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Holmes County times-advertiser
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100549/00172
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Title: Holmes County times-advertiser
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
Place of Publication: Bonifay, FL
Publication Date: 08-01-2012
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50 www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM IN BRIEF bonifaynow.com Connect With Us 24/7 Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo galleries, opinions and more... @WCN_HCT And Mobile Too Volume 122, Number 16 Wednesday, August 1 2012 Pd. Pol.Adv. paid for and approved by Kyle Hudson, Dem. Holmes Co. Clerk of Court Elect Kyle I will your vote in the August August August Primary I will I will I will I will appreciate Tax collector, commissions District 5 seat to be decided Aug. 14 By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Holmes County voters will decide several contests in the primary election scheduled for Aug. 14. The biggest eld of contenders vying for a county of ce is that of the Holmes County Clerk of Court of ce, where seven candidates are seeking election. Only the Democratic Clerk of Court candidates Kyle Hudson, Lee Moss and Zachary R. White will face off in the primary election. The sole Republican candidate, Don W. Hersman Jr., and the two candidates running with no party af liation, John King Jr., Timothy H. Wells and Marsha Farmer Sherrouse will face the Democratic winner in November. Incumbent Holmes County Baker makes bid for School Board seat From Staff Reports BONIFAY Wilburn G. Baker of Westville has announced his candidacy for the Holmes County School Board, District 2 position. For me its the satisfaction of helping our children become successful leaders in Holmes Bell aims for re-election as tax collector From Staff Reports BONIFAY Harry Bell has announced his plans to seek re-election as Holmes County tax collector. Bell said in a news release that he has been honored and blessed with the trust the citizens of Holmes County beDennis Lee eyes reclaiming sheriffs of ce From Staff Reports BONIFAY Dennis Lee announced his candidacy for the Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce. A Republican, Lee served as Holmes County Sheriff from 1996-2008. During that time, Lee and his staff were responsible for the Wells running for Holmes Clerk of Court From Staff Reports BONIFAY Bonifay attorney Tim Wells has announced his candidacy for the of ce of clerk of the circuit court for Holmes County. With the upcoming retirement of both Cody Taylor and his chief deputy, theres Marell seeks commissions District 5 seat From Staff Reports BONIFAY Local business owner and Bonifay resident Kristen Marell has announced her candidacy for the Holmes County Commissioner District 5 seat. Marell and her husband Primary crucial to candidates EARLY VOTING Early voting for the 2012 Primary Election begins Saturday, Aug. 4, from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the Supervisor of Elections of ce, in the basement of the Holmes County Courthouse. Early voting also will be 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 5. For the rest of the week, Aug. 6-11, ballots may be cast from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 2012 VOTERS GUIDE Be sure to read the 2012 Holmes County Voters Guide in this edition of the Holmes County TimesAdvertiser. INSIDE TODAY Find your precincts voting location. Page A2 HARRY BELL TIM WELLS WILBURN BAKER DENNIS LEE KRISTEN MARELL INDEX Opinion ................................ A4 Outdoors .............................. A6 Sports .................................. A7 Extra .................................... B1 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B7 Phone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 ELECTION 2012 See WELLS A2 See MARELL A2 See LEE A2 See BELL A2 See BAKER A2 See PRIMARY A2 Seventh-Day Adventist Church Yard Sale BONIFAY The Bonifay Seventh-Day Adventist Church across from Docs Market will have a yard sale starting at 7 a.m. Thursday. The funds raised will help purchase school supplies for local students. Bonifay Middle School orientation BONIFAY Orientation for the 2012-13 school year will be in the Bonifay Middle School Cafeteria a follows: Aug. 15, fth grade at 8:30 a.m. and sixth grade at 10 a.m.; Aug. 16, seventh grade at 8:30 a.m. and eighth grade at 10 a.m. Bonifay Saints sign-ups BONIFAY Bonifay Saints, also known as See BRIEF A8 Going down that long road, its dark and dreary. Been going so long, stressed, tired and weary. Drank, did some drugs and bar hopped with the best, Never took time for Jesus, to kick back and rest. Been in that dark place so very long. Was hard to convince me I was in the wrong. Was convinced that there was this life, nothing more. No time for Jesus, just try and Ill show you the door. Convinced it was to just go into eternal sleep, Somehow the Spirit slowly into my mind did creep. It brought me to my knees and broke my heart, Made me realize, I was going to Hell, I had a good start. Go to church, sitting there, I could hardly wait, Invitation time, down the aisle like a bull out of the gate. My life to my savior, I committed my soul, I gave Him my all, mind, body, being, the whole. The peace that came and washed over me, Opened my eyes, now I can plainly see. The road I was on, seems it was long ago, The road is for and to Jesus, I want you all to know. I look back and think about myself, foolish and dumb, How God kept me alive many times as I tried to succumb. I now realize for everything theres a purpose to be had, Hell take the meanest old sinner and make good from the bad. CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser David Bruner, paralyzed after a car accident in 1996, nds strength in inspirational poetry. Bruner is pictured with mother, Maveen Bruner.

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Local A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, August 1, 2012 HOLMES COUNTY PRECINCT LOCATIONS Sheriff Tim Brown and chal lenger Dennis Lee will face each other in the Republican primary on Aug. 14, and the winner of that contest will go on face John Braxton Jr., who has no party afliation, in the November General Election. In the race for Holmes County property appraiser, Democrat Otis Corbin Jr. is competing with Republican Felecia Fisanick. Because neither candidate faces op position from within their own party, both will move on to the General Election. The job of county tax col lector is being sought by two Democrats Harry Bell and Fran Fuller resulting in one of the two local universal primary contests. If all candidates for an of ce have the same party af liation and the winner will have no opposition in the General Election, then all qualied voters, regardless of party afliation, may vote in the primary elections for that ofce. These contests are called universal primary contests, according to the Santa Rosa County Supervi sor of Elections website, san tarosa..gov. The outcome of the prima ry will determine the winner of the election, although it is very possible there could be run-off elections required. The race for county com missioner, District 5, is the other universal primary in Holmes County. Five Demo crats are vying for the Dis trict 5 seat: Kristen Marell, J. Wayne Marsh, Ron Monk Jr., Bill Parish and Harold Smith. In the District 1 county commissioner race, there is a trio of Republicans, Charles Chuck Aronhalt, Stephen Herrington III and Bobby Sasnett, facing off in the pri mary. The sole Democrat, Jim King, will face the winner of the Republican primary in November. Likewise in District 3, Re publicans Jerry Cooley and David Whitaker will face each other in the primary, with the winner going on to face Democrat Phillip Music in November. The superintendent of schools race has two Demo crats, Buddy Lee Brown and Eddie Dixon, facing each other in the primary with the winner taking on Republican Terry Mears in November. The county school board, District 2 and District 4 rac es are nonpartisan and may be decided during the Pri mary Election, barring any run-offs. Contestants for the school board, District 2 seat include Wilburn G. Baker, Debbie Kolmetz and Andrea Schiller. School board District 4 contestants are Shay McCor mick and Shirley Owens. Countys future, Baker said. If I can help one child do better in his or her studies, it would all be worth it. Oftentimes, it is just lis tening and providing resources, guidance and support to a child to make all of the difference of whether or not he or she fails or succeeds. Baker was an instructor at Chipola College for 20 years and served as Holmes County EMS director for 24 years and as a paramedic. He is a certied re safety inspector and certi ed reghter and is a state of Florida grant selection team member Baker has been involved with the welfare of children in the Holmes County School System for more than 30 years, he said, and he is a lifelong resident of Holmes County. He said he has 35 years experience in health care, safety, administration bud gets and grants. If elected, I plan to be on sight and available to listen to and address the concerns of Holmes County students, par ents and teachers, he said. I have worked closely with the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners for over 30 years and have gained much from my experience that will be helpful if elected to the School Board ofce. I have always been a hard worker, and will continue to work had for you if elected. I will be accessible to talk with students, parents and teachers to listen to their concerns and ideas, Bak er said. There is no I in team, and working together, everyone achieves more. stowed upon him in August and November 2004 and 2008. Bell said his No. 1 mission has been to be fully accessible to the public and to be dedicated to knowledgeable, efcient and friendly service. Bell has created partnerships with the Florida Division of Driver Licenses and made numerous upgrades and restructuring of the tax collector ofce to maximize efcient man agement of public funds with the highest level of service, he said. Bell has a bachelors degree from Troy University-Dothan in business administration. He is a graduate of the Florida School of Banking and a graduate of Floridas Tax Collector Certica tion Program-Certied Florida Collector. Bell said he continues to serve in the community as a vol unteer, member and a requested speaker at various clubs and or ganizations throughout Holmes County. Bell is the son of Harry and Margaret Bell of Marianna. His wife of 26 years is Sandra George Bell, daughter of Glen and Betty George of Bonifay. They have three children: Zac, age 22; Nic, age 18; and Cassie, age 14. Zac currently attends college. Nic is a 2012 high school graduate and is preparing to serve a two-year church mission; Cassie attends school in Holmes County. The family attends church in Bonifay at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. I believe that everyone must be treated fairly, honestly, with professionalism and most im portantly kindness, Bell said. Serving the citizens of Holmes County has been an honor and privilege to provide friendly and proven service. Please come by your ofce and allow us to dem onstrate our commitment to service. most drug arrests in Holmes County history, Lee said in a news release. Lee said more than $300,000 in drug forfeitures was put to use fighting crime in Holmes County. A nationally recognized war on meth, education pro grams for children and citizens of all ages and personal super vision of every major crime scene in the county were all features of his tenure in office, Lee said. A fifth-generation Holmes County resident, Lee and his family reside in the Bethlehem community. He and his wife, Leesa (Manning), have four children and two grandchil dren. They attend Carmel As sembly of God. Lee has 28 years of law en forcement experience. Serv ing as your sheriff was (my) childhood dream, he said. Believing that the job of sheriff is a job, not a position, Lee worked his way up from dispatcher/jailer to road deputy, holding each position at the po lice department as well, finally serving as Bonifay Police Chief from 1989-1996 and Holmes County Sheriff from 1996-2008. Lee said he is running to finish the job he and his staff started, because he believes Holmes County is worth fighting for. If elected, Lee promises a highly trained, highly effective and highly supervised sheriffs department that will communi cate with the people. A well-informed and educat ed public is the best backup law enforcement can have when it comes to combating crime, Lee said. Citizens have a right to know what is going on in their communities. By using grant money and alternate funding sources, Lee said he plans to maximize the budget without sacrificing the safety of Holmes Countians for political gain. Each citizen deserves to be treated with respect and dig nity, Lee said. I believe in an open-door policy and welcome your questions, concerns and suggestions. own and manage a local business, Cross Country Ex terminators, which has served Holmes County for more than 37 years. Since leaving my in surance career, managing and budgeting our business has been a huge learning process for me, especially during our tough economy, Marell said in a news release. A resident of Florida since 1977, Marell has been a Hol mes County resident for 30 years. She was raised in the campsites in Gritney and now resides in Bonifay. She has lived at her residence on High way 177A since 1994. Marell and her husband, Eric, have been married for 18 years, and they have two sons, Cole, 14 and Bradly, 6. Marell graduated from Hol mes County High School in 1992 and continued her edu cation in health care, insur ance and financial planning, business management and accounting. Holmes County needs lead ership for growth and strength in our communities and coun ty, Marell said. We also need new management for our county. With my proven lead ership, and my experience in business management, I know Im the right person for the job of your county commissioner. As your County Commis sioner, I promise to represent the people of Holmes County professionally and with re spect. I will make it a priority to be available to listen and ad dress the concerns and issues of all people of Holmes County, not just District 5. I will work with the board to make pru dent decisions, and I will work the full four years you elect me for. Holmes County Commis sioners are your local govern ment. The decisions made by our county commissioners are crucial for our county. By elect ing me, I will be honest, trust worthy, dependable, and strong enough to make the crucial de cisions our county needs. almost 80 years of knowledge walking out the door, Wells said in a news release. The new clerk will have to hit the ground running, and will now have to do the job with a small er budget, since the July 1 leg islative cuts. As an attorney for over 26 years, I have the expe rience to allow a smooth transi tion into ofce and the desire to keep the well-trained staff al ready in place and continue the efcient service of the clerks ofce. The clerks ofce is busy every day of the year, Wells said. County bills and employ ees have to be paid, court lings and public records must be pro cessed correctly and on time, and the privacy of non-public records must be maintained. With my legal background, I have a unique understanding of the court system which no other candidate has. In addition to a 22-year law practice, Wells has worked at various times as a prosecutor, public defender, assistant attor ney general and FDOT senior attorney. He has been involved in the community as a 23-year member and past president of the Bonifay Kiwanis Club, a 21-year member and past VP of the Chamber of Commerce and current vice-chair of the Development Commission. He has also worked with Teen Court as judge and trainer, been a literacy volunteer and taught criminal justice courses for both Chipola College and Washington-Holmes Technical Center. Tim Wells has been mar ried for more than 25 years to his wife, Debbie, and they have three children, Laura, Julie and Perry II. The family has lived near Esto for more than 20 years on property originally purchased by Tims great-grandfather. BAKER from page A1 BELL from page A1 LEE from page A1 MARELL from page A1 WELLS from page A1 Precinct 1 (Ponce de Leon) Ponce de Leon Town Hall 1580 Highway 90 Ponce de Leon, FL 32455 Precinct 2 (Pine Log) Pine Log Volunteer Fire Dept. 1652 N. Highway 81 Westville, FL 32464 Precinct 3 (New Hope) New Hope Volunteer Fire Dept. 1243 Highway 179A Westville, FL 32464 Precinct 4 (Bethlehem) Bethlehem School Choral Suite 2767 Highway 160 Bonifay, FL 32425 Precinct 5 (Gritney) Gritney Volunteer Fire Dept. 2141 Tobe Retherford Road Bonifay, FL 32425 Precinct 6 (Noma) Noma Community Center 3467 Skipper Ave. Bonifay, FL 32425 Precinct 7 (West Bonifay) Holmes County Agriculture Center 1173 E. Highway 90 Bonifay, FL 32425 Precinct 8 (East Bonifay) Holmes County Agriculture Center 1173 E. Highway 90 Bonifay, FL 32425 PRIMARY from page A1

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 Wednesday, August 1, 2012 From Staff Reports WAUSAU The rst whiff of Possum Festival was in the air Saturday night as the annual Miss Fun Day Pageant was held at the Wausau Possum Palace. The pageant had numerous young ladies turn out to compete for Miss Fun Day titles and a few young men were even brave enough to vie for the Mr. Fun Day King title. Madison Carter was named 2012 Miss Fun Day and most photogenic and Miranda Odom was rst runner-up in the Miss Fun Day competition. Other titles included: The 2012 Miss Tiny Baby Fun Day was Haven Austin Mathis, Most Photogenic winner was Laura Elizabeth Yates, 2nd Runner-Up was Avery Grace Kirkland and 1st Runner-up Payten Brianne Joyner. Mr. Fun Day King was Bentley Arries Paul Locke. First Runner-Up was Brandon Miller. Little Baby Fun Day was Addison Grace Chance, while 1st Runner-Up went to Palyn Jayne Byers and 2nd Runner-Up and Most Photogenic was Faith Elizabeth Ann Russell. Miss Tiny Tot Fun Day was Amaya Brunson. The 2nd Runner-Up was Macie Riley, and 1st Runner-Up and Most Photogenic was Kinley Kristene Kirkland. Little Miss Fun Day 2012 and Most Photogenic winner was Hanna Elaine Duke, and 2nd Runner-Up Alexia Flowers and 1st Runner-Up Jeanna Raquael Johnson. Junior Miss Fun Day was Abby Renee McKenzie, while 2nd Runner-Up was Ashley Feldman, Most Photogenic went to Billie LeAnn Goodman, and 1st RunnerUp was Sara Kingsley Scott. Miss Pre-Teen Fun Day was Isabella Flowers, and 2nd Runner-Up was Sara Catherine Padgett. Most Photogenic went to Marissa White, and 1st Runner-Up was Alyssa Marie Willey. Miss Teen Fun Day winner was Kayla Anne Rudd, while 2nd Runner-Up went to Ericka Marie Adams, and 1st Runner-Up and Most Photogenic was Rebecca Lynn Williams. The 43rd annual Wausau Possum Festival begins at 6 p.m. Friday with the annual Possum King & Queen Contest. Saturday is the annual Fun Day and is no admission charge. The day kicks off with the Wausau Masonic Lodge pancake breakfast at 6 a.m. At 7:30 a.m. the Possum Trot 5K Run/Walk in downtown Wausau starts, and at 9 a.m. the Invocation and Welcome at the Possum Palace of cially opens the event. From 9:45 to 10:30 a.m. Musician Billy Lipford will be performing at the Possum Palace. At 10 a.m. the Fun Day Parade will be held downtown and the music continues from 10:30 to 11 a.m. with the Parish Family. The Cornpone baking contest will be held at 11 a.m. From 11:20 to noon Big Bend Bluegrass will perform and from noon to 12:10 the ag raising and National Anthem will be performed at the Possum Palace. The Possum Auction and Quilt Auction will be held from 12:10 to 12:45 p.m. at the Palace followed by special guest speakers until 1:15 p.m. The Parish Family returns to perform from 1:15 until 2 p.m., then from 2 to 2:30 p.m. the Sack Races and Greasy Pole contest will be held. Billy Lipford returns to perform from 2 to 2:45 p.m., followed by Big Bend Bluegrass from 2:45 to 3:15 p.m. From 3:15 to 4:15 p.m. the Hog Callin, Rooster Crowin for kids at will be held. Events conclude with the Hog Callin Contest for adults at the Palace from 4:15 to 5:15 p.m. Northwest Florida Community Hospital FAIR Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012 9am-Noon FREE A DMI SS IO N for school-age children and families Washington County Health Dept. IMMUN I ZAT I ON CL I N IC For school age children 9am-Noon 9am-Noon Washington County Health Dept. Washington County Health Dept. Washington County Health Dept. Washington County Health Dept. Washington County Health Dept. We Treat You Like Family better than (850) 638-1610 Free Haircuts NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." www.mulliseye.com Chipley Office We are located directly across the parking lot from the Walmart in Chipley "W E W E LCOM E N EW PATI EN TS, C ALL T ODAY F OR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TM EN T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley Office Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 8-31-12 FREE E Y E EX AM COD E: W C 00 T odd R obinson, M D Board C ertified Eye Physician and C ataract S urgeon L ee M ullis, M D Board C ertified Eye Physician and C ataract S urgeon NOTICE The City of Bonifay Council would like to apologize to David Guthrie for the misleading statement that he had not been paying his City utility bills. The remark was referring to the water and sewer impact and tap fees NOT his monthly bills. Photos by RANDAL SEYLER | Times-Advertiser Left: Haven Mathis was named Miss Tiny Baby Fun Day. Haven is the daughter of Jeremy and Jessica Mathis of Sand Hills. Above: Jadeyn Popp, left, looks on as Alexia Flowers, second from left, is named 2nd runner-up and Hanna Duke, center, is named 2012 Little Miss Fun Day at Wausau on Saturday night. Also pictured is Michelle Miller at right. Little Miss Fun Day contestants were 4 to 6 years old. Possum Festival begins Friday Above: Payten Joyner gets a lift on her way to winning 1st RunnerUp in the 2012 Miss Tiny Baby Fun Day Pageant. By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com VERNON Over one year later, the city of Vernon is prepared to move forward with the long-awaited water and sewer project. The city council approved the engineering agreements for both the Community Development Block Grant Water system improvement and the State Revolving Fund Sewer line project on Monday. The city has been in need of replacing and expanding their sewer and water system for quite some time and with the widening of State Road 79 the project has been delayed that much more. Steps are being taken to insure that this project proceeds at a steady pace, said Grant Writer Nolan Baker. The CDBG Water system improvement engineering agreement is allowing Baker to set out the bid for the project and the SRF Sewer line project engineering agreement is to go forward with designing the project. Before the meeting began there was a moment of silence for the recently departed City Council Member Oscar Ward. He will be greatly missed by both the city hall and in the city of Vernon, said Mayor Michelle Cook. He will be missed by all. The council approved allowing a basketball tournament to be held on Aug. 11 at the Vernon City Hall gym. The council also approved of writer Brent Heards request to become an honorary citizen of Vernon, Fla. His request stated that he has many fond memories of Vernon and that his newest book would be entitled Postcards from Vernon. Vernon to proceed with water, sewer project The pageant had numerous young ladies turn out to compete for Miss Fun Day titles and a few young men were even brave enough to vie for the Mr. Fun Day King title.

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Opinion A4 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com 1-800-645-8688 ADVERTISING 850-547-9414 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2012, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. A friend of mine, who isnt nearly as old as I am, said the other day, I think its just hotter than it used to be. I hear that a lot in these miserably hot days of July and August, and sometimes I am tempted to believe that global warming is being felt here in the deep South. But in truth, its probably no hotter than its ever been, though I believe the reports that some of the great glaciers are melting. But I told my friend Paula that I think its the air conditioning that has so spoiled us that we cant tolerate the heat like we used to. I can remember plenty of nights even as a child, that I couldnt sleep because of the heat. Our mama called our home a hull of a house. One man wrote in The Heritage of Holmes County that their home was a cull of a house. We could have called ours that too. Until I was in my early teens, we had no screens on the windows. I told Paula that, and she couldnt believe folks lived like that in my lifetime. At least we did have glass windows. I knew a few houses in our community that had wooden shutters. Well, I told her we didnt quite live on Gods Little Acre, but we werent too far from Tobacco Road. We got screens on the windows when my dad picked up a hitch-hiker, which he frequently did in those years of the Great Depression. After spending one night in our house, the man made my dad a proposition. If Daddy would buy the materials, hed stay on and build the screens for just room and board. After that, Mr. Wagner hit the road, and we never heard from him again. Sometimes on those hot muggy nights, wed go out on the front porch and sleep on the cotton that was piled there waiting to get a bail to take to the gin. I cant say that was any more comfortable as the mosquitoes had a field day on you there, too; the cotton was sometimes still warm from having come in from the field in late afternoon; and the stickers from the pieces of burrs hidden in the fluffy stuff made for a lumpy bed. We never got electricity until I was almost out of high school, so obviously we had no electric fans. Grandma Wells always had a hand fan by her bed to fan herself to sleep. They were good, too, for shooing off mosquitoes and gnats. During the day, people just sweated a lot. We kids would draw up a wash tub of well water and jump in and out of it if we got a chance to cool off between farm chores. Sometimes wed all hop on the pick-up truck and make a quick run to the creek before evening chores. Most of the time there was no break between afternoon and evening chores. Even when we built our home in 1959-60, central air conditioning was not standard in our price range. We had a huge window fan, which wed used in the old house (The Tison old home where my husband grew up). Since it didnt fit in the windows of our new house, wed set it in the hall and cool the bedrooms at night. Our son got so used to the noise that hed run it in the closet in the winter so he could sleep. Whoever invented window screening made a huge step in protecting southern homes from mosquitoes that caused such diseases as malaria and yellow fever as well as equine encephalitis. The fevers have pretty much been eliminated with better swamp drainage, window screening and other means of mosquito control. Encephalitis is always a threat, especially in the dog days of summer, and we are warned to take precautions to protect ourselves by (1) wearing protective clothing,(2) wearing mosquito repellant, (3) getting rid of places, such as empty containers, flower pots, etc., that harbor mosquito larvae and (4) staying indoors around twilight. Dr. John Gorie of Apalachicola who invented the ice machine and led to the invention of air conditioning probably has had more impact on the way we live than any invention of modern times. In fact, he was seeking to keep his patients cool when he invented a way to make ice. Thank you to Dr. John Gorie and whoever invented screen wire. Is it getting hotter, or is it me? HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison Wednesday, August 1, 2012 Although the official back to school date is still a few weeks away, I heard an interesting talk Sunday about children and their development, based on research by the Search Institute. The Rev. Darby Neptune was speaking at Unity of Panama City on the 40 developmental assets for adolescents and how these metrics can predict the success, or lack of success, in youth. I am not a real big believer in, well, anything much less sociological mumbojumbo mixed in with a bunch of statistics, but the survey from the Search Institute was interesting in that the assets it surveyed included eight basic topics, broken down into two groups internal assets and external assets. The external assets were identified as support, empowerment, boundaries and expectations and constructive use of time. The Internal Assets were commitment to learning, positive Values, social competencies and positive identity. The eight assets are further divided into 20 internal and 20 external subcategories. On one level, the 40 developmental assets represent everyday wisdom about positive experiences and characteristics for young people, states on the website, searchinstitute.org. For example, under the external assets support heading, students were asked to rate topics such as family support, positive family communication, other adult relationships, caring neighborhood, caring school climate and parent involvement in schooling. Children responded on a survey indicating how much, or how little, of these influences were in their lives. In addition, Search Institute research has found that these assets are powerful influences on adolescent behaviorboth protecting young people from many different problem behaviors and promoting positive attitudes and behaviors. This power is evident across all cultural and socioeconomic groups of youth. There is also evidence from other research that assets have the same kind of power for younger children. Nearly 150,000 youth, grades six to 12, from 202 different communities across the U.S. were surveyed in 2003, and it was found that more of the assets that the children said they had in their lives, the less likely they were to engage in highrisk behavior, such as problem alcohol use, violence, illicit drug use or sexual activity. According to the website, the same kind of impact is evident with many other problem behaviors, including tobacco use, depression and attempted suicide, antisocial behavior, school problems, driving and alcohol and gambling. The Rev. Darby said she was living in Winter Park, Fla., when she first heard of the Search Institute research and the communitys dismay when their affluent children barely scored higher than the national average of 18.3 assets. Neptune said 18 was the national average, and Winter Park scored 18.6. The number 18 was important, because, according to the research, students who scored 21 or high were dramatically less likely to get into trouble or drop out of school. Having more assets, according to the report, also mean the chances increased that the young people would have positive attitudes and behaviors. Many of the external assets deal not just with the childrens immediate family, but with their whole community schools, churches, neighbors and adults. Children who find their community respects them and treats them as valued community members become valued community members. Those who do not feel connected to their communities suffer, and as a result, the community suffers. The Rev. Darbys advice was simple. Treat children with respect, and communicate with them. Typically adults shun children sometimes even their own children but the more engaged and accepted a child is by his community, the more he wants to be a part of the community, not a problem. In the end, it seems, at least according to the Search Institutes research, it really may take a village to raise a child. Whod have thunk it? It really does take a village RANDAL SEYLER Editor Study indicates 40 developmental assets that predict a childs success To my beloved Bonifay: Just wanted to send out a thanks to everyone here in Bonifay. I have been back down here since October of 2005, and you guys have been good to me from my church family over at West Bonifay Baptist, to my doctors and nurses and to all the friends I have made in the community, either from being neighbors or running into you while I have been out and about walking. To everyone who has ever stopped when seeing me walking to offer me a ride, I appreciate it. That is one thing I love about small towns. Everyone knows everyone, and when one is down the rest of the community steps up to help. But I am now about to head back to the city, Tucson, Ariz., to be exact, and I just wanted to take a moment and let all on you know how much I appreciated you hospitality and also wanted to pass on a tip to anyone who may be going through a rough time or struggling with a tough decision. Try getting out and walking, either early in the morning (5 a.m. or so) or later in the evening (8 p.m. or so) and just walk down to a spot that isnt right off a main road and just sit and listen to natures music and enjoy the portraits in the sky. I have never found anything so relaxing. I like to pick a sport that is a good 15 to 20 minute walk away from my house, and I would sing songs to my self as I walked, and when I got there I would just sit and listen. And before long, I would be relaxed, and my head would be clear. For anyone who knows me and would like to keep in touch, my email is at the bottom of this letter. Take care, and God bless. Kevin L. Sexton Bonifay braven1978@yahoo.com LETTER TO THE EDITOR

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 Wednesday, August 1, 2012 CHIPLEY The Chipley Ki wanis Club met for its weekly luncheon at Pattillos Restau rant at the WashingtonHolmes County Technical Center. The guest speaker for the lunch was Jim Appleman, for mer State Attorney for the 14th Judicial Circuit. Appleman was the state attorney for our area for 16 years. His remarks were non-political as he ex plained how the judicial system in Florida operates. Following is a summary of Applemans explanation. The judicial process is initi ated when a complaint is filed, which can be filed by either law enforcement personnel or a resident. Once filed, law enforcement will investigate and try to determine if there is probable cause to believe that a crime has been committed and who committed the crime. Once probable cause has been determined, law enforcement will arrest the individual or in dividuals suspected of a crime. One notable exception to prob able cause is in the case of do mestic violence. If investigating domestic violence, law enforce ment is compelled to remove at least one of the parties to the violence, even if unable to de termine probable cause. The reason for this is that if one of the parties is not removed, the domestic violence usually begins anew upon the departure of law enforcement. Removal of at least one party protects both parties. When arrested a suspect is confined to a jail. His first ap pearance before a judge, appro priately called First Appear ance, is simply to determine if the suspect is a risk for flight or will show in court when re quired. To determine this, the judge considers the charges, the defendant, the defendants past history and whether or not the defendant can afford an at torney. Depending upon the cir cumstances, a suspect may be released, may be released after posting bail or may be ordered held in jail. First Appearance makes no attempt to evalu ate the validity of the charges, but simply to assess the risk of flight of the defendant. Only after First Appearance does the state attorneys office become involved. The state at torney, or one of his deputies, will meet with law enforcement to evaluate the case. If there ap pears insufficient evidence to go forward with a trial, the state attorneys office has the discre tion to dismiss the charges. If the state attorneys office and law enforcement find there is sufficient reason and evidence to proceed, the state attorney files for information, the for mal document that may result in a trial. The defendant is then arraigned and given the infor mation the state has against him or her, and the judge makes a determination (again) as to whether or not the defendant can afford an attorney or should be assigned a public defender (lawyer). Both the State Attorneys Of fice and the Public Defenders Office are funded through tax revenue. Once a defense lawyer has been hired or assigned the pro cess of Discovery begins. The state attorneys office must turn over to the defense any evidence that they possess concerning the case. The defense lawyer(s) and the state attorney meet to dis cuss the case to see if it should be resolved without going to trial. In Florida, the victim of the crime is also involved in this process. Depending upon the suspected crime, the evidence, and the defendant, the state at torney and defense may agree to a plea deal which avoids a timely and costly trial. In a plea deal, the defendant agrees to plead guilty in exchange for any one or combination of reduced charges, probation or a reduced sentence. The presiding judge has the final approval authority over any plea deal. Of note, in Discovery the state must turn over to the de fense all information it has per taining to the case. The defense does not need to give the state all information it possesses, but it must inform the state of all witnesses it intends to call and the state has the right to depose (question) all potential defense witnesses before the trial. As opposed to the federal system, the Florida system seeks to avoid any surprises by either the state or the defense during the trial. In Florida, as in all of the United States, a defendant has a right to a trial by a jury com posed of peers; the right to cross examine all witnesses; and the right to not testify against oneself. Appleman informed the club that most cases are resolved through some sort of plea bar gain. A small percentage go to trial. This saves the state time and money. It costs Florida about $50 per day in operating costs to keep a person in jail. This does not include the cost of building the jail or prison. The Kiwanis club meets Tuesdays at Patillos restau rant in the middle of the WHTC campus at noon. For an invita tion, contact any Kiwanian or call David Solger, membership chairperson, at 850-638-1276. For more information about the Kiwanis Club of Chipley, vis it www.ChipleyKiwanis.com. Special To The News TALLAHASSEE In conjunction with the 22nd anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Governors Commission on Jobs for Floridians with Disabilities released its premier 2012 annual report recently. As we work to make Florida the best place for businesses to create pri vate-sector jobs, we must also be sure that those persons with disabilities who want to work have the opportunity to do so, Gov. Rick Scott said. Having a job adds to any persons dignity and purpose and opens doors to indepen dence, which is especially important for Floridians with disabilities. Gov. Scott created the Commis sion through Executive Order 11-161 to study and nd ways to address the dis parity in employment for persons with disabilities relative to the general pop ulation. Charged by the executive order to provide public policy solutions and strategies to the Governor and state policymakers, the Commission pro vides three primary recommendations to serve as initial steps for advancing job and employment opportunities for Floridians with disabilities: The Commission recommends streamlining information and identi fying a single-point of contact for em ployers so they can easily navigate the disability system and expand their pool of qualied candidates. The Commission recommends the development of a long-term commu nications plan for the state to promote awareness among employers in order to address misperceptions of persons with disabilities. The Commission determined per sons with disabilities need to be given as many rsthand experiences as pos sible to participate and compete in the workforce. The Commission recom mends state policymakers, business leaders, and community partners pro mote and utilize internship and work experience opportunities for individu als with disabilities as a key tool to improving perceptions and addressing the employment disparity confronting these individuals. The Commission will continue to hold periodic meetings around the state to seek input from employers in order to better understand how the state can assist businesses in estab lishing a corporate culture that is en thusiastic about hiring persons with disabilities. The goal is to fulll Governor Scotts top priority to ensure all Floridians are able to gain employment. Special to the News CHIPLEY The Spanish Trail Playhouse presents An Evening of Southern Gospel at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 18, The performance will be held at the His toric Chipley High School Theatre, home of the Spanish Trail Playhouse. The program features many of the re gions top Christian vocalists and musicians. The artists scheduled to perform are Trish Brannon, Rachel Webb, Rosalyn Scott, Terri Garrett, Leah Page and A.D. Davis, all from Chipley. Others include Sonny and Linda Morris of Eufaula, Ala.; Rhonda and Shelby Lewis from Panama City; and Crossroads Quartet of Chipley. The stage band members include A.D. Davis, drums; Scotty French, lead guitar; Emory Wells, acoustic guitar; Kirk Thomp son, bass guitar and MC; Doug Salter, piano; and Jimmy Miller, pedal steel guitar, banjo and dobro. This is a fundraising event for The Span ish Trail Playhouse. Doors open at 6 p.m. and advanced tickets are on sale at the Washing ton County Public Library. Tickets will be available at the door the day of show. All tickets are general admis sion $10. Location: Spanish Trail Playhouse, 680 2nd Street, Chipley. Former State Attorney talks judicial system to Kiwanis Playhouse plans an Evening of Southern Gospel Commission releases report on jobs for those with disabilities Having a job adds to any persons dignity and purpose and opens doors to independence, which is especially important for Floridians with disabilities. Gov. Rick Scott AP Special to the Times-Advertiser Holmes Council On Aging celebrated their July birthdays on Friday. Our Birthday for the month of July was Fay Ennger Happy Birthday. Holmes Council On Aging would like to Thank Dennis Lee and his family for providing the birthday dinner and Piggly Wiggly for donating the birthday cake. HOLMES COUNCIL ON AGING JULY BIRTHDAYS Holmes County arrests July 14 July 21, 2012 Tarrence Allen, 30, hold for Hillsborough Ronald Lee Baskins, 58, prison transport services hold Robert Bruce Brownlee, 46, driving while license suspended or revoked Johnny F. Clark, 58, no charges listed Trevardo D. Dixon, 24, hold for Miami Dade Samantha Dawn Edeneld, 20, battery-dating violence John Ellis, 60, prison transport services hold Samuel James Gillam, 27, hold for Missouri Perfecto Gomar, 43, permit unauthorized person to drive Pedro Gomar-Hernandez, 41, operate motor vehicle without valid drivers license Danny Albert Graham, 35, violation of probation on felony battery Jeffery Scott Gray, 48, failure to appear Michael Gerard Green, 23, battery dating violence Crystal Renae Greene, 27, driving while license suspended Roger Dale Greenlee, 45, hold for Walton County James Wendon Harris, 45, resisting ofcer without violence, trespass in structure Nathaniel Harris, 21, hold for Hillsborough Cassandra Renea Holley, 37, hold for Hillsborough Cecil Ray Howell, 51, violation of drivers licenses restriction of business purposes only Cecil Ray Howell, 51, driving under the inuence with property damage, violation of drivers license restrictions Joseph Salvatore Iemolo, 22, prison transport services hold Lewis Paul Ingram, 28, failure to report change of residence Richard Lee Jackson, 40, hold for Hillsborough Horacia Lacayo, 23, violation of probation Marc Evans Lacy, 22, prison transport services hold Andrew Geoffrey Levins, 43, driving under the inuence Kevin A. Lucas, 46, hold for prison transport services Warren Francis McDonald, 24, prison transport services house Jason Alan Miller, 43, domestic battery Brandon V. Pierre, 20, prison transport services hold Joy Lynn Quinn, 37, hold for prison transport services Davis K. Reid, 69, violation of probation Thomas Gene Ritchie, 27, child support Melvin Lee Singletary, prison transport services hold Christopher James Stien, hold for Walton County Joey Lee Strickland, 41, felon in possession of a rearm Juan Maya Victor-Maya, 42, prison transport services hold Michael Allen Ward, 21, violation of probation on burglary, violation of probation on grand theft Shane Warren, 26, violation of probation 2 counts Steven Grady Webster, 41, driving while license suspended or revoked Joe Brown White, 34, prison transport services Perry NMN Williamson, 46, disorderly intoxication Holmes County marriages and divorces July 16 July 20, 2012 Marriages Quinton Jacob Hall, 9-301994 of Westville and Amanda Lee Holland, 12-21-1982 of Black, Ala. Michael Todd Calhoon, 11-22-1985 of Atlanta and Gwendolyn Anne Spivey, 928-1986 of Atlanta Joshua Anthony Smith, 10-13-1990 of Bonifay and Cassandra Lynn Pollard, 1125-1988 of Bonifay Shannon Dewayne Curry, 12-2-1983 of Chipley and Sally Leann Roberts, 7-25-1981 of Bonifay Divorces Ernie gray and Melanie Jane Gray Aaron Steverson and Nina SteversonMost court cases are resolved through some sort of plea bargain. A small percentage go to trial. This saves the state time and money. It costs Florida about $50 per day in operating costs to keep a person in jail. This does not include the cost of building the jail or prison. Jim Appleman former state attorney for the 14th Judicial Circuit Marriages & DIVORCES Arrest REPORT

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OUTDOORS Wednesday, August 1, 2012 Page 6 www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Send your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com A Section There is a king mackerel tournament coming in August that Im sure many will want to enter. This is not one of those costly lifeor-death tournaments. Ive shed tournaments that offer large sums of money and they can bring out the worst in people. The tournament is hosted by the Mexico Beach Artificial Reef Association. The 16th annual MBARA Kingfish Tournament will be Aug. 25 in Mexico Beach. The Captains Party is on Friday night Aug. 24. The prize money certainly is enough to warrant the entry fee, but not large enough to stay up late into night trying to gure out a way to cheat. Entry is $150 per boat and you can sh as many anglers as you can safely put on a boat. You can leave from anywhere and dock anywhere, but you must weigh your sh at Mexico Beach Marina from 1-5 p.m. CDT. You can bring your sh to the scales by boat, car, horse or truck. Fishing will begin at 5 a.m. and end at 5 p.m. This is a one-day boat tournament. Prizes for the sh are as follows: King Mackerel, 1. $3,000, 2. $2,000, 3. $1,000; Spanish Mackerel, 1. $500, 2. $300, 3. $200; Wahoo, 1. $1,000, only one sh eligible. Since 1997 the MBARA has raised and spent more than $1 million on more than 200 arti cial reefs off Mexico Beach, Panama City and Port St. Joe. All reefs are public numbers and are posted on the organizations website. You also can see underwater video of these reefs on the website as well. This is an all-volunteer organization. You can preregister online at www.mbara.org or you can preregister at Mexico Beach Marina or at Half Hitch Tackle in Port St. Joe. You can read a detailed explanation of the rules at www.mbra.org and read a question and answer section for your information. If you own a small boat like mine, this is the tournament to enter. You would never have to leave the buoy line to catch either a king or Spanish mackerel. As a matter of fact, a Spanish would be what I would be shing for. Bring the family and have a good time. Hooked on Outdoors Outdoor Life Scott Lindsey captainlindsey@ knology.net Pollinators THE GREAT By STAN KIRKLAND FWC T heres a growing movement in Florida, and the rest of the country, for that matter, to recognize the crucial value of pollinators and the role they play in agriculture and forestry. Pollinators include insects such as bees, beetles, ies, butter ies and moths, and other wildlife species such as birds and bats. Pollinators are absolutely crucial to the things we eat and, in some cases, what we wear, said Arlo Kane, a wildlife biologist with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). Pollinators move pollen between owers and this annually accounts for the production of $20 billion worth of vegetables, fruits and nuts. Kane was one of seven speakers at a recent pollinator short course in Marianna. In addition to the FWCs presence, the 150 participants who attended were hosted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, National Wild Turkey Federation, University of Florida IFAS, and The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation. Unfortunately, pollinators, and particularly species of insects, are in decline across the country, according to Kane. There are 4,000 species of bees alone that are native to the United States and most have disappeared or are only a fraction of their original number. A National Academy of Sciences report says the decline in pollinators is due to habitat loss, diseases and widespread pesticide use. To stem the loss of pollinators, theres an emphasis to get gardeners, homeowners and landowners to help by planting wild owers and plants that are good for native bees and other insects. The plants should be native to our area, which means theyll likely require less fertilizer or water than plants from other parts of the country, Kane said. You also need a variety of plants so you have owering plants from the spring into the fall. Suggested areas for planting native wild owers include the borders or edges of farm elds, in between the rows of planted pines; roadsides, and gardens. Kane said native wild owers and the insects they attract are also great habitat and feeding areas for wildlife such as bobwhite quail, wild turkeys, mourning doves and gopher tortoises. Information about Floridas native wild owers is available at local plant nurseries and online at awild owers. org or xerces.org The green anole is no chameleon By JESSICA BASHAM Special to the News/ Green anoles, a type of American lizard, are often called American chameleons because they can change color, but they are not chameleons at all. These anoles are the only native lizard in the southeastern United States that changes color, but it is only from bright green to brown or gray. Usually their change in color is due to stress, but also to temperature and mating. Males extend a bright pink dewlap (a piece of skin that unfolds from its throat) when looking for a mate or when warning other males to back off. Their head-bobs are like pushups and show the female and other males that they are strong. Mating season starts in the beginning of April and continues throughout the summer months. In south Florida, the mating season is a little longer. If you see a green anole bobbing up and down and showing his dewlap, look around: there may be a female nearby. A female lays one or sometimes two eggs every two weeks, usually in dirt or debris at the base of a plant. The green anole is the only native anole in the Southeast and is found from North Carolina west to Texas and throughout Florida. True chameleons, however, live in Africa, Madagascar, Portugal, Spain and parts of Asia. At least two species have been introduced into Florida. They can change to every color of the rainbow because of mood, temperature, habitat, stress, anger and defense. They often blend easily into their surroundings by changing color. Chameleons hold on to branches with their feet and coiled tails. Their long, curled tongues shoot out like arrows to catch prey. Anoles are small, long and slender. Like the chameleon, they have the ability to cling to objects but only because of a sticky pad on the underside of their toes. Their tails are not coiled but long and thin and can break easily. This is so they can escape predators. When caught by the tail, the lizard squirms until its tail breaks and it can escape to freedom. The confused predator is left with only the tail and wondering where its lunch has gone. Lizard tails will grow back a little. Watching green anoles is easy. Around homes, they hang from walls, scurry across sidewalks and driveways and climb shrubs, branches and trees. A little anole visits me daily. He perches on a railing outside my of ce window and bobs his head up and down, showing off his bright pink dewlap. Anoles generally have a territory, so chances are youll see one in the same place, day after day. For more information, you can visit http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich. S pecial to the NEWS/TIMES ADVERTISER Green anoles are mistakenly called American chameleons because they change color. However, green anoles only turn shades of green, brown or gray.

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Special to the News Completed last weekend was the United States Fastpitch Association 2012 Softball World Series at Frank Brown Park in Panama and local girls are on a team out of Panama, which won their division. This team was put together for the rst time this year and represents seven area high school teams. Rutherford, Bay, Arnold, Mosley, North Bay Haven, Chipley, and Holmes County. They have played in seven tournaments this summer and plan to stay together to continue into the fall. Highlights for the World Series include Pitchers and catchers Cheyenne Berry (HC), Emily Kent (CH), and Kayla Whitaker (R) and MacKenzie Wolffer (B) and Carley Mead (CH) combined for 33 out of 51 of the outs at the plate in strikeouts. Kayla Whitaker had 33 strikeouts in the tournament despite ghting off fevers of 105 the night before bracket games started. Her team carried her with an awesome display of hitting to allow her the rest she needed to do her job. They were backed up by an awesome defensive stance that allowed only 2 runs in pool play. There were no runs scored on the Power in bracket play. Kinzie Harrington (Mosley) led the team hitting for the tournament hitting .571. Kaylyn Julian (R) led the team in RBIs. Others who hit above .500 were Jessie Powell (R), Shelby Ramsey (Arnold). These girls have come a long way from the rst tournament they played in May. They have played A and B class tournaments all summer to prepare for this World Series Trophy. Gun Show August 11th & 12th Panama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds 2080424 Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4 C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 a m o r 2 p m Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING DOG DAYS OF SUMMER By PAT McCANN 747-5068 | Twitter: @patmccann pmccann@pcnh.com EBRO This literally begins with a lick and a promise. Sarah Lucas, who lives a few hops from Ebro Greyhound Park, had promised one of the greyhound pups from a small litter of three to Joe Watson, her former partner for four years in SL Kennel. Lucas brought the male puppy to the track and the of ce of Teresa Duncan, who works in administration at Ebro, where Lucas was to meet Watson, who currently owns and operates AJN Kennel. Duncan and the pup immediately bonded, which was evident to Watson when he arrived. But this is Duncans story, so let her tell it. As babies (Sarah) let me see them and when Joe came to see the one he was going to get Sarah gave him to me and he was loving on me, Duncan said. When I handed him to Joe he was still paying attention to me and then he was licking and loving me again. Joe said, I guess I have a partner. It just happened. Duncan is an Ohio native who has spent much of her adult life in the Panhandle. Now in her 40s, she lives with her husband, Cecil, on 10 acres outside of Fountain. A self-professed animal person, Duncan has worked at the track for six years. While she doesnt have human children, she currently has an extended family of seven greyhounds in her care in addition to horses and a miniature schnauzer among others. But there was something else missing. I had adopted (greyhounds) and they are great, but I wanted to have a baby greyhound, Teresa said. I had to do it. AJN Sweet Smoke has been performing like a prodigy in the 2012 live greyhound racing meeting at the Washington County pari-mutuel facility. It has been a short journey thus far for the rst-time owner, as well as Watson, who this year has branched out to full ownership of a kennel. In addition to AJN Sweet Smoke, who only began racing in May, trainer Thomas Suggs is in his rst year of handling that responsibility. The initial results have been highly positive with Sweet Smoke breaking his maiden at Ebro, or winning for the rst time, and continuing to perform at a high level while advancing through grades to compete with the best dogs at the track. Duncan initially took the latest addition of her family to Fountain to live. Stocky Hess, president of Ebro Greyhound Park and a veteran of many aspects of the greyhound racing industry for parts of six decades, told Duncan that some champion dogs had been hand-raised by owners and not sent immediately to a farm. Stocky has taught me a lot, Duncan said. He talks to me about when he used to run dogs. He can tell you this and that. His experience. Training. Hes done it all. AJN Sweet Smoke would roam the property with the schnauzer. He was kennel trained, but he did pretty much what he wanted to do, Duncan said. That included getting a lot of sleep. In the kingsized bed. When he was a year old I knew from the get-go he would have to leave me and go to a trainer, Duncan said. Sarah talked about sending all three to Oklahoma, but it was November, it was cold and the ground was hard and I didnt want him to cut his feet. Joe sends a lot of his dogs to Fort White between Lake City and Gainesville. He was down there almost six months, I didnt get him back until April. Joe was there a lot and he knew he was well taken care of. Joe has a kennel in Sarasota and he was getting ready to close (for that meet) and took him to Sarasota, not for racing, but to get him used to kennel life and he would work him a little bit. Previously Duncan had taken care of Sweet Smokes registration with the National Greyhound Association. He got his ID tattoo numbers in his ears at 3 months. She received an onion skin document with the dogs markings on it and ID numbers, and later his of cial papers of ownership. Then there was no small matter of naming her boy, as Duncan commonly refers to her greyhound. Duncan explained that only 16 letters can be used, and that Watsons greyhounds all have the AJN moniker. We put AJN Smoke, and I wanted Sweet because hes so sweet, Duncan said. And then he smokes them on the track. Im a NASCAR fan and Tony Stewarts nickname is Smoke and he owned the track in Ohio where my grandfather use to race in the 40s and 50s. He bought it and kept the memories going. A more sobering aspect of her greyhounds identi cation markings came when Duncan explained why she had Sweet Smoke micro chipped. It serves as a psychological safeguard for her emotional attachment. She was one of the rst on the scene that day in late October 2010 when the appalling realization of what had occurred in one of the kennels on the compound was discovered some weeks after the racing season had concluded. Thirty-four greyhounds, some of them with their muzzles bound by duct tape, had been methodically starved to death. The man responsible, Ronnie Williams, was sentenced to ve years in prison for his crime, but Ebro Greyhound Park likely will be viewed by some into the future as his accomplice. I was the one that was down there. I was the one that realized the duct tape, Duncan said. That still haunts me. It was the most horrible day ever. I can still remember the clothes I had on. It is one of the worst things Ive ever experienced in my life. It will always be a part of me. If you can do that to an animal, what else can you do? Because of her of ce duties, Duncan was the person charged with elding queries from greyhound owners wondering if their animals were among those victimized. Many of the dogs bodies had decomposed to the extent they couldnt be identi ed by their ear markings. I was the one answering the phone and I couldnt tell them, Duncan said. I never want to be in a situation those people were in. Duncans position at Ebro also offers many perks. Not in the least is her friendship with Watson, and con dence that Sweet Smoke is receiving proper care and handling. In addition to the advice from Hess, presiding judge Lamar Page has been helpful. He put me on the racing roster so I can see him when I want, Duncan said. He tells me little tips, tells me he looks good. He makes it exciting for me. Hes been very encouraging with his potential and how this works. Greyhound owners are paid a percentage of their dogs earnings through an agreement with the kennel owner. Usually that is a somewhat standard 35 percent, and 50 percent for stakes races. It can vary, as some kennel owners only pay for results in Grades A and B, but Watson rewards all grades. The amount depends on whether the dogs places rst, second or third, and points are rewarded depending on the grade or race which can be maiden, J, D, C, B or A depending on the past performance of the greyhound. The prize money pool is impacted by the handle (amount wagered) bet on the entire live racing performance as well as the tracks simulcast handle and the take from Ebros Poker Room also gures into the mix. Various pari-mutuel facilities in Florida and other states also offer slot machines on premises which equates to a higher take and more lucrative payoffs for both the kennel and the greyhound owner. There is no fee for owners to enter races. Ebro racing secretary Bill Nelson determines the daily performance schedule, most greyhounds racing every fourth day. Otherwise theyre housed in an airconditioned kennel at the track where there sometimes is a television or radio to provide background noise. The dogs are turned out into an outside pen every ve or six hours and at times are taken to a sprint path for exercise. Duncan is getting familiar with the racing routine for AJN Sweet Smoke. I know he loves doing this, she said. Theres no way you can make one run. Some just decide that this isnt for them. The ones that want to run, youve got to let them run. You can see it in their eyes. If you werent into it you would know. Like when he was sick, or if theyre hurt. The relationship I have with Joe, if I really wanted to create an issue I would call the racing secretary. As an owner you have the right to pull your dog. Ebro Greyhound Park is known throughout the circuit as a Puppy Track, or venue where promising greyhounds break in before chasing larger purses often offered at downstate or out-of-state tracks. Duncan knows that like a highly recruited prep athlete going off to college in another part of the country, that time could come for AJN Sweet Smoke. Its gonna kill me if we send him out of state, she said. Hes like a real child, and you want to be there supporting them. Im anxious for the day he comes back to the house. I dont want him to get hurt for that to happen, but no ifs ands or buts, whatever it takes to x him were going to do. Euthanization is not an option. ANDREW WARDLOW | The News Herald Teresa Duncan and AJN Sweet Smoke display their excitement while reuniting following a recent race at Ebro Greyhound Park. I guess I have a partner Part one in a three-part series about a first-time owner of a racing greyhound, a first-time full owner of a greyhound racing kennel and the dog making his racing debut. Panama City softball team wins division Team members include Kinzie Harrington (Mosley), Denise Whitaker (Coach), MacKenzie Wolffer (Bay), Jessie Powell (Rutherford), Emily Kent (Chipley), Cheyenne Berry (Holmes County), Allison Thigpen (Rutherford), Ginger Chance (Coach), Shelby Lewis (North Bay Haven), Shelby Ramsey (Arnold), Carley Mead (Chipley), Kaylyn Julian (Rutherford), Kayla Whitaker (Rutherford), Haley Melnick (Bay). Coaches: Denise Whitaker, Ginger Chance, Thom Mead, John Powell and Stephanie Sims. Special to the News SP O RTS www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, August 1, 2012 A Page 7 Section

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Washington, Holmes at a glance INDEX Society ................................. B2 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classieds ............................ B6 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, AUGUS T 1 2012 B P A GE 1 Section Bonifay Womens Club to hold political rally BONIFAY The Bonifay Womens Club will be sponsoring a Political Rally from 6 to 8 p.m. on Saturday at Holmes County High School. BBQ plates will be available from 5 to 7 p.m. for $5. Wausau Fun Day, Possum Festival this weekend WA US A U The Wausau Fun Day and Possum Festival is Friday and Saturday at the Dalton Carter Community Center in Wausau. For more information, call 6381781 or visit www. wausaupossumfestival. com. Two-Toed Tom yard sale Saturday ES TO The Town of Esto will be holding a Two-Toed Tom Yard Sale starting at 8 a.m., on Saturday at John Clark Park in Esto. Inside tables are $10 and outside spaces at $5. All outside people will need to bring their own tables. There is plenty of space for everyone. Inside space is limited. There will also be a bake sale. To reserve a space call Darlene at 263-3201. Girl Scout Alumnae to hold reunion TALLAHASSEE Girl Scout Alumnae will gather in celebration of 100 Years at the Girl Scouts of the Florida Panhandles alumnae reunion from 2 to 4 p.m., on Sunday. The reunion will be held in The Florida Historic Capitol Museum Senate Chambers, 400 South Monroe Street in Tallahassee. For more information, call 487-1902. Forehand Family Reunion BETHLEHEM The annual Forehand Family Reunion is Sunday at Bethlehem Methodist Church. All friends and relatives are invited. Paper goods and drinks will be provided. For more information, call 547-2157. Royalty FUN DAY Miss Tiny Baby Fun Day contestants included, from left, Brylee Lynn Waites, Brystol Kennedie West, Most Photogenic winner Laura Elizabeth Yates, 2nd Runner-Up Avery Grace Kirkland, 1st Runner-up Payten Brianne Joyner, Paisley Sasser and 2012 Miss Tiny Baby Fun Day Haven Austin Mathis. The pageant kicks off the 43rd annual Wausau Possum Festival, which begins Friday with the Possum King and Queen Contest. Madison Carter, left, was named Miss Fun Day and most photogenic and Miranda Odom, below, was rst runnerup. Mr. Fun Day King contestants included, from left, 1st RunnerUp Brandon Miller, Brantley Garret Moody, Raylen Wyatt and 2012 Mr. Fun Day King Bentley Arries Paul Locke. Winners in the Little Baby Fun Day contest were, from left, 1st Runner-Up Palyn Jayne Byers, 2012 Little Baby Fun Day Addison Grace Chance, and 2nd Runner-Up and Most Photogenic Faith Elizabeth Ann Russell. Little Miss Fun Day and Most Photogenic winner Hanna Elaine Duke, left, with 2nd RunnerUp Alexia Flowers and 1st RunnerUp Jeanna Raquael Johnson. Miss Tiny Tot winners included, from left, 2nd Runner-Up Macie Riley, 1st Runner-Up and Most Photogenic Kinley Kristene Kirkland, and 2012 Miss Tiny Tot Fun Day Amaya Brunson. Junior Miss Fun Day winners were, from left, winner Abby Renee McKenzie, 2nd Runner-Up Ashley Feldman, Most Photogenic Billie LeAnn Goodman, and 1st Runner-Up Sara Kingsley Scott. Left top: Miss Pre-Teen Fun Day winners were, from left, 2nd Runner-Up Sara Catherine Padgett, Most Photogenic Marissa White, 2012 Miss PreTeen Fun Day Isabella Flowers, 1st Runner-Up Alyssa Marie Willey. Left bottom: Miss Teen Fun Day Kayla Anne Rudd, left, 2nd Runner-Up Ericka Marie Adams, and 1st Runner-Up and Most Photogenic Rebecca Lynn Williams.

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Wednesday, August 1, 2012 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Special to Extra After a year of practices and competing in the state archery competition, Levi McDaniel represented Florida 4-H as one of the four archery team members at the 2012 National 4-H Shooting Sports Invitational. The competition spanned three days of shooting and included 500 youth representing 32 states and their 4-H programs. Shooting sports is one of the largest of all 4-H projects reaching 350,000 youth nationwide each year. While shooting sports teaches youth the sport, it also instills self-discipline, teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving skills. For more information on the shooting sports programs in Washington County 4-H, contact 4-H Youth Development Agent, Julie Pigott Dillard, at 638-6180 or juliepd@ufl.edu. Learn more about the shooting sports program by visiting the Washington County 4-H website: washington.ifas.ufl.edu/ 4hy/washington-county-4h-clubs-test/. and www.BonifayRehab.com B ONIFAY N URS IN G & REH AB CE N TER Make the Move Mexican Restaurant The children and grandchildren of Lowell and Ernestine Smith will be holding a reception from 2-4 p.m., on Aug. 11, in honor of their 50th Wedding Anniversary. The reception will be held at the Fist Baptist Church of Bonifay, in the fellowship hall. No gifts please. Davis and Angela Hanes of Ponce de Leon are proud to announce the engagement of their daughter, Timra Deanne Hanes to Joshua Larmar Miller, son of Jonah Miller and Rejonna (Robert) Grimes of Ponce de Leon. The bride elect is the granddaughter of Evie Hanes and the late Johnny Hanes of Bonifay, Jim King of Bonifay, Sue and Gary Newell of Westville. Timra is a 2012 graduate of Ponce de Leon High School. The groom elect is the grandson of Callie Mae Miller and the late J. C. Miller of Leonia, Lillian French and the late Ray French of Ponce de Leon, and the great grandson of Vinnie Mitchell of Ponce de Leon. Josh is a 2004 graduate of Ponce de Leon High School and Haney Technical Center where he received certification in Heating and Cooling. He is employed with Woodalls Total Comfort Systems in Marianna. The wedding will take place at Cedars Springs Assembly of God Church in Westville on Aug. 10 at 6:30 p.m. All family and friends are cordially invited. A reception will follow in the churchs fellowship hall. From Staff Reports BONIFAY After 43 years of service, Bonifay Postmaster Roger Brooks has announced his retirement as of July 31. According to Brooks, he began his career as a custodian at the Bonifay of ce during the summer shortly after graduating high school. Two years later he was appointed as a letter carrier and then was promoted to Supervisor of Customer Service shortly after. Brooks said that during his time as Supervisor he had the privilege to work in many post of ces in the panhandle of Florida, including Blountstown, Caryville, Graceville, Panama City and included many of ces in both North and South Florida and South Georgia. In 1985 he was appointed Postmaster of Bonifay. I will miss the employees and the customers of the local of ce, said Brooks. Serving the public has been an honor and I have always tried to give back to the community. The entire opportunity has been a blessing. The retiring Postmaster acknowledged former Postmaster Ed Williams for his support during those early years of Brooks career. I will continue to live in the Bonifay area, but I will be spending time with my daughter, her husband and a couple of special granddaughters who live in South Carolina, said Brooks. Smiths Celebrate 50 Years Hanes and Miller National 4-H Archery Invitational SPECIAL TO EXTRA Chipola President Dr. Gene Prough congratulates Karen Bradley on being named Career Employee for June. MARIANNA Karen Bradley is Chipola Colleges Career Employee for June. Bradley serves as a Testing Assistant in Student Affairs in the Testing Of ce and has worked at the college since 2010. Bradley named top employee CECILIA SPEARS Bonifay Postmaster Roger Brooks retires after 43 years of service. Bonifay Postmaster Roger Brooks retires WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENT

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Wednesday, August 1, 2012 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 There are a number of things around your house that can be deadly to your cats and dogs, some you may know, and some may be surprising. Some are even in your kitchen cabinets and refrigerator. Dr. Dorothy Black, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences (CVM), shares some enlightening information about common food items that may be toxic to your pet. According to Dr. Black, the following foods can be particularly dangerous to cats and dogs. These foods may not necessarily cause toxic reactions in every case of ingestion, but its just a good rule of thumb to keep these items off your kitchen counters and under no circumstances feed these foods to your pet, Black said. Grapes and raisins possess an unknown toxic substance that can lead to renal failure by an unknown mechanism. Toxic doses have been reported after ingesting just one to two grapes or raisins. Not all animals suffer kidney failure after grape/raisin ingestion and it appears to be an idiosyncratic reaction. Nevertheless, it is best to avoid this food for your dogs and cats. There is no known antidote, only supportive care and renal dialysis to support kidney recovery. Grapes can be particularly tricky for dogs, because many actually like to eat grapes, so you have to be especially aware, Black said. Our pets are amazing creatures, but they can really get into dangerous situations with human food very quickly. Chocolate is commonly known to be bad for pets. It contains two ingredients known to be toxic to dogs and cats, caffeine and theobromine. Dark chocolate is particularly harmful because it has a higher concentration of toxic metabolites than milk or white chocolate. Clinical signs of distress seen after chocolate ingestion include: anxiety/ anxiousness, hyperactivity, urination, elevated body temperature, seizures, and irregular heart rhythms. There is no antidote, but supportive care is usually successful for recovery. Xylitol is a common sugar substitute now used in many home kitchens. It is associated with a severe decline in blood sugar levels and liver failure if ingested by pets. The exact mechanism of the toxicity is unknown and there is no antidote. Supportive care is typically successful for treatment of hypoglycemia, however, liver failure may still occur and prognosis is guarded. It is important to remember that if you cook or use xylitol in your foods, that those foods should not be fed to pets, Black said. It is still toxic if used in cooking or baking. Onions, garlic, and chives are also toxic to pets. They contain the toxin allicin, which is released upon crushing or chewing the plant. Allicin damages the hemoglobin in red blood cells leading to anemia (such as Heinz body anemia and methemoglobinemia). Cats are especially susceptible to this toxin. There is no antidote, however, supportive care is typically successful. While cats are particularly affected by onions and garlic, dogs are especially susceptible to macadamia nut toxicity. An unknown toxin in the nut leads to difculty walking, high body temperatures, depression, and vomiting within one to two hours after ingestion. While no deaths have been reported to date, supportive care in the hospital is often required. Supportive care, which is the usual treatment for food toxicity, often works to recover pets who ingest these foods, Black said. But these supportive treatments to get pets back on their feet are often very costly for the owner, and difcult for the patient. In cases that require dialysis, pets have a difcult road to recovery. The foods mentioned here should be kept off countertops and out of reach of pets, and under no circumstances fed to dogs and cats. Preventing your pet from ingesting these items is the best way to keep them safe. But if they do ingest these foods, Dr. Black recommends contacting your veterinarian immediately. ABOUT PET TALK Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at /pet-talk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to cvmtoday@cvm.tamu.edu. ExtraSPECIAL TO E XTRA Twenty-nine students recently completed the Associate Degree Nursing program at Chipola College. Graduates are now qualied to take the state certication examination to become Registered Nurses. Graduates include, seated from left: Carla Foster, Kathryn Boyce, Ashley Barrentine, Whitney Wilson, Taylor Shelton, Jenna Hatcher, Jerri Lynn Stone, Emily Cain, Victoria Levine, Whitney Ellenburg; standing, from left: Jerry Nelson, Katherine Cunningham, Ashley Kennett, Tiffany Thompson, Shelita Grant, Wendy Motley, Hannah Turner, Tina Belser, Meagan Kornegay, Catherine Moses, Kimberly Huett, Brandy Scott, Judith Monpas, Michael Roberts, Dennis Foster, Justin Kulkusky, Logan Bradley, Corey Bailes and Whitney Halley. Special to Extra The Florida Department of Agriculture recognized the Kent family of County Line Road as a Century Pioneer Family Farm on July 20. The designation notes that the family has continu ally owned either all or part of their farm for at least 100 years. About 200 farms have been put on the list since the program began in 1985. About 14 Jackson County families, including the Kents, are on the list. Its really just to rec ognize our agriculture heritage and to promote the idea and make people aware theres agriculture in this state, said Susan Reese, deputy external affairs director for the de partment of agriculture. Air Force Airman Chris tian J. Gerhart graduated from basic military train ing at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week pro gram that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core val ues, physical tness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Gerhart is the son of JoAnn Gerhart of Carmi chael Road, Bonifay. He is a 2004 graduate of Deland High School. Human treats, poison to pets Nursing students complete program CHIPOLA COLLEGE Kent family celebrated for owning farm for 105 years Gerhart graduates basic military Crossword PUZZLESOLUTION ON PAGE B5

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FAITH B Section www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. First Baptist Church come as you are Mike Orr, Pastor 1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830 Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. Learning Religion by Heart In many cultures children are taught prayers and creeds shortly after they have begun to speak. With out understanding them, young children memorize their prayers and creeds. As these children grow in understanding, their parents may explain bits and pieces of the prayers if their children are curious and bold enough to ask. But, as a general rule, most children accept whatever their parents tell them, and parents assume wrongly, that be cause the children have learned their prayers that they also understand them. The prayers are reinforced by regular recita tions, at church and at home, but there is often little effort to explain or interpret them. When these children are old enough to be on their own, they will remember their prayers in the same way that they remember nursery rhymes; there will be a strong resonance and per haps even a feeling of comfort and safety associated with these prayers, but no deep understanding, and no live connection with ones faith. Are we attempt ing to instill faith in a way that is more appropriate to learning poetry or multiplication tables rather than having a genuine experience of God? BROWN FUNERAL HOME 1068 Main Street, Chipley 638-4010 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Fix these words of mine in your hearts and minds; tie them as symbols on your hands and bind them on your foreheads. Teach them to your children, talking about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up. Deuteronomy 11:19 This Message Courtesy of Page 4 Wednesday, August 1, 2012 Rev. James L. Snyder It was just another day, and I was indulging a carefree moment of complaining about the weather. I cant believe its so hot today, I muttered. I thought I was talking to myself, but obviously, I had an audience. Have you ever said or did something not realizing somebody was watching you? Every time I am in a restaurant eating, I endeavor to remember there is an audience and try my very best not to spill the soup on my lap. Although, I must admit that that kind of lap dance always gets a vigorous round of applause from the audience. Dont ask me how I know. I thought in my own special way of thinking that I was alone only to nd out the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage was within earshot of my remarks. I must say she is rather remarkable. Those earshot moments are quite extensive. I will not go as far as to say that she can read my mind, although I think she can, but she seems to know what I am thinking even before I go through the effort and labor of thinking. I do not know why I even spend the energy thinking on my own. Even when I do think up a thought of my own and go so far as to express it I am always challenged. The challenge is to not think that way. The challenger is my wife. Life would be so much easier, not to mention less stressful, if I just would quit thinking my own thoughts. It is when I am thinking my own thoughts that I get into trouble. Life would be so much easier if I allowed someone else to think my thoughts for me. After all, isnt that why men get married? Why women get married still baf es me. Getting back to my moment of complaining: I cant believe, I muttered, its so hot today. To which, my wife said, Dont you know its summer? And dont you know that its supposed to be hot during the summer? I did know that, but it did not make the heat any more bearable. Then she said something that rather confused me. I have been confused before. Confusion is a familiar territory to me. But this confusion was different. If, my wife said rather sternly, you cant stand the heat get out of the kitchen. What the kitchen had to do with it being hot outside is way beyond my pay scale. There was a brief moment when I almost threw caution to the wind and asked my wife what she meant by that comment. Boy, am I glad I didnt. I make it a practice to stay as far away from the kitchen as possible, especially when my wife is present. There is something about a kitchen that makes me rather nervous to the point of dropping her favorite cup and having it break all over the oor. I stay out of the kitchen, heat or no heat. If I remember correctly, my wife said as she stared at me rather intently, a few months ago you were complaining about how cold it was. She was right. It was not but a few months ago, I was complaining that it was so cold outside that I just could not bear it. Youre going to have to make up your mind. That was a serious admonition from her. For her to tell me to make up my mind sends some very contradictory messages to me. After all, she is forever making up my mind for me. She seems to know exactly what I want at the restaurant and before I can get a word in edgewise or otherwise, she has ordered for me. Im not complaining. She knows exactly what I want. Either, she continued, its too hot or its too cold. Now make up your mind. I smiled demurely in her direction and nodded in the af rmative. Not wanting to further the conversation I whispered very gently, Yes, dear. It concluded our tte--tte. Later on in the evening, we were watching television. It was the local news, and the special report of the day had to do with the record heat wave across our country. Its been a long time, the weatherman said, since weve seen temperatures this high. Boy, is it hot out there. I glanced in her direction as covertly as possible and noticed she was staring at me, just daring me to say something. There is a time to say something, and then sometimes something should not be said at all. I concealed my infectious grin as much as possible knowing that someone was watching me. Under my breath I whispered, I cant believe its so hot today. After all, it is summer and it is supposed to be hot. I just believe that everybody has the right to complain about the weather. I also believe that some people have the right not to hear me complain about the weather. It is a well-noted mark of wisdom to know when to speak and when not to speak. Solomon in the Old Testament had it right when he said, Even a fool, when he holdeth his peace, is counted wise: and he that shutteth his lips is esteemed a man of understanding (Proverbs 17:28 KJV). So, this is summer, but you did not hear it from me. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att. net. His web site is www. jamessnyderministries. com Saint Mary A.M.E Church to Hold Homecoming CARYVILLE Saint Mary A.M.E Church will be hold homecoming services at 4 p.m. Aug. 4. The Rev. Jerome Goodman, pastor at New Bethel A.M.E. Church in Argyle, will be our guest speaker. For more information, call Vickie Broxton at 373-7112. Christian Haven Chuch Jam Session CHIPLEY Christian Haven Church will be holding their Monthly Jam Session Aug. 4. A covered dish meal will start at 6 p.m. with signing starting after the meal. For more information, call 638-0836 or 773-2602. New Life Fellowship Assembly of God Womens Conference CHIPLEY New Life Fellowship Assembly of God presents Daughters of Destiny: A Womens Conference. There will be four sessions: the rst session will be held at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 23, the second session will be held at 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 24, and third session at 9 a.m. and the fourth session at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 25. The guest speaker will be Diane Coleman, and conference host Sherri Evans will also be speaking. Conference worship leader is Tiffane Raulerson. Early bird registration is $30. Registration at the conference is $40. Contact church of ce to inquire about area hotel discounts for the conference. The church is located at 695 5th St. in Chipley. For more information, call the church of ce at 638-1134, Monday through Thursday 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. First Freewill Baptist Church to hold revival BONIFAY The First Freewill Baptist Church of Bonifay will be holding a revival at 6 p.m. Aug. 27 and at 7 p.m. Aug. 27-31. Special speaker will be the Rev. Dennis Tanton, with special music by Vessels of Clay. Lighthouse Assembly of God Womens Ministry will hold a yard sale from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 2-3 and again from 7 a.m. to noon Aug.4. Proceeds go to the womens projects for the improving of the church. The yard sale will be in the fellowship hall at 1201 Waukesha St. in Bonifay. All donations are welcome. For more information, call Marie at 638-2027. Library hours Wausau Library Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County Library (Bonifay) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed Washington County Library (Chipley) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Vernon Library Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills Library Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed MONDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Monday each month (unless a holiday) at 6:00 at the Chipley library. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach of ce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999. TUESDAY 8 to 10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 5 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at 6:25 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-451 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. 12 p.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday. (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A FRIDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Homes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Winn Dixie in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks while you get your shopping done. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. SUNDAY 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at GracevilleCampbellton Hospital in Graceville. COMMUNITY CALENDAR Lighthouse Assembly of God to hold yard sale Faith BRIEFS So, this is summer, is it?

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Wednesday, August 1, 2012 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Literacy group holds summer reading camp WASHINGTON COUNTY The Literacy Volunteers of Washington County will be offering a Summer Reading Program organized by the Washington County Public Library from 10 a.m. to noon Aug. 2 at the Country Oaks Learning Center, 268 Quail Hollow Blvd. in Chipley. This program is for children ages 512. Snacks and drinks will be provided on all program dates. For more information, call 638-1231. Gods Vineyard to hold overnight camp VERNON Gods Vineyard Worship Center will be holding Overnight Camp for ages 13 and up through Aug. 4. The Overnight Youth Camp is a free camp. Applications may be picked up at Dees Restaurant in Vernon. For more information, call Vicky Wilson at 535-2471. Candidate Town Hall Meet and Greet All Washington County candidates and residents are invited to a Candidate Town Hall Forum Meet and Greet at 5:30 p.m. Aug. 7 in the Sunny Hills County Building, on Challenger Road. The forum will start promptly at 6 p.m., with the primary races rst as follows: The District 1 candidates Republican Primary; Superintendent of Schools Republican Primary; School Board District 3 two candidates. Each candidate will be given 3 minutes for an introduction their platform. The platform should include their solution for Washington County. Any Washington County resident wishing to ask speci c questions, please contact Karen Schoen at kbschoen@bellsouth.net or Chuck at shachakel@ att.net. Volunteers sought for festival BONIFAY Festival organizers are looking for hard-working volunteers with a heart to serve their community. Join us at 6 p.m. Aug 7 in the old library behind City Hall to kick off the planning for the fth annual Down Home Street Festival. For more info, contact us at info@bonifaystreetfestival. com or 373-7747. Art Show BONIFAY Art students from Holmes County High School, middle school, and So as Fine Art Studio will be displaying their artworks for the month of August. A reception at 5 p.m. Aug. 10 will be free and the public is invited. Snacks and refreshments will be provided. The reception will be at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery, 110 W. Pennsylvania Ave. in Bonifay. For more information, call 329-8381 or email your questions to laurdendavis@gmail.com. Northwest Florida Community Back 2 School Fair CHIPLEY Northwest Florida Community Hospital in Chipley will host its annual Back 2 School Fair from 9 a.m. to noon Aug. 11 at the hospital. It is free. Schoolaged children will receive free haircuts and various school supplies. There will be food, backpack door prizes and entertainment. The Washington County Health Department will provide an immunization clinic for school age children at no charge. For more information, call Aileen Koon or Heather Shelby at 638-1610. Quarterly HCHS Alumni luncheon BONIFAY The quarterly Holmes County High School Alumni Luncheon will be at 11:30 a.m. Aug. 14 at Scotts Restaurant (Formerly Simbos) in Bonifay. All alumni, former students and faculty are invited to attend. Holmes County High School Band Camp BONIFAY Holmes County High School Blue Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences. Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section of www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership with Legacy com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212 Crossword SOLUTION Obituaries Michael Allen Greenwell, age 56, passed from this life Saturday, June 30, 2012, in Washington County. He was born Aug. 11, 1955, to James A. and Celia Sue (Young) Greenwell. Mr. Greenwell was a clerk for the United States Postal Service. He is survived by his wife, Kimberly M. Greenwell of Orlando; son, Joshua Greenwell of Bristol, Va.; two daughters, Devon Miller of Orlando and Nadia Conrad of Dallas, Texas; and one granddaughter. Memorialization was by cremation. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net. Michael A. Greenwell Mrs. Rubye V. Curry Brown of Highway 2, Bonifay, went home to be with her Lord and Savior on Thursday, July 19, 2012, with her loving and devoted family at her side. She was 95. Mrs. Brown was born Feb. 10, 1917, in Holmes County, to the late Rev. John Arthur and Lillie Sanders Curry. After several years of service, she retired from the Holmes County Extension Service as a nutritionist. She enjoyed cooking, sewing and working in her ower garden, but rst and foremost she loved her Lord and her family. She was a Congregational Methodist by faith. In addition to her parents, her husband, C. Jay Brown, and two sons, J.R. Jerry Brown and Johnny Jack Brown, all preceded her death. Survivors include one son, Kim Brown (Carol), Geneva, Ala.; three daughters, Jeanette Smith (Clyde) and Iris Smith (Jerry), all of Bonifay, and Lillie Smith of Geneva. Ala.; one sister, Mary Lois Sowell, Bonifay; 14 grandchildren; 26 great-grandchildren; a number of great-greatgrandchildren; and several nieces, nephews, cousins, other extended family and friends. Funeral services were held at 4 p.m. Sunday, July 22, 2012, at East Pittman Baptist Church with the Rev. Wesley Adams and the Rev. Clyde R. Smith of ciating. Mrs. Brown was placed into the church one hour prior to service time. Burial followed in the church cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Saturday, July 21, from 6 to 8 p.m. Great-grandsons served as honorary pallbearers. Rubye V. Brown RUBYE V. BROWN Mrs. Ann Cook, age 68, of Ponce De Leon passed away Saturday, July 21, 2012. She was born May 1, 1944. in Lockhart, Ala., to Odis and Betty Adams Burkett. Mrs. Cook was a resident of Ponce De Leon. She was Baptist by faith and a member of the East Baptist Church. She owned and operated two restaurants for many years and was a Licensed General Contractor and a Licensed Roo ng Contractor. She enjoyed family gatherings, shing and was a very talented cook. Mrs. Cook was preceded in death by her mother, Betty Adams Burkett. Mrs. Cook is survived by her father, Odis Burkett of DeFuniak Springs; her loving husband of 25 years, Bill Cook of Ponce De Leon; three sons, Willard Timothy Carroll of Ocala, Terry Bruce Carroll of Pensacola and Jamie William Cook and wife, Amber, of Freeport; two daughters, Deborah K. Carroll of Ponce De Leon and Carolyn Carroll Slay and husband, Skeet, of Leonia; two brothers, Charles Ray Burkett and wife, Karen, and their daughter, Savannah, of Laurel Hill and Lamar Lambeth; 11 grandchildren, Adam Carroll, Jennifer Carroll Groce and husband, Lance, Sierra Carroll Irby, Jhace William Cook, Shane Carroll, Darah Carroll, Sandy Hougland and husband, Phillip, Buck Slay and wife, Kle, Beth Slay Alford and husband, Danny, Keith Slay and Josh Slay; and eight greatgrandchildren, Kaeson, Boone, Bryson, Bailey, Jesse, Savanah, Sarah and Mason. A time of visitation was held from 1 to 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 24, 2012, at Clary-Glenn Funeral Home Chapel, 230 Park Ave., DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 24, 2012, at Clary-Glenn Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Greg Alford and Joel Glenn of ciating. Burial followed in the Magnolia Cemetery. Floral arrangements are being accepted. You may go online to view obituaries, offer condolences and sign guest book at www.claryglenn.com. Clary-Glenn Funeral Home is entrusted with the arrangements. Ann Cook ANN COOK Janet Toole Carroll, age 67, of Wausau, left her family and friends to be with the Lord on Friday, July 20, 2012, at her home. She was born in Palm Harbor, on May 17, 1945, to Audrey Foxworth Toole and the late Calvin Toole, Sr. before moving to Chipley. She graduated Valedictorian from Chipley High School in 1963 and continued her thirst for knowledge through reading and word games. She took every opportunity to expose her grandchildren to learning opportunities. She was very active in her retirement from PAEC and enjoyed reading, camping and shing. Janet will be remembered as a loving wife, mother, grandmother, aunt, sister and daughter. She touched the hearts of many and was a true blessing to all who knew her. She is survived by her mother, Audrey Toole of Chipley; her husband of 43 years, Alto Carroll; two daughters, Cindy Carroll Cross and husband, Justin, of Crawfordville and Marcia Carroll of Tallahassee; one brother, Calvin Toole Jr. and wife, Pauline, of Bonifay; and four grandchildren, Ian and Jenna Cross, and Julia and Ari Bremer. The active pallbearers were Richard Clark, George Clayton Owens, Pat McDaniel, Ron Jones, Rick Everett and Marcus Harrell. The family received friends Sunday, July 22, 2012, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel. Funeral services were held Monday, July 23, 2012, at 2 p.m. at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel with the Rev. Troy Lee Walsingham of ciating. Interment followed at Ferguson Cemetery. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh.net. Janet T. Carroll Mr. Johnny Charles Vaughan, of Vaughan Dead River Lane, Westville, passed away Thursday, July 19, 2012. He was 62. Johnny was born April 17, 1950, in Holmes County, to the late Charlie Clark and Emma Lee Smith Vaughan. He was a 1968 graduate of Bethlehem High School and an avid Alabama Roll Tide football fan. In addition to his parents, a brother, James Lee Vaughan, and a sister, Charlene Hawthorne, preceded him in death. Survivors include four sisters, Ruth Forsythe of Dothan, Ala., Rachel Heath of Pensacola, and Cumi Vaughan and Linda Hughes, both of Geneva Ala.; one brother, Posie Vaughan of Westville; and several nieces, nephews, other extended family and friends. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, July 25, at New Hope Baptist Church with the Rev. Clay Hatcher of ciating. Burial followed in the Mt. Ida Congregational Methodist Church Cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the church Wednesday beginning at 10 a.m., and continued until service time. Johnny C. Vaughan Judy McElwain, 68, of Noma passed away Wednesday, July 25, following a sudden illness. Ms. Judy was born Sept. 22, 1943, in Borderland, Ky., to the late Cecil and Grace Thompson Booten. Devoted and beloved wife, mother and grandmother, Ms. Judy worked with the U.S. Postal Service for many years as a postal carrier and retired as a Postmaster. She was a member of the Blessed Trinity Catholic Church in Bonifay. She was preceded in death by her parents; son, Gary McElwain; brothers, Cary Booten, Cecil Ray Booten, Jr., and Jimmy Booten, and sister, Lorraine Vickers. She is survived by her husband, Donald R. McElwain, Noma; son, Donald Donnie McElwain, Graceville; four daughters, Dawn Crutch eld (Matthew) and Kim Miller, all of Noma, Jessica Walters (D.J.) of Graceville and Debi Pendl (Vince) of Summer eld, N.C.; brother, Larry Booten, Sr. (Donna), Davie; two sisters, Riki Ann Booten, Eufaula, Ala., and Linda Faye Booten, Noma; four grandchildren, Zoie, Jolie, Carly and Christopher; one greatgrandson, Liam; and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Funeral Mass was held at 11 a.m. on Monday, July 30, 2012, at the Blessed Trinity Catholic Church with Father Richard Dawson of ciating. Burial followed in Noma Cemetery with James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family received friends at the funeral home Sunday from 6 to 8 p.m. Expressions of sympathy can be made at www. jamesandlipford.com. Judy McElwain Mrs. Cecil Doris Lefebvre, age 88, of Bonifay, passed away July 23, 2012, at her home. She was born March 27, 1924, in Gas City, Ind., to the late Russell and Liddie Bell Young Jones. Mrs. Lefebvre was a former member of Mill Springs Christian Chapel in Quincy and currently a member of Gully Springs Baptist Church in Bonifay. Mrs. Lefebvre is survived by a son, Willie R. Lefebvre of San Clemente, Calif.; six daughters, Doris J. Meador of Vernon, Ind., Betty J. Lefebvre of Bonifay, Liddie B. Aronhalt of Bonifay, Barbara A. Alexander of Piedmont, S.D., Margaret D. Hunt of Ocean Park, Wash., and Hazel M. Lefebvre of Mobile, Ala.; 21 grandchildren; and 19 great-grandchildren. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Cecil D. Lefebvre Community EVENTS See EVENTS B6

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Wednesday, August 1, 2012 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Pride Band is getting ready for another year of events. Aug 1-3: Band camp for rookies, percussion, color guard and band of cers will be 8-11:30 a.m. Full band camp will be 12:30-5 p.m. Aug. 6-10: Full band camp will be 8-11:30 a.m. and 12:30-5 p.m. Aug. 13-17: Full band from 5-7 p.m. AgEnder representative to speak Karen Schoen of Americans against UN Agenda 21 will speak at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 15 at Shepherds Gate Church in Sunny Hills, educating Washington County residents about the loss of their individual rights and loss of private property. The church is on State Road 77. 2012 Graceville Harvest Festival The 31st annual Harvest Festival Pageant will be at the Graceville Civic Center in Graceville at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 7-8. The entry fee is $55 with all proceeds going to the Graceville Harvest Day Celebration. Contestants may participate in photogenic for an additional $10. Photogenic entries will be limited to one photo per contestant. Applications may be picked up at Bush Paint and Supply in Graceville, Graceville City Hall, Graceville News and Forget Me Not Photography in Bonifay. Deadline to enter is Aug. 17. Winners will receive a large trophy, large crown and banner. Alternates and participants will receive trophies. For more information, call Teresa Bush at 263-4744 or 263-3072 or Michelle Watkins at the city of Graceville at 263-3250. Wallace Baseball Showcase set DOTHAN, Ala. Dothan will be hosting a Summer Baseball Showcase at 9 a.m. Aug. 18. This Showcase is for 2013, 14, and 15 athletes. In attendance will be junior college and Division I college coaches along with professional scouts. If interested, contact the Wallace baseball of ce at 334-556-2416. Return registration form by Aug. 11. The cost of this showcase is $100 per athlete. Make all checks out to Mackey Sasser. Walk-ups are welcome. Pee Wee football, cheer sign-ups BONIFAY Signups will be 9-11 a.m. Saturdays through Aug. 25 at the Bonifay Rec Center. Please bring a copy of your childs birth certi cate. Cost for football is $50 per child. New cheerleaders will be $100, and returning cheerleaders from last season will be $50 if the uniform still ts. If you have any questions, call Mark Gilmore at 527-4363 or Michele Sherrouse at 373-6227. Bethlehem Alumni banquet planned BETHLEHEM The Bethlehem Alumni Association Reunion Banquet will be at 5:30 p.m. Aug. 4 in the old cafeteria at Bethlehem School. Anyone who attended Bethlehem School or works at Bethlehem School is invited to attend. Former school administrators, teachers and staff members are also encouraged to attend. A roast beef dinner with all the trimmings will be served. The cost of the meal is $15 per person. Tickets may be purchased at Millers Store (near Millers Crossroads). Please share this information with your classmates and colleagues. For more information, call Chryle Brinley at 334-360-0308 or Larry or Peggy Moore 263-2507. Holmes County Farm Bureau membership meeting BONIFAY The Holmes County Farm Bureau annual membership meeting will be Aug. 23 at the Holmes County Agriculture Center on U.S. 90 East. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. with the meeting beginning at 6 p.m. Please RSVP to the of ce at 5474227 by noon Aug. 20. Senior Group going on tour WASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will be going on a tour of Ohio Indiana Amish country and Chicago Razzle Dazzle on Sept. 1-9. For more information, call Merita Stanley at 594-9980. Youth Ranch Golf Tournament PANAMA CITY The Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch Golf Tournament will take place Sept. 15 at the Panama Country Club. The monies raised from this bene t will go directly to the Youth Ranch, which runs solely on donations. The Washington County Sheriffs Of ce is one of the sponsors for the golf tournament. For more information, contact Andrea Gainey at 638-6115. Jacob City Day JACOB The city of Jacob has slated Sept. 15 for its Jacob City Day Celebration, which will include a parade, entertainment, food and activities for all. The festivities will start at 11 a.m. with a parade along Jackson Road. The other activities will take place at the Jacob City Park, 2254 Jacob Main Street (Highway 162). Anyone desiring to be in the parade will need to contact Eula Johnson at 263-2120 on or before Sept. 7. Booths are available to vendors; please contact Verloria T. Wilson at 2636636 for more information. 2012 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant BONIFAY The 2012 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant sponsored by the HCHS Blue Pride Band Boosters will be at 4 p.m. Sept. 22 at Holmes County High School. There is no residency required to enter this pageant. Girls age 4-20 and boys age 4-9 may enter. Contestant entry fee is $45. If two or more siblings register in any category, it will be $35 each. Registration dates, all at Holmes County High School, are as follows: 5-7 p.m. Sept. 11 10 a.m. to noon Sept. 15 Late registration 5-7 p.m. Sept. 18. A $10 late fee will be added on this date. You may also turn in registration forms at BES, BMS, HCHS or by mail to HCHS; Attn: Band Boosters; 825 West U.S. 90; Bonifay, FL 32425. If you have any questions, contact Cindy Goodson at goodsonc@ hdsb.org or 373-7517. Washington County candidate forum SUNNY HILLS On Oct. 4, we will have a candidate forum for all candidates with questions from the residents. All Washington County residents are invited to participate. Please send any questions to: Karen at kbschoen@bellsouth.net, or Chuck at shachakel@ att.net. Senior Group to explore Alpine countries WASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will be exploring the Alpine countries of Germany, Austria and Switzerland from Sept. 28 to Oct. 11. For more information, call Merita Stanley at 594-9980. Washington County Girls Night Out CHIPLEY The Womens Imaging Services at Northwest Florida Community Hospital proudly present Girls Night Out on Oct. 11 at the Washington County Agricultural Center in Chipley. For more information, call Heather Shelby at 415-8119. Holmes County High School Class of 1953 BONIFAY Members of the Holmes County High School Class of 1953 are looking for other members of the class to let them know if they are interested in holding a 60th class reunion. If you are interested, call Joann (Black) Scott at 763-4633, Grace (Whipple) Watson at 623-3058 or Ruth (Andrews) Bellot at 547-3452. Senior Group going to the Georgia Mountain Festival WASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will be going to the Georgia Mountain Festival Oct. 16-20. The festival will be in Helen and in Hiawassee, Ga. For more information, call Merita Stanley at 594-9980. Second annual Scarecrow Contest CHIPLEY The second annual Scarecrow Contest, sponsored by the Chipley Garden Club, will be Oct. 13 on the lawn of the museum in conjunction with Washington County Historical Societys FALL INTO HISTORY Festival with assistance from the Washington County Arts Council and Tourist Development Council. Senior Group to experience Christmas in Branson WASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will experience Christmas in Branson, Mo., Nov. 25 to Dec. 1. This trip will include seven shows, seven days and six nights. For more information, call Merita Stanley at 594-9980. POLITICAL CA MP AI GN PRI N TI NG Get the message out with MEET THE CANDIDATE BBQ FOR JOHN SMITH FULL COLOR POSTCARDS ELECT JOAN FULLER FOR COUNT Y S EAT GLOSS Y FULL COLOR RACK CARDS GLOSS Y FULL COLOR DOOR HANGERS WE PRINT MORE THAN JUST NEWSPAPERS CALL KIM FOR FREE QUOTE 638-0212 posters yers business forms all types brochures newsletters postcards letterheads envelopes labels posters tickets yers rubber stamps specialty items and more STOCK DESIGN PADDLE FANS EVENTS from page B5 Special to Extra Planning ahead for the future is a great idea and a key ingredient in most successful businesses but is a daunting task, as the Board of Trustees and Of cers of The Artists Guild of Northwest Florida Inc. discovered this year. The nine-member board and of cers of the not-for-pro t 501(c)(3) Florida corporation based in Jackson County have been wrestling with the strategic planning for the organization since January. They completed the task in July and developed goals and objectives for the organization over the next three years. Getting started on such an arduous task takes creative leadership. TAG called upon Paul Smith, Kevin Yoder and Juanice Wengerd of Rivertown Community Church, who volunteered their time in two separate workshops to get the process started. Then Nancy Zurenda, TAG president, took the reins and guided the board and other interested members through the goal setting and planning process. Much of the work was hammered out in the conference room at the Jackson County Public Library and by individual board members. Strategic planning is especially challenging in the context of a not-for-pro t organization with a diverse membership. The initial meeting outlined numerous objectives for the organization. Then the TAG membership was asked what they believed to be the most important goals for the group. Under Zurendas direction, the participating members honed the goals and established objectives. Our plan includes 17 Strategic Objectives with goals that will serve to accomplish TAGs mission to enrich the cultural and artistic life of Northwest Florida and the surrounding areas through educational programs and opportunities in the visual, performing, and literary arts. Several committees have been formed to focus on the areas of growing membership, searching for a TAG home, expanding art sales opportunities, as well as advertising/marketing and fundraising, stated Zurenda. TAG is not an organization just for 2 and 3 dimensional artists, Zurenda said. Our goal is to reach out to writers, and performing artists as well as art patrons and art lovers and to include them in our programming. In order to enrich the cultural and artistic life of Northwest Florida TAG has a long range goal of nding and supporting a permanent location for the organization to host workshops, seminars, and meetings. The facility could also support a gallery and a small shop featuring the work of local and regional artists. The arts can help fuel the local economy and promote small businesses as well by attracting visitors to our communities, said TAG Founding President Judy Brooten. Arts group plans for future

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One owner, excellent condition. (850)547-2308, (850)624-6236. 1978 Chevy El Camino 350 cubic inch Chevy engine. Four barrael Elderbock carb, glass pack muffler, automatic, streight body. $4000. OBO 850-624-1679 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $17,000, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 8-5116 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 11-472 CA JOHN T. STRAIN, LARRY W. STRAIN, and EMELEE SCHMIDT, Plaintiffs, Vs. HAROLD M. PRESCOTT and BRANDY L. PRESCOTT Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 9, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the East Door of the Holmes County Courthouse 11:00 a.m. on August 9, 2012, the following described property: Begin at the Southeast Corner of the SW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of Section 1, Township 5 North, Range 15 West, Holmes County, Florida and run West 165.0 feet; thence North 1320.0 feet; thence East 165.0 feet; thence South 1320.0 feet back to the Point of Beginning. Containing 5.1 acres more or less. According to survey by Thomas E. Jenkins, Fl. Cert. #2019, dated 3/28/01.(nl/dew) Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: July 13, 2012. CODY TAYLOR Clerk of Court By: /s/ Cindy Jackson Deputy Clerk CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE I CERTIFY that a true and correct copy of the foregoing Notice of Sale under F.S Chapter 45 has been furnished by United States Mail on July 13, 2012 to Scott Manion, Esq., attorney for Brandy Prescott, 2119 Delta Blvd, Tallahassee FL 32303 and by hand delivery to Timothy H. Wells, Post Office Box 155, Bonifay, FL 32425, attorney for Plaintiffs. /s/ Cindy Jackson Deputy Clerk As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 25, August 1, 2012. 8-5117 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No. 12-47 PR Division -CP IN RE: THE ESTATE OF LANA JEAN POWELL Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LANA JEAN POWELL, deceased, File Number12-47 PR Div CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Post Office Box 397, Bonifay, Florida 32435. The names and addresses of the Curator and the attorney for the estate are set forth below. LUIS E. BARRETO, ESQUIRE Florida Bar No.: 0946478 Barreto & Romero, P.A. Biscayne Building, Suite 507 19 West Flagler Street Miami, Florida 33130 Telephone (305)358-1771 LORI LEE YATES, Personal Representative of the Estate c/o LUIS E. BARRETO, ESQUIRE Barreto & Romero, P.A. Biscayne Building, Suite 507 19 West Flagler Street Miami, Florida 33130 Telephone (305)358-1771 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All persons on whom this notice is served who have objections that challenge the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative, venue, or jurisdiction of this Court are required to file their objections with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is August 1, 2012. CURATOR AND ATTORNEY FOR CURATOR: LUIS E. BARRETO & ASSOCIATES, P.A. LUIS E. BARRETO, ESQUIRE, Curator Florida Bar No.: 0946478 Biscayne Building 19 W. Flagler Street Miami, FL 33130 Telephone (305)358-1771 Facsimile (305)358-1773. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 1, 8, 2012. 8-5114 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA Civil Circuit CASE NO: 12-164CA SOUTH GULF INC. Plaintiff v. WILLIAM I. DOBSON TERRY M. PAYNE JENNIFER L. PAYNE AND BENEFICIAL FLORIDA, INC., Defendants CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the cause pending in the Circuit Court in and for Holmes County, Florida, being case no. 12-164CA, the undersigned clerk will sell the property situate in Holmes County, Florida described as follows: Commence at the NW Corner of the S of the SE of NW Section 2, Township 5N, Range 15W, Holmes County, Florida and run S0037’36”E along the forty line 196.35 feet to an old fence line; thence run N8151’17”E 547.85 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue N8151’17”E along said line 420.82 feet to a fence line; thence run S0200’49”E along said fence line 608.52 feet to the North right of way line of Beal Packing Road said point being 15 feet North of Centerline; thence run S8904’45”W along said line 418.37 feet; thence run N0127’04”E, 555.59 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 5.6 acres more or less. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m. on the 23 day of August 2012, at the front door of the Holmes County Courthouse, Bonifay, FL. Dated this 13 day of July, 2012. CODY TAYLOR CLERK OF COURT By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 25, August 1, 2012. 8-5121 Public Auction at El Sankary Towing in Ponce De Leon Fl, 1600 Pirate Cove Rd. 32455 at 8:00 a.m. on August 17, 2012. (1) 1993 Ford Crown Vic -Vin # 2FACP74W4PX118649 Owner: Frankey Baker (1) 1992 Jeep Cherokee -Vin # 1J4FT58S2NL118961 Owner: Brittney Manning. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 1, 8, 2012. 8-5120 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 12-64_ PR IN RE: ESTATE OF JEFFIE CARMON KEMP, JR ., a/k/a J.C. KEMP, JR. deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Jeffie Carmon Kemp, Jr., a/k/a J.C. Kemp, Jr., deceased, whose date of death was March 15, 2012, and whose social security number is XXX-XX-7027, File Number 12-64 PR is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Holmes County Courthouse, Post Office Box 397, Bonifay, Florida 32425. The name and address of the Co-Personal Representatives and the Co-Personal Representatives’s attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is August 1, 2012. Co-Personal Representative: JOY ANN WELLS, 15252 NW JW RACKLEY STREET, ALTHA, FLORIDA 32421. JAMES EDWARD KEMP, POST OFFICE BOX 3184, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32056. Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives: JOHN Y. ROBERTS. ROBERTS, ROBERTS & ROBERTS 2879 MADISON STREET, POST OFFICE BOX 1544, MARIANNA, FLORIDA 32447 (850) 526-3865 FLORIDA BAR NO. 0496871 As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 1, 8, 2012. COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 Publisher’s Notice “SCAM “To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. I Buy Any Junk Car $250 FLAT RATE (800) 277-1569 ADVERTISE YOUR WAY TO SUCCESS! Call now to grow your business. Get your classified ad in 119 newspapers with one order. Advertising Networks of Florida—(866)742.1373 I’m looking for a single woman 35-45, non-smoker, Christian. (850)547-1445. UKC American Pit Bu ll Terrier bullies. Ready to go, fawns, blues, etc. Soft, cute, cudley, First Shots, great pedigrees. $400.00 850-638-3132 “Downsizing”. Saturday, Aug. 4, 2012. 7:30-1:00 p.m. 1515 S. Hwy 79, Bonifay. Collection of Steins, decanters, bird figurines, glassware, pyrex, milk glass & much more miscellaneous. Back to School Yard Sale August 1st-4th. 8:00 a.m—til. Behind Panhandle Lumber, Armstrong Street, Bonifay. Clothes, shoes, household items and much more. (850)547-9320. Estate Sale Esto. Saturday, August 4. 7 a.m.-until. 2nd Ave. North. (Turn off Hwy 79 @ Esto Church of Christ). 6 chairs, table & china hutch, dropleaf coffee table, rocker/recliner, couch, china, ladies, clothes-small, petite, medium & large. Garage Sale Friday & Saturday August 3rd & 4th. 8 a.m. until. 905 W. Banfill Ave., Bonifay. Garage Sale. Friday, Aug. 3rd. 1134 Iola Dr, Chipley, Orange Hill Hwy. 7AM-Until. Back to school kids clothes. HUGE YARD SALE Sat Aug 4 Railroad Ave Chipley. Including furniture, household items, designer clothes, sporting goods, and much much more. Large 2 family Yard Sale. Saturday, Aug. 4, 7 a.m.-until. Corner of North Ave & North Caryville Rd., Bonifay. LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE: Like a big Flea Market, but yard sale prices. Friday & SaturdayAug 3 & 4 8:00AM-5:00PM. Located on the bypass (Maple Avenue) Geneva, AL. Near Courthouse. Mulit-Family Yard Sale Fri & Sat 8 am Until. 896 8th ST Chipley .Lots of adult, junior & children new &used clothes, purses, shoes, house hold items, bed linens, furniture, entertainment center, lots of odds & ends Multi Family Yard Sale Aug 4th 8-2 located at 1270 Merry Acres Drive Chipley. R on Hwy 273 N “ Murry’s Tire Store” 1/2 mile on left on Merry Acres, to end right over bridge. Kids clothes many sizes 2/$1.00, ladies, mens size 56, household, tea pots, silver jewelry, TV, MISC. & MUCH MORE! K&L Farm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 U-PICK GRAPES $4.00/Gallon (850)547-2326 Follow signs on Hwy 177A to 1837 Flowing Well Rd., Bonifay. U-Pick 7 days, daylight Electric Scooter Chair. Clean, complete, good condition. $200. (850)956-3027 or cell (850)307-2271. Caryville Flea Market Produce, knives, honey, westerns, movies, okra $1.00/lb., old tools, new and used stuff. Open Saturdays 8 a.m. Gilbert Catfish Pond Closed Monday and Tuesday 2854 Highview Circle Chipley, Fl 32428 Phone:850-638-8633 Judy’s hand made Quilts Some on hand or custom made to your order. (850)768-0165. Several Items For Sale Terry Craft 15 Bass Boat, 115HP Mariner, GPS depth finder, trolling motor, $3500.00. GE washer/ dryer like new. $250 for both. Pool table, slate top, regulation, excellent condition $500. Call 850-326-2436 or 850-638-0215 WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incl’d 638-1918 3BR/1.5BA for rent $650/mth. No pets. Deposit, & references required Chipley. 638-1918 For Rent: Nice Townhouse apartment 2BR/2.5BA, one car garage in downtown Bonifay. NO PETS. Call (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586. 3-4 Bedroom home fully furnished, $950/mo, Bonifay area. Also 2 Bdrm/1 bath Apt. $700/mo, fully furnished, free lawn service. (850)547-2096. For Rent 3BR/2BA trailer, $300/month. 2BR/1BA trailer $250/month. Ponce de Leon area. (850)226-4656. FOR RENT. 3BD/ 1BA h ousein Gilbert Subdivision. $650/mth, $650/depo. (850) 547-4284 or (850)638-0300. Ask to speak with Kim, Monday -Friday. House for rent on North 2nd Street, Chipley, Fl. 2 Bdrm/1 bath. (850)547-2061. No pets please. (2) 2BR/2BA MH for rent near Chipley. Water & garbage furnished. $400 & $425 plus deposit. Call 547-4232. 527-4911 “Bonifay’s Best” Mobile Home Community has 2 or 3 bedrooms available ranging from $435-$625/month. Large lots, quiet, clean and on-site maintenance. Only responsible persons should apply. Great Bonifay Schools. No pets. One month deposit. HUD Assistance may be available. Contact Sue: (850)547-1386 or (512)751-2847. 2BR Furnished Mobile Home CH/A. Real clean. On Bonnett Pond Rd. $500/mth $200/dep. Sorry No Pets 850-638-1462 3BD/2BADoublewide Country setting. Water furnished. Rent $650 deposit $400.In Washington County. 5 miles east of Walmart. Hud accepted. 850-260-5626 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. Country Living DW Mobile Home for Rent. Located off Brickyard Rd North on Hayley Dr. Front & rear porches. Real nice, big yard. Call Lou Corbin 638-1911 FOR RENT: Nice 2BR & 3BR MH Corbin RD Near Sapp Community Church. I furnish water, garbage, extermination, change air filter & mow grass once a mth. Deck on front & back, small storage building.For more info, call Lou Corbin @ 638-1911 or cell phone, 326-0044. Sorry No Pets. $33,500 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. Reduced Price! Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858.

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, August 1, 2012 ATTN: DRIVERS ....Apply Now, 13 Driver Positions Top 5% Pay, 401K, Great Insurance New KW Conventionals 2 Mos CDL Class A Driving Exp ( 877)258-8782 Drivers -Refrigerated and Dry Van freight. Hometime Choices: Weekly, 7/ON -7/OFF, 14/ON-7/OFF and more. Modern Trucks! CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. (800)414-9569. www.driveknight.com EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE HAPPY JACK DuraSpot: latest technology in flea, tick, mosquito & mite control on dogs. Patented. At farm, feed & hardware stores. Distributed by Fuller Supply (205) 343-3341. www.happyjackinc.com MEDICAL CAREERS begin here -Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (888) 2033179 www. CenturaOnline.com Medical OfficeTrainees Needed! Train online to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Training & Local Job Placement assistance thru SC Training, HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888) 374-7294. Full time Automotive Sales position. Previous experience preferred. Geneva area. (334)684-3646. Maintenance Part Time Maintenance Tech at Oak Terrace Apartments in Bonifay, FL Candidate will perform varies Maintenance duties necessary to maintain and have a clean community& facility. Duties will include plumbing, light electrical,painting, cleaning, etc. Candidate will work as a team player with fellow employees. Applicants must have own tools & reliable transportation. Please contact Beth In gram at boyd-mail.com Now Accepting Applications for,cooks,servers, oyster shuckers & dishwashers. Taking applications Tues-Sat from 10am-4pm. Apply in Person by 8-25-12. French’s Restaurant & Oyster Bar HWY 90, Caryville, FL 850-548-5800 Now Hiring Preschool Teacher: Must be able to pass a level 2 background check. Experience is a plus but not necessary. Also looking for a cook. Apply at The Academy located at 1567 Hwy 90 Chipley. Babysitter/Housekeeper wanted in my home in Bonifay, part-time. Ok to bring your own kids along. Drug free Christian home. Monica (850)855-1177. FINANCE MANAGERJerkins, Inc. in Bonifay, FL is looking for an experienced Financial Manager. A/P, A/R, & Payroll are some of the requirements. Excel a must. Please send your resumes to: micah@jerkinsinc.com Web ID#34217662Text FL17662 to 56654 Form Carpenters & Laborers (Seasonal/PT) needed for construction project in Bonifay. Please call 386-496-3883 to apply. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our Medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Install/Maint/RepairDeisel Fleet MechanicJerkins, Inc. in Bonifay, FL looking for an experienced Deisel Fleet Mechanic. Apply in person 312 West Pennsylvania Ave, Bonifay or call 850-547-3651 Web ID#34218304Text FL18304 to 56654 Auto Technician Full Time Tech. Ford exp perfered. 334-684-3646 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Schneider National! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job Ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Drivers/Flatbed Class A. GET HOME WEEKENDS! Southeast Regional, Earn up to 39c/mi. 1 year OTR Flatbed experience required, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, LLC Child Care Tri-County Community Council Inc., is accepting applications for Early Head Start Home Visitor in Walton County. Responsibility: Conduct weekly home visits with Early Heard Start home based program enrollees and provide services per grant guidelines. Minimum Qualifications: High School (GED); Must have a Chold Development Associate (CDA) or be willing to obtain within 1 year ; 3-6 months related work experience and or training with infants and toddlers. Must have Current driver’s license and proper vehicle insurance coverage. Must comply with health and background screening. For additional information and application call LeaAnn, Personnel Tech (850)547-3689, or visit the agency website www .tricountycommunity council.com and submit by Aug 6 4:30 p.m. Successful applicant will be subject to pre-employment drug test. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER AND DRUG AND SMOKE FREE WORKPLACE. Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more! Nothing works harder than the Classifieds! 850-638-0212 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today Why a management career at Costa Enterprises McDonalds? Because its much more than a career „ its a curriculum for life. The training, skills and experiences youll gain from running your own multi-million dollar restaurant are simply unmatched. This is your opportunity for a career where anythings possible. The sky is the limit, and we will fine tune your skills and maximize your talents to reveal your true potential.We believe in our peopleWe know what its like to be a leader. Thats why we provide you with a progressive career path that gives you the opportunity to be at the top of your game. Over 50 percent of McDonalds Franchisees started off behind the counter, as did more than 75 percent of our Restaurant Managers, and many of McDonalds Corporate Staff. We are committed to our people, which is why we offer opportunity, nurture talent, develop leaders and reward achievement. At McDonalds we enjoy a diverse, collaborative environment that fosters respect and drives high levels of engagement, which are essential to our continued success. We believe in educationMcDonalds is committed to being a learning organization. Not only do we provide educational assistance to our employees, but we also offer a college scholarship program for outstanding student employees. Another unique benefit of a career with McDonalds is our very own Hamburger University. Our programs lay an ideal foundation for building a high-powered career in McDonalds management and beyond. McDonalds is currently the only organization to be recognized by the American Council on Education (ACE) for our Restaurant Management curriculum. Your participation in our training programs can earn you credit toward your college degree program.We believe in giving back to our communitiesAt McDonalds you play an important role in serving the community. After all, the people you know, meet, serve, hire or greet are all part of it. Over the years, millions of people have frequented McDonalds because its a trusted name with proven service. Giving back to our community through educational, athletic, and other avenues is our way of returning that loyalty. We are extremely proud to support Ronald McDonald House Charities and its cornerstone program, Ronald McDonald House. We believe in perksWe value the hard work and dedication of each member of our team. At Costa Enterprises McDonalds we are pleased to provide exceptional benefits that reflect our appreciation for our people and their contributions to our success. Benefits include competitive wages, flexible hours, health insurance options, monthly bonus plans, continued education, 401(k), paid vacations, and up to wireless phone, laptop and even a company vehicle when you reach the General Manager position!We believe that you make the differenceDo you feel like you have what it takes to manage one of our fast-paced multimillion dollar restaurants? Then start today on the path that can take you down a long successful management career with McDonalds. At Costa Enterprises McDonalds we know that our people make all the difference. Apply online today through our website at www.costamcd.com or stop by any one of our 14 Costa Enterprise owned locations across the Panhandle from Port St. Joe, Blountstown, Panama City, Destin, Niceville to Navarre. At McDonalds, we believe you can do great things here! Featured Jobs To Place An Employment Here Please Contact Lorna Brown Phone: (850) 747-5019 € Email: lbrown@pcnh.com Like Us On Facebook: www.facebook.com/emcoastjobs Or Follow Us on Twitter: @emcoastjobs



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50www.bonifaynow.com For the latest breaking news, visitBONIFAYNOW.COM IN BRIEF bonifaynow.comConnect With Us 24/7 Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo galleries, opinions and more...@WCN_HCT And Mobile Too Volume 122, Number 16Wednesday, August 1 2012 Pd. Pol.Adv. paid for and approved by Kyle Hudson, Dem. Holmes Co. Clerk of Court Elect Kyle I will your vote in the August August August Primary I will I will I will I will appreciate Tax collector, commissions District 5 seat to be decided Aug. 14By RANDAL SEYLER638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Holmes County voters will decide several contests in the primary election scheduled for Aug. 14. The biggest eld of contenders vying for a county of ce is that of the Holmes County Clerk of Court of ce, where seven candidates are seeking election. Only the Democratic Clerk of Court candidates Kyle Hudson, Lee Moss and Zachary R. White will face off in the primary election. The sole Republican candidate, Don W. Hersman Jr., and the two candidates running with no party af liation, John King Jr., Timothy H. Wells and Marsha Farmer Sherrouse will face the Democratic winner in November. Incumbent Holmes County Baker makes bid for School Board seatFrom Staff ReportsBONIFAY Wilburn G. Baker of Westville has announced his candidacy for the Holmes County School Board, District 2 position. For me its the satisfaction of helping our children become successful leaders in Holmes Bell aims for re-election as tax collectorFrom Staff ReportsBONIFAY Harry Bell has announced his plans to seek re-election as Holmes County tax collector. Bell said in a news release that he has been honored and blessed with the trust the citizens of Holmes County be-Dennis Lee eyes reclaiming sheriffs of ceFrom Staff ReportsBONIFAY Dennis Lee announced his candidacy for the Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce. A Republican, Lee served as Holmes County Sheriff from 1996-2008. During that time, Lee and his staff were responsible for the Wells running for Holmes Clerk of CourtFrom Staff ReportsBONIFAY Bonifay attorney Tim Wells has announced his candidacy for the of ce of clerk of the circuit court for Holmes County. With the upcoming retirement of both Cody Taylor and his chief deputy, theres Marell seeks commissions District 5 seatFrom Staff ReportsBONIFAY Local business owner and Bonifay resident Kristen Marell has announced her candidacy for the Holmes County Commissioner District 5 seat. Marell and her husband Primary crucial to candidates EARLY VOTINGEarly voting for the 2012 Primary Election begins Saturday, Aug. 4, from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the Supervisor of Elections of ce, in the basement of the Holmes County Courthouse. Early voting also will be 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 5. For the rest of the week, Aug. 6-11, ballots may be cast from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.2012 VOTERS GUIDEBe sure to read the 2012 Holmes County Voters Guide in this edition of the Holmes County TimesAdvertiser.INSIDE TODAYFind your precincts voting location. Page A2 HARRY BELL TIM WELLS WILBURN BAKER DENNIS LEE KRISTEN MARELL INDEXOpinion ................................A4 Outdoors ..............................A6 Sports ..................................A7 Extra ....................................B1 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B7 Phone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 ELECTION 2012 See WELLS A2 See MARELL A2 See LEE A2 See BELL A2 See BAKER A2 See PRIMARY A2 Seventh-Day Adventist Church Yard Sale BONIFAY The Bonifay Seventh-Day Adventist Church across from Docs Market will have a yard sale starting at 7 a.m. Thursday. The funds raised will help purchase school supplies for local students.Bonifay Middle School orientationBONIFAY Orientation for the 2012-13 school year will be in the Bonifay Middle School Cafeteria a follows: Aug. 15, fth grade at 8:30 a.m. and sixth grade at 10 a.m.; Aug. 16, seventh grade at 8:30 a.m. and eighth grade at 10 a.m.Bonifay Saints sign-upsBONIFAY Bonifay Saints, also known as See BRIEF A8 Going down that long road, its dark and dreary. Been going so long, stressed, tired and weary. Drank, did some drugs and bar hopped with the best, Never took time for Jesus, to kick back and rest. Been in that dark place so very long. Was hard to convince me I was in the wrong. Was convinced that there was this life, nothing more. No time for Jesus, just try and Ill show you the door. Convinced it was to just go into eternal sleep, Somehow the Spirit slowly into my mind did creep. It brought me to my knees and broke my heart, Made me realize, I was going to Hell, I had a good start. Go to church, sitting there, I could hardly wait, Invitation time, down the aisle like a bull out of the gate. My life to my savior, I committed my soul, I gave Him my all, mind, body, being, the whole. The peace that came and washed over me, Opened my eyes, now I can plainly see. The road I was on, seems it was long ago, The road is for and to Jesus, I want you all to know. I look back and think about myself, foolish and dumb, How God kept me alive many times as I tried to succumb. I now realize for everything theres a purpose to be had, Hell take the meanest old sinner and make good from the bad. CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser David Bruner, paralyzed after a car accident in 1996, nds strength in inspirational poetry. Bruner is pictured with mother, Maveen Bruner.

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LocalA2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, August 1, 2012 HOLMES COUNTY PRECINCT LOCATIONS Sheriff Tim Brown and challenger Dennis Lee will face each other in the Republican primary on Aug. 14, and the winner of that contest will go on face John Braxton Jr., who has no party afliation, in the November General Election. In the race for Holmes County property appraiser, Democrat Otis Corbin Jr. is competing with Republican Felecia Fisanick. Because neither candidate faces opposition from within their own party, both will move on to the General Election. The job of county tax collector is being sought by two Democrats Harry Bell and Fran Fuller resulting in one of the two local universal primary contests. If all candidates for an ofce have the same party afliation and the winner will have no opposition in the General Election, then all qualied voters, regardless of party afliation, may vote in the primary elections for that ofce. These contests are called universal primary contests, according to the Santa Rosa County Supervisor of Elections website, santarosa..gov. The outcome of the primary will determine the winner of the election, although it is very possible there could be run-off elections required. The race for county commissioner, District 5, is the other universal primary in Holmes County. Five Democrats are vying for the District 5 seat: Kristen Marell, J. Wayne Marsh, Ron Monk Jr., Bill Parish and Harold Smith. In the District 1 county commissioner race, there is a trio of Republicans, Charles Chuck Aronhalt, Stephen Herrington III and Bobby Sasnett, facing off in the primary. The sole Democrat, Jim King, will face the winner of the Republican primary in November. Likewise in District 3, Republicans Jerry Cooley and David Whitaker will face each other in the primary, with the winner going on to face Democrat Phillip Music in November. The superintendent of schools race has two Democrats, Buddy Lee Brown and Eddie Dixon, facing each other in the primary with the winner taking on Republican Terry Mears in November. The county school board, District 2 and District 4 races are nonpartisan and may be decided during the Primary Election, barring any run-offs. Contestants for the school board, District 2 seat include Wilburn G. Baker, Debbie Kolmetz and Andrea Schiller. School board District 4 contestants are Shay McCormick and Shirley Owens. Countys future, Baker said. If I can help one child do better in his or her studies, it would all be worth it. Oftentimes, it is just listening and providing resources, guidance and support to a child to make all of the difference of whether or not he or she fails or succeeds. Baker was an instructor at Chipola College for 20 years and served as Holmes County EMS director for 24 years and as a paramedic. He is a certied re safety inspector and certied reghter and is a state of Florida grant selection team member Baker has been involved with the welfare of children in the Holmes County School System for more than 30 years, he said, and he is a lifelong resident of Holmes County. He said he has 35 years experience in health care, safety, administration budgets and grants. If elected, I plan to be on sight and available to listen to and address the concerns of Holmes County students, parents and teachers, he said. I have worked closely with the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners for over 30 years and have gained much from my experience that will be helpful if elected to the School Board ofce. I have always been a hard worker, and will continue to work had for you if elected. I will be accessible to talk with students, parents and teachers to listen to their concerns and ideas, Baker said. There is no I in team, and working together, everyone achieves more. stowed upon him in August and November 2004 and 2008. Bell said his No. 1 mission has been to be fully accessible to the public and to be dedicated to knowledgeable, efcient and friendly service. Bell has created partnerships with the Florida Division of Driver Licenses and made numerous upgrades and restructuring of the tax collector ofce to maximize efcient management of public funds with the highest level of service, he said. Bell has a bachelors degree from Troy University-Dothan in business administration. He is a graduate of the Florida School of Banking and a graduate of Floridas Tax Collector Certication Program-Certied Florida Collector. Bell said he continues to serve in the community as a volunteer, member and a requested speaker at various clubs and organizations throughout Holmes County. Bell is the son of Harry and Margaret Bell of Marianna. His wife of 26 years is Sandra George Bell, daughter of Glen and Betty George of Bonifay. They have three children: Zac, age 22; Nic, age 18; and Cassie, age 14. Zac currently attends college. Nic is a 2012 high school graduate and is preparing to serve a two-year church mission; Cassie attends school in Holmes County. The family attends church in Bonifay at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. I believe that everyone must be treated fairly, honestly, with professionalism and most importantly kindness, Bell said. Serving the citizens of Holmes County has been an honor and privilege to provide friendly and proven service. Please come by your ofce and allow us to demonstrate our commitment to service. most drug arrests in Holmes County history, Lee said in a news release. Lee said more than $300,000 in drug forfeitures was put to use fighting crime in Holmes County. A nationally recognized war on meth, education programs for children and citizens of all ages and personal supervision of every major crime scene in the county were all features of his tenure in office, Lee said. A fifth-generation Holmes County resident, Lee and his family reside in the Bethlehem community. He and his wife, Leesa (Manning), have four children and two grandchildren. They attend Carmel Assembly of God. Lee has 28 years of law enforcement experience. Serving as your sheriff was (my) childhood dream, he said. Believing that the job of sheriff is a job, not a position, Lee worked his way up from dispatcher/jailer to road deputy, holding each position at the police department as well, finally serving as Bonifay Police Chief from 1989-1996 and Holmes County Sheriff from 1996-2008. Lee said he is running to finish the job he and his staff started, because he believes Holmes County is worth fighting for. If elected, Lee promises a highly trained, highly effective and highly supervised sheriffs department that will communicate with the people. A well-informed and educated public is the best backup law enforcement can have when it comes to combating crime, Lee said. Citizens have a right to know what is going on in their communities. By using grant money and alternate funding sources, Lee said he plans to maximize the budget without sacrificing the safety of Holmes Countians for political gain. Each citizen deserves to be treated with respect and dignity, Lee said. I believe in an open-door policy and welcome your questions, concerns and suggestions. own and manage a local business, Cross Country Exterminators, which has served Holmes County for more than 37 years. Since leaving my insurance career, managing and budgeting our business has been a huge learning process for me, especially during our tough economy, Marell said in a news release. A resident of Florida since 1977, Marell has been a Holmes County resident for 30 years. She was raised in the campsites in Gritney and now resides in Bonifay. She has lived at her residence on Highway 177A since 1994. Marell and her husband, Eric, have been married for 18 years, and they have two sons, Cole, 14 and Bradly, 6. Marell graduated from Holmes County High School in 1992 and continued her education in health care, insurance and financial planning, business management and accounting. Holmes County needs leadership for growth and strength in our communities and county, Marell said. We also need new management for our county. With my proven leadership, and my experience in business management, I know Im the right person for the job of your county commissioner. As your County Commissioner, I promise to represent the people of Holmes County professionally and with respect. I will make it a priority to be available to listen and address the concerns and issues of all people of Holmes County, not just District 5. I will work with the board to make prudent decisions, and I will work the full four years you elect me for. Holmes County Commissioners are your local government. The decisions made by our county commissioners are crucial for our county. By electing me, I will be honest, trustworthy, dependable, and strong enough to make the crucial decisions our county needs. almost 80 years of knowledge walking out the door, Wells said in a news release. The new clerk will have to hit the ground running, and will now have to do the job with a smaller budget, since the July 1 legislative cuts. As an attorney for over 26 years, I have the experience to allow a smooth transition into ofce and the desire to keep the well-trained staff already in place and continue the efcient service of the clerks ofce. The clerks ofce is busy every day of the year, Wells said. County bills and employees have to be paid, court lings and public records must be processed correctly and on time, and the privacy of non-public records must be maintained. With my legal background, I have a unique understanding of the court system which no other candidate has. In addition to a 22-year law practice, Wells has worked at various times as a prosecutor, public defender, assistant attorney general and FDOT senior attorney. He has been involved in the community as a 23-year member and past president of the Bonifay Kiwanis Club, a 21-year member and past VP of the Chamber of Commerce and current vice-chair of the Development Commission. He has also worked with Teen Court as judge and trainer, been a literacy volunteer and taught criminal justice courses for both Chipola College and Washington-Holmes Technical Center. Tim Wells has been married for more than 25 years to his wife, Debbie, and they have three children, Laura, Julie and Perry II. The family has lived near Esto for more than 20 years on property originally purchased by Tims great-grandfather. BAKER from page A1 BELL from page A1 LEE from page A1 MARELL from page A1 WELLS from page A1Precinct 1 (Ponce de Leon) Ponce de Leon Town Hall 1580 Highway 90 Ponce de Leon, FL 32455 Precinct 2 (Pine Log) Pine Log Volunteer Fire Dept. 1652 N. Highway 81 Westville, FL 32464 Precinct 3 (New Hope) New Hope Volunteer Fire Dept. 1243 Highway 179A Westville, FL 32464 Precinct 4 (Bethlehem) Bethlehem School Choral Suite 2767 Highway 160 Bonifay, FL 32425 Precinct 5 (Gritney) Gritney Volunteer Fire Dept. 2141 Tobe Retherford Road Bonifay, FL 32425 Precinct 6 (Noma) Noma Community Center 3467 Skipper Ave. Bonifay, FL 32425 Precinct 7 (West Bonifay) Holmes County Agriculture Center 1173 E. Highway 90 Bonifay, FL 32425 Precinct 8 (East Bonifay) Holmes County Agriculture Center 1173 E. Highway 90 Bonifay, FL 32425 PRIMARY from page A1

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A3Wednesday, August 1, 2012From Staff ReportsWAUSAU The rst whiff of Possum Festival was in the air Saturday night as the annual Miss Fun Day Pageant was held at the Wausau Possum Palace. The pageant had numerous young ladies turn out to compete for Miss Fun Day titles and a few young men were even brave enough to vie for the Mr. Fun Day King title. Madison Carter was named 2012 Miss Fun Day and most photogenic and Miranda Odom was rst runner-up in the Miss Fun Day competition. Other titles included: The 2012 Miss Tiny Baby Fun Day was Haven Austin Mathis, Most Photogenic winner was Laura Elizabeth Yates, 2nd Runner-Up was Avery Grace Kirkland and 1st Runner-up Payten Brianne Joyner. Mr. Fun Day King was Bentley Arries Paul Locke. First Runner-Up was Brandon Miller. Little Baby Fun Day was Addison Grace Chance, while 1st Runner-Up went to Palyn Jayne Byers and 2nd Runner-Up and Most Photogenic was Faith Elizabeth Ann Russell. Miss Tiny Tot Fun Day was Amaya Brunson. The 2nd Runner-Up was Macie Riley, and 1st Runner-Up and Most Photogenic was Kinley Kristene Kirkland. Little Miss Fun Day 2012 and Most Photogenic winner was Hanna Elaine Duke, and 2nd Runner-Up Alexia Flowers and 1st Runner-Up Jeanna Raquael Johnson. Junior Miss Fun Day was Abby Renee McKenzie, while 2nd Runner-Up was Ashley Feldman, Most Photogenic went to Billie LeAnn Goodman, and 1st RunnerUp was Sara Kingsley Scott. Miss Pre-Teen Fun Day was Isabella Flowers, and 2nd Runner-Up was Sara Catherine Padgett. Most Photogenic went to Marissa White, and 1st Runner-Up was Alyssa Marie Willey. Miss Teen Fun Day winner was Kayla Anne Rudd, while 2nd Runner-Up went to Ericka Marie Adams, and 1st Runner-Up and Most Photogenic was Rebecca Lynn Williams. The 43rd annual Wausau Possum Festival begins at 6 p.m. Friday with the annual Possum King & Queen Contest. Saturday is the annual Fun Day and is no admission charge. The day kicks off with the Wausau Masonic Lodge pancake breakfast at 6 a.m. At 7:30 a.m. the Possum Trot 5K Run/Walk in downtown Wausau starts, and at 9 a.m. the Invocation and Welcome at the Possum Palace of cially opens the event. From 9:45 to 10:30 a.m. Musician Billy Lipford will be performing at the Possum Palace. At 10 a.m. the Fun Day Parade will be held downtown and the music continues from 10:30 to 11 a.m. with the Parish Family. The Cornpone baking contest will be held at 11 a.m. From 11:20 to noon Big Bend Bluegrass will perform and from noon to 12:10 the ag raising and National Anthem will be performed at the Possum Palace. The Possum Auction and Quilt Auction will be held from 12:10 to 12:45 p.m. at the Palace followed by special guest speakers until 1:15 p.m. The Parish Family returns to perform from 1:15 until 2 p.m., then from 2 to 2:30 p.m. the Sack Races and Greasy Pole contest will be held. Billy Lipford returns to perform from 2 to 2:45 p.m., followed by Big Bend Bluegrass from 2:45 to 3:15 p.m. From 3:15 to 4:15 p.m. the Hog Callin, Rooster Crowin for kids at will be held. Events conclude with the Hog Callin Contest for adults at the Palace from 4:15 to 5:15 p.m. Northwest Florida Community Hospital FAIR Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012 9am-Noon FREE ADMISSIONfor school-age children and familiesWashington County Health Dept. IMMUNIZATION CLINICFor school age children 9am-Noon 9am-Noon Washington County Health Dept. Washington County Health Dept. Washington County Health Dept. Washington County Health Dept. Washington County Health Dept. We Treat You Like Familybetter than (850)638-1610Free Haircuts NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." www.mulliseye.com Chipley Office We are located directly across the parking lot from the Walmart in Chipley"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS,CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITYAPPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley OfficeBoard Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 8-31-12 FREEEYE EXAM CODE: WC00ToddRobinson,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeon LeeMullis,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeon NOTICEThe City of Bonifay Council would like to apologize to David Guthrie for the misleading statement that he had not been paying his City utility bills. The remark was referring to the water and sewer impact and tap fees NOT his monthly bills. Photos by RANDAL SEYLER | Times-AdvertiserLeft: Haven Mathis was named Miss Tiny Baby Fun Day. Haven is the daughter of Jeremy and Jessica Mathis of Sand Hills. Above: Jadeyn Popp, left, looks on as Alexia Flowers, second from left, is named 2nd runner-up and Hanna Duke, center, is named 2012 Little Miss Fun Day at Wausau on Saturday night. Also pictured is Michelle Miller at right. Little Miss Fun Day contestants were 4 to 6 years old. Possum Festival begins FridayAbove: Payten Joyner gets a lift on her way to winning 1st RunnerUp in the 2012 Miss Tiny Baby Fun Day Pageant.By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com VERNON Over one year later, the city of Vernon is prepared to move forward with the long-awaited water and sewer project. The city council approved the engineering agreements for both the Community Development Block Grant Water system improvement and the State Revolving Fund Sewer line project on Monday. The city has been in need of replacing and expanding their sewer and water system for quite some time and with the widening of State Road 79 the project has been delayed that much more. Steps are being taken to insure that this project proceeds at a steady pace, said Grant Writer Nolan Baker. The CDBG Water system improvement engineering agreement is allowing Baker to set out the bid for the project and the SRF Sewer line project engineering agreement is to go forward with designing the project. Before the meeting began there was a moment of silence for the recently departed City Council Member Oscar Ward. He will be greatly missed by both the city hall and in the city of Vernon, said Mayor Michelle Cook. He will be missed by all. The council approved allowing a basketball tournament to be held on Aug. 11 at the Vernon City Hall gym. The council also approved of writer Brent Heards request to become an honorary citizen of Vernon, Fla. His request stated that he has many fond memories of Vernon and that his newest book would be entitled Postcards from Vernon.Vernon to proceed with water, sewer project The pageant had numerous young ladies turn out to compete for Miss Fun Day titles and a few young men were even brave enough to vie for the Mr. Fun Day King title.

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OpinionA4 | Holmes County Times-AdvertiserCONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com 1-800-645-8688 ADVERTISING 850-547-9414 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2012, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. A friend of mine, who isnt nearly as old as I am, said the other day, I think its just hotter than it used to be. I hear that a lot in these miserably hot days of July and August, and sometimes I am tempted to believe that global warming is being felt here in the deep South. But in truth, its probably no hotter than its ever been, though I believe the reports that some of the great glaciers are melting. But I told my friend Paula that I think its the air conditioning that has so spoiled us that we cant tolerate the heat like we used to. I can remember plenty of nights even as a child, that I couldnt sleep because of the heat. Our mama called our home a hull of a house. One man wrote in The Heritage of Holmes County that their home was a cull of a house. We could have called ours that too. Until I was in my early teens, we had no screens on the windows. I told Paula that, and she couldnt believe folks lived like that in my lifetime. At least we did have glass windows. I knew a few houses in our community that had wooden shutters. Well, I told her we didnt quite live on Gods Little Acre, but we werent too far from Tobacco Road. We got screens on the windows when my dad picked up a hitch-hiker, which he frequently did in those years of the Great Depression. After spending one night in our house, the man made my dad a proposition. If Daddy would buy the materials, hed stay on and build the screens for just room and board. After that, Mr. Wagner hit the road, and we never heard from him again. Sometimes on those hot muggy nights, wed go out on the front porch and sleep on the cotton that was piled there waiting to get a bail to take to the gin. I cant say that was any more comfortable as the mosquitoes had a field day on you there, too; the cotton was sometimes still warm from having come in from the field in late afternoon; and the stickers from the pieces of burrs hidden in the fluffy stuff made for a lumpy bed. We never got electricity until I was almost out of high school, so obviously we had no electric fans. Grandma Wells always had a hand fan by her bed to fan herself to sleep. They were good, too, for shooing off mosquitoes and gnats. During the day, people just sweated a lot. We kids would draw up a wash tub of well water and jump in and out of it if we got a chance to cool off between farm chores. Sometimes wed all hop on the pick-up truck and make a quick run to the creek before evening chores. Most of the time there was no break between afternoon and evening chores. Even when we built our home in 1959-60, central air conditioning was not standard in our price range. We had a huge window fan, which wed used in the old house (The Tison old home where my husband grew up). Since it didnt fit in the windows of our new house, wed set it in the hall and cool the bedrooms at night. Our son got so used to the noise that hed run it in the closet in the winter so he could sleep. Whoever invented window screening made a huge step in protecting southern homes from mosquitoes that caused such diseases as malaria and yellow fever as well as equine encephalitis. The fevers have pretty much been eliminated with better swamp drainage, window screening and other means of mosquito control. Encephalitis is always a threat, especially in the dog days of summer, and we are warned to take precautions to protect ourselves by (1) wearing protective clothing,(2) wearing mosquito repellant, (3) getting rid of places, such as empty containers, flower pots, etc., that harbor mosquito larvae and (4) staying indoors around twilight. Dr. John Gorie of Apalachicola who invented the ice machine and led to the invention of air conditioning probably has had more impact on the way we live than any invention of modern times. In fact, he was seeking to keep his patients cool when he invented a way to make ice. Thank you to Dr. John Gorie and whoever invented screen wire.Is it getting hotter, or is it me?HAPPY CORNERHazel Wells Tison Wednesday, August 1, 2012 Although the official back to school date is still a few weeks away, I heard an interesting talk Sunday about children and their development, based on research by the Search Institute. The Rev. Darby Neptune was speaking at Unity of Panama City on the 40 developmental assets for adolescents and how these metrics can predict the success, or lack of success, in youth. I am not a real big believer in, well, anything much less sociological mumbojumbo mixed in with a bunch of statistics, but the survey from the Search Institute was interesting in that the assets it surveyed included eight basic topics, broken down into two groups internal assets and external assets. The external assets were identified as support, empowerment, boundaries and expectations and constructive use of time. The Internal Assets were commitment to learning, positive Values, social competencies and positive identity. The eight assets are further divided into 20 internal and 20 external subcategories. On one level, the 40 developmental assets represent everyday wisdom about positive experiences and characteristics for young people, states on the website, searchinstitute.org. For example, under the external assets support heading, students were asked to rate topics such as family support, positive family communication, other adult relationships, caring neighborhood, caring school climate and parent involvement in schooling. Children responded on a survey indicating how much, or how little, of these influences were in their lives. In addition, Search Institute research has found that these assets are powerful influences on adolescent behaviorboth protecting young people from many different problem behaviors and promoting positive attitudes and behaviors. This power is evident across all cultural and socioeconomic groups of youth. There is also evidence from other research that assets have the same kind of power for younger children. Nearly 150,000 youth, grades six to 12, from 202 different communities across the U.S. were surveyed in 2003, and it was found that more of the assets that the children said they had in their lives, the less likely they were to engage in highrisk behavior, such as problem alcohol use, violence, illicit drug use or sexual activity. According to the website, the same kind of impact is evident with many other problem behaviors, including tobacco use, depression and attempted suicide, antisocial behavior, school problems, driving and alcohol and gambling. The Rev. Darby said she was living in Winter Park, Fla., when she first heard of the Search Institute research and the communitys dismay when their affluent children barely scored higher than the national average of 18.3 assets. Neptune said 18 was the national average, and Winter Park scored 18.6. The number 18 was important, because, according to the research, students who scored 21 or high were dramatically less likely to get into trouble or drop out of school. Having more assets, according to the report, also mean the chances increased that the young people would have positive attitudes and behaviors. Many of the external assets deal not just with the childrens immediate family, but with their whole community schools, churches, neighbors and adults. Children who find their community respects them and treats them as valued community members become valued community members. Those who do not feel connected to their communities suffer, and as a result, the community suffers. The Rev. Darbys advice was simple. Treat children with respect, and communicate with them. Typically adults shun children sometimes even their own children but the more engaged and accepted a child is by his community, the more he wants to be a part of the community, not a problem. In the end, it seems, at least according to the Search Institutes research, it really may take a village to raise a child. Whod have thunk it?It really does take a village RANDAL SEYLEREditorStudy indicates 40 developmental assets that predict a childs success To my beloved Bonifay: Just wanted to send out a thanks to everyone here in Bonifay. I have been back down here since October of 2005, and you guys have been good to me from my church family over at West Bonifay Baptist, to my doctors and nurses and to all the friends I have made in the community, either from being neighbors or running into you while I have been out and about walking. To everyone who has ever stopped when seeing me walking to offer me a ride, I appreciate it. That is one thing I love about small towns. Everyone knows everyone, and when one is down the rest of the community steps up to help. But I am now about to head back to the city, Tucson, Ariz., to be exact, and I just wanted to take a moment and let all on you know how much I appreciated you hospitality and also wanted to pass on a tip to anyone who may be going through a rough time or struggling with a tough decision. Try getting out and walking, either early in the morning (5 a.m. or so) or later in the evening (8 p.m. or so) and just walk down to a spot that isnt right off a main road and just sit and listen to natures music and enjoy the portraits in the sky. I have never found anything so relaxing. I like to pick a sport that is a good 15 to 20 minute walk away from my house, and I would sing songs to my self as I walked, and when I got there I would just sit and listen. And before long, I would be relaxed, and my head would be clear. For anyone who knows me and would like to keep in touch, my email is at the bottom of this letter. Take care, and God bless.Kevin L. SextonBonifay braven1978@yahoo.com LETTER TO THE EDITOR

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A5Wednesday, August 1, 2012CHIPLEY The Chipley Kiwanis Club met for its weekly luncheon at Pattillos Restaurant at the WashingtonHolmes County Technical Center. The guest speaker for the lunch was Jim Appleman, former State Attorney for the 14th Judicial Circuit. Appleman was the state attorney for our area for 16 years. His remarks were non-political as he explained how the judicial system in Florida operates. Following is a summary of Applemans explanation. The judicial process is initiated when a complaint is filed, which can be filed by either law enforcement personnel or a resident. Once filed, law enforcement will investigate and try to determine if there is probable cause to believe that a crime has been committed and who committed the crime. Once probable cause has been determined, law enforcement will arrest the individual or individuals suspected of a crime. One notable exception to probable cause is in the case of domestic violence. If investigating domestic violence, law enforcement is compelled to remove at least one of the parties to the violence, even if unable to determine probable cause. The reason for this is that if one of the parties is not removed, the domestic violence usually begins anew upon the departure of law enforcement. Removal of at least one party protects both parties. When arrested a suspect is confined to a jail. His first appearance before a judge, appropriately called First Appearance, is simply to determine if the suspect is a risk for flight or will show in court when required. To determine this, the judge considers the charges, the defendant, the defendants past history and whether or not the defendant can afford an attorney. Depending upon the circumstances, a suspect may be released, may be released after posting bail or may be ordered held in jail. First Appearance makes no attempt to evaluate the validity of the charges, but simply to assess the risk of flight of the defendant. Only after First Appearance does the state attorneys office become involved. The state attorney, or one of his deputies, will meet with law enforcement to evaluate the case. If there appears insufficient evidence to go forward with a trial, the state attorneys office has the discretion to dismiss the charges. If the state attorneys office and law enforcement find there is sufficient reason and evidence to proceed, the state attorney files for information, the formal document that may result in a trial. The defendant is then arraigned and given the information the state has against him or her, and the judge makes a determination (again) as to whether or not the defendant can afford an attorney or should be assigned a public defender (lawyer). Both the State Attorneys Office and the Public Defenders Office are funded through tax revenue. Once a defense lawyer has been hired or assigned the process of Discovery begins. The state attorneys office must turn over to the defense any evidence that they possess concerning the case. The defense lawyer(s) and the state attorney meet to discuss the case to see if it should be resolved without going to trial. In Florida, the victim of the crime is also involved in this process. Depending upon the suspected crime, the evidence, and the defendant, the state attorney and defense may agree to a plea deal which avoids a timely and costly trial. In a plea deal, the defendant agrees to plead guilty in exchange for any one or combination of reduced charges, probation or a reduced sentence. The presiding judge has the final approval authority over any plea deal. Of note, in Discovery the state must turn over to the defense all information it has pertaining to the case. The defense does not need to give the state all information it possesses, but it must inform the state of all witnesses it intends to call and the state has the right to depose (question) all potential defense witnesses before the trial. As opposed to the federal system, the Florida system seeks to avoid any surprises by either the state or the defense during the trial. In Florida, as in all of the United States, a defendant has a right to a trial by a jury composed of peers; the right to cross examine all witnesses; and the right to not testify against oneself. Appleman informed the club that most cases are resolved through some sort of plea bargain. A small percentage go to trial. This saves the state time and money. It costs Florida about $50 per day in operating costs to keep a person in jail. This does not include the cost of building the jail or prison. The Kiwanis club meets Tuesdays at Patillos restaurant in the middle of the WHTC campus at noon. For an invitation, contact any Kiwanian or call David Solger, membership chairperson, at 850-638-1276. For more information about the Kiwanis Club of Chipley, visit www.ChipleyKiwanis.com. Special To The NewsTALLAHASSEE In conjunction with the 22nd anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Governors Commission on Jobs for Floridians with Disabilities released its premier 2012 annual report recently.   As we work to make Florida the best place for businesses to create private-sector jobs, we must also be sure that those persons with disabilities who want to work have the opportunity to do so, Gov. Rick Scott said. Having a job adds to any persons dignity and purpose and opens doors to independence, which is especially important for Floridians with disabilities.  G ov. Scott created the Commis sion through Executive Order 11-161 to study and nd ways to address the disparity in employment for persons with disabilities relative to the general population. Charged by the executive order to provide public policy solutions and strategies to the Governor and state policymakers, the Commission provides three primary recommendations to serve as initial steps for advancing job and employment opportunities for Floridians with disabilities:  T he Commission recommends streamlining information and identifying a single-point of contact for employers so they can easily navigate the disability system and expand their pool of qualied candidates.  T he Commission recommends the development of a long-term communications plan for the state to promote awareness among employers in order to address misperceptions of persons with disabilities.   T he Commission determined per sons with disabilities need to be given as many rsthand experiences as possible to participate and compete in the workforce. The Commission recommends state policymakers, business leaders, and community partners promote and utilize internship and work experience opportunities for individuals with disabilities as a key tool to improving perceptions and addressing the employment disparity confronting these individuals.  T he Commission will continue to hold periodic meetings around the state to seek input from employers in order to better understand how the state can assist businesses in establishing a corporate culture that is enthusiastic about hiring persons with disabilities. The goal is to fulll Governor Scotts top priority to ensure all Floridians are able to gain employment.Special to the NewsCHIPLEY   The Spanish Trail Playhouse presents An Evening of Southern Gospel at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 18, The performance will be held at the Historic Chipley High School Theatre, home of the Spanish Trail Playhouse. The program features many of the regions top Christian vocalists and musicians. T he artists scheduled to perform are  Trish Brannon, Rachel Webb, Rosalyn Scott, Terri Garrett, Leah Page and A.D. Davis, all from C hipley.  Others include  Sonny and Linda Morris of Eufaula, Ala.; Rhonda and Shelby Lewis from Panama City; and Crossroads Q uartet of Chipley.  The stage band members include  A.D. Davis, drums; Scotty French, lead guitar; Emory Wells, acoustic guitar; Kirk Thompson, bass guitar and MC; Doug Salter, piano; and Jimmy Miller, pedal steel guitar, banjo and dobro. This is a fundraising event for The Spanish Trail Playhouse. Doors open at 6 p.m. and advanced tickets are on sale at the Washington County Public Library. Tickets will be available at the door the day of show. All tickets are general admission $10. L ocation:  Spanish Trail Playhouse, 680 2nd Street, Chipley.Former State Attorney talks judicial system to Kiwanis Playhouse plans an Evening of Southern Gospel Commission releases report on jobs for those with disabilities Having a job adds to any persons dignity and purpose and opens doors to independence, which is especially important for Floridians with disabilities.Gov. Rick Scott AP Special to the Times-AdvertiserHolmes Council On Aging celebrated their July birthdays on Friday. Our Birthday for the month of July was Fay Ennger Happy Birthday. Holmes Council On Aging would like to Thank Dennis Lee and his family for providing the birthday dinner and Piggly Wiggly for donating the birthday cake. HOlLMesES COUNcilCIL ON agi AGINgG JUlyLY BirthIRTHDaysAYS Holmes County arrests July 14 July 21, 2012 Tarrence Allen, 30, hold for Hillsborough Ronald Lee Baskins, 58, prison transport services hold Robert Bruce Brownlee, 46, driving while license suspended or revoked Johnny F. Clark, 58, no charges listed Trevardo D. Dixon, 24, hold for Miami Dade Samantha Dawn Edeneld, 20, battery-dating violence John Ellis, 60, prison transport services hold Samuel James Gillam, 27, hold for Missouri Perfecto Gomar, 43, permit unauthorized person to drive Pedro Gomar-Hernandez, 41, operate motor vehicle without valid drivers license Danny Albert Graham, 35, violation of probation on felony battery Jeffery Scott Gray, 48, failure to appear Michael Gerard Green, 23, battery dating violence Crystal Renae Greene, 27, driving while license suspended Roger Dale Greenlee, 45, hold for Walton County James Wendon Harris, 45, resisting ofcer without violence, trespass in structure Nathaniel Harris, 21, hold for Hillsborough Cassandra Renea Holley, 37, hold for Hillsborough Cecil Ray Howell, 51, violation of drivers licenses restriction of business purposes only Cecil Ray Howell, 51, driving under the inuence with property damage, violation of drivers license restrictions Joseph Salvatore Iemolo, 22, prison transport services hold Lewis Paul Ingram, 28, failure to report change of residence Richard Lee Jackson, 40, hold for Hillsborough Horacia Lacayo, 23, violation of probation Marc Evans Lacy, 22, prison transport services hold Andrew Geoffrey Levins, 43, driving under the inuence Kevin A. Lucas, 46, hold for prison transport services Warren Francis McDonald, 24, prison transport services house Jason Alan Miller, 43, domestic battery Brandon V. Pierre, 20, prison transport services hold Joy Lynn Quinn, 37, hold for prison transport services Davis K. Reid, 69, violation of probation Thomas Gene Ritchie, 27, child support Melvin Lee Singletary, prison transport services hold Christopher James Stien, hold for Walton County Joey Lee Strickland, 41, felon in possession of a rearm Juan Maya Victor-Maya, 42, prison transport services hold Michael Allen Ward, 21, violation of probation on burglary, violation of probation on grand theft Shane Warren, 26, violation of probation 2 counts Steven Grady Webster, 41, driving while license suspended or revoked Joe Brown White, 34, prison transport services Perry NMN Williamson, 46, disorderly intoxication Holmes County marriages and divorces July 16 July 20, 2012 Marriages Quinton Jacob Hall, 9-301994 of Westville and Amanda Lee Holland, 12-21-1982 of Black, Ala. Michael Todd Calhoon, 11-22-1985 of Atlanta and Gwendolyn Anne Spivey, 928-1986 of Atlanta Joshua Anthony Smith, 10-13-1990 of Bonifay and Cassandra Lynn Pollard, 1125-1988 of Bonifay Shannon Dewayne Curry, 12-2-1983 of Chipley and Sally Leann Roberts, 7-25-1981 of Bonifay Divorces Ernie gray and Melanie Jane Gray Aaron Steverson and Nina SteversonMost court cases are resolved through some sort of plea bargain. A small percentage go to trial. This saves the state time and money. It costs Florida about $50 per day in operating costs to keep a person in jail. This does not include the cost of building the jail or prison. Jim Appleman former state attorney for the 14th Judicial Circuit Marriages & Di DIVOrcesRCES Arrest rep REPOrtRT

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OUTDOORS Wednesday, August 1, 2012 Page 6www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comSend your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com ASection There is a king mackerel tournament coming in August that Im sure many will want to enter. This is not one of those costly lifeor-death tournaments. Ive shed tournaments that offer large sums of money and they can bring out the worst in people. The tournament is hosted by the Mexico Beach Artificial Reef Association. The 16th annual MBARA Kingfish Tournament will be Aug. 25 in Mexico Beach. The Captains Party is on Friday night Aug. 24. The prize money certainly is enough to warrant the entry fee, but not large enough to stay up late into night trying to gure out a way to cheat. Entry is $150 per boat and you can sh as many anglers as you can safely put on a boat. You can leave from anywhere and dock anywhere, but you must weigh your sh at Mexico Beach Marina from 1-5 p.m. CDT. You can bring your sh to the scales by boat, car, horse or truck. Fishing will begin at 5 a.m. and end at 5 p.m. This is a one-day boat tournament. Prizes for the sh are as follows: King Mackerel, 1. $3,000, 2. $2,000, 3. $1,000; Spanish Mackerel, 1. $500, 2. $300, 3. $200; Wahoo, 1. $1,000, only one sh eligible. Since 1997 the MBARA has raised and spent more than $1 million on more than 200 arti cial reefs off Mexico Beach, Panama City and Port St. Joe. All reefs are public numbers and are posted on the organizations website. You also can see underwater video of these reefs on the website as well. This is an all-volunteer organization. You can preregister online at www.mbara.org or you can preregister at Mexico Beach Marina or at Half Hitch Tackle in Port St. Joe. You can read a detailed explanation of the rules at www.mbra.org and read a question and answer section for your information. If you own a small boat like mine, this is the tournament to enter. You would never have to leave the buoy line to catch either a king or Spanish mackerel. As a matter of fact, a Spanish would be what I would be shing for. Bring the family and have a good time.Hooked on Outdoors Outdoor LifeScott Lindseycaptainlindsey@ knology.netPollinatorsTHE GREAT By STAN KIRKLANDFWCTheres a growing movement in Florida, and the rest of the country, for that matter, to recognize the crucial value of pollinators and the role they play in agriculture and forestry. Pollinators include insects such as bees, beetles, ies, butter ies and moths, and other wildlife species such as birds and bats. Pollinators are absolutely crucial to the things we eat and, in some cases, what we wear, said Arlo Kane, a wildlife biologist with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). Pollinators move pollen between owers and this annually accounts for the production of $20 billion worth of vegetables, fruits and nuts. Kane was one of seven speakers at a recent pollinator short course in Marianna. In addition to the FWCs presence, the 150 participants who attended were hosted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, National Wild Turkey Federation, University of Florida IFAS, and The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation. Unfortunately, pollinators, and particularly species of insects, are in decline across the country, according to Kane. There are 4,000 species of bees alone that are native to the United States and most have disappeared or are only a fraction of their original number. A National Academy of Sciences report says the decline in pollinators is due to habitat loss, diseases and widespread pesticide use. To stem the loss of pollinators, theres an emphasis to get gardeners, homeowners and landowners to help by planting wild owers and plants that are good for native bees and other insects. The plants should be native to our area, which means theyll likely require less fertilizer or water than plants from other parts of the country, Kane said. You also need a variety of plants so you have owering plants from the spring into the fall. Suggested areas for planting native wild owers include the borders or edges of farm elds, in between the rows of planted pines; roadsides, and gardens. Kane said native wild owers and the insects they attract are also great habitat and feeding areas for wildlife such as bobwhite quail, wild turkeys, mourning doves and gopher tortoises. Information about Floridas native wild owers is available at local plant nurseries and online at awild owers. org or xerces.org The green anole is no chameleonBy JESSICA BASHAMSpecial to the News/ Green anoles, a type of American lizard, are often called American chameleons because they can change color, but they are not chameleons at all. These anoles are the only native lizard in the southeastern United States that changes color, but it is only from bright green to brown or gray. Usually their change in color is due to stress, but also to temperature and mating. Males extend a bright pink dewlap (a piece of skin that unfolds from its throat) when looking for a mate or when warning other males to back off. Their head-bobs are like pushups and show the female and other males that they are strong. Mating season starts in the beginning of April and continues throughout the summer months. In south Florida, the mating season is a little longer. If you see a green anole bobbing up and down and showing his dewlap, look around: there may be a female nearby. A female lays one or sometimes two eggs every two weeks, usually in dirt or debris at the base of a plant. The green anole is the only native anole in the Southeast and is found from North Carolina west to Texas and throughout Florida. True chameleons, however, live in Africa, Madagascar, Portugal, Spain and parts of Asia. At least two species have been introduced into Florida. They can change to every color of the rainbow because of mood, temperature, habitat, stress, anger and defense. They often blend easily into their surroundings by changing color. Chameleons hold on to branches with their feet and coiled tails. Their long, curled tongues shoot out like arrows to catch prey. Anoles are small, long and slender. Like the chameleon, they have the ability to cling to objects but only because of a sticky pad on the underside of their toes. Their tails are not coiled but long and thin and can break easily. This is so they can escape predators. When caught by the tail, the lizard squirms until its tail breaks and it can escape to freedom. The confused predator is left with only the tail and wondering where its lunch has gone. Lizard tails will grow back a little. Watching green anoles is easy. Around homes, they hang from walls, scurry across sidewalks and driveways and climb shrubs, branches and trees. A little anole visits me daily. He perches on a railing outside my of ce window and bobs his head up and down, showing off his bright pink dewlap. Anoles generally have a territory, so chances are youll see one in the same place, day after day. For more information, you can visit http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich. Special to the NEWS/TIMES ADVERTISERGreen anoles are mistakenly called American chameleons because they change color. However, green anoles only turn shades of green, brown or gray.

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Special to the NewsCompleted last weekend was the United States Fastpitch Association 2012 Softball World Series at Frank Brown Park in Panama and local girls are on a team out of Panama, which won their division. This team was put together for the rst time this year and represents seven area high school teams. Rutherford, Bay, Arnold, Mosley, North Bay Haven, Chipley, and Holmes County. They have played in seven tournaments this summer and plan to stay together to continue into the fall. Highlights for the World Series include Pitchers and catchers Cheyenne Berry (HC), Emily Kent (CH), and Kayla Whitaker (R) and MacKenzie Wolffer (B) and Carley Mead (CH) combined for 33 out of 51 of the outs at the plate in strikeouts. Kayla Whitaker had 33 strikeouts in the tournament despite ghting off fevers of 105 the night before bracket games started. Her team carried her with an awesome display of hitting to allow her the rest she needed to do her job. They were backed up by an awesome defensive stance that allowed only 2 runs in pool play. There were no runs scored on the Power in bracket play. Kinzie Harrington (Mosley) led the team hitting for the tournament hitting .571. Kaylyn Julian (R) led the team in RBIs. Others who hit above .500 were Jessie Powell (R), Shelby Ramsey (Arnold). These girls have come a long way from the rst tournament they played in May. They have played A and B class tournaments all summer to prepare for this World Series Trophy. Gun ShowAugust11th & 12th Panama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds2080424Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 a m o r 2 p m Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING DOG DAYS OF SUMMERBy PAT McCANN747-5068 | Twitter: @patmccann pmccann@pcnh.com EBRO This literally begins with a lick and a promise. Sarah Lucas, who lives a few hops from Ebro Greyhound Park, had promised one of the greyhound pups from a small litter of three to Joe Watson, her former partner for four years in SL Kennel. Lucas brought the male puppy to the track and the of ce of Teresa Duncan, who works in administration at Ebro, where Lucas was to meet Watson, who currently owns and operates AJN Kennel. Duncan and the pup immediately bonded, which was evident to Watson when he arrived. But this is Duncans story, so let her tell it. As babies (Sarah) let me see them and when Joe came to see the one he was going to get Sarah gave him to me and he was loving on me, Duncan said. When I handed him to Joe he was still paying attention to me and then he was licking and loving me again. Joe said, I guess I have a partner. It just happened. Duncan is an Ohio native who has spent much of her adult life in the Panhandle. Now in her 40s, she lives with her husband, Cecil, on 10 acres outside of Fountain. A self-professed animal person, Duncan has worked at the track for six years. While she doesnt have human children, she currently has an extended family of seven greyhounds in her care in addition to horses and a miniature schnauzer among others. But there was something else missing. I had adopted (greyhounds) and they are great, but I wanted to have a baby greyhound, Teresa said. I had to do it. AJN Sweet Smoke has been performing like a prodigy in the 2012 live greyhound racing meeting at the Washington County pari-mutuel facility. It has been a short journey thus far for the rst-time owner, as well as Watson, who this year has branched out to full ownership of a kennel. In addition to AJN Sweet Smoke, who only began racing in May, trainer Thomas Suggs is in his rst year of handling that responsibility. The initial results have been highly positive with Sweet Smoke breaking his maiden at Ebro, or winning for the rst time, and continuing to perform at a high level while advancing through grades to compete with the best dogs at the track. Duncan initially took the latest addition of her family to Fountain to live. Stocky Hess, president of Ebro Greyhound Park and a veteran of many aspects of the greyhound racing industry for parts of six decades, told Duncan that some champion dogs had been hand-raised by owners and not sent immediately to a farm. Stocky has taught me a lot, Duncan said. He talks to me about when he used to run dogs. He can tell you this and that. His experience. Training. Hes done it all. AJN Sweet Smoke would roam the property with the schnauzer. He was kennel trained, but he did pretty much what he wanted to do, Duncan said. That included getting a lot of sleep. In the kingsized bed. When he was a year old I knew from the get-go he would have to leave me and go to a trainer, Duncan said. Sarah talked about sending all three to Oklahoma, but it was November, it was cold and the ground was hard and I didnt want him to cut his feet. Joe sends a lot of his dogs to Fort White between Lake City and Gainesville. He was down there almost six months, I didnt get him back until April. Joe was there a lot and he knew he was well taken care of. Joe has a kennel in Sarasota and he was getting ready to close (for that meet) and took him to Sarasota, not for racing, but to get him used to kennel life and he would work him a little bit. Previously Duncan had taken care of Sweet Smokes registration with the National Greyhound Association. He got his ID tattoo numbers in his ears at 3 months. She received an onion skin document with the dogs markings on it and ID numbers, and later his of cial papers of ownership. Then there was no small matter of naming her boy, as Duncan commonly refers to her greyhound. Duncan explained that only 16 letters can be used, and that Watsons greyhounds all have the AJN moniker. We put AJN Smoke, and I wanted Sweet because hes so sweet, Duncan said. And then he smokes them on the track. Im a NASCAR fan and Tony Stewarts nickname is Smoke and he owned the track in Ohio where my grandfather use to race in the 40s and 50s. He bought it and kept the memories going. A more sobering aspect of her greyhounds identi cation markings came when Duncan explained why she had Sweet Smoke micro chipped. It serves as a psychological safeguard for her emotional attachment. She was one of the rst on the scene that day in late October 2010 when the appalling realization of what had occurred in one of the kennels on the compound was discovered some weeks after the racing season had concluded. Thirty-four greyhounds, some of them with their muzzles bound by duct tape, had been methodically starved to death. The man responsible, Ronnie Williams, was sentenced to ve years in prison for his crime, but Ebro Greyhound Park likely will be viewed by some into the future as his accomplice. I was the one that was down there. I was the one that realized the duct tape, Duncan said. That still haunts me. It was the most horrible day ever. I can still remember the clothes I had on. It is one of the worst things Ive ever experienced in my life. It will always be a part of me. If you can do that to an animal, what else can you do? Because of her of ce duties, Duncan was the person charged with elding queries from greyhound owners wondering if their animals were among those victimized. Many of the dogs bodies had decomposed to the extent they couldnt be identi ed by their ear markings. I was the one answering the phone and I couldnt tell them, Duncan said. I never want to be in a situation those people were in. Duncans position at Ebro also offers many perks. Not in the least is her friendship with Watson, and con dence that Sweet Smoke is receiving proper care and handling. In addition to the advice from Hess, presiding judge Lamar Page has been helpful. He put me on the racing roster so I can see him when I want, Duncan said. He tells me little tips, tells me he looks good. He makes it exciting for me. Hes been very encouraging with his potential and how this works. Greyhound owners are paid a percentage of their dogs earnings through an agreement with the kennel owner. Usually that is a somewhat standard 35 percent, and 50 percent for stakes races. It can vary, as some kennel owners only pay for results in Grades A and B, but Watson rewards all grades. The amount depends on whether the dogs places rst, second or third, and points are rewarded depending on the grade or race which can be maiden, J, D, C, B or A depending on the past performance of the greyhound. The prize money pool is impacted by the handle (amount wagered) bet on the entire live racing performance as well as the tracks simulcast handle and the take from Ebros Poker Room also gures into the mix. Various pari-mutuel facilities in Florida and other states also offer slot machines on premises which equates to a higher take and more lucrative payoffs for both the kennel and the greyhound owner. There is no fee for owners to enter races. Ebro racing secretary Bill Nelson determines the daily performance schedule, most greyhounds racing every fourth day. Otherwise theyre housed in an airconditioned kennel at the track where there sometimes is a television or radio to provide background noise. The dogs are turned out into an outside pen every ve or six hours and at times are taken to a sprint path for exercise. Duncan is getting familiar with the racing routine for AJN Sweet Smoke. I know he loves doing this, she said. Theres no way you can make one run. Some just decide that this isnt for them. The ones that want to run, youve got to let them run. You can see it in their eyes. If you werent into it you would know. Like when he was sick, or if theyre hurt. The relationship I have with Joe, if I really wanted to create an issue I would call the racing secretary. As an owner you have the right to pull your dog. Ebro Greyhound Park is known throughout the circuit as a Puppy Track, or venue where promising greyhounds break in before chasing larger purses often offered at downstate or out-of-state tracks. Duncan knows that like a highly recruited prep athlete going off to college in another part of the country, that time could come for AJN Sweet Smoke. Its gonna kill me if we send him out of state, she said. Hes like a real child, and you want to be there supporting them. Im anxious for the day he comes back to the house. I dont want him to get hurt for that to happen, but no ifs ands or buts, whatever it takes to x him were going to do. Euthanization is not an option.ANDREW WARDLOW | The News HeraldTeresa Duncan and AJN Sweet Smoke display their excitement while reuniting following a recent race at Ebro Greyhound Park. I guess I have a partnerPart one in a three-part series about a first-time owner of a racing greyhound, a first-time full owner of a greyhound racing kennel and the dog making his racing debut.Panama City softball team wins division Team members include Kinzie Harrington (Mosley), Denise Whitaker (Coach), MacKenzie Wolffer (Bay), Jessie Powell (Rutherford), Emily Kent (Chipley), Cheyenne Berry (Holmes County), Allison Thigpen (Rutherford), Ginger Chance (Coach), Shelby Lewis (North Bay Haven), Shelby Ramsey (Arnold), Carley Mead (Chipley), Kaylyn Julian (Rutherford), Kayla Whitaker (Rutherford), Haley Melnick (Bay). Coaches: Denise Whitaker, Ginger Chance, Thom Mead, John Powell and Stephanie Sims.Special to the News SP O RTS www.bonifaynow.comWednesday, August 1, 2012 APage 7Section

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Washington, Holmes at a glance INDEXSociety ................................. B2 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classieds ............................ B6 Washington County News Holmes County Times-AdvertiserWednesday, AUGUSt T 1 2012 B Pa A GE 1 SectionBonifay Womens Club to hold political rallyBONIFAY The Bonifay Womens Club will be sponsoring a Political Rally from 6 to 8 p.m. on Saturday at Holmes County High School. BBQ plates will be available from 5 to 7 p.m. for $5.Wausau Fun Day, Possum Festival this weekend WAUS US AU U The Wausau Fun Day and Possum Festival is Friday and Saturday at the Dalton Carter Community Center in Wausau. For more information, call 6381781 or visit www. wausaupossumfestival. com.Two-Toed Tom yard sale SSaturday ESES TO   The Town of Esto will be holding a Two-Toed Tom Yard Sale starting at 8 a.m., on Saturday at John Clark Park in Esto. Inside tables are $10 and outside spaces at $5. All outside people will need to bring their own tables. There is plenty of space for everyone. Inside space is limited. There will also be a bake sale. To reserve a space call Darlene at 263-3201. GGirl SScout Alumnae to hold reunion TALLAHASSEESSEE Girl Scout Alumnae will gather in celebration of 100 Years at the Girl Scouts of the Florida Panhandles alumnae reunion from 2 to 4 p.m., on Sunday.  The reunion will be held in The Florida Historic Capitol Museum Senate Chambers, 400 South Monroe Street in Tallahassee. For more information, call 487-1902.  Forehand Family Reunion BEETHLEEHEEM The annual Forehand Family Reunion is Sunday at Bethlehem Methodist Church. All friends and relatives are invited. Paper goods and drinks will be provided. For more information, call 547-2157. RoyaltyFUN DAYMiss Tiny Baby Fun Day contestants included, from left, Brylee Lynn Waites, Brystol Kennedie West, Most Photogenic winner Laura Elizabeth Yates, 2nd Runner-Up Avery Grace Kirkland, 1st Runner-up Payten Brianne Joyner, Paisley Sasser and 2012 Miss Tiny Baby Fun Day Haven Austin Mathis. The pageant kicks off the 43rd annual Wausau Possum Festival, which begins Friday with the Possum King and Queen Contest. Madison Carter, left, was named Miss Fun Day and most photogenic and Miranda Odom, below, was rst runnerup. Mr. Fun Day King contestants included, from left, 1st RunnerUp Brandon Miller, Brantley Garret Moody, Raylen Wyatt and 2012 Mr. Fun Day King Bentley Arries Paul Locke. Winners in the Little Baby Fun Day contest were, from left, 1st Runner-Up Palyn Jayne Byers, 2012 Little Baby Fun Day Addison Grace Chance, and 2nd Runner-Up and Most Photogenic Faith Elizabeth Ann Russell. Little Miss Fun Day and Most Photogenic winner Hanna Elaine Duke, left, with 2nd RunnerUp Alexia Flowers and 1st RunnerUp Jeanna Raquael Johnson. Miss Tiny Tot winners included, from left, 2nd Runner-Up Macie Riley, 1st Runner-Up and Most Photogenic Kinley Kristene Kirkland, and 2012 Miss Tiny Tot Fun Day Amaya Brunson. Junior Miss Fun Day winners were, from left, winner Abby Renee McKenzie, 2nd Runner-Up Ashley Feldman, Most Photogenic Billie LeAnn Goodman, and 1st Runner-Up Sara Kingsley Scott. Left top: Miss Pre-Teen Fun Day winners were, from left, 2nd Runner-Up Sara Catherine Padgett, Most Photogenic Marissa White, 2012 Miss PreTeen Fun Day Isabella Flowers, 1st Runner-Up Alyssa Marie Willey. Left bottom: Miss Teen Fun Day Kayla Anne Rudd, left, 2nd Runner-Up Ericka Marie Adams, and 1st Runner-Up and Most Photogenic Rebecca Lynn Williams.

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Wednesday, August 1, 2012 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Special to ExtraAfter a year of practices and competing in the state archery competition, Levi McDaniel represented Florida 4-H as one of the four archery team members at the 2012 National 4-H Shooting Sports Invitational. The competition spanned three days of shooting and included 500 youth representing 32 states and their 4-H programs. Shooting sports is one of the largest of all 4-H projects reaching 350,000 youth nationwide each year. While shooting sports teaches youth the sport, it also instills self-discipline, teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving skills. For more information on the shooting sports programs in Washington County 4-H, contact 4-H Youth Development Agent, Julie Pigott Dillard, at 638-6180 or juliepd@ufl.edu. Learn more about the shooting sports program by visiting the Washington County 4-H website: washington.ifas.ufl.edu/ 4hy/washington-county-4h-clubs-test/. and www.BonifayRehab.com BONIFAYNURSING & REHAB CENTERMake the Move Mexican Restaurant The children and grandchildren of Lowell and Ernestine Smith will be holding a reception from 2-4 p.m., on Aug. 11, in honor of their 50th Wedding Anniversary. The reception will be held at the Fist Baptist Church of Bonifay, in the fellowship hall. No gifts please. Davis and Angela Hanes of Ponce de Leon are proud to announce the engagement of their daughter, Timra Deanne Hanes to Joshua Larmar Miller, son of Jonah Miller and Rejonna (Robert) Grimes of Ponce de Leon. The bride elect is the granddaughter of Evie Hanes and the late Johnny Hanes of Bonifay, Jim King of Bonifay, Sue and Gary Newell of Westville. Timra is a 2012 graduate of Ponce de Leon High School. The groom elect is the grandson of Callie Mae Miller and the late J. C. Miller of Leonia, Lillian French and the late Ray French of Ponce de Leon, and the great grandson of Vinnie Mitchell of Ponce de Leon. Josh is a 2004 graduate of Ponce de Leon High School and Haney Technical Center where he received certification in Heating and Cooling. He is employed with Woodalls Total Comfort Systems in Marianna. The wedding will take place at Cedars Springs Assembly of God Church in Westville on Aug. 10 at 6:30 p.m. All family and friends are cordially invited. A reception will follow in the churchs fellowship hall.From Staff ReportsBONIFAY After 43 years of service, Bonifay Postmaster Roger Brooks has announced his retirement as of July 31. According to Brooks, he began his career as a custodian at the Bonifay of ce during the summer shortly after graduating high school. Two years later he was appointed as a letter carrier and then was promoted to Supervisor of Customer Service shortly after. Brooks said that during his time as Supervisor he had the privilege to work in many post of ces in the panhandle of Florida, including Blountstown, Caryville, Graceville, Panama City and included many of ces in both North and South Florida and South Georgia. In 1985 he was appointed Postmaster of Bonifay. I will miss the employees and the customers of the local of ce, said Brooks. Serving the public has been an honor and I have always tried to give back to the community. The entire opportunity has been a blessing. The retiring Postmaster acknowledged former Postmaster Ed Williams for his support during those early years of Brooks career. I will continue to live in the Bonifay area, but I will be spending time with my daughter, her husband and a couple of special granddaughters who live in South Carolina, said Brooks.Smiths Celebrate 50 YearsHanes and MillerNational 4-H Archery Invitational SPECIAL TO EXTRAChipola President Dr. Gene Prough congratulates Karen Bradley on being named Career Employee for June.MARIANNA Karen Bradley is Chipola Colleges Career Employee for June. Bradley serves as a Testing Assistant in Student Affairs in the Testing Of ce and has worked at the college since 2010. Bradley named top employeeCECILIA SPEARSBonifay Postmaster Roger Brooks retires after 43 years of service.Bonifay Postmaster Roger Brooks retires WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENT

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Wednesday, August 1, 2012 Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 There are a number of things around your house that can be deadly to your cats and dogs, some you may know, and some may be surprising. Some are even in your kitchen cabinets and refrigerator. Dr. Dorothy Black, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences (CVM), shares some enlightening information about common food items that may be toxic to your pet. According to Dr. Black, the following foods can be particularly dangerous to cats and dogs. These foods may not necessarily cause toxic reactions in every case of ingestion, but its just a good rule of thumb to keep these items off your kitchen counters and under no circumstances feed these foods to your pet, Black said. Grapes and raisins possess an unknown toxic substance that can lead to renal failure by an unknown mechanism. Toxic doses have been reported after ingesting just one to two grapes or raisins. Not all animals suffer kidney failure after grape/raisin ingestion and it appears to be an idiosyncratic reaction. Nevertheless, it is best to avoid this food for your dogs and cats. There is no known antidote, only supportive care and renal dialysis to support kidney recovery. Grapes can be particularly tricky for dogs, because many actually like to eat grapes, so you have to be especially aware, Black said. Our pets are amazing creatures, but they can really get into dangerous situations with human food very quickly. Chocolate is commonly known to be bad for pets. It contains two ingredients known to be toxic to dogs and cats, caffeine and theobromine. Dark chocolate is particularly harmful because it has a higher concentration of toxic metabolites than milk or white chocolate. Clinical signs of distress seen after chocolate ingestion include: anxiety/ anxiousness, hyperactivity, urination, elevated body temperature, seizures, and irregular heart rhythms. There is no antidote, but supportive care is usually successful for recovery. Xylitol is a common sugar substitute now used in many home kitchens. It is associated with a severe decline in blood sugar levels and liver failure if ingested by pets. The exact mechanism of the toxicity is unknown and there is no antidote. Supportive care is typically successful for treatment of hypoglycemia, however, liver failure may still occur and prognosis is guarded. It is important to remember that if you cook or use xylitol in your foods, that those foods should not be fed to pets, Black said. It is still toxic if used in cooking or baking. Onions, garlic, and chives are also toxic to pets. They contain the toxin allicin, which is released upon crushing or chewing the plant. Allicin damages the hemoglobin in red blood cells leading to anemia (such as Heinz body anemia and methemoglobinemia). Cats are especially susceptible to this toxin. There is no antidote, however, supportive care is typically successful. While cats are particularly affected by onions and garlic, dogs are especially susceptible to macadamia nut toxicity. An unknown toxin in the nut leads to difculty walking, high body temperatures, depression, and vomiting within one to two hours after ingestion. While no deaths have been reported to date, supportive care in the hospital is often required. Supportive care, which is the usual treatment for food toxicity, often works to recover pets who ingest these foods, Black said. But these supportive treatments to get pets back on their feet are often very costly for the owner, and difcult for the patient. In cases that require dialysis, pets have a difcult road to recovery. The foods mentioned here should be kept off countertops and out of reach of pets, and under no circumstances fed to dogs and cats. Preventing your pet from ingesting these items is the best way to keep them safe. But if they do ingest these foods, Dr. Black recommends contacting your veterinarian immediately. ABOUT PET TALK Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at /pet-talk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to cvmtoday@cvm.tamu.edu. ExtraSPECIAL TO EE XTRA Twenty-nine students recently completed the Associate Degree Nursing program at Chipola College. Graduates are now qualied to take the state certication examination to become Registered Nurses. Graduates include, seated from left: Carla Foster, Kathryn Boyce, Ashley Barrentine, Whitney Wilson, Taylor Shelton, Jenna Hatcher, Jerri Lynn Stone, Emily Cain, Victoria Levine, Whitney Ellenburg; standing, from left: Jerry Nelson, Katherine Cunningham, Ashley Kennett, Tiffany Thompson, Shelita Grant, Wendy Motley, Hannah Turner, Tina Belser, Meagan Kornegay, Catherine Moses, Kimberly Huett, Brandy Scott, Judith Monpas, Michael Roberts, Dennis Foster, Justin Kulkusky, Logan Bradley, Corey Bailes and Whitney Halley. Special to ExtraThe Florida Department of Agriculture recognized the Kent family of County Line Road as a Century Pioneer Family Farm on July 20. The designation notes that the family has continually owned either all or part of their farm for at least 100 years. About 200 farms have been put on the list since the program began in 1985. About 14 Jackson County families, including the Kents, are on the list. Its really just to recognize our agriculture heritage and to promote the idea and make people aware theres agriculture in this state, said Susan Reese, deputy external affairs director for the department of agriculture. Air Force Airman Christian J. Gerhart graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical tness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Gerhart is the son of JoAnn Gerhart of Carmichael Road, Bonifay. He is a 2004 graduate of Deland High School.Human treats, poison to pets Nursing students complete program CCHIPOLA CCOLLEGEKent family celebrated for owning farm for 105 yearsGerhart graduates basic military Crossword PPUZZLESOLUTIOOLUTION OON PAGEPAGE B5

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FAITH BSectionwww.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.First Baptist Churchcome as you areMike Orr, Pastor1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.Learning Religion by HeartIn many cultures children are taught prayers and creeds shortly after they have begun to speak. Without understanding them, young children memorize their prayers and creeds. As these children grow in understanding, their parents may explain bits and pieces of the prayers if their children are curious and bold enough to ask. But, as a general rule, most children accept whatever their parents tell them, and parents assume wrongly, that because the children have learned their prayers that they also understand them. The prayers are reinforced by regular recitations, at church and at home, but there is often little effort to explain or interpret them. When these children are old enough to be on their own, they will remember their prayers in the same way that they remember nursery rhymes; there will be a strong resonance and perhaps even a feeling of comfort and safety associated with these prayers, but no deep understanding, and no live connection with ones faith. Are we attempting to instill faith in a way that is more appropriate to learning poetry or multiplication tables rather than having a genuine experience of God?BROWN FUNERAL HOME1068 Main Street, Chipley638-4010 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Fix these words of mine in your hearts and minds; tie them as symbols on your hands and bind them on your foreheads. Teach them to your children, talking about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up. Deuteronomy 11:19This Message Courtesy of Page 4 Wednesday, August 1, 2012Rev. James L. SnyderIt was just another day, and I was indulging a carefree moment of complaining about the weather. I cant believe its so hot today, I muttered. I thought I was talking to myself, but obviously, I had an audience. Have you ever said or did something not realizing somebody was watching you? Every time I am in a restaurant eating, I endeavor to remember there is an audience and try my very best not to spill the soup on my lap. Although, I must admit that that kind of lap dance always gets a vigorous round of applause from the audience. Dont ask me how I know. I thought in my own special way of thinking that I was alone only to nd out the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage was within earshot of my remarks. I must say she is rather remarkable. Those earshot moments are quite extensive. I will not go as far as to say that she can read my mind, although I think she can, but she seems to know what I am thinking even before I go through the effort and labor of thinking. I do not know why I even spend the energy thinking on my own. Even when I do think up a thought of my own and go so far as to express it I am always challenged. The challenge is to not think that way. The challenger is my wife. Life would be so much easier, not to mention less stressful, if I just would quit thinking my own thoughts. It is when I am thinking my own thoughts that I get into trouble. Life would be so much easier if I allowed someone else to think my thoughts for me. After all, isnt that why men get married? Why women get married still baf es me. Getting back to my moment of complaining: I cant believe, I muttered, its so hot today. To which, my wife said, Dont you know its summer? And dont you know that its supposed to be hot during the summer? I did know that, but it did not make the heat any more bearable. Then she said something that rather confused me. I have been confused before. Confusion is a familiar territory to me. But this confusion was different. If, my wife said rather sternly, you cant stand the heat get out of the kitchen. What the kitchen had to do with it being hot outside is way beyond my pay scale. There was a brief moment when I almost threw caution to the wind and asked my wife what she meant by that comment. Boy, am I glad I didnt. I make it a practice to stay as far away from the kitchen as possible, especially when my wife is present. There is something about a kitchen that makes me rather nervous to the point of dropping her favorite cup and having it break all over the oor. I stay out of the kitchen, heat or no heat. If I remember correctly, my wife said as she stared at me rather intently, a few months ago you were complaining about how cold it was. She was right. It was not but a few months ago, I was complaining that it was so cold outside that I just could not bear it. Youre going to have to make up your mind. That was a serious admonition from her. For her to tell me to make up my mind sends some very contradictory messages to me. After all, she is forever making up my mind for me. She seems to know exactly what I want at the restaurant and before I can get a word in edgewise or otherwise, she has ordered for me. Im not complaining. She knows exactly what I want. Either, she continued, its too hot or its too cold. Now make up your mind. I smiled demurely in her direction and nodded in the af rmative. Not wanting to further the conversation I whispered very gently, Yes, dear. It concluded our tte--tte. Later on in the evening, we were watching television. It was the local news, and the special report of the day had to do with the record heat wave across our country. Its been a long time, the weatherman said, since weve seen temperatures this high. Boy, is it hot out there. I glanced in her direction as covertly as possible and noticed she was staring at me, just daring me to say something. There is a time to say something, and then sometimes something should not be said at all. I concealed my infectious grin as much as possible knowing that someone was watching me. Under my breath I whispered, I cant believe its so hot today. After all, it is summer and it is supposed to be hot. I just believe that everybody has the right to complain about the weather. I also believe that some people have the right not to hear me complain about the weather. It is a well-noted mark of wisdom to know when to speak and when not to speak. Solomon in the Old Testament had it right when he said, Even a fool, when he holdeth his peace, is counted wise: and he that shutteth his lips is esteemed a man of understanding (Proverbs 17:28 KJV). So, this is summer, but you did not hear it from me. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att. net. His web site is www. jamessnyderministries. comSaint Mary A.M.E Church to Hold HomecomingCARYVILLE Saint Mary A.M.E Church will be hold homecoming services at 4 p.m. Aug. 4. The Rev. Jerome Goodman, pastor at New Bethel A.M.E. Church in Argyle, will be our guest speaker. For more information, call Vickie Broxton at 373-7112.Christian Haven Chuch Jam SessionCHIPLEY Christian Haven Church will be holding their Monthly Jam Session Aug. 4. A covered dish meal will start at 6 p.m. with signing starting after the meal. For more information, call 638-0836 or 773-2602.New Life Fellowship Assembly of God Womens ConferenceCHIPLEY New Life Fellowship Assembly of God presents Daughters of Destiny: A Womens Conference. There will be four sessions: the rst session will be held at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 23, the second session will be held at 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 24, and third session at 9 a.m. and the fourth session at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 25. The guest speaker will be Diane Coleman, and conference host Sherri Evans will also be speaking. Conference worship leader is Tiffane Raulerson. Early bird registration is $30. Registration at the conference is $40. Contact church of ce to inquire about area hotel discounts for the conference. The church is located at 695 5th St. in Chipley. For more information, call the church of ce at 638-1134, Monday through Thursday 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. First Freewill Baptist Church to hold revivalBONIFAY The First Freewill Baptist Church of Bonifay will be holding a revival at 6 p.m. Aug. 27 and at 7 p.m. Aug. 27-31. Special speaker will be the Rev. Dennis Tanton, with special music by Vessels of Clay. Lighthouse Assembly of God Womens Ministry will hold a yard sale from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 2-3 and again from 7 a.m. to noon Aug.4. Proceeds go to the womens projects for the improving of the church. The yard sale will be in the fellowship hall at 1201 Waukesha St. in Bonifay. All donations are welcome. For more information, call Marie at 638-2027.Library hoursWausau Library Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County Library (Bonifay) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed Washington County Library (Chipley) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Vernon Library Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills Library Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedMONDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 6 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Monday each month (unless a holiday) at 6:00 at the Chipley library. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach of ce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999.TUESDAY8 to 10 a.m.: Church Fellowship Breakfasts at Around the Corner Grill. Breakfast provided. All denominations welcome. 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 5 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at 6:25 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-451 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AWEDNESDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.: The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. 12 p.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday. (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 6380093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AFRIDAY10 a.m. to noon: Homes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 638-6217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30: Bead Class every second Friday at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery call 703-0347 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a gettogether for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Winn Dixie in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks while you get your shopping done. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church.SUNDAY8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at GracevilleCampbellton Hospital in Graceville. COMMUNITY CALENDARLighthouse Assembly of God to hold yard sale Faith BRIEFSSo, this is summer, is it?

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Wednesday, August 1, 2012 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5Literacy group holds summer reading campWASHINGTON COUNTY The Literacy Volunteers of Washington County will be offering a Summer Reading Program organized by the Washington County Public Library from 10 a.m. to noon Aug. 2 at the Country Oaks Learning Center, 268 Quail Hollow Blvd. in Chipley. This program is for children ages 512. Snacks and drinks will be provided on all program dates. For more information, call 638-1231.Gods Vineyard to hold overnight campVERNON Gods Vineyard Worship Center will be holding Overnight Camp for ages 13 and up through Aug. 4. The Overnight Youth Camp is a free camp. Applications may be picked up at Dees Restaurant in Vernon. For more information, call Vicky Wilson at 535-2471.Candidate Town Hall Meet and Greet All Washington County candidates and residents are invited to a Candidate Town Hall Forum Meet and Greet at 5:30 p.m. Aug. 7 in the Sunny Hills County Building, on Challenger Road. The forum will start promptly at 6 p.m., with the primary races rst as follows: The District 1 candidates Republican Primary; Superintendent of Schools Republican Primary; School Board District 3 two candidates. Each candidate will be given 3 minutes for an introduction their platform. The platform should include their solution for Washington County. Any Washington County resident wishing to ask speci c questions, please contact Karen Schoen at kbschoen@bellsouth.net or Chuck at shachakel@ att.net. Volunteers sought for festivalBONIFAY Festival organizers are looking for hard-working volunteers with a heart to serve their community. Join us at 6 p.m. Aug 7 in the old library behind City Hall to kick off the planning for the fth annual Down Home Street Festival. For more info, contact us at info@bonifaystreetfestival. com or 373-7747.Art ShowBONIFAY Art students from Holmes County High School, middle school, and So as Fine Art Studio will be displaying their artworks for the month of August. A reception at 5 p.m. Aug. 10 will be free and the public is invited. Snacks and refreshments will be provided. The reception will be at LaurdenDavis Art Gallery, 110 W. Pennsylvania Ave. in Bonifay. For more information, call 329-8381 or email your questions to laurdendavis@gmail.com.Northwest Florida Community Back 2 School FairCHIPLEY Northwest Florida Community Hospital in Chipley will host its annual Back 2 School Fair from 9 a.m. to noon Aug. 11 at the hospital. It is free. Schoolaged children will receive free haircuts and various school supplies. There will be food, backpack door prizes and entertainment. The Washington County Health Department will provide an immunization clinic for school age children at no charge. For more information, call Aileen Koon or Heather Shelby at 638-1610.Quarterly HCHS Alumni luncheonBONIFAY The quarterly Holmes County High School Alumni Luncheon will be at 11:30 a.m. Aug. 14 at Scotts Restaurant (Formerly Simbos) in Bonifay. All alumni, former students and faculty are invited to attend.Holmes County High School Band CampBONIFAY Holmes County High School Blue Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences.Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section ofwww.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com, you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership withLegacy.com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212 Crossword SOLUTION ObituariesMichael Allen Greenwell, age 56, passed from this life Saturday, June 30, 2012, in Washington County. He was born Aug. 11, 1955, to James A. and Celia Sue (Young) Greenwell. Mr. Greenwell was a clerk for the United States Postal Service. He is survived by his wife, Kimberly M. Greenwell of Orlando; son, Joshua Greenwell of Bristol, Va.; two daughters, Devon Miller of Orlando and Nadia Conrad of Dallas, Texas; and one granddaughter. Memorialization was by cremation. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net. Michael A. GreenwellMrs. Rubye V. Curry Brown of Highway 2, Bonifay, went home to be with her Lord and Savior on Thursday, July 19, 2012, with her loving and devoted family at her side. She was 95. Mrs. Brown was born Feb. 10, 1917, in Holmes County, to the late Rev. John Arthur and Lillie Sanders Curry. After several years of service, she retired from the Holmes County Extension Service as a nutritionist. She enjoyed cooking, sewing and working in her ower garden, but rst and foremost she loved her Lord and her family. She was a Congregational Methodist by faith. In addition to her parents, her husband, C. Jay Brown, and two sons, J.R. Jerry Brown and Johnny Jack Brown, all preceded her death. Survivors include one son, Kim Brown (Carol), Geneva, Ala.; three daughters, Jeanette Smith (Clyde) and Iris Smith (Jerry), all of Bonifay, and Lillie Smith of Geneva. Ala.; one sister, Mary Lois Sowell, Bonifay; 14 grandchildren; 26 great-grandchildren; a number of great-greatgrandchildren; and several nieces, nephews, cousins, other extended family and friends. Funeral services were held at 4 p.m. Sunday, July 22, 2012, at East Pittman Baptist Church with the Rev. Wesley Adams and the Rev. Clyde R. Smith of ciating. Mrs. Brown was placed into the church one hour prior to service time. Burial followed in the church cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Saturday, July 21, from 6 to 8 p.m. Great-grandsons served as honorary pallbearers.Rubye V. Brown RUBYE V. BROWNMrs. Ann Cook, age 68, of Ponce De Leon passed away Saturday, July 21, 2012. She was born May 1, 1944. in Lockhart, Ala., to Odis and Betty Adams Burkett. Mrs. Cook was a resident of Ponce De Leon. She was Baptist by faith and a member of the East Baptist Church. She owned and operated two restaurants for many years and was a Licensed General Contractor and a Licensed Roo ng Contractor. She enjoyed family gatherings, shing and was a very talented cook. Mrs. Cook was preceded in death by her mother, Betty Adams Burkett. Mrs. Cook is survived by her father, Odis Burkett of DeFuniak Springs; her loving husband of 25 years, Bill Cook of Ponce De Leon; three sons, Willard Timothy Carroll of Ocala, Terry Bruce Carroll of Pensacola and Jamie William Cook and wife, Amber, of Freeport; two daughters, Deborah K. Carroll of Ponce De Leon and Carolyn Carroll Slay and husband, Skeet, of Leonia; two brothers, Charles Ray Burkett and wife, Karen, and their daughter, Savannah, of Laurel Hill and Lamar Lambeth; 11 grandchildren, Adam Carroll, Jennifer Carroll Groce and husband, Lance, Sierra Carroll Irby, Jhace William Cook, Shane Carroll, Darah Carroll, Sandy Hougland and husband, Phillip, Buck Slay and wife, Kle, Beth Slay Alford and husband, Danny, Keith Slay and Josh Slay; and eight greatgrandchildren, Kaeson, Boone, Bryson, Bailey, Jesse, Savanah, Sarah and Mason. A time of visitation was held from 1 to 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 24, 2012, at Clary-Glenn Funeral Home Chapel, 230 Park Ave., DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 24, 2012, at Clary-Glenn Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Greg Alford and Joel Glenn of ciating. Burial followed in the Magnolia Cemetery. Floral arrangements are being accepted. You may go online to view obituaries, offer condolences and sign guest book at www.claryglenn.com. Clary-Glenn Funeral Home is entrusted with the arrangements.Ann Cook ANN COOKJanet Toole Carroll, age 67, of Wausau, left her family and friends to be with the Lord on Friday, July 20, 2012, at her home. She was born in Palm Harbor, on May 17, 1945, to Audrey Foxworth Toole and the late Calvin Toole, Sr. before moving to Chipley. She graduated Valedictorian from Chipley High School in 1963 and continued her thirst for knowledge through reading and word games. She took every opportunity to expose her grandchildren to learning opportunities. She was very active in her retirement from PAEC and enjoyed reading, camping and shing. Janet will be remembered as a loving wife, mother, grandmother, aunt, sister and daughter. She touched the hearts of many and was a true blessing to all who knew her. She is survived by her mother, Audrey Toole of Chipley; her husband of 43 years, Alto Carroll; two daughters, Cindy Carroll Cross and husband, Justin, of Crawfordville and Marcia Carroll of Tallahassee; one brother, Calvin Toole Jr. and wife, Pauline, of Bonifay; and four grandchildren, Ian and Jenna Cross, and Julia and Ari Bremer. The active pallbearers were Richard Clark, George Clayton Owens, Pat McDaniel, Ron Jones, Rick Everett and Marcus Harrell. The family received friends Sunday, July 22, 2012, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel. Funeral services were held Monday, July 23, 2012, at 2 p.m. at Brown Funeral Home, Brickyard Road Chapel with the Rev. Troy Lee Walsingham of ciating. Interment followed at Ferguson Cemetery. Family and friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh.net.Janet T. CarrollMr. Johnny Charles Vaughan, of Vaughan Dead River Lane, Westville, passed away Thursday, July 19, 2012. He was 62. Johnny was born April 17, 1950, in Holmes County, to the late Charlie Clark and Emma Lee Smith Vaughan. He was a 1968 graduate of Bethlehem High School and an avid Alabama Roll Tide football fan. In addition to his parents, a brother, James Lee Vaughan, and a sister, Charlene Hawthorne, preceded him in death. Survivors include four sisters, Ruth Forsythe of Dothan, Ala., Rachel Heath of Pensacola, and Cumi Vaughan and Linda Hughes, both of Geneva Ala.; one brother, Posie Vaughan of Westville; and several nieces, nephews, other extended family and friends. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, July 25, at New Hope Baptist Church with the Rev. Clay Hatcher of ciating. Burial followed in the Mt. Ida Congregational Methodist Church Cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the church Wednesday beginning at 10 a.m., and continued until service time.Johnny C. VaughanJudy McElwain, 68, of Noma passed away Wednesday, July 25, following a sudden illness. Ms. Judy was born Sept. 22, 1943, in Borderland, Ky., to the late Cecil and Grace Thompson Booten. Devoted and beloved wife, mother and grandmother, Ms. Judy worked with the U.S. Postal Service for many years as a postal carrier and retired as a Postmaster. She was a member of the Blessed Trinity Catholic Church in Bonifay. She was preceded in death by her parents; son, Gary McElwain; brothers, Cary Booten, Cecil Ray Booten, Jr., and Jimmy Booten, and sister, Lorraine Vickers. She is survived by her husband, Donald R. McElwain, Noma; son, Donald Donnie McElwain, Graceville; four daughters, Dawn Crutch eld (Matthew) and Kim Miller, all of Noma, Jessica Walters (D.J.) of Graceville and Debi Pendl (Vince) of Summer eld, N.C.; brother, Larry Booten, Sr. (Donna), Davie; two sisters, Riki Ann Booten, Eufaula, Ala., and Linda Faye Booten, Noma; four grandchildren, Zoie, Jolie, Carly and Christopher; one greatgrandson, Liam; and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Funeral Mass was held at 11 a.m. on Monday, July 30, 2012, at the Blessed Trinity Catholic Church with Father Richard Dawson of ciating. Burial followed in Noma Cemetery with James & Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family received friends at the funeral home Sunday from 6 to 8 p.m. Expressions of sympathy can be made at www. jamesandlipford.com.Judy McElwainMrs. Cecil Doris Lefebvre, age 88, of Bonifay, passed away July 23, 2012, at her home. She was born March 27, 1924, in Gas City, Ind., to the late Russell and Liddie Bell Young Jones. Mrs. Lefebvre was a former member of Mill Springs Christian Chapel in Quincy and currently a member of Gully Springs Baptist Church in Bonifay. Mrs. Lefebvre is survived by a son, Willie R. Lefebvre of San Clemente, Calif.; six daughters, Doris J. Meador of Vernon, Ind., Betty J. Lefebvre of Bonifay, Liddie B. Aronhalt of Bonifay, Barbara A. Alexander of Piedmont, S.D., Margaret D. Hunt of Ocean Park, Wash., and Hazel M. Lefebvre of Mobile, Ala.; 21 grandchildren; and 19 great-grandchildren. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Cecil D. Lefebvre Community EVENTSSee EVENTS B6

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Wednesday, August 1, 2012 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News ExtraPride Band is getting ready for another year of events. Aug 1-3: Band camp for rookies, percussion, color guard and band of cers will be 8-11:30 a.m. Full band camp will be 12:30-5 p.m. Aug. 6-10: Full band camp will be 8-11:30 a.m. and 12:30-5 p.m. Aug. 13-17: Full band from 5-7 p.m. AgEnder representative to speakKaren Schoen of Americans against UN Agenda 21 will speak at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 15 at Shepherds Gate Church in Sunny Hills, educating Washington County residents about the loss of their individual rights and loss of private property. The church is on State Road 77.2012 Graceville Harvest FestivalThe 31st annual Harvest Festival Pageant will be at the Graceville Civic Center in Graceville at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 7-8. The entry fee is $55 with all proceeds going to the Graceville Harvest Day Celebration. Contestants may participate in photogenic for an additional $10. Photogenic entries will be limited to one photo per contestant. Applications may be picked up at Bush Paint and Supply in Graceville, Graceville City Hall, Graceville News and Forget Me Not Photography in Bonifay. Deadline to enter is Aug. 17. Winners will receive a large trophy, large crown and banner. Alternates and participants will receive trophies. For more information, call Teresa Bush at 263-4744 or 263-3072 or Michelle Watkins at the city of Graceville at 263-3250.Wallace Baseball Showcase setDOTHAN, Ala. Dothan will be hosting a Summer Baseball Showcase at 9 a.m. Aug. 18. This Showcase is for 2013, 14, and 15 athletes. In attendance will be junior college and Division I college coaches along with professional scouts. If interested, contact the Wallace baseball of ce at 334-556-2416. Return registration form by Aug. 11. The cost of this showcase is $100 per athlete. Make all checks out to Mackey Sasser. Walk-ups are welcome. Pee Wee football, cheer sign-upsBONIFAY Signups will be 9-11 a.m. Saturdays through Aug. 25 at the Bonifay Rec Center. Please bring a copy of your childs birth certi cate. Cost for football is $50 per child. New cheerleaders will be $100, and returning cheerleaders from last season will be $50 if the uniform still ts. If you have any questions, call Mark Gilmore at 527-4363 or Michele Sherrouse at 373-6227.Bethlehem Alumni banquet plannedBETHLEHEM The Bethlehem Alumni Association Reunion Banquet will be at 5:30 p.m. Aug. 4 in the old cafeteria at Bethlehem School. Anyone who attended Bethlehem School or works at Bethlehem School is invited to attend. Former school administrators, teachers and staff members are also encouraged to attend. A roast beef dinner with all the trimmings will be served. The cost of the meal is $15 per person. Tickets may be purchased at Millers Store (near Millers Crossroads). Please share this information with your classmates and colleagues. For more information, call Chryle Brinley at 334-360-0308 or Larry or Peggy Moore 263-2507.Holmes County Farm Bureau membership meetingBONIFAY The Holmes County Farm Bureau annual membership meeting will be Aug. 23 at the Holmes County Agriculture Center on U.S. 90 East. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. with the meeting beginning at 6 p.m. Please RSVP to the of ce at 5474227 by noon Aug. 20.Senior Group going on tourWASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will be going on a tour of Ohio Indiana Amish country and Chicago Razzle Dazzle on Sept. 1-9. For more information, call Merita Stanley at 594-9980.Youth Ranch Golf TournamentPANAMA CITY The Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch Golf Tournament will take place Sept. 15 at the Panama Country Club. The monies raised from this bene t will go directly to the Youth Ranch, which runs solely on donations. The Washington County Sheriffs Of ce is one of the sponsors for the golf tournament. For more information, contact Andrea Gainey at 638-6115.Jacob City DayJACOB The city of Jacob has slated Sept. 15 for its Jacob City Day Celebration, which will include a parade, entertainment, food and activities for all. The festivities will start at 11 a.m. with a parade along Jackson Road. The other activities will take place at the Jacob City Park, 2254 Jacob Main Street (Highway 162). Anyone desiring to be in the parade will need to contact Eula Johnson at 263-2120 on or before Sept. 7. Booths are available to vendors; please contact Verloria T. Wilson at 2636636 for more information.2012 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageantBONIFAY The 2012 Northwest Florida Championship Rodeo pageant sponsored by the HCHS Blue Pride Band Boosters will be at 4 p.m. Sept. 22 at Holmes County High School. There is no residency required to enter this pageant. Girls age 4-20 and boys age 4-9 may enter. Contestant entry fee is $45. If two or more siblings register in any category, it will be $35 each. Registration dates, all at Holmes County High School, are as follows: 5-7 p.m. Sept. 11 10 a.m. to noon Sept. 15 Late registration 5-7 p.m. Sept. 18. A $10 late fee will be added on this date. You may also turn in registration forms at BES, BMS, HCHS or by mail to HCHS; Attn: Band Boosters; 825 West U.S. 90; Bonifay, FL 32425. If you have any questions, contact Cindy Goodson at goodsonc@ hdsb.org or 373-7517. Washington County candidate forumSUNNY HILLS On Oct. 4, we will have a candidate forum for all candidates with questions from the residents. All Washington County residents are invited to participate. Please send any questions to: Karen at kbschoen@bellsouth.net, or Chuck at shachakel@ att.net.Senior Group to explore Alpine countriesWASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will be exploring the Alpine countries of Germany, Austria and Switzerland from Sept. 28 to Oct. 11. For more information, call Merita Stanley at 594-9980.Washington County Girls Night OutCHIPLEY The Womens Imaging Services at Northwest Florida Community Hospital proudly present Girls Night Out on Oct. 11 at the Washington County Agricultural Center in Chipley. For more information, call Heather Shelby at 415-8119.Holmes County High School Class of 1953BONIFAY Members of the Holmes County High School Class of 1953 are looking for other members of the class to let them know if they are interested in holding a 60th class reunion. If you are interested, call Joann (Black) Scott at 763-4633, Grace (Whipple) Watson at 623-3058 or Ruth (Andrews) Bellot at 547-3452.Senior Group going to the Georgia Mountain FestivalWASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will be going to the Georgia Mountain Festival Oct. 16-20. The festival will be in Helen and in Hiawassee, Ga. For more information, call Merita Stanley at 594-9980.Second annual Scarecrow Contest CHIPLEY The second annual Scarecrow Contest, sponsored by the Chipley Garden Club, will be Oct. 13 on the lawn of the museum in conjunction with Washington County Historical Societys FALL INTO HISTORY Festival with assistance from the Washington County Arts Council and Tourist Development Council.Senior Group to experience Christmas in BransonWASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will experience Christmas in Branson, Mo., Nov. 25 to Dec. 1. This trip will include seven shows, seven days and six nights. For more information, call Merita Stanley at 594-9980. POLITICAL CAMPAIGN PRINTINGGet the message out with MEET THE CANDIDATE BBQ FOR JOHN SMITH FULL COLOR POSTCARDS ELECTJOAN FULLERFOR COUNTY SEATGLOSSY FULL COLOR RACK CARDS GLOSSY FULL COLOR DOOR HANGERS WE PRINTMORE THAN JUST NEWSPAPERSCALL KIM FOR FREE QUOTE638-0212posters yers business forms all types brochures newsletters postcards letterheads envelopes labels posters tickets yers rubber stamps specialty items and moreSTOCK DESIGN PADDLE FANS EVENTS from page B5 Special to ExtraPlanning ahead for the future is a great idea and a key ingredient in most successful businesses but is a daunting task, as the Board of Trustees and Of cers of The Artists Guild of Northwest Florida Inc. discovered this year. The nine-member board and of cers of the not-for-pro t 501(c)(3) Florida corporation based in Jackson County have been wrestling with the strategic planning for the organization since January. They completed the task in July and developed goals and objectives for the organization over the next three years. Getting started on such an arduous task takes creative leadership. TAG called upon Paul Smith, Kevin Yoder and Juanice Wengerd of Rivertown Community Church, who volunteered their time in two separate workshops to get the process started. Then Nancy Zurenda, TAG president, took the reins and guided the board and other interested members through the goal setting and planning process. Much of the work was hammered out in the conference room at the Jackson County Public Library and by individual board members. Strategic planning is especially challenging in the context of a not-for-pro t organization with a diverse membership. The initial meeting outlined numerous objectives for the organization. Then the TAG membership was asked what they believed to be the most important goals for the group. Under Zurendas direction, the participating members honed the goals and established objectives. Our plan includes 17 Strategic Objectives with goals that will serve to accomplish TAGs mission to enrich the cultural and artistic life of Northwest Florida and the surrounding areas through educational programs and opportunities in the visual, performing, and literary arts. Several committees have been formed to focus on the areas of growing membership, searching for a TAG home, expanding art sales opportunities, as well as advertising/marketing and fundraising, stated Zurenda. TAG is not an organization just for 2 and 3 dimensional artists, Zurenda said. Our goal is to reach out to writers, and performing artists as well as art patrons and art lovers and to include them in our programming. In order to enrich the cultural and artistic life of Northwest Florida TAG has a long range goal of nding and supporting a permanent location for the organization to host workshops, seminars, and meetings. The facility could also support a gallery and a small shop featuring the work of local and regional artists. The arts can help fuel the local economy and promote small businesses as well by attracting visitors to our communities, said TAG Founding President Judy Brooten.Arts group plans for future

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Wednesday, August 1, 2012 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 Easy Care Lawn Services. Yard services and pressure washing. Call for FREE estimate & affordable rates 850-527-6291 Licensed & Insurances Matts Removal! Garbage removal, free metal removal, yard jobs, moving jobs. We buy items. Nobody Beats My Prices! (850)547-1445, cell (850)658-2376. For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. Painting Inside or outside. Residential or commercial. Satisfaction Guarantee. Local references. 31 yrs experience. Dennis Glenn. 850-596-4143 C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 CALL TODAY!Reasonable Rates, Will Clean Weekly, Monthly, Move-In/Out. Call (850) 773-9852 Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 B B USINESS USINESS G G UIDE UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 18 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service! THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Dentons RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDAWE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS$ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENTMon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414Service On All Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration & Hoods638-3611 Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 $4,995 Xtreme Boats EZ GO Golf Cart Excellent Conditition, back seat & golf cart repairs.$1900 Call 535-4121 35 Dutchman Bunkhouse Special Fifth Wheel Bath and half, sleeps 8. One owner, excellent condition. (850)547-2308, (850)624-6236. 1978 Chevy El Camino 350 cubic inch Chevy engine. Four barrael Elderbock carb, glass pack muffler, automatic, streight body. $4000. OBO 850-624-1679 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $17,000, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 8-5116 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 11-472 CA JOHN T. STRAIN, LARRY W. STRAIN, and EMELEE SCHMIDT, Plaintiffs, Vs. HAROLD M. PRESCOTT and BRANDY L. PRESCOTT Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 9, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the East Door of the Holmes County Courthouse 11:00 a.m. on August 9, 2012, the following described property: Begin at the Southeast Corner of the SW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of Section 1, Township 5 North, Range 15 West, Holmes County, Florida and run West 165.0 feet; thence North 1320.0 feet; thence East 165.0 feet; thence South 1320.0 feet back to the Point of Beginning. Containing 5.1 acres more or less. According to survey by Thomas E. Jenkins, Fl. Cert. #2019, dated 3/28/01.(nl/dew) Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: July 13, 2012. CODY TAYLOR Clerk of Court By: /s/ Cindy Jackson Deputy Clerk CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE I CERTIFY that a true and correct copy of the foregoing Notice of Sale under F.S Chapter 45 has been furnished by United States Mail on July 13, 2012 to Scott Manion, Esq., attorney for Brandy Prescott, 2119 Delta Blvd, Tallahassee FL 32303 and by hand delivery to Timothy H. Wells, Post Office Box 155, Bonifay, FL 32425, attorney for Plaintiffs. /s/ Cindy Jackson Deputy Clerk As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 25, August 1, 2012. 8-5117 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No. 12-47 PR Division -CP IN RE: THE ESTATE OF LANA JEAN POWELL Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LANA JEAN POWELL, deceased, File Number12-47 PR Div CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Post Office Box 397, Bonifay, Florida 32435. The names and addresses of the Curator and the attorney for the estate are set forth below. LUIS E. BARRETO, ESQUIRE Florida Bar No.: 0946478 Barreto & Romero, P.A. Biscayne Building, Suite 507 19 West Flagler Street Miami, Florida 33130 Telephone (305)358-1771 LORI LEE YATES, Personal Representative of the Estate c/o LUIS E. BARRETO, ESQUIRE Barreto & Romero, P.A. Biscayne Building, Suite 507 19 West Flagler Street Miami, Florida 33130 Telephone (305)358-1771 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All persons on whom this notice is served who have objections that challenge the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative, venue, or jurisdiction of this Court are required to file their objections with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is August 1, 2012. CURATOR AND ATTORNEY FOR CURATOR: LUIS E. BARRETO & ASSOCIATES, P.A. LUIS E. BARRETO, ESQUIRE, Curator Florida Bar No.: 0946478 Biscayne Building 19 W. Flagler Street Miami, FL 33130 Telephone (305)358-1771 Facsimile (305)358-1773. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 1, 8, 2012. 8-5114 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA Civil Circuit CASE NO: 12-164CA SOUTH GULF, INC. Plaintiff v. WILLIAM I. DOBSON TERRY M. PAYNE JENNIFER L. PAYNE AND BENEFICIAL FLORIDA, INC., Defendants CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the cause pending in the Circuit Court in and for Holmes County, Florida, being case no. 12-164CA, the undersigned clerk will sell the property situate in Holmes County, Florida described as follows: Commence at the NW Corner of the S of the SE of NW Section 2, Township 5N, Range 15W, Holmes County, Florida and run S00E along the forty line 196.35 feet to an old fence line; thence run N81E 547.85 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue N81E along said line 420.82 feet to a fence line; thence run S02E along said fence line 608.52 feet to the North right of way line of Beal Packing Road said point being 15 feet North of Centerline; thence run S89W along said line 418.37 feet; thence run N01E, 555.59 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 5.6 acres more or less. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m. on the 23 day of August 2012, at the front door of the Holmes County Courthouse, Bonifay, FL. Dated this 13 day of July, 2012. CODY TAYLOR CLERK OF COURT By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 25, August 1, 2012. 8-5121 Public Auction at El Sankary Towing in Ponce De Leon Fl, 1600 Pirate Cove Rd. 32455 at 8:00 a.m. on August 17, 2012. (1)1993 Ford Crown Vic -Vin # 2FACP74W4PX118649 Owner: Frankey Baker (1) 1992 Jeep Cherokee -Vin # 1J4FT58S2NL118961 Owner: Brittney Manning. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 1, 8, 2012. 8-5120 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 12-64_ PR IN RE: ESTATE OF JEFFIE CARMON KEMP, JR., a/k/a J.C. KEMP, JR. deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Jeffie Carmon Kemp, Jr., a/k/a J.C. Kemp, Jr., deceased, whose date of death was March 15, 2012, and whose social security number is XXX-XX-7027, File Number 12-64 PR is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Holmes County Courthouse, Post Office Box 397, Bonifay, Florida 32425. The name and address of the Co-Personal Representatives and the Co-Personal Representativess attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is August 1, 2012. Co-Personal Representative: JOY ANN WELLS, 15252 NW JW RACKLEY STREET, ALTHA, FLORIDA 32421. JAMES EDWARD KEMP, POST OFFICE BOX 3184, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32056. Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives: JOHN Y. ROBERTS. ROBERTS, ROBERTS & ROBERTS 2879 MADISON STREET, POST OFFICE BOX 1544, MARIANNA, FLORIDA 32447 (850) 526-3865 FLORIDA BAR NO. 0496871 As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser August 1, 8, 2012. COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 Publishers Notice SCAM To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. I Buy Any Junk Car $250 FLAT RATE (800) 277-1569 ADVERTISE YOUR WAY TO SUCCESS! Call now to grow your business. Get your classified ad in 119 newspapers with one order. Advertising Networks of Florida(866)742.1373 Im looking for a single woman 35-45, non-smoker, Christian. (850)547-1445. UKC American Pit Bu ll Terrier bullies. Ready to go, fawns, blues, etc. Soft, cute, cudley, First Shots, great pedigrees. $400.00 850-638-3132 Downsizing. Saturday, Aug. 4, 2012. 7:30-1:00 p.m. 1515 S. Hwy 79, Bonifay. Collection of Steins, decanters, bird figurines, glassware, pyrex, milk glass & much more miscellaneous. Back to School Yard Sale August 1st-4th. 8:00 a.mtil. Behind Panhandle Lumber, Armstrong Street, Bonifay. Clothes, shoes, household items and much more. (850)547-9320. Estate Sale Esto. Saturday, August 4. 7 a.m.-until. 2nd Ave. North. (Turn off Hwy 79 @ Esto Church of Christ). 6 chairs, table & china hutch, dropleaf coffee table, rocker/recliner, couch, china, ladies, clothes-small, petite, medium & large. Garage Sale Friday & Saturday August 3rd & 4th. 8 a.m. until. 905 W. Banfill Ave., Bonifay. Garage Sale. Friday, Aug. 3rd. 1134 Iola Dr, Chipley, Orange Hill Hwy. 7AM-Until. Back to school kids clothes. HUGE YARD SALE Sat Aug 4 Railroad Ave Chipley. Including furniture, household items, designer clothes, sporting goods, and much much more. Large 2 family Yard Sale. Saturday, Aug. 4, 7 a.m.-until. Corner of North Ave & North Caryville Rd., Bonifay. LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE: Like a big Flea Market, but yard sale prices. Friday & SaturdayAug 3 & 4 8:00AM-5:00PM. Located on the bypass (Maple Avenue) Geneva, AL. Near Courthouse. Mulit-Family Yard Sale Fri & Sat 8 am Until. 896 8th ST Chipley .Lots of adult, junior & children new &used clothes, purses, shoes, house hold items, bed linens, furniture, entertainment center, lots of odds & ends Multi Family Yard Sale Aug 4th 8-2 located at 1270 Merry Acres Drive Chipley. R on Hwy 273 N Murrys Tire Store 1/2 mile on left on Merry Acres, to end right over bridge. Kids clothes many sizes 2/$1.00, ladies, mens size 56, household, tea pots, silver jewelry, TV, MISC. & MUCH MORE! K&L Farm, LLCGreen Peanuts for Boiling!!1567 Piney Grove Rd in Chipley Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 8-4pm 850-638-5002 260-5003/527-3380 U-PICK GRAPES $4.00/Gallon (850)547-2326 Follow signs on Hwy 177A to 1837 Flowing Well Rd., Bonifay. U-Pick 7 days, daylight Electric Scooter Chair.Clean, complete, good condition. $200. (850)956-3027 or cell (850)307-2271. Caryville Flea Market Produce, knives, honey, westerns, movies, okra $1.00/lb., old tools, new and used stuff. Open Saturdays 8 a.m. Gilbert Catfish Pond Closed Monday and Tuesday 2854 Highview Circle Chipley, Fl 32428 Phone:850-638-8633 Judys hand made Quilts. Some on hand or custom made to your order. (850)768-0165. Several Items For Sale. Terry Craft 15 Bass Boat, 115HP Mariner, GPS depth finder, trolling motor, $3500.00. GE washer/ dryer like new. $250 for both. Pool table, slate top, regulation, excellent condition $500. Call 850-326-2436 or 850-638-0215 WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incld 638-1918 3BR/1.5BA for rent $650/mth. No pets. Deposit, & references required Chipley. 638-1918 For Rent: Nice Townhouse apartment. 2BR/2.5BA, one car garage in downtown Bonifay. NO PETS. Call (850)547-3129, (850)326-2586. 3-4 Bedroom home fully furnished, $950/mo, Bonifay area. Also 2 Bdrm/1 bath Apt. $700/mo, fully furnished, free lawn service. (850)547-2096. For Rent 3BR/2BA trailer, $300/month. 2BR/1BA trailer $250/month. Ponce de Leon area. (850)226-4656. FOR RENT. 3BD/ 1BA h ousein Gilbert Subdivision. $650/mth, $650/depo. (850) 547-4284 or (850)638-0300. Ask to speak with Kim, Monday -Friday. House for rent on North 2nd Street, Chipley, Fl. 2 Bdrm/1 bath. (850)547-2061. No pets please. (2) 2BR/2BA MH for rent near Chipley. Water & garbage furnished. $400 & $425 plus deposit. Call 547-4232. 527-4911 Bonifays Best Mobile Home Community has 2 or 3 bedrooms available ranging from $435-$625/month. Large lots, quiet, clean and on-site maintenance. Only responsible persons should apply. Great Bonifay Schools. No pets. One month deposit. HUD Assistance may be available. Contact Sue: (850)547-1386 or (512)751-2847. 2BR Furnished Mobile Home CH/A. Real clean. On Bonnett Pond Rd. $500/mth $200/dep. Sorry No Pets 850-638-1462 3BD/2BADoublewide Country setting. Water furnished. Rent $650 deposit $400.In Washington County. 5 miles east of Walmart. Hud accepted. 850-260-5626 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. Country Living DW Mobile Home for Rent. Located off Brickyard Rd North on Hayley Dr. Front & rear porches. Real nice, big yard. Call Lou Corbin 638-1911 FOR RENT: Nice 2BR & 3BR MH Corbin RD Near Sapp Community Church. I furnish water, garbage, extermination, change air filter & mow grass once a mth. Deck on front & back, small storage building.For more info, call Lou Corbin @ 638-1911 or cell phone, 326-0044. Sorry No Pets. $33,500 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. Reduced Price! Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858.

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, August 1, 2012 ATTN: DRIVERS ....Apply Now, 13 Driver Positions Top 5% Pay, 401K, Great Insurance New KW Conventionals 2 Mos CDL Class A Driving Exp ( 877)258-8782 Drivers -Refrigerated and Dry Van freight. Hometime Choices: Weekly, 7/ON -7/OFF, 14/ON-7/OFF and more. Modern Trucks! CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. (800)414-9569. www.driveknight.com EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE HAPPY JACK DuraSpot: latest technology in flea, tick, mosquito & mite control on dogs. Patented. At farm, feed & hardware stores. Distributed by Fuller Supply (205) 343-3341. www.happyjackinc.com MEDICAL CAREERS begin here -Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (888) 2033179 www. CenturaOnline.com Medical OfficeTrainees Needed! Train online to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Training & Local Job Placement assistance thru SC Training, HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888) 374-7294. Full time Automotive Sales position. Previous experience preferred. Geneva area. (334)684-3646. Maintenance Part Time Maintenance Tech at Oak Terrace Apartments in Bonifay, FL Candidate will perform varies Maintenance duties necessary to maintain and have a clean community& facility. Duties will include plumbing, light electrical,painting, cleaning, etc. Candidate will work as a team player with fellow employees. Applicants must have own tools & reliable transportation. Please contact Beth In gram at boyd-mail.com Now Accepting Applications for,cooks,servers, oyster shuckers & dishwashers. Taking applications Tues-Sat from 10am-4pm. Apply in Person by 8-25-12. Frenchs Restaurant & Oyster Bar HWY 90, Caryville, FL 850-548-5800 Now Hiring Preschool Teacher: Must be able to pass a level 2 background check. Experience is a plus but not necessary. Also looking for a cook. Apply at The Academy located at 1567 Hwy 90 Chipley. Babysitter/Housekeeper wanted in my home in Bonifay, part-time. Ok to bring your own kids along. Drug free Christian home. Monica (850)855-1177. FINANCE MANAGERJerkins, Inc. in Bonifay, FL is looking for an experienced Financial Manager. A/P, A/R, & Payroll are some of the requirements. Excel a must. Please send your resumes to: micah@jerkinsinc.com Web ID#34217662Text FL17662 to 56654 Form Carpenters & Laborers (Seasonal/PT) needed for construction project in Bonifay. Please call 386-496-3883 to apply. Healthcare/Medical Medical office currently looking for an ARNP/PA to join our Medical team. Our office specializes in Cardiology, Internal Medicine & Family Practice. Please fax resume & references to 850-547-5415, attn Kim Sasser. Install/Maint/RepairDeisel Fleet MechanicJerkins, Inc. in Bonifay, FL looking for an experienced Deisel Fleet Mechanic. Apply in person 312 West Pennsylvania Ave, Bonifay or call 850-547-3651 Web ID#34218304Text FL18304 to 56654 Auto Technician Full Time Tech. Ford exp perfered. 334-684-3646 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Schneider National! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job Ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Drivers/Flatbed Class A. GET HOME WEEKENDS! Southeast Regional, Earn up to 39c/mi. 1 year OTR Flatbed experience required, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, LLC Child Care Tri-County Community Council Inc., is accepting applications for Early Head Start Home Visitor in Walton County. Responsibility: Conduct weekly home visits with Early Heard Start home based program enrollees and provide services per grant guidelines. Minimum Qualifications: High School (GED); Must have a Chold Development Associate (CDA) or be willing to obtain within 1 year ; 3-6 months related work experience and or training with infants and toddlers. Must have Current drivers license and proper vehicle insurance coverage. Must comply with health and background screening. For additional information and application call LeaAnn, Personnel Tech (850)547-3689, or visit the agency website www .tricountycommunity council.com and submit by Aug 6 4:30 p.m. Successful applicant will be subject to pre-employment drug test. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER AND DRUG AND SMOKE FREE WORKPLACE. Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more! Nothing works harder than the Classifieds! 850-638-0212 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today Why a management career at Costa Enterprises McDonalds? Because its much more than a career its a curriculum for life. The training, skills and experiences youll gain from running your own multi-million dollar restaurant are simply unmatched. This is your opportunity for a career where anythings possible. The sky is the limit, and we will fine tune your skills and maximize your talents to reveal your true potential.We believe in our peopleWe know what its like to be a leader. Thats why we provide you with a progressive career path that gives you the opportunity to be at the top of your game. Over 50 percent of McDonalds Franchisees started off behind the counter, as did more than 75 percent of our Restaurant Managers, and many of McDonalds Corporate Staff. We are committed to our people, which is why we offer opportunity, nurture talent, develop leaders and reward achievement. At McDonalds we enjoy a diverse, collaborative environment that fosters respect and drives high levels of engagement, which are essential to our continued success. We believe in educationMcDonalds is committed to being a learning organization. Not only do we provide educational assistance to our employees, but we also offer a college scholarship program for outstanding student employees. Another unique benefit of a career with McDonalds is our very own Hamburger University. Our programs lay an ideal foundation for building a high-powered career in McDonalds management and beyond. McDonalds is currently the only organization to be recognized by the American Council on Education (ACE) for our Restaurant Management curriculum. Your participation in our training programs can earn you credit toward your college degree program.We believe in giving back to our communitiesAt McDonalds you play an important role in serving the community. After all, the people you know, meet, serve, hire or greet are all part of it. Over the years, millions of people have frequented McDonalds because its a trusted name with proven service. Giving back to our community through educational, athletic, and other avenues is our way of returning that loyalty. We are extremely proud to support Ronald McDonald House Charities and its cornerstone program, Ronald McDonald House. We believe in perksWe value the hard work and dedication of each member of our team. At Costa Enterprises McDonalds we are pleased to provide exceptional benefits that reflect our appreciation for our people and their contributions to our success. Benefits include competitive wages, flexible hours, health insurance options, monthly bonus plans, continued education, 401(k), paid vacations, and up to wireless phone, laptop and even a company vehicle when you reach the General Manager position!We believe that you make the differenceDo you feel like you have what it takes to manage one of our fast-paced multimillion dollar restaurants? Then start today on the path that can take you down a long successful management career with McDonalds. At Costa Enterprises McDonalds we know that our people make all the difference. Apply online today through our website at www.costamcd.com or stop by any one of our 14 Costa Enterprise owned locations across the Panhandle from Port St. Joe, Blountstown, Panama City, Destin, Niceville to Navarre. At McDonalds, we believe you can do great things here! Featured Jobs To Place An Employment Here Please Contact Lorna Brown Phone: (850) 747-5019 Email: lbrown@pcnh.com Like Us On Facebook: www.facebook.com/emcoastjobs Or Follow Us on Twitter: @emcoastjobs