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Holmes County times-advertiser
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100549/00177
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Title: Holmes County times-advertiser
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
Place of Publication: Bonifay, FL
Publication Date: 09-05-2012
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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System ID: UF00100549:00177

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50 www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM Phone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 IN BRIEF bonifaynow.com Connect With Us 24/7 Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo galleries, opinions and more... @WCN_HCT And Mobile Too Bus drivers just want a little respect By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Several bus drivers with family members were present at the Holmes County School Boards regularly scheduled meeting on Aug. 21 requesting to be heard about issues that were concerning them. One local bus driver of over 15 years, Janet Ellenburg, stood before the board with various concerns. You got to have a love for this job because there isnt much money in it, Ellenburg said. We were wondering if we can set up a meeting with the board to make our conditions a little better. We have a problem communicating, and we just want a little respect. She explained that sometimes bus drivers have questions, but no one to turn to and there hasnt been an outline of the rules provided for them. Teachers treat us like second rate citizens, Ellenburg said. When you have a problem with a child and are only paid for three and a half hours a day, weve got to spend more time at the schools unpaid time. Another issue was the new policy of transporting 3-year-olds on the bus for the Exceptional Student Education. She said that not only had they not received proper information on the children, but sometimes they werent even told that a special needs child was being brought aboard for transport. HOLMES COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Holmes County Board of County Commissioners approved of Nicole Niki Crawson as the new Holmes County Extension 4-H Agent at their regularly scheduled meeting on Aug. 28. The University of Florida has completed the interview process, and I would like to formally recommend that the board approve Crawson as the new Holmes County Extension 4-H Agent, wrote HC CED and Extension Agent Shep Eubanks. The University of Florida IFAS Extension would like for Crawson to begin work on Friday, Sept. 14. The board approved of Commissioner Kenneth Williams recommendation that the county employees go back to being paid for overtime instead of compensatory time. Williams explained that workers were taking the time off almost as quick as they were acquiring it, causing a mess. The board also heard that a resident of Holmes County was experiencing ooding at his residence recently and was inquiring what recent activity done by the county could have caused it. Whitney Nelson of Melvin Engineering reported that he investigated the area around the mans residence as far as could impact his property and said he found no recent county activity that would create ooding on the mans property. The next Holmes County Board of County Commission meeting is scheduled for 9 a.m. on Sept. 11 at the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners room, which is located beside the Holmes County Court House. HC BOCC approves new extension 4-H agent Special to the Times-Advertiser Formerly West Florida Wilderness School, a moderate risk program holding up to 30 students, the school has now changed over to AMIKids West Florida a foster care center, working under the blanket of Department of Children and Family Services. This foster care center is designed for teenage boys that require a more structured environment to ensure that they attend and receive mental health, substance abuse, education, behavioral, medical and dental services. The home will work with boys that have demonstrated behaviors, such as running away and conduct disorder, that are difficult to treat in their regular home setting. The school will house 24 students with a one to six staff to child ratio. The 12-acre campus will basically remain the same and operate 24 hours a day all year round with supervision by trained staff. Each youth will have a service plan developed by a multi-disciplinary treatment team that Holmes welcomes new AMIKids program By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Its a message youve probably heard before Live United. But what does it mean for the residents of Holmes and Washington counties? There are 30 agencies serving Holmes County that are United Way agencies, said Ron Sharpe, director of resource development for United Way of Northwest Florida. After brie y consulting a list of agencies, he adds, and there are 32 agencies United Way touches lives Local agencies bene t from donations See AMIKIDS A2 See UNITED WAY A2 See DRIVERS A5 Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 5 2012 Volume 122, Number 17 LOCAL UNITED WAY BOARD MEMBERS Holmes County Julia Bullington: Holmes County Chamber of Commerce Brenda Blitch: Doctors Memorial Hospital Melissa Bruner: Regions Bank Fran Haithcoat: Wells Fargo INDEX Arrests ................................. A3 Opinion ................................ A4 Outdoors .............................. A6 Sports .................................. A7 Extra .................................... B1 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B7 School bands face off B1 Chamber hosts Southerland The Holmes County Chamber of Commerce will hold a Meet and Greet with U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland II at 2 p.m. today, Sept. 5, at the Chamber of ce in Bonifay. The public is invited to attend. For more information, call Julia Bullington at 547-6155. 2012 Miss Graceville Harvest Festival GRACEVILLE The 31st annual Harvest Festival Pageant will be held at the Graceville Civic Center in Graceville at 6:30 p.m. on Sept. 7 and 8. All proceeds will go to the Graceville Harvest Day Celebration. For more information, call Teresa Bush at 2634744 or 263-3072 or Michelle Watkins at the City of Graceville at 263-3250. Picnic in The Park planned PONCE de LEON SPRINGS Holmes County Teen Court, Holmes County School Board, C.A.S.E Coalition, the Sheriffs Department and the Florida Department of Environment Protection will be sponsoring a Picnic in The Park from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sept. 8 at Ponce de Leon Springs. Entry is free of charge, and there will be free hamburgers, free hotdogs, games and swimming. Come out and help keep our youth drug and crime free. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES-ADVERTISER At the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce meeting in May, the United Way of Northwest Florida distributed checks to local agencies. The United Way is beginning its fundraising drive for 2013, kicking off on Saturday with Dine United.

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Local A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, September 5, 2012 I am quitting smoking for my family. The Big Bend Area Health Education Center (Big Bend AHEC) is offering FREE tobacco cessation classes in Holmes County and throughout the Big Bend region. We know the challenges you face. We will help you develop the tools to succeed and we will provide the support you need. For more information, call Big Bend AHEC at: 850-482-6500 (local office) or 1-87-QUIT-NOW-6 (1-877-848-6696) Visit www.ahectobacco.com for the schedule of classes we have available. FREE N I COT I NE PATCHES! NO COST TO ATTEND! serving Washington County. Those are all agencies that impact the people who live right here. Sharp was in Bonifay Thursday for the August Holmes County Chamber of Commerce meeting as businesses and organizations throughout the area begin their annual fundraising campaigns to bene t the United Way of Northwest Florida. Fifty percent of the people in our area visit a United Way agency at one time or another, Sharpe said. I usually say, look to your left; now look to your right. You probably see someone the United Way has helped. The annual fundraising program begins Saturday, Sept. 8, with Dine United. Participating restaurants donate a portion of their proceeds on Saturday to the United Way, according to the United Way website, unitedwaynw .org. Some of the area restaurants participating include Popeyes, Subway, T.G.I.Fridays, Sonnys Real Pit Bar-B-Q and Margaritaville. The full list is available on the website. The United Way of Northwest Florida serves bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson and Washington counties. Local agencies that bene t from the United Way include the Washington County Council on Aging, Tri-County Community Council, The Salvation Army, Bay Area Food Bank (which serves local church food pantries), ARC in Chipley and Literacy Volunteers of Washington County, just to name a few. Its such a wide diversity of people who bene t from services supported by United Way, Sharpe said. From pre-kindergarten programs to Meals on Wheels for the elderly, United Way touches lives across the spectrum. Sharpe said the strength of the United Way is that the money collected from the contributions throughout the year combines to help agencies get matching funds. For every $1 United Way gives to the Meals On Wheels program, the Council on Aging receives $9 in matching funds. Employers who have campaigns in their workplace allow employees to make donations via payroll deduction. One dollar a week, $52 a year, that is a Coke a week. Youre not going to miss it, but it is going to do a world of good right here in our communities. From each dollar donated, 95 cents stays in the region, and 80 cents is returned to the local agencies, Sharpe said. We keep our costs low so that money can go back to the agencies. In Chipley, the prekindergarten program at Kids World not only bene ts from United Way, but the employees raised over $3,500 in donations with their own campaign. Each dollar the United Way provides to pre-kindergarten care receives $17 in matching funds, meaning the funds raised at Kids World has a $63,000 impact on the community. Small businesses are as important as large ones, and every campaign makes a difference, Sharpe said. Another program United Way is bringing to Washington and Holmes counties is the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program, and the United Way is looking for local volunteers to be trained in assisting people with their tax returns. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities recently invited Sharpe to attend a two-day tax credit seminar on Sept. 19-20 in Washington, D.C., based on the success the VITA program had in Northwest Florida last year. VITA is an IRS sanctioned program that trains volunteers to prepare simple tax returns for individuals and families with a low-to-moderate income. In 2012, the local VITA program processed 2,281 tax returns, which brought approximately $2.7 million in refunds back into Bay County. Many individuals who qualify for this service are unaware of tax credits that are available to them, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit or the Child Tax Credit, or lack the resources to le their own tax returns. We help those who dont know how to do tax returns, and those who cant afford $150 or $250 to have a preparer do their taxes for them, Sharpe said. He noted that VITA was not a competitor with H&R Block or local accountants. The people who come to us for help werent going to go anywhere else they couldnt afford it. Many of the people helped last year did not know about the Earned Income Tax Credit and the VITA program helped bring an estimated $3 million back into the local economy, Sharpe said. Last year VITA volunteers were available in Wausau, Vernon and at the Washington County Chamber of Commerce ofce in Chipley, but Sharpe hopes to improve on that availability this coming spring. Were recruiting people to help with VITA, and we train them. We also hope to bring nancial literacy education into the program in the future, and help people learn about checking, savings and credit. Another new program the United Way of Northwest Florida is offering is a discount prescription drug plan, which can save members 20 percent on brand name drugs and 40 percent on generics, Sharpe said. This program is totally free and is there to help people with no health insurance, Sharpe said. Did you know that 25.7 percent of the citizens in Washington County have no health insurance? Those using the United Way prescription drug plan just present the card at the pharmacy when lling a prescription. The card is accepted at 53,000 pharmacies nationwide and instructions are available in English and Spanish. The discount card is also available online, Sharpe said. You can get the card on our website, he said. FIRST CALL FOR HELP For assistance from the United Way of Northwest Florida, call 1-800696-8740 UNITED WAY from page A1 includes a licensed mental health counselor, who is also a certified addiction professional. Each student will attend school in the Holmes County School District and will be able to attend extracurricular activities, such as sports and all school-related recreation. There are currently four local church organizations that provide on-site ministries, additional counseling and baptisms. Participation in all religious services is strictly voluntary. The youth can also participate in lifeguard certification, scuba and CPR by trained instructors on campus. As before, community service will play a big role in the student program. Everything from sandbagging Holmes and businesses to cooking at the rodeo and helping out at the local retirement homes will play a part for each student to give back to our community. Please contact Ms. Kim Hughes, executive director, 548-5524 for any additional information. AMIKIDS from page A1 ON THE WEB Visit United Way of Northwest Floridas website at www.united waynw .org www.united Special to the Times-Advertiser POPLAR SPRINGS Bethel Baptist Church will hold revival services beginning Sunday, Sept. 16, and continuing nightly until Sept. 19. Guest speaker will be the Rev. Larry Finley, pastor of Northside Baptist Church in Starke, Fla. Special music will be provided by the Bethel Choir at each service. Services will be held at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. on Sunday then at 7 p.m. nightly Monday to Wednesday. Pastor Kent Lampp and the congregation offer a warm invitation to the public to attend the services. The church is at 1349 Hwy. 172 in the Poplar Springs community. Bethel Baptist plans revival Special to the Times-Advertiser MARIANNA After an extensive search, Steve Anderson has been selected as the new director of Public Service Programs at Chipola College. Public Service includes academies in corrections, law enforcement and re ghting. Anderson has more than 38 years of experience in the Public Service eld. He has served as state investigator for the 14th Judicial Circuit of Florida. As well, he previously served as a Probation Supervisor for the Court system under Judge Woodrow W. Hatcher. He has taught numerous criminal justice classes over his years of public service. For information about Chipolas Public Service programs, visit www. chipola.edu or phone 850-718-2394. Chipola gets new Public Service Programs director

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 Wednesday, September 5, 2012 Tri-County Gas Celebrates Its 50th Anniversary From L-R: Adam Majors 2 years, Stephanie Martin 17 years, Haywood Smith 17 years, Jimmy Manuel, President 30+ years, Heather Mayo 2 years, James Marcum 7 years, Bart White 3 years, Gerald Dowling 40+ years, (Not pictured) Harold Smith 40+ years Tri-County Gas Celebrates August 19 25, 2012 Zachary Andrews, 23, Battery domestic, criminal mischief Ray Phillips Appley, 54, marijuana cultivation Jeffray Lane Baxley, 26, violation of drivers license restrictions Walter Allen Ferrell, 46, violation of probation on no valid license Jose Gonzalez-Ruiz, 57, driving under the in uence Dominic Edwin Goodwin, 31, violation of possession of new legend without prescription, violation of probation on disorderly conduct, battery domestic violence Glenn Gilbert Gunn, 46, felony violation of probation Madeleine Michelle Hall, 40, disorderly intoxication, violation of probation on no valid drivers license, violation of probation on leaving the scene of an accident, violation of probation on domestic battery, violation of probation on criminal mischief, violation of probation on false information given to law enforcement of cer Katherine Holt, 47, no charges listed Katherine Holt, 47, no charges listed Lesly Houglund, 49, violation of probation on domestic battery Joseph Wellington Jellison, 40, driving while license suspended or revoked Joseph Allen Kirkland, 46, battery domestic Alberto Jose Lopez, 27, hold for Miami Jeffrey Dan Pitts, 41, recommit on constructive possession of weapon Charles Tracy Recor, 53, domestic battery, manufacturing of meth, assault domestic violence, felon in possession Brian John Smith, 23, hold for Miami Dade Christian Smith, 32, hold for Miami Marklinn R. Smith, 48, marijuana cultivation August 20 24, 2012 Marriages Jamey Christopher Padget, 2-27-1987 of Headland Ala., and Ashley Nicole Johnson, 7-10-1989 of Geneva Ala. James Scott Thompson, 10-9-1974 of Chipley and Paula Renea Jernigan, 12-291979 of Bonifay Richard Eugene Murren, 10-4-1925 of Alford and Imogene Jordan, 8-8-1947 of Alford Divorces There were no divorces reported for the week of August 20-24. From Staff Reports CHIPLEY The noti cation that Northwest Florida Community Hospital has been named one of Americas top 5,0 00 busines ses by Inc. Magazine almost went unread. The envelope said something about an invitation, and we get a zillion things like it in the mail, NFCH President/CEO Patrick Schlenker said Aug. 23. It sat there a couple of days before I opened it. When it was nally opened, Schlenker learned the Chipley hospital was listed at 2,969 in the to 5,000 businesses in the U.S. That is top 5,000 out of about 5.2 million U.S. businesses, Schlenker notes. The Inc. 5000 is ranked according to percentage revenue growth over a four-year period. To qualify, companies must have been founded and generating revenue by the rst week of the starting calendar year, and therefore able to show four full calendar years of sales. The 2012 list is currently on the magazines website, www.inc.com. Each year over 676,000 new business are registered, Schlenker. For the past 30 years the organization Inc. has recognized the top 5,000 fastestgrowing private companies in America. As an Inc. 5000 honoree, Northwest Florida Community Hospital now shares a pedigree with Intuit, Zappos, Under Armour, Microsoft, Jamba Juice, Timberland, Clif Bar, Pandora, Patagonia, Oracle, and other notable alumni, Inc. Magazine Editor In Chief Eric Schurenberg wrote in the noti cation letter. In addition to Northwest Florida Community Hospital the 2012 list added such powerhouses as Publix Supermarkets, CDW, Levi Strauss and a little social media company called Facebook. Welcome to a very exclusive club. To me that is almost an impossible achievement, Schlenker said. It took a lot of folks for us to receive that honor. We have a very dedicated, hardworking team. Schlenker said the hospitals board, physicians, 270 associates and a very dedicated community have worked together to make NFCH a success. You have to have community support, without that, none of this would be possible. The Washington County Chamber of Commerce is also a great supporter of NFCH, he said. We have been very blessed. The entry on Northwest Florida Community Hospital shows that the hospital has posted a 3-Year growth of 74 percent and reported 2011 revenue of $62.4 million. According to the magazine, the hospital had $35.9 million in 2008 revenue and has added 95 jobs in the previous three years. The hospital was founded in 1951 and has 212 employees. NFCH ranks 243 in the health industry list, according to the magazine. NFCH is a 59-bed health care facility that includes a 25-bed critical access hospital, a 34-bed long-term care facility, and a home health agency. If offers a wide range of services, including family medicine, surgery, podiatry, cardiology, sleep studies, counseling, and lab services. The 2012 Inc. 500|5000 is ranked according to percentage revenue growth when comparing 2008 to 2011, according to the website inc.com. To qualify, companies must have been founded and generating revenue by March 31, 2008. They had to be U.S.-based, privately held, for pro t, and independentnot subsidiaries or divisions of other companiesas of December 31, 2011. (Since then, a number of companies on the list have gone public or been acquired.) The minimum revenue required for 2008 is $100,000; the minimum for 2011 is $2 million. As always, Inc. reserves the right to decline applicants for subjective reasons. Companies on the Inc. 500 are featured in Inc.s September issue. We are so proud and honored to have been recognized as one of their fastestgrowing private companies, Schlenker said. Marriages & DIVORCES Arrest REPORT SPECIAL TO THE TIMES-ADVERTISER Northwest Florida Community Hospital administrators and staff celebrated the hospitals inclusion in the Inc. Magazine Inc. 5000 on Aug. 23. NFCH named to Inc. 5000 list Growth, revenues lands local hospital national recognition TOP 10 FASTEST GROWING COMPANIES ON THE INC. 5000 LIST RANK CO. NAME PERCENTAGE 3-YEAR GROWTH 1 Uni ed Payments 23.646 2 Astrum Solar 23.577 3 Edge Solutions 21.036 4 Integrity Funding 12.443 5 Gold & Silver Buyers 12.222 6 Captial Payments 11.676 7 AdRoll 11.082 8 Acquia 10.461 9 Red Frog Events 10.404 10 Cartagz 10.237

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Another family member, Maria Rogers Heil, daughter of Muriel Wells Turner and W. A. (Will) Rogers of Marianna, has inspired the prattle topic for today. Her sons, Austin and Graham, along with her paternal grandparent, Clark and Myrtle Rogers of Vernon, will appreciate the writings of this young lady. A few years ago, Maria, a decorator, was asked to write an essay in a job interview on the subject of What Inspires Me. She wrote a story about how her grandmother, my mother, Marie Harris Wells, had inspired her. She, and the other grandchildren, affectionately called this lady Granny Rie. Recently when Maria went to work full time at Chrysalis Fine Fabrics in Tallahassee, she was asked the same question as to what inspired her. She pulled out her story of the past, did some embellishments and presented it to her new employer. Chrysalis Fine Fabrics is a store in Tallahassee that sells beautiful fabrics for the home and assists customers with decorating decisions. They can be found on the internet, complete with a blog page which makes reference to Marias story, of cially entitled A Lesson in Beauty. Outside the dining room window of my grandparents farmhouse was the most majestic fig tree! Red birds decorated the branches like baubles on a Christmas tree as they filled their bellies with the sunflower seeds my Pa sprinkled on the ground below. I remember, like yesterday asking my Grannie Rie why some of the birds were redder than others. Some were actually prettier. She gently explained that the female birds were less vibrant than the males because of their roles in nature. They needed to blend with the scenery to protect their young. It was not their choice but their de nition by natureGod. She also told me that their color reminded her of the barn that stood in spite of itself next to the old house. It too, was less vibrant, but had protected the corn in the crib to feed the cattle during the winter months, housed the equipment from inclimate weather, and kept the newborns warm in the stables. Faded and worn but beautiful because of its purpose. Her answer led me to look at my surroundings differently. Beauty isnt always found in the most vibrant, obvious or expected. It truly belongs to everyone and everything. Sometimes the very purpose of love of something makes it beautiful. I guess thats what is meant by the expression, Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I know the vibrant and bold colors of red were my grandmothers favorite. She wore it in her best Sunday dresses and carefully drew it on her lips. But I think she identified more with the female cardinal and the old barns shades of red. She saw them as beautiful because of her own purpose. She was the mother of ten children and her role and purpose was something defined for her. She found beauty in this life and raised her family in the background or camouflage of the vibrant male, father, husband and local farmer. She loved her gentle role in nature and her subtle beauty is found in all of her offspring. She watched over them and cheered them on when time to leave the nest behind. She gave them roots and wings. Much of my own talent comes solely from nature. I did not study art or design in college. My passion for design comes from my roots and wings. In agreeing for this story to be printed as a Perrys Prattle, Maria wrote that she is flattered to know that Uncle Perry wanted to use this in his column. She further acknowledged I embellished the story a little, but the heart of the lesson remains unchanged. She concluded Granny Rie forever made me aware of the female cardinal and its subtle beauty just like hers!! Readers of Perrys Prattle will know that your writer is one of the ten children born to Granny Rie and Pa and reared to adulthood in the home place, complete with the fig tree, the Red birds, and the dilapidated barn and other functional out building on all farms of that era. It was beyond my fondest dreams or imagination that I would ever see the scenes and setting put in print so beautifully, professionally and academically as was done by my niece. I believe that I can safely say that the host of family, neighbors, fellow church associates and friends will appreciate the analogy of this uncommon lady to natures loveliness and beauty. See you all next week. Miss Lizzie Lewis called me the other day lled with excitement and told me about a celebrity visitor shed had for lunch the day before. Carolina Rose who Lizzie said was the daughter of the late Bill Monroe was traveling from engagements in New Orleans and Mississippi to some place in south Florida. Those of you who read my column or know Miss Lizzie, know that for years she has been the national chairman of the Bill Monroe fan club. She makes the annual pilgrimage in late September or early October to Rosine Kentucky for the Bluegrass Festival at the home place of the Bill Monroe family on Jerusalem Ridge. So she has come to know the Monroe family and those associated with the festival including Dr. Mercer Campbell and his wife who heads the Monroe foundation. When Carolina Rose who was traveling solo on this tour saw that shed go through Bonifay she called the Lewis household and arranged to come by for a visit. Of course Miss Lizzie and her daughters, Mattie Lou Scarvey and Daisy Swearingen prepared lunch and were gracious southern hostesses for their honored guest. I personally had not known who Carolina Rose is, but looking her up on line, I learned that she was born Gloria Jean Polk to Ruby Elma Polk in Virginia. Her biography tells of her not knowing who her father was until 2002 and meeting her brother, Al Jones in 2005. Al claims his mother Lura Jones told him when he was ten years old that he was the son of Bill Monroe. Though some of the family of Bill Monroe have denied the existence of illegitimate children to the famous Bluegrass entertainer, Gloria Jean also known as Carolina Rose and Al Jones were introduced at the 2005 Monroe festival as the son and daughter of Bill Monroe. Many say that his song, Georgia Rose, tells the story of the child he didnt know. Adding credence to Carolina Rose and Al Jones claims is the fact that Monroe provided in his will the sum of one dollar to any children who came forward claiming to be rightful heirs. Of course that may be standard practice for celebrities to protect their legal heirs in that way. As far as I know, neither of the two have made any claim to the Monroe estate, being satis ed to use whatever bene t derived from the association with the name. But Miss Lizzie is comfortable with the fact that Rose is indeed Monroes daughter as well as that Al Jones is his son. She says he is the spittin image of him. Many say Al who is in his 70s has a striking resemblance to the elder Monroe. That both Al and Rose are talented musicians substantiate the claims. She said that as a child she sat on the steps of their home and listened and sang along with the juke box at the nearby store. Now in her late 60s, she started singing publicly at the age of six. Presently located in Nashville, she along with her Bluegrass Girls play festivals all over. However, she also performs solo or with a pick-up local band. Hence, her freedom to stop in Holmes County and visit with the lady that many in the Bluegrass world call Mama Lewis. Though her husband, Elijah and his brother both play instruments, Miss Lizzie confesses she cant play a note tough she enjoys singing in her church, New Smyrna Assembly of God One of her acquaintances gave her a handmade mandolin, but the 90 plus lady has never tried to play it. She treasures it, none the less, as she treasures her acquaintance with those in the Bluegrass Music World. The week of Oct 4, 2012 will nd her and whichever family member is elected making their way to Rosine, Ky to Jerusalem Ridge and the Bluegrass Festival at the Monroe Home Place. (To learn more about Carolina Rose, her biography, From Gloria Jean to Carolina Rose is available at Amazon.com) Miss Lizzies special guest; Monroes lost children HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison PERRYS PRATTLE Perry Wells SPECIAL TO THE TIMES-ADVERTISER Maria and her sweet pup Fisher, a Golden Retriever, likes to chase red birds, blue birds, black birds, great blue herons, cow birds and more. Learning a lesson in true beauty Opinion A4 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, September 5, 2012 CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com 1-800-645-8688 ADVERTISING 850-547-9414 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2012, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. She gently explained that the female birds were less vibrant than the males because of their roles in nature. They needed to blend with the scenery to protect their young. It was not their choice but their definition by nature God.

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 Wednesday, September 5, 2012 Proven leadership from the Battleeld to the Schoolhouse. Bronze Star Teaching Certicate Meritorious Service Medal FOR SUPE R INTENDENT OF SCH OO LS Terry Mears A NOTE FROM TERRY: With que stions being raised concerning my service to our country, I felt it necessary to present to you some of my military achievements. The real honors go to every member of every branch of our armed forces and especially those that served beside me. My role was to serve you, our country and our Lord in battle with pride and humility. It is with great humbleness that I display these honors of which my family has only been made aware of during my preparation for this ad. I thank you the citizens of Holmes County for allowing me to serve you in the United States Army and I ask you for the opportunity to serve you again as your Superintendent of the Holmes County School District. By CHRIS OLWELL Halifax Media PANAMA CITY A former Deane Bozeman High School teacher who was arrested earlier this year and accused of having sexual relationships with students withdrew his not guilty plea Thursday and pleaded no contest to 14 felony counts. Judge Elijah Smiley admonished William Crews, 59, for failing to live up to societys expectations for teachers to keep students safe, saying something terribly went wrong. Smiley sentenced Crews to 20 years in prison and designated him a sexual predator as part of a plea agreement prosecutor Jennifer Hawkins said was the best option for society and Crews six victims. Crews had been scheduled for trial next week. It was dif cult for all of the victims to talk about what happened, Hawkins said after the hearing, adding that they were all prepared to come to trial next week if needed. Crews attorney, James White, declined to comment after the hearing. In preparation for the trial, prosecutors led motions asking Smiley to protect the identity of the victims, some of whom are adults now, by closing the courtroom to spectators and allowing them to testify under pseudonyms. The victims were all males and were in their early teens when the contact took place. Investigators were able to establish the conduct happened between 2001 and 2006, but it could have continued until 2011, of cials said after Crews arrest. Crews was arrested in February after investigators with the Bay County Sheriffs Of ce opened a storage unit where the victims said the contact occurred and found sex toys and pornographic movies. The rst victim told investigators Crews had taken them to the unit to watch pornography and engage in sexual acts. Investigators were able to identify the other victims during the course of the investigation who told similar stories of abuse by Crews. He had been investigated before, in the late 1990s, for similar allegations. Investigators determined the evidence in that case was not suf cient to support a prosecution. Hawkins described Crews as a predator who knew how to target vulnerable young people who might have been having problems at home or in school. Like any sexual predator, he knew the victims to pick out, Hawkins said. The 14 counts Crews pleaded to Thursday included two counts of sexual activity with a minor, three counts of lewd and lascivious molestation, four counts of lewd and lascivious exhibition and ve counts of showing obscene material to minors. Former teacher gets 20 years for molestations Teen Art Classes Ages 13-18 Instructors: Keith Martin Johns Fall Sessions September 10 November 19, 2012 Once a week on Monday from 3:30-5:30 p.m. $45 per month Registration is required, limited space Learn the fundamental basic principles that govern realistic art. Classic realistic drawing and painting skills will be taught from one session to the next. The discipline of this type of art instruction is much like other disciplinary art forms; such as music or dance. 5422 Cliff St. Graceville Contact (850) 360-4908 or Linda@keithmartinjons.com 850-258-3110 90 Son-in-Law Road in Florida Springs RV Park bonifays n ewest dining s ecret with a touch of Come and Enjoy the Friday and Saturday Surf & Turf Special Like us on Facebook for our weekly specials MU ST ANG GR I LL Open 5 PM8 PM N ightly WILLIAM CREWS DRIVERS from page A1 Jay Wayne Marsh, another bus driver present, con rmed that he hadnt been informed when they brought a three-year-old on to his bus and he was unprepared and unequipped to accommodate to a child of special needs. You need to notify these bus drivers that theres going to be a three-year-old with issues, said Becky Marsh, wife of Jay Wayne. They need to be prepared to have these children. Let them know if theyre a biter or autistic. Ellenburg added Jay Waynes was a biter and bit several children before he was warned that it was an issue. Ellenburgs husband, Junior Ellenburg, informed the school board that another issue was a new bus stop the district established in a eld was overgrown and should be considered a safety issue. She was thrown off into a wheat patch to pick up those children, Junior said. They need to respect her as a woman and as an employee. Chairman John Motley said that the district would be in touch with the bus drivers to see about resolving those matters as soon as possible. The board approved of Superintendent Gary Galloways recommendations for the 2012-2013 school year: To hire Ralph Forehand as teacher at Holmes County High School, Mitzi Speigner as teacher at Poplar Springs, Michael Ard, Sr. as bus driver at Bethlehem High School, Michelle Coe as part-time, 10-month custodian at Bonifay Elementary School and Cody Carroll as ESE Aide I at Ponce de Leon High School To transfer Natalie Boman as teacher from PDLHS to Bonifay Middle School, Kenny Tate as teacher from PS to BMS, Tonya McInnis as reading coach to PDLES and PDLHS, Maelynn Hat eld as reading coach to HCHS and PS, Miriam Beasley as teacher to BMS and Graduations Assistance Program, Chuck Cameron as ESE Aide from HCHS to BHS and Lucretia Mims as Bonifay bus driver to BHS. To accept the resignation of Odell Power as teacher at BMS for retirement effective as of 3 p.m. on Aug. 17, Amanda Gautney as Aide II at HCHS effective as of 3 p.m. on Aug. 14 and Alice Simmons as guidance counselor at HCHS effective as of 3 p.m. on Aug. 17 To approve of medical leave of absence for James Hayes as Bonifay bus driver beginning July 2 and ending Oct. 26, Belinda Evans as pre-kindergarten teacher at PDLES beginning Aug. 10 and ending Sept. 7 and Silvia Mixon as aide at BES beginning Aug. 20 and ending Jan. 8, 2013. To add Cheryl Harrison as teacher at BMS to the Deferred Retirement Option Program beginning Nov. 1. Also approved were administrative programs: 2012-13 contract to provide local law enforcement with Holmes County Sheriffs Ofce and out of county/state students; Consent Agenda: invoices, warrant list, payouts over $3,000, budget amendments and Aug. 7 meeting minutes; and Federal, State Programs or Projects: 2012-13 Carl D. Perkins-Career & Technical Project Application and 2012-2013 Carl D. Perkins Rural and Sparsely Populated Project Application. The next Holmes County School District meeting is scheduled for 9 a.m. on Sept. 4 at the Holmes County School District Of ce. You got to have a love for this job because there isnt much money in it. We were wondering if we can set up a meeting with the board to make our conditions a little better. We have a problem communicating, and we just want a little respect. Janet Ellenberg School bus driver

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OUTDOORS Wednesday, September 5, 2012 Page 6 www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Send your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com A Section By STAN KIRKLAND Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) compiles a weekly report from around the state of law enforcement cases of interest. Each item is only a few sentences long but one thing you see on occasion are reports about individuals who are cited, usually at sea, for trying to bring in lleted sh. The law about landing sh is pretty clear. FWC rules require that marine, and freshwater game sh for that matter, must be landed in whole condition. The rule applies not only at sea, but also to piers, bridges and even catwalks. The reason for the law is pretty straightforward. The law is in place for all species with size limits, said Capt. Ken Parramore, FWC area supervisor. Size limits allow these sh to reach a harvestable size. If the sh are lleted on the water, that impedes an of cers ability to determine if the sh was legal-sized. Its been several years but one summer morning, I was wade shing in eastern Bay County and I saw a bag rolling in the surf. The bag, it turned out, was lled with 6-7 pounds of what appeared to be grouper llets. They were spoiled, of course. Its only a guess but I suspect someone was trying to circumvent the law, got dgety, and threw their sh overboard. It struck me then, and still does today, the lengths some people go to, when complying with the law would have been much smarter. And, better for our shery resources. Make sure to land your sh whole, its the law AFTER THE STORM Its ugly, dirty and tough, but find right spots and fishing can be great By FRANK SARGEANT franksargeant@charter.net OK, for a few more days, its just going to be plain ugly on the water we know that. But theres always a silver lining to shing conditions after a big storm. Maybe its a bit mud-stained, but its there. The runoff from the big rains means the rivers will be high and murky, and all that fresh water coming down into the bays means they will have a slug of low-salinity water moving through them. The tannin-stained water turns the bays black, and even creates a long rip-line extending into the gulf where the salt water meets the fresh, green meeting black. Some species are ne with low salinity, some high-tail it. And most dont like the mud stirred up by wind, waves and strong currents. So, lets start upstream and work down. FRESHWATER AFTER THE STORM High water gives bass a chance to move into shallow backwaters and creeks where they cant go at lower levels and as the water starts to fall back to normal levels, they gang up at the creek mouths and drains to eat the bait that gets pulled out with the falling water. In the lower reaches, theyll have red sh with them; reds are pretty tolerant of low salinity. Anywhere a side creek forms a point as it enters a larger river, where a culvert or a dam creates ow and aeration, where theres an eddy in fast-moving water, there are likely to be bass as well as lunker cat sh in the deeper holes and stripers and hybrids in areas like the Apalach below Woodruff Dam. Starting on the east side of the Panhandle, the owing water is likely to produce angling action in the Ochlocknee and Apalachicola rivers anywhere from their respective dams down to tide-water. Deer Point Lake Dam at the head of North Bay is worth checking, as are all the creeks that run into the bays in the Panama City Beach areaBurnt Mill and Crooked Creek are some of the larger ows. Farther west, the Choctawhatchee and Mitchell rivers can be good, and Four Mile Creek, Alaqua Creek, Basin Bayou, Rock Creek and Jumper Creek are worth a look. Feeding into Pensacola Bay, the East Bay River north of Navarre, the Blackwater and the Escambia are all major out ows where sh can take advantage of water coming out of the swamps as things settle back toward normal. For bass on the runouts, noisy topwaters always are a good start a big Super Spook or Gun sh 115, worked fast with the current, nails the hungriest sh and lets you know where there might be a school. You can then follow up with a -ounce jig or a weighted creature bait, bumped along bottom with the ow, to wear them out. Jerk-baits like the Slug-Go can also do the job. Dark colors work best in the dark water. FISHING THE BAYS Some of the usual inshore saltwater suspects including spotted sea trout can be very hard to nd after a major ush of black water comes into the bays they move to the main passes or out into the gulf, where they settle on nearshore structure until things get back to normal. Reds can be anywhere from well up the rivers to out on the beach they dont seem to mind the tannin water, but for those who like to look for them on the ats, the dark water makes them a lot harder to see. In some areas, however, the natural topography of the bays and ats restricts the ow of the fresh water, keeping the shallowest ats salty and clear in most storms nd some of these ats, on the back side of Santa Rosa, for example, and you may nd lots of reds ripe for sightshing. Flats nearer the major passes also tend to clear quicker thanks to the regular ushing of the tides, so these are also worth checking. Visible reds can be caught on all the usual stuff, including gold streamer ies, weedless spoons and DOA Shrimp, provided they are adroitly placed well ahead of the sh. Where you cant see them under docks with a good ow, for example, its smarter to switch to live shrimp or pin sh. Anchor well back from the structure and make casts upstream so that the baits sweep the edges of the pilings you might have to hit a dozen piers without catching anything, but eventually youll nd one where theyre stacked up. Flounder generally are less affected by murky water than other species, and the usual spots are likely to continue to be productive. Check out piers, oyster bars, channel edges and jetty rocks, and sh live killi sh which you can net around oyster bars at low tide; theyre by far the best ounder bait there is. Of course, live shrimp are much easier to get and also work well. Or trim a quarter-ounce bucktail jig with a live killi or fresh shrimp tail and drag it down over the dropoff. When shing jetty rocks, remember the sh may be anywhere from 3 feet off the rocks on out; sh parallel to the rocks to start and then work out to deeper water. Flounder dont move a lot, so you have to. Make a series of casts, drag the bait over all the structure you can reach, and then move 10 yards down the jetty and fan cast once again. Keep moving until you hit sh; sitting in one spot with bait on the bottom catches only cat sh most of the time, though you might luck into a passing red sh. GREEN WATER TACTICS Its common for a rip-line to form around the major inlets after a big rain inshore; theres black water coming out of the pass on outgoing tide, owing into the green water of the Gulf and forming distinct edges usually littered with weeds and debris the fresh water takes a long distance to mix with the salt water. The rip where these two waters meet can hold anything from kings and Spanish to cobia and bull sharks. Best way to sh these edges is to slow-troll a live bluerunner, nger mullet, thread n or horse sardine down the green side of the rip, just out of the trash line. Game sh seem to cruise the edge looking for food pulled out of the bays, and if your bait is in the right place at the right time, you get bit. Plenty of big king mackerel tournaments have been won with this tactic. Its wise to take a few tips from the king sh pros for this type of shing, even if youre not competing in a tournament. Add a menhaden oil drip (available at tackle shops that cater to offshore anglers, and at Bass Pro Shops) as well as a mesh bag full of dogfood soaked with menhaden oil to create a scent trail that will bring sh to your baits. This tactic works best if you troll one area for an extended period make a half-mile loop down one side of the black water and up the other, and repeat farther out if you dont nd sh. Tossing a live thread n or sardine into the wake now and then may draw up a skyrocketing sh and let you know where to concentrate your efforts. HEADING OFFSHORE Its common for milky water to extend several miles off the beach after a major storm, and except around the inlets not many sh will bite inside this murk. So if you are looking for grouper or snapper, head offshore at least until you see clear water; of course, most of the best Panhandle structure is farther offshore in any case, but if you have the secret number of a pile of old washing machines a mile off the beach, right now may not be prime time to sh it. And when it comes to blue water shing, in general storms have minimal impact though some anglers say there seems to be a surge in action from sails, marlin, wahoo, dolphin and tuna just after the storm as always, head offshore until you nd long, solid weedlines before putting baits in the water. Outdoors contributor Frank Sargeant has put on a new hat recently, becoming editor of The Fishing Wire, an Internet news service with some 400,000 subscribers worldwide. The service covers state shery issues, new products in the shing and boating industry, outdoors events and issues and lots more. The Fishing Wire, as well as the companion service The Outdoors Wire, is available for free subscription at www. the shingwire.com. Businesses and agencies wishing to submit material for the wire can send it to frank@the shingwire.com.

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COLLEGE PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM WIN WIN WIN WIN WIN WIN $ $ $ $ $ $ 25 25 25 25 25 25 W W W W W W EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! Check your winner picks and send in today! SEPT. 8 SCOREBOARD Enter by Noon on Friday TI E BR E AK E R Pittsburgh Denver (Monday) Total Points ______ Total Points ______ Total Net Yardage ______ Total Net Yardage______ Enter at the Washington County News or the Holmes County TimesA dvertiser oces; or mail to1364 N. Railroad Ave., in Chipley www.chipleypaper.com or www. bonifaynow.com Name ____________________________________________ Address __________________________________________ City ________________________________ Zip _________ Daytime Phone ____________________________________ Email ____________________________________________ Subscriber Non-Subscriber R ules 1. College Pick-em will reward persons based on their ability to pick the most winners of each weeks college football games. 2. Winners will be selected on the basis of choices for the Saturday/Friday games. Ties will be broken through selections for a weekend Pro game: the winner, the winning point spread (margin of victory), and the yardage totals in that order. 3. Each weekly winner will receive a $25 gift card. The names of the winners will be published in News and TimesAdvertiser each Wednesday. 4. A drawing will be held from ALL contest entries after the Nov. 24 game for a $100 gift card. The winner will be published in the Times and the News. No purchase necessary to win. 5. Entries can be made on the entry coupon, or a similar form (8-1/2 x 11) carrying the same information. Duplicate entry forms also will be available online at chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com 6. Entries can be dropped o or mailed to the News oce, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, Fla. 32428; or at the Times oce at 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, 32425, during business hours, 8 a.m.5 p.m. CT; or submitted via email on the entry form at chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com 7. All entries must be received by noon CST each Friday. Postmarks will have no bearing on whether or not the deadline is met. 8. Entrants may submit no more than two entries per week. You must enter only your own name and a single address. You may not submit entries in the name of other people. Winners found to have submitted more than two entries and/ or in the name of another person will be disqualied. 9. The News and the Times-Advertiser assumes no responsibility for failure to receive any entry. All entries become the property of News and the Times-Advertiser and none will be returned. 10. Employees of News and the Times-Advertiser and their immediate families are not eligible to participate. 11. Decision of the judges is nal. ALL PLAYERS, BY THE ACT OF ENTERING, AGREE TO ABIDE BY THE RULES. CHEC K HE R E WEDNESD A Y FO R E A CH WEE K S W I NNE R Sept. 1 and 8 Winners will be published Sept. 12 1. Penn State Virginia 2. Miami Kansas State 3. Florida Texas A&M 4. Wisconsin Oregon State 5. Nebraska UCLA 6. Georgia Missouri 7. Illinois Arizona State 8. Memphis Arkansas State 9. Iowa State Iowa 10. N. Carolina Wake Forest By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY When the Chipley Tigers faced the Vernon Yellow Jackets at Philip Rountree Stadium in Chipley, the Tigers gave as good as they got and then some. The two squads seemed evenly matched, with both offenses seemingly capable of marching down the elds at will, but the Tigers went into halftime with a 14-7 lead and never relinquished that edge, eventually stopping Vernon 35-28. Chipleys running back Kobe McCrary scored the Tigers rst touchdown with 2:23 to play in the rst quarter. Fletcher Dilmores extra point attempt made it 7-0. The second quarter opened with Chipley driving 57 yards on six plays, ending with B.J. Olivers 20-yard scamper into the end zone. Dilmores aim was true and the Tigers led 14-0 in with 8:30 to play in the half. Vernons Tristian Porter found the end zone on a quarterback Dylan Kirk pass less than 2 minutes later to get the Yellow Jackets on the board. Aaron Bowers kick was good to make it 14-7. The second half opened with the Tigers capping a 55-yard, 12-play drive with a 3-yard score by Oliver from 2 nd and goal. Dilmores kick was no good, but the Tigers were up 20-7 with 6:33 remaining in the third quarter. The Yellow Jackets replied with a 66yard, 7-play effort that ended with Kirk shot a short pass to Porter in the end zone. Bowers kick was good and it was a 20-14 game with 3:26 left in the quarter. The Tigers were not to be outdone, and they came back with a 59-yard drive that began with McCrary nabbing an off-sides Yellow Jackets kick and returning it to the Yellow Jackets 43. Oliver went up the middle on the next play for three, then quarterback Jordan Finch connected with Oliver who scored on a 43-yard run. The Tigers went for twopoints and bumped their lead to 28-14. The Yellow Jackets came back in the fourth quarter when Porter connected with Cody Harmon on a screen pass from the 12-yard line to score. Bowers kicked the extra point and the score was 28-21 with 10:29 left to play. The Yellow Jackets tried the off-sides kick again, but this time the Tigers recovered it at the Vernon 49. The Tigers were stalled for three downs, but Finch gained some yardage with a QB keeper, driving deep into the Yellow Jackets territory. A personal foul against Vernon moved the Tigers to within easy striking distance, but it took eight more plays before McCrary scored from the 3-yard line. Dilmores kick made it 35-21 with 5:10 left to play. The Yellow Jackets were good for one more score, this one capping a 59-yard, 4play effort that ended with Kirk connecting with Austin Brown on a second and goal effort. Bowers kick made it 35-28. The Tigers got control of the ball with 3:12 left to play and successfully ran the clock down for the win. On Friday, Chipley travels to Blountstown, while Vernon hosts Wewa. Kickoffs are at 7 p.m. TIMES-ADVERTISER Chipleys Kobe McCrary takes the handoff from QB Jordan Finch during Fridays game against the Vernon Yellow Jackets at Philip Rountree Stadium in Chipley. The Tigers beat the Yellow Jackets 35-28. Below: The Chipley Tigers take the eld in their rst home game of 2012. By BRAD MLNER 747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com COTTONDALE Speed was on the menu on Thursday. Marianna had multiple helpings. Cottondale couldnt stomach the cuisine. The Bulldogs showcased their talented roster in the season opener for both teams as Derrick Knowles and Teon Long led the way to a 42-20 victory. Knowles had 10 carries for 134 yards and a touchdown, all in the rst half, and Long scampered for 124 on nine carries with two TDs. Theyre just fast and there isnt just one of them. Cottondale coach Mike Melvin said. We were in position to make stops sometimes, but theyre fast and we couldnt make the play. And there was too many of them. The speedy duo helped new coach Tim Cokely start on a high note for the Bulldogs (1-0). He credited their talent and added offseason work is paying dividends. I got the job in February and the kids really took to the weight room, Cokely said. It has helped increase our speed and strength. Two strong runs from Knowles set up short scores by Joc Wooden in the rst half. The rst was a 17-yard sprint before being pushed out at the 1 following the rst of four Cottondale turnovers in the opening 24 minutes. The second went for 48 yards on fourth-and-2 from the 50. Wooden went in a play later to give Marianna a 21-6 lead. Knowles scored untouched from 14 yards to cap a truncated march set up by the second of three C.J. Smith interceptions to up the lead to 28-6. Long scored midway through the rst quarter, also untouched, from 19 yards. Cottondale answered the quick rst score with a nine-play, 61-yard drive to narrow the gap to 7-6. Smith completed one of two rst-half passes to Jacquez Walker in the back of the end zone. The 2-point conversion failed and the Hornets (0-1) were never as close again. Cottondales best weapon, Sheldon Vann, was hampered by cramping for much of the second half. He was held to 25 yards on 12 carries and gutted out a 75yard scoring reception, but largely gave way to younger players at running back. That gave eighth-grader JaVontai Hall and freshman DaMichael Faulk valuable varsity carries. Hall had 23 yards and a TD to cap the scoring in the fourth quarter and Faulk led Cottondale with 61 yards. You could see they were a little scared when they got in there, Melvin said. But from the third to fourth quarter they really grew up. Marianna also was able to drain its bench. Cokely said it was by design rather than a comfortable option due to a lopsided score. We planned to play a lot of kids, thats what well do, he said. Its a long season. Everyone has to be ready for the fourth quarter. Both teams face stiff challenges in Week 2. Marianna is at Bratt Northview and Cottondale travels to Sneads. Marianna 14 14 14 0 42 Cottondale 6 2 6 6 20 First quarter MHS:Wooden 1 run (Meadows kick) 11:46, 7-0 MHS CHS: Walker 23 pass from Smith (run failed) 7:49, 7-6 MHS: Long 19 run (Meadows kick) 5:47, 14-6 Second quarter MHS: Wooden 2 run (Meadows kick) 9:54, 21-6 MHS: Knowles 14 run (Meadows kick) 2:54, 28-6 CHS: Safety, Williams sacked in end zone :22, 28-8 Third quarter MHS: Long 45 run (Meadows kick) 8:50, 35-8 MHS: Copeland 2 pass from Williams (Meadows kick) 5:10, 42-8 CHS: Vann 75 pass from Smith (run failed) 4:02, 42-14 Fourth quarter CHS: Hall 5 run (run failed) 9:25, 42-20 The News Herald BLOUNTSTOWN Holmes County took control by halftime and limited Blountstown to less than 100 total yards Friday in a 20-0 win in a battle of Class 1A teams considered by many to be strong playoff contenders in the Panhandle. The Blue Devils (1-0) got two touchdown passes from Jacky Miles, who was 8 of 10 for 165 yards in a remarkably balanced attack. Kodi Russ produced 116 yards rushing on 16 carries, Holmes County with 165 passing and 167 rushing for the game. Conversely, Blountstown (0-1) was held to 84 yards on the ground and 15 passing for a total of 99. Miles passed 10 yards to Dustin Janas will 1:10 left in the rst quarter to culminate a 78-yard drive to open the scoring. The extra point failed, but less than 3 minutes later Franklin Russ ran 9 yards and the Blue Devils led 12-0 after a quick four-play march. Miles second TD pass went 29 yards to Ty Russ with 1:25 before halftime. The pair teamed for a successful conversion and Holmes County was well in charge by intermission. Ty Russ caught ve passes for 112 yards. Miles added 26 yards on 14 carries and Franklin Russ had 20 yards on four attempts. Blountstown was led by Javakiel Brighams 64 yards rushing on 15 attempts. Quarterback Hunter Jordan rushed for 27 yards, but was held to 15 passing on just four attempts. Janas topped Holmes County with six tackles and had three of the Blue Devils six quarterback sacks. Holmes County also forced three turnovers. Brigham had eight tackles and Tripp Taylor seven to pace the Tigers defense. Blountstown hosts Chipley this week. SP O RTS www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, September 5, 2012 A Page 7 Section Blue Devils blank Tigers Marianna runs past Cottondale, 42-20 Chipley bests Vernon PHOTO BY NIKKI CULLIFER Holmes County High School defeated Blountstown 20-0 on Friday night at Blountstown in the seasons first conference game. The Blue Devils host Jay on Friday in Bonifay. Kickoff is at 7 p.m.

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Local A8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, September 5, 2012 By LAUREN SAGE REINLIE Halifax Media DeFUNIAK SPRINGS More than 68 years after the Air Force accidentally dropped bombs on the Alaqua community in Walton County and killed four members of the Cosson family, a memorial has been erected at the site of the tragedy. On the evening of Aug. 11, 1944, James Cosson was gathered with his extended family at his farm house. His family owned several lots in the area and they often got together in the evenings after the work day was done to catch up. His four children were playing outside. As the sun began to set, a whirring noise suddenly came from the sky and bombs began to fall all around them. Nothing could be done but to try to take cover. Cosson, his brother and two of his children were killed. Five other family members were severely wounded. An Air Force plane on a training mission out of then Eglin Field had accidentally released the bombs after passing its target at a nearby test site. Read more about the Cosson tragedy On Thursday, three years after residents began a sustained effort to place a marker at the site of the tragedy, of cials celebrated its unveiling. Were here today to reect a debt of gratitude to a family, Walton County Commissioner Sara Comander said. Many family members still live in the area and were among the 50 or so people who attended the ceremony. Residents and local of cials also were on hand. Despite more than a few thwarted attempts, volunteers and of cials were nally able to gain approval for the marker earlier this year. It was a bittersweet remembrance for some family members still grappling with the tragedy, but most expressed their gratitude for the marker and the recognition that comes with it. Weve had so many promises of what was going to happen here and it didnt, Thomas Bill Cosson, James Cossons son, said after the ceremony. After 68 years, you dont know what to expect, but its happened. Thomas was 5 years old when the bombs were dropped. He has a 12inch scar where a piece of shrapnel lodged in his side. I didnt think Id ever see this before I died, he said. World War II was in full swing in August 1944. Planes dropped test bombs regularly on Eglin property near the Cosson home. But on that night, a failure of the mechanical release device caused the bombs not be released until after the pilot had passed the test site, according to of cial accounts. It was the worst training accident in Florida during the war. Congressman Jeff Miller, who had proposed the marker as long ago as 2003, said during the ceremony that piece of history should be remembered by young and old. This region and this family suffered not only a tragedy, but they paid a very high price for the defense of this country, he said. The marker also serves as a snapshot of what life was like in Northwest Florida nearly 70 years ago, said Doug Kolodziejczak, district chief for the Eglin Air Force Base Fire Department, who helped get the marker placed. While the Alaqua community still is a rural area, in 1944 the Cosson family had no phones or electricity, and used lanterns at night, Kolodziejczak said. Dirt roads were the only path to hospitals or other public service buildings. The well and remnants of the homes chimney can still be seen on the property, which is now thick woods, not farmland. The local people know what happened behind these trees, but the people who drive by dont, Miller said after the ceremony. He said he hopes the marker will change that. 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Coupon Expires: 9-30-12 FREE E Y E EX AM COD E: W C 00 T odd R obinson, M D Board C ertified Eye Physician and C ataract S urgeon L ee M ullis, M D Board C ertified Eye Physician and C ataract S urgeon From Staff Reports MARIANNA A man was arrested Thursday at a mental health facility after bullets were found in his vehicle, according to the Jackson County Sheriffs Of ce. Security of cials at Sunland called the JCSO after a man appeared very agitated and upset at the facility. During a subsequent investigation, it was determined the man was there to confront an employee concerning issues that a family member of his was having with that employee. While speaking with the individual, of cers observed a box of bullets in plain view in the front seat area of the suspects vehicle. The bullets are considered to be contraband by Florida law, and the introduction of such into a mental health facility, is illegal, JCSO said. The man, identi ed as Ricardo Leon Sanders, 22, 4204 Vallie Road, Marianna, was taken into custody on charges of introduction of contraband into a mental health facility. From Staff Reports MARIANNA The Jackson County Sheriffs Of ce is looking for a person who smashed the glass to the front door of Citi Trends in Marianna and stole as many items as they could in four trips in and out of the store. The suspect wore an oversized gray hoodie, dark colored pants, black tennis shoes and a black, multicolored shirt. The suspect might have worn a mask, according to a release from the JCSO. The burglary occurred around 2 a.m. on Aug. 28. Anyone with information on the suspect should contact the JCSO at 850-482-9624 or CrimeStoppers at 850-526-5000. Victims of 1944 bombing accident memorialized NICK TOMECEK / DAILY NEWS A crowd gathers Thursday during a ceremony to unveil a marker where four members of Cosson family were killed in 1944 when bombs were dropped on their home during a training mission from then Eglin Field. Police charge man with having bullets at mental health facility Of cers in Marianna looking for burglar

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Washington, Holmes at a glance INDEX Society ................................. B2 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B6 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser B PAGE 1 Section Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 5 2012 WHTC to offer computer classes CHIPLEY WashingtonHolmes Technical Center will be holding several computer classes through December 11. Basic Computer Class for Windows 7 is a ve week course that will be held Sept. 4 Oct. 4. A Fast Course on Outlook 7 will be held on Oct. 9. A fast Course on Excel 07 Level I will be held on Oct. 16, 18, 23, and 25. The Level 2 Class will be held on Oct. 30, Nov. 1, and 6. A Fast Course on Word 07 Level 1 will be held on Nov. 8, 13, and 15. There will also be a Fast Course on PowerPoint 2007 on Dec. 4, 6, and 11. For more information and tution cost please contact the WHTC at 638-1180. Sign language classes offered CHIPLEY Free Sign Language Classes will be offered from 6 8 p.m. each Wednesday from Sept. 19 through Dec. 12. Classes will be held at Shiloh Baptist Church, 1976 Shiloh Lane, Chipley. The Sign Language classes are free. The book is $40. A Basic Course in American Sign Language. Info: Bob/Trisha Hicks, familyofhicks@ yahoo.com or 628-1553 and Melissa Garner, melissagarner93@ yahoo.com, 326-0244. 2012 Miss. Graceville Harvest Festival GRACEVILLE The 31st Annual Harvest Festival Pageant will be held at the Graceville Civic Center in Graceville at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 7, and Saturday, Sept. 8. All proceeds will go to the Graceville Harvest Day Celebration. For more information call Teresa Bush at 2634744 or 263-3072, or Michelle Watkins at the City of Graceville at 263-3250. Kent Cemetery Work Day ALFORD There will be a Cemetery Work Day at Kent Cemetery on Saturday, Sept. 8. The cemetery is southwest of Alford. School bands face off PHOTOS BY RANDAL SEYLER Undeniably, part of the excitement of football Friday nights is the music provided by the high school bands. This past Friday was no different, with the Vernon High School band (wearing white T-shirts) facing off with the Chipley High School band (wearing dark T-shirts) at Philip Rountree Stadium. The Yellow Jackets band performed a short selection from this years program, while the Tigers band performed their show, based on classic Disney music, for the hometown audience.

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Wednesday, September 5, 2012 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra and J.D. OWENS INC. Carpet & Ceramic Outlet YOUR HOMETOWN LOW PRICE! CARPET, CERAMIC, PORCELAIN, VINYL, NAFCO, LAMINATE, HARDWOOD & AREA RUGS Weve Got It At The Price You Want! HUGE REMNANT SALE! 12 x 9 Tan Frieze ...................................... $ 95 50 12 x 12 Dark Green Plush ........................ $ 139 90 12 x 13 Light Tan Plush ............................ $ 109 90 12 x 13 Dark Blue Plush ........................... $ 155 50 12 x 14 Heavy Tan Frieze ......................... $ 165 50 12 x 14 Medium Brown Frieze ................. $ 149 90 12 x 15 Chocolate Frieze ......................... $ 179 90 12 x 15 Light Tan Plush ............................ $ 155 50 12 x 16 Medium Blue Frieze .................... $ 189 90 12 x 19 Heavy Velvet Plush Tan .............. $ 225 50 12 x 19 2 Green Comm. Plush .................... $ 205 50 12 x 20 Multi Color Comm. ...................... $ 169 90 BOUND RUGS 2x4 ............... $ 5.00 2x8 ............. $ 15.50 3x5 ............. $ 12.50 4x6 ............. $ 19.90 5x7 ............. $ 39.90 6x9 ............. $ 49.90 J.D. OWENS CARPET & C ERA MIC OUTLET Located Between Arrowhead Campgrounds & Hopkins, On Hwy. 90 The Place To Shop, If Money Matters! carpettilemarianna.com Helping Hands... Compassionate Hearts B ONIFAY Offering Inpatient and Outpatient Therapy N URS IN G & RE HAB C E N TER Occupational Physical Speech 24-hour Skilled Nursing Rehabilitation Gym Admissions 7 Days a Week Special to Extra On behalf of the Caterpillar Trade Press Relations team, we are pleased to announce the appointment of former Bonifay resident Christina Schave as a Trade Press Media Representative. Schave is a 2000 graduate of Holmes County High School and worked at the Holmes County Times-Advertiser from 1999-2001. Her family still resides in Holmes County. Schave will be replacing Amber Thomas who has been promoted to a position within Caterpillar in the newly formed Industrial and Waste Division. Schave has most recently worked as an Account Public Relations Lead at Two Rivers Marketing in Des Moines, Iowa, supporting global construction equipment manufacturers Doosan Infracore Construction Equipment and Bobcat Company since April of 2010. Prior to that position she was managing editor for Total Landscape Care for Randall-Reilly Publishing in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, from July 2006 through April 2010. She worked for The Tuscaloosa News from 2004 to 2006. Schave has a Master of Arts in Journalism with a specialization in new media (University of Alabama), and a Bachelors of Science in Journalism with a specialization in editing (University of Florida). In addition to her broad job and educational experience, Schave currently is a board member of the Construction Writers Association and also serves as their Public Relations Committee chair; chair of the Central Iowa chapter of PRSA Professional Development Committee; and board member of the Turf and Ornamental Communicators Association. She has also served as adjunct professor for the University of Alabamas Reese-Phifer College of C&IS; authored a chapter on Media Bias and the Military published in the graduate-level textbook Media Bias: Finding It, Fixing It; and served as assistant director and instructor for the University of Alabamas annual Multicultural Journalism Workshop for high school students 2005-2009. Schaves position with Caterpillar is effective Sept.10. We are very pleased to have her joining us and bringing her broad skills and industry relationships to our Caterpillar media relations team. Amanda Danielle Cook and Scott Dean Red eld are proud to announce their engagement and upcoming marriage. Amanda is the daughter of Donald and Nancy Amanda Cook of Chipley. She is a 2009 graduate of Chipley High School and a 2011 graduate of Chipola College with an AA Degree. Amanda plans to graduate from Florida State University Panama City in May 2013 with a Bachelors Degree in Recreation, Tourism and Event, to become an Event Planner. Scott is the son of Michael Wayne and Jackie Ann Red eld of Chipley. He is a 2009 graduate of Chipley High School. Scott moved to Nebraska in the fall of 2009 to play football. He graduated from Gulf Coast State College in 2011 with an AA Degree. Scott plans to graduate from Florida State University in May 2013 with a Bachelors Degree in Political Science. He will be taking the LSAT in December and will attend law school of his choice in August 2013. Michael Wayne and Jackie Ann Red eld, the grooms parents, hosted an engagement party for the couple on June 16. The party was attended by close friends and family. The wedding will be held in May 2013. SPECIAL TO EXTRA Holmes County Council on Aging celebrated the birthdays for the month of August on Friday. The birthdays for the month were Daisy Swerringen and Iris Moore happy birthday, ladies, from the Council on Aging. The Council thanks John Braxton Jr. and wife Vickie for sponsoring the dinner this month and thanks to Piggly Wiggly of Bonifay for the birthday cake. Gonzalez graduates Basic Military Training Air Force Reserve Airman 1st Class Sherina M. Gonzalez graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Gonzalez is the daughter of Ernesto Gonzales and sister of Tiffany Gonzalez, both of Fourth Street, Chipley. She is a 2009 graduate of Chipley High School. She earned an associate degree in 2011 from Chipola College, Marianna. Hill Graduates Basic Military Training Air Force Reserve Airman 1st Class Alyson Q. Hill graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical tness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Hill earned distinction as an honor graduate. She is the daughter of Cassaline Davis of Moss Hill Road, Chipley. The airman is a 2007 graduate of Vernon High School. She earned a bachelors degree in 2011 from the University of Florida, Gainesville. Special to Extra Chipley High School JROTC would like to welcome our new Senior Army Instructor Major Bill Chomos. It is a great honor to have Major Chomos as part of the JROTC family. We are looking forward to an outstanding School year. It is time for the cadets to get motivated and on track. Last school year, Chipley High School JROTC was the only program in area 11 to qualify to compete at the state level in drill, ri e and raider teams. We plan on keeping our reputation of being the premier JROTC program in area 11. The leadership is looking forward to working with all cadets to continue our tradition of excellence. We have enjoyed the way our community has supported us during competition, with your continued support we will once again climb to the top. If you would like more information about our JROTC program or how you can become an honorary member, please call First Sergeant Lonnie Segers at 638-6100 ext 503 or 726-0041. 2013 Washington County Relay For Life kick off WASHINGTON COUNTY The Washington County Relay For Life 2013 kick off will be held at 6 p.m. on Sept. 17, at the Washington County Ag. Center in Chipley. This is a free event designed to get the message out about what the American Cancer Society does for our community. The Kick Off will be set up like a mini relay to allow everyone to see how the relay is set up. There will be food, games and fun for everyone. If you know someone who would like to start a team but they are not sure on where to start, bring them out on Sept. 17 to the Ag Center. Washington County Relay For Life WASHINGTON COUNTY Washington County will be holding their 2013 Relay For Life Event, from 6 p.m. on April 12 until 11 a.m. on April 13, at Pals Park in Chipley. The theme for the 2013 Relay For Life is Race For a Cure. Christina Schave to join Caterpillar Press Relations CHRISTINA SCHAVE HOLMES COUNTY COUNCIL ON AGING BIRTHDAYS Coming back Army strong Cook and Red eld to wed RELAY FOR LIFE BASIC MILITARY TRAINING GRADUATIONS

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Wednesday, September 5, 2012 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Library hours Wausau Library Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County Library (Bonifay) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed Washington County Library (Chipley) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Vernon Library Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills Library Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed MONDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Monday each month (unless a holiday) at 6 p.m. at the Chipley library. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach of ce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999. TUESDAY 8 9 a.m.: Tai Chi Class at the Washington County Public Library, Chipley Branch 8 10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 5 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church. Games start at 6:25 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-451 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. to noon: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday. (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh-in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A You are cordially invited to join us in celebrating the co-ops 75th anniversary. There will be a punch and cake reception and heavy hors doeuvres. Each attendee will receive a registration gift and be entered into a drawing for a $75 gift card and commemorative throw. Wednesday, September 12 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Staphylococcus (staph) bacteria are all around us in an intimate way since it normally lives on the skin and mucous membranes of both people and animals alike. It usually is not of a concern to the individual if the skin is functioning normally and there is not a risk for infection (e.g., systemic illness and immune compromise). When infection is present, usually of the skin, most staph bacteria are susceptible to commonly prescribed antibiotics. Although many individuals walk around every day with staph bacteria, not all staph are alike. Indeed, Staphylococcus aureus prefers people (as well as pigs and some horses) over dogs and cats, Staphylococcus pseudintermedius likes the skin of companion animals over man. Methicillin-resistant staph refers to Staphylococcus bacteria that have developed a resistance to commonly prescribed penicillin and penicillin-like antibiotics, making infections dif cult to treat. Again, most staph bacteria are susceptible to a wide array of antibiotics, but these particular staph have developed resistance to typical antibiotics, hence they are more challenging to eliminate. Dr. Adam Patterson, clinical assistant professor and chief of dermatology at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences Small Animal Hospital, explained staph skin infections (pyoderma) in animals present as skin sores recognized as redness, pimples, scabs, dander, and hair loss. Many times these infections itch and result from uncontrolled allergic skin disease. When this type of infection occurs, it usually responds to correctly prescribed and administered topical and/ or systemic antibacterial treatments. If the infection is not easily treated by an appropriate course of antibiotics, then the chance for a resistant infection is heightened. Although subject to debate, as this is an area of ongoing research, Patterson said risk factors for methicillin-resistant staph infections in both people and animals seem to include repeated courses of antibiotics, chronic skin disease, immune compromise, recurring hospital visits, and indwelling medical implants such as those used for orthopedic surgery. When these risk factors are present in animals with pyoderma, veterinarians perform a culture of the skin sore to determine if the bacteria are indeed methicillin-resistant. A resistant infection doesnt look different than susceptible infections, the only way to know is to culture the skin, Patterson said. Once it is con rmed the pet is infected with methicillin-resistant staph, the veterinarian can determine the best course of action. Patterson said the most common treatments are topical such as antiseptic shampoos and culturebased systemic antibiotics. When we can, we try to treat them topically, Patterson said. Methicillin resistance doesnt mean that the bacteria are more pathogenic, they just are not killed by common antibiotics anymore. People with methicillinresistant staph are said to have MRSA (methicillinresistant Staphylococcus Aureus). Since dogs and cats tend to have a different species of staph on their skin, resistant bacteria are most often called methicillinResistant Staphylococcus Pseudintermedius (MRSPi or MRSP). People are normally not infected with MRSPi; likewise, dogs and cats are normally not infected with MRSA. Common transfer of MRSPi from pets to people has been fairly rare and isolated to date, while transfer of MRSA from people to pets is somewhat more likely. Again, MRSPi is predominantly found in companion pets, while MRSA is primarily found in people. We dont know much about dog-to-dog spread, but it is a large component of research on the epidemiology of methicillin resistance as we move forward, Patterson said. A few simple recommendations to help reduce the chance of transfer of staph bacteria between household people and pets once an animal has con rmed MRSPi infection include: administering the veterinary-prescribed treatment as directed, wearing gloves when treating the affected pet with topical therapy, keeping young children and immunocompromised people (cancer, HIV/AIDS, etc.) away from the affected pet, keeping personal skin wounds covered and protected, discouraging the pet from licking the face of people, and not letting the affected pet share the bed or linens with household persons. Above all, Patterson emphasized the need to wash all surfaces of the hands after handling the affected pet. Additionally, a search into why the pet has a resistant infection should be undertaken and corrected once identi ed. If you develop skin sores or have concerns about your personal health once a methicillin-resistant staph infection has been con rmed in your pet, then consult your physician. ABOUT PET TALK Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at:// vetmed.tamu.edu/pet-talk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to cvmtoday@cvm.tamu. edu. SPECIAL TO EXTRA The Republican Party of Holmes County held their 4th Biennial Reagan Day Dinner on Friday, Aug. 17 at the Agricultural Center in Bonifay. Their theme was Leading Florida to Victory in 2012. Staph infections and Methicillin Resistance PET TALK Community CALENDAR REAGAN DAY

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FAITH B Section www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Dave Ramseys Financial Peace University is coming to First Baptist Church at 311 N. Waukesha Street in Bonifay with classes beginning on Sunday, Sept. 9 at 4:30 p.m. Contact David Lauen at 547-2420 for more information or to register. More than one and a half million families have positively changed their nancial future through Dave Ramseys Financial Peace University (FPU). Updated in summer 2012, the now nine-week course provides families and individuals with practical tools to gain control of their finances and set themselves up for long-term financial success. The course meets once a week where a different lesson is taught by Dave on DVD followed by a small-group discussion. Lessons include budgeting, relationships and money, getting out of debt, saving for emergencies and investing. Since its inception in 1994 FPU has helped more than 1.5 million families positively change their financial future. Through common-sense principles and small-group accountability, FPU gives people the tools they need to change their behavior and succeed financially. On average families who complete FPU pay off $5,300 and save $2,700 in the first 90 days. Following the class nearly 94 percent of those families budget regularly. FPU will not only transform the way you handle money, but also your marriage and other areas of your life, says Ramsey. This isnt a boring financial class. We make learning about money fun and easy to understand so people in every situation can benefit from the information. Ramsey knows firsthand the pain that financial stress can cause. After creating a net worth of more than a million dollars by age 26, he quickly lost it all. Since then Ramsey has helped families and individuals across the country learn how to get control of their finances and avoid debt so they dont have to experience the same pain he did. FPU lessons also include guest speakers Rachel Cruze, speaker and daughter of Dave Ramsey; Jon Acuff, author of Wall Street Journal best-seller Quitter and popular blog Stuff Christians Like; and Chris Hogan, counselor and speaker for the Dave Ramsey organization. The revised FPU will be offered through churches and community centers. After purchasing a membership each participant receives a workbook, Dave Ramseys Complete Guide to Money, an envelope system and an audio CD library. Participants will also have access to budgeting forms and MP3s of all the lessons. For more information or to purchase a membership, go to www. daveramsey.com. About Dave Ramsey Dave Ramsey is Americas trusted voice on money and business. Hes authored four New York Times best-selling books: Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover and EntreLeadership. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 5 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com. But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. First Baptist Church come as you are Mike Orr, Pastor 1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830 Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. Strife and Struggle Strife and struggle are part of life. Although we s ometimes wish for a life free of struggle, strife and struggle give life its zest. The Bible is full of good men and women who struggled mightily with evil, and gripping. But, we should remember that the external half of the story. There is almost always some internal strife or struggle that must be dealt with. David struggled with his enemies, but what makes him a real hero is his struggle with himself. Even Jesus was faced with this internal struggle, as we see Him struggling with himself in the garden of Gethse mane, and later on the cross. Some of est strivers even struggle with God. Consider the bold ness of Job, who dares to call God to account for his suffering, referring to God as his adversary: He has torn me in his wrath and hated me; he has gnashed his teeth at me; my adversary sharpens his eyes against me. (Job 16: 9) Strong words, though one wonders if even harsher words were exchanged between Jacob and God during their night-long wrestling match in the desert (Genesis 32). Many of remember that a life without struggle would be vapid. It is far better to embrace the struggle, and especially to attack the negativity within ourselves. BROWN FUNERAL HOME 1068 Main Street, Chipley 638-4010 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser This Message Courtesy of For in my inner being I delight in Gods law; but I see another law at work in me, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a pris oner of the law of sin at work within me. Romans 7: 22-23 Page 4 Wednesday, September 5, 2012 Rev. James L. Snyder All we hear these days are complaints about the economy and nobody seems to be doing anything about it. Politicians talk about it all the time and yet do nothing creative in the area of improving our economy. If you could put all the political speeches end to end, there would positively be no end to it. What we need to stimulate our economy is some kind of stimulation that does not come from the government. They stimulate me, all right, but not in the right way. This is where I step in. I assure you I am not running for any of ce. If the truth were known, I am running away from every of ce I can think of, especially my church of ce. I have no political agenda or aspirations; I am just a plain ordinary American citizen. I understand such creatures are an endangered species in todays economy. I am proud to be just a plain ordinary American. I am not middle-class, lower-class and certainly not high-class. In fact, I have no class at all, and I am glad to leave it like that. I couldnt pass the test anyway. But I am doing my part in stimulating the economy. The secret plan I have can be boiled down to one word: vacation. This past week I have bravely gone where I have not been for a long time and that is on vacation. There is nothing like a vacation to stimulate many things, including the economy. It takes me a whole year to scrimp and save so the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I can go on a vacation. But in the end, it is well worth it. After a weeklong vacation, I am highly stimulated to return home where I can recuperate from all that stimulation. My wallet is still vibrating. I must confess that the primary stimulation in a vacation has to do with my credit card. It was stimulated in more ways than I care to remember, and at the end of the month the credit card company will remind me of all that stimulation. If the government does not have enough money in its coffers to balance the budget, it is not because I have not done my part. Every time I turned around there was a tax on something. Do not let this get out, but if the government knows I turned around so many times, they will nd a way to tax that. I am not a conspiracy enthusiast, but I believe I stumbled onto a most blatant conspiracy with the United States government. I am here merely to give my humble testimony. The conspiracy, as I found it, focuses in on the airlines. I know this might sound like a farfetched idea, but I can only give my observation. The airlines are in a conspiracy with the United States government to take as much money from me as they possibly can. Not that I have a lot of money, I just would like to keep as much of it as possible for those occasions when I would like to take my wife out to a restaurant and just have a relaxing evening. That takes money. It began with checking in our luggage. Two bags for me and two bags for my wife equals too much luggage. We put our luggage on the conveyor belt and then were informed by the check-in clerk that each bag cost an extra $50. She swiped my credit card and even though I am not a mathematical wizard, I believe it was in the neighborhood of $200. I do not like that neighborhood. Later on, I sat down to gure it out and discovered it would be far cheaper not to take any luggage and then when arriving at my destination buy a new set of clothes. My entire wardrobe does not equal $100. Of course, on my wifes side of the closet it is a different story. We got our boarding pass and then the young woman behind the counter looked at me and asked a strange question. Sir, how tall are you? It has been a long time since anybody asked me that kind of a question. Why she wanted to know how tall I was could not be found in the corridors of my empty mind. I then informed her that I was 6. I see, she said as she stared at her computer screen. Then she explained. The average height of a male passenger on our plane is 5. You exceed that limit by 4 inches. I looked at my wife and we both shared a wonderful laugh. Then I look back at her behind the counter, but she was not laughing. There will be an extra charge for your exceeding our height limit. Lets see, she said as she studied the computer screen, thats 4 inches times $15 per inch which equals $60. She then swiped my credit card, again, and charged it with the $60 extra fee. That was just the beginning of the swiping by the airlines. By the time our vacation was over, I was totally swiped out. When I got home I meditated a little bit on what Jesus said, Render therefore unto Caesar the things which be Caesars, and unto God the things which be Gods (Luke 20:25 KJV). I really do not mind rendering to Caesar but I just wish he wasnt so greedy. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att. net. His web site is www. jamessnyderministries.com Evergreen Missionary Baptist Bene t WESTVILLE Evergreen Missionary Baptist Church will be having a Building Fund Bene t on Sept 8 at the Westville City Hall. The yard sale will start at 8 a.m., and starting at 10 a.m. they will begin selling sliced pork dinners for $60. Noma Assembly of God Homecoming NOMA Noma Assembly of God will be holding Homecoming services at 10 a.m. on Sept. 9. Special singers will be The Thompsons and special speaker will be Brother Roger Cosson. Lunch and Fellowship will follow. The church is at 1062 Tindal St. in Noma. Wausau Assembly of God Revival WAUSAU The Wausau Assembly of God Church will be having revival at 6 p.m. Sept 9, and 7 p.m. on Sept. 10 12. Brother Gene Keen will be preaching each night. We invite everyone to come out and be with us. The church is on Highway 77 in Wausau. For more information call 638-0883 or 596-4451. Only Grace Ministries presents The Ring BONIFAY Only by Grace Ministries will proudly present the original theatrical production, The Ring, at 10:45 a.m. on Sept 16, at Gully Springs Baptist Church in Bonifay. The modern day drama illustrates the story of The Prodigal Son as it relates to everyday life. The Ring captivated audiences of all ages as it illustrates the Fathers unfailing love through story and music. Sept. 16 will also mark the 95th Homecoming at Gully Springs Baptist Church. Northside Baptist Church 65th Homecoming PONCE DE LEON Northside Baptist Church in Ponce de Leon will be holding their 65th Homecoming at 10 a.m. in Sept. 16. Dr. Thomas Kinchen will bring the message, and Four Calvary Quartet will perform special music. For more information call Lavelle Brooks at 836-4881, Carol Busby at 836-4470 or Frances Cooey at 956-2822. Mondays that Matter CHIPLEY Holmes Creek Baptist Church will be holding a Fall Revival, at 6:30 p.m. each Monday in the month of September. September 10, Dr. John Sullivan, Executive Director of the Florida Baptist Convention will be the guest speaker. Worship Leader will be Jonathan Brown of Ozark Baptist Church in Ozark, Ala. September 17, the Rev. Nathan Carroll, Pastor of the First Baptist Church in Geneva, Ala. will be the guest speaker. Worship Leader will be Gary Medlock on Northside Baptist Church in Ponce de Leon. On September 24, Dr. Fred Evers, Pastor of Northside Baptist Church in Tifton Ga., will be the guest speaker. Special to Extra WESTVILLE The Womens Mission Team of Hickory Hill Baptist at Westville attended the 10th Annual Womens Conference in Slocomb, Ala., on Aug. 25. The team, led by Sister Helen McKinley, took 12 ladies of all ages to the day long Christian praise and worship services, and of course, as the Baptist women are known for, had a fun lled breakfast and lunch fellowship, meeting the other guests and speakers. Some of the ladies who have not been on a fellowship trip said they had no idea that it could be so fun and realized to attend a conference. Nationally known Christian motivator and womens faith advocate, Rhea Briscoe, was the keynote speaker. Rhea speaks of Gods faithfulness and uses His word to minister the love of Christ to everyone. Also features was Lynda Randle who grew up in the intercity of Washington DE., and was led by Gods hand to eventually sing with the Gathers Christian Singers. Lynda quickly won over the ladies with her wit and outgoing personality. The Hickory Hill Womens Ministry Team is making plans to attend the Swamp Gravy Festival in Colquit, Ga., in October. If anyone would like further information, you are invited to the Hickory Hill Baptist Church, or you may call the church at 956-4116. My humble effort at stimulating the economy Dave Ramseys Financial Peace University coming to Bonifay Hickory Hill Womens mission team is on the road Faith EVENTS

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Wednesday, September 5, 2012 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Letter Learners program set CHIPLEY Letter Learners will begin at the Washington County Public Library, at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 6. This is a free program for library patrons and their little ones. Letter Learners is an inspired program where letters and their sounds, along with their vowels are introduced. Flannel board interaction, introductions of colors, crafts and of course stories are a part of this hourlong program with some holiday celebrations tossed in, too. Please call 638-1314 to register you little letter learner or email Mrs. Zedra at kidsrule@wcpl com. 2012 Miss Graceville Harvest Festival GRACEVILLE The 31st annual Harvest Festival Pageant will be held at the Graceville Civic Center in Graceville at 6:30 p.m. on Sept. 7 and 8. All proceeds will go to the Graceville Harvest Day Celebration. For more information call Teresa Bush at 263-4744 or 263-3072, or Michelle Watkins at the City of Graceville at 263-3250. Kent Cemetery work day ALFORD There will be a Cemetery Work Day at Kent Cemetery on Saturday, Sept. 8. The cemetery is three miles southwest of Alford. Please arrive as early as possible and bring tools and mowers to work with. Following the working there will be a sh fry. Please bring a covered dish and drinks. Picnic in the Park planned PONCE de LEON SPRINGS Holmes County Teen Court, Holmes County School Board, C.A.S.E Coalition, the Sheriffs Department, and the Florida Department of Environment Protection will be sponsoring a Picnic in The Park from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., on Sept. 8, at Ponce de Leon Springs. Entry is free of charge, and there will be free hamburgers, free hotdogs, games and swimming. Come out and help keep our youth drug and crime free. Jacob City Day JACOB The City of Jacob has slated Sept. 15, for its Jacob City Day Celebration, which will include a parade, entertainment, food and activities for all. The festivities will start at 11 a.m. with a parade along Jackson Road. The other activities will take place at the Jacob City Park, at 2254 Jacob main St. (Highway 162). Anyone desiring to be in the parade will need to contact Eula Johnson at 263-2120 on or before September 7. Booths are available to vendors; please contact Verloria T. Wilson at 2636636 for more information. Town of Westville elections WESTVILLE A regular election for the Town of Westville will be held on Sept 11. The polls will open at 7 a.m. Polls are at the Westville Community Center. Kid Safety and Fun Expo CHIPEY MPE and H&H will sponsor a Free Kid Safety and Fun Expo, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., on Sept. 15, at the Chipley WalMart. There will be baby twin deer at the expo and much, much more. Youth Ranch Golf Tournament PANAMA CITY The Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch Golf Tournament will take place Sept. 15 at the Panama Country Club. The monies raised from this bene t will go directly to the Youth Ranch, which runs solely on donations. The Washington County Sheriffs Of ce is one of the sponsors for the golf tournament. For more information contact Andrea Gainey at 638-6115. Chipley High School Class of 1972 CHIPLEY The Chipley High School Class of 1972 are making plans for their class reunion. Activities are being planned for Homecoming, which is Oct. 5-6. We will ride in the parade, attend the football game, meet after the game, and will get together sometime Saturday. You can keep up with everything on Facebook. (Chipley High School Class of 1972 Reunion) Its being updated as plans are being nalized. If you would like further information you may contact Cathy Pitts Adams 638-1665, adams03@bellsouth.net or Gwen Lane Collins at gwen13@aol.com. If you plan on attending, please RSVP by Sept. 19, 2012. (If youre coming or not). 2012 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant BONIFA Y The 2012 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant sponsored by the HCHS Blue Pride Band Boosters will be held at 4 p.m., Sept. 22, at Holmes County High School. There is no residency required to enter this pageant. Girls age 4-20 and boys age 4-9 may enter. Contestant entry fee is $45. If two or more siblings register in any category it will be $35. All registration dates are held at Holmes County High School on Tuesday, Sept. 11 from 5-7 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 15, from 10 a.m.noon; Late registration Tuesday, Sept. 18, from 5-7 p.m. (a $10 late fee will be added on this date). You may also turn in registration forms at BES, BMS, HCHS or by mail to: HCHS; Attn: Band Boosters; 825 West Highway 90; Bonifay, Florida 32425. If you have any questions you may contact Cindy Goodson at goodsonc@hdsb.org, or by phone or text 373-7517. Senior Group going on Tour WASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will be going on a tour of Ohio Indiana Amish country, and Chicago Razzle Dazzle on Sept. 1-9. For more information call Merita Stanley at 594-9980. Western Star Pageant slated BONIFAY The annual Western Star Pageant will be held on Sept. 29 in the Holmes County High School. Boys and girls can enter. Boys 0 to 7 years old and girls 0 to 21 years old may compete and the Ms. competition will include ages 22 and up. Sign up will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sept. 18 at the Bonifay Dance Center on Highway 90. For more information, call Wanda at 614-1062 or 768-2005; or Bernyce at 547-3474 or 768-1150. Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences. Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section of www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership with Legacy com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212 Mrs. Theresa Ann Williams, 61, of Bonifay, died Aug. 24, 2012. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Theresa A. Williams Mrs. Mary Pachis McCullough of Bonifay died Aug. 24, 2012. Funeral services were held, Aug. 25, 2012 at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with interment at Lakeview United Methodist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Mary P. McCullough Mr. Lynvol Wilkerson of Holmes County, passed away on Monday, Aug. 27, 2012. He was 79. Lynvol was born Sept. 16, 1932, in Walton County, the son of Ira C. Wilkerson and Emma Elam Wilkerson. He was a graduate of Walton County High School, Class of 1951, and Troy State University. He enjoyed a 32-year career teaching History and Social Studies at Bethlehem High School. He was a Korean War Veteran, a member of the Esther Masonic Lodge for more than fty years, and a member of New Teamon Baptist Church. Lynvol enjoyed shing and hunting and was an avid fan of Bethlehem basketball during his career. After his retirement, he enjoyed traveling and riding his ATV with his dog, Baloo. Lynvol was preceded in death by his parents; ve sisters, Lola Owens, Lora Pearson, Blondene Beck, Roberta Frazier, and Dianne Laird, and three brothers, Ocelar, Kenneth, and Rodney Wilkerson. He is survived by his wife, Daisy; his son, David (Patricia) of Bonifay; his daughter, Shasta Kruse (Mark) of Tallahassee; four grandchildren, Dara, Kelsey, Nathan, and Hannah Wilkerson; two sisters, Cludie Faulk and Wavine Turner; four brothers, Ira Jr., Robert, Chester, and Jerome Wilkerson, and numerous nieces and nephews. The family received friends from 5 to 7 p.m., on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012, at the Williams Funeral Home in Graceville. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., on Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012, at New Teamon Baptist Church in Slocomb, Ala., with the Rev. Lee Chorn of ciating. Burial followed at the New Teamon Baptist Church Cemetery, with Williams Funeral Home of Graceville directing. In lieu of owers, memorials can be made to the New Teamon Baptist Church Building Fund, 3813 South County Road 85, Slocomb, AL 36375. Lynvol Wilkerson Mr. Ralph Bailey, 74 of Bonifay, died on Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012, at his Residence in Bonifay. Born Friday, April 22, 1938 in Muscogee County, Ga. He was the son of the late Wayne Bryant Bailey and Lucille Grubbs Bailey and is preceded in death by a son, Guy Lee Bailey, sister, Sybil Bowers, brother, Neil Bailey. He was a Veteran of the United States Navy. Surviving is his wife, Catherine Spurlin Bailey; sons, Tim Bailey of Americus, Ga., Allen Bailey of Americus, Ga., Roy Bailey of Americus, Ga., and Randy Bailey of Americus, Ga.; step-sons, Thomas Webb, Jacksonville, Robert Webb, Tampa, James Webb, Cottondale, and Douglas Webb, Smithville, Ga.; brothers, Willard Bailey of Perry, Billy Wayne Bailey of Chipley, Everett Bailey of Westville, Robert Bailey of Bonifay and David Bailey of Noma; sister, Joy Hollingsworth of Old Town, and nine grand children. A Funeral service was held at 2 p.m., on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012 at Sims Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Jason Campbell of ciating. Interment followed in the Caryville Cemetery, with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m., on Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2012, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Ralph Bailey Bernice Marie Sieg, 94 of Bonifay, died on Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012, at Doctors Memorial Hospital in Bonifay. Born Monday, Sept. 17, 1917, she was the daughter of the late William Miller and the late Leila Bush Miller. Surviving are sons, Billy Gene Sieg of Suwannee, and Jerry Sieg of Slidell, La.; daughter, Rebecca Clark of Bonifay; sister, Blondell Thompkins of Jacksonville; four grand children, and three great grand children. A Funeral service was held at 11 a.m., on Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2012 at Bonifay Cemetery with Lester Boswell, Ray Boswell, and the Rev. Tim Stout of ciating. Interment followed in the Bonifay Cemetery, with Sims Funeral Home directing. Bernice M. Sieg Mr. Donald Wayne Stricklen, 47 of Caryville, died on Friday, Aug. 24, 2012, at Northwest Florida Community Hospital in Chipley. Born Thursday, June 17, 1965 in Chipley, he was the son of the late George Stricklen and the late Joann Burns Stricklen. Surviving are daughter, Stephanie Stricklen of Vernon; brothers, Gregory Stricklen of Caryville, Mark Stricklen of Caryville, and Tom Stricklen of Caryville, and girlfriend, Sonya Deal of Caryville. A Funeral service was held at 2 p.m., on Saturday, Sept. 1, 2012 at Sims Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Lewis Burns officiating. Interment followed in the Caryville Cemetery, with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m., on Friday, Aug. 31, 2012, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel Donald W. Stricklen Mrs. Johnnie Mae Hill, 78, of Esto, passed away Aug. 28, 2012, in the Bonifay Nursing and Rehab Center, Bonifay. She was a homemaker of the Baptist Faith. She was a native of Lapine, Ala., and a long time resident of Ebro. Survivors include he husband, Willie Hill, of Ebro; two sisters, Eva Mae Robinson, Laura Hill, Mary Toles, Miami; a devoted niece, Denice (Ricky) Hogans, Vernon, and many other relatives and friends. Funeral services were conducted at 3 p.m., Sept. 2 at Oak Grove Baptist Church, Ebro, with the Rev. Carl Jett and the Rev. Billy Marshell, of ciating. Interment followed in the St. Luke Memorial Garden Cemetery, Vernon. The were reposed in the church one hour prior to services with the Copper Funeral Home of Chipley directing. Johnnie M. Hill Mr. Roosevelt Douglas, Jr., 79, of Chipley, passed away Aug. 28 in the Gulf Coast Medical Center, Panama City. He was a native of Washington County of the Baptist faith, a Korean War Veteran and a retired correction officer. He is the son of the late Roosevelt Sr. and Bessie Douglas of Ft. Walton Beach. Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Royce Lewis Douglas, Chipley; two children, Kenneth Douglas, Marianna and Donna Douglas of Tampa; two sisters, Dr. Thelma Wood, Vernon, and Mrs. Connie Mongomery, Fort Walton Beach, and many other relatives and friends. Funeral services were conducted at 1 p.m., Sept. 1, at the old Roulhac High School Auditorium in Chipley with the Rev. Price Wilson, and the Rev. Cleve Widderburn officiating. The remains were in repose at the auditorium one hour prior to service. Interment followed in the Southside Cemetery, Chipley with Military Honors and the Cooper Funeral Home of Chipley, directing. Roosevelt Douglas, Jr. Obituaries Community EVENTS

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Wednesday, September 5, 2012 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra By FELICIA KITZMILLER Halifax Media PANAMA CITY BEACH Dol phins are graceful, playful and intelligent and they dont need handouts. The National Marine Fisheries Service calls the Panama City area a hot spot for illegal dolphin interaction, and a recent report reveals those most passionate about dolphin interaction are the most ignorant of laws to protect the animals and the most likely to engage in harmful behavior. Feeding and harassing wild dolphins is prohibited by the Marine Mammals Protection Act. Violations of the act are prosecuted by the United States Attor neys Ofce and carry hefty nes and penalties. Yet the problem persists. Its true that Panama City is recognized and has been recognized for feeding dolphins, and that goes back at least 30 years, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser vation Commission (FWC) spokesman Stan Kirkland said. Why we got the repu tation I dont know. It proba bly goes back to taking tour ists out to see dolphins and, of course, everyone wants to get up close and theyd feed them. The report commis sioned by National Marine Fisheries Service, called Panama City Residents, Visitors and Business Operators Attitudes toward the Illegal Feeding and Ha rassment of Wild Dolphins, agrees with Kirklands assessment. Nearly 400 visitors, resi dents and business owners participated in the survey from November 2010 to July 2011. According to the sur vey, visitors are more likely to want to feed and interact with wild dolphins. Most say their interest stems from TV, movies and word of mouth. Most say they dont know if feeding dolphins is legal. You dont see dolphin interaction education in Tennessee, Kirkland said. Dane Taylor, who owns Dolphin Tours and More, said the problem is exacer bated by tour boat captains who feed the dolphins as a means of bringing animals closer to the boat. We have to correct them each and every time, Taylor said of his patrons. I tell them its a $100,000 ne; hence, there are no sh on this boat. Why its harmful Its easy to tell when a dolphin has been fed illegal ly, said Stacey Horstman, bottlenose conservation coordinator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The dol phins will approach the boats with their head out of the water and mouth open in classic baiting position, she said. While feeding wild dol phins may be well-inten tioned, Horstman said it can start an abundance of problems for dolphins who become acclimated to handouts. They can be hit by boat propellers, get tangled in hooks and shing lines, and natural hunting instincts fade. Dolphins ac customed to handouts have a tendency to pillage the lines of shermen, making them an object of contempt and sometimes a target for retribution. The sher ies survey showed charter shers were the least likely to be concerned about pro tecting wild dolphins. Earlier this summer Kirkland said he talked to a recreational sher who was hauling in a legal grouper when he watched a dolphin steal the sh right off his hook. To say he wasnt happy is an understatement, Kirkland said. Illegal dolphin feeding can have consequences for people, too, ofcials said. There are many document ed cases of dolphins biting people. Dolphins are large, powerful marine mammals, and they have a lot of teeth, Kirkland said. In July, a dolphin grabbed a teenage girl who was swimming at the St. Andrews State Park, Kirk land said. In that case the skin wasnt broken and the girl didnt require medical attention, but not all are so lucky. They dont know if someone is sticking their hand out to touch or pet them. They can mistake a hand or an arm for a food item, Horstman said. Enforcement In most cases when an FWC ofcer spots people feeding dolphins, they issue a warning, Kirkland said. If they are spotted again, they are ticketed. Commercial vessels, however, all have been warned, and if they are spotted by FWC they are immediately ticketed. Only a handful of citations have been issued in the last few years because everyone stops bad behavior as an FWC ofcer approaches, making feeding difcult to catch, Kirkland said. Interactions are even more difcult to police, Kirkland said. Humans are supposed to stay at least 50 yards from dolphins in the water, but it becomes a question of who was there rst. There is nothing to prohibit a dolphin from ap proaching a human, which happens often. Were not in the busi ness of trying to hamper a legitimate business, he said. Several Panama City businesses advertise dol phin interaction on their websites and feature photos of people swimming with one or several dolphins. Taylor said he allows his customers to enter the water when dolphins are spotted, but not in their im mediate area and only with a warning not to touch or hold on to the animals. Well anchor the boat and allow people to swim around an area dolphins are in and if a dolphin swims up to them, well, then, they had a good day, he said. Even passive interac tion with humans, however, can change a dolphins behavior and is therefore considered harassment, Horstman said. Capt. Andersons dolphin tours take a more stringent approach and dont let their patrons in the water. Its not legal to get up close enough and its really not safe to be trying to swim with wild dolphins, opera tions manager Pam Ander son said. They might have that smile on their face, but they are still wild animals. Competing against busi nesses that skirt the rules can be a challenge, but An derson said the safety of patrons is the rst priority. Hopefully those who arent doing that will be taken care of, she said. Dolphin enthusiasts can have a great experience if they get out on the boats of people who are doing it right. By CHRIS OLWELL Halifax Media PENSACOLA While making a career out of buying abandoned stor age units is bound to come with a few surprises along the way, Clay Knight will never see another unit like the one he opened up Fri day morning. I can surely hope not, Knight said. Ive seen some messed up things, but this tops the cake. Knight purchased the contents of a storage unit that had been rented by Michael Berkland, a former associate medical exam iner with the 1st Judicial Circuits Medical Examin ers Ofce who was red in 2003 for failing to complete autopsy reports. Knight said it wasnt an odor that tipped him and his wife to the presence of the re mains of about 100 people; they just opened a box and found pieces of people. The macabre discovery has sparked an investiga tion by the State Attorneys Ofce and the Medical Ex aminers Ofce into Berk land, who is believed to have collected the pieces during autopsies he con ducted privately in Panama City, Fort Walton Beach, Tallahassee and Pensacola between 1997 and 2007. None of the remains are believed to be connected to autopsies Berkland performed for the Medical Examiners Ofce. Berkland worked in pri vate pathology until 2007, when he lost his license to practice in Florida, ac cording to the SAO. Prior to coming to Florida, Berk land had been a coroner in Missouri, where his license was revoked in 1999. Berkland began renting the storage unit at Uncle Bobs Storage in April 2009. It was auctioned to Knight on Aug. 22, and Knight discovered the body parts two days later after hed cleared the unit of the of ce furniture and other property. Knight paid $900 for the contents of the unit, which included a lung, hearts, and 10 brains, ac cording to the SAO, as well as at least one ear and one tongue, Knight said. The pieces were stored in plastic containers, plastic bags and even a 32-ounce Styrofoam cup. Some of the containers had cracked and spilled. Many of the containers were labeled with the per sons name, autopsy date and autopsy location. Many others were not, which has complicated efforts by the Medical Examiners Ofce to contact the next of kin. Pensacola police re leased an incident report of the discovery, but a vepage inventory of the body parts was redacted. The inventory has not been released because some of the families of the de ceased might not be aware of the investigation. Police continue to inves tigate the case along with the Medical Examiners Ofce and the State Attor neys Ofce to determine what, if any, laws were bro ken. Berkland has not been charged. Knights purchase last week was the rst time hed bought the contents of an abandoned storage unit. He decided to take the rest of the week off from his new enterprise. On rst buy, man nds body parts Police still investigating discovery in ex-medical examiners storage unit N EWS H E R AL D F ILE PHOTO The seemingly harmless feeding and petting of wild dolphins is just the sort of behavior that could be illegal. The National Marine Fisheries Service calls the Panama City area a hot spot for illegal dolphin interaction. P.C. area a hot spot for illegal dolphin interaction

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BARONE ; ET AL., Defendants, NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendants: FRANK C. BARONE (LAST KNOWN RESIDENCE-209 WEST KANSAS AVENUE, BONIFAY, FL 32425) UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FRANK C. BARONE (LAST KNOWN RESIDENCE-209 WEST KANSAS AVENUE, BONIFAY, FL 32425) YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: THE WEST 175 FEET OF BLOCK NUMBERED 68 OF THE TOWN OF BONIFAY, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT OF THE SAME DRAWN BY G.W. BANFILL IN 1886, A COPY OF WHICH IS ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND WHICH LANDS ARE A PART OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST. a/k/a 209 W KANSAS AVENUE, BONIFAY, FL 32425 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Heller & Zion, LLP, Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1428 Brickell Avenue, Suite 700, Miami, Florida 33131 on or before October 5, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the HOLMES COUNTY ADVERTISER and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This notice is provided pursuant to Florida Rules of Judicial Administration Rule 2.540 Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447; Phone: 850-718-0026; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771; Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcour ts.org. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 21 day of August, 2012. Cody Taylor As Clerk of the Court By Diane Eaton As Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 5, 12, 2012. 9-5129 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 11-000317-CA 21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION, A Delaware corporation, Plaintiff, vs. MICHAEL K. MORRISON AND KRISTIN M. MORRISON, HIS WIFE; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiff’s Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on July 27, 2012 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on September 6, 2012 at 11:00 A.M. (CST), at Holmes County Courthouse, Bonifay, Fl., the following described property: See Attached Exhibit “A” annexed hereto and incorporated herein by this reference Together with that certain 2004 Nobility Model Kingswood 44 x 24 Serial Number N8-11376AB Property Address: 1704 Highway 173, Graceville, FL 32440 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTERST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated August 9, 2012. CODY TAYLOR, CLERK HOLMES COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT By:Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 29, September 5, 2012. 9-5138 Public Auction at El Sankary Towing in Ponce De Leon Fl, 1600 Pirate Cove Rd. 32455 at 8:00 a.m. on September 21, 2012: 1987 Honda TR200 FatCat Motorcycle Offroad-no Vin # Owner: Rodney Battle. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 5, 2012. 9-5140 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 2011CA000243 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ,acting through the United States Department of Agriculture, Rural Development, f/k/a Farmers Home Administration, a/k/a Rural Housing Service, Plaintiff, vs. CLAY P. WALKER A/K/A CLAY PRESTON WALKER; and TERESA C. WALKER A/K/A TERESA NOWELL WALKER, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on August 13, 2012, by the above entitled Court in the above styled cause, the undersigned Clerk of Court or any of his duly authorized deputies, will sell the property situated in HOLMES County, Florida, described as: An acre of land in Holmes County, Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the Southwest Corner of the NW 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of Section 28, Township 7 North, Range 13 West, and thence East, 397.78 feet to the Point of Beginning, said point being on the North side of a county road: thence S 89 40’E, along the North side of said road, 210 feet; thence N 1 20’W, 210 feet; thence N 89 40’W, 210 feet; thence S 1 20’E, 210 feet to the Point of Beginning. at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash on October 18, 2012, at the front door of the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, FL 32425, beginning at 11:00 A.M. Central Time, subject to all ad valorem taxes and assessments for the real property described above. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. REQUESTS FOR ACCOMMODATIONS BY PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator, Bay County Courthouse, 300 E. Fourth Street, Panama City, Florida 32401, (850)747-5338, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED on August 20, 2012. CODY TAYLOR Clerk of Circuit Court P.O. Box 397 Bonifay, FL 32425 BY: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 5, 12, 2012. 9-5136 ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS MOTOR-GRADERS Notice is hereby given that the Board of County Commissioners of Holmes County, Florida (the “County” or “HCBCC”), will receive sealed proposals from qualified vendors to furnish and sell certain motor grader equipment to the Holmes County, Florida, Board of County Commissioners Bid information and forms may be picked up at the Holmes County Commissioners’ Office located at 107 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425 or online at the County’s website. Bids must be sealed and plainly marked “HCBCC MOTOR-GRADER-12” and must be submitted to the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners’ office no later than 3:00 P.M. on September 14, 2012. Bids will be opened at the Board office at 3:45 P.M. on September 14, 2012. Bids received after the time set forth herein will be rejected and returned unopened to the bidder. All interested parties are strongly invited to bid and attend. Holmes County does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, or handicapped status in employment or provision of service As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 5, 2012. 9-5134 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 12-CA-186 RONALD M. MONK JR. and DONALD ROYCE MONK, Plaintiffs v. ROBERT C. MOORE PAUL MOORE and PAMELA CLARK, Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO:PAUL MOORE 631 N Hagadorn Street South Lyon, MI 48178 ROBERT C. MOORE 822 East Roosevelt Street, Mason, MI 48854 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Holmes County, Florida, for a Complaint to Quite Title, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses to it, if any, to: James J. Goodman, Jr., Attorney for the Petitioners, 935 Main Street, Chipley, FL 32428 on or before October 6, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, at the Holmes County Courthouse, 226 North Waukesha, Bonifay, Florida, either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; or a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. WITNESS my hand and Seal of this Court on the 21st day of August 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT, Diane Deaton, As Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012. 9-5135 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 12-CA-181 RONALD M. MONK JR., And DONALD ROYCE MONK, Plaintiffs V.REBECCA HAVARD And DANIEL HUGHES, Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: REBECCA HAVARD, 106 Fels Avenue, Fairhope, AL 36532; DANIEL HUGHES, 13947 Sherwood Highland, Fairhope, AL 36532. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Holmes County, Florida, for a Complaint to Quite Title, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses to it, if any, to: James J. Goodman, Jr., Attorney for the Petitioners, 935 Main Street, Chipley, FL 32428 on or before October 6, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, at the Holmes County Courthouse, Bonifay, Florida, either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; or a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. WITNESS my hand and Seal of this Court on the 21st day of August, 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT, Diane Deaton, Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times September 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012. 9-5137 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION FILE NUMBER 12-67PR IN RE: THE ESTATE OF CHARLES H. BUSH, Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of CHARLES H. BUSH, deceased, whose date of death was 2/23/2012, File Number 12-67PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida, Post Office Box 397, Bonifay, Florida, 32425. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against decedent’s Estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims and who may have been served a copy of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedent’s Estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOT WITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIMS FILED TWO YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is September 5, 2012. DONALD BUSH Personal Representative. 2400 Brooks Drive, Bonifay, Fl 32425 JEAN TOWERS TREJO Personal Representative, 960 Scottsdale Drive, Pingree Grove IL 60140. KRISTI MILLER NOVONGLOSKY THE LAW OFFICE OF KRISTI MILLER NOVONGLOSKY, PA FLORIDA BAR NO. 0182044 POST OFFICE BOX 1129, CHIPLEY, FLORIDA 32428 (850) 638-7587 ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 5, 12, 2012. 9-5143 PUBLIC AUCTION Howell Mini-Storage at 309 S. Waukesha St Bonifay Fl. 32425 will hold a private or public auction on the contents of these units, for nonpayment according to Fl. Statute 83. Tenant has until the 22 September 2012 at 10:00 AM to pay in full. No checks. Items of general household goods storage in buildings listed below. Building 2 unit 2 Robert Grimmer Building 3 unit 6 Frank Turbeville As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser September 5th and 12th, 2012. Looking for a Christian single lady 25 & older for friendship. Non-smoker & drinker. Disability ok. (850)547-1445. AUCTION LARGE Annual Fall Construction & Harvest Auction DATE: September 15th, 2012 8:00AM LOCATION: 5529 Hwy231 North Campbellton Fl 32426 (3) Local Farm Dispersals, (2) Estates, Bank Repos, Sheriff Depts, city and county surplus, plus consignments. Mason Auction & Sales LLC # AB2766 850-263-0473 Office 850-258-7652 Chad Mason 850-849-0792 Gerald Mason www.masonauction.com GIGANTIC AUCTION, September 12-13, 2012, 3475 Ashley Rd., Montgomery, Alabama. Crawler tractors & loaders, hydraulic excavators, articulating dumps, roll-offs and truck-tractors, motor scrapers & graders, loader backhoes, wheel loaders, forklifts, trenchers, skid steers, paving & compaction, rollers, tri-tandem & single axle dumps, lowboys, skidders, feller bunchers, log loaders & trailers, farm tractors, travel trailers. Over 800 Items will be sold! For details visit: www. jmwood.com. J.M. Wood Auction Co., Inc. (334) 264-3265. Bryant Wood Al lic #1137 Promotional prices start at $19.99 a month for DISH for 12 months. Call Today and ask about Next Day Installation. (800) 336-7043. For Sale 2 New Brown bar stools. $30 ea. Call Karen @ 850-252-3238 Flea across Florida 272 mile yard sale Sept 14, 15, 16. Three days through Caryville, Fl. Come join us. Open 8 a.m. Fri & Sat Sept 7 &8 8Am. Antiques, furniture, appliances, household goods, clothing & more. 949 Orange Hill Rd .Just S. of Brickyard Rd Yard Sale Sept 8th 8:00-Until. 925 Carlisle Rd. Behind GoodWill & McDonalds. LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE: Like a big Flea Market, but yard sale prices. Friday & Saturday September 7th & 8th 8:00AM5:00PM. Located on the bypass (Maple Avenue) Geneva, AL. Near Courthouse. K&L Farm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 NOW OPEN U-Pick Grapes! Open 7 days a week 7AM-7PM 1304-A Clayton Rd., Chipley. U pick $5.00 gallon. 850-638-2624 Wood mizer LT-40 bend sawmill 18” planer, electric powered. Oliver tractor 115 hp. Treated lumber, 184, 186, 286, 686, 284 on 2x4’s, 16 ft. long. For more info call (850)547-0956 or (850)326-4548. Caryville Flea Market Produce, knives, honey, westerns, movies, baseball cards, old tools, new and used stuff. Open Saturdays 8 a.m. For Sale 12X20 sjed w/ 12x20 carport. In good cond. Asking $2,500 OBO. Willing to trade for vehicle of equal value. 850-326-1263 For Sale 8 x10 Utility Shed approx 1 1/2 years old. Excellent cond. Gave $1600, asking $900. Dining table w/ 4 chairs very nice $125, solid oak armoir, will last several life times. Gave $800, asking $450 Call 850-956-2037 Gilbert Catfish Pond Closed Monday and Tuesday 2854 Highview Circle Chipley, Fl 32428 Phone:850-638-8633 For Rent: Nice Townhouse apartment 2BR/2.5BA, one car garage in downtown Bonifay. NO PETS. Call (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586. One Bdrm. Apartment. Bonifay area. Stove, refrigerator. Includes all electricity & utilities. $425/month. Info: (850)547-0956, (850)326-4548 2 bed 1.5 bath cute house in Ponce de Leon. $500 deposit $700 month. Small pet ok with deposit, available now.Call 850-496-7088 or 850-598-6823 2 Houses For Rent 2BD/1BA w/ bonus room on 1 acre near Falling Waters. $575/mth plus deposit & references. 2BD/1BA w/ carport in Cottondale. $ 425/mth plus deposit & references. 850-579-4317 or 866-1965 2BD/1BA House 901 Main St Chipley. $600 mth. Security depo $575. Available 8/29 Call 850-271-9973. 3BR/1.5BA for rent $650/mth. No pets. Deposit, & references required Chipley. 638-1918 3/2 house in Chipley. will be available after the first of September. Rent $700 per month with $500 security deposit. Progressive Realty 850-638-8220 FOR RENT: Doublewide MH, 3/2, Pleasant Hill Rd, Washington Co just South of Bonifay. $600 per month with $500 security deposit. No pets please. For immediate occupancy. Progressive Realty 850-638-8220 In Chipley City Limits 4BD/2BA living room, dining room. For more information call Tina 850-573-0319 (2) 2BR/2BA MH for rent near Chipley. Water & garbage furnished. $400 & $425 plus deposit. Call 547-4232. 527-4911 3bd/1ba in Wausau. $400/mth plus security. NO PETS. 773-1352 OR 258-3815. Remodel 3BR/2BA Mobile Home. 1BR/1BA Mobile Home. Call 638-0451 for info. 32 x 52’ Block building on 1/2 acre land. 1 mile from Bonifay city limits. $25,000. Part trade for car or truck. (850)768-0165. Acre of land for sale Hwy 177A, Bonifay. (863)773-6155

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, September 5, 2012 Featured Jobs To Place An Employment Here Please Contact Lorna Brown Phone: (850) 747-5019 € Email: lbrown@pcnh.com Like Us On Facebook: www.facebook.com/emcoastjobs Or Follow Us on Twitter: @emcoastjobs emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By LARRY BUHLMonster Contributing Writer If you spend a lot of time at a desk, personalizing the space makes sense „ whether its a private corner office or a shared cubicle. But just as your clothes and body language make an impression on others, your workspace gives co-workers and clients a distinct impression about you. Plants, books, artwork „ even your name plaque „ transmit clues about your efficiency, sociability and competence, experts say. Everything in your office sends a message, whether you want it to or not,Ž said Lisa Marie Luccioni, an adjunct professor of communication at the University of Cincinnati. So what might they be thinking when they see your space?You would rather be fishing (or skiing or skydiving or ... )Evidence: Pictures and artifacts from your hobby on every surface. Theres a delicate balance between sharing your interests and giving the impression that you are daydreaming all day about jumping out of planes or skiing, according to Barbara Pachter, business etiquette expert and the author of New Rules at Work.Ž Pictures of your hobby are good conversation starters, but if you have too many of them, it makes people wonder whether youre really daydreaming about fly-fishing,Ž she says.They can hang aroundEvidence: A full candy dish, aspirin in the drawer, well-tended plants, pictures of children and babies. Things like an open door, candy, a comfortable guest chair and photos of people „ but not pictures of objects „ signal an extroverted workspace that people will feel free to linger in,Ž said Sam Gosling, a professor of psychology at the University of Texas and author of Snoop: What Your Stuff Says About You.ŽThey shouldnt hang around Evidence: Flimsy guest chair, guest chair covered in files or no guest chair. Your desk faces away from guests. Minimal or no decoration. Even if your office has photos or artwork, but theyre images of things and not people, (people) can make an assumption youre more introverted and might not want them to linger,Ž Gosling says.You demand respect Evidence: Multiple degrees on the wall, awards on the shelf, pictures of you and important people, magazines featuring articles about you. The plaque on your desk says your full name and title and lists your advanced degrees. Name plaques form a strong impression,Ž Luccioni says. If it says just your first name, people assume youre friendly and approachable. If it has a formal title, they think you want to be respected for your rank.Ž They should avoid doing business with youEvidence: Messy piles of papers on every surface. Half-eaten donuts atop teetering stacks of binders. Carpet stains. Experts agree a messy office can seriously damage your reputation as a conscientious person. Its hard to function in a messy office, and people assume your office chaos will spill over to their project and their files will be lost in your mess,Ž Pachter says.You dont take the whole work thing too seriouslyEvidence: Humorous posters, ironic bumper stickers, whimsical images and toys.Conscious decoratingExperts have several suggestions for making sure your workspace matches the image you want to project. Err on the conservative side: If clients visit you or if you are in a high-traffic area, you want to make sure people dont stop in their tracks to gawk at your collection of teddy bears or tiki torches. Be careful with controversial items: Consider the cost-reward ratio of putting up something like a political campaign poster,Ž Luccioni says. You might find kindred spirits, or you might offend people and get a first meeting off to a bad start.Ž All experts say anything potentially racist, sexist, homophobic or otherwise disparaging of a group is a no-no. Follow industry norms: Some industries demand a strict image of seriousness, while others are more laid-back. A poster with a funny or counterculture slogan is more appropriate in the office of an advertising copywriter than the office a defense attorney. Consider the physical arrangement: A desk can act as a barrier and give formality, which is good for reviews but can be intimidating,Ž Luccioni says. She adds that a small circular table allows everyone to meet on an equal basis. A power difference, if you want that, can be achieved by giving guests smaller, flimsier chairs. And if you tend to make snap judgments about others offices, try to look at the bigger picture, Gosling recommends. Any one item can have many different purposes,Ž he says. If someone has a plant, maybe they have a green thumb, maybe theyre into feng shui or maybe the plant was left over from the last person in that office. If you see someone with a super-neat desk, how do you know whether theyre truly neat, or whether they swept everything into a drawer before you stopped by?Ž What your workplace says about you Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMENEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!!! Become a Newspaper Carrier or Single Copy/ Rack Route Marianna, Cottondale, Chipley, & Bonifay. Area Carriers Open routes available in the early morning Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS Deliver your newspaper in your communityIndependent ContractorsMust have: A reliable vehicle Proof of Auto Insurance A valid driver’s license Be 18 yrs or older Contact Colin Parker cparker@chipleypaper.c om 501 W 11th St. and complete a carrier application Experienced/ Skills Cabinet maker wanted immediately.Please contact Carpenter Son at 850-326-8232 for additional information or interview. Wages will be discussed at the time of interview and based on verifiable work experience. Full time permanent position. Preschool has opening for someone to care for and teach young children. Experience and classes a plus. (850)547-1444. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our Medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 Airlines Are HiringTrain for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified-Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866) 314-3769. ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINEfrom Home. Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com ATTN: DRIVERS ....Apply Now 13 Driver Positions Top 5% Pay, 401K, Great Insurance, New KW Conventionals Need CDL Class A Driving Exp. Call ( 877) 258-8782. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job Ready in just 15 days (888) 368-1964. Drivers 100% Owner Operator Co. Pay increase/Home weekly, Regional & Dedicated Class A-CDL 1 yr. exp. in last 3 Call (800) 695-9643 or www. driveforwatkins.com DriversAnnual Salary $45K to $60K. Quarterly Bonus. Flexible hometime. Refrigerated and Dry Van Freight. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. (800) 414-9569. www. driverknight.com DRIVERS/ CLASS A Flatbed, GET HOME WEEKENDS! Up to 39¢/mi, Late model equipment & Big Miles! 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800) 5725489x 227, SunBelt Transport EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE Medical Billing Training! Train for Medical Billing Careers at SCTrain.edu No Exprience Needed! Job placement assistance after training! HS/GED/ PC Needed (888) 872-4677 MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179. Medical OfficeTrainees Needed! Become a Medical Office Assistant at SC Train!! No Experience needed! Online Training gets you job ready! HS Diploma/ GED & PC/Internet needed! (888) 374-7294. Nursing CareersBegin Here-GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURA INSTITUTE (877) 206-6559. START NOW! OPEN A RED HOT DOLLAR, DOLLAR PLUS, MAILBOX, DISCOUNT PARTY, DISCOUNT CLOTHING, TEEN STORE, FITNESS CENTER FROM $51,900 WORLDWIDE! WWW.DRSS20.COM (800)518-3064 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 1978 Chevy El Camino 350 cubic inch Chevy engine. Four barrael Elderbock carb, glass pack muffler, automatic, streight body. $4000. OBO 850-624-1679 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $16,800, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414



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50www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visitBONIFAYNOW.COMPhone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 IN BRIEF bonifaynow.comConnect With Us 24/7 Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo galleries, opinions and more...@WCN_HCT And Mobile Too Bus drivers just want a little respectBy CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Several bus drivers with family members were present at the Holmes County School Boards regularly scheduled meeting on Aug. 21 requesting to be heard about issues that were concerning them. One local bus driver of over 15 years, Janet Ellenburg, stood before the board with various concerns. You got to have a love for this job because there isnt much money in it, Ellenburg said. We were wondering if we can set up a meeting with the board to make our conditions a little better. We have a problem communicating, and we just want a little respect. She explained that sometimes bus drivers have questions, but no one to turn to and there hasnt been an outline of the rules provided for them. Teachers treat us like second rate citizens, Ellenburg said. When you have a problem with a child and are only paid for three and a half hours a day, weve got to spend more time at the schools unpaid time. Another issue was the new policy of transporting 3-year-olds on the bus for the Exceptional Student Education. She said that not only had they not received proper information on the children, but sometimes they werent even told that a special needs child was being brought aboard for transport. HOLMES COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETINGBy CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Holmes County Board of County Commissioners approved of Nicole Niki Crawson as the new Holmes County Extension 4-H Agent at their regularly scheduled meeting on Aug. 28. The University of Florida has completed the interview process, and I would like to formally recommend that the board approve Crawson as the new Holmes County Extension 4-H Agent, wrote HC CED and Extension Agent Shep Eubanks. The University of Florida IFAS Extension would like for Crawson to begin work on Friday, Sept. 14. The board approved of Commissioner Kenneth Williams recommendation that the county employees go back to being paid for overtime instead of compensatory time. Williams explained that workers were taking the time off almost as quick as they were acquiring it, causing a mess. The board also heard that a resident of Holmes County was experiencing ooding at his residence recently and was inquiring what recent activity done by the county could have caused it. Whitney Nelson of Melvin Engineering reported that he investigated the area around the mans residence as far as could impact his property and said he found no recent county activity that would create ooding on the mans property. The next Holmes County Board of County Commission meeting is scheduled for 9 a.m. on Sept. 11 at the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners room, which is located beside the Holmes County Court House.HC BOCC approves new extension 4-H agentSpecial to the Times-AdvertiserFormerly West Florida Wilderness School, a moderate risk program holding up to 30 students, the school has now changed over to AMIKids West Florida a foster care center, working under the blanket of Department of Children and Family Services. This foster care center is designed for teenage boys that require a more structured environment to ensure that they attend and receive mental health, substance abuse, education, behavioral, medical and dental services. The home will work with boys that have demonstrated behaviors, such as running away and conduct disorder, that are difficult to treat in their regular home setting. The school will house 24 students with a one to six staff to child ratio. The 12-acre campus will basically remain the same and operate 24 hours a day all year round with supervision by trained staff. Each youth will have a service plan developed by a multi-disciplinary treatment team that Holmes welcomes new AMIKids programBy RANDAL SEYLER638-0212 | @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Its a message youve probably heard before Live United. But what does it mean for the residents of Holmes and Washington counties? There are 30 agencies serving Holmes County that are United Way agencies, said Ron Sharpe, director of resource development for United Way of Northwest Florida. After brie y consulting a list of agencies, he adds, and there are 32 agencies United Way touches livesLocal agencies bene t from donations See AMIKIDS A2 See UNITED WAY A2 See DRIVERS A5Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 5 2012Volume 122, Number 17 LOCAL UNITED WAY BOARD MEMBERS Holmes CountyJulia Bullington: Holmes County Chamber of CommerceBrenda Blitch: Doctors Memorial HospitalMelissa Bruner: Regions BankFran Haithcoat: Wells Fargo INDEXArrests .................................A3 Opinion ................................A4 Outdoors ..............................A6 Sports ..................................A7 Extra ....................................B1 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B7School bands face off B1 Chamber hosts SoutherlandThe Holmes County Chamber of Commerce will hold a Meet and Greet with U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland II at 2 p.m. today, Sept. 5, at the Chamber of ce in Bonifay. The public is invited to attend. For more information, call Julia Bullington at 547-6155.2012 Miss Graceville Harvest FestivalGRACEVILLE The 31st annual Harvest Festival Pageant will be held at the Graceville Civic Center in Graceville at 6:30 p.m. on Sept. 7 and 8. All proceeds will go to the Graceville Harvest Day Celebration. For more information, call Teresa Bush at 2634744 or 263-3072 or Michelle Watkins at the City of Graceville at 263-3250.Picnic in The Park plannedPONCE de LEON SPRINGS Holmes County Teen Court, Holmes County School Board, C.A.S.E Coalition, the Sheriffs Department and the Florida Department of Environment Protection will be sponsoring a Picnic in The Park from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sept. 8 at Ponce de Leon Springs. Entry is free of charge, and there will be free hamburgers, free hotdogs, games and swimming. Come out and help keep our youth drug and crime free.SPECIAL TO THE TIMES-ADVERTISERAt the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce meeting in May, the United Way of Northwest Florida distributed checks to local agencies. The United Way is beginning its fundraising drive for 2013, kicking off on Saturday with Dine United.

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LocalA2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, September 5, 2012 I am quitting smoking for my family. The Big Bend Area Health Education Center (Big Bend AHEC) is offering FREE tobacco cessation classes in Holmes County and throughout the Big Bend region. We know the challenges you face. We will help you develop the tools to succeed and we will provide the support you need. For more information, call Big Bend AHEC at: 850-482-6500 (local office) or 1-87-QUIT-NOW-6 (1-877-848-6696) Visit www.ahectobacco.com for the schedule of classes we have available. FREE NICOTINE PATCHES! NO COST TO ATTEND! serving Washington County. Those are all agencies that impact the people who live right here. Sharp was in Bonifay Thursday for the August Holmes County Chamber of Commerce meeting as businesses and organizations throughout the area begin their annual fundraising campaigns to bene t the United Way of Northwest Florida. Fifty percent of the people in our area visit a United Way agency at one time or another, Sharpe said. I usually say, look to your left; now look to your right. You probably see someone the United Way has helped. The annual fundraising program begins Saturday, Sept. 8, with Dine United. Participating restaurants donate a portion of their proceeds on Saturday to the United Way, according to the United Way website, unitedwaynw .org. Some of the area restaurants participating include Popeyes, Subway, T.G.I.Fridays, Sonnys Real Pit Bar-B-Q and Margaritaville. The full list is available on the website. The United Way of Northwest Florida serves bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson and Washington counties. Local agencies that bene t from the United Way include the Washington County Council on Aging, Tri-County Community Council, The Salvation Army, Bay Area Food Bank (which serves local church food pantries), ARC in Chipley and Literacy Volunteers of Washington County, just to name a few. Its such a wide diversity of people who bene t from services supported by United Way, Sharpe said. From pre-kindergarten programs to Meals on Wheels for the elderly, United Way touches lives across the spectrum. Sharpe said the strength of the United Way is that the money collected from the contributions throughout the year combines to help agencies get matching funds. For every $1 United Way gives to the Meals On Wheels program, the Council on Aging receives $9 in matching funds. Employers who have campaigns in their workplace allow employees to make donations via payroll deduction. One dollar a week, $52 a year, that is a Coke a week. Youre not going to miss it, but it is going to do a world of good right here in our communities. From each dollar donated, 95 cents stays in the region, and 80 cents is returned to the local agencies, Sharpe said. We keep our costs low so that money can go back to the agencies. In Chipley, the prekindergarten program at Kids World not only bene ts from United Way, but the employees raised over $3,500 in donations with their own campaign. Each dollar the United Way provides to pre-kindergarten care receives $17 in matching funds, meaning the funds raised at Kids World has a $63,000 impact on the community. Small businesses are as important as large ones, and every campaign makes a difference, Sharpe said. Another program United Way is bringing to Washington and Holmes counties is the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program, and the United Way is looking for local volunteers to be trained in assisting people with their tax returns. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities recently invited Sharpe to attend a two-day tax credit seminar on Sept. 19-20 in Washington, D.C., based on the success the VITA program had in Northwest Florida last year. VITA is an IRS sanctioned program that trains volunteers to prepare simple tax returns for individuals and families with a low-to-moderate income. In 2012, the local VITA program processed 2,281 tax returns, which brought approximately $2.7 million in refunds back into Bay County. Many individuals who qualify for this service are unaware of tax credits that are available to them, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit or the Child Tax Credit, or lack the resources to le their own tax returns. We help those who dont know how to do tax returns, and those who cant afford $150 or $250 to have a preparer do their taxes for them, Sharpe said. He noted that VITA was not a competitor with H&R Block or local accountants. The people who come to us for help werent going to go anywhere else they couldnt afford it. Many of the people helped last year did not know about the Earned Income Tax Credit and the VITA program helped bring an estimated $3 million back into the local economy, Sharpe said. Last year VITA volunteers were available in Wausau, Vernon and at the Washington County Chamber of Commerce ofce in Chipley, but Sharpe hopes to improve on that availability this coming spring. Were recruiting people to help with VITA, and we train them. We also hope to bring nancial literacy education into the program in the future, and help people learn about checking, savings and credit. Another new program the United Way of Northwest Florida is offering is a discount prescription drug plan, which can save members 20 percent on brand name drugs and 40 percent on generics, Sharpe said. This program is totally free and is there to help people with no health insurance, Sharpe said. Did you know that 25.7 percent of the citizens in Washington County have no health insurance? Those using the United Way prescription drug plan just present the card at the pharmacy when lling a prescription. The card is accepted at 53,000 pharmacies nationwide and instructions are available in English and Spanish. The discount card is also available online, Sharpe said. You can get the card on our website, he said. FIRST CALL FOR HELPFor assistance from the United Way of Northwest Florida, call 1-800696-8740 UNITED WAY from page A1includes a licensed mental health counselor, who is also a certified addiction professional. Each student will attend school in the Holmes County School District and will be able to attend extracurricular activities, such as sports and all school-related recreation. There are currently four local church organizations that provide on-site ministries, additional counseling and baptisms. Participation in all religious services is strictly voluntary. The youth can also participate in lifeguard certification, scuba and CPR by trained instructors on campus. As before, community service will play a big role in the student program. Everything from sandbagging Holmes and businesses to cooking at the rodeo and helping out at the local retirement homes will play a part for each student to give back to our community. Please contact Ms. Kim Hughes, executive director, 548-5524 for any additional information. AMIKIDS from page A1 ON THE WEBVisit United Way of Northwest Floridas website at www.united waynw .org www.united Special to the Times-AdvertiserPOPLAR SPRINGS Bethel Baptist Church will hold revival services beginning Sunday, Sept. 16, and continuing nightly until Sept. 19. Guest speaker will be the Rev. Larry Finley, pastor of Northside Baptist Church in Starke, Fla. Special music will be provided by the Bethel Choir at each service. Services will be held at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. on Sunday then at 7 p.m. nightly Monday to Wednesday. Pastor Kent Lampp and the congregation offer a warm invitation to the public to attend the services. The church is at 1349 Hwy. 172 in the Poplar Springs community.Bethel Baptist plans revivalSpecial to the Times-AdvertiserMARIANNA After an extensive search, Steve Anderson has been selected as the new director of Public Service Programs at Chipola College. Public Service includes academies in corrections, law enforcement and re ghting. Anderson has more than 38 years of experience in the Public Service eld. He has served as state investigator for the 14th Judicial Circuit of Florida. As well, he previously served as a Probation Supervisor for the Court system under Judge Woodrow W. Hatcher. He has taught numerous criminal justice classes over his years of public service. For information about Chipolas Public Service programs, visit www. chipola.edu or phone 850-718-2394.Chipola gets new Public Service Programs director

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A3Wednesday, September 5, 2012 Tri-County Gas Celebrates Its 50th Anniversary From L-R: Adam Majors 2 years, Stephanie Martin 17 years, Haywood Smith 17 years, Jimmy Manuel, President 30+ years, Heather Mayo 2 years, James Marcum 7 years, Bart White 3 years, Gerald Dowling 40+ years, (Not pictured) Harold Smith 40+ years Tri-County Gas Celebrates August 19 25, 2012 Zachary Andrews, 23, Battery domestic, criminal mischief Ray Phillips Appley, 54, marijuana cultivation Jeffray Lane Baxley, 26, violation of drivers license restrictions Walter Allen Ferrell, 46, violation of probation on no valid license Jose Gonzalez-Ruiz, 57, driving under the in uence Dominic Edwin Goodwin, 31, violation of possession of new legend without prescription, violation of probation on disorderly conduct, battery domestic violence Glenn Gilbert Gunn, 46, felony violation of probation Madeleine Michelle Hall, 40, disorderly intoxication, violation of probation on no valid drivers license, violation of probation on leaving the scene of an accident, violation of probation on domestic battery, violation of probation on criminal mischief, violation of probation on false information given to law enforcement of cer Katherine Holt, 47, no charges listed Katherine Holt, 47, no charges listed Lesly Houglund, 49, violation of probation on domestic battery Joseph Wellington Jellison, 40, driving while license suspended or revoked Joseph Allen Kirkland, 46, battery domestic Alberto Jose Lopez, 27, hold for Miami Jeffrey Dan Pitts, 41, recommit on constructive possession of weapon Charles Tracy Recor, 53, domestic battery, manufacturing of meth, assault domestic violence, felon in possession Brian John Smith, 23, hold for Miami Dade Christian Smith, 32, hold for Miami Marklinn R. Smith, 48, marijuana cultivation August 20 24, 2012 Marriages Jamey Christopher Padget, 2-27-1987 of Headland Ala., and Ashley Nicole Johnson, 7-10-1989 of Geneva Ala. James Scott Thompson, 10-9-1974 of Chipley and Paula Renea Jernigan, 12-291979 of Bonifay Richard Eugene Murren, 10-4-1925 of Alford and Imogene Jordan, 8-8-1947 of Alford Divorces There were no divorces reported for the week of August 20-24.From Staff ReportsCHIPLEY The noti cation that Northwest Florida Community Hospital has been named one of Americas top 5,000 businesses by Inc. Magazine almost went unread. The envelope said something about an invitation, and we get a zillion things like it in the mail, NFCH President/CEO Patrick Schlenker said Aug. 23. It sat there a couple of days before I opened it. When it was nally opened, Schlenker learned the Chipley hospital was listed at 2,969 in the to 5,000 businesses in the U.S. That is top 5,000 out of about 5.2 million U.S. businesses, Schlenker notes. The Inc. 5000 is ranked according to percentage revenue growth over a four-year period. To qualify, companies must have been founded and generating revenue by the rst week of the starting calendar year, and therefore able to show four full calendar years of sales. The 2012 list is currently on the magazines website, www.inc.com. Each year over 676,000 new business are registered, Schlenker. For the past 30 years the organization Inc. has recognized the top 5,000 fastestgrowing private companies in America. As an Inc. 5000 honoree, Northwest Florida Community Hospital now shares a pedigree with Intuit, Zappos, Under Armour, Microsoft, Jamba Juice, Timberland, Clif Bar, Pandora, Patagonia, Oracle, and other notable alumni, Inc. Magazine Editor In Chief Eric Schurenberg wrote in the noti cation letter. In addition to Northwest Florida Community Hospital the 2012 list added such powerhouses as Publix Supermarkets, CDW, Levi Strauss and a little social media company called Facebook. Welcome to a very exclusive club. To me that is almost an impossible achievement, Schlenker said. It took a lot of folks for us to receive that honor. We have a very dedicated, hardworking team. Schlenker said the hospitals board, physicians, 270 associates and a very dedicated community have worked together to make NFCH a success. You have to have community support, without that, none of this would be possible. The Washington County Chamber of Commerce is also a great supporter of NFCH, he said. We have been very blessed. The entry on Northwest Florida Community Hospital shows that the hospital has posted a 3-Year growth of 74 percent and reported 2011 revenue of $62.4 million. According to the magazine, the hospital had $35.9 million in 2008 revenue and has added 95 jobs in the previous three years. The hospital was founded in 1951 and has 212 employees. NFCH ranks 243 in the health industry list, according to the magazine. NFCH is a 59-bed health care facility that includes a 25-bed critical access hospital, a 34-bed long-term care facility, and a home health agency. If offers a wide range of services, including family medicine, surgery, podiatry, cardiology, sleep studies, counseling, and lab services. The 2012 Inc. 500|5000 is ranked according to percentage revenue growth when comparing 2008 to 2011, according to the website inc.com. To qualify, companies must have been founded and generating revenue by March 31, 2008. They had to be U.S.-based, privately held, for pro t, and independentnot subsidiaries or divisions of other companiesas of December 31, 2011. (Since then, a number of companies on the list have gone public or been acquired.) The minimum revenue required for 2008 is $100,000; the minimum for 2011 is $2 million. As always, Inc. reserves the right to decline applicants for subjective reasons. Companies on the Inc. 500 are featured in Inc.s September issue. We are so proud and honored to have been recognized as one of their fastestgrowing private companies, Schlenker said. Marriages & DIVORCES Arrest REPORT SPECIAL TO THE TIMES-ADVERTISERNorthwest Florida Community Hospital administrators and staff celebrated the hospitals inclusion in the Inc. Magazine Inc. 5000 on Aug. 23.NFCH named to Inc. 5000 listGrowth, revenues lands local hospital national recognition TOP 10 FASTEST GROWING COMPANIES ON THE INC. 5000 LISTRANK CO. NAME PERCENTAGE 3-YEAR GROWTH 1 Uni ed Payments 23.646 2 Astrum Solar 23.577 3 Edge Solutions 21.036 4 Integrity Funding 12.443 5 Gold & Silver Buyers 12.222 6 Captial Payments 11.676 7 AdRoll 11.082 8 Acquia 10.461 9 Red Frog Events 10.404 10 Cartagz 10.237

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Another family member, Maria Rogers Heil, daughter of Muriel Wells Turner and W. A. (Will) Rogers of Marianna, has inspired the prattle topic for today. Her sons, Austin and Graham, along with her paternal grandparent, Clark and Myrtle Rogers of Vernon, will appreciate the writings of this young lady. A few years ago, Maria, a decorator, was asked to write an essay in a job interview on the subject of What Inspires Me. She wrote a story about how her grandmother, my mother, Marie Harris Wells, had inspired her. She, and the other grandchildren, affectionately called this lady Granny Rie. Recently when Maria went to work full time at Chrysalis Fine Fabrics in Tallahassee, she was asked the same question as to what inspired her. She pulled out her story of the past, did some embellishments and presented it to her new employer. Chrysalis Fine Fabrics is a store in Tallahassee that sells beautiful fabrics for the home and assists customers with decorating decisions. They can be found on the internet, complete with a blog page which makes reference to Marias story, of cially entitled A Lesson in Beauty. Outside the dining room window of my grandparents farmhouse was the most majestic fig tree! Red birds decorated the branches like baubles on a Christmas tree as they filled their bellies with the sunflower seeds my Pa sprinkled on the ground below. I remember, like yesterday asking my Grannie Rie why some of the birds were redder than others. Some were actually prettier. She gently explained that the female birds were less vibrant than the males because of their roles in nature. They needed to blend with the scenery to protect their young. It was not their choice but their de nition by natureGod. She also told me that their color reminded her of the barn that stood in spite of itself next to the old house. It too, was less vibrant, but had protected the corn in the crib to feed the cattle during the winter months, housed the equipment from inclimate weather, and kept the newborns warm in the stables. Faded and worn but beautiful because of its purpose. Her answer led me to look at my surroundings differently. Beauty isnt always found in the most vibrant, obvious or expected. It truly belongs to everyone and everything. Sometimes the very purpose of love of something makes it beautiful. I guess thats what is meant by the expression, Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I know the vibrant and bold colors of red were my grandmothers favorite. She wore it in her best Sunday dresses and carefully drew it on her lips. But I think she identified more with the female cardinal and the old barns shades of red. She saw them as beautiful because of her own purpose. She was the mother of ten children and her role and purpose was something defined for her. She found beauty in this life and raised her family in the background or camouflage of the vibrant male, father, husband and local farmer. She loved her gentle role in nature and her subtle beauty is found in all of her offspring. She watched over them and cheered them on when time to leave the nest behind. She gave them roots and wings. Much of my own talent comes solely from nature. I did not study art or design in college. My passion for design comes from my roots and wings. In agreeing for this story to be printed as a Perrys Prattle, Maria wrote that she is flattered to know that Uncle Perry wanted to use this in his column. She further acknowledged I embellished the story a little, but the heart of the lesson remains unchanged. She concluded Granny Rie forever made me aware of the female cardinal and its subtle beauty just like hers!! Readers of Perrys Prattle will know that your writer is one of the ten children born to Granny Rie and Pa and reared to adulthood in the home place, complete with the fig tree, the Red birds, and the dilapidated barn and other functional out building on all farms of that era. It was beyond my fondest dreams or imagination that I would ever see the scenes and setting put in print so beautifully, professionally and academically as was done by my niece. I believe that I can safely say that the host of family, neighbors, fellow church associates and friends will appreciate the analogy of this uncommon lady to natures loveliness and beauty. See you all next week. Miss Lizzie Lewis called me the other day lled with excitement and told me about a celebrity visitor shed had for lunch the day before. Carolina Rose who Lizzie said was the daughter of the late Bill Monroe was traveling from engagements in New Orleans and Mississippi to some place in south Florida. Those of you who read my column or know Miss Lizzie, know that for years she has been the national chairman of the Bill Monroe fan club. She makes the annual pilgrimage in late September or early October to Rosine Kentucky for the Bluegrass Festival at the home place of the Bill Monroe family on Jerusalem Ridge. So she has come to know the Monroe family and those associated with the festival including Dr. Mercer Campbell and his wife who heads the Monroe foundation. When Carolina Rose who was traveling solo on this tour saw that shed go through Bonifay she called the Lewis household and arranged to come by for a visit. Of course Miss Lizzie and her daughters, Mattie Lou Scarvey and Daisy Swearingen prepared lunch and were gracious southern hostesses for their honored guest. I personally had not known who Carolina Rose is, but looking her up on line, I learned that she was born Gloria Jean Polk to Ruby Elma Polk in Virginia. Her biography tells of her not knowing who her father was until 2002 and meeting her brother, Al Jones in 2005. Al claims his mother Lura Jones told him when he was ten years old that he was the son of Bill Monroe. Though some of the family of Bill Monroe have denied the existence of illegitimate children to the famous Bluegrass entertainer, Gloria Jean also known as Carolina Rose and Al Jones were introduced at the 2005 Monroe festival as the son and daughter of Bill Monroe. Many say that his song, Georgia Rose, tells the story of the child he didnt know. Adding credence to Carolina Rose and Al Jones claims is the fact that Monroe provided in his will the sum of one dollar to any children who came forward claiming to be rightful heirs. Of course that may be standard practice for celebrities to protect their legal heirs in that way. As far as I know, neither of the two have made any claim to the Monroe estate, being satis ed to use whatever bene t derived from the association with the name. But Miss Lizzie is comfortable with the fact that Rose is indeed Monroes daughter as well as that Al Jones is his son. She says he is the spittin image of him. Many say Al who is in his 70s has a striking resemblance to the elder Monroe. That both Al and Rose are talented musicians substantiate the claims. She said that as a child she sat on the steps of their home and listened and sang along with the juke box at the nearby store. Now in her late 60s, she started singing publicly at the age of six. Presently located in Nashville, she along with her Bluegrass Girls play festivals all over. However, she also performs solo or with a pick-up local band. Hence, her freedom to stop in Holmes County and visit with the lady that many in the Bluegrass world call Mama Lewis. Though her husband, Elijah and his brother both play instruments, Miss Lizzie confesses she cant play a note tough she enjoys singing in her church, New Smyrna Assembly of God One of her acquaintances gave her a handmade mandolin, but the 90 plus lady has never tried to play it. She treasures it, none the less, as she treasures her acquaintance with those in the Bluegrass Music World. The week of Oct 4, 2012 will nd her and whichever family member is elected making their way to Rosine, Ky to Jerusalem Ridge and the Bluegrass Festival at the Monroe Home Place. (To learn more about Carolina Rose, her biography, From Gloria Jean to Carolina Rose is available at Amazon.com) Miss Lizzies special guest; Monroes lost childrenHAPPY CORNERHazel Wells Tison PERRYS PRATTLEPerry Wells SPECIAL TO THE TIMES-ADVERTISERMaria and her sweet pup Fisher, a Golden Retriever, likes to chase red birds, blue birds, black birds, great blue herons, cow birds and more.Learning a lesson in true beauty OpinionA4 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, September 5, 2012CONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com 1-800-645-8688 ADVERTISING 850-547-9414 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2012, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. She gently explained that the female birds were less vibrant than the males because of their roles in nature. They needed to blend with the scenery to protect their young. It was not their choice but their definition by nature God.

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A5Wednesday, September 5, 2012 Proven leadership from the Battleeld to the Schoolhouse. Bronze Star Teaching Certicate Meritorious Service Medal FORSUPERINTENDENTOFSCHOOLS Terry Mears A NOTE FROM TERRY: With questions being raised concerning my service to our country, I felt it necessary to present to you some of my military achievements. The real honors go to every member of every branch of our armed forces and especially those that served beside me. My role was to serve you, our country and our Lord in battle with pride and humility. It is with great humbleness that I display these honors of which my family has only been made aware of during my preparation for this ad. I thank you the citizens of Holmes County for allowing me to serve you in the United States Army and I ask you for the opportunity to serve you again as your Superintendent of the Holmes County School District. By CHRIS OLWELLHalifax Media PANAMA CITY A former Deane Bozeman High School teacher who was arrested earlier this year and accused of having sexual relationships with students withdrew his not guilty plea Thursday and pleaded no contest to 14 felony counts. Judge Elijah Smiley admonished William Crews, 59, for failing to live up to societys expectations for teachers to keep students safe, saying something terribly went wrong. Smiley sentenced Crews to 20 years in prison and designated him a sexual predator as part of a plea agreement prosecutor Jennifer Hawkins said was the best option for society and Crews six victims. Crews had been scheduled for trial next week. It was dif cult for all of the victims to talk about what happened, Hawkins said after the hearing, adding that they were all prepared to come to trial next week if needed. Crews attorney, James White, declined to comment after the hearing. In preparation for the trial, prosecutors led motions asking Smiley to protect the identity of the victims, some of whom are adults now, by closing the courtroom to spectators and allowing them to testify under pseudonyms. The victims were all males and were in their early teens when the contact took place. Investigators were able to establish the conduct happened between 2001 and 2006, but it could have continued until 2011, of cials said after Crews arrest. Crews was arrested in February after investigators with the Bay County Sheriffs Of ce opened a storage unit where the victims said the contact occurred and found sex toys and pornographic movies. The rst victim told investigators Crews had taken them to the unit to watch pornography and engage in sexual acts. Investigators were able to identify the other victims during the course of the investigation who told similar stories of abuse by Crews. He had been investigated before, in the late 1990s, for similar allegations. Investigators determined the evidence in that case was not suf cient to support a prosecution. Hawkins described Crews as a predator who knew how to target vulnerable young people who might have been having problems at home or in school. Like any sexual predator, he knew the victims to pick out, Hawkins said. The 14 counts Crews pleaded to Thursday included two counts of sexual activity with a minor, three counts of lewd and lascivious molestation, four counts of lewd and lascivious exhibition and ve counts of showing obscene material to minors.Former teacher gets 20 years for molestations Teen Art ClassesAges 13-18 Instructors: Keith Martin JohnsFall Sessions September 10 November 19, 2012Once a week on Monday from 3:30-5:30 p.m. $45 per monthRegistration is required, limited spaceLearn the fundamental basic principles that govern realistic art. Classic realistic drawing and painting skills will be taught from one session to the next. The discipline of this type of art instruction is much like other disciplinary art forms; such as music or dance. 5422 Cliff St. Graceville Contact (850) 360-4908or Linda@keithmartinjons.com 850-258-311090 Son-in-Law Road in Florida Springs RV Park bonifays newest dining secret with a touch of Come and Enjoy the Friday and Saturday Surf & Turf SpecialLike us on Facebook for our weekly specials MUSTANG GRILL Open 5 PM8 PM Nightly WILLIAM CREWS DRIVERS from page A1Jay Wayne Marsh, another bus driver present, con rmed that he hadnt been informed when they brought a three-year-old on to his bus and he was unprepared and unequipped to accommodate to a child of special needs. You need to notify these bus drivers that theres going to be a three-year-old with issues, said Becky Marsh, wife of Jay Wayne. They need to be prepared to have these children. Let them know if theyre a biter or autistic. Ellenburg added Jay Waynes was a biter and bit several children before he was warned that it was an issue. Ellenburgs husband, Junior Ellenburg, informed the school board that another issue was a new bus stop the district established in a eld was overgrown and should be considered a safety issue. She was thrown off into a wheat patch to pick up those children, Junior said. They need to respect her as a woman and as an employee. Chairman John Motley said that the district would be in touch with the bus drivers to see about resolving those matters as soon as possible. The board approved of Superintendent Gary Galloways recommendations for the 2012-2013 school year: To hire Ralph Forehand as teacher at Holmes County High School, Mitzi Speigner as teacher at Poplar Springs, Michael Ard, Sr. as bus driver at Bethlehem High School, Michelle Coe as part-time, 10-month custodian at Bonifay Elementary School and Cody Carroll as ESE Aide I at Ponce de Leon High School To transfer Natalie Boman as teacher from PDLHS to Bonifay Middle School, Kenny Tate as teacher from PS to BMS, Tonya McInnis as reading coach to PDLES and PDLHS, Maelynn Hat eld as reading coach to HCHS and PS, Miriam Beasley as teacher to BMS and Graduations Assistance Program, Chuck Cameron as ESE Aide from HCHS to BHS and Lucretia Mims as Bonifay bus driver to BHS. To accept the resignation of Odell Power as teacher at BMS for retirement effective as of 3 p.m. on Aug. 17, Amanda Gautney as Aide II at HCHS effective as of 3 p.m. on Aug. 14 and Alice Simmons as guidance counselor at HCHS effective as of 3 p.m. on Aug. 17 To approve of medical leave of absence for James Hayes as Bonifay bus driver beginning July 2 and ending Oct. 26, Belinda Evans as pre-kindergarten teacher at PDLES beginning Aug. 10 and ending Sept. 7 and Silvia Mixon as aide at BES beginning Aug. 20 and ending Jan. 8, 2013. To add Cheryl Harrison as teacher at BMS to the Deferred Retirement Option Program beginning Nov. 1. Also approved were administrative programs: 2012-13 contract to provide local law enforcement with Holmes County Sheriffs Ofce and out of county/state students; Consent Agenda: invoices, warrant list, payouts over $3,000, budget amendments and Aug. 7 meeting minutes; and Federal, State Programs or Projects: 2012-13 Carl D. Perkins-Career & Technical Project Application and 2012-2013 Carl D. Perkins Rural and Sparsely Populated Project Application. The next Holmes County School District meeting is scheduled for 9 a.m. on Sept. 4 at the Holmes County School District Of ce.You got to have a love for this job because there isnt much money in it. We were wondering if we can set up a meeting with the board to make our conditions a little better. We have a problem communicating, and we just want a little respect.Janet Ellenberg School bus driver

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OUTDOORS Wednesday, September 5, 2012 Page 6www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comSend your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com ASection By STAN KIRKLANDFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) compiles a weekly report from around the state of law enforcement cases of interest. Each item is only a few sentences long but one thing you see on occasion are reports about individuals who are cited, usually at sea, for trying to bring in lleted sh. The law about landing sh is pretty clear. FWC rules require that marine, and freshwater game sh for that matter, must be landed in whole condition. The rule applies not only at sea, but also to piers, bridges and even catwalks. The reason for the law is pretty straightforward. The law is in place for all species with size limits, said Capt. Ken Parramore, FWC area supervisor. Size limits allow these sh to reach a harvestable size. If the sh are lleted on the water, that impedes an of cers ability to determine if the sh was legal-sized. Its been several years but one summer morning, I was wade shing in eastern Bay County and I saw a bag rolling in the surf. The bag, it turned out, was lled with 6-7 pounds of what appeared to be grouper llets. They were spoiled, of course. Its only a guess but I suspect someone was trying to circumvent the law, got dgety, and threw their sh overboard. It struck me then, and still does today, the lengths some people go to, when complying with the law would have been much smarter. And, better for our shery resources.Make sure to land your sh whole, its the law AFTER THE STORM Its ugly, dirty and tough, but find right spots and fishing can be great By FRANK SARGEANT franksargeant@charter.net OK, for a few more days, its just going to be plain ugly on the water we know that. But theres always a silver lining to shing conditions after a big storm. Maybe its a bit mud-stained, but its there. The runoff from the big rains means the rivers will be high and murky, and all that fresh water coming down into the bays means they will have a slug of low-salinity water moving through them. The tannin-stained water turns the bays black, and even creates a long rip-line extending into the gulf where the salt water meets the fresh, green meeting black. Some species are ne with low salinity, some high-tail it. And most dont like the mud stirred up by wind, waves and strong currents. So, lets start upstream and work down. FRESHWATER AFTER THE STORM High water gives bass a chance to move into shallow backwaters and creeks where they cant go at lower levels and as the water starts to fall back to normal levels, they gang up at the creek mouths and drains to eat the bait that gets pulled out with the falling water. In the lower reaches, theyll have red sh with them; reds are pretty tolerant of low salinity. Anywhere a side creek forms a point as it enters a larger river, where a culvert or a dam creates ow and aeration, where theres an eddy in fast-moving water, there are likely to be bass as well as lunker cat sh in the deeper holes and stripers and hybrids in areas like the Apalach below Woodruff Dam. Starting on the east side of the Panhandle, the owing water is likely to produce angling action in the Ochlocknee and Apalachicola rivers anywhere from their respective dams down to tide-water. Deer Point Lake Dam at the head of North Bay is worth checking, as are all the creeks that run into the bays in the Panama City Beach areaBurnt Mill and Crooked Creek are some of the larger ows. Farther west, the Choctawhatchee and Mitchell rivers can be good, and Four Mile Creek, Alaqua Creek, Basin Bayou, Rock Creek and Jumper Creek are worth a look. Feeding into Pensacola Bay, the East Bay River north of Navarre, the Blackwater and the Escambia are all major out ows where sh can take advantage of water coming out of the swamps as things settle back toward normal. For bass on the runouts, noisy topwaters always are a good start a big Super Spook or Gun sh 115, worked fast with the current, nails the hungriest sh and lets you know where there might be a school. You can then follow up with a -ounce jig or a weighted creature bait, bumped along bottom with the ow, to wear them out. Jerk-baits like the Slug-Go can also do the job. Dark colors work best in the dark water. FISHING THE BAYS Some of the usual inshore saltwater suspects including spotted sea trout can be very hard to nd after a major ush of black water comes into the bays they move to the main passes or out into the gulf, where they settle on nearshore structure until things get back to normal. Reds can be anywhere from well up the rivers to out on the beach they dont seem to mind the tannin water, but for those who like to look for them on the ats, the dark water makes them a lot harder to see. In some areas, however, the natural topography of the bays and ats restricts the ow of the fresh water, keeping the shallowest ats salty and clear in most storms nd some of these ats, on the back side of Santa Rosa, for example, and you may nd lots of reds ripe for sightshing. Flats nearer the major passes also tend to clear quicker thanks to the regular ushing of the tides, so these are also worth checking. Visible reds can be caught on all the usual stuff, including gold streamer ies, weedless spoons and DOA Shrimp, provided they are adroitly placed well ahead of the sh. Where you cant see them under docks with a good ow, for example, its smarter to switch to live shrimp or pin sh. Anchor well back from the structure and make casts upstream so that the baits sweep the edges of the pilings you might have to hit a dozen piers without catching anything, but eventually youll nd one where theyre stacked up. Flounder generally are less affected by murky water than other species, and the usual spots are likely to continue to be productive. Check out piers, oyster bars, channel edges and jetty rocks, and sh live killi sh which you can net around oyster bars at low tide; theyre by far the best ounder bait there is. Of course, live shrimp are much easier to get and also work well. Or trim a quarter-ounce bucktail jig with a live killi or fresh shrimp tail and drag it down over the dropoff. When shing jetty rocks, remember the sh may be anywhere from 3 feet off the rocks on out; sh parallel to the rocks to start and then work out to deeper water. Flounder dont move a lot, so you have to. Make a series of casts, drag the bait over all the structure you can reach, and then move 10 yards down the jetty and fan cast once again. Keep moving until you hit sh; sitting in one spot with bait on the bottom catches only cat sh most of the time, though you might luck into a passing red sh. GREEN WATER TACTICS Its common for a rip-line to form around the major inlets after a big rain inshore; theres black water coming out of the pass on outgoing tide, owing into the green water of the Gulf and forming distinct edges usually littered with weeds and debris the fresh water takes a long distance to mix with the salt water. The rip where these two waters meet can hold anything from kings and Spanish to cobia and bull sharks. Best way to sh these edges is to slow-troll a live bluerunner, nger mullet, thread n or horse sardine down the green side of the rip, just out of the trash line. Game sh seem to cruise the edge looking for food pulled out of the bays, and if your bait is in the right place at the right time, you get bit. Plenty of big king mackerel tournaments have been won with this tactic. Its wise to take a few tips from the king sh pros for this type of shing, even if youre not competing in a tournament. Add a menhaden oil drip (available at tackle shops that cater to offshore anglers, and at Bass Pro Shops) as well as a mesh bag full of dogfood soaked with menhaden oil to create a scent trail that will bring sh to your baits. This tactic works best if you troll one area for an extended period make a half-mile loop down one side of the black water and up the other, and repeat farther out if you dont nd sh. Tossing a live thread n or sardine into the wake now and then may draw up a skyrocketing sh and let you know where to concentrate your efforts. HEADING OFFSHORE Its common for milky water to extend several miles off the beach after a major storm, and except around the inlets not many sh will bite inside this murk. So if you are looking for grouper or snapper, head offshore at least until you see clear water; of course, most of the best Panhandle structure is farther offshore in any case, but if you have the secret number of a pile of old washing machines a mile off the beach, right now may not be prime time to sh it. And when it comes to blue water shing, in general storms have minimal impact though some anglers say there seems to be a surge in action from sails, marlin, wahoo, dolphin and tuna just after the storm as always, head offshore until you nd long, solid weedlines before putting baits in the water. Outdoors contributor Frank Sargeant has put on a new hat recently, becoming editor of The Fishing Wire, an Internet news service with some 400,000 subscribers worldwide. The service covers state shery issues, new products in the shing and boating industry, outdoors events and issues and lots more. The Fishing Wire, as well as the companion service The Outdoors Wire, is available for free subscription at www. the shingwire.com. Businesses and agencies wishing to submit material for the wire can send it to frank@the shingwire.com.

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COLLEGE PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM PICK-EM WIN WIN WIN WIN WIN WIN $ $ $ $ $ $ 25 25 25 25 25 25 W W W W W W EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! EEKLY! Check your winner picks and send in today!SEPT. 8 SCOREBOARD Enter by Noon on Friday TIE BREAKERPittsburgh Denver (Monday) Total Points ______ Total Points ______ Total Net Yardage ______Total Net Yardage______ Enter at the Washington County News or the Holmes County Times-Advertiser oces; or mail to1364 N. Railroad Ave., in Chipley www.chipleypaper.com or www. bonifaynow.comName____________________________________________ Address__________________________________________ City________________________________Zip_________ Daytime Phone____________________________________ Email____________________________________________ Subscriber Non-SubscriberRules1.College Pick-em will reward persons based on their ability to pick the most winners of each weeks college football games. 2.Winners will be selected on the basis of choices for the Saturday/Friday games. Ties will be broken through selections for a weekend Pro game: the winner, the winning point spread (margin of victory), and the yardage totals in that order. 3.Each weekly winner will receive a $25 gift card. The names of the winners will be published in News and TimesAdvertiser each Wednesday. 4.A drawing will be held from ALL contest entries after the Nov. 24 game for a $100 gift card. The winner will be published in the Times and the News. No purchase necessary to win. 5.Entries can be made on the entry coupon, or a similar form (8-1/2 x 11) carrying the same information. Duplicate entry forms also will be available online at chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com 6.Entries can be dropped o or mailed to the News oce, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, Fla. 32428; or at the Times oce at 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, 32425, during business hours, 8 a.m.5 p.m. CT; or submitted via email on the entry form at chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com 7.All entries must be received by noon CST each Friday. Postmarks will have no bearing on whether or not the deadline is met. 8.Entrants may submit no more than two entries per week. You must enter only your own name and a single address. You may not submit entries in the name of other people. Winners found to have submitted more than two entries and/ or in the name of another person will be disqualied. 9.The News and the Times-Advertiser assumes no responsibility for failure to receive any entry. All entries become the property of News and the Times-Advertiser and none will be returned. 10.Employees of News and the Times-Advertiser and their immediate families are not eligible to participate. 11.Decision of the judges is nal. ALL PLAYERS, BY THE ACT OF ENTERING, AGREE TO ABIDE BY THE RULES. CHECK HERE WEDNESDAY FOR EACH WEEKS WINNERSept. 1 and 8 Winners will be published Sept. 12 1. Penn StateVirginia 2.MiamiKansas State 3.FloridaTexas A&M 4.WisconsinOregon State 5.NebraskaUCLA 6.GeorgiaMissouri 7.IllinoisArizona State 8.MemphisArkansas State 9.Iowa StateIowa 10.N. CarolinaWake Forest By RANDAL SEYLER638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY When the Chipley Tigers faced the Vernon Yellow Jackets at Philip Rountree Stadium in Chipley, the Tigers gave as good as they got and then some. The two squads seemed evenly matched, with both offenses seemingly capable of marching down the elds at will, but the Tigers went into halftime with a 14-7 lead and never relinquished that edge, eventually stopping Vernon 35-28. Chipleys running back Kobe McCrary scored the Tigers rst touchdown with 2:23 to play in the rst quarter. Fletcher Dilmores extra point attempt made it 7-0. The second quarter opened with Chipley driving 57 yards on six plays, ending with B.J. Olivers 20-yard scamper into the end zone. Dilmores aim was true and the Tigers led 14-0 in with 8:30 to play in the half. Vernons Tristian Porter found the end zone on a quarterback Dylan Kirk pass less than 2 minutes later to get the Yellow Jackets on the board. Aaron Bowers kick was good to make it 14-7. The second half opened with the Tigers capping a 55-yard, 12-play drive with a 3-yard score by Oliver from 2nd and goal. Dilmores kick was no good, but the Tigers were up 20-7 with 6:33 remaining in the third quarter. The Yellow Jackets replied with a 66yard, 7-play effort that ended with Kirk shot a short pass to Porter in the end zone. Bowers kick was good and it was a 20-14 game with 3:26 left in the quarter. The Tigers were not to be outdone, and they came back with a 59-yard drive that began with McCrary nabbing an off-sides Yellow Jackets kick and returning it to the Yellow Jackets 43. Oliver went up the middle on the next play for three, then quarterback Jordan Finch connected with Oliver who scored on a 43-yard run. The Tigers went for twopoints and bumped their lead to 28-14. The Yellow Jackets came back in the fourth quarter when Porter connected with Cody Harmon on a screen pass from the 12-yard line to score. Bowers kicked the extra point and the score was 28-21 with 10:29 left to play. The Yellow Jackets tried the off-sides kick again, but this time the Tigers recovered it at the Vernon 49. The Tigers were stalled for three downs, but Finch gained some yardage with a QB keeper, driving deep into the Yellow Jackets territory. A personal foul against Vernon moved the Tigers to within easy striking distance, but it took eight more plays before McCrary scored from the 3-yard line. Dilmores kick made it 35-21 with 5:10 left to play. The Yellow Jackets were good for one more score, this one capping a 59-yard, 4play effort that ended with Kirk connecting with Austin Brown on a second and goal effort. Bowers kick made it 35-28. The Tigers got control of the ball with 3:12 left to play and successfully ran the clock down for the win. On Friday, Chipley travels to Blountstown, while Vernon hosts Wewa. Kickoffs are at 7 p.m.TIMES-ADVERTISERChipleys Kobe McCrary takes the handoff from QB Jordan Finch during Fridays game against the Vernon Yellow Jackets at Philip Rountree Stadium in Chipley. The Tigers beat the Yellow Jackets 35-28. Below: The Chipley Tigers take the eld in their rst home game of 2012.By BRAD MLNER747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com COTTONDALE Speed was on the menu on Thursday. Marianna had multiple helpings. Cottondale couldnt stomach the cuisine. The Bulldogs showcased their talented roster in the season opener for both teams as Derrick Knowles and Teon Long led the way to a 42-20 victory. Knowles had 10 carries for 134 yards and a touchdown, all in the rst half, and Long scampered for 124 on nine carries with two TDs. Theyre just fast and there isnt just one of them. Cottondale coach Mike Melvin said. We were in position to make stops sometimes, but theyre fast and we couldnt make the play. And there was too many of them. The speedy duo helped new coach Tim Cokely start on a high note for the Bulldogs (1-0). He credited their talent and added offseason work is paying dividends. I got the job in February and the kids really took to the weight room, Cokely said. It has helped increase our speed and strength. Two strong runs from Knowles set up short scores by Joc Wooden in the rst half. The rst was a 17-yard sprint before being pushed out at the 1 following the rst of four Cottondale turnovers in the opening 24 minutes. The second went for 48 yards on fourth-and-2 from the 50. Wooden went in a play later to give Marianna a 21-6 lead. Knowles scored untouched from 14 yards to cap a truncated march set up by the second of three C.J. Smith interceptions to up the lead to 28-6. Long scored midway through the rst quarter, also untouched, from 19 yards. Cottondale answered the quick rst score with a nine-play, 61-yard drive to narrow the gap to 7-6. Smith completed one of two rst-half passes to Jacquez Walker in the back of the end zone. The 2-point conversion failed and the Hornets (0-1) were never as close again. Cottondales best weapon, Sheldon Vann, was hampered by cramping for much of the second half. He was held to 25 yards on 12 carries and gutted out a 75yard scoring reception, but largely gave way to younger players at running back. That gave eighth-grader JaVontai Hall and freshman DaMichael Faulk valuable varsity carries. Hall had 23 yards and a TD to cap the scoring in the fourth quarter and Faulk led Cottondale with 61 yards. You could see they were a little scared when they got in there, Melvin said. But from the third to fourth quarter they really grew up. Marianna also was able to drain its bench. Cokely said it was by design rather than a comfortable option due to a lopsided score. We planned to play a lot of kids, thats what well do, he said. Its a long season. Everyone has to be ready for the fourth quarter. Both teams face stiff challenges in Week 2. Marianna is at Bratt Northview and Cottondale travels to Sneads. Marianna 14 14 14 0 42 Cottondale 6 2 6 6 20 First quarter MHS:Wooden 1 run (Meadows kick) 11:46, 7-0 MHS CHS: Walker 23 pass from Smith (run failed) 7:49, 7-6 MHS: Long 19 run (Meadows kick) 5:47, 14-6 Second quarter MHS: Wooden 2 run (Meadows kick) 9:54, 21-6 MHS: Knowles 14 run (Meadows kick) 2:54, 28-6 CHS: Safety, Williams sacked in end zone :22, 28-8 Third quarter MHS: Long 45 run (Meadows kick) 8:50, 35-8 MHS: Copeland 2 pass from Williams (Meadows kick) 5:10, 42-8 CHS: Vann 75 pass from Smith (run failed) 4:02, 42-14 Fourth quarter CHS: Hall 5 run (run failed) 9:25, 42-20 The News Herald BLOUNTSTOWN Holmes County took control by halftime and limited Blountstown to less than 100 total yards Friday in a 20-0 win in a battle of Class 1A teams considered by many to be strong playoff contenders in the Panhandle. The Blue Devils (1-0) got two touchdown passes from Jacky Miles, who was 8 of 10 for 165 yards in a remarkably balanced attack. Kodi Russ produced 116 yards rushing on 16 carries, Holmes County with 165 passing and 167 rushing for the game. Conversely, Blountstown (0-1) was held to 84 yards on the ground and 15 passing for a total of 99. Miles passed 10 yards to Dustin Janas will 1:10 left in the rst quarter to culminate a 78-yard drive to open the scoring. The extra point failed, but less than 3 minutes later Franklin Russ ran 9 yards and the Blue Devils led 12-0 after a quick four-play march. Miles second TD pass went 29 yards to Ty Russ with 1:25 before halftime. The pair teamed for a successful conversion and Holmes County was well in charge by intermission. Ty Russ caught ve passes for 112 yards. Miles added 26 yards on 14 carries and Franklin Russ had 20 yards on four attempts. Blountstown was led by Javakiel Brighams 64 yards rushing on 15 attempts. Quarterback Hunter Jordan rushed for 27 yards, but was held to 15 passing on just four attempts. Janas topped Holmes County with six tackles and had three of the Blue Devils six quarterback sacks. Holmes County also forced three turnovers. Brigham had eight tackles and Tripp Taylor seven to pace the Tigers defense. Blountstown hosts Chipley this week. SP O RTS www.bonifaynow.comWednesday, September 5, 2012 APage 7SectionBlue Devils blank TigersMarianna runs past Cottondale, 42-20Chipley bests VernonPHOTO BY NIKKI CULLIFERHolmes County High School defeated Blountstown 20-0 on Friday night at Blountstown in the seasons first conference game. The Blue Devils host Jay on Friday in Bonifay. Kickoff is at 7 p.m.

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LocalA8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, September 5, 2012By LAUREN SAGE REINLIEHalifax Media DeFUNIAK SPRINGS More than 68 years after the Air Force accidentally dropped bombs on the Alaqua community in Walton County and killed four members of the Cosson family, a memorial has been erected at the site of the tragedy. On the evening of Aug. 11, 1944, James Cosson was gathered with his extended family at his farm house. His family owned several lots in the area and they often got together in the evenings after the work day was done to catch up. His four children were playing outside. As the sun began to set, a whirring noise suddenly came from the sky and bombs began to fall all around them. Nothing could be done but to try to take cover. Cosson, his brother and two of his children were killed. Five other family members were severely wounded. An Air Force plane on a training mission out of then Eglin Field had accidentally released the bombs after passing its target at a nearby test site. Read more about the Cosson tragedy On Thursday, three years after residents began a sustained effort to place a marker at the site of the tragedy, of cials celebrated its unveiling. Were here today to reect a debt of gratitude to a family, Walton County Commissioner Sara Comander said. Many family members still live in the area and were among the 50 or so people who attended the ceremony. Residents and local of cials also were on hand. Despite more than a few thwarted attempts, volunteers and of cials were nally able to gain approval for the marker earlier this year. It was a bittersweet remembrance for some family members still grappling with the tragedy, but most expressed their gratitude for the marker and the recognition that comes with it. Weve had so many promises of what was going to happen here and it didnt, Thomas Bill Cosson, James Cossons son, said after the ceremony. After 68 years, you dont know what to expect, but its happened. Thomas was 5 years old when the bombs were dropped. He has a 12inch scar where a piece of shrapnel lodged in his side. I didnt think Id ever see this before I died, he said. World War II was in full swing in August 1944. Planes dropped test bombs regularly on Eglin property near the Cosson home. But on that night, a failure of the mechanical release device caused the bombs not be released until after the pilot had passed the test site, according to of cial accounts. It was the worst training accident in Florida during the war. Congressman Jeff Miller, who had proposed the marker as long ago as 2003, said during the ceremony that piece of history should be remembered by young and old. This region and this family suffered not only a tragedy, but they paid a very high price for the defense of this country, he said. The marker also serves as a snapshot of what life was like in Northwest Florida nearly 70 years ago, said Doug Kolodziejczak, district chief for the Eglin Air Force Base Fire Department, who helped get the marker placed. While the Alaqua community still is a rural area, in 1944 the Cosson family had no phones or electricity, and used lanterns at night, Kolodziejczak said. Dirt roads were the only path to hospitals or other public service buildings. The well and remnants of the homes chimney can still be seen on the property, which is now thick woods, not farmland. The local people know what happened behind these trees, but the people who drive by dont, Miller said after the ceremony. He said he hopes the marker will change that. We had a family gathered together on an evening to talk about what had happened during the day, never knowing what might occur, he said. What happened changed the family and the community forever. www.kubota.com Until April 2013 Down Financing Payments* ORInstant Kubota Bucks up to $2,500** NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." www.mulliseye.com Chipley Office We are located directly across the parking lot from the Walmart in Chipley"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS,CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITYAPPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley OfficeBoard Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 9-30-12 FREEEYE EXAM CODE: WC00ToddRobinson,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeon LeeMullis,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeon From Staff ReportsMARIANNA A man was arrested Thursday at a mental health facility after bullets were found in his vehicle, according to the Jackson County Sheriffs Of ce. Security of cials at Sunland called the JCSO after a man appeared very agitated and upset at the facility. During a subsequent investigation, it was determined the man was there to confront an employee concerning issues that a family member of his was having with that employee. While speaking with the individual, of cers observed a box of bullets in plain view in the front seat area of the suspects vehicle. The bullets are considered to be contraband by Florida law, and the introduction of such into a mental health facility, is illegal, JCSO said. The man, identi ed as Ricardo Leon Sanders, 22, 4204 Vallie Road, Marianna, was taken into custody on charges of introduction of contraband into a mental health facility.From Staff ReportsMARIANNA The Jackson County Sheriffs Of ce is looking for a person who smashed the glass to the front door of Citi Trends in Marianna and stole as many items as they could in four trips in and out of the store. The suspect wore an oversized gray hoodie, dark colored pants, black tennis shoes and a black, multicolored shirt. The suspect might have worn a mask, according to a release from the JCSO. The burglary occurred around 2 a.m. on Aug. 28. Anyone with information on the suspect should contact the JCSO at 850-482-9624 or CrimeStoppers at 850-526-5000.Victims of 1944 bombing accident memorialized NICK TOMECEK / DAILY NEWSA crowd gathers Thursday during a ceremony to unveil a marker where four members of Cosson family were killed in 1944 when bombs were dropped on their home during a training mission from then Eglin Field.Police charge man with having bullets at mental health facilityOf cers in Marianna looking for burglar

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Washington, Holmes at a glanceINDEXSociety .................................B2 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B6 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser BPAGE 1SectionWednesday, SEPTEMBER 5 2012WHTC to offer computer classesCHIPLEY WashingtonHolmes Technical Center will be holding several computer classes through December 11. Basic Computer Class for Windows 7 is a ve week course that will be held Sept. 4 Oct. 4. A Fast Course on Outlook 7 will be held on Oct. 9. A fast Course on Excel 07 Level I will be held on Oct. 16, 18, 23, and 25. The Level 2 Class will be held on Oct. 30, Nov. 1, and 6. A Fast Course on Word 07 Level 1 will be held on Nov. 8, 13, and 15. There will also be a Fast Course on PowerPoint 2007 on Dec. 4, 6, and 11. For more information and tution cost please contact the WHTC at 638-1180.Sign language classes offeredCHIPLEY Free Sign Language Classes will be offered from 6 8 p.m. each Wednesday from Sept. 19 through Dec. 12. Classes will be held at Shiloh Baptist Church, 1976 Shiloh Lane, Chipley. The Sign Language classes are free. The book is $40. A Basic Course in American Sign Language. Info: Bob/Trisha Hicks, familyofhicks@ yahoo.com or 628-1553 and Melissa Garner, melissagarner93@ yahoo.com, 326-0244.2012 Miss. Graceville Harvest FestivalGRACEVILLE The 31st Annual Harvest Festival Pageant will be held at the Graceville Civic Center in Graceville at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 7, and Saturday, Sept. 8. All proceeds will go to the Graceville Harvest Day Celebration. For more information call Teresa Bush at 2634744 or 263-3072, or Michelle Watkins at the City of Graceville at 263-3250.Kent Cemetery Work DayALFORD There will be a Cemetery Work Day at Kent Cemetery on Saturday, Sept. 8. The cemetery is southwest of Alford. School bands face off PHOTOS BY RANDAL SEYLERUndeniably, part of the excitement of football Friday nights is the music provided by the high school bands. This past Friday was no different, with the Vernon High School band (wearing white T-shirts) facing off with the Chipley High School band (wearing dark T-shirts) at Philip Rountree Stadium. The Yellow Jackets band performed a short selection from this years program, while the Tigers band performed their show, based on classic Disney music, for the hometown audience.

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Wednesday, September 5, 2012 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra and J.D. OWENS INC.Carpet & Ceramic OutletYOUR HOMETOWN LOW PRICE!CARPET, CERAMIC, PORCELAIN, VINYL, NAFCO, LAMINATE, HARDWOOD & AREA RUGSWeve Got It At The Price You Want! HUGE REMNANT SALE!12 x 9Tan Frieze......................................$955012 x 12Dark Green Plush........................$1399012 x 13Light Tan Plush............................$1099012 x 13Dark Blue Plush...........................$1555012 x 14Heavy Tan Frieze.........................$1655012 x 14Medium Brown Frieze.................$1499012 x 15Chocolate Frieze.........................$1799012 x 15Light Tan Plush............................$1555012 x 16Medium Blue Frieze....................$1899012 x 19Heavy Velvet Plush Tan..............$2255012 x 192Green Comm. Plush....................$2055012 x 20Multi Color Comm.......................$16990BOUND RUGS2x4...............$5.00 2x8.............$15.50 3x5.............$12.50 4x6.............$19.90 5x7.............$39.90 6x9.............$49.90 J.D. OWENS CARPET & CERAMIC OUTLETLocated Between Arrowhead Campgrounds & Hopkins, On Hwy. 90 The Place To Shop, If Money Matters!carpettilemarianna.com Helping Hands... Compassionate Hearts BONIFAY Offering Inpatient and Outpatient TherapyNURSING & REHABCENTEROccupational Physical Speech24-hour Skilled Nursing Rehabilitation Gym Admissions 7 Days a Week Special to ExtraOn behalf of the Caterpillar Trade Press Relations team, we are pleased to announce the appointment of former Bonifay resident Christina Schave as a Trade Press Media Representative. Schave is a 2000 graduate of Holmes County High School and worked at the Holmes County Times-Advertiser from 1999-2001. Her family still resides in Holmes County. Schave will be replacing Amber Thomas who has been promoted to a position within Caterpillar in the newly formed Industrial and Waste Division. Schave has most recently worked as an Account Public Relations Lead at Two Rivers Marketing in Des Moines, Iowa, supporting global construction equipment manufacturers Doosan Infracore Construction Equipment and Bobcat Company since April of 2010. Prior to that position she was managing editor for Total Landscape Care for Randall-Reilly Publishing in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, from July 2006 through April 2010. She worked for The Tuscaloosa News from 2004 to 2006. Schave has a Master of Arts in Journalism with a specialization in new media (University of Alabama), and a Bachelors of Science in Journalism with a specialization in editing (University of Florida). In addition to her broad job and educational experience, Schave currently is a board member of the Construction Writers Association and also serves as their Public Relations Committee chair; chair of the Central Iowa chapter of PRSA Professional Development Committee; and board member of the Turf and Ornamental Communicators Association. She has also served as adjunct professor for the University of Alabamas Reese-Phifer College of C&IS; authored a chapter on Media Bias and the Military published in the graduate-level textbook Media Bias: Finding It, Fixing It; and served as assistant director and instructor for the University of Alabamas annual Multicultural Journalism Workshop for high school students 2005-2009. Schaves position with Caterpillar is effective Sept.10. We are very pleased to have her joining us and bringing her broad skills and industry relationships to our Caterpillar media relations team. Amanda Danielle Cook and Scott Dean Red eld are proud to announce their engagement and upcoming marriage. Amanda is the daughter of Donald and Nancy Amanda Cook of Chipley. She is a 2009 graduate of Chipley High School and a 2011 graduate of Chipola College with an AA Degree. Amanda plans to graduate from Florida State University Panama City in May 2013 with a Bachelors Degree in Recreation, Tourism and Event, to become an Event Planner. Scott is the son of Michael Wayne and Jackie Ann Red eld of Chipley. He is a 2009 graduate of Chipley High School. Scott moved to Nebraska in the fall of 2009 to play football. He graduated from Gulf Coast State College in 2011 with an AA Degree. Scott plans to graduate from Florida State University in May 2013 with a Bachelors Degree in Political Science. He will be taking the LSAT in December and will attend law school of his choice in August 2013. Michael Wayne and Jackie Ann Red eld, the grooms parents, hosted an engagement party for the couple on June 16. The party was attended by close friends and family. The wedding will be held in May 2013.SPECIAL TO EXTRAHolmes County Council on Aging celebrated the birthdays for the month of August on Friday. The birthdays for the month were Daisy Swerringen and Iris Moore happy birthday, ladies, from the Council on Aging. The Council thanks John Braxton Jr. and wife Vickie for sponsoring the dinner this month and thanks to Piggly Wiggly of Bonifay for the birthday cake.Gonzalez graduates Basic Military TrainingAir Force Reserve Airman 1st Class Sherina M. Gonzalez graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Gonzalez is the daughter of Ernesto Gonzales and sister of Tiffany Gonzalez, both of Fourth Street, Chipley. She is a 2009 graduate of Chipley High School. She earned an associate degree in 2011 from Chipola College, Marianna.Hill Graduates Basic Military TrainingAir Force Reserve Airman 1st Class Alyson Q. Hill graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical tness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Hill earned distinction as an honor graduate. She is the daughter of Cassaline Davis of Moss Hill Road, Chipley. The airman is a 2007 graduate of Vernon High School. She earned a bachelors degree in 2011 from the University of Florida, Gainesville.Special to ExtraChipley High School JROTC would like to welcome our new Senior Army Instructor Major Bill Chomos. It is a great honor to have Major Chomos as part of the JROTC family. We are looking forward to an outstanding School year. It is time for the cadets to get motivated and on track. Last school year, Chipley High School JROTC was the only program in area 11 to qualify to compete at the state level in drill, ri e and raider teams. We plan on keeping our reputation of being the premier JROTC program in area 11. The leadership is looking forward to working with all cadets to continue our tradition of excellence. We have enjoyed the way our community has supported us during competition, with your continued support we will once again climb to the top. If you would like more information about our JROTC program or how you can become an honorary member, please call First Sergeant Lonnie Segers at 638-6100 ext 503 or 726-0041. 2013 Washington County Relay For Life kick offWASHINGTON COUNTY The Washington County Relay For Life 2013 kick off will be held at 6 p.m. on Sept. 17, at the Washington County Ag. Center in Chipley. This is a free event designed to get the message out about what the American Cancer Society does for our community. The Kick Off will be set up like a mini relay to allow everyone to see how the relay is set up. There will be food, games and fun for everyone. If you know someone who would like to start a team but they are not sure on where to start, bring them out on Sept. 17 to the Ag Center. Washington County Relay For LifeWASHINGTON COUNTY Washington County will be holding their 2013 Relay For Life Event, from 6 p.m. on April 12 until 11 a.m. on April 13, at Pals Park in Chipley. The theme for the 2013 Relay For Life is Race For a Cure. Christina Schave to join Caterpillar Press Relations CHRISTINA SCHAVE HOLMES COUNTY COUNCIL ON AGING BIRTHDAYSComing back Army strong Cook and Red eld to wed RELAY FOR LIFE BASIC MILITARY TRAINING GRADUATIONS

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Wednesday, September 5, 2012 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3Library hoursWausau Library Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County Library (Bonifay) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed Washington County Library (Chipley) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Vernon Library Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills Library Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedMONDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Monday each month (unless a holiday) at 6 p.m. at the Chipley library. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach of ce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999.TUESDAY8 9 a.m.: Tai Chi Class at the Washington County Public Library, Chipley Branch 8 10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 5 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church. Games start at 6:25 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-451 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AWEDNESDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. to noon: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday. (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh-in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A You are cordially invited to join us in celebrating the co-ops 75th anniversary.There will be a punch and cake reception and heavy hors doeuvres. Each attendee will receive a registration gift and be entered into a drawing for a $75 gift card and commemorative throw.Wednesday, September 12 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Staphylococcus (staph) bacteria are all around us in an intimate way since it normally lives on the skin and mucous membranes of both people and animals alike. It usually is not of a concern to the individual if the skin is functioning normally and there is not a risk for infection (e.g., systemic illness and immune compromise). When infection is present, usually of the skin, most staph bacteria are susceptible to commonly prescribed antibiotics. Although many individuals walk around every day with staph bacteria, not all staph are alike. Indeed, Staphylococcus aureus prefers people (as well as pigs and some horses) over dogs and cats, Staphylococcus pseudintermedius likes the skin of companion animals over man. Methicillin-resistant staph refers to Staphylococcus bacteria that have developed a resistance to commonly prescribed penicillin and penicillin-like antibiotics, making infections dif cult to treat. Again, most staph bacteria are susceptible to a wide array of antibiotics, but these particular staph have developed resistance to typical antibiotics, hence they are more challenging to eliminate. Dr. Adam Patterson, clinical assistant professor and chief of dermatology at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences Small Animal Hospital, explained staph skin infections (pyoderma) in animals present as skin sores recognized as redness, pimples, scabs, dander, and hair loss. Many times these infections itch and result from uncontrolled allergic skin disease. When this type of infection occurs, it usually responds to correctly prescribed and administered topical and/ or systemic antibacterial treatments. If the infection is not easily treated by an appropriate course of antibiotics, then the chance for a resistant infection is heightened. Although subject to debate, as this is an area of ongoing research, Patterson said risk factors for methicillin-resistant staph infections in both people and animals seem to include repeated courses of antibiotics, chronic skin disease, immune compromise, recurring hospital visits, and indwelling medical implants such as those used for orthopedic surgery. When these risk factors are present in animals with pyoderma, veterinarians perform a culture of the skin sore to determine if the bacteria are indeed methicillin-resistant. A resistant infection doesnt look different than susceptible infections, the only way to know is to culture the skin, Patterson said. Once it is con rmed the pet is infected with methicillin-resistant staph, the veterinarian can determine the best course of action. Patterson said the most common treatments are topical such as antiseptic shampoos and culturebased systemic antibiotics. When we can, we try to treat them topically, Patterson said. Methicillin resistance doesnt mean that the bacteria are more pathogenic, they just are not killed by common antibiotics anymore. People with methicillinresistant staph are said to have MRSA (methicillinresistant Staphylococcus Aureus). Since dogs and cats tend to have a different species of staph on their skin, resistant bacteria are most often called methicillinResistant Staphylococcus Pseudintermedius (MRSPi or MRSP). People are normally not infected with MRSPi; likewise, dogs and cats are normally not infected with MRSA. Common transfer of MRSPi from pets to people has been fairly rare and isolated to date, while transfer of MRSA from people to pets is somewhat more likely. Again, MRSPi is predominantly found in companion pets, while MRSA is primarily found in people. We dont know much about dog-to-dog spread, but it is a large component of research on the epidemiology of methicillin resistance as we move forward, Patterson said. A few simple recommendations to help reduce the chance of transfer of staph bacteria between household people and pets once an animal has con rmed MRSPi infection include: administering the veterinary-prescribed treatment as directed, wearing gloves when treating the affected pet with topical therapy, keeping young children and immunocompromised people (cancer, HIV/AIDS, etc.) away from the affected pet, keeping personal skin wounds covered and protected, discouraging the pet from licking the face of people, and not letting the affected pet share the bed or linens with household persons. Above all, Patterson emphasized the need to wash all surfaces of the hands after handling the affected pet. Additionally, a search into why the pet has a resistant infection should be undertaken and corrected once identi ed. If you develop skin sores or have concerns about your personal health once a methicillin-resistant staph infection has been con rmed in your pet, then consult your physician. ABOUT PET TALKPet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at:// vetmed.tamu.edu/pet-talk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to cvmtoday@cvm.tamu. edu.SPECIAL TO EXTRAThe Republican Party of Holmes County held their 4th Biennial Reagan Day Dinner on Friday, Aug. 17 at the Agricultural Center in Bonifay. Their theme was Leading Florida to Victory in 2012. Staph infections and Methicillin Resistance PET TALK Community CALENDAR REAGAN DAY

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FAITH BSectionwww.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comBONIFAY Dave Ramseys Financial Peace University is coming to First Baptist Church at 311 N. Waukesha Street in Bonifay with classes beginning on Sunday, Sept. 9 at 4:30 p.m. Contact David Lauen at 547-2420 for more information or to register. More than one and a half million families have positively changed their nancial future through Dave Ramseys Financial Peace University (FPU). Updated in summer 2012, the now nine-week course provides families and individuals with practical tools to gain control of their finances and set themselves up for long-term financial success. The course meets once a week where a different lesson is taught by Dave on DVD followed by a small-group discussion. Lessons include budgeting, relationships and money, getting out of debt, saving for emergencies and investing. Since its inception in 1994 FPU has helped more than 1.5 million families positively change their financial future. Through common-sense principles and small-group accountability, FPU gives people the tools they need to change their behavior and succeed financially. On average families who complete FPU pay off $5,300 and save $2,700 in the first 90 days. Following the class nearly 94 percent of those families budget regularly. FPU will not only transform the way you handle money, but also your marriage and other areas of your life, says Ramsey. This isnt a boring financial class. We make learning about money fun and easy to understand so people in every situation can benefit from the information. Ramsey knows firsthand the pain that financial stress can cause. After creating a net worth of more than a million dollars by age 26, he quickly lost it all. Since then Ramsey has helped families and individuals across the country learn how to get control of their finances and avoid debt so they dont have to experience the same pain he did. FPU lessons also include guest speakers Rachel Cruze, speaker and daughter of Dave Ramsey; Jon Acuff, author of Wall Street Journal best-seller Quitter and popular blog Stuff Christians Like; and Chris Hogan, counselor and speaker for the Dave Ramsey organization. The revised FPU will be offered through churches and community centers. After purchasing a membership each participant receives a workbook, Dave Ramseys Complete Guide to Money, an envelope system and an audio CD library. Participants will also have access to budgeting forms and MP3s of all the lessons. For more information or to purchase a membership, go to www. daveramsey.com.About Dave RamseyDave Ramsey is Americas trusted voice on money and business. Hes authored four New York Times best-selling books: Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover and EntreLeadership. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 5 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com. But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.First Baptist Churchcome as you areMike Orr, Pastor1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.Strife and StruggleStrife and struggle are part of life. Although we sometimes wish for a life free of struggle, strife and struggle give life its zest. The Bible is full of good men and women who struggled mightily with evil, and gripping. But, we should remember that the external half of the story. There is almost always some internal strife or struggle that must be dealt with. David struggled with his enemies, but what makes him a real hero is his struggle with himself. Even Jesus was faced with this internal struggle, as we see Him struggling with himself in the garden of Gethsemane, and later on the cross. Some of est strivers even struggle with God. Consider the boldness of Job, who dares to call God to account for his suffering, referring to God as his adversary: He has torn me in his wrath and hated me; he has gnashed his teeth at me; my adversary sharpens his eyes against me. (Job 16: 9) Strong words, though one wonders if even harsher words were exchanged between Jacob and God during their night-long wrestling match in the desert (Genesis 32). Many of remember that a life without struggle would be vapid. It is far better to embrace the struggle, and especially to attack the negativity within ourselves.BROWN FUNERAL HOME1068 Main Street, Chipley638-4010 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser This Message Courtesy ofFor in my inner being I delight in Gods law; but I see another law at work in me, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin at work within me. Romans 7: 22-23 Page 4 Wednesday, September 5, 2012Rev. James L. Snyder All we hear these days are complaints about the economy and nobody seems to be doing anything about it. Politicians talk about it all the time and yet do nothing creative in the area of improving our economy. If you could put all the political speeches end to end, there would positively be no end to it. What we need to stimulate our economy is some kind of stimulation that does not come from the government. They stimulate me, all right, but not in the right way. This is where I step in. I assure you I am not running for any of ce. If the truth were known, I am running away from every of ce I can think of, especially my church of ce. I have no political agenda or aspirations; I am just a plain ordinary American citizen. I understand such creatures are an endangered species in todays economy. I am proud to be just a plain ordinary American. I am not middle-class, lower-class and certainly not high-class. In fact, I have no class at all, and I am glad to leave it like that. I couldnt pass the test anyway. But I am doing my part in stimulating the economy. The secret plan I have can be boiled down to one word: vacation. This past week I have bravely gone where I have not been for a long time and that is on vacation. There is nothing like a vacation to stimulate many things, including the economy. It takes me a whole year to scrimp and save so the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I can go on a vacation. But in the end, it is well worth it. After a weeklong vacation, I am highly stimulated to return home where I can recuperate from all that stimulation. My wallet is still vibrating. I must confess that the primary stimulation in a vacation has to do with my credit card. It was stimulated in more ways than I care to remember, and at the end of the month the credit card company will remind me of all that stimulation. If the government does not have enough money in its coffers to balance the budget, it is not because I have not done my part. Every time I turned around there was a tax on something. Do not let this get out, but if the government knows I turned around so many times, they will nd a way to tax that. I am not a conspiracy enthusiast, but I believe I stumbled onto a most blatant conspiracy with the United States government. I am here merely to give my humble testimony. The conspiracy, as I found it, focuses in on the airlines. I know this might sound like a farfetched idea, but I can only give my observation. The airlines are in a conspiracy with the United States government to take as much money from me as they possibly can. Not that I have a lot of money, I just would like to keep as much of it as possible for those occasions when I would like to take my wife out to a restaurant and just have a relaxing evening. That takes money. It began with checking in our luggage. Two bags for me and two bags for my wife equals too much luggage. We put our luggage on the conveyor belt and then were informed by the check-in clerk that each bag cost an extra $50. She swiped my credit card and even though I am not a mathematical wizard, I believe it was in the neighborhood of $200. I do not like that neighborhood. Later on, I sat down to gure it out and discovered it would be far cheaper not to take any luggage and then when arriving at my destination buy a new set of clothes. My entire wardrobe does not equal $100. Of course, on my wifes side of the closet it is a different story. We got our boarding pass and then the young woman behind the counter looked at me and asked a strange question. Sir, how tall are you? It has been a long time since anybody asked me that kind of a question. Why she wanted to know how tall I was could not be found in the corridors of my empty mind. I then informed her that I was 6. I see, she said as she stared at her computer screen. Then she explained. The average height of a male passenger on our plane is 5. You exceed that limit by 4 inches. I looked at my wife and we both shared a wonderful laugh. Then I look back at her behind the counter, but she was not laughing. There will be an extra charge for your exceeding our height limit. Lets see, she said as she studied the computer screen, thats 4 inches times $15 per inch which equals $60. She then swiped my credit card, again, and charged it with the $60 extra fee. That was just the beginning of the swiping by the airlines. By the time our vacation was over, I was totally swiped out. When I got home I meditated a little bit on what Jesus said, Render therefore unto Caesar the things which be Caesars, and unto God the things which be Gods (Luke 20:25 KJV). I really do not mind rendering to Caesar but I just wish he wasnt so greedy. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att. net. His web site is www. jamessnyderministries.comEvergreen Missionary Baptist Bene t WESTVILLE Evergreen Missionary Baptist Church will be having a Building Fund Bene t on Sept 8 at the Westville City Hall. The yard sale will start at 8 a.m., and starting at 10 a.m. they will begin selling sliced pork dinners for $60.Noma Assembly of God Homecoming NOMA Noma Assembly of God will be holding Homecoming services at 10 a.m. on Sept. 9. Special singers will be The Thompsons and special speaker will be Brother Roger Cosson. Lunch and Fellowship will follow. The church is at 1062 Tindal St. in Noma.Wausau Assembly of God RevivalWAUSAU The Wausau Assembly of God Church will be having revival at 6 p.m. Sept 9, and 7 p.m. on Sept. 10 12. Brother Gene Keen will be preaching each night. We invite everyone to come out and be with us. The church is on Highway 77 in Wausau. For more information call 638-0883 or 596-4451.Only Grace Ministries presents The RingBONIFAY Only by Grace Ministries will proudly present the original theatrical production, The Ring, at 10:45 a.m. on Sept 16, at Gully Springs Baptist Church in Bonifay. The modern day drama illustrates the story of The Prodigal Son as it relates to everyday life. The Ring captivated audiences of all ages as it illustrates the Fathers unfailing love through story and music. Sept. 16 will also mark the 95th Homecoming at Gully Springs Baptist Church.Northside Baptist Church 65th HomecomingPONCE DE LEON Northside Baptist Church in Ponce de Leon will be holding their 65th Homecoming at 10 a.m. in Sept. 16. Dr. Thomas Kinchen will bring the message, and Four Calvary Quartet will perform special music. For more information call Lavelle Brooks at 836-4881, Carol Busby at 836-4470 or Frances Cooey at 956-2822.Mondays that MatterCHIPLEY Holmes Creek Baptist Church will be holding a Fall Revival, at 6:30 p.m. each Monday in the month of September. September 10, Dr. John Sullivan, Executive Director of the Florida Baptist Convention will be the guest speaker. Worship Leader will be Jonathan Brown of Ozark Baptist Church in Ozark, Ala. September 17, the Rev. Nathan Carroll, Pastor of the First Baptist Church in Geneva, Ala. will be the guest speaker. Worship Leader will be Gary Medlock on Northside Baptist Church in Ponce de Leon. On September 24, Dr. Fred Evers, Pastor of Northside Baptist Church in Tifton Ga., will be the guest speaker.Special to ExtraWESTVILLE The Womens Mission Team of Hickory Hill Baptist at Westville attended the 10th Annual Womens Conference in Slocomb, Ala., on Aug. 25. The team, led by Sister Helen McKinley, took 12 ladies of all ages to the day long Christian praise and worship services, and of course, as the Baptist women are known for, had a fun lled breakfast and lunch fellowship, meeting the other guests and speakers. Some of the ladies who have not been on a fellowship trip said they had no idea that it could be so fun and realized to attend a conference. Nationally known Christian motivator and womens faith advocate, Rhea Briscoe, was the keynote speaker. Rhea speaks of Gods faithfulness and uses His word to minister the love of Christ to everyone. Also features was Lynda Randle who grew up in the intercity of Washington DE., and was led by Gods hand to eventually sing with the Gathers Christian Singers. Lynda quickly won over the ladies with her wit and outgoing personality. The Hickory Hill Womens Ministry Team is making plans to attend the Swamp Gravy Festival in Colquit, Ga., in October. If anyone would like further information, you are invited to the Hickory Hill Baptist Church, or you may call the church at 956-4116.My humble effort at stimulating the economyDave Ramseys Financial Peace University coming to BonifayHickory Hill Womens mission team is on the road Faith EVENTS

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Wednesday, September 5, 2012 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5Letter Learners program setCHIPLEY Letter Learners will begin at the Washington County Public Library, at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 6. This is a free program for library patrons and their little ones. Letter Learners is an inspired program where letters and their sounds, along with their vowels are introduced. Flannel board interaction, introductions of colors, crafts and of course stories are a part of this hourlong program with some holiday celebrations tossed in, too. Please call 638-1314 to register you little letter learner or email Mrs. Zedra at kidsrule@wcpl com.2012 Miss Graceville Harvest FestivalGRACEVILLE The 31st annual Harvest Festival Pageant will be held at the Graceville Civic Center in Graceville at 6:30 p.m. on Sept. 7 and 8. All proceeds will go to the Graceville Harvest Day Celebration. For more information call Teresa Bush at 263-4744 or 263-3072, or Michelle Watkins at the City of Graceville at 263-3250.Kent Cemetery work dayALFORD There will be a Cemetery Work Day at Kent Cemetery on Saturday, Sept. 8. The cemetery is three miles southwest of Alford. Please arrive as early as possible and bring tools and mowers to work with. Following the working there will be a sh fry. Please bring a covered dish and drinks.Picnic in the Park plannedPONCE de LEON SPRINGS Holmes County Teen Court, Holmes County School Board, C.A.S.E Coalition, the Sheriffs Department, and the Florida Department of Environment Protection will be sponsoring a Picnic in The Park from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., on Sept. 8, at Ponce de Leon Springs. Entry is free of charge, and there will be free hamburgers, free hotdogs, games and swimming. Come out and help keep our youth drug and crime free. Jacob City DayJACOB The City of Jacob has slated Sept. 15, for its Jacob City Day Celebration, which will include a parade, entertainment, food and activities for all. The festivities will start at 11 a.m. with a parade along Jackson Road. The other activities will take place at the Jacob City Park, at 2254 Jacob main St. (Highway 162). Anyone desiring to be in the parade will need to contact Eula Johnson at 263-2120 on or before September 7. Booths are available to vendors; please contact Verloria T. Wilson at 2636636 for more information.Town of Westville electionsWESTVILLE A regular election for the Town of Westville will be held on Sept 11. The polls will open at 7 a.m. Polls are at the Westville Community Center. Kid Safety and Fun ExpoCHIPEY MPE and H&H will sponsor a Free Kid Safety and Fun Expo, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., on Sept. 15, at the Chipley WalMart. There will be baby twin deer at the expo and much, much more.Youth Ranch Golf TournamentPANAMA CITY The Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch Golf Tournament will take place Sept. 15 at the Panama Country Club. The monies raised from this bene t will go directly to the Youth Ranch, which runs solely on donations. The Washington County Sheriffs Of ce is one of the sponsors for the golf tournament. For more information contact Andrea Gainey at 638-6115. Chipley High School Class of 1972CHIPLEY The Chipley High School Class of 1972 are making plans for their class reunion. Activities are being planned for Homecoming, which is Oct. 5-6. We will ride in the parade, attend the football game, meet after the game, and will get together sometime Saturday. You can keep up with everything on Facebook. (Chipley High School Class of 1972 Reunion) Its being updated as plans are being nalized. If you would like further information you may contact Cathy Pitts Adams 638-1665, adams03@bellsouth.net or Gwen Lane Collins at gwen13@aol.com. If you plan on attending, please RSVP by Sept. 19, 2012. (If youre coming or not). 2012 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageantBONIFAY The 2012 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant sponsored by the HCHS Blue Pride Band Boosters will be held at 4 p.m., Sept. 22, at Holmes County High School. There is no residency required to enter this pageant. Girls age 4-20 and boys age 4-9 may enter. Contestant entry fee is $45. If two or more siblings register in any category it will be $35. All registration dates are held at Holmes County High School on Tuesday, Sept. 11 from 5-7 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 15, from 10 a.m.noon; Late registration Tuesday, Sept. 18, from 5-7 p.m. (a $10 late fee will be added on this date). You may also turn in registration forms at BES, BMS, HCHS or by mail to: HCHS; Attn: Band Boosters; 825 West Highway 90; Bonifay, Florida 32425. If you have any questions you may contact Cindy Goodson at goodsonc@hdsb.org, or by phone or text 373-7517. Senior Group going on TourWASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will be going on a tour of Ohio Indiana Amish country, and Chicago Razzle Dazzle on Sept. 1-9. For more information call Merita Stanley at 594-9980.Western Star Pageant slatedBONIFAY The annual Western Star Pageant will be held on Sept. 29 in the Holmes County High School. Boys and girls can enter. Boys 0 to 7 years old and girls 0 to 21 years old may compete and the Ms. competition will include ages 22 and up. Sign up will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sept. 18 at the Bonifay Dance Center on Highway 90. For more information, call Wanda at 614-1062 or 768-2005; or Bernyce at 547-3474 or 768-1150. Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences.Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section ofwww.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com, you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership withLegacy.com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212 Mrs. Theresa Ann Williams, 61, of Bonifay, died Aug. 24, 2012. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.Theresa A. WilliamsMrs. Mary Pachis McCullough of Bonifay died Aug. 24, 2012. Funeral services were held, Aug. 25, 2012 at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with interment at Lakeview United Methodist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing.Mary P. McCulloughMr. Lynvol Wilkerson of Holmes County, passed away on Monday, Aug. 27, 2012. He was 79. Lynvol was born Sept. 16, 1932, in Walton County, the son of Ira C. Wilkerson and Emma Elam Wilkerson. He was a graduate of Walton County High School, Class of 1951, and Troy State University. He enjoyed a 32-year career teaching History and Social Studies at Bethlehem High School. He was a Korean War Veteran, a member of the Esther Masonic Lodge for more than fty years, and a member of New Teamon Baptist Church. Lynvol enjoyed shing and hunting and was an avid fan of Bethlehem basketball during his career. After his retirement, he enjoyed traveling and riding his ATV with his dog, Baloo. Lynvol was preceded in death by his parents; ve sisters, Lola Owens, Lora Pearson, Blondene Beck, Roberta Frazier, and Dianne Laird, and three brothers, Ocelar, Kenneth, and Rodney Wilkerson. He is survived by his wife, Daisy; his son, David (Patricia) of Bonifay; his daughter, Shasta Kruse (Mark) of Tallahassee; four grandchildren, Dara, Kelsey, Nathan, and Hannah Wilkerson; two sisters, Cludie Faulk and Wavine Turner; four brothers, Ira Jr., Robert, Chester, and Jerome Wilkerson, and numerous nieces and nephews. The family received friends from 5 to 7 p.m., on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012, at the Williams Funeral Home in Graceville. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., on Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012, at New Teamon Baptist Church in Slocomb, Ala., with the Rev. Lee Chorn of ciating. Burial followed at the New Teamon Baptist Church Cemetery, with Williams Funeral Home of Graceville directing. In lieu of owers, memorials can be made to the New Teamon Baptist Church Building Fund, 3813 South County Road 85, Slocomb, AL 36375.Lynvol WilkersonMr. Ralph Bailey, 74 of Bonifay, died on Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012, at his Residence in Bonifay. Born Friday, April 22, 1938 in Muscogee County, Ga. He was the son of the late Wayne Bryant Bailey and Lucille Grubbs Bailey and is preceded in death by a son, Guy Lee Bailey, sister, Sybil Bowers, brother, Neil Bailey. He was a Veteran of the United States Navy. Surviving is his wife, Catherine Spurlin Bailey; sons, Tim Bailey of Americus, Ga., Allen Bailey of Americus, Ga., Roy Bailey of Americus, Ga., and Randy Bailey of Americus, Ga.; step-sons, Thomas Webb, Jacksonville, Robert Webb, Tampa, James Webb, Cottondale, and Douglas Webb, Smithville, Ga.; brothers, Willard Bailey of Perry, Billy Wayne Bailey of Chipley, Everett Bailey of Westville, Robert Bailey of Bonifay and David Bailey of Noma; sister, Joy Hollingsworth of Old Town, and nine grand children. A Funeral service was held at 2 p.m., on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012 at Sims Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Jason Campbell of ciating. Interment followed in the Caryville Cemetery, with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m., on Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2012, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel.Ralph BaileyBernice Marie Sieg, 94 of Bonifay, died on Sunday, Aug. 26, 2012, at Doctors Memorial Hospital in Bonifay. Born Monday, Sept. 17, 1917, she was the daughter of the late William Miller and the late Leila Bush Miller. Surviving are sons, Billy Gene Sieg of Suwannee, and Jerry Sieg of Slidell, La.; daughter, Rebecca Clark of Bonifay; sister, Blondell Thompkins of Jacksonville; four grand children, and three great grand children. A Funeral service was held at 11 a.m., on Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2012 at Bonifay Cemetery with Lester Boswell, Ray Boswell, and the Rev. Tim Stout of ciating. Interment followed in the Bonifay Cemetery, with Sims Funeral Home directing.Bernice M. SiegMr. Donald Wayne Stricklen, 47 of Caryville, died on Friday, Aug. 24, 2012, at Northwest Florida Community Hospital in Chipley. Born Thursday, June 17, 1965 in Chipley, he was the son of the late George Stricklen and the late Joann Burns Stricklen. Surviving are daughter, Stephanie Stricklen of Vernon; brothers, Gregory Stricklen of Caryville, Mark Stricklen of Caryville, and Tom Stricklen of Caryville, and girlfriend, Sonya Deal of Caryville. A Funeral service was held at 2 p.m., on Saturday, Sept. 1, 2012 at Sims Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Lewis Burns officiating. Interment followed in the Caryville Cemetery, with Sims Funeral Home directing. The family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m., on Friday, Aug. 31, 2012, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel .Donald W. StricklenMrs. Johnnie Mae Hill, 78, of Esto, passed away Aug. 28, 2012, in the Bonifay Nursing and Rehab Center, Bonifay. She was a homemaker of the Baptist Faith. She was a native of Lapine, Ala., and a long time resident of Ebro. Survivors include he husband, Willie Hill, of Ebro; two sisters, Eva Mae Robinson, Laura Hill, Mary Toles, Miami; a devoted niece, Denice (Ricky) Hogans, Vernon, and many other relatives and friends. Funeral services were conducted at 3 p.m., Sept. 2 at Oak Grove Baptist Church, Ebro, with the Rev. Carl Jett and the Rev. Billy Marshell, of ciating. Interment followed in the St. Luke Memorial Garden Cemetery, Vernon. The were reposed in the church one hour prior to services with the Copper Funeral Home of Chipley directing.Johnnie M. HillMr. Roosevelt Douglas, Jr., 79, of Chipley, passed away Aug. 28 in the Gulf Coast Medical Center, Panama City. He was a native of Washington County of the Baptist faith, a Korean War Veteran and a retired correction officer. He is the son of the late Roosevelt Sr. and Bessie Douglas of Ft. Walton Beach. Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Royce Lewis Douglas, Chipley; two children, Kenneth Douglas, Marianna and Donna Douglas of Tampa; two sisters, Dr. Thelma Wood, Vernon, and Mrs. Connie Mongomery, Fort Walton Beach, and many other relatives and friends. Funeral services were conducted at 1 p.m., Sept. 1, at the old Roulhac High School Auditorium in Chipley with the Rev. Price Wilson, and the Rev. Cleve Widderburn officiating. The remains were in repose at the auditorium one hour prior to service. Interment followed in the Southside Cemetery, Chipley with Military Honors and the Cooper Funeral Home of Chipley, directing.Roosevelt Douglas, Jr. Obituaries Community EVENTS

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Wednesday, September 5, 2012 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News ExtraBy FELICIA KITZMILLERHalifax Media PANAMA CITY BEACH Dolphins are graceful, playful and intelligent and they d ont need handouts.  The National Marine Fisheries Service calls the Panama City area a hot spot for illegal dolphin interaction, and a recent report reveals those most passionate about dolphin interaction are the most ignorant of laws to protect the animals and the most likely to engage in harmful behavior. Feeding and harassing wild dolphins is prohibited by the Marine Mammals Protection Act. Violations of the act are prosecuted by the United States Attorneys Ofce and carry hefty nes and penalties. Yet the problem persists. Its true that Panama City is recognized and has been recognized for feeding dolphins, and that goes back at least 30 years, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) spokesman Stan Kirkland said. Why we got the reputation I dont know. It probably goes back to taking tourists out to see dolphins and, of course, everyone wants to get up close and theyd feed them. The report commissioned by National Marine Fisheries Service, called Panama City Residents, Visitors and Business O perators Attitudes toward the Illegal Feeding and Harassment of Wild Dolphins, agrees with Kirklands assessment. Nearly 400 visitors, residents and business owners participated in the survey from November 2010 to July 2011. According to the survey, visitors are more likely to want to feed and interact with wild dolphins. Most say their interest stems from TV, movies and word of mouth. Most say they dont know if feeding dolphins is legal. You dont see dolphin interaction education in Tennessee, Kirkland said. Dane Taylor, who owns Dolphin Tours and More, said the problem is exacerbated by tour boat captains who feed the dolphins as a means of bringing animals closer to the boat. We have to correct them each and every time, Taylor said of his patrons. I tell them its a $100,000 ne; hence, there are no sh on this boat.  Why its harmfulIts easy to tell when a dolphin has been fed illegally, said Stacey Horstman, bottlenose conservation coordinator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The dolphins will approach the boats with their head out of the water and mouth open in classic baiting position, she said. While feeding wild dolphins may be well-intentioned, Horstman said it can start an abundance of problems for dolphins who become acclimated to handouts. They can be hit by boat propellers, get tangled in hooks and shing lines, and natural hunting instincts fade. Dolphins accustomed to handouts have a tendency to pillage the lines of shermen, making them an object of contempt and sometimes a target for retribution. The sheries survey showed charter shers were the least likely to be concerned about protecting wild dolphins. Earlier this summer Kirkland said he talked to a recreational sher who was hauling in a legal grouper when he watched a dolphin steal the sh right off his hook. To say he wasnt happy is an understatement, Kirkland said. Illegal dolphin feeding can have consequences for people, too, ofcials said. There are many documented cases of dolphins biting people. Dolphins are large, powerful marine mammals, and they have a lot of teeth, Kirkland said. In July, a dolphin grabbed a teenage girl who was swimming at the St. Andrews State Park, Kirkland said. In that case the skin wasnt broken and the girl didnt require medical attention, but not all are so lucky. They dont know if someone is sticking their hand out to touch or pet them. They can mistake a hand or an arm for a food item, Horstman said.  EnforcementIn most cases when an FWC ofcer spots people feeding dolphins, they issue a warning, Kirkland said. If they are spotted again, they are ticketed. Commercial vessels, however, all have been warned, and if they are spotted by FWC they are immediately ticketed. Only a handful of citations have been issued in the last few years because everyone stops bad behavior as an FWC ofcer approaches, making feeding difcult to catch, Kirkland said. Interactions are even more difcult to police, Kirkland said. Humans are supposed to stay at least 50 yards from dolphins in the water, but it becomes a question of who was there rst. There is nothing to prohibit a dolphin from approaching a human, which happens often. Were not in the business of trying to hamper a legitimate business, he said. Several Panama City businesses advertise dolphin interaction on their websites and feature photos of people swimming with one or several dolphins. Taylor said he allows his customers to enter the water when dolphins are spotted, but not in their immediate area and only with a warning not to touch or hold on to the animals. Well anchor the boat and allow people to swim around an area dolphins are in and if a dolphin swims up to them, well, then, they had a good day, he said. Even passive interaction with humans, however, can change a dolphins behavior and is therefore considered harassment, Horstman said. Capt. Andersons dolphin tours take a more stringent approach and dont let their patrons in the water. Its not legal to get up close enough and its really not safe to be trying to swim with wild dolphins, operations manager Pam Anderson said. They might have that smile on their face, but they are still wild animals. Competing against businesses that skirt the rules can be a challenge, but Anderson said the safety of patrons is the rst priority. Hopefully those who arent doing that will be taken care of, she said. Dolphin enthusiasts can have a great experience if they get out on the boats of people who are doing it right. By CHRIS OLWELLHalifax Media PENSACOLA While making a career out of buying abandoned storage units is bound to come with a few surprises along the way, Clay Knight will never see another unit like the one he opened up Friday morning. I can surely hope not, Knight said. Ive seen some messed up things, but this tops the cake. Knight purchased the contents of a storage unit that had been rented by M ichael Berkland, a former associate medical examiner with the 1st Judicial Circuits Medical Examiners Ofce who was red in 2003 for failing to complete autopsy reports. Knight said it wasnt an odor that tipped him and his wife to the presence of the remains of about 100 people; they just opened a box and found pieces of people. The macabre discovery has sparked an investigation by the State Attorneys Ofce and the Medical Examiners Ofce into Berkland, who is believed to have collected the pieces during autopsies he conducted privately in Panama City, Fort Walton Beach, Tallahassee and Pensacola between 1997 and 2007. None of the remains are believed to be connected to autopsies Berkland performed for the Medical Examiners Ofce. Berkland worked in private pathology until 2007, when he lost his license to practice in Florida, according to the SAO. Prior to coming to Florida, Berkland had been a coroner in Missouri, where his license was revoked in 1999. Berkland began renting the storage unit at Uncle Bobs Storage in April 2009. It was auctioned to Knight on Aug. 22, and Knight discovered the body parts two days later after hed cleared the unit of the ofce furniture and other property. Knight paid $900 for the contents of the unit, which included a lung, hearts, and 10 brains, according to the SAO, as well as at least one ear and one tongue, Knight said. The pieces were stored in plastic containers, plastic bags and even a 32-ounce Styrofoam cup. Some of the containers had cracked and spilled. Many of the containers were labeled with the persons name, autopsy date and autopsy location. Many others were not, which has complicated efforts by the Medical Examiners Ofce to contact the next of kin. Pensacola police released an incident report of the discovery, but a vepage inventory of the body parts was redacted. The inventory has not been r eleased because some of the families of the deceased might not be aware of the investigation. Police continue to investigate the case along with the Medical Examiners Ofce and the State Attorneys Ofce to determine what, if any, laws were broken. Berkland has not been charged. Knights purchase last week was the rst time hed bought the contents of an abandoned storage unit. He decided to take the rest of the week off from his new enterprise.On rst buy, man nds body partsPolice still investigating discovery in ex-medical examiners storage unit News EWS He E Ral AL D File ILE photoPHOTOThe seemingly harmless feeding and petting of wild dolphins is just the sort of behavior that could be illegal. The National Marine Fisheries Service calls the Panama City area a hot spot for illegal dolphin interaction.P.C. area a hot spot for illegal dolphin interaction

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, September 5, 2012 Featured Jobs To Place An Employment Here Please Contact Lorna Brown Phone: (850) 747-5019 Email: lbrown@pcnh.com Like Us On Facebook: www.facebook.com/emcoastjobs Or Follow Us on Twitter: @emcoastjobs emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By LARRY BUHLMonster Contributing Writer If you spend a lot of time at a desk, personalizing the space makes sense whether its a private corner office or a shared cubicle. But just as your clothes and body language make an impression on others, your workspace gives co-workers and clients a distinct impression about you. Plants, books, artwork even your name plaque transmit clues about your efficiency, sociability and competence, experts say. Everything in your office sends a message, whether you want it to or not, said Lisa Marie Luccioni, an adjunct professor of communication at the University of Cincinnati. So what might they be thinking when they see your space?You would rather be fishing (or skiing or skydiving or ... )Evidence: Pictures and artifacts from your hobby on every surface. Theres a delicate balance between sharing your interests and giving the impression that you are daydreaming all day about jumping out of planes or skiing, according to Barbara Pachter, business etiquette expert and the author of New Rules at Work. Pictures of your hobby are good conversation starters, but if you have too many of them, it makes people wonder whether youre really daydreaming about fly-fishing, she says.They can hang aroundEvidence: A full candy dish, aspirin in the drawer, well-tended plants, pictures of children and babies. Things like an open door, candy, a comfortable guest chair and photos of people but not pictures of objects signal an extroverted workspace that people will feel free to linger in, said Sam Gosling, a professor of psychology at the University of Texas and author of Snoop: What Your Stuff Says About You.They shouldnt hang around Evidence: Flimsy guest chair, guest chair covered in files or no guest chair. Your desk faces away from guests. Minimal or no decoration. Even if your office has photos or artwork, but theyre images of things and not people, (people) can make an assumption youre more introverted and might not want them to linger, Gosling says.You demand respect Evidence: Multiple degrees on the wall, awards on the shelf, pictures of you and important people, magazines featuring articles about you. The plaque on your desk says your full name and title and lists your advanced degrees. Name plaques form a strong impression, Luccioni says. If it says just your first name, people assume youre friendly and approachable. If it has a formal title, they think you want to be respected for your rank. They should avoid doing business with youEvidence: Messy piles of papers on every surface. Half-eaten donuts atop teetering stacks of binders. Carpet stains. Experts agree a messy office can seriously damage your reputation as a conscientious person. Its hard to function in a messy office, and people assume your office chaos will spill over to their project and their files will be lost in your mess, Pachter says.You dont take the whole work thing too seriouslyEvidence: Humorous posters, ironic bumper stickers, whimsical images and toys.Conscious decoratingExperts have several suggestions for making sure your workspace matches the image you want to project. Err on the conservative side: If clients visit you or if you are in a high-traffic area, you want to make sure people dont stop in their tracks to gawk at your collection of teddy bears or tiki torches. Be careful with controversial items: Consider the cost-reward ratio of putting up something like a political campaign poster, Luccioni says. You might find kindred spirits, or you might offend people and get a first meeting off to a bad start. All experts say anything potentially racist, sexist, homophobic or otherwise disparaging of a group is a no-no. Follow industry norms: Some industries demand a strict image of seriousness, while others are more laid-back. A poster with a funny or counterculture slogan is more appropriate in the office of an advertising copywriter than the office a defense attorney. Consider the physical arrangement: A desk can act as a barrier and give formality, which is good for reviews but can be intimidating, Luccioni says. She adds that a small circular table allows everyone to meet on an equal basis. A power difference, if you want that, can be achieved by giving guests smaller, flimsier chairs. And if you tend to make snap judgments about others offices, try to look at the bigger picture, Gosling recommends. Any one item can have many different purposes, he says. If someone has a plant, maybe they have a green thumb, maybe theyre into feng shui or maybe the plant was left over from the last person in that office. If you see someone with a super-neat desk, how do you know whether theyre truly neat, or whether they swept everything into a drawer before you stopped by? What your workplace says about you Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMENEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!!! Become a Newspaper Carrier or Single Copy/ Rack Route Marianna, Cottondale, Chipley, & Bonifay. 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