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Holmes County times-advertiser
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100549/00171
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Title: Holmes County times-advertiser
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
Place of Publication: Bonifay, FL
Publication Date: 07-11-2012
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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bonifaynow.com Connect With Us 24/7 Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo galleries, opinions and more... @WCN_HCT And Mobile Too Wednesday, JULY 11 2012 City addresses nuisance animals FSU medical students tour local health facilities Special to the Times-Advertiser BONIFAY A group of approximately 30 rst-year Florida State University medical students recently toured Doctors Memorial Hospital and the Holmes County Health Department as part of the Rural Education Opportunity Program. FSUs mission is to educate medical students who will subsequently seek to practice in rural areas in Florida. The REOP was formed in 2010 and is a half-day orientation to rural communities in the Florida panhandle for incoming medical students. The students, along with the College of Medicines Dean Dr. John Fogarty and third-year medical student JD Byrd, were welcomed by JoAnn Baker, DMH administrator. The group then toured the city of Bonifay with the guidance of Julia Bullington from the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce before making their way to the Holmes County Health Department. Moises Vallejos and Valarie Shipley were on hand to provide the tour, and Dr. Allen Swift offered information about their services. Lunch was provided at DMH after the tours, and several speakers were available to provide additional information to the students. Elaine May eld, administrative assistant with the Holmes County Development Commission, provided statistics about the county, emphasizing the countys assets of natural resources and the need for continued quality healthcare. Dr. Patrick Hawkins, an FSU College of Medicine alumnus, and Dr. Leisa Bailey, community faculty partner, also spoke to the students. They provided information about rural health, the advantages of getting to know your patients and having a wider scope of opportunities to practice a variety of procedures in a rural setting, as larger practices are more specialized. Esto re chief announces retirement By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com ESTO Esto Fire Chief Charles Corcoran announced his retirement and the Town Council appointed Tom Murphy to train to become re chief during the regularly scheduled council meeting on July 5. Council Member Jeff Carnley is serving as the temporary acting re chief until he can complete Murphys training. Carnley said with his 22 years of experience with the re department, he would lend his help for however long it takes to get Murphy ready as chief. Monk seeks re-election to commission From Staff Reports BONIFAY Ron Monk Jr. announced his plan to seek re-election as the Holmes County District 5 County Commissioner on Thursday. It has been an honor to serve the citizens of Holmes County for the past four years, Monk said in a news release. The experience Ive gained while serving in this capacity has been vast and invaluable. Monk said meeting with State Sen. Greg Evers and State Rep. Brad Drake to combat the septic tank inspection bill (Senate Bill 550) was de nitely a learning experience in the legislative process. I am very proud to have been a part of the implementation of new polices and procedures for the maintenance of our roads and bridges, Monk said. On the nancial side, as your board chairman, I feel I was instrumental in getting over $700,000. All of this was accomplished while operating within a balances budget and also not raising your taxes. RON MONK JR. Bonifay assistant police chief retires By CECILIA SPEARS Staff Writer cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY The Bonifay City Council discussed goats and delinquent fees at Mondays regular July meeting. At the previous council meeting, a resident had come to complain about his neighbors goats. What with the hot summer weather coming and theres these goats with all their feces in the backyard, and their natural goat smell, the odor alone is unbearable, he said. If shes (my neighbor) allowed to keep goats, I should be allowed to have a cow to eat my grass, give me milk and pull me around in my wheelchair. Something needs to be done, because theres more then just goats, its cats and dogs and all those feces together is just unbearable. At the request of Council Member Roger Brooks, City Attorney Lucas Taylor looked into a nuisance ordinance they could enforce. I found a dog ordinance that included nuisance animals, which also referred to obnoxious fumes, Taylor said. We can get them to get rid of the goats on this ordinance. At the last meeting, David and Vicky Guthrie of Healing Palms Hyperbarics had requested a reprieve from the city for the impact fees billed to them, which was $900 for water tap and hook-up fees and $1,800 for sewer. Theyve asked for extensions before, Woodham said. Wed give them six months and then theyd ask for another six months, and they have yet to pay for anything. Mayor Lawrence Cloud asked if the Guthries had paid regular bills. CHARLES CORCORAN See ESTO A2 PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE TIMES-ADVERTISER Dr. Leisa Bailey addresses medical students from Florida State University who recently toured Doctors Memorial Hospital in Bonifay as part of the Rural Education Opportunity Program. Holmes health tour Dr. Allen Swift provides information to the visiting medical students about the Holmes County Health Department. MEDICAL STUDENTS TOUR HOLMES COUNTY Volume 122, Number 13 INDEX Arrests ................................. A3 Opinion ................................ A4 Outdoors .............................. A6 Sports .................................. A7 Extra .................................... B1 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B7 See CITY A2 www.bonifaynow.com Game and Fish Expo CHIPLEY MPE will have a Game and Fish Expo from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 14 and 28 at the Chipley Walmart to teach kids about safety. For more information, call MPE at 326-9109. Community Clothes Exchange BONIFAY A community clothes exchange will be 1-6 p.m. July 16-17 at the Bonifay Elementary School Activity Building. Monday will be the donation dropoff day, and Tuesday is for shopping. Donate your child clothes, shoes, backpacks and lunch boxes that are in good shape and can be used by someone else and pick up items your child can use for the school year. Urquhart reunion BONIFAY The annual Urquhart Family Reunion will be at 11 a.m. July 21 at the Holmes County Agricultural Center on East U.S. 90 in Bonifay. Family and friends are invited to for fellowship and good food. Art showcase BONIFAY All art students are invited to display their school artworks and any other visual arts for free in August. Talk to So a Davis or make an appointment at 329-8381. 50 For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM Phone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 IN BRIEF Bonifay martial arts instructor earns master title | B1

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A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser They havent paid a single bill, and I say we write them a letter saying they have 10 days to pay the rst $900, Woodham said. Cloud said the owners attributed their inability to pay to lack of revenue. He said they had offered to pay the $900 for the water tap and hook-up but have yet to pay anything. I dont know where the misconception came that we approved to wave the sewer impact fees for two years, but the minutes needed to be reviewed before we approved of them, Cloud said. He needs to pay the $900 he owes now, then $900 the next year and then the nal $900 the year after that, along with his regular monthly bills. The council agreed to send a letter requesting that the initial $900 be paid within 10 days or legal action would be taken. Wanda Campbell, chief operations of cer with Chemical Addictions Recovery Effort Inc., requested that the city help them with of ce space for substance abuse counseling services. We are a not-for-pro t organization providing services since 1972, and more than 90 percent of the population we serve is indigent, Campbell wrote. We provided services to a minimum of 70 patients and their families last year. We were sharing donated of ce space with DCF (the Department of Children and Families) on Waukesha Street until their recent relocation to Washington County. She said the groups still share an of ce in Chipley, but most of CAREs patients from Holmes County do not have proper transportation. The majority of our clients is without income and have little to no income; therefore, it would be a hardship on them to have to travel to Chipley from Holmes County for services, she wrote. Unfortunately some would probably not be able to receive our services. Please consider your recreation center or any other available building; any assistance is appreciated. Police Chief Chris Wells recommended to them the building across from the Bonifay Middle School, which is occupied by DJJ and run frequently by the Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce. The council agreed to allow Wells to see what he could do to help establish communications between CARE and the HCSO about possible available space. Woodham said there were several houses interested in garbage pick-up through the city. Our garbage services pick up garbage on Son-inLaw Road, but they dont go down the side streets, Woodham said. Someones picking it up, but its not ours. Theyre outside the city limits, but theyre on city water. Cloud said they could canvas the area to see how many of the people down those streets are interested in getting city garbage pickup, and if there is enough need, it could possibly be done. The council approved of Clouds motion to change the citys new hires from being determined by the department heads and supervisors to having the city council review, interview and approve of which applicants should be hired and what their salary should be. Police Chief Wells also announced during the council meeting that Bonifay Police Assistant Chief Joe Sallas has of cially retired after 27 years of service. Replacing him as assistant chief is Gregory Yancey. The council approved of the Holmes County High Schools Baseball Booster Clubs request to use the recreation elds to hold a fundraising tournament on July 21-22. The next regularly scheduled Bonifay City Council meeting is set for 6 p.m. July 23 at Bonifay City Hall. Wednesday, July 11, 2012 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." www.mulliseye.com Chipley Office We are located directly across the parking lot from the Walmart in Chipley "W E W E LCOM E N EW PATI EN TS, C ALL T ODAY F OR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TM EN T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley Office Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 7-31-12 FREE E Y E EX AM COD E: W C 00 T odd R obinson, M D Board C ertified Eye Physician and C ataract S urgeon L ee M ullis, M D Board C ertified Eye Physician and C ataract S urgeon POLITICAL CA MP AI GN PRI N TI NG Get the message out with MEET THE CANDIDATE BBQ FOR JOHN SMITH FULL COLOR POSTCARDS ELECT JOAN FULLER FOR COUNT Y S EAT GLOSS Y FULL COLOR RACK CARDS GLOSS Y FULL COLOR DOOR HANGERS WE PRINT MORE THAN JUST NEWSPAPERS CALL KIM FOR FREE QUOTE 638-0212 posters yers business forms all types brochures newsletters postcards letterheads envelopes labels posters tickets yers rubber stamps specialty items and more STOCK DESIGN PADDLE FANS Special to The Times-Advertiser Trawick Construction presented the United Way of Northwest Florida a check for $6,965 from funds raised during its fourth annual Bring Your Old Buddy Golf Tournament at Sunny Hills Golf Course. This fundraising event has gotten bigger each year thanks to the hard work of all our employees, said Phillip Metcalf, director of safety and human resources. It means so much to all of us here at Trawick Construction to be able to help a charity like the United Way of Northwest Florida that positively affects so many lives. Trawick Constructions total campaign contribution to the United Way of Northwest Florida was $7,115. Trawick Construction, a Quantas Services Company, is an award-winning provider of outside plant services to telecom and long-line companies throughout the United States. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES-ADVERTISER Trawick Construction recently presented $6,965 to United Way of Northwest Florida. Attending were, from left, Trawick associates Jack Commander, Tim Hammack, Dennis Richards, Darryl Spence and Phillip Metcalf, and Wayland Fulford, Darrin Wall and Nicole Bare eld representing the Washington County United Way Campaign Committee. Golf tourney nets $6,965 for United Way The council also revealed that Dollar General announced the opening date of the new Esto store will be Aug. 12. Council Member Darlene Madden told the council that $5,029.64 was raised at last years Two-Toed Tom Festival, and the council approved of her request to split it evenly among the Recreational Center, the general fund, the re department and the Two-Toed Tom account for the next festival. The total came out to $1,257.41 each. Tabled until the next meeting was an addendum to the water ordinance regarding the councils raising water rates annually if required. Also tabled were plans for the council to review the two applicants for town water operator. Council members discussed various ways of helping save the ducks that live in the John W. Clark Park pond. The eggs go missing, and so do the ducks, Madden said. Somethings got to be done. The council decided to seek help from a local duck owner, using his incubator to ensure the safety and protection of the ducks. Other means of protecting the ducks, including nes and criminal charges, are under investigation. According to the minutes of the previous meeting on June 5, Dennis Dingman from Summit Professional Services presented a Fair Housing Workshop for a Rehab Grant, presenting council members with documents outlining how the water system would be laid out. The documents included a map showing how the water transmission mains would be laid out; a preliminary cost estimate for Alternative 3, which is the plan requested by the council; a 2012 Scoring Analysis; and a water system cost analysis. Town Attorney Jeff Goodman voiced his concerns with the exact amount the town was to pay for the engineering of the project, which was estimated at $42,982.28. The engineering would have to be completed before the town would be given the grant and a loan to nance the new water system, so the council agreed to have the town clerk call Jim Bundy with Hatch Mott MacDonald set up a special meeting to discuss the amount he would charge for engineering. The council agreed to look into a possible loan with the Department of Environmental Protection for the amount charged for engineering at the interest rate of 2.5 percent for 20 years, but there is no guarantee the town will get a loan until December or January. Dingman agreed to call Joann Van Hall with Rural Development to get an estimate on what their loan would be and at what rate of interest. The council approved of placing an ad in the newspaper to request volunteers to help with next years Two-Toed Tom Festival. The council also approved sending out code enforcement notices once again to owners of properties that need cleaning, which includes all property owners in Esto, not just those located on State Road 79. The next regularly scheduled town council meeting will be at 7 p.m. Aug. 7 at Esto Town Hall. ESTO from page A1 CITY from page A1 Local

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 I am quitting smoking for my family. The Big Bend Area Health Education Center (Big Bend AHEC) is offering FREE tobacco cessation classes in Holmes County and throughout the Big Bend region. We know the challenges you face. We will help you develop the tools to succeed and we will provide the support you need. For more information, call Big Bend AHEC at: 850-482-6500 (local office) or 1-87-QUIT-NOW-6 (1-877-848-6696) Visit www.ahectobacco.com for the schedule of classes we have available. FREE N I COT I NE PATCHES! NO COST TO ATTEND! Northwest Florida Community Hospital We Treat You Like Family better than Northwest Florida Community Hospital 1360 Brickyard Road Chipley, Florida www.nfch.org is pleased to announce Jesus Ramirez, MD as the newest member of our Health Care Team. Dr. Ramirez diagnoses and treats diseases, conditions and abnormalities of the lungs, cardiopulmonary system and respiratory tract. He also treats COPD, sleep apnea, lung cancer, emphysema, insomnia, snoring, asthma and bronchitis. He is available to see patients on Tuesdays at the Northwest Florida Community Hospital Specialty Clinic. Please join us in welcoming Dr. Ramirez to our community. Call 850-638-9398 for an appointment with Dr. Ramirez Wednesday, July 11, 2012 June 25 June 29, 2012 Marriages Jonathan Jerome Mosley, 11/14-1983 of Decatur and Amber Leigh Thompson 3/18/1982 of Decatur Christopher Wayne Gibson, 11/27/1980 of Bonifay and Sara Marie Baltazar, 9/14/1983 of Bonifay Divorces Shannon Lose and Amy Steverson Losee Allan Lee and Kathrine Lee Clifford Floyd Jr. and Mary Floyd CHIPLEY Washington County Sheriffs Ofce will be seeking volunteers to participate in an allvolunteer program to help make our county a safer place to live, Sheriff Bobby Haddock said in a news release on Monday. The Public Service Ofcer program will be used to augment the patrol efforts of our deputies, Haddock said. They will provide us with extra eyes and ears and will assist us in many other areas of responsibility as well. Initially, the sheriffs ofce will select from a pool of interested volunteers and then determine who are qualied as candidates. Volunteers will be screened, must complete a background check and should be capable of performing the duties expected of them. Once selected, PSO candidates must successfully complete the required training curriculum. Some of the initial duties they will perform will be visibility patrol, assisting with trafc and crowd control, welfare checks and special events. All necessary equipment will be provided to the volunteers who will be expected to perform a required number of hours each month. PSOs will not be sworn law enforcement personnel and therefore will not be responding to or handling any potentially dangerous calls for service. Primarily, they will provide those services which are essential to public safety that deputies are already doing, freeing up our personnel for more serious law enforcement duties. This has been a successful program in many other counties in the state, Haddock said. Volunteers have always been a vital part of our community in many ways, he said. This will simply be another way in which qualied residents of Washington County will be able to participate in something that is vital to the safety of our citizens. Interested parties should contact the Washington County Sheriffs Ofce at 638-6069 for additional information. Holmes County MARRIAGES AND DIVORCES Sheriffs Ofce plans PSO Program Holmes County A rrests June 24 June 30, 2012 Anthony K. Barnes, 40, violation of probation Lonnie Jay Bowling, 43, out of state warrant Kenny Michael Brabley, 23, battery domestic violence Terri Leigh Bradley, 22, battery domestic violence Cody Everett Burghoff, 20, grand theft auto Giovaanni William Depalma, 51, hold for Hillsborough Christopher Scott Dunn, 33, driving while license suspended or revoked Thomas H. Ellenbrock, 37, hold for Hillsborough Kevin Lee Gillham, 50, driving on suspended license Donald Fredrick Groover, 31, violation of probation Kenneth Luquette Harris, 38 failure to appear on driving while license suspended or revoked Katherine Holt, 47, recommit Jason Spencer Johnson, 33, violation of probation Roy Allen Kirch, 31, eeing and attempting to elude, driving while license suspended or revoked Lee Van Reed, 50, violation of probation Anthony Joseph Richard, 42, violation of probation Teresa Kay Shinkman, 37, violation of probation on issuing worthless checks Chaseton Hunter Tice, 22, violation of probation on battery and assault Howard Glen Toole, 57, violation of probation Joseph Allen Wells, 27, disorderly conduct, criminal mischief Arrest REPORT By ANGEL MCCURDY Daily News N ICE V ILLE During the past year, John Barranco has privately celebrated the seven birthdays of his family that was killed in a plane crash last summer. On July 9, 2011, Barrancos daughter, 38-year-old Terresa Teutenberg, along with her husband, 42-year-old Fred Teutenberg, and ve of their children 2-year-old Emma, 4-year-old Peyton, 6-year-old Ellie, 9-year-old Brendon and 10-year-old Will were killed in a plane crash while making an emergency land ing near the Demopolis, Ala., airport. There are good days and there are bad days, Barranco said. (Thursday) marked a year from the last time I talk ed to my daughter before her and her family went down to St. Louis for Freds family reunion. We said goodbye without realizing it would be our nal goodbye. Initial reports from the National Transportation Safety Board said Freds Cessna 421C was approaching the De mopolis airport when it lost radar con tact at an altitude of 800 feet before it crashed in a wooded area less than one mile north of the runway. The Niceville community was stunned after learning of the crash. The Teuten bergs, who were members of Niceville United Methodist Church, were ac tive in their volunteering and business ventures. Terresa owned Discovery Learning Academy in Bluewater Bay while Fred played in the church band, coached and played for several soccer teams and owned Advanced Integrated Technology Systems, his start-up business. Im at the point now that enough time has gone by that it doesnt affect me like it did when it rst happened, said Blane Pearson, minister of admin istration at Niceville United Methodist and a close friend of Freds. Its really hard to forget about it, but talking to oth er people, sharing, doing remembrance of them, that helps rather than trying to internalize everything. The NTSB reported the cockpit, cabin and left wing of the Teutenbergs plane were consumed by re after the crash. The right wing was torn from the plane and ended up against a tree. A nal re port has not been released. Its rough now. Were waiting for the nal report to nd out what exactly hap pened, what was going on during those last minutes of the ight and those kinds of things, Barranco said. In April, they said a month. In May, they said it would ready around the anniversary. Not too long ago, they said it would be another two months. I believe the investigation is done, and theyre at the point of working on the summation report. Hopefully, within another month well get the report and have a little closure. Terresas mother, Sharon Elliott, said she struggles each day to cope with the loss of her family. The saying that time makes it easier is not true, Elliott said, crying. I miss them so much. But the community sup port has been overwhelming. I hadnt realized my daughter and her husband and kids had touched so many lives, she added. It seems like every day theres somebody new saying they knew them and asking me if they can do anything to help. A memorial service to mark the oneyear anniversary of the tragedy was scheduled for Monday at Discovery Learning Academy. There were so many wonderful things about the family. Terresa and Freds lives revolved around the chil dren, Barranco said. I cant even de scribe how much the whole family loved each other. I wish I had another day with them. Anniversary of Teutenberg plane crash marked SPECI A L TO T HE TIME SAD V E RT I S E R July 9 marks the one-year anniversary of the fatal plane crash near the Demopolis, Ala., airport that killed the Teutenberg family.

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Opinion A4 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com 1-800-645-8688 ADVERTISING 850-547-9414 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2012, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. Wednesday, July 11, 2012 As an English Major I learned about dialect, diction, pejoration, ideolect and a bunch of other stuff. I learned about formal English and casual English. I learned about the French in uence on the language due to the Norman Conquest in 1066. Because of that, French became the language of the court and English became the language of the common man. I learned that no one sat down and wrote a bunch of rules of grammar but use by the educated class dictates what is considered proper. I learned that Greek was the language of learning and that Latin was the language of science. I learned a whole bunch of things, some of which I found useful in teaching and some I never used. Much I forgot. One thing I learned is that language, spelling and usage change over the years. Some words meanings change entirely. Weve seen that in our own time. Being between cleaning ladies, I was taking pains to do a good job of cleaning my bathroom oor. When I was growing up, taking pains to do something meant giving careful attention to doing a good job; for example, painstakingly scrubbing all the built up wax off the oor. Now I dont suppose our parents or grandparents would have meant to moan and groan or writhe in pain to do a good job like one of my Brackin schoolmates, Mary Dell. Everybody in the country used to have clean swept yards, which were swept with brush brooms made from gall berry bushes. Ive been told that people kept their yards swept clean as a re precaution. That was probably the case especially on the prairie, but for us, chickens and hogs running loose was the main reason for our brush broom yard sweeping. Anyway, Mary Dell was doing the weekly chore. Her mother said, Now Mary Dell, take pains and do a good job. Sister Loma reported that she checked on her later and found her moaning and groaning and crying out. When asked what was wrong, Mary Dell replied, Im taking pains to do a good job. At my age, when I am trying to reach the oor, you can be sure I am in pain even if I am not taking pains. This expression reminded me of a number of words that were in our ideolect as a child. When you ask an older person how they were, the usual response was, tolable. Just tolable. It was a long time before I realized they were saying tolerable. They were able, if barely, to tolerate their in rmaties. Another word that we often heard was terreckly. It was not until Aunt Annie Padgett Wells came into our family that I knew adults were putting us off with the promise of directly. There was a fair amount of difference in terreckly, which meant maybe Ill get around to it after awhile, and directly, which I thought meant right away. Another expression we used to hear before weight was such a weighty issue was, My! Youve fell off. You been sick? Today, youve lost weight would be considered a compliment, but most people would say, Fell off? Fell off what? Saying you are fat and pretty today would hardly be considered a compliment as it was in my childhood days. We like most country folks had an open well. Water was drawn up by means of a rope or chain run through a pulley. We called that a tickle. I suppose the correct word for that would be tackle, but that sounds like something you take shing or do on the football eld, neither of which Id ever heard of in my childhood. The only shing tackle we had was a cane pole, a black line tted with a small shhook and a cork. In addition, we would likely carry a strong stob (stake) and an ax for snoring up some bait along with an empty tomato can to hold the earth worms that crawled up to see what the earth was vibrating about. If we were lucky, Daddy left us enough bait at the shing hole near the landing while he went into the swamp to nd a better spot. He could disappear into the swamp almost as fast as he could down a pea or cornrow at gathering time. I am glad that education, travel, television and radio have afforded us the opportunity to grow intellectually and the resultant language changes, but its often fun to look back and laugh at some of the things that were commonplace in our younger days. Remember the formality of leaving when you visited a neighbor or friend. The conversation went like this: We better be going. Ooh Yall dont need to hurry off. (Maybe youve been there three hours.) Yea, we got to go. Yall just come on and go with us. No, we better stay here. Well, Yall just be a coming. Dear Editor, The trailer in which Larry Rednour had only recently moved into started burning in the middle of the night (1 a.m.). Larry tried to put the re out and was so badly burned that he has to have skin grafts to his hands. His doctor says he wont be able to work for a year and medical bills are piling up. I have it on good authority that they will be in the hundreds of thousands of dollars. A fund has been started at Tyndall Credit Union in Chipley, account number 1972011, but very little has been donated. I have faith in the citizens of Washington and Holmes counties for their generosity if they were aware of the circumstances. Someone said it was on T.V. What, one time? How about a public interest story in the paper? He has applied for Medicaid, but we know how that is. If approved, it usually takes ve or six months. This family needs help now. Churches take love offerings and some can give a little and some a lot. Every bit helps. God will bless you as you give. Micki Wright Vernon Our language has experienced a lot of changes HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison LETTER TO THE EDITOR In last weeks column, a promise was made to pursue a second writing of the Prattlers experience of participating in the 60th annual Florida Folk Festival. This was the threeday event held in May at the historic Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park in White Springs, Fla. The town nestles on the beautiful banks of the wellknown iconic Suwannee River, a landmark in the nation. Coming to visit and support the participation of the Prattler was my sister, Gail, who has resided in Gainesville throughout her working career as a pharmacist. She came on Saturday, and on Sunday, sister Hazel and sister-in-law, Esteena, made the long drive from DeFuniak Springs and Bonifay to lend support. Esteena, who calls Jasper, Fla., her hometown, joined her brother, Jimmy Kry, wife Martha and granddaughter, who told me, that for years, they make the annual trek to White Springs from their home in Bushnell, Fla., for the gigantic Folk Festival. Another special person met was retired Circuit Judge John Peach from Jasper, who obviously came to our location expressly to meet us. He served as judge along with Circuit Judge Clyde B. Wells, my brother, who was killed in 1990. He is now on Senior Judge status and has become acquainted with Clydes son, Circuit Judge Kelvin Clyde Wells, who is presently serving in the post once held by his dad. He repeated some of the Hamilton County Judge David Bembrys stories whom the Prattler had the privilege of serving with. Sadly, Judge Bembry passed away while still serving as county judge. Many visitors came to the Folk Tent expressly to hear Chipley resident Laurence Cutts, who was listed on the program as conducting a program on beekeeping, the family business he has followed as a profession. Unfortunately, illness prevented Laurences attendance. Three of my stage appearances were with Wayne Martin, a Blountstown resident who was instrumental in directing Blaine Waide to me for the initial interview. Wayne gave me fair warning of the enormity of the 60-year-old Florida Folk, where he has attended for the past 25 years. He won the Fiddling Contest twice and has now stepped aside in deference to younger entrants. He formerly carried a business card that identi ed him as The Fiddling Fool. He plays ddle for Big Bend Bluegrass, a band led by Wausau resident James Hood, his son, Vernon High School coach Danny Hood, Carolyn Van Lierop and Crystal Owens. Even with Waynes warning of the mammoth size of the event, your writer was totally overwhelmed upon arriving at the sprawling grounds of the facility. Upon locating the assigned site, Folklife Stage, our party did not wander far from the home territory. Upon reading the detailed Program, I was excited over the possibility of seeing and hearing the music performers who were scheduled to perform. Many had made visits to Chipley during our time of operating the Northwest Florida Music Park. Doug Gauss, a Tarpon Springs native, who now calls Tallahassee his home, was on the program continuing his history of 30 years performing at the Folk Festival. Widely known for his unique style of nger picking the guitar, Doug also plays other folk instrument including banjo, mandolin and hammered dulcimer. He joined Wayne Martin for a performance at a bluegrass festival here many years ago in a musical tribute to the life of Will McLean, a Chipley native, who wrote and sang a variety of folk songs during his lifetime in this genre. When we rst began the festivals here, one of the rst bands hired was Skip Johns and the Travelers from Live Oak, Fla. Skip was listed as performer at White Springs.We also recall Red and Murphy Henry, a husband and wife musical duo who played a Chipley Festival in the late 1970s when Noah Grif n Jr. and wife Lois rst brought festivals to our town. Red, along with his son, Chris, were among the performers at the May event. To our regret, we did not have opportunity to see any of the above musicians whom we had known in the past. We also had to forfeit seeing Quincy, Fla., native Billy Dean and daughter, Hannah Dean, who has enjoyed successes in the country music eld. John Anderson, well known in the music circles with a host of hit songs, including Im Just an Old Chunk of Coal, and the highlight entertainer, legendary musician performer and folk historian Arlo Guthrie, are among the many others that we did not see. Arlo is the son of Woody Guthrie, who lived in the famous Folk Boom era while composing and singing the still-celebrated song This Land Is Your Land. Fortunately for us, we were near the spacious, air conditioned Carillon Tower, where story telling artist presented interesting and entertaining stories throughout the weekend. One such performance came from Blountstowns Joan Alderman, daughterin-law Amy En nger Alderman playing the upright bass ddle and former Calhoun County Sheriff Buddy Smith accompanying the duo on guitar. Amy is the daughter of David and Judy Roberts En nger, who reside in the Bonnet Pond area of Washington County. We enjoyed many other story tellers while relaxing in air conditioned comfort and escaping the outdoor heat. On Sunday morning, Hester and I did visit the Amphitheater and listen to the Sacred Harp Singers from Tallahassee. We were near the food vendors and the return walk allowed us to purchase lunch, thus keeping us within the boundaries of the assigned Folklife Tent. We offer sincere thanks and appreciation to all those who planned and carried through the outstanding, educational, entertaining and interesting three day events. On the surface, it would appear impossible and overwhelming to carry out such a task. Yes, Hester and I agree that we would attend next year, if only as spectators. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Shown is an over ow crowd of spectators at an Amphitheater concert. Florida Folk Festival part two PERRYS PRATTLE Perry Wells

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 NOTICE The Holmes County School Board will be considering amendments to School Board Policies, Student Progression Plan and Student Code of Conduct at the School Board meeting August 7, 2012 at 9:00 am. A copy of the documents to be amended may be viewed at the Holmes County School Board Of will be held August 7, 2012 at 9:00 am in the Board Room. Wednesday, July 11, 2012 Special to Times-Advertiser WASHINGTON, D.C. The U.S. Forest Service, De partment of the Interior, Department of Defense and FEMA continue to support efforts to protect life, public safety and aid in community recovery from wildres and subsequent ash ooding in multiple Western states. On June 28, President Obama approved a disas ter declaration for Colo rado providing additional support to state and local ofcials responding to the res, as well as federal as sistance for individuals af fected by the High Park and Waldo Canyon Fires. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar is in Colorado Springs today to see the wildre response efforts rsthand and thank re ghters, rst responders and volunteers for their ef forts to battle the res and support the communities that have been impacted. While in Colorado Springs, Secretary Salazar is attend ing a brieng with Colorado Springs Mayor Steve Bach, El Paso County Sheriff Ter ry Maketa, Incident Com mander Troy Nelson, and Burned Area Emergency Response Team Leader Marc Stamer regarding the federal, state and local response to the Waldo Can yon Fire. Salazar is also touring the Mountain Shadows sub division with members of the BAER team who are on site to assess damage. Six Department of Defense C-130 aircraft equipped with U.S. Forest Service Modular Airborne Fire Fighting Systems and under the command and control of U.S. Northern Command continue to as sist in the efforts to control res in the Rocky Mountain region and western United States at the request of the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho. As of Sunday, DoD aircraft have conducted 145 air drops and discharged more than 380,100 gallons of retardant. The 145th Airlift Wing, North Carolina Air Na tional Guard will hold a private memorial service tomorrow for the four air men killed in the crash of a Modular Airborne Fire Fighting System equipped C-130. The men died July 1, when their plane went down while ghting a forest re near Edgemont, S.D. Currently, 20 large airtankers, including six MAFFS-equipped C-130s, as well as 71 Single Engine Air Tankers are available nationally to combat res burning in a number of Western states. More than 8,500 personnel, more than 530 re engines and more than 65 helicopters are also ghting wildres around the U.S., supporting state and local efforts. As federal partners continue to support state and local ofcials battling the Waldo Canyon re with more than 80 federal, state and local reghters, eight re engines and three he licopters today ghting the re in the hillsides west of Colorado Springs, the U.S. Forest Service today re ported that as the Waldo Canyon re in Colorado was 98 percent contained after burning more than 18,000 acres west of Colora do Springs and destroying over 300 homes. Ofcials expect the re to be fully contained in a few days as some reghters and sup pression resources are be ing redirected to other res in the West. The State of Alaska has sent 10 crews to support wildre suppression ef forts in the Western states, predominantly made up of Alaska Natives from the communities of Nondalton, Kenai, Copper River, Ve netie, Fort Yukon, St. Michael, Koyuk, Selawik, Shageluk, Scammon Bay. In Colorado, Secretary of Agri culture Tom Vilsack has designated all counties as pri mary Secretarially designated natural disaster counties, except Delta and San Juan which are contiguous disaster counties, due to the damage caused by drought, excessive heat, and high winds. This designation makes all qualied farm operators in the designated areas eli gible for low interest emer gency loans from USDAs Farm Service Agency, provided that eligibility re quirements are met. Farm ers in eligible counties have eight months from the date of the declaration to apply for loans to help cover part of their actual losses. As part of heightened efforts, the Forest Service and the Department of the Interior have completed training of two Army bat talions at Fort Carson, near Colorado Springs, Colo., to potentially serve as ground reghters to boost the number of reghters avail able for wildre suppression throughout the nation. The training involves one day of classroom training and two days of eld training. Dur ing the classroom training, soldiers learn about wild re suppression including re behavior and reline safety. During eld training, soldiers receive instruction in re suppression methods and procedures. Since the beginning of the Waldo Canyon re, Fort Carson units and services have committed more than 120 soldiers, 10 bulldozers and other equipment and resources to provide assis tance to ongoing re con tainment operations and interagency support to the Greater Colorado Springs community. On July 3, FEMA ap proved two additional Fire Management Assistance Grants for the Shingle re in Kane County, Utah and for the Oil Creek re in Weston County, Wyoming. This brings the overall to tal number of FMAGs ap proved for states during this re season to 24. Other states that have received these important grants in clude Colorado, Montana, New Mexico, Nevada and Texas. FMAGs are provided through the Disaster Relief Fund and made available by FEMA to assist in cov ering 75 percent of the eli gible state and local costs of ghting res that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for eld camps; equipment use, repair and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activi ties; and tools, materials and supplies. On July 1, the NIFC released its latest Na tional Wildland Signicant Fire Potential Outlook for July-October 2012, which provides coordinated fed eral, state, local and tribal government agencies, rst responders and the public with information about the likelihood that wildland re events will require mobilization of additional resources from outside the area in which the re situ ation originates. Updated outlooks are released by NIFC on the rst of every month. The major disaster dec laration for Colorado, ap proved by President Obama on June 28, makes federal funding available to state and eligible local governments and certain private nonprot organiza tions on a cost-sharing ba sis for emergency protec tive measures, including direct Federal assistance, for El Paso and Larimer Counties impacted by the High Park and Waldo Can yon Fires. Federal funding is also available for Crisis Counseling and Disaster Unemployment Assistance for affected individuals in El Paso and Larimer Counties impacted by the High Park and Waldo Canyon Fires. Additional forms of assis tance may be designated as part of the disaster declara tion once joint federal, state and local damage assess ments are fully completed. Overall, federal partners have deployed 14 Incident Management Teams (IMT), including four Type 1 IMTs, and eight Type 2 IMTs, to help provide a coordinated and aggressive response to wildres across the coun try. These teams have been strategically assigned to highly complex wildres such as, the Waldo Canyon Fire near Colorado Springs, Colorado, the Dahl and Ash Creek res in Montana, the Seeley and Fontenelle Fires in Wyoming, and others. To further address the severity of current wild land re activity across the western states, Secretary Salazar and Secretary Vil sack have directed federal land managers to take ad ditional measures to help reduce the risks of new wildres, ensure the high est possible level of coordi nation among federal land management agencies, and continue to prioritize safety for reghters and communities. Additional measures include prohib iting new prescribed res in geographic areas where Preparedness Level is at 4 or 5 which currently in cludes the Rocky Mountain Area, Eastern Great Basin Area, and Southwest Area and requiring regional or state level approval to ini tiate any new prescribed re in all other geographic areas. These measures will remain in effect until the National Multi-Agency Coordinating group deter mines a national Prepared ness Level 3 or below. On June 27th, NMAC raised the preparedness level to 4, on a scale of 1-5. The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the De partment of the Interior, in partnerships with states and local agencies, have de veloped a cohesive strategy to respond to the increase in wildres in recent years by focusing on: Restoring and main taining resilient landscapes. Through forest and range land restoration activities such as mechanical thin ning and controlled burns, ofcials can make forests and rangelands healthier and less susceptible to cat astrophic re. Creating re-adapted communities. The Forest Service, the Department of the Interior and their partners are working with communities to reduce re hazards around houses to make them more resistant to wildre threats. Responding to Wild res. This element consid ers the full spectrum of re management activities and recognizes the differences in missions among local, state, tribal and Federal agencies. There is increased risk of ash ooding in burn ar eas as a result of res, and with the traditional sum mer rain season beginning, its important communities remain aware of this poten tial hazard. Flash oods can occur very rapidly, without warning or even any vis ible signs of rain, making it important to follow the direction of state and local ofcials. To learn about ood risks in your area and for information on ood insur ance, visit www.oodsmart. gov. For more information on ood preparedness tips and ways you can protect your family before, during and after a ood visit www. ready.gov/oods. On average, the USDA Forest Service and the De partment of the Interior bureaus respond to about 16,500 wildres per year that occur on land under their jurisdiction and assist state and local agencies in responding to a signicant number of the approxi mately 60,000 wildres per year that occur on land un der their jurisdiction. Fed eral reghters, aircraft, and ground equipment are strategically assigned to parts of the country as the re season shifts across the nation. Fireghting experts will continuously monitor conditions and move these assets as necessary to be best positioned and in crease initial response ca pabilities. In addition, fed eral agencies are conduct ing accelerated restoration activities nationwide aimed at healthier forests and re duced re risks in the years to come. Federal land managers are also helping communi ties prepare for wildre. Federal partnerships with state, tribal and local agen cies strengthen prepared ness programs, such as Firewise www.rewise.org/ and Ready Set Go! www. iafc.org/readySetGo that help families and communi ties prepare for and survive wildre. You can also visit FEMAs Ready.gov www. ready.gov, to learn more about steps you and your family can take to be pre pared for an emergency. Federal partners continue to support response efforts Holmes County Council on Aging celebrated their June birthdays on June 29. Those having birthdays in June are, from left, Dorothy Smith and Peggy McCaw. There were also various political candidates on hand to help celebrate. HOLMES COUNTY COUNCIL ON AGING CELEBRATES BIR THDA YS AP Shawn Torres of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management starts a backburn while battling the Kinyon Road Fire west of Castleford, Idaho, on July 7. More than 150 reghters are ghting the blaze that has consumed more than 75,000 acres.

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OUTD OO RS www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Send your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com A Section Wednesday, July 11, 2012 Most snapper shermen Ive talked to are saying they arent seeing all that many sh. You can do the same thing at a bass tournament and ask 40 shermen out of 50 who shed the tournament and they will say it was a slow day, but ve or six will have a box full. I can tell you that places inside of eight miles where we caught red snapper last year arent producing right now. The good news is these same spots are producing some good gag grouper on live bait. If you are going to take the trouble to sh the Gulf, you might as well do everything you can do to catch sh including taking the trouble to catch some live bait. I know when you stop to catch live bait it seems as if you are wasting valuable shing time, but it actually is time well spent. Choffers are probably the easiest live bait to catch, and I know they are the easiest to keep alive for several days. Compared to menhaden, which are almost impossible to keep alive overnight, choffers can be kept in a cage and fed for a week. Choffers can also be kept alive in a livewell that doesnt have a great amount of freshwater owing into it. The trick here is to keep the water temperature cool. Simply add some ice to the bait well every so often. A livewell can get too hot to keep many baits alive. Hooking on a choffer can sometimes bring on more talk. Some people like to hook them in the top of the tail. I dont like to do this because it causes the choffer to spin going down and by the time the bait reaches the bottom your leader will become so twisted it will go from six feet long to two feet in length. Not a very attractive sight to a weary grouper. Ive found that by hooking the choffer in the mouth either across the mouth or up and down from the bottom of the mouth and out the top the bait will swim to the bottom and not twist the leader. Using circle hooks you have to let the grouper have the bait for a few seconds. If you jerk when you feel a sh bite you will usually lose your sh. Pull tight or let the grouper swim away with the bait and continue applying pressure until you think the sh is hooked. Hooked on Outdoors Outdoor Life Scott Lindsey captainlindsey@ knology.net State extends scallop season By KHRYSTEN KEYS Star Staff Intern If the scallop season wasnt long enough for you then you are in luck. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has permanently extended the scalloping season an additional two weeks. The new season will begin July 1 and end Sept. 25. A study concerning the extended seasons of the past two years suggested the new extended season will not have a negative effect on the scallops. The ndings have made the FWC also look into changing a ban on commercial harvest of bay scallops in Florida state waters, a decision that was made in 1994. As for now, the commercial harvest of bay scallops is not allowed. The FWC is pressing for information from consumers and scallop hunters concerning their hunting habits and their feelings and interest concerning an extended season. You can help FWCs scallop researchers by completing an online survey at svy.mk/bayscallops or by completing a postage-paid survey. For more information, email BayScallops@MyFWC.com Remember: The bag limit for scalloping is two gallons of whole bay scallops or one pint of meat per person a day. The vessel limit for scalloping is 10 gallons of whole bay scallops or half a gallon of meat. Bald eagle population soaring in Florida Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission The bald eagle population is in creasing in Florida, which continues to be one of the top spots in the lower 48 states for bald eagles to nest and raise their young. Based on its 2011 aerial survey, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission estimates there are 1,457 active bald eagle nests in Florida, almost a 9 percent increase since 2008 when the state implemented a bald eagle management plan. Long-term success with bald eagles in Florida is re ected in the species recovery from just 88 active nests in 1973. Today at the Audubon Center for Birds of Prey in Maitland, leaders from the FWC and Audubon Florida highlighted the bald eagles recovery and the ongoing challenge of conserving these large raptors. They said celebrating the bald eagles resurgence in Florida was a great way to kick off the nations 236th anniversary of declaring independence. Bald eagles have made a remarkable recovery in Florida. The FWC and Audubon are working togeth er to protect bald eagles in Florida, so these majestic raptors will continue to soar as a symbol of national pride and conservation success, FWC Chairman Kenneth Wright said. For 20 years, Audubon Florida has recruited citizen-scientists to monitor eagles and their nests through its EagleWatch program, active in more than 40 counties. Audubon is proud to have played a role in the bald eagles amazing success story in Florida, said Eric Draper, executive director for Audubon Florida. Our dedicated staff and EagleWatch volunteers, along with our state agency part ners, have helped to identify potential threats to these magnicent birds and their nest sites, but our work is far from done. Together, we are leading the nation in the protection of this im portant and iconic species. Working with ranchers and other landown ers to protect bald eagle habitat is another pri ority for Audubon, with its involvement going back 50 years to the start of the Cooperative Kis simmee Eagle Sanctuary Program. Floridians and visitors are encouraged to get outdoors throughout the year to enjoy the states many parks and public lands and watch bald eagles soar. You can nd a Bald Eagle Nest Locator at MyFWC.com/Eagle Bald eagles almost disappeared from the lower 48 states by the mid-20th century, with an estimated 417 pairs in the United States in 1963. The use of the now-banned pesticide DDT was causing eggshells to weaken and break under the weight of adults incubating eggs. Today, a healthy and stable eagle population in Florida will depend on continued availability of ap propriate nesting and foraging habitats as well as protection from disturbance during the nesting season. The public can help conserve bald eagles in Flori da by following state guidelines for activities near ea gle nests and by reporting new eagle nest locations to BaldEagle@MyFWC.com. Audubons Center for Birds of Prey contributes to eagle conservation through its specialized clini cal care and EagleWatch program. The Center re cently celebrated the 450th rehabilitated bald eagle released back into the wild since 1979. For more on bald eagles, go to MyFWC.com/Ea gle For information on Audubons EagleWatch and Center for Birds of Prey, visit http://.audubon.org/ audubon-center-birds-prey For information on volun teering to monitor eagles through EagleWatch, contact eaglewatch@audubon.org. NATIO N AL TREASURE Page A6

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CHIPL E Y GUN & P AWN The P awn P eople We Sell Guns & More! WE LOAN MONEY NO Credit check... Just FAST CASH WE BUY GOLD Dont be fooled by others claiming to pay more WE PAY TOP PRICES WE PAY FAST CASH 850.638.8987 Wednesday, July 11, 2012 CATHRINE LAMB 638-0212 | @Catspitstop clamb@chipleypaper.com Tony Stewart took home his third Coke Zero 400 trophy on Saturday. Smoke qualied second for the Coke Zero 400 on Friday after noon, but was moved back to the 42 spot after inspection. He did what he does best dur ing restrictor plate races he played it cool at the back for the rst 70 or 80 laps, letting the pole sitter Matt Kenseth and his Roush Fenway racing teammate Greg Bife hold the lead for a while. As the nal lap came around Smoke teamed up with Kasey Kahne and came around Matt Kenseth fast on the outside for the lead, just as Bife wiggled just a little in the trafc behind Stewart and caused what many NASCAR fans were waiting for, the Big One at Daytona, as Stewart took the checkered ag for the win. In the Nationwide series race on Friday night, Kurt Busch got his first win with Phoenix Rac ing in a green white checkered finish. He pitted six times for re pairs after being involved in an accident on lap 66, causing his owner to believe he was out of contention for the win. Howev er, Bush brought home the Sub way Jalapeo 250 trophy, even after all of the chaos. Saturday night he was having a good run in the Coke Zero 400, remaining with the leadersfor most of the race, before being caught up in an accident. Busch just couldnt make it back to the front and fin ished in the 35 th position, which happens to be where he quali fied for the Coke Zero 400. Next weeks races The Nationwide Series race, F.W. Webb 200 will be run at 2:46 p.m. on ESPN. The race is being held at the New Hampshire Mo tor Speedway in Loudon, N.H. Last years winner was Kyle Busch. The Sprint Cup Series race, Lenox Industrial Tools 301 will be run at 12:15 p.m. on TNT. The race is being held at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon, N.H. Last years winner was Ryan Newman. Stewart wins third Coke Zero 400 SP O RT S www.bonifaynow.com A Page 7 Section COKE ZERO 400, SPRINT CUP 1. Tony Stewart 2. Jeff Burton 3. Matt Kenseth 4. Joey Logano 5. Ryan Newman 6. Carl Edwards 7. Kasey Kahne 8. Brad Keselowski 9. Michael Waltrip 10. Bobby Labonte SUBWAY JALAPENO 250, N ATIONWIDE 1. Kurt Busch 2. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. 3. Michael Annett 4. Austin Dillon 5. Joey Logano 6. Elliot Sadler 7. Justin Allgaier 8. Mike Bliss 9. Timmy Hill 10. Sam Hornish Jr. STANDING S Sprint Cup 1. Matt Kenseth 2. Dale Earnhardt Jr. -25 3. Greg Bife -44 4. Jimmie Johnson -58 5. Tony Stewart 84 6. Kevin Harvick 90 7. Denny Hamlin -92 7. Martin Truex Jr. -92 9. Brad Keselowski -103 10. Clint Bowyer -104 Nationwide 1. Elliott Sadler 2. Austin Dillon -2 3. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. -18 4. Sam Hornish Jr. -35 5. Justin Allgaier -72 6. Michael Annett -95 7. Cole Whitt 103 8. Mike Bliss -164 9. Danica Patrick 208 10. Tayler Malsam -222 A llmendinger suspending, Hornish Jr. competes Penske Racing was notied by NASCAR Senior Vice President of Racing Operations Steve ODonnell 90 minutes before the start of the Coke Zero 400 that AJ Allmendinger had been temporally suspended from NASCR, after his A sample from a random drug test on June 29. NASCAR on Monday received an ofcial request for Allmendingers B sample to be tested. Allmendinger was set to start the race in the eighth position. As the Penske team scrambled to get the No. 22 set up for the replacement driver, Sam Hornish Jr., they sent a plane back to Charlotte to pick him up to race. To put even more presser on the team they had to rework the seat, steering wheel and the petals for Hornish Jr. He arrived with just minutes to spare before the green ag waved. Sam Hornish Jr., nished 33 after being sent from the eight-position to the 43-position because of the suspension. Penske Racing president Tim Cindric said Monday the team is again going with Hornish this week because making the decision allows the No. 22 team to move forward with its preparations without any uncertainty. A J A LLMENDINGER KURT BUSCH Special To The News Sixty-seven people lost their lives in Florida last year in boating accidents, and there have already been 28 deaths so far this year, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commis sion, which has released its 2011 Boating Accident Statistical Report. The FWC is responsible for reviewing, analyzing and compiling boating acci dent data for the state. Its statistical re port details boating accidents and their causes. The frequency of boating accidents in Florida and their causes would prob ably shock most people, said Investiga tor Andy Bickel, of the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement. We want to reduce the number of ac cidents, injuries and deaths on Florida waters, Bickel said. Drowning is the leading cause of death in boating accidents, statistics show. Theres an easy x. Wear a life jack et, Bickel said. There are several styles of life jackets available to boaters that wont interfere with your boating experi ence and may save your life. Todays boaters can choose from sev eral models of light and comfortable, in atable belt-pack and over-the-shoulder life jackets that can be worn while sh ing or enjoying the sun, and they do not interfere with boating activities. Accidents can occur without warning, and if for some reason someone ends up in the water, quite often its too late to put on a life jacket. The leading type of accident contin ues to be boaters colliding with other boats or objects, Bickel said. With the number of boaters in our beautiful state, its important to pay close attention to everything thats going on around your boat. Statistics repeatedly show that boat ers who have taken a basic boating safety class are less likely to be involved in a se rious boating accident. The 2011 Boating Accident Statisti cal Report is now available online at MyFWC.com/Boating, click on Boating Accidents. 2011 boating statistics available The Associated Press GREENSBORO, N.C. The Atlantic Coast Conference is remaining tied to the Orange Bowl. The league announced on July 3 a 12year agreement with the bowl beginning after the 2014 season. It says details on the opponent and broadcast partner will come later. The ACC has sent its champion to the South Florida-based bowl every year since 2006, and this announce ment means that relationship will con tinue when the Bowl Subdivision makes the switch to a four-team playoff in two years. As we look ahead to the future of postseason college football, this will fur ther an already benecial partnership for both organizations, ACC Commis sioner John Swofford said. The Dis cover Orange Bowl has a rich history of prestige, is located within the leagues footprint and is a great destination for our student-athletes, alumni and fans. In addition to our continued partner ship, we are very pleased to be playing annually on New Years Day. The Orange Bowl will be played an nually at 1 p.m. on Jan. 1. The league anticipates the Orange Bowl hosting at least four seminal games and says in those years, its champion will play in one of the three other host bowls. If the ACC champion makes the play offs, another ACC team will play in the Orange Bowl. The ACC becomes the fth major conference to announce a tie with a bowl that expects to be part of the pool of six bowls from which two seminal sites will rotate. The Big 12 and Southeastern Conference are creating the Champions Bowl for their representatives, while the Big Ten and Pac-12 are committed to the Rose Bowl. O. Ford Gibson, president and chair of the Orange Bowl Committee, says his bowl is is extremely pleased to con tinue its relationship with the ACC and is looking forward to entering this new era of postseason collegiate football with a valued partner and its historically suc cessful member institutions. ACC announces 12-year deal with the Orange Bowl

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American Board of Family Medicine, State of Alabama and the State of Florida Wednesday, July 11, 2012 Local A8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Speicial To Times-Advertiser BLOUNTSTOWN The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement will be the host of Journey Stories, an exhibition of the Smithsonian Institutions Museum on Main Street series. The exhibition, sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council, will be on display July 14 to Aug. 25 at the Settlements Club House. There also will be exhibits from Washington County on display at the exhibit. Journey Stories recounts the struggles of our ancestors as they traveled to North America and, once here, made their way across the continent, according to the website, ppmuseum.org. The stories tell how our ancestors made the nation great one step, one journey at the time. The Settlement will be presenting local journey stories and local histories to complement the Smithsonians Journey Stories exhibition and will be conducting programs leading up to the exhibit dates on local history and folklore that we feel will be educational in nature and enhance any history classes presented in local schools and to the population at large, according to the website. The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is the only North Florida location to be selected to host Journey Stories. All other Florida locations are in south central and southern portions of the state. Settlement of cials encourage students throughout the Florida Panhandle to attend the exhibit. Counties affected by Debby granted assistance Speicial To Times-Advertiser TALLAHASSEE The federal government has approved public assistance for 20 requested counties to be included in the federal disaster declaration due to the impacts of Tropical Storm Debby across Florida. Three additional counties were approved for Individual Assistance, including Duval, Nassau and Union. Public assistance provides grant assistance for debris removal and emergency protective measures. Costs for repair, replacement, or restoration of disaster-damaged, publicly-owned facilities also can be covered under public assistance. The counties approved to receive Public Assistance include Baker, Charlotte, Citrus, Clay, Columbia, Dixie, Franklin, Gulf, Hamilton, Hernando, Jefferson, Lafayette, Liberty, Manatee, Nassau, Pasco, Sarasota, Suwannee, Union and Wakulla counties. Public assistance from the federal declaration comes in conjunction with the earlier approval of Individual Assistance for eleven Florida counties. State, tribal, local governments and certain types of private non-pro t organizations in the 20 designated counties should visit www.FloridaPA.org to create an account within 30 days of a presidential declaration to apply for Public Assistance. Federal Individual Assistance makes federal and state assistance available to individuals and families. Residents and business owners who sustained losses in the designated county can begin applying for individual assistance starting today by registering online at www. disasterassistance.gov, by web enabled mobile device at m.fema.gov or by calling 800-621-FEMA(3362) or 800-462-7585(TTY) for the hearing and speech impaired. The tollfree telephone numbers will operate from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily until further notice. Debby made landfall June 27 in Steinhatchee. Effects from the storm were felt statewide. The primary concern from Debby was the proli c amount of rainfall and the resulting ooding impacts. Six rivers across Florida reached major ood stage, and two rivers, the Sopchoppy and the St. Marys, reached record breaking crests. The Atlantic Hurricane Season runs from June 1 to Nov. 30. To get a plan, visit www.FloridaDisaster. org. By RANDAL YAKEY News Herald Writer WEST BAY Airport revenues are up, market share is up and everything seems to be moving in the right direction for the Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport. Everything except the grass. It still wont grow. Now, airport of cials have agreed to spend an additional $218,281 for another lawn placement plan. We are con dent this will work, ECPs executive director John Wheat said during the last airport authority board meeting. Wheat said the airport will try to stabilize the soil in the area to meet Florida Department of Environmental Protection regulations regarding environmental issues, including erosion. We now know what needs to be taken care of, Wheat said. GAC Contractors Inc. has been awarded the contract, which was approved by the airport authority June 27. The airport will be responsible for the installation of wells and irrigation systems with an estimated cost of $39,300. Watering and maintenance of the sod or seed will be the responsibility of the airport. It was about a year ago the airport authority agreed to spend an extra $400,000 to mend the sod, winter rye grass and seed germination problems. But growing a luscious lawn isnt always easy. It can be especially dif cult, said Tim Brock, of Brock Lawn & Pest. Brock, who is not connected to the project but who runs a company that specializes in commercial and residential work, said an industrial area like the airport can be dif cult because of the terrain and size of the project. He said the area where they chose to construct the airport is on land he suspected would be tough to grow sod on. Getting grass to take hold might be part of the problem. They call that area the Sand Hills, Brock said. If no improvements are made, the airport could be subject to DEP nes. The airport site spans about 1,400 acres. GAC Contractors specializes in building construction, road work and site work. Calls to GAC for comment on the project, and this article, were not returned prior to press time. Alan Forst appointed to nominating commission Special To Times-Advertiser TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott announced the appointment of Alan Orantes Forst to the Nineteenth Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission. Forst, 53, of Palm City, has been a member of Floridas Reemployment Assistance Appeals Commission since 2001 and serves as its current chief executive and chief administrative of cer. Previously, he practiced with Crary Buchanan in Stuart, representing both employees and employers. Forst also served in several positions at federal government agencies, including the Department of Justice, the Department of Labor and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. He earned a bachelors degree from Georgetown University and a law degree from the Columbus School of Law of the Catholic University of America. He succeeds Robert J. Gorman and is appointed for a term beginning July 9, 2012, and ending July 1, 2016. He is appointed from the list of nominees submitted by the Florida Bar. Smithsonian Journey Stories come to Northwest Florida Airport facing more expense for grass ANDREW JOHNSON | The News Herald Ongoing problems with getting the grass to grow at Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport will mean an additional $218,281 for a new lawn placement plan.

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Washington, Holmes at a glance Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser B PAGE 1 Section Wednesday, JULY 11 2012 Yes Lord Deliverance to offer summer meals CHIPLEY Yes Lord Deliverance Ministries will participate in the Summer Food Service Program during the month of July. Nutritionally balanced meals will be provided to all children regardless of race, color, sex, disability, age or national origin during summer vacation when breakfasts and lunches are not available. All children 18 years old and younger are eligible for meals at no charge, and there will be no discrimination in the course of the meal service. The programs are only approved for geographical areas of need where 50 percent or more of the children qualify for free or reduced-price meals during the school year. Starting July 9 and running through July 19, a supper meal will be served from 5-6 p.m. and an evening snack from 8-9 p.m. Meals will be served at 739 Seventh St. in Chipley. Art showcase planned BONIFAY All art students are invited to display their school artworks, art from art studios and any other visual art learning and creative activities for free in August. Come and show your artworks earlier for selection process. Talk to So a Davis, or make an appointment at 329-8381. The art gallery is at 110 W. Pennsylvania Ave. in Bonifay. Gods Vineyard to hold overnight youth camp VERNON Gods Vineyard Worship Center will have overnight camp for ages 13 and up from July 30 to Aug. 4. The camp is free. Applications may be picked up at Dees Restaurant in Vernon. For more information, call Vicky Wilson at 535-2471. By RANDAL SEYLER 638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Youve heard of the One Percent people, the super elite? Well, what about the .001 Percenters? Taekwondo instructor Wesley Wing of Bonifay received promotion to the level of master by the American Taekwondo Association recently at the ATA World Championships, held June 18-24 at the Statehouse Convention Center in Little Rock, Ark. There are 250,000 members of the ATA, and of that there are under 300 sixth-degree black belts, Wing said. That works out to 0.001 percent of the total ATA population. Even at that, Wing was being modest according to the ATA website, the organization has grown to more than 350,000 members world wide, making it the largest martial arts association in existence. Wing has been teaching ATA taekwondo for 27 years, since he rst got his black belt and took over a class that then met at the Bonifay Police Department. Today he has his own school, Bonifay Taekwondo USA, at 120 N. Waukesha St., and dozens of youngsters are in the school (dojang in Korean) each night, learning not just kicks and punches, but important life lessons. I want to start a leadership academy where we teach kids how to present themselves, how to introduce themselves to adults and how to do public speaking. I want these kids to have skills that will make a difference in their lives, Wing said. Teaching children is not every martial artists inclination, but Wing said he has always enjoyed teaching children and has students as young as 4 years old in his classes. Wings instructor, ninth-degree black belt Soon Ho Lee of Panama City, was brother to the founder of ATA taekwondo, the late H.U. Lee. After H.U. Lees passing, Soon Ho Lee served as grandmaster of the organization until he retired last year. In Ho Lee, H.U. Lees younger brother, is the current ATA grandmaster. It was Wings instructor, Soon Ho Lee, who put him to teaching. He called me up one day and said, Youre the instructor in Bonifay. I was living and working in Dothan (Ala.) at the time, but I said, yes, sir. Each year, one of the biggest highlights of the annual ATA event, which routinely attracts 20,000 people or more to Little Rock, is the opening ceremonies held at Verizon Arena in North Little Rock, according to the website ataonline.com. Taking place at the ATA opening ceremonies is the traditional Masters Ceremony and high rank testing. Wing was part of the Masters Ceremony. He was promoted to sixth-degree black belt in 2011, and it was a year-long process to receive the title of master, he said. The title doesnt automatically come with the rank. First you have to be nominated, Wing said. Then there is a week-long ceremony, INDEX Society ................................. B2 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B7 TAEKWONDO MASTER Bonifay martial arts instructor earns master title PHOTOS BY RANDAL SEYLER | Extra Sixth-degree black belt and ATA Taekwondo Master Wesley Wing helps a young student with her blocking technique July 2 at Wings school, Bonifay Taekwondo USA. Wing was awarded his title of master in June at the ATA World Championships in Little Rock, Ark. ATA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS Three adult students from Bonifay Taekwondo USA traveled to the ATA World Championships in Little Rock June 18-24 to compete with students from 17 countries and ve continents in one of the largest taekwondo tournaments in the world. Noah Collins won a silver medal in the national event, while competitors Phillip Byrd and Stephanie Foskey competed but did not place. Its a very, very tough competition, said instructor Wesley Wing. Just to go and compete at that level is something amazing, and to have Mr. Collins win silver was really impressive. SPECIAL TO EXTRA Bonifay taekwondo instructor Wesley Wing was promoted to the level of master during the Masters Ceremony in Little Rock, Ark., in June. Young taekwondo students take a break during class July 2 in Bonifay. Taekwondo Master Wesley Wing instructs class at his Bonifay school. Wing has taught taekwondo in Bonifay since 1987 and moved to his current location at 120 N. Waukesha St. earlier this year. See MASTER B2

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B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News which includes a 7-day fast. Its pretty hard to do. I mean, I cant imagine me doing without food, Wing said, jokingly. The fast is a limited-intake fast for two days, then an even more limited fast for three days. On the morning of the sixth day, we got two jars of baby food. That was the best thing I ever ate. After the baby food came a full day of working out in preparation for the Masters Ceremony. The trek from taekwondo beginner to sixth-degree black belt typically would take 25 years of work, but Wing jokes that he was a bit hard headed so it took him a couple of extra years. Its a quarter century of work most never do. Though many martial arts schools follow trends, Wing said he has stuck with traditional taekwondo because that was what appealed to him. Now, many schools offer MMA or Brazilian jujitsu, including the ATA school in Panama City where Wing began his training, but for him, traditional taekwondo has been, and remains, more than enough to keep him busy. For me, taekwondo is a way of life. Its more than just a sport, its something that you can do your whole life, Wing said. Im 58, and I hope to still be active and teaching when Im 70. J.D. OWENS CARPET OU T L ET will save you money E V ER YD A Y!!! J.D. OWENS CARPET OU T L ET 2597 S pringcreek R oad, Marianna, FL 3 1/2 Miles E ast of Marianna on Hwy. 90 (850) 526-3619 Textured Plush Carpet 79 99 Super Thick 13 Loose Lay Vinyl 49 FHA Quality Vinyl SF SF SF Engineered Value Grade 3 Oak Plank $ 2 29 SF AREA RUG SALE! Over 200 In Stock carpettilemarianna.com ROGERS INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. Serving You Is Our Most Important Product *Property Insurance is not available in the state of Florida from Auto-Owners Insurance. *Property Insurance is not available in the state of Flordia from Auto-Owners Insurance. G RAND PENIN G Conveniently located on the corner of Highway 77 and Highway 2 in Graceville, right across from the PigglyWiggly. Please stop in and see us, view our latest used car inventory, consign your vehicle on our lot or just stop on by and say hello! We are here to deal, sales@southcountrymotors.com Wednesday, July 11 2012 RANDAL SEYLER | Extra Master Wesley Wing leads his class during a typical Monday night workout at Bonifay Taekwondo USA. MASTER from page B1 Extra Hannah Woodall and Ryan Tidwell are excited to announce their upcoming marriage on July 21, 2012, at Samson First United Methodist Church with a reception to follow at the Samson Municipal Complex. both in Samson, Ala. Hannah is the daughter of Eric and Amber Stromenger. She is a 2008 graduate of Ponce de Leon High School and a 2012 graduate of Northwest Florida State College, where she earned her Bachelor of Science degree in education. Ryan is the son of Shelia and Alan Ethridge and Revion Tidwell. He is a 2008 graduate of Geneva High School and a recent graduate of Enterprise State Community College, where he earned an Associate of Arts degree. Ryan is a sales representative with Allstate Beverage. Invitations are not being sent out. but all family and friends are invited to share as we celebrate this joyous occasion together. Morris and Hynes to wed The families of Beverly Morris and Geoff Hynes are pleased to announce their upcoming marriage. Beverly is a 2009 graduate of Rutherford High School and is enrolled in the Dental Assisting Program at Gulf Coast State College. Geoff is a 2002 graduate of Chipley High School, completed the Aviation Technology program at Enterprise-Ozark Community College in 2005 and is employed with the Florida Department of Transportation. The couple will exchange vows at 3 p.m. July 28, 2012, at Shiloh Baptist Church. A reception will follow. Benton celebrates 4th birthday Riley Benton of Bonifay celebrated his 4th birthday on July 10. Riley is the son of Holly Benton and the grandson of James and Patricia Benton. Riley celebrated with a Diego party on July 14 at home with friends and family. Adysen Hardy to celebrate 2nd birthday Adysen Kyle Hardy will be 2 on July 13. She is the daughter of Joe and Ashley Hardy Jr. of Bonifay and has a big brother named Daiden. She is the granddaughter of Joe and Dianne Hardy Sr. and Eddie and Shelia Paul, all of Bonifay. She will be celebrating her birthday with a ipop theme party. CECILIA SPEARS | Extra Holmes County High School graduate Courtney Reeves received a $1,000 scholarship from the Esther Lodge No. 144 Free and Accepted Masons in Bonifay on July 1. She plans on going into the eld of forensic science. On hand for the presentation were her mother, Barbara Reeves; father, Neal Reeves; Rick Peters, Worshipful Master of Esther Lodge; and Robert Curry. past master of Estar Lodge and chairman of the scholarship committee. Happy BIRTHDAY Weddings & ENGAGEMENTS Woodall, Tidwell to wed REEVES EARNS MASONS SCHOLARSHIP

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Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 547-2244 OWENS C HIR O PRACTI C CLINIC ACUPUNCTURE Extra Wednesday, July 11 2012 Hunter Crews of Boni fay, presents a check for $3,275 to the Center of Autism and Related Dis abilities at Florida State University. The money was raised at a Autism Walk that was held in honor of Hunters 16th Birthday. Hunter has also attended a STEM Cam. Hunter would like to thank everyone for their support. There has been a surge in reported cases of Pigeon Fever in Texas during the past year. With summer and y season in full swing, now is the perfect time for horse owners to become aware and educated about Pigeon Fever. There is no vaccine for the disease, so prevention and recognition of its symp toms are of the utmost importance. The disease is named after the symp tomatic intramuscular ab scesses and swelling of the chest and pectoral regions of infected horses, causing a pigeon like appearance. The infection is conrmed with a bacterial culture in reported cases. Pigeon Fever, also known as Dryland Distem per, is common in drier regions like the western United States. The bacte rium that causes Pigeon Fever, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, lives and multiplies in dry soil and manure. While Pigeon Fever is not new to Texas, the past year has seen a rapid increase in reported cases, most likely as a re sult of the severe drought. Dr. Keith Chafn, pro fessor at the CVM, com mented on the disease and the increase in incidence. We know we see about three or four cases a day in the clinic, Chafn said. And many more veterinar ians are reporting cases across the state. Horses contract the disease through an open wound or y bite, with bacteria entering through these abrasions or wounds. Chafn recommends a good y control program for your horses (sprays, sheets and repellents), basic sanitation, and recognizing the symp toms quickly for prompt treatment. While most of the cases present with ex ternal swelling, some cases can result in internal ab scesses that could develop pneumonia, colic, weight loss, fever, lethargy, blood in the urine, and other sys temic symptoms. Most cases of Pigeon Fever involve external ab scesses in the pectoral re gion and under the belly, back to the mammary or sheath area, Chafn said. About less than ten per cent of cases reported in volve internal abscesses, which are most common in the abdomen or thorax. The internal cases are the most dangerous, some can be fatal. Treating external Pigeon Fever typically consists of surgically opening the ab scesses to allow drainage. Timing and ultrasound are so critical to managing this disease, Chafn said. Ultrasound allows the vet erinarian to determine if the swelling has reached mature abscess stage. Also, ultrasound allows the vet erinarian to see what criti cal structures are nearby, which helps prevent com plications. I dont know how you would ever treat this disease without ultrasono graphic imaging. Because a recently drained abscess is potentially contagious it is important to lavage the abscess cavity with anti septic solutions and I often prefer to place antimicrobi als locally into the abscess cavity. Also, it is important to completely disinfect any of the pus that drains from the abscesses. This will help minimize spread of the disease, via ies, to other horses. Once the abscess es have been drained, treat ed, and healed, the horses are generally no longer contagious. If you recognize any of the symptoms of Pigeon Fe ver, you should contact your veterinarian immediately to begin treatment. ABOUT PET TALK Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sci ences, Texas A&M Univer sity. Stories can be viewed on the Web at vetmed.tamu. edu/pet-talk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to cvmtoday@cvm.tamu.edu. Descendants of Ed and Sarah (Register) Nelson will hold their annual re union July 14 at Baileys Surf and Turf on U.S. High way 90 east in Chipley, be ginning at 11 a.m. Ed and Sarah Nelson lived on a homestead about two miles from Oakie Ridge Baptist Church on what is today called Gilbert Mill Road, south of Chipley. Ed was a Baptist preacher and farmer. He and Sarah were two of the 12 original mem bers of Oakie Ridge Church and were the parents of 10 children, some of whom were already gone from home when the youngest was born. That explains why, although they were a close-knit family, they were never all together at one time until they were advanced in years and held a reunion in 1947; a picture of all ten made by Herbert Heisner on that occasion became instantly trea sured by family members, especially since one sister, Lavonia, was involved in an auto accident en route home and died a few days later. Ed Nelson was descend ed from Jens Nissen of Hadersley, Denmark, who landed on American shores at Port St. Joe in 1829. His name was Americanized to John Nelson as he found work at a salt works some where along the coast and learned the language. He migrated westward and bought land in 1838 near Vernon, was married, and later helped organize a church called the Holmes Valley Baptist Church, later renamed Ebenezer Baptist Church, sometime about 1846. Many other descendants of John Nelson live in this area and all are invited to attend the reunion. CHIPLEY The Chipley Kiwanis Club met for its weekly luncheon at Pat tillos Restaurant at the Washington-Holmes Coun ty Technical Center on June 19. Lunch was provided by the staff of the WashingtonHolmes County Technical Center. The Kiwanis club re cruited volunteers from the membership to slice 100 watermelons for attendees at the Watermelon Festival. These watermelons were purchased by the water melon festival committee from local growers to dis tribute free as slices to the general public. Fred Kelley, of Pilots for Christ, was the guest speaker. He informed the Kiwanis Club about Pilots for Christ, which is an or ganization of commercial pilots who donate their aircraft and time to y in dividuals needing critical transport. The individual pilots donate all of their aircraft use and time, but get reimbursed for gas by the organization. Many in dividuals are not able to y on commercial aircraft due to their medical conditions, such as a baby in trans port for cancer treatment. Therefore individuals re ceive this service based on critical, not nancial need. Pilots for Christ has own over 998 successful missions. To contact Pilots for Christ, Inc. call 251-3621746 or email fredkel leyministries@yahoo.com The Kiwanis club meets Tuesdays at Pattillos res taurant in the middle of the WHTC campus at noon. For an invitation, contact any Kiwanian or David Solger, Membership Chair person at 638-1276. For more information about the Kiwanis Club of Chipley, visit www.Chi pleyKiwanis.com. PIGEON FEVER IN TEXAS Crews presents check to CARD Fred Kelley of Pilots for Christ explains the organizations mission to the Chipley Kiwanis Club. Kiwanis Club hear of Pilots For Christ Hanna Elaine Duke, 6, daughter of Scott and Chastity Duke, was crowned Little Miss Fire cracker 2012 and Miss Photogenic on June 2 in Vernon. Hanna received a medallion, trophy, banner, and crown, and was super excited to win this pag eant for the second year in a row. Hanna was the 2011 Future Little Miss Firecracker and Miss Photogenic winner. Hanna loves pageants, and currently holds titles as Little Miss Western Star and Western Star Supreme, Little Miss Pumpkin Cutie, Little Miss Strawberry, Little Miss Springtime, Petite Miss Washington County, and Miss Spirit of Wash ington County. Hannas other hobbies include teeball and swimming. This summer Hanna plans to begin quilting and piano lessons. Hannas grandparents are Danny and Jan Duke of Caryville, and Marvin and late Judy Reno of Wausau. NELSON REUNION Duke wins Little Miss Firecracker Crossword PUZZLESOLUTION ON P AGE B5

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FAITH B Section www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Wednesday, July 11, 2012 Page B4 Lakeview United Methodist Church to Host Belinda Chitty VERNON Lakeview United Methodist Church will host a sing at 6:30 p.m. Friday, July 13, featuring Belinda Chitty. The church is located at 1969 Lakeview Dr., just off Pate Pond Road. For more information call 535-2380. New Home Baptist Church to Hold Homecoming GRACEVILLE Pastor Dan Fender and the congregation of New Home Baptist Church invites everyone to the 100th Homecoming Celebration on Sunday, July 15. Services will begin at 10 a.m. with music and singing. Former pastor Johnny Jones will bring the homecoming message, followed by dinner in the fellowship hall. New Home is located off of Piano Road, north of TriCounty Road in Jackson County. Oak Grove Baptist Church to Hold VBS PONCE de LEON Oak Grove Baptist Church will hold vacation Bible school from 6-8:30 p.m. on July 16-20 at the Oak Grove Baptist Church. Ages three and older are invited to come. The church is located three miles east of Ponce de Leon. Izagora Methodist Church to hold Fundraiser EAST PITTMAN Izagora Methodist Church will be holding a fundraiser from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on July 21 at the East Pittman Fire Department. They will be selling BBQ plates for a $6 donation. The plates will be dine in or carry out. There will also be a homemade cake auction. All politicians are welcome. Entertainment will be by The Gospel Tones of Marianna. All proceeds will go to the church building fund. For more information, call 956-2772. Caryville Baptist Church to Hold VBS CARYVILLE Caryville Baptist Church will be holding vacation Bible school from 5-8 p.m. on July 22-27. Come and bring your friends. There will also be an adult class. Refreshments will be served nightly. Gods Power Art Day Camp CHIPLEY The Chipley First Presbyterian Church is proud to announce Gods Power an Art Day Camp Bible School 2012. The Day Camp will run from 9:30-11:30 a.m. on Aug. 6-10. Enrollment is limited to 20 students in grades 3-8. Students must pre-register on or before July 15. Registration forms are available in the church of ce and at chipley1stpres.org. For more information or questions, email the Art Camp director at wvanl@ bellsouth.net. Gap Pond Free Will Baptist Church Gospel Sing SUNNY HILLS Gap Pond Free Will Baptist Church will be holding an Open Mic Gospel Sing at 6 p.m. July 28. A potluck dinner will follow in the fellowship hall. The church is located at 1980 Gap Blvd., in Sunny Hills. For more information, call Sister Doris Burnsed at 265-3080. Saint Mary A.M.E Church to Hold Homecoming CARYVILLE Saint Mary A.M.E Church will be hold homecoming services at 11 a.m. on Aug. 4. The Rev. Jerome Goodman, pastor at New Bethel A.M.E. Church in Argyle will be our guest speaker. For more information, call Vickie Broxton at 373-7112. New Life Fellowship Assembly of God Womens Conference CHIPLEY New Life Fellowship Assembly of God presents Daughters of Destiny: A Womens Conference. There will be four sessions: the rst session will be held at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 23, the second session at 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 24, the third session at 9 a.m. and the fourth session at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 25. The guest speaker will be Diane Coleman and also speaking will conference host Sherri Evans. Conference worship leader is Tiffane Raulerson. Early bird registration is $30. Registration at the conference is $40. Contact church of ce to inquire about area hotel discounts for the conference. The church is located at 695 5th St. in Chipley. For more information, call the church of ce at 638-1134, Monday through Thursday 8 a.m.-1 p.m. by the Rev. James L. Snyder Sometimes watching the news on television gets rather disparaging. Now that we have 24/7 news, not only can we see the news any time we want to, but we can see it over and over and over again. It is particularly disheartening when there is a slow news day. I think all of us can remember O.J. Simpsons mad race down a Los Angeles highway. I can remember the good old days when Uncle Walter brought us up to speed on the days news inside of a 30minute program. Oh, for those good old days. Never has an American generation been exposed to so much and knows so little for so short a time. This all came to me recently when the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I were watching the news after our evening repast. I think it was the 9,999 time this particular news story had been played. Of course, we do not watch television that often, and so we may only have seen a very short portion. The short portion that we saw was just about enough and my wife said so. It was the news story, if you remember, of the bus lady who was bullied by children. I think those children, my wife said and then paused while she grit her teeth violently, need a good old-fashioned spanking. And with that, she crossed her arms and set her face in a de ant manner. Luckily, I was not one of those children or I would have received the intentions of her mind at that point. Her comment got me to thinking. There was a time, back in the day, when spankings were rather normal. Someone once said that if you saw a young boy on the street you should stop what youre doing and give him a good spanking because he was either coming from trouble or headed for trouble. Raising children then was a community affair. I am not sure that ever took place, but it does have an authentic ring to it. I semi-fondly remember when I was a youngster I had the heebie-jeebies whaled out of me by my father on a regular basis. And I can testify that I have not missed those heebie-jeebies. My life is better for not having them. Watching the video about the kids bullying that bus lady, I could not help but think that they were a rather spoiled bunch of little brats, pardon my French. I think I would have taken it one step further than my wife. Not only do those youngsters need a good old-fashioned spanking, but I think their parents do as well. Kids today are only a mirror of what they see and hear at home. When I was young, the only spoiled brats around were the children of the rich folk. They could afford to be spoiled brats because their parents with their money bought their way into society. The only thing those kids ever earned was a bad reputation and disdain from the rest of us. The rest of us, having gone through the spanking rituals, could not afford to be spoiled brats. Good parents made sure of that. I think of what my father used to say: Son, Im going to take this Board of Education and apply it to the seat of your learning. I can testify that he was very enthusiastic about his job. With all that education, I have had multiple degrees on my posterior. Even to this day, every time I sit down I am reminded of that education. This Board of Education that my father was superintendent of always hung by the door. Being the religious person that my father was, he had printed on this Board of Education the phrase from a favorite hymn, I Need Thee Every Hour. It was a motto he lived up to all the years of my boyhood. I often prayed my father would get weary of exercising that Board, but I must confess that my naughtiness wearied long before he did. Looking back, I am grateful. I will not go as far as to say that I am a good person, only that I am not a spoiled brat. I have learned through the years, thanks to the energy of my father, to extend courtesy to everybody around me and be respectful. Respecting other people is not something that comes naturally. Everybody needs to be taught that everybody deserves respect. Some people have earned more respect than others, I grant you. However, nobody deserves deliberate disrespect like those kids gave that bus lady. With all the studies are being done through our governmental grant programs, I wonder why nobody has ever, at least to my knowledge, done a study on the importance of discipline in the home. It is at this point I must agree most heartily with the scriptural injunction on this subject. Solomon, the wisest man in the world, had much to say about disciplining children. And if anybody should know about disciplining children, it was Solomon. Foolishness is bound in the heart of a child; but the rod of correction shall drive it far from him (Proverbs 22:15 KJV). He that spareth his rod hateth his son: but he that loveth him chasteneth him betimes (Proverbs 13:24 KJV). Disciplining children to ensure they grow up to be proper adults demands a whole lot of energy especially from parents. Love sometimes carries a large stick. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries.com Faith BRIEFS Whatever happened to old-fashioned spankings? Special To The News Its that time of year when homeowners need to remember that con-artists are in our area looking for an easy way to make fast money through home improvement scams. Unfortunately, home repairs can often be daunting to many homeowners, making them vulnerable to scammers. To add to the problem, the fraudster has often left the area before the unsuspecting victim realized they have been left with an empty wallet and unfinished work. Home improvement scams of all typed have been around for years and summer time is the perfect season for a sales pitch that goes something like this, We are in your area today providing free inspection of. Unfortunately, consumers can fill in the blank as fraudsters will provide so-called free inspections on air conditioners, duct cleaning, roof repairs and just about anything that may need fixing before a hurricane comes our way. The Washington County Sheriffs Office Crime Prevention Unit encourages you to be on the look out for traveling con-artists who: Peddle roofing, paving and other repair work door to door Use high pressure sales tactics such as today only or free inspection Say they have material left over from a previous job Quote too good to be true prices, which are well below typical bargain prices Ask for payment upfront to by materials or request that the full amount be paid before work is done Drive vehicles with no company name and out of state plates Do your homework before you begin a home improvement project or repair: Find a reputable contractor referrals from friend, neighbors and co-workers are a great place to start Ask questions such as business license information, insurance, etc., or better yet, check for yourself at www. myfloridalicense.com Write down the vehicle make, model and license plate number Insist on a written contract detailing the work to be done Get a reliability report from the Better Business Bureau at www. bbb.com If you have any questions regarding these home improvement safety and security tips or if you would like to report a fraud or scam, please contact the Washington County Sheriffs Office Fraud Line at 638-8477. To arrange to have someone come out to your community to talk about this or another safety or security topic please contact the Washington County Sheriffs Office, Community Relations Section at 638-6115. Repair knowledge before home work = A+ But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Good News Bible Acts 1:8 Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. First Baptist Church come as you are Mike Orr, Pastor 1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830 Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. This Message Courtesy of Give Expecting Nothing in Return The saying Beware of Greeks bearing gifts is an old piece of wisdom which advises us to not trust our enemies, after the story in the Iliad of the Trojan horse, a gift that ultimately destroyed the city of Troy and its inhabitants. But there was also another reason to beware of Greeks bearing gifts, and that was that they always expected something in return, of comparable value. Gift-giving in ancient cultures was meant to be reciprocated and this carries over to modern times. But, a true gift should be something freely given without any expectation of re turn. If there is an expectation of a comparable return then we are really bartering rather than giving. So, we should give with a spirit of genuine charity, not expecting any thing in return. Test your ability to give in this spirit by giving anonymously, so that the recipient wont know who it came from. This isnt always practical, but can sometimes be done by sending someone an anonymous gift through the mail or by arranging for an intermediary to give the gift for you, perhaps even allowing the intermediary to take credit for the gift. Wanting to be thanked for a gift is all about our ego, and while it is only natural to desire thanks, it is better to give expecting nothing in return. BROWN FUNERAL HOME 1068 Main Street, Chipley 638-4010 Hwy. 77 S, Chipley 638-4097 Hwy. 79 S., Bonifay 547-9688 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser 1364 N. Railroad, Chipley 638-0212 112 E. Virginia, Bonifay 547-9414 Stephen B. Register, CPA 1552 Brickyard Road Chipley, FL 638-4251 So when you give to the needy, do not announce it with trum pets, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and on the streets, to be honored by others. . But when you give to the needy, do not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing, so that your giving may be in secret. Matthew 6:2-4

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Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Extra Wednesday, July 11, 2012 Ricky Vickers, 52, of Noma passed away Tuesday, June 26, at his residence following a sudden illness. Ricky was born in Pensacola on March 31, 1960. A 1978 graduate of Poplar Springs High School, Ricky previously worked many years with Chipley Advanced Auto Care and then NAPA. He was currently working with Firestone in Dothan. Ricky was a beloved dad to his two girls. He was loving called Pawpaw by his grandchildren. Ricky was hardworking, excellent mechanic and loved spending time with his family and friends. He was preceded in death by his father, Milton Vickers; mother, Virginia Dozier Vickers Williams and stepfather, William S. Bill Williams. Survived by his two daughters, Casie Sharpe, Hope Mills, N.C., and Stacie Ryals, Bonifay; brother, Milton Howard Vickers; two sisters, Vicki Mosser and husband Randy, Bonifay, and Tami Kirkland and husband James, Graceville; nine grandchildren and several aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Monday, July 2 at Noma Baptist Church with the Rev. Jonathan Shepard of ciating. Burial followed in Noma Cemetery with James and Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family received friends at the funeral home Sunday from 6-8 p.m. Expressions of sympathy can be made at www.jamesandlipford. com. Ricky Vickers Omer Clayton Bell passed peacefully the morning of June 30 at Twin Cities Hospital surrounded by family and friends. He was born April 18, 1922, in Octavia, Okla. Omer had a successful career as a Lt. Commander in the United States Navy and retired July 1, 1970, after serving 29 years. He was a veteran of World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. He was one of few people to actually witness the mushroom cloud from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima. Omer excelled as a pilot and went on to y for Petroleum Helicopters (PHI) Inc., ARAMCO oil in Saudi Arabia and had his own crop-dusting business with his twin brother, Odie Bell. After WWII, the brothers followed this successful business with a ight instruction school and charter ight operation in Pensacola. Omer was a passionate man who had many adventures and interests. He never lost his love for ying and all things farm and ranch related. Omer was a very positive person who loved to laugh, reminisce and spend time with family and friends. He will be well missed and fondly remembered by all those blessed to have known him. He was predeceased by his father, Edgar Houston Bell; mother, Willie Mathus Bell; ve brothers, one sister and his son, Omer Clayton Bell Jr. He is survived by his twin brother, Odie Gordon Bell; daughters, Amanda Bell, Melinda Bell Hagan, Donna Battin, Vickie Henline and Sherry Robinson; grandchildren, Houston Wright, Austin Battin, Shannon Robinson, Cole Bell, Isabelle Hagan, Ava Hagan and two great-grandchildren. Graveside Services were held at 11 a.m., Friday, July 6, at Barrancas National Cemetery in Pensacola, with full military honors with the Rev. Lonnie Wright of ciating. For those unable to attend the family has requested that you send condolences to Amanda Bell at 920 Ten Lake Drive; DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to First Christian Church, 4342 US Highway 90 West, DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435. Memorialization was by cremation. You may go online to view obituaries, offer condolences and sign guest book at www.claryglenn.com. Clary-Glenn Funeral Home is entrusted with the arrangements. The family wishes to thank the professional staff and caregivers at the Twin Cities Hospital for the wonderful and compassionate care Omer received during his illness. Omer C. Bell OMER C. BELL Mrs. Bernice Louise Thompson Huggins of Westville, Fla., passed away Wednesday, July 4. She was 81. Mrs. Huggins was born Jan. 29, 1931, to the late James Jesse and Cleo Miller Thompson. She was a very loving mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. She attended Poplar Head United Methodist Church. In addition to her parents; her husband, John A. Bill Huggins; a brother, Alvin Thompson; a sister, Carole T. Burch; a granddaughter, Felicia Braswell, as well as a daughter, Judy Caron Huggins, all preceded her in death. Survivors include one son, Tony Huggins (Wanda); two grandchildren, Alan Huggins and Melaney H. Yates (Freddie); two great-grandchildren, Joseph Alan Huggins and Brittany Marie Hayes, all of Westville, and other extended family and friends. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m., Friday, July 6, in the chapel of Sorrells Funeral Home in Geneva with the Rev. Jim Mashburn officiating. Burial followed in the Poplar Head United Methodist Church Cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Thursday, July 5, from 6-8 p.m. The family would like to say a special thank you to Jimmy King and Adrianna Taylor and the entire staff of Covenant Hospice of Marianna. Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva, 334-6849999, was in charge of arrangements. Express your condolences in our guest book at www. sorrellsfuneralhomes. com. Bernice L. Huggins Infant Shane Ray Andrus, 7 months old, died July 3. Funeral services were held July 8 at the Bonifay Seventh Day Adventist Church. Burial was at the Vernon City Cemetery. Shane R. Andrus Mr. John Henry Powell, age 54, of Esto, passed away July 4. He was born April 22, 1958, in Bonifay. He was preceded in death by his father, Lester Junior Powell. Mr. Powell is survived by his wife, Cecilia Melinda Powell of Esto; his mother, Evelyn Powell of Hartford, Ala.; two sons, Travis Powell of Bonifay and John Henry Powell Jr. of Geneva, Ala.; two daughters, Erin Powell of Hartford, Ala., and Chrystal Phillips Foster of Melbourne; a step-daughter, Deanna Edwards and husband Parker of Dothan, Ala.; two brothers, Junior Earl Powell of Hartford, Ala., and Danny Powell and wife Jennifer of Esto; two sisters, Linda Gail Powell of Hartford, Ala., and Linda Louise Granger and husband Kye of Hartford, Ala.; five grandchildren, Ariana Foster, Sean Foster, Riley Powell, Alexandera Edwards and Alexis Powell. A memorial service was held at 3 p.m., Saturday, July 7, 2012, at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Mitch Johnson officiating. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Family received friends prior to service from 1:30-3 p.m. John H. Powell Obituaries Library hours Wausau Library Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County Library (Bonifay) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed Washington County Library (Chipley) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Vernon Library Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills Library Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed MONDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 6386217. Donations accepted. 6 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Monday each month (unless a holiday) at 6:00 at the Chipley library. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach of ce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999. TUESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m. : Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 6386217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 5 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at 6:25 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-451 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A WEDNESDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. : The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 6386217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397. THURSDAY 7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday. (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 638-0093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon : Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 6386217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177A FRIDAY 10 a.m. to noon: Homes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 6386217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30 p.m.: Bead Class every second Friday at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery call 703-0347 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a get-together for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Winn Dixie in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks while you get your shopping done. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church. SUNDAY 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at Graceville-Campbellton Hospital in Graceville. Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences. Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section of www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership with Legacy com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212 COMMUNITY CALENDAR Crossword SOLUTION

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B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Literacy group summer reading camp CHIPLEY The Literacy Volunteers of Washington County will offer a Summer Reading Program organized by the Washington County Public Library from 10 a.m. to noon Thursday, July 19, July 26 and Aug. 2. The program will be at the Country Oaks Learning Center, at 268 Quail Hollow Blvd. in Chipley. This program is for children ages 5-12. Snacks and drinks will be provided. For more information, call 638-1231. Life at the Landings and Beyond DEFUNIAK SPRINGS Grit & Grace Inc. invites everyone to their 2012 production of Life at the Landings.... and Beyond. Show times will be 7 p.m. July 20-21 and 2 p.m. July 22. Seating is limited. Tickets can be reserved by calling 270-7008 or by logging on to www. gritandgrace.org They also can be purchased at the door 30 minutes before curtain call, if still available. Adult Summer Read Program CHIPLEY The Washington County Public Library will hold its rst Adult Summer Read Program, Between the Covers, at 6 p.m. July 24. The program will discuss the best romance reads and feature a classic romance movie. The rst 25 to register at the event will receive a goodie bag. Refreshments will be served. If you cant make it to the events, dont worry. Just register and start reading. A drawing will be held at the end of July. You could win a Kindle or a $75 Barnes and Noble gift card. For more information or to pre-register, call Renae at 638-1314 or email requests@wcpl.com. Martin Luther King Jr. planning meeting CHIPLEY There will be a planning meeting for the eighth annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day Parade and Celebration at 1 p.m. July 21 at the TJ Roulhac Enrichment and Activity Center, in the old Roulhac Middle School on Church Ave. For more information. call the Rev. T.J. Smith at 260-2323. MPE to hold Game and Fish Expo CHIPLEY MPE will have a Game and Fish Expo from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 14, and again on July 28. The expo will be held at the Chipley Walmart to teach kids about safety. For more information, call MPE at 326-9109. Wausau Fun Day and Possum Festival WAUSAU The Wausau Fun Day and Possum Festival will be Aug. 3-4 at the Dalton Carter Community Center in Wausau. For more information, call 638-1781 or visit www. wausaupossumfestival. com Wallace Baseball Showcase set DOTHAN, Ala. Dothan will host a Summer Baseball Showcase at 9 a.m. Aug. 18 for 2013, 2014, and 2015 athletes. In attendance will be junior college and Division I college coaches, along with professional scouts. If interested, contact the Wallace baseball ofce at 334-556-2416. Please return your registration form by Aug. 11. The cost of this showcase is $100 per athlete. Please make all checks out to Mackey Sasser. Walk-ups are welcome. It Pays to Read library program CHIPLEY The Washington County Public Library soon will host Dream Big, their 2012 It Pays to Read summer reading program for Washington County students. For the Country Oaks Branch, programs will start at 10:30 a.m. Thursday, July 12, and the Sunny Hills programs will be at 2 p.m. for older students. To have your name entered in the drawing, you must attend Thursday programs. It Pays To Read is open to all Washington County students. For more information, call 638-1314. Free childbirth classes BONIFAY The Holmes County Health Departments Healthy Start program will offer a free childbirth class for any woman who is pregnant. Women are encouraged to bring their partners with them to the class. Three sessions remain in the class, from 5:307:30 p.m. July 12, 19 and 26, at the Holmes County Health Department Annex. The class will teach pregnant women about what happens to a womans body before labor begins, relaxation and breathing, different stages of labor, recognizing true labor verses false labor, massage during labor, different positions for labor, episiotomy, care of newborn/procedures after delivery, breastfeeding and much more. To sign up for the class, or if you have questions, call Healthy Start at 547-8684 ext. 18 or 19 and ask to speak to Glenna Padgett, Valery Lawton or Gabby Sanders. Senior Group tours WASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will be going on a tour of Ohio Indiana Amish country and Chicago Razzle Dazzle on Sept. 1-9. The Group will be exploring the Alpine countries of Germany, Austria and Switzerland from Sept. 28 to Oct. 11. The group also will go to the Georgia Mountain Festival Oct. 16-20. The festival will be held in Helen and in Hiawassee, Ga. For more information, call Merita Stanley at 594-9980. Holmes County High School Class of 1953 BONIFAY Members of the Holmes County High School Class of 1953 are looking for other members to let them know if they are interested in holding a 60th class reunion. If you are interested, call Joann (Black) Scott at 763-4633, Grace (Whipple) Watson at 623-3058, or Ruth (Andrews) Bellot at 547-3452. Washington County Girls Night Out CHIPLEY The Womens Imaging Services at Northwest Florida Community Hospital proudly present Girls Night Out on Oct. 11. The event will be at the Washington County Ag Center in Chipley. For more information, call Heather Shelby at 415-8119. 2nd annual Scarecrow Contest CHIPLEY The second annual Scarecrow Contest, sponsored by the Chipley Garden Club, will be Oct. 13 on the lawn of the Washington County Historical Museum in conjunction with the Washington County Historical Societys Fall Into History Festival, with assistance from the Washington County Arts Council and Tourist Development Council. Y OUR COMMUNIT Y PARTNER FOR QUALIT Y HEALT H C ARE We Treat You Like Family better than Northwest Florida Community Hospital Appreciates Its Specialists 1360 Brickyard R oad Chipley, F lorida 850-638-1610 www.nfch.org Artur Vardanyan, MD Board Certied Wound Medicine Treatment of dia betic wounds, pressure sores, radiation burns, surgical wounds, thermal burns, crush injuries, and animal or insect wounds. For a ppointment, call: 850-415-8300 Nayan Bhatt, MD Board Certied Internal Medicine and Nuclear Cardiology Diagnosis a nd treatment of coronary, peripheral and carotid vascular disease with interest in managing heart failure/debrillators. For appointment, call: 850-415-8111 Dinesh Bhatt, MD Board Certied Internal Medicine Subspecialty Cardiology Diagnosis and treatment of coronary, peripheral and carotid vascular disease with interest in managing heart failure/debrillators. For appointment, call: 850-415-8111 H. James Wall, MD Board Certied Otolaryngology Ear, nose and throat illnesses, vertigo, surgery, rhinoplasty, allergy testing, and treatment for vertigo. Hearing tests for children and adults. For appointment, call: 850-415-8185 Gabriel Berry, MD Board Certied General Surgery Full general su rgery to include: Hernia, laproscopy, endoscopy, colonoscopy, and gall bladder. For appointment, call: 850-415-8180 Aaron Shores, MD Board Certied Pain Management Disorders of the s pine, including pinched nerves, low back and neck pain. Peripheral neuropathy. For appointment, call: 850-638-0505 David Taing, MD Board Certied Family Medicine Subspecialty Sports Medicine Non-surgi cal orthopedic injuries, casting and splinting, joint and muscle treatment, steroid injections, rotator cu syndrome, carpal tunnel pain, tennis elbow, bursitis, synovitis, and plantar fasciitis. For app ointment, call: 850-415-8185 Adam Peaden, DPM Board Eligible Foot and Ankle Surgery Diabetic w ound care, ankle and foot trauma, FDA approved toenail fungus laser. For appoint ment, call: 850-638-(FOOT) 3668 FREE Hearing Consultation and Moisture and Wax Removal Most Makes and Models of hearing aids. For a limited time. Benets of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of hearing loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Some restrictions may apply. Not to be combined with other offers or previous purchases. Limited time offer. Call or visit today for Your FREE Hearing Consultation! Moisture & Wax can ruin your hearing aids Beltones New HPF 80 NanoBlock Technology MOISTURE, HUMIDITY DIRT, EAR WAX, SKIN OIL Special Trade-in offer on Hearing Aids with the HPF 80 NanoBlock protective coating NO ONE DOES MORE THAN TO PROTECT YOUR INVESTMENT IN BETTER HEARING HPF 80 NanoBlock its just the latest break through from a company thats been commited to advancing hearing science for 70 years. www.beltone.com Chipley, FL 1611 Main Street Ste. 4 (850) 387-4931 Marianna, FL 3025 6th Street (850) 387-4931 Extra Wednesday, July 11, 2012 News BRIEFS

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Wednesday, July 11, 2012 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 B B U S I N E S S USINESS G G U I D E UIDE T o P l a c e A n A d C a l l 6 3 8 0 2 1 2 o r 5 4 7 9 4 1 4 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 18 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service! THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Denton's RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDA WE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS $ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENT Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 BOOK STORENEW OWNERSNew LOW prices Good yard stu every day. Also low prices. Across from Sims Funeral Home and A+ Pharmacy Mon.-Fri. 10am-3pmService On All Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration & Hoods638-3611 Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Outside Sales Representative An exciting opportunity now exists to join The News Herald. We are searching for enthusiastic, hard-working, and driven Outside Sales Representatives to join our team! Job Description The News Herald is looking for motivated sales professionals to establish footholds in their local markets by providing products and services to businesses. The Outside Sales Representative’s duties may include but are not limited to:  Cold call and prospect new territory opportunities.  Introduce business owners to programs via presentation, answer detailed questions and maintain that relationship. Requirements  Have strong work ethic  Experience presenting advertising materials to a variety of businesses  Cold calling experience  Reliable Transportation  Experience handling warm leads and prospecting for new leads.  Field Sales, Business to Business Sales (B2B), Inside Sales, Outside Sales, or Outbound Sales experience ( Preferred) We Offer:  Room for advancement and career opportunity  Dynamic Monthly Residual Compensation  Bonus programs  Introductory and Ongoing Training  Business Materials including phone, laptop and IPad, business cards, sales material and product knowledge information The News Herald offers a competitive bene t package including medical, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave, and six paid holidays per year. Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th Street for an application or send a resume to resumes@ afreedom.com.Freedom Florida is a Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY: 7-5108 PUBLIC NOTICE The Holmes County Board of Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing for the closure and abandonment of the following described portion of what is known as “Kelly Lane” The NW of the NE , Section 36, Township 7 North, Range 17 West. The SW of the SE ; SE of the SW ; SW of SW of Section 25, Township 7 North, Range 17 West, Holmes County, Florida. Said Public Hearing will be held on July 31, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. in the County Commissioner’s Meeting Room located at 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425. The Board at this Hearing is authorized to close, abandon and vacate any interest the county has, if any, the above described road. The Hearing may be continued from time to time as may be necessary. The public is encouraged to attend. Ron Monk, Chairman Holmes County Board of Commissioners. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 4, 11, 2012. 7-5107 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 12-55 PR IN RE: ESTATE OF GRANT SIMMONS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the Estate of Grant Simmons, deceased, File Number 12-55 PR, by the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425; that the Decedent’s date of death was March 31, 2012; that the total value of the Estate is less than $75,000.00, and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Al Simmons Address 1310 Banfill Avenue, Bonifay, Florida 32425. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the Estate of the Decedent and persons having claims or demands against the Estate of the Decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is July 4, 2012. Attorney for Person Giving Notice: Glenda F. Swearingen Attorney for Al Simmons Florida Bar Number: 306339 PO Box 1009 Marianna, FL 32446 Telephone: (850) 526-4465 Fax: (850) 526-2316 E-Mail: glenda@aginggraciously.com. Person Giving Notice: Al Simmons P.O. Box 152 Bonifay, Florida 32425. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 4, 11, 2012. 7-5109 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No.: 13-63PR IN RE: Estate of LOUVENIA PITTS AUSTIN Deceased PETITION FOR SUMMARY ADMINISTRATION NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LOUVENIA PITTS AUSTIN, deceased, in the above-numbered case, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 N Oklahoma, Bonifay, FL 32425. The names and addresses of the petitioners and/or personal representative and their attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is 07/04/2012. Personal Representative DANIEL I. AUSTIN, Personal Representative c/o Nancy D. O’Connor, P.A., PO Box 886, Bonifay, FL 32425 Attorney for Personal Representative: NANCY D. O’CONNOR, P.A. Attorney for Petitioner Florida Bar No.: 324231 PO Box 886 Bonifay, FL 32425 850/547-7367 As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 4, 11, 2012. 7-5106 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-174DR Division: Paula Ann Basford Petitioner and Fletcher Lee Basford Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR Dissolution of Marriage TO: Fletcher Lee Basford. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Paula Ann Basford whose address is 3264 Hwy 2, Bonifay, Fl. 32425 on or before July 24, 2012, and file the original with the clerk of this Court at P.O. Box 397, Bonifay, Fl. 32425 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerk’s office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated June 22, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser June 27, July 4, 11, 18, 2012. 7-5111 PUBLIC AUCTION The following vehicle will be sold at public auction at Eastern Diesel & Auto Wrecker Service, Inc. 2005 S. Waukesha, Bonifay, Fl. at 8:00 a.m. on July 25, 2012 for towing and storage: VIN # 1HGEJ1252PL051639 93 Honda Civic Owner Stephanie Nicole Sanning. 1695 Arrant Rd, Westville, Fl. Lienholder Wayne Carey Auto Sales, P.O. Box 715, Bonifay, Fl. EASTERN DIESEL AND AUTO WRECKER SERVICE, INC. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 11, 2012. 7-5112 PUBLIC AUCTION Howell Mini-Storage at 309 S. Waukesha St Bonifay Fl. 32425 will hold a private or public auction on the contents of these units, for nonpayment according to Fl Statute 83. Tenant has until the 28 July 2012 at 10:00 AM to pay in full. No checks. Items of general household goods storage in buildings listed below. Building 1 unit 10 Eva Mitchell. Building 2 unit 11 Miranda Anderson. Building 3 unit 10 Melisa Edminson. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 11, 18, 2012. COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 Publisher’s Notice “SCAM “To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. THANK YOU! The family of Hazel Bush would like to express our sincerest thanks for the love and support of family and friends during our time of grief. Thank you again and may God Bless. Text FL16654 to 56654 Adopt: Adoring Married, Creative Professionals, Celebrations, loving Home awaits Miracle 1st baby. Expenses paid *FLBar42311* *1-800-552-0045* Are you pregnant? A happily married young couple seek to adopt. Will be fulltime mom/ devoted dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Adam Sklar RE: C & L (888) 537-5055. FL Bar# 0150789. Goats for sale 1 Billy, 2 Nannies, 4 Kids. Call (850)547-3125. Chipley: 3534 Hwy 162. From Bonifay: Hwy 173 north to Hwy 162 east 1.5 miles on right. From Chipley: Hwy 77 north to Hwy 162 west when you cross county line its 1 mile west on left. LOOK FOR SIGNS. Saturday, July14th. 7:00 a.m. -Have Too Much Stuff YARD SALEWe will have a little bit of everything! From Exercise Equipment, A 32in TV, Portable Dishwasher, Clothes for Women, Men, Girls, Boys, Baby, Household Items, Toys and Tons More. Kids will also be Selling Snacks Refreshments too. Community Yard Sale Mo’s Trading Post Every Saturday 5157 Hwy 77 Greenhead. Former location of Papa Jack’s BBQ. 850-388-6535 AMMO.410 Low Recoil Snake Loads. Shoot inexpensive 32 Cal Handgun ammo through your Mosin Nagant battle rifle 30-30 .308 or 30-06. Bring back the fun of target shooting. Coming soon 9mm for your 35 Whelen and 45 ACP for the 45/70. Call John @ CBL HandGun Training. 850-260-1342 Fresh from the Farm! Okra & Peas, also we shell peas. Call (850)956-4556. Leave message, may be in the field. Wood mizer LT-40 bend sawmill 18” planer, electric powered. Oliver tractor 115 hp. Treated lumber, 184, 186, 286, 686, 284 on 2x4’s, 16 ft. long. For more info call (850)547-0956 or (850)326-4548. AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Caryville Flea Market Produce, knives, honey, westerns, movies, okra $1.00/lb., old tools, new and used stuff. Open Saturdays 8 a.m. Gilbert Catfish Pond Closed Monday and Tuesday 2854 Highview Circle Chipley, Fl 32428 Phone:850-638-8633 Meet singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now (888)744-4426 SAFE -Military File Safe, Good condition, great for keeping all valuables, not just files. $395. 850-832-7191 or 850-785-0693. Wanted: Junk appliances. Lawn-mowers, farm and garden equipment, golf carts, satellites for free. I will pick up. Call (850)-547-0088 WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. Direct Care Staff: Several positions available at Assisted Living Facility in Bonifay, Caryville and Vernon. Duties include; cleaning of resident’s rooms, assistance with bathes, medications and preparing meals. Pay starts at $8.50 an hour. Must be able to pass level two background screening and have reliable transportation. Call 547-3708 for more information. DRIVERS Class-A CDL Flatbed Drivers Home on the weekends! All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 Education Child Care Worker. Must have 40 hrs of training. Send resume to lcumbaa@yahoo.com or apply in person @ Grace & Glory Christian School. 929 Main St Chipley ATTN: Drivers Great Miles+ Top 5% Pay= Money Security+ Respect= PRICELESS 2 Mos CDL Class A Exp (877) 258-8782. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Schneider National! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job Ready in just 15 days! (888) 368-1964. Drivers -Refrigerated and Dry Van Freight with plenty of miles. Annual Salary $45K to $60K. Flexible hometime. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. (800) 414-9569 www.driveknight.com Drivers 100% Owner Operator Co. Regional & Dedicated Home weekly Class A C.D.L. 1 yr. exp. in last 3 Call (800)695-9643 DriversHIRING Experienced/ Inexperienced Tanker Drivers! Great Benefits and Pay! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: (877) 882-6537 www.oakley transport.com Drivers/ Flatbed Class A. GET HOME WEEKENDS!Southeast Regional, Earn up to 39¢/mi, 1 year OTR Flatbed experience required. (800) 5725489 X227, Sunbelt Transport, LLC EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE MEDICAL CAREERS begin here-Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-2033179 www. CenturaOnline.com Medical OfficeTrainees Needed! Train online to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Training & Local Job Placement assistance thru SC Training, HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888) 374-7294. OWNER OPERATORS Guaranteed minimum 2,700 miles/week! All miles paid loaded/ empty. Class-A CDL & 1 yr exp. Lease Purchase Program w/ Dowan Payment Assistance Fleet Owners Welcome (866) 2207845 driveforgreat wide.com Painting Inside or outside. Residential or commercial. Satisfaction Guarantee. Local references. 31 yrs experience. Dennis Glenn. 850-596-4143 PRIVATE SITTER SERVICES. Available, experienced CNA. Contact 850-326-6187 Easy Care Lawn Services. Yard services and pressure washing. Call for FREE estimate & affordable rates 850-527-6291 Licensed & Insurances For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 LIttle Hands Learning Center now open in Ponce De Leon Monday-Friday 6 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Only $17.00 per day. Call (850)307-2828. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, July 11, 2012 COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com (850) 547-9500 B on if a y Fl or ida idi Xtreme Boats FACTORY DIRECT Bettie's Country Realty BETTIE L. SLAY, BROKER (Florida & Alabama) 205 E. North Ave., Bonifay, Florida 32425(850) 547-3510 www.bettiescountryrealtyonline.com WE GET RESULTS NATIONAL MLS3 BR 1 BA ON 1 AC OWNER FINANCE REDUCED -$54,900---10 AC FARM 3 BR HOME BARNS PASTURE-$175,000---NICE 2 BR BRICK-$85,900-4+ ACRES 3 BR 2 BA CHIPLEY-$79,900---2.5 ACRES-$19,900---NEWER 3 BR 2 BA CHIPLEY -$137,900---4 BR 1.5 BA BRICK-$89,900---2 ACRES OWNER FINANCE-$19,900---18 ACRES 4 BR 3 BA DWMH-$139,900---2 BR HOME ON 1 ACRE-$42,500---LAKEFRONT HOME ON 18 ACRES-$99,900---3 BR HOME ON 2+AC REDUCED-$74,900--4+ AC OLD HOMESITE-$24,900--41+ ACRES W/ 3 MH'S & 4 PONDS-$129,900---2 BR INTOWN-$39,000---9 ACRES WRIGHTS CREEK-$31,900---4 BR 2.5 BA HOME ON 4 ACRES-$95,000-NEWER 3 BR 2 BA HOME ON 1 AC-$105,000---46 AC 4 BR 2 BA MH BARNS FENCED PASTURE-$159,000---2 HOMES ON 13 AC HWY FRONTAGE$159,000---5 ACRES W/HOME, BARN, PASTURE & POND-$85,000 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incl’d 638-1918 Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio -$350, 2 bdrm/2bth-$475. City utilities included. (850)557-7732 3-4 Bedroom home fully furnished, $950/mo, Bonifay area. Also 2 Bdrm/1 bath Apt. $700/mo, fully furnished, free lawn service. (850)547-2096. FOR RENT 3BD/ 2BA House in the historical district Chipley. $700/mth, $700/depo. (850) 547-4284 or (850)638-0300. Ask to speak with Kim, Monday -Friday For Rent 3BR/2BTH HIllcrest Circle, Vernon. Hud Accepted! 850-388-6535 House for rent on North 2nd Street, Chipley, Fl. 2 Bdrm/1 bath. (850)547-2061. No pets please. Nice clean houses, apartments & mobile homes for rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, houses for sale. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. Spacious 3BD/1BA House Country Setting Bonifay. CH/A. Large Lot Also For Sale home at 815 8th St. Chipley 547-2091 or 441-8181 “Bonifay’s Best” Mobile Home Community has 2 or 3 bedrooms available ranging from $435-$625/month. Large lots, quiet, clean and on-site maintenance. Only responsible persons should apply. Great Bonifay Schools. No pets. One month deposit. HUD Assistance may be available. Contact Sue: (850)547-1386 or (512)751-2847. 2BR/2BA MH for rent. Water & garbage furnished. $425 plus deposit. Call 547-4232. 527-4911 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. 3BD/2BA Mobile Home. In quiet Chipley park. CH/A, W/D hook up. No Pets. $475/mth plus deposit. 850-763-3320 or 850-774-3034. FOR RENT: Nice 2BR & 3BR MH Corbin RD Near Sapp Community Church. I furnish water, garbage, extermination, change air filter & mow grass once a mth. Deck on front & back, small storage building.For more info, call Lou Corbin @ 638-1911 or cell phone, 326-0044. Sorry No Pets. Panama City CLOSEOUT SALE: Unbeatable Prices, D/W & S/W. Most are Zone III. Kensinger Housing, 3424 E. 15th, St, Call (850) 785-0693.Text FL16550 to 56654 HUNTING425 Acres in Abbeville, AL. Deer and turkey. No dogs. For more info call 334-692-5141 or 334-797-9803 40 Acre Horse Ranch for lease in Chipley, lush pastures, fence/ cross fence, barn and efficiency apt $850 mo. 334—333-2693 40 Acres in Holmes County Versatile Property w/ Pastures, Pines & Hardwoods. Bldg w/2 Car Garage. Well, Septic & Power Pole, $99,500. Call (850) 547-9801 or (850)527-1166. Email: tigermork@yahoo.com Tex t FL16586 to 56654 $33,500 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. For Sale by Owner 12 plus acres, clear. Off Hwy 231 Steelcity, Fla. (850)614-1120. Reduced Price! Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858. DWMH2009 3 / 2 Big tub, 1 acre, fenced three sides and garage shop, Wausau area $82,500 850-638-4953 Pontiac Bonneville 1997. Leather seats, cruise control, sun roof, 91,000 miles, excellent condition. $3,000 OBO. Call 305-298-7466. Text FL14590 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $6752000 Chevy Impala -4 Door T otal Price $4,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $20002004 Chevy Silverado -X/Cab $9500 Total 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $7752000 Dodge Durango-3 Rows $4500 Total 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9752000 Dodge Ram -4 Door $5200 Total 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $17,000, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 € 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99* Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414



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bonifaynow.comConnect With Us 24/7 Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo galleries, opinions and more...@WCN_HCT And Mobile Too Wednesday, JULY 11 2012City addresses nuisance animals FSU medical students tour local health facilitiesSpecial to the Times-AdvertiserBONIFAY A group of approximately 30 rst-year Florida State University medical students recently toured Doctors Memorial Hospital and the Holmes County Health Department as part of the Rural Education Opportunity Program. FSUs mission is to educate medical students who will subsequently seek to practice in rural areas in Florida. The REOP was formed in 2010 and is a half-day orientation to rural communities in the Florida panhandle for incoming medical students. The students, along with the College of Medicines Dean Dr. John Fogarty and third-year medical student JD Byrd, were welcomed by JoAnn Baker, DMH administrator. The group then toured the city of Bonifay with the guidance of Julia Bullington from the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce before making their way to the Holmes County Health Department. Moises Vallejos and Valarie Shipley were on hand to provide the tour, and Dr. Allen Swift offered information about their services. Lunch was provided at DMH after the tours, and several speakers were available to provide additional information to the students. Elaine May eld, administrative assistant with the Holmes County Development Commission, provided statistics about the county, emphasizing the countys assets of natural resources and the need for continued quality healthcare. Dr. Patrick Hawkins, an FSU College of Medicine alumnus, and Dr. Leisa Bailey, community faculty partner, also spoke to the students. They provided information about rural health, the advantages of getting to know your patients and having a wider scope of opportunities to practice a variety of procedures in a rural setting, as larger practices are more specialized. Esto re chief announces retirementBy CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com ESTO Esto Fire Chief Charles Corcoran announced his retirement and the Town Council appointed Tom Murphy to train to become re chief during the regularly scheduled council meeting on July 5. Council Member Jeff Carnley is serving as the temporary acting re chief until he can complete Murphys training. Carnley said with his 22 years of experience with the re department, he would lend his help for however long it takes to get Murphy ready as chief.Monk seeks re-election to commissionFrom Staff ReportsBONIFAY Ron Monk Jr. announced his plan to seek re-election as the Holmes County District 5 County Commissioner on Thursday. It has been an honor to serve the citizens of Holmes County for the past four years, Monk said in a news release. The experience Ive gained while serving in this capacity has been vast and invaluable. Monk said meeting with State Sen. Greg Evers and State Rep. Brad Drake to combat the septic tank inspection bill (Senate Bill 550) was de nitely a learning experience in the legislative process. I am very proud to have been a part of the implementation of new polices and procedures for the maintenance of our roads and bridges, Monk said. On the nancial side, as your board chairman, I feel I was instrumental in getting over $700,000. All of this was accomplished while operating within a balances budget and also not raising your taxes. RON MONK JR. Bonifay assistant police chief retiresBy CECILIA SPEARSStaff Writer cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY The Bonifay City Council discussed goats and delinquent fees at Mondays regular July meeting. At the previous council meeting, a resident had come to complain about his neighbors goats. What with the hot summer weather coming and theres these goats with all their feces in the backyard, and their natural goat smell, the odor alone is unbearable, he said. If shes (my neighbor) allowed to keep goats, I should be allowed to have a cow to eat my grass, give me milk and pull me around in my wheelchair. Something needs to be done, because theres more then just goats, its cats and dogs and all those feces together is just unbearable. At the request of Council Member Roger Brooks, City Attorney Lucas Taylor looked into a nuisance ordinance they could enforce. I found a dog ordinance that included nuisance animals, which also referred to obnoxious fumes, Taylor said. We can get them to get rid of the goats on this ordinance. At the last meeting, David and Vicky Guthrie of Healing Palms Hyperbarics had requested a reprieve from the city for the impact fees billed to them, which was $900 for water tap and hook-up fees and $1,800 for sewer. Theyve asked for extensions before, Woodham said. Wed give them six months and then theyd ask for another six months, and they have yet to pay for anything. Mayor Lawrence Cloud asked if the Guthries had paid regular bills. CHARLES CORCORAN See ESTO A2 PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE TIMES-ADVERTISERDr. Leisa Bailey addresses medical students from Florida State University who recently toured Doctors Memorial Hospital in Bonifay as part of the Rural Education Opportunity Program.Holmes health tourDr. Allen Swift provides information to the visiting medical students about the Holmes County Health Department. MEDICAL STUDENTS TOUR HOLMES COUNTY Volume 122, Number 13INDEXArrests .................................A3 Opinion ................................A4 Outdoors ..............................A6 Sports ..................................A7 Extra ....................................B1 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B7 See CITY A2www.bonifaynow.comGame and Fish ExpoCHIPLEY MPE will have a Game and Fish Expo from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 14 and 28 at the Chipley Walmart to teach kids about safety. For more information, call MPE at 326-9109.Community Clothes ExchangeBONIFAY A community clothes exchange will be 1-6 p.m. July 16-17 at the Bonifay Elementary School Activity Building. Monday will be the donation dropoff day, and Tuesday is for shopping. Donate your child clothes, shoes, backpacks and lunch boxes that are in good shape and can be used by someone else and pick up items your child can use for the school year.Urquhart reunionBONIFAY The annual Urquhart Family Reunion will be at 11 a.m. July 21 at the Holmes County Agricultural Center on East U.S. 90 in Bonifay. Family and friends are invited to for fellowship and good food.Art showcaseBONIFAY All art students are invited to display their school artworks and any other visual arts for free in August. Talk to So a Davis or make an appointment at 329-8381. 50 For the latest breaking news, visitBONIFAYNOW.COMPhone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 IN BRIEF Bonifay martial arts instructor earns master title | B1

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A2 | Holmes County Times-AdvertiserThey havent paid a single bill, and I say we write them a letter saying they have 10 days to pay the rst $900, Woodham said. Cloud said the owners attributed their inability to pay to lack of revenue. He said they had offered to pay the $900 for the water tap and hook-up but have yet to pay anything. I dont know where the misconception came that we approved to wave the sewer impact fees for two years, but the minutes needed to be reviewed before we approved of them, Cloud said. He needs to pay the $900 he owes now, then $900 the next year and then the nal $900 the year after that, along with his regular monthly bills. The council agreed to send a letter requesting that the initial $900 be paid within 10 days or legal action would be taken. Wanda Campbell, chief operations of cer with Chemical Addictions Recovery Effort Inc., requested that the city help them with of ce space for substance abuse counseling services. We are a not-for-pro t organization providing services since 1972, and more than 90 percent of the population we serve is indigent, Campbell wrote. We provided services to a minimum of 70 patients and their families last year. We were sharing donated of ce space with DCF (the Department of Children and Families) on Waukesha Street until their recent relocation to Washington County. She said the groups still share an of ce in Chipley, but most of CAREs patients from Holmes County do not have proper transportation. The majority of our clients is without income and have little to no income; therefore, it would be a hardship on them to have to travel to Chipley from Holmes County for services, she wrote. Unfortunately some would probably not be able to receive our services. Please consider your recreation center or any other available building; any assistance is appreciated. Police Chief Chris Wells recommended to them the building across from the Bonifay Middle School, which is occupied by DJJ and run frequently by the Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce. The council agreed to allow Wells to see what he could do to help establish communications between CARE and the HCSO about possible available space. Woodham said there were several houses interested in garbage pick-up through the city. Our garbage services pick up garbage on Son-inLaw Road, but they dont go down the side streets, Woodham said. Someones picking it up, but its not ours. Theyre outside the city limits, but theyre on city water. Cloud said they could canvas the area to see how many of the people down those streets are interested in getting city garbage pickup, and if there is enough need, it could possibly be done. The council approved of Clouds motion to change the citys new hires from being determined by the department heads and supervisors to having the city council review, interview and approve of which applicants should be hired and what their salary should be. Police Chief Wells also announced during the council meeting that Bonifay Police Assistant Chief Joe Sallas has of cially retired after 27 years of service. Replacing him as assistant chief is Gregory Yancey. The council approved of the Holmes County High Schools Baseball Booster Clubs request to use the recreation elds to hold a fundraising tournament on July 21-22. The next regularly scheduled Bonifay City Council meeting is set for 6 p.m. July 23 at Bonifay City Hall.Wednesday, July 11, 2012 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." www.mulliseye.com Chipley Office We are located directly across the parking lot from the Walmart in Chipley"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS,CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITYAPPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley OfficeBoard Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 7-31-12 FREEEYE EXAM CODE: WC00ToddRobinson,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeon LeeMullis,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeon POLITICAL CAMPAIGN PRINTINGGet the message out with MEET THE CANDIDATE BBQ FOR JOHN SMITH FULL COLOR POSTCARDS ELECTJOAN FULLERFOR COUNTY SEATGLOSSY FULL COLOR RACK CARDS GLOSSY FULL COLOR DOOR HANGERS WE PRINTMORE THAN JUST NEWSPAPERSCALL KIM FOR FREE QUOTE638-0212posters yers business forms all types brochures newsletters postcards letterheads envelopes labels posters tickets yers rubber stamps specialty items and moreSTOCK DESIGN PADDLE FANS Special to The Times-AdvertiserTrawick Construction presented the United Way of Northwest Florida a check for $6,965 from funds raised during its fourth annual Bring Your Old Buddy Golf Tournament at Sunny Hills Golf Course. This fundraising event has gotten bigger each year thanks to the hard work of all our employees, said Phillip Metcalf, director of safety and human resources. It means so much to all of us here at Trawick Construction to be able to help a charity like the United Way of Northwest Florida that positively affects so many lives. Trawick Constructions total campaign contribution to the United Way of Northwest Florida was $7,115. Trawick Construction, a Quantas Services Company, is an award-winning provider of outside plant services to telecom and long-line companies throughout the United States. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES-ADVERTISERTrawick Construction recently presented $6,965 to United Way of Northwest Florida. Attending were, from left, Trawick associates Jack Commander, Tim Hammack, Dennis Richards, Darryl Spence and Phillip Metcalf, and Wayland Fulford, Darrin Wall and Nicole Bare eld representing the Washington County United Way Campaign Committee.Golf tourney nets $6,965 for United Way The council also revealed that Dollar General announced the opening date of the new Esto store will be Aug. 12. Council Member Darlene Madden told the council that $5,029.64 was raised at last years Two-Toed Tom Festival, and the council approved of her request to split it evenly among the Recreational Center, the general fund, the re department and the Two-Toed Tom account for the next festival. The total came out to $1,257.41 each. Tabled until the next meeting was an addendum to the water ordinance regarding the councils raising water rates annually if required. Also tabled were plans for the council to review the two applicants for town water operator. Council members discussed various ways of helping save the ducks that live in the John W. Clark Park pond. The eggs go missing, and so do the ducks, Madden said. Somethings got to be done. The council decided to seek help from a local duck owner, using his incubator to ensure the safety and protection of the ducks. Other means of protecting the ducks, including nes and criminal charges, are under investigation. According to the minutes of the previous meeting on June 5, Dennis Dingman from Summit Professional Services presented a Fair Housing Workshop for a Rehab Grant, presenting council members with documents outlining how the water system would be laid out. The documents included a map showing how the water transmission mains would be laid out; a preliminary cost estimate for Alternative 3, which is the plan requested by the council; a 2012 Scoring Analysis; and a water system cost analysis. Town Attorney Jeff Goodman voiced his concerns with the exact amount the town was to pay for the engineering of the project, which was estimated at $42,982.28. The engineering would have to be completed before the town would be given the grant and a loan to nance the new water system, so the council agreed to have the town clerk call Jim Bundy with Hatch Mott MacDonald set up a special meeting to discuss the amount he would charge for engineering. The council agreed to look into a possible loan with the Department of Environmental Protection for the amount charged for engineering at the interest rate of 2.5 percent for 20 years, but there is no guarantee the town will get a loan until December or January. Dingman agreed to call Joann Van Hall with Rural Development to get an estimate on what their loan would be and at what rate of interest. The council approved of placing an ad in the newspaper to request volunteers to help with next years Two-Toed Tom Festival. The council also approved sending out code enforcement notices once again to owners of properties that need cleaning, which includes all property owners in Esto, not just those located on State Road 79. The next regularly scheduled town council meeting will be at 7 p.m. Aug. 7 at Esto Town Hall. ESTO from page A1 CITY from page A1 Local

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 I am quitting smoking for my family. The Big Bend Area Health Education Center (Big Bend AHEC) is offering FREE tobacco cessation classes in Holmes County and throughout the Big Bend region. We know the challenges you face. We will help you develop the tools to succeed and we will provide the support you need. For more information, call Big Bend AHEC at: 850-482-6500 (local office) or 1-87-QUIT-NOW-6 (1-877-848-6696) Visit www.ahectobacco.com for the schedule of classes we have available. FREE NICOTINE PATCHES! NO COST TO ATTEND! Northwest Florida Community Hospital We Treat You Like Familybetter than Northwest Florida Community Hospital1360 Brickyard Road Chipley, Floridawww.nfch.org is pleased to announceJesus Ramirez, MDas the newest member of our Health Care Team. Dr. Ramirez diagnoses and treats diseases, conditions and abnormalities of the lungs, cardiopulmonary system and respiratory tract. He also treats COPD, sleep apnea, lung cancer, emphysema, insomnia, snoring, asthma and bronchitis. He is available to see patients on Tuesdays at the Northwest Florida Community Hospital Specialty Clinic.Please join us in welcoming Dr. Ramirez to our community.Call 850-638-9398for an appointment with Dr. Ramirez Wednesday, July 11, 2012June 25 June 29, 2012Marriages Jonathan Jerome Mosley, 11/14-1983 of Decatur and Amber Leigh Thompson 3/18/1982 of Decatur Christopher Wayne Gibson, 11/27/1980 of Bonifay and Sara Marie Baltazar, 9/14/1983 of Bonifay Divorces Shannon Lose and Amy Steverson Losee Allan Lee and Kathrine Lee Clifford Floyd Jr. and Mary Floyd CHIPLEY Washington County Sheriffs Ofce will be seeking volunteers to participate in an allvolunteer program to help make our county a safer place to live, Sheriff Bobby Haddock said in a news release on Monday. The Public Service Ofcer program will be used to augment the patrol efforts of our deputies, Haddock said. They will provide us with extra eyes and ears and will assist us in many other areas of responsibility as well. Initially, the sheriffs ofce will select from a pool of interested volunteers and then determine who are qualied as candidates. Volunteers will be screened, must complete a background check and should be capable of performing the duties expected of them. Once selected, PSO candidates must successfully complete the required training curriculum. Some of the initial duties they will perform will be visibility patrol, assisting with trafc and crowd control, welfare checks and special events. All necessary equipment will be provided to the volunteers who will be expected to perform a required number of hours each month. PSOs will not be sworn law enforcement personnel and therefore will not be responding to or handling any potentially dangerous calls for service. Primarily, they will provide those services which are essential to public safety that deputies are already doing, freeing up our personnel for more serious law enforcement duties. This has been a successful program in many other counties in the state, Haddock said. Volunteers have always been a vital part of our community in many ways, he said. This will simply be another way in which qualied residents of Washington County will be able to participate in something that is vital to the safety of our citizens. Interested parties should contact the Washington County Sheriffs Ofce at 638-6069 for additional information. Holmes County m M ARRiIAGeES ANdD diDIVORceCESSheriffs Ofce plans PSO ProgramHolmes County A A rrestsJune 24 June 30, 2012 Anthony K. Barnes, 40, violation of probation Lonnie Jay Bowling, 43, out of state warrant Kenny Michael Brabley, 23, battery domestic violence Terri Leigh Bradley, 22, battery domestic violence Cody Everett Burghoff, 20, grand theft auto Giovaanni William Depalma, 51, hold for Hillsborough Christopher Scott Dunn, 33, driving while license suspended or revoked Thomas H. Ellenbrock, 37, hold for Hillsborough Kevin Lee Gillham, 50, driving on suspended license Donald Fredrick Groover, 31, violation of probation Kenneth Luquette Harris, 38 failure to appear on driving while license suspended or revoked Katherine Holt, 47, recommit Jason Spencer Johnson, 33, violation of probation Roy Allen Kirch, 31, eeing and attempting to elude, driving while license suspended or revoked Lee Van Reed, 50, violation of probation Anthony Joseph Richard, 42, violation of probation Teresa Kay Shinkman, 37, violation of probation on issuing worthless checks Chaseton Hunter Tice, 22, violation of probation on battery and assault Howard Glen Toole, 57, violation of probation Joseph Allen Wells, 27, disorderly conduct, criminal mischief Arrest RepREPORT By ANGEL MCCURDYDaily NewsN N ICEV V ILLE During the past year, John Barranco has privately celebrated the seven birthdays of his family that was killed in a plane crash last summer. On July 9, 2011, Barrancos daughter, 38-year-old Terresa Teutenberg, along with her husband, 42-year-old Fred Teutenberg, and ve of their children 2-year-old Emma, 4-year-old Peyton, 6-year-old Ellie, 9-year-old Brendon and 10-year-old Will were killed in a plane crash while making an emergency landing near the Demopolis, Ala., airport. There are good days and there are bad days, Barranco said. (Thursday) marked a year from the last time I talked to my daughter before her and her family went down to St. Louis for Freds family reunion. We said goodbye without realizing it would be our nal goodbye. Initial reports from the National Transportation Safety Board said Freds Cessna 421C was approaching the Demopolis airport when it lost radar contact at an altitude of 800 feet before it crashed in a wooded area less than one mile north of the runway. The Niceville community was stunned after learning of the crash. The Teutenbergs, who were members of Niceville United Methodist Church, were active in their volunteering and business ventures. Terresa owned Discovery Learning Academy in Bluewater Bay while Fred played in the church band, coached and played for several soccer teams and owned Advanced Integrated Technology Systems, his start-up business. Im at the point now that enough time has gone by that it doesnt affect me like it did when it rst happened, said Blane Pearson, minister of administration at Niceville United Methodist and a close friend of Freds. Its really hard to forget about it, but talking to other people, sharing, doing remembrance of them, that helps rather than trying to internalize everything. The NTSB reported the cockpit, cabin and left wing of the Teutenbergs plane were consumed by re after the crash. The right wing was torn from the plane and ended up against a tree. A nal report has not been released. Its rough now. Were waiting for the nal report to nd out what exactly happened, what was going on during those last minutes of the ight and those kinds of things, Barranco said. In April, they said a month. In May, they said it would ready around the anniversary. Not too long ago, they said it would be another two months. I believe the investigation is done, and theyre at the point of working on the summation report. Hopefully, within another month well get the report and have a little closure. Terresas mother, Sharon Elliott, said she struggles each day to cope with the loss of her family. The saying that time makes it easier is not true, Elliott said, crying. I miss them so much. But the community support has been overwhelming. I hadnt realized my daughter and her husband and kids had touched so many lives, she added. It seems like every day theres somebody new saying they knew them and asking me if they can do anything to help. A memorial service to mark the oneyear anniversary of the tragedy was scheduled for Monday at Discovery Learning Academy. There were so many wonderful things about the family. Terresa and Freds lives revolved around the children, Barranco said. I cant even describe how much the whole family loved each other. I wish I had another day with them. Anniversary of Teutenberg plane crash marked SpeciSPECI Al L TO The HE TimeTIME S-Ad AD Ve E RTi I Se E RJuly 9 marks the one-year anniversary of the fatal plane crash near the Demopolis, Ala., airport that killed the Teutenberg family.

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OpinionA4 | Holmes County Times-AdvertiserCONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com 1-800-645-8688 ADVERTISING 850-547-9414 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Halifax Media Group. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Halifax Media Group, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2012, Halifax Media Group. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Halifax Media Group. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. Wednesday, July 11, 2012As an English Major I learned about dialect, diction, pejoration, ideolect and a bunch of other stuff. I learned about formal English and casual English. I learned about the French in uence on the language due to the Norman Conquest in 1066. Because of that, French became the language of the court and English became the language of the common man. I learned that no one sat down and wrote a bunch of rules of grammar but use by the educated class dictates what is considered proper. I learned that Greek was the language of learning and that Latin was the language of science. I learned a whole bunch of things, some of which I found useful in teaching and some I never used. Much I forgot. One thing I learned is that language, spelling and usage change over the years. Some words meanings change entirely. Weve seen that in our own time. Being between cleaning ladies, I was taking pains to do a good job of cleaning my bathroom oor. When I was growing up, taking pains to do something meant giving careful attention to doing a good job; for example, painstakingly scrubbing all the built up wax off the oor. Now I dont suppose our parents or grandparents would have meant to moan and groan or writhe in pain to do a good job like one of my Brackin schoolmates, Mary Dell. Everybody in the country used to have clean swept yards, which were swept with brush brooms made from gall berry bushes. Ive been told that people kept their yards swept clean as a re precaution. That was probably the case especially on the prairie, but for us, chickens and hogs running loose was the main reason for our brush broom yard sweeping. Anyway, Mary Dell was doing the weekly chore. Her mother said, Now Mary Dell, take pains and do a good job. Sister Loma reported that she checked on her later and found her moaning and groaning and crying out. When asked what was wrong, Mary Dell replied, Im taking pains to do a good job. At my age, when I am trying to reach the oor, you can be sure I am in pain even if I am not taking pains. This expression reminded me of a number of words that were in our ideolect as a child. When you ask an older person how they were, the usual response was, tolable. Just tolable. It was a long time before I realized they were saying tolerable. They were able, if barely, to tolerate their in rmaties. Another word that we often heard was terreckly. It was not until Aunt Annie Padgett Wells came into our family that I knew adults were putting us off with the promise of directly. There was a fair amount of difference in terreckly, which meant maybe Ill get around to it after awhile, and directly, which I thought meant right away. Another expression we used to hear before weight was such a weighty issue was, My! Youve fell off. You been sick? Today, youve lost weight would be considered a compliment, but most people would say, Fell off? Fell off what? Saying you are fat and pretty today would hardly be considered a compliment as it was in my childhood days. We like most country folks had an open well. Water was drawn up by means of a rope or chain run through a pulley. We called that a tickle. I suppose the correct word for that would be tackle, but that sounds like something you take shing or do on the football eld, neither of which Id ever heard of in my childhood. The only shing tackle we had was a cane pole, a black line tted with a small shhook and a cork. In addition, we would likely carry a strong stob (stake) and an ax for snoring up some bait along with an empty tomato can to hold the earth worms that crawled up to see what the earth was vibrating about. If we were lucky, Daddy left us enough bait at the shing hole near the landing while he went into the swamp to nd a better spot. He could disappear into the swamp almost as fast as he could down a pea or cornrow at gathering time. I am glad that education, travel, television and radio have afforded us the opportunity to grow intellectually and the resultant language changes, but its often fun to look back and laugh at some of the things that were commonplace in our younger days. Remember the formality of leaving when you visited a neighbor or friend. The conversation went like this: We better be going. Ooh Yall dont need to hurry off. (Maybe youve been there three hours.) Yea, we got to go. Yall just come on and go with us. No, we better stay here. Well, Yall just be a coming. Dear Editor, The trailer in which Larry Rednour had only recently moved into started burning in the middle of the night (1 a.m.). Larry tried to put the re out and was so badly burned that he has to have skin grafts to his hands. His doctor says he wont be able to work for a year and medical bills are piling up. I have it on good authority that they will be in the hundreds of thousands of dollars. A fund has been started at Tyndall Credit Union in Chipley, account number 1972011, but very little has been donated. I have faith in the citizens of Washington and Holmes counties for their generosity if they were aware of the circumstances. Someone said it was on T.V. What, one time? How about a public interest story in the paper? He has applied for Medicaid, but we know how that is. If approved, it usually takes ve or six months. This family needs help now. Churches take love offerings and some can give a little and some a lot. Every bit helps. God will bless you as you give.Micki WrightVernonOur language has experienced a lot of changesHAPPY CORNERHazel Wells Tison LETTER TO THE EDITOR In last weeks column, a promise was made to pursue a second writing of the Prattlers experience of participating in the 60th annual Florida Folk Festival. This was the threeday event held in May at the historic Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park in White Springs, Fla. The town nestles on the beautiful banks of the wellknown iconic Suwannee River, a landmark in the nation. Coming to visit and support the participation of the Prattler was my sister, Gail, who has resided in Gainesville throughout her working career as a pharmacist. She came on Saturday, and on Sunday, sister Hazel and sister-in-law, Esteena, made the long drive from DeFuniak Springs and Bonifay to lend support. Esteena, who calls Jasper, Fla., her hometown, joined her brother, Jimmy Kry, wife Martha and granddaughter, who told me, that for years, they make the annual trek to White Springs from their home in Bushnell, Fla., for the gigantic Folk Festival. Another special person met was retired Circuit Judge John Peach from Jasper, who obviously came to our location expressly to meet us. He served as judge along with Circuit Judge Clyde B. Wells, my brother, who was killed in 1990. He is now on Senior Judge status and has become acquainted with Clydes son, Circuit Judge Kelvin Clyde Wells, who is presently serving in the post once held by his dad. He repeated some of the Hamilton County Judge David Bembrys stories whom the Prattler had the privilege of serving with. Sadly, Judge Bembry passed away while still serving as county judge. Many visitors came to the Folk Tent expressly to hear Chipley resident Laurence Cutts, who was listed on the program as conducting a program on beekeeping, the family business he has followed as a profession. Unfortunately, illness prevented Laurences attendance. Three of my stage appearances were with Wayne Martin, a Blountstown resident who was instrumental in directing Blaine Waide to me for the initial interview. Wayne gave me fair warning of the enormity of the 60-year-old Florida Folk, where he has attended for the past 25 years. He won the Fiddling Contest twice and has now stepped aside in deference to younger entrants. He formerly carried a business card that identi ed him as The Fiddling Fool. He plays ddle for Big Bend Bluegrass, a band led by Wausau resident James Hood, his son, Vernon High School coach Danny Hood, Carolyn Van Lierop and Crystal Owens. Even with Waynes warning of the mammoth size of the event, your writer was totally overwhelmed upon arriving at the sprawling grounds of the facility. Upon locating the assigned site, Folklife Stage, our party did not wander far from the home territory. Upon reading the detailed Program, I was excited over the possibility of seeing and hearing the music performers who were scheduled to perform. Many had made visits to Chipley during our time of operating the Northwest Florida Music Park. Doug Gauss, a Tarpon Springs native, who now calls Tallahassee his home, was on the program continuing his history of 30 years performing at the Folk Festival. Widely known for his unique style of nger picking the guitar, Doug also plays other folk instrument including banjo, mandolin and hammered dulcimer. He joined Wayne Martin for a performance at a bluegrass festival here many years ago in a musical tribute to the life of Will McLean, a Chipley native, who wrote and sang a variety of folk songs during his lifetime in this genre. When we rst began the festivals here, one of the rst bands hired was Skip Johns and the Travelers from Live Oak, Fla. Skip was listed as performer at White Springs.We also recall Red and Murphy Henry, a husband and wife musical duo who played a Chipley Festival in the late 1970s when Noah Grif n Jr. and wife Lois rst brought festivals to our town. Red, along with his son, Chris, were among the performers at the May event. To our regret, we did not have opportunity to see any of the above musicians whom we had known in the past. We also had to forfeit seeing Quincy, Fla., native Billy Dean and daughter, Hannah Dean, who has enjoyed successes in the country music eld. John Anderson, well known in the music circles with a host of hit songs, including Im Just an Old Chunk of Coal, and the highlight entertainer, legendary musician performer and folk historian Arlo Guthrie, are among the many others that we did not see. Arlo is the son of Woody Guthrie, who lived in the famous Folk Boom era while composing and singing the still-celebrated song This Land Is Your Land. Fortunately for us, we were near the spacious, air conditioned Carillon Tower, where story telling artist presented interesting and entertaining stories throughout the weekend. One such performance came from Blountstowns Joan Alderman, daughterin-law Amy En nger Alderman playing the upright bass ddle and former Calhoun County Sheriff Buddy Smith accompanying the duo on guitar. Amy is the daughter of David and Judy Roberts En nger, who reside in the Bonnet Pond area of Washington County. We enjoyed many other story tellers while relaxing in air conditioned comfort and escaping the outdoor heat. On Sunday morning, Hester and I did visit the Amphitheater and listen to the Sacred Harp Singers from Tallahassee. We were near the food vendors and the return walk allowed us to purchase lunch, thus keeping us within the boundaries of the assigned Folklife Tent. We offer sincere thanks and appreciation to all those who planned and carried through the outstanding, educational, entertaining and interesting three day events. On the surface, it would appear impossible and overwhelming to carry out such a task. Yes, Hester and I agree that we would attend next year, if only as spectators. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSShown is an over ow crowd of spectators at an Amphitheater concert.Florida Folk Festival part two PERRYS PRATTLEPerry Wells

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 NOTICEThe Holmes County School Board will be considering amendments to School Board Policies, Student Progression Plan and Student Code of Conduct at the School Board meeting August 7, 2012 at 9:00 am. A copy of the documents to be amended may be viewed at the Holmes County School Board Ofwill be held August 7, 2012 at 9:00 am in the Board Room. Wednesday, July 11, 2012Special to Times-AdvertiserWASHINGTON, D.C. The U.S. Forest Service, Department of the Interior, Department of Defense and FEMA continue to support efforts to protect life, public safety and aid in community recovery from wildres and subsequent ash ooding in multiple Western states. On June 28, President Obama approved a disaster declaration for Colorado providing additional support to state and local ofcials responding to the res, as well as federal assistance for individuals affected by the High Park and Waldo Canyon Fires.   S ecretary of the Interior Ken Salazar is in Colorado Springs today to see the wildre response efforts rsthand and thank reghters, rst responders and volunteers for their efforts to battle the res and support the communities that have been impacted. While in Colorado Springs, Secretary Salazar is attending a brieng with Colorado Springs Mayor Steve Bach, El Paso County Sheriff Terry Maketa, Incident Commander Troy Nelson, and Burned Area Emergency Response Team Leader Marc Stamer regarding the federal, state and local response to the Waldo Canyon Fire. Salazar is also touring the Mountain Shadows subdivision with members of the BAER team who are on site to assess damage.  S ix Department of Defense C-130 aircraft equipped with U.S. Forest Service Modular Airborne Fire Fighting Systems and under the command and control of U.S. Northern Command continue to assist in the efforts to control res in the Rocky Mountain region and western United States at the request of the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho. As of Sunday, DoD aircraft have conducted 145 air drops and discharged more than 380,100 gallons of retardant.  T he 145th Airlift Wing, North Carolina Air National Guard will hold a private memorial service tomorrow for the four airmen killed in the crash of a Modular Airborne Fire Fighting System equipped C-130. The men died July 1, when their plane went down while ghting a forest re near Edgemont, S.D.   C urrently, 20 large airtankers, including six MAFFS-equipped C-130s, as well as 71 Single Engine Air Tankers are available nationally to combat res burning in a number of Western states. More than 8,500 personnel, more than 530 re engines and more than 65 helicopters are also ghting wildres around the U.S., supporting state a nd local efforts.     As federal partners continue to support state and local ofcials battling the Waldo Canyon re with more than 80 federal, state and local reghters, eight re engines and three helicopters today ghting the re in the hillsides west of Colorado Springs, the U.S. Forest Service today reported that as the Waldo Canyon re in Colorado was 98 percent contained after burning more than 18,000 acres west of Colorado Springs and destroying over 300 homes. Ofcials expect the re to be fully contained in a few days as some reghters and suppression resources are being redirected to other res in the West.  T he State of Alaska has sent 10 crews to support wildre suppression efforts in the Western states, predominantly made up of Alaska Natives from the communities of Nondalton, Kenai, Copper River, Venetie, Fort Yukon, St. Michael, Koyuk, Selawik, Shageluk, Scammon Bay.  I n Colorado, Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack has designated all counties as primary Secretarially designated natural disaster counties, except Delta and San Juan which are contiguous disaster counties, due to the damage caused by drought, excessive heat, and high winds. This designation makes all qualied farm operators in the designated areas eligible for low interest emergency loans from USDAs Farm Service Agency, provided that eligibility requirements are met. Farmers in eligible counties have eight months from the date of the declaration to apply for loans to help cover part of their actual losses.   A s part of heightened efforts, the Forest Service and the Department of the Interior have completed training of two Army battalions at Fort Carson, near Colorado Springs, Colo., to potentially serve as ground reghters to boost the number of reghters available for wildre suppression throughout the nation. The training involves one day of classroom training and two days of eld training. During the classroom training, soldiers learn about wildre suppression including re behavior and reline safety. During eld training, soldiers receive instruction in re suppression methods and procedures.   S ince the beginning of the Waldo Canyon re, Fort Carson units and services have committed more than 120 soldiers, 10 bulldozers and other equipment and resources to provide assistance to ongoing re containment operations and interagency support to the Greater Colorado Springs community.   O n July 3, FEMA ap proved two additional Fire Management Assistance Grants for the Shingle re in Kane County, Utah and for the Oil Creek re in Weston County, Wyoming. This brings the overall total number of FMAGs approved for states during this re season to 24. Other states that have received these important grants include Colorado, Montana, New Mexico, Nevada and Texas.  F MAGs are provided through the Disaster Relief Fund and made available by FEMA to assist in covering 75 percent of the eligible state and local costs of ghting res that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for eld camps; equipment use, repair and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials and supplies.  O n July 1, the NIFC released its latest National Wildland Signicant Fire Potential Outlook for July-October 2012, which provides coordinated federal, state, local and tribal government agencies, rst responders and the public with information about the likelihood that wildland re events will require mobilization of additional resources from outside the area in which the re situation originates. Updated outlooks are released by NIFC on the rst of every month.  T he major disaster dec l aration for Colorado,   ap proved by President Obama on June 28, makes federal funding available to state and eligible local governments and certain private nonprot organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency protective measures, including direct Federal assistance, for El Paso and Larimer Counties impacted by the High Park and Waldo Canyon Fires. Federal funding is also available for Crisis Counseling and Disaster Unemployment Assistance for affected individuals in El Paso and Larimer Counties impacted by the High Park and Waldo Canyon Fires. Additional forms of assistance may be designated as part of the disaster declaration once joint federal, state and local damage assessments are fully completed.  O verall, federal partners have deployed 14 Incident Management Teams (IMT), including four Type 1 IMTs, and eight Type 2 IMTs, to help provide a coordinated and aggressive response to wildres across the country. These teams have been strategically assigned to highly complex wildres such as, the Waldo Canyon Fire near Colorado Springs, Colorado, the Dahl and Ash Creek res in Montana, the Seeley and Fontenelle Fires in Wyoming, and others.  T o further address the severity of current wildland re activity across the western states, Secretary Salazar and Secretary Vilsack have directed federal land managers to take additional measures to help reduce the risks of new wildres, ensure the highest possible level of coordination among federal land management agencies, and continue to prioritize safety for reghters and communities. Additional measures include prohibiting new prescribed res in geographic areas where Preparedness Level is at 4 or 5 which currently includes the Rocky Mountain Area, Eastern Great Basin Area, and Southwest Area and requiring regional or state level approval to initiate any new prescribed re in all other geographic areas. These measures will remain in effect until the National Multi-Agency Coordinating group determines a national Preparedn ess Level 3 or below.  On June 27th, NMAC raised the preparedness level to 4, on a scale of 1-5.   The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of the Interior, in partnerships with states and local agencies, have developed a cohesive strategy to respond to the increase in wildres in recent years by focusing on:  Restoring and main taining resilient landscapes. Through forest and rangeland restoration activities such as mechanical thinning and controlled burns, ofcials can make forests and rangelands healthier and less susceptible to catastrophic re.   Creating re-adapted communities. The Forest Service, the Department of the Interior and their partners are working with communities to reduce re hazards around houses to make them more resistant to wildre threats.   Responding to Wild res. This element considers the full spectrum of re management activities and recognizes the differences in missions among local, state, tribal and Federal agencies.   T here is increased risk of ash ooding in burn areas as a result of res, and with the traditional summer rain season beginning, its important communities remain aware of this potential hazard. Flash oods can occur very rapidly, without warning or even any visible signs of rain, making it important to follow the direction of state and local ofcials. To learn about ood risks in your area and for information on ood insurance, visit www.oodsmart. gov. For more information on ood preparedness tips and ways you can protect your family before, during and after a ood visit www. ready.gov/oods.  O n average, the USDA Forest Service and the Department of the Interior bureaus respond to about 16,500 wildres per year that occur on land under their jurisdiction and assist state and local agencies in responding to a signicant number of the approximately 60,000 wildres per year that occur on land under their jurisdiction. Federal reghters, aircraft, and ground equipment are strategically assigned to parts of the country as the re season shifts across the nation. Fireghting experts will continuously monitor conditions and move these assets as necessary to be best positioned and increase initial response capabilities. In addition, federal agencies are conducting accelerated restoration activities nationwide aimed at healthier forests and reduced re risks in the years to come.  F ederal land managers are also helping communities prepare for wildre. Federal partnerships with state, tribal and local agencies strengthen preparedness programs, such as Firewise www.rewise.org/ and Ready Set Go! www. iafc.org/readySetGo that help families and communities prepare for and survive wildre. You can also visit FEMAs Ready.gov www. ready.gov, to learn more about steps you and your family can take to be prepared for an emergency. Federal partners continue to support response effortsHolmes County Council on Aging celebrated their June birthdays on June 29. Those having birthdays in June are, from left, Dorothy Smith and Peggy McCaw. There were also various political candidates on hand to help celebrate. hoHOLMEsS coCOUntNTY coCOUnciNCIL onON aging AGING cCELEBRatATEsS BiIRthda THDA YsS APShawn Torres of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management starts a backburn while battling the Kinyon Road Fire west of Castleford, Idaho, on July 7. More than 150 reghters are ghting the blaze that has consumed more than 75,000 acres.

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OUTDoo OO RS www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comSend your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com ASection Wednesday, July 11, 2012 Most snapper shermen Ive talked to are saying they arent seeing all that many sh. You can do the same thing at a bass tournament and ask 40 shermen out of 50 who shed the tournament and they will say it was a slow day, but ve or six will have a box full. I can tell you that places inside of eight miles where we caught red snapper last year arent producing right now. The good news is these same spots are producing some good gag grouper on live bait. If you are going to take the trouble to sh the Gulf, you might as well do everything you can do to catch sh including taking the trouble to catch some live bait. I know when you stop to catch live bait it seems as if you are wasting valuable shing time, but it actually is time well spent. Choffers are probably the easiest live bait to catch, and I know they are the easiest to keep alive for several days. Compared to menhaden, which are almost impossible to keep alive overnight, choffers can be kept in a cage and fed for a week. Choffers can also be kept alive in a livewell that doesnt have a great amount of freshwater owing into it. The trick here is to keep the water temperature cool. Simply add some ice to the bait well every so often. A livewell can get too hot to keep many baits alive. Hooking on a choffer can sometimes bring on more talk. Some people like to hook them in the top of the tail. I dont like to do this because it causes the choffer to spin going down and by the time the bait reaches the bottom your leader will become so twisted it will go from six feet long to two feet in length. Not a very attractive sight to a weary grouper. Ive found that by hooking the choffer in the mouth either across the mouth or up and down from the bottom of the mouth and out the top the bait will swim to the bottom and not twist the leader. Using circle hooks you have to let the grouper have the bait for a few seconds. If you jerk when you feel a sh bite you will usually lose your sh. Pull tight or let the grouper swim away with the bait and continue applying pressure until you think the sh is hooked.Hooked on Outdoors Outdoor LifeScott Lindseycaptainlindsey@ knology.netState extends scallop seasonBy KHRYSTEN KEYSStar Staff Intern If the scallop season wasnt long enough for you then you are in luck. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has permanently extended the scalloping season an additional two weeks. The new season will begin July 1 and end Sept. 25. A study concerning the extended seasons of the past two years suggested the new extended season will not have a negative effect on the scallops. The ndings have made the FWC also look into changing a ban on commercial harvest of bay scallops in Florida state waters, a decision that was made in 1994. As for now, the commercial harvest of bay scallops is not allowed. The FWC is pressing for information from consumers and scallop hunters concerning their hunting habits and their feelings and interest concerning an extended season. You can help FWCs scallop researchers by completing an online survey at svy.mk/bayscallops or by completing a postage-paid survey. For more information, email BayScallops@MyFWC.com Remember: The bag limit for scalloping is two gallons of whole bay scallops or one pint of meat per person a day. The vessel limit for scalloping is 10 gallons of whole bay scallops or half a gallon of meat. Bald eagle population soaring in FloridaFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation CommissionThe bald eagle population is in creasing in Florida, which continues to be one of the top spots in the lower 48 states for bald eagles to nest and raise their young. Based on its 2011 aerial survey, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission estimates there are 1,457 active bald eagle nests in Florida, almost a 9 percent increase since 2008 when the state implemented a bald eagle management plan. Long-term success with bald eagles in Florida is re ected in the species recovery from just 88 active nests in 1973. Today at the Audubon Center for Birds of Prey in Maitland, leaders from the FWC and Audubon Florida highlighted the bald eagles recovery and the ongoing challenge of conserving these large raptors. They said celebrating the bald eagles resurgence in Florida was a great way to kick off the nations 236th anniversary of declaring independence. Bald eagles have made a remarkable recovery in Florida. The FWC and Audubon are working togeth er to protect bald eagles in Florida, so these majestic raptors will continue to soar as a symbol of national pride and conservation success, FWC Chairman Kenneth Wright said. For 20 years, Audubon Florida has recruited citizen-scientists to monitor eagles and their nests through its EagleWatch program, active in more than 40 counties. Audubon is proud to have played a role in the bald eagles amazing success story in Florida, said Eric Draper, executive director for Audubon Florida. Our dedicated staff and EagleWatch volunteers, along with our state agency partners, have helped to identify potential threats to these magnicent birds and their nest sites, but our work is far from done. Together, we are leading the nation in the protection of this important and iconic species. Working with ranchers and other landown ers to protect bald eagle habitat is another pri ority for Audubon, with its involvement going back 50 years to the start of the Cooperative Kis simmee Eagle Sanctuary Program. Floridians and visitors are encouraged to get outdoors throughout the year to enjoy the states many parks and public lands and watch bald eagles soar. You can nd a Bald Eagle Nest Locator at MyFWC.com/Eagle. Bald eagles almost disappeared from the lower 48 states by the mid-20th century, with an estimated 417 pairs in the United States in 1963. The use of the now-banned pesticide DDT was causing eggshells to weaken and break under the weight of adults incubating eggs. Today, a healthy and stable eagle population in Florida will depend on continued availability of ap propriate nesting and foraging habitats as well as protection from disturbance during the nesting season. The public can help conserve bald eagles in Flori da by following state guidelines for activities near ea gle nests and by reporting new eagle nest locations to BaldEagle@MyFWC.com. Audubons Center for Birds of Prey contributes to eagle conservation through its specialized clini cal care and EagleWatch program. The Center recently celebrated the 450th rehabilitated bald eagle released back into the wild since 1979. For more on bald eagles, go to MyFWC.com/Eagle. For information on Audubons EagleWatch and Center for Birds of Prey, visit http://.audubon.org/ audubon-center-birds-prey. For information on volun teering to monitor eagles through EagleWatch, contact eaglewatch@audubon.org. NATIOn N AL TREASURE Page A6

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CHIPL E Y GUN & PAWN ThePawnPeople We Sell Guns & More!WE LOAN MONEYNO Credit check... Just FAST CASHWE BUY GOLDDont be fooled by others claiming to pay moreWE PAY TOP PRICES WE PAY FAST CASH850.638.8987 Wednesday, July 11, 2012 CATHRINE LAMB638-0212 | @Catspitstop clamb@chipleypaper.com Tony Stewart took home his third Coke Zero 400 trophy on Saturday. Smoke qualied second for the Coke Zero 400 on Friday after noon, but was moved back to the 42 spot after inspection. He did what he does best dur ing restrictor plate races he played it cool at the back for the rst 70 or 80 laps, letting the pole sitter Matt Kenseth and his Roush Fenway racing teammate Greg Bife hold the lead for a while. As the nal lap came around Smoke teamed up with Kasey Kahne and came around Matt Kenseth fast on the outside for the lead, just as Bife wiggled just a little in the trafc behind Stewart and caused what many NASCAR fans were waiting for, the Big One at Daytona, as Stewart took the checkered ag for the win. In the Nationwide series race on Friday night, Kurt Busch got his first win with Phoenix Rac ing in a green white checkered finish. He pitted six times for re pairs after being involved in an accident on lap 66, causing his owner to believe he was out of contention for the win. Howev er, Bush brought home the Sub way Jalapeo 250 trophy, even after all of the chaos. Saturday night he was having a good run in the Coke Zero 400, remaining with the leadersfor most of the race, before being caught up in an accident. Busch just couldnt make it back to the front and fin ished in the 35th position, which happens to be where he quali fied for the Coke Zero 400.Next weeks racesThe Nationwide Series race, F.W. Webb 200 will be run at 2:46 p.m. on ESPN. The race is being held at the New Hampshire Mo tor Speedway in Loudon, N.H. Last years winner was Kyle Busch. The Sprint Cup Series race, Lenox Industrial Tools 301 will be run at 12:15 p.m. on TNT. The race is being held at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon, N.H. Last years winner was Ryan Newman. Stewart wins third Coke Zero 400 SP O RTs S www.bonifaynow.com APage 7SectionCOKE ZERO 400, SPRINT CUP1. Tony Stewart 2. Jeff Burton 3. Matt Kenseth 4. Joey Logano 5. Ryan Newman 6. Carl Edwards 7. Kasey Kahne 8. Brad Keselowski 9. Michael Waltrip 10. Bobby LabonteSUBWAY JALAPENO 250, NN ATIONWIDE 1. Kurt Busch 2. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. 3. Michael Annett 4. Austin Dillon 5. Joey Logano 6. Elliot Sadler 7. Justin Allgaier 8. Mike Bliss 9. Timmy Hill 10. Sam Hornish Jr. STANDINGs S Sprint Cup 1. Matt Kenseth 2. Dale Earnhardt Jr. -25 3. Greg Bife -44 4. Jimmie Johnson -58 5. Tony Stewart 84 6. Kevin Harvick 90 7. Denny Hamlin -92 7. Martin Truex Jr. -92 9. Brad Keselowski -103 10. Clint Bowyer -104 Nationwide 1. Elliott Sadler 2. Austin Dillon -2 3. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. -18 4. Sam Hornish Jr. -35 5. Justin Allgaier -72 6. Michael Annett -95 7. Cole Whitt 103 8. Mike Bliss -164 9. Danica Patrick 208 10. Tayler Malsam -222 AA llmendinger suspending, Hornish Jr. competes Penske Racing was notied by NASCAR Senior Vice President of Racing Operations Steve ODonnell 90 minutes before the start of the Coke Zero 400 that AJ Allmendinger had been temporally suspended from NASCR, after his A sample from a random drug test on June 29. NASCAR on Monday received an ofcial request for Allmendingers B sample to be tested. Allmendinger was set to start the race in the eighth position. As the Penske team scrambled to get the No. 22 set up for the replacement driver, Sam Hornish Jr., they sent a plane back to Charlotte to pick him up to race. To put even more presser on the team they had to rework the seat, steering wheel and the petals for Hornish Jr. He arrived with just minutes to spare before the green ag waved. Sam Hornish Jr., nished 33 after being sent from the eight-position to the 43-position because of the suspension. Penske Racing president Tim Cindric said Monday the team is again going with Hornish this week because making the decision allows the No. 22 team to move forward with its preparations without any uncertainty. AA J AA LLMENDINGER KKURT BBUschSCH Special To The NewsSixty-seven people lost their lives in Florida last year in boating accidents, and there have already been 28 deaths so far this year, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commis sion, which has released its 2011 Boating Accident Statistical Report. The FWC is responsible for reviewing, analyzing and compiling boating acci dent data for the state. Its statistical re port details boating accidents and their causes. The frequency of boating accidents in Florida and their causes would prob ably shock most people, said Investiga tor Andy Bickel, of the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement. We want to reduce the number of ac cidents, injuries and deaths on Florida waters, Bickel said. Drowning is the leading cause of death in boating accidents, statistics show. Theres an easy x. Wear a life jack et, Bickel said. There are several styles of life jackets available to boaters that wont interfere with your boating experi ence and may save your life. Todays boaters can choose from sev eral models of light and comfortable, in atable belt-pack and over-the-shoulder life jackets that can be worn while sh ing or enjoying the sun, and they do not interfere with boating activities. Accidents can occur without warning, and if for some reason someone ends up in the water, quite often its too late to put on a life jacket. The leading type of accident contin ues to be boaters colliding with other boats or objects, Bickel said. With the number of boaters in our beautiful state, its important to pay close attention to everything thats going on around your boat. Statistics repeatedly show that boat ers who have taken a basic boating safety class are less likely to be involved in a se rious boating accident. The 2011 Boating Accident Statisti cal Report is now available online at MyFWC.com/Boating, click on Boating Accidents.2011 boating statistics available The Associated PressGREENSBORO, N.C. The Atlantic Coast Conference is remaining tied to the Orange Bowl. The league announced on July 3 a 12year agreement with the bowl beginning after the 2014 season. It says details on the opponent and broadcast partner will come later. The ACC has sent its champion to the South Florida-based bowl every year since 2006, and this announce ment means that relationship will con tinue when the Bowl Subdivision makes the switch to a four-team playoff in two years. As we look ahead to the future of postseason college football, this will fur ther an already benecial partnership for both organizations, ACC Commis sioner John Swofford said. The Dis cover Orange Bowl has a rich history of prestige, is located within the leagues footprint and is a great destination for our student-athletes, alumni and fans. In addition to our continued partner ship, we are very pleased to be playing annually on New Years Day. The Orange Bowl will be played an nually at 1 p.m. on Jan. 1. The league anticipates the Orange Bowl hosting at least four seminal games and says in those years, its champion will play in one of the three other host bowls. If the ACC champion makes the play offs, another ACC team will play in the Orange Bowl. The ACC becomes the fth major conference to announce a tie with a bowl that expects to be part of the pool of six bowls from which two seminal sites will rotate. The Big 12 and Southeastern Conference are creating the Champions Bowl for their representatives, while the Big Ten and Pac-12 are committed to the Rose Bowl. O. Ford Gibson, president and chair of the Orange Bowl Committee, says his bowl is is extremely pleased to con tinue its relationship with the ACC and is looking forward to entering this new era of postseason collegiate football with a valued partner and its historically suc cessful member institutions.ACC announces 12-year deal with the Orange Bowl

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Pharmacy Drugs Drive-Thru Window Huge selection of collegiate gifts and jewelryBuy One, Get One 50% OFFAll Gift Items and Jewelry We have the largest selection of MARIANA JEWELRY in Northern Florida Kings Discount Drugs1242 Main Street Chipley638-4875 this saturday in and BONIFAYNURSING & REHAB CENTER Kyle S. Chavers, M.D. Long-term care physician and owner of Extended Care Medical associates, Dothan, AL Assistant Medical Director of Bonifay Nursing and Rehab Center Wound Care Physician, Flowers Hospital Wound Care Center Primary/Urgent Care Staff Physician, PrimeTeam, Inc., Dothan, Daleville and Headland AL Dr. Chavers is a member of the Medical Association of the State of Alabama; American Academy of Family Phhysicians; American College of Sports Medicine and Tuscalossa Family Practice Residency Association. American Board of Family Medicine, State of Alabama and the State of Florida Wednesday, July 11, 2012 LocalA8 | Holmes County Times-AdvertiserSpeicial To Times-AdvertiserBLOUNTSTOWN The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement will be the host of Journey Stories, an exhibition of the Smithsonian Institutions Museum on Main Street series. The exhibition, sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council, will be on display July 14 to Aug. 25 at the Settlements Club House. There also will be exhibits from Washington County on display at the exhibit. Journey Stories recounts the struggles of our ancestors as they traveled to North America and, once here, made their way across the continent, according to the website, ppmuseum.org. The stories tell how our ancestors made the nation great one step, one journey at the time. The Settlement will be presenting local journey stories and local histories to complement the Smithsonians Journey Stories exhibition and will be conducting programs leading up to the exhibit dates on local history and folklore that we feel will be educational in nature and enhance any history classes presented in local schools and to the population at large, according to the website. The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is the only North Florida location to be selected to host Journey Stories. All other Florida locations are in south central and southern portions of the state. Settlement of cials encourage students throughout the Florida Panhandle to attend the exhibit. Counties affected by Debby granted assistanceSpeicial To Times-AdvertiserTALLAHASSEE The federal government has approved public assistance for 20 requested counties to be included in the federal disaster declaration due to the impacts of Tropical Storm Debby across Florida. Three additional counties were approved for Individual Assistance, including Duval, Nassau and Union. Public assistance provides grant assistance for debris removal and emergency protective measures. Costs for repair, replacement, or restoration of disaster-damaged, publicly-owned facilities also can be covered under public assistance. The counties approved to receive Public Assistance include Baker, Charlotte, Citrus, Clay, Columbia, Dixie, Franklin, Gulf, Hamilton, Hernando, Jefferson, Lafayette, Liberty, Manatee, Nassau, Pasco, Sarasota, Suwannee, Union and Wakulla counties. Public assistance from the federal declaration comes in conjunction with the earlier approval of Individual Assistance for eleven Florida counties. State, tribal, local governments and certain types of private non-pro t organizations in the 20 designated counties should visit www.FloridaPA.org to create an account within 30 days of a presidential declaration to apply for Public Assistance. Federal Individual Assistance makes federal and state assistance available to individuals and families. Residents and business owners who sustained losses in the designated county can begin applying for individual assistance starting today by registering online at www. disasterassistance.gov, by web enabled mobile device at m.fema.gov or by calling 800-621-FEMA(3362) or 800-462-7585(TTY) for the hearing and speech impaired. The tollfree telephone numbers will operate from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily until further notice. Debby made landfall June 27 in Steinhatchee. Effects from the storm were felt statewide. The primary concern from Debby was the proli c amount of rainfall and the resulting ooding impacts. Six rivers across Florida reached major ood stage, and two rivers, the Sopchoppy and the St. Marys, reached record breaking crests. The Atlantic Hurricane Season runs from June 1 to Nov. 30. To get a plan, visit www.FloridaDisaster. org. By RANDAL YAKEYNews Herald Writer WEST BAY Airport revenues are up, market share is up and everything seems to be moving in the right direction for the Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport. Everything except the grass. It still wont grow. Now, airport of cials have agreed to spend an additional $218,281 for another lawn placement plan. We are con dent this will work, ECPs executive director John Wheat said during the last airport authority board meeting. Wheat said the airport will try to stabilize the soil in the area to meet Florida Department of Environmental Protection regulations regarding environmental issues, including erosion. We now know what needs to be taken care of, Wheat said. GAC Contractors Inc. has been awarded the contract, which was approved by the airport authority June 27. The airport will be responsible for the installation of wells and irrigation systems with an estimated cost of $39,300. Watering and maintenance of the sod or seed will be the responsibility of the airport. It was about a year ago the airport authority agreed to spend an extra $400,000 to mend the sod, winter rye grass and seed germination problems. But growing a luscious lawn isnt always easy. It can be especially dif cult, said Tim Brock, of Brock Lawn & Pest. Brock, who is not connected to the project but who runs a company that specializes in commercial and residential work, said an industrial area like the airport can be dif cult because of the terrain and size of the project. He said the area where they chose to construct the airport is on land he suspected would be tough to grow sod on. Getting grass to take hold might be part of the problem. They call that area the Sand Hills, Brock said. If no improvements are made, the airport could be subject to DEP nes. The airport site spans about 1,400 acres. GAC Contractors specializes in building construction, road work and site work. Calls to GAC for comment on the project, and this article, were not returned prior to press time.Alan Forst appointed to nominating commissionSpecial To Times-AdvertiserTALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott announced the appointment of Alan Orantes Forst to the Nineteenth Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission. Forst, 53, of Palm City, has been a member of Floridas Reemployment Assistance Appeals Commission since 2001 and serves as its current chief executive and chief administrative of cer. Previously, he practiced with Crary Buchanan in Stuart, representing both employees and employers. Forst also served in several positions at federal government agencies, including the Department of Justice, the Department of Labor and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. He earned a bachelors degree from Georgetown University and a law degree from the Columbus School of Law of the Catholic University of America. He succeeds Robert J. Gorman and is appointed for a term beginning July 9, 2012, and ending July 1, 2016. He is appointed from the list of nominees submitted by the Florida Bar.Smithsonian Journey Stories come to Northwest Florida Airport facing more expense for grass ANDREW JOHNSON | The News HeraldOngoing problems with getting the grass to grow at Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport will mean an additional $218,281 for a new lawn placement plan.

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Washington, Holmes at a glance Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser BPAGE 1SectionWednesday, JULY 11 2012Yes Lord Deliverance to offer summer mealsCHIPLEY Yes Lord Deliverance Ministries will participate in the Summer Food Service Program during the month of July. Nutritionally balanced meals will be provided to all children regardless of race, color, sex, disability, age or national origin during summer vacation when breakfasts and lunches are not available. All children 18 years old and younger are eligible for meals at no charge, and there will be no discrimination in the course of the meal service. The programs are only approved for geographical areas of need where 50 percent or more of the children qualify for free or reduced-price meals during the school year. Starting July 9 and running through July 19, a supper meal will be served from 5-6 p.m. and an evening snack from 8-9 p.m. Meals will be served at 739 Seventh St. in Chipley.Art showcase plannedBONIFAY All art students are invited to display their school artworks, art from art studios and any other visual art learning and creative activities for free in August. Come and show your artworks earlier for selection process. Talk to So a Davis, or make an appointment at 329-8381. The art gallery is at 110 W. Pennsylvania Ave. in Bonifay. Gods Vineyard to hold overnight youth campVERNON Gods Vineyard Worship Center will have overnight camp for ages 13 and up from July 30 to Aug. 4. The camp is free. Applications may be picked up at Dees Restaurant in Vernon. For more information, call Vicky Wilson at 535-2471.By RANDAL SEYLER638-0212| @WCN_HCT rseyler@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Youve heard of the One Percent people, the super elite? Well, what about the .001 Percenters? Taekwondo instructor Wesley Wing of Bonifay received promotion to the level of master by the American Taekwondo Association recently at the ATA World Championships, held June 18-24 at the Statehouse Convention Center in Little Rock, Ark. There are 250,000 members of the ATA, and of that there are under 300 sixth-degree black belts, Wing said. That works out to 0.001 percent of the total ATA population. Even at that, Wing was being modest according to the ATA website, the organization has grown to more than 350,000 members world wide, making it the largest martial arts association in existence. Wing has been teaching ATA taekwondo for 27 years, since he rst got his black belt and took over a class that then met at the Bonifay Police Department. Today he has his own school, Bonifay Taekwondo USA, at 120 N. Waukesha St., and dozens of youngsters are in the school (dojang in Korean) each night, learning not just kicks and punches, but important life lessons. I want to start a leadership academy where we teach kids how to present themselves, how to introduce themselves to adults and how to do public speaking. I want these kids to have skills that will make a difference in their lives, Wing said. Teaching children is not every martial artists inclination, but Wing said he has always enjoyed teaching children and has students as young as 4 years old in his classes. Wings instructor, ninth-degree black belt Soon Ho Lee of Panama City, was brother to the founder of ATA taekwondo, the late H.U. Lee. After H.U. Lees passing, Soon Ho Lee served as grandmaster of the organization until he retired last year. In Ho Lee, H.U. Lees younger brother, is the current ATA grandmaster. It was Wings instructor, Soon Ho Lee, who put him to teaching. He called me up one day and said, Youre the instructor in Bonifay. I was living and working in Dothan (Ala.) at the time, but I said, yes, sir. Each year, one of the biggest highlights of the annual ATA event, which routinely attracts 20,000 people or more to Little Rock, is the opening ceremonies held at Verizon Arena in North Little Rock, according to the website ataonline.com. Taking place at the ATA opening ceremonies is the traditional Masters Ceremony and high rank testing. Wing was part of the Masters Ceremony. He was promoted to sixth-degree black belt in 2011, and it was a year-long process to receive the title of master, he said. The title doesnt automatically come with the rank. First you have to be nominated, Wing said. Then there is a week-long ceremony, INDEXSociety .................................B2 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B7 TAEKWONDO MASTERBonifay martial arts instructor earns master titlePHOTOS BY RANDAL SEYLER | ExtraSixth-degree black belt and ATA Taekwondo Master Wesley Wing helps a young student with her blocking technique July 2 at Wings school, Bonifay Taekwondo USA. Wing was awarded his title of master in June at the ATA World Championships in Little Rock, Ark. ATA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPSThree adult students from Bonifay Taekwondo USA traveled to the ATA World Championships in Little Rock June 18-24 to compete with students from 17 countries and ve continents in one of the largest taekwondo tournaments in the world. Noah Collins won a silver medal in the national event, while competitors Phillip Byrd and Stephanie Foskey competed but did not place. Its a very, very tough competition, said instructor Wesley Wing. Just to go and compete at that level is something amazing, and to have Mr. Collins win silver was really impressive. SPECIAL TO EXTRABonifay taekwondo instructor Wesley Wing was promoted to the level of master during the Masters Ceremony in Little Rock, Ark., in June. Young taekwondo students take a break during class July 2 in Bonifay. Taekwondo Master Wesley Wing instructs class at his Bonifay school. Wing has taught taekwondo in Bonifay since 1987 and moved to his current location at 120 N. Waukesha St. earlier this year.See MASTER B2

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B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News which includes a 7-day fast. Its pretty hard to do. I mean, I cant imagine me doing without food, Wing said, jokingly. The fast is a limited-intake fast for two days, then an even more limited fast for three days. On the morning of the sixth day, we got two jars of baby food. That was the best thing I ever ate. After the baby food came a full day of working out in preparation for the Masters Ceremony. The trek from taekwondo beginner to sixth-degree black belt typically would take 25 years of work, but Wing jokes that he was a bit hard headed so it took him a couple of extra years. Its a quarter century of work most never do. Though many martial arts schools follow trends, Wing said he has stuck with traditional taekwondo because that was what appealed to him. Now, many schools offer MMA or Brazilian jujitsu, including the ATA school in Panama City where Wing began his training, but for him, traditional taekwondo has been, and remains, more than enough to keep him busy. For me, taekwondo is a way of life. Its more than just a sport, its something that you can do your whole life, Wing said. Im 58, and I hope to still be active and teaching when Im 70. J.D. OWENS CARPET OUTLETwill save you money EVERYDAY!!! J.D. OWENS CARPET OUTLET2597SpringcreekRoad, Marianna, FL3 1/2 Miles East of Marianna on Hwy. 90 (850) 526-3619 Textured PlushCarpet7999Super Thick 13 Loose LayVinyl49FHA QualityVinylSF SF SFEngineered Value Grade3 Oak Plank$229SFAREA RUG SALE!Over 200 In Stockcarpettilemarianna.com ROGERS INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. Serving You Is Our Most Important Product*Property Insurance is not available in the state of Florida from Auto-Owners Insurance. *Property Insurance is not available in the state of Flordia from Auto-Owners Insurance. GRANDPENING Conveniently located on the corner of Highway 77 and Highway 2 in Graceville, right across from the PigglyWiggly. Please stop in and see us, view our latest used car inventory, consign your vehicle on our lot or just stop on by and say hello! We are here to deal, sales@southcountrymotors.com Wednesday, July 11 2012 RANDAL SEYLER | ExtraMaster Wesley Wing leads his class during a typical Monday night workout at Bonifay Taekwondo USA. MASTER from page B1 Extra Hannah Woodall and Ryan Tidwell are excited to announce their upcoming marriage on July 21, 2012, at Samson First United Methodist Church with a reception to follow at the Samson Municipal Complex. both in Samson, Ala. Hannah is the daughter of Eric and Amber Stromenger. She is a 2008 graduate of Ponce de Leon High School and a 2012 graduate of Northwest Florida State College, where she earned her Bachelor of Science degree in education. Ryan is the son of Shelia and Alan Ethridge and Revion Tidwell. He is a 2008 graduate of Geneva High School and a recent graduate of Enterprise State Community College, where he earned an Associate of Arts degree. Ryan is a sales representative with Allstate Beverage. Invitations are not being sent out. but all family and friends are invited to share as we celebrate this joyous occasion together. Morris and Hynes to wedThe families of Beverly Morris and Geoff Hynes are pleased to announce their upcoming marriage. Beverly is a 2009 graduate of Rutherford High School and is enrolled in the Dental Assisting Program at Gulf Coast State College. Geoff is a 2002 graduate of Chipley High School, completed the Aviation Technology program at Enterprise-Ozark Community College in 2005 and is employed with the Florida Department of Transportation. The couple will exchange vows at 3 p.m. July 28, 2012, at Shiloh Baptist Church. A reception will follow. Benton celebrates 4th birthdayRiley Benton of Bonifay celebrated his 4th birthday on July 10. Riley is the son of Holly Benton and the grandson of James and Patricia Benton. Riley celebrated with a Diego party on July 14 at home with friends and family.Adysen Hardy to celebrate 2nd birthdayAdysen Kyle Hardy will be 2 on July 13. She is the daughter of Joe and Ashley Hardy Jr. of Bonifay and has a big brother named Daiden. She is the granddaughter of Joe and Dianne Hardy Sr. and Eddie and Shelia Paul, all of Bonifay. She will be celebrating her birthday with a ipop theme party.CECILIA SPEARS | ExtraHolmes County High School graduate Courtney Reeves received a $1,000 scholarship from the Esther Lodge No. 144 Free and Accepted Masons in Bonifay on July 1. She plans on going into the eld of forensic science. On hand for the presentation were her mother, Barbara Reeves; father, Neal Reeves; Rick Peters, Worshipful Master of Esther Lodge; and Robert Curry. past master of Estar Lodge and chairman of the scholarship committee. Happy BIRTHDAY Weddings & ENGAGEMENTSWoodall, Tidwell to wed REEVES EARNS MASONS SCHOLARSHIP

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Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 547-2244 OWENSCHIROPRACTIC CLINIC ACUPUNCTURE ExtraWednesday, July 11 2012Hunter Crews of Bonifay, presents a check for $3,275 to the Center of Autism and Related Disabilities at Florida State University. The money was raised at a Autism Walk that was held in honor of Hunters 16th Birthday. Hunter has also attended a STEM Cam. Hunter would like to thank everyone for their support. There has been a surge in reported cases of Pigeon Fever in Texas during the past year. With summer and y season in full swing, now is the perfect time for horse owners to become aware and educated about Pigeon Fever. There is no vaccine for the disease, so prevention and recognition of its symptoms are of the utmost importance. The disease is named after the symptomatic intramuscular abscesses and swelling of the chest and pectoral regions of infected horses, causing a pigeon like appearance. The infection is conrmed with a bacterial culture in reported cases. Pigeon Fever, also known as Dryland Distemper, is common in drier regions like the western United States. The bacterium that causes Pigeon Fever, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, lives and multiplies in dry soil and manure. While Pigeon Fever is not new to Texas, the past year has seen a rapid increase in reported cases, most likely as a result of the severe drought. Dr. Keith Chafn, professor at the CVM, commented on the disease and the increase in incidence. We know we see about three or four cases a day in the clinic, Chafn said. And many more veterinarians are reporting cases across the state. Horses contract the disease through an open wound or y bite, with bacteria entering through these abrasions or wounds. Chafn recommends a good y control program for your horses (sprays, sheets and repellents), basic sanitation, and recognizing the symptoms quickly for prompt treatment. While most of the cases present with external swelling, some cases can result in internal abscesses that could develop pneumonia, colic, weight loss, fever, lethargy, blood in the urine, and other systemic symptoms. Most cases of Pigeon Fever involve external abscesses in the pectoral region and under the belly, back to the mammary or sheath area, Chafn said. About less than ten per cent of cases reported involve internal abscesses, which are most common in the abdomen or thorax. The internal cases are the most dangerous, some can be fatal. Treating external Pigeon Fever typically consists of surgically opening the abscesses to allow drainage. Timing and ultrasound are so critical to managing this disease, Chafn said. Ultrasound allows the veterinarian to determine if the swelling has reached mature abscess stage. Also, ultrasound allows the veterinarian to see what critical structures are nearby, which helps prevent complications. I dont know how you would ever treat this disease without ultrasonographic imaging. Because a recently drained abscess is potentially contagious it is important to lavage the abscess cavity with antiseptic solutions and I often prefer to place antimicrobials locally into the abscess cavity. Also, it is important to completely disinfect any of the pus that drains from the abscesses. This will help minimize spread of the disease, via ies, to other horses. Once the abscesses have been drained, treated, and healed, the horses are generally no longer contagious. If you recognize any of the symptoms of Pigeon Fever, you should contact your veterinarian immediately to begin treatment. ABOUT PET TALK Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at vetmed.tamu. edu/pet-talk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to cvmtoday@cvm.tamu.edu. Descendants of Ed and Sarah (Register) Nelson will hold their annual reunion July 14 at Baileys Surf and Turf on U.S. Highway 90 east in Chipley, beginning at 11 a.m. Ed and Sarah Nelson lived on a homestead about two miles from Oakie Ridge Baptist Church on what is today called Gilbert Mill Road, south of Chipley. Ed was a Baptist preacher and farmer. He and Sarah were two of the 12 original members of Oakie Ridge Church and were the parents of 10 children, some of whom were already gone from home when the youngest was born. That explains why, although they were a close-knit family, they were never all together at one time until they were advanced in years and held a reunion in 1947; a picture of all ten made by Herbert Heisner on that occasion became instantly treasured by family members, especially since one sister, Lavonia, was involved in an auto accident en route home and died a few days later. Ed Nelson was descended from Jens Nissen of Hadersley, Denmark, who landed on American shores at Port St. Joe in 1829. His name was Americanized to John Nelson as he found work at a salt works somewhere along the coast and learned the language. He migrated westward and bought land in 1838 near Vernon, was married, and later helped organize a church called the Holmes Valley Baptist Church, later renamed Ebenezer Baptist Church, sometime about 1846. Many other descendants of John Nelson live in this area and all are invited to attend the reunion. CHIPLEY The Chipley Kiwanis Club met for its weekly luncheon at Pattillos Restaurant at the Washington-Holmes County Technical Center on June 19. Lunch was provided by the staff of the WashingtonHolmes County Technical Center. The Kiwanis club recruited volunteers from the membership to slice 100 watermelons for attendees at the Watermelon Festival. These watermelons were purchased by the watermelon festival committee from local growers to distribute free as slices to the general public. Fred Kelley, of Pilots for Christ, was the guest speaker. He informed the Kiwanis Club about Pilots for Christ, which is an organization of commercial pilots who donate their aircraft and time to y individuals needing critical transport. The individual pilots donate all of their aircraft use and time, but get reimbursed for gas by the organization. Many individuals are not able to y on commercial aircraft due to their medical conditions, such as a baby in transport for cancer treatment. Therefore individuals receive this service based on critical, not nancial need. Pilots for Christ has own over 998 successful missions. To contact Pilots for Christ, Inc. call 251-3621746 or email fredkelleyministries@yahoo.com The Kiwanis club meets Tuesdays at Pattillos restaurant in the middle of the WHTC campus at noon. For an invitation, contact any Kiwanian or David Solger, Membership Chairperson at 638-1276. For more information about the Kiwanis Club of Chipley, visit www.ChipleyKiwanis.com. piPIGeEON FeEVeER iIN TeEXAS Crews presents check to CARDFred Kelley of Pilots for Christ explains the organizations mission to the Chipley Kiwanis Club.Kiwanis Club hear of Pilots For ChristHanna Elaine Duke, 6, daughter of Scott and Chastity Duke, was crowned Little Miss Firecracker 2012 and Miss Photogenic on June 2 in Vernon. Hanna received a medallion, trophy, banner, and crown, and was super excited to win this pageant for the second year in a row. Hanna was the 2011 Future Little Miss Firecracker and Miss Photogenic winner. Hanna loves pageants, and currently holds titles as Little Miss Western Star and Western Star Supreme, Little Miss Pumpkin Cutie, Little Miss Strawberry, Little Miss Springtime, Petite Miss Washington County, and Miss Spirit of Washington County. Hannas other hobbies include teeball and swimming. This summer Hanna plans to begin quilting and piano lessons. Hannas grandparents are Danny and Jan Duke of Caryville, and Marvin and late Judy Reno of Wausau. NelNELSON ReREUNiION Duke wins Little Miss Firecracker Crossword PUZZleLESOSOLUTUTIONON ONON PAG AGE B5

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FAITH BSectionwww.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comWednesday, July 11, 2012 Page B4Lakeview United Methodist Church to Host Belinda ChittyVERNON Lakeview United Methodist Church will host a sing at 6:30 p.m. Friday, July 13, featuring Belinda Chitty. The church is located at 1969 Lakeview Dr., just off Pate Pond Road. For more information call 535-2380.New Home Baptist Church to Hold HomecomingGRACEVILLE Pastor Dan Fender and the congregation of New Home Baptist Church invites everyone to the 100th Homecoming Celebration on Sunday, July 15. Services will begin at 10 a.m. with music and singing. Former pastor Johnny Jones will bring the homecoming message, followed by dinner in the fellowship hall. New Home is located off of Piano Road, north of TriCounty Road in Jackson County. Oak Grove Baptist Church to Hold VBSPONCE de LEON Oak Grove Baptist Church will hold vacation Bible school from 6-8:30 p.m. on July 16-20 at the Oak Grove Baptist Church. Ages three and older are invited to come. The church is located three miles east of Ponce de Leon.Izagora Methodist Church to hold FundraiserEAST PITTMAN Izagora Methodist Church will be holding a fundraiser from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on July 21 at the East Pittman Fire Department. They will be selling BBQ plates for a $6 donation. The plates will be dine in or carry out. There will also be a homemade cake auction. All politicians are welcome. Entertainment will be by The Gospel Tones of Marianna. All proceeds will go to the church building fund. For more information, call 956-2772.Caryville Baptist Church to Hold VBSCARYVILLE Caryville Baptist Church will be holding vacation Bible school from 5-8 p.m. on July 22-27. Come and bring your friends. There will also be an adult class. Refreshments will be served nightly.Gods Power Art Day CampCHIPLEY The Chipley First Presbyterian Church is proud to announce Gods Power an Art Day Camp Bible School 2012. The Day Camp will run from 9:30-11:30 a.m. on Aug. 6-10. Enrollment is limited to 20 students in grades 3-8. Students must pre-register on or before July 15. Registration forms are available in the church of ce and at chipley1stpres.org. For more information or questions, email the Art Camp director at wvanl@ bellsouth.net. Gap Pond Free Will Baptist Church Gospel SingSUNNY HILLS Gap Pond Free Will Baptist Church will be holding an Open Mic Gospel Sing at 6 p.m. July 28. A potluck dinner will follow in the fellowship hall. The church is located at 1980 Gap Blvd., in Sunny Hills. For more information, call Sister Doris Burnsed at 265-3080.Saint Mary A.M.E Church to Hold HomecomingCARYVILLE Saint Mary A.M.E Church will be hold homecoming services at 11 a.m. on Aug. 4. The Rev. Jerome Goodman, pastor at New Bethel A.M.E. Church in Argyle will be our guest speaker. For more information, call Vickie Broxton at 373-7112.New Life Fellowship Assembly of God Womens ConferenceCHIPLEY New Life Fellowship Assembly of God presents Daughters of Destiny: A Womens Conference. There will be four sessions: the rst session will be held at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 23, the second session at 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 24, the third session at 9 a.m. and the fourth session at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 25. The guest speaker will be Diane Coleman and also speaking will conference host Sherri Evans. Conference worship leader is Tiffane Raulerson. Early bird registration is $30. Registration at the conference is $40. Contact church of ce to inquire about area hotel discounts for the conference. The church is located at 695 5th St. in Chipley. For more information, call the church of ce at 638-1134, Monday through Thursday 8 a.m.-1 p.m.by the Rev. James L. SnyderSometimes watching the news on television gets rather disparaging. Now that we have 24/7 news, not only can we see the news any time we want to, but we can see it over and over and over again. It is particularly disheartening when there is a slow news day. I think all of us can remember O.J. Simpsons mad race down a Los Angeles highway. I can remember the good old days when Uncle Walter brought us up to speed on the days news inside of a 30minute program. Oh, for those good old days. Never has an American generation been exposed to so much and knows so little for so short a time. This all came to me recently when the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I were watching the news after our evening repast. I think it was the 9,999 time this particular news story had been played. Of course, we do not watch television that often, and so we may only have seen a very short portion. The short portion that we saw was just about enough and my wife said so. It was the news story, if you remember, of the bus lady who was bullied by children. I think those children, my wife said and then paused while she grit her teeth violently, need a good old-fashioned spanking. And with that, she crossed her arms and set her face in a de ant manner. Luckily, I was not one of those children or I would have received the intentions of her mind at that point. Her comment got me to thinking. There was a time, back in the day, when spankings were rather normal. Someone once said that if you saw a young boy on the street you should stop what youre doing and give him a good spanking because he was either coming from trouble or headed for trouble. Raising children then was a community affair. I am not sure that ever took place, but it does have an authentic ring to it. I semi-fondly remember when I was a youngster I had the heebie-jeebies whaled out of me by my father on a regular basis. And I can testify that I have not missed those heebie-jeebies. My life is better for not having them. Watching the video about the kids bullying that bus lady, I could not help but think that they were a rather spoiled bunch of little brats, pardon my French. I think I would have taken it one step further than my wife. Not only do those youngsters need a good old-fashioned spanking, but I think their parents do as well. Kids today are only a mirror of what they see and hear at home. When I was young, the only spoiled brats around were the children of the rich folk. They could afford to be spoiled brats because their parents with their money bought their way into society. The only thing those kids ever earned was a bad reputation and disdain from the rest of us. The rest of us, having gone through the spanking rituals, could not afford to be spoiled brats. Good parents made sure of that. I think of what my father used to say: Son, Im going to take this Board of Education and apply it to the seat of your learning. I can testify that he was very enthusiastic about his job. With all that education, I have had multiple degrees on my posterior. Even to this day, every time I sit down I am reminded of that education. This Board of Education that my father was superintendent of always hung by the door. Being the religious person that my father was, he had printed on this Board of Education the phrase from a favorite hymn, I Need Thee Every Hour. It was a motto he lived up to all the years of my boyhood. I often prayed my father would get weary of exercising that Board, but I must confess that my naughtiness wearied long before he did. Looking back, I am grateful. I will not go as far as to say that I am a good person, only that I am not a spoiled brat. I have learned through the years, thanks to the energy of my father, to extend courtesy to everybody around me and be respectful. Respecting other people is not something that comes naturally. Everybody needs to be taught that everybody deserves respect. Some people have earned more respect than others, I grant you. However, nobody deserves deliberate disrespect like those kids gave that bus lady. With all the studies are being done through our governmental grant programs, I wonder why nobody has ever, at least to my knowledge, done a study on the importance of discipline in the home. It is at this point I must agree most heartily with the scriptural injunction on this subject. Solomon, the wisest man in the world, had much to say about disciplining children. And if anybody should know about disciplining children, it was Solomon. Foolishness is bound in the heart of a child; but the rod of correction shall drive it far from him (Proverbs 22:15 KJV). He that spareth his rod hateth his son: but he that loveth him chasteneth him betimes (Proverbs 13:24 KJV). Disciplining children to ensure they grow up to be proper adults demands a whole lot of energy especially from parents. Love sometimes carries a large stick. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries.com Faith BRIEFSWhatever happened to old-fashioned spankings? Special To The NewsIts that time of year when homeowners need to remember that con-artists are in our area looking for an easy way to make fast money through home improvement scams. Unfortunately, home repairs can often be daunting to many homeowners, making them vulnerable to scammers. To add to the problem, the fraudster has often left the area before the unsuspecting victim realized they have been left with an empty wallet and unfinished work. Home improvement scams of all typed have been around for years and summer time is the perfect season for a sales pitch that goes something like this, We are in your area today providing free inspection of. Unfortunately, consumers can fill in the blank as fraudsters will provide so-called free inspections on air conditioners, duct cleaning, roof repairs and just about anything that may need fixing before a hurricane comes our way. The Washington County Sheriffs Office Crime Prevention Unit encourages you to be on the look out for traveling con-artists who: Peddle roofing, paving and other repair work door to door Use high pressure sales tactics such as today only or free inspection Say they have material left over from a previous job Quote too good to be true prices, which are well below typical bargain prices Ask for payment upfront to by materials or request that the full amount be paid before work is done Drive vehicles with no company name and out of state plates Do your homework before you begin a home improvement project or repair: Find a reputable contractor referrals from friend, neighbors and co-workers are a great place to start Ask questions such as business license information, insurance, etc., or better yet, check for yourself at www. myfloridalicense.com Write down the vehicle make, model and license plate number Insist on a written contract detailing the work to be done Get a reliability report from the Better Business Bureau at www. bbb.com If you have any questions regarding these home improvement safety and security tips or if you would like to report a fraud or scam, please contact the Washington County Sheriffs Office Fraud Line at 638-8477. To arrange to have someone come out to your community to talk about this or another safety or security topic please contact the Washington County Sheriffs Office, Community Relations Section at 638-6115.Repair knowledge before home work = A+ But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Good News Bible Acts 1:8Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.First Baptist Churchcome as you areMike Orr, Pastor1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.This Message Courtesy ofGive Expecting Nothing in ReturnThe saying Beware of Greeks bearing gifts is an old piece of wisdom which advises us to not trust our enemies, after the story in the Iliad of the Trojan horse, a gift that ultimately destroyed the city of Troy and its inhabitants. But there was also another reason to beware of Greeks bearing gifts, and that was that they always expected something in return, of comparable value. Gift-giving in ancient cultures was meant to be reciprocated and this carries over to modern times. But, a true gift should be something freely given without any expectation of return. If there is an expectation of a comparable return then we are really bartering rather than giving. So, we should give with a spirit of genuine charity, not expecting anything in return. Test your ability to give in this spirit by giving anonymously, so that the recipient wont know who it came from. This isnt always practical, but can sometimes be done by sending someone an anonymous gift through the mail or by arranging for an intermediary to give the gift for you, perhaps even allowing the intermediary to take credit for the gift. Wanting to be thanked for a gift is all about our ego, and while it is only natural to desire thanks, it is better to give expecting nothing in return.BROWN FUNERAL HOME1068 Main Street, Chipley638-4010Hwy. 77 S, Chipley 638-4097 Hwy. 79 S., Bonifay 547-9688Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser1364 N. Railroad, Chipley 638-0212 112 E. Virginia, Bonifay 547-9414Stephen B. Register, CPA1552 Brickyard Road Chipley, FL 638-4251So when you give to the needy, do not announce it with trumpets, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and on the streets, to be honored by others. . But when you give to the needy, do not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing, so that your giving may be in secret. Matthew 6:2-4

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Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 ExtraWednesday, July 11, 2012Ricky Vickers, 52, of Noma passed away Tuesday, June 26, at his residence following a sudden illness. Ricky was born in Pensacola on March 31, 1960. A 1978 graduate of Poplar Springs High School, Ricky previously worked many years with Chipley Advanced Auto Care and then NAPA. He was currently working with Firestone in Dothan. Ricky was a beloved dad to his two girls. He was loving called Pawpaw by his grandchildren. Ricky was hardworking, excellent mechanic and loved spending time with his family and friends. He was preceded in death by his father, Milton Vickers; mother, Virginia Dozier Vickers Williams and stepfather, William S. Bill Williams. Survived by his two daughters, Casie Sharpe, Hope Mills, N.C., and Stacie Ryals, Bonifay; brother, Milton Howard Vickers; two sisters, Vicki Mosser and husband Randy, Bonifay, and Tami Kirkland and husband James, Graceville; nine grandchildren and several aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Monday, July 2 at Noma Baptist Church with the Rev. Jonathan Shepard of ciating. Burial followed in Noma Cemetery with James and Lipford Funeral Home in Graceville directing. Family received friends at the funeral home Sunday from 6-8 p.m. Expressions of sympathy can be made at www.jamesandlipford. com.Ricky VickersOmer Clayton Bell passed peacefully the morning of June 30 at Twin Cities Hospital surrounded by family and friends. He was born April 18, 1922, in Octavia, Okla. Omer had a successful career as a Lt. Commander in the United States Navy and retired July 1, 1970, after serving 29 years. He was a veteran of World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. He was one of few people to actually witness the mushroom cloud from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima. Omer excelled as a pilot and went on to y for Petroleum Helicopters (PHI) Inc., ARAMCO oil in Saudi Arabia and had his own crop-dusting business with his twin brother, Odie Bell. After WWII, the brothers followed this successful business with a ight instruction school and charter ight operation in Pensacola. Omer was a passionate man who had many adventures and interests. He never lost his love for ying and all things farm and ranch related. Omer was a very positive person who loved to laugh, reminisce and spend time with family and friends. He will be well missed and fondly remembered by all those blessed to have known him. He was predeceased by his father, Edgar Houston Bell; mother, Willie Mathus Bell; ve brothers, one sister and his son, Omer Clayton Bell Jr. He is survived by his twin brother, Odie Gordon Bell; daughters, Amanda Bell, Melinda Bell Hagan, Donna Battin, Vickie Henline and Sherry Robinson; grandchildren, Houston Wright, Austin Battin, Shannon Robinson, Cole Bell, Isabelle Hagan, Ava Hagan and two great-grandchildren. Graveside Services were held at 11 a.m., Friday, July 6, at Barrancas National Cemetery in Pensacola, with full military honors with the Rev. Lonnie Wright of ciating. For those unable to attend the family has requested that you send condolences to Amanda Bell at 920 Ten Lake Drive; DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to First Christian Church, 4342 US Highway 90 West, DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435. Memorialization was by cremation. You may go online to view obituaries, offer condolences and sign guest book at www.claryglenn.com. Clary-Glenn Funeral Home is entrusted with the arrangements. The family wishes to thank the professional staff and caregivers at the Twin Cities Hospital for the wonderful and compassionate care Omer received during his illness.Omer C. Bell OMER C. BELLMrs. Bernice Louise Thompson Huggins of Westville, Fla., passed away Wednesday, July 4. She was 81. Mrs. Huggins was born Jan. 29, 1931, to the late James Jesse and Cleo Miller Thompson. She was a very loving mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. She attended Poplar Head United Methodist Church. In addition to her parents; her husband, John A. Bill Huggins; a brother, Alvin Thompson; a sister, Carole T. Burch; a granddaughter, Felicia Braswell, as well as a daughter, Judy Caron Huggins, all preceded her in death. Survivors include one son, Tony Huggins (Wanda); two grandchildren, Alan Huggins and Melaney H. Yates (Freddie); two great-grandchildren, Joseph Alan Huggins and Brittany Marie Hayes, all of Westville, and other extended family and friends. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m., Friday, July 6, in the chapel of Sorrells Funeral Home in Geneva with the Rev. Jim Mashburn officiating. Burial followed in the Poplar Head United Methodist Church Cemetery with Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva directing. The family received friends at the funeral home Thursday, July 5, from 6-8 p.m. The family would like to say a special thank you to Jimmy King and Adrianna Taylor and the entire staff of Covenant Hospice of Marianna. Sorrells Funeral Home of Geneva, 334-6849999, was in charge of arrangements. Express your condolences in our guest book at www. sorrellsfuneralhomes. com.Bernice L. HugginsInfant Shane Ray Andrus, 7 months old, died July 3. Funeral services were held July 8 at the Bonifay Seventh Day Adventist Church. Burial was at the Vernon City Cemetery.Shane R. AndrusMr. John Henry Powell, age 54, of Esto, passed away July 4. He was born April 22, 1958, in Bonifay. He was preceded in death by his father, Lester Junior Powell. Mr. Powell is survived by his wife, Cecilia Melinda Powell of Esto; his mother, Evelyn Powell of Hartford, Ala.; two sons, Travis Powell of Bonifay and John Henry Powell Jr. of Geneva, Ala.; two daughters, Erin Powell of Hartford, Ala., and Chrystal Phillips Foster of Melbourne; a step-daughter, Deanna Edwards and husband Parker of Dothan, Ala.; two brothers, Junior Earl Powell of Hartford, Ala., and Danny Powell and wife Jennifer of Esto; two sisters, Linda Gail Powell of Hartford, Ala., and Linda Louise Granger and husband Kye of Hartford, Ala.; five grandchildren, Ariana Foster, Sean Foster, Riley Powell, Alexandera Edwards and Alexis Powell. A memorial service was held at 3 p.m., Saturday, July 7, 2012, at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Mitch Johnson officiating. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Family received friends prior to service from 1:30-3 p.m.John H. Powell ObituariesLibrary hoursWausau Library Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County Library (Bonifay) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed Washington County Library (Chipley) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Vernon Library Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills Library Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedMONDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 6386217. Donations accepted. 6 p.m.: Writers Group meets the rst Monday each month (unless a holiday) at 6:00 at the Chipley library. 6-7:30 p.m.: Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program (SADVP) hosts a domestic violence support group at the SADVP Rural Outreach of ce, 1461 S. Railroad Ave., Apartment 1, in Chipley. Call Emma or Jess at 415-5999.TUESDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m. : Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 6386217. Donations accepted. Noon: Chipley Kiwanis Club meeting. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 5 p.m.: BINGO at St. Joseph Catholic Church games start at 6:25 p.m. Call Peg Russ at 638-451 6 p.m.: Holmes County Commission meets second Tuesdays. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AWEDNESDAY10 a.m. to noon: Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. : The Vernon Historical Society Museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Meetings are fourth Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 6386217. Donations accepted. 1 p.m.: Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in Chipley. 7 p.m.: Depression and Bipolar Support Group meets at First Baptist Church educational annex building in Bonifay. Call 547-4397.THURSDAY7:30 a.m.: Washington County Chamber of Commerce breakfast every third Thursday 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.: Amazing Grace Church USDA Food Distribution every third Thursday. (Holmes County Residents Only) 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Money Sense at Goodwill Career Training Center; call 638-0093; every third Thursday 10 a.m. to noon : Holmes Council on Aging provides hot meals and socialization. 10:30 a.m.: Chipley Library preschool story time. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 6386217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m.: Care Givers Support group meets third Thursdays at the First Presbyterian Church at 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Noon: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at New Life Assembly Fellowship Hall, Chipley. 6 p.m.: TOPS meets at 7 p.m. with weigh in at 6 p.m. at Mt. Olive Baptist Church 6 p.m.: The Holmes County Historical Society meets rst Thursdays at 6 p.m. The public is invited to attend. 6:30 p.m.: T.O.P.S. Mt. Olive Baptist Church on State Road 79 North. 7 p.m.: Narcotics Anonymous meeting, Blessed Trinity Catholic Church on County Road 177AFRIDAY10 a.m. to noon: Homes Council on Aging provides bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socialization. 11 a.m.: Washington Council on Aging (Chipley) senior lunches; for reservations, call 6386217. Donations accepted. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: On third Fridays, Washington County Council on Aging (Chipley) will have a plate lunch available to anyone as a fundraiser for our local senior citizens. Plates are $6. Must make reservation at 638-6216 or 638-6217. 3:30 p.m.: Bead Class every second Friday at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery call 703-0347 6-8 p.m.: Mariannas Gathering Place Foundation has a get-together for 50+ senior singles, widowed or divorced on last Fridays at Winn Dixie in Marianna. Come join the fun for games, prizes and snacks while you get your shopping done. For more information, call 526-4561. 8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting at Chipley Presbyterian Church.SUNDAY8 p.m.: Alcoholics Anonymous meeting in the board room at Graceville-Campbellton Hospital in Graceville. Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences.Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section ofwww.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com, you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership withLegacy.com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212 COMMUNITY CALENDAR Crossword SOLUTION

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B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County NewsLiteracy group summer reading campCHIPLEY The Literacy Volunteers of Washington County will offer a Summer Reading Program organized by the Washington County Public Library from 10 a.m. to noon Thursday, July 19, July 26 and Aug. 2. The program will be at the Country Oaks Learning Center, at 268 Quail Hollow Blvd. in Chipley. This program is for children ages 5-12. Snacks and drinks will be provided. For more information, call 638-1231.Life at the Landings and BeyondDEFUNIAK SPRINGS Grit & Grace Inc. invites everyone to their 2012 production of Life at the Landings.... and Beyond. Show times will be 7 p.m. July 20-21 and 2 p.m. July 22. Seating is limited. Tickets can be reserved by calling 270-7008 or by logging on to www. gritandgrace.org They also can be purchased at the door 30 minutes before curtain call, if still available.Adult Summer Read ProgramCHIPLEY The Washington County Public Library will hold its rst Adult Summer Read Program, Between the Covers, at 6 p.m. July 24. The program will discuss the best romance reads and feature a classic romance movie. The rst 25 to register at the event will receive a goodie bag. Refreshments will be served. If you cant make it to the events, dont worry. Just register and start reading. A drawing will be held at the end of July. You could win a Kindle or a $75 Barnes and Noble gift card. For more information or to pre-register, call Renae at 638-1314 or email requests@wcpl.com.Martin Luther King Jr. planning meetingCHIPLEY There will be a planning meeting for the eighth annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day Parade and Celebration at 1 p.m. July 21 at the TJ Roulhac Enrichment and Activity Center, in the old Roulhac Middle School on Church Ave. For more information. call the Rev. T.J. Smith at 260-2323.MPE to hold Game and Fish ExpoCHIPLEY MPE will have a Game and Fish Expo from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 14, and again on July 28. The expo will be held at the Chipley Walmart to teach kids about safety. For more information, call MPE at 326-9109.Wausau Fun Day and Possum FestivalWAUSAU The Wausau Fun Day and Possum Festival will be Aug. 3-4 at the Dalton Carter Community Center in Wausau. For more information, call 638-1781 or visit www. wausaupossumfestival. com.Wallace Baseball Showcase setDOTHAN, Ala. Dothan will host a Summer Baseball Showcase at 9 a.m. Aug. 18 for 2013, 2014, and 2015 athletes. In attendance will be junior college and Division I college coaches, along with professional scouts. If interested, contact the Wallace baseball ofce at 334-556-2416. Please return your registration form by Aug. 11. The cost of this showcase is $100 per athlete. Please make all checks out to Mackey Sasser. Walk-ups are welcome. It Pays to Read library programCHIPLEY The Washington County Public Library soon will host Dream Big, their 2012 It Pays to Read summer reading program for Washington County students. For the Country Oaks Branch, programs will start at 10:30 a.m. Thursday, July 12, and the Sunny Hills programs will be at 2 p.m. for older students. To have your name entered in the drawing, you must attend Thursday programs. It Pays To Read is open to all Washington County students. For more information, call 638-1314.Free childbirth classes BONIFAY The Holmes County Health Departments Healthy Start program will offer a free childbirth class for any woman who is pregnant. Women are encouraged to bring their partners with them to the class. Three sessions remain in the class, from 5:307:30 p.m. July 12, 19 and 26, at the Holmes County Health Department Annex. The class will teach pregnant women about what happens to a womans body before labor begins, relaxation and breathing, different stages of labor, recognizing true labor verses false labor, massage during labor, different positions for labor, episiotomy, care of newborn/procedures after delivery, breastfeeding and much more. To sign up for the class, or if you have questions, call Healthy Start at 547-8684 ext. 18 or 19 and ask to speak to Glenna Padgett, Valery Lawton or Gabby Sanders.Senior Group toursWASHINGTON/HOLMES COUNTY Senior Group will be going on a tour of Ohio Indiana Amish country and Chicago Razzle Dazzle on Sept. 1-9. The Group will be exploring the Alpine countries of Germany, Austria and Switzerland from Sept. 28 to Oct. 11. The group also will go to the Georgia Mountain Festival Oct. 16-20. The festival will be held in Helen and in Hiawassee, Ga. For more information, call Merita Stanley at 594-9980.Holmes County High School Class of 1953BONIFAY Members of the Holmes County High School Class of 1953 are looking for other members to let them know if they are interested in holding a 60th class reunion. If you are interested, call Joann (Black) Scott at 763-4633, Grace (Whipple) Watson at 623-3058, or Ruth (Andrews) Bellot at 547-3452.Washington County Girls Night OutCHIPLEY The Womens Imaging Services at Northwest Florida Community Hospital proudly present Girls Night Out on Oct. 11. The event will be at the Washington County Ag Center in Chipley. For more information, call Heather Shelby at 415-8119.2nd annual Scarecrow Contest CHIPLEY The second annual Scarecrow Contest, sponsored by the Chipley Garden Club, will be Oct. 13 on the lawn of the Washington County Historical Museum in conjunction with the Washington County Historical Societys Fall Into History Festival, with assistance from the Washington County Arts Council and Tourist Development Council. YOUR COMMUNITY PARTNER FOR QUALITY HEALTHCARE We Treat You Like Familybetter than Northwest Florida Community Hospital Appreciates Its Specialists 1360 Brickyard Road Chipley, Florida850-638-1610www.nfch.org Artur Vardanyan, MDBoard Certied Wound Medicine Treatment of diabetic wounds, pressure sores, radiation burns, surgical wounds, thermal burns, crush injuries, and animal or insect wounds. For appointment, call: 850-415-8300Nayan Bhatt, MD Board Certied Internal Medicine and Nuclear Cardiology Diagnosis and treatment of coronary, peripheral and carotid vascular disease with interest in managing heart failure/debrillators. For appointment, call: 850-415-8111Dinesh Bhatt, MDBoard Certied Internal Medicine Subspecialty Cardiology Diagnosis and treatment of coronary, peripheral and carotid vascular disease with interest in managing heart failure/debrillators. For appointment, call: 850-415-8111H. James Wall, MD Board Certied Otolaryngology Ear, nose and throat illnesses, vertigo, surgery, rhinoplasty, allergy testing, and treatment for vertigo. Hearing tests for children and adults. For appointment, call: 850-415-8185Gabriel Berry, MDBoard Certied General Surgery Full general surgery to include: Hernia, laproscopy, endoscopy, colonoscopy, and gall bladder. For appointment, call: 850-415-8180Aaron Shores, MDBoard Certied Pain Management Disorders of the spine, including pinched nerves, low back and neck pain. Peripheral neuropathy. For appointment, call: 850-638-0505David Taing, MDBoard Certied Family Medicine Subspecialty Sports Medicine Non-surgical orthopedic injuries, casting and splinting, joint and muscle treatment, steroid injections, rotator cu syndrome, carpal tunnel pain, tennis elbow, bursitis, synovitis, and plantar fasciitis. For appointment, call: 850-415-8185Adam Peaden, DPM Board Eligible Foot and Ankle Surgery Diabetic wound care, ankle and foot trauma, FDA approved toenail fungus laser. For appointment, call: 850-638-(FOOT) 3668 FREE Hearing Consultation and Moisture and Wax Removal Most Makes and Models of hearing aids. For a limited time.Benets of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of hearing loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Some restrictions may apply. Not to be combined with other offers or previous purchases. Limited time offer. Call or visit today for Your FREE Hearing Consultation!Moisture & Wax can ruin your hearing aids Beltones NewHPF80NanoBlock TechnologyMOISTURE, HUMIDITY DIRT, EAR WAX, SKIN OIL Special Trade-in offer on Hearing Aids with the HPF80 NanoBlock protective coating NO ONE DOES MORE THAN TO PROTECT YOUR INVESTMENT IN BETTER HEARING HPF80NanoBlock its just the latest breakthrough from a company thats been commited to advancing hearing science for 70 years. www.beltone.comChipley, FL 1611 Main Street Ste. 4(850) 387-4931Marianna, FL 3025 6th Street(850) 387-4931 ExtraWednesday, July 11, 2012 News briefsBRIEFS

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Wednesday, July 11, 2012 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 B B USINESS USINESS G G UIDE UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 18 Years With Friendly and Reliable Service! THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Dentons RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDAWE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS$ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENTMon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 BOOK STORENEW OWNERSNew LOW prices Good yard stu every day. Also low prices. Across from Sims Funeral Home and A+ Pharmacy Mon.-Fri. 10am-3pmService On All Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration & Hoods638-3611Electrical Installation, Services and Repair Electrician on Sta Outside Sales Representative An exciting opportunity now exists to join The News Herald. We are searching for enthusiastic, hard-working, and driven Outside Sales Representatives to join our team! Job Description The News Herald is looking for motivated sales professionals to establish footholds in their local markets by providing products and services to businesses. The Outside Sales Representatives duties may include but are not limited to: Cold call and prospect new territory opportunities. Introduce business owners to programs via presentation, answer detailed questions and maintain that relationship. Requirements Have strong work ethic Experience presenting advertising materials to a variety of businesses Cold calling experience Reliable Transportation Experience handling warm leads and prospecting for new leads. Field Sales, Business to Business Sales (B2B), Inside Sales, Outside Sales, or Outbound Sales experience ( Preferred) We Offer: Room for advancement and career opportunity Dynamic Monthly Residual Compensation Bonus programs Introductory and Ongoing Training Business Materials including phone, laptop and IPad, business cards, sales material and product knowledge information The News Herald offers a competitive bene t package including medical, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave, and six paid holidays per year.Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th Street for an application or send a resume to resumes@ afreedom.com.Freedom Florida is a Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY: 7-5108 PUBLIC NOTICE The Holmes County Board of Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing for the closure and abandonment of the following described portion of what is known as Kelly Lane The NW of the NE Section 36, Township 7 North, Range 17 West. The SW of the SE ; SE of the SW ; SW of SW of Section 25, Township 7 North, Range 17 West, Holmes County, Florida. Said Public Hearing will be held on July 31, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. in the County Commissioners Meeting Room located at 107 E Virginia Ave, Bonifay, FL 32425. The Board at this Hearing is authorized to close, abandon and vacate any interest the county has, if any, the above described road. The Hearing may be continued from time to time as may be necessary. The public is encouraged to attend. Ron Monk, Chairman Holmes County Board of Commissioners. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 4, 11, 2012. 7-5107 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 12-55 PR IN RE: ESTATE OF GRANT SIMMONS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the Estate of Grant Simmons, deceased, File Number 12-55 PR, by the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425; that the Decedents date of death was March 31, 2012; that the total value of the Estate is less than $75,000.00, and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Al Simmons Address 1310 Banfill Avenue, Bonifay, Florida 32425. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the Estate of the Decedent and persons having claims or demands against the Estate of the Decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is July 4, 2012. Attorney for Person Giving Notice: Glenda F. Swearingen Attorney for Al Simmons Florida Bar Number: 306339 PO Box 1009 Marianna, FL 32446 Telephone: (850) 526-4465 Fax: (850) 526-2316 E-Mail: glenda@aginggraciously.com. Person Giving Notice: Al Simmons P.O. Box 152 Bonifay, Florida 32425. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 4, 11, 2012. 7-5109 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No.: 13-63PR IN RE: Estate of LOUVENIA PITTS AUSTIN Deceased PETITION FOR SUMMARY ADMINISTRATION NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of LOUVENIA PITTS AUSTIN, deceased, in the above-numbered case, is pending in the Circuit Court for Holmes County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 N Oklahoma, Bonifay, FL 32425. The names and addresses of the petitioners and/or personal representative and their attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is 07/04/2012. Personal Representative DANIEL I. AUSTIN, Personal Representative c/o Nancy D. OConnor, P.A., PO Box 886, Bonifay, FL 32425 Attorney for Personal Representative: NANCY D. OCONNOR, P.A. Attorney for Petitioner Florida Bar No.: 324231 PO Box 886 Bonifay, FL 32425 850/547-7367 As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 4, 11, 2012. 7-5106 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-174DR Division: Paula Ann Basford Petitioner and Fletcher Lee Basford Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR Dissolution of Marriage TO: Fletcher Lee Basford. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Paula Ann Basford whose address is 3264 Hwy 2, Bonifay, Fl. 32425 on or before July 24, 2012, and file the original with the clerk of this Court at P.O. Box 397, Bonifay, Fl. 32425 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated June 22, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser June 27, July 4, 11, 18, 2012. 7-5111 PUBLIC AUCTION The following vehicle will be sold at public auction at Eastern Diesel & Auto Wrecker Service, Inc. 2005 S. Waukesha, Bonifay, Fl. at 8:00 a.m. on July 25, 2012 for towing and storage: VIN # 1HGEJ1252PL051639 93 Honda Civic. Owner Stephanie Nicole Sanning. 1695 Arrant Rd, Westville, Fl. Lienholder Wayne Carey Auto Sales, P.O. Box 715, Bonifay, Fl. EASTERN DIESEL AND AUTO WRECKER SERVICE, INC. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 11, 2012. 7-5112 PUBLIC AUCTION Howell Mini-Storage at 309 S. Waukesha St Bonifay Fl. 32425 will hold a private or public auction on the contents of these units, for nonpayment according to Fl Statute 83. Tenant has until the 28 July 2012 at 10:00 AM to pay in full. No checks. Items of general household goods storage in buildings listed below. Building 1 unit 10 Eva Mitchell. Building 2 unit 11 Miranda Anderson. Building 3 unit 10 Melisa Edminson. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser July 11, 18, 2012. COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 Publishers Notice SCAM To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. THANK YOU! The family of Hazel Bush would like to express our sincerest thanks for the love and support of family and friends during our time of grief. Thank you again and may God Bless. Text FL16654 to 56654 Adopt: Adoring Married, Creative Professionals, Celebrations, loving Home awaits Miracle 1st baby. Expenses paid *FLBar42311* *1-800-552-0045* Are you pregnant? A happily married young couple seek to adopt. Will be fulltime mom/ devoted dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Adam Sklar RE: C & L (888) 537-5055. FL Bar# 0150789. Goats for sale 1 Billy, 2 Nannies, 4 Kids. Call (850)547-3125. Chipley: 3534 Hwy 162. From Bonifay: Hwy 173 north to Hwy 162 east 1.5 miles on right. From Chipley: Hwy 77 north to Hwy 162 west when you cross county line its 1 mile west on left. LOOK FOR SIGNS. Saturday, July14th. 7:00 a.m. -Have Too Much Stuff YARD SALEWe will have a little bit of everything! From Exercise Equipment, A 32in TV, Portable Dishwasher, Clothes for Women, Men, Girls, Boys, Baby, Household Items, Toys and Tons More. Kids will also be Selling Snacks Refreshments too. Community Yard Sale. Mos Trading Post Every Saturday 5157 Hwy 77 Greenhead. Former location of Papa Jacks BBQ. 850-388-6535 AMMO.410 Low Recoil Snake Loads. Shoot inexpensive 32 Cal Handgun ammo through your Mosin Nagant battle rifle 30-30 .308 or 30-06. Bring back the fun of target shooting. Coming soon 9mm for your 35 Whelen and 45 ACP for the 45/70. Call John @ CBL HandGun Training. 850-260-1342 Fresh from the Farm! Okra & Peas, also we shell peas. Call (850)956-4556. Leave message, may be in the field. Wood mizer LT-40 bend sawmill 18 planer, electric powered. Oliver tractor 115 hp. Treated lumber, 184, 186, 286, 686, 284 on 2x4s, 16 ft. long. For more info call (850)547-0956 or (850)326-4548. AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Caryville Flea Market Produce, knives, honey, westerns, movies, okra $1.00/lb., old tools, new and used stuff. Open Saturdays 8 a.m. Gilbert Catfish Pond Closed Monday and Tuesday 2854 Highview Circle Chipley, Fl 32428 Phone:850-638-8633 Meet singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now (888)744-4426 SAFE -Military File Safe, Good condition, great for keeping all valuables, not just files. $395. 850-832-7191 or 850-785-0693. Wanted: Junk appliances. Lawn-mowers, farm and garden equipment, golf carts, satellites for free. I will pick up. Call (850)-547-0088 WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. Direct Care Staff: Several positions available at Assisted Living Facility in Bonifay, Caryville and Vernon. Duties include; cleaning of residents rooms, assistance with bathes, medications and preparing meals. Pay starts at $8.50 an hour. Must be able to pass level two background screening and have reliable transportation. Call 547-3708 for more information. DRIVERS Class-A CDL Flatbed Drivers Home on the weekends! All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 Education Child Care Worker. Must have 40 hrs of training. Send resume to lcumbaa@yahoo.com or apply in person @ Grace & Glory Christian School. 929 Main St Chipley ATTN: Drivers Great Miles+ Top 5% Pay= Money Security+ Respect= PRICELESS 2 Mos CDL Class A Exp (877) 258-8782. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Schneider National! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job Ready in just 15 days! (888) 368-1964. Drivers -Refrigerated and Dry Van Freight with plenty of miles. Annual Salary $45K to $60K. Flexible hometime. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. (800) 414-9569 www.driveknight.com Drivers 100% Owner Operator Co. Regional & Dedicated Home weekly Class A C.D.L. 1 yr. exp. in last 3 Call (800)695-9643 DriversHIRING Experienced/ Inexperienced Tanker Drivers! Great Benefits and Pay! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: (877) 882-6537 www.oakley transport.com Drivers/ Flatbed Class A. GET HOME WEEKENDS!Southeast Regional, Earn up to 39/mi, 1 year OTR Flatbed experience required. (800) 5725489 X227, Sunbelt Transport, LLC EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE MEDICAL CAREERS begin here-Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-2033179 www. CenturaOnline.com Medical OfficeTrainees Needed! Train online to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Training & Local Job Placement assistance thru SC Training, HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888) 374-7294. OWNER OPERATORS Guaranteed minimum 2,700 miles/week! All miles paid loaded/ empty. Class-A CDL & 1 yr exp. Lease Purchase Program w/ Dowan Payment Assistance Fleet Owners Welcome (866) 2207845 driveforgreat wide.com Painting Inside or outside. Residential or commercial. Satisfaction Guarantee. Local references. 31 yrs experience. Dennis Glenn. 850-596-4143 PRIVATE SITTER SERVICES. Available, experienced CNA. Contact 850-326-6187 Easy Care Lawn Services. Yard services and pressure washing. Call for FREE estimate & affordable rates 850-527-6291 Licensed & Insurances For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 LIttle Hands Learning Center now open in Ponce De Leon Monday-Friday 6 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Only $17.00 per day. Call (850)307-2828. Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, July 11, 2012 COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com(850) 547-9500 B on if a y Fl or ida idi Xtreme BoatsFACTORY DIRECT Bettie's Country RealtyBETTIE L. SLAY, BROKER (Florida & Alabama) 205 E. North Ave., Bonifay, Florida 32425(850) 547-3510 www.bettiescountryrealtyonline.comWE GET RESULTS NATIONAL MLS3 BR 1 BA ON 1 AC OWNER FINANCE REDUCED -$54,900---10 AC FARM 3 BR HOME BARNS PASTURE-$175,000---NICE 2 BR BRICK-$85,900-4+ ACRES 3 BR 2 BA CHIPLEY-$79,900---2.5 ACRES-$19,900---NEWER 3 BR 2 BA CHIPLEY -$137,900---4 BR 1.5 BA BRICK-$89,900---2 ACRES OWNER FINANCE-$19,900---18 ACRES 4 BR 3 BA DWMH-$139,900---2 BR HOME ON 1 ACRE-$42,500---LAKEFRONT HOME ON 18 ACRES-$99,900---3 BR HOME ON 2+AC REDUCED-$74,900--4+ AC OLD HOMESITE-$24,900--41+ ACRES W/ 3 MHS & 4 PONDS-$129,900---2 BR INTOWN-$39,000---9 ACRES WRIGHTS CREEK-$31,900---4 BR 2.5 BA HOME ON 4 ACRES-$95,000-NEWER 3 BR 2 BA HOME ON 1 AC-$105,000---46 AC 4 BR 2 BA MH BARNS FENCED PASTURE-$159,000---2 HOMES ON 13 AC HWY FRONTAGE$159,000---5 ACRES W/HOME, BARN, PASTURE & POND-$85,000 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incld 638-1918 Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio -$350, 2 bdrm/2bth-$475. City utilities included. (850)557-7732 3-4 Bedroom home fully furnished, $950/mo, Bonifay area. Also 2 Bdrm/1 bath Apt. $700/mo, fully furnished, free lawn service. (850)547-2096. FOR RENT 3BD/ 2BA House in the historical district Chipley. $700/mth, $700/depo. (850) 547-4284 or (850)638-0300. Ask to speak with Kim, Monday -Friday For Rent 3BR/2BTH HIllcrest Circle, Vernon. Hud Accepted! 850-388-6535 House for rent on North 2nd Street, Chipley, Fl. 2 Bdrm/1 bath. (850)547-2061. No pets please. Nice clean houses, apartments & mobile homes for rent in Bonifay area. HUD approved. Also, houses for sale. Call Martha (850)547-5085, (850)547-2531. Spacious 3BD/1BA House Country Setting Bonifay. CH/A. Large Lot Also For Sale home at 815 8th St. Chipley 547-2091 or 441-8181 Bonifays Best Mobile Home Community has 2 or 3 bedrooms available ranging from $435-$625/month. Large lots, quiet, clean and on-site maintenance. Only responsible persons should apply. Great Bonifay Schools. No pets. One month deposit. HUD Assistance may be available. Contact Sue: (850)547-1386 or (512)751-2847. 2BR/2BA MH for rent. Water & garbage furnished. $425 plus deposit. Call 547-4232. 527-4911 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. 3BD/2BA Mobile Home. In quiet Chipley park. CH/A, W/D hook up. No Pets. $475/mth plus deposit. 850-763-3320 or 850-774-3034. FOR RENT: Nice 2BR & 3BR MH Corbin RD Near Sapp Community Church. I furnish water, garbage, extermination, change air filter & mow grass once a mth. Deck on front & back, small storage building.For more info, call Lou Corbin @ 638-1911 or cell phone, 326-0044. Sorry No Pets. Panama City CLOSEOUT SALE: Unbeatable Prices, D/W & S/W. Most are Zone III. Kensinger Housing, 3424 E. 15th, St, Call (850) 785-0693.Text FL16550 to 56654 HUNTING425 Acres in Abbeville, AL. Deer and turkey. No dogs. For more info call 334-692-5141 or 334-797-9803 40 Acre Horse Ranch for lease in Chipley, lush pastures, fence/ cross fence, barn and efficiency apt $850 mo. 334-2693 40 Acres in Holmes County Versatile Property w/ Pastures, Pines & Hardwoods. Bldg w/2 Car Garage. Well, Septic & Power Pole, $99,500. Call (850) 547-9801 or (850)527-1166. Email: tigermork@yahoo.com Tex t FL16586 to 56654 $33,500 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. For Sale by Owner 12 plus acres, clear. Off Hwy 231 Steelcity, Fla. (850)614-1120. Reduced Price! Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858. DWMH2009 3 / 2 Big tub, 1 acre, fenced three sides and garage shop, Wausau area $82,500 850-638-4953 Pontiac Bonneville 1997. Leather seats, cruise control, sun roof, 91,000 miles, excellent condition. $3,000 OBO. Call 305-298-7466. Text FL14590 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $6752000 Chevy Impala -4 Door T otal Price $4,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $20002004 Chevy Silverado -X/Cab $9500 Total 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $7752000 Dodge Durango-3 Rows $4500 Total 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9752000 Dodge Ram -4 Door $5200 Total 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $17,000, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99* Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414