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Holmes County times-advertiser
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100549/00163
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Title: Holmes County times-advertiser
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
Place of Publication: Bonifay, FL
Publication Date: 05-16-2012
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Wednesday, MAY 16 2012 Pay Tribute to Those We Remember Memorial Day 2012 Honor th e special people whove touched your life family, friends, Veterans and have passed on. This special Memorial Day tribute publishes on May 23 in the News and the Times and our websites. Contact us at 850-638-0212 or 547-9414 for more details. By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Bonifay will be the rst stop of many as Enterprise Florida hosts a Regional Training Session in Holmes County at the invitation of the Holmes County Development Commission on Wednesday, May 23. Enterprise Florida is hosting regional training sessions to give updates on key programs, economic development processes, marketing initiatives, incentives, international services and more. Attending the training sessions will be Economic Development Ofce members, staff and Enterprise Florida Stakeholder council members from across the region including Holmes County Development Commission, Washington County Chamber of Commerce, Jackson County Development Council, Bay County Economic Development Alliance and Walton County Economic Development Alliance to name a few. Bonifay is the starting point of the Northwest Regions training sessions provided by Enterprise Florida and will continue to Tampa, Jacksonville, Fort Myers, Orlando, Sebring and will complete their training tour in Fort Lauderdale in mid-September. It was an honor for Holmes County to be chosen as the location and rst of theses sessions to be held throughout the state, said Elaine May eld, Administrative Assistant for the Holmes County Development Commission. This will also be Jim Brooks last week as Executive Director of the Holmes ersonnel from JCJ Amusements were busy setting up this years Holmes County Fair Midway attractions on Monday in Bonifay. The Holmes County Fair and Farmers Market begins at 5:30 p.m. today with opening ceremonies. The fair continues nightly until Saturday with gates opening at 5 p.m. CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY From the same public library that brought you a snow day in June, the Holmes County Public Library hopes to out-do themselves this year with a variety of fun and free activities for the kids this summer, including NASA, a space suit and a portable planetarium. Director of the HCPL Susan Harris conrmed that there was more than 48,000 pounds of ice imported and used to create last years Summer Snow Day in Bonifay, which brought in almost 1,000 children. Its all about the children, Harris said. And this year we want to make it even bigger and even better. This years summer program will be held from June 21 through July 19. Kicking it off on June 21 will be a visit and program from NASA, including an actual space suit for a photo opportunity for the children to dress up as an actual astronaut. Following that on June 28 there will be a Discovery Dome Planetarium available. This is a portable planetarium with a variety of shows for the children, ranging from stars to solar systems, Harris said. We want to show that they can dream as big as they want to and its not too late to dream of becoming an astronaut. On July 12 there will be entertainment from The Groove Club Family Entertainment, which includes live singing with fun interactive songs and a funky DJ booth, dances with sing-a-longs and lots of audience participation, comedy, a By CECILIA SPEARS 547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY After months of discussion, research and analysis from multiple Holmes County Agencies the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners voted to put into motion the process of relocating Holmes County 911 Dispatch and Director Clint Erickson out to the new Emergency Operations Center during their regularly scheduled meeting on May 8 with a vote of 3 to 2, with Commissioner Jim King and Chairman Ron Monk voting no. Space became an issue with the 911 Dispatch when a grant gave the department $300,000 worth of new and additional equipment. The new equipment had to be in place and operational by June 2013, but time was of the essence as their current equipments warranty was running out and the new equipment would have to nd a new storage place till space was acquired. The options were narrowed down to two possibilities: expand their current space or move to the new EOC. Bonifay rst stop for regional training 50 www.bonifaynow.com Volume 122, Number 5 For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM Phone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 INDEX Arrests ................................. A3 Opinion ................................ A4 Outdoors .............................. A6 Sports .................................. A7 Extra .................................... B1 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B7 IN BRIEF New Miss Poplar Springs crowned B1 Patriots Party meets Thursday The Northwest Florida Patriots Party will meet at 6 p.m. Thursday at the Around the Corner Grill in Bonifay. Guest speaker will be Elaine Thompson, chairwoman of the Concerned Patriots of Jackson County. The topic will be Agenda 21. The public is invited to attend. Poplar Springs athletic banquet Tuesday The Poplar Springs High School annual athletic banquet will be held at 6 p.m. May 22 at the high school. The public is invited to attend. Health Department offers free Zumba classes Community Zumba classes (Latino dancing) will be offered every Tuesday night until June 26 at the Bonifay Rec. Center. Classes are free and will take place from 6-7 p.m. The instructor is Justin Cox out of Panama City. Zumba is a great workout. No registration is required. Sessions to focus on development, services and more See TRAINING A2 From Staff Reports TALLAHASSEE The Florida Commission on Ethics dismissed a complaint against Bonifay Police Chief Christopher Wells for lack of legal suf ciency, according to a report released on May 9. The complaint was led by Jesse Elijah Rogers of Bonifay and alleged that Wells allowed a Bonifay police of cer to arrest Rogers on criminal charges, including a charge of burglary of what Rogers describes as his own home. Rogers also alleged that the police chief allowed the same of cer to burglarize and tamper with Rogers mailbox, along with mailboxes of his father and a former neighbor, according to the commissions report and order dismissing the complaint. The complaint was dismissed for failing to constitute a legally suf cient complaint, according to the dismissal order. The commissioners reviews for legal sufciency are limited to questions of jurisdiction and determinations as to whether the contents of the complaint are adequate to allege a violation of the Code of Ethics, according to the news release. As no factual investigation precedes the reviews, the commissions conclusions do not reect on the accuracy of the allegations made in these complaints, according to the release. Ethics Commission dismisses complaint against Bonifay chief Holmes County OKs 911 Dispatch move See COMPLAINT A2 See DISPATCH A5 Ready for fun Holmes County Fair starts tonight CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser P Library going big at summer program See LIBRARY A5 Kicking it off will be a visit and program from NASA, including an actual space suit for a photo opportunity for the children to dress up as an actual astronaut.

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Local A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, May 16, 2012 I t s e e m s o b v i o u s i n r e t r o s p e c t b u t t h e r e w a s a t i m e w h e n g e t t i n g e l e c t r i c i t y o u t s i d e o f t h e c i t y l i m i t s w a s n t a given. T oday the spirit of c o m m u n i t y t h a t c o o p s w e r e b u i l t u p o n c o n t i n u e s t o t h r i v e A n d a s m e m b e r s w e c a n a l l l e n d a h a n d b y s a v i n g e n e r g y L e a r n h o w a t w w w w e s t o r i d a c o o p E L E C T R I C C O O P S W E R E C O N S T R U C T E D W I T H L I N E S P O L E S A N D T H E F O O L H A R D Y N O T I O N T H A T W E A L L P R O S P E R B Y H E L P I N G E A C H O T H E R Its just what the doctor ordered. Grasshopper True ZeroTurn mowers are the perfect prescription to cure the aches and pains of mowing. Our humanomic design, foam-padded steering levers and the industrys most comfortable seat are standard features, so operators stay fresh, focused and alert. Test drive a Grasshopper today. Doctors orders. Its just what the doctor ordered. 2008 The Grasshopper Company YOUR NEXT MOWER Visit grasshoppermower.com for more information. Its just what the doctor ordered. www.lanesoutdoor.com 901 Hwy. 277 Chipley, FL (850) 638-4364 0% interest for 48 month nancing available J.D. OWENS CARPET OU T L ET will save you money E V ER YD A Y!!! J.D. OWENS CARPET OU T L ET 2597 S pringcreek R oad, Marianna, FL 3 1/2 Miles E ast of Marianna on Hwy. 90 (850) 526-3619 Textured Plush Carpet 79 99 Super Thick 13 Loose Lay Vinyl 49 FHA Quality Vinyl SF SF SF Engineered Value Grade 3 Oak Plank $ 2 29 SF AREA RUG SALE! Over 200 In Stock B ONIFAY N URS IN G & REH AB CE N TER 306 West Brock Avenue Bonifay, FL 32425 850-547-9289 www.BonifayRehab.com Make the Move 24 Hour Skilled Nursing for Short-term & Longterm Care Inpatient & Outpatient Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy and Speech Therapy Main Dining Area with Fireplace Additional Dining Area as well as Private Dining Area Ice Cream Parlor with Visitor Seating Area Visitor/Patient Lounges Cable TV Enclosed Courtyard Activities Rehabilitation Gym Beauty/Barber Salon Laundry Services Admissions 7 Days a Week Correction Policy It is the Policy of the Washington County News and the Holmes County Times-Advertiser to correct all errors that appear in news stories. If you wish to report an error or clarify a story, call 638-0212 or email news@chipleypaper.com. Due to a press production error, the Personal Property Taxes listings published May 9 in the Times-Advertiser are incorrect. The correct 2011 listings are in todays edition of the Times-Advertiser. County Development Commission before moving into the Executive Director position for the Northwest Florida Business Development Council, d.b.a. Opportunity Florida. Brooks last day as Executive Director of the Holmes County Development Commission is May 25 and his rst day as Executive Director of the Northwest Florida Business Development Council, d.b.a. Opportunity Florida is June 4. I dont look at it as though Im leaving Holmes County but that Im working for Holmes County on another level, said Brook. About Enterprise Florida, Inc. Enterprise Florida Inc. (EFI) is a public-private partnership serving as Floridas primary organization devoted to statewide economic development. EFIs mission is to facilitate job growth for Floridas businesses and citizens leading to a vibrant statewide economy. EFI accomplishes this mission by focusing on a wide range of industry sectors, including clean energy, life sciences, information technology, aviation/aerospace, homeland security/defense, nancial/professional services, manufacturing and beyond. In collaboration with a statewide network of regional and local economic development organizations, EFI helps to improve Floridas business climate, ensuring the states global competitiveness. Enterprise Florida is committed to assisting companies con dentially with their expansion and location plans. We provide site selection services, demographic information, incentive information, trade leads and much more. We also coordinate introductions to our network of economic development partners throughout the state. For more information on Opportunity Florida, www.opportunity orida.com/. TRAINING from page A1 Setting it STRAIGHT The commission took action on 34 complaints during the May 4 meeting, according to Chairman Robert Sniffen. The commission also adopted a formal opinion regarding a county commissioner who had questions about con icts of interest. The opinion nds that a con ict would be created for a county commissioner to be employed by a company providing services to his county or to constitutional of ces of his county. However, a con ict is not created if the company were to provide services to other counties or municipalities located inside or outside his county, provided that the company does not pursue providing services regarding situations where one or more of the other counties/municipalities and his county have combined, contracted or cooperated with each other to provide services. In another opinion, the commission determined that a con ict of interest would be created where a city commissioner, who also sits on the Community Redevelopment Agency, applies for redevelopment incentive grants from the citys redevelopment division. COMPLAINT from page A1

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Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 Wednesday, May 16, 2012 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." www.mulliseye.com Chipley Office We are located directly across the parking lot from the Walmart in Chipley "W E W E LCOM E N EW PATI EN TS, C ALL T ODAY F OR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TM EN T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley Office Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 5-31-12 FREE E Y E EX AM COD E: W C 00 T odd R obinson, M D Board C ertified Eye Physician and C ataract S urgeon L ee M ullis, M D Board C ertified Eye Physician and C ataract S urgeon Special to the Times-Advertiser PONCE de LEON The town of Ponce de Leon approved of a tower lease agreement for wireless equipment facility with the Florida Rural Broadband Alliance In New Business during their regularly scheduled meeting on Thursday, May 3. Town Attorney Lyndia Spears said that she had been in contact with Jim Brooks of the Holmes County Development Commission concerning a tower lease agreement for a wireless equipment facility between the Florida Rural Broadband Alliance and the Town of Ponce de Leon. The Federal Government for government grants requires the agreement. The Northwest Florida Rural Area of Critical Economic Concern wants the Town to agree to lease the towns water tower for broadband communications. Chipley, Vernon and Westville have already agreed to the agreement. If the town signs the agreement and the company uses the Towns water tower, the Town would receive $2,200 each month after 5 years. After discussion, the town agreed tentatively to approve the agreement. In un nished business, Spears explained to the mayor and council that she had received a quitclaim deed from the Holmes County School Boards attorney, Lucas Taylor, for the old Ag shop. Since the School Board does not own the property, the only thing they can rightfully give is a leasehold interest in the building. Taylor stated that the School Board did not realize that they did not own the property until a title search had been completed. Spears said she tried to contact the actual owner, Mary Alfred, about the building but was not able to reach her and that she did not think it was in the best interest of the Town to accept the quitclaim deed. Spears stated that she would continue to try and contact Alfred. On May 7, Spears relayed the message that she had reached Alfreds son via telephone. He said that Alfred is presently in a health care facility and due to her condition and care needs he is unable to donate the property to the town. The State has required him to list the property for sale to reimburse the State for services provided. A letter was sent to Carl Gillman advising him of the legalities involved with the building. In administration, the mayor and council were told that Blue Rhino has vacated the old shirt factory building as of April 30 and Debbie Kolmetz at Panhandle Reality has listed the building for lease for $1,800 per month. Kolmetz asked that the building be spruced up on the outside and inside in the event she shows it. The building does need work, and the Mayor and Council discussed the subject of Daryl Dockery having items in the building. Kolmetz had spoken with Dockery about the items left and he told her that he had an agreement with Blue Rhino that in return for storing the items, he would pay the power bill. The Mayor and Town Council agreed that a letter be sent to Dockery giving him 30 calendar days to remove the items or the items would become the property of the town. April 29 May 5, 2012 Dillon Birge, 20, domestic battery Melissa Kneller Blair, 26, driving under the in uence, fail to stop and remain at a crash involving injury, hold for Geneva County Ala., operating vehicle with no license, grand theft auto Rusty Lee Bryant, 32, out of county warrant, fugitive from justice Lisa Michelle Carroll, 45, uttering a forged instrument Rocky Charles Darley, 52, domestic battery Ronnie Ladale Dearman, 39, violation of probation Teresa Jean Goodwin, 35, out of county warrant Tracy Michelle Green, 44, out of county warrants, fugitive from justice Madeleine Michelle Hall, 40 leaving the scene of an accident, no valid drivers license Rebecca Jean Hess, 39, petit theft, criminal trespass Joseph Ray Howell, 25, violation of probation Charles Jeremy Sasser, 32, violation of probation James Self, 59, driving under the in uence, driving while license suspended or revoked second offence Jennifer Lynn Teska, 35, violation of probation Dwayne Ricardo Wilson, 40, hold for Hillsborough County April 30 May 4, 2012 Marriages Jacob Edward Nelson 6/24/1048 of Darlington and May Madglene Hurley 13/23/1943 of Gaskin Brandon Lee Palmer 8/4/1988 of Caryville and Mary Grace Barnes 11/29/1994 of Bonifay James Dennis McDaniel 1/30/1964 of Enterprise and Quillian Wall Stokes 3/11/1977 of Enterprise Divorces Richard Walsingham and Rhonda S. Walsingham Arrest REPORT Marriages & DIVORCES Ponce de Leon OKs tower lease agreement

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What do you think of a county fair in the spring? In an attempt to rejuvenate the Holmes County Fair which was chartered Oct. 5, 1959, and has been traditionally held in the fall, will be in May this year. May should prove to be a good time for the fair, as that will time it well ahead of the NW Fl Championship Rodeo and football season not to mention fall and winter holidays, Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas. The current board chaired by Joey Fisanick has an exciting list of activities and personalities lined up for Wednesday through Saturday. On the midway which is always popular with the young is CJC Amusements. Events will kick off Wednesday, May 16, at 5:30 p.m. beginning with TV personality Red Holland as Master of Ceremonies. He will be around all evening to Howdy with old friends. Wednesday night is also designated as church night and locals are invited to worship at the fair. In addition, the Holmes County Miss, Jr. Miss, and Little Miss will be on hand to cut the ribbon and welcome fairgoers. Throughout the week, James and Anita Faircloth, local artisans who display their talents at Florida State Fair each year as well as fairs and festivals all over, will be on hand to demonstrate the crafting of whips and corn shuck dolls. James also will demonstrate the skill of whip cracking, from which Floridians get the name of Florida Crackers. The magic of Christopher Thomas, who will appear on Americas Got Talent later this year, will be a feature of May 18. An added attraction this year is the Pioneer Days which will go on throughout the fair. Skills used in earlier days will be demonstrated such as blacksmithing by Mike Murphy. Every evening and all day on Saturday, a Farmers Market will be available for local farmers to sell their fresh produce or other homemade or home grown products. Hopefully, I will be there with some fresh Tison bueberries all day Saturday. Also on Saturday, a chili cook-off will be 3-4 p.m. that day. The North Bay Clan of the Lower Muscogee Native American Dancers will also be featured that day. As you would expect to nd at a county fair, a 4-H fashion show, livestock show, antique tractor show, youth public speaking, photography, baked goods, canned goods, jelly and jam exhibits along with educational and church exhibits will complete the fair. Since this is a major election year, the fair is expected to draw many of the political hopefuls from the area. On Saturday night, following entertainment by Ron French and All Heart Music, a political rally will be held with candidates for ofce giving you reasons you should vote for them. Fair week is a good time to mix and mingle with them and determine your choice for the most qualied to get your vote. When the fair was chartered, Clifton Lyons Sr., a driving force in the chartering, was elected chairman. Other members included Jack Tison, vice-president, C. U. Storey, county agent, treasurer, and Sally Childers, Home Demonstration Agent, secretary. The board of directors was J.Paul Grifth, Leonard Balaban, Ben Ellis, Ruth Cooey and James Powell. Other members of the fair board were Don Treadwell, Catherine Lyon, Annie Lee Williams, W.C. Revell, C.L. Bass, Lois Huggins, Nell Deal, Charity Carroll, Mrs. Bob Johnson, Mrs. Ray Gillis, Frances Majors, Wayne Manning, M.M. Gilman, Hinton McKinnon, Gov E. Webb, Roy Clanton, Remus Franklin, Denice Brown and Sallie Wilcox. Many of the ladies on the board were president of their respective Home Demonstration Club in their community. This years board includes Clint Erickson, fair manager, Misty Erickson, Felicia Fisanick, Donna Melvin, Kim Cullifer, Ross Boman, Kathryn Boman, Harold Smith, Velma Whitaker, Kyle Hudson, David Perry, Debbie Kolmetz and Dawn Barone. See you at the fair! Wednesday, May 16, 2012 The Holmes District School Board will accept sealed bids until May 29, 2012 for L.P. Propane Gas, Grease Trap Pumping, Garbage Disposal, Pest Control and Fire Extinguishers for the 2012-2013 School Year. For more information or to receive a bid packet contact Larry Zorn 547-6674 x 232. Opinion A4 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bareeld: nbareeld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULA TION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com 1-800-645-8688 ADVERTISING 850-547-9414 POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County T imes-A dvertiser P. O Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USP S 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc., 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2012, Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc. Nicole P. Bareeld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.Mayor: Inmate health reports were not falsied intentionally Dear Editor, On July 25-26, 2011, I prepared, dated and signed two incident reports regarding health issues of two inmates. The information I provided in the reports was correct and accurate to the best of my knowledge. These reports were sent to the wardens ofce, where they were processed. When I signed the completed reports, I used the date they were originally created by me. No changes had been made. The reports reected the situation as I reported on July 25-26, 2011. There was no intent on my part to falsify the reports in question. In the course of the investigation, I answered each question posed to me the only way knew, honestly and truthfully. My friends know thats who I am. I cannot account for the interpretation of the answers given. I have been told by the Department of Corrections that this unfortunate situation is behind us and we are moving forward. I am still proudly employed with the Department of Corrections and look forward to returning to work on May 18. I am also looking forward to continuing my service to the City of Chipley, its employees and its citizens. Over the past 24 years, I have strived to do what is best for Chipley and serve the city honesty and integrity. I will continue to do so. Linda Cain Chipley mayorW ar on drugs a necessary ght Dear Editor, I often read the Washington County News. I see its pages plagued with people of all ages that have fell victim to a demon I call drug addiction. These arrests clean up the streets of this ne community and make it a safer place to live. It shows that Washington County has waged was on drugs and will not tolerate them. I cant help but wonder though if this war is one that cant be won. Drug addiction spreads rapidly like a contagious disease. What starts out as fun to these individuals turns into a demon that they can no longer control. The go through life like a run away train with no brakes. Addicts no longer have a choice; an unbelievable craving and desire for their drug of choice control them. Sadly there are only two different destinations for these run away trains (addicts). They either end up in jail (prison) or the graveyard. I speak from experience and am one of the lucky ones. I write this while sitting in a prison cell I would like to see another destination or a third option available to these poor lost souls. I would like to see more treatment centers and detox places that are willing to help. I would like to read stories in this newspaper about groups that are reaching out to help these people that have made mistakes. If there were more places available to help those that are battling addiction maybe there would be less pictures in this paper of drug arrests. Addiction is a disease that does not go away. If we look up these individuals and never offer them any treatment, they will return right back to that runaway lifestyle upon release. More substance abuse treatment is needed in and outside of jails and prisons. The best approach to the war on drugs is treatment. If we show the addicts that they can live a drug free life we are making headway on the war on drugs. Addicts dont necessarily stop their drug use just because they are incarcerated. Drugs run rampant in the prison system, treatment is what is needed. Many want to change and pray for strength but it seems that society has locked us up and forgot about us. We are all created in the image of God even the addicts. Have compassion in your hearts and realize its not the person thats bad but the demon spirit of addiction that controls them, and treatment is the answer no prison. Respectfully, Bobby Ray Rackley Graceville Correctional Facility WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on F acebook or tweet us @ W CN_ H C T Letters TO THE EDITOR The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Freedom Communications. Holmes County fair moves to MayHAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison Recently I saw an article on Yahoo listing the best and worst jobs, and as usual, journalism was listed as one of the worst possible careers. The list was provided by CareerCast.com, and like most things on the Internet, the list should be taken with about a pound of salt. Newspaper reporter was No. 5 on the worst job list. Journalism is the career I actually went to college to learn, and journalism as been on the worst jobs list pretty much every year since I was in college in the early 80s. This year it was sandwiched in between oil rig workers (No. 4) and waiters and waitresses (No. 6). The worst list was topped by lumberjacks, and included dairy farmers at No. 2, enlisted military at No. 3, and finished up with meter readers (7), dishwashers (8), butchers (9) and broadcasters (10). Journalism is one of those jobs like fireman, policeman or model railroad shop owner its not a career that anyone with half a brain goes into expecting to get rich. I always enjoyed writing. One of my heroes of journalism was my professor and mentor, Dr. Joel Gambill, longtime chairman of the journalism department at Arkansas State University. I first met Dr. Gambill the summer between my junior and senior year in high school, which would have been 1976, when I attended a journalism camp at ASU. When I walked into his office in 1982 after finishing high school and serving in the Navy for four years, he called me by first name and asked where Id been apparently hed been expecting me sooner. Thirty years later, Im still a journalist. Dr. Gambill spent 40 years at ASU, and 36 of those years he was chairman of the department. He retired in April of 2010, but he has students, like me, spread across the country carrying on, I hope, in a manner of which hed approve. My idea has always been to treat people the way youd like to be treated, Dr. Gambill said. Not a bad motto to live by. I think the importance of a job isnt based on how much it pays, or what benefits you get, but by how what you do helps others. Journalism may not be the best job, but it has its moments especially when you can provide a service to the community. RANDAL SEYLER Editor Worst job a matter of perspective

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The City of Bonifay currently is allowing them to use one of their buildings rent-free and agreed to allow 911 Dispatch to expand as long as Dispatch assumed all of the expenses. Several issues arose from remaining in their current building, which included air conditioning as well as time, money and labor to expand. Another issue was that the rst instillation of the new equipment was free, but if they had to move the equipment in the next ve years it would cost them $20,000 to move. We want to make sure that wherever this equipment goes that there is where it will stay for at least ve years, said Erickson. Originally the plan was that 911 Dispatch would be located with the other emergency management services at the new EOC building, however at the time they werent allowed to occupy the same space due to possible interference. This year that restriction has been lifted as long as the two entities werent causing an interference with one another in any way. The next obstacle to arise was that if Dispatch was to move out to the EOC they would have to establish a new T1 line, which is required by law to have for emergency services. Currently the T1 line they are using is shared by the Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce and to create a new T1 line would create an additional $681 expense to the HCSO, which with the sheriffs of ce current budget restraints would be next to impossible. Even with the budget restraints Sheriff Tim Brown said he was more then willing to help 911 Dispatch in any way possible. Right now Im in a neutral zone, said Brown. Im ne with any decision you make, whether its to move or to stay. Erickson said that he had done some research and found that as of right now the State could not help pay for a new T1 lines monthly expenses, but that they could apply in a year to be nanced in next years budget. Erickson said that the plus to moving out to the EOC was that they would have more then enough room, which included the ability to expand a little in the future if need be. It would cost $13,000 to move to the new location, said Erickson, but they had enough in the budget to pay for $8,000 of the cost. King then made a motion that Dispatch is moved the EOC but Erickson remain behind in another of ce to be closer to the people. It would be an extra mile for people to have to go just to put in their address, said King. Im just looking out for the citizens. I dont want to create any extra headaches for them. The vote failed with a vote of 2 to 3, with Commissioners Kenneth Williams and Monty Merchant and Chairman Monk voting no. Williams then motioned that the BOCC write a formal letter to the state requesting to move the 911 Dispatch to the EOC. The vote was passed with a vote of 3 to 2, with King and Monk voting no. BOCC approved of declaring the week of May 6 through 12 National Arson Awareness Week, presented to them by the Division of State Fire Marshall. County Engineer Cliff Knauer gave a name for the road selected for the Small County Road Assistance Program, which was County Road 181 from County Road 185 to the Walton County line. This portion of the road was recently patched due to the extensive holes that were in the road, one of which was described as being big enough to hide a Pinto at a previous meeting. After extensive research Knauer had found that the base material of the road was insuf cient to properly support a road without regular and extensive maintenance. The base material was found to be several layers of plastic clay in some areas and rotting trees and debris in others. I would like to ask you to check out the section of CR 181 in Westville before making your decision Cliff, said King. Knauer agreed to look at the road but strongly advised that something must be done to the section of CR 181 he mentioned soon. That section of County Road 181 is going to be in really bad shape by 2017 and no amount of patching will help after that, said Knauer. Knauer gave an update for the 319 Grant to x the erosion problems on Mt. Zion Road. Due to the economy this is one of the only grants left and it also has one of the highest matches Ive ever seen, said Knauer. It was explained that a $200,000 grant would have a $80,000 match, but that he was still looking into the possibility of an in-kind match, which means that the county pay the match in materials or labor. He said at the moment he seen that it only stated that a cash match was required. It would help the scoring of that road if we had some background water testing, Knauer said. Holmes District School Board PUBLIC NOTICE Personnel representing the Holmes District School Board will be available at the Board Room at 701 E. Pennsylvania Avenue on May 31, 2012 at 3:30 p.m. to provide information and accept input on all federal and state projects. Projects up for discussion at this time will include but are not limited to: IDEA, Part B Entitlement These funds are allocated for the support of special projects which will contribute to the solution of persisting state-wide needs in the education of exceptional students. IDEA, Part B Preschool Entitlement These funds are allocated to provide special Title I Part A (Title I Basic) program provides services to help schools with high concentrations of students from low-income families be able to offer high-quality education academic achievement standards and state academic assessments. Title I, Part D, Neglected and Delinquent (Prevention and Intervention Programs, for youth who are neglected, delinquent, or at risk.) This programs purpose is to improve educational services to youth in local and state facilities for neglected and delinquent youth. These youth must have the opportunity to meet the same state content and performance standards that all youth in the state will be expected to meet. Title II, Part A Teacher and Principal Training/Recruiting This programs purpose is to and principals. Title II, Part D (Enhancing Education Through Technology) The primary goal of this program is to improve student academic achievement through the use of technology in elementary and secondary schools. Title III Part A individual student needs. The program uses either English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) or home language instructional strategies. Title IV Part B -21st Century Community Learning Centers-This program provides afterschool and summer enrichment programs for students. Title VI, Part B, Subpart 2 Rural Education Achievement Program These funds are allocated to provide additional support to rural or low income districts. Race to the Top -This programs purpose is to carry out a broad range of strategies designed to improve our lowest performing schools and increase the academic achievement of our students. POLITICAL CA MP AI GN PRI N TI NG Get the message out with MEET THE CANDIDATE BBQ FOR JOHN SMITH FULL COLOR POSTCARDS ELECT JOAN FULLER FOR COUNT Y S EAT GLOSS Y FULL COLOR RACK CARDS GLOSS Y FULL COLOR DOOR HANGERS WE PRINT MORE THAN JUST NEWSPAPERS CALL KIM FOR FREE QUOTE 638-0212 posters yers business forms all types brochures newsletters postcards letterheads envelopes labels posters tickets yers rubber stamps specialty items and more STOCK DESIGN PADDLE FANS It Pays to Own Orange $0 Down & 0 % A.P.R. Financing for 60 Months* or Valuable Customer Instant Rebates** Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2012 Smart Engineering Reliable Long-lasting Value Kubota already sets the bar for well-engineered, high-performance compact tractors. Now were setting a money saving standard, too. For a limited time, you can save big on your next Kubota quality equipment that works hard for you todayand holds its value tomorrow. www.KubotaRewards.com L3800 B3300 Let your authorized dealer show you how rewarding it is to own a Kubota. Offers end June 30, 2012. Annual Graduation Celebration Section Send congratulations to the special graduates in our community! The Graduation Section publishes Wednesday, May 30. Place your ad by noon on Monday, May 21. For rate information call 638-0212 or 547-9414. Featuring seniors from the following high schools: Holmes County, Bethlehem, Poplar Springs, Ponce de Leon, Chipley, Vernon, Graceville, Cottondale GRADUATE FAMILY & FRIENDS Send personal congratulations to your graduate with an announcement on the Graduate Tribute listing in the Graduation section. For $15 per graduate well list: graduates name, school, up to 20 words of personal tribute, and the family members or friend sponsoring the listing. Tribute payment and wording must be received by 2 p.m. Wednesday, May 21. This offer is for individuals only, not businesses. Send congratulations Graduation Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 Wednesday, May 16, 2012 DISPATCH from page A1 little magic, hand puppets and storytelling with a lifesized bear or elephant that joins in. The last day, Harris said, would be a blast ending at the Holmes County Agricultural Center with games, fun and free food. Were able to give as much as we do to our children because of the wonderful support shown throughout the community, said Harris. Doctors Memorial Hospital supplied food last year, Wells Fargo donated books, Bank of Bonifay, now First Federal, gave us $1,000 with their Swipe-n-Save program, where every time you use youre debit card a dollar is saved towards a donation of $1,000 to a program in need in Holmes County. This is just to name a few of the many who show their unending support to us. She said a big asset and the reason why they are able to receive grants is because of the support of the Friends of the Library. There are only a few of them, but boy do they really care about the library work hard to ensure that the library is able to continue to do the best they can for the community, said Harris. Were still in need of more friends, for those who are interested. Harris said there would be eight programs a day starting at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. She also encourages all children interested on joining to register as soon as possible to know how many they will be accommodating. Register at the library or call 547-3573. LIBRARY from page A1

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Wednesday, May 16, 2012 OUTDOORS Page 6 www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Send your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com A Section By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com Wetsuit, check. Air tank, check. Mask, check. Area divers soon will be adding passport to their equipment checklists as they dive the new Panhandle Shipwreck Trail, set to launch in late May. Through the development of the trail, divers will be able to track their underwater journeys in Northwest Florida by passport in an effort by the Florida Division of Historical Resources to bring divers to the Panhandle again and again. It will feature 12 shipwrecks, starting in Pensacola and ending with the wreck of the Vamar in Port St. Joe. Lindsay Smith, an underwater archaeologist with the Florida Bureau of Archaeological Research, is part of a small team developing the trail through a grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The shipwrecks are amazing, theres just a wonderful variety (in the Panhandle), said Smith, who noted it was dif cult to pinpoint only 12 wrecks. Theyre all very close together and theres just so many to choose from. There are tons of wrecks in the Panhandle, and were only highlighting 12 of them. Smith said the ultimate goal in the development of the trail is to help boost the dive economy throughout the region. The Panhandle has a very strong diving community, Smith said. As far as scuba shops, theres probably about 20. The idea for the Panhandle Shipwreck Trail came from State Underwater Archaeologist Roger Smith. He thought it would be a great thing for the Panhandle because tourism kind of lagged after the oil spill, Smith said. Were really hoping to get some return tourism and invigorate the local dive communities. Smith and the team of underwater archaeologists also are developing a website, which will be complete with underwater photography and video footage of the Panhandle wrecks featured and links to the dive shops on each leg of the trail. Because of the enthusiastic response the team has received for the Shipwreck Trail, the team assembled some 25 to 30 hours of underwater video footage for all of the trail candidates, as well as historic photographs. The site will feature 13 short videos, the rst introducing the trail and passport and one highlighting each wreck. The passports are in the nal stages of development, and Smith said they are hoping to distribute the passports to area dive shops and launch the new website before Memorial Day at the end of this month. The passport will serve as a marketing tool, dive log and souvenir and will hopefully encourage return visitation to the Panhandle area, said Smith. Divers will log visibility, water temperature and weather conditions, pressure and dive time, and record their dive buddy and charter boat from each dive. Dive shops and charter boats will have the opportunity to offer the passport to divers for a small registration fee to participate in the trail, with a registration form to provide information about each passport holder. The shops and boats each will carry an of cial stamp to verify each dive completed on the trail to be paired with the signature of the captain on the passport. Before the project came to fruition, Smith said the group of underwater archaeologists rst needed to speak with area dive shop owners in order to see what type of project would be most bene cial. After the NOAA grant was received, we decided to go into the different communities and gauge interest, Smith said. We went and talked to local dive shop owners about what their customers look for in dive trips. Smith said the response from local shop owners about the development of a shipwreck trail was phenomenal. The team collected 22 shipwreck nominations from the owners and narrowed it down to 12, making sure there were dives for every skill level. The Florida Keys has a similar Wreck Trek, but Smith said the Panhandle Shipwreck Trail will operate a bit differently. They have a much larger number of dive shops, Smith said about the Keys. The visibility (in the Panhandle) isnt the same as the Keys, but the wrecks are close enough to shore to still allow for great underwater visibility. Were looking at it a little bit differently, because we want to track how the sites are being used and who is diving them. Smith said the team plans on utilizing social networking sites like Facebook to allow divers to share their experiences and get in touch with other people who dive the trail. The website will also play an integral part in the development and promotion of the trail. The Panhandle Shipwreck Trail will feature ve Pensacola wrecks: USS Oriskany, San Pablo (Russian Freighter), Pete Tide II, YDT 14 and 15 (Navy tenders), and Three Barges; ve off the coast of Panama City: Black Bart, USS Strength, FAMI Twin Tugs, USS Accokeek and USS Cheppewa; the Miss Louise in Destin; and Port St. Joes wreck of the Vamar will serve as the easternmost stop on the dive trail. The Vamar is one of Floridas 11 designated underwater archaeological preserves. The ship wrecked under mysterious circumstances in World War II-era Port St. Joe in 1942, and now rests on the ocean oor near the tip of St. Joseph Peninsula. Resting in only 25 feet of water, the Vamar is often considered one of the best shallow water dives on the Emerald Coast. As noted by the Bureau of Archaeological Research, divers can explore the ships steam engine, bilge keels and rudder quadrant and investigate the mystery of the wreck. A plaque will soon be sunk as the last step in designating the wreck of the Vamar as a state underwater preserve. The wreck was dedicated an underwater preserve back in 2004. I think the Shipwreck Trail kind of renewed the interest in getting that plaque down there, Smith said. In order for a wreck to become an underwater preserve, Smith said, it must be nominated by a local group interested in recognizing the site. It comes from a community level, where the people come together and want to recognize a speci c site, Smith said. Its all done with public support and volunteer work. Spotted scorpion sh seek safety by camou aging themselves in the reef growth around the wreck of the Vamar. Below, a colony of blenny hides in the reef growth. PHOTOS BY BOB AND CAROL COX | Special to The News Herald Lookdown Jacks are known to congregate around the wreck of the Vamar, located about four miles off the shore of Mexico Beach. SHIPWRECK VOYAGE Trail aims to lure divers to the Panhandle By STAN KIRKLAND Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Its hard to imagine a more passionate proponent of life jackets than Bay County native Mike Gilbert. These days the Fountain resident enjoys the simple things of life, but if not for a life jacket, he knows he wouldnt be here. In October 2005, Gilbert launched his boat late one afternoon in Parker and ran to the kiddie pool at St. Andrew State Park to gig ounder. He knew the fall ounder run to the gulf could be incredible. All he needed was darkness and a little good luck. There was little wind when he crossed the bay, but not long after sundown strong winds kicked up. Gilbert knew he had to nd a more sheltered place where he could spot ounder with his underwater lights. In the darkness he headed out across the bay to Red sh Point on Tyndall Air Force Base, but without warning, a wave broke over his small boat. His boat rolled over and he was in the water. I had no time to react, Gilbert said. One minute things were OK, the next minute I was in the water. If I hadnt been wearing a life jacket, I wouldnt have made it. Gilbert believes he went in the water around 8 p.m. He also knew the tide was strong and running out to sea. The situation went from bad to worse when he and his vessel were swept out the Panama City Pass and into the Gulf of Mexico. In the darkness he spotted a buoy but was unable to reach it. Wave after wave of stinging salt water slapped him in the face. Bobbing in the turbulent gulf waters, Gilbert says it was one of the longest nights of his life. About 8 oclock the following morning, a husband and wife heading into the gulf for a days shing spotted Gilbert. After 12 hours and drifting for miles, he was rescued. Now when Gilbert goes shing and he sees people who arent wearing a life jacket, he tells them his story. Some listen to him. Others choose to ignore him, but that doesnt bother Gilbert. They call them life jackets for a reason. They shouldnt be stored, they should be worn, he said. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission investigates boating accidents in state waters. FWC data shows, without question, there would be fewer boating fatalities each year if more people wore life jackets, particularly when boating in vessels less than 26 feet in length. In 2009, there were 65 boating fatalities in Florida; 69 percent were drownings associated with not wearing a life jacket. In 2010 the number of fatalities jumped to 79, 62 percent in which the victim drowned but might have survived had they worn a life jacket. Years ago life jackets were bulky and uncomfortable. Thankfully, thats no longer the case. In atable around-the-neck and belt-pack models are lightweight, affordable and widely available. They are life savers. Life jackets make a big difference

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SP O RTS www.bonifaynow.com A Section Wednesday, May 16, 2012 From the Associates of Store 2114 Chipley 638-2243 Way to Go Athletes Ryan McIntyre Chipley H.S. Basketball 12th Grade Ty Alford Ponce de Leon H.S. Baseball, Catcher Calf & Team Roping 12th Grade Ashlyn Golden Poplar Springs H.S. Softball, Pitcher & 8th Grade Alana Hearn Vernon H.S. 11th Grade Congratulations to these top athletes! Bethlehem H.S. Basketball 12th Grade Sarah Pippin Holmes County H.S. Softball, Pitcher 12th Grade From Staff Reports BONIFAY On May 10, Holmes County High School senior Ethan Russ signed with Bethel University in McKenzie, Tenn., for a football scholarship for the 2012-2013 season. Russ will be making a transition from a Holmes County High School Blue Devil to a Bethel University Wildcat in the Mid-Southwest Division. Ethan is the son of Michael and Debbra Russ of Bonifay, and his grandparents are Betty Taylor of Ebro, Lloyd and Hazel Russ of Chipley, and the late K.W. and Carolyn Sellers of Caryville. Russ will be graduating HCHS in June and still is deciding on a major. By CATHRINE LAMB 638-0212 | @catspitstop clamb@chipleypaper.com Well race fans, we have made it back in one piece. All the horror stories you hear about race weekends at Talladega, well, dont listen. It was great. Sure, there were people drinking and carrying on, but they were not messing with anyone. The staff and everyone at the racetrack were very nice. Cecilia got to experience her rst NASCAR accident May 4, as a car ipped coming out of turn four. But all in all we had a great time. Hoping we can do it again soon. On May 4, as those of you that were watching the Nationwide Race in Talladega saw and listening on the radio heard, Eric McClure, the driver of the No. 14 Hefty Reynolds Wrap, Chevrolet, hit the wall hard in turn three and had to be air-lifted to UAB Hospital from the track. Reports from NASCAR are that in the accident, he suffered a concussion and some internal bruising as he hit that wall headrst. I am happy to report that he has since been released from UAB and is expected to make a full recovery. CECILIA SPEARS | The News Ethan Russ signs with Bethel University in the presence of friends, team mates and family. With him are his mother and father, Debbra and Michael Russ, sister, Leah Pettis, and grandmother, Betty Taylor. HCHS senior Russ signs with Bethel Results from Aarons Dream Weekend NATIONWIDE SERIES 1. Joey Logano 2. Kyle Busch 3. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. 4. Chole Whitt 5. Dale Earnhardt Jr. 6. Kurt Busch 7. James Buescher 8. Justin Allgaier 9. Kenny Wallace 10. Elliot Sadler SPRINT CUP SERIES 1. Brad Keselowski 2. Kyle Busch 3. Matt Kenseth 4. Kasey Kahne 5. Greg Bif e 6. Clint Bowyer 7. David Ragan 8. Trevor Bayne 9. Dale Earnhardt Jr. 10. Jeff Burton Results from Darlington NFW SPORT CLIPS HELP A HERO 200 NATIONWIDE SERIES 1. Joey Logano 2. Denny Hamlin 3. Brad Keselowski 4. Sam Hornish Jr. 5. Austin Dillon 6. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. 7. Brian Scott 8. Kurt Busch 9. James Buescher 10. Cole Whitt BOJANGLES SOUTHERN 500 SPRINT CUP SERIES 1. Jimmie Johnson 2. Greg Bif e 3. Tony Stewart 4. Kyle Busch 5. Martin Truex Jr. 6. Matt Kenseth 7. Carl Edwards 8. Kasey Kahne 9. Marcos Ambrose 10. Joey Logano Standings after Darlington NATIONWIDE SERIES 1. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. 2. Elliot Sadler -23 3. Austin Dillon -35 4. Sam Hornish Jr. -59 5. Cole Whitt -82 6. Michael Annett -93 7. Justin Allgaier -104 8. Mike Bliss -134 9. Joe Nemecheck -142 10. Danica Patrick -145 SPRINT CUP SERIES 1. Greg Bif e 2. Matt Kenseth -2 3. Dale Earnhardt Jr. -14 4. Denny Hamlin -17 5. Jimmie Johnson -39 5. Martin Truex Jr. -39 7. Tony Stewart -42 8. Kevin Harvick -50 9. Kyle Busch -62 10. Carl Edwards -74 Next races May 19 6 p.m. SPEED Sprint Cup Charlotte N.C. Charlotte Motor Speedway Sprint All-Star Race Last years winner was Carl Edwards May 20 12:30 p.m. ESPN Nationwide Series Iowa Iowa Speedway Pioneer Hi-Bred 250 Last years winner was Ricky Stenhouse Jr. Logano, Keselowski win at Talladega At left is the Dale Earnhardt Jr. Mountain Dew car on display at Walmart in Talladega, Ala. Below is the rst lap of the Aarons 499. PHOTOS BY CATHRINE LAMB AND CECILIA SPEARS | The News STANDINGS Page 7

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Local Wednesday, May 16, 2012 A8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser

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Jefferson Swindle, D.D.S. 199 SOUTH MAIN ST. BONIFAY, FL 32425 TEL: (850) 547-4225 FAX: (850) 547-9849 HAVE FUN AT THE FAIR! P & P Heating & Cooling Specialists, Inc. 1075 N. Hwy. 79 Bonifay, FL FREE ESTIMATES Esto, FL (850) 263-2823 Danny Powell Henry Powell License FL #CAC1814302 AL #98126 TRI-COUNTY GAS Bonifay, Florida 547-3696 1-800-874-2720 BONIFAY PIGGLY WIGGLY Down Home Down e Street (850) 547-3826 911 N. Waukesha Street Bonifay We'll See You At the Pig! Your Guide to THE FAIR printing business forms brochures newsletters postcards letterheads envelopes labels posters tickets yers programs invitations rubber stamps specialty items copying creative services We print more than just newspapers www.chipleypaper.com www.bonifaynow.com Sims Insurance Agency Auto Home Commercial Life Jamie Wells Agent 410 N. Waukesha St. Bonifay, FL 32425 Phone: 850-547-5411 Fax: 850-547-5412 jwellssia@embarqmail.com 306 West Brock Avenue Bonifay, FL 32425 850-547-9289 www.BonifayRehab.com 306 West Brock Avenue Bonifay, FL 32425 850-547-9289 www.BonifayRehab.com Helping Hands... Compassionate Hearts B ONIFAY N URS IN G & RE HAB C E N TER PHYSICAL THERA P Y OCCU P A T I O NAL THERA P Y SP EECH THERA P Y WI T H VI T A ST EM A D V ANCED WO UND C ARE FLORIDA SPRINGS RV RESORT & CAMPGROUND Located in the Florida Springs office Serving a touch of J. Michaels from PC Beach, and a taste of Andys best selections! Our menu is short & sweet and the atmosphere quaint Serving quality food at a fair price Open daily 5-8pm Closed on Tuesdays Call ahead 850-547-3042 or 850-258-3110 Oering private partiescall for details Located in the Florida Springs office MUSTANG G RILL NOW OPEN! 90 Son-in-Law Road, Bonifay, FL Hwy. 79 & I10 Exit 112 north and turn right beside Wafe House oridaspringsrv.com chipleypaper.com bonifaynow.com WEDNESDAY N IGHT Church at the Fair Night Church at the fairgrounds 6pm with Rev. Ryan Helms Local gospel music by Cornerstone Bluegrass Gospel T HURSDAY N IGHT School Spirit Night Battle of the High School Bands Dash for Cash Kids 10 & under dig through saw dust to nd money FRIDAY N IGHT Farmer's Night at the Fair Free Hayrides Learn How to Can Exhibit Produce Growing Class Local entertainment by Mika Moore Magic Show Featuring The Magic of Cristopher Thomas Seen on America's Got Talent Farmer's Market Buy and sell local produce Magic Show with Cristopher Thomas Native American Demonstrations North Bay Clan of Lower Creek Muskogee Tribe H olmes County Fairgrounds located at 3085 S andpath R oad, Bonifay 850-547-3816 holmescountyfair.com Perfect Pool Supplies 122 S. Waukesha St. Bonifay, Florida 850-547-2626 Have fun at the fair! Holmes County Chamber of Commerce Join us Thursday, May 24, at 7 a.m. for our monthly member meeting. Log Cabin, Byrd Avenue Bonifay (850) 547-3636 CLOUD AUTO PARTS, INC. AUTO TRUCK TRACTOR "CALL CLOUD FIRST" 310 S. Waukesha Street Lawrence E. Cloud Bonifay, FL 32425 Call 638-0212 for a quote. WC N H C T S ATURDAY Old Holmes Day at the Fair Fair Fest Arts and Craft Show Native American Exhibits and Demonstrations Political Rally 4-H Fashion Show Entertainment featuring Ron French All Heart Music

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Memorial Day Sale May 21-25 $10 Rell 20 lb. Cylinder 10% OFF ALL APPLI A N C ES in S tock AS Propane & Appliance Center Hwy. 90 W. Bonifay, FL 850-547-1520 MONDAY-FRIDAY 8 AM TILL 5 PM Hosted by the Greater Holmes County Fair Association Gates Open : 5pm Nightly 9am on Saturday Midway featuring JCJ Amusements Old Holmes Exhibits Fair Fest Craft Show Farmer's Market Chili Cook Off Native American Exhibits Art & Photography Contest Livestock Exhibits Fashion Show Political Rally Entertainment Boat, ATV, Tractor and RV Show DASH for CASH for kids

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Washington, Holmes at a glance Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser B PAGE 1 Section Wednesday, MAY 16 2012 Always, Patsy Cline CHIPLEY Tickets for the Spanish Trail Playhouse production of Always, Patsy Cline are on sale. Always, Patsy Cline has been one of the most produced musicals in America according to American Theatre Magazine. It will take the stage at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, May 18-19, and 2 p.m. Sunday, May 20. Directed by Polly Kneiss and produced by Rachel Webb, this production stars Sonya Lynn DeMarco as Patsy Cline and Mil Cox as Louis Seger and features a live band of local musicians. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors (65 and up) and military with ID and $10 for students 12 and under and can be purchased at the Spanish Trail Playhouse box of ce, 680 Second St. in Chipley, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. For more information, email spanishtrailplayhouse@ gmail.com, call 6389113 or visit www. spanishtrailplayhouse. com. RMS band concert The Roulhac Middle School Spring Band Concert is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. May 24 in the school auditorium. This performance will feature the 6th Grade Beginner Band and the 7th/8th Grade Concert Band performing a wide variety of entertaining tunes. The public is invited to attend both concerts and admission is free. Girls Night Out BONIFAY In celebration of National Womens Health Week, the Holmes County Health Department will host Girls Night Out from 5-8 p.m. Thursday at Carmel Assembly of God. There will be food, fun and shopping. A guest presenter will speak on womens health. For more information, contact Traci Corbin at 547-8500, ext. 249. Miss Poplar Springs From left are Chloe King, Petit Miss Poplar Springs; and Dayna Snell, First Runner-Up. Haley Stout was named Preteen Miss Poplar Springs. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO EXTRA Alexus Williams was named Junior Miss Poplar Springs. From left are Veronica Vickers, First Runner-Up; and Christina Bell, Teen Miss Poplar Springs. From left are Autumn Johnson, Third Runner-Up; Erilyn Smith, Little Miss Poplar Springs; Jaycee Blanton, First Runner-Up; and Erica Snell, Second Runner-Up. From left are Hannah Collins, First Runner-Up; Julianna Peters, Princess; Mekenzie Vinson, Young Miss Poplar Springs; Lee Miller, Princess; Jayci Haygood, Second Runner-Up; Hannah Vickers, Third Runner-Up; and Regan Joiner, Princess. From left are Kelly Cook, First Runner-Up; Cassandra White, Miss Poplar Springs; and Kayleen Rodriguez, Second Runner-Up. INDEX Society ................................. B2 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B7

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Wednesday, May 16, 2012 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Go to AnyGivenTimeJax.com to enter to win a vacation in sunny Jacksonville! SO MUCH TO DO, ANY GIVEN TIME. Looking for the best in hearing care? Look to Beltone Only Beltone offers the exclusive BelCare program, our ongoing commitment to customer satisfaction, providing you with benets such as: 15% OFF TRUE WIRELESS HEARING AID SYSTEM & ultra comfortable when its noisy advanced technology Financing Available WAC Chipley, FL (850) 387-4931 Marianna, FL (850) 387-4931 The benets of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Discounts off MSRP Previous purchases excluded. For a limited time. Cannot be combined with any other offers. No other company offers the same level of commitment youll nd at Beltone. WERE IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD! Free Annual Hearing Evaluations Beltone Ranked #1 in Patient Care Free Lifetime Instrument Care Free cleanings and adjustments for as long as you own your Beltone hearing instruments And, our 1500 locations nationwide serve you no matter where you live or travel! Allen Barnes 21 Years Experience Special To The News Chipley Garden Club held its End of the Year meeting at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, May 2, at the Collins Hospitality House on Smokehouse Lake in Chipley. Club members Arlon DeForge and Gweneth Collins presented a program entitled Bluebirds & Mealworms. Gweneth began by stating the bluebird, a favorite of many people, is not only beautiful, but also musical. The bird had become uncommon in this area but around 2005 began making a comeback. It is a common sight in our area. She noted both male and female birds are brightly colored and demonstrated its queedle call. She also discussed its range, habitat, nesting and houses. Several books, color photographs, a nest with eggs (found deserted last Winter) and a bluebird house were on display. She also provided several handouts. Arlon DeForge discussed the construction of the bluebird house. Arlon and her husband, Jerry, have been cultivating mealworms for over twenty years. She discussed its life cycle from eggs to Mealworm Beetle, concentrating on the worm which is a favorite treat of bluebirds. She stated they are very easy to raise they feed on wheat bran and live their entire life in any dry, cool and ventilated container. When you need some, you just dip out some of the bran, give it a shake, pick out the worms, place them on a tray, and the bluebirds will come! She brought a small sample of the farm to share with members and volunteered to provide a start for anyone who would like to raise them. Prior to the program a short business meeting was held. Downtown pots will be decorated with Flags for Memorial Day and Watermelons for the Watermelon Festival. The Scarecrow Contest will be Saturday, October 13 in conjunction with Washington County Historical Societys Fall into History Fest. 2012-13 Chipley Garden Club Of cers are Karen Roland, President; Arlon DeForge, First Vice President; Glenda Wilson, Second Vice President; Gweneth Collins, Recording Secretary/ Communications Of cer; Marlene Ray, Corresponding Secretary; Bill DiZinno, Treasurer; and Genie Comegys, Chaplain. If you would like more information about Chipley Garden Club and its projects, please call Karen Roland at 638-9968. Bluebird Tweet at Chipley Garden Club 2012-13 Of cers Bill DiZinno, Treasurer; Gweneth Collins, Recording Secretary/Communications Of cer; Glenda Wilson, 2nd Vice President; Genie Comegys, Chaplain; Arlon DeForge, 1st Vice President. Seated is President Karen Roland. Special To Extra TALLAHASSEE Floridas 24 regional workforce boards and the nearly 100 one-stop career centers they oversee continue to demonstrate their strong commitment to helping unemployed Floridians get to work. In April, nearly 30,000 job placements of Floridians who were assisted by the boards were reported. Since January, nearly 124,000 job placements have been reported statewide including about 27,500 job seekers who had been receiving unemployment compensation. These placements are an indicator of hiring in Florida as the states economic recovery continues. Governor Rick Scott has made job creation and economic growth the top priority for his administration. The work of regional boards to connect job seekers with employers looking to hire is instrumental to our ongoing efforts to retain and grow jobs in Florida, said Governor Rick Scott. We can tell from Chief Executive magazines recent improved ranking of Florida from the No. 3 spot to No. 2 that our state is becoming known as the best place for businesses to expand and create jobs. In light of these job opportunities, we will remain focused on outcomes such as job placements that matter most to Florida families and businesses. The results from Aprils Monthly Job Placement Report underscore continued progress with 29,514 individuals placed in jobs. Of these individuals, 6,754 were receiving unemployment compensation. With every job placement, we are advancing workforce and economic development goals to strengthen Floridas economy, said Chris Hart IV, President/ CEO of Workforce Florida Inc., the states chief workforce policy organization. Economic success starts at the regional level and I commend boards statewide and their front-line staff for maintaining a strong focus on jobs. The top 10 ranked regional workforce boards for reported job placements in April are: 1. Workforce Solutions Indian River, Martin, Okeechobee and St. Lucie counties Board Chair Angie Metcalf and President/ CEO Richard Stetson 2. Pasco Hernando Workforce Board Pasco and Hernando counties Board Chair Lex Smith and President/CEO Jerome Salatino 3. Florida Crown Workforce Board Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist and Union counties Board Chair Jennie Reed and Executive Director John Chastain 4. Heartland Workforce Desoto, Hardee and Highlands counties Board Chair David Royal and President Roger Hood 5. Brevard Workforce Board Chair Jack Rood and President Lisa Rice 6. Chipola Regional Workforce Development Board Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson, Liberty, and Washington counties Board Chair Darrin Wall and Executive Director Richard Williams 7. South Florida Workforce Miami-Dade and Monroe counties Board Chair Alvin West and Executive Director Rick Beasley 8. WorkNet Pinellas Pinellas County Board Chair Dr. Tony Leisner and President Ed Peachey 9. Workforce Development Board of Okaloosa and Walton Counties Board Chair Dr. David O. Miller and Executive Director Linda Sumblin 10. Workforce Connection Citrus, Levy and Marion counties Board Chair Suzanne Mills and Chief Executive Of cer Rusty Skinner Among the thousands of Floridians who went to work in April after receiving workforce-board assistance is Roy Antigua. After losing his social work job about a year ago, Mr. Antigua was hired as the Multi Facility Director of Admissions by Consulate Management in Pasco County. I spent four to ve days a week submitting as many as 20 resumes a day while worrying about how I was going to pay my bills, said Mr. Antigua. The staff at Pasco Hernando Workforce Board saw my commitment and helped me nd a position that is a perfect t for me. It has allowed me to regain the lifestyle I enjoyed before I lost my full-time job a year ago. Being persistent and seeking my local boards help really paid off. The Monthly Job Placement Report was developed by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity and Workforce Florida in response to Governor Scotts call for enhanced performance measurement to support economic recovery and growth. It highlights jobplacement achievement and facilitates the identi cation and sharing of best practices. The report also provides another measurement of Floridas economic activities. Another economic indicator is employment data from the Department of Economic Opportunitys Labor Market Statistics Center. Floridas 9-percent unemployment rate in March was the largest over-the-month decline since 1992. Nonagricultural jobs increased by 10,800 over the month and 89,800 jobs over the year. Seven industries delivered overthe-year job growth: trade, transportation and utilities; professional and business services; education and health services; leisure and hospitality; nancial activities; manufacturing; and other services. Growth primarily occurred in food and beverage stores, employment services; ambulatory health care services; food services and drinking places; real estate; fabricated metal product manufacturing; and personal and laundry services, according to labor market information. To view the Monthly Job Placement Report and a list of Frequently Asked Questions, go to www. oridajobs.org/workforceboard-resources/programmonitoring-and-reports/ monthly-regional-workforce-board-job-placementreports. Floridas workforce system is made up of Workforce Florida, the statewide workforce investment board; the Department of Economic Opportunity, the state agency responsible for policy implementation and administrative and scal management; and the 24 regional workforce boards and nearly 100 one-stop career centers charged with the design and delivery of local workforce services. For more information on Workforce Florida or its state and local workforce partners, visit WorkforceFlorida.com. Please visit EmployFlorida.com to list a job opening or search for jobs and access a wide array of workforce resources. Job Seekers aided by Workforce Boards are getting to work Since January nearly 124,000 job placements have been reported statewide Jared and Shannon White would like to introduce their son, Jayden Welcome White, to the Holmes County Community. Jayden made his arrival on December 16, 2011 at 12:30 a.m. He weighed eight pounds, ve ounces and was 20 inches long. Jaydens grandparents are Roger and Dianne White of Ponce de Leon, and Stan and Monica Grif n of Westville. Every good and perfect gift comes from above, James 1:17. The parents of Emily Harrison and Charles Paul announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their children. Emily is the daughter of Tammy and Jimmy Harrison of Bonifay. Her grandparents are Harmon Sellers and the late Idawe Sellers of Bonifay and J. C. McCormick and the late Carolyn Ryan. Charles is the son of Treasa Duffell and Wayne Paul. His grandparents are Odell and Peggy Paul and Louis Duffell and the late Charles Duffell. The bride elect is a 2008 graduate Bethlehem High School. She is employed with Wells Fargo Bank. The Groom elect is a 2003 graduate of Bethlehem High School and is employed with Burford Tree Expert. To mimic the country feel Charles and Emily know and love so much, their wedding will be held at a family friends eld on James G Road on May 19 at 4 p.m. All family and friends are invited to attend. WHITES ANNOUNCE BIRTH OF SON HARRISON AND PAUL ANNOUNCE ENGAGEMENT

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Wednesday, May 16, 2012 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 By Sandra Devine, President Bonifay Garden Club Special to Extra The Bonifay Garden Club recently enjoyed a guided tour through the rose gardens of Patricia and Buddy Guilford of Hartford, Ala., on April 13. Both Patricia and Buddy hail from Hartford, and they both love working in their flower gardens, which is mainly comprised of different varieties of roses. Buddy volunteers that he has been interested in growing roses since the early 1970s, but did not get into rose production on a larger scale until he and Patricia bought their present home in 1977, which had an established rose garden, parts of which remain today. Buddy has always been involved in the growing business as he retired from farming and raising cattle. Buddy and Patricia are excited and proud to share the handiwork of their labor during the rose blooming season that runs from April up until a heavy frost, usually in November. Roses thrive in a slightly acidic soil, about a pH of 6.5, and full sun. Various classes of roses perform differently in the hot humid climate of lower Alabama and the upper panhandle of Florida. The Guilfords generally like to work with HybridTea Roses, Floribundas, Grandiforas, Climbing and Landscape Roses and Old Garden Roses. Buddy explains that HybridTea Roses have a vase-like habitat with bare legs (lower stems exposed without leaves or blooms) and produce beautiful long stem roses excellent for cuttings used in arrangements. The Floribunda varieties grow in a round, compact bushtype habitat with blooms in a cluster or spray. Grandiflora Roses are similar to the HybridTea variety except they bloom in clusters. The 1700s and 1800s ushered in the Old Garden Roses, which are relatively easy to grow, produce a very fragrant bloom and is popular in landscaping. I use an all purpose 16-4-8 fertilizer and mulch heavily with pine bark around my roses, adds Buddy. Folks ask me regularly, which is my favorite rose, but I dont have a real favorite. I enjoy them all. If youre thinking about growing roses, visit some gardens in your area and make a list of varieties that you like. You might want to visit with the Wiregrass Rose Society in Dothan (Ala.) or the Tallahassee Rose Society to get more ideas as well, Guilford said. The Knock Out Rose is very popular due to its propensity to with stand harsh hot climates, ward off pests and disease and still bloom beautifully and successfully thrive. However, the Carefree Beauty Rose is the newer variety on the market that is touted to be even easier to grow than the Knock Out Roseper Guilford. The Houston (Texas) Rose Society awarded a grant to the Texas A & M University to hybridize a rose variety that would be well suited to hardiness zone 8A (which includes the Holmes County area). Thus, the CarefreeBeauty series was born. One could garner more information on the Carefree Beauty utilizing the internet at earthkindroses.com As the field trip tour was ending, Guilford offered the following bit of sage advice to all us garden clubbers eager to go home and grow roses. The secret to growing roses is selecting the right plant, selecting the right location for planting, utilizing full sunshine and water, water, water. ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7. When arthritis has your knees creaking and your joints aching, it can be a miserable time. Your pets may feel your pain as well. Arthritis in pets can be just as agonizing as it is in humans, and the disease and its effects are very similar in both pets and people, says Dr. Sharon Kerwin, professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences who specializes in orthopedic medicine. Kerwin says animal arthritis attacks bones and joints much the same way as the disease does in humans, but with one noticeable exception it can strike some animals, especially dogs, before they become a 1-year-old. Any animal can get arthritis, but dogs and cats especially seem to be prone to get the disease, Kerwin says. It is not unusual for a dog to have a check-up in its first year, and the veterinarian can already detect signs of arthritis. It means the owner will almost certainly have to make some adjustments in the way the animal is cared for and the amount of exercise and movement the dog gets. Certain breeds are especially prone to get arthritis, and these include the Rottweiler, golden retrievers, and Labrador retrievers. Kerwin says there are several signs pet owners may look for if they suspect their animal might have arthritis. First is an obvious decrease in activity, she explains. The animal may not want to go as far as it used to on a walk. It may not want to walk at all. In cats, it is sometimes a little harder to detect arthritis, but the animal may appear to be less active and may have trouble jumping on top of a chair or table. Treatments can vary, depending on the severity of arthritis, Kerwin says. Surgery, she explains, is sometimes recommended, especially if a hip or other joint is severely affected. Drugs are often prescribed, and joint diets have also become available for dogs and cats in recent years, Kerwin explains. Physical rehabilitation can be a very effective treatment in controlling signs associated with arthritis. As with humans, weather changes especially colder weather can often be felt in bones and joints, and these changes can affect your pet, Kerwin adds. Probably the most frequent question veterinarians get asked about arthritis in pets is, Should I continue to exercise my pet? Theres no easy answer, Kerwin believes. Low-impact exercise, like a walk, is better than no exercise at all, Kerwin adds, Swimming is an ideal exercise for dogs if they will do it, and even cats can swim in a water treadmill. Thats why its best to consult with a veterinarian to get the treatment plans best suited for your pet. Pet arthritis is not a death sentence for your animal, but owners need to be aware that the animal cannot do certain things. Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at http:// vetmed.tamu.edu/pet-talk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to cvmtoday@cvm.tamu. edu. Arthritis isnt just for humans Bonifay Garden Club tours rose garden Close-up of yellow rose bed. Red roses with birdhouse. Buddy Guilford explains rose planting techniques. Beautiful close up of yellow/pink rose, Double Delight. These colors are the colors for the Bonifay Garden Club. Hazel Tison and Susan Pittman inspect owers during the rose garden tour. Crossword PUZZLE SOLUTION ON PAGE B5

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FAITH B Section www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com By Rev. James L. Snyder Finally, someone has come up with a weight loss program I can sink my teeth into without guilt. And, I say its about time. I cant speak for anybody else, but Im fed up with diet programs that simply beat me to death. Im tired of starving myself under the pretense of dieting, and exercising my body to the brink of absolute exhaustion. Its about time someone looked on the lighter side of dieting. According to a study in Athens, Greece, scientists have found a good laugh is a calorie burner not to be ignored. You can be sure this gained my attention. Some American researchers found that 10 to 15 minutes of genuine giggling can burn off the number of calories found in a medium square of chocolate. These scientists discovered a way to measure how many calories people burn when they laugh. When I read this, I laughed for 39 minutes, allowing me to eat two medium squares of chocolate. At this rate, Ill be able to eat several pounds of chocolate a day. Now thats what I call a diet. According to their ndings, the average person burns 20 percent more calories when laughing, compared to not laughing. If somebody laughs for 10 or 15 minutes a day they would burn up to 50 calories, depending on body size and the intensity of the laughter. This means if I laughed for 10 to 15 minutes a day, I would burn enough calories to lose 4-1/2 pounds in a year. Thats nothing to laugh at. This means in 50 years I would completely disappear from the face of the earth. Which poses a question; when a person loses weight, where does that weight go? Im not one to jump on the latest bandwagon but there is nothing funny about carrying around extra weight. For some its like having a monkey on their back, for me its more like a gorilla. Up to this point, my weight loss program has been a laughing matter. Little did I know my laughing was burning calories. My exercise program has been a real joke, which may have done me good and I didnt know it. To be honest, my regimen has not produced the results I desired. Just a few years ago, I exercised my right as an American citizen to vote for the president of my choice, which has been quite taxing on me, you can be sure. This kind of exercise takes more out of a person than realized at the time and must be good because I lost a great chunk of money in paying my taxes this year. Every day I exercise my right to remain silent when the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage is giving me a piece of her mind. Although I have not lost any weight with this exercise, I havent lost any arguments, either. Personally, I think its a good trade-off. Now, with this new information I shall change my whole approach to dieting. Instead of working hard, exercising every day and watching what I eat, I shall throw caution to the wind and laugh all day long. I shall laugh off all criticism with good humor. I shall roll in the aisles with uncontrollable mirth. My only concern is that I dont die laughing. For the observant person, like Yours Truly, each day provides plenty of things to laugh about. My only problem is to know exactly where to start. I could start laughing at my Beloved but Im sure I would lose something other than weight, so I dont want to go there, if you know what I mean. A good guffaw, Ive discovered, carries more than just personal bene ts. An old proverb says, Laugh, and the whole world laughs with you. So, I can see where my laughing is going to help other people lose weight. Why didnt somebody think of this before? I may have lost some time; but be assured I am determined to giggle my way to supreme health in the days and months ahead. To begin my regimen of laughter, I only need to wake up in the morning. Believe me when I say, not waking up in the morning is no laughing matter. When I wake up, I yawn, stretch and then go to the bathroom. One look in the mirror is good for a good belly laugh, which helps start the day in the right direction. For the next laugh, I turn to the early morning news programs, which is good for a laugh-a-minute. We truly live in a funny world, at least for the person who takes the time to see the funny side of the street. All those people on early morning television seriously think what they say is important. When in reality, very little of what they say makes any difference in anyones day. If they only knew how insigni cant their opinions are, they probably wouldnt get up in the morning and go to work. They give, on any given morning, sidesplitting, rib-tickling, laugh-a-minute exercises. If you happen to see me walking down the street with a smile all over my face, dont be alarmed. I am engaged in my Laughtercise for the day. A merry heart doeth good like a medicine: but a broken spirit drieth the bones (Proverbs 17:22). The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 352-687-4240 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. The church web site is www. whatafellowship.com. Special To Extra BONIFAY Warden Roberts, Chaplain Faulkenberry, and other staff at the Holmes Correctional Institute recently hosted a Regional Chaplains Conference at Bonifay. The conference was set up and planned by Regional Chaplain Director David Ring. The 55 state and volunteer prison chaplains also completed the orientation and leader training course required for volunteers to use the lifeskills transitions courses developed by the Family Integrity Training Inc. Chaplain Alex Taylor and Chaplain Gingrich gave updates on several needed topics. One was the effectiveness of educational programs in reducing recidivism (return to incarceration). Another was the implementing of the Second Chance program offered through TBN and how some facilities reported that it was especially improving the morale of the youth offenders causing less security issues. The nal presentation was an actual volunteer training session put on by Family Integrity Training Inc. Pastor Ed White presented FITs 100-hour, faith-based curriculum as a means to equip Chaplains and volunteers in offering courses which could meet the states requirement of each inmate exiting the state prison system. The state requires that each inmate complete an approved 100-hourtransition course before leaving the prison system. FITs Integrity Program meets this requirement. Pastor White worked with The Florida Department of Corrections to formulate such a program in 2005. He enlisted the help of Dr. Don Pratt who developed the present program. The program combines ve courses from the Living Free curricula established by Jimmy Ray Lee and three other books written by Dr. Pratt to speci cally address the criteria established by the Florida Legislature. Fred DeMouey, FIT Board member, explained the effectiveness of these lessons in changing lives. He is convinced that rehabilitation is much more effective in the long term and a very possible answer to keeping communities safe. This is true because the majority of prisoners will be released back into the community they came from. They will either be changed or hardened. It would behoove us to put our resources to work so that change happens in as many people as possible. Beverly Shatterly, Panhandle FIT Coordinator, explained how to implement the program by reviewing the Anger Your Master or your Servant student manual. She expressed her view that the course materials are so well written anyone can facilitate a class with minimal training. The secret to its effectiveness is an interactive emphasis which is not preachy. She said You actually get into the minds of the students and they open up in a way as never before. Many will let down their guard and share things that helps the whole group move forward. The FIT transitional course is actually a collection of eight separate courses each featuring a speci c life skill. Titles from the Living Free series are: Insight, a lesson in nding the roots of addictions; Free to Grow, lessons on dealing with lifes disappointments; Godly Parenting, Handling Loss and Grief; and Anger our Master or our Servant, a course dealing with topics often court-ordered by judges. Dr. Pratts courses are Parenting 101, Dating and Marriage, and Financial Success from Scratch. All these courses re ect real-life issues that face an inmate when transitioning back into the main stream of society. The cost to train each student is $10 per unit. The total 100-hour program is only $60 per student. The costs are kept low because all staff and volunteers pay their own way, many driving hundreds of miles to teach a class. Because inmates do not have the means to buy the materials, FIT relies on fundraisers from churches and donations to fund a course. More information can be found at the FIT website at www.100hour. org. Donations are welcome and can be done through the website or by phone 941-739-1338. Though some of the courses were written for churches and some for prisoners, they have all proved to be useful in any settingwhere life-skill development is important. This includes prisons, jails, probation, community programs, transitional houses, churches, and Sunday School classes. If you have a heart for this type of ministry or like to learn more, you can become a certi ed FIT volunteer and learn how to use these materials at one of our training classes. The next training in your area will be on May 19 in Crestview, Florida. It is an all-day orientation session and you can register online at our FIT website www.100hour.org. The cost is $35 for regular registration or $25 for preregistered online. Wednesday, May 16, 2012 But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Good News Bible Acts 1:8 Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. First Baptist Church come as you are Mike Orr, Pastor 1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830 Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. This Message Courtesy of Gratitude is a Social Virtue Gratitude has th e power to transform our lives. We can go from feeling sad, lonely and self-pitying to happy, connected and blessed to be alive in no time at all. One of the reasons why this is the case is that gratitude is almost always directed towards other people. We should be thankful for what others have done for us or have given to us, or simply that they have been there for us in a time of need. This connection with other people is very powerful and gratitude often immediately con nects us with oth ers. Though we tend to think of the individual as the basic unit or atom of the larger society, an iso lated and uncon nected individual is very atypical. To paraphrase Aristotle, only a god or a monster would live apart from all society. Some gratitude exercises which work well are to think of people you are thankful for but who you havent actually thanked, and then send them a short thank you note, e-mail or text message. Another one which works well is to keep a gratitude journal, where you write down what you are thankful for at the end of each day. A related exercise is to think about what went well during the day and why, and to write about that. Christopher Simon Rejoice always, pray continually, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is Gods will for you in Christ Jesus. 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18 BROWN FUNERAL HOME 1068 Main Street, Chipley 638-4010 Hwy. 77 S, Chipley 638-4097 Hwy. 79 S., Bonifay 547-9688 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser 1364 N. Railroad, Chipley 638-0212 112 E. Virginia, Bonifay 547-9414 Stephen B. Register, CPA 1552 Brickyard Road Chipley, FL 638-4251 Page 4 Faith-Based Transitional Program introduced CHAPLAINS CONFERENCE New Bayview Church to Hold Fish Fry BETHLEHEM New Bayview Church of God of Prophecy will be holding a sh fry starting at 10:30 a.m. on May 19. Plates will include fried sh, baked beans, coleslaw and hushpuppies for a $6 donation. This is a fundraiser for the New Bayview building fund. The event will be held on U.S. Highway 2 at Millers Grocery at Millers Crossroads in Bethlehem. Camp Ground Church to Hold Bene t BONIFAY Camp Ground Church at 2136 U.S. Highway 179-A will be holding a bene t on May 19. All candidates are welcome to come and speak. Lunch will begin at 11 a.m. and will consist of sh and fried chicken, potato salad, baked beans, cake and a drink. Plates will be $5. There will be cakes and a quilt up for auction. All proceed will go to help with the upkeep of the cemetery. The Harrelsons to perform at Otter Creek PONCE DE LEON The Harrelsons will be singing at Otter Creek Methodist Church at 7 p.m., May 19. The church is four miles north of Ponce de Leon off U.S. Highway 81. Pleasant Grove Church to Hold Homecoming Services Pleasant Grove Church will hold their Homecoming Services starting at 6 p.m. on May 19. Sunday morning worship will be held at 11 a.m. on May 20. Brother James Snodgrass will bring the message and dinner will follow. For more information contact Brother Bufford Williams at 638-1189 or Julian Miller at 535-2375. Faith BRIEFS Giggle the pounds away with laughtercise

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Wednesday, May 16, 2012 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Wausau Library Monday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Holmes County Library (Bonifay) Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: Closed Washington County Library (Chipley) Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Vernon Library Monday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Sunny Hills Library Monday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences. Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section of www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership with Legacy com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212 Mrs. Anna Mable Haines, age 77, of Bonifay, passed away April 28, 2012 at Bonifay Nursing and Rehab Center. She was born July 7, 1934 in Mt. Holly, N. J., to the late Frank and Rebecca Wells. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Haines is preceded in death by one sister, Betty Peer. Mrs. Haines is survived by her husband, Neil Henry Haines of Bonifay; three daughters, Beth Johnson of Bonifay, Donna Haines and Pete of Chipley, and Judy Chambers of Bonifay; two brothers, Donald Wells and Frankie Wells; two sisters, Irene Thomas and Sherry Kirkbride; eight grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Anna M. Haines Joe Hayes, 54, died April 21, 2012. Graveside services was held, May 4, 2012. Joe Hayes Louvenia Pitts Austin, age 80, passed away May 6, 2012 at her home. She was born in Holmes County Aug. 25, 1931 to Claudia V. Buttram Pitts and William Henry Pitts, Jr. Mrs. Austin was a graduate of Holmes County High School and Miami Dade Community College. She was formerly employed by State of Florida HRS in Bonifay, Dade County Public Schools in Miami, and Division of Forestry in Chipley. She was a member of the National Association of Educational Of ce Personnel and received PSP Certi cation thru NAEOP in 1970. In 1954-1959 she served as Treasurer then President of Non-Commissioned Of cers Wives Club at OHare AFB in Chicago, IL. She is a descendant of the Rev. Elijah Andrew Buttram, founder of Carmel Assembly of God Church of which she was a long time member. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Charles E. Austin; daughter, Judith V. Austin Luterman; stepmother, Eula Mae Pitts; two sisters, Mamie Lee Pitts Bowlin and Loriene Hazel Dilmore, and a brother, John Louvaughn Pitts. She is survived by two sons, Daniel I. Austin and John A. Austin both of Bonifay; two brothers, William H. Pitts, III and wife Mary Lou of Palatka, and Ricky Pitts and wife Jennifer of Valrico; sisterin-law, Kay F. Pitts of DeLand; a sister, Brenda Oney and husband Lugie of Live Oak; three grandsons, TSgt John C. Luterman and wife Crystal, Travis C. Austin of Pensacola, and Trevor K. Austin of Bonifay; one great-granddaughter, Alexia R. Luterman; one great-grandson, Xavier Luterman and many nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Thursday, May 10, 2012 at Carmel Assembly of God Church with the Rev. Jerry Moore and the Rev. Jonathan West of ciating. Interment followed in the Carmel Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay directing. Visitation was from 10 11 a.m. at Carmel Church. Memorial contributions may be given to Carmel Church Building Fund, 1484 Carmel Church Road, Bonifay, Florida 32425. Louvenia P. Austin Mrs. Ella Jean Sims, age 78, of Bonifay, passed away May 6, 2012 at her home. She was born Aug. 10, 1933 in Westville, to the late Johnnie Lester McKuhen and Nicie Myrtle Mayo McKuhen. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Sims was preceded in death by her husband, Archie Vann Sims; three brothers, Oliver McKuhen, Charles McKuhen, and J.L. McKuhen, and aunt, Beula Wade. Mrs. Sims is survived by a son, Sheldon Vann Sims and wife, Patsy of Calhoun, Ga.; a granddaughter, Candra Leann Sims; three grandchildren, Talor Adams, Shelby Folmer, and Raven Folmer, and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. Thursday, May 10, 2012 at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Ike Steverson and the Rev. Danny Carnley of ciating. Interment followed in the St. Johns Free Will Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay directing. Family received friends from 5-7 PM Wednesday at Peel Funeral Home. Ella J. Sims Cody Samuel Darby, age 21, of Westville, passed away Friday, April 27, 2012, in Pensacola. He was born Sept. 18, 1990, in Pensacola. Cody loved the outdoors. He enjoyed all types of hunting and shing with his buddies. He attended Ponce De Leon and Paxton High School. His favorite teacher was Odon Russell. He is preceded in death by his brother, Timothy Wayne Agerton and grandmother, Mary Lois Darby. Cody is survived by his parents, Willard and Shirley Darby of Darlington, and Ralph and Ann Smith also of Darlington; brothers, Jeremy Smith, Dion and Joey Darby, and Nick, Leigh, and Chris Duncan; sisters, Kisha En nger, Jessica Peak, Emily Darby, Kim Kilgore, and Samantha Wainwright; grandparents, Pa Preston Darby, and Walter and Carleata Smith; the love of his life, Brandy Roberts and son Gunnar; two special aunts, Candy Smith and Louise Sewell; four special uncles, Larry Sewell, Rusty Smith, Ronnie Smith, and Charles Cordle, and numerous nieces and nephews. A memorial service for Cody will be held May 20, 2012 at 1 p.m. at Outreach for Christ Church in Darlington. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.daviswatkins.com. Arrangements are under the direction of DavisWatkins Funeral Home. Cody S. Darby Barry Eugene Paul, age 65 of Chipley, passed away Wednesday, May 9, 2012 in the Bay Medical Center. Barry was born June 12, 1946 in Niagara Falls, N. Y., to the late Ernest Robert and Betty Jane (Stevens) Paul. A former owner of a oor installation company in New York, he had been a resident of Washington County for the past 10 years, coming from New York. He was an avid outdoorsman and a member of the New Vision United Methodist Church in Greenhead. In addition to his parents, he is predeceased by his step-mother, Gloria Rogers Paul. Survivors include his wife of 46 years, Beverly Paul of Chipley; two sons, Phillip Paul of Kendal, N.Y. and Cameron Paul of Chipley; two daughters, Wendy Lewis and husband John of Dallas Texas, Loretta Vick and husband Larry of Alvion, N.Y.; four brothers, Robert Paul of Florida, Hugh Paul, Keith Paul and Kenny Paul all of N. Y.; two sisters, Linda Scalenski of Florida and Cheryl Arnold of N.Y.; six grandchildren and three great grandchildren. Memorial services were held Friday, May 11, 2012 at 11 a.m., in the New Vision United Methodist Church in Greenhead with the Rev. Stephanie Cox of ciating. Cremation followed. In lieu of owers, the family suggests contributions to New Vision United Methodist Church, 2661 Blocker Church Road, Chipley, Florida 32428. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net. Barry E. Paul Mr. Robert Earl Bob Jenkins, Sr., age 84, of Bonifay, passed away May 9, 2012 at Doctors Memorial Hospital in Bonifay. Mr. Jenkins was born Oct. 3, 1927 in Port St. Joe, to the late Charles Mack and Norene Dunlap Jenkins. In addition to his parents, Mr. Jenkins was preceded in death by a grandson, Sky Jenkins; four brothers, George Jenkins, Jack Jenkins, Jimmy Jenkins, and Charlie Jenkins. Mr. Jenkins was survived by his wife, Betty Jean Miller Jenkins of Bonifay; two sons, Bob Jenkins, Jr. of Ocean Springs, Miss., and Jeff Jenkins and wife Kim of Fort Walton Beach; a daughter, Sandy Brannon and husband, Mitchell of Gulf Breeze; one brother, Tom Jenkins and wife Vonzie of Bonifay; two sisters, Velma Stubbs of Bonifay, and Thelma Harts eld and husband Albert of Tallahassee; four grandchildren, Amy Jenkins, Josh Jenkins, Justin Jenkins, and Zach Brannon, and one greatgrandchild, Carter Sky Fazzio. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m., Friday, May 11, 2012 at First Baptist Church Bonifay with the Rev. Shelly Chandler and the Rev. Jeep Sullivan of ciating. Interment followed in the Bonifay City Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay directing. In lieu of owers memorial contributions may be given to First Baptist Church, 311 North Waukesha Street, Bonifay, FL 32425 or Alzheimers Association, alz.org, P.O. Box 96011, Washington, DC 20090-6011. Family received friends from 910 a.m. at First Baptist Church. Robert E. Jenkins, Sr. Mr. Charles Gregory Thomas, 37 of Ponce De Leon, died on Tuesday, May 8, 2012, at Doctors Memorial Hospital in Bonifay. Born Monday, March 31, 1975 in Geneva, Ala. Surviving are his mother Wanda Thomas of Ponce De Leon; brother, David Thomas of Ponce De Leon; sister, Sharon Tillis of Lakeland; step daughter, Krystle Stanley of Defuniak Springs, and step son, Dwayne McMillan of Defuniak Springs. Funeral service was held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, May 12, 2012 at Oak Grove Baptist Church with the Rev. Larry McGowan and the Rev. Chris Carroll of ciating. Interment followed in Oak Grove Cemetery, Ponce de Leon, with Sims Funeral Home of Bonifay directing. The family received friends from 6-8 p.m. on Friday, May 11, 2012, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel. Charles G. Thomas Leah Danielle Ryals, 26 of Trenton, went home to be with the Lord on May 8, 2012 from injuries sustained in an automobile accident. Leah was born June 4, 1985 in Valdosta, Ga., to Trisha and Bob Hicks. She has lived in Trenton for a few months coming from Ga. She was a member of Pine Grove Baptist Church in Trenton where her husband Josh served as Music Minister. Leah posted a quote recently, I love my Lord, my husband, my son and family. These are the joys of my life. I have set the Lord always before me. Because he is at my right hand, I will not be shaken! There is no life apart from Christ, either youre for Him or against Him. Leah loved life and brought color to everyones life who knew her. She was preceded in death by her brother, Charles Robert Hicks Jr. She is survived by her husband, Josh Ryals of Trenton; son, Jansen Wayne Ryals of Trenton; parents, Bob and Trisha Hicks of Wausau; sister, Robyn Necole Williams and husband Nicholas of Quinlan, Texas; grandmother, Dot McDonald of Wausau and three nephews and two nieces. Funeral services were held at 3:30 p.m., Saturday, May 12, 2012 at Shiloh Baptist Church, Chipley, with the Rev. Tim Patton and Dr. Greg Douglas of ciating. Burial followed in Wausau Memorial Gardens cemetery with Obert Funeral Home of Chipley directing. Family received friends from 2-3:30p.m., Saturday at Shiloh Baptist Church. Flowers are accepted or donations may be made to Shiloh Deaf Missions. Leah D. Ryals Obituaries Library HOURS CODY S. DARBY Crossword SOLUTION

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Wednesday, May 16, 2012 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Pay tribute to Those We Remember Memorial Day 2012 Honor the special people who have touched your life family, friends, Veterans and have passed on in this special Memorial Day tribute. Share a favorite photo, memory or tribute message in this keepsake piece which publishes Wednesday, May 23rd in the News and Times-Advertiser The Tribute will also be posted on our newspaper websites for 90 days. Photos ru n in black and white. A star graphic identies Veterans; please designate. Tribute copy, photo and payment MUST be received by Noon on Wednesday, May 16. Rates 4 sizes 1 block .............. $22 3 blocks ............... $48 2 blocks ............ $36 4 blocks ............... $62 638-0212 547-9414 In memory of our parents JANE & AL SMITH We miss you and love you! From your children, Pat, Jack and Sam Two block ad this saturday in and Girls Night Out In celebration of National Womens Health Week, the Holmes County Health Department will host Girls Night Out from 5-8 p.m. Thursday at Carmel Assembly of God. There will be food, fun, and shopping. A guest presenter will speak on Womens Health. For more information, call Traci Corbin at 547-8500, ext. 249. Washington County Arts Council scholarship The Washington County Arts Council announces its annual $500 scholarship competition. Graduating high school seniors in Washington County who wish to pursue a college degree in the arts are eligible to compete by submitting a double spaced type-written essay of 2,500 words or less on the subject of Why the arts? In these dif cult economic times, your essay should convey to the reader why you feel supporting the arts is important. Deadline for submitting is May 24 and entries should be mailed to Washington County Arts Council, P.O. Box 973, Chipley, FL 32428. For more information, contact Tonya Pippin at 638-7700 or tonya@ pippinappraisal.com. VHS to Present The Emperors New Clothes VERNON The Emperors New Clothes will take the stage at 7 p.m. May 24-25. General admission tickets are on sale in the Vernon High School Main Of ce. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students. Vernon High School is at 3232 Moss Hill Road. For more information, contact Director Kevin Russell at vhstheatre@gmail.com or 535-2046. AARP Mature Driving Class CHIPLEY Washington County Council on Aging and AARP are co-sponsoring a mature driving class for individuals age 50 and over from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on May 25. This course is developed especially for the senior driver and will be held at 1348 South Blvd in Chipley at the Washington County Council on Aging. This mature driving course is approved by the DHSMV for a three-year insurance premium reduction. There is no testing and only a minimal course fee of $12 for AARP members and $14 for non-AARP members. Please enroll by calling the Washington County Council on Aging at 638-6216. One-on-One art classes One-on-One oil, watercolor, and drawing classes are now on going. The art classes will be held at 110 W. Pennsylvania Avenue Bonifay. Please call for more details at 3298381. LDA is adding more art activities, such as: a favorite picture transferred to a T-shirt can now be done here at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery. For more information call 329-8381. Chipley Lions Club selling brooms CHIPLEY The Chipley Lions Club is selling brooms for $10 each to raise funds to help those who need assistance with eye care. For more information, contact Sherry Smith at 638-7855 or email chipleylionsclub@gmail. com. Jesse and David memorial golf tourney The Jesse and David Memorial Scramble will be June 2 at the Sunny Hills Country Club. Registration will be 7:30-8:10 a.m. with a shotgun start at 8:15 a.m. The cost will be $50 per player or $150 per team of three. Breakfast and lunch will be included. Hole sponsorships are $100. All proceeds will go to the New Roof Project at Washington Primitive Baptist Church at Hard Labor Creek. For more information, contact John Whittington at 5570006, Kenny Mitchell at 373-6177 or Jerry Tyre at 638-4409. Panhandle Watermelon Festival Pageant CHIPLEY The 56th annual Panhandle Watermelon Pageant will be at 6:30 p.m. June 8-9 at the Washington County Agriculture Center. Door admission is $5 per adult, free to children 3 years of age and younger. For more information, call Teresa Bush at 2634744 or 263-3072 or Sherry Saunders at 263-3554. Washington County Arts Council The Washington County Arts Council invites all local artists to share their paintings, drawings, sculptures, textiles or ceramics at the annual Panhandle Watermelon Festival Art Show and Sale, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 23 in the west wing of the Ag Center in Chipley. Sidewalk Art Fair BONIFAY Bring your artwork and easel to paint at the Sidewalk Art Fair in Bonifay, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 23 at 110 W. Pennsylvania Ave. There will be art displays of handmade jewelry, paintings of oil, watercolor, pencil drawings, photographs and wood carvings. Raf e tickets will be drawn, and pieces of artwork will be bid on. Refreshments will be provided. For more information, call 329-8381, email laurdendavis@gmail. com or nd Laurden-Davis Art Gallery on Facebook. Miss Firecracker Pageant VERNON The Miss Firecracker Pageant will be at 1 p.m. June 2 at the Vernon Community Center. The pageant is sponsored by the city of Vernon as a fundraiser for the annual free reworks show July 4 at the city sportsplex. Categories include Baby Miss, Toddler Miss, Tiny Tot, Future Little Miss, Little Miss, Young Miss, Pre-Teen, Teen Miss, Junior Miss, Miss Firecracker, Jr. Ms. Firecracker Sr. Ms. Firecracker, Miss Patriotic and Miss Independence. Pageant attire is formal, and all contestants under 10 will receive a small crown. There will be a queen, 1st and 2nd runner-up for each age group. Children who hold a title from last year will have to move up to the next group of competition. For registration forms or questions, contact Vernon City Hall at 535-2444 or Pageant Director Laura Brewer at 535-2074 after 5:30 p.m. Community EVENTS Special to Extra On April 5 the Reception and Medical Center hosted its rst Community Advisory Meeting and tour of the grounds. Attendees included representatives from the Union County School Board, County Commission, City Manager, City Commission, Property Appraisers ofce, Tax Collectors of ce, Clerk of the Courts of ce, Emergency Management Services, Union County Sheriffs of ce, Union County Ministerial Society, Union County Recreation Board, local business owners, Senator Steve Oelrich, Representative Charles E. Van Zant and District Secretary Donna Ellerkamp on behalf of Representative Elizabeth W. Porter. Department of Corrections of cials included: Assistant Secretary of Institutions Timothy Cannon, Assistant Secretary of ReEntry William Carr, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Administration Michelle Pyle, Legislative Affairs Director Will Kendrick, Regional Director of Institutions Chris Southerland, Regional Director of Community Corrections Barbara Scala as well as local wardens and community corrections staff. The day began with words of welcome from Warden Brian Riedl and a continental style breakfast. Following breakfast Assistant Warden Kish briefed the group on what to expect during the rest of the day. The attendees were then loaded into three transport vans and received into the Department of Corrections just as a new commitment would see RMC for the rst time. The group was treated to a tour of the Main Unit before being transported back to the training building for a power point presentation and a grilled steak lunch. The presentation began with a look into the role Community Corrections plays in and around the City of Lake Butler and the surrounding communities. The next portion offered insight into the history of RMC and its sister units as well as our on-site hospital and secure ward at Memorial Hospital Jacksonville. In addition, the presentation highlighted some of the many Re-Entry initiatives and community projects that RMC has been able to take part in over the past couple of years and the group was educated as to why Re-Entry bene ts not just those being released from prison, but each and every citizen of the State of Florida. When the presentation was complete the oor was opened for anyone wishing to voice questions, concerns or to simply share their experiences. Many of those in attendance applauded RMC for its active role in the local communities, school system and drove home the point we have desperately wanted to get outthat RMC is much more than bricks, blocks and razor wire; we truly are a member of the community. The meeting came to a close with remarks from Director Southerland and Warden Riedl on what to expect in the way of future meetings and the direction the Florida Department of Corrections is heading. RMC would like to thank those who took time out of their busy schedules to attend this rst Community Advisory Meeting and we truly believe that through active partnerships with the community and local business leaders we can make a difference. RMC holds rst community advisory meeting Sowell Tractor Co., Inc. 2841 Hwy. 77 North, Panama City 763-5441 Toll Free: 866-448-9899 www.sowelltractorco.com We Trade for Anything That Dont Eat! Financing Arranged (WAC) EVERYTHING YOU VALUE 0% Financing Available Only On Kabota Equiptment. WAC See dealer for details.

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Wednesday, May 16, 2012 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 1 P-0002400 $1,241.00 01001379 ALRED ROY 2 P-0004500 $16.43 01003830 ANGERBRANDT JOEY 3 P-0007300 $40.21 02000615 BAKER LOIS 4 P-0008600 $27.09 02002205 BAXLEY DAVID & BETTY 5 P-0010600 $27.09 02004000 BERRY BILLY 6 P-0010900 $3,036.46 02004850 BEST WESTERN 7 P-0011700 $150.11 02005360 BIDDLE TRACY 8 P-0021300 $18.89 03000199 CAIN JOHNNIE H 9 P-0023500 $35.30 03002480 CARROLL PHIL 10 P-0025800 $681.21 03004600 CHIPLEY PHYSICAL THERAPY INC 11 P-0028400 $18.89 03007225 COBIA JOHN T 12 P-0029000 $904.72 03008025 COLLINS LOGGING INC. 13 P-0033600 $79.59 03011910 CURRY JOE 14 P-0034900 $99.27 04000700 DARYL MESSER LAND WORK &TREE S 15 P-0041500 $658.65 05001025 ELLENBURG WADE 16 P-0044900 $921.13 06001085 FILL UPS FOOD STORES III INC 17 P-0045000 $1,054.00 06001086 FILL UPS FOOD STORES III INC 18 P-0056200 $319.87 08000650 HAPPY ACRES ASSISTED LIVING 19 P-0058200 $468.69 08002575 HATCH MOTT & MACDONALD LLC 20 P-0058300 $133.70 08002580 HATCHER WILLIAM DAVID 21 P-0058800 $8.22 08003025 HELMS CARLIE & SANDRA 22 P-0063500 $199.34 08006855 HOLMES MFG CORP 23 P-0063700 $18.89 08006865 HOLMES NELL 24 P-0068100 $942.56 10000955 JB’S PACKAGE STORE INC 25 P-0070600 $100.91 10003550 JONES TONY 26 P-0071900 $27.09 11000355 KELLUM NANCY K 27 P-0072700 $113.40 11000620 KING KEN 28 P-0073900 $60.96 11002056 KIRKLAND ROY 29 P-0074300 $64.32 12000075 LACHANCE DONALD & ROSEANN 30 P-0079400 $307.60 12003880 LOCKE DEVELOPMENT 31 P-0081400 $13.15 13001537 MARELL JAMES C 32 P-0081700 $110.19 13001560 MARSH PAMELA 33 P-0082400 $26.59 13003575 MAYO DIANNE ESTATE 34 P-0086200 $237.64 13007900 MILLER LESLIE 35 P-0102900 $1,232.80 16009500 POWELL WAYNE 36 P-0104200 $68.09 18000350 RALEY MILISSA 37 P-0104300 $57.04 18000450 RAPINCHUK JOHN 38 P-0104700 $308.83 18000900 REDMON ARCHIE & LORI 39 P-0115500 $22.16 19005100 SINGLETARY JOSEPH B 40 P-0116000 $39.07 19005550 SLAY JIMMY WAYNE & B 41 P-0116100 $23.80 19005650 SLAY RICHARD 42 P-0117200 $51.68 19007200 SMITH KENNETH 43 P-0125100 $150.11 20000975 TAYLOR MARTY 44 P-0125200 $100.91 20000990 TAYLOR MELISSA 45 P-0127000 $164.05 20002850 THOMLEY BRUCE 46 P-0131500 $396.18 21000999 VAGHMAR BHUPENDRA 47 P-0135000 $50.88 23001800 WATFORD STEVE 48 P-0145700 $53.33 23010022 WRIGHT ANNIE A 49 P-0146700 $84.50 25001205 YARBROUGH CHRISTINA PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES As published in the Holmes County Times-Advertiser, May 9, 2012. B B U S I N E S S USINESS G G U I D E UIDE T o P l a c e A n A d C a l l 6 3 8 0 2 1 2 o r 5 4 7 9 4 1 4 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 16 Years With, Friendly and Reliable Service!Service On All Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration & Hoods638-3611Call For Monthly Specials THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Denton's RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDA WE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS $ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENT Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709Triple O FarmsDozer & Tractor WorkO ering an array of work from land clearing to site restoration and road building. Complete clean up of site from leveling, discing to landscaping for house or preparation for planting or whatever you need Contact Jim(850) 768-2602Family Owned & Operated Wilderness Tractor ServiceBush hogging, frontend tractor work, food plotting, plowing and harrowing work. Free Estimates850-590-3479 COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. 5-5088 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 11-CA-000354 2010-3 SFR VENTURE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. BOBBY L. HAWKINS ; GLENDA C. HAWKINS, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Holmes County, Florida, will on the 24th day of May 2012, at 11:00 a.m. the Front Steps of the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425, at 11:00 A.M., offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Holmes County, Florida 511 W. BANFILL AVE. BONIFAY, FL 32425. E 1/2 COMMENCE AT THE NW CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST AND RUN EAST 670.46 FEET THENCE NORTH 60 FEET TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF BANFILL AVE. AND POB THENCE WEST 107.5 FEET THENCE SOUTH 150 FEET THENCE EAST 107.5 FEET THENCE NORTH 150 FEET TO POB. & 513 W. BANFILL AVE. BONIFAY, FL 32425. W 1/2 COMMENCE AT THE NW CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST AND RUN EAST 670.46 FEET THENCE NORTH 60 FEET TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF BANFILL AVE. THENCE WEST 107.5 FEET TO POB THENCE CONT. WEST 107.5 FEET THENCE SOUTH 150 FEET THENCE EAST 107.5 FEET THENCE NORTH TO POB. 1999 AMERSON DWMH, I.D. #(S): BHAL09086A&B 2001 OAKWOOD DWMH, I.D. #(S): HOGH18106347A&B. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 19th day of April, 2012. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT by Diane Eaton, Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser May 9, 16, 2012. 5-5089 Meeting Notice Tri-County Airport Authority’s regularly scheduled meeting for May 10, 2012 has been rescheduled for May 24, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. local time. The meeting will be held in the Tri-County Airport Terminal building. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser May 16, 23, 2012. 5-5087 PUBLIC SALE Tharp & Sons Mini Storage in Bonifay, Fl. will hold a sale for these units for non-payment of rent in accordance with the FL Statute Act 83-801-83-809. Tenants will have until May 26, 2012 to pay in full. No checks accepted. 1. Marsha Hendrix, Bonifay, Fl. 2. Unknown As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser May 9, 16, 2012. 5-5076 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-11-DP IN THE INTEREST OF : M.W. DOB: 09/10/2004 J.W. DOB: 04/03/2006 J.R. DOB: 11/13/2008 R.R. DOB: 01/14/2010 MINOR CHILDREN (SEC.39.801 (b) FS) The State of Florida to MICHAEL ROSS, natural father whose residence and address is unknown. You are hereby notified that a Petition under oath has been filed in the above styled Court for the Termination of Parental Rights in the case of M.W., J.W., J.R., and R.R. children, to licensed child placement agency for subsequent adoption. You are hereby noticed that an Advisory Hearing will be held before the Honorable Christopher N. Patterson, Judge of the Circuit Court, Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, at the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32428, on the 12th day of June, 2012, at the hour of 1:30 p.m., CENTRAL TIME. You have the right to appear with counsel at this hearing. If you can not afford legal representation, the Court will appoint counsel for you at this hearing upon the determination of insolvency. You must either appear on the date and at the time specified or send a written response to the Court prior to that time. YOUR FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THESE CHILDREN. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD OR CHILDREN. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser April 25, May 2, 9, 16, 2012.

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, May 16, 2012 Painting Inside or outside. Residential or commercial. Satisfaction Guarantee. Local references. 31 yrs experience. Dennis Glenn. 850-596-4143 C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. $4,995 Xtreme Boats 1990 Ford Van High-Top. Airconditioner in back window. Can be used for camping. A-1 Great Condition.Call Paul 326-0500 Total Down Payment$67599 Ford F150 X/Cab 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 850-215-1769 9am-9pm You automatically approved if you can make payments on time! Total Down Payment$77500 Chevy Monte Carlo 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 850-215-1769 9am-9pm You automatically approved if you can make payments on time! Total Down Payment$77501 Dodge Durango 3-Rows 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 850-215-1769 9am-9pm You automatically approved if you can make payments on time! Total Down Payment$87502 Ford Explorer 3-rows 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 850-215-1769 9am-9pm You automatically approved if you can make payments on time! Got Bad Credit? Ride Today! Buy Here/Pay Here $0 Down/1st payment Tax, Tag & Title. Call Steve 334-803-9550 Restrictions apply. Total Down Payment$157503 Chevy Silverado X/Cab 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 850-215-1769 9am-9pm You automatically approved if you can make payments on time! Total Down Payment$177503 Chevy Silverado X/Cab 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 850-215-1769 9am-9pm You automatically approved if you can make payments on time! Total Down Payment$67502 Ford F150 X/Cab 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 850-215-1769 9am-9pm You automatically approved if you can make payments on time! Total Down Payment$67598 Ford Mustang 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 850-215-1769 9am-9pm You automatically approved if you can make payments on time! NC Mountains AUCTION, May 26th. 77 Acres; Main House; (2) Guest Cottages. Alleghany/Grayson Counties. Selling as one unit. Gorgeous views; pond; stream; pastureland. (336)970-1866; (336)789-2926 www.RogersAuctionGroup.co m NC#685-VA#2 NC MountainsAvery & Watauga Counties. Online Only Auction. 345+/-Acres; 6,000+/-sf. Home/Lake Hickory; 21+/-Acres Beech Mountain; (2) Tracts Foscoe (800)442-7906 www.RogersAuctionGroup .com. NCAL#685 SUV 2007 Chrysler Aspen Limited Copper Color with chrome accents. Soft leather seating with power everything. Heated front seats (both power) and bucket heated 2nd row, with full 3rd row. DVD system w/ 4 head sets. New Brakes all the way around and new tires! Never been in an accident! All scheduled maintenance done through Dodge Dealer. Great sound system w/ Satellite Radio, the back can listen to their Own music/movie through the headsets, while the front listens to their own! 20 inch custom wheels. Factory GPS System, 2 wheel drive with towing package. Very clean and in excellent condition. 88,000 miles (mostly highway) $17,500 Call 850-303-1773 will email photos Bettie's Country Realty BETTIE L. SLAY, BROKER (Florida & Alabama)205 E. North Ave., Bonifay, Florida 32425(850) 547-3510 www.bettiescountryrealtyonline.com WE GET RESULTS NATIONAL MLSNICE 3 BR 1.5 BA BRICK ON 1 ACRE REDUCED-$98,900---10 AC FARM 3 BR HOME BARNS PASTURE-$175,000--4+ ACRES 3 BR 2 BA CHIPLEY-$79,900---NEWER 3 BR 2 BA CHIPLEY -$138,900---4 BR 1.5 BA BRICK-$89,900---3 BR HOME ON 1 AC OWNER FINANCE REDUCED$59,900---LIKE NEW 3 BR 2.5 BA ON 1+ ACRE-$169,900---2 ACRES OWNER FINANCE-$19,900---11 ACRES OWNER FINANCE REDUCED$24,900---18 ACRES 4 BR 3 BA DWMH-$139,900---2 BR HOME ON 1 ACRE-$42,500---LAKEFRONT HOME ON 18 ACRES-$99,900---13 ACRES PASTURE HWY -$59,900---3 BR HOME ON 2+AC-$79,900--NICE 2 BR BRICK-$85,900--4+ AC OLD HOMESITE-$24,900---41+ ACRES W/ 3 MH’S & 4 PONDS-$129,900---FINISH & SAVE 3 BR HOME REDUCED$28,900---NICE LAKEFRONT 2 BR 2 BA MH-$55,000---2 BR INTOWN$39,000---2 HOMES ON 13 AC HWY FRONTAGE-$159,000 5 Acres TrackFor Sale 40 miles North of PanamaCity Beach,1 mile off Hwy 79. 25K OBO. Mike Stansberry 423-253-4226 $33,500 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. Reduced Price! Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858. ORCALL866-539-4171 $2,500downincashorcertifiedfundsfor eachproperty.5%premiumoneachsale. Allsalessubjecttosellersapproval.OPENHOUSE: Sat&Sun,May19&201:00-3:00pm H&MCQ1035357,AB110;B.G. Hudson,Jr.,BK3006464,AU230 Upto2%toBuyersAgents! €NoBackTaxesorLiens €InsurableTitleGetThe Details At: BidNowFlorida.com FLORIDABank-OwnedHOMES732JOANLANE with3BRand2BA 1,144SFHomeSELLINGONSITETUES€MAY22€10:00AMAgent:NikkiFinch CoastalConceptsRealty 850.596.6101 HOMEAUCTION includingthisLocal PanamaCity Home locatedat: 2 Bdr/2Bath Mobile Home in Bethlehem Community. No pets. Non smoker. Security deposit required. Water/utility building/ lawn services provided. $400/month. (850)547-2157. 14X70 3BR/2BA Single Wide located in Chipley $500/mo, $500/depo. Call 850-209-5696 OR 850-209-1426 2BR Furnished Mobile Home CH/A. Real clean. On Bonnett Pond Rd. $500/mth $200/dep. Sorry No Pets 850-638-1462 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. For Rent Doublewide. 206 Tiller Dr2 large BR/1BA, front porch, large reardeck, carport, utilityroom, large backyard, completely remodeled. NO Pets. $595.00. 547-5606. Ref Required FOR RENT Nice mobile home convenient location in Chipley. No Pets. 850-638-4640 FOR RENT: Nice 2BR & 3BR Mobile Homes. On nice big lot in nice neighborhood. Near Sapp Community Church. For more info, call Lou Corbin @ 638-1911 or cell phone, 326-0044. Sorry No Pets. Wages Pond: Near Sunny Hills. SW 3br 2ba, All appliances, screened porch, dock, carport. $555 month + Deposit 850-233-4636 Text FL09639 to 56654 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incl’d 638-1918 2BR/1.5BA Townhouse for rent. No pets. Deposit, references required. 843 8th St, Chipley. 638-1918 FOR RENT 1 Bed apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent: Bright 2BR/2BA screened porch Townhouse apartment. Non-Smoker, references. Good location Bonifay Area 850-547-3494 or 850-532-2177 Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio & 2 bedroom units $350-450/mo. City utilities included. (850)557-7732 2BD/1BA House 901 Main St Chipley. $595 mth. Security depo $575. Available 5/10. Call 850-271-9973. For Rent 3BR/2BA Brick House inclosed garage. No Pets. 850-638-1918 For Rent: Vernon, 2BR/1BA, large porch and yard. $500 month, New floors. 850-535-9650 Home for Rent 409 Rangeline, Bonifay, new appl, CH/A, large porch, large backyard. 1 min from Middle School. Contact David 850-768-0749 Large Executive home 4,500 sq. ft., 5 bedrooms/6 bathrooms, 2 laundry rooms. Private paved driveway meets highway-Bonifay. Fully furnished. Serious calls only. $1500 per month. (850)547-2096. 2 and 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes for rent in Bonifay. No Pets. (850)547-3462. A Few Pro Drivers Needed Top Pay & 401K 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www. meltontruck.com/drive DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Become a driver for Schneider National! Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! CDL & Job Ready in just 3 weeks! (888)368-1964 Drivers -Refrigerated & Dry Van Freight. Great Pay! Quarterly Safety Bonus! Part and full-time lanes. Hometime options. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. (800)414-9569 www.driveknight.com Drivers 100% Owner Operator Co. Regional & Dedicated Home weekly Class A C.D.L. 1 yr. exp. in last 3 Call (800)695-9643 Drivers-Class A Flatbed -$-Home Weekends, Run Southeast US, Requires 1 Yr OTR Flatbed experience, & Pay UP TO .39¢/mile Call (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, LLC EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Vets welcome. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE Hiring NON-CDL and CDL drivers with 1-ton or larger pickup trucks or semi-tractors with or without wedge trailer. Great rates, flexible schedule, and up to $5,000 mileage bonus. Call (866)764-1601 or log onto ForemostTransport.com today. We respect our drivers! MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 NEW TO TRUCKING? Your new career starts now! $0 Tuition Cost No Credit Check Great Pay & Benefits Short employment commitment required Call (866)297-8916 www.joinCRST.com ESTATE SALE Fri & Sat, May 18,19. 8-12. Seasonal items, piano, boat, motor, lots more. Great prices! 744 3rd St. Moving Sale May 24 & 25, 7 a.m. till? 55 gal. fish tank, large desk, misc. furniture, other items. 2102 Wrights Creek Rd. Caryville. Fresh From the Farm Squash40¢/lb, Sweet Corn 4 for $1 or $12 for a bushel. Call Summer at 850-956-4556 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (877)206-5165 www. CenturaOnline.com For Sale New 6 string guitar. Length 36’’ width 13 1/2,reenforced neck.$ 75.00 cash. Like new, baby highchair, $35.00cash. 850-638-4437 Matt’s Removal! Garbage removal, free metal removal, yard jobs, moving jobs. We buy items. Nobody Beats My Prices! (850)547-1445, cell (850)658-2376. STOP GNAT & MOSQUITO BITES! Buy Swamp Gator All Natural Insect Repellant, Family Safe, Use Head to Toe. Available at Ace Hardware, The Home Depot & HomeDepot.com Wanted: Junk appliances. Lawn-mowers, farm and garden equipment, golf carts, satellites for free. I will pick up. Call (850)-547-0088 WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. CNA/ OFFICE STAFF Position available in Bonifay location for Assisted Administrator for 56 bed facility. No degree required, must be hard working individual willing to assist in all aspects of taking care of residents to include assisting with all daily living skills, preparing meals, and being on call as needed. Pay depends on experience. Call 547-3708 for more information Direct Care Staff: Several positions available at Assisted Living Facility in Bonifay and Vernon. Duties include; cleaning of resident’s rooms, assistance with bathes, medications and preparing meals. Pay starts at $8.25 an hour. Must be able to pass level two background screening and have reliable transportation. Call 547-3708 for more information. Hometown Care Services Hiring care givers for nonmedical in-home care. Part-time position only. Preemployment drug screening and background check required. www.hometown cares.com Call 850-535-4427 FL232619 ADVERTISE YOUR WAY TO SUCCESS! Call now to grow your business. Get your classified ad in 119 newspapers with one order. Advertising Networks of Florida—(866)742.1373 Potential to generate $4,000 to $20,000 or more a month with this activity. No selling. Experience financial and time freedom. Call (352)445-1385 Financial FreedomWay.info. Adopt: TV Producer & Counselor in 30’s, yearn for 1st baby. Alex & Allison 800-52 2-0045 FLBar42311 *Expenses Paid* YORKIE PUPPIES Two females and two males, $300 each. Vet checked and tails docked. Ready to go May 9th. 850-415-5762 or 850-415-6256. Text FL08215 to 56654 Yellow Lab House Trained. 5 years old. Very Friendly.Free to Good Home. Call 850-638-9846 AUCTION *CALL CENTER CLOSING* Computers, furniture, generator +MORE! Bid online thru May 15th www.one-more-time.us. LIVE Auction May 18th at 10am -6671 Caroline Street, Milton, FL; 18%BP online -10%BP live. Gaddis & Associates (850)-227-8280. 1 More Time Auction Services (407)466-2270 www.one-more-time.us. Fritz Real Estate & Auctions Licensed Real Estate Broker (800)-422-9155 AU2871-AB2650 ORLANDO AUCTIONS: No Minimums, No Reserves! Inventory of Cabinet Manuf. Facility, May 16. Bankruptcy & Consignment Auction, May 19. Ewald Auction & Realty, AB2473/AU1340. 10%BP. (407)275-6853 B&B Furniture 1342 North RR Avenue, Chipley. We pay cash for clean, quality furniture. and some appliances 850-557-0211 or 850-415-6866. Ask for Pasco or Carolyn An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 € 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99* Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414

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Gate Admission $5 Armbands $15 Every Day Gates Open 5pm Nightly 9am on Saturday May 16-19, 2011 Holmes County Fairgrounds Bonifay

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Gates Open: 5:30 pm Wednesday-Friday 9am on Saturday ADMISSION $5.00 Gates Open: 5:30 pm Wednesday-Friday 9am on Saturday Holmes County Fair May 16-19, 2012 SWING BY THE Farmer's Market and Livestock Show Every Day *Enhanced Checking: is account requires $50 to open. Text Message Alerts: Standard text messaging rates apply. eStatements: Paper statements available upon request for Enhanced and Elite. ATM Fees: Out of market ATM fees from other banks will be refunded with receipt. GenGold Membership: GenGold benets and services subject to change without notice. Some benets and services may require an additional fee. See www.gengold.com for complete details. Club Savings account: is is an interest bearing account. No quarterly service charge. Minimum $10 monthly automatic transfer from Enhanced is required. Minimum opening balance is $25. Customer chooses May 1 or November 1 distribution date. Early withdrawal penalty is $25. Transfers to another account or 3rd parties by pre-authorized, automatic, telephone transfer limited to 6 per month. e interest rate and APY are subject to change without notice. Account will earn no interest any day the balance falls below $1,000. Fees may reduce earnings. eDeposit: Online banking and First Federal account with 625 or better Qualile Score required for eDeposit. B: (850) 547-3624 C: (850) 638-7892 M: (850) 526-4411 best value checking for everyday life all for just best value checking for everyday life E NH A N CED C H EC KIN G 1 instant personalized Visa Debit Card ATM fees refunded with receipt* 1 box of standard checks per year online banking and bill pay eStatements* text message & email alerts* mobile banking eDeposit available (make deposits from home)* 1 non-sucient funds charge waived per year upon request GenGold membership benefits* free regular or club savings account with automatic transfer* all for just $ 6 a month Wednesday, May 16 CHUR C H AT THE FAIR NIGHT Free admission with 1 non-perishable food item. Senior Citizens ages 62 and over get in FREE Church at the Fair 6-7:30 pm Entertainment: local gospel groups 7:30-9:30 pm Door Prizes and Giveaways at 9:30 pm Thursday, May 17 SC H OOL SP IRIT N IGHT $3 admission for K-12 wearing apparel with name or mascot of their school on it. (excluding college) Boat, tractor and ATV show/sale begins Door prizes and giveaways at 9 pm Friday, May 18 F ARMER S AT THE F AIR N IGHT Free Hayrides, How to Can exhibit Entertainment: Magic Show 6-7:30 pm and Mika Moore 8-10 pm Dine for Cash and Chicken Chase Door prizes and giveaways at 9 pm Saturday, May 19 OLD H OL ME S D A Y Kids 12 and under get in FREE per paying adult Fair Fest 2012 12-6 pm 9 am 6 pm Old Holmes Day Exhibits, Native American Village and Demos, Antique Tractors, Farmer's Market Entertainment with Mika Moore 10-11 am Entertainment with Cornerstone Bluegrass Gospel 12-1:30 pm Political Rally 2-4 pm Chili Cook O 3-4 pm 4-H Fashion Show 6:30-7:30 Entertainment with Ron French All Heart Music 8-10 pm



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Wednesday, MAY 16 2012 Pay Tribute to Those We RememberMemorial Day 2012Honor the special people whove touched your life family, friends, Veterans and have passed on. This special Memorial Day tribute publishes on May 23 in the News and the Times and our websites. Contact us at 850-638-0212 or 547-9414 for more details. By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY Bonifay will be the rst stop of many as Enterprise Florida hosts a Regional Training Session in Holmes County at the invitation of the Holmes County Development Commission on Wednesday, May 23. Enterprise Florida is hosting regional training sessions to give updates on key programs, economic development processes, marketing initiatives, incentives, international services and more. Attending the training sessions will be Economic Development Ofce members, staff and Enterprise Florida Stakeholder council members from across the region including Holmes County Development Commission, Washington County Chamber of Commerce, Jackson County Development Council, Bay County Economic Development Alliance and Walton County Economic Development Alliance to name a few. Bonifay is the starting point of the Northwest Regions training sessions provided by Enterprise Florida and will continue to Tampa, Jacksonville, Fort Myers, Orlando, Sebring and will complete their training tour in Fort Lauderdale in mid-September. It was an honor for Holmes County to be chosen as the location and rst of theses sessions to be held throughout the state, said Elaine May eld, Administrative Assistant for the Holmes County Development Commission. This will also be Jim Brooks last week as Executive Director of the Holmes ersonnel from JCJ Amusements were busy setting up this years Holmes County Fair Midway attractions on Monday in Bonifay. The Holmes County Fair and Farmers Market begins at 5:30 p.m. today with opening ceremonies. The fair continues nightly until Saturday with gates opening at 5 p.m. CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY From the same public library that brought you a snow day in June, the Holmes County Public Library hopes to out-do themselves this year with a variety of fun and free activities for the kids this summer, including NASA, a space suit and a portable planetarium. Director of the HCPL Susan Harris conrmed that there was more than 48,000 pounds of ice imported and used to create last years Summer Snow Day in Bonifay, which brought in almost 1,000 children. Its all about the children, Harris said. And this year we want to make it even bigger and even better. This years summer program will be held from June 21 through July 19. Kicking it off on June 21 will be a visit and program from NASA, including an actual space suit for a photo opportunity for the children to dress up as an actual astronaut. Following that on June 28 there will be a Discovery Dome Planetarium available. This is a portable planetarium with a variety of shows for the children, ranging from stars to solar systems, Harris said. We want to show that they can dream as big as they want to and its not too late to dream of becoming an astronaut. On July 12 there will be entertainment from The Groove Club Family Entertainment, which includes live singing with fun interactive songs and a funky DJ booth, dances with sing-a-longs and lots of audience participation, comedy, a By CECILIA SPEARS547-9414 | @WCN_HCT cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY After months of discussion, research and analysis from multiple Holmes County Agencies the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners voted to put into motion the process of relocating Holmes County 911 Dispatch and Director Clint Erickson out to the new Emergency Operations Center during their regularly scheduled meeting on May 8 with a vote of 3 to 2, with Commissioner Jim King and Chairman Ron Monk voting no. Space became an issue with the 911 Dispatch when a grant gave the department $300,000 worth of new and additional equipment. The new equipment had to be in place and operational by June 2013, but time was of the essence as their current equipments warranty was running out and the new equipment would have to nd a new storage place till space was acquired. The options were narrowed down to two possibilities: expand their current space or move to the new EOC.Bonifay rst stop for regional training 50www.bonifaynow.com Volume 122, Number 5For the latest breaking news, visitBONIFAYNOW.COM Phone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 INDEXArrests .................................A3 Opinion ................................A4 Outdoors ..............................A6 Sports ..................................A7 Extra ....................................B1 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B7 IN BRIEFNew Miss Poplar Springs crowned B1 Patriots Party meets ThursdayThe Northwest Florida Patriots Party will meet at 6 p.m. Thursday at the Around the Corner Grill in Bonifay. Guest speaker will be Elaine Thompson, chairwoman of the Concerned Patriots of Jackson County. The topic will be Agenda 21. The public is invited to attend.Poplar Springs athletic banquet TuesdayThe Poplar Springs High School annual athletic banquet will be held at 6 p.m. May 22 at the high school. The public is invited to attend.Health Department offers free Zumba classesCommunity Zumba classes (Latino dancing) will be offered every Tuesday night until June 26 at the Bonifay Rec. Center. Classes are free and will take place from 6-7 p.m. The instructor is Justin Cox out of Panama City. Zumba is a great workout. No registration is required.Sessions to focus on development, services and more See TRAINING A2 From Staff ReportsTALLAHASSEE The Florida Commission on Ethics dismissed a complaint against Bonifay Police Chief Christopher Wells for lack of legal suf ciency, according to a report released on May 9. The complaint was led by Jesse Elijah Rogers of Bonifay and alleged that Wells allowed a Bonifay police of cer to arrest Rogers on criminal charges, including a charge of burglary of what Rogers describes as his own home. Rogers also alleged that the police chief allowed the same of cer to burglarize and tamper with Rogers mailbox, along with mailboxes of his father and a former neighbor, according to the commissions report and order dismissing the complaint. The complaint was dismissed for failing to constitute a legally suf cient complaint, according to the dismissal order. The commissioners reviews for legal sufciency are limited to questions of jurisdiction and determinations as to whether the contents of the complaint are adequate to allege a violation of the Code of Ethics, according to the news release. As no factual investigation precedes the reviews, the commissions conclusions do not reect on the accuracy of the allegations made in these complaints, according to the release.Ethics Commission dismisses complaint against Bonifay chief Holmes County OKs 911 Dispatch moveSee COMPLAINT A2 See DISPATCH A5Ready for funHolmes County Fair starts tonightCECILIA SPEARS | Times-AdvertiserP Library going big at summer programSee LIBRARY A5Kicking it off will be a visit and program from NASA, including an actual space suit for a photo opportunity for the children to dress up as an actual astronaut.

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LocalA2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, May 16, 2012 Itseemsobviousinretrospect, buttherewasatimewhengetting electricityoutsideofthecitylimits wasnt a given. Today, the spirit of communitythatco-opswerebuiltupon continuestothrive.Andasmemberswe canalllendahandbysavingenergy. Learnhowatwww.west orida.coop.ELECTRICCO-OPSWERE CONSTRUCTEDWITH LINES,POLESANDTHE FOOLHARDYNOTIONTHAT WEALLPROSPERBY HELPING EACH OTHER. Its just what the doctor ordered.Grasshopper True ZeroTurn mowers are the perfect prescription to cure the aches and pains of mowing. Our humanomic design, foam-padded steering levers and the industrys most comfortable seat are standard features, so operators stay fresh, focused and alert. Test drive a Grasshopper today. Doctors orders. Its just what the doctor ordered. 2008 The Grasshopper Company YOUR NEXT MOWERVisit grasshoppermower.com for more information. Its just what the doctor ordered.www.lanesoutdoor.com901 Hwy. 277 Chipley, FL(850) 638-4364 0%interest for 48 month nancing available J.D. OWENS CARPET OUTLETwill save you money EVERYDAY!!! J.D. OWENS CARPET OUTLET2597SpringcreekRoad, Marianna, FL3 1/2 Miles East of Marianna on Hwy. 90 (850) 526-3619 Textured PlushCarpet7999Super Thick 13 Loose LayVinyl49FHA QualityVinylSF SF SFEngineered Value Grade3 Oak Plank$229SFAREA RUG SALE!Over 200 In Stock BONIFAYNURSING & REHAB CENTER 306 West Brock Avenue Bonifay, FL 32425850-547-9289 www.BonifayRehab.comMake the Move 24HourSkilledNursing forShort-term&LongtermCare Inpatient&Outpatient PhysicalTherapy, Occupational TherapyandSpeech Therapy MainDiningAreawith Fireplace AdditionalDiningArea aswellasPrivate DiningArea IceCreamParlorwith VisitorSeatingArea Visitor/PatientLounges CableTV EnclosedCourtyard Activities RehabilitationGym Beauty/BarberSalon LaundryServices Admissions7Daysa Week Correction Policy It is the Policy of the Washington County News and the Holmes County Times-Advertiser to correct all errors that appear in news stories. If you wish to report an error or clarify a story, call 638-0212 or email news@chipleypaper.com. Due to a press production error, the Personal Property Taxes listings published May 9 in the Times-Advertiser are incorrect. The correct 2011 listings are in todays edition of the Times-Advertiser. County Development Commission before moving into the Executive Director position for the Northwest Florida Business Development Council, d.b.a. Opportunity Florida. Brooks last day as Executive Director of the Holmes County Development Commission is May 25 and his rst day as Executive Director of the Northwest Florida Business Development Council, d.b.a. Opportunity Florida is June 4. I dont look at it as though Im leaving Holmes County but that Im working for Holmes County on another level, said Brook. About Enterprise Florida, Inc. Enterprise Florida Inc. (EFI) is a public-private partnership serving as Floridas primary organization devoted to statewide economic development. EFIs mission is to facilitate job growth for Floridas businesses and citizens leading to a vibrant statewide economy. EFI accomplishes this mission by focusing on a wide range of industry sectors, including clean energy, life sciences, information technology, aviation/aerospace, homeland security/defense, nancial/professional services, manufacturing and beyond. In collaboration with a statewide network of regional and local economic development organizations, EFI helps to improve Floridas business climate, ensuring the states global competitiveness. Enterprise Florida is committed to assisting companies con dentially with their expansion and location plans. We provide site selection services, demographic information, incentive information, trade leads and much more. We also coordinate introductions to our network of economic development partners throughout the state. For more information on Opportunity Florida, www.opportunity orida.com/. TRAINING from page A1 Setting it STRAIGHT The commission took action on 34 complaints during the May 4 meeting, according to Chairman Robert Sniffen. The commission also adopted a formal opinion regarding a county commissioner who had questions about con icts of interest. The opinion nds that a con ict would be created for a county commissioner to be employed by a company providing services to his county or to constitutional of ces of his county. However, a con ict is not created if the company were to provide services to other counties or municipalities located inside or outside his county, provided that the company does not pursue providing services regarding situations where one or more of the other counties/municipalities and his county have combined, contracted or cooperated with each other to provide services. In another opinion, the commission determined that a con ict of interest would be created where a city commissioner, who also sits on the Community Redevelopment Agency, applies for redevelopment incentive grants from the citys redevelopment division. COMPLAINT from page A1

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LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A3Wednesday, May 16, 2012 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." www.mulliseye.com Chipley Office We are located directly across the parking lot from the Walmart in Chipley"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS,CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITYAPPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley OfficeBoard Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 5-31-12 FREEEYE EXAM CODE: WC00ToddRobinson,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeon LeeMullis,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeon Special to the Times-AdvertiserPONCE de LEON The town of Ponce de Leon approved of a tower lease agreement for wireless equipment facility with the Florida Rural Broadband Alliance In New Business during their regularly scheduled meeting on Thursday, May 3. Town Attorney Lyndia Spears said that she had been in contact with Jim Brooks of the Holmes County Development Commission concerning a tower lease agreement for a wireless equipment facility between the Florida Rural Broadband Alliance and the Town of Ponce de Leon. The Federal Government for government grants requires the agreement. The Northwest Florida Rural Area of Critical Economic Concern wants the Town to agree to lease the towns water tower for broadband communications. Chipley, Vernon and Westville have already agreed to the agreement. If the town signs the agreement and the company uses the Towns water tower, the Town would receive $2,200 each month after 5 years. After discussion, the town agreed tentatively to approve the agreement. In un nished business, Spears explained to the mayor and council that she had received a quitclaim deed from the Holmes County School Boards attorney, Lucas Taylor, for the old Ag shop. Since the School Board does not own the property, the only thing they can rightfully give is a leasehold interest in the building. Taylor stated that the School Board did not realize that they did not own the property until a title search had been completed. Spears said she tried to contact the actual owner, Mary Alfred, about the building but was not able to reach her and that she did not think it was in the best interest of the Town to accept the quitclaim deed. Spears stated that she would continue to try and contact Alfred. On May 7, Spears relayed the message that she had reached Alfreds son via telephone. He said that Alfred is presently in a health care facility and due to her condition and care needs he is unable to donate the property to the town. The State has required him to list the property for sale to reimburse the State for services provided. A letter was sent to Carl Gillman advising him of the legalities involved with the building. In administration, the mayor and council were told that Blue Rhino has vacated the old shirt factory building as of April 30 and Debbie Kolmetz at Panhandle Reality has listed the building for lease for $1,800 per month. Kolmetz asked that the building be spruced up on the outside and inside in the event she shows it. The building does need work, and the Mayor and Council discussed the subject of Daryl Dockery having items in the building. Kolmetz had spoken with Dockery about the items left and he told her that he had an agreement with Blue Rhino that in return for storing the items, he would pay the power bill. The Mayor and Town Council agreed that a letter be sent to Dockery giving him 30 calendar days to remove the items or the items would become the property of the town. April 29 May 5, 2012 Dillon Birge, 20, domestic battery Melissa Kneller Blair, 26, driving under the in uence, fail to stop and remain at a crash involving injury, hold for Geneva County Ala., operating vehicle with no license, grand theft auto Rusty Lee Bryant, 32, out of county warrant, fugitive from justice Lisa Michelle Carroll, 45, uttering a forged instrument Rocky Charles Darley, 52, domestic battery Ronnie Ladale Dearman, 39, violation of probation Teresa Jean Goodwin, 35, out of county warrant Tracy Michelle Green, 44, out of county warrants, fugitive from justice Madeleine Michelle Hall, 40 leaving the scene of an accident, no valid drivers license Rebecca Jean Hess, 39, petit theft, criminal trespass Joseph Ray Howell, 25, violation of probation Charles Jeremy Sasser, 32, violation of probation James Self, 59, driving under the in uence, driving while license suspended or revoked second offence Jennifer Lynn Teska, 35, violation of probation Dwayne Ricardo Wilson, 40, hold for Hillsborough County April 30 May 4, 2012 Marriages Jacob Edward Nelson 6/24/1048 of Darlington and May Madglene Hurley 13/23/1943 of Gaskin Brandon Lee Palmer 8/4/1988 of Caryville and Mary Grace Barnes 11/29/1994 of Bonifay James Dennis McDaniel 1/30/1964 of Enterprise and Quillian Wall Stokes 3/11/1977 of Enterprise Divorces Richard Walsingham and Rhonda S. Walsingham Arrest REPORT Marriages & DIVORCES Ponce de Leon OKs tower lease agreement

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What do you think of a county fair in the spring? In an attempt to rejuvenate the Holmes County Fair which was chartered Oct. 5, 1959, and has been traditionally held in the fall, will be in May this year. May should prove to be a good time for the fair, as that will time it well ahead of the NW Fl Championship Rodeo and football season not to mention fall and winter holidays, Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas. The current board chaired by Joey Fisanick has an exciting list of activities and personalities lined up for Wednesday through Saturday. On the midway which is always popular with the young is CJC Amusements. Events will kick off Wednesday, May 16, at 5:30 p.m. beginning with TV personality Red Holland as Master of Ceremonies. He will be around all evening to Howdy with old friends. Wednesday night is also designated as church night and locals are invited to worship at the fair. In addition, the Holmes County Miss, Jr. Miss, and Little Miss will be on hand to cut the ribbon and welcome fairgoers. Throughout the week, James and Anita Faircloth, local artisans who display their talents at Florida State Fair each year as well as fairs and festivals all over, will be on hand to demonstrate the crafting of whips and corn shuck dolls. James also will demonstrate the skill of whip cracking, from which Floridians get the name of Florida Crackers. The magic of Christopher Thomas, who will appear on Americas Got Talent later this year, will be a feature of May 18. An added attraction this year is the Pioneer Days which will go on throughout the fair. Skills used in earlier days will be demonstrated such as blacksmithing by Mike Murphy. Every evening and all day on Saturday, a Farmers Market will be available for local farmers to sell their fresh produce or other homemade or home grown products. Hopefully, I will be there with some fresh Tison bueberries all day Saturday. Also on Saturday, a chili cook-off will be 3-4 p.m. that day. The North Bay Clan of the Lower Muscogee Native American Dancers will also be featured that day. As you would expect to nd at a county fair, a 4-H fashion show, livestock show, antique tractor show, youth public speaking, photography, baked goods, canned goods, jelly and jam exhibits along with educational and church exhibits will complete the fair. Since this is a major election year, the fair is expected to draw many of the political hopefuls from the area. On Saturday night, following entertainment by Ron French and All Heart Music, a political rally will be held with candidates for ofce giving you reasons you should vote for them. Fair week is a good time to mix and mingle with them and determine your choice for the most qualied to get your vote. When the fair was chartered, Clifton Lyons Sr., a driving force in the chartering, was elected chairman. Other members included Jack Tison, vice-president, C. U. Storey, county agent, treasurer, and Sally Childers, Home Demonstration Agent, secretary. The board of directors was J.Paul Grifth, Leonard Balaban, Ben Ellis, Ruth Cooey and James Powell. Other members of the fair board were Don Treadwell, Catherine Lyon, Annie Lee Williams, W.C. Revell, C.L. Bass, Lois Huggins, Nell Deal, Charity Carroll, Mrs. Bob Johnson, Mrs. Ray Gillis, Frances Majors, Wayne Manning, M.M. Gilman, Hinton McKinnon, Gov E. Webb, Roy Clanton, Remus Franklin, Denice Brown and Sallie Wilcox. Many of the ladies on the board were president of their respective Home Demonstration Club in their community. This years board includes Clint Erickson, fair manager, Misty Erickson, Felicia Fisanick, Donna Melvin, Kim Cullifer, Ross Boman, Kathryn Boman, Harold Smith, Velma Whitaker, Kyle Hudson, David Perry, Debbie Kolmetz and Dawn Barone. See you at the fair!Wednesday, May 16, 2012 The Holmes District School Board will accept sealed bids until May 29, 2012 for L.P. Propane Gas, Grease Trap Pumping, Garbage Disposal, Pest Control and Fire Extinguishers for the 2012-2013 School Year. For more information or to receive a bid packet contact Larry Zorn 547-6674 x 232. OpinionA4 | Holmes County Times-AdvertiserCONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bareeld: nbareeld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, Sp PORTS OR OpPInNIOnN news@bonifaynow.com CLa ASSIFIED & cCIRcCULaA TIOnN Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com 1-800-645-8688 ADVER TISInNG 850-547-9414 POSTMASTER: S S end address change to: Holmes County T T imes-A A dvertiser P.O O Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USSPS S 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc., 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2012, Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc. All Rights Reserved. COp PYriRIGHtT NOticeTICE: The entire contents of the HHolmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc. Nicole P. Bareeld, Publisher Randal Seyler, Editor Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.Mayor: IInmate health reports were not falsied intentionallyDear Editor, On July 25-26, 2011, I prepared, dated and signed two incident reports regarding health issues of two inmates. The information I provided in the reports was correct and accurate to the best of my knowledge. These reports were sent to the wardens ofce, where they were processed. When I signed the completed reports, I used the date they were originally created by me. No changes had been made. The reports reected the situation as I reported on July 25-26, 2011. There was no intent on my part to falsify the reports in question. In the course of the investigation, I answered each question posed to me the only way knew, honestly and truthfully. My friends know thats who I am. I cannot account for the interpretation of the answers given. I have been told by the Department of Corrections that this unfortunate situation is behind us and we are moving forward. I am still proudly employed with the Department of Corrections and look forward to returning to work on May 18. I am also looking forward to continuing my service to the City of Chipley, its employees and its citizens. Over the past 24 years, I have strived to do what is best for Chipley and serve the city honesty and integrity. I will continue to do so. Linda Cain Chipley mayorWW ar on drugs a necessary ghtDear Editor, I often read the Washington County News. I see its pages plagued with people of all ages that have fell victim to a demon I call drug addiction. These arrests clean up the streets of this ne community and make it a safer place to live. It shows that Washington County has waged was on drugs and will not tolerate them. I cant help but wonder though if this war is one that cant be won. Drug addiction spreads rapidly like a contagious disease. What starts out as fun to these individuals turns into a demon that they can no longer control. The go through life like a run away train with no brakes. Addicts no longer have a choice; an unbelievable craving and desire for their drug of choice control them. Sadly there are only two different destinations for these run away trains (addicts). They either end up in jail (prison) or the graveyard. I speak from experience and am one of the lucky ones. I write this while sitting in a prison cell I would like to see another destination or a third option available to these poor lost souls. I would like to see more treatment centers and detox places that are willing to help. I would like to read stories in this newspaper about groups that are reaching out to help these people that have made mistakes. If there were more places available to help those that are battling addiction maybe there would be less pictures in this paper of drug arrests. Addiction is a disease that does not go away. If we look up these individuals and never offer them any treatment, they will return right back to that runaway lifestyle upon release. More substance abuse treatment is needed in and outside of jails and prisons. The best approach to the war on drugs is treatment. If we show the addicts that they can live a drug free life we are making headway on the war on drugs. Addicts dont necessarily stop their drug use just because they are incarcerated. Drugs run rampant in the prison system, treatment is what is needed. Many want to change and pray for strength but it seems that society has locked us up and forgot about us. We are all created in the image of God even the addicts. Have compassion in your hearts and realize its not the person thats bad but the demon spirit of addiction that controls them, and treatment is the answer no prison. Respectfully,Bobby Ray Rackley Graceville Correctional FacilityWANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on F F acebook or tweet us @W W CN_H H CT T Letters TOTO THETHE EDITOR The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Freedom Communications. Holmes County fair moves to MayHappHAPPY cCORnNERHazel Wells Tison Recently I saw an article on Yahoo listing the best and worst jobs, and as usual, journalism was listed as one of the worst possible careers. The list was provided by CareerCast.com, and like most things on the Internet, the list should be taken with about a pound of salt. Newspaper reporter was No. 5 on the worst job list. Journalism is the career I actually went to college to learn, and journalism as been on the worst jobs list pretty much every year since I was in college in the early 80s. This year it was sandwiched in between oil rig workers (No. 4) and waiters and waitresses (No. 6). The worst list was topped by lumberjacks, and included dairy farmers at No. 2, enlisted military at No. 3, and finished up with meter readers (7), dishwashers (8), butchers (9) and broadcasters (10). Journalism is one of those jobs like fireman, policeman or model railroad shop owner its not a career that anyone with half a brain goes into expecting to get rich. I always enjoyed writing. One of my heroes of journalism was my professor and mentor, Dr. Joel Gambill, longtime chairman of the journalism department at Arkansas State University. I first met Dr. Gambill the summer between my junior and senior year in high school, which would have been 1976, when I attended a journalism camp at ASU. When I walked into his office in 1982 after finishing high school and serving in the Navy for four years, he called me by first name and asked where Id been apparently hed been expecting me sooner. Thirty years later, Im still a journalist. Dr. Gambill spent 40 years at ASU, and 36 of those years he was chairman of the department. He retired in April of 2010, but he has students, like me, spread across the country carrying on, I hope, in a manner of which hed approve. My idea has always been to treat people the way youd like to be treated, Dr. Gambill said. Not a bad motto to live by. I think the importance of a job isnt based on how much it pays, or what benefits you get, but by how what you do helps others. Journalism may not be the best job, but it has its moments especially when you can provide a service to the community. RanRANDaAL S SEYLEREditorWorst job a matter of perspective

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The City of Bonifay currently is allowing them to use one of their buildings rent-free and agreed to allow 911 Dispatch to expand as long as Dispatch assumed all of the expenses. Several issues arose from remaining in their current building, which included air conditioning as well as time, money and labor to expand. Another issue was that the rst instillation of the new equipment was free, but if they had to move the equipment in the next ve years it would cost them $20,000 to move. We want to make sure that wherever this equipment goes that there is where it will stay for at least ve years, said Erickson. Originally the plan was that 911 Dispatch would be located with the other emergency management services at the new EOC building, however at the time they werent allowed to occupy the same space due to possible interference. This year that restriction has been lifted as long as the two entities werent causing an interference with one another in any way. The next obstacle to arise was that if Dispatch was to move out to the EOC they would have to establish a new T1 line, which is required by law to have for emergency services. Currently the T1 line they are using is shared by the Holmes County Sheriffs Of ce and to create a new T1 line would create an additional $681 expense to the HCSO, which with the sheriffs of ce current budget restraints would be next to impossible. Even with the budget restraints Sheriff Tim Brown said he was more then willing to help 911 Dispatch in any way possible. Right now Im in a neutral zone, said Brown. Im ne with any decision you make, whether its to move or to stay. Erickson said that he had done some research and found that as of right now the State could not help pay for a new T1 lines monthly expenses, but that they could apply in a year to be nanced in next years budget. Erickson said that the plus to moving out to the EOC was that they would have more then enough room, which included the ability to expand a little in the future if need be. It would cost $13,000 to move to the new location, said Erickson, but they had enough in the budget to pay for $8,000 of the cost. King then made a motion that Dispatch is moved the EOC but Erickson remain behind in another of ce to be closer to the people. It would be an extra mile for people to have to go just to put in their address, said King. Im just looking out for the citizens. I dont want to create any extra headaches for them. The vote failed with a vote of 2 to 3, with Commissioners Kenneth Williams and Monty Merchant and Chairman Monk voting no. Williams then motioned that the BOCC write a formal letter to the state requesting to move the 911 Dispatch to the EOC. The vote was passed with a vote of 3 to 2, with King and Monk voting no. BOCC approved of declaring the week of May 6 through 12 National Arson Awareness Week, presented to them by the Division of State Fire Marshall. County Engineer Cliff Knauer gave a name for the road selected for the Small County Road Assistance Program, which was County Road 181 from County Road 185 to the Walton County line. This portion of the road was recently patched due to the extensive holes that were in the road, one of which was described as being big enough to hide a Pinto at a previous meeting. After extensive research Knauer had found that the base material of the road was insuf cient to properly support a road without regular and extensive maintenance. The base material was found to be several layers of plastic clay in some areas and rotting trees and debris in others. I would like to ask you to check out the section of CR 181 in Westville before making your decision Cliff, said King. Knauer agreed to look at the road but strongly advised that something must be done to the section of CR 181 he mentioned soon. That section of County Road 181 is going to be in really bad shape by 2017 and no amount of patching will help after that, said Knauer. Knauer gave an update for the 319 Grant to x the erosion problems on Mt. Zion Road. Due to the economy this is one of the only grants left and it also has one of the highest matches Ive ever seen, said Knauer. It was explained that a $200,000 grant would have a $80,000 match, but that he was still looking into the possibility of an in-kind match, which means that the county pay the match in materials or labor. He said at the moment he seen that it only stated that a cash match was required. It would help the scoring of that road if we had some background water testing, Knauer said. Holmes District School Board PUBLIC NOTICEPersonnel representing the Holmes District School Board will be available at the Board Room at 701 E. Pennsylvania Avenue on May 31, 2012 at 3:30 p.m. to provide information and accept input on all federal and state projects. Projects up for discussion at this time will include but are not limited to: IDEA, Part B Entitlement These funds are allocated for the support of special projects which will contribute to the solution of persisting state-wide needs in the education of exceptional students. IDEA, Part B Preschool Entitlement These funds are allocated to provide special Title I Part A (Title I Basic) program provides services to help schools with high concentrations of students from low-income families be able to offer high-quality education academic achievement standards and state academic assessments. Title I, Part D, Neglected and Delinquent (Prevention and Intervention Programs, for youth who are neglected, delinquent, or at risk.) This programs purpose is to improve educational services to youth in local and state facilities for neglected and delinquent youth. These youth must have the opportunity to meet the same state content and performance standards that all youth in the state will be expected to meet. Title II, Part A Teacher and Principal Training/Recruiting This programs purpose is to and principals. Title II, Part D (Enhancing Education Through Technology) The primary goal of this program is to improve student academic achievement through the use of technology in elementary and secondary schools. Title III Part A individual student needs. The program uses either English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) or home language instructional strategies. Title IV Part B-21st Century Community Learning Centers-This program provides afterschool and summer enrichment programs for students. Title VI, Part B, Subpart 2 Rural Education Achievement Program These funds are allocated to provide additional support to rural or low income districts. Race to the Top -This programs purpose is to carry out a broad range of strategies designed to improve our lowest performing schools and increase the academic achievement of our students. POLITICAL CAMPAIGN PRINTINGGet the message out with MEET THE CANDIDATE BBQ FOR JOHN SMITH FULL COLOR POSTCARDS ELECTJOAN FULLERFOR COUNTY SEATGLOSSY FULL COLOR RACK CARDS GLOSSY FULL COLOR DOOR HANGERS WE PRINTMORE THAN JUST NEWSPAPERSCALL KIM FOR FREE QUOTE638-0212posters yers business forms all types brochures newsletters postcards letterheads envelopes labels posters tickets yers rubber stamps specialty items and moreSTOCK DESIGN PADDLE FANS It Pays to Own Orange$0 Down & 0%A.P.R.Financing for 60 Months*or Valuable Customer Instant Rebates** Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2012Smart Engineering Reliable Long-lasting Value Kubota already sets the bar for well-engineered, high-performance compact tractors. Now were setting a money saving standard, too. For a limited time, you can save big on your next Kubota quality equipment that works hard for you todayand holds its value tomorrow. www.KubotaRewards.comL3800 B3300 Let your authorized dealer show you how rewarding it is to own a Kubota. Offers end June 30, 2012. Annual Graduation Celebration SectionSend congratulations to the special graduates in our community!The Graduation Section publishes Wednesday, May 30. Place your ad by noon on Monday, May 21. For rate information call 638-0212 or 547-9414.Featuring seniors from the following high schools:Holmes County, Bethlehem, Poplar Springs, Ponce de Leon, Chipley, Vernon, Graceville, Cottondale GRADUATE FAMILY & FRIENDSSend personal congratulations to your graduate with an announcement on the Graduate Tribute listing in the Graduation section. For $15 per graduate well list: graduates name, school, up to 20 words of personal tribute, and the family members or friend sponsoring the listing.Tribute payment and wording must be received by 2 p.m. Wednesday, May 21. This offer is for individuals only, not businesses. Send congratulations Graduation LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A5Wednesday, May 16, 2012 DISPATCH from page A1little magic, hand puppets and storytelling with a lifesized bear or elephant that joins in. The last day, Harris said, would be a blast ending at the Holmes County Agricultural Center with games, fun and free food. Were able to give as much as we do to our children because of the wonderful support shown throughout the community, said Harris. Doctors Memorial Hospital supplied food last year, Wells Fargo donated books, Bank of Bonifay, now First Federal, gave us $1,000 with their Swipe-n-Save program, where every time you use youre debit card a dollar is saved towards a donation of $1,000 to a program in need in Holmes County. This is just to name a few of the many who show their unending support to us. She said a big asset and the reason why they are able to receive grants is because of the support of the Friends of the Library. There are only a few of them, but boy do they really care about the library work hard to ensure that the library is able to continue to do the best they can for the community, said Harris. Were still in need of more friends, for those who are interested. Harris said there would be eight programs a day starting at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. She also encourages all children interested on joining to register as soon as possible to know how many they will be accommodating. Register at the library or call 547-3573. LIBRARY from page A1

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Wednesday, May 16, 2012 OUTDOORS Page 6www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comSend your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com ASection By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com Wetsuit, check. Air tank, check. Mask, check. Area divers soon will be adding passport to their equipment checklists as they dive the new Panhandle Shipwreck Trail, set to launch in late May. Through the development of the trail, divers will be able to track their underwater journeys in Northwest Florida by passport in an effort by the Florida Division of Historical Resources to bring divers to the Panhandle again and again. It will feature 12 shipwrecks, starting in Pensacola and ending with the wreck of the Vamar in Port St. Joe. Lindsay Smith, an underwater archaeologist with the Florida Bureau of Archaeological Research, is part of a small team developing the trail through a grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The shipwrecks are amazing, theres just a wonderful variety (in the Panhandle), said Smith, who noted it was dif cult to pinpoint only 12 wrecks. Theyre all very close together and theres just so many to choose from. There are tons of wrecks in the Panhandle, and were only highlighting 12 of them. Smith said the ultimate goal in the development of the trail is to help boost the dive economy throughout the region. The Panhandle has a very strong diving community, Smith said. As far as scuba shops, theres probably about 20. The idea for the Panhandle Shipwreck Trail came from State Underwater Archaeologist Roger Smith. He thought it would be a great thing for the Panhandle because tourism kind of lagged after the oil spill, Smith said. Were really hoping to get some return tourism and invigorate the local dive communities. Smith and the team of underwater archaeologists also are developing a website, which will be complete with underwater photography and video footage of the Panhandle wrecks featured and links to the dive shops on each leg of the trail. Because of the enthusiastic response the team has received for the Shipwreck Trail, the team assembled some 25 to 30 hours of underwater video footage for all of the trail candidates, as well as historic photographs. The site will feature 13 short videos, the rst introducing the trail and passport and one highlighting each wreck. The passports are in the nal stages of development, and Smith said they are hoping to distribute the passports to area dive shops and launch the new website before Memorial Day at the end of this month. The passport will serve as a marketing tool, dive log and souvenir and will hopefully encourage return visitation to the Panhandle area, said Smith. Divers will log visibility, water temperature and weather conditions, pressure and dive time, and record their dive buddy and charter boat from each dive. Dive shops and charter boats will have the opportunity to offer the passport to divers for a small registration fee to participate in the trail, with a registration form to provide information about each passport holder. The shops and boats each will carry an of cial stamp to verify each dive completed on the trail to be paired with the signature of the captain on the passport. Before the project came to fruition, Smith said the group of underwater archaeologists rst needed to speak with area dive shop owners in order to see what type of project would be most bene cial. After the NOAA grant was received, we decided to go into the different communities and gauge interest, Smith said. We went and talked to local dive shop owners about what their customers look for in dive trips. Smith said the response from local shop owners about the development of a shipwreck trail was phenomenal. The team collected 22 shipwreck nominations from the owners and narrowed it down to 12, making sure there were dives for every skill level. The Florida Keys has a similar Wreck Trek, but Smith said the Panhandle Shipwreck Trail will operate a bit differently. They have a much larger number of dive shops, Smith said about the Keys. The visibility (in the Panhandle) isnt the same as the Keys, but the wrecks are close enough to shore to still allow for great underwater visibility. Were looking at it a little bit differently, because we want to track how the sites are being used and who is diving them. Smith said the team plans on utilizing social networking sites like Facebook to allow divers to share their experiences and get in touch with other people who dive the trail. The website will also play an integral part in the development and promotion of the trail. The Panhandle Shipwreck Trail will feature ve Pensacola wrecks: USS Oriskany, San Pablo (Russian Freighter), Pete Tide II, YDT 14 and 15 (Navy tenders), and Three Barges; ve off the coast of Panama City: Black Bart, USS Strength, FAMI Twin Tugs, USS Accokeek and USS Cheppewa; the Miss Louise in Destin; and Port St. Joes wreck of the Vamar will serve as the easternmost stop on the dive trail. The Vamar is one of Floridas 11 designated underwater archaeological preserves. The ship wrecked under mysterious circumstances in World War II-era Port St. Joe in 1942, and now rests on the ocean oor near the tip of St. Joseph Peninsula. Resting in only 25 feet of water, the Vamar is often considered one of the best shallow water dives on the Emerald Coast. As noted by the Bureau of Archaeological Research, divers can explore the ships steam engine, bilge keels and rudder quadrant and investigate the mystery of the wreck. A plaque will soon be sunk as the last step in designating the wreck of the Vamar as a state underwater preserve. The wreck was dedicated an underwater preserve back in 2004. I think the Shipwreck Trail kind of renewed the interest in getting that plaque down there, Smith said. In order for a wreck to become an underwater preserve, Smith said, it must be nominated by a local group interested in recognizing the site. It comes from a community level, where the people come together and want to recognize a speci c site, Smith said. Its all done with public support and volunteer work. Spotted scorpion sh seek safety by camou aging themselves in the reef growth around the wreck of the Vamar. Below, a colony of blenny hides in the reef growth. PHOTOS BY BOB AND CAROL COX | Special to The News HeraldLookdown Jacks are known to congregate around the wreck of the Vamar, located about four miles off the shore of Mexico Beach. SHIPWRECKVOYAGETrail aims to lure divers to the Panhandle By STAN KIRKLANDFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Its hard to imagine a more passionate proponent of life jackets than Bay County native Mike Gilbert. These days the Fountain resident enjoys the simple things of life, but if not for a life jacket, he knows he wouldnt be here. In October 2005, Gilbert launched his boat late one afternoon in Parker and ran to the kiddie pool at St. Andrew State Park to gig ounder. He knew the fall ounder run to the gulf could be incredible. All he needed was darkness and a little good luck. There was little wind when he crossed the bay, but not long after sundown strong winds kicked up. Gilbert knew he had to nd a more sheltered place where he could spot ounder with his underwater lights. In the darkness he headed out across the bay to Red sh Point on Tyndall Air Force Base, but without warning, a wave broke over his small boat. His boat rolled over and he was in the water. I had no time to react, Gilbert said. One minute things were OK, the next minute I was in the water. If I hadnt been wearing a life jacket, I wouldnt have made it. Gilbert believes he went in the water around 8 p.m. He also knew the tide was strong and running out to sea. The situation went from bad to worse when he and his vessel were swept out the Panama City Pass and into the Gulf of Mexico. In the darkness he spotted a buoy but was unable to reach it. Wave after wave of stinging salt water slapped him in the face. Bobbing in the turbulent gulf waters, Gilbert says it was one of the longest nights of his life. About 8 oclock the following morning, a husband and wife heading into the gulf for a days shing spotted Gilbert. After 12 hours and drifting for miles, he was rescued. Now when Gilbert goes shing and he sees people who arent wearing a life jacket, he tells them his story. Some listen to him. Others choose to ignore him, but that doesnt bother Gilbert. They call them life jackets for a reason. They shouldnt be stored, they should be worn, he said. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission investigates boating accidents in state waters. FWC data shows, without question, there would be fewer boating fatalities each year if more people wore life jackets, particularly when boating in vessels less than 26 feet in length. In 2009, there were 65 boating fatalities in Florida; 69 percent were drownings associated with not wearing a life jacket. In 2010 the number of fatalities jumped to 79, 62 percent in which the victim drowned but might have survived had they worn a life jacket. Years ago life jackets were bulky and uncomfortable. Thankfully, thats no longer the case. In atable around-the-neck and belt-pack models are lightweight, affordable and widely available. They are life savers. Life jackets make a big difference

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SP O RTS www.bonifaynow.com ASectionWednesday, May 16, 2012 From the Associates of Store 2114 Chipley 638-2243 Way to Go AthletesRyan McIntyreChipley H.S. Basketball 12th GradeTy AlfordPonce de Leon H.S. Baseball, Catcher Calf & Team Roping 12th GradeAshlyn GoldenPoplar Springs H.S. Softball, Pitcher & 8th Grade Alana HearnVernon H.S. 11th Grade Congratulations to these top athletes!Bethlehem H.S. Basketball 12th GradeSarah PippinHolmes County H.S. Softball, Pitcher 12th Grade From Staff ReportsBONIFAY On May 10, Holmes County High School senior Ethan Russ signed with Bethel University in McKenzie, Tenn., for a football scholarship for the 2012-2013 season. Russ will be making a transition from a Holmes County High School Blue Devil to a Bethel University Wildcat in the Mid-Southwest Division. Ethan is the son of Michael and Debbra Russ of Bonifay, and his grandparents are Betty Taylor of Ebro, Lloyd and Hazel Russ of Chipley, and the late K.W. and Carolyn Sellers of Caryville. Russ will be graduating HCHS in June and still is deciding on a major.By CATHRINE LAMB638-0212 | @catspitstop clamb@chipleypaper.com Well race fans, we have made it back in one piece. All the horror stories you hear about race weekends at Talladega, well, dont listen. It was great. Sure, there were people drinking and carrying on, but they were not messing with anyone. The staff and everyone at the racetrack were very nice. Cecilia got to experience her rst NASCAR accident May 4, as a car ipped coming out of turn four. But all in all we had a great time. Hoping we can do it again soon. On May 4, as those of you that were watching the Nationwide Race in Talladega saw and listening on the radio heard, Eric McClure, the driver of the No. 14 Hefty Reynolds Wrap, Chevrolet, hit the wall hard in turn three and had to be air-lifted to UAB Hospital from the track. Reports from NASCAR are that in the accident, he suffered a concussion and some internal bruising as he hit that wall headrst. I am happy to report that he has since been released from UAB and is expected to make a full recovery. CECILIA SPEARS | The NewsEthan Russ signs with Bethel University in the presence of friends, team mates and family. With him are his mother and father, Debbra and Michael Russ, sister, Leah Pettis, and grandmother, Betty Taylor.HCHS senior Russ signs with Bethel Results from Aarons Dream WeekendNATIONWIDE SERIES 1. Joey Logano 2. Kyle Busch 3. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. 4. Chole Whitt 5. Dale Earnhardt Jr. 6. Kurt Busch 7. James Buescher 8. Justin Allgaier 9. Kenny Wallace 10. Elliot Sadler SPRINT CUP SERIES 1. Brad Keselowski 2. Kyle Busch 3. Matt Kenseth 4. Kasey Kahne 5. Greg Bif e 6. Clint Bowyer 7. David Ragan 8. Trevor Bayne 9. Dale Earnhardt Jr. 10. Jeff BurtonResults from DarlingtonNFW SPORT CLIPS HELP A HERO 200 NATIONWIDE SERIES 1. Joey Logano 2. Denny Hamlin 3. Brad Keselowski 4. Sam Hornish Jr. 5. Austin Dillon 6. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. 7. Brian Scott 8. Kurt Busch 9. James Buescher 10. Cole Whitt BOJANGLES SOUTHERN 500 SPRINT CUP SERIES 1. Jimmie Johnson 2. Greg Bif e 3. Tony Stewart 4. Kyle Busch 5. Martin Truex Jr. 6. Matt Kenseth 7. Carl Edwards 8. Kasey Kahne 9. Marcos Ambrose 10. Joey LoganoStandings after DarlingtonNATIONWIDE SERIES 1. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. 2. Elliot Sadler -23 3. Austin Dillon -35 4. Sam Hornish Jr. -59 5. Cole Whitt -82 6. Michael Annett -93 7. Justin Allgaier -104 8. Mike Bliss -134 9. Joe Nemecheck -142 10. Danica Patrick -145 SPRINT CUP SERIES 1. Greg Bif e 2. Matt Kenseth -2 3. Dale Earnhardt Jr. -14 4. Denny Hamlin -17 5. Jimmie Johnson -39 5. Martin Truex Jr. -39 7. Tony Stewart -42 8. Kevin Harvick -50 9. Kyle Busch -62 10. Carl Edwards -74Next racesMay 19 6 p.m. SPEED Sprint Cup Charlotte N.C. Charlotte Motor Speedway Sprint All-Star Race Last years winner was Carl Edwards May 20 12:30 p.m. ESPN Nationwide Series Iowa Iowa Speedway Pioneer Hi-Bred 250 Last years winner was Ricky Stenhouse Jr. Logano, Keselowski win at Talladega At left is the Dale Earnhardt Jr. Mountain Dew car on display at Walmart in Talladega, Ala. Below is the rst lap of the Aarons 499.PHOTOS BY CATHRINE LAMB AND CECILIA SPEARS | The NewsSTANDINGSPage 7

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LocalWednesday, May 16, 2012 A8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser

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Jefferson Swindle, D.D.S.199 SOUTH MAIN ST. BONIFAY, FL 32425 TEL: (850) 547-4225 FAX: (850) 547-9849HAVE FUN AT THE FAIR! P & PHeating & Cooling Specialists, Inc.1075 N. Hwy. 79 Bonifay, FLFREE ESTIMATESEsto, FL (850) 263-2823 Danny Powell Henry PowellLicense FL #CAC1814302 AL #98126 TRI-COUNTY GASBonifay, Florida 547-3696 1-800-874-2720 BONIFAY PIGGLY WIGGLY Down Home Down e Street(850) 547-3826 911 N. Waukesha Street BonifayWe'll See You At the Pig! Your Guide toTHE FAIR printingbusiness forms brochures newsletters postcards letterheads envelopes labels posters tickets yers programs invitations rubber stamps specialty items copying creative servicesWe print more than just newspapers www.chipleypaper.com www.bonifaynow.com Sims Insurance AgencyAuto Home Commercial LifeJamie Wells Agent 410 N. Waukesha St. Bonifay, FL 32425Phone: 850-547-5411Fax: 850-547-5412 jwellssia@embarqmail.com 306 West Brock Avenue Bonifay, FL 32425 850-547-9289 www.BonifayRehab.com 306 West Brock Avenue Bonifay, FL 32425 850-547-9289 www.BonifayRehab.com Helping Hands... Compassionate Hearts BONIFAYNURSING & REHABCENTERPHYSICAL THERAPY OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY SPEECH THERAPY WITH VITASTEM ADVANCEDWOUNDCARE FLORIDA SPRINGS RV RESORT & CAMPGROUND Located in the Florida Springs officeServing a touch of J. Michaels from PC Beach, and a taste of Andys best selections!Our menu is short & sweet and the atmosphere quaint Serving quality food at a fair priceOpen daily 5-8pm Closed on Tuesdays Call ahead 850-547-3042 or 850-258-3110 Oering private partiescall for details Located in the Florida Springs office MUSTANGGRILL NOW OPEN!90 Son-in-Law Road, Bonifay, FLHwy. 79 & I10 Exit 112 north and turn right beside Wafe Houseoridaspringsrv.com chipleypaper.com bonifaynow.com WEDNESDAY NIGHTChurch at the Fair NightChurch at the fairgrounds 6pm with Rev. Ryan Helms Local gospel music by Cornerstone Bluegrass Gospel THURSDAY NIGHTSchool Spirit NightBattle of the High School Bands Dash for Cash Kids 10 & under dig through saw dust to nd money FRIDAY NIGHTFarmer's Night at the FairFree Hayrides Learn How to Can Exhibit Produce Growing Class Local entertainment by Mika Moore Magic Show Featuring The Magic of Cristopher ThomasSeen on America's Got Talent Farmer's MarketBuy and sell local produceMagic ShowwithCristopher ThomasNative American DemonstrationsNorth Bay Clan of Lower Creek Muskogee TribeHolmes County Fairgrounds located at 3085Sandpath Road, Bonifay 850-547-3816 holmescountyfair.com Perfect Pool Supplies122 S. Waukesha St. Bonifay, Florida850-547-2626 Have fun at the fair!Holmes County Chamber of CommerceJoin us Thursday, May 24, at 7 a.m. for our monthly member meeting. Log Cabin, Byrd Avenue Bonifay (850) 547-3636CLOUD AUTO PARTS, INC.AUTO TRUCK TRACTOR "CALL CLOUD FIRST" 310 S. Waukesha Street Lawrence E. Cloud Bonifay, FL 32425 Call 638-0212 for a quote. WCN_HCTSATURDAYOld Holmes Day at the FairFair Fest Arts and Craft Show Native American Exhibits and Demonstrations Political Rally 4-H Fashion Show Entertainment featuring Ron French All Heart Music

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Memorial Day SaleMay 21-25 $10 Rell20 lb. Cylinder 10% OFFALL APPLIANCESinStock AS Propane & Appliance Center Hwy. 90 W. Bonifay, FL850-547-1520MONDAY-FRIDAY 8 AM TILL 5 PMHosted by the Greater Holmes County Fair Association Gates Open: 5pm Nightly 9am on Saturday Midway featuring JCJ Amusements Old Holmes Exhibits Fair Fest Craft Show Farmer's Market Chili Cook Off Native American Exhibits Art & Photography Contest Livestock Exhibits Fashion Show Political Rally Entertainment Boat, ATV, Tractor and RV Show DASHforCASHfor kids

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Washington, Holmes at a glance Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser BPAGE 1Section Wednesday, MAY 16 2012Always, Patsy ClineCHIPLEY Tickets for the Spanish Trail Playhouse production of Always, Patsy Cline are on sale. Always, Patsy Cline has been one of the most produced musicals in America according to American Theatre Magazine. It will take the stage at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, May 18-19, and 2 p.m. Sunday, May 20. Directed by Polly Kneiss and produced by Rachel Webb, this production stars Sonya Lynn DeMarco as Patsy Cline and Mil Cox as Louis Seger and features a live band of local musicians. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors (65 and up) and military with ID and $10 for students 12 and under and can be purchased at the Spanish Trail Playhouse box of ce, 680 Second St. in Chipley, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Friday. For more information, email spanishtrailplayhouse@ gmail.com, call 6389113 or visit www. spanishtrailplayhouse. com.RMS band concertThe Roulhac Middle School Spring Band Concert is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. May 24 in the school auditorium. This performance will feature the 6th Grade Beginner Band and the 7th/8th Grade Concert Band performing a wide variety of entertaining tunes. The public is invited to attend both concerts and admission is free. Girls Night OutBONIFAY In celebration of National Womens Health Week, the Holmes County Health Department will host Girls Night Out from 5-8 p.m. Thursday at Carmel Assembly of God. There will be food, fun and shopping. A guest presenter will speak on womens health. For more information, contact Traci Corbin at 547-8500, ext. 249. Miss Poplar SpringsFrom left are Chloe King, Petit Miss Poplar Springs; and Dayna Snell, First Runner-Up. Haley Stout was named Preteen Miss Poplar Springs.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO EXTRAAlexus Williams was named Junior Miss Poplar Springs. From left are Veronica Vickers, First Runner-Up; and Christina Bell, Teen Miss Poplar Springs. From left are Autumn Johnson, Third Runner-Up; Erilyn Smith, Little Miss Poplar Springs; Jaycee Blanton, First Runner-Up; and Erica Snell, Second Runner-Up. From left are Hannah Collins, First Runner-Up; Julianna Peters, Princess; Mekenzie Vinson, Young Miss Poplar Springs; Lee Miller, Princess; Jayci Haygood, Second Runner-Up; Hannah Vickers, Third Runner-Up; and Regan Joiner, Princess. From left are Kelly Cook, First Runner-Up; Cassandra White, Miss Poplar Springs; and Kayleen Rodriguez, Second Runner-Up.INDEXSociety .................................B2 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B7

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Wednesday, May 16, 2012 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Go to AnyGivenTimeJax.com to enter to win a vacation in sunny Jacksonville! SO MUCH TO DO,ANY GIVENTIME. Looking for the best in hearing care? Look to Beltone Only Beltone offers the exclusive BelCare program, our ongoing commitment to customer satisfaction, providing you with benets such as: 15%OFFTRUE WIRELESS HEARING AID SYSTEM & ultra comfortable when its noisy advanced technology Financing Available WAC Chipley, FL (850) 387-4931Marianna, FL (850) 387-4931The benets of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Discounts off MSRP Previous purchases excluded. For a limited time. Cannot be combined with any other offers. No other company offers the same level of commitment youll nd at Beltone. WERE IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD! Free Annual Hearing Evaluations Beltone Ranked #1 in Patient Care Free Lifetime Instrument Care-Free cleanings and adjustments for as long as you own your Beltone hearing instruments And, our1500 locations nationwideserve you no matter where you live or travel!Allen Barnes 21 Years Experience Special To The NewsChipley Garden Club held its End of the Year meeting at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, May 2, at the Collins Hospitality House on Smokehouse Lake in Chipley. Club members Arlon DeForge and Gweneth Collins presented a program entitled Bluebirds & Mealworms. Gweneth began by stating the bluebird, a favorite of many people, is not only beautiful, but also musical. The bird had become uncommon in this area but around 2005 began making a comeback. It is a common sight in our area. She noted both male and female birds are brightly colored and demonstrated its queedle call. She also discussed its range, habitat, nesting and houses. Several books, color photographs, a nest with eggs (found deserted last Winter) and a bluebird house were on display. She also provided several handouts. Arlon DeForge discussed the construction of the bluebird house. Arlon and her husband, Jerry, have been cultivating mealworms for over twenty years. She discussed its life cycle from eggs to Mealworm Beetle, concentrating on the worm which is a favorite treat of bluebirds. She stated they are very easy to raise they feed on wheat bran and live their entire life in any dry, cool and ventilated container. When you need some, you just dip out some of the bran, give it a shake, pick out the worms, place them on a tray, and the bluebirds will come! She brought a small sample of the farm to share with members and volunteered to provide a start for anyone who would like to raise them. Prior to the program a short business meeting was held. Downtown pots will be decorated with Flags for Memorial Day and Watermelons for the Watermelon Festival. The Scarecrow Contest will be Saturday, October 13 in conjunction with Washington County Historical Societys Fall into History Fest. 2012-13 Chipley Garden Club Of cers are Karen Roland, President; Arlon DeForge, First Vice President; Glenda Wilson, Second Vice President; Gweneth Collins, Recording Secretary/ Communications Of cer; Marlene Ray, Corresponding Secretary; Bill DiZinno, Treasurer; and Genie Comegys, Chaplain. If you would like more information about Chipley Garden Club and its projects, please call Karen Roland at 638-9968.Bluebird Tweet at Chipley Garden Club 2012-13 Of cers Bill DiZinno, Treasurer; Gweneth Collins, Recording Secretary/Communications Of cer; Glenda Wilson, 2nd Vice President; Genie Comegys, Chaplain; Arlon DeForge, 1st Vice President. Seated is President Karen Roland.Special To ExtraTALLAHASSEE Floridas 24 regional workforce boards and the nearly 100 one-stop career centers they oversee continue to demonstrate their strong commitment to helping unemployed Floridians get to work. In April, nearly 30,000 job placements of Floridians who were assisted by the boards were reported. Since January, nearly 124,000 job placements have been reported statewide including about 27,500 job seekers who had been receiving unemployment compensation. These placements are an indicator of hiring in Florida as the states economic recovery continues. Governor Rick Scott has made job creation and economic growth the top priority for his administration. The work of regional boards to connect job seekers with employers looking to hire is instrumental to our ongoing efforts to retain and grow jobs in Florida, said Governor Rick Scott. We can tell from Chief Executive magazines recent improved ranking of Florida from the No. 3 spot to No. 2 that our state is becoming known as the best place for businesses to expand and create jobs. In light of these job opportunities, we will remain focused on outcomes such as job placements that matter most to Florida families and businesses. The results from Aprils Monthly Job Placement Report underscore continued progress with 29,514 individuals placed in jobs. Of these individuals, 6,754 were receiving unemployment compensation. With every job placement, we are advancing workforce and economic development goals to strengthen Floridas economy, said Chris Hart IV, President/ CEO of Workforce Florida Inc., the states chief workforce policy organization. Economic success starts at the regional level and I commend boards statewide and their front-line staff for maintaining a strong focus on jobs. The top 10 ranked regional workforce boards for reported job placements in April are: 1. Workforce Solutions Indian River, Martin, Okeechobee and St. Lucie counties Board Chair Angie Metcalf and President/ CEO Richard Stetson 2. Pasco Hernando Workforce Board Pasco and Hernando counties Board Chair Lex Smith and President/CEO Jerome Salatino 3. Florida Crown Workforce Board Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist and Union counties Board Chair Jennie Reed and Executive Director John Chastain 4. Heartland Workforce Desoto, Hardee and Highlands counties Board Chair David Royal and President Roger Hood 5. Brevard Workforce Board Chair Jack Rood and President Lisa Rice 6. Chipola Regional Workforce Development Board Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson, Liberty, and Washington counties Board Chair Darrin Wall and Executive Director Richard Williams 7. South Florida Workforce Miami-Dade and Monroe counties Board Chair Alvin West and Executive Director Rick Beasley 8. WorkNet Pinellas Pinellas County Board Chair Dr. Tony Leisner and President Ed Peachey 9. Workforce Development Board of Okaloosa and Walton Counties Board Chair Dr. David O. Miller and Executive Director Linda Sumblin 10. Workforce Connection Citrus, Levy and Marion counties Board Chair Suzanne Mills and Chief Executive Of cer Rusty Skinner Among the thousands of Floridians who went to work in April after receiving workforce-board assistance is Roy Antigua. After losing his social work job about a year ago, Mr. Antigua was hired as the Multi Facility Director of Admissions by Consulate Management in Pasco County. I spent four to ve days a week submitting as many as 20 resumes a day while worrying about how I was going to pay my bills, said Mr. Antigua. The staff at Pasco Hernando Workforce Board saw my commitment and helped me nd a position that is a perfect t for me. It has allowed me to regain the lifestyle I enjoyed before I lost my full-time job a year ago. Being persistent and seeking my local boards help really paid off. The Monthly Job Placement Report was developed by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity and Workforce Florida in response to Governor Scotts call for enhanced performance measurement to support economic recovery and growth. It highlights jobplacement achievement and facilitates the identi cation and sharing of best practices. The report also provides another measurement of Floridas economic activities. Another economic indicator is employment data from the Department of Economic Opportunitys Labor Market Statistics Center. Floridas 9-percent unemployment rate in March was the largest over-the-month decline since 1992. Nonagricultural jobs increased by 10,800 over the month and 89,800 jobs over the year. Seven industries delivered overthe-year job growth: trade, transportation and utilities; professional and business services; education and health services; leisure and hospitality; nancial activities; manufacturing; and other services. Growth primarily occurred in food and beverage stores, employment services; ambulatory health care services; food services and drinking places; real estate; fabricated metal product manufacturing; and personal and laundry services, according to labor market information. To view the Monthly Job Placement Report and a list of Frequently Asked Questions, go to www. oridajobs.org/workforceboard-resources/programmonitoring-and-reports/ monthly-regional-workforce-board-job-placementreports. Floridas workforce system is made up of Workforce Florida, the statewide workforce investment board; the Department of Economic Opportunity, the state agency responsible for policy implementation and administrative and scal management; and the 24 regional workforce boards and nearly 100 one-stop career centers charged with the design and delivery of local workforce services. For more information on Workforce Florida or its state and local workforce partners, visit WorkforceFlorida.com. Please visit EmployFlorida.com to list a job opening or search for jobs and access a wide array of workforce resources.Job Seekers aided by Workforce Boards are getting to workSince January nearly 124,000 job placements have been reported statewideJared and Shannon White would like to introduce their son, Jayden Welcome White, to the Holmes County Community. Jayden made his arrival on December 16, 2011 at 12:30 a.m. He weighed eight pounds, ve ounces and was 20 inches long. Jaydens grandparents are Roger and Dianne White of Ponce de Leon, and Stan and Monica Grif n of Westville. Every good and perfect gift comes from above, James 1:17. The parents of Emily Harrison and Charles Paul announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their children. Emily is the daughter of Tammy and Jimmy Harrison of Bonifay. Her grandparents are Harmon Sellers and the late Idawe Sellers of Bonifay and J. C. McCormick and the late Carolyn Ryan. Charles is the son of Treasa Duffell and Wayne Paul. His grandparents are Odell and Peggy Paul and Louis Duffell and the late Charles Duffell. The bride elect is a 2008 graduate Bethlehem High School. She is employed with Wells Fargo Bank. The Groom elect is a 2003 graduate of Bethlehem High School and is employed with Burford Tree Expert. To mimic the country feel Charles and Emily know and love so much, their wedding will be held at a family friends eld on James G Road on May 19 at 4 p.m. All family and friends are invited to attend. WHITES ANNOUNCE BIRTH OF SON HARRISON AND PAUL ANNOUNCE ENGAGEMENT

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Wednesday, May 16, 2012 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3By Sandra Devine, President Bonifay Garden ClubSpecial to Extra The Bonifay Garden Club recently enjoyed a guided tour through the rose gardens of Patricia and Buddy Guilford of Hartford, Ala., on April 13. Both Patricia and Buddy hail from Hartford, and they both love working in their flower gardens, which is mainly comprised of different varieties of roses. Buddy volunteers that he has been interested in growing roses since the early 1970s, but did not get into rose production on a larger scale until he and Patricia bought their present home in 1977, which had an established rose garden, parts of which remain today. Buddy has always been involved in the growing business as he retired from farming and raising cattle. Buddy and Patricia are excited and proud to share the handiwork of their labor during the rose blooming season that runs from April up until a heavy frost, usually in November. Roses thrive in a slightly acidic soil, about a pH of 6.5, and full sun. Various classes of roses perform differently in the hot humid climate of lower Alabama and the upper panhandle of Florida. The Guilfords generally like to work with HybridTea Roses, Floribundas, Grandiforas, Climbing and Landscape Roses and Old Garden Roses. Buddy explains that HybridTea Roses have a vase-like habitat with bare legs (lower stems exposed without leaves or blooms) and produce beautiful long stem roses excellent for cuttings used in arrangements. The Floribunda varieties grow in a round, compact bushtype habitat with blooms in a cluster or spray. Grandiflora Roses are similar to the HybridTea variety except they bloom in clusters. The 1700s and 1800s ushered in the Old Garden Roses, which are relatively easy to grow, produce a very fragrant bloom and is popular in landscaping. I use an all purpose 16-4-8 fertilizer and mulch heavily with pine bark around my roses, adds Buddy. Folks ask me regularly, which is my favorite rose, but I dont have a real favorite. I enjoy them all. If youre thinking about growing roses, visit some gardens in your area and make a list of varieties that you like. You might want to visit with the Wiregrass Rose Society in Dothan (Ala.) or the Tallahassee Rose Society to get more ideas as well, Guilford said. The Knock Out Rose is very popular due to its propensity to with stand harsh hot climates, ward off pests and disease and still bloom beautifully and successfully thrive. However, the Carefree Beauty Rose is the newer variety on the market that is touted to be even easier to grow than the Knock Out Roseper Guilford. The Houston (Texas) Rose Society awarded a grant to the Texas A & M University to hybridize a rose variety that would be well suited to hardiness zone 8A (which includes the Holmes County area). Thus, the CarefreeBeauty series was born. One could garner more information on the Carefree Beauty utilizing the internet at earthkindroses.com As the field trip tour was ending, Guilford offered the following bit of sage advice to all us garden clubbers eager to go home and grow roses. The secret to growing roses is selecting the right plant, selecting the right location for planting, utilizing full sunshine and water, water, water. ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7. When arthritis has your knees creaking and your joints aching, it can be a miserable time. Your pets may feel your pain as well. Arthritis in pets can be just as agonizing as it is in humans, and the disease and its effects are very similar in both pets and people, says Dr. Sharon Kerwin, professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences who specializes in orthopedic medicine. Kerwin says animal arthritis attacks bones and joints much the same way as the disease does in humans, but with one noticeable exception it can strike some animals, especially dogs, before they become a 1-year-old. Any animal can get arthritis, but dogs and cats especially seem to be prone to get the disease, Kerwin says. It is not unusual for a dog to have a check-up in its first year, and the veterinarian can already detect signs of arthritis. It means the owner will almost certainly have to make some adjustments in the way the animal is cared for and the amount of exercise and movement the dog gets. Certain breeds are especially prone to get arthritis, and these include the Rottweiler, golden retrievers, and Labrador retrievers. Kerwin says there are several signs pet owners may look for if they suspect their animal might have arthritis. First is an obvious decrease in activity, she explains. The animal may not want to go as far as it used to on a walk. It may not want to walk at all. In cats, it is sometimes a little harder to detect arthritis, but the animal may appear to be less active and may have trouble jumping on top of a chair or table. Treatments can vary, depending on the severity of arthritis, Kerwin says. Surgery, she explains, is sometimes recommended, especially if a hip or other joint is severely affected. Drugs are often prescribed, and joint diets have also become available for dogs and cats in recent years, Kerwin explains. Physical rehabilitation can be a very effective treatment in controlling signs associated with arthritis. As with humans, weather changes especially colder weather can often be felt in bones and joints, and these changes can affect your pet, Kerwin adds. Probably the most frequent question veterinarians get asked about arthritis in pets is, Should I continue to exercise my pet? Theres no easy answer, Kerwin believes. Low-impact exercise, like a walk, is better than no exercise at all, Kerwin adds, Swimming is an ideal exercise for dogs if they will do it, and even cats can swim in a water treadmill. Thats why its best to consult with a veterinarian to get the treatment plans best suited for your pet. Pet arthritis is not a death sentence for your animal, but owners need to be aware that the animal cannot do certain things. Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. Stories can be viewed on the Web at http:// vetmed.tamu.edu/pet-talk. Suggestions for future topics may be directed to cvmtoday@cvm.tamu. edu. Arthritis isnt just for humans Bonifay Garden Club tours rose garden Close-up of yellow rose bed. Red roses with birdhouse. Buddy Guilford explains rose planting techniques. Beautiful close up of yellow/pink rose, Double Delight. These colors are the colors for the Bonifay Garden Club. Hazel Tison and Susan Pittman inspect owers during the rose garden tour. Crossword PUZZLESOLUTION ON PAGE B5

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FAITH BSectionwww.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comBy Rev. James L. SnyderFinally, someone has come up with a weight loss program I can sink my teeth into without guilt. And, I say its about time. I cant speak for anybody else, but Im fed up with diet programs that simply beat me to death. Im tired of starving myself under the pretense of dieting, and exercising my body to the brink of absolute exhaustion. Its about time someone looked on the lighter side of dieting. According to a study in Athens, Greece, scientists have found a good laugh is a calorie burner not to be ignored. You can be sure this gained my attention. Some American researchers found that 10 to 15 minutes of genuine giggling can burn off the number of calories found in a medium square of chocolate. These scientists discovered a way to measure how many calories people burn when they laugh. When I read this, I laughed for 39 minutes, allowing me to eat two medium squares of chocolate. At this rate, Ill be able to eat several pounds of chocolate a day. Now thats what I call a diet. According to their ndings, the average person burns 20 percent more calories when laughing, compared to not laughing. If somebody laughs for 10 or 15 minutes a day they would burn up to 50 calories, depending on body size and the intensity of the laughter. This means if I laughed for 10 to 15 minutes a day, I would burn enough calories to lose 4-1/2 pounds in a year. Thats nothing to laugh at. This means in 50 years I would completely disappear from the face of the earth. Which poses a question; when a person loses weight, where does that weight go? Im not one to jump on the latest bandwagon but there is nothing funny about carrying around extra weight. For some its like having a monkey on their back, for me its more like a gorilla. Up to this point, my weight loss program has been a laughing matter. Little did I know my laughing was burning calories. My exercise program has been a real joke, which may have done me good and I didnt know it. To be honest, my regimen has not produced the results I desired. Just a few years ago, I exercised my right as an American citizen to vote for the president of my choice, which has been quite taxing on me, you can be sure. This kind of exercise takes more out of a person than realized at the time and must be good because I lost a great chunk of money in paying my taxes this year. Every day I exercise my right to remain silent when the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage is giving me a piece of her mind. Although I have not lost any weight with this exercise, I havent lost any arguments, either. Personally, I think its a good trade-off. Now, with this new information I shall change my whole approach to dieting. Instead of working hard, exercising every day and watching what I eat, I shall throw caution to the wind and laugh all day long. I shall laugh off all criticism with good humor. I shall roll in the aisles with uncontrollable mirth. My only concern is that I dont die laughing. For the observant person, like Yours Truly, each day provides plenty of things to laugh about. My only problem is to know exactly where to start. I could start laughing at my Beloved but Im sure I would lose something other than weight, so I dont want to go there, if you know what I mean. A good guffaw, Ive discovered, carries more than just personal bene ts. An old proverb says, Laugh, and the whole world laughs with you. So, I can see where my laughing is going to help other people lose weight. Why didnt somebody think of this before? I may have lost some time; but be assured I am determined to giggle my way to supreme health in the days and months ahead. To begin my regimen of laughter, I only need to wake up in the morning. Believe me when I say, not waking up in the morning is no laughing matter. When I wake up, I yawn, stretch and then go to the bathroom. One look in the mirror is good for a good belly laugh, which helps start the day in the right direction. For the next laugh, I turn to the early morning news programs, which is good for a laugh-a-minute. We truly live in a funny world, at least for the person who takes the time to see the funny side of the street. All those people on early morning television seriously think what they say is important. When in reality, very little of what they say makes any difference in anyones day. If they only knew how insigni cant their opinions are, they probably wouldnt get up in the morning and go to work. They give, on any given morning, sidesplitting, rib-tickling, laugh-a-minute exercises. If you happen to see me walking down the street with a smile all over my face, dont be alarmed. I am engaged in my Laughtercise for the day. A merry heart doeth good like a medicine: but a broken spirit drieth the bones (Proverbs 17:22). The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at 352-687-4240 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. The church web site is www. whatafellowship.com.Special To ExtraBONIFAY Warden Roberts, Chaplain Faulkenberry, and other staff at the Holmes Correctional Institute recently hosted a Regional Chaplains Conference at Bonifay. The conference was set up and planned by Regional Chaplain Director David Ring. The 55 state and volunteer prison chaplains also completed the orientation and leader training course required for volunteers to use the lifeskills transitions courses developed by the Family Integrity Training Inc. Chaplain Alex Taylor and Chaplain Gingrich gave updates on several needed topics. One was the effectiveness of educational programs in reducing recidivism (return to incarceration). Another was the implementing of the Second Chance program offered through TBN and how some facilities reported that it was especially improving the morale of the youth offenders causing less security issues. The nal presentation was an actual volunteer training session put on by Family Integrity Training Inc. Pastor Ed White presented FITs 100-hour, faith-based curriculum as a means to equip Chaplains and volunteers in offering courses which could meet the states requirement of each inmate exiting the state prison system. The state requires that each inmate complete an approved 100-hourtransition course before leaving the prison system. FITs Integrity Program meets this requirement. Pastor White worked with The Florida Department of Corrections to formulate such a program in 2005. He enlisted the help of Dr. Don Pratt who developed the present program. The program combines ve courses from the Living Free curricula established by Jimmy Ray Lee and three other books written by Dr. Pratt to speci cally address the criteria established by the Florida Legislature. Fred DeMouey, FIT Board member, explained the effectiveness of these lessons in changing lives. He is convinced that rehabilitation is much more effective in the long term and a very possible answer to keeping communities safe. This is true because the majority of prisoners will be released back into the community they came from. They will either be changed or hardened. It would behoove us to put our resources to work so that change happens in as many people as possible. Beverly Shatterly, Panhandle FIT Coordinator, explained how to implement the program by reviewing the Anger Your Master or your Servant student manual. She expressed her view that the course materials are so well written anyone can facilitate a class with minimal training. The secret to its effectiveness is an interactive emphasis which is not preachy. She said You actually get into the minds of the students and they open up in a way as never before. Many will let down their guard and share things that helps the whole group move forward. The FIT transitional course is actually a collection of eight separate courses each featuring a speci c life skill. Titles from the Living Free series are: Insight, a lesson in nding the roots of addictions; Free to Grow, lessons on dealing with lifes disappointments; Godly Parenting, Handling Loss and Grief; and Anger our Master or our Servant, a course dealing with topics often court-ordered by judges. Dr. Pratts courses are Parenting 101, Dating and Marriage, and Financial Success from Scratch. All these courses re ect real-life issues that face an inmate when transitioning back into the main stream of society. The cost to train each student is $10 per unit. The total 100-hour program is only $60 per student. The costs are kept low because all staff and volunteers pay their own way, many driving hundreds of miles to teach a class. Because inmates do not have the means to buy the materials, FIT relies on fundraisers from churches and donations to fund a course. More information can be found at the FIT website at www.100hour. org. Donations are welcome and can be done through the website or by phone 941-739-1338. Though some of the courses were written for churches and some for prisoners, they have all proved to be useful in any settingwhere life-skill development is important. This includes prisons, jails, probation, community programs, transitional houses, churches, and Sunday School classes. If you have a heart for this type of ministry or like to learn more, you can become a certi ed FIT volunteer and learn how to use these materials at one of our training classes. The next training in your area will be on May 19 in Crestview, Florida. It is an all-day orientation session and you can register online at our FIT website www.100hour.org. The cost is $35 for regular registration or $25 for preregistered online. Wednesday, May 16, 2012 But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Good News Bible Acts 1:8Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.First Baptist Churchcome as you areMike Orr, Pastor1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.This Message Courtesy ofGratitude is a Social VirtueGratitude has the power to transform our lives. We can go from feeling sad, lonely and self-pitying to happy, connected and blessed to be alive in no time at all. One of the reasons why this is the case is that gratitude is almost always directed towards other people. We should be thankful for what others have done for us or have given to us, or simply that they have been there for us in a time of need. This connection with other people is very powerful and gratitude often immediately connects us with others. Though we tend to think of the individual as the basic unit or atom of the larger society, an isolated and unconnected individual is very atypical. To paraphrase Aristotle, only a god or a monster would live apart from all society. Some gratitude exercises which work well are to think of people you are thankful for but who you havent actually thanked, and then send them a short thank you note, e-mail or text message. Another one which works well is to keep a gratitude journal, where you write down what you are thankful for at the end of each day. A related exercise is to think about what went well during the day and why, and to write about that. Christopher SimonRejoice always, pray continually, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is Gods will for you in Christ Jesus. 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18BROWN FUNERAL HOME1068 Main Street, Chipley638-4010Hwy. 77 S, Chipley 638-4097 Hwy. 79 S., Bonifay 547-9688Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser1364 N. Railroad, Chipley 638-0212 112 E. Virginia, Bonifay 547-9414Stephen B. Register, CPA1552 Brickyard Road Chipley, FL 638-4251 Page 4Faith-Based Transitional Program introduced CHAPLAINS CONFERENCENew Bayview Church to Hold Fish FryBETHLEHEM New Bayview Church of God of Prophecy will be holding a sh fry starting at 10:30 a.m. on May 19. Plates will include fried sh, baked beans, coleslaw and hushpuppies for a $6 donation. This is a fundraiser for the New Bayview building fund. The event will be held on U.S. Highway 2 at Millers Grocery at Millers Crossroads in Bethlehem.Camp Ground Church to Hold Bene tBONIFAY Camp Ground Church at 2136 U.S. Highway 179-A will be holding a bene t on May 19. All candidates are welcome to come and speak. Lunch will begin at 11 a.m. and will consist of sh and fried chicken, potato salad, baked beans, cake and a drink. Plates will be $5. There will be cakes and a quilt up for auction. All proceed will go to help with the upkeep of the cemetery. The Harrelsons to perform at Otter CreekPONCE DE LEON The Harrelsons will be singing at Otter Creek Methodist Church at 7 p.m., May 19. The church is four miles north of Ponce de Leon off U.S. Highway 81.Pleasant Grove Church to Hold Homecoming ServicesPleasant Grove Church will hold their Homecoming Services starting at 6 p.m. on May 19. Sunday morning worship will be held at 11 a.m. on May 20. Brother James Snodgrass will bring the message and dinner will follow. For more information contact Brother Bufford Williams at 638-1189 or Julian Miller at 535-2375. Faith BRIEFSGiggle the pounds away with laughtercise

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Wednesday, May 16, 2012 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5Wausau LibraryMonday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: Closed Thursday: 1-6 p.m. Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedHolmes County Library (Bonifay)Monday: Closed Tuesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday: ClosedWashington County Library (Chipley)Monday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedVernon LibraryMonday: Closed Tuesday: 1-6 p.m. Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday: Closed Sunday: ClosedSunny Hills LibraryMonday: 1-6 p.m. Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 1-6 p.m. Thursday: Closed Friday: Closed Saturday: Closed Sunday: Closed Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences.Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section ofwww.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com, you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership withLegacy.com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212 Mrs. Anna Mable Haines, age 77, of Bonifay, passed away April 28, 2012 at Bonifay Nursing and Rehab Center. She was born July 7, 1934 in Mt. Holly, N. J., to the late Frank and Rebecca Wells. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Haines is preceded in death by one sister, Betty Peer. Mrs. Haines is survived by her husband, Neil Henry Haines of Bonifay; three daughters, Beth Johnson of Bonifay, Donna Haines and Pete of Chipley, and Judy Chambers of Bonifay; two brothers, Donald Wells and Frankie Wells; two sisters, Irene Thomas and Sherry Kirkbride; eight grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. Memorialization was by cremation with Peel Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.Anna M. HainesJoe Hayes, 54, died April 21, 2012. Graveside services was held, May 4, 2012.Joe HayesLouvenia Pitts Austin, age 80, passed away May 6, 2012 at her home. She was born in Holmes County Aug. 25, 1931 to Claudia V. Buttram Pitts and William Henry Pitts, Jr. Mrs. Austin was a graduate of Holmes County High School and Miami Dade Community College. She was formerly employed by State of Florida HRS in Bonifay, Dade County Public Schools in Miami, and Division of Forestry in Chipley. She was a member of the National Association of Educational Of ce Personnel and received PSP Certi cation thru NAEOP in 1970. In 1954-1959 she served as Treasurer then President of Non-Commissioned Of cers Wives Club at OHare AFB in Chicago, IL. She is a descendant of the Rev. Elijah Andrew Buttram, founder of Carmel Assembly of God Church of which she was a long time member. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Charles E. Austin; daughter, Judith V. Austin Luterman; stepmother, Eula Mae Pitts; two sisters, Mamie Lee Pitts Bowlin and Loriene Hazel Dilmore, and a brother, John Louvaughn Pitts. She is survived by two sons, Daniel I. Austin and John A. Austin both of Bonifay; two brothers, William H. Pitts, III and wife Mary Lou of Palatka, and Ricky Pitts and wife Jennifer of Valrico; sisterin-law, Kay F. Pitts of DeLand; a sister, Brenda Oney and husband Lugie of Live Oak; three grandsons, TSgt John C. Luterman and wife Crystal, Travis C. Austin of Pensacola, and Trevor K. Austin of Bonifay; one great-granddaughter, Alexia R. Luterman; one great-grandson, Xavier Luterman and many nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Thursday, May 10, 2012 at Carmel Assembly of God Church with the Rev. Jerry Moore and the Rev. Jonathan West of ciating. Interment followed in the Carmel Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay directing. Visitation was from 10 11 a.m. at Carmel Church. Memorial contributions may be given to Carmel Church Building Fund, 1484 Carmel Church Road, Bonifay, Florida 32425.Louvenia P. AustinMrs. Ella Jean Sims, age 78, of Bonifay, passed away May 6, 2012 at her home. She was born Aug. 10, 1933 in Westville, to the late Johnnie Lester McKuhen and Nicie Myrtle Mayo McKuhen. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Sims was preceded in death by her husband, Archie Vann Sims; three brothers, Oliver McKuhen, Charles McKuhen, and J.L. McKuhen, and aunt, Beula Wade. Mrs. Sims is survived by a son, Sheldon Vann Sims and wife, Patsy of Calhoun, Ga.; a granddaughter, Candra Leann Sims; three grandchildren, Talor Adams, Shelby Folmer, and Raven Folmer, and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. Thursday, May 10, 2012 at Peel Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Ike Steverson and the Rev. Danny Carnley of ciating. Interment followed in the St. Johns Free Will Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay directing. Family received friends from 5-7 PM Wednesday at Peel Funeral Home.Ella J. SimsCody Samuel Darby, age 21, of Westville, passed away Friday, April 27, 2012, in Pensacola. He was born Sept. 18, 1990, in Pensacola. Cody loved the outdoors. He enjoyed all types of hunting and shing with his buddies. He attended Ponce De Leon and Paxton High School. His favorite teacher was Odon Russell. He is preceded in death by his brother, Timothy Wayne Agerton and grandmother, Mary Lois Darby. Cody is survived by his parents, Willard and Shirley Darby of Darlington, and Ralph and Ann Smith also of Darlington; brothers, Jeremy Smith, Dion and Joey Darby, and Nick, Leigh, and Chris Duncan; sisters, Kisha En nger, Jessica Peak, Emily Darby, Kim Kilgore, and Samantha Wainwright; grandparents, Pa Preston Darby, and Walter and Carleata Smith; the love of his life, Brandy Roberts and son Gunnar; two special aunts, Candy Smith and Louise Sewell; four special uncles, Larry Sewell, Rusty Smith, Ronnie Smith, and Charles Cordle, and numerous nieces and nephews. A memorial service for Cody will be held May 20, 2012 at 1 p.m. at Outreach for Christ Church in Darlington. Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at www.daviswatkins.com. Arrangements are under the direction of DavisWatkins Funeral Home. Cody S. DarbyBarry Eugene Paul, age 65 of Chipley, passed away Wednesday, May 9, 2012 in the Bay Medical Center. Barry was born June 12, 1946 in Niagara Falls, N. Y., to the late Ernest Robert and Betty Jane (Stevens) Paul. A former owner of a oor installation company in New York, he had been a resident of Washington County for the past 10 years, coming from New York. He was an avid outdoorsman and a member of the New Vision United Methodist Church in Greenhead. In addition to his parents, he is predeceased by his step-mother, Gloria Rogers Paul. Survivors include his wife of 46 years, Beverly Paul of Chipley; two sons, Phillip Paul of Kendal, N.Y. and Cameron Paul of Chipley; two daughters, Wendy Lewis and husband John of Dallas Texas, Loretta Vick and husband Larry of Alvion, N.Y.; four brothers, Robert Paul of Florida, Hugh Paul, Keith Paul and Kenny Paul all of N. Y.; two sisters, Linda Scalenski of Florida and Cheryl Arnold of N.Y.; six grandchildren and three great grandchildren. Memorial services were held Friday, May 11, 2012 at 11 a.m., in the New Vision United Methodist Church in Greenhead with the Rev. Stephanie Cox of ciating. Cremation followed. In lieu of owers, the family suggests contributions to New Vision United Methodist Church, 2661 Blocker Church Road, Chipley, Florida 32428. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. Friends and family may sign the online register at www. brownfh.net.Barry E. PaulMr. Robert Earl Bob Jenkins, Sr., age 84, of Bonifay, passed away May 9, 2012 at Doctors Memorial Hospital in Bonifay. Mr. Jenkins was born Oct. 3, 1927 in Port St. Joe, to the late Charles Mack and Norene Dunlap Jenkins. In addition to his parents, Mr. Jenkins was preceded in death by a grandson, Sky Jenkins; four brothers, George Jenkins, Jack Jenkins, Jimmy Jenkins, and Charlie Jenkins. Mr. Jenkins was survived by his wife, Betty Jean Miller Jenkins of Bonifay; two sons, Bob Jenkins, Jr. of Ocean Springs, Miss., and Jeff Jenkins and wife Kim of Fort Walton Beach; a daughter, Sandy Brannon and husband, Mitchell of Gulf Breeze; one brother, Tom Jenkins and wife Vonzie of Bonifay; two sisters, Velma Stubbs of Bonifay, and Thelma Harts eld and husband Albert of Tallahassee; four grandchildren, Amy Jenkins, Josh Jenkins, Justin Jenkins, and Zach Brannon, and one greatgrandchild, Carter Sky Fazzio. Funeral services were held at 10 a.m., Friday, May 11, 2012 at First Baptist Church Bonifay with the Rev. Shelly Chandler and the Rev. Jeep Sullivan of ciating. Interment followed in the Bonifay City Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay directing. In lieu of owers memorial contributions may be given to First Baptist Church, 311 North Waukesha Street, Bonifay, FL 32425 or Alzheimers Association, alz.org, P.O. Box 96011, Washington, DC 20090-6011. Family received friends from 910 a.m. at First Baptist Church.Robert E. Jenkins, Sr.Mr. Charles Gregory Thomas, 37 of Ponce De Leon, died on Tuesday, May 8, 2012, at Doctors Memorial Hospital in Bonifay. Born Monday, March 31, 1975 in Geneva, Ala. Surviving are his mother Wanda Thomas of Ponce De Leon; brother, David Thomas of Ponce De Leon; sister, Sharon Tillis of Lakeland; step daughter, Krystle Stanley of Defuniak Springs, and step son, Dwayne McMillan of Defuniak Springs. Funeral service was held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, May 12, 2012 at Oak Grove Baptist Church with the Rev. Larry McGowan and the Rev. Chris Carroll of ciating. Interment followed in Oak Grove Cemetery, Ponce de Leon, with Sims Funeral Home of Bonifay directing. The family received friends from 6-8 p.m. on Friday, May 11, 2012, at Sims Funeral Home Chapel.Charles G. ThomasLeah Danielle Ryals, 26 of Trenton, went home to be with the Lord on May 8, 2012 from injuries sustained in an automobile accident. Leah was born June 4, 1985 in Valdosta, Ga., to Trisha and Bob Hicks. She has lived in Trenton for a few months coming from Ga. She was a member of Pine Grove Baptist Church in Trenton where her husband Josh served as Music Minister. Leah posted a quote recently, I love my Lord, my husband, my son and family. These are the joys of my life. I have set the Lord always before me. Because he is at my right hand, I will not be shaken! There is no life apart from Christ, either youre for Him or against Him. Leah loved life and brought color to everyones life who knew her. She was preceded in death by her brother, Charles Robert Hicks Jr. She is survived by her husband, Josh Ryals of Trenton; son, Jansen Wayne Ryals of Trenton; parents, Bob and Trisha Hicks of Wausau; sister, Robyn Necole Williams and husband Nicholas of Quinlan, Texas; grandmother, Dot McDonald of Wausau and three nephews and two nieces. Funeral services were held at 3:30 p.m., Saturday, May 12, 2012 at Shiloh Baptist Church, Chipley, with the Rev. Tim Patton and Dr. Greg Douglas of ciating. Burial followed in Wausau Memorial Gardens cemetery with Obert Funeral Home of Chipley directing. Family received friends from 2-3:30p.m., Saturday at Shiloh Baptist Church. Flowers are accepted or donations may be made to Shiloh Deaf Missions.Leah D. Ryals Obituaries Library HOURS CODY S. DARBY Crossword SOLUTION

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Wednesday, May 16, 2012 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Pay tribute toThose We RememberMemorial Day 2012 Honor the special people who have touched your life family, friends, Veterans and have passed on in this special Memorial Day tribute. Share a favorite photo, memory or tribute message in this keepsake piece which publishes Wednesday, May 23rd in the News and Times-Advertiser. The Tribute will also be posted on our newspaper websites for 90 days. Photos run in black and white. A star graphic identies Veterans; please designate. Tribute copy, photo and payment MUST be received by Noon on Wednesday, May 16. Rates 4 sizes 1 block..............$223 blocks...............$48 2 blocks............$364 blocks...............$62 638-0212 547-9414 In memory of our parentsJANE & AL SMITHWe miss you and love you! From your children, Pat, Jack and Sam Two block ad this saturday in and Girls Night OutIn celebration of National Womens Health Week, the Holmes County Health Department will host Girls Night Out from 5-8 p.m. Thursday at Carmel Assembly of God. There will be food, fun, and shopping. A guest presenter will speak on Womens Health. For more information, call Traci Corbin at 547-8500, ext. 249. Washington County Arts Council scholarshipThe Washington County Arts Council announces its annual $500 scholarship competition. Graduating high school seniors in Washington County who wish to pursue a college degree in the arts are eligible to compete by submitting a double spaced type-written essay of 2,500 words or less on the subject of Why the arts? In these dif cult economic times, your essay should convey to the reader why you feel supporting the arts is important. Deadline for submitting is May 24 and entries should be mailed to Washington County Arts Council, P.O. Box 973, Chipley, FL 32428. For more information, contact Tonya Pippin at 638-7700 or tonya@ pippinappraisal.com.VHS to Present The Emperors New ClothesVERNON The Emperors New Clothes will take the stage at 7 p.m. May 24-25. General admission tickets are on sale in the Vernon High School Main Of ce. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students. Vernon High School is at 3232 Moss Hill Road. For more information, contact Director Kevin Russell at vhstheatre@gmail.com or 535-2046. AARP Mature Driving ClassCHIPLEY Washington County Council on Aging and AARP are co-sponsoring a mature driving class for individuals age 50 and over from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on May 25. This course is developed especially for the senior driver and will be held at 1348 South Blvd in Chipley at the Washington County Council on Aging. This mature driving course is approved by the DHSMV for a three-year insurance premium reduction. There is no testing and only a minimal course fee of $12 for AARP members and $14 for non-AARP members. Please enroll by calling the Washington County Council on Aging at 638-6216.One-on-One art classesOne-on-One oil, watercolor, and drawing classes are now on going. The art classes will be held at 110 W. Pennsylvania Avenue Bonifay. Please call for more details at 3298381. LDA is adding more art activities, such as: a favorite picture transferred to a T-shirt can now be done here at Laurden-Davis Art Gallery. For more information call 329-8381. Chipley Lions Club selling broomsCHIPLEY The Chipley Lions Club is selling brooms for $10 each to raise funds to help those who need assistance with eye care. For more information, contact Sherry Smith at 638-7855 or email chipleylionsclub@gmail. com.Jesse and David memorial golf tourneyThe Jesse and David Memorial Scramble will be June 2 at the Sunny Hills Country Club. Registration will be 7:30-8:10 a.m. with a shotgun start at 8:15 a.m. The cost will be $50 per player or $150 per team of three. Breakfast and lunch will be included. Hole sponsorships are $100. All proceeds will go to the New Roof Project at Washington Primitive Baptist Church at Hard Labor Creek. For more information, contact John Whittington at 5570006, Kenny Mitchell at 373-6177 or Jerry Tyre at 638-4409.Panhandle Watermelon Festival PageantCHIPLEY The 56th annual Panhandle Watermelon Pageant will be at 6:30 p.m. June 8-9 at the Washington County Agriculture Center. Door admission is $5 per adult, free to children 3 years of age and younger. For more information, call Teresa Bush at 2634744 or 263-3072 or Sherry Saunders at 263-3554.Washington County Arts CouncilThe Washington County Arts Council invites all local artists to share their paintings, drawings, sculptures, textiles or ceramics at the annual Panhandle Watermelon Festival Art Show and Sale, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 23 in the west wing of the Ag Center in Chipley.Sidewalk Art FairBONIFAY Bring your artwork and easel to paint at the Sidewalk Art Fair in Bonifay, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 23 at 110 W. Pennsylvania Ave. There will be art displays of handmade jewelry, paintings of oil, watercolor, pencil drawings, photographs and wood carvings. Raf e tickets will be drawn, and pieces of artwork will be bid on. Refreshments will be provided. For more information, call 329-8381, email laurdendavis@gmail. com or nd Laurden-Davis Art Gallery on Facebook.Miss Firecracker PageantVERNON The Miss Firecracker Pageant will be at 1 p.m. June 2 at the Vernon Community Center. The pageant is sponsored by the city of Vernon as a fundraiser for the annual free reworks show July 4 at the city sportsplex. Categories include Baby Miss, Toddler Miss, Tiny Tot, Future Little Miss, Little Miss, Young Miss, Pre-Teen, Teen Miss, Junior Miss, Miss Firecracker, Jr. Ms. Firecracker Sr. Ms. Firecracker, Miss Patriotic and Miss Independence. Pageant attire is formal, and all contestants under 10 will receive a small crown. There will be a queen, 1st and 2nd runner-up for each age group. Children who hold a title from last year will have to move up to the next group of competition. For registration forms or questions, contact Vernon City Hall at 535-2444 or Pageant Director Laura Brewer at 535-2074 after 5:30 p.m. Community EVENTSSpecial to ExtraOn April 5 the Reception and Medical Center hosted its rst Community Advisory Meeting and tour of the grounds. Attendees included representatives from the Union County School Board, County Commission, City Manager, City Commission, Property Appraisers ofce, Tax Collectors of ce, Clerk of the Courts of ce, Emergency Management Services, Union County Sheriffs of ce, Union County Ministerial Society, Union County Recreation Board, local business owners, Senator Steve Oelrich, Representative Charles E. Van Zant and District Secretary Donna Ellerkamp on behalf of Representative Elizabeth W. Porter. Department of Corrections of cials included: Assistant Secretary of Institutions Timothy Cannon, Assistant Secretary of ReEntry William Carr, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Administration Michelle Pyle, Legislative Affairs Director Will Kendrick, Regional Director of Institutions Chris Southerland, Regional Director of Community Corrections Barbara Scala as well as local wardens and community corrections staff. The day began with words of welcome from Warden Brian Riedl and a continental style breakfast. Following breakfast Assistant Warden Kish briefed the group on what to expect during the rest of the day. The attendees were then loaded into three transport vans and received into the Department of Corrections just as a new commitment would see RMC for the rst time. The group was treated to a tour of the Main Unit before being transported back to the training building for a power point presentation and a grilled steak lunch. The presentation began with a look into the role Community Corrections plays in and around the City of Lake Butler and the surrounding communities. The next portion offered insight into the history of RMC and its sister units as well as our on-site hospital and secure ward at Memorial Hospital Jacksonville. In addition, the presentation highlighted some of the many Re-Entry initiatives and community projects that RMC has been able to take part in over the past couple of years and the group was educated as to why Re-Entry bene ts not just those being released from prison, but each and every citizen of the State of Florida. When the presentation was complete the oor was opened for anyone wishing to voice questions, concerns or to simply share their experiences. Many of those in attendance applauded RMC for its active role in the local communities, school system and drove home the point we have desperately wanted to get outthat RMC is much more than bricks, blocks and razor wire; we truly are a member of the community. The meeting came to a close with remarks from Director Southerland and Warden Riedl on what to expect in the way of future meetings and the direction the Florida Department of Corrections is heading. RMC would like to thank those who took time out of their busy schedules to attend this rst Community Advisory Meeting and we truly believe that through active partnerships with the community and local business leaders we can make a difference. RMC holds rst community advisory meeting Sowell Tractor Co., Inc.2841 Hwy. 77 North, Panama City 763-5441 Toll Free: 866-448-9899 www.sowelltractorco.comWe Trade for Anything That Dont Eat! Financing Arranged (WAC) EVERYTHING YOU VALUE 0% Financing Available Only On Kabota Equiptment. WAC See dealer for details.

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Wednesday, May 16, 2012 Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 1 P-0002400 $1,241.00 01001379 ALRED ROY 2 P-0004500 $16.43 01003830 ANGERBRANDT JOEY 3 P-0007300 $40.21 02000615 BAKER LOIS 4 P-0008600 $27.09 02002205 BAXLEY DAVID & BETTY 5 P-0010600 $27.09 02004000 BERRY BILLY 6 P-0010900 $3,036.46 02004850 BEST WESTERN 7 P-0011700 $150.11 02005360 BIDDLE TRACY 8 P-0021300 $18.89 03000199 CAIN JOHNNIE H 9 P-0023500 $35.30 03002480 CARROLL PHIL 10 P-0025800 $681.21 03004600 CHIPLEY PHYSICAL THERAPY INC 11 P-0028400 $18.89 03007225 COBIA JOHN T 12 P-0029000 $904.72 03008025 COLLINS LOGGING INC. 13 P-0033600 $79.59 03011910 CURRY JOE 14 P-0034900 $99.27 04000700 DARYL MESSER LAND WORK &TREE S 15 P-0041500 $658.65 05001025 ELLENBURG WADE 16 P-0044900 $921.13 06001085 FILL UPS FOOD STORES III INC 17 P-0045000 $1,054.00 06001086 FILL UPS FOOD STORES III INC 18 P-0056200 $319.87 08000650 HAPPY ACRES ASSISTED LIVING 19 P-0058200 $468.69 08002575 HATCH MOTT & MACDONALD LLC 20 P-0058300 $133.70 08002580 HATCHER WILLIAM DAVID 21 P-0058800 $8.22 08003025 HELMS CARLIE & SANDRA 22 P-0063500 $199.34 08006855 HOLMES MFG CORP 23 P-0063700 $18.89 08006865 HOLMES NELL 24 P-0068100 $942.56 10000955 JBS PACKAGE STORE INC 25 P-0070600 $100.91 10003550 JONES TONY 26 P-0071900 $27.09 11000355 KELLUM NANCY K 27 P-0072700 $113.40 11000620 KING KEN 28 P-0073900 $60.96 11002056 KIRKLAND ROY 29 P-0074300 $64.32 12000075 LACHANCE DONALD & ROSEANN 30 P-0079400 $307.60 12003880 LOCKE DEVELOPMENT 31 P-0081400 $13.15 13001537 MARELL JAMES C 32 P-0081700 $110.19 13001560 MARSH PAMELA 33 P-0082400 $26.59 13003575 MAYO DIANNE ESTATE 34 P-0086200 $237.64 13007900 MILLER LESLIE 35 P-0102900 $1,232.80 16009500 POWELL WAYNE 36 P-0104200 $68.09 18000350 RALEY MILISSA 37 P-0104300 $57.04 18000450 RAPINCHUK JOHN 38 P-0104700 $308.83 18000900 REDMON ARCHIE & LORI 39 P-0115500 $22.16 19005100 SINGLETARY JOSEPH B 40 P-0116000 $39.07 19005550 SLAY JIMMY WAYNE & B 41 P-0116100 $23.80 19005650 SLAY RICHARD 42 P-0117200 $51.68 19007200 SMITH KENNETH 43 P-0125100 $150.11 20000975 TAYLOR MARTY 44 P-0125200 $100.91 20000990 TAYLOR MELISSA 45 P-0127000 $164.05 20002850 THOMLEY BRUCE 46 P-0131500 $396.18 21000999 VAGHMAR BHUPENDRA 47 P-0135000 $50.88 23001800 WATFORD STEVE 48 P-0145700 $53.33 23010022 WRIGHT ANNIE A 49 P-0146700 $84.50 25001205 YARBROUGH CHRISTINA PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES As published in the Holmes County Times-Advertiser, May 9, 2012. B B USINESS USINESS G G UIDE UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 16 Years With, Friendly and Reliable Service!Service On All Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration & Hoods638-3611Call For Monthly Specials THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Dentons RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDAWE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS$ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENTMon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709Triple O FarmsDozer & Tractor WorkO ering an array of work from land clearing to site restoration and road building. Complete clean up of site from leveling, discing to landscaping for house or preparation for planting or whatever you need Contact Jim(850) 768-2602Family Owned & Operated Wilderness Tractor ServiceBush hogging, frontend tractor work, food plotting, plowing and harrowing work. Free Estimates850-590-3479 COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in color! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. 5-5088 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 11-CA-000354 2010-3 SFR VENTURE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. BOBBY L. HAWKINS ; GLENDA C. HAWKINS, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Holmes County, Florida, will on the 24th day of May 2012, at 11:00 a.m. the Front Steps of the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32425, at 11:00 A.M., offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Holmes County, Florida 511 W. BANFILL AVE. BONIFAY, FL 32425. E 1/2 COMMENCE AT THE NW CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST AND RUN EAST 670.46 FEET THENCE NORTH 60 FEET TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF BANFILL AVE. AND POB THENCE WEST 107.5 FEET THENCE SOUTH 150 FEET THENCE EAST 107.5 FEET THENCE NORTH 150 FEET TO POB. & 513 W. BANFILL AVE. BONIFAY, FL 32425. W 1/2 COMMENCE AT THE NW CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST AND RUN EAST 670.46 FEET THENCE NORTH 60 FEET TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF BANFILL AVE. THENCE WEST 107.5 FEET TO POB THENCE CONT. WEST 107.5 FEET THENCE SOUTH 150 FEET THENCE EAST 107.5 FEET THENCE NORTH TO POB. 1999 AMERSON DWMH, I.D. #(S): BHAL09086A&B 2001 OAKWOOD DWMH, I.D. #(S): HOGH18106347A&B. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 19th day of April, 2012. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT by Diane Eaton, Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser May 9, 16, 2012. 5-5089 Meeting Notice Tri-County Airport Authoritys regularly scheduled meeting for May 10, 2012 has been rescheduled for May 24, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. local time. The meeting will be held in the Tri-County Airport Terminal building. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser May 16, 23, 2012. 5-5087 PUBLIC SALE Tharp & Sons Mini Storage in Bonifay, Fl. will hold a sale for these units for non-payment of rent in accordance with the FL Statute Act 83-801-83-809. Tenants will have until May 26, 2012 to pay in full. No checks accepted. 1. Marsha Hendrix, Bonifay, Fl. 2. Unknown As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser May 9, 16, 2012. 5-5076 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-11-DP IN THE INTEREST OF : M.W. DOB: 09/10/2004 J.W. DOB: 04/03/2006 J.R. DOB: 11/13/2008 R.R. DOB: 01/14/2010 MINOR CHILDREN (SEC.39.801 (b) FS) The State of Florida to MICHAEL ROSS, natural father whose residence and address is unknown. You are hereby notified that a Petition under oath has been filed in the above styled Court for the Termination of Parental Rights in the case of M.W., J.W., J.R., and R.R. children, to licensed child placement agency for subsequent adoption. You are hereby noticed that an Advisory Hearing will be held before the Honorable Christopher N. Patterson, Judge of the Circuit Court, Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, at the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, Florida 32428, on the 12th day of June, 2012, at the hour of 1:30 p.m., CENTRAL TIME. You have the right to appear with counsel at this hearing. If you can not afford legal representation, the Court will appoint counsel for you at this hearing upon the determination of insolvency. You must either appear on the date and at the time specified or send a written response to the Court prior to that time. YOUR FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THESE CHILDREN. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD OR CHILDREN. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser April 25, May 2, 9, 16, 2012.

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B8| Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, May 16, 2012 Painting Inside or outside. Residential or commercial. Satisfaction Guarantee. Local references. 31 yrs experience. Dennis Glenn. 850-596-4143 C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. $4,995 Xtreme Boats 1990 Ford Van High-Top. Airconditioner in back window. Can be used for camping. A-1 Great Condition.Call Paul 326-0500 Total Down Payment$67599 Ford F150 X/Cab 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 850-215-1769 9am-9pm You automatically approved if you can make payments on time! Total Down Payment$77500 Chevy Monte Carlo 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 850-215-1769 9am-9pm You automatically approved if you can make payments on time! Total Down Payment$77501 Dodge Durango 3-Rows 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 850-215-1769 9am-9pm You automatically approved if you can make payments on time! Total Down Payment$87502 Ford Explorer 3-rows 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 850-215-1769 9am-9pm You automatically approved if you can make payments on time! Got Bad Credit? Ride Today! Buy Here/Pay Here $0 Down/1st payment Tax, Tag & Title. Call Steve 334-803-9550 Restrictions apply. Total Down Payment$157503 Chevy Silverado X/Cab 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 850-215-1769 9am-9pm You automatically approved if you can make payments on time! Total Down Payment$177503 Chevy Silverado X/Cab 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 850-215-1769 9am-9pm You automatically approved if you can make payments on time! Total Down Payment$67502 Ford F150 X/Cab 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 850-215-1769 9am-9pm You automatically approved if you can make payments on time! Total Down Payment$67598 Ford Mustang 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 850-215-1769 9am-9pm You automatically approved if you can make payments on time! NC Mountains AUCTION, May 26th. 77 Acres; Main House; (2) Guest Cottages. Alleghany/Grayson Counties. Selling as one unit. Gorgeous views; pond; stream; pastureland. (336)970-1866; (336)789-2926 www.RogersAuctionGroup.co m NC#685-VA#2 NC MountainsAvery & Watauga Counties. Online Only Auction. 345+/-Acres; 6,000+/-sf. Home/Lake Hickory; 21+/-Acres Beech Mountain; (2) Tracts Foscoe (800)442-7906 www.RogersAuctionGroup .com. NCAL#685 SUV 2007 Chrysler Aspen Limited Copper Color with chrome accents. Soft leather seating with power everything. Heated front seats (both power) and bucket heated 2nd row, with full 3rd row. DVD system w/ 4 head sets. New Brakes all the way around and new tires! Never been in an accident! All scheduled maintenance done through Dodge Dealer. Great sound system w/ Satellite Radio, the back can listen to their Own music/movie through the headsets, while the front listens to their own! 20 inch custom wheels. Factory GPS System, 2 wheel drive with towing package. Very clean and in excellent condition. 88,000 miles (mostly highway) $17,500 Call 850-303-1773 will email photos Bettie's Country RealtyBETTIE L. SLAY, BROKER (Florida & Alabama)205 E. North Ave., Bonifay, Florida 32425(850) 547-3510 www.bettiescountryrealtyonline.comWE GET RESULTS NATIONAL MLSNICE 3 BR 1.5 BA BRICK ON 1 ACRE REDUCED-$98,900---10 AC FARM 3 BR HOME BARNS PASTURE-$175,000--4+ ACRES 3 BR 2 BA CHIPLEY-$79,900---NEWER 3 BR 2 BA CHIPLEY -$138,900---4 BR 1.5 BA BRICK-$89,900---3 BR HOME ON 1 AC OWNER FINANCE REDUCED$59,900---LIKE NEW 3 BR 2.5 BA ON 1+ ACRE-$169,900---2 ACRES OWNER FINANCE-$19,900---11 ACRES OWNER FINANCE REDUCED$24,900---18 ACRES 4 BR 3 BA DWMH-$139,900---2 BR HOME ON 1 ACRE-$42,500---LAKEFRONT HOME ON 18 ACRES-$99,900---13 ACRES PASTURE HWY -$59,900---3 BR HOME ON 2+AC-$79,900--NICE 2 BR BRICK-$85,900--4+ AC OLD HOMESITE-$24,900---41+ ACRES W/ 3 MHS & 4 PONDS-$129,900---FINISH & SAVE 3 BR HOME REDUCED$28,900---NICE LAKEFRONT 2 BR 2 BA MH-$55,000---2 BR INTOWN$39,000---2 HOMES ON 13 AC HWY FRONTAGE-$159,000 5 Acres TrackFor Sale 40 miles North of PanamaCity Beach,1 mile off Hwy 79. 25K OBO. Mike Stansberry 423-253-4226 $33,500 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. Reduced Price! Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858. ORCALL866-539-4171 $2,500downincashorcertifiedfundsfor eachproperty.5%premiumoneachsale. Allsalessubjecttosellersapproval.OPENHOUSE: Sat&Sun,May19&201:00-3:00pmH&MCQ1035357,AB110;B.G. Hudson,Jr.,BK3006464,AU230 Upto2%toBuyersAgents!NoBackTaxesorLiens InsurableTitleGetThe Details At:BidNowFlorida.com FLORIDABank-OwnedHOMES732JOANLANE with3BRand2BA 1,144SFHomeSELLINGONSITETUESMAY2210:00AMAgent:NikkiFinch CoastalConceptsRealty 850.596.6101 HOMEAUCTIONincludingthisLocal PanamaCity Home locatedat: 2 Bdr/2Bath Mobile Home in Bethlehem Community. No pets. Non smoker. Security deposit required. Water/utility building/ lawn services provided. $400/month. (850)547-2157. 14X70 3BR/2BA Single Wide located in Chipley $500/mo, $500/depo. Call 850-209-5696 OR 850-209-1426 2BR Furnished Mobile Home CH/A. Real clean. On Bonnett Pond Rd. $500/mth $200/dep. Sorry No Pets 850-638-1462 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. For Rent Doublewide. 206 Tiller Dr2 large BR/1BA, front porch, large reardeck, carport, utilityroom, large backyard, completely remodeled. NO Pets. $595.00. 547-5606. Ref Required FOR RENT Nice mobile home convenient location in Chipley. No Pets. 850-638-4640 FOR RENT: Nice 2BR & 3BR Mobile Homes. On nice big lot in nice neighborhood. Near Sapp Community Church. For more info, call Lou Corbin @ 638-1911 or cell phone, 326-0044. Sorry No Pets. Wages Pond: Near Sunny Hills. SW 3br 2ba, All appliances, screened porch, dock, carport. $555 month + Deposit 850-233-4636 Text FL09639 to 56654 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incld 638-1918 2BR/1.5BA Townhouse for rent. No pets. Deposit, references required. 843 8th St, Chipley. 638-1918 FOR RENT 1 Bed apartment, convenient location in Chipley. No pets. 850-638-4640 For Rent: Bright 2BR/2BA screened porch Townhouse apartment. Non-Smoker, references. Good location Bonifay Area 850-547-3494 or 850-532-2177 Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio & 2 bedroom units $350-450/mo. City utilities included. (850)557-7732 2BD/1BA House. 901 Main St Chipley. $595 mth. Security depo $575. Available 5/10. Call 850-271-9973. For Rent 3BR/2BA Brick House inclosed garage. No Pets. 850-638-1918 For Rent: Vernon, 2BR/1BA, large porch and yard. $500 month, New floors. 850-535-9650 Home for Rent 409 Rangeline, Bonifay, new appl, CH/A, large porch, large backyard. 1 min from Middle School. Contact David 850-768-0749 Large Executive home 4,500 sq. ft., 5 bedrooms/6 bathrooms, 2 laundry rooms. Private paved driveway meets highway-Bonifay. Fully furnished. Serious calls only. $1500 per month. (850)547-2096. 2 and 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes for rent in Bonifay. No Pets. (850)547-3462. A Few Pro Drivers Needed Top Pay & 401K 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www. meltontruck.com/drive DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Become a driver for Schneider National! Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! CDL & Job Ready in just 3 weeks! (888)368-1964 Drivers -Refrigerated & Dry Van Freight. Great Pay! Quarterly Safety Bonus! Part and full-time lanes. Hometime options. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. (800)414-9569 www.driveknight.com Drivers 100% Owner Operator Co. Regional & Dedicated Home weekly Class A C.D.L. 1 yr. exp. in last 3 Call (800)695-9643 Drivers-Class A Flatbed -$-Home Weekends, Run Southeast US, Requires 1 Yr OTR Flatbed experience, & Pay UP TO .39/mile Call (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, LLC EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Vets welcome. Call: (843)266-3731 / bulldoghiway.com EOE Hiring NON-CDL and CDL drivers with 1-ton or larger pickup trucks or semi-tractors with or without wedge trailer. Great rates, flexible schedule, and up to $5,000 mileage bonus. Call (866)764-1601 or log onto ForemostTransport.com today. We respect our drivers! MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 NEW TO TRUCKING? Your new career starts now! $0 Tuition Cost No Credit Check Great Pay & Benefits Short employment commitment required Call (866)297-8916 www.joinCRST.com ESTATE SALE Fri & Sat, May 18,19. 8-12. Seasonal items, piano, boat, motor, lots more. Great prices! 744 3rd St. Moving Sale May 24 & 25, 7 a.m. till? 55 gal. fish tank, large desk, misc. furniture, other items. 2102 Wrights Creek Rd. Caryville. Fresh From the Farm Squash40/lb, Sweet Corn 4 for $1 or $12 for a bushel. Call Summer at 850-956-4556 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (877)206-5165 www. CenturaOnline.com For Sale New 6 string guitar. Length 36 width 13 1/2,reenforced neck.$ 75.00 cash. Like new, baby highchair, $35.00cash. 850-638-4437 Matts Removal! Garbage removal, free metal removal, yard jobs, moving jobs. We buy items. Nobody Beats My Prices! (850)547-1445, cell (850)658-2376. STOP GNAT & MOSQUITO BITES! Buy Swamp Gator All Natural Insect Repellant, Family Safe, Use Head to Toe. Available at Ace Hardware, The Home Depot & HomeDepot.com Wanted: Junk appliances. Lawn-mowers, farm and garden equipment, golf carts, satellites for free. I will pick up. Call (850)-547-0088 WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. CNA/ OFFICE STAFF Position available in Bonifay location for Assisted Administrator for 56 bed facility. No degree required, must be hard working individual willing to assist in all aspects of taking care of residents to include assisting with all daily living skills, preparing meals, and being on call as needed. Pay depends on experience. Call 547-3708 for more information Direct Care Staff: Several positions available at Assisted Living Facility in Bonifay and Vernon. Duties include; cleaning of residents rooms, assistance with bathes, medications and preparing meals. Pay starts at $8.25 an hour. Must be able to pass level two background screening and have reliable transportation. Call 547-3708 for more information. Hometown Care Services Hiring care givers for nonmedical in-home care. Part-time position only. Preemployment drug screening and background check required. www.hometown cares.com Call 850-535-4427 FL232619 ADVERTISE YOUR WAY TO SUCCESS! Call now to grow your business. Get your classified ad in 119 newspapers with one order. Advertising Networks of Florida(866)742.1373 Potential to generate $4,000 to $20,000 or more a month with this activity. No selling. Experience financial and time freedom. Call (352)445-1385 Financial FreedomWay.info. Adopt: TV Producer & Counselor in 30s, yearn for 1st baby. Alex & Allison 800-52 2-0045 FLBar42311 *Expenses Paid* YORKIE PUPPIES Two females and two males, $300 each. Vet checked and tails docked. Ready to go May 9th. 850-415-5762 or 850-415-6256. Text FL08215 to 56654 Yellow Lab House Trained. 5 years old. Very Friendly.Free to Good Home. Call 850-638-9846 AUCTION *CALL CENTER CLOSING* Computers, furniture, generator +MORE! Bid online thru May 15th www.one-more-time.us. LIVE Auction May 18th at 10am -6671 Caroline Street, Milton, FL; 18%BP online -10%BP live. Gaddis & Associates (850)-227-8280. 1 More Time Auction Services (407)466-2270 www.one-more-time.us. Fritz Real Estate & Auctions Licensed Real Estate Broker (800)-422-9155 AU2871-AB2650 ORLANDO AUCTIONS: No Minimums, No Reserves! Inventory of Cabinet Manuf. Facility, May 16. Bankruptcy & Consignment Auction, May 19. Ewald Auction & Realty, AB2473/AU1340. 10%BP. (407)275-6853 B&B Furniture 1342 North RR Avenue, Chipley. We pay cash for clean, quality furniture. and some appliances 850-557-0211 or 850-415-6866. Ask for Pasco or Carolyn An Advertising Breakthrough A SAVINGS OF $32.01 OFF THE REGULAR PRICE 20 Words 8 Weeks One LOW Price!THE WHEEL DEALTo place your ad, call850-638-0212 850-547-9414Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser Weekly Advertiser*Up to 20 words. Personal ads only, no dealers. Have a car, truck van or motorcycle you are wanting to sell? We'll run your ad in all three publications for8 WEEKSFOR$19.99* Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414

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Gate Admission$5Armbands $15 Every DayGates Open 5pm Nightly 9am on SaturdayMay 16-19, 2011Holmes County Fairgrounds Bonifay

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Gates Open: 5:30 pm Wednesday-Friday 9am on SaturdayADMISSION $5.00 Gates Open: 5:30 pm Wednesday-Friday 9am on Saturday Holmes County FairMay 16-19, 2012SWING BY THEFarmer's Market and Livestock Show Every Day *Enhanced Checking: is account requires $50 to open. Text Message Alerts: Standard text messaging rates apply. eStatements: Paper statements available upon request for Enhanced and Elite. ATM Fees: Out of market ATM fees from other banks will be refunded with receipt. GenGold Membership: GenGold benets and services subject to change without notice. Some benets and services may require an additional fee. See www.gengold.com for complete details. Club Savings account: is is an interest bearing account. No quarterly service charge. Minimum $10 monthly automatic transfer from Enhanced is required. Minimum opening balance is $25. Customer chooses May 1 or November 1 distribution date. Early withdrawal penalty is $25. Transfers to another account or 3rd parties by pre-authorized, automatic, telephone transfer limited to 6 per month. e interest rate and APY are subject to change without notice. Account will earn no interest any day the balance falls below $1,000. Fees may reduce earnings. eDeposit: Online banking and First Federal account with 625 or better Qualile Score required for eDeposit. B: (850) 547-3624 C: (850) 638-7892 M: (850) 526-4411 best value checking for everyday lifeall for just best value checking for everyday life ENHANCEDCHECKING 1 instant personalized Visa Debit Card ATM fees refunded with receipt* 1 box of standard checks per year online banking and bill pay eStatements* text message & email alerts* mobile banking eDeposit available (make deposits from home)*1 non-sucient funds charge waived per year upon request GenGoldmembership benefits*free regular or club savings account with automatic transfer* all for just $6a month Wednesday, May 16CHURCH AT THE FAIR NIGHTFree admission with 1 non-perishable food item. Senior Citizens ages 62 and over get in FREE Church at the Fair 6-7:30 pm Entertainment: local gospel groups 7:30-9:30 pm Door Prizes and Giveaways at 9:30 pmThursday, May 17SCHOOL SPIRIT NIGHT$3 admission for K-12 wearing apparel with name or mascot of their school on it. (excluding college) Boat, tractor and ATV show/sale begins Door prizes and giveaways at 9 pmFriday, May 18FARMERS AT THE FAIR NIGHTFree Hayrides, How to Can exhibit Entertainment: Magic Show 6-7:30 pm and Mika Moore 8-10 pm Dine for Cash and Chicken Chase Door prizes and giveaways at 9 pmSaturday, May 19OLDHOLMES DAYKids 12 and under get in FREE per paying adult Fair Fest 2012 12-6 pm 9 am 6 pm Old Holmes Day Exhibits, Native American Village and Demos, Antique Tractors, Farmer's Market Entertainment with Mika Moore 10-11 am Entertainment with Cornerstone Bluegrass Gospel 12-1:30 pm Political Rally 2-4 pm Chili Cook O 3-4 pm 4-H Fashion Show 6:30-7:30 Entertainment with Ron French All Heart Music 8-10 pm