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Holmes County times-advertiser ( June 19, 2013 )

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Holmes County times-advertiser
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Newspaper
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Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
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Bonifay, FL
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June 19, 2013
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University of Florida
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UF00100549:00221

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Title:
Holmes County times-advertiser
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
Place of Publication:
Bonifay, FL
Creation Date:
June 19, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
UF00100549:00221


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50¢ www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM Phone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 IN BRIEF imes imes imes T dvertiser imes imes imes imes T T dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser A HOLMES COUNTY By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY — Work replacing and expanding the city’s water/sewer system has come to a halt because of the threat of heavy rains, the Bonifay City Council learned July 22. “We most likely won’t be able to resume until some time next week,” said Zack Worley, representative from engineering rm Hatch Mott MacDonald. “I would like to inform you that we’re taking every step to make needed adjustments as we go.” The council approved of $9,700 for a culvert and junction box near Jackson Avenue and to reline the pipe on State Road 79 instead of replacing it, by request of the state Department of Transportation. The council also approved of donating $500 to the Holmes County Dixie Youth All Stars as they head to Nationals in Alexandria, La. By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY — The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners went into its second week of reviewing the budget during a special session July 23 to decide what millage rate to propose during next week’s regularly scheduled meeting. The Holmes County Sheriff’s Of ce submitted in a revised version of its budget, reducing it by $7,802 from the previous submission to encourage the county to consider adding another deputy position. “We devised to add another deputy by taking away our bonuses,” Sheriff Tim Brown said. Commissioner Kenneth Williams suggested they eliminate one of the two deputies’ positions at the courthouse to give more toward hiring a deputy to watch the county. “First of all, that was the judge’s call to increase security at the courthouse,” Brown said. “Second, we don’t have anyone to relieve the one deputy, which means that the area’s security would be compromised every time he had to use the bathroom or eat lunch.” Williams suggested a possible part-time position to cover for the rst deputy. “I have a problem with the weekend having only two guys watching over Holmes County and during the week there’s two guys watching the courthouse,” Williams said. “My rst priority isn’t the courthouse, it’s those who need protection in By MICHAEL BRAGA and ANTHONY CORMIER Halifax Media Group The Bank of Bonifay repeatedly broke the rules, a Herald-Tribune investigation found. Insiders awarded themselves loans that were far larger than the law allowed. Directors let their wives sit in on board meetings and gave them access to bank records until they were told it was against the law. The bank also failed to track wire transfers from suspected money launderers in Pakistan. Lending of cers did not always obtain legally required appraisals. State regulators found that loan les were disorganized and some loan applications contained nothing more than a borrower’s name, address and signature. Practically every time they visited, state regulators criticized the bank for its low standards, nding that it ignored recommendations for changes and helped insiders enrich themselves at the institution’s expense. Bank of Bonifay collapsed in May 2010, costing the nancial system nearly $80 million. Founded in the Florida Panhandle in 1906, it was the oldest of the 68 banks that failed in Florida during the Great Recession. State examinations show the bank was cited for violations both big and small. Regulators say directors BREAKING THE BANKS Find a database of the 68 banks featured in this series, related documents and other stories in the series at newsherald.com Wednesday, JULY 31 2013 Volume 123, Number 16 INDEX Opinion ................................ A4 Outdoors .............................. A6 Sports .................................. A7 Extra .................................... B1 Obituaries ............................ B3 Faith .................................... B4 Classi eds ............................ B5 Florida Sales Tax Holiday The Florida Sales Tax Holiday for back-toschool supplies begins at 12:01 a.m. Friday, Aug. 2, and ends at midnight Sunday, Aug. 4. For a complete list of tax-exempt items, see last week’s special Back To School section or bonifaynow.com. HCHS Blue Pride Band Camp BONIFAY — Rookies and band of cers in Holmes County High School’s Blue Pride Band Camp will meet from 8-11:30 a.m., and the full band will meet from 1-5 p.m. Thursday and Friday, Aug. 1-2. The full band will meet from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 5-9, with a lunch break from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., and 6-8 p.m. Aug. 12-16. Email hchsbluepride@gmail. com with questions. Childbirth Education Classes BONIFAY — Childbirth Education Classes will be 5:30-7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Aug. 1-22, at the Holmes County Health Department Healthy Start Annex, 402 N. Oklahoma St. Back To School Bash BONIFAY — A Back to School Bash will be 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 3, at Bonifay Elementary School with a bouncy house, face painting, school supplies and more. School district approves millage increase By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY — The Holmes County District School Board approved a resolution to adopt the tentative millage rate for 2013-14 during its special session July 29. The resolution will increase the millage by 1.5 mills for a total of 7.396. “It was successfully advertised in the local newspapers, and the reason why we had to advertise is because the total millage rate exceeds the roll-back rate by 20.26 percent,” Board Finance Of cer Larry Hawkins said. “The only reason it is such a signi cant increase is primarily due to the new schools being built; otherwise, it would’ve actually reduced.” During the public hearing, resident Tony Bess addressed the board. “I’m Holmes County, born and raised, and so are my children,” Bess said. “The only problem I see with this is that only about 30 to 40 percent of those living in Holmes County actually pay this tax because the rest are exempt in one way or another. Isn’t there a sales tax or something that could make this more fair?” Superintendent Eddie Dixon said the law requires there be a CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser Grace Bailey was the guest for the Bonifay Kiwanis Club’s July 24 meeting as entertainment, singing “That’s All Right, Mama” by Elvis Presley, “At Last” by Etta James and hymn “His Eye is on the Sparrow.” Bailey is in her senior year at Troy University, majoring in theater with a minor in music. She said she has recently become very active in the theater department. To see Bailey’s performance, click on the link at www.bonifaynow.com Heavy rains delay city’s sewer/water project KIWANIS IN CONCERT Regulators cited failed Bonifay bank County works toward millage rate proposal See BANK A2 See MILLAGE A2 See SEWER A2 See SCHOOL A2 War hero Bud Day remembered, A5

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Local A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, July 31, 2013 " " "" % # " "! %%! &" " $ " %"" The bene ts of hearing instruments var y by type and degree of loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Discounts off MSRP Previous purchases excluded. For a limited time. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Clean,clear natur al sound Y our Hearing Aids communicate with each other automatically adjusting themselves. Ear -to-Ear Synchronization: Settings are automatically transferred to the other aid. Beltone Pr omise™ Hearing Aid System $1000 off Applies to 2 Hearing Aids at Pr emier Level. $800 off Adv antage Level. MARIANNA 3025 6th STREET (850)387-4931 W ednesdays & F ridays Allen Barnes HAS: BC-HIS 24 Y ears Experience Bill Fletcher HAS: BC-HIS 24 Y ears Experience WE’RE IN Y OUR NEIGHBORHOOD! CHIPLEY 1611 MAIN STREET #4 (850)387-4931 Monday F riday The bene ts of hearing instruments var y by type and degree of loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Discounts off MSRP Previous purchases excluded. For a limited time. Cannot be combined with any other offers. paid $3.5 million in dividends in 2007 even though Bank of Bonifay recorded a $2.3 million loss that year. The state also said that nine of the bank’s directors obtained unsecured credit lines of $100,000 each in April 2007 — far exceeding the state limit of $25,000. The Herald-Tribune identi ed at least $12 million in mortgages to directors between 1995 and 2009. Companies held in part by Rupert Phillips, a former director, obtained $4.8 million in mortgages from Bank of Bonifay in 2006 and 2007 — more than any other board member. He resigned from the board in December 2007. Phillips is an investor in Halifax Media Group, which owns the Herald-Tribune and other newspapers, including The News Herald. Meanwhile, regulators found four instances in which the bank exceeded limits on loans to a single borrower. One Panhandle developer received a $1.2 million loan without an appraisal, while another received two loans totaling $3.1 million based on bogus nancial information, regulators found. The developer who received the $3.1 million could only keep up with payments for four months, the report said. “The repayment capacity of the borrower was in ated on the loan application,” regulators wrote in their 2008 report. They said the borrower held out that long only because the bank gave him $44,000 to make the interest payments. Regulators said the bank also evaded loan-to-value requirements by giving borrowers two loans on the same property. The total of the two loans often exceeded 100 percent of the value of the real estate, and executives made no effort to point this out to visiting regulators. With the end of the real estate boom, Bank of Bonifay’s problem loans mushroomed and its losses mounted. But the bank neither wrote down its bad loans as fast as the law requires nor put enough money into loan loss reserves. When questioned about these delays, James Goodson — then acting as chief executive of cer — fought back. He said regulatory provisions were “broad and open to interpretation,” and he would not commit to making the accounting changes regulators requested. “His apparent inability to understand problems in his actions and disagreements with examiner ndings is underscored by his comments throughout the open section of this report,” regulators wrote in 2009. Despite its growing problems, the bank continued to make large and risky loans right up to the end. In March 2009, it provided a $2.5 million loan to a company controlled by the directors of another struggling Panhandle institution — Coastal Community Bank. Within 15 months, both Coastal Community and Bank of Bonifay were out of business. Holmes County because that’s who I serve — Holmes County.” Brown said he’d look into other possible ways of amending the issue to bring before the board. Brown also agreed to become more actively involved in nding ways to save money on inmate medical expenses. “If you can save some money, then that’s money that can be saved towards your contingency funds,” Williams said. “Look at it some more, because I think we’re really close to our goal here.” The board approved advertising for a new recycling and litter full-time position with the Holmes County Recycling Center, which was made possible by an increase of $20,000 a year through a solid waste grant. “It’s a good idea,” Williams said. “We get enough calls for litter alone to keep him busy at all times. We’ll also need him to have the quali cations required to supervise inmate labor if he needs assistance.” Williams added it might be a good idea to look into ways of investigating where the trash is coming from and issuing nes to generate revenue and reduce littering. In the area of transportation, commissioners found they were using more on road materials and having to pull from bridge funds, so they agreed to ip the allotted amounts for next year’s budget. “I also see that the income from the road signs is down,” Williams said. “Could it be because we aren’t doing private signs anymore?” Road Department Hubert Hendrix agreed that might be a distinct possibility. Chairman Monty Merchant said the purpose of adjusting the budget is to prepare the board to set a fairly proposed millage rate during the next regularly scheduled meeting. “We need to be ready to set the millage rate for next Tuesday night,” Merchant said. “It’s kind of the purpose of these meetings; to see if we can get everything lined up and balanced out.” BANK from page A1 MILLAGE from page A1 “After an undefeated season we won State and now we’ll be heading to Alexandria, La. for the Nationals to represent not only Bonifay but the state of Florida,” head coach Matt Tate said. “These kids have worked hard to get where they are, and we appreciate all the support you’ve shown. We’ll do our city proud.” The council agreed to allow the Bonifay Blue Devils’ peewee football team to practice on the large baseball eld at the Bonifay Recreational Facility, but requested that no practice be held on Thursdays because a local church hosts ag football games for the local children. “We’ve got over 90 boys and girls playing this year and over 40 cheerleaders, and we just needed a little bit more room to play,” head coach Noah Bowen said. “We thank you for all you do for us.” Resident and business owner Wayne Sellers came before the council to voice a few complaints. “One, I’d appreciate it if you’d stop sending your police of cer to harass me about the appearance of my property,” Sellers said. “I understand that broken glass is a safety issue, but before you go looking at anyone’s property, you best be looking at your own, because I’ve been complaining for over 17 years about these trees growing in these ditches and that retention pond.” He added that the city had caused some damage to his parking lot as well and that elevated patchwork is causing water to ow toward his place of business. “You cut up my parking lot a few years back and haven’t done anything about it, and now you’re giving me 30 days to comply with you; why don’t I give you 30 days to comply with me?” Sellers said. Council Member Richard Woodham con rmed the patchwork on Sellers’ parking lot was causing drainage issues and council agreed to allow Public Works Supervisor Jack Marell to look at it and get an estimation of repairs. Marell also told Sellers the Department of Transportation had informed him they were going to use some of their equipment to remove the trees in the ditches and retention pond. “I’m not downing your ordinance; it’s been doing this city some good in some places,” Sellers said. “It’s just how you’ve been handling it by handing down unfair burdens on these folks. This isn’t no place to get rich, but it’s a wonderful place to live.” The council also approved of Resolution 13-25, which takes a stance against illegal immigration. “People who enter the United States illegally should not receive any bene ts from American taxpayers,” read City Clerk Jeri Gibson. “All United States borders should be totally secured and 100 percent veri ed, and any person in the U.S. illegally should receive no amnesty.” The council also approved helping the Bonifay Fire Department purchase new doors for the re station by paying for half the cost of $4,600. “They’ve been diligently working for this city no matter what the circumstances,” Woodham said. “When half the city lost power not too long ago, they were here searching every corner on their own vehicles. They do so much for this city, we owe them that much at least.” The next Bonifay City Council meeting is set for 6 p.m. Aug. 12 at Bonifay City Hall. SEWER from page A1 1.5 millage rate for the next three years dedicated toward the project. “Even if we had the money, they’d still want that millage rate as a show of good faith that this is what the community wants,” Dixon said. “We’ve looked into other avenues like the sales tax; however, Holmes County doesn’t generate enough revenue to satisfy that three percent requirement — not in three years.” The next Holmes County District School Board meeting is set for 9 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 6. SCHOOL from page A1 Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 Wednesday, July 31, 2013 Heat pump wat er heat ers pr o vide as much as $300 in ener gy sa vings per y ear compar ed t o a traditional elec tr ic wat er heat er and y ou get t wice as much hot wat er fr om each k ilo watt -hour of elec tr icit y consumed V isit w w w .w estor ida.coop t oda y f or mor e details S tar t a hea t pump w a t er hea t er r ev olution NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our polic y that the patient and an y other per son r esponsib le f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimb ur sed b y pa yment or an y other ser vice e x amination or tr eatment which is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hour s of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee discount ed f ee or r educed f ee ser vice e x amination or tr eatment. "WE WELCOME NEW P A TIENTS, CALL TODA Y FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW P A TIENTS 59 AND OLDER This cer tif icat e is good f or a complet e Medical Ey e Ex am with T odd R obinson, M.D In Our Chiple y Of f ice Boar d C er tif ied Ey e Ph y sician and Sur geon. The e x am includes a pr escr iption f or e y e glasses and t ests f or Glaucoma, C at ar acts and other e y e diseases FOR Y OUR APPOINTMENT C ALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILI TY : U .S Citiz ens living in the Flor ida P anhandle 59 y ear s and older not pr esentl y under our car e C oupon Expir es: 8-1 5-1 3 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: WC00 S m ar t Le ns es SM C an pr oduce clear vision without glasses at all dist ances ww w .m ulli se y e .co m MULLIS EYE INSTITUTE Chiple y Of f ice 1 691 Main St., St e 1 850-638-7220 W e ar e locat ed dir ectl y acr oss the par king lot fr om the W almar t in Chiple y T odd R obinson, M.D Boar d C er tif ied Ey e Ph y sician and C at ar act Sur geon Weekend arrests in Holmes County From Staff Reports BONIFAY The Holmes County Sheriffs Ofce reported the arrest of multiple people on the July 20 weekend. According to the report, Randy J. Gibson, 39, of Hartford, Ala., was arrested following a high-speed chase on July 20 after deputies noticed him driving his red Ford Mustang recklessly through the Pittman Community. The deputies attempted to pull Gibson over, but he ed, leading the deputies on a high-speed chase for several miles before Gibson pulled over and continued to run away on foot, crossing over into Geneva County, Ala. according to the report, He was captured shortly thereafter. Gibson is being charged with eeing and attempting to elude, willful and wanton reckless driving, attaching tag not assigned and resisting an ofcer without violence, according to the report, and is being held at the Holmes County Jail. Later that day Victor Brooks Wilson, 32, of Bonifay was arrested on drug charges after being pulled over for a trafc stop on State Road 2, according to the report. According to the report, a deputy noticed a violation on Wilsons black Ford Mustang and after pulling him over noticed drug paraphernalia. After a search of Wilsons car, the deputy found methamphetamine, according to the report. Wilson is being charged with possession of methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia and is being held at the Holmes County Jail. Three were arrested on July 22 on drug possession charges after a deputy pulled over a white SUV on State Road 81 near Ponce de Leon. Arrested were Jeb Travis Chaney, 24, or DeFuniak Springs, Chelsea Danielle Miller, 21, of Ponce de Leon and Michael Anderson Harris, 24, of Freeport, according to the report. After the deputy pulled them over, he noticed the smell of marijuana coming from the van while talking with the driver, according to the report. After searching the van, the deputy found several ounces of marijuana along with drug paraphernalia. Chaney, Miller and Harris were arrested on charges of possession of marijuana over 20 grams and drug paraphernalia and are being held at the Holmes County Jail. Sheriff Tim Brown asks that anyone with information of illegal activity contact the Holmes County Sheriffs Ofce at 850-547-4421 or reportacrime@holmescosheriff.or g RANDY J. GIBSON VICTOR B. WILSON JEB TRAVIS CHANEY CHELSEA D. MILLER MICHAEL A. HARRIS JUL Y 14 JUL Y 20Travis Worley Adams, 35, violation of probation on sale, manufacture or deliver of meth, violation of probation on possession of meth Chyen Nicole Best, 19, hold for Bay County Nicky Nichole Boggs, 27, violation of probation Cynthia Gale Carnley, 55, violation of probation on domestiv violence Gerry Bruce Case, 25, violation of probation on driving while license suspended or revoked, violation of probation on no valid registration, violation of probation on improper tag attached Brandon Lee Commander, 29 hold for Geneva County Jessica Lynn Curry, 28, violation of probation on possession of meth, violation of probation on trafc in stolen property, bond suspended for violation of probation Dustin Wade Durrance, 33, child support Jamie Lawton Ellis, 22, burglary, theft Randy Jim Gibson, 33, eeing and eluding, resisting with violence Brenda Gail Haley, 31, theft of utilities Jerome Kenneth Hall, 41, violation of probation Krista June Hammond, 54, cultivation of marijuana Andrews Ray Holmes, 34, hold for Hillsborough David Leroy Jenkins, 52, hold for Hillsborough Eric Conelius Johnson, 31, possession of methamphetamine Toranto Jerome Lett, 30, violation of probation on possession of cannabis less than 20 grams, violation of probation on possession of drug paraphernalia Tyler Allen Lofall, 28, hold for Hillsborough Theresa Marie Maclean, 44, hold for Hillsborough Silas Lavell Nobles, 24, domestic violence Jon Paul Nordt, 33, disorderly conduct Luis Santonio Pandules, 26, hold for Hillsborough Dallas Payne, 24, hold for court Jessie Allen Perell, 23, violation of probation on retail theft Denise Yvete Redmon, 49, violation of probation on grand theft Jose Fabin Santiago, 32, hold for Hillsborough Michael Lynn Thompson, 54, resisting without violence, disorderly conduct Ricardo Tirado, 54, driving under the inuence Brenda Sue Toole, 57, hold for Hillsborough Nathan Paul Welling, 39, hold for Hillsborough Christopher Dale Williams, 29, hold for Hillsborough Victor Wilson, 32, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of methF DE P using new technology to examine water quality By ZACK McDONALD 747-5071 @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.co m PANAMA C I T Y B E A CH Florida De partment of Environmental Protec tion ofcials announced an initiative to develop new rules rening wa ter quality standards for beach and recreational waters throughout the state. The FDEP will propose updates to Floridas bacteria criteria for recreational waters, applying guid ance from the EPA. The changes ultimately will be presented to the Florida Environmental Regulation Commission and EPA for approval after a series of technical advisory committee meetings and other pub lic workshops. New laboratory tools and as sessment methods recently allowed FDEP scientists to quickly identify whether fecal bacteria, an indicator for the possible presence of patho gens, are related to humans, animals or other sources. The new lab equipment and meth ods use DNA analyses of bacteria and modern tracers, including arti cial sweeteners, to identify human waste from other sources, according to the FDEP. Armed with that knowledge, the FDEP can more quickly identify and reduce the sources of pathogens in recreational waters and act to pro tect public health. However, the science needed to set water quality criteria based on di rect measurement of pathogens has not yet been developed, so FDEP de vised a multi-pronged approach us ing the latest technology. Measuring fecal bacteria levels is easy, said Drew Bartlett, Division of Environmental Assessment and Restoration director. Unfortunately, readily distinguishing the sources of the bacteria and the potentially harmful pathogens that may go along with them has been beyond scientic capabilities. Bartlett said since the tools are now available rules and protocols can be crafted to reduce the sources of the problems, restore water qual ity and protect public health. A technical advisory committee will be formed to guide FDEP on the scientic intricacies of the rules since they will be implemented using new scientic technologies. The panel of experts includes representatives of the EPA, the Florida Department of Health, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, local governments and the academic community, according to FDEP. The FDEP also will propose changes to its water quality assess ment strategy to take advantage of the new lab tools and land-use sur veys to determine where elevated bacteria levels may indicate an in creased risk to human health, of cials said. Where high bacteria levels are de tected, and using the most advanced source tracking capabilities, FDEP ofcials will direct actions that re duce the sources of the problems and restore water quality. The rst committee meeting will be held Aug. 20 at 9 a.m. in the Florida Department of Environmen tal Protection, Bob Martinez Center, Room 609, 2600 Blair Stone Road in Tallahassee. Holmes County ARRESTS JUL Y 15 19 MarriagesTravis Wayne Marlow, 12/18/1985 of Bonifay and Jacqueline Leigh Furr, 3/24/1983 of Bonifay Andrian Anton Marin, 6/11/1986 of Chipley and Shelly Rae Chancey, 9/23/1974 of Bonifay Christopher Lee Whitehead, 2/6/1987 of Bonifay and La-Keesha Marie Williams, 6/26/1990 of Bonifay Aldreadge Tera Jackson, 2/16/1975 of Caryville and Jamie Annette Tolbert, 12/11/1980 of Ponce de LeonDivorcesCharles M. Andrews and Cecilia Wing Cook Marriages & Divorces Board to decide today on county millage rate By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CH IP LE Y The Washington County Board of County Commissioners dis cussed everything except the county mill age rate at a special workshop Monday. The workshop was called Thursday so the commissioners could discuss the mill age rate. They will vote on a millage rate today in a special meeting. County Clerk of Court and Comptroller Linda Cook asked the commissioners to set the millage rate at Thursdays meet ing. She proposed a millage rate of 9.23 mills to the commissioners, up from last years rate of 8.9195 mills. The county is required to set the mill age by Aug. 4, Cook said. We need a decision on the millage rate; we have got to have this turned in to the state by Aug. 4, she said. The commis sioners avoided the millage question, how ever, instead looking at the countys pro posed budget for places to cut including discussions of doing away with the jobs of county manager and a human resources director, setting a minimum county prop erty tax of $250, taking away county em ployees paid lunch benet and increas ing the amount county employees pay for health insurance among other ideas. Most of the ideas came from Com missioner Todd Abbott, who opened the discussion. I just want to throw a couple of things out there, Abbott said, rst as a citizen of Washington County, secondly as a taxpay er and third as a county commissioner. Abbott said the county is facing a bud get shortfall, and the job of budgeting for the county is not getting any easier. Has anyone contacted the constitu tional ofcers to see what money they will be bringing back to the budget? Abbott asked. Have we thought about contact ing them and seeing if they could cut their budgets by three percent? Abbott also suggested the county look into setting a minimum property tax of $250 for all residents. The minority of residents are paying the taxes for the majority, he said. I think everyone who uses county services should have to pay taxes. Chairman Alan Bush noted that the county budget is facing unfunded man dates from the state and federal govern ments, which have increased the countys nancial woes. As the budget stands presently, the county is facing a $102,000 decit. We couldnt have predicted they would increase the amount the county has to pay into the retirement the way they did, Bush said, noting that the county is being required to pay an additional $227,000 to the state employee pension program. On top of that, the countys ad valorem tax base has dropped about $228,000 be cause of declining property values. Washington commissioners discuss various budget cuts

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With all the sustained rains this July, I searched my memory to compare it with previous rainy Julys. The most recent was July of 1994, the last big ood in our area, but I dont recall so many consecutive days of rain as we have had this summer. That ood damaged some of the blueberries, but the focus on ood recovery pretty much shut down the blueberry business. However, this year, the water damage to the berries was extensive and pretty much shut us down due to the poor quality of the rain soaked fruit, not to mention the dif culty of picking in the downpours. But these continued days of rain got me wondering how we lled such times in my growing up years. We didnt have T.V. nor the electricity to run it with. We didnt even have board games. We werent blessed with art materials such as crayons or nger paints. How did we ll those days? Of course there were chores. Helping to prepare the neverending meals for a large family required help to shell (wet) peas if the rains persisted or shuck fresh corn or peel potatoes. These were inside chores. Cooking on the wood stove required wood which presented a problem in rainy weather as the wood pile was outdoors. We often had to lay stovewood under the stove to dry enough to keep the re going. Running out between down pours, wed bring in a turn and leave it on the back porch to drip. I can hear the sizzle as a wet piece of wood was added to the re box. Another chore that presented a real problem in the rainy season was laundry. Since we washed outdoors, well, we did have a wash bench under a shed, but the pot where we boiled the clothes was outside. There was still the problem of wet wood. Then, if we managed to get the clothes washed, there was the problem of where to dry them. Clothes dryers had not been invented, and again, there would have been no electricity to run it. There werent enough chair backs in the kitchen to hang things over, so it was just a mess of sour smelly laundry if the rains didnt let up. If there was some article of clothing that was really needed, we might try to iron it dry. (Next to impossible.) Barn chores would have included shucking and shelling corn. We had a small corn sheller or else we shelled it by hand for the daily chicken feed. Grandpa Wells had a bigger sheller which we used, especially if we were shelling select ears to carry to the grist mill to make corn meal. Some other chores might have included mending harnesses and tack, hand-sharpening hoes and shovels, putting shucks or dry hay on the cow stalls, or a myriad of other tasks Daddy could think up. (That reminds me of a family story my older brothers tell. At Brackin School it was Thanksgiving week during the depth of the Depression. The teacher Burton Ferrell was reminding the children to be thankful, especially if their dad had a job. Cousin Lee Ellison spoke up and said, I dont have to be thankful. My Daddy can thank up a job for us at any time.) For entertainment we often played under the house which is on a hill and built high off the ground. We drove on imaginary roads with brick bat cars. (Half bricks left over from the houses foundation.) We made playhouses of apple or vegetable cartons which were wood at that time. Our dishes were the china insets from canning jar lids. Our cook pots were empty pork and bean cans or syrup cans. Our menu was mud pies. Between showers, chasing each other around the house burned off energy. We might also play hellover with a string ball which Grandma Wells made for us. The deep ditches down the hill provided the best clay for clay modeling projects. Inside, we sometimes played cards. (We did own a deck of playing cards.) We might play hide and seek and nish driving our Mama crazy. We girls might play paper dolls with cut-outs from the Sears Roebuck Catalog. Cousin Lenora had a set of Jack Rocks and sometime shed come over and wed play Jacks. I was never any good and that. My sister Minnie Lee always read if she could get her hands on a book. For reading there were the daily paper, The Advertiser, and an occasional funny book. (Comic Book) And Mama had a few novels she had collected. I asked my husband what he remembered about entertainment during rainy spells when he was a boy. He said they looked forward to the rains as the two ponds between them and town lled up enough they could go swimming in what they called the second pond which is in Northdale subdivision about where Jempsy Owens home is now located. David Storey, son of former County Agent C.U. Storey, and his wife Melinda stopped and visited a few weeks ago. He recalled that he and Hiram and some of their friends would swim in those holes when they were kids. Before Highway 79 was a road, the road went through there and there was a little bridge at the second pond. He remembers before 79 was paved in about 1935 driving the cows home after a big rain and a car sliding into the ditch almost hitting him and the cows near his grandmothers home. (The Elliot Sharon Home.) There are plenty of resources today for keeping kids entertained. Movies, DVDs, T.V. and all the electronic devices that I dont know the names of are available. Arcades inside malls allow the Mamas to go shopping while the kids play. Vacation Bible Schools abound during the summer. And if all else fails, there are enough mud holes to provide entertainment. But I am ready for the rains to let up for awhile. Note: Holmes County Historical Society meets the 2nd Thursday of each month at the Society building. (Next meeting is Aug. 8) HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison What did we used to do on rainy days In the past, a four-hour tour of duty at the Vernon Historical Society Museum seemingly motivated my mind for a Prattle narrative. It happened again on July 17 during my appointed time in the facility. When not busy with visitors in the museum, an effort is made to look for items recently donated to the facility. Two discoveries were made recently. One will be todays subject and, hopefully, the second item will be explored as a topic next week. As reported previously, my mind seems to be alert to the history and heritage of Vernon, especially the happenings at the old school, as I re ect upon them during my duty. This may because the rst class room to become part of the present four-room museum, was my home room during my senior year, 1943-44. My starting year at Vernon High School was 1939-40. Imagine my surprise when a small autograph book was seen in one of the many shelves marked Essie Mae Waller, Vernon High School-Class of 193940. The book was the typical one, purchased in dime stores, rather inexpensive, and usually bought by the girls, as the boys seemingly regarded autographs for the feminine gender. The short poems and home made rhymes were generic in content and typical of other autograph books your writer has seen down through the years. The wording of the writing gave clear proof that the students were juniors, with most making reference to looking forward to being seniors the following year. I remember Essie Mae rather vividly, as I also recalled most of the other girls and boys, who signed autographs for her. Lynda Waller, niece of Essie Mae, is an active member of the Vernon Historical Society, has served as an of cer and volunteers much of her time on duty at the popular array of the countys history. My guess is that Lynda has recently donated this interesting item to the collection of heritage now on display in the old school building. Down through the years, I have told our sons of seeing Roy Acuff and his Smoky Mountain Boys, in concert in the Vernon High School Auditorium early in my experience of attending school there. I did not remember the year of his appearance. While leisurely turning the aged, but well preserved book, reading each verse with much interest, I was shocked when somewhere toward the middle of the book, I found the answer I had been awaiting for all if these years with these notations in Essies Autograph Book. The rst one read: Best Wishes from Roy AcuffWSM. Directly under that one, obviously written in an old time ink pen were the words: & Mrs. Roy Acuff. The next four autographs came from members of the Roy Acuff Band. The rst one read: Jess Easterday Smoky Mt. boys W. S. M., Best of Luck Robert Lunn WSM, Best wishes from Rachael Veach W. S. M. Nashville, Tenn., concluding with: Luck Lonnie Wilson (Pap) Smoky Mt. Boys W. S. M. May this happen again! There were no dates on any of the above treasured writings, neither were there dates on any of the classmates salutations in Essie Mae Books. Recalling that the school terms started in September and ended in April, I knew Roy Acuff and band made that notable personal appearance in the old Vernon High School Auditorium within the above time frame. This information sent me to my personal library of reference books on those pioneers music makers who became stars in the early beginning of the long famous, Grand Ole Opry. I immediately learned that Roy Acuff made his second audition for the historic show on Feb. 5, 1938. Jess Easterday, listed above from the Vernon appearance, played ddle on that show, along with Clell Summey, dobro and Red Jones, bass. This audition resulted in the band, Roy Acuff and the Crazy Tennesseans, making their rst regular appearance on the Grand Ole Opry on Feb. 19, 1938. General manager, Harry Stone, didnt like the name of the band, Crazy Tennesseans, which he contended was a slur on Tennessee. He recommended that since Roy came from the Smoky Mountains, he adopt that name. Roy agreed and the band became Roy Acuff and the Smoky Mountain Boys Further factual research of Acuff History shows him hiring Lonnie Wilson, Pete Kirby (who became Bashful Brother Oswald on the show) and the rst female member of the group, Rachael Veachy. Remember she, along with Lonnie Wilson, were in the Vernon performance. Roy reports that chastising reports began to come to him for having the young girl traveling, un-chaperoned, with all the men in the act. Roy was sensitive to that kind of innuendo and made amends by giving Lonnie Wilson the name Pap. Rachel then became Bashful Brother Oswalds sister. Teaming them together made for a tremendous success right off. Readers will note that both Lonnie Wilson and Rachel Veasey appeared in the Vernon concert. Some of Essie Maes classmates who signed her Autograph Book, which has now become a valued piece of history included Herman Justice, Heston Smith, Arol Hudson, Gladwell Newsome, Hiram Owens, Harry Williams, Orerial Tiller, Gameul Holley, Wiley Ward, Wester Galloway, Henry C. Pitts, Olen Ferguson and Jim Williams. The girls listed are Marie Long, Vonceil Austin, Helen Russ, Nettie Sikes, Ef e Lee Shef eld Brock, Frances Harrell, Gertrude McCullough, Iva Lee Whitehead, Lucille Hood, Grace Justice, Ola Mae Cook, Elouise Tiller and Earldeen Tiller. Two teachers, Oneida McFatter Gilmore and J. Hugh Brock have notations in the historic book. Aline Swindle Hightower, a member of the class, was not listed. I have especially enjoyed preparing todays article. I hope my readers will enjoy it as well. See you all next week with the second jewel from the Vernon Historical Society Museum. The greatly loved and highly respected, Roy Acuff, was born Sept. 15, 1903 and died Nov. 23, 1992. He became a legend on the World Famous Grand Ole Orpy, although beginning his musical career after reaching the age of thirty. The King of Country Music visits Vernon HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. OPINION www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, July 31, 2013 A Page 4 Section The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@ bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci @chipleypaper.com 850-547-9414 Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 ADVERTISING Stephanie Smith: ssmith@ chipleypaper. com 850-638-0212 PERRYS PRATTLE Perry Wells

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 Wednesday, July 31, 2013 M‰? ‰ Vb BU \ =9 [ WB ] V^ ] Q B ] Ÿ†‹‹ t £ Œ£ B a B [ f? 9 f M‰ ?‰ Vb BU \ =9 [ WB ] V^ ] Q B ] . \ ’•† ƒ {•Š [ t} > Rt• †t t> DQ i ˆ ¤¦ˆ† b“¦ ‹ HDf b K i ¦ g M ¦ h¦›ˆ i‹ƒ‘ £ Wšš ˆ W| mS[ r W g M c ar p ettile mar ianna. c om ¦ Wšš ˆ W| NˆŠ“ |   F|ƒ‘ mS[ r W g M R¦Š ˆ hˆ“ˆ ƒ¤š š‰ DfKD f kPh ¦ Fš| ¤  b šš“ b |¤š i ¦‰ g M ^ ˆ £™™ S h¤šƒ‘0 e ]O J eg RZg je CZGJ C O J ZGq RZG N “ S er ving Y ou Is O ur Most Imp or tant P r o duc t ” *P r oper t y Insur anc e is not a v ailable in the sta t e of F lorida fr om A ut o O wners Insur anc e B •{›†‹ ?£‚ {› † ?• ƒ Rt£ ; ?tƒ •  ] f • It ‹›… ! ! ! ! ! ! M ember FDIC 3 3 W e s t G a r d e n S t r e e t P e n s a c o l a F L 3 2 5 0 2 850.202.9900 or 1.877.962.3224 1 7 S E E g l i n P a r k w a y F t W a l to n B e a c h F L 3 2 5 4 8 850.244.9900 or 1.866.362.3224 w w w .beachc ommunit ybank .c om # & ( !"$ '" % w  Y • Ÿ s §   y    w y §• p ’ § • b £ Y l uiY Y • ¦  ¦ ua] s § p ¦ s •£ ’Ž ƒ £b Ž x £ Ž x Ž e £ ’§¦ s $ ƒ¡ C $ m { Ž £ m h • Ž § ¨ £’ ] • £§ § £ e ] ¦ ¦ s Ž £ ƒ Ž § ] m em bb b $ ] ? | {y { F a nd By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Carol and Bob Cox of Mexico Beach were featured in the July issue of Field and Stream Magazine and honored by its Heroes of Conservation program for their volunteer work with the Mexico Beach Articial Reef Association. For their conservation work, MBARA was awarded a $500 grant from Toyota Motor Sales USA, Inc. The Cox’s will also be eligible to win a grand prize of $5,000 and a new Toyota Tundra. Each month, the magazine pro les three grassroots conservationists who go above and beyond in the protection of sh, wildlife and habitat. The duo applied for the Field and Stream award online by submitting a detailed breakdown of the work they had accomplished with MBARA. They were eager to seek additional grant money for a cause they are passionate about. Before becoming involved with the reef association, Carol and Bob, who consider themselves “Citizen Scientists,” were stationed on an Air Force base in Guam, a tropical location near the equator known for its coral reefs and clear water. Already active with shing, waterskiing and snorkeling, Carol urged Bob to take scuba lessons with her, though he was hesitant to do so. “I was always fascinated by Jacques Cousteau,” Carol said. “Once Bob got started, he was more enthusiastic about it than I was.” The pair continued to dive around Guam with Bob eventually becoming a certi ed Dive Instructor, and Carol, a Dive Master. In 1998 they were stationed at Tyndall Air Force Base after speci cally asking for a Florida assignment. While on base they spotted a brochure for the MBARA and soon became members. “While we’re here, we may as well do something to improve diving and shing,” recalled Carol. “The military engrains volunteerism into people.” Within a few months of joining MBARA, Carol had been elected to the position of secretary. The couple became involved with events like the annual King sh Tournament where Carol spent several years as the of cial tournament photographer. While in Guam, the couple became fascinated with the local underwater scene and soon learned the art of underwater photography and videography. The Cox’s praised the MBARA for its active efforts at preserving and encouraging marine life in the waters off Mexico Beach. “The MBARA is an active organization. You see all the good it does,” said Carol. According to the Coxes, when the moved to the area in 1998, there were very few places to dive or sh in Mexico Beach, but the MBARA has helped to establish over 140 sites. Just a few years ago, red snapper was rare in Mexico Beach. Carol reported the city now has “one of the best snapper sheries in the state of Florida.” Bob, now president of the MBARA, and Carol, treasurer, spend their volunteer time conducting surveys on the arti cial reefs and examining their structures as they seek out ways to improve future reefs. They also perform sh counts around established reefs to evaluate their performance. In addition to creating certain sizes and shapes, the couple has found the proper materials that will bring sh to the area and allow them to thrive. They discovered that embedding Florida arti cial limestone into the reefs mimicked the hard bottom that occurs naturally in the area. Mexico Beach couple noted in magazine for reef work From Staff Reports WAUSAU — The 2013 Miss Fun Day Brooke Trout was crowned on Saturday in Wausau when the Miss Fun Day Pageant kicked off the 44th annual Possum Festival. Forty-two contestants competed for titles at Saturday’s pageant, including two young Fun Day King contestants. Trout won the coveted Miss Fun Day title, while Christina Michelle Hall was rst runner-up and Melanie Danielle Baxley was second runner-up. The festival weekend begins at 5 p.m. Friday with the perennial favorite, the Possum King and Queen Contest, and is followed on Saturday with the annual Fun Day, which features food, music and fun all day long. The Possum Festival is sponsored by the Wausau Volunteer Fire Department. All the events are held at or around the Possum Palace. The Saturday events are free to the public. Friday’s Possum King and Queen contest begins at 6 p.m., with gates opening at 5 p.m. Entry age is 16 and older, and there is no entry fee to sign up. Prize money will be $75 for rst, $50 for second and $25 for third. Gate admission to the Possum King and Queen contest is $3 for adult, 12 and younger are free, There will be food and craft vendors set up, so bring chairs and enjoy. Saturday starts with a Pancake Breakfast at 6 a.m., and the Possum Trot at 7:30 a.m. The parade will begin at 10 a.m. Other events scheduled for the Fun Day include a sack race, hog calling, rooster crowing, cow lowing and cross cutting. There will also be a dunking booth, water slides and inatables for the children. For the grown-ups, there will also be a dance from 710 p.m., featuring the band Straight Shooters. Admission is $5 a person, and 12 and younger are free. 44TH ANNUAL POSSUM FESTIVAL FUN DAY Events free to public 6 a.m.: Pancake breakfast at the lodge 7:30 a.m.: Possum trot 9:30 a.m.: Billy Lipford 10 a.m.: Parade 10:30 a.m.: Shelly Smith Treio (gospel music) 11 a.m.: Corn Pone 11:30 a.m.: Highcotton (blue grass) Noon: Flag raising 12:10 p.m.: Possum and Quilt auction 1 p.m.: Greasy Pole Possum Festival Fun Day scheduled for Saturday PHOTOS BY RANDAL SEYLER | Times-Advertiser Above: Miss Baby Fun Day winner Havynn Austin Mathis, at left, reacts to winning her title while rst runner-up and photogenic winner Avery Grace Kirkland looks on during Saturday’s Miss Fun Day Pageant in Wausau. For more photos, see Page B1 and visit chipleypaper.com. Left: Miss Baby Fun Day Annslee Grace Rollin looks surprised as she is crowned at the Miss Fun Day Pageant on Saturday. This coming weekend the 44th annual Possum Festival will be held in Wausau.

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O UTDOORS Wednesday, July 31, 2013 Page 6 www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Send your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com A Section Dolphin mystery ON THE WEB Find a video, photo gallery and an interactive map of the strandings at newsherald.com Researchers seeking clues in ‘unprecedented’ Gulf die-off 2013 STRANDINGS Strandings of dolphins and other species from Jan. 1 to July 7. By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH— For the past three years, dolphins have been dying at an unprecedented rate in the Gulf of Mexico, and experts say there’s no end in sight. “The length and the severity of this event is unprecedented in the Gulf,” said Chris Robbins, a scientist and senior manager for restoration planning with Ocean Conservancy. “More than 1,000 animals have stranded and more than 95 percent of those have been dead. … The mortalities we’re seeing are far above what the historical average has been.” Under the Marine Mammal Protection Act, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration declared an Unusual Mortality Event in December 2010 for dolphins in the northern Gulf of Mexico, the area from the Texas/Louisiana border to Franklin County. Since the event began in February 2010, 1,026 strandings have occurred through July 21. The event is the most severe ever recorded in the Gulf, with 95 percent of strandings ending in mortality. “It’s the longest in duration and highest number of strandings in the UME program,” said Erin Fougeres, Marine Mammal Stranding Network Program administrator for NOAA. “In this case, this Unusual Mortality Event has been going on since just prior to the oil spill.” By NOAA de nition, a UME is “a stranding that is unexpected, involves a signi cant die-off of any marine mammal population and demands immediate response.” But response is dif cult when the cause of the UME still is unknown. Oil’s role Although the UME began two months prior to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, researchers are not ruling out oil dispersant as a factor. “This unusual mortality event actually started before the oil spill in February 2010, but when the oil spill happened there was a spike in strandings, and they’ve been high ever since,” Robbins said. “It does raise a question to the extent of which the oil spill has exacerbated the UME.” Robbins said many of the symptoms observed in the stranding events are consistent with those of marine mammals that have been exposed to oil. “What they’re seeing in these animals is a compromised immune system,” Robbins said. “It may be like a cancer patient with a compromised immune system coming down with something else because they’ve been exposed to a virus or some other type of contaminant.” Experts are investigating what role brucella bacteria might have in relation to the UME. Thus far, 27 out of 107 dolphins were positive or suspected to be positive for brucella, a common cause of abortions in the marine mammals. Some animals also are showing signs of pneumonia and adrenal gland abnormalities, Fougeres reported. “We don’t have any de nitive cause of the mortalities at this point,” Fougeres said. “There may not be any one thing that’s killing off the animals. There may be more than one factor involved.” NOAA has formally recognized 59 marine mammal UMEs in the U.S. since 1991, but has determined cause for just 25 of them. In the same timeframe, the Gulf of Mexico has seen 11 UMEs involving dolphins. Fougeres reported the most common cause of the previous events was morbillivirus, a highly infectious virus that includes agents of measles and canine distemper. “We’re trying to rule out the most common causes of UMEs that have happened in the Gulf in the past,” Fougeres said. Morbillivirus “doesn’t appear to be the case.” The highest number of strandings has occurred in Louisiana, followed by Mississippi, Alabama and the Florida Panhandle. “Fortunately, for the Florida Panhandle, they haven’t really been too much above average since 2010,” Fougeres said. Response Although the current UME has not increased strandings much in the Panhandle, responders from Gulf World Marine Park say the difference is the dolphins washing up are more likely to be dead. “We haven’t had an increase in stranding response,” said Gulf World stranding coordinator Secret Holmes-Douglas. “We usually average about 12 to 14 a year and that’s what we’re getting right now, but we’re just not getting live animals.” Gulf World is part of NOAA’s Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program as outlined in the Marine Mammal Protection Act, and it has one of the largest stranding response areas on the books. “We respond from Walton County to the St. Marks River in Franklin County,” Holmes-Douglas said. “We’re responsible for any cetaceans that wash up in our region.” When a dead dolphin comes in, Gulf World veterinarians must perform an intensive necropsy on the animal, an eightto 10-hour process in which they take tissue, virus and bacteria samples. “We try to look for a cause of death if we can determine it,” said staff veterinarian Lydia Scaggs. “But most of the time, you can’t determine the cause of death.” UME protocol requires a higher number of biological samples, which are sent to researchers with NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service for further testing. The UME requires every animal be investigated, no matter the condition. Scaggs said a stranded marine mammal only has a 5 percent chance of survival, and those that do survive a stranding only have a 1 percent chance of ever being released. “Dolphins, they’re just so sick by the time they get in,” said Scaggs, who noted many suffer from pneumonia. Rehabilitation For the small percent of stranded dolphins that do survive, Gulf World rehabilitates the animals onsite, a task that is intensive and costly. “Being a part of the stranding agreement, you take responsibility for funding and rehabilitation,” Holmes-Douglas said. “When you rehab an animal, that’s really where the cost comes in.” Gulf World also is responsible for rehabbing animals collected by Emerald Coast Wildlife Refuge to the west. PHOTOS BY HEATHER LEIPHART | The News Herald Bottle-nosed dolphin Roux, right, clowns around with his friend Jett at Gulf World in Panama City Beach. Roux was rescued from Louisiana and participates in a few of the dolphin shows, while Jett was born at the marine park. TOP : Trainer Megan McGinnis rewards Roux with a sh. Dolphin mystery Dolphin mystery

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By PAT McCANN News Herald Executive Sports Editor David and Beverly Barron both teach at Everitt Middle School, but he admits that they’ve been married to Chaos for 11 years. While that might sound a bit daunting for a relationship on one level, when discovering that Chaos is a summer travel ball softball team for girls another perspective begins to form. Barron also coaches Rutherford’s high school varsity softball team, but the commitment to the Chaos 16U team is more time-consuming and profound. “It’s not just me, a majority of travel coaches are in it to get these girls exposure,” Barron said. “Florida is becoming a hot bed of talent. We need to get the word out that we’ve got girls playing at a high level. “In years past, we didn’t have that coming out of Bay County. We need to expose them to the recruiting process.” The way Barron explained it, recruiting in college softball sounds a lot like the system in place for college basketball where coaches and recruiters ock to major showcases featuring AAU talent. The sport and the group putting on the showcase differs, but the philosophy is the same. “That’s the plan, we go to a lot of showcases,” Barron said. “What has evolved is that coaches can see 5001,000 girls in one recruiting visit. Their season coincides with ours, so it’s nearly impossible to recruit during the high school season. “We’re trying to give the girls somewhere to play. We started by putting an all-star team together out of Callaway rec ball with some pretty big names on it.” Barron said what has evolved is that older girls in Bay County often wind up playing one or the other — rec ball or travel ball — but seldom both. Whereas numbers seem to be at least stabilizing in youth baseball programs and the number of travel ball teams increasing, the same can’t be said for softball. Rec leagues don’t boast large participation numbers. Lynn Haven had 10 teams this season, Panama City Beach reported a total of 60 players and Callaway 50. Neither are travel softball teams prominent in the younger ages. According to those active here in softball travel ball, there is no 8U team in Bay County, only one 10U, one 12U and just a few for older players. That begs an immediate question of where future players are going to come from. ONE ALTERNATIVE Arnold High School coach Rick Green hasn’t been involved in travel ball, but said that of the 23 junior varsity and varsity players in the Marlins’ program all but ve were playing travel ball this summer, almost exclusively for teams outside of Bay County. One of them, shortstop Sarah Robertson, is competing for a select team out of Jacksonville. Green said there has been some talk of forming a travel ball organization in Panama City Beach for teenaged players, but he also is concerned with the number of younger girls entering the sport. “I did a little numbers study and found 386 girls in third, fourth and fth grades on the Beach,” Green said. “I found out that (the rec league at Frank Brown Park) had two teams in that age group and they were having to play each other every week. “Now that’s not the rec park’s fault. So I took it upon myself and sent letters out that we’re going to try to develop a rec league and play at Arnold.” Green said that the Emerald Coast Fastpitch league was a result, with 45 girls along elementary school boundaries competing among four teams. A few practices were held in late May and the schedule played out in June, a championship game recently completed. Green said that parents wanted to play using high school rules, which meant open baserunning, although with a slightly smaller softball and pitching distance of 35 feet. Games were ve innings or a maximum 1 hour, 15 minutes and teams were not allowed to score more than ve runs per inning. “It wasn’t always pretty, but the girls had a great time,” Green said. “I’ve probably had 30 ask if we would consider doing this in the fall, but that’s something we’d have to check into with the school system.” Green said that a registration fee of $30 was required, clearance was obtained for facility use of Arnold’s eld, insurance was supplied, and players were out tted in a T-shirt and whatever uniform pants they desired. Equipment was supplied by players and parents, but supporters sometimes offered to help furnish softballs. “Now that we’ve started this I think it will help us,” Green said. “There’s interest on the Beach now. And because it was divided up by school it kept us from all the good players being on one team. It was a smooth transition.” Green thinks that the decline in rec league softball is linked to the school district not offering school-sponsored softball at the middle school level. “And I understand that nancial aspect of it,” Green said. “But we discovered there were a lot of diamonds in the rough out there” in potential softball talent. TRAVEL COMMITMENT The Chaos organization had as many as four teams at one time, but currently offers 16U and 14U. The Lady Lightning program once was by far the largest in Bay County with age-group teams at most every level, but its numbers have dwindled in recent years. There isn’t nearly the number of softball travel teams as there are in baseball, but it’s more common for 14U and 16U girls to play summer ball than boys because in baseball summer high school programs become prominent at the older levels. Make no mistake, however, the commitment in time and money is no less severe for girls and their parents in softball as their counterparts on baseball travel teams. Barron is in his 11th year with the organization having started with the Starlets 10U ballclub, on which his daughter, Abbie, played for when she was 5. Last summer, when Abbie was a rising freshman at Rutherford the Chaos played in a tournament against a team that basically was 20U. Barron said his daughter pitched against a player who was a freshman at Furman. The team subsists by fundraising, Barron adamant that parents aren’t given a mandate for a set fee to enable their daughter to compete. After a tournament schedule is formulated, a budget is projected to cover the costs. One year when the team was 12U it played in 14 tournaments. That budget, Barron admitted, might have approached $30,000 with tournament entry fees factored in as well as travel, lodging and meals. Parents who travel to watch their kids compete still have to dip into their resources to cover the same expenses, minus the entry fee. “A lot of teams have a straight up fee, but don’t do fundraising,” Barron said. “We’ve never done it that way. We fundraise and the money we bring in we spend on the girls. Parents are encouraged to fundraise. In the 11 years I’ve been doing this I’ve probably had the parents of only ve girls say we’re just going to write you a check. It’s a unity thing.” Barron’s team comprises not only county players. He said the current edition has girls from Dothan, Tallahassee, Bethlehem and Chipley, but does practice on a regular basis. “We know that it’s a huge nancial commitment from parents, that’s why we fundraise almost every weekend” when they’re not playing, Barron said. Some of the fundraising might be bagging groceries at local supermarkets. “If I’ve got a girl that’s got the ability we do what we can do,” Barron said. This year the schedule included six tournaments in the Southeast, but Chaos 16U travels farther than many younger-age travel baseball teams. In addition to Kissimmee, Tallahassee and Pensacola, Barron looked into an event in Oklahoma City that did not become feasible, and has taken ballclubs as far as Nashville, Birmingham, Atlanta, Tampa and Gulfport. “We’ve won a lot of tournaments; we were fourth in the World Series A bracket,” Barron said. “The way we look at it, it’s like family. We’ve seen some travel teams passing out uniforms in the parking lot (having acquired players at the last minute). I’ve had tournament of cials tell me that at least when the Chaos shows up you know who it is.” Barron doesn’t know what the future holds for softball in Bay County. The commitment all around is a heavy one. Barron said that the Chaos once played seven games in one day without leaving the eld after falling into the losers’ bracket in a tournament. And the team also travels to showcases held during the fall, sometimes as late as November. “The minute it ceases to be fun we stop, instantly,” Barron said. “We’ve had a couple of girls in the last year decide they didn’t want to play anymore and we understand.” He said he regularly gauges the commitment of his daughter in the same way. Mosley head coach Brian Wilke coached his daughters Brooke and Bethany on Lady Lightning teams for years, then later when they advanced to Mosley’s varsity. He said there often is a core of about seven girls who start out in 8U and continue on through the levels process. Bubba Hill started the Lady Lightning, which eventually elded teams in all age groups. Wilke said that during his time as a coach there was a board or treasurer, an estimated budget for tournament fees and uniforms. Very few coaches are paid, said Wilke, who estimated that in his time coaching travel ball he might have spent close to $100,000 of his own money. “The fees usually are from $500 to $2,000 per player for the average travel team,” Wilke said, “and you go to the elite teams with a lot of girls signing with Division I and they’re spending $5,000 or more, but they’re ying places.” Wilke said a normal summer season during his tenure was ve or six tournaments, the farthest distance probably Nashville. He said the Lady Lightning played in World Series where there were hundreds of teams and showcases with 40 teams. In various tournaments there could be anywhere from ve teams to 40 in the same division. “Most of the time they’re Saturday-Sunday tournaments, but sometimes Friday through Sunday, and one tournament is four or ve day,” Wilke said. “Yeah, I think it’s the future. Some of it’s sad. We always had programs where kids could earn their way on a team with fundraisers. Now the lower socio-economically just can’t afford it. You almost have to have the means, and that’s kind of sad.” YOUNGER AGES The Panama City Poison started last year as a 10U travel team located in Panama City Beach and expects to have both a 10U and 12U team next season. Poison president David Lynn said that he scouted the rec leagues to get out the word that the initial team was forming, and a sixto sevenweek free camp will be held this summer, with practice twice a week, to impart skills and tactics on a new group of girls interested in expanded softball participation. “At the end of camp we’ll choose a team and take them this fall and let them play in a tournament, and hopefully they become next spring the 10U team,” Lynn said. The Poison, which eventually probably will evolve into the Panama City Beach Poison with most of the players residents of the Beach, are playing in 17 tournaments this season. Lynn said the Poison try and stay within a 2-hour radius of Bay County and that 10 of the tournaments are oneday events giving parents the option of returning home without an overnight stay. Leagues of Their Own Part 4: Girls travel ball offers exposure for talent B •{›†‹ ?£‚ {› † ?• ƒ Rt£ ; ?tƒ •  ] f • It ‹›… ! ! ! ! ! ! $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL e ne w College of A pplied S tudies at FSU P anama City was appr o v ed b y the FSU Boar d of T r ustees in J une 2010 and allo ws the campus to mor e easily r espond to wor kfor ce needs in our ar ea. W e invite y ou to suppor t e Campaign for O ur Community ’ s U niv ersity by helping us build an endo wment for tomorr o w ’ s jobs. O ur goal is to establish a $5 million endo wment for the College of A pplied S tudies b y 2017, which will allo w FSU P anama City to establish student scholarships, implement ne w degr ee pr ograms and pr o vide ne w equipment and technology T o learn ho w y ou can suppor t our community ’ s univ ersity contact M ar y B eth Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR COMMUNIT Y ’S UNIVERSIT Y E ndo wment for T omorr o w ’ s J obs S PORTS www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, July 31, 2013 A Page 7 Section

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Local A8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, July 31, 2013 1 108728 “ S EA D R A GO N” P IR A TE CR UIS E Mor e inf o and sc hedule at www .pir at ecr uise .net or call (850)234-7 40 0. Open Mar ch thr ough October! Come away with us and enjoy a unique and funlled 2-hour family adventure cruise on one of Florida’ s premier vacation attractions. 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Y OUR HOME ) % % 0 %( N o w our in v en t or y is lo w and leads fr om our e x t end ing adv er tising k eep c oming in. W e need t o list y our home pr oper t y and v ac an t land )( % ) ))( # ., $ 1 ) * ,, / $ ., .. $ / & .., M ik e A lvis Br ok er O ce: 850-547-9400 Cell: 850-258-2214 By LAUREN SAGE REINLIE 315-4443 | @LaurenRnwfdn lreinlie@nwfdailynews.com SHALIMAR — Col. Bud Day, one of the military’s most decorated war heroes and a longtime vet eran’s activist, has died at the age of 88. He passed away Saturday at his home in Shalimar surround ed by family and in the arms of his wife and childhood sweet heart, Doris, after a long battle with cancer. “He would have died in my arms if I could have picked him up,” Doris Day said Sunday. Day, a veteran of World War II and the Korean and Viet nam wars, spent much of his post-military life advocating for veterans. Close friends and associates admire his tireless drive to pur sue what he thought was right, whether resisting his interroga tors during his almost six years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam or ling a lawsuit against the federal government to try to se cure promised health benets for veterans. “He was one of those guys, had he lived several thousands of years ago, he would have been one of the Spartans,” said Oka loosa County Judge Patt Maney, a longtime friend and fellow vet eran. “He didn’t care what the odds were, he was going to do what he thought was right, and the whole country is better off for it.” Day, a veteran of the Marines, the Army and the Air Force, re ceived the Medal of Honor, the military’s highest award, for escaping his captors after his plane was shot down in Viet nam in 1967. He was eventually recaptured. In all, he earned more than 70 medals for his service as a Ma rine in the Pacic during World War II and then as an Air Force pilot in Korea and Vietnam. Countless people in the com munity and across the country herald Day’s achievements, but in life he was more modest about his accomplishments. “It’s what you are supposed to do,” he said of his military and community service at his 88th birthday party in February. “Courage, dignity — that stands for something.” It was during his more than 67 months in prisons in Vietnam that Day met Sen. John McCain, a fellow prisoner. They shared a cell for some time and Day helped nurse a badly injured Mc Cain back to health. The two have remained close. “I owe my life to Bud, and much of what I know about char acter and patriotism,” McCain said in a statement released Sunday. “He was the bravest man I ever knew, and his erce resistance and resolute leader ship set the example for us in prison of how to return home with honor ... I will miss him terribly.” McCain said he will have more to say about Day’s life and his passing later this week. A funeral is expected to be Thursday at the Emerald Coast Conference Center with a burial at Barrancas National Memorial Cemetery in Pensacola, accord ing to Bill Everitt, head of the local chapter of the Military Or der of the Purple Heart, of which Day was a member. Day was born in Sioux City, Iowa, on Feb. 24, 1925. He enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1942 during World War II while he was still in high school. After the war, he attended college on the GI Bill, earning a bachelor’s and law degrees in four years. He joined the Army Reserve and then switched to the Air Force where he learned to y, pi loting air defense F-84s in Korea and the ghter-bomber F-100 in Vietnam. Taken captive Day’s plane was shot down on Aug. 26, 1967, in Vietnam. He and the other airman on board had to eject. Day’s arm was broken in three places from the fall and he was temporarily blinded in one eye. He called in his location, but was quickly captured by a group of armed Vietnamese teenagers. “Within 10 seconds of that call, there’s a 13-year-old kid with a bolt-action rie in my face,” he told the Daily News in 2007. He was taken to a makeshift camp and bound, but was able to escape. He received the Medal of Honor for the 10 days he evaded his captors in the jungle and for his refusal to give up informa tion that might compromise the safety of other service members or the military’s mission. He survived during that time on berries and uncooked frogs and used a bamboo log to cross the Ben Hai River. He eventually was shot twice and recaptured. Completely de bilitated, he continued to resist interrogation. He was held for some time in the infamous Hanoi Hilton prison, which was where he met McCain. In the prison known as the Plantation, Day shared a cell with Ron Webb, another prison er who was already there when Day arrived. “I was there when he was hobbling down the camp,” Webb said at Day’s birthday party earlier this year. “He was badly injured, badly tortured. It was quite a sight to see him.” Day, then in his 40s and serv ing as a major, was often the highest-ranking captive in the prisons. As part of his torture, he was hung by his arms for days, tear ing them from their sockets. He and the other prisoners were nearly starved to death. He returned to the United States on March 17, 1973, a skel eton of the once-muscular man he had been. After he returned, he said knowing his wife and the rest of his family would be ne helped him get through his time in the prisons. “I knew things were OK for Do rie. She’s always had it together,” Day told the Daily News in 2005. “My major thing was doing the right thing for myself. It meant keeping my honor. I wasn’t going to do anything dishonorable.” Tireless advocate Day retired from the Air Force in 1977, and he and his family de cided to stay in Northwest Flor ida, where he began work as a lawyer. Maney, who argued cases against Day often in the early years, said he was tenacious and would never give up on a case, no matter how trivial. He also became a champion for veterans of his wars and of more recent conicts. One of his most high-prole efforts was his work to secure TRICARE medical benets for veterans of World War II, Korea and Vietnam. Day single-handedly sued the federal government on behalf of two Northwest Florida veterans. The suit sought to restore free health benets to tens of thou sands of military retirees who en listed between 1941 and 1956. The case died in 2004 when the Supreme Court refused to hear an appeal, but the suit, Day and his plaintiffs’ tireless lob bying on the issue are credited with forcing Congress to pass the TRICARE for Life Act, which made it easier for all military re tirees and their families to afford health care. “The things that allowed him to survive as a POW also gave him the strength to take on the federal government,” Maney said. “That’s a huge undertaking, but he did what he thought was right. He thought veterans de served better.” His strong character proved inspirational for countless people in his community and across the country. Many have made the pil grimage to his home to meet him and pay their respects, Maney said. His door was always open. “He was just a quiet, rm, blunt, unassuming, humble, but very determined guy,” Maney said. When Maney, a retired briga dier general, was injured in a bomb explosion in Afghanistan, Day made the trip to Walter Reed hospital in Washington, D.C., to visit him. “He bucked you up and got you going again, that’s for sure,” Maney said. He has been instrumental in veterans initiatives such as the Fisher House for injured or ill service members and the Honor Flights for World War II veterans, said Tom Rice, owner of Magno lia Grill and himself an advocate for veterans. He continued this work until the last days of his life. “He always said, ‘As long as I’m vertical, I’ll be doing all I can,’” Rice said. He said that dedication, even as he was battling cancer and nearing the end of his life, was inspiring. “Long after a lot of us probably would just sit on the couch, he was still ring away and looking out for somebody else,” he said. Congressman Jeff Miller said in a statement on Sunday that since he rst met Day, any time he hears the word ‘hero’ he thinks of him in his ight jacket with his Medal of Honor fastened high around his neck. “Though many have bravely served their country before Col. Day, and many continue to honor ably serve, few have endured as much as (he has) for honor, duty and love of country,” Miller said. “Our community will miss his un wavering perseverance, his limit less patriotism, and his enduring optimism for the future of Ameri ca. I will miss his friendship.” The Associated Press contrib uted to this report. Decorated war hero Col. Bud Day dies AP In this Sept. 2, 2008, le photo, retired Col. George “Bud” Day waves to the crowed at the Republican National Convention in St. Paul, Minn.

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Washington County News z Holmes County Times-Advertiser B PAGE 1 Section E XTRA Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com Wednesday, JULY 31 2013 POSSUM PAGEANTRY POSSUM PAGEANTRY POSSUM PAGEANTRY POSSUM PAGEANTRY “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) What was Detroit most renowned for manufacturing at the turn of the 20th century? Staplers, Chewing tobacco, Boots, Bicycles 2) Nathaniel Taylor portrayed what character on older TV’s “Sanford and Son”? Bubba, Rollo, Grady, Lamont 3) Phobos, one of the moons of Mars, makes how many complete orbits around the planet every day? One half, 3, 6, 27 4) What did most everyone in the Middle Ages believe was the “seat of intelligence”? Stomach, Brain, Heart, Eyes 5) From recent surveys what is considered the most honest profession? Ministry, Nursing, Teaching, Carpentry 6) Studies support that people perform better on tests when they have what? Good pencil, Breakfast, Not much sleep, A cold 7) Lili de Alvarez was the 1st woman player to do what at Wimbledon? Cuss of cial, Wear “shorts,” Throw racket, Default match 8) Who is the only former president buried within the boundaries of Washington, D.C.? Wilson, Eisenhower, JFK, Reagan 9) In 1903 how many days did it take the rst automobile to cross the U.S.? 11, 25, 52, 100 10) Brutus Thornapple is/was the star of what comic strip? Drabble, The Buckets, Flight Deck, The Born Loser 11) In an operation what is ordinarily removed in a hysterectomy? Appendix, Gall Bladder, Uterus, Abscessed tooth 12) Which continent has the greatest number of countries? Europe, Asia, Africa, S. America 13) The Asian Flu originated in what country? China, Japan, Thailand, Vietnam 14) How many points are on a Maltese cross? 8, 10, 12, 14 ANSWERS 1) Chewing tobacco. 2) Rollo. 3) 3. 4) Heart. 5) Nursing. 6) A cold. 7) Wear “shorts.” 8) Wilson. 9) 52. 10) The Born Loser. 11) Uterus. 12) Africa. 13) China. 14) 8. PHOTOS BY RANDAL SEYLER | Extra ABOVE : From left are Little Miss First Runer-up and photogenic winner Heaven Boyett, Makayla Hewitt, Angelicia McIntyre, 2013 Little Miss Fun Day Karmen Stubbs, Second Runner-up Destiny Nicole Hall, Alicia Marie Johnson, Brooklyn Kyser, and Aela Deese. BELOW : From left, Brooke Trout was crowned 2013 Miss Fun Day and most photogenic, while Second Runner-up went to Melanie Danielle Baxley and First Runner-up was Christina Michelle Hall. LEFT: Second Runner-up Alexia Kendal Flowers, Junior Miss Fun Day Kaylin Lane, Jewel Vincent, First Runner-up, photogenic and overall photogenic winner Hanna Elaine Duke, Billie LeAnn Goodman, Sara-Kingsley Scott. RIGHT: From left are 2013 Miss Teen Fun Day Mya Thomas, Second Runner-up and photogenic winner Desiree Finch and First Runner-up Alyssa Marie Willey. LEFT: From left are Second Runner-up Sarah Grace Pippin, Kaylee Marie Bullard, First Runner-up and photogenic winner Brooke Victoria Smith, Miss Pre-Teen Fun Day Adora Nicole Edwards, Angelina Victoria Doss and Kendall Faye. RIGHT: Lawson Cooper, left, was named Mr. Baby Fun Day King, while young Xy’Juan Xy’Kell Thomas was rst runner-up and most photogenic. ABOVE LEFT: Tiny Tot competitors, from left, were Aubrey Maelene Wood, Second Runner-up and photogenic winner Faith Elizabeth Russell, 2013 Miss Tiny Tot Fun Day Brooklyn Carter, First Runner-up Paytin Briard and Halle Riley. ABOVE: Miss Baby Fun Day competitors were winner Havynn Austin Mathis, from left, First Runner-up and photogenic winner Avery Grace Kirkland and Second Runner-up Cali Vincent. LEFT: Contestants for Baby Fun Day were Jenna Mallory, First Runner-up Melanie Stevens, Miss Baby Fun Day Annslee Grace Rollin, Second Runner-up and photogenic winner Mya White, Ashlynn Pitts and Kyndal Marie Landry.

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Wednesday, July 31, 2013 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra www .kubota.com 7+ & $ % ( 35?< : = C> 5>38 : 8 43 % ), + 85B78 ./ '8?82 -+ + + + -+ *+ %+ ', 37 ) '8?8 8?C8 ? 33?B34B8 3B?( 87 5>38 :C 3?5?3?< 783B81 ?5A ?8 ><> 90"0/" 3CB8 =C> C>B ?3BBC8 83C8 8C 3 & $ % 8?8 = 3C8 : 8 /+ ( 3587 & $ % ?88 ? 33?B34B8 5C8 ?: 783B8 75C83? 833? :88 ? 5>3<87 83B8 5>3<8 : 75C8 833? :88 >3BB 48 ? 3557358 ?> 38 B3 5B? : ?8B??<>8 4B8787 $ % 33?B34B8 : %83B+ 3?3B 55 8C83B 5C8 & $ % 37 B38 ( 35?< C3 48 33?B34B8 ?> 5C8 ?3 8438 : :8 ?35?< ? 33?B34B8 ><> 43 87? 3?+ *'+ "=/ 8B C B7+ ) 358+ 9!"6 4@85 587? 33B 'C8 858? 3B #: :8 8?8 90"0/" '88 : 783?B >88 37 >8 B3 8 ? < A435C : C8 ?:C3? #?3B 8?C8 C3 48 > So w ell T r actor Co ., Inc. 2841 Hwy 77 North, P anama City www .so w elltr actor co .com Financing Arranged (W AC) W e T rade for Anything That Don’ t Eat! When most people think of their ideal pet, a certain breed of dog or cat instantly comes to mind. However, for those who love more exotic pets and are willing to put in a little more time and effort, a pot-bellied pig can be an ideal choice. “Pot-bellied pigs, including mini and micro pigs, can make good indoor and outdoor pets,” said Philippa Sprake, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. “Pigs are social animals, and each has their own personality.” Though pigs are unbelievably intelligent and undeniably adorable, there are a few things pet owners should know before bringing little Wilbur home to stay. The rst thing future owners should do is check with their local homeowners association as well as their home’s zoning regulations to ensure that pigs can be kept on the property. Pigs can be extremely noisy, especially when adapting to a new environment, and the last thing any new pet owner wants is an angry neighbor or landlord trying to have the pet removed. “When it comes to deciding on a piglet, it is very important to choose one that is at least 8 weeks old, weaned and comes from a reputable breeder to ensure that it is healthy,” Sprake said. “Also, even though they are called miniature, micro pigs can still grow to around 40 pounds, and full-size or traditional pot belly pigs can reach 100 pounds or more, so it is important to see the parents of the pig you are planning on taking home to evaluate your piglet’s potential adult size.” When it comes to training your new potbellied pig, it is important to remember pigs can be as intensive a pet as dogs, and as such they need exercise and social interaction, or they may develop health and behavioral problems. Pigs can be trained very similarly to dogs using positive reinforcement techniques such as clicker training. They are also highly food motivated, so it is important to make sure that their treats are low in calories, such as fresh fruits or vegetables, in order to prevent obesity. “When it comes to feed, young pigs should be fed a youth mini-pig feed until they reach around 2 years of age,” said Sprake. “After this they can be fed adult or senior foods, which are high in ber and relatively low calorie to help curb obesity. Pigs should also have access to fresh water at all times and should never be fed human food as the high salt content can cause salt toxicity.” When it comes to deciding where to place your pig’s bedding, the rst thing a pet owner must decide is if they want to keep their new pet inside or out. Regardless, all pigs need access to the outside so they can root, which is an instinctive behavior where the pig digs in the ground with their snout searching for food and obtaining iron from the soil, which is vital to prevent anemia. “Pigs are sensitive to both hot and cold temperature extremes,” Sprake said. “Therefore, they need shelter from the sun, wind and rain. If kept outside in Texas, for example, they will need fans to compensate for the hot summer months as well as a kiddie pool or shallow pond to wallow in and cool off. Pigs can also be kept inside as they are easily housetrained or litter-box trained.” Pet pigs, like their livestock counterparts, should be checked regularly by a veterinarian to ensure that they are healthy as possible. “Pet pigs initially need to be vaccinated to avoid several diseases and should be spayed or neutered to prevent behavioral issues, unwanted litters and other health problems,” Sprake said. “Pigs should also be wormed several times a year and need their feet trimmed regularly. The biggest problems veterinarians see in pet pigs usually comes from owners providing an inappropriate diet.” About Pet Talk Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the web at vetmed.tamu.edu/pettalk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to editor@cvm.tamu.edu PE tT T a A LK Special to Extra GRAC EE VI LLELLE — It has been said many times: We have never done it that way before, or this is not the way we always done it in the past, but what does God say? “Behold, I will do a new thing; now it shall spring forth; shall you not know it? I will even make a highway in the wilderness and rivers in the desert.” (Isaiah 43:19) This is a quote from the recently published book by Carson Fender of Graceville. The title of the book is “God.. You want me to go where.. and do what…!” This 154-page book is a compilation of hands-on teaching and preaching experience for the past 50-plus years. Fender was called and ordained into the gospel ministry at the First Baptist Church of Fort Lauderdale. Dr. Billy Graham preached Carson’s ordination service and was ordained along with Dr. Stephan Tchividjian, Dr. Graham’s son-in-law. Carson served on the staff of Senior Pastor, Dr. O.S Hawkins along with eight other full time pastors at the 10,000-member First Baptist Church of Fort Lauderdale. Carson served as the Minister of Adult Education and then later served as the Minister of Senior Adults to 1,800 senior adults. He served as an Associate Church Enrichment Missionary for the State Convention of the Southern Baptist Conservatives of Virginia while simultaneously serving as the Director of Missions for the 32member churches of the New River Baptist Association in southwest Virginia. After enjoying 11 years in the mountains of the Elk Creek Valley of southwest Virginia (Carson’s roots), he relocated back to Florida in the area of Graceville to be close to his son and family. He has served other churches in many capacities. He recently completed an Intentional Interim Pastorate at Holmes Creek Baptist Church in Chipley, where he served for 13 months. He recently had an article published in the Baptist Banner of Virginia on the controversial subject, “The Doctrine of Election.” Semi-retired at age 81, Carson is the pastor of the Union Hill Baptist Church at Millers Crossroad as a bio-vocational Pastor. Starting Aug. 4, Carson will begin a series of messages from the book of Revelation on Sunday Mornings and a series of messages from the book of Daniel on Sunday evenings. Son, Dan Fender and family live in Graceville and Ester Fender Santillie and family live in Conyers, Ga. Carson says the word “retirement” in the life of a committed healthy minister is a myth. He and Martha, have been married for 56 years. They have four grandchildren and one new great-granddaughter. Special to Extra MARIANNA — The Chipola College Appreciation Club recently selected ofcers and directors for the current year. Ofcers are President Robert Trammell; Vice President Ronnie Myers; Treasurer and Secretary Joc Calloway. Outgoing president Terry Allen was thanked for his service to the club. Directors include Terry Allen of Graceville, Leroy Boone of Marianna, Doyle Bosse of Marianna, Bill Davis of Marianna, Joe Ray Durham of Blountstown, Steve Givens of Marianna, Jason Hurst of Marianna, Coyle Mayo of Marianna, Jack Peacock of Marianna, Bill Peacock of Marianna, Colby Peel of Chipley, Aaron Peterson of Marianna, Gene Prough of Chipley, Donnie Read of Bristol, Charlie Reid of Valparaiso, Mel Roberts of Marianna, Robby Roberts of Marianna, Shannon Saunders of Marianna, Allen Scheffer of Marianna, Cody Taylor of Bonifay, Sonny Wise of Marianna and Chris Young of Panama City. The Appreciation Club is a tax-deductible organization governed by local supporters. The group helps the college and its students by promoting athletics and underwriting scholarships and functions not supported from public funds. The standard $250 membership provides access to Chipola Appreciation Club general seating and Hospitality Room for four guests at all Chipola home men’s and women’s basketball games. The Gold $1,000 Membership provides Chipola Appreciation Club reserved seating for four guests and Appreciation Club general seating for two more guests and admittance to the Chipola Club Hospitality Room. Corporate Sponsorships also are available. A portion of membership dues are tax-deductible. For information about the Appreciation Club, call 718-2451. Special to Extra Do you have a child 818 years old interested in raising and exhibiting a beef or swine project as a 4H or FFA member? Are you a veteran exhibitor looking to learn more about animal science projects? The 4H/FFA Animal Science Project Workshop for both parents and exhibitors will give you the resources you need to get your project started. From where to purchase an animal to the tools you’ll use to the feed it, you’ll get the information you need from Mark Mauldin, Agriculture and Natural Resource Agent. Cindy Yeager, from the USDA Farm Service Agency, will be presenting information on the USDA Youth Loan Program and other agricultural programs. The Animal Science Project Workshop will be at 5:30 p.m. Aug. 13 in the East Wing Conference Room/Ag Center. Call 638-6180 to RSVP for the workshop. Immediately after the workshop at 6:30 p.m., the Livestock 4-H Club will hold its 4-H year kick-off meeting. For more information on Washington County 4-H, visit the UF IFAS Washington County Extension website at washington.ifas.u. edu or call 638-6180 and speak to County Extension Director/4H Youth Development Agent Julie Pigott Dillard. 4-H is the ofcial youth development organization of the University of Florida, an equal opportunity institution.LL ibrary hoursWausau L L ibrary Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County L L ibrary (Bonifay) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed Washington County L L ibrary (Chipley) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Vernon L L ibrary Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills L L ibrary Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed MONDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach ofce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999.TUE E SDAY 8 to 9 a.m.: Tai Chi Class at the Washington County Public Library, Chipley Branch 8 to 10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 5 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at 6:25 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-451 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A C ommunityOMMUNITY C aA LE ndarNDAR What you need to know before bringing home your rst pig ON TH EE W EE B Check out the book online at www.blurb.com Graceville pastor authors book C arsonARSON FE ndND E rR 4-H offers youth programs Chipola Appreciation Club names directors

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Wednesday, July 31, 2013 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Crossword PUZZLESOLUTION ON PAGE B5 Katherine Hammock Varnum, 90, died July 21, 2013. Services were held July 24, 2013 at Brown Funeral Home, 1068 Main St. in Chipley. Interment was at Macedonia Cemetery. Friends and family may sign the online register at http://www. brownfh.net/. Katherine H. Varnum Bobby Hunt, of Durham, N.C., died on July 26, 2013. Graveside services will be held Saturday, Aug. 10, 2013. Bobby Hunt Author Venard Kirkland, 76 of Chipley, passed away Wednesday, July 24, 2013, at Northwest Florida Community Hospital. Venard was born Nov. 27, 1936, in Graceville to Malcolm and Irene (Jordan) Kirkland. A lifelong resident of the Panhandle, he worked road construction and attended Wausau Pentecostal Church. He was preceded in death by his parents, Malcolm and Irene Kirkland. He is survived by his loving of wife of 55 years, Mary Catherine Kirkland of Chipley; four daughters, Tammy Nelson (Royce) of Chipley, Tina Pierce (David) of Bonifay, Teresa Conroy Richard of Panama City, and Tracie Kirkland of Sunny Hills; brother, Kenny Kirkland of Wausau; ve grandchildren, Whitney Nelson, Dixie Trotter, Julia Conroy Lewis, Lydia Conroy and Ashton Kirkland; and four great-grandchildren, Austin Nelson, Christian Nelson, Lauren Michelle Nelson and Adrian King. Services were held at 2 p.m. Saturday, July 27, 2013, at Wausau Pentecostal Church in Wausau, with the Rev. James Barwick, the Rev. Bobby Lee Wood, and the Rev. Roger Dale Hagan ofciating. Visitation was held at 12:30 p.m. until the start of the funeral at the church. Interment followed in Wausau Memorial Gardens Cemetery in Wausau. Obert Funeral Home of Chipley is directing. Author Kirkland Mrs. Alma White, 87 of Bonifay, died on Sunday, July 7, 2013, at her residence in Bonifay. Born Tuesday, Oct. 27, 1925, in Hartford, Ala., she was the daughter of the late Albert Phillips and the late Rosa Davis Phillips. She was the wife of Comer White. Surviving are sons, Devon White of Tallahassee, Larry White of Bonifay and Tommy White of Malvern, Ala.; daughter, Carolyn Judd of Bonifay; seven grandchildren; 13 great grandchildren; and three great-great-grandchildren. A funeral service was held at 2 p.m. Wednesday, July 10, 2013, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Ike Steverson ofciating. Interment followed in the St, Johns Cemetery, Bonifay. The family received friends from 1:30 to 2 p.m. Wednesday, July 10, 2013, Sims Funeral Home, Bonifay directing. Alma White Imogene Burkett Bontrager, 55, of Marianna, passed away at her home surrounded by her loving family on Friday, July 26, 2013. Imogene was born Oct. 21, 1957, and raised in Blountstown, by her parents Grady and Lovie Burkett. She graduated from Blountstown High School in 1975. In 1976 she married her high school sweetheart, Daniel Bontrager. She was a loving wife and mother who was devoted to her children and a large extended family. She enjoyed spending time outdoors, traveling, and raising deer on the family farm. Imogene was preceded in death by her father, Grady Burkett. She is survived by her husband of 36 years, Daniel; her daughter, Mandy Bontrager Brewer and husband, John Brewer; a son, Travis Bontrager; her mother, Lovie Burkett; and her siblings, Gregory Burkett, Volena Bareld, Delores McDougald and Lawana McDonald. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m. Monday, July 29, 2013, at Evangel Worship Center in Marianna, with Pastor LaVon Pettis ofciating. Burial followed at Nettle Ridge Cemetery in Blountstown, with James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. The family received family and friends from 4 to 6 p.m. Sunday, July 28, 2013, at Evangel Worship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road, Marianna, FL 32448. Flowers are welcome as well as donations to Covenant Hospice, 4215 Kelson Ave. Suite E, Marianna, FL 32446 Expressions of sympathy may be made online at www.jamesandsikesfuneral homes.com. Imogene B. Bontrager Malrie Ruthford Paul, age 82, of Westville, was called home to be with his Lord on Friday, July 19, 2013, at 6:15 p.m. at Southeast Alabama Medical Center in Dothan, Ala. He was born May 17, 1931, in Westville, to the late John and Beedie Arrant Paul. He was Baptist by faith and a member of Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church of Holmes County. Malrie left home at a young age and went to Columbus, Ga., to stay with his sister and work at a textile factory, until he was drafted into the United States Army and served two years. He came back to Florida and worked at Martins Tire Recapping in DeFuniak Springs until 1960. He then began working for the Department of Transportation of DeFuniak Springs until he retired in 1996. Malrie enjoyed his retirement, where he raised cows, hogs, chickens and turkeys. He also enjoyed planting his garden and working in the yard. He loved sitting on his front porch with his wife and children while watching his grandchildren play. You were always welcome to come and sit with him; he really enjoyed the company on his porch. He was preceded in death by his parents; one sister, Thelma PaulStringfellow; and two brothers, Buford (Buddy) Paul and Bryce Paul. Malrie is survived by his loving wife of 52 years, Edith Ann Gillman-Paul; four sons, Larry R. Paul (Cheryl) of Coffee Springs, Ala., David R. Paul (Paula) of the United States Army, George Daniel Paul (Catrina) of Westville, and the Rev. Samuel Dale Paul (Mary) of DeFuniak Springs; one daughter, Pamela Ann PaulBrackin (Danny) of DeFuniak Springs; 10 grandchildren, Jennifer (Doug), Ryan, Nicole (Orlando), Justin, Benjamin, Danielle, Rebekah and Calie; four great-grandchildren, Kacey, Dylan, Jonah and Leila; four sisters, Mildred Brooks of Ponce de Leon, Muriel Collins of Tallahassee, Earlene Iaculla of Lake Forrest, Ill., and Christine Swinney and husband Tom of Goshen, Ky.; one brother, Melvin Paul and wife, Carlene, of Westville; sister-in-law, Sharon Paul of DeFuniak Springs; and numerous nieces and nephews who were very special to him. A time of visitation was 6-8 p.m. Thursday, July 25, 2013, in the chapel of DavisWatkins Funeral Home, 1474 Highway 83 N., DeFuniak Springs. Funeral services were at 10 a.m. Friday, July 26, 2013, at Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church in Holmes County with the Rev. Dale Paul, the Rev. Terry Smith and the Rev. Ike Steverson ofciating. Committal services will follow at Pleasant Ridge Cemetery with military honors provided by the United States Army. Those serving at pallbearers were Ryan Paul, Doug Smith, Dylan Smith, Bobby Stringfellow, Sr., Gary Gillman and Tim Gaff. Flowers are being accepted. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.daviswatkins.com. Arrangements and services and under the direction of Davis-Watkins Funeral Home. Malrie R. Paul MALRIE R. P AUL Birlie Palmer, 101, of Holmes County passed away Friday, July 19, 2013, in Port St. Joe. Mrs. Palmer was born Jan. 10, 1912, to the late Roe and Sabie Sellers in Slocomb, Ala. She was a member of the First Assembly of God Church in Bonifay for over 65 years. She served her Lord by teaching Sunday School, being a WM Leader, a deacon and superintendent of Sunday School. Mrs. Palmer worked at the Great Day Store as cashier and in food service at Memorial Hospital. She was preceded in death by her beloved husband, Robert Ellie Palmer; a sister, Estell Chestnut; and a brother, Dan Sellers. Mrs. Palmer is survived by a son, Robert E. Palmer; four daughters, Blondell Sanders, Geraldine White, Catherine Jenkins and husband, Wadell, and Margaret Chitty and husband, Darrell; 16 grandchildren; 38 greatgrandchildren; numerous great greatgrandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services were at 2 p.m. Monday, July 22, 2013, at the First Assembly of God Church with the Rev. John R. Chance and the Rev. Gary White ofciating. Interment took place in St. Johns Freewill Baptist Church Cemetery. The family received friends from 1 to 2 p.m. Monday before the funeral. Flowers will be accepted, or donations may be made to Covenant Hospice. Southerland Family Funeral Home was entrusted with funeral arrangements. Condolences may be submitted or viewed at www.southerlandfamily. com. Birlie Palmer BIRLIE P ALMER Mrs. Kathryn Elizabeth Shaw Flowers, age 85, was born on Aug. 23, 1927 in Gainesville, to Albert B. Shaw and Lucile Wall Shaw Gran. She passed away peacefully at home Friday, July 26, 2013, surrounded by her grandchildren. Mema has resided with her granddaughter Shelley Johnson, husband, Kevin, and great-grandchildren Kaden and Kiaya for the past eight years. She will be greatly missed by all who knew her. Elizabeth had been a resident of Seagrove Beach, since 1970, moving from Tallahassee. She lived and raised her two sons in Tallahassee for 12 years while her husband, Dick Flowers, coached at FSU and Florida High School. Elizabeth owned and operated Flowers Nursery and Day Camp while living in Tallahassee. After moving to Seagrove Beach in 1970, she and her husband owned and operated Seagrove Villas Motel and Cottages, and the Wheel House Restaurant. Memas love for family and children continued in Seagrove as she operated her little gift shop and candy store, giving away more candy, gifts and lodging than she sold. She was an active member of the Seagrove Beach Garden Club for over 40 years. Mema had a very deep love for animals, children, gardening, cooking for family and friends, traveling, and dancing. She was the rst majorette for the University of Florida Gators, and later came to her senses and became an avid Seminole. Elizabeth Flowers is preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Lee Richard Flowers, Jr. known as Coach Flowers and Pops; and sons, Woodrow Lee Flowers and Albert Bradley Flowers. Mrs. Flowers is survived by her six grandchildren, Kelli Matthews and husband, Michael, Melissa Powell and husband, Cale, Jennifer McKenzie and husband, Nathan, Allison Flowers, Shelley Johnson and husband, Kevin and Richard Flowers and wife, Christy; 14 greatgrandchildren, Austin, Jordan, Isabella, Jayden, Destiny, Caleb, Mason, Tyler, Mallory, Kaden, Kiaya, Madeline, Molly and Aiden; former daughters-inlaw, Linda Flowers Presnell and Janet Lee Flowers. The family would like to say a special thank you to many who helped with Mema, Shelby Johnson, Patty Freeman, Alta Tabb, Patty Hansen and Linda Presnell. Shelley would like to extend her heartfelt thanks to all of her family for surrounding one another and supporting one another during the loss of Mema. A time of visitation was held from 10 to 11 a.m., Monday, July 29, 2013, at Clary-Glenn Freeport Chapel Funeral Home; 150 East Highway 20; Freeport, FL 32439. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Monday, July 29, 2013, at Clary-Glenn Freeport Chapel Funeral Home with the Rev. Roy Carroll ofciating. Floral arrangements are being accepted. Pallbearers will be Kevin Johnson, Cale Powell, Nathan McKenzie, Greg Presnell, Greg Whitehead and Jamie Johnson. Burial followed in the Point Washington Cemetery. You may go online to view obituaries, offer condolences and sign guest book at www.claryglenn.com. Clary-Glenn Freeport Chapel Funeral Home is entrusted with the arrangements.Kathryn E. Flowers KATHR YN E. FLOWERS See OBITUARIES B5 Obituaries

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T odd R obinson, M.D. Board Cer tied Eye Ph ysician & Surgeon Mullis Ey e Institute 1 691 Main Street, Suite #1 L ocated across from W almar t 850-638-7220 Ey e Care f or S enior s F irst Bap ist Church Come as you are (850) 638-1830 Bap ist Come Church p ist irst Ba Come Owners: JD & Delisha Kilgore 1218 Main St. 638-4097 Celebrating 31 years JERR Y W A TKIN S I N S UN C E A G E N C Y A U T O HOME L IFE L E T U S Q U O T E Y O U 1304 J a ck son A ve ., C hi ple y FL (850) 638-2222 Horton s Chipley Heating & Cooling Sales, Service & Installation 1213 Main St., Chipley (850) 638-8376 (850) 638-1805 BRO WN FUNERAL HOME 1 068 Main St., Chipley FL 32428 Phone: 638-4010 Donald Brown LFD, Manager Stephen B. Register CP A 1 552 Bric k yard R oad Chipley FL P anhandle Lumber & Supply F or ALL Y our Building Needs 405 W Hwy 90, Bonifay (850) 547-9354 507 W Hwy 90, Bonifay 1 357 Bric k yard Rd., Chipley Consumer & Commer cial Power Equipment V isit our website at www .lanesoutdoor .com 901 Hwy 277, Chipley 850.638.4364 Home F olks serving Home F olks W e gi v e commercial rates to area churches Gas 1055 F o wler A v e ., C hiple y B ehind our Chipley f ac t or y H ours: T hur and F ri. 9 A M 5 PM S a t 9 A M 3 PM 638-9421 WE S T P OIN T HOME F ACTOR Y OUTLET 879 U se r y R o ad C h i p le y F lo r id a 32428 850-638-4654 Washington County Re habilit at ion & Nursing Cente r Page 4 Wednesday, July 31, 2013 According to my calculations, summer is half over. I am not quite sure how this came about but the calendar has never lied to me before. It has confused me and taunted me but it has never lied to me. Looking at my calendar I can see no lazy days of summer noted anywhere in the foreseeable future. I am not sure if this is an oversight on my part and that I should have at least penciled in one lazy day of summer or if those lazy days of summer are a thing of the past. I sure hope it is not the latter. I can hardly imagine a world without any lazy days of summer. It just would not be summer in my opinion. This probably is the price people pay for getting old. When I was young most of my summer was lled with lazy days where I practiced the ne art of doing nothing. Oh how I yearn for the return of those good old days of yesteryear. Someone once told me, Sonny, dont ever grow old. At the time, I did not know what he meant. I assumed he was referring to his loss of hair or arthritis in his joints or forgetting things. I thought that was what it meant to grow old. He meant nothing of the sort. Now that I am old, I understand exactly what he was warning. There is no doubt in my mind; he was bemoaning the fact that his lazy days were gone. Perhaps, he was envious of the fact that at the time I had loads and loads of lazy days on my hands. I did not know just how rich I was. Now I do, but it is too late. Where have all those lazy days gone? I was whining about this to the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage hoping to get some empathy at least. Instead of sympathizing with me, all she did was look at me and say in that tone of voice that I know so well, You just want an excuse to do nothing. To which I replied most sharply, I dont need an excuse to do nothing, all I need is an opportunity. Thinking about what I said I discovered there was more wisdom in that one sentence than anything else I have ever said. I had to sit in the corner for a few moments recovering from the shock of saying something with wisdom in it. I probably say many things with wisdom in it without even thinking. In fact, I am good at saying many things without thinking. Although I may not be good at a wide variety of things, I have mastered the art of doing nothing. I can do nothing better than I can do anything. Of course, I do not have too many opportunities to do anything; I have more opportunities to do nothing. If I had my choice, I would rather do nothing than anything. My philosophy is simply this, why be good at nothing and not put it to good use? I have invested a lot of time and energy into doing nothing and I am concerned that not having an opportunity to do nothing I might forget the nesse associated with that art. I do not get a chance very often to do nothing so I am anxious to practice the skills associated with nothing. In this regard, my calendar has not been very cooperative. Where are those lazy days of summer where I can do nothing? Not only has my calendar not been cooperative but also my wife has been the epitome of obstruction in this pursuit of mine. Just when I think a lazy day is looming on the horizon, she comes up with something for me to do. Even though all I wanted to do was nothing, she insists that I do her something. Either I do her something or else. I do not want to do her or else for nothing. Those lazy days of summer were the perfect opportunity to perfect the ne art of doing nothing. Regretfully I have to honestly face the fact that those times are far behind me. No more lazy days of summer for me. At least not as many as there used to be. The old preacher in Ecclesiastes was right when he said, To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven: (Ecclesiastes 3:1 KJV). I can look back with a sense of satisfaction and know that when I did have those lazy days of summer I put them to good use and developed skill in doing nothing. I know before me are some days when I will not have the strength or energy to do anything, then my ability to do nothing will come in good use. I think it is quite important to live in the time at hand. The apostle Paul understood this when he wrote, And that, knowing the time, that now it is high time to awake out of sleep: for now is our salvation nearer than when we believed. (Romans 13:11 KJV). Now that I am older, (and whos to say how much older I will get) I can say with a good deal of expertise, never grow old. By that I mean, never forget those lazy days of summer. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries. co m Caryville Baptist Church Bluegrass Jam CARYVILLE Caryville Baptist Church will be holding a Bluegrass Jam at 6 p.m. on Aug. 2. A pot luck meal will be served around 7:30 p.m. The church is located at 4217 Old Bonifay Rd. Fun in the Son at Union Hill BONIFAY Fun in the Son days will be observed on Saturday, Aug. 3, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and will include lunch. Youth and children age 4 and up are invited, along with parents, for water slide, puppets, music and drama, Bible study and crafts. Union Hill Baptist Church is located at 2759 Union Hill Church Road in Bonifay. The church is on County Road 177 and is one mile south of the Millers Crossroad and Route 2 intersection. To pre-register: Please call 334-886-3513 or email: ascollins@centurytel.net. For more information, call Liz Kidd at 263-3612. Youth Caravan is Coming to Bonifay FUMC BONIFAY Youth Caravan will be at Bonifay First United Methodist Church July 31st. Services will begin nightly at 6 p.m. Youth Caravan is a team of Christian young adults on a summer mission geared towards youth ministry. They are students from the Auburn University Wesley Foundation. Their goal is to spread Gods light in new and exciting ways through song, educational programs, games, and fellowship. Come join the fun. For more information, contact Ben Goolsby or Dan Godwin at 547-3785. Pine Hill Church Homecoming Pine Hill Church will be having Homecoming on Aug. 4. We will begin at 10 a.m. There will be special singing by Billy Gene Dickerson and the guest speaker will be Elizabeth McCormick. Bring a covered dish and enjoy lunch on the grounds after the morning service. If you have any questions you may contact Presley Owens 547-2018 or James Bush 547-5790 First Presbyterian Church Art Day Camp CHIPLEY Chipley First Presbyterian Church will hold their annual Art Day Camp Bible School from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. from Aug. 5 through Aug. 9. This years theme is Faith, Hope and Charity! Attendance will strictly be limited to 20 students, ages 10 13 years. Registration must be completed on or before Aug. 1 by contacting the church of ce at 658 5th Street in Chipley. Faith EVENTS Whatever happened to those lazy days of summer? DR. JAMES L. SNYDER Out to Pastor

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Wednesday, July 31, 2013 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! W ith your paid obituar y family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos fr ee of charge. Find Obituaries. Shar e Condolences. 9u €un‹ju j F{ vu? M… xu CHQTM[;: ‡n{’j‹œ up{‡… ‡v ™™™ ?px{ˆ€uœˆjˆu‹ ?p‡‚ ‡‹ n‡…{vjœ…‡™ ?p‡‚ œ‡’ pj…S " In par tnership with t£¨›  p‡‚ Find obituaries, shar e condolences and celebrate a life at or Shirley Mae Hayes, 70 of Chipley, passed away Thursday, July 25, 2013, at Gulf Coast Medical Center. Shirley was born Dec. 9, 1942, in Alford to Willie and Ruby Velma Lee (Davis) Corbin. A lifelong resident of the Panhandle, she worked as a technician for Cross Country, and was a member of Rock Hill Church. She was preceded in death by her parents, Willie and Ruby Corbin. She is survived by her two sons, Bubba Huckaby (Dorinda) of Chipley and John Huckaby (Jonnie) of Chipley; daughter, Cindy Huckaby Smith (Jack Franklin) of Chipley; seven brothers, Billy Ray Corbin, Ronnie Corbin, Willie Hubert Corbin, Jimmy Ray Corbin and Donnie Wayne Corbin all of Chipley; two sisters, Joyce Faye Taylor of Chipley and Angelo Prescott of Chipley; 10 grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Services were held at 10 a.m. Monday, July 29, 2013, at Rock Hill Church in Chipley, with the Rev. Charlie Chavers of ciating. Visitation was held from 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday, July 28, 2013, at Rock Hill Church. Interment followed in Rock Hill Church cemetery in Chipley. Obert Funeral Home of Chipley directing. Shirley M. Hayes Ms. Phyllis Diane Retherford of Geneva, Ala., went home to be with her Lord and Savior after a courageous battle with cancer on Wednesday, July 24, 2013, with her loving family by her side. She was 69. Phyllis was born Dec. 12, 1943, in Holmes County, to the late Willard Buel and Flora Sanders Retherford. She was a 1961 graduate of Bethlehem High School. For several years, she was employed with WardCowan Tractor Company and later retired from the City of Geneva as a bookkeeper. She was a very loving and devoted mother, grandmother and sister. Affectionately known as “Baba” to her grandchildren, nieces and nephews, they were the light of her life. She was a member of Izagora Congregational Methodist Church. Survivors include two daughters, Gina Seay of Geneva and Lori Gibson (Tom) of Wetumpka; three grandsons, Colton Pate, and T.J. and Garrett Gibson; one sister, Sharon Johnson (Johnny), Bonifay; two brothers, Billy Charles Retherford (Bea), Westville, and Sherman Retherford (Rhonda), Bonifay; special friend, Connie Marsh; and several nieces, nephews, other extended family and friends. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Saturday, July 27, 2013, in the chapel of Sorrells Funeral Home in Geneva with the Rev. Gary Armstrong of ciating. Burial followed in the East Pittman Baptist Church Cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home and Crematory directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Friday, July 26, from 6 to 8 p.m. Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva, 334-684-9999, is in charge of arrangements. Express your condolences in our guest book at www. sorrellsfuneralhomes.com. Phyllis D. Retherford PHYLLIS D. RETHERFORD Mr. Connie Ray Weeks of Weeks Lane, Westville, passed away Thursday, June 27, 2013. He was 76. Mr. Weeks was born Jan. 25, 1937, in Holmes County, to the late Robert Leon and Mazie Agnes Stafford Weeks. For 22 years, he proudly served his country with the U.S. Army. During his military career, while serving in Vietnam, he was awarded the Purple Heart and the Bronze Star, along with several other medals and awards. He enjoyed fishing and working in his vegetable garden. He loved the outdoors and his garden so much, you would see him out hoeing his garden in his wheelchair. Mr. Weeks was of the Baptist faith. Survivors include one sister, Margaret Woodall of Westville; one brother, Billy Weeks of Westville; and several special nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m. Sunday, June 30, in the chapel of Sorrells Funeral Home in Geneva, Ala., with the Rev. Jonathan Sorensen officiating and Eric Stromenger delivering the eulogy. Burial followed in the Hurricane Creek Baptist Church Cemetery with military honors and Sorrells Funeral Home and Crematory of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Sunday afternoon beginning at 2 p.m. and continued until service time. Memorials may be made to the American Disabled Veterans or The Wounded Warrior Project. Connie R. Weeks CONNIE R. WEEKS Crossword SOLUTION Like us on Obituaries Wednesday, July 31, 2013 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B5 7-5323 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2011-CA-000417 JPMorgan Chase Bank National Association, as Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance LLC, Successor By Merger to Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation Plaintiff, vs. Jason W. Hudson and Cristi H. Hudson, Husband and Wife; Holmes County, Florida Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated June 19, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2011-CA-000417 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance LLC, Successor By Merger to Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation, Plaintiff and Jason W. Hudson and Cristi H. Hudson, Husband and Wife are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Kyle Hudson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE, 201 N. OKLAHOMA ST., BONIFAY, FLORIDA, 32425, AT 11:00 A.M. CENTRAL STANDARD TIME on August 8, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: THE NORTH ONE-HALF, OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER, OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER, OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER, OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850) 747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call 711. Kyle Hudson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Holmes County, Florida Diane Eaton DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 24, 31, 2013. 7-5329 Tri-County Community Council, Inc., Board of Directors will meet on Thursday, August 8, 2013 at 5:00 p.m., with Finance Committee & Head Start Committee meeting at 4:15 p.m. and Programs Committee meeting at 4:30 p.m. at McLains Restaurant located on 331 South in DeFuniak Springs. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 31, 2013. 7-5281 IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO: 13-CA-119, RONALD M. MONK JR. and DONALD ROYCE MONK, Plaintiffs, vs. DAVID NESBITT Defendant NOTICE OF ACTION TO: DAVID NESBITT 3840 Sain Lane, Graceville, Florida 32440. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Holmes County, Florida, for a Complaint to Quite Title on the following parcel: Parcel Number: 0908.01-005-00E-005.000. Lot 5, Block E, Unit 6, Dogwood Lakes Estates, Holmes County, Florida in Section 8, Township 5 North, Range 15 West as recorded in the plat book in the Office of the Clerk of Court, Holmes County, Florida in Plat Book 1 page 38. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses to it, if any, to James J. Goodman, Jr., Attorney for the Petitioners, 935 Main Street, Chipley, FL32428 on or before August 26, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, at the Holmes County Courthouse, 226 North Waukesha, Bonifay, Florida, either before VHUYLFHRQ3ODLQWLIIVDW torney or immediately thereafter; or a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. WITNESS my hand and Seal of this Court on the 17th day of June, 2013. HOLMES CO.CLERK OF THE COURTKYLE HUDSON. Diane Eaton, As Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013. 7-5326 PUBLIC AUCTION The following vehicles will be sold at public auction at Eastern Diesel & Auto Wrecker Service, Inc. 2005 S. Waukesha, Bonifay, Fl. at 8:00 a.m. on August 14, 2013, for towing and storage: (1) VIN # 1FMDU32X2RUB51389 ‘94 Ford 4 dr., Owner: Tatanisha Nicole Thomas, 2524 Phase II, Bonifay, Fl. Lienholder: Titlemax of Alabama, 2321 Montgomery Hwy., Dothan, Al. Insurance: Workmen’s Auto Ins. Co., P.O. Box 54845, Los Angeles, Ca. (2) VIN # 2G1WF55E8Y9116308 ‘00 Chev 4 dr. Mary Tucker Morris, 1590 Hwy. 179, Bonifay, Fl. Community South Credit Union, P.O. Box 623, Chipley,Fl.(3)VIN# JM2UF1138MO114229 ‘91 Mazda pick-up, Robert Earl Sexton Jr., 90 Son-in-law Rd., Bonifay, Fl. (4) VIN# 1PTO1JAH6V6001620 ‘97 TRMO-Trailer. Owner: Tim Ashi, 322 Nolan St. SE, Atlanta, Ga., Ranas Trailer Lease, 1273 Almont Dr., Atlanta, Ga. EASTERN DIESEL AND AUTO WRECKER SERVICE, INC. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 31, 2013. 8-5315 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOMLES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-DP-10 IN THE INTEREST OF M.T.H. DOB: 03/25/2010; M.D.H. DOB: 12/29/2011; MINOR CHILDREN (SEC.39.801 (b) FS) The State of Florida to RUSSELL HANSON, natural father whose residence and address is unknown. You are hereby notified that a Petition under oath has been filed in the above styled Court for the Termination of Parental Rights in the case of M.T.H and M.D.H., children, to licensed child placement agency for subsequent adoption. You are hereby noticed that an Advisory and Adjudicatory Hearing will be held before the Honorable Christopher N. Patterson, Judge of the Circuit Court, Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, at the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida, on the 13th day of August, 2013, at the hour of 9:00 a.m., CENTRAL TIME. You have the right to appear with counsel at this hearing. If you can not afford legal representation, the Court will appoint counsel for you at this hearing upon the determination of insolvency. You must either appear on the date and at the time specified or send a written response to the Court prior to that time. YOUR FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THESE CHILDREN. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILDREN. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 17, 24, 31, August 7, 2013. 8-5324 ITEM NO. 4263681 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION NO.: 13-000319-CA Parcel No(s).: 1100, 1102 STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Petitioner, -vsHOWARD M. HIGHTOWER and others, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION IN EMINENT DOMAIN AND NOTICE OF HEARING TO: All defendants named in Schedule A, attached; all parties claiming interests by, through, under, or against the named defendants; and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title, or interest in and to the property described in Schedule B. A petition in eminent domain has been filed to acquire certain property interests in Holmes County, Florida. Each defendant is required to serve written defenses to the petition on petitioner’s attorney, whose name and address are shown below, on or before September 19, 2013, and to file the original of the defenses with the clerk of this court either before service on the petitioner’s attorney or immediately thereafter, showing what right, title, interest, or lien defendant has in or to the property described in the petition, and to show cause why that property should not be taken for the uses and purposes set forth in the petition. If any defendant fails to do so, a default will be entered against that defendant for the relief demanded in the petition. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a declaration of taking has been filed in this cause and that petitioner will apply for an order of taking and any other order the court deems proper before the Honorable Christopher N. Patterson, one of the judges of this court, on October 3, 2013 at 1:30 P.M. Central Time, at the Holmes County Courthouse at Bonifay, Florida. All defendants in this action may request a hearing at the time and place designated and be heard. Any defendant failing to file a request for hearing shall waive any right to object to the order of taking. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on July 22, 2013, KYLE HUDSON As Clerk of Court By: Diane Eaton As Deputy Clerk. Everett F. Jones Attorney for Petitioner Post Office Box 607 Chipley, Florida 32428 (850) 415-9391 Florida Bar No.: 375387. Schedule A OUT OF STATE DEFENDANT MICHAEL KING 212 Haldane Drive Southern Pines, North Carolina 28387 Parcel 1100 UNKNOWN DEFENDANTS Unknown Heirs, Beneficiaries, Devisees, Legatees, Spouses and Creditors of Norman C. Edwards, Deceased Parcel 1100 Unknown Heirs, Beneficiaries, Devisees, Legatees, Spouses and Creditors of Georgane Bush, Deceased Parcel 1102 Schedule B ITEM NO. 4263681 LIBERTY SCHOOL RD. HOLMES COUNTY DESCRIPTION FEE SIMPLE RIGHT OF WAY Parcel 1100 A parcel of land being in the Southwest of Section 1, Township 5 North, Range 15 West, Holmes County, Florida described as follows: Commence at a inch iron pipe (no ID) marking the southwest corner of said Section 1; thence South 8710’21” East 1,325.85 feet along the south line of said Section 1 (north line of Section 12, Township 5 North, Range 15 West) to the centerline of survey of Liberty School Road (county maintained), as shown on Florida Department of Transportation (F.D.O.T.) Right of Way Map F.P. No. 4263681 (said map being on file at F.D.O.T. District 3 Office, Chipley, Florida); thence South 8529’07” East 747.79 feet along said centerline of survey; thence South 8805’08” East 146.25 feet along said centerline; thence departing said centerline run North 0154’52” East 24.71 feet, crossing said north line of Section 12 (said south line of Section 1) to an intersection of the existing northerly right of way line of said Liberty School Road with the westerly line of that certain property as described in Official Records Book 364, Page 172 of the Public Records of Holmes County, Florida and POINT OF BEGINNING; thence North 8849’43” West 147.47 feet along said northerly right of way line ; thence departing said right of way line, run North 4543’07” East 25.21 feet; thence North 8625’20” East 52.24 feet; thence North 4143’13” East 15.62 feet; thence South 8805’08” East 15.00 feet; thence South 5203’29” East 40.80 feet; thence South 7957’19” East 20.12 feet to said westerly property line as per Official Records Book 364, Page 172; thence South 0107’22” West 6.44 feet along said property line to POINT OF BEGINNING; Containing 2,875 square feet, more or less. OWNED BY: NORMAN C. EDWARDS, Deceased. SUBJECT TO: Judgment Recorded in OR Book 422 Page 647 and OR Book 462 Page 568, in favor of Unifund CCR Partners, G.P. Judgment, Recorded in OR Book 304 Page 78 and OR Book 418 Page 702 in favor of First Select Corporation Interest, if any, in favor of Michael King, Henry Charles Edwards and the Unknown heirs, Beneficiaries, Devisees, Legatees, Spouses and Creditors, of Norman C. Edwards, Deceased ITEM NO. 4263681 LIBERTY SCHOOL RD. HOLMES COUNTY DESCRIPTION FEE SIMPLE RIGHT OF WAY Parcel 1104 A parcel of land being in the Northwest of Section 12, Township 5 North, Range 15 West, Holmes County, Florida described as follows: Commence at a inch iron pipe (no ID) marking the northwest corner of said Section 12; thence South 8710’21” East 1,325.85 feet along the north line of said Section 12 to the centerline of survey of Liberty School Road (county maintained), as shown on Florida Department of Transportation (F.D.O.T.) Right of Way Map F.P. No.

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Most case one week turnaround. Servicing Minn Kota & Motorguide 850-272-5305 Talk about a great deal, advertise your Business or Service here for only $18.00 per week!8 week minimum 638-0212 547-9414 5017238 1110794 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ LOW INTEREST FINANCING BORROW UP TO $ 20 K, PAY $ 38 6/MONTH. 8 % INTEREST 6 YEAR TERM. Persona l an d S ma ll Business Loans Debt Consolidation € Bad Credit OK CALL 855-331-5322 1113277 GC S C is an E A /EO/ M /F/V et e m p l o y er. GC S C Eq uit y O ce 850 872 3866 CHIEF DEVELOPMENT OFFICER This position will be responsible for supporting the educational mission of the college by encouraging corporations, foundations, & individuals to donate gifts, grants, or bequests of money or property to the college through personal and public presentations, written proposals, & special fund-raising events. Requires: Master’s degree in Marketing, Communication, or Business. Experience working with small & large groups, foundations, grants & community organizations. Experience as a project leader & with soliciting of funds & campaigns. Salary commensurate with education & experience. This position will remain open until lled. Applications may be submitted at GCSC Human Resources 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. 4263681 (said map being on file at F.D.O.T. District 3 Office, Chipley, Florida); thence South 8529’07” East 747.79 feet along said centerline of survey; thence South 8805’08” East 231.53 feet along said centerline; thence departing said centerline, run South 0154’52” West 20.74 feet to an intersection of the existing southerly right of way line of said Liberty School Road with the westerly line of that certain property as described in Official Records Book 221, Page 748 of the Public Records of Holmes County, Florida and POINT OF BEGINNING; thence North 8823’48” West 231.53 feet along said southerly right of way line of Liberty School Road; thence North 8312’03” West 119.12 feet along said right of way line; thence departing said right of way line, run South 0430’53” West 7.77 feet; thence South 8529’52” East 119.16 feet; thence South 7959’28” East 56.82 feet; thence South 2641’45” East 25.06 feet; thence South 7837’23” East 18.25 feet; thence North 7801’48” East 91.68 feet; thence South 6625’10” East 60.78 feet to said westerly property line as per Official Records Book 221, Page 748; thence North 0135’49” East 37.70 feet along said property line to POINT OF BEGINNING; Containing 5,711 square feet more or less. OWNED BY: HERSCHEL E. KNESTRICK and KATHLEEN KNESTRICK f/k/a KATHLEEN A. MULLINS SUBJECT TO: Mortgage Recorded in OR Book 428 Page 192, in favor of Wachovia Mortgage Corporation. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 31, August 7, 2013. 8-5325 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2010-CA-000472 Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage, Successor by Merger to Union Planters Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.-David E. Kitchell a/k/a David Kitchell and Cindy U. Kitchell, His Wife; Franklin L. Powell; Sherman Acquisition Limited Partnership Successor in Interest to Sherman Acquisition II, LP; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated June 19, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000472 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Florida, wherein Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage, Successor by Merger to Union Planters Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and David E. Kitchell a/k/a David Kitchell and Cindy U. Kitchell, His Wife are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Kyle Hudson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE, 201 N. OKLAHOMA ST., BONIFAY, FLORIDA, 32425, AT 11:00 A.M. CENTRAL STANDARD TIME on October 24, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCE AT THE NW CORNER OF THE SW 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST AND RUN EAST 608.73 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 660 FEET; THENCE EAST 1670 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT BEING 417.45 FEET WEST OF THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 6; THENCE SOUTH 138.22.FEET; THENCE WEST 60 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 521.78 FEET TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4, THENCE WEST TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS A 30 FOOT BY 60 FOOT EASEMENT IN THE SW CORNER OF ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY. LYING AND BEING IN HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850) 747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call 711. Kyle Hudson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Holmes County, Florida; Diane Eaton DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 31, August 7, 2013. 8-5322 IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILACTION CASE NO.:07000466CAMXAX DIVISION: CIVIL NATIONALCITY MORTGAGE CO ., Plaintiff,vs. KIMBERLY STOYAK A/K/AKIMBERLYPENSYL STOYAK, ETAL., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Clerk of Court of HOLMES County, will on the 29 day of August, 2013, at 11:00 a.m., CSTat Inside Front Door of the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 North Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, FL32425, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situate in HOLMES, Florida: COMMENCE ATTHE SW CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE NW 1/4 SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP6 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST, AND RUN N 02 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG FORTYLINE 330.0 FEET, THEN N 88 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST1028.60 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF COUNTYROAD TO POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE S 24 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EASTALONG SAID ROAD 115.00 FEET, THENCE S 88 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 396.00 FEET, THENCE N 24 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 115.00 FEET, THENCE N 88 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 396.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING LYING AND BEING IN HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 2003 DOUBLEWIDE HOME VIN # HM03GA0117423A AND HM03GA0117423B pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in Case No. 2007-CA-000466 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HOLMES County, Florida, the style of which is indicated above. WINTESS MYHAND and seal of this Court on June 25, 2013, Kyle Hudson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact the Court ADACoordinator at 407-836-2302 or 1-800-955-8771 (T.D.D.), no later than (7) seven days prior to the proceeding. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 31, August 7, 2013. Choosing adoption? Loving, single woman will provide stable home/support of large, extended family. Let’s help each other. Financial security. Expenses paid. Deborah, toll-free (855-779-3699) Sklar Law Firm, LLC Fl Bar #0150789 Premium Metal Roofing Manufacturer Direct! 8 Metal Roof profiles in 40+ colors Superior customer service, same day pick-up, fast delivery! 1-888779-4270 or visit www. gulfcoastsupply.com 2 Family Yard Sale This Saturday August 3, 1032 Brickyard Rd, Chipley. 8AM until. We are located directly across from Westpoint. Lots of items for sale. Beds, children’s clothing & toys, furniture, home decor & much more. LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE : Like a big Flea Market, but yard sale prices. Friday and Saturday, August 2nd & 3rd, 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Located on the bypass (Maple Avenue) Geneva, Al. Near Courthouse. Yard Sale Fri/Sat 2&3 Aug. 2266 Bonifay Gritney Rd. 8 a.m.-until. Stove, washer, dryer, etc. Yard Sale Friday and Saturday August 2 and 3, 896 8th Street Chipley, 8 until. Name brand children, Jrs and Adult size clothing, shoes, purses, household items lots of assorted items. Yard Sale. Sat, Aug 3 7am-until. 723 Sewell Farms Rd, Chipley. Childrens, ladies & mens clothes, tools, household items, etc. Fresh from the Farm! okra. Leave a message. (850)956-4556. 10 Inch Radial Arm Saw, routers, nail guns, large tool chest. 850-535-0410. EMPLOYMENTDRIVERS Guaranteed home EVERY weekend! Company: All miles PAID (loaded or empty)! Lease: To own NO money down, NO credit check! Call: 1-888-880-5911. MANAGEMENT County Coordinator/Public Works Director – Holmes County Florida is seeking a County Coordinator/Public Works Director. Salary to be determined. A complete job description can be obtained from the Holmes County Commissioner’s office, 850-547-1119, or via email: sherry@holmescountyfl.org. Interested parties must submit application and resume no later than August 7, 2013 at 11:00 am to the office of the County Commissioners, 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Medical/Health Is currently seeking applications for: HVAC/Mechanical Maintenance Full Time, hospital experience preferred. Competitive salary & benefits Complete an application online: NFCH.com and fax to: (850) 638-0622 Attn: Human Resources (850) 415-8106. DFW EOE, & a smoke free campus Web ID#: 34260366 Text FL60366 to 56654 PT Merchandiser needed to service Chipley. www .apply2jobs.com/tng Apply to requisition number: (ME4132) Chipley, FL 32428. The Academy of Learning and Development is NOW HIRING. Infant Teacher and Two Year old Teacher. To apply you must have a minimum of two years experience in a Licensed child care Center and a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC). Applicants interested in applying may do so at the One Stop Career Center located 680 2nd Street Chipley, FL 32428. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a Certified Microsoft Professional! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! SC TRAIN can get you job ready ASAP! HS Diploma/GED PC/Internet needed! 1-888-212-5888 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Drivers HIRING EXPERIENCED/INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51 per Mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com. EOE TIDY NOOK NEEDS handyman / landscaper / cleaner to service properties in area. Travel required. Will train. Must have access to internet and own tools. 888-389-8237 A SODA/SNACK VENDING ROUTE LOCATIONS INCLUDED IN YOU LOCAL AREA $8,995 MINIMUM INVESTMENT GUARANTEE CASH FLOW 10 YEAR WARRANTEE 1-800-367-6709 Ext.99 We can help! Good, bad credit, bankruptcy. Need cash fast! Personal loans, business start up available. Loans from $4K, no fees. Free consultations, quick, easy and confidential. Call 24 hrs. toll free. (888)220-2239 Executive Office Space for rent downtown Chipley. 638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1BR Apartment w/kitchen, LR, large walk-in closet. New shower. Also, store or office, $400/mth. 547-5244. 4BR Home & 2BR Apartments, furnished. Bonifay. Private, well maintained. Includes W&D. Lawn maintenance & water provided. (850)547-2096. FOR RENT 1B/R apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent. 2 BR/1BA duplex 638-7128. An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEAL To place your ad, call850-638-0212 € 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser *Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKS FOR $ 19.99* Mandi Lea Apartments in Vernon, 1, 2, and 3/BR. Financial Assistance available is qualified. 638-4640. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio and 2 Bdr Units $350-500 Includes City Util (850)557-7732 SpaciousOne Bedroom Apartment $425 Two Bedroom Apartment $450 Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. 3BR/1BA for rent. No pets. Deposit, & references required. HUD accepted. $595/mth Chipley. 638-1918 3BR/2BA House in Chipley. Newly renovated kitchen & bathroom floors. Stove & refrigerator included. $700 a month. Call 850-547-3746. 3BR/1BA AC, For Rent, Wausau, No Pets, $600/MO and $600/Dep. Reference, 638-7601 Great little Country farm house with 3BR/1BA, metal roof, front and back porch, large yard, hardwood floors, freezer, washer and dryer, stove, refrigerator, free lawn care and garbage, CHA, no pets, references required. Located on Holmes Valley Road near Vernon. $650/MO and $300/DEP. 850-535-0368. House For Rent Older House in Dogwood Lakes, fenced yard, on 8th fairway of golf course, 3BR/2BA Partiality furnished, 2733 Muir Lane. Available 8/10 $575/MO first and last 850-547-5044 Nice clean houses, apartments & mobile homes for rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, houses for sale. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. Small 2 Bdrm/1B block house in Bonifay. 2 garages plus storage building. First month, last month & security deposit. No pets. (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586. 2 & 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes Deposit required. Water & sewage provided. (No pets). Bonifay. (850)547-5007 2&3BR, In Town $325.00&$425.00. 2BR, 5 miles south of Chipley, $325. Water included. Sec 8 accepted. 850-260-9795, 850-381-8173. 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850-768-3508, 850-638-9933. Bonifay: (In Cricket Village) 3bd/2ba, Double Wide. Available August 1st. $650+$650 Dep. Call: 850-699-9464 Text FL60523 to 56654 Nice 2Bdrm/2Ba MH large private lot, newly renovated, Bonifay. 16x20 storage building. No smoking, no pets. $550/mo, $500/depo. Maureen (850)547-2950 or (850)527-5909. Spacious 3 Bdr/2 Bath Doublewide near Chipley city limits. Fenced yard. No pets, no smokers. Long term only. (850)547-2627. For Sell by Owner 3BR/2BA, new vinyl siding and metal roof, .75 acre land, CHA, conveniently located. Reduced to $65,000 OBO. 850-481-5354 or 850-849-7676. Modern 2BR/2BA well kept 1500sf home. CH&A, hardwood floors in LR & DR, large den, nice kitchen with breakfast nook. Large utility room. Chain link fence, storage bldg. Nice trees. City water/sewage. Quiet paved street. $99,500. (850)326-7024. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. FORECLOSURE LAND LIQUIDATION! Own your own mountain retreat with National Forest access in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. 1+ acre mountain view homesite in gated mountain community, bargain priced at only $14,900 -way below cost! Paved road, municipal water, underground power. Financing. Call now 1-866-952-5303, x 32 2000 Ford Crown Vic. Police interceptor Runs good, in good condition w/spot light & push bars. $2500.00 OBO. (850)263-7892. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsend’s. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8 am to 4 pm. Call (850)638-1483



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50www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visitBONIFAYNOW.COMPhone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 IN BRIEF imes imes imes T dvertiser imes imes imes imes T T dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser AHOLMES COUNTY By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Work replacing and expanding the citys water/sewer system has come to a halt because of the threat of heavy rains, the Bonifay City Council learned July 22. We most likely wont be able to resume until some time next week, said Zack Worley, representative from engineering rm Hatch Mott MacDonald. I would like to inform you that were taking every step to make needed adjustments as we go. The council approved of $9,700 for a culvert and junction box near Jackson Avenue and to reline the pipe on State Road 79 instead of replacing it, by request of the state Department of Transportation. The council also approved of donating $500 to the Holmes County Dixie Youth All Stars as they head to Nationals in Alexandria, La.By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners went into its second week of reviewing the budget during a special session July 23 to decide what millage rate to propose during next weeks regularly scheduled meeting. The Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce submitted in a revised version of its budget, reducing it by $7,802 from the previous submission to encourage the county to consider adding another deputy position. We devised to add another deputy by taking away our bonuses, Sheriff Tim Brown said. Commissioner Kenneth Williams suggested they eliminate one of the two deputies positions at the courthouse to give more toward hiring a deputy to watch the county. First of all, that was the judges call to increase security at the courthouse, Brown said. Second, we dont have anyone to relieve the one deputy, which means that the areas security would be compromised every time he had to use the bathroom or eat lunch. Williams suggested a possible part-time position to cover for the rst deputy. I have a problem with the weekend having only two guys watching over Holmes County and during the week theres two guys watching the courthouse, Williams said. My rst priority isnt the courthouse, its those who need protection in By MICHAEL BRAGA and ANTHONY CORMIERHalifax Media Group The Bank of Bonifay repeatedly broke the rules, a Herald-Tribune investigation found. Insiders awarded themselves loans that were far larger than the law allowed. Directors let their wives sit in on board meetings and gave them access to bank records until they were told it was against the law. The bank also failed to track wire transfers from suspected money launderers in Pakistan. Lending of cers did not always obtain legally required appraisals. State regulators found that loan les were disorganized and some loan applications contained nothing more than a borrowers name, address and signature. Practically every time they visited, state regulators criticized the bank for its low standards, nding that it ignored recommendations for changes and helped insiders enrich themselves at the institutions expense. Bank of Bonifay collapsed in May 2010, costing the nancial system nearly $80 million. Founded in the Florida Panhandle in 1906, it was the oldest of the 68 banks that failed in Florida during the Great Recession. State examinations show the bank was cited for violations both big and small. Regulators say directors BREAKING THE BANKSFind a database of the 68 banks featured in this series, related documents and other stories in the series at newsherald.com.Wednesday, JULY 31 2013Volume 123, Number 16 INDEXOpinion ................................A4 Outdoors ..............................A6 Sports ..................................A7 Extra ....................................B1 Obituaries ............................B3 Faith ....................................B4 Classi eds ............................B5Florida Sales Tax HolidayThe Florida Sales Tax Holiday for back-toschool supplies begins at 12:01 a.m. Friday, Aug. 2, and ends at midnight Sunday, Aug. 4. For a complete list of tax-exempt items, see last weeks special Back To School section or bonifaynow.com.HCHS Blue Pride Band CampBONIFAY Rookies and band of cers in Holmes County High Schools Blue Pride Band Camp will meet from 8-11:30 a.m., and the full band will meet from 1-5 p.m. Thursday and Friday, Aug. 1-2. The full band will meet from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 5-9, with a lunch break from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., and 6-8 p.m. Aug. 12-16. Email hchsbluepride@gmail. com with questions. Childbirth Education ClassesBONIFAY Childbirth Education Classes will be 5:30-7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Aug. 1-22, at the Holmes County Health Department Healthy Start Annex, 402 N. Oklahoma St. Back To School BashBONIFAY A Back to School Bash will be 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 3, at Bonifay Elementary School with a bouncy house, face painting, school supplies and more.School district approves millage increaseBy CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY The Holmes County District School Board approved a resolution to adopt the tentative millage rate for 2013-14 during its special session July 29. The resolution will increase the millage by 1.5 mills for a total of 7.396. It was successfully advertised in the local newspapers, and the reason why we had to advertise is because the total millage rate exceeds the roll-back rate by 20.26 percent, Board Finance Of cer Larry Hawkins said. The only reason it is such a signi cant increase is primarily due to the new schools being built; otherwise, it wouldve actually reduced. During the public hearing, resident Tony Bess addressed the board. Im Holmes County, born and raised, and so are my children, Bess said. The only problem I see with this is that only about 30 to 40 percent of those living in Holmes County actually pay this tax because the rest are exempt in one way or another. Isnt there a sales tax or something that could make this more fair? Superintendent Eddie Dixon said the law requires there be a CECILIA SPEARS | Times-AdvertiserGrace Bailey was the guest for the Bonifay Kiwanis Clubs July 24 meeting as entertainment, singing Thats All Right, Mama by Elvis Presley, At Last by Etta James and hymn His Eye is on the Sparrow. Bailey is in her senior year at Troy University, majoring in theater with a minor in music. She said she has recently become very active in the theater department. To see Baileys performance, click on the link at www.bonifaynow.com.Heavy rains delay citys sewer/water project KIWANIS IN CONCERTRegulators cited failed Bonifay bankCounty works toward millage rate proposal See BANK A2 See MILLAGE A2 See SEWER A2 See SCHOOL A2War hero Bud Day remembered, A5

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LocalA2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, July 31, 2013 Thebenetsofhearinginstrumentsvarybytypeanddegreeofloss,noiseenvironment,accuracyofhearingevaluationandpropert.DiscountsoffMSRP Previouspurchasesexcluded.Foralimitedtime.Cannotbecombinedwithanyotheroffers. Clean,clear,naturalsoundYourHearingAidscommunicatewitheachother automaticallyadjustingthemselves. Ear-to-EarSynchronization: Settingsareautomaticallytransferredtotheotheraid.BeltonePromise HearingAidSystem$1000offAppliesto2HearingAidsatPremierLevel.$800offAdvantageLevel. MARIANNA30256thSTREET(850)387-4931Wednesdays&FridaysAllenBarnesHAS:BC-HIS 24Years ExperienceBillFletcherHAS:BC-HIS 24Years Experience WEREINYOURNEIGHBORHOOD!CHIPLEY1611MAINSTREET#4(850)387-4931Monday-Friday Thebenetsofhearinginstrumentsvarybytypeanddegreeofloss,noiseenvironment,accuracyofhearingevaluationandpropert.DiscountsoffMSRP Previouspurchasesexcluded.Foralimitedtime.Cannotbecombinedwithanyotheroffers. paid $3.5 million in dividends in 2007 even though Bank of Bonifay recorded a $2.3 million loss that year. The state also said that nine of the banks directors obtained unsecured credit lines of $100,000 each in April 2007 far exceeding the state limit of $25,000. The Herald-Tribune identi ed at least $12 million in mortgages to directors between 1995 and 2009. Companies held in part by Rupert Phillips, a former director, obtained $4.8 million in mortgages from Bank of Bonifay in 2006 and 2007 more than any other board member. He resigned from the board in December 2007. Phillips is an investor in Halifax Media Group, which owns the Herald-Tribune and other newspapers, including The News Herald. Meanwhile, regulators found four instances in which the bank exceeded limits on loans to a single borrower. One Panhandle developer received a $1.2 million loan without an appraisal, while another received two loans totaling $3.1 million based on bogus nancial information, regulators found. The developer who received the $3.1 million could only keep up with payments for four months, the report said. The repayment capacity of the borrower was in ated on the loan application, regulators wrote in their 2008 report. They said the borrower held out that long only because the bank gave him $44,000 to make the interest payments. Regulators said the bank also evaded loan-to-value requirements by giving borrowers two loans on the same property. The total of the two loans often exceeded 100 percent of the value of the real estate, and executives made no effort to point this out to visiting regulators. With the end of the real estate boom, Bank of Bonifays problem loans mushroomed and its losses mounted. But the bank neither wrote down its bad loans as fast as the law requires nor put enough money into loan loss reserves. When questioned about these delays, James Goodson then acting as chief executive of cer fought back. He said regulatory provisions were broad and open to interpretation, and he would not commit to making the accounting changes regulators requested. His apparent inability to understand problems in his actions and disagreements with examiner ndings is underscored by his comments throughout the open section of this report, regulators wrote in 2009. Despite its growing problems, the bank continued to make large and risky loans right up to the end. In March 2009, it provided a $2.5 million loan to a company controlled by the directors of another struggling Panhandle institution Coastal Community Bank. Within 15 months, both Coastal Community and Bank of Bonifay were out of business. Holmes County because thats who I serve Holmes County. Brown said hed look into other possible ways of amending the issue to bring before the board. Brown also agreed to become more actively involved in nding ways to save money on inmate medical expenses. If you can save some money, then thats money that can be saved towards your contingency funds, Williams said. Look at it some more, because I think were really close to our goal here. The board approved advertising for a new recycling and litter full-time position with the Holmes County Recycling Center, which was made possible by an increase of $20,000 a year through a solid waste grant. Its a good idea, Williams said. We get enough calls for litter alone to keep him busy at all times. Well also need him to have the quali cations required to supervise inmate labor if he needs assistance. Williams added it might be a good idea to look into ways of investigating where the trash is coming from and issuing nes to generate revenue and reduce littering. In the area of transportation, commissioners found they were using more on road materials and having to pull from bridge funds, so they agreed to ip the allotted amounts for next years budget. I also see that the income from the road signs is down, Williams said. Could it be because we arent doing private signs anymore? Road Department Hubert Hendrix agreed that might be a distinct possibility. Chairman Monty Merchant said the purpose of adjusting the budget is to prepare the board to set a fairly proposed millage rate during the next regularly scheduled meeting. We need to be ready to set the millage rate for next Tuesday night, Merchant said. Its kind of the purpose of these meetings; to see if we can get everything lined up and balanced out. BANK from page A1 MILLAGE from page A1After an undefeated season we won State and now well be heading to Alexandria, La. for the Nationals to represent not only Bonifay but the state of Florida, head coach Matt Tate said. These kids have worked hard to get where they are, and we appreciate all the support youve shown. Well do our city proud. The council agreed to allow the Bonifay Blue Devils peewee football team to practice on the large baseball eld at the Bonifay Recreational Facility, but requested that no practice be held on Thursdays because a local church hosts ag football games for the local children. Weve got over 90 boys and girls playing this year and over 40 cheerleaders, and we just needed a little bit more room to play, head coach Noah Bowen said. We thank you for all you do for us. Resident and business owner Wayne Sellers came before the council to voice a few complaints. One, Id appreciate it if youd stop sending your police of cer to harass me about the appearance of my property, Sellers said. I understand that broken glass is a safety issue, but before you go looking at anyones property, you best be looking at your own, because Ive been complaining for over 17 years about these trees growing in these ditches and that retention pond. He added that the city had caused some damage to his parking lot as well and that elevated patchwork is causing water to ow toward his place of business. You cut up my parking lot a few years back and havent done anything about it, and now youre giving me 30 days to comply with you; why dont I give you 30 days to comply with me? Sellers said. Council Member Richard Woodham con rmed the patchwork on Sellers parking lot was causing drainage issues and council agreed to allow Public Works Supervisor Jack Marell to look at it and get an estimation of repairs. Marell also told Sellers the Department of Transportation had informed him they were going to use some of their equipment to remove the trees in the ditches and retention pond. Im not downing your ordinance; its been doing this city some good in some places, Sellers said. Its just how youve been handling it by handing down unfair burdens on these folks. This isnt no place to get rich, but its a wonderful place to live. The council also approved of Resolution 13-25, which takes a stance against illegal immigration. People who enter the United States illegally should not receive any bene ts from American taxpayers, read City Clerk Jeri Gibson. All United States borders should be totally secured and 100 percent veri ed, and any person in the U.S. illegally should receive no amnesty. The council also approved helping the Bonifay Fire Department purchase new doors for the re station by paying for half the cost of $4,600. Theyve been diligently working for this city no matter what the circumstances, Woodham said. When half the city lost power not too long ago, they were here searching every corner on their own vehicles. They do so much for this city, we owe them that much at least. The next Bonifay City Council meeting is set for 6 p.m. Aug. 12 at Bonifay City Hall. SEWER from page A1 1.5 millage rate for the next three years dedicated toward the project. Even if we had the money, theyd still want that millage rate as a show of good faith that this is what the community wants, Dixon said. Weve looked into other avenues like the sales tax; however, Holmes County doesnt generate enough revenue to satisfy that three percent requirement not in three years. The next Holmes County District School Board meeting is set for 9 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 6. SCHOOL from page A1 Like us on WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS/ HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A3Wednesday, July 31, 2013 Heatpumpwaterheatersprovideasmuchas$300inenergy savingsperyearcomparedtoatraditionalelectricwaterheater, andyougettwiceasmuchhotwaterfromeachkilowatt-hourof electricityconsumed. Visitwww.westorida.cooptodayformoredetails. Startaheatpumpwaterheaterrevolution NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment."WEWELCOMENEWPATIENTS,CALLTODAYFORYOURPRIORITYAPPOINTMENT" FORNEWPATIENTS 59ANDOLDERThiscertificateisgoodforacomplete MedicalEyeExamwithToddRobinson,M.D. InOurChipleyOfficeBoardCertifiedEyePhysicianandSurgeon.Theexamincludesaprescriptionforeyeglassesandtestsfor Glaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases.FORYOURAPPOINTMENTCALL: 850-638-7220ELIGIBILITY:U.S.CitizenslivingintheFloridaPanhandle, 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. CouponExpires:8-15-13 FREEEYEEXAMCODE:WC00 SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances www.mulliseye.comMULLIS EYEINSTITUTEChipleyOffice1691MainSt.,Ste.1 850-638-7220Wearelocateddirectlyacrosstheparking lotfromtheWalmartinChipleyToddRobinson, M.D.BoardCertifiedEyePhysicianand CataractSurgeon Weekend arrests in Holmes CountyFrom Staff Reports BONIFAY T he Holmes County Sheriffs Ofce reported the arrest of multiple people on the July 20 weekend. According to the report, Randy J. Gibson, 39, of Hartford, Ala., was arrested following a high-speed chase on July 20 after deputies noticed him driving his red Ford Mustang recklessly through the Pittman Community. T he deputies attempted to pull Gibson over, but he ed, leading the deputies on a high-speed chase for several miles before Gibson pulled over and continued to run away on foot, crossing over into Geneva County, Ala. according to the report, He was captured shortly thereafter. Gibson is being charged with eeing and attempting to elude, willful and wanton reckless driving, attaching tag not assigned and resisting an ofcer without violence, according to the report, and is being held at the Holmes County Jail. Later that day Victor Brooks Wilson, 32, of Bonifay was arrested on drug charges after being pulled over for a trafc stop on State Road 2, according to the report. According to the report, a deputy noticed a violation on Wilsons black Ford Mustang and after pulling him over noticed drug paraphernalia. After a search of Wilsons car, the deputy found methamphetamine, according to the report. Wilson is being charged with p ossession of methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia and is being held at the Holmes County Jail. Three were arrested on July 22 on drug possession charges after a deputy pulled over a white SUV on State Road 81 near Ponce de Leon. Arrested were Jeb Travis Chaney, 24, or DeFuniak Springs, Chelsea Danielle Miller, 21, of Ponce de Leon and Michael Anderson Harris, 24, of Freeport, according to the report. After the deputy pulled them over, he noticed the smell of marijuana coming from the van while talking with the driver, according to the report. After searching the van, the deputy found several ounces o f marijuana along with drug paraphernalia. Chaney, Miller and Harris were arrested on charges of possession of marijuana over 20 grams and drug paraphernalia and are being held at the Holmes County Jail. Sheriff Tim Brown asks that anyone with information of illegal activity contact the Holmes County Sheriffs Ofce at 850-547-4421 or reportacrime@holmescosheriff.org. RanANDyY J. GibIBSonON ViICTorOR B. WiILSonON JEbB TraviTRAVIS C CHanANEyY CCHELSEaA DD. MiILLErR MiICHaAEL A. Harri HARRIS JULy Y 14 JULy Y 20Travis Worley Adams, 35, violation of probation on sale, manufacture or deliver of meth, violation of probation on possession of meth Chyen Nicole Best, 19, hold for Bay County Nicky Nichole Boggs, 27, violation of probation Cynthia Gale Carnley, 55, violation of probation on domestiv violence Gerry Bruce Case, 25, violation of probation on driving while license suspended or revoked, violation of probation on no valid registration, violation of probation on improper tag attached Brandon Lee Commander, 29 hold for Geneva County Jessica Lynn Curry, 28, violation of probation on possession of meth, violation of probation on trafc in stolen property, b ond suspended for violation of probation Dustin Wade Durrance, 33, child support Jamie Lawton Ellis, 22, burglary, theft Randy Jim Gibson, 33, eeing and eluding, resisting with violence Brenda Gail Haley, 31, theft of utilities Jerome Kenneth Hall, 41, violation of probation Krista June Hammond, 54, cultivation of marijuana Andrews Ray Holmes, 34, hold for Hillsborough David Leroy Jenkins, 52, hold for Hillsborough Eric Conelius Johnson, 31, possession of methamphetamine T oranto Jerome Lett, 30, violation of probation on possession of cannabis less than 20 grams, violation of probation on possession of drug paraphernalia T yler Allen Lofall, 28, hold for Hillsborough Theresa Marie Maclean, 44, hold for Hillsborough S ilas Lavell Nobles, 24, domestic violence Jon P aul Nordt, 33, disorderly conduct Luis Santonio Pandules, 26, hold for Hillsborough D allas Payne, 24, hold for court Jessie Allen Perell, 23, violation of probation on retail theft Denise Yvete Redmon, 49, violation of probation on grand theft Jose Fabin Santiago, 32, hold for Hillsborough Michael Lynn Thompson, 54, resisting without violence, disorderly conduct Ricardo Tirado, 54, driving under the inuence B renda Sue Toole, 57, hold for Hillsborough Nathan Paul Welling, 39, hold for Hillsborough Christopher Dale Williams, 29, hold for Hillsborough V ictor Wilson, 32, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of methFDE DE P using new technology to examine water qualityBy ZACK McDONALD747-5071 @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com P ANAMA C C IT T Y BE E ACH CH Florida De p artment of Environmental Protec t ion ofcials announced an initiative to develop new rules rening w a t er quality standards for beach and recreational waters throughout the state. T he FDEP will propose updates to Floridas bacteria criteria for recreational waters, applying guid a nce from the EPA. The changes ultimately will be presented to the Florida Environmental Regulation Commission and EPA for approval after a series of technical advisory committee meetings and other pub l ic workshops. New laboratory tools and as s essment methods recently allowed FDEP scientists to quickly identify whether fecal bacteria, an indicator for the possible presence of patho g ens, are related to humans, animals or other sources. The new lab equipment and meth o ds use DNA analyses of bacteria and modern tracers, i ncluding arti cial sweeteners, to identify human waste from other sources, according to the FDEP. Armed with that knowledge, the FDEP can more quickly identify and reduce the sources of pathogens in recreational waters and act to pro t ect public health. However, the science needed to set water quality criteria based on di r ect measurement of pathogens has not yet been developed, so FDEP de v ised a multi-pronged approach us i ng the latest technology. Measuring fecal bacteria levels is easy, said Drew Bartlett, Division of Environmental Assessment and Restoration director. Unfortunately, readily distinguishing the sources of the bacteria and the potentially harmful pathogens that may go along with them h as been beyond scientic capabilities. B artlett said since the tools are now available rules and protocols can be crafted to reduce the sources of the problems, restore water qual i ty and protect public health. A technical advisory committee will be formed to guide FDEP on the scientic intricacies of the rules since they will be implemented using new scientic technologies. The panel of experts includes representatives of the EPA, the Florida Department of Health, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, local governments and the academic community, according to FDEP. The FDEP also will propose changes to its water quality assess m ent strategy to t ake advantage of the new lab tools and land-use sur v eys to determine where elevated bacteria levels may indicate an in c reased risk to human health, of c ials said. Where high bacteria levels are de t ected, and using the most advanced source tracking capabilities, FDEP ofcials will direct actions that re d uce the sources of the problems and restore water quality. The rst committee meeting will be held Aug. 20 at 9 a.m. in the Florida Department of Environmen t al Protection, Bob Martinez Center, Room 609, 2600 Blair Stone Road in Tallahassee. Holmes County ARRESTSESTS JULy Y 15 19MarriagesTravis Wayne Marlow, 12/18/1985 of Bonifay and Jacqueline Leigh Furr, 3/24/1983 of Bonifay Andrian Anton Marin, 6/11/1986 of Chipley and Shelly Rae Chancey, 9/23/1974 of Bonifay Christopher Lee Whitehead, 2/6/1987 of Bonifay and La-Keesha Marie Williams, 6/26/1990 of Bonifay Aldreadge Tera Jackson, 2/16/1975 of Caryville and Jamie Annette Tolbert, 12/11/1980 of Ponce de LeonDDivorcesCharles M. Andrews and Cecilia Wing Cook Marriages & Divorces Board to decide today on county millage rateBy RANDAL SEYLER638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.comCH C H IPLE LE Y The Washington County Board of County Commissioners dis c ussed everything except the county mill a ge rate at a special workshop Monday. The workshop was called Thursday so the commissioners could discuss the mill a ge rate. They will vote on a millage rate today in a special meeting. County Clerk of Court and Comptroller Linda Cook asked the commissioners to set the millage rate at Thursdays meet i ng. She proposed a millage rate of 9.23 mills to the commissioners, up from last years rate of 8.9195 mills. The county is required to set the mill a ge by Aug. 4, Cook said. We need a decision on t he millage rate; we have got to have this turned in to the state by Aug. 4, she said. The commis s ioners avoided the millage question, how e ver, instead looking at the countys pro p osed budget for places to cut including discussions of doing away with the jobs of county manager and a human resources director, setting a minimum county prop e rty tax of $250, taking away county em p loyees paid lunch benet and increas i ng the amount county employees pay for health insurance among other ideas. Most of the ideas came from Com m issioner Todd Abbott, who opened the discussion. I just want to throw a couple o f things out there, Abbott said, rst as a citizen of Washington County, secondly as a taxpay e r and third as a county commissioner. Abbott said the county is facing a bud g et shortfall, and the job of budgeting for the county is not getting any easier. Has anyone contacted the constitu t ional ofcers to see what money they will be bringing back to the budget? Abbott asked. Have we thought about contact i ng them and seeing if they could cut their budgets by three percent? Abbott also suggested the county look into setting a minimum property tax of $250 for all residents. The minority of residents a re paying the taxes for the majority, he said. I think everyone who uses county services should have to pay taxes. C hairman Alan Bush noted that the county budget is facing unfunded man d ates from the state and federal govern m ents, which have increased the countys nancial woes. As the budget stands presently, the county is facing a $102,000 decit. We couldnt have predicted they would increase the amount the county has to pay into the retirement the way they did, Bush said, noting that the county is being required to pay an additional $227,000 to the state employee pension program. On top o f that, the countys ad valorem tax base has dropped about $228,000 be c ause of declining property values.Washington commissioners discuss various budget cuts

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With all the sustained rains this July, I searched my memory to compare it with previous rainy Julys. The most recent was July of 1994, the last big ood in our area, but I dont recall so many consecutive days of rain as we have had this summer. That ood damaged some of the blueberries, but the focus on ood recovery pretty much shut down the blueberry business. However, this year, the water damage to the berries was extensive and pretty much shut us down due to the poor quality of the rain soaked fruit, not to mention the dif culty of picking in the downpours. But these continued days of rain got me wondering how we lled such times in my growing up years. We didnt have T.V. nor the electricity to run it with. We didnt even have board games. We werent blessed with art materials such as crayons or nger paints. How did we ll those days? Of course there were chores. Helping to prepare the neverending meals for a large family required help to shell (wet) peas if the rains persisted or shuck fresh corn or peel potatoes. These were inside chores. Cooking on the wood stove required wood which presented a problem in rainy weather as the wood pile was outdoors. We often had to lay stovewood under the stove to dry enough to keep the re going. Running out between down pours, wed bring in a turn and leave it on the back porch to drip. I can hear the sizzle as a wet piece of wood was added to the re box. Another chore that presented a real problem in the rainy season was laundry. Since we washed outdoors, well, we did have a wash bench under a shed, but the pot where we boiled the clothes was outside. There was still the problem of wet wood. Then, if we managed to get the clothes washed, there was the problem of where to dry them. Clothes dryers had not been invented, and again, there would have been no electricity to run it. There werent enough chair backs in the kitchen to hang things over, so it was just a mess of sour smelly laundry if the rains didnt let up. If there was some article of clothing that was really needed, we might try to iron it dry. (Next to impossible.) Barn chores would have included shucking and shelling corn. We had a small corn sheller or else we shelled it by hand for the daily chicken feed. Grandpa Wells had a bigger sheller which we used, especially if we were shelling select ears to carry to the grist mill to make corn meal. Some other chores might have included mending harnesses and tack, hand-sharpening hoes and shovels, putting shucks or dry hay on the cow stalls, or a myriad of other tasks Daddy could think up. (That reminds me of a family story my older brothers tell. At Brackin School it was Thanksgiving week during the depth of the Depression. The teacher Burton Ferrell was reminding the children to be thankful, especially if their dad had a job. Cousin Lee Ellison spoke up and said, I dont have to be thankful. My Daddy can thank up a job for us at any time.) For entertainment we often played under the house which is on a hill and built high off the ground. We drove on imaginary roads with brick bat cars. (Half bricks left over from the houses foundation.) We made playhouses of apple or vegetable cartons which were wood at that time. Our dishes were the china insets from canning jar lids. Our cook pots were empty pork and bean cans or syrup cans. Our menu was mud pies. Between showers, chasing each other around the house burned off energy. We might also play hellover with a string ball which Grandma Wells made for us. The deep ditches down the hill provided the best clay for clay modeling projects. Inside, we sometimes played cards. (We did own a deck of playing cards.) We might play hide and seek and nish driving our Mama crazy. We girls might play paper dolls with cut-outs from the Sears Roebuck Catalog. Cousin Lenora had a set of Jack Rocks and sometime shed come over and wed play Jacks. I was never any good and that. My sister Minnie Lee always read if she could get her hands on a book. For reading there were the daily paper, The Advertiser, and an occasional funny book. (Comic Book) And Mama had a few novels she had collected. I asked my husband what he remembered about entertainment during rainy spells when he was a boy. He said they looked forward to the rains as the two ponds between them and town lled up enough they could go swimming in what they called the second pond which is in Northdale subdivision about where Jempsy Owens home is now located. David Storey, son of former County Agent C.U. Storey, and his wife Melinda stopped and visited a few weeks ago. He recalled that he and Hiram and some of their friends would swim in those holes when they were kids. Before Highway 79 was a road, the road went through there and there was a little bridge at the second pond. He remembers before 79 was paved in about 1935 driving the cows home after a big rain and a car sliding into the ditch almost hitting him and the cows near his grandmothers home. (The Elliot Sharon Home.) There are plenty of resources today for keeping kids entertained. Movies, DVDs, T.V. and all the electronic devices that I dont know the names of are available. Arcades inside malls allow the Mamas to go shopping while the kids play. Vacation Bible Schools abound during the summer. And if all else fails, there are enough mud holes to provide entertainment. But I am ready for the rains to let up for awhile. Note: Holmes County Historical Society meets the 2nd Thursday of each month at the Society building. (Next meeting is Aug. 8)HAPPY CORNERHazel Wells Tison What did we used to do on rainy days In the past, a four-hour tour of duty at the Vernon Historical Society Museum seemingly motivated my mind for a Prattle narrative. It happened again on July 17 during my appointed time in the facility. When not busy with visitors in the museum, an effort is made to look for items recently donated to the facility. Two discoveries were made recently. One will be todays subject and, hopefully, the second item will be explored as a topic next week. As reported previously, my mind seems to be alert to the history and heritage of Vernon, especially the happenings at the old school, as I re ect upon them during my duty. This may because the rst class room to become part of the present four-room museum, was my home room during my senior year, 1943-44. My starting year at Vernon High School was 1939-40. Imagine my surprise when a small autograph book was seen in one of the many shelves marked Essie Mae Waller, Vernon High School-Class of 193940. The book was the typical one, purchased in dime stores, rather inexpensive, and usually bought by the girls, as the boys seemingly regarded autographs for the feminine gender. The short poems and home made rhymes were generic in content and typical of other autograph books your writer has seen down through the years. The wording of the writing gave clear proof that the students were juniors, with most making reference to looking forward to being seniors the following year. I remember Essie Mae rather vividly, as I also recalled most of the other girls and boys, who signed autographs for her. Lynda Waller, niece of Essie Mae, is an active member of the Vernon Historical Society, has served as an of cer and volunteers much of her time on duty at the popular array of the countys history. My guess is that Lynda has recently donated this interesting item to the collection of heritage now on display in the old school building. Down through the years, I have told our sons of seeing Roy Acuff and his Smoky Mountain Boys, in concert in the Vernon High School Auditorium early in my experience of attending school there. I did not remember the year of his appearance. While leisurely turning the aged, but well preserved book, reading each verse with much interest, I was shocked when somewhere toward the middle of the book, I found the answer I had been awaiting for all if these years with these notations in Essies Autograph Book. The rst one read: Best Wishes from Roy AcuffWSM. Directly under that one, obviously written in an old time ink pen were the words: & Mrs. Roy Acuff. The next four autographs came from members of the Roy Acuff Band. The rst one read: Jess Easterday Smoky Mt. boys W. S. M., Best of Luck Robert Lunn WSM, Best wishes from Rachael Veach W. S. M. Nashville, Tenn., concluding with: Luck Lonnie Wilson (Pap) Smoky Mt. Boys W. S. M. May this happen again! There were no dates on any of the above treasured writings, neither were there dates on any of the classmates salutations in Essie Mae Books. Recalling that the school terms started in September and ended in April, I knew Roy Acuff and band made that notable personal appearance in the old Vernon High School Auditorium within the above time frame. This information sent me to my personal library of reference books on those pioneers music makers who became stars in the early beginning of the long famous, Grand Ole Opry. I immediately learned that Roy Acuff made his second audition for the historic show on Feb. 5, 1938. Jess Easterday, listed above from the Vernon appearance, played ddle on that show, along with Clell Summey, dobro and Red Jones, bass. This audition resulted in the band, Roy Acuff and the Crazy Tennesseans, making their rst regular appearance on the Grand Ole Opry on Feb. 19, 1938. General manager, Harry Stone, didnt like the name of the band, Crazy Tennesseans, which he contended was a slur on Tennessee. He recommended that since Roy came from the Smoky Mountains, he adopt that name. Roy agreed and the band became Roy Acuff and the Smoky Mountain Boys Further factual research of Acuff History shows him hiring Lonnie Wilson, Pete Kirby (who became Bashful Brother Oswald on the show) and the rst female member of the group, Rachael Veachy. Remember she, along with Lonnie Wilson, were in the Vernon performance. Roy reports that chastising reports began to come to him for having the young girl traveling, un-chaperoned, with all the men in the act. Roy was sensitive to that kind of innuendo and made amends by giving Lonnie Wilson the name Pap. Rachel then became Bashful Brother Oswalds sister. Teaming them together made for a tremendous success right off. Readers will note that both Lonnie Wilson and Rachel Veasey appeared in the Vernon concert. Some of Essie Maes classmates who signed her Autograph Book, which has now become a valued piece of history included Herman Justice, Heston Smith, Arol Hudson, Gladwell Newsome, Hiram Owens, Harry Williams, Orerial Tiller, Gameul Holley, Wiley Ward, Wester Galloway, Henry C. Pitts, Olen Ferguson and Jim Williams. The girls listed are Marie Long, Vonceil Austin, Helen Russ, Nettie Sikes, Ef e Lee Shef eld Brock, Frances Harrell, Gertrude McCullough, Iva Lee Whitehead, Lucille Hood, Grace Justice, Ola Mae Cook, Elouise Tiller and Earldeen Tiller. Two teachers, Oneida McFatter Gilmore and J. Hugh Brock have notations in the historic book. Aline Swindle Hightower, a member of the class, was not listed. I have especially enjoyed preparing todays article. I hope my readers will enjoy it as well. See you all next week with the second jewel from the Vernon Historical Society Museum.The greatly loved and highly respected, Roy Acuff, was born Sept. 15, 1903 and died Nov. 23, 1992. He became a legend on the World Famous Grand Ole Orpy, although beginning his musical career after reaching the age of thirty. The King of Country Music visits Vernon HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. OPINION www.bonifaynow.comWednesday, July 31, 2013 APage 4SectionThe views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. CONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci @chipleypaper.com 850-547-9414 Circulation Customer Service 1-800-345-8688 ADVERTISING Stephanie Smith: ssmith@ chipleypaper. com 850-638-0212PERRYS PRATTLEPerry Wells

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A5Wednesday, July 31, 2013 carpettilemarianna.com ServingYouIsOurMostImportantProduct*PropertyInsuranceisnotavailableinthestateofFloridafromAuto-OwnersInsurance. Member FDIC 33WestGardenStreet Pensacola,FL32502850.202.9900or1.877.962.322417SEEglinParkway FtWaltonBeach,FL32548850.244.9900or1.866.362.3224 www.beachcommunitybank.com and By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Carol and Bob Cox of Mexico Beach were featured in the July issue of Field and Stream Magazine and honored by its Heroes of Conservation program for their volunteer work with the Mexico Beach Articial Reef Association. For their conservation work, MBARA was awarded a $500 grant from Toyota Motor Sales USA, Inc. The Coxs will also be eligible to win a grand prize of $5,000 and a new Toyota Tundra. Each month, the magazine pro les three grassroots conservationists who go above and beyond in the protection of sh, wildlife and habitat. The duo applied for the Field and Stream award online by submitting a detailed breakdown of the work they had accomplished with MBARA. They were eager to seek additional grant money for a cause they are passionate about. Before becoming involved with the reef association, Carol and Bob, who consider themselves Citizen Scientists, were stationed on an Air Force base in Guam, a tropical location near the equator known for its coral reefs and clear water. Already active with shing, waterskiing and snorkeling, Carol urged Bob to take scuba lessons with her, though he was hesitant to do so. I was always fascinated by Jacques Cousteau, Carol said. Once Bob got started, he was more enthusiastic about it than I was. The pair continued to dive around Guam with Bob eventually becoming a certi ed Dive Instructor, and Carol, a Dive Master. In 1998 they were stationed at Tyndall Air Force Base after speci cally asking for a Florida assignment. While on base they spotted a brochure for the MBARA and soon became members. While were here, we may as well do something to improve diving and shing, recalled Carol. The military engrains volunteerism into people. Within a few months of joining MBARA, Carol had been elected to the position of secretary. The couple became involved with events like the annual King sh Tournament where Carol spent several years as the of cial tournament photographer. While in Guam, the couple became fascinated with the local underwater scene and soon learned the art of underwater photography and videography. The Coxs praised the MBARA for its active efforts at preserving and encouraging marine life in the waters off Mexico Beach. The MBARA is an active organization. You see all the good it does, said Carol. According to the Coxes, when the moved to the area in 1998, there were very few places to dive or sh in Mexico Beach, but the MBARA has helped to establish over 140 sites. Just a few years ago, red snapper was rare in Mexico Beach. Carol reported the city now has one of the best snapper sheries in the state of Florida. Bob, now president of the MBARA, and Carol, treasurer, spend their volunteer time conducting surveys on the arti cial reefs and examining their structures as they seek out ways to improve future reefs. They also perform sh counts around established reefs to evaluate their performance. In addition to creating certain sizes and shapes, the couple has found the proper materials that will bring sh to the area and allow them to thrive. They discovered that embedding Florida arti cial limestone into the reefs mimicked the hard bottom that occurs naturally in the area.Mexico Beach couple noted in magazine for reef work From Staff ReportsWAUSAU The 2013 Miss Fun Day Brooke Trout was crowned on Saturday in Wausau when the Miss Fun Day Pageant kicked off the 44th annual Possum Festival. Forty-two contestants competed for titles at Saturdays pageant, including two young Fun Day King contestants. Trout won the coveted Miss Fun Day title, while Christina Michelle Hall was rst runner-up and Melanie Danielle Baxley was second runner-up. The festival weekend begins at 5 p.m. Friday with the perennial favorite, the Possum King and Queen Contest, and is followed on Saturday with the annual Fun Day, which features food, music and fun all day long. The Possum Festival is sponsored by the Wausau Volunteer Fire Department. All the events are held at or around the Possum Palace. The Saturday events are free to the public. Fridays Possum King and Queen contest begins at 6 p.m., with gates opening at 5 p.m. Entry age is 16 and older, and there is no entry fee to sign up. Prize money will be $75 for rst, $50 for second and $25 for third. Gate admission to the Possum King and Queen contest is $3 for adult, 12 and younger are free, There will be food and craft vendors set up, so bring chairs and enjoy. Saturday starts with a Pancake Breakfast at 6 a.m., and the Possum Trot at 7:30 a.m. The parade will begin at 10 a.m. Other events scheduled for the Fun Day include a sack race, hog calling, rooster crowing, cow lowing and cross cutting. There will also be a dunking booth, water slides and inatables for the children. For the grown-ups, there will also be a dance from 710 p.m., featuring the band Straight Shooters. Admission is $5 a person, and 12 and younger are free. 44TH ANNUAL POSSUM FESTIVAL FUN DAYEvents free to public6 a.m.: Pancake breakfast at the lodge7:30 a.m.: Possum trot 9:30 a.m.: Billy Lipford 10 a.m.: Parade10:30 a.m.: Shelly Smith Treio (gospel music) 11 a.m.: Corn Pone11:30 a.m.: Highcotton (blue grass)Noon: Flag raising12:10 p.m.: Possum and Quilt auction 1 p.m.: Greasy PolePossum Festival Fun Day scheduled for Saturday PHOTOS BY RANDAL SEYLER | Times-AdvertiserAbove: Miss Baby Fun Day winner Havynn Austin Mathis, at left, reacts to winning her title while rst runner-up and photogenic winner Avery Grace Kirkland looks on during Saturdays Miss Fun Day Pageant in Wausau. For more photos, see Page B1 and visit chipleypaper.com. Left: Miss Baby Fun Day Annslee Grace Rollin looks surprised as she is crowned at the Miss Fun Day Pageant on Saturday. This coming weekend the 44th annual Possum Festival will be held in Wausau.

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OUTDOORS Wednesday, July 31, 2013 Page 6www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comSend your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com ASection Dolphin mysteryON THE WEBFind a video, photo gallery and an interactive map of the strandings at newsherald.com.Researchers seeking clues in unprecedented Gulf die-off 2013 STRANDINGSStrandings of dolphins and other species from Jan. 1 to July 7.By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH For the past three years, dolphins have been dying at an unprecedented rate in the Gulf of Mexico, and experts say theres no end in sight. The length and the severity of this event is unprecedented in the Gulf, said Chris Robbins, a scientist and senior manager for restoration planning with Ocean Conservancy. More than 1,000 animals have stranded and more than 95 percent of those have been dead. The mortalities were seeing are far above what the historical average has been. Under the Marine Mammal Protection Act, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration declared an Unusual Mortality Event in December 2010 for dolphins in the northern Gulf of Mexico, the area from the Texas/Louisiana border to Franklin County. Since the event began in February 2010, 1,026 strandings have occurred through July 21. The event is the most severe ever recorded in the Gulf, with 95 percent of strandings ending in mortality. Its the longest in duration and highest number of strandings in the UME program, said Erin Fougeres, Marine Mammal Stranding Network Program administrator for NOAA. In this case, this Unusual Mortality Event has been going on since just prior to the oil spill. By NOAA de nition, a UME is a stranding that is unexpected, involves a signi cant die-off of any marine mammal population and demands immediate response. But response is dif cult when the cause of the UME still is unknown. Oils role Although the UME began two months prior to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, researchers are not ruling out oil dispersant as a factor. This unusual mortality event actually started before the oil spill in February 2010, but when the oil spill happened there was a spike in strandings, and theyve been high ever since, Robbins said. It does raise a question to the extent of which the oil spill has exacerbated the UME. Robbins said many of the symptoms observed in the stranding events are consistent with those of marine mammals that have been exposed to oil. What theyre seeing in these animals is a compromised immune system, Robbins said. It may be like a cancer patient with a compromised immune system coming down with something else because theyve been exposed to a virus or some other type of contaminant. Experts are investigating what role brucella bacteria might have in relation to the UME. Thus far, 27 out of 107 dolphins were positive or suspected to be positive for brucella, a common cause of abortions in the marine mammals. Some animals also are showing signs of pneumonia and adrenal gland abnormalities, Fougeres reported. We dont have any de nitive cause of the mortalities at this point, Fougeres said. There may not be any one thing thats killing off the animals. There may be more than one factor involved. NOAA has formally recognized 59 marine mammal UMEs in the U.S. since 1991, but has determined cause for just 25 of them. In the same timeframe, the Gulf of Mexico has seen 11 UMEs involving dolphins. Fougeres reported the most common cause of the previous events was morbillivirus, a highly infectious virus that includes agents of measles and canine distemper. Were trying to rule out the most common causes of UMEs that have happened in the Gulf in the past, Fougeres said. Morbillivirus doesnt appear to be the case. The highest number of strandings has occurred in Louisiana, followed by Mississippi, Alabama and the Florida Panhandle. Fortunately, for the Florida Panhandle, they havent really been too much above average since 2010, Fougeres said. ResponseAlthough the current UME has not increased strandings much in the Panhandle, responders from Gulf World Marine Park say the difference is the dolphins washing up are more likely to be dead. We havent had an increase in stranding response, said Gulf World stranding coordinator Secret Holmes-Douglas. We usually average about 12 to 14 a year and thats what were getting right now, but were just not getting live animals. Gulf World is part of NOAAs Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program as outlined in the Marine Mammal Protection Act, and it has one of the largest stranding response areas on the books. We respond from Walton County to the St. Marks River in Franklin County, Holmes-Douglas said. Were responsible for any cetaceans that wash up in our region. When a dead dolphin comes in, Gulf World veterinarians must perform an intensive necropsy on the animal, an eightto 10-hour process in which they take tissue, virus and bacteria samples. We try to look for a cause of death if we can determine it, said staff veterinarian Lydia Scaggs. But most of the time, you cant determine the cause of death. UME protocol requires a higher number of biological samples, which are sent to researchers with NOAAs National Marine Fisheries Service for further testing. The UME requires every animal be investigated, no matter the condition. Scaggs said a stranded marine mammal only has a 5 percent chance of survival, and those that do survive a stranding only have a 1 percent chance of ever being released. Dolphins, theyre just so sick by the time they get in, said Scaggs, who noted many suffer from pneumonia. Rehabilitation For the small percent of stranded dolphins that do survive, Gulf World rehabilitates the animals onsite, a task that is intensive and costly. Being a part of the stranding agreement, you take responsibility for funding and rehabilitation, Holmes-Douglas said. When you rehab an animal, thats really where the cost comes in. Gulf World also is responsible for rehabbing animals collected by Emerald Coast Wildlife Refuge to the west. PHOTOS BY HEATHER LEIPHART | The News HeraldBottle-nosed dolphin Roux, right, clowns around with his friend Jett at Gulf World in Panama City Beach. Roux was rescued from Louisiana and participates in a few of the dolphin shows, while Jett was born at the marine park. TOP: Trainer Megan McGinnis rewards Roux with a sh. Dolphin mystery Dolphin mystery

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By PAT McCANNNews Herald Executive Sports Editor David and Beverly Barron both teach at Everitt Middle School, but he admits that theyve been married to Chaos for 11 years. While that might sound a bit daunting for a relationship on one level, when discovering that Chaos is a summer travel ball softball team for girls another perspective begins to form. Barron also coaches Rutherfords high school varsity softball team, but the commitment to the Chaos 16U team is more time-consuming and profound. Its not just me, a majority of travel coaches are in it to get these girls exposure, Barron said. Florida is becoming a hot bed of talent. We need to get the word out that weve got girls playing at a high level. In years past, we didnt have that coming out of Bay County. We need to expose them to the recruiting process. The way Barron explained it, recruiting in college softball sounds a lot like the system in place for college basketball where coaches and recruiters ock to major showcases featuring AAU talent. The sport and the group putting on the showcase differs, but the philosophy is the same. Thats the plan, we go to a lot of showcases, Barron said. What has evolved is that coaches can see 5001,000 girls in one recruiting visit. Their season coincides with ours, so its nearly impossible to recruit during the high school season. Were trying to give the girls somewhere to play. We started by putting an all-star team together out of Callaway rec ball with some pretty big names on it. Barron said what has evolved is that older girls in Bay County often wind up playing one or the other rec ball or travel ball but seldom both. Whereas numbers seem to be at least stabilizing in youth baseball programs and the number of travel ball teams increasing, the same cant be said for softball. Rec leagues dont boast large participation numbers. Lynn Haven had 10 teams this season, Panama City Beach reported a total of 60 players and Callaway 50. Neither are travel softball teams prominent in the younger ages. According to those active here in softball travel ball, there is no 8U team in Bay County, only one 10U, one 12U and just a few for older players. That begs an immediate question of where future players are going to come from.ONE ALTERNATIVEArnold High School coach Rick Green hasnt been involved in travel ball, but said that of the 23 junior varsity and varsity players in the Marlins program all but ve were playing travel ball this summer, almost exclusively for teams outside of Bay County. One of them, shortstop Sarah Robertson, is competing for a select team out of Jacksonville. Green said there has been some talk of forming a travel ball organization in Panama City Beach for teenaged players, but he also is concerned with the number of younger girls entering the sport. I did a little numbers study and found 386 girls in third, fourth and fth grades on the Beach, Green said. I found out that (the rec league at Frank Brown Park) had two teams in that age group and they were having to play each other every week. Now thats not the rec parks fault. So I took it upon myself and sent letters out that were going to try to develop a rec league and play at Arnold. Green said that the Emerald Coast Fastpitch league was a result, with 45 girls along elementary school boundaries competing among four teams. A few practices were held in late May and the schedule played out in June, a championship game recently completed. Green said that parents wanted to play using high school rules, which meant open baserunning, although with a slightly smaller softball and pitching distance of 35 feet. Games were ve innings or a maximum 1 hour, 15 minutes and teams were not allowed to score more than ve runs per inning. It wasnt always pretty, but the girls had a great time, Green said. Ive probably had 30 ask if we would consider doing this in the fall, but thats something wed have to check into with the school system. Green said that a registration fee of $30 was required, clearance was obtained for facility use of Arnolds eld, insurance was supplied, and players were out tted in a T-shirt and whatever uniform pants they desired. Equipment was supplied by players and parents, but supporters sometimes offered to help furnish softballs. Now that weve started this I think it will help us, Green said. Theres interest on the Beach now. And because it was divided up by school it kept us from all the good players being on one team. It was a smooth transition. Green thinks that the decline in rec league softball is linked to the school district not offering school-sponsored softball at the middle school level. And I understand that nancial aspect of it, Green said. But we discovered there were a lot of diamonds in the rough out there in potential softball talent.TRAVEL COMMITMENTThe Chaos organization had as many as four teams at one time, but currently offers 16U and 14U. The Lady Lightning program once was by far the largest in Bay County with age-group teams at most every level, but its numbers have dwindled in recent years. There isnt nearly the number of softball travel teams as there are in baseball, but its more common for 14U and 16U girls to play summer ball than boys because in baseball summer high school programs become prominent at the older levels. Make no mistake, however, the commitment in time and money is no less severe for girls and their parents in softball as their counterparts on baseball travel teams. Barron is in his 11th year with the organization having started with the Starlets 10U ballclub, on which his daughter, Abbie, played for when she was 5. Last summer, when Abbie was a rising freshman at Rutherford the Chaos played in a tournament against a team that basically was 20U. Barron said his daughter pitched against a player who was a freshman at Furman. The team subsists by fundraising, Barron adamant that parents arent given a mandate for a set fee to enable their daughter to compete. After a tournament schedule is formulated, a budget is projected to cover the costs. One year when the team was 12U it played in 14 tournaments. That budget, Barron admitted, might have approached $30,000 with tournament entry fees factored in as well as travel, lodging and meals. Parents who travel to watch their kids compete still have to dip into their resources to cover the same expenses, minus the entry fee. A lot of teams have a straight up fee, but dont do fundraising, Barron said. Weve never done it that way. We fundraise and the money we bring in we spend on the girls. Parents are encouraged to fundraise. In the 11 years Ive been doing this Ive probably had the parents of only ve girls say were just going to write you a check. Its a unity thing. Barrons team comprises not only county players. He said the current edition has girls from Dothan, Tallahassee, Bethlehem and Chipley, but does practice on a regular basis. We know that its a huge nancial commitment from parents, thats why we fundraise almost every weekend when theyre not playing, Barron said. Some of the fundraising might be bagging groceries at local supermarkets. If Ive got a girl thats got the ability we do what we can do, Barron said. This year the schedule included six tournaments in the Southeast, but Chaos 16U travels farther than many younger-age travel baseball teams. In addition to Kissimmee, Tallahassee and Pensacola, Barron looked into an event in Oklahoma City that did not become feasible, and has taken ballclubs as far as Nashville, Birmingham, Atlanta, Tampa and Gulfport. Weve won a lot of tournaments; we were fourth in the World Series A bracket, Barron said. The way we look at it, its like family. Weve seen some travel teams passing out uniforms in the parking lot (having acquired players at the last minute). Ive had tournament of cials tell me that at least when the Chaos shows up you know who it is. Barron doesnt know what the future holds for softball in Bay County. The commitment all around is a heavy one. Barron said that the Chaos once played seven games in one day without leaving the eld after falling into the losers bracket in a tournament. And the team also travels to showcases held during the fall, sometimes as late as November. The minute it ceases to be fun we stop, instantly, Barron said. Weve had a couple of girls in the last year decide they didnt want to play anymore and we understand. He said he regularly gauges the commitment of his daughter in the same way. Mosley head coach Brian Wilke coached his daughters Brooke and Bethany on Lady Lightning teams for years, then later when they advanced to Mosleys varsity. He said there often is a core of about seven girls who start out in 8U and continue on through the levels process. Bubba Hill started the Lady Lightning, which eventually elded teams in all age groups. Wilke said that during his time as a coach there was a board or treasurer, an estimated budget for tournament fees and uniforms. Very few coaches are paid, said Wilke, who estimated that in his time coaching travel ball he might have spent close to $100,000 of his own money. The fees usually are from $500 to $2,000 per player for the average travel team, Wilke said, and you go to the elite teams with a lot of girls signing with Division I and theyre spending $5,000 or more, but theyre ying places. Wilke said a normal summer season during his tenure was ve or six tournaments, the farthest distance probably Nashville. He said the Lady Lightning played in World Series where there were hundreds of teams and showcases with 40 teams. In various tournaments there could be anywhere from ve teams to 40 in the same division. Most of the time theyre Saturday-Sunday tournaments, but sometimes Friday through Sunday, and one tournament is four or ve day, Wilke said. Yeah, I think its the future. Some of its sad. We always had programs where kids could earn their way on a team with fundraisers. Now the lower socio-economically just cant afford it. You almost have to have the means, and thats kind of sad.YOUNGER AGESThe Panama City Poison started last year as a 10U travel team located in Panama City Beach and expects to have both a 10U and 12U team next season. Poison president David Lynn said that he scouted the rec leagues to get out the word that the initial team was forming, and a sixto sevenweek free camp will be held this summer, with practice twice a week, to impart skills and tactics on a new group of girls interested in expanded softball participation. At the end of camp well choose a team and take them this fall and let them play in a tournament, and hopefully they become next spring the 10U team, Lynn said. The Poison, which eventually probably will evolve into the Panama City Beach Poison with most of the players residents of the Beach, are playing in 17 tournaments this season. Lynn said the Poison try and stay within a 2-hour radius of Bay County and that 10 of the tournaments are oneday events giving parents the option of returning home without an overnight stay.Leagues of Their Own Part 4: Girls travel ball offers exposure for talent $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL enewCollegeofAppliedStudiesatFSUPanamaCitywasapprovedbytheFSUBoard ofTrusteesinJune2010andallowsthecampustomoreeasilyrespondtoworkforceneeds inourarea.WeinviteyoutosupporteCampaignforOurCommunitysUniversityby helpingusbuildanendowmentfortomorrowsjobs.Ourgoalistoestablisha$5million endowmentfortheCollegeofAppliedStudiesby2017,whichwillallowFSUPanama Citytoestablishstudentscholarships,implementnewdegreeprogramsandprovidenew equipmentandtechnology. Tolearnhowyoucansupportourcommunitysuniversity,contactMaryBethLovingoodat (850)770-2108ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. THECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs SPORTS www.bonifaynow.comWednesday, July 31, 2013 APage 7Section

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LocalA8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, July 31, 2013 1108728SEADRAGONPIRATECRUISE Moreinfoandscheduleatwww.piratecruise.netorcall(850)234-7400.OpenMarchthroughOctober! Comeawaywithusandenjoyauniqueand fun-lled2-hourfamilyadventurecruiseonone ofFloridaspremiervacationattractions. More info and schedule at www.piratecruise 850)234-7 .net or call (400. fune e cruise on on amily adventur lled 2-hour f fune e cruise on on amily adventur lled 2-hour f of Florida ns. tion attractio s premier vaca Thekidswillswordght,swabthedeck,rethe kidcannon,searchfortreasureandmuchmore whileyousitback,listentothemusicandenjoy thescenery.Haveacolddrinkorsnackwhile youhelptheCaptainsearchfordolphins. BONIFAY306WestBrockAve. Bonifay,FL32425 850-547-9289 NURSING&REHABCENTERwww.BonifayRehab.com 2091546 Wealsotakecareof (850)638-5885 MostVehicles Upto5qts. syntheticblend MostVehicles PERFORMANCEREALTYhashadabanneryearfor realestatesales!YOURHOME Nowourinventoryislowandleadsfromourextendingadvertisingkeepcomingin.Weneedtolistyour home,propertyandvacantland. MikeAlvis,Broker Oce:850-547-9400Cell:850-258-2214 By LAUREN SAGE REINLIE315-4443 | @LaurenRnwfdn lreinlie@nwfdailynews.com SHALIMAR Col. Bud Day, one of the militarys most decorated war heroes and a longtime veterans activist, has died at the age of 88. He passed away Saturday at his home in Shalimar surrounded by family and in the arms of his wife and childhood sweetheart, Doris, after a long battle with cancer. He would have died in my arms if I could have picked him up, Doris Day said Sunday. Day, a veteran of World War II and the Korean and Vietnam wars, spent much of his post-military life advocating for veterans. Close friends and associates admire his tireless drive to pursue what he thought was right, whether resisting his interrogators during his almost six years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam or ling a lawsuit against the federal government to try to secure promised health benets for veterans. He was one of those guys, had he lived several thousands of years ago, he would have been one of the Spartans, said Okaloosa County Judge Patt Maney, a longtime friend and fellow veteran. He didnt care what the odds were, he was going to do what he thought was right, and the whole country is better off for it. Day, a veteran of the Marines, the Army and the Air Force, received the Medal of Honor, the militarys highest award, for escaping his captors after his plane was shot down in Vietnam in 1967. He was eventually recaptured. In all, he earned more than 70 medals for his service as a Marine in the Pacic during World War II and then as an Air Force pilot in Korea and Vietnam. Countless people in the community and across the country herald Days achievements, but in life he was more modest about his accomplishments. Its what you are supposed to do, he said of his military and community service at his 88th birthday party in February. Courage, dignity that stands for something. It was during his more than 67 months in prisons in Vietnam that Day met Sen. John McCain, a fellow prisoner. They shared a cell for some time and Day helped nurse a badly injured McCain back to health. The two have remained close. I owe my life to Bud, and much of what I know about character and patriotism, McCain said in a statement released Sunday. He was the bravest man I ever knew, and his erce resistance and resolute leadership set the example for us in prison of how to return home with honor ... I will miss him terribly. McCain said he will have more to say about Days life and his passing later this week. A funeral is expected to be Thursday at the Emerald Coast Conference Center with a burial at Barrancas National Memorial Cemetery in Pensacola, according to Bill Everitt, head of the local chapter of the Military Order of the Purple Heart, of which Day was a member. Day was born in Sioux City, Iowa, on Feb. 24, 1925. He enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1942 during World War II while he was still in high school. After the war, he attended college on the GI Bill, earning a bachelors and law degrees in four years. He joined the Army Reserve and then switched to the Air Force where he learned to y, piloting air defense F-84s in Korea and the ghter-bomber F-100 in Vietnam.Taken captiveDays plane was shot down on Aug. 26, 1967, in Vietnam. He and the other airman on board had to eject. Days arm was broken in three places from the fall and he was temporarily blinded in one eye. He called in his location, but was quickly captured by a group of armed Vietnamese teenagers. Within 10 seconds of that call, theres a 13-year-old kid with a bolt-action rie in my face, he told the Daily News in 2007. He was taken to a makeshift camp and bound, but was able to escape. He received the Medal of Honor for the 10 days he evaded his captors in the jungle and for his refusal to give up information that might compromise the safety of other service members or the militarys mission. He survived during that time on berries and uncooked frogs and used a bamboo log to cross the Ben Hai River. He eventually was shot twice and recaptured. Completely debilitated, he continued to resist interrogation. He was held for some time in the infamous Hanoi Hilton prison, which was where he met McCain. In the prison known as the Plantation, Day shared a cell with Ron Webb, another prisoner who was already there when Day arrived. I was there when he was hobbling down the camp, Webb said at Days birthday party earlier this year. He was badly injured, badly tortured. It was quite a sight to see him. Day, then in his 40s and serving as a major, was often the highest-ranking captive in the prisons. As part of his torture, he was hung by his arms for days, tearing them from their sockets. He and the other prisoners were nearly starved to death. He returned to the United States on March 17, 1973, a skeleton of the once-muscular man he had been. After he returned, he said knowing his wife and the rest of his family would be ne helped him get through his time in the prisons. I knew things were OK for Dorie. Shes always had it together, Day told the Daily News in 2005. My major thing was doing the right thing for myself. It meant keeping my honor. I wasnt going to do anything dishonorable.Tireless advocateDay retired from the Air Force in 1977, and he and his family decided to stay in Northwest Florida, where he began work as a lawyer. Maney, who argued cases against Day often in the early years, said he was tenacious and would never give up on a case, no matter how trivial. He also became a champion for veterans of his wars and of more recent conicts. One of his most high-prole efforts was his work to secure TRICARE medical benets for veterans of World War II, Korea and Vietnam. Day single-handedly sued the federal government on behalf of two Northwest Florida veterans. The suit sought to restore free health benets to tens of thousands of military retirees who enlisted between 1941 and 1956. The case died in 2004 when the Supreme Court refused to hear an appeal, but the suit, Day and his plaintiffs tireless lobbying on the issue are credited with forcing Congress to pass the TRICARE for Life Act, which made it easier for all military retirees and their families to afford health care. The things that allowed him to survive as a POW also gave him the strength to take on the federal government, Maney said. Thats a huge undertaking, but he did what he thought was right. He thought veterans deserved better. His strong character proved inspirational for countless people in his community and across the country. Many have made the pilgrimage to his home to meet him and pay their respects, Maney said. His door was always open. He was just a quiet, rm, blunt, unassuming, humble, but very determined guy, Maney said. When Maney, a retired brigadier general, was injured in a bomb explosion in Afghanistan, Day made the trip to Walter Reed hospital in Washington, D.C., to visit him. He bucked you up and got you going again, thats for sure, Maney said. He has been instrumental in veterans initiatives such as the Fisher House for injured or ill service members and the Honor Flights for World War II veterans, said Tom Rice, owner of Magnolia Grill and himself an advocate for veterans. He continued this work until the last days of his life. He always said, As long as Im vertical, Ill be doing all I can, Rice said. He said that dedication, even as he was battling cancer and nearing the end of his life, was inspiring. Long after a lot of us probably would just sit on the couch, he was still ring away and looking out for somebody else, he said. Congressman Jeff Miller said in a statement on Sunday that since he rst met Day, anytime he hears the word hero he thinks of him in his ight jacket with his Medal of Honor fastened high around his neck. Though many have bravely served their country before Col. Day, and many continue to honorably serve, few have endured as much as (he has) for honor, duty and love of country, Miller said. Our community will miss his unwavering perseverance, his limitless patriotism, and his enduring optimism for the future of America. I will miss his friendship. The Associated Press contributed to this report. Decorated war hero Col. Bud Day dies APIn this Sept. 2, 2008, le photo, retired Col. George Bud Day waves to the crowed at the Republican National Convention in St. Paul, Minn.

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Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser BPAGE 1Section EXTRATrivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com Wednesday, JULY 31 2013 POSSUM PAGEANTRY POSSUM PAGEANTRY POSSUM PAGEANTRY POSSUM PAGEANTRY Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Washington County News and The Holmes County Times-Advertiser. 1) What was Detroit most renowned for manufacturing at the turn of the 20th century? Staplers, Chewing tobacco, Boots, Bicycles 2) Nathaniel Taylor portrayed what character on older TVs Sanford and Son? Bubba, Rollo, Grady, Lamont 3) Phobos, one of the moons of Mars, makes how many complete orbits around the planet every day? One half, 3, 6, 27 4) What did most everyone in the Middle Ages believe was the seat of intelligence? Stomach, Brain, Heart, Eyes 5) From recent surveys what is considered the most honest profession? Ministry, Nursing, Teaching, Carpentry 6) Studies support that people perform better on tests when they have what? Good pencil, Breakfast, Not much sleep, A cold 7) Lili de Alvarez was the 1st woman player to do what at Wimbledon? Cuss of cial, Wear shorts, Throw racket, Default match 8) Who is the only former president buried within the boundaries of Washington, D.C.? Wilson, Eisenhower, JFK, Reagan 9) In 1903 how many days did it take the rst automobile to cross the U.S.? 11, 25, 52, 100 10) Brutus Thornapple is/was the star of what comic strip? Drabble, The Buckets, Flight Deck, The Born Loser 11) In an operation what is ordinarily removed in a hysterectomy? Appendix, Gall Bladder, Uterus, Abscessed tooth 12) Which continent has the greatest number of countries? Europe, Asia, Africa, S. America 13) The Asian Flu originated in what country? China, Japan, Thailand, Vietnam 14) How many points are on a Maltese cross? 8, 10, 12, 14 ANSWERS 1) Chewing tobacco. 2) Rollo. 3) 3. 4) Heart. 5) Nursing. 6) A cold. 7) Wear shorts. 8) Wilson. 9) 52. 10) The Born Loser. 11) Uterus. 12) Africa. 13) China. 14) 8. PHOTOS BY RANDAL SEYLER | ExtraABOVE: From left are Little Miss First Runer-up and photogenic winner Heaven Boyett, Makayla Hewitt, Angelicia McIntyre, 2013 Little Miss Fun Day Karmen Stubbs, Second Runner-up Destiny Nicole Hall, Alicia Marie Johnson, Brooklyn Kyser, and Aela Deese. BELOW: From left, Brooke Trout was crowned 2013 Miss Fun Day and most photogenic, while Second Runner-up went to Melanie Danielle Baxley and First Runner-up was Christina Michelle Hall. LEFT: Second Runner-up Alexia Kendal Flowers, Junior Miss Fun Day Kaylin Lane, Jewel Vincent, First Runner-up, photogenic and overall photogenic winner Hanna Elaine Duke, Billie LeAnn Goodman, Sara-Kingsley Scott. RIGHT: From left are 2013 Miss Teen Fun Day Mya Thomas, Second Runner-up and photogenic winner Desiree Finch and First Runner-up Alyssa Marie Willey. LEFT: From left are Second Runner-up Sarah Grace Pippin, Kaylee Marie Bullard, First Runner-up and photogenic winner Brooke Victoria Smith, Miss Pre-Teen Fun Day Adora Nicole Edwards, Angelina Victoria Doss and Kendall Faye. RIGHT: Lawson Cooper, left, was named Mr. Baby Fun Day King, while young XyJuan XyKell Thomas was rst runner-up and most photogenic. ABOVE LEFT: Tiny Tot competitors, from left, were Aubrey Maelene Wood, Second Runner-up and photogenic winner Faith Elizabeth Russell, 2013 Miss Tiny Tot Fun Day Brooklyn Carter, First Runner-up Paytin Briard and Halle Riley. ABOVE: Miss Baby Fun Day competitors were winner Havynn Austin Mathis, from left, First Runner-up and photogenic winner Avery Grace Kirkland and Second Runner-up Cali Vincent. LEFT: Contestants for Baby Fun Day were Jenna Mallory, First Runner-up Melanie Stevens, Miss Baby Fun Day Annslee Grace Rollin, Second Runner-up and photogenic winner Mya White, Ashlynn Pitts and Kyndal Marie Landry.

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Wednesday, July 31, 2013 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra www.kubota.com SowellTractorCo.,Inc.2841Hwy.77North,PanamaCity www.sowelltractorco.comFinancing Arranged (WAC) WeTrade forAnything ThatDont Eat! When most people think of their ideal pet, a certain breed of dog or cat instantly comes to mind. However, for those who love more exotic pets and are willing to put in a little more time and effort, a pot-bellied pig can be an ideal choice. Pot-bellied pigs, including mini and micro pigs, can make good indoor and outdoor pets, said Philippa Sprake, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Pigs are social animals, and each has their own personality. Though pigs are unbelievably intelligent and undeniably adorable, there are a few things pet owners should know before bringing little Wilbur home to stay. The rst thing future owners should do is check with their local homeowners association as well as their homes zoning regulations to ensure that pigs can be kept on the property. Pigs can be extremely noisy, especially when adapting to a new environment, and the last thing any new pet owner wants is an angry neighbor or landlord trying to have the pet removed. When it comes to deciding on a piglet, it is very important to choose one that is at least 8 weeks old, weaned and comes from a reputable breeder to ensure that it is healthy, Sprake said. Also, even though they are called miniature, micro pigs can still grow to around 40 pounds, and full-size or traditional pot belly pigs can reach 100 pounds or more, so it is important to see the parents of the pig you are planning on taking home to evaluate your piglets potential adult size. When it comes to training your new potbellied pig, it is important to remember pigs can be as intensive a pet as dogs, and as such they need exercise and social interaction, or they may develop health and behavioral problems. Pigs can be trained very similarly to dogs using positive reinforcement techniques such as clicker training. They are also highly food motivated, so it is important to make sure that their treats are low in calories, such as fresh fruits or vegetables, in order to prevent obesity. When it comes to feed, young pigs should be fed a youth mini-pig feed until they reach around 2 years of age, said Sprake. After this they can be fed adult or senior foods, which are high in ber and relatively low calorie to help curb obesity. Pigs should also have access to fresh water at all times and should never be fed human food as the high salt content can cause salt toxicity. When it comes to deciding where to place your pigs bedding, the rst thing a pet owner must decide is if they want to keep their new pet inside or out. Regardless, all pigs need access to the outside so they can root, which is an instinctive behavior where the pig digs in the ground with their snout searching for food and obtaining iron from the soil, which is vital to prevent anemia. Pigs are sensitive to both hot and cold temperature extremes, Sprake said. Therefore, they need shelter from the sun, wind and rain. If kept outside in Texas, for example, they will need fans to compensate for the hot summer months as well as a kiddie pool or shallow pond to wallow in and cool off. Pigs can also be kept inside as they are easily housetrained or litter-box trained. Pet pigs, like their livestock counterparts, should be checked regularly by a veterinarian to ensure that they are healthy as possible. Pet pigs initially need to be vaccinated to avoid several diseases and should be spayed or neutered to prevent behavioral issues, unwanted litters and other health problems, Sprake said. Pigs should also be wormed several times a year and need their feet trimmed regularly. The biggest problems veterinarians see in pet pigs usually comes from owners providing an inappropriate diet.About Pet TalkPet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the web at vetmed.tamu.edu/pettalk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to editor@cvm.tamu.edu PEtT Ta ALKSpecial to ExtraGRACEEVILLELLE It has been said many times: We have never done it that way before, or this is not the way we always done it in the past, but what does God say? Behold, I will do a new thing; now it shall spring forth; shall you not know it? I will even make a highway in the wilderness and rivers in the desert. (Isaiah 43:19) This is a quote from the recently published book by Carson Fender of Graceville. The title of the book is God.. You want me to go where.. and do what! This 154-page book is a compilation of hands-on teaching and preaching experience for the past 50-plus years. Fender was called and ordained into the gospel ministry at the First Baptist Church of Fort Lauderdale. Dr. Billy Graham preached Carsons ordination service and was ordained along with Dr. Stephan Tchividjian, Dr. Grahams son-in-law. Carson served on the staff of Senior Pastor, Dr. O.S Hawkins along with eight other full time pastors at the 10,000-member First Baptist Church of Fort Lauderdale. Carson served as the Minister of Adult Education and then later served as the Minister of Senior Adults to 1,800 senior adults. He served as an Associate Church Enrichment Missionary for the State Convention of the Southern Baptist Conservatives of Virginia while simultaneously serving as the Director of Missions for the 32member churches of the New River Baptist Association in southwest Virginia. After enjoying 11 years in the mountains of the Elk Creek Valley of southwest Virginia (Carsons roots), he relocated back to Florida in the area of Graceville to be close to his son and family. He has served other churches in many capacities. He recently completed an Intentional Interim Pastorate at Holmes Creek Baptist Church in Chipley, where he served for 13 months. He recently had an article published in the Baptist Banner of Virginia on the controversial subject, The Doctrine of Election. Semi-retired at age 81, Carson is the pastor of the Union Hill Baptist Church at Millers Crossroad as a bio-vocational Pastor. Starting Aug. 4, Carson will begin a series of messages from the book of Revelation on Sunday Mornings and a series of messages from the book of Daniel on Sunday evenings. Son, Dan Fender and family live in Graceville and Ester Fender Santillie and family live in Conyers, Ga. Carson says the word retirement in the life of a committed healthy minister is a myth. He and Martha, have been married for 56 years. They have four grandchildren and one new great-granddaughter.Special to ExtraMARIANNA The Chipola College Appreciation Club recently selected ofcers and directors for the current year. Ofcers are President Robert Trammell; Vice President Ronnie Myers; Treasurer and Secretary Joc Calloway. Outgoing president Terry Allen was thanked for his service to the club. Directors include Terry Allen of Graceville, Leroy Boone of Marianna, Doyle Bosse of Marianna, Bill Davis of Marianna, Joe Ray Durham of Blountstown, Steve Givens of Marianna, Jason Hurst of Marianna, Coyle Mayo of Marianna, Jack Peacock of Marianna, Bill Peacock of Marianna, Colby Peel of Chipley, Aaron Peterson of Marianna, Gene Prough of Chipley, Donnie Read of Bristol, Charlie Reid of Valparaiso, Mel Roberts of Marianna, Robby Roberts of Marianna, Shannon Saunders of Marianna, Allen Scheffer of Marianna, Cody Taylor of Bonifay, Sonny Wise of Marianna and Chris Young of Panama City. The Appreciation Club is a tax-deductible organization governed by local supporters. The group helps the college and its students by promoting athletics and underwriting scholarships and functions not supported from public funds. The standard $250 membership provides access to Chipola Appreciation Club general seating and Hospitality Room for four guests at all Chipola home mens and womens basketball games. The Gold $1,000 Membership provides Chipola Appreciation Club reserved seating for four guests and Appreciation Club general seating for two more guests and admittance to the Chipola Club Hospitality Room. Corporate Sponsorships also are available. A portion of membership dues are tax-deductible. For information about the Appreciation Club, call 718-2451.Special to ExtraDo you have a child 818 years old interested in raising and exhibiting a beef or swine project as a 4H or FFA member? Are you a veteran exhibitor looking to learn more about animal science projects? The 4H/FFA Animal Science Project Workshop for both parents and exhibitors will give you the resources you need to get your project started. From where to purchase an animal to the tools youll use to the feed it, youll get the information you need from Mark Mauldin, Agriculture and Natural Resource Agent. Cindy Yeager, from the USDA Farm Service Agency, will be presenting information on the USDA Youth Loan Program and other agricultural programs. The Animal Science Project Workshop will be at 5:30 p.m. Aug. 13 in the East Wing Conference Room/Ag Center. Call 638-6180 to RSVP for the workshop. Immediately after the workshop at 6:30 p.m., the Livestock 4-H Club will hold its 4-H year kick-off meeting. For more information on Washington County 4-H, visit the UF IFAS Washington County Extension website at washington.ifas.u. edu or call 638-6180 and speak to County Extension Director/4H Youth Development Agent Julie Pigott Dillard. 4-H is the ofcial youth development organization of the University of Florida, an equal opportunity institution.LL ibrary hoursWausau L L ibrary Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed H olmes County L L ibrary (Bonifay) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed W ashington County L L ibrary (Chipley) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed V ernon L L ibrary Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed S unny Hills L L ibrary Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedMONDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach ofce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999.TUE E SDAY8 to 9 a.m.: Tai Chi Class at the Washington County Public Library, Chipley Branch 8 to 10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 5 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at 6:25 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-451 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A CommunityOMMUNITY CaALEndarNDAR What you need to know before bringing home your rst pig ON THEE WEEBCheck out the book online at www.blurb.comGraceville pastor authors book CarsonARSON FEndNDErR 4-H offers youth programsChipola Appreciation Club names directors

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Wednesday, July 31, 2013 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Crossword PUZZLESOLULUTION ON PAGEE B5Katherine Hammock Varnum, 90, died July 21, 2013. Services were held July 24, 2013 at Brown Funeral Home, 1068 Main St. in Chipley. Interment was at Macedonia Cemetery. Friends and family may sign the online register at http://www. brownfh.net/. Katherine H. VarnumBobby Hunt, of Durham, N.C., died on July 26, 2013. Graveside services will be held Saturday, Aug. 10, 2013.Bobby HuntAuthor Venard Kirkland, 76 of Chipley, passed away Wednesday, July 24, 2013, at Northwest Florida Community Hospital. Venard was born Nov. 27, 1936, in Graceville to Malcolm and Irene (Jordan) Kirkland. A lifelong resident of the Panhandle, he worked road construction and attended Wausau Pentecostal Church. He was preceded in death by his parents, Malcolm and Irene Kirkland. He is survived by his loving of wife of 55 years, Mary Catherine Kirkland of Chipley; four daughters, Tammy Nelson (Royce) of Chipley, Tina Pierce (David) of Bonifay, Teresa Conroy Richard of Panama City, and Tracie Kirkland of Sunny Hills; brother, Kenny Kirkland of Wausau; ve grandchildren, Whitney Nelson, Dixie Trotter, Julia Conroy Lewis, Lydia Conroy and Ashton Kirkland; and four great-grandchildren, Austin Nelson, Christian Nelson, Lauren Michelle Nelson and Adrian King. Services were held at 2 p.m. Saturday, July 27, 2013, at Wausau Pentecostal Church in Wausau, with the Rev. James Barwick, the Rev. Bobby Lee Wood, and the Rev. Roger Dale Hagan ofciating. Visitation was held at 12:30 p.m. until the start of the funeral at the church. Interment followed in Wausau Memorial Gardens Cemetery in Wausau. Obert Funeral Home of Chipley is directing.Author KirklandMrs. Alma White, 87 of Bonifay, died on Sunday, July 7, 2013, at her residence in Bonifay. Born Tuesday, Oct. 27, 1925, in Hartford, Ala., she was the daughter of the late Albert Phillips and the late Rosa Davis Phillips. She was the wife of Comer White. Surviving are sons, Devon White of Tallahassee, Larry White of Bonifay and Tommy White of Malvern, Ala.; daughter, Carolyn Judd of Bonifay; seven grandchildren; 13 great grandchildren; and three great-great-grandchildren. A funeral service was held at 2 p.m. Wednesday, July 10, 2013, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Ike Steverson ofciating. Interment followed in the St, Johns Cemetery, Bonifay. The family received friends from 1:30 to 2 p.m. Wednesday, July 10, 2013, Sims Funeral Home, Bonifay directing.Alma WhiteImogene Burkett Bontrager, 55, of Marianna, passed away at her home surrounded by her loving family on Friday, July 26, 2013. Imogene was born Oct. 21, 1957, and raised in Blountstown, by her parents Grady and Lovie Burkett. She graduated from Blountstown High School in 1975. In 1976 she married her high school sweetheart, Daniel Bontrager. She was a loving wife and mother who was devoted to her children and a large extended family. She enjoyed spending time outdoors, traveling, and raising deer on the family farm. Imogene was preceded in death by her father, Grady Burkett. She is survived by her husband of 36 years, Daniel; her daughter, Mandy Bontrager Brewer and husband, John Brewer; a son, Travis Bontrager; her mother, Lovie Burkett; and her siblings, Gregory Burkett, Volena Bareld, Delores McDougald and Lawana McDonald. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m. Monday, July 29, 2013, at Evangel Worship Center in Marianna, with Pastor LaVon Pettis ofciating. Burial followed at Nettle Ridge Cemetery in Blountstown, with James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. The family received family and friends from 4 to 6 p.m. Sunday, July 28, 2013, at Evangel Worship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road, Marianna, FL 32448. Flowers are welcome as well as donations to Covenant Hospice, 4215 Kelson Ave. Suite E, Marianna, FL 32446 Expressions of sympathy may be made online at www.jamesandsikesfuneral homes.com.Imogene B. BontragerMalrie Ruthford Paul, age 82, of Westville, was called home to be with his Lord on Friday, July 19, 2013, at 6:15 p.m. at Southeast Alabama Medical Center in Dothan, Ala. He was born May 17, 1931, in Westville, to the late John and Beedie Arrant Paul. He was Baptist by faith and a member of Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church of Holmes County. Malrie left home at a young age and went to Columbus, Ga., to stay with his sister and work at a textile factory, until he was drafted into the United States Army and served two years. He came back to Florida and worked at Martins Tire Recapping in DeFuniak Springs until 1960. He then began working for the Department of Transportation of DeFuniak Springs until he retired in 1996. Malrie enjoyed his retirement, where he raised cows, hogs, chickens and turkeys. He also enjoyed planting his garden and working in the yard. He loved sitting on his front porch with his wife and children while watching his grandchildren play. You were always welcome to come and sit with him; he really enjoyed the company on his porch. He was preceded in death by his parents; one sister, Thelma PaulStringfellow; and two brothers, Buford (Buddy) Paul and Bryce Paul. Malrie is survived by his loving wife of 52 years, Edith Ann Gillman-Paul; four sons, Larry R. Paul (Cheryl) of Coffee Springs, Ala., David R. Paul (Paula) of the United States Army, George Daniel Paul (Catrina) of Westville, and the Rev. Samuel Dale Paul (Mary) of DeFuniak Springs; one daughter, Pamela Ann PaulBrackin (Danny) of DeFuniak Springs; 10 grandchildren, Jennifer (Doug), Ryan, Nicole (Orlando), Justin, Benjamin, Danielle, Rebekah and Calie; four great-grandchildren, Kacey, Dylan, Jonah and Leila; four sisters, Mildred Brooks of Ponce de Leon, Muriel Collins of Tallahassee, Earlene Iaculla of Lake Forrest, Ill., and Christine Swinney and husband Tom of Goshen, Ky.; one brother, Melvin Paul and wife, Carlene, of Westville; sister-in-law, Sharon Paul of DeFuniak Springs; and numerous nieces and nephews who were very special to him. A time of visitation was 6-8 p.m. Thursday, July 25, 2013, in the chapel of DavisWatkins Funeral Home, 1474 Highway 83 N., DeFuniak Springs. Funeral services were at 10 a.m. Friday, July 26, 2013, at Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church in Holmes County with the Rev. Dale Paul, the Rev. Terry Smith and the Rev. Ike Steverson ofciating. Committal services will follow at Pleasant Ridge Cemetery with military honors provided by the United States Army. Those serving at pallbearers were Ryan Paul, Doug Smith, Dylan Smith, Bobby Stringfellow, Sr., Gary Gillman and Tim Gaff. Flowers are being accepted. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.daviswatkins.com. Arrangements and services and under the direction of Davis-Watkins Funeral Home.Malrie R. Paul MaALriRIE R. Pa AULBirlie Palmer, 101, of Holmes County passed away Friday, July 19, 2013, in Port St. Joe. Mrs. Palmer was born Jan. 10, 1912, to the late Roe and Sabie Sellers in Slocomb, Ala. She was a member of the First Assembly of God Church in Bonifay for over 65 years. She served her Lord by teaching Sunday School, being a WM Leader, a deacon and superintendent of Sunday School. Mrs. Palmer worked at the Great Day Store as cashier and in food service at Memorial Hospital. She was preceded in death by her beloved husband, Robert Ellie Palmer; a sister, Estell Chestnut; and a brother, Dan Sellers. Mrs. Palmer is survived by a son, Robert E. Palmer; four daughters, Blondell Sanders, Geraldine White, Catherine Jenkins and husband, Wadell, and Margaret Chitty and husband, Darrell; 16 grandchildren; 38 greatgrandchildren; numerous great greatgrandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services were at 2 p.m. Monday, July 22, 2013, at the First Assembly of God Church with the Rev. John R. Chance and the Rev. Gary White ofciating. Interment took place in St. Johns Freewill Baptist Church Cemetery. The family received friends from 1 to 2 p.m. Monday before the funeral. Flowers will be accepted, or donations may be made to Covenant Hospice. Southerland Family Funeral Home was entrusted with funeral arrangements. Condolences may be submitted or viewed at www.southerlandfamily. com. Birlie Palmer BirIRLiIE Pa ALmMErRMrs. Kathryn Elizabeth Shaw Flowers, age 85, was born on Aug. 23, 1927 in Gainesville, to Albert B. Shaw and Lucile Wall Shaw Gran. She passed away peacefully at home Friday, July 26, 2013, surrounded by her grandchildren. Mema has resided with her granddaughter Shelley Johnson, husband, Kevin, and great-grandchildren Kaden and Kiaya for the past eight years. She will be greatly missed by all who knew her. Elizabeth had been a resident of Seagrove Beach, since 1970, moving from Tallahassee. She lived and raised her two sons in Tallahassee for 12 years while her husband, Dick Flowers, coached at FSU and Florida High School. Elizabeth owned and operated Flowers Nursery and Day Camp while living in Tallahassee. After moving to Seagrove Beach in 1970, she and her husband owned and operated Seagrove Villas Motel and Cottages, and the Wheel House Restaurant. Memas love for family and children continued in Seagrove as she operated her little gift shop and candy store, giving away more candy, gifts and lodging than she sold. She was an active member of the Seagrove Beach Garden Club for over 40 years. Mema had a very deep love for animals, children, gardening, cooking for family and friends, traveling, and dancing. She was the rst majorette for the University of Florida Gators, and later came to her senses and became an avid Seminole. Elizabeth Flowers is preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Lee Richard Flowers, Jr. known as Coach Flowers and Pops; and sons, Woodrow Lee Flowers and Albert Bradley Flowers. Mrs. Flowers is survived by her six grandchildren, Kelli Matthews and husband, Michael, Melissa Powell and husband, Cale, Jennifer McKenzie and husband, Nathan, Allison Flowers, Shelley Johnson and husband, Kevin and Richard Flowers and wife, Christy; 14 greatgrandchildren, Austin, Jordan, Isabella, Jayden, Destiny, Caleb, Mason, Tyler, Mallory, Kaden, Kiaya, Madeline, Molly and Aiden; former daughters-inlaw, Linda Flowers Presnell and Janet Lee Flowers. The family would like to say a special thank you to many who helped with Mema, Shelby Johnson, Patty Freeman, Alta Tabb, Patty Hansen and Linda Presnell. Shelley would like to extend her heartfelt thanks to all of her family for surrounding one another and supporting one another during the loss of Mema. A time of visitation was held from 10 to 11 a.m., Monday, July 29, 2013, at Clary-Glenn Freeport Chapel Funeral Home; 150 East Highway 20; Freeport, FL 32439. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Monday, July 29, 2013, at Clary-Glenn Freeport Chapel Funeral Home with the Rev. Roy Carroll ofciating. Floral arrangements are being accepted. Pallbearers will be Kevin Johnson, Cale Powell, Nathan McKenzie, Greg Presnell, Greg Whitehead and Jamie Johnson. Burial followed in the Point Washington Cemetery. You may go online to view obituaries, offer condolences and sign guest book at www.claryglenn.com. Clary-Glenn Freeport Chapel Funeral Home is entrusted with the arrangements.Kathryn EE. Flowers KathrATHR YnN EE. FLowOWErsRSSee OBITU UARIEES B5 Obituaries

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FAITH BSectionwww.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com CircleHGas&Deli I tsnotwhatwedobuthowwedoit!982OrangeHillRoad,Chipley638-9505 2961Penn.Ave.,Marianna,FL(850)526-3511 1-800-423-8002www.mariannatoyota.com MARIANNATOYOTA BOBPFORTE (850)482-4601 www.DownHomeDentalCenter.com HAVEYOURUNITSERVICEDTO SAVE ONYOURELECTRICBILL(850)263-28231075N.HWY.79BONIFAY,FL CometotheMullisEyeInstitute&letustakeGreatCareofYou!ToddRobinson,M.D.BoardCertiedEyePhysician&SurgeonMullisEyeInstitute1691MainStreet,Suite#1LocatedacrossfromWalmart 850-638-7220EyeCareforSeniors FirstBapistChurchComeasyouare (850)638-1830 Bapist Come Churchp ist irst Ba Come Owners:JD&DelishaKilgore1218MainSt.638-4097Celebrating31years JERRYWATKINS INSUNCEAGENCY AUTOHOMELIFELETUSQUOTEYOU 1304JacksonAve.,Chipley,FL (850)638-2222 HortonsChipley Heating&CoolingSales,Service&Installation 1213MainSt.,Chipley (850)638-8376 (850)638-1805 BROWN FUNERALHOME1068MainSt.,Chipley,FL32428Phone:638-4010 DonaldBrown-LFD,Manager StephenB.Register,CPA 1552BrickyardRoad Chipley,FL Panhandle Lumber&SupplyForALLYourBuildingNeeds 405W.Hwy90,Bonifay(850)547-9354 507W.Hwy90,Bonifay1357BrickyardRd.,Chipley Consumer& Commercial Power EquipmentVisitourwebsiteat www.lanesoutdoor.com 901Hwy277,Chipley 850.638.4364 HomeFolksservingHomeFolksWegivecommercialratestoareachurches Gas 1055FowlerAve.,ChipleyBehindourChipleyfactory.Hours:Thur.andFri.9AM-5PM Sat.9AM-3PM638-9421 WESTPOINTHOMEFACTORYOUTLET 879UseryRoad,Chipley,Florida32428850-638-4654 WashingtonCounty Rehabilitation& NursingCenter Page 4 Wednesday, July 31, 2013According to my calculations, summer is half over. I am not quite sure how this came about but the calendar has never lied to me before. It has confused me and taunted me but it has never lied to me. Looking at my calendar I can see no lazy days of summer noted anywhere in the foreseeable future. I am not sure if this is an oversight on my part and that I should have at least penciled in one lazy day of summer or if those lazy days of summer are a thing of the past. I sure hope it is not the latter. I can hardly imagine a world without any lazy days of summer. It just would not be summer in my opinion. This probably is the price people pay for getting old. When I was young most of my summer was lled with lazy days where I practiced the ne art of doing nothing. Oh how I yearn for the return of those good old days of yesteryear. Someone once told me, Sonny, dont ever grow old. At the time, I did not know what he meant. I assumed he was referring to his loss of hair or arthritis in his joints or forgetting things. I thought that was what it meant to grow old. He meant nothing of the sort. Now that I am old, I understand exactly what he was warning. There is no doubt in my mind; he was bemoaning the fact that his lazy days were gone. Perhaps, he was envious of the fact that at the time I had loads and loads of lazy days on my hands. I did not know just how rich I was. Now I do, but it is too late. Where have all those lazy days gone? I was whining about this to the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage hoping to get some empathy at least. Instead of sympathizing with me, all she did was look at me and say in that tone of voice that I know so well, You just want an excuse to do nothing. To which I replied most sharply, I dont need an excuse to do nothing, all I need is an opportunity. Thinking about what I said I discovered there was more wisdom in that one sentence than anything else I have ever said. I had to sit in the corner for a few moments recovering from the shock of saying something with wisdom in it. I probably say many things with wisdom in it without even thinking. In fact, I am good at saying many things without thinking. Although I may not be good at a wide variety of things, I have mastered the art of doing nothing. I can do nothing better than I can do anything. Of course, I do not have too many opportunities to do anything; I have more opportunities to do nothing. If I had my choice, I would rather do nothing than anything. My philosophy is simply this, why be good at nothing and not put it to good use? I have invested a lot of time and energy into doing nothing and I am concerned that not having an opportunity to do nothing I might forget the nesse associated with that art. I do not get a chance very often to do nothing so I am anxious to practice the skills associated with nothing. In this regard, my calendar has not been very cooperative. Where are those lazy days of summer where I can do nothing? Not only has my calendar not been cooperative but also my wife has been the epitome of obstruction in this pursuit of mine. Just when I think a lazy day is looming on the horizon, she comes up with something for me to do. Even though all I wanted to do was nothing, she insists that I do her something. Either I do her something or else. I do not want to do her or else for nothing. Those lazy days of summer were the perfect opportunity to perfect the ne art of doing nothing. Regretfully I have to honestly face the fact that those times are far behind me. No more lazy days of summer for me. At least not as many as there used to be. The old preacher in Ecclesiastes was right when he said, To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven: (Ecclesiastes 3:1 KJV). I can look back with a sense of satisfaction and know that when I did have those lazy days of summer I put them to good use and developed skill in doing nothing. I know before me are some days when I will not have the strength or energy to do anything, then my ability to do nothing will come in good use. I think it is quite important to live in the time at hand. The apostle Paul understood this when he wrote, And that, knowing the time, that now it is high time to awake out of sleep: for now is our salvation nearer than when we believed. (Romans 13:11 KJV). Now that I am older, (and whos to say how much older I will get) I can say with a good deal of expertise, never grow old. By that I mean, never forget those lazy days of summer. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries. comCaryville Baptist Church Bluegrass JamCARYVILLE Caryville Baptist Church will be holding a Bluegrass Jam at 6 p.m. on Aug. 2. A pot luck meal will be served around 7:30 p.m. The church is located at 4217 Old Bonifay Rd.Fun in the Son at Union HillBONIFAY Fun in the Son days will be observed on Saturday, Aug. 3, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and will include lunch. Youth and children age 4 and up are invited, along with parents, for water slide, puppets, music and drama, Bible study and crafts. Union Hill Baptist Church is located at 2759 Union Hill Church Road in Bonifay. The church is on County Road 177 and is one mile south of the Millers Crossroad and Route 2 intersection. To pre-register: Please call 334-886-3513 or email: ascollins@centurytel.net. For more information, call Liz Kidd at 263-3612.Youth Caravan is Coming to Bonifay FUMCBONIFAY Youth Caravan will be at Bonifay First United Methodist Church July 31st. Services will begin nightly at 6 p.m. Youth Caravan is a team of Christian young adults on a summer mission geared towards youth ministry. They are students from the Auburn University Wesley Foundation. Their goal is to spread Gods light in new and exciting ways through song, educational programs, games, and fellowship. Come join the fun. For more information, contact Ben Goolsby or Dan Godwin at 547-3785. Pine Hill Church HomecomingPine Hill Church will be having Homecoming on Aug. 4. We will begin at 10 a.m. There will be special singing by Billy Gene Dickerson and the guest speaker will be Elizabeth McCormick. Bring a covered dish and enjoy lunch on the grounds after the morning service. If you have any questions you may contact Presley Owens 547-2018 or James Bush 547-5790First Presbyterian Church Art Day CampCHIPLEY Chipley First Presbyterian Church will hold their annual Art Day Camp Bible School from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. from Aug. 5 through Aug. 9. This years theme is Faith, Hope and Charity! Attendance will strictly be limited to 20 students, ages 10 13 years. Registration must be completed on or before Aug. 1 by contacting the church of ce at 658 5th Street in Chipley. Faith EVENTSWhatever happened to those lazy days of summer? DR. JAMES L. SNYDEROut to Pastor

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Wednesday, July 31, 2013 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 UploadyourLegacyguestbookphotosnowforFREE!Withyourpaidobituary,familyandfriendswillnow haveunlimitedaccesstouploadedphotosfreeofcharge. FindObituaries. ShareCondolences. Inpartnershipwith. Findobituaries,sharecondolencesand celebratealifeat or Shirley Mae Hayes, 70 of Chipley, passed away Thursday, July 25, 2013, at Gulf Coast Medical Center. Shirley was born Dec. 9, 1942, in Alford to Willie and Ruby Velma Lee (Davis) Corbin. A lifelong resident of the Panhandle, she worked as a technician for Cross Country, and was a member of Rock Hill Church. She was preceded in death by her parents, Willie and Ruby Corbin. She is survived by her two sons, Bubba Huckaby (Dorinda) of Chipley and John Huckaby (Jonnie) of Chipley; daughter, Cindy Huckaby Smith (Jack Franklin) of Chipley; seven brothers, Billy Ray Corbin, Ronnie Corbin, Willie Hubert Corbin, Jimmy Ray Corbin and Donnie Wayne Corbin all of Chipley; two sisters, Joyce Faye Taylor of Chipley and Angelo Prescott of Chipley; 10 grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Services were held at 10 a.m. Monday, July 29, 2013, at Rock Hill Church in Chipley, with the Rev. Charlie Chavers of ciating. Visitation was held from 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday, July 28, 2013, at Rock Hill Church. Interment followed in Rock Hill Church cemetery in Chipley. Obert Funeral Home of Chipley directing.Shirley M. HayesMs. Phyllis Diane Retherford of Geneva, Ala., went home to be with her Lord and Savior after a courageous battle with cancer on Wednesday, July 24, 2013, with her loving family by her side. She was 69. Phyllis was born Dec. 12, 1943, in Holmes County, to the late Willard Buel and Flora Sanders Retherford. She was a 1961 graduate of Bethlehem High School. For several years, she was employed with WardCowan Tractor Company and later retired from the City of Geneva as a bookkeeper. She was a very loving and devoted mother, grandmother and sister. Affectionately known as Baba to her grandchildren, nieces and nephews, they were the light of her life. She was a member of Izagora Congregational Methodist Church. Survivors include two daughters, Gina Seay of Geneva and Lori Gibson (Tom) of Wetumpka; three grandsons, Colton Pate, and T.J. and Garrett Gibson; one sister, Sharon Johnson (Johnny), Bonifay; two brothers, Billy Charles Retherford (Bea), Westville, and Sherman Retherford (Rhonda), Bonifay; special friend, Connie Marsh; and several nieces, nephews, other extended family and friends. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Saturday, July 27, 2013, in the chapel of Sorrells Funeral Home in Geneva with the Rev. Gary Armstrong of ciating. Burial followed in the East Pittman Baptist Church Cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home and Crematory directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Friday, July 26, from 6 to 8 p.m. Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva, 334-684-9999, is in charge of arrangements. Express your condolences in our guest book at www. sorrellsfuneralhomes.com.Phyllis D. Retherford PHYLLIS D. RETHERFORDMr. Connie Ray Weeks of Weeks Lane, Westville, passed away Thursday, June 27, 2013. He was 76. Mr. Weeks was born Jan. 25, 1937, in Holmes County, to the late Robert Leon and Mazie Agnes Stafford Weeks. For 22 years, he proudly served his country with the U.S. Army. During his military career, while serving in Vietnam, he was awarded the Purple Heart and the Bronze Star, along with several other medals and awards. He enjoyed fishing and working in his vegetable garden. He loved the outdoors and his garden so much, you would see him out hoeing his garden in his wheelchair. Mr. Weeks was of the Baptist faith. Survivors include one sister, Margaret Woodall of Westville; one brother, Billy Weeks of Westville; and several special nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m. Sunday, June 30, in the chapel of Sorrells Funeral Home in Geneva, Ala., with the Rev. Jonathan Sorensen officiating and Eric Stromenger delivering the eulogy. Burial followed in the Hurricane Creek Baptist Church Cemetery with military honors and Sorrells Funeral Home and Crematory of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Sunday afternoon beginning at 2 p.m. and continued until service time. Memorials may be made to the American Disabled Veterans or The Wounded Warrior Project.Connie R. Weeks CONNIE R. WEEKS Crossword SOLUTION Like us on Obituaries Wednesday, July 31, 2013 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B5 7-5323 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2011-CA-000417 JPMorgan Chase Bank National Association, as Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance LLC, Successor By Merger to Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation Plaintiff, vs. Jason W. Hudson and Cristi H. Hudson, Husband and Wife; Holmes County, Florida Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated June 19, 2013, entered in Civil Case N o. 2011-CA-000417 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance LLC, Successor By Merger to Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation, Plaintiff and Jason W. Hudson and Cristi H. Hudson, Husband and Wife are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Kyle Hudson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE, 201 N. OKLAHOMA ST., BONIFAY, FLORIDA, 32425, AT 11:00 A.M. CENTRAL STANDARD TIME on August 8, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: THE NORTH ONE-HALF, OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER, OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER, OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER, OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850) 747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call 711. Kyle Hudson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Holmes County, Florida Diane Eaton DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 24, 31, 2013. 7-5329 Tri-County Community Council, Inc., Board of Directors will meet on Thursday, August 8, 2013 at 5:00 p.m., with Finance Committee & Head Start Committee meeting at 4:15 p.m. and Programs Committee meeting at 4:30 p.m. at McLains Restaurant located on 331 South in DeFuniak Springs. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 31, 2013. 7-5281 IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO: 13-CA-119, RONALD M. MONK JR. and DONALD ROYCE MONK, Plaintiffs, vs. DAVID NESBITT Defendant NOTICE OF ACTION TO: DAVID NESBITT 3840 Sain Lane, Graceville, Florida 32440. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Holmes County, Florida, for a Complaint to Quite Title on the following parcel: Parcel Number: 0908.01-005-00E-005.000. Lot 5, Block E, Unit 6, Dogwood Lakes Estates, Holmes County, Florida in Section 8, Township 5 North, Range 15 West as recorded in the plat book in the Office of the Clerk of Court, Holmes County, Florida in Plat Book 1 page 38. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses to it, if any, to James J. Goodman, Jr., Attorney for the Petitioners, 935 Main Street, Chipley, FL32428 on or before August 26, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, at the Holmes County Courthouse, 226 North Waukesha, Bonifay, Florida, either before torney or immediately thereafter; or a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. WITNESS my hand and Seal of this Court on the 17th day of June, 2013. HOLMES CO.CLERK OF THE COURTKYLE HUDSON. Diane Eaton, As Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013. 7-5326 PUBLIC AUCTION The following vehicles will be sold at public auction at Eastern Diesel & Auto Wrecker Service, Inc. 2005 S. Waukesha, Bonifay, Fl. at 8:00 a.m. on August 14, 2013, for towing and storage: (1) VIN # 1FMDU32X2RUB51389 94 Ford 4 dr., Owner: Tatanisha Nicole Thomas, 2524 Phase II, Bonifay, Fl. Lienholder: Titlemax of Alabama, 2321 Montgomery Hwy., Dothan, Al. Insurance: Workmens Auto Ins. Co., P.O. Box 54845, Los Angeles, Ca. (2) VIN # 2G1WF55E8Y9116308 00 Chev 4 dr. Mary Tucker Morris, 1590 Hwy. 179, Bonifay, Fl. Community South Credit Union, P.O. Box 623, Chipley,Fl.(3)VIN# JM2UF1138MO114229 91 Mazda pick-up, Robert Earl Sexton Jr., 90 Son-in-law Rd., Bonifay, Fl. (4) VIN# 1PTO1JAH6V6001620 97 TRMO-Trailer. Owner: Tim Ashi, 322 Nolan St. SE, Atlanta, Ga., Ranas Trailer Lease, 1273 Almont Dr., Atlanta, Ga. EASTERN DIESEL AND AUTO WRECKER SERVICE, INC. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 31, 2013. 8-5315 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOMLES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE N O.: 2011-DP-10 IN THE INTEREST OF M.T.H. DOB: 03/25/2010; M.D.H. DOB: 12/29/2011; MINOR CHILDREN (SEC.39.801 (b) FS) The State of Florida to RUSSELL HANSON, natural father whose residence and address is unknown. You are hereby notified that a Petition under oath has been filed in the above styled Court for the Termination of Parental Rights in the case of M.T.H and M.D.H., children, to licensed child placement agency for subsequent adoption. You are hereby noticed that an Advisory and Adjudicatory Hearing will be held before the Honorable Christopher N. Patterson, Judge of the Circuit Court, Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, at the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida, on the 13th day of August, 2013, at the hour of 9:00 a.m., CENTRAL TIME. You have the right to appear with counsel at this hearing. If you can not afford legal representation, the Court will appoint counsel for you at this hearing upon the determination of insolvency. You must either appear on the date and at the time specified or send a written response to the Court prior to that time. YOUR FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THESE CHILDREN. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILDREN. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 17, 24, 31, August 7, 2013. 8-5324 ITEM NO. 4263681 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION NO.: 13-000319-CA Parcel No(s).: 1100, 1102 STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Petitioner, -vsHOWARD M HIGHTOWER and others, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION IN EMINENT DOMAIN AND NOTICE OF HEARING TO: All defendants named in Schedule A, attached; all parties claiming interests by, through, under, or against the named defendants; and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title, or interest in and to the property described in Schedule B. A petition in eminent domain has been filed to acquire certain property interests in Holmes County, Florida. Each defendant is required to serve written defenses to the petition on petitioners attorney, whose name and address are shown below, on or before September 19, 2013, and to file the original of the defenses with the clerk of this court either before service on the petitioners attorney or immediately thereafter, showing what right, title, interest, or lien defendant has in or to the property described in the petition, and to show cause why that property should not be taken for the uses and purposes set forth in the petition. If any defendant fails to do so, a default will be entered against that defendant for the relief demanded in the petition. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a declaration of taking has been filed in this cause and that petitioner will apply for an order of taking and any other order the court deems proper before the Honorable Christopher N. Patterson, one of the judges of this court, on October 3, 2013 at 1:30 P.M. Central Time, at the Holmes County Courthouse at Bonifay, Florida. All defendants in this action may request a hearing at the time and place designated and be heard. Any defendant failing to file a request for hearing shall waive any right to object to the order of taking. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on July 22, 2013, KYLE HUDSON As Clerk of Court By: Diane Eaton As Deputy Clerk. Everett F. Jones Attorney for Petitioner Post Office Box 607 Chipley, Florida 32428 (850) 415-9391 Florida Bar No.: 375387. Schedule A OUT OF STATE DEFENDANT MICHAEL KING 212 Haldane Drive Southern Pines, North Carolina 28387 Parcel 1100 UNKNOWN DEFENDANTS Unknown Heirs, Beneficiaries, Devisees, Legatees, Spouses and Creditors of Norman C. Edwards, Deceased Parcel 1100 Unknown Heirs, Beneficiaries, Devisees, Legatees, Spouses and Creditors of Georgane Bush, Deceased Parcel 1102 Schedule B ITEM NO. 4263681 LIBERTY SCHOOL RD. HOLMES COUNTY DESCRIPTION FEE SIMPLE RIGHT OF WAY Parcel 1100 A parcel of land being in the Southwest of Section 1, Township 5 North, Range 15 West, Holmes County, Florida described as follows: Commence at a inch iron pipe (no ID) marking the southwest corner of said Section 1; thence South 871021 East 1,325.85 feet along the south line of said Section 1 (north line of Section 12, Township 5 North, Range 15 West) to the centerline of survey of Liberty School Road (county maintained), as shown on Florida Department of Transportation (F.D.O.T.) Right of Way Map F.P. No. 4263681 (said map being on file at F.D.O.T. District 3 Office, Chipley, Florida); thence South 852907 East 747.79 feet along said centerline of survey; thence South 880508 East 146.25 feet along said centerline; thence departing said centerline run North 015452 East 24.71 feet, crossing said north line of Section 12 (said south line of Section 1) to an intersection of the existing northerly right of way line of said Liberty School Road with the westerly line of that certain property as described in Official Records Book 364, Page 172 of the Public Records of Holmes County, Florida and POINT OF BEGINNING; thence North 884943 West 147.47 feet along said northerly right of way line ; thence departing said right of way line, run North 454307 East 25.21 feet; thence North 862520 East 52.24 feet; thence North 414313 East 15.62 feet; thence South 880508 East 15.00 feet; thence South 520329 East 40.80 feet; thence South 795719 East 20.12 feet to said westerly property line as per Official Records Book 364, Page 172; thence South 010722 West 6.44 feet along said property line to POINT OF BEGINNING; Containing 2,875 square feet, more or less. OWNED BY: NORMAN C. EDWARDS, Deceased. SUBJECT TO: Judgment Recorded in OR Book 422 Page 647 and OR Book 462 Page 568, in favor of Unifund CCR Partners, G.P. Judgment, Recorded in OR Book 304 Page 78 and OR Book 418 Page 702 in favor of First Select Corporation Interest, if any, in favor of Michael King, Henry Charles Edwards and the Unknown heirs, Beneficiaries, Devisees, Legatees, Spouses and Creditors, of Norman C. Edwards, Deceased ITEM NO. 4263681 LIBERTY SCHOOL RD. HOLMES COUNTY DESCRIPTION FEE SIMPLE RIGHT OF WAY Parcel 1104 A parcel of land being in the Northwest of Section 12, Township 5 North, Range 15 West, Holmes County, Florida described as follows: Commence at a inch iron pipe (no ID) marking the northwest corner of said Section 12; thence South 871021 East 1,325.85 feet along the north line of said Section 12 to the centerline of survey of Liberty School Road (county maintained), as shown on Florida Department of Transportation (F.D.O.T.) Right of Way Map F.P. No.

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B6| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, July 31, 2013 B USINESS G UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on StaServing Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611 Easy Care Lawn & Tractor ServiceLawn Care Tree Trimming Debris Removal Tractor & Bobcat Work Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured850-527-6291 850-849-3825Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414TROLLING MOTOR REPAIRAordable service! Fast Repair! Most case one week turnaround. Servicing Minn Kota & Motorguide 850-272-5305 Talk about a great deal, advertise your Business or Service here for only$18.00per week!8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 5017238 1110794 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ LOW INTEREST FINANCINGBORROW UP TO $ 20 K, PAY $ 386/MONTH. 8% INTEREST 6 YEAR TERM. Personal and Small Business Loans Debt Consolidation Bad Credit OK CALL 855-331-5322 1113277 GCS C is an EA /EO/M /F/V et e m p l o y er. GCS C Equit y Oce 850. 872. 3866 CHIEF DEVELOPMENT OFFICERThis position will be responsible for supporting the educational mission of the college by encouraging corporations, foundations, & individuals to donate gifts, grants, or bequests of money or property to the college through personal and public presentations, written proposals, & special fund-raising events. Requires: Masters degree in Marketing, Communication, or Business. Experience working with small & large groups, foundations, grants & community organizations. Experience as a project leader & with soliciting of funds & campaigns. Salary commensurate with education & experience. This position will remain open until lled. Applications may be submitted at GCSC Human Resources 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. 4263681 (said map being on file at F.D.O.T. District 3 Office, Chipley, Florida); thence South 85 East 747.79 feet along said centerline of survey; thence South 88 East 231.53 feet along said centerline; thence departing said centerline, run South 01 West 20.74 feet to an intersection of the existing southerly right of way line of said Liberty School Road with the westerly line of that certain property as described in Official Records Book 221, Page 748 of the Public Records of Holmes County, Florida and POINT OF BEGINNING; thence North 88 West 231.53 feet along said southerly right of way line of Liberty School Road; thence North 83 West 119.12 feet along said right of way line; thence departing said right of way line, run South 04 West 7.77 feet; thence South 85 East 119.16 feet; thence South 79 East 56.82 feet; thence South 26 East 25.06 feet; thence South 78 East 18.25 feet; thence North 78 East 91.68 feet; thence South 66 East 60.78 feet to said westerly property line as per Official Records Book 221, Page 748; thence North 01 East 37.70 feet along said property line to POINT OF BEGINNING; Containing 5,711 square feet more or less. OWNED BY: HERSCHEL E. KNESTRICK and KATHLEEN KNESTRICK f/k/a KATHLEEN A. MULLINS SUBJECT TO: Mortgage Recorded in OR Book 428 Page 192, in favor of Wachovia Mortgage Corporation. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 31, August 7, 2013. 8-5325 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2010-CA-000472 Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage, Successor by Merger to Union Planters Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.-David E. Kitchell a/k/a David Kitchell and Cindy U. Kitchell, His Wife; Franklin L. Powell; Sherman Acquisition Limited Partnership Successor in Interest to Sherman Acquisition II, LP; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated June 19, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000472 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Florida, wherein Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage, Successor by Merger to Union Planters Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and David E. Kitchell a/k/a David Kitchell and Cindy U. Kitchell, His Wife are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Kyle Hudson, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE, 201 N. OKLAHOMA ST., BONIFAY, FLORIDA, 32425, AT 11:00 A.M. CENTRAL STANDARD TIME on October 24, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCE AT THE NW CORNER OF THE SW 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST AND RUN EAST 608.73 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 660 FEET; THENCE EAST 1670 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT BEING 417.45 FEET WEST OF THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 6; THENCE SOUTH 138.22.FEET; THENCE WEST 60 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 521.78 FEET TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4, THENCE WEST TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS A 30 FOOT BY 60 FOOT EASEMENT IN THE SW CORNER OF ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY. LYING AND BEING IN HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850) 747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call 711. Kyle Hudson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Holmes County, Florida; Diane Eaton DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 31, August 7, 2013. 8-5322 IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILACTION CASE NO.:07000466CAMXAX DIVISION: CIVIL NATIONALCITY MORTGAGE CO ., Plaintiff,vs. KIMBERLY STOYAK A/K/AKIMBERLYPENSYL STOYAK, ETAL., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Clerk of Court of HOLMES County, will on the 29 day of August, 2013, at 11:00 a.m., CSTat Inside Front Door of the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 North Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, FL32425, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situate in HOLMES, Florida: COMMENCE ATTHE SW CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE NW 1/4 SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP6 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST, AND RUN N 02 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG FORTYLINE 330.0 FEET, THEN N 88 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST1028.60 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF COUNTYROAD TO POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE S 24 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EASTALONG SAID ROAD 115.00 FEET, THENCE S 88 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 396.00 FEET, THENCE N 24 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 115.00 FEET, THENCE N 88 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 396.00 FEETTO THE POINTOF BEGINNING LYING AND BEING IN HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 2003 DOUBLEWIDE HOME VIN # HM03GA0117423A AND HM03GA0117423B pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in Case No. 2007-CA-000466 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for HOLMES County, Florida, the style of which is indicated above. WINTESS MYHAND and seal of this Court on June 25, 2013, Kyle Hudson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact the Court ADACoordinator at 407-836-2302 or 1-800-955-8771 (T.D.D.), no later than (7) seven days prior to the proceeding. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 31, August 7, 2013. Choosing adoption? Loving, single woman will provide stable home/support of large, extended family. Lets help each other. Financial security. Expenses paid. Deborah, toll-free (855-779-3699) Sklar Law Firm, LLC Fl Bar #0150789 Premium Metal Roofing, Manufacturer Direct! 8 Metal Roof profiles in 40+ colors Superior customer service, same day pick-up, fast delivery! 1-888779-4270 or visit www. gulfcoastsupply.com 2 Family Yard Sale This Saturday August 3, 1032 Brickyard Rd, Chipley. 8AM until. We are located directly across from Westpoint. Lots of items for sale. Beds, childrens clothing & toys, furniture, home decor & much more. LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE: Like a big Flea Market, but yard sale prices. Friday and Saturday, August 2nd & 3rd, 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Located on the bypass (Maple Avenue) Geneva, Al. Near Courthouse. Yard Sale Fri/Sat 2&3 Aug. 2266 Bonifay Gritney Rd. 8 a.m.-until. Stove, washer, dryer, etc. Yard Sale Friday and Saturday August 2 and 3, 896 8th Street Chipley, 8 until. Name brand children, Jrs and Adult size clothing, shoes, purses, household items lots of assorted items. Yard Sale. Sat, Aug 3, 7am-until. 723 Sewell Farms Rd, Chipley. Childrens, ladies & mens clothes, tools, household items, etc. Fresh from the Farm! okra. Leave a message. (850)956-4556. 10 Inch Radial Arm Saw, routers, nail guns, large tool chest. 850-535-0410. EMPLOYMENTDRIVERS Guaranteed home EVERY weekend! Company: All miles PAID (loaded or empty)! Lease: To own NO money down, NO credit check! Call: 1-888-880-5911. MANAGEMENT County Coordinator/Public Works Director Holmes County Florida is seeking a County Coordinator/Public Works Director. Salary to be determined. A complete job description can be obtained from the Holmes County Commissioners office, 850-547-1119, or via email: sherry@holmescountyfl.org. Interested parties must submit application and resume no later than August 7, 2013 at 11:00 am to the office of the County Commissioners, 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice in Bonifay. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Medical/Health Is currently seeking applications for: HVAC/Mechanical Maintenance Full Time, hospital experience preferred. Competitive salary & benefits Complete an application online: NFCH.com and fax to: (850) 638-0622 Attn: Human Resources (850) 415-8106. DFW EOE, & a smoke free campus Web ID#: 34260366 Text FL60366 to 56654 PT Merchandiser needed to service Chipley. www .apply2jobs.com/tng Apply to requisition number: (ME4132) Chipley, FL 32428. The Academy of Learning and Development is NOW HIRING.Infant Teacher and Two Year old Teacher. To apply you must have a minimum of two years experience in a Licensed child care Center and a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC). Applicants interested in applying may do so at the One Stop Career Center located 680 2nd Street Chipley, FL 32428. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a Certified Microsoft Professional! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! SC TRAIN can get you job ready ASAP! HS Diploma/GED PC/Internet needed! 1-888-212-5888 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Traning. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Drivers HIRING EXPERIENCED/INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51 per Mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www.bulldoghiway.com. EOE TIDY NOOK NEEDS handyman / landscaper / cleaner to service properties in area. Travel required. Will train. Must have access to internet and own tools. 888-389-8237 A SODA/SNACK VENDING ROUTE LOCATIONS INCLUDED IN YOU LOCAL AREA $8,995 MINIMUM INVESTMENT GUARANTEE CASH FLOW 10 YEAR WARRANTEE 1-800-367-6709 Ext.99 We can help! Good, bad credit, bankruptcy. Need cash fast! Personal loans, business start up available. Loans from $4K, no fees. Free consultations, quick, easy and confidential. Call 24 hrs. toll free. (888)220-2239 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. 638-1918 Retail Store Space available.Main Street. Downtown Chipley. 850-638-1918 1BR Apartment w/kitchen, LR, large walk-in closet. New shower. Also, store or office, $400/mth. 547-5244. 4BR Home & 2BR Apartments, furnished. Bonifay. Private, well maintained. Includes W&D. Lawn maintenance & water provided. (850)547-2096. FOR RENT 1B/R apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent. 2 BR/1BA duplex. 638-7128. An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99* Mandi Lea Apartments in Vernon, 1, 2, and 3/BR. Financial Assistance available is qualified. 638-4640. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio and 2 Bdr Units $350-500 Includes City Util (850)557-7732 SpaciousOne Bedroom Apartment $425 Two Bedroom Apartment $450 Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. 3BR/1BA for rent. No pets. Deposit, & references required. HUD accepted. $595/mth Chipley. 638-1918 3BR/2BA House in Chipley. Newly renovated kitchen & bathroom floors. Stove & refrigerator included. $700 a month. Call 850-547-3746. 3BR/1BA AC, For Rent, Wausau, No Pets, $600/MO and $600/Dep. Reference, 638-7601 Great little Country farm house with 3BR/1BA, metal roof, front and back porch, large yard, hardwood floors, freezer, washer and dryer, stove, refrigerator, free lawn care and garbage, CHA, no pets, references required. Located on Holmes Valley Road near Vernon. $650/MO and $300/DEP. 850-535-0368. House For Rent. Older House in Dogwood Lakes, fenced yard, on 8th fairway of golf course, 3BR/2BA Partiality furnished, 2733 Muir Lane. Available 8/10 $575/MO first and last 850-547-5044 Nice clean houses, apartments & mobile homes for rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, houses for sale. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. Small 2 Bdrm/1B block house in Bonifay. 2 garages plus storage building. First month, last month & security deposit. No pets. (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586. 2 & 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes. Deposit required. Water & sewage provided. (No pets). Bonifay. (850)547-5007 2&3BR, In Town $325.00&$425.00. 2BR, 5 miles south of Chipley, $325. Water included. Sec 8 accepted. 850-260-9795, 850-381-8173. 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850-768-3508, 850-638-9933. Bonifay: (In Cricket Village) 3bd/2ba, Double Wide. Available August 1st. $650+$650 Dep. Call: 850-699-9464 Text FL60523 to 56654 Nice 2Bdrm/2Ba MH large private lot, newly renovated, Bonifay. 16x20 storage building. No smoking, no pets. $550/mo, $500/depo. Maureen (850)547-2950 or (850)527-5909. Spacious 3 Bdr/2 Bath Doublewide near Chipley city limits. Fenced yard. No pets, no smokers. Long term only. (850)547-2627. For Sell by Owner 3BR/2BA, new vinyl siding and metal roof, .75 acre land, CHA, conveniently located. Reduced to $65,000 OBO. 850-481-5354 or 850-849-7676. Modern 2BR/2BA well kept 1500sf home. CH&A, hardwood floors in LR & DR, large den, nice kitchen with breakfast nook. Large utility room. Chain link fence, storage bldg. Nice trees. City water/sewage. Quiet paved street. $99,500. (850)326-7024. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. 5 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. FORECLOSURE LAND LIQUIDATION! Own your own mountain retreat with National Forest access in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. 1+ acre mountain view homesite in gated mountain community, bargain priced at only $14,900 -way below cost! Paved road, municipal water, underground power. Financing. Call now 1-866-952-5303, x 32 2000 Ford Crown Vic. Police interceptor Runs good, in good condition w/spot light & push bars. $2500.00 OBO. (850)263-7892. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8 am to 4 pm. Call (850)638-1483