<%BANNER%>
Holmes County times-advertiser
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100549/00174
 Material Information
Title: Holmes County times-advertiser
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
Place of Publication: Bonifay, FL
Publication Date: 08-15-2012
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00100549:00174

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

50 www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM Phone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 bonifaynow.com Connect With Us 24/7 Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo galleries, opinions and more... @WCN_HCT And Mobile Too Bonifay OKs clubs offer to help get city excited about rodeo By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Bonifay City Council approved of allowing the Kiwanis Club to put up rodeo ags along city streets during their regularly scheduled meeting on Monday. When I was a kid there was a uniqueness to Bonifay when it came to rodeo time, said Kiwanis Club President Bill Bullington. When you came into Bonifay, the whole city would display streaming rodeo ags, vibrant in color and radiating excitement for the upcoming festivities. Windows would be creatively painted depicting Western scenes, and the city would feel alive with growing anticipation. Bullington said he wanted to revive the days when the Bonifay Rodeo was a big deal, starting with displaying the rodeo ags. He said the Kiwanis Club would help with the expenses. He also said the city could possibly hold a window painting contest in which they would award a local business for the best Western scene depicted on their store front window. Bonifay Kiwanis Club has an obligation to the communitys children, thats a given. However, we now feel that we should be more involved in the community as a whole, Bullington said. Bullington also discussed the clubs contract with the city and urged for collaboration about where the Air Force could hold a free public concert. Theyre bringing in some of their best talent, Bullington said. Also, the National Guard will be bringing in some unique things, both in the parade and afterwards. Theres going to be a lot of talent and phenomenal shows, and were hoping well be able to renew the spirit of the community and the excitement of the rodeo. In other business, the council approved of a residents request to place a mobile home on their property because their father recently had a stroke and couldnt take care of himself. Weve granted permission like this before during times of duress, Council Member Roger Brooks said. It always comes with the stipulation that as soon as it is deemed no longer necessary, then the trailer has to go. Fisanick running for property appraiser From Staff Reports BONIFAY Felecia Fisanick announced her candidacy for the Holmes County Property Appraisers of ce on Tuesday, Aug. 7. Fisanick is the daughter of Richard and Gail Woodham and the wife of Joey Fisanick, and the owner of Woodham Plumbing and Utilities Contractors. She graduated from Bethlehem School and attended Chipola College. She is a licensed real estate sales associate, serves as the secretary of the Doctors Memorial Board of Trustees and is founder of the Northwest Florida Friends of NRA. She serves on the Downhome Street Festival committee as co-chairman and the Holmes County Fair Committee. A few years ago the housing market collapsed, bringing on the worst economic times that my generation has experienced, Fisanick said. Homes that had property values in the hundreds of thousands of dollars are now worth about half that. As property values rose, so did our taxes, but as they crashed did our taxes fall with them? One of the questions that many of you have asked is why this happened and why havent our taxes been lowered to meet the fallen property values. I want answers just as you the people of Holmes By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com ESTO The town of Esto is pursuing an addendum to its water ordinance that will allow the council to raise the water rates annually if the need arises. The addendum was discussed during the town council meeting on Aug. 7. We should be able to put out a notice of a public hearing at the next meeting, said Town Attorney Jeff Goodman. I just received the information needed to nish the addendum, and if things go well, then we can get a public hearing for September. Town Council President Danny Powell said the town might need to raise water rates in the future because of an upcoming project to upgrade its water system. This would be to help compensate for possible loans that will be used to upgrade our water system for the town, Powell said. We promise to keep it as reasonable as possible, but we also need that security. The council approved of appointing Tom Murphy as the new Esto re chief for the remainder of the year, when the position of re chief is up for renewal. Toms doing an excellent job, said council member Jeff Carnley. It helps that hes already familiar with the re department, very capable of doing the job and it will go just as smoothly as before. Many of the Esto re ghters were present to show their support of Murphy becoming chief. Esto city limits came into question after a resident researched how to get the speed limit reduced in front of his house. Resident Bill Gray requested that the speed limit be reduced in front of his house, complaining that the speed didnt reduce from 55 to 45 miles per hour until past his house. Town Clerk Jody Sellers said she had called the Department of Transportation the previous Friday and was told the state recently did a study of that road and concluded the town didnt warrant signs lowering the speed limit or a stop light at the intersection of highways 2 and 79. Gray said the representative who talked with him said the area FELECIA FISANICK CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser Chainsaw artist Julius Moeller displays a dragon he carved from cedar for a tattoo shop in Panama City. For the full story and more photos, see Page B1 Kiwanis: Raise the rodeo ags Esto pursuing water ordinance addendum WOOD WORKS IN THE Volume 122, Number 18 Wednesday, AUGUST 15 2012 INDEX Arrests ................................. A3 Opinion ................................ A4 Outdoors .............................. A6 Sports .................................. A7 Extra .................................... B1 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B7 New email address for obituaries The email address for obituaries at Holmes County Times-Advertiser has changed. Obituaries should now be sent to obits@chipleypaper.com. Health clinic open on Saturday BONIFAY The Holmes County Community Health Clinic at 203 W. Iowa St. will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. RHUMC Back 2 School Bash BONIFAY Red Hill United Methodist will host its annual Back 2 School Bash from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Activities include water slides, face painting, door prizes, popcorn, snow cones, hot dogs and music throughout the day. School-aged children will receive backpacks lled with school supplies. Join the pastor and congregation as they kick off the school year with friends, food and fun. See FISANICK A2 See RODEO A2 See ESTO A2 PRIMARY ELECTION RESULTS ONLINE Visit bonifay now.com for the results of Tuesdays Primary Election. IN BRIEF See BRIEF A3 Big Bend Health Career Camp a success B1

PAGE 2

Local A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, August 15, 2012 ESTO from page A1 in question would have to be annexed into the city limits in order for the city to have control over the speed limit. Sellers said a second situation came up with the inquiry because there were two stores in that area, Big Daddys Li quor LLC and the Express Lane. The stores were supposed to have already been annexed into the town, but she said she was informed by the DOT that the annexation process was never fully completed. She said those owners were paying town taxes and have been doing so for seven years. This is one of those odd situations where its legal that theyre paying taxes even if the annexation wasnt fully competed, Goodman said. Weve got to nd out what was missing to complete this annexation. Sellers also told Goodman that Charles Corcoran would like to be an nexed into the town as well, saying Corcorans property is already in the town limits, but somehow his house is just outside the town limits. First well nd out about what needs to be done to nish annexing in the two stores, then Ill look into the validity of what Mr. Gray had been told about the city being able to control the speed limit if that area was annexed in, and then well see about Mr. Corcoran be ing annexed in as well, Goodman said. It would be good to nd out if theres anyone else in that area that would like to be annexed in; that way we can get it done at one time. The council approved of borrowing additional money to replace the air-con ditioning units at the towns recreational center, which will take paying off their loan at $600 a month from 5 months to 20. Sellers said theyve xed the units as much as they could over the years and that they were the same units that came with the building when it was built. The council also approved of Good mans advisement to nd the specica tions of the units and then put the items out for bid. The council approved of renewing their contract with Allen, Yagow & Car to provide their towns audit for the amount of $7,500 and agreed to look for another rm the next year, one that would be cheaper and more local than Crestview. It was announced that the latest TwoToed Tom Yard Sale yielded a prot of $240 to go toward the 2013 festival. The next regularly scheduled Esto Town Council meeting is set for 7 p.m. Sept. 4 at the Esto Town Hall. County do, she said. I understand that the state has laws that must be adhered to, and I feel condent that we can follow those laws while still ghting for you and looking out for the best interest of the lo cal taxpayer. If elected I will make sure the prop erty appraisers ofce will be one that you will be comfortable visiting while taking care of business, Fisanick said in a news release. We will get answers to your questions, and I can assure you that I will remember who put me in ofce. I will be a property appraiser who works for all of the taxpay ers of Holmes County, she said. A resident came before the council because she injured herself when she fell into the hole where her water meter was located. She said a city employee had ad mitted that when they checked the me ter, they forgot to put the lid back on. The resident was advised to ll out an incident report at City Hall following medical treatment. The council approved Resolution 1235, stating that the city has applied for a Community Development Block Grant under the previsions set forth in Title 1 of the Housing and Community Develop ment Act of 1974, and recognizes that handicap accessibility to both the physi cal facilities and the process of planning, development, implementations and as sessment of CBDGs is a necessary and desirable goal and that a well dened Grievance Policy will assist in the provi sion of handicap accessibility. We are already in compliance, said grant writer Bob Jones. This is just a formality for the grant application. City Attorney Lucas Taylor told the council he would not be able to send a letter of disapproval of the quality of ser vice to Mediacom like the council had re quested during the previous meeting. Its because we, as a city, no longer have a contract with Mediacom. How ever, there is still something that the residents of this city can do to formally le a complaint, Taylor said. Theres an online form that they can submit voic ing their complaint and submit it to their corporate ofce. The link to complete the online for mal complaint provided to Taylor for the residents is www.800helpa.com/com plnt.html. Several residents were present to complain about their Mediacom service, all saying they have trouble keeping ser vice and they are unable to get hold of a representative. The council approved of Brooks re quest to take a survey to see how many residents on the far end of Jenkins Av enue are interested in sewer services provided by the city. Ive got many requests from resi dents of the city of Bonifay saying theyre interested in having city sewer services but are currently unable to have those services provided because the sewer hasnt expanded that far, Brooks said. If theres enough of a response, then we can get our engineers to see about what it would take to get funding and have the sewer expanded out that way. Jones agreed with Brooks that a sur vey would be a good idea and that there was funding through rural development to help. You should expand that idea to the whole city and see how many other plac es are without sewer, Jones said. It would be a good future project. The council also agreed to Council Member Richard Woodhams request that the city look into adopting Holmes Countys dog ordinance. Bonifay Police Chief Chris Wells agreed that Holmes Countys dog ordi nance was well structured and had a lot of teeth to enforce it. Are there restrictions on certain breeds? Woodham asked. More and more people are owning pit bulls in this area. Its only a matter of time be fore were sitting here discussing how someone got hurt and what needs to be done. The next city council meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m. Aug. 27 at the Boni fay City Hall. SPECIAL TO THE NEW S Esto Town Council members and residents gathered as Esto celebrated its new Dollar General stores grand opening on Aug. 11. Headquartered in Goodlettsville, Tenn., Dollar General Corporation is the nations largest small-box discount retailer, posting $14.8 billion in annual sales. The 9,000-square-foot store is open daily from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. DOLLAR GENERAL GRAND OPENING FISANICK from page A1 RODEO from page A1 By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com VERNON Vernon Fire Chief Matt Go thard asked the City Council what his dis cretionary spending limit was for the re department Monday night. Gothard had a re trucks air condition ing repaired for $300, and some questions arose over the amount a department head could spend without seeking the councils approval. I think the amount is $500, but I am not sure, Council Member Byron Biddle said. It would be found in the citys nancial policies. Biddle said $300 was probably within the limits of a department heads spending. Mayor Michelle Cook said she was con cerned that the expenditure was made without approval and that the work was done by one of the volunteer remen. The mayor asked Gothard if the job should not have been done by an estab lished company such as Hasty. Gothard said he was not aware of any requirements as to what company should do repair work for the city. Council Member Tina Sloan said in the past, work has been done by other volun teer remen, and that if the work was go ing to be less expensive than a contractor or garage, the city had had no problems with that practice. If the work is less expensive, then we should do it, she said. Gothard also reported that the citys rescue truck is no longer usable. The truck dies then wont restart for an hour or so, and no one who has looked at the truck has been able to diagnose the prob lem, he said. Isnt that the truck we replaced the starter on? Biddle asked. Weve replaced about everything on that truck, Gothard said. Cook asked if that was the only truck the city had that could haul the depart ments Cascade trailer. Gothard said that was indeed the case. Cascade trailers al low air tanks to be relled at the scene of a re or other emergency. I have a list of what all has been spent on that truck, as opposed to replacing it, Gothard said. Ill bring it to the next workshop. The City Council also approved a reso lution allowing the Vernon Garden Club to seek a highway beautication grant from the state. The grant, if approved, would require the city provide water for the land scaping. The council approved both sub jects unanimously. The mayor reported that work on the Department of Transportation predicts that the State Road 79 bridge in Vernon will be completed by Dec. 5. She also said there would be a political forum held in the Community Center on Oct. 18. Clerk Diann Hendrix reported that the street department needs a new pressure washer and asked for permission to get three estimates. Council questions department head spending limits VERNON CITY COUNCIL @ WC N_ HCTFO LL O W US O N TWITTERW A S HI NG TO N C O UN T Y NEW S / H OLME S C O UN T Y ADV E R TI S E RFIND US ONLINEF IN D US O N FA CE BOOK

PAGE 3

Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 Wednesday, August 15, 2012 1360 Brickyard Road Chipley, FL 32428 (850) 638-1610 www.nfch.org Northwest Florida Community Hospital Emergency Service Expert Care When Theres No Time to Spare When minutes count you can always rely on our board-certied physicians, highly-trained RNs, LPNs and Paramedics to handle your emergency. Always here for you 24 hours a day, every day. We Treat You Like Family better than Radiologists. 547-2244 OWENS C HIR O PRACTI C CLINIC ACUPUNCTURE (850) 638-4219 Now Available Midland Weather Alert Radio Model# WR-120 EZ for only $39.99!! Mitchell Sight and Sound Washington Square 1414 Main St. #2 Chipley, FL 32428 Hours: Mon-Fri 9-6 Sat 9-4 All Major Credit Cards Accepted Sheriffs Of ce seeks help in thefts From Staff Reports BONIFAY The Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce is asking for the publics assistance with two recent thefts in Holmes County. Missing from a farm in Northeast Holmes County is a yellow, 20-by-8-foot, heavy-duty metal farm trailer with two mobile home axles and fold-up metal loading ramps. This trailer was loaded with 1-by-4 inch and 1by-6-inch tongue and groove oak boards, 12 and 16 feet in length, and rough-cut cedar boards 8 feet long. Also on the trailer were 15 sheets of 2-by-10-foot roo ng metal. Also recently missing from the same community is a 2009 black Buell sport bike, similar to the one pictured. Anyone with information concerning these thefts or other crimes in Holmes County can call Crime Stoppers of Holmes County at 866-689-8477. You will not have to give your name, and you may be entitled to a cash reward of up to $1,000. You may also call the Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce at 547-3681. The following arrests were made July 29 to Aug. 4 in Holmes County. Phillip Dale Adkins, 24, no valid drivers license, ee and elude at high speed Darrell Maurice Askew, 40, hold for prison transport service Michael Craig Barlow, 37, hold for Hillsborough Michael Alan Baxley, 37, driving while license suspended or revoked Frankie Brown, 49, hold for Hillsborough Joe Brian Debose, 45, violation of probation felony driving while license suspended or revoked Heather Leanne Finch, 22, false information to law enforcement of cer Charles Gibson, 32, violation of probation Robert Daniel Gore, 18, failure to appear on no valid drivers license Scott Allan Grimsley, 33, hold for prison transport service Tiffany Ann Helton, 29, hold for prison transport service Thomas Charles Hershell, 55, driving while license suspended or revoked John Samuel Holley, 28, grand theft, burglary, contributing to the delinquency of a child Katherine Holt, 47, weekender Damarius Jabrail Jones, 22, driving while license suspended or revoked Jennifer Anjeannette Jones, 23, criminal use of personal identi cation Thomas Luebano, 32, violation of probation on sale and delivery of marijuana Cameron Baxter Mahini, 21, hold for prison transport service David Robert Manzi, 30, hold for prison transport service Tedrick Demond McKenzie, 36, hold for prison transport service Tracey Altoniad McMillian, 46, hold for prison transport service Kennie Wayne Mitchem, 22, disorderly intoxication, resisting of cer without violence Julius Cornelious Oliver, 23, hold for Hillsborough Richard Jason Pippins, 31, no valid drivers license, failure to appear, false of cial statement Andrew Daniel Pringle, 29, driving while license suspended or revoked Luciano Rodriguez, 27, no valid drivers license, giving false name to law enforcement of cer, giving false information to law enforcement of cer William Reed Spence, 35, violation of probation, driving while license suspended or revoked, reckless driving Jeremy Ray Troutman, 31, hold for prison transport service Robert Christopher Vermillion, 25, trespassing Justin Wade Ward, 30, uttering forged instrument, criminal use of identi cation information Jeremy Keith Whitney, 21, driving under the in uence Danny Ray Williams, 41, hold for prison transport service Arrest REPORT Noma Back to School Fun Day Saturday NOMA Noma Assembly of God will have a Back to School Fun Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. The fun day is free, and there will be puppets, cotton candy, snow cones, a train and a water slide (shirt and shorts required). Evening of Southern Gospel Saturday CHIPLEY The Spanish Trail Playhouse presents An Evening of Southern Gospel at 7 p.m. Saturday at the historic Chipley High School Theatre, home of the Spanish Trail Playhouse. The program features many of the regions top Christian musicians. Scheduled to perform are Trish Brannon, Rachel Webb, Rosalyn Scott, Terri Garrett, Leah Page, A.D. Davis and Crossroads Quartet, all from Chipley. Others include Sonny and Linda Morris of Eufaula, Ala., and Rhonda and Shelby Lewis from Panama City. The stage band members include A.D. Davis, drums; Scotty French, lead guitar; Emory Wells, acoustic guitar; Kirk Thompson, bass guitar and emcee; Doug Salter, piano; Jimmy Miller, pedal steel guitar, banjo, and dobro. This is a fundraising event for The Spanish Trail Playhouse. Doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets, $10, are available at the Chipley public library and will be available at the door. Noma Community Reunion The annual Noma Community Reunion will be at 10 a.m. Sept. 1 in the Noma Town Hall building. Lunch will be served at noon. All past and present residents and friends are invited. Please bring a welllled basket of your favorite dishes. Also, please bring tea, if that is the beverage you prefer. Soft drinks, ice, cups, plates and eating utensils will be furnished. For more information, contact Ludine Riddle at 974-8438. BRIEF from page A1

PAGE 4

Wednesday, August 15, 2012 Opinion A4 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com 1-800-645-8688 ADVERTISING 850-547-9414 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2012, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. August brings memories of birthdays With the arrival of August, I start thinking of a family get-to-gather to celebrate all the August and early September birthdays. Three of my four brothers were born in August, and Max, the youngest, was born Sept. 9 on our dads 31st birthday. Max was No. 7 and the rst of the large brood to be born in a hospital. It was cotton-picking time, and the front porch was full of the white stuff waiting for a bale, enough to take to the gin. At that time, the gin operated by the Childs family was on Oklahoma Street behind Jerry Cooleys Holmes County Milling Co., which faces Waukesha. Next door to the gin, right by the L.& N. Railroad tracks, was The Happy Corner Grocery operated by the Moore family. When our mama announced it was time to go to the hospital, the prospective new father said she would have to wait until they got the cotton loaded. The farm hands and Daddy quickly installed the high bodies onto the pick-up truck and loaded the cotton. Only then could the frugal Mr. Wells justify a trip to Bonifay. Later that day, he came by Brackin School, where the remainder of the ock except Clyde were, to announce a baby brother named Carl Max had been born. I was 5, and I remember it very well. (Seven years later, sister Muriel Irene came along, and in two years Patricia Gail rounded out our number to four girls and four boys. It also assured our dad would not be drafted into the World War II army.) Aug. 14 never approaches without remembering that it is my late brother Clydes birthday. Last week, I attended the 80th birthday of our friend, Tom Jenkins, and was reminded again that he and Clyde, who died in 1990 in a plane crash, were born the same month. So this would have been a signi cant birthday for Clyde. Though we fought most of the time as children, we were close friends as adults. Every child should have an Uncle Clyde. One of our ghts, if you could call it that, stands out. We were hoeing and arguing over who got to use the little hoe. That was a hoe that was well worn, so the blade was thin from much sharpening. Everyone wanted that hoe. Daddy never took much time for arbitrating nor disciplining. (He just did it.) So he said, Clyde, you can have it for the rst row, and then you can have it, Hazel. When we got to the end of the row, Clyde started back hoeing the next row. I waited to give him time to relinquish the little hoe, but he continued down the row. So I lifted my heavier hoe and conked him on the head, whereupon he let out a loud yell. Daddy who was well ahead of us said, Why did you do that? He didnt give me the little hoe, I whined. Well, did you get it? my daddy said as he continued to hoe. Somewhere I read it is important for a parent to be casual. Another thing we fought about was getting up in the morning. Clyde never slept late, and he considered it his responsibility to get me up every morning. That usually set the tone for the day. My two older brothers, Jim and Perry, celebrate birthdays on Aug. 21 and 24, respectively. The sister just older than I, Minnie Russ, and Clyde are both deceased, but that leaves three octogenarians of the Hugh and Marie Wells children. I believe Jack is the only one of the Tison siblings to live past age 80. Among our many aunts, uncles and cousins, we have many August birthdays including our younger son, Glen, who was born on Aug. 30, 1959. I read recently a statistic that there are more people born in August than any other month. Our family certainly would bear that out. I suppose it is because of the short days and long nights of the cold winter months. Growing up in a large family certainly had its drawbacks, and there were times when I would wish for fewer people to spread the limited nancial resources among, but then Id think, Which one could we spare? I always gured if a choice had to be one or another, I would be the rst to go. Now, looking back, I wouldnt trade my life for anyone elses. Each one of my siblings is a special blessing I am thankful for and proud of. I am still getting a lot of good feedback and positive comments on the column. That keeps me going. If I repeat myself too much, then it will be time to nd someone else to do the Happy Corner. As I was watching the throngs of parents and children at the Northwest Florida Community Hospitals Back 2 School Fair on Saturday, I couldnt help but think going to school has gotten much more complicated than I remember it being of course, having been on the kid side of the fence, it might just have seemed less involved in the 60s and 70s than it is now. The Back 2 School Fair was very well-attended, in spite of drizzling rain. Hospital of cials estimate a crowd of 2,500 parents and children attended during the three-hour event and thousands of school supplies were distributed to children at no cost. Backpacks, bicycle helmets, laundry lists of notebooks, glue, pens, and on and on The lists of school supplies are impressive, and doubtless expensive, especially if you have more than one child to buy supplies for each year. The Back 2 School Fair was an amazing event, but I couldnt help think back to my own school days seeing all the youngsters enjoying their last few hours before getting back on the yellow bus. All I remember needing as far as supplies go were Big Chief tablets, a box of Crayons and No. 2 pencils for elementary school. I just remember getting a pack of loose-leaf paper and a box of Bic pens in middle school and high school. We were fairly low maintenance back in the day, and I know compared to my parents days in school, when all you had was re and cave walls to paint on, us kids in the 60s/70s probably seemed high-tech. I think I even had a calculator in high school, not that we were allowed to use them. For me, back to school means football season is nearing and were getting closer to cool (or at least cooler) weather. I havent experienced fall in the Panhandle yet, but I dont expect to be wearing sweaters or gloves any time soon. Most of my football expertise comes from watching high school games from the sidelines, taking photos and occasionally dodging a tackle. As far as college football, I dont especially have a favorite team. As a graduate of Arkansas State University, I suppose I am a default fan of the Red Wolves, who will play the Troy Trojans in Alabama on Nov. 17 that might warrant a road trip. The Red Wolves will be in Florida on Oct. 4 facing the Florida International Golden Panthers in Miami, but I dont think I will drive that far to see ASU take on FIU. The FIU rivalry with the Red Wolves goes back quite a ways, I seem to remember them playing each other in the early 80s when I was, yet again, a student returning to school. For students, this last week before the school bells start ringing again means an end to the freedom of summer and a return to the tyranny of the teacher, which I personally remember dreading, back in the long ago (relatively speaking) before cellphones, Internet and video games. I spent most of my pre-teen summer days exploring the levees and streams, elds and pastures, running or bicycling up and down gravel and dirt roads. Once I was old enough to get a job, that became my summer and school didnt look so bad in comparison. But before becoming a Walmart stock boy at 15, I dont remember spending any time inside during the summer, although surely there must have been a rainy day or two between 1964 and 1974, but if there was I dont remember it. Mostly I just remember the vastness of the cotton elds, sliding down levees on cardboard sleds, and shooting reworks at the moon on the Fourth of July. Two of my favorite companions were egrets and red-winged blackbirds, and they were plentiful in the Mississippi Delta. I still have ashbacks to my childhood when I see a red-wing blackbird sitting on a wire fence. School, for the pre-teen me, was just something to be endured between summers and I cant help but believe there are dozens of youngsters out there this week who know exactly what I am talking about. RANDAL SEYLER Editor Back to school more complicated with time All I remember needing as far as supplies go were Big Chief tablets, a box of Crayons and No. 2 pencils for elementary school. I just remember getting a pack of loose-leaf paper and a box of Bic pens in middle school and high school. HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison

PAGE 5

Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 Wednesday, August 15, 2012 NOTICE OF BUDGET WORKSHOP The City of Bonifay will hold a Budget Hearing on Monday, August 20, 2012. Workshop will be held at 6:00 p.m. at City Hall. LABOR DAY DEADLINES Deadlines for ALL Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 5 Publications Our Business Oces Enjoy a safe Labor Day weekend! ELECT ELECT FELECIA FISANICK FELECIA FISANICK FELECIA FISANICK for HOLMES COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISER I am Felecia Fisanick and I am seeking the oce of Holmes County Property Appraiser. If elected I W ILL : Run the oce in a professional, yet friendly manner. Always remember that YOU, the people of Holmes County, put me in oce and that I work for YOU! Always show respect for YOUR property as it is just that YOUR property. Perform tasks in an eecient and timely fashion. Answer the questions that I can and nd answers to those that I dont know the answers to. Every question has an answer! Follow the laws of the State while still ghting for you, the people of Holmes County If ele cted I W ILL NOT : Use the oce of Property Appraiser for personal gain. Use the state as an excuse not to do the job I am elected to do. Have you, the people of Holmes County, come to an oce where you will feel uncomfortable. Let the people down who put me in oce. I humbly ask for your vote and remember that on November 6th, a vote for FELEC I A F I SA NI CK is a vote to put the T ax Payers of Holmes C ounty First! By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Empact is a nonpro t organization to empower the community through education, said Stephen Andrews, founder of Empact. We take the kids on trips, hoping to instill a since of community with each generation so they to can grow up and have a positive impact on the community and on the city. Recent efforts have been amplied as Empact held two basketball tournaments to raise money for two separate local causes. The rst basketball tournament raised $500 for Madaline McFatter, a local who recently had lost her husband of 53 years, James Edward McFatter, known to many in the community as coach Mac. The second and most recent basketball tournament raised $500 for Jeremy Worthing, a student at Bonifay Middle School who has been diagnosed with cancer and is receiving help from the community for medical and travel expenses. Teaming up for Jeremy shirts are available through BMS or through the Prayer Chain for Jeremy pro le on Facebook. Contacts are Jalisa Brannon, Melanie Albury or Deborah Jones at BMS. We go throughout the city gathering donations and getting teams registered which also helps with adding funds to the cause were supporting for that tournament, Andrews said. Then theres the tournament itself, where we have concession stands and a live DJ. Its something fun for people to come to and support a good cause. Andrews said he hopes to expand the types of basketball tournaments to include womens basketball, childrens basketball and maybe even co-ed. People will give to a good cause, he said. Our community has been no exception. Theyve been a tremendous support in both providing donations and players. He said 100 people signed up the rst time they held a tournament and 150 people signed up during their last tournament. The next cause Andrews said they were trying to hold a tournament for is breast cancer awareness in October. I hope to see even more community support as we raise money for the American Cancer Society during Octobers Breast Cancer Awareness, Andrews said. By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY The Washington County School Board adopted a revised attendance policy after a public hearing and a presentation by Administrative Services Director Pat Collins on Monday. The revised policy addresses elementary, middle and high schools in the district and adds statutory requirements that previously were not included in the districts policy. One state law allows the state to suspend the drivers license or not issue a license or learners permit to students reported as not meeting the statutory attendance requirements. The student will also be referred to truancy court. Collins noted parents of habitually truant children also may be sanctioned under Florida law. It is a second-degree misdemeanor, and parents can be ordered to complete a training program, or attend the school their children attend, she said. The document of record according to state law is the teachers grade book, Collins said, and it is important that teachers are keeping accurate records of attendance and enforcing the absenteeism policy. Students under the policy are allowed up to four days of absence during a nine-week period with a parental note and only for reasons as speci ed in the policy. For any absence over four days in a nineweek period, a doctors note, funeral program of immediate family member, religious holiday or documented legal reason is required, according to the policy. If a student logs ve or more unexcused absences within a month, or 10 unexcused absences in a 90-day period, they will be referred to the Child Study Team to determine if early patterns of truancy are developing, as required by state law. Four unexcused tardies or unexcused checkouts in a nine-week grading period will be considered as one unexcused absence for the period in which the tardy or checkout occurred, according to the policy. The new policy also drops a nine-week grade by only 10 points instead of giving a student an F for excessive absenteeism. The purpose isnt to make them drop out, or make it impossible for them to catch up, said Vernon High School Principal Brian Riviere. We want to hold their feet to the re, but we want them to stay in school and be able to bring that grade up. The main goal was to streamline the old policy, Riviere said. We tried to nd a middle path that holds students accountable but lets them recover their grade. The bottom line is we want to get to the bottom of why the childs not in school, and get them back in the classroom, Collins said. In other business, the board heard a presentation from WashingtonHolmes Technical Center Director Martha Compton and staff on the Skills USA national competition in Kansas City. WHTC pharmacy technician student Cristel Boyette won a silver medal in national competition in the category of medical mathematics. The board also heard from Students Working Against Tobacco members who read a proclamation against candyavored tobacco products. The Chipley branch of First Federal Bank of Florida also presented a check for $1,000 to the Kate M. Smith Elementary Schools AR program. From Staff Reports CHIPLEY A Vernon man was arrested for allegedly using a BB gun to abduct a woman on Wednesday, according to Chipley police. Antonio Francis Leverett, 31, of Vernon, was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, kidnapping and possession of drug paraphernalia, according to a police report. Chipley of cers were dispatched to an altercation on North Second Street, where a complaint had been made that a man had made threats with a gun and ed into the woods. Of cers were told the man in question was Antonio Leverett, according to the report. An investigation revealed Leverett had forced a woman to drive him to a location where he then threatened another person with the weapon. Additional of cers arrived on scene and began a search to locate Leverett. A short time later, an ofcer found Leverett at a nearby residence. Leverett was taken into custody, where he also was found to be in possession of drug paraphernalia, according to the report. Of cers also located the weapon, which was discovered to be an air cartridge BB gun, according to police. CECILIA SPEARS | The Times-Advertiser Stephen Andrews, founder of Empact, a non-pro t organization to empower the community through education. Local wants to make an Empact School Board adopts revised attendance policy Man accused of using BB gun in kidnapping

PAGE 6

OUTDOORS www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Send your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com A Section Hooked on Outdoors I watch in wonderment as boat after boat blasts out into the Gulf in pursuit of black grouper while all the time leaving more grouper behind than anglers could legally bring back to the landing if they tried. Most boaters leaving Carl Gray Park pass under the Hathaway Bridge and head to the pass while leaving behind grouper so large they would be a challenge to break away from the bridge and get to the top. I talked to a diver who inspects the bridge and he said there were goliath grouper under there that could eat a man in one bite. He said there were gag grouper up to 40 pounds and some black snapper that were humongous. When they blew up the old bridge a 35-pound red snapper that probably had lived under there for the better part of its life came oating to the top. Along the seawall at the shipyard and at the paper mill there are grouper that would be almost impossible to tear away from that wall. If you dont believe me, just don some gear and take a look around. Of course some of the biggest bull sharks you will ever see also live down there and the visibility isnt all that good. A lot of people have thrown stuff into the bay under the cover of darkness that has attracted a lot of sh; grouper as well as black and red snapper. I discovered one of these places in about 29 feet of water clear enough to actually see the grouper swimming around the structure. It was almost like shooting sh in a barrel until a hurricane moved this makeshift reef to parts unknown and the good shing with it. Lets not forget the sewer line that caused so much consternation a few years back. They say they covered it up, but that only made it better as far as grouper shing goes. And lets not forget the DuPont Bridge going to Tyndall Air Force Base. There are some grouper under this bridge as big as you ever will want to tangle with. You had better bring your big boy britches if you want to catch one of these sh. They have hidey holes they can run into before you get the slack out of your line. Big choffers and large mullet will get these sh out, but you better be ready to lose some tackle if you go. Wednesday, August 15, 2012 Page 6 Outdoor Life Scott Lindsey captainlindsey@ knology.net Coyotes and humans SXC Coyotes are a rusty brown color and typically weigh 25 to 35 pounds. They usually move after sundown and are more apt to be seen at night in rural areas, crossing roads or scavenging on road kill. By Stan Kirkland FWC There was a time in the not-toodistant past when coyotes were a rarity in the eastern United States. However, that no longer is the case. The small animal predators scienti cally known as Canis latrans once were found almost exclusively in the Southwest, but they now are rmly entrenched throughout the U.S. and even much of Canada. Our home state of Florida is no exception. Coyotes are a rusty brown color and typically weigh 25 to 35 pounds. They usually move after sundown and are more apt to be seen at night in rural areas, crossing roads or scavenging on road kill. They also will make themselves welcome in urban areas, where there is cover. In a perfect world, coyotes would stick to the things that wildlife biologists say they normally eat rats, mice, small birds, snakes, carrion and even watermelons and cantaloupes. Unfortunately, coyotes sometimes cross paths with small pets, such as dogs and house cats, which they can attack and kill. A study published by the Journal of Wildlife Management a couple of years ago points out just what can happen when coyotes cross paths with house cats. The study looked at eight radio-collared coyotes on the outskirts of Tucson, Ariz., from November 2005 through February 2006. Of 36 instances where coyotes encountered the cats, cats died in 19 of the interactions. In Florida there have been a number of instances where coyotes have gone after small dogs. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) doesnt investigate the incidents but they are a recognized occurrence. So, what does a person do if they want coyotes removed? Under FWC rules, coyotes are an unprotected furbearer. That means they can be removed or killed during daylight hours, 365 days a year, on private property. Landowners can remove the coyotes or hire a trapper to do the work. While it may make a person feel better that theyve removed a coyote or two, biologists say coyotes from outside the area quickly move in and occupy the vacated range. Where the concern is for small pets, biologists say there are several things people can do. That includes clearing debris and brush piles around the property, making the site less suitable to coyotes. Where there are woods or elds that border home, biologists recommend a standard fence or electric fence to discourage coyotes from coming in the yard. Biologists say its also not a good idea to allow house cats to roam free. Another thing that biologists say is sometimes a problem is attractants, such as garbage or pet food. They say garbage cans should be secured and recommend not feeding pets where coyotes may have access to the food. While coyotes usually ee at the site of humans, on rare occasions they may approach. If that happens, the recommended advice is to make noise and wave your arms. Those looking for information about coyotes or help dealing with a coyote issue can contact the FWCs Regional Of ce in Panama City at 850-265-3676. The FWC website MyFWC.com has information about coyotes by selecting Wildlife & Habitats and then Species Pro les. Charter shing making a comeback HOUMA, La. (AP) Charter shing has proven to be a tough industry to sink in Terrebonne and Lafourche parishes. Many charter boat captains saw fewer and fewer customers as a result of the 2010 BP oil spill, but now they are starting to recover and reel in more anglers. I would classify this as a comeback year, said Daryl Carpenter, president of the Louisiana Charter Boat Association that represents more than 140 charter boat captains along Louisianas coast. Terrebonne and Lafourche parishes received more than $2 million each from BP as a result of the oil spill with much of the money going to tourism advertising. Pat Gordon, Planning and Zoning director for Terrebonne, said the parish isnt advertising for speci c charter boat operations but for the industry a whole. Were advertising for people to come and sh in Terrebonne, Gordon said. Weve run ads in Cabelas Out tter Journal and are running an ad in the Louisiana Fishing Regulation Brochure. Theres a shing show that runs on HTV, and some ads are being played on that channel. One thing we have done for the local captains is get as many of them listed on the Convention and Visitors Bureau website as possible. Gordon said in addition to using the money to advertise shing, local festivals and the new parish branding received a monetary boost from the BP money. But it wont last forever. We got the money two years ago, Gordon said, and it will all be spent by the end of the third year. Michel Claudet, Terrebonne Parish president, said he thought the advertising campaigns, which focused on promoting Terrebonne as the Salt Water Fishing Capital of the World, were paying off. I think it has worked out, Claudet said. Some captains have said they are really busy. I think these guys certainly want more, but business is good. Its like everything else, you make an investment and hope to see a return on it. We are doing things to show that we are the Salt Water Fishing Capital of the World. In addition to parishsponsored advertising, groups such as the Metairie-based Louisiana Tourism and Coastal Coalition have been advertising for these hardhit companies. First of all, were seeing a rebound, said Carpenter, who also owns the Grand Isle-based Reel Screamers Guide Service. Ive stressed advertising to our members, and they should participate in these programs. But Im trying to say to BP and the government that one year does not a comeback make. Carpenter said the dollars spent on advertising was money well spent. There are several advertising programs taking place through the Charter Boat Association and through BP and federal government grants, Carpenter said. Local sherman also have seen the bene ts of these initiatives. While few of them could provide exact numbers, they all agree this year has been better than the last two.

PAGE 7

SP O RTS www.bonifaynow.com A Section Last in a three-part series about a rst-time owner of a racing greyhound, a rst-time full owner of a greyhound racing kennel and the dog making his racing debut this summer at Ebro Greyhound Park. By PAT McCANN 747-5068 | @pcnhpat pmccann@pcnh.com EBRO The afternoon downpour had eased into a steady rain and nally yielded to a mist by the time AJN Sweet Smoke was paraded down the track at Ebro Greyhound Track during an evening performance last week. Sweet Smoke was set to make his Grade A debut at about 9 p.m. in the 10th race of the evening card that had begun at 6:30 p.m. On a normal evening Race 10 it would have been perhaps 30 minutes earlier, but this was a Tuesday and family night at the pari-mutuel facility located a 15-minute drive north on State 79 for many tourists staying in Panama City Beach. The betting lines were longer. The time between races extended. Sweet Smokes racing routine actually had started about 3:30 p.m. in Kennel No. 5 located in the compound at the far reach of the parking lot. Thats when Smoke and the other greyhounds Joe Watsons AJN Kennel had entered that night received a snack of ground beef topped by corn syrup that trainer Thomas Suggs had prepared. Only the selected dogs in the kennel that were going to race received the snack. They knew at that point it was game on. Teresa Duncan, rst-time owner of a racing greyhound, was getting her game face on as well. Onlookers have informed her that watching her watch AJN Sweet Smoke chase around the track is nearly as entertaining as the race. Duncan, who lives with her husband outside of Fountain, decided early on that Sweet Smoke, now 20 months old, would run the entire season at Ebro, that concludes its 2012 meeting in September. I wanted to watch him run and because hes a good kid, Duncan explained. There had been early signs that Sweet Smoke might be a promising dog. Duncan said she saw that early on when he was frolicking on their 10-acre property. I would tell Joe that he is fast, she said. I know youre just hearing me say this I would tell him. He would say, yeah, yeah, yeah. Watson took note when he brought 10 greyhounds to Sarasota. He had been told to keep an eye on one of the dogs, that it could turn out to be a top performer. One day he saw Sweet Smoke catch her from behind. Hes got a lot of potential, Watson remembered his thoughts. AJN Sweet Smoke is trained by Thomas Suggs. Duncan hinted that it is dif cult for her not to dote on her animal. Hes such a sweet boy, she said. Thomas said I should change his name to Spoiled Smoke. I mean, hes my kid. One time I wanted to see him at the track and Thomas said, Hes not here to talk, hes here to race. Joe is a good friend of mine, hes gave me the right to see him. I try to back off so as not to delay Smokes progress and interfere with his routine. Two weeks ago I went to see him the morning he was to run, and I knew he didnt feel good. I called Joe and told him he was not himself and asked him what we needed to do. He said to race him and see how he reacts. He nished sixth, which is his worst yet. On this night, AJN Sweet Smoke was about to make his eighth start of the season and eighth of his career. He already had won four races in seven starts and nished second twice. Then there was the sixth-place nish when Duncan said she could tell by his eyes that her dog wasnt feeling up to par. I wanted him to learn the ropes at a puppy track and get the experience he needs, Duncan said. Otherwise he could get bashed by other dogs with more experience. We dont want to hurry him as long as he stays healthy and doesnt get hurt. Ebro President Stocky Hess has extensive experience in most phases of greyhound racing. Hes shared some of his knowledge with Duncan, who works in administration at Ebro Greyhound Park. First thing, I told her that hes not going to win every race, Hess said. You dont put young pups in over their head. Some you put them up in grade and they have trouble and they cant handle it. If they continue to get bounced around they lose their con dence. A good handler is observant of that. AJN Sweet Smoke performed well in schooling races that are run during the day when the track usually is silent. In addition to helping acclimate the dogs they provide those wagering on of cial races a snapshot of the dogs potential. Schooling races also help the racing secretary place older dogs in desired grades when they relocate here. Watson said he is wary when young dogs advance into Grade A against the fastest and more veteran dogs at the track. He said that a rst-time start in Grade B often is no different. When theyre moving up in class theyre against dogs that got more experience, and that worries me, Watson said. Hes got a lot of potential DOG DAYS OF SUMMER: PART 3 By JASON SHOOT 747-5069 | @pcnhjasonshoot jshoot@pcnh.com BONIFAY The queen will have her palace. So says the prince, who in this fairy tale is Holmes Countys Chris Walker, a 6-foot-9 forward who has verbally committed to Billy Donovans mens basketball team at the University of Florida. Walker is recognized as one of the premier recruits in the country, rated seventh nationally by ESPN.com and sixth by Rivals.com. His athleticism is otherworldly compared to most 17-year-olds, and he fully expects to hear NBA commissioner David Stern call his name as a lottery selection in the leagues 2014 draft. NBA draft people have said Im like a sick mix of Kevin Garnett and Perry Jones III, Walker said. High praise that may be, but dont describe it as unfounded. Walker only now is beginning to tap into his limitless potential, and his skills have improved exponentially since he led Holmes County to the Region 2-1A semi nals last winter. Playing alongside future Gator teammate Kasey Hill on the Florida Elite AAU team throughout the summer, Walker was forced to step up his game playing against the countrys best players in tournaments stretching from Atlanta to Las Vegas. Walker learned something about himself in the process. Its one thing to overwhelm opponents at a rural public school in the smallest high school classi cation in Florida. Its another to dominate against college recruits headed to national powers such as Kentucky, Louisville and Kansas. I really built up my con dence two months ago, he said. That was my rst look at how good I can really be. Humble beginnings Walker has lived his entire life in Bonifay, a central Panhandle community boasting fewer than 2,800 residents. That he will nish his prep career in a Blue Devils uniform is remarkable in its own right considering he has resisted overtures from some of the premier prep schools in the nation. Walker turned down Oak Hill Academy in Virginia, a program unrivaled in its ability to produce NBA-caliber talent. He declined a chance to play at Montrose Christian School in Maryland, the same program that helped Kevin Durant harness the skills that would turn him into the most lethal scorer in professional basketball. What I want to do is be my own guy, said Walker, who turns 18 on Dec. 22. I wanted to show them A.I.P. anything is possible. I wanted to stay in Bonifay. I turned down 30 offers and stuck with my home team. Even if youre at a little school, you can do your own thing and go for it. Walkers mother, Jeneen Campbell, is a single parent living on disability. Walker acknowledged that life never has been easy, and he said he draws strength from watching his mother battle through her own adversity. My mom truly is my backbone, he said. Shes at every game. Shes like my queen. Ive got to take care of her, and I want her not to have to do anything. It increases my drive to make my dreams come true. I want her to have her own castle. Walker has found a father gure in Holmes County coach Po White, who said he never has treated Walker any differently from the other players in the Blue Devil program. We established trust with one another, and weve built a great rapport with one another, White said. He is able to come to me when hes having a dif cult situation. That comes with the trust weve developed with one another, and it says a lot about him and the decision he made to stay. An easy decision Give Donovan credit. When he wants a player, he doesnt hide it. Billy Donovan came to a lot of my high school games, my workouts and every game in July, Walker said. He couldve watched some of the other top players, but he came to watch me. Every single game. We could be playing a sorry team, and there he was watching. Walker announced his decision to play at Florida in a four-minute video posted on YouTube. The rst 2 minutes of that video consist of a highlight reel featuring windmill dunks, Walker-led fast breaks, 3-point shots and several Big man verbally committed to UF Holmes Countys Walker has one eye on future, but feet planted rmly in Bonifay Wednesday, August 15, 2012 Page 7 See WALKER A8 See DOG A8

PAGE 8

Local A8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, August 15, 2012 We cannot guarantee when this offer will be repeated in the newspaper. Clip this offer and please call today! $10,000.00 Bene t $7,000.00 Bene t $5,000.00 Bene t $3,000.00 Bene t Age 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-85 Male 32.50 36.00 45.00 55.00 66.00 89.00 121.00 166.00 Female 27.00 30.00 37.50 42.00 51.00 69.00 98.00 139.50 Male 23.05 25.50 31.80 38.80 46.50 62.60 85.00 116.50 Female 19.20 21.30 26.55 29.70 36.00 48.60 68.90 97.95 Male 16.75 18.50 23.00 28.00 33.50 45.00 61.00 83.50 Female 14.00 15.50 19.25 21.50 26.00 35.00 49.50 70.25 Male 10.45 11.50 14.20 17.20 20.50 27.40 37.00 50.50 Female 8.80 9.70 11.95 13.30 16.00 21.40 30.10 42.55 Your a ordable monthly rate will lock-in at your enrollment age ... Or enroll online at www.mutualofomahalifedirect.com Now, from United of Omaha Life Insurance Company ... Whole Life Insurance. Are you between the ages of 45 and 8 5 ? Then this GUARANTEED ACCEPTANCE policy is for YOU! >> 4 bene t levels up to $10,000! >> Rates lock-in at age you enroll! >> Call for FREE all-by-mail enrollment packet! NO medical exam! NO health questions! Our graded death bene t whole life insurance policy can be used to pay funeral costs, nal medical expenses...or other monthly bills. Right now, you can make a decision that could help make a di cult time a little easier for your loved ones. You may have been putting o purchasing life insurance, but you dont have to wait another day. is policy is renewable to age 100**! Plus, your policy will never be canceled EVER because of changes in health. So call today! Why this policy? Why now? AFN44167 Life Insurance underwritten by United of Omaha Life Insurance Company, Mutual of Omaha Plaza, Omaha NE 68175; 1-800-775-6000. United of Omaha is licensed nationwide, except New York. Policy Form ICC11L057P or state equivalent (in FL: 7722L-0505). This policy contains reductions, limitations, and exclusions, including a reduction in death benefits during the first two years of policy ownership **In FL, policy is renewable until age 121. This is a solicitation of insurance, an insurance agent may contact you. Sowell Tractor Co., Inc. 2841 Hwy. 77 North, Panama City 763-5441 Toll Free: 866-448-9899 www.sowelltractorco.com We Trade for Anything That Dont Eat! Financing Arranged (WAC) EVERYTHING YOU VALUE 0% Financing Available Only On Kabota Equiptment. WAC See dealer for details. WALKER from page A7 DOG from page A7 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." www.mulliseye.com Chipley Office We are located directly across the parking lot from the Walmart in Chipley "W E W E LCOM E N EW PATI EN TS, C ALL T ODAY F OR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TM EN T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley Office Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 8-31-12 FREE E Y E EX AM COD E: W C 00 T odd R obinson, M D Board C ertified Eye Physician and C ataract S urgeon L ee M ullis, M D Board C ertified Eye Physician and C ataract S urgeon scenes of Walker blocking shots with his long arms. In short, he looked little like the high school junior last winter who often was satis ed with a layup attempt instead of trying to throw down a dunk on a lesser opponent. That Chris Walker exists no more. Me now, Im a high motor for my team, Walker said. I can lead a team now. With my skill set, I can play outside or inside, I can post up. I can defend and guard (all ve positions), and thats because of the athleticism I have. Walker expressed his eagerness to continue playing with Florida Elite teammate Hill, a point guard who also has committed for Florida. He believes the duo will bring its own version of Lob City the moniker handed down to Chris Paul and highying Blake Grif n of the Los Angeles Clippers to Gainesville and the OConnell Center. We know each other, and we know what weve got to do, he said. The decision to verbally commit to Florida early takes the pressure off Walker as he prepares for his nal season at the high school level. He said he intends to focus on the classroom more than he ever has before (he stressed that his grades wont raise any red ags) and wants to lead the Blue Devils to their rst state championship. Florida can watch and see how my grades are, Walker said, and make sure Im in shape. One and done Basketball fans at Florida unhappy to see shooting guard Bradley Beal depart for the NBA after one season at UF may be disappointed to learn that Walker fully intends to leave Florida after one year, too. Coach (Donovan) said where my skill level is, if thats what I want I should go for it, Walker said. What I keep hearing is that Im a potential lottery pick. But Im not satis ed. Walker expects a steep learning curve from the high school level to the upper echelon of major college basketball, and he is aware that the NBA is another giant leap forward after that. The pace at which his game is improving suggests he will be ready to meet that challenge. Walker said Donovan told him he believes Walker can play small forward or power forward at the college level. He wants to avoid the tweener label that has dogged many college players making the jump to the NBA, but he believes his all-around ability will afford him a chance to play either position professionally. I can shoot threes now, Walker explained. I can nesse you. I can dunk on you. I can guard anything, and Im rebounding better. When I block shots I catch the ball. I can post you up with my back to the basket and hit you with a post move. Or I can face you up and use my quickness to blow by you. Walker readily admits he has to spend more time in the weight room, and he said he is working hard to improve his ball-handling ability. White said Walkers shot remains a work in progress but is improving steadily. While Walker has room for improvement, its easy to forget he wont play his rst game in a Florida uniform for another 15 months. That time will prove valuable as he gures out just what kind of basketball player he wants to be. Im my own guy, he said. People ask me who I play like. I tell them Chris Walker. Among the greyhounds Sweet Smoke would face this night was This is Lester, one of the top performing greyhounds at Ebro during the 2011 season. Duncan prefers Friday and Saturday performances so her husband, Cecil, who works on a job site near Ocala can commute and watch Smoke run. On nights her boy races, she wants him to know shes there, and often attends the weigh-in held late in the afternoon so she can see him. I only missed one race when I was out sick. He won box to wire, she said. But hed seen me a few days before, Duncan was quick to point out. Theres been times when they bring him out, and Ill yell to him (from the box seats) and hell turn and look straight up to me. I made Joe go to the nish line with me because I hadnt yet. I wanted to see him up close, and its a different viewpoint. Joe told me that when he rst comes by dont yell. You dont want to break their focus. Otherwise you know Im going to yell for him Everybody says its entertaining to watch me. Youre in your own little world for 30 seconds which is the duration of most races. After the dogs had been put into the starting boxes the electronic lure that the greyhounds chase began to make its circuit toward them. AJN Sweet Smoke broke from the 7 box and the race was on. This is Lester got the best start of the eight dogs in the eld, but Sweet Smoke had the lead by the time the pack chased around the rst turn. His lead was two lengths, and thats the way it stayed as they sprinted around the 5-16 mile course. At the nish Sweet Smoke won by two and a half lengths with This is Lester second and Gable High, who also had maintained his position throughout, third by three and a half. Neither This is Lester nor Gable High was able to gain ground in the race to the nish line as Sweet Smoke won in 30.81 seconds, a decent but not alarming time for a Grade A winner. Then again, it was the fastest time recorded in 16 races on this soggy evening. Just as rewarding for AJN Kennel, 13 of the 16 greyhounds entered that evening ran in the money with ve nishing rst, four second and four third. All in all, it was a good evening for Sweet Smoke, Duncan and Watson. That much was reinforced when the dog was reunited with his mother and a small circle of well-wishers following the race. This has been great, but I can be very emotional, Duncan said. The rst time he ran and won it made me cry. The rst time I read a story about him it made me cry. Hey, hes a hometown kid. What can I say?

PAGE 9

Washington, Holmes at a glance Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser B PAGE 1 Section Local man inspires with chainsaw creations By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com WESTVILLE Wood is his canvas, and the chainsaw is his brush. Local chainsaw artist Julius Moeller presses through adversity to continue to follow his dream, his passion, his legacy: rede ning art using what some in the art community would de ne as a crude and barbaric tool, a chainsaw. Its my great escape, Moeller said. Whenever Im working on my art, I go to my own little world. Someone could walk up on me, and I wouldnt even know theyre there. Moeller, born Sept. 10, 1963, in Indianapolis, Ind., said he has had quite a few things to escape from as life has dealt him many tragedies. When I was 7, I was bit in the back of the head by a St. Bernard, Moeller said. I almost lost my eyesight, and I lost most of my hearing. When he was 9 years old, he was introduced to what would become his lifelong obsession, chainsaw art. My grandfather was letting me cut small limbs with a chainsaw when one of the guys helping him used his chainsaw to carve his initials into a log, Moeller said. I told him I could do that too and showed him. Thats when it all started. In his teens, Moellers grandfather took him to festivals and carnivals, showing off his skills and selling his artwork. He soon got work in landscaping, both landscaping and using the wood acquired from those jobs to create more art. He said his artwork continued until tragedy struck again in his mid-20s. I had a at tire and I was pushing my car off the road when a driver clipped me, Moeller said. My hips were broken, my ribs were crushed, they had to rebuild my lung, and because of my previous brain damage, I ended up with epilepsy. As soon as he could pick up a chainsaw, he said he was right back at it and kept at it till his mid-30s, when he set down the chainsaw for a steady job. I set it down but I knew there was something missing, Moeller said. I was miserable, and I couldnt gure out why. It just got worse and worse. He said he went through several failed marriages. It wasnt till I was in my mid40s that I took up the chainsaw again, he said. It was all because of this one local guy who did chainsaw art. Watching him rekindled the passion in me for it and made me realize what Id been missing for almost a decade. In 2007, Moellers 26-yearold son, Brandon Lee Moeller, committed suicide. He was a fantastic artist, Moeller said. He could draw almost anything, and he could play most instruments by ear. He just got messed up in drugs and hung himself. His other two sons have overcome their own adversities, he said. My second oldest son joined the military and went to Afghanistan, Moeller said. Then he came back and gave me so many grandchildren. His youngest son is living in a large city as a graf ti artist. Hes a recovering heroine addict and doing very well for himself, he said. In 2009, Moeller said he almost lost the ability to do his art for good. I was using a drill, and the drill jerked and snapped the tendons in my predominate wrist, Moeller said. I had to get metal plates to fuse them together. After a lot of effort and time, he was able to adjust to his new wrist and picked up the chainsaw yet again. He said the most recent adversity to overcome is the economy. When the economy is rough, art is the rst thing to suffer, Moeller said. When the economy goes bad people dont want art, they want food and gas and things required to live. People dont need art to live, but artists like me need art to live. Another reason Moeller said he was able to continue on is because of the never-ending support from his friends and family. I get so much support from my family and friends, he said. Both morally and nancially. His latest challenge given to him is to break the Guinness World Record by building the worlds largest wheelbarrow for St. Andrews Farmers Market in Panama City to be placed in their community garden as a centerpiece. They are trying to beat the largest wheelbarrow, which is located in Fussen, Germany, and was built on Feb. 19, 2007, by the Burschenverein Geisenried in Geisenried, Germany. It is 6 foot, 4.7 inches tall, 29 feet, 11.05 inches long and has wheels that are 4 foot, 4.17 inches in diameter. It weighs in at 2,381 pounds. PHOTOS BY CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser LEFT: The sign outside chainsaw artist Julius Moellers workshop travels with him on road art shows. CENTER: This special-ordered dragon is 14 feet long, and Moeller said it took six eight-hour days to complete. RIGHT: Moellers leaf design table is made of cedar. MY GREAT ESCAPE ABOVE: Moellers carved motorcycle won rst place in the Marianna Arts Festival in 2011. LEFT: Moellers carved saxophone won rst place in the festival in 2012. When the economy goes bad people dont want art, they want food and gas and things required to live. People dont need art to live, but artists like me need art to live. Julius Moeller chainsaw artist Wednesday, AUGUST 15 2012 Bonifay Middle School orientation BONIFAY Orientation for the 2012-13 school year will be in the Bonifay Middle School cafeteria as follows: today, Aug. 15, fth grade at 8:30 a.m. and sixth grade at 10 a.m.; Thursday, Aug. 16, seventh grade at 8:30 a.m. and eighth grade at 10 a.m. Representative of AgEnder to speak SUNNY HILLS Karen Schoen of Americans against UN Agenda 21 will be speaking at 6:30 p.m. today, Aug. 15, at Shepherds Gate Church in Sunny Hills, educating Washington County residents about the loss of their individual rights and private property. The church is on State Road 77. Free hunter safety Internet course BONIFAY The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a free hunter safety Internet-completion course from 6-9 p.m. Aug. 17 and 8 a.m. to noon Aug. 18 at First Baptist Church, 311 N. Waukesha St. in Bonifay. Students must complete the Internet course before coming to class and bring a copy of the nal report from the online portion. The nal report form does not have to be notarized. An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. The hunter safety course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license. The FWC course satis es hunter-safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at MyFWC. com/HunterSafety or by calling Hunter Safety Coordinator George Warthen at the FWCs regional of ce in Panama City at 265-3676. INDEX Society ................................. B2 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B7

PAGE 10

Wednesday, August 15, 2012 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra and J.D. OWENS INC. Carpet & Ceramic Outlet YOUR HOMETOWN LOW PRICE! CARPET, CERAMIC, PORCELAIN, VINYL, NAFCO, LAMINATE, HARDWOOD & AREA RUGS Weve Got It At The Price You Want! HUGE REMNANT SALE! 12 x 9 Tan Frieze ...................................... $ 95 50 12 x 12 Dark Green Plush ........................ $ 139 90 12 x 13 Light Tan Plush ............................ $ 109 90 12 x 13 Dark Blue Plush ........................... $ 155 50 12 x 14 Heavy Tan Frieze ......................... $ 165 50 12 x 14 Medium Brown Frieze ................. $ 149 90 12 x 15 Chocolate Frieze ......................... $ 179 90 12 x 15 Light Tan Plush ............................ $ 155 50 12 x 16 Medium Blue Frieze .................... $ 189 90 12 x 19 Heavy Velvet Plush Tan .............. $ 225 50 12 x 19 2 Green Comm. Plush .................... $ 205 50 12 x 20 Multi Color Comm. ...................... $ 169 90 BOUND RUGS 2x4 ............... $ 5.00 2x8 ............. $ 15.50 3x5 ............. $ 12.50 4x6 ............. $ 19.90 5x7 ............. $ 39.90 6x9 ............. $ 49.90 J.D. OWENS CARPET & C ERA MIC OUTLET Located Between Arrowhead Campgrounds & Hopkins, On Hwy. 90 The Place To Shop, If Money Matters! carpettilemarianna.com Helping Hands... Compassionate Hearts B ONIFAY Offering Inpatient and Outpatient Therapy N URS IN G & RE HAB C E N TER Occupational Physical Speech 24-hour Skilled Nursing Rehabilitation Gym Admissions 7 Days a Week Frank and Carol Kreis of Chipley are pleased to announce the engagement of Frank Mays Kreis Jr. to Heidi Elizabeth Gasparrini, daughter of Timothy and Pamela Gasparrini of Littleton, Colorado. The bride-to-be is a 2003 graduate of Columbine High School and a 2008 graduate of Brigham Young University. She is employed as a consultant at Deloitte. The groom-to-be graduated in 1997 from Suncoast High School. He is a 2001 graduate of Emory University and a 2005 graduate of Tulane Law School. He is employed as an attorney at Social Security Administration. An Aug. 23 wedding is planned at the Washington DC temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. A reception will follow. CHIPLEY Jaci Dickens was recently crowned Baby Miss Hearts of the USA of Washington County. As a local winner she has earned the privilege to participate at the pageants state level. Part of the entry fee includes each participant collecting as many canned goods as possible in order to combat local hunger. Our goal is 2000 canned goods by Sept. 25. A box will be at the Piggly Wiggly in Chipley and Save-A-lot. Jaci will be at Walmart collecting cans on Aug. 17. The canned goods that are collected will be donated to the Chipola Ministry Food Bank. Donations may also be dropped off at Mt. Ararat AME Church in Marianna. They will also gladly pick up any donations at a location of your choosing. Jaci is the daughter of Shanae Dickens of Marianna. For more information, call Equallia or Shanae Dickens at 573-4039 or 272-8651. Special to Extra Students from the Ponce de Leon FCCLA (Family, Career and Community Leaders of America) joined with 7,000 nationwide members, advisers, alumni and guests in Orlando, Fla., July 8-12 for the 2012 National Leadership Conference. This years studentoriginated theme for the annual national meeting was #realitycheck. Throughout the ve-day convention, participants examined and discussed several critical issues, including family, school and community violence prevention, physical as well as nancial tness, future career exploration and countless community service projects. A number of relevant youth issues, such as the changing roles of men and women in the home and workplace, leadership and obesity prevention were also explored at the meeting through presentations, workshops and youth sessions. Ponce de Leon High School had six students that joined over 3,600 other students to compete in STAR Events (Students Taking Action with Recognition), which are competitive events that build pro ciency and achievement in leadership and job-related skills. Holly Parson and Lee Parson competed in Chapter Showcase, which is an event that recognizes chapters that develop and implement a well-balanced program of work and promote FCCLA and family and consumer sciences skills in the community. Holly and Lee earned a gold medal, which is the highest award. Nick Price, Tyler Smith and Koby Townsend earned a gold medal in Chapter Service Project, junior division. This event recognizes chapters that develop an indepth service project that makes a worthwhile contribution to families, schools and communities. Students use family and consumer sciences skills to address and take action on a community need. Nick, Tyler and Koby implemented an anti-smoking campaign for students in the Ponce de Leon community. They joined with the SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco) club at school to encourage students avoid tobacco products. Harley Rowe, earned a silver medal in Chapter Service Project, senior division. His project focused on weather safety. He planned activities to inform students on what to do in case of a tornado or any severe weather. Brason English, a junior at Ponce de Leon High School also attended the leadership conference. Brason was elected at the Florida State Leadership Conference in March to serve Florida FCCLA as president-elect his junior year, and he will serve as president his senior year. Brason spent the week at nationals attending of cer training sessions. FCCLA is a dynamic and effective national student organization that helps young men and women become leaders and address important personal, family, work and societal issues through family and consumer sciences education. FCCLA has over 200,000 members and over 6,500 chapters from 50 state associations, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The organization has involved more than 10 million youth since its founding in 1945. Army Pvt. Artie E. Russell has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical tness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, ri e marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, eld tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic rst aid, foot marches, and eld training exercises. Russell is the daughter of Kenya Leonard of Highway 69 in Greenwood, and John Brigham of Chipley. She is a 2007 graduate of Marianna High School. Special to Extra CHIPLEY Chipley Garden Club members recently spent time working on their downtown pot Christmas decorations. In previous years the pots have been accented with multi-color Christmas trees, red and burgundy silk poinsettias and giant globes, but 2012 will be quite different. This December the club will be decorating the pots with newly constructed silver-tinseled Christmas trees made from tomato cages and silver holiday decorations. The club feels the new silver trees will compliment the city of Chipleys twinkling white lights of Christmas beautifully. Want something cool to do this summer? Get your family together and start thinking about twinkly lights, Nativity scenes, elves, reindeer, snow akes, candy canes and dont forget Santa! Each December Chipley Garden Club awards the Yard of the Month to a home within Chipley city limits with the best holiday decorations. Plan to get your decorations up early this year the committee surveys yards the week after Thanksgiving through the rst week of December. Ponce de Leon FCCLA students win medals at national conference Kreis, Gasparrini to wed Dickens crowned Baby Miss Heart of the USA of Washington County Garden Club plans for Christmas Russell graduates basic combat training From Staff Reports MARIANNA Chipola College recently announced members of the cheerleading squad for the upcoming 2012-13 athletic season. Chipleys Olivia Guettler, along with Dara Wilkerson and Jessica Bean of Bonifay, are among the squad. Chipola cheerleaders not only excite the fans at Chipola basketball games, but the members of the squad serve as goodwill ambassadors at numerous community functions and events. Members of the 201213 squad include: Taylor Spikes, Panama City; Brantlee Kirkland, Ashford, Ala.;Dara Wilkerson, Bonifay; Coral Aguado, Graceville; Jordan Skipper, Ashford; Nilsa Prowant, Blountstown; Morgan Sumner, Graceville; Jessica Bean, Bonifay; Olivia Guettler, Chipley; Lauren Locke, Sneads; Katelyn Buff, Bristol; Dalton Hendrix, Marianna; Mike Sawyer, Marianna; Terrence Shanks, Altha. Chipola College announces 2012-13 cheerleaders SPECIAL TO EXTRA Chipley Garden Club members have been working on downtown Christmas decorations. ENGAGEMENT

PAGE 11

Wednesday, August 15, 2012 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 Special to Extra For the third year in a row at Chipola College, Big Bend Area Health Educa tion Center or Big Bend AHEC, a non-prot organi zation whose main ofce is in Tallahassee, has spon sored a summer camp for high school students inter ested health careers. The camp is provided at no cost to the students. This year 34 high school students from Jackson, Washington, Calhoun, and Liberty coun ties attended the weeklong summer camp. Twenty students from Jackson and Washington counties spent the camp week at Chipola College in Marianna. While the 14 students from Cal houn and Liberty counties visited many locations in Bristol and Blountstown, they also joined the Chipola students on two days of the camp. Camp activities included pig heart and kidney dissec tion, blood typing, medical terminology, and simula tion lab experience. In the simulation lab at the Chipo la College Health Science Building students were able to learn many skills of current nursing, EMT, and paramedic students. An overview of numerous health careers is provided so that students understand the entire health care team. Students were exposed to many other health profes sions rather than just the well-known medicine and nursing. Jackson Hospital provided a tour of their fa cility and an opportunity for a full day of shadowing of various departments in the hospital for many campers. Students also received a 7hour ACT review course, and information on college admissions and nancial aid. The Jackson County Sheriffs Ofce provided information on the physical effects and dangers of many current drug trends. Calhoun and Liberty campers had the special opportunity to spend the afternoon with Laban Bon trager, DMD in Bristol. During the visit the camp ers learned about aspects of dental care and hygiene and were able to experience hands on dental activities at his ofce. Calhoun Lib erty Hospital also provided students with the opportu nity to tour their facility and shadow health profession als of all kinds for the day. One of the highlights of the camp week was a road trip to Tallahassee. The students toured the FSU College of Medicine and had an opportunity to in teract with current medical students. The medical stu dents taught campers skills training in the simulation lab to learn heart and lung sounds and vital signs. Summer camp is not new for Big Bend AHEC as they have sponsored similar camps for over 20 years. Big Bend AHEC serves a 14 county area and provides health educa tion services and tobacco cessation and prevention programs. AHEC also helps recruit health profession als to rural areas. That is one of the main reasons for camp. Camp Director, Brigitta Nuccio, says, Our hope with providing sum mer camp is that we will help these students get the experience they need to know if a health career is right for them and that they will return to rural areas to practice. Nuccio actually attended the camp herself in 1995 as a high school student from Cottondale. She did go on to college and received a masters from the University of Florida, College of Medicine. For the last 5 years, Nuccio has worked for Big Bend AHEC. Camp locations continue to be added. This year in addition to Chipola and Cal hounLiberty, camps were also held in Madison and Gulf counties. If you would like to support Big Bend AHEC Health Careers Summer Camp programs or would like additional in formation, please call Bri gitta Nuccio at 482-6500. For the past two weeks, Pet Talks have addressed poisonous foods and medi cations common in most homes. This week the focus is on miscellaneous poison ous items around the house including plants, pennies, and insecticides. Plants There are several plants that can be toxic to pets. Lil ies, for example, are toxic to cats. The ingestion of any part of any type of lily can lead to kidney failure. The clinical signs can include vomiting, depression, or loss of appetite. If you sus pect your cat of ingesting lil ies, you should contact your veterinarian immediately. There is no antidote, and intense supportive care is needed for cats to recover. Also, sago palms are a common decorative house plant that is toxic to pets. The seeds, leaves, and cones of the plant can cause acute liver failure. The most common symptoms are vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, and yellowing of the skin and eyes. If your pet ingests sago, and they show the clinical signs of poisoning, the prog nosis is guarded to poor Dr. Dorothy Black, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M University Col lege of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences (CVM), explained. There is no antidote and support ive care is extensive and in cludes blood transfusions. While lilies and sago palms are very toxic, Black explained that poinsettias are usually non to mild ly toxic. Pets ingesting this plant either have no clinical signs or gastrointestinal discomfort. Poinsettias are usu ally referred to as highly toxic, but they really arent, Black said. So feel free to display the poinsettias at Christmas! Pennies It may be surprising to some people, but pennies minted after 1981 contain signicant quantities of the metal zinc. When ingested, excess zinc is absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract and causes red blood cells to break apart. Pets, then, become anemic show ing signs of lethargy, vomit ing, diarrhea, port/wine col ored urine, and yellowing of the skin and gums. Removal of the penny and aggressive supportive care with blood transfusions usually allows for a success ful recovery, Black said. Chemicals and insecticides A dangerous chemical common in many garages is Ethylene glycol. It is found in radiator coolants, brake u ids, and many other house hold products. When ingest ed it causes the pet to ap pear intoxicated and, as the toxin is metabolized, it leads to kidney failure. Although there are medications that can inhibit the toxin and pre vent kidney failure, it must be administered within the rst three to six hours postingestion. If kidney injury is already present prognosis is guarded, but with immediate treatment prognosis is good. Ant bait is used extensive ly in Texas, especially pyre thrin and pyrethroid contain ing products. When ingested in signicant quantities, these chemicals can cause total body tremors and sei zures in cats and dogs, and their body temperatures can become markedly elevated. Supportive care, including muscle relaxants and antiseizure medications, are re quired until the pet can me tabolize the drug. Not all ant baits contain pyrethrins, some are safe for pets, Black said. Read the labels carefully before you make a purchase. Other insecticides that contain organophosphates are highly toxic substances. When ingested these insec ticides can cause severe clinical reactions, including salivation, tearing, urina tion, defecation, vomiting, respiratorydistress, trem ors, seizures, and paralysis. Drugs exist to counter act the toxin and are used in addition to extensive sup portive care, Black said. But successful recoveries require prompt treatment. Rat bait is another house hold danger. It is offered in three main varieties: anti coagulant, bromethalin, and vitamin D analog (cholecal ciferol). All three types can lead to death of dogs and cats that ingest them. Anticoag ulant rodentecides (brodi facoum, bromadiolone, war farin) lead to uncontrollable bleeding. Although there is no antidote, if the pet is brought immediately to the veterinarian, treatment and decontamination can pre vent bleeding from acciden tal ingestion. Bromethalin toxicity leads to progressive neurologic signs such as dif culty walking and can prog ress to seizures and death. There is no antidote, only supportive care. Also, chole calciferol bait causes renal failure and is highly toxic. As with bromethalin, there is no antidote, only support ive care. Dialysis can be at tempted if clinical signs are present. If you think your pet has ingested any of these toxic substances, contact your veterinarian immediately. Treating your pet quickly after ingestion is key to a successful recovery, Black said. For additional informa tion on substances that are toxic to pets, please consult the resources below. ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center 1-888-426-4435 $65 consultation fee www.aspca. org/pet-care/poison-control/ Pet Poison Hotline 1-800-213-6680 $39 consultation fee per incident www.petpoisonhelpline. com/ About Pet Talk Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at vetmed.tamu.edu/pet-talk. Suggestions for future top ics may be directed to cvm today@cvm.tamu.edu. Big Bend Health Careers Camp huge success Poisonous to pets: Common household toxins Crossword PUZZLESOLUTION ON PAGE B5

PAGE 12

FAITH B Section www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. First Baptist Church come as you are Mike Orr, Pastor 1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830 Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. A Copernican Revolution There is a natural tendency to project our own views, especially our moral views, onto God. We tend to believe that what we think is good and evil, corresponds to Gods view of what is actually good and evil. But, God obviously does not have to conform to us. Rather, we must conform to God. Copernicus revolutionized astronomy by postulat ing that the earth revolves around the sun, rather than the sun going round the earth, which was the accepted view at the time. Coper nicus realized that placing the Sun in the center and the earth at the periphery was counterintuitive, but it greatly sim To apply the metaphor of the Copernican revolution to our moral views, we need only remember that God is the center of the moral universe and the author of goodness. We are at the periphery, and so instead of assuming that Gods views must somehow conform to ours, we should hope and pray that our views conform to Gods. We could be wrong about almost everything we believe. rant creatures, i.e., not God. So, we should let God be God, and accept that His ways are not your ways. BROWN FUNERAL HOME 1068 Main Street, Chipley 638-4010 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser This Message Courtesy of For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways, declares the LORD. As the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts.. Isaiah 55: 8-9 Rev. James L. Snyder I am not sure who invented summer vacation, but I think they deserve a Nobel Peace Prize. Every year is worth the intense strain when there is a summer vacation to look forward to. Ah, summer vacation. The freedom of not having anything to do. No schedule in my face. No appointments frustrating me. Just an agenda of fun and more fun, and dont forget the eating. Both the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and me got up early to begin the drive to the airport to take us to our vacation location. I was so full of energy I could not sit still. It was then that I broke into singing, comfortably off key, a Carpenters song much to the agitation of my wife. Weve only just begun, White lace and promises, A kiss for luck and were on our way. All my wife could do was stare at me. Finally, she said, You sure are excited. Ive never seen you so excited. Are you sure youre all right? I could not have been more all right. All I could think of was a week before me surrounded by grandchildren I have not seen for over a year. How old is...? I went through all the grandchildren. It is easy to forget how old kids are because every year their age changes. When you get to be my age, it is hard to keep up with all of these changes. A week of stuf ng them with all the candy I could carry. Taking them out to a restaurant and showing them the proper use of the drinking straw and the ne art of a spitball battle. After all, it is a grandfathers solemn duty to teach his grandchildren the ne art of shenaniganism. Where else are they going to learn it? Their grandmother? I dont think so. We nally arrived at the airport, parked our car and proceeded to the check-in counter. I am not sure my feet touched the ground, so excited was I to get on our way. Slow down, my wife pleaded. I cant keep up with you. We nally arrived at the check-in counter with our baggage, and one of the attendants asked me a simple question. I hate it when people ask me a question when I am in one of my silly moods. Believe me, I was in one of my silliest silly moods at this time. Sir, the attendant asked me very seriously, do you have anything perishable or ammable in your luggage? With silliness smeared all over my mug I said, I sure do. I got a Bible in there and it is DynO-Mite. And, I had the audacity to smile very broadly. Then it happened. Someone said, Did he say dynamite? Wheres the dynamite? The attendant said, He said the dynamite was in his briefcase. Suddenly, lights went on, buzzers began ringing, men in uniforms surrounded me, and two grabbed and subdued me. In a few moments, the hazmat men arrived asking where the dynamite was. The man in charge pointed to my briefcase and said, Its in the briefcase. They begin moving people away while the hazmat men came in to remove the briefcase with the alleged dynamite. At this time, I was absolutely stunned. Every ounce of silliness had drained from my person, and I knew I was about to go to jail. Finally, the senior security guard came and looked at me. Where did you say the dynamite was, sir? I stammered and stuttered but nally I said, I said my Bible was dynamite. He stared at me. Look me up and down, glared at me with eyes that burned into my very soul. Then he spoke. Would you by any chance be a minister? He said rather gruf y. Yes sir, I stammered as if my life depended upon what I was going to say, I am a minister, a preacher of the gospel. I thought the last part might do something for me. At least it was a shot, excuse me, a try. He glared at me and shouted, False alarm. Just another crazy preacher. As he walked away, I could hear him muttering under his breath, Where do all these crazy preachers come from? The terminal nally quieted down, I went through the inspection, and I must say, I am not complaining mind you, but the pat down was a little longer and rougher than I remembered it being in the past. They stripped me down almost to my birthday suit. Thank God for wrinkles. As I walked down the aisle on the plane, I could hear people whispering, Thats him. Thats the crazy preacher with the dynamite. I nally sat down next to my wife who was staring out the window. In a few minutes the plane took off and as we reached our altitude, she, while still staring out the window, said to me, Next time well take separate planes. She paused for a moment and then said, In fact, well take separate airports. I think I am going to stick to what the Bible says. For the word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any twoedged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart (Hebrews 4:12 KJV). The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www. jamessnyderministries. com. Otter Creek Revival PONCE de LEON Revival Services at Otter Creek Methodist Church will be held at 7 p.m. from Aug. 12-17 (Sunday to Friday). The Rev. Gary Gibben, from Panama City, will be the guest speaker. Homecoming is Sunday, Aug. 19. The church is located four miles north of Ponce de Leon off Highway 81. Everyone is invited to attend these services. New Orange Baptist Church to hold Gospel Jam CHIPLEY New Orange Baptist Church will hold its monthly Gospel Jam at 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18. The church is located on Alford Road, a quarter-mile off Orange Hill Road, six miles south of Chipley. A covered dish dinner will follow. For more information, call 638-1166 or 773-0020. Shady Grove Baptist Church homecoming BONIFAY Shady Grove Baptist Church will be holding homecoming services starting at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 19. Charlie Hinson will be the speaker and he will also be singing. Lunch will be served in the fellowship hall after the service. The church is located at 1955 Highway 177-A. New Life Fellowship Assembly of God Womens Conference CHIPLEY New Life Fellowship Assembly of God presents Daughters of Destiny: A Womens Conference. There will be four sessions: the rst session will be held at 7 p.m. Aug. 23 the second session will be at 7 p.m. Aug. 24 and third session at 9 a.m. and the fourth session at 11 a.m. Aug. 25. The guest speaker will be Diane Coleman and conference host Sherri Evans will also be speaking. Conference worship leader is Tiffane Raulerson. Early bird registration is $30. Registration at the conference is $40. Contact church of ce to inquire about area hotel discounts for the conference. The church is located at 695 5th St. in Chipley. For more information, call the Church of ce at 638-1134, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Thursday. First Freewill Baptist Church to hold revival BONIFAY The First Freewill Baptist Church of Bonifay will be holding a revival at 6 p.m. Aug. 27 and at 7 p.m. Aug. 27-31. Special speaker will be the Rev. Dennis Tanton, with special music by Vessels of Clay. Library hours Wausau Library Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County Library (Bonifay) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed Washington County Library (Chipley) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Vernon Library Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills Library Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed MONDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Monday each month (unless a holiday) at 6:00 at the Chipley library. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach of ce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999. TUESDAY 8 to 10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 5 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at 6:25 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-451 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. noon: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday. (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 638-0093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A FRIDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Homes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a get-together for 50-plus senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Winn Dixie in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks while you get your shopping done. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. SUNDAY 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at GracevilleCampbellton Hospital in Graceville. COMMUNITY CALENDAR A midsummers day nightmare Wednesday, August 15, 2012 Page 4 Faith BRIEFS

PAGE 13

Wednesday, August 15, 2012 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 By BOB JOHNSON The Associated Press MONTGOMERY, Ala. Mayors and other of cials from Florida to Louisiana will be in Alabama this week for a conference to discuss restoring passenger train service in the region. The service from Jacksonville to New Orleans was at one time part of Amtraks Sunset Limited line from Los Angeles to Jacksonville, with stops in Chipley and Crestview. It was discontinued after Hurricane Katrina in 2005 wreaked havoc in the area, destroying lives and damaging homes, businesses and railroad tracks. Of cials believe reviving the train service would be a boost to tourism and would help the economies of communities across the Gulf Coast still recovering from Katrina. Mobile Mayor Sam Jones said restoring the Jacksonville-to-New Orleans line will give Gulf Coast residents a transportation option that hasnt existed in seven years. Jones said its an important issue in Mobile, where the primary transportation options since Katrina have been automobiles and plane, both of which he described as too costly. He said the meeting will allow mayors and other ofcials to decide the best approach to get the service started again. He said the regional line would open the region to train service across the country and make attractions like beaches and casinos more accessible. And Jones hopes any new line would be more convenient than the one that ran through Mobile seven years ago it rolled through the city at 3 a.m., he said. The closure of the Sunset Limited line has affected some 13 communities where the train stopped and passengers could get on or off. A spokesman for Amtrak, Marc Magliari, said the Sunset Limited line has not run east of New Orleans since Katrina. Frank Corder, a city council member in one of those cities, Pascagoula, Miss., will be attending Thursdays conference. He said restarting the train service would boost tourism. The entire Gulf Coast is focusing more and more on tourism. Providing an additional access point just makes sense. Adding access to Gulfport, Mobile and New Orleans, where major air connections are located, would de nitely enhance tourism all along the Coast, Corder said. Corder also said train service would reduce transportation costs for area businesses and ease traf c on heavily traveled highways such as Interstate 10 and U.S. 90. New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu has been a proponent of restarting the rail service and will be represented at the conference by Deputy Mayor Cedric Grant, who said he hopes daily service can be opened. In addition to helping businesses, the train service would be like some of the commuter lines that operate in the northeast and other parts of the country. He said it would make it easier for someone to live in Biloxi, Miss., or in another Gulf Coast city and work in New Orleans. He is hopeful Amtrak of cials will look at the demographics and realize there truly is a market here for the rail line. The Florida capital of Tallahassee was once a stop on the line, and that city will have several representatives at the conference as well. Max Stout, who works in the mayors of ce for special projects, said there has been a grassroots effort in Tallahassee to restart the train service. The citizens are telling us they want an affordable transportation alternative, Stout said. Such a line could help revive a tradition from the 1920s and 1930s in the north Florida college town, when trains were used to take Florida State fans to football games around the country. Trains kind of make sense these days, Stout said. Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences. Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section of www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership with Legacy com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212 Mr. Foy L. Deal of Hwy 2, Westville, (New Hope Community) went home to be with his Lord and Savior Thursday, Aug. 9, 2012. He was 87. Mr. Deal, affectionately known as Foy, was born Oct. 12, 1924, in Holmes County, to the late Fletcher Lewis and Nellie Elizabeth Curry Vaughan Deal. He began his banking career in Sept. 1959 with The American Bank in Geneva as a teller and after 30 years of service retired as Sr. Vice President. Until his health began to fail he was very active in his community and his church. He was a member of the New Hope Neighborhood Watch, the Geneva Lions Club and New Hope Baptist Church where he served in many different capacities. He enjoyed shing and sharing his famous hush puppies at sh frys. Mr. Deal followed the Golden Rule in his daily activities and went out of his way to help people, which was his greatest joy. He will be greatly missed by all who knew him. In addition to his parents two brothers, Walton and Millard Vaughan, as well as three sisters, Lois Bare eld, Emma Bell and Evie Nell Watson, and a very special daughter-in-law, Felecia Rainey Deal, all preceded him in death. Survivors include his wife of 63 years, Nell Pierce Deal, Westville; two sons, Gary Deal (Teresa), Samson and Roger Deal, Westville; grandchildren, Michael Deal (Angela), New Hope, Jeremy Deal, Samson and Emily Deal, New Hope, John Michael Morris, Geneva, Brad McDonald, New Hope, Megan Espraza (Edgar), Bonifay, Susan Stephenson (Joey), Enterprise, Donna Bruce (John), Bonifay, Terri Stout (Joe), Samson; 19 greatgrandchildren; two greatgreat-grandchildren; brother-in-law, Roscoe Watson, Pensacola, and several nieces, nephews, other extended family and friends. Funeral services were held at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12, in the New Hope Baptist Church with the Rev. Clay Hatcher of ciating. Mr. Deal was placed into the church one hour prior to service time. Burial followed in the church cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Saturday, Aug. 11, from 5 to 8 p.m. The family asked that owers be omitted and memorial contributions be made to the New Hope Baptist Church Building Fund, 1954 Hwy 2, Westville, FL 32464 or the Geneva Lions Club, P. O. Box 652, Geneva, AL 36340. Members of the Geneva Lions Club will serve as pallbearers. Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva, 334-684-9999, is in charge of arrangements. Express your condolences in our guest book at www. sorrellsfuneralhomes.com Foy L. Deal FOY L. DEAL Mr. Jerry Jay Braxton Crutch eld, age 74, of Sanford, passed away on Thursday, Aug. 2, 2012. Mr. Crutch eld was born in Alamance County, N.C., on Oct. 27, 1937 to Elisha and Leona Crutch eld. Mr. Crutch eld served in the United States Air Force for 24 years and served as a Minister for over 20 years. In addition to his parents, Mr. Crutch eld was preceded in death by his sister, Dorothy Cates and brother-in-law, Thomas Cates. He is survived by his wife, Bertie Pigott Crutch eld of Sanford; two sisters, Val Carden of Graham, N.C., and Nettie Day (Bob) of Burlington, N.C.; one brother, Graham Crutch eld (Caroline) of Raleigh, N.C.; one son, Jay Crutch eld (Dana) of Lake Mary; two daughters, Sandy Barnes (Randy) of Crawfordville, and Kristy Woolsey (Justin) of Sanford, as well as seven grandchildren, Alexys, Renate, Jeffery, Jaylyn, Bryan, Nikki, and Noah. During visitation the family received friends at Central Baptist Church in Sanford, from 3 to 4 p.m. A funeral service was held at 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 5, 2012 at Central Baptist Church in Sanford. A funeral service was held at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012 at Friendship Primitive Baptist Church in Crawfordville, with interment followed at Pigott Cemetery in Crawfordville. Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay, directing. Jerry B. Crutch eld Debi Harcus Herring, 56, of Bonifay, went to be with the Lord after a courageous sevenyear battle with cancer. She was the president and owner of Marianna Financial Services. Debi was preceded in death by her father, Melvin Harcus. Debi is survived by her husband, Cullen Herring; her mother, Jeanette Harcus; her grandmother, Katie Amerson; a son, Jeremy Harcus and his wife Casie; a sister, Kim Drummond and her husband Dan; a step-son, Brad Herring and his wife Dawn; a step-daughter, Brandie Tapscott and her husband Steve; four grandchildren, Graften Harcus, Kayla Tapscott, Emma Herring and Ashley Herring; her best friend for 36 years, Mary Jo King and her husband James; a special niece, Tiffany Johnson and her children, Jevin and Bradlee. A special thanks to Dr. Scott McCallister and his staff at Dothan Oncology, along with Allison, Cindy and Amy of Emerald Coast Hospice. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m., Friday, Aug. 10, 2012 at Gully Springs Baptist Church with the Rev. Tim Hall, the Rev. Ralph Merchant and the Rev. Carl Hadley of ciating. Interment followed in the Gully Spring Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay directing. Family received friends from 5 to 7 p.m., Thursday at Peel Funeral Home. Pallbearers were Ray Wilson, Jason King, Allen Pippin, JJ Cline, Ansel Wilson and Wesley Wing. Serving as honorary pallbearers were Carthell Hodge, Vaughn McDaniel, James Cline, and the ladies Sunday School Class of Gully Springs Baptist Church. Debi H. Herring Mr. James Willard Powell of Westville, passed away Aug. 4, 2012. He was 97. Mr. Powell was born in Darlington, on May 27, 1915 to the late James Daniel and Lizzie Leona Stafford Powell. Mr. Powell loved to work and drive his John Deere Tractor. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife, Lydia Padgett Powell and nine brothers and sisters. He is survived by one son, Jimmy Powell (Olean) of Westville; two grandchildren, James Andrew Powell (Mariana) of Tallahassee, and Traci Landers (Jim) of Westville; four great grandchildren, Dustin Landers, Jessica Barnhouse (Jamie) all of Westville, Elizabeth Powell, and Peter Hogencamp both of Tallahassee, and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. Monday, Aug. 6, 2012 in the chapel of Pittman Funeral Home in Geneva with the Rev. Rod Jones of ciating. Burial followed in the Beulah Anna Baptist Church Cemetery with Pittman Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home on Monday beginning at 1 p.m. until service time. You can sign the guest registry at, www. pittmanfuneral.com James Willard Powell Shirley Sue Nelson, 57 of Chipley, died, Aug. 8, 2012. A Funeral service was held, Aug. 12, 2012 at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Interment followed at Old Mt. Zion Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing. Shirley S. Nelson AP Amtraks Sunset Limited backs into its nal stop in New Orleans on Nov. 2. Originally running from Los Angeles to Orlando, Amtrak suspended service on the line east of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina damaged railroad tracks. Southern mayors to discuss regional train service Sunset Limited made stops in Chipley, Crestview before Katrina Crossword SOLUTION Obituaries

PAGE 14

Wednesday, August 15, 2012 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Gillman Family Reunion WESTVILLE The Gillman Family Reunion will be held Aug. 25 in the fellowship hall at Leonia Baptist Church. The church is at 1124 Gillman Road in Westville. The reunion is always held on the last Saturday in August and lunch will be served at noon. For more information, call Sylvia Glover at 956-2877 or Teresa Johnson at 956-2810. Holmes County High School Band Camp BONIFAY Holmes County High School Blue Pride Band is getting ready to prepare for another year of events. Today Aug. 17 Full band from 5-7 p.m. Washington County Farm Bureau Meeting CHIPLEY The Annual Meeting of the Washington County Farm Bureau is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. on Aug. 16. A brief business meeting and a performance by PeeWee Johns and Band will follow dinner. Washington County Farm Bureau members should have already conrmed their attendance. Farm Bureau Ofce: 638-1756 Soccer sign-ups slated CHIPLEY The City of Chipley Parks and Recreation Department will be holding its 2012 soccer sign-ups until Aug. 31. Players must be between the ages of 4-15 as of Sept. 30. The cost to play is $42. To register stop by the Pals Park Ofce from 3-5 p.m. Monday through Friday and ll out a registration form. Applications can be downloaded from www. palspark.org and mailed with payment to P.O. Box 1007, Chipley, FL 32428. Please make checks payable to the City of Chipley. You can also email a completed application form to palspark@ cityofchipley.com and bring in your payment by 4 p.m., on Aug. 31. We are also looking for coaches and ofcials. If you or someone you know might be interested contact Guy Lane at 638-6348 or 527-9275 or email him at palspark@cityofchipley. com. 2012 Miss. Graceville Harvest Festival GRACEVILLE The 31st Annual Harvest Festival Pageant will be held at the Graceville Civic Center in Graceville at 6:30 p.m. on Sept. 7 and 8. The entry fee is $55 with all proceeds going to the Graceville Harvest Day Celebration. Contestants may participate in photogenic for an additional $10. Photogenic entries will be limited to one photo per contestant. Applications may be picked up at Bush Paint and Supply in Graceville, Graceville City Hall, Graceville News, and Forget Me Not Photography in Bonifay. Dead line to enter is Aug. 17. Winners will receive a large trophy, large crown and banner. Alternates and participants will receive trophies. For more information call Teresa Bush at 263-4744 or 2633072, or Michelle Watkins at the City of Graceville at 263-3250. Bonifay Saints Sign-ups BONIFAY Bonifay Saints, also known as the Bonifay Bulldogs, will be holding signups every Saturday until school starts from 9 a.m. until Noon at Dueces Automotive, next to Donut Shop. Registration will be $40. Holmes County Farm Bureau Annual Membership Meeting BONIFAY The Holmes County Farm Bureau Annual Membership meeting will be Aug. 23 at the Holmes County Agriculture Center on Highway 90 East. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. with the meeting beginning at 6 p.m. RSVP to the ofce at 547-4227 by Monday, Aug. 20, before noon. Mature Driving Class CHIPLEY Washington County Council on Aging and AARP are co-sponsoring a mature driving class on Aug. 24, this eight-hour course is developed especially for the senior driver and will be held at the Washington County Council on Aging from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Council on Aging building is at 1348 South Blvd., beside the health department in Chipley. The cost of the course is $12 for AARP members and $14 for non-members. For anyone that was or is in the educational eld will only have to pay $5 for the class. This National Safety Council Course reviews basic driving knowledge, new trafc laws and introduces techniques to help offset the effects of the aging process on driver performance. It is geared to your safety needs and helping to compensate for age related changes. This mature driving is approved by the DHSMV for a three-year insurance premium reduction. For more information or to sign up please contact the Washington County Council on Aging at 638-6216. Pee Wee football, cheer sign ups BONIFAY Sign ups will be every Saturday through Aug. 25 from 9 to 11 a.m., at the Bonifay Rec Center. Please bring a copy of your child birth certicate when you come to sign up. Cost for football is $50 per child. Cost for Cheerleading is as follows: new cheerleader will be $100, a returning cheerleader from last season is $50 is uniform still ts. If you have any questions, call Mark Gilmore at 527-4363 or Michele Sherrouse at 373-6227. Bethlehem Peewees seek coaches Now doing sign-ups for Bethlehem Peewee Football/Cheer leading ages 5-13. They are also looking for football and cheer coaches. All coaches will be subject to background check. Sign-ups will be from now until Sept. 1. For registration forms, call Cliff Kimbel, 334-248-4254, Charity Knight, 260-1006, or Naomie Pettis, 547-4044. Finch Family Reunion CHIPLEY The Finch Family Reunion for descendents and friends of the late William Dallas Finch will be Sept. 1. The reunion will begin at 11 a.m. at the Washington County Ag Center on Highway 90 West in Chipley. Bring a well-lled basket to feed your family and friends at noon. If you have any photos or other related items that you would be willing to share with the family and friends, please bring them along. After lunch we ask that all remain while photos are taken for future events. For more information call Kenneth Finch at 638-5307, Ruth Creamer at 638-4310 or E. O. Lisenby at 763-2187. Senior Group going on Tour WASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will be going on a tour of Ohio Indiana Amish country, and Chicago Razzle Dazzle on Sept. 1-9. For more information call Merita Stanley at 594-9980. Town of Westville Elections WESTVILLE A regular election for the Town of Westville will be held on Sept 11. The polls will open at 7 a.m. Polls are at the Westville Community Center. The positions to be led and the expiration date for these positions are as follows: Council member seat two and three, expires in 2014 and Mayor seat will expire in 2014. Those people wishing to qualify for the above ofces may do so at the ofce of the Town Clerk in the Westville Community Center, 8 a.m. to noon and 12:30-4:30 p.m. Aug. 20-24. The qualifying fee for this regular election is $25. Youth Ranch Golf Tournament PANAMA CITY The Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch Golf Tournament will take place Sept. 15 at the Panama Country Club. The monies raised from this benet will go directly to the Youth Ranch, which runs solely on donations. The Washington County Sheriffs Ofce is one of the sponsors for the golf tournament. For more information contact Andrea Gainey at 638-6115. Jacob City Day JACOB The City of Jacob has slated Sept. 15, for its Jacob City Day Celebration, which will include a parade, entertainment, food and activities for all. The festivities will start at 11 a.m. with a parade along Jackson Road. The other activities will take place at the Jacob City Park at 2254 Jacob main Street (Highway 162). Anyone desiring to be in the parade will need to contact Eula Johnson at 263-2120 on or before September 7. Booths are available to vendors; please contact Verloria T. Wilson at 263-6636 for more information. 2012 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant BONIFAY The 2012 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant sponsored by the HCHS Blue Pride Band Boosters will be held at 4 p.m., Sept. 22, at Holmes County High School. There is no residency required to enter this pageant. Girls age 4-20 and boys age 4-9 may enter. Contestant entry fee $45. If two or more siblings register in any category it will $35. All registration dates are held at Holmes County High School on Tuesday, Sept. 11 from 5-7 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 15, from 10 a.m. to noon; Late registration Tuesday, Sept. 18, from 5-7 p.m. (a $10 late fee will be added on this date). You may also turn in registration forms at BES, BMS, HCHS or by mail to: HCHS; Attn: Band Boosters; 825 West Highway 90; Bonifay, Florida 32425. If you have any questions you may contact Cindy Goodson at goodsonc@hdsb.org, or by phone or text 373-7517. Washington County Candidate Forum SUNNY HILLS On Oct. 4, we will have a candidate forum for all candidates with questions from the residents. All Washington County residents are invited to participate. Please send any questions to: Karen at kbschoen@bellsouth.net, or Chuck at shachakel@ att.net Senior Group Will be exploring the Alpine Countries WASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will be exploring the Alpine Countries of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland on Sept. 28-Oct. 11 For more information call Merita Stanley at 594-9980. Holmes County High School Class of 1953 BONIFAY Members of the Holmes County High School Class of 1953, are looking for other members of the class to let them know if they are interested in holding a 60th Class Reunion. If you are interested call Joann (Black) Scott at 763-4633, Grace (Whipple) Watson at 623-3058, or Ruth (Andrews) Bellot at 547-3452. Washington County Girls Night Out CHIPLEY The Womens Imaging Services at Northwest Florida Community Hospital, proudly present Girls Night Out, Oct. 11. The event will be held at the Washington County Ag Center in Chipley. For more information call Heather Shelby at 415-8119. Second Annual Scarecrow Contest CHIPLEY The Second Annual Scarecrow Contest, sponsored by the Chipley Garden Club, will be Oct. 13 on the lawn of the museum in conjunction with Washington County Historical Societys Fall Into History Festival with assistance from the Washington County Arts Council and Tourist Development Council. Senior Group going to the Georgia Mountain Festival WASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will be going to the Georgia Mountain Festival Oct. 16-20. The festival will be held in Helen and in Hiawassee, Ga. For more information, call Merita Stanley at 594-9980. Senior Group to experience Christmas in Branson WASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will experience Christmas in Branson, Mo., Nov. 25 to Dec. 1. This trip will include seven shows, seven days, and six nights. For information, call Merita Stanley at 594-9980. Community EVENTS Special to Extra Washington-Holmes Technical Center was es tablished in 1965 with the hope that the vocational school would provide in dividuals with the educa tion and training needed to obtain gainful employment and earn a living. The hope has been realized over the years as thousands of peo ple have been trained to enter the workforce, climb the ladder of success and make positive economic contributions to our com munity and beyond. WHTC has provided such services by continually striving to maintain cost effective education with affordable tuition that allows students to be trained without incur ring long-term debt. As Washington-Holmes Technical Center begins the celebration of its 45th birthday, they are looking back on the growth and successes of their training programs and graduates. WHTC originally opened with nine programs and has grown to the present 26 programs. Programs have come and gone over the years to meet the changing demands of the workforce. WHTC works closely with the Region 3 Workforce Board to determine the needs of business and in dustry and aligns training programs to meet those needs. Sixty-ve percent of the jobs by the year of 2014 will require an educa tion past high school, but most of that training can be completed in less than two years. With so many peo ple in our region facing un employment and underem ployment, WHTC is focus ing on training programs that will allow students to complete their training in one year or less, earn an in dustry certication or state license and begin work in a growing career eld. In the past year, WHTC has added the Pharmacy Technician and Medical Coder/Biller to the health care training programs. The Pharmacy Technician program has graduated twelve students who already have jobs. This past year, Washing ton-Holmes Technical Cen ter partnered with Chipola College and the University of West Florida to apply for a Technical Skills Training Grant from the US Labor Department. The part nership was awarded the grant and provides funds for WHTC to add two new information technology programs Applied Cyber security and Applied Infor mation Technology, both of which can be completed in less than six months. Another program being considered for the upcom ing year is Digital Audio Production. These new training efforts will help ensure that people from our communities have the chance to succeed in new and emerging elds and that growing businesses have access to a skilled workforce. Washington-Holmes Technical Center serves adults and teens from North Florida and neigh boring areas in South Geor gia and Alabama. Classes are designed to provide individualized training in class sizes that allow a more personally focused approach by instructors. WHTC utilizes a variety of educational delivery meth ods, including lecture, com puter-assisted instruction, audio-visual instructions, hands-on learning, intern ships and externships and cooperative education/onthe-job training. WTHC also recognizes the challenges associated with a highly competitive job market. Programs are in place to assist stu dents in meeting their career goals through ca reer development training in areas such as resume writing, interview skills and essential job skills to help complete their train ing package. The goal is immediate placement for program completers through total empower ment of each individual. For more information about the training oppor tunities at WashingtonHolmes Technical Center, call 638-1180 extension 317 or visit the WHTC website at www.whtc.us. WHTC celebrates 45 years of specialized training P HOTOS S PECIAL TO EX TRA Networking Instructor, Bert Fravezzi with students 2008 Skills USA State Gold Medalist, Josh Straub 2010 SkillsUSA State Gold Medalist, Welding Student Chaz Scott

PAGE 15

Wednesday, August 15, 2012 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. Painting Inside or outside. Residential or commercial. Satisfaction Guarantee. Local references. 31 yrs experience. Dennis Glenn. 850-596-4143 C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Matt’s Removal! Garbage removal, free metal removal, yard jobs, moving jobs. We buy items. Nobody Beats My Prices! (850)547-1445, cell (850)658-2376. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 B B U S I N E S S USINESS G G U I D E UIDE T o P l a c e A n A d C a l l 6 3 8 0 2 1 2 o r 5 4 7 9 4 1 4 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 18 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service! THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Denton's RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDA WE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS $ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENT Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414Service On All Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration & Hoods638-3611 Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 2005 Yamaha Kodiak 4 wheeler 4 WD camo w/camo cover. Excellent condition. $3600. (850)638-1072 or 260-5970. COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com (850) 547-9500 B oni f a y Florida www.xtrem ein dus tri es.com Xtreme Boats FACTORY DIRECT 1978 Chevy El Camino 350 cubic inch Chevy engine. Four barrael Elderbock carb, glass pack muffler, automatic, streight body. $4000. OBO 850-624-1679 2002 4D Buick Century Limited Great condition, good gas mileage. Asking $3750. Call (850)381-8572 or (850)547-3474. 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $17,000, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 Mobile home for rent on 8 acres, Bonifay. 3 Bedroom, 2 full baths. Rent-$500/mo. First and last months. (850)547-2225 $33,500 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. Reduced Price! Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858. DWMH2009 3 / 2 Big tub, 1 acre, fenced three sides and garage shop, Wausau area $82,500 850-638-4953 $3,000 cash assume mtg $600+ credit-worthy. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incl’d 638-1918 3BR/1.5BA for rent $650/mth. No pets. Deposit, & references required Chipley. 638-1918 For Rent: Nice Townhouse apartment 2BR/2.5BA, one car garage in downtown Bonifay. NO PETS. Call (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Now renting studios $350 Includes city utilities & pest control. Call Tom @ (850)557-7732 “Bonifay’s Best” Mobile Home Community has 2 or 3 bedrooms available ranging from $435-$625/month. Large lots, quiet, clean and on-site maintenance. Only responsible persons should apply. Great Bonifay Schools. No pets. One month deposit. HUD Assistance may be available. Contact Sue: (850)547-1386 or (512)751-2847. 2 bdrm, 1 bath Mobile Home for Rent. $375+/mo. In Bethlehem area. References and deposit required. No pets. Call 547-9968. Text FL17886 to 56654 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850-638-7315 or 638-9933. 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. Country Living (1) 2BR Mobile Home for Rent.& (1) 3BR MH. Garbarge furnished, will exter, once a mth change AC filter & mow grass in summer mths. Sorry NO Pets. Real nice big yard. For more information call Lou Corbin 638-1911 or 326-0044 Country Living -Vernon Area3/2 Doublewide $600 2/1 mobile home $450 Located 1/8 mile from City of Vernon. Electric and refuge not included. 850-866-7210 For RentDWMH 3/2 HVAC 1150 sq. ft near Bonifay $600 monthly/ incl. trash pick up. Req. 1st/last month’s rent, plus $250 sec deposit. No pets. 850-547-2122 FOR RENT Nice mobile home convenient location in Chipley. No Pets. 850-638-4640 8-5119 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, DIVISION: Case No.: 12-216DR ALLANNAH ALTER, Petitioner and JAMES ALTER Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE (NO CHILD OR FINANCIAL SUPPORT) TO: JAMES ALTER, Respondent’s last known address: UNKNOWN. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on ALLANNAH ALTER, whose address is 1076 HWY 179, BONIFAY, FL 32425 on or before AUGUST 24, 2012, and file the original with the clerk of this Court at 201 N. OKLAHOMA STREET, Bonifay, Fl. 32425 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. The action is asking the court to decide how the following real or personal property should be divided: NONE. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerk’s office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated July 25, 2012.. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 1, 8, 15, 22, 2012. 8-5126 PUBLIC SALE Tharp & Sons Mini Storage in Bonifay, Fl. will hold a sale for these units for non-payment of rent in accordance with the FL Statute Act 83-801-83-809. Tenants will have until August 31, 2012 to pay in full. No checks accepted. 1. Tara Maynard, Bonifay, Fl. 2. Melissa Scott, Corona, Calif. 3. Jimmie Crafton, Bonifay, Fl. 4. Unknown. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 15, 22, 2012. 8-5122 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No.: 12PR68 IN RE: Estate of BERNICE LOUISE HUGGINS Deceased. PETITION FOR SUMMARY ADMINISTRATION NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BERNICE LOUISE HUGGINS, deceased, in the above-numbered case, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 N. Oklahoma, Bonifay, FL 32425. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is August 8, 2012. Personal Representative: Tony Alcus Huggins c/o Nancy D. O’Connor, P.A. PO Box 886 Bonifay, FL 32425 Attorney for Personal Representative NANCY D. O’CONNOR, P.A. Florida Bar No.: 324231. PO Box 886 Bonifay, FL 32425 850/547-7367 As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 8, 15, 2012. 8-5123 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 12-0222CA NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, PLAINTIFF, VS. DONALD W. WHITE A/K/A DONALD WHITE A/K/A DON WHITE, ET AL. DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF ACTION To: Beverly L. White a/k/a Beverly & Donald W. White a/k/a Donald White a/k/a Don White RESIDENCE: UNKNOWN. LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 1597 Highway 177, Bonifay, FL 32425 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Holmes County, Florida: COMMENCE AT THE SE CORNER OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES-47 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID PARCEL FOR A DISTANCE OF 703.69 FEET TO AN IRON ROD ON THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF HIGHWAY C-177; THENCE NORTH 58 DEGREES-37 MINUTES-56 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 200.00 FEET ALONG SAID R/W LINE TO AN IRON ROD MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 58 DEGREES-37 MINUTES-55 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 544.81 FEET ALONG SAID R/W LINE TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES-16 MINUTES-27 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 693.65 FEET ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID EAST 1/2 OF SW 1/4 TO AN IRON ROD; THENCE NORTH 84 DEGREES-59 MINUTES-41 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 549.50 FEET TO AN IRON ROD; THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES-03 MINUTES-21 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1026.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH AND SUBJECT TO COVENANTS, EASEMENTS, AND RESTRICTIONS OF RECORD. SAID PROPERTY CONTAINS 10.0 ACRES MORE OF LESS. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action, on Gladstone Law Group, P.A., attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is 1499 W. Palmetto Park Rd, Suite 300, Boca Raton, FL 33486, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, either before 30 days or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED: June 24, 2012, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Diane Eaton, Deputy Clerk of the Court. “If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator, Mr. Larry Lyons at P. O. Box 1089, 301 McKenzie, Panama City, FL 32402; telephone number 850-747-5327 two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired, call the Florida Relay Services at 1-800-955-8771 (TTY); if you are voice impaired, call the Florida Relay Services at 1-800-955-8770.” As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 8, 15, 2012. COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 Publisher’s Notice “SCAM “To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Looking for a Christian single lady over 30 for friendship. Non-smoker & drinker. Disability ok. (850)547-1445. Missing Black Male Irish Wolf Hound/ Lab Mix aprox 80lbs no collar/chip & a young male dwarf goat w/ collar. Wandered away together on Aug 8 near the Quail Hollow General Store off Orange Hill. Picture can be viewed at Craig List/ panamacity/farm&garden. Reward for their return. 850-638-0908 Pawaday Dog House has 2 New Full Time Groomer’s. Now Open Mon-Sat. 638-2660 Real Estate Auction, Executive Mountain Home w/Guest House & Lake on 212+/-Acres Divided, Independence, VA. 9/8/12 at 2 p.m. On Site at 1002 Saddle Creek Road, Independence, VA. Like & Online. iron Horse Auction Co. (800)977-2248. NCAL3936. VAAL580. ironhorseauction.com FOR SALE 2009 24X34 Metal Storage Building. 6 windows ,floors. $4000 Located on Campbellton Hwy near Chipley. Must move will assist. (850) 227-4578 Fri & Sat; Aug 17 & 18 8-12 1540 Lonnie Rd 5miles South of I-10. DVD’s, young teen items household items, lots of misc. K&L Farm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 NOW OPEN U-Pick Grapes! Open 7 days a week 7AM-7PM 1304-A Clayton Rd., Chipley. U pick $5.00 gallon. 850-638-2624 Oakcrest Vineyard 850-638-8412 Open Mid-August U-pcik Muscadines 14 different varities 8:00am to 5:00pm Thurs-Sat Sunday 1:00pm to 5:00pm. 1082 Garner Way Chipley 273 South 1 mile passed The Industrial Park U-PICK GRAPES $4.00/Gallon (850)547-2326 Follow signs on Hwy 177A to 1837 Flowing Well Rd., Bonifay. U-Pick 7 days, daylight For Sale 120 Gallon propane gas tank, set of logs, & 2 propane heaters. In good condition. Call anytime.850-535-1623 Gilbert Catfish Pond Closed Monday and Tuesday 2854 Highview Circle Chipley, Fl 32428 Phone:850-638-8633 Heavy Duty mower for sale. Poulan Pro 48” cut, hydrostatic drive. Like new condition. $900.00 OBO. (850)614-1139. Meet singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now (888)744-4426

PAGE 16

B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, August 15, 2012 EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE HAPPY JACK DuraSpot: latest technology in flea, tick, mosquito & mite control on dogs. Patented. At farm, feed & hardware stores. Distributed by Fuller Supply (205) 343-3341. www.happyjackinc.com Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of advertising! 120 community newspapers, 32 websites, 26 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida (866) 742-1373. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURA INSTITUTE (877)206-6559 MEDICAL CAREERS begin here -Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (888) 2033179 www. CenturaOnline.com Medical OfficeTrainees Needed! Become a Medical Office Assistant at SC Train!! No Experience needed! Online training gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888) 374-7294. Drivers/Flatbed Class A. GET HOME WEEKENDS! Southeast Regional, Earn up to 39¢/mi. 1 year OTR Flatbed experience required, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, LLC Wanted 2 Barbers Chipley Florida. Call 850-228-2173 AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINEfrom Home. Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com ATTN: DRIVERS Great Miles + Top 5% Pay = Money Security + Respect = PRICELESS 2 Mos CDL Class A Exp ( 877)258-8782 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job Ready in just 15 days! (888)368-1964 Drivers 100% Owner Operator Co. Regional & Dedicated Home weekly Class A C.D.L. 1 yr. exp. in last 3 Call (800)695-9643 Now Hiring Preschool Teacher: Must be able to pass a level 2 background check. Experience is a plus but not necessary. Also looking for a cook. Apply at The Academy located at 1567 Hwy 90 Chipley. Security/Protect SvsAssistant Chief/ Fire Prevention OfficerThe City of Marianna has an Assistant Chief/ Fire Prevention Officer position. Apply at your local One Stop Career Center or call 850-718-1016 for details. EOE/Drug Free Workplace Employer Web ID#: 34220430 Text FL20430 to 56654 The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for the position of On Call Paramedic. For application and complete job description contact Greg Barton, EMS Director at the EMS Office, Hwy. 90 East, Bonifay, FL 32425, or (850)547-4671. Please turn in updated resume & application to the EMS Director office no later than 4:00 pm on August 23, 2012. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer. Drivers Refrigerated & Dry Van freight Flexible hometime. Annual Salary $45k to $60k. Quarterly Bonus. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR exp. (800)414-9569 www.driveknight.com FINANCE MANAGERJerkins, Inc. in Bonifay, FL is looking for an experienced Financial Manager. A/P, A/R, & Payroll are some of the requirements. Excel a must. Please send your resumes to: micah@jerkinsinc.com Web ID#34217662Text FL17662 to 56654 Now Accepting Applications for,cooks,servers, oyster shuckers & dishwashers. Taking applications Tues-Sat from 10am-4pm. Apply in Person by 8-25-12. French’s Restaurant & Oyster Bar HWY 90, Caryville, FL 850-548-5800 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By Bridget Quigg Imagine the following scenario. S omeone asks you how work is going and y ou say, Not bad. The pay is great and t he stress is manageable.Ž According to r esearch from online salary database P ayScale.com that could be your reality if y ou choose one of the following well-paying j obs where workers report below-average l evels of stress. PayScale.com collects salary and job i nformation from employees around the c ountry and has found the most enviable g igs are typically knowledge-based and r equire highly specialized training and e ducation. Being smart at something really helps y ou feel happy,Ž says Katie Bardaro, lead r esearch analyst at PayScale.com The m ore preparation you put into a career, the m ore you can define your career, such as b eing able to set your schedule and your t asks.Ž She adds that not having the pressure o f being a cog in the machine alleviates s ome stress.Ž It seems that being able to w alk into a room and command everyones a ttention as you share your expertise m akes you less likely to crave that sixth c up of coffee. Perhaps the promise of a career like t his will inspire you to get the degree or a dditional job training you need to land one of these five high-paying, low-stress jobs.1. Optometrist Median annual salary $99,200Good attention to detail and a strong background in the sciences help optometrists diagnose vision problems, prescribe vision-correcting eyewear and help manage eye diseases such as glaucoma. In addition to earning a bachelors degree and doctorate, optometrists must pass state and national exams. After all that, apparently, they are pretty happy. Job prospects are excellent, with 24 percent job growth expected through 2018, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).2. Materials scientist Median annual salary $90,600Synthetic fibers, lubricants, leakproof materials „ these are a few of the products created by materials scientists. They need strong chemistry backgrounds and at least a bachelors degree to get started. Those holding a Ph.D. often specialize in areas such as analytical chemistry or polymer chemistry. 3. Economist Median annual salary $85,600Economists pay attention to the distribution of goods and resources. They might focus on money, natural resources or other valuables, and often work to predict future outcomes. Those with a Ph.D. fare best in what can be a very competitive job market. You have to be willing to produce plenty of reports and analyses based on hours of number crunching. The government employs the majority of economists, according to the BLS.4. Aeronautical engineer Median annual salary $82,800Who would not feel inspired working on the wonder of flight every day? From lowering aircraft weight and fuel needs to improving safety, aeronautical engineers spend a lot of time rethinking and improving how we travel through the air. Aeronautical engineers typically have a bachelors degree to start, but many earn masters degrees and pass both licensing and professional advancement exams.5. User experience designer Median annual salary $79,100User experience (UX) designers optimize any experience where humans interact with objects, such as board games, ATMs and cars. For example, in a world where almost anyone can create a website in hours, leading companies often hire UX designers to make their site more attractive and easy to use. UX designers come from a variety of disciplines, including psychology, industrial design and anthropology. I work on projects just as they start or even initiate the project myself,Ž says Mike Bibik, a senior UX designer in Seattle. This affords (me) a greater amount of influence, and I am not dealing with the stress of project decisions or directions with which I disagree.Ž5 high-paying, low-stress jobs Featured Jobs To Place An Employment Here Please Contact Lorna Brown Phone: (850) 747-5019 € Email: lbrown@pcnh.com Like Us On Facebook: www.facebook.com/emcoastjobs Or Follow Us on Twitter: @emcoastjobs



PAGE 1

50www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visitBONIFAYNOW.COMPhone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 bonifaynow.comConnect With Us 24/7 Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo galleries, opinions and more...@WCN_HCT And Mobile Too Bonifay OKs clubs offer to help get city excited about rodeoBy CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Bonifay City Council approved of allowing the Kiwanis Club to put up rodeo ags along city streets during their regularly scheduled meeting on Monday. When I was a kid there was a uniqueness to Bonifay when it came to rodeo time, said Kiwanis Club President Bill Bullington. When you came into Bonifay, the whole city would display streaming rodeo ags, vibrant in color and radiating excitement for the upcoming festivities. Windows would be creatively painted depicting Western scenes, and the city would feel alive with growing anticipation. Bullington said he wanted to revive the days when the Bonifay Rodeo was a big deal, starting with displaying the rodeo ags. He said the Kiwanis Club would help with the expenses. He also said the city could possibly hold a window painting contest in which they would award a local business for the best Western scene depicted on their store front window. Bonifay Kiwanis Club has an obligation to the communitys children, thats a given. However, we now feel that we should be more involved in the community as a whole, Bullington said. Bullington also discussed the clubs contract with the city and urged for collaboration about where the Air Force could hold a free public concert. Theyre bringing in some of their best talent, Bullington said. Also, the National Guard will be bringing in some unique things, both in the parade and afterwards. Theres going to be a lot of talent and phenomenal shows, and were hoping well be able to renew the spirit of the community and the excitement of the rodeo. In other business, the council approved of a residents request to place a mobile home on their property because their father recently had a stroke and couldnt take care of himself. Weve granted permission like this before during times of duress, Council Member Roger Brooks said. It always comes with the stipulation that as soon as it is deemed no longer necessary, then the trailer has to go.Fisanick running for property appraiserFrom Staff ReportsBONIFAY Felecia Fisanick announced her candidacy for the Holmes County Property Appraisers of ce on Tuesday, Aug. 7. Fisanick is the daughter of Richard and Gail Woodham and the wife of Joey Fisanick, and the owner of Woodham Plumbing and Utilities Contractors. She graduated from Bethlehem School and attended Chipola College. She is a licensed real estate sales associate, serves as the secretary of the Doctors Memorial Board of Trustees and is founder of the Northwest Florida Friends of NRA. She serves on the Downhome Street Festival committee as co-chairman and the Holmes County Fair Committee. A few years ago the housing market collapsed, bringing on the worst economic times that my generation has experienced, Fisanick said. Homes that had property values in the hundreds of thousands of dollars are now worth about half that. As property values rose, so did our taxes, but as they crashed did our taxes fall with them? One of the questions that many of you have asked is why this happened and why havent our taxes been lowered to meet the fallen property values. I want answers just as you the people of Holmes By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com ESTO The town of Esto is pursuing an addendum to its water ordinance that will allow the council to raise the water rates annually if the need arises. The addendum was discussed during the town council meeting on Aug. 7. We should be able to put out a notice of a public hearing at the next meeting, said Town Attorney Jeff Goodman. I just received the information needed to nish the addendum, and if things go well, then we can get a public hearing for September. Town Council President Danny Powell said the town might need to raise water rates in the future because of an upcoming project to upgrade its water system. This would be to help compensate for possible loans that will be used to upgrade our water system for the town, Powell said. We promise to keep it as reasonable as possible, but we also need that security. The council approved of appointing Tom Murphy as the new Esto re chief for the remainder of the year, when the position of re chief is up for renewal. Toms doing an excellent job, said council member Jeff Carnley. It helps that hes already familiar with the re department, very capable of doing the job and it will go just as smoothly as before. Many of the Esto re ghters were present to show their support of Murphy becoming chief. Esto city limits came into question after a resident researched how to get the speed limit reduced in front of his house. Resident Bill Gray requested that the speed limit be reduced in front of his house, complaining that the speed didnt reduce from 55 to 45 miles per hour until past his house. Town Clerk Jody Sellers said she had called the Department of Transportation the previous Friday and was told the state recently did a study of that road and concluded the town didnt warrant signs lowering the speed limit or a stop light at the intersection of highways 2 and 79. Gray said the representative who talked with him said the area FELECIA FISANICKCECILIA SPEARS | Times-AdvertiserChainsaw artist Julius Moeller displays a dragon he carved from cedar for a tattoo shop in Panama City. For the full story and more photos, see Page B1.Kiwanis: Raise the rodeo agsEsto pursuing water ordinance addendumWOOD WORKSIN THE Volume 122, Number 18Wednesday, AUGUST 15 2012INDEXArrests .................................A3 Opinion ................................A4 Outdoors ..............................A6 Sports ..................................A7 Extra ....................................B1 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B7 New email address for obituariesThe email address for obituaries at Holmes County Times-Advertiser has changed. Obituaries should now be sent to obits@chipleypaper.com.Health clinic open on SaturdayBONIFAY The Holmes County Community Health Clinic at 203 W. Iowa St. will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.RHUMC Back 2 School BashBONIFAY Red Hill United Methodist will host its annual Back 2 School Bash from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Activities include water slides, face painting, door prizes, popcorn, snow cones, hot dogs and music throughout the day. School-aged children will receive backpacks lled with school supplies. Join the pastor and congregation as they kick off the school year with friends, food and fun.See FISANICK A2 See RODEO A2 See ESTO A2 PRIMARY ELECTION RESULTS ONLINEVisit bonifay now.com for the results of Tuesdays Primary Election. IN BRIEFSee BRIEF A3 Big Bend Health Career Camp a success B1

PAGE 2

LocalA2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, August 15, 2012 ESTO from page A1 in question would have to be annexed into the city limits in order for the city to have control over the speed limit. Sellers said a second situation came up with the inquiry because there were two stores in that area, Big Daddys Liquor LLC and the Express Lane. The stores were supposed to have already been annexed into the town, but she said she was informed by the DOT that the annexation process was never fully completed. She said those owners were paying town taxes and have been doing so for seven years. This is one of those odd situations where its legal that theyre paying taxes even if the annexation wasnt fully competed, Goodman said. Weve got to nd out what was missing to complete this annexation. Sellers also told Goodman that Charles Corcoran would like to be annexed into the town as well, saying Corcorans property is already in the town limits, but somehow his house is just outside the town limits. First well nd out about what needs to be done to nish annexing in the two stores, then Ill look into the validity of what Mr. Gray had been told about the city being able to control the speed limit if that area was annexed in, and then well see about Mr. Corcoran being annexed in as well, Goodman said. It would be good to nd out if theres anyone else in that area that would like to be annexed in; that way we can get it done at one time. The council approved of borrowing additional money to replace the air-conditioning units at the towns recreational center, which will take paying off their loan at $600 a month from 5 months to 20. Sellers said theyve xed the units as much as they could over the years and that they were the same units that came with the building when it was built. The council also approved of Goodmans advisement to nd the specications of the units and then put the items out for bid. The council approved of renewing their contract with Allen, Yagow & Car to provide their towns audit for the amount of $7,500 and agreed to look for another rm the next year, one that would be cheaper and more local than Crestview. It was announced that the latest TwoToed Tom Yard Sale yielded a prot of $240 to go toward the 2013 festival. The next regularly scheduled Esto Town Council meeting is set for 7 p.m. Sept. 4 at the Esto Town Hall. County do, she said. I understand that the state has laws that must be adhered to, and I feel condent that we can follow those laws while still ghting for you and looking out for the best interest of the local taxpayer. If elected I will make sure the property appraisers ofce will be one that you will be comfortable visiting while taking care of business, Fisanick said in a news release. We will get answers to your questions, and I can assure you that I will remember who put me in ofce. I will be a property appraiser who works for all of the taxpayers of Holmes County, she said. A resident came before the council because she injured herself when she fell into the hole where her water meter was located. She said a city employee had admitted that when they checked the meter, they forgot to put the lid back on. The resident was advised to ll out an incident report at City Hall following medical treatment. The council approved Resolution 1235, stating that the city has applied for a Community Development Block Grant under the previsions set forth in Title 1 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, and recognizes that handicap accessibility to both the physical facilities and the process of planning, development, implementations and assessment of CBDGs is a necessary and desirable goal and that a well dened Grievance Policy will assist in the provision of handicap accessibility. We are already in compliance, said grant writer Bob Jones. This is just a formality for the grant application. City Attorney Lucas Taylor told the council he would not be able to send a letter of disapproval of the quality of service to Mediacom like the council had requested during the previous meeting. Its because we, as a city, no longer have a contract with Mediacom. However, there is still something that the residents of this city can do to formally le a complaint, Taylor said. Theres an online form that they can submit voicing their complaint and submit it to their corporate ofce. The link to complete the online formal complaint provided to Taylor for the residents is www.800helpa.com/complnt.html. Several residents were present to complain about their Mediacom service, all saying they have trouble keeping service and they are unable to get hold of a representative. The council approved of Brooks request to take a survey to see how many residents on the far end of Jenkins Avenue are interested in sewer services provided by the city. Ive got many requests from residents of the city of Bonifay saying theyre interested in having city sewer services but are currently unable to have those services provided because the sewer hasnt expanded that far, Brooks said. If theres enough of a response, then we can get our engineers to see about what it would take to get funding and have the sewer expanded out that way. Jones agreed with Brooks that a survey would be a good idea and that there was funding through rural development to help. You should expand that idea to the whole city and see how many other places are without sewer, Jones said. It would be a good future project. The council also agreed to Council Member Richard Woodhams request that the city look into adopting Holmes Countys dog ordinance. Bonifay Police Chief Chris Wells agreed that Holmes Countys dog ordinance was well structured and had a lot of teeth to enforce it. Are there restrictions on certain breeds? Woodham asked. More and more people are owning pit bulls in this area. Its only a matter of time before were sitting here discussing how someone got hurt and what needs to be done. The next city council meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m. Aug. 27 at the Bonifay City Hall. SPECIAL TO THE NEWs SEsto Town Council members and residents gathered as Esto celebrated its new Dollar General stores grand opening on Aug. 11. Headquartered in Goodlettsville, Tenn., Dollar General Corporation is the nations largest small-box discount retailer, posting $14.8 billion in annual sales. The 9,000-square-foot store is open daily from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. DOLLAOLLAR GEENEERALAL GRAAND OPEOPENIING FISANICK from page A1 RODEO from page A1 By RANDAL SEYLER638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com VE ERNOON Vernon Fire Chief Matt Gothard asked the City Council what his discretionary spending limit was for the re department Monday night. Gothard had a re trucks air conditioning repaired for $300, and some questions arose over the amount a department head could spend without seeking the councils approval. I think the amount is $500, but I am not sure, Council Member Byron Biddle said. It would be found in the citys nancial policies. Biddle said $300 was probably within the limits of a department heads spending. Mayor Michelle Cook said she was concerned that the expenditure was made without approval and that the work was done by one of the volunteer remen. The mayor asked Gothard if the job should not have been done by an established company such as Hasty. Gothard said he was not aware of any requirements as to what company should do repair work for the city. Council Member Tina Sloan said in the past, work has been done by other volunteer remen, and that if the work was going to be less expensive than a contractor or garage, the city had had no problems with that practice. If the work is less expensive, then we should do it, she said. Gothard also reported that the citys rescue truck is no longer usable. The truck dies then wont restart for an hour or so, and no one who has looked at the truck has been able to diagnose the problem, he said. Isnt that the truck we replaced the starter on? Biddle asked. Weve replaced about everything on that truck, Gothard said. Cook asked if that was the only truck the city had that could haul the departments Cascade trailer. Gothard said that was indeed the case. Cascade trailers allow air tanks to be relled at the scene of a re or other emergency. I have a list of what all has been spent on that truck, as opposed to replacing it, Gothard said. Ill bring it to the next workshop. The City Council also approved a resolution allowing the Vernon Garden Club to seek a highway beautication grant from the state. The grant, if approved, would require the city provide water for the landscaping. The council approved both subjects unanimously. The mayor reported that work on the Department of Transportation predicts that the State Road 79 bridge in Vernon will be completed by Dec. 5. She also said there would be a political forum held in the Community Center on Oct. 18. Clerk Diann Hendrix reported that the street department needs a new pressure washer and asked for permission to get three estimates. Council questions department head spending limits VEERNOON CITCITY COCOUNCILCIL @WC WC N_HCT HCTFOll LL Ow W US On N TWITTERWW As S HIng NG TOn N C C Oun UN Ty Y NEWs S /H H OLMEs S C C Oun UN Ty Y Adv ADV Er R TIs S Er RFIIND US OONLILINEEFin IN D US On N FAce CE BOOK

PAGE 3

LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A3Wednesday, August 15, 2012 1360 Brickyard Road Chipley, FL 32428 (850) 638-1610 www.nfch.orgNorthwest Florida Community Hospital Emergency Service Expert Care When Theres No Time to SpareWhen minutes count you can always rely on our board-certied physicians, highly-trained RNs, LPNs and Paramedics to handle your emergency.Always here for you 24 hours a day, every day. We Treat You Like Familybetter than Radiologists. 547-2244 OWENSCHIROPRACTIC CLINIC ACUPUNCTURE (850) 638-4219 Now AvailableMidland Weather Alert Radio Model# WR-120 EZfor only$39.99!! Mitchell Sight and SoundWashington Square 1414 Main St. #2 Chipley, FL 32428Hours: Mon-Fri 9-6 Sat 9-4All Major Credit Cards Accepted Sheriffs Of ce seeks help in theftsFrom Staff ReportsBONIFAY The Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce is asking for the publics assistance with two recent thefts in Holmes County. Missing from a farm in Northeast Holmes County is a yellow, 20-by-8-foot, heavy-duty metal farm trailer with two mobile home axles and fold-up metal loading ramps. This trailer was loaded with 1-by-4 inch and 1by-6-inch tongue and groove oak boards, 12 and 16 feet in length, and rough-cut cedar boards 8 feet long. Also on the trailer were 15 sheets of 2-by-10-foot roo ng metal. Also recently missing from the same community is a 2009 black Buell sport bike, similar to the one pictured. Anyone with information concerning these thefts or other crimes in Holmes County can call Crime Stoppers of Holmes County at 866-689-8477. You will not have to give your name, and you may be entitled to a cash reward of up to $1,000. You may also call the Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce at 547-3681. The following arrests were made July 29 to Aug. 4 in Holmes County. Phillip Dale Adkins, 24, no valid drivers license, ee and elude at high speed Darrell Maurice Askew, 40, hold for prison transport service Michael Craig Barlow, 37, hold for Hillsborough Michael Alan Baxley, 37, driving while license suspended or revoked Frankie Brown, 49, hold for Hillsborough Joe Brian Debose, 45, violation of probation felony driving while license suspended or revoked Heather Leanne Finch, 22, false information to law enforcement of cer Charles Gibson, 32, violation of probation Robert Daniel Gore, 18, failure to appear on no valid drivers license Scott Allan Grimsley, 33, hold for prison transport service Tiffany Ann Helton, 29, hold for prison transport service Thomas Charles Hershell, 55, driving while license suspended or revoked John Samuel Holley, 28, grand theft, burglary, contributing to the delinquency of a child Katherine Holt, 47, weekender Damarius Jabrail Jones, 22, driving while license suspended or revoked Jennifer Anjeannette Jones, 23, criminal use of personal identi cation Thomas Luebano, 32, violation of probation on sale and delivery of marijuana Cameron Baxter Mahini, 21, hold for prison transport service David Robert Manzi, 30, hold for prison transport service Tedrick Demond McKenzie, 36, hold for prison transport service Tracey Altoniad McMillian, 46, hold for prison transport service Kennie Wayne Mitchem, 22, disorderly intoxication, resisting of cer without violence Julius Cornelious Oliver, 23, hold for Hillsborough Richard Jason Pippins, 31, no valid drivers license, failure to appear, false of cial statement Andrew Daniel Pringle, 29, driving while license suspended or revoked Luciano Rodriguez, 27, no valid drivers license, giving false name to law enforcement of cer, giving false information to law enforcement of cer William Reed Spence, 35, violation of probation, driving while license suspended or revoked, reckless driving Jeremy Ray Troutman, 31, hold for prison transport service Robert Christopher Vermillion, 25, trespassing Justin Wade Ward, 30, uttering forged instrument, criminal use of identi cation information Jeremy Keith Whitney, 21, driving under the in uence Danny Ray Williams, 41, hold for prison transport service Arrest REPORT Noma Back to School Fun Day SaturdayNOMA Noma Assembly of God will have a Back to School Fun Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. The fun day is free, and there will be puppets, cotton candy, snow cones, a train and a water slide (shirt and shorts required).Evening of Southern Gospel SaturdayCHIPLEY The Spanish Trail Playhouse presents An Evening of Southern Gospel at 7 p.m. Saturday at the historic Chipley High School Theatre, home of the Spanish Trail Playhouse. The program features many of the regions top Christian musicians. Scheduled to perform are Trish Brannon, Rachel Webb, Rosalyn Scott, Terri Garrett, Leah Page, A.D. Davis and Crossroads Quartet, all from Chipley. Others include Sonny and Linda Morris of Eufaula, Ala., and Rhonda and Shelby Lewis from Panama City. The stage band members include A.D. Davis, drums; Scotty French, lead guitar; Emory Wells, acoustic guitar; Kirk Thompson, bass guitar and emcee; Doug Salter, piano; Jimmy Miller, pedal steel guitar, banjo, and dobro. This is a fundraising event for The Spanish Trail Playhouse. Doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets, $10, are available at the Chipley public library and will be available at the door.Noma Community ReunionThe annual Noma Community Reunion will be at 10 a.m. Sept. 1 in the Noma Town Hall building. Lunch will be served at noon. All past and present residents and friends are invited. Please bring a welllled basket of your favorite dishes. Also, please bring tea, if that is the beverage you prefer. Soft drinks, ice, cups, plates and eating utensils will be furnished. For more information, contact Ludine Riddle at 974-8438. BRIEF from page A1

PAGE 4

Wednesday, August 15, 2012 OpinionA4 | Holmes County Times-AdvertiserCONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com 1-800-645-8688 ADVERTISING 850-547-9414 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2012, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. August brings memories of birthdaysWith the arrival of August, I start thinking of a family get-to-gather to celebrate all the August and early September birthdays. Three of my four brothers were born in August, and Max, the youngest, was born Sept. 9 on our dads 31st birthday. Max was No. 7 and the rst of the large brood to be born in a hospital. It was cotton-picking time, and the front porch was full of the white stuff waiting for a bale, enough to take to the gin. At that time, the gin operated by the Childs family was on Oklahoma Street behind Jerry Cooleys Holmes County Milling Co., which faces Waukesha. Next door to the gin, right by the L.& N. Railroad tracks, was The Happy Corner Grocery operated by the Moore family. When our mama announced it was time to go to the hospital, the prospective new father said she would have to wait until they got the cotton loaded. The farm hands and Daddy quickly installed the high bodies onto the pick-up truck and loaded the cotton. Only then could the frugal Mr. Wells justify a trip to Bonifay. Later that day, he came by Brackin School, where the remainder of the ock except Clyde were, to announce a baby brother named Carl Max had been born. I was 5, and I remember it very well. (Seven years later, sister Muriel Irene came along, and in two years Patricia Gail rounded out our number to four girls and four boys. It also assured our dad would not be drafted into the World War II army.) Aug. 14 never approaches without remembering that it is my late brother Clydes birthday. Last week, I attended the 80th birthday of our friend, Tom Jenkins, and was reminded again that he and Clyde, who died in 1990 in a plane crash, were born the same month. So this would have been a signi cant birthday for Clyde. Though we fought most of the time as children, we were close friends as adults. Every child should have an Uncle Clyde. One of our ghts, if you could call it that, stands out. We were hoeing and arguing over who got to use the little hoe. That was a hoe that was well worn, so the blade was thin from much sharpening. Everyone wanted that hoe. Daddy never took much time for arbitrating nor disciplining. (He just did it.) So he said, Clyde, you can have it for the rst row, and then you can have it, Hazel. When we got to the end of the row, Clyde started back hoeing the next row. I waited to give him time to relinquish the little hoe, but he continued down the row. So I lifted my heavier hoe and conked him on the head, whereupon he let out a loud yell. Daddy who was well ahead of us said, Why did you do that? He didnt give me the little hoe, I whined. Well, did you get it? my daddy said as he continued to hoe. Somewhere I read it is important for a parent to be casual. Another thing we fought about was getting up in the morning. Clyde never slept late, and he considered it his responsibility to get me up every morning. That usually set the tone for the day. My two older brothers, Jim and Perry, celebrate birthdays on Aug. 21 and 24, respectively. The sister just older than I, Minnie Russ, and Clyde are both deceased, but that leaves three octogenarians of the Hugh and Marie Wells children. I believe Jack is the only one of the Tison siblings to live past age 80. Among our many aunts, uncles and cousins, we have many August birthdays including our younger son, Glen, who was born on Aug. 30, 1959. I read recently a statistic that there are more people born in August than any other month. Our family certainly would bear that out. I suppose it is because of the short days and long nights of the cold winter months. Growing up in a large family certainly had its drawbacks, and there were times when I would wish for fewer people to spread the limited nancial resources among, but then Id think, Which one could we spare? I always gured if a choice had to be one or another, I would be the rst to go. Now, looking back, I wouldnt trade my life for anyone elses. Each one of my siblings is a special blessing I am thankful for and proud of. I am still getting a lot of good feedback and positive comments on the column. That keeps me going. If I repeat myself too much, then it will be time to nd someone else to do the Happy Corner. As I was watching the throngs of parents and children at the Northwest Florida Community Hospitals Back 2 School Fair on Saturday, I couldnt help but think going to school has gotten much more complicated than I remember it being of course, having been on the kid side of the fence, it might just have seemed less involved in the 60s and 70s than it is now. The Back 2 School Fair was very well-attended, in spite of drizzling rain. Hospital of cials estimate a crowd of 2,500 parents and children attended during the three-hour event and thousands of school supplies were distributed to children at no cost. Backpacks, bicycle helmets, laundry lists of notebooks, glue, pens, and on and on The lists of school supplies are impressive, and doubtless expensive, especially if you have more than one child to buy supplies for each year. The Back 2 School Fair was an amazing event, but I couldnt help think back to my own school days seeing all the youngsters enjoying their last few hours before getting back on the yellow bus. All I remember needing as far as supplies go were Big Chief tablets, a box of Crayons and No. 2 pencils for elementary school. I just remember getting a pack of loose-leaf paper and a box of Bic pens in middle school and high school. We were fairly low maintenance back in the day, and I know compared to my parents days in school, when all you had was re and cave walls to paint on, us kids in the 60s/70s probably seemed high-tech. I think I even had a calculator in high school, not that we were allowed to use them. For me, back to school means football season is nearing and were getting closer to cool (or at least cooler) weather. I havent experienced fall in the Panhandle yet, but I dont expect to be wearing sweaters or gloves any time soon. Most of my football expertise comes from watching high school games from the sidelines, taking photos and occasionally dodging a tackle. As far as college football, I dont especially have a favorite team. As a graduate of Arkansas State University, I suppose I am a default fan of the Red Wolves, who will play the Troy Trojans in Alabama on Nov. 17 that might warrant a road trip. The Red Wolves will be in Florida on Oct. 4 facing the Florida International Golden Panthers in Miami, but I dont think I will drive that far to see ASU take on FIU. The FIU rivalry with the Red Wolves goes back quite a ways, I seem to remember them playing each other in the early 80s when I was, yet again, a student returning to school. For students, this last week before the school bells start ringing again means an end to the freedom of summer and a return to the tyranny of the teacher, which I personally remember dreading, back in the long ago (relatively speaking) before cellphones, Internet and video games. I spent most of my pre-teen summer days exploring the levees and streams, elds and pastures, running or bicycling up and down gravel and dirt roads. Once I was old enough to get a job, that became my summer and school didnt look so bad in comparison. But before becoming a Walmart stock boy at 15, I dont remember spending any time inside during the summer, although surely there must have been a rainy day or two between 1964 and 1974, but if there was I dont remember it. Mostly I just remember the vastness of the cotton elds, sliding down levees on cardboard sleds, and shooting reworks at the moon on the Fourth of July. Two of my favorite companions were egrets and red-winged blackbirds, and they were plentiful in the Mississippi Delta. I still have ashbacks to my childhood when I see a red-wing blackbird sitting on a wire fence. School, for the pre-teen me, was just something to be endured between summers and I cant help but believe there are dozens of youngsters out there this week who know exactly what I am talking about. RANDAL SEYLEREditor Back to school more complicated with timeAll I remember needing as far as supplies go were Big Chief tablets, a box of Crayons and No. 2 pencils for elementary school. I just remember getting a pack of loose-leaf paper and a box of Bic pens in middle school and high school. HAPPY CORNERHazel Wells Tison

PAGE 5

LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A5Wednesday, August 15, 2012 NOTICE OF BUDGET WORKSHOPThe City of Bonifay will hold a Budget Hearing on Monday, August 20, 2012. Workshop will be held at 6:00 p.m. at City Hall. LABOR DAY DEADLINESDeadlines for ALL Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 5 Publications Our Business Oces Enjoy a safe Labor Day weekend! ELECT ELECT FELECIA FISANICK FELECIA FISANICK FELECIA FISANICK forHOLMES COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISERI am Felecia Fisanick and I am seeking the oce of Holmes County Property Appraiser. If elected I WILL: Run the oce in a professional, yet friendly manner. Always remember that YOU, the people of Holmes County, put me in oce and that I work for YOU! Always show respect for YOUR property as it is just that YOUR property. Perform tasks in an eecient and timely fashion. Answer the questions that I can and nd answers to those that I dont know the answers to. Every question has an answer! Follow the laws of the State while still ghting for you, the people of Holmes County If elected I WILLNOT: Use the oce of Property Appraiser for personal gain. Use the state as an excuse not to do the job I am elected to do. Have you, the people of Holmes County, come to an oce where you will feel uncomfortable. Let the people down who put me in oce. I humbly ask for your vote and remember that on November 6th, a vote for FELECIA FISANICK is a vote to put the Tax Payers of Holmes County First! By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Empact is a nonpro t organization to empower the community through education, said Stephen Andrews, founder of Empact. We take the kids on trips, hoping to instill a since of community with each generation so they to can grow up and have a positive impact on the community and on the city. Recent efforts have been amplied as Empact held two basketball tournaments to raise money for two separate local causes. The rst basketball tournament raised $500 for Madaline McFatter, a local who recently had lost her husband of 53 years, James Edward McFatter, known to many in the community as coach Mac. The second and most recent basketball tournament raised $500 for Jeremy Worthing, a student at Bonifay Middle School who has been diagnosed with cancer and is receiving help from the community for medical and travel expenses. Teaming up for Jeremy shirts are available through BMS or through the Prayer Chain for Jeremy pro le on Facebook. Contacts are Jalisa Brannon, Melanie Albury or Deborah Jones at BMS. We go throughout the city gathering donations and getting teams registered which also helps with adding funds to the cause were supporting for that tournament, Andrews said. Then theres the tournament itself, where we have concession stands and a live DJ. Its something fun for people to come to and support a good cause. Andrews said he hopes to expand the types of basketball tournaments to include womens basketball, childrens basketball and maybe even co-ed. People will give to a good cause, he said. Our community has been no exception. Theyve been a tremendous support in both providing donations and players. He said 100 people signed up the rst time they held a tournament and 150 people signed up during their last tournament. The next cause Andrews said they were trying to hold a tournament for is breast cancer awareness in October. I hope to see even more community support as we raise money for the American Cancer Society during Octobers Breast Cancer Awareness, Andrews said.By RANDAL SEYLER638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com CHIPLEY The Washington County School Board adopted a revised attendance policy after a public hearing and a presentation by Administrative Services Director Pat Collins on Monday. The revised policy addresses elementary, middle and high schools in the district and adds statutory requirements that previously were not included in the districts policy. One state law allows the state to suspend the drivers license or not issue a license or learners permit to students reported as not meeting the statutory attendance requirements. The student will also be referred to truancy court. Collins noted parents of habitually truant children also may be sanctioned under Florida law. It is a second-degree misdemeanor, and parents can be ordered to complete a training program, or attend the school their children attend, she said. The document of record according to state law is the teachers grade book, Collins said, and it is important that teachers are keeping accurate records of attendance and enforcing the absenteeism policy. Students under the policy are allowed up to four days of absence during a nine-week period with a parental note and only for reasons as speci ed in the policy. For any absence over four days in a nineweek period, a doctors note, funeral program of immediate family member, religious holiday or documented legal reason is required, according to the policy. If a student logs ve or more unexcused absences within a month, or 10 unexcused absences in a 90-day period, they will be referred to the Child Study Team to determine if early patterns of truancy are developing, as required by state law. Four unexcused tardies or unexcused checkouts in a nine-week grading period will be considered as one unexcused absence for the period in which the tardy or checkout occurred, according to the policy. The new policy also drops a nine-week grade by only 10 points instead of giving a student an F for excessive absenteeism. The purpose isnt to make them drop out, or make it impossible for them to catch up, said Vernon High School Principal Brian Riviere. We want to hold their feet to the re, but we want them to stay in school and be able to bring that grade up. The main goal was to streamline the old policy, Riviere said. We tried to nd a middle path that holds students accountable but lets them recover their grade. The bottom line is we want to get to the bottom of why the childs not in school, and get them back in the classroom, Collins said. In other business, the board heard a presentation from WashingtonHolmes Technical Center Director Martha Compton and staff on the Skills USA national competition in Kansas City. WHTC pharmacy technician student Cristel Boyette won a silver medal in national competition in the category of medical mathematics. The board also heard from Students Working Against Tobacco members who read a proclamation against candyavored tobacco products. The Chipley branch of First Federal Bank of Florida also presented a check for $1,000 to the Kate M. Smith Elementary Schools AR program.From Staff ReportsCHIPLEY A Vernon man was arrested for allegedly using a BB gun to abduct a woman on Wednesday, according to Chipley police. Antonio Francis Leverett, 31, of Vernon, was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, kidnapping and possession of drug paraphernalia, according to a police report. Chipley of cers were dispatched to an altercation on North Second Street, where a complaint had been made that a man had made threats with a gun and ed into the woods. Of cers were told the man in question was Antonio Leverett, according to the report. An investigation revealed Leverett had forced a woman to drive him to a location where he then threatened another person with the weapon. Additional of cers arrived on scene and began a search to locate Leverett. A short time later, an ofcer found Leverett at a nearby residence. Leverett was taken into custody, where he also was found to be in possession of drug paraphernalia, according to the report. Of cers also located the weapon, which was discovered to be an air cartridge BB gun, according to police. CECILIA SPEARS | The Times-AdvertiserStephen Andrews, founder of Empact, a non-pro t organization to empower the community through education.Local wants to make an Empact School Board adopts revised attendance policyMan accused of using BB gun in kidnapping

PAGE 6

OUTDOORS www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comSend your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com ASection Hooked on OutdoorsI watch in wonderment as boat after boat blasts out into the Gulf in pursuit of black grouper while all the time leaving more grouper behind than anglers could legally bring back to the landing if they tried. Most boaters leaving Carl Gray Park pass under the Hathaway Bridge and head to the pass while leaving behind grouper so large they would be a challenge to break away from the bridge and get to the top. I talked to a diver who inspects the bridge and he said there were goliath grouper under there that could eat a man in one bite. He said there were gag grouper up to 40 pounds and some black snapper that were humongous. When they blew up the old bridge a 35-pound red snapper that probably had lived under there for the better part of its life came oating to the top. Along the seawall at the shipyard and at the paper mill there are grouper that would be almost impossible to tear away from that wall. If you dont believe me, just don some gear and take a look around. Of course some of the biggest bull sharks you will ever see also live down there and the visibility isnt all that good. A lot of people have thrown stuff into the bay under the cover of darkness that has attracted a lot of sh; grouper as well as black and red snapper. I discovered one of these places in about 29 feet of water clear enough to actually see the grouper swimming around the structure. It was almost like shooting sh in a barrel until a hurricane moved this makeshift reef to parts unknown and the good shing with it. Lets not forget the sewer line that caused so much consternation a few years back. They say they covered it up, but that only made it better as far as grouper shing goes. And lets not forget the DuPont Bridge going to Tyndall Air Force Base. There are some grouper under this bridge as big as you ever will want to tangle with. You had better bring your big boy britches if you want to catch one of these sh. They have hidey holes they can run into before you get the slack out of your line. Big choffers and large mullet will get these sh out, but you better be ready to lose some tackle if you go.Wednesday, August 15, 2012 Page 6 Outdoor LifeScott Lindseycaptainlindsey@ knology.net Coyotes and humansSXCCoyotes are a rusty brown color and typically weigh 25 to 35 pounds. They usually move after sundown and are more apt to be seen at night in rural areas, crossing roads or scavenging on road kill. By Stan KirklandFWC There was a time in the not-toodistant past when coyotes were a rarity in the eastern United States. However, that no longer is the case. The small animal predators scienti cally known as Canis latrans once were found almost exclusively in the Southwest, but they now are rmly entrenched throughout the U.S. and even much of Canada. Our home state of Florida is no exception. Coyotes are a rusty brown color and typically weigh 25 to 35 pounds. They usually move after sundown and are more apt to be seen at night in rural areas, crossing roads or scavenging on road kill. They also will make themselves welcome in urban areas, where there is cover. In a perfect world, coyotes would stick to the things that wildlife biologists say they normally eat rats, mice, small birds, snakes, carrion and even watermelons and cantaloupes. Unfortunately, coyotes sometimes cross paths with small pets, such as dogs and house cats, which they can attack and kill. A study published by the Journal of Wildlife Management a couple of years ago points out just what can happen when coyotes cross paths with house cats. The study looked at eight radio-collared coyotes on the outskirts of Tucson, Ariz., from November 2005 through February 2006. Of 36 instances where coyotes encountered the cats, cats died in 19 of the interactions. In Florida there have been a number of instances where coyotes have gone after small dogs. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) doesnt investigate the incidents but they are a recognized occurrence. So, what does a person do if they want coyotes removed? Under FWC rules, coyotes are an unprotected furbearer. That means they can be removed or killed during daylight hours, 365 days a year, on private property. Landowners can remove the coyotes or hire a trapper to do the work. While it may make a person feel better that theyve removed a coyote or two, biologists say coyotes from outside the area quickly move in and occupy the vacated range. Where the concern is for small pets, biologists say there are several things people can do. That includes clearing debris and brush piles around the property, making the site less suitable to coyotes. Where there are woods or elds that border home, biologists recommend a standard fence or electric fence to discourage coyotes from coming in the yard. Biologists say its also not a good idea to allow house cats to roam free. Another thing that biologists say is sometimes a problem is attractants, such as garbage or pet food. They say garbage cans should be secured and recommend not feeding pets where coyotes may have access to the food. While coyotes usually ee at the site of humans, on rare occasions they may approach. If that happens, the recommended advice is to make noise and wave your arms. Those looking for information about coyotes or help dealing with a coyote issue can contact the FWCs Regional Of ce in Panama City at 850-265-3676. The FWC website MyFWC.com has information about coyotes by selecting Wildlife & Habitats and then Species Pro les.Charter shing making a comebackHOUMA, La. (AP) Charter shing has proven to be a tough industry to sink in Terrebonne and Lafourche parishes. Many charter boat captains saw fewer and fewer customers as a result of the 2010 BP oil spill, but now they are starting to recover and reel in more anglers. I would classify this as a comeback year, said Daryl Carpenter, president of the Louisiana Charter Boat Association that represents more than 140 charter boat captains along Louisianas coast. Terrebonne and Lafourche parishes received more than $2 million each from BP as a result of the oil spill with much of the money going to tourism advertising. Pat Gordon, Planning and Zoning director for Terrebonne, said the parish isnt advertising for speci c charter boat operations but for the industry a whole. Were advertising for people to come and sh in Terrebonne, Gordon said. Weve run ads in Cabelas Out tter Journal and are running an ad in the Louisiana Fishing Regulation Brochure. Theres a shing show that runs on HTV, and some ads are being played on that channel. One thing we have done for the local captains is get as many of them listed on the Convention and Visitors Bureau website as possible. Gordon said in addition to using the money to advertise shing, local festivals and the new parish branding received a monetary boost from the BP money. But it wont last forever. We got the money two years ago, Gordon said, and it will all be spent by the end of the third year. Michel Claudet, Terrebonne Parish president, said he thought the advertising campaigns, which focused on promoting Terrebonne as the Salt Water Fishing Capital of the World, were paying off. I think it has worked out, Claudet said. Some captains have said they are really busy. I think these guys certainly want more, but business is good. Its like everything else, you make an investment and hope to see a return on it. We are doing things to show that we are the Salt Water Fishing Capital of the World. In addition to parishsponsored advertising, groups such as the Metairie-based Louisiana Tourism and Coastal Coalition have been advertising for these hardhit companies. First of all, were seeing a rebound, said Carpenter, who also owns the Grand Isle-based Reel Screamers Guide Service. Ive stressed advertising to our members, and they should participate in these programs. But Im trying to say to BP and the government that one year does not a comeback make. Carpenter said the dollars spent on advertising was money well spent. There are several advertising programs taking place through the Charter Boat Association and through BP and federal government grants, Carpenter said. Local sherman also have seen the bene ts of these initiatives. While few of them could provide exact numbers, they all agree this year has been better than the last two.

PAGE 7

SP O RTS www.bonifaynow.com ASectionLast in a three-part series about a rst-time owner of a racing greyhound, a rst-time full owner of a greyhound racing kennel and the dog making his racing debut this summer at Ebro Greyhound Park.By PAT McCANN747-5068 | @pcnhpat pmccann@pcnh.com EBRO The afternoon downpour had eased into a steady rain and nally yielded to a mist by the time AJN Sweet Smoke was paraded down the track at Ebro Greyhound Track during an evening performance last week. Sweet Smoke was set to make his Grade A debut at about 9 p.m. in the 10th race of the evening card that had begun at 6:30 p.m. On a normal evening Race 10 it would have been perhaps 30 minutes earlier, but this was a Tuesday and family night at the pari-mutuel facility located a 15-minute drive north on State 79 for many tourists staying in Panama City Beach. The betting lines were longer. The time between races extended. Sweet Smokes racing routine actually had started about 3:30 p.m. in Kennel No. 5 located in the compound at the far reach of the parking lot. Thats when Smoke and the other greyhounds Joe Watsons AJN Kennel had entered that night received a snack of ground beef topped by corn syrup that trainer Thomas Suggs had prepared. Only the selected dogs in the kennel that were going to race received the snack. They knew at that point it was game on. Teresa Duncan, rst-time owner of a racing greyhound, was getting her game face on as well. Onlookers have informed her that watching her watch AJN Sweet Smoke chase around the track is nearly as entertaining as the race. Duncan, who lives with her husband outside of Fountain, decided early on that Sweet Smoke, now 20 months old, would run the entire season at Ebro, that concludes its 2012 meeting in September. I wanted to watch him run and because hes a good kid, Duncan explained. There had been early signs that Sweet Smoke might be a promising dog. Duncan said she saw that early on when he was frolicking on their 10-acre property. I would tell Joe that he is fast, she said. I know youre just hearing me say this I would tell him. He would say, yeah, yeah, yeah. Watson took note when he brought 10 greyhounds to Sarasota. He had been told to keep an eye on one of the dogs, that it could turn out to be a top performer. One day he saw Sweet Smoke catch her from behind. Hes got a lot of potential, Watson remembered his thoughts. AJN Sweet Smoke is trained by Thomas Suggs. Duncan hinted that it is dif cult for her not to dote on her animal. Hes such a sweet boy, she said. Thomas said I should change his name to Spoiled Smoke. I mean, hes my kid. One time I wanted to see him at the track and Thomas said, Hes not here to talk, hes here to race. Joe is a good friend of mine, hes gave me the right to see him. I try to back off so as not to delay Smokes progress and interfere with his routine. Two weeks ago I went to see him the morning he was to run, and I knew he didnt feel good. I called Joe and told him he was not himself and asked him what we needed to do. He said to race him and see how he reacts. He nished sixth, which is his worst yet. On this night, AJN Sweet Smoke was about to make his eighth start of the season and eighth of his career. He already had won four races in seven starts and nished second twice. Then there was the sixth-place nish when Duncan said she could tell by his eyes that her dog wasnt feeling up to par. I wanted him to learn the ropes at a puppy track and get the experience he needs, Duncan said. Otherwise he could get bashed by other dogs with more experience. We dont want to hurry him as long as he stays healthy and doesnt get hurt. Ebro President Stocky Hess has extensive experience in most phases of greyhound racing. Hes shared some of his knowledge with Duncan, who works in administration at Ebro Greyhound Park. First thing, I told her that hes not going to win every race, Hess said. You dont put young pups in over their head. Some you put them up in grade and they have trouble and they cant handle it. If they continue to get bounced around they lose their con dence. A good handler is observant of that. AJN Sweet Smoke performed well in schooling races that are run during the day when the track usually is silent. In addition to helping acclimate the dogs they provide those wagering on of cial races a snapshot of the dogs potential. Schooling races also help the racing secretary place older dogs in desired grades when they relocate here. Watson said he is wary when young dogs advance into Grade A against the fastest and more veteran dogs at the track. He said that a rst-time start in Grade B often is no different. When theyre moving up in class theyre against dogs that got more experience, and that worries me, Watson said.Hes got a lot of potential DOG DAYS OF SUMMER: PART 3 By JASON SHOOT747-5069 | @pcnhjasonshoot jshoot@pcnh.com BONIFAY The queen will have her palace. So says the prince, who in this fairy tale is Holmes Countys Chris Walker, a 6-foot-9 forward who has verbally committed to Billy Donovans mens basketball team at the University of Florida. Walker is recognized as one of the premier recruits in the country, rated seventh nationally by ESPN.com and sixth by Rivals.com. His athleticism is otherworldly compared to most 17-year-olds, and he fully expects to hear NBA commissioner David Stern call his name as a lottery selection in the leagues 2014 draft. NBA draft people have said Im like a sick mix of Kevin Garnett and Perry Jones III, Walker said. High praise that may be, but dont describe it as unfounded. Walker only now is beginning to tap into his limitless potential, and his skills have improved exponentially since he led Holmes County to the Region 2-1A semi nals last winter. Playing alongside future Gator teammate Kasey Hill on the Florida Elite AAU team throughout the summer, Walker was forced to step up his game playing against the countrys best players in tournaments stretching from Atlanta to Las Vegas. Walker learned something about himself in the process. Its one thing to overwhelm opponents at a rural public school in the smallest high school classi cation in Florida. Its another to dominate against college recruits headed to national powers such as Kentucky, Louisville and Kansas. I really built up my con dence two months ago, he said. That was my rst look at how good I can really be. Humble beginnings Walker has lived his entire life in Bonifay, a central Panhandle community boasting fewer than 2,800 residents. That he will nish his prep career in a Blue Devils uniform is remarkable in its own right considering he has resisted overtures from some of the premier prep schools in the nation. Walker turned down Oak Hill Academy in Virginia, a program unrivaled in its ability to produce NBA-caliber talent. He declined a chance to play at Montrose Christian School in Maryland, the same program that helped Kevin Durant harness the skills that would turn him into the most lethal scorer in professional basketball. What I want to do is be my own guy, said Walker, who turns 18 on Dec. 22. I wanted to show them A.I.P. anything is possible. I wanted to stay in Bonifay. I turned down 30 offers and stuck with my home team. Even if youre at a little school, you can do your own thing and go for it. Walkers mother, Jeneen Campbell, is a single parent living on disability. Walker acknowledged that life never has been easy, and he said he draws strength from watching his mother battle through her own adversity. My mom truly is my backbone, he said. Shes at every game. Shes like my queen. Ive got to take care of her, and I want her not to have to do anything. It increases my drive to make my dreams come true. I want her to have her own castle. Walker has found a father gure in Holmes County coach Po White, who said he never has treated Walker any differently from the other players in the Blue Devil program. We established trust with one another, and weve built a great rapport with one another, White said. He is able to come to me when hes having a dif cult situation. That comes with the trust weve developed with one another, and it says a lot about him and the decision he made to stay. An easy decision Give Donovan credit. When he wants a player, he doesnt hide it. Billy Donovan came to a lot of my high school games, my workouts and every game in July, Walker said. He couldve watched some of the other top players, but he came to watch me. Every single game. We could be playing a sorry team, and there he was watching. Walker announced his decision to play at Florida in a four-minute video posted on YouTube. The rst 2 minutes of that video consist of a highlight reel featuring windmill dunks, Walker-led fast breaks, 3-point shots and several Big man verbally committed to UFHolmes Countys Walker has one eye on future, but feet planted rmly in Bonifay Wednesday, August 15, 2012 Page 7See WALKER A8 See DOG A8

PAGE 8

LocalA8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, August 15, 2012 We cannot guarantee when this offer will be repeated in the newspaper. Clip this offer and please call today! $10,000.00Bene t $7,000.00Bene t $5,000.00Bene t $3,000.00Bene t Age 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-85 Male 32.50 36.00 45.00 55.00 66.00 89.00 121.00 166.00 Female 27.00 30.00 37.50 42.00 51.00 69.00 98.00 139.50 Male 23.05 25.50 31.80 38.80 46.50 62.60 85.00 116.50 Female 19.20 21.30 26.55 29.70 36.00 48.60 68.90 97.95 Male 16.75 18.50 23.00 28.00 33.50 45.00 61.00 83.50 Female 14.00 15.50 19.25 21.50 26.00 35.00 49.50 70.25 Male 10.45 11.50 14.20 17.20 20.50 27.40 37.00 50.50 Female 8.80 9.70 11.95 13.30 16.00 21.40 30.10 42.55 Your a ordable monthly rate will lock-in at your enrollment age ...Or enroll online at www.mutualofomahalifedirect.comNow, from United of Omaha Life Insurance Company ...Whole Life Insurance.Are you between the ages of 45 and 8 5 ?Then this GUARANTEED ACCEPTANCE policy is for YOU!>> 4 bene t levels up to $10,000! >> Rates lock-in at age you enroll! >> Call for FREE all-by-mail enrollment packet!NO medical exam! NO health questions! Our graded death bene t whole life insurance policy can be used to pay funeral costs, nal medical expenses...or other monthly bills. Right now, you can make a decision that could help make a di cult time a little easier for your loved ones. You may have been putting o purchasing life insurance, but you dont have to wait another day. is policy is renewable to age 100**! Plus, your policy will never be canceled EVER because of changes in health. So call today! Why this policy? Why now? AFN44167Life Insurance underwritten by United of Omaha Life Insurance Company, Mutual of Omaha Plaza, Omaha NE 68175; 1-800-775-6000. United of Omaha is licensed nationwide, except New York. Policy Form ICC11L057P or state equivalent (in FL: 7722L-0505). This policy contains reductions, limitations, and exclusions, including a reduction in death benefits during the first two years of policy ownership **In FL, policy is renewable until age 121. This is a solicitation of insurance, an insurance agent may contact you. Sowell Tractor Co., Inc.2841 Hwy. 77 North, Panama City 763-5441 Toll Free: 866-448-9899 www.sowelltractorco.comWe Trade for Anything That Dont Eat! Financing Arranged (WAC) EVERYTHING YOU VALUE 0% Financing Available Only On Kabota Equiptment. WAC See dealer for details. WALKER from page A7 DOG from page A7 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." www.mulliseye.com Chipley Office We are located directly across the parking lot from the Walmart in Chipley"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS,CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITYAPPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley OfficeBoard Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 8-31-12 FREEEYE EXAM CODE: WC00ToddRobinson,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeon LeeMullis,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeon scenes of Walker blocking shots with his long arms. In short, he looked little like the high school junior last winter who often was satis ed with a layup attempt instead of trying to throw down a dunk on a lesser opponent. That Chris Walker exists no more. Me now, Im a high motor for my team, Walker said. I can lead a team now. With my skill set, I can play outside or inside, I can post up. I can defend and guard (all ve positions), and thats because of the athleticism I have. Walker expressed his eagerness to continue playing with Florida Elite teammate Hill, a point guard who also has committed for Florida. He believes the duo will bring its own version of Lob City the moniker handed down to Chris Paul and highying Blake Grif n of the Los Angeles Clippers to Gainesville and the OConnell Center. We know each other, and we know what weve got to do, he said. The decision to verbally commit to Florida early takes the pressure off Walker as he prepares for his nal season at the high school level. He said he intends to focus on the classroom more than he ever has before (he stressed that his grades wont raise any red ags) and wants to lead the Blue Devils to their rst state championship. Florida can watch and see how my grades are, Walker said, and make sure Im in shape. One and done Basketball fans at Florida unhappy to see shooting guard Bradley Beal depart for the NBA after one season at UF may be disappointed to learn that Walker fully intends to leave Florida after one year, too. Coach (Donovan) said where my skill level is, if thats what I want I should go for it, Walker said. What I keep hearing is that Im a potential lottery pick. But Im not satis ed. Walker expects a steep learning curve from the high school level to the upper echelon of major college basketball, and he is aware that the NBA is another giant leap forward after that. The pace at which his game is improving suggests he will be ready to meet that challenge. Walker said Donovan told him he believes Walker can play small forward or power forward at the college level. He wants to avoid the tweener label that has dogged many college players making the jump to the NBA, but he believes his all-around ability will afford him a chance to play either position professionally. I can shoot threes now, Walker explained. I can nesse you. I can dunk on you. I can guard anything, and Im rebounding better. When I block shots I catch the ball. I can post you up with my back to the basket and hit you with a post move. Or I can face you up and use my quickness to blow by you. Walker readily admits he has to spend more time in the weight room, and he said he is working hard to improve his ball-handling ability. White said Walkers shot remains a work in progress but is improving steadily. While Walker has room for improvement, its easy to forget he wont play his rst game in a Florida uniform for another 15 months. That time will prove valuable as he gures out just what kind of basketball player he wants to be. Im my own guy, he said. People ask me who I play like. I tell them Chris Walker. Among the greyhounds Sweet Smoke would face this night was This is Lester, one of the top performing greyhounds at Ebro during the 2011 season. Duncan prefers Friday and Saturday performances so her husband, Cecil, who works on a job site near Ocala can commute and watch Smoke run. On nights her boy races, she wants him to know shes there, and often attends the weigh-in held late in the afternoon so she can see him. I only missed one race when I was out sick. He won box to wire, she said. But hed seen me a few days before, Duncan was quick to point out. Theres been times when they bring him out, and Ill yell to him (from the box seats) and hell turn and look straight up to me. I made Joe go to the nish line with me because I hadnt yet. I wanted to see him up close, and its a different viewpoint. Joe told me that when he rst comes by dont yell. You dont want to break their focus. Otherwise you know Im going to yell for him Everybody says its entertaining to watch me. Youre in your own little world for 30 seconds which is the duration of most races. After the dogs had been put into the starting boxes the electronic lure that the greyhounds chase began to make its circuit toward them. AJN Sweet Smoke broke from the 7 box and the race was on. This is Lester got the best start of the eight dogs in the eld, but Sweet Smoke had the lead by the time the pack chased around the rst turn. His lead was two lengths, and thats the way it stayed as they sprinted around the 5-16 mile course. At the nish Sweet Smoke won by two and a half lengths with This is Lester second and Gable High, who also had maintained his position throughout, third by three and a half. Neither This is Lester nor Gable High was able to gain ground in the race to the nish line as Sweet Smoke won in 30.81 seconds, a decent but not alarming time for a Grade A winner. Then again, it was the fastest time recorded in 16 races on this soggy evening. Just as rewarding for AJN Kennel, 13 of the 16 greyhounds entered that evening ran in the money with ve nishing rst, four second and four third. All in all, it was a good evening for Sweet Smoke, Duncan and Watson. That much was reinforced when the dog was reunited with his mother and a small circle of well-wishers following the race. This has been great, but I can be very emotional, Duncan said. The rst time he ran and won it made me cry. The rst time I read a story about him it made me cry. Hey, hes a hometown kid. What can I say?

PAGE 9

Washington, Holmes at a glance Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser BPAGE 1SectionLocal man inspires with chainsaw creations By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com WESTVILLE Wood is his canvas, and the chainsaw is his brush. Local chainsaw artist Julius Moeller presses through adversity to continue to follow his dream, his passion, his legacy: rede ning art using what some in the art community would de ne as a crude and barbaric tool, a chainsaw. Its my great escape, Moeller said. Whenever Im working on my art, I go to my own little world. Someone could walk up on me, and I wouldnt even know theyre there. Moeller, born Sept. 10, 1963, in Indianapolis, Ind., said he has had quite a few things to escape from as life has dealt him many tragedies. When I was 7, I was bit in the back of the head by a St. Bernard, Moeller said. I almost lost my eyesight, and I lost most of my hearing. When he was 9 years old, he was introduced to what would become his lifelong obsession, chainsaw art. My grandfather was letting me cut small limbs with a chainsaw when one of the guys helping him used his chainsaw to carve his initials into a log, Moeller said. I told him I could do that too and showed him. Thats when it all started. In his teens, Moellers grandfather took him to festivals and carnivals, showing off his skills and selling his artwork. He soon got work in landscaping, both landscaping and using the wood acquired from those jobs to create more art. He said his artwork continued until tragedy struck again in his mid-20s. I had a at tire and I was pushing my car off the road when a driver clipped me, Moeller said. My hips were broken, my ribs were crushed, they had to rebuild my lung, and because of my previous brain damage, I ended up with epilepsy. As soon as he could pick up a chainsaw, he said he was right back at it and kept at it till his mid-30s, when he set down the chainsaw for a steady job. I set it down but I knew there was something missing, Moeller said. I was miserable, and I couldnt gure out why. It just got worse and worse. He said he went through several failed marriages. It wasnt till I was in my mid40s that I took up the chainsaw again, he said. It was all because of this one local guy who did chainsaw art. Watching him rekindled the passion in me for it and made me realize what Id been missing for almost a decade. In 2007, Moellers 26-yearold son, Brandon Lee Moeller, committed suicide. He was a fantastic artist, Moeller said. He could draw almost anything, and he could play most instruments by ear. He just got messed up in drugs and hung himself. His other two sons have overcome their own adversities, he said. My second oldest son joined the military and went to Afghanistan, Moeller said. Then he came back and gave me so many grandchildren. His youngest son is living in a large city as a graf ti artist. Hes a recovering heroine addict and doing very well for himself, he said. In 2009, Moeller said he almost lost the ability to do his art for good. I was using a drill, and the drill jerked and snapped the tendons in my predominate wrist, Moeller said. I had to get metal plates to fuse them together. After a lot of effort and time, he was able to adjust to his new wrist and picked up the chainsaw yet again. He said the most recent adversity to overcome is the economy. When the economy is rough, art is the rst thing to suffer, Moeller said. When the economy goes bad people dont want art, they want food and gas and things required to live. People dont need art to live, but artists like me need art to live. Another reason Moeller said he was able to continue on is because of the never-ending support from his friends and family. I get so much support from my family and friends, he said. Both morally and nancially. His latest challenge given to him is to break the Guinness World Record by building the worlds largest wheelbarrow for St. Andrews Farmers Market in Panama City to be placed in their community garden as a centerpiece. They are trying to beat the largest wheelbarrow, which is located in Fussen, Germany, and was built on Feb. 19, 2007, by the Burschenverein Geisenried in Geisenried, Germany. It is 6 foot, 4.7 inches tall, 29 feet, 11.05 inches long and has wheels that are 4 foot, 4.17 inches in diameter. It weighs in at 2,381 pounds. PHOTOS BY CECILIA SPEARS | Times-AdvertiserLEFT: The sign outside chainsaw artist Julius Moellers workshop travels with him on road art shows. CENTER: This special-ordered dragon is 14 feet long, and Moeller said it took six eight-hour days to complete. RIGHT: Moellers leaf design table is made of cedar.MY GREAT ESCAPEABOVE: Moellers carved motorcycle won rst place in the Marianna Arts Festival in 2011. LEFT: Moellers carved saxophone won rst place in the festival in 2012. When the economy goes bad people dont want art, they want food and gas and things required to live. People dont need art to live, but artists like me need art to live.Julius Moeller chainsaw artistWednesday, AUGUST 15 2012Bonifay Middle School orientationBONIFAY Orientation for the 2012-13 school year will be in the Bonifay Middle School cafeteria as follows: today, Aug. 15, fth grade at 8:30 a.m. and sixth grade at 10 a.m.; Thursday, Aug. 16, seventh grade at 8:30 a.m. and eighth grade at 10 a.m.Representative of AgEnder to speakSUNNY HILLS Karen Schoen of Americans against UN Agenda 21 will be speaking at 6:30 p.m. today, Aug. 15, at Shepherds Gate Church in Sunny Hills, educating Washington County residents about the loss of their individual rights and private property. The church is on State Road 77.Free hunter safety Internet course BONIFAY The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a free hunter safety Internet-completion course from 6-9 p.m. Aug. 17 and 8 a.m. to noon Aug. 18 at First Baptist Church, 311 N. Waukesha St. in Bonifay. Students must complete the Internet course before coming to class and bring a copy of the nal report from the online portion. The nal report form does not have to be notarized. An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. The hunter safety course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license. The FWC course satis es hunter-safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at MyFWC. com/HunterSafety or by calling Hunter Safety Coordinator George Warthen at the FWCs regional of ce in Panama City at 265-3676. INDEXSociety .................................B2 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B7

PAGE 10

Wednesday, August 15, 2012 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra and J.D. OWENS INC.Carpet & Ceramic OutletYOUR HOMETOWN LOW PRICE!CARPET, CERAMIC, PORCELAIN, VINYL, NAFCO, LAMINATE, HARDWOOD & AREA RUGSWeve Got It At The Price You Want! HUGE REMNANT SALE!12 x 9Tan Frieze......................................$955012 x 12Dark Green Plush........................$1399012 x 13Light Tan Plush............................$1099012 x 13Dark Blue Plush...........................$1555012 x 14Heavy Tan Frieze.........................$1655012 x 14Medium Brown Frieze.................$1499012 x 15Chocolate Frieze.........................$1799012 x 15Light Tan Plush............................$1555012 x 16Medium Blue Frieze....................$1899012 x 19Heavy Velvet Plush Tan..............$2255012 x 192Green Comm. Plush....................$2055012 x 20Multi Color Comm.......................$16990BOUND RUGS2x4...............$5.00 2x8.............$15.50 3x5.............$12.50 4x6.............$19.90 5x7.............$39.90 6x9.............$49.90 J.D. OWENS CARPET & CERAMIC OUTLETLocated Between Arrowhead Campgrounds & Hopkins, On Hwy. 90 The Place To Shop, If Money Matters!carpettilemarianna.com Helping Hands... Compassionate Hearts BONIFAY Offering Inpatient and Outpatient TherapyNURSING & REHABCENTEROccupational Physical Speech24-hour Skilled Nursing Rehabilitation Gym Admissions 7 Days a Week Frank and Carol Kreis of Chipley are pleased to announce the engagement of Frank Mays Kreis Jr. to Heidi Elizabeth Gasparrini, daughter of Timothy and Pamela Gasparrini of Littleton, Colorado. The bride-to-be is a 2003 graduate of Columbine High School and a 2008 graduate of Brigham Young University. She is employed as a consultant at Deloitte. The groom-to-be graduated in 1997 from Suncoast High School. He is a 2001 graduate of Emory University and a 2005 graduate of Tulane Law School. He is employed as an attorney at Social Security Administration. An Aug. 23 wedding is planned at the Washington DC temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. A reception will follow. CHIPLEY Jaci Dickens was recently crowned Baby Miss Hearts of the USA of Washington County. As a local winner she has earned the privilege to participate at the pageants state level. Part of the entry fee includes each participant collecting as many canned goods as possible in order to combat local hunger. Our goal is 2000 canned goods by Sept. 25. A box will be at the Piggly Wiggly in Chipley and Save-A-lot. Jaci will be at Walmart collecting cans on Aug. 17. The canned goods that are collected will be donated to the Chipola Ministry Food Bank. Donations may also be dropped off at Mt. Ararat AME Church in Marianna. They will also gladly pick up any donations at a location of your choosing. Jaci is the daughter of Shanae Dickens of Marianna. For more information, call Equallia or Shanae Dickens at 573-4039 or 272-8651.Special to ExtraStudents from the Ponce de Leon FCCLA (Family, Career and Community Leaders of America) joined with 7,000 nationwide members, advisers, alumni and guests in Orlando, Fla., July 8-12 for the 2012 National Leadership Conference. This years studentoriginated theme for the annual national meeting was #realitycheck. Throughout the ve-day convention, participants examined and discussed several critical issues, including family, school and community violence prevention, physical as well as nancial tness, future career exploration and countless community service projects. A number of relevant youth issues, such as the changing roles of men and women in the home and workplace, leadership and obesity prevention were also explored at the meeting through presentations, workshops and youth sessions. Ponce de Leon High School had six students that joined over 3,600 other students to compete in STAR Events (Students Taking Action with Recognition), which are competitive events that build pro ciency and achievement in leadership and job-related skills. Holly Parson and Lee Parson competed in Chapter Showcase, which is an event that recognizes chapters that develop and implement a well-balanced program of work and promote FCCLA and family and consumer sciences skills in the community. Holly and Lee earned a gold medal, which is the highest award. Nick Price, Tyler Smith and Koby Townsend earned a gold medal in Chapter Service Project, junior division. This event recognizes chapters that develop an indepth service project that makes a worthwhile contribution to families, schools and communities. Students use family and consumer sciences skills to address and take action on a community need. Nick, Tyler and Koby implemented an anti-smoking campaign for students in the Ponce de Leon community. They joined with the SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco) club at school to encourage students avoid tobacco products. Harley Rowe, earned a silver medal in Chapter Service Project, senior division. His project focused on weather safety. He planned activities to inform students on what to do in case of a tornado or any severe weather. Brason English, a junior at Ponce de Leon High School also attended the leadership conference. Brason was elected at the Florida State Leadership Conference in March to serve Florida FCCLA as president-elect his junior year, and he will serve as president his senior year. Brason spent the week at nationals attending of cer training sessions. FCCLA is a dynamic and effective national student organization that helps young men and women become leaders and address important personal, family, work and societal issues through family and consumer sciences education. FCCLA has over 200,000 members and over 6,500 chapters from 50 state associations, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The organization has involved more than 10 million youth since its founding in 1945. Army Pvt. Artie E. Russell has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical tness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, ri e marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, eld tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic rst aid, foot marches, and eld training exercises. Russell is the daughter of Kenya Leonard of Highway 69 in Greenwood, and John Brigham of Chipley. She is a 2007 graduate of Marianna High School.Special to ExtraCHIPLEY Chipley Garden Club members recently spent time working on their downtown pot Christmas decorations. In previous years the pots have been accented with multi-color Christmas trees, red and burgundy silk poinsettias and giant globes, but 2012 will be quite different. This December the club will be decorating the pots with newly constructed silver-tinseled Christmas trees made from tomato cages and silver holiday decorations. The club feels the new silver trees will compliment the city of Chipleys twinkling white lights of Christmas beautifully. Want something cool to do this summer? Get your family together and start thinking about twinkly lights, Nativity scenes, elves, reindeer, snow akes, candy canes and dont forget Santa! Each December Chipley Garden Club awards the Yard of the Month to a home within Chipley city limits with the best holiday decorations. Plan to get your decorations up early this year the committee surveys yards the week after Thanksgiving through the rst week of December.Ponce de Leon FCCLA students win medals at national conference Kreis, Gasparrini to wedDickens crowned Baby Miss Heart of the USA of Washington CountyGarden Club plans for ChristmasRussell graduates basic combat trainingFrom Staff ReportsMARIANNA Chipola College recently announced members of the cheerleading squad for the upcoming 2012-13 athletic season. Chipleys Olivia Guettler, along with Dara Wilkerson and Jessica Bean of Bonifay, are among the squad. Chipola cheerleaders not only excite the fans at Chipola basketball games, but the members of the squad serve as goodwill ambassadors at numerous community functions and events. Members of the 201213 squad include: Taylor Spikes, Panama City; Brantlee Kirkland, Ashford, Ala.;Dara Wilkerson, Bonifay; Coral Aguado, Graceville; Jordan Skipper, Ashford; Nilsa Prowant, Blountstown; Morgan Sumner, Graceville; Jessica Bean, Bonifay; Olivia Guettler, Chipley; Lauren Locke, Sneads; Katelyn Buff, Bristol; Dalton Hendrix, Marianna; Mike Sawyer, Marianna; Terrence Shanks, Altha.Chipola College announces 2012-13 cheerleaders SPECIAL TO EXTRAChipley Garden Club members have been working on downtown Christmas decorations. ENGAGEMENT

PAGE 11

Wednesday, August 15, 2012 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3Special to ExtraFor the third year in a row at Chipola College, Big Bend Area Health Education Center or Big Bend AHEC, a non-prot organization whose main ofce is in Tallahassee, has sponsored a summer camp for high school students interested health careers. The camp is provided at no cost to the students. This year 34 high school students from Jackson, Washington, Calhoun, and Liberty counties attended the weeklong summer camp. Twenty students from Jackson and Washington counties spent the camp week at Chipola College in Marianna. While the 14 students from Calhoun and Liberty counties visited many locations in Bristol and Blountstown, they also joined the Chipola students on two days of the camp. Camp activities included pig heart and kidney dissection, blood typing, medical terminology, and simulation lab experience. In the simulation lab at the Chipola College Health Science Building students were able to learn many skills of current nursing, EMT, and paramedic students. An overview of numerous health careers is provided so that students understand the entire health care team. Students were exposed to many other health professions rather than just the well-known medicine and nursing. Jackson Hospital provided a tour of their facility and an opportunity for a full day of shadowing of various departments in the hospital for many campers. Students also received a 7hour ACT review course, and information on college admissions and nancial aid. The Jackson County Sheriffs Ofce provided information on the physical effects and dangers of many current drug trends. Calhoun and Liberty campers had the special opportunity to spend the afternoon with Laban Bontrager, DMD in Bristol. During the visit the campers learned about aspects of dental care and hygiene and were able to experience hands on dental activities at his ofce. Calhoun Liberty Hospital also provided students with the opportunity to tour their facility and shadow health professionals of all kinds for the day. One of the highlights of the camp week was a road trip to Tallahassee. The students toured the FSU College of Medicine and had an opportunity to interact with current medical students. The medical students taught campers skills training in the simulation lab to learn heart and lung sounds and vital signs. Summer camp is not new for Big Bend AHEC as they have sponsored similar camps for over 20 years. Big Bend AHEC serves a 14 county area and provides health education services and tobacco cessation and prevention programs. AHEC also helps recruit health professionals to rural areas. That is one of the main reasons for camp. Camp Director, Brigitta Nuccio, says, Our hope with providing summer camp is that we will help these students get the experience they need to know if a health career is right for them and that they will return to rural areas to practice. Nuccio actually attended the camp herself in 1995 as a high school student from Cottondale. She did go on to college and received a masters from the University of Florida, College of Medicine. For the last 5 years, Nuccio has worked for Big Bend AHEC. Camp locations continue to be added. This year in addition to Chipola and CalhounLiberty, camps were also held in Madison and Gulf counties. If you would like to support Big Bend AHEC Health Careers Summer Camp programs or would like additional information, please call Brigitta Nuccio at 482-6500. For the past two weeks, Pet Talks have addressed poisonous foods and medications common in most homes. This week the focus is on miscellaneous poisonous items around the house including plants, pennies, and insecticides.PlantsThere are several plants that can be toxic to pets. Lilies, for example, are toxic to cats. The ingestion of any part of any type of lily can lead to kidney failure. The clinical signs can include vomiting, depression, or loss of appetite. If you suspect your cat of ingesting lilies, you should contact your veterinarian immediately. There is no antidote, and intense supportive care is needed for cats to recover. Also, sago palms are a common decorative house plant that is toxic to pets. The seeds, leaves, and cones of the plant can cause acute liver failure. The most common symptoms are vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, and yellowing of the skin and eyes. If your pet ingests sago, and they show the clinical signs of poisoning, the prognosis is guarded to poor Dr. Dorothy Black, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences (CVM), explained. There is no antidote and supportive care is extensive and includes blood transfusions. While lilies and sago palms are very toxic, Black explained that poinsettias are usually non to mildly toxic. Pets ingesting this plant either have no clinical signs or gastrointestinal discomfort. Poinsettias are usually referred to as highly toxic, but they really arent, Black said. So feel free to display the poinsettias at Christmas!PenniesIt may be surprising to some people, but pennies minted after 1981 contain signicant quantities of the metal zinc. When ingested, excess zinc is absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract and causes red blood cells to break apart. Pets, then, become anemic showing signs of lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, port/wine colored urine, and yellowing of t he skin and gums.  Removal of the penny and aggressive supportive care with blood transfusions usually allows for a successful recovery, Black said.Chemicals and insecticidesA dangerous chemical common in many garages is Ethylene glycol. It is found in radiator coolants, brake uids, and many other household products. When ingested it causes the pet to appear intoxicated and, as the toxin is metabolized, it leads to kidney failure. Although there are medications that can inhibit the toxin and prevent kidney failure, it must be administered within the rst three to six hours posti ngestion.  If kidney injury is already present prognosis is guarded, but with immediate treatment prognosis is good. Ant bait is used extensively in Texas, especially pyrethrin and pyrethroid containing products. When ingested in signicant quantities, these chemicals can cause total body tremors and seizures in cats and dogs, and their body temperatures can become markedly elevated. Supportive care, including muscle relaxants and antiseizure medications, are required until the pet can met abolize the drug.  Not all ant baits contain pyrethrins, some are safe for pets, Black said. Read the labels carefully before you make a purchase. Other insecticides that contain organophosphates are highly toxic substances. When ingested these insecticides can cause severe clinical reactions, including salivation, tearing, urination, defecation, vomiting, respiratorydistress, tremo rs, seizures, and paralysis.  Drugs exist to counteract the toxin and are used in addition to extensive supportive care, Black said. But successful recoveries require prompt treatment. Rat bait is another household danger. It is offered in three main varieties: anticoagulant, bromethalin, and vitamin D analog (cholecalc iferol).  All three types can lead to death of dogs and cats t hat ingest them.  Anticoag ulant rodentecides (brodifacoum, bromadiolone, warfarin) lead to uncontrollable b leeding.  Although there is no antidote, if the pet is b rought immediately to the veterinarian, treatment and decontamination can prevent bleeding from accidental ingestion. Bromethalin toxicity leads to progressive neurologic signs such as difculty walking and can progress to seizures and death. There is no antidote, only supportive care. Also, cholecalciferol bait causes renal failure and is highly toxic. As with bromethalin, there is no antidote, only supportive care. Dialysis can be attempted if clinical signs are present. If you think your pet has ingested any of these toxic substances, contact your veterinarian immediately. Treating your pet quickly after ingestion is key to a successful recovery, Black said. For additional information on substances that are toxic to pets, please consult the resources below. ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center 1-888-426-4435 $65 consultation fee www.aspca. org/pet-care/poison-control/  P et Poison Hotline 1-800-213-6680 $39 consultation fee per incident www.petpoisonhelpline. com/ About Pet Talk Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at vetmed.tamu.edu/pet-talk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to cvmtoday@cvm.tamu.edu.Big Bend Health Careers Camp huge successPoisonous to pets: Common household toxins Crossword PUZZLESOLULUTION ON PAGEE B5

PAGE 12

FAITH BSectionwww.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.First Baptist Churchcome as you areMike Orr, Pastor1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.A Copernican RevolutionThere is a natural tendency to project our own views, especially our moral views, onto God. We tend to believe that what we think is good and evil, corresponds to Gods view of what is actually good and evil. But, God obviously does not have to conform to us. Rather, we must conform to God. Copernicus revolutionized astronomy by postulating that the earth revolves around the sun, rather than the sun going round the earth, which was the accepted view at the time. Copernicus realized that placing the Sun in the center and the earth at the periphery was counterintuitive, but it greatly simTo apply the metaphor of the Copernican revolution to our moral views, we need only remember that God is the center of the moral universe and the author of goodness. We are at the periphery, and so instead of assuming that Gods views must somehow conform to ours, we should hope and pray that our views conform to Gods. We could be wrong about almost everything we believe. rant creatures, i.e., not God. So, we should let God be God, and accept that His ways are not your ways.BROWN FUNERAL HOME1068 Main Street, Chipley638-4010 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser This Message Courtesy ofFor my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways, declares the LORD. As the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts.. Isaiah 55: 8-9 Rev. James L. Snyder I am not sure who invented summer vacation, but I think they deserve a Nobel Peace Prize. Every year is worth the intense strain when there is a summer vacation to look forward to. Ah, summer vacation. The freedom of not having anything to do. No schedule in my face. No appointments frustrating me. Just an agenda of fun and more fun, and dont forget the eating. Both the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and me got up early to begin the drive to the airport to take us to our vacation location. I was so full of energy I could not sit still. It was then that I broke into singing, comfortably off key, a Carpenters song much to the agitation of my wife. Weve only just begun, White lace and promises, A kiss for luck and were on our way. All my wife could do was stare at me. Finally, she said, You sure are excited. Ive never seen you so excited. Are you sure youre all right? I could not have been more all right. All I could think of was a week before me surrounded by grandchildren I have not seen for over a year. How old is...? I went through all the grandchildren. It is easy to forget how old kids are because every year their age changes. When you get to be my age, it is hard to keep up with all of these changes. A week of stuf ng them with all the candy I could carry. Taking them out to a restaurant and showing them the proper use of the drinking straw and the ne art of a spitball battle. After all, it is a grandfathers solemn duty to teach his grandchildren the ne art of shenaniganism. Where else are they going to learn it? Their grandmother? I dont think so. We nally arrived at the airport, parked our car and proceeded to the check-in counter. I am not sure my feet touched the ground, so excited was I to get on our way. Slow down, my wife pleaded. I cant keep up with you. We nally arrived at the check-in counter with our baggage, and one of the attendants asked me a simple question. I hate it when people ask me a question when I am in one of my silly moods. Believe me, I was in one of my silliest silly moods at this time. Sir, the attendant asked me very seriously, do you have anything perishable or ammable in your luggage? With silliness smeared all over my mug I said, I sure do. I got a Bible in there and it is DynO-Mite. And, I had the audacity to smile very broadly. Then it happened. Someone said, Did he say dynamite? Wheres the dynamite? The attendant said, He said the dynamite was in his briefcase. Suddenly, lights went on, buzzers began ringing, men in uniforms surrounded me, and two grabbed and subdued me. In a few moments, the hazmat men arrived asking where the dynamite was. The man in charge pointed to my briefcase and said, Its in the briefcase. They begin moving people away while the hazmat men came in to remove the briefcase with the alleged dynamite. At this time, I was absolutely stunned. Every ounce of silliness had drained from my person, and I knew I was about to go to jail. Finally, the senior security guard came and looked at me. Where did you say the dynamite was, sir? I stammered and stuttered but nally I said, I said my Bible was dynamite. He stared at me. Look me up and down, glared at me with eyes that burned into my very soul. Then he spoke. Would you by any chance be a minister? He said rather gruf y. Yes sir, I stammered as if my life depended upon what I was going to say, I am a minister, a preacher of the gospel. I thought the last part might do something for me. At least it was a shot, excuse me, a try. He glared at me and shouted, False alarm. Just another crazy preacher. As he walked away, I could hear him muttering under his breath, Where do all these crazy preachers come from? The terminal nally quieted down, I went through the inspection, and I must say, I am not complaining mind you, but the pat down was a little longer and rougher than I remembered it being in the past. They stripped me down almost to my birthday suit. Thank God for wrinkles. As I walked down the aisle on the plane, I could hear people whispering, Thats him. Thats the crazy preacher with the dynamite. I nally sat down next to my wife who was staring out the window. In a few minutes the plane took off and as we reached our altitude, she, while still staring out the window, said to me, Next time well take separate planes. She paused for a moment and then said, In fact, well take separate airports. I think I am going to stick to what the Bible says. For the word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any twoedged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart (Hebrews 4:12 KJV). The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www. jamessnyderministries. com.Otter Creek RevivalPONCE de LEON Revival Services at Otter Creek Methodist Church will be held at 7 p.m. from Aug. 12-17 (Sunday to Friday). The Rev. Gary Gibben, from Panama City, will be the guest speaker. Homecoming is Sunday, Aug. 19. The church is located four miles north of Ponce de Leon off Highway 81. Everyone is invited to attend these services. New Orange Baptist Church to hold Gospel JamCHIPLEY New Orange Baptist Church will hold its monthly Gospel Jam at 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18. The church is located on Alford Road, a quarter-mile off Orange Hill Road, six miles south of Chipley. A covered dish dinner will follow. For more information, call 638-1166 or 773-0020.Shady Grove Baptist Church homecomingBONIFAY Shady Grove Baptist Church will be holding homecoming services starting at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 19. Charlie Hinson will be the speaker and he will also be singing. Lunch will be served in the fellowship hall after the service. The church is located at 1955 Highway 177-A.New Life Fellowship Assembly of God Womens ConferenceCHIPLEY New Life Fellowship Assembly of God presents Daughters of Destiny: A Womens Conference. There will be four sessions: the rst session will be held at 7 p.m. Aug. 23 the second session will be at 7 p.m. Aug. 24 and third session at 9 a.m. and the fourth session at 11 a.m. Aug. 25. The guest speaker will be Diane Coleman and conference host Sherri Evans will also be speaking. Conference worship leader is Tiffane Raulerson. Early bird registration is $30. Registration at the conference is $40. Contact church of ce to inquire about area hotel discounts for the conference. The church is located at 695 5th St. in Chipley. For more information, call the Church of ce at 638-1134, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Thursday. First Freewill Baptist Church to hold revivalBONIFAY The First Freewill Baptist Church of Bonifay will be holding a revival at 6 p.m. Aug. 27 and at 7 p.m. Aug. 27-31. Special speaker will be the Rev. Dennis Tanton, with special music by Vessels of Clay.Library hoursWausau Library Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County Library (Bonifay) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed Washington County Library (Chipley) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Vernon Library Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills Library Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedMONDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Monday each month (unless a holiday) at 6:00 at the Chipley library. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach of ce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999.TUESDAY8 to 10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 5 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at 6:25 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-451 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AWEDNESDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. noon: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday. (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. 3 p.m.: Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 638-0093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AFRIDAY10 a.m. to noon: Homes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a get-together for 50-plus senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Winn Dixie in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks while you get your shopping done. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church.SUNDAY8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at GracevilleCampbellton Hospital in Graceville. COMMUNITY CALENDARA midsummers day nightmareWednesday, August 15, 2012 Page 4 Faith BRIEFS

PAGE 13

Wednesday, August 15, 2012 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5By BOB JOHNSON The Associated Press MONTGOMERY, Ala. Mayors and other of cials from Florida to Louisiana will be in Alabama this week for a conference to discuss restoring passenger train service in the region. The service from Jacksonville to New Orleans was at one time part of Amtraks Sunset Limited line from Los Angeles to Jacksonville, with stops in Chipley and Crestview. It was discontinued after Hurricane Katrina in 2005 wreaked havoc in the area, destroying lives and damaging homes, businesses and railroad tracks. Of cials believe reviving the train service would be a boost to tourism and would help the economies of communities across the Gulf Coast still recovering from Katrina. Mobile Mayor Sam Jones said restoring the Jacksonville-to-New Orleans line will give Gulf Coast residents a transportation option that hasnt existed in seven years. Jones said its an important issue in Mobile, where the primary transportation options since Katrina have been automobiles and plane, both of which he described as too costly. He said the meeting will allow mayors and other ofcials to decide the best approach to get the service started again. He said the regional line would open the region to train service across the country and make attractions like beaches and casinos more accessible. And Jones hopes any new line would be more convenient than the one that ran through Mobile seven years ago it rolled through the city at 3 a.m., he said. The closure of the Sunset Limited line has affected some 13 communities where the train stopped and passengers could get on or off. A spokesman for Amtrak, Marc Magliari, said the Sunset Limited line has not run east of New Orleans since Katrina. Frank Corder, a city council member in one of those cities, Pascagoula, Miss., will be attending Thursdays conference. He said restarting the train service would boost tourism. The entire Gulf Coast is focusing more and more on tourism. Providing an additional access point just makes sense. Adding access to Gulfport, Mobile and New Orleans, where major air connections are located, would de nitely enhance tourism all along the Coast, Corder said. Corder also said train service would reduce transportation costs for area businesses and ease traf c on heavily traveled highways such as Interstate 10 and U.S. 90. New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu has been a proponent of restarting the rail service and will be represented at the conference by Deputy Mayor Cedric Grant, who said he hopes daily service can be opened. In addition to helping businesses, the train service would be like some of the commuter lines that operate in the northeast and other parts of the country. He said it would make it easier for someone to live in Biloxi, Miss., or in another Gulf Coast city and work in New Orleans. He is hopeful Amtrak of cials will look at the demographics and realize there truly is a market here for the rail line. The Florida capital of Tallahassee was once a stop on the line, and that city will have several representatives at the conference as well. Max Stout, who works in the mayors of ce for special projects, said there has been a grassroots effort in Tallahassee to restart the train service. The citizens are telling us they want an affordable transportation alternative, Stout said. Such a line could help revive a tradition from the 1920s and 1930s in the north Florida college town, when trains were used to take Florida State fans to football games around the country. Trains kind of make sense these days, Stout said. Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences.Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section ofwww.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com, you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership withLegacy.com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212 Mr. Foy L. Deal of Hwy 2, Westville, (New Hope Community) went home to be with his Lord and Savior Thursday, Aug. 9, 2012. He was 87. Mr. Deal, affectionately known as Foy, was born Oct. 12, 1924, in Holmes County, to the late Fletcher Lewis and Nellie Elizabeth Curry Vaughan Deal. He began his banking career in Sept. 1959 with The American Bank in Geneva as a teller and after 30 years of service retired as Sr. Vice President. Until his health began to fail he was very active in his community and his church. He was a member of the New Hope Neighborhood Watch, the Geneva Lions Club and New Hope Baptist Church where he served in many different capacities. He enjoyed shing and sharing his famous hush puppies at sh frys. Mr. Deal followed the Golden Rule in his daily activities and went out of his way to help people, which was his greatest joy. He will be greatly missed by all who knew him. In addition to his parents two brothers, Walton and Millard Vaughan, as well as three sisters, Lois Bare eld, Emma Bell and Evie Nell Watson, and a very special daughter-in-law, Felecia Rainey Deal, all preceded him in death. Survivors include his wife of 63 years, Nell Pierce Deal, Westville; two sons, Gary Deal (Teresa), Samson and Roger Deal, Westville; grandchildren, Michael Deal (Angela), New Hope, Jeremy Deal, Samson and Emily Deal, New Hope, John Michael Morris, Geneva, Brad McDonald, New Hope, Megan Espraza (Edgar), Bonifay, Susan Stephenson (Joey), Enterprise, Donna Bruce (John), Bonifay, Terri Stout (Joe), Samson; 19 greatgrandchildren; two greatgreat-grandchildren; brother-in-law, Roscoe Watson, Pensacola, and several nieces, nephews, other extended family and friends. Funeral services were held at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12, in the New Hope Baptist Church with the Rev. Clay Hatcher of ciating. Mr. Deal was placed into the church one hour prior to service time. Burial followed in the church cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Saturday, Aug. 11, from 5 to 8 p.m. The family asked that owers be omitted and memorial contributions be made to the New Hope Baptist Church Building Fund, 1954 Hwy 2, Westville, FL 32464 or the Geneva Lions Club, P. O. Box 652, Geneva, AL 36340. Members of the Geneva Lions Club will serve as pallbearers. Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva, 334-684-9999, is in charge of arrangements. Express your condolences in our guest book at www. sorrellsfuneralhomes.comFoy L. Deal FOY L. DEALMr. Jerry Jay Braxton Crutch eld, age 74, of Sanford, passed away on Thursday, Aug. 2, 2012. Mr. Crutch eld was born in Alamance County, N.C., on Oct. 27, 1937 to Elisha and Leona Crutch eld. Mr. Crutch eld served in the United States Air Force for 24 years and served as a Minister for over 20 years. In addition to his parents, Mr. Crutch eld was preceded in death by his sister, Dorothy Cates and brother-in-law, Thomas Cates. He is survived by his wife, Bertie Pigott Crutch eld of Sanford; two sisters, Val Carden of Graham, N.C., and Nettie Day (Bob) of Burlington, N.C.; one brother, Graham Crutch eld (Caroline) of Raleigh, N.C.; one son, Jay Crutch eld (Dana) of Lake Mary; two daughters, Sandy Barnes (Randy) of Crawfordville, and Kristy Woolsey (Justin) of Sanford, as well as seven grandchildren, Alexys, Renate, Jeffery, Jaylyn, Bryan, Nikki, and Noah. During visitation the family received friends at Central Baptist Church in Sanford, from 3 to 4 p.m. A funeral service was held at 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 5, 2012 at Central Baptist Church in Sanford. A funeral service was held at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012 at Friendship Primitive Baptist Church in Crawfordville, with interment followed at Pigott Cemetery in Crawfordville. Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay, directing.Jerry B. Crutch eldDebi Harcus Herring, 56, of Bonifay, went to be with the Lord after a courageous sevenyear battle with cancer. She was the president and owner of Marianna Financial Services. Debi was preceded in death by her father, Melvin Harcus. Debi is survived by her husband, Cullen Herring; her mother, Jeanette Harcus; her grandmother, Katie Amerson; a son, Jeremy Harcus and his wife Casie; a sister, Kim Drummond and her husband Dan; a step-son, Brad Herring and his wife Dawn; a step-daughter, Brandie Tapscott and her husband Steve; four grandchildren, Graften Harcus, Kayla Tapscott, Emma Herring and Ashley Herring; her best friend for 36 years, Mary Jo King and her husband James; a special niece, Tiffany Johnson and her children, Jevin and Bradlee. A special thanks to Dr. Scott McCallister and his staff at Dothan Oncology, along with Allison, Cindy and Amy of Emerald Coast Hospice. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m., Friday, Aug. 10, 2012 at Gully Springs Baptist Church with the Rev. Tim Hall, the Rev. Ralph Merchant and the Rev. Carl Hadley of ciating. Interment followed in the Gully Spring Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay directing. Family received friends from 5 to 7 p.m., Thursday at Peel Funeral Home. Pallbearers were Ray Wilson, Jason King, Allen Pippin, JJ Cline, Ansel Wilson and Wesley Wing. Serving as honorary pallbearers were Carthell Hodge, Vaughn McDaniel, James Cline, and the ladies Sunday School Class of Gully Springs Baptist Church.Debi H. HerringMr. James Willard Powell of Westville, passed away Aug. 4, 2012. He was 97. Mr. Powell was born in Darlington, on May 27, 1915 to the late James Daniel and Lizzie Leona Stafford Powell. Mr. Powell loved to work and drive his John Deere Tractor. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife, Lydia Padgett Powell and nine brothers and sisters. He is survived by one son, Jimmy Powell (Olean) of Westville; two grandchildren, James Andrew Powell (Mariana) of Tallahassee, and Traci Landers (Jim) of Westville; four great grandchildren, Dustin Landers, Jessica Barnhouse (Jamie) all of Westville, Elizabeth Powell, and Peter Hogencamp both of Tallahassee, and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. Monday, Aug. 6, 2012 in the chapel of Pittman Funeral Home in Geneva with the Rev. Rod Jones of ciating. Burial followed in the Beulah Anna Baptist Church Cemetery with Pittman Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home on Monday beginning at 1 p.m. until service time. You can sign the guest registry at, www. pittmanfuneral.comJames Willard Powell Shirley Sue Nelson, 57 of Chipley, died, Aug. 8, 2012. A Funeral service was held, Aug. 12, 2012 at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Interment followed at Old Mt. Zion Cemetery with Sims Funeral Home directing.Shirley S. Nelson APAmtraks Sunset Limited backs into its nal stop in New Orleans on Nov. 2. Originally running from Los Angeles to Orlando, Amtrak suspended service on the line east of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina damaged railroad tracks.Southern mayors to discuss regional train serviceSunset Limited made stops in Chipley, Crestview before Katrina Crossword SOLUTION Obituaries

PAGE 14

Wednesday, August 15, 2012 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News ExtraGillman Family ReunionWESTVILLE The Gillman Family Reunion will be held Aug. 25 in the fellowship hall at Leonia Baptist Church. The church is at 1124 Gillman Road in Westville. The reunion is always held on the last Saturday in August and lunch will be served at noon. For more information, call Sylvia Glover at 956-2877 or Teresa Johnson at 956-2810.Holmes County High School Band CampBONIFAY Holmes County High School Blue Pride Band is getting ready to prepare for another year of events. Today Aug. 17 Full band from 5-7 p.m. Washington County Farm Bureau MeetingCHIPLEY The Annual Meeting of the Washington County Farm Bureau is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. on Aug. 16. A brief business meeting and a performance by PeeWee Johns and Band will follow dinner. Washington County Farm Bureau members should have already conrmed their attendance. Farm Bureau Ofce: 638-1756Soccer sign-ups slatedCHIPLEY The City of Chipley Parks and Recreation Department will be holding its 2012 soccer sign-ups until Aug. 31. Players must be between the ages of 4-15 as of Sept. 30. The cost to play is $42. To register stop by the Pals Park Ofce from 3-5 p.m. Monday through Friday and ll out a registration form. Applications can be downloaded from www. palspark.org and mailed with payment to P.O. Box 1007, Chipley, FL 32428. Please make checks payable to the City of Chipley. You can also email a completed application form to palspark@ cityofchipley.com and bring in your payment by 4 p.m., on Aug. 31. We are also looking for coaches and ofcials. If you or someone you know might be interested contact Guy Lane at 638-6348 or 527-9275 or email him at palspark@cityofchipley. com. 2012 Miss. Graceville Harvest FestivalGRACEVILLE The 31st Annual Harvest Festival Pageant will be held at the Graceville Civic Center in Graceville at 6:30 p.m. on Sept. 7 and 8. The entry fee is $55 with all proceeds going to the Graceville Harvest Day Celebration. Contestants may participate in photogenic for an additional $10. Photogenic entries will be limited to one photo per contestant. Applications may be picked up at Bush Paint and Supply in Graceville, Graceville City Hall, Graceville News, and Forget Me Not Photography in Bonifay. Dead line to enter is Aug. 17. Winners will receive a large trophy, large crown and banner. Alternates and participants will receive trophies. For more information call Teresa Bush at 263-4744 or 2633072, or Michelle Watkins at the City of Graceville at 263-3250.Bonifay Saints Sign-upsBONIFAY Bonifay Saints, also known as the Bonifay Bulldogs, will be holding signups every Saturday until school starts from 9 a.m. until Noon at Dueces Automotive, next to Donut Shop. Registration will be $40.Holmes County Farm Bureau Annual Membership MeetingBONIFAY The Holmes County Farm Bureau Annual Membership meeting will be Aug. 23 at the Holmes County Agriculture Center on Highway 90 East. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. with the meeting beginning at 6 p.m. RSVP to the ofce at 547-4227 by Monday, Aug. 20, before noon.Mature Driving ClassCHIPLEY Washington County Council on Aging and AARP are co-sponsoring a mature driving class on Aug. 24, this eight-hour course is developed especially for the senior driver and will be held at the Washington County Council on Aging from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Council on Aging building is at 1348 South Blvd., beside the health department in Chipley. The cost of the course is $12 for AARP members and $14 for non-members. For anyone that was or is in the educational eld will only have to pay $5 for the class. This National Safety Council Course reviews basic driving knowledge, new trafc laws and introduces techniques to help offset the effects of the aging process on driver performance. It is geared to your safety needs and helping to compensate for age related changes. This mature driving is approved by the DHSMV for a three-year insurance premium reduction. For more information or to sign up please contact the Washington County Council on Aging at 638-6216.Pee Wee football, cheer sign upsBONIFAY Sign ups will be every Saturday through Aug. 25 from 9 to 11 a.m., at the Bonifay Rec Center. Please bring a copy of your child birth certicate when you come to sign up. Cost for football is $50 per child. Cost for Cheerleading is as follows: new cheerleader will be $100, a returning cheerleader from last season is $50 is uniform still ts. If you have any questions, call Mark Gilmore at 527-4363 or Michele Sherrouse at 373-6227.Bethlehem Peewees seek coachesNow doing sign-ups for Bethlehem Peewee Football/Cheer leading ages 5-13. They are also looking for football and cheer coaches. All coaches will be subject to background check. Sign-ups will be from now until Sept. 1. For registration forms, call Cliff Kimbel, 334-248-4254, Charity Knight, 260-1006, or Naomie Pettis, 547-4044.Finch Family ReunionCHIPLEY The Finch Family Reunion for descendents and friends of the late William Dallas Finch will be Sept. 1. The reunion will begin at 11 a.m. at the Washington County Ag Center on Highway 90 West in Chipley. Bring a well-lled basket to feed your family and friends at noon. If you have any photos or other related items that you would be willing to share with the family and friends, please bring them along. After lunch we ask that all remain while photos are taken for future events. For more information call Kenneth Finch at 638-5307, Ruth Creamer at 638-4310 or E. O. Lisenby at 763-2187.Senior Group going on TourWASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will be going on a tour of Ohio Indiana Amish country, and Chicago Razzle Dazzle on Sept. 1-9. For more information call Merita Stanley at 594-9980.Town of Westville ElectionsWESTVILLE A regular election for the Town of Westville will be held on Sept 11. The polls will open at 7 a.m. Polls are at the Westville Community Center. The positions to be led and the expiration date for these positions are as follows: Council member seat two and three, expires in 2014 and Mayor seat will expire in 2014. Those people wishing to qualify for the above ofces may do so at the ofce of the Town Clerk in the Westville Community Center, 8 a.m. to noon and 12:30-4:30 p.m. Aug. 20-24. The qualifying fee for this regular election is $25.Youth Ranch Golf TournamentPANAMA CITY The Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch Golf Tournament will take place Sept. 15 at the Panama Country Club. The monies raised from this benet will go directly to the Youth Ranch, which runs solely on donations. The Washington County Sheriffs Ofce is one of the sponsors for the golf tournament. For more information contact Andrea Gainey at 638-6115.Jacob City DayJACOB The City of Jacob has slated Sept. 15, for its Jacob City Day Celebration, which will include a parade, entertainment, food and activities for all. The festivities will start at 11 a.m. with a parade along Jackson Road. The other activities will take place at the Jacob City Park at 2254 Jacob main Street (Highway 162). Anyone desiring to be in the parade will need to contact Eula Johnson at 263-2120 on or before September 7. Booths are available to vendors; please contact Verloria T. Wilson at 263-6636 for more information.2012 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageantBONIFAY The 2012 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant sponsored by the HCHS Blue Pride Band Boosters will be held at 4 p.m., Sept. 22, at Holmes County High School. There is no residency required to enter this pageant. Girls age 4-20 and boys age 4-9 may enter. Contestant entry fee $45. If two or more siblings register in any category it will $35. All registration dates are held at Holmes County High School on Tuesday, Sept. 11 from 5-7 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 15, from 10 a.m. to noon; Late registration Tuesday, Sept. 18, from 5-7 p.m. (a $10 late fee will be added on this date). You may also turn in registration forms at BES, BMS, HCHS or by mail to: HCHS; Attn: Band Boosters; 825 West Highway 90; Bonifay, Florida 32425. If you have any questions you may contact Cindy Goodson at goodsonc@hdsb.org, or by phone or text 373-7517. Washington County Candidate ForumSUNNY HILLS On Oct. 4, we will have a candidate forum for all candidates with questions from the residents. All Washington County residents are invited to participate. Please send any questions to: Karen at kbschoen@bellsouth.net, or Chuck at shachakel@ att.netSenior Group Will be exploring the Alpine CountriesWASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will be exploring the Alpine Countries of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland on Sept. 28-Oct. 11 For more information call Merita Stanley at 594-9980.Holmes County High School Class of 1953BONIFAY Members of the Holmes County High School Class of 1953, are looking for other members of the class to let them know if they are interested in holding a 60th Class Reunion. If you are interested call Joann (Black) Scott at 763-4633, Grace (Whipple) Watson at 623-3058, or Ruth (Andrews) Bellot at 547-3452.Washington County Girls Night OutCHIPLEY The Womens Imaging Services at Northwest Florida Community Hospital, proudly present Girls Night Out, Oct. 11. The event will be held at the Washington County Ag Center in Chipley. For more information call Heather Shelby at 415-8119.Second Annual Scarecrow Contest CHIPLEY The Second Annual Scarecrow Contest, sponsored by the Chipley Garden Club, will be Oct. 13 on the lawn of the museum in conjunction with Washington County Historical Societys Fall Into History Festival with assistance from the Washington County Arts Council and Tourist Development Council.Senior Group going to the Georgia Mountain FestivalWASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will be going to the Georgia Mountain Festival Oct. 16-20. The festival will be held in Helen and in Hiawassee, Ga. For more information, call Merita Stanley at 594-9980.Senior Group to experience Christmas in BransonWASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will experience Christmas in Branson, Mo., Nov. 25 to Dec. 1. This trip will include seven shows, seven days, and six nights. For information, call Merita Stanley at 594-9980. Community EventsVENTSSpecial to ExtraWashington-Holmes Technical Center was established in 1965 with the hope that the vocational school would provide individuals with the education and training needed to obtain gainful employment and earn a living. The hope has been realized over the years as thousands of people have been trained to enter the workforce, climb the ladder of success and make positive economic contributions to our community and beyond. WHTC has provided such services by continually striving to maintain cost effective education with affordable tuition that allows students to be trained without incurring long-term debt. As Washington-Holmes Technical Center begins the celebration of its 45th birthday, they are looking back on the growth and successes of their training programs and graduates. WHTC originally opened with nine programs and has grown to the present 26 programs. Programs have come and gone over the years to meet the changing demands of the workforce. WHTC works closely with the Region 3 Workforce Board to determine the needs of business and industry and aligns training programs to meet those needs. Sixty-ve percent of the jobs by the year of 2014 will require an education past high school, but most of that training can be completed in less than two years. With so many people in our region facing unemployment and underemployment, WHTC is focusing on training programs that will allow students to complete their training in one year or less, earn an industry certication or state license and begin work in a growing career eld. In the past year, WHTC has added the Pharmacy Technician and Medical Coder/Biller to the health care training programs. The Pharmacy Technician program has graduated twelve students who already have jobs. This past year, Washington-Holmes Technical Center partnered with Chipola College and the University of West Florida to apply for a Technical Skills Training Grant from the US Labor Department. The partnership was awarded the grant and provides funds for WHTC to add two new information technology programs Applied Cybersecurity and Applied Information Technology, both of which can be completed in less than six months. Another program being considered for the upcoming year is Digital Audio Production. These new training efforts will help ensure that people from our communities have the chance to succeed in new and emerging elds and that growing businesses have access to a skilled workforce. Washington-Holmes Technical Center serves adults and teens from North Florida and neighboring areas in South Georgia and Alabama. Classes are designed to provide individualized training in class sizes that allow a more personally focused approach by instructors. WHTC utilizes a variety of educational delivery methods, including lecture, computer-assisted instruction, audio-visual instructions, hands-on learning, internships and externships and cooperative education/onthe-job training. WTHC also recognizes the challenges associated with a highly competitive job market. Programs are in place to assist students in meeting their career goals through career development training in areas such as resume writing, interview skills and essential job skills to help complete their training package. The goal is immediate placement for program completers through total empowerment of each individual. For more information about the training opportunities at WashingtonHolmes Technical Center, call 638-1180 extension 317 or visit the WHTC website at www.whtc.us. WHTC celebrates 45 years of specialized training Photos HOTOS Special PECIAL toTO EXtra TRANetworking Instructor, Bert Fravezzi with students 2008 Skills USA State Gold Medalist, Josh Straub 2010 SkillsUSA State Gold Medalist, Welding Student Chaz Scott

PAGE 15

Wednesday, August 15, 2012 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. Painting Inside or outside. Residential or commercial. Satisfaction Guarantee. Local references. 31 yrs experience. Dennis Glenn. 850-596-4143 C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Matts Removal! Garbage removal, free metal removal, yard jobs, moving jobs. We buy items. Nobody Beats My Prices! (850)547-1445, cell (850)658-2376. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 B B USINESS USINESS G G UIDE UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 18 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service! THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Dentons RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDAWE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS$ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENTMon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414Service On All Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration & Hoods638-3611 Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 2005 Yamaha Kodiak 4 wheeler, 4 WD camo w/camo cover. Excellent condition. $3600. (850)638-1072 or 260-5970. COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com(850) 547-9500 B oni f a y Florida www.xtrem ein dus tri es.com Xtreme BoatsFACTORY DIRECT 1978 Chevy El Camino 350 cubic inch Chevy engine. Four barrael Elderbock carb, glass pack muffler, automatic, streight body. $4000. OBO 850-624-1679 2002 4D Buick Century Limited Great condition, good gas mileage. Asking $3750. Call (850)381-8572 or (850)547-3474. 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $17,000, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 Mobile home for rent on 8 acres, Bonifay. 3 Bedroom, 2 full baths. Rent-$500/mo. First and last months. (850)547-2225 $33,500 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. Reduced Price! Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858. DWMH2009 3 / 2 Big tub, 1 acre, fenced three sides and garage shop, Wausau area $82,500 850-638-4953 $3,000 cash assume mtg $600+ credit-worthy. WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incld 638-1918 3BR/1.5BA for rent $650/mth. No pets. Deposit, & references required Chipley. 638-1918 For Rent: Nice Townhouse apartment. 2BR/2.5BA, one car garage in downtown Bonifay. NO PETS. Call (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586. Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Now renting studios $350 Includes city utilities & pest control. Call Tom @ (850)557-7732 Bonifays Best Mobile Home Community has 2 or 3 bedrooms available ranging from $435-$625/month. Large lots, quiet, clean and on-site maintenance. Only responsible persons should apply. Great Bonifay Schools. No pets. One month deposit. HUD Assistance may be available. Contact Sue: (850)547-1386 or (512)751-2847. 2 bdrm, 1 bath Mobile Home for Rent. $375+/mo. In Bethlehem area. References and deposit required. No pets. Call 547-9968. Text FL17886 to 56654 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-849-6842, 850-638-7315 or 638-9933. 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. Country Living (1) 2BR Mobile Home for Rent.& (1) 3BR MH. Garbarge furnished, will exter, once a mth change AC filter & mow grass in summer mths. Sorry NO Pets. Real nice big yard. For more information call Lou Corbin 638-1911 or 326-0044 Country Living -Vernon Area3/2 Doublewide $600 2/1 mobile home $450 Located 1/8 mile from City of Vernon. Electric and refuge not included. 850-866-7210 For RentDWMH 3/2 HVAC 1150 sq. ft near Bonifay $600 monthly/ incl. trash pick up. Req. 1st/last months rent, plus $250 sec deposit. No pets. 850-547-2122 FOR RENT Nice mobile home convenient location in Chipley. No Pets. 850-638-4640 8-5119 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, DIVISION: Case No.: 12-216DR ALLANNAH ALTER, Petitioner and JAMES ALTER Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE (NO CHILD OR FINANCIAL SUPPORT) TO: JAMES ALTER, Respondents last known address: UNKNOWN. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on ALLANNAH ALTER, whose address is 1076 HWY 179, BONIFAY, FL 32425 on or before AUGUST 24, 2012, and file the original with the clerk of this Court at 201 N. OKLAHOMA STREET, Bonifay, Fl. 32425 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. The action is asking the court to decide how the following real or personal property should be divided: NONE. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated July 25, 2012.. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 1, 8, 15, 22, 2012. 8-5126 PUBLIC SALE Tharp & Sons Mini Storage in Bonifay, Fl. will hold a sale for these units for non-payment of rent in accordance with the FL Statute Act 83-801-83-809. Tenants will have until August 31, 2012 to pay in full. No checks accepted. 1. Tara Maynard, Bonifay, Fl. 2. Melissa Scott, Corona, Calif. 3. Jimmie Crafton, Bonifay, Fl. 4. Unknown. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 15, 22, 2012. 8-5122 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No.: 12PR68 IN RE: Estate of BERNICE LOUISE HUGGINS, Deceased. PETITION FOR SUMMARY ADMINISTRATION NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BERNICE LOUISE HUGGINS, deceased, in the above-numbered case, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 N. Oklahoma, Bonifay, FL 32425. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is August 8, 2012. Personal Representative: Tony Alcus Huggins c/o Nancy D. OConnor, P.A. PO Box 886 Bonifay, FL 32425 Attorney for Personal Representative NANCY D. OCONNOR, P.A. Florida Bar No.: 324231. PO Box 886 Bonifay, FL 32425 850/547-7367 As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 8, 15, 2012. 8-5123 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 12-0222CA NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, PLAINTIFF, VS. DONALD W. WHITE A/K/A DONALD WHITE A/K/A DON WHITE, ET AL. DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF ACTION To: Beverly L. White a/k/a Beverly & Donald W. White a/k/a Donald White a/k/a Don White RESIDENCE: UNKNOWN. LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 1597 Highway 177, Bonifay, FL 32425 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Holmes County, Florida: COMMENCE AT THE SE CORNER OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES-47 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID PARCEL FOR A DISTANCE OF 703.69 FEET TO AN IRON ROD ON THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF HIGHWAY C-177; THENCE NORTH 58 DEGREES-37 MINUTES-56 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 200.00 FEET ALONG SAID R/W LINE TO AN IRON ROD MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 58 DEGREES-37 MINUTES-55 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 544.81 FEET ALONG SAID R/W LINE TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES-16 MINUTES-27 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 693.65 FEET ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID EAST 1/2 OF SW 1/4 TO AN IRON ROD; THENCE NORTH 84 DEGREES-59 MINUTES-41 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 549.50 FEET TO AN IRON ROD; THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES-03 MINUTES-21 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 1026.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH AND SUBJECT TO COVENANTS, EASEMENTS, AND RESTRICTIONS OF RECORD. SAID PROPERTY CONTAINS 10.0 ACRES MORE OF LESS. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action, on Gladstone Law Group, P.A., attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is 1499 W. Palmetto Park Rd, Suite 300, Boca Raton, FL 33486, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, either before 30 days or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED: June 24, 2012, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Diane Eaton, Deputy Clerk of the Court. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator, Mr. Larry Lyons at P. O. Box 1089, 301 McKenzie, Panama City, FL 32402; telephone number 850-747-5327 two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you are hearing impaired, call the Florida Relay Services at 1-800-955-8771 (TTY); if you are voice impaired, call the Florida Relay Services at 1-800-955-8770. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 8, 15, 2012. COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 Publishers Notice SCAM To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Looking for a Christian single lady over 30 for friendship. Non-smoker & drinker. Disability ok. (850)547-1445. Missing Black Male Irish Wolf Hound/ Lab Mix aprox 80lbs no collar/chip & a young male dwarf goat w/ collar. Wandered away together on Aug 8 near the Quail Hollow General Store off Orange Hill. Picture can be viewed at Craig List/ panamacity/farm&garden. Reward for their return. 850-638-0908 Pawaday Dog House has 2 New Full Time Groomers. Now Open Mon-Sat. 638-2660 Real Estate Auction, Executive Mountain Home w/Guest House & Lake on 212+/-Acres Divided, Independence, VA. 9/8/12 at 2 p.m. On Site at 1002 Saddle Creek Road, Independence, VA. Like & Online. iron Horse Auction Co. (800)977-2248. NCAL3936. VAAL580. ironhorseauction.com FOR SALE 2009 24X34 Metal Storage Building. 6 windows ,floors. $4000 Located on Campbellton Hwy near Chipley. Must move will assist. (850) 227-4578 Fri & Sat; Aug 17 & 18 8-12 1540 Lonnie Rd 5miles South of I-10. DVDs, young teen items household items, lots of misc. K&L Farm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 NOW OPEN U-Pick Grapes! Open 7 days a week 7AM-7PM 1304-A Clayton Rd., Chipley. U pick $5.00 gallon. 850-638-2624 Oakcrest Vineyard 850-638-8412 Open Mid-August U-pcik Muscadines 14 different varities 8:00am to 5:00pm Thurs-Sat Sunday 1:00pm to 5:00pm. 1082 Garner Way Chipley 273 South 1 mile passed The Industrial Park U-PICK GRAPES $4.00/Gallon (850)547-2326 Follow signs on Hwy 177A to 1837 Flowing Well Rd., Bonifay. U-Pick 7 days, daylight For Sale 120 Gallon propane gas tank, set of logs, & 2 propane heaters. In good condition. Call anytime.850-535-1623 Gilbert Catfish Pond Closed Monday and Tuesday 2854 Highview Circle Chipley, Fl 32428 Phone:850-638-8633 Heavy Duty mower for sale. Poulan Pro, 48 cut, hydrostatic drive. Like new condition. $900.00 OBO. (850)614-1139. Meet singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now (888)744-4426

PAGE 16

B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, August 15, 2012 EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE HAPPY JACK DuraSpot: latest technology in flea, tick, mosquito & mite control on dogs. Patented. At farm, feed & hardware stores. Distributed by Fuller Supply (205) 343-3341. www.happyjackinc.com Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of advertising! 120 community newspapers, 32 websites, 26 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida (866) 742-1373. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURA INSTITUTE (877)206-6559 MEDICAL CAREERS begin here -Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (888) 2033179 www. CenturaOnline.com Medical OfficeTrainees Needed! Become a Medical Office Assistant at SC Train!! No Experience needed! Online training gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888) 374-7294. Drivers/Flatbed Class A. GET HOME WEEKENDS! Southeast Regional, Earn up to 39/mi. 1 year OTR Flatbed experience required, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, LLC Wanted 2 Barbers Chipley Florida. Call 850-228-2173 AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINEfrom Home. Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com ATTN: DRIVERS Great Miles + Top 5% Pay = Money Security + Respect = PRICELESS 2 Mos CDL Class A Exp ( 877)258-8782 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Stevens Transport! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job Ready in just 15 days! (888)368-1964 Drivers 100% Owner Operator Co. Regional & Dedicated Home weekly Class A C.D.L. 1 yr. exp. in last 3 Call (800)695-9643 Now Hiring Preschool Teacher: Must be able to pass a level 2 background check. Experience is a plus but not necessary. Also looking for a cook. Apply at The Academy located at 1567 Hwy 90 Chipley. Security/Protect SvsAssistant Chief/ Fire Prevention OfficerThe City of Marianna has an Assistant Chief/ Fire Prevention Officer position. Apply at your local One Stop Career Center or call 850-718-1016 for details. EOE/Drug Free Workplace Employer Web ID#: 34220430 Text FL20430 to 56654 The Holmes County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for the position of On Call Paramedic. For application and complete job description contact Greg Barton, EMS Director at the EMS Office, Hwy. 90 East, Bonifay, FL 32425, or (850)547-4671. Please turn in updated resume & application to the EMS Director office no later than 4:00 pm on August 23, 2012. Holmes County is a Drug-Free Workplace and Equal Opportunity Employer. Drivers Refrigerated & Dry Van freight Flexible hometime. Annual Salary $45k to $60k. Quarterly Bonus. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR exp. (800)414-9569 www.driveknight.com FINANCE MANAGERJerkins, Inc. in Bonifay, FL is looking for an experienced Financial Manager. A/P, A/R, & Payroll are some of the requirements. Excel a must. Please send your resumes to: micah@jerkinsinc.com Web ID#34217662Text FL17662 to 56654 Now Accepting Applications for,cooks,servers, oyster shuckers & dishwashers. Taking applications Tues-Sat from 10am-4pm. Apply in Person by 8-25-12. Frenchs Restaurant & Oyster Bar HWY 90, Caryville, FL 850-548-5800 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By Bridget Quigg Imagine the following scenario. S omeone asks you how work is going and y ou say, Not bad. The pay is great and t he stress is manageable. According to r esearch from online salary database P ayScale.com, that could be your reality if y ou choose one of the following well-paying j obs where workers report below-average l evels of stress. PayScale.com collects salary and job i nformation from employees around the c ountry and has found the most enviable g igs are typically knowledge-based and r equire highly specialized training and e ducation. Being smart at something really helps y ou feel happy, says Katie Bardaro, lead r esearch analyst at PayScale.com. The m ore preparation you put into a career, the m ore you can define your career, such as b eing able to set your schedule and your t asks. She adds that not having the pressure o f being a cog in the machine alleviates s ome stress. It seems that being able to w alk into a room and command everyones a ttention as you share your expertise m akes you less likely to crave that sixth c up of coffee. Perhaps the promise of a career like t his will inspire you to get the degree or a dditional job training you need to land one of these five high-paying, low-stress jobs.1. Optometrist Median annual salary $99,200Good attention to detail and a strong background in the sciences help optometrists diagnose vision problems, prescribe vision-correcting eyewear and help manage eye diseases such as glaucoma. In addition to earning a bachelors degree and doctorate, optometrists must pass state and national exams. After all that, apparently, they are pretty happy. Job prospects are excellent, with 24 percent job growth expected through 2018, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).2. Materials scientist Median annual salary $90,600Synthetic fibers, lubricants, leakproof materials these are a few of the products created by materials scientists. They need strong chemistry backgrounds and at least a bachelors degree to get started. Those holding a Ph.D. often specialize in areas such as analytical chemistry or polymer chemistry. 3. Economist Median annual salary $85,600Economists pay attention to the distribution of goods and resources. They might focus on money, natural resources or other valuables, and often work to predict future outcomes. Those with a Ph.D. fare best in what can be a very competitive job market. You have to be willing to produce plenty of reports and analyses based on hours of number crunching. The government employs the majority of economists, according to the BLS.4. Aeronautical engineer Median annual salary $82,800Who would not feel inspired working on the wonder of flight every day? From lowering aircraft weight and fuel needs to improving safety, aeronautical engineers spend a lot of time rethinking and improving how we travel through the air. Aeronautical engineers typically have a bachelors degree to start, but many earn masters degrees and pass both licensing and professional advancement exams.5. User experience designer Median annual salary $79,100User experience (UX) designers optimize any experience where humans interact with objects, such as board games, ATMs and cars. For example, in a world where almost anyone can create a website in hours, leading companies often hire UX designers to make their site more attractive and easy to use. UX designers come from a variety of disciplines, including psychology, industrial design and anthropology. I work on projects just as they start or even initiate the project myself, says Mike Bibik, a senior UX designer in Seattle. This affords (me) a greater amount of influence, and I am not dealing with the stress of project decisions or directions with which I disagree.5 high-paying, low-stress jobs Featured Jobs To Place An Employment Here Please Contact Lorna Brown Phone: (850) 747-5019 Email: lbrown@pcnh.com Like Us On Facebook: www.facebook.com/emcoastjobs Or Follow Us on Twitter: @emcoastjobs