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Holmes County times-advertiser
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100549/00183
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Title: Holmes County times-advertiser
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
Place of Publication: Bonifay, FL
Publication Date: 01-23-2013
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00100549:00197

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Connect with us 24/7 Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo galleries, opinions and more... @WCN_HCT Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo galleries, opinions and more... @WCN_HCT @WCN_HCT @WCN_HCT A dver tiser Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo A A dver dver dver dver dver dver tiser tiser tiser tiser tiser tiser tiser T imes bonifaynow.com By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY It was a full house when the Bethlehem community members turned out to support recently transferred principal of Bethlehem High School Zeb Brown during the the Holmes County School Board meeting on Jan. 15. One by one almost a dozen speakers came before the school board demanding and pleading for explanations, accountability and a promise to continue putting education rst at Bethlehem High School. Im a parent of eight children, seven of which have attended Bethlehem and two are presently attending Bethlehem High, Drew Kriser said. I graduated from Bethlehem High, almost all my brothers and sister attended there. The Kriser family has been attending Bethlehem school for over 39 years. His family has a history with the school, he said, which gave experience to his voice. Its had its ups and downs, said Kriser. The reason why I got up here is because its mostly been downs. Im not a critical person, I believe in people, I believe in the school, in fact I love the school; my children are in that school. He said even with the love of his school he had to be frank. The quality of our education has been substandard, said Kriser. Finally we had someone holding the standard up and you yanked him out. Do you understand why were so upset? He said that Brown was removed without explanation, justi cation and just cause. Community rallies to support Brown Crowd turns out for school board meeting See BROWN A2 50 www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, JANUARY 23 2013 Volume 122, Number 41 For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM Phone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 INDEX Arrests ................................. A3 Opinion ................................ A4 Outdoors .............................. A6 Sports .................................. A7 Extra .................................... B1 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B6 IN BRIEF Instructor: Gun education essential for all owners | B1 Ander Brown Day scheduled BONIFAY West Bonifay Baptist Church invites the community to celebrate Ander Browns Wild Game, Fish and Fowl Dinner to be held at 5:30 p.m. on Friday at West Bonifay Baptist Church. Once a year Brown holds a game dinner at the church to promote the love of sportsmanship for hunting and shing and invites everyone with a passion for the sport to join for the free dinner. The assortment of game for the dinner ranges from sh to fowl and was provided by Brown. Paper seeks junior reporters BONIFAY The Holmes County Times-Advertiser seeks high school students to become junior reporters. Junior reporters will cover high school activities and sports for the weekly newspaper and will receive training in writing and photography, credit as a reporter, as well as community service hours. Junior Reporters should be in high school, and are needed for all area schools, including Bethlehem, Chipley, Poplar Springs, Ponce de Leon, Holmes County High and Vernon. For more information, call Managing Editor Randal Seyler at 6380212 or email rseyler@ chipleypaper.com. imes imes imes T dvertiser imes imes imes imes T T dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser A HOLMES COUNTY By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY DMH Patient and Public Relations Director Brenda Blitch informed the Doctors Memorial Foundation that a mandatory survey was being issued for all Acute Care Hospitals and their HCAHP Score would affect the hospitals funding during their regularly scheduled meeting on Feb. 11. According to www.patientcenteredcare.org, The HCAHPS survey is a nationally standardized survey that captures patients perspectives of their hospital care. It allows consumers, for the rst time, to compare hospitals based on measures of how effectively they are satisfying patients needs and expectations. The surveys 27 questions look beyond clinical outcomes and technical capabilities of hospitals and focus instead on aspects DMHF to help in survey See FOUNDATION A3 From Staff Reports BONIFAY A Bonifay man was killed after his pickup struck a wild boar on County Road 181 on Saturday, according to a Florida Highway Patrol report. David Earl Bruner, 60, was southbound on CR 181 in his 1993 Toyota pickup when he collided with a boar that was on the roadway. The pickup left the road and went into the eastern shoulder of the road then struck two trees east of the road. The pickup came to rest facing east. Bruner was pronounced dead at the scene by Holmes County EMS. Bruner was not wearing his seatbelt, according to the report. Bonifay man dies after truck strikes boar The 2013 Holmes County High Sweetheart Court includes sophomore attendants Auburn Fisancik, Erica Hudson, Morgan Cross; freshman attendants Carlee Jordan, Melea Kirk and junior attendants Presley Hobbs, Makayla Clemmons, Kaitlyn Claycomb and Cierra Davis. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE TIMES-ADVERTISER Sweetheart Queen Savannah Meeks, Lydia Sheesley, Whitney Corbin, Zoie Hodge, Selina Long and Sierra Smith comprise the senior Sweetheart Court. The Holmes County High School Sweetheart ballgame is set for Friday, Jan. 25. The Blue Devils will host the Marianna Bulldogs. The junior varsity boys game will begin at 5:30 p.m. and the varsity game will follow. The HCHS Sweetheart Court will be introduced between games and the 2013 Sweetheart Queen will be crowned during half-time of the varsity game. Sweetheart Court From Staff Reports ESTO An escaped convict from Delaware, who was arrested following an eight-hour standoff with police in Brevard County, is suspected of being responsible for the armed robbery of the Express Lane in Esto on Jan. 7. Kenneth Edward Wood, 40, is suspected of the Esto robbery, according to a Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce report. Robbery suspect arrested KENNETH WOOD See ROBBERY A3

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Local A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, January 23, 2013 Just we felt like it or because of politics or whatever everyone is suggesting it is, he said. Zeb had vision, he was dedicated, he held people accountable; all these are something that didnt happen much there. When people arent performing well and theyre self-serving they dont like to be held accountable, so they make a lot of noise and youve listened to some of that, Im afraid. The school board wasnt listening to the people, said Kriser. Or at least I wasnt approached and I wasnt asked; nobody consulted me, he said. Each of you is an elected of cial and youve been entrusted to rights and powers to make choices for the bene t of the students and the school. With those rights and powers granted by us, the people who give you that power, you have a responsibility. He said the school board answers to the community. You answer to us, we dont answer to you, he said. I say that respectfully. Weve got to be of the right paradigm of mind if were going to nd a solution to this and set this right. As parents, he said, they would have to live with the lasting affects caused by the decisions the school board members make. Were the ones that have to live with the decisions you make every day, said Kreismer. You guys make a decision then you go home and then you dont come back for another month. Weve got to live with it every day, week, month, year and on into the future. There are a lot of people, including parents, teachers and staff, he said, that care. There are many of us that have invest signi cant time and effort in the education of our children through the years, he said. It gets really hard when we anticipate that there might be some backsliding when there has been made some much needed progress and then this decision was made and we were like this cant be happening. What if things start to backslide? We dont want any backsliding. He said that they were requesting that the school board take responsibility. Weve been responsible, Zeb was being responsible and now we want to dump it on you because it was you that made the decision, he said. Consulting the parents and community members when you make signi cant decisions that effect our children, the students, is not just a good idea, its your responsibility. I leave you to remember where you get your powers and put the students rst, because youve made a decision and lost a person that had dedication, had vision and held people accountable. Another speaker from the community was Veronica Smith. Ive had six of my seven children go to school there, said Smith. I have two children going to school there now and will have a total of nine children go through there when they graduate. Smith said she called several of the board members during the Christmas holiday. If feel Ive got to speak this more to the voters; for all the ones who are here voting for these men and these women that are in our of ces, said Smith. These things need to be in the minutes and one of the board members tells me that this has been on the books since June, that Mr. Brown was to be removed. Some bodys lying. She said that the people should take serious consideration on who they vote on. This is our community and unless we take it back, unless we ght for it, its going to go to the dogs, said Smith. The school board members, chair and Superintendent thanked the community for participating. We appreciate everyone showing up and giving their support, said Chair Jason Motley. We promise to take all that was said under advisement. I know I want whats best for my alma mater as well. Superintendent Eddie Dixon also commended those who came in support of Brown. I appreciate how everyone came to show their support, said Dixon. It is very commendable. School board member Sid Johnson said he also appreciated the support shown by the community. We need to know what the community thinks and feels about certain issues, said Johnson. We need the input. Board members approved of Stacey Thompson as the new principal of Bethlehem High School and Rosanne Mitchell as Assistant Principal. The board also approved of Jim Goodman as Deputy Superintendent/Personnel Administrator at the District Of ce. The board approved of overnight/out of state trips for Holmes County High Schools band to attend the Exclusive Honor Band and Scholarship Opportunities/Auditions on Jan. 31 through Feb. 2 held in Troy, Ala., Poplar Springs and Bonifay Middle Schools Gifted Class to attend the History of Army Aviation on Jan. 28 in Fort Rucker, Ala., Ponce de Leon and Bethlehems Gifted Class to attend Art Hands on Lessons and Discover Painted History of the People and Traditions Which Gave Birth to the Community on Feb. 4 in Dothan, Ala. and Ponce de Leon High Schools Future Business Leaders of America Club to attend the State Of cer Training with Florida State Representatives and Governor on Feb. 10 through Feb. 12 in Tallahassee. These are funded by the clubs themselves, right? asked School board member Debbie Kolmetz. Dixon said in normal cases the clubs pays for their trips, however the FBLA Board was paying for the Ponce de Leon FBLA trip. The next regularly scheduled school board meeting is set for 9 a.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 5. J.D. OWENS INC. Carpet & Ceramic Outlet YOUR HOMETOWN LOW PRICE! CARPET, CERAMIC, PORCELAIN, VINYL, NAFCO, LAMINATE, HARDWOOD & AREA RUGS Weve Got It At The Price You Want! HUGE REMNANT SALE! 12 x 9 Tan Frieze ...................................... $ 95 50 12 x 12 Dark Green Plush ........................ $ 139 90 12 x 13 Light Tan Plush ............................ $ 109 90 12 x 13 Dark Blue Plush ........................... $ 155 50 12 x 14 Heavy Tan Frieze ......................... $ 165 50 12 x 14 Medium Brown Frieze ................. $ 149 90 12 x 15 Chocolate Frieze ......................... $ 179 90 12 x 15 Light Tan Plush ............................ $ 155 50 12 x 16 Medium Blue Frieze .................... $ 189 90 12 x 19 Heavy Velvet Plush Tan .............. $ 225 50 12 x 19 2 Green Comm. Plush .................... $ 205 50 12 x 20 Multi Color Comm. ...................... $ 169 90 BOUND RUGS 2x4 ............... $ 5.00 2x8 ............. $ 15.50 3x5 ............. $ 12.50 4x6 ............. $ 19.90 5x7 ............. $ 39.90 6x9 ............. $ 49.90 J.D. OWENS CARPET & C ERA MIC OUTLET Located Between Arrowhead Campgrounds & Hopkins, On Hwy. 90 The Place To Shop, If Money Matters! carpettilemarianna.com WEST P OINT SALE SALE SALE FAMOUS BRAND Fleece Throw $9.99 BIG PILLOW SALE Great selection of famous name comforters, sheets, towels, pillows, blankets, throws in a true factory outlet atmosphere at factory outlet prices. 1055 Fowler Ave., Chipley Behind our Chipley factory in the Industrial Park. O of Orange Hill Hwy. on Commerce Ave. Hours: Thur. and Fri. 9 AM 5 PM Sat. 9 AM 3 PM (850) 638-9421 Great selection of famous name comforters, sheets, Great selection of famous name comforters, sheets, FAMOUS BRAND 3 piece Comforter Set Queen $79.99 King $89.99 B ONIFAY N URS IN G & REH AB CE N TER We are proud to welcome BRANNIGAN KELLER as our Rehab Program Manager CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser The Bethlehem community gathered at last Tuesday nights school district board meeting to show their support for recently transferred principal of Bethlehem High School Zeb Brown. BROWN from page A1

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 Wednesday, January 23, 2013 of the care experience that are particularly meaningful to patients, including: communication with doctors, communication with nurses, communication about medications, responsiveness of hospital staff, pain management, quality of discharge instructions, cleanliness of hospital environment and quiet of hospital environment. This is their way of making sure you earn what you get paid, said Blitch. She explained that it would be $2,000 for the contract and additional for the surveys. This is done by an independent contractor to insure that theres no way that we can tamper with the results, said Blitch. Weve got the option to use mail-in surveys or by phone. Were requesting that the Foundation consider helping with some of the expenses. The Doctors Memorial Hospital Foundation is preparing for their biggest fundraiser of the year, Golf Ball Drop and Golf Scramble. The fourth annual Doctors Memorial Foundation Golf Scramble and Golf Ball Drop is scheduled for Friday, April 12, at the Dogwood Lakes Golf Club. Members of the Foundation issued out names of individuals and businesses who might be enlisted to participate as sponsors or who would be willing to donate towards the event. Tee Box Sponsors are set at $50, Hole Sponsors are at $100 and donated door prizes and gift bag items could be any price. Team members would also be recruited at that time. For the Four Man Scramble or Best Ball the cost is $200 per team or $50 per individual, which includes the round of golf, cart and lunch and the cash prizes are $400 for rst place, $200 for second place and $100. Mulligans are available for purchase to be eligible for door prizes and they are set at two for $10 and can be used for any stroke. A mulligan is a free shot given a golfer when the shot before that was poorly played. The Foundation also discussed selling tickets for the Ball Drop. In the Ball Drop there are hundreds of numbered balls placed in a dump truck and then dropped over a golf hole. The numbered ball is closest to, or is the rst into the hole, will win a guaranteed cash prize of $500. This is one event where you dont have to be present to win, Blitch said. Tickets are $10 for one ball, $25 for three balls or $50 for seven. Tickets will be available with any foundation member, which includes Hazel Tison, Diane Little, Roger Brooks and Blitch and at the following locations: Doctors Memorial Hospital Boutique, the First Federal formally known as the Bank of Bonifay and the Holmes County Times-Advertiser. For more information contact Blitch at 547-8193. All proceeds go to the Doctors Memorial Hospital Foundation. For more information and registration forms visit the Washington County News/ Holmes County Times-Advertisers Facebook page. Next the Foundation discussed ways to increase Foundation Memberships/ Bene ts Sponsors. Among the most important is your membership in the Doctors Memorial Hospital Foundation, wrote Administrator JoAnn Baker. Your participation is critical in achieving the best possible medical care available to all who need it. Each contribution is essential in supporting our hospitals current technology, modern facilities and enhanced services. Blitch said Foundation members receive a 10 percent discount on any non-prescription item at the Medicine Shoppe Pharmacy and Padgett Drugs along with a 10 percent discount on prescriptions paid for in cash, a 10 percent discount on merchandise sold at Bettyes Boutique, in the hospital, an employee discount of $3.50 on lunches served in the hospital cafeteria on Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., a 10 percent discount at Hardees in Bonifay, a 10 percent discount at the Movie and Gift Depot in Bonifay and a Corporate Discount rate at the Best Western Inn and Suites in Bonifay. For more information on bene ts of being a Foundation member visit their website at www.doctorsmemorial.org/foundation. THE PASSAGE OF O BAMA CARE LAW AND C ONFIRMA T ION BY T HE U S SU PREME CO U R T MEANS NEW T AXES FOR C ER T AIN MEDI C A L DEVI C ES. O r, if you currently wear hearing instruments that arent performing as well as they should be, call us for a FREE CL E AN AND CH E CK B enets of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of hearing loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and pr oper t. D iscounts off MSRP P revious purchases excluded. F or a limited time. Cannot be combined with any other offers. C lean, C lear, natural sound S uper smart, these H ighI Q hearing aids seemlessly adjust to your surroundings for clear and effortless hearing. W ith E ar-toE ar S ynchronization, program and volume changes are applied automatically from one hearing aid to the other. The Promise of natural hearing... has arrived. 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CH IP L EY 1611 Main Street, Ste. 4 (850)387-4931 M A RI ANNA 3025 6th Street (850)387-4931 Allen Barnes HAS : B CHIS 23 Y ears E xperience (Wednesdays) FOUNDATION from page A1 Wear Red Day and Heart Awareness Walk event scheduled BONIFAY The Holmes County Health Department and Doctors Memorial Hospital are partnering together to promote Heart Health Awareness. Cardiovascular Disease is the No. 1 killer of American men and women. CVD is responsible for more deaths in women than the next four causes combined, including all forms of cancers. Friday, Feb. 1, is the 10 year anniversary of National Wear Red Day endorsed by the American Heart Association and the Go Red for Women Campaign. Holmes Countys healthcare organizations encourage everyone to wear red on Friday, Feb. 1, in support of Cardiovascular Disease awareness. A Heart Awareness Walk will take place that day from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Doctors Memorial Hospital. The walk is free and everyone is invited to participate. Walkers are encouraged to bring a heart healthy lunch and commit to walking at least four laps or more. The rst 100 participants will receive free gifts and educational resources concerning heart healthy exercises, nutrition and much more. For more information please call 5478193 or 547-8500, ext. 249. Bice Named to Deans List at The Citadel Devin Michael Bice of Bonifay has been named to the Deans List at The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, for academic achievement during the fall semester of the 2012-2013 academic year. Bice is a cadet seeking a bachelors degree in Physical Education. The following are the Holmes County arrests for Jan. 6-12: Jermaine Beach, 26, hold for another agency Brenda Ann Biddle, 32, uttering forged instrument Jerry E. Bunion, 43, to go out with Hillsborough Emmanuel Casillas, 30, hold for Texas transport Dale Anthony Castro, 41, capital sexual battery Makeda Diah, 27, hold for outside agency Bobby Fife, 46, hold for Texas transport Johnny M. Fleming, house for another agency Kevin Lee Gillam, 51, violation of probation David Hunter Guthrie, 22, uttering forged instrument, forgery, criminal use of personal identi cation Otis E. Harrell, 31, hold for Hillsborough Patricia Lawhorn, 39, child support Ronnie Wayne Lumpkin, 27, felony violation of probation Tommy Ray Marsh, 42, hold for court James David McCullers, 24, no charges listed William Jason McKeithen, 38, disorderly conduct, resisting of cer without violence Amy Rachel Owens, 21, disorderly intoxication, criminal trespass Nathan Davis Patton, 27, hold for another agency Tamala Payne, 46, no charges listed Jatina Monique Pettaway, 22, possession of cannabis less than 20 grams Renzil Powell, 31, driving while license suspended or revoked Jesse Rodgers, 30, recommit for court Mario Lazoro Rodiguez, 40, violation of probation Ashley Nicole Sloan, 25, violation of community control Willie Staten, 22, hold for agency Anthony Ray Thomas, 35, burglary Alec Thompson, 33, child support Charles Edward Turner, 52, violation of probation on possession of marijuana, obstruct criminal investigation, possession of marijuana Brandon Michael Waddell, 22, recommit violation of probation on possession of meth Mallory Wooten, 30, violation of probation The following are the Holmes County marriages and divorces for Jan. 7-11: MARRIAGES Kenneth Zackary Ingle, 8/25/1993 of Bonifay and Sarah Anna George, 9/13/1995 of Bonifay DIVORCES Johnny Ray Branton and Margaret Lee Branton Anthony Hudson, Sr. and Danielle Hudson Buddy L. Brown and Stephanie A. Brown Community BRIEFS Marriages & DIVORCES Arrest REPORT Wood escaped from Sussex County, Del., authorities where he had been convicted on sexual battery charges, and he is also a suspect in two armed robberies in Alabama and one in Taylor County, according to a report from Taylor County Sheriff Wayne Ivey, published on the website oridatoday.com. Holmes County investigators responded to the Express Lane in Esto on an armed robbery report on Jan. 7. When they arrived the clerk said that a white male had produced a handgun and demanded money. After taking the money from the clerk the man ed on a gold color GMC pickup truck. Surveillance video from the store provided video of the robbery and the truck. The truck was later determined to be stolen from Covington County, Ala., according to the report. Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce were advised by Alabama authorities that a store in Geneva had also been robbed earlier by a suspect of the same description. On the morning of Jan. 8, authorities in Taylor County responded to a similar robbery and subsequently chased the suspect in the GMC pickup, who ed on foot. At that time authorities believed the suspect to be Wood. Wood reportedly had friends and family in Brevard and of cials tracked him to a mobile home park, where the police surrounded the trailer in which Wood was hiding. The SWAT team was called out, and Wood eventually surrendered. He was arrested on the outstanding warrant from Delaware for escape after conviction, but more charges are expected. ROBBERY from page A1 DOCTORS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL FOUNDATION The Doctors Memorial Hospital Foundation is a nonpro t organization whose mission is to promote the advancement and further the aims and purposes of Doctors Memorial Hospital. The foundation works with donors who care about the quality of healthcare in Holmes and surrounding counties to ensure that their gifts provide meaningful important support to the hospital. The Foundation is a key partner in the hospitals stability and growth. This newly formed foundation is a charitable 501(c)3 organization governed by its own ve member Board of Directors. They serve voluntarily and represent the local community. Through monetary support by yearly memberships or onetime donations, the Foundation assists the hospital in purchasing necessary equipment and providing new services to better serve the community. Every dollar donated stays locally.

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Time spent recently in the Vernon Historical Society Museum, housed in the semi-retired former Vernon High School Building, inspired last weeks column. Mentioned were bus drivers who drove students into Vernon School, along winding, narrow clay roads, beginning in Caryville and zigzagging the maze of turns and overlaps before nally arriving in Vernon. This has stirred my memory of other drivers of that era who overcome untold hazards of driving and tirelessly delivered students safely to school. James Elearzor Galloway II drove the biggest bus of the eet, bringing a host of children, including many of his own, all the way from Millers Ferry and Hinson Cross Roads to Vernon. This was a long ride along treacherous roads, especially in rainy weather when slick clay top soil sent many school buses plunging into ditches. Other bus drivers usually came to the rescue as sending for a wrecker was out of the question. This writer recalls that Mr. Galloway always wore a tie when dressed for his bus route. Two of his sons, Wester and Callis, served as his substitute drivers. They parked the oversized bus on the southwest corner of the school building during school hours and many students, including yours truly, used it as an escape lunch room. The country boy from Brackin School still wanted to hide as he he ate his home packed food, usually consisting of two home made biscuits, one lled with sausage or ham and the second one lined with g preserves. The beautiful story of the Galloway family is a feature of the Heritage of Washington County Book, released in 2006 and reissued six months ago in a fourth printing. The Prattler has the books for sale and I am convinced that the additional supply of 200 books are moving out as fast at the original publication. Other drivers of my era in Vernon School includes Mr. Hosea Varnum and Mr. Gordon Mercer of the Deadening and Greenhead areas. My longtime friend, Doug Jones, rode to Vernon with Mr. Mercer, who had the record of driving the smallest bus on the routes. Being small in stature, Doug told the story on himself that he admired the oversized Hinson Cross Roads bus pulling into the School campus and further envied the size of the boys who came swaggering off the bus, including Willie Green Hinson, Heber J. Galloway, Lorainne Hammock, Mack and Bert Railey and others who were much larger than Doug. He claims that he found himself wishing for the opportunity to get to visit Hinson Cross Roads one day, a feat which seemed out of his reach at that time. Mr. Jack Haddock drove a bus into Vernon from the Bonnet Pond community, looping into Wausau and other areas to the east. He, too, could have at least halflled his bus with members of his on family. I love the story from Clifton Haddock of recent years when asked if all the Haddock Children received their education at Vernon High School. His reply was yes, all the schooling that any of us got was at Vernon, then concluded by saying All of our college education was gotten at home! Schools need the right people Dear Editor, Thank you for printing something about us in your paper. Holmes County Times-Advertiser has not yet done so. Channel 7 News attended but somehow screwed up the video, and when I asked them where was our story they declined to follow through at all. I feel as though we are being swept under the carpet and our wishes are not being heard on this matter. The Board has chosen to do exactly as they want to do parents be damned. I found the most interesting thing about the meeting that came to my attention has not been mentioned so far by anyone. I was unaware until Tuesdays meeting that in Holmes County Zeb Brown was the only principal with the credentials to back him up. Stacey Thompson is not accredited. Why would anyone want to remove the one and only principal in all of Holmes County that has the educational level to be principal and replace him with one that doesnt. Why has Holmes Co. residents allowed this substandard for our principals to go on? Does anyone know about this and not care or are we willing to allow our children to continue to receive less than a decent education from people who would rather line their own pockets then make healthy decisions for our community. We need to make note of these things because there is always another election around the corner. We have a right to a fair education for our children and we have incredible talent in our young people that is not being utilized to its fullest. We need to nd the right people that want to help us achieve all that we can to make our neck of the woods the best it can be. Veronica Smith Westville Students need more quali ed personnel Dear Editor, One the evening of Jan. 15, 2013, I went to the Holmes District School Board Meeting. The main meeting room was full so approximately 50 of us concerned citizens were standing in the attached of ce. Unfortunately we could hear nothing. It would have been nice if a microphone and speaker was used. A large crowd was expected so a change of venue to a larger facility would have been nice. Here is what I would have informed all. A few years ago Zeb Brown was assigned a group of students at Bethlehem Middle School, as the year progressed it became obvious that is attendance was poor. Many times I understand his girlfriend was in the classroom, not Zeb Brown. She was more of a sitter, not a teacher. Therefore these students were deprived of the complete education, which the citizens of Holmes County were paying Zeb Brown to produce to our most important asset, our young people. How many similar situations have occurred or are occurring? The administration at the time of this occurrence is gone so they cant be red but Zeb Brown should be. According to recent articles in the HCTA Zeb Brown puts the students rst. Obviously that is incorrect. The students were severely short changed. Where was he? He was taking a culinary course. There must be more quali ed personnel in the system who would put the students rst as they should be. I understand there are numerous complaints both in writing and on a web site. There are others who feel as I do about this situation. Dick Basht Bonifay Letters to the EDITOR With the con ict about Bethlehem School principal being re-assigned, I am reminded of the biggest con ict we experienced in the 30-plus years of my husbands tenure with the Holmes County School system. When Florida educators voted to stage a walk-out in protest of the Florida Legislature and Governor Claude Kirk Jr.s failure to act on legislation to fund the needs of education, it became the only state nationwide to carry out such a protest. Their action was not done hastily nor with out much thought to the increasing de ciencies in the educational system. Floridas tradition as a low-tax state and its constitutional prohibition on income tax, combined with low property tax, limited all public services, but education had suffered the most as enrollment had grown more than 50 percent in years just prior to 1968. Teachers were frustrated by out-of-date materials, overcrowded classrooms, dilapidated buildings and pay far below the national average. Due to pressure from the Florida Education Association and the National Education Association, the state legislature extended its 1967 session, but the governor vetoed the 150 million dollars earmarked for education. Thirtyve thousand teachers rallied in the Tangerine Bowl in Orlando on Aug 14 of 67 to plan a way to get the attention of the governor. A walkout was planned for February of 1968 if the governor failed to act. The walk-out closed schools in 22 Florida Counties. Closing the schools was the aim of the walk-out, but Holmes County, like the remaining counties, did not have 100% participation so the local schools stayed open. This week I have still been cleaning out closets, and I came across clippings about the strike, as many chose to call it. Here are excerpts from the statement published in the Holmes County Advertiser from the teacher group. We have made the momentous decision to leave our classrooms, not in search of higher paychecks, but in an effort to dramatize the sad plight of education. It was a decision that we did not make lightly. By taking this step, we placed our careers, our retirement status, our jobs, and the nancial security of ourselves, and our family in jeopardy. But, more important, were retaining our self-respect and our honor because our cause is right . For years, Floridas public school system, Holmes County not excluded, has been declining. We teachers have shouted the alarm. Our shouts were met by public apathy, disinterest, inaction. Some people heard and became concerned. Most did not. We teachers nally found it necessary to assume the leadership role because our business, civic and political leaders as a whole did not or would not. The statement goes on to explain that Governor Claude Kirk Jr had chosen to leave the state for Californias Disney Land rather than face the issue of an Educational Crisis which existed in Florida. The legislatures plan would have given some teacher pay raises, but ignored the need for funding quality education. Such things as adequate facilities, supplies, up-todate equipment were not provided. The tax package gave some property tax relief, in effect shifting school nancing burden to those least likely to afford it. On Tuesday Feb. 20, Wednesday Feb 21, and Thursday Feb 22, 1968, 36 or 38 Holmes County teachers did not show up for classes. A special board meeting was called to address the issue and they called for the contract which each teacher had signed to be read. After conferring with board attorney, the late Clyde B. Wells, it was moved by Mr. Russell Dean and seconded by Mr. Tup McWaters to terminate the contracts due to failure to abide by the contract. Thirtysix resignations were delivered to Superintendant Fred Johnson and the board on Friday, Feb.23 by Mr. Joe Collins the chairman of the Holmes County Teachers. Possibly two teachers from the group returned to work. It was a bitter time for us the families of the teachers who walked. The failure of the board to support their action, even taking a punitive stance, was unsettling. Facing several months of no income was most stressful. I know nancial advisors tell you that you should have an emergency fund of half a years salary, but a teachers salary at that time was a subsistence amount at best. Another bitter thing was the animosity between those who walked and those who didnt although many of them were supportive in theory, at least. The things that were happening at the school with the substitutes were disturbing. We had a son in high school and he reported some of the misuse of equipment in the ag dept. For example tools were welded to metal desks. Some substitutes were bodily threatened by some of the students and they returned to their safe homes. There was so much talk about the walkout that when one delegation walked out of the Democratic National Convention that summer in protest of some issue, our ten year old daughter asked, What are they? Teachers? The strike was called off on March 8, but it was about 6 weeks as I recall when those who walked went back to work on annual contract.(less pay) They were expected to apologize to the board and were admonished not to discuss the issue at schools. The county lost several outstanding educators. Joe Collins, chemistry and physics teacher found work in Chipley and his children transferred there. Beverly Helms, speech pathologist also transferred to Washington County. Carlton Treadwell went to Chipola Jr. College as an instructor. His brother Don returned to the University of Florida to get a masters degree and taught vocational classes at Woodham High School and George Stone Vocational School in Pensacola. T.E. Segers, coach at Bethlehem, transferred to Holmes County High. Several out of county teachers left, one a highly regarded Chemical engineer. Even though those of us involved in the walk-out paid a heavy price, results were seen as the succeeding legislative bodies have passed education reforms. Collective bargaining was a viable means of gaining better working conditions until the recession has caused that to be a moot process. Better facilities are evident. Teachers salaries are much improved. Starting teachers today make more than I was earning when I retired 25 years after the strike. Employees in the system today owe a debt of gratitude to those 38 brave souls in Holmes County and hundreds over the state who stood up for what was right and initiated educational reforms in funding that have bene tted teachers and staff as well as the students they teach. No amount of money can pay for the frustrations encountered in the classroom, and I know its much worse today than when I was there. But it is the most rewarding calling, especially in retrospect as you see the achievements of your former students. Living in a small town gives me the pleasure of regularly greeting former students. Con ict brings memories teacher walk-out CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com 1-800-645-8688 ADVERTISING 850-547-9414 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. OPINION www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, January 23, 2013 A Page 4 Section Riding the bus to school as a kid was an experience PERRYS PRATTLE Perry Wells HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Vernon High School bus drivers of the past.

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 Wednesday, January 23, 2013 By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY After a recess of the regularly scheduled meeting, the Holmes Coun ty Board of County Com missioners reconvened to hold a workshop on Tues day, Jan. 8, in which a guest speaker from the Florida Association of Counties Vir ginia Ginger Delegal was present. In light of the new com missioners, weve invited Mrs. Delegal to be a guest speaker, said Holmes County Attorney Goodman. The FAC also holds con ferences for new commis sioners. Its a privilege to have her here, not only as a speaker but to be available for a question and answer session. Delegal said she consid ered herself a mythbuster. The Florida Associa tion of Counties has been around for over 85 years, Delegal said. One of the myths we frequently bust is that small counties can become chartered. What it all comes down to is home rule. County Commissioner Kenneth Williams said Holmes County was dis couraged from becoming a chartered county because it would mean less income. Delegal said this also would be considered a myth. If you were to get less money it would because of population, not charter, Delegal said. She reviewed the deni tion of a county, how it dif fers from a city, what forms of government are offered to the counties and what forms of government do other similar sized counties in Florida choose. Florida has 67 counties, Delegal said. Twenty of which are chartered coun ties. Historically, a county in Florida was a political subdivision of the state, es tablished by the state to ex ecute state services at the local level. She dened Home Rule as the transfer of certain state powers to local en tities in matters of local concern, but no complete autonomy. This offers locals more control over their internal affairs and alleviates the need for state legislation of local concerns, she said. Ideas are consistent with traditional American ideals of self governance and in dependence. This is impor tant for Holmes County to consider because over half of the population of Holmes County live in unincorpo rated areas of the county and therefore are looking to the county to provide most of the services required to maintain quality of life. She said some of the benets of being a char tered county are that the county can choose form of government, power to tax in unincorporated ar eas, may alter functions of county ofcers, can have county ordinances prevail over municipal ordinances, special acts that limit power must be approved by vot ers and can increase citizen involvement. Right now as an nonchartered county ordi nances are trumped by city ordinances, said Delegal. If the county were to be come chartered then the county can prevail over city ordinances. Traditionally, she said, the duties of a county were assessment of property, record keeping, maintain rural roads, administer elections, perform judicial functions and local law en forcement and public safe ty, but lately those services have expanded to include public health and wel fare, consumer protection, economic development, employment and training, planning and zoning, water quality, re protection and emergency management. Goodman asked for her to relay the benets of hav ing a County Administra tor, County Coordinator or County Manager. This is someone who is a staff expert and allows for commissioners someone to consult with outside of the meeting capacity, Delegal said. As it is now because of the Sunshine Law com missioners can only speak to one another during an ofcially called meeting or workshop. They are not al lowed to talk to one another about county matters out side of an ofcial meeting. She said one of the worst types of trouble comes when commissioners talk about a matter in casual settings, such as at a grocery store or via email, and it comes up for vote later on. This could lead to a revoking of the vote and a heavy ne to the county. A county manager is one that you can speak with without having to be in an ofcial meeting capacity, she said. This will allow you to voice your ideas with someone who can advise for or against it before you bring it before the board. This will save quite a bit of time in the future. Goodman said for the time being he was acting as the advisor for the county as they have had no manager since the departure of Hol mes County Administrator Greg Wood in 2009. There are certain prob lems that come with me being your advisor in an administrative capacity, Goodman said. There will come a time when I wont be able to objectively play both rolls. There could come a time when you will need a witness in the adminis trative roll and as your at torney I couldnt also be a witness. Commissioner Bill Par ish said he agreed with the attorney about looking into the possibility of county administrator. I understand being the consultant of these depart ment heads, but as our attor ney youd have to do all these jobs, Parish said. I can see the need of an administra tor. Were falling short on a county that depends on us for these services. Delegal advised that the county needed a staff expert. This is someone who is an expert of how staff regu lations go, she said. Some one can be designated this position or this can be added to someones duties. Commissioner Monty Merchant told the board that they should consider asking the contractor of the recent bids for graders to extend their contracts. The previous board was considering purchasing four to six new graders and put it out to bid shortly before the 2012 elections. The bid deadline came shortly after the election when three new commissioners came on board. The three new com missioners said they did not feel comfortable with voting on a bid so soon after being elected and so the bid was tossed out due to deadline. Were paying $4,500 a month to lease a grader, said Merchant. We should do something. Maybe we can get then to extend the bids by another 30 to 60 days. Parish said if they were able to get the contractors to consider extending the deadline for that long, which would allow for more time to research the matter, then he would be ready to make an informed decision. The next regularly scheduled meeting is set for 6 p.m. on Jan. 29 at the BOCC chamber located behind the Holmes County Court House. $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL e new College of Applied Studies at FSU Panama City was approved by the FSU Board of Trustees in June 2010 and allows the campus to more easily respond to workforce needs in our area. We invite you to support e Campaign for Our Communitys University by helping us build an endowment for tomorrows jobs. Our goal is to establish a $5 million endowment for the College of Applied Studies by 2017, which will allow FSU Panama City to establish student scholarships, implement new degree programs and provide new equipment and technology. To learn how you can support our communitys university, contact Mary Beth Lovingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. THE CAMPAIGN FOR OUR COMMUNITYS UNIVERSITY Endowment for Tomorrows Jobs 2084408 Enter Starting January 27th www.nwfdail y news.com BENEFITTING Guest speaker educates new BOCC members

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OUTDOORS Wednesday, January 23, 2013 Page 6 www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Send your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com A Section IN THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES (AP) The man known as Alligator Ron has a lifetime of experience in the Florida Everglades, a eet of airboats at his disposal and knows the habitats of furry prey for large reptiles. He still couldnt lead a pack of hunters to a single Burmese python. Thats the catch in Floridas Python Challenge: Even experienced hunters with special permits to regularly stalk the exotic snake through Floridas swamplands are having trouble nding them for a statesponsored competition. When these snakes are in the water, in the vegetation, they blend in naturally to where you cant hardly see them, said state wildlife commissioner Ron Bergeron, whose nickname is emblazoned on the rudder of his black airboat, over the image of him riding an alligator. The vast majority of roughly 1,000 people who signed up to hunt Burmese pythons on public lands from Jan. 12 through Feb. 10 are amateurs when it comes to pythons. Only about 30 hold permits for harvesting pythons throughout the year. The permit holders might have a slight edge when it comes to handling snakes, but the tan, splotchy pythons have natural camou age that gives them an important advantage in the ecosystem they have invaded. As of Thursday, 21 pythons had been killed for the contest, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. It is dif cult to pin down how many Burmese pythons slither through Floridas Everglades, but of cials say their effect is glaringly obvious. According to a study released last year, sightings of raccoons, opossums, bobcats, rabbits and other mammals in the Everglades are down as much as 99 percent in areas where pythons are known to live. Its believed the pythons devour the native wildlife, and ofcials worry the snakes voracious appetite will undermine the ongoing, multimillion-dollar effort to restore natural water ow through the Everglades. Bergeron led U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., into the Everglades to hunt pythons Thursday afternoon. They splashed from their airboat through knee-deep water into several islands that rise in small bumps above the sawgrass, but they always emerged empty-handed. They didnt ush out any of the mammals Bergeron thought he would see, either. The only thing they did nd: signs of feral hogs, another problematic invasive species. Rabbits were like rats. Growing up, you saw them everywhere, said Jim Howard, a Miami native and a python permit holder participating in the contest. I havent seen a rabbit in 20 years. I dont see foxes. I hardly see anything. He has caught a python in the Everglades in each of the last two years, though. Each was more than 12 feet long and contained more than 50 eggs. He returned to those locations Wednesday, poking under ferns and discarded wooden boards with a hook at the end of a 3-foot-long stick. All he found were the sheddings of some large snake each transparent scale was the size of a ngertip. After spending hours steering his boat along 14 miles of canals to levees and embankments where pythons might lurk, Howard extended the hook toward the dense, impenetrable grass that stretched all the way to the horizon, with no landmarks or vantage points. Millions of acres in any direction in the Everglades are exactly the same. From that perspective, the hunt for wellhidden pythons seems futile. Were looking at inches, Howard said. Of cials say the number of pythons caught during the contest isnt as important as the data they provide. Im going to be ecstatic if we see 100, said Frank Mazzotti, a University of Florida professor of wildlife ecology who is helping the commission with the contest. He continued to low-ball expectations for the nal tally. Im happy with 11. Im going to be happy with whatever we have. The small number only proves that theyre really hard to nd, he said. The state hopes to use the information from python necropsies particularly whats in their stomachs to improve their attempts at dealing with the snakes. Our list of what pythons eat is not complete yet, Mazzotti said. The population of Burmese pythons, an invasive species in Florida, likely developed from pets released into the wild, either intentionally or in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew in 1992. They can grow to be more than 20 feet long and have no natural enemies in Florida other than very large alligators or cold weather, which drives heat-seeking snakes onto sunny roads and levees. Florida prohibits owning or selling pythons for use as pets, and federal law bans importation and interstate sale of the species. Mazzotti had one tip for hunters frustrated by the pythons near-invisibility: Stop and listen for a dry, rustling sound in the grass. It sounds like something large, he said. Foliage, swamplands, water make hunt more difficult PHOTOS BY AP TV crews pet and take photos as Capt. Jeff Fobb from the Miami-Dade Fire Rescues Venom Response Unit, holds a python Jan. 12, during the kick-off ceremonies for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissions month-long Python Challenge in Davie. The 13-foot reptile was captured in a backyard swimming pool in 2012. Below, Jim Howard, of Cooper City, examines a piece of a large snake skin he found under some foliage in the Florida Everglades during his search of pythons. At top, Howard searches under the dense foliage. PYTHON CHALLENGE They didnt ush out any of the mammals Bergeron thought he would see, either. The only thing they did nd: signs of feral hogs, another problematic invasive species. Rabbits were like rats. Growing up, you saw them everywhere, said Jim Howard, a Miami native and a python permit holder participating in the contest. I havent seen a rabbit in 20 years. I dont see foxes. I hardly see anything. He has caught a python in the Everglades in each of the last two years, though. Each was more than 12 feet long and conAfter spending hours steering his boat along 14 miles of canals to levees and embankments where pythons might pythons caught during the contest isnt as important as the data they provide. Im listen for a dry, rustling sound in the grass. It sounds like something large, he said. The only thing they did nd: signs of feral hogs, another problematic invasive species. Rabbits were like rats. Growing up, you saw them everywhere, said Jim Howard, a Miami native and a python permit holder participating in the contest. I havent seen a rabbit in 20 years. I dont see foxes. I hardly see anything. He has caught a python in the Everglades in each of the last two years, though. Each was more than 12 feet long and conments where pythons might lurk, Howard extended the hook toward the dense, impenetrable grass that stretched all Im large, he said.

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SPORTS www.bonifaynow.com A Section 2nd Annual 2nd Annual By BRAD MILNER 747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com One of the trappings of youth often is the inability to see beyond today. However, Cory Calloway and Trent Forrest will have no trouble picturing a bright future as long as they continue on the successful path theyve traced thus far. Calloway is the less-seasoned of the two as a Port St. Joe eighth-grader playing in only his second year of organized basketball. Forrest is a freshman who was thrust into a leadership role on Chipleys defending state championship team and comes armed with a pedigree in the sport. The AAU teammates are prominent components of two young basketball programs, each with one senior apiece. Chipley also features high-scoring sophomore Tyrome Sharpe. Port St. Joe complements Calloway with freshmen T.J. Williams and Chad Quinn, the Tiger Sharks secondand third-leading scorers. But Calloway and Forrest have stood out among the pack for various reasons, their coaches said. And with both playing in the Rural Class 1A, theres little doubt they could be waging postseason battles for many years. Forrest, a 6-foot-4 athlete who can play any position, is in his rst season on the varsity. Chipley is a traditional high school fed by middle school programs, so Forrest had to wait until the ninth grade to play at the varsity level. Calloway is able to play on varsity since Port St. Joe is a 6-12 school. Forrest immediately was thrust into a position to replace the leadership and scoring prowess of the departed Alex Hamilton and Cameron Dozier, the duo leading Chipley to a 1A title and now playing college basketball. Chipley coach Joel Orlando said Forrest has t perfectly into his new surroundings. Hes been able to do it with strong character, a good basketball IQ, good academics and a strong family background, Orlando said. All of those things help him be so special. Forrests father played basketball at Chipola and an uncle competed at Clemson. The lineage not only mapped out future success, but it helped teach Forrest about handling pressure and staying focused. I knew that I was going to have to step up, said Forrest, who averages 22 points per game. They (his father and uncle) told me that these things would come sooner or later. Im used to it, I was ready. Forrest has never been one to shy from competing against older players. He stood in during practices with the East team of the Freedom All-Star Classic as an eighth-grader and made some of the seniors work harder than expected. Its this determination that separates him from other players, Orlando said. Hes competitive in everything he does and that is contagious, Orlando said. He carries himself like a senior on and off the court, too. But he does what we need. He could be the leading scorer or pass the ball a lot, dives on loose balls, takes charges. And in turn the rest of his teammates has fallen into roles, Orlando said. Forrest is the leader and he takes the job seriously. I know the team looks to me so I always want to do my best, Forrest said. I know theres a lot I can do, a lot I can improve on, but I just need to stay grounded. Calloway said the same, but his answers were often tinged with a wry smile while trying to restrain his con dence. Port St. Joe coach Derek Kurnitsky said Calloway is a player who knows hes good, displays it on the court and isnt afraid to talk about it. That said, Kurnitsky added that Calloway is like a fresh oyster plucked from the Gulf of Mexico in nearby Apalachicola. Hes averaging 19 and really has no clue how to play the game, Kurnitsky said of the 6-2 guard. Hes so raw, itll take a few years for him to get used to the game, but hes a worker. That much is evidenced by Calloways desire to shoot the basketball. Its apparent in games, with Kurnitsky giving him the green light to pull the trigger, and also when hes not with the team. One day it was pouring rain and I got a call from my assistant coach, Kurnitsky said. He said Guess whos outside shooting? When you shoot in the rain you know youre good. Calloway played youth baseball prior to high school and was plucked from the diamond to the court by Kurnitsky. Like Forrest, he shows little fear of competing against players often three or four and sometimes ve years older. I like the challenge, he said. I knew I was going to have to play a big role with this team, be a leader and Ive done pretty well already. Thats a bit of an understatement. Calloway has routinely led the Tiger Sharks in scoring and also won a recent game with a shot at the buzzer against South Walton. Those accolades dont amount to much, he admitted, given there is a lot of time left in his still young prep career. His list of improvements includes working on his skills to the right side for the left-hander as well as becoming a well-rounded player. That means becoming dominant on defense and not only as a scorer. Kurnitsky doesnt worry about Calloway becoming a complete package. He compared him to Hamilton, the latter blossoming during his freshman season at Bay and turning into one of the areas best players after transferring to Chipley. Calloway has designs on evolving into an NBA-type performer. He understands theres a long way to go before that process even can be considered. I do have to take it one game at a time, Calloway said. I focus on the game right now, then think about the next one and the next. Also helping Calloway is a rich tradition at Port St. Joe lled with state championships and outstanding players. Kurnitsky is aware of the history as are many of the longtime faculty at the school. He parroted Forrest in saying Calloway must keep a level head. There are so many great players from Port St. Joe, the teachers tell him that, Kurnitsky said. He isnt the best with the tradition here, but he has time. I think that helps keep him grounded and motivated. By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY After the Holmes County Blue Devils junior varsity pulled a last-minute 27-26 win over the Baker, the Blue Devils varsity team gained a sound victory against the Gators with a score of 70-50 on Friday, Jan. 18. After every period the Blue Devils maintained an almost 10 point lead against the Gators. We have a big, big man, said HCHS head coach Poe White in reference to Chris Walker. He poses quite a problem for the other teams. Walker recently signed on with the University of Florida. White said though this was a good win he didnt think he was where he thought they should be as a team. Weve got to get better, he said. Weve got to get back to playing as a team and stop being sel sh with the ball. He said they started the season very well. Were struggling right now with bulling the ball, said White. We started the season with good chemistry and I hope well get back to that before the end of the season. Chipleys Forrest and PSJs Calloway take charge early Page 7 CATHRINE LAMB | Times-Advertiser Holmes County High Schools Chris Walker attempts a two-point shot during the Blue Devils 7050 win over the Baker Gators. HCHS Blue Devils defeat Baker Gators 70-50 and Wednesday, January 23, 2013 HCHS VARSITY BASKETBALL FAST BREAK TO SPOTLIGHT HEATHER LEIPHART | Halifax Media Group Chipley freshman Trent Forrest (11) has assumed a leadership role for the young Tigers, who lost their top two scorers from last seasons Class 1A state title team. Above: Cory Calloway has found instant success as an eighth-grader for Port St. Joe, but he is aware he has a long way to go before being considered one of the best the basketball-rich program has produced.

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A8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, January 23, 2013 Enter Now To win $500! 2nd Annual 2nd Annual 2084409 : _______________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ________________________________________ ____________________________________________ __________________ __________ ____ We BRING it HOME Volume 122, Number 23 Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 19 2012 Special to Times-Advertiser BONIFAY The Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo Parade goes hand in hand with the rodeo events. The parade will be Friday and Saturday, Oct. 5-6, at 1 p.m. Thousands of spectators ood the streets of Bonifay on Friday and Saturday afternoon to view oats, queens, dignitaries, bands, ATVs, wagon trains and hundreds Championship Rodeo Parade to be Oct. 5-6 BOCC talks employment, bonuses Cecilia Spears 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT Cecilia.spears@halifaxmediagroup.com BONIFAY Holmes County Board of County Commissioners recognized September as National Suicide Prevention Month by signing a declaration provided by Life Management during their regularly scheduled meeting on Sept. 11. Life Management thanks the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners for their support, said Teresa McDonald of Life Management. Very few know that suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States, and for every completed suicide there are 11 attempted suicides. The toll free crisis and suicide prevention hotline is 1-800-490-4826 for a local counselor available 24 hours a day, seven days a week or the national hotline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). The board approved of the Holmes County Small Quantity Generator Program Report, which indicated a cost of $4,000 to dispose of chemical waste produced by the county. The board also approved of County Attorney Jeff Goodmans recommendation to allow West Florida Regional Planning to update the Holmes County BOCC Equal Opportunity Plan for $770. The plan is several years old and is in need of updating, said Goodman. It would be a lot cheaper for them to update it because they have all of the resources and knowledge of the present requirements at the their ngertips than Pink Glove Dance 50 www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM IN BRIEF Residents enjoy Picnic in the Park B1 Laura Ingalls Wilder Picnic in the Piney Woods WESTVILLE The Laura Ingalls Wilder seventh annual Picnic in the Piney Woods will be start at 10 a.m. on Sept. 29 at the home site of Peter Franklin Ingalls in Westville. There will be a Laura Ingalls Wilder costume and talent contest. There will be a potluck lunch, the chicken will be provided. The picnic is hosted by the family of Peter Franklin Ingalls and sponsored by the Holmes County Historical Society. The site is at 1225 Highway 163 in Westville. For more information, call Mary Joe Craft at 956-2956 or Wayne Ingalls at 334-898-1115. Free child birth classes planned BONIFAY The Holmes County Health Commissioner Phillip Music brought before the board the idea of swapping employees from one district to another because the employees wanted to work in the district in which they also reside. See BOCC A5 Get the best source for local news, interests and events in Holmes County We B ring it H ome. delivered for ONLY $2.54 a month! Call 866-747-5000 to subscribe Mention HCT Home or mail form below. Oer good for new annual subscriptions paid in advance, while supplies last. Please call for out-of-county rate and short term subscription rates; in-county is same day mail. The Walmart Gift Card may be redeemed at any Walmart, including our local Chipley store. bonifaynow.com Sign up today for an annual subscription and receive a $10 WALMART GIFT CARD!* Return form to: HCT HOME, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, Fla. 32425. Oce open: M-F, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Yes! Si gn me up for an annual subscription to the Holmes County Times-Advertiser $30.45 annual rate in-county* publishes on Wednesdays Name ________________________________________________ Phone _____________ Delivery Address __________________________________________________________ City _____________________________________ State ______ Zip ________________ Payment enclosed $____________ Signature __________________________________ Charge my credit/debit card. __Visa __MasterCard __ Am Express __ Discover Credit Card # _____________________________________________ Exp. Date ______ FIND US i n Print, Online and on the Road! PHOTOS BY CATHRINE LAMB | Times-Advertiser Poplar Springs Junior Varsity Lady Atomics defeated the Bethlehem Junior Varsity Lady Wildcats with a 23-11 win. By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Surrounded by friends, family, teachers, coaches and fellow students, Holmes County High School seniors Ciara Jones and Shelby Clark signed on with Chipola College in the HCHS Library on Jan. 15. With Jones and Clark were Clarks family Pam and Dan Miner, Jeanette Rudd and Jeanette Shield; Jones family Todd Jones and Matalie Bowman; and grad assistants with Chipola College Kellie Todd and Liz Krauser. We wanted to pass on that Chipola is excited for them to be joining our softball family, Krauser said. Both Jones and Clark are four-year varsity players. Jones has a batting average of .421, an on base percentage of .522, with 95 runs and 34 stolen bases. She will be going to Chipola to play in the position of middle/infield. Clark has a batting average of .419, an on base percentage of .499, with 82 runs and 31 stolen bases. She will be going to Chipola to play in the position of outfield. Im feeling pretty good about it all, Clark said. I like the college, and I get to go to college with my best friend. Clark said she wasnt sure what her major would be yet, but that she was interest in the medical field and physical therapy. POPLAR SPRINGS BASKETBALL HCHS seniors Jones and Clark sign on with Chipola Sports CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser Holmes County High School seniors Ciara Jones and Shelby Clark signed on with Chipola College in the HCHS Library on Jan. 15. The Bethlehem Junior Varsity Wildcats pulled off a close and very exciting 28-24 win over the Poplar Springs Junior Varsity Atomics.

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Washington, Holmes at a glance Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser B PAGE 1 Section EXTRA Council on Aging sh fry BONIFAY The Holmes County Council on Aging will have a sh fry fundraiser Friday, Jan. 25. The plates will include sh, cole slaw, baked beans, hushpuppies and cake. To help, call Rachel Locke at 547-9289 or Carol Ricks at 5263577. The council also is accepting donations of food or money. Please mail monetary donations to Emerald Coast Hospice, Attn: Carol Ricks, 4374 Lafayette St., Marianna, FL 32446. Bethlehem High School Homecoming BETHLEHEM Bethlehem High Schools Homecoming will be Saturday, Jan. 26, honoring the classes of 1943, 1953, 1963, 1973, 1983, 1993 and 2003. The presentation of the Homecoming court will begin at 4:30 p.m. The Varsity Lady Wildcats will play the Vernon Yellow Jackets at 6 p.m., and alumni will be recognized after the rst game. All alumni are invited to visit with former classmates as we celebrate another year of tradition, excellence and Wildcat pride. Poplar Springs Homecoming 2013 POPLAR SPRINGS Poplar Springs High Schools Homecoming on Saturday, Jan. 26, will recognize the classes of 1943, 1953, 1963, 1973, 1983, 1993 and 2003. The Poplar Springs varsity girls game will begin at 5 p.m., the recognition ceremony will be at 6:15 p.m., and the varsity boys will play at 7 p.m. A reception will be held in the media center after the recognition of classes. Honored classes, alumni members, former principals, teachers and spouses are invited. Alumni also can become active members of the PSHS Alumni Association during the reception. The fee is $7 per year for one person or $10 a year for couples. The reception for alumni is funded through the PSHS Alumni Association. We are able to continue this tradition through your generous donations. A photographer will be present to make pictures during class recognition. One 8-by-10-inch photo will be $12. INDEX Society ................................. B2 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B6 By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY With the recent controversy over gun sales and ownership, local gun salesman and instructor Curtis Porter said education is essential. Theres been a massive local effort to increase security in heavily congregated places, said Porter, owner and senior gun instructor for Impact Fire Arms in Bonifay. The most response was from a very unlikely place, and thats been the churches. Weve been reviewing security measures that churches can take in response to an armed hostile and what can be done to better insure the safety of their congregation. Porter said the best way to make a decision concerning rearms is to become educated and stay informed. The rst thing were going to nd out is what your general need for the rearm is, Porter said. If its for self-defense, if its for home protection, if its a conceal/carry. Once you decide what its for, well go through the process of picking out a gun because the gun you have in mind might not necessarily be the gun you need for those purposes. He said he tries to get a feel for the customer and assess the level of experience the customer has with rearms. Once weve got that gured out, then well nd out if they want experience, he said. It sounds funny at rst, but theres some people who just want to know how to make it shoot and they dont want to learn anything else, and then youve got people who really want to know. The people who want to know, who want to go through a bunch of training, who really want to know how to operate a gun safely and to use it for defense, then we can push them in a different direction and a more complicated gun. Porter said if customers dont want the experience and just want to go out and shoot few rounds and keep it in their house, then for safety reasons, he would try to push them toward simpler guns such as revolvers. Once weve gured out what theyve needed, then well try to get them signed up for some classes, Porter said. Between me and my instructors and my staff, weve got almost 100 years worth of experience. Three of my instructors are law enforcement, and Ive started teaching in the military about 25 years; I was an instructor in the Marine Corps. Theres a big difference between someones dad taking them out and teaching them how to squirrel hunt and how to use a gun for protection, he said. If I cant convince them to come take some of our classes, then I try to convince them to nd a competent instructor to help them do that. To nd a competent instructor, Porter said potential students should check their credentials and look for experience. Theres a difference between a new instructor that has six months teaching experience and someone who has been doing it for a very long time and has real world experience, he said. Thats the most important difference between learning how to be an instructor for a classroom instead of being an instructor from real world experience. Ive had two tours of combat and found out real quick that what I was taught doesnt really work in violent confrontations. He said some of his law enforcement staff learned the same thing when they were in violent gun confrontations. You want to nd out their history and their background, he said. One of the best things to do is nd some of their previous students and ask them. For those who are still unsure if guns are for them, Porter advised they take some courses rst. Come take some classes, he said. What well show you real quick is that its not the gun thats dangerous, its the person who hold the gun in their hands. A gun itself is an inert object; it cannot hurt you. The only time people get hurt with a rearm is when people do not know how to properly use them. Porter said concealed weapons classes to cover the three rules of rearms safety: Always assume the gun is loaded. Keep your nger off trigger. Keep the gun pointed in a safe direction. The course also covers the National Ri e Associations rules of gun safety, types of handguns and functions of semis and revolvers, loading and unloading and the basics of marksmanship, including stance, sight alignment, breathing, trigger squeeze and follow through. Also covered are Florida statutes on where you can carry, dealing with a law enforcement of cer, lethal force, using your concealed weapon to get out of trouble, methods of concealment and range rules, safety and courses of re. Wednesday, JANUARY 23 2013 Instructor: Education essential for all gun owners PHOTOS BY CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser Curtis Porter, owner and lead senior gun instructor for Impact Fire Arms, discusses gun safety at his store in Bonifay. What well show you real quick is that its not the gun thats dangerous, its the person who hold the gun in their hands. A gun itself is an inert object; it cannot hurt you. The only time people get hurt with a rearm is when people do not know how to properly use them. Curtis Porter, owner, instructor, Impact Fire Arms Always assume the gun is loaded. Keep your nger off trigger. Keep the gun pointed in a safe direction. EYE ON SAFETY Different guns suit different customers, depending on the guns primary purpose. Gun education and safety classes can help determine which gun is right for which user and how to use them properly.

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Wednesday, January 23, 2013 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com Chipley Office We are located directly across the parking lot from the Walmart in Chipley "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley Office Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 1-31-13 FREE EYE E X AM CODE : W C 00 T odd R obinson, M D Board C ertified E ye Physician and C ataract S urgeon I n M emory of L ee M ullis, M D Smart Lenses SM Society Devin, Rushing wed in Key West Robert Devin and Gina Rushing are excited to announce their marriage Nov. 8, 2012, on Smathers Beach in Key West. Robert is the son of Ronald and Jean Devin of South Windsor, Conn. Gina is the daughter of Agnes and the late Theodore Rushing of Ponce de Leon. After the intimate ceremony, their kids, grandson and friends enjoyed a pub-crawl tour of Key West. The party continued as they celebrated Sunset Celebration at Mallory Square. All reboarded the cruise ship Carnival Ecstasy for a special reception dinner. The week-long family vacation, wedding and honeymoon included two stops in the Bahamas. Rob and Gina are employed at Northwest Florida Reception Center and will continue to reside in Chipley. Special to Extra Air Force Airman Chelsea M. Whatley, Air Force Airman Marian C. Cooper and Air Force Airman Artavia U. McKinnie recently graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical tness and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Whatley is the daughter of Sandra Kent of Chipley and Edward Whatley Sr. of Ohatchee, Ala. She is a 2010 graduate of Chipley High School. Cooper is the daughter of Vickie and Mason Cooper of Vernon. She is a 2010 graduate of Vernon High School. McKinnie is the daughter of Angela McKinnie of Chipley. She is a 2011 graduate of Washington County Christian School in Chipley. Special to Extra CHIPLEY Registered Nurse Carol Ricks, clinical liaison with Emerald Coast Hospice, recently spoke about the bene ts of hospice care with the Americans Veterans, Post 7 in Chipley. Emerald Coast Hospice is a We Honor Veterans Partner, which is a national hospice provider awareness campaign conducted by the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization in collaboration with the Department of Veterans Affairs. Special to Extra BONIFAY Sam Nolen recently was recognized by his pastor and church congregation as a 2012-13 scholarship recipient from The General Board of Higher Education & Ministry. He attends Red Hill United Methodist Church on Highway 2 in Bonifay, where he is active in the music ministry. Nolan is the son of Ken and Wendy Nolen. This ministry leads and serves the United Methodist Church in the recruitment, preparation, nurture, education and support of Christian leaders by providing scholarships funded through offerings, wills, annuities and other designated gifts. Nolen recently graduated from Bonifay High School and is attending Troy University, where he is majoring in music education and plays saxophone for the Sound of the South marching band. Raney named to Deans List Samantha Raney has been named to the Deans List at The Baptist College of Florida in Graceville for the fall 2012 semester. The Deans List is published each semester to honor those students who maintain a 3.25 to 3.99 grade point average on a 4.0 scale. Raney is a freshman at the Baptist College of Florida. She is active in her church, volunteers as a coach for the To Nocks Archery Club and helps with the Sew Crazy Club, both of Washington County 4-H. Samantha is the daughter of Gayle Atwood and the late Shane Raney of Chipley. She is a 2011 graduate of home schooling. The honor student is a member of Shiloh Baptist Church in Chipley. Golden named to Deans List Dr. Herbert H. J. Riedel, LBW Community College president, has announced academic honor students for the 2012 fall semester. A total of 104 students were named to the Presidents List, and 110 students were named to the Deans List. To qualify for these distinctions, students must be enrolled on a full-time basis and post a 3.5-3.99 (B+) grade point average to qualify for the Deans List and a 4.0 (A) grade point average to qualify for the Presidents List. Alex Elmer Golden of Westville received Presidents List honors. Military BRIEFS 3 graduate basic training MARIAN C. COOPER ARTAVIA U. MCKINNIE CHELSEA M. WHATLEY FOUR GENERATIONS Wedding Carol Ricks speaks about hospice with veterans SPECIAL TO EXTRA Pastor Matthew Rich, left, presents Sam Nolen with the 2012-13 scholarship at Red Hill United Methodist Church. SPECIAL TO EXTRA Four generations are represented with Kylee and Karlee Arrington, father Will Arrington, grandmother Debra Schaum and great-grandmother Jeanette Covington. Nolen receives scholarship Academic HONORS

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Wednesday, January 23, 2013 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Special to the Times/News TALLAHASSEE For the fourth year in a row, the Florida Department of Edu cation/Macys Teacher of the Year is a contender for the National Teacher of the Year award. Alex Lopes, Floridas 2013 Teacher of the Year, was named one of four nalists for the prestigious award by the Council of Chief State School Ofcers. He joins educators from Maryland, New Hampshire and Wash ington in line for the national award. The winner will be announced at a White House ceremony during National Recognition Week on April 21-16 in Washington, D.C. Gov. Rick Scott said Flor idas teachers are the back bone of our classrooms and they help students obtain the skills and talents they will need to get a job, build a family, and live their version of the American Dream. I look forward to continuing to nd ways we can support our educators so they have the tools they need to suc ceed. On behalf of all Floridi ans, I would like to wish Alex the best of luck. Florida has a strong tra dition of quality, passionate educators and Mr. Lopes is no exception, said Commis sioner of Education Dr. Tony Bennett. It is important to recognize those who go above and beyond in the teaching profession and serve our stu dents so diligently. I congrat ulate Mr. Lopes on being a nalist for one of our nations highest teaching honors. Lopes is a prekindergar ten special education teach er from Carol City Elemen tary School in Miami-Dade County. By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Sue Brown was elected the new presi dent of the Holmes County Historical Society during their regularly scheduled meeting Thursday, Jan. 10. Otheres elected were Buford Williams, secretary; Lavonne Tardif, treasurer; David Bevan, historian; and John Coomer stepped down from management duties to assume responsibilities as a lifetime member of the His torical Society. Williams said the biggest trouble facing the Histori cal Society was diminishing membership. Weve got to cry for help, Williams said. Due to members dying off or not attending any more, the Historical Society is in dire need of help. He said membership dues were only $10 and they meet at 4 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the Historical Society at 412 W. Kansas in Bonifay. This is a plea out to any one who has interest in pre serving the history of Hol mes County, Williams said. We dont want to end up like that tomb stone up north that reads: Here lies Lester Moore; Four slugs from a .44; No Les No Moore. Williams said one could be a supporter and/or mem ber of the Holmes County Historical Society with out having to attend the meetings. We dont want our Hol mes County Historical Soci ety to die on the vine, said Williams. I know theres people out there who are willing and wanting to sup port their history. Its our roots and our history were trying to protect, and we ap preciate all the support we can get. At the previous meeting on Nov. 8, Tardif noted the money in the bank as reads, $278.03 should read $268.03 and it was approved. Member Sue Williams said Buford Williams had sent his letter on improv ing our membership to the editor of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser but did not know if it had been print ed as of that date. Bevan said he was still working on Dr. Pauls con tribution to our community and plans to search for fur ther information in the lo cal library. He also reported that he cleaned the grave of George Banll, founder of Bonifay. The next regularly scheduled meeting of the Holmes County Historical Society will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 8. Special to the Times/News SOUTHPORT Gulf Coast Electric Co operative Compliance Ofcer Lacy Pet tis recently completed the Occupation al Safety and Health Administrations 30-hour Outreach Training Program in construction. The OSHA Outreach Training Pro gram for the construction industry pro vides training on the recognition, avoid ance, abatement and prevention of safe ty and health hazards in workplaces. This training helps ensure workers are knowledgeable about workplace haz ards and their rights and contributes to increased productivity. Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative is part of Touchstone Energy. About 75 employees serve more than 20,000 meters and 2,500 miles of line in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Jackson, Wal ton and Washington counties and in the municipalities of Wewahitchka, Ebro, Lynn Haven, White City, Fountain and Southport. Special to the Times/News As winter break comes to a close, nu merous students nd themselves back at home with a fridge full of leftovers. For many pet owners, this means a few less trips to the store for pet food. While sharing lunch with your four-legged friend is possible, owners should real ize that your pet has particular dietary restrictions it must follow to guarantee that it stays happy and healthy. People enjoy sharing food with their pets, it is part of the bonding process, said Deb Zoran, doctor of veterinary medicine, and associate professor at Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medi cine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM). But proper control of the types and amounts of food pets are served is cru cial for its safety. For example, a diet consisting too high of fats can very dangerous for dogs, even causing such problems as di arrhea or in severe cases pancreatitis, Zoran said. The additional calories found in average table foods can also lead to obesity problems in your pet if not controlled. These problems arise not from the food itself, as whole foods such as meat and potatoes are very nutritious and well digested, but from the many spic es added and the food not being in the proper balance for the pet. The food itself is perfectly good for our pets, Zoran said. If owners want to feed human food and are willing to follow prescribed recipes set up by a nu tritionist, then it is an excellent way to meet their nutritional needs. Choosing to feed your pet in this fashion also leaves the owner with the responsibility for meeting their pets proper nutritional needs, which are different for dogs and cats. Chicken is an excellent and frequently used meat source to feed pets, with the fat removed for dogs and left in place for cats. Generally high fat things are poten tially very problematic for dogs, while cats dont need carbs in their diets at all, Zoran said. Spices and season ings, especially onions, capsaicin, and other additives are all potentially prob lematic in your pet food as well. About pet talk Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Sto ries can be viewed at vetmed.tamu. edu/pettalk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to cvmtoday@cvm.tamu. edu. Historical Society elects new president Pet talk: Scrap the table scraps? P HOTOS SPE C IAL TO THE T I M ES /N E W S Left: Snow is a 1to 2-year-old female white English cross, about 40 pounds. She is a real beauty with a very short, pure white coat and golden eyes. She is very good on a leash, calm and gentle. She loves lying out on the grass in the sun and rolling over for belly rubs and she will take the smallest treat from your hand ever so gently. Right: Jose is a 1-year-old male rat terrier/Chihuahua cross, about 7 or 8 pounds. He is a sweet little guy, good on a leash and loves to snuggle with someone who will rub his head or belly and make him feel safe. He should do well in a home that already has pets. Animal Control of West Florida is at 686 U.S. 90 in Chipley and is open Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon. For more information, call 638-2082. Pettis completes OSHA program Floridas Teacher of the Year is national nalistS PE C IAL TO THE T I M ES /N E W S

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Special to Extra VERNON Precept Bible Studies are being offered at Ebenezer Church in February at 3334 Holmes Valley Road in Vernon. Deadline for registration is Feb. 6, with classes beginning the week of Feb. 10. You can register by contacting Kathy Rodgers at ebc@aarkenterprises. com or 535-2227. List the class name, day, and time desired, along with a contact phone number. In & Out and Precept Upon Precept courses will cost $12 for workbooks. Childcare will be offered, but must be pre-arranged at registration. If you are not able to cover the cost of the workbook, let Kathy know at registration. These studies take an in-depth look at what the Word of God has to say concerning various subjects. Each courses homework is designed to get the student in and out in 20 minutes per day, ve days a week. Class time consists of a one hour discussion from that weeks homework and one hour of video from Kay Arthur or others giving additional insight. Marriage Without Regrets Learning How to Become One (16 lessons): Married and single men and women alike will bene t from this thorough study of Gods Word on marriage the roles of husband and wife, effective and compassionate communication, sex, love, nances, divorce and remarriage. Thursdays from 6:30-8:30 p.m. and Sundays from 5-7 p.m. Covenant: Knowing Gods Covenant (11 lessons): See this incredible thread running from Genesis through Revelation. God enters into a binding agreement with His people and always keeps His promises. Trusting Him as a covenant partner frees us from the bondage of worry and anxiety. Tuesdays from 9:3011:30 a.m. and 6:30-8:30 p.m. Spiritual Gifts: Discover Your Spiritual Gifts (12 lessons): What has God called you to do and uniquely equipped you for? Discover the spiritual gifts God has given you and understand those given to all believers to glorify Himself and strengthen His church. Sundays from 2:304:30 p.m. This may also be offered as a 40 minute Study beginning Wednesday, March 20, to be determined as interest dictates. The 40 minute Bible Studies have no homework and help you discover for yourself, through examining the Word of God, what He has to say on various topics and how it applies to your life. They are designed to be completed and discussed by the whole group in six session. Having A Real Relationship With God (6 Weeks): Have you ever wondered if its possible to have a meaningful and authentic relationship with God one that really works in the day-in and day-out circumstances of your life? This powerful, six-week, no homework inductive Bible Study will help you discover for yourself how such a rewarding relationship with God is possible. This study opens the Bible to show you the way to salvation, with a special focus on where you stand with God, how your sin keeps you from knowing him, and how Christ bridged the chasm between humanity and God. Wednesdays at 7:20 p.m. Harris Chapel Revival CARYVILLE Harris Chapel Holiness Churchs revival concludes tonight, Jan. 23, when the nal service is held at 7 p.m. Special guest speakers will be Norman E. Harris, Steve Andrews, Marvin Grier, Tonya Russ and Judy Harris. The church is located eight miles north of Caryville on Highway 179. For more information call pastor Norman Harris at 547-3888. Fourth Friday Mission Supper BONIFAY Please join us for our Fourth Friday Mission Supper at Red Hill Methodist Church, in Bonifay, at 5:30 p.m. today, Jan. 23. The menu will be cat sh lets, smoked chicken, baked beans, coleslaw, cheese grits, hushpuppies, dessert and tea. We are a small church having a good time in the Lord. Donations accepted. For more information call Lind Yarbrough at 334-684-3106 after 5:30 p.m. Christian Haven Church Jam Session CHIPLEY Christian Haven Church will be holding their monthly Jam Session on Feb 2. Refreshments will start at 6 p.m. and singing shortly after. For more information you may call 638-0836 or 773-2620. But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. First Baptist Church come as you are Mike Orr, Pastor 1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830 Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. Bear Wrongs Patiently th spiritual work of mercy is to bear wrongs patiently. Bearing wrongs patiently does not, how ever, mean being a doormat for others to walk on. It simply means that, regardless of the wrongs which we suffer, we should bear them all patiently. For ex ample, if you have had something stolen from your unlocked car, this virtue requires that you treat this with patience and equanimity, but not that you con tinue to keep your car unlocked. It is more about the attitude that you have concerning the wrong done to you. We might take a lesson from the ancient stoics, who counseled that every event has two handles, as it were, one by which it can be borne and one by which it is unbearable. Remember that everything here is temporary and that liars, thieves, and even murderers really have no power over our immortal souls. Finally, consider the example of Jesus in his last days. Faced with false charges and inhuman torture and suffering, he prayed for his accusers and tormentors. We should show patience by praying for those who wrong us, realizing that they are the ones who have truly been harmed by their misdeeds. BROWN FUNERAL HOME 1068 Main Street, Chipley 638-4010 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser This Message Courtesy of For one is approved if, mind ful of God, he endures pain while suffering unjustly. For what credit is it, if when you do wrong and are beaten for it you take it patiently? But if when you do right and suffer for it you take it patiently, you have Gods approval. R.S.V. 1 Peter 2:19-21 Personally, I sure will be glad when January is over. If confession is good for the soul, then let me have a good soul cleansing and confess that January is not my favorite month of the year. At the beginning of each year, a certain resident in our home begins acting like an angel and starts harping about a diet. But, not just a diet. I could take that, I think. Rather, my diet. What my diet has to do with her is a question I have yet to ask. One of my New Years resolutions is to ask no question I do not want to hear the answer. Believe me when I say ignorance is bliss. The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage is a health nut, whereas, I am just a plain nut with lots of fudge icing on the top. As nuts are concerned, I prefer nuts with fudge icing. Every year right after Christmas and before the New Year comes in, my wife and I have this conversation about the upcoming diet. I need to correct myself here. When I use the word conversation, I probably should use the word monologue. When it comes to diets, I have absolutely nothing to say. My wife on the other hand, has plenty to say and when she is saying it to me, she holds nothing back. When it comes to diets and dieting, I have my own ideas about the whole matter. I do not see myself as fat, just post-thin. For arguments sake, lets say I am fat. I take refuge in the Bible along this line, which says, All the fat is the Lords (Leviticus 4:16b KJV). If I was to argue with my wife, which I promise you I am not going to, I could lay all of the blame about my being post-thin on her. I have pictures to prove my point. Before we got married, I was very thin. Now look at me! I dont have to draw a picture for you, do I? Along this line of diets, I think I am doing rather well. I have come up with ideas that have made me quite comfortable along this line. Last week I bought a dress shirt and brought it home. When I tried it on it was three sizes too big for me making me look rather thin. I love that shirt. That shirt was made for people like me. Every time I wear that shirt in public somebody usually says, You mustve lost a lot of weight. I just smile. I have other shirts in my closet that have brought me no end of grief. Here is what I want to know. Why do my shirts get thin but I dont? After all, we go to the same places and eat at the same restaurants. There is something here I believe I am missing! Whenever I am off on a trip somewhere my wife always says just as I leave, Make sure that you watch what you eat while youre away. I am delighted to report to her or anybody else who will listen that I always watch what I eat. After all, I would hate to take a bite of broccoli by mistake. Therefore, I watch every bite I eat to make sure it is as delicious as possible. My wife is always encouraging me to eat more fruit. I believe fruit is a matter of personal opinion and preference. My wife believes that bananas are fruit. I, on the other hand, believe that a banana split is fruit. My wife has the idea that an Apple a day keeps the doctor away. I have a different slant on that idea. I believe an Apple Fritter a day keeps everybody away. When it comes to salads, my wife is the crowned queen of salads. She has a golden touch when it comes to making salads. If I am not careful, she will serve me a salad three times a day. Another thing I need to watch out for with her salads. Occasionally, she will try to slip in some form of broccoli. For some unknown reason she believes broccoli is the panacea for all ills nutritionally. As diets come and go, my diets usually go without leaving a trace behind them. Years ago, I got serious about a diet and was determined to lose 25 pounds of ugly fat. Much to my chagrin, I lost the other fat instead. Now look at me! The diet phase is beginning to run its course as we come to the close of January. Towards the end of January, my lovely bride begins thinking of Valentines Day. For me, whatever gets her attention off my diet is good news any day of the week. I suppose it is true what people say that you are what you eat. I further suppose that it is important to eat the right things. Not only is that true physically but also spiritually. The Bible has something to say about this. As newborn babes, desire the sincere milk of the word, that ye may grow thereby (1 Peter 2:1 KJV). Nothing is more important in my daily routine than feasting on the Word of God. I may not do very well on my physical diet, but I do take special care about my spiritual diet. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, P.O. Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call 866-5522543 or email jamessnyder2@ att.net. His web site is www. jamessnyderministries.com. My New Years diet ts me to a T-shirt FAITH Wednesday, January 23, 2013 B Page 4 Section www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com DR. JAMES L. SNYDER Out to Pastor Faith BRIEFS Ebenezer Church to offer classes in February MONDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach of ce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call 415-5999. TUESDAY 8 to 9 a.m.: Tai Chi Class at the Washington County Public Library, Chipley. 8 to 10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 5 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at 6:25 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-451 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A. WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. 11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County residents only). 9 a.m. 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 1 p.m.: Writers Group meets third Thursday at the Chipley Library. 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society second Thursday of each month. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church. 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6:30 p.m.: TOPS Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A. Community CALENDAR

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Wednesday, January 23, 2013 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences. Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section of www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books In partnership with Legacy com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at or Mrs. Clyty Odessie Casey, 91, of Ebro, passed away Jan. 14, 2013, at Bonifay Nursing and Rehab Center in Bonifay. She was born March 21, 1921, in Ebro to the late Ira Christopher Columbus Strickland and Zellie Miller Strickland. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Casey was preceded in death by her husband, Samuel Edward Casey; three brothers, Emmett Strickland, G.W. Strickland and Ira Strickland Jr.; one sister, Bethel Morrell; and one granddaughter, Dawn Waller. Mrs. Casey is survived by two sons, Eddie Olean Casey of Ebro and Billy Gene Casey and wife, Sarah, of Ebro; one daughter, Christine Casey of Ebro; three sisters, Elma Morrell of Ebro, Velma Stiller of Ebro and Idell Anglin of Ebro; seven grandchildren, Steve Casey, Troy Casey, Greg Casey, Donna Clark, Sherri Taylor, Laurie Waller and Shane Waller; 14 greatgrandchildren, and seven great-great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 1 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013, at Spring Valley Holiness Church with the Rev. Tommy Taylor, the Rev. Horace McCormick and the Rev. Wesley Hall of ciating. Interment followed in the Ebro Community Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends from 6-8 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013, at Spring Valley Holiness Church. Clyty O. Casey Bernice Catherine Mitchell Ming-Squires passed away Jan. 14, 2013, in Graceville. She was born May 25, 1919, in Jackson County. She was preceded in death by her parents, Brown Dozier and Levada Golden Mitchell; rst husband, Mansel Ming (1937-1969); second husband, George Squires (1972-2002); and one sister Willie Murl Mitchell Miller. Bernice is survived by her daughter, Sarah Catherine Ming (Marvin) Marley of Graceville; brother, Brown Dovel (Jane) Mitchell of Lynn Haven; grandchildren, Marc E. (Sandy) Marley of Wilsonville, Ala., Phillip C. (Rachel) Marley of Greenville, N.C., Todd M. (Michelle) Marley of Marianna, Emily C. Marley (Ray) Gillis of Blountstown and Vicki L. Marley (Mike) Inscho of Graceville; 18 great grandchildren; three great-great grandchildren; stepdaughters, Christine Squires-Strayer of Grand Island, Mary Nell SquiresWhitehead of Bonifay and Juanita Squires-Myers of Chipley; stepson, Buddy Squires of Newnan, Ga.; 13 stepgrandchildren; 32 great-stepgrandchildren; eight great-greatstepchildren; and numerous nieces, nephew and cousins. Funeral services for Bernice were held at 2 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013, at Galilee Methodist Church with the Rev. Robert Marley and the Rev. Scott Sessions of ciating. Interment followed in the Galilee Cemetery. A time of remembrance was held from 1 p.m. until time of service. Williams Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Bernice C. Ming-Squires Cozie D. Brown, 98, of Chipley, passed away Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013 in the Northwest Florida Community Hospital. Mrs. Cozie was born Oct. 4, 1914, in Chipley to the late Henry and Daisy (Burch) Johnson. She was a lifelong resident of Chipley and a long time member of Blue Lake Baptist Church where she had many times served as Sunday School teacher and Vacation Bible School worker. In addition to her parents, she is predeceased by her husband of 51 years, Buford Brown. Survivors include one son, Don Brown and wife, Nina, of Chipley; one sister, Ozie Pippin of Dothan, Ala.; three grandchildren, Cindy Rawls and husband, Scott, of Havana, Eric Brown and wife, Teresa, of Chipley and Greta Harris of Lynn Haven; ve great-grandchildren, Adam Padgett, Hannah Ashe, Ryan Brown, Jordan Brown and Ava Harris and many, many people that she had touched the lives of. The family received friends Monday, Jan. 14, 2013, from 6-8 p.m. at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel. Funeral services were held Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2013, at 3 p.m. at Blue Lake Baptist Church with the Rev. Tim Evans and the Rev. Michael Orr of ciating. Interment followed in Blue Lake Cemetery. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. Cozie D. Brown Vera Vernell Bush Peterson, 94, of Chipley, passed away Sunday, Jan. 13, 2013, in the Northwest Florida Community Hospital. Mrs. Vera was born Jan. 27, 1918, in Southport to the late Curtis Cohen and Margaret Jane (Taylor) Pennington. She had been a resident of Washington County most of her life and was a homemaker. Mrs. Vera was one of the original founders and charter member of the Grace Assembly at Chipley. Her life centered around her family and her church. In addition to her parents, she is predeceased by her husband of 54 years, Thomas Ell Bush, and her husband of 5 years, Lloyd H. Peterson; one son, Jimmy Doyle Bush; three brothers, Wilmer Pennington, James Thelmer Pennington and Curtis C. Pennington; one sister, Waltzy Kimmons; and a half sister, Lula Pennington. Survivors include two sons, Thomas Alton Bush and wife, Phyllis, of Chipley and Curtis Marcus Bush of Pinckard, Ala.; two daughters, Mary Helen Clifford of Pensacola and Betty Faye Parker and husband, Larry, of Chipley; daughter-in-law, Annie Jo Bush (wife of Jimmy Bush); 11 grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren; six great-great-grandchildren and a host of nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013, at 3 p.m. in the Grace Assembly at Chipley Church with the Rev. Dallas Pettis of ciating. The family received friends one hour prior to services. Interment followed in Glenwood Cemetery. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net. Vera V. Peterson Mr. Lee Jennings Blalock of Highway 177-A, Bonifay, passed away Monday, Jan. 14, 2013. He was 77. Mr. Blalock, affectionately known as Lee, was born May 8, 1935, in Geneva County, Ala., to the late Lex Steagall and Era Mae Shiver Blalock. After several years of service, he retired from Jackson Correctional Institute as a lieutenant. Lee loved the outdoors. He enjoyed working on his farm, shing and quail hunting. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy, and he attended Pleasant Home Freewill Baptist Church. In addition to his parents, his brother, Harvey Blalock, preceded him in death. Survivors include his wife of 57 years, Ann Smith Blalock; three sons, Kenny Blalock (Kathy), Roger Blalock (Lucia) and Jeff Blalock; three grandchildren, Kelly Williams, Amanda Sewell (Zach) and Kendall Harker (Austin); four greatgrandchildren, Cheyenne and Paden Miller and Rhett and McKinley Sewell, all of Bonifay, and other extended family and a host of friends. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013, in the chapel of Sorrells Funeral Home in Geneva with the Rev. Jay Ward and the Rev. Jerry McAdams of ciating. Burial followed in the Pleasant Home Freewill Baptist Church Cemetery with military honors and Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Wednesday, Jan. 16, from 6-8 p.m. Flowers will be accepted or memorial contributions may be made to the Pleasant Home Freewill Baptist Church, Black, AL 36314. Lee J. Blalock LEE J. BLALOCK Dorman L. Kight, Don or Donnie, 75, passed away on Jan. 13, 2013, after an extended illness. He was born on Aug. 3, 1937, in Tallassee, Ala. He was raised in Bonifay, along with his two brothers. Don served in the Air Force, and after his service in the military he pursued a college degree at the Miami-Dade Jr. College, receiving an associates degree in 1970, and then attended the University of Florida where he received his bachelors degree in accounting in 1972. He moved to Tallahassee, to raise his family and pursue his professional career. After more than 30 years as an accountant, he retired from Department of Environmental Protection (formerly known as Department of Natural Resources-Division of Law Enforcement) to spend more time with his grandkids and have more time for his hobbies of hunting, shing, ballroom and country-western dancing. Don Kight is survived by his daughters Carina Dunlap and her husband, Andrew, and Tara Hewitt and her husband, Craig; ve grandchildren, Adam Dunlap, Evan Dunlap, Craig Hewitt III, Catherine Hewitt and Camille Hewitt; two brothers, Frank Kight and his wife, Patricia, of Leroy, Ala., and Joe Kight and wife, Diane, of Pensacola; and many nieces, nephews and cousins, all of whom held a special place in his heart. Funeral services were held at John Wesley United Methodist Church in Tallahassee on Wednesday, Jan. 16 at 3 p.m. Family received visitors immediately following the service at the home of Carina Dunlap until 6 p.m. A graveside service for close friends and family will be held the following day at noon Eastern Time at Bonifay; 507 North Caryville Rd., Bonifay, FL. 32425. The family would like to thank everyone who touched our loved ones life, we are forever grateful for your kindness and friendship. In lieu of owers, please make donations in his memory to the National Parkinsons Foundation, North Florida Chapter; PO Box 14722 Tallahassee, FL 32317, www.npfnorth orida. org. The Chapter is committed to serving the local Parkinson community in cooperation with the Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare Parkinsons Center. Culleys Meadowwood Funeral Home, 1737 Riggins Road, is in charge of arrangements. Dorman L. Kight DORMAN L. KIGHT Bobby Burl Law, 68, of Sunny Hills, passed away on Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013. He was a resident of Panama City most of his life. He graduated from Bay High School and retired from Gulf Power Company after 35 years. Bobby was a loyal member of Shepherds Gate Church, where he was active in many charitable projects both locally and in Mexico, where he traveled many times to assist in building projects. Bobby was a generous, loving and devoted man who shared his many talents with his family and friends throughout his life. He loved his family and spent many hours enjoying his six grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, John D. and Katherine Steverson Law. Survivors include his wife of 47 years, Suzan Metz Law; two children, Amy Miller and husband, Richard, of Hamilton, Ga., and Burl Law and wife, Megan, of Sunny Hills; grandchildren, Colt, Grace, Mercy, Truth and Kindred Miller and Olivia Law; sister, Peggy Palmer and Penny of Wisconsin and Johnny Law and wife, Kim, of Crestview, and many nieces, nephews and cousins. A celebration of life was held at 2 p.m., Friday, Jan. 18, 2013, at Shepherds Gate Church in Wausau. Contributions in Bobbys memory may be made to the NRA. Bobby B. Law Earnest Buford Sims, 90, of Marianna, died Jan. 7, 2013. Funeral services were held on, January 10, 2013, at James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel. Interment followed at Pope Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing. Earnest B. Sims Michael Lynn Krontz, 64, of Bonifay, died Nov. 22, 2012. Memorialization was by cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Michael L. Krontz Freddie Joe Gainey, 57 of Bonifay, died on Friday, Jan. 11, 2013, at his Residence in Bonifay. Born Monday, March 28, 1955, in Holmes County, he was the son of the late Joe Gainey and the late Annie Flowers Gainey. He was the husband of Jeanie Gainey. Surviving are sons, Billy Joe Gainey of Dothan, Ala., Michael Joe Gainey of Bonifay and Chris Mark Joe Gainey of Bonifay; daughters, Teresa Goodwin of DeFuniak Springs, Michelle Gainey of Bonifay and Cyrstal Redmon of Vernon; sisters, Debbie Gainey of Bonifay, Vicki Gainey of Bonifay and Melissa Thomas of Bonifay, and 13 grandchildren. A funeral service was held at 11 a.m., on Monday, Jan. 14, 2013, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel with Gino Mayo officiating. Interment followed in Bonifay Cemetery, Bonifay, FL with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 10-11 a.m. on Monday, Jan. 14, 2013, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Freddie J. Gainey Mrs. Ingeborg Adelheit Rabon of Chipley passed away Friday, Jan. 18, 2013. She was 88. Inge was born Nov. 10, 1924, in Magdeburg, Germany, to the late Johannes Bttger and Erna Liebetrutt. Her husband, Willis Elbert Rabon, and brother, Hanns Bttger, preceded her in death. Survivors include her son, Willis Rabon, Havana; grandson, Orion Rabon; great-granddaughter, Audriona Rabon, Tallahassee; and sister, Mickey Wilson, Chipley, as well as several special nieces, along with other extended family. A private memorial service was conducted by family members at her home. Memorial contributions may be made to Covenant Hospice, 4440 Lafayette St. Suite C, Marianna, FL 32446. Ingeborg A. Rabon Obituaries MORE OBITUARIES B6

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Wednesday, January 23, 2013 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra B6 | Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, January 23, 2013 1-5210 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 30-2012-CA-000252 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA N.A. Plaintiff, v. JAMES B. WAFFORD ; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAMES B. WAFFORD; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Defendant(s), NOTICE OF ACTION JAMES B. WAFFORD Last Known Address: 807 McGee Road Bonifay, Florida 32425 Current Address: Unknown. Previous Address: 1710 Sims Boulevard Bonifay, Florida 32425 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAMES B. WAFFORD Last Known Address: 807 McGee Road Bonifay, Florida 32425. Current Address: Unknown. Previous Address: Unknown. ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Holmes County, Florida: THE SOUTH 164 FEET OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of: 807 McGee Road, Bonifay, Florida 32425 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses on or before February 15, 2013, a date which is within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 350 Jim Moran Blvd., Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on October 24, 2012. CODY TAYLOR CLERK OF THE COURT By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. Attorney for Plaintiff Michael T. Gelety, Esquire Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A 350 Jim Moran Blvd, Suite 100 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Telephone: (954) 354-3544. Facsimile: (954) 354-3545 Email: mgelety@erwlaw.com Secondary Email: Erwparalegal.boa2@erwla w.com. IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days beore your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser January 16, 23, 2013. 1-5214 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: Edward Hutchins, Last known address of: 1593 Blue Creek Rd, Ponce de Leon, FL 32455; Jennifer M Lynch, Last known address of: 1125 Alex Brown Rd., Bonifay, FL 32425. You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Holmes County, Florida, no later than thirty(30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser January 23, 2013. 1-5212 PUBLIC AUCTION Howell Mini-Storage at 309 S. Waukesha St Bonifay Fl. 32425 will hold a private or public auction on the contents of these units, for nonpayment according to Fl Statute 83. Tenant has until the February 2, 2013 at 10:00 AM to pay in full. No checks. Items of general household goods storage in buildings listed below. Buidling 1 unit 7 Robert Brinkley. Building 3 unit 1 Gerald Greene. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser January 16, 23, 2013. 1-5213 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 30-2012-CA-000308 VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND Tennessee FINANCE INC., a corporation authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs FELINA M. HARRIS, a/k/a FELINA MARIA HARRIS and JOHN C. HARRIS, a/k/a JOHN CALVIN HARRIS wife and husband; ; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION, if any, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on January 7, 2013 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on February 7, 2013 at 11:00 A.M. (CST) at the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 North Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425 for the following described property: Parcel 2, SPRING HILL FARM, a subdivision according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 24, 25 and 26, in the Public Records of Holmes County, Florida. Together with that certain 2010 CMH RIVERVIEW, 76 x 16 mobile home bearing identification numbers: CS2010737TNA and CS2010737TNB. Property Address: 1465 Griffin Drive, Westville, FL 32464. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTERST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: January 11, 2013. CODY TAYLOR, CLERK HOLMES COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT By: Diane Eaton, Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser January 23, 30, 2013. 1-5215 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 30-2012-CA-000356. 2010-3 SFR VENTURE, LLC vs. DONNY A. GIBSON, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: DONNY A. GIBSON, 2357 HWY 177A, BONIFAY, FL 32425 and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DONNY A. GIBSON, 2357 HWY 177A, BONIFAY, FL 32425, LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED, 2357 HWY 177A, BONIFAY, FL 32425. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING AT THE SE CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4 OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG EAST SIDE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4 880 FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE RUN WEST 165 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 880 FEET, PARALLEL TO THE EASTERN SIDE OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4, TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID FORTY; THENCE EAST 165 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT: COMMENCE AT THE SE CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4 OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE EAST SIDE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4 350 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH ALONG SAID EAST LINE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4, 530 FEET; THENCE RUN WEST 165 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 530 FEET; THENCE RUN EAST 165 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. has been filed against you and you are required to file a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Casey Jernigan King, McCalla Raymer, LLC, 225 E. Robinson St. Suite 660, Orlando, FL 32801 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 28 day of November, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser January 23, 30, 2013. Daniel Walton Padgett passed away Dec. 10, 2012. He was the second child born to Daniel Morrison Padgett and Dollie Bell Brownell. He was born in Caryville on Jan. 27, 1927. During WWII, his family moved to Panama City. While attending Bay County High School, Dan Padgett joined the U.S. Navy. When the war was over, he returned and graduated from Bay High. He attended Florida State University and graduated with a B.S. in mathematics. During his student days at FSU, Padgett responded to the call of God to the ministry. He was ordained at Hickory Hill Baptist Church, of which he was a charter member. His rst-time pastorate was at New Hope Baptist Church in Holmes County. During that time, he was employed at Eglin Air Force Base. In 1953, Dan Padgett enrolled in Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas, where he received the Master of Divinity. During his ve years as a seminary student, he worked full time as a senior analog computer engineer at Chance Vought Aircraft in Grand Prairie, Texas. In 1954, Dan Padgett married Pauline Polly Donaldson of Cairo, Ga. For seven years, he was pastor at Thomasville Road Baptist Church in Tallahassee. He was employed by the Florida Baptist Convention in Jacksonville as a consultant for childrens curriculum in the Training Union Department. Later, he served as Minister of Education at Hendricks Avenue Baptist Church. In 1970, he accepted a position in Nashville, Tenn., at the Baptist Sunday School Board (now Lifeway) as a consultant and editor of childrens Sunday School and Vacation Bible School literature. Padgett moved back to Holmes County and became principal/teacher at Prosperity Elementary School in 1973. He also pastored at Hickory Hill Baptist Church for 12 years. He became the executive director of the Washington-Holmes Association for Retarded Citizens (ARC), a training school for mentally challenged adults in Chipley. He was the pastor of Sandy Creek Baptist Church for 13 years. During his years in Florida, Padgett was active in civic and community affairs. In his retirement, he was called on many times to ll pulpits and to conduct funerals. For 47 years, he served as chairman of the annual Padgett Reunion. He returned to Nashville, Tenn., in 2010 to spend more time with his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He was known as Papa and will be missed greatly. He is preceded in death by his parents; brothers, Charles Quinton Padgett, Clyde Padgett and Freddie Padgett; and son-inlaw, James Agresta. He is survived by Polly, his devoted wife of 58 years; daughters, Pamela Hughes and Paula Agresta; son, Philip Padgett, all of Nolensville, Tenn.; grandchildren, Heather (Josh) Parker, Marc (Wendy) Hughes, Cal and Abby Agresta, and Dillon, Gabriella, Meredith, Katherine and Preston Padgett; greatgrandchildren, Tinsley, Savannah and Arye Parker and Amara Hughes; sisters and brother, Lola (Jack) Silver, Sue (Skip) Walker and John Padgett; several nieces and nephews; and numerous close friends. Funeral services and internment were held in Nolensville, Tenn., on Dec. 14, 2012. A memorial service for family and friends will be held on Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013, at 11 a.m. at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. In memory of Dan Padgett, contributions may be made to the Dan and Polly Padgett Benevolence Fund at Hickory Hill Baptist Church. Woodbine Funeral Home and Waller Chapel Directors, 615-776-7009, was in charge of arrangements. Daniel W. Padgett DANIEL W. PADGETT OBITUARIES from page B5 Mrs. Shelba Jean Baker Bowers of Bowers Road, Westville, passed away Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013, surrounded by her loving family. She was 76. Shelba was born Sept. 7, 1936, in Holmes County to the late George Luther and Bessie Powell Baker. She was a very loving and devoted wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. Shelba always had a smile for everyone she met. In addition to her parents a grandson, Jacob Armstrong preceded her in death. Survivors include her husband of 48 years, Roland Dee Bowers, Westville; one son, Charles Armstrong (Pam), Westville; two daughters, Cynthia Armstrong, Westville, and Kimberly Riley (Walt), Spanish Fort, Ala.; six grandchildren, Justin Armstrong (Tabitha), Geneva, Casey and Jesse Armstrong, both of Westville, Chase, Clint and Amanda Riley, all of Spanish Fort, Ala.; two great-grandchildren, Makayla Thomasson and Cheyanne Armstrong, both of Geneva; three sisters, Mavis Brown (George), Jackson, S.C., Faye Brown, Ponce de Leon, Barbara Glass (Thomas), Geneva; one brother, Dale Baker (Margaret), Westville, and several special nieces, nephews, other extended family and a host of friends. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2013, at Open Pond United Pentecostal Church with the Rev. Steven Connell ofciating and Ernie Land delivering the eulogy. Mrs. Bowers was placed into the church one hour prior to service time. Burial followed in the Campground Cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Monday, Jan. 14, from 6-8 p.m. Flowers will be accepted or memorial contributions may be made to Covenant Hospice, 4440 Lafayette St. Suite C, Marianna, FL 32446. Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva, 334684-9999, is in charge of arrangements. Express your condolences in our guest book at www.sorrellsfuneralhomes.com. Shelba J. Bowers SHELBA J. BOWERS Lamar Grantham, 64, of Vernon, died Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013, at his residence. He was born April 23, 1948, to the late Lloyd Grantham and Lillie (Carter) Grantham. Mr. Grantham was a lifelong resident of Vernon. He was of the Pentecostal faith and a member of Christian Haven Church. Mr. Grantham worked in the maintenance department for the city of Chipley. He is survived by his wife, Laurie Grantham, of Vernon; four sons, Elliot Grantham of Wausau, Austin Grantham of Wausau, Zachary Kortering of Vernon and Daniel Grantham of Vernon; three daughters, Lillie Helton of Vernon, Caylah Kortering of Chipley and Ellen Grantham of Vernon; one brother, Loyal Grantham, Crawfordville; three sisters, Lena Raulerson of Crawfordville, Louise Pelache of Bay County and Lurine Skompski of Bay County; and two grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013, at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel with the Rev. Carlos Finch and the Rev. Ronnie Gene Hagan ofciating. Family received friends one hour prior to service. Interment followed at Wausau Memorial Garden in Wausau, with Brown Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. Lamar Grantham Leroy Mitchell Perry, 80, of Melbourne, died Jan. 11, 2013. Funeral services were held on Jan 14, 2013, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Interment followed at Bonifay Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing.Leroy M. Perry Community EVENTSN SD AR Chipola Chapter to meetM ARIANNA Chipola Chap ter NSDAR will meet at 11 a.m. today at the Hudnall Building Community Room. Dr. Ray Mar ling will speak about Womens Heart Health. Reservations are required for the luncheon and may be made by contact ing Vice Regent Carolyn Jordan at 638-1947 or cdjordan@bell south.net. Concerned A merican Patriots meetingM ARIANNA Concerned American Patriots of Jackson County will hold its rst meet ing of the year at 6 p.m. today at the Ag. Center on Highway 90 West (next to the National Guard Armory). Speaker is Mike Maharrey, national com munications director for the Tenth Amendment Center. His subject will be Our Last Hope Rediscovering the Lost Road to Liberty. Focus is on under standing the relationship be tween states and the federal government and why it matters. Everyone is invited, and admis sion is free.

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Wednesday, January 23, 2013 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 “Can You Dig It?” Heavy Equipment School. 3wk Training Program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Excavators. Local Job Placement Asst. VA Benefits Approved. 2 National Certifications. Call 866-362-6497 B B U S I N E S S USINESS G G U I D E UIDE T o P l a c e A n A d C a l l 6 3 8 0 2 1 2 o r 5 4 7 9 4 1 4 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Denton's RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDA WE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS $ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENT Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709 Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611 HODGES ROOFINGLet us show you how to save $100s or maybe $1,000s on a new metal roof. 850 348-9399Lic. #RC0066509Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414REOPENED Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMENEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!!! Contractors Needed To Verify and Resolve Newspaper Subscriber Delivery Issues. Looking for a carrier in Washington Co., Jackson Co., or the Youngstown/Fountain area The News Herald needs three independent contractors to work from 3:00 am until 7:00 am everyday Monday through Sunday Must have: Be 18 yrs or older A reliable vehicle Proof of Auto Insurance A valid driver’s license If interested, Please contact Colin Parker at cparker@chipleypaper.c om Multiple merchandising positions availablefor a 10 week temporary job in Chipley, FL$12 an hour please call 888-678-8966 x1189. Please leave a message. AIRLINE CAREERS Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 Apply Now, 13 Drivers Top 5% Pay & Benefits Credential, Fuel, & Referral Bonus Available. Need CDL Class A Driving Experience. 877-258-8782 www.ad-drivers.com Driver Daily or Weekly Pay. $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months and 12 months. $0.03 Quarterly Bonus. Requires 3 months recent experience. 800414-9569 www. driveknight.com Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our Medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice. In Bonifay Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Install/Maint/RepairLicensed ElectricianGulf Coast Electric Cooperative is accepting applications for position of Licensed Electrician at Workforce Center of Florida, 625 Highway 231, Panama City, Florida through Friday, February 1, 2013. For more information visit our website at www .gcec.com Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID#: 34238869 Text FL38869 to 56654 Install/Maint/RepairLine TechnicianGulf Coast Electric Cooperative is accepting applications for two positions of Line Technician at Workforce Center of Florida, 625 Highway 231, Panama City, Florida through Friday, February 1, 2013. For more information visit our website at www .gcec.com Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID#: 34238868 Text FL38868 to 56654 Install/Maint/RepairWater TechnicianGulf Coast Electric Cooperative is accepting applications for position of Water Technician at Workforce Center of Florida, 625 Highway 231, Panama City, Florida through Friday, February 1, 2013. For more information visit our website at www .gcec.com Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID#: 34238862 Text FL38862 to 56654 MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE. Sat 1/26/13 8-12. Baby clothes all sizes, boy & girl. Many other household items. 762 Dogwood LN Chipley. Hwy 90 W and look for signs. YOUR UGLY NAIL FUNGUS (and Cracking Heels) CAN BE GONE! Nail Fungus Soak $16.95 Guaranteed! Thousands of Satisfied Customers. www.LongCreekHerbs.co m (417)779-5450 12 inch Band Saw, 10 inch Table Saw, Troybilt Garden Tiller. (850)373-7442. Ceramic classes starting after January 3 in Bonifay. Come join the fun. (850)547-5244 Wanted to Rent; Farm land or pasture in Chipley & suroundding areas for the year 2013. 850-718-1859. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. CAMELLIA SALE Big & small, lots to choose from. Cheap prices, great quality. Arbor Lane Nursery. 2636 Burner Dairy Rd, Vernon. 535-9886 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Schneider National! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 888.368.1964 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 Educational Teacher needed for VPK class. CDA Required for position. Apply in person @Grace & Glory Christian School 929 Main St Chipley. 638-3700 *Adopt*:Doting dad, stay at home mom (&puppies) excited to give your baby everything! *Expenses Paid* *Bob & Maria* FKBar42311 1800-522-0045 ADOPT: Childless teacher (33) and devoted husband (37) wish to adopt; promise unconditional love, opportunities. Expenses Paid. Kristie/Gabe. Attorney Adam Sklar, Bar#0150789. 1-888-387-9290 TOLL FREE. Annual Winter & Construction Auction DATE: Saturday February 23, 2013 8:00AM LOCATION: 5529 Hwy231 North Campbellton Fl 32426 (4) Local Farm Dispersals, (3) Estates, Bank Repos, Sheriff Depts, city and county surplus, plus consignments. Mason Auction & Sales LLC # AB2766 850-263-0473 Office 850-258-7652 Chad Mason 850-849-0792 Gerald Mason www.masonauction.com Firewood. Smoking wood, Fat lighter, seasoned or green. Split & delivered $55.00. (850)547-9291 or (850)373-7027. LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET, In Original Plastic, Never Used, Orig. $3,000, sacrifice $975.—CHERRY BEDROOM SET, Solid Wood, new in factory boxes—$895. Can Deliver. Bill (813) 298-0221. COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, January 23, 2013 COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com (850) 547-9500 B oni f a y Florida www.xtrem ein dus tri es.com Xtreme Boats FACTORY DIRECT Sales/Business DevelopmentWashington County News/ Holmes County Times AdvertiserAdvertising Sales ExecutiveHalifax Media Group is looking for an experienced sales executive to provide online and print advertising solutions to advertisers in Washington/Holmes Counties in beautiful northwest Florida, to maximize the benefits of advertising for our customers while maximizing revenues for our company. This position will focus on soliciting print and online advertising,on behalf of the businesses and brands of Halifax Media Group, Northwest Florida. Prior sales experience a must. Washington and Holmes counties are just a short drive to the World’s Most Beautiful Beaches and have plenty of outdoor recreational opportunities. Halifax Media Group offers an excellent benefit package including health, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave. Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-Free Workplace No phone calls, please Web ID 34238713 Text FL38713 to 56654 2003 Dodge Stratus R/T 2 Dr. Dark gray, black leather interior. Fully loaded, good condition. 149,000 miles. $3700 OBO. 850-773-5009 1999 DODGE DAKOTA SPORT LONG BED V-6 3.9 engine automatic, radio/AC, sliding rear window, towing hitch, steel wheels, fair cond. 100,300 miles. NEEDS tires, battery & fuel pump $ 1,800 OBO Private OwnerChipley Please leave name & # 850-638-3306 For Sale 1988 Chevy Silverado. $1500, 46in Craftsman mower 19HP $400. For more information call 638-4492 DWMH2009 3 / 2 Big tub, 1 acre, fenced three sides and garage shop, Wausau area 850-638-4953 $3,000 cash assume mtg $600+ credit-worthy. WANTED FARM LAND in Washington, Holmes, & Jackson counties. 850-481-2248 20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0 Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views, West Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www. sunsetranches.com By Owner: 19 wooded acres on Hwy. 79, 3 miles north of Bonifay. $3,500 per acre. Call Richard @ (850)547-2637. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. Mobile Home for rent $425/month. 3/Bdrm 1-1/2 bath. Bonifay. No pets. Security deposit $400.00. (850)547-0989 FSBO/Agent: 3 Bd/2 Bth 20 acres, 1600’ metal shed, $225K. (305)394-3992 3 BR/2BA Mobile Home for rent. 9 miles from Chipley. Call 638-4689 or 326-2053 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850326-0582, 850-638-7315. Doublewide 4101 Douglas Ferry Rd., Bonifay. 2 Bdr/2 Bath. Carport. See on Craigs list. No pets. Background check required. $595/month. (850)547-4606. Douglas Ferry Rd. 2 Bdrm/1 Bath New carpet, clean. Water, garbage, lawn service furnished. Background check required. No pets. $450/month. (850)547-4606. FOR RENT Nice mobile home excellent location in Chipley. No Pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Homes $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Leave message. SpaciousTwo Bedroom $475. Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. 2 Bdrm/1 1/2 bath Townhouse Chipley. $595/month. Deposit/references required. No Pets. (850)638-1918. 3 Bdrm/1 bath Farm House near Vernon. CH/A, front & back porch, hardwood floors, includes microwave, deep freezer, washer/dryer, refrigerator & stove. Free lawn care & garbage. No pets. $600/mth $300deposit. (850)535-0368 3BR/2BA Doublewide Large patio backporch. Front porch w/roof on .7 acre, 179A, near Geneva line. $650.00/mth, avail Dec. 1st. 547-3746. Cottage Style House 3 Bdrm/1 bath, screened porch. No smoking. No pets. $725/mth. Need references. Bonifay area. (850)547-3494 (850) 532-2177 Home For Rent 3BR/ 1.5BA A/C Wausau. $650.00 Rent $650.00 Deposit. No Pets. 638-7601 Rent or sale. 3BD/2BA, handicapped equip. 3BD/1.5BA in Chipley. CH&A, large lots. Conveniently located. 850-481-5352 or 850-441-8181 or 850-547-2091. Sunny Hills 3 br 1.5 ba Lndry, gar., pool, good cond., $850 mo + dd Barbara Hindman RltyOwner (850)527-5085 $350/mth 1st, last, and deposit. Call 850-849-3907 for more information Rooms for Rent. Water, sewer, garbage, electric included. In Bonifay. $450/month. (850)296-8073 “Bonifay’s Best” Mobile Home Community has 2 or 3 bedrooms available ranging from $435-$625/month. Large lots, quiet, clean and on-site maintenance. Only responsible persons should apply. Great Bonifay Schools. Bonifay’s ONLY Neighborhood Crime Watch Community. No pets. One month deposit. HUD Assistance may be available. Contact Sue: (850)547-1386 or (512)751-2847. 2 BR/1BA and 1/2 Mobile Home for rent. 9 miles from Chipley. Call 638-4689 or 326-2053 NURSING CAREERS begin here -Train in months, not years. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job Placement assistance. Call Centura Institute Orlando (877) 206-6559 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. 800-443-5186 www. CenturaOnline.com Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incl’d 638-1918 For Rent -Quiet neighborhood, Single family, 2 bedroom duplex. Chipley. No pets. Background & proof of income required. 850-638-7128 FOR RENT 1 Bed apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 Drivers Class A Flatbed HOME EVERY WEEKEND! Pay 37¢/mi, Both ways, FULL BENEFITS, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience. 800-572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, FL Drivers HIRING EXPERIENCED/ INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51 per Mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877882-6537 www. OakleyTransport.com Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com. EOE MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Diploma/ GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 MEDICAL CAREERS begin here -Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. 888-203-3179 www. CenturaOnline.com NEW COMPANY GROUND FLOOR OPPORTUNITY. Earn serious income. Training, support, website and mentoring by top income earner included. Need 5 leaders to launch Florida. (704)799-9270 TIRED OF LIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? There’s great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDL Training @ NFCC/ Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. CALL TODAY! (866) 467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you.



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Connect with us 24/7Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo galleries, opinions and more...@WCN_HCT Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo galleries, opinions and more... @WCN_HCT @WCN_HCT @WCN_HCT A dver tiser Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo A A dver dver dver dver dver dver tiser tiser tiser tiser tiser tiser tiser T imesbonifaynow.com By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY It was a full house when the Bethlehem community members turned out to support recently transferred principal of Bethlehem High School Zeb Brown during the the Holmes County School Board meeting on Jan. 15. One by one almost a dozen speakers came before the school board demanding and pleading for explanations, accountability and a promise to continue putting education rst at Bethlehem High School. Im a parent of eight children, seven of which have attended Bethlehem and two are presently attending Bethlehem High, Drew Kriser said. I graduated from Bethlehem High, almost all my brothers and sister attended there. The Kriser family has been attending Bethlehem school for over 39 years. His family has a history with the school, he said, which gave experience to his voice. Its had its ups and downs, said Kriser. The reason why I got up here is because its mostly been downs. Im not a critical person, I believe in people, I believe in the school, in fact I love the school; my children are in that school. He said even with the love of his school he had to be frank. The quality of our education has been substandard, said Kriser. Finally we had someone holding the standard up and you yanked him out. Do you understand why were so upset? He said that Brown was removed without explanation, justi cation and just cause.Community rallies to support BrownCrowd turns out for school board meetingSee BROWN A2 50www.bonifaynow.comWednesday, JANUARY 23 2013 Volume 122, Number 41For the latest breaking news, visitBONIFAYNOW.COMPhone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 INDEXArrests .................................A3 Opinion ................................A4 Outdoors ..............................A6 Sports ..................................A7 Extra ....................................B1 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B6 IN BRIEFInstructor: Gun education essential for all owners | B1 Ander Brown Day scheduledBONIFAY West Bonifay Baptist Church invites the community to celebrate Ander Browns Wild Game, Fish and Fowl Dinner to be held at 5:30 p.m. on Friday at West Bonifay Baptist Church. Once a year Brown holds a game dinner at the church to promote the love of sportsmanship for hunting and shing and invites everyone with a passion for the sport to join for the free dinner. The assortment of game for the dinner ranges from sh to fowl and was provided by Brown.Paper seeks junior reportersBONIFAY The Holmes County Times-Advertiser seeks high school students to become junior reporters. Junior reporters will cover high school activities and sports for the weekly newspaper and will receive training in writing and photography, credit as a reporter, as well as community service hours. Junior Reporters should be in high school, and are needed for all area schools, including Bethlehem, Chipley, Poplar Springs, Ponce de Leon, Holmes County High and Vernon. For more information, call Managing Editor Randal Seyler at 6380212 or email rseyler@ chipleypaper.com. imes imes imes T dvertiser imes imes imes imes T T dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser dvertiser AHOLMES COUNTYBy CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY DMH Patient and Public Relations Director Brenda Blitch informed the Doctors Memorial Foundation that a mandatory survey was being issued for all Acute Care Hospitals and their HCAHP Score would affect the hospitals funding during their regularly scheduled meeting on Feb. 11. According to www.patientcenteredcare.org, The HCAHPS survey is a nationally standardized survey that captures patients perspectives of their hospital care. It allows consumers, for the rst time, to compare hospitals based on measures of how effectively they are satisfying patients needs and expectations. The surveys 27 questions look beyond clinical outcomes and technical capabilities of hospitals and focus instead on aspects DMHF to help in survey See FOUNDATION A3From Staff ReportsBONIFAY A Bonifay man was killed after his pickup struck a wild boar on County Road 181 on Saturday, according to a Florida Highway Patrol report. David Earl Bruner, 60, was southbound on CR 181 in his 1993 Toyota pickup when he collided with a boar that was on the roadway. The pickup left the road and went into the eastern shoulder of the road then struck two trees east of the road. The pickup came to rest facing east. Bruner was pronounced dead at the scene by Holmes County EMS. Bruner was not wearing his seatbelt, according to the report.Bonifay man dies after truck strikes boar The 2013 Holmes County High Sweetheart Court includes sophomore attendants Auburn Fisancik, Erica Hudson, Morgan Cross; freshman attendants Carlee Jordan, Melea Kirk and junior attendants Presley Hobbs, Makayla Clemmons, Kaitlyn Claycomb and Cierra Davis.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE TIMES-ADVERTISERSweetheart Queen Savannah Meeks, Lydia Sheesley, Whitney Corbin, Zoie Hodge, Selina Long and Sierra Smith comprise the senior Sweetheart Court. The Holmes County High School Sweetheart ballgame is set for Friday, Jan. 25. The Blue Devils will host the Marianna Bulldogs. The junior varsity boys game will begin at 5:30 p.m. and the varsity game will follow. The HCHS Sweetheart Court will be introduced between games and the 2013 Sweetheart Queen will be crowned during half-time of the varsity game.Sweetheart CourtFrom Staff ReportsESTO An escaped convict from Delaware, who was arrested following an eight-hour standoff with police in Brevard County, is suspected of being responsible for the armed robbery of the Express Lane in Esto on Jan. 7. Kenneth Edward Wood, 40, is suspected of the Esto robbery, according to a Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce report.Robbery suspect arrested KENNETH WOODSee ROBBERY A3

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LocalA2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, January 23, 2013 Just we felt like it or because of politics or whatever everyone is suggesting it is, he said. Zeb had vision, he was dedicated, he held people accountable; all these are something that didnt happen much there. When people arent performing well and theyre self-serving they dont like to be held accountable, so they make a lot of noise and youve listened to some of that, Im afraid. The school board wasnt listening to the people, said Kriser. Or at least I wasnt approached and I wasnt asked; nobody consulted me, he said. Each of you is an elected of cial and youve been entrusted to rights and powers to make choices for the bene t of the students and the school. With those rights and powers granted by us, the people who give you that power, you have a responsibility. He said the school board answers to the community. You answer to us, we dont answer to you, he said. I say that respectfully. Weve got to be of the right paradigm of mind if were going to nd a solution to this and set this right. As parents, he said, they would have to live with the lasting affects caused by the decisions the school board members make. Were the ones that have to live with the decisions you make every day, said Kreismer. You guys make a decision then you go home and then you dont come back for another month. Weve got to live with it every day, week, month, year and on into the future. There are a lot of people, including parents, teachers and staff, he said, that care. There are many of us that have invest signi cant time and effort in the education of our children through the years, he said. It gets really hard when we anticipate that there might be some backsliding when there has been made some much needed progress and then this decision was made and we were like this cant be happening. What if things start to backslide? We dont want any backsliding. He said that they were requesting that the school board take responsibility. Weve been responsible, Zeb was being responsible and now we want to dump it on you because it was you that made the decision, he said. Consulting the parents and community members when you make signi cant decisions that effect our children, the students, is not just a good idea, its your responsibility. I leave you to remember where you get your powers and put the students rst, because youve made a decision and lost a person that had dedication, had vision and held people accountable. Another speaker from the community was Veronica Smith. Ive had six of my seven children go to school there, said Smith. I have two children going to school there now and will have a total of nine children go through there when they graduate. Smith said she called several of the board members during the Christmas holiday. If feel Ive got to speak this more to the voters; for all the ones who are here voting for these men and these women that are in our of ces, said Smith. These things need to be in the minutes and one of the board members tells me that this has been on the books since June, that Mr. Brown was to be removed. Some bodys lying. She said that the people should take serious consideration on who they vote on. This is our community and unless we take it back, unless we ght for it, its going to go to the dogs, said Smith. The school board members, chair and Superintendent thanked the community for participating. We appreciate everyone showing up and giving their support, said Chair Jason Motley. We promise to take all that was said under advisement. I know I want whats best for my alma mater as well. Superintendent Eddie Dixon also commended those who came in support of Brown. I appreciate how everyone came to show their support, said Dixon. It is very commendable. School board member Sid Johnson said he also appreciated the support shown by the community. We need to know what the community thinks and feels about certain issues, said Johnson. We need the input. Board members approved of Stacey Thompson as the new principal of Bethlehem High School and Rosanne Mitchell as Assistant Principal. The board also approved of Jim Goodman as Deputy Superintendent/Personnel Administrator at the District Of ce. The board approved of overnight/out of state trips for Holmes County High Schools band to attend the Exclusive Honor Band and Scholarship Opportunities/Auditions on Jan. 31 through Feb. 2 held in Troy, Ala., Poplar Springs and Bonifay Middle Schools Gifted Class to attend the History of Army Aviation on Jan. 28 in Fort Rucker, Ala., Ponce de Leon and Bethlehems Gifted Class to attend Art Hands on Lessons and Discover Painted History of the People and Traditions Which Gave Birth to the Community on Feb. 4 in Dothan, Ala. and Ponce de Leon High Schools Future Business Leaders of America Club to attend the State Of cer Training with Florida State Representatives and Governor on Feb. 10 through Feb. 12 in Tallahassee. These are funded by the clubs themselves, right? asked School board member Debbie Kolmetz. Dixon said in normal cases the clubs pays for their trips, however the FBLA Board was paying for the Ponce de Leon FBLA trip. The next regularly scheduled school board meeting is set for 9 a.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 5. J.D. OWENS INC.Carpet & Ceramic OutletYOUR HOMETOWN LOW PRICE!CARPET, CERAMIC, PORCELAIN, VINYL, NAFCO, LAMINATE, HARDWOOD & AREA RUGSWeve Got It At The Price You Want! HUGE REMNANT SALE!12 x 9Tan Frieze......................................$955012 x 12Dark Green Plush........................$1399012 x 13Light Tan Plush............................$1099012 x 13Dark Blue Plush...........................$1555012 x 14Heavy Tan Frieze.........................$1655012 x 14Medium Brown Frieze.................$1499012 x 15Chocolate Frieze.........................$1799012 x 15Light Tan Plush............................$1555012 x 16Medium Blue Frieze....................$1899012 x 19Heavy Velvet Plush Tan..............$2255012 x 192Green Comm. 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O of Orange Hill Hwy. on Commerce Ave. Hours: Thur. and Fri. 9 AM 5 PM Sat. 9 AM 3 PM(850) 638-9421 Great selection of famous name comforters, sheets, Great selection of famous name comforters, sheets, FAMOUS BRAND3 pieceComforter SetQueen $79.99King $89.99 BONIFAYNURSING & REHAB CENTER We are proud to welcomeBRANNIGAN KELLERas our Rehab Program Manager CECILIA SPEARS | Times-AdvertiserThe Bethlehem community gathered at last Tuesday nights school district board meeting to show their support for recently transferred principal of Bethlehem High School Zeb Brown. BROWN from page A1

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A3Wednesday, January 23, 2013 of the care experience that are particularly meaningful to patients, including: communication with doctors, communication with nurses, communication about medications, responsiveness of hospital staff, pain management, quality of discharge instructions, cleanliness of hospital environment and quiet of hospital environment. This is their way of making sure you earn what you get paid, said Blitch. She explained that it would be $2,000 for the contract and additional for the surveys. This is done by an independent contractor to insure that theres no way that we can tamper with the results, said Blitch. Weve got the option to use mail-in surveys or by phone. Were requesting that the Foundation consider helping with some of the expenses. The Doctors Memorial Hospital Foundation is preparing for their biggest fundraiser of the year, Golf Ball Drop and Golf Scramble. The fourth annual Doctors Memorial Foundation Golf Scramble and Golf Ball Drop is scheduled for Friday, April 12, at the Dogwood Lakes Golf Club. Members of the Foundation issued out names of individuals and businesses who might be enlisted to participate as sponsors or who would be willing to donate towards the event. Tee Box Sponsors are set at $50, Hole Sponsors are at $100 and donated door prizes and gift bag items could be any price. Team members would also be recruited at that time. For the Four Man Scramble or Best Ball the cost is $200 per team or $50 per individual, which includes the round of golf, cart and lunch and the cash prizes are $400 for rst place, $200 for second place and $100. Mulligans are available for purchase to be eligible for door prizes and they are set at two for $10 and can be used for any stroke. A mulligan is a free shot given a golfer when the shot before that was poorly played. The Foundation also discussed selling tickets for the Ball Drop. In the Ball Drop there are hundreds of numbered balls placed in a dump truck and then dropped over a golf hole. The numbered ball is closest to, or is the rst into the hole, will win a guaranteed cash prize of $500. This is one event where you dont have to be present to win, Blitch said. Tickets are $10 for one ball, $25 for three balls or $50 for seven. Tickets will be available with any foundation member, which includes Hazel Tison, Diane Little, Roger Brooks and Blitch and at the following locations: Doctors Memorial Hospital Boutique, the First Federal formally known as the Bank of Bonifay and the Holmes County Times-Advertiser. For more information contact Blitch at 547-8193. All proceeds go to the Doctors Memorial Hospital Foundation. For more information and registration forms visit the Washington County News/ Holmes County Times-Advertisers Facebook page. Next the Foundation discussed ways to increase Foundation Memberships/ Bene ts Sponsors. Among the most important is your membership in the Doctors Memorial Hospital Foundation, wrote Administrator JoAnn Baker. Your participation is critical in achieving the best possible medical care available to all who need it. Each contribution is essential in supporting our hospitals current technology, modern facilities and enhanced services. Blitch said Foundation members receive a 10 percent discount on any non-prescription item at the Medicine Shoppe Pharmacy and Padgett Drugs along with a 10 percent discount on prescriptions paid for in cash, a 10 percent discount on merchandise sold at Bettyes Boutique, in the hospital, an employee discount of $3.50 on lunches served in the hospital cafeteria on Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., a 10 percent discount at Hardees in Bonifay, a 10 percent discount at the Movie and Gift Depot in Bonifay and a Corporate Discount rate at the Best Western Inn and Suites in Bonifay. For more information on bene ts of being a Foundation member visit their website at www.doctorsmemorial.org/foundation. THE PASSAGE OF OBAMA CARE LAW AND CONFIRMATION BY THE USSUPREME COURT MEANS NEW TAXES FOR CERTAIN MEDICAL DEVICES.Or, if you currently wear hearing instruments that arent performing as well as they should be, call us for a FREE CLEAN AND CHECK .Benets of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of hearing loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t.Discounts off MSRP. Previous purchases excluded. For a limited time. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Clean,Clear, natural soundSuper smart, these High-IQ hearing aids seemlessly adjust to your surroundings for clear and effortless hearing. 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GOOD NEWS!CHIPLEY1611 Main Street, Ste. 4(850)387-4931MARIANNA3025 6th Street(850)387-4931 Allen BarnesHAS:BC-HIS 23YearsExperience(Wednesdays) FOUNDATION from page A1 Wear Red Day and Heart Awareness Walk event scheduledBONIFAY The Holmes County Health Department and Doctors Memorial Hospital are partnering together to promote Heart Health Awareness. Cardiovascular Disease is the No. 1 killer of American men and women. CVD is responsible for more deaths in women than the next four causes combined, including all forms of cancers. Friday, Feb. 1, is the 10 year anniversary of National Wear Red Day endorsed by the American Heart Association and the Go Red for Women Campaign. Holmes Countys healthcare organizations encourage everyone to wear red on Friday, Feb. 1, in support of Cardiovascular Disease awareness. A Heart Awareness Walk will take place that day from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Doctors Memorial Hospital. The walk is free and everyone is invited to participate. Walkers are encouraged to bring a heart healthy lunch and commit to walking at least four laps or more. The rst 100 participants will receive free gifts and educational resources concerning heart healthy exercises, nutrition and much more. For more information please call 5478193 or 547-8500, ext. 249.Bice Named to Deans List at The CitadelDevin Michael Bice of Bonifay has been named to the Deans List at The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, for academic achievement during the fall semester of the 2012-2013 academic year. Bice is a cadet seeking a bachelors degree in Physical Education. The following are the Holmes County arrests for Jan. 6-12: Jermaine Beach, 26, hold for another agency Brenda Ann Biddle, 32, uttering forged instrument Jerry E. Bunion, 43, to go out with Hillsborough Emmanuel Casillas, 30, hold for Texas transport Dale Anthony Castro, 41, capital sexual battery Makeda Diah, 27, hold for outside agency Bobby Fife, 46, hold for Texas transport Johnny M. Fleming, house for another agency Kevin Lee Gillam, 51, violation of probation David Hunter Guthrie, 22, uttering forged instrument, forgery, criminal use of personal identi cation Otis E. Harrell, 31, hold for Hillsborough Patricia Lawhorn, 39, child support Ronnie Wayne Lumpkin, 27, felony violation of probation Tommy Ray Marsh, 42, hold for court James David McCullers, 24, no charges listed William Jason McKeithen, 38, disorderly conduct, resisting of cer without violence Amy Rachel Owens, 21, disorderly intoxication, criminal trespass Nathan Davis Patton, 27, hold for another agency Tamala Payne, 46, no charges listed Jatina Monique Pettaway, 22, possession of cannabis less than 20 grams Renzil Powell, 31, driving while license suspended or revoked Jesse Rodgers, 30, recommit for court Mario Lazoro Rodiguez, 40, violation of probation Ashley Nicole Sloan, 25, violation of community control Willie Staten, 22, hold for agency Anthony Ray Thomas, 35, burglary Alec Thompson, 33, child support Charles Edward Turner, 52, violation of probation on possession of marijuana, obstruct criminal investigation, possession of marijuana Brandon Michael Waddell, 22, recommit violation of probation on possession of meth Mallory Wooten, 30, violation of probation The following are the Holmes County marriages and divorces for Jan. 7-11:MARRIAGESKenneth Zackary Ingle, 8/25/1993 of Bonifay and Sarah Anna George, 9/13/1995 of BonifayDIVORCESJohnny Ray Branton and Margaret Lee Branton Anthony Hudson, Sr. and Danielle Hudson Buddy L. Brown and Stephanie A. Brown Community BRIEFS Marriages & DIVORCES Arrest REPORTWood escaped from Sussex County, Del., authorities where he had been convicted on sexual battery charges, and he is also a suspect in two armed robberies in Alabama and one in Taylor County, according to a report from Taylor County Sheriff Wayne Ivey, published on the website oridatoday.com. Holmes County investigators responded to the Express Lane in Esto on an armed robbery report on Jan. 7. When they arrived the clerk said that a white male had produced a handgun and demanded money. After taking the money from the clerk the man ed on a gold color GMC pickup truck. Surveillance video from the store provided video of the robbery and the truck. The truck was later determined to be stolen from Covington County, Ala., according to the report. Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce were advised by Alabama authorities that a store in Geneva had also been robbed earlier by a suspect of the same description. On the morning of Jan. 8, authorities in Taylor County responded to a similar robbery and subsequently chased the suspect in the GMC pickup, who ed on foot. At that time authorities believed the suspect to be Wood. Wood reportedly had friends and family in Brevard and of cials tracked him to a mobile home park, where the police surrounded the trailer in which Wood was hiding. The SWAT team was called out, and Wood eventually surrendered. He was arrested on the outstanding warrant from Delaware for escape after conviction, but more charges are expected. ROBBERY from page A1 DOCTORS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL FOUNDATIONThe Doctors Memorial Hospital Foundation is a nonpro t organization whose mission is to promote the advancement and further the aims and purposes of Doctors Memorial Hospital. The foundation works with donors who care about the quality of healthcare in Holmes and surrounding counties to ensure that their gifts provide meaningful important support to the hospital. The Foundation is a key partner in the hospitals stability and growth. This newly formed foundation is a charitable 501(c)3 organization governed by its own ve member Board of Directors. They serve voluntarily and represent the local community. Through monetary support by yearly memberships or onetime donations, the Foundation assists the hospital in purchasing necessary equipment and providing new services to better serve the community. Every dollar donated stays locally.

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Time spent recently in the Vernon Historical Society Museum, housed in the semi-retired former Vernon High School Building, inspired last weeks column. Mentioned were bus drivers who drove students into Vernon School, along winding, narrow clay roads, beginning in Caryville and zigzagging the maze of turns and overlaps before nally arriving in Vernon. This has stirred my memory of other drivers of that era who overcome untold hazards of driving and tirelessly delivered students safely to school. James Elearzor Galloway II drove the biggest bus of the eet, bringing a host of children, including many of his own, all the way from Millers Ferry and Hinson Cross Roads to Vernon. This was a long ride along treacherous roads, especially in rainy weather when slick clay top soil sent many school buses plunging into ditches. Other bus drivers usually came to the rescue as sending for a wrecker was out of the question. This writer recalls that Mr. Galloway always wore a tie when dressed for his bus route. Two of his sons, Wester and Callis, served as his substitute drivers. They parked the oversized bus on the southwest corner of the school building during school hours and many students, including yours truly, used it as an escape lunch room. The country boy from Brackin School still wanted to hide as he he ate his home packed food, usually consisting of two home made biscuits, one lled with sausage or ham and the second one lined with g preserves. The beautiful story of the Galloway family is a feature of the Heritage of Washington County Book, released in 2006 and reissued six months ago in a fourth printing. The Prattler has the books for sale and I am convinced that the additional supply of 200 books are moving out as fast at the original publication. Other drivers of my era in Vernon School includes Mr. Hosea Varnum and Mr. Gordon Mercer of the Deadening and Greenhead areas. My longtime friend, Doug Jones, rode to Vernon with Mr. Mercer, who had the record of driving the smallest bus on the routes. Being small in stature, Doug told the story on himself that he admired the oversized Hinson Cross Roads bus pulling into the School campus and further envied the size of the boys who came swaggering off the bus, including Willie Green Hinson, Heber J. Galloway, Lorainne Hammock, Mack and Bert Railey and others who were much larger than Doug. He claims that he found himself wishing for the opportunity to get to visit Hinson Cross Roads one day, a feat which seemed out of his reach at that time. Mr. Jack Haddock drove a bus into Vernon from the Bonnet Pond community, looping into Wausau and other areas to the east. He, too, could have at least halflled his bus with members of his on family. I love the story from Clifton Haddock of recent years when asked if all the Haddock Children received their education at Vernon High School. His reply was yes, all the schooling that any of us got was at Vernon, then concluded by saying All of our college education was gotten at home! Schools need the right peopleDear Editor, Thank you for printing something about us in your paper. Holmes County Times-Advertiser has not yet done so. Channel 7 News attended but somehow screwed up the video, and when I asked them where was our story they declined to follow through at all. I feel as though we are being swept under the carpet and our wishes are not being heard on this matter. The Board has chosen to do exactly as they want to do parents be damned. I found the most interesting thing about the meeting that came to my attention has not been mentioned so far by anyone. I was unaware until Tuesdays meeting that in Holmes County Zeb Brown was the only principal with the credentials to back him up. Stacey Thompson is not accredited. Why would anyone want to remove the one and only principal in all of Holmes County that has the educational level to be principal and replace him with one that doesnt. Why has Holmes Co. residents allowed this substandard for our principals to go on? Does anyone know about this and not care or are we willing to allow our children to continue to receive less than a decent education from people who would rather line their own pockets then make healthy decisions for our community. We need to make note of these things because there is always another election around the corner. We have a right to a fair education for our children and we have incredible talent in our young people that is not being utilized to its fullest. We need to nd the right people that want to help us achieve all that we can to make our neck of the woods the best it can be.Veronica SmithWestvilleStudents need more quali ed personnelDear Editor, One the evening of Jan. 15, 2013, I went to the Holmes District School Board Meeting. The main meeting room was full so approximately 50 of us concerned citizens were standing in the attached of ce. Unfortunately we could hear nothing. It would have been nice if a microphone and speaker was used. A large crowd was expected so a change of venue to a larger facility would have been nice. Here is what I would have informed all. A few years ago Zeb Brown was assigned a group of students at Bethlehem Middle School, as the year progressed it became obvious that is attendance was poor. Many times I understand his girlfriend was in the classroom, not Zeb Brown. She was more of a sitter, not a teacher. Therefore these students were deprived of the complete education, which the citizens of Holmes County were paying Zeb Brown to produce to our most important asset, our young people. How many similar situations have occurred or are occurring? The administration at the time of this occurrence is gone so they cant be red but Zeb Brown should be. According to recent articles in the HCTA Zeb Brown puts the students rst. Obviously that is incorrect. The students were severely short changed. Where was he? He was taking a culinary course. There must be more quali ed personnel in the system who would put the students rst as they should be. I understand there are numerous complaints both in writing and on a web site. There are others who feel as I do about this situation.Dick BashtBonifay Letters to the EDITOR With the con ict about Bethlehem School principal being re-assigned, I am reminded of the biggest con ict we experienced in the 30-plus years of my husbands tenure with the Holmes County School system. When Florida educators voted to stage a walk-out in protest of the Florida Legislature and Governor Claude Kirk Jr.s failure to act on legislation to fund the needs of education, it became the only state nationwide to carry out such a protest. Their action was not done hastily nor with out much thought to the increasing de ciencies in the educational system. Floridas tradition as a low-tax state and its constitutional prohibition on income tax, combined with low property tax, limited all public services, but education had suffered the most as enrollment had grown more than 50 percent in years just prior to 1968. Teachers were frustrated by out-of-date materials, overcrowded classrooms, dilapidated buildings and pay far below the national average. Due to pressure from the Florida Education Association and the National Education Association, the state legislature extended its 1967 session, but the governor vetoed the 150 million dollars earmarked for education. Thirtyve thousand teachers rallied in the Tangerine Bowl in Orlando on Aug 14 of 67 to plan a way to get the attention of the governor. A walkout was planned for February of 1968 if the governor failed to act. The walk-out closed schools in 22 Florida Counties. Closing the schools was the aim of the walk-out, but Holmes County, like the remaining counties, did not have 100% participation so the local schools stayed open. This week I have still been cleaning out closets, and I came across clippings about the strike, as many chose to call it. Here are excerpts from the statement published in the Holmes County Advertiser from the teacher group. We have made the momentous decision to leave our classrooms, not in search of higher paychecks, but in an effort to dramatize the sad plight of education. It was a decision that we did not make lightly. By taking this step, we placed our careers, our retirement status, our jobs, and the nancial security of ourselves, and our family in jeopardy. But, more important, were retaining our self-respect and our honor because our cause is right . For years, Floridas public school system, Holmes County not excluded, has been declining. We teachers have shouted the alarm. Our shouts were met by public apathy, disinterest, inaction. Some people heard and became concerned. Most did not. We teachers nally found it necessary to assume the leadership role because our business, civic and political leaders as a whole did not or would not. The statement goes on to explain that Governor Claude Kirk Jr had chosen to leave the state for Californias Disney Land rather than face the issue of an Educational Crisis which existed in Florida. The legislatures plan would have given some teacher pay raises, but ignored the need for funding quality education. Such things as adequate facilities, supplies, up-todate equipment were not provided. The tax package gave some property tax relief, in effect shifting school nancing burden to those least likely to afford it. On Tuesday Feb. 20, Wednesday Feb 21, and Thursday Feb 22, 1968, 36 or 38 Holmes County teachers did not show up for classes. A special board meeting was called to address the issue and they called for the contract which each teacher had signed to be read. After conferring with board attorney, the late Clyde B. Wells, it was moved by Mr. Russell Dean and seconded by Mr. Tup McWaters to terminate the contracts due to failure to abide by the contract. Thirtysix resignations were delivered to Superintendant Fred Johnson and the board on Friday, Feb.23 by Mr. Joe Collins the chairman of the Holmes County Teachers. Possibly two teachers from the group returned to work. It was a bitter time for us the families of the teachers who walked. The failure of the board to support their action, even taking a punitive stance, was unsettling. Facing several months of no income was most stressful. I know nancial advisors tell you that you should have an emergency fund of half a years salary, but a teachers salary at that time was a subsistence amount at best. Another bitter thing was the animosity between those who walked and those who didnt although many of them were supportive in theory, at least. The things that were happening at the school with the substitutes were disturbing. We had a son in high school and he reported some of the misuse of equipment in the ag dept. For example tools were welded to metal desks. Some substitutes were bodily threatened by some of the students and they returned to their safe homes. There was so much talk about the walkout that when one delegation walked out of the Democratic National Convention that summer in protest of some issue, our ten year old daughter asked, What are they? Teachers? The strike was called off on March 8, but it was about 6 weeks as I recall when those who walked went back to work on annual contract.(less pay) They were expected to apologize to the board and were admonished not to discuss the issue at schools. The county lost several outstanding educators. Joe Collins, chemistry and physics teacher found work in Chipley and his children transferred there. Beverly Helms, speech pathologist also transferred to Washington County. Carlton Treadwell went to Chipola Jr. College as an instructor. His brother Don returned to the University of Florida to get a masters degree and taught vocational classes at Woodham High School and George Stone Vocational School in Pensacola. T.E. Segers, coach at Bethlehem, transferred to Holmes County High. Several out of county teachers left, one a highly regarded Chemical engineer. Even though those of us involved in the walk-out paid a heavy price, results were seen as the succeeding legislative bodies have passed education reforms. Collective bargaining was a viable means of gaining better working conditions until the recession has caused that to be a moot process. Better facilities are evident. Teachers salaries are much improved. Starting teachers today make more than I was earning when I retired 25 years after the strike. Employees in the system today owe a debt of gratitude to those 38 brave souls in Holmes County and hundreds over the state who stood up for what was right and initiated educational reforms in funding that have bene tted teachers and staff as well as the students they teach. No amount of money can pay for the frustrations encountered in the classroom, and I know its much worse today than when I was there. But it is the most rewarding calling, especially in retrospect as you see the achievements of your former students. Living in a small town gives me the pleasure of regularly greeting former students. Con ict brings memories teacher walk-outCONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com 1-800-645-8688 ADVERTISING 850-547-9414 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2013, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. OPINION www.bonifaynow.comWednesday, January 23, 2013 APage 4SectionRiding the bus to school as a kid was an experiencePERRYS PRATTLEPerry Wells HAPPY CORNERHazel Wells Tison SPECIAL TO THE NEWSVernon High School bus drivers of the past.

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A5Wednesday, January 23, 2013By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY After a recess of the regularly scheduled meeting, the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners reconvened to hold a workshop on Tuesday, Jan. 8, in which a guest speaker from the Florida Association of Counties Virginia Ginger Delegal was present. In light of the new commissioners, weve invited Mrs. Delegal to be a guest speaker, said Holmes County Attorney Goodman. The FAC also holds conferences for new commissioners. Its a privilege to have her here, not only as a speaker but to be available for a question and answer session. Delegal said she considered herself a mythbuster. The Florida Association of Counties has been around for over 85 years, Delegal said. One of the myths we frequently bust is that small counties can become chartered. What it all comes down to is home rule. County Commissioner Kenneth Williams said Holmes County was discouraged from becoming a chartered county because it would mean less income. Delegal said this also would be considered a myth. If you were to get less money it would because of population, not charter, Delegal said. She reviewed the denition of a county, how it differs from a city, what forms of government are offered to the counties and what forms of government do other similar sized counties in Florida choose. Florida has 67 counties, Delegal said. Twenty of which are chartered counties. Historically, a county in Florida was a political subdivision of the state, established by the state to execute state services at the local level. She dened Home Rule as the transfer of certain state powers to local entities in matters of local concern, but no complete autonomy. This offers locals more control over their internal affairs and alleviates the need for state legislation of local concerns, she said. Ideas are consistent with traditional American ideals of self governance and independence. This is important for Holmes County to consider because over half of the population of Holmes County live in unincorporated areas of the county and therefore are looking to the county to provide most of the services required to maintain quality of life. She said some of the benets of being a chartered county are that the county can choose form of government, power to tax in unincorporated areas, may alter functions of county ofcers, can have county ordinances prevail over municipal ordinances, special acts that limit power must be approved by voters and can increase citizen involvement. Right now as an nonchartered county ordinances are trumped by city ordinances, said Delegal. If the county were to become chartered then the county can prevail over city ordinances. Traditionally, she said, the duties of a county were assessment of property, record keeping, maintain rural roads, administer elections, perform judicial functions and local law enforcement and public safety, but lately those services have expanded to include public health and welfare, consumer protection, economic development, employment and training, planning and zoning, water quality, re protection and emergency management. Goodman asked for her to relay the benets of having a County Administrator, County Coordinator or County Manager. This is someone who is a staff expert and allows for commissioners someone to consult with outside of the meeting capacity, Delegal said. As it is now because of the Sunshine Law commissioners can only speak to one another during an ofcially called meeting or workshop. They are not allowed to talk to one another about county matters outside of an ofcial meeting. She said one of the worst types of trouble comes when commissioners talk about a matter in casual settings, such as at a grocery store or via email, and it comes up for vote later on. This could lead to a revoking of the vote and a heavy ne to the county. A county manager is one that you can speak with without having to be in an ofcial meeting capacity, she said. This will allow you to voice your ideas with someone who can advise for or against it before you bring it before the board. This will save quite a bit of time in the future. Goodman said for the time being he was acting as the advisor for the county as they have had no manager since the departure of Holmes County Administrator Greg Wood in 2009. There are certain problems that come with me being your advisor in an administrative capacity, Goodman said. There will come a time when I wont be able to objectively play both rolls. There could come a time when you will need a witness in the administrative roll and as your attorney I couldnt also be a witness. Commissioner Bill Parish said he agreed with the attorney about looking into the possibility of county administrator. I understand being the consultant of these department heads, but as our attorney youd have to do all these jobs, Parish said. I can see the need of an administrator. Were falling short on a county that depends on us for these services. Delegal advised that the county needed a staff expert. This is someone who is an expert of how staff regulations go, she said. Someone can be designated this position or this can be added to someones duties. Commissioner Monty Merchant told the board that they should consider asking the contractor of the recent bids for graders to extend their contracts. The previous board was considering purchasing four to six new graders and put it out to bid shortly before the 2012 elections. The bid deadline came shortly after the election when three new commissioners came on board. The three new commissioners said they did not feel comfortable with voting on a bid so soon after being elected and so the bid was tossed out due to deadline. Were paying $4,500 a month to lease a grader, said Merchant. We should do something. Maybe we can get then to extend the bids by another 30 to 60 days. Parish said if they were able to get the contractors to consider extending the deadline for that long, which would allow for more time to research the matter, then he would be ready to make an informed decision. The next regularly scheduled meeting is set for 6 p.m. on Jan. 29 at the BOCC chamber located behind the Holmes County Court House. $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL e new College of Applied Studies at FSU Panama City was approved by the FSU Board of Trustees in June 2010 and allows the campus to more easily respond to workforce needs in our area. We invite you to support e Campaign for Our Communitys University by helping us build an endowment for tomorrows jobs. Our goal is to establish a $5 million endowment for the College of Applied Studies by 2017, which will allow FSU Panama City to establish student scholarships, implement new degree programs and provide new equipment and technology. To learn how you can support our communitys university, contact Mary Beth Lovingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblovingood@pc.fsu.edu.THECAMPAIGN FOR OUR COMMUNITYS UNIVERSITYEndowment for Tomorrows Jobs 2084408 Enter Starting January 27th www.nwfdail y news.com BENEFITTING Guest speaker educates new BOCC members

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OUTDOORS Wednesday, January 23, 2013 Page 6www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comSend your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com ASection IN THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES (AP) The man known as Alligator Ron has a lifetime of experience in the Florida Everglades, a eet of airboats at his disposal and knows the habitats of furry prey for large reptiles. He still couldnt lead a pack of hunters to a single Burmese python. Thats the catch in Floridas Python Challenge: Even experienced hunters with special permits to regularly stalk the exotic snake through Floridas swamplands are having trouble nding them for a statesponsored competition. When these snakes are in the water, in the vegetation, they blend in naturally to where you cant hardly see them, said state wildlife commissioner Ron Bergeron, whose nickname is emblazoned on the rudder of his black airboat, over the image of him riding an alligator. The vast majority of roughly 1,000 people who signed up to hunt Burmese pythons on public lands from Jan. 12 through Feb. 10 are amateurs when it comes to pythons. Only about 30 hold permits for harvesting pythons throughout the year. The permit holders might have a slight edge when it comes to handling snakes, but the tan, splotchy pythons have natural camou age that gives them an important advantage in the ecosystem they have invaded. As of Thursday, 21 pythons had been killed for the contest, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. It is dif cult to pin down how many Burmese pythons slither through Floridas Everglades, but of cials say their effect is glaringly obvious. According to a study released last year, sightings of raccoons, opossums, bobcats, rabbits and other mammals in the Everglades are down as much as 99 percent in areas where pythons are known to live. Its believed the pythons devour the native wildlife, and ofcials worry the snakes voracious appetite will undermine the ongoing, multimillion-dollar effort to restore natural water ow through the Everglades. Bergeron led U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., into the Everglades to hunt pythons Thursday afternoon. They splashed from their airboat through knee-deep water into several islands that rise in small bumps above the sawgrass, but they always emerged empty-handed. They didnt ush out any of the mammals Bergeron thought he would see, either. The only thing they did nd: signs of feral hogs, another problematic invasive species. Rabbits were like rats. Growing up, you saw them everywhere, said Jim Howard, a Miami native and a python permit holder participating in the contest. I havent seen a rabbit in 20 years. I dont see foxes. I hardly see anything. He has caught a python in the Everglades in each of the last two years, though. Each was more than 12 feet long and contained more than 50 eggs. He returned to those locations Wednesday, poking under ferns and discarded wooden boards with a hook at the end of a 3-foot-long stick. All he found were the sheddings of some large snake each transparent scale was the size of a ngertip. After spending hours steering his boat along 14 miles of canals to levees and embankments where pythons might lurk, Howard extended the hook toward the dense, impenetrable grass that stretched all the way to the horizon, with no landmarks or vantage points. Millions of acres in any direction in the Everglades are exactly the same. From that perspective, the hunt for wellhidden pythons seems futile. Were looking at inches, Howard said. Of cials say the number of pythons caught during the contest isnt as important as the data they provide. Im going to be ecstatic if we see 100, said Frank Mazzotti, a University of Florida professor of wildlife ecology who is helping the commission with the contest. He continued to low-ball expectations for the nal tally. Im happy with 11. Im going to be happy with whatever we have. The small number only proves that theyre really hard to nd, he said. The state hopes to use the information from python necropsies particularly whats in their stomachs to improve their attempts at dealing with the snakes. Our list of what pythons eat is not complete yet, Mazzotti said. The population of Burmese pythons, an invasive species in Florida, likely developed from pets released into the wild, either intentionally or in the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew in 1992. They can grow to be more than 20 feet long and have no natural enemies in Florida other than very large alligators or cold weather, which drives heat-seeking snakes onto sunny roads and levees. Florida prohibits owning or selling pythons for use as pets, and federal law bans importation and interstate sale of the species. Mazzotti had one tip for hunters frustrated by the pythons near-invisibility: Stop and listen for a dry, rustling sound in the grass. It sounds like something large, he said.Foliage, swamplands, water make hunt more difficult PHOTOS BY APTV crews pet and take photos as Capt. Jeff Fobb from the Miami-Dade Fire Rescues Venom Response Unit, holds a python Jan. 12, during the kick-off ceremonies for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissions month-long Python Challenge in Davie. The 13-foot reptile was captured in a backyard swimming pool in 2012. Below, Jim Howard, of Cooper City, examines a piece of a large snake skin he found under some foliage in the Florida Everglades during his search of pythons. At top, Howard searches under the dense foliage. PYTHON CHALLENGE They didnt ush out any of the mammals Bergeron thought he would see, either. The only thing they did nd: signs of feral hogs, another problematic invasive species. Rabbits were like rats. Growing up, you saw them everywhere, said Jim Howard, a Miami native and a python permit holder participating in the contest. I havent seen a rabbit in 20 years. I dont see foxes. I hardly see anything. He has caught a python in the Everglades in each of the last two years, though. Each was more than 12 feet long and conAfter spending hours steering his boat along 14 miles of canals to levees and embankments where pythons might pythons caught during the contest isnt as important as the data they provide. Im listen for a dry, rustling sound in the grass. It sounds like something large, he said. The only thing they did nd: signs of feral hogs, another problematic invasive species. Rabbits were like rats. Growing up, you saw them everywhere, said Jim Howard, a Miami native and a python permit holder participating in the contest. I havent seen a rabbit in 20 years. I dont see foxes. I hardly see anything. He has caught a python in the Everglades in each of the last two years, though. Each was more than 12 feet long and conments where pythons might lurk, Howard extended the hook toward the dense, impenetrable grass that stretched all Im large, he said.

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SPORTS www.bonifaynow.com ASection 2nd Annual 2nd Annual By BRAD MILNER747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com One of the trappings of youth often is the inability to see beyond today. However, Cory Calloway and Trent Forrest will have no trouble picturing a bright future as long as they continue on the successful path theyve traced thus far. Calloway is the less-seasoned of the two as a Port St. Joe eighth-grader playing in only his second year of organized basketball. Forrest is a freshman who was thrust into a leadership role on Chipleys defending state championship team and comes armed with a pedigree in the sport. The AAU teammates are prominent components of two young basketball programs, each with one senior apiece. Chipley also features high-scoring sophomore Tyrome Sharpe. Port St. Joe complements Calloway with freshmen T.J. Williams and Chad Quinn, the Tiger Sharks secondand third-leading scorers. But Calloway and Forrest have stood out among the pack for various reasons, their coaches said. And with both playing in the Rural Class 1A, theres little doubt they could be waging postseason battles for many years. Forrest, a 6-foot-4 athlete who can play any position, is in his rst season on the varsity. Chipley is a traditional high school fed by middle school programs, so Forrest had to wait until the ninth grade to play at the varsity level. Calloway is able to play on varsity since Port St. Joe is a 6-12 school. Forrest immediately was thrust into a position to replace the leadership and scoring prowess of the departed Alex Hamilton and Cameron Dozier, the duo leading Chipley to a 1A title and now playing college basketball. Chipley coach Joel Orlando said Forrest has t perfectly into his new surroundings. Hes been able to do it with strong character, a good basketball IQ, good academics and a strong family background, Orlando said. All of those things help him be so special. Forrests father played basketball at Chipola and an uncle competed at Clemson. The lineage not only mapped out future success, but it helped teach Forrest about handling pressure and staying focused. I knew that I was going to have to step up, said Forrest, who averages 22 points per game. They (his father and uncle) told me that these things would come sooner or later. Im used to it, I was ready. Forrest has never been one to shy from competing against older players. He stood in during practices with the East team of the Freedom All-Star Classic as an eighth-grader and made some of the seniors work harder than expected. Its this determination that separates him from other players, Orlando said. Hes competitive in everything he does and that is contagious, Orlando said. He carries himself like a senior on and off the court, too. But he does what we need. He could be the leading scorer or pass the ball a lot, dives on loose balls, takes charges. And in turn the rest of his teammates has fallen into roles, Orlando said. Forrest is the leader and he takes the job seriously. I know the team looks to me so I always want to do my best, Forrest said. I know theres a lot I can do, a lot I can improve on, but I just need to stay grounded. Calloway said the same, but his answers were often tinged with a wry smile while trying to restrain his con dence. Port St. Joe coach Derek Kurnitsky said Calloway is a player who knows hes good, displays it on the court and isnt afraid to talk about it. That said, Kurnitsky added that Calloway is like a fresh oyster plucked from the Gulf of Mexico in nearby Apalachicola. Hes averaging 19 and really has no clue how to play the game, Kurnitsky said of the 6-2 guard. Hes so raw, itll take a few years for him to get used to the game, but hes a worker. That much is evidenced by Calloways desire to shoot the basketball. Its apparent in games, with Kurnitsky giving him the green light to pull the trigger, and also when hes not with the team. One day it was pouring rain and I got a call from my assistant coach, Kurnitsky said. He said Guess whos outside shooting? When you shoot in the rain you know youre good. Calloway played youth baseball prior to high school and was plucked from the diamond to the court by Kurnitsky. Like Forrest, he shows little fear of competing against players often three or four and sometimes ve years older. I like the challenge, he said. I knew I was going to have to play a big role with this team, be a leader and Ive done pretty well already. Thats a bit of an understatement. Calloway has routinely led the Tiger Sharks in scoring and also won a recent game with a shot at the buzzer against South Walton. Those accolades dont amount to much, he admitted, given there is a lot of time left in his still young prep career. His list of improvements includes working on his skills to the right side for the left-hander as well as becoming a well-rounded player. That means becoming dominant on defense and not only as a scorer. Kurnitsky doesnt worry about Calloway becoming a complete package. He compared him to Hamilton, the latter blossoming during his freshman season at Bay and turning into one of the areas best players after transferring to Chipley. Calloway has designs on evolving into an NBA-type performer. He understands theres a long way to go before that process even can be considered. I do have to take it one game at a time, Calloway said. I focus on the game right now, then think about the next one and the next. Also helping Calloway is a rich tradition at Port St. Joe lled with state championships and outstanding players. Kurnitsky is aware of the history as are many of the longtime faculty at the school. He parroted Forrest in saying Calloway must keep a level head. There are so many great players from Port St. Joe, the teachers tell him that, Kurnitsky said. He isnt the best with the tradition here, but he has time. I think that helps keep him grounded and motivated. By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY After the Holmes County Blue Devils junior varsity pulled a last-minute 27-26 win over the Baker, the Blue Devils varsity team gained a sound victory against the Gators with a score of 70-50 on Friday, Jan. 18. After every period the Blue Devils maintained an almost 10 point lead against the Gators. We have a big, big man, said HCHS head coach Poe White in reference to Chris Walker. He poses quite a problem for the other teams. Walker recently signed on with the University of Florida. White said though this was a good win he didnt think he was where he thought they should be as a team. Weve got to get better, he said. Weve got to get back to playing as a team and stop being sel sh with the ball. He said they started the season very well. Were struggling right now with bulling the ball, said White. We started the season with good chemistry and I hope well get back to that before the end of the season.Chipleys Forrest and PSJs Calloway take charge earlyPage 7CATHRINE LAMB | Times-AdvertiserHolmes County High Schools Chris Walker attempts a two-point shot during the Blue Devils 7050 win over the Baker Gators.HCHS Blue Devils defeat Baker Gators 70-50 and Wednesday, January 23, 2013 HCHS VARSITY BASKETBALL FAST BREAK TO SPOTLIGHT HEATHER LEIPHART | Halifax Media GroupChipley freshman Trent Forrest (11) has assumed a leadership role for the young Tigers, who lost their top two scorers from last seasons Class 1A state title team. Above: Cory Calloway has found instant success as an eighth-grader for Port St. Joe, but he is aware he has a long way to go before being considered one of the best the basketball-rich program has produced.

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A8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, January 23, 2013 Enter NowTo win $500! 2nd Annual 2nd Annual 2084409 :___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ We BRING it HOME! Volume 122, Number 23Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 19 2012 Special to Times-AdvertiserBONIFAY The Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo Parade goes hand in hand with the rodeo events. The parade will be Friday and Saturday, Oct. 5-6, at 1 p.m. Thousands of spectators ood the streets of Bonifay on Friday and Saturday afternoon to view oats, queens, dignitaries, bands, ATVs, wagon trains and hundreds Championship Rodeo Parade to be Oct. 5-6 BOCC talks employment, bonusesCecilia Spears547-9414 | @WCN_HCT Cecilia.spears@halifaxmediagroup.com BONIFAY Holmes County Board of County Commissioners recognized September as National Suicide Prevention Month by signing a declaration provided by Life Management during their regularly scheduled meeting on Sept. 11. Life Management thanks the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners for their support, said Teresa McDonald of Life Management. Very few know that suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States, and for every completed suicide there are 11 attempted suicides. The toll free crisis and suicide prevention hotline is 1-800-490-4826 for a local counselor available 24 hours a day, seven days a week or the national hotline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). The board approved of the Holmes County Small Quantity Generator Program Report, which indicated a cost of $4,000 to dispose of chemical waste produced by the county. The board also approved of County Attorney Jeff Goodmans recommendation to allow West Florida Regional Planning to update the Holmes County BOCC Equal Opportunity Plan for $770. The plan is several years old and is in need of updating, said Goodman. It would be a lot cheaper for them to update it because they have all of the resources and knowledge of the present requirements at the their ngertips than Pink Glove Dance 50www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visitBONIFAYNOW.COM IN BRIEFResidents enjoy Picnic in the Park B1 Laura Ingalls Wilder Picnic in the Piney WoodsWESTVILLE The Laura Ingalls Wilder seventh annual Picnic in the Piney Woods will be start at 10 a.m. on Sept. 29 at the home site of Peter Franklin Ingalls in Westville. There will be a Laura Ingalls Wilder costume and talent contest. There will be a potluck lunch, the chicken will be provided. The picnic is hosted by the family of Peter Franklin Ingalls and sponsored by the Holmes County Historical Society. The site is at 1225 Highway 163 in Westville. For more information, call Mary Joe Craft at 956-2956 or Wayne Ingalls at 334-898-1115. Free child birth classes planned BONIFAY The Holmes County Health Commissioner Phillip Music brought before the board the idea of swapping employees from one district to another because the employees wanted to work in the district in which they also reside. See BOCC A5 Get the best source for local news, interests and events in Holmes CountyWe Bring it Home.delivered for ONLY$2.54a month! Call 866-747-5000 to subscribeMention HCT Home or mail form below.*Oer good for new annual subscriptions paid in advance, while supplies last. Please call for out-of-county rate and short term subscription rates; in-county is same day mail. The Walmart Gift Card may be redeemed at any Walmart, including our local Chipley store.bonifaynow.comSign up today for an annual subscription and receive a $10 WALMART GIFT CARD!* Return form to: HCT HOME, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, Fla. 32425. Oce open: M-F, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.Yes! Sign me up for an annual subscription to the Holmes County Times-Advertiser$30.45 annual rate in-county* publishes on WednesdaysName________________________________________________Phone_____________ Delivery Address__________________________________________________________ City_____________________________________State______Zip________________ Payment enclosed $____________ Signature__________________________________ Charge my credit/debit card. __Visa __MasterCard __ Am Express __ Discover Credit Card #_____________________________________________Exp. Date______FIND US in Print, Online and on the Road! PHOTOS BY CATHRINE LAMB | Times-AdvertiserPoplar Springs Junior Varsity Lady Atomics defeated the Bethlehem Junior Varsity Lady Wildcats with a 23-11 win.By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Surrounded by friends, family, teachers, coaches and fellow students, Holmes County High School seniors Ciara Jones and Shelby Clark signed on with Chipola College in the HCHS Library on Jan. 15. With Jones and Clark were Clarks family Pam and Dan Miner, Jeanette Rudd and Jeanette Shield; Jones family Todd Jones and Matalie Bowman; and grad assistants with Chipola College Kellie Todd and Liz Krauser. We wanted to pass on that Chipola is excited for them to be joining our softball family, Krauser said. Both Jones and Clark are four-year varsity players. Jones has a batting average of .421, an on base percentage of .522, with 95 runs and 34 stolen bases. She will be going to Chipola to play in the position of middle/infield. Clark has a batting average of .419, an on base percentage of .499, with 82 runs and 31 stolen bases. She will be going to Chipola to play in the position of outfield. Im feeling pretty good about it all, Clark said. I like the college, and I get to go to college with my best friend. Clark said she wasnt sure what her major would be yet, but that she was interest in the medical field and physical therapy. POPLAR SPRINGS BASKETBALLHCHS seniors Jones and Clark sign on with Chipola SportsCECILIA SPEARS | Times-AdvertiserHolmes County High School seniors Ciara Jones and Shelby Clark signed on with Chipola College in the HCHS Library on Jan. 15. The Bethlehem Junior Varsity Wildcats pulled off a close and very exciting 28-24 win over the Poplar Springs Junior Varsity Atomics.

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Washington, Holmes at a glance Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser BPAGE 1Section EXTRACouncil on Aging sh fryBONIFAY The Holmes County Council on Aging will have a sh fry fundraiser Friday, Jan. 25. The plates will include sh, cole slaw, baked beans, hushpuppies and cake. To help, call Rachel Locke at 547-9289 or Carol Ricks at 5263577. The council also is accepting donations of food or money. Please mail monetary donations to Emerald Coast Hospice, Attn: Carol Ricks, 4374 Lafayette St., Marianna, FL 32446.Bethlehem High School HomecomingBETHLEHEM Bethlehem High Schools Homecoming will be Saturday, Jan. 26, honoring the classes of 1943, 1953, 1963, 1973, 1983, 1993 and 2003. The presentation of the Homecoming court will begin at 4:30 p.m. The Varsity Lady Wildcats will play the Vernon Yellow Jackets at 6 p.m., and alumni will be recognized after the rst game. All alumni are invited to visit with former classmates as we celebrate another year of tradition, excellence and Wildcat pride.Poplar Springs Homecoming 2013POPLAR SPRINGS Poplar Springs High Schools Homecoming on Saturday, Jan. 26, will recognize the classes of 1943, 1953, 1963, 1973, 1983, 1993 and 2003. The Poplar Springs varsity girls game will begin at 5 p.m., the recognition ceremony will be at 6:15 p.m., and the varsity boys will play at 7 p.m. A reception will be held in the media center after the recognition of classes. Honored classes, alumni members, former principals, teachers and spouses are invited. Alumni also can become active members of the PSHS Alumni Association during the reception. The fee is $7 per year for one person or $10 a year for couples. The reception for alumni is funded through the PSHS Alumni Association. We are able to continue this tradition through your generous donations. A photographer will be present to make pictures during class recognition. One 8-by-10-inch photo will be $12. INDEXSociety .................................B2 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B6By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY With the recent controversy over gun sales and ownership, local gun salesman and instructor Curtis Porter said education is essential. Theres been a massive local effort to increase security in heavily congregated places, said Porter, owner and senior gun instructor for Impact Fire Arms in Bonifay. The most response was from a very unlikely place, and thats been the churches. Weve been reviewing security measures that churches can take in response to an armed hostile and what can be done to better insure the safety of their congregation. Porter said the best way to make a decision concerning rearms is to become educated and stay informed. The rst thing were going to nd out is what your general need for the rearm is, Porter said. If its for self-defense, if its for home protection, if its a conceal/carry. Once you decide what its for, well go through the process of picking out a gun because the gun you have in mind might not necessarily be the gun you need for those purposes. He said he tries to get a feel for the customer and assess the level of experience the customer has with rearms. Once weve got that gured out, then well nd out if they want experience, he said. It sounds funny at rst, but theres some people who just want to know how to make it shoot and they dont want to learn anything else, and then youve got people who really want to know. The people who want to know, who want to go through a bunch of training, who really want to know how to operate a gun safely and to use it for defense, then we can push them in a different direction and a more complicated gun. Porter said if customers dont want the experience and just want to go out and shoot few rounds and keep it in their house, then for safety reasons, he would try to push them toward simpler guns such as revolvers. Once weve gured out what theyve needed, then well try to get them signed up for some classes, Porter said. Between me and my instructors and my staff, weve got almost 100 years worth of experience. Three of my instructors are law enforcement, and Ive started teaching in the military about 25 years; I was an instructor in the Marine Corps. Theres a big difference between someones dad taking them out and teaching them how to squirrel hunt and how to use a gun for protection, he said. If I cant convince them to come take some of our classes, then I try to convince them to nd a competent instructor to help them do that. To nd a competent instructor, Porter said potential students should check their credentials and look for experience. Theres a difference between a new instructor that has six months teaching experience and someone who has been doing it for a very long time and has real world experience, he said. Thats the most important difference between learning how to be an instructor for a classroom instead of being an instructor from real world experience. Ive had two tours of combat and found out real quick that what I was taught doesnt really work in violent confrontations. He said some of his law enforcement staff learned the same thing when they were in violent gun confrontations. You want to nd out their history and their background, he said. One of the best things to do is nd some of their previous students and ask them. For those who are still unsure if guns are for them, Porter advised they take some courses rst. Come take some classes, he said. What well show you real quick is that its not the gun thats dangerous, its the person who hold the gun in their hands. A gun itself is an inert object; it cannot hurt you. The only time people get hurt with a rearm is when people do not know how to properly use them. Porter said concealed weapons classes to cover the three rules of rearms safety: Always assume the gun is loaded. Keep your nger off trigger. Keep the gun pointed in a safe direction. The course also covers the National Ri e Associations rules of gun safety, types of handguns and functions of semis and revolvers, loading and unloading and the basics of marksmanship, including stance, sight alignment, breathing, trigger squeeze and follow through. Also covered are Florida statutes on where you can carry, dealing with a law enforcement of cer, lethal force, using your concealed weapon to get out of trouble, methods of concealment and range rules, safety and courses of re.Wednesday, JANUARY 23 2013Instructor: Education essential for all gun owners PHOTOS BY CECILIA SPEARS | Times-AdvertiserCurtis Porter, owner and lead senior gun instructor for Impact Fire Arms, discusses gun safety at his store in Bonifay.What well show you real quick is that its not the gun thats dangerous, its the person who hold the gun in their hands. A gun itself is an inert object; it cannot hurt you. The only time people get hurt with a rearm is when people do not know how to properly use them.Curtis Porter, owner, instructor, Impact Fire Arms Always assume the gun is loaded. Keep your nger off trigger. Keep the gun pointed in a safe direction. EYE ON SAFETYDifferent guns suit different customers, depending on the guns primary purpose. Gun education and safety classes can help determine which gun is right for which user and how to use them properly.

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Wednesday, January 23, 2013 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com Chipley Office We are located directly across the parking lot from the Walmart in Chipley"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS,CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITYAPPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley OfficeBoard Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 1-31-13 FREEEYEEXAM CODE: WC00ToddRobinson,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeon InMemory of LeeMullis,M.D.Smart LensesSM SocietyDevin, Rushing wed in Key WestRobert Devin and Gina Rushing are excited to announce their marriage Nov. 8, 2012, on Smathers Beach in Key West. Robert is the son of Ronald and Jean Devin of South Windsor, Conn. Gina is the daughter of Agnes and the late Theodore Rushing of Ponce de Leon. After the intimate ceremony, their kids, grandson and friends enjoyed a pub-crawl tour of Key West. The party continued as they celebrated Sunset Celebration at Mallory Square. All reboarded the cruise ship Carnival Ecstasy for a special reception dinner. The week-long family vacation, wedding and honeymoon included two stops in the Bahamas. Rob and Gina are employed at Northwest Florida Reception Center and will continue to reside in Chipley. Special to ExtraAir Force Airman Chelsea M. Whatley, Air Force Airman Marian C. Cooper and Air Force Airman Artavia U. McKinnie recently graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical tness and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Whatley is the daughter of Sandra Kent of Chipley and Edward Whatley Sr. of Ohatchee, Ala. She is a 2010 graduate of Chipley High School. Cooper is the daughter of Vickie and Mason Cooper of Vernon. She is a 2010 graduate of Vernon High School. McKinnie is the daughter of Angela McKinnie of Chipley. She is a 2011 graduate of Washington County Christian School in Chipley.Special to ExtraCHIPLEY Registered Nurse Carol Ricks, clinical liaison with Emerald Coast Hospice, recently spoke about the bene ts of hospice care with the Americans Veterans, Post 7 in Chipley. Emerald Coast Hospice is a We Honor Veterans Partner, which is a national hospice provider awareness campaign conducted by the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization in collaboration with the Department of Veterans Affairs.Special to ExtraBONIFAY Sam Nolen recently was recognized by his pastor and church congregation as a 2012-13 scholarship recipient from The General Board of Higher Education & Ministry. He attends Red Hill United Methodist Church on Highway 2 in Bonifay, where he is active in the music ministry. Nolan is the son of Ken and Wendy Nolen. This ministry leads and serves the United Methodist Church in the recruitment, preparation, nurture, education and support of Christian leaders by providing scholarships funded through offerings, wills, annuities and other designated gifts. Nolen recently graduated from Bonifay High School and is attending Troy University, where he is majoring in music education and plays saxophone for the Sound of the South marching band. Raney named to Deans ListSamantha Raney has been named to the Deans List at The Baptist College of Florida in Graceville for the fall 2012 semester. The Deans List is published each semester to honor those students who maintain a 3.25 to 3.99 grade point average on a 4.0 scale. Raney is a freshman at the Baptist College of Florida. She is active in her church, volunteers as a coach for the To Nocks Archery Club and helps with the Sew Crazy Club, both of Washington County 4-H. Samantha is the daughter of Gayle Atwood and the late Shane Raney of Chipley. She is a 2011 graduate of home schooling. The honor student is a member of Shiloh Baptist Church in Chipley.Golden named to Deans ListDr. Herbert H. J. Riedel, LBW Community College president, has announced academic honor students for the 2012 fall semester. A total of 104 students were named to the Presidents List, and 110 students were named to the Deans List. To qualify for these distinctions, students must be enrolled on a full-time basis and post a 3.5-3.99 (B+) grade point average to qualify for the Deans List and a 4.0 (A) grade point average to qualify for the Presidents List. Alex Elmer Golden of Westville received Presidents List honors. Military BRIEFS3 graduate basic trainingMARIAN C. COOPERARTAVIA U. MCKINNIECHELSEA M. WHATLEY FOUR GENERATIONS Wedding Carol Ricks speaks about hospice with veterans SPECIAL TO EXTRAPastor Matthew Rich, left, presents Sam Nolen with the 2012-13 scholarship at Red Hill United Methodist Church.SPECIAL TO EXTRAFour generations are represented with Kylee and Karlee Arrington, father Will Arrington, grandmother Debra Schaum and great-grandmother Jeanette Covington.Nolen receives scholarship Academic HONORS

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Wednesday, January 23, 2013 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3Special to the Times/NewsTALLAHASSEE For the fourth year in a row, the Florida Department of Education/Macys Teacher of the Year is a contender for the National Teacher of the Year award. Alex Lopes, Floridas 2013 Teacher of the Year, was named one of four nalists for the prestigious award by the Council of Chief State School Ofcers. He joins educators from Maryland, New Hampshire and Washington in line for the national award. The winner will be announced at a White House ceremony during National Recognition Week on April 21-16 in Washington, D.C. Gov. Rick Scott said Floridas teachers are the backbone of our classrooms and they help students obtain the skills and talents they will need to get a job, build a family, and live their version of the American Dream. I look forward to continuing to nd ways we can support our educators so they have the tools they need to succeed. On behalf of all Floridians, I would like to wish Alex the best of luck. Florida has a strong tradition of quality, passionate educators and Mr. Lopes is no exception, said Commissioner of Education Dr. Tony Bennett. It is important to recognize those who go above and beyond in the teaching profession and serve our students so diligently. I congratulate Mr. Lopes on being a nalist for one of our nations highest teaching honors. Lopes is a prekindergarten special education teacher from Carol City Elementary School in Miami-Dade County.By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Sue Brown was elected the new president of the Holmes County Historical Society during their regularly scheduled meeting Thursday, Jan. 10. Otheres elected were Buford Williams, secretary; Lavonne Tardif, treasurer; David Bevan, historian; and John Coomer stepped down from management duties to assume responsibilities as a lifetime member of the Historical Society. Williams said the biggest trouble facing the Historical Society was diminishing membership. Weve got to cry for help, Williams said. Due to members dying off or not attending any more, the Historical Society is in dire need of help. He said membership dues were only $10 and they meet at 4 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the Historical Society at 412 W. Kansas in Bonifay. This is a plea out to anyone who has interest in preserving the history of Holmes County, Williams said. We dont want to end up like that tomb stone up north that reads: Here lies Lester Moore; Four slugs from a .44; No Les No Moore. Williams said one could be a supporter and/or member of the Holmes County Historical Society without having to attend the meetings. We dont want our Holmes County Historical Society to die on the vine, said Williams. I know theres people out there who are willing and wanting to support their history. Its our roots and our history were trying to protect, and we appreciate all the support we can get. At the previous meeting on Nov. 8, Tardif noted the money in the bank as reads, $278.03 should read $268.03 and it was approved. Member Sue Williams said Buford Williams had sent his letter on improving our membership to the editor of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser but did not know if it had been printed as of that date. Bevan said he was still working on Dr. Pauls contribution to our community and plans to search for further information in the local library. He also reported that he cleaned the grave of George Banll, founder of Bonifay. The next regularly scheduled meeting of the Holmes County Historical Society will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 8. Special to the Times/NewsSOUTHPORT Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative Compliance Ofcer Lacy Pettis recently completed the Occupational Safety and Health Administrations 30-hour Outreach Training Program in construction. The OSHA Outreach Training Program for the construction industry provides training on the recognition, avoidance, abatement and prevention of safety and health hazards in workplaces. This training helps ensure workers are knowledgeable about workplace hazards and their rights and contributes to increased productivity. Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative is part of Touchstone Energy. About 75 employees serve more than 20,000 meters and 2,500 miles of line in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Jackson, Walton and Washington counties and in the municipalities of Wewahitchka, Ebro, Lynn Haven, White City, Fountain and Southport. Special to the Times/NewsAs winter break comes to a close, numerous students nd themselves back at home with a fridge full of leftovers. For many pet owners, this means a few less trips to the store for pet food. While sharing lunch with your four-legged friend is possible, owners should realize that your pet has particular dietary restrictions it must follow to guarantee that it stays happy and healthy. People enjoy sharing food with their pets, it is part of the bonding process, said Deb Zoran, doctor of veterinary medicine, and associate professor at Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM). But proper control of the types and amounts of food pets are served is crucial for its safety. For example, a diet consisting too high of fats can very dangerous for dogs, even causing such problems as diarrhea or in severe cases pancreatitis, Zoran said. The additional calories found in average table foods can also lead to obesity problems in your pet if not controlled. These problems arise not from the food itself, as whole foods such as meat and potatoes are very nutritious and well digested, but from the many spices added and the food not being in the proper balance for the pet. The food itself is perfectly good for our pets, Zoran said. If owners want to feed human food and are willing to follow prescribed recipes set up by a nutritionist, then it is an excellent way to meet their nutritional needs. Choosing to feed your pet in this fashion also leaves the owner with the responsibility for meeting their pets proper nutritional needs, which are different for dogs and cats. Chicken is an excellent and frequently used meat source to feed pets, with the fat removed for dogs and left in place for cats. Generally high fat things are potentially very problematic for dogs, while cats dont need carbs in their diets at all, Zoran said. Spices and seasonings, especially onions, capsaicin, and other additives are all potentially problematic in your pet food as well.About pet talkPet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed at vetmed.tamu. edu/pettalk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to cvmtoday@cvm.tamu. edu. Historical Society elects new president Pet talk: Scrap the table scraps? Photos HOTOS speSPE Cial IAL toTO theTHE Ti I Mes ES /Ne E Ws SLeft: Snow is a 1to 2-year-old female white English cross, about 40 pounds. She is a real beauty with a very short, pure white coat and golden eyes. She is very good on a leash, calm and gentle. She loves lying out on the grass in the sun and rolling over for belly rubs and she will take the smallest treat from your hand ever so gently. Right: Jose is a 1-year-old male rat terrier/Chihuahua cross, about 7 or 8 pounds. He is a sweet little guy, good on a leash and loves to snuggle with someone who will rub his head or belly and make him feel safe. He should do well in a home that already has pets. Animal Control of West Florida is at 686 U.S. 90 in Chipley and is open Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon. For more information, call 638-2082. Pettis completes OSHA program Floridas Teacher of the Year is national nalistSpe PE Cial IAL toTO theTHE Ti I Mes ES /Ne E Ws S

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Special to ExtraVERNON Precept Bible Studies are being offered at Ebenezer Church in February at 3334 Holmes Valley Road in Vernon. Deadline for registration is Feb. 6, with classes beginning the week of Feb. 10. You can register by contacting Kathy Rodgers at ebc@aarkenterprises. com or 535-2227. List the class name, day, and time desired, along with a contact phone number. In & Out and Precept Upon Precept courses will cost $12 for workbooks. Childcare will be offered, but must be pre-arranged at registration. If you are not able to cover the cost of the workbook, let Kathy know at registration. These studies take an in-depth look at what the Word of God has to say concerning various subjects. Each courses homework is designed to get the student in and out in 20 minutes per day, ve days a week. Class time consists of a one hour discussion from that weeks homework and one hour of video from Kay Arthur or others giving additional insight. Marriage Without Regrets Learning How to Become One (16 lessons): Married and single men and women alike will bene t from this thorough study of Gods Word on marriage the roles of husband and wife, effective and compassionate communication, sex, love, nances, divorce and remarriage. Thursdays from 6:30-8:30 p.m. and Sundays from 5-7 p.m. Covenant: Knowing Gods Covenant (11 lessons): See this incredible thread running from Genesis through Revelation. God enters into a binding agreement with His people and always keeps His promises. Trusting Him as a covenant partner frees us from the bondage of worry and anxiety. Tuesdays from 9:3011:30 a.m. and 6:30-8:30 p.m. Spiritual Gifts: Discover Your Spiritual Gifts (12 lessons): What has God called you to do and uniquely equipped you for? Discover the spiritual gifts God has given you and understand those given to all believers to glorify Himself and strengthen His church. Sundays from 2:304:30 p.m. This may also be offered as a 40 minute Study beginning Wednesday, March 20, to be determined as interest dictates. The 40 minute Bible Studies have no homework and help you discover for yourself, through examining the Word of God, what He has to say on various topics and how it applies to your life. They are designed to be completed and discussed by the whole group in six session. Having A Real Relationship With God (6 Weeks): Have you ever wondered if its possible to have a meaningful and authentic relationship with God one that really works in the day-in and day-out circumstances of your life? This powerful, six-week, no homework inductive Bible Study will help you discover for yourself how such a rewarding relationship with God is possible. This study opens the Bible to show you the way to salvation, with a special focus on where you stand with God, how your sin keeps you from knowing him, and how Christ bridged the chasm between humanity and God. Wednesdays at 7:20 p.m.Harris Chapel RevivalCARYVILLE Harris Chapel Holiness Churchs revival concludes tonight, Jan. 23, when the nal service is held at 7 p.m. Special guest speakers will be Norman E. Harris, Steve Andrews, Marvin Grier, Tonya Russ and Judy Harris. The church is located eight miles north of Caryville on Highway 179. For more information call pastor Norman Harris at 547-3888.Fourth Friday Mission SupperBONIFAY Please join us for our Fourth Friday Mission Supper at Red Hill Methodist Church, in Bonifay, at 5:30 p.m. today, Jan. 23. The menu will be cat sh lets, smoked chicken, baked beans, coleslaw, cheese grits, hushpuppies, dessert and tea. We are a small church having a good time in the Lord. Donations accepted. For more information call Lind Yarbrough at 334-684-3106 after 5:30 p.m.Christian Haven Church Jam SessionCHIPLEY Christian Haven Church will be holding their monthly Jam Session on Feb 2. Refreshments will start at 6 p.m. and singing shortly after. For more information you may call 638-0836 or 773-2620. But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.First Baptist Churchcome as you areMike Orr, Pastor1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.Bear Wrongs Patientlyth spiritual work of mercy is to bear wrongs patiently. Bearing wrongs patiently does not, however, mean being a doormat for others to walk on. It simply means that, regardless of the wrongs which we suffer, we should bear them all patiently. For example, if you have had something stolen from your unlocked car, this virtue requires that you treat this with patience and equanimity, but not that you continue to keep your car unlocked. It is more about the attitude that you have concerning the wrong done to you. We might take a lesson from the ancient stoics, who counseled that every event has two handles, as it were, one by which it can be borne and one by which it is unbearable. Remember that everything here is temporary and that liars, thieves, and even murderers really have no power over our immortal souls. Finally, consider the example of Jesus in his last days. Faced with false charges and inhuman torture and suffering, he prayed for his accusers and tormentors. We should show patience by praying for those who wrong us, realizing that they are the ones who have truly been harmed by their misdeeds.BROWN FUNERAL HOME1068 Main Street, Chipley638-4010 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser This Message Courtesy ofFor one is approved if, mindful of God, he endures pain while suffering unjustly. For what credit is it, if when you do wrong and are beaten for it you take it patiently? But if when you do right and suffer for it you take it patiently, you have Gods approval. R.S.V. 1 Peter 2:19-21 Personally, I sure will be glad when January is over. If confession is good for the soul, then let me have a good soul cleansing and confess that January is not my favorite month of the year. At the beginning of each year, a certain resident in our home begins acting like an angel and starts harping about a diet. But, not just a diet. I could take that, I think. Rather, my diet. What my diet has to do with her is a question I have yet to ask. One of my New Years resolutions is to ask no question I do not want to hear the answer. Believe me when I say ignorance is bliss. The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage is a health nut, whereas, I am just a plain nut with lots of fudge icing on the top. As nuts are concerned, I prefer nuts with fudge icing. Every year right after Christmas and before the New Year comes in, my wife and I have this conversation about the upcoming diet. I need to correct myself here. When I use the word conversation, I probably should use the word monologue. When it comes to diets, I have absolutely nothing to say. My wife on the other hand, has plenty to say and when she is saying it to me, she holds nothing back. When it comes to diets and dieting, I have my own ideas about the whole matter. I do not see myself as fat, just post-thin. For arguments sake, lets say I am fat. I take refuge in the Bible along this line, which says, All the fat is the Lords (Leviticus 4:16b KJV). If I was to argue with my wife, which I promise you I am not going to, I could lay all of the blame about my being post-thin on her. I have pictures to prove my point. Before we got married, I was very thin. Now look at me! I dont have to draw a picture for you, do I? Along this line of diets, I think I am doing rather well. I have come up with ideas that have made me quite comfortable along this line. Last week I bought a dress shirt and brought it home. When I tried it on it was three sizes too big for me making me look rather thin. I love that shirt. That shirt was made for people like me. Every time I wear that shirt in public somebody usually says, You mustve lost a lot of weight. I just smile. I have other shirts in my closet that have brought me no end of grief. Here is what I want to know. Why do my shirts get thin but I dont? After all, we go to the same places and eat at the same restaurants. There is something here I believe I am missing! Whenever I am off on a trip somewhere my wife always says just as I leave, Make sure that you watch what you eat while youre away. I am delighted to report to her or anybody else who will listen that I always watch what I eat. After all, I would hate to take a bite of broccoli by mistake. Therefore, I watch every bite I eat to make sure it is as delicious as possible. My wife is always encouraging me to eat more fruit. I believe fruit is a matter of personal opinion and preference. My wife believes that bananas are fruit. I, on the other hand, believe that a banana split is fruit. My wife has the idea that an Apple a day keeps the doctor away. I have a different slant on that idea. I believe an Apple Fritter a day keeps everybody away. When it comes to salads, my wife is the crowned queen of salads. She has a golden touch when it comes to making salads. If I am not careful, she will serve me a salad three times a day. Another thing I need to watch out for with her salads. Occasionally, she will try to slip in some form of broccoli. For some unknown reason she believes broccoli is the panacea for all ills nutritionally. As diets come and go, my diets usually go without leaving a trace behind them. Years ago, I got serious about a diet and was determined to lose 25 pounds of ugly fat. Much to my chagrin, I lost the other fat instead. Now look at me! The diet phase is beginning to run its course as we come to the close of January. Towards the end of January, my lovely bride begins thinking of Valentines Day. For me, whatever gets her attention off my diet is good news any day of the week. I suppose it is true what people say that you are what you eat. I further suppose that it is important to eat the right things. Not only is that true physically but also spiritually. The Bible has something to say about this. As newborn babes, desire the sincere milk of the word, that ye may grow thereby (1 Peter 2:1 KJV). Nothing is more important in my daily routine than feasting on the Word of God. I may not do very well on my physical diet, but I do take special care about my spiritual diet. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, P.O. Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call 866-5522543 or email jamessnyder2@ att.net. His web site is www. jamessnyderministries.com. My New Years diet ts me to a T-shirt FAITH Wednesday, January 23, 2013 BPage 4Sectionwww.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com DR. JAMES L. SNYDEROut to Pastor Faith BRIEFSEbenezer Church to offer classes in February MONDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach of ce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call 415-5999.TUESDAY8 to 9 a.m.: Tai Chi Class at the Washington County Public Library, Chipley. 8 to 10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 5 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at 6:25 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-451 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A.WEDNESDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. 11 a.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday (Holmes County residents only). 9 a.m. 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 1 p.m.: Writers Group meets third Thursday at the Chipley Library. 4 p.m.: Holmes County Historical Society second Thursday of each month. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church. 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6:30 p.m.: TOPS Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A. Community CALENDAR

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Wednesday, January 23, 2013 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences.Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section ofwww.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com, you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books In partnership withLegacy.com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at or Mrs. Clyty Odessie Casey, 91, of Ebro, passed away Jan. 14, 2013, at Bonifay Nursing and Rehab Center in Bonifay. She was born March 21, 1921, in Ebro to the late Ira Christopher Columbus Strickland and Zellie Miller Strickland. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Casey was preceded in death by her husband, Samuel Edward Casey; three brothers, Emmett Strickland, G.W. Strickland and Ira Strickland Jr.; one sister, Bethel Morrell; and one granddaughter, Dawn Waller. Mrs. Casey is survived by two sons, Eddie Olean Casey of Ebro and Billy Gene Casey and wife, Sarah, of Ebro; one daughter, Christine Casey of Ebro; three sisters, Elma Morrell of Ebro, Velma Stiller of Ebro and Idell Anglin of Ebro; seven grandchildren, Steve Casey, Troy Casey, Greg Casey, Donna Clark, Sherri Taylor, Laurie Waller and Shane Waller; 14 greatgrandchildren, and seven great-great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 1 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013, at Spring Valley Holiness Church with the Rev. Tommy Taylor, the Rev. Horace McCormick and the Rev. Wesley Hall of ciating. Interment followed in the Ebro Community Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends from 6-8 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013, at Spring Valley Holiness Church.Clyty O. CaseyBernice Catherine Mitchell Ming-Squires passed away Jan. 14, 2013, in Graceville. She was born May 25, 1919, in Jackson County. She was preceded in death by her parents, Brown Dozier and Levada Golden Mitchell; rst husband, Mansel Ming (1937-1969); second husband, George Squires (1972-2002); and one sister Willie Murl Mitchell Miller. Bernice is survived by her daughter, Sarah Catherine Ming (Marvin) Marley of Graceville; brother, Brown Dovel (Jane) Mitchell of Lynn Haven; grandchildren, Marc E. (Sandy) Marley of Wilsonville, Ala., Phillip C. (Rachel) Marley of Greenville, N.C., Todd M. (Michelle) Marley of Marianna, Emily C. Marley (Ray) Gillis of Blountstown and Vicki L. Marley (Mike) Inscho of Graceville; 18 great grandchildren; three great-great grandchildren; stepdaughters, Christine Squires-Strayer of Grand Island, Mary Nell SquiresWhitehead of Bonifay and Juanita Squires-Myers of Chipley; stepson, Buddy Squires of Newnan, Ga.; 13 stepgrandchildren; 32 great-stepgrandchildren; eight great-greatstepchildren; and numerous nieces, nephew and cousins. Funeral services for Bernice were held at 2 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013, at Galilee Methodist Church with the Rev. Robert Marley and the Rev. Scott Sessions of ciating. Interment followed in the Galilee Cemetery. A time of remembrance was held from 1 p.m. until time of service. Williams Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.Bernice C. Ming-SquiresCozie D. Brown, 98, of Chipley, passed away Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013 in the Northwest Florida Community Hospital. Mrs. Cozie was born Oct. 4, 1914, in Chipley to the late Henry and Daisy (Burch) Johnson. She was a lifelong resident of Chipley and a long time member of Blue Lake Baptist Church where she had many times served as Sunday School teacher and Vacation Bible School worker. In addition to her parents, she is predeceased by her husband of 51 years, Buford Brown. Survivors include one son, Don Brown and wife, Nina, of Chipley; one sister, Ozie Pippin of Dothan, Ala.; three grandchildren, Cindy Rawls and husband, Scott, of Havana, Eric Brown and wife, Teresa, of Chipley and Greta Harris of Lynn Haven; ve great-grandchildren, Adam Padgett, Hannah Ashe, Ryan Brown, Jordan Brown and Ava Harris and many, many people that she had touched the lives of. The family received friends Monday, Jan. 14, 2013, from 6-8 p.m. at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel. Funeral services were held Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2013, at 3 p.m. at Blue Lake Baptist Church with the Rev. Tim Evans and the Rev. Michael Orr of ciating. Interment followed in Blue Lake Cemetery. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. Cozie D. BrownVera Vernell Bush Peterson, 94, of Chipley, passed away Sunday, Jan. 13, 2013, in the Northwest Florida Community Hospital. Mrs. Vera was born Jan. 27, 1918, in Southport to the late Curtis Cohen and Margaret Jane (Taylor) Pennington. She had been a resident of Washington County most of her life and was a homemaker. Mrs. Vera was one of the original founders and charter member of the Grace Assembly at Chipley. Her life centered around her family and her church. In addition to her parents, she is predeceased by her husband of 54 years, Thomas Ell Bush, and her husband of 5 years, Lloyd H. Peterson; one son, Jimmy Doyle Bush; three brothers, Wilmer Pennington, James Thelmer Pennington and Curtis C. Pennington; one sister, Waltzy Kimmons; and a half sister, Lula Pennington. Survivors include two sons, Thomas Alton Bush and wife, Phyllis, of Chipley and Curtis Marcus Bush of Pinckard, Ala.; two daughters, Mary Helen Clifford of Pensacola and Betty Faye Parker and husband, Larry, of Chipley; daughter-in-law, Annie Jo Bush (wife of Jimmy Bush); 11 grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren; six great-great-grandchildren and a host of nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013, at 3 p.m. in the Grace Assembly at Chipley Church with the Rev. Dallas Pettis of ciating. The family received friends one hour prior to services. Interment followed in Glenwood Cemetery. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net. Vera V. PetersonMr. Lee Jennings Blalock of Highway 177-A, Bonifay, passed away Monday, Jan. 14, 2013. He was 77. Mr. Blalock, affectionately known as Lee, was born May 8, 1935, in Geneva County, Ala., to the late Lex Steagall and Era Mae Shiver Blalock. After several years of service, he retired from Jackson Correctional Institute as a lieutenant. Lee loved the outdoors. He enjoyed working on his farm, shing and quail hunting. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy, and he attended Pleasant Home Freewill Baptist Church. In addition to his parents, his brother, Harvey Blalock, preceded him in death. Survivors include his wife of 57 years, Ann Smith Blalock; three sons, Kenny Blalock (Kathy), Roger Blalock (Lucia) and Jeff Blalock; three grandchildren, Kelly Williams, Amanda Sewell (Zach) and Kendall Harker (Austin); four greatgrandchildren, Cheyenne and Paden Miller and Rhett and McKinley Sewell, all of Bonifay, and other extended family and a host of friends. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013, in the chapel of Sorrells Funeral Home in Geneva with the Rev. Jay Ward and the Rev. Jerry McAdams of ciating. Burial followed in the Pleasant Home Freewill Baptist Church Cemetery with military honors and Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Wednesday, Jan. 16, from 6-8 p.m. Flowers will be accepted or memorial contributions may be made to the Pleasant Home Freewill Baptist Church, Black, AL 36314.Lee J. Blalock LEE J. BLALOCKDorman L. Kight, Don or Donnie, 75, passed away on Jan. 13, 2013, after an extended illness. He was born on Aug. 3, 1937, in Tallassee, Ala. He was raised in Bonifay, along with his two brothers. Don served in the Air Force, and after his service in the military he pursued a college degree at the Miami-Dade Jr. College, receiving an associates degree in 1970, and then attended the University of Florida where he received his bachelors degree in accounting in 1972. He moved to Tallahassee, to raise his family and pursue his professional career. After more than 30 years as an accountant, he retired from Department of Environmental Protection (formerly known as Department of Natural Resources-Division of Law Enforcement) to spend more time with his grandkids and have more time for his hobbies of hunting, shing, ballroom and country-western dancing. Don Kight is survived by his daughters Carina Dunlap and her husband, Andrew, and Tara Hewitt and her husband, Craig; ve grandchildren, Adam Dunlap, Evan Dunlap, Craig Hewitt III, Catherine Hewitt and Camille Hewitt; two brothers, Frank Kight and his wife, Patricia, of Leroy, Ala., and Joe Kight and wife, Diane, of Pensacola; and many nieces, nephews and cousins, all of whom held a special place in his heart. Funeral services were held at John Wesley United Methodist Church in Tallahassee on Wednesday, Jan. 16 at 3 p.m. Family received visitors immediately following the service at the home of Carina Dunlap until 6 p.m. A graveside service for close friends and family will be held the following day at noon Eastern Time at Bonifay; 507 North Caryville Rd., Bonifay, FL. 32425. The family would like to thank everyone who touched our loved ones life, we are forever grateful for your kindness and friendship. In lieu of owers, please make donations in his memory to the National Parkinsons Foundation, North Florida Chapter; PO Box 14722 Tallahassee, FL 32317, www.npfnorth orida. org. The Chapter is committed to serving the local Parkinson community in cooperation with the Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare Parkinsons Center. Culleys Meadowwood Funeral Home, 1737 Riggins Road, is in charge of arrangements.Dorman L. Kight DORMAN L. KIGHTBobby Burl Law, 68, of Sunny Hills, passed away on Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013. He was a resident of Panama City most of his life. He graduated from Bay High School and retired from Gulf Power Company after 35 years. Bobby was a loyal member of Shepherds Gate Church, where he was active in many charitable projects both locally and in Mexico, where he traveled many times to assist in building projects. Bobby was a generous, loving and devoted man who shared his many talents with his family and friends throughout his life. He loved his family and spent many hours enjoying his six grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, John D. and Katherine Steverson Law. Survivors include his wife of 47 years, Suzan Metz Law; two children, Amy Miller and husband, Richard, of Hamilton, Ga., and Burl Law and wife, Megan, of Sunny Hills; grandchildren, Colt, Grace, Mercy, Truth and Kindred Miller and Olivia Law; sister, Peggy Palmer and Penny of Wisconsin and Johnny Law and wife, Kim, of Crestview, and many nieces, nephews and cousins. A celebration of life was held at 2 p.m., Friday, Jan. 18, 2013, at Shepherds Gate Church in Wausau. Contributions in Bobbys memory may be made to the NRA.Bobby B. LawEarnest Buford Sims, 90, of Marianna, died Jan. 7, 2013. Funeral services were held on, January 10, 2013, at James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel. Interment followed at Pope Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing.Earnest B. SimsMichael Lynn Krontz, 64, of Bonifay, died Nov. 22, 2012. Memorialization was by cremation with Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.Michael L. KrontzFreddie Joe Gainey, 57 of Bonifay, died on Friday, Jan. 11, 2013, at his Residence in Bonifay. Born Monday, March 28, 1955, in Holmes County, he was the son of the late Joe Gainey and the late Annie Flowers Gainey. He was the husband of Jeanie Gainey. Surviving are sons, Billy Joe Gainey of Dothan, Ala., Michael Joe Gainey of Bonifay and Chris Mark Joe Gainey of Bonifay; daughters, Teresa Goodwin of DeFuniak Springs, Michelle Gainey of Bonifay and Cyrstal Redmon of Vernon; sisters, Debbie Gainey of Bonifay, Vicki Gainey of Bonifay and Melissa Thomas of Bonifay, and 13 grandchildren. A funeral service was held at 11 a.m., on Monday, Jan. 14, 2013, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel with Gino Mayo officiating. Interment followed in Bonifay Cemetery, Bonifay, FL with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 10-11 a.m. on Monday, Jan. 14, 2013, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel.Freddie J. GaineyMrs. Ingeborg Adelheit Rabon of Chipley passed away Friday, Jan. 18, 2013. She was 88. Inge was born Nov. 10, 1924, in Magdeburg, Germany, to the late Johannes Bttger and Erna Liebetrutt. Her husband, Willis Elbert Rabon, and brother, Hanns Bttger, preceded her in death. Survivors include her son, Willis Rabon, Havana; grandson, Orion Rabon; great-granddaughter, Audriona Rabon, Tallahassee; and sister, Mickey Wilson, Chipley, as well as several special nieces, along with other extended family. A private memorial service was conducted by family members at her home. Memorial contributions may be made to Covenant Hospice, 4440 Lafayette St. Suite C, Marianna, FL 32446.Ingeborg A. Rabon ObituariesMORE OBITUARIES B6

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Wednesday, January 23, 2013 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra B6| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, January 23, 2013 1-5210 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 30-2012-CA-000252 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA N.A. Plaintiff, v. JAMES B. WAFFORD ; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAMES B. WAFFORD; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL O THER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Defendant(s), NOTICE OF ACTION JAMES B. WAFFORD Last Known Address: 807 McGee Road Bonifay, Florida 32425 Current Address: Unknown. Previous Address: 1710 Sims Boulevard Bonifay, Florida 32425 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAMES B. WAFFORD Last Known Address: 807 McGee Road Bonifay, Florida 32425. Current Address: Unknown. Previous Address: Unknown. ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Holmes County, Florida: THE SOUTH 164 FEET OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of: 807 McGee Road, Bonifay, Florida 32425 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses on or before February 15, 2013, a date which is within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 350 Jim Moran Blvd., Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on October 24, 2012. CODY TAYLOR CLERK OF THE COURT By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. Attorney for Plaintiff Michael T. Gelety, Esquire Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A 350 Jim Moran Blvd, Suite 100 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Telephone: (954) 354-3544. Facsimile: (954) 354-3545 Email: mgelety@erwlaw.com Secondary Email: Erwparalegal.boa2@erwla w.com. IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days beore your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser January 16, 23, 2013. 1-5214 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: Edward Hutchins, Last known address of: 1593 Blue Creek Rd, Ponce de Leon, FL 32455; Jennifer M Lynch, Last known address of: 1125 Alex Brown Rd., Bonifay, FL 32425. You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Holmes County, Florida, no later than thirty(30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser January 23, 2013. 1-5212 PUBLIC AUCTION Howell Mini-Storage at 309 S. Waukesha St Bonifay Fl. 32425 will hold a private or public auction on the contents of these units, for nonpayment according to Fl Statute 83. Tenant has until the February 2, 2013 at 10:00 AM to pay in full. No checks. Items of general household goods storage in buildings listed below. Buidling 1 unit 7 Robert Brinkley. Building 3 unit 1 Gerald Greene. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser January 16, 23, 2013. 1-5213 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 30-2012-CA-000308 VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND Tennessee FINANCE INC., a corporation authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs FELINA M. HARRIS, a/k/a FELINA MARIA HARRIS and JOHN C. HARRIS, a/k/a JOHN CALVIN HARRIS wife and husband; ; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION, if any, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on January 7, 2013 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on February 7, 2013 at 11:00 A.M. (CST) at the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 North Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425 for the following described property: Parcel 2, SPRING HILL FARM, a subdivision according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 24, 25 and 26, in the Public Records of Holmes County, Florida. Together with that certain 2010 CMH RIVERVIEW, 76 x 16 mobile home bearing identification numbers: CS2010737TNA and CS2010737TNB. Property Address: 1465 Griffin Drive, Westville, FL 32464. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTERST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: January 11, 2013. CODY TAYLOR, CLERK HOLMES COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT By: Diane Eaton, Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser January 23, 30, 2013. 1-5215 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 30-2012-CA-000356. 2010-3 SFR VENTURE, LLC vs. DONNY A. GIBSON, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: DONNY A. GIBSON, 2357 HWY 177A, BONIFAY, FL 32425 and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DONNY A. GIBSON, 2357 HWY 177A, BONIFAY, FL 32425, LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED, 2357 HWY 177A, BONIFAY, FL 32425. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit: BEGINNING AT THE SE CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4 OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG EAST SIDE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4 880 FEET, MORE OR LESS; THENCE RUN WEST 165 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 880 FEET, PARALLEL TO THE EASTERN SIDE OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4, TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID FORTY; THENCE EAST 165 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT: COMMENCE AT THE SE CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4 OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE EAST SIDE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4 350 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH ALONG SAID EAST LINE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4, 530 FEET; THENCE RUN WEST 165 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 530 FEET; THENCE RUN EAST 165 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. has been filed against you and you are required to file a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Casey Jernigan King, McCalla Raymer, LLC, 225 E. Robinson St. Suite 660, Orlando, FL 32801 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 28 day of November, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court BY: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser January 23, 30, 2013. Daniel Walton Padgett passed away Dec. 10, 2012. He was the second child born to Daniel Morrison Padgett and Dollie Bell Brownell. He was born in Caryville on Jan. 27, 1927. During WWII, his family moved to Panama City. While attending Bay County High School, Dan Padgett joined the U.S. Navy. When the war was over, he returned and graduated from Bay High. He attended Florida State University and graduated with a B.S. in mathematics. During his student days at FSU, Padgett responded to the call of God to the ministry. He was ordained at Hickory Hill Baptist Church, of which he was a charter member. His rst-time pastorate was at New Hope Baptist Church in Holmes County. During that time, he was employed at Eglin Air Force Base. In 1953, Dan Padgett enrolled in Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas, where he received the Master of Divinity. During his ve years as a seminary student, he worked full time as a senior analog computer engineer at Chance Vought Aircraft in Grand Prairie, Texas. In 1954, Dan Padgett married Pauline Polly Donaldson of Cairo, Ga. For seven years, he was pastor at Thomasville Road Baptist Church in Tallahassee. He was employed by the Florida Baptist Convention in Jacksonville as a consultant for childrens curriculum in the Training Union Department. Later, he served as Minister of Education at Hendricks Avenue Baptist Church. In 1970, he accepted a position in Nashville, Tenn., at the Baptist Sunday School Board (now Lifeway) as a consultant and editor of childrens Sunday School and Vacation Bible School literature. Padgett moved back to Holmes County and became principal/teacher at Prosperity Elementary School in 1973. He also pastored at Hickory Hill Baptist Church for 12 years. He became the executive director of the Washington-Holmes Association for Retarded Citizens (ARC), a training school for mentally challenged adults in Chipley. He was the pastor of Sandy Creek Baptist Church for 13 years. During his years in Florida, Padgett was active in civic and community affairs. In his retirement, he was called on many times to ll pulpits and to conduct funerals. For 47 years, he served as chairman of the annual Padgett Reunion. He returned to Nashville, Tenn., in 2010 to spend more time with his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He was known as Papa and will be missed greatly. He is preceded in death by his parents; brothers, Charles Quinton Padgett, Clyde Padgett and Freddie Padgett; and son-inlaw, James Agresta. He is survived by Polly, his devoted wife of 58 years; daughters, Pamela Hughes and Paula Agresta; son, Philip Padgett, all of Nolensville, Tenn.; grandchildren, Heather (Josh) Parker, Marc (Wendy) Hughes, Cal and Abby Agresta, and Dillon, Gabriella, Meredith, Katherine and Preston Padgett; greatgrandchildren, Tinsley, Savannah and Arye Parker and Amara Hughes; sisters and brother, Lola (Jack) Silver, Sue (Skip) Walker and John Padgett; several nieces and nephews; and numerous close friends. Funeral services and internment were held in Nolensville, Tenn., on Dec. 14, 2012. A memorial service for family and friends will be held on Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013, at 11 a.m. at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. In memory of Dan Padgett, contributions may be made to the Dan and Polly Padgett Benevolence Fund at Hickory Hill Baptist Church. Woodbine Funeral Home and Waller Chapel Directors, 615-776-7009, was in charge of arrangements.Daniel W. Padgett DANIEL W. PAdDGETT OBITUARIES from page B5Mrs. Shelba Jean Baker Bowers of Bowers Road, Westville, passed away Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013, surrounded by her loving family. She was 76. Shelba was born Sept. 7, 1936, in Holmes County to the late George Luther and Bessie Powell Baker. She was a very loving and devoted wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. Shelba always had a smile for everyone she met. In addition to her parents a grandson, Jacob Armstrong preceded her in death. Survivors include her husband of 48 years, Roland Dee Bowers, Westville; one son, Charles Armstrong (Pam), Westville; two daughters, Cynthia Armstrong, Westville, and Kimberly Riley (Walt), Spanish Fort, Ala.; six grandchildren, Justin Armstrong (Tabitha), Geneva, Casey and Jesse Armstrong, both of Westville, Chase, Clint and Amanda Riley, all of Spanish Fort, Ala.; two great-grandchildren, Makayla Thomasson and Cheyanne Armstrong, both of Geneva; three sisters, Mavis Brown (George), Jackson, S.C., Faye Brown, Ponce de Leon, Barbara Glass (Thomas), Geneva; one brother, Dale Baker (Margaret), Westville, and several special nieces, nephews, other extended family and a host of friends. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2013, at Open Pond United Pentecostal Church with the Rev. Steven Connell ofciating and Ernie Land delivering the eulogy. Mrs. Bowers was placed into the church one hour prior to service time. Burial followed in the Campground Cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Monday, Jan. 14, from 6-8 p.m. Flowers will be accepted or memorial contributions may be made to Covenant Hospice, 4440 Lafayette St. Suite C, Marianna, FL 32446. Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva, 334684-9999, is in charge of arrangements. Express your condolences in our guest book at www.sorrellsfuneralhomes.com.Shelba J. Bowers SHELbBA J. BOwWERsSLamar Grantham, 64, of Vernon, died Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013, at his residence. He was born April 23, 1948, to the late Lloyd Grantham and Lillie (Carter) Grantham. Mr. Grantham was a lifelong resident of Vernon. He was of the Pentecostal faith and a member of Christian Haven Church. Mr. Grantham worked in the maintenance department for the city of Chipley. He is survived by his wife, Laurie Grantham, of Vernon; four sons, Elliot Grantham of Wausau, Austin Grantham of Wausau, Zachary Kortering of Vernon and Daniel Grantham of Vernon; three daughters, Lillie Helton of Vernon, Caylah Kortering of Chipley and Ellen Grantham of Vernon; one brother, Loyal Grantham, Crawfordville; three sisters, Lena Raulerson of Crawfordville, Louise Pelache of Bay County and Lurine Skompski of Bay County; and two grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013, at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel with the Rev. Carlos Finch and the Rev. Ronnie Gene Hagan ofciating. Family received friends one hour prior to service. Interment followed at Wausau Memorial Garden in Wausau, with Brown Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. LLamar GGranthamLeroy Mitchell Perry, 80, of Melbourne, died Jan. 11, 2013. Funeral services were held on Jan 14, 2013, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Interment followed at Bonifay Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing.LLeroy M. Perry Community EVENTsSNN SDAR AR Chipola Chapter to meetMARIANNA ARIANNA Chipola Chapter NSDAR will meet at 11 a.m. today at the Hudnall Building Community Room. Dr. Ray Marling will speak about Womens Heart Health. Reservations are required for the luncheon and may be made by contacting Vice Regent Carolyn Jordan at 638-1947 or cdjordan@bellsouth.net. Concerned A A merican Patriots meetingMARIANNA ARIANNA Concerned American Patriots of Jackson County will hold its rst meeting of the year at 6 p.m. today at the Ag. Center on Highway 90 West (next to the National Guard Armory). Speaker is Mike Maharrey, national communications director for the Tenth Amendment Center. His subject will be Our Last Hope Rediscovering the Lost Road to Liberty. Focus is on understanding the relationship between states and the federal government and why it matters. Everyone is invited, and admission is free.

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Wednesday, January 23, 2013 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 Can You Dig It? Heavy Equipment School. 3wk Training Program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Excavators. Local Job Placement Asst. VA Benefits Approved. 2 National Certifications. Call 866-362-6497 B B USINESS USINESS G G UIDE UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Dentons RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDAWE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS$ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENTMon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709 Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611 HODGES ROOFINGLet us show you how to save $100s or maybe $1,000s on a new metal roof. 850 348-9399Lic. #RC0066509Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414REOPENED Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMENEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!!! Contractors Needed To Verify and Resolve Newspaper Subscriber Delivery Issues. Looking for a carrier in Washington Co., Jackson Co., or the Youngstown/Fountain area The News Herald needs three independent contractors to work from 3:00 am until 7:00 am everyday Monday through Sunday Must have: Be 18 yrs or older A reliable vehicle Proof of Auto Insurance A valid drivers license If interested, Please contact Colin Parker at cparker@chipleypaper.c om Multiple merchandising positions availablefor a 10 week temporary job in Chipley, FL$12 an hour please call 888-678-8966 x1189. Please leave a message. AIRLINE CAREERS Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 Apply Now, 13 Drivers Top 5% Pay & Benefits Credential, Fuel, & Referral Bonus Available. Need CDL Class A Driving Experience. 877-258-8782 www.ad-drivers.com Driver Daily or Weekly Pay. $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months and 12 months. $0.03 Quarterly Bonus. Requires 3 months recent experience. 800414-9569 www. driveknight.com Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our Medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice. In Bonifay Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Install/Maint/RepairLicensed ElectricianGulf Coast Electric Cooperative is accepting applications for position of Licensed Electrician at Workforce Center of Florida, 625 Highway 231, Panama City, Florida through Friday, February 1, 2013. For more information visit our website at www .gcec.com Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID#: 34238869 Text FL38869 to 56654 Install/Maint/RepairLine TechnicianGulf Coast Electric Cooperative is accepting applications for two positions of Line Technician at Workforce Center of Florida, 625 Highway 231, Panama City, Florida through Friday, February 1, 2013. For more information visit our website at www .gcec.com Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID#: 34238868 Text FL38868 to 56654 Install/Maint/RepairWater TechnicianGulf Coast Electric Cooperative is accepting applications for position of Water Technician at Workforce Center of Florida, 625 Highway 231, Panama City, Florida through Friday, February 1, 2013. For more information visit our website at www .gcec.com Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID#: 34238862 Text FL38862 to 56654 MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE. Sat 1/26/13 8-12. Baby clothes all sizes, boy & girl. Many other household items. 762 Dogwood LN Chipley. Hwy 90 W and look for signs. YOUR UGLY NAIL FUNGUS (and Cracking Heels) CAN BE GONE! Nail Fungus Soak $16.95 Guaranteed! Thousands of Satisfied Customers. www.LongCreekHerbs.co m (417)779-5450 12 inch Band Saw, 10 inch Table Saw, Troybilt Garden Tiller. (850)373-7442. Ceramic classes starting after January 3 in Bonifay. Come join the fun. (850)547-5244 Wanted to Rent; Farm land or pasture in Chipley & suroundding areas for the year 2013. 850-718-1859. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. CAMELLIA SALE Big & small, lots to choose from. Cheap prices, great quality. Arbor Lane Nursery. 2636 Burner Dairy Rd, Vernon. 535-9886 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Schneider National! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! 888.368.1964 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 Educational Teacher needed for VPK class. CDA Required for position. Apply in person @Grace & Glory Christian School 929 Main St Chipley. 638-3700 *Adopt*:Doting dad, stay at home mom (&puppies) excited to give your baby everything! *Expenses Paid* *Bob & Maria* FKBar42311 1800-522-0045 ADOPT: Childless teacher (33) and devoted husband (37) wish to adopt; promise unconditional love, opportunities. Expenses Paid. Kristie/Gabe. Attorney Adam Sklar, Bar#0150789. 1-888-387-9290 TOLL FREE. Annual Winter & Construction Auction DATE: Saturday February 23, 2013 8:00AM LOCATION:5529 Hwy231 North Campbellton Fl 32426 (4) Local Farm Dispersals, (3) Estates, Bank Repos, Sheriff Depts, city and county surplus, plus consignments. Mason Auction & Sales LLC # AB2766 850-263-0473 Office 850-258-7652 Chad Mason 850-849-0792 Gerald Mason www.masonauction.com Firewood. Smoking wood, Fat lighter, seasoned or green. Split & delivered $55.00. (850)547-9291 or (850)373-7027. LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET, In Original Plastic, Never Used, Orig. $3,000, sacrifice $975.CHERRY BEDROOM SET, Solid Wood, new in factory boxes$895. Can Deliver. Bill (813) 298-0221. COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, January 23, 2013 COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com(850) 547-9500 B oni f a y Florida www.xtrem ein dus tri es.com Xtreme BoatsFACTORY DIRECT Sales/Business DevelopmentWashington County News/ Holmes County Times AdvertiserAdvertising Sales ExecutiveHalifax Media Group is looking for an experienced sales executive to provide online and print advertising solutions to advertisers in Washington/Holmes Counties in beautiful northwest Florida, to maximize the benefits of advertising for our customers while maximizing revenues for our company. This position will focus on soliciting print and online advertising,on behalf of the businesses and brands of Halifax Media Group, Northwest Florida. Prior sales experience a must. Washington and Holmes counties are just a short drive to the Worlds Most Beautiful Beaches and have plenty of outdoor recreational opportunities. Halifax Media Group offers an excellent benefit package including health, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave. Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-Free Workplace No phone calls, please Web ID 34238713 Text FL38713 to 56654 2003 Dodge Stratus R/T 2 Dr. Dark gray, black leather interior. Fully loaded, good condition. 149,000 miles. $3700 OBO. 850-773-5009 1999 DODGE DAKOTA SPORT LONG BED V-6 3.9 engine automatic, radio/AC, sliding rear window, towing hitch, steel wheels, fair cond. 100,300 miles. NEEDS tires, battery & fuel pump $ 1,800 OBO Private OwnerChipley Please leave name & # 850-638-3306 For Sale 1988 Chevy Silverado. $1500, 46in Craftsman mower 19HP $400. For more information call 638-4492 DWMH2009 3 / 2 Big tub, 1 acre, fenced three sides and garage shop, Wausau area 850-638-4953 $3,000 cash assume mtg $600+ credit-worthy. WANTED FARM LAND in Washington, Holmes, & Jackson counties. 850-481-2248 20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0 Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views, West Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www. sunsetranches.com By Owner: 19 wooded acres on Hwy. 79, 3 miles north of Bonifay. $3,500 per acre. Call Richard @ (850)547-2637. Prime Property. Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd, Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Some owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858 or 326-9109. Mobile Home for rent $425/month. 3/Bdrm 1-1/2 bath. Bonifay. No pets. Security deposit $400.00. (850)547-0989 FSBO/Agent: 3 Bd/2 Bth 20 acres, 1600 metal shed, $225K. (305)394-3992 3 BR/2BA Mobile Home for rent. 9 miles from Chipley. Call 638-4689 or 326-2053 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850326-0582, 850-638-7315. Doublewide 4101 Douglas Ferry Rd., Bonifay. 2 Bdr/2 Bath. Carport. See on Craigs list. No pets. Background check required. $595/month. (850)547-4606. Douglas Ferry Rd. 2 Bdrm/1 Bath. New carpet, clean. Water, garbage, lawn service furnished. Background check required. No pets. $450/month. (850)547-4606. FOR RENT Nice mobile home excellent location in Chipley. No Pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent: 2BR/1BA Mobile Homes $300/month plus $300/deposit No pets. Call 850-547-2043 Leave message. SpaciousTwo Bedroom $475. Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. 2 Bdrm/1 1/2 bath Townhouse Chipley. $595/month. Deposit/references required. No Pets. (850)638-1918. 3 Bdrm/1 bath Farm House near Vernon. CH/A, front & back porch, hardwood floors, includes microwave, deep freezer, washer/dryer, refrigerator & stove. Free lawn care & garbage. No pets. $600/mth $300deposit. (850)535-0368 3BR/2BA Doublewide Large patio backporch. Front porch w/roof on .7 acre, 179A, near Geneva line. $650.00/mth, avail Dec. 1st. 547-3746. Cottage Style House 3 Bdrm/1 bath, screened porch. No smoking. No pets. $725/mth. Need references. Bonifay area. (850)547-3494 (850) 532-2177 Home For Rent 3BR/ 1.5BA A/C Wausau. $650.00 Rent $650.00 Deposit. No Pets. 638-7601 Rent or sale. 3BD/2BA, handicapped equip. 3BD/1.5BA in Chipley. CH&A, large lots. Conveniently located. 850-481-5352 or 850-441-8181 or 850-547-2091. Sunny Hills 3 br 1.5 ba Lndry, gar., pool, good cond., $850 mo + dd Barbara Hindman RltyOwner (850)527-5085 $350/mth 1st, last, and deposit. Call 850-849-3907 for more information Rooms for Rent. Water, sewer, garbage, electric included. In Bonifay. $450/month. (850)296-8073 Bonifays Best Mobile Home Community has 2 or 3 bedrooms available ranging from $435-$625/month. Large lots, quiet, clean and on-site maintenance. Only responsible persons should apply. Great Bonifay Schools. Bonifays ONLY Neighborhood Crime Watch Community. No pets. One month deposit. HUD Assistance may be available. Contact Sue: (850)547-1386 or (512)751-2847. 2 BR/1BA and 1/2 Mobile Home for rent. 9 miles from Chipley. Call 638-4689 or 326-2053 NURSING CAREERS begin here -Train in months, not years. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job Placement assistance. Call Centura Institute Orlando (877) 206-6559 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. 800-443-5186 www. CenturaOnline.com Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incld 638-1918 For Rent -Quiet neighborhood, Single family, 2 bedroom duplex. Chipley. No pets. Background & proof of income required. 850-638-7128 FOR RENT 1 Bed apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 Drivers Class A Flatbed HOME EVERY WEEKEND! Pay 37/mi, Both ways, FULL BENEFITS, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience. 800-572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, FL Drivers HIRING EXPERIENCED/ INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51 per Mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877882-6537 www. OakleyTransport.com Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www. bulldoghiway.com. EOE MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Diploma/ GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 MEDICAL CAREERS begin here -Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. 888-203-3179 www. CenturaOnline.com NEW COMPANY GROUND FLOOR OPPORTUNITY. Earn serious income. Training, support, website and mentoring by top income earner included. Need 5 leaders to launch Florida. (704)799-9270 TIRED OF LIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDL Training @ NFCC/ Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. CALL TODAY! (866) 467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you.