels and could generate much needed tax revenue for the city and county. The city selected the Tallahassee rm of Doug Bruce & Associates to serve as consultants in the process. On Thursday, Angela Drzewiecki, representing Doug Bruce & Associates, presented a grant proposal to the council. The council was set to approve a resolution on Tuesday authorizing the consultants to seek a Water Supply Development Community Assistance Initiative Grant from the Northwest Florida Water Management District. This resolution is just one small step, but it is a step forward toward progress, so congratulations to Mayor Cain and the rest of the council for looking to the future for not only Chipley, but Washington County as well. Progress at Dozier Kudos to Gov. Rick Scott and his Cabinet for clearing the path for researchers from the University of South Florida to exhume bodies at the former Dozier School for Boys in Marianna. Former inmates at the school have alleged abuse, rape, torture and even murder of children by adult staff members in the 1950s and 60s. USF researchers have identi ed 50 graves in the schools unmarked burial grounds, which are 19 more than the state found in a brief investigation that concluded in 2008. Researchers, as well as the families of the dead children, want to exhume the bodies so they can be examined and identi ed. In May a judge denied a request from Attorney General Pam Bondi to exhume the remains. In response, USF applied to the Florida Department of State for an archaeological permit to dig up the burial sites. However, Secretary of State Ken Detzner turned it down, saying his department doesnt have the legal authority. That was a imsy, bureaucratic dodge. On Aug. 6, the governor and his Cabinet members Bondi, Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam and Chief Financial Of cer Jeff Atwater unanimously approved a land agreement that will allow the USF research to proceed. We applaud the move, especially Bondis persistence in pursuing this. The families deserve answers as to what happened to their loved ones. In our VIEW By Wendy Victoria Northwest Florida Daily News As assignment editor, I get frequent requests from authors to write about books they published themselves. Being a bit of a book snob, I almost always say no. Last week, though, I said yes after getting a book from a local woman in her 80s who wrote about growing up on a farm in Holmes County. Ironically, she doesnt want her name used and doesnt want the publicity, which begs the question of why she brought me the book. I cant answer that, but I can tell you I wouldnt have survived her upbringing and neither would my children. The fth of 10 children, the author says she was raised in a house with no screens, running water or outhouse. The only furniture they had was two beds, a table, chairs and a rocking chair with one leg shorter than the other. When one of the kids misbehaved, her mother whipped all of them with a branch from a peach tree in the yard. That tree was missing so many switches it never produced more than a few tiny, ugly peaches. Between the ages of about 5 and 10, the author was entrusted with the care of her ve younger brothers while her mother worked in the elds. She writes about holding a pillow over her baby brothers faces so she could try to get them to nap. Only a child herself, she didnt realize that could have killed them. Any shoes they wore didnt t and they didnt complain. They ate what they could grow or what was given to them in trade. Their mother convinced them that eating chicken feet would make them better looking. Later, the author gured out her mother likely just wanted to save the better parts of the chicken for the pastor when he visited. When she left home at 17, shed never seen her re ection in a mirror, taking her mothers word that she was pretty. Shed never been anywhere other than her home, church or school. She was afraid. Still, she turned out OK, as did every one of her siblings, she writes. And thats more than we can say for a lot of kids raised in more permissive times. One of my friends asked me if we had drug problems when I was growing up, she wrote. I replied, I had a drug problem when I was growing up. I was drug to church two times on Sunday. I was drug to the cotton elds every day. I was drug behind the house when I disobeyed my parents And all of those drugs are still in my veins. They affect my behavior and everything I do, say or think. God bless the parents who drug us. Daily News Assignment Editor Wendy Victoria can be reached at 358-4478 or wvictoria@ nwfdailynews.com. Guest COLUMN Elderly author grew up with her own type of drug problem HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. OPINION www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, August 14, 2013 A Page 4 Section The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@ bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci @chipleypaper.com 850-547-9414 Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 ADVERTISING Stephanie Smith: ssmith@ chipleypaper. com 850-638-0212 Mr. Ben Smith sent me word that some errors occurred in my previous story, and knowing that he had recently celebrated his 88th birthday, Jack and I paid him a visit. I often make errors in my stories and dont usually try to correct them and I wont in this case, because most of the material came from Barbara the daughter of Brown Miller, in the Heritage of Holmes County book. However, Mr. Smith and Millers son Julian Miller did agree that the story of water in the gas tank was just a story and did not happen. I searched the E.W. Carswell book Holmsteading to nd the date of the formation of the N.SD Miller Wholesale Distribution Co. but was unsuccessful in nding a date. There was an N.D. Miller store listed in the early 1920s and in Jan 1923, N.D. Miller was listed as owning stock in the newly formed Farmers and Merchants Bank which bought the assets of the failed Holmes County Bank. Other than the wholesale distribution company, Mr. N. D. Miller is also remembered for managing the Eureka Hotel which was built by Mr. G.W. Ban l, but was operated by Mr. and Mrs. Miller from 1910 for many years. Mr. Ben Smith worked for the N.D. Miller Company full time from 1942 through 1956, but worked part time as a youth. Over the years, many people worked for the Miller Company. Tom Jenkins told me he worked for them. But in addition to the ones mentioned last week, Mr. Smith recalled J.W. Leavins, Cecil Yates, and Elbert Harrell. The company serviced independent grocers from the Chattahoochee River to Pensacola. Some additional Bonifay stores he remembered were the Suwanee Store, with Roy Dowling as the proprietor and later Mr. J.M. Browning. The only restaurant he remembered was operated by a Greek named Steve Koutric. Mrs. Videll Mcfatters was a general store with dry goods as well as groceries. In Leonia there was Heath Mercantile operated by Hiram Spears. Dady Post Of ce was there. He told how during the war (WWII) candy was scarce and whatever the wholesaler got in was apportioned between all the stores they serviced. He remembered how Mr.Spears daughters swarmed his truck looking for the sweet treats when he serviced them. The local rolling stores lled their traveling stores with N.D. Miller merchandise. On the back of their store they carried chicken coops. They would take chickens and eggs in trade for goods. Then, they would trade those items back to the company in payment for their bill. According to Ben Smith, one driver falsi ed his weight tickets to the degree that Mr. Brown Miller sued him for his debt and was awarded a 40 acre eld. Because Irish potatoes were so much a part of their business, Brown Miller who had bought the company, planted the entire 40 acres in potatoes. Brown Miller had lived previously in Miami and made contacts there to sell the chickens and the eggs. When the rolling stores had collected enough to load a truck, Wallace Donaldson would deliver them via truck to Miami. Brown Miller also contracted with the military for delivery of rations for soldiers. Mr. Smith would pick them up from the canning plants. He said from the number of Van Camp Pork and Beans he hauled, he surmised that the army only fed beans and crackers. He said he delivered tons of soda crackers (thats what we called saltines then) and it took 14,000 pounds of Klotz Crackers to ll a 40 foot trailer. He hauled 2 tons of Henderson brand sugar a week from Louisiana. I asked if a lot of that went to bootleggers and he af rmed that it did. I also asked if he knew local people that the company bought syrup from. He said the Cope family in Chipley furnished a lot and Silas Lee, Quincys dad, furnished some. I have a feeling that my granddaddy, Tom Wells, did too. I found these syrup labels among the Tison memorabilia but I would guess that it was some of Jacks Grandma Meekers family, the Youngs, who made the syrup. Mr. Smith said that the whole N.D. Miller operation shut down for the week of July 4th and all employees and their families were invited to a big picnic on the 4th at Jenkins Fish Camp at Seven Runs on the Choctowhatchee River where they could swim, sh, and have a good time. Ben Smith still lives near where he, his six brothers and one sister grew up. They attended Fairview School located on what is now Malcolm Taylor Road. He remembers Mr. Drane Kates as his earliest teacher. Daughter Sarah lives nearby. Son Larry who works at Jerkins also lives nearby. Son Ray drives a truck that hauls all of Willie Nelsons equipment and a kind of rolling gift shop. Ben sang southern gospel with Quincy Carnley, Devon Andrews, and Henry Ray Kent or Roy Yates with Marion Moss as pianist. He loves visitors and recalling old times. We enjoyed our visit with this man who loves to tell how to be a redneck. Visit with Mr. Smith adds to N.D. Miller Company story HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison The label from a can of Pure Cane Syrup from the National Can Company in Baltimore, Md., features the N.D. Miller Company Store in Bonifay.

PAGE 5

A u t o-O w n er s I n s ura n ce ra n ks hig h es t a m o n g a u t o in s ura n ce p r o v ider s in t h e J .D P o w er a n d A s s o ci a t es 2008-2012 A u t o C l a im s S t udiesS M. 2012 s t ud y b a s e d o n 12,508 t o t a l r es p o n s es, ra n k in g 26 in s ura n ce p r o v ider s. E x c l udes t h os e w i t h c l a im s o n l y f o r g l a s s/w in d s hie ld t h e/s t o len, r o ad side a s si s t a n ce o r b o di l y in j ur y c l a im s. P r o p r iet a r y r es u l ts b a s e d o n exp er ien ces a n d p er cep t io n s o f co n s um er s s ur v e y e d N o v em b er 2011-S ep t em b er 2012. Y o ur exp er ien ces m a y va r y V i si t j d p o w er .co m. H c£‘ — „£œ ‘ŽV—“”‘ —£ M ‘ m„—’„‹—£ —” ”‘ H W£ „£‹‘ M„—  O¦‘—‘ £‹‘ R— ‘ y ‘„ —£ „ j ! „‹‹ Ž—£“ Y SN S g ‘ „£Ž H‹—„‘ S Ox MO[ [ O`MO NO[ WtO jON R „ —£ „£‹‘ £‘‘Ž ‹„ —— Ž„5 w ‘ „ ‘ „£ —£Ž‘ ¦‘£Ž‘£ „ “ ‘£‹ ¦ Ž ‘ ¦ ‘‘£—£“ H c £‘ W£ „£‹‘ S P r o p er t y I n s ura n ce i s n o t a va i l a b le in t h e s t a t e o f Flo r id a f r o m A u t o-O w n er s I n s ura n ce Sims Insur ance Agenc y 410 N. W auk esha Str eet Bonif ay FL 32425 Agent s: Mik e Sims and J amie W ells (850) 547-5 411 gulfcoastderm.com MEDICAL | SURGICAL | COSMETIC TOT AL ACCESS TOT AL CONFIDENCE. T O T AL CA R E FOR YOUR SKIN. BONIF A Y | MARIANNA | P ANAMA CITY Jon W ar d, MD | Boar d-Certi ed Dermatologist Karrie Thomas, P A-C | Nationally Certi ed Physician Assistant What does this mean for you? Access to the r egion’ s widest range of advanced skin cancer tr eatments, including painless Super cial Radiation Therapy and Mohs micr ographic sur gery Same-week appointments Our physician-supervised spa, of fering pr oven tr eatments for total skin r evitalization and r ejuvenation T o make an appointment or schedule a complimentary cosmetic consultation, please call 1 877 -231 DERM (3376). R OR Y C. F ARRIS, M.D. Dr F arris is a board-certied orthopaedic surgeon who practices general orthopae dics with a special interest in sports medi cine and joint replacement surger y Dr F arris earned his Medical Degree a t the University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL. A na tive of Samson, Dr F arris lives in Enterprise. SOUTHERN BONE & JOINT SPECIALIS T S R or y C. F ar r is, M.D. 1200 M aple A ve G e ne va A l ab a ma w w w. southe rnb one c om W e als o t ak e c ar e of (850) 638-5885 V†‹ =…tƒ  [ ›t› ;t‹ t {  M ost V ehicles Up t o 5 qts syn thetic blend M ost V ehicles LFAF Ug BR ^ JR@F C ar p et & C er amic O utlet Y OUR HOMET O WN L O W P RICE! :6 V SUbRA \b G^ 2’x4’ ............... $ 5.00 2’x8’ ............. $ 15.50 3’x5’ ............. $ 12.50 4’x6’ ............. $ 19.90 5’x7’ ............. $ 39.90 6’x9’ ............. $ 49.90 M‰ ?‰ V b BU \ = 9[ WB ] = B[9 R L= V^]QB ] L o c a t ed B et w een A r r o whead C amp gr ounds & H opk ins O n H w y 90 “ T he Plac e T o S hop I f Mone y Ma tt ers!” c ar p ettil emar ianna .c om B •{›†‹ ?£‚ {› † ?• ƒ Rt£ ; ?tƒ •  ] f • It ‹›… ! ! ! ! ! ! Opinion Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 Wednesday, August 14, 2013 By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY —Brent Gar dener, general manager of Pier Park in Panama City Beach, talked about how Bonifay helped shape Pier Park and what changes were happening soon at the Bonifay Ki wanis Club meeting on Aug. 7. “I work for Simon, the world’s largest real es tate company,” said Gar dener. “They’ve got 336 properties with 312 in the United States and located in 38 states. We profit $168 billion in retail a year.” He explained that if there’s any mall or outlet with the name “Mills” or “Premium” in the title, Simon owns it. “Pier Park is our crowning achievement and we want to focus on events,” said Gardner. “We want to draw people in and have the best time they could possibly have that way they’ll keep coming back. My job is to do all that I can do to serve the community be cause we are more than a mall, we are a commu nity center; a safe place for friends and families to hang out, be around and enjoy the atmosphere.” Gardener said that Bonifay played a part in developing Pier Park. “We actually surveyed people incognito in Boni fay, as well as the sur rounding areas, and ca sually asked if there was a mall to be built, what would they like to see in it,” he said. “It’s very easy for us to get the stigma as being a big, bad corpora tion who doesn’t care about the little people when in fact we all start ed from something only manned by a few people and grew, and we love to help those starters.” Gardner said they have over 100 event days per year, such as the Beach Ball Drop in January, Taste of the Beach, Fall Festival, Thunder Beach and the newest coming up Pirate Invasion. “There is literally go ing to be an invasion of pirates on Pier Park com ing in from the ocean,” he said. “Some Johnny Depp looking characters are going to kidnap the may or and there’s going to be a battle against ships just off shore for everyone to watch. It’s going to be so much fun.” He then went into dispelling some of the latest rumors. “Pier Park North is not ours,” said Gar dener. “St. Joe actually owns the name and has enlisted another devel oper for that section. Pier Park West will be developed by us.” The rumor of Miracle Strip moving from the small section at Pier Park to their new land to rebuild the full park is true, said Gardener. “We expect that they’ll have all of the rides moved out by the end of the year,” he said. “I can confirm that we will soon have a Dave and Busters in the area that currently has the bungee rides.” He said that there was going to be more and more coming into the Pier Park area but that they were going to take their time introducing the new developments. “We don’t want to overdevelop the area,” said Gardener. “They all ready have so much to offer. We can just take our time and enjoy the area for what it is; a great place to spend time with friends and family.” General Manager for Pier Park Brent Gardener was the guest speaker for this week’s Bonifay Kiwanis Club on Aug. 7. GM of Pier Park speaks at Bonifay Kiwanis

PAGE 6

O UTDOORS Wednesday, August 14, 2013 Page 6 www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Send your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com A Section There’s one thing I cannot understand about the marketing of our area. You would think we only had the beaches to attract people. I think the people in the marketing business should be made to understand we also have some of the best redfish fishing in Florida. Most of the time when you turn on outdoors shows you see the Banana River or the Cape Canaveral area and the redfish fishing in those places. Do you know how much time and gas mileage you can save by stopping in Panama City? Nowhere in those areas will you find redfish crashing crabs on the surface in 50 feet of water during a hard outgoing tide. If you love to fly fish, the pass here is the place to test out that 10-weight fly rod. When the pass crabs get sucked out into the Gulf and mixed with the bay grass, and those big honkers are busting the surface looking like big blocks of concrete being thrown into the water you know you are in fly rod heaven. Not only can you catch them on a fly rod, but live bait fishermen consistently catch bull reds on lightweight spinning reels. After battling two or three 15to 30-pound reds a fellow soon earns some respect for fish that size. We also have some of the finest guides you could find in the state. All this adds up to some pretty good fishing. Some wives are reluctant to get on a boat that stays out 6-8 hours, so the hubby goes fishing and the wife stays at the hotel and misses out on some fine fun. That can be fixed by fishing with a guide on a custommade trip of your design. Most guides are willing to take you fishing, but some I know will take your family over to Shell Island for a day in the sun or for a picnic if you provide the food. No one is getting seasick or ready to come home on this trip because it is designed by you. So tell me why anyone would want to travel another mile south when we have it all right here in the Panama City area? Hooked on Outdoors Outdoor Life Scott Lindsey captainlindsey@ knology.net PHOTOS BY FRANK SARGEANT | Special to the News Herald The silver kings average 80 to 90 pounds, but sh of 150 pounds are no longer uncommon thanks to all-release regulations. By FRANK SARGEANT franksargeant@charter.net When saltwater turns fresh and clear water turns coffee black, it requires a bit of a mental adjustment to achieve continued angling success for the favorite inshore species such as spotted seatrout, red sh and ounder. It also is likely to require an adjustment in geography; your favorite marsh holes and creeks might have few or no sh, and you might have to head to outside waters to connect. Not to say that coastal sh can’t thrive in brackish water — in winter, not only trout and reds but also mangrove snapper, black drum and sheepshead often prowl into areas that are almost completely fresh. But that’s forced upon them as a refuge from cold water on the ats; all things being equal, they like a relatively high salinity, along with a lot of bait sh and shrimp along with moderate temperatures. So where do the sh go when they depart from our favorite dock holes, creek mouths and bridge pilings? A lot of them head out on the beach, settling on any structure they can nd within easy swim of bait schools. That’s why it’s not uncommon to connect with schools of trout, often big ones, around nearshore arti cial reefs and wrecks. And of course reds, when they mature, actually are open-water sh, only returning to the passes and bays in late summer and fall to spawn. So they are highly tolerant of the higher salinities of the open Gulf. Tarpon are one species that are not particularly unhappy in black, lowsalinity water. They start their lives in places like this, often far back in the marshes, moving to deeper water only as they mature. And after they nish the mid-summer spawn, many of them return to the black waters of inside bays where they will remain until the rst chill of October. The key to nding black water tarpon — and other species for that matter — is nding bait tolerant of the water conditions. Shad don’t mind a bit of black water, and the tiny bay anchovies known as “glass minnows” don’t either — they swim well up coastal rivers. Find swarms of these bait sh and you’ll usually nd game sh of some stripe. (You wouldn’t think a 100-pound-tarpon would have much interest in bait an inch long, but they plunge through the tightly-packed minnows like whales eating krill, gulping down huge mouthfuls of them.) Fishing black water areas can be a challenge, to be sure; the sh can’t see arti cial lures more than a few feet away, and when they’re feeding on specialized bait such as the tiny glass minnows, they might ignore the usual lures. There are several strategies to get around the issue, however. One is simply to go to cut bait on the bottom; the scent lures the sh in, even if they can’t see the bait at any distance. This is particularly effective for late summer tarpon — nd Handling the murk of Florida’s torrential summer downpours Tarpon are not much bothered by an in ux of “black” water, and can be caught on an assortment of cut baits, live baits or arti cials. TAMPA BAY WATCH | Special to the News Herald Florida’s bay scallop season is now underway and continues through Sept. 24. St. Joe Bay is one of the prime areas in Panhandle waters. By FRANK SARGEANT franksargeant@charter.net That’s how some children think of Florida’s bay scallop season. Though the scallop season has been open for some time and tens of thousands already have been harvested by eager divers, those remaining are the largest of the season — scallops grow fast. The prime scalloping area in the Panhandle is St. Joe Bay, where clear water and lots of eel grass provide ideal habitat for the swimming shell sh. They also are abundant on the ats off Steinhatchee and Suwannee, as well as at Homosassa and Crystal River. Scallops are an annual crop; they hatch, grow to maturity, spawn and die in a single year, so the annual take by recreational divers is thought to have minimal impact. The tiny larvae develop into shell sh up to 3 inches across by July and August of each year, and thousands of Florida families turn out to pursue these strange little animals, the only shell sh that can “swim.” Unlike most shell sh that af x themselves to the bottom, bay scallops can swim by clapping their shells together. Admittedly, it’s a slow, crazy dance, but they do manage to move from place to place, and with the help of the tides sometimes can travel for miles. The shell sh are typically found in water from 4 to 10 feet deep over turtle grass, the longleaved greenery that sprouts abundantly from the bottom in the open areas. Because they are lethargic swimmers, scallops are easy for a snorkeler to capture by hand, and they are a favorite target for young swimmers; many families plan their annual summer vacation with the children for the opening of the scallop season. Once things get rolling, nding the scallops is simply a matter of looking for the eet — where the shell sh are abundant, there will be dozens of boats drifting over them. It’s an underwater Easter egg hunt BLACK WATER FISHING

PAGE 7

S PORTS www.bonifaynow.com A Section By JASON SHOOT 747-5069 |@PCNHJasonShoot jshoot@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — Debbie Funkhouser is a coach at heart, but she’s an athletic director by title. Funkhouser is one of the most respected minds among local volleyball coaches, and she has been an important contributor to the growth of the sport in the area. Now that she’s the athletic director at North Bay Haven Charter Academy, however, she has reluctantly stepped away from the sport to focus on her duties overseeing all sports at the charter school. “For two out of three years, I coached the middle school team,” Funkhouser said. “It’s hard to nd volleyball coaches who really are knowledgeable and don’t just want a supplement. I couldn’t nd a coach — they play six or seven games and they’re done. I have to say it was hard because (other) teams or coaches need something. It didn’t work. I feel bad because we have a group of girls who are going to be really strong, but they’ll be great. It’s really a good group of kids.” The athletic program at NBH only now is maturing beyond the pupal stage with its rst-ever incoming class of 12th-graders. Funkhouser left her post as volleyball coach at Mosley to accept the job as athletic director at NBH in 2010, and she faced a monumental challenge of building the school’s athletics department from the ground up. Coaches had to be hired. Facilities had to be leased. A culture of athletics had to be nurtured and cultivated. It hasn’t been easy. “In the beginning, everyone made the team, and we created a culture you don’t really want in competitive high school athletics,” Funkhouser said. “On the other hand, it made the teams very close. … We want the kids to play for fun. We’ve lost that in high school athletics. High school athletics has become a stairway to college athletics and then the pros. We have forgotten the average kid who wants to come out to have fun. “We have kids who never would have come out for sports. I was going around in the spring … saying, ‘Please play baseball. Please play softball.’ We scheduled games, and we didn’t want a negative feeling in the community that we scheduled games and then canceled them. If they didn’t play that sport, I’d say, ‘I don’t care. The coach will teach you how.’ The ones who hung in there, I have great admiration for them. The coaches have high expectations, and (the kids) are working hard at something they never thought North Bay Haven making progress toward varsity sports See NORTH BAY A8 B •{›†‹ ?£‚ {› † ?• ƒ Rt£ ; ?tƒ •  ] f • It ‹›… ! ! ! ! ! ! " $ # $ $ $ #$ $ $ " $ $ $ $ # $ $ T o learn ho w y ou can suppor t our community ’ s univ ersity contact M ar y B eth Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR C OMMUNIT Y ’S UNIVERSIT Y E ndo wment for T omorr o w ’ s J obs $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL Special to Halifax Media GAINESVILLE — In an aggressive move to protect teens from the ongoing threat of performance-enhancing drugs, the head of the Florida High School Athletic Association asked on Aug. 6 that the organization’s medical policy experts to conduct a top-to-bottom review of existing policies to determine what additional measures can be enacted to prevent the use of improper substances by high school student-athletes. Dr. Roger Dearing, FHSAA’s executive director, asked the association’s Sports Medicine Advisory Committee to conduct a thorough review of existing standards to determine how they can be strengthened to stop the trend of PED use among professional and college athletes from spreading throughout prep sports. Dearing noted that under existing FHSAA sportsmanship bylaws and policies, student-athletes can be suspended from competing if they have used PEDs, but Dearing suggested these prohibitions might be insuf cient in light of recent allegations that South Florida high school athletes received PEDs as part of the Biogenesis scandal. “The FHSAA’s overriding priority is the safety, well-being and constructive development of young student-athletes, whose bodies and character are still forming,” Dearing said. “Performanceenhancing drugs undermine every aspect of this goal, and so it is imperative that our student-athletes adhere to a zerotolerance policy toward these inherently unfair and dangerous substances. Here is the bottom line for me: As executive director of FHSAA, I believe we must draw a line in the sand against performing-enhancing drugs. School districts simply cannot tolerate coaches who encourage or look the other way when athletes use PEDs. Therefore, these coaches cannot be allowed to keep their jobs or have anything to do with young athletes. This is about more than safeguarding fair play — it’s about saving lives.” Dearing was joined in his call for a review by state Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, a former school principal and superintendent who now serves as chief executive of cer of the Florida Association of District School Superintendents; and Dr. Jennifer Roth Maynard, an assistant professor of family and sports medicine with the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville and a member of the FHSAA Sports Medicine Advisory Committee. “Performance-enhancing drugs pose FHSAA seeks policy review on performance-enhancing drugs “As executive director of FHSAA, I believe we must draw a line in the sand against performingenhancing drugs. School districts simply cannot tolerate coaches who encourage or look the other way when athletes use PEDs. Therefore, these coaches cannot be allowed to keep their jobs or have anything to do with young athletes.” Roger Dearing executive director, Florida High School Athletic Association See DRUGS A8 Wednesday, August 14, 2013 Page 7 Above, from left, Meladey Collins, Logan Leonard and Anzli Laurel listen to instruction during Saturday’s Combat Weapons seminar at Bonifay Taekwondo USA. Combat Weapons is one of the fastest growing competitions at the ATA tournaments, said Wesley Wing, head instructor and owner of the Bonifay school. At right, Italy Laurel, left, squares off with Erica Daniel, while instructor Amber Wing serves as referee. PHOTOS BY RANDAL SEYLER | Times-Advertiser Koleman Brooks, left, strikes at Logan Leonard’s feet, while instructor Amber Wing referees the match. COMBAT WEAPONS SEMINAR

PAGE 8

Local A8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, August 14, 2013 S ta y C onnec t ed! Lik e us on F acebook & F ollo w us on T witt er /emer aldc oast .jobs @EC oastJ obs W eathe r ization — or sealing air leaks — can s av e up t o 40 pe r cent on heating and cooling bill s C onditioned air mi x es with outside air th r ough gaps in e x t e r ior wall s wind o w s door s r oo f s and oor s wasting ene r gy and mon e y C aul k ing and w eather st r ipping all e via t es dra f ts & helps y our home f eel colder when i t ’ s hot outsid e G o f or the most benet with the least expense and w eathe r i z e y our hom e R oll up y our slee v es and r oll d o wn y our ene r gy c osts www .kubota.com 4+ & $ % ( 02<: 7 @; 2;05 7 5 10 ,+ + + 04 ) '5<5 5<@5 < 00 <5 ;:; 6.".-" 0@?5 @; @;? <0??@5 50@5 5@ 0 & $ % 5<5 0@5 7 5 -+ ( 0254 & $ % <55 < 00102@ 7 @5 <7@0< #<0? 5<@5 @0 15 ; So w ell T r actor Co ., Inc. 2841 Hwy 77 North, P anama City www .so w elltr actor co .com Financing Arranged (W AC) W e T rade for Anything That Don’ t Eat! NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our polic y that the patient and an y other per son r esponsib le f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimb ur sed b y pa yment or an y other ser vice e x amination or tr eatment which is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hour s of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee discount ed f ee or r educed f ee ser vice e x amination or tr eatment. "WE WELCOME NEW P A TIENTS, CALL TODA Y FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW P A TIENTS 59 AND OLDER This cer tif icat e is good f or a complet e Medical Ey e Ex am with T odd R obinson, M.D In Our Chiple y Of f ice Boar d C er tif ied Ey e Ph y sician and Sur geon. The e x am includes a pr escr iption f or e y e glasses and t ests f or Glaucoma, C at ar acts and other e y e diseases FOR Y OUR APPOINTMENT C ALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILI TY : U .S Citiz ens living in the Flor ida P anhandle 59 y ear s and older not pr esentl y under our car e C oupon Expir es: 8-31 -1 3 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: WC00 S m ar t Le ns es SM C an pr oduce clear vision without glasses at all dist ances ww w .m ulli se y e .co m MULLIS EYE INSTITUTE Chiple y Of f ice 1 691 Main St., St e 1 !# 850-638-7220 W e ar e locat ed dir ectl y acr oss the par king lot fr om the W almar t in Chiple y T odd R obinson, M.D Boar d C er tif ied Ey e Ph y sician and C at ar act Sur geon they’d really do.” Funkhouser said it was important to nd coaches who strived to win but would not be overly dismayed by the losses that were certain to accompany programs as they matured. A coach’s recognition of the importance of educa tion was paramount. “I feel like our administration and parents and kids are looking for athlet ics to come up and be as good as our ac ademics are,” Funkhouser said. “When I was able to interview coaches with (Principal Meredith Higgins), we de nitely looked for someone where wins weren’t No. 1. Winning has to be impor tant to a coach, but we wanted someone who could motivate athletes and see them as whole people. “Academics are important, and (coaches) have to expect that. If a kid needs tutoring during practice time, it’s their job as coach to talk to the player and the teacher and work that out. If it has to be during practice, they have to accept that. … Academics have to be rst.” To emphasize that point, NBH re quires its student-athletes to carry a 2.2 grade point average rather than the 2.0 GPA required at other county schools. “We look at academics all year long, not just when we have to look at them at the end of the semester,” Funkhouser said. “If their grades start to fall, we can do something about it. That’s a denite advantage of being a small school. … You can’t beat a smaller school. All eyes are on kids all the time, not in a nega tive way like we’re waiting for them to slip up, but in a very positive way. I know all the kids in the school and almost all of them by name. The kids know that, ‘Hey, I need to be where I’m supposed to be and need to be studying the way I’m supposed to.’ “‘High expectations, high achieve ment,’ is our school’s motto. Those ex pectations go across the board, from the classroom to the playing eld, the gym, the clubs. We have high expectations for the kids, and they live up to them. We won’t water them down.” The culture of athletics at NBH un doubtedly will change now that teams have seniors in all of their sports for the rst time. The Buccaneers have strug gled to compete against senior-laden opponents in all sports, but that is to be expected with athletes who are less experienced and not as physically devel oped as players on rival teams. Funkhouser, who is no less competi tive now than she was when she was conveying instructions to her volleyball players from the sidelines at Mosley’s Jim Redfern Gymnasium a decade ago, is certain NBH athletics are headed in the proper direction. “I think we’ve been blessed with the coaches we’ve gotten,” she said. “When I took this position, my heart as a coach has always been for the kids. I want kids to love playing. I want them to work hard and win. I don’t want them to practice ve days a week and not win. “We have young coaches. Jared Hale is a great football mind, and he has a personality that attracts kids, and they work hard for him. We have a new soccer coach in Jennifer Parrott, who played at Bay High and coaches Bay United. The kids are ocking to play, and our coach es make them feel like they care.” a very real, very dangerous threat to high school stu dent-athletes, both physi cally and psychologically,” Montford said. “I com mend the FHSAA for be ing proactive in addressing the challenge presented by coaches, parents and young athletes who want to get ahead by any means possible, whatever the per sonal cost.” The 15-member Sports Medicine Advisory Commit tee includes a cross-section of experts from across Flor ida, including 11 physicians as well as athletic trainers, former coaches and educa tors. The committee’s work has led to recent FHSAA policies to better protect young student athletes in the areas of concussions and heat/hydration. “The Advisory Com mittee should consider all aspects of performanceenhancing drugs,” Dearing said, asking for a “thorough top-to-bottom review of existing policies and pro cedures regarding the use of performance-enhancing drugs by those who break the rules in order to tilt the playing eld to their own advantage.” Dearing asked the com mittee to consider the full range of issues related to PEDs, including but not limited to: • whether existing policies and procedures provide sufcient author ity for schools to test and discipline student-athletes who may be using banned substances; • the legal, policy and scal implications of height ened policies against per formance-enhancing drugs; and • whether the FHSAA prohibition against perfor mance-enhancing drugs would be more effective if set out as a standalone poli cy rather than existing only as a part of a broader policy on sportsmanship. “Most young athletes have no idea the harm that can be caused by perfor mance-enhancing drugs,” Maynard said. “Teenagers are still developing, both physically and mentally, and PEDs have no place in their lives. Whatever the FHSAA can do to stop PEDs from being used by high school student-athletes is a step in the right direction.” A list of members of the FHSAA Sports Medicine Ad visory Committee is at www. fhsaa.org/gov/sportsmed. DRUGS from page A7 NORTH BAY from page A7 “‘High expectations, high achievement,’ is our school’s motto. Those expectations go across the board, from the classroom to the playing eld, the gym, the clubs. We have high expectations for the kids, and they live up to them. We won’t water them down.” Debbie Funkhouser athletic director, North Bay Haven Charter Academy

PAGE 9

Washington County News z Holmes County Times-Advertiser B PAGE 1 Section E XTRA Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) It takes 20 seconds for food to reach your stomach, but how long until the brain realizes it’s there? Same time, 90 sec, 5 min, 20 min 2) Jamaica Blue Mountain is often regarded as being the best “what” in the world? Wine, Coffee, Bottled water, Hand cream 3) “Four Corners” is where Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and which other state intersect? Utah, Montana, Oklahoma, Nevada 4) At what stage in his life did King Arthur take the Excalibur (sword) out of a stone? Young boy, Teen, Middle-aged man, Deathbed 5) What was the couple’s last name to complete the rst car-crossing of the Canadian Rockies? Brooks, Cook, Werner, Glidden 6) Which company invented the word “processor” in 1965? Tandy, IBM, GE, VW 7) What does “terebi” mean in Japanese? TV, Tube, Tub, Tower 8) Atlantis is supposedly beneath which ocean? Atlantic, Southern, Paci c, Indian 9) In what year was the Panama Canal opened? 1914, 1922, 1936, 1947 10) What’s a whole number called? Euclid, Oscar, Integer, Frit 11) What were Jason and the Argonauts searching for? Shangri-La, Holy Grail, Beelzebub, Golden Fleece 12) Fusion-jazz combines jazz and? Rock, Country, Soul, Bluegrass 13) What color boxing trunks was Muhammad Ali partial to? Red, White, Black, Gold 14) When did the rst Cannes Film Festival open? 1946, 1951, 1960, 1974 ANSWERS 1) 20 min. 2) Coffee. 3) Utah. 4) Young boy. 5) Glidden. 6) IBM. 7) TV. 8) Atlantic. 9) 1914. 10) Integer. 11) Golden Fleece. 12) Rock. 13) White. 14) 1946. Wednesday, AUGUST 14 2013 PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAZY C ALPACA RANCH The Lazy C Alpaca Ranch owners Holly and Jesse Cunningham enjoy inviting the youth of Holmes County to come and visit their alpacas free of charge. The ranch is home to 136 alpacas of more than 20 colors. CECILIA SPEARS | Extra Alpaca farming is one local family’s GOLDEN FLEECE By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY — A year after moving to Holmes County and settling down on a little over 100 acres with 136 alpacas and a few dogs, Holly and Jesse Cunningham said they are living their dream with the Lazy C Alpaca Ranch. “We’ve been looking into owning alpacas for around ve years because they’re easy to care for, have great tax incentives and are easy to maintain,” Holly said. “We sheer their wool once a year; it’s the nest ber, and there’s a good market for it for hats, socks, blankets and so much more.” Jesse said the animals’ personalities make them enjoyable to be around, and they make great lawnmowers. “We also take then to shows where they are judged for their con rmation, eece and color,” Holly said. “We’ve got several champions right now. Winning awards helps with breading and selling them just like with race horses.” She said the alpacas are gentle and shy but have an insatiable curiosity. “They are communal creatures with a strong herd instinct and tend to prefer staying close to family,” she said. “On the other hand, they are wonderful with humans, adults and children. They really make you want to give them a hug. Alpaca farming is a really fun family business, plus it’s a short commute from the house to the pastures.” A large portion of the Cunninghams’ property is also dedicated to growing hay to help feed the alpacas. Holly said she had recently opened the ranch to be visited by children and their families and that her favorite part of Holmes County is the caring and supportive community. “When we had the big rainstorms going through this area, during the rst of July, the alpacas were not fairing well,” Holly said. “The amount of rain and ooding conditions were stressing the alpacas bad. I had made a comment of Facebook that we were constructing an emergency shelter to get them to dry land and shelter.” She said she and her family were outside working quickly to move the alpacas to safety when she saw someone at their gate. “They had seen our post and wanted to help. How incredible,” Holly said. “For nearly ve hours in the pouring rain, they helped us move the alpacas to safety. This community is awesome.” Lazy C Alpaca Ranch is off Highway 177 just outside of Bonifay. “Just call us, and we’ll be happy to answer any questions you have about alpacas and the alpaca lifestyle,” Holly said. “Or better yet, schedule a farm visit.” WEB WATCH Learn more about Lazy C Alpaca Ranch and the Cunningham family on the ranch’s Facebook page, Lazy C AlpacaRanch

PAGE 10

Wednesday, August 14, 2013 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra .4 # -5&& -,,,,,,, # .4 ,,,$ .4 -,,,,,,, -(&& / 6 ,,, -,,,,,,, -5 -,,,,,,, -,,,,,,, )+ $ + !+ % )+ / (34 # 6 2 # 2 $ '7(&2 % 2 1.(&. % # :x ‡Š  5g• ‚t On w‚‚ } =‡ rrx uŠ PWaE PMTE\ T uesday, August @(^L Star ting at $ 6 f or the f ir st 25 w or ds .25¢ ea. ad ditional w or d A d d a Phot o $6 A d d a Bo x $3 A d d Ar tw or k $4 3/ FF PJ 5/ Y A B C D E D aily N e w s and N e w s H er a ld: -D e adl i ne u r s d a y A ug u st 15th -Pu bl i s he d T ue s d a y A ug u st 20th S ant a R o s a Pre ss G a z ette Cre st v ie w N e w s Bulleti n D e sti n L o g W a s hi ng ton Cou nt y N e w s H ol me s Cou nt y N e w s : -D e adl i ne F r id a y A ug u st 16th -Pu bl i s he d W e d ne s d a y A ug u st 21st W a lton Su n: -D e adl i ne T ue s d a y A ug u st 13th -Pu bl i s he d S a tu rd a y A ug u st 17th A p a l achicol a T i me s & P or t St J o e St ar : -D e adl i ne F r id a y A ug u st 16th -Pu bl i s he d u r s d a y A ug u st 22nd Ms. Kerri Pelham of Graceville announces the engagement of her daughter, Katherine Michele Pelham, to Javy Edward Waller, son of the late Ms. Dawn Waller of Vernon. The couple will be married in a private ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013, at First United Methodist Church, Graceville. All family and friends are invited to attend the reception, which is at 6 p.m. at 1080 Penny Lane, Graceville. The bride-elect is the daughter of Mr. Joe Wells of Panama City, and the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Pat Pelham of Graceville and Mr. and Mrs. James Wells of Bonifay. Katherine is a 2009 graduate of Graceville High School and is currently enrolled in the Licensed Practical Nursing program at Washington-Holmes Technical Center. The groom-elect is the nephew of Mr. and Mrs. Keith Davis of Graceville. Javy is a 2006 graduate of Chipley High School and is employed with Davis Farms in Chipley. Engagement Brystol Rhian Free celebrated her rst birthday on Aug. 4. She is the daughter of Jeremy and Terra Free of Ponce De Leon. Her brother is Tyler, and her sister is Drew. Grandparents are Johnny and Tammy Free of Ponce de Leon, Chuck and Kim Jones and greatgrandparents Louise Free, Ruth Shelly, Abby Lou Jones. Birthday Andrew Marshall (Drew) Cumbie was awarded Most Outstanding Trumpet at Rehobeth Middle School for 2012-2013 as a seventh grader. Drew is the son of Dan and Tracy Cumbie of Dothan, Ala. His grandparents are Brenda (Rabon) Cumbie-Adams, Carlton Adams, and the late Doyle R. Cumbie, of Wicksburg, Ala., and Chipley, and James and Brenda Trawick of Dothan, Ala. His great-grandparents are the late Mallie L. and Clara Wiggins Rabon, and the late Daniel and Molly Luverne Cumbie, of Chipley the late Bernie and Louise Marshall, of Grimes, and the late Marvin and Lorraine Trawick, of Dothan, Ala. Sophia Jeanette Crutcheld was born at Forbes Regional in Monroeville, Pa., on Aug. 2, 2013, at 2:53 p.m. She weighed 6 pounds, 14 ounces, and was 20 inches long. Sophia’s parents are Brandon and Minnie Crutcheld of Monroeville, Pa. Her grandparents are Eddie and Jacqueline Crutcheld of Monroeville Pa. and her greatgrandparents are Jack and Marilyn Ulrich of Bonifay and Jimmy and Martha Bryant of Bonifay. Sophia’s great-grandfather is the late Edward Eugene Crutcheld of Graceville. Her uncle is Eddie Crutcheld Jr. of Bonifay. Birth Special to Extra CHIPLEY — Two Chipley High School students Chloe Bruner and Austin Wyatt were chosen to perform at the inaugural nine star Honor band in Altamonte Springs for the Florida Bandmasters Association Conference. More than 80 ninth-graders from throughout the state participated. Hayden Carole Barton and Ryan Landon Hagberg of Perry were united in marriage at 5 p.m. on May 18. Pastor Justin Webb performed the ceremony at First Baptist Church, Perry. A reception followed at First Presbyterian Church. The bride was given in marriage by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Scott Barton of Perry. The groom’s parents are Mr. and Mrs. Ron Hagberg of Perry. Grandparents of the bride are Mr. and Mrs. Hildon Barton of Bonifay and Mr. and Mrs. Bill Smith of Donalsonville, Ga. The groom’s grandparents are Barbara Sue Butts and the late Faison Butts, and Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Hagberg of St. Petersburg. Brooke Barton of Perry, the twin sister of the bride, served as maid of honor. The bridesmaids were Elisa Murphy, Cassidy Pridgeon, Rebecca Hagberg, sister of the groom of Perry, Alena Martin of DeFuniak Springs, junior bridesmaid Janie Barton, cousin of the bride of Ocala, and Kate Sullivan of Perry was the ower girl. Blake Sapp served as best man. Groomsmen were Justin Fralix, Justin Wesson, Daniel Barton of Ocala, cousin of the bride, and Christian Goodman of Perry was the ring bearer. The bride is a 2011 graduate of North Florida Community College, and she attended Chipola College School of Nursing and is employed as an LPN at Little Pines Pediatrics. The groom is a 2010 graduate of North Florida Community College and a 2013 graduate of the University Of Florida School Of Engineering and is employed at Buckeye Technologies. Following a honeymoon to Jamaica, the couple now resides in Perry. Wedding Pelham and Waller to wed Drew Cumbie receives Most Outstanding Trumpet Award Brystol celebrates 1st birthdayS pecial PECIAL toTO EXt T R a A Chipley High School students Chloe Bruner and Austin Wyatt were chosen to perform at the inaugural Nine Star Honor Band in Altamonte Springs. CHS students perform at conference Crutchelds welcome baby girl Barton and Hagberg marry

PAGE 11

Wednesday, August 14, 2013 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 E sta t e S ale LOG HOME KITS AMERICAN LOG HOMES IS ASSISTING LIQUID A TION OF LAND DEVELOPERS EST A TE View at www .thegreatamericanlogco.com Ready Only Reply Call 704-602-3035 ask for Accounting Dept. 3 Log Homes selling for BALANCE O WED FREE DELIVER Y BALANCE O WED $17,000 BALANCE O WED $22,900 BALANCE O WED $15,700 Crossword PUZZLESOLUTION ON PAGE B5 Whether they want it to bark, purr, slither or squawk, there comes a time when a pet appears on nearly every childs birthday wish list. For most parents, this decision can be a bit daunting. Is your child ready to take on the responsibility of caring for a pet? Will the new animal negatively affect his or her health? Though your child may think your wary attitude is unnecessary, these are valid questions for every parent to ask themselves and their family before welcoming a new pet into their home. The rst thing that you need to think of is if your children are old enough and responsible enough to handle a pet around the house, said Dr. Mark Stickney, Clinical Associate Professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. You also need to be aware of the temperament of the new pet that youre bringing in. Low maintenance animals, such as hamsters and sh, prove to be great starter pets for children. They require minimal amounts of time and care, introducing the child to the responsibilities of pet ownership without giving them more than they can manage. Of course, puppies and kittens are always crowd pleasers as well. Their high energy level and love for attention makes them the perfect child companion. But what about when little Bobby begs for that snake at the pet store? With animals like lizards and snakes, their care and feeding requirements can be a bit tricky as far as humidity, temperature etc., Stickney said. These animals also eat other animals for food, which may be upsetting to some children. Depending on their age and maturity, that might be something beyond a childs ability to handle. When choosing a family pet, it is also important to take into consideration your childrens sensitivity to various allergens. One of the rst things that you need to do is consult with your physician, said Stickney. If your child is allergic to pollen or some sort of grass that an animal could track into the house, an indoor animal such as a cat would be a non-issue. However, if your children still have their heart set on that uffy puppy, there are certainly ways to accommodate their desires. Some dog breeds, such as Poodles and Yorkies, are considered to be less allergenic than others based on the amount of fur that they shed, Stickney said. And there is even evidence to support that infants exposed to animals earlier in life are less likely to develop allergies later on. Allowing your children to care for a pet is not all risk. Having a pet in your family has shown to be equally benecial for both the animal and child. Dogs especially really enjoy having someone to play with them, teach them tricks, and do some basic obedience training, said Stickney. Its mentally stimulating for both the dog and child, which can improve discipline on both ends. Research has shown numerous health benets of owning a pet, including lower blood pressure and elevated mood. There is even evidence to support that interaction between pets and children with disabilities, such as Downs syndrome or Autism, is extremely benecial. The key is that you need to have a nice, docile pet, Stickney said. One that isnt too active or rough, but that just wants to be loved on and to love right back. S P EC IA L TO E X T R A Spirit Filled Church of God In Christ located In Caryville, and Pastor Tony Howard and his wife Clementine, distributed school supplies to local children. Each child was also given a personal pocket bible. BIBLES AND SCHOOL SUPPLIES WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. 11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 1 p.m.: Caregivers Meeting at Washington County Council on Aging in Chipley for more information call 638-6216 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society 2nd Thursday of each month. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Line Dancing Class for more information call 638-6216 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AFRIDAY 6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper 4th Friday of every month January September. 6-8 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging 50+ dance club for more information call 638-6216 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Winn Dixie in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks while you get your shopping done. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church.SATURDAY The Holmes County Community Health Clinic located at 203 W. Iowa Street, Bonifay, will be open from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., the rst and third Saturday The Alford Community Health Clinic will be the 2nd and 4th Saturdays of each month, from 10 a.m. until the last patient is seen. 10 a.m. 12 p.m. Childrens education day 4th Saturday of every month North Bay Clan Tribal Grounds, 1560 Lonnie Road.SUNDAY 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at GracevilleCampbellton Hospital in Graceville. Weigh the pros and cons of getting a pet for a child PET T ALK W AUSAU Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday-Sunday: ClosedHOLMES COUNTY Monday: Closed Tuesday-Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: ClosedW ASHINGTON COUNTY Monday-Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday-Sunday: ClosedVERNON Monday: Closed Tuesday-Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday-Sunday: ClosedSUNNY HILLS Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday-Sunday: Closed Library HOURS Community CALENDAR

PAGE 12

FAITH B Section www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com C irc le H Gas & Del i I t s n o t w h a t w e d o b ut h o w w e d o i t 9 8 2 Or a n g e H i l l R o a d C h i p l e y 6 3 895 0 5 2961 P e nn. A ve ., M a r i a nn a FL (850) 526-3511 1-800-423-8002 w w w .m a r i a nn a t o y ot a com MARIANNA T O Y O T A BO B PFORTE (850) 482-4601 www .Do wnHomeDentalCenter .com HA VE YOUR U NIT SER VICED TO SA VE ON Y OUR ELECTRIC BILL (850) 263-2823 1075 N HW Y 79 B ONIF A Y FL Come to the Mullis Eye Institute & let us tak e Great Care of Y ou! T odd R obinson, M.D. Board Cer tied Eye Ph ysician & Surgeon Mullis Ey e Institute 1 691 Main Street, Suite #1 L ocated across from W almar t 850-638-7220 Ey e Care f or S enior s F irst Bap ist Church Come as you are (850) 638-1830 Bap ist Come Church p ist irst Ba Come Owners: JD & Delisha Kilgore 1218 Main St. 638-4097 Celebrating 31 years JERR Y W A TKIN S I N S UN C E A G E N C Y A U T O HOME L IFE L E T U S Q U O T E Y O U 1304 J a ck son A ve ., C hi ple y FL (850) 638-2222 Horton s Chipley Heating & Cooling Sales, Service & Installation 1213 Main St., Chipley (850) 638-8376 (850) 638-1805 BRO WN FUNERAL HOME 1 068 Main St., Chipley FL 32428 Phone: 638-4010 Donald Brown LFD, Manager Stephen B. Register CP A 1 552 Bric k yard R oad Chipley FL P anhandle Lumber & Supply F or ALL Y our Building Needs 405 W Hwy 90, Bonifay (850) 547-9354 507 W Hwy 90, Bonifay 1 357 Bric k yard Rd., Chipley Consumer & Commer cial Power Equipment V isit our website at www .lanesoutdoor .com 901 Hwy 277, Chipley 850.638.4364 Home F olks serving Home F olks W e gi v e commercial rates to area churches Gas 1055 F o wler A v e ., C hiple y B ehind our Chipley f ac t or y H ours: T hur and F ri. 9 A M 5 PM S a t 9 A M 3 PM 638-9421 WE S T P OIN T HOME F ACTOR Y OUTLET 879 U se r y R o ad C h i p le y F lo r id a 32428 850-638-4654 Washington County Re habilit at ion & Nursing Cente r Page B4 Wednesday, August 14, 2013 Palmetto State Quartet ESTO Palmetto State Quartet will be in concert at Mt. Zion Independent Baptist Church on Saturday, Aug. 17. The concert will begin at 7 p.m. The church is located at 3205 Hwy 2 in Esto. All are invited to come and attend this night of worship with a great quartet. Calvary Hill Revival VERNON Calvary Hill Pentecostal Church will be holding revival services at 6 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 11, and each night during the week at 7 p.m. until Aug. 14. Brother Dewain Phillips will be delivering the message. The church is located on Highway 277 across from Vernon Elementary School. For more information call 535-0003. Otter Creek Revival Revival Services at Otter Creek Methodist Church beginning Monday, Aug. 12, and concluding on Aug. 16. Services will be held at 7 p.m., on Monday thru Friday. Brother Larry Justice, from Chipley, will be our speaker each night. Cedar Springs Fun Day WESTVILLE Cedar Springs Assembly of God Church will bod a Fun Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Aug. 17. There will be a water slide (shorts and shirt are required), free snow cones, hamburgers, and hot dogs. The church is located at 1989 North Highway 181 in Westville. Faith EVENTS Amish aint always Amish Recently, it was my privilege to go to a convention in Ohio in the middle of a large Amish/ Mennonite community. I looked forward to this very much because I grew up in Lancaster County Pennsylvania, which has many Amish/Mennonite communities. I was expecting quite a bit as I packed my bags to leave. Are you sure you got everything? A phrase reiterated to me by the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. To which I responded by saying, Yes, for the umpteenth time I got everything. This in and of itself was to guarantee me I would forget something, usually essential in my travel. Then when I get home, I will be reminded that I was reminded to make sure I got everything. Nothing, at this point, could deter my high-level expectation of going into an Amish/Mennonite community. My great eagerness was looking forward to indulging in one of my favorite desserts: the shoo y pie. Nobody makes shoo y pie quite like those wonderful Amish people. To make matters even more enticing, I would not have anybody sitting next to me reminding me I had enough shoo y pie. I fully intended to gorge myself on as much shoo y pie as my wallet could handle. In my book, there is no such thing as too much shoo y pie. I drove 15 hours to get to this little town in Ohio. Every mile creating anticipation for my dessert delicacy awaiting me in some Amish restaurant. I confess it has been a long time since I visited an Amish/Mennonite community. Even though I grew up in such a community some things a person tends to forget. The convention I was attending ended Sunday morning at lunch. I, being the grandiose Know-It-All, decided to skip the Sunday lunch and look for a restaurant to indulge in my delectable delicacy. The convention was wonderful and as I left the grounds, I did so with a lot of joy in each step. The thing I forgot was it was Sunday in an Amish/ Mennonite community. If you have never been in such a community, let me inform you that on Sunday the only thing open are churches. I had forgotten this little tidbit. During the week, I made a list of several Amish restaurants. I had plans of visiting each of them before I left and having shoo y pie, a whole pie, in each restaurant. When I got to the rst restaurant, it nally hit me. This was Sunday and everything in an Amish/ Mennonite community was closed. I do not usually go to a restaurant on Sunday unless it is some special occasion. I was a little chagrined to realize everything was closed. This only heightened my anticipation of the shoo y pie delicacy awaiting me come tomorrow. At times it feels like tomorrow will never come, but eventually tomorrow came and I awoke with a song on my lips, a pang of hunger in my stomach and a desire to indulge in a shoo y delicacy. I nally arrived at my rst Amish restaurant and I was drooling so much I could hardly tell the hostess I was just a party of one. Boy, what a party it was going to be. Being a gentleman, I contained myself as best I could and ordered a very scrumptious repast. Nobody can cook like those Amish women. Oh, what a lunch I had. I think what made it so wonderful was the dessert expectation hovering over me like an angelic halo. Just as I was nishing my lunch the lovely young waitress, all dressed in Amish attire, came by inquiring if I would like to see the dessert menu. No, I said with a delectable determination, I know exactly what I want for dessert. We exchanged smiles. I have no idea what she was smiling about; maybe the anticipatory tip. I knew what I was smiling about; the anticipatory dessert. I tried to contain myself and carefully pace out my instructions. Young lady, I said as calmly as possible, I will have a piece of shoo y pie. In fact, why dont you bring me the whole pie. And with that, I smiled. The waitress looked at me rather strangely and said, What kind of pie do you want? Being the kind of person that enjoys a good old-fashioned joke, I responded, Ha ha ha. A shoo y pie, if you please. Whats a shoo y pie? I can take a joke as well as anybody but there comes a time when all jokes need to be put aside and bring on the shoo y pie. This is an Amish restaurant, isnt it? Yes it is, she smiled patiently. Youve heard of a shoo y pie, havent you? No, Ive never heard of such a pie. I cannot tell you the depth of disappointment this brought to me. For weeks, I have been looking forward to some good old-fashioned shoo y pie. As it turned out, only the Amish/ Mennonite in Lancaster County Pennsylvania, know anything about shoo y pies. Not all Amish are the same even though they look alike. The apostle Paul understood this kind of disappointment. If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men most miserable (1 Corinthians 15:19 KJV). I have had many disappointments in life and many people have disappointed me, but I have found in Jesus Christ no disappointment whatsoever. All legitimate hope is in Jesus. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries. com. DR. JAMES L. SNYDER Out to Pastor

PAGE 13

Wednesday, August 14, 2013 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Mildred Lorene White of Graceville, and formerly of Geneva, Ala., passed away on Aug. 9, 2013. She was 82. Miss White was born in Geneva County on Oct. 13, 1930, to the late Floyd and Jessie Redmon White. She was a graduate of Coffee Springs School, Class of 1948. She was preceded in death by her sister, Cathryn Capps and two brothers, James White and Harlon White. She is survived by her niece, Brenda Stoltzfus (Fred) of Blountstown; three nephews, Roger Capps (Susan) of Orlando, Mark Capps (Kay) and Kenneth Capps (Susie), both of Graceville; 11 great nieces and nephews, Chris Capps, Christina Johnson, both of Slocomb, Ala., Keith Capps of Columbus, Ga., Chris Blackburn of Graceville, Maegen Zauner, Jake Zauner and Jackson Feulner, all of Bonifay, Lee Sword of Sunny Hills, Missy Lee of Bonifay, Wendy Taylor of Blountstown and Brian Taylor (Samantha), both of Blountstown. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Monday, Aug. 12, 2013, in the chapel of Pittman Funeral Home in Geneva with the Rev. Jerry Moore, the Rev. Jonathan West and the Rev. Randall Walker ofciating. Burial followed at Eden Baptist Church Cemetery with Pittman Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends prior to the service Monday beginning at 10 a.m. Mildred L. White Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! W ith your paid obituar y family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos fr ee of charge. Find Obituaries. Shar e Condolences. In par tnership with Find obituaries, shar e condolences and celebrate a life at or Crossword SOLUTION Extra Harold William Christofferson, 64, of Vernon died Aug. 6, 2013. Memorialization was by cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Harold W. Christofferson Mary Louise Register Hill, 87, of Panama City Beach died Aug. 7, 2013. Funeral services were held on Aug. 12, 2013, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Interment followed at Bonifay Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing. Mary L. Hill Kenneth Wayne Sawyer, 70, of Bonifay died Aug. 10, 2013. Funeral services were held, Aug. 13, 2013, at Peel Funeral Home. Interment followed in the Bonifay Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Kenneth W. Sawyer Mrs. Jane Ann Thompson, age 59, of Bonifay, passed away Aug. 6, 2013 at her mothers and nieces home. She was born July 15, 1954 in Liberty, N.Y. Mrs. Thompson worked at Country Home Products and Kinney Drugs both in Vermont before moving to Bonifay, where she worked at Holmes County Council on Aging. She enjoyed owering, gardening, music, Christmas, her many pets and life. Mrs. Thompson was preceded in death by her fathers, Irving Taylor and Austin Schrader and a granddaughter, Bailey Bent. Mrs. Thompson is survived by her mother, Lavina Schrader of Bonifay; her husband, Robert Thompson of Vermont; one son, Paul Irving Bent III and daughter-in-law, Jessica of Starksboro, Vt.; daughter, Tara Lee Wells and sonin-law, Daniel Wells of Bonifay, Amanda Eastling and son-in-law, Charles Eastling of Bonifay and Bridgette Sunhawk and son-in-law, Raven Sunhawk of Middlebury, Vt.; brother, Lanny Kemmis of Chipley; sisters, Donna ODell of Chipley, Virginia Rundle of Bonifay and Randi Perugino of West Wyoming, Pa.; grandchildren, Morgann Wells, Makayla MyKayla Wells, Elizabeth Eastling, Dalton Eastling, Kyle Bent, Parker Bent, Hunter Sunhawk, Logan Sunhawk, Brenna Laframboise and Brittney Lansdale and several nieces, nephews and family. A celebration of life was held at 5 p.m., Thursday, Aug.t 8, 2013, on Wells Road in Bonifay. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Jane A. Thompson Lynita Gwen Calhoun Peacock, born to George and Beatrice Curry Calhoun, on Feb. 8, 1959, in Pensacola, went home to be with the Lord and Savior on Aug. 4, 2013. Gwen graduated from Holmes County High School in 1977, and resumed her education at PJC earning degrees in both English and Architecture. She started a career in drafting, but gave that up to become a wife and devoted mother to her two sons, which were her heart. She was preceded in death by her parents. Gwen is survived by her husband, Willard Peacock of the Bethlehem Community; sons, Hunter Peacock and Grady Peacock; special friend and cousin, Nickie Specht; sister, Tina Calhoun; stepmother, Judy Calhoun and several uncles, aunts, cousins, nieces, nephews and many friends. Pallbearers were Jason Pugh, John Specht, Gene Myers, Daylon Gainey, Ben Hawthrone, and Perry Lee. A funeral service was held at 11 a.m., on Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Jerry Moore and the Rev. Ryan Hodge ofciating. Interment followed in Westville Cemetery, Westville, with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 10-11 a.m. on Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel Lynita G. Peacock Obituaries Kiwanis Club holds Tuesday Lunch Special to Extra CHIPLEY The Chipley Kiwanis Club met for its weekly luncheon at Pattillos Restaurant at the Wash ington Holmes Technical Center, on Aug. 5. Lunch was provided by the students of the culinary program at the Technical Center. Paul Goulding, program chair man, introduced Ruth McCrary, Jane Potter, Cynthia Johnson and Susan Roberts, members of the Friends of the Library. Mrs. McCrary and Mrs. Potter presented information about their organization. The rst public library was founded in 1934 by the Chipley Wom ans Club, Mrs. McCrary noted. In September of 1988 the Com munity Improvement Committee of the Chipley Womans Club rec ommended that the Friends of the Library be formed as a separate organization. In 1989 the Friends of the Washington County Library was formed with Margie Sangaree serv ing as its rst president. The Friends of the Library meet eight times per year at the Blue Lake Community Center. It pres ently has 67 members. The Friends assist in program development for the Washington County Library in Chipley and the branch libraries in Wausau, Sunny Hills and Vernon as well. It also provides informa tional services in support of all of the Washington County Branches. The Friends sponsor fund raisers including Bridgarama, an annual card and game night, and sales of excess books. Last year the Friends purchased the new lighted sign for the Chipley Branch and purchased $2,000 worth of books for the librar ies as well. Mrs. Potter is the Program Chair and informed the Kiwanians that the Friends provide a number of programs during the year. This past year the speakers have included authors Chuck Barris (novel Toymaker), Michael Morris (novels A Place Called Wiregrass and Elisa James), Nancy Springer (novel Dark Lie), and Michael List er (novel Thunder Beach). Other speakers included Elisa James, a Panama City Attorney who served two tours in Afghanistan as an Of cer in the Army Judge Advocate General Corps (military attorneys), Carolyn Saunders, an Instructor at Chipola College, and Gus Gustafson, a local minister who spoke about SCUBA diving. The annual Chipley Kiwanis Din ner Theater will be held on Thurs day, Sept. 24. Entertainment this year will include local singers and musicians. The Kiwanis club meets Tues days at Pattillos restaurant in the middle of the WHTC campus at noon. For an invitation, contact any Kiwanian or Laura Joiner, Member ship Chairperson at 260-5971. For more information about the Kiwanis Club of Chipley, visit www. ChipleyKiwanis.com Bonifay Garden Club supports state and national effort Special to Extra BONIFAY Bonifay Garden Club is supporting Florida and National Garden Club efforts to help reforest national and state parks. In 2010 and 2011, more than 11,000 acres were destroyed by wildres in Oceola Na tional and John Bethea State Forest in Florida. Human activities also de stroy portions of forests. The U.S. Forest Service is trying to reforest 250-500 acres per year to replace those trees. Sixty-eight dol lars will buy enough trees to replant one acre. Garden Clubs are committed to improving and preserving the en vironment. Bonifay Garden Club is honoring that commitment by par ticipating in Penny Pines Reforesta tion Project. A collection jar will be at each meeting, and jars can be placed in various businesses about town. Each time $68 have been donated, it will be turned over to the Florida Federation, and a lump sum check will be sent periodically to the U.S. Forest Service. More than 80 national forests will benet from this project. Indigenous trees will be planted in the forests, especially the endangered longleaf pine. The public is invited to participate in this project, and donations can be given to honor individuals. You may request a donation form available at ffg.org. Bonifay Garden Club Trea surer is Eileen Wright, 1774 Highway 177A, Bonifay, FL 32425. The Bonifay Garden Club will meet on Sept. 13 in the board room at Doctors Memorial Hospital. New members are encouraged to attend this rst meeting of the 2013-14 club year. S PECIAL TO EX T R A Friends of the Library Ruth McCrary and Jane Potter visited the Chipley Kiwanis Club on Aug. 5.

PAGE 14

HCHS Blue Pride Band Camp BONIFAY — Holmes County High School Blue Pride Band Camp is fast approaching. We need all students to be there on the dates and times listed. The full band will meet from 6 to 8 p.m. on Aug. 12 thru 16. If you have any questions you may email hchsbluepride@ gmail.com. KMS Orientations set CHIPLEY —  Kate Middle School Orientations will be held in the Cafeteria on Friday, Aug. 16 at the following times: Kindergarten at 8:30 a.m. and Grades one thru four at 9:30 a.m. The 2013-2014 Class list will not be posted until Aug. 14 at 3 p.m. Annual Washington County Farm Bureau Meeting CHIPLEY — The Annual Meeting of the Washington County Farm Bureau is scheduled for Thursday, Aug. 15, at the Washington County Agricultural Center. The evening’s activities will begin at 6:30 p.m., with dinner followed by a brief business meeting. The evening will feature a presentation by Char Westfall with music provided by PeeWee Johns and Band. Washington County Farm Bureau members will not want to miss this evening of food, fun and fellowship. In order that adequate preparation can be made, members are encouraged to conrm their attendance by notifying the Farm Bureau Ofce, 638-1756, no later than noon Monday, Aug. 12. VHS Class of 1978 VERNON — The Vernon High School graduating Class of 1978 will be meeting to continue making plans for their 35th class reunion at 6 p.m. on Saturday, Aug.17, at Calvary Hill Pentecostal Church Fellowship Hall. The church is located across from Vernon Elementary School. For more information call Jody Calloway Bush at 535-0003. Finch Family Reunion SUNNY HILLS — The William Dallas Finch Decedents Association would like to announce the Finch Family Reunion for the descendants and friends of the late William Dallas Finch. The reunion will be held on Aug. 31 at the Sunny Hills Community Center. Please arrive at approximately 11 a.m. this will allow for fellowship prior to the meal being served at noon. Bring a well lled basket to share with others. If you have photos or other related items that you would be willing to share, please bring them along. After lunch please stay so that we may take more photos for future events. For more information call Kenneth Finch at 638-5307. Drink a Cup, For a Cure CHIPLEY — The Washington Rehab and Nursing Center will be holding a drink a Cup For a Cure event from 7:30 a.m. to 10 a.m., on Aug. 21, at the Center. Senior Citizens will receive a free 16 ounce cup of coffee and the rst 100 seniors will be given a free coffee mug. Nonsenior citizens pay only $2 per cup. All proceeds will go to the Washington County Relay For Life. For more information call 638-4654. Enrichment Center offers after-school program CHIPLEY — T.J. Roulhac Enrichment and Activity Center will offer a free after-school program beginning in September. The program will be from 2:30 to 5 p.m. Monday to Thursday for children under the age of 18. The major purpose of the program is the improvement of academic skills, the reduction of juvenile delinquency and the elimination of youth violence. The program will be staffed by three contracted personnel — a program director, an educational coordinator and an activity coordinator. All positions require a high school diploma or GED and some basic computer knowledge. Job applicants should contact the school on Saturday mornings at 638-2115, or the following numbers during the week at 535-2587 or 867-1566. 2013 Graceville Harvest Festival Pageant GRACEVILLE — The 32nd Annual Harvest Festival Pageant will be held at the Graceville Civic Center in Graceville on Sept. 20 and 21. The entry fee is $60 with all proceeds going to the Graceville Harvest Day Celebration. Contestants may participate in photogenic for an additional $10. Photogenic entries will be limited to one photo per contestant. This is an open pageant. Checks should be made payable to the City of Graceville. Winners will receive a large trophy, crown and banner. Alternates and participants will receive trophies. There will be a people’s choice winner in each category. This has no effect on the overall winners. The contestant from each category that collects the most money will with the people’s choice title for that age category and will receive a trophy at the pageant. All contestants in Tiny Baby Miss through Little Miss must wear short pageant wear. All contestants in the Petite Miss through Miss must wear long pageant ware. Applications may be picked up at Bush Paint and Supply, Graceville City Hall and the Graceville News in Graceville and at Forget Me Not Photography in Bonifay. Applications should be mailed or brought to Bush Paint and Supply, Attn: Teresa Bush, Pageant Director, 971 6th Ave., Graceville, FL 32440. Application deadline is Sept. 10. For more information call Teresa Bush Day time at 263-4744 or night time 263-3070 or Michelle Watkins at the City of Graceville at 263-3250. Annual Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo Pageant BONIFAY — The Blue Pride Band Boosters will be Sponsoring the Annual Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo Pageant on Sept. 21 at Holmes County High School. Contestant entry fee $50. Photogenic fee $10 for rst photo, $5 for each additional photo (5x7 or 8x10) People’s Choice award will be presented to the contestant with the most money in the jar. Contestant must provide the jar (no larger than a gallon) with contestant name, category and photo on jar. One winner will receive the award. The pageant is open for girls ages four to 20 and boys ages four to eight. No residency is required. Registration will take place from 5 to 7 p.m., on Tuesday, Sept. 10, and from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., on Saturday, Sept. 14. Late registration will be from 5 to 7 p.m., on Tuesday, Sept. 17 ($10 late fee added after Sept. 14). Registration forms may be turned in at registration times, at HCHS, BMS, or BES during normal school hours, or my mail Holmes County High School, ATTN: Band boosters, 825 West Highway 90, Bonifay, FL 32425. If you have any questions you may email: goodsonc@hdsb.org or call or text 373-7517. Flea Across Florida Flea Across Florida the longest yard sale in the state of Florida will be coming through Washington and Holmes County on Sept. 13, 14 and 15. The yard sale stretches from Liveoak 272 miles to Pensacola. 2013 Soccer Registration CHIPLEY — The City of Chipley will begin registration for the 2013 soccer season on Aug. 20. And child between the ages of four and 14 as of Oct. 1 will be eligible to participate. If registered from 4 to 7 p.m. on Aug. 20 or Aug. 22 the cost is $37 per player. If registered from 3 to 5 p.m. on Aug. 26 – 30 or Sept. 3 – 6 the cost is $42 per player. If registered after Sept. 6 the cost is then $47 per player. Teams will be picked on Sept. 9 Practice will begin on Sept. 12. The season will begin on Sept. 30 and the last game will be played on Oct. 29. If you have not heard from a coach by Sept. 11 call Guy Lane at 638-6348 or 658-2773. 5017344 a nd Community E venVEN T sS Wednesday, August 14, 2013 Extra B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser

PAGE 15

Wednesday, August 14, 2013 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 B USINESS G UIDE Hasty Heating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183 Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on StaServing Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611 Easy Care Lawn & Tractor ServiceLawn Care Tree Trimming Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825 Advertise your service or business for as little as $10/week.Ad runs in the Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser 638-0212 or 547-9414 5016815 LABOR DAY DEADLINES Deadlines for ALL Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 4 Publications DISPLAY ADS € NEWS € LEGALS THURSDAY, AUG. 29 € 4 PM CLASSIFIED LINE ADS FRIDAY, AUG. 30 € Noon Our Business Oces WILL BE CLOSED MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 2Enjoy a safe Labor Day weekend! Washington County imes A dvertiserHOLMES COUNTY T 8-5328 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2009 CA 000328 OCWEN LOAN SERVICING LLC, Plaintiff, vs. BEVERLY A. GILLEY A/K/A BEVERLY GILLEY, UNKNOWN TENANT (S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BEVERLY A. GILLEY A/K/A BEVERLY GILLEY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed May 29, 2013 entered in Civil Case No. 2009 CA 000328 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Bonifay, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Holmes County Courthouse, 201 North Oklahoma, Bonifay, FL. 32425 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 12 day of September, 2013 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCE at a 1/2` iron rod and cap (PSM 2019), marking the southwest corner of the northeast 1/4 of the southwest 1/4 of Section 10, Township 4 North, Range 14 West, Holmes County, Florida; thence S.8912`06”E along the south line of said northeast 1/4 of the southwest 1/4, a distance of 214.77` to a 1/2” iron rod and cap (PSM 2019) on the easterly maintained right-of-way line of Holmestead Road, said iron rod being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said south line N.0011`35”E along said right-of-way line a distance of 272.22 feet; thence N.1123`16”W along said right-of-way line, a distance of 91.25 feet; thence N.3727`13”W along said right-of-way line, a distance of 119.75 feet to a 1/2” iron rod and cap (PSM 2142); thence, leaving said right-of-way line, S.8912`06”E a distance of 298.19 feet to an iron rod and cap (PSM 2142); thence S.0102`23”W a distance of 455.44 feet to a 1/2” iron rod and cap (PSM 2142) on the aforesaid south line of the northeast 1/4 of the southwest 1/4; thence N.8912`06”W along said south line of the northeast 1/4 of the southwest 1/4, a distance of 200.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 2005 CAVALIER DOUBLE-WIDE MOBILE HOME WITH SERIAL NUMBERS: CV2005ALO264613A AND CV05AL0264613B Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. 8-5327 PUBLIC AUCTION Howell Mini-Storage at 309 S. Waukesha St Bonifay Fl. 32425 will hold a private or public auction on the contents of these units, for nonpayment according to Fl Statute 83. Tenant has until August 31, 2013 at 10:00 AM to pay in full. No checks will be accepted. Items of general household goods storage in buildings listed below. Jason Sheppard Building 1 Unit 3; Timothy Broxton Building 2 Unit 4; Travis Marlow Building 6 Unit 7. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 7, 14, 2013. For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8 am to 4 pm. Call (850)638-1483 Can You Dig It? Heavy Equipment Operator Training! 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. VA Benefits Eligible. 1-866-362-6497 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414

PAGE 16

B8 | Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, August 14, 2013 1113086 160 Properties 65 Offerings August 27th & 28th 11:00 a.m. Atlanta, GA Holiday Inn Atlanta 4386 Chamblee Dunwoody Rd. GAL # 2034; FLAL # AB-1488 Information 800.479.1763 johndixon.com A B S O L U T E* A UC T I O N Dated this 18 day of July, 2013. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 7, 14, 2013. 8-5330 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 30-2012-CA-000360 2010-3 SFR VENTURE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. JEANNIE D. BAREFOOT TOMMY M. BAREFOOT, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered April 29, 2013 in Civil Case No. 30-2012-CA-000360 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Bonifay, Florida, wherein 2010-3 SFR VENTURE, LLC is Plaintiff and JEANNIE D. BAREFOOT, TOMMY M. BAREFOOT, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Holmes County Courthouse, 201 North Oklahoma, Bonifay, FL. 32425 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 29 day of August, 2013 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Parcel No. 3: Beginning at the SW corner of the NW of Section 6, Township 4 North, Range 14 West, and run along the West line of said Section 6 on a bearing of N204`E, for 537 feet to a point of beginning; thence run S8759`E, for 372 feet; thence run N204`E, for 98 feet; thence run N8759`W, for 372 feet; thence run S204`W, for 98 feet to the point of beginning. All lying and being a part of the NW of Section 6, Township 4 North, Range 14 West, according to a certain survey made by W. Frasier Cox, Registered Land Surveyor, Florida Certificate No. 1223 and made in May, 1961. Less road right of way on West side of the above described property Also less and except that certain parcel owned by Roy Messer and wife Donna Messer as described in Official Records Book 140, Page 345, Public Records of Holmes County, Florida. Together with all improvements. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 25 day of July, 2013. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447; Phone: 850-718-0026; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771; Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcour ts.org. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 7, 14, 2013. 8-5333 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL (RFP): HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA RFP No. 13-105 Issue Date: July 30, 2013 Title: Camera and Digital Recording Devices for Courthouse Security Issued By: Holmes County Board of County Commissioners, 107 East Virginia Ave. Bonifay, Florida 32425 Phone (850)547-1119 Fax (850)547-4134 Email: Sherry Snellsherry@holmescountyfl.org. Sealed proposals will be received on or before 2:00 P.M. (CST) August 30, 2013 for furnishing the services and/or items described herein. The time of receipt shall be determined by the time clock stamp in the County office. All questions must be submitted before 2:00 P.M. (CST) August 23, 2013. If necessary, an addendum will be issued in the form of a facsimile and posted to the county web site at www.holmescountyfl.org. If proposals are mailed, send directly to Sherry Snell at the address listed above. If hand delivered, deliver to the same address as above. The County reserves the right to cancel this RFP and/or reject any or all proposals and to waive any informality in any proposal received by the County. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 7, 14, 2013. 8-5336 PUBLIC NOTICE Skyway Towers, LLC is proposing to install a monopole telecommunications tower off of Highway 79 North in Bonifay, Holmes County, Florida 32425 at latitude 30 56’20.8” north and longitude 85 38’59.2” west. The height of the tower will be 60.7 meters above ground level (117.5 meters above mean sea level). The tower is anticipated to have steady red lights, FAA Style E (L-864/L-865-/L-810). Specific information regarding the project is available by calling Henry Fisher during normal business hours at (205) 629-3868. Any interested party may submit comments by September 19, 2013 with Environmental Engineers, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, AL35120 for comments on the impact of the proposed action on any districts, sites, buildings, structures, or objects significant in American history, archaeology, engineering, or culture that are listed or determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places under National Historic Preservation Act Section 106. Interested persons may review the application for this project at www .fcc.gov/asr/applications by entering Antenna Structure Registration (Form 854) file no. A0844363. Interested persons may raise environmental concerns about the project under the National Environmental Policy Act rules of the Federal Communications Commission, 47 CFR § 1.1307, by notifying the FCC of the specific reasons that the action may have a significant impact on the quality of the human environment. Requests for Environmental Review must be filed within 30 days of the date that notice of the project is published on the FCC’s website and may only raise environmental concerns. The FCC strongly encourages interested parties to file Requests for Environmental Review online at www .fcc.gov/asr/environmen t alrequest, but they may be filed with a paper copy by mailing the Request to FCC Requests for Environmental Review, Attn: Ramon Williams, 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20554. A copy of the Request should be provided to Environmental Engineers, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, Alabama 35120. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 14, 2013. 8-5335 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed proposals for: RFP 13-103: INMATE MEDICAL SERVICES. RFP with criteria, requirements and the scope of work may be downloaded from the county’s web site or will be provided upon written request by contacting: Sherry Snell, Holmes County Board of County Commissioners, 107 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425, Phone (850) 547-1119, Fax (850) 547-4134, or sherry@holmescountyfl.org. Proposal submissions must be sealed and marked with the name of the proposer, and the RFP number and titled “RFP 13-103: INMATE MEDICAL SERVICES” so as to identify the enclosed proposal. Each submittal shall include one (1) original and eight (8) copies of the proposal. Proposals must be delivered to the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners, Attn: Sherry Snell, 107 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425, so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M. (cst), Friday, August 23, 2013, at which time they will be opened. Proposals received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners will not be responsible for the late deliveries of proposals that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service. The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals or any parts thereof, and the award, if made, will be made to the best qualified and most responsible respondent whose proposal and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of Holmes County, as determined by the Board of County Commissioners. The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive irregularities in the proposal. Holmes County is currently contracting with a private physician for the services herein and reserves the right to reject all bids and extend the agreement with its current provider if deemed in the best interest of the County by the Board. The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual’s disability status. The non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board’s functions, including one’s access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Sherry Snell at (850)-547-1119 for assistance. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 7, 14, 2013. 8-5334 The Holmes County Board of Commissioners will accept sealed bids for the following: Catastrophic Inmate Medical Insurance. All bids must be marked “Catastrophic Inmate Medical Insurance” and submitted on the Bid Form provided by the County Commissioner Office, 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425 no later than 2:00 p.m. on Friday, August 23, 2013 at which time the bids will be opened in a Public Meeting. Bid specifications and a bid form can be downloaded online at www holmescountyfl.org or may be picked up at the Holmes County Board of Commissioner’s office. Contact Sherry Snell at 850-547-1119 for more information. Holmes County is an Equal Opportunity Employer and reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids it deems to be in the best interest of the citizens of Holmes County. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 7, 14, 2013. 8-5337 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.: 2013-CP-33 IN RE: ESTATE OF VALENTINO MARCOCCIA ,Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of VALENTINO MARCOCCIA, deceased, with the case number indicated above, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 North Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425. The names and addresses of the co-personal representatives and of the co-personal representatives’ attorneys are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED 2 YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is: August 14, 2013. RONALD L. NELSON Florida Bar Number 280194 Attorney for Co-Personal Representative 517 East Government Street, Pensacola, FL 32502. Telephone (850) 434-1700 CLAYTON J.M. ADKINSON Florida Bar Number 171651 Attorney for Co-Personal Representative P.O. Box 1207 DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435. Telephone (850) 892-5195 Co-Personal Representatives: VINCENT MARCOCCIA 16 Biscayne Drive Mount Sinai, NY 11766 MARTHA MARCOCCIA 2617 Highway 81 N Ponce De Leon, FL 32455. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 14, 21, 2013. 8-5331 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 30-2013-CA-000206 VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee Corporation, P.O. Box 9800 Maryville, TN 37802 Plaintiff, v. JAMES WILLIAM RABON a/k/a JAMES RABON, CERESIA LYNN RABON, BETTY L. RABON n/k/a BETTY L. ANDERSON, JAMES E. RABON, IF LIVING, BUT IF DECEASED, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS AND TRUSTEES OF JAMES E. RABON, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: JAMES E. RABON, IF LIVING, BUT IF DECEASED, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS AND TRUSTEES OF JAMES E. RABON YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Holmes, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 14, Township 5 North, Range 15 West of Holmes County, Florida, thence South 04 degrees 54 minutes 25 seconds East along the West boundary line of said Section 14, 2375.87 feet to the Point of Beginning, thence North 87 degrees 03 minutes 00 seconds East, 263.48 feet to the centerline of a county road, thence South 22 degrees 46 minutes 59 seconds West along said centerline 316.77 feet; thence South 86 degrees 13 minutes 56 seconds West, 116.15 feet to said West line of Section 14, thence North 04 degrees 54 minutes 25 seconds West along said West line of Section 14, 287.18 feet to the Point of Beginning. Together with a 2010, CMH mobile home; Model: Value 1. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2010 CMHM MOBILE HOME, SERIAL NUMBER WHC018264GA. Commonly known as: 2036 BUCK TREADWELL RD., BONIFAY, FL 32425 You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, P.A., Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203, Tallahassee, Florida 32312, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 25 day of July, 2013. CLERK OF COURT By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 7, 14, 2013. 8-5338 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Mayor and Town Council of Ponce de Leon are accepting sealed bids until September 5, 2013 at 11:00 AM on the following salvaged trucks: One (1) 1977 Ford Pumper, (1) One 1984 Ford Pumper. The trucks are being sold without a title, “as is”, and may be inspected at the Ponce de Leon Fire House located at 1508 Skelton Street, Ponce de Leon, FL. Bids may be mailed to Town of Ponce de Leon, PO Box 214, Ponce de Leon, FL 32455, or submitted to the Town Clerk at PDL Town Hall, 1580 Hwy 90, Ponce de Leon during normal business hours. Bids will be opened on September 5, 2013 at 7:00 PM at the Town Hall. For more information please contact Johnny Locke at 850-209-6407. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 14, 21, 28, 2013. 8-5339 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: Shane A Locklear Last known address of: 512 E Pennsylvania Avenue, Bonifay, FL 32425. You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Holmes County, Florida, no later than thirty(30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 14, 2013. 8-5340 PUBLIC SALE Tharp & Sons Mini Storage in Bonifay, Fl. will hold a sale for these units for non-payment of rent in accordance with the FL Statute Act 83-801-83-809. Tenants will have until August 31, 2013 to pay in full. No checks are accepted. 1. Billy Mingo; Caryville, Fl. 2. Unknown. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 14, 21, 2013. 8-5332 Bowen Storage Company, 102 South Waukesha St. Bonifay, Fl. 32425. (850)547-4264. Notice : Julie Lowery, 3926 Main St., Cottondale, Fl. 32431. Subject: Storage Building B1. This notice is to inform you that the contents of storage building B1 will be sold unless we hear from you by 8/25/2013. Owner: Bowen Storage Company. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 7, 14, 2013. 9-5341 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA Case no.: 13-313DR Division: CHRISTINA BRUNSON Petitioner and ERIC BRUNSON SR, Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PETITION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE WITH MINOR CHILDREN. TO: ERIC BRUNSON, SR. 1528 GASDORF LANE, WESTVILLE, FL. 32464. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Petition for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on CHRISTINA BRUNSON whose address is 1528 GASDORF LANE, WESTVILLE, FL 32464, on or before SEPTEMBER 18, 2013, and file the original with the clerk of this Court at 201 N. OKLAHOMA STREET, Bonifay, Fl. 32425 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerk’s office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated August 9, 2013. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Cindy Jackson Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 14, 21, 28, September 4, 2013. 9-5342 NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201301172 TO: Eric E. Tucci A Notice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibiliy for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August, 14, 21, 28, September 4, 2013. ADOPT: A childless couple seeks to adopt. Loving home with tenderness, warmth, happiness. Financial security. Expenses paid. Regis & David (888)9861520 or text (347)4061924;www.davidandregisadopt.com -Adam B. Skiar FL# 0150789 AUCTIONAugust 28th. Beech Mountain, NC. Commercial Property; 1.68+/-acres. Former: Ski shop; gift shop; (3) apartments; 10,500 +/-sqft. Great location. www.Rogers AuctionGroup.com. 800-442-7906. NCAL#685. MAG SPARK/ (R)Convert your percussion sidelock muzzleloader from #11 cap to shotshell 209 in seconds. Dealer for MAGSPARK (R), EEZOX(TM) PREMIUM GUN CARE TRUGLO Muzzleloader and rifle sights. Call John @ CBL Chipley, 850-260-1342. cumminsbulletsandlube.c om. Fresh from the Farm! Okra. Leave a message. (850)956-4556. K&LFarm, LLC Green Peanuts for Boiling!! 1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 U-PICK GRAPES $4.00/Gallon (850)547-2326 Follow signs on Hwy 177Ato 1837 Flowing Well Rd., Bonifay. U-Pick 7 days, daylight Campbellton Farm Service 5221 Highway 231 South, Campbellton, Fl 850-263-6324, New Crop Bulk Oats (Good for Cover Crop or Grazing) $4.00 bushel 50# cleaned & bagged Oats (horse feed) $8.00 bag. Craftsman riding mower, 4000 series. 48-inch cut, 24 hp b/s, good shape 550 Call 850-628-5436 WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. BURFORD’S TREE Now hiring Groundsman, Climber-trimmers & Foreman. Must have valid D.L. & be able to pass background check. CDL’s a plus. Call Bill at (850)336-1255. Panama City & Chipley area. Bus/Strategic Mgmt Washington County News/ Holmes County Times Advertiser Advertising Sales Executive Halifax Media Group is looking for an experienced sales executive to provide online and print advertising solutions to advertisers in Washington/Holmes Counties in beautiful northwest Florida, to maximize the benefits of advertising for our customers while maximizing revenues for our company. This position will focus on soliciting print and online advertising,on behalf of the businesses and brands of Halifax Media Group, Northwest Florida. Prior sales experience a must. Washington and Holmes counties are just a short drive to the World’s Most Beautiful Beaches and have plenty of outdoor recreational opportunities. Halifax Media Group offers an excellent benefit package including health, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave. Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-Free Workplace No phone calls, please. Web ID#: 34261271 Full time Automobile Sales help wanted minimum 2 years experience required. Fax resumes to 334-684-3713 or email to wardmotor@centurytel.ne t. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Install/Maint/Repair DISPATCHERS AND BILLING CLERK National cleaning and outsourcing company needs experienced staff for above positions for a large, luxury property in the Santa Rosa Beach area. Dispatchers -$10 $12 per hour, shifts from 8am to 10pm, weekends required. Billing clerk needed to process invoices to customers daily and other related duties. Voluntary benefits available after 90 days. Send resumes to: nikki.bernal@theservicecompanies.com We are a crime and drug free workplace and an EOE Web ID#: 34261565 txt FL61565 to 56654 Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church is currently seeking a musician for Sunday Worship services. Church services are 1st & 4th Sunday beginning at 11:00a.m. All interested musicians please contact Deacon Chester Campbell(850)373-7090 or Minister Tony Davis(850)326-3628. Logistics/TransportClass A CDL Truck DriverThe News Herald is accepting applications for a hardworking, responsible truck driver to load and deliver newspaper bundles to our contractors along with other related duties. Hours are late night to early morning, on a rotating schedule. Applicants must have a valid Class A CDL Florida driver license, a clean driving record, proof of insurance, a current medical card. Benefits include medical and dental insurance, 401(k), vacation and sick leave, and paid holidays. Come by The News Herald front office located at 501 W. 11th Street Monday -Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. for an application or send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. Interviews will be scheduled at a later date. No phone calls please. Equal Opportunity Employer Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34261274 Other Pastor NeededRock Hill Church in Chipley Florida is seeking a full time ordained Nondenominational or Penticostal pastor. For further information please call (850) 579-2981 or (850) 579-2223 Text FL62077 to 56654 Web ID#: 34262077 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com. EOE MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a Medical Office Assistant! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED PC/Internet needed! 1-888374-7294 Executive Office Space for rent downtown Chipley. 638-1918 Office space for rent in Bonifay. 204 Harvey Ethridge St. Phone: (850)548-5045 or (850)307-3654. 1701AWaukesha St. (850)579-5113 or (850)305-6202. Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1BR Apartment w/kitchen, LR, large walk-in closet. New shower. Also, store or office. $400/mth. (850)547-5244. 4BR Home & 2BR Apartments, furnished. Bonifay. Private, well maintained. Includes W&D. Lawn maintenance & water provided. (850)547-2096. For Rent -1000+/-sq ft 2 or 3 BR/1BA Duplex apartment. $550. now taking applications. HUD not accepted. 638-7128. Mandi Lea Apartments in Vernon, 2/BR. Financial Assistance available if qualified. 638-4640. SpaciousOne Bedroom Apartment $425 Two Bedroom Apartment $450 Stove/Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. 3BR/1BA for rent. No pets. Deposit, & references required. HUD accepted. $595/mth Chipley. 638-1918 3BR/2BA House in Chipley. Newly renovated kitchen & bathroom floors. Stove & refrigerator included. $700 a month. Call 850-547-3746. 3BR/1BA AC, For Rent, Wausau, No Pets, $600/MO and $600/Dep. Reference, 638-7601 3BR/1BAHouse $550.00/mo, Vernon area. 850-353-2912. For Rent 1BR house in Chipley great neighborhood. $475/MO 850-258-3874. For Rent, 4BR/1BA, No pets, HUD accepted, AC, references. $700/MO and $700/DEP in Chipley 638-7601. Nice clean houses, apartments & mobile homes for rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, houses for sale. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. Small 2 Bdrm/1B block house, 3 Bdrm/1 bath house. Also an apt -2 Bdrm/2 1/2 bath. All in Bonifay No pets. (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586. 2BR/2BA M.H. Vernon. First, last, plus deposit. Excellent condition. No pets. HUD accepted. Call Moses 850-326-2201. 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850-768-3508, 850-638-9933. 2BR/2BA Mobile Home in quite park between Bonifay and Chipley. $425 plus Deposit. 547-4232 or 527-4911. 3BD/2BA,Doublewide .4.5 miles from Chipley. Water & sewage included. $650/mo. (850)638-2999 HUNTING LAND for rent or lease, 1 year or 5 years, 160 acres or 300 acres. For more information call 638-1911 or 326-0044. For Sell by Owner 3BR/2BA, Updated, .75 acre, CHA, conveniently located. Reduced to $65,000 OBO. 850-481-5352, 850-441-8181. Handicap Equipped. Must sell By Owner : 3 Bdr/1B, LR, kitchen/dining, utility, double carport, storage building, 2 patios, 3 window AC’s, workshop. On 2 acres near 5 points. (850)628-5436 Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. Mobile Homes with acreage. Ready to move in. Seller Financing with approved credit. Lots of room for the price, 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850-308-6473 LandHomesExpress.com OWNER MUST SELL! Beautifully wooded homesite located next to crystal clear mountain lake, WISP Ski area and brand new golf Course-only $79,900. Adjoining lot sold for $249,900. Bank will finance. Call 301-387-8100, x 91



PAGE 1

50www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visitBONIFAYNOW.COMPhone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 IN BRIEF imes imes imes T dvertiser imes imes imes imes T T dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser AHOLMES COUNTY By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY The Holmes County District Schools welcomed 11 new school buses into their eet on Thursday. All these buses are state of the art and have superior marks in safety, said Superintendent Eddie Dixon. The buses are longer, holding four more children and have seats that are a foot taller to protect the childrens heads and necks. There are also four digital cameras throughout the bus for increased security. Dixon said the buses cost $106,000 each, and if not for the funds provided by the Ebro Greyhound Tracks additional funding, the district would not have been able to afford the buses. Right now, weve got enough to have one provided By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Holmes County Board of County Commissioners discussed preparations for the arrival of Federal Emergency Management Agency representatives with the Director of Emergency Operations Center Wanda Stafford during a special session on Thursday. We met with the FEMA director yesterday at the EOC, Stafford said. The kick-off meeting will be held in a couple of weeks, and FEMA representatives will want to meet with us to go with the Holmes County road foremen to assess damages. Our project worksheets will be written at that time, and well work out all the small and large projects. Stafford said 75 percent of the funding will be paid at the beginning for the small projects. However, for the large projects, they will ask for a 12 percent match from the county. Were going to ask for a waiver, Stafford said. In 2009 we asked for a waiver, and we had half of the match waived. She said the EOC would also ask for vector control, which is a countywide mosquito spraying. Im requesting a county engineer to make sure that all FEMA funds are captured, Stafford said. These representatives may come in as soon as next week, and theyll want to be ready to get started. Stafford also requested two temporary positions be opened speci cally for documentation upkeep and organization. This is a critical point, she said. Documentation determines if we get funding or not, and if one little detail is out of order, we risk not By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com ESTO Esto Town Council held the rst reading of its new proposed mobile home ordinance during their Aug. 6 meeting. All mobile homes must meet the following requirements for Esto prior to being placed on real property in the town, Council member Teresa Harrison read. All mobile homes must be structurally sound, clean, sanitary, well-maintained and approved by council. Council may give a 90-day extension, if needed. All mobile homes must meet all U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards and the Florida Manufactured Building Act. All mobile homes must meet all requirements on Application for Town of Esto. If any mobile home is moved onto the property without council approval, a $250 ne will be assessed and a lien will be placed on the property. An additional $10 per day will be charged until it is moved off the property. Council member Darlene Madden asked about the purpose of the 90-day extension. Sometimes a good mobile home will be moved in, but it still isnt inhabitable, Town Council President Danny Powell said. The 90 days gives anyone a reasonable amount of time to complete necessary nishing touches, like putting on the skirting, hooking up the water, etc. After that, the nes will start, and I will add that the 90-day extension is still based on council approval. John Little came before the council to ask that they sign an ordinance against granting illegal immigrants amnesty and bene ts. The council approved of the resolution of support. I realize we have illegals, and theyve been here for a long time, Powell said. I just dont think that its fair to those of us who are paying our dues and that cant get ahead because theyre taking the burden of these illegals. The council approved of paying a local man $2,115 to repair and refurbish the kitchen and inside of the Esto Community Center. Madden said there will be a yard sale on Sept. 14 to raise money for next years Two-Toe Tom Festival. She said they are accepting donations to sell at the yard sale to help raise funds. She said anything will be accepted as a donation, from clothes to furniture, and if anyone was interested in making a donation or would like more information to contact her at 263-3201. Esto approves rst reading of mobile home ordinanceSee FEMA A2 County preps for FEMA CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser Superintendent Eddie Dixon introduces 11 new buses into the Holmes County District Schools eet on Thursday.School district welcomes 11 new buses NEW WHEELSSee BUSES A3 Bethlehem Elementary Open HouseBETHLEHEM Bethlehem Elementary will hold its Open House from 8:3010:30 a.m., on Friday, Aug. 16. Open House will be for pre-k through fth grade.Bonifay Middle School OrientationBONIFAY Orientation for the 2013-14 school year is at the Bonifay Middle School cafeteria as follows: fth grade, Aug. 14 at 8:30 a.m.; Sixth grade, Aug. 14 at 10 a.m.; Seventh grade, Aug. 15 at 8:30 a.m.; Eighth grade, Aug 15. at 10 a.m.Ponce De Leon Elementary School free breakfastPONCE DE LEON The Holmes County School Board has announced an amendment to its policy for serving meals to students in the National School Breakfast Program for the 2013-14 school year. All students will be served breakfast at no charge at Ponce de Leon Elementary School For more information, call the Gail Anderson, food service administrator, at 5479341 ext. 256.Alpaca farming is one local familys golden eece | B1 By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Assistant State Attorney Brandon Young came before the Bonifay City Council on behalf of the Bonifay Kiwanis Club to renegotiate a 50-year contract between the city and the club for the use of Memorial Field during the council meeting on Monday. There is a 50-year agreement between the Bonifay Kiwanis Club and the City of Bonifay for the use of Memorial Field that was renewed in 1995, Young said. Before the Kiwanis Club would receive numerous bills to pay various people for jobs, and this contract was arranged between the club and the city so that the club would pay one lump sum to the city to cover all the expenses associated with using Memorial Field for two events. The contract agreed on a payment of $5,000 per year, which covered the yearly rodeo and all-night gospel sing, with a cost of living reassessment, he said. Over the past few years, theyve been receiving a few bills in addition to the $5,000, Young said. Since the club has done away with the allnight gospel sing; theres only one event. Also, at the time, garbage was a large expense to the city, which was around $2,000. However, for the last few years, the club has a contract dealing directly with Waste Management, so that is no longer an expense of the city. Young proposed the 50year contract be reduced to a ve-year contract and the lump amount be held at $6,000. I can admit, in 18 years $5,000 may not seem to be the appropriate amount any more, and I dont feel that handing you $5,000 and saying were done because of a 50-year contract is going to leave us in very good standings with one another, Kiwanis requests contract change BONIFAY CITY COUNCILVolume 123, Number 18 See BONIFAY A2Wednesday, AUGUST 14 2013INDEXOpinion ................................A4 Outdoors ..............................A6 Sports ..................................A7 Extra ....................................B1 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B7

PAGE 2

LocalA2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, August 14, 2013 Young said. We need to be able to renegotiate the contract every ve years so that its still fresh with those who can remember when the contract renegotiated last. We appreciate all that the city has done, but theres something that needs to be done about this contract. Council member Richard Woodham suggested a workshop be held to negotiate the terms of the new contract. The council approved of City Engineer Amir Zafars request for a change order that would speed up the progress being made on several streets in Bonifay, which includes Varner and Virginia Avenue. The council also approved of allowing Stantec Engineering Firm to clean up Middlebrooks Park on Sept. 10. The council approved of grant writer Bob Jones putting in an application for a $50,000 grant to x the water park at Middlebrooks Park. Weve got to do something additional to the playground and picnic area to do what we need to do for additional points, Jones said. We also need a new recreational committee. The old one has been inactive for so long that its considered non-existent. Mayor Lawrence Cloud agreed to come up with at least two additional members in the next few days and appointed council member Micah McCormick chairman. City Clerk Jeri Gibson read the First Reading of the citys Capital Assets Policy, which she indicated was deemed necessary by the citys auditor. All purchase of real and personal property with an original cost of $1,000 and an expected life of one year or more shall be designated by the City as a capital asset, read Gibson. All purchases of capital assets shall be subject to the purchasing, cash disbursement and procurement procedures currently adopted by the Council at the time of purchase. Cloud informed the council he and Public Works Supervisor Jack Marell spent hours with a representative from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to assess 37 different projects throughout the city because of the damage caused by the recent rains. Marell said those individuals wanting to check to see if FEMA would help reimburse or pay for damage caused by the recent excessive rains during the State of Emergency can contact Wanda Stafford at the Emergency Operations Center at 547-5114. The next scheduled meeting of the Bonifay City Council is set for 6 p.m. on Aug. 26. getting funded at all. Commissioner David Whitaker said he had spoke with the Director of Chipola Work Force and said there is additional manpower and funding to help with just that. Stafford agreed to look into the Chipola Work Force and the Board approved of giving Stafford the authority to head the FEMA project. The board approved of the resolution stating the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners was in support of Walton Countys RESTORE Act, which was presented to the Board at the last meeting. They were wanting us to join forces with them before, but we didnt have the chance to review it fully, Chairman Monty Merchant said. During the last Board of County Commissioners meeting, Larry Jones and Billy McKee with Walton County presented a resolution to the Board stating the Board was in support of Waltons upcoming RESTORE Act Project. Were working on two projects pertaining to the RESTORE Act, Jones said. The rst is an inventory of all unpaved roads that would affect the Choctawhatchee River water shed with sediment. So far weve got over 800 listed in Holmes, Washington and Walton counties. Jones said the second project was a study on bank erosion. These studies are just the rst step in getting grants to pave these roads, so that sedimentation off of these roads can be greatly reduced, he said. Were moving on with the studies, and this resolution is just saying that Holmes County supports our project. County Attorney Jeff Goodman advised the board that this was an ideal opportunity. These restoration claims go all the way up to Washington, Goodman said. Were talking billions, not millions, of dollars in funding. County Engineer Cliff Knauer added the studies would help them in future grant pursuits as well. Goodman requested the new Garbage Franchise Agreement be tabled until the next meeting. The one that was given to you is the rst draft, not the nal draft, Goodman said. Theres only very few changes between the rst and last, but I just want to make sure youre signing the right agreement. Goodman gave an update on the Holmes County Fair Board. I had a conversation with Clint Erickson, and he has informed me that the Fair Board has agreed to dissolve and has sought counsel with Attorney Lucas Taylor, Goodman said. I must admit that at rst I was very uneasy to hear theyve taken counsel with another attorney, but when I heard it was Lucas, I could rest assured knowing theyre in very capable hands. Theyve got a lot to do to dissolve the Fair Board in the proper fashion, but Taylor will be more than able to help them in this transition. Greg Barton, Director of Emergency Management Services, gave a report on the success of the EMS Collections, saying they were over their projected amount and more successful than surrounding agencies. Weve had 1,665 accounts come in, Barton said. Everyone goes to collections now, regardless of being late on payments, as to the approval of the council. Barton said he was having an issue with the New Hope Fire Station. We rent it out for the community to hold their family reunions, community functions and fundraisers. However, weve got one who wants to come in to train drug and attack dogs, Barton said. The main problem is that we dont have a lease agreement, and this is the rst time weve encountered something like this. The board agreed Barton should politely reject the persons request because of liability and the upcoming hurricane season, which the re station is also used as an emergency shelter. The board also agreed Goodman should write up a lease agreement. If youre going to rent the building out then you must have a lease agreement, otherwise you run into the problem Washington County had with their Agricultural Center, when people were coming in and holding raves there, Goodman said. There was extensive damage and drugs left there from these people who preyed on those with weak lease agreements. Commissioner Bill Parish wanted to stress the State of Emergency has been lifted, and county policies are back in place. FEMA from page A1 Pictured:Bobby,Hilton,Michael,Joyce,Tim,Eddie;notpictured:StevenandPaulinePROPANE rellsandtankexchange TOPLINEAPPLIANCES washers,dryersandrefrigerators GRILLSANDCOOKERS Outdoorcookingcenterwithall thexinsforafamilyfeast AS Propane&ApplianceCenterOurexperiencedstaprovidespersonal servicewithasmile stopbytodayandyoullseewhy! MeetthefacesofHy-TempGasLocalfolkswhoveproudlyservedyouformanyyears! YETICoolersandmanycooking accessories Member FDIC 33WestGardenStreet Pensacola,FL32502850.202.9900or1.877.962.322417SEEglinParkway FtWaltonBeach,FL32548850.244.9900or1.866.362.3224 www.beachcommunitybank.com ServingYouIsOurMostImportantProduct*PropertyInsuranceisnotavailableinthestateofFloridafromAuto-OwnersInsurance. BONIFAY from page A1

PAGE 3

LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A3Wednesday, August 14, 2013 Dr.Hawkins,MegTaylor,andstawouldliketoinviteyoutojoinusforourOpenHouseandBacktoSchoolCelebrationFriday,August16thfrom12-2pm.Comejointhecelebrationwithfood,funandfreeschoolsupplies.Dr.HawkinsandMegopenedatanewlocationandareexcitedtocontinuetoprovideyouandyourfamilywithexceptional medicalcare.Wearelocatedat310E.ByrdAve.,SuiteB,Bonifay.Weareacceptingpatientsandmostinsurance.Callforanappointmentat(850)547-4440.GodBlessyouforyourcontinuedsupportandprayers. PATRICKHAWKINS,M.D. MEGTAYLOR,ARNP,WOMEN'SHEALTH KEYTOPICSYOUNEEDTOKNOWABOUTADVERTISINGONLINEFREEDIGITALADVERTISINGSEMINAR FORLOCALBUSINESS OWNERS/REPRESENTATIVES EVERYBODYLOVESFREEGIVEAWAYSBringyourbusiness cardforachanceto wingreatprizes! Aug.19at4pm(CT)attheWashingtonCountyChamber 6725thStreet,Chipley Seatingislimited.RSVPto: 850-638-0212Onlineadvertisingisakeyelementof anyadvertisingormarketingpromotion.Ifyouarentusingdigitaladvertisingtoreachyour customerbase,someoneelseprobablyis.Ifyouare advertisingonline,great!Weregoingtocoverbest practicestohelpbothseasoneddigitaladvertisersand beginnersalike. By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Holmes County District School Board reviewed and approved administrative programs for the 2013-14 school year during the Boards Aug. 6 meeting. At the top of their agenda, the board approved its contract with the Holmes County Sheriffs Ofce to provide local law enforcement for school board meetings and school-related functions. Its very economical, Chairman Rusty Williams said. We get more than what we pay for. The board also approved the Code of Student Conduct. The only thing that has changed is that weve done away with requiring students to make up days that are missed, and weve added verbiage against bullying, District Administrator Jean West said. Though the change in requiring students to make up missed days is more like reverting back to the old code, before they were required to make up days on Saturday mornings beginning at 6 a.m. The board approved of a personnel handbook. This is the rst time weve had a district handbook, Superintendent Eddie Dixon said. Its a personnel handbook that goes to every employee within the district, which included custodians, bus drivers, etc. It is a collaboration of board policies and state statutes that not only gives our personnel answers to their questions but the reasons behind them. The board approved of an Interagency Agreement with Chipola College for the Take Stock in Children Program. This program has been around for years, raising money for scholarships, and then about three years ago it just kind of stalled out, Dixon said. Chipola College has volunteered to administrate this program for us at no cost. This program is for at-risk children who wont receive academic scholarships and just fall between the cracks. School board member Debbie Kolmetz said she was happy that the Take Stock in Children scholarship was returning to Holmes County schools. The board also approved of Project Application for 21st Century Community Learning Center to help fund the local WINGS program. This is a wonderful program that has been very benecial to our community, Williams said. Other items the board approved included Service Agreement for Applied Behavior Analysis through Florida State Universitys Early Childhood Autism Program; Performance Contract with Spectrum Counseling rst year extension; Performance Contract for Occupational Therapy Services second year extension; July 29 meeting minutes; and Project Application for IDEA Part B, Entitlement and IDEA, Part B and Preschool. Were getting ready for a new school year, Dixon said. Weve visited all the facilities, and weve got the air conditioning for Ponce de Leon High School almost ready. Thursday, teachers will be returning to all the schools in Holmes County, and then the students will be back on Monday. Board Member Shirley Owens wanted to remind everyone several of their bus drivers had went out to pick up the districts 11 new school buses. The next meeting of the Holmes County District School Board is set for 6 p.m. on Aug. 20. School District preps for new school year Thebenetsofhearinginstrumentsvarybytypeanddegreeofloss,noiseenvironment,accuracyofhearingevaluationandpropert.DiscountsoffMSRP Previouspurchasesexcluded.Foralimitedtime.Cannotbecombinedwithanyotheroffers. Clean,clear,naturalsoundYourHearingAidscommunicatewitheachother automaticallyadjustingthemselves. Ear-to-EarSynchronization: Settingsareautomaticallytransferredtotheotheraid.BeltonePromise HearingAidSystem$1000offAppliesto2HearingAidsatPremierLevel.$800offAdvantageLevel. MARIANNA30256thSTREET(850)387-4931Wednesdays&FridaysAllenBarnesHAS:BC-HIS 24Years ExperienceBillFletcherHAS:BC-HIS 24Years Experience WEREINYOURNEIGHBORHOOD!CHIPLEY1611MAINSTREET#4(850)387-4931Monday-Friday Thebenetsofhearinginstrumentsvarybytypeanddegreeofloss,noiseenvironment,accuracyofhearingevaluationandpropert.DiscountsoffMSRP Previouspurchasesexcluded.Foralimitedtime.Cannotbecombinedwithanyotheroffers. 1361JacksonAve.Chipley638-1756washington@bic.com 1108N.WaukeshaSt.Bonifay547-4227holmes@bic.comTrustinyourlocalFarmBureauagency. Wehavebeenherefor60years andareheretostay. BUSES from page A1to each school, Dixon said. I would like to look into getting additional buses fairly soon. We still have buses that are 13 to 18 years old, and thats just not going to hack it. He explained the proposed funding was established into the millage increase to help purchase the buses. These new buses get over 11 miles to the gallon, which is almost double the amount of the old ones, which only get six miles to the gallon, Dixon said. The money were saving in gas is going to take care of most of the interest rate in and of itself. This is a great investment for the safety of our students as well as economically for the school district.

PAGE 4

Chipley seeks growthThe Chipley City Council is to be commended for their proactive work toward extending city water lines south of Interstate 10. The process back in February when Mayor Linda Cain invited Consultant Doug Bruce to explain to the council what the city could do to seek grants to fund the expansion of the utilities beyond the I-10 boundary. Getting utilities south of the interstate would open up properties for new businesses such as restaurants and hotels and could generate much needed tax revenue for the city and county. The city selected the Tallahassee rm of Doug Bruce & Associates to serve as consultants in the process. On Thursday, Angela Drzewiecki, representing Doug Bruce & Associates, presented a grant proposal to the council. The council was set to approve a resolution on Tuesday authorizing the consultants to seek a Water Supply Development Community Assistance Initiative Grant from the Northwest Florida Water Management District. This resolution is just one small step, but it is a step forward toward progress, so congratulations to Mayor Cain and the rest of the council for looking to the future for not only Chipley, but Washington County as well.Progress at DozierKudos to Gov. Rick Scott and his Cabinet for clearing the path for researchers from the University of South Florida to exhume bodies at the former Dozier School for Boys in Marianna. Former inmates at the school have alleged abuse, rape, torture and even murder of children by adult staff members in the 1950s and 60s. USF researchers have identi ed 50 graves in the schools unmarked burial grounds, which are 19 more than the state found in a brief investigation that concluded in 2008. Researchers, as well as the families of the dead children, want to exhume the bodies so they can be examined and identi ed. In May a judge denied a request from Attorney General Pam Bondi to exhume the remains. In response, USF applied to the Florida Department of State for an archaeological permit to dig up the burial sites. However, Secretary of State Ken Detzner turned it down, saying his department doesnt have the legal authority. That was a imsy, bureaucratic dodge. On Aug. 6, the governor and his Cabinet members Bondi, Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam and Chief Financial Of cer Jeff Atwater unanimously approved a land agreement that will allow the USF research to proceed. We applaud the move, especially Bondis persistence in pursuing this. The families deserve answers as to what happened to their loved ones. In our VIEW By Wendy VictoriaNorthwest Florida Daily News As assignment editor, I get frequent requests from authors to write about books they published themselves. Being a bit of a book snob, I almost always say no. Last week, though, I said yes after getting a book from a local woman in her 80s who wrote about growing up on a farm in Holmes County. Ironically, she doesnt want her name used and doesnt want the publicity, which begs the question of why she brought me the book. I cant answer that, but I can tell you I wouldnt have survived her upbringing and neither would my children. The fth of 10 children, the author says she was raised in a house with no screens, running water or outhouse. The only furniture they had was two beds, a table, chairs and a rocking chair with one leg shorter than the other. When one of the kids misbehaved, her mother whipped all of them with a branch from a peach tree in the yard. That tree was missing so many switches it never produced more than a few tiny, ugly peaches. Between the ages of about 5 and 10, the author was entrusted with the care of her ve younger brothers while her mother worked in the elds. She writes about holding a pillow over her baby brothers faces so she could try to get them to nap. Only a child herself, she didnt realize that could have killed them. Any shoes they wore didnt t and they didnt complain. They ate what they could grow or what was given to them in trade. Their mother convinced them that eating chicken feet would make them better looking. Later, the author gured out her mother likely just wanted to save the better parts of the chicken for the pastor when he visited. When she left home at 17, shed never seen her re ection in a mirror, taking her mothers word that she was pretty. Shed never been anywhere other than her home, church or school. She was afraid. Still, she turned out OK, as did every one of her siblings, she writes. And thats more than we can say for a lot of kids raised in more permissive times. One of my friends asked me if we had drug problems when I was growing up, she wrote. I replied, I had a drug problem when I was growing up. I was drug to church two times on Sunday. I was drug to the cotton elds every day. I was drug behind the house when I disobeyed my parents And all of those drugs are still in my veins. They affect my behavior and everything I do, say or think. God bless the parents who drug us. Daily News Assignment Editor Wendy Victoria can be reached at 358-4478 or wvictoria@ nwfdailynews.com. Guest COLUMNElderly author grew up with her own type of drug problem HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. OPINION www.bonifaynow.comWednesday, August 14, 2013 APage 4SectionThe views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci @chipleypaper.com 850-547-9414 Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 ADVERTISING Stephanie Smith: ssmith@ chipleypaper. com 850-638-0212Mr. Ben Smith sent me word that some errors occurred in my previous story, and knowing that he had recently celebrated his 88th birthday, Jack and I paid him a visit. I often make errors in my stories and dont usually try to correct them and I wont in this case, because most of the material came from Barbara the daughter of Brown Miller, in the Heritage of Holmes County book. However, Mr. Smith and Millers son Julian Miller did agree that the story of water in the gas tank was just a story and did not happen. I searched the E.W. Carswell book Holmsteading to nd the date of the formation of the N.SD Miller Wholesale Distribution Co. but was unsuccessful in nding a date. There was an N.D. Miller store listed in the early 1920s and in Jan 1923, N.D. Miller was listed as owning stock in the newly formed Farmers and Merchants Bank which bought the assets of the failed Holmes County Bank. Other than the wholesale distribution company, Mr. N. D. Miller is also remembered for managing the Eureka Hotel which was built by Mr. G.W. Ban l, but was operated by Mr. and Mrs. Miller from 1910 for many years. Mr. Ben Smith worked for the N.D. Miller Company full time from 1942 through 1956, but worked part time as a youth. Over the years, many people worked for the Miller Company. Tom Jenkins told me he worked for them. But in addition to the ones mentioned last week, Mr. Smith recalled J.W. Leavins, Cecil Yates, and Elbert Harrell. The company serviced independent grocers from the Chattahoochee River to Pensacola. Some additional Bonifay stores he remembered were the Suwanee Store, with Roy Dowling as the proprietor and later Mr. J.M. Browning. The only restaurant he remembered was operated by a Greek named Steve Koutric. Mrs. Videll Mcfatters was a general store with dry goods as well as groceries. In Leonia there was Heath Mercantile operated by Hiram Spears. Dady Post Of ce was there. He told how during the war (WWII) candy was scarce and whatever the wholesaler got in was apportioned between all the stores they serviced. He remembered how Mr.Spears daughters swarmed his truck looking for the sweet treats when he serviced them. The local rolling stores lled their traveling stores with N.D. Miller merchandise. On the back of their store they carried chicken coops. They would take chickens and eggs in trade for goods. Then, they would trade those items back to the company in payment for their bill. According to Ben Smith, one driver falsi ed his weight tickets to the degree that Mr. Brown Miller sued him for his debt and was awarded a 40 acre eld. Because Irish potatoes were so much a part of their business, Brown Miller who had bought the company, planted the entire 40 acres in potatoes. Brown Miller had lived previously in Miami and made contacts there to sell the chickens and the eggs. When the rolling stores had collected enough to load a truck, Wallace Donaldson would deliver them via truck to Miami. Brown Miller also contracted with the military for delivery of rations for soldiers. Mr. Smith would pick them up from the canning plants. He said from the number of Van Camp Pork and Beans he hauled, he surmised that the army only fed beans and crackers. He said he delivered tons of soda crackers (thats what we called saltines then) and it took 14,000 pounds of Klotz Crackers to ll a 40 foot trailer. He hauled 2 tons of Henderson brand sugar a week from Louisiana. I asked if a lot of that went to bootleggers and he af rmed that it did. I also asked if he knew local people that the company bought syrup from. He said the Cope family in Chipley furnished a lot and Silas Lee, Quincys dad, furnished some. I have a feeling that my granddaddy, Tom Wells, did too. I found these syrup labels among the Tison memorabilia but I would guess that it was some of Jacks Grandma Meekers family, the Youngs, who made the syrup. Mr. Smith said that the whole N.D. Miller operation shut down for the week of July 4th and all employees and their families were invited to a big picnic on the 4th at Jenkins Fish Camp at Seven Runs on the Choctowhatchee River where they could swim, sh, and have a good time. Ben Smith still lives near where he, his six brothers and one sister grew up. They attended Fairview School located on what is now Malcolm Taylor Road. He remembers Mr. Drane Kates as his earliest teacher. Daughter Sarah lives nearby. Son Larry who works at Jerkins also lives nearby. Son Ray drives a truck that hauls all of Willie Nelsons equipment and a kind of rolling gift shop. Ben sang southern gospel with Quincy Carnley, Devon Andrews, and Henry Ray Kent or Roy Yates with Marion Moss as pianist. He loves visitors and recalling old times. We enjoyed our visit with this man who loves to tell how to be a redneck.Visit with Mr. Smith adds to N.D. Miller Company story HAPPY CORNERHazel Wells Tison The label from a can of Pure Cane Syrup from the National Can Company in Baltimore, Md., features the N.D. Miller Company Store in Bonifay.

PAGE 5

Auto-OwnersInsurancerankshighestamongautoinsuranceprovidersintheJ.D.PowerandAssociates2008-2012AutoClaimsStudiesSM.2012studybasedon12,508totalresponses,ranking26insuranceproviders.Excludesthosewithclaimsonlyfor glass/windshield,the/stolen,roadsideassistanceorbodilyinjuryclaims.ProprietaryresultsbasedonexperiencesandperceptionsofconsumerssurveyedNovember2011-September2012.Yourexperiencesmayvary.Visitjdpower.com. PropertyInsuranceisnotavailableinthestateofFloridafromAuto-OwnersInsuranceSimsInsuranceAgency410N.WaukeshaStreet Bonifay,FL32425 Agents:MikeSimsandJamieWells(850)547-5411 gulfcoastderm.com MEDICAL|SURGICAL|COSMETICTOTALACCESS.TOTALCONFIDENCE.TOTALCAREFORYOURSKIN.BONIFAY|MARIANNA|PANAMACITY JonWard,MD| Board-CertiedDermatologist KarrieThomas,PA-C| NationallyCertiedPhysicianAssistantWhatdoesthismeanforyou? Accesstotheregionswidestrange ofadvancedskincancertreatments, includingpainlessSupercialRadiation TherapyandMohsmicrographicsurgery Same-weekappointments Ourphysician-supervisedspa,offering proventreatmentsfortotalskin revitalizationandrejuvenation Tomakeanappointmentorschedulea complimentarycosmeticconsultation, pleasecall 1-877-231-DERM(3376). RORYC.FARRIS,M.D.Dr.Farrisisaboard-certiedorthopaedic surgeonwhopracticesgeneralorthopaedicswithaspecialinterestinsportsmedicineandjointreplacementsurgery.Dr. FarrisearnedhisMedicalDegreeatthe UniversityofAlabamaSchoolofMedicine, Birmingham,AL.AnativeofSamson,Dr. FarrislivesinEnterprise.SOUTHERNBONE& JOINTSPECIALISTSRoryC.Farris,M.D.1200MapleAve. Geneva,Alabama www.southernbone.com Wealsotakecareof (850)638-5885 MostVehicles Upto5qts. syntheticblend MostVehicles Carpet&CeramicOutletYOURHOMETOWNLOWPRICE! HUGEREMNANTSALE!12x9TanFrieze......................................$955012x12DarkGreenPlush........................$1399012x13LightTanPlush............................$1099012x13DarkBluePlush...........................$1555012x14HeavyTanFrieze.........................$1655012x14MediumBrownFrieze.................$1499012x15ChocolateFrieze.........................$1799012x15LightTanPlush............................$1555012x16MediumBlueFrieze....................$1899012x19HeavyVelvetPlushTan..............$2255012x192GreenComm.Plush....................$2055012x20MultiColorComm.......................$169902x4...............$5.00 2x8.............$15.50 3x5.............$12.50 4x6.............$19.90 5x7.............$39.90 6x9.............$49.90 LocatedBetweenArrowheadCampgrounds&Hopkins,OnHwy.90 ThePlaceToShop,IfMoneyMatters! carpettilemarianna.com OpinionHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A5Wednesday, August 14, 2013 By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Brent Gardener, general manager of Pier Park in Panama City Beach, talked about how Bonifay helped shape Pier Park and what changes were happening soon at the Bonifay Kiwanis Club meeting on Aug. 7. I work for Simon, the worlds largest real estate company, said Gardener. Theyve got 336 properties with 312 in the United States and located in 38 states. We profit $168 billion in retail a year. He explained that if theres any mall or outlet with the name Mills or Premium in the title, Simon owns it. Pier Park is our crowning achievement and we want to focus on events, said Gardner. We want to draw people in and have the best time they could possibly have that way theyll keep coming back. My job is to do all that I can do to serve the community because we are more than a mall, we are a community center; a safe place for friends and families to hang out, be around and enjoy the atmosphere. Gardener said that Bonifay played a part in developing Pier Park. We actually surveyed people incognito in Bonifay, as well as the surrounding areas, and casually asked if there was a mall to be built, what would they like to see in it, he said. Its very easy for us to get the stigma as being a big, bad corporation who doesnt care about the little people when in fact we all started from something only manned by a few people and grew, and we love to help those starters. Gardner said they have over 100 event days per year, such as the Beach Ball Drop in January, Taste of the Beach, Fall Festival, Thunder Beach and the newest coming up Pirate Invasion. There is literally going to be an invasion of pirates on Pier Park coming in from the ocean, he said. Some Johnny Depp looking characters are going to kidnap the mayor and theres going to be a battle against ships just off shore for everyone to watch. Its going to be so much fun. He then went into dispelling some of the latest rumors. Pier Park North is not ours, said Gardener. St. Joe actually owns the name and has enlisted another developer for that section. Pier Park West will be developed by us. The rumor of Miracle Strip moving from the small section at Pier Park to their new land to rebuild the full park is true, said Gardener. We expect that theyll have all of the rides moved out by the end of the year, he said. I can confirm that we will soon have a Dave and Busters in the area that currently has the bungee rides. He said that there was going to be more and more coming into the Pier Park area but that they were going to take their time introducing the new developments. We dont want to overdevelop the area, said Gardener. They all ready have so much to offer. We can just take our time and enjoy the area for what it is; a great place to spend time with friends and family.General Manager for Pier Park Brent Gardener was the guest speaker for this weeks Bonifay Kiwanis Club on Aug. 7.GM of Pier Park speaks at Bonifay Kiwanis

PAGE 6

OUTDOORS Wednesday, August 14, 2013 Page 6www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comSend your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com ASection Theres one thing I cannot understand about the marketing of our area. You would think we only had the beaches to attract people. I think the people in the marketing business should be made to understand we also have some of the best redfish fishing in Florida. Most of the time when you turn on outdoors shows you see the Banana River or the Cape Canaveral area and the redfish fishing in those places. Do you know how much time and gas mileage you can save by stopping in Panama City? Nowhere in those areas will you find redfish crashing crabs on the surface in 50 feet of water during a hard outgoing tide. If you love to fly fish, the pass here is the place to test out that 10-weight fly rod. When the pass crabs get sucked out into the Gulf and mixed with the bay grass, and those big honkers are busting the surface looking like big blocks of concrete being thrown into the water you know you are in fly rod heaven. Not only can you catch them on a fly rod, but live bait fishermen consistently catch bull reds on lightweight spinning reels. After battling two or three 15to 30-pound reds a fellow soon earns some respect for fish that size. We also have some of the finest guides you could find in the state. All this adds up to some pretty good fishing. Some wives are reluctant to get on a boat that stays out 6-8 hours, so the hubby goes fishing and the wife stays at the hotel and misses out on some fine fun. That can be fixed by fishing with a guide on a custommade trip of your design. Most guides are willing to take you fishing, but some I know will take your family over to Shell Island for a day in the sun or for a picnic if you provide the food. No one is getting seasick or ready to come home on this trip because it is designed by you. So tell me why anyone would want to travel another mile south when we have it all right here in the Panama City area?Hooked on Outdoors Outdoor LifeScott Lindseycaptainlindsey@ knology.net PHOTOS BY FRANK SARGEANT | Special to the News HeraldThe silver kings average 80 to 90 pounds, but sh of 150 pounds are no longer uncommon thanks to all-release regulations.By FRANK SARGEANTfranksargeant@charter.net When saltwater turns fresh and clear water turns coffee black, it requires a bit of a mental adjustment to achieve continued angling success for the favorite inshore species such as spotted seatrout, red sh and ounder. It also is likely to require an adjustment in geography; your favorite marsh holes and creeks might have few or no sh, and you might have to head to outside waters to connect. Not to say that coastal sh cant thrive in brackish water in winter, not only trout and reds but also mangrove snapper, black drum and sheepshead often prowl into areas that are almost completely fresh. But thats forced upon them as a refuge from cold water on the ats; all things being equal, they like a relatively high salinity, along with a lot of bait sh and shrimp along with moderate temperatures. So where do the sh go when they depart from our favorite dock holes, creek mouths and bridge pilings? A lot of them head out on the beach, settling on any structure they can nd within easy swim of bait schools. Thats why its not uncommon to connect with schools of trout, often big ones, around nearshore arti cial reefs and wrecks. And of course reds, when they mature, actually are open-water sh, only returning to the passes and bays in late summer and fall to spawn. So they are highly tolerant of the higher salinities of the open Gulf. Tarpon are one species that are not particularly unhappy in black, lowsalinity water. They start their lives in places like this, often far back in the marshes, moving to deeper water only as they mature. And after they nish the mid-summer spawn, many of them return to the black waters of inside bays where they will remain until the rst chill of October. The key to nding black water tarpon and other species for that matter is nding bait tolerant of the water conditions. Shad dont mind a bit of black water, and the tiny bay anchovies known as glass minnows dont either they swim well up coastal rivers. Find swarms of these bait sh and youll usually nd game sh of some stripe. (You wouldnt think a 100-pound-tarpon would have much interest in bait an inch long, but they plunge through the tightly-packed minnows like whales eating krill, gulping down huge mouthfuls of them.) Fishing black water areas can be a challenge, to be sure; the sh cant see arti cial lures more than a few feet away, and when theyre feeding on specialized bait such as the tiny glass minnows, they might ignore the usual lures. There are several strategies to get around the issue, however. One is simply to go to cut bait on the bottom; the scent lures the sh in, even if they cant see the bait at any distance. This is particularly effective for late summer tarpon nd Handling the murk of Floridas torrential summer downpours Tarpon are not much bothered by an in ux of black water, and can be caught on an assortment of cut baits, live baits or arti cials.TAMPA BAY WATCH | Special to the News Herald Floridas bay scallop season is now underway and continues through Sept. 24. St. Joe Bay is one of the prime areas in Panhandle waters. By FRANK SARGEANTfranksargeant@charter.net Thats how some children think of Floridas bay scallop season. Though the scallop season has been open for some time and tens of thousands already have been harvested by eager divers, those remaining are the largest of the season scallops grow fast. The prime scalloping area in the Panhandle is St. Joe Bay, where clear water and lots of eel grass provide ideal habitat for the swimming shell sh. They also are abundant on the ats off Steinhatchee and Suwannee, as well as at Homosassa and Crystal River. Scallops are an annual crop; they hatch, grow to maturity, spawn and die in a single year, so the annual take by recreational divers is thought to have minimal impact. The tiny larvae develop into shell sh up to 3 inches across by July and August of each year, and thousands of Florida families turn out to pursue these strange little animals, the only shell sh that can swim. Unlike most shell sh that af x themselves to the bottom, bay scallops can swim by clapping their shells together. Admittedly, its a slow, crazy dance, but they do manage to move from place to place, and with the help of the tides sometimes can travel for miles. The shell sh are typically found in water from 4 to 10 feet deep over turtle grass, the longleaved greenery that sprouts abundantly from the bottom in the open areas. Because they are lethargic swimmers, scallops are easy for a snorkeler to capture by hand, and they are a favorite target for young swimmers; many families plan their annual summer vacation with the children for the opening of the scallop season. Once things get rolling, nding the scallops is simply a matter of looking for the eet where the shell sh are abundant, there will be dozens of boats drifting over them. Its an underwater Easter egg hunt BLACK WATER FISHING

PAGE 7

SPORTS www.bonifaynow.com ASectionBy JASON SHOOT747-5069 |@PCNHJasonShoot jshoot@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY Debbie Funkhouser is a coach at heart, but shes an athletic director by title. Funkhouser is one of the most respected minds among local volleyball coaches, and she has been an important contributor to the growth of the sport in the area. Now that shes the athletic director at North Bay Haven Charter Academy, however, she has reluctantly stepped away from the sport to focus on her duties overseeing all sports at the charter school. For two out of three years, I coached the middle school team, Funkhouser said. Its hard to nd volleyball coaches who really are knowledgeable and dont just want a supplement. I couldnt nd a coach they play six or seven games and theyre done. I have to say it was hard because (other) teams or coaches need something. It didnt work. I feel bad because we have a group of girls who are going to be really strong, but theyll be great. Its really a good group of kids. The athletic program at NBH only now is maturing beyond the pupal stage with its rst-ever incoming class of 12th-graders. Funkhouser left her post as volleyball coach at Mosley to accept the job as athletic director at NBH in 2010, and she faced a monumental challenge of building the schools athletics department from the ground up. Coaches had to be hired. Facilities had to be leased. A culture of athletics had to be nurtured and cultivated. It hasnt been easy. In the beginning, everyone made the team, and we created a culture you dont really want in competitive high school athletics, Funkhouser said. On the other hand, it made the teams very close. We want the kids to play for fun. Weve lost that in high school athletics. High school athletics has become a stairway to college athletics and then the pros. We have forgotten the average kid who wants to come out to have fun. We have kids who never would have come out for sports. I was going around in the spring saying, Please play baseball. Please play softball. We scheduled games, and we didnt want a negative feeling in the community that we scheduled games and then canceled them. If they didnt play that sport, Id say, I dont care. The coach will teach you how. The ones who hung in there, I have great admiration for them. The coaches have high expectations, and (the kids) are working hard at something they never thought North Bay Haven making progress toward varsity sportsSee NORTH BAY A8 Tolearnhowyoucansupportourcommunitysuniversity,contactMaryBethLovingoodat (850)770-2108ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu.THECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL Special to Halifax MediaGAINESVILLE In an aggressive move to protect teens from the ongoing threat of performance-enhancing drugs, the head of the Florida High School Athletic Association asked on Aug. 6 that the organizations medical policy experts to conduct a top-to-bottom review of existing policies to determine what additional measures can be enacted to prevent the use of improper substances by high school student-athletes. Dr. Roger Dearing, FHSAAs executive director, asked the associations Sports Medicine Advisory Committee to conduct a thorough review of existing standards to determine how they can be strengthened to stop the trend of PED use among professional and college athletes from spreading throughout prep sports. Dearing noted that under existing FHSAA sportsmanship bylaws and policies, student-athletes can be suspended from competing if they have used PEDs, but Dearing suggested these prohibitions might be insuf cient in light of recent allegations that South Florida high school athletes received PEDs as part of the Biogenesis scandal. The FHSAAs overriding priority is the safety, well-being and constructive development of young student-athletes, whose bodies and character are still forming, Dearing said. Performanceenhancing drugs undermine every aspect of this goal, and so it is imperative that our student-athletes adhere to a zerotolerance policy toward these inherently unfair and dangerous substances. Here is the bottom line for me: As executive director of FHSAA, I believe we must draw a line in the sand against performing-enhancing drugs. School districts simply cannot tolerate coaches who encourage or look the other way when athletes use PEDs. Therefore, these coaches cannot be allowed to keep their jobs or have anything to do with young athletes. This is about more than safeguarding fair play its about saving lives. Dearing was joined in his call for a review by state Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, a former school principal and superintendent who now serves as chief executive of cer of the Florida Association of District School Superintendents; and Dr. Jennifer Roth Maynard, an assistant professor of family and sports medicine with the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville and a member of the FHSAA Sports Medicine Advisory Committee. Performance-enhancing drugs pose FHSAA seeks policy review on performance-enhancing drugsAs executive director of FHSAA, I believe we must draw a line in the sand against performingenhancing drugs. School districts simply cannot tolerate coaches who encourage or look the other way when athletes use PEDs. Therefore, these coaches cannot be allowed to keep their jobs or have anything to do with young athletes.Roger Dearing executive director, Florida High School Athletic AssociationSee DRUGS A8 Wednesday, August 14, 2013 Page 7 Above, from left, Meladey Collins, Logan Leonard and Anzli Laurel listen to instruction during Saturdays Combat Weapons seminar at Bonifay Taekwondo USA. Combat Weapons is one of the fastest growing competitions at the ATA tournaments, said Wesley Wing, head instructor and owner of the Bonifay school. At right, Italy Laurel, left, squares off with Erica Daniel, while instructor Amber Wing serves as referee.PHOTOS BY RANDAL SEYLER | Times-AdvertiserKoleman Brooks, left, strikes at Logan Leonards feet, while instructor Amber Wing referees the match. COMBAT WEAPONS SEMINAR

PAGE 8

LocalA8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, August 14, 2013 StayConnected!LikeusonFacebook &FollowusonTwitter /emeraldcoast.jobs@ECoastJobs Weatherizationorsealingairleakscansaveupto40percent onheatingandcoolingbills.Conditionedairmixeswithoutsideair throughgapsinexteriorwalls,windows,doors,roofsandoors,wasting energyandmoney.Caulkingandweatherstrippingalleviatesdrafts& helpsyourhomefeelcolderwhenitshotoutside.Goforthemost benetwiththeleastexpenseandweatherizeyourhome.Rollupyoursleevesandrolldownyour energycosts www.kubota.com SowellTractorCo.,Inc.2841Hwy.77North,PanamaCity www.sowelltractorco.comFinancing Arranged (WAC) WeTrade forAnything ThatDont Eat! NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment."WEWELCOMENEWPATIENTS,CALLTODAYFORYOURPRIORITYAPPOINTMENT" FORNEWPATIENTS 59ANDOLDERThiscertificateisgoodforacomplete MedicalEyeExamwithToddRobinson,M.D. InOurChipleyOfficeBoardCertifiedEyePhysicianandSurgeon.Theexamincludesaprescriptionforeyeglassesandtestsfor Glaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases.FORYOURAPPOINTMENTCALL: 850-638-7220ELIGIBILITY:U.S.CitizenslivingintheFloridaPanhandle, 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. CouponExpires:8-31-13 FREEEYEEXAMCODE:WC00 SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances www.mulliseye.comMULLIS EYEINSTITUTEChipleyOffice1691MainSt.,Ste.1 850-638-7220Wearelocateddirectlyacrosstheparking lotfromtheWalmartinChipleyToddRobinson, M.D.BoardCertifiedEyePhysicianand CataractSurgeon theyd really do. Funkhouser said it was important to nd coaches who strived to win but would not be overly dismayed by the losses that were certain to accompany programs as they matured. A coachs recognition of the importance of education was paramount. I feel like our administration and parents and kids are looking for athletics to come up and be as good as our academics are, Funkhouser said. When I was able to interview coaches with (Principal Meredith Higgins), we denitely looked for someone where wins werent No. 1. Winning has to be important to a coach, but we wanted someone who could motivate athletes and see them as whole people. Academics are important, and (coaches) have to expect that. If a kid needs tutoring during practice time, its their job as coach to talk to the player and the teacher and work that out. If it has to be during practice, they have to accept that. Academics have to be rst. To emphasize that point, NBH requires its student-athletes to carry a 2.2 grade point average rather than the 2.0 GPA required at other county schools. We look at academics all year long, not just when we have to look at them at the end of the semester, Funkhouser said. If their grades start to fall, we can do something about it. Thats a denite advantage of being a small school. You cant beat a smaller school. All eyes are on kids all the time, not in a negative way like were waiting for them to slip up, but in a very positive way. I know all the kids in the school and almost all of them by name. The kids know that, Hey, I need to be where Im supposed to be and need to be studying the way Im supposed to. High expectations, high achievement, is our schools motto. Those expectations go across the board, from the classroom to the playing eld, the gym, the clubs. We have high expectations for the kids, and they live up to them. We wont water them down. The culture of athletics at NBH undoubtedly will change now that teams have seniors in all of their sports for the rst time. The Buccaneers have struggled to compete against senior-laden opponents in all sports, but that is to be expected with athletes who are less experienced and not as physically developed as players on rival teams. Funkhouser, who is no less competitive now than she was when she was conveying instructions to her volleyball players from the sidelines at Mosleys Jim Redfern Gymnasium a decade ago, is certain NBH athletics are headed in the proper direction. I think weve been blessed with the coaches weve gotten, she said. When I took this position, my heart as a coach has always been for the kids. I want kids to love playing. I want them to work hard and win. I dont want them to practice ve days a week and not win. We have young coaches. Jared Hale is a great football mind, and he has a personality that attracts kids, and they work hard for him. We have a new soccer coach in Jennifer Parrott, who played at Bay High and coaches Bay United. The kids are ocking to play, and our coaches make them feel like they care. a very real, very dangerous threat to high school student-athletes, both physically and psychologically, Montford said. I commend the FHSAA for being proactive in addressing the challenge presented by coaches, parents and young athletes who want to get ahead by any means possible, whatever the personal cost. The 15-member Sports Medicine Advisory Committee includes a cross-section of experts from across Florida, including 11 physicians as well as athletic trainers, former coaches and educators. The committees work has led to recent FHSAA policies to better protect young student athletes in the areas of concussions and heat/hydration. The Advisory Committee should consider all aspects of performanceenhancing drugs, Dearing said, asking for a thorough top-to-bottom review of existing policies and procedures regarding the use of performance-enhancing drugs by those who break the rules in order to tilt the playing eld to their own advantage. Dearing asked the committee to consider the full range of issues related to PEDs, including but not limited to: whether existing policies and procedures provide sufcient authority for schools to test and discipline student-athletes who may be using banned substances; the legal, policy and scal implications of heightened policies against performance-enhancing drugs; and whether the FHSAA prohibition against performance-enhancing drugs would be more effective if set out as a standalone policy rather than existing only as a part of a broader policy on sportsmanship. Most young athletes have no idea the harm that can be caused by performance-enhancing drugs, Maynard said. Teenagers are still developing, both physically and mentally, and PEDs have no place in their lives. Whatever the FHSAA can do to stop PEDs from being used by high school student-athletes is a step in the right direction. A list of members of the FHSAA Sports Medicine Advisory Committee is at www. fhsaa.org/gov/sportsmed. DRUGS from page A7 NORTH BAY from page A7High expectations, high achievement, is our schools motto. Those expectations go across the board, from the classroom to the playing eld, the gym, the clubs. We have high expectations for the kids, and they live up to them. We wont water them down.Debbie Funkhouser athletic director, North Bay Haven Charter Academy

PAGE 9

Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser BPAGE 1Section EXTRATrivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) It takes 20 seconds for food to reach your stomach, but how long until the brain realizes its there? Same time, 90 sec, 5 min, 20 min 2) Jamaica Blue Mountain is often regarded as being the best what in the world? Wine, Coffee, Bottled water, Hand cream 3) Four Corners is where Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and which other state intersect? Utah, Montana, Oklahoma, Nevada 4) At what stage in his life did King Arthur take the Excalibur (sword) out of a stone? Young boy, Teen, Middle-aged man, Deathbed 5) What was the couples last name to complete the rst car-crossing of the Canadian Rockies? Brooks, Cook, Werner, Glidden 6) Which company invented the word processor in 1965? Tandy, IBM, GE, VW 7) What does terebi mean in Japanese? TV, Tube, Tub, Tower 8) Atlantis is supposedly beneath which ocean? Atlantic, Southern, Paci c, Indian 9) In what year was the Panama Canal opened? 1914, 1922, 1936, 1947 10) Whats a whole number called? Euclid, Oscar, Integer, Frit 11) What were Jason and the Argonauts searching for? Shangri-La, Holy Grail, Beelzebub, Golden Fleece 12) Fusion-jazz combines jazz and? Rock, Country, Soul, Bluegrass 13) What color boxing trunks was Muhammad Ali partial to? Red, White, Black, Gold 14) When did the rst Cannes Film Festival open? 1946, 1951, 1960, 1974 ANSWERS 1) 20 min. 2) Coffee. 3) Utah. 4) Young boy. 5) Glidden. 6) IBM. 7) TV. 8) Atlantic. 9) 1914. 10) Integer. 11) Golden Fleece. 12) Rock. 13) White. 14) 1946.Wednesday, AUGUST 14 2013 PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAZY C ALPACA RANCHThe Lazy C Alpaca Ranch owners Holly and Jesse Cunningham enjoy inviting the youth of Holmes County to come and visit their alpacas free of charge. The ranch is home to 136 alpacas of more than 20 colors.CECILIA SPEARS | Extra Alpaca farming is one local familysGOLDEN FLEECE By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY A year after moving to Holmes County and settling down on a little over 100 acres with 136 alpacas and a few dogs, Holly and Jesse Cunningham said they are living their dream with the Lazy C Alpaca Ranch. Weve been looking into owning alpacas for around ve years because theyre easy to care for, have great tax incentives and are easy to maintain, Holly said. We sheer their wool once a year; its the nest ber, and theres a good market for it for hats, socks, blankets and so much more. Jesse said the animals personalities make them enjoyable to be around, and they make great lawnmowers. We also take then to shows where they are judged for their con rmation, eece and color, Holly said. Weve got several champions right now. Winning awards helps with breading and selling them just like with race horses. She said the alpacas are gentle and shy but have an insatiable curiosity. They are communal creatures with a strong herd instinct and tend to prefer staying close to family, she said. On the other hand, they are wonderful with humans, adults and children. They really make you want to give them a hug. Alpaca farming is a really fun family business, plus its a short commute from the house to the pastures. A large portion of the Cunninghams property is also dedicated to growing hay to help feed the alpacas. Holly said she had recently opened the ranch to be visited by children and their families and that her favorite part of Holmes County is the caring and supportive community. When we had the big rainstorms going through this area, during the rst of July, the alpacas were not fairing well, Holly said. The amount of rain and ooding conditions were stressing the alpacas bad. I had made a comment of Facebook that we were constructing an emergency shelter to get them to dry land and shelter. She said she and her family were outside working quickly to move the alpacas to safety when she saw someone at their gate. They had seen our post and wanted to help. How incredible, Holly said. For nearly ve hours in the pouring rain, they helped us move the alpacas to safety. This community is awesome. Lazy C Alpaca Ranch is off Highway 177 just outside of Bonifay. Just call us, and well be happy to answer any questions you have about alpacas and the alpaca lifestyle, Holly said. Or better yet, schedule a farm visit.WEB WATCHLearn more about Lazy C Alpaca Ranch and the Cunningham family on the ranchs Facebook page, Lazy C AlpacaRanch.

PAGE 10

Wednesday, August 14, 2013 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Tuesday,August Startingat$6forthefirst 25words .25ea.additionalword AddaPhoto$6 AddaBox$3 AddArtwork$4 A B C D E DailyNewsandNewsHerald: -Deadline-ursday,August15th -Published-Tuesday,August20th SantaRosaPressGazette CrestviewNewsBulletin DestinLog WashingtonCountyNews HolmesCountyNews: -Deadline-Friday,August16th -Published-Wednesday,August21st WaltonSun: -Deadline-Tuesday,August13th -Published-Saturday,August17th ApalachicolaTimes &PortSt.JoeStar: -Deadline-Friday,August16th -Published-ursday,August22nd Ms. Kerri Pelham of Graceville announces the engagement of her daughter, Katherine Michele Pelham, to Javy Edward Waller, son of the late Ms. Dawn Waller of Vernon. The couple will be married in a private ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013, at First United Methodist Church, Graceville. All family and friends are invited to attend the reception, which is at 6 p.m. at 1080 Penny Lane, Graceville. The bride-elect is the daughter of Mr. Joe Wells of Panama City, and the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Pat Pelham of Graceville and Mr. and Mrs. James Wells of Bonifay. Katherine is a 2009 graduate of Graceville High School and is currently enrolled in the Licensed Practical Nursing program at Washington-Holmes Technical Center. The groom-elect is the nephew of Mr. and Mrs. Keith Davis of Graceville. Javy is a 2006 graduate of Chipley High School and is employed with Davis Farms in Chipley. EngagementBrystol Rhian Free celebrated her rst birthday on Aug. 4. She is the daughter of Jeremy and Terra Free of Ponce De Leon. Her brother is Tyler, and her sister is Drew. Grandparents are Johnny and Tammy Free of Ponce de Leon, Chuck and Kim Jones and greatgrandparents Louise Free, Ruth Shelly, Abby Lou Jones. Birthday Andrew Marshall (Drew) Cumbie was awarded Most Outstanding Trumpet at Rehobeth Middle School for 2012-2013 as a seventh grader. Drew is the son of Dan and Tracy Cumbie of Dothan, Ala. His grandparents are Brenda (Rabon) Cumbie-Adams, Carlton Adams, and the late Doyle R. Cumbie, of Wicksburg, Ala., and Chipley, and James and Brenda Trawick of Dothan, Ala. His great-grandparents are the late Mallie L. and Clara Wiggins Rabon, and the late Daniel and Molly Luverne Cumbie, of Chipley the late Bernie and Louise Marshall, of Grimes, and the late Marvin and Lorraine Trawick, of Dothan, Ala. Sophia Jeanette Crutcheld was born at Forbes Regional in Monroeville, Pa., on Aug. 2, 2013, at 2:53 p.m. She weighed 6 pounds, 14 ounces, and was 20 inches long. Sophias parents are Brandon and Minnie Crutcheld of Monroeville, Pa. Her grandparents are Eddie and Jacqueline Crutcheld of Monroeville Pa. and her greatgrandparents are Jack and Marilyn Ulrich of Bonifay and Jimmy and Martha Bryant of Bonifay. Sophias great-grandfather is the late Edward Eugene Crutcheld of Graceville. Her uncle is Eddie Crutcheld Jr. of Bonifay. BirthSpecial to ExtraCHIPLEY Two Chipley High School students Chloe Bruner and Austin Wyatt were chosen to perform at the inaugural nine star Honor band in Altamonte Springs for the Florida Bandmasters Association Conference. More than 80 ninth-graders from throughout the state participated. Hayden Carole Barton and Ryan Landon Hagberg of Perry were united in marriage at 5 p.m. on May 18. Pastor Justin Webb performed the ceremony at First Baptist Church, Perry. A reception followed at First Presbyterian Church. The bride was given in marriage by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Scott Barton of Perry. The grooms parents are Mr. and Mrs. Ron Hagberg of Perry. Grandparents of the bride are Mr. and Mrs. Hildon Barton of Bonifay and Mr. and Mrs. Bill Smith of Donalsonville, Ga. The grooms grandparents are Barbara Sue Butts and the late Faison Butts, and Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Hagberg of St. Petersburg. Brooke Barton of Perry, the twin sister of the bride, served as maid of honor. The bridesmaids were Elisa Murphy, Cassidy Pridgeon, Rebecca Hagberg, sister of the groom of Perry, Alena Martin of DeFuniak Springs, junior bridesmaid Janie Barton, cousin of the bride of Ocala, and Kate Sullivan of Perry was the ower girl. Blake Sapp served as best man. Groomsmen were Justin Fralix, Justin Wesson, Daniel Barton of Ocala, cousin of the bride, and Christian Goodman of Perry was the ring bearer. The bride is a 2011 graduate of North Florida Community College, and she attended Chipola College School of Nursing and is employed as an LPN at Little Pines Pediatrics. The groom is a 2010 graduate of North Florida Community College and a 2013 graduate of the University Of Florida School Of Engineering and is employed at Buckeye Technologies. Following a honeymoon to Jamaica, the couple now resides in Perry. Wedding Pelham and Waller to wedDrew Cumbie receives Most Outstanding Trumpet AwardBrystol celebrates 1st birthdaySpecial PECIAL toTO EXt T Ra AChipley High School students Chloe Bruner and Austin Wyatt were chosen to perform at the inaugural Nine Star Honor Band in Altamonte Springs. CHS students perform at conference Crutchelds welcome baby girlBarton and Hagberg marry

PAGE 11

Wednesday, August 14, 2013 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 EstateSaleLOGHOMEKITSAMERICANLOGHOMESISASSISTINGLIQUIDATIONOF LANDDEVELOPERSESTATE Viewat www.thegreatamericanlogco.com ReadyOnlyReply.Call704-602-3035askforAccountingDept. 3LogHomessellingfor BALANCEOWED.FREEDELIVERY BALANCEOWED$17,000 BALANCEOWED$22,900 BALANCEOWED$15,700 Crossword PUZZLESOLULUTION ON PAGEE B5Whether they want it to bark, purr, slither or squawk, there comes a time when a pet appears on nearly every childs birthday wish list. For most parents, this decision can be a bit daunting. Is your child ready to take on the responsibility of caring for a pet? Will the new animal negatively affect his or her health? Though your child may think your wary attitude is unnecessary, these are valid questions for every parent to ask themselves and their family before welcoming a new pet into their home. The rst thing that you need to think of is if your children are old enough and responsible enough to handle a pet around the house, said Dr. Mark Stickney, Clinical Associate Professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. You also need to be aware of the temperament of the new pet that youre bringing in. Low maintenance animals, such as hamsters and sh, prove to be great starter pets for children. They require minimal amounts of time and care, introducing the child to the responsibilities of pet ownership without giving them more than they can manage. Of course, puppies and kittens are always crowd pleasers as well. Their high energy level and love for attention makes them the perfect child companion. But what about when little Bobby begs for that snake at the pet store? With animals like lizards and snakes, their care and feeding requirements can be a bit tricky as far as humidity, temperature etc., Stickney said. These animals also eat other animals for food, which may be upsetting to some children. Depending on their age and maturity, that might be something beyond a childs ability to handle. When choosing a family pet, it is also important to take into consideration your childrens sensitivity to various allergens. One of the rst things that you need to do is consult with your physician, said Stickney. If your child is allergic to pollen or some sort of grass that an animal could track into the house, an indoor animal such as a cat would be a non-issue. However, if your children still have their heart set on that uffy puppy, there are certainly ways to accommodate their desires. Some dog breeds, such as Poodles and Yorkies, are considered to be less allergenic than others based on the amount of fur that they shed, Stickney said. And there is even evidence to support that infants exposed to animals earlier in life are less likely to develop allergies later on. Allowing your children to care for a pet is not all risk. Having a pet in your family has shown to be equally benecial for both the animal and child. Dogs especially really enjoy having someone to play with them, teach them tricks, and do some basic obedience training, said Stickney. Its mentally stimulating for both the dog and child, which can improve discipline on both ends. Research has shown numerous health benets of owning a pet, including lower blood pressure and elevated mood. There is even evidence to support that interaction between pets and children with disabilities, such as Downs syndrome or Autism, is extremely benecial. The key is that you need to have a nice, docile pet, Stickney said. One that isnt too active or rough, but that just wants to be loved on and to love right back. Sp P ECia IA L to TO E E Xt T Ra ASpirit Filled Church of God In Christ located In Caryville, and Pastor Tony Howard and his wife Clementine, distributed school supplies to local children. Each child was also given a personal pocket bible. BibIBLEsS anAND sSCHooOOL sSUppPPLiIEsS WEDEDNEESDDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURHURSDDAY7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. 11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley 1 p.m.: Caregivers Meeting at Washington County Council on Aging in Chipley for more information call 638-6216 2 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Thursday of each month (unless a holiday) at the Chipley Library 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society 2nd Thursday of each month. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging Line Dancing Class for more information call 638-6216 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AFRRIDDAY6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 5 p.m.: Red Hill Methodist Church Mission Supper 4th Friday of every month January September. 6-8 p.m.: Washington County Council on Aging 50+ dance club for more information call 638-6216 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Winn Dixie in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks while you get your shopping done. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church.SATURDURDAYThe Holmes County Community Health Clinic located at 203 W. Iowa Street, Bonifay, will be open from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., the rst and third Saturday The Alford Community Health Clinic will be the 2nd and 4th Saturdays of each month, from 10 a.m. until the last patient is seen. 10 a.m. 12 p.m. Childrens education day 4th Saturday of every month North Bay Clan Tribal Grounds, 1560 Lonnie Road.SUUNDDAY8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at GracevilleCampbellton Hospital in Graceville.Weigh the pros and cons of getting a pet for a child PEtT Ta ALK Wa AUsaSAUMonday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday-Sunday: ClosedHoHOLMEsS CoCOUntyNTYMonday: Closed Tuesday-Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: ClosedWas ASHingtonINGTON Co COUntyNTYMonday-Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday-Sunday: ClosedVERnonNONMonday: Closed Tuesday-Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday-Sunday: ClosedSUnnyNNY HiHILLsSMonday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday-Sunday: Closed Library H HOURURS Community CCALELENDDARR

PAGE 12

FAITH BSectionwww.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com CircleHGas&Deli I tsnotwhatwedobuthowwedoit!982OrangeHillRoad,Chipley638-9505 2961Penn.Ave.,Marianna,FL(850)526-3511 1-800-423-8002www.mariannatoyota.com MARIANNATOYOTA BOBPFORTE (850)482-4601 www.DownHomeDentalCenter.com HAVEYOURUNITSERVICEDTO SAVE ONYOURELECTRICBILL(850)263-28231075N.HWY.79BONIFAY,FL CometotheMullisEyeInstitute&letustakeGreatCareofYou!ToddRobinson,M.D.BoardCertiedEyePhysician&SurgeonMullisEyeInstitute1691MainStreet,Suite#1LocatedacrossfromWalmart850-638-7220 EyeCareforSeniors FirstBapistChurchComeasyouare (850)638-1830 Bapist Come Churchp ist irst Ba Come Owners:JD&DelishaKilgore1218MainSt.638-4097Celebrating31years JERRYWATKINS INSUNCEAGENCY AUTOHOMELIFELETUSQUOTEYOU 1304JacksonAve.,Chipley,FL (850)638-2222 HortonsChipley Heating&CoolingSales,Service&Installation 1213MainSt.,Chipley (850)638-8376 (850)638-1805 BROWN FUNERALHOME1068MainSt.,Chipley,FL32428Phone:638-4010DonaldBrown-LFD,Manager StephenB.Register,CPA 1552BrickyardRoad Chipley,FL Panhandle Lumber&SupplyForALLYourBuildingNeeds 405W.Hwy90,Bonifay(850)547-9354 507W.Hwy90,Bonifay1357BrickyardRd.,Chipley Consumer& Commercial Power EquipmentVisitourwebsiteat www.lanesoutdoor.com 901Hwy277,Chipley 850.638.4364 HomeFolksservingHomeFolksWegivecommercialratestoareachurches Gas 1055FowlerAve.,ChipleyBehindourChipleyfactory.Hours:Thur.andFri.9AM-5PM Sat.9AM-3PM638-9421 WESTPOINTHOMEFACTORYOUTLET 879UseryRoad,Chipley,Florida32428850-638-4654 WashingtonCounty Rehabilitation& NursingCenter Page B4 Wednesday, August 14, 2013Palmetto State QuartetESTO Palmetto State Quartet will be in concert at Mt. Zion Independent Baptist Church on Saturday, Aug. 17. The concert will begin at 7 p.m. The church is located at 3205 Hwy 2 in Esto. All are invited to come and attend this night of worship with a great quartet.Calvary Hill RevivalVERNON Calvary Hill Pentecostal Church will be holding revival services at 6 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 11, and each night during the week at 7 p.m. until Aug. 14. Brother Dewain Phillips will be delivering the message. The church is located on Highway 277 across from Vernon Elementary School. For more information call 535-0003.Otter Creek RevivalRevival Services at Otter Creek Methodist Church beginning Monday, Aug. 12, and concluding on Aug. 16. Services will be held at 7 p.m., on Monday thru Friday. Brother Larry Justice, from Chipley, will be our speaker each night.Cedar Springs Fun DayWESTVILLE Cedar Springs Assembly of God Church will bod a Fun Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Aug. 17. There will be a water slide (shorts and shirt are required), free snow cones, hamburgers, and hot dogs. The church is located at 1989 North Highway 181 in Westville. Faith EVENTSAmish aint always AmishRecently, it was my privilege to go to a convention in Ohio in the middle of a large Amish/ Mennonite community. I looked forward to this very much because I grew up in Lancaster County Pennsylvania, which has many Amish/Mennonite communities. I was expecting quite a bit as I packed my bags to leave. Are you sure you got everything? A phrase reiterated to me by the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. To which I responded by saying, Yes, for the umpteenth time I got everything. This in and of itself was to guarantee me I would forget something, usually essential in my travel. Then when I get home, I will be reminded that I was reminded to make sure I got everything. Nothing, at this point, could deter my high-level expectation of going into an Amish/Mennonite community. My great eagerness was looking forward to indulging in one of my favorite desserts: the shoo y pie. Nobody makes shoo y pie quite like those wonderful Amish people. To make matters even more enticing, I would not have anybody sitting next to me reminding me I had enough shoo y pie. I fully intended to gorge myself on as much shoo y pie as my wallet could handle. In my book, there is no such thing as too much shoo y pie. I drove 15 hours to get to this little town in Ohio. Every mile creating anticipation for my dessert delicacy awaiting me in some Amish restaurant. I confess it has been a long time since I visited an Amish/Mennonite community. Even though I grew up in such a community some things a person tends to forget. The convention I was attending ended Sunday morning at lunch. I, being the grandiose Know-It-All, decided to skip the Sunday lunch and look for a restaurant to indulge in my delectable delicacy. The convention was wonderful and as I left the grounds, I did so with a lot of joy in each step. The thing I forgot was it was Sunday in an Amish/ Mennonite community. If you have never been in such a community, let me inform you that on Sunday the only thing open are churches. I had forgotten this little tidbit. During the week, I made a list of several Amish restaurants. I had plans of visiting each of them before I left and having shoo y pie, a whole pie, in each restaurant. When I got to the rst restaurant, it nally hit me. This was Sunday and everything in an Amish/ Mennonite community was closed. I do not usually go to a restaurant on Sunday unless it is some special occasion. I was a little chagrined to realize everything was closed. This only heightened my anticipation of the shoo y pie delicacy awaiting me come tomorrow. At times it feels like tomorrow will never come, but eventually tomorrow came and I awoke with a song on my lips, a pang of hunger in my stomach and a desire to indulge in a shoo y delicacy. I nally arrived at my rst Amish restaurant and I was drooling so much I could hardly tell the hostess I was just a party of one. Boy, what a party it was going to be. Being a gentleman, I contained myself as best I could and ordered a very scrumptious repast. Nobody can cook like those Amish women. Oh, what a lunch I had. I think what made it so wonderful was the dessert expectation hovering over me like an angelic halo. Just as I was nishing my lunch the lovely young waitress, all dressed in Amish attire, came by inquiring if I would like to see the dessert menu. No, I said with a delectable determination, I know exactly what I want for dessert. We exchanged smiles. I have no idea what she was smiling about; maybe the anticipatory tip. I knew what I was smiling about; the anticipatory dessert. I tried to contain myself and carefully pace out my instructions. Young lady, I said as calmly as possible, I will have a piece of shoo y pie. In fact, why dont you bring me the whole pie. And with that, I smiled. The waitress looked at me rather strangely and said, What kind of pie do you want? Being the kind of person that enjoys a good old-fashioned joke, I responded, Ha ha ha. A shoo y pie, if you please. Whats a shoo y pie? I can take a joke as well as anybody but there comes a time when all jokes need to be put aside and bring on the shoo y pie. This is an Amish restaurant, isnt it? Yes it is, she smiled patiently. Youve heard of a shoo y pie, havent you? No, Ive never heard of such a pie. I cannot tell you the depth of disappointment this brought to me. For weeks, I have been looking forward to some good old-fashioned shoo y pie. As it turned out, only the Amish/ Mennonite in Lancaster County Pennsylvania, know anything about shoo y pies. Not all Amish are the same even though they look alike. The apostle Paul understood this kind of disappointment. If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men most miserable (1 Corinthians 15:19 KJV). I have had many disappointments in life and many people have disappointed me, but I have found in Jesus Christ no disappointment whatsoever. All legitimate hope is in Jesus. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries. com. DR. JAMES L. SNYDEROut to Pastor

PAGE 13

Wednesday, August 14, 2013 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5Mildred Lorene White of Graceville, and formerly of Geneva, Ala., passed away on Aug. 9, 2013. She was 82. Miss White was born in Geneva County on Oct. 13, 1930, to the late Floyd and Jessie Redmon White. She was a graduate of Coffee Springs School, Class of 1948. She was preceded in death by her sister, Cathryn Capps and two brothers, James White and Harlon White. She is survived by her niece, Brenda Stoltzfus (Fred) of Blountstown; three nephews, Roger Capps (Susan) of Orlando, Mark Capps (Kay) and Kenneth Capps (Susie), both of Graceville; 11 great nieces and nephews, Chris Capps, Christina Johnson, both of Slocomb, Ala., Keith Capps of Columbus, Ga., Chris Blackburn of Graceville, Maegen Zauner, Jake Zauner and Jackson Feulner, all of Bonifay, Lee Sword of Sunny Hills, Missy Lee of Bonifay, Wendy Taylor of Blountstown and Brian Taylor (Samantha), both of Blountstown. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Monday, Aug. 12, 2013, in the chapel of Pittman Funeral Home in Geneva with the Rev. Jerry Moore, the Rev. Jonathan West and the Rev. Randall Walker ofciating. Burial followed at Eden Baptist Church Cemetery with Pittman Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends prior to the service Monday beginning at 10 a.m.Mildred L. White UploadyourLegacyguestbookphotosnowforFREE!Withyourpaidobituary,familyandfriendswillnow haveunlimitedaccesstouploadedphotosfreeofcharge. FindObituaries. ShareCondolences. Inpartnershipwith. Findobituaries,sharecondolencesand celebratealifeat or Crossword SOLUTION ExtraHarold William Christofferson, 64, of Vernon died Aug. 6, 2013. Memorialization was by cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.Harold W. ChristoffersonMary Louise Register Hill, 87, of Panama City Beach died Aug. 7, 2013. Funeral services were held on Aug. 12, 2013, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Interment followed at Bonifay Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing.Mary L. HillKenneth Wayne Sawyer, 70, of Bonifay died Aug. 10, 2013. Funeral services were held, Aug. 13, 2013, at Peel Funeral Home. Interment followed in the Bonifay Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing.Kenneth W. SawyerMrs. Jane Ann Thompson, age 59, of Bonifay, passed away Aug. 6, 2013 at her mothers and nieces home. She was born July 15, 1954 in Liberty, N.Y. Mrs. Thompson worked at Country Home Products and Kinney Drugs both in Vermont before moving to Bonifay, where she worked at Holmes County Council on Aging. She enjoyed owering, gardening, music, Christmas, her many pets and life. Mrs. Thompson was preceded in death by her fathers, Irving Taylor and Austin Schrader and a granddaughter, Bailey Bent. Mrs. Thompson is survived by her mother, Lavina Schrader of Bonifay; her husband, Robert Thompson of Vermont; one son, Paul Irving Bent III and daughter-in-law, Jessica of Starksboro, Vt.; daughter, Tara Lee Wells and sonin-law, Daniel Wells of Bonifay, Amanda Eastling and son-in-law, Charles Eastling of Bonifay and Bridgette Sunhawk and son-in-law, Raven Sunhawk of Middlebury, Vt.; brother, Lanny Kemmis of Chipley; sisters, Donna ODell of Chipley, Virginia Rundle of Bonifay and Randi Perugino of West Wyoming, Pa.; grandchildren, Morgann Wells, Makayla MyKayla Wells, Elizabeth Eastling, Dalton Eastling, Kyle Bent, Parker Bent, Hunter Sunhawk, Logan Sunhawk, Brenna Laframboise and Brittney Lansdale and several nieces, nephews and family. A celebration of life was held at 5 p.m., Thursday, Aug.t 8, 2013, on Wells Road in Bonifay. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.Jane A. ThompsonLynita Gwen Calhoun Peacock, born to George and Beatrice Curry Calhoun, on Feb. 8, 1959, in Pensacola, went home to be with the Lord and Savior on Aug. 4, 2013. Gwen graduated from Holmes County High School in 1977, and resumed her education at PJC earning degrees in both English and Architecture. She started a career in drafting, but gave that up to become a wife and devoted mother to her two sons, which were her heart. She was preceded in death by her parents. Gwen is survived by her husband, Willard Peacock of the Bethlehem Community; sons, Hunter Peacock and Grady Peacock; special friend and cousin, Nickie Specht; sister, Tina Calhoun; stepmother, Judy Calhoun and several uncles, aunts, cousins, nieces, nephews and many friends. Pallbearers were Jason Pugh, John Specht, Gene Myers, Daylon Gainey, Ben Hawthrone, and Perry Lee. A funeral service was held at 11 a.m., on Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Jerry Moore and the Rev. Ryan Hodge ofciating. Interment followed in Westville Cemetery, Westville, with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 10-11 a.m. on Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel .Lynita G. Peacock Obituaries Kiwanis Club holds Tuesday LunchSpecial to ExtraCHIPLEY The Chipley Kiwanis Club met for its weekly luncheon at Pattillos Restaurant at the Washington Holmes Technical Center, on Aug. 5. Lunch was provided by the students of the culinary program at the Technical Center. Paul Goulding, program chairman, introduced Ruth McCrary, Jane Potter, Cynthia Johnson and Susan Roberts, members of the Friends of the Library. Mrs. McCrary and Mrs. Potter presented information about their organization. The rst public library was founded in 1934 by the Chipley Womans Club, Mrs. McCrary noted. In September of 1988 the Community Improvement Committee of the Chipley Womans Club recommended that the Friends of the Library be formed as a separate organization. In 1989 the Friends of the Washington County Library was formed with Margie Sangaree serving as its rst president. The Friends of the Library meet eight times per year at the Blue Lake Community Center. It presently has 67 members. The Friends assist in program development for the Washington County Library in Chipley and the branch libraries in Wausau, Sunny Hills and Vernon as well. It also provides informational services in support of all of the Washington County Branches. The Friends sponsor fund raisers including Bridgarama, an annual card and game night, and sales of excess books. Last year the Friends purchased the new lighted sign for the Chipley Branch and purchased $2,000 worth of books for the libraries as well. Mrs. Potter is the Program Chair and informed the Kiwanians that the Friends provide a number of programs during the year. This past year the speakers have included authors Chuck Barris (novel Toymaker), Michael Morris (novels A Place Called Wiregrass and Elisa James), Nancy Springer (novel Dark Lie), and Michael Lister (novel Thunder Beach). Other speakers included Elisa James, a Panama City Attorney who served two tours in Afghanistan as an Ofcer in the Army Judge Advocate General Corps (military attorneys), Carolyn Saunders, an Instructor at Chipola College, and Gus Gustafson, a local minister who spoke about SCUBA diving. The annual Chipley Kiwanis Dinner Theater will be held on Thursday, Sept. 24. Entertainment this year will include local singers and musicians. The Kiwanis club meets Tuesdays at Pattillos restaurant in the middle of the WHTC campus at noon. For an invitation, contact any Kiwanian or Laura Joiner, Membership Chairperson at 260-5971. For more information about the Kiwanis Club of Chipley, visit www. ChipleyKiwanis.com Bonifay Garden Club supports state and national effortSpecial to ExtraBONIFAY Bonifay Garden Club is supporting Florida and National Garden Club efforts to help reforest national and state parks. In 2010 and 2011, more than 11,000 acres were destroyed by wildres in Oceola National and John Bethea State Forest in Florida. Human activities also destroy portions of forests. The U.S. Forest Service is trying to reforest 250-500 acres per year to replace those trees. Sixty-eight dollars will buy enough trees to replant one acre. Garden Clubs are committed to improving and preserving the environment. Bonifay Garden Club is honoring that commitment by participating in Penny Pines Reforestation Project. A collection jar will be at each meeting, and jars can be placed in various businesses about town. Each time $68 have been donated, it will be turned over to the Florida Federation, and a lump sum check will be sent periodically to the U.S. Forest Service. More than 80 national forests will benet from this project. Indigenous trees will be planted in the forests, especially the endangered longleaf pine. The public is invited to participate in this project, and donations can be given to honor individuals. You may request a donation form available at ffg.org. Bonifay Garden Club Treasurer is Eileen Wright, 1774 Highway 177A, Bonifay, FL 32425. The Bonifay Garden Club will meet on Sept. 13 in the board room at Doctors Memorial Hospital. New members are encouraged to attend this rst meeting of the 2013-14 club year. Special PECIAL toTO EXt T Ra AFriends of the Library Ruth McCrary and Jane Potter visited the Chipley Kiwanis Club on Aug. 5.

PAGE 14

HCHS Blue Pride Band CampBONIFAY Holmes County High School Blue Pride Band Camp is fast approaching. We need all students to be there on the dates and times listed. The full band will meet from 6 to 8 p.m. on Aug. 12 thru 16. If you have any questions you may email hchsbluepride@ gmail.com. KMS Orientations setCHIPLEY   Kate Middle School Orientations will be held in the Cafeteria on Friday, Aug. 16 at the following times: Kindergarten at 8:30 a.m. and Grades one thru four at 9:30 a.m. The 2013-2014 Class list will not be posted until Aug. 14 at 3 p.m.Annual Washington County Farm Bureau MeetingCHIPLEY The Annual Meeting of the Washington County Farm Bureau is scheduled for Thursday, Aug. 15, at the Washington County Agricultural Center. The evenings activities will begin at 6:30 p.m., with dinner followed by a brief business meeting. The evening will feature a presentation by Char Westfall with music provided by PeeWee Johns and Band. Washington County Farm Bureau members will not want to miss this evening of food, fun and fellowship. In order that adequate preparation can be made, members are encouraged to conrm their attendance by notifying the Farm Bureau Ofce, 638-1756, no later than noon Monday, Aug. 12.VHS Class of 1978VERNON The Vernon High School graduating Class of 1978 will be meeting to continue making plans for their 35th class reunion at 6 p.m. on Saturday, Aug.17, at Calvary Hill Pentecostal Church Fellowship Hall. The church is located across from Vernon Elementary School. For more information call Jody Calloway Bush at 535-0003.Finch Family ReunionSUNNY HILLS The William Dallas Finch Decedents Association would like to announce the Finch Family Reunion for the descendants and friends of the late William Dallas Finch. The reunion will be held on Aug. 31 at the Sunny Hills Community Center. Please arrive at approximately 11 a.m. this will allow for fellowship prior to the meal being served at noon. Bring a well lled basket to share with others. If you have photos or other related items that you would be willing to share, please bring them along. After lunch please stay so that we may take more photos for future events. For more information call Kenneth Finch at 638-5307.Drink a Cup, For a CureCHIPLEY The Washington Rehab and Nursing Center will be holding a drink a Cup For a Cure event from 7:30 a.m. to 10 a.m., on Aug. 21, at the Center. Senior Citizens will receive a free 16 ounce cup of coffee and the rst 100 seniors will be given a free coffee mug. Nonsenior citizens pay only $2 per cup. All proceeds will go to the Washington County Relay For Life. For more information call 638-4654.Enrichment Center offers after-school programCHIPLEY T.J. Roulhac Enrichment and Activity Center will offer a free after-school program beginning in September. The program will be from 2:30 to 5 p.m. Monday to Thursday for children under the age of 18. The major purpose of the program is the improvement of academic skills, the reduction of juvenile delinquency and the elimination of youth violence. The program will be staffed by three contracted personnel a program director, an educational coordinator and an activity coordinator. All positions require a high school diploma or GED and some basic computer knowledge. Job applicants should contact the school on Saturday mornings at 638-2115, or the following numbers during the week at 535-2587 or 867-1566.2013 Graceville Harvest Festival PageantGRACEVILLE The 32nd Annual Harvest Festival Pageant will be held at the Graceville Civic Center in Graceville on Sept. 20 and 21. The entry fee is $60 with all proceeds going to the Graceville Harvest Day Celebration. Contestants may participate in photogenic for an additional $10. Photogenic entries will be limited to one photo per contestant. This is an open pageant. Checks should be made payable to the City of Graceville. Winners will receive a large trophy, crown and banner. Alternates and participants will receive trophies. There will be a peoples choice winner in each category. This has no effect on the overall winners. The contestant from each category that collects the most money will with the peoples choice title for that age category and will receive a trophy at the pageant. All contestants in Tiny Baby Miss through Little Miss must wear short pageant wear. All contestants in the Petite Miss through Miss must wear long pageant ware. Applications may be picked up at Bush Paint and Supply, Graceville City Hall and the Graceville News in Graceville and at Forget Me Not Photography in Bonifay. Applications should be mailed or brought to Bush Paint and Supply, Attn: Teresa Bush, Pageant Director, 971 6th Ave., Graceville, FL 32440. Application deadline is Sept. 10. For more information call Teresa Bush Day time at 263-4744 or night time 263-3070 or Michelle Watkins at the City of Graceville at 263-3250.Annual Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo PageantBONIFAY The Blue Pride Band Boosters will be Sponsoring the Annual Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo Pageant on Sept. 21 at Holmes County High School. Contestant entry fee $50. Photogenic fee $10 for rst photo, $5 for each additional photo (5x7 or 8x10) Peoples Choice award will be presented to the contestant with the most money in the jar. Contestant must provide the jar (no larger than a gallon) with contestant name, category and photo on jar. One winner will receive the award. The pageant is open for girls ages four to 20 and boys ages four to eight. No residency is required. Registration will take place from 5 to 7 p.m., on Tuesday, Sept. 10, and from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., on Saturday, Sept. 14. Late registration will be from 5 to 7 p.m., on Tuesday, Sept. 17 ($10 late fee added after Sept. 14). Registration forms may be turned in at registration times, at HCHS, BMS, or BES during normal school hours, or my mail Holmes County High School, ATTN: Band boosters, 825 West Highway 90, Bonifay, FL 32425. If you have any questions you may email: goodsonc@hdsb.org or call or text 373-7517.Flea Across FloridaFlea Across Florida the longest yard sale in the state of Florida will be coming through Washington and Holmes County on Sept. 13, 14 and 15. The yard sale stretches from Liveoak 272 miles to Pensacola.2013 Soccer RegistrationCHIPLEY The City of Chipley will begin registration for the 2013 soccer season on Aug. 20. And child between the ages of four and 14 as of Oct. 1 will be eligible to participate. If registered from 4 to 7 p.m. on Aug. 20 or Aug. 22 the cost is $37 per player. If registered from 3 to 5 p.m. on Aug. 26 30 or Sept. 3 6 the cost is $42 per player. If registered after Sept. 6 the cost is then $47 per player. Teams will be picked on Sept. 9 Practice will begin on Sept. 12. The season will begin on Sept. 30 and the last game will be played on Oct. 29. If you have not heard from a coach by Sept. 11 call Guy Lane at 638-6348 or 658-2773. 5017344 and Community EvenVENTsSWednesday, August 14, 2013 ExtraB6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser

PAGE 15

Wednesday, August 14, 2013 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 B USINESS G UIDE HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on StaServing Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611 Easy Care Lawn & Tractor ServiceLawn Care Tree Trimming Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825Advertise your service or business for as little as $10/week.Ad runs in the Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser and the Weekly Advertiser 638-0212 or 547-9414 5016815 LABOR DAY DEADLINESDeadlines for ALL Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 4 Publications DISPLAY ADS NEWS LEGALS THURSDAY, AUG. 29 4 PM CLASSIFIED LINE ADS FRIDAY, AUG. 30 Noon Our Business Oces WILL BE CLOSED MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 2Enjoy a safe Labor Day weekend! Washington County imes A dvertiserHOLMES COUNTY T 8-5328 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2009 CA 000328 OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. BEVERLY A. GILLEY A/K/A BEVERLY GILLEY, UNKNOWN TENANT (S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BEVERLY A. GILLEY A/K/A BEVERLY GILLEY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed May 29, 2013 entered in Civil Case No. 2009 CA 000328 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Bonifay, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Holmes County Courthouse, 201 North Oklahoma, Bonifay, FL. 32425 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 12 day of September, 2013 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCE at a 1/2` iron rod and cap (PSM 2019), marking the southwest corner of the northeast 1/4 of the southwest 1/4 of Section 10, Township 4 North, Range 14 West, Holmes County, Florida; thence S.89`06E along the south line of said northeast 1/4 of the southwest 1/4, a distance of 214.77` to a 1/2 iron rod and cap (PSM 2019) on the easterly maintained right-of-way line of Holmestead Road, said iron rod being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said south line N.00`35E along said right-of-way line a distance of 272.22 feet; thence N.11`16W along said right-of-way line, a distance of 91.25 feet; thence N.37`13W along said right-of-way line, a distance of 119.75 feet to a 1/2 iron rod and cap (PSM 2142); thence, leaving said right-of-way line, S.89`06E a distance of 298.19 feet to an iron rod and cap (PSM 2142); thence S.01`23W a distance of 455.44 feet to a 1/2 iron rod and cap (PSM 2142) on the aforesaid south line of the northeast 1/4 of the southwest 1/4; thence N.89`06W along said south line of the northeast 1/4 of the southwest 1/4, a distance of 200.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 2005 CAVALIER DOUBLE-WIDE MOBILE HOME WITH SERIAL NUMBERS: CV2005ALO264613A AND CV05AL0264613B Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. 8-5327 PUBLIC AUCTION Howell Mini-Storage at 309 S. Waukesha St Bonifay Fl. 32425 will hold a private or public auction on the contents of these units, for nonpayment according to Fl Statute 83. Tenant has until August 31, 2013 at 10:00 AM to pay in full. No checks will be accepted. Items of general household goods storage in buildings listed below. Jason Sheppard Building 1 Unit 3; Timothy Broxton Building 2 Unit 4; Travis Marlow Building 6 Unit 7. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 7, 14, 2013. For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8 am to 4 pm. Call (850)638-1483 Can You Dig It? Heavy Equipment Operator Training! 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. VA Benefits Eligible. 1-866-362-6497 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414

PAGE 16

B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, August 14, 2013 1113086 160 Properties 65 Offerings August 27th & 28th, 11:00 a.m. Atlanta, GA Holiday Inn Atlanta 4386 Chamblee Dunwoody Rd. bttntfb btnfrbbtn btnfbnrb brbtn btnt bntbn rfb brbtntr bnbbb rtb rb GAL # 2034; FLAL # AB-1488 Information 800.479.1763 johndixon.com A B S O L U T E* A UC T I O N Dated this 18 day of July, 2013. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 7, 14, 2013. 8-5330 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 30-2012-CA-000360 2010-3 SFR VENTURE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. JEANNIE D. BAREFOOT TOMMY M. BAREFOOT, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered April 29, 2013 in Civil Case No. 30-2012-CA-000360 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Bonifay, Florida, wherein 2010-3 SFR VENTURE, LLC is Plaintiff and JEANNIE D. BAREFOOT, TOMMY M. BAREFOOT, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Holmes County Courthouse, 201 North Oklahoma, Bonifay, FL. 32425 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 29 day of August, 2013 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Parcel No. 3: Beginning at the SW corner of the NW of Section 6, Township 4 North, Range 14 West, and run along the West line of said Section 6 on a bearing of N2`E, for 537 feet to a point of beginning; thence run S87`E, for 372 feet; thence run N2`E, for 98 feet; thence run N87`W, for 372 feet; thence run S2`W, for 98 feet to the point of beginning. All lying and being a part of the NW of Section 6, Township 4 North, Range 14 West, according to a certain survey made by W. Frasier Cox, Registered Land Surveyor, Florida Certificate No. 1223 and made in May, 1961. Less road right of way on West side of the above described property Also less and except that certain parcel owned by Roy Messer and wife Donna Messer as described in Official Records Book 140, Page 345, Public Records of Holmes County, Florida. Together with all improvements. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 25 day of July, 2013. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447; Phone: 850-718-0026; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771; Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcour ts.org. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 7, 14, 2013. 8-5333 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL (RFP): HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA RFP No. 13-105 Issue Date: July 30, 2013 Title: Camera and Digital Recording Devices for Courthouse Security Issued By: Holmes County Board of County Commissioners, 107 East Virginia Ave. Bonifay, Florida 32425 Phone (850)547-1119 Fax (850)547-4134 Email: Sherry Snellsherry@holmescountyfl.org. Sealed proposals will be received on or before 2:00 P.M. (CST) August 30, 2013 for furnishing the services and/or items described herein. The time of receipt shall be determined by the time clock stamp in the County office. All questions must be submitted before 2:00 P.M. (CST) August 23, 2013. If necessary, an addendum will be issued in the form of a facsimile and posted to the county web site at www.holmescountyfl.org. If proposals are mailed, send directly to Sherry Snell at the address listed above. If hand delivered, deliver to the same address as above. The County reserves the right to cancel this RFP and/or reject any or all proposals and to waive any informality in any proposal received by the County. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 7, 14, 2013. 8-5336 PUBLIC NOTICE Skyway Towers, LLC is proposing to install a monopole telecommunications tower off of Highway 79 North in Bonifay, Holmes County, Florida 32425 at latitude 30 5620.8 north and longitude 85 3859.2 west. The height of the tower will be 60.7 meters above ground level (117.5 meters above mean sea level). The tower is anticipated to have steady red lights, FAA Style E (L-864/L-865-/L-810). Specific information regarding the project is available by calling Henry Fisher during normal business hours at (205) 629-3868. Any interested party may submit comments by September 19, 2013 with Environmental Engineers, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, AL35120 for comments on the impact of the proposed action on any districts, sites, buildings, structures, or objects significant in American history, archaeology, engineering, or culture that are listed or determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places under National Historic Preservation Act Section 106. Interested persons may review the application for this project at www .fcc.gov/asr/applications by entering Antenna Structure Registration (Form 854) file no. A0844363. Interested persons may raise environmental concerns about the project under the National Environmental Policy Act rules of the Federal Communications Commission, 47 CFR 1.1307, by notifying the FCC of the specific reasons that the action may have a significant impact on the quality of the human environment. Requests for Environmental Review must be filed within 30 days of the date that notice of the project is published on the FCCs website and may only raise environmental concerns. The FCC strongly encourages interested parties to file Requests for Environmental Review online at www .fcc.gov/asr/environmen t alrequest, but they may be filed with a paper copy by mailing the Request to FCC Requests for Environmental Review, Attn: Ramon Williams, 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20554. A copy of the Request should be provided to Environmental Engineers, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, Alabama 35120. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 14, 2013. 8-5335 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed proposals for: RFP 13-103: INMATE MEDICAL SERVICES. RFP with criteria, requirements and the scope of work may be downloaded from the countys web site or will be provided upon written request by contacting: Sherry Snell, Holmes County Board of County Commissioners, 107 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425, Phone (850) 547-1119, Fax (850) 547-4134, or sherry@holmescountyfl.org. Proposal submissions must be sealed and marked with the name of the proposer, and the RFP number and titled RFP 13-103: INMATE MEDICAL SERVICES so as to identify the enclosed proposal. Each submittal shall include one (1) original and eight (8) copies of the proposal. Proposals must be delivered to the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners, Attn: Sherry Snell, 107 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425, so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 P.M. (cst), Friday, August 23, 2013, at which time they will be opened. Proposals received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners will not be responsible for the late deliveries of proposals that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of delivery service. The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals or any parts thereof, and the award, if made, will be made to the best qualified and most responsible respondent whose proposal and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of Holmes County, as determined by the Board of County Commissioners. The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive irregularities in the proposal. Holmes County is currently contracting with a private physician for the services herein and reserves the right to reject all bids and extend the agreement with its current provider if deemed in the best interest of the County by the Board. The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners does not discriminate upon the basis of any individuals disability status. The non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Boards functions, including ones access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Sherry Snell at (850)-547-1119 for assistance. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 7, 14, 2013. 8-5334 The Holmes County Board of Commissioners will accept sealed bids for the following: Catastrophic Inmate Medical Insurance. All bids must be marked Catastrophic Inmate Medical Insurance and submitted on the Bid Form provided by the County Commissioner Office, 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425 no later than 2:00 p.m. on Friday, August 23, 2013 at which time the bids will be opened in a Public Meeting. Bid specifications and a bid form can be downloaded online at www holmescountyfl.org or may be picked up at the Holmes County Board of Commissioners office. Contact Sherry Snell at 850-547-1119 for more information. Holmes County is an Equal Opportunity Employer and reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids it deems to be in the best interest of the citizens of Holmes County. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 7, 14, 2013. 8-5337 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.: 2013-CP-33 IN RE: ESTATE OF VALENTINO MARCOCCIA,Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of VALENTINO MARCOCCIA, deceased, with the case number indicated above, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 North Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425. The names and addresses of the co-personal representatives and of the co-personal representatives attorneys are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED 2 YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is: August 14, 2013. RONALD L. NELSON Florida Bar Number 280194 Attorney for Co-Personal Representative 517 East Government Street, Pensacola, FL 32502. Telephone (850) 434-1700 CLAYTON J.M. ADKINSON Florida Bar Number 171651 Attorney for Co-Personal Representative P.O. Box 1207 DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435. Telephone (850) 892-5195 Co-Personal Representatives: VINCENT MARCOCCIA 16 Biscayne Drive Mount Sinai, NY 11766 MARTHA MARCOCCIA 2617 Highway 81 N Ponce De Leon, FL 32455. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 14, 21, 2013. 8-5331 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 30-2013-CA-000206 VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee Corporation, P.O. Box 9800 Maryville, TN 37802 Plaintiff, v. JAMES WILLIAM RABON a/k/a JAMES RABON, CERESIA LYNN RABON, BETTY L. RABON n/k/a BETTY L. ANDERSON, JAMES E. RABON, IF LIVING, BUT IF DECEASED, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS AND TRUSTEES OF JAMES E. RABON, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: JAMES E. RABON, IF LIVING, BUT IF DECEASED, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS AND TRUSTEES OF JAMES E. RABON YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Holmes, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 14, Township 5 North, Range 15 West of Holmes County, Florida, thence South 04 degrees 54 minutes 25 seconds East along the West boundary line of said Section 14, 2375.87 feet to the Point of Beginning, thence North 87 degrees 03 minutes 00 seconds East, 263.48 feet to the centerline of a county road, thence South 22 degrees 46 minutes 59 seconds West along said centerline 316.77 feet; thence South 86 degrees 13 minutes 56 seconds West, 116.15 feet to said West line of Section 14, thence North 04 degrees 54 minutes 25 seconds West along said West line of Section 14, 287.18 feet to the Point of Beginning. Together with a 2010, CMH mobile home; Model: Value 1. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2010 CMHM MOBILE HOME, SERIAL NUMBER WHC018264GA. Commonly known as: 2036 BUCK TREADWELL RD., BONIFAY, FL 32425 You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, P.A., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203, Tallahassee, Florida 32312, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 25 day of July, 2013. CLERK OF COURT By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 7, 14, 2013. 8-5338 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Mayor and Town Council of Ponce de Leon are accepting sealed bids until September 5, 2013 at 11:00 AM on the following salvaged trucks: One (1) 1977 Ford Pumper, (1) One 1984 Ford Pumper. The trucks are being sold without a title, as is, and may be inspected at the Ponce de Leon Fire House located at 1508 Skelton Street, Ponce de Leon, FL. Bids may be mailed to Town of Ponce de Leon, PO Box 214, Ponce de Leon, FL 32455, or submitted to the Town Clerk at PDL Town Hall, 1580 Hwy 90, Ponce de Leon during normal business hours. Bids will be opened on September 5, 2013 at 7:00 PM at the Town Hall. For more information please contact Johnny Locke at 850-209-6407. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 14, 21, 28, 2013. 8-5339 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: Shane A Locklear Last known address of: 512 E Pennsylvania Avenue, Bonifay, FL 32425. You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Holmes County, Florida, no later than thirty(30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 14, 2013. 8-5340 PUBLIC SALE Tharp & Sons Mini Storage in Bonifay, Fl. will hold a sale for these units for non-payment of rent in accordance with the FL Statute Act 83-801-83-809. Tenants will have until August 31, 2013 to pay in full. No checks are accepted. 1. Billy Mingo; Caryville, Fl. 2. Unknown. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 14, 21, 2013. 8-5332 Bowen Storage Company, 102 South Waukesha St. Bonifay, Fl. 32425. (850)547-4264. Notice: Julie Lowery, 3926 Main St., Cottondale, Fl. 32431. Subject: Storage Building B1. This notice is to inform you that the contents of storage building B1 will be sold unless we hear from you by 8/25/2013. Owner: Bowen Storage Company. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 7, 14, 2013. 9-5341 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA Case no.: 13-313DR Division: CHRISTINA BRUNSON, Petitioner and ERIC BRUNSON SR, Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PETITION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE WITH MINOR CHILDREN. TO: ERIC BRUNSON, SR. 1528 GASDORF LANE, WESTVILLE, FL. 32464. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Petition for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on CHRISTINA BRUNSON whose address is 1528 GASDORF LANE, WESTVILLE, FL 32464, on or before SEPTEMBER 18, 2013, and file the original with the clerk of this Court at 201 N. OKLAHOMA STREET, Bonifay, Fl. 32425 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated August 9, 2013. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Cindy Jackson Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 14, 21, 28, September 4, 2013. 9-5342 NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201301172 TO: Eric E. Tucci A Notice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibiliy for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August, 14, 21, 28, September 4, 2013. ADOPT: A childless couple seeks to adopt. Loving home with tenderness, warmth, happiness. Financial security. Expenses paid. Regis & David (888)9861520 or text (347)4061924;www.davidandregisadopt.com -Adam B. Skiar FL# 0150789 AUCTIONAugust 28th. Beech Mountain, NC. Commercial Property; 1.68+/-acres. Former: Ski shop; gift shop; (3) apartments; 10,500 +/-sqft. Great location. www.Rogers AuctionGroup.com. 800-442-7906. NCAL#685. MAG SPARK/(R)Convert your percussion sidelock muzzleloader from #11 cap to shotshell 209 in seconds. Dealer for MAGSPARK(R), EEZOX(TM) PREMIUM GUN CARE TRUGLO Muzzleloader and rifle sights. Call John @ CBL Chipley, 850-260-1342. cumminsbulletsandlube.c om. Fresh from the Farm! Okra. Leave a message. (850)956-4556. K&LFarm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 U-PICK GRAPES $4.00/Gallon (850)547-2326 Follow signs on Hwy 177Ato 1837 Flowing Well Rd., Bonifay. U-Pick 7 days, daylight Campbellton Farm Service 5221 Highway 231 South, Campbellton, Fl 850-263-6324, New Crop Bulk Oats (Good for Cover Crop or Grazing) $4.00 bushel 50# cleaned & bagged Oats (horse feed) $8.00 bag. Craftsman riding mower, 4000 series. 48-inch cut, 24 hp b/s, good shape 550 Call 850-628-5436 WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. BURFORDS TREE Now hiring Groundsman, Climber-trimmers & Foreman. Must have valid D.L. & be able to pass background check. CDLs a plus. Call Bill at (850)336-1255. Panama City & Chipley area. Bus/Strategic MgmtWashington County News/ Holmes County Times Advertiser Advertising Sales ExecutiveHalifax Media Group is looking for an experienced sales executive to provide online and print advertising solutions to advertisers in Washington/Holmes Counties in beautiful northwest Florida, to maximize the benefits of advertising for our customers while maximizing revenues for our company. This position will focus on soliciting print and online advertising,on behalf of the businesses and brands of Halifax Media Group, Northwest Florida. Prior sales experience a must. Washington and Holmes counties are just a short drive to the Worlds Most Beautiful Beaches and have plenty of outdoor recreational opportunities. Halifax Media Group offers an excellent benefit package including health, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave. Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-Free Workplace No phone calls, please. Web ID#: 34261271 Full time Automobile Sales help wanted. minimum 2 years experience required. Fax resumes to 334-684-3713 or email to wardmotor@centurytel.ne t. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Install/Maint/RepairDISPATCHERS AND BILLING CLERKNational cleaning and outsourcing company needs experienced staff for above positions for a large, luxury property in the Santa Rosa Beach area. Dispatchers -$10 $12 per hour, shifts from 8am to 10pm, weekends required. Billing clerk needed to process invoices to customers daily and other related duties. Voluntary benefits available after 90 days. Send resumes to: nikki.bernal@theservicecompanies.com We are a crime and drug free workplace and an EOE Web ID#: 34261565 txt FL61565 to 56654 Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church is currently seeking a musician for Sunday Worship services. Church services are 1st & 4th Sunday beginning at 11:00a.m. All interested musicians please contact Deacon Chester Campbell(850)373-7090 or Minister Tony Davis(850)326-3628. Logistics/TransportClass A CDL Truck DriverThe News Herald is accepting applications for a hardworking, responsible truck driver to load and deliver newspaper bundles to our contractors along with other related duties. Hours are late night to early morning, on a rotating schedule. Applicants must have a valid Class A CDL Florida driver license, a clean driving record, proof of insurance, a current medical card. Benefits include medical and dental insurance, 401(k), vacation and sick leave, and paid holidays. Come by The News Herald front office located at 501 W. 11th Street Monday -Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. for an application or send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. Interviews will be scheduled at a later date. No phone calls please. Equal Opportunity Employer Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34261274 OtherPastor NeededRock Hill Church in Chipley Florida is seeking a full time ordained Nondenominational or Penticostal pastor. For further information please call (850) 579-2981 or (850) 579-2223 Text FL62077 to 56654 Web ID#: 34262077 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com. EOE MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a Medical Office Assistant! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED PC/Internet needed! 1-888374-7294 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. 638-1918 Office space for rent in Bonifay. 204 Harvey Ethridge St. Phone: (850)548-5045 or (850)307-3654. 1701AWaukesha St. (850)579-5113 or (850)305-6202. Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1BR Apartment w/kitchen, LR, large walk-in closet. New shower. Also, store or office. $400/mth. (850)547-5244. 4BR Home & 2BR Apartments, furnished. Bonifay. Private, well maintained. Includes W&D. Lawn maintenance & water provided. (850)547-2096. For Rent -1000+/-sq ft2 or 3 BR/1BA Duplex apartment. $550. now taking applications. HUD not accepted. 638-7128. Mandi Lea Apartments in Vernon, 2/BR. Financial Assistance available if qualified. 638-4640. SpaciousOne Bedroom Apartment $425 Two Bedroom Apartment $450 Stove/Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. 3BR/1BA for rent. No pets. Deposit, & references required. HUD accepted. $595/mth Chipley. 638-1918 3BR/2BA House in Chipley. Newly renovated kitchen & bathroom floors. Stove & refrigerator included. $700 a month. Call 850-547-3746. 3BR/1BA AC, For Rent, Wausau, No Pets, $600/MO and $600/Dep. Reference, 638-7601 3BR/1BAHouse $550.00/mo, Vernon area. 850-353-2912. For Rent 1BR house in Chipley great neighborhood. $475/MO 850-258-3874. For Rent, 4BR/1BA, No pets, HUD accepted, AC, references. $700/MO and $700/DEP in Chipley 638-7601. Nice clean houses, apartments & mobile homes for rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, houses for sale. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. Small 2 Bdrm/1B block house, 3 Bdrm/1 bath house. Also an apt-2 Bdrm/2 1/2 bath. All in Bonifay No pets. (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586. 2BR/2BA M.H. Vernon. First, last, plus deposit. Excellent condition. No pets. HUD accepted. Call Moses 850-326-2201. 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850-768-3508, 850-638-9933. 2BR/2BA Mobile Home in quite park between Bonifay and Chipley. $425 plus Deposit. 547-4232 or 527-4911. 3BD/2BA,Doublewide .4.5 miles from Chipley. Water & sewage included. $650/mo. (850)638-2999 HUNTING LAND for rent or lease, 1 year or 5 years, 160 acres or 300 acres. For more information call 638-1911 or 326-0044. For Sell by Owner 3BR/2BA, Updated, .75 acre, CHA, conveniently located. Reduced to $65,000 OBO. 850-481-5352, 850-441-8181. Handicap Equipped. Must sell By Owner: 3 Bdr/1B, LR, kitchen/dining, utility, double carport, storage building, 2 patios, 3 window ACs, workshop. On 2 acres near 5 points. (850)628-5436 Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. Mobile Homes with acreage. Ready to move in. Seller Financing with approved credit. Lots of room for the price, 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850-308-6473 LandHomesExpress.com OWNER MUST SELL! Beautifully wooded homesite located next to crystal clear mountain lake, WISP Ski area and brand new golf Course-only $79,900. Adjoining lot sold for $249,900. Bank will finance. Call 301-387-8100, x 91