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Holmes County times-advertiser
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100549/00182
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Title: Holmes County times-advertiser
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
Place of Publication: Bonifay, FL
Publication Date: 10-10-2012
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00100549:00182

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bonifaynow.comConnect With Us 24/7 Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo galleries, opinions and more...@WCN_HCT And Mobile Too By RANDAL SEYLER638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Holmes County Development Commissioners discussed the Lonnie Lindsey property and the Interstate Industrial Building on Oct. 2, only to come to the conclusion that they are still at square one waiting on contracts from prospective buyers. The 4.2 acres on Lonnie Lindsey Drive, which is owned by the HCDC, was to sell to James Sellers for $6,400, but when Panhandle Forestry mistakenly accessed the property to harvest timber, Sellers reduced his offer to $4,000 and the commissioners voted at the Sept. 4 meeting to decline the lesser amount. This month, no further word had been heard from Sellers. Where does this leave us? board chairman Bud Riviere asked. Is he still interested in the property? vice chairman Tim Wells asked. Ive had no contact with Mr. Sellers since the last meeting, Riviere said. I think were back to Square One, Wells said. If he is still interested in the property, he needs to contact us. At this time, I think we just have to wait and see what he wants to do, board member Mike Alvis said. Alvis said he was told by Sellers that Panhandle Forestry had offered $1,000 in compensation to Sellers for damage to the property, and asked if the company shouldnt pay the $1,000 to the commission. Administrative assistant Elaine May eld said she was contacted by the forestry company who offered $1,500 for access through the land, but she denied the offer since she did not have the authority to approve such action. Commissioner Shirley Hawthorne suggested in the future the board require contracts be in writing before bringing the matter before the commission for approval, since there wasnt a written contract for the $6,400 amount, which was originally approved as the selling price by the commissioners. In the case of the Interstate Industrial Building, Alvis told commissioners the HCDC should see a contract No action taken on Lonnie Lindsey land 50www.bonifaynow.comWednesday, OCTOBER 10 2012 Volume 122, Number 26For the latest breaking news, visitBONIFAYNOW.COMPhone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 INDEXArrests .................................A5 Opinion ................................A4 Outdoors ..............................A8 Sports ..................................A9 Extra ....................................B1 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B6 IN BRIEF Holmes County High School Advisory CouncilBONIFAY The Holmes County High School Advisory will meet at 5 p.m. on Oct. 16 in the HCHS Guidance conference room. The meeting is open to the public, and copies of the agenda may be obtained at the front desk at HCHS.Graceville Harvest FestivalGRACEVILLE The Graceville Harvest Festival is Oct. 20 starting at 10 a.m. with a parade downtown. The free festival will be held at the VF Outlets in Graceville. There will be an antique car show, arts and crafts and food. Howl-O-Ween to be Oct. 19-21CHIPLEY The Seacrest Wolf Preserve will hold their annual Howl-O-Ween on Oct. 19-21. The 19th is for campers only. The wolf preserve is on Bonnett Pond Road. For more information, call 773-2897.The Cemetery Club stagedCHIPLEY The Spanish Trail Playhouse will present The Cemetery Club at 7 p.m., Oct. 19-21, and at 2 p.m. on Oct. 22 at the Old Chipley High School. Tickets at $12 for adults and $10 for seniors and military. For more information call 638-9113. See LAND A3 BONIFAY Phillip Music announced his candidacy for re-election as the Holmes County District 3 County Commissioner on Friday. Music said he has been blessed to be able to serve as commissioner for the past eight years. He added that being able to serve the citizens of Holmes County has been a great honor and he appreciated the trust that has been bestowed upon him. During the past eight years, Music said he has helped to keep the millage rate as low as possible and also voted to help save the Country over $700,000 in re nancing a bond. Music said he is committed to serving the citizens of Holmes County to try and make it a better place for everyone. Music has been married to Janice Music for 49 years, and they have four children and 13 grandchildren. He is the owner of his own construction company and has worked in that eld for over 30 years. He said he is also a proud Christian man. I would be grateful to have the opportunity to continue to serve in the role of county commissioner, Music said.Music announces bid for re-election PHILLIP MUSIC By RANDAL SEYLER638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY The city of Vernon will pay $3,900 in attorney fees and costs after a judge ruled the city council violated the state Sunshine Law by failing to follow the requirements of conducting a closed session and violated the Public Records Law by failing to produce for inspection a transcript of the closed session. The decision came about after the Washington County News and its former parent company, Florida Freedom Newspapers, led suit against the city of Vernon following an improperly held executive session of the city council on April 23.Vernon to pay attorney feesCity violated Sunshine Law, will disclose public recordSee VERNON A3 RODEO FUN Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo festivities entertain area residentsBy CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT Cecilia.spears@halifaxmediagroup.com BONIFAY Holmes County School District invited local school pageant winners, Miss Ponce de Leon Makala Hicks, Little Miss Ponce de Leon Layla Jackson and Little Miss Poplar Springs Erilyn Smith, to their regularly scheduled meeting on Oct. 2. These girls are helping in representing our schools at the Miss National Peanut Festival Pageant, said Superintendent Gary Galloway. Its a worth while experience. One that will bene t them for the rest of their lives. At the previous meeting of the school board, held on Sept. 18, Holmes County resident Teresa Hamilton of Westville came before the Holmes County District School Board because of concerns she was having about where the bus stops to let her great-niece off and on. We have a problem, said Hamilton. The bus has been stopping at a particular spot for over 45 years without incident and now its been changed because they are saying its dangerous. How about it being dangerous dropping off a pre-schooler off at an empty house for two weeks. Hamilton explained that the old bus stop was at the bottom of a hill and the new one is at the top of a hill farther away from home.See PAGEANT A2Above: Colton Jones and Emily Marcum enjoyed their time spent with fellow cowboys and cowgirls of Bonifay Elementary School as they participated in this years mini-rodeo. Left: Karen Newman of Bonifay Elementary School prepares Savannah Goodman and Ryan Holbert for the next activity in their annual mini-rodeo held on Thursday. For photos of the Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo, see Page 1B and visit bonifaynow.com. HCSD invites Peanut pageant reps to meeting Chipley tackles South Walton in Homecoming game A9

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ANNOUNCING A PANAMA CITY PICTORIAL HISTORY BOOKAbout the book:The Panama City News Herald is pleased to be working with local historical organizations and libraries to bring our readers an heirloom-quality,coffee table pictorial book on the history of our area. This keepsake book will feature hundreds of stunning historic images from the late 1800s to present day from the greater Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November.$29.95SHIPS MID NOVEMBER Reg. $39.95 BUY NOW! EXTENDED DEADLINE BY PUBLISHINGCOMPANYDUE TOPOPULAR DEMANDORDERNOW & SAVE $10!ACTUAL COVER & TITLEIncluded in the book:Doral Bank, Innovations Federal Credit Union, Bay Credit Union, and The Tourist Development Council MAIL IN FORM OR ORDER ONLINE AT: PANAMACITY.PICTORIALBOOK.COM Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. BUY NOW! SAVE $10 I wish to pre-order:______Copies at $29.95 plus $1.95 tax per book and pick up my order at The News Herald oce. Total $31.90/book ______Copies at $29.95 plus $5.95 shipping and handling and $1.95 tax per book and have my order shipped to the address below. Total $37.85/bookTOTAL AMOUNTENCLOSED:_______________Name ___________________________________________________________________________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________________________ State _______________ Zip __________ Phone (_____) ______________________ E-mail ________________________________________________ Signature ________________________________________________________________________________ Charge Card Number_____________________________________ Security Code______________Exp. Date_____________________ PAYMENTMETHODCHECK/MONEYORDERPayable to: The News Herald VISA AMEX MASTERCARD DISCOVER students to higher levels of E d d i e D i x o n E L E C T S u p e r i n t e n d e n t F O R H o l m e s C o u n t y S c h o o l s O F ont LocalA2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, October 10, 2012 School Board Chair Jason Motley said that the reason why they changed the location is because they had a log truck come in early one morning while the bus was loading and since it was on a hill the truck was having dif culty coming to a complete stop and there could have been an incident. Im not in favor of changing the stop because I have a daughter that sometimes rides that bus and Im aware of how dangerous that stop can be, said Motley. The rst time the bus driver thought it was unsafe he reported it and then the Florida Highway Patrol went out to investigate and it was their recommendation that the location be changed. After school board member Sid Johnson recommended to go down and look at the stop the rest of the board members agreed they too would go take a look at the location and present their ndings at the next school board meeting. School board member Rusty Williams and Johnson reported that they had went out to the location and both agreed with the FHP that the school bus stop should remain in the new location. The school board agreed that no action would be taken. The school board approved of hiring Elisha Weeks as teacher at Bethlehem School and Holly Blane as teacher at Poplar Springs School for the 2012-2013 school year and accept the resignation of Julie White as Aide III Lunchroom Cashier at Bonifay Elementary School effective as of Sept. 24, 2012, David Davis as teacher at Ponce de Leon High School for retirement purposes effective as of Oct. 26, 2012 and Donald Dady as Assistant Principal at Bethlehem High School for retirement purposes effective as of Nov. 30, 2012. The school board also approved of 2012-2013 School Advisory Councils, Out of County Students Amended, Invoices, Warrant List, Pay Outs over $3,000, Budget Amendments, Sept. 18 Minutes and the 2012-2013 Parent Guide. PAGEANT from page A1Miss Ponce de Leon Makala Hicks, Little Miss Ponce de Leon Layla Jackson and Little Miss Poplar Springs Erilyn Smith stand with Holmes County Superintendent Gary Galloway.PHOTO BY CECILIA SPEARS

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Proven leadership from the Battleeld to the Schoolhouse. FORSUPERINTENDENTOFSCHOOLS A NOTE FROM TERRY: When I made the decision to place the statistics in this weeks paper it was with great reservation. I truly believe that the numbers do not reect the professionalism of our educators and support sta but that of our leadership. I continue to run my campaign with honor yet we must all face the reality of my opponent being Business As Usual. As citizens, parents and/or professionals, we cannot sit idly by while the education of our children and grandchildren is reected in such a negative light. As your next Superintendent of Education, I WILL move forward in assisting our educators in reversing our statewide standings and providing our students with the education they deserve. The quality that is expected from every citizen of our great county cannot be achieved through the Business As Usual mentality. VOTE for me, Terry Mears, for Superintendent of Education and together we will make a dierence. Come Eat a Free Supper with TerryMonday, October 15th from 5:30pm until 7:30pm Pine Log Volunteer Fire Department, North Hwy 81DID YOU KNOW: Source: www.doe.orgVOTE SAVE ON HOMEOWNERS INSURANCE Auto Home Life How Many Times Has Your Insurance Been Changed? Providing You With Quality & Service At A Fair PriceRuled A+ Superior by AM Best Rating1108 N. Waukesha St.Bonifay 547-4227Trust in your local Farm Bureau agency. We have been here for 60 years and are here to stay.AGENT STEVE A. BUSHOver 30 years experience. steve.bush@bic.com to purchase that property by Friday from Qualico Steel Company owned by John Downs. The commission received a letter of intent to purchase from Qualico Steel, but the letter expired on Sept. 13. The new contract is expected to have some additional requirements, including exclusion from taxes and having a roadway paved by the HCDC, Alvis said. The purchase price listed for the property on the letter was $602,500 for the 9.34 acres and buildings. Commissioner Alvis also serves as Qualico Steels real estate broker on the purchase. I am ready to tender my resignation from the board, Alvis said. I dont want anything to stand in the way of bringing jobs to Holmes County. Qualico Steel is supposed to bring 25 jobs with the new business and expects it could hire as many as 100 people by next year, Alvis said. So were basically at the same place with this deal, waiting on a contract, Riviere said. Alvis said that was correct, but he expects the commissioners to have a contract in hand Friday. Hasnt this been ongoing for two years? commissioner Frances Williams asked. Alvis said Qualico Steels interest in the property has waxed and waned over the years. The commissioners also decided to hold a special meeting on Oct. 23 to discuss the Raper Property. The HCDC has been invited to essentially loan a property owner money in exchange for receiving 60plus acres free and clear, Riviere explained. Commissioner Sandy Spear said she felt that she was not well enough informed about the Raper Property proposal to make any kind of decision, and asked if a special meeting to discuss the deal could be arranged. I know some of us are new on the board and we would like to have more information, at least I know I would, she said. LAND from page A1 LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A3Wednesday, October 10, 2012This order is a landmark case, said attorney John Bussian, who represented the newspaper, its former owner and now Halifax Media Group. No court in Florida had ruled that by not following the steps required by the Sunshine Law to hold an executive session meant the governmental body then had to disclose the contents of that session. Everybody had talked about that consequence but it had never been mandated by a court. The order authorizing award of attorney fees and costs was issued on Sept. 28 and awards the Washington County News $3,500 in attorneys fees and $400 for costs. The city of Vernon has 30 days to pay the fees. On April 23 at the city council meeting, the councils new mayor, Michelle Cook, and council member Oscar Ward were to be briefed on pending litigation the city faced, so City Attorney Kerry Adkison called for an executive session following the regular council meeting. Prior to the council going into executive session, Adkison said the panel would not come out following the session to reconvene and conclude the executive session, as required under Florida law. On April 27, the Washington County News sent a Sunshine Law request for a transcript of the executive session to the mayor and to the city attorney, and the request for the transcript went unanswered. Eventually, the Washington County News led suit against the city over the issue, and a hearing was held on June 26 in the 14th Judicial Circuit Court. The order by District Court Judge Christopher Patterson setd a precedent in the 14th Judicial District, and it will be there for other districts and courts in the state to consider, Bussian said. If there are any other cases of this magnitude, there is a good chance this case has blazed a trail for openness and compliance with the open meeting law. In the order to disclose, Judge Patterson ruled that the council violated the Sunshine Law by failing to follow the requirements for conducting a closed session. It also states the council violated the Public Records law by failing to produce for inspection by the plaintiff the transcript or tape of the April 23 closed session. The city was ordered to produce a transcript or tape of the closed session. The tape produced by the city was inaudible, however, and no transcript of the executive session exists. This nal judgment by Judge Patterson af rms public trust was violated through disregard of open meeting and public record laws meant to protect our citizens against government abuse, said Washington County News Publisher Nicole Bare eld. Let this serve as a notice to all public of cials that these actions will not be tolerated, and remind them of their responsibility to the publics they serve. VERNON from page A1

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OpinionA4 | Holmes County Times-AdvertiserCONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com 1-800-645-8688 ADVERTISING 850-547-9414 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2012, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. ROGERS INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. Serving You Is Our Most Important Product*Property Insurance is not available in the state of Florida from Auto-Owners Insurance. Before leaving the topic of the historic Railroad Centennial Celebration held in Chipley on May 22 and 23, 1982, a report must be made on another group of talent that we were able to have come to our town for a musical performance during the gigantic event. The Wiregrass Sacred Harp Singers, directed by 83-year-old Dewey Williams of Ozark, Ala., graciously came to the Centennial Opry House on a bitter cold February Sunday afternoon and performed a highly spirited and enjoyable concert of their style of music, so well-known and accepted in this area. Dewey Williams sent the writer his package of promotional materials, which explained that he had been directing Sacred Harp for radio broadcast since 1955 and for television viewing since 1966. At that time, the television show was being carried on WTVY in Dothan at 8 a.m. each rst and fourth Sunday morning of the month. The Prattler was a listener and a fan of this genre of music and had the privilege of making the overture, resulting in the Wiregrass Sacred Harp Singers making the appearance in Chipley. On the taped television shows, Williams had 40 to 50 men and women, old and young, join him in presenting the style of music that they all knew, understood and enjoy singing. Some of his performers came for the taping sessions from several counties in Alabama and Georgia. The leader of the singing group utilizes each concert as training session to explain the history of this style of music. Dewey Williams was featured in the summer of 1977 in an article printed in the magazine SOUTH, published in Graceville, Fla., by Editor Jesse Tullos. The writing was titled Sacred Harp: An Art Form Preserved. Mr. Williams was age 79 when this article was printed. It was ve years later, at the age of 83, when he brought the singing ensemble for the Chipley performance. While performing in here, he continued his teaching approach as the talented singers presented their songs. Williams, a native of Ozark, Ala., explains that he was just a lad when I would sit on the kitchen oor and sing Sacred Harp songs with my family. He continued I didnt even know what I was singing, the reports, I learned the songs by listening. In his ripe old age, Williams had made a signi cant contribution toward preserving Sacred Harp singing, an art which dates back to medieval times. Sacred Harp singing survived the years of poverty and illiteracy among the American blacks by being passed on verbally from generation to generation, according to the song leader. Some songs were nally written down in the 1880s in three parts by B. F. White, a Dothan man. W. M. Cooper added a fourth part and copyrighted a book of Sacred Harp Songs in 1902. He further lists Jerry Jackson of Ozark as writing the song book Colored Sacred Harp in 1931. These men were inspired to write the songs by the Spirit of God, Williams says. He remembers seeing Cooper when he was quite young and Cooper was already an old man. The Dewey Williams teaching dialogue continues Four parts, bass, tenor, alto and treble, make up the modern Sacred Harp songs. The chords are either major, coming from Ezekiel, or minor from Isaiah. His teaching explains the monosyllables, fa, so, la and mi, representing the four gospel books, Matthew, Mark, Luke and Prattler pro les Dewey WilliamsCOURTESY OF NANCY MCNEIL Dewey Williams sings Oh, Jesus, Ever With Us Stay as he sits on the porch of his home in Ozark, Ala.When a Holmes Countian dies at the peak of his career, it brings a lot of sadness and affords a chance to look back at his life and work. The number of people attending the funeral of Billy Galloway (Clyde W. 1954-2012) attest to the place he had made for himself in Tallahassee and Florida where he was born and where he chose to spend his working years. His earliest life was spent in DeFuniak Springs, but Sweet Gum Head in Holmes County in the Galloway Community always was his permanent home. There he had numerous cousins to play, hunt and sh with. When the family, Dad and Mother, Clyde and Dot and sister Cissy moved there and later into Bonifay, Billy became an important part of Holmes County High School student population, where his mother, Dorothy Davis Galloway, was a business teacher. He was also active in the youth group at First Baptist Church, Bonifay. Among HCHS students at FBC were Bish Creel, Ricky Callahan, Bill Lee, Chip Vara and others. At HCHS, Billy lettered in football and was active in student government, Key Club, the Debate Team and other activities. He was chosen as class favorite his junior and senior years. He was chosen by the faculty to represent the school at Boys State, where his contact with government of cials sealed his ambition to enter the legal profession. His dad, the late Clyde Galloway, had served in the Florida House of Representatives and was instrumental in establishing and securing funding for Washington/ Holmes Vocational/ Technical School (now known as Washington/ Holmes Technical School). Following graduation from HCHS and Chipola College, Billy graduated in 1976 from FSU with double majors in riskmanagement and real estate. He earned his Juris Doctorate from Mississippi College in Clanton, Miss., and began his career as an attorney with the Florida Department of Insurance, serving as bureau chief of property and casualty solvency. He began his private practice in 1994 and opened his law rm, Galloway, Brennon P.A., in 2006 representing chie y insurance companies. Billy was admitted to the Florida Supreme Court, the Federal Middle District Court of Florida and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit. He provided Congressional testimony regarding the federal HMO Medicare Pilot Program and was instrumental in the 2011 drafting and passage of the Sink Hole Reform bill. He was active in the Thomasville Road Baptist Church, where funeral services were held Oct 2. His major benevolent involvement was with his support, both personally and nancially, of the Ken Smith Ministries. Smith, a former football coach, has as his major focus ministry to men, especially pastors. He and Billy shared their love and support for FSU football. Ken and pastor Curtis Clark of ciated at the impressive funeral services. At Billys request, it was a joyful affair, beginning with a solo that I recognized as a Sacred Harp song that we sang at Bethel Primitive Church when I was a child. I couldnt get it out of my mind, so I came home and looked in my late fatherin-laws Sacred Harp song book until I found it. It was not a simple task, as songs in that book have strange titles. Here are the words: (v.1) Ye eeting charms of earth, farewell. Your springs of joy are dry. My soul now seeks another home, a brighter world on high. (2) Farewell my friends whose tender care has long engaged my love; Your fond embrace I now exchange for better friends above. (Chorus) Im a long time traveling here below; Im a long time traveling away from home. Im a long time traveling here below to lay this body down. Billy Galloways survivors include his wife, Misty Rosich Galloway, son, William Will Addison Galloway, mother, Dorothy Galloway, and sister, Cecelia Cissy Galloway. Numerous aunts, uncles and cousins, largely in Holmes County, also survive.HAPPY CORNERHazel Wells Tison PERRYS PRATTLEPerry Wells Remembering Billy Galloway This is in response to a letter written by a local doctor asking all faiths to condemn the video that is supposed to be causing all of the radical Muslims to riot and hate the United States, in the Muslim countries. I would like to take this opportunity to set the record straight concerning some things he said and the agenda of the Muslims in general. The first thing that I would like to say is that these people are up set because this video is supposed to blaspheme Muhammad, but their supposed-to-be holy book (The Quran) blasphemes my Lord the Savior Jesus Christ, and my God who is the God of heaven and Earth. Why the Christians not out killing people like the Muslims are? Well the answer is simple: Jesus said that vengeance is mine, and I will repay. My God is big enough that he doesnt need Christians to defend him, but he will defend us and will also wreak vengeance on those who kill and abuse Christians. The Muslims god tells them to kill Christians and Jews (in the Quran), but our God tells us to love those who hate us and wish to do us harm. And if a Muslim should convert and become a Christian, the Muslims god tells them to kill the one who converts to Christianity. Their agenda is to kill all Christians and Jews and to overthrow the United States government and our constitution. The Muslims say that their religion is a peaceful religion, but in those countries that have been overthrown already, they are systematically killing all Christians who refuse to deny that Jesus is the son of God and refuse to become Muslims, just like their prophet Muhammad did when his armies over threw those countries when he was alive. Muhammad created the most vicious and barbaric religion that has ever been, or ever will be, and is anything but peaceful. Those who call themselves peaceful Muslims are doing what their holy book (The Quran) and Muhammad taught them to do are hypocrites. If they do not like what the radical Muslims are doing, why do they stay in this religion? The answer is that they approve of what they are doing and are funding those radical groups, and so is the President of The United States, who is a practicing Muslim (as he told the Muslim brotherhood that he was still a Muslim). Our president gave Egypt $1.5 million of out tax money, LETTER TO THE EDITORReader points out religious differencesSee PRATTLER A5 See LETTER A5 Wednesday, October 10, 2012

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A5Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Sowell Tractor Co., Inc.2841 Hwy. 77 North, Panama City 763-5441 Toll Free: 866-448-9899 www.sowelltractorco.comWe Trade for Anything That Dont Eat! Financing Arranged (WAC) EVERYTHING YOU VALUE 0% Financing Available Only On Kabota Equiptment. WAC See dealer for details. Thursday October 11 11am-3pm1718 South Waukesha St. Bonifay, FL $149Teachers model also available for $219 and $299 These are brand new 2012 Singer school Model sewing machines. These sewing machines remain UNSOLD. S Sept. 16-22Kevin Belkowsky, no charges listed Joanne Sadalia Bell, 54, issuing worthless check, resisting ofcer with out violence Reta Bullard Boyett, 53, criminal mischief, leaving a scene of a accident without giving info Tracy Nicole Bruner, 19, weekender David Dwaine Burgess, 62, out of county warrant Damian Marcus Coatney, 23, criminal mischief, escape, disorderly intoxication Collie Adren Cox, 26, hold for Hillsborough David Wayne Curry, 44, failure to appear on manufacturing meth, failure to appear on possession of meth, failure to appear on possession of drug paraphernalia William David Dean, 29, out of county warrant Gerald M. Devine, 22, hold for Polk County Barbara Ann Holbert, 38, trespassing in structure inhabited Dennis Linares, 22, no valid drivers license Quintinn Lavez Lumpkin, 20, failure to appear on reckless driving Carly Wayne Majors, 53, burglary, sexual battery upon a child less than 12 years of age Keith Wesley Miller, 46, dealing in stolen property, aggravated battery domestic Stacey Lynn Miller, 44, dealing in stolen property Ronnie L Sheppard, 48, hold for prison transport service Paul Thomas, 46, hold for prison transport service David Mitchell Waddell, 28, domestic battery, resisting with violence Shelia Walker, no charges listed Shelia Ann Walker, 60, violation of probation on battery Rebecca Elizabeth Workman, 36, violation of probation on driving under the inuence Dawn Marie Yates, 42, weekender status on issuing worthless checksSept. 24-28, 2012Marriages Nathan Christopher Brown, 10/6/1992 of Fort Walton Beach and Ashley Nicole Worley, 9/19/1994 of Fort Walton Beach Clinton Joshua Brock, 5/16/1991 of Bonifay and Taylor Nicolette Rolling, 3/11/1993 of Bonifay Charles Michael Benton, 10/1/1990 of Bonifay and Amanda Lynn Dault, 12/6/1993 of Bonifay Timothy Dean Carter, 6/22/1960 of Bonifay and Robin Diane Long, 12/14/1969 of Bonifay Divorces Dennis Brian Jordan and Dawn Michelle Jordan Arrest REPORT Marriages & DIVORCEs Sand this man is crucifying Christians, naked, in their capital. (Where is our news media? Why dont they report this to the rest of the world?) Now the Muslims think that it is alright for them to blaspheme Jesus and use our constitutional right to do so, but they want to quench our right to free speech. If they want to live in America, which is a Christian nation, even though our president and Mrs. Clinton does not claim it so, they need to adapt or return to those nations that practice the Muslim religion. Jesus told his followers that Satan comes but to kill, to steal and to destroy. Now who does that remind you of? But Jesus came so that we can have live and that more abundant. Jesus also said that you are the servant to whom you lend your members to obey, so who are the Muslims obeying? They are obeying their father who is the god of this world, and he is not the God of heaven and earth. Our God commands us to love one another, not hate and kill. Killing someone simply because they do not worship the same God that you do is shedding innocent blood, which Christians are forbidden to so because it breaks the Ten Commandments that our God has given to us to obey, and it keeps us from sinning against our God. So if their god is telling them to shed innocent blood then he is not the same God I serve. If God changed his mind like that, then no one could trust him, so they are definitely serving the God of this world, and not the God of Heaven and Earth. Now the liberal news media calls a view like his hatred, but I call it an act of love. By this I mean that I am pointing out those differences to those who will read this and understand those differences and will come to realize that someone is on the wrong side of eternity, and I know that is the Muslims, and if even one of them reads this and realize this, then I will not have wasted my time writing this letter. Eternity is a long time and outer darkness is forever and eternal. I dont wish this on anyone, and I have the calling to point out the difference.Samuel Brooks Jr.Bonifay John, are sung instead of words at the beginning of each song. Then the songs words, taken from gospel, are sung. There is no instrumental accompaniment. When he was older, Williams studied Sacred Harp Music more formally under three accomplished composers of Sacred Harp, who lived in Ozark. I found out where the notes belong and how to mark time. You need to mark time to sing it correct, Williams said. Since his youth, Williams has directed a group of Sacred Harp Singers. Conventions were held regularly and the popular event lasted two or three days. He recalls an older acquaintance told him that he used to drive 15 miles in a horse and buggy to get to a sing. And there were no paved or even clay roads back then, Williams noted. The travels of Dewey Williams and the Wiregrass Sacred Harp Singers have taken him to the Folklife Festival at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C., where the singers were able to sing in a building that seats 5,000 people. Local conventions of Sacred Harp Singing are still held in the area as well as day long events usually honoring an old-time singer by naming the session as a memorial singing. Dewey Williams alluded to the topic of dying while conducting the singing in Chipley. Dying is just like the sun coming up in the east each morning. You know that its coming, so you just dont worry about it, was his philosophical attitude. The exact date of the passing of Dewey Williams is not known, but his name is lovingly mentioned among Sacred Harp Singers of area, when and wherever they meet. It was the distinct pleasure and honor to have the professional Wiregrass Sacred Harp Singers grace the Railroad Centennial Celebration for a song session which has long been remembered by those who were privileged to hear them. See you all next week. PRATTLER from page A4 LETTER from page A4

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LocalA6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, October 10, 2012 A GOOD MAN Chooses to do what is Right. A GOOD MAN Places importance on Family. A GOOD MAN Changes the World By his Example.TIM WELLS IS A GOOD MAN.We Endorse TIM WELLS the most FULLY QUALIFIED PERSON for Clerk of Court. Vote Nov. 6 for a GOOD MANTIM WELLS P, Kings Discount Drugs 3RD ANNUALMariana Trunk Show J.D. OWENS CARPET OUTLETwill save you money EVERYDAY!!! J.D. OWENS CARPET OUTLET2597 Springcreek Road, Marianna, FL3 1/2 Miles East of Marianna on Hwy. 90 (850) 526-3619 J.D. OWENS CARPET OU Textured PlushCarpet7999Super Thick 13 Loose LayVinyl49FHA QualityVinylSF SF SFEngineered Value Grade3 Oak Plank$229SFAREA RUG SALE!Over 200 In Stockcarpettilemarianna.com The WestPoint Home Factory Outlet is back in Chipley! Different location but same great product and great prices! Great selection of Famous name Comforters, Sheets, Towels, Pillows, Blankets, Throws in a true factory outlet atmosphere at factory outlet prices.WestPoint Home Factory Outlet1055 Fowler Drive, Chipley, FL 32428 Right behind our Chipley Factory(850) 638-9421Store Hours: Thurs-Sat from 10am to 5pm CT Helping Hands... Compassionate Hearts BONIFAY Offering Inpatient and Outpatient TherapyNURSING & REHABCENTEROccupational Physical Speech24-hour Skilled Nursing Rehabilitation Gym Admissions 7 Days a Week MEDICARE OPEN ENROLLMENT Q&AOctober 3 9-30:10:30 amHolmes Countys SHINE representative, Minzie Carnley, will be available to answer any questions you have about Medicare Open Enrollment. Refreshments will be served. FREE FISH FRY SHERIFF HOLMES/WASHINGTON TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED COORDINATING BOARD MEETING TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2012 10:00 am WASHINGTON COUNTY ADMINISTRATIVE BUILDING 1331 SOUTH BOULEVARD, CHIPLEY, FLORIDATHE PUBLIC IS INVITED.REASONABLE ACCOMODATIONS ARE MET IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT AND FOR LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS OTHER THAN ENGLISH.CALL BRITTANY ELLERS TOLL FREE 800-226-8914 48 HRS IN ADVANCE By RANDAL SEYLER638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY At midnight on Sept. 30 the federal Farm Bill of cially expired, leaving local farmers uncertain about their future. The Farm Bill was created during the Great Depression with the intent of stabilizing the price of crops to insure there would be abundant, inexpensive food, Washington County Extension Director Andy Andreasen said. Congress usually reauthorizes farm bills, which provide the foundation for the nations food, farm and rural policy, approximately every ve years. In 2008, Congress adopted a farm bill the Food, Conservation and Energy Act of 2008 but set the expiration of that legislation for the end of Fiscal Year 2012, which was Sept. 30. As part of that renewal, the bill suspends permanent law decades-old agricultural laws that no longer work with contemporary markets. Expiration also threatens the nations largest nutrition program, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as food stamps. According to the Congressional Research Service (CRS), in the past the specter of permanent law taking effect has served as a stick forcing to Congress to act. Under permanent law, the government must intervene to raise the level of crops and milk to parity, which is de ned as the purchasing power of those crops in 1910-1914. Farmers depend on the subsidy process to keep their businesses going during lean years, and the loan program the Farm Bill provides guarantees the producer a base amount of income, which the banks rely on before lending operating capital, Andreasen said. Without the Farm Bill in place, banks could be hesitant to loan money to farmers before December, he added. Some producers borrow from $900,000 a year to $2 million a year for production costs. As a result, crucial rural development, conservation and beginning farmer and rancher programs are at risk of having their funding evaporate because Congress failed to pass a 2012 Farm Bill, said Traci Bruckner, Assistant Policy Director with Center for Rural Affairs. Weve come to the 11th hour, we dont have a Farm Bill, Congress has not taken action, and the window that they have to take action is rapidly closing, added Bruckner. According to Bruckner, as members of Congress come back to their home districts to campaign, rural people will have an important opportunity to talk to them. She wants people to tell their representatives they need a Farm Bill, one thats done right. People have an opportunity to let them know that its unacceptable. Its unacceptable not to have a Farm Bill; its unacceptable to not invest in rural development programs that help create jobs through small business development; its unacceptable to reduce conservation funding to just the bare minimum. They are procrastinating until after the election, Andreasen said. No one in Congress wants to tackle it until the election is over.Bonifays newest business, Anna Bellas, held their Open House on Saturday, Sept. 22. This business has been a long-time dream of mine, owner Anna Kent said. For me this business is about new beginnings and I want to share that same feeling with my clients. Without the help of many this would not have been made possible. For more information contact Anna Bellas at 547-5665 or visit their Facebook page at AnnaBellas Salon & Day Spa.SPECIAL TO TIMES-ADVERTISERCongress not likely to pass farm bill before election ANNA BELLAS OPEN HOUSE

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A7Wednesday, October 10, 2012 What Are You Afraid Of?If you enjoyed last years OUTbREAK, youre going to love Phobik! This year, Bonifays Haunted Hospital will prey on your deepest fears. 401 East Byrd Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425 Doors Open 6 PM for Advanced Ticket HoldersGeneral Admissions begins at 7:30 PM $10.00 per ticket Purchase Your Advance Tickets Now at Phobik.org!!New this year! No waiting in line and plenty of fun. Concessions will be available to purchase at the event. Fun and creepy activities to entertain you while you wait.DOCTORS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL FOUNDATIONPRESENTS Friday, October 12 Saturday, October 13 Friday, October 19 Saturday, October 20 Friday, October 26 Saturday, October 27 Wednesday, October 31Sponsored in part by the Holmes County Tourist Development Council Special to the Times-AdvertiserTALLAHASSEE Goodwill Industries-Big Bend Inc. was recently recognized as the best non-pro t in Florida providing service-related employment opportunities for people with disabilities. This prestigious award was presented by RESPECT of Florida Executive Director John McBride in conjunction with National Disability Employment Awareness Month. Through a partnership with RESPECT, Goodwill maintains seven contracts that employ and train people to do everything from litter clear-up and mowing to airport janitor services. Eighty percent of Goodwill Industries workforce is made up of Floridians with a disability. Every success we achieve is thanks to our incredible team of employees. It is because of their commitment and hard work that they and Goodwill thrives, said Fred Shelfer, CEO of Goodwill Industries-Big Bend. Receiving this honor during National Disability Employment Awareness Month is particularly special because it underscores our important mission to provide job training, education and employment to people with disabilities and other barriers to employment. Goodwills Contract Services has a staff of 34, and 80 percent of the non-managerial workers have disabilities. Some of the employees have been previously honored by RESPECT. In 2011, two of the employees received statewide individual awards while working on the janitorial contract at Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport in Panama City one earning the RESPECT of Florida Rookie of the Year award and the other being honored as the Outstanding Employee of the Year. Goodwill Services of the Big Bend has launched a real trailblazing contract service program that is building innovative partnerships and effectively serving a host of public agencies and private businesses, said John McBride, Executive Director of RESPECT of Florida. They are not just putting Floridians to work, they are also helping Floridians with disabilities in our community maintain their independence and self respect by working at jobs that make a difference. Area Goodwill receives employment services award SPECIAL TO THE TIMES-ADVERTISER

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OUTDOORS Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Page 8www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comSend your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com ASection By FRANK SARGEANTfranksargeant@charter.net We call them bulls, even though they are cows. But when the fall red sh run is on, who cares if theyre girls or boys? Adult red sh spend most of their long lives up to 35 years offshore, hanging around bait sh schools and feeding their prodigious appetites. During that time they can reach weights of over 90 pounds, though the max in the Gulf of Mexico appears closer to 50. All of the largest sh are females, biologists with the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission say. Though the big ones are primarily offshore sh, in September and October they come back to inshore waters where they grew up, to feed and to spawn. The young sh will spend their rst four years in the bays and backwaters but the adults head back offshore around Halloween. The massive adults are not targets for the grill; all reds over 27 inches are off-limits to harvest in Florida; the 18-27-inch slot limit has been largely responsible for the steady increase in red sh numbers since the mid-1990s. But when it comes to an angling challenge, the big reds are one of the best in inshore waters; theyre fat, theyre powerful and they wont give up. And, if you get in the right spot at the right time, they can be incredibly abundant; schools of hundreds or even thousands sometimes appear along the beaches, creating the famed red wave all red sh anglers dream of.The red waveThe red wave results when a big school of reds comes to the surface, sometimes chasing bait, sometimes traveling, sometimes, on chilly mornings, simply sun-bathing. When theyre feeding, the churning water can be seen a quarter mile away. But at other times, you have to be relatively close to see the mass of sh, which appears a sort or rust to rose red. Back in the days when red sh were legal targets and the blackened red sh craze had created a commercial market, as much as 50,000 pounds of spawners were scooped up by a single boat in a single strike off Panhandle beaches. Not surprisingly, this treatment soon brought red sh numbers to a critical level, and the stocks did not start to recover until gill and purse seines were banned for use on the species in 1995. A onesh recreational limit was placed on reds shortly thereafter. Now, after 17 years of protection, reds appear to be doing well all over the state but particularly in the Panhandle, where the recreational harvest limit was recently increased from one sh daily to two daily. State regulators say numbers are adequate to handle the increased harvest without impact. Where to nd bulls The giant sh tend to congregate around major passes as well as around nearshore reefs and inlets. Cape San Blas and Cape St. George, both just east of Panama City Beach, are classic fall red sh locations; the long points extending into the Gulf create natural feeding and spawning areas, and the sh show up there every year by the hundreds. West Pass and Indian Pass, at either end of St. Vincents Island, are also good spots, as is the St. Vincent Bar, on the east end of the island inside the bay. St. Joseph Point and Bell Shoal, at the mouth of St. Joseph Bay, are also prime areas. The jetties at the mouth of St. Andrews Bay are good, as are the sh havens off the beach to the southeast. The jetties at Destin are worth a visit, as are those at the entry to Pensacola Bay. All of the public shing piers along Panhandle beaches are visited by waves of bull reds at times; if you happen to be there when the sh move through, youll be part of a re drill as everybody gets bit at once.What it takesDont go bear hunting with a switch. You arent going to land a 40-pound red sh on 8pound-test spinning gear unless your name is Stu Apte. Baitcasting gear with 25-pound test and a long, stout rod is more suited to the task easier on you, easier on the sh, because a long battle makes survival after release less likely. If youre shing from a beach, jetty or pier, youll need even heavier tackle; 50-pound braid on a jumbo spinning rig is a good choice. Bull reds will attack most anything that will t into their big mouths, but live and cut baits are most dependable; live mullet, pin sh, croakers and horse thread ns or greenbacks are always a good bet. They also readily grab blue crabs. Stout hooks are an essential part of the rig; 6/0 to 7/0 circle hooks will stick the sh and also prevent them from swallowing the hook most of the time. A couple feet of 60pound-test mono or uoro leader protects your line from the rough jaws of the sh. Where the reds are not visible, its basically a bottomshing routine. Add enough weight to hold the bait on bottom, cast it out and set back to wait if theres a bull red around, theyll take care of the rest. Along the beach, theyll usually prowl outside the green bar. Around rip rap in the passes they can be anywhere from right against to rocks to out in the deeper water. Areas on sand points where the currents clash and create rips are often good. When it comes to arti cials, any large lure can do the job. When you see sh on top, a big topwater lure can create some spectacular action a Super Spook or Chug-N-Spook, worked fast and loud, will bring sh rushing from every direction. (Flatten the barbs on these treble-hooked plugs so you can easily release oversized sh.) One-ounce jigs trimmed with 6-inch shad tails or the 1to 2-ounce Tsunami shad swimbaits are good choices when the sh are deeper. Sometimes, you can spot a school on sonar in the deeper sections of major passes, and dropping a lure to them vertically results in instant hookups. When you dont know where the sh are, rigging up with a big trolling lure like the Manns Plus 25 or Mirrolure 113 allows you to cover lots of water fast. Pull the lures around arti cial reefs and markers near the beaches, or in the rip of the larger passes on outgoing tides. Again, the trebles on these lures should have the barbs attened, and a long-handled hook-remover like those from Rapala should be at hand to help release the sh. Reds are very durable and readily survive catch and release if theyre put back in the water promptly get the hooks out, grab a few photos and send them on their way theyll make more little red sh, which will be in our bays and estuaries next year at this time.Blackened red shThough you cant eat any of the jumbo reds, there are plenty of sh in the slot around at this time of year as well; most are found on inside ats and creek mouths, and that shing improves as the water cools. Blackened red sh is one of the more noted ways of preparing red sh llets. It produces a ery, crusty llet that pleases even those who dont like sh. Its a dish best prepared outside on a grill it makes a lot of smoke! The llets are skinned, the rib cage cut out and the red line removed it creates a shy taste. The llets are basted with melted butter (yep, you need the real thing to make this work, cardiologists be damned) then set aside to drain on paper towels. Make a dip of a few teaspoons of paprika, black pepper, white pepper, oregano, thyme, garlic powder, onion powder, salt and most important, cayenne pepper more if youre a Cajun, less if you dont like a lot of heat. Dip the llets in the mixed spices, coating thoroughly. Press added spices into the llets with your hand. Now, heat up a heavy cast iron skillet until its smoking hot. If the skillet is not really hot, the blackening wont work. Once the skillet is sizzling, quickly add llets, then pour a teaspoon of melted butter over each llet. Be forewarned the smoke will y and if you drip butter on the outside of the skillet, you might start a re. Leave the llets cook until theyre black on the bottom, about two minutes, then ip and repeat on the other side. Check for doneness with a fork. Thats all there is to it wonderful spicy crust and tender moist sh inside; its a killer way to celebrate the fall red sh bite.Free Fishing WireFrank Sargeant is now editor of The Fishing Wire, an online news service covering angling, boating, conservation and regulations nationwide. For a free, no-strings subscription, visit www.the shingwire.com BULLY, BULLY, BULLY!Bull redfish visit Northwest Florida beaches in fallPHOTO BY CAPT. DON DINGMANMonster reds like this one might be more than 20 years old. The species grows to more than 90 pounds, though 50 pounds seems to be near the max in the Gulf of Mexico.TrophyCatch bass-reward program launchedFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation CommissionCatching a trophy largemouth bass is the dream of anyone who shes for this valuable game sh, which is the most-sought species in North America. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissions new TrophyCatch Program ( TrophyCatchFlorida.com ), launched Monday, will increase opportunities for anglers shing in Florida to ful ll that dream, while rewarding them for helping make other anglers dreams come true by letting their trophy swim for another lucky angler to catch. Gov. Rick Scott understands the importance of recreational shing to Florida, which annually generates more than $8 billion in economic impact and supports more than 75,000 jobs. In Florida, freshwater bass alone annually provide anglers more than 14 million days of healthy outdoor recreation and generate approximately $1.25 billion in economic impact (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2006). The FWCs management programs are designed to provide enjoyment for even more anglers and thus increase tourism and economic bene ts. TrophyCatch will help accomplish that and document progress. TrophyCatch is an innovative program to reward anglers for being great resource stewards by legally catching and releasing trophy largemouth bass, Scott said. TrophyCatch includes three tiers to encourage reporting and live-releasing bass heavier than 8 pounds that are caught in Florida waters. Bass 8 to 9.9 pounds (Lunker Club), or those 10 to 12.9 pounds (Trophy Club) that are caught, documented and released can be reported online at TrophyCatch Florida.com anytime of the year. All that is required to qualify for great prizes are photos of the entire sh on a scale with the weight visible, and one of the sh on a tape measurer, showing the length. Bass that are heavier than 13 pounds and are caught between Oct 1. and April 30 each year must be certi ed by FWC staff to verify their weight and take genetic samples. Certi ed catches that are released or provided to FWC for research will be entered into the Hall of Fame Club, making the angler eligible for great prizes. The World Fishing Network is partnering with the FWC to promote and manage the trophy bass website. TrophyCatch will enable biologists to manage lakes and rivers better by providing valuable incentives to anglers for reporting and releasing their catches of trophy bass, said Tom Champeau, director of the FWCs Division of Freshwater Fisheries Management. The information will be used to evaluate and improve management strategies that produce more and larger bass. Numerous industry sponsors are providing prizes to encourage conservation of these valuable sh.

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By RANDAL SEYLER638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY The Chipley Tigers had a hearty Homecoming feast, pouncing on the South Walton Seahawks early in the opening quarter to post a 37-6 win at Philip Rountree Stadium on Friday. Junior Kobe McCrary scored on a 30-yard scamper to put the Tigers on the board just 1:10 into the game, and Fletcher Dilmores aim was good, as usual, for the extra point. A bad snap resulted in the Seahawks putting 2 points on the board for the Tigers with a touchback about a minute later, then on their next possession the Tigers marched 70 yards on 4 plays, helped immensely by Sophomore Carlon Smiths 60-yard kick return, which put the Tigers on the Seahawks 30 to begin the drive. Smith also took a short pass from junior quarterback Jordan Finch on the second down and was stopped inside the 5-yard line, then McCrary was able to sweep left to score with 8:44 left in the first quarter. Dilmore added a point and the Tigers led 16-0. In the final minutes of the first stanza, the Tigers started yet another scoring drive, which was capped just seconds into the second quarter with a 5-yard run by junior Jacob Wilson. Dilmore kicked another field goal and the Chipley squad led 23-0 with 11:53 left to play in the half. McCrary scored again at the 8:58 mark, this time from 25 yards out, topping a 63-yard, 4-play drive. Dilmore did his part and the Tigers were leading 30-0 at the half. Chipley came back from halftime and on the first possession of the quarter, marched 54 yards on six plays to score one final time when Wilson nabbed a 15-yard toss from Finch in the end zone. Dilmore was on the mark and the Tigers led 37-0, which mercifully started the continuous clock. South Walton came back on their next possession when senior Drew Pfeiffer returned a Chipley kick from inside the Seahawks 10 to the Tigers 42. The Seahawks kept the momentum going, marching into the end zone in five plays and sending junior Sage Roberts into the end zone from 15 yard out. Chipley has an open schedule next Friday, while South Walton travels to Graceville. Kickoff is 7 p.m.Fridays prep football scores Agape Christian 28, Foundation Academy 12 All Saints 28, Cedar Creek Christian 0 Alonso 20, Bloomingdale 0 American 18, Miami Beach 13 Apopka 46, Ocoee 0 Archbishop McCarthy 34, Pembroke Pines 7 Armwood 20, Sickles 16 Arnold 10, Rutherford 7 Astronaut 17, Satellite 0 Atlantic Community 40, West Boca Raton Community 0 Auburndale 35, Tenoroc 6 Aucilla Christian 43, Munroe Day 0 Baker County 36, Paxon 0 Baldwin 57, Harvest Community Scvool 16 Bartram Trail 30, Atlantic Coast 14 Bayside 21, Melbourne 7 Benjamin 31, LaSalle 30 Berean Christian 40, Palmer Trinity 0 Berkeley Prep 41, St. Petersburg Catholic 19 Bishop Kenny 38, Forrest 22 Bishop Moore 48, Poinciana 0 Blake 40, Middleton 34 Blountstown 21, Sneads 0 Bolles School 38, Ribault 6 Booker 57, Lake Placid 27 Boynton Beach 38, Fort Pierce Westwood 18 Calvary Christian 38, Cambridge Christian 8 Cardinal Newman 27, Wellington 19 Carrollwood Day 40, St. Petersburg Canterbury 19 Chamberlain 31, Tampa Freedom 16 Charles Flanagan 44, West Broward 8 Charlotte 49, Gulf Coast 0 Chiles 28, Ocala Forest 10 Chipley 37, South Walton 6 Christopher Columbus Catholic 63, Miami Coral Park 7 Clay 41, Terry Parker 28 Clearwater 20, Seminole 15 Clearwater Central Catholic 27, Tampa Catholic 7 Clewiston 35, Avon Park 0 Cocoa 40, Cocoa Beach 6 Columbia 52, Ridgeview 17 Cooper City 31, Nova 8 Coral Gables 6, South Miami 0 Coral Springs 35, Coral Glades 13 Cottondale 34, Vernon 13 Countryside 49, St. Petersburg Northeast 0 Creekside 36, Menendez 7 Crescent City 11, FAMU Developmental Research 6 Dade Christian 47, Barrington Christian Academy 6 DeLand 30, Fletcher 28 Dillard 70, Pompano Beach 0 Dr. Phillips 23, Boone 6 Dunbar 34, North Fort Myers 9 Dunedin 20, Spoto 13 Dunnellon 39, Santa Fe 12 Durant 22, Plant City 7 Eagles View 27, St. Joseph Academy 0 East Bay 33, Riverview 14 East Gadsden 47, Marianna 0 East Lake 22, North Port 16 East Lee County 49, Mariner 7 Edgewater 23, Winter Springs 12 Escambia 25, Pensacola Washington 9 Estero 20, Cape Coral 3 Evans 27, East Ridge 14 Father Lopez Catholic 48, St. John Lutheran 6 First Baptist 59, Evangelical Christian 14 First Coast 19, Fleming Island 16 Fivay 46, Hudson 3 Florida Christian 33, Archbishop Curley 13 Florida School for the Deaf and Blind 76, Alabama School for the Deaf, Ala. 6 Fort Meade 17, Frostproof 16 Fort Pierce Central 34, Viera 0 Freeport 41, Baker School 34 Ft. Walton Beach 21, Crestview 17 Gainesville 56, Citrus 7 Gateway 9, Liberty 6 George Jenkins 35, Wekiva 13 Glades Central 47, Suncoast 0 Glades Day 69, Coral Springs Christian 0 Godby 54, Suwannee 0 Goleman 28, Miami Springs 7 Graceville 46, Wewahitchka 28 Hagerty 24, University (Orange City) 3 Harmony 26, Celebration 0 Heritage 27, Eau Gallie 7 Hernando 35, River Ridge 0 Highlands Christian 34, Oviedo Masters Academy 24 Hilliard 29, Bell 14 Hillsborough 36, Jefferson 28 Holy Trinity Episcopal 16, St. John Neumann 6 Ida S. Baker 42, Bishop Verot 6 Immokalee 29, Lely 21 Indian Rocks 25, Admiral Farragut 21 Inlet Grove 40, North Broward 18 Island Coast 24, Fort Myers 21, OT Jefferson County 53, Branford 0 Jesuit 47, Lennard 0 John Carroll Catholic 28, Westminster Academy 14 John I. Leonard 21, Boca Raton Community 7 Jones 47, Lake Highland 10 Kathleen 31, Bartow 7 Keswick Christian 35, Northside Christian 28 Keystone Heights 21, Umatilla 9 King 48, Leto 3 Kings Academy 29, Fort Lauderdale Calvary Christian 10 Kissimmee Osceola 43, St. Cloud 0 Lafayette 30, Hamilton County 14 Lake Brantley 35, Sanford Seminole 20 Lake Gibson 28, Winter Haven 24 Lake Howell 28, Oak Ridge 21 Lake Mary 35, Lyman 0 Lake Mary Prep 20, Victory Christian 8 Lake Nona 42, Tavares 7 Lakeland 33, Lake Region 0 Lakewood 16, Gibbs 0 Lakewood Ranch 41, Tarpon Springs 34 Landmark Christian 45, Seffner Christian 7 Largo 34, Dixie Hollins 0 Leesburg 50, Lake Minneola High School 26 Leesburg The First Academy 48, Central Florida Christian 8 Lehigh 40, Cypress Lake 14 Lemon Bay 28, Port Charlotte 20 Liberty County 34, West Gadsden 12 Lincoln 45, Buchholz 7 Maclay 58, Rocky Bayou Christian 0 Madison County 51, West Port 7 Manatee 56, Braden River 0 Martin County 30, Port St. Lucie 24, OT Mater Academy 21, Keys Gate 0 McArthur 21, Fort Lauderdale 7 Melbourne Central Catholic 13, Orangewood Christian 0 Merritt Island Christian 34, International Community 7 Merritt Island 25, Rockledge 0 Miami Carol City 22, Belen Jesuit 17 Miami Central 38, Homestead 20 Miami Edison 42, Doral Academy Charter 7 Miami Ferguson 27, Miami Sunset 14 Miami Jackson 32, Key West 12 Milton 40, Tate 28 Miramar 27, St. Thomas Aquinas 24, 2OT Mitchell 27, Land OLakes 17 Monarch 38, Piper 22 Moore Haven 56, St. Stephens Episcopal 0 Mount Dora 57, Weeki Wachee 12 Naples 42, Barron Collier 14 Navarre 21, Choctawhatchee 17 New Smyrna Beach 24, Mainland 21 Newberry 16, Chie and 7 Newsome 35, Brandon 13 North Florida Christian 41, Hawthorne 6 North Marion 44, Crystal River 3 North Miami 21, Hialeah 2 North Miami Beach 40, Miami Krop 27 Northview 62, Jay 14 Oak Hall 17, St. Francis 14 Oakleaf 33, Leon 13 Ocala Trinity Catholic 38, Monsignor Pace 14 Ocala Vanguard 42, Lake Weir 3 Okeechobee 38, Forest Hill 28 Olympia 41, West Orange 27 Orange Park 49, Middleburg 14 Orlando Christian 49, Montverde Academy 6 Orlando Freedom 42, Cypress Creek 0 Orlando The First Academy 49, Trinity Prep 0 Orlando University 38, Colonial 0 Pace 20, Pensacola 10 Palatka 40, Nease 12 Palm Beach Central 45, Park Vista Community 7 Palm Harbor University 35, Sarasota Riverview 9 Palmetto 48, Bayshore 7 Pasco 26, Wesley Chapel 0 Pensacola Catholic 29, Florida 26 Pine Ridge 26, Deltona 6 Pinellas Park 28, St. Petersburg 3 Plantation 47, Hollywood Hills 6 Plantation American Heritage 44, Hallandale 3 Ponte Vedra 34, Matanzas 3 Pope John Paul II 54, St. Andrews 22 Port Orange Atlantic 26, Eustis 20, OT Port St. Joe 56, Franklin County 14 Providence 42, Episcopal 7 R.E. Lee 35, Stanton College Prep 17 Raines 33, Andrew Jackson 0 Ridge Community 35, Haines City 13 Royal Palm Beach 42, Spanish River 0 Sandalwood 28, Mandarin 14 Santa Fe Catholic 9, Mount Dora Bible 6 Santaluces 21, Lake Worth 20 Seabreeze 52, South Lake 0 Sebastian River 17, Olympic Heights 14 Seminole Osceola 34, Boca Ciega 24 Seminole Ridge 37, Pahokee 18 Seven Rivers Christian 20, Peniel Baptist 14 Somerset Academy 42, Archbishop Carroll 39 South Dade 23, Miami Killian 21 South Fork 39, Palm Beach Lakes 0 South Fort Myers 31, Riverdale 28 South Sumter 41, Bradford 0 Springstead 42, Brooksville Central 7 St. Edwards 48, South Florida HEAT 6 St. Johns Country Day 32, Temple Christian 6 Sunlake 14, Nature Coast Tech 13 Taravella 28, Everglades 14 Taylor 35, The Villages 20 Taylor County 45, Walton 27 Timber Creek 31, East River 3 Treasure Coast 40, St. Lucie Centennial 0 Trenton 61, Bronson 6 Trinity Christian-Jacksonville 76, Bishop Snyder 0 Union County 28, Dixie County 14 University Christian 69, Duval Charter 8 Venice 48, Sarasota 12 Warner Christian 37, Deltona Trinity Christian 25 West Florida 37, Gulf Breeze 14 Western 41, Stranahan 0 Westminster Christian 28, Champagnat Catholic 6 Wolfson 60, Englewood 12 Yulee 35, Fernandina Beach 0 Zephyrhills 34, Gulf 3 Prep SCORES SP O RTS www.bonifaynow.comWednesday, October 10, 2012 APage 9Section The Chipley Tigers ran over the South Walton Seahawks Friday night for a 37-6 Homecoming victory. The Tigers get a rest this Friday.PHOTOS BY RANDAL SEYLER | The Times-AdvertiserTigers feast on SeahawksChipley downs South Walton 37-6 for Homecoming For the last 50 years, First Federal has enjoyed giving back to our communities. To celebrate our 50th Anniversary, were asking you to participate by choosing a local organization that you think deserves a $500 donation from us. Voting will be open from October 1st 13th. Go to our website to choose one of these great organizations in your county: (850) 547-3624 C B: W S P H C H S B D M Hr F300 N.Waukesha St. Bonifay, FL

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By CATHRINE LAMB638-0212 | @catspitstop clamb@chipleypaper.com Matt Kenseth escaped the Big One for the win as Tony Stewart ipped down the track. As Smoke ipped he took with him all of the chase contenders except Kenseth, who won, and Jeff Gordon. The contenders that were involved, well. some of the nished but most of them didnt. Here they are anyway, Tony Stewart, Jimmie Johnson, Dale Earnhardt Jr., Brad Keselowski, Denny Hamlin, Kasey Kahne, Clint Bowyer, Martin Truex Jr., Kevin Harvick, and Greg Bif e. Of those drivers involved Keselowski, and Bif e were the only two to cross the nish line. For anyone who knows me, you know I am a huge Stewart fan and stand behind him 100 percent. So it should come as no surprise to you when I say, that as he came out of the in eld medical center and admitted that the accident was his fault I liked to have passed out. On to something else Kurt Busch took his last ride with the Phoenix team. He will race in charlotte next weekend in the number 78, with Furniture Row Racing, taking the place of Regan Smith. Smith will be racing the number 51 for Phoenix in Charlotte. So far this is a one-race deal for Smith. Bass Pro Shops has announced that they will be sponsoring 18 races on Tony Stewarts No. 14. Results for Good Sam Roadside Assistance 500 1. Matt Kenseth 2. Jeff Gordon 3. Kyle Busch 4. David Ragan 5. Regan Smith 6. Greg Bif e 7. Brad Keselowski 8. Travis Kvapil 9. Ryan Newman 10. Jeff Burton Standings after Good Sam Roadside Assistance 500 1. Brad Keselowski 2. Jimmie Johnson -14 3. Denny Hamlin -23 4. Kasey Kahne -36 5. Clint Bowyer -40 6. Jeff Gordon -42 7. Tony Stewart -46 8. Martin Truex Jr. -48 9. Kevin Harvick -49 9. Greg Bif e -49 11. Dale Earnhardt Jr. -51 12. Matt Kenseth -62 Chase contenders not nishing in the top 10 were, Kevin Harvick, 11th; Kasey Kahne, 12th; Martin Truex Jr., 13th; Denny Hamlin, 14th; Jimmie Johnson, 17th; Dale Earnhardt Jr., 20th; Tony Stewart, 22nd and Clint Bowyer he placed 23rd. In memory of my brotherAnthony Grant HerringtonApril 17, 1956 September 6, 2011 Down FinancingUntil April 2013 Payments* PLUS$750 Instant Kubota Bucks**OR Instant Kubota Bucks up to $2,000** www.kubota.com NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." www.mulliseye.com Chipley Office We are located directly across the parking lot from the Walmart in Chipley"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS,CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITYAPPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley OfficeBoard Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 10-31-12 FREEEYE EXAM CODE: WC00ToddRobinson,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeon LeeMullis,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeonSmart LensesSM SportsA10 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, October 10, 2012Kenseth escapes Big One, wins at Talladega MATT KENSETHSPECIAL TO THE TIMES-ADVERTISERStewart ips through the pack on the last lap of the Good Same Roadside Assistance 500 in Talladega, Ala. on Sunday.

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Washington, Holmes at a glance INDEXSociety .................................B2 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B6 Washington County News Holmes County Times-AdvertiserWednesday, OCTOBER 10 2012 BPAGE 1SectionLocal salon partners with American Cancer SocietyCHIPLEY Salon Gloss in Chipley has Partnered with Brand Sexy Hair for the Caring is Sexy Charity Cut-A-Thon event. The event is today. The stylist will offer hair cuts for $15 with $10 of that going to bene t the self-help beauty charity dedicated to improving the self-image of cancer patients. The salon is at 811 Main St in Chipley.NFCH to hosts Girls Night Out CHIPLEY In observance of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Northwest Florida Community Hospital in Chipley will host a free Girls Night Out at the Washington County Agricultural Center at 5 p.m. on sunday. Dr. Vanessa King-Johnson will give a presentation related to womens health. Women are invited to shop local vendors, learn about early detection and register for prizes. A light dinner will be served. For more information, call Aileen Koon at 850-415-8318.First United Methodist to hold domestic violence awareness dinnerCHIPLEY The First United Methodist Church of Chipley will hold a Domestic Violence Awareness Dinner at 6 p.m. on Monday. Support you community by attending a free kick-off dinner for the Domestic Violence Task Force. RSVP to Missy Lee at 718-6575 or Jennifer May at 415-5999.VHS Class of 1972VERNON The class of will meet at 11 a.m., on Friday at Harris Farm Store in Vernon to work on the oat. Then at noon they will meet behind the old high school to get in line for the parade. After the parade, the class will meet at Castaways in Bonifay to eat. Everyone will try to sit together at the game that starts at 7 p.m. Saturday. Classmates and family members will meet from 4-8 p.m. at Ellen and Jackie Morris house at 5146 Creek Road, Vernon. To ask what to bring or for more information, call Jane (Austin) Lively at 258-2081, or Wanda Carter at 258-4008. NORTHWEST FLORIDA CHAMPIONSHIP RODEO Wild timeat theRODEO

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Wednesday, October 10, 2012 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Looking for the best in hearing care? Look to Beltone Only Beltone offers the exclusive BelCare program, our ongoing commitment to customer satisfaction, providing you with benets such as: Financing Available WAC Chipley, FL 1611 Main Street Ste. 4(850) 387-4931Marianna, FL 3025 6th Street(850) 387-4931The benets of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Discounts off MSRP Previous purchases excluded. For a limited time. Cannot be combined with any other offers. 15%OFFTRUE WIRELESS HEARING AID SYSTEM & ultra comfortable when its noisy advanced technology So, call or come in today. No other company offers the same level of commitment youll nd at Beltone. WERE IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD! Free Annual Hearing Evaluations Beltone Ranked #1 in Patient Care Free Lifetime Instrument Care-Free cleanings and adjustments for as long as you own your Beltone hearing instruments And, our1500 locations nationwideserve you no matter where you live or travel!Allen Barnes 23 Years Experience Kensington Victoria Naker, daughter of Ken and Vicky Naker, turned one year old on September 4. Her brothers, Matt, Chris and Lathan, her grandparents, John and Jane Brown, and her greatgrandmother, Minnie Ragland, all helped her celebrate her big day with a birthday party on September 2 at her home in Chipley along with several friends and family members. Kensi is also the granddaughter of Barbara Naker of DeKalb, Illinois, and the greatgranddaughter of Catherine BrockWorthington of Chipley.PHOTO BY CECILIA SPEARSAlmost 100 horse riders and several covered wagons showed up for this years Lonny Lindsey Scholarship Trail Ride, which spanned from the Carmel Church to Smith Park in Bonifay on Saturday, Sept. 29. A more extensive story and more pictures of the Lonny Lindsey Scholarship Trail Ride will be available in the Oct. 17 edition of the Times-Advertiser.Special to ExtraCHIPLEY The Chipley Kiwanis Club met for its weekly luncheon at Pattillos Restaurant at the Washington Holmes County Technical Center on Sept. 25. Lunch was provided by the staff of the Washington-Homes County Technical Center. The Chipley Kiwanis Club installed of cers and directors for the 2012-13 year and gave out awards to club members at their regular Tuesday meeting. Many members received perfect attendance awards, which are earned by attending every meeting and making up missed meetings with alternate activities. Stan Peacock, Kiwanis, Division 2 Lt. Governor was in attendance. The of cers for the 2012-13 year are as follows: President, Jan Page; PresidentElect, Paul Goulding; Vice President, Garrett Martin; Secretary, Laura Joiner; Treasurer, Tommy Sasser; Asst. Treasurer, Joe Johnson; Immediate Past President, Vincent Spencer. Directors for the next scal year that were installed are David Corbin, Dell Corbin and Travis Hall for the three year term, Melissa Finch, Lamerle Feitsma and Vickie Williams for the two year term and Frank Cumbaa, Weyland Fulford and Sandy Solger for the one year term. Those recognized for perfect attendance include: One Year Frank Cumbaa, Garrett Martin, Jan Page, Tommy Sasser, Wayne Saunders, and Vincent Spencer. Two Year Weyland Fulford. Three Year David Corbin, Rick Davis and Paul Goulding. Five Year Vickie Williams. Seven Year Lamerle Feitsma. Eight Year Steve Mason. Ten Year Dell Corbin, Gene Holley, Price Wilson. Twelve Year Joe Johnson. Thirteen Year Laura Joiner. Twenty Year David Solger. Forty-Seven Year Bruce Christmas. Members were also recognized for their years of membership in Kiwanis. Nicole Fair eld, David Corbin, Rick Davis, Linda Lareau, Rhonda Sap, Wayne Saunders, and Vickie Williams were recognized for their 5year membership. Kim Wilson, Malcolm Gainey and Lamerle Feitsma were recognized for their 10-year membership and Dell Corbin was recognized for his 15-year membership. Lastly, David Solger was recognized for his 25year membership. The Kiwanis club meets Tuesdays at Patillos restaurant in the middle of the WHTC campus at noon. For an invitation, contact any Kiwanian or David Solger, Membership Chairperson at 638-1276. For more information about the Kiwanis Club of Chipley, visit www. ChipleyKiwanis.com. Special to the NewsCHIPLEY Students in the Chipley High School Music Theatre Department are hard at work preparing for their fall productions. There is a great deal of excitement and energy in the ongoing work for the department. Anyone interested in helping with the productions or becoming a sponsor for the year, please contact Mrs. Hinson at 638-6100 extension 615. Make plans to come out and see this years dramatic and musical productions you will not want to miss them! Flowers for Algernon 7 p.m. Oct. 18 and 20, $10 admission, $5 student This is the compelling story of Charlie GOrdon, a mentally challenged man, and the strange interweaving of his life with that of Algernon, a mouse. Experimental surgery has been performed on Algernon increasing his intelligence fourfold. The operation is tried on Charlie, who rapidly increases in intelligence, far more intelligent than his teacher, Alice Kinnian, or the doctors who created the operating technique. As Charlie approaches the peak of his brilliance, Algernon shows frightening symptoms of regression. The play becomes a race against time in which Charlie tries to keep his new intelligence long enough to save himself and thus continue what he and Alice have found. This is a different kind of play: poignant, romantic, funny and tragic, but with hope for mans indomitable spirit. Flowers for Algernon Cast: Dr. Strauss Damion Potter Professor Nemur Landon Odum Alice Kinnian Julia Veit Burt Seldon Brandon Licea Charlie Gordon Hunter Harden and Garrett Pletcher (double cast) Derek Ethan Shwartz Nurse Kendal Daniels Frank Nolan Spencer Gina Kayla Lara Mrs. Donner Mary Rosalyn Taylor Joe Adam Bass Mother Malinda Locke Little Charlie TBA Father Matt Chase Child Norma Tea Creamer Mrs. Feldman Chloe Bruner Ellen Danielle Runnels Teen-age Charlie Matt Mosley Bernie Nathan Rolling Connie Jessie Massey Chairlady Julie Carroll Voice in Audience Drake McCorvey Mrs. Mooney Ashlyn Jeffries Mrs. Nemur Brittany Woods Mr. Harvey Noah Smothers Jackie Welberg Lindsay Miller Anne Welberg Chelsea McIntyre Norma Sydney Ward Party Guests and Concert-goers Raven Marks Brittany Cope Taylor Collins Ashley Maphis Tech Crew: Zach Lankist, Chase Strickland, Nick Spencer, Brittney Sanders, Parisha Massaline, Kacy Lawson, Devon James, Cory Guster (Stage Manager), Chase Dalton, Alex Bush Love, Laughter, and Legends: The Music of the Beatles 7 p.m. on Nov. 15-17, $10, $5 students. The combined choirs of Chipley High School will bring to the stage a nostalgic and energetic presentation of the music of the Beatles. You are sure to hear your favorites in this musical production which includes a compilation of songs performed and/or written by the members of the band. Join us as we salute the timeless music and greatest hits of the Beatles. Concert Choir Christmas Concert 6 p.m. on Dec. 6, Free admission.CHS students to present Flowers for AlgernonSPECIAL TO EXTRANew of cers of the Chipley Kiwanis Club for 2012-13 include President, Jan Page; President-Elect, Paul Goulding; Vice President, Garrett Martin; Secretary, Laura Joiner; Treasurer, Tommy Sasser; Asst. Treasurer, Joe Johnson; Immediate Past President, Vincent Spencer. Kiwanis Club installs of cers for the 2012-2013 scal year NAKER TURNS ONE LONNY LINDSEY TRAIL RIDE

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Wednesday, October 10, 2012 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3Special to The NewsCHIPLEY Club member Lyndal Pleas presented an informative program on Collecting & Pressing Wild Flowers at the Oct. 3 meeting of Chipley Garden Club. Members and guests were delighted by the bouquets of wild flowers on the tables under the pavilion at Shivers Park. Lyndal remarked, All these beautiful wild flowers were collected locally. Florida has the third largest floral content in the continental United States, just behind California and Texas. There are over 4000 wild flowers in Florida and 3600 of them are native. Something is blooming just about year round. Just look! They are everywhere! Lyndal recommended discretion when collecting specimens and suggested taking a clipping rather than pulling up the whole plant. Collection should be done in the afternoon making sure to collect the bloom and at least two leaves. The plant should be identified and pressed as soon as possible. Lyndal demonstrated pressing flowers using paper towels and heavy books. She also provided forms for recording purposes. Several recently pressed flower specimens phlox, oxalis, butterfly bush, and goldenrod were displayed as well as Judy Solgers (Wausau Garden Club) award winning pressed wildflower collection. At the business meeting, President Karen Roland presented a certificate from National Garden Clubs to Club member Linda MacLellan for her support of the Penny Pines Project. Her generous donation will help provide seedlings to reforest 300 acres of lost trees in our national forests. The club also discussed the upcoming 2nd Annual Scarecrow Contest on Oct. 13, FFGC District II Fall Meeting in Graceville on October 10, distributing plants and making terrariums with students at KMS Elementary School and Washington County Christian School, and the clubs 80th Anniversary Reception. The next meeting of Chipley Garden Club will be on Wednesday, Nov. 7. We welcome visitors and new members at anytime during the year. If you would like to attend a meeting or learn more about garden clubbing, please contact Karen Roland, Club President, at 638-9968 or email her at blueorchidoasis@yahoo. com. Is your middle-aged cat experiencing increased thirst, appetite, and urination? Is your furry friend losing weight or has a change in behavior? If so, your family cat may have hyperthyroidism. This common disease is caused by an overproduction of thyroid hormones, called T3 and T4, due to dysfunction of the thyroid glands in the cats neck. There are two of these glands, on either side of the windpipe. Both glands are usually affected, but this is not always the case. The symptoms mentioned previously are not the only signs of hyperthyroidism; other symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, and a matted or greasy coat. These signs start slowly and many owners may not initially realize that something is wrong, said Dr. Audrey Cook, associate professor at Texas A&M College of VeterinaryMedicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM). A drop in body weight is often the rst clue that a cat is suffering from hyperthyroidism, which is one of the reasons why regular vet visits are so important in older cats, Cook said. If a cat starts exhibiting the symptoms of hyperthyroidism, a trip to the veterinarian will conrm the diagnosis. The veterinarian will perform a physical examination, which will include careful examination of the neck. An enlarged thyroid gland may be palpated, but a normal exam does not rule out the possibility of hyperthyroidism. To conrm the disease, the animals thyroid hormone level will be checked through blood work. Since thyroid hormones affect most organs in the body, it is important to test a cat for the disease if it is suspected. If left untreated, secondary problems can arise such as heart enlargement, with an elevated heart rate. Another problem resulting from untreated hyperthyroidism is hypertension, or high blood pressure. Both hypertension and heart disease caused by hyperthyroidism will resolve with proper treatment of the thyroid disease. Left untreated, the cardiac complications related to hyperthyroidism can be life-threatening, Cook said. Hyperthyroidism can be treated three ways: medication,radioactiveiodine, or surgery. Traditionally, medication is the main way to treat the disease. For this option, an antithyroid medication is given to decrease the amount of the hormones released from the thyroid glands. This is relatively inexpensive, but the drug must be given once or twice daily for the rest of the cats life. Also, side effects can include vomiting, anemia, lethargy and bone marrow suppression. Some owners have a hard time getting the medication in to their cat, Cook said. We can get it reformulated in to a liquid if this is easier, and sometimes we use a product that is rubbed into the ear and absorbed that way. Radioactive-iodine therapy is becoming increasingly popular when dealing with hyperthyroidism in cats. For this longterm treatment, the cat is injected with the radioactive iodine, which destroys the tissue of the overactive thyroid gland. Although this procedure is usually very effective, it is more expensive and requires the cat being conned to the hospital while the radioactivity decreases. This is one of the best ways to treat this disease, and the choice I made for my own cat when she was hyperthyroid, Cook said. Surgical removal of the thyroid gland(s) is another option available for this disease. Although the long-term success rate is good, there is a risk of damage to the parathyroid glands, located close to the thyroid gland. The parathyroid gland is responsible for maintaining proper calcium blood levels. We usually only recommend surgery if the gland is cancerous, which is very rare, or if medication or radiation are not a suitable choice, Cook said. A veterinarian can help determine which treatment option is best for your animal. In general, the prognosis for a cat with hyperthyroidism is good. After treatment, long-term monitoring of the thyroid levels will help ensure the cat continues to live a happy life.ABOUT PET TALKPet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at vetmed.tamu.edu/pet-talk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to cvmtoday@cvm.tamu. edu.Feline hyperthyroidism: symptoms and treatments PetET Talk ALKGarden Club learns to collect and press wild owers Crossword PuUZZleLESOLUTION ON PAGE B4 Down FinancingUntil April 2013 Payments* ORInstant Kubota Bucks up to $400** www.kubota.com RTV1140CPX RTV900XT

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FAITH BSectionwww.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.First Baptist Churchcome as you areMike Orr, Pastor1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.On Growing UPWhat does it mean to grow up and become an adult? This is certainly not an easy question to answer, although we usually know it when adulthood is lacking and someone is acting childishly. There is a lot of growing up required of us nowadays and thus adulthood is being delayed by an extended period of adolescence. This leaves us with lots of twentyand thirty-year-old individuals who are living at home and taking on very few if any of the responsibilities to be responsible for ones actions and ones life and to stop expecting other people to take care of you. It also entails taking responsibility for where one is in life and refusing to blame our parents, teachers, or others for our lack of success. At some point, we all have to grow up and realize that our life is OURS and no one elses, and however much others may have contributed to it, only we can shape our own lives. Whether this is always true is debatable; parents and teachers do have an impact on children and the adults they will become. But, it is best for each of us to take responsibility for our own lives and start acting and believing as if we are the masters of our own fates. Perhaps that is what it really means to be grown up: to strive to mold and fashion our own lives and to live by our own standards and ideals. And, to do it with the faith of one who takes complete responsibility for every aspect of his or her existence.BROWN FUNERAL HOME1068 Main Street, Chipley638-4010 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser This Message Courtesy ofWhen I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I put childish ways behind me. 1 Corinthians 13: 11 Special to Extra Public Square Rosary Crusade setBONIFAY A crusade for the Holy Rosary will be noon to 2 p.m. Oct. 13 in front of Memorial Field on State Road 79 in Bonifay. America is at a historic crossroad. Secularists are trying to push God from the public square. They reject His bene cial action upon society. But without God, where will our leaders get the wisdom to solve the great problems we face? We must stop the secularist advance and pray to God for help. He will hear us if we pray through the intercession of His Blessed Mother. Thats why we are launching the 2012 Public Square Rosary Crusade. Public prayer is far more powerful than private prayer to appease the anger of God and call down His mercy, and Holy Mother Church, guided by the Holy Ghost, has always advocated public prayer in times of public tragedy and suffering, Saint Louis de Montfort said in The Secret of the Rosary. For more information, call Mike DeRuntz at 239-273-6956.First Baptist Church HomecomingPONCE DE LEON The First Baptist Church of Ponce de Leon will have homecoming services on Oct. 14. Congregational signing will begin at 10:30 a.m. A fellowship meal will follow morning service.Calvary Hill Pentecostal HomecomingVERNON Pastor Tim Bush and the congregation of Calvary Hill Pentecostal Church, approximately half a mile east of State Road 79 on State Road 277 across from Vernon Elementary School, would like to invite everyone to attend Homecoming 2012 on Oct. 14. Anointed singing with The Drummond Family will begin at 10 a.m. The morning message will follow with our guest speaker and Evangelist Brother Dewain Phillips. The celebration will conclude with our famous dinner on the grounds after the morning message in the fellowship hall. Please call 535-0003 for more information.Women on Missions arts and crafts festCOTTONDALE The 13th annual Women on Missions Arts and Crafts Festival will be 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 20 at the First Baptist Church in Cottondale. Breakfast and lunch will be available. There will be baked goods, sewing items, seasonal decorations, books, plants, jellies, jams cookbooks and much more for sale to support the church building fund and mission projects.Worship Under The StarsCHIPLEY One Way Home Ministries presents a year-end blowout event. The last Worship Under The Stars concert will be at 5 p.m. Oct. 20. There will be live music and fellowship all evening. Special guest will be The F.O.G., Bridge and Trees of Adullam. Food and drinks will be free. Dress and fellowship is casual. The event is open to the public. Worship Under The Stars is at Tabernacle of Praise in Chipley.SPECIAL TO EXTRAESTO Jeff and Sheri Ester will be in concert at 6 p.m. on Oct. 13 at Mt. Zion Baptist Church in Esto. The concert is in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Sheri Easter is a living testimony of Gods healing power, as she is now breast cancer-free. This is a free concert; a love offering will be taken. Come and enjoy an amazing night of gospel music. For more information, call 547-5302. WEDNESDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday. 9 a.m. to noon: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center third Thursdays. Call 638-0093 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6:30 p.m.: TOPS Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AFRIDAY6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30 p.m.: Bead Class second Fridays at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery. Call 703-0347. 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a get-together for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Winn Dixie in Marianna. Call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church.By THE REV. JAMES L. SNYDER My father was not what you would call a literate person. Apart from the Bible, he did not read much of anything else on a regular basis. As a young person I can remember him quoting a great American patriot: Benjamin Franklin. The only quote he knew of this man was, Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise. For a long time I thought he was making it up and then one day, I happened to run across a book in the library about Benjamin Franklin and, there it was. Benjamin actually did say that. I had to give my father that one. It seems that every time it got close to what my father termed as my bedtime, he would remind me of this famous quote. It made me hate bedtime when it came. At the time, I had my doubts about the validity of this quote because if my father followed this quote as he encouraged me to do, why was he not healthy, wealthy and wise? At the time, I was in no position to question his wisdom. I was wise enough to know that the best part of wisdom was not to challenge the wisdom of my father. This has attributed to my length of life to date. Incidentally, I have carried this over into my married life. According to my father, if I simply obeyed Franklins advice I would have a life lled with health, wealth and wisdom. The three things absolutely needed in life to make a person happy. Or, so Franklin would lead us to believe. After what seems to be a lifetime of living and living in as much harmony of these two aspects of life, I must say that there is very little truth to be said concerning good old Franklins saying. No matter how early I go to bed or how early I get up, I do not seem to be any wealthier or healthier. Perhaps, and this is only a guess on my part because I am not as wise as old Benjamin Franklin. You had to do something when you got up that contributed or created your wealth. Just a suggestion from me. That is the way it is with most sayings. They sound good; you sound wise in quoting them; but after every saying is quoted, nothing seems to change. They just do not cover the whole spectrum. It is not that I have not given it the good old college try; it just does not work for me. This past week I had an occasion to think about this quote. I have tried keeping the early to bed and early to rise objective in full focus throughout my life. I am not up partying until the wee hours of the morning. At my age, my party time is early afternoon. I have made a concerted effort to get enough rest and just to make sure I have enough rest I indulge in an afternoon nap. I am not sure where this comes in Benjamin Franklins quote. Recently, I had cause to re ect upon the validity of Benjamin Franklins sage advice. My quarterly taxes were due, and you know what good old Uncle Sam thinks about being late on his payments. If confession is good for the soul (another famous quote), I need to confess that while I was writing this check to Uncle Sam I had some rather harsh thoughts about him in the process. There, I said it. During the same week, some other bills were due, and none of them would take no for an answer. Again, I must confess, while writing these checks I was sputtering to myself quite a bit. As I looked at my checkbook, I knew that the wealthy component of Benjamin Franklins quote did not come in my direction. I was simply out of wealth. Not only that, but I recently spent about four weeks sick with bronchitis and pneumonia and spent about three weeks in bed. Not only was I early to bed, but I was glued to my bed. How does that t into Franklins saying? The healthy aspect of that quote has not fallen in my direction either. If you want to know about the wise element, simply query the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. Another old phrase says three strikes and youre out. Well, according to the Franklin saying, I must concede that I am out. I am not wealthy, in many regards Im not healthy and for sure, and Im not wise. It is my opinion that there is a lot more to life than wise old sayings from some old man from the past. Benjamin Franklin, for example, no doubt practiced early to bed and early to rise but in the end, he died. That does not sound too healthy to me. Of course, the best place for wisdom is the Bible. I like what the wisest man in the world said, Trust in the Lord with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding. In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths (Proverbs 3:5-6 KJV). I am not too sure about the healthy and the wealthy components (that is up for grabs), but I am convinced the wise part comes from the Lord. After all, the Bible teaches us that God is omniscient. If God knows everything and I know God, I am in a good position. The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries. com. COMMUNITY CALENDARWednesday, October 10, 2012 Page 4One Franklin axiom hasnt really worked Faith BRIEFS Mt. Zion Baptist Church to host Jeff and Sheri Easter Crossword SOLUTION

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Wednesday, October 10, 2012 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences.Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section ofwww.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com, you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership withLegacy.com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212 and ObituariesMrs. Noelle Silcox, age 87, passed away Saturday, Sept. 29, 2012. She was born Nov. 3, 1924, in Stone Mountain, Ga., to Charles and Nora Jones Smith. Mrs. Silcox was a resident of Freeport. She was Methodist by faith and a member of the Freeport United Methodist Church. She was a devoted wife, mother, grandmother and great grandmother. She enjoyed cooking, sewing, crocheting and spending time with her family. Mrs. Silcox is preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Oscar Theo Silcox Sr.; one brother, Charles Smith, and four sisters Mary Garcia, Alice Middlebrook, Joann Thompson and Dorothy Smith. Mrs. Silcox is survived by her one son, Oscar Theo Silcox, Jr. and wife Hazel of DeFuniak Springs; two daughters, Julie F. Netttles and Melanie Nettles both of Freeport; four grandchildren, Adam Stubbs, Anthony Stubbs, Tabitha Zimmerman and Timothy Nettles; five great grandchildren, Bree Padgett, Sky Stubbs, Alexis Zimmerman. Caylin Zimmerman and Isaac Stubbs, and one great great grandchild, Avionnah Padgett. A time of Visitation was held from 2 to 3 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 at Black Creek United Methodist Church; 1170 Black Creek BLVD, Freeport, Florida 32439. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 at Black Creek United Methodist Church with the Rev. Tom Birka and the Rev. Louis Taunton officiating and Eulogy by Anthony Stubbs.Noelle SilcoxMrs. Lillian Hazel Silcox, age 87, of Freeport, passed away March 20, 2012. She was born Sept. 11, 1924 in Wicksburg, Ala. to Dewitt and Lillie Merriweather McLean. Mrs. Silcox was a resident of Freeport, for the past 60 years. She was Jehovah Witness by faith. She enjoyed shing, quilting, sewing, cooking and above all else working in her garden. Mrs. Silcox is preceded in death by her father and mother; her husband, Woodrow Wilson Silcox; one brother, Kenneth McLean and one sister, Carolyn Pearson. Mrs. Silcox is survived by her son, Randal Silcox and wife Paula of Freeport, and two brothers, Tamedge McLean and Billy McLean. Memorial Services was held at 2 p.m., Sunday, March 25, 2012, at ClaryGlenn Freeport Chapel Funeral Home with Eulogy by Ed Pearson. Memorialization was by cremation. You may go online to view obituaries, offer condolences and sign guest book at www.claryglenn.com. Clary-Glenn Freeport Chapel Funeral Home is entrusted with the arrangements.Lillian HazelMrs. Grace Elaine Moring, age 68, of Bonifay, passed away Oct. 1, 2012 at Signature Health Care of North Florida in Graceville. She was born Oct. 7, 1943 in Bonifay. Mrs. Moring was preceded in death by her parents, J.D. Brown and Ruthie Mae Brown and husband, John Edward Moring. Mrs. Moring is survived by one son, Charles Farrell II and wife Stacey of Albany, Ga.; one step-son, John Michael Moring and wife Angela of DeFuniak Springs; two daughters, Yvonne Soule and husband Bill of Marietta, Ga. and Janet Reynolds and husband Rick of Concord, N.C.; one stepdaughter, Tracy Moring of Brundidge, Ala.; 11 grandchildren; one greatgrandchild, and one sister, Irene Blakey of Mobile, Ala. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.Grace E. MoringMrs. Lucille Crutch eld, 86 of Graceville passed away Monday, Oct. 1, 2012 at Signature Healthcare in Graceville. Ms. Lucille was born in Noma, on April 21, 1926, to the late Zeb Dee Jones and Eliza Thomley Jones. Ms. Lucille was a loving mother, grandmother, aunt and friend. She was a member of Damascus Baptist Church. Preceded in death by her husband, Jim Crutch eld; daughter, Sarah; grandson, Roy Towne; ve brothers, Leon, Robert, Sollie, Charlie, and Cleatus; three sisters Ressie, Mollie, and Elsie. She is survived by her beloved children, Edward Crutch eld (Madelyn), Graceville, Catherine Knight (Louie), Slocomb, Ala., Agnes Garner (Billy), Cottonwood, Ala., David Crutch eld Bowling Green, Ky., William Crutch eld (Patty), Graceville, and Randy Crutch eld, Graceville; 12 grandchildren Tammy Paridon, Tracey Crutch eld, Marla Greer, Steven Crutch eld, Keith Knight, Jamie Knight, Nicole Hoberecht, Clay Garner, Chris Crutch eld, Brandon Crutch eld, Jessica Woodham, and Drew Crutch eld; 13 great grandchildren, two great great grandchildren, and a host of special nieces and nephews. Funeral service was held at 2 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012 at Damascus Baptist Church with the Rev. Fred Cook, the Rev. Jamie Knight and Mr. Carlton Floyd of ciating. Burial followed in Collins Mill Cemetery with James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family received friends at the funeral home Wednesday, from 6 to 8 p .m. Expressions of sympathy can be made at www. jamesandlipford.com.Lucille Crutch eldBetty Birge Rustin, age 73, passed from this life Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 at her home in Chipley. Betty was born on Jan. 1, 1939 to the late Coy and Edna (Gainey) Birge in Chipley. Mrs. Rustin was a lifelong resident of Chipley and a member of the Church of God of Prophecy and a loving wife, mother, granny, and great grandmother. She is predeceased by her husband, Grady Ronal Rustin and one brother, Sonny Birge. Survivors include one son, Darrell Rustin and wife Karen of Chipley; two daughters, Wanda Wasson and Kay Yeatman both of Chipley; one brother, Larry Birge and wife Carol of Graceville; two sisters, Martha Moody of Bonifay, and Gail Jones and husband Billy of Graceville; eight grandchildren, Don Hendrix, Chris Miles, Lori Miles, Kayla Wasson, Shelby Rustin Wasson, Cansas Wasson, Blayne Rustin, and Dawn Yeatman; ve great grandchildren, Natalia Wasson, Bo Miles, Rhett Miles, Marissa Hendrix, Haley Mapel. Family received friends Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012 from 5 to 8 p.m., at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel. Funeral services were held Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012 at 2 p.m., at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel with the Rev. Earnest Dupree of ciating. Interment followed at Glenwood Cemetery, Chipley, with Brown Funeral Home directing. Friends and Family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net.Betty B. RustinClyde W. Billy Galloway Jr., born Feb. 2, 1954 in Tallahassee, passed away in his home surrounded by family on Sept. 27, 2012, after a courageous battle with cancer. Billy spent his childhood in DeFuniak Springs. His family moved to Tallahassee, and then to Bonifay. He graduated from Holmes County High School in Bonifay, where he was President of the Sr. Class and played football. He attended Chipola Jr. College in Marianna, and graduated from Florida State University in 1976. Billy attended law school at Mississippi College in Clinton, Miss. After graduation from law school, Billy passed the Florida bar exam and began his career as an attorney with the Florida Department of Insurance. For many years, he served the citizens of Florida as a Bureau Chief of Property and Casualty Solvency. Billy was instrumental in assisting with the needs of victims affected by Hurricane Andrew. In 1994 Billy transitioned into private practice. He worked at several law rms before beginning his own law rm in 2006, Galloway & Brennan, P.A. He served on several Boards of Directors as a member and as general counsel; one dearest to his heart was Ken Smith Ministries. Billy had a passion for Seminole football, shing, hunting, traveling and spending time with family and friends. Billy will be remembered for his love of life, family and God. He was a devoted son, brother, husband, father, uncle and friend. He had a warm smile and an embracing heart, never meeting a stranger and always wanting to help. He liked to tell a joke and make people laugh; and if something was broken, he wanted to try to x it, either physically or spiritually. We will miss him until we see him again in Heaven. Billy was preceded in death by his father, Clyde W. Galloway, Sr. He is survived by his wife, Melissa Misty Rosich Galloway; his son, William Addison Galloway; his mother, Dorothy Galloway; his sister, Cecilia Cissy Galloway, all of Tallahassee; his uncle and aunts, Bill and Helen Galloway and Pat Andrews of Holmes County and Vallie Riddle of Niceville, and by many cousins, nieces and nephews who loved him dearly. The family received visitors at Thomasville Road Baptist Church on Monday, Oct. 1, 2012 from 6 to 8 p.m. Funeral Services were held at Thomasville Road Baptist Church on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 at 12:30 p.m. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Covenant Hospice, 1545 Raymond Diehl Road, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 (covenanthospice.org) or Lone Survivor Foundation, 2626 S. Loop W., Ste. 415, Houston, TX 77054 (www. lonesurvivorfoundation. org). Clyde W. Galloway Jr.Merle Albert Eastman, 91 of Chipley passed away Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012 at the Washington Rehab and Nursing facility. Merle was born May 15, 1921 in Windsor, Vt., to Archie and Twila Eastman. He served in the United States Army and later retired as Veterans counselor. He also received an AA degree from Central Florida Community College. He was preceded in death by his parents; wife, Barbara Jean Eastman, and two daughters, Cheryl Ann Golding and Marilynn Potter. He is survived by his son, Merle Albert Eastman Jr. (Kim) of Fort McCoy; four daughters, Ronne Knighten (Dennis) of Crestview, Nancy Carroll, Michele Roy (Dick) and Twila Koon (Gerald McKinnie) all of Ocala; two step sons, Mike Walker (Kathy) of Chipley, and Marvin Randy Pierce of Hawthorne; two step daughters, Teresa Walker of Ocala, and Rita Walker of Houston, Texas; 13 grandchildren and nine step grandchildren and numerous great grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 5 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012 at Turning Point church with the Rev. Terry Hinote of ciating. Cremation followed with Obert Funeral Home of Chipley in charge of arrangements. Inurnment of Mr. Eastman will take place at a later date in the Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell.Merle A. EastmanCol. Norman Charles Edwards July 26, 1924September 19, 2012. Col. Edwards passed away, peacefully, in his sleep, after a long and hard battle. He was a member of the Army Air Corp during WWII. His plane was shot down over France, where six German soldiers were waiting for his parachute to land. We were told by some of the French witnesses that his capture was of a violent nature. His dog tags were ripped from his neck and were found in a eld about 40 years later by a French farmer. He was eventually taken to the POW camp, Stalag IV. On Black Friday, the prisoners were forced to start out on a long and arduous march, as word had been received that the Russians were coming. Many men died along the way, due to starvation, frostbite, and abuse. Norman was a Staff Sergeant, at the time. He thought he saw an opportunity to escape, and attempted to do so. He was stopped by machine gun re that shot both of his legs off. They thought he was dead and left him on the road over night. When morning came, he was still alive, as the cold weather had congealed his blood and kept him from bleeding to death. The guards drug him back to their temporary camp and a young POW medic nished sawing the bones off and stitched up his legs. He was suffering from frostbite. Two weeks later the Russians and some American troops liberated the camp. He went to a hospital in Europe and from there went to Walter Reed. He later rose to the rank of Colonel by various government operations. He never let the loss of his legs slow him down. He owned and operated an air eld and continued to y for a long while. He then moved to Florida and went to work at the Miami Police Department as a photographer for the homicide division. From there he went to work for a sophisticated security service company that specialized in voice analyzers and lie detectors. He then opened his own detective agency called International Security, Inc. He worked with various police agencies in the panhandle area. He worked there until he retired. Not one to sit idle, he then began to play around with ea markets, selling military supplies. He leaves behind his beloved grandson, Capt. Michael King and his wife Tina and his two greatgrandchildren, Mikey and Heather; two dear brothers, Richard Edwards, Sr. and his wife Lenny of Virginia Beach, and Henry Charles Edwards of Bonifay; and we cannot fail to mention that his best friend and companion of 24 years, Claudette Mazzoli, was left behind also. He will be in the hearts of all of us who loved him for all time and the wonderful memories will never fade. He was a true hero. We didnt need all the medals to know that, but he earned them anyway. If it werent for all the soldiers of his generation, we would all be speaking German today. We salute you all. Norman was cremated according to his wishes and his ashes will be buried in Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors. Norman was 88 years old. Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.Norman C. Edwards See OBITUARIES B6

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Wednesday, October 10, 2012 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County NewsGeorge Edgar Williams, 76, Youngstown, passed away Sept. 28, 2012, at Covenant Hospice, Panama City, after a short illness. Mr. Williams was born May 9, 1936, to the late James Edgar and Mabel Stephenson Williams in Hollywood. He was raised in Jacksonville but resided most of his life in Chipley and Youngstown. Mr. Williams was married to the former Geraldine Carlile on Nov. 26, 1953. Mr. Williams was a member of AFLCIO International Union of Operating Engineers, Local 653. He owned and operated retail stores in Chipley and Bonifay, and later Panhandle Realty in Panama City. He was active in a number of civic organizations including The Association of Retarded Citizens of Florida holding several local and state ofces, The 21 Club with Century Realty, the Gideons and the Masons. Mr. Williams was president of the Board of the Tropical Breeze Resort in Panama City Beach and an active member of First Baptist Church of Bayou George. Mr. Williams is survived by his wife, Geraldine; three daughters, Sharon Williams Commander, Carol Williams, and Judy Williams Peterson (Eddie); one son, Dennis (Pam) Williams; six grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren; two brothers, Daniel Williams and James (Jimmy) Williams, and a number of nieces and nephews. A Memorial Service was held Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 at 7 p.m., at First Baptist Church, Bayou George with the Rev. Fred Lowry ofciating. The family received friends at 6 p.m., prior to the Memorial Service at the church. In lieu of owers, memorials may be made to the St. Andrews Bay Center, 1804 Carolina Avenue, Lynn Haven, Fla. Expressions of sympathy may be viewed or submitted on line at www.kentforestlawn.com. Kent Forest Lawn Funeral Home; 2403 Harrison Ave,; Panama City, FL 32405; 850-763-4694.George E. WilliamsMrs. Audrey Mae Carter, 96, of Graceville passed away Sunday, Sept. 30, 2012, at her daughters home in Reidsville, N.C. Mrs. Carter was born in Ponce De Leon, Nov. 26, 1915 to the late Henry Lee Pullum and Hattie Lenora Davis Pullum. A beloved mother and grand mother, Mrs. Carter was a long time member of Pilgrims Rest Baptist Church. She is preceded in death by her husband, George W. Carter, Sr.; son, George W. Carter, Jr.; two sisters, Jewel Carter, Irene Carter, and brother, Buford Pullum. She is survived by two daughters, and son-inlaw, Opal and R.E. buck Phillips, Cottondale and Catherine and Gene Land of Reidsville, N.C.; daughter-in-law, Gayvon Carter, Graceville; brother, Huey Pullum, Aiken, S.C.; four grandsons, eight great grandchildren, and two great great grandchildren. Funeral service was held at 2 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012 at the Chapel of James and Lipford Funeral Home with the Rev. Chester Padgett ofciating. Burial will follow in Pilgrims Rest Cemetery with James and Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Saturday, from 12 p.m. until time of service. Expressions of sympathy can be made www.jamesandlipford.com.Audrey M. CarterMrs. Desta Marlene McDaniel, age 77, of Bonifay, passed away Oct. 4, 2012, at her home. She was born July 2, 1935, in Albany, Ohio. Mrs. McDaniel was preceded in death by her father, Frank Storey Perry; mother, Marjorie Estella Knowlton Perry Brown, and one brother, Frank Frankie Storey Perry. Mrs. McDaniel is survived by her husband of 58 years, Vaughn Sherman McDaniel of Bonifay; one son, Randy McDaniel and wife Amy of Tallahassee; two daughters, Tamara Bush and husband, Donnie, of Bonifay, and Julie Pooser and husband, Tom, of DeFuniak Springs; six grandchildren, Blair McDaniel and wife, Heyward, Madison McDaniel, Kelly Patrick and husband, Joel, Emily Segers and husband, Ryan, Olivia Pooser, and Seth Pooser; three greatgrandchildren, Braydon, Egan, and Aleena; one brother, David Perry and wife Patricia of Bonifay, and one sister, Pat Hoisington of Oxnard, Calif. Funeral services were 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 7, 2012, at Gully Springs Baptist Church with the Rev. Tim Hall ofciating. Interment followed in Gully Springs Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends one hour prior to funeral at Gully Springs Church.Desta M. McDanielJoy Simmons Everitt, age 82, passed away peacefully Oct. 3, 2012, with her family by her side. Joys beauty, grace and love of life were celebrated as she accepted her greatest promotion to join the ultimate love of her life, Jesus Christ. She was born Feb. 2, 1930, in Wausau, to Cuy Simmons and Eva Wilcox; she was one of ve children. Her childhood was happy and lled with love. She graduated from Chipley High School; Joy was kind and always the proper southern lady. High school sweethearts, Joy met Waller, her knight in shining armor, and she instantly knew she wanted him to be hers. They married in Donaldsonville, Ga., on Dec. 24, 1948. They have three children, and being a mother was central to Joys life. She was a constant example of Christ, especially evident in the nurturing of her family. Life is all about living with intention, and Joy lived daily out of purpose lled intention. Joy was known for her kindness. If you have met Joy, you have felt the Saviors love. She loved others the way the Savior asked us to love unconditionally and without reserve. Joys three children were born to a mother who cherished them and their differences, a mother who was constant in her love, guidance and example. With unwavering strength, Joy endured the untimely passing of her only daughter, Debbie. Through her unimaginable grief, she was a source of great comfort to her family; with quiet condence she consistently displayed complete trust in the perfect will of God. All of her grandchildren know secretly that they are their grandmothers favorite. She spent every moment she could with them, her favorite display of affection being the pleasure of cooking whatever they desired. Her home was always open, and everyone felt welcomed and known by her. She was a mother to all. Joy happily chose to serve, spending her days in constant service of others. She was a proud and faithful member of Wausau Assembly of God. She spent over 40 years working as church secretary, magnifying her calling through service. She spent over 30 years as a social worker for Department of Children and Families. Joy lived a life of optimism and faith. She led her family with her example of turning to Christ and nding strength in Him. She chose to be humble. She chose to be loving. She chose joy. And her children and grandchildren watched and learned. They know where to turn for peace because they watched their mother and grandmother nd it in Christ. We choose now to honor her legacy with laughter and love while being ever-serving and faithful. Joy Simmons Everitt was preceded in death by her husband, Waller David Everitt; her daughter, Debbie Everitt Lovett; and her grandson Phillip Everitt. She is survived by her two children, Waller (David) Everitt, Jr., and Richard (Rick) Stephen Everitt; and grandchildren, Jeff Everitt, Andrea Everitt Gainey, Rebecca Lovett Seitz, Caleb Lovett and Elizabeth Everitt; and six greatgrandchildren. She is also survived by her siblings, Earl Simmons, Louise Kirkland, and Lois Hiley. A public viewing was Saturday, Oct. 6, at Wausau Assembly of God from 8:30 to 10 a.m. Funeral services were immediately after the viewing at 10 a.m. Graveside service was at Bonnett Pond Church Cemetery directly after the service.Joy Simmons EverittMrs. Flossie Louise Duren Huggins, 86, of Bonifay, passed away Sept. 30, 2012, at her home. She was born Oct. 18, 1925, in Black, Ala., to the late Grover Huey Crutcheld and Bonnie Vera Tucker Crutcheld. Mrs. Huggins was a member of the East Pittman Freewill Baptist Church. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Huggins was preceded in death by one brother, Elton Crutcheld. Mrs. Huggins is survived by one son, Johnny P. Duren and wife, Sonja, of Bonifay; two daughters, Donna Walker and husband, Tommy, of Port St. Joe, and Priscilla Buchanan and husband, Jim, of Wewahitchka; three grandchildren, Mathew L. Walker, Tyson A. Young and wife, Kimberly, and Bonnie L. Young; two great-granddaughters; two great-greatgranddaughters; three brothers, Dewey Crutcheld of Mobile, Ala., T.J. Crutcheld and wife, Muriel, of Bonifay, and Joe H. Crutcheld and wife, Annabelle, of Crawfordville; one sisterin-law, Betty Crutcheld of Bonifay; and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012, at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Gary Taylor and the Rev. Herman Sellers ofciating. Interment was at 3 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012, at Holley Hill Cemetery in Port St. Joe, with the Rev. Dudley Balmer ofciating. Peel Funeral Home in Bonifay directed. Family received friends one hour prior to service at Peel Funeral Home.Flossie L. Huggins Obituaries View obituaries and sign the guestbook at chipleypaper.com B6| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Easy Care Lawn & Tractor Services. Tractor work, brush mowing & land cleanup, driveway & parking lot repair, debris removable, lawn care & pressure washing. Give us a call for a Free Estimate/ License & Insured. 850-527-6291 TRACTOR WORK WE DO IT ALL! 30 YRS Experience. Call 850-527-6291 C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. C all (850)638-1483 Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 10-5154 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 08CA370 DENZEL J. DOCKERY and RUTH DOCKERY, as Co-Trustees of the Ruth Dockery Revocable Trust and the Denzel J. Dockery Revocable Trust dated August 9, 2007, Plaintiffs, vs. LBK, LLC, a Mississippi LLC, as Trustee of THE SPRINGS LAND TRUST, and The Estate of LOWELL B. KELLY, and TRACY A. COLLINS, as Personal Representative of the Estate of Lowell B. Kelly and UNITED STATES of AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY (INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE), Defendants. NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES. TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment entered on the 11th day of September, 2012, in Case Number 08CA370 of the Circuit Court, Holmes County, Florida, in which DENZEL J. DOCKERY and RUTH DOCKERY, as Co-Trustees of the Ruth Dockery Revocable Trust and the Denzel J. Dockery Revocable Trust dated August 9, 2007, are the Plaintiffs and LBK, LLC, a Mississippi LLC, as Trustee of THE SPRINGS LAND TRUST, and The Estate of LOWELL B. KELLY, and TRACY A. COLLINS, as Personal Representative of the Estate of Lowell B. Kelly and UNITED STATES of AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY (INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE), are the Defendants, the Clerk of this Court will sell at public sale the following described real property: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST SECTION LINE, 1348.95 F EET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST, 1932.65 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD 81; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 1306.48 F EET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST, 1940.34 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST OF SAID SECTION 9; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST, 1985.12 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 03 DEGREES WEST, 1319.95 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST, 642.08 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST, 1053.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY MAINTENANCE LINE OF VALEE ROAD; THENCE SOUTH 81 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID MAINTENANCE LINE, 419.82 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MAINTENANCE LINE, NORTH 85 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST, 594.79 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MAINTENANCE LINE, SOUTH 77 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST, 334.29 FEET TO ITS INTERSECTION WITH THE EAST LINE OF THE WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST OF SAID SECTION 9; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WEST LINE, 2430.38 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4; THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4, 1318.09 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 9; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EAST SECTION LINE, 2647.91 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 9; THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH SECTION LINE, 2607.19 FEET TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST OF SAID SECTION 9; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST, 1329.03 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 1 0 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST, 1629.21 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST, 1341.46 FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 9; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH SECTION LINE, 977.70 FEET TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 9 AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINS 419.62 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. NOTE: GRANTORS HAVE RESERVED A LIFE ESTATE IN THE FOLLOWING: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTHWEST 1/4, 980.15 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST, 182.81 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST, 135.78 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST, 267.21 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST, 70.74 FEET TO THE WATERS EDGE OF VORTEX SPRING; THENCE ALONG THE WATERS EDGE OF SAID SPRING THE FOLLOWING COURSES: SOUTH 24 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 69.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 51 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST, 60.47 FEET; THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST, 76.41 FEET; THENCE NORTH 52 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST, 45.13 FEET; THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST, 81.21 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST, 43.75 FEET; THENCE NORTH 35 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST, 24.79 FEET; THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST, 24.60 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID WATERS EDGE, RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 46 MINUTES

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Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 B B USINESS USINESS G G UIDE UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Dentons RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDAWE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS$ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENTMon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709 Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611 MullensTree ServiceCall for free estimate 120 ft. crane Licensed850-326-3408 850-263-0083 HODGES ROOFINGLet us show you how to save $100s or maybe $1,000s on a new metal roof. 850 348-9399Lic. #RC0066509 An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99* Yamaha Grizzle 2008 ATV, 450cc, 4x4, Auto, Low Hours, Swamplite Tires, $4,200 OBO, Call 850-368-0696 COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com(850) 547-9500 B oni f a y Florida www.xtrem ein dus tri es.com Xtreme BoatsFACTORY DIRECT 14 x 64 Mobile Home 2 Bdrm/1 bath, Fireplace. Nice. $5,000. (850)260-9226. DWMH2009 3 / 2 Big tub, 1 acre, fenced three sides and garage shop, Wausau area 850-638-4953 $3,000 cash assume mtg $600+ credit-worthy. FOR SALE! 1994 Cobra Mustang With 347 Stroker -All custom built -Trickflow Intake -Aluminum Heads -Ported and Polished -1.6 Competition Cam Roller Rockers -Competition Cam Rods -Traction Control -NOS Setup just need bottle and lines -Too many extras to list This is high performance car. FOR SALE $5,000 FIRM. Contact Jason @ 850-557-7906 Nissan Altima 2011 25S silver, black interior, 25k miles, immaculate condition, $17,500.(850) 547-4969 Text FL27084 to 56654 2009 Dodge Grand Caravan Stow & Go seating. Back up camera, cd/dvd system. 56,000 miles. Like new condition. Asking $16,500. Call 638-1556. after 6pm Sunny Hills area, 3 br, 1.5 ba, Laundry Room, gar, nice pool, good condition, Available Now! $900 mo + Dep. Barbara Hindman Realty (850) 527-5085 Bonifays Best Mobile Home Community has 2 or 3 bedrooms available ranging from $435-$625/month. Large lots, quiet, clean and on-site maintenance. Only responsible persons should apply. Great Bonifay Schools. No pets. One month deposit. HUD Assistance may be available. Contact Sue: (850)547-1386 or (512)751-2847. 2 Bdrm/1 bath MH, Hwy 173 Graceville/Bonifay. $375/mo, depo required (850)393-3094. 3 BR/2BA Mobile Home for rent. 9 miles from Chipley. Call 638-4689 or 326-2053 2BR/2BA MH near Chipley. Water & garbage furnished. $400/mth, plus deposit. 2BR/1BA MH, $385/mth plus deposit. Call 547-4232, 527-4911. 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Just renovated Call (850)547-3746. For Rent 3BD/ 2 Full Ranch style house. Nice area. Nice view for morning coffee Just off Corbin Rd $750/mth Sorry No Pets. Days (850)638-4630, Nights (850)638-1434. For Rent Real Nice 3BD/ 2BA mobile home. Just outside city limits of Chipley. Sorry No Pets. Days (850)638-4630, nights (850)638-1434. Waterfront Property: 5 br, 4 ba home. Very close to town but very private. 2 fireplaces, 2 car garage, game room. Beautiful views. of North Bay. Want to trade for hunting land/farm in FL or AL. Call (850) 258-9120. Text FL26047 to 56654 LOW INTERESTFINANCING Borrow up to 20k and pay $389.00 per mo. at 8% Car Loans, Small Business Loans & Debt Consolidation Bad Credit Ok Call Toll Free: 888-741-9122 Today!! Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incld 638-1918 RIDGEWOOD APARTMENTS OF BONIFAY Studio, 1 Bdrm, 2 Bdrm available. City Util. & Pest Control Incld. Ask about our Move in Special. (850)557-7732. Two Bdrm. Apartment. Bonifay area. Stove, refrigerator. Includes all electricity & utilities. $400/month. Info: (850)547-0956, (850)326-4548 THE GROVES RESORT Vernon, Florida. 2 Condos for rent 2 Bedroom/2 bath, utilities included-electric, Dish TV, trash, water plus all Park amenities-ATV, Horse & hiking trails. Pets welcome (deposit required). $955/mo + depo (850)773-3992 (850)520-0496 2 Bdrm/1 bath house on 465 N. 2nd street,Chipley. $475/mo. $400/depo. (850)547-2061. 4 BD Fully Furnished For rent $800/mth ALSO Polaris Four Wheeler For Sale execellent condition. $3000 Call 547-2096 For Rent 1BR/1BA, 2BR/1BA, 3BR/1BA. Homes in Chipley, large shadded lots. References required. Call 850-441-8181 or 850-547-2091 39 SECONDS EAST ALONG A FOUR FOOT CHAIN LINK FENCE, 154.80 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID FENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST, 116.56 FEET, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID FENCE, SOUTH 05 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST, 314.74 FEET TO THE END OF SAID FENCE; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 05 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST, 75.81 FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST OF SECTION 9; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID LINE, 711.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINS 6.0 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. The sale will be held on the 18 day of October, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the East door of the Holmes County Courthouse, located at 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425, in accordance with Section 45.031 of the Florida Statutes. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 13 day of September, 2012. CODY TAYLOR CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. Clayton J.M. Adkinson Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box l207 DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32435 Whitney Smith Attorney for the Defendants 1283 N. Eglin Parkway Shalimar, Florida 32579 United States of America Department of Treasury (Internal Revenue Service) 7180 N. 9th Street Pensacola, Florida 32501 As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser October 3, 10, 2012. 10-5151 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No: 2010 CA 000353 Division: Judge Patterson DIANE GAIL PURSELL AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF GLENN G. WATT, deceased, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID W. CURRY also known as DAVID WAYNE CURRY; and CAROL L. CURRY; and MARY ROE the unknown spouse of David W. Curry; and JOHN DOE the unknown spouse of Carol L. Curry., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Cody Taylor, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Holmes County, Florida, will, on the 15 day of November, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 A.M., Central Time, at the Holmes County Courthouse located at 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Holmes County, Florida, to-wit: The North 122.48 feet of the S of the NW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of Section 26, Township 4 N, Range 17 W, less and except so much thereof as lies E of the W right-of-way line of the County Road running North and South through the said NW 1/4 of the NE 1/4. Property Parcel No.: 1826.00-000-000-.016-000. The successful high bidder, if other than the Plaintiff(s), shall post with the Clerk a deposit equal to five percent (5%) of the final bid at the time of the sale. The deposit shall be applied to the sale price at the time of payment. The balance of the sale price shall be paid in full to the Clerk by 4:00 p.m., on the same day as the sale. This sale is made pursuant to the Default Final Judgment entered in a case pending in the Circuit Court of Escambia County, Florida, the style of which is Diane Gail Pursell, as Personal Representative of the Estate of Glenn G. Watt v. David W. Curry, et al., and the docket number of which is Case No.: 2010 CA 000353. In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Clerk of the Court, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425, at (850) 547-1100 within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-(800) 955-8771, if are voice impaired, call 1-(800) 955-8770. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THE DEFAULT FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIEN HOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAT 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. Witness my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 20 day of September, 2012. Cody Taylor Clerk of the Circuit Court Holmes County, Florida By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. Edmund W. Holt, FBN #192705 1017 N. 12th Ave. Pensacola, Florida 32501. (850) 434-7694 Attorney for Plaintiff As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser October 10, 17, 2012. 10-5155 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO : 2011-CA-000490 DIVISION: UCN: 302011CA000490XXCICI WALTER MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC,Plaintiff, vs. GENE RAYMOND BUSH JR; JANICE LYNN BUSH; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, PURSUANT TO THE JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE ENTERED IN THE ABOVE CAUSE, I WILL SELL THE PROPERTY SITUATED IN HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS: COMMENCE AT THE NE CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF NE 1/4 OF SECTION 31, T6N, R14W, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN S 00 35 W. ALONG THEN EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 31, A DISTANCE OF 200.60 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE CONTINUE S 00 35 W 130.00 FEET, THENCE N 88 55 W 335.00 FEET, THENCE N 00 35 E 130.00 FEET, THENCE S 88 55 W. 335.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AT PUBLIC SALE, TO THE HIGHEST AND BEST BIDDER, FOR CASH, ON OCTOBER 25, 2012, AT 11:00AM AT HOLMES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, BONIFAY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT HOLMES COUNTY COURT ADMINSTRATION, P O BOX 826, MARIANNA, FLORIDA 32447, (850) 718-0026, ADARequest@jud14.flcourts.o rg AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711. DATED: September 21, 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT By: Diane Eaton, Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser October 10, 17, 2012. 10-5156 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 2012-234-DR JACQUELINE FURR Petitioner, v. BRETT K. FURR Respondent NOTICE AND OPPORTUNITY TO BE HEARD TO:BRETT K. FURR. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a custody proceeding involving RMF born October 13, 2004, MLF born November 24, 2006 and BKF born November 24, 2006, has been filed in the Circuit Court of Holmes County, Florida, Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma St., P.O. Box 397, Bonifay FL 32425. The nature of the action is a dissolution of marriage. If you wish to be heard on the issue of custody, you must file a notice with the Clerk of Circuit Court and serve a copy on Stan Trappe, Esquire, Trappe & Dusseault, P.A., 236 McKenzie Ave., P.O. Box 2526, Panama City FL 32402 within 20 days of the first publication of this notice, stating the address where you want to receive notice. WITNESS my hand and seal of this court on this 19 day of September, 2012. Cody Taylor, Clerk. By Diane Eaton, Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser October 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012. 10-5157 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF FRED DAVID PARKER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of FRED DAVID PARKER, deceased, whose date of death was July 20, 2012, and whose social security number is xxx-xx-5956, is pending in the Circuit Court of Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 North Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 3, 2012. Attorney for Personal Representative: David F. Holmes, Esq FL Bar No. 0261602. P. O. Box 1180, Slocomb, AL 36375 334-886-3123. Personal Representative: Shala Parker 1075 Rock Hill Court Ponce de Leon, Florida 32455. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser October 3, 10, 2012. 10-5158 Public Auction at El Sankary Towing in Ponce De Leon Fl, 1600 Pirate Cove Rd. 32455 at 8:00 a.m. on October 22, 2012. Vin# 1FTDF15N1KNB64714 1989 Ford F150 Pickup Owner: Joseph Jellison Jr. 2342 Trailer Park Dr., Bonifay, Fl. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser October 10, 2012. COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 GREEN BERRY BUSH HOMECOMING! Saturday Oct 13th @ noon. 1167 Sunday Rd Chipley. Orange hIll United Methodist Church. Come celebrate with us. Turn your art into cash! FREE ART APPRAISALS FOR POSSIBLE CONSIGNMENT* Oct 13 & 14. Noon to 10pm at Baterbys Art Gallery. 9101 International Drive, Ste. 1008, Orlando, FL 32819. Call 1-866-537-1013 or visit www.Baterbys.com for more information. *Verbal appraisals & consignments taken based on consideration. Adopt*: Active young TV Producer & Attorney, home-cooking, beaches, sports await precious baby. Expenses paid *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* Adopt*: Actor & Filmmaker, LOVE Awaits first baby. Matt & Kristi *Expenses paid* *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* Firewood. Split & delivered. (850)547-9291. Big Yard Sale Fri. Oct. 12 & Sat. Oct 13. Located in the Bethlehem Community on Hwy 177 approximately 1 mile south of Bethlehem School. Caryville Flea Market Produce, knives, tupelo honey, movies, games, westerns, baseball cards, tools. New & used stuff. Open Saturdays 8a.m. Located beside Riverstop. Live bait, crickets, gas, diesel, lotto and all your fishing needs. INDOOR FLEA MARKET Hwy. 79 Esto, Fl. Open every Fri., Sat., Sun. beginning October 12. Spaces available. (850)263-7500. Indoor Yard/Garage Sale. Clothes, books, tools, misc. 8am-til. 743 3rd St. Chipley. Oct 12 & 13 Large Yard Sale this Saturday Oct 13 at 7:00am until. 1032 Brickyard Rd. Across from West Point. Lots of kids toys, clothes for the family & furniture Mulit-Family Yard Sale Fri & Sat 8 am Until. 896 8th ST Chipley .Lots of adult, junior & children new &used clothes, purses, shoes, house hold items, bed linens, furniture, entertainment center. Something for everybody. YARD & MOVING SALE 742 Sunday Rd, Chipley. DAILY till 10/31/2012 K&L Farm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 CASH NOW!! RECEIVING PAYMENTS from Mortgage Notes, Structured Settlements, Contest annuity or Cell Tower Lease? SELL PAYMENTS NOW! NYAC (800) 338-5815 Gilbert Catfish Pond Closed Monday and Tuesday 2854 Highview Circle Chipley, Fl 32428 Phone:850-638-8633 OPENING A CERAMIC SHOP IN BONIFAY. Need members, classes avaiable. Call for info 850-547-5244 Refrigerator with Icemaker $125.00. 2 piece sectional couch with Ottoman (green) $125.00. (850)260-9226. Wanted to Rent; Farm land or pasture in Chipley & suroundding areas for the year 2013. 850-718-1859. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, October 10, 2012 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By PETER VOGTMonster Senior Contributing Writer Every time youre on break from school, someone hits you with that most common question asked of college students: Whats your major? For months, youve been able to get away with responses like Im not sure, or Im keeping my options open. But now thanks to your schools academic rules, your parents incessant nagging or even your own impatience youre forced to make a choice, and you dont know what to do. Thousands of college students around the country go through the same anxiety-producing experience every year, often around mid-semester when they have to choose their courses for the following semester (and theyve already taken all their general or core courses). Are you in the I have to pick a major now what? mode? If so, dont panic. If youre like many college students, the major you select wont have a huge impact on your future career anyway. But even if it will, there are plenty of things you can do to help yourself make a sound decision.Meet with a campus career counselorYour schools career counselors know your institutions majors well, and they have a good general sense of where those majors might take you with respect to your career. Perhaps more importantly, though, many campus career centers keep detailed statistics on the types of jobs their schools graduates have landed with various majors. Typically, these statistics appear in the career centers placement report, which you can ask for and then read to find out where different majors might take you in the future.Read your undergraduate bulletin, related publicationsMaybe you dont need to actually read the entire undergraduate bulletin, but at the very least, page through it and look at all the majors available at your institution. You never know when youll stumble upon one that really fits your interests. If browsing your institutions undergraduate bulletin sounds far too boring, stop by your schools admissions office and ask for briefer major-related publications that might be available.Talk to professors and students in various majorsStart by asking your friends and acquaintances what theyre majoring in and why. What do these students like and dislike about their majors? And what can they tell you about the courses in their majors and the careers their majors might lead to? Similarly, ask professors in various academic departments to briefly describe their majors. Tell them youre interested in learning more about what previous students in the department have gone on to do, career-wise. Professors will gladly tell you in most cases, if you ask.Check out What Can I Do with a Major in ______? materialsThere are lots of ways to answer the question, What can I do with a major in _______?. Dozens of major-related books are available to you as well, often at your schools main library or your campus career centers library. VGM Career Horizons, for example, publishes several Great Jobs for _____ Majors books as well as the Opportunities in _____ ____ Careers series.Page through guides to college majorsSeveral publishers have developed books that offer extensive descriptions of various college majors and what careers those majors might lead to. JIST, for instance, offers The College Majors Handbook, which features information (based on a survey of some 150,000 college graduates) on 60 different majors. Ferguson Publishing, meanwhile, offers College Majors and Careers, which also describes 60 majors in detail. Theres no need to fly blind when it comes to researching and then choosing a college major, especially in this day of the Internet and easily accessible information. The more you talk to knowledgeable people and read about various majors, especially those you know little or nothing about, the better chance you have of picking the one that best fits both your short-term needs and your longterm career goals.I have to pick a major ... now what? Featured Jobs Contact Lornaat(850) 747-5019or Email: lbrown@pcnh.com LORNA BROWNEMPLOYMENT SALES SPECIALIST LUSADYTAYLOREMPLOYMENT SALES SPECIALISTContact Lusadyat(850) 522-5173or Email: ltaylor@pcnh.com MEDICAL BILLING TRAINING! Train for Medical Billing Careers at SCTrain.edu No Experience Needed! Job placemnet assistance after training! HS/GED/PC Needed (888)872-4677 MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placemnet assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www.centuraonline.com Nursing CareersBegin Here-GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURA INSTITUTE (877) 206-6559. SURROGATE MOMS NEEDED! Most generous compensation and benefits program offered anywhere, starting at $25,000. Healthy, non-smoking, 21-39, prior birth without complications, no criminal background. Confidential, compassionate services. Reasonable expenses will be paid. OpenArmsConsultants.co m TIRED OF LIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDL Training @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. CALL TODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Skidder Operator Needed. Smith Logging. 850-658-4609 AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 Drivers 100% Owner Operator Co. Pay increase / Home weekly, Regional & Dedicated Class A-CDL 1yr. Exp. In last 3 Call (800) 695-9643 or www.driveforwatkins.com DRIVERS/ CLASS A Flatbed, GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39/mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800) 5725489x 227, SunBelt Transport EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE Freight Up = More $ Need CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.drive4melton.com MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Online training gets you job ready ASAP! HS Diploma/ GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job Ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-591 MEDICAL-HEALTH I believe I am defined by the care I give.Home healthcare allows you to see one patient at a time. When you become a part of home healthcare, you become a part of your patients lives. Now Hiring RNs Job Fair for Registered nurses on October 11th 12:00-5:30pm at the local Marianna FL location. Gentiva offers: *Competitive salary and benefit packages *One-on-one patient care *Specialized training Contact local Recruiter, Shea Parker Phone: 1.866.GENTIVA Email shea.parker@gentiva.com. Visit us at gentiva.com/careers GENTIVA home health AA/EOE/M/F/D/V encouraged to apply. Anna Bellas Salon In need of 2 additional Stylists & Nail technicians. Also need PT Massage Therapist & Permanent make-up artist. May contact salon for interview at (850)547-5665. Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMENEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!!! Become a Newspaper Carrier or Single Copy/ Rack Route Cottondale Southport, Greenhead, & Chipley Open routes available in the early morning Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS Deliver your newspaper in your communityIndependent ContractorsMust have: A reliable vehicle Proof of Auto Insurance A valid drivers license Be 18 yrs or older Contact Colin Parker cparker@chipleypaper.c om Contact Colin Parker cparker@ chipleypaper.com or 850-625-7466.



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bonifaynow.com Connect With Us 24/7 Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo galleries, opinions and more... @WCN_HCT And Mobile Too By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Holmes County Development Commissioners discussed the Lonnie Lindsey property and the Interstate Industrial Building on Oct. 2, only to come to the conclusion that they are still at square one waiting on contracts from prospective buyers. The 4.2 acres on Lonnie Lindsey Drive, which is owned by the HCDC, was to sell to James Sellers for $6,400, but when Panhandle Forestry mistakenly accessed the property to harvest timber, Sellers reduced his offer to $4,000 and the commissioners voted at the Sept. 4 meeting to decline the lesser amount. This month, no further word had been heard from Sellers. Where does this leave us? board chairman Bud Riviere asked. Is he still interested in the property? vice chairman Tim Wells asked. Ive had no contact with Mr. Sellers since the last meeting, Riviere said. I think were back to Square One, Wells said. If he is still interested in the property, he needs to contact us. At this time, I think we just have to wait and see what he wants to do, board member Mike Alvis said. Alvis said he was told by Sellers that Panhandle Forestry had offered $1,000 in compensation to Sellers for damage to the property, and asked if the company shouldnt pay the $1,000 to the commission. Administrative assistant Elaine May eld said she was contacted by the forestry company who offered $1,500 for access through the land, but she denied the offer since she did not have the authority to approve such action. Commissioner Shirley Hawthorne suggested in the future the board require contracts be in writing before bringing the matter before the commission for approval, since there wasnt a written contract for the $6,400 amount, which was originally approved as the selling price by the commissioners. In the case of the Interstate Industrial Building, Alvis told commissioners the HCDC should see a contract No action taken on Lonnie Lindsey land 50 www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, OCTOBER 10 2012 Volume 122, Number 26 For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM Phone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 INDEX Arrests ................................. A5 Opinion ................................ A4 Outdoors .............................. A8 Sports .................................. A9 Extra .................................... B1 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B6 IN BRIEF Holmes County High School Advisory Council BONIFAY The Holmes County High School Advisory will meet at 5 p.m. on Oct. 16 in the HCHS Guidance conference room. The meeting is open to the public, and copies of the agenda may be obtained at the front desk at HCHS. Graceville Harvest Festival GRACEVILLE The Graceville Harvest Festival is Oct. 20 starting at 10 a.m. with a parade downtown. The free festival will be held at the VF Outlets in Graceville. There will be an antique car show, arts and crafts and food. Howl-O-Ween to be Oct. 19-21 CHIPLEY The Seacrest Wolf Preserve will hold their annual Howl-O-Ween on Oct. 19-21. The 19th is for campers only. The wolf preserve is on Bonnett Pond Road. For more information, call 773-2897. The Cemetery Club staged CHIPLEY The Spanish Trail Playhouse will present The Cemetery Club at 7 p.m., Oct. 19-21, and at 2 p.m. on Oct. 22 at the Old Chipley High School. Tickets at $12 for adults and $10 for seniors and military. For more information call 638-9113. See LAND A3 BONIFAY Phillip Music announced his candidacy for re-election as the Holmes County District 3 County Commissioner on Friday. Music said he has been blessed to be able to serve as commissioner for the past eight years. He added that being able to serve the citizens of Holmes County has been a great honor and he appreciated the trust that has been bestowed upon him. During the past eight years, Music said he has helped to keep the millage rate as low as possible and also voted to help save the Country over $700,000 in re nancing a bond. Music said he is committed to serving the citizens of Holmes County to try and make it a better place for everyone. Music has been married to Janice Music for 49 years, and they have four children and 13 grandchildren. He is the owner of his own construction company and has worked in that eld for over 30 years. He said he is also a proud Christian man. I would be grateful to have the opportunity to continue to serve in the role of county commissioner, Music said. Music announces bid for re-election PHILLIP MUSIC By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY The city of Vernon will pay $3,900 in attorney fees and costs after a judge ruled the city council violated the state Sunshine Law by failing to follow the requirements of conducting a closed session and violated the Public Records Law by failing to produce for inspection a transcript of the closed session. The decision came about after the Washington County News and its former parent company, Florida Freedom Newspapers, led suit against the city of Vernon following an improperly held executive session of the city council on April 23. Vernon to pay attorney fees City violated Sunshine Law, will disclose public record See VERNON A3 RODEO FUN Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo festivities entertain area residents By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT Cecilia.spears@halifaxmediagroup.com BONIFAY Holmes County School District invited local school pageant winners, Miss Ponce de Leon Makala Hicks, Little Miss Ponce de Leon Layla Jackson and Little Miss Poplar Springs Erilyn Smith, to their regularly scheduled meeting on Oct. 2. These girls are helping in representing our schools at the Miss National Peanut Festival Pageant, said Superintendent Gary Galloway. Its a worth while experience. One that will bene t them for the rest of their lives. At the previous meeting of the school board, held on Sept. 18, Holmes County resident Teresa Hamilton of Westville came before the Holmes County District School Board because of concerns she was having about where the bus stops to let her great-niece off and on. We have a problem, said Hamilton. The bus has been stopping at a particular spot for over 45 years without incident and now its been changed because they are saying its dangerous. How about it being dangerous dropping off a pre-schooler off at an empty house for two weeks. Hamilton explained that the old bus stop was at the bottom of a hill and the new one is at the top of a hill farther away from home. See PAGEANT A2 Above: Colton Jones and Emily Marcum enjoyed their time spent with fellow cowboys and cowgirls of Bonifay Elementary School as they participated in this years mini-rodeo. Left: Karen Newman of Bonifay Elementary School prepares Savannah Goodman and Ryan Holbert for the next activity in their annual mini-rodeo held on Thursday. For photos of the Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo, see Page 1B and visit bonifaynow.com. HCSD invites Peanut pageant reps to meeting Chipley tackles South Walton in Homecoming game A9

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ANNOUNCING A PANAMA CITY PICTORIAL HISTORY BOOK About the book: The Panama City News Herald is pleased to be working with local historical organizations and libraries to bring our readers an heirloom-quality, coffee table pictorial book on the history of our area. This keepsake book will feature hundreds of stunning historic images from the late 1800s to present day from the greater Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. $ 29 .95 SHIP S MID NOVEMBER R eg. $ 39.95 BUY NOW! EX T E N DED DE A D LIN E BY PUBLISHING COMPANY D U E TO POPULAR DE MAN D OR DE R NO W & SA VE $10! ACTUAL C OVER & T I TL E Included in the book: Doral Bank, Innovations Federal Credit Union, Bay Credit Union, and The Tourist Development Council MA I L I N FORM OR ORDER O NL I N E AT : P ANA M AC I T Y.PI CT ORI AL BOOK. C OM Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. BUY NOW! SAVE $10 I wish to pre-order: ______Copies at $29.95 plus $1.95 tax per book and pick up my order at The News Herald oce. Total $31.90/book ______ Copies at $29.95 plus $5.95 shipping and handling and $1.95 tax per book and have my order shipped to the address below. Total $37.85/ book T O TAL A MO UNT E NCL O S ED :_______________ Name ___________________________________________________________________________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________________________ State _______________ Zip __________ Phone (_____) ______________________ E-mail ________________________________________________ Signature ________________________________________________________________________________ Charge Card Number_____________________________________ Security Code______________Exp. Date_____________________ P A YME NT ME T HOD C HE C K / MO N EYORDER Payable to: The News Herald VI SA A ME X M AST ER CA RD DI SC OVER students to higher levels of E d d i e D i x o n E L E C T S u p e r i n t e n d e n t F O R H o l m e s C o u n t y S c h o o l s O F o n t Local A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, October 10, 2012 School Board Chair Jason Motley said that the reason why they changed the location is because they had a log truck come in early one morning while the bus was loading and since it was on a hill the truck was having dif culty coming to a complete stop and there could have been an incident. Im not in favor of changing the stop because I have a daughter that sometimes rides that bus and Im aware of how dangerous that stop can be, said Motley. The rst time the bus driver thought it was unsafe he reported it and then the Florida Highway Patrol went out to investigate and it was their recommendation that the location be changed. After school board member Sid Johnson recommended to go down and look at the stop the rest of the board members agreed they too would go take a look at the location and present their ndings at the next school board meeting. School board member Rusty Williams and Johnson reported that they had went out to the location and both agreed with the FHP that the school bus stop should remain in the new location. The school board agreed that no action would be taken. The school board approved of hiring Elisha Weeks as teacher at Bethlehem School and Holly Blane as teacher at Poplar Springs School for the 2012-2013 school year and accept the resignation of Julie White as Aide III Lunchroom Cashier at Bonifay Elementary School effective as of Sept. 24, 2012, David Davis as teacher at Ponce de Leon High School for retirement purposes effective as of Oct. 26, 2012 and Donald Dady as Assistant Principal at Bethlehem High School for retirement purposes effective as of Nov. 30, 2012. The school board also approved of 2012-2013 School Advisory Councils, Out of County Students Amended, Invoices, Warrant List, Pay Outs over $3,000, Budget Amendments, Sept. 18 Minutes and the 2012-2013 Parent Guide. PAGEANT from page A1 Miss Ponce de Leon Makala Hicks, Little Miss Ponce de Leon Layla Jackson and Little Miss Poplar Springs Erilyn Smith stand with Holmes County Superintendent Gary Galloway. PHOTO BY CECILIA SPEARS

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Proven leadership from the Battleeld to the Schoolhouse. FOR SUPE R INTENDENT OF SCH OO LS A NOTE FROM TERRY: When I made the decision to place the statistics in this weeks paper it was with great reservation. I truly believe that the numbers do not reect the professionalism of our educators and support sta but that of our leadership. I continue to run my campaign with honor yet we must all face the reality of my opponent being Business As Usual. As citizens, parents and/or professionals, we cannot sit idly by while the education of our children and grandchildren is reected in such a negative light. As your next Superintendent of Education, I WILL move forward in assisting our educators in reversing our statewide standings and providing our students with the education they deserve. The quality that is expected from every citizen of our great county cannot be achieved through the Business As Usual mentality. VOTE for me, Terry Mears, for Superintendent of Education and together we will make a dierence. Come Eat a Free Supper with Terry Monday, October 15th from 5:30pm until 7:30pm Pine Log Volunteer Fire Department, North Hwy 81 DID Y O U KN O W: Source: www.doe.org VOTE SAVE ON HOMEOWNERS INSURANCE Auto Home Life How Many Times Has Your Insurance Been Changed? Providing You With Quality & Service At A Fair Price Ruled A+ Superior by AM Best Rating 1108 N. Waukesha St. Bonifay 547-4227 Trust in your local Farm Bureau agency. We have been here for 60 years and are here to stay. AGENT S TE V E A. BU S H Over 30 years experience. steve.bush@bic.com to purchase that property by Friday from Qualico Steel Company owned by John Downs. The commission received a letter of intent to purchase from Qualico Steel, but the letter expired on Sept. 13. The new contract is expected to have some additional requirements, including exclusion from taxes and having a roadway paved by the HCDC, Alvis said. The purchase price listed for the property on the letter was $602,500 for the 9.34 acres and buildings. Commissioner Alvis also serves as Qualico Steels real estate broker on the purchase. I am ready to tender my resignation from the board, Alvis said. I dont want anything to stand in the way of bringing jobs to Holmes County. Qualico Steel is supposed to bring 25 jobs with the new business and expects it could hire as many as 100 people by next year, Alvis said. So were basically at the same place with this deal, waiting on a contract, Riviere said. Alvis said that was correct, but he expects the commissioners to have a contract in hand Friday. Hasnt this been ongoing for two years? commissioner Frances Williams asked. Alvis said Qualico Steels interest in the property has waxed and waned over the years. The commissioners also decided to hold a special meeting on Oct. 23 to discuss the Raper Property. The HCDC has been invited to essentially loan a property owner money in exchange for receiving 60plus acres free and clear, Riviere explained. Commissioner Sandy Spear said she felt that she was not well enough informed about the Raper Property proposal to make any kind of decision, and asked if a special meeting to discuss the deal could be arranged. I know some of us are new on the board and we would like to have more information, at least I know I would, she said. LAND from page A1 Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 Wednesday, October 10, 2012 This order is a landmark case, said attorney John Bussian, who represented the newspaper, its former owner and now Halifax Media Group. No court in Florida had ruled that by not following the steps required by the Sunshine Law to hold an executive session meant the governmental body then had to disclose the contents of that session. Everybody had talked about that consequence but it had never been mandated by a court. The order authorizing award of attorney fees and costs was issued on Sept. 28 and awards the Washington County News $3,500 in attorneys fees and $400 for costs. The city of Vernon has 30 days to pay the fees. On April 23 at the city council meeting, the councils new mayor, Michelle Cook, and council member Oscar Ward were to be briefed on pending litigation the city faced, so City Attorney Kerry Adkison called for an executive session following the regular council meeting. Prior to the council going into executive session, Adkison said the panel would not come out following the session to reconvene and conclude the executive session, as required under Florida law. On April 27, the Washington County News sent a Sunshine Law request for a transcript of the executive session to the mayor and to the city attorney, and the request for the transcript went unanswered. Eventually, the Washington County News led suit against the city over the issue, and a hearing was held on June 26 in the 14th Judicial Circuit Court. The order by District Court Judge Christopher Patterson setd a precedent in the 14th Judicial District, and it will be there for other districts and courts in the state to consider, Bussian said. If there are any other cases of this magnitude, there is a good chance this case has blazed a trail for openness and compliance with the open meeting law. In the order to disclose, Judge Patterson ruled that the council violated the Sunshine Law by failing to follow the requirements for conducting a closed session. It also states the council violated the Public Records law by failing to produce for inspection by the plaintiff the transcript or tape of the April 23 closed session. The city was ordered to produce a transcript or tape of the closed session. The tape produced by the city was inaudible, however, and no transcript of the executive session exists. This nal judgment by Judge Patterson af rms public trust was violated through disregard of open meeting and public record laws meant to protect our citizens against government abuse, said Washington County News Publisher Nicole Bare eld. Let this serve as a notice to all public of cials that these actions will not be tolerated, and remind them of their responsibility to the publics they serve. VERNON from page A1

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Opinion A4 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com 1-800-645-8688 ADVERTISING 850-547-9414 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2012, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. ROGERS INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. Serving You Is Our Most Important Product *Property Insurance is not available in the state of Florida from Auto-Owners Insurance. Before leaving the topic of the historic Railroad Centennial Celebration held in Chipley on May 22 and 23, 1982, a report must be made on another group of talent that we were able to have come to our town for a musical performance during the gigantic event. The Wiregrass Sacred Harp Singers, directed by 83-year-old Dewey Williams of Ozark, Ala., graciously came to the Centennial Opry House on a bitter cold February Sunday afternoon and performed a highly spirited and enjoyable concert of their style of music, so well-known and accepted in this area. Dewey Williams sent the writer his package of promotional materials, which explained that he had been directing Sacred Harp for radio broadcast since 1955 and for television viewing since 1966. At that time, the television show was being carried on WTVY in Dothan at 8 a.m. each rst and fourth Sunday morning of the month. The Prattler was a listener and a fan of this genre of music and had the privilege of making the overture, resulting in the Wiregrass Sacred Harp Singers making the appearance in Chipley. On the taped television shows, Williams had 40 to 50 men and women, old and young, join him in presenting the style of music that they all knew, understood and enjoy singing. Some of his performers came for the taping sessions from several counties in Alabama and Georgia. The leader of the singing group utilizes each concert as training session to explain the history of this style of music. Dewey Williams was featured in the summer of 1977 in an article printed in the magazine SOUTH, published in Graceville, Fla., by Editor Jesse Tullos. The writing was titled Sacred Harp: An Art Form Preserved. Mr. Williams was age 79 when this article was printed. It was ve years later, at the age of 83, when he brought the singing ensemble for the Chipley performance. While performing in here, he continued his teaching approach as the talented singers presented their songs. Williams, a native of Ozark, Ala., explains that he was just a lad when I would sit on the kitchen oor and sing Sacred Harp songs with my family. He continued I didnt even know what I was singing, the reports, I learned the songs by listening. In his ripe old age, Williams had made a signi cant contribution toward preserving Sacred Harp singing, an art which dates back to medieval times. Sacred Harp singing survived the years of poverty and illiteracy among the American blacks by being passed on verbally from generation to generation, according to the song leader. Some songs were nally written down in the 1880s in three parts by B. F. White, a Dothan man. W. M. Cooper added a fourth part and copyrighted a book of Sacred Harp Songs in 1902. He further lists Jerry Jackson of Ozark as writing the song book Colored Sacred Harp in 1931. These men were inspired to write the songs by the Spirit of God, Williams says. He remembers seeing Cooper when he was quite young and Cooper was already an old man. The Dewey Williams teaching dialogue continues Four parts, bass, tenor, alto and treble, make up the modern Sacred Harp songs. The chords are either major, coming from Ezekiel, or minor from Isaiah. His teaching explains the monosyllables, fa, so, la and mi, representing the four gospel books, Matthew, Mark, Luke and Prattler pro les Dewey Williams COURTESY OF NANCY MCNEIL Dewey Williams sings Oh, Jesus, Ever With Us Stay as he sits on the porch of his home in Ozark, Ala. When a Holmes Countian dies at the peak of his career, it brings a lot of sadness and affords a chance to look back at his life and work. The number of people attending the funeral of Billy Galloway (Clyde W. 1954-2012) attest to the place he had made for himself in Tallahassee and Florida where he was born and where he chose to spend his working years. His earliest life was spent in DeFuniak Springs, but Sweet Gum Head in Holmes County in the Galloway Community always was his permanent home. There he had numerous cousins to play, hunt and sh with. When the family, Dad and Mother, Clyde and Dot and sister Cissy moved there and later into Bonifay, Billy became an important part of Holmes County High School student population, where his mother, Dorothy Davis Galloway, was a business teacher. He was also active in the youth group at First Baptist Church, Bonifay. Among HCHS students at FBC were Bish Creel, Ricky Callahan, Bill Lee, Chip Vara and others. At HCHS, Billy lettered in football and was active in student government, Key Club, the Debate Team and other activities. He was chosen as class favorite his junior and senior years. He was chosen by the faculty to represent the school at Boys State, where his contact with government of cials sealed his ambition to enter the legal profession. His dad, the late Clyde Galloway, had served in the Florida House of Representatives and was instrumental in establishing and securing funding for Washington/ Holmes Vocational/ Technical School (now known as Washington/ Holmes Technical School). Following graduation from HCHS and Chipola College, Billy graduated in 1976 from FSU with double majors in riskmanagement and real estate. He earned his Juris Doctorate from Mississippi College in Clanton, Miss., and began his career as an attorney with the Florida Department of Insurance, serving as bureau chief of property and casualty solvency. He began his private practice in 1994 and opened his law rm, Galloway, Brennon P.A., in 2006 representing chie y insurance companies. Billy was admitted to the Florida Supreme Court, the Federal Middle District Court of Florida and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit. He provided Congressional testimony regarding the federal HMO Medicare Pilot Program and was instrumental in the 2011 drafting and passage of the Sink Hole Reform bill. He was active in the Thomasville Road Baptist Church, where funeral services were held Oct 2. His major benevolent involvement was with his support, both personally and nancially, of the Ken Smith Ministries. Smith, a former football coach, has as his major focus ministry to men, especially pastors. He and Billy shared their love and support for FSU football. Ken and pastor Curtis Clark of ciated at the impressive funeral services. At Billys request, it was a joyful affair, beginning with a solo that I recognized as a Sacred Harp song that we sang at Bethel Primitive Church when I was a child. I couldnt get it out of my mind, so I came home and looked in my late fatherin-laws Sacred Harp song book until I found it. It was not a simple task, as songs in that book have strange titles. Here are the words: (v.1) Ye eeting charms of earth, farewell. Your springs of joy are dry. My soul now seeks another home, a brighter world on high. (2) Farewell my friends whose tender care has long engaged my love; Your fond embrace I now exchange for better friends above. (Chorus) Im a long time traveling here below; Im a long time traveling away from home. Im a long time traveling here below to lay this body down. Billy Galloways survivors include his wife, Misty Rosich Galloway, son, William Will Addison Galloway, mother, Dorothy Galloway, and sister, Cecelia Cissy Galloway. Numerous aunts, uncles and cousins, largely in Holmes County, also survive. HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison PERRYS PRATTLE Perry Wells Remembering Billy Galloway This is in response to a letter written by a local doctor asking all faiths to condemn the video that is supposed to be causing all of the radical Muslims to riot and hate the United States, in the Muslim countries. I would like to take this opportunity to set the record straight concerning some things he said and the agenda of the Muslims in general. The first thing that I would like to say is that these people are up set because this video is supposed to blaspheme Muhammad, but their supposed-to-be holy book (The Quran) blasphemes my Lord the Savior Jesus Christ, and my God who is the God of heaven and Earth. Why the Christians not out killing people like the Muslims are? Well the answer is simple: Jesus said that vengeance is mine, and I will repay. My God is big enough that he doesnt need Christians to defend him, but he will defend us and will also wreak vengeance on those who kill and abuse Christians. The Muslims god tells them to kill Christians and Jews (in the Quran), but our God tells us to love those who hate us and wish to do us harm. And if a Muslim should convert and become a Christian, the Muslims god tells them to kill the one who converts to Christianity. Their agenda is to kill all Christians and Jews and to overthrow the United States government and our constitution. The Muslims say that their religion is a peaceful religion, but in those countries that have been overthrown already, they are systematically killing all Christians who refuse to deny that Jesus is the son of God and refuse to become Muslims, just like their prophet Muhammad did when his armies over threw those countries when he was alive. Muhammad created the most vicious and barbaric religion that has ever been, or ever will be, and is anything but peaceful. Those who call themselves peaceful Muslims are doing what their holy book (The Quran) and Muhammad taught them to do are hypocrites. If they do not like what the radical Muslims are doing, why do they stay in this religion? The answer is that they approve of what they are doing and are funding those radical groups, and so is the President of The United States, who is a practicing Muslim (as he told the Muslim brotherhood that he was still a Muslim). Our president gave Egypt $1.5 million of out tax money, LETTER TO THE EDITOR Reader points out religious differences See PRATTLER A5 See LETTER A5 Wednesday, October 10, 2012

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Sowell Tractor Co., Inc. 2841 Hwy. 77 North, Panama City 763-5441 Toll Free: 866-448-9899 www.sowelltractorco.com We Trade for Anything That Dont Eat! Financing Arranged (WAC) EVERYTHING YOU VALUE 0% Financing Available Only On Kabota Equiptment. WAC See dealer for details. Thursday October 11 11am-3pm 1718 South Waukesha St. Bonifay, FL $149 Teachers model also available for $219 and $299 These are brand new 2012 Singer school Model sewing machines. These sewing machines remain UNSOLD. S Sept. 16-22 Kevin Belkowsky, no charges listed Joanne Sadalia Bell, 54, issuing worthless check, resisting ofcer with out violence Reta Bullard Boyett, 53, criminal mischief, leaving a scene of a accident without giving info Tracy Nicole Bruner, 19, weekender David Dwaine Burgess, 62, out of county warrant Damian Marcus Coatney, 23, criminal mischief, escape, disorderly intoxication Collie Adren Cox, 26, hold for Hillsborough David Wayne Curry, 44, failure to appear on manufacturing meth, failure to appear on possession of meth, failure to appear on possession of drug paraphernalia William David Dean, 29, out of county warrant Gerald M. Devine, 22, hold for Polk County Barbara Ann Holbert, 38, trespassing in structure inhabited Dennis Linares, 22, no valid drivers license Quintinn Lavez Lumpkin, 20, failure to appear on reckless driving Carly Wayne Majors, 53, burglary, sexual battery upon a child less than 12 years of age Keith Wesley Miller, 46, dealing in stolen property, aggravated battery domestic Stacey Lynn Miller, 44, dealing in stolen property Ronnie L Sheppard, 48, hold for prison transport service Paul Thomas, 46, hold for prison transport service David Mitchell Waddell, 28, domestic battery, resisting with violence Shelia Walker, no charges listed Shelia Ann Walker, 60, violation of probation on battery Rebecca Elizabeth Workman, 36, violation of probation on driving under the inuence Dawn Marie Yates, 42, weekender status on issuing worthless checks Sept. 24-28, 2012 Marriages Nathan Christopher Brown, 10/6/1992 of Fort Walton Beach and Ashley Nicole Worley, 9/19/1994 of Fort Walton Beach Clinton Joshua Brock, 5/16/1991 of Bonifay and Taylor Nicolette Rolling, 3/11/1993 of Bonifay Charles Michael Benton, 10/1/1990 of Bonifay and Amanda Lynn Dault, 12/6/1993 of Bonifay Timothy Dean Carter, 6/22/1960 of Bonifay and Robin Diane Long, 12/14/1969 of Bonifay Divorces Dennis Brian Jordan and Dawn Michelle Jordan Arrest REPORT Marriages & DIVORCE S and this man is crucifying Christians, naked, in their capital. (Where is our news media? Why dont they report this to the rest of the world?) Now the Muslims think that it is alright for them to blaspheme Jesus and use our constitutional right to do so, but they want to quench our right to free speech. If they want to live in America, which is a Christian nation, even though our president and Mrs. Clinton does not claim it so, they need to adapt or return to those nations that practice the Muslim religion. Jesus told his followers that Satan comes but to kill, to steal and to destroy. Now who does that remind you of? But Jesus came so that we can have live and that more abundant. Jesus also said that you are the servant to whom you lend your members to obey, so who are the Muslims obeying? They are obeying their father who is the god of this world, and he is not the God of heaven and earth. Our God commands us to love one another, not hate and kill. Killing someone simply because they do not worship the same God that you do is shedding innocent blood, which Christians are forbidden to so because it breaks the Ten Commandments that our God has given to us to obey, and it keeps us from sinning against our God. So if their god is telling them to shed innocent blood then he is not the same God I serve. If God changed his mind like that, then no one could trust him, so they are definitely serving the God of this world, and not the God of Heaven and Earth. Now the liberal news media calls a view like his hatred, but I call it an act of love. By this I mean that I am pointing out those differences to those who will read this and understand those differences and will come to realize that someone is on the wrong side of eternity, and I know that is the Muslims, and if even one of them reads this and realize this, then I will not have wasted my time writing this letter. Eternity is a long time and outer darkness is forever and eternal. I dont wish this on anyone, and I have the calling to point out the difference. Samuel Brooks Jr. Bonifay John, are sung instead of words at the beginning of each song. Then the songs words, taken from gospel, are sung. There is no instrumental accompaniment. When he was older, Williams studied Sacred Harp Music more formally under three accomplished composers of Sacred Harp, who lived in Ozark. I found out where the notes belong and how to mark time. You need to mark time to sing it correct, Williams said. Since his youth, Williams has directed a group of Sacred Harp Singers. Conventions were held regularly and the popular event lasted two or three days. He recalls an older acquaintance told him that he used to drive 15 miles in a horse and buggy to get to a sing. And there were no paved or even clay roads back then, Williams noted. The travels of Dewey Williams and the Wiregrass Sacred Harp Singers have taken him to the Folklife Festival at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C., where the singers were able to sing in a building that seats 5,000 people. Local conventions of Sacred Harp Singing are still held in the area as well as day long events usually honoring an old-time singer by naming the session as a memorial singing. Dewey Williams alluded to the topic of dying while conducting the singing in Chipley. Dying is just like the sun coming up in the east each morning. You know that its coming, so you just dont worry about it, was his philosophical attitude. The exact date of the passing of Dewey Williams is not known, but his name is lovingly mentioned among Sacred Harp Singers of area, when and wherever they meet. It was the distinct pleasure and honor to have the professional Wiregrass Sacred Harp Singers grace the Railroad Centennial Celebration for a song session which has long been remembered by those who were privileged to hear them. See you all next week. PRATTLER from page A4 LETTER from page A4

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Local A6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, October 10, 2012 A GOOD MAN Chooses to do what is Right. A GOOD MAN Places importance on Family. A GOOD MAN Changes the World By his Example. TIM WELLS IS A GOOD MAN. We Endorse TIM WELLS the most FULLY QUALIFIED PERSON for Clerk of Court. Vote Nov. 6 for a GOOD MAN TIM WELLS P Kings Discount Drugs 3RD ANNU A L Mariana Trunk Show J.D. OWENS CARPET OU T L ET will save you money E V ER YD A Y!!! J.D. OWENS CARPET OU T L ET 2597 S pringcreek R oad, Marianna, FL 3 1/2 Miles East of Marianna on Hwy. 90 (850) 526-3619 J.D. OWENS CARPET OU Textured Plush Carpet 79 99 Super Thick 13 Loose Lay Vinyl 49 FHA Quality Vinyl SF SF SF Engineered Value Grade 3 Oak Plank $ 2 29 SF AREA RUG SALE! Over 200 In Stock carpettilemarianna.com The WestPoint Home Factory Outlet is back in Chipley! Different location but same great product and great prices! Great selection of Famous name Comforters, Sheets, Towels, Pillows, Blankets, Throws in a true factory outlet atmosphere at factory outlet prices. WestPoint Home Factory Outlet 1055 Fowler Drive, Chipley, FL 32428 Right behind our Chipley Factory (850) 638-9421 Store Hours: Thurs-Sat from 10am to 5pm CT Helping Hands... Compassionate Hearts B ONIFAY Offering Inpatient and Outpatient Therapy N URS IN G & RE HAB C E N TER Occupational Physical Speech 24-hour Skilled Nursing Rehabilitation Gym Admissions 7 Days a Week MEDICARE OPEN E NR O LL M ENT Q& A October 3 9-30:10:30 am Holmes Countys SHINE representative, Minzie Carnley, will be available to answer any questions you have about Medicare Open Enrollment. Refreshments will be served. FREE FISH FRY SHERIFF HOLMES/WASHINGTON TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED COORDINATING BOARD MEETING TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2012 10:00 am WASHINGTON COUNTY ADMINISTRATIVE BUILDING 1331 SOUTH BOULEVARD, CHIPLEY, FLORIDA THE PUBLIC IS INVITED. REASONABLE ACCOMODATIONS ARE MET IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT AND FOR LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS OTHER THAN ENGLISH. CALL BRITTANY ELLERS TOLL FREE 800-226-8914 48 HRS IN ADVANCE By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY At midnight on Sept. 30 the federal Farm Bill of cially expired, leaving local farmers uncertain about their future. The Farm Bill was created during the Great Depression with the intent of stabilizing the price of crops to insure there would be abundant, inexpensive food, Washington County Extension Director Andy Andreasen said. Congress usually reauthorizes farm bills, which provide the foundation for the nations food, farm and rural policy, approximately every ve years. In 2008, Congress adopted a farm bill the Food, Conservation and Energy Act of 2008 but set the expiration of that legislation for the end of Fiscal Year 2012, which was Sept. 30. As part of that renewal, the bill suspends permanent law decades-old agricultural laws that no longer work with contemporary markets. Expiration also threatens the nations largest nutrition program, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as food stamps. According to the Congressional Research Service (CRS), in the past the specter of permanent law taking effect has served as a stick forcing to Congress to act. Under permanent law, the government must intervene to raise the level of crops and milk to parity, which is de ned as the purchasing power of those crops in 1910-1914. Farmers depend on the subsidy process to keep their businesses going during lean years, and the loan program the Farm Bill provides guarantees the producer a base amount of income, which the banks rely on before lending operating capital, Andreasen said. Without the Farm Bill in place, banks could be hesitant to loan money to farmers before December, he added. Some producers borrow from $900,000 a year to $2 million a year for production costs. As a result, crucial rural development, conservation and beginning farmer and rancher programs are at risk of having their funding evaporate because Congress failed to pass a 2012 Farm Bill, said Traci Bruckner, Assistant Policy Director with Center for Rural Affairs. Weve come to the 11th hour, we dont have a Farm Bill, Congress has not taken action, and the window that they have to take action is rapidly closing, added Bruckner. According to Bruckner, as members of Congress come back to their home districts to campaign, rural people will have an important opportunity to talk to them. She wants people to tell their representatives they need a Farm Bill, one thats done right. People have an opportunity to let them know that its unacceptable. Its unacceptable not to have a Farm Bill; its unacceptable to not invest in rural development programs that help create jobs through small business development; its unacceptable to reduce conservation funding to just the bare minimum. They are procrastinating until after the election, Andreasen said. No one in Congress wants to tackle it until the election is over. Bonifays newest business, Anna Bellas, held their Open House on Saturday, Sept. 22. This business has been a long-time dream of mine, owner Anna Kent said. For me this business is about new beginnings and I want to share that same feeling with my clients. Without the help of many this would not have been made possible. For more information contact Anna Bellas at 547-5665 or visit their Facebook page at AnnaBellas Salon & Day Spa. SPECIAL TO TIMES-ADVERTISER Congress not likely to pass farm bill before election ANNA BELLAS OPEN HOUSE

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A7 Wednesday, October 10, 2012 What Are You Afraid Of? If you enjoyed last years OUTbREAK, youre going to love Phobik! This year, Bonifays Haunted Hospital will prey on your deepest fears. 401 East Byrd Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425 Doors Open 6 PM for Advanced Ticket Holders General Admissions begins at 7:30 PM $10.00 per ticket Purchase Your Advance Tickets Now at Phobik.org!! New this year! No waiting in line and plenty of fun. Concessions will be available to purchase at the event. Fun and creepy activities to entertain you while you wait. D OCTORS M E M ORIAL H OSPITAL F OUN D ATION P RESENTS Friday, October 12 Saturday, October 13 Friday, October 19 Saturday, October 20 Friday, October 26 Saturday, October 27 Wednesday, October 31 Sponsored in part by the Holmes County Tourist Development Council Special to the Times-Advertiser TALLAHASSEE Goodwill Industries-Big Bend Inc. was recently recognized as the best non-pro t in Florida providing service-related employment opportunities for people with disabilities. This prestigious award was presented by RESPECT of Florida Executive Director John McBride in conjunction with National Disability Employment Awareness Month. Through a partnership with RESPECT, Goodwill maintains seven contracts that employ and train people to do everything from litter clear-up and mowing to airport janitor services. Eighty percent of Goodwill Industries workforce is made up of Floridians with a disability. Every success we achieve is thanks to our incredible team of employees. It is because of their commitment and hard work that they and Goodwill thrives, said Fred Shelfer, CEO of Goodwill Industries-Big Bend. Receiving this honor during National Disability Employment Awareness Month is particularly special because it underscores our important mission to provide job training, education and employment to people with disabilities and other barriers to employment. Goodwills Contract Services has a staff of 34, and 80 percent of the non-managerial workers have disabilities. Some of the employees have been previously honored by RESPECT. In 2011, two of the employees received statewide individual awards while working on the janitorial contract at Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport in Panama City one earning the RESPECT of Florida Rookie of the Year award and the other being honored as the Outstanding Employee of the Year. Goodwill Services of the Big Bend has launched a real trailblazing contract service program that is building innovative partnerships and effectively serving a host of public agencies and private businesses, said John McBride, Executive Director of RESPECT of Florida. They are not just putting Floridians to work, they are also helping Floridians with disabilities in our community maintain their independence and self respect by working at jobs that make a difference. Area Goodwill receives employment services award SPECIAL TO THE TIMES-ADVERTISER

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OUTDOORS Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Page 8 www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Send your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com A Section By FRANK SARGEANT franksargeant@charter.net We call them bulls, even though they are cows. But when the fall red sh run is on, who cares if theyre girls or boys? Adult red sh spend most of their long lives up to 35 years offshore, hanging around bait sh schools and feeding their prodigious appetites. During that time they can reach weights of over 90 pounds, though the max in the Gulf of Mexico appears closer to 50. All of the largest sh are females, biologists with the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission say. Though the big ones are primarily offshore sh, in September and October they come back to inshore waters where they grew up, to feed and to spawn. The young sh will spend their rst four years in the bays and backwaters but the adults head back offshore around Halloween. The massive adults are not targets for the grill; all reds over 27 inches are off-limits to harvest in Florida; the 18-27-inch slot limit has been largely responsible for the steady increase in red sh numbers since the mid-1990s. But when it comes to an angling challenge, the big reds are one of the best in inshore waters; theyre fat, theyre powerful and they wont give up. And, if you get in the right spot at the right time, they can be incredibly abundant; schools of hundreds or even thousands sometimes appear along the beaches, creating the famed red wave all red sh anglers dream of. The red wave The red wave results when a big school of reds comes to the surface, sometimes chasing bait, sometimes traveling, sometimes, on chilly mornings, simply sun-bathing. When theyre feeding, the churning water can be seen a quarter mile away. But at other times, you have to be relatively close to see the mass of sh, which appears a sort or rust to rose red. Back in the days when red sh were legal targets and the blackened red sh craze had created a commercial market, as much as 50,000 pounds of spawners were scooped up by a single boat in a single strike off Panhandle beaches. Not surprisingly, this treatment soon brought red sh numbers to a critical level, and the stocks did not start to recover until gill and purse seines were banned for use on the species in 1995. A onesh recreational limit was placed on reds shortly thereafter. Now, after 17 years of protection, reds appear to be doing well all over the state but particularly in the Panhandle, where the recreational harvest limit was recently increased from one sh daily to two daily. State regulators say numbers are adequate to handle the increased harvest without impact. Where to nd bulls The giant sh tend to congregate around major passes as well as around nearshore reefs and inlets. Cape San Blas and Cape St. George, both just east of Panama City Beach, are classic fall red sh locations; the long points extending into the Gulf create natural feeding and spawning areas, and the sh show up there every year by the hundreds. West Pass and Indian Pass, at either end of St. Vincents Island, are also good spots, as is the St. Vincent Bar, on the east end of the island inside the bay. St. Joseph Point and Bell Shoal, at the mouth of St. Joseph Bay, are also prime areas. The jetties at the mouth of St. Andrews Bay are good, as are the sh havens off the beach to the southeast. The jetties at Destin are worth a visit, as are those at the entry to Pensacola Bay. All of the public shing piers along Panhandle beaches are visited by waves of bull reds at times; if you happen to be there when the sh move through, youll be part of a re drill as everybody gets bit at once. What it takes Dont go bear hunting with a switch. You arent going to land a 40-pound red sh on 8pound-test spinning gear unless your name is Stu Apte. Baitcasting gear with 25-pound test and a long, stout rod is more suited to the task easier on you, easier on the sh, because a long battle makes survival after release less likely. If youre shing from a beach, jetty or pier, youll need even heavier tackle; 50-pound braid on a jumbo spinning rig is a good choice. Bull reds will attack most anything that will t into their big mouths, but live and cut baits are most dependable; live mullet, pin sh, croakers and horse thread ns or greenbacks are always a good bet. They also readily grab blue crabs. Stout hooks are an essential part of the rig; 6/0 to 7/0 circle hooks will stick the sh and also prevent them from swallowing the hook most of the time. A couple feet of 60pound-test mono or uoro leader protects your line from the rough jaws of the sh. Where the reds are not visible, its basically a bottomshing routine. Add enough weight to hold the bait on bottom, cast it out and set back to wait if theres a bull red around, theyll take care of the rest. Along the beach, theyll usually prowl outside the green bar. Around rip rap in the passes they can be anywhere from right against to rocks to out in the deeper water. Areas on sand points where the currents clash and create rips are often good. When it comes to arti cials, any large lure can do the job. When you see sh on top, a big topwater lure can create some spectacular action a Super Spook or Chug-N-Spook, worked fast and loud, will bring sh rushing from every direction. (Flatten the barbs on these treble-hooked plugs so you can easily release oversized sh.) One-ounce jigs trimmed with 6-inch shad tails or the 1to 2-ounce Tsunami shad swimbaits are good choices when the sh are deeper. Sometimes, you can spot a school on sonar in the deeper sections of major passes, and dropping a lure to them vertically results in instant hookups. When you dont know where the sh are, rigging up with a big trolling lure like the Manns Plus 25 or Mirrolure 113 allows you to cover lots of water fast. Pull the lures around arti cial reefs and markers near the beaches, or in the rip of the larger passes on outgoing tides. Again, the trebles on these lures should have the barbs attened, and a long-handled hook-remover like those from Rapala should be at hand to help release the sh. Reds are very durable and readily survive catch and release if theyre put back in the water promptly get the hooks out, grab a few photos and send them on their way theyll make more little red sh, which will be in our bays and estuaries next year at this time. Blackened red sh Though you cant eat any of the jumbo reds, there are plenty of sh in the slot around at this time of year as well; most are found on inside ats and creek mouths, and that shing improves as the water cools. Blackened red sh is one of the more noted ways of preparing red sh llets. It produces a ery, crusty llet that pleases even those who dont like sh. Its a dish best prepared outside on a grill it makes a lot of smoke! The llets are skinned, the rib cage cut out and the red line removed it creates a shy taste. The llets are basted with melted butter (yep, you need the real thing to make this work, cardiologists be damned) then set aside to drain on paper towels. Make a dip of a few teaspoons of paprika, black pepper, white pepper, oregano, thyme, garlic powder, onion powder, salt and most important, cayenne pepper more if youre a Cajun, less if you dont like a lot of heat. Dip the llets in the mixed spices, coating thoroughly. Press added spices into the llets with your hand. Now, heat up a heavy cast iron skillet until its smoking hot. If the skillet is not really hot, the blackening wont work. Once the skillet is sizzling, quickly add llets, then pour a teaspoon of melted butter over each llet. Be forewarned the smoke will y and if you drip butter on the outside of the skillet, you might start a re. Leave the llets cook until theyre black on the bottom, about two minutes, then ip and repeat on the other side. Check for doneness with a fork. Thats all there is to it wonderful spicy crust and tender moist sh inside; its a killer way to celebrate the fall red sh bite. Free Fishing Wire Frank Sargeant is now editor of The Fishing Wire, an online news service covering angling, boating, conservation and regulations nationwide. For a free, no-strings subscription, visit www.the shingwire.com BULLY, BULLY, BULLY! Bull redfish visit Northwest Florida beaches in fall PHOTO BY CAPT. DON DINGMAN Monster reds like this one might be more than 20 years old. The species grows to more than 90 pounds, though 50 pounds seems to be near the max in the Gulf of Mexico. TrophyCatch bass-reward program launched Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Catching a trophy largemouth bass is the dream of anyone who shes for this valuable game sh, which is the most-sought species in North America. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissions new TrophyCatch Program ( TrophyCatchFlorida.com ), launched Monday, will increase opportunities for anglers shing in Florida to ful ll that dream, while rewarding them for helping make other anglers dreams come true by letting their trophy swim for another lucky angler to catch. Gov. Rick Scott understands the importance of recreational shing to Florida, which annually generates more than $8 billion in economic impact and supports more than 75,000 jobs. In Florida, freshwater bass alone annually provide anglers more than 14 million days of healthy outdoor recreation and generate approximately $1.25 billion in economic impact (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2006). The FWCs management programs are designed to provide enjoyment for even more anglers and thus increase tourism and economic bene ts. TrophyCatch will help accomplish that and document progress. TrophyCatch is an innovative program to reward anglers for being great resource stewards by legally catching and releasing trophy largemouth bass, Scott said. TrophyCatch includes three tiers to encourage reporting and live-releasing bass heavier than 8 pounds that are caught in Florida waters. Bass 8 to 9.9 pounds (Lunker Club), or those 10 to 12.9 pounds (Trophy Club) that are caught, documented and released can be reported online at TrophyCatch Florida.com anytime of the year. All that is required to qualify for great prizes are photos of the entire sh on a scale with the weight visible, and one of the sh on a tape measurer, showing the length. Bass that are heavier than 13 pounds and are caught between Oct 1. and April 30 each year must be certi ed by FWC staff to verify their weight and take genetic samples. Certi ed catches that are released or provided to FWC for research will be entered into the Hall of Fame Club, making the angler eligible for great prizes. The World Fishing Network is partnering with the FWC to promote and manage the trophy bass website. TrophyCatch will enable biologists to manage lakes and rivers better by providing valuable incentives to anglers for reporting and releasing their catches of trophy bass, said Tom Champeau, director of the FWCs Division of Freshwater Fisheries Management. The information will be used to evaluate and improve management strategies that produce more and larger bass. Numerous industry sponsors are providing prizes to encourage conservation of these valuable sh.

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By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY The Chipley Tigers had a hearty Homecoming feast, pouncing on the South Walton Seahawks early in the opening quarter to post a 37-6 win at Philip Rountree Stadium on Friday. Junior Kobe McCrary scored on a 30-yard scamper to put the Tigers on the board just 1:10 into the game, and Fletcher Dilmores aim was good, as usual, for the extra point. A bad snap resulted in the Seahawks putting 2 points on the board for the Tigers with a touchback about a minute later, then on their next possession the Tigers marched 70 yards on 4 plays, helped immensely by Sophomore Carlon Smiths 60-yard kick return, which put the Tigers on the Seahawks 30 to begin the drive. Smith also took a short pass from junior quarterback Jordan Finch on the second down and was stopped inside the 5-yard line, then McCrary was able to sweep left to score with 8:44 left in the first quarter. Dilmore added a point and the Tigers led 16-0. In the final minutes of the first stanza, the Tigers started yet another scoring drive, which was capped just seconds into the second quarter with a 5-yard run by junior Jacob Wilson. Dilmore kicked another field goal and the Chipley squad led 23-0 with 11:53 left to play in the half. McCrary scored again at the 8:58 mark, this time from 25 yards out, topping a 63-yard, 4-play drive. Dilmore did his part and the Tigers were leading 30-0 at the half. Chipley came back from halftime and on the first possession of the quarter, marched 54 yards on six plays to score one final time when Wilson nabbed a 15-yard toss from Finch in the end zone. Dilmore was on the mark and the Tigers led 37-0, which mercifully started the continuous clock. South Walton came back on their next possession when senior Drew Pfeiffer returned a Chipley kick from inside the Seahawks 10 to the Tigers 42. The Seahawks kept the momentum going, marching into the end zone in five plays and sending junior Sage Roberts into the end zone from 15 yard out. Chipley has an open schedule next Friday, while South Walton travels to Graceville. Kickoff is 7 p.m. Fridays prep football scores Agape Christian 28, Foundation Academy 12 All Saints 28, Cedar Creek Christian 0 Alonso 20, Bloomingdale 0 American 18, Miami Beach 13 Apopka 46, Ocoee 0 Archbishop McCarthy 34, Pembroke Pines 7 Armwood 20, Sickles 16 Arnold 10, Rutherford 7 Astronaut 17, Satellite 0 Atlantic Community 40, West Boca Raton Community 0 Auburndale 35, Tenoroc 6 Aucilla Christian 43, Munroe Day 0 Baker County 36, Paxon 0 Baldwin 57, Harvest Community Scvool 16 Bartram Trail 30, Atlantic Coast 14 Bayside 21, Melbourne 7 Benjamin 31, LaSalle 30 Berean Christian 40, Palmer Trinity 0 Berkeley Prep 41, St. Petersburg Catholic 19 Bishop Kenny 38, Forrest 22 Bishop Moore 48, Poinciana 0 Blake 40, Middleton 34 Blountstown 21, Sneads 0 Bolles School 38, Ribault 6 Booker 57, Lake Placid 27 Boynton Beach 38, Fort Pierce Westwood 18 Calvary Christian 38, Cambridge Christian 8 Cardinal Newman 27, Wellington 19 Carrollwood Day 40, St. Petersburg Canterbury 19 Chamberlain 31, Tampa Freedom 16 Charles Flanagan 44, West Broward 8 Charlotte 49, Gulf Coast 0 Chiles 28, Ocala Forest 10 Chipley 37, South Walton 6 Christopher Columbus Catholic 63, Miami Coral Park 7 Clay 41, Terry Parker 28 Clearwater 20, Seminole 15 Clearwater Central Catholic 27, Tampa Catholic 7 Clewiston 35, Avon Park 0 Cocoa 40, Cocoa Beach 6 Columbia 52, Ridgeview 17 Cooper City 31, Nova 8 Coral Gables 6, South Miami 0 Coral Springs 35, Coral Glades 13 Cottondale 34, Vernon 13 Countryside 49, St. Petersburg Northeast 0 Creekside 36, Menendez 7 Crescent City 11, FAMU Developmental Research 6 Dade Christian 47, Barrington Christian Academy 6 DeLand 30, Fletcher 28 Dillard 70, Pompano Beach 0 Dr. Phillips 23, Boone 6 Dunbar 34, North Fort Myers 9 Dunedin 20, Spoto 13 Dunnellon 39, Santa Fe 12 Durant 22, Plant City 7 Eagles View 27, St. Joseph Academy 0 East Bay 33, Riverview 14 East Gadsden 47, Marianna 0 East Lake 22, North Port 16 East Lee County 49, Mariner 7 Edgewater 23, Winter Springs 12 Escambia 25, Pensacola Washington 9 Estero 20, Cape Coral 3 Evans 27, East Ridge 14 Father Lopez Catholic 48, St. John Lutheran 6 First Baptist 59, Evangelical Christian 14 First Coast 19, Fleming Island 16 Fivay 46, Hudson 3 Florida Christian 33, Archbishop Curley 13 Florida School for the Deaf and Blind 76, Alabama School for the Deaf, Ala. 6 Fort Meade 17, Frostproof 16 Fort Pierce Central 34, Viera 0 Freeport 41, Baker School 34 Ft. Walton Beach 21, Crestview 17 Gainesville 56, Citrus 7 Gateway 9, Liberty 6 George Jenkins 35, Wekiva 13 Glades Central 47, Suncoast 0 Glades Day 69, Coral Springs Christian 0 Godby 54, Suwannee 0 Goleman 28, Miami Springs 7 Graceville 46, Wewahitchka 28 Hagerty 24, University (Orange City) 3 Harmony 26, Celebration 0 Heritage 27, Eau Gallie 7 Hernando 35, River Ridge 0 Highlands Christian 34, Oviedo Masters Academy 24 Hilliard 29, Bell 14 Hillsborough 36, Jefferson 28 Holy Trinity Episcopal 16, St. John Neumann 6 Ida S. Baker 42, Bishop Verot 6 Immokalee 29, Lely 21 Indian Rocks 25, Admiral Farragut 21 Inlet Grove 40, North Broward 18 Island Coast 24, Fort Myers 21, OT Jefferson County 53, Branford 0 Jesuit 47, Lennard 0 John Carroll Catholic 28, Westminster Academy 14 John I. Leonard 21, Boca Raton Community 7 Jones 47, Lake Highland 10 Kathleen 31, Bartow 7 Keswick Christian 35, Northside Christian 28 Keystone Heights 21, Umatilla 9 King 48, Leto 3 Kings Academy 29, Fort Lauderdale Calvary Christian 10 Kissimmee Osceola 43, St. Cloud 0 Lafayette 30, Hamilton County 14 Lake Brantley 35, Sanford Seminole 20 Lake Gibson 28, Winter Haven 24 Lake Howell 28, Oak Ridge 21 Lake Mary 35, Lyman 0 Lake Mary Prep 20, Victory Christian 8 Lake Nona 42, Tavares 7 Lakeland 33, Lake Region 0 Lakewood 16, Gibbs 0 Lakewood Ranch 41, Tarpon Springs 34 Landmark Christian 45, Seffner Christian 7 Largo 34, Dixie Hollins 0 Leesburg 50, Lake Minneola High School 26 Leesburg The First Academy 48, Central Florida Christian 8 Lehigh 40, Cypress Lake 14 Lemon Bay 28, Port Charlotte 20 Liberty County 34, West Gadsden 12 Lincoln 45, Buchholz 7 Maclay 58, Rocky Bayou Christian 0 Madison County 51, West Port 7 Manatee 56, Braden River 0 Martin County 30, Port St. Lucie 24, OT Mater Academy 21, Keys Gate 0 McArthur 21, Fort Lauderdale 7 Melbourne Central Catholic 13, Orangewood Christian 0 Merritt Island Christian 34, International Community 7 Merritt Island 25, Rockledge 0 Miami Carol City 22, Belen Jesuit 17 Miami Central 38, Homestead 20 Miami Edison 42, Doral Academy Charter 7 Miami Ferguson 27, Miami Sunset 14 Miami Jackson 32, Key West 12 Milton 40, Tate 28 Miramar 27, St. Thomas Aquinas 24, 2OT Mitchell 27, Land OLakes 17 Monarch 38, Piper 22 Moore Haven 56, St. Stephens Episcopal 0 Mount Dora 57, Weeki Wachee 12 Naples 42, Barron Collier 14 Navarre 21, Choctawhatchee 17 New Smyrna Beach 24, Mainland 21 Newberry 16, Chie and 7 Newsome 35, Brandon 13 North Florida Christian 41, Hawthorne 6 North Marion 44, Crystal River 3 North Miami 21, Hialeah 2 North Miami Beach 40, Miami Krop 27 Northview 62, Jay 14 Oak Hall 17, St. Francis 14 Oakleaf 33, Leon 13 Ocala Trinity Catholic 38, Monsignor Pace 14 Ocala Vanguard 42, Lake Weir 3 Okeechobee 38, Forest Hill 28 Olympia 41, West Orange 27 Orange Park 49, Middleburg 14 Orlando Christian 49, Montverde Academy 6 Orlando Freedom 42, Cypress Creek 0 Orlando The First Academy 49, Trinity Prep 0 Orlando University 38, Colonial 0 Pace 20, Pensacola 10 Palatka 40, Nease 12 Palm Beach Central 45, Park Vista Community 7 Palm Harbor University 35, Sarasota Riverview 9 Palmetto 48, Bayshore 7 Pasco 26, Wesley Chapel 0 Pensacola Catholic 29, Florida 26 Pine Ridge 26, Deltona 6 Pinellas Park 28, St. Petersburg 3 Plantation 47, Hollywood Hills 6 Plantation American Heritage 44, Hallandale 3 Ponte Vedra 34, Matanzas 3 Pope John Paul II 54, St. Andrews 22 Port Orange Atlantic 26, Eustis 20, OT Port St. Joe 56, Franklin County 14 Providence 42, Episcopal 7 R.E. Lee 35, Stanton College Prep 17 Raines 33, Andrew Jackson 0 Ridge Community 35, Haines City 13 Royal Palm Beach 42, Spanish River 0 Sandalwood 28, Mandarin 14 Santa Fe Catholic 9, Mount Dora Bible 6 Santaluces 21, Lake Worth 20 Seabreeze 52, South Lake 0 Sebastian River 17, Olympic Heights 14 Seminole Osceola 34, Boca Ciega 24 Seminole Ridge 37, Pahokee 18 Seven Rivers Christian 20, Peniel Baptist 14 Somerset Academy 42, Archbishop Carroll 39 South Dade 23, Miami Killian 21 South Fork 39, Palm Beach Lakes 0 South Fort Myers 31, Riverdale 28 South Sumter 41, Bradford 0 Springstead 42, Brooksville Central 7 St. Edwards 48, South Florida HEAT 6 St. Johns Country Day 32, Temple Christian 6 Sunlake 14, Nature Coast Tech 13 Taravella 28, Everglades 14 Taylor 35, The Villages 20 Taylor County 45, Walton 27 Timber Creek 31, East River 3 Treasure Coast 40, St. Lucie Centennial 0 Trenton 61, Bronson 6 Trinity Christian-Jacksonville 76, Bishop Snyder 0 Union County 28, Dixie County 14 University Christian 69, Duval Charter 8 Venice 48, Sarasota 12 Warner Christian 37, Deltona Trinity Christian 25 West Florida 37, Gulf Breeze 14 Western 41, Stranahan 0 Westminster Christian 28, Champagnat Catholic 6 Wolfson 60, Englewood 12 Yulee 35, Fernandina Beach 0 Zephyrhills 34, Gulf 3 Prep SCORES SP O RTS www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, October 10, 2012 A Page 9 Section The Chipley Tigers ran over the South Walton Seahawks Friday night for a 37-6 Homecoming victory. The Tigers get a rest this Friday. PHOTOS BY RANDAL SEYLER | The Times-Advertiser Tigers feast on Seahawks Chipley downs South Walton 37-6 for Homecoming For the last 50 years, First Federal has enjoyed giving back to our communities. To celebrate our 50th Anniversary, were asking you to participate by choosing a local organization that you think deserves a $500 donation from us. Voting will be open from October 1st 13th. Go to our website to choose one of these great organizations in your county: (850) 547-3624 C B: W S P H C H S B D M Hr F 300 N.Waukesha St. Bonifay, FL

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By CATHRINE LAMB 638-0212 | @catspitstop clamb@chipleypaper.com Matt Kenseth escaped the Big One for the win as Tony Stewart ipped down the track. As Smoke ipped he took with him all of the chase contenders except Kenseth, who won, and Jeff Gordon. The contenders that were involved, well. some of the nished but most of them didnt. Here they are anyway, Tony Stewart, Jimmie Johnson, Dale Earnhardt Jr., Brad Keselowski, Denny Hamlin, Kasey Kahne, Clint Bowyer, Martin Truex Jr., Kevin Harvick, and Greg Bif e. Of those drivers involved Keselowski, and Bif e were the only two to cross the nish line. For anyone who knows me, you know I am a huge Stewart fan and stand behind him 100 percent. So it should come as no surprise to you when I say, that as he came out of the in eld medical center and admitted that the accident was his fault I liked to have passed out. On to something else Kurt Busch took his last ride with the Phoenix team. He will race in charlotte next weekend in the number 78, with Furniture Row Racing, taking the place of Regan Smith. Smith will be racing the number 51 for Phoenix in Charlotte. So far this is a one-race deal for Smith. Bass Pro Shops has announced that they will be sponsoring 18 races on Tony Stewarts No. 14. Results for Good Sam Roadside Assistance 500 1. Matt Kenseth 2. Jeff Gordon 3. Kyle Busch 4. David Ragan 5. Regan Smith 6. Greg Bif e 7. Brad Keselowski 8. Travis Kvapil 9. Ryan Newman 10. Jeff Burton Standings after Good Sam Roadside Assistance 500 1. Brad Keselowski 2. Jimmie Johnson -14 3. Denny Hamlin -23 4. Kasey Kahne -36 5. Clint Bowyer -40 6. Jeff Gordon -42 7. Tony Stewart -46 8. Martin Truex Jr. -48 9. Kevin Harvick -49 9. Greg Bif e -49 11. Dale Earnhardt Jr. -51 12. Matt Kenseth -62 Chase contenders not nishing in the top 10 were, Kevin Harvick, 11th; Kasey Kahne, 12th; Martin Truex Jr., 13th; Denny Hamlin, 14th; Jimmie Johnson, 17th; Dale Earnhardt Jr., 20th; Tony Stewart, 22nd and Clint Bowyer he placed 23rd. In memory of my brother Anthony Grant Herrington April 17, 1956 September 6, 2011 Down Financing Until April 2013 Payments PLUS $750 Instant Kubota Bucks ** OR Instant Kubota Bucks up to $2,000 ** www.kubota.com NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." www.mulliseye.com Chipley Office We are located directly across the parking lot from the Walmart in Chipley "W E W E LCOM E N EW PATI EN TS, C ALL T ODAY F OR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TM EN T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley Office Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 10-31-12 FREE E Y E EX AM COD E: W C 00 T odd R obinson, M D Board C ertified Eye Physician and C ataract S urgeon L ee M ullis, M D Board C ertified Eye Physician and C ataract S urgeon Smart Lenses SM Sports A10 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Kenseth escapes Big One, wins at Talladega MATT KENSETH SPECIAL TO THE TIMES-ADVERTISER Stewart ips through the pack on the last lap of the Good Same Roadside Assistance 500 in Talladega, Ala. on Sunday.

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Washington, Holmes at a glance INDEX Society ................................. B2 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B6 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, OCTOBER 10 2012 B PAGE 1 Section Local salon partners with American Cancer Society CHIPLEY Salon Gloss in Chipley has Partnered with Brand Sexy Hair for the Caring is Sexy Charity Cut-A-Thon event. The event is today. The stylist will offer hair cuts for $15 with $10 of that going to bene t the self-help beauty charity dedicated to improving the self-image of cancer patients. The salon is at 811 Main St in Chipley. NFCH to hosts Girls Night Out CHIPLEY In observance of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Northwest Florida Community Hospital in Chipley will host a free Girls Night Out at the Washington County Agricultural Center at 5 p.m. on sunday. Dr. Vanessa King-Johnson will give a presentation related to womens health. Women are invited to shop local vendors, learn about early detection and register for prizes. A light dinner will be served. For more information, call Aileen Koon at 850-415-8318. First United Methodist to hold domestic violence awareness dinner CHIPLEY The First United Methodist Church of Chipley will hold a Domestic Violence Awareness Dinner at 6 p.m. on Monday. Support you community by attending a free kick-off dinner for the Domestic Violence Task Force. RSVP to Missy Lee at 718-6575 or Jennifer May at 415-5999. VHS Class of 1972 VERNON The class of will meet at 11 a.m., on Friday at Harris Farm Store in Vernon to work on the oat. Then at noon they will meet behind the old high school to get in line for the parade. After the parade, the class will meet at Castaways in Bonifay to eat. Everyone will try to sit together at the game that starts at 7 p.m. Saturday. Classmates and family members will meet from 4-8 p.m. at Ellen and Jackie Morris house at 5146 Creek Road, Vernon. To ask what to bring or for more information, call Jane (Austin) Lively at 258-2081, or Wanda Carter at 258-4008. NORTHWEST FLORIDA CHAMPIONSHIP RODEO Wild time at the RODEO

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Wednesday, October 10, 2012 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Looking for the best in hearing care? Look to Beltone Only Beltone offers the exclusive BelCare program, our ongoing commitment to customer satisfaction, providing you with benets such as: Financing Available WAC Chipley, FL 1611 Main Street Ste. 4 (850) 387-4931 Marianna, FL 3025 6th Street (850) 387-4931 The benets of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Discounts off MSRP Previous purchases excluded. For a limited time. Cannot be combined with any other offers. 15% OFF TRUE WIRELESS HEARING AID SYSTEM & ultra comfortable when its noisy advanced technology So, call or come in today. No other company offers the same level of commitment youll nd at Beltone. WERE IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD! Free Annual Hearing Evaluations Beltone Ranked #1 in Patient Care Free Lifetime Instrument Care Free cleanings and adjustments for as long as you own your Beltone hearing instruments And, our 1500 locations nationwide serve you no matter where you live or travel! Allen Barnes 23 Years Experience Kensington Victoria Naker, daughter of Ken and Vicky Naker, turned one year old on September 4. Her brothers, Matt, Chris and Lathan, her grandparents, John and Jane Brown, and her greatgrandmother, Minnie Ragland, all helped her celebrate her big day with a birthday party on September 2 at her home in Chipley along with several friends and family members. Kensi is also the granddaughter of Barbara Naker of DeKalb, Illinois, and the greatgranddaughter of Catherine BrockWorthington of Chipley. PHOTO BY CECILIA SPEARS Almost 100 horse riders and several covered wagons showed up for this years Lonny Lindsey Scholarship Trail Ride, which spanned from the Carmel Church to Smith Park in Bonifay on Saturday, Sept. 29. A more extensive story and more pictures of the Lonny Lindsey Scholarship Trail Ride will be available in the Oct. 17 edition of the Times-Advertiser. Special to Extra CHIPLEY The Chipley Kiwanis Club met for its weekly luncheon at Pattillos Restaurant at the Washington Holmes County Technical Center on Sept. 25. Lunch was provided by the staff of the Washington-Homes County Technical Center. The Chipley Kiwanis Club installed of cers and directors for the 2012-13 year and gave out awards to club members at their regular Tuesday meeting. Many members received perfect attendance awards, which are earned by attending every meeting and making up missed meetings with alternate activities. Stan Peacock, Kiwanis, Division 2 Lt. Governor was in attendance. The of cers for the 2012-13 year are as follows: President, Jan Page; PresidentElect, Paul Goulding; Vice President, Garrett Martin; Secretary, Laura Joiner; Treasurer, Tommy Sasser; Asst. Treasurer, Joe Johnson; Immediate Past President, Vincent Spencer. Directors for the next scal year that were installed are David Corbin, Dell Corbin and Travis Hall for the three year term, Melissa Finch, Lamerle Feitsma and Vickie Williams for the two year term and Frank Cumbaa, Weyland Fulford and Sandy Solger for the one year term. Those recognized for perfect attendance include: One Year Frank Cumbaa, Garrett Martin, Jan Page, Tommy Sasser, Wayne Saunders, and Vincent Spencer. Two Year Weyland Fulford. Three Year David Corbin, Rick Davis and Paul Goulding. Five Year Vickie Williams. Seven Year Lamerle Feitsma. Eight Year Steve Mason. Ten Year Dell Corbin, Gene Holley, Price Wilson. Twelve Year Joe Johnson. Thirteen Year Laura Joiner. Twenty Year David Solger. Forty-Seven Year Bruce Christmas. Members were also recognized for their years of membership in Kiwanis. Nicole Fair eld, David Corbin, Rick Davis, Linda Lareau, Rhonda Sap, Wayne Saunders, and Vickie Williams were recognized for their 5year membership. Kim Wilson, Malcolm Gainey and Lamerle Feitsma were recognized for their 10-year membership and Dell Corbin was recognized for his 15-year membership. Lastly, David Solger was recognized for his 25year membership. The Kiwanis club meets Tuesdays at Patillos restaurant in the middle of the WHTC campus at noon. For an invitation, contact any Kiwanian or David Solger, Membership Chairperson at 638-1276. For more information about the Kiwanis Club of Chipley, visit www. ChipleyKiwanis.com. Special to the News CHIPLEY Students in the Chipley High School Music Theatre Department are hard at work preparing for their fall productions. There is a great deal of excitement and energy in the ongoing work for the department. Anyone interested in helping with the productions or becoming a sponsor for the year, please contact Mrs. Hinson at 638-6100 extension 615. Make plans to come out and see this years dramatic and musical productions you will not want to miss them! Flowers for Algernon 7 p.m. Oct. 18 and 20, $10 admission, $5 student This is the compelling story of Charlie GOrdon, a mentally challenged man, and the strange interweaving of his life with that of Algernon, a mouse. Experimental surgery has been performed on Algernon increasing his intelligence fourfold. The operation is tried on Charlie, who rapidly increases in intelligence, far more intelligent than his teacher, Alice Kinnian, or the doctors who created the operating technique. As Charlie approaches the peak of his brilliance, Algernon shows frightening symptoms of regression. The play becomes a race against time in which Charlie tries to keep his new intelligence long enough to save himself and thus continue what he and Alice have found. This is a different kind of play: poignant, romantic, funny and tragic, but with hope for mans indomitable spirit. Flowers for Algernon Cast: Dr. Strauss Damion Potter Professor Nemur Landon Odum Alice Kinnian Julia Veit Burt Seldon Brandon Licea Charlie Gordon Hunter Harden and Garrett Pletcher (double cast) Derek Ethan Shwartz Nurse Kendal Daniels Frank Nolan Spencer Gina Kayla Lara Mrs. Donner Mary Rosalyn Taylor Joe Adam Bass Mother Malinda Locke Little Charlie TBA Father Matt Chase Child Norma Tea Creamer Mrs. Feldman Chloe Bruner Ellen Danielle Runnels Teen-age Charlie Matt Mosley Bernie Nathan Rolling Connie Jessie Massey Chairlady Julie Carroll Voice in Audience Drake McCorvey Mrs. Mooney Ashlyn Jeffries Mrs. Nemur Brittany Woods Mr. Harvey Noah Smothers Jackie Welberg Lindsay Miller Anne Welberg Chelsea McIntyre Norma Sydney Ward Party Guests and Concert-goers Raven Marks Brittany Cope Taylor Collins Ashley Maphis Tech Crew: Zach Lankist, Chase Strickland, Nick Spencer, Brittney Sanders, Parisha Massaline, Kacy Lawson, Devon James, Cory Guster (Stage Manager), Chase Dalton, Alex Bush Love, Laughter, and Legends: The Music of the Beatles 7 p.m. on Nov. 15-17, $10, $5 students. The combined choirs of Chipley High School will bring to the stage a nostalgic and energetic presentation of the music of the Beatles. You are sure to hear your favorites in this musical production which includes a compilation of songs performed and/or written by the members of the band. Join us as we salute the timeless music and greatest hits of the Beatles. Concert Choir Christmas Concert 6 p.m. on Dec. 6, Free admission. CHS students to present Flowers for Algernon SPECIAL TO EXTRA New of cers of the Chipley Kiwanis Club for 2012-13 include President, Jan Page; President-Elect, Paul Goulding; Vice President, Garrett Martin; Secretary, Laura Joiner; Treasurer, Tommy Sasser; Asst. Treasurer, Joe Johnson; Immediate Past President, Vincent Spencer. Kiwanis Club installs of cers for the 2012-2013 scal year NAKER TURNS ONE LONNY LINDSEY TRAIL RIDE

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Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Special to The News CHIPLEY Club member Lyndal Pleas presented an informative program on Collecting & Pressing Wild Flowers at the Oct. 3 meeting of Chipley Garden Club. Members and guests were delighted by the bouquets of wild flowers on the tables under the pavilion at Shivers Park. Lyndal remarked, All these beautiful wild flowers were collected locally. Florida has the third largest floral content in the continental United States, just behind California and Texas. There are over 4000 wild flowers in Florida and 3600 of them are native. Something is blooming just about year round. Just look! They are everywhere! Lyndal recommended discretion when collecting specimens and suggested taking a clipping rather than pulling up the whole plant. Collection should be done in the afternoon making sure to collect the bloom and at least two leaves. The plant should be identified and pressed as soon as possible. Lyndal demonstrated pressing flowers using paper towels and heavy books. She also provided forms for recording purposes. Several recently pressed flower specimens phlox, oxalis, butterfly bush, and goldenrod were displayed as well as Judy Solgers (Wausau Garden Club) award winning pressed wildflower collection. At the business meeting, President Karen Roland presented a certificate from National Garden Clubs to Club member Linda MacLellan for her support of the Penny Pines Project. Her generous donation will help provide seedlings to reforest 300 acres of lost trees in our national forests. The club also discussed the upcoming 2nd Annual Scarecrow Contest on Oct. 13, FFGC District II Fall Meeting in Graceville on October 10, distributing plants and making terrariums with students at KMS Elementary School and Washington County Christian School, and the clubs 80th Anniversary Reception. The next meeting of Chipley Garden Club will be on Wednesday, Nov. 7. We welcome visitors and new members at anytime during the year. If you would like to attend a meeting or learn more about garden clubbing, please contact Karen Roland, Club President, at 638-9968 or email her at blueorchidoasis@yahoo. com. Is your middle-aged cat experiencing increased thirst, appetite, and urination? Is your furry friend losing weight or has a change in behavior? If so, your family cat may have hyperthyroidism. This common disease is caused by an overproduction of thyroid hormones, called T3 and T4, due to dysfunction of the thyroid glands in the cats neck. There are two of these glands, on either side of the windpipe. Both glands are usually affected, but this is not always the case. The symptoms mentioned previously are not the only signs of hyperthyroidism; other symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, and a matted or greasy coat. These signs start slowly and many owners may not initially realize that something is wrong, said Dr. Audrey Cook, associate professor at Texas A&M College of VeterinaryMedicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM). A drop in body weight is often the rst clue that a cat is suffering from hyperthyroidism, which is one of the reasons why regular vet visits are so important in older cats, Cook said. If a cat starts exhibiting the symptoms of hyperthyroidism, a trip to the veterinarian will conrm the diagnosis. The veterinarian will perform a physical examination, which will include careful examination of the neck. An enlarged thyroid gland may be palpated, but a normal exam does not rule out the possibility of hyperthyroidism. To conrm the disease, the animals thyroid hormone level will be checked through blood work. Since thyroid hormones affect most organs in the body, it is important to test a cat for the disease if it is suspected. If left untreated, secondary problems can arise such as heart enlargement, with an elevated heart rate. Another problem resulting from untreated hyperthyroidism is hypertension, or high blood pressure. Both hypertension and heart disease caused by hyperthyroidism will resolve with proper treatment of the thyroid disease. Left untreated, the cardiac complications related to hyperthyroidism can be life-threatening, Cook said. Hyperthyroidism can be treated three ways: medication,radioactiveiodine, or surgery. Traditionally, medication is the main way to treat the disease. For this option, an antithyroid medication is given to decrease the amount of the hormones released from the thyroid glands. This is relatively inexpensive, but the drug must be given once or twice daily for the rest of the cats life. Also, side effects can include vomiting, anemia, lethargy and bone marrow suppression. Some owners have a hard time getting the medication in to their cat, Cook said. We can get it reformulated in to a liquid if this is easier, and sometimes we use a product that is rubbed into the ear and absorbed that way. Radioactive-iodine therapy is becoming increasingly popular when dealing with hyperthyroidism in cats. For this longterm treatment, the cat is injected with the radioactive iodine, which destroys the tissue of the overactive thyroid gland. Although this procedure is usually very effective, it is more expensive and requires the cat being conned to the hospital while the radioactivity decreases. This is one of the best ways to treat this disease, and the choice I made for my own cat when she was hyperthyroid, Cook said. Surgical removal of the thyroid gland(s) is another option available for this disease. Although the long-term success rate is good, there is a risk of damage to the parathyroid glands, located close to the thyroid gland. The parathyroid gland is responsible for maintaining proper calcium blood levels. We usually only recommend surgery if the gland is cancerous, which is very rare, or if medication or radiation are not a suitable choice, Cook said. A veterinarian can help determine which treatment option is best for your animal. In general, the prognosis for a cat with hyperthyroidism is good. After treatment, long-term monitoring of the thyroid levels will help ensure the cat continues to live a happy life. ABOUT PET TALK Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at vetmed.tamu.edu/pet-talk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to cvmtoday@cvm.tamu. edu. Feline hyperthyroidism: symptoms and treatments PET T ALK Garden Club learns to collect and press wild owers Crossword PUZZLE SOLUTION ON PAGE B4 Down Financing Until April 2013 Payments OR Instant Kubota Bucks up to $400 ** www.kubota.com RTV1140CPX RTV900XT

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FAITH B Section www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. First Baptist Church come as you are Mike Orr, Pastor 1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830 Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. On Growing UP What does it mean to grow up and become an adult? This is certainly not an easy question to answer, although we usually know it when adulthood is lacking and someone is acting childishly. There is a lot of growing up required of us nowadays and thus adulthood is being delayed by an extended period of adolescence. This leaves us with lots of twentyand thirty-year-old individuals who are living at home and taking on very few if any of the responsibilities to be responsible for ones actions and ones life and to stop expecting other people to take care of you. It also entails taking responsibility for where one is in life and refus ing to blame our parents, teachers, or others for our lack of success. At some point, we all have to grow up and realize that our life is OURS and no one elses, and however much others may have contributed to it, only we can shape our own lives. Whether this is always true is debatable; parents and teachers do have an impact on children and the adults they will become. But, it is best for each of us to take responsibility for our own lives and start acting and believing as if we are the masters of our own fates. Perhaps that is what it really means to be grown up: to strive to mold and fashion our own lives and to live by our own standards and ideals. And, to do it with the faith of one who takes complete responsibility for every aspect of his or her existence. BROWN FUNERAL HOME 1068 Main Street, Chipley 638-4010 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser This Message Courtesy of When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I put childish ways behind me. 1 Corinthians 13: 11 Special to Extra Public Square Rosary Crusade set BONIFAY A crusade for the Holy Rosary will be noon to 2 p.m. Oct. 13 in front of Memorial Field on State Road 79 in Bonifay. America is at a historic crossroad. Secularists are trying to push God from the public square. They reject His bene cial action upon society. But without God, where will our leaders get the wisdom to solve the great problems we face? We must stop the secularist advance and pray to God for help. He will hear us if we pray through the intercession of His Blessed Mother. Thats why we are launching the 2012 Public Square Rosary Crusade. Public prayer is far more powerful than private prayer to appease the anger of God and call down His mercy, and Holy Mother Church, guided by the Holy Ghost, has always advocated public prayer in times of public tragedy and suffering, Saint Louis de Montfort said in The Secret of the Rosary. For more information, call Mike DeRuntz at 239-273-6956. First Baptist Church Homecoming PONCE DE LEON The First Baptist Church of Ponce de Leon will have homecoming services on Oct. 14. Congregational signing will begin at 10:30 a.m. A fellowship meal will follow morning service. Calvary Hill Pentecostal Homecoming VERNON Pastor Tim Bush and the congregation of Calvary Hill Pentecostal Church, approximately half a mile east of State Road 79 on State Road 277 across from Vernon Elementary School, would like to invite everyone to attend Homecoming 2012 on Oct. 14. Anointed singing with The Drummond Family will begin at 10 a.m. The morning message will follow with our guest speaker and Evangelist Brother Dewain Phillips. The celebration will conclude with our famous dinner on the grounds after the morning message in the fellowship hall. Please call 535-0003 for more information. Women on Missions arts and crafts fest COTTONDALE The 13th annual Women on Missions Arts and Crafts Festival will be 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 20 at the First Baptist Church in Cottondale. Breakfast and lunch will be available. There will be baked goods, sewing items, seasonal decorations, books, plants, jellies, jams cookbooks and much more for sale to support the church building fund and mission projects. Worship Under The Stars CHIPLEY One Way Home Ministries presents a year-end blowout event. The last Worship Under The Stars concert will be at 5 p.m. Oct. 20. There will be live music and fellowship all evening. Special guest will be The F.O.G., Bridge and Trees of Adullam. Food and drinks will be free. Dress and fellowship is casual. The event is open to the public. Worship Under The Stars is at Tabernacle of Praise in Chipley. SPECIAL TO EXTRA ESTO Jeff and Sheri Ester will be in concert at 6 p.m. on Oct. 13 at Mt. Zion Baptist Church in Esto. The concert is in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Sheri Easter is a living testimony of Gods healing power, as she is now breast cancer-free. This is a free concert; a love offering will be taken. Come and enjoy an amazing night of gospel music. For more information, call 547-5302. WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday. 9 a.m. to noon: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center third Thursdays. Call 638-0093 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6:30 p.m.: TOPS Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A FRIDAY 6 a.m.: Mens Breakfast and Bible Study at Hickory Hill Baptist Church in Westville. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30 p.m.: Bead Class second Fridays at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery. Call 703-0347. 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a get-together for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Winn Dixie in Marianna. Call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. By THE REV. JAMES L. SNYDER My father was not what you would call a literate person. Apart from the Bible, he did not read much of anything else on a regular basis. As a young person I can remember him quoting a great American patriot: Benjamin Franklin. The only quote he knew of this man was, Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise. For a long time I thought he was making it up and then one day, I happened to run across a book in the library about Benjamin Franklin and, there it was. Benjamin actually did say that. I had to give my father that one. It seems that every time it got close to what my father termed as my bedtime, he would remind me of this famous quote. It made me hate bedtime when it came. At the time, I had my doubts about the validity of this quote because if my father followed this quote as he encouraged me to do, why was he not healthy, wealthy and wise? At the time, I was in no position to question his wisdom. I was wise enough to know that the best part of wisdom was not to challenge the wisdom of my father. This has attributed to my length of life to date. Incidentally, I have carried this over into my married life. According to my father, if I simply obeyed Franklins advice I would have a life lled with health, wealth and wisdom. The three things absolutely needed in life to make a person happy. Or, so Franklin would lead us to believe. After what seems to be a lifetime of living and living in as much harmony of these two aspects of life, I must say that there is very little truth to be said concerning good old Franklins saying. No matter how early I go to bed or how early I get up, I do not seem to be any wealthier or healthier. Perhaps, and this is only a guess on my part because I am not as wise as old Benjamin Franklin. You had to do something when you got up that contributed or created your wealth. Just a suggestion from me. That is the way it is with most sayings. They sound good; you sound wise in quoting them; but after every saying is quoted, nothing seems to change. They just do not cover the whole spectrum. It is not that I have not given it the good old college try; it just does not work for me. This past week I had an occasion to think about this quote. I have tried keeping the early to bed and early to rise objective in full focus throughout my life. I am not up partying until the wee hours of the morning. At my age, my party time is early afternoon. I have made a concerted effort to get enough rest and just to make sure I have enough rest I indulge in an afternoon nap. I am not sure where this comes in Benjamin Franklins quote. Recently, I had cause to re ect upon the validity of Benjamin Franklins sage advice. My quarterly taxes were due, and you know what good old Uncle Sam thinks about being late on his payments. If confession is good for the soul (another famous quote), I need to confess that while I was writing this check to Uncle Sam I had some rather harsh thoughts about him in the process. There, I said it. During the same week, some other bills were due, and none of them would take no for an answer. Again, I must confess, while writing these checks I was sputtering to myself quite a bit. As I looked at my checkbook, I knew that the wealthy component of Benjamin Franklins quote did not come in my direction. I was simply out of wealth. Not only that, but I recently spent about four weeks sick with bronchitis and pneumonia and spent about three weeks in bed. Not only was I early to bed, but I was glued to my bed. How does that t into Franklins saying? The healthy aspect of that quote has not fallen in my direction either. If you want to know about the wise element, simply query the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. Another old phrase says three strikes and youre out. Well, according to the Franklin saying, I must concede that I am out. I am not wealthy, in many regards Im not healthy and for sure, and Im not wise. It is my opinion that there is a lot more to life than wise old sayings from some old man from the past. Benjamin Franklin, for example, no doubt practiced early to bed and early to rise but in the end, he died. That does not sound too healthy to me. Of course, the best place for wisdom is the Bible. I like what the wisest man in the world said, Trust in the Lord with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding. In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths (Proverbs 3:5-6 KJV). I am not too sure about the healthy and the wealthy components (that is up for grabs), but I am convinced the wise part comes from the Lord. After all, the Bible teaches us that God is omniscient. If God knows everything and I know God, I am in a good position. The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries. com. COMMUNITY CALENDAR Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Page 4 One Franklin axiom hasnt really worked Faith BRIEFS Mt. Zion Baptist Church to host Jeff and Sheri Easter Crossword SOLUTION

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Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences. Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section of www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership with Legacy com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212 and Obituaries Mrs. Noelle Silcox, age 87, passed away Saturday, Sept. 29, 2012. She was born Nov. 3, 1924, in Stone Mountain, Ga., to Charles and Nora Jones Smith. Mrs. Silcox was a resident of Freeport. She was Methodist by faith and a member of the Freeport United Methodist Church. She was a devoted wife, mother, grandmother and great grandmother. She enjoyed cooking, sewing, crocheting and spending time with her family. Mrs. Silcox is preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Oscar Theo Silcox Sr.; one brother, Charles Smith, and four sisters Mary Garcia, Alice Middlebrook, Joann Thompson and Dorothy Smith. Mrs. Silcox is survived by her one son, Oscar Theo Silcox, Jr. and wife Hazel of DeFuniak Springs; two daughters, Julie F. Netttles and Melanie Nettles both of Freeport; four grandchildren, Adam Stubbs, Anthony Stubbs, Tabitha Zimmerman and Timothy Nettles; five great grandchildren, Bree Padgett, Sky Stubbs, Alexis Zimmerman. Caylin Zimmerman and Isaac Stubbs, and one great great grandchild, Avionnah Padgett. A time of Visitation was held from 2 to 3 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 at Black Creek United Methodist Church; 1170 Black Creek BLVD, Freeport, Florida 32439. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 at Black Creek United Methodist Church with the Rev. Tom Birka and the Rev. Louis Taunton officiating and Eulogy by Anthony Stubbs. Noelle Silcox Mrs. Lillian Hazel Silcox, age 87, of Freeport, passed away March 20, 2012. She was born Sept. 11, 1924 in Wicksburg, Ala. to Dewitt and Lillie Merriweather McLean. Mrs. Silcox was a resident of Freeport, for the past 60 years. She was Jehovah Witness by faith. She enjoyed shing, quilting, sewing, cooking and above all else working in her garden. Mrs. Silcox is preceded in death by her father and mother; her husband, Woodrow Wilson Silcox; one brother, Kenneth McLean and one sister, Carolyn Pearson. Mrs. Silcox is survived by her son, Randal Silcox and wife Paula of Freeport, and two brothers, Tamedge McLean and Billy McLean. Memorial Services was held at 2 p.m., Sunday, March 25, 2012, at ClaryGlenn Freeport Chapel Funeral Home with Eulogy by Ed Pearson. Memorialization was by cremation. You may go online to view obituaries, offer condolences and sign guest book at www.claryglenn.com. Clary-Glenn Freeport Chapel Funeral Home is entrusted with the arrangements. Lillian Hazel Mrs. Grace Elaine Moring, age 68, of Bonifay, passed away Oct. 1, 2012 at Signature Health Care of North Florida in Graceville. She was born Oct. 7, 1943 in Bonifay. Mrs. Moring was preceded in death by her parents, J.D. Brown and Ruthie Mae Brown and husband, John Edward Moring. Mrs. Moring is survived by one son, Charles Farrell II and wife Stacey of Albany, Ga.; one step-son, John Michael Moring and wife Angela of DeFuniak Springs; two daughters, Yvonne Soule and husband Bill of Marietta, Ga. and Janet Reynolds and husband Rick of Concord, N.C.; one stepdaughter, Tracy Moring of Brundidge, Ala.; 11 grandchildren; one greatgrandchild, and one sister, Irene Blakey of Mobile, Ala. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Grace E. Moring Mrs. Lucille Crutch eld, 86 of Graceville passed away Monday, Oct. 1, 2012 at Signature Healthcare in Graceville. Ms. Lucille was born in Noma, on April 21, 1926, to the late Zeb Dee Jones and Eliza Thomley Jones. Ms. Lucille was a loving mother, grandmother, aunt and friend. She was a member of Damascus Baptist Church. Preceded in death by her husband, Jim Crutch eld; daughter, Sarah; grandson, Roy Towne; ve brothers, Leon, Robert, Sollie, Charlie, and Cleatus; three sisters Ressie, Mollie, and Elsie. She is survived by her beloved children, Edward Crutch eld (Madelyn), Graceville, Catherine Knight (Louie), Slocomb, Ala., Agnes Garner (Billy), Cottonwood, Ala., David Crutch eld Bowling Green, Ky., William Crutch eld (Patty), Graceville, and Randy Crutch eld, Graceville; 12 grandchildren Tammy Paridon, Tracey Crutch eld, Marla Greer, Steven Crutch eld, Keith Knight, Jamie Knight, Nicole Hoberecht, Clay Garner, Chris Crutch eld, Brandon Crutch eld, Jessica Woodham, and Drew Crutch eld; 13 great grandchildren, two great great grandchildren, and a host of special nieces and nephews. Funeral service was held at 2 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012 at Damascus Baptist Church with the Rev. Fred Cook, the Rev. Jamie Knight and Mr. Carlton Floyd of ciating. Burial followed in Collins Mill Cemetery with James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family received friends at the funeral home Wednesday, from 6 to 8 p .m. Expressions of sympathy can be made at www. jamesandlipford.com. Lucille Crutch eld Betty Birge Rustin, age 73, passed from this life Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 at her home in Chipley. Betty was born on Jan. 1, 1939 to the late Coy and Edna (Gainey) Birge in Chipley. Mrs. Rustin was a lifelong resident of Chipley and a member of the Church of God of Prophecy and a loving wife, mother, granny, and great grandmother. She is predeceased by her husband, Grady Ronal Rustin and one brother, Sonny Birge. Survivors include one son, Darrell Rustin and wife Karen of Chipley; two daughters, Wanda Wasson and Kay Yeatman both of Chipley; one brother, Larry Birge and wife Carol of Graceville; two sisters, Martha Moody of Bonifay, and Gail Jones and husband Billy of Graceville; eight grandchildren, Don Hendrix, Chris Miles, Lori Miles, Kayla Wasson, Shelby Rustin Wasson, Cansas Wasson, Blayne Rustin, and Dawn Yeatman; ve great grandchildren, Natalia Wasson, Bo Miles, Rhett Miles, Marissa Hendrix, Haley Mapel. Family received friends Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012 from 5 to 8 p.m., at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel. Funeral services were held Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012 at 2 p.m., at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel with the Rev. Earnest Dupree of ciating. Interment followed at Glenwood Cemetery, Chipley, with Brown Funeral Home directing. Friends and Family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. Betty B. Rustin Clyde W. Billy Galloway Jr., born Feb. 2, 1954 in Tallahassee, passed away in his home surrounded by family on Sept. 27, 2012, after a courageous battle with cancer. Billy spent his childhood in DeFuniak Springs. His family moved to Tallahassee, and then to Bonifay. He graduated from Holmes County High School in Bonifay, where he was President of the Sr. Class and played football. He attended Chipola Jr. College in Marianna, and graduated from Florida State University in 1976. Billy attended law school at Mississippi College in Clinton, Miss. After graduation from law school, Billy passed the Florida bar exam and began his career as an attorney with the Florida Department of Insurance. For many years, he served the citizens of Florida as a Bureau Chief of Property and Casualty Solvency. Billy was instrumental in assisting with the needs of victims affected by Hurricane Andrew. In 1994 Billy transitioned into private practice. He worked at several law rms before beginning his own law rm in 2006, Galloway & Brennan, P.A. He served on several Boards of Directors as a member and as general counsel; one dearest to his heart was Ken Smith Ministries. Billy had a passion for Seminole football, shing, hunting, traveling and spending time with family and friends. Billy will be remembered for his love of life, family and God. He was a devoted son, brother, husband, father, uncle and friend. He had a warm smile and an embracing heart, never meeting a stranger and always wanting to help. He liked to tell a joke and make people laugh; and if something was broken, he wanted to try to x it, either physically or spiritually. We will miss him until we see him again in Heaven. Billy was preceded in death by his father, Clyde W. Galloway, Sr. He is survived by his wife, Melissa Misty Rosich Galloway; his son, William Addison Galloway; his mother, Dorothy Galloway; his sister, Cecilia Cissy Galloway, all of Tallahassee; his uncle and aunts, Bill and Helen Galloway and Pat Andrews of Holmes County and Vallie Riddle of Niceville, and by many cousins, nieces and nephews who loved him dearly. The family received visitors at Thomasville Road Baptist Church on Monday, Oct. 1, 2012 from 6 to 8 p.m. Funeral Services were held at Thomasville Road Baptist Church on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 at 12:30 p.m. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Covenant Hospice, 1545 Raymond Diehl Road, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 (covenanthospice.org) or Lone Survivor Foundation, 2626 S. Loop W., Ste. 415, Houston, TX 77054 (www. lonesurvivorfoundation. org). Clyde W. Galloway Jr. Merle Albert Eastman, 91 of Chipley passed away Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012 at the Washington Rehab and Nursing facility. Merle was born May 15, 1921 in Windsor, Vt., to Archie and Twila Eastman. He served in the United States Army and later retired as Veterans counselor. He also received an AA degree from Central Florida Community College. He was preceded in death by his parents; wife, Barbara Jean Eastman, and two daughters, Cheryl Ann Golding and Marilynn Potter. He is survived by his son, Merle Albert Eastman Jr. (Kim) of Fort McCoy; four daughters, Ronne Knighten (Dennis) of Crestview, Nancy Carroll, Michele Roy (Dick) and Twila Koon (Gerald McKinnie) all of Ocala; two step sons, Mike Walker (Kathy) of Chipley, and Marvin Randy Pierce of Hawthorne; two step daughters, Teresa Walker of Ocala, and Rita Walker of Houston, Texas; 13 grandchildren and nine step grandchildren and numerous great grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 5 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012 at Turning Point church with the Rev. Terry Hinote of ciating. Cremation followed with Obert Funeral Home of Chipley in charge of arrangements. Inurnment of Mr. Eastman will take place at a later date in the Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. Merle A. Eastman Col. Norman Charles Edwards July 26, 1924September 19, 2012. Col. Edwards passed away, peacefully, in his sleep, after a long and hard battle. He was a member of the Army Air Corp during WWII. His plane was shot down over France, where six German soldiers were waiting for his parachute to land. We were told by some of the French witnesses that his capture was of a violent nature. His dog tags were ripped from his neck and were found in a eld about 40 years later by a French farmer. He was eventually taken to the POW camp, Stalag IV. On Black Friday, the prisoners were forced to start out on a long and arduous march, as word had been received that the Russians were coming. Many men died along the way, due to starvation, frostbite, and abuse. Norman was a Staff Sergeant, at the time. He thought he saw an opportunity to escape, and attempted to do so. He was stopped by machine gun re that shot both of his legs off. They thought he was dead and left him on the road over night. When morning came, he was still alive, as the cold weather had congealed his blood and kept him from bleeding to death. The guards drug him back to their temporary camp and a young POW medic nished sawing the bones off and stitched up his legs. He was suffering from frostbite. Two weeks later the Russians and some American troops liberated the camp. He went to a hospital in Europe and from there went to Walter Reed. He later rose to the rank of Colonel by various government operations. He never let the loss of his legs slow him down. He owned and operated an air eld and continued to y for a long while. He then moved to Florida and went to work at the Miami Police Department as a photographer for the homicide division. From there he went to work for a sophisticated security service company that specialized in voice analyzers and lie detectors. He then opened his own detective agency called International Security, Inc. He worked with various police agencies in the panhandle area. He worked there until he retired. Not one to sit idle, he then began to play around with ea markets, selling military supplies. He leaves behind his beloved grandson, Capt. Michael King and his wife Tina and his two greatgrandchildren, Mikey and Heather; two dear brothers, Richard Edwards, Sr. and his wife Lenny of Virginia Beach, and Henry Charles Edwards of Bonifay; and we cannot fail to mention that his best friend and companion of 24 years, Claudette Mazzoli, was left behind also. He will be in the hearts of all of us who loved him for all time and the wonderful memories will never fade. He was a true hero. We didnt need all the medals to know that, but he earned them anyway. If it werent for all the soldiers of his generation, we would all be speaking German today. We salute you all. Norman was cremated according to his wishes and his ashes will be buried in Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors. Norman was 88 years old. Sims Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Norman C. Edwards See OBITUARIES B6

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Wednesday, October 10, 2012 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News George Edgar Williams, 76, Youngstown, passed away Sept. 28, 2012, at Covenant Hospice, Panama City, after a short illness. Mr. Williams was born May 9, 1936, to the late James Edgar and Mabel Stephenson Williams in Hollywood. He was raised in Jacksonville but resided most of his life in Chipley and Youngstown. Mr. Williams was married to the former Geraldine Carlile on Nov. 26, 1953. Mr. Williams was a member of AFLCIO International Union of Operating Engineers, Local 653. He owned and operated retail stores in Chipley and Bonifay, and later Panhandle Realty in Panama City. He was active in a number of civic organizations including The Association of Retarded Citizens of Florida holding several local and state ofces, The 21 Club with Century Realty, the Gideons and the Masons. Mr. Williams was president of the Board of the Tropical Breeze Resort in Panama City Beach and an active member of First Baptist Church of Bayou George. Mr. Williams is survived by his wife, Geraldine; three daughters, Sharon Williams Commander, Carol Williams, and Judy Williams Peterson (Eddie); one son, Dennis (Pam) Williams; six grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren; two brothers, Daniel Williams and James (Jimmy) Williams, and a number of nieces and nephews. A Memorial Service was held Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 at 7 p.m., at First Baptist Church, Bayou George with the Rev. Fred Lowry ofciating. The family received friends at 6 p.m., prior to the Memorial Service at the church. In lieu of owers, memorials may be made to the St. Andrews Bay Center, 1804 Carolina Avenue, Lynn Haven, Fla. Expressions of sympathy may be viewed or submitted on line at www.kentforestlawn.com. Kent Forest Lawn Funeral Home; 2403 Harrison Ave,; Panama City, FL 32405; 850-763-4694. George E. Williams Mrs. Audrey Mae Carter, 96, of Graceville passed away Sunday, Sept. 30, 2012, at her daughters home in Reidsville, N.C. Mrs. Carter was born in Ponce De Leon, Nov. 26, 1915 to the late Henry Lee Pullum and Hattie Lenora Davis Pullum. A beloved mother and grand mother, Mrs. Carter was a long time member of Pilgrims Rest Baptist Church. She is preceded in death by her husband, George W. Carter, Sr.; son, George W. Carter, Jr.; two sisters, Jewel Carter, Irene Carter, and brother, Buford Pullum. She is survived by two daughters, and son-inlaw, Opal and R.E. buck Phillips, Cottondale and Catherine and Gene Land of Reidsville, N.C.; daughter-in-law, Gayvon Carter, Graceville; brother, Huey Pullum, Aiken, S.C.; four grandsons, eight great grandchildren, and two great great grandchildren. Funeral service was held at 2 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012 at the Chapel of James and Lipford Funeral Home with the Rev. Chester Padgett ofciating. Burial will follow in Pilgrims Rest Cemetery with James and Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Saturday, from 12 p.m. until time of service. Expressions of sympathy can be made www.jamesandlipford.com. Audrey M. Carter Mrs. Desta Marlene McDaniel, age 77, of Bonifay, passed away Oct. 4, 2012, at her home. She was born July 2, 1935, in Albany, Ohio. Mrs. McDaniel was preceded in death by her father, Frank Storey Perry; mother, Marjorie Estella Knowlton Perry Brown, and one brother, Frank Frankie Storey Perry. Mrs. McDaniel is survived by her husband of 58 years, Vaughn Sherman McDaniel of Bonifay; one son, Randy McDaniel and wife Amy of Tallahassee; two daughters, Tamara Bush and husband, Donnie, of Bonifay, and Julie Pooser and husband, Tom, of DeFuniak Springs; six grandchildren, Blair McDaniel and wife, Heyward, Madison McDaniel, Kelly Patrick and husband, Joel, Emily Segers and husband, Ryan, Olivia Pooser, and Seth Pooser; three greatgrandchildren, Braydon, Egan, and Aleena; one brother, David Perry and wife Patricia of Bonifay, and one sister, Pat Hoisington of Oxnard, Calif. Funeral services were 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 7, 2012, at Gully Springs Baptist Church with the Rev. Tim Hall ofciating. Interment followed in Gully Springs Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends one hour prior to funeral at Gully Springs Church. Desta M. McDaniel Joy Simmons Everitt, age 82, passed away peacefully Oct. 3, 2012, with her family by her side. Joys beauty, grace and love of life were celebrated as she accepted her greatest promotion to join the ultimate love of her life, Jesus Christ. She was born Feb. 2, 1930, in Wausau, to Cuy Simmons and Eva Wilcox; she was one of ve children. Her childhood was happy and lled with love. She graduated from Chipley High School; Joy was kind and always the proper southern lady. High school sweethearts, Joy met Waller, her knight in shining armor, and she instantly knew she wanted him to be hers. They married in Donaldsonville, Ga., on Dec. 24, 1948. They have three children, and being a mother was central to Joys life. She was a constant example of Christ, especially evident in the nurturing of her family. Life is all about living with intention, and Joy lived daily out of purpose lled intention. Joy was known for her kindness. If you have met Joy, you have felt the Saviors love. She loved others the way the Savior asked us to love unconditionally and without reserve. Joys three children were born to a mother who cherished them and their differences, a mother who was constant in her love, guidance and example. With unwavering strength, Joy endured the untimely passing of her only daughter, Debbie. Through her unimaginable grief, she was a source of great comfort to her family; with quiet condence she consistently displayed complete trust in the perfect will of God. All of her grandchildren know secretly that they are their grandmothers favorite. She spent every moment she could with them, her favorite display of affection being the pleasure of cooking whatever they desired. Her home was always open, and everyone felt welcomed and known by her. She was a mother to all. Joy happily chose to serve, spending her days in constant service of others. She was a proud and faithful member of Wausau Assembly of God. She spent over 40 years working as church secretary, magnifying her calling through service. She spent over 30 years as a social worker for Department of Children and Families. Joy lived a life of optimism and faith. She led her family with her example of turning to Christ and nding strength in Him. She chose to be humble. She chose to be loving. She chose joy. And her children and grandchildren watched and learned. They know where to turn for peace because they watched their mother and grandmother nd it in Christ. We choose now to honor her legacy with laughter and love while being ever-serving and faithful. Joy Simmons Everitt was preceded in death by her husband, Waller David Everitt; her daughter, Debbie Everitt Lovett; and her grandson Phillip Everitt. She is survived by her two children, Waller (David) Everitt, Jr., and Richard (Rick) Stephen Everitt; and grandchildren, Jeff Everitt, Andrea Everitt Gainey, Rebecca Lovett Seitz, Caleb Lovett and Elizabeth Everitt; and six greatgrandchildren. She is also survived by her siblings, Earl Simmons, Louise Kirkland, and Lois Hiley. A public viewing was Saturday, Oct. 6, at Wausau Assembly of God from 8:30 to 10 a.m. Funeral services were immediately after the viewing at 10 a.m. Graveside service was at Bonnett Pond Church Cemetery directly after the service. Joy Simmons Everitt Mrs. Flossie Louise Duren Huggins, 86, of Bonifay, passed away Sept. 30, 2012, at her home. She was born Oct. 18, 1925, in Black, Ala., to the late Grover Huey Crutcheld and Bonnie Vera Tucker Crutcheld. Mrs. Huggins was a member of the East Pittman Freewill Baptist Church. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Huggins was preceded in death by one brother, Elton Crutcheld. Mrs. Huggins is survived by one son, Johnny P. Duren and wife, Sonja, of Bonifay; two daughters, Donna Walker and husband, Tommy, of Port St. Joe, and Priscilla Buchanan and husband, Jim, of Wewahitchka; three grandchildren, Mathew L. Walker, Tyson A. Young and wife, Kimberly, and Bonnie L. Young; two great-granddaughters; two great-greatgranddaughters; three brothers, Dewey Crutcheld of Mobile, Ala., T.J. Crutcheld and wife, Muriel, of Bonifay, and Joe H. Crutcheld and wife, Annabelle, of Crawfordville; one sisterin-law, Betty Crutcheld of Bonifay; and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012, at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Gary Taylor and the Rev. Herman Sellers ofciating. Interment was at 3 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012, at Holley Hill Cemetery in Port St. Joe, with the Rev. Dudley Balmer ofciating. Peel Funeral Home in Bonifay directed. Family received friends one hour prior to service at Peel Funeral Home. Flossie L. Huggins Obituaries View obituaries and sign the guestbook at chipleypaper.com B6 | Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Easy Care Lawn & Tractor Services. Tractor work, brush mowing & land cleanup, driveway & parking lot repair, debris removable, lawn care & pressure washing. Give us a call for a Free Estimate/ License & Insured. 850-527-6291 TRACTOR WORK WE DO IT ALL! 30 YRS Experience. Call 850-527-6291 C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 10-5154 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 08CA370 DENZEL J. DOCKERY and RUTH DOCKERY, as Co-Trustees of the Ruth Dockery Revocable Trust and the Denzel J. Dockery Revocable Trust dated August 9, 2007, Plaintiffs, vs. LBK, LLC, a Mississippi LLC, as Trustee of THE SPRINGS LAND TRUST, and The Estate of LOWELL B. KELLY, and TRACY A. COLLINS, as Personal Representative of the Estate of Lowell B. Kelly and UNITED STATES of AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY (INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE), Defendants. NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES. TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment entered on the 11th day of September, 2012, in Case Number 08CA370 of the Circuit Court, Holmes County, Florida, in which DENZEL J. DOCKERY and RUTH DOCKERY, as Co-Trustees of the Ruth Dockery Revocable Trust and the Denzel J. Dockery Revocable Trust dated August 9, 2007, are the Plaintiffs and LBK, LLC, a Mississippi LLC, as Trustee of THE SPRINGS LAND TRUST, and The Estate of LOWELL B. KELLY, and TRACY A. COLLINS, as Personal Representative of the Estate of Lowell B. Kelly and UNITED STATES of AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY (INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE), are the Defendants, the Clerk of this Court will sell at public sale the following described real property: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST SECTION LINE, 1348.95 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST, 1932.65 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD 81; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 1306.48 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST, 1940.34 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST OF SAID SECTION 9; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST, 1985.12 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 03 DEGREES WEST, 1319.95 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST, 642.08 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST, 1053.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY MAINTENANCE LINE OF VALEE ROAD; THENCE SOUTH 81 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID MAINTENANCE LINE, 419.82 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MAINTENANCE LINE, NORTH 85 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST, 594.79 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MAINTENANCE LINE, SOUTH 77 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST, 334.29 FEET TO ITS INTERSECTION WITH THE EAST LINE OF THE WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST OF SAID SECTION 9; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WEST LINE, 2430.38 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4; THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4, 1318.09 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 9; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EAST SECTION LINE, 2647.91 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 9; THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH SECTION LINE, 2607.19 FEET TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST OF SAID SECTION 9; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST, 1329.03 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST, 1629.21 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST, 1341.46 FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 9; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH SECTION LINE, 977.70 FEET TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 9 AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINS 419.62 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. NOTE: GRANTORS HAVE RESERVED A LIFE ESTATE IN THE FOLLOWING: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTHWEST 1/4, 980.15 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST, 182.81 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST, 135.78 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST, 267.21 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST, 70.74 FEET TO THE WATERS EDGE OF VORTEX SPRING; THENCE ALONG THE WATERS EDGE OF SAID SPRING THE FOLLOWING COURSES: SOUTH 24 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 69.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 51 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST, 60.47 FEET; THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST, 76.41 FEET; THENCE NORTH 52 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST, 45.13 FEET; THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST, 81.21 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST, 43.75 FEET; THENCE NORTH 35 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST, 24.79 FEET; THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST, 24.60 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID WATERS EDGE, RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 46 MINUTES

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Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 B B U S I N E S S USINESS G G U I D E UIDE T o P l a c e A n A d C a l l 6 3 8 0 2 1 2 o r 5 4 7 9 4 1 4 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Denton's RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDA WE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS $ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENT Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709 Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611 MullensTree ServiceCall for free estimate 120 ft. crane Licensed850-326-3408 850-263-0083 HODGES ROOFINGLet us show you how to save $100s or maybe $1,000s on a new metal roof. 850 348-9399Lic. #RC0066509 An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212  850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99* Yamaha Grizzle 2008 ATV, 450cc, 4x4, Auto, Low Hours, Swamplite Tires, $4,200 OBO, Call 850-368-0696 COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com (850) 547-9500 B oni f a y Florida www.xtrem ein dus tri es.com Xtreme Boats FACTORY DIRECT 14 x 64 Mobile Home 2 Bdrm/1 bath, Fireplace. Nice. $5,000. (850)260-9226. DWMH2009 3 / 2 Big tub, 1 acre, fenced three sides and garage shop, Wausau area 850-638-4953 $3,000 cash assume mtg $600+ credit-worthy. FOR SALE! 1994 Cobra Mustang With 347 Stroker -All custom built -Trickflow Intake -Aluminum Heads -Ported and Polished -1.6 Competition Cam Roller Rockers -Competition Cam Rods -Traction Control -NOS Setup just need bottle and lines -Too many extras to list This is high performance car. FOR SALE $5,000 FIRM. Contact Jason @ 850-557-7906 Nissan Altima 2011 25S silver, black interior, 25k miles, immaculate condition, $17,500.(850) 547-4969 Text FL27084 to 56654 2009 Dodge Grand Caravan Stow & Go seating. Back up camera, cd/dvd system. 56,000 miles. Like new condition. Asking $16,500. Call 638-1556. after 6pm Sunny Hills area, 3 br, 1.5 ba, Laundry Room, gar, nice pool, good condition, Available Now! $900 mo + Dep. Barbara Hindman Realty (850) 527-5085 “Bonifay’s Best” Mobile Home Community has 2 or 3 bedrooms available ranging from $435-$625/month. Large lots, quiet, clean and on-site maintenance. Only responsible persons should apply. Great Bonifay Schools. No pets. One month deposit. HUD Assistance may be available. Contact Sue: (850)547-1386 or (512)751-2847. 2 Bdrm/1 bath MH Hwy 173 Graceville/Bonifay. $375/mo, depo required (850)393-3094. 3 BR/2BA Mobile Home for rent. 9 miles from Chipley. Call 638-4689 or 326-2053 2BR/2BA MH near Chipley. Water & garbage furnished. $400/mth, plus deposit. 2BR/1BA MH, $385/mth plus deposit. Call 547-4232, 527-4911. 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. $500/mth. Just renovated Call (850)547-3746. For Rent 3BD/ 2 Full Ranch style house. Nice area. Nice view for morning coffee Just off Corbin Rd $750/mth Sorry No Pets. Days (850)638-4630, Nights (850)638-1434. For Rent Real Nice 3BD/ 2BA mobile home. Just outside city limits of Chipley. Sorry No Pets. Days (850)638-4630, nights (850)638-1434. Waterfront Property: 5 br, 4 ba home. Very close to town but very private. 2 fireplaces, 2 car garage, game room. Beautiful views. of North Bay. Want to trade for hunting land/farm in FL or AL. Call (850) 258-9120. Text FL26047 to 56654 LOW INTERESTFINANCING Borrow up to 20k and pay $389.00 per mo. at 8% Car Loans, Small Business Loans & Debt Consolidation Bad Credit Ok Call Toll Free: 888-741-9122 Today!! Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incl’d 638-1918 RIDGEWOOD APARTMENTS OF BONIFAY Studio, 1 Bdrm, 2 Bdrm available. City Util. & Pest Control Incld. Ask about our Move in Special. (850)557-7732. Two Bdrm. Apartment. Bonifay area. Stove, refrigerator. Includes all electricity & utilities. $400/month. Info: (850)547-0956, (850)326-4548 THE GROVES RESORT Vernon, Florida. 2 Condos for rent 2 Bedroom/2 bath, utilities included-electric, Dish TV, trash, water plus all Park amenities-ATV, Horse & hiking trails. Pets welcome (deposit required). $955/mo + depo (850)773-3992 (850)520-0496 2 Bdrm/1 bath house on 465 N. 2nd street,Chipley. $475/mo. $400/depo. (850)547-2061. 4 BD Fully Furnished For rent $800/mth ALSO Polaris Four Wheeler For Sale execellent condition. $3000 Call 547-2096 For Rent 1BR/1BA, 2BR/1BA, 3BR/1BA. Homes in Chipley, large shadded lots. References required. Call 850-441-8181 or 850-547-2091 39 SECONDS EAST ALONG A FOUR FOOT CHAIN LINK FENCE, 154.80 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID FENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST, 116.56 FEET, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID FENCE, SOUTH 05 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST, 314.74 FEET TO THE END OF SAID FENCE; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 05 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST, 75.81 FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTHWEST OF SECTION 9; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID LINE, 711.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINS 6.0 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. The sale will be held on the 18 day of October, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the East door of the Holmes County Courthouse, located at 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425, in accordance with Section 45.031 of the Florida Statutes. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 13 day of September, 2012. CODY TAYLOR CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. Clayton J.M. Adkinson Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box l207 DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32435 Whitney Smith Attorney for the Defendants 1283 N. Eglin Parkway Shalimar, Florida 32579 United States of America Department of Treasury (Internal Revenue Service) 7180 N. 9th Street Pensacola, Florida 32501 As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser October 3, 10, 2012. 10-5151 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No: 2010 CA 000353 Division: Judge Patterson DIANE GAIL PURSELL AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF GLENN G. WATT, deceased, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID W. CURRY also known as DAVID WAYNE CURRY; and CAROL L. CURRY; and MARY ROE the unknown spouse of David W. Curry; and JOHN DOE the unknown spouse of Carol L. Curry., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Cody Taylor, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Holmes County, Florida, will, on the 15 day of November, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 A.M., Central Time, at the Holmes County Courthouse located at 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Holmes County, Florida, to-wit: The North 122.48 feet of the S of the NW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of Section 26, Township 4 N, Range 17 W, less and except so much thereof as lies E of the W right-of-way line of the County Road running North and South through the said NW 1/4 of the NE 1/4. Property Parcel No.: 1826.00-000-000-.016-000. The successful high bidder, if other than the Plaintiff(s), shall post with the Clerk a deposit equal to five percent (5%) of the final bid at the time of the sale. The deposit shall be applied to the sale price at the time of payment. The balance of the sale price shall be paid in full to the Clerk by 4:00 p.m., on the same day as the sale. This sale is made pursuant to the Default Final Judgment entered in a case pending in the Circuit Court of Escambia County, Florida, the style of which is Diane Gail Pursell, as Personal Representative of the Estate of Glenn G. Watt v. David W. Curry, et al., and the docket number of which is Case No.: 2010 CA 000353. In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Clerk of the Court, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425, at (850) 547-1100 within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-(800) 955-8771, if are voice impaired, call 1-(800) 955-8770. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THE DEFAULT FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIEN HOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAT 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. Witness my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 20 day of September, 2012. Cody Taylor Clerk of the Circuit Court Holmes County, Florida By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. Edmund W. Holt, FBN #192705 1017 N. 12th Ave. Pensacola, Florida 32501. (850) 434-7694 Attorney for Plaintiff As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser October 10, 17, 2012. 10-5155 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO : 2011-CA-000490 DIVISION: UCN: 302011CA000490XXCICI WALTER MORTGAGE COMPANY LLC,Plaintiff, vs. GENE RAYMOND BUSH JR ; JANICE LYNN BUSH; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, PURSUANT TO THE JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE ENTERED IN THE ABOVE CAUSE, I WILL SELL THE PROPERTY SITUATED IN HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS: COMMENCE AT THE NE CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF NE 1/4 OF SECTION 31, T6N, R14W, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN S 0040’ 35’’ W. ALONG THEN EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 31, A DISTANCE OF 200.60 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE CONTINUE S 0040’ 35’’ W 130.00 FEET, THENCE N 8858’ 55’’ W 335.00 FEET, THENCE N 0040’ 35’’ E 130.00 FEET, THENCE S 8858’ 55’’ W. 335.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AT PUBLIC SALE, TO THE HIGHEST AND BEST BIDDER, FOR CASH, ON OCTOBER 25, 2012, AT 11:00AM AT HOLMES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, BONIFAY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT HOLMES COUNTY COURT ADMINSTRATION, P O BOX 826, MARIANNA, FLORIDA 32447, (850) 718-0026, ADARequest@jud14.flcourts.o rg AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711. DATED: September 21, 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT By: Diane Eaton, Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser October 10, 17, 2012. 10-5156 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 2012-234-DR JACQUELINE FURR Petitioner, v. BRETT K. FURR Respondent NOTICE AND OPPORTUNITY TO BE HEARD TO:BRETT K. FURR. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a custody proceeding involving RMF born October 13, 2004, MLF born November 24, 2006 and BKF born November 24, 2006, has been filed in the Circuit Court of Holmes County, Florida, Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma St., P.O. Box 397, Bonifay FL 32425. The nature of the action is a dissolution of marriage. If you wish to be heard on the issue of custody, you must file a notice with the Clerk of Circuit Court and serve a copy on Stan Trappe, Esquire, Trappe & Dusseault, P.A., 236 McKenzie Ave., P.O. Box 2526, Panama City FL 32402 within 20 days of the first publication of this notice, stating the address where you want to receive notice. WITNESS my hand and seal of this court on this 19 day of September, 2012. Cody Taylor, Clerk. By Diane Eaton, Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser October 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012. 10-5157 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF FRED DAVID PARKER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of FRED DAVID PARKER, deceased, whose date of death was July 20, 2012, and whose social security number is xxx-xx-5956, is pending in the Circuit Court of Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 North Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 3, 2012. Attorney for Personal Representative: David F. Holmes, Esq FL Bar No. 0261602. P. O. Box 1180, Slocomb, AL 36375 334-886-3123. Personal Representative: Shala Parker 1075 Rock Hill Court Ponce de Leon, Florida 32455. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser October 3, 10, 2012. 10-5158 Public Auction at El Sankary Towing in Ponce De Leon Fl, 1600 Pirate Cove Rd. 32455 at 8:00 a.m. on October 22, 2012. Vin# 1FTDF15N1KNB64714 1989 Ford F150 Pickup Owner: Joseph Jellison Jr. 2342 Trailer Park Dr., Bonifay, Fl. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser October 10, 2012. COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 GREEN BERRY BUSH HOMECOMING! Saturday Oct 13th @ noon. 1167 Sunday Rd Chipley. Orange hIll United Methodist Church. Come celebrate with us. Turn your art into cash! FREE ART APPRAISALS FOR POSSIBLE CONSIGNMENT* Oct 13 & 14. Noon to 10pm at Baterbys Art Gallery. 9101 International Drive, Ste. 1008, Orlando, FL 32819. Call 1-866-537-1013 or visit www.Baterbys.com for more information. *Verbal appraisals & consignments taken based on consideration. Adopt *: Active young TV Producer & Attorney, home-cooking, beaches, sports await precious baby. Expenses paid *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* Adopt *: Actor & Filmmaker, LOVE Awaits first baby. Matt & Kristi *Expenses paid* *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* Firewood. Split & delivered. (850)547-9291. Big Yard Sale Fri. Oct. 12 & Sat. Oct 13. Located in the Bethlehem Community on Hwy 177 approximately 1 mile south of Bethlehem School. Caryville Flea Market Produce, knives, tupelo honey, movies, games, westerns, baseball cards, tools. New & used stuff. Open Saturday’s 8a.m. Located beside Riverstop. Live bait, crickets, gas, diesel, lotto and all your fishing needs. INDOOR FLEA MARKET Hwy. 79 Esto, Fl. Open every Fri., Sat., Sun. beginning October 12. Spaces available. (850)263-7500. Indoor Yard/Garage Sale. Clothes, books, tools, misc. 8am-til. 743 3rd St. Chipley. Oct 12 & 13 Large Yard Sale this Saturday Oct 13 at 7:00am until. 1032 Brickyard Rd. Across from West Point. Lots of kids toys, clothes for the family & furniture Mulit-Family Yard Sale Fri & Sat 8 am Until. 896 8th ST Chipley .Lots of adult, junior & children new &used clothes, purses, shoes, house hold items, bed linens, furniture, entertainment center. Something for everybody. YARD & MOVING SALE 742 Sunday Rd, Chipley. DAILY till 10/31/2012 K&L Farm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 CASH NOW!! RECEIVING PAYMENTS from Mortgage Notes, Structured Settlements, Contest annuity or Cell Tower Lease? SELL PAYMENTS NOW! NYAC (800) 338-5815 Gilbert Catfish Pond Closed Monday and Tuesday 2854 Highview Circle Chipley, Fl 32428 Phone:850-638-8633 OPENING A CERAMIC SHOP IN BONIFAY Need members, classes avaiable. Call for info 850-547-5244 Refrigerator with Icemaker $125.00. 2 piece sectional couch with Ottoman (green) $125.00. (850)260-9226. Wanted to Rent; Farm land or pasture in Chipley & suroundding areas for the year 2013. 850-718-1859. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, October 10, 2012 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By PETER VOGTMonster Senior Contributing Writer Every time youre on break from school, someone hits you with that most common question asked of college students: Whats your major?Ž For months, youve been able to get away with responses like Im not sure,Ž or Im keeping my options open.Ž But now „ thanks to your schools academic rules, your parents incessant nagging or even your own impatience „ youre forced to make a choice, and you dont know what to do. Thousands of college students around the country go through the same anxiety-producing experience every year, often around mid-semester when they have to choose their courses for the following semester (and theyve already taken all their general or core courses). Are you in the I have to pick a major „ now what?Ž mode? If so, dont panic. If youre like many college students, the major you select wont have a huge impact on your future career anyway. But even if it will, there are plenty of things you can do to help yourself make a sound decision.Meet with a campus career counselorYour schools career counselors know your institutions majors well, and they have a good general sense of where those majors might take you with respect to your career. Perhaps more importantly, though, many campus career centers keep detailed statistics on the types of jobs their schools graduates have landed with various majors. Typically, these statistics appear in the career centers placement report, which you can ask for and then read to find out where different majors might take you in the future.Read your undergraduate bulletin, related publicationsMaybe you dont need to actually read the entire undergraduate bulletin, but at the very least, page through it and look at all the majors available at your institution. You never know when youll stumble upon one that really fits your interests. If browsing your institutions undergraduate bulletin sounds far too boring, stop by your schools admissions office and ask for briefer major-related publications that might be available.Talk to professors and students in various majorsStart by asking your friends and acquaintances what theyre majoring in and why. What do these students like and dislike about their majors? And what can they tell you about the courses in their majors and the careers their majors might lead to? Similarly, ask professors in various academic departments to briefly describe their majors. Tell them youre interested in learning more about what previous students in the department have gone on to do, career-wise. Professors will gladly tell you in most cases, if you ask.Check out What Can I Do with a Major in ______?Ž materialsThere are lots of ways to answer the question, What can I do with a major in _______?Ž. Dozens of major-related books are available to you as well, often at your schools main library or your campus career centers library. VGM Career Horizons, for example, publishes several Great Jobs for _____ Majors books as well as the Opportunities in _____ ____ Careers series.Page through guides to college majorsSeveral publishers have developed books that offer extensive descriptions of various college majors and what careers those majors might lead to. JIST, for instance, offers The College Majors Handbook, which features information (based on a survey of some 150,000 college graduates) on 60 different majors. Ferguson Publishing, meanwhile, offers College Majors and Careers, which also describes 60 majors in detail. Theres no need to fly blind when it comes to researching and then choosing a college major, especially in this day of the Internet and easily accessible information. The more you talk to knowledgeable people and read about various majors, especially those you know little or nothing about, the better chance you have of picking the one that best fits both your short-term needs and your longterm career goals.I have to pick a major ... now what? Featured Jobs Contact Lornaat(850) 747-5019or Email: lbrown@pcnh.com LORNA BROWNEMPLOYMENT SALES SPECIALIST LUSADYTAYLOREMPLOYMENT SALES SPECIALISTContact Lusadyat(850) 522-5173or Email: ltaylor@pcnh.com MEDICAL BILLING TRAINING! Train for Medical Billing Careers at SCTrain.edu No Experience Needed! Job placemnet assistance after training! HS/GED/PC Needed (888)872-4677 MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placemnet assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www.centuraonline.com Nursing CareersBegin Here-GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURA INSTITUTE (877) 206-6559. SURROGATE MOMS NEEDED! Most generous compensation and benefits program offered anywhere, starting at $25,000. Healthy, non-smoking, 21-39, prior birth without complications, no criminal background. Confidential, compassionate services. Reasonable expenses will be paid. OpenArmsConsultants.co m TIRED OF LIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? There’s great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDL Training @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. CALL TODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Skidder Operator Needed. Smith Logging. 850-658-4609 AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 Drivers 100% Owner Operator Co. Pay increase / Home weekly, Regional & Dedicated Class A-CDL 1yr. Exp. In last 3 Call (800) 695-9643 or www.driveforwatkins.com DRIVERS/ CLASS A Flatbed, GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39¢/mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800) 5725489x 227, SunBelt Transport EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE Freight Up = More $ Need CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.drive4melton.com MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Online training gets you job ready ASAP! HS Diploma/ GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job Ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-591 MEDICAL-HEALTH I believe I am defined by the care I give.Home healthcare allows you to see one patient at a time. When you become a part of home healthcare, you become a part of your patients’ lives. Now Hiring RNs Job Fair for Registered nurses on October 11th 12:00-5:30pm at the local Marianna FL location. Gentiva offers: *Competitive salary and benefit packages *One-on-one patient care *Specialized training Contact local Recruiter, Shea Parker Phone: 1.866.GENTIVA Email shea.parker@gentiva.com. Visit us at gentiva.com/careers GENTIVA home health AA/EOE/M/F/D/V encouraged to apply. Anna Bella’s Salon In need of 2 additional Stylists & Nail technicians. Also need PT Massage Therapist & Permanent make-up artist. May contact salon for interview at (850)547-5665. Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMENEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!!! Become a Newspaper Carrier or Single Copy/ Rack Route Cottondale Southport, Greenhead, & Chipley Open routes available in the early morning Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS Deliver your newspaper in your communityIndependent ContractorsMust have: A reliable vehicle Proof of Auto Insurance A valid driver’s license Be 18 yrs or older Contact Colin Parker cparker@chipleypaper.c om Contact Colin Parker cparker@ chipleypaper.com or 850-625-7466.