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Holmes County times-advertiser
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Title: Holmes County times-advertiser
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
Place of Publication: Bonifay, FL
Publication Date: 09-12-2012
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Volume 122, Number 18 Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 12 2012 By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cecilia.spears@halifaxmediagroup.com ESTO At their Sept. 4 meeting, Esto Town Council members received attorney Jeff Goodmans completed addendum, which was requested by the council, to allow the town to increase water rates. Town Council President Danny Powell said the hike was a necessity. The increase would help pay for any possible loans associated with moving forward with the towns water system replacement project, which was pushed forward when the council approved allowing town engineering rm Hatch Mott MacDonald to create a construction plan for $9,000. Hatch Mott MacDonalds Jim Bundy said the town was pressed for time to create the plans so they could include them in the Community Development Block Grant application for extra points. Bundy also said their fees, including the $9,000 for construction plans, would PHO T O B Y C EC ILIA S PE A RS | The Times Advertiser ore than 400 students and adults enjoyed summers last ing at this years Picnic in the Park. The event was held at the Ponce de Leon Springs on Saturday with free hamburgers, hotdogs, games and swimming and was sponsored by Holmes County Teen Court, Holmes County School District, CASE Coalition, Holmes County Sheriffs Ofce and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. 50 www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM Phone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 INDEX Arrests ................................. A3 Opinion ................................ A4 Outdoors .............................. A8 Sports ................................ A10 Extra .................................... B1 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classieds ............................ B6 IN BRIEF Blue Pride Band showcases Academy Awards hits | B1 Health Clinic to open SaturdayBONIF AY Holmes County Community Health Clinic at 203 W. Iowa Street, Bonifay, will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday. Russell Roast scheduled ThursdayC HI P L E Y City council member and Spanish Trail Playhouse president Kevin Russell will be the subject of a Man of the Hour Roast at 7 p.m. on Thursday at the Washington County Ag Center. Russell is being roasted as part of a fundraiser for the Spanish Trail Playhouse. Tickets are $15 or $25 per couple and price includes a meal. For ticket information, call Barbara at 960-1347. Western Star Pageant slatedBONIF AY The annual Western Star Pageant will be held on Sept. 29 in the Holmes County High School. Boys and girls can enter. Boys 0 to 7 years old and girls 0 to 21 years old may compete and the Ms. competition will include ages 22 and up. Sign up will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sept. 18 at the Bonifay Dance Center on Highway 90. For more information, call Wanda at 614-1062 or 768-2005; or Bernyce at 547-3474 or 768-1150. Special to the NewsC HI P L E Y The Merchants of Historic Downtown Chipley have worked for several years to promote business through visitation to the downtown areas of Chipley, organiz ing and executing special events in cluding concerts, photos with Santa and parades, and this year they are thinking outside the box. The group is embracing one of the newest phenomena in recent history, a mega yard sale of his toric proportions. Stretching from Live Oak, in Suwanee County, to Pensacola, 272 miles to the west, Flea Across Florida is spawned from the Flea Across America concept simply encouraging communities to make available ar eas for residents to set up a yard sale on a specic weekend. We decided to embrace the event this year, said Barbara James, who organized the event with Kathy Foster and Sherri Bid dle. We are using the Flea Across Florida weekend to hold our own, customized event, and we encour age everyone to get involved. The event, advertised through a grant from the Washington County Tourist Development Council and donations from The Goulding Agen cy Inc. in Chipley, is Friday and Saturday. Stretching literally from county line to county line in Wash ington County, the event loosely fol lows Highway 90. Anyone having a yard or ga rage sale, a ea market or just wanting to get rid of unused items needs to put a sign on Highway 90, directing people to their loca tion, Kathy Foster said. The City of Chipley has also allowed us to close off Railroad Avenue, between 5th Street and Main Street, on Sat urday, Sept. 15, and anyone can set up a table with their offerings, but only on that day. On Friday, you will have to nd your own place to set up, but we expect a lot of par ticipation on that day as well. Downtown Chipley group to host mega yard sale See YARD SALE A2 Esto moves forward with water system plan Savoring summer M See ESTO A2 Cecilia Spears 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT Cecilia.spears@halifaxmediagroup.com B O N I F AY Regional Vice President of Operations Da vid Servies came before the Bonifay City Council during their regularly scheduled meeting Monday as a repre sentative of Mediacom Com munications Corporation to address the multitude of service complaints issued by Bonifay residents. There have been numer ous complaints from resi dents who have had issues with your services, Coun cil member Roger Brooks said. I happened to be one of the ones who complained about these services, or the lack there of. Though, I did recently have someone to nally come down, take a look and now mine is in better shape then it was. Servies told the council the company had recently gone through signicant changes in services and that they had noticed af ter this change there was a large spike in calls about problems. We value your busi ness, so if theres anything we can do to better resolve these issues feel free to give me a call, Servies said as he handed council mem bers his business card. Bonifay resident Ann Leavins approached the council about alleviating is sues of cars speeding down Clifford Street, on which she and her grandson live. I appeared before the council several years ago to address the speed limit on Clifford Street, Leavins said. I have an autistic grandson who lives down the street from me that walks down that street to visit. At that time, a threeway stop sign was placed and disabled signs were put up to watch for him, but with the construction going on and it being used as an Mediacom Rep visits Bonifay Council See COUNCIL A8 Regional Vice President of Operations David Servies told the council the company had recently gone through signicant changes in services and there was a large spike in calls about problems.

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Local A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Proven leadership from the Battleeld to the Schoolhouse. FOR SUPE R INTENDENT OF SCH OO LS A NOTE FROM TERRY: Fam ily is a very important part of everyones life. I have been blessed with a very large family that has shown their support in many areas of my campaign. The beauty of their support is that it does not require a promise or favor. They support me out of love and devotion and for that I am abundantly thankful. I am grateful that I do not have any family connected to the school system other than as students. I have not made any promises to family members or any other person as to job placement. My family is all blessed with occupations and will not be hired by the school system. I can assure you, the voters of Holmes County, no preferential treatment will be tolerated or take place if I am elected your superintendent. Not having any family connections to the system will be a great advantage in the proactive management and the rebuilding of the School Districts rise to excellence. Come Out For A Cookout and Meet Terry Thursday, September 20th from 5:30pm until 7:30pm. Free Hot dogs & Hamburgers Ponce De Leon City Park at the City Hall Terry Mears and wife Tudy Segers Mears Father, the late Edgar Mears; Mother, Ollie Mears, middle row: Brother, the late Colly Mears; sister, Ola Lott; Terry Mears, top row: sister, Nellie Summerall; brother, Tillman Mears, and sister, Judy Horn. We are hoping that churches and other nonpro t agencies, who are constantly trying to nd funds for their projects, will take advantage of this built-in crowd and put up signs advertising their locations for the event, Sherri Biddle said. This is a great opportunity to have some fun and get rid of your unwanted items while you make some extra cash. We realized that we were wearing out our members, many of whom are not even business owners, by expecting them to organize and work special events, Foster said. This concept lets us simply put into play a mechanism to advertise the event and then allow any and all who wish to participate to do so. The great part about the event is that you dont have to move your sale items to Railroad Avenue or anywhere else just put out a sign directing people to visit your location. The event originated with the Suwanee County Tourist Development Council, based in Live Oak, and many communities have embraced the event weekend. Thousands of bargain hunters have prowled the 272-mile route for the past few years, discovering good deals but, more importantly, learning something about their neighbors as well. Come early if you expect to get a space on Railroad Avenue, said Barbara James, who is coordinating that effort. There is room for 40 or 50 vendors on the two one-ways streets, but we expect business to be brisk and we expect the spaces to go quickly. Its rst-come, rst-served, so getting to the area early on Sept. 15 will be the key to success. The good thing is that if you dont get a spot on Railroad Avenue, Biddle said, you can simply set up anywhere in downtown Chipley that will allow you to do so, and enjoy this built-in crowd of shoppers. And this is a great kick-off to the holiday shopping season. More information can be found at www. ChipleyFleaMarket.org. YARD SALE from page A1 be covered by the Rural Development Grant if it was granted. Until then, he said, the town will not be billed for the services. What it boils down to is whether or not youre willing to invest $9,000 with the chance of only having a set of plans, Goodman said. The council approved of submitting the application for the water line replacement. The council also approved of allowing the Esto Fire Department to take its $10,000 mature CD and transfer it to the re departments savings account, where it could accumulate interest. That money might be needed in the towns general fund to pay for the $9,000 construction plans if grant applications are denied. The council welcomed the towns new water operator, Bill Austin, for his rst report, which included that the system was properly grounded and that a crock, which dilutes and distributes bleach to the towns water, was donated to the city and that new switches were required. Goodman advised Austin put out bids for at least three quotes for the new switches. Council member Darlene Madden reported what she had learned from the recent mitigation meeting at the Holmes County Emergency Operations Center. It was awesome, Madden said. The new EOC building is very impressive. Madden told the council the town was requested to submit a wish list of emergency preparedness items, such as storm-resistant shutters and roo ng, re suppression devises, etc. The council discussed possible items to go on the list and decided to bring more recommendations at a later time. Local resident Lindsey McClellan came before the council to say several locals were interested in creating an Esto library. Weve got seven people willing to donate their time, several hundred books of various age and categories, and even the Holmes County Public Library is willing to help, McClellan said. We just need a place to set it up. Powell asked she give the council some time to think of any place that could be used and suggested she ask the owner of the old post of ce if they could set up in there until the property was sold. Madden asked Goodman what was holding up the application process for grant money to go toward promoting the upcoming Two Toe Tom Festival in 2013. Goodman said there were speci c guidelines to receive grant money from the Tourist Development Council and that he would review those requirements with her later. The council approved of removing Charles Corcorans name as signatory from the Esto Fire Protection, Esto Fire Department Checking and Esto Fire Department Savings accounts and replacing his name with Bill Austins. The council also approved of getting new indoor/outdoor carpeting for the entrance of the Town Hall not exceeding $150. A mother and resident of Esto requested that a shelter be put up at a local bus stop, and senior maintenance worker Bobby Adams agreed to build it and sought permission from the property owner to build it. The owner requested not to be held accountable for the safety and well being of the school children on his property. The council redirected them to the Holmes County School Board to seek immunity from liability. The council also approved of looking into putting in security cameras and signs at John Clark Park because of recent vandalism. The park was vandalized two different times this week, Town Clerk Jody Sellers said. Someone rode an ATV into the gazebo and knocked several concrete blocks out. Then someone punched a hole through the dock and tried to pull up one of the grills. Sellers said the grills were a donation from a local resident who wished to remain anonymous. Those were donated for the residents of the town to enjoy the park to the fullest, Sellers said. I cant imagine whod be so depraved to destroy something so much hard work and heart went into to build. Goodman gave his full support, saying something similar happened in a local park in Washington County and that he had put together what was required to put up the security cameras and fully enforce the penalties of destruction of public property. We actually got quite a few prosecuted because of those cameras, Goodman said. Its been a very effective deterrent as well. The next regularly scheduled meeting for the Esto Town Council is set for 7 p.m. Oct. 2 at Esto Town Hall. ESTO from page A1 alternate 79 the stop signs are being ignored, and theyre speeding again. Leavins suggested speed bumps or rumble strips placed to dissuade speeders. Mayor Lawrence Cloud reassured her that the city would be looking into the matter and had Police Chief Chris Wells con rm that he would be sending out a patrol to watch that road for speeders till the problem could be resolved. Brooks added that there were several complaints of speeding near Holmes County High School on Sandpath Road. Wells informed Brooks that he would have his men on it immediately. Council approved of Lyle Fergesons request to place a trailer on his property behind his oral business on State Road 90. From all appearances it seems like a brand new trailer, even if it is a slightly older model, Council member Richard Woodham said. Bonifay resident Jim Hayes was before the council once again with complaints of his neighbors goats. Taylor informed Hayes at the the owner of the goats had been informed of the complaint and if the council requested it, then two letters could be sent out to hold a formal mitigation session between the two landowners to settle matters. The council agreed to follow with the procedure of calling in the two landowners as soon as Hayes returned from his upcoming knee surgery. Woodham informed the council that Holmes County Correctional Institute was still in need of a water meter replaced and he hadnt received a reply from the institute in several months. Taylor informed him that they had recently changed hands with a new warden and that Woodham should contact the new warden, saying that the new warden seemed to be more negotiable. The owner of the Bradley Building came before the council because one of his tenants informed him that the city was charging the building two separate water bills. The owner informed the council that the building still only had one sink, one toilet and one set of lines, as it always has. Woodham explained that the problem came with the tenants that were splitting the pay but would nd themselves in a bind if one tenant left without paying. Woodham then suggested that the owner take responsibility of the water bill and add the expense to the tenants rent. The owner agreed to accept responsibility for the water bill. Brooks informed the council that something needed to be done about the bleachers at Memorial Field. I think the city use to take the crew down there and pressure wash it, said Brooks. You can tell that it hasnt been done is several years because its in desperate need of it now. Woodham said that it wasnt the citys responsibility to maintain the bleachers, bathrooms or maintenance as a whole. COUNCIL from page A1

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 Wednesday, September 12, 2012 SAVE ON HOMEOWNERS INSURANCE Auto Home Life How Many Times Has Your Insurance Been Changed? Providing You With Quality & Service At A Fair Price Ruled A+ Superior by AM Best Rating 1108 N. Waukesha St. Bonifay 547-4227 Trust in your local Farm Bureau agency. We have been here for 60 years and are here to stay. AGENT S TE V E A. BU S H Over 30 years experience. steve.bush@bic.com www.kubota.com Until April 2013 Down Financing Payments OR Instant Kubota Bucks up to $2,500 ** NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." www.mulliseye.com Chipley Office We are located directly across the parking lot from the Walmart in Chipley "W E W E LCOM E N EW PATI EN TS, C ALL T ODAY F OR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TM EN T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley Office Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 9-30-12 FREE E Y E EX AM COD E: W C 00 T odd R obinson, M D Board C ertified Eye Physician and C ataract S urgeon L ee M ullis, M D Board C ertified Eye Physician and C ataract S urgeon Holmes County Arrests August 26 September 1, 2012 Sheron Baker, 58, domestic battery Justin Bell, 22, hold for prison transport Daniel Tod Brauer, 46, child support Thomas Anthly Brownell, 53, attaching tag not assigned Daniel Cobb, 28, hold for prison transport Carline M Daughtery, 26, violation of probation on intro of contraband Brandon Emerson, 22, hold for prison transport Kendrick Harvey, 22, hold for prison transport William Cody He in, 27, fraudulent use of credit card Jamarquis Henderson, 26, hold for prison transport Patrick Dalton Howard, 28, domestic violence assault Cody Levi Hudson, 19, possession of a controlled substance Mark J Isaacs, 26, violation of probation Stephanie Anne Johnson, out of county warrant from Walton County Christopher Shawn Leis, 37. Domestic violence battery Coy B Rucker, 31, out of county warrant James Shimchick, 62, hold for prison transport Steven Singletary, 41, child support purge Willie Smith, hold for prison transport Kevin Dewayne Thomposn, 37, battery domestic violence Aaron Micheal Vandyke, 19, lewd and lascivious battery Robert West, 47, hold for prison transport Carol Marie Wood, 28, hold for Washington County, violation of probation on domestic battery Dawn Marie Yates, 42, weekender Andrew Zavala, 20, hold for prison transport CHIPLEY Multiple drug arrests were made Thursday by the Washington County Drug Task Force. Task force investigators, conducting overnight surveillance at a local business, said they observed Roger Lee Thomas, 27, of 646 Highpocket Lane, remove batteries from their packaging and try to conceal them in his clothing. The man then exited the store and tried to enter a vehicle that was located at the entrance. After identifying themselves as law enforcement of cers, they said the man tried to reenter the store, where he was arrested. Thomas was charged with resisting an of cer with violence, possession of narcotic equipment, petit theft and violation of state probation for attempted grand theft and burglary. Of cers were able to locate and stop the vehicle Thomas tried to ee in near Orange Hill Road and Joiner Road. A search of the vehicle revealed an active mobile methamphetamine lab as well as marijuana and listed chemicals used in the manufacturing of methamphetamines, according to the report. Arrested was Linda Gail Marble, 26, of 1231 Court Ave., on charges of possession of marijuana, possession of a controlled substance and petit theft. Investigators then responded to a possible shoplifting at Walmart, where employees said a woman was acting erratically and had re-entered the store several times. After arriving on scene, investigators observed the woman enter a vehicle in the parking lot of the store. After being stopped for a traf c infraction, a search was conducted and revealed marijuana on the woman, according to the police report. A search of the driver revealed two baggies containing pills. Arrested were Nancy Ann Parsons, 48, of Panama City Beach on charges of possession of marijuana and Russell Keith Eddins, 37, of Youngstown, on charges of possession of a controlled substance without prescription. Eddins is on federal probation for conspiracy to distribute over 500 grams of methamphetamines, according to police. In another instance, investigators saw a man trying to purchase listed chemicals used in the manufacturing of methamphetamines at multiple locations in Chipley. After being approached by law enforcement, police said the man and the driver of the vehicle both admitted to purchasing the items to later use in manufacturing meth. Arrested was Thomas Wayne Carter, 52, of Bonifay, on charges of possession of listed chemicals and driving while license suspended or revoked. The task force comprises the Washington County Sheriffs Of ce, Chipley Police Department and federal agencies. Anyone with information on illegal drug activity should call 638-TIPS (8477) or email tips@wcso.us. ROGER LEE THOMAS LINDA GAIL MARBLE NANCY ANN PARSONS RUSSELL KEITH EDDINS THOMAS CARTER Task Force nabs 5 on drug charges Arrest REPORT

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Opinion A4 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com 1-800-645-8688 ADVERTISING 850-547-9414 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2012, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Our sons have cautioned dad throughout his writing endeavors to always try to give factual information as somewhere down the line some error may cause problems to those who are accepting the article as true and correct. Maybe today is the day to revert to the method used in the Panama City News Herald, Setting it straight, to clarify some recent misprinting. In the Aug. 22 Perrys Prattle, some quick improvising had to be done in order to meet publishing deadlines. In the paragraph describing the federal government program agency AAAs 1934 effort to assist farmers, the intended term, reduce crop acreage was printed produce, thus giving the wrong message. The program was actually one where farmers were paid for plowing up certain crops before it was harvested with the intent to decrease yields and increase prices. It was an unpopular concept with some farmers, including my father and grandfather, but one that was followed hoping for the desired result. Even though rather insigni cant, that same article listed the rural route for the Hugh Wells family as Route 11 Bonifay, when it should have read Route 1. Equally of relatively unimportance is the report in this article that the standard 1934 Plymouth Coupe was priced at $385 in the Progressive Farmer advertisement. The correct price listed was $385. There were other obvious typographical errors, which will not be corrected, but instead, the Prattler will thank the staff at the Washington County News for pulling me out of this deadline dilemma. In the July 25 Prattle, the writer will accept full responsibility for the error of listing the church where Hunt Cunningham grew up and later served as pastor as Bayou George Assembly of God Church when actually it was Bear Creek Assembly of God. This historic item approaching 60 years ago is important to the parties involved and yours truly is happy to set the record straight. The Prattler can now face Jerry Tyre, my friend who inspired the above writing with his Letter to the Editor of the Panama City News Herald on the topic of the death of Andy Grif th. Hopefully, one day I will have opportunity to see Hunt Cunningham once again and can face him easier after having made these corrections. Acceptance of Perrys Prattle, and the enjoyment thereof is expressed to the writer almost weekly. John Purnell, a Chipley resident and a native of Red Level, Ala., recently told me that he remembers L. & N. Engine No. 152, a recent Prattle topic, and had the privilege of riding in the engine as a 5-year-old boy. The engineer was Lee Stamps, and he allowed for the short ride as the engine pulled into the station at Red Level. The train ran from Georgiana Ala., to Graceville Fla., a total distance of 100 miles. In this vein of writing, a follow up report is made on the article of last week featuring and picturing my cousin, Rufus Wells, son of Alex and Arleva Cook Wells. Reference was made to the illness of family members, including that of Harrell Wells, brother to Rufus. With sadness, the news came one day after last weeks article went to press that Harrell had passed away in his Salem, Ala., home. His funeral was held on Sept. 4 at Bethel Primitive Baptist Church, where he grew up and where his parents and two siblings are buried and will also be the nal resting place for other brothers and sisters. Harrells obituary will no doubt be listed in this addition of the Washington County News, naming all family members. Harrells birth date of Jan. 21, 1938, brought to mind that the year of his birth also brought other cousins into the world, the children of uncles and aunts of the Wells offspring. Josh and Annie Padgett Wells had William Karl (Bill Wells), born Aug. 28, 1938. Born to Virginia Wells Hinson and Arthur Hinson is their second daughter, Hannah Ruth Hinson White, with an Aug. 21, 1938, arrival. Lela Wells Harris and Edward Harris saw their second son, Ralph Edward Harris, arrive on Aug. 24, 1938. All of the above writing leads me right into reporting that all of the above information on my immediate family can be found in the Heritage of Washington County Book. Those who included their family in the book can also make the same statement. As stated two weeks ago, the Heritage Book is now available after an absence of more than two years. Should any one in your circle of family or friends tell you that they wish they had purchased a book, please tell them the good news. Perry Wells at 850638-1016 or perry1000@ bellsouth.net now has the fourth printing of the books at his home selling for the same price at $64.20 in Chipley or $72 when mailed, a service he is also providing. My mailing address is 950 Highway 277 Chipley, FL 32428. The books are selling briskly, maybe even quicker than before, so dont wait too long and miss out on the informative and beautiful history of Washington County. See you all next week. It seems like when football season approaches, a renewed interest in past school associates accelerates, and reunions take place at football games and other places. Of course everywhere I go locally, I meet former students and so does my husband. Some of them we both taught. As we were lunching at Cast-AWay this week, the oyster shucker, Chuck Richmond, reminded us that he was a former student. I had promised him previously that I would refresh my memory of him by looking up the 1983 HCHS yearbook, so I came home and dug it out and there he was on the rst page as the twelfth grade Class Favorites along with Norma Smith. Farther over he was pictured with the FFA of cers as the 1982-83 president. He even signed my yearbook as C.C. Ledbetter. No wonder I didnt remember him, considering who else was in that class, including two of the Short boys, Drew and Darryl. Those two werent nearly as talkative, though, as older brother Dale. I had him and Curtis Bartholomew in the same class a few years before, and they had a race to see who could get the most marks for talking. I had most of the class of 83, though when they were in the ninth grade, and over all, I dont believe any other class could hold a light to them. Many of the girls were members of my church, First Baptist Bonifay. Norma Jean Smith, Tony Rich, Jill McFatter, Stacie Turner and Karen Smith were some of the ones I told that it was good that I had taught them in Sunday School when they were 4and 5-year-olds. It was easy to love them at that age but not as ninth graders. As I looked back in the 1983 yearbook, I saw that overall that class was pretty laid back; its just that the talkative ones drowned out those with good behavior. I guess that coming from a big, noisy family myself made me able as a teacher to tolerate a noise level above most. Most of them have gone on to become successful people, so having me as a lenient teacher didnt set them back too much. Looking back through the 1983 yearbook, I was saddened to see how many of the staff are no longer alive: Catherine Carswell, Jim Richardson, Myra Clark, Judy Williamson and her mother Annie Williamson, Herman Dodson, Carolyn Berry, Ann Galloway, Curtis Street, Lyverne Curry, Dale Morrison, Eleanor Peacock and coach Mac James Edward McFatter. We have special memories associated with all of these. Another thing that is sad is the number of advertisers which are no longer in business or have changed ownership: First Bank of Holmes County is now Wells Fargo; The Bank of Bonifay is The Bank of Bonifay First Federal; Joe Clarks Nationwide Insurance, Tri-County Bandag Tire Co, TG&Y Family Center (Chipley), Mims Barber and Style Shop, Evans of Bonifay, Holmes Shirt Company, Fishin Headquarters, Hudson-Riley Of ce Supply, Holmes Creek Auto Parts, Sears Catalog Sales, Charlenes Boutique, Firestone Transmission and Exhaust Center, The Style Shoppe, WBGC Bonifay and Chipley, Bonifay Manufacturing Inc., Century 21 Kent Realty, Coates McCullar & Company, Don Levens Auto Body, Howell Chevrolet Co., Phillips Auto Parts, Owl Sleep Shop, Western Auto, Simbos, Prestons Service Center, The Family Tree, West Fl Auto Parts, Bonifay Drug Company and Blitchs Restaurant. At Cast-A-Way, we also saw Judge Owen Powell, John Murray Little and Bruce Pelham HCHS classmates. Bruce of Tallahassee has overcome a lot of adversity and has published a book titled Im Not Drunk.....I Just have M.S. Hopefully, I will be able to do a column on him and his family soon. If you want to travel down memory lane, just pull out your or your childrens yearbook. It will bring back many memories and make you realize how much things have changed as time marches (or rushes) on. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS The eleven surviving children of the Alex and Arleva Wells family made in 1997 just days before the passing of Parker Wells. HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison PERRYS PRATTLE Perry Wells The Prattler clari es previous articles, follows up on last week Community outings bring contact with former students J.D. OWENS CARPET OU T L ET will save you money E V ER YD A Y!!! J.D. OWENS CARPET OU T L ET 2597 S pringcreek R oad, Marianna, FL 3 1/2 Miles East of Marianna on Hwy. 90 (850) 526-3619 J.D. OWENS CARPET OU T L ET J.D. 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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Like us on Facebook Sowell Tractor Co., Inc. 2841 Hwy. 77 North, Panama City 763-5441 Toll Free: 866-448-9899 www.sowelltractorco.com We Trade for Anything That Dont Eat! Financing Arranged (WAC) EVERYTHING YOU VALUE 0% Financing Available Only On Kabota Equiptment. WAC See dealer for details. Special to The Times-Advertiser CHIPLEY The Chipley Garden Club will sponsor a free Build-a-Better-Scarecrow Workshop at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18, under the pavilion at the Farmers Market in downtown Chipley. Karen Roland, club president and professional artist, and other garden club members will provide handouts and share ideas and suggestions on building scarecrows. The free workshop is open to the public and will be great source of information for anyone planning on entering the upcoming second annual Scarecrow Contest, which will be in October in conjunction with Washington County Historical Societys Fall into History Fest on Oct. 13. Reservations are not necessary just show up and have fun. The Washington County History Museum also will be open for tours that day from 10 a.m. to noon. By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY City of cials met with the owners of Grace & Glory Christian School to discuss the schools recent growth, City Council members learned at the Sept. 4 workshop. David (Pettis, city code enforcement of cer) and I met with them last week, City Administrator Dan Miner said, and we discussed the parking, landscaping and stormwater issues. The Christian school was the topic of discussion on Aug. 16 when the council learned that modular buildings had been added to the campus without the school coming before the citys planning and zoning committee for approval. Under the current city ordinances, approval by city of cials was not required, Miner told the council, but changes are being made so any such growth in the future will have to come before the citys planning committee. This was our fault; this should have been handled through planning and zoning, Miner said, adding that Grace & Glory of cials were understanding and that any future growth on the campus will come before the city for approval. We have our certi cate of completion that the city signed off on, said Debbie Williams, administrator of Grace & Glory Christian School. During our construction, we had a few parking issues, but we dont have those anymore. The K-12 school has about 130 students and is in its third year of existence. Classes began Aug. 20, and Williams said the school has monitors on hand to keep the traf c owing before and after school. In addition the addition of buildings on campus, the issue of traf c between Main Street (State Road 77), the west entrance to the campus, and Seventh Street, the eastern access to the campus, also was discussed. From now on, traf c will enter on Seventh Street and exit on Main, Miner said. We have monitors out there. Even if it rains, they are out there with umbrellas, Williams said. We are able to keep the traf c owing. Williams said the school employs 23 people and is part of the ministry of the Grace & Glory Worship Center. They were very agreeable and understanding about the citys concerns, Miner said. He said the school would have to hire an engineer to deal with stormwater issues on the property. They want to do it all the correct way, Mayor Linda Cain said. They were just going by what the city told them, but now they understand that they need to come to the planning and zoning committee. It needs to be handled in the correct way and not affect the neighbors, Council Member Karen Rustin said. Im not against businesses or growth, but the city needs to be involved in situations like this. The council also had questions about placing a school zone sign near the campus on Main Street, but Miner said the school would have to request the sign from the Department of Transportation. I appreciate your meeting with them, and I appreciate their attitude, the mayor said. Williams said she appreciates the Chipley Police Department for patrolling the school grounds after hours. She also said the school has been blessed by Yes Lord Deliverance Church, which allows the school to use their parking lot for over ow parking. We give God the glory because we have just been so blessed. Were in our third year, and its very exciting, Williams said. Of cials discuss growth with Grace & Glory Im not against businesses or growth, but the city needs to be involved in situations like this. Karen Rustin Chipley City Council Member Chipley Garden Club to sponsor scarecrow workshop

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Local A6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, September 12, 2012 DES PLAINES, Ill. Sep tember is Mold Awareness Month and the National As sociation of the Remodel ing Industry (NARI) wants homeowners to know how to recognize signs of mold or water damage, and how to catch these issues early onor prevent them all together. Mold is everywhere, though the amount and lo cation of the mold is what can be harmful to your home and your health. Brian Jones, president of Jones Design Build LLC, based in Minneapolis, knows rst-hand about mold in the homehow it impacts a house and how to have it safely removed. His company worked on a bath room project, which won the 2011 North Central Re gional CotY award-winning project in the Residential Bathroom over $60,000 cat egory, which required mold remediation. MO IS TUR E BR IN G S M O LD Mold becomes a prob lem when moisture is pres ent, and the mold begins to grow. The risk increases in places that are more ex posed to moisture, such as bathrooms, kitchens, attics and basements. Oftentimes, bathrooms that are not properly ven tilated or not properly insu lated are at greater risk of mold issues, regardless of the age of the home, Jones says. This was the case with Jones clients and their 10year-old home. They began to notice stains on their rst oor ceiling, directly under the location of their upstairs shower, and grew concerned. Once Jones took down the drywall during the demolition phase of the project, their concerns were realizedthe berglass batt insulation throughout the entire shower wall area was covered in mold. In this instance, the ceiling of the shower was sloped, and it can be dif cult to install berglass insulation properly when the area is sloped, increas ing chance for error, Jones says. There needs to be a plastic barrier that protects the insulation from open ings where moisture seeps in. Given the oddly shaped shower, the vapor barrier between the drywall and the insulation was not taped or sealed at all seams, so moisture found its way un der the plastic, creating a ripe environment for mold to thrive. Mold growth behind the wall reduced the direct health risk to the homeown ers, but according to Jones, if left untouched, mold poses another risk to the structural elements of their bathroom. Mold that continues to grow for years can actually eat through the wood, caus ing structural problems, he says. REM OV IN G M O LD After the discovery, Jones called in mold re mediation experts to clear the area before work could continue. If not prop erly removed, mold can re-emerge. Luckily for Jones, re mediation is a fairly simple process. A plastic bar rier contains the area with the mold, so that it doesnt spread into other parts of the home. As it is being re moved, a fan drives air to the outside through a win dow, and HEPA vacuums remove leftover mold parti cles from the area, he says. Once the area is completely cleared of mold and dried, it is sealed with a mold-inhib iting paint to help prevent future outbreaks. Following the remedia tion, Jones recommended using a polyurethane spray foam insulation instead of the berglass batt insula tion that was originally used. The polyurethane foam insulation is sprayed into the area, so it completely lls every crevice and hole that may be present, Jones says. Not only does this type of insulation block all moisture, but it is also known for its energy-ef cient elements. Jones knowledge and expertise was very ben ecial to his clients when dealing with a hidden is sue like mold during their bathroom remodel. They were very happy to have detected the problem early on, before structural dam age could occur. RE COG NI Z IN G ISS U ES EA R L Y Do you have moisture issues in your home? Jones provides the following tips to ensure early detection of moisture issues and preventative measures for mold growth: Staining. By the time you notice staining, you can be sure that water either has been or is present. Dry wall and paint is easy and cheap to replace, so when I see staining, I recommend clients cut through the drywall immediately and locate the problem, Jones says. Helping Hands... Compassionate Hearts B ONIFAY Offering Inpatient and Outpatient Therapy N URS IN G & RE HAB C E N TER Occupational Physical Speech 24-hour Skilled Nursing Rehabilitation Gym Admissions 7 Days a Week MEDICARE OPEN E NR O LL M ENT Questions & A nswers October 3 9:30:10:30 am Holmes Countys SHINE representative, Minzie Carnley, will be available to answer any questions you have about Medicare Open Enrollment. Refreshments will be served. FREE FISH FRY SHERIFF Teen Art Classes Ages 13-18 Instructors: Keith Martin Johns Fall Sessions September 10 November 19, 2012 Once a week on Monday from 3:30-5:30 p.m. $45 per month Registration is required, limited space Learn the fundamental basic principles that govern realistic art. Classic realistic drawing and painting skills will be taught from one session to the next. The discipline of this type of art instruction is much like other disciplinary art forms; such as music or dance. 5422 Cliff St. Graceville Contact (850) 360-4908 or Linda@keithmartinjons.com Budget, millage adopted by school board By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com C HIPLE Y The numbers are in, and theyre lower than expected. That is what Superintendent Sandra Cook told the Washing ton County School Board Monday night. Were down by 13 students, overall, Cook said. There are a lot of contributing factors, includ ing a growing private school here in Washington County. Some programs at Washing ton-Holmes Technical Center have also seen a decrease in at tendance, but they are expected to pick back up soon, Director Martha Compton said. However, the heavy machinery mainte nance program and the public safety programs have both seen decreases in enrollment. Were doing a little better than we were at the end of the school year, but we had hoped wed be up a little more, Cook said. Chipley High School added four students over last years numbers, increasing to 580, while Vernon High School added two students for a total of 392. Roul hac Middle School dropped ve students, down to 623 enrolled, while Vernon Middle School add ed 12 to bring their enrollment up to 456. The biggest loss was at Kate M. Smith Elementary, where the numbers dropped by 47, down from 2011s enrollment of 837 to 790 this year. Principal Lesa Burdeshaw noted that the school had lost a large group of fourth graders and the incoming kindergarten class es were smaller than usual. Six students who had left to at tend a private school returned to Kate M. Smith, she added. Vernon Elementary School was down by two students with 551 enrolled, and the WISE pro gram showed an increase of 23 students, bringing the programs student body up to 66, over the 43 enrolled in 2011. Okeechobee enrollment was down 12, for a total of 106 students, and WHTC was down 95 students for an enrollment of 320, as com pared to 415 enrolled in 2011. The Washington County School Board adopted the years millage rate and the 2012-13 budget Mon day in a public hearing, which preceded the September board meeting. The millage rate is less than the 2011-12 rate at 7.975 mills, District Finance Director Lucy Carmichael told the board. The board approved Resolu tion 12-03, adopting the millage rate and breaking it down into components. The board also ap proved the nal budget of more than $92 million. Cook also announced that the schools would be celebrat ing Patriots Day on Sept. 17 and Celebrate Freedom Week will be from Sept. 17-22. On the consent agenda, the board approved all items except the Universal Free Breakfast program. The board unanimously voted no for that program. According to Food Research and Action Center information, The School Breakfast Program (SBP), authorized by the Child Nutrition Act of 1966, started as a pilot program to provide fund ing for school breakfasts in poor areas and areas where children had to travel great distances to school. The intent was to provide a nutritious breakfast to children who might otherwise not receive one. The following Florida districts participate in the Universal Free Breakfast Program: Franklin, Brevard, Collier, Dade, Gadsden, Glades, Hendry, Hillsborough, Jackson, Jefferson, Putnam, Highlands and Lee. Board Member Vann Brock called the item out for discussion, and Superintendent Cook for warded the program to the board as presented. Brock said the board had dis cussed the program before. The cost compared to the rewards just makes the program not feasible, he said. By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com VERNON Ownership of the land at Wayside Park was the top ic of discussion again Monday at the Vernon City Council meeting. The reworks began when resident Dennis Compton asked the council about posts that have appeared near the park, which is located on Holmes Creek on the north side of Vernon just off High way 279. The council was informed by resident Hal Kirk that he had put up the posts in following his attorneys instruction. Kirk owns the property next to the park and has a canoe livery business. There was a woman down there with bulldogs, Kirk said, adding that he intended to put up a 6-foot fence blocking access to his property from the park. I own all the property there except for the square where the gazebo sits, he said as he presented a survey map to the council. If you dont agree with my survey, then you should get your own survey. Kirk ran afoul of the city in 2011 when he tried to block ac cess to the park, which has a boat ramp that was built with Game and Fish Commission funding. Kerry Adkison, attorney for the city of Vernon, said the land for the park was donated by Ste ven Miller to the state in 1959, and the state turned the park over to the county in the 1980s. The city is currently in the process of taking over ownership of the property. Kirk said he was not interfer ing with the boat ramp or the park gazebo, but he was going to fence in his property for his own protection. Weve had problems with dogs, drinking, arrests and drug busts down there. In 2011, Kirk attempted to put a gate across the boat ramp ac cess road but the project was halted by the Washington County Sheriffs Department. Kirk has been in contention with the city, taking the matter to court. Adkison said Kirk had not led lawsuit to get clear title to the property, as the judge had ordered. The bottom line is he is not doing what the court told him to do. Do you believe you own the boat ramp? Adkison asked. I think the property should come back to me, Kirk replied. Kirk said he did not intend to put a fence around the boat ramp, but wanted to fence to keep dogs and others from coming on his property. Resident Jerry Brock said he had been swimming at that site since before there was a Way side Park. Id hate to see it just be there to launch boats. There used to be a swing there under the bridge, and I dont know how many times I jumped off into the creek. Now I have grandchildren who are swimming there. Ive been all over this country with the military, and I can hon estly say there isnt anywhere I would rather swim than right there, Brock said. The council adjourned to an executive session to discuss the litigation pertaining to Way side Park, Adkison said, but an nounced no action following the executive session. Wayside Park property ownership disputed Washington elementary school enrollment drops Take care of mold in your home before it turns ugly

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A7 Wednesday, September 12, 2012 I caught you another one! Come and Get It at ROGERS INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. Serving You Is Our Most Important Product *Property Insurance is not available in the state of Florida from Auto-Owners Insurance. *Property Insurance is not available in the state of Flordia from Auto-Owners Insurance. Wow Another year has gone by so quickly. This time seems so much more special with every thing going on in our lives. You watch over us and know our needs and prayers. Elizabeth Edwards had a quote that said, If you know someone who has lost a child and youre afraid to mention them because you think you might make them sad by reminding them that they died, they didnt forget they died. Youre not reminding them.What youre reminding them of is that you remember that they lived and thats a great, great gift! That brings me to your 10 year class reunion coming up. I was so glad to know that there will be a remembrance table for you and your classmates that are no longer here. Your picture will be there to remember you were a unique part of the Class of 2002 and had many accomplishments that made us proud. The many lives you touched all over the world and the stories I could tell about your life is a blessing for all of us that knew you. We love and miss you always! Mom, Dad, Paul & Vicky SPECIAL TO EXTRA TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott announced on Thursday the appointments of Michelle Bedoya Barnett, Paul M. Renner, Michael S. Mullin, Courtney K. Grimm and Robert E. OQuinn Jr. to the Fourth Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission. Michelle Bedoya Barnett, 33, of Jacksonville, has been an attorney with Alexander DeGance Barnett since 2010. Previously, she practiced with Holland and Knight from 2004 to 2012. She received a bachelors degree from the University of Florida and a law degree from Vanderbilt University. She succeeds Deno A. Hicks and is appointed for a term beginning Sept. 6 and ending July 1, 2016. Paul M. Renner, 45, of Jacksonville, has been an attorney with Milam Howard since 2005. Previously, he practiced as a sole practitioner from 2004 to 2005, with Atkinson Diner Stone from 1999 to 2004, and served as an assistant state attorney in the Broward County State Attorneys Of ce from 1995 to 1998. Renner has served as an of cer in the United States Navy and Active Reserves since 1989 and has completed tours of duty in Operation Desert Storm and Operation Enduring Freedom. He received a bachelors degree from Davidson College and a law degree from the University of Florida. He succeeds Charles W. Alford and is appointed for a term beginning Sept. 6 and ending July 1, 2016. Michael S. Mullin, 65, of Fernandina Beach, has practiced with Roger Towers since 2007. Previously, he served as Nassau County attorney for 25 years and as sole practitioner for 17 years, and served in the United States Army from 1965 to 1968. He received a bachelors degree from the University of West Florida and a law degree from Stetson University. He succeeds Robert E. OQuinn Jr. and is appointed for a term beginning Sept. 6 and ending July 1, 2014. He is appointed from the list of nominees submitted by the Florida Bar. Courtney K. Grimm, 44, of Green Cove Springs, has practiced with Bedell, Dittmar, DeVault, Pillans and Coxe since 2001. She received a bachelors degree from Sweet Briar College and a law degree from the University of Florida. She succeeds Joseph W. Prichard Jr. and is appointed for a term beginning Sept. 6 and ending July 1, 2016. She is appointed from the list of nominees submitted by the Florida Bar. Robert E. OQuinn Jr., 59, of Jacksonville, has practiced with Cole, Scot & Kissane P.A. since 2005. Previously, he served as a public defender in the Fourth Judicial Circuit of Florida from 1980 to 1982. He received a bachelors degree from the University of Florida and a law degree from Samford University. He succeeds Richard R. Alexander and is appointed for a term beginning Sept. 6 and ending July 1, 2015. He is appointed from the list of nominees submitted by the Florida Bar. TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott has announced six appointments to the Purple Ribbon Task Force. Ronald Davis, 67, of Tallahassee, is president of 21st Century Solutions. Jamie L. Glavich, 51, of Jacksonville, is the owner of Almost Home Senior Services Inc. Albert B. Johnson, 59, of Miami, is a retired teacher with Miami-Dade County Public Schools. Linda J. Levin, 45, of Jacksonville, is the executive director of the Northeast Florida Area Agency on Aging. Stacey D. Payne, 43, of Cape Coral, is the community relations manager for the Lee County Sheriffs Of ce. Christine L. Powers, 61, of Largo, is the director of adult day services and business development for Community Aging and Retirement Services Inc. All were appointed for a term beginning Sept. 6 and ending Aug. 1. The task force was created to help the state be more proactive in ghting Alzheimers. Scott appoints 5 to 4th Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission Scott appoints 6 to Purple Ribbon Task Force FLORIDA APPOINTMENTS Special to The Times-Advertiser At its meeting Wednesday in Tampa, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission approved draft rule amendments regarding falconry, wildlife rehabilitation and taking of wildlife on roads and rights-of-way. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the FWC currently share regulatory authority for falconry, including issuing permits for falconers. However, the USFWS now is relinquishing its responsibilities to states. For falconry to continue to be allowed in Florida, the FWC must amend rules and regulations to meet or exceed federal standards and they must be certi ed by the Service, said Maj. Curtis Brown, who presented the amendments. This includes areas like eligibility requirements for falconers; details regarding possession of golden eagles; requirements for banding, reporting and release of birds; permitting for seasonal residents and visitors; educational display; rehabilitation; and possession of prey. In addition to those areas, which must comply with the federal standards, FWC staff also included some new amendments, Brown said. FWC staff held public workshops and worked closely with stakeholders on their needs and concerns to develop the amendments. The topics addressed include classi cation of falconers; reinstatement of lapsed permits; restoration of suspended or revoked permits; the take, acquisition and transportation of raptors; housing and temporary care; feathers and carcasses of raptors; propagation; and the practice of falconry in the vicinity of threatened and endangered species. Commissioners discussed, heard public comment and ultimately approved the draft amendments as presented by staff with the direction for staff to research and consider adding merlins for use by apprentice falconers. The complete draft amendments, which pertain to rules 68A-9.005, 69A-9.006 and 68A-4.008, can be viewed online and will be presented for nal public hearing at the February 2013 Commission meeting. For more information about falconry regulations, visit MyFWC.com/Rules and select Proposed Rule Changes. 2013 Washington County Relay For Life kickoff Monday WASHINGTON COUNTY The Washington County Relay For Life 2013 kickoff will be at 6 p.m. Monday, Sept. 17, at the Washington County Agricultural Center in Chipley. This is a free event designed to get the message out about what the American Cancer Society does for our community. The kickoff will be set up like a mini relay to allow everyone to see how the relay is set up. There will be food, games and fun for everyone. If you know someone who would like to start a team, bring them to this event. Washington County Relay to be April 12 WASHINGTON COUNTY Washington County will have its 2013 Relay For Life event from 6 p.m. April 12 to 11 a.m. April 13 at Pals Park in Chipley. This theme for the 2013 Relay For Life is Race For a Cure. Relay for Life BRIEFS FWC approves draft rules for falconry

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www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Send your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com Section Page 8 Wednesday, September 12, 2012 FWC charts next steps for Florida panther population Special to The Times-Advertiser The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, working in partnership with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, plans to document where panthers are roaming beyond south Florida and develop the best practices to help people and panthers coexist. The efforts described in a recent staff report at the FWCs Commission meeting in Tampa would aid a potential northward expansion of the range of breeding panthers as part of the next steps in panther population recovery. Panther expansion northward is going to be, in large part, due to cooperation with private landowners, Commission Chairman Kenneth Wright said. The panther needs a large area to roam, as much as 200 square miles for an adult male. In south Florida, panthers have access to federally managed public lands such as Everglades National Park, Big Cypress National Preserve and the Panther National Wildlife Refuge in addition to state and privately owned lands. In the southern part of central Florida, a key area for potential expansion of the large cat, more panther habitat is privately owned. We have room for more panther population growth as long as we manage areas successfully, said Commissioner Ronald Bergeron, who suggested it should be a priority both to conserve the core population in south Florida and prepare for expansion north of the Caloosahatchee River. We have to target the heart of where the panthers are, and continue to move forward with good habitat and with underpasses to protect panthers crossing highways. In the coming months, staff said the FWC will be collaborating closely with stakeholders, including private landowners in central Florida, about what information and resources they need to feel prepared for an increased presence of panthers. The Commissioners supported this approach, particularly an exploration of what panther-related conservation incentives should be made available to landowners. For expansion, I think we have to see some version of good wildlife corridors or good unfragmented habitat, said Commissioner Aliese Liesa Priddy. We need to get realistic about what our goals should be and what habitat is available. Priddy said continuing the FWCs strong partnership with USFWS to update panther management goals and enhance resources would be critical. She added that building public support for panther expansion also was an important goal. Weve come a long way, said Priddy. But we want to achieve more. Panthers once ranged across Florida and into seven other southern states. Today most of the panther population is concentrated in south Florida. Adult male panthers, however, have been documented to range throughout central and north Florida. FWC staff has not been able to of cially document since the 1970s that adult female panthers live north of the Caloosahatchee River or Lake Okeechobee. The panther population is estimated to be 100 to 160 adults and sub-adults. Subadults have left their mothers but not yet reached sexual maturity. The ultimate goal, stated in the recovery plan developed by USFWS in conjunction with the FWC and other partners, is long-term viability of the Florida panther so it no longer is listed as endangered. Currently the FWCs panther management team uses evidence gathered from the capture and tracking of radio-collared panthers, the causes of panther mortalities, and documentation of denning mothers to monitor population trends, changes in occupied range, and threats to the population. For example, the panther staff was able to detect the outbreak of feline-leukemia virus and control the disease before it had major population impacts. Capturing the cats also has been useful for measuring genetic diversity and detecting inbreeding problems. Future research will address: Understanding and responding to the challenges of how people react to panther range expansion. Partnering with private landowners to study panthers food habits and use of ranch lands. Re ning methods to estimate panther numbers and population trends. The FWC also is enlisting the help of Florida citizens in collecting more information about the panthers range. A new website developed by the FWC, https://public. myfwc.com/hsc/panthersightings/getlatlong.aspx allows people to easily upload photos of panthers and their tracks and link them to a speci c location on a geographic database. Since use of motionactivated game cameras has become commonplace, People are getting incredible photos of all kinds of wildlife by day and night, said Kipp Frohlich, who leads the FWCs Imperiled Species Management Section. We are really hoping that someone will step up and be the rst person who can show real proof of a female or kittens in central or north Florida. That would be really exciting news. The panther is Floridas of cial state animal. All funding for state research and conservation of panthers comes from Florida residents voluntary purchase of the panther specialty license plate. For more information, please go to www.buyaplate.com and click on the panther Cat Tag. The panther report is available with the September meeting agenda at MyFWC.com/Commission KINGS BUCK Story courtesy of Deer & Deer Hunting Magazine GRANT COUNTY Wisc. A controversial potential world-record buck taken here six years ago that could be the biggest buck ever killed will be formally panel-scored in Montana later this month, according to an exclusive report from Deer & Deer Hunting Magazine. In a statement released Thursday, the Boone and Crockett Club con rmed that the potential world record Johnny King buck will be scored by four experienced judges, none of who have prior experience with this particular trophy. A source close to the situation told Deer & Deer Hunting the panel-scoring session will occur on Saturday, Sept. 22, in Missoula, Mont. The panels ndings will be the deers nal score, the release said. This development comes nearly six years after Johnny King killed the big deer with a borrowed .30-30 while deer hunting on family property in western Wisconsin. The massive 12-pointer a 6-by-6 with no abnormal points is believed to gross more than 220 inches and quite possibly net more than the current world record Milo Hanson Buck which scored 213-5/8 B&C. Hanson shot his buck in Saskatchewan in 1993. Ironically, both men were hunting whitetail properties that were very similar: strips of woods surrounded by agricultural land. They also shot their big bucks while conducting deer drives. The panel scorers are being asked to score via the recommendation by the 32-man records committee to the B&C board. The odds of killing a wild, freeranging buck like this? About 1 in 320 million. Kings buck, however, has been shrouded in controversy almost since the day it was killed. Despite convictions by many longtime certi ed B&C scorers that the buck is a typical 12pointer, some, including at least one high-ranking B&C of cial, believed the bucks right G-3 tine was an abnormal point because of the way it appeared on the main beam. Those beliefs led to a scandal of epic proportions in the deer hunting world that had remained out of the public eye for years until Deer & Deer Hunting reported on it in the magazines Summer 2011 edition. Now, a year and many bitter developments later, the club has apparently decided to score the rack as a typical. According to B&C of cials who chose not to be identi ed, the club will ask a panel of its of cial scorers to measure the antlers in Montana in about three weeks. The club needs to arrange to have the antlers brought to Montana by Jay Fish, an antler collector who bought the rack from Johnny King several years ago. King previously told D&DH that he sold the rack because he thought he would never have the energy, expenses or ability to ght for its justice. This recent development comes after two prominent antler scoring experts (including one longtime B&C scorer) produced step-by-step videos of them scoring the rack while explaining in detail the clubs of cial rules in their measurement determinations. This video proof apparently was enough to convince the B&C records committee that the buck is indeed a typical and should be scored as such. Hence, the panel scorers will not determine if the rack is nontypical. They will score it as a typical and let the chips fall where they may, so to speak. When told of the news, King expressed guarded optimism. Its about time, said King, an ever day deer hunter from Mount Horeb, Wisc. I dont want to seem ungrateful, but why did it have to take this long, and why did we have to go through all of this? Its a shame that (some scorers) had to threaten B&C for them to do whats right. (Editors note: If you are a serious local hunter, theres a reason to start working on your food plots now. Deer & Deer Hunting Magazine could be writing about you next year if you prepare properly.) Johnny Kings potentially worldrecord buck is finally getting a formal scoring, six years after he shot it. Contributed photos www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com O UTDOORS Section A

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SP O RTS www.bonifaynow.com A Section COLLEGE PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM WIN WIN WIN WIN WIN WIN $ $ $ $ $ $ 25 25 25 25 25 25 W W W W W W EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! Check your winner picks and send in today! SEPT. 15 SCOREBOARD Enter by Noon on Friday TI E BR E AK E R B altimore Philadelphia Total Points ______ Total Points ______ Total Net Yardage ______ Total Net Yardage______ Enter at the Washington County News or the Holmes County TimesA dvertiser oces; or mail to1364 N. Railroad Ave., in Chipley www.chipleypaper.com or www. bonifaynow.com Name ____________________________________________ Address __________________________________________ City ________________________________ Zip _________ Daytime Phone ____________________________________ Email ____________________________________________ Subscriber Non-Subscriber R ules 1. College Pick-em will reward persons based on their ability to pick the most winners of each weeks college football games. 2. Winners will be selected on the basis of choices for the Saturday/Friday games. Ties will be broken through selections for a weekend Pro game: the winner, the winning point spread (margin of victory), and the yardage totals in that order. 3. Each weekly winner will receive a $25 gift card. The names of the winners will be published in News and TimesAdvertiser each Wednesday. 4. A drawing will be held from ALL contest entries after the Nov. 24 game for a $100 gift card. The winner will be published in the Times and the News. No purchase necessary to win. 5. Entries can be made on the entry coupon, or a similar form (8-1/2 x 11) carrying the same information. Duplicate entry forms also will be available online at chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com 6. Entries can be dropped o or mailed to the News oce, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, Fla. 32428; or at the Times oce at 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, 32425, during business hours, 8 a.m.5 p.m. CT; or submitted via email on the entry form at chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com 7. All entries must be received by noon CST each Friday. Postmarks will have no bearing on whether or not the deadline is met. 8. Entrants may submit no more than two entries per week. You must enter only your own name and a single address. You may not submit entries in the name of other people. Winners found to have submitted more than two entries and/ or in the name of another person will be disqualied. 9. The News and the Times-Advertiser assumes no responsibility for failure to receive any entry. All entries become the property of News and the Times-Advertiser and none will be returned. 10. Employees of News and the Times-Advertiser and their immediate families are not eligible to participate. 11. Decision of the judges is nal. ALL PLAYERS, BY THE ACT OF ENTERING, AGREE TO ABIDE BY THE RULES. CHEC K HE R E WEDNESD A Y FO R E A CH WEE K S W I NNE R Sept. 1 Winner: Larry Johnson, Bonifay, 1 miss, T.B. Sept. 8 Winner: Bob Johnson, Bonifay, 2 miss 1. N. Carolina Louisville 2. Wake Forest Florida State 3. Alabama Arkansas 4. Virginia Georgia Tech 5. Florida Tennessee 6. Southern California Stanford 7. Notre Dame Michigan State 8. Colorado Fresno State 9. Bowling Green Toledo 10. Navy Penn State Page 9 Wednesday, September 12, 2012 By BRAD MILNER 747-5065 | @pcnhbradmilner bmilner@pcnh.com SAND HILLS Bozeman has passed its rst big football test of the season. Jacob Martinez accounted for three scores, and David Elmore and Javoni Bell each notched two touchdowns as the hosts beat Port St. Joe 35-8 on Friday. It was a battle between a Bucks team looking to take the next step forward and an improved Tiger Sharks squad that fell to 1-1. Bozeman moved to 2-0 in its home opener, which featured the Bucks in all red jerseys. This was a big win for us, Bozeman coach Loren Tillman said. I thought aside from some missed tackles, we played well defensively against a team that was scoring a lot of points in the jamboree and last week. Bozeman also showed a killer instinct that had been missing in the past after PSJ struck for its rst and only score late in the third quarter. Jarkice Davis took a pitch right, broke two tackles in the back eld, squirted through more defenders to the sideline, cut left, sprinted down the opposite sideline and dived over for a 55-yard score. Natron Lee added a 2-point conversion to narrow the gap to 21-8. Bell erased the momentum with a 52-yard scoring run four plays later. Davis, who had a game-high 142 yards, fumbled on the next possession. Martinez, who along with James Jernigan fought through cramping in the second half, connected with Elmore for 19 yards to cap the scoring to open the fourth quarter. We were able to ght back a little bit, Port St. Joe coach Chuck Gannon said. There was still plenty of time to get back in the game. Bell, who had 123 yards on eight carries, and Martinez, who threw for two TDs on three completions and rushed for 52 yards and a TD, saw to it PSJ didnt draw any closer. Port St. Joe had a lot of ght left, Tillman said. We showed our depth with the players cramping Vernon trounces Wewa 38-6 By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com VERNON The Yellow Jackets took command of their rst home game early in the rst quarter Friday night, and they never looked back, stinging the Wewahitchka Gators 38-6. Junior tight end Brandon Malloy put the Yellow Jackets on the board with 5:23 to play in the opening quarter, rst carrying the ball 68 yards from the Vernon 30 yard-line to the Wewahitchka 2-yard mark before busting through the middle to score. Senior quarterback Dylan Kirk connected with junior wide receiver Julian Silas on the twopoint attempt to make it 8-0. With 2 minutes left to play in the rst quarter, Kirk connected with sophomore wide receiver Austin Brown in the end zone, capping a 70-yard play that began with a Julian Silas interception, stopping a Gator drive at the Vernon 30. The PAT was no good, but the Yellow Jackets led 14-0. Kirk connected with Brown again from 10-yards out with 4:44 to play in the half, completing a 65-yard, 7-play drive. Kirks screen pass to Silas was good for two more points, and Vernon led 22-0. With 2:10 left to play in the half, Brown picked off a Gator pass inside the Wewahitchka 30 By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cecilia.spears@halifaxmediagroup.com BONIFAY The Holmes County High School Blue Devils overcame the Jay High School Royals in a show of force Friday night, nishing the game with a score of 52-14. Jacky Miles Jr. scored the rst touchdown of the night on a 1-yard run with 8:47 left in the rst quarter. With a good kick from Ty Russ, the score was 7-0. Shortly afterward, Russ carried the ball 30 yards for a touchdown with 7:06 left in the rst quarter but missed the extra point kick, which was blocked by Jay, leaving the score 13-0. Blue Devil Kodi Russ ran a 42-yard play just short of the goal with 1:50 left in the rst quarter, then drove it home for a touchdown with 1:45 left on the clock. With a successful pass from Miles to Dustin Janas, the Blue Devils completed a successful 2point conversion and ended the rst quarter with a score of 21-0. Jay Royals Ricky Co eld came on strong with a 75-yard dash to the goal, resulting in the Royals rst touchdown of the evening, though with a failed attempt at a 2-point conversion the score remained at 21-6 with 9:25 left in the rst half. Miles ran a 28-yard touchdown with 8:38 left in the rst half and then completed a successful 2-point conversion to put the score at 29-6. The Blue Devils defense pushed the Royals back to the end zone, eventually scoring a safety to make the score 31-6. Shortly after, Kodi Russ ran From Staff Reports BLOUNTSTOWN Andrew Bennett kicked a 26-yard eld goal with 1 second left as Blountstown avoided overtime with a 31-28 win over Chipley on Friday night. Chipley (1-1) had marched 62 yards in 15 plays to tie the game 28-28 with 1:58 remaining. Kobe McCrary climaxed a 7-minute, 28-second possession with a 1-yard scoring run and added a conversion to overcome a 28-20 de cit. Blountstown (1-1) responded by moving 48 yards in 10 plays. Quarterback Hunter Jordans 13-yard run on fourth-and-5 reached the 10 and set up Bennetts winning kick. The ending was indicative of a game that featured four lead changes and neither team gaining more than a one-possession advantage. Blountstown led early when Jordan passed 40 yards to Josh Taylor for a touchdown. Chipley went ahead when McCary, who gained 165 yards on 24 carries, ran 3 yards to score and Fletcher Dilmores extra point produced a 7-6 edge. Corin Peterson went 17 yards to score and Javakiel Brighams conversion run put Blountstown on top 14-7. Chipley produced a 14-14 halftime tie on Dallas Olivers rst touchdown on a 3-yard run. Oliver regained the lead for his team with a 7-yard run and Chipley led 20-14. Alex Mayorga had a 2-yard scoring run, and Bennetts extra point gave Blountstown a 21-20 lead after three quarters. That lead swelled to 28-20 early in the fourth quarter before the frantic nish. Brigham had 104 yards rushing on 13 attempts, and Jordan added 88 on 13 carries for Blountstown. Jordans TD pass was his only completion in nine attempts. Oliver added 136 yards rushing on 16 carries for Chipley as each team exceeded 300 yards on the ground. Bobby Andrews topped Blountstown with 11 tackles and, Dylan Lee and Brigham each had nine. Blountstown is at Freeport next week while Chipley travels to Northview. Bennett kick secures Blountstown victory ANDREW P JOHNSON | The News Herald Bozemans Javoni Bell scored two touchdowns, including a 52-yarder in the third quarter, to punctuate the Bucks 35-8 victory over visiting Port St. Joe on Friday. Bozeman surges past Port St. Joe See VERNON A10 Holmes overtakes Jay CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser The Holmes County High School Blue Devils defeated the Jay High School Royals 52-14 Friday at Bonifay. The Blue Devils travel to Baker on Friday. See HOLMES A10 Andrew Jackson 44, Englewood 6 Apopka 15, Lake Brantley 9 Atlantic Coast 59, Paxon 3 Atlantic Community 10, Boca Raton Community 9 Aucilla Christian 53, Oak Hall 21 Barron Collier 12, Westminster Christian 0 Bartow 27, Auburndale 7 Benjamin 29, John Carroll Catholic 7 Berkeley Prep 30, Victory Christian 7 Bishop Snyder 42, St. Joseph Academy 34 Bloomingdale 28, Strawberry Crest 27 Boca Raton Christian 14, Merritt Island Christian 6 Bolles School 30, Plantation American Heritage 27 Boynton Beach 39, Spanish River 3 Bradenton Christian 33, Northside Christian 10 Bradford 39, Hawthorne 6 Branford 60, Trenton 14 Buchholz 28, Orange Park 24 Calvary Christian 38, Indian Rocks 21 Cardinal Mooney 23, Bishop Verot 20 Cardinal Newman 49, Pahokee 22 Carrollwood Day 48, Keswick Christian 0 Central Florida Christian 32, Peniel Baptist 6 Chaminade-Madonna College Prep 40, Village Academy 0 Charlotte 48, Riverdale 25 Chie and 48, P.K. Yonge 0 Christs Church 56, Seacoast Christian 6 Christopher Columbus Catholic 49, Belen Jesuit 3 Colonial 36, Deltona 6 Cornerstone 31, Seven Rivers Christian 22 Countryside 27, East Lake 14 PREP FOOTBALL SCORES See SCORES A10 See BOZEMAN A10

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A10 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, September 12, 2012 NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING The TOWN OF ESTO has tentatively adopted a budget for 2012-2013 A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the BUDGET and MILLAGE RATE Will be held on Friday, September 14, 2011 At 7:00 P.M. At the Esto Town Hall in Esto, Florida Looking for the best in hearing care? Look to Beltone Only Beltone offers the exclusive BelCare program, our ongoing commitment to customer satisfaction, providing you with benets such as: Financing Available WAC Chipley, FL 1611 Main Street Ste. 4 (850) 387-4931 Marianna, FL 3025 6th Street (850) 387-4931 The benets of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Discounts off MSRP Previous purchases excluded. For a limited time. Cannot be combined with any other offers. 15% OFF TRUE WIRELESS HEARING AID SYSTEM & ultra comfortable when its noisy advanced technology So, call or come in today. No other company offers the same level of commitment youll nd at Beltone. WERE IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD! Free Annual Hearing Evaluations Beltone Ranked #1 in Patient Care Free Lifetime Instrument Care Free cleanings and adjustments for as long as you own your Beltone hearing instruments And, our 1500 locations nationwide serve you no matter where you live or travel! Allen Barnes 23 Years Experience a 50-yard touchdown with 5:50 left in the rst half, and Ty Russ made the extra point, making the score 38-6. Kodi Russ managed another touchdown in 7 yards, and with another successful kick from Ty Russ, the score was 6-45 with 3:58 left in the rst half. Because of injuries, Ty Russ was unable to play in the second half. The Royals Tate Upton completed a successful 13-yard touchdown with 7:28 left in the third quarter, and with a successful 2-point conversion carried out by Co eld, the score was 45-14. Miles secured the next touchdown for the Blue Devils, and with a successful kick from Kodi Russ, the score was 52-14, which was held for the remainder of the game. We won the game, but not without a lot of struggles, said HCHS Head Coach Brad Johnson. With only 20 guys, were nding that conditioning has a lot to do with the big picture. Were going to need a lot more conditioning to get down the stretch. From Staff Reports MILTON Rutherford returned home with another football loss on Friday, but Rams coach Alvin Dempsey is seeing more positives each week. Milton opened up an early lead and defeated Rutherford 31-3. The Rams fell to 0-2 on the season, but there was improvement on defense, despite what the score indicated. Rutherford opened with a 4817 loss at Tallahassee Florida High in the week before. (Two weeks ago), they were running up and down the eld like we werent even there, Dempsey said. In this game, when they jumped out on us 14-0, our defense didnt give up, and we saw a lot of good things. The Rams had two goal-line stands to keep the Panthers from increasing the bulge. Rutherford also blocked a eld goal. The guys didnt quit, Dempsey said. I told them if we keep ghting, well get there. Im excited how our young guys are coming along. Were still gelling a bit, and thats what happens when you have a new coach and the team is getting to know each other. Rutherfords lone points came on a 36-yard eld goal by Alex Riley in the second quarter to narrow the gap to 14-3. Milton led only 17-3 at halftime, but Andre Flakes 84-yard touchdown run late in the third quarter sealed control for the Panthers. Rutherford hosts Pensacola Escambia in its home opener this week. Milton downs Rutherford Crystal River 48, Williston 21 Delray American Heritage 36, Armwood 28 Deltona Trinity Christian 47, St. Edwards 0 DeSoto County 23, Okeechobee 7 Dixie County 46, Santa Fe 8 Dr. Phillips 31, Olympia 18 Dunbar 48, Lehigh 34 Durant 29, Alonso 0 Dwyer 34, Jupiter 0 Ed White 29, Forrest 14 Evans 42, Cypress Creek 10 First Baptist 67, St. Stephens Episcopal 0 First Coast 17, Bayside 3 Flagler Palm Coast 11, Seabreeze 7 Fleming Island 46, Nature Coast Tech 7 Fletcher 35, Bishop Kenny 9 Fort Lauderdale Calvary Christian 20, Somerset Academy 15 Fort Meade 42, Lake Region 6 Fort Myers 37, Golden Gate 27 Fort White 21, Newberry 7 Frostproof 19, Sebring 8 Gaither 69, Leto 0 Gateway 22, Lake Minneola High School 16 George Steinbrenner 23, East Bay 0 Gibbs 28, Lennard 18 Glades Day 34, Highlands Christian 7 Graceville 19, Franklin County 0 Hallandale 23, Oakland Park Northeast 12 Holy Trinity Episcopal 7, Orangewood Christian 0 Homestead 14, Miami Southridge 0 Ida S. Baker 30, Cape Coral 20 International Community 8, All Saints 6 Island Coast 51, Estero 20 Jensen Beach 17, Eau Gallie 14 Jesuit 16, Middleton 0 Jones 40, Mainland 8 Keystone Heights 14, Fernandina Beach 0 Kings Academy 23, Clewiston 21 Kissimmee Osceola 28, Bishop Moore 14 LaBelle 13, Evangelical Christian 7 Lafayette 42, Bell 7 Lake Gibson 21, Lake Wales 3 Lake Mary 33, Winter Springs 0 Lake Mary Prep 39, Windermere Prep 0 Lake Weir 22, Belleview 20 Lakeland 42, Tenoroc 0 Lakewood 33, Blake 0 Landmark Christian 45, Santa Fe Catholic 0 Largo 35, Pinellas Park 2 Lecanto 24, Weeki Wachee 7 Leesburg 21, Eustis 20 Lely 33, Cypress Lake 0 Lemon Bay 51, Gateway Charter 7 Lyman 21, Lake Howell 6 Manatee 49, Sarasota Riverview 7 Mandarin 28, Creekside 14 Mariner 34, North Fort Myers 3 Matanzas 26, Florida Air Academy 14 Miami Jackson 34, Braddock 8 Miramar 42, Blanche Ely 20 Mitchell 51, Gulf 0 Mount Dora 21, Tavares 0 Mount Dora Bible 29, Leesburg The First Academy 20 Naples 55, Immokalee 29 Nease 16, Middleburg 10 New Smyrna Beach 41, DeLand 35, OT North Broward 39, Doral Academy Charter 6 North Florida Christian 40, Agape Christian 0 North Port 42, Braden River 0 Oak Ridge 27, Lake Highland 17 Ocala Forest 37, Dunnellon 20 Ocala Trinity Catholic 21, Eastside 12 Ocala Vanguard 20, North Marion 6 Olympic Heights 36, Suncoast 0 Orlando Freedom 31, West Orange 28 Orlando The First Academy 45, Wesley Chapel 0 Ormond Beach Calvary Christian 28, Temple Christian 8 Out-of-Door Academy 33, Community School of Naples 22 Palm Beach Central 56, Lake Worth 26 Palm Beach Gardens 25, West Boca Raton Community 20 Palm Harbor University 27, St. Petersburg 6 Palmetto 47, Sarasota 28 Palmetto Ridge 14, Gulf Coast 5 Park Vista Community 21, Seminole Ridge 7 Pasco 49, Land OLakes 7 Ponte Vedra 32, Bartram Trail 31 Pope John Paul II 22, Westminster Academy 11 Port Charlotte 24, Bayshore 22 Port Orange Atlantic 24, Pine Ridge 0 Raines 51, R.E. Lee 6 Reagan/Doral 28, Southern Pines Pinecrest, N.C. 20 Ridge Community 21, Mulberry 0 Ridgeview 30, Clay 21 River Ridge 17, Ridgewood 14 Robinson 29, Dunedin 0 Sandalwood 41, Wolfson 12 Santaluces 37, Palm Beach Lakes 6 Sebastian River 17, St. Lucie Centennial 16 South Fork 26, Port St. Lucie 9 South Fort Myers 49, East Lee County 0 South Lake 24, Hernando 13 South Sumter 55, East Ridge 13 Southeast 12, Lakewood Ranch 7 Springstead 38, Fivay 0 St. Thomas Aquinas 43, Cypress Bay 17 Stanton College Prep 20, Baldwin 16 Sunlake 17, Wiregrass Ranch 12 Tampa Bay Tech 14, King 0 Tampa Catholic 20, Zephyrhills 9 Taravella 54, Coconut Creek 6 Tarpon Springs 33, Clearwater 17 Taylor 33, St. John Lutheran 14 Terry Parker 24, Ribault 14 Treasure Coast 47, Fort Pierce Westwood 6 Umatilla 14, The Villages 7 Union County 42, Interlachen 0 University Christian 34, Providence 20 Venice 55, Booker 0 Vero Beach 48, Martin County 15 Warner Christian 52, Father Lopez Catholic 14 Wellington 20, Forest Hill 6 West Nassau County 44, Eagles View 24 West Port 28, Citrus 26 Winter Haven 56, Haines City 7 Winter Park 26, Edgewater 13 POSTPONEMENTS AND CANCELLATIONS Miami Country Day vs. Coral Springs Charter, ppd. Merritt Island vs. Harmony, ppd. Boone vs. Timber Creek, ppd. Ocoee vs. Orlando University, ppd. East River vs. Wekiva, ppd. Episcopal vs. Astronaut, ccd. Hillsboro, Texas vs. Cocoa, ppd. Fort Pierce Central vs. Palm Bay, susp. St. Cloud vs. Rockledge, ppd. SCORES from page A9 and returned it to the end zone. The PAT was good for two more and the Yellow Jackets led 30-0 going into halftime. Vernons nal score came with 8:27 left to play in the third quarter, when Malloy went up the middle from the 2-yard line. Kirk found Brown in the end zone for two points to make it 38-0, which invoked the mercy rule and kept the clock running. The Gators were able to get on the board when sophomore quarterback Rashard Raine was able to connect with junior tight end Javar Hill after the Gators recovered a Yellow Jackets fumble at the Vernon 35. Raine connected with Hill at the 9-yard line on the rst play, then duplicated the effort from rst and goal. The Yellow Jackets travel to Deane Bozeman High School in Panama City next Friday, while the Gators host Munroe High School from Quincy. Kickoff is 7 p.m. HOLMES from page A9 and team speed; that was important. The teams spent the majority of the rst quarter swapping punts and attempting physical dominance. Bozeman punted on its rst three possessions but caught a break when it recovered a fumbled pitch at its 38. Bozeman went 62 yards for the opening score on a drive aided by a late hit penalty. Daniel Taylor had two carries for 34 yards to set up a 1-yard dive by Martinez to open the scoring early in the second quarter. A penalty for an ineligible receiver down eld stunted the Tiger Sharks ensuing drive. They had moved as deep as the Bozeman 33 on the strength of a 36-yard halfback pass from Davis to Troy Williams. PSJ went backward 15 yards and was forced to punt. Kris Kenney fumbled away the Bucks next possession two plays later and PSJ drove to the 13 before turning the ball over on downs. Bozeman capitalized when Martinez found Elmore at the Bozeman 45. Elmore cut inside past a defender and nished off a 72-yard connection for a 14-0 Bozeman halftime lead. Gannon said playing against a potential playoff team, and more of them in the future, will help toughen PSJ. We learned we have to be more physical through a whole game, he said. And we need to cut down the mental mistakes. Port St. Joe is off this week. Bozeman hosts Vernon. BOZEMAN from page A9 RANDAL SEYLER | The News The Vernon Yellow Jackets beat the Wewahitchka Gators 38-6 Friday in Vernon. The Yellow Jackets travel to Panama City Friday to take on Deane Bozeman High School. Sports VERNON from page A9

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Washington, Holmes at a glance B PAGE 1 Section Kid Safety and Fun Expo CHIPEY MPE and H&H will sponsor a Free Kid Safety and Fun Expo from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15, at the Chipley Walmart. There will be baby deer at the expo and much more. Youth Ranch Golf Tournament PANAMA CITY The Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch Golf Tournament will be Saturday, Sept. 15, at the Panama Country Club. The money raised will go directly to the Youth Ranch, which runs solely on donations. The Washington County Sheriffs Of ce is one of the tournament sponsors. For more information, call Andrea Gainey at 638-6115. Jacob City Day JACOB Jacob has slated Saturday, Sept. 15, for its Jacob City Day Celebration, which will include a parade, entertainment, food and activities for all. The festivities will start at 11 a.m. with a parade along Jackson Road. Other activities will take place at Jacob City Park, 2254 Jacob Main St. (Highway 162). Booths are available to vendors; contact Verloria T. Wilson at 263-6636 for more information. Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant BONIFAY The 2012 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant sponsored by the HCHS Blue Pride Band Boosters will be at 4 p.m. Sept. 22 at Holmes County High School. There is no residency requirement. Girls ages 4-20 and boys ages 4-9 may enter for $45. If two or more siblings register in any category, it will cost $35 each. Registration at HCHS will be 10 a.m. to noon Saturday and 5-7 p.m. Tuesday. A $10 late fee will be added Tuesday. You may also turn in registration forms at Bonifay Elementary Schoo., Bonifay Middle School, HCHS or by mail to HCHS; Attn: Band Boosters; 825 W. U.S. 90; Bonifay, FL 32425. If you have any questions, contact Cindy Goodson at goodsonc@hdsb.org or 373-7517. INDEX Society ................................. B2 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B6 Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 12 2012 PHOTOS BY CECILIA SPEARS | Extra Holmes County High Schools Blue Pride Band performed during halftime during the Blue Devils football game Friday, Sept. 7, against the Jay Royals. Their theme for this year is Academy Awards. This years band of cers are Drum Major Madison Simmons, Band Captain Katie White, Quartermaster Mollie Niemi, Chaplain Anna Bailey and Section Leaders Victoria Justice, Justin Barton, Anthony McCorvey, Lacey Adams and Jordan Taylor/Michala French. Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser BAND ON THE RUN

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Wednesday, September 12, 2012 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Special to Extra BONIFAY Doctors Memorial Hospital in Bonifay is now taking applications for the fall session of the candy striper program. A candy striper must be between the ages of 14 and 18 years of age and volunteer his/her time weekly at the hospital by assisting the nursing staff with patients needs, such as re lling water and ice, taking books and magazines to rooms, ling and other simple but important tasks. Candy stripers volunteer one afternoon a week for two hours. This is an excellent introduction to the eld of healthcare and the volunteer hours may be used as community service hours for scholarships. Applications can be picked up at the hospital or downloaded from www. doctorsmemorial.org and must be completed and returned to the volunteer services director by Wednesday, Sept. 19. The required orientation and training is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 20 from 3-5 pm. The fall session is limited to the rst 15 approved applicants. For more information about the candy striper program, contact the cirector of volunteer services at 547-8193. By STEVE MASON Special to Extra CHIPLEY The Chipley Kiwanis Club met Sept. 4 for its weekly luncheon at Pattillos Restaurant at the WashingtonHolmes Technical Center. Lunch was provided by the staff of the Washington-Holmes Technical Center. Paul Goulding introduced the program, a question and answer session with the three current candidates for the upcoming election for Washington County sheriff. The candidates for sheriff are current Sheriff Bobby Haddock, Mr. Chris Ellis and Mr. John Pettis. The rst request was that the candidates tell something about themselves. Sheriff Haddock noted that he has been in law enforcement for 34 years, including one year with Chipley PD, 11 years with the Washington County Sheriffs Department, 14 years with the State Attorneys Of ce and eight years as the Washington County Sheriff. Chris Ellis has been in law enforcement for 30 years, including 1 year with the Washington County Sheriffs Of ce and 29 years with the Florida Highway Patrol. He spent 10 years in Daytona Beach and has been based in Washington County since 1995. He has a passion for drug interdiction and would make use of DEA and FDLE as additional resources. John Pettis has served in law enforcement since 2005 and is a school resource of cer. He would like to establish a business advisory council to provide community input to the sheriffs of ce. Question: Other than drugs, what is the biggest crime threat? John Pettis noted that theft and burglary are related to drugs and violent crimes are up. He would like to hold a quarterly community forum as well as the business advisory council. Chris Ellis noted that thefts are related to drugs. Meth heads cant hold jobs so they steal. WCSO now has one person handling drug issues. We need the DEA and FDLE involved and need more of cers on the road. Sheriff Haddock noted that an orange card is left at the door when an of cer checks a house. The depressed economy and drugs are the greatest issues facing the WCSO. Meth dealers make meth for themselves and sell to nance their habit. He also noted that small numbers and small changes make for large statistical changes. For example, in 2010 there was one sexual crime. Last year there were nine. Also, the average crime clearance rate is 40 percent. This year it is 43 percent. Last year the recovery rate on property was 43 percent, while this year the rate is 73 percent. At the same time, due to the economic downturn, last year the WCSO lost three and a half positions. This year an additional four positions will be lost. Chris Ellis noted that overall crime is down 7 percent this year, while Washington County is up 16 percent, and Chipley is down 9 percent. The key is more deputies on the road and making them more visible. Question: Since we have lost some school resource of cer positions, what is the impact and how are we dealing with the situation and how can the situation be improved? Sheriff Haddock noted that they only have three resource of cers. They lost one position this year and will lose one more next year. Haddock wants to start drug education in elementary schools and will use drug money to implement school programs. Mr. Ellis wants to address an issue with the WC School Board. School penalties for small amounts of drugs are much tougher from the School Board than from the court system. A 10-day suspension and loss of sports is too tough a penalty for possession of a small amount of drugs. John Pettis noted that drugs are in the middle schools. We need tools to educate students. He noted that after a suspension, a student only receives 60 percent credit for any grade the student makes on the work. He believes the guidelines should be less severe. Question: How can we pay for more programs? John Pettis suggested that the WCSO go to 12hour shifts as a way to save money. He also noted that free training and federal grants are available. Chris Ellis would look to streamline the department and work with other law enforcement agencies. Sheriff Haddock noted that the WCSO has applied for numerous grants and that they have the best equipment available. He also noted that WCSO has worked on a number of task forces with the DEA, FDLE, the Chipley PD and other county sheriffs departments. WCSO has memoranda of understanding with many other state and county agencies to foster cooperation. On the subject of staf ng, 12hour shifts would mean that there would be four deputies per shift rather than ve per shift that they have now. The major funding issue, which the WCSO faces, is due to the reduction in the tax base due to the current poor economy. Chris Ellis noted that half of drugs are being mailed into the county via USPS, FedEx and UPS. He believes in a strong canine program. Question: How will you recruit and retain quali ed personnel in this economic downturn? Sheriff Haddock noted that he has started an Explorer program (a Boy Scout program for older boys) to encourage local boys to join law enforcement. The current salary starts at $28,500. Two years ago the county had to cut its participation in the employee health insurance premium. Deputies now net about $17,500, and the WCSO lost seven people as a result. Sheriff Haddock had brought in $3 million in revenue by housing state and federal prisoners in the Washington County Jail. Chris Ellis noted that pay is a problem, but it is not always money that retains personnel. Appreciation and how people are treated makes a difference. Off-duty employment opportunities also help. John Pettis added that morale is also important. None of us do it for the money! The Chipley Kiwanis will host other candidate forums in the near future. The Kiwanis club meets Tuesdays at Patillos restaurant in the middle of the WHTC campus at noon. For an invitation, contact any Kiwanian or David Solger, membership chairperson, at 850-638-1276. For more information about the Kiwanis Club of Chipley, visit www.ChipleyKiwanis.com. Special to Extra Elijah and Lizzie Lewis celebrated their 73rd wedding anniversary on Aug. 5. Their children are Daisy Swearingen, Mattie Scarvey, Naomi Corne, Albert Lewis, Bernie Lewis and a deceased daughter, Mary Callie Hartley. They have six grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren and many other family members. Kiwanis Club holds political forum for sheriff candidates SPECIAL TO EXTRA A candy striper volunteers his/her time weekly at the hospital by assisting the nursing staff with patients needs such as re lling water and ice, taking books and magazines to rooms or assisting nurses by taking vital signs and ling or other simple but important tasks. This is a great way to ful ll community service hours required for some scholarships. Letters of recommendation may also be obtained from the volunteer services director upon request. Candy striper fall program begins Lewises celebrate 73rd anniversary and Sheriff candidates Bobby Haddock, Chris Ellis and John Pettis visit the Chipley Kiwanis Club on Sept. 4.

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Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 About 70 percent of horses will develop wolf teeth. Though these teeth usually do not pose a health risk to the horse, they are often removed in performance horses to prevent interference with the bit and to avoid traumatizing the soft tissues around the teeth, leading to soreness. Horsemen differ in opinions on when or if these teeth should be removed, but understanding the physiology of wolf teeth can help individual horse owners make the best personal decision for their horses. Wolf teeth generally emerge between the ages of 5 and 12 months. Predominantly, the teeth emerge in the upper jaw 2 to 3 centimeters in front of the rst cheek teeth. Wolf teeth also can erupt adjacent to the rst cheek teeth and are present in both colts and llies. The wolf teeth do not serve any real purpose for the horse, and therefore, removing them does not pose any disruption to chewing, said Dr. Glennon Mays, clinical assistant professor in the Large Animal Hospital at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. Millions of years ago, horses were small, forest-dwelling animals. They were browsers, not grazers, and the wolf teeth were more prominent because they helped horses eat twigs and brush, Mays said. But, now, there really isnt any need for them in the modern horse. Because the wolf teeth are not necessary and there is a possibility they can interfere with bit placement in the mouth of performance horses, many horse trainers opt to have them removed before they can potentially cause pain for horses during training. The idea is to remove as many excuses as possible for unacceptable behavior in horses throughout the training process and during performance, Mays said. There is a common understanding that the name wolf teeth is a connotation of bad teeth, that it was the teeths reputation as bad that led to them being named wolf teeth. Even with this reputation as a negative, unneeded component of the mouth, owners do not always remove the teeth, especially in horses that do not have erupted wolf teeth or in horses that are not used for performance purposes. Removing wolf teeth is a decision you should make with your veterinarian, Mays said. The procedure is not particularly dangerous, but there are risks with any surgical procedure. There is the possibility of severing or damaging the palatine artery, which can cause a great deal of blood loss. Or in horses with large, curved wolf teeth, the curvature of the tooth increases the possibility for complications. Sedation and local anesthetic should be used to make the procedure safe and comfortable for the horse, Mays said. Recovery ranges from about a day to a week depending on the horse and size of the tooth being extracted. The actual extraction consists of cleaning and ushing the mouth, using an elevator to cut the gum around the tooth and stretching the periodontal ligament in order to loosen the wolf tooth. The tooth is grasped and removed with forceps. Because wolf teeth can be a variety of sizes and shapes, the procedure time varies from a couple of minutes to half an hour. Mays recommended ensuring your horse is vaccinated for tetanus before the procedure. Adequate protection includes an initial vaccination, with a second booster administered four to six weeks after the initial vaccine, then another booster every two to four years. Tetanus bacteria thrive in small, usually hidden puncture-type wounds with little to no oxygen. Therefore, mouth wounds are a prime environment for tetanus bacteria to develop. Tetanus is usually fatal in horses, and mares are often overrepresented as being especially vulnerable, largely because males typically are vaccinated for tetanus before castration. Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at http://vetmed.tamu. edu/pet-talk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to cvmtoday@cvm.tamu.edu. By GWENETH COLLINS Chipley Garden Club CHIPLEY Chipley Garden Clubs rst meeting of the 2012-13 club year was Sept. 5 at the home of Gweneth and Wade Collins. New members and guests were welcomed by Club President Karen Roland as the meeting began. Club Member Jane Brewer, who is also FFGC District II director, extended her congratulations and conveyed her pride in our club for the many awards we received at the 2012 Spring FFGC Convention. Current projects were discussed, including our second annual Scarecrow Contest, which will be Oct. 13 at the Farmers Market in downtown Chipley. The Scarecrow Contest will be in conjunction with the Washington County Historical Societys Fall into History Fest. We also will sponsor a free Build-a-Better-Scarecrow Workshop on Sept. 18 at the Farmers Market. The public is invited to participate in both events. Other projects discussed included Octobers FFGC District II fall meeting in Graceville, Yard of the Month, Pennies for Pines, The Little Blue (Pond) Water Project in Sunny Hills and pre-planning for our 80th anniversary reception. Club member Gweneth Collins presented a program covering the clubs 80 years of gardening history. After a DVD featuring photographic journey from the 1950s to the present, she shared the history of Chipley Garden Club its many projects and accomplishments from 1932 to the present. Although the stylish hats and white gloves of the original 1932 club are gone, the mentality remains the same: civic mindedness, horticultural education for young people, the love of nature, recycling and waste management, protecting the natural world and beautication of our community. The next regular meeting of Chipley Garden Club will be Oct. 3 at Shivers Park. We welcome members and visitors at any time. If you would like more information or would like to join, contact club president Karen Roland at 648-9968 or blueorchidoasis@yahoo. com. Special to Extra Florida veterans wishing to enter the commercial shing industry soon might be able to do so more easily thanks to changes made today at the Sept. 5-6 Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission meeting in Tampa. These changes are anticipated to take effect on Veterans Day, Nov. 11. The commission implemented a new program that will modify income requirements for Florida veterans seeking a commercial restricted species endorsement license. The restricted species endorsement allows commercial harvesters to sh for and sell species that are designated as restricted. Spanish and king mackerel, ounder, shrimp, dolphin and several reef sh are among the list of species that require a restricted species endorsement. Currently, commercial harvesters trying to qualify for a restricted species endorsement license must have a Florida Saltwater Products License, which is Floridas commercial saltwater shing license, and be able to attribute $5,000 or 25 percent of their total annual income during one of the past three years to sales of saltwater products. With the new changes in place, restricted species endorsement income requirements will be waived for one license year (July 1 to June 30) for Florida veterans who were honorably discharged between Sept. 11, 2001, and June 30, 2014. After June 30, 2014, this income requirement waiver will continue to extend to Florida veterans so long as they apply within four years of an honorable discharge. The one-license-year waiver also extends to honorably discharged veterans with service-connected disabilities. After the one-year waiver expires, veterans with service-connected disabilities will have a reduced income requirement of $2,500 instead of $5,000. To qualify for these exemptions, veterans must be certied by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs or the United States Armed Forces to have at least a 10 percent disability that is service-connected. To learn more about commercial shing requirements, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on Saltwater and Commercial. Special to Extra DESTIN William O. Bill Cleckley, the Northwest Florida Water Management Districts director of land management and acquisition, was recognized Thursday by Audubon Florida for his achievements managing public forests, lakes, springs and wetlands in northwest Florida. Each year, Audubon presents its Sustainable Forestry Award at the Florida Forestry Associations annual meeting to honor a forester for protecting the states water and wildlife. Throughout his 26 years at the district, Bill has shown an unwavering commitment to protecting and restoring Floridas treasured water and land resources, said District Executive Director Jon Steverson. Thanks to his leadership and dedication, the district has developed one of the most active restoration and recreational programs in the South, and natural communities across the panhandle continue to thrive. During his tenure with the district, Cleckley helped acquire more than 122,000 acres key to the protection and preservation of Floridas water resources. He also oversees 212,371 acres of district-owned property and more than 12,400 acres of conservation easements. Using his forestry expertise to focus on habitat restoration, hes led efforts to reforest more than 11,000 acres of longleaf pine uplands and restore groundcover on thousands of acres of upland and wetland wiregrass habitats. Bill Cleckley has done an excellent job of managing and restoring the districts public lands, which are a resource for people and wildlife alike, said Eric Draper, Audubon Florida executive director. Anyone who has used the districts lands for recreation knows that they provide a gateway to a wonderful assemblage of springs, forests and rivers. Audubon is proud to be associated with the Florida Forestry Association to present this award. The districts lands protect many important wetland and natural vegetation communities, including river oodplains, recharge areas/springs, headwater wetlands, coastal marshes and pristine bottomland hardwood and associated upland forests. The districts acquisitions include more than 85 percent of the oodplains along the Choctawhatchee and Escambia rivers and Econna Creek. Every acre of district-owned land is open for sustainable public use, offering a variety of recreational activities, including bird-watching, nature study, photography, hiking, jogging, camping, shing, hunting, swimming, canoeing, boating and other nature-related outdoor activities. By working cooperatively with local law enforcement agencies, the district is committed to providing family-friendly springs and waterways experiences for Floridians and visitors. Chipley Garden Club recalls its history Crossword PUZZLESOLUTION ON PAGE B5 FWC to ease requirements for veterans COMMERCIAL FISHING Land manager recognized for restoration efforts Equine wolf teeth usually not harmful PET T ALK PET TALK

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FAITH B Section www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. First Baptist Church come as you are Mike Orr, Pastor 1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830 Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. What Can You Do Without A king once asked a wise man what his teaching was good for. The king claimed that he was happier than the wise man because he had sumptuous palaces to live in, armies at his command, and beauti ful women to consort with. The wise man asked the king whether he could be per fectly content doing nothing for an hour, to which the king replied that he could. Then the wise man asked him if he could be per fectly content for an entire day while do ing absolutely nothing. The king replied the wise man responded that he could be perfectly happy doing nothing for seven days and seven nights, and thus the wise man had the greater share of happiness. Perhaps what this story really reveals is that it is not what we have that makes us happy but what we can do without. BROWN FUNERAL HOME 1068 Main Street, Chipley 638-4010 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser This Message Courtesy of I know what it is tobe in need, and I know what it is to have plenty. I have learned the secret of being content in any and every situation, whether well fed or hungry, whether living in plenty or in want. Philippians 4:12 Page 4 Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Rev. James L. Snyder I often hear derogatory remarks directed toward the IRS. I must admit that many of these critical remarks originated with me. Not that I do not like my good old Uncle Sam, it is that he is a little demanding when it comes to tax time. Every year I complain about ling my income tax and paying out gobs and gobs of dollars to the United States government. I know it is important to pay taxes, and I pay my fair share even though it may be grudgingly. Throughout the years, I have complained that dear old Uncle Sam never writes me a letter. I will have to amend that complaint because I recently received a personalized letter from the IRS. Well, you can imagine my surprise at getting this letter. With trembling hands, I opened the letter, anxious to know what was going on in the world of Uncle Sam. I expected a detailed letter of what he was doing and how he was getting along and how the kids were and all that sort of thing. Imagine my surprise when none of that information was contained in the letter. From the contents of the letter, and I must say a lot of it was goobly glop, I had fallen far short of my share of income tax this past year. According to the letter, I was a gazillion dollars short of what he had expected from me and quite frankly, he was disappointed in this behavior on my part. Do not ask me how many zeros a gazillion dollars have because I do not know. I do not have that many ngers or toes. Although, I read the letter several times it was not quite clear how much I actually owed and what plans there were in place for me to pay it back. From what I could understand from the letter, I owed good old Uncle Sam an arm and a leg, and he was highly expecting that I would come through for him. Well, that kind of letter did not set well with me. I was tempted to leave the country, then sneak back as an illegal alien and not have to worry about all this nasty stuff. But, I did not have that much energy available. There was a phone number I was to call if I had any personal questions. Boy, did I have some personal questions. I was fully expecting not to get a real human voice when I called. But, again, I was pleasantly surprised. Within 30 minutes and after dozens of pushing this button and pushing that button, I had on the other end of the phone a very pleasant and cheerful voice, a representative of the IRS. After we exchanged some personal niceties and followed up on the weather report from each of our locations, we nally got down to the real business of the phone call. I must confess I was not expecting such pleasantries from an IRS agent. I assumed she had the telephone in one hand and a loaded, fully cocked revolver in the other. If she did, she concealed it most admirably. Then we got down to the nitty-gritty of what the IRS is all about: collecting taxes from potentially delinquent taxpayers, like myself. The thought that I deliberately was delinquent was rather humiliating for me. Simply put, I just did not pay enough in, but this telephone call was going to rectify all of that. After she crunched all the gures and as I waited patiently on my end of the phone, she was able to determine I owed the government an arm and a leg. It was then that the negotiations began in earnest. I must confess she could not have been any nicer had she been my grandmother. She then began to query as to which arm and which leg I was going to give to the government. This presented a real dif cult decision on my part. Throughout the years, I have grown quite fond of both arms and both legs. Then I asked her if I could counter a proposal. She replied in the af rmative. Would you consider, I began rather slowly, an arm or a leg? There was a pause on the other end of the phone when I could tell she was thinking. Whenever you get a government employee to think, watch out. I could hear the old wheels grinding and grinding. Finally, she said, I think that would be acceptable. And, Ill even allow you to select either arm or leg. We like to work with people. Now the burden was on me. I now owed the government an arm or a leg, and I just had to select which one. I rst considered my arms. In thinking about them, I use both of my arms although the left one less than the right one every day. What with writing and eating my arms are rather busy throughout the day. Then I considered my legs. I like my right leg and so the choice became rather easy for me. Now, the United States government has at least one leg to stand on, thanks to Yours Truly. I have something greater to stand on. Stand fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free, and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondage (Galatians 5:1 KJV). Jesus Christ trumps Uncle Sam when it comes to liberty. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att. net. His web site is www. jamessnyderministries. com Special to Extra PANAMA CITY Building Bridges: An Interfaith Dialog will be held at Unity of Panama City on from 6-9 p.m. on Sept. 19. In todays diverse and changing world, it is crucial to create greater understanding and connections between different faith groups. Come explore four faith traditions to discover how they are unique, and more importantly, what they have in common. Speakers include: Ron Fazer (Bahai), Dr. Cynthia Gingold (Judaism), Nancy James (Buddhism) and the Rev. Dr. Margaret Shepard (Episcopalian). After their presentations, the audience will have time to ask questions and then dialog in small groups about ways to foster a more respectful world. As we become ever more global in our thinking and actions, it is time to move past mere tolerance. It is time to build strong bridges that allow all faith traditions to work in connection to lift up the level of discussion as we address local and world issues, Darby Neptune, minister at Unity of Panama City, said. Unity of Panama City, host of this event, invites people from all backgrounds to participate. This is one step in this spiritual communitys vision of co-creating a harmonious world that works for all. For more information, contact Paula Merck, Unity of Panama City, 1764 Lisenby Ave., Panama City, FL 32405, e-mail panamacityunity@ knology.net or call 850769-7481. Unity of Panama City is online at www. unityofpanamacity.org. Library hours Wausau Library Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County Library (Bonifay) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed Washington County Library (Chipley) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Vernon Library Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills Library Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed MONDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Monday each month (unless a holiday) at 6:00 at the Chipley library. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach of ce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999. TUESDAY 8 to 9 a.m.: Tai Chi Class at the Washington County Public Library, Chipley Branch 8 to 10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 5 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at 6:25 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-451 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. 12 p.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday. (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A FRIDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Homes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Winn Dixie in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks while you get your shopping done. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. SUNDAY 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at GracevilleCampbellton Hospital in Graceville. COMMUNITY CALENDAR Unity plans interfaith event Faith BRIEF Who says the IRS is a meany? Only Grace Ministries presents The Ring BONIFAY Only by Grace Ministries will proudly present the original theatrical production, The Ring, at 10:45 a.m. on Sept 16 at Gully Springs Baptist Church in Bonifay. The modern day drama illustrates the story of The Prodigal Son as it relates to everyday life. The Ring captivated audiences of all ages as it illustrates the Fathers unfailing love through story and music. Sept. 16 will also mark the 95th homecoming at Gully Springs Baptist Church.

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Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences. Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section of www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership with Legacy com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212 Special to the News TALLAHASSEE Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida Forest Service is awarding 27 city, county and non-pro t entities with over $260,000 dollars in grant funding as part of the 2012 Urban and Community Forestry grants. With over 75 percent of Floridas population living in urban areas, access to green spaces can be challenging, said Agriculture Commissioner Adam H. Putnam. The Urban and Community Forestry grants provide the necessary link between cities and Floridas natural resources, allowing even the most urbanized citizens to enjoy the bene ts trees have to offer. Administered by the Florida Forest Service, the grants are funded as part of a nationwide campaign by the USDA Forest Service, program participants receive reimbursement for practices such as conducting community tree inventories, preparing urban forestry management plans, developing local tree ordinances, hiring temporary staff, purchasing urban forestry equipment, conducting personnel training and creating urban forestry education programs. Trees provide numerous amenities to urban communities including clean air, lower energy costs, storm water abatement, increased property values, and improved neighborhood aesthetics, said Jim Karels, director of the Departments Florida Forest Service. These grants are important for ensuring urban forests and its amenities are available for many generations. For a list of the 2012 grant winners, applicants should visit the Florida Forest Service website, www. oridaforestservice.com. Additional information about eligible practices, program requirements and procedures is provided. Each year, the Florida Forest Service accepts applications from January through March. Qualifying applications are then evaluated and ranked for funding approval. The Florida Forest Service manages over one million acres of public forest land while protecting over 26 million acres of homes, forestland and natural resources from the devastating effects of wild re. For statewide forestry updates and wild re information, visit www. oridaforestservice.com or follow FFS on Facebook or Twitter. For more information about the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, visit. www.FreshFromFlorida.com or follow Commissioner Putnam on Facebook or Twitter. Obituaries Dept. of Agriculture announces community forestry grant awards Mrs. Sharon Omega Blanton, age 58, of Bonifay, passed away Sept. 2 at her home. She was born July 27, 1954, in Leitch eld, Ky., to the late William Roscoe Blanton and Pauline Duvall Blanton. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Blanton was preceded in death by a brother, Jerry Blanton. Mrs. Blanton is survived by three sons, James Mancill and wife Melissa of Bonifay, Jason Mancill and wife Cheryl of Midway, Ga., and Davey Mancill of Bonifay; one daughter, Melissa Missy Mancill of Seaford, Del.; 13 grandchildren, Donnie Mancill, Andrea Mancill, Angel Mancill, Shaelynn Mancill, Jacob Mancill, Jason Mancill Jr., Ryan Roof Mancill, Megan Roof Mancill, Christian Franklin Mancill, Dalton Mancill, Ashton Mancill, Emma Lesley, Zayle Weeks; ve brothers, Pat Blanton of Anneta, Ky., Jr Blanton of Vine Grove, Ky., Gary Blanton of Bonifay, Ricky Blanton of Bonifay, and Dewayne Blanton of Leitch eld; ve sisters, Grace Ivy of Vaiden, Ms., Jean Downs of Cecilia, Ky., Frankie Saltsman of Vine Grove, Ky., Judy Voge of Winter Haven, Joan Estep of Fraser, Mich.; best friends, Rossana Gahn and Charlene Steverson. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7 at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Mitch Johnson of ciating. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Family received friends Thursday from 5-7 p.m. at Peel Funeral Home. Sharon O. Blanton Mrs. Brenda Gomillion Howard, age 52, of Ponce de Leon, passed away Sept. 3 in an auto accident. She was born June 18, 1960, in Geneva, Ala., to the late Broward Gomillion and Reba Strickland Gomillion. Mrs. Howard is survived by a daughter, Shanta Sapp and husband Jeremy of Bonifay; two grandsons, Cayden Sapp and Judah Sapp, both of Bonifay; and a brother, Allen Gomillion and wife Bonnie of Ponce de Leon. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. Sept. 7 at Northside Baptist Church with the Rev. Rodd Jones and the Rev. Larry McGowan of ciating. Interment followed in the Ponce de Leon Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends one hour prior to service at Northside Baptist Church. Brenda G. Howard Mrs. Dorothy J. Ivey, age 85, of Bonifay, passed away Sept. 2 at Bay Medical Care Center in Panama City. She was born Feb. 12, 1927, in West Bay, Cayman Islands. She was preceded in death by her husband, Thomas Ivey and grandson, Timothy Ivey. Mrs. Ivey is survived by two sons, David Ivey and wife Diana of Hartford, Ala., and John Ivey and wife Brenda of Ringgold, Ga.; nine grandchildren, David and Melissa Ivey, Jonathon and Sheryl Ivey, Jennifer and Kevin Fite, David Ivey, Kenny and Heather Ivey, Daniel and Mary Ivey, Angela Sims, Michael Ivey and Aaron Ivey; 18 greatgrandchildren and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Sept. 5 at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Johnie Bradshaw of ciating. Interment followed in the Bonifay Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends one hour prior to service. Dorothy J. Ivey Mrs. Bessie Mae Walters, 99, of Graceville passed away Friday, Aug. 31 at Washington Health & Rehabilitation in Chipley. Ms. Bessie was born in Midland City, Ala., on March 5, 1913, to the late James Bascom Ward and Beulah Dean Ward. A beloved mother, grandmother, sister, aunt and friend, Ms. Bessie was a member of Damascus Baptist Church. She is preceded in death by her husband, C.C. Walters, parents, seven brothers and three sisters. She is survived by her children, Edward Walters and wife Sylvia, Graceville, Janie Pelham, Bloomington, Minn., Tommy Walters and wife Rita, Augusta, Ga., Boyd Walters and wife Mari Cynthia, North Myrtle Beach, S. C., Chris Walters and wife MerryLou, Altha, Janair Gates and husband David, Marianna; brother O.T. Ward and wife Ruby, Graceville; 14 grandchildren, 19 greatgrandchildren, seven great-great-grandchildren, a host of nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Sept. 5 at Damascus Baptist Church with James C. Walters, the Rev. Chester Padgett and Dr. Bill Floyd of ciating. Burial followed in Marvin Chapel Cemetery with James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family received friends at the church from 10 a.m. until time of service. Expressions of sympathy may be made at www. jamesandlipford.com. Bessie M. Walters Robert E. Moody, age 73, passed from this life Friday, Aug. 31, at his home in Panama City. He was born in Houston County, Ala., on Dec. 15, 1938, to John T. and Mattie (Blackmon) Moody. Mr. Moody was the owner of Moodys Auto Service. He is preceded in death by one daughter, Peggy Moody; four brothers, John E. Moody, J.T. Moody, Earl Moody and Johnny Moody; two sisters, Janie Mae Callaway and Fannie Lou Newsome. Mr. Moody is survived by his wife, Ellen Moody of Panama City; three sons, Hurtis L. Moody, John S. Moody and James Moody all of Panama City; three daughters, Angela Murnon of Panama City, Melissa Waters and husband Shawn of Panama City, and Darlene Cheney and husband Jason of Navarre; two brothers, William Moody of Alford, and Danny Moody of Lake City; three sisters, Pearle Newsome of Chipley, Annie Lou Vannest of Lynn Haven, Donnie Merle Baker of Riverbank, Calif.; seven grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Sept. 4 at Brown Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Carlos Finch of ciating. Internment followed in the Glenwood Cemetery. Visitation was held from 6-8 p.m. Sept. 3 in Brown Funeral Home Chapel. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh.net. Robert E. Moody Mr. Harrell Edward Wells, age 74, of Salem, Ala., passed away Aug. 31, 2012. He was born Jan. 21, 1938, in Bonifay, to the late Alex Wells and Arleva Cook Wells. In addition to his parents, Mr. Wells was preceded in death by two brothers, Lee Wells and Parker Wells, and two sisters, Mary Perdue and Arkie Revell. Mr. Wells is survived by a daughter, Kim Gilley and husband Ernest of Salem, Ala.; two sons, Waylon Wells of Columbus, Ga., and Ashley Wells and wife Jamie of Beauregard, Ala.; seven grandchildren, Nick Richard, Chris Gilley, Travis Gilley, Lisa Gilley, Kami Wells, Kayley Wells and Natalie Wells; three greatgrandchildren, Carson Gilley, Summer Gilley, and Carter Gilley; four brothers, Rufus Wells of Ocala, John Wells of Pensacola, Joel Wells of Bonifay and Carlton Wells of Bonifay; three sisters, Wilma Stubbs of Vernon, Imogene Birge of Bonifay and Annie Loue Richard of Salem, Ala.; and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 1 p.m. Sept. 4 at Bethel Primitive Baptist Church with Elder Bobby Willis of ciating. Interment followed in the Bethel Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends Monday from 5-7 p.m. at Peel Funeral Home. Harrell E. Wells Mr. Joseph Stanley Swamp Duck Paul, age 74, of Bonifay, passed away Aug. 31, 2012 at his daughters home in Pinckard, Ala. He was born Aug. 5, 1938, in Holmes County to the late James Floyd Paul and Jewel Gilley Paul. In addition to his parents, Mr. Paul was preceded in death by four siblings, William H. Paul, James Floyd Paul Jr., Martha Grif n and Jimmy Paul. Mr. Paul is survived by his wife, Ann Paul of Bonifay; three children, Joey Paul and wife Lori of Sylacauga, Ala., Lana Williams and husband Rick of Pinckard, Ala., and Stacey Paul and wife Jan of Bonifay; six grandchildren, Christopher Williams, Alicia Pughsley and husband Kevin, Corey Williams, William Paul, Jeremy Paul, and Jared Paul; soon to be greatgrandchild, Maddox Pughsley; and three brothers, Odell Paul of Bonifay, Manuel Paul of Dothan, Ala., and Daniel Paul of Orange City. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m. Sept. 3 at Carmel Assembly of God Church with the Rev. Tommy Moore, the Rev. Jerry Moore and the Rev. Jonathan West of ciating. Interment followed in the Carmel Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends from 1-3 p.m. at Carmel Church, 1485 Carmel Church Road, Bonifay. Joseph S. Paul Mrs. Margaret Ella Keener Peterman of the Royals Crossroads Community in Holmes County, formerly of Dothan, Ala., passed away Thursday, Aug. 30 at her home after a courageous battle with cancer. She was 80 years old. Marge was born Nov. 12, 1931, in Schenectady, N.Y., to the late Charles Tiffany and Anna OLeary Keener. Her family moved to Orlando (Bear Gulley Lake) when she was in her early teens. After graduating from Orlando High School, Marge became an of ce secretary for various businesses including Cape Canaveral in Titusville, which she loved. Upon meeting her lifelong love, Lamar, she moved to Dothan, Ala., to start a new life on the Petermans farm. Marge worked as an of ce secretary at WTVY for many years and at CocaCola Bottling Company in Dothan before becoming a legal secretary, which she retired from when her children started school. Marge and her family moved to what is now called P & J Farms in Holmes County, in the mid 1980s. She was a very hard working and caring person. She loved to take care of her family (especially her grandchildren) and loved to sit on her front porch looking out over the pastures and the animals. She loved everything about being a farmers wife and living in the country. She suffered for many years with back problems and then the cancer took over her body. Her family will miss her greatly but knows that she is in a much better place now, and she is free of any pain and suffering. Anyone who knew Marge knows how sweet and giving she was. Her husband, Lamar Peterman, died 4 years ago. They were married for almost 55 years. The Peterman family would like to express their sincere appreciation to Emerald Coast Hospice, especially Debra and Deb, Dr. Steve Stokes, Tonya, Debbie, Megan, Rob and Bruce at the Enterprise Cancer Center, Dr. Jerry Fincher and the nurses at Flowers Hospital, 5th Floor. Thank you to everyone who took such good care of Marge during this dif cult time. Survivors include one son, Will Peterman; one daughter and son-in-law, Laura and Pat Jackson; three grandchildren, Marc, Katherine and Luke Jackson, all of Holmes County; one sister, Florence Keating (wife of late Paul P. Keating, Jr.), Baton Rouge, La.; nieces, Ann (Silas) Ross and Susan (Howard) Cannon, all of Jackson, Miss., Margaret (Steve) Herron and Cindy (Glen) Brown, all of Dallas, Texas; nephew, Paul (Rita) Keating, Baton Rouge, La.; extended family also include Jim and Sandy Jackson, Geneva, Ala., and special family friends also include Teresa Little and Teddy and Sabrina Fain. A memorial celebration of life service was held, Sept. 2 at 4 p.m., with visitation beginning at 3 p.m. in the chapel of Sorrells Funeral Home in Geneva, Ala., with Bro. Hurtis Manning and Bro. Gary Watson of ciating. Flowers will be accepted or the family asks that memorial contributions be made to Camp Victory, 363 Victory Circle, Samson, AL 36477. Margaret E. Peterman

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Wednesday, September 12, 2012 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra B6 | Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, September 12, 2012 9-5139 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2011-CA-000273 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF THE MORGAN STANLEY ABS CAPITAL I INC., TRUST 2007-HE2, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-HE2, Plaintiff, vs. FRANK C. BARONE ; ET AL., Defendants, NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendants: FRANK C. BARONE (LAST KNOWN RESIDENCE-209 WEST KANSAS AVENUE, BONIFAY, FL 32425) UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FRANK C. BARONE (LAST KNOWN RESIDENCE-209 WEST KANSAS AVENUE, BONIFAY, FL 32425) YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: THE WEST 175 FEET OF BLOCK NUMBERED 68 OF THE TOWN OF BONIFAY, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT OF THE SAME DRAWN BY G.W. BANFILL IN 1886, A COPY OF WHICH IS ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND WHICH LANDS ARE A PART OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST. a/k/a 209 W KANSAS AVENUE, BONIFAY, FL 32425 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Heller & Zion, LLP, Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1428 Brickell Avenue, Suite 700, Miami, Florida 33131 on or before October 5, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This notice is provided pursuant to Florida Rules of Judicial Administration Rule 2.540 Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447; Phone: 850-718-0026; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771; Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcour ts.org. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 21 day of August, 2012. Cody Taylor As Clerk of the Court By Diane Eaton As Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 5, 12, 2012. 9-5140 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 2011CA000243 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ,acting through the United States Department of Agriculture, Rural Development, f/k/a Farmers Home Administration, a/k/a Rural Housing Service, Plaintiff, vs. CLAY P. WALKER A/K/A CLAY PRESTON WALKER; and TERESA C. WALKER A/K/A TERESA NOWELL WALKER, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on August 13, 2012, by the above entitled Court in the above styled cause, the undersigned Clerk of Court or any of his duly authorized deputies, will sell the property situated in HOLMES County, Florida, described as: An acre of land in Holmes County, Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the Southwest Corner of the NW 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of Section 28, Township 7 North, Range 13 West, and thence East, 397.78 feet to the Point of Beginning, said point being on the North side of a county road: thence S 89 40E, along the North side of said road, 210 feet; thence N 1 20W, 210 feet; thence N 89 40W, 210 feet; thence S 1 20E, 210 feet to the Point of Beginning. at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash on October 18, 2012, at the front door of the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, FL 32425, beginning at 11:00 A.M. Central Time, subject to all ad valorem taxes and assessments for the real property described above. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. REQUESTS FOR ACCOMMODATIONS BY PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator, Bay County Courthouse, 300 E. Fourth Street, Panama City, Florida 32401, (850)747-5338, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED on August 20, 2012. CODY TAYLOR Clerk of Circuit Court P.O. Box 397 Bonifay, FL 32425 BY: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 5, 12, 2012. 9-5141 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 30-2012-CA-000296 DIVISION: JAMES B. NUTTER & COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs THE UNKNOWN HEIRS ,DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,UNDER, OR AGAINST JAMES L. DEBORD A/K/A JAMES LEE DEBORD, DECEASED et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,UNDER, OR AGAINST JAMES L. DEBORD A/K/A JAMES LEE DEBORD, DECEASED. LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN. CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS. LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN. CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in HOLMES County, Florida: LOT 7, BLOCK D, OF SOUTHGATE SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 2, PAGE 18 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 16 day of August, 2012. Cody Taylor Clerk of the Court By: Diane Eaton As Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 12, 19, 2012. 9-5134 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 12-CA-186 RONALD M. MONK JR. and DONALD ROYCE MONK, Plaintiffs v. ROBERT C. MOORE PAUL MOORE and PAMELA CLARK, Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO:PAUL MOORE 631 N Hagadorn Street South Lyon, MI 48178 ROBERT C. MOORE 822 East Roosevelt Street, Mason, MI 48854 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Holmes County, Florida, for a Complaint to Quite Title, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses to it, if any, to: James J. Goodman, Jr., Attorney for the Petitioners, 935 Main Street, Chipley, FL 32428 on or before October 6, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, at the Holmes County Courthouse, 226 North Waukesha, Bonifay, Florida, either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; or a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. WITNESS my hand and Seal of this Court on the 21st day of August 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT, Diane Deaton, As Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012. 9-5135 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 12-CA-181 RONALD M. MONK JR., And DONALD ROYCE MONK, Plaintiffs V.REBECCA HAVARD And DANIEL HUGHES, Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: REBECCA HAVARD, 106 Fels Avenue, Fairhope, AL 36532; DANIEL HUGHES, 13947 Sherwood Highland, Fairhope, AL 36532. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Holmes County, Florida, for a Complaint to Quite Title, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses to it, if any, to: James J. Goodman, Jr., Attorney for the Petitioners, 935 Main Street, Chipley, FL 32428 on or before October 6, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, at the Holmes County Courthouse, Bonifay, Florida, either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; or a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. WITNESS my hand and Seal of this Court on the 21st day of August, 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT, Diane Deaton, Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times September 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012. 9-5137 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION FILE NUMBER 12-67PR IN RE: THE ESTATE OF CHARLES H. BUSH, Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of CHARLES H. BUSH, deceased, whose date of death was 2/23/2012, File Number 12-67PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida, Post Office Box 397, Bonifay, Florida, 32425. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against decedents Estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims and who may have been served a copy of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedents Estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOT WITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIMS FILED TWO YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is September 5, 2012. DONALD BUSH Personal Representative. 2400 Brooks Drive, Bonifay, Fl 32425 JEAN TOWERS TREJO Personal Representative, 960 Scottsdale Drive, Pingree Grove IL 60140. KRISTI MILLER NOVONGLOSKY THE LAW OFFICE OF KRISTI MILLER NOVONGLOSKY, PA FLORIDA BAR NO. 0182044 POST OFFICE BOX 1129, CHIPLEY, FLORIDA 32428 (850) 638-7587 ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 5, 12, 2012. 9-5142 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION C ASE NO.: 30-2011-CA-000032 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK NA, Plaintiff, vs. PATRICIA D SUTTON et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RERussell Roast held Thursday CHIPLEY City council member and Spanish Trail Playhouse president Kevin Russell will be the subject of a Man of the Hour Roast at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 13, at the Washington County Ag Center. Russell is being roasted as part of a fundraiser for the Spanish Trail Playhouse. Tickets are $15 or $25 per couple, and price includes the meal. For ticket information, call Barbara at 960-1347. Kid Safety and Fun Expo CHIPEY MPE and H&H will sponsor a Free Kid Safety and Fun Expo, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., on Saturday, Sept. 15, at the Chipley Walmart. There will be baby twin deer at the expo and much, much more. Youth Ranch Golf Tournament PANAMA CITY The Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch Golf Tournament will take place Saturday, Sept. 15, at the Panama Country Club. The monies raised from this benet will go directly to the Youth Ranch, which runs solely on donations. The Washington County Sheriffs Ofce is one of the sponsors for the golf tournament.For more information, contact Andrea Gainey at 638-6115. Jacob City Day JACOB The City of Jacob has slated Saturday, Sept. 15, for its Jacob City Day Celebration, which will include a parade, entertainment, food and activities for all. The festivities will start at 11 a.m. with a parade along Jackson Road. The other activities will take place at the Jacob City Park at 2254 Jacob Main Street (Highway 162). Booths are available to vendors; please contact Verloria T. Wilson at 2636636 for more information. 2012 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant BONIFAY The 2012 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant sponsored by the HCHS Blue Pride Band Boosters will be held at 4 p.m., Sept. 22, at Holmes County High School. There is no residency required to enter this pageant. Girls ages 4-20 and boys ages 4-9 may enter. Contestant entry fee $45. If two or more siblings register in any category, it will cost $35. All registration dates are held at Holmes County High School on Tuesday, Sept. 11 from 5-7 p.m. and Saturday, Sept. 15, from 10 a.m. to noon. Late registration is Tuesday, Sept. 18, from 5-7 p.m. (a $10.00 late fee will be added on this date). You may also turn in registration forms at BES, BMS, HCHS or by mail to: HCHS; Attn: Band Boosters; 825 West Highway 90, Bonifay, FL 32425. If you have any questions, you may contact Cindy Goodson at goodsonc@hdsb.org or by phone or text at 373-7517. Wiregrass Hospital reunion planed GENEVA, Ala. Wiregrass Hospital Reunion for past and present employees is planned for 11 a.m. Sept. 26 at City Caf downtown in Geneva. Please call the numbers list if you plan to attend so we can let City Caf know approximate number of people attending. Call 334684-2907, 334-692-3250 or 850-956-4179. Western Star Pageant slated BONIFAY The annual Western Star Pageant will be held on Sept. 29 in the Holmes County High School. Boys and girls can enter. Boys 0-7 years old and girls 0-21 years old may compete, and the Ms. competition will include ages 22 and up. Sign up will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sept. 18 at the Bonifay Dance Center on Highway 90. For more information, call Wanda at 614-1062 or 768-2005 or Bernyce at 547-3474 or 768-1150. Kid Safety and Fun Expo BONIFAY MPE and H&H will sponsor a Free Kid Safety and Fun Expo from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 4, 5 and 6, at the Bonifay Rodeo. There will be baby twin deer at the expo and much, much more. Washington County Candidate Forum SUNNY HILLS On Oct. 4, we will have a candidate forum for all candidates with questions from the residents. All Washington County residents are invited to participate. Please send any questions to Karen at kbschoen@bellsouth.net or Chuck at shachakel@ att.net Senior Group Will be exploring the Alpine Countries WASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will be exploring the Alpine Countries of Germany, Austria and Switzerland on Sept. 28 to Oct. 11. For more information, call Merita Stanley at 594-9980. Chipley High School Class of 1972 CHIPLEY The Chipley High School Class of 1972 are making plans for their class reunion. Activities are being planned for homecoming, which is Oct. 5-6. We will ride in the parade, attend the football game, meet after the game and will get together sometime Saturday. You can keep up with everything on Facebook (Chipley High School Class of 1972 Reunion). Its being updated as plans are being nalized. If you would like further information, you may contact Cathy Pitts Adams (850) 638-1665, adams03@ bellsouth.net or Gwen Lane Collins at gwen13@ aol.com. If you plan on attending, please RSVP by Sept. 19, 2012 (if youre coming or not). Holmes County High School Class of 1953 BONIFAY Members of the Holmes County High School Class of 1953 are looking for other members of the class to let them know if they are interested in holding a 60th class reunion. If you are interested, call Joann (Black) Scott at 763-4633, Grace (Whipple) Watson at 623-3058 or Ruth (Andrews) Bellot at 547-3452. Washington County Girls Night Out CHIPLEY The Womens Imaging Services at Northwest Florida Community Hospital proudly present Girls Night Out, Oct. 11. The event will be held at the Washington County Ag Center in Chipley. For more information, call Heather Shelby at 415-8119. Special to Extra DOTHAN Local human resources pro fessionals and ofce managers can learn the importance of Investing in YOU! during the 13th annual Wiregrass Human Resourc es Management Association forum hosted by Troy University on Thursday, Sept. 20. The forum will start at 7:30 a.m. at the Dothan Campus inside Sony Hall in the Li brary/Technology Building. The event will include discussion of how human resources professionals can grow and advance their careers. Each pre-registered participant will have the opportunity to take an online assess ment called TTI Talent Insights Executive Version (DISC), designed to increase their understanding of individual talents. Partici pants can earn 4.25 HR Certication Insti tute credits. The forum is open to the public and will be of interest to anyone in the human re sources eld, including assistants, manag ers and business owners. Registration is $69 for college students, $79 for WHRMA mem bers and $89 for non-members.Contact the Troy Continuing Education Center at 334983-0005 to register or for more information, or go to whrma.shrm.org. WHRMA is an afliate of the Society for Human Resource Management and is the main local starting point for networking, information, professional development and continued support of excellence in human resources. Community EVENTS Troy to host annual Wiregrass human resources forum

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Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 B B U S I N E S S USINESS G G U I D E UIDE T o P l a c e A n A d C a l l 6 3 8 0 2 1 2 o r 5 4 7 9 4 1 4 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Denton's RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDA WE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS $ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENT Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611 MullensTree ServiceCall for free estimate 120 ft. crane Licensed850-326-3408 850-263-0083 An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 € 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99* Easy Care Lawn Services. Yard services and pressure washing. Call for FREE estimate & affordable rates 850-527-6291 Licensed & Insurances Matt’s Removal! Garbage removal, free metal removal, yard jobs, moving jobs. We buy items. Nobody Beats My Prices! (850)547-1445, cell (850)658-2376. LOW INTERESTFINANCING Borrow up to 20k and pay $389.00 per mo. at 8% Car Loans, Small Business Loans & Debt Consolidation Bad Credit Ok Call Toll Free: 888-741-9122 Today!! C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 Anna Bella Salon & Day Spa Now hiring for all positions including Message Therapist, Permanent Makeup Artist. Need to be started by “ Open House” Sat Sept 22. Located @ 705 W. Hwy 90 Bonifay. For more information call 547-5665 Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com (850) 547-9500 B oni f a y Florida www.xtrem ein dus tri es.com Xtreme Boats FACTORY DIRECT 2080688 89 Acres FARMLAND Estate of Ted AdamsŽ Walton County, FL "#$%&'"()"#&*+&&)%.&*&.%&%%A MarkNet Alliance Member/#0.1*2+34($)1.*3( Excellent Home Sites 5 Mini Farms 6"7 %:;16<# &=4>%47* +'?7%"6<@1B) "1;G?")%.=*&.+I 32 x 52’ Block building on 1/2 acre land. 1 mile from Bonifay city limits. $25,000. Part trade for car or truck. (850)768-0165. Acre of land for sale Hwy 177A, Bonifay. (863)773-6155 1978 Chevy El Camino 350 cubic inch Chevy engine. Four barrael Elderbock carb, glass pack muffler, automatic, streight body. $4000. OBO 850-624-1679 2009 Dodge Grand Caravan Stow & Go seating. Back up camera, cd/dvd system. 56,000 miles. Like new condition. Asking $16,500. Call 638-1556. after 6pm 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $16,800, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 (2) 2BR/2BA MH for rent near Chipley. Water & garbage furnished. $400 & $425 plus deposit. Call 547-4232. 527-4911 2/3BR MH’S All on nice big lots. All electric, storage building. I furnish water, garbage, exterminate, change filters and mow grass in summer months. Sorry No Pets. For more info call Lou Corbin at 638-1911 or 326-0044. 3bd/1ba in Wausau. $400/mth plus security. NO PETS. 773-1352 OR 258-3815. 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. In Vernon, 1 BR, renovated MH w/washer & dryer. $350/ mth. Call Ron @ 535-9650. 2 Bdrm/2bath Central A/H Bonifay. No pets, No smoking $500/depo, $700/mo rent. Call Maureen (850)547-2950 2BD/1BA House 901 Main St Chipley. $600 mth. Security depo $575. Available 8/29 Call 850-271-9973. 3BR/1.5BA for rent. No pets. Deposit, & references required Chipley. 638-1918 3/2 house in Chipley. will be available after the first of September. Rent $700 per month with $500 security deposit. Progressive Realty 850-638-8220 Charming 1 Bedroom home on pond For Rent near Bonifay. Large yard, deck, storage building, Recently renovated $650. per month. Call 802-496-7746 For Rent or Sell 3BD 1 1/2 BA Brick home on Deltona Blvd in Wausau. Call 573-0051 or 850-573-0050 for more information FOR RENT: Doublewide MH, 3/2, Pleasant Hill Rd, Washington Co just South of Bonifay. $600 per month with $500 security deposit. No pets please. For immediate occupancy. Progressive Realty 850-638-8220 “Bonifay’s Best” Mobile Home Community has 2 or 3 bedrooms available ranging from $435-$625/month. Large lots, quiet, clean and on-site maintenance. Only responsible persons should apply. Great Bonifay Schools. No pets. One month deposit. HUD Assistance may be available. Contact Sue: (850)547-1386 or (512)751-2847. SCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated August 27, 2012, and entered in Case No. 30-2011-CA-000032 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, NA, is the Plaintiff and Patricia D. Sutton, Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Wells Fargo Financial Bank, Tenant #1 n/k/a Randy Cox, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on at the front door of the Holmes County Courthouse, Holmes County, Florida at on the 27th day of September, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: COMMENCE AT INTERSECTION OF NORTH R/W OF OLD US 90 AND THE WEST LINE OF SE OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 17 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN NE’LY ALONG R/W 191 FT. TO POB. CONTINUE NE’LY 450 FT; THENCE NW’LY PERPENDICULAR TO OLD US 90, 180 FT.; THENCE RUN SW’LY PARALLEL TO OLD US 90, 450 FT; THENCE SE’LY 180 FT. TO POB. A/K/A 1559 SKELTON STREET, PONCE DE LEON, FL 32455-6709 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Holmes County, Florida this 29 day of August, 2012. Clerk of the Circuit Court Holmes County, Florida By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 10-63655 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 12, 19, 2012. 9-5144 PUBLIC AUCTION The following vehicles will be sold at public auction at Eastern Diesel & Auto Wrecker Service, Inc. 2005 S. Waukesha, Bonifay, Fl. at 8:00 a.m. on September 26, 2012 for towing and storage: 1. 95 Mazda 2 d r Vin# 1YVGE31D5S5337735 Owners: (A) Kody Shala White 3492 Hwy 2, Bonifay, Fl. (B) Jasmine Blossom Alexis Dodds 3492 Hwy 2, Bonifay, Fl. Lienholder Sunbelt Credit 1414 Main St. Suite 7, Chipley, Fl. 2. 01 Ford 4 door Vin# 1FMEU17L41LA58849 Owner Alicia Marie Snowden, 2370 White Pond Church Rd., Alford, Fl. 3. 97 Saturn 4 dr Vin# 1G8ZJ5275VZ178026 Russell Allen Hanson 1741 Hwy 179, Westville, Fl. 4. 2001 Toyota Tacoma Vin # 5TEWN72N11Z876980 Owner Pippin Jason 4566 S. St Hwy 167, Hartford, Al. Lienholder American General Auto Finance, 6235 Davis Hwy 104, Pensacola, Fl 5. 01 Dodge PU Vin # 1B7HC16X01S264104 Owner Bomac Electric Inc. P.O. Box 733, Clinton, Ms. EASTERN DIESEL AND AUTO WRECKER SERVICE, INC. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 12, 2012. 9-5143 PUBLIC AUCTION Howell Mini-Storage at 309 S. Waukesha St Bonifay Fl. 32425 will hold a private or public auction on the contents of these units, for nonpayment according to Fl. Statute 83. Tenant has until the 22 September 2012 at 10:00 AM to pay in full. No checks. Items of general household goods storage in buildings listed below. Building 2 unit 2 Robert Grimmer Building 3 unit 6 Frank Turbeville As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 5th and 12th, 2012. 9-5145 REQUEST FOR BID – HOLMES COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids for: RFP 12-103: JANITORIAL SERVICES Bid information with criteria, requirements and the scope of work may be downloaded from the county’s web site (www.holmescountyfl.org) or will be provided upon written request by contacting: Sherry Snell, Holmes County Board of County Commissioners, 107 E Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425, Phone (850) 547-1119, Fax (850) 547-4134. Bid submissions must be sealed and marked with the name of the proposer, and the Bid number and titled “RFP 12-103: JANITORIAL SERVICES” so as to identify the enclosed proposal. Each submittal shall include one (1) original and six (6) copies of the proposal. Bids must be delivered to the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners, Attn: Sherry Snell, 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425, so as to reach said office no later than 2:00 p.m. (cst), Friday, September 28, 2012, at which time they will be opened. Proposals received later than the date and time as specified will be rejected. The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners will not be responsible for the late deliveries of proposals that are incorrectly addressed, delivered in person, by mail or any other type of deliver service. The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids or any parts thereof, and the award, if made, will be made to the best qualified and most responsible respondent whose bid and qualifications indicate that the award will be in the best interest of Holmes County, as determined by the Board of County Commissioners. The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive irregularities in the proposal. Each bid shall be valid to Holmes County for a period of ninety (90) days after the bid opening. The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual’s disability status. The non-discrimination policy involves every aspect of the Board’s functions, including one’s access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26 Florida Statutes should contact Sherry Snell at (850) 547-1119 for assistance. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 12, 19, 2012. COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 Turn your art into cash! FREE ART APPAISALS FOR POSSIBLE CONSIGNMENT* Sept 15 & 16. Noon to 10pm at Baterbys Art Gallery. 9101 international Drive, Ste. 1008, Orlando, Fl 32819. Call 1-866-537-1013 or visit www.Baterbys.com for more information. *Verbal appraisals & consignmnets taken based on consideration. Again Reduced $250 UKC American Pit Bull Terrier Bullies. Blues & fawns great backgrounds. Beautiful pedigree, generations, markings, personalities. Pups. 850-638-3132 AUCTION LARGE Annual Fall Construction & Harvest Auction DATE: September 15th, 2012 8:00AM LOCATION: 5529 Hwy231 North Campbellton Fl 32426 (3) Local Farm Dispersals, (2) Estates, Bank Repos, Sheriff Depts, city and county surplus, plus consignments. Mason Auction & Sales LLC # AB2766 850-263-0473 Office 850-258-7652 Chad Mason 850-849-0792 Gerald Mason www.masonauction.com Caryville Flea Market Produce, knives, honey, westerns, movies, baseball cards, old tools, new and used stuff. Open Saturdays 8 a.m. Clearance Sale Susiesbarn 2957 Hwy 90 Bonifay at Ed’s Auto Sales. Household, misc. items. Also all adult clothes, shoes & purses will be free. Also $500.00 off all cash sales on all vehicles. (850)547-2895. Sept 14, 8-4; Sept 15, 8-12. Flea across Florida 272 mile yard sale Sept 14, 15, 16. Three days through Caryville, Fl. Come join us. Open 8 a.m. Yard Sale @ 1585 South Blvd clothes, washer/dryer, twin beds, scooters, Barbies, pet shops, polly pockets Saturday 09/15 until noon Yard Sale! Saturday, 9/18 8 until. 1440 Clifford St., Bonifay. house on street behind Badcock.Furniture,clothes,exer cise machine,kitchen misc,etc Fresh from the Farm! Okra For Sell (850)956-4556, (850)956-4686. K&L Farm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 NOW OPEN U-Pick Grapes! Open 7 days a week 7AM-7PM 1304-A Clayton Rd., Chipley. U pick $5.00 gallon. 850-638-2624 Wood mizer LT-40 bend sawmill 18” planer, electric powered. Oliver tractor 115 hp. Treated lumber, 184, 186, 286, 686, 284 on 2x4’s, 16 ft. long. For more info call (850)547-0956 or (850)326-4548. For Sale 25 Fence panels 6x10 $15 single axcel trailer $150, California King water bed $75. Misc 638-5444 or 658-2819 FOR SALE: Wurlitzer Console Piano $1500 Total Gym $500 Professional Weight Bench with free weights -$100 All Excellent Condition – Call 850.260.9085 Gilbert Catfish Pond Closed Monday and Tuesday 2854 Highview Circle Chipley, Fl 32428 Phone:850-638-8633 Promotional prices start at $19.99 a month for DISH for 12 months. Call Today and ask about Next Day installation. (800) 407-7851 Wanted Ceramic Kiln 110 or 220 Volts. Will look at anything. 850-547-5244 WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. 1 BD UpStairs Apt for rent. Kitchen, living room & walk in closet. Refrigerator, stove, and new carpet, new shower, new floor tile. $450/mth.including water sewer & garbarge. 850-547-5244 One Bdrm. Apartment. Bonifay area. Stove, refrigerator. Includes all electricity & utilities. $425/month. Info: (850)547-0956, (850)326-4548 2 Houses For Rent 2BD/1BA w/ bonus room on 1 acre near Falling Waters. $575/mth plus deposit & references. 2BD/1BA w/ carport in Cottondale. $ 425/mth plus deposit & references. 850-579-4317 or 866-1965 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Drivers 100% Owner Operator Co. Pay increase / Home weekly, Regional & Dedicated Class A-CDL 1yr. Exp. In last 3 Call (800) 695-9643 or www.driveforwatkins.com EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE Medical Billing Training! Train for Medical Billing Careers at SCTrain.edu No Experience Needed! Job placemnet assistance after training! HS/GED/PC Needed (888) 872-4677 MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placemnet assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www.centuraonline.com Nursing CareersBegin Here-GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURA INSTITUTE (877) 206-6559. SURROGATE MOMS NEEDED! Most generous compensation and benefits program offered anywhere, starting at $25,000. Healthy, non-smoking, 21-39, prior birth without complications, no criminal background. Confidential, compassionate services. Reasonable expenses will be paid. OpenArmsConsultants.co m Shop Manager Needed in Santa Rosa Beach, FL Great Pay/ Benefits APPLY ONLINE www.durhamschoolservices.com ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TRAINEES NEEDED! Online Training with SC Train gets you job ready ASAP! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed. (888) 212-5888 ATTENTION: Drivers! Drive 4 Us Top Pay & CSA Friendly Equip 401K & Great Insurance Need CDL Class A Driving Exp (877) 258-8782 Drivers -HIRING EXPERIENCED/INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today! (877) 882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com Drivers -Daily or Weekly Pay! $0.01 raise per mile after 6 months. Refigerated & Dry Van Freight. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR exp. (800) 414-95-69. www.driveknight.com DRIVERS/ CLASS A Flatbed, GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39¢/mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800) 5725489x 227, SunBelt Transport Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our Medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. IT/Software Dev The City of Marianna has anInformation SystemsTechnician PositionApply at your local One Stop Career Center or call 850-718-1001 for details. EOE/Drug Free Workplace Employer Web ID#: 34224117 Text FL24117 to 56654 Receptionist Front Desk Nights ONLY/House Keeping days & nights at Holiday Inn Express in Bonifay. Apply in person at Chipley Days Inn or at The Holiday Inn Express in Bonifay. No phone calls. The City of Bonifay is currently seeking a Class B CDL driver with a tanker license. Backhoe operator will be an asset. Salary to be determined by qualifications. The City of Bonifay is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Full time permanent position. Preschool has opening for someone to care for and teach young children. Experience and classes a plus. (850)547-1444. Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMENEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!!! Become a Newspaper Carrier or Single Copy/ Rack Route Marianna, Cottondale, Chipley, & Bonifay. Area Carriers Open routes available in the early morning Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS Deliver your newspaper in your communityIndependent ContractorsMust have: A reliable vehicle Proof of Auto Insurance A valid driver’s license Be 18 yrs or older Contact Colin Parker cparker@chipleypaper.c om 501 W 11th St. and complete a carrier application Airport Manager Tri-County Airport, Bonifay, Fl. 40 hr week/ Contract position. Aviation, mechanical, electrical and office experience preferred. Mail resume to P.O. Box 756, Bonifay, Fl. 32425. List salary requirements. Answer before Sept. 21, 2012. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job Ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964 Earn Up To $500 a day in one of today’s fastest growing service industries. Fee revealing report: Dry-Tech Promo # CL 44895 19871 NordhoffSt. Northridge, CA 91324 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By SUSAN BRYANTMonster Contributing Writer Few would dispute the power that a true friendship has to enrich our lives. But what role should friendship play in the workplace? Is it smarter to keep your personal and professional lives separate or to purposely seek out and cultivate friendships on the job?The pros and consDr. Jan Yager, author of Friendshifts: The Power of Friendship and How It Shapes Our Lives, has found that workplace friendships can have a profound effect on your career. A friend on the job can let you in on the inner workings of your company or field, provide feedback on your performance or act as a sounding board. Having a buddy at work can make a job more enjoyable, even enhancing your creativity and productivity. Many people get new jobs as a result of friendships, and companies often promote programs that reward employees for referring their friends for employment. When workplace friendships go awry, however, the impact can be costly. Too much socializing impedes productivity; personal or professional information can be revealed to inappropriate people; and cliques may form, leading to favoritism, exclusivity and negativity. Although clicking with someone on the job can spark a friendship, whether to invest in the relationship may become a deeper issue. Its a question of trust for Mary, a photo editor. You make friends at work and eventually reveal what you really think about managers, coworkers and your job, and then you hope they wont divulge that information, intentionally or unintentionally, to anyone else,Ž she says. There are allegiances that have to be kept if youre friends at work. Dont let personal information youve discussed go beyond the circle of friendship.ŽFriends forever?Are the friendships you develop at work fundamentally different from other friendships? In some ways, yes, Yager says. A job provides financial security. If forced to choose between keeping your source of income and a friendship, most people would choose to keep their job. Because of the pros and cons of developing friendships at work, you have more at stake when deciding whether to enter into a workplace friendship. The right group of friends can be a great influence in your career. The wrong group can get you fired. Befriending the bossCan, or should, bosses and subordinates be friends? Same-level friendships are the easiest to maintain,Ž Yager says. Problems can arise if one friend has to supervise or evaluate the other.Ž If you try to befriend the boss, your coworkers might question your motives. If your boss befriends you, he may be accused of having a favorite.When friendships fizzleWorkplace friendships are great, but they can burn out quickly, too,Ž says Mary Ann, a bank vice president. If you leave a department or change positions, the similar circumstances that originally brought you together are now gone, and so is the friendship.Ž What is the best indicator of whether a friendship can survive one person moving on? Shared values, according to Yager. Although a shared environment may jump start a friendship, a deeper connection must be made to maintain it. You must genuinely like a person, whatever the circumstances, to become lasting friends. Unfortunately, because people often instinctively hold back from revealing too much about themselves to coworkers, this deeper connection can be difficult to make. On the plus side, if two people have become casual friends while on the job, they may be able to deepen their friendshi p once one person moves on and they no longer feel inhibited by the workplace environment.Buddying upSo how does one navigate the treacherous waters of workplace friendships? Yager provides this advice: Be discreet about your friends confidences, and think carefully about the type of information you choose to divulge. If you think your friendship puts you or your friend in a compromising position on the job, talk about it. If necessary, withdraw yourself from situations that might be a conflict of interest. Find out if your company has a policy regarding workplace friendships, and follow the rules. Workplace friendships: Asset or liability ? Featured Jobs Contact Lorna at (850) 747-5019 or Email: lbrown@pcnh.com LUSADY TAYLOREMPLOYMENT SALES SPECIALISTThe News Herald would like to welcome Lusady Taylor as our new Employment Sales Specialist. Contact Lusady at (850) 522-5173 or email her at ltaylor@pcnh.com LORNA BROWNEMPLOYMENT SALES SPECIALIST



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Volume 122, Number 18Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 12 2012 By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cecilia.spears@halifaxmediagroup.com ESTO At their Sept. 4 meeting, Esto Town Council members received attorney Jeff Goodmans completed addendum, which was requested by the council, to allow the town to increase water rates. Town Council President Danny Powell said the hike was a necessity. The increase would help pay for any possible loans associated with moving forward with the towns water system replacement project, which was pushed forward when the council approved allowing town engineering rm Hatch Mott MacDonald to create a construction plan for $9,000. Hatch Mott MacDonalds Jim Bundy said the town was pressed for time to create the plans so they could include them in the Community Development Block Grant application for extra points. Bundy also said their fees, including the $9,000 for construction plans, would PHOt T O bB Y Cec EC ILIA Spe PE Ars RS | The Times Advertiserore than 400 students and adults enjoyed summers last ing at this years Picnic in the Park. The event was held at the Ponce de Leon Springs on Saturday with free hamburgers, hotdogs, games and swimming and was sponsored by Holmes County Teen Court, Holmes County School District, CASE Coalition, Holmes County Sheriffs Ofce and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. 50www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visitBONIFAYNOW.COMPhone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 IINDEXArrests. .................................A3 Opinion. ................................A4 Outdoors. ..............................A8 Sports. ................................A10 Extra. ....................................B1 Faith. ....................................B4 Obituaries. ............................B5 Classieds. ............................B6 IN BRIEFBlue Pride Band showcases Academy Awards hits | B1 HHealth Clinic to open SaturdayBOONIIFAY AY Holmes County Community Health Clinic at 203 W. Iowa Street, Bonifay, will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday.Russell Roast scheduled ThursdayCHI HI PL L EY Y City council member and Spanish Trail Playhouse president Kevin Russell will be the subject of a Man of the Hour Roast at 7 p.m. on Thursday at the Washington County Ag Center. Russell is being roasted as part of a fundraiser for the Spanish Trail Playhouse. Tickets are $15 or $25 per couple and price includes a meal. For ticket information, call Barbara at 960-1347.Western Star Pageant slatedBOONIIFAY AY The annual Western Star Pageant will be held on Sept. 29 in the Holmes County High School. Boys and girls can enter. Boys 0 to 7 years old and girls 0 to 21 years old may compete and the Ms. competition will include ages 22 and up. Sign up will be held  from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sept. 18 at the Bonifay Dance Center on Highway 90. For more information, call Wanda at 614-1062 or 768-2005; or Bernyce at 547-3474 or 768-1150.   Special to the NewsCHI HI PL L EY Y   The Merchants of Historic Downtown Chipley have worked for several years to promote business through visitation to the downtown areas of Chipley, organizing and executing special events including concerts, photos with Santa and parades, and this year they are thinking outside the box. The group is embracing one of the newest phenomena in recent history, a mega yard sale of historic proportions.  Stretching from Live Oak, in Suwanee County, to Pensacola, 272 miles to the west, Flea Across Florida is spawned from the Flea Across America concept simply encouraging communities to make available areas for residents to set up a yard sale on a specic weekend. We decided to embrace the event this year, said Barbara James, who organized the event with Kathy Foster and Sherri Biddle.  We are using the Flea Across Florida weekend to hold our own, customized event, and we encourage everyone to get involved. The event, advertised through a grant from the Washington County Tourist Development Council and donations from The Goulding Agency Inc. in Chipley, is Friday and S aturday.  Stretching literally from county line to county line in Washington County, the event loosely follows Highway 90. Anyone having a yard or garage sale, a ea market or just wanting to get rid of unused items needs to put a sign on Highway 90, directing people to their location, Kathy Foster said.  The City of Chipley has also allowed us to close off Railroad Avenue, between 5th Street and Main Street, on Saturday, Sept. 15, and anyone can set up a table with their offerings, but only on that day.  On Friday, you will have to nd your own place to set up, but we expect a lot of participation on that day as well.Downtown Chipley group to host mega yard saleSee YArdRD SALeE A2 Esto moves forward with water system plan Savoring summerM See estEST O A2Cecilia Spears547-9414 | @WCN_HCT Cecilia.spears@halifaxmediagroup.com BO O NI I FAY A Y Regional Vice President of Operations David Servies came before the Bonifay City Council during their regularly scheduled meeting Monday as a representative of Mediacom Communications Corporation to address the multitude of service complaints issued by Bonifay residents. There have been numerous complaints from residents who have had issues with your services, Council member Roger Brooks said. I happened to be one of the ones who complained about these services, or the lack there of. Though, I did recently have someone to nally come down, take a look and now mine is in better shape then it was. Servies told the council the company had recently gone through signicant changes in services and that they had noticed after this change there was a large spike in calls about problems. We value your business, so if theres anything we can do to better resolve these issues feel free to give me a call, Servies said as he handed council members his business card. Bonifay resident Ann Leavins approached the council about alleviating issues of cars speeding down Clifford Street, on which she and her grandson live. I appeared before the council several years ago to address the speed limit on Clifford Street, Leavins said. I have an autistic grandson who lives down the street from me that walks down that street to visit. At that time, a threeway stop sign was placed and disabled signs were put up to watch for him, but with the construction going on and it being used as an Mediacom Rep visits Bonifay CouncilSee COUnc NCIL A8Regional Vice President of Operations David Servies told the council the company had recently gone through signicant changes in services and there was a large spike in calls about problems.

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LocalA2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Proven leadership from the Battleeld to the Schoolhouse. FORSUPERINTENDENTOFSCHOOLS A NOTE FROM TERRY: Family is a very important part of everyones life. I have been blessed with a very large family that has shown their support in many areas of my campaign. The beauty of their support is that it does not require a promise or favor. They support me out of love and devotion and for that I am abundantly thankful. I am grateful that I do not have any family connected to the school system other than as students. I have not made any promises to family members or any other person as to job placement. My family is all blessed with occupations and will not be hired by the school system. I can assure you, the voters of Holmes County, no preferential treatment will be tolerated or take place if I am elected your superintendent. Not having any family connections to the system will be a great advantage in the proactive management and the rebuilding of the School Districts rise to excellence. Come Out For A Cookout and Meet TerryThursday, September 20th from 5:30pm until 7:30pm. Free Hot dogs & Hamburgers Ponce De Leon City Park at the City HallTerry Mears and wife Tudy Segers MearsFather, the late Edgar Mears; Mother, Ollie Mears, middle row: Brother, the late Colly Mears; sister, Ola Lott; Terry Mears, top row: sister, Nellie Summerall; brother, Tillman Mears, and sister, Judy Horn. We are hoping that churches and other nonpro t agencies, who are constantly trying to nd funds for their projects, will take advantage of this built-in crowd and put up signs advertising their locations for the event, Sherri Biddle said. This is a great opportunity to have some fun and get rid of your unwanted items while you make some extra cash. We realized that we were wearing out our members, many of whom are not even business owners, by expecting them to organize and work special events, Foster said. This concept lets us simply put into play a mechanism to advertise the event and then allow any and all who wish to participate to do so. The great part about the event is that you dont have to move your sale items to Railroad Avenue or anywhere else just put out a sign directing people to visit your location. The event originated with the Suwanee County Tourist Development Council, based in Live Oak, and many communities have embraced the event weekend. Thousands of bargain hunters have prowled the 272-mile route for the past few years, discovering good deals but, more importantly, learning something about their neighbors as well. Come early if you expect to get a space on Railroad Avenue, said Barbara James, who is coordinating that effort. There is room for 40 or 50 vendors on the two one-ways streets, but we expect business to be brisk and we expect the spaces to go quickly. Its rst-come, rst-served, so getting to the area early on Sept. 15 will be the key to success. The good thing is that if you dont get a spot on Railroad Avenue, Biddle said, you can simply set up anywhere in downtown Chipley that will allow you to do so, and enjoy this built-in crowd of shoppers. And this is a great kick-off to the holiday shopping season. More information can be found at www. ChipleyFleaMarket.org. YARD SALE from page A1be covered by the Rural Development Grant if it was granted. Until then, he said, the town will not be billed for the services. What it boils down to is whether or not youre willing to invest $9,000 with the chance of only having a set of plans, Goodman said. The council approved of submitting the application for the water line replacement. The council also approved of allowing the Esto Fire Department to take its $10,000 mature CD and transfer it to the re departments savings account, where it could accumulate interest. That money might be needed in the towns general fund to pay for the $9,000 construction plans if grant applications are denied. The council welcomed the towns new water operator, Bill Austin, for his rst report, which included that the system was properly grounded and that a crock, which dilutes and distributes bleach to the towns water, was donated to the city and that new switches were required. Goodman advised Austin put out bids for at least three quotes for the new switches. Council member Darlene Madden reported what she had learned from the recent mitigation meeting at the Holmes County Emergency Operations Center. It was awesome, Madden said. The new EOC building is very impressive. Madden told the council the town was requested to submit a wish list of emergency preparedness items, such as storm-resistant shutters and roo ng, re suppression devises, etc. The council discussed possible items to go on the list and decided to bring more recommendations at a later time. Local resident Lindsey McClellan came before the council to say several locals were interested in creating an Esto library. Weve got seven people willing to donate their time, several hundred books of various age and categories, and even the Holmes County Public Library is willing to help, McClellan said. We just need a place to set it up. Powell asked she give the council some time to think of any place that could be used and suggested she ask the owner of the old post of ce if they could set up in there until the property was sold. Madden asked Goodman what was holding up the application process for grant money to go toward promoting the upcoming Two Toe Tom Festival in 2013. Goodman said there were speci c guidelines to receive grant money from the Tourist Development Council and that he would review those requirements with her later. The council approved of removing Charles Corcorans name as signatory from the Esto Fire Protection, Esto Fire Department Checking and Esto Fire Department Savings accounts and replacing his name with Bill Austins. The council also approved of getting new indoor/outdoor carpeting for the entrance of the Town Hall not exceeding $150. A mother and resident of Esto requested that a shelter be put up at a local bus stop, and senior maintenance worker Bobby Adams agreed to build it and sought permission from the property owner to build it. The owner requested not to be held accountable for the safety and well being of the school children on his property. The council redirected them to the Holmes County School Board to seek immunity from liability. The council also approved of looking into putting in security cameras and signs at John Clark Park because of recent vandalism. The park was vandalized two different times this week, Town Clerk Jody Sellers said. Someone rode an ATV into the gazebo and knocked several concrete blocks out. Then someone punched a hole through the dock and tried to pull up one of the grills. Sellers said the grills were a donation from a local resident who wished to remain anonymous. Those were donated for the residents of the town to enjoy the park to the fullest, Sellers said. I cant imagine whod be so depraved to destroy something so much hard work and heart went into to build. Goodman gave his full support, saying something similar happened in a local park in Washington County and that he had put together what was required to put up the security cameras and fully enforce the penalties of destruction of public property. We actually got quite a few prosecuted because of those cameras, Goodman said. Its been a very effective deterrent as well. The next regularly scheduled meeting for the Esto Town Council is set for 7 p.m. Oct. 2 at Esto Town Hall. ESTO from page A1alternate 79 the stop signs are being ignored, and theyre speeding again. Leavins suggested speed bumps or rumble strips placed to dissuade speeders. Mayor Lawrence Cloud reassured her that the city would be looking into the matter and had Police Chief Chris Wells con rm that he would be sending out a patrol to watch that road for speeders till the problem could be resolved. Brooks added that there were several complaints of speeding near Holmes County High School on Sandpath Road. Wells informed Brooks that he would have his men on it immediately. Council approved of Lyle Fergesons request to place a trailer on his property behind his oral business on State Road 90. From all appearances it seems like a brand new trailer, even if it is a slightly older model, Council member Richard Woodham said. Bonifay resident Jim Hayes was before the council once again with complaints of his neighbors goats. Taylor informed Hayes at the the owner of the goats had been informed of the complaint and if the council requested it, then two letters could be sent out to hold a formal mitigation session between the two landowners to settle matters. The council agreed to follow with the procedure of calling in the two landowners as soon as Hayes returned from his upcoming knee surgery. Woodham informed the council that Holmes County Correctional Institute was still in need of a water meter replaced and he hadnt received a reply from the institute in several months. Taylor informed him that they had recently changed hands with a new warden and that Woodham should contact the new warden, saying that the new warden seemed to be more negotiable. The owner of the Bradley Building came before the council because one of his tenants informed him that the city was charging the building two separate water bills. The owner informed the council that the building still only had one sink, one toilet and one set of lines, as it always has. Woodham explained that the problem came with the tenants that were splitting the pay but would nd themselves in a bind if one tenant left without paying. Woodham then suggested that the owner take responsibility of the water bill and add the expense to the tenants rent. The owner agreed to accept responsibility for the water bill. Brooks informed the council that something needed to be done about the bleachers at Memorial Field. I think the city use to take the crew down there and pressure wash it, said Brooks. You can tell that it hasnt been done is several years because its in desperate need of it now. Woodham said that it wasnt the citys responsibility to maintain the bleachers, bathrooms or maintenance as a whole. COUNCIL from page A1

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A3Wednesday, September 12, 2012 SAVE ON HOMEOWNERS INSURANCE Auto Home Life How Many Times Has Your Insurance Been Changed? Providing You With Quality & Service At A Fair PriceRuled A+ Superior by AM Best Rating1108 N. Waukesha St.Bonifay 547-4227Trust in your local Farm Bureau agency. We have been here for 60 years and are here to stay.AGENT STEVE A. 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Coupon Expires: 9-30-12 FREEEYE EXAM CODE: WC00ToddRobinson,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeon LeeMullis,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeon Holmes County Arrests August 26 September 1, 2012 Sheron Baker, 58, domestic battery Justin Bell, 22, hold for prison transport Daniel Tod Brauer, 46, child support Thomas Anthly Brownell, 53, attaching tag not assigned Daniel Cobb, 28, hold for prison transport Carline M Daughtery, 26, violation of probation on intro of contraband Brandon Emerson, 22, hold for prison transport Kendrick Harvey, 22, hold for prison transport William Cody He in, 27, fraudulent use of credit card Jamarquis Henderson, 26, hold for prison transport Patrick Dalton Howard, 28, domestic violence assault Cody Levi Hudson, 19, possession of a controlled substance Mark J Isaacs, 26, violation of probation Stephanie Anne Johnson, out of county warrant from Walton County Christopher Shawn Leis, 37. Domestic violence battery Coy B Rucker, 31, out of county warrant James Shimchick, 62, hold for prison transport Steven Singletary, 41, child support purge Willie Smith, hold for prison transport Kevin Dewayne Thomposn, 37, battery domestic violence Aaron Micheal Vandyke, 19, lewd and lascivious battery Robert West, 47, hold for prison transport Carol Marie Wood, 28, hold for Washington County, violation of probation on domestic battery Dawn Marie Yates, 42, weekender Andrew Zavala, 20, hold for prison transport CHIPLEY Multiple drug arrests were made Thursday by the Washington County Drug Task Force. Task force investigators, conducting overnight surveillance at a local business, said they observed Roger Lee Thomas, 27, of 646 Highpocket Lane, remove batteries from their packaging and try to conceal them in his clothing. The man then exited the store and tried to enter a vehicle that was located at the entrance. After identifying themselves as law enforcement of cers, they said the man tried to reenter the store, where he was arrested. Thomas was charged with resisting an of cer with violence, possession of narcotic equipment, petit theft and violation of state probation for attempted grand theft and burglary. Of cers were able to locate and stop the vehicle Thomas tried to ee in near Orange Hill Road and Joiner Road. A search of the vehicle revealed an active mobile methamphetamine lab as well as marijuana and listed chemicals used in the manufacturing of methamphetamines, according to the report. Arrested was Linda Gail Marble, 26, of 1231 Court Ave., on charges of possession of marijuana, possession of a controlled substance and petit theft. Investigators then responded to a possible shoplifting at Walmart, where employees said a woman was acting erratically and had re-entered the store several times. After arriving on scene, investigators observed the woman enter a vehicle in the parking lot of the store. After being stopped for a traf c infraction, a search was conducted and revealed marijuana on the woman, according to the police report. A search of the driver revealed two baggies containing pills. Arrested were Nancy Ann Parsons, 48, of Panama City Beach on charges of possession of marijuana and Russell Keith Eddins, 37, of Youngstown, on charges of possession of a controlled substance without prescription. Eddins is on federal probation for conspiracy to distribute over 500 grams of methamphetamines, according to police. In another instance, investigators saw a man trying to purchase listed chemicals used in the manufacturing of methamphetamines at multiple locations in Chipley. After being approached by law enforcement, police said the man and the driver of the vehicle both admitted to purchasing the items to later use in manufacturing meth. Arrested was Thomas Wayne Carter, 52, of Bonifay, on charges of possession of listed chemicals and driving while license suspended or revoked. The task force comprises the Washington County Sheriffs Of ce, Chipley Police Department and federal agencies. Anyone with information on illegal drug activity should call 638-TIPS (8477) or email tips@wcso.us. ROGER LEE THOMAS LINDA GAIL MARBLE NANCY ANN PARSONS RUSSELL KEITH EDDINS THOMAS CARTERTask Force nabs 5 on drug charges Arrest REPORT

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OpinionA4 | Holmes County Times-AdvertiserCONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com 1-800-645-8688 ADVERTISING 850-547-9414 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2012, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. Wednesday, September 12, 2012Our sons have cautioned dad throughout his writing endeavors to always try to give factual information as somewhere down the line some error may cause problems to those who are accepting the article as true and correct. Maybe today is the day to revert to the method used in the Panama City News Herald, Setting it straight, to clarify some recent misprinting. In the Aug. 22 Perrys Prattle, some quick improvising had to be done in order to meet publishing deadlines. In the paragraph describing the federal government program agency AAAs 1934 effort to assist farmers, the intended term, reduce crop acreage was printed produce, thus giving the wrong message. The program was actually one where farmers were paid for plowing up certain crops before it was harvested with the intent to decrease yields and increase prices. It was an unpopular concept with some farmers, including my father and grandfather, but one that was followed hoping for the desired result. Even though rather insigni cant, that same article listed the rural route for the Hugh Wells family as Route 11 Bonifay, when it should have read Route 1. Equally of relatively unimportance is the report in this article that the standard 1934 Plymouth Coupe was priced at $385 in the Progressive Farmer advertisement. The correct price listed was $385. There were other obvious typographical errors, which will not be corrected, but instead, the Prattler will thank the staff at the Washington County News for pulling me out of this deadline dilemma. In the July 25 Prattle, the writer will accept full responsibility for the error of listing the church where Hunt Cunningham grew up and later served as pastor as Bayou George Assembly of God Church when actually it was Bear Creek Assembly of God. This historic item approaching 60 years ago is important to the parties involved and yours truly is happy to set the record straight. The Prattler can now face Jerry Tyre, my friend who inspired the above writing with his Letter to the Editor of the Panama City News Herald on the topic of the death of Andy Grif th. Hopefully, one day I will have opportunity to see Hunt Cunningham once again and can face him easier after having made these corrections. Acceptance of Perrys Prattle, and the enjoyment thereof is expressed to the writer almost weekly. John Purnell, a Chipley resident and a native of Red Level, Ala., recently told me that he remembers L. & N. Engine No. 152, a recent Prattle topic, and had the privilege of riding in the engine as a 5-year-old boy. The engineer was Lee Stamps, and he allowed for the short ride as the engine pulled into the station at Red Level. The train ran from Georgiana Ala., to Graceville Fla., a total distance of 100 miles. In this vein of writing, a follow up report is made on the article of last week featuring and picturing my cousin, Rufus Wells, son of Alex and Arleva Cook Wells. Reference was made to the illness of family members, including that of Harrell Wells, brother to Rufus. With sadness, the news came one day after last weeks article went to press that Harrell had passed away in his Salem, Ala., home. His funeral was held on Sept. 4 at Bethel Primitive Baptist Church, where he grew up and where his parents and two siblings are buried and will also be the nal resting place for other brothers and sisters. Harrells obituary will no doubt be listed in this addition of the Washington County News, naming all family members. Harrells birth date of Jan. 21, 1938, brought to mind that the year of his birth also brought other cousins into the world, the children of uncles and aunts of the Wells offspring. Josh and Annie Padgett Wells had William Karl (Bill Wells), born Aug. 28, 1938. Born to Virginia Wells Hinson and Arthur Hinson is their second daughter, Hannah Ruth Hinson White, with an Aug. 21, 1938, arrival. Lela Wells Harris and Edward Harris saw their second son, Ralph Edward Harris, arrive on Aug. 24, 1938. All of the above writing leads me right into reporting that all of the above information on my immediate family can be found in the Heritage of Washington County Book. Those who included their family in the book can also make the same statement. As stated two weeks ago, the Heritage Book is now available after an absence of more than two years. Should any one in your circle of family or friends tell you that they wish they had purchased a book, please tell them the good news. Perry Wells at 850638-1016 or perry1000@ bellsouth.net now has the fourth printing of the books at his home selling for the same price at $64.20 in Chipley or $72 when mailed, a service he is also providing. My mailing address is 950 Highway 277 Chipley, FL 32428. The books are selling briskly, maybe even quicker than before, so dont wait too long and miss out on the informative and beautiful history of Washington County. See you all next week. It seems like when football season approaches, a renewed interest in past school associates accelerates, and reunions take place at football games and other places. Of course everywhere I go locally, I meet former students and so does my husband. Some of them we both taught. As we were lunching at Cast-AWay this week, the oyster shucker, Chuck Richmond, reminded us that he was a former student. I had promised him previously that I would refresh my memory of him by looking up the 1983 HCHS yearbook, so I came home and dug it out and there he was on the rst page as the twelfth grade Class Favorites along with Norma Smith. Farther over he was pictured with the FFA of cers as the 1982-83 president. He even signed my yearbook as C.C. Ledbetter. No wonder I didnt remember him, considering who else was in that class, including two of the Short boys, Drew and Darryl. Those two werent nearly as talkative, though, as older brother Dale. I had him and Curtis Bartholomew in the same class a few years before, and they had a race to see who could get the most marks for talking. I had most of the class of 83, though when they were in the ninth grade, and over all, I dont believe any other class could hold a light to them. Many of the girls were members of my church, First Baptist Bonifay. Norma Jean Smith, Tony Rich, Jill McFatter, Stacie Turner and Karen Smith were some of the ones I told that it was good that I had taught them in Sunday School when they were 4and 5-year-olds. It was easy to love them at that age but not as ninth graders. As I looked back in the 1983 yearbook, I saw that overall that class was pretty laid back; its just that the talkative ones drowned out those with good behavior. I guess that coming from a big, noisy family myself made me able as a teacher to tolerate a noise level above most. Most of them have gone on to become successful people, so having me as a lenient teacher didnt set them back too much. Looking back through the 1983 yearbook, I was saddened to see how many of the staff are no longer alive: Catherine Carswell, Jim Richardson, Myra Clark, Judy Williamson and her mother Annie Williamson, Herman Dodson, Carolyn Berry, Ann Galloway, Curtis Street, Lyverne Curry, Dale Morrison, Eleanor Peacock and coach Mac James Edward McFatter. We have special memories associated with all of these. Another thing that is sad is the number of advertisers which are no longer in business or have changed ownership: First Bank of Holmes County is now Wells Fargo; The Bank of Bonifay is The Bank of Bonifay First Federal; Joe Clarks Nationwide Insurance, Tri-County Bandag Tire Co, TG&Y Family Center (Chipley), Mims Barber and Style Shop, Evans of Bonifay, Holmes Shirt Company, Fishin Headquarters, Hudson-Riley Of ce Supply, Holmes Creek Auto Parts, Sears Catalog Sales, Charlenes Boutique, Firestone Transmission and Exhaust Center, The Style Shoppe, WBGC Bonifay and Chipley, Bonifay Manufacturing Inc., Century 21 Kent Realty, Coates McCullar & Company, Don Levens Auto Body, Howell Chevrolet Co., Phillips Auto Parts, Owl Sleep Shop, Western Auto, Simbos, Prestons Service Center, The Family Tree, West Fl Auto Parts, Bonifay Drug Company and Blitchs Restaurant. At Cast-A-Way, we also saw Judge Owen Powell, John Murray Little and Bruce Pelham HCHS classmates. Bruce of Tallahassee has overcome a lot of adversity and has published a book titled Im Not Drunk.....I Just have M.S. Hopefully, I will be able to do a column on him and his family soon. If you want to travel down memory lane, just pull out your or your childrens yearbook. It will bring back many memories and make you realize how much things have changed as time marches (or rushes) on. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe eleven surviving children of the Alex and Arleva Wells family made in 1997 just days before the passing of Parker Wells.HAPPY CORNERHazel Wells Tison PERRYS PRATTLEPerry Wells The Prattler clari es previous articles, follows up on last week Community outings bring contact with former students J.D. OWENS CARPET OUTLETwill save you money EVERYDAY!!! J.D. OWENS CARPET OUTLET2597 Springcreek Road, Marianna, FL3 1/2 Miles East of Marianna on Hwy. 90 (850) 526-3619 J.D. OWENS CARPET OU T L ET J.D. 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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A5Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Like us on Facebook Sowell Tractor Co., Inc.2841 Hwy. 77 North, Panama City 763-5441 Toll Free: 866-448-9899 www.sowelltractorco.comWe Trade for Anything That Dont Eat! Financing Arranged (WAC) EVERYTHING YOU VALUE 0% Financing Available Only On Kabota Equiptment. WAC See dealer for details. Special to The Times-AdvertiserCHIPLEY The Chipley Garden Club will sponsor a free Build-a-Better-Scarecrow Workshop at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18, under the pavilion at the Farmers Market in downtown Chipley. Karen Roland, club president and professional artist, and other garden club members will provide handouts and share ideas and suggestions on building scarecrows. The free workshop is open to the public and will be great source of information for anyone planning on entering the upcoming second annual Scarecrow Contest, which will be in October in conjunction with Washington County Historical Societys Fall into History Fest on Oct. 13. Reservations are not necessary just show up and have fun. The Washington County History Museum also will be open for tours that day from 10 a.m. to noon. By RANDAL SEYLER638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY City of cials met with the owners of Grace & Glory Christian School to discuss the schools recent growth, City Council members learned at the Sept. 4 workshop. David (Pettis, city code enforcement of cer) and I met with them last week, City Administrator Dan Miner said, and we discussed the parking, landscaping and stormwater issues. The Christian school was the topic of discussion on Aug. 16 when the council learned that modular buildings had been added to the campus without the school coming before the citys planning and zoning committee for approval. Under the current city ordinances, approval by city of cials was not required, Miner told the council, but changes are being made so any such growth in the future will have to come before the citys planning committee. This was our fault; this should have been handled through planning and zoning, Miner said, adding that Grace & Glory of cials were understanding and that any future growth on the campus will come before the city for approval. We have our certi cate of completion that the city signed off on, said Debbie Williams, administrator of Grace & Glory Christian School. During our construction, we had a few parking issues, but we dont have those anymore. The K-12 school has about 130 students and is in its third year of existence. Classes began Aug. 20, and Williams said the school has monitors on hand to keep the traf c owing before and after school. In addition the addition of buildings on campus, the issue of traf c between Main Street (State Road 77), the west entrance to the campus, and Seventh Street, the eastern access to the campus, also was discussed. From now on, traf c will enter on Seventh Street and exit on Main, Miner said. We have monitors out there. Even if it rains, they are out there with umbrellas, Williams said. We are able to keep the traf c owing. Williams said the school employs 23 people and is part of the ministry of the Grace & Glory Worship Center. They were very agreeable and understanding about the citys concerns, Miner said. He said the school would have to hire an engineer to deal with stormwater issues on the property. They want to do it all the correct way, Mayor Linda Cain said. They were just going by what the city told them, but now they understand that they need to come to the planning and zoning committee. It needs to be handled in the correct way and not affect the neighbors, Council Member Karen Rustin said. Im not against businesses or growth, but the city needs to be involved in situations like this. The council also had questions about placing a school zone sign near the campus on Main Street, but Miner said the school would have to request the sign from the Department of Transportation. I appreciate your meeting with them, and I appreciate their attitude, the mayor said. Williams said she appreciates the Chipley Police Department for patrolling the school grounds after hours. She also said the school has been blessed by Yes Lord Deliverance Church, which allows the school to use their parking lot for over ow parking. We give God the glory because we have just been so blessed. Were in our third year, and its very exciting, Williams said. Of cials discuss growth with Grace & GloryIm not against businesses or growth, but the city needs to be involved in situations like this.Karen Rustin Chipley City Council Member Chipley Garden Club to sponsor scarecrow workshop

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LocalA6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, September 12, 2012DES PLAINES, Ill. September is Mold Awareness Month and the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) wants homeowners to know how to recognize signs of mold or water damage, and how to catch these issues early onor prevent them all together. Mold is everywhere, though the amount and location of the mold is what can be harmful to your home and your health. Brian Jones, president of Jones Design Build LLC, based in Minneapolis, knows rst-hand about mold in the homehow it impacts a house and how to have it safely removed. His company worked on a bathroom project, which won the 2011 North Central Regional CotY award-winning project in the Residential Bathroom over $60,000 category, which required mold remediation. MOis IS TURe E BRin IN Gs S m M Old LDMold becomes a problem when moisture is present, and the mold begins to grow. The risk increases in places that are more exposed to moisture, such as bathrooms, kitchens, attics and basements. Oftentimes, bathrooms that are not properly ventilated or not properly insulated are at greater risk of mold issues, regardless of the age of the home, Jones says. This was the case with Jones clients and their 10year-old home. They began to notice stains on their rst oor ceiling, directly under the location of their upstairs shower, and grew concerned. Once Jones took down the drywall during the demolition phase of the project, their concerns were realizedthe berglass batt insulation throughout the entire shower wall area was covered in mold. In this instance, the ceiling of the shower was sloped, and it can be difcult to install berglass insulation properly when the area is sloped, increasing chance for error, Jones says. There needs to be a plastic barrier that protects the insulation from openings where moisture seeps in. Given the oddly shaped shower, the vapor barrier between the drywall and the insulation was not taped or sealed at all seams, so moisture found its way under the plastic, creating a ripe environment for mold to thrive. Mold growth behind the wall reduced the direct health risk to the homeowners, but according to Jones, if left untouched, mold poses another risk to the structural elements of their bathroom. Mold that continues to grow for years can actually eat through the wood, causing structural problems, he says. RemREM OVin IN G m M Old LDAfter the discovery, Jones called in mold remediation experts to clear the area before work could continue. If not properly removed, mold can re-emerge. Luckily for Jones, remediation is a fairly simple process. A plastic barrier contains the area with the mold, so that it doesnt spread into other parts of the home. As it is being removed, a fan drives air to the outside through a window, and HEPA vacuums remove leftover mold particles from the area, he says. Once the area is completely cleared of mold and dried, it is sealed with a mold-inhibiting paint to help prevent future outbreaks. Following the remediation, Jones recommended using a polyurethane spray foam insulation instead of the berglass batt insulation that was originally used. The polyurethane foam insulation is sprayed into the area, so it completely lls every crevice and hole that may be present, Jones says. Not only does this type of insulation block all moisture, but it is also known for its energy-efcient elements. Jones knowledge and expertise was very benecial to his clients when dealing with a hidden issue like mold during their bathroom remodel. They were very happy to have detected the problem early on, before structural damage could occur. ReRE COGni NI Zin IN G iss ISS Ues ES ea EA Rl L YDo you have moisture issues in your home? Jones provides the following tips to ensure early detection of moisture issues and preventative measures for mold growth: Staining. By the time you notice staining, you can be sure that water either has been or is present. Drywall and paint is easy and cheap to replace, so when I see staining, I recommend clients cut through the drywall immediately and locate the problem, Jones says. Helping Hands... Compassionate Hearts BONIFAY Offering Inpatient and Outpatient TherapyNURSING & REHABCENTEROccupational Physical Speech24-hour Skilled Nursing Rehabilitation Gym Admissions 7 Days a Week MEDICARE OPEN ENROLLMENT Questions & AnswersOctober 3 9:30:10:30 amHolmes Countys SHINE representative, Minzie Carnley, will be available to answer any questions you have about Medicare Open Enrollment. Refreshments will be served. FREE FISH FRY SHERIFF Teen Art ClassesAges 13-18 Instructors: Keith Martin JohnsFall Sessions September 10 November 19, 2012Once a week on Monday from 3:30-5:30 p.m. $45 per monthRegistration is required, limited spaceLearn the fundamental basic principles that govern realistic art. Classic realistic drawing and painting skills will be taught from one session to the next. The discipline of this type of art instruction is much like other disciplinary art forms; such as music or dance. 5422 Cliff St. Graceville Contact (850) 360-4908or Linda@keithmartinjons.com Budget, millage adopted by school boardBy RANDAL SEYLER638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.comC C H IPLEY Y The numbers are in, and theyre lower than expected. That is what Superintendent Sandra Cook told the Washington County School Board Monday night. Were down by 13 students, overall, Cook said. There are a lot of contributing factors, including a growing private school here in Washington County. Some programs at Washington-Holmes Technical Center have also seen a decrease in attendance, but they are expected to pick back up soon, Director Martha Compton said. However, the heavy machinery maintenance program and the public safety programs have both seen decreases in enrollment. Were doing a little better than we were at the end of the school year, but we had hoped wed be up a little more, Cook said. Chipley High School added four students over last years numbers, increasing to 580, while Vernon High School added two students for a total of 392. Roulhac Middle School dropped ve students, down to 623 enrolled, while Vernon Middle School added 12 to bring their enrollment up to 456. The biggest loss was at Kate M. Smith Elementary, where the numbers dropped by 47, down from 2011s enrollment of 837 to 790 this year. Principal Lesa Burdeshaw noted that the school had lost a large group of fourth graders and the incoming kindergarten classes were smaller than usual. Six students who had left to attend a private school returned to Kate M. Smith, she added. Vernon Elementary School was down by two students with 551 enrolled, and the WISE program showed an increase of 23 students, bringing the programs student body up to 66, over the 43 enrolled in 2011. Okeechobee enrollment was down 12, for a total of 106 students, and WHTC was down 95 students for an enrollment of 320, as compared to 415 enrolled in 2011. The Washington County School Board adopted the years millage rate and the 2012-13 budget Monday in a public hearing, which preceded the September board meeting. The millage rate is less than the 2011-12 rate at 7.975 mills, District Finance Director Lucy Carmichael told the board. The board approved Resolution 12-03, adopting the millage rate and breaking it down into components. The board also approved the nal budget of more than $92 million. Cook also announced that the schools would be celebrating Patriots Day on Sept. 17 and Celebrate Freedom Week will be from Sept. 17-22. On the consent agenda, the board approved all items except the Universal Free Breakfast program. The board unanimously voted no for that program. According to Food Research and Action Center information, The School Breakfast Program (SBP), authorized by the Child Nutrition Act of 1966, started as a pilot program to provide funding for school breakfasts in poor areas and areas where children had to travel great distances to school. The intent was to provide a nutritious breakfast to children who might otherwise not receive one. The following Florida districts participate in the Universal Free Breakfast Program: Franklin, Brevard, Collier, Dade, Gadsden, Glades, Hendry, Hillsborough, Jackson, Jefferson, Putnam, Highlands and Lee. Board Member Vann Brock called the item out for discussion, and Superintendent Cook forwarded the program to the board as presented. Brock said the board had discussed the program before. The cost compared to the rewards just makes the program not feasible, he said.By RANDAL SEYLER638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.comV V ERRNOON Ownership of the land at Wayside Park was the topic of discussion again Monday at the Vernon City Council meeting. The reworks began when resident Dennis Compton asked the council about posts that have appeared near the park, which is located on Holmes Creek on the north side of Vernon just off Highway 279. The council was informed by resident Hal Kirk that he had put up the posts in following his attorneys instruction. Kirk owns the property next to the park and has a canoe livery business. There was a woman down there with bulldogs, Kirk said, adding that he intended to put up a 6-foot fence blocking access to his property from the park. I own all the property there except for the square where the gazebo sits, he said as he presented a survey map to the council. If you dont agree with my survey, then you should get your own survey. Kirk ran afoul of the city in 2011 when he tried to block access to the park, which has a boat ramp that was built with Game and Fish Commission funding. Kerry Adkison, attorney for the city of Vernon, said the land for the park was donated by Steven Miller to the state in 1959, and the state turned the park over to the county in the 1980s. The city is currently in the process of taking over ownership of the property. Kirk said he was not interfering with the boat ramp or the park gazebo, but he was going to fence in his property for his own protection. Weve had problems with dogs, drinking, arrests and drug busts down there. In 2011, Kirk attempted to put a gate across the boat ramp access road but the project was halted by the Washington County Sheriffs Department. Kirk has been in contention with the city, taking the matter to court. Adkison said Kirk had not led lawsuit to get clear title to the property, as the judge had ordered. The bottom line is he is not doing what the court told him to do. Do you believe you own the boat ramp? Adkison asked. I think the property should come back to me, Kirk replied. Kirk said he did not intend to put a fence around the boat ramp, but wanted to fence to keep dogs and others from coming on his property. Resident Jerry Brock said he had been swimming at that site since before there was a Wayside Park. Id hate to see it just be there to launch boats. There used to be a swing there under the bridge, and I dont know how many times I jumped off into the creek. Now I have grandchildren who are swimming there. Ive been all over this country with the military, and I can honestly say there isnt anywhere I would rather swim than right there, Brock said. The council adjourned to an executive session to discuss the litigation pertaining to Wayside Park, Adkison said, but announced no action following the executive session.Wayside Park property ownership disputedWashington elementary school enrollment dropsTake care of mold in your home before it turns ugly

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A7Wednesday, September 12, 2012 I caught you another one! Come and Get It at ROGERS INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. Serving You Is Our Most Important Product*Property Insurance is not available in the state of Florida from Auto-Owners Insurance. *Property Insurance is not available in the state of Flordia from Auto-Owners Insurance. Wow! Another year has gone by so quickly. This time seems so much more special with everything going on in our lives. You watch over us and know our needs and prayers. Elizabeth Edwards had a quote that said, If you know someone who has lost a child and youre afraid to mention them because you think you might make them sad by reminding them that they died, they didnt forget they died. Youre not reminding them.What youre reminding them of is that you remember that they lived and thats a great, great gift! That brings me to your 10 year class reunion coming up. I was so glad to know that there will be a remembrance table for you and your classmates that are no longer here. Your picture will be there to remember you were a unique part of the Class of 2002 and had many accomplishments that made us proud. The many lives you touched all over the world and the stories I could tell about your life is a blessing for all of us that knew you. We love and miss you always! Mom, Dad, Paul & Vicky SPECIAL TO EXTRATALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott announced on Thursday the appointments of Michelle Bedoya Barnett, Paul M. Renner, Michael S. Mullin, Courtney K. Grimm and Robert E. OQuinn Jr. to the Fourth Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission. Michelle Bedoya Barnett, 33, of Jacksonville, has been an attorney with Alexander DeGance Barnett since 2010. Previously, she practiced with Holland and Knight from 2004 to 2012. She received a bachelors degree from the University of Florida and a law degree from Vanderbilt University. She succeeds Deno A. Hicks and is appointed for a term beginning Sept. 6 and ending July 1, 2016. Paul M. Renner, 45, of Jacksonville, has been an attorney with Milam Howard since 2005. Previously, he practiced as a sole practitioner from 2004 to 2005, with Atkinson Diner Stone from 1999 to 2004, and served as an assistant state attorney in the Broward County State Attorneys Of ce from 1995 to 1998. Renner has served as an of cer in the United States Navy and Active Reserves since 1989 and has completed tours of duty in Operation Desert Storm and Operation Enduring Freedom. He received a bachelors degree from Davidson College and a law degree from the University of Florida. He succeeds Charles W. Alford and is appointed for a term beginning Sept. 6 and ending July 1, 2016. Michael S. Mullin, 65, of Fernandina Beach, has practiced with Roger Towers since 2007. Previously, he served as Nassau County attorney for 25 years and as sole practitioner for 17 years, and served in the United States Army from 1965 to 1968. He received a bachelors degree from the University of West Florida and a law degree from Stetson University. He succeeds Robert E. OQuinn Jr. and is appointed for a term beginning Sept. 6 and ending July 1, 2014. He is appointed from the list of nominees submitted by the Florida Bar. Courtney K. Grimm, 44, of Green Cove Springs, has practiced with Bedell, Dittmar, DeVault, Pillans and Coxe since 2001. She received a bachelors degree from Sweet Briar College and a law degree from the University of Florida. She succeeds Joseph W. Prichard Jr. and is appointed for a term beginning Sept. 6 and ending July 1, 2016. She is appointed from the list of nominees submitted by the Florida Bar. Robert E. OQuinn Jr., 59, of Jacksonville, has practiced with Cole, Scot & Kissane P.A. since 2005. Previously, he served as a public defender in the Fourth Judicial Circuit of Florida from 1980 to 1982. He received a bachelors degree from the University of Florida and a law degree from Samford University. He succeeds Richard R. Alexander and is appointed for a term beginning Sept. 6 and ending July 1, 2015. He is appointed from the list of nominees submitted by the Florida Bar. TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott has announced six appointments to the Purple Ribbon Task Force. Ronald Davis, 67, of Tallahassee, is president of 21st Century Solutions. Jamie L. Glavich, 51, of Jacksonville, is the owner of Almost Home Senior Services Inc. Albert B. Johnson, 59, of Miami, is a retired teacher with Miami-Dade County Public Schools. Linda J. Levin, 45, of Jacksonville, is the executive director of the Northeast Florida Area Agency on Aging. Stacey D. Payne, 43, of Cape Coral, is the community relations manager for the Lee County Sheriffs Of ce. Christine L. Powers, 61, of Largo, is the director of adult day services and business development for Community Aging and Retirement Services Inc. All were appointed for a term beginning Sept. 6 and ending Aug. 1. The task force was created to help the state be more proactive in ghting Alzheimers.Scott appoints 5 to 4th Circuit Judicial Nominating CommissionScott appoints 6 to Purple Ribbon Task Force FLORIDA APPOINTMENTS Special to The Times-AdvertiserAt its meeting Wednesday in Tampa, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission approved draft rule amendments regarding falconry, wildlife rehabilitation and taking of wildlife on roads and rights-of-way. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the FWC currently share regulatory authority for falconry, including issuing permits for falconers. However, the USFWS now is relinquishing its responsibilities to states. For falconry to continue to be allowed in Florida, the FWC must amend rules and regulations to meet or exceed federal standards and they must be certi ed by the Service, said Maj. Curtis Brown, who presented the amendments. This includes areas like eligibility requirements for falconers; details regarding possession of golden eagles; requirements for banding, reporting and release of birds; permitting for seasonal residents and visitors; educational display; rehabilitation; and possession of prey. In addition to those areas, which must comply with the federal standards, FWC staff also included some new amendments, Brown said. FWC staff held public workshops and worked closely with stakeholders on their needs and concerns to develop the amendments. The topics addressed include classi cation of falconers; reinstatement of lapsed permits; restoration of suspended or revoked permits; the take, acquisition and transportation of raptors; housing and temporary care; feathers and carcasses of raptors; propagation; and the practice of falconry in the vicinity of threatened and endangered species. Commissioners discussed, heard public comment and ultimately approved the draft amendments as presented by staff with the direction for staff to research and consider adding merlins for use by apprentice falconers. The complete draft amendments, which pertain to rules 68A-9.005, 69A-9.006 and 68A-4.008, can be viewed online and will be presented for nal public hearing at the February 2013 Commission meeting. For more information about falconry regulations, visit MyFWC.com/Rules and select Proposed Rule Changes. 2013 Washington County Relay For Life kickoff MondayWASHINGTON COUNTY The Washington County Relay For Life 2013 kickoff will be at 6 p.m. Monday, Sept. 17, at the Washington County Agricultural Center in Chipley. This is a free event designed to get the message out about what the American Cancer Society does for our community. The kickoff will be set up like a mini relay to allow everyone to see how the relay is set up. There will be food, games and fun for everyone. If you know someone who would like to start a team, bring them to this event.Washington County Relay to be April 12WASHINGTON COUNTY Washington County will have its 2013 Relay For Life event from 6 p.m. April 12 to 11 a.m. April 13 at Pals Park in Chipley. This theme for the 2013 Relay For Life is Race For a Cure. Relay for Life BRIEFSFWC approves draft rules for falconry

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www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comSend your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com Section Page 8 Wednesday, September 12, 2012 FWC charts next steps for Florida panther populationSpecial to The Times-AdvertiserThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, working in partnership with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, plans to document where panthers are roaming beyond south Florida and develop the best practices to help people and panthers coexist. The efforts described in a recent staff report at the FWCs Commission meeting in Tampa would aid a potential northward expansion of the range of breeding panthers as part of the next steps in panther population recovery. Panther expansion northward is going to be, in large part, due to cooperation with private landowners, Commission Chairman Kenneth Wright said. The panther needs a large area to roam, as much as 200 square miles for an adult male. In south Florida, panthers have access to federally managed public lands such as Everglades National Park, Big Cypress National Preserve and the Panther National Wildlife Refuge in addition to state and privately owned lands. In the southern part of central Florida, a key area for potential expansion of the large cat, more panther habitat is privately owned. We have room for more panther population growth as long as we manage areas successfully, said Commissioner Ronald Bergeron, who suggested it should be a priority both to conserve the core population in south Florida and prepare for expansion north of the Caloosahatchee River. We have to target the heart of where the panthers are, and continue to move forward with good habitat and with underpasses to protect panthers crossing highways. In the coming months, staff said the FWC will be collaborating closely with stakeholders, including private landowners in central Florida, about what information and resources they need to feel prepared for an increased presence of panthers. The Commissioners supported this approach, particularly an exploration of what panther-related conservation incentives should be made available to landowners. For expansion, I think we have to see some version of good wildlife corridors or good unfragmented habitat, said Commissioner Aliese Liesa Priddy. We need to get realistic about what our goals should be and what habitat is available. Priddy said continuing the FWCs strong partnership with USFWS to update panther management goals and enhance resources would be critical. She added that building public support for panther expansion also was an important goal. Weve come a long way, said Priddy. But we want to achieve more. Panthers once ranged across Florida and into seven other southern states. Today most of the panther population is concentrated in south Florida. Adult male panthers, however, have been documented to range throughout central and north Florida. FWC staff has not been able to of cially document since the 1970s that adult female panthers live north of the Caloosahatchee River or Lake Okeechobee. The panther population is estimated to be 100 to 160 adults and sub-adults. Subadults have left their mothers but not yet reached sexual maturity. The ultimate goal, stated in the recovery plan developed by USFWS in conjunction with the FWC and other partners, is long-term viability of the Florida panther so it no longer is listed as endangered. Currently the FWCs panther management team uses evidence gathered from the capture and tracking of radio-collared panthers, the causes of panther mortalities, and documentation of denning mothers to monitor population trends, changes in occupied range, and threats to the population. For example, the panther staff was able to detect the outbreak of feline-leukemia virus and control the disease before it had major population impacts. Capturing the cats also has been useful for measuring genetic diversity and detecting inbreeding problems. Future research will address: Understanding and responding to the challenges of how people react to panther range expansion. Partnering with private landowners to study panthers food habits and use of ranch lands. Re ning methods to estimate panther numbers and population trends. The FWC also is enlisting the help of Florida citizens in collecting more information about the panthers range. A new website developed by the FWC, https://public. myfwc.com/hsc/panthersightings/getlatlong.aspx allows people to easily upload photos of panthers and their tracks and link them to a speci c location on a geographic database. Since use of motionactivated game cameras has become commonplace, People are getting incredible photos of all kinds of wildlife by day and night, said Kipp Frohlich, who leads the FWCs Imperiled Species Management Section. We are really hoping that someone will step up and be the rst person who can show real proof of a female or kittens in central or north Florida. That would be really exciting news. The panther is Floridas of cial state animal. All funding for state research and conservation of panthers comes from Florida residents voluntary purchase of the panther specialty license plate. For more information, please go to www.buyaplate.com and click on the panther Cat Tag. The panther report is available with the September meeting agenda at MyFWC.com/Commission KINGS BUCKStory courtesy of Deer & Deer Hunting MagazineGRANT COUNTY, Wisc. A controversial potential world-record buck taken here six years ago that could be the biggest buck ever killed will be formally panel-scored in Montana later this month, according to an exclusive report from Deer & Deer Hunting Magazine. In a statement released Thursday, the Boone and Crockett Club con rmed that the potential world record Johnny King buck will be scored by four experienced judges, none of who have prior experience with this particular trophy. A source close to the situation told Deer & Deer Hunting the panel-scoring session will occur on Saturday, Sept. 22, in Missoula, Mont. The panels ndings will be the deers nal score, the release said. This development comes nearly six years after Johnny King killed the big deer with a borrowed .30-30 while deer hunting on family property in western Wisconsin. The massive 12-pointer a 6-by-6 with no abnormal points is believed to gross more than 220 inches and quite possibly net more than the current world record Milo Hanson Buck which scored 213-5/8 B&C. Hanson shot his buck in Saskatchewan in 1993. Ironically, both men were hunting whitetail properties that were very similar: strips of woods surrounded by agricultural land. They also shot their big bucks while conducting deer drives. The panel scorers are being asked to score via the recommendation by the 32-man records committee to the B&C board. The odds of killing a wild, freeranging buck like this? About 1 in 320 million. Kings buck, however, has been shrouded in controversy almost since the day it was killed. Despite convictions by many longtime certi ed B&C scorers that the buck is a typical 12pointer, some, including at least one high-ranking B&C of cial, believed the bucks right G-3 tine was an abnormal point because of the way it appeared on the main beam. Those beliefs led to a scandal of epic proportions in the deer hunting world that had remained out of the public eye for years until Deer & Deer Hunting reported on it in the magazines Summer 2011 edition. Now, a year and many bitter developments later, the club has apparently decided to score the rack as a typical. According to B&C of cials who chose not to be identi ed, the club will ask a panel of its of cial scorers to measure the antlers in Montana in about three weeks. The club needs to arrange to have the antlers brought to Montana by Jay Fish, an antler collector who bought the rack from Johnny King several years ago. King previously told D&DH that he sold the rack because he thought he would never have the energy, expenses or ability to ght for its justice. This recent development comes after two prominent antler scoring experts (including one longtime B&C scorer) produced step-by-step videos of them scoring the rack while explaining in detail the clubs of cial rules in their measurement determinations. This video proof apparently was enough to convince the B&C records committee that the buck is indeed a typical and should be scored as such. Hence, the panel scorers will not determine if the rack is nontypical. They will score it as a typical and let the chips fall where they may, so to speak. When told of the news, King expressed guarded optimism. Its about time, said King, an ever day deer hunter from Mount Horeb, Wisc. I dont want to seem ungrateful, but why did it have to take this long, and why did we have to go through all of this? Its a shame that (some scorers) had to threaten B&C for them to do whats right.(Editors note: If you are a serious local hunter, theres a reason to start working on your food plots now. Deer & Deer Hunting Magazine could be writing about you next year if you prepare properly.) Johnny Kings potentially worldrecord buck is finally getting a formal scoring, six years after he shot it.Contributed photos www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com OUTDOORS Section A

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SP O RTS www.bonifaynow.com ASection COLLEGE PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM WIN WIN WIN WIN WIN WIN $ $ $ $ $ $ 25 25 25 25 25 25 W W W W W W EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! Check your winner picks and send in today!SEPT. 15 SCOREBOARD Enter by Noon on Friday TIE BREAKERBaltimore Philadelphia Total Points ______ Total Points ______ Total Net Yardage ______Total Net Yardage______ Enter at the Washington County News or the Holmes County Times-Advertiser oces; or mail to1364 N. Railroad Ave., in Chipley www.chipleypaper.com or www. bonifaynow.comName____________________________________________ Address__________________________________________ City________________________________Zip_________ Daytime Phone____________________________________ Email____________________________________________ Subscriber Non-SubscriberRules1.College Pick-em will reward persons based on their ability to pick the most winners of each weeks college football games. 2.Winners will be selected on the basis of choices for the Saturday/Friday games. Ties will be broken through selections for a weekend Pro game: the winner, the winning point spread (margin of victory), and the yardage totals in that order. 3.Each weekly winner will receive a $25 gift card. The names of the winners will be published in News and TimesAdvertiser each Wednesday. 4.A drawing will be held from ALL contest entries after the Nov. 24 game for a $100 gift card. The winner will be published in the Times and the News. No purchase necessary to win. 5.Entries can be made on the entry coupon, or a similar form (8-1/2 x 11) carrying the same information. Duplicate entry forms also will be available online at chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com 6.Entries can be dropped o or mailed to the News oce, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, Fla. 32428; or at the Times oce at 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, 32425, during business hours, 8 a.m.5 p.m. CT; or submitted via email on the entry form at chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com 7.All entries must be received by noon CST each Friday. Postmarks will have no bearing on whether or not the deadline is met. 8.Entrants may submit no more than two entries per week. You must enter only your own name and a single address. You may not submit entries in the name of other people. Winners found to have submitted more than two entries and/ or in the name of another person will be disqualied. 9.The News and the Times-Advertiser assumes no responsibility for failure to receive any entry. All entries become the property of News and the Times-Advertiser and none will be returned. 10.Employees of News and the Times-Advertiser and their immediate families are not eligible to participate. 11.Decision of the judges is nal. ALL PLAYERS, BY THE ACT OF ENTERING, AGREE TO ABIDE BY THE RULES. CHECK HERE WEDNESDAY FOR EACH WEEKS WINNERSept. 1 Winner: Larry Johnson, Bonifay, 1 miss, T.B. Sept. 8 Winner: Bob Johnson, Bonifay, 2 miss 1. N. CarolinaLouisville 2.Wake ForestFlorida State 3.AlabamaArkansas 4.Virginia Georgia Tech 5.FloridaTennessee 6.Southern CaliforniaStanford 7.Notre DameMichigan State 8.ColoradoFresno State 9.Bowling GreenToledo 10.NavyPenn State Page 9 Wednesday, September 12, 2012By BRAD MILNER747-5065 | @pcnhbradmilner bmilner@pcnh.com SAND HILLS Bozeman has passed its rst big football test of the season. Jacob Martinez accounted for three scores, and David Elmore and Javoni Bell each notched two touchdowns as the hosts beat Port St. Joe 35-8 on Friday. It was a battle between a Bucks team looking to take the next step forward and an improved Tiger Sharks squad that fell to 1-1. Bozeman moved to 2-0 in its home opener, which featured the Bucks in all red jerseys. This was a big win for us, Bozeman coach Loren Tillman said. I thought aside from some missed tackles, we played well defensively against a team that was scoring a lot of points in the jamboree and last week. Bozeman also showed a killer instinct that had been missing in the past after PSJ struck for its rst and only score late in the third quarter. Jarkice Davis took a pitch right, broke two tackles in the back eld, squirted through more defenders to the sideline, cut left, sprinted down the opposite sideline and dived over for a 55-yard score. Natron Lee added a 2-point conversion to narrow the gap to 21-8. Bell erased the momentum with a 52-yard scoring run four plays later. Davis, who had a game-high 142 yards, fumbled on the next possession. Martinez, who along with James Jernigan fought through cramping in the second half, connected with Elmore for 19 yards to cap the scoring to open the fourth quarter. We were able to ght back a little bit, Port St. Joe coach Chuck Gannon said. There was still plenty of time to get back in the game. Bell, who had 123 yards on eight carries, and Martinez, who threw for two TDs on three completions and rushed for 52 yards and a TD, saw to it PSJ didnt draw any closer. Port St. Joe had a lot of ght left, Tillman said. We showed our depth with the players cramping Vernon trounces Wewa 38-6By RANDAL SEYLER638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com VERNON The Yellow Jackets took command of their rst home game early in the rst quarter Friday night, and they never looked back, stinging the Wewahitchka Gators 38-6. Junior tight end Brandon Malloy put the Yellow Jackets on the board with 5:23 to play in the opening quarter, rst carrying the ball 68 yards from the Vernon 30 yard-line to the Wewahitchka 2-yard mark before busting through the middle to score. Senior quarterback Dylan Kirk connected with junior wide receiver Julian Silas on the twopoint attempt to make it 8-0. With 2 minutes left to play in the rst quarter, Kirk connected with sophomore wide receiver Austin Brown in the end zone, capping a 70-yard play that began with a Julian Silas interception, stopping a Gator drive at the Vernon 30. The PAT was no good, but the Yellow Jackets led 14-0. Kirk connected with Brown again from 10-yards out with 4:44 to play in the half, completing a 65-yard, 7-play drive. Kirks screen pass to Silas was good for two more points, and Vernon led 22-0. With 2:10 left to play in the half, Brown picked off a Gator pass inside the Wewahitchka 30 By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cecilia.spears@halifaxmediagroup.com BONIFAY The Holmes County High School Blue Devils overcame the Jay High School Royals in a show of force Friday night, nishing the game with a score of 52-14. Jacky Miles Jr. scored the rst touchdown of the night on a 1-yard run with 8:47 left in the rst quarter. With a good kick from Ty Russ, the score was 7-0. Shortly afterward, Russ carried the ball 30 yards for a touchdown with 7:06 left in the rst quarter but missed the extra point kick, which was blocked by Jay, leaving the score 13-0. Blue Devil Kodi Russ ran a 42-yard play just short of the goal with 1:50 left in the rst quarter, then drove it home for a touchdown with 1:45 left on the clock. With a successful pass from Miles to Dustin Janas, the Blue Devils completed a successful 2point conversion and ended the rst quarter with a score of 21-0. Jay Royals Ricky Co eld came on strong with a 75-yard dash to the goal, resulting in the Royals rst touchdown of the evening, though with a failed attempt at a 2-point conversion the score remained at 21-6 with 9:25 left in the rst half. Miles ran a 28-yard touchdown with 8:38 left in the rst half and then completed a successful 2-point conversion to put the score at 29-6. The Blue Devils defense pushed the Royals back to the end zone, eventually scoring a safety to make the score 31-6. Shortly after, Kodi Russ ran From Staff ReportsBLOUNTSTOWN Andrew Bennett kicked a 26-yard eld goal with 1 second left as Blountstown avoided overtime with a 31-28 win over Chipley on Friday night. Chipley (1-1) had marched 62 yards in 15 plays to tie the game 28-28 with 1:58 remaining. Kobe McCrary climaxed a 7-minute, 28-second possession with a 1-yard scoring run and added a conversion to overcome a 28-20 de cit. Blountstown (1-1) responded by moving 48 yards in 10 plays. Quarterback Hunter Jordans 13-yard run on fourth-and-5 reached the 10 and set up Bennetts winning kick. The ending was indicative of a game that featured four lead changes and neither team gaining more than a one-possession advantage. Blountstown led early when Jordan passed 40 yards to Josh Taylor for a touchdown. Chipley went ahead when McCary, who gained 165 yards on 24 carries, ran 3 yards to score and Fletcher Dilmores extra point produced a 7-6 edge. Corin Peterson went 17 yards to score and Javakiel Brighams conversion run put Blountstown on top 14-7. Chipley produced a 14-14 halftime tie on Dallas Olivers rst touchdown on a 3-yard run. Oliver regained the lead for his team with a 7-yard run and Chipley led 20-14. Alex Mayorga had a 2-yard scoring run, and Bennetts extra point gave Blountstown a 21-20 lead after three quarters. That lead swelled to 28-20 early in the fourth quarter before the frantic nish. Brigham had 104 yards rushing on 13 attempts, and Jordan added 88 on 13 carries for Blountstown. Jordans TD pass was his only completion in nine attempts. Oliver added 136 yards rushing on 16 carries for Chipley as each team exceeded 300 yards on the ground. Bobby Andrews topped Blountstown with 11 tackles and, Dylan Lee and Brigham each had nine. Blountstown is at Freeport next week while Chipley travels to Northview. Bennett kick secures Blountstown victory ANDREW P JOHNSON | The News HeraldBozemans Javoni Bell scored two touchdowns, including a 52-yarder in the third quarter, to punctuate the Bucks 35-8 victory over visiting Port St. Joe on Friday. Bozeman surges past Port St. JoeSee VERNON A10 Holmes overtakes JayCECILIA SPEARS | Times-AdvertiserThe Holmes County High School Blue Devils defeated the Jay High School Royals 52-14 Friday at Bonifay. The Blue Devils travel to Baker on Friday.See HOLMES A10Andrew Jackson 44, Englewood 6 Apopka 15, Lake Brantley 9 Atlantic Coast 59, Paxon 3 Atlantic Community 10, Boca Raton Community 9 Aucilla Christian 53, Oak Hall 21 Barron Collier 12, Westminster Christian 0 Bartow 27, Auburndale 7 Benjamin 29, John Carroll Catholic 7 Berkeley Prep 30, Victory Christian 7 Bishop Snyder 42, St. Joseph Academy 34 Bloomingdale 28, Strawberry Crest 27 Boca Raton Christian 14, Merritt Island Christian 6 Bolles School 30, Plantation American Heritage 27 Boynton Beach 39, Spanish River 3 Bradenton Christian 33, Northside Christian 10 Bradford 39, Hawthorne 6 Branford 60, Trenton 14 Buchholz 28, Orange Park 24 Calvary Christian 38, Indian Rocks 21 Cardinal Mooney 23, Bishop Verot 20 Cardinal Newman 49, Pahokee 22 Carrollwood Day 48, Keswick Christian 0 Central Florida Christian 32, Peniel Baptist 6 Chaminade-Madonna College Prep 40, Village Academy 0 Charlotte 48, Riverdale 25 Chie and 48, P.K. Yonge 0 Christs Church 56, Seacoast Christian 6 Christopher Columbus Catholic 49, Belen Jesuit 3 Colonial 36, Deltona 6 Cornerstone 31, Seven Rivers Christian 22 Countryside 27, East Lake 14 PREP FOOTBALL SCORES See SCORES A10 See BOZEMAN A10

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A10 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, September 12, 2012 NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARINGThe TOWN OF ESTO has tentatively adopted a budget for 2012-2013. A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the BUDGET and MILLAGE RATE Will be held on Friday, September 14, 2011 At 7:00 P.M. At the Esto Town Hall in Esto, Florida Looking for the best in hearing care? Look to Beltone Only Beltone offers the exclusive BelCare program, our ongoing commitment to customer satisfaction, providing you with benets such as: Financing Available WAC Chipley, FL 1611 Main Street Ste. 4(850) 387-4931Marianna, FL 3025 6th Street(850) 387-4931The benets of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Discounts off MSRP Previous purchases excluded. For a limited time. Cannot be combined with any other offers. 15%OFFTRUE WIRELESS HEARING AID SYSTEM & ultra comfortable when its noisy advanced technology So, call or come in today. No other company offers the same level of commitment youll nd at Beltone. WERE IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD! Free Annual Hearing Evaluations Beltone Ranked #1 in Patient Care Free Lifetime Instrument Care-Free cleanings and adjustments for as long as you own your Beltone hearing instruments And, our1500 locations nationwideserve you no matter where you live or travel!Allen Barnes 23 Years Experience a 50-yard touchdown with 5:50 left in the rst half, and Ty Russ made the extra point, making the score 38-6. Kodi Russ managed another touchdown in 7 yards, and with another successful kick from Ty Russ, the score was 6-45 with 3:58 left in the rst half. Because of injuries, Ty Russ was unable to play in the second half. The Royals Tate Upton completed a successful 13-yard touchdown with 7:28 left in the third quarter, and with a successful 2-point conversion carried out by Co eld, the score was 45-14. Miles secured the next touchdown for the Blue Devils, and with a successful kick from Kodi Russ, the score was 52-14, which was held for the remainder of the game. We won the game, but not without a lot of struggles, said HCHS Head Coach Brad Johnson. With only 20 guys, were nding that conditioning has a lot to do with the big picture. Were going to need a lot more conditioning to get down the stretch.From Staff ReportsMILTON Rutherford returned home with another football loss on Friday, but Rams coach Alvin Dempsey is seeing more positives each week. Milton opened up an early lead and defeated Rutherford 31-3. The Rams fell to 0-2 on the season, but there was improvement on defense, despite what the score indicated. Rutherford opened with a 4817 loss at Tallahassee Florida High in the week before. (Two weeks ago), they were running up and down the eld like we werent even there, Dempsey said. In this game, when they jumped out on us 14-0, our defense didnt give up, and we saw a lot of good things. The Rams had two goal-line stands to keep the Panthers from increasing the bulge. Rutherford also blocked a eld goal. The guys didnt quit, Dempsey said. I told them if we keep ghting, well get there. Im excited how our young guys are coming along. Were still gelling a bit, and thats what happens when you have a new coach and the team is getting to know each other. Rutherfords lone points came on a 36-yard eld goal by Alex Riley in the second quarter to narrow the gap to 14-3. Milton led only 17-3 at halftime, but Andre Flakes 84-yard touchdown run late in the third quarter sealed control for the Panthers. Rutherford hosts Pensacola Escambia in its home opener this week. Milton downs RutherfordCrystal River 48, Williston 21 Delray American Heritage 36, Armwood 28 Deltona Trinity Christian 47, St. Edwards 0 DeSoto County 23, Okeechobee 7 Dixie County 46, Santa Fe 8 Dr. Phillips 31, Olympia 18 Dunbar 48, Lehigh 34 Durant 29, Alonso 0 Dwyer 34, Jupiter 0 Ed White 29, Forrest 14 Evans 42, Cypress Creek 10 First Baptist 67, St. Stephens Episcopal 0 First Coast 17, Bayside 3 Flagler Palm Coast 11, Seabreeze 7 Fleming Island 46, Nature Coast Tech 7 Fletcher 35, Bishop Kenny 9 Fort Lauderdale Calvary Christian 20, Somerset Academy 15 Fort Meade 42, Lake Region 6 Fort Myers 37, Golden Gate 27 Fort White 21, Newberry 7 Frostproof 19, Sebring 8 Gaither 69, Leto 0 Gateway 22, Lake Minneola High School 16 George Steinbrenner 23, East Bay 0 Gibbs 28, Lennard 18 Glades Day 34, Highlands Christian 7 Graceville 19, Franklin County 0 Hallandale 23, Oakland Park Northeast 12 Holy Trinity Episcopal 7, Orangewood Christian 0 Homestead 14, Miami Southridge 0 Ida S. Baker 30, Cape Coral 20 International Community 8, All Saints 6 Island Coast 51, Estero 20 Jensen Beach 17, Eau Gallie 14 Jesuit 16, Middleton 0 Jones 40, Mainland 8 Keystone Heights 14, Fernandina Beach 0 Kings Academy 23, Clewiston 21 Kissimmee Osceola 28, Bishop Moore 14 LaBelle 13, Evangelical Christian 7 Lafayette 42, Bell 7 Lake Gibson 21, Lake Wales 3 Lake Mary 33, Winter Springs 0 Lake Mary Prep 39, Windermere Prep 0 Lake Weir 22, Belleview 20 Lakeland 42, Tenoroc 0 Lakewood 33, Blake 0 Landmark Christian 45, Santa Fe Catholic 0 Largo 35, Pinellas Park 2 Lecanto 24, Weeki Wachee 7 Leesburg 21, Eustis 20 Lely 33, Cypress Lake 0 Lemon Bay 51, Gateway Charter 7 Lyman 21, Lake Howell 6 Manatee 49, Sarasota Riverview 7 Mandarin 28, Creekside 14 Mariner 34, North Fort Myers 3 Matanzas 26, Florida Air Academy 14 Miami Jackson 34, Braddock 8 Miramar 42, Blanche Ely 20 Mitchell 51, Gulf 0 Mount Dora 21, Tavares 0 Mount Dora Bible 29, Leesburg The First Academy 20 Naples 55, Immokalee 29 Nease 16, Middleburg 10 New Smyrna Beach 41, DeLand 35, OT North Broward 39, Doral Academy Charter 6 North Florida Christian 40, Agape Christian 0 North Port 42, Braden River 0 Oak Ridge 27, Lake Highland 17 Ocala Forest 37, Dunnellon 20 Ocala Trinity Catholic 21, Eastside 12 Ocala Vanguard 20, North Marion 6 Olympic Heights 36, Suncoast 0 Orlando Freedom 31, West Orange 28 Orlando The First Academy 45, Wesley Chapel 0 Ormond Beach Calvary Christian 28, Temple Christian 8 Out-of-Door Academy 33, Community School of Naples 22 Palm Beach Central 56, Lake Worth 26 Palm Beach Gardens 25, West Boca Raton Community 20 Palm Harbor University 27, St. Petersburg 6 Palmetto 47, Sarasota 28 Palmetto Ridge 14, Gulf Coast 5 Park Vista Community 21, Seminole Ridge 7 Pasco 49, Land OLakes 7 Ponte Vedra 32, Bartram Trail 31 Pope John Paul II 22, Westminster Academy 11 Port Charlotte 24, Bayshore 22 Port Orange Atlantic 24, Pine Ridge 0 Raines 51, R.E. Lee 6 Reagan/Doral 28, Southern Pines Pinecrest, N.C. 20 Ridge Community 21, Mulberry 0 Ridgeview 30, Clay 21 River Ridge 17, Ridgewood 14 Robinson 29, Dunedin 0 Sandalwood 41, Wolfson 12 Santaluces 37, Palm Beach Lakes 6 Sebastian River 17, St. Lucie Centennial 16 South Fork 26, Port St. Lucie 9 South Fort Myers 49, East Lee County 0 South Lake 24, Hernando 13 South Sumter 55, East Ridge 13 Southeast 12, Lakewood Ranch 7 Springstead 38, Fivay 0 St. Thomas Aquinas 43, Cypress Bay 17 Stanton College Prep 20, Baldwin 16 Sunlake 17, Wiregrass Ranch 12 Tampa Bay Tech 14, King 0 Tampa Catholic 20, Zephyrhills 9 Taravella 54, Coconut Creek 6 Tarpon Springs 33, Clearwater 17 Taylor 33, St. John Lutheran 14 Terry Parker 24, Ribault 14 Treasure Coast 47, Fort Pierce Westwood 6 Umatilla 14, The Villages 7 Union County 42, Interlachen 0 University Christian 34, Providence 20 Venice 55, Booker 0 Vero Beach 48, Martin County 15 Warner Christian 52, Father Lopez Catholic 14 Wellington 20, Forest Hill 6 West Nassau County 44, Eagles View 24 West Port 28, Citrus 26 Winter Haven 56, Haines City 7 Winter Park 26, Edgewater 13POSTPONEMENTS AND CANCELLATIONSMiami Country Day vs. Coral Springs Charter, ppd. Merritt Island vs. Harmony, ppd. Boone vs. Timber Creek, ppd. Ocoee vs. Orlando University, ppd. East River vs. Wekiva, ppd. Episcopal vs. Astronaut, ccd. Hillsboro, Texas vs. Cocoa, ppd. Fort Pierce Central vs. Palm Bay, susp. St. Cloud vs. Rockledge, ppd. SCORES from page A9and returned it to the end zone. The PAT was good for two more and the Yellow Jackets led 30-0 going into halftime. Vernons nal score came with 8:27 left to play in the third quarter, when Malloy went up the middle from the 2-yard line. Kirk found Brown in the end zone for two points to make it 38-0, which invoked the mercy rule and kept the clock running. The Gators were able to get on the board when sophomore quarterback Rashard Raine was able to connect with junior tight end Javar Hill after the Gators recovered a Yellow Jackets fumble at the Vernon 35. Raine connected with Hill at the 9-yard line on the rst play, then duplicated the effort from rst and goal. The Yellow Jackets travel to Deane Bozeman High School in Panama City next Friday, while the Gators host Munroe High School from Quincy. Kickoff is 7 p.m. HOLMES from page A9and team speed; that was important. The teams spent the majority of the rst quarter swapping punts and attempting physical dominance. Bozeman punted on its rst three possessions but caught a break when it recovered a fumbled pitch at its 38. Bozeman went 62 yards for the opening score on a drive aided by a late hit penalty. Daniel Taylor had two carries for 34 yards to set up a 1-yard dive by Martinez to open the scoring early in the second quarter. A penalty for an ineligible receiver down eld stunted the Tiger Sharks ensuing drive. They had moved as deep as the Bozeman 33 on the strength of a 36-yard halfback pass from Davis to Troy Williams. PSJ went backward 15 yards and was forced to punt. Kris Kenney fumbled away the Bucks next possession two plays later and PSJ drove to the 13 before turning the ball over on downs. Bozeman capitalized when Martinez found Elmore at the Bozeman 45. Elmore cut inside past a defender and nished off a 72-yard connection for a 14-0 Bozeman halftime lead. Gannon said playing against a potential playoff team, and more of them in the future, will help toughen PSJ. We learned we have to be more physical through a whole game, he said. And we need to cut down the mental mistakes. Port St. Joe is off this week. Bozeman hosts Vernon. BOZEMAN from page A9 RANDAL SEYLER | The NewsThe Vernon Yellow Jackets beat the Wewahitchka Gators 38-6 Friday in Vernon. The Yellow Jackets travel to Panama City Friday to take on Deane Bozeman High School. Sports VERNON from page A9

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Washington, Holmes at a glance BPAGE 1SectionKid Safety and Fun ExpoCHIPEY MPE and H&H will sponsor a Free Kid Safety and Fun Expo from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15, at the Chipley Walmart. There will be baby deer at the expo and much more.Youth Ranch Golf TournamentPANAMA CITY The Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch Golf Tournament will be Saturday, Sept. 15, at the Panama Country Club. The money raised will go directly to the Youth Ranch, which runs solely on donations. The Washington County Sheriffs Of ce is one of the tournament sponsors. For more information, call Andrea Gainey at 638-6115.Jacob City DayJACOB Jacob has slated Saturday, Sept. 15, for its Jacob City Day Celebration, which will include a parade, entertainment, food and activities for all. The festivities will start at 11 a.m. with a parade along Jackson Road. Other activities will take place at Jacob City Park, 2254 Jacob Main St. (Highway 162). Booths are available to vendors; contact Verloria T. Wilson at 263-6636 for more information.Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageantBONIFAY The 2012 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant sponsored by the HCHS Blue Pride Band Boosters will be at 4 p.m. Sept. 22 at Holmes County High School. There is no residency requirement. Girls ages 4-20 and boys ages 4-9 may enter for $45. If two or more siblings register in any category, it will cost $35 each. Registration at HCHS will be 10 a.m. to noon Saturday and 5-7 p.m. Tuesday. A $10 late fee will be added Tuesday. You may also turn in registration forms at Bonifay Elementary Schoo., Bonifay Middle School, HCHS or by mail to HCHS; Attn: Band Boosters; 825 W. U.S. 90; Bonifay, FL 32425. If you have any questions, contact Cindy Goodson at goodsonc@hdsb.org or 373-7517. INDEXSociety .................................B2 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B6Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 12 2012PHOTOS BY CECILIA SPEARS | ExtraHolmes County High Schools Blue Pride Band performed during halftime during the Blue Devils football game Friday, Sept. 7, against the Jay Royals. Their theme for this year is Academy Awards. This years band of cers are Drum Major Madison Simmons, Band Captain Katie White, Quartermaster Mollie Niemi, Chaplain Anna Bailey and Section Leaders Victoria Justice, Justin Barton, Anthony McCorvey, Lacey Adams and Jordan Taylor/Michala French. Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser BAND ON THE RUN

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Wednesday, September 12, 2012 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News ExtraSpecial to ExtraBONIFAY Doctors Memorial Hospital in Bonifay is now taking applications for the fall session of the candy striper program. A candy striper must be between the ages of 14 and 18 years of age and volunteer his/her time weekly at the hospital by assisting the nursing staff with patients needs, such as re lling water and ice, taking books and magazines to rooms, ling and other simple but important tasks. Candy stripers volunteer one afternoon a week for two hours. This is an excellent introduction to the eld of healthcare and the volunteer hours may be used as community service hours for scholarships. Applications can be picked up at the hospital or downloaded from www. doctorsmemorial.org and must be completed and returned to the volunteer services director by Wednesday, Sept. 19. The required orientation and training is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 20 from 3-5 pm. The fall session is limited to the rst 15 approved applicants. For more information about the candy striper program, contact the cirector of volunteer services at 547-8193.By STEVE MASONSpecial to Extra CHIPLEY The Chipley Kiwanis Club met Sept. 4 for its weekly luncheon at Pattillos Restaurant at the WashingtonHolmes Technical Center. Lunch was provided by the staff of the Washington-Holmes Technical Center. Paul Goulding introduced the program, a question and answer session with the three current candidates for the upcoming election for Washington County sheriff. The candidates for sheriff are current Sheriff Bobby Haddock, Mr. Chris Ellis and Mr. John Pettis. The rst request was that the candidates tell something about themselves. Sheriff Haddock noted that he has been in law enforcement for 34 years, including one year with Chipley PD, 11 years with the Washington County Sheriffs Department, 14 years with the State Attorneys Of ce and eight years as the Washington County Sheriff. Chris Ellis has been in law enforcement for 30 years, including 1 year with the Washington County Sheriffs Of ce and 29 years with the Florida Highway Patrol. He spent 10 years in Daytona Beach and has been based in Washington County since 1995. He has a passion for drug interdiction and would make use of DEA and FDLE as additional resources. John Pettis has served in law enforcement since 2005 and is a school resource of cer. He would like to establish a business advisory council to provide community input to the sheriffs of ce.Question: Other than drugs, what is the biggest crime threat? John Pettis noted that theft and burglary are related to drugs and violent crimes are up. He would like to hold a quarterly community forum as well as the business advisory council. Chris Ellis noted that thefts are related to drugs. Meth heads cant hold jobs so they steal. WCSO now has one person handling drug issues. We need the DEA and FDLE involved and need more of cers on the road. Sheriff Haddock noted that an orange card is left at the door when an of cer checks a house. The depressed economy and drugs are the greatest issues facing the WCSO. Meth dealers make meth for themselves and sell to nance their habit. He also noted that small numbers and small changes make for large statistical changes. For example, in 2010 there was one sexual crime. Last year there were nine. Also, the average crime clearance rate is 40 percent. This year it is 43 percent. Last year the recovery rate on property was 43 percent, while this year the rate is 73 percent. At the same time, due to the economic downturn, last year the WCSO lost three and a half positions. This year an additional four positions will be lost. Chris Ellis noted that overall crime is down 7 percent this year, while Washington County is up 16 percent, and Chipley is down 9 percent. The key is more deputies on the road and making them more visible.Question: Since we have lost some school resource of cer positions, what is the impact and how are we dealing with the situation and how can the situation be improved? Sheriff Haddock noted that they only have three resource of cers. They lost one position this year and will lose one more next year. Haddock wants to start drug education in elementary schools and will use drug money to implement school programs. Mr. Ellis wants to address an issue with the WC School Board. School penalties for small amounts of drugs are much tougher from the School Board than from the court system. A 10-day suspension and loss of sports is too tough a penalty for possession of a small amount of drugs. John Pettis noted that drugs are in the middle schools. We need tools to educate students. He noted that after a suspension, a student only receives 60 percent credit for any grade the student makes on the work. He believes the guidelines should be less severe. Question: How can we pay for more programs? John Pettis suggested that the WCSO go to 12hour shifts as a way to save money. He also noted that free training and federal grants are available. Chris Ellis would look to streamline the department and work with other law enforcement agencies. Sheriff Haddock noted that the WCSO has applied for numerous grants and that they have the best equipment available. He also noted that WCSO has worked on a number of task forces with the DEA, FDLE, the Chipley PD and other county sheriffs departments. WCSO has memoranda of understanding with many other state and county agencies to foster cooperation. On the subject of staf ng, 12hour shifts would mean that there would be four deputies per shift rather than ve per shift that they have now. The major funding issue, which the WCSO faces, is due to the reduction in the tax base due to the current poor economy. Chris Ellis noted that half of drugs are being mailed into the county via USPS, FedEx and UPS. He believes in a strong canine program.Question: How will you recruit and retain quali ed personnel in this economic downturn? Sheriff Haddock noted that he has started an Explorer program (a Boy Scout program for older boys) to encourage local boys to join law enforcement. The current salary starts at $28,500. Two years ago the county had to cut its participation in the employee health insurance premium. Deputies now net about $17,500, and the WCSO lost seven people as a result. Sheriff Haddock had brought in $3 million in revenue by housing state and federal prisoners in the Washington County Jail. Chris Ellis noted that pay is a problem, but it is not always money that retains personnel. Appreciation and how people are treated makes a difference. Off-duty employment opportunities also help. John Pettis added that morale is also important. None of us do it for the money! The Chipley Kiwanis will host other candidate forums in the near future. The Kiwanis club meets Tuesdays at Patillos restaurant in the middle of the WHTC campus at noon. For an invitation, contact any Kiwanian or David Solger, membership chairperson, at 850-638-1276. For more information about the Kiwanis Club of Chipley, visit www.ChipleyKiwanis.com. Special to ExtraElijah and Lizzie Lewis celebrated their 73rd wedding anniversary on Aug. 5. Their children are Daisy Swearingen, Mattie Scarvey, Naomi Corne, Albert Lewis, Bernie Lewis and a deceased daughter, Mary Callie Hartley. They have six grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren and many other family members. Kiwanis Club holds political forum for sheriff candidates SPECIAL TO EXTRAA candy striper volunteers his/her time weekly at the hospital by assisting the nursing staff with patients needs such as re lling water and ice, taking books and magazines to rooms or assisting nurses by taking vital signs and ling or other simple but important tasks. This is a great way to ful ll community service hours required for some scholarships. Letters of recommendation may also be obtained from the volunteer services director upon request.Candy striper fall program beginsLewises celebrate 73rd anniversary and Sheriff candidates Bobby Haddock, Chris Ellis and John Pettis visit the Chipley Kiwanis Club on Sept. 4.

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Wednesday, September 12, 2012 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 About 70 percent of horses will develop wolf teeth. Though these teeth usually do not pose a health risk to the horse, they are often removed in performance horses to prevent interference with the bit and to avoid traumatizing the soft tissues around the teeth, leading to soreness. Horsemen differ in opinions on when or if these teeth should be removed, but understanding the physiology of wolf teeth can help individual horse owners make the best personal decision for their horses. Wolf teeth generally emerge between the ages of 5 and 12 months. Predominantly, the teeth emerge in the upper jaw 2 to 3 centimeters in front of the rst cheek teeth. Wolf teeth also can erupt adjacent to the rst cheek teeth and are present in both colts and llies. The wolf teeth do not serve any real purpose for the horse, and therefore, removing them does not pose any disruption to chewing, said Dr. Glennon Mays, clinical assistant professor in the Large Animal Hospital at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. Millions of years ago, horses were small, forest-dwelling animals. They were browsers, not grazers, and the wolf teeth were more prominent because they helped horses eat twigs and brush, Mays said. But, now, there really isnt any need for them in the modern horse. Because the wolf teeth are not necessary and there is a possibility they can interfere with bit placement in the mouth of performance horses, many horse trainers opt to have them removed before they can potentially cause pain for horses during training. The idea is to remove as many excuses as possible for unacceptable behavior in horses throughout the training process and during performance, Mays said. There is a common understanding that the name wolf teeth is a connotation of bad teeth, that it was the teeths reputation as bad that led to them being named wolf teeth. Even with this reputation as a negative, unneeded component of the mouth, owners do not always remove the teeth, especially in horses that do not have erupted wolf teeth or in horses that are not used for performance purposes. Removing wolf teeth is a decision you should make with your veterinarian, Mays said. The procedure is not particularly dangerous, but there are risks with any surgical procedure. There is the possibility of severing or damaging the palatine artery, which can cause a great deal of blood loss. Or in horses with large, curved wolf teeth, the curvature of the tooth increases the possibility for complications. Sedation and local anesthetic should be used to make the procedure safe and comfortable for the horse, Mays said. Recovery ranges from about a day to a week depending on the horse and size of the tooth being extracted. The actual extraction consists of cleaning and ushing the mouth, using an elevator to cut the gum around the tooth and stretching the periodontal ligament in order to loosen the wolf tooth. The tooth is grasped and removed with forceps. Because wolf teeth can be a variety of sizes and shapes, the procedure time varies from a couple of minutes to half an hour. Mays recommended ensuring your horse is vaccinated for tetanus before the procedure. Adequate protection includes an initial vaccination, with a second booster administered four to six weeks after the initial vaccine, then another booster every two to four years. Tetanus bacteria thrive in small, usually hidden puncture-type wounds with little to no oxygen. Therefore, mouth wounds are a prime environment for tetanus bacteria to develop. Tetanus is usually fatal in horses, and mares are often overrepresented as being especially vulnerable, largely because males typically are vaccinated for tetanus before castration. Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at http://vetmed.tamu. edu/pet-talk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to cvmtoday@cvm.tamu.edu. By GWENETH COLLINS Chipley Garden Club CHIPLEY Chipley Garden Clubs rst meeting of the 2012-13 club year was Sept. 5 at the home of Gweneth and Wade Collins. New members and guests were welcomed by Club President Karen Roland as the meeting began. Club Member Jane Brewer, who is also FFGC District II director, extended her congratulations and conveyed her pride in our club for the many awards we received at the 2012 Spring FFGC Convention. Current projects were discussed, including our second annual Scarecrow Contest, which will be Oct. 13 at the Farmers Market in downtown Chipley. The Scarecrow Contest will be in conjunction with the Washington County Historical Societys Fall into History Fest. We also will sponsor a free Build-a-Better-Scarecrow Workshop on Sept. 18 at the Farmers Market. The public is invited to participate in both events. Other projects discussed included Octobers FFGC District II fall meeting in Graceville, Yard of the Month, Pennies for Pines, The Little Blue (Pond) Water Project in Sunny Hills and pre-planning for our 80th anniversary reception. Club member Gweneth Collins presented a program covering the clubs 80 years of gardening history. After a DVD featuring photographic journey from the 1950s to the present, she shared the history of Chipley Garden Club its many projects and accomplishments from 1932 to the present. Although the stylish hats and white gloves of the original 1932 club are gone, the mentality remains the same: civic mindedness, horticultural education for young people, the love of nature, recycling and waste management, protecting the natural world and beautication of our community. The next regular meeting of Chipley Garden Club will be Oct. 3 at Shivers Park. We welcome members and visitors at any time. If you would like more information or would like to join, contact club president Karen Roland at 648-9968 or blueorchidoasis@yahoo. com. Special to ExtraFlorida veterans wishing to enter the commercial shing industry soon might be able to do so more easily thanks to changes made today at the Sept. 5-6 Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission meeting in Tampa. These changes are anticipated to take effect on Veterans Day, Nov. 11. The commission implemented a new program that will modify income requirements for Florida veterans seeking a commercial restricted species endorsement license. The restricted species endorsement allows commercial harvesters to sh for and sell species that are designated as restricted. Spanish and king mackerel, ounder, shrimp, dolphin and several reef sh are among the list of species that require a restricted species endorsement. Currently, commercial harvesters trying to qualify for a restricted species endorsement license must have a Florida Saltwater Products License, which is Floridas commercial saltwater shing license, and be able to attribute $5,000 or 25 percent of their total annual income during one of the past three years to sales of saltwater products. With the new changes in place, restricted species endorsement income requirements will be waived for one license year (July 1 to June 30) for Florida veterans who were honorably discharged between Sept. 11, 2001, and June 30, 2014. After June 30, 2014, this income requirement waiver will continue to extend to Florida veterans so long as they apply within four years of an honorable discharge. The one-license-year waiver also extends to honorably discharged veterans with service-connected disabilities. After the one-year waiver expires, veterans with service-connected disabilities will have a reduced income requirement of $2,500 instead of $5,000. To qualify for these exemptions, veterans must be certied by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs or the United States Armed Forces to have at least a 10 percent disability that is service-connected. To learn more about commercial shing requirements, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on Saltwater and Commercial. Special to ExtraDESTIN William O. Bill Cleckley, the Northwest Florida Water Management Districts director of land management and acquisition, was recognized Thursday by Audubon Florida for his achievements managing public forests, lakes, springs and wetlands in northwest Florida. Each year, Audubon presents its Sustainable Forestry Award at the Florida Forestry Associations annual meeting to honor a forester for protecting the states water and wildlife. Throughout his 26 years at the district, Bill has shown an unwavering commitment to protecting and restoring Floridas treasured water and land resources, said District Executive Director Jon Steverson. Thanks to his leadership and dedication, the district has developed one of the most active restoration and recreational programs in the South, and natural communities across the panhandle continue to thrive. During his tenure with the district, Cleckley helped acquire more than 122,000 acres key to the protection and preservation of Floridas water resources. He also oversees 212,371 acres of district-owned property and more than 12,400 acres of conservation easements. Using his forestry expertise to focus on habitat restoration, hes led efforts to reforest more than 11,000 acres of longleaf pine uplands and restore groundcover on thousands of acres of upland and wetland wiregrass habitats. Bill Cleckley has done an excellent job of managing and restoring the districts public lands, which are a resource for people and wildlife alike, said Eric Draper, Audubon Florida executive director. Anyone who has used the districts lands for recreation knows that they provide a gateway to a wonderful assemblage of springs, forests and rivers. Audubon is proud to be associated with the Florida Forestry Association to present this award. The districts lands protect many important wetland and natural vegetation communities, including river oodplains, recharge areas/springs, headwater wetlands, coastal marshes and pristine bottomland hardwood and associated upland forests. The districts acquisitions include more than 85 percent of the oodplains along the Choctawhatchee and Escambia rivers and Econna Creek. Every acre of district-owned land is open for sustainable public use, offering a variety of recreational activities, including bird-watching, nature study, photography, hiking, jogging, camping, shing, hunting, swimming, canoeing, boating and other nature-related outdoor activities. By working cooperatively with local law enforcement agencies, the district is committed to providing family-friendly springs and waterways experiences for Floridians and visitors. Chipley Garden Club recalls its history Crossword PUZZleLESOLUUTION ON PAGE B5 FWC to ease requirements for veterans CoOMMeERcialCIAL FishingISHING Land manager recognized for restoration efforts Equine wolf teeth usually not harmful PetET Tal ALK PET TALKK

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FAITH BSectionwww.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.First Baptist Churchcome as you areMike Orr, Pastor1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.What Can You Do WithoutA king once asked a wise man what his teaching was good for. The king claimed that he was happier than the wise man because he had sumptuous palaces to live in, armies at his command, and beautiful women to consort with. The wise man asked the king whether he could be perfectly content doing nothing for an hour, to which the king replied that he could. Then the wise man asked him if he could be perfectly content for an entire day while doing absolutely nothing. The king replied the wise man responded that he could be perfectly happy doing nothing for seven days and seven nights, and thus the wise man had the greater share of happiness. Perhaps what this story really reveals is that it is not what we have that makes us happy but what we can do without.BROWN FUNERAL HOME1068 Main Street, Chipley638-4010 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser This Message Courtesy ofI know what it is tobe in need, and I know what it is to have plenty. I have learned the secret of being content in any and every situation, whether well fed or hungry, whether living in plenty or in want. Philippians 4:12 Page 4 Wednesday, September 12, 2012Rev. James L. Snyder I often hear derogatory remarks directed toward the IRS. I must admit that many of these critical remarks originated with me. Not that I do not like my good old Uncle Sam, it is that he is a little demanding when it comes to tax time. Every year I complain about ling my income tax and paying out gobs and gobs of dollars to the United States government. I know it is important to pay taxes, and I pay my fair share even though it may be grudgingly. Throughout the years, I have complained that dear old Uncle Sam never writes me a letter. I will have to amend that complaint because I recently received a personalized letter from the IRS. Well, you can imagine my surprise at getting this letter. With trembling hands, I opened the letter, anxious to know what was going on in the world of Uncle Sam. I expected a detailed letter of what he was doing and how he was getting along and how the kids were and all that sort of thing. Imagine my surprise when none of that information was contained in the letter. From the contents of the letter, and I must say a lot of it was goobly glop, I had fallen far short of my share of income tax this past year. According to the letter, I was a gazillion dollars short of what he had expected from me and quite frankly, he was disappointed in this behavior on my part. Do not ask me how many zeros a gazillion dollars have because I do not know. I do not have that many ngers or toes. Although, I read the letter several times it was not quite clear how much I actually owed and what plans there were in place for me to pay it back. From what I could understand from the letter, I owed good old Uncle Sam an arm and a leg, and he was highly expecting that I would come through for him. Well, that kind of letter did not set well with me. I was tempted to leave the country, then sneak back as an illegal alien and not have to worry about all this nasty stuff. But, I did not have that much energy available. There was a phone number I was to call if I had any personal questions. Boy, did I have some personal questions. I was fully expecting not to get a real human voice when I called. But, again, I was pleasantly surprised. Within 30 minutes and after dozens of pushing this button and pushing that button, I had on the other end of the phone a very pleasant and cheerful voice, a representative of the IRS. After we exchanged some personal niceties and followed up on the weather report from each of our locations, we nally got down to the real business of the phone call. I must confess I was not expecting such pleasantries from an IRS agent. I assumed she had the telephone in one hand and a loaded, fully cocked revolver in the other. If she did, she concealed it most admirably. Then we got down to the nitty-gritty of what the IRS is all about: collecting taxes from potentially delinquent taxpayers, like myself. The thought that I deliberately was delinquent was rather humiliating for me. Simply put, I just did not pay enough in, but this telephone call was going to rectify all of that. After she crunched all the gures and as I waited patiently on my end of the phone, she was able to determine I owed the government an arm and a leg. It was then that the negotiations began in earnest. I must confess she could not have been any nicer had she been my grandmother. She then began to query as to which arm and which leg I was going to give to the government. This presented a real dif cult decision on my part. Throughout the years, I have grown quite fond of both arms and both legs. Then I asked her if I could counter a proposal. She replied in the af rmative. Would you consider, I began rather slowly, an arm or a leg? There was a pause on the other end of the phone when I could tell she was thinking. Whenever you get a government employee to think, watch out. I could hear the old wheels grinding and grinding. Finally, she said, I think that would be acceptable. And, Ill even allow you to select either arm or leg. We like to work with people. Now the burden was on me. I now owed the government an arm or a leg, and I just had to select which one. I rst considered my arms. In thinking about them, I use both of my arms although the left one less than the right one every day. What with writing and eating my arms are rather busy throughout the day. Then I considered my legs. I like my right leg and so the choice became rather easy for me. Now, the United States government has at least one leg to stand on, thanks to Yours Truly. I have something greater to stand on. Stand fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free, and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondage (Galatians 5:1 KJV). Jesus Christ trumps Uncle Sam when it comes to liberty. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att. net. His web site is www. jamessnyderministries. comSpecial to ExtraPANAMA CITY Building Bridges: An Interfaith Dialog will be held at Unity of Panama City on from 6-9 p.m. on Sept. 19. In todays diverse and changing world, it is crucial to create greater understanding and connections between different faith groups. Come explore four faith traditions to discover how they are unique, and more importantly, what they have in common. Speakers include: Ron Fazer (Bahai), Dr. Cynthia Gingold (Judaism), Nancy James (Buddhism) and the Rev. Dr. Margaret Shepard (Episcopalian). After their presentations, the audience will have time to ask questions and then dialog in small groups about ways to foster a more respectful world. As we become ever more global in our thinking and actions, it is time to move past mere tolerance. It is time to build strong bridges that allow all faith traditions to work in connection to lift up the level of discussion as we address local and world issues, Darby Neptune, minister at Unity of Panama City, said. Unity of Panama City, host of this event, invites people from all backgrounds to participate. This is one step in this spiritual communitys vision of co-creating a harmonious world that works for all. For more information, contact Paula Merck, Unity of Panama City, 1764 Lisenby Ave., Panama City, FL 32405, e-mail panamacityunity@ knology.net or call 850769-7481. Unity of Panama City is online at www. unityofpanamacity.org.Library hoursWausau Library Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County Library (Bonifay) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed Washington County Library (Chipley) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Vernon Library Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills Library Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedMONDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Monday each month (unless a holiday) at 6:00 at the Chipley library. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach of ce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999.TUESDAY8 to 9 a.m.: Tai Chi Class at the Washington County Public Library, Chipley Branch 8 to 10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 5 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at 6:25 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-451 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AWEDNESDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. 12 p.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday. (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AFRIDAY10 a.m. to noon: Homes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Winn Dixie in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks while you get your shopping done. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church.SUNDAY8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at GracevilleCampbellton Hospital in Graceville. COMMUNITY CALENDARUnity plans interfaith event Faith BRIEFWho says the IRS is a meany? Only Grace Ministries presents The RingBONIFAY Only by Grace Ministries will proudly present the original theatrical production, The Ring, at 10:45 a.m. on Sept 16 at Gully Springs Baptist Church in Bonifay. The modern day drama illustrates the story of The Prodigal Son as it relates to everyday life. The Ring captivated audiences of all ages as it illustrates the Fathers unfailing love through story and music. Sept. 16 will also mark the 95th homecoming at Gully Springs Baptist Church.

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Wednesday, September 12, 2012 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences.Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section ofwww.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com, you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership withLegacy.com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212 Special to the NewsTALLAHASSEE Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida Forest Service is awarding 27 city, county and non-pro t entities with over $260,000 dollars in grant funding as part of the 2012 Urban and Community Forestry grants. With over 75 percent of Floridas population living in urban areas, access to green spaces can be challenging, said Agriculture Commissioner Adam H. Putnam. The Urban and Community Forestry grants provide the necessary link between cities and Floridas natural resources, allowing even the most urbanized citizens to enjoy the bene ts trees have to offer. Administered by the Florida Forest Service, the grants are funded as part of a nationwide campaign by the USDA Forest Service, program participants receive reimbursement for practices such as conducting community tree inventories, preparing urban forestry management plans, developing local tree ordinances, hiring temporary staff, purchasing urban forestry equipment, conducting personnel training and creating urban forestry education programs. Trees provide numerous amenities to urban communities including clean air, lower energy costs, storm water abatement, increased property values, and improved neighborhood aesthetics, said Jim Karels, director of the Departments Florida Forest Service. These grants are important for ensuring urban forests and its amenities are available for many generations. For a list of the 2012 grant winners, applicants should visit the Florida Forest Service website, www. oridaforestservice.com. Additional information about eligible practices, program requirements and procedures is provided. Each year, the Florida Forest Service accepts applications from January through March. Qualifying applications are then evaluated and ranked for funding approval. The Florida Forest Service manages over one million acres of public forest land while protecting over 26 million acres of homes, forestland and natural resources from the devastating effects of wild re. For statewide forestry updates and wild re information, visit www. oridaforestservice.com or follow FFS on Facebook or Twitter. For more information about the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, visit. www.FreshFromFlorida.com or follow Commissioner Putnam on Facebook or Twitter. ObituariesDept. of Agriculture announces community forestry grant awardsMrs. Sharon Omega Blanton, age 58, of Bonifay, passed away Sept. 2 at her home. She was born July 27, 1954, in Leitch eld, Ky., to the late William Roscoe Blanton and Pauline Duvall Blanton. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Blanton was preceded in death by a brother, Jerry Blanton. Mrs. Blanton is survived by three sons, James Mancill and wife Melissa of Bonifay, Jason Mancill and wife Cheryl of Midway, Ga., and Davey Mancill of Bonifay; one daughter, Melissa Missy Mancill of Seaford, Del.; 13 grandchildren, Donnie Mancill, Andrea Mancill, Angel Mancill, Shaelynn Mancill, Jacob Mancill, Jason Mancill Jr., Ryan Roof Mancill, Megan Roof Mancill, Christian Franklin Mancill, Dalton Mancill, Ashton Mancill, Emma Lesley, Zayle Weeks; ve brothers, Pat Blanton of Anneta, Ky., Jr Blanton of Vine Grove, Ky., Gary Blanton of Bonifay, Ricky Blanton of Bonifay, and Dewayne Blanton of Leitch eld; ve sisters, Grace Ivy of Vaiden, Ms., Jean Downs of Cecilia, Ky., Frankie Saltsman of Vine Grove, Ky., Judy Voge of Winter Haven, Joan Estep of Fraser, Mich.; best friends, Rossana Gahn and Charlene Steverson. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7 at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Mitch Johnson of ciating. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Family received friends Thursday from 5-7 p.m. at Peel Funeral Home.Sharon O. BlantonMrs. Brenda Gomillion Howard, age 52, of Ponce de Leon, passed away Sept. 3 in an auto accident. She was born June 18, 1960, in Geneva, Ala., to the late Broward Gomillion and Reba Strickland Gomillion. Mrs. Howard is survived by a daughter, Shanta Sapp and husband Jeremy of Bonifay; two grandsons, Cayden Sapp and Judah Sapp, both of Bonifay; and a brother, Allen Gomillion and wife Bonnie of Ponce de Leon. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. Sept. 7 at Northside Baptist Church with the Rev. Rodd Jones and the Rev. Larry McGowan of ciating. Interment followed in the Ponce de Leon Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends one hour prior to service at Northside Baptist Church.Brenda G. HowardMrs. Dorothy J. Ivey, age 85, of Bonifay, passed away Sept. 2 at Bay Medical Care Center in Panama City. She was born Feb. 12, 1927, in West Bay, Cayman Islands. She was preceded in death by her husband, Thomas Ivey and grandson, Timothy Ivey. Mrs. Ivey is survived by two sons, David Ivey and wife Diana of Hartford, Ala., and John Ivey and wife Brenda of Ringgold, Ga.; nine grandchildren, David and Melissa Ivey, Jonathon and Sheryl Ivey, Jennifer and Kevin Fite, David Ivey, Kenny and Heather Ivey, Daniel and Mary Ivey, Angela Sims, Michael Ivey and Aaron Ivey; 18 greatgrandchildren and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Sept. 5 at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Johnie Bradshaw of ciating. Interment followed in the Bonifay Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends one hour prior to service.Dorothy J. IveyMrs. Bessie Mae Walters, 99, of Graceville passed away Friday, Aug. 31 at Washington Health & Rehabilitation in Chipley. Ms. Bessie was born in Midland City, Ala., on March 5, 1913, to the late James Bascom Ward and Beulah Dean Ward. A beloved mother, grandmother, sister, aunt and friend, Ms. Bessie was a member of Damascus Baptist Church. She is preceded in death by her husband, C.C. Walters, parents, seven brothers and three sisters. She is survived by her children, Edward Walters and wife Sylvia, Graceville, Janie Pelham, Bloomington, Minn., Tommy Walters and wife Rita, Augusta, Ga., Boyd Walters and wife Mari Cynthia, North Myrtle Beach, S. C., Chris Walters and wife MerryLou, Altha, Janair Gates and husband David, Marianna; brother O.T. Ward and wife Ruby, Graceville; 14 grandchildren, 19 greatgrandchildren, seven great-great-grandchildren, a host of nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Sept. 5 at Damascus Baptist Church with James C. Walters, the Rev. Chester Padgett and Dr. Bill Floyd of ciating. Burial followed in Marvin Chapel Cemetery with James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family received friends at the church from 10 a.m. until time of service. Expressions of sympathy may be made at www. jamesandlipford.com.Bessie M. WaltersRobert E. Moody, age 73, passed from this life Friday, Aug. 31, at his home in Panama City. He was born in Houston County, Ala., on Dec. 15, 1938, to John T. and Mattie (Blackmon) Moody. Mr. Moody was the owner of Moodys Auto Service. He is preceded in death by one daughter, Peggy Moody; four brothers, John E. Moody, J.T. Moody, Earl Moody and Johnny Moody; two sisters, Janie Mae Callaway and Fannie Lou Newsome. Mr. Moody is survived by his wife, Ellen Moody of Panama City; three sons, Hurtis L. Moody, John S. Moody and James Moody all of Panama City; three daughters, Angela Murnon of Panama City, Melissa Waters and husband Shawn of Panama City, and Darlene Cheney and husband Jason of Navarre; two brothers, William Moody of Alford, and Danny Moody of Lake City; three sisters, Pearle Newsome of Chipley, Annie Lou Vannest of Lynn Haven, Donnie Merle Baker of Riverbank, Calif.; seven grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Sept. 4 at Brown Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Carlos Finch of ciating. Internment followed in the Glenwood Cemetery. Visitation was held from 6-8 p.m. Sept. 3 in Brown Funeral Home Chapel. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh.net.Robert E. MoodyMr. Harrell Edward Wells, age 74, of Salem, Ala., passed away Aug. 31, 2012. He was born Jan. 21, 1938, in Bonifay, to the late Alex Wells and Arleva Cook Wells. In addition to his parents, Mr. Wells was preceded in death by two brothers, Lee Wells and Parker Wells, and two sisters, Mary Perdue and Arkie Revell. Mr. Wells is survived by a daughter, Kim Gilley and husband Ernest of Salem, Ala.; two sons, Waylon Wells of Columbus, Ga., and Ashley Wells and wife Jamie of Beauregard, Ala.; seven grandchildren, Nick Richard, Chris Gilley, Travis Gilley, Lisa Gilley, Kami Wells, Kayley Wells and Natalie Wells; three greatgrandchildren, Carson Gilley, Summer Gilley, and Carter Gilley; four brothers, Rufus Wells of Ocala, John Wells of Pensacola, Joel Wells of Bonifay and Carlton Wells of Bonifay; three sisters, Wilma Stubbs of Vernon, Imogene Birge of Bonifay and Annie Loue Richard of Salem, Ala.; and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 1 p.m. Sept. 4 at Bethel Primitive Baptist Church with Elder Bobby Willis of ciating. Interment followed in the Bethel Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends Monday from 5-7 p.m. at Peel Funeral Home.Harrell E. WellsMr. Joseph Stanley Swamp Duck Paul, age 74, of Bonifay, passed away Aug. 31, 2012 at his daughters home in Pinckard, Ala. He was born Aug. 5, 1938, in Holmes County to the late James Floyd Paul and Jewel Gilley Paul. In addition to his parents, Mr. Paul was preceded in death by four siblings, William H. Paul, James Floyd Paul Jr., Martha Grif n and Jimmy Paul. Mr. Paul is survived by his wife, Ann Paul of Bonifay; three children, Joey Paul and wife Lori of Sylacauga, Ala., Lana Williams and husband Rick of Pinckard, Ala., and Stacey Paul and wife Jan of Bonifay; six grandchildren, Christopher Williams, Alicia Pughsley and husband Kevin, Corey Williams, William Paul, Jeremy Paul, and Jared Paul; soon to be greatgrandchild, Maddox Pughsley; and three brothers, Odell Paul of Bonifay, Manuel Paul of Dothan, Ala., and Daniel Paul of Orange City. Funeral services were held at 3 p.m. Sept. 3 at Carmel Assembly of God Church with the Rev. Tommy Moore, the Rev. Jerry Moore and the Rev. Jonathan West of ciating. Interment followed in the Carmel Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Family received friends from 1-3 p.m. at Carmel Church, 1485 Carmel Church Road, Bonifay.Joseph S. PaulMrs. Margaret Ella Keener Peterman of the Royals Crossroads Community in Holmes County, formerly of Dothan, Ala., passed away Thursday, Aug. 30 at her home after a courageous battle with cancer. She was 80 years old. Marge was born Nov. 12, 1931, in Schenectady, N.Y., to the late Charles Tiffany and Anna OLeary Keener. Her family moved to Orlando (Bear Gulley Lake) when she was in her early teens. After graduating from Orlando High School, Marge became an of ce secretary for various businesses including Cape Canaveral in Titusville, which she loved. Upon meeting her lifelong love, Lamar, she moved to Dothan, Ala., to start a new life on the Petermans farm. Marge worked as an of ce secretary at WTVY for many years and at CocaCola Bottling Company in Dothan before becoming a legal secretary, which she retired from when her children started school. Marge and her family moved to what is now called P & J Farms in Holmes County, in the mid 1980s. She was a very hard working and caring person. She loved to take care of her family (especially her grandchildren) and loved to sit on her front porch looking out over the pastures and the animals. She loved everything about being a farmers wife and living in the country. She suffered for many years with back problems and then the cancer took over her body. Her family will miss her greatly but knows that she is in a much better place now, and she is free of any pain and suffering. Anyone who knew Marge knows how sweet and giving she was. Her husband, Lamar Peterman, died 4 years ago. They were married for almost 55 years. The Peterman family would like to express their sincere appreciation to Emerald Coast Hospice, especially Debra and Deb, Dr. Steve Stokes, Tonya, Debbie, Megan, Rob and Bruce at the Enterprise Cancer Center, Dr. Jerry Fincher and the nurses at Flowers Hospital, 5th Floor. Thank you to everyone who took such good care of Marge during this dif cult time. Survivors include one son, Will Peterman; one daughter and son-in-law, Laura and Pat Jackson; three grandchildren, Marc, Katherine and Luke Jackson, all of Holmes County; one sister, Florence Keating (wife of late Paul P. Keating, Jr.), Baton Rouge, La.; nieces, Ann (Silas) Ross and Susan (Howard) Cannon, all of Jackson, Miss., Margaret (Steve) Herron and Cindy (Glen) Brown, all of Dallas, Texas; nephew, Paul (Rita) Keating, Baton Rouge, La.; extended family also include Jim and Sandy Jackson, Geneva, Ala., and special family friends also include Teresa Little and Teddy and Sabrina Fain. A memorial celebration of life service was held, Sept. 2 at 4 p.m., with visitation beginning at 3 p.m. in the chapel of Sorrells Funeral Home in Geneva, Ala., with Bro. Hurtis Manning and Bro. Gary Watson of ciating. Flowers will be accepted or the family asks that memorial contributions be made to Camp Victory, 363 Victory Circle, Samson, AL 36477.Margaret E. Peterman

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Wednesday, September 12, 2012 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra B6| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, September 12, 2012 9-5139 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE N O. 2011-CA-000273 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF THE MORGAN STANLEY ABS CAPITAL I INC., T RUST 2007-HE2, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-HE2, Plaintiff, vs. FRANK C. BARONE ; ET AL., Defendants, NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendants: FRANK C. BARONE (LAST KNOWN RESIDENCE-209 WEST KANSAS AVENUE, BONIFAY, FL 32425) UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FRANK C. BARONE (LAST KNOWN RESIDENCE-209 WEST KANSAS AVENUE, BONIFAY, FL 32425) YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: THE WEST 175 FEET OF BLOCK NUMBERED 68 OF THE TOWN OF BONIFAY, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT OF THE SAME DRAWN BY G.W. BANFILL IN 1886, A COPY OF WHICH IS ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND WHICH LANDS ARE A PART OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST. a/k/a 209 W KANSAS AVENUE, BONIFAY, FL 32425 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Heller & Zion, LLP, Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1428 Brickell Avenue, Suite 700, Miami, Florida 33131 on or before October 5, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This notice is provided pursuant to Florida Rules of Judicial Administration Rule 2.540 Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447; P hone: 850-718-0026; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771; Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcour ts.org. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 21 day of August, 2012. Cody Taylor As Clerk of the Court By Diane Eaton As Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 5, 12, 2012. 9-5140 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 2011CA000243 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ,acting through the United States Department of Agriculture, Rural Development, f/k/a Farmers Home Administration, a/k/a Rural Housing Service, Plaintiff, vs. CLAY P. WALKER A/K/A CLAY PRESTON WALKER; and TERESA C. WALKER A/K/A TERESA NOWELL WALKER, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on August 13, 2012, by the above entitled Court in the above styled cause, the undersigned Clerk of Court or any of his duly authorized deputies, will sell the property situated in HOLMES County, Florida, described as: An acre of land in Holmes County, Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the Southwest Corner of the NW 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of Section 28, Township 7 North, Range 13 West, and thence East, 397.78 feet to the Point of Beginning, said point being on the North side of a county road: thence S 89 40E, along the North side of said road, 210 feet; thence N 1 20W, 210 feet; thence N 89 40W, 210 feet; thence S 1 20E, 210 feet to the Point of Beginning. at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash on October 18, 2012, at the front door of the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, FL 32425, beginning at 11:00 A.M. Central Time, subject to all ad valorem taxes and assessments for the real property described above. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. REQUESTS FOR ACCOMMODATIONS BY PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator, Bay County Courthouse, 300 E. Fourth Street, Panama City, Florida 32401, (850)747-5338, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED on August 20, 2012. CODY TAYLOR Clerk of Circuit Court P.O. Box 397 Bonifay, FL 32425 BY: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 5, 12, 2012. 9-5141 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 30-2012-CA-000296 DIVISION: JAMES B. NUTTER & COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs THE UNKNOWN HEIRS ,DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING B Y, THROUGH,UNDER, OR AGAINST JAMES L. DEBORD A/K/A JAMES LEE DEBORD, DECEASED et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING B Y, THROUGH,UNDER, OR AGAINST JAMES L. DEBORD A/K/A JAMES LEE DEBORD, DECEASED. LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN. CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING B Y, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS. LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN. CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in HOLMES County, Florida: LOT 7, BLOCK D, OF SOUTHGATE SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 2, PAGE 18 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 16 day of August, 2012. Cody Taylor Clerk of the Court By: Diane Eaton As Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 12, 19, 2012. 9-5134 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 12-CA-186 RONALD M. MONK JR. and DONALD ROYCE MONK, Plaintiffs v. ROBERT C. MOORE PAUL MOORE and PAMELA CLARK, Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO:PAUL MOORE 631 N Hagadorn Street South Lyon, MI 48178 ROBERT C. MOORE 822 East Roosevelt Street, Mason, MI 48854 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Holmes County, Florida, for a Complaint to Quite Title, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses to it, if any, to: James J. Goodman, Jr., Attorney for the Petitioners, 935 Main Street, Chipley, FL 32428 on or before October 6, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, at the Holmes County Courthouse, 226 North Waukesha, Bonifay, Florida, either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; or a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. WITNESS my hand and Seal of this Court on the 21st day of August 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT, Diane Deaton, As Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012. 9-5135 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 12-CA-181 RONALD M. MONK JR., And DONALD ROYCE MONK, Plaintiffs V.REBECCA HAVARD And DANIEL HUGHES, Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: REBECCA HAVARD, 106 Fels Avenue, Fairhope, AL 36532; DANIEL HUGHES, 13947 Sherwood Highland, Fairhope, AL 36532. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Holmes County, Florida, for a Complaint to Quite Title, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses to it, if any, to: James J. Goodman, Jr., Attorney for the Petitioners, 935 Main Street, Chipley, FL 32428 on or before October 6, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, at the Holmes County Courthouse, Bonifay, Florida, either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; or a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. WITNESS my hand and Seal of this Court on the 21st day of August, 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT, Diane Deaton, Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times September 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012. 9-5137 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION FILE NUMBER 12-67PR IN RE: THE ESTATE OF CHARLES H. BUSH, Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of CHARLES H. BUSH, deceased, whose date of death was 2/23/2012, File Number 12-67PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida, Post Office Box 397, Bonifay, Florida, 32425. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against decedents Estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims and who may have been served a copy of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedents Estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOT WITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIMS FILED TWO YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is September 5, 2012. DONALD BUSH Personal Representative. 2400 Brooks Drive, Bonifay, Fl 32425 JEAN TOWERS TREJO Personal Representative, 960 Scottsdale Drive, Pingree Grove IL 60140. KRISTI MILLER NOVONGLOSKY THE LAW OFFICE OF KRISTI MILLER NOVONGLOSKY, PA FLORIDA BAR NO. 0182044 POST OFFICE BOX 1129, CHIPLEY, FLORIDA 32428 (850) 638-7587 ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 5, 12, 2012. 9-5142 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION C ASE NO.: 30-2011-CA-000032 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK NA, Plaintiff, vs. PATRICIA D SUTTON et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RERussell Roast held ThursdayCHIPLEY City council member and Spanish Trail Playhouse president Kevin Russell will be the subject of a Man of the Hour Roast at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 13, at the Washington County Ag Center. Russell is being roasted as part of a fundraiser for the Spanish Trail Playhouse. Tickets are $15 or $25 per couple, and price includes the meal. For ticket information, call Barbara at 960-1347.Kid Safety and Fun ExpoCHIPEY MPE and H&H will sponsor a Free Kid Safety and Fun Expo, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., on Saturday, Sept. 15, at the Chipley Walmart. There will be baby twin deer at the expo and much, much more.Youth Ranch Golf TournamentPANAMA CITY The Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch Golf Tournament will take place Saturday, Sept. 15, at the Panama Country Club. The monies raised from this benet will go directly to the Youth Ranch, which runs solely on donations. The Washington County Sheriffs Ofce is one of the sponsors for the golf tournament.For more information, contact Andrea Gainey at 638-6115. Jacob City DayJACOB The City of Jacob has slated Saturday, Sept. 15, for its Jacob City Day Celebration, which will include a parade, entertainment, food and activities for all. The festivities will start at 11 a.m. with a parade along Jackson Road. The other activities will take place at the Jacob City Park at 2254 Jacob Main Street (Highway 162). Booths are available to vendors; please contact Verloria T. Wilson at 2636636 for more information.2012 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageantBONIFAY The 2012 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant sponsored by the HCHS Blue Pride Band Boosters will be held at 4 p.m., Sept. 22, at Holmes County High School. There is no residency required to enter this pageant. Girls ages 4-20 and boys ages 4-9 may enter. Contestant entry fee $45. If two or more siblings register in any category, it will cost $35. All registration dates are held at Holmes County High School on Tuesday, Sept. 11 from 5-7 p.m. and Saturday, Sept. 15, from 10 a.m. to noon. Late registration is Tuesday, Sept. 18, from 5-7 p.m. (a $10.00 late fee will be added on this date). You may also turn in registration forms at BES, BMS, HCHS or by mail to: HCHS; Attn: Band Boosters; 825 West Highway 90, Bonifay, FL 32425. If you have any questions, you may contact Cindy Goodson at goodsonc@hdsb.org or by phone or text at 373-7517. Wiregrass Hospital reunion planedGENEVA, Ala. Wiregrass Hospital Reunion for past and present employees is planned for 11 a.m. Sept. 26 at City Caf downtown in Geneva. Please call the numbers list if you plan to attend so we can let City Caf know approximate number of people attending. Call 334684-2907, 334-692-3250 or 850-956-4179. Western Star Pageant slatedBONIFAY The annual Western Star Pageant will be held on Sept. 29 in the Holmes County High School. Boys and girls can enter. Boys 0-7 years old and girls 0-21 years old may compete, and the Ms. competition will include ages 22 and up. Sign up will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sept. 18 at the Bonifay Dance Center on Highway 90. For more information, call Wanda at 614-1062 or 768-2005 or Bernyce at 547-3474 or 768-1150. Kid Safety and Fun ExpoBONIFAY MPE and H&H will sponsor a Free Kid Safety and Fun Expo from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 4, 5 and 6, at the Bonifay Rodeo. There will be baby twin deer at the expo and much, much more. Washington County Candidate ForumSUNNY HILLS On Oct. 4, we will have a candidate forum for all candidates with questions from the residents. All Washington County residents are invited to participate. Please send any questions to Karen at kbschoen@bellsouth.net or Chuck at shachakel@ att.net Senior Group Will be exploring the Alpine CountriesWASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will be exploring the Alpine Countries of Germany, Austria and Switzerland on Sept. 28 to Oct. 11. For more information, call Merita Stanley at 594-9980. Chipley High School Class of 1972CHIPLEY The Chipley High School Class of 1972 are making plans for their class reunion. Activities are being planned for homecoming, which is Oct. 5-6. We will ride in the parade, attend the football game, meet after the game and will get together sometime Saturday. You can keep up with everything on Facebook (Chipley High School Class of 1972 Reunion). Its being updated as plans are being nalized. If you would like further information, you may contact Cathy Pitts Adams (850) 638-1665, adams03@ bellsouth.net or Gwen Lane Collins at gwen13@ aol.com. If you plan on attending, please RSVP by Sept. 19, 2012 (if youre coming or not).Holmes County High School Class of 1953BONIFAY Members of the Holmes County High School Class of 1953 are looking for other members of the class to let them know if they are interested in holding a 60th class reunion. If you are interested, call Joann (Black) Scott at 763-4633, Grace (Whipple) Watson at 623-3058 or Ruth (Andrews) Bellot at 547-3452. Washington County Girls Night OutCHIPLEY The Womens Imaging Services at Northwest Florida Community Hospital proudly present Girls Night Out, Oct. 11. The event will be held at the Washington County Ag Center in Chipley. For more information, call Heather Shelby at 415-8119.Special to ExtraDOTHAN Local human resources professionals and ofce managers can learn the importance of Investing in YOU! during the 13th annual Wiregrass Human Resources Management Association forum hosted by Troy University on Thursday, Sept. 20. The forum will start at 7:30 a.m. at the Dothan Campus inside Sony Hall in the Library/Technology Building. The event will include discussion of how human resources professionals can grow and advance their careers. Each pre-registered participant will have the opportunity to take an online assessment called TTI Talent Insights Executive Version (DISC), designed to increase their understanding of individual talents. Participants can earn 4.25 HR Certication Institute credits. The forum is open to the public and will be of interest to anyone in the human resources eld, including assistants, managers and business owners. Registration is $69 for college students, $79 for WHRMA members and $89 for non-members.Contact the Troy Continuing Education Center at 334983-0005 to register or for more information, or go to whrma.shrm.org. WHRMA is an afliate of the Society for Human Resource Management and is the main local starting point for networking, information, professional development and continued support of excellence in human resources. Community eventsEVENTSTroy to host annual Wiregrass human resources forum

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Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 B B USINESS USINESS G G UIDE UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Dentons RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDAWE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS$ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENTMon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 19 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service!Sales & Service on all Air Conditioner Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration638-3611 MullensTree ServiceCall for free estimate 120 ft. crane Licensed850-326-3408 850-263-0083 An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99* Easy Care Lawn Services. Yard services and pressure washing. Call for FREE estimate & affordable rates 850-527-6291 Licensed & Insurances Matts Removal! Garbage removal, free metal removal, yard jobs, moving jobs. We buy items. Nobody Beats My Prices! (850)547-1445, cell (850)658-2376. LOW INTERESTFINANCING Borrow up to 20k and pay $389.00 per mo. at 8% Car Loans, Small Business Loans & Debt Consolidation Bad Credit Ok Call Toll Free: 888-741-9122 Today!! C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 Anna Bella Salon & Day Spa Now hiring for all positions including Message Therapist, Permanent Makeup Artist. Need to be started by Open House Sat Sept 22. Located @ 705 W. Hwy 90 Bonifay. For more information call 547-5665 Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com(850) 547-9500 B oni f a y Florida www.xtrem ein dus tri es.com Xtreme BoatsFACTORY DIRECT 2080688 89 Acres FARMLAND Estate of Ted Adams Walton County, FLbtntfrttnttrr rfbttt! "#t$bt%&t'"(tf)t"#t&*+&&t)t-r %.&*&.%&%%A MarkNet Alliance Member/#t.1*+tnttbt(t$)tt1t.t*3t(tf Excellent Home Sites 5 Mini Farms tt"tt7t %:tt;t1t%tttt7t* +trt'ft?tt7t%ft"t6
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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Drivers 100% Owner Operator Co. Pay increase / Home weekly, Regional & Dedicated Class A-CDL 1yr. Exp. In last 3 Call (800) 695-9643 or www.driveforwatkins.com EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE Medical Billing Training! Train for Medical Billing Careers at SCTrain.edu No Experience Needed! Job placemnet assistance after training! HS/GED/PC Needed (888) 872-4677 MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placemnet assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www.centuraonline.com Nursing CareersBegin Here-GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURA INSTITUTE (877) 206-6559. SURROGATE MOMS NEEDED! Most generous compensation and benefits program offered anywhere, starting at $25,000. Healthy, non-smoking, 21-39, prior birth without complications, no criminal background. Confidential, compassionate services. Reasonable expenses will be paid. OpenArmsConsultants.co m Shop Manager Needed in Santa Rosa Beach, FL Great Pay/ Benefits APPLY ONLINE www.durhamschoolservices.com ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TRAINEES NEEDED! Online Training with SC Train gets you job ready ASAP! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed. (888) 212-5888 ATTENTION: Drivers! Drive 4 Us Top Pay & CSA Friendly Equip 401K & Great Insurance Need CDL Class A Driving Exp (877) 258-8782 Drivers -HIRING EXPERIENCED/INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today! (877) 882-6537 www.OakleyTransport.com Drivers -Daily or Weekly Pay! $0.01 raise per mile after 6 months. Refigerated & Dry Van Freight. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR exp. (800) 414-95-69. www.driveknight.com DRIVERS/ CLASS A Flatbed, GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39/mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800) 5725489x 227, SunBelt Transport Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our Medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. IT/Software Dev The City of Marianna has anInformation SystemsTechnician PositionApply at your local One Stop Career Center or call 850-718-1001 for details. EOE/Drug Free Workplace Employer Web ID#: 34224117 Text FL24117 to 56654 Receptionist Front Desk Nights ONLY/House Keeping days & nights at Holiday Inn Express in Bonifay. Apply in person at Chipley Days Inn or at The Holiday Inn Express in Bonifay. No phone calls. The City of Bonifay is currently seeking a Class B CDL driver with a tanker license. Backhoe operator will be an asset. Salary to be determined by qualifications. The City of Bonifay is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Full time permanent position. Preschool has opening for someone to care for and teach young children. Experience and classes a plus. (850)547-1444. Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMENEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!!! Become a Newspaper Carrier or Single Copy/ Rack Route Marianna, Cottondale, Chipley, & Bonifay. Area Carriers Open routes available in the early morning Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS Deliver your newspaper in your communityIndependent ContractorsMust have: A reliable vehicle Proof of Auto Insurance A valid drivers license Be 18 yrs or older Contact Colin Parker cparker@chipleypaper.c om 501 W 11th St. and complete a carrier application Airport Manager Tri-County Airport, Bonifay, Fl. 40 hr week/ Contract position. Aviation, mechanical, electrical and office experience preferred. Mail resume to P.O. Box 756, Bonifay, Fl. 32425. List salary requirements. Answer before Sept. 21, 2012. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job Ready in 15 days! (888) 368-1964 Earn Up To $500 a day in one of todays fastest growing service industries. Fee revealing report: Dry-Tech Promo # CL 44895 19871 NordhoffSt. Northridge, CA 91324 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By SUSAN BRYANTMonster Contributing Writer Few would dispute the power that a true friendship has to enrich our lives. But what role should friendship play in the workplace? Is it smarter to keep your personal and professional lives separate or to purposely seek out and cultivate friendships on the job?The pros and consDr. Jan Yager, author of Friendshifts: The Power of Friendship and How It Shapes Our Lives, has found that workplace friendships can have a profound effect on your career. A friend on the job can let you in on the inner workings of your company or field, provide feedback on your performance or act as a sounding board. Having a buddy at work can make a job more enjoyable, even enhancing your creativity and productivity. Many people get new jobs as a result of friendships, and companies often promote programs that reward employees for referring their friends for employment. When workplace friendships go awry, however, the impact can be costly. Too much socializing impedes productivity; personal or professional information can be revealed to inappropriate people; and cliques may form, leading to favoritism, exclusivity and negativity. Although clicking with someone on the job can spark a friendship, whether to invest in the relationship may become a deeper issue. Its a question of trust for Mary, a photo editor. You make friends at work and eventually reveal what you really think about managers, coworkers and your job, and then you hope they wont divulge that information, intentionally or unintentionally, to anyone else, she says. There are allegiances that have to be kept if youre friends at work. Dont let personal information youve discussed go beyond the circle of friendship.Friends forever?Are the friendships you develop at work fundamentally different from other friendships? In some ways, yes, Yager says. A job provides financial security. If forced to choose between keeping your source of income and a friendship, most people would choose to keep their job. Because of the pros and cons of developing friendships at work, you have more at stake when deciding whether to enter into a workplace friendship. The right group of friends can be a great influence in your career. The wrong group can get you fired. Befriending the bossCan, or should, bosses and subordinates be friends? Same-level friendships are the easiest to maintain, Yager says. Problems can arise if one friend has to supervise or evaluate the other. If you try to befriend the boss, your coworkers might question your motives. If your boss befriends you, he may be accused of having a favorite.When friendships fizzleWorkplace friendships are great, but they can burn out quickly, too, says Mary Ann, a bank vice president. If you leave a department or change positions, the similar circumstances that originally brought you together are now gone, and so is the friendship. What is the best indicator of whether a friendship can survive one person moving on? Shared values, according to Yager. Although a shared environment may jump start a friendship, a deeper connection must be made to maintain it. You must genuinely like a person, whatever the circumstances, to become lasting friends. Unfortunately, because people often instinctively hold back from revealing too much about themselves to coworkers, this deeper connection can be difficult to make. On the plus side, if two people have become casual friends while on the job, they may be able to deepen their friendshi p once one person moves on and they no longer feel inhibited by the workplace environment.Buddying upSo how does one navigate the treacherous waters of workplace friendships? Yager provides this advice: Be discreet about your friends confidences, and think carefully about the type of information you choose to divulge. If you think your friendship puts you or your friend in a compromising position on the job, talk about it. If necessary, withdraw yourself from situations that might be a conflict of interest. Find out if your company has a policy regarding workplace friendships, and follow the rules. Workplace friendships: Asset or liability ? Featured Jobs Contact Lorna at (850) 747-5019 or Email: lbrown@pcnh.com LUSADY TAYLOREMPLOYMENT SALES SPECIALISTThe News Herald would like to welcome Lusady Taylor as our new Employment Sales Specialist. Contact Lusady at (850) 522-5173 or email her at ltaylor@pcnh.com LORNA BROWNEMPLOYMENT SALES SPECIALIST