<%BANNER%>
Holmes County times-advertiser
ALL ISSUES CITATION DOWNLOADS
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100549/00151
 Material Information
Title: Holmes County times-advertiser
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
Place of Publication: Bonifay, FL
Publication Date: 02-01-2012
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00100549:00151

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

By Cecilia Spears Staff Writer cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY West Bonifay Baptist Churchs invitation to celebrate Ander Browns Wild Game, Fish and Fowl Dinner Friday was answered by hundreds in the community who came to participate in the event, which offered food and fellowship. Once a year, Brown holds a game dinner at the church to promote his love of sportsmanship, hunting and shing, and invites everyone with a passion for the sport to join the free dinner. The assortment of game for the dinner ranged from sh to fowl and was provided by Brown. Most guests and family members said that Browns intentions are unmistakable; that his love of sportsmanship is only surpassed by his love for God, family and fellowship. Id like to thank all those who put in so much hard work to help put this together, especially those who cooked, Brown said. You cant go wrong with good food, good fellowship and the love of God. Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo galleries, opinions & more... Follow Us On Facebook And Mobile Too! @WCN_HCT Connect With Us 24/7 www.bonifaynow.com 50 www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, FEBRUARY 1 2012 Volume 121, Number 42 For the latest breaking news, visit BONIFAYNOW.COM Phone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 INDEX Arrests ................................. A3 Opinion ................................ A4 Outdoors .............................. A6 Sports .................................. A7 Extra .................................... B1 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B6 IN BRIEF Florida Department of Corrections CARYVILLE As of today, Wednesday, Feb. 1, Caryville Work Camp is scheduled to close by mid-summer. As a result of declining prison admissions and excess bed space, the Florida Department of Corrections will be closing seven prisons and four work/forestry camps by July 1 as part of a statewide consolidation plan. No inmates will be released early as a result of this decision and there will remain adequate bed space to accommodate projected prison admissions, which have steadily decreased since FY 2007-08. Those prisons being closed are Broward Correctional Institution in Ft. Lauderdale, Demilly CI in Polk City, Gainesville CI in Alachua County, Hillsborough CI in Riverview, Indian River CI in Vero Beach, Jefferson CI in Monticello and New River CI (both units) in Raiford. In addition, River Junction Work Camp in Chattahoochee, Caryville Work Camp, near the Northwest Florida Reception Center in Washington County, Hendry Work Camp in Immokalee and Levy Forestry Camp near Lowell CI in Ocala will also be closed. Declining prison admissions has led to a surplus of prison beds, allowing us to pare down our budget shortfall by consolidating and closing our older, less ef cient facilities. We are committed to placing as many affected staff as possible in vacant positions for which they are quali ed, said Secretary of Florida Department of Corrections Ken Tucker. Inmates will be relocated to institutions with vacancies that meet their custody, pro le, health, education and risk assessment needs. To determine which prisons and facilities would be affected, Tucker assembled an internal workgroup of subject matter experts, who developed criteria for evaluating facilities based on several factors including: facility mission, cost per inmate, maintenance and construction costs, community and employee impact, inmate labor squads, security, education and programs and volunteers. These criteria were vetted through a variety of public and private sector entities. The department employed quantitative measures to create an institutional scoring sheet to objectively measure the pros and cons for each institution. State to close Caryville work camp Holmes County Development Commission A low existing industrial base, a large commuter population, resilient manufacturing; All of the above may be the secret to this countys lower-than-average unemployment rate. For whatever reason, Holmes County reported a December 2011 unemployment rate of 7.6 percent, about 2.3 percent lower than the state average and almost 1 percent lower than the national average. Holmes County Economic Development Commission executive director Jim Brook said he thinks that expanding existing industry might be a large part of the countys good unemployment gure, along with a major expansion to one multi-national company with a presence in Bonifay. LKQ, an automotive parts remanufacturer and re-seller completed an expansion of their Holmes County, facility in 2011 and created 21 new jobs. The existing 10,000 square foot facility was expanded by 20,000 square feet with a $1.3 million capital investment. We were very fortunate that LKQ decided to expand the Bonifay facility following a recent acquisition of a competing manufacturer and a re-shuf ing of their processing and distribution strategy. Coordinating with the Holmes County Planning Board and the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners, LKQ and the Holmes County Development Commission worked with the local and corporate of cials over several months preceding the expansion to navigate through land-use issues and the comprehensive plan to facilitate the project. There was some question for a while if the company was going to shutdown or choose to expand here, Brook said. I believe a friendly planning board, a pro-jobs county commission and the enterprise Growing industry key to countys lower unemployment See INDUSTRY A2 By Cecilia Spears Staff Writer cspears@chipleypaper.com Holmes County Election results are now available for viewing at www. bonifaynow.com. Unfortunately, the results werent available until after the publication date. Find out the presidential primary results online. Being an involved voter has become more and more important in todays world, said Debbie Wilcox Morris, Holmes County supervisor of elections. It is important for todays voters to be well informed in order to participate effectively in the elections process. The more you know in advance of election day, the more pleasant your voting experience will be. Also available are instructions on how to set up a default absentee ballot to arrive at your home every year. Coverage of upcoming local candidates and presidential progress will also be available as this years election progresses. For more information on voting, visit the supervisor of elections of cial website at www.holmeselections.com. Holmes County election results available online Community celebrates Ander Brown Day Below Ander Brown (Left) enjoying time with family and friends. CECILIA SPEARS | Times-Advertiser Holmes County Sports sign ups BONIFAY Holmes County Youth Sports will be holding baseball and softball sign ups from 9 a.m. to noon Feb. 4 at the Bonifay Middle School gym. Registration is $40. Online registration is available through Feb. 4 for players, coaches and umpires. A late fee of $10 will be added for players who register after Feb. 4. The Christian Rods & Customs Spring Warm Up Car Show BONIFAY The Christian Rods & Customs, Holmes & Washington County Chapters will be hosting a Spring Warm Up Car Show Saturday, Feb. 4, at the First Baptist Church, 311 Waukesha St., to bene t the Pregnancy Centers in Holmes and Washington County. Admission is free for the public. Entry time for car enthusiasts who would like to show off their vehicles begins at 8 a.m. and costs $20. Prizes will include Top 20, Pregnancy Center Choice and door prizes. The awards will be announced at 2:30 p.m. There will be BBQ pork and chicken plates for sale for $5. Everyone can enter for a chance at the 50/50 drawing. For more information, call David Stull at 850768-2870. Hello from the Times-Advertiser new editor A4

PAGE 2

Local A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, February 1, 2012 Caregivers Available for SHUT-INS Trusted In-Home Care for Seniors of All Ages! 25 Years Experience 7 Days a Week 24 Hours a Day Excellent References Commitment to Quality Care Compassionate, Skilled Caregivers Personal Care Transportation Errands Light Housekeeping Companionship Meal Preparation Emotional & Spiritual Support Gail Hall, Owner Home 850-482-5424 Cell 850-264-1793 Carol Hagin Cell 850-557-0085 Gails Sitting Agency Now Stocking Cross Ties and Concrete Blocks Gun Show February 11th & 12th Panama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds 2077251 Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4 C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 o r 2 Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING J.D. OWENS CARPET OU T L ET will save you money E V ER YD A Y!!! J.D. OWENS CARPET OU T L ET 2597 S pringcreek R oad, Marianna, FL 3 1/2 Miles E ast of Marianna on Hwy. 90 (850) 526-3619 Textured Plush Carpet 79 69 99 Loose Lay Fiberglass Back Vinyl Super Thick 13 Loose Lay Vinyl 49 FHA Quality Vinyl Boats, Pool, Patio Turf SF SF SF SF 45 SF zone helped to give Holmes County the nod. The county paved the unimproved access road leading to the facility. Holmes County offers a Rural Enterprise Zone program that provides incentives to industries that locate or expand in designated regions within the county. Expansion of other existing industry has helped to sustain Holmes County during uncertain economic times. Situated within Holmes County is an economic mini-cluster of precision metal parts and fabrication shops that continue to experience sustained or increased sales and demonstrate overall growth despite national downward economic trends. Each of these ve manufacturers, AUS Manufacturing, Environmental Supply and Manufacturing, Holmes Tool and Engineering, Johnson Laser Works and Man own Engineering, employ workers at higher than average wages (approximately $48,500), as compared to other nongovernment industries in the county. Each employs skilled machinists operating advanced technology such as CNC (computer numerically controlled) mills, lathes, water jets, plasma and laser cutters and other highly automated metal working machinery. For example, through principles established by the company in its earlier years, now de ned as lean manufacturing, and by leveraging talented machinists, new technology and strict quality systems, minority-owned Man own Engineering has been able to expand its core competencies thereby differentiating itself from its competitors. Holmes Tool, producing high precision machined parts and fabricated components for the power generating industry in its 20,000-square-foot machine and fabrication shop, is the second, largest employer in the county, just behind LKQ. AUS produces one-off and specialized production parts also for the utility industry as well as the military. Environmental Supply and Manufacturing has traditionally operated more production runs and supports more traditional manufacturers. All of the fabrication shops have, in the past or currently, supplied the military and military contractors, Brook said. At least two of the shops export to foreign markets and participated in the SBA Hub Zone program. The Hub Zone program has now sunset for Holmes County. Johnson Laser, located outside the state-line community of Esto, is a supplier to the larger fabrication shops. Brook said all of the companies, with the exception of Johnson Laser, are located in the Rural Enterprise Zone. These companies are a unique asset and, I believe, an opportunity to attract ancillary business and industry. For example, all of the companies have to ship their product out to a third party for heat-treating. Without exception, all of our industries operate quietly, without a lot of fanfare and attention, Brook said. Our fabrication micro-cluster does some amazing work and supplies quality product to large multinational companies as well as the military and the ever-important energy industry. These companies also offer relatively high wage jobs that require some computer training and manual competencies. At least twice over the past twelve months, I have seen help wanted signs for CNC machine operators at the plants. Holmes County is a traditionally rural area located in northwest Florida along the state-line with Alabama. LKQ is an example of the logistics and distribution target market actively pursued by Holmes County and other rural counties within Northwest Florida along Interstate 10. Holmes County boast the closest, undeveloped, interchange at I-10 leading to the new, Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport. he Holmes County Development Commission works under a memorandum of understanding as the designated local economic development organization charged with implementation of state programs with Enterprise Florida (EFI), is a member of Opportunity Florida and is a marketing participate with Floridas Great Northwest. INDUSTRY from page A1 Three teens from the Florida Music Education Association sang at the Bonifay Kiwanis Club luncheon on Wednesday, Jan. 25. These individuals were selected from more than 150 students from various schools located between Pensacola and Tallahassee. Christine Louen directed the music they sang. Bonifay Kiwanis is one of the largest particpating membership organizations in our area and invites anyone interested in becoming a member to contact us at 850-547-5363 or email kiwanis@bonifaykiwanis. org. BONIFAY KIWANIS HOSTS FMEA SUBMITTED PHOTO Holmes Council on Aging held their New Year and Birthday Dinner on Friday Jan. 27. We had a great dinner. A great big thank you to Gentiva Home Health for sponsoring the event and to Piggly Wiggly for donating the birthday cake. Celebrating their birthdays from left to right is Mattie Scarvey, Deloris Smith and Derotha Haney. (Not pictured: R. J. Carnley). HCCOA celebrates new year and January birthdays

PAGE 3

Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3 Wednesday, February 1, 2012 By Randal Yakey Florida Freedom Newspapers PANAMA CITY Catholic Charities of Northwest Florida has launched a new program to assist struggling veterans with a grant through the Department of Housing and Urban Development and Veterans Affairs. The program, called VA Support Services for Veteran Families is a partnership between the VA, Families Count of Pensacola and Catholic Charities serving veterans in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Okaloosa, Walton and Washington counties. The goal of the program is to improve housing stability, to prevent at-risk families from becoming homeless and to provide supportive services to very low-income veterans and their families residing in or transitioning to permanent housing. Through community outreach and intensive case management, Catholic Charities will educate and assist participants to obtain military and civilian bene ts such as housing counseling, health care services, daily living services, transportation services, personal nancial planning services and child care services, to name a few. This really is for at-risk veterans, said Catholic Charities regional director Diane Williams in Panama City. Catholic Charities is the social ministry of the Catholic church in the 18-county region of Northwest Florida, whose mission is to serve vulnerable families. By Gov. Rick Scott We recently learned Floridas unemployment rate decreased in December to 9.9 percent, down for the fourth straight month. Thats a 2.1-percent drop in points in a year. For the rst time in two-and-a-half years, Floridas unemployment number is in single digits. These numbers provide clear evidence Floridas economy is moving in the right direction. But most importantly, these numbers mean Floridians who didnt have jobs one year ago are now able to nd jobs. I am committed to working to make Florida the best place to start, grow or move a business so that every Floridian who wants a job has the opportunity to get to work. As one of the nations leaders in job creation, Florida totaled 141,500 private-sector jobs last year. Thats almost 12,800 new jobs every month. In December alone, Florida added more than 5,000 private-sector jobs at a rate of more than 12 jobs for every job that was lost as local, state and federal governments trimmed their workforce in order to live within their means. Floridas lower unemployment rate is proof businesses, not governments, create jobs, and it is Floridians who deserve the credit. With the help of the Legislature, I am committed to making changes that continue moving Florida in the right direction. I am focused on streamlining government, removing barriers to job creation, eliminating burdensome regulations and keeping the cost of living as low for families and businesses. There still is much work to be done. We must build on our success and ensure the short-term and long-term success of Floridas businesses. Our achievements must serve as a platform for attracting new businesses to Florida from around the world. I have no doubt Florida can be the No. 1 destination for global business. To achieve that goal, we must have the best educated workforce with the skills necessary to compete in our 21st century global economy. A good education is essential to getting a good job, so I have proposed adding $1 billion for K-12 education. This is the third largest amount of state funding for K-12 in the past decade. To ensure we do not let the children of our state down, I will not sign any budget into law that does not contain signi cantly more state dollars for education than we had last year. The Florida House of Representatives shares my vision and has allocated more than $1 billion for education. I am grateful for their support for the young people of our state. Another step that will make Florida a better place for business is to make sure we focus on the transportation projects that are best for Florida. Preparing Floridas ports for increased trade from the expanded Panama Canal and free trade agreements will ensure Florida is a global trading hub and attract businesses to our state from across the world. Florida already is the top tourist destination, and we are well on our way to being the leading place for business. We are making great progress in the Sunshine State, and I look forward to working closely with the Legislature to identify ways to ensure that every Floridian that wants a job, can get one. I remain focused on three things: making sure Floridas children can receive a good education, making sure that Floridians can nd a job and keeping the cost of living low in our state. Please share your ideas with me by emailing Rick. Scott@eog.my orida.com. Working together, we can get Florida back to work! Jan. 15 Jan. 21 Scott Dewayne Adams, 36, Violation of probation on worthless checks Travis Worley Adams, 33, Manufacturing Methamphetamine, Possession of paraphernalia, Possession of controlled substance Carlos Anderson, 23, Hold for Hillsborough Deandre Belim, 37, Hold for Miami Dade Casie Lynn Brannon-Pelham, 23, Manufacturing Methamphetamine, Possession of paraphernalia, Possession of controlled substance David Waylon Carnley, 41, Driving while license suspended or revoked, Tag not assigned Spencer Klay Childress, 21, Hold for Hillsborough Jeannie Currington, 34, Violation of probation on shoplifting Ricky George Everett, 43, Child support, Driving while license suspended or revoked, Attached tag not assigned Harold Anthony Fish, 55, Violation of injunction Courtland Armao Freeman, 24, Hold for Hillsborough James Clarin Gregory, 65, Hold for Washington and Jackson Counties Harold Dwayne Harper, 27, Hold for prison transport service Dawn Sondra McCullough, 50, Hold for prison transport service Oscar Molina, 26, Hold for Hillsborough Terry Eugene Moore, 30, Hold for outside agency Salvador Mathew Reyes, 21, Violation of probation on possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, Violation of probation on possession of paraphernalia Pedro Robles Saucedo, 48, Hold for outside agency Shane Adam Warren, 26, Possession of drug equipment, Possession of amphetamine Derek Sterling Watson, 29, Hold for outside agency Steven Grady Webster, 41, Improper tag John D. Whitaker, 62, Hold for Hillsborough Mark Fredrick Zabkiewicz, 30, Hold for prison transport services Jan. 17 Jan. 20 Marriages There were no marriages reported this week. Divorces James Ryan Rogers and April Rogers Harlen Wade Stephens and Lisa Stephens The Holmes District School System would like to acknowledge and thank Mr. Robert (Buddy) Skipper of the Noma Community for his donation of $7,000 to the District. Mr. Skipper presented the gift to the School Board at the January 17th Board Meeting to be used to bene t the students of Holmes County. Mr. Skipper has a history of being a supportive gure of the school system and this is just the latest example of his many endeavors to do so. HOLMES SCHOOL SYSTEM DONATION CONTRIBUTED PHOTO Holmes County ARREST REPORT HOLMES COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE Marriages & DIVORCES Floridians are getting back to the workforce LEARN MORE For more information about the program, contact the VA Support Services for Veteran Families team for Bay, Holmes, Gulf, Jackson and Washington counties at 850-7630475. For Okaloosa and Walton counties, call 850-763-0475. Program aims to prevent homelessness among vets In December alone, Florida added more than 5,000 private-sector jobs at a rate of more than 12 jobs for every job that was lost as local, state and federal governments trimmed their workforce in order to live within their means. Rick Scott Florida governor

PAGE 4

Things to remember Learning of the death of my former teacher, Pauline Russ Baragona Cook Shores brought back memories of my school days. When I entered seventh grade at Vernon High School in the fall of 1943, I was still very much the skinny little kid from Brackin School who scarcely knew which big yellow bus to get on in the afternoons. Of course big brother Perry, older sister Minnie Lee, younger brothers Clyde and Max were also on the bus, so it wasnt as big a deal for me as it was when our Brackin teacher resigned toward the end of the previous school year and Clyde, Max and I had to enroll at Vernon. That year I had Mrs. Bessie Alma Pippin who paddled kids every Friday who didnt pass the spelling test. I squeaked by without a paddling. Seventh grade started with a substitute teacher for home room and science. When our teacher came several weeks after schools opening, I was very much in awe of her as her appearance at school was delayed by the wartime death of her young husband and the birth of their child. I think I only had Mrs. Pauline Baragona for study hall in the 8th grade where I had loosened up quite a bit and loved to talk a lot and get out of my seat in the auditorium where we had study hall and go to the pencil sharpener so that I could wink at the older boys as I returned to my seat. In the 9th grade, however, Miss Pauline was my biology teacher and my home economics teacher. I learned to outline as she taught how the plant and animal kingdoms are organized. I was a top student in that class, but although Id always had chores at home, especially in the kitchen, I was not a top student in home economics. In cooking, the rst thing we had to make was a salad. I found the easiest one, sunshine salad. All I had to do was place some lettuce on a salad plate, separate the slices of an orange or grapefruit, place them on top of the lettuce and drizzle with bottled French dressing. I was quite proud of my salad until Mrs. Baragona pointed out that I was supposed to section the orange. She explained that sectioning and separating werent the same thing. Cooking classes got better, but sewing was a disaster. We had to do a unit on childcare and then make a baby garment by hand, including handmade buttonholes. I still have that white batiste buttondownthefront baby gown on which my home economics teacher had the audacity to give my a D minus. I also remember the skirt we had to make. It had to have at least four gores and a zipper. Money was scarce and fabric was hard to nd in those post war years, so Mama bought me some navy and white print seersucker. I used someones 8-gore pattern in about a size 18, I think. It was so big, I had to keep taking up the seams; then we had to pink the seams with a hand-turned gadget called a pinking machine and I accidentally cut holes in the skirt. It was no big loss, however, because no one would have worn it to a dog ght. With some help from my cousin Lenora I did make one garment that I actually wore though it was far from perfect. It had a red cotton bodice with a red and white print feed sack skirt. A red ruf e went around the front and came up to the waist in the back, sort of an apron effect. Never mind that the gathers werent even and the ruf e was a little off center. You cant spot aws in a prancing horse, according to my friend Lorna Raper. The pedal sewing machine and I had a running battle. It wanted to go backward for some reason. Mrs. Cook, as Pauline had become by the tenth grade, said that it was because I talked instead of concentrating on making the pedal go in the right direction. Mrs. Cook tried to offer us country kids a little culture. We had a formal tea to which our mothers were invited. I dont remember getting a new dress myself, but I remember as if it were today what my Mama wore. She didnt intend for the town ladies to look any better than she did. She had a new little black dress with a two-layered skirt, crepe trimmed in satin. Her hat was a knock out. Kind of a pillbox style black straw with pink and fuchsia silk owers. And Gloves. Of course gloves. Pink gloves. We were proud of our little ve foot tall Mama. I am sure that Mrs. Pauline Russ Baragona Cook never gave another thought to the grief that my cousin Loriene Cook Kosier and I gave her with our talking and giggling in class, and I know I never apologized. But having taught all of the grades, seven through 12, I was duly punished for any of my bad behavior. I also know that teachers dont hold grudges. We are just happy to see former students and know that they have become selfsupporting, law abiding citizens. After the death of her husband, Tom Cook, she married Gene Shores and later retired. Even after all those years of teaching, Mrs. Pauline never stopped. She was honored last spring at the District Garden Club for 50 years service to the Vernon Garden Club. I was proud to be there and say that I was one of her former students. My 6th grade teacher, Mrs. Bessie Pippin Marshal, was also in attendance at that meeting. My thanks to both these ladies for the influence that you had on my life. Dear Editor, Im ashamed to be a card-carrying member of the Republican Party. Are Romney and Gingrich the best we can put up as our nominee? Do we, as a party, really feel that the lesser of two evils is the best way to select a Presidential candidate? Our debates have deteriorated to an endless, pointless, barrage of mud-slinging; never any real detailed debate over issues. This really depresses me. Mr. O must be loving it, as he will have all the mud he needs when it comes to mud-slinging time in November. Bill Ford Bonifay LETTER TO THE EDITOR The more things change, the more they stay the same. A year ago, I was managing editor of the Washington County Newspapers not in Florida, but in Washington County, Ark. As of Monday, my job title became managing editor of the Washington County News and the Holmes County Times-Advertiser, but while the title is the same, my latitude changed quite a bit. My wife and I packed up and moved to Chipley this past weekend so I could take the position as managing editor of Washington County News and Holmes County Times-Advertiser. In a nutshell, I began my journalism career in high school, then after a stint in the Navy, I returned to Arkansas State University for my degree in journalism. I have worked as editor at weekly papers in Eureka Springs, Ark., Dumas, Ark., and of course in Washington County. The paper was in the city of Lincoln, population 2,100. I began the process of moving to the tri-county area back before Christmas, but the holidays slowed down the process and I wasnt able to see Chipley until early January when I flew down to visit. It was pretty much love at first sight for me, and I couldnt wait until I was bringing my better half, Shannon, down to see this region. I kept trying to come up with an Arkansas correlation, but there wasnt really anything quite to match Chipley. To this newbie, the city has a quiet, beach-like charm in the architecture and a grand sense of southern hospitality. Spanish moss and palm trees are the biggest tip-off I am not in Arkansas anymore. Washington County, Ark., is home to the city of Fayetteville and the University of Arkansas, which of course is home to the Arkansas Razorbacks, which is the states No. 1 team. The Hogs did very well in the SEC this past season. My alma mater is Arkansas State University, however, which is in northeast Arkansas and is home to the Red Wolves, which play in the Sun Belt Conference. Everyone I have met so far in my three-day residency here has been very gregarious Sunday night we dined at KFC and I was impressed with one of the young ladies behind the counter who is planning a new career as a nurse, beginning her training this week at WashingtonHolmes Technical Center. I havent gotten to explore much of Holmes County yet, although I came down from Montgomery via U.S. Highway 231, so I got to see much of the countryside. Still, I have yet to get to come meet many residents. If you see me out and about, feel free to stop and say hello. I am looking forward to meeting as many folks as I can and becoming a part of the community. My philosophy on community newspapers such as ours is that the newspaper is the collective story of not only the city or the county government, but its the story of all of us, and I am looking forward to telling as many of our stories as possible. Since I am new here, I am asking for your help in telling the tri-county story. Email me at rseyler@chipleypaper.com about your lives Im interested in everything. Jobs, hobbies, churches and church happenings, county history If you think it should be in the paper, drop me a note or give me a call 638-0212. Im looking forward to reading, and writing, about you. New editor joins newspapers staff Death of Shores brings many memories of VHS Opinion A4 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, February 1, 2012 CONTACT US PUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com 1-800-645-8688 ADVERTISING 850-547-9414 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Freedom Communications. WANT MORE? Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95 The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc., 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2012, Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: T he entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. HAPPY CORNER Hazel Wells Tison Personal property crimes are some of the most frequently reported crimes both locally and nationwide during this time of yet. The increase in criminal activity is compounded by the unstable economy and the higher than normal scrap metal value. For criminals, property crime, now more than ever, is a very lucrative business. The Washington County Sheriffs Of ce would like to ask residents to continue to be vigilant to both protect themselves and be aware of anything suspicious in their neighborhoods. Please take the time secure your belongings. If you feel you are a victim of a scam or would like to report suspicious activity please contact the Washington County Sheriffs Of ce at 638-8477. Lock your doors and windows Record serial numbers and photograph item of value Mark items with a personal identi cation number or logo Be mindful of your routines, make changes periodically Get to know and communicate with your neighbors Report suspicious people or vehicles (day or night) Be active in your neighborhood crime watch Be mindful of package deliveries (USPS, UPS, FedEx, etc.) Pay special attention to storage facilities, check regularly Community ALERT My philosophy on community newspapers such as ours is that the newspaper is the collective story of not only the city or the county government, but its the story of all of us, and I am looking forward to telling as many of our stories as possible. RANDAL SEYLER Editor I am sure that Mrs. Pauline Russ Baragona Cook never gave another thought to the grief that my cousin Loriene Cook Kosier and I gave her with our talking and giggling in class, and I know I never apologized. But having taught all of the grades, seven through 12, I was duly punished for any of my bad behavior.

PAGE 5

Local Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A5 Wednesday, February 1, 2012 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." www.mulliseye.com Chipley Office We are located directly across the parking lot from the Walmart in Chipley "W E W E LCOM E N EW PATI EN TS, C ALL T ODAY F OR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TM EN T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley Office Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 2-29-12 FREE E Y E EX AM COD E: W C 00 T odd R obinson, M D Board C ertified Eye Physician and C ataract S urgeon L ee M ullis, M D Board C ertified Eye Physician and C ataract S urgeon March 9,10,11, 2012 The Bay County Fairgrounds Register now for booth space at the 2012 Home & Garden Expo in Panama City, FL. Share your home improvement products, services, and enhancements with thousands of families in the Bay area looking to renovate, decorate, and landscape their homes. All vendors receive a FREE quarter-page ad in the official 2012 Home & Garden Expo program, reaching more than 80,000 adults in Bay and seven surrounding counties. For vendor application or information on the show: Call: 850.763.8618, or email: expostradeshows@aol.com Space Is Limited, So Reserve Yours NOW! For sponsorship information call: 850.763.6587 For additional advertising information in the official program of the 2012 Home and Garden Expo contact The News Herald at 850-747-5025 SP ONSORS CALL TO ALL VENDORS Financing Available See Store for Details www.Beltone.com Chipley, FL 1611 Main Street Ste. 4 (850) 387-4931 Marianna, FL 3025 6th Street (850) 387-4931 The benets of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Discounts off MSRP Previous purchases excluded. For a limited time. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Exp. 2-3-12. Boo boo nada mime? Do you have the time? Now through Feb. 8, 2012 SAVE on a Beltone True TM System $ 800 OFF When you or someone you know has a hard time understanding the sounds of voice, even simple sentences can be misunderstood. This is just one of the specialized hearing problems we solve. Beltones True MIC We hid it for you. Clear and natural sound, virtually eliminating wind noise. Special to the News Laurence Paul Cutts father was a beekeeper, so it came as a natural progression that he would follow in his fathers footsteps. At 16, Cutts began raising queens to sell. This grew into a business in which he produced and sold honey and provided bees for pollination for various crops in Florida, Alabama and Georgia. He worked in this business until 1985, when he accepted a position with the state of Florida overseeing the states apiary inspections. During his employment with the state, the varroa mite and small hive beetle were creating major problems for beekeepers throughout the state. Laurence was instrumental in bringing the need for research to reduce beehive losses to the forefront. Throughout his tenure with the state, he was always accessible to both commercial and independent beekeepers with unlimited advice and direction. A commercial beekeeper with more than 8,000 hives once remarked that without Cutts, he would have lost everything. He recently invented and is marketing a new beetle trap through various bee supply companies in the United States. This trap promises to be a better deterrent for the small hive beetle. Laurence was known as a leader in the states beekeeping industry and as such was a much sought-after speaker and teacher. Because of his leadership, determination and experience, Florida remains a leader in agricultural production. Without honey bees pollinating Florida crops, this state would be unable to produce the quantity and quality of various agricultural products it does today. Local beekeeper inducted into Agricultural Hall of Fame LAURENCE PAUL CUTTS Congratulations to Januarys Coloring Contest winners! The Grand Prize Winner who will receive a $10 gift certi cate to Walmart is Dylan Baldwin, 6, of Ponce de Leon. First-place winner in the 7-9 age group is Rayna Little eld, 7, of Bonifay. Thank you to al those who participated, and we look forward to all future entries. February COLORING CONTEST DYLAN BALDWIN, 6 Ponce de Leon RAYNA LITTLEFIELD, 7 Bonifay Its Coloring Contest time again! Submit your childs colored picture by Friday, Feb. 24. There will be a winner selected from each child group to run in the paper and a grand prize of a $10 Walmart gift card for one lucky individual. Children groups are ages 2-3, 4-6, 7-9 and 10-12. Winners will be announced and printed Wednesday, Feb. 29. Entries can be mailed or taken to your local newspaper of ce: Washington County News, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428; or Holmes County Times-Advertiser, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Name:________________________________________ Age:_________ City:_________________________ Phone number:___________________ (phone numbers will not be printed; used for contact purposes only) JANUARY WINNERS

PAGE 6

OUTDOORS Wednesday, February 1, 2012 Page 6 www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Send your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com A Section Can you believe it? Spanish mackerel in January? Most every year in March everyone goes to bed like a kid excitingly waiting for Santa Claus on Christmas Day, except in this case these shermen are waiting for the spring run of Spanish mackerel. This year the wait was over sort of early. A whole two months to be exact. On both big piers, the city and M.B. Miller, Spanish mackerel were caught this past week. I wouldnt put too much stock in the fact it appears they have arrived early this year, because they are just holdovers from last year. If we ever get some cold weather it will drive down the water temperature and they will be as hard to nd as your brother-in-law who owes you money. Another sh that is a holdover from last year is the pompano. They have been catching pompano off the beaches all winter. These pompano arent the biggest ones I have seen, but you should not have to measure them. When Phillips Inlet opened recently thousands of juvenile pompano emptied into the Gulf. Im sure some of the pompano being caught are some of those. These pompano have been trapped in the inlet since summer waiting to get back to the Gulf. The old reliable whiting also are biting in certain spots on the beach including the cement piers. Red sh seem to come and go as they please and a few are being caught when they pass under the piers. I have noticed that normally a red sh caught from a boat has to be more than 18 inches and under 27 inches. Not so it seems if caught off the beach. If it can t in the cooler or even if it cant it never seems to nd its way back to the water. At least not with the crew shing down my way. Another sh that is being caught and seen under the piers is sheepshead, another March sh. They also are caught beginning in March when they come to spawn around the jetties and wrecks in shallow water. I know the Gulf is warm for January, but water temperature is not the only factor that pushes these sh to spawn. The length of the day or amount of sunlight also is an indicator. If you are tired of sitting in the woods and not seeing a deer, pick up the rod go shing. At least until it turns cold again. Hooked on Outdoors & & Brought home a big buck or sh? Submit your hunting and shing photos to outdoors@pcnh. com Hook harvest Outdoor Life Scott Lindsey captainlindsey@ knology.net SPECIAL TO FLORIDA FREEDOM NEWSPAPERS | Bill Bartush. Whitetail deer were once rare in the state but not anymore. Hunters are able to be more selective in which deer to remove from the herd. By Stan Kirkland FWC Deer hunters love to reminisce about past hunting seasons and big deer some that got away and others that now adorn their walls. What hunters new to the sport might not realize is how much deer hunting has changed, particularly in Florida, over the past three to four decades. Going back even further, whitetailed deer were practically eliminated from Florida in the early 1900s because of over exploitation, eradication efforts in South Florida associated with the cattle fever tick, and losses to the screwworm. It wasnt until the 50s and 60s that deer were stocked by the then-Game and Freshwater Fish Commission in various places and deer populations began to rebuild. This also was aided by increased enforcement of game laws. When deer hunting seasons resumed in the 50s and 60s, most hunters hunted deer the only way anyone in the South knew how with hounds. They used mostly walker hounds and sometimes beagles. Every hunter wanted dogs with a good nose, dogs that would cold trail and bark when the deer jumped. If all went according to plan, the deer ran by members of the hunting party on stand. They shot at the bucks and the does went by untouched. At least that was the plan. When Floridas human population was relatively low in the 1960s and 70s, deer dog incursions on private property were infrequent enough that deer dog hunting continued unabated. The 80s and 90s however, brought change. As Floridas population increased and more and more people moved to rural areas, complaints about deer dog hunting increased. In response, the GFC prohibited the hunting groups from taking stands on most roads across the state, whether they were county-maintained dirt roads or paved highways. Beginning in 2005, hunting parties were required to register their hunting lands with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, a move to show the landowner was okay with deer dog hunting on their property. The changes in deer dog hunting in Florida and other Southern states loosely corresponded to an upsurge in deer still-hunting. Still-hunting usually involved a hunter in a tree stand or in a ground blind waiting for a deer to pass. Today, deer dog hunting is still alive and well on private lands, albeit not to the extent as years past, and on public areas managed by the FWC. However, the majority of deer hunters now are still-hunters. Every outdoors TV program about deer hunting features still-hunting. At the same time, hunters and landowners today are more interested in managing their deer. Theyve learned they can generally support so many deer on the property and they work with the FWC to remove both does and mature bucks. The proof that deer management is working in Florida is the incredible number of above-average bucks measured for the Florida Buck Registry. DEER HUNTING DEER HUNTING Changing times in When deer hunting seasons resumed in the s and s, most hunters hunted deer the only way anyone in the South knew how with hounds. They used mostly walker hounds and sometimes beagles. KACEY STEPHENS | The Deer Shack This trophy buck was brought into The Deer Shack last week by a hunter who didnt care to share where you can nd deer like that. KACEY STEPHENS | The Deer Shack Richard Warmack, right, and his son Isaac, took this deer in the Greenhead area last week.

PAGE 7

CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF CURRENT SPECIALS 18 Holes with cart Seniors 55+ Mon-Fri 23.26+Tax Seniors 55+ Weekends & Hol. 26.98+Tax Under 55 Mon-Fri 26.98+Tax Under 55 Weekends & Hol. 30.70+Tax Twilight Rate All Players Mon-Fri After 1:00 PM 20.93 + Tax Kids under 12 always play free with paying adult PLAY ALL DAY 39.50 + Tax OFFERS EXPIRE February 29, 2012 FULLY OVERSEEDED TEES & GREENS Well Worth The Drive 5248 Clubhouse Drive Marianna, FL 32446 800-587-6257 www.indianspringsgolfcourse.net For the BEST DEAL Around Come and Play in Bonifay www.dogwoodlakesgc.com DOGW D LAKES Golf Club 850-547-GOLF 800-545-0322 1934 C O UNTRY C L UB DR. BO NI F AY, FL $ 20 +tax Every Day in February Over-seeded greens, tees and fairways No Spin the Wheel in February. Call for tee times. SP O RTS www.bonifaynow.com Wednesday, February 1, 2012 A Page 7 Section Florida Freedom Newspapers Gallaghers Gymnastics mens team recently competed at the O Zone Invitational in Knoxville, Tenn., while the womens team was in Tallahassee and PCB Elite cheerleaders performed in Daytona Beach. In Knoxville, at the largest mens gymnastics invitational in the Southeast, Andrew Hess led the way in Level 8 capturing rst place in the oor, rings and parallel bars. His efforts catapulted him into a rst-place nish in the all-around. In Level 9, 13-year-old Paxton Peacock placed rst on rings and earned second on pommel horse and parallel bars to win all-around in the age 12-13 group. Peacock had the highest all-around score of Level 9 athletes, a total of 49 boys in all age groups. In Level 10, the highest Junior Olympic level, Alexander Hess was fourth on pommel horse and sixth on vault. The Arnold sophomore placed 14th all-around. Level 6 gymnast Trent Bawcom placed fth on oor and rings and 10th all-around. In the older age group, Cameron Nagy was seventh on oor and 10th all-around. Gallaghers Level 5 team of Cole Nagy, Alex Creswell, Eli Creswell and Austin Smith placed sixth in a eld of 13. Smith placed fth on pommel horse, third on rings and seventh all-around. Eli Creswell was second on horse and ninth all-around and Alex Creswell sixth on both vault and parallel bars. In Tallahassee, Nadya Parsons, Eliza Sims, Madalyn Ward, Grace Andes and Lena Ottinger competed in their rst competition. In Level 4, Ottinger was fth on balance beam. Also competing in the AAU State Quali er, Level 4 gymnast Sydney Melvin was second on vault, beam, oor and all-around. In Level 5, Kirsten Bjerkeset was second on beam. Ammy Castillo and Aliza Molnar competed in their rst Level 7 meet. Molnar nished second on beam and all-around and third on vault, bars and oor. Castillo won the bars title. At The State hosted by American Championships in Daytona, Gallaghers competitive cheer team, PCB Elite, took sixth out of more than 100 teams. It will compete in the National Championships in March in Orlando. By Jason Shoot Florida Freedom Newspapers PONCE DE LEON Tim Alford, as should be expected, saw signs for concern long before his players did. Now in his 17th season coaching the Ponce de Leon girls basketball team, Alford watched his players head into the holiday break with a 14-0 record. Two stunning losses at a tournament in Freeport in late December, however, stripped away a layer of overcon dence that Alfords players now readily admit was hindering the team. You can tell there is a big difference between the beginning of the year and where we are now, senior point guard Kate Carroll said. Those two losses during Christmas break got our attention. The Pirates havent lost since, rolling up a 21-2 record this season, including a 10-0 run through District 3-1A. Everything was different, junior Jordan Thomas said of bouncing back from losses against Cookeville (Tenn.) and Paxton. You could tell a whole lot changed. We were all on the same page, and its easier playing that way. You could watch our tapes (early in the season), and you could tell our defense was getting worse. Defense is our main priority. Like coach Alford said, Defense never lets you down. Our shots will fall. If PDL advances out of the District 3-1A tournament set to begin on Monday in Cottondale, it will extend a streak of seven consecutive years that the Pirates have reached regional play in the postseason. Since the 2004-05 season, PDL has quali ed for two state semi nals, one regional nal, three regional semi nals and one regional quarter nal. Ask Alfords players about that string of success and theyll give you myriad answers that all nd their way back to the same central gure: Tim Alford. Two key gures on this years Pirates team, Thomas and fellow junior Ashley Harper, once had reasons not to play basketball for Alford. That was before they got to know him, of course. Coach Alford, I consider him one of my best friends, said Thomas, who lives minutes away from Walton High in DeFuniak Springs but makes the daily trip for school at PDL. I can talk to him about anything. Harpers older sister, Hillary, capped her own remarkable career in a Pirates uniform last year. Growing up behind her, Ashley was cognizant that expectations consequently would be higher for her, too. It felt like I was following in her footsteps, Harper said. I didnt want to play basketball because of that. I didnt want to be compared to her. Harper said she changed her tune after she saw how Hillary interacted with Alford on and off the court. Alfords in uence was a positive one, and Harper decided she would try to carve her own path on the basketball court at PDL. Hes always on me about being lazy or not doing something right, Harper said behind a smile and a laugh. He didnt take it easy on me. Alford has bene ted from Ponce de Leons long-standing merger of the towns middle school and high school. He knows what sort of player he has coming down the pipeline as much as three years before that player has entered her rst varsity game. Im fortunate theyre on our campus in sixth grade, Alford said. Everything they do in middle school is leading up to what will eventually happen (on varsity). Its not as advanced, but the things we want them to know, they get early. Jazz Flock, a 6-foot senior who can play in the post and step out and knock down shots from the perimeter, arrived at PDL in eighth grade. An Indiana native, Flock joined Carroll as ninth-graders on the Pirates varsity squad. He calls it out, Flock said, and we know exactly what to do. Flocks all-around game gives the Pirates options on offense that most other Class 1A schools cant duplicate. She can back down smaller players into the post, and she can take taller, slower players outside, where she can hoist a jumper or take her defender off the dribble. Flocks emergence as a go-to player offensively was made more important when the teams expected starter at shooting guard, Jaicee Mayo, tore a knee ligament in the nal practice before the season began. Carroll also is a stabilizing force on the oor, offering a wheelbarrow full of experience and leadership. Its a big obligation, Carroll said of living up to the programs past success, which includes two state titles. De nitely expectations are always high. But its not just the pressure of the past we put on ourselves. Its this year, too. The Pirates are hopeful they will get another shot at Paxton, which plays in District 1-1A and beat PDL 49-36 on Dec. 30. If those teams do square off again, theyll meet in the Class 1A state semi nals with a berth in the championship game at stake. The Pirates, as they learned once (or twice) from their two defeats, are aware that considerable work remains before that opportunity potentially presents itself. Before we lost we thought we could get by with anything, Harper said. We went out there thinking we had it. When we got beat we realized we have to start working hard. Its been tough, but its been worth it. Added Carroll: I cant say for sure where were going. ... But well work for it every day. PDL focus strong for postseason By Cathrine Lamb Editorial Assistant Clamb@chipleypaper.com Danica Sue Patrick, better known to NASCAR fans as simply Danica, was born on March 25, 1982, in Beloit, WI. She now lives in Phoenix, Ariz., with her husband. Even though she is not the only woman to have been in NASCAR she is one of the few. The rst was Louise Smith which won more than 30 races in the 1940a. Danica started her career at the age of 10 Kart Racing. She was the rst woman to lead at the Indy 500 in 2009. Danica will be running 10 races in the #10 car in the Sprint Cup Series for Stewart-Hess Racing, and fulltime in the #7 Go Daddy car for JR Motor Sports. Patrick has announced that she will be taking a year off from the Indy 500 so she will be able to race in the Coke 400 the two races are being run on the same day. In her personal life she says she will drive anything fast and black, but she dose her errands in a Acura MDX. Danicas hobbies are working out, traveling, nice dinners and laughing. Danica says her most memorable moment was leading the Indy 500. Next week I will be doing Cathrines Pit Stop on the history of NASCAR. Cathrines PIT STOP A look at a legend in the making AP PHOTOS Danica Patrick in her garage during NASCAR auto racing testing at the Daytona International Speedway on Jan. 12 in Daytona Beach. Gallaghers Hess leads group at gymnasts event Thursday, January 19, 2012 | The News Herald | Page C3 Girls basketball Scoring Player Gms. Pts Avg. Smith W 8 152 19.0 Beach Bz 14 245 17.5 Ware M 20 296 14.8 Canfield M 20 290 14.5 Adams NB 10 120 12.0 Culpepper NB 9 81 9.0 Farris NB 10 68 6.8 Trzaska M 20 123 6.2 Smith M 20 117 5.9 Baker W 2 10 5.0 Goodin M 16 78 4.9 White M 20 95 4.8 Parker W 7 33 4.7 Baucom Bz 14 64 4.5 Penning NB 10 44 4.4 Abbasi NB 10 42 4.2 Ross M 20 54 2.7 Walding W 7 19 2.7 Koonce Bz 14 33 2.3 Gaddis NB 10 20 2.0 Lanier W 7 12 1.7 Plummer Bz 14 16 1.1 Owens W 4 4 1.0 Byram NB 7 4 0.6 Ramey M 7 4 0.6 Whitfield Bz 14 7 0.5 Trumbull NB 4 2 0.5 Howerton Bz 14 6 0.4 Ellis M 12 5 0.4 Dudinsky NB 6 2 0.3 Barton NB 9 2 0.3 Rebounding Player Gms. No. Avg. Canfield M 20 231 11.6 Abbasi NB 10 89 8.9 Lanier W 7 52 7.4 Smith M 20 145 7.3 Plummer Bz 14 97 6.9 Baucom Bz 14 80 5.7 White M 20 101 5.1 Goodin M 16 82 5.1 Walding W 7 35 5.0 Baker W 2 10 5.0 Penning NB 10 47 4.7 Smith W 8 35 4.4 Beach Bz 14 52 3.7 Ware M 20 72 3.6 Whitfield Bz 14 47 3.3 Adams NB 10 29 2.9 Culpepper NB 9 26 2.9 Barton NB 9 24 2.7 Trzaska M 20 49 2.5 Koonce Bz 14 33 2.3 Ross M 20 41 2.1 Farris NB 10 19 1.9 Gaddis NB 10 18 1.8 Byram NB 7 12 1.7 Howerton Bz 14 19 1.3 King NB 3 3 1.0 Ellis M 12 11 0.9 Ramey M 7 6 0.9 Duchene Bz 14 10 0.7 Dudinksy NB 6 4 0.7 Parker W 7 4 0.6 Trumbull NB 4 1 0.3 Saults NB 5 1 0.2 Assists Player Gms. No. Avg. Walding W 7 58 8.3 Lanier W 7 33 4.7 Farris NB 10 41 4.1 Baker W 2 8 4.0 Smith W 8 27 3.4 Trzaska M 20 62 3.1 Baucom Bz 14 41 2.9 Beach Bz 14 39 2.7 Parker W 7 16 2.3 Canfield M 20 41 2.1 White M 20 40 2.0 Ware M 20 40 2.0 Adams NB 10 18 1.8 Koonce Bz 14 21 1.5 Smith M 20 28 1.4 Goodin M 16 21 1.3 Culpepper NB 9 12 1.3 Plummer Bz 14 17 1.2 Ellis M 12 11 0.9 Ross M 20 15 0.8 Penning NB 10 7 0.7 Howerton Bz 14 7 0.5 Abbasi NB 10 5 0.5 Boys basketball Scoring Player Gms. Pts Avg. W.Rogers At 11 182 16,5 K.Rogers At 11 162 14.7 Jackson A 16 171 10.7 Harrell Bz 19 196 10.3 Adams Bz 19 173 9.1 Davison A 17 149 8.8 Warner At 11 94 8.5 Lott A 17 141 8.3 Oatis A 9 66 7.3 Flowers Bz 19 136 7.1 Granville Bz 19 131 6.8 Suttles Bz 19 113 5.9 Waddell Bz 19 100 5.2 Nowells A 17 77 4.5 Gutierrez Bz 17 77 4.5 Stewart A 17 67 3.9 Smedley A 17 65 3.8 Murray A 17 60 3.5 Mayo Bz 14 41 2.9 Feitzel A 8 12 1.5 Peltonen Bz 11 13 1.2 Nicholson A 9 5 0.6 Kirkland Bz 7 2 0.3 Winters Bz 8 1 0.1 Rebounding Player Gms. Pts Avg. Davison A 17 92 5.4 Jackson A 16 87 5.4 Flowers Bz 19 95 5.0 Harrell Bz 19 84 4.4 Adams Bz 19 80 4.2 Lott A 17 67 3.9 Stewart A 17 51 3.0 Nowells A 17 46 2.7 Waddell Bz 19 48 2.5 Mayo Bz 14 36 2.5 Granville Bz 19 46 2.4 Gutierrez Bz 17 40 2.3 Smedley A 17 32 1.9 Murray A 17 32 1.9 Feitzel A 8 15 1.9 Gay Bz 6 9 1.5 Suttles Bz 19 14 0.7 Kirkland Bz 7 5 0.7 Nicholson A 9 4 0.4 Peltonen Bz 11 4 0.4 Freeman Bz 8 1 0.1 Assists Player Gms. Pts Avg. Lott A 17 55 3.2 Harrell Bz 19 54 2.8 Smedley A 17 36 2.1 Waddell Bz 19 37 1.9 Murray A 17 27 1.6 Adams Bz 19 29 1.5 Granville Bz 19 25 1.3 Davison A 17 19 1.1 Nowells A 17 13 0.8 Jackson A 16 12 0.8 Stewart A 17 11 0.6 Suttles Bz 19 11 0.6 Winters Bz 8 4 0.5 Flowers Bz 19 7 0.4 Nicholson A 9 4 0.4 Feitzel A 8 3 0.4 Gutierrez Bz 17 5 0.3 Peltonen Bz 11 3 0.3 Girls soccer Scoring Player Gls. Ast. Tot. Vogler M 23 11 34 Ki.Crowley A 20 5 25 Nohmer A 21 2 23 Hall Bz 18 4 22 Jones PSJ 15 7 22 Bates M 2 12 14 Vickers M 8 4 12 Strippling PSJ 7 5 12 Johnson Bz 6 6 12 Ke.Crowley A 8 3 11 Wood PSJ 7 3 10 McGhee PSJ 7 2 9 Bennett M 6 2 8 ORourke Bz 5 3 8 Thomas M 4 4 8 Thompson M 5 2 7 Buttram M 4 3 7 Mullins M 3 4 7 Laine PSJ 6 0 6 Rish PSJ 4 2 6 Swift M 2 3 5 A.Jaworski A 1 4 5 Campbell M 1 3 4 Henson M 1 3 4 J.Lehtio A 1 2 3 Wiser A 1 2 3 Stuart PSJ 1 2 3 Southerland M 2 0 2 Kerigan PSJ 2 0 2 Grammer M 1 1 2 Branch PSJ 1 1 2 Schultz A 1 1 2 Girard A 1 1 2 Santora M 0 2 2 Wade Bz 0 2 2 B.Jaworski A 0 2 2 Rogers A 1 0 1 Robles PSJ 1 0 1 Ferrera Bz 1 0 1 Locher Bz 1 0 1 Gay Bz 1 0 1 Keeper saves Henriquez A 87, Delaplaine Bz 64, Blackwell A 52, Grammer M 52, Pridgeon PSJ 27, Laine PSJ 11, A.Jaworksi A 9, Rinehart M 6, Boardway M 5, Stripling PSJ 3. Boys soccer Scoring Player Gls. Ast. Tot. Duarte PSJ 17 3 20 Hicks B 13 6 19 Wilkins B 11 6 17 May PSJ 12 2 14 Beachum PSJ 11 3 14 Lippmann B 9 5 14 McDaniel A 11 2 13 Masker A 9 4 13 Jacobsen M 5 6 11 Lane B 3 8 11 Wright M 5 5 10 Nycum M 5 5 10 D.Lacour PSJ 4 6 10 Perles M 3 6 9 Cryderman PSJ 5 3 8 Grant M 5 3 8 Shoaf PSJ 2 5 7 Hapner M 6 0 6 McLemore PSJ 3 3 6 Martinez Bz 5 0 5 Marsh M 4 1 5 Joseph B 4 1 5 Layfield B 3 2 5 Wright B 3 2 5 Fasbinder B 1 4 5 Brown B 0 5 5 McCormick B 2 2 4 Benjamin Bz 1 3 4 Bush PSJ 1 3 4 Peffers A 0 4 4 Arteaga M 3 0 3 Mitchell A 3 0 3 Jones PSJ 2 1 3 Bottomy M 1 2 3 Bautista B 1 2 3 J.Calzada Bz 2 0 2 Crum M 2 0 2 Reed M 1 1 2 Ihaksi A 1 1 2 Phillips A 1 1 2 D.Calzada Bz 1 1 2 Luna Bz 1 1 2 J.Lacour PSJ 1 1 2 Smith B 1 1 2 Nelson M 0 2 2 Glass A 1 0 1 Kennington PSJ 1 0 1 Morrow B 1 0 1 Bradgon M 0 1 1 Schoppe A 0 1 1 Shields Bz 0 1 1 Burns Bz 0 1 1 Robles PSJ 0 1 1 Cauthen B 0 1 1 Pickett PSJ 0 1 1 Keeper saves Cook Bz 88, Murphy A 72, Thrasher B 51, Paravalos A 44, Bowers PSJ 30, Beachum PSJ 11, Ker rigan PSJ 7. Schools key: Altha (At), Arnold (A), Bay (B), Bozeman (Bz), Mosley (M), North Bay Haven (NB), Port St. Joe (PSJ), Wewahi tchka (W). WINTER STATS By PAT McCANN Sports Editor | pmccann@pcnh.com 747-5068 | Twitter: @patmccann Nobody wants to enter a tournament feeling like theyre playing for second place. Three schools in next weeks District 2-3A boys soccer pairing at Arnold couldnt be blamed for adopting that mantra. Choctawhatchee, last years state runner-up in Class 4A, is the overwhelm ing favorite in the fourschool district that begins on Tuesday. The Indians were cruising along at 17-2 late last week while Arnold was 4-11-4 and Rutherford 3-7-3. The fact the host Marlins edged the Rams in a recent game dropped Rutherford to the No. 4 seed and a firstround collision with Choc tawhatchee. Arnold faces Milton, 4-12-0. Choctaw, who took sec ond place in their 4A state run last year, look unstop pable now that they have been dropped into 3A play. Arnold coach Rick Sylvester said. There is no question Choctaw is, far and away the best team in the district and maybe in North Florida. Rutherford has a daunting task meeting them in their opening game. The Marlins have strug gled through their worst season in Sylvesters nine years guiding the program. Having faced a great deal of adversity this year, and sporting the worst record since I have been coaching here, we are cling ing to the hope that we can beat Milton and somehow make a go of it in the final, Sylvester said. With very limited forces left after a long season of attrition, the odds are certainly against us, but we are hoping that we can make the best of our beautiful facility and put on a respectable show at home. Bay fashioned a 10-0-0 district record to earn the first seed in District 1-2A, that tournament at Walton in DeFuniak Springs. Tor nadoes coach Ron Houpt knows that anything can happen in the playoffs wit nessed by his teams deep run last winter. Bay, 13-6-3, by far looks like the best bet on paper to advance of any county squad. This district tourna ment has had many sur prises in the past, Houpt said. We will focus on not letting that happen to us. We will play one game at a time and treat it as the most important game we will play this year. Actually it will be. We started off slowly this year and have made adjustments in the last month and are now ready to make a playoff run. We have had many injuries during the season, but now seem to all be healthy. Mosley, 10-6-1, lost a tie breaker with Lincoln for the No. 3 seed in 2-4A which could become pivotal as it knocked the Dolphins into Mondays play-in game. The ramifications were made more severe by the winner of that game advancing to meet top-seeded Chiles in one of Wednesdays semi finals. Leon and Lincoln meet in the other. Its a tough road to advance because we will face Chiles in the semi, who defeated us three times during the season, Mosley coach Dave Ska kal said. If, however, we can beat Columbia for the fourth time we are optimis tic because we played very well against Chiles the last time we saw them. Any thing is possible in a district tournament. Port St. Joe posted a 4-1-1 record during the regular season against 1-1A opponents, with a pair of lopsided victories against first-round opponent Freeport. The top-seeded Tiger Sharks are 13-2-1 overall. We will be entering dis tricts this year with a confi dent, but cautious nature, coach Gary Hindley said. We got a bit out of sorts during the holiday break, but our last several regularseason games were back on track. Boys soccer postseason starts next week AN DREW J OH N SO N | The News Herald Arnolds Thomas McDaniel scored two goals in the Marlins 2-1 win over Rutherford recently. All times C S T D istrict 1-1A at R ocky Bayou Tuesday, Jan. 24: Port St. Joe vs. Freeport 6 p.m., Rocky Bayou vs. Franklin County 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27: Semifinal win ners 7 p.m. D istrict 1-2A at W alton Monday, Jan. 23: Marianna vs. Bozeman 5 p.m., South Walton vs. Walton 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 25: Bay vs. Marianna-Bozeman winner 5 p.m., Pensacola Catholic vs. South Walton-Walton winner 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27: Semifinal win ners 7 p.m. D istrict 2-3A at Arnold Tuesday, Jan. 24: Arnold vs. Milton 5 p.m., Choctawhatchee vs. Rutherford 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27: Semifinals win ners 7 p.m. D istrict 2-4A at Chiles Monday, Jan. 23: Mosley vs. Lake City Columbia 5 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 25: Leon vs. Lincoln 4 p.m., Mosley-Columbia winner vs. Chiles 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27: Semifinal win ners 6 p.m. D ISTRI C T S CH E DUL ES Mosleys Grant named to Ray Guy Prokicker.com All-American team The News H erald LYNN H AV E N Mark Grant of Mosley was among the inaugu ral Ray Guy Prokicker.com High School All-Americans for some of the nations top punting, kick ing, kickoff and long-snapping prospects. Players were selected from the Prokicker.com staff, which watched and coached the play ers during camps, and also by how the players performed on the field during the 2011 high school season. There were four All-America cat egories punting, kicking, long-snapping and kick off specialist. Grant was named honorable mention in the kick off specialist category. He had 32 touchbacks among 42 kickoffs for the Dolphins, and an average of 64.3 yards per kickoff. Grant also had 36 points on four field goals and 24 extra points. Ray Guy is considered the greatest punter in NFL history. Pat McCann D uderstadt leads Tsunamis: Michael Duderstadt claimed high-point honors in the Senior Boys division with four victo ries, and the Panama City Swim Team placed third in the GPAC Winter Invitational Jan. 13-15 in Pensacola. PCST competed with 37 swimmers against more than 400 swimmers from 14 teams from Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. Duderstadt won individual races in the 50-yard backstroke, 100 backstroke, 100 breaststroke and 200 individual medley. Kari Troia (11-12 girls) won two races, the 50 and 100 breaststroke to fin ish third in high-point scoring in her age group. Three other Tsunami swim mers won one race. Kyla Hallam (11-12 girls) won the 50 freestyle, Hannah Retherford (13-14 girls) won the 50 butterfly, and Chad McGuire (13-14 boys) won the 200 breaststroke. The Tsunamis will compete at the Mac Crutchfield Invitational in Tallahassee on Jan. 27-29. Jason S hoot Gallaghers Gymnasts excel: Gallaghers Gymnastics mens team recently competed at the O Zone Invitational in Knoxville, Tenn., while the womens team was in Tallahassee and PCB Elite cheerleaders performed in Daytona Beach. In Knoxville, at the largest mens gymnastics invitational in the Southeast, Andrew Hess led the way in Level 8 capturing first place in the floor, rings and par allel bars. His efforts catapulted him into a first-place finish in the all-around. In Level 9, 13-year-old Paxton Peacock placed first on rings and earned second on pommel horse and parallel bars to win all-around in the age 12-13 group. Peacock had the highest all-around score of Level 9 athletes, a total of 49 boys in all age groups. In Level 10, the highest Junior Olympic level, Alexander Hess was fourth on pommel horse and sixth on vault. The Arnold sopho more placed 14th all-around. Level 6 gymnast Trent Bawcom placed fifth on floor and rings and 10th all-around. In the older age group, Cameron Nagy was sev enth on floor and 10th all-around. Gallaghers Level 5 team of Cole Nagy, Alex Creswell, Eli Cre swell and Austin Smith placed MARK GRANT E arly at-bats By B R A D MILN ER PCNH Writer | bmilner@pcnh.com 747-5065 | Twitter: @PCNHBradMilner TUC SO N, Ariz. Brady Colburn and Preston Brown have a jumpstart on the rest of their Bay County breth ren this baseball season. The duo recently competed in the 2012 Under Armour Preseason AllAmerican Tournament at the Arizona A N D REW HESS SEE N O TEB OOK | C4 P RE P N O TE BOO K CO NT R IBUT ED P HO T O Rutherfords Brady Colburn, left, and Bays Preston Brown, competed in the 2012 Under Armour Preseason All-American Tournament Friday through Sunday in Tucson, Ariz. Rams Colburn, Tornadoes Brown get running start at baseball season SEE EAR LY START | C4 PREP ANDREW HESS

PAGE 8

Local A8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, February 1, 2012 Been in long-term care over 20 years. Worked as an administrator for 14 years. Worked in Texas, Kentucky, New Mexico, Georgia and now Florida. Recently moved here from the Atlanta, GA area. Grew up in Ohio Has a son, daughter and three grandchildren and 2 dogs. Currently lives in DeFuniak Springs. DEBORAH MONTENARO, NHA, Administrator 306 West Brock Avenue Bonifay, FL 32425 850-547-9289 www.BonifayRehab.com B ONIFAY N URS IN G & REH AB CE N TER Welcomes our New Administrator Deborah Montenaro, NHA Treat Your Sweetheart! KINGS DISCOUNT DRUGS 1242 Main St. Chipley 850-638-4875 this saturday in and Holmes County Chamber of Commerce 5TH ANNU A L GOLF TOURNAMEN T Friday, March 16, 2012 Dogwood L akes Golf Club For more information contact Holmes County Chamber of Commerce 547-4682 $ 10,000 HOLE IN ONE Multiple levels of sponsorship or participation are available. $2,400 IN OTHER PRIZES Sign your team up now 6513789 New Year Special 15% Off With Ad We are currently paving in your area. With our crew and equipment close by, we are offering prompt service and reasonable rates to all area residents for a short time. Please call immediately if you are interested in having any asphalt paving done this year. NOTICE ASPHALT PAVING WE DO: HOUSE DRIVEWAYS PARKING LOTS FARM LANES LONG LANES DRIVEWAYS PRIVATE ROADS PATCHWORK NEW HOMES GRADEWORK SEAL COATING BASEWORK ASPHALT MILLINGS Free Estimates Fast Service Quality Work Full-Service Asphalt Paving Tired of a Dust Bowl in the Summer and a Mud Hole in the Winter? Dont Fuss ... CALL US! Of ce 800-566-7182 Mobile 850-524-0823 Donohue Asphalt 850-769-6139 236 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL Stan Trappe ATTORNEY AT LAW Let Me Help You Admitted to Practice Law in Florida Since 1974 By Lane Evans On Tuesday, Jan. 17, the Yellow Jacket Battalion loaded the bus and headed to Mobile, Ala. This eld trip was both educational and enjoyable. Select cadets were chosen to attend the adventure and were asked to take notes on all the historical facts that they passed by on their tour of the ship. The U.S.S. Alabama was built in 1940. The ship, from stem to stern, is 680 feet long and 108 feet wide. The guns were 16 inches in diameter and shoot a 2,700 pound projectile loaded with 900 pounds of gun powder. The ship itself was a small city; containing doctors of ces, dentist of ces, a Brig, isolation room, laundry room, chow hall, Ice Cream Parlor, Bakery and of course, a sick bay. In addition, we boarded the U.S.S. Drum, the submarine on display with the ship. On board the submarine, there was barely any space to move around. Every inch of the walls was covered in dials, levers, switches and tubes. All in all, the eld trip was an amazing experience. The cadets in attendance had a great time and learned a lot. Maj. Kuneman said the ship is, incredible, and you just have to go see it to believe it. Yellow Jacket Battalion eld trip to U.S.S. Alabama TALLAHASSEE (AP) U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland says he will file a bill in Congress that would put pressure on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to adopt state rather than federal water pollution rules for Florida. The Panama City Republican announced his plans Monday on the steps of Floridas old Capitol. The legislation would prohibit the EPA from adopting its own rules for Florida if the agency administrator determines state rules meet requirements of the federal Water Pollution Control Act. It would not affect other states. Our bill reinforces the bipartisan work being accomplished in the Florida Legislature to ensure that no one has greater control in determining the health of our waterways than ourselves, Southerland said. Environmentalists contend the states proposed rules setting numeric nutrient standards for phosphorous and nitrogen in lakes, streams and other water bodies would be too weak to prevent or clean up toxic algae choking Floridas waterways. The nutrients are contained in such pollutants as sewage, manure and fertilizer. Agriculture, business and utility interests back the states version. They contend the tougher federal rules would be too expensive to implement. We are not trying to reduce or to undermine the requirements in the Clean Water Act, Southerland said. Were just saying when we meet those standards, acknowledge those standards and do not single us out for a stiffer standard that does not apply to the other 49 states. A nonbinding provision in the proposed legislation also would express the sense of Congress that the EPA should take into account the economic effect of numeric nutrient criteria when deciding which set of rules to adopt. That includes not promulgating or enforcing any criteria that would result in a negative economic impact of 15 percent on any such sector. The legislation might be too late to affect the EPAs decision on rules for inland waters, which is expected by March. The agency, though, says it may agree to another delay if the state needs more time to implement the rules. The implementation date already has been delayed for 15 months. The EPA also is developing separate rules for coastal areas. They currently are scheduled for adoption in November. Southerland to le water pollution bill We are not trying to reduce or to undermine the requirements in the Clean Water Act. Were just saying when we meet those standards, acknowledge those standards and do not single us out for a stiffer standard that does not apply to the other 49 states. Rep. Steve Southerland

PAGE 9

Washington, Holmes at a glance INDEX Society ................................. B2 Faith .................................... B4 Obituaries ............................ B5 Classi eds ............................ B6 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser B PAGE 1 Section Special to the News During the Washington County Fire ghters Appreciation Banquet on Thursday, Jan. 26 Brian Goddin, Wild re Mitigation Specialist/Public Information Of cer for Holmes and Washington County introduced everyone to the Ready, Set, Go program being introduced to the surrounding counties. Ready, Set, Go! Is a program that prepares citizens in the event of a wildland re, said Godden. We are here to provide the tools needed to educate others so we can all be more prepared for when a wildland re strikes. Wednesday, F ebruary 1 2012 Ready, Set, Go is coming More on Ready, Set, Go! Right: Brian Goddin, Wild re Mitigation Specialist/Public Information Of cer for Holmes and Washington County introduced everyone to the Ready, Set, Go program scheduled for introduction to the surrounding counties. CECILIA SPEARS The Ready, Set, Go! Program seeks to develop and improve the dialogue between re departments and the residents they serve. Engaging in this dialogue is particularly important for the re service, because national studies have shown that re ghters are uniquely respected in their communities and can project a trusted voice to the public preparedness appeal. They can also explain what re resources are available during an event and the role that individuals can play in preparedness and early evacuation if called for by their local of cials to increase the safety of residents and responding re ghters to a wildland re. The RSG Program works in complimentary and collaborative fashion with Firewise and other existing wildland re public education efforts. It ampli es their preparedness messages to individuals to better achieve the common goal we all share of re-adapted communities. When re ghters encourage residents to take personal responsibility for preparing their property and family for WUI/wildland re, residents become an active part of the solution to the problem of increasing re losses. R eady Preparing for the Fire Threat: Be Ready, Be Firewise. Take personal responsibility and prepare long before the threat of a wildfire so your home is ready in case of a fire. Create defensible space by clearing brush away from your home. Use fire-resistant landscaping and harden your home with fire-safe construction measures. Assemble emergency supplies and belongings in a safe spot. Make sure all residents residing within the home are on the same page, plan escape routes. For more information about how to be Ready for wildland fires, go to Firewise. org S et Situational Awareness When a Fire Starts: Pack your vehicle with your emergency items. Stay aware of the latest news from local media and your local fire department for updated information on the fire. G o Leave early! Following your Action Plan makes you prepared and firefighters are now able to best maneuver the wildfire, ensuring you and your familys safety. Be Ready! Be Set! Go! Following your Action Plan makes you prepared and re ghters are now able to best maneuver the wild re, ensuring you and your familys safety. CHIPLEY The Glenn Miller Orchestra will be making a concert stop in Chipley in February. Through a special arrangement by Dr. James Clemmons and the Chipley High Band Boosters, the band will be in concert Feb. 7 at the CHS Auditorium on Brickyard Road. The legendary Glenn Miller was one of the most successful of all the dance bandleaders in the swing era of the 1930s and s. A matchless string of hit records, the constant effects of radio broadcasts and the drawing power at theaters, hotels and dance pavilions built and sustained the momentum of popularity for Glenn Miller. Tickets for the Feb. 7 concert at Chipley High School are $20 for adults and $15 for students and can be purchased from any CHS Band Booster or through the CHS Band of ce at 6386100, ext. 525. All seats will be reserved for this 7 p.m. concert in the CHS Auditorium in the center of the campus on Brickyard Road in Chipley. Proceeds from the event will go to the Chipley Band Boosters, whose mission is to support the band program at CHS. Glenn Miller Band in concert at Chipley High School

PAGE 10

Just 15 per word Submit Messages & Payment to: Washington County News P.O. Box 627 Chipley, FL 32428 Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67 Bonifay, FL 32425 or just drop o at our oce in Chipley or Bonifay. or call 850-547-9414 or 638-0212 www.chipleypaper.com www.bonifaynow.com *Two winners will be selected by Friday, Feb. 10. Judging by staff and sponsoring restaurants. Advertise Your Valentine Gifts & Specials. Call 276-9251 For More Details. WIN DINNER FOR 2 LOVE LINE S FOR M Y Valentine T O TAL: $____________ M ethod of Payment: Check M oney O rder V isa M astercard Credit Card Number__________________________________________ Expiration Date________________ Love Line Message Form You may send as many love lines as you would like. Please use an additional sheet if necessary. Payment must accompany each entry form. ALL ENTRIES MUST BE RECEIVED BY 2 P.M. FRID A Y, FEB. 3 rd S enders N ame: ________________________________________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________________________________________________ Phone _________________________________________________________________________________________ C hoose Artwork Add Heart Artwork for $1.50 -O R Add a Rose for $1.50 Message (15 per word): _________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Love Lines will appear in the Wednesday, Feb. 8 issues of the Washington County News and Holmes County Times-Advertiser AND on the newspapers websites through Valentines Day, Feb. 14 Sue, How To Be Roman tic 101, Send a Love Line... reading them is so much fun! Happy Valentines Day! Robert Phoebe, I knew cupids arrow had struck the rst time I gazed into your eyes. Happy Valentines Day! Love You Forever John EXAMPLES All Love Lines Must Be Submitted No Later Than 2 P.M. Friday, Feb. 3 Write the most romantic V alentines message or verse and you could be sharing a special meal for two at a local restaurant! Wednesday, February 1, 2012 B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Hes cute and sweet and so much fun. Our little prince Clayton is turning 1. Happy 1st Birthday to Clayton Cecil John Townsend, who turned 1 year old on Jan. 29. He is the son of Daniel Townsend and Keshia Williams. His maternal grandparents are John and Connie Williams of Vernon. Claytons paternal grandparents are Christine Townsend and the late Cecil Townsend of Ponce de Leon. A year has passed how time has own; we cant believe how much he has grown. BIRTHDAY Donald and Judi (Shade) Monk would like to announce the birth of their daughter, who also is their rst child, Diana Sloane Monk. Diana was born Dec. 11, 2011, at 4:14 a.m. She weighed 9 pounds, 1 ounce and was 21 inches long. Dianas maternal grandparents are John and Carol Shade of Connecticut. Her paternal grandparents are Ronald and Bonnie Monk of Bonifay and Rick and Sarah (Monk Miller) McWaters of Freeport. BIRTHS Matthew and Emily Shilts of Vail, Ariz., would like announce the birth of their son, Gabriel Matthew. He was born Dec. 3, 2011, at Tucson Medical Center in Tucson, Ariz. He weighed 7 pounds and 10 ounces and was 19 and inches long. The maternal grandparents are Eddie and Linda Barrentine of Graceville. Paternal grandparents are Bill and Susan Lutz of Sparta, Wis., and Albert Shilts of Madison, Wis. Paternal great grandparents are Neil and Lillian Wendt of Lake Mills, Wis. Dewy webs and peach blossoms showcase a foggy January morning in Westville. Taken by Nicole Bradley. PHOTO OF THE WEEK Hardy and Rhonda Clyatt of Lake Butler announce the engagement of their daughter, Brianne Clyatt to Michael Smith, son of Jimmy and Linda Smith of New Bern, N.C. The couple met at Southeastern Free Will Baptist College in Wendell, N.C. The upcoming bride is the granddaughter of Ms. Lounell Duncan and the late Thomas Duncan of Chipley, and the Rev. and Mrs. Bobby Clyatt of Lake Butler. Brianne is a 2010 graduate oh Union County High School. She attended Southeastern and will continue to pursue he college education in Ind. The future groom is the grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. Grady King of Bridgeton, N.C., Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Smith, and Ms. Barbara Harman of New Bern, N.C. Michael earned a Religious Arts degree from Southeastern Free Will Baptist College. He currently is a youth pastor in Muncie, Ind., where the couple will serve together at True Light Baptist Church. The wedding will take place April 14 in Lake Butler. ENGAGEMENT

PAGE 11

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3 President Thomas A. Kinchen offered an inspirational start to the spring semester chapel services at The Baptist College of Florida (BCF) in Graceville on Monday, Jan. 16, with his chapel series entitled The After Christmas Specials. Kinchen welcomed new BCF students, recognized the Lady Eagles volleyball team for their outstanding season, and began the Monday morning chapel service by asking the question, After Christmas, the presents, wrapping, and decorations, where do you nd Jesus? Referencing the book of Luke, Kinchen read the account of a young Jesus missing from His family. After searching, He was found in the temple listening and speaking with the teachers. Where was Jesus? He was about His Fathers work. Folks today are frantically searching for Jesus, Kinchen said. Its pretty easy to nd Him. Just go where Gods work is being done, where His word is being proclaimed in truth, and where Gods people are worshipping, working, and ministering. BCF students and faculty were reminded not to misplace Jesus in the chaotic holiday season and in their everyday lives. Tuesdays chapel service continued with Kinchen illustrating the typical hinting season of Christmas. For example, people spend months before Christmas hinting to others what they are hoping to receive as gifts. Many times though, people arent satis ed with their presents. It may not t or doesnt work exactly how they planned. Kinchen also observed that around Christmas time, Christians are adamant about wanting to keep Christ in Christmas. But do they really want Him? Its okay if Hes a little plastic Jesus. Its okay if Hes warmed by a little 20-watt light bulb in a convenient cardboard manger with some imported hay. Thats okay. He doesnt bother us much there, does He? Its even okay if Hes the little lost boy in the temple, or a healing Savior, touching those in desperate need. But do we really want Christ in Christmas when Hes cleansing the temple and we know there are dirty places in our lives? Do we really want Him interrupting our plans? Kinchen closed the chapel packed series Wednesday by reading from the book of Micah and focusing on the familiar topic of re-gifting. How many people have been re-gifting Jesus? Kinchen asked. Our Lord does not deserve re-gifting in our lives or in our worship. Recorded versions of all of the chapel sermons are available at wfbu.com. Bethlehems 2012 Homecoming festivities began at 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 21, with the presentation of the middle school prince and princess nominees. Eighth grade nominees were: Josie Dampier, Kelsey En nger, Harlie Peters and Stevie Spivey for princess; Caleb Brannon, Dakota Potter, Mason Wallace and Brandon Wilson for prince. Kelsey En nger and Mason Wallace were crowned princess and prince. The high school Homecoming Court was then presented. Of the ve nominees for queen, senior Kaylin Grif n was crowned 2012 Homecoming Queen, and Devin Miller was crowned Homecoming King. Special recognition was afforded several people during this years Homecoming celebration. Sheila Richards introduced everyone to Kaylee Barton. Kaylee, who has proximal femoral focal de ciency, will be undergoing several surgeries in the future. She is the recipient of a very successful fundraiser A Walk for Kaylee that Bethlehems FCCLA sponsored. Kaylee and her family said they were appreciative of the support shown by the school and community. Wanda Pope was presented an iPad for her efforts in the fundraising event. Bethlehems athletic department presented lettermans jackets to Assistant Principal Donald Dady and former coach/ principal Jerry Dixon for their unswerving dedication to BHS athletic programs. Dixon commented that in all of his years of both playing ball and coaching, this was the rst lettermans jacket he ever had. The nights honored guest was Jackie Benton, former Bethlehem teacher. Benton is a life-long native of Holmes County. She attended Bethlehem High from rst through 11th grade and then transferred to Holmes County High School to take business courses, graduating with honors in 1956. Bentons family has seen four generations walk through the halls of Bethlehem. Her father, Valton Coates, was a member of Bethlehems rst graduating class in 1932, and her grandchildren currently attend. Beginning her career at BHS at age 33, Benton taught second grade for two years, then moved to third grade for many years before winding up in preKindergarten, retiring in 2001. During her tenure, she served as cheerleading sponsor and Pep Club sponsor from 1973-1977. She then gave up coaching to watch her own children cheer and play ball. Her daughter Sheila (who now teaches at BHS) commented, I cannot remember a basketball or softball game that she didnt attend as long as I played. Benton said she has always been a Wildcat at heart and showed it with her school spirit. Many of Mrs. Bentons students recall the sleepovers and Easter egg hunts held at her home. She welcomed students as though they were her own children with a warm, beautiful smile and a loving heart. She never hesitated to read the Bible and Bible stories to her students. Many times, someone passing by her classroom would see her in a rocking chair, sharing Gods Word with her students gathered around her. Mrs. Jackie Benton has sacri ced many hours for the sake of her students and family. She truly is the example of a teacher in every sense of the word and will remain in the memories of countless Bethlehem graduates for decades to come. Between the varsity games, alumni from the classes of 1942, 1952, 1962, 1972, 1982, 1992 and 2002 were recognized. The class of 1992 presented a marble bench in front of the school in memory of classmates who had passed away, Christy Wilkerson and Chris Yancey. Class members also presented Christys and Chriss families with plaques. Bethlehem celebrates Homecoming 2012 BCF President preaches the After Christmas Specials SUBMITTED PHOTOS BCF President Thomas A. Kinchen poses with the BCF Lady Eagles Volleyball Team. Left BCF President Thomas A. Kinchen preaches in the R.G. Lee Chapel. Special to Extra Rusty Brooks, of the Carl Vinson Institute of Government and former resident of Bonifay, was announced was named as the 2012 Hill Fellow at The University of Georgia on, Nov. 28 at the 21st annual Public Service and Outreach (PSO) Meeting and Awards Luncheon. Brooks is the associate director for the Vinson Institutes International Center, which he has served in a variety of capacities since 1982. He was a 2004 winner of the Walter Barnard Hill Award. Brooks is a Bonifay native, having attended the local school system, graduating in 1970; attended Chipola Junior College, receiving an Associate of Arts degree in 1972; attended the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Ala., receiving a Bachelor of Science degree in Political Science in 1974; and a Master of Arts in Criminal Justice in 1975; taught Criminal Science at the University of North Carolina in Wilmington, N.C., for two years; enrolled in the University of Georgia in 1978, receiving PhD in Sociology in 1982; then he began working in the University of Georgia, Carl Vinson Institute of Government. He and his wife, Paula, have two children: Ty of Boulder, Colo., and Kelsey of Athens, Ga.. Both are graduates of The University of Georgia. Brooks is the son of Ray Brooks of Bonifay and the late Betty Jo Helmes Brooks. Brooks has earned a worldwide reputation for his efforts to share the expertise and resources of the University of Georgia with governments around the world. Through training for government of cials and employees, shared technical assistance, and research, the programs he directs contribute to bettering the lives of people from Croatia to China to Liberia and beyond, helping their governments become better able to respond to their needs. Brooks work facilitates networks among Georgia and countries around the globe and promotes increased cultural understanding by coordinating exchanges between U.S. and international leaders, leading in some cases to exploration of economic development opportunities in Georgia. Local recognized as 2012 Hill Fellow RUSTY BROOKS BONIFAY STUDENT MAKES MERIT LIST AT DARTON COLLEGE ALBANY, Ga. Hannah E Paulk of Bonifay, made the Merit List at Darton College in Albany for the Fall 2011 semester. To qualify for the Merit List, a student must be part time and have earned a 3.4 or higher grade point average. Crossword PUZZLE SOLUTION ON PAGE B6

PAGE 12

FAITH B Section www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com The First Amendment of our Constitution says, Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceable to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. Please do me a favor and read this First Amendment at least ve times and then tell me why our government has for over 68 years been protecting and spending tons of money to spread the religions of Atheism and Agnosticism? For clari cation, an Agnostic is a person who believes that nothing is known about the existence of God or about things outside the human experience. An Atheist believes there is no God. Now back to the reason for the question. For over 68 years, if not much longer, our government has promoted and protected this religion through our government school system, and some have twisted the words of our First Amendment to protect it. You see, Evolution and the Big Bang Theory have been taught in the science classes of our public schools all these years and our children have even been tested to make sure they understand this religion which was imagined in the mind of George Waterhouse Darwin, who was a racist and by his theory an atheist. Then, Thomas Huxley, an agnostic, advanced the acceptance of evolution among scientists and the public alike, even though there is no science or scienti c proof for any of it. Thats right, no scienti c proof! I believe a real scientist would actually laugh in the face of Darwin if he presented it in the world we live in today. So, why do our school boards continue to waste money purchasing books, and paying teachers to teach non-truths, that they themselves are not comfortable with? And why have museums wasted money to create the Nebraska man, which is supposed to be the link between man and monkey. When in actuality, the person who rst drew the Nebraska man drew him from one small tooth, which was later found to be the jawbone of a wild pig. If I could take a 5,000 piece jigsaw puzzle and throw it into a category three hurricane and when it landed it was all together and matted, I might think that it was worth taking our childrens valuable learning time to teach the possibilities of this ridiculous theory, that they might question whether there was a God or not. NOT!!! Because you and I both know, even if we did this experiment one-million times, not even two pieces would come together. So the truth of the matter is; it takes more faith to believe that this great universe just came together without a creator, than it does to believe that there is a God. To my understanding of things, since evolution is not a science and it is based on the beliefs of one person, it is a religion. A religion according to the subtitle of his Origin was The Preservation of Favored Races in the Struggle for Life. The question you can simply ask is, who do you think Darwin tagged as the Unfavored races? So my question is; why is the ACLU and others so interested in preserving a religion, sponsored by our government, which is against the Constitution, and is racialist? And why are they afraid to share another view? After all, evolution is only a theory. Are they afraid that their religion of choice would not be accepted anymore, because it cannot pass the test of human questioning? The simple answer to all of these questions comes from the Bible which says, Even him, whose coming is after the working of Satan with all power and signs and lying wonders, And with all deceivableness of unrighteousness in them that perish; because they received not the love of the truth, that they might be saved. And for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lie: That they all might be damned who believed not the truth, but had pleasure in unrighteousness (2 Thes. 2:9-12 KJV). These thoughts have been brought to you From the Heart of Tim Hall, timothyjhall.org, Senior Pastor, Gully Springs Baptist Church, P.O. Box 745, 2824 U.S. Highway 90 West Bonifay, Florida 32425. Located; three miles west of the light at Highway 79, 850-547-3920 and author of Church Go To Hell! Please? Email: timhall_2000@yahoo.com (Please be advised that my articles are purposely meant to be challenging and at times, controversial. They should no way re ect negatively on the paper in which you read it). Holmes Baptist Association Secret Church BONIFAY Holmes Baptist Association is sponsoring Secret Church at Gully Springs Baptist Church in Bonifay on Friday, Feb. 3 beginning at 6 p.m. Our leader David Pratt will lead us through the Bible as he teaches us how to study our Bibles and get more out of personal Bible Study. Dont expect to get home before midnight. Look forward to studying with you Friday. Our next Secret Church will be Good Friday. Please RSVP by calling 547-3920. First United Methodist Church of Chipley Super Bowl Hot Wing Sale Pickup CHIPLEY The First United Methodist Church of Chipley took orders for their annual Super Bowl Hot Wing Sale. Customers may pick up their orders on Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 5th from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Drive thru pick up is available. The church is at 1285 Jackson Ave., next to the courthouse. The Jasper String Quartet to be at Gulf Beach Presbyterian PANAMA CITY BEACH The Jasper String Quartet will be at Gulf Beach Presbyterian on Friday, Feb. 3 at 7 p.m. They were the grand prizewinner in the Plowman Chamber Music Competition, received a silver medal at the Fischoff Chamber Music Competition, and won grand prize at the Coleman Competition. The New York Times an impressive young ensemble. The quartet has performed across the USA, Canada, Norway, England, Italy, and Japan. Art by the Visual Arts Center. Gulf Beach Presbyterian is on Highway 79 between Front and Back Beach Road on Panama City Beach. A suggested donation is $15 at the door. For more information call 230-1991. Christian Haven Church to hold Gospel Jam WAUSAU Christian Haven Church will hold their monthly Gospel Jam on Saturday, Feb. 4, beginning at 6 p.m. with a covered dish dinner and the Jam starting immediately after dinner, acoustic instruments only. Come and enjoy an evening of music and fellowship. The church is east of Wausau on Finch Circle. For more info call 638-0836 or 773-2602. Saint Agathas Episcopal Church Breakfast DEFUNIAK SPRINGS Saint Agathas Episcopal Church will be having Breakfast in the Parish Hall on Feb. 4, March 3, April 7, and on May 5, from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. Breakfast will include eggs, grits, homefries, pancakes, bacon, sausage, toast, sausage gravy on biscuits or toast, juice, milk or coffee. There will also be healthy choice items. Adult plates will be $4.50 and children 10 and under are $2.50 The Parish Hall is at 150 Circle Drive in DeFuniak Springs. Hwy. 77 S, Chipley 638-4097 Hwy. 79 S., Bonifay 547-9688 Stephen B. Register, CPA 1552 Brickyard Road Chipley, FL 638-4251 BROWN FUNERAL HOME 1068 Main Street, Chipley 638-4010 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser 1364 N. Railroad, Chipley 638-0212 112 E. Virginia, Bonifay 547-9414 But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Good News Bible Acts 1:8 Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. First Baptist Church come as you are Mike Orr, Pastor 1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830 Place your message here for only $8.00 per week. This Message Courtesy of Anonymous Acts of Kindness It is only natural for us to want to be recognized for our good deeds; however there is undoubtedly some thing even better in doing the occasional secret good both the giver and the receiver more than the gift of kindness that is performed with full recognition of who did it. The doer of a secret good deed will feel that there is something purer in their motive because they are not doing it to receive thanks or recognition, and this feeling is likely to raise the doers self-es teem. In addition, the person who receives the anony mous gift or act of kindness is likely to feel that the world is a kinder, friendlier place, with people out there whom they dont even know doing good deeds. There are lots of ways we can do a secret good deed. For example, paying the toll for the person behind us, or buying the couples tickets behind us in line at the movie theater. Other ideas may include putting money in expired meters, leaving some food or a gift for someone at work, or perhaps leaving a plate of goodies in someones desk who we know wont have time to go out for lunch. We should be creative do a secret good deed. There is really no end to the anonymous acts of kindness we can do, and it really will make us and the recipient feel great. The generous soul will be made rich, and he who waters will also be watered himself. New K.J.V. Proverbs 11:25 Wednesday, February 1, 2012 Page 4 Faith EVENTS By Rev. James L. Snyder I am rather oldfashioned in some areas of my life, which I do not intend to upgrade to current standards. I do not believe in changing something unless it really needs to be changed. A crazy phobia is going around these days suggesting that if something is old, it must not be any good and if it is new, it must be good. I think old Solomon was right when he said, there is no new thing under the sun (Ecclesiastes 1:9 KJV). So, I am never intimidated by some new gizmo or gadget that comes down the line. One of the things I have no intention of upgrading is in the area of giving credit. I believe in giving credit where credit is due. After all, I need all the credit I can get these days. If somebody does something that blesses me, I am beholden to give them their due credit. I am under the opinion that if I give enough people enough credit that one day I just may be able to cash in. This all came to me this past week when I had my visit to the dentist. I make it a rule to visit my dentist once a decade whether I need to or not. The thing that spurred my visit to the dentist this time was one of my llings had fallen out. Actually, I am assuming it fell out because where it used to be was a hole in my tooth. Upon pondering the situation to its logical conclusion, I must have eaten my lling. This dental hygienic situation brought me to my latest visit with my dental hygienist. While I was there, I thought I would save time, if not money, and have my teeth cleaned. Every decade I like to have my teeth cleaned. According to my dentists records, the last time I had my teeth cleaned was 13 years ago. So, it is time. Because it was so long since my last visit with the dentist, he insisted on taking pictures of all my teeth. I hope to get copies so I can post it on my Facebook. After all, what would my Facebook be without pictures of teeth? I had forgotten the whole procedure of dental photography. It took an entire hour to photograph all my teeth one at a time. During the sixty minutes of my photography shoot, I had to keep my mouth open. I have never had my mouth open for so long in all my life. The upshot of my visit with the dentist was I had a clean bill of health regarding my teeth and gums. I must have been doing something right to have such healthy teeth and gums for a person my age. When the dentist said a person my age, I was not sure if he was insulting me or congratulating me for good health. Being the gentleman that I am, I took the latter. I dont know what youre doing, the dentist said cheerfully as I left his of ce, just keep it up. With that, I left the dentist of ce. I thought a lot about what he said and I have come to a major conclusion. I like giving credit where credit is due, so I had to think long and hard about whom to credit for my good dental health. Certainly, I could congratulate the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage on her superb dietary work in the kitchen. Without doubt, it pays to eat the right food if you are going to have good health. But I think it goes much further than this. What am I doing to credit such a good dental health report? Then it came to me. Have you ever given serious thought about something for so long, you seem to be getting nowhere, and then all of a sudden, it hits you? I know what I can credit my excellent dental health to. Apple Fritters. That is right. The reason I have good teeth and good gums is because of a consistent diet of Apple Fritters. After all, everybody knows the main ingredient of an Apple Fritter is an Apple. There is nothing better for a person than an Apple. Where the Fritter comes in is very simple. The Fritter part of an Apple Fritter is the means by which my body can assimilate the nutritional aspects of the Apple. The Fritter facilitates the good parts of the Apple to every part of my body. Therefore, with a deep sense of humility and gratefulness, I credit my dental health to the regular consumption of Apple Fritters. A friend of mine recently suggested that I might be addicted to Apple Fritters, but I kindly remonstrated him by explaining I am addicted to good dental health. My spiritual health is a different matter. Now unto him that is able to keep you from falling, and to present you faultless before the presence of his glory with exceeding joy, to the only wise God our Saviour, be glory and majesty, dominion and power, both now and for ever. Amen (Jude 1:24-25 KJV). God gets all the credit in my life for my spiritual health now and forever. Giving credit where credit is due Separation of Church and State FROM THE HEART Tim Hall See EVENTS B5

PAGE 13

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 Extra Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences. Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section of www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership with Legacy com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212 An annual resource guide for residents in Washington & Holmes counties who are presented with many choices for obtaining quality health care in the area. For more information contact: 850.638.0212 or 850.547.9414 The Medical Services Directory has updated listings of physicians grouped by eld-of-practice. It also features the latest news and information about local health and wellness providers. Consumers in Washington and Holmes counties spend more than $71 million on health care annualy; with an additional $37 million in sales for health and personal care products. Make sure these consumers know about the services and products you have to offer with your advertising in the 2012 area Medical Services Directory. Publishes Wednesday, Feb. 22 in both the Washington County News and the Holmes County Times Advertiser Deadline: Noon, Wednesday, Feb. 10 2012 Medical Services Directory Sally H Bowers, 84, of Pensacola passed away Friday, Jan. 20, 2012, at Bainbridge Healthcare. Mrs. Bowers was born Oct. 8, 1927, in Westville, where she grew up and lived until moving to Pensacola in the late 1950s to work for U.S. Civil Service, from which she retired in 1986. Mrs. Bowers was preceded in death her husband, Willard Bowers. Survivors include her nephews, Clyde Skinner and his wife, Diane, of Lancaster, S.C., Thomas Skinner and his wife, Jennifer, of Tallahassee, and Jerry Skinner and his wife, Sharon, of Westville; and her sister-in-law, Lonie Skinner of Westville. The funeral service was held at 2 p.m. Monday, Jan. 23, 2012, at Cedar Springs Assembly of God Church near Westville. Interment followed at Camp Ground Cemetery near Westville. The family received friends from 1 to 1:45 p.m. Monday, Jan. 23, 2012, at Cedar Springs Assembly of God. Online visitors may sign the guest register at www. iveyfuneral.com. Sally H. Bowers SALLY H. BOWERS Mrs. Martha Nell Faircloth, age 88, of Bonifay passed away Jan. 13, 2012, at Southeast Alabama Medical Center in Dothan, Ala. She was born Feb. 8, 1923, in Wyandotte, Mich., to the late Henry and Amy Taylor King. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Faircloth was preceded in death by her husband, Cody Faircloth; a son, David Faircloth; and a brother, Henry King Jr. Mrs. Faircloth is survived by two children, James Faircloth and wife, Anita, and Amy Nell Faircloth Dykes and husband, Charles, all of Bonifay; seven grandchildren, Paula, Laura, Jamey, Deana, Davey, Charlie and Jodi; and seven great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15, 2012, at Union Hill Baptist Church with the Rev. Wesley Adams and the Rev. Huey Hughes of ciating. Interment was in the Union Hill Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay directing. Martha N. Faircloth Mrs. Lonie Bowers Skinner, age 91, of Westville, passed away Jan. 25, 2012 at Jackson Hospital in Marianna. She was born June 22, 1920, in Westville to the late Henry T. and Mary Ann Huggins Bowers. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Skinner was preceded in death by her husband, Clyde Skinner, and a brother and sisterin-law, Willard and Sally Bowers. Mrs. Skinner is survived by three sons, Clyde Skinner and wife, Diane, of Lancaster, S.C., Thomas Skinner and wife, Jennifer, of Tallahassee, and Jerry T. Skinner and wife, Sharon, of Westville; four grandchildren; and several great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 28, 2012, at Cedar Springs Assembly of God Church with the Rev. Roger Hagan of ciating. Interment followed in the Pleasant Ridge Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay directing. Lonie B. Skinner Mrs. Mae Bell Briggs Hill, 74, daughter of the late Rosetta and Roland Briggs Sr. of Bonifay, passed away Jan. 22 at her resident. She was a native of Holmes County, of the Baptist faith and an educator. Survivors include three brothers, Robert Briggs of California, Roland Briggs Jr. (Betty) of McKinney, Texas, and John Briggs (Doris) of Virginia; aunt, Mary King of Bonifay; and many nieces, nephews, cousins, other relatives and friends. A memorial service will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 4, in the Cooper Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Henry Taylor of ciating. Interment of cremains will follow in the Bonifay Cemetery. Mae Bell B. Hill James Walton (Bo) Baker, age 66, of Chipley passed away Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012, at his home. Mr. Baker was born Nov. 1, 1945, in Chipley to the late Frank and Ester (Wilcox) Baker. He was a lifelong resident of Washington County, a farmer and a member of the Apostolic United Pentecostal Church in Marianna. In addition to his parents, he was predeceased by two brothers, Neal Baker and Royal Baker; and one sister, Inez Lipford. Survivors include his wife, Vickie Baker, of Chipley; one son, John Thomas Baker and wife, Dalon, of Marianna; one daughter, Mendy Steverson and husband, Allen, of Cottondale; one brother, Lewis Baker of Macon, Ga.; and four sisters, Imogene Jordan of Marianna, Inell Reeves of Chipley, Ileta Tadlock of Chipley and Irene Lipford of Chipley. Memorial services were held Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012, at 3:30 p.m. in the Apostolic Life United Apostolic Church in Marianna. Memorialization was by cremation. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements. James W. Baker Pauline Cook-Shores, age 88, went home to be with the Lord on Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2012. Ms. Pauline was born Sept. 25, 1923, in Bonifay to the late Theron Sr. and Mary Russ (Brock). She has lived in Washington County most of her life, where she worked at Vernon High School as a home economics teacher. Ms. Pauline was the president of the Vernon Garden Club for 50 years, an advisor for the Future Homemakers of America for more than 40 years and served with the Delta Kappa Gamma Members. Along with her parents, she was preceded in death by three husbands, George S. Baragona, Thomas Wallace Cook Sr. and Gene Shores; and two brothers, Burness Russ and Theron Russ Jr. Survivors include two sons, George T. Baragona and wife, Gloria, of Tallahassee and Thomas (Tommy) W. Cook Jr. and wife, Terri, of Vernon; two stepsons, Ricky Shores and wife, Lila, of Newton, Ala., and Greg Shores of Chipley; four stepdaughters, Sue (Shores) Broom and husband, Paul, of Chipley, Faye (Shores) Cope and husband, Lynn, of Chipley, Pam Shores-Cates of Vernon, and Amy (Shores) Pelham and husband, Wesley, of Faceville, Ga.; two grandchildren, Michelle Baragona and Kimberly Bigelow; four great grandchildren, Courtney and Chris Warren and Justin and Kaylie Williams; one stepgrandson, Joseph T. Allen; and an additional 10 stepgrandchildren and eight stepgreat-grandchildren. Services were held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 28, 2012, at Eastside Baptist Church in Vernon with the Rev. Mike Browning of ciating. Interment followed at the Vernon City Cemetery. Visitation was held Friday, Jan. 27, 2012, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Brown Funeral Home Brickyard Road Chapel. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net. Pauline Cook-Shores Mrs. Nancy Harrell Metcalf, age 79, of Vernon passed away Jan. 26, 2012, at her home. She was born Dec. 31, 1932, to the late John G. and Alverda Nall Harrell. Over the years she was a switchboard operator, legal clerk and secretary in various civilian and military of ces around the world. She was a mother and loving wife, but rst and foremost Nancy was a born-again, spiritlled Christian who lived every day to glorify her Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. She was always ready to help, through prayer, maybe by paying a light bill or delivering some much needed food. Her friends knew if they needed prayer she was the one to call. Never too busy, she would drop everything and go to her prayer closet to get it done. She is rejoicing this day and every one to come throughout eternity in the presence of the Lord. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Metcalf was preceded in death by her husband, Jack M. Metcalf; and her sisters, Betty, Doris and Pat. Mrs. Metcalf is succeeded by her sons, Gary M. Metcalf and J. Dale Metcalf; daughterin-law, Gina; four grandchildren; ve greatgrandchildren; two greatgreat-grandchildren; and many friends. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2012, at Live Oak Baptist Church with the Rev. David Timms of ciating. Family received friends from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 30, 2012, at Peel Funeral Home Vernon Chapel, Vernon. Interment was in the Live Oak Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Memorial contributions may be given to Covenant Hospice, 4215 Kelson Ave., Suite E, Marianna, FL 32446. Nancy H. Metcalf Jolly G Toole, Sr. took ight from his home in Marianna, to his heavenly home Thursday, Jan. 26, 2012. Jolly was born April 23, 1939, to Woodrow Houston Toole Senior and Martha Mirl Duncan Toole. Jolly was a veteran of the United States Air Force and held two masters degrees. He retired from 30+ years of public service with the State of Florida. He is loved and survived by his wife, Linda Kay Toole; and two children, his son Jolly G. Toole II and his daughter, Kimberly Crane; four grandchildren, Caleb Gabriel Toole, Candace Rose-Marie Toole, Joshua Crane and Emily Crane; two brothers, Tony Toole of Whigham, Ga., and Woodrow Houston Junior of New Smyrna Beach, Fla.; and two sisters, Nancy Grif n of Vero Beach and Mary Jane Kachelries of Wallingford, Pa. Family received visitors at Brown Funeral Home (Main Street) Friday, Jan. 27, from 6 to 8 p.m. Graveside service was held at 3 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 28, at Piney Grove Cemetery, Chipley, with the Rev. Tim Owen of ciating. Interment was in the Piney Grove Cemetery, under the direction of Brown Funeral Home. Jolly G Toole, Sr. Mrs. Emma Lee Robinson, 94, of Chipley passed away Jan. 25 in the Northwest Florida Hospital. She was of the Baptist faith and a native of Washington County. Survivors include two sons, George Robinson, Jr. of Chipley and John Henry Robinson of North Carolina; and many other relatives. Funeral services were conducted at 1 p.m. Monday, Jan. 30, at Mt. Ararat Baptist Church Chipley, with the Rev. Dr. H.G. McCoullough and the Rev. T. Smith of ciating. Interment followed in the Northside Cemetery with Cooper Funeral Home of Chipley directing. The remains lied in repose at the church one hour prior to service. Emma L. Robinson Obituaries Victory Tabernacle Bluegrass Gospel Sing HARTFORD, Ala. Victory Tabernacle invites you to a Bluegrass Gospel Sing at 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 4. Special guests will be Keith Rowell and Friends and Straight and Narrow. The Tabernacle is at 10005 E. State Highway 52 in Hartford, Ala. For more information call 334-5882838 or email victory tabernaclepm@yahoo.com. Playground Swing Bing Band to be at Gulf Beach PANAMA CITY BEACH The Emerald Coasts nest 18-piece big band will return to Gulf Beach Presbyterian at 7 p.m. Feb. 12 to swing the night away with greatest hits from all of the greatest bands. Gulf Beach Presbyterian is on State 79 between Front Beach and Back Beach roads in Panama City Beach. A suggested donation is $15 at the door. Call 230-1991. David Seering to be at Gulf Beach Presbyterian PANAMA CITY BEACH Singer David Seering will be at Gulf Beach Presbyterian at 7 p.m. Feb. 14. He will be doing a special Valentines Day performance A Night of Love Songs. Singer is a Sinatra inspired musical mastery. Gulf Beach Presbyterian is on State Road 79 between Front Beach and Back Beach roads on Panama City Beach. A suggested donation is $15 at the door. For more information, call 230-1991. EVENTS from page B4 See EVENTS B6

PAGE 14

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Thomas Pandolphi to be at Gulf Beach Presbyterian PANAMA CITY BEACH Pianist Thomas Pandolphi will be at Gulf Beach Presbyterian at 7 p.m. Feb. 19 to play A Night into Gershwin, from Gershwin classics and jazz to the famous Rhapsody in Blue. The Washington Post calls Pandolphi Master of both the grand gesture and sensual line ... brilliant, exceptionally articulate. There will be baskets on display by Carol Dickson. Gulf Beach Presbyterian is on State Road 79 between Front Beach and Back Beach roads in Panama City Beach. A suggested donation is $15 at the door. Call 230-1991. The Lehnert Chamber Players to be at Gulf Beach Presbyterian PANAMA CITY BEACH The Lehnert Chamber Players will be at Gulf Beach Presbyterian at 7 p.m. Feb. 24. The Lehnert Chamber Players consist of internationally acclaimed Oswald Lehnert, violinist; Oswald Lehnert Jr., cellist; and Doris Lehnert, pianist. The Lehnerts are from Boulder, Colo. The concert will also feature guest violist Larry Tyson. They will be performing a concert of Brahms, Mozart, Schumann, Beethoven and Liszt. There will be art on display by by Phyllis Reimink. Gulf Beach Presbyterian is on State Road 79 between Front Beach and Back Beach roads in Panama City Beach. A suggested donation is $15 at the door. For more information call 230-1991. LIVE 4 HIM CONCERT With Ronaldo Feliciano CHIPLEY The Masters Silent Sign Ministry and Others will perform from 7-9 p.m. Feb. 24 at Shiloh Baptist Church, 1976 Shiloh Lane in Chipley. Celebrating nine years of Gods faithfulness, Shiloh Baptist Church Deaf Ministry invites you to join us for this unique evening and enjoy Music WORTH Watching. The concert is free. A love offering will be received for Deaf Missions. For information, call Trisha Hicks 6281553 or familyofhicks@ yahoo.com or Carmen Stewart 834-655-8300 (text) or carmenstewart@ hishandsmissions.org. LIFE Giving MUSIC in SIGN workshop with Ronaldo Feliciano CHIPLEY A LIFE Giving MUSIC in SIGN workshop with Ronaldo Feliciano will be 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Feb. 25 at Shiloh Baptist Church, 1976 Shiloh Lane in Chipley. This is music WORTH watching! Come, all deaf, hard of hearing, ASL students and interpreters and learn how at this fun and active workshop. Bring your creativity. Leave your fears. Please register as soon as possible. Cost of the workshop is $15 on or before Feb. 4, $20 on or before Feb. 18 and $25 at the door. Child care is not available for this event. A full refund is available within one week of concert with written request. For additional accommodations, call Bob or Trisha Hicks 628-1553 or 896-8007. EVENTS from page B5 Crossword SOLUTION FIND IT ONLINE www.bonifay now.com BONIFAY Holmes County Relay for Life will begin at noon April 28 at Memorial Field in Bonifay. Luminaries for donations All Relay For Life teams are selling luminaries to be displayed on the night of the Relay around the track. After dark, the Relay For Life celebration will include a special luminary ceremony. Encircling the track with lights of hope, the Luminary Ceremony reaches for tomorrow with each candle of life and touches the stars for only a moment to remember those of yesterday. Your donation for each bag will place a luminary along the pathway to memorialize or honor someone you love. The bags will stay lit throughout the evening, reminding us that hope lives among us. The ceremony will begin just after dark. If you would like to participate in the ceremony by honoring or remembering a loved one who has battled cancer, contact a Relay For Life team. Relay track markers for sale All Relay For Life teams are selling track markers to be displayed on the night of the Relay around the track. Track markers are 18 feet by 14 inches and are $100. Rules for the markers: Message must t in boxes on the order form The squares include letters and/or spaces (there are 46 squares) No logos or pictures No political or campaign issues Messages may be business or personal For more information, contact a team. Team Survivor Scentsy fundraiser Team Survivor is holding a Scentsy fundraiser in February and March. The consultant has agreed to give 10 percent of all proceeds to Relay For Life. In the month of February, all products in the Scentsy catalog are 10 percent off the listed pricem excluding licensed items and combination packs. For a book or to place an order, call Cathrine Lamb at 326-0121, Cecilia Spears at 658-4038, Connie Wheeler at 260-4073 or Linda Bybee at 260-9658. Team Survivor to hold fundraiser at Walmart CHIPLEY Team Survivor will have a fundraiser with proceeds going to Washington County Relay For Life. The fundraiser will be at 7 a.m. April 14 in front of Walmart. There will be hair bows, hair ties, headbands, Scentsy and much more. For more information, call Linda Bybee at 260-9658, Cathrine Lamb at 326-0121 or Cecilia Spears at 658-4038. Area Relay for Life teams raising funds Wednesday, February 1, 2012 Holmes County Times Advertiser | B6 2-5031 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 2008-CA-000374 AURORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. NICK VITTORIO A/K/A N. VITTORIO; JANE DOE; JOHN DOE; HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated October 5, 2009 and an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale Date dated this 10th day of January 2012, and entered in Case No. 2008-CA-000374, of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Florida, wherein AURORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC is the Plaintiff and NICK VITTORIO AKA N. VITTORIO; JANE DOE; JOHN DOE; HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT (S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT STEPS OF THE HOLMES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 201 NORTH OKLAHOMA STREET, BONIFAY, FL 32425, 11:00 AM on the 16th day of February 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: THE SOUTH 10 ACRES OF THE SE OF THE SE OF SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 11th day of January 2012. CODY TAYLOR Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser January 25, February 1, 2012. COLOR SELLS! Get Your Classified Ad in COLOR! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 2-5034 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 12-02PR IN RE: ESTATE OF JANET L. VAIL, Deceased. Division Probate NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Janet L. Vail, deceased, whose date of death was November 12, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for HOLMES County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 North Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, FL 32425. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is February 1, 2012. Attorney for Personal Representative: Lucas N. Taylor Attorney for William Newton Vail Florida Bar No. 670189 122B South Waukesha Street Bonifay, FL 32425 Telephone: (850) 547-7301 Fax: (850) 547-7303 Personal Representative: William Newton Vail, 1338 Dancey Landing Road, Bonifay, Florida 32425. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser February 1, 8, 2012. 2-5032 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO.: 2011-CA-212 DIVISION:, 21st MORTGAGE CORPORATION, etc., Plaintiff, vs. RONALD O. WILLIAMS, et al. Defendants NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment entered on January 10, 2012, in Case No: 2011-CA-212 of the Circuit Court, Holmes County Florida, in which 21st Mortgage Corporation is Plaintiff and Ronald O. Williams et al., are the defendants, the Clerk of this Court will sell at public sale the following described real property: Exhibit A: Commence at an existing iron pipe marking the northeast corner of NW 1/4 of NW 1/4 of section 27, township 6 north, range 15 west, Holmes County, Florida; thence N. 895925 W. along the north boundary line of said NW 1/4 of NW 1/4 for a distance of 147.58 feet to an iron rod, said rod being the point of beginning; thence S. 000230 W. for 295.16 feet to an iron rod; thence N. 895925 W. for 147.58 feet to an iron rod; thence N. 000230 E. for 295.16 feet to an iron rod set on the aforesaid north boundary line of NW 1/4 of NW 1/4; thence S. 895925 E. along said north boundary line for 147.58 feet to the point of beginning. This parcel is located in the NW 1/4 of NW 1/4 of section 27, township 6 north, range 15 west, Holmes County, Florida, and contains 1.00 acre, more or less. Together with 2006 Nobility Kingswood 44 x 28 manufactured home, Serial No: N8-12597A/B, located on the property. The sale will be held on February 16, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. (Central) to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the front door of the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma St., Bonifay, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in the proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact ADA Coordinator, 201 N. Oklahoma St., Bonifay, Florida 32425. (850)747-5338 at least 7 days before you scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 11 day of January, 2012. CODY TAYLOR, CLERK OF SAID COURT By: Diane Eaton As Deputy Clerk. Lance P. Cohen, 1912 Hamilton St. Suite 206, Jacksonville, FL 32210, (904)388-6500, Attorney for Plaintiff. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser February 1, 8, 2012. Classified can! If youre ready to move up or are just starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. Weve got properties at every price, with locations all over town! And if youre planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the markets best prospects.

PAGE 15

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 B B U S I N E S S USINESS G G U I D E UIDE T o P l a c e A n A d C a l l 6 3 8 0 2 1 2 o r 5 4 7 9 4 1 4 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Denton's RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDA WE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS $ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENT Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are Carpeted Van Hillard Siding Co.Vinyl Siding € Overhang & Facia Aluminum Patio Covers & Carports Energy E cient Windows € Insulated Mobile Home Roof Systems Pressure Washing € Wood Decks Screen Rooms € Metal Roo ng Shingle Roo ng € Painting Bonifay-Chipley 850-526-5029Free Estimates Over 30 Years Experience Quality Workmanship Van Hillard We Do Good WorkŽ DALE'S CHIMNEY SWEEPSComplete Chimney & Fireplace Services850-547-04103411 Spring Valley Lane Bonifay, FL 25 Years Experience HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 16 Years With, Friendly and Reliable Service!Service On All Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration & Hoods638-3611Call For Monthly Specials HELP WANTEDPAINTERS NEEDEDD&G Painting & Remodeling849-7982 849-0736 Talk about a great deal, advertise your Business or Service here for only$18.00per week!8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 Find the right person for your job today at emeraldcoastjobs.com 1,460 Sq Ft OfficeSpace for rent in Bonifay. 850-547-4238 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incl’d 638-1918 For Rent: Bright 2BR/2BA screened porch Townhouse apartment. Non-Smoker, references. Good location Bonifay Area 850-547-3494 or 850-532-2177 SpaciousOne Bedroom $425 Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. A Few Pro Drivers Needed Top Pay & 401K 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com WANTED 10 HOMES needing siding, windows, roofs or sunrooms. Save hundreds of dollars. No money down. Payments $89/mo. All credit accepted. Senior/Military discounts! (866) 668-8681 Child Care needs loving person. Experience preferred. Call (850)547-1444. DriversExp. Tanker. Great Pay! Regional/ Linehaul. CDL-A w/ H&T Dbls. Good MVR. www. drive4sbi.com Paul 800-826-3413 Medical/HealthER ManagerNorthwest Florida Community Hospital, Chipley, FL, is seeking an experienced ER Manager. Florida RN license required. Must be customer service oriented.RN,ERAll shifts available, FL. license required. Applications available online:NFCH.org Fax (850)-638-0622 E-mail: dblount@nfch.org Ph (850)-415-8106 Drug Free and Smoke Free Work Place. EOE Web-Id 34195058Text fl95058 to 56654 Drivers: RUN 5 STATE REGIONAL! Get Home Weekends, Earn Up to 39¢/mi., 1 yr OTR Flatbed exp. req’d. SUNBELT TRANSPORTATION, LLC (800) 572-5489 ext. 227 Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of advertising! 122 weekly newspapers, 32 websites, 25 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida (866) 742-1373. Administrative The Chipley Housing Authority of the City of Chipley, Florida is seeking an experienced housing professional for the position of Executive Director who will direct the operations of an agency of 88 units of Conventional Public Housing and answer to a five member Board of Commissioners. Requirements include a Bachelor’s Degree in Public Administration, Finance, Business Administration or a related field with experience in public housing work, financial planning, administrative management or a combination of education, training and experience equivalent to these requirements.The successful candidate must be PHM certified or certifiable with in one year of employment The salary is negotiable and will be commensurate with qualifications and experience of the successful candidate. The Authority offers excellent health and retirement benefits. Successful candidate must obtain and maintain a valid FL driver’s licenses, must be bondable, pass drug screening, criminal and credit check. A detailed letter of interest including salary requirements, detailed resume and reference in triplicate should be submitted no later that February 22, 2012 to: Search Committee Chipley Housing Authority P.O.Box 388 Chipley, Florida 32428-0388 Equal Opportunity Employer Wood mizer LT-40 bend sawmill 18” planer, electric powered. Oaiyer tractor 115 hp. Treated lumber, 184, 186, 286, 686, 284 on 2x4’s, 16 ft. long. For more info call (850)547-0956 or (850)326-4548. Burn barrels $15.00. 2012 Nursing Drug handbook $75.00. Guinea birds $10.00 each. (850)373-2873, (850)319-5797. Caryville Flea Market Produce, knives, tupelo honey, fresh greens $1.50, western books, games, movies, new and used items. Open Saturdays. Commercial Tanning Bed. 32 light bed. $2500, OBO. 850-527-5250 Queen size plush Pillowtop Mattress Set New-in plastic, 10 yr. factory warranty. Can deliver. List price $799, sacrifice $240. (850)527-2295. Wanted to Rent : Farmland for 2012 season. (850) 415-1217. Wanted to Rent; Farm land or pasture in suroundding area. 850-718-1859. Wanted: Junk appliances. Lawn-mowers, farm and garden equipment, golf carts, satellites for free. I will pick up. Call (850)-547-0088 WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. Camellia Sale Up to 1/2 off reg prices! Many sizes & colors. Arbor Lane Nursury 2636 Bruner Dairy RD Vernon 850-535-9886 Huge Garage Sale Low Prices Sat Feb 4 744 3rd St LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE: Like a big Flea Market, but yard sale prices. Friday & Saturday February 3rd & 4th 8:00AM5:00PM. Located on the bypass (Maple Avenue) Geneva, AL. Near Courthouse. Multi-Family Garage sale Saturday Feb.4. 905 Banfill Ave. 8 a.m—until. All sizes name brand clothes-lots of girls size 10-12. Yard Sale Fri & SatFeb 3rd & 4th.Furniture, kids cloths,from 24 mth to teen, toys. 1362 Cherry Ave, behind WC Health Dept. Yard Sale Sat Feb 4 7:00AM 847 S 8th St 1 Blk behind Brock Paint & Body. 326-2920 Yard Sale Saturday Beside Shavers & Brock Furniture. Beds, reclining sofa, sofas, daybed,mattress’s, headboards, children clothes. HANDGUN TRAININGLearn the POINT SHOOT METHOD TAUGHT BY POLICE ACADEMIES. Our shooting equipment offers no flinch, no noise, no recoil. CBL Handgun Training 850-260-1342 Chipley SMALL LIVESTOCK & MISCELLANEOUS AUCTION 4100 Pate Pond Rd Vernon, Fl. Every Saturday Livestock-3 pm-bring your own cages. Miscellaneous-6pm. Cash, debit/credit cards. Refreshments available. Sellers welcome. No buyers premium. (850)547-9140, (850)415-0183, (850)326-1606. Michelle & HC”s Auctions, Michelle Roof FL AU3014, AB2224 Firewood Delivered. Cut to length. (850)547-9291. B&B Furniture 1342 North RR Avenue, Chipley. We pay cash for clean, quality furniture. and some appaliences 850-557-0211 or 850-415-6866. Ask for Pasco or Carolyn HUGE 4 FAMILY YARD SALE. Sat Feb 4th @ 743 5th St Chipley.Baby, childrens, woman, men, plus size clothing & shoes, household items, furniture, nursery items, toys & yard toys. ALL PRICED TO GO!!!! A UCTION Sat.,February 25th, 2012-8am 5529 Hwy 231 N. Campbellton, FL. 3 Local Farm Dispersals, 2 Estates Bank Repos Sheriff Depts, City and County Surplus Plus Consignments Mason Auction & sales LLC.#AB2766 850-263-0473 office 850-258-7652 Chad Mason 850-849-0792 Gerald Masonwww.masonauction.com Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Earn College Degree Online. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (877) 206-5165 www.CenturaOnline.com RED GREEN LIVE Experience this hilarious one-man show! April 5th, Tampa Theatre (800-745-3000), April 7th, News-Journal Centre, Davidson Theatre, Daytona State College. (800-595-4849) www.redgreen.com For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you don’t have the room, “We Do” Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Allied Health career training-Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com

PAGE 16

B8| Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, February 1, 2012 Jorge Says … Come join us during our2961 Penn. Ave., Marianna, FL (850) 526-3511 € 1-800-423-8002 www.mariannatoyota.com All prices and discounts after any factory rebate, factory to dealer cash excludes tax, tag, registration, title and includes d ealer fees. Subject to pre-sale. MARIANNA TOYOTA 7 Years, 100,000 Mile Limited Powertrain Warranty 1 Year, 12,000 Miles Platinum Warranty**Sale ends 2/6/12 Z e r o D o w n A p p r o v e d C r e d i t Zero Down Approved Credit. G r e a t S e l e c t i o n S p e c i a l L e a s e P r o g r a m s Great Selection Special Lease Programs. C o m p e t i t i v e I n t e r e s t R a t e s Competitive Interest Rates. F r i e n d l y S t a f f N o G a m e s Friendly Staff. No Games. G r e a t S e r v i c e & P a r t s D e p a r t m e n t Great Service & Parts Department. N o G i m m i c k s 2 9 y e a r s o f s e r v i c e No Gimmicks. 29 years of service u r P R E O W N E D V E H I C L E S S U P E R S A L E PRE-OWNED VEHICLES SUPER SALE C o m e c h e c k i t o u t Come check it out! New 2011 Toyota Avalon LimitedLeather, Sunroof, LoadedSAVE$4,000 Off MSRPModel # 3554 Stock # 9525New 2012 Toyota Sienna XLE LimitedNavigation, Leather, Sunroof, LoadedSAVE$5,000 Off MSRPModel # 5356 Stock # 9356New 2011 Toyota Corolla S4 door Automatic only 2 leftModel # 1834 MORE TO CHOOSE FROM! Chris FarrarSales Travis RussSales Aaron PetersonSalesVance McGoughSales Ronnie AllenSales Steve HughesSales Steven AdkisonSales Lester TinsleySales Mgr.David CumbieSales Mgr. Steve RobertsSales MARIANNA TOYOTA Remember, If You Cant Come to Us, Just Give Us a Call, and Well Drive it to You! M O R E T O C H O O S E F R O M MORE TO CHOOSE FROM G R E A T S E L E C T I O N C O M P E T I T I V E I N T E R E S T R A T E S GREAT SELECTION COMPETITIVE INTEREST RATES!All prices and discounts after any factory rebates, factory to dealer cash, excludes tax, tag, registration and title and incl udes dealer fees. Subject to Pre-sale. 08 Toyota Tundra Double Cab, SR5, Auto, Sharp, Super Deal $19,949 08 Toyota Highlander, Limited Edition, Loaded, Come get it! 08 Toyota FS Cruiser, auto, low miles, Super Nice, SAVE! 08 Toyota Sequoia Limited, loaded, Tow Package, alloys, leather, SHARP! 08 Toyota Corolla, 4-door sedan, automatic, low payments! 08 Toyota 4-Runner, SR5-V6, Local Trade 07 Toyota Rav4, Automatic, Sharp! 07 Toyota Camry LE 4-door automatic, come get it! 07 Toyota Highlander, automatic, special $17,974 07 Tundra Double Cab Limited, V8, 4x4, Ready to Go! 06 Toyota Landcruiser, 4x4, Sunroof, Leather, Special $26,888 06 Toyota Avalon, luxury, price to go $14,888 11 Toyota 4-Runner Limited, Navigation, Leather, Sunroof, Low miles 11 Toyota Corolla LE, 4-door, automatic, only 8K miles, save! 11 Toyota Sequoia Platinum Edition one owner 11 Toyota Tacoma Double cab, Pre-runner V-6, sharp! 11 Toyota Camry XLE, V6, navigation, leather, sunroof, SAVE! 11 Toyota Camry LE, 4-door, power package, Don't Miss It! $17,688 10 Toyota Venza, auto, power package, alloy wheels, SHARP! 10 Toyota Tundra, Double Cab, SR5, V-8, Special SHARP! 10 Toyota Corolla LE, 4-Door, Automatic, Priced To Go! 10 Toyota 4-Runner Limited, Navigation, loaded 10 Toyota Prius, Great Gas Mileage! 09 Toyota Camry LE, leather, sunroof, alloy wheels, SAVE! New 2012 Toyota Prius V HybridIn Stock NowModel # 1243 Stock # 9750New 2012 Toyota TacomaDouble Cab, Automatic TRD w/ navigation, 18Ž wheelsModel #7188 Stock # 9757New 2012 Toyota Camry LAutomatic 4 doorModel # 2514 Stock # 9711 '10 Chrysler 300M4-Door Sharp!$12,848'11 Honda CRV EX-LLeather, Sunroof only 7k miles$ Save'02 Dodge 1500Reg. Cab, Auto Trans., Special$5,449'00 Chevy TahoeLeather w/ Barn doors, must see$9,888'03 Dodge 1500V-8 4x4, Automatic, 62k milesSuper Deal$12,848'07 DodgeCaravanFamily vehicle must go Super Deal$7,888'06 Honda RidgelineAutomatic, 4x4Special$16,949'06 Jeep Wrangler44, Only 27K Miles, Sharp!'06 Cadillac 8RXLeather, Navigation, Luxury'09 Honda Accord EX-LLeather, Sunroof, V6, Sharp!$21,888 '03 Lincoln Town CarLuxury, 59k miles Special$11,949'07Mercedes-BenzS550 Luxury Low, Low miles'08 Ford EdgeSharp utility vehicle Special$17,988 '06 Toyota Camry LEAuto, Spoiler, Special!$8,848 '05 Chevy TrailblazerClean, low miles, only 44k milesSave! Great Selection From Corollas to Sequoias, All Priced To Sell, Come Check It Out!'05 Toyota Sienna LEFamily van Must goSuper Deal$8,779'07 Toyota Rav4Automatic, Must go$11,879'03 Ford Windstarmini van, family vehicleSuper$5,579'01 Nissan Armadaonly 14k miles Nice, one ownerSave $'02 PT CruiserAutomatic Price to go$4,990 COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com (850) 547-9500 Bonifay Florid a Xtreme Boats FACTORY DIRECT Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 ‘97 Buell S3 Thunderbolt Motorcycle, Harley Davidson Motor, runs great and garage kept, 17,000 miles. $3,500!! Call 850-271-5761 and leave a message. 1988 DODGE P/UP Automatic, air-assist breaks. $700/OBO 96 TOYOTA TACOMA Auto, AC, radio, CD, liner, box, hitch $3,1000/OBO 99 DODGE DAKOTA SPORT LONG BED. V.6-3.9 L engine auto. AC, radio, hitch, steel, wheels $ 2,850/OBO PRIVATE OWNER Please leave name/# Chipley, 850-638-3306 For sale ford F600 18 ft flat bed dump plus scissor lift. For construction or hay. Receiver hitch, V8, 2 speed $4300 Call 956-2220 2003 Venture LS Van 6 passenger. Runs good. 97,000 miles. $4,000 firm. Call (850)547-2427. 99 Pontiac Grand Prix $575 down 02 Dodge Durango $ 675 down 02 Ford F250 X/Cab 4 Door $975 down 02 Chevy Silverado X/Cab 4 Door $2000 down 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!!! $37,000 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. Reduced Price! Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858. Driver -Start out the year with Daily Pay and Weekly Hometime! Single Source Dispatch. Van and Refrigeration. CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. (800) 414-9569 www.driveknight.com 5 Acres TrackFor Sale 40 miles North of PanamaCity Beach,1 mile off Hwy 79. Owner financing w/$3000 down 0% interest for 2 yr $200/mth. Mike Stansberry 423-253-4226 Mobile Homes in Cottondale on Sapp Rd, 8 miles E. of Chipley. 3br/2ba Doublewide & 2br/2ba singlewide avail. Total elec. (850)-258-4868 or 850-209-8847 www.charlos countryliving.com 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-638-7315, 850-849-6842 or 638-9933. 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. 3BD/2BA MH. Very nice & on private lot w/ extras on the Mill Pond in Marianna. $600/mth $600 deposit 638-7822 3BD/2BA Mobile Home. In quiet Chipley park CH/A W/D hook up. No Pets. $475/mth plus deposit 638-0560 or 850-774-3034 For Rent 2 BR/ 2BA MH in Bonifay. Water & sewage included. 638-2999 For Rent 3 bedroom 2 Bath in quiet area Water & gar barge furnished. No pets. $ 550/ mth $250 deposit 850-638-8570 Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio $350, 2 bedroom $470 City utilities incl. (850)557-7732. Cute House in the Country! 4 BR/ 2BA $850/mth, section8 okay. Call Amy @ 786-586-9826 Small 3BR/1BA in Vernon. Newly updated $550/mth. $550 deposit. HUD accepted. 850-527-5250 2 and 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes for rent in Bonifay. No Pets. (850)547-3462. 2BD Mobile Home on Large lot no pets. 1772 Old Bonifay Rd. 638-1716Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414



PAGE 1

By Cecilia SpearsStaff Writer cspears@chipleypaper.com BONIFAY West Bonifay Baptist Churchs invitation to celebrate Ander Browns Wild Game, Fish and Fowl Dinner Friday was answered by hundreds in the community who came to participate in the event, which offered food and fellowship. Once a year, Brown holds a game dinner at the church to promote his love of sportsmanship, hunting and shing, and invites everyone with a passion for the sport to join the free dinner. The assortment of game for the dinner ranged from sh to fowl and was provided by Brown. Most guests and family members said that Browns intentions are unmistakable; that his love of sportsmanship is only surpassed by his love for God, family and fellowship. Id like to thank all those who put in so much hard work to help put this together, especially those who cooked, Brown said. You cant go wrong with good food, good fellowship and the love of God. Get breaking news, videos, expanded stories, photo galleries, opinions & more...Follow Us On Facebook And Mobile Too!@WCN_HCT Connect With Us24/7www.bonifaynow.com 50www.bonifaynow.comWednesday, FEBRUARY 1 2012 Volume 121, Number 42For the latest breaking news, visitBONIFAYNOW.COM Phone: 850-547-9414 Web site: bonifaynow.com Fax: 850-547-9418 INDEXArrests .................................A3 Opinion ................................A4 Outdoors ..............................A6 Sports ..................................A7 Extra ....................................B1 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B6 IN BRIEF Florida Department of CorrectionsCARYVILLE As of today, Wednesday, Feb. 1, Caryville Work Camp is scheduled to close by mid-summer. As a result of declining prison admissions and excess bed space, the Florida Department of Corrections will be closing seven prisons and four work/forestry camps by July 1 as part of a statewide consolidation plan. No inmates will be released early as a result of this decision and there will remain adequate bed space to accommodate projected prison admissions, which have steadily decreased since FY 2007-08. Those prisons being closed are Broward Correctional Institution in Ft. Lauderdale, Demilly CI in Polk City, Gainesville CI in Alachua County, Hillsborough CI in Riverview, Indian River CI in Vero Beach, Jefferson CI in Monticello and New River CI (both units) in Raiford. In addition, River Junction Work Camp in Chattahoochee, Caryville Work Camp, near the Northwest Florida Reception Center in Washington County, Hendry Work Camp in Immokalee and Levy Forestry Camp near Lowell CI in Ocala will also be closed. Declining prison admissions has led to a surplus of prison beds, allowing us to pare down our budget shortfall by consolidating and closing our older, less ef cient facilities. We are committed to placing as many affected staff as possible in vacant positions for which they are quali ed, said Secretary of Florida Department of Corrections Ken Tucker. Inmates will be relocated to institutions with vacancies that meet their custody, pro le, health, education and risk assessment needs. To determine which prisons and facilities would be affected, Tucker assembled an internal workgroup of subject matter experts, who developed criteria for evaluating facilities based on several factors including: facility mission, cost per inmate, maintenance and construction costs, community and employee impact, inmate labor squads, security, education and programs and volunteers. These criteria were vetted through a variety of public and private sector entities. The department employed quantitative measures to create an institutional scoring sheet to objectively measure the pros and cons for each institution.State to close Caryville work campHolmes County Development CommissionA low existing industrial base, a large commuter population, resilient manufacturing; All of the above may be the secret to this countys lower-than-average unemployment rate. For whatever reason, Holmes County reported a December 2011 unemployment rate of 7.6 percent, about 2.3 percent lower than the state average and almost 1 percent lower than the national average. Holmes County Economic Development Commission executive director Jim Brook said he thinks that expanding existing industry might be a large part of the countys good unemployment gure, along with a major expansion to one multi-national company with a presence in Bonifay. LKQ, an automotive parts remanufacturer and re-seller completed an expansion of their Holmes County, facility in 2011 and created 21 new jobs. The existing 10,000 square foot facility was expanded by 20,000 square feet with a $1.3 million capital investment. We were very fortunate that LKQ decided to expand the Bonifay facility following a recent acquisition of a competing manufacturer and a re-shuf ing of their processing and distribution strategy. Coordinating with the Holmes County Planning Board and the Holmes County Board of County Commissioners, LKQ and the Holmes County Development Commission worked with the local and corporate of cials over several months preceding the expansion to navigate through land-use issues and the comprehensive plan to facilitate the project. There was some question for a while if the company was going to shutdown or choose to expand here, Brook said. I believe a friendly planning board, a pro-jobs county commission and the enterprise Growing industry key to countys lower unemploymentSee INDUSTRY A2By Cecilia SpearsStaff Writer cspears@chipleypaper.com Holmes County Election results are now available for viewing at www. bonifaynow.com. Unfortunately, the results werent available until after the publication date. Find out the presidential primary results online. Being an involved voter has become more and more important in todays world, said Debbie Wilcox Morris, Holmes County supervisor of elections. It is important for todays voters to be well informed in order to participate effectively in the elections process. The more you know in advance of election day, the more pleasant your voting experience will be. Also available are instructions on how to set up a default absentee ballot to arrive at your home every year. Coverage of upcoming local candidates and presidential progress will also be available as this years election progresses. For more information on voting, visit the supervisor of elections of cial website at www.holmeselections.com.Holmes County election results available onlineCommunity celebratesAnder Brown Day Below, Ander Brown (Left) enjoying time with family and friends.CECILIA SPEARS | Times-AdvertiserHolmes County Sports sign upsBONIFAY Holmes County Youth Sports will be holding baseball and softball sign ups from 9 a.m. to noon Feb. 4 at the Bonifay Middle School gym. Registration is $40. Online registration is available through Feb. 4 for players, coaches and umpires. A late fee of $10 will be added for players who register after Feb. 4. The Christian Rods & Customs Spring Warm Up Car ShowBONIFAY The Christian Rods & Customs, Holmes & Washington County Chapters will be hosting a Spring Warm Up Car Show Saturday, Feb. 4, at the First Baptist Church, 311 Waukesha St., to bene t the Pregnancy Centers in Holmes and Washington County. Admission is free for the public. Entry time for car enthusiasts who would like to show off their vehicles begins at 8 a.m. and costs $20. Prizes will include Top 20, Pregnancy Center Choice and door prizes. The awards will be announced at 2:30 p.m. There will be BBQ pork and chicken plates for sale for $5. Everyone can enter for a chance at the 50/50 drawing. For more information, call David Stull at 850768-2870. Hello from the Times-Advertiser new editor A4

PAGE 2

LocalA2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, February 1, 2012 Caregivers Available for SHUT-INS Trusted In-Home Care for Seniors of All Ages!25 Years Experience 7 Days a Week 24 Hours a Day Excellent References Commitment to Quality Care Compassionate, Skilled Caregivers Personal Care Transportation Errands Light Housekeeping Companionship Meal Preparation Emotional & Spiritual Support Gail Hall, Owner Home 850-482-5424 Cell 850-264-1793 Carol Hagin Cell 850-557-0085 Gails Sitting Agency Now Stocking Cross Ties and Concrete Blocks Gun ShowFebruary 11th & 12th Panama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds2077251Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 o r 2 Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING J.D. OWENS CARPET OUTLETwill save you money EVERYDAY!!! J.D. OWENS CARPET OUTLET2597SpringcreekRoad, Marianna, FL3 1/2 Miles East of Marianna on Hwy. 90 (850) 526-3619 Textured PlushCarpet796999Loose Lay Fiberglass BackVinylSuper Thick 13 Loose LayVinyl49FHA QualityVinylBoats, Pool, Patio TurfSF SF SF SF45SF zone helped to give Holmes County the nod. The county paved the unimproved access road leading to the facility. Holmes County offers a Rural Enterprise Zone program that provides incentives to industries that locate or expand in designated regions within the county. Expansion of other existing industry has helped to sustain Holmes County during uncertain economic times. Situated within Holmes County is an economic mini-cluster of precision metal parts and fabrication shops that continue to experience sustained or increased sales and demonstrate overall growth despite national downward economic trends. Each of these ve manufacturers, AUS Manufacturing, Environmental Supply and Manufacturing, Holmes Tool and Engineering, Johnson Laser Works and Man own Engineering, employ workers at higher than average wages (approximately $48,500), as compared to other nongovernment industries in the county. Each employs skilled machinists operating advanced technology such as CNC (computer numerically controlled) mills, lathes, water jets, plasma and laser cutters and other highly automated metal working machinery. For example, through principles established by the company in its earlier years, now de ned as lean manufacturing, and by leveraging talented machinists, new technology and strict quality systems, minority-owned Man own Engineering has been able to expand its core competencies thereby differentiating itself from its competitors. Holmes Tool, producing high precision machined parts and fabricated components for the power generating industry in its 20,000-square-foot machine and fabrication shop, is the second, largest employer in the county, just behind LKQ. AUS produces one-off and specialized production parts also for the utility industry as well as the military. Environmental Supply and Manufacturing has traditionally operated more production runs and supports more traditional manufacturers. All of the fabrication shops have, in the past or currently, supplied the military and military contractors, Brook said. At least two of the shops export to foreign markets and participated in the SBA Hub Zone program. The Hub Zone program has now sunset for Holmes County. Johnson Laser, located outside the state-line community of Esto, is a supplier to the larger fabrication shops. Brook said all of the companies, with the exception of Johnson Laser, are located in the Rural Enterprise Zone. These companies are a unique asset and, I believe, an opportunity to attract ancillary business and industry. For example, all of the companies have to ship their product out to a third party for heat-treating. Without exception, all of our industries operate quietly, without a lot of fanfare and attention, Brook said. Our fabrication micro-cluster does some amazing work and supplies quality product to large multinational companies as well as the military and the ever-important energy industry. These companies also offer relatively high wage jobs that require some computer training and manual competencies. At least twice over the past twelve months, I have seen help wanted signs for CNC machine operators at the plants. Holmes County is a traditionally rural area located in northwest Florida along the state-line with Alabama. LKQ is an example of the logistics and distribution target market actively pursued by Holmes County and other rural counties within Northwest Florida along Interstate 10. Holmes County boast the closest, undeveloped, interchange at I-10 leading to the new, Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport. he Holmes County Development Commission works under a memorandum of understanding as the designated local economic development organization charged with implementation of state programs with Enterprise Florida (EFI), is a member of Opportunity Florida and is a marketing participate with Floridas Great Northwest. INDUSTRY from page A1 Three teens from the Florida Music Education Association sang at the Bonifay Kiwanis Club luncheon on Wednesday, Jan. 25. These individuals were selected from more than 150 students from various schools located between Pensacola and Tallahassee. Christine Louen directed the music they sang. Bonifay Kiwanis is one of the largest particpating membership organizations in our area and invites anyone interested in becoming a member to contact us at 850-547-5363 or email kiwanis@bonifaykiwanis. org. BONIFAY KIWANIS HOSTS FMEA SUBMITTED PHOTOHolmes Council on Aging held their New Year and Birthday Dinner on Friday Jan. 27. We had a great dinner. A great big thank you to Gentiva Home Health for sponsoring the event and to Piggly Wiggly for donating the birthday cake. Celebrating their birthdays from left to right is Mattie Scarvey, Deloris Smith and Derotha Haney. (Not pictured: R. J. Carnley).HCCOA celebrates new year and January birthdays

PAGE 3

LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A3Wednesday, February 1, 2012 By Randal YakeyFlorida Freedom Newspapers PANAMA CITY Catholic Charities of Northwest Florida has launched a new program to assist struggling veterans with a grant through the Department of Housing and Urban Development and Veterans Affairs. The program, called VA Support Services for Veteran Families is a partnership between the VA, Families Count of Pensacola and Catholic Charities serving veterans in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Okaloosa, Walton and Washington counties. The goal of the program is to improve housing stability, to prevent at-risk families from becoming homeless and to provide supportive services to very low-income veterans and their families residing in or transitioning to permanent housing. Through community outreach and intensive case management, Catholic Charities will educate and assist participants to obtain military and civilian bene ts such as housing counseling, health care services, daily living services, transportation services, personal nancial planning services and child care services, to name a few. This really is for at-risk veterans, said Catholic Charities regional director Diane Williams in Panama City. Catholic Charities is the social ministry of the Catholic church in the 18-county region of Northwest Florida, whose mission is to serve vulnerable families. By Gov. Rick ScottWe recently learned Floridas unemployment rate decreased in December to 9.9 percent, down for the fourth straight month. Thats a 2.1-percent drop in points in a year. For the rst time in two-and-a-half years, Floridas unemployment number is in single digits. These numbers provide clear evidence Floridas economy is moving in the right direction. But most importantly, these numbers mean Floridians who didnt have jobs one year ago are now able to nd jobs. I am committed to working to make Florida the best place to start, grow or move a business so that every Floridian who wants a job has the opportunity to get to work. As one of the nations leaders in job creation, Florida totaled 141,500 private-sector jobs last year. Thats almost 12,800 new jobs every month. In December alone, Florida added more than 5,000 private-sector jobs at a rate of more than 12 jobs for every job that was lost as local, state and federal governments trimmed their workforce in order to live within their means. Floridas lower unemployment rate is proof businesses, not governments, create jobs, and it is Floridians who deserve the credit. With the help of the Legislature, I am committed to making changes that continue moving Florida in the right direction. I am focused on streamlining government, removing barriers to job creation, eliminating burdensome regulations and keeping the cost of living as low for families and businesses. There still is much work to be done. We must build on our success and ensure the short-term and long-term success of Floridas businesses. Our achievements must serve as a platform for attracting new businesses to Florida from around the world. I have no doubt Florida can be the No. 1 destination for global business. To achieve that goal, we must have the best educated workforce with the skills necessary to compete in our 21st century global economy. A good education is essential to getting a good job, so I have proposed adding $1 billion for K-12 education. This is the third largest amount of state funding for K-12 in the past decade. To ensure we do not let the children of our state down, I will not sign any budget into law that does not contain signi cantly more state dollars for education than we had last year. The Florida House of Representatives shares my vision and has allocated more than $1 billion for education. I am grateful for their support for the young people of our state. Another step that will make Florida a better place for business is to make sure we focus on the transportation projects that are best for Florida. Preparing Floridas ports for increased trade from the expanded Panama Canal and free trade agreements will ensure Florida is a global trading hub and attract businesses to our state from across the world. Florida already is the top tourist destination, and we are well on our way to being the leading place for business. We are making great progress in the Sunshine State, and I look forward to working closely with the Legislature to identify ways to ensure that every Floridian that wants a job, can get one. I remain focused on three things: making sure Floridas children can receive a good education, making sure that Floridians can nd a job and keeping the cost of living low in our state. Please share your ideas with me by emailing Rick. Scott@eog.my orida.com. Working together, we can get Florida back to work! Jan. 15 Jan. 21Scott Dewayne Adams, 36, Violation of probation on worthless checks Travis Worley Adams, 33, Manufacturing Methamphetamine, Possession of paraphernalia, Possession of controlled substance Carlos Anderson, 23, Hold for Hillsborough Deandre Belim, 37, Hold for Miami Dade Casie Lynn Brannon-Pelham, 23, Manufacturing Methamphetamine, Possession of paraphernalia, Possession of controlled substance David Waylon Carnley, 41, Driving while license suspended or revoked, Tag not assigned Spencer Klay Childress, 21, Hold for Hillsborough Jeannie Currington, 34, Violation of probation on shoplifting Ricky George Everett, 43, Child support, Driving while license suspended or revoked, Attached tag not assigned Harold Anthony Fish, 55, Violation of injunction Courtland Armao Freeman, 24, Hold for Hillsborough James Clarin Gregory, 65, Hold for Washington and Jackson Counties Harold Dwayne Harper, 27, Hold for prison transport service Dawn Sondra McCullough, 50, Hold for prison transport service Oscar Molina, 26, Hold for Hillsborough Terry Eugene Moore, 30, Hold for outside agency Salvador Mathew Reyes, 21, Violation of probation on possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, Violation of probation on possession of paraphernalia Pedro Robles Saucedo, 48, Hold for outside agency Shane Adam Warren, 26, Possession of drug equipment, Possession of amphetamine Derek Sterling Watson, 29, Hold for outside agency Steven Grady Webster, 41, Improper tag John D. Whitaker, 62, Hold for Hillsborough Mark Fredrick Zabkiewicz, 30, Hold for prison transport services Jan. 17 Jan. 20MarriagesThere were no marriages reported this week.DivorcesJames Ryan Rogers and April Rogers Harlen Wade Stephens and Lisa StephensThe Holmes District School System would like to acknowledge and thank Mr. Robert (Buddy) Skipper of the Noma Community for his donation of $7,000 to the District. Mr. Skipper presented the gift to the School Board at the January 17th Board Meeting to be used to bene t the students of Holmes County. Mr. Skipper has a history of being a supportive gure of the school system and this is just the latest example of his many endeavors to do so. HOLMES SCHOOL SYSTEM DONATIONCONTRIBUTED PHOTO Holmes County ARREST REPORT HOLMES COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE Marriages & DIVORCESFloridians are getting back to the workforce LEARN MOREFor more information about the program, contact the VA Support Services for Veteran Families team for Bay, Holmes, Gulf, Jackson and Washington counties at 850-7630475. For Okaloosa and Walton counties, call 850-763-0475.Program aims to prevent homelessness among vets In December alone, Florida added more than 5,000 private-sector jobs at a rate of more than 12 jobs for every job that was lost as local, state and federal governments trimmed their workforce in order to live within their means. Rick Scott Florida governor

PAGE 4

Things to rememberLearning of the death of my former teacher, Pauline Russ Baragona Cook Shores brought back memories of my school days. When I entered seventh grade at Vernon High School in the fall of 1943, I was still very much the skinny little kid from Brackin School who scarcely knew which big yellow bus to get on in the afternoons. Of course big brother Perry, older sister Minnie Lee, younger brothers Clyde and Max were also on the bus, so it wasnt as big a deal for me as it was when our Brackin teacher resigned toward the end of the previous school year and Clyde, Max and I had to enroll at Vernon. That year I had Mrs. Bessie Alma Pippin who paddled kids every Friday who didnt pass the spelling test. I squeaked by without a paddling. Seventh grade started with a substitute teacher for home room and science. When our teacher came several weeks after schools opening, I was very much in awe of her as her appearance at school was delayed by the wartime death of her young husband and the birth of their child. I think I only had Mrs. Pauline Baragona for study hall in the 8th grade where I had loosened up quite a bit and loved to talk a lot and get out of my seat in the auditorium where we had study hall and go to the pencil sharpener so that I could wink at the older boys as I returned to my seat. In the 9th grade, however, Miss Pauline was my biology teacher and my home economics teacher. I learned to outline as she taught how the plant and animal kingdoms are organized. I was a top student in that class, but although Id always had chores at home, especially in the kitchen, I was not a top student in home economics. In cooking, the rst thing we had to make was a salad. I found the easiest one, sunshine salad. All I had to do was place some lettuce on a salad plate, separate the slices of an orange or grapefruit, place them on top of the lettuce and drizzle with bottled French dressing. I was quite proud of my salad until Mrs. Baragona pointed out that I was supposed to section the orange. She explained that sectioning and separating werent the same thing. Cooking classes got better, but sewing was a disaster. We had to do a unit on childcare and then make a baby garment by hand, including handmade buttonholes. I still have that white batiste buttondownthefront baby gown on which my home economics teacher had the audacity to give my a D minus. I also remember the skirt we had to make. It had to have at least four gores and a zipper. Money was scarce and fabric was hard to nd in those post war years, so Mama bought me some navy and white print seersucker. I used someones 8-gore pattern in about a size 18, I think. It was so big, I had to keep taking up the seams; then we had to pink the seams with a hand-turned gadget called a pinking machine and I accidentally cut holes in the skirt. It was no big loss, however, because no one would have worn it to a dog ght. With some help from my cousin Lenora I did make one garment that I actually wore though it was far from perfect. It had a red cotton bodice with a red and white print feed sack skirt. A red ruf e went around the front and came up to the waist in the back, sort of an apron effect. Never mind that the gathers werent even and the ruf e was a little off center. You cant spot aws in a prancing horse, according to my friend Lorna Raper. The pedal sewing machine and I had a running battle. It wanted to go backward for some reason. Mrs. Cook, as Pauline had become by the tenth grade, said that it was because I talked instead of concentrating on making the pedal go in the right direction. Mrs. Cook tried to offer us country kids a little culture. We had a formal tea to which our mothers were invited. I dont remember getting a new dress myself, but I remember as if it were today what my Mama wore. She didnt intend for the town ladies to look any better than she did. She had a new little black dress with a two-layered skirt, crepe trimmed in satin. Her hat was a knock out. Kind of a pillbox style black straw with pink and fuchsia silk owers. And Gloves. Of course gloves. Pink gloves. We were proud of our little ve foot tall Mama. I am sure that Mrs. Pauline Russ Baragona Cook never gave another thought to the grief that my cousin Loriene Cook Kosier and I gave her with our talking and giggling in class, and I know I never apologized. But having taught all of the grades, seven through 12, I was duly punished for any of my bad behavior. I also know that teachers dont hold grudges. We are just happy to see former students and know that they have become selfsupporting, law abiding citizens. After the death of her husband, Tom Cook, she married Gene Shores and later retired. Even after all those years of teaching, Mrs. Pauline never stopped. She was honored last spring at the District Garden Club for 50 years service to the Vernon Garden Club. I was proud to be there and say that I was one of her former students. My 6th grade teacher, Mrs. Bessie Pippin Marshal, was also in attendance at that meeting. My thanks to both these ladies for the influence that you had on my life. Dear Editor, Im ashamed to be a card-carrying member of the Republican Party. Are Romney and Gingrich the best we can put up as our nominee? Do we, as a party, really feel that the lesser of two evils is the best way to select a Presidential candidate? Our debates have deteriorated to an endless, pointless, barrage of mud-slinging; never any real detailed debate over issues. This really depresses me. Mr. O must be loving it, as he will have all the mud he needs when it comes to mud-slinging time in November.Bill FordBonifay LETTER TO THE EDITORThe more things change, the more they stay the same. A year ago, I was managing editor of the Washington County Newspapers not in Florida, but in Washington County, Ark. As of Monday, my job title became managing editor of the Washington County News and the Holmes County Times-Advertiser, but while the title is the same, my latitude changed quite a bit. My wife and I packed up and moved to Chipley this past weekend so I could take the position as managing editor of Washington County News and Holmes County Times-Advertiser. In a nutshell, I began my journalism career in high school, then after a stint in the Navy, I returned to Arkansas State University for my degree in journalism. I have worked as editor at weekly papers in Eureka Springs, Ark., Dumas, Ark., and of course in Washington County. The paper was in the city of Lincoln, population 2,100. I began the process of moving to the tri-county area back before Christmas, but the holidays slowed down the process and I wasnt able to see Chipley until early January when I flew down to visit. It was pretty much love at first sight for me, and I couldnt wait until I was bringing my better half, Shannon, down to see this region. I kept trying to come up with an Arkansas correlation, but there wasnt really anything quite to match Chipley. To this newbie, the city has a quiet, beach-like charm in the architecture and a grand sense of southern hospitality. Spanish moss and palm trees are the biggest tip-off I am not in Arkansas anymore. Washington County, Ark., is home to the city of Fayetteville and the University of Arkansas, which of course is home to the Arkansas Razorbacks, which is the states No. 1 team. The Hogs did very well in the SEC this past season. My alma mater is Arkansas State University, however, which is in northeast Arkansas and is home to the Red Wolves, which play in the Sun Belt Conference. Everyone I have met so far in my three-day residency here has been very gregarious Sunday night we dined at KFC and I was impressed with one of the young ladies behind the counter who is planning a new career as a nurse, beginning her training this week at WashingtonHolmes Technical Center. I havent gotten to explore much of Holmes County yet, although I came down from Montgomery via U.S. Highway 231, so I got to see much of the countryside. Still, I have yet to get to come meet many residents. If you see me out and about, feel free to stop and say hello. I am looking forward to meeting as many folks as I can and becoming a part of the community. My philosophy on community newspapers such as ours is that the newspaper is the collective story of not only the city or the county government, but its the story of all of us, and I am looking forward to telling as many of our stories as possible. Since I am new here, I am asking for your help in telling the tri-county story. Email me at rseyler@chipleypaper.com about your lives Im interested in everything. Jobs, hobbies, churches and church happenings, county history If you think it should be in the paper, drop me a note or give me a call 638-0212. Im looking forward to reading, and writing, about you. New editor joins newspapers staffDeath of Shores brings many memories of VHS OpinionA4 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, February 1, 2012CONTACTUSPUBLISHER Nicole Bare eld: nbare eld@chipleypaper.com NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION news@bonifaynow.com CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION Melissa Kabaci: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com 1-800-645-8688 ADVERTISING 850-547-9414 The views expressed here are not necessarily those of this paper or Freedom Communications. WANT MORE?Find us online at chipleypaper.com friend us on Facebook or tweet us @WCN_HCT POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Holmes County Times-Advertiser P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425 USPS 004-341 SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN COUNTY 13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks: $18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45 OUT OF COUNTY 13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks: $24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc., 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida. Copyright 2012, Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc. All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Holmes County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the expressed permission of Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc. Nicole P. Bare eld, Publisher Cameron Everett, Production SupervisorHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions of news stories are welcomed. Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling, clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers are asked to provide a home address and daytime telephone number (neither is printed) for veri cation purposes. Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper. com. Please specify if the letter should be printed in the Washington County News or Holmes County Times-Advertiser. Questions? Call 638-0212. HAPPY CORNERHazel Wells Tison Personal property crimes are some of the most frequently reported crimes both locally and nationwide during this time of yet. The increase in criminal activity is compounded by the unstable economy and the higher than normal scrap metal value. For criminals, property crime, now more than ever, is a very lucrative business. The Washington County Sheriffs Of ce would like to ask residents to continue to be vigilant to both protect themselves and be aware of anything suspicious in their neighborhoods. Please take the time secure your belongings. If you feel you are a victim of a scam or would like to report suspicious activity please contact the Washington County Sheriffs Of ce at 638-8477. Lock your doors and windows Record serial numbers and photograph item of value Mark items with a personal identi cation number or logo Be mindful of your routines, make changes periodically Get to know and communicate with your neighbors Report suspicious people or vehicles (day or night) Be active in your neighborhood crime watch Be mindful of package deliveries (USPS, UPS, FedEx, etc.) Pay special attention to storage facilities, check regularly Community ALERT My philosophy on community newspapers such as ours is that the newspaper is the collective story of not only the city or the county government, but its the story of all of us, and I am looking forward to telling as many of our stories as possible. RANDAL SEYLEREditorI am sure that Mrs. Pauline Russ Baragona Cook never gave another thought to the grief that my cousin Loriene Cook Kosier and I gave her with our talking and giggling in class, and I know I never apologized. But having taught all of the grades, seven through 12, I was duly punished for any of my bad behavior.

PAGE 5

LocalHolmes County Times-Advertiser | A5Wednesday, February 1, 2012 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." www.mulliseye.com Chipley Office We are located directly across the parking lot from the Walmart in Chipley"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS,CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITYAPPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D. In Our Chipley OfficeBoard Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-638-7220 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 2-29-12 FREEEYE EXAM CODE: WC00ToddRobinson,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeon LeeMullis,M.D.BoardCertified Eye Physician and CataractSurgeon March 9,10,11, 2012 The Bay County FairgroundsRegister now for booth space at the 2012 Home & Garden Expo in Panama City, FL. Share your home improvement products, services, and enhancements with thousands of families in the Bay area looking to renovate, decorate, and landscape their homes. All vendors receive a FREEquarter-page ad in the official 2012 Home & Garden Expo program, reaching more than 80,000 adults in Bay and seven surrounding counties. For vendor application or information on the show: Call: 850.763.8618, or email: expostradeshows@aol.com Space Is Limited, So Reserve Yours NOW! For sponsorship information call: 850.763.6587For additional advertising information in the official program of the 2012 Home and Garden Expo, contact The News Herald at 850-747-5025 SPONSORS CALL TO ALL VENDORS Financing Available See Store for Details www.Beltone.comChipley, FL 1611 Main Street Ste. 4(850) 387-4931Marianna, FL 3025 6th Street(850) 387-4931The benets of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing evaluation and proper t. Discounts off MSRP Previous purchases excluded. For a limited time. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Exp. 2-3-12.Boo boo nada mime?Do you have the time? Now through Feb. 8, 2012SAVE on a Beltone TrueTMSystem$800 OFFWhen you or someone you know has a hard time understanding the sounds of voice, even simple sentences can be misunderstood. This is just one of the specialized hearing problems we solve. Beltones True MIC We hid it for you. Clear and natural sound, virtually eliminating wind noise. Special to the NewsLaurence Paul Cutts father was a beekeeper, so it came as a natural progression that he would follow in his fathers footsteps. At 16, Cutts began raising queens to sell. This grew into a business in which he produced and sold honey and provided bees for pollination for various crops in Florida, Alabama and Georgia. He worked in this business until 1985, when he accepted a position with the state of Florida overseeing the states apiary inspections. During his employment with the state, the varroa mite and small hive beetle were creating major problems for beekeepers throughout the state. Laurence was instrumental in bringing the need for research to reduce beehive losses to the forefront. Throughout his tenure with the state, he was always accessible to both commercial and independent beekeepers with unlimited advice and direction. A commercial beekeeper with more than 8,000 hives once remarked that without Cutts, he would have lost everything. He recently invented and is marketing a new beetle trap through various bee supply companies in the United States. This trap promises to be a better deterrent for the small hive beetle. Laurence was known as a leader in the states beekeeping industry and as such was a much sought-after speaker and teacher. Because of his leadership, determination and experience, Florida remains a leader in agricultural production. Without honey bees pollinating Florida crops, this state would be unable to produce the quantity and quality of various agricultural products it does today.Local beekeeper inducted into Agricultural Hall of Fame LAURENCE PAUL CUTTS Congratulations to Januarys Coloring Contest winners! The Grand Prize Winner who will receive a $10 gift certi cate to Walmart is Dylan Baldwin, 6, of Ponce de Leon. First-place winner in the 7-9 age group is Rayna Little eld, 7, of Bonifay. Thank you to al those who participated, and we look forward to all future entries. February COLORING CONTEST DYLAN BALDWIN, 6Ponce de LeonRAYNA LITTLEFIELD, 7Bonifay Its Coloring Contest time again! Submit your childs colored picture by Friday, Feb. 24. There will be a winner selected from each child group to run in the paper and a grand prize of a $10 Walmart gift card for one lucky individual. Children groups are ages 2-3, 4-6, 7-9 and 10-12. Winners will be announced and printed Wednesday, Feb. 29. Entries can be mailed or taken to your local newspaper of ce: Washington County News, 1364 N. Railroad Ave., Chipley, FL 32428; or Holmes County Times-Advertiser, 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL 32425.Name:________________________________________ Age:_________ City:_________________________ Phone number:___________________ (phone numbers will not be printed; used for contact purposes only) JANUARY WINNERS

PAGE 6

OUTDOORS Wednesday, February 1, 2012 Page 6www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comSend your Outdoors news to news@chipleypaper.com ASection Can you believe it? Spanish mackerel in January? Most every year in March everyone goes to bed like a kid excitingly waiting for Santa Claus on Christmas Day, except in this case these shermen are waiting for the spring run of Spanish mackerel. This year the wait was over sort of early. A whole two months to be exact. On both big piers, the city and M.B. Miller, Spanish mackerel were caught this past week. I wouldnt put too much stock in the fact it appears they have arrived early this year, because they are just holdovers from last year. If we ever get some cold weather it will drive down the water temperature and they will be as hard to nd as your brother-in-law who owes you money. Another sh that is a holdover from last year is the pompano. They have been catching pompano off the beaches all winter. These pompano arent the biggest ones I have seen, but you should not have to measure them. When Phillips Inlet opened recently thousands of juvenile pompano emptied into the Gulf. Im sure some of the pompano being caught are some of those. These pompano have been trapped in the inlet since summer waiting to get back to the Gulf. The old reliable whiting also are biting in certain spots on the beach including the cement piers. Red sh seem to come and go as they please and a few are being caught when they pass under the piers. I have noticed that normally a red sh caught from a boat has to be more than 18 inches and under 27 inches. Not so it seems if caught off the beach. If it can t in the cooler or even if it cant it never seems to nd its way back to the water. At least not with the crew shing down my way. Another sh that is being caught and seen under the piers is sheepshead, another March sh. They also are caught beginning in March when they come to spawn around the jetties and wrecks in shallow water. I know the Gulf is warm for January, but water temperature is not the only factor that pushes these sh to spawn. The length of the day or amount of sunlight also is an indicator. If you are tired of sitting in the woods and not seeing a deer, pick up the rod go shing. At least until it turns cold again.Hooked on Outdoors & & Brought home a big buck or sh? Submit your hunting and shing photos to outdoors@pcnh. com.Hook harvest Outdoor LifeScott Lindseycaptainlindsey@ knology.net SPECIAL TO FLORIDA FREEDOM NEWSPAPERS | Bill Bartush.Whitetail deer were once rare in the state but not anymore. Hunters are able to be more selective in which deer to remove from the herd.By Stan KirklandFWC Deer hunters love to reminisce about past hunting seasons and big deer some that got away and others that now adorn their walls. What hunters new to the sport might not realize is how much deer hunting has changed, particularly in Florida, over the past three to four decades. Going back even further, whitetailed deer were practically eliminated from Florida in the early 1900s because of over exploitation, eradication efforts in South Florida associated with the cattle fever tick, and losses to the screwworm. It wasnt until the 50s and 60s that deer were stocked by the then-Game and Freshwater Fish Commission in various places and deer populations began to rebuild. This also was aided by increased enforcement of game laws. When deer hunting seasons resumed in the 50s and 60s, most hunters hunted deer the only way anyone in the South knew how with hounds. They used mostly walker hounds and sometimes beagles. Every hunter wanted dogs with a good nose, dogs that would cold trail and bark when the deer jumped. If all went according to plan, the deer ran by members of the hunting party on stand. They shot at the bucks and the does went by untouched. At least that was the plan. When Floridas human population was relatively low in the 1960s and 70s, deer dog incursions on private property were infrequent enough that deer dog hunting continued unabated. The 80s and 90s however, brought change. As Floridas population increased and more and more people moved to rural areas, complaints about deer dog hunting increased. In response, the GFC prohibited the hunting groups from taking stands on most roads across the state, whether they were county-maintained dirt roads or paved highways. Beginning in 2005, hunting parties were required to register their hunting lands with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, a move to show the landowner was okay with deer dog hunting on their property. The changes in deer dog hunting in Florida and other Southern states loosely corresponded to an upsurge in deer still-hunting. Still-hunting usually involved a hunter in a tree stand or in a ground blind waiting for a deer to pass. Today, deer dog hunting is still alive and well on private lands, albeit not to the extent as years past, and on public areas managed by the FWC. However, the majority of deer hunters now are still-hunters. Every outdoors TV program about deer hunting features still-hunting. At the same time, hunters and landowners today are more interested in managing their deer. Theyve learned they can generally support so many deer on the property and they work with the FWC to remove both does and mature bucks. The proof that deer management is working in Florida is the incredible number of above-average bucks measured for the Florida Buck Registry. DEER HUNTING DEER HUNTING Changing times inWhen deer hunting seasons resumed in the s and s, most hunters hunted deer the only way anyone in the South knew how with hounds. They used mostly walker hounds and sometimes beagles.KACEY STEPHENS | The Deer ShackThis trophy buck was brought into The Deer Shack last week by a hunter who didnt care to share where you can nd deer like that.KACEY STEPHENS | The Deer Shack Richard Warmack, right, and his son Isaac, took this deer in the Greenhead area last week.

PAGE 7

CHAMPIONSHIP GOLFCURRENT SPECIALS18 Holes with cart Seniors 55+Mon-Fri 23.26+Tax Seniors 55+Weekends & Hol.26.98+Tax Under 55Mon-Fri26.98+Tax Under 55Weekends & Hol.30.70+TaxTwilight Rate All Players Mon-Fri After 1:00 PM20.93 + Tax Kids under 12 always play free with paying adultPLAY ALL DAY39.50 + TaxOFFERS EXPIRE February 29, 2012 FULLY OVERSEEDED TEES & GREENS Well Worth The Drive 5248 Clubhouse Drive Marianna, FL 32446 800-587-6257 www.indianspringsgolfcourse.net For the BEST DEAL Around Come and Play in Bonifaywww.dogwoodlakesgc.com DOGW D LAKES Golf Club850-547-GOLF 800-545-03221934 COUNTRY CLUB DR. BONIFAY, FL $20 +taxEvery Day in FebruaryOver-seeded greens, tees and fairwaysNo Spin the Wheel in February. Call for tee times. SP O RTS www.bonifaynow.comWednesday, February 1, 2012 APage 7SectionFlorida Freedom NewspapersGallaghers Gymnastics mens team recently competed at the O Zone Invitational in Knoxville, Tenn., while the womens team was in Tallahassee and PCB Elite cheerleaders performed in Daytona Beach. In Knoxville, at the largest mens gymnastics invitational in the Southeast, Andrew Hess led the way in Level 8 capturing rst place in the oor, rings and parallel bars. His efforts catapulted him into a rst-place nish in the all-around. In Level 9, 13-year-old Paxton Peacock placed rst on rings and earned second on pommel horse and parallel bars to win all-around in the age 12-13 group. Peacock had the highest all-around score of Level 9 athletes, a total of 49 boys in all age groups. In Level 10, the highest Junior Olympic level, Alexander Hess was fourth on pommel horse and sixth on vault. The Arnold sophomore placed 14th all-around. Level 6 gymnast Trent Bawcom placed fth on oor and rings and 10th all-around. In the older age group, Cameron Nagy was seventh on oor and 10th all-around. Gallaghers Level 5 team of Cole Nagy, Alex Creswell, Eli Creswell and Austin Smith placed sixth in a eld of 13. Smith placed fth on pommel horse, third on rings and seventh all-around. Eli Creswell was second on horse and ninth all-around and Alex Creswell sixth on both vault and parallel bars. In Tallahassee, Nadya Parsons, Eliza Sims, Madalyn Ward, Grace Andes and Lena Ottinger competed in their rst competition. In Level 4, Ottinger was fth on balance beam. Also competing in the AAU State Quali er, Level 4 gymnast Sydney Melvin was second on vault, beam, oor and all-around. In Level 5, Kirsten Bjerkeset was second on beam. Ammy Castillo and Aliza Molnar competed in their rst Level 7 meet. Molnar nished second on beam and all-around and third on vault, bars and oor. Castillo won the bars title. At The State hosted by American Championships in Daytona, Gallaghers competitive cheer team, PCB Elite, took sixth out of more than 100 teams. It will compete in the National Championships in March in Orlando.By Jason ShootFlorida Freedom Newspapers PONCE DE LEON Tim Alford, as should be expected, saw signs for concern long before his players did. Now in his 17th season coaching the Ponce de Leon girls basketball team, Alford watched his players head into the holiday break with a 14-0 record. Two stunning losses at a tournament in Freeport in late December, however, stripped away a layer of overcon dence that Alfords players now readily admit was hindering the team. You can tell there is a big difference between the beginning of the year and where we are now, senior point guard Kate Carroll said. Those two losses during Christmas break got our attention. The Pirates havent lost since, rolling up a 21-2 record this season, including a 10-0 run through District 3-1A. Everything was different, junior Jordan Thomas said of bouncing back from losses against Cookeville (Tenn.) and Paxton. You could tell a whole lot changed. We were all on the same page, and its easier playing that way. You could watch our tapes (early in the season), and you could tell our defense was getting worse. Defense is our main priority. Like coach Alford said, Defense never lets you down. Our shots will fall. If PDL advances out of the District 3-1A tournament set to begin on Monday in Cottondale, it will extend a streak of seven consecutive years that the Pirates have reached regional play in the postseason. Since the 2004-05 season, PDL has quali ed for two state semi nals, one regional nal, three regional semi nals and one regional quarter nal. Ask Alfords players about that string of success and theyll give you myriad answers that all nd their way back to the same central gure: Tim Alford. Two key gures on this years Pirates team, Thomas and fellow junior Ashley Harper, once had reasons not to play basketball for Alford. That was before they got to know him, of course. Coach Alford, I consider him one of my best friends, said Thomas, who lives minutes away from Walton High in DeFuniak Springs but makes the daily trip for school at PDL. I can talk to him about anything. Harpers older sister, Hillary, capped her own remarkable career in a Pirates uniform last year. Growing up behind her, Ashley was cognizant that expectations consequently would be higher for her, too. It felt like I was following in her footsteps, Harper said. I didnt want to play basketball because of that. I didnt want to be compared to her. Harper said she changed her tune after she saw how Hillary interacted with Alford on and off the court. Alfords in uence was a positive one, and Harper decided she would try to carve her own path on the basketball court at PDL. Hes always on me about being lazy or not doing something right, Harper said behind a smile and a laugh. He didnt take it easy on me. Alford has bene ted from Ponce de Leons long-standing merger of the towns middle school and high school. He knows what sort of player he has coming down the pipeline as much as three years before that player has entered her rst varsity game. Im fortunate theyre on our campus in sixth grade, Alford said. Everything they do in middle school is leading up to what will eventually happen (on varsity). Its not as advanced, but the things we want them to know, they get early. Jazz Flock, a 6-foot senior who can play in the post and step out and knock down shots from the perimeter, arrived at PDL in eighth grade. An Indiana native, Flock joined Carroll as ninth-graders on the Pirates varsity squad. He calls it out, Flock said, and we know exactly what to do. Flocks all-around game gives the Pirates options on offense that most other Class 1A schools cant duplicate. She can back down smaller players into the post, and she can take taller, slower players outside, where she can hoist a jumper or take her defender off the dribble. Flocks emergence as a go-to player offensively was made more important when the teams expected starter at shooting guard, Jaicee Mayo, tore a knee ligament in the nal practice before the season began. Carroll also is a stabilizing force on the oor, offering a wheelbarrow full of experience and leadership. Its a big obligation, Carroll said of living up to the programs past success, which includes two state titles. De nitely expectations are always high. But its not just the pressure of the past we put on ourselves. Its this year, too. The Pirates are hopeful they will get another shot at Paxton, which plays in District 1-1A and beat PDL 49-36 on Dec. 30. If those teams do square off again, theyll meet in the Class 1A state semi nals with a berth in the championship game at stake. The Pirates, as they learned once (or twice) from their two defeats, are aware that considerable work remains before that opportunity potentially presents itself. Before we lost we thought we could get by with anything, Harper said. We went out there thinking we had it. When we got beat we realized we have to start working hard. Its been tough, but its been worth it. Added Carroll: I cant say for sure where were going. ... But well work for it every day. PDL focus strong for postseason By Cathrine LambEditorial Assistant Clamb@chipleypaper.com Danica Sue Patrick, better known to NASCAR fans as simply Danica, was born on March 25, 1982, in Beloit, WI. She now lives in Phoenix, Ariz., with her husband. Even though she is not the only woman to have been in NASCAR she is one of the few. The rst was Louise Smith which won more than 30 races in the 1940a. Danica started her career at the age of 10 Kart Racing. She was the rst woman to lead at the Indy 500 in 2009. Danica will be running 10 races in the #10 car in the Sprint Cup Series for Stewart-Hess Racing, and fulltime in the #7 Go Daddy car for JR Motor Sports. Patrick has announced that she will be taking a year off from the Indy 500 so she will be able to race in the Coke 400 the two races are being run on the same day. In her personal life she says she will drive anything fast and black, but she dose her errands in a Acura MDX. Danicas hobbies are working out, traveling, nice dinners and laughing. Danica says her most memorable moment was leading the Indy 500. Next week I will be doing Cathrines Pit Stop on the history of NASCAR. Cathrines PIT STOPA look at a legend in the making AP PHOTOSDanica Patrick in her garage during NASCAR auto racing testing at the Daytona International Speedway on Jan. 12 in Daytona Beach. Gallaghers Hess leads group at gymnasts event Thursday, January 19, 2012 | The News Herald | Page C3 Girls basketballScoring Player Gms. Pts Avg. Smith W 8152 19.0 Beach Bz 14245 17.5 Ware M 20296 14.8 Canfield M 20290 14.5 Adams NB 10120 12.0 Culpepper NB 9819.0 Farris NB 10686.8 Trzaska M 201236.2 Smith M 201175.9 Baker W 2105.0 Goodin M 16784.9 White M 20954.8 Parker W 7334.7 Baucom Bz 14644.5 Penning NB 10444.4 Abbasi NB 10424.2 Ross M 20542.7 Walding W 7192.7 Koonce Bz 14332.3 Gaddis NB 10202.0 Lanier W 7121.7 Plummer Bz 14161.1 Owens W 44 1.0 Byram NB 74 0.6 Ramey M 74 0.6 Whitfield Bz 147 0.5 Trumbull NB 42 0.5 Howerton Bz 146 0.4 Ellis M 125 0.4 Dudinsky NB 62 0.3 Barton NB 92 0.3 Rebounding Player Gms. No. Avg. Canfield M 20231 11.6 Abbasi NB 10898.9 Lanier W 7527.4 Smith M 201457.3 Plummer Bz 14976.9 Baucom Bz 14805.7 White M 201015.1 Goodin M 16825.1 Walding W 7355.0 Baker W 2105.0 Penning NB 10474.7 Smith W 8354.4 Beach Bz 14523.7 Ware M 20723.6 Whitfield Bz 14473.3 Adams NB 10292.9 Culpepper NB 9262.9 Barton NB 9242.7 Trzaska M 20492.5 Koonce Bz 14332.3 Ross M 20412.1 Farris NB 10191.9 Gaddis NB 10181.8 Byram NB 7121.7 Howerton Bz 14191.3 King NB 33 1.0 Ellis M 12110.9 Ramey M 76 0.9 Duchene Bz14100.7 Dudinksy NB 64 0.7 Parker W 74 0.6 Trumbull NB41 0.3 Saults NB51 0.2 Assists Player Gms. No. Avg. Walding W7588.3 Lanier W 7334.7 Farris NB 10414.1 Baker W 28 4.0 Smith W 8273.4 Trzaska M 20623.1 Baucom Bz 14412.9 Beach Bz 14392.7 Parker W 7162.3 Canfield M 20412.1 White M 20402.0 Ware M 20402.0 Adams NB 10181.8 Koonce Bz 14211.5 Smith M 20281.4 Goodin M 16211.3 Culpepper NB 9121.3 Plummer Bz 14171.2 Ellis M 12110.9 Ross M 20150.8 Penning NB 107 0.7 Howerton Bz 147 0.5 Abbasi NB 105 0.5Boys basketballScoring Player Gms. Pts Avg. W.Rogers At 11182 16,5 K.Rogers At 11162 14.7 Jackson A 16171 10.7 Harrell Bz 19196 10.3 Adams Bz 191739.1 Davison A 171498.8 Warner At 11948.5 Lott A 171418.3 Oatis A 9667.3 Flowers Bz 191367.1 Granville Bz 191316.8 Suttles Bz 191135.9 Waddell Bz 191005.2 Nowells A 17774.5 Gutierrez Bz 17774.5 Stewart A 17673.9 Smedley A 17653.8 Murray A 17603.5 Mayo Bz 14412.9 Feitzel A 8121.5 Peltonen Bz 11131.2 Nicholson A 95 0.6 Kirkland Bz 72 0.3 Winters Bz 81 0.1 Rebounding Player Gms. Pts Avg. Davison A 17925.4 Jackson A 16875.4 Flowers Bz 19955.0 Harrell Bz 19844.4 Adams Bz 19804.2 Lott A 17673.9 Stewart A 17513.0 Nowells A 17462.7 Waddell Bz 19482.5 Mayo Bz 14362.5 Granville Bz 19462.4 Gutierrez Bz 17402.3 Smedley A 17321.9 Murray A 17321.9 Feitzel A 8151.9 Gay Bz 69 1.5 Suttles Bz 19140.7 Kirkland Bz 75 0.7 Nicholson A 94 0.4 Peltonen Bz 114 0.4 Freeman Bz 81 0.1 Assists Player Gms. Pts Avg. Lott A 17553.2 Harrell Bz 19542.8 Smedley A 17362.1 Waddell Bz 19371.9 Murray A 17271.6 Adams Bz 19291.5 Granville Bz 19251.3 Davison A 17191.1 Nowells A 17130.8 Jackson A 16120.8 Stewart A 17110.6 Suttles Bz 19110.6 Winters Bz 84 0.5 Flowers Bz 197 0.4 Nicholson A 94 0.4 Feitzel A 83 0.4 Gutierrez Bz 175 0.3 Peltonen Bz 113 0.3Girls soccerScoring Player Gls. Ast. Tot. Vogler M 231134 Ki.Crowley A 205 25 Nohmer A 212 23 Hall Bz 184 22 Jones PSJ 157 22 Bates M 21214 Vickers M 84 12 Strippling PSJ 75 12 Johnson Bz 66 12 Ke.Crowley A 83 11 Wood PSJ 73 10 McGhee PSJ 72 9 Bennett M 62 8 ORourke Bz 53 8 Thomas M 44 8 Thompson M 52 7 Buttram M 43 7 Mullins M 34 7 Laine PSJ 60 6 Rish PSJ 42 6 Swift M 23 5 A.Jaworski A 14 5 Campbell M 13 4 Henson M 13 4 J.Lehtio A 12 3 Wiser A 12 3 Stuart PSJ 12 3 Southerland M 20 2 Kerigan PSJ 20 2 Grammer M 11 2 Branch PSJ 11 2 Schultz A 11 2 Girard A 11 2 Santora M 02 2 Wade Bz 02 2 B.Jaworski A 02 2 Rogers A 10 1 Robles PSJ 10 1 Ferrera Bz 10 1 Locher Bz 10 1 Gay Bz 10 1 Keepersaves Henriquez A 87, Delaplaine Bz 64, Blackwell A 52, Grammer M 52, Pridgeon PSJ 27, Laine PSJ 11, A.Jaworksi A 9, Rinehart M 6, Boardway M 5, Stripling PSJ 3.Boys soccerScoring Player Gls. Ast. Tot. Duarte PSJ 173 20 Hicks B 136 19 Wilkins B 116 17 May PSJ 122 14 Beachum PSJ 113 14 Lippmann B 95 14 McDaniel A 112 13 Masker A 94 13 Jacobsen M 56 11 Lane B 38 11 Wright M 55 10 Nycum M 55 10 D.Lacour PSJ 46 10 Perles M 36 9 Cryderman PSJ 53 8 Grant M 53 8 Shoaf PSJ 25 7 Hapner M 60 6 McLemore PSJ 33 6 Martinez Bz 50 5 Marsh M 41 5 Joseph B 41 5 Layfield B 32 5 Wright B 32 5 Fasbinder B 14 5 Brown B 05 5 McCormick B 22 4 Benjamin Bz 13 4 Bush PSJ 13 4 Peffers A 04 4 Arteaga M 30 3 Mitchell A 30 3 Jones PSJ 21 3 Bottomy M 12 3 Bautista B 12 3 J.Calzada Bz 20 2 Crum M 20 2 Reed M 11 2 Ihaksi A 11 2 Phillips A 11 2 D.Calzada Bz 11 2 Luna Bz 11 2 J.Lacour PSJ 11 2 Smith B 11 2 Nelson M 02 2 Glass A 10 1 Kennington PSJ 10 1 Morrow B 10 1 Bradgon M 01 1 Schoppe A 01 1 Shields Bz 01 1 Burns Bz 01 1 Robles PSJ 01 1 Cauthen B 01 1 Pickett PSJ 01 1 Keepersaves Cook Bz 88, Murphy A 72, Thrasher B 51, Paravalos A 44, Bowers PSJ 30, Beachum PSJ 11, Kerrigan PSJ 7. Schoolskey: Altha (At), Arnold (A), Bay (B), Bozeman (Bz), Mosley (M), North Bay Haven (NB), Port St. Joe (PSJ), Wewahitchka (W). WINTER STATS By PAT McCANNSports Editor | pmccann@pcnh.com 747-5068 | Twitter: @patmccann Nobody wants to enter a tournament feeling like theyre playing for second place. Three schools in next weeks District 2-3A boys soccer pairing at Arnold couldnt be blamed for adopting that mantra. Choctawhatchee, last years state runner-up in Class 4A, is the overwhelming favorite in the fourschool district that begins on Tuesday. The Indians were cruising along at 17-2 late last week while Arnold was 4-11-4 and Rutherford 3-7-3. The fact the host Marlins edged the Rams in a recent game dropped Rutherford to the No. 4 seed and a firstround collision with Choctawhatchee. Arnold faces Milton, 4-12-0. Choctaw, who took second place in their 4A state run last year, look unstoppable now that they have been dropped into 3A play. Arnold coach Rick Sylvester said. There is no question Choctaw is, far and away the best team in the district and maybe in North Florida. Rutherford has a daunting task meeting them in their opening game. The Marlins have struggled through their worst season in Sylvesters nine years guiding the program. Having faced a great deal of adversity this year, and sporting the worst record since I have been coaching here, we are clinging to the hope that we can beat Milton and somehow make a go of it in the final, Sylvester said. With very limited forces left after a long season of attrition, the odds are certainly against us, but we are hoping that we can make the best of our beautiful facility and put on a respectable show at home. Bay fashioned a 10-0-0 district record to earn the first seed in District 1-2A, that tournament at Walton in DeFuniak Springs. Tornadoes coach Ron Houpt knows that anything can happen in the playoffs witnessed by his teams deep run last winter. Bay, 13-6-3, by far looks like the best bet on paper to advance of any county squad. This district tournament has had many surprises in the past, Houpt said. We will focus on not letting that happen to us. We will play one game at a time and treat it as the most important game we will play this year. Actually it will be. We started off slowly this year and have made adjustments in the last month and are now ready to make a playoff run. We have had many injuries during the season, but now seem to all be healthy. Mosley, 10-6-1, lost a tiebreaker with Lincoln for the No. 3 seed in 2-4A which could become pivotal as it knocked the Dolphins into Mondays play-in game. The ramifications were made more severe by the winner of that game advancing to meet top-seeded Chiles in one of Wednesdays semifinals. Leon and Lincoln meet in the other. Its a tough road to advance because we will face Chiles in the semi, who defeated us three times during the season, Mosley coach Dave Skakal said. If, however, we can beat Columbia for the fourth time we are optimistic because we played very well against Chiles the last time we saw them. Anything is possible in a district tournament. Port St. Joe posted a 4-1-1 record during the regular season against 1-1A opponents, with a pair of lopsided victories against first-round opponent Freeport. The top-seeded Tiger Sharks are 13-2-1 overall. We will be entering districts this year with a confident, but cautious nature, coach Gary Hindley said. We got a bit out of sorts during the holiday break, but our last several regularseason games were back on track.Boys soccer postseason starts next week ANDREW JOHNSON | The News HeraldArnolds Thomas McDaniel scored two goals in the Marlins 2-1 win over Rutherford recently.All times CSTDistrict 1-1A at Rocky Bayou Tuesday, Jan. 24: Port St. Joe vs. Freeport 6 p.m., Rocky Bayou vs. Franklin County 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27: Semifinal winners 7 p.m. District 1-2A at Walton Monday, Jan. 23: Marianna vs. Bozeman 5 p.m., South Walton vs. Walton 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 25: Bay vs. Marianna-Bozeman winner 5 p.m., Pensacola Catholic vs. South Walton-Walton winner 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27: Semifinal winners 7 p.m. District 2-3A at Arnold Tuesday, Jan. 24:Arnold vs. Milton 5 p.m., Choctawhatchee vs. Rutherford 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27: Semifinals winners 7 p.m. District 2-4A at Chiles Monday, Jan. 23: Mosley vs. Lake City Columbia 5 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 25: Leon vs. Lincoln 4 p.m., Mosley-Columbia winner vs. Chiles 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27: Semifinal winners 6 p.m. DISTRICTSCHEDULES Mosleys Grant named to Ray Guy Prokicker.com All-American team The News Herald LYNN HAVEN Mark Grant of Mosley was among the inaugural Ray Guy Prokicker.com High School All-Americans for some of the nations top punting, kicking, kickoff and long-snapping prospects. Players were selected from the Prokicker.com staff, which watched and coached the players during camps, and also by how the players performed on the field during the 2011 high school season. There were four All-America categories punting, kicking, long-snapping and kickoff specialist. Grant was named honorable mention in the kickoff specialist category. He had 32 touchbacks among 42 kickoffs for the Dolphins, and an average of 64.3 yards per kickoff. Grant also had 36 points on four field goals and 24 extra points. Ray Guy is considered the greatest punter in NFL history. Pat McCann Duderstadt leads Tsunamis: Michael Duderstadt claimed high-point honors in the Senior Boys division with four victories, and the Panama City Swim Team placed third in the GPAC Winter Invitational Jan. 13-15 in Pensacola. PCST competed with 37 swimmers against more than 400 swimmers from 14 teams from Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. Duderstadt won individual races in the 50-yard backstroke, 100 backstroke, 100 breaststroke and 200 individual medley. Kari Troia (11-12 girls) won two races, the 50 and 100 breaststroke to finish third in high-point scoring in her age group. Three other Tsunami swimmers won one race. Kyla Hallam (11-12 girls) won the 50 freestyle, Hannah Retherford (13-14 girls) won the 50 butterfly, and Chad McGuire (13-14 boys) won the 200 breaststroke. The Tsunamis will compete at the Mac Crutchfield Invitational in Tallahassee on Jan. 27-29. Jason Shoot Gallaghers Gymnasts excel: Gallaghers Gymnastics mens team recently competed at the O Zone Invitational in Knoxville, Tenn., while the womens team was in Tallahassee and PCB Elite cheerleaders performed in Daytona Beach. In Knoxville, at the largest mens gymnastics invitational in the Southeast, Andrew Hess led the way in Level 8 capturing first place in the floor, rings and parallel bars. His efforts catapulted him into a first-place finish in the all-around. In Level 9, 13-year-old Paxton Peacock placed first on rings and earned second on pommel horse and parallel bars to win all-around in the age 12-13 group. Peacock had the highest all-around score of Level 9 athletes, a total of 49 boys in all age groups. In Level 10, the highest Junior Olympic level, Alexander Hess was fourth on pommel horse and sixth on vault. The Arnold sophomore placed 14th all-around. Level 6 gymnast Trent Bawcom placed fifth on floor and rings and 10th all-around. In the older age group, Cameron Nagy was seventh on floor and 10th all-around. Gallaghers Level 5 team of Cole Nagy, Alex Creswell, Eli Creswell and Austin Smith placed MARK GRANT Early at-bats By BRAD MILNERPCNH Writer | bmilner@pcnh.com 747-5065 | Twitter: @PCNHBradMilner TUCSON, Ariz. Brady Colburn and Preston Brown have a jumpstart on the rest of their Bay County brethren this baseball season. The duo recently competed in the 2012 Under Armour Preseason AllAmerican Tournament at the Arizona ANDREW HESSSEENOTEBOOK | C4 PREPNOTEBOOK CONTRIBUTED PHOTORutherfords Brady Colburn, left, and Bays Preston Brown, competed in the 2012 Under Armour Preseason All-American Tournament Friday through Sunday in Tucson, Ariz. Rams Colburn, Tornadoes Brown get running start at baseball seasonSEEEARLY START | C4 PREP ANDREW HESS

PAGE 8

LocalA8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, February 1, 2012 Beeninlong-termcareover20years. Workedasanadministratorfor14years. WorkedinTexas,Kentucky,NewMexico,Georgia andnowFlorida. RecentlymovedherefromtheAtlanta,GAarea. GrewupinOhio Hasason,daughterandthreegrandchildrenand 2dogs. CurrentlylivesinDeFuniakSprings. DEBORAH MONTENARO, NHA, Administrator306 West Brock Avenue Bonifay, FL 32425 850-547-9289 www.BonifayRehab.comBONIFAYNURSING & REHAB CENTERWelcomes our New AdministratorDeborah Montenaro, NHA Treat Your Sweetheart! KINGS DISCOUNT DRUGS1242 Main St. Chipley850-638-4875 this saturday in and Holmes County Chamber of Commerce 5TH ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENTFriday, March 16, 2012DogwoodLakes Golf Club For more information contact Holmes County Chamber of Commerce 547-4682$10,000HOLE IN ONEMultiple levels of sponsorship or participation are available. $2,400IN OTHER PRIZESSign your team up now 6513789 New Year Special 15% Off With AdWe are currently paving in your area.With our crew and equipment close by, we are offering prompt service and reasonable rates to all area residents for a short time. Please call immediately if you are interested in having any asphalt paving done this year. NOTICEASPHALT PAVING WE DO: HOUSE DRIVEWAYS PARKING LOTS FARM LANES LONG LANES DRIVEWAYS PRIVATE ROADS PATCHWORK NEW HOMES GRADEWORK SEAL COATING BASEWORK ASPHALT MILLINGS Free Estimates Fast Service Quality Work Full-Service Asphalt PavingTired of a Dust Bowl in the Summer and a Mud Hole in the Winter? Dont Fuss ... CALL US!Of ce 800-566-7182 Mobile 850-524-0823Donohue Asphalt 850-769-6139236 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL Stan TrappeATTORNEY AT LAWLet Me Help YouAdmitted to Practice Law in Florida Since 1974 By Lane EvansOn Tuesday, Jan. 17, the Yellow Jacket Battalion loaded the bus and headed to Mobile, Ala. This eld trip was both educational and enjoyable. Select cadets were chosen to attend the adventure and were asked to take notes on all the historical facts that they passed by on their tour of the ship. The U.S.S. Alabama was built in 1940. The ship, from stem to stern, is 680 feet long and 108 feet wide. The guns were 16 inches in diameter and shoot a 2,700 pound projectile loaded with 900 pounds of gun powder. The ship itself was a small city; containing doctors of ces, dentist of ces, a Brig, isolation room, laundry room, chow hall, Ice Cream Parlor, Bakery and of course, a sick bay. In addition, we boarded the U.S.S. Drum, the submarine on display with the ship. On board the submarine, there was barely any space to move around. Every inch of the walls was covered in dials, levers, switches and tubes. All in all, the eld trip was an amazing experience. The cadets in attendance had a great time and learned a lot. Maj. Kuneman said the ship is, incredible, and you just have to go see it to believe it.Yellow Jacket Battalion eld trip to U.S.S. Alabama TALLAHASSEE (AP) U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland says he will file a bill in Congress that would put pressure on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to adopt state rather than federal water pollution rules for Florida. The Panama City Republican announced his plans Monday on the steps of Floridas old Capitol. The legislation would prohibit the EPA from adopting its own rules for Florida if the agency administrator determines state rules meet requirements of the federal Water Pollution Control Act. It would not affect other states. Our bill reinforces the bipartisan work being accomplished in the Florida Legislature to ensure that no one has greater control in determining the health of our waterways than ourselves, Southerland said. Environmentalists contend the states proposed rules setting numeric nutrient standards for phosphorous and nitrogen in lakes, streams and other water bodies would be too weak to prevent or clean up toxic algae choking Floridas waterways. The nutrients are contained in such pollutants as sewage, manure and fertilizer. Agriculture, business and utility interests back the states version. They contend the tougher federal rules would be too expensive to implement. We are not trying to reduce or to undermine the requirements in the Clean Water Act, Southerland said. Were just saying when we meet those standards, acknowledge those standards and do not single us out for a stiffer standard that does not apply to the other 49 states. A nonbinding provision in the proposed legislation also would express the sense of Congress that the EPA should take into account the economic effect of numeric nutrient criteria when deciding which set of rules to adopt. That includes not promulgating or enforcing any criteria that would result in a negative economic impact of 15 percent on any such sector. The legislation might be too late to affect the EPAs decision on rules for inland waters, which is expected by March. The agency, though, says it may agree to another delay if the state needs more time to implement the rules. The implementation date already has been delayed for 15 months. The EPA also is developing separate rules for coastal areas. They currently are scheduled for adoption in November.Southerland to le water pollution billWe are not trying to reduce or to undermine the requirements in the Clean Water Act. Were just saying when we meet those standards, acknowledge those standards and do not single us out for a stiffer standard that does not apply to the other 49 states.Rep. Steve Southerland

PAGE 9

Washington, Holmes at a glance INDEXSociety .................................B2 Faith ....................................B4 Obituaries ............................B5 Classi eds ............................B6 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser BPAGE 1Section Special to the NewsDuring the Washington County Fire ghters Appreciation Banquet on Thursday, Jan. 26 Brian Goddin, Wild re Mitigation Specialist/Public Information Of cer for Holmes and Washington County introduced everyone to the Ready, Set, Go program being introduced to the surrounding counties. Ready, Set, Go! Is a program that prepares citizens in the event of a wildland re, said Godden. We are here to provide the tools needed to educate others so we can all be more prepared for when a wildland re strikes.Wednesday, February 1 2012Ready, Set, Go is coming More on Ready, Set, Go!Right: Brian Goddin, Wild re Mitigation Specialist/Public Information Of cer for Holmes and Washington County introduced everyone to the Ready, Set, Go program scheduled for introduction to the surrounding counties.CECILIA SPEARS The Ready, Set, Go! Program seeks to develop and improve the dialogue between re departments and the residents they serve. Engaging in this dialogue is particularly important for the re service, because national studies have shown that re ghters are uniquely respected in their communities and can project a trusted voice to the public preparedness appeal. They can also explain what re resources are available during an event and the role that individuals can play in preparedness and early evacuation if called for by their local of cials to increase the safety of residents and responding re ghters to a wildland re. The RSG Program works in complimentary and collaborative fashion with Firewise and other existing wildland re public education efforts. It ampli es their preparedness messages to individuals to better achieve the common goal we all share of re-adapted communities. When re ghters encourage residents to take personal responsibility for preparing their property and family for WUI/wildland re, residents become an active part of the solution to the problem of increasing re losses. Ready Preparing for the Fire Threat: Be Ready, Be Firewise. Take personal responsibility and prepare long before the threat of a wildfire so your home is ready in case of a fire. Create defensible space by clearing brush away from your home. Use fire-resistant landscaping and harden your home with fire-safe construction measures. Assemble emergency supplies and belongings in a safe spot. Make sure all residents residing within the home are on the same page, plan escape routes. For more information about how to be Ready for wildland fires, go to Firewise. org Set Situational Awareness When a Fire Starts: Pack your vehicle with your emergency items. Stay aware of the latest news from local media and your local fire department for updated information on the fire. Go Leave early! Following your Action Plan makes you prepared and firefighters are now able to best maneuver the wildfire, ensuring you and your familys safety. Be Ready! Be Set! Go! Following your Action Plan makes you prepared and re ghters are now able to best maneuver the wild re, ensuring you and your familys safety. CHIPLEY The Glenn Miller Orchestra will be making a concert stop in Chipley in February. Through a special arrangement by Dr. James Clemmons and the Chipley High Band Boosters, the band will be in concert Feb. 7 at the CHS Auditorium on Brickyard Road. The legendary Glenn Miller was one of the most successful of all the dance bandleaders in the swing era of the 1930s and s. A matchless string of hit records, the constant effects of radio broadcasts and the drawing power at theaters, hotels and dance pavilions built and sustained the momentum of popularity for Glenn Miller. Tickets for the Feb. 7 concert at Chipley High School are $20 for adults and $15 for students and can be purchased from any CHS Band Booster or through the CHS Band of ce at 6386100, ext. 525. All seats will be reserved for this 7 p.m. concert in the CHS Auditorium in the center of the campus on Brickyard Road in Chipley. Proceeds from the event will go to the Chipley Band Boosters, whose mission is to support the band program at CHS.Glenn Miller Band in concert at Chipley High School

PAGE 10

Just 15 per wordSubmit Messages & Payment to:Washington County NewsP.O. Box 627 Chipley, FL 32428Holmes County Times-AdvertiserP.O. Box 67 Bonifay, FL 32425or just drop o at our oce in Chipley or Bonifay. or call 850-547-9414 or 638-0212 www.chipleypaper.com www.bonifaynow.com *Two winners will be selected by Friday, Feb. 10. Judging by staff and sponsoring restaurants. Advertise Your Valentine Gifts & Specials. Call 276-9251 For More Details. WIN DINNER FOR 2 LOVE LINES FOR MYValentine TOTAL: $____________ Method of Payment: Check MoneyOrder Visa MastercardCredit Card Number__________________________________________ Expiration Date________________ Love Line Message FormYou may send as many love lines as you would like. Please use an additional sheet if necessary. Payment must accompany each entry form. ALL ENTRIES MUST BE RECEIVED BY 2 P.M. FRIDAY, FEB. 3rd.Senders Name: ________________________________________________________________________________ Address_______________________________________________________________________________________ Phone_________________________________________________________________________________________ Choose Artwork Add Heart Artwork for $1.50 -ORAdd a Rose for $1.50 Message (15 per word):_________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________Love Lines will appear in the Wednesday, Feb. 8 issues of the Washington County News and Holmes County Times-Advertiser AND on the newspapers websites through Valentines Day, Feb. 14 Sue, How To Be Romantic 101, Send a Love Line... reading them is so much fun! Happy Valentines Day! Robert Phoebe, I knew cupids arrow had struck the rst time I gazed into your eyes. Happy Valentines Day! Love You Forever John EXAMPLES All Love Lines Must Be Submitted No Later Than 2 P.M. Friday, Feb. 3 Write the most romantic Valentines message or verse and you could be sharing a special meal for two at a local restaurant! Wednesday, February 1, 2012B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News Extra Hes cute and sweet and so much fun. Our little prince Clayton is turning 1. Happy 1st Birthday to Clayton Cecil John Townsend, who turned 1 year old on Jan. 29. He is the son of Daniel Townsend and Keshia Williams. His maternal grandparents are John and Connie Williams of Vernon. Claytons paternal grandparents are Christine Townsend and the late Cecil Townsend of Ponce de Leon. A year has passed how time has own; we cant believe how much he has grown. BIRTHDAY Donald and Judi (Shade) Monk would like to announce the birth of their daughter, who also is their rst child, Diana Sloane Monk. Diana was born Dec. 11, 2011, at 4:14 a.m. She weighed 9 pounds, 1 ounce and was 21 inches long. Dianas maternal grandparents are John and Carol Shade of Connecticut. Her paternal grandparents are Ronald and Bonnie Monk of Bonifay and Rick and Sarah (Monk Miller) McWaters of Freeport. BIRTHS Matthew and Emily Shilts of Vail, Ariz., would like announce the birth of their son, Gabriel Matthew. He was born Dec. 3, 2011, at Tucson Medical Center in Tucson, Ariz. He weighed 7 pounds and 10 ounces and was 19 and inches long. The maternal grandparents are Eddie and Linda Barrentine of Graceville. Paternal grandparents are Bill and Susan Lutz of Sparta, Wis., and Albert Shilts of Madison, Wis. Paternal great grandparents are Neil and Lillian Wendt of Lake Mills, Wis. Dewy webs and peach blossoms showcase a foggy January morning in Westville. Taken by Nicole Bradley. PHOTO OF THE WEEK Hardy and Rhonda Clyatt of Lake Butler announce the engagement of their daughter, Brianne Clyatt to Michael Smith, son of Jimmy and Linda Smith of New Bern, N.C. The couple met at Southeastern Free Will Baptist College in Wendell, N.C. The upcoming bride is the granddaughter of Ms. Lounell Duncan and the late Thomas Duncan of Chipley, and the Rev. and Mrs. Bobby Clyatt of Lake Butler. Brianne is a 2010 graduate oh Union County High School. She attended Southeastern and will continue to pursue he college education in Ind. The future groom is the grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. Grady King of Bridgeton, N.C., Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Smith, and Ms. Barbara Harman of New Bern, N.C. Michael earned a Religious Arts degree from Southeastern Free Will Baptist College. He currently is a youth pastor in Muncie, Ind., where the couple will serve together at True Light Baptist Church. The wedding will take place April 14 in Lake Butler. ENGAGEMENT

PAGE 11

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3President Thomas A. Kinchen offered an inspirational start to the spring semester chapel services at The Baptist College of Florida (BCF) in Graceville on Monday, Jan. 16, with his chapel series entitled The After Christmas Specials. Kinchen welcomed new BCF students, recognized the Lady Eagles volleyball team for their outstanding season, and began the Monday morning chapel service by asking the question, After Christmas, the presents, wrapping, and decorations, where do you nd Jesus? Referencing the book of Luke, Kinchen read the account of a young Jesus missing from His family. After searching, He was found in the temple listening and speaking with the teachers. Where was Jesus? He was about His Fathers work. Folks today are frantically searching for Jesus, Kinchen said. Its pretty easy to nd Him. Just go where Gods work is being done, where His word is being proclaimed in truth, and where Gods people are worshipping, working, and ministering. BCF students and faculty were reminded not to misplace Jesus in the chaotic holiday season and in their everyday lives. Tuesdays chapel service continued with Kinchen illustrating the typical hinting season of Christmas. For example, people spend months before Christmas hinting to others what they are hoping to receive as gifts. Many times though, people arent satis ed with their presents. It may not t or doesnt work exactly how they planned. Kinchen also observed that around Christmas time, Christians are adamant about wanting to keep Christ in Christmas. But do they really want Him? Its okay if Hes a little plastic Jesus. Its okay if Hes warmed by a little 20-watt light bulb in a convenient cardboard manger with some imported hay. Thats okay. He doesnt bother us much there, does He? Its even okay if Hes the little lost boy in the temple, or a healing Savior, touching those in desperate need. But do we really want Christ in Christmas when Hes cleansing the temple and we know there are dirty places in our lives? Do we really want Him interrupting our plans? Kinchen closed the chapel packed series Wednesday by reading from the book of Micah and focusing on the familiar topic of re-gifting. How many people have been re-gifting Jesus? Kinchen asked. Our Lord does not deserve re-gifting in our lives or in our worship. Recorded versions of all of the chapel sermons are available at wfbu.com. Bethlehems 2012 Homecoming festivities began at 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 21, with the presentation of the middle school prince and princess nominees. Eighth grade nominees were: Josie Dampier, Kelsey En nger, Harlie Peters and Stevie Spivey for princess; Caleb Brannon, Dakota Potter, Mason Wallace and Brandon Wilson for prince. Kelsey En nger and Mason Wallace were crowned princess and prince. The high school Homecoming Court was then presented. Of the ve nominees for queen, senior Kaylin Grif n was crowned 2012 Homecoming Queen, and Devin Miller was crowned Homecoming King. Special recognition was afforded several people during this years Homecoming celebration. Sheila Richards introduced everyone to Kaylee Barton. Kaylee, who has proximal femoral focal de ciency, will be undergoing several surgeries in the future. She is the recipient of a very successful fundraiser A Walk for Kaylee that Bethlehems FCCLA sponsored. Kaylee and her family said they were appreciative of the support shown by the school and community. Wanda Pope was presented an iPad for her efforts in the fundraising event. Bethlehems athletic department presented lettermans jackets to Assistant Principal Donald Dady and former coach/ principal Jerry Dixon for their unswerving dedication to BHS athletic programs. Dixon commented that in all of his years of both playing ball and coaching, this was the rst lettermans jacket he ever had. The nights honored guest was Jackie Benton, former Bethlehem teacher. Benton is a life-long native of Holmes County. She attended Bethlehem High from rst through 11th grade and then transferred to Holmes County High School to take business courses, graduating with honors in 1956. Bentons family has seen four generations walk through the halls of Bethlehem. Her father, Valton Coates, was a member of Bethlehems rst graduating class in 1932, and her grandchildren currently attend. Beginning her career at BHS at age 33, Benton taught second grade for two years, then moved to third grade for many years before winding up in preKindergarten, retiring in 2001. During her tenure, she served as cheerleading sponsor and Pep Club sponsor from 1973-1977. She then gave up coaching to watch her own children cheer and play ball. Her daughter Sheila (who now teaches at BHS) commented, I cannot remember a basketball or softball game that she didnt attend as long as I played. Benton said she has always been a Wildcat at heart and showed it with her school spirit. Many of Mrs. Bentons students recall the sleepovers and Easter egg hunts held at her home. She welcomed students as though they were her own children with a warm, beautiful smile and a loving heart. She never hesitated to read the Bible and Bible stories to her students. Many times, someone passing by her classroom would see her in a rocking chair, sharing Gods Word with her students gathered around her. Mrs. Jackie Benton has sacri ced many hours for the sake of her students and family. She truly is the example of a teacher in every sense of the word and will remain in the memories of countless Bethlehem graduates for decades to come. Between the varsity games, alumni from the classes of 1942, 1952, 1962, 1972, 1982, 1992 and 2002 were recognized. The class of 1992 presented a marble bench in front of the school in memory of classmates who had passed away, Christy Wilkerson and Chris Yancey. Class members also presented Christys and Chriss families with plaques. Bethlehem celebrates Homecoming 2012BCF President preaches the After Christmas SpecialsSUBMITTED PHOTOSBCF President Thomas A. Kinchen poses with the BCF Lady Eagles Volleyball Team. Left, BCF President Thomas A. Kinchen preaches in the R.G. Lee Chapel.Special to ExtraRusty Brooks, of the Carl Vinson Institute of Government and former resident of Bonifay, was announced was named as the 2012 Hill Fellow at The University of Georgia on, Nov. 28 at the 21st annual Public Service and Outreach (PSO) Meeting and Awards Luncheon. Brooks is the associate director for the Vinson Institutes International Center, which he has served in a variety of capacities since 1982. He was a 2004 winner of the Walter Barnard Hill Award. Brooks is a Bonifay native, having attended the local school system, graduating in 1970; attended Chipola Junior College, receiving an Associate of Arts degree in 1972; attended the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Ala., receiving a Bachelor of Science degree in Political Science in 1974; and a Master of Arts in Criminal Justice in 1975; taught Criminal Science at the University of North Carolina in Wilmington, N.C., for two years; enrolled in the University of Georgia in 1978, receiving PhD in Sociology in 1982; then he began working in the University of Georgia, Carl Vinson Institute of Government. He and his wife, Paula, have two children: Ty of Boulder, Colo., and Kelsey of Athens, Ga.. Both are graduates of The University of Georgia. Brooks is the son of Ray Brooks of Bonifay and the late Betty Jo Helmes Brooks. Brooks has earned a worldwide reputation for his efforts to share the expertise and resources of the University of Georgia with governments around the world. Through training for government of cials and employees, shared technical assistance, and research, the programs he directs contribute to bettering the lives of people from Croatia to China to Liberia and beyond, helping their governments become better able to respond to their needs. Brooks work facilitates networks among Georgia and countries around the globe and promotes increased cultural understanding by coordinating exchanges between U.S. and international leaders, leading in some cases to exploration of economic development opportunities in Georgia.Local recognized as 2012 Hill Fellow RUSTY BROOKSBONIFAY STUDENT MAKES MERIT LIST AT DARTON COLLEGEALBANY, Ga. Hannah E Paulk of Bonifay, made the Merit List at Darton College in Albany for the Fall 2011 semester. To qualify for the Merit List, a student must be part time and have earned a 3.4 or higher grade point average. Crossword PUZZLESOLUTION ON PAGE B6

PAGE 12

FAITH BSectionwww.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.comThe First Amendment of our Constitution says, Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceable to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. Please do me a favor and read this First Amendment at least ve times and then tell me why our government has for over 68 years been protecting and spending tons of money to spread the religions of Atheism and Agnosticism? For clari cation, an Agnostic is a person who believes that nothing is known about the existence of God or about things outside the human experience. An Atheist believes there is no God. Now back to the reason for the question. For over 68 years, if not much longer, our government has promoted and protected this religion through our government school system, and some have twisted the words of our First Amendment to protect it. You see, Evolution and the Big Bang Theory have been taught in the science classes of our public schools all these years and our children have even been tested to make sure they understand this religion which was imagined in the mind of George Waterhouse Darwin, who was a racist and by his theory an atheist. Then, Thomas Huxley, an agnostic, advanced the acceptance of evolution among scientists and the public alike, even though there is no science or scienti c proof for any of it. Thats right, no scienti c proof! I believe a real scientist would actually laugh in the face of Darwin if he presented it in the world we live in today. So, why do our school boards continue to waste money purchasing books, and paying teachers to teach non-truths, that they themselves are not comfortable with? And why have museums wasted money to create the Nebraska man, which is supposed to be the link between man and monkey. When in actuality, the person who rst drew the Nebraska man drew him from one small tooth, which was later found to be the jawbone of a wild pig. If I could take a 5,000 piece jigsaw puzzle and throw it into a category three hurricane and when it landed it was all together and matted, I might think that it was worth taking our childrens valuable learning time to teach the possibilities of this ridiculous theory, that they might question whether there was a God or not. NOT!!! Because you and I both know, even if we did this experiment one-million times, not even two pieces would come together. So the truth of the matter is; it takes more faith to believe that this great universe just came together without a creator, than it does to believe that there is a God. To my understanding of things, since evolution is not a science and it is based on the beliefs of one person, it is a religion. A religion according to the subtitle of his Origin was The Preservation of Favored Races in the Struggle for Life. The question you can simply ask is, who do you think Darwin tagged as the Unfavored races? So my question is; why is the ACLU and others so interested in preserving a religion, sponsored by our government, which is against the Constitution, and is racialist? And why are they afraid to share another view? After all, evolution is only a theory. Are they afraid that their religion of choice would not be accepted anymore, because it cannot pass the test of human questioning? The simple answer to all of these questions comes from the Bible which says, Even him, whose coming is after the working of Satan with all power and signs and lying wonders, And with all deceivableness of unrighteousness in them that perish; because they received not the love of the truth, that they might be saved. And for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lie: That they all might be damned who believed not the truth, but had pleasure in unrighteousness (2 Thes. 2:9-12 KJV). These thoughts have been brought to you From the Heart of Tim Hall, timothyjhall.org, Senior Pastor, Gully Springs Baptist Church, P.O. Box 745, 2824 U.S. Highway 90 West Bonifay, Florida 32425. Located; three miles west of the light at Highway 79, 850-547-3920 and author of Church Go To Hell! Please? Email: timhall_2000@yahoo.com (Please be advised that my articles are purposely meant to be challenging and at times, controversial. They should no way re ect negatively on the paper in which you read it). Holmes Baptist Association Secret ChurchBONIFAY Holmes Baptist Association is sponsoring Secret Church at Gully Springs Baptist Church in Bonifay on Friday, Feb. 3 beginning at 6 p.m. Our leader David Pratt will lead us through the Bible as he teaches us how to study our Bibles and get more out of personal Bible Study. Dont expect to get home before midnight. Look forward to studying with you Friday. Our next Secret Church will be Good Friday. Please RSVP by calling 547-3920. First United Methodist Church of Chipley Super Bowl Hot Wing Sale PickupCHIPLEY The First United Methodist Church of Chipley took orders for their annual Super Bowl Hot Wing Sale. Customers may pick up their orders on Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 5th from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Drive thru pick up is available. The church is at 1285 Jackson Ave., next to the courthouse. The Jasper String Quartet to be at Gulf Beach PresbyterianPANAMA CITY BEACH The Jasper String Quartet will be at Gulf Beach Presbyterian on Friday, Feb. 3 at 7 p.m. They were the grand prizewinner in the Plowman Chamber Music Competition, received a silver medal at the Fischoff Chamber Music Competition, and won grand prize at the Coleman Competition. The New York Times an impressive young ensemble. The quartet has performed across the USA, Canada, Norway, England, Italy, and Japan. Art by the Visual Arts Center. Gulf Beach Presbyterian is on Highway 79 between Front and Back Beach Road on Panama City Beach. A suggested donation is $15 at the door. For more information call 230-1991.Christian Haven Church to hold Gospel JamWAUSAU Christian Haven Church will hold their monthly Gospel Jam on Saturday, Feb. 4, beginning at 6 p.m. with a covered dish dinner and the Jam starting immediately after dinner, acoustic instruments only. Come and enjoy an evening of music and fellowship. The church is east of Wausau on Finch Circle. For more info call 638-0836 or 773-2602.Saint Agathas Episcopal Church BreakfastDEFUNIAK SPRINGS Saint Agathas Episcopal Church will be having Breakfast in the Parish Hall on Feb. 4, March 3, April 7, and on May 5, from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. Breakfast will include eggs, grits, homefries, pancakes, bacon, sausage, toast, sausage gravy on biscuits or toast, juice, milk or coffee. There will also be healthy choice items. Adult plates will be $4.50 and children 10 and under are $2.50 The Parish Hall is at 150 Circle Drive in DeFuniak Springs. Hwy. 77 S, Chipley 638-4097 Hwy. 79 S., Bonifay 547-9688Stephen B. Register, CPA1552 Brickyard Road Chipley, FL 638-4251 BROWN FUNERAL HOME1068 Main Street, Chipley638-4010 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser1364 N. Railroad, Chipley 638-0212 112 E. Virginia, Bonifay 547-9414But when the holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be lled with power, and you will be my witnesses... Good News Bible Acts 1:8Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.First Baptist Churchcome as you areMike Orr, Pastor1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643 Chipley, Florida (850) 638-1830Place your message here for only $8.00 per week.This Message Courtesy ofAnonymous Acts of KindnessIt is only natural for us to want to be recognized for our good deeds; however there is undoubtedly something even better in doing the occasional secret good both the giver and the receiver more than the gift of kindness that is performed with full recognition of who did it. The doer of a secret good deed will feel that there is something purer in their motive because they are not doing it to receive thanks or recognition, and this feeling is likely to raise the doers self-esteem. In addition, the person who receives the anonymous gift or act of kindness is likely to feel that the world is a kinder, friendlier place, with people out there whom they dont even know doing good deeds. There are lots of ways we can do a secret good deed. For example, paying the toll for the person behind us, or buying the couples tickets behind us in line at the movie theater. Other ideas may include putting money in expired meters, leaving some food or a gift for someone at work, or perhaps leaving a plate of goodies in someones desk who we know wont have time to go out for lunch. We should be creative do a secret good deed. There is really no end to the anonymous acts of kindness we can do, and it really will make us and the recipient feel great. The generous soul will be made rich, and he who waters will also be watered himself. New K.J.V. Proverbs 11:25 Wednesday, February 1, 2012 Page 4 Faith EVENTSBy Rev. James L. SnyderI am rather oldfashioned in some areas of my life, which I do not intend to upgrade to current standards. I do not believe in changing something unless it really needs to be changed. A crazy phobia is going around these days suggesting that if something is old, it must not be any good and if it is new, it must be good. I think old Solomon was right when he said, there is no new thing under the sun (Ecclesiastes 1:9 KJV). So, I am never intimidated by some new gizmo or gadget that comes down the line. One of the things I have no intention of upgrading is in the area of giving credit. I believe in giving credit where credit is due. After all, I need all the credit I can get these days. If somebody does something that blesses me, I am beholden to give them their due credit. I am under the opinion that if I give enough people enough credit that one day I just may be able to cash in. This all came to me this past week when I had my visit to the dentist. I make it a rule to visit my dentist once a decade whether I need to or not. The thing that spurred my visit to the dentist this time was one of my llings had fallen out. Actually, I am assuming it fell out because where it used to be was a hole in my tooth. Upon pondering the situation to its logical conclusion, I must have eaten my lling. This dental hygienic situation brought me to my latest visit with my dental hygienist. While I was there, I thought I would save time, if not money, and have my teeth cleaned. Every decade I like to have my teeth cleaned. According to my dentists records, the last time I had my teeth cleaned was 13 years ago. So, it is time. Because it was so long since my last visit with the dentist, he insisted on taking pictures of all my teeth. I hope to get copies so I can post it on my Facebook. After all, what would my Facebook be without pictures of teeth? I had forgotten the whole procedure of dental photography. It took an entire hour to photograph all my teeth one at a time. During the sixty minutes of my photography shoot, I had to keep my mouth open. I have never had my mouth open for so long in all my life. The upshot of my visit with the dentist was I had a clean bill of health regarding my teeth and gums. I must have been doing something right to have such healthy teeth and gums for a person my age. When the dentist said a person my age, I was not sure if he was insulting me or congratulating me for good health. Being the gentleman that I am, I took the latter. I dont know what youre doing, the dentist said cheerfully as I left his of ce, just keep it up. With that, I left the dentist of ce. I thought a lot about what he said and I have come to a major conclusion. I like giving credit where credit is due, so I had to think long and hard about whom to credit for my good dental health. Certainly, I could congratulate the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage on her superb dietary work in the kitchen. Without doubt, it pays to eat the right food if you are going to have good health. But I think it goes much further than this. What am I doing to credit such a good dental health report? Then it came to me. Have you ever given serious thought about something for so long, you seem to be getting nowhere, and then all of a sudden, it hits you? I know what I can credit my excellent dental health to. Apple Fritters. That is right. The reason I have good teeth and good gums is because of a consistent diet of Apple Fritters. After all, everybody knows the main ingredient of an Apple Fritter is an Apple. There is nothing better for a person than an Apple. Where the Fritter comes in is very simple. The Fritter part of an Apple Fritter is the means by which my body can assimilate the nutritional aspects of the Apple. The Fritter facilitates the good parts of the Apple to every part of my body. Therefore, with a deep sense of humility and gratefulness, I credit my dental health to the regular consumption of Apple Fritters. A friend of mine recently suggested that I might be addicted to Apple Fritters, but I kindly remonstrated him by explaining I am addicted to good dental health. My spiritual health is a different matter. Now unto him that is able to keep you from falling, and to present you faultless before the presence of his glory with exceeding joy, to the only wise God our Saviour, be glory and majesty, dominion and power, both now and for ever. Amen (Jude 1:24-25 KJV). God gets all the credit in my life for my spiritual health now and forever.Giving credit where credit is dueSeparation of Church and StateFROM THE HEARTTim Hall See EVENTS B5

PAGE 13

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 ExtraWashington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5 Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE! With your paid obituary, family and friends will now have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge. Find Obituaries. Share Condolences.Celebrate a Life. On the IMPROVED obituary section ofwww.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com, you can: More easily search the most timely and complete online resource for newspaper obituaries View and sign the new online Guest Books Online access will also allow you to attach a candle to your love ones name along with your message. In partnership withLegacy.com Find obituaries, share condolences and celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com For further information or questions call 638-0212 An annual resource guide for residents in Washington & Holmes counties who are presented with many choices for obtaining quality health care in the area. For more information contact: 850.638.0212 or 850.547.9414The Medical Services Directory has updated listings of physicians grouped by eld-of-practice. It also features the latest news and information about local health and wellness providers. Consumers in Washington and Holmes counties spend more than $71 million on health care annualy; with an additional $37 million in sales for health and personal care products. Make sure these consumers know about the services and products you have to offer with your advertising in the 2012 area Medical Services Directory. Publishes Wednesday, Feb. 22in both the Washington County News and the Holmes County Times AdvertiserDeadline: Noon, Wednesday, Feb. 102012 Medical Services Directory Sally H Bowers, 84, of Pensacola passed away Friday, Jan. 20, 2012, at Bainbridge Healthcare. Mrs. Bowers was born Oct. 8, 1927, in Westville, where she grew up and lived until moving to Pensacola in the late 1950s to work for U.S. Civil Service, from which she retired in 1986. Mrs. Bowers was preceded in death her husband, Willard Bowers. Survivors include her nephews, Clyde Skinner and his wife, Diane, of Lancaster, S.C., Thomas Skinner and his wife, Jennifer, of Tallahassee, and Jerry Skinner and his wife, Sharon, of Westville; and her sister-in-law, Lonie Skinner of Westville. The funeral service was held at 2 p.m. Monday, Jan. 23, 2012, at Cedar Springs Assembly of God Church near Westville. Interment followed at Camp Ground Cemetery near Westville. The family received friends from 1 to 1:45 p.m. Monday, Jan. 23, 2012, at Cedar Springs Assembly of God. Online visitors may sign the guest register at www. iveyfuneral.com. Sally H. Bowers SALLY H. BOWERSMrs. Martha Nell Faircloth, age 88, of Bonifay passed away Jan. 13, 2012, at Southeast Alabama Medical Center in Dothan, Ala. She was born Feb. 8, 1923, in Wyandotte, Mich., to the late Henry and Amy Taylor King. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Faircloth was preceded in death by her husband, Cody Faircloth; a son, David Faircloth; and a brother, Henry King Jr. Mrs. Faircloth is survived by two children, James Faircloth and wife, Anita, and Amy Nell Faircloth Dykes and husband, Charles, all of Bonifay; seven grandchildren, Paula, Laura, Jamey, Deana, Davey, Charlie and Jodi; and seven great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15, 2012, at Union Hill Baptist Church with the Rev. Wesley Adams and the Rev. Huey Hughes of ciating. Interment was in the Union Hill Baptist Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay directing.Martha N. FairclothMrs. Lonie Bowers Skinner, age 91, of Westville, passed away Jan. 25, 2012 at Jackson Hospital in Marianna. She was born June 22, 1920, in Westville to the late Henry T. and Mary Ann Huggins Bowers. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Skinner was preceded in death by her husband, Clyde Skinner, and a brother and sisterin-law, Willard and Sally Bowers. Mrs. Skinner is survived by three sons, Clyde Skinner and wife, Diane, of Lancaster, S.C., Thomas Skinner and wife, Jennifer, of Tallahassee, and Jerry T. Skinner and wife, Sharon, of Westville; four grandchildren; and several great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 28, 2012, at Cedar Springs Assembly of God Church with the Rev. Roger Hagan of ciating. Interment followed in the Pleasant Ridge Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home of Bonifay directing.Lonie B. SkinnerMrs. Mae Bell Briggs Hill, 74, daughter of the late Rosetta and Roland Briggs Sr. of Bonifay, passed away Jan. 22 at her resident. She was a native of Holmes County, of the Baptist faith and an educator. Survivors include three brothers, Robert Briggs of California, Roland Briggs Jr. (Betty) of McKinney, Texas, and John Briggs (Doris) of Virginia; aunt, Mary King of Bonifay; and many nieces, nephews, cousins, other relatives and friends. A memorial service will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 4, in the Cooper Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Henry Taylor of ciating. Interment of cremains will follow in the Bonifay Cemetery. Mae Bell B. HillJames Walton (Bo) Baker, age 66, of Chipley passed away Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012, at his home. Mr. Baker was born Nov. 1, 1945, in Chipley to the late Frank and Ester (Wilcox) Baker. He was a lifelong resident of Washington County, a farmer and a member of the Apostolic United Pentecostal Church in Marianna. In addition to his parents, he was predeceased by two brothers, Neal Baker and Royal Baker; and one sister, Inez Lipford. Survivors include his wife, Vickie Baker, of Chipley; one son, John Thomas Baker and wife, Dalon, of Marianna; one daughter, Mendy Steverson and husband, Allen, of Cottondale; one brother, Lewis Baker of Macon, Ga.; and four sisters, Imogene Jordan of Marianna, Inell Reeves of Chipley, Ileta Tadlock of Chipley and Irene Lipford of Chipley. Memorial services were held Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012, at 3:30 p.m. in the Apostolic Life United Apostolic Church in Marianna. Memorialization was by cremation. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net. Brown Funeral Home of Chipley is in charge of the arrangements.James W. BakerPauline Cook-Shores, age 88, went home to be with the Lord on Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2012. Ms. Pauline was born Sept. 25, 1923, in Bonifay to the late Theron Sr. and Mary Russ (Brock). She has lived in Washington County most of her life, where she worked at Vernon High School as a home economics teacher. Ms. Pauline was the president of the Vernon Garden Club for 50 years, an advisor for the Future Homemakers of America for more than 40 years and served with the Delta Kappa Gamma Members. Along with her parents, she was preceded in death by three husbands, George S. Baragona, Thomas Wallace Cook Sr. and Gene Shores; and two brothers, Burness Russ and Theron Russ Jr. Survivors include two sons, George T. Baragona and wife, Gloria, of Tallahassee and Thomas (Tommy) W. Cook Jr. and wife, Terri, of Vernon; two stepsons, Ricky Shores and wife, Lila, of Newton, Ala., and Greg Shores of Chipley; four stepdaughters, Sue (Shores) Broom and husband, Paul, of Chipley, Faye (Shores) Cope and husband, Lynn, of Chipley, Pam Shores-Cates of Vernon, and Amy (Shores) Pelham and husband, Wesley, of Faceville, Ga.; two grandchildren, Michelle Baragona and Kimberly Bigelow; four great grandchildren, Courtney and Chris Warren and Justin and Kaylie Williams; one stepgrandson, Joseph T. Allen; and an additional 10 stepgrandchildren and eight stepgreat-grandchildren. Services were held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 28, 2012, at Eastside Baptist Church in Vernon with the Rev. Mike Browning of ciating. Interment followed at the Vernon City Cemetery. Visitation was held Friday, Jan. 27, 2012, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Brown Funeral Home Brickyard Road Chapel. Friends and family may sign the online register at www.brownfh. net.Pauline Cook-ShoresMrs. Nancy Harrell Metcalf, age 79, of Vernon passed away Jan. 26, 2012, at her home. She was born Dec. 31, 1932, to the late John G. and Alverda Nall Harrell. Over the years she was a switchboard operator, legal clerk and secretary in various civilian and military of ces around the world. She was a mother and loving wife, but rst and foremost Nancy was a born-again, spiritlled Christian who lived every day to glorify her Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. She was always ready to help, through prayer, maybe by paying a light bill or delivering some much needed food. Her friends knew if they needed prayer she was the one to call. Never too busy, she would drop everything and go to her prayer closet to get it done. She is rejoicing this day and every one to come throughout eternity in the presence of the Lord. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Metcalf was preceded in death by her husband, Jack M. Metcalf; and her sisters, Betty, Doris and Pat. Mrs. Metcalf is succeeded by her sons, Gary M. Metcalf and J. Dale Metcalf; daughterin-law, Gina; four grandchildren; ve greatgrandchildren; two greatgreat-grandchildren; and many friends. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2012, at Live Oak Baptist Church with the Rev. David Timms of ciating. Family received friends from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 30, 2012, at Peel Funeral Home Vernon Chapel, Vernon. Interment was in the Live Oak Church Cemetery with Peel Funeral Home directing. Memorial contributions may be given to Covenant Hospice, 4215 Kelson Ave., Suite E, Marianna, FL 32446.Nancy H. MetcalfJolly G Toole, Sr. took ight from his home in Marianna, to his heavenly home Thursday, Jan. 26, 2012. Jolly was born April 23, 1939, to Woodrow Houston Toole Senior and Martha Mirl Duncan Toole. Jolly was a veteran of the United States Air Force and held two masters degrees. He retired from 30+ years of public service with the State of Florida. He is loved and survived by his wife, Linda Kay Toole; and two children, his son Jolly G. Toole II and his daughter, Kimberly Crane; four grandchildren, Caleb Gabriel Toole, Candace Rose-Marie Toole, Joshua Crane and Emily Crane; two brothers, Tony Toole of Whigham, Ga., and Woodrow Houston Junior of New Smyrna Beach, Fla.; and two sisters, Nancy Grif n of Vero Beach and Mary Jane Kachelries of Wallingford, Pa. Family received visitors at Brown Funeral Home (Main Street) Friday, Jan. 27, from 6 to 8 p.m. Graveside service was held at 3 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 28, at Piney Grove Cemetery, Chipley, with the Rev. Tim Owen of ciating. Interment was in the Piney Grove Cemetery, under the direction of Brown Funeral Home.Jolly G Toole, Sr.Mrs. Emma Lee Robinson, 94, of Chipley passed away Jan. 25 in the Northwest Florida Hospital. She was of the Baptist faith and a native of Washington County. Survivors include two sons, George Robinson, Jr. of Chipley and John Henry Robinson of North Carolina; and many other relatives. Funeral services were conducted at 1 p.m. Monday, Jan. 30, at Mt. Ararat Baptist Church Chipley, with the Rev. Dr. H.G. McCoullough and the Rev. T. Smith of ciating. Interment followed in the Northside Cemetery with Cooper Funeral Home of Chipley directing. The remains lied in repose at the church one hour prior to service.Emma L. Robinson ObituariesVictory Tabernacle Bluegrass Gospel SingHARTFORD, Ala. Victory Tabernacle invites you to a Bluegrass Gospel Sing at 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 4. Special guests will be Keith Rowell and Friends and Straight and Narrow. The Tabernacle is at 10005 E. State Highway 52 in Hartford, Ala. For more information call 334-5882838 or email victory tabernaclepm@yahoo.com.Playground Swing Bing Band to be at Gulf BeachPANAMA CITY BEACH The Emerald Coasts nest 18-piece big band will return to Gulf Beach Presbyterian at 7 p.m. Feb. 12 to swing the night away with greatest hits from all of the greatest bands. Gulf Beach Presbyterian is on State 79 between Front Beach and Back Beach roads in Panama City Beach. A suggested donation is $15 at the door. Call 230-1991.David Seering to be at Gulf Beach PresbyterianPANAMA CITY BEACH Singer David Seering will be at Gulf Beach Presbyterian at 7 p.m. Feb. 14. He will be doing a special Valentines Day performance A Night of Love Songs. Singer is a Sinatra inspired musical mastery. Gulf Beach Presbyterian is on State Road 79 between Front Beach and Back Beach roads on Panama City Beach. A suggested donation is $15 at the door. For more information, call 230-1991. EVENTS from page B4See EVENTS B6

PAGE 14

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 B6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | Washington County News ExtraThomas Pandolphi to be at Gulf Beach PresbyterianPANAMA CITY BEACH Pianist Thomas Pandolphi will be at Gulf Beach Presbyterian at 7 p.m. Feb. 19 to play A Night into Gershwin, from Gershwin classics and jazz to the famous Rhapsody in Blue. The Washington Post calls Pandolphi Master of both the grand gesture and sensual line ... brilliant, exceptionally articulate. There will be baskets on display by Carol Dickson. Gulf Beach Presbyterian is on State Road 79 between Front Beach and Back Beach roads in Panama City Beach. A suggested donation is $15 at the door. Call 230-1991.The Lehnert Chamber Players to be at Gulf Beach PresbyterianPANAMA CITY BEACH The Lehnert Chamber Players will be at Gulf Beach Presbyterian at 7 p.m. Feb. 24. The Lehnert Chamber Players consist of internationally acclaimed Oswald Lehnert, violinist; Oswald Lehnert Jr., cellist; and Doris Lehnert, pianist. The Lehnerts are from Boulder, Colo. The concert will also feature guest violist Larry Tyson. They will be performing a concert of Brahms, Mozart, Schumann, Beethoven and Liszt. There will be art on display by by Phyllis Reimink. Gulf Beach Presbyterian is on State Road 79 between Front Beach and Back Beach roads in Panama City Beach. A suggested donation is $15 at the door. For more information call 230-1991.LIVE 4 HIM CONCERT With Ronaldo FelicianoCHIPLEY The Masters Silent Sign Ministry and Others will perform from 7-9 p.m. Feb. 24 at Shiloh Baptist Church, 1976 Shiloh Lane in Chipley. Celebrating nine years of Gods faithfulness, Shiloh Baptist Church Deaf Ministry invites you to join us for this unique evening and enjoy Music WORTH Watching. The concert is free. A love offering will be received for Deaf Missions. For information, call Trisha Hicks 6281553 or familyofhicks@ yahoo.com or Carmen Stewart 834-655-8300 (text) or carmenstewart@ hishandsmissions.org.LIFE Giving MUSIC in SIGN workshop with Ronaldo FelicianoCHIPLEY A LIFE Giving MUSIC in SIGN workshop with Ronaldo Feliciano will be 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Feb. 25 at Shiloh Baptist Church, 1976 Shiloh Lane in Chipley. This is music WORTH watching! Come, all deaf, hard of hearing, ASL students and interpreters and learn how at this fun and active workshop. Bring your creativity. Leave your fears. Please register as soon as possible. Cost of the workshop is $15 on or before Feb. 4, $20 on or before Feb. 18 and $25 at the door. Child care is not available for this event. A full refund is available within one week of concert with written request. For additional accommodations, call Bob or Trisha Hicks 628-1553 or 896-8007. EVENTS from page B5 Crossword SOLUTION FIND IT ONLINEwww.bonifay now.com BONIFAY Holmes County Relay for Life will begin at noon April 28 at Memorial Field in Bonifay.Luminaries for donationsAll Relay For Life teams are selling luminaries to be displayed on the night of the Relay around the track. After dark, the Relay For Life celebration will include a special luminary ceremony. Encircling the track with lights of hope, the Luminary Ceremony reaches for tomorrow with each candle of life and touches the stars for only a moment to remember those of yesterday. Your donation for each bag will place a luminary along the pathway to memorialize or honor someone you love. The bags will stay lit throughout the evening, reminding us that hope lives among us. The ceremony will begin just after dark. If you would like to participate in the ceremony by honoring or remembering a loved one who has battled cancer, contact a Relay For Life team.Relay track markers for saleAll Relay For Life teams are selling track markers to be displayed on the night of the Relay around the track. Track markers are 18 feet by 14 inches and are $100. Rules for the markers: Message must t in boxes on the order form The squares include letters and/or spaces (there are 46 squares) No logos or pictures No political or campaign issues Messages may be business or personal For more information, contact a team.Team Survivor Scentsy fundraiserTeam Survivor is holding a Scentsy fundraiser in February and March. The consultant has agreed to give 10 percent of all proceeds to Relay For Life. In the month of February, all products in the Scentsy catalog are 10 percent off the listed pricem excluding licensed items and combination packs. For a book or to place an order, call Cathrine Lamb at 326-0121, Cecilia Spears at 658-4038, Connie Wheeler at 260-4073 or Linda Bybee at 260-9658.Team Survivor to hold fundraiser at WalmartCHIPLEY Team Survivor will have a fundraiser with proceeds going to Washington County Relay For Life. The fundraiser will be at 7 a.m. April 14 in front of Walmart. There will be hair bows, hair ties, headbands, Scentsy and much more. For more information, call Linda Bybee at 260-9658, Cathrine Lamb at 326-0121 or Cecilia Spears at 658-4038.Area Relay for Life teams raising funds Wednesday, February 1, 2012 Holmes County Times Advertiser | B6 2-5031 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE N O.: 2008-CA-000374 AURORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. NICK VITTORIO A/K/A N. VITTORIO; JANE DOE; JOHN DOE; HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated October 5, 2009 and an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale Date dated this 10th day of January 2012, and entered in Case No. 2008-CA-000374, of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for Holmes County, Florida, wherein AURORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC is the Plaintiff and NICK VITTORIO AKA N. VITTORIO; JANE DOE; JOHN DOE; HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT (S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT STEPS OF THE HOLMES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 201 NORTH OKLAHOMA STREET, BONIFAY, FL 32425, 11:00 AM on the 16th day of February 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: THE SOUTH 10 ACRES OF THE SE OF THE SE OF SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 11th day of January 2012. CODY TAYLOR Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Diane Eaton Deputy Clerk. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser January 25, February 1, 2012. COLOR SELLS!Get Your Classified Ad in COLOR! Call now for details and be noticed! 638-0212 or 547-9414 2-5034 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 12-02PR IN RE: ESTATE OF JANET L. VAIL, Deceased. Division Probate NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Janet L. Vail, deceased, whose date of death was November 12, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for HOLMES County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 201 North Oklahoma Street, Bonifay, FL 32425. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is February 1, 2012. Attorney for Personal Representative: Lucas N. Taylor Attorney for William Newton Vail Florida Bar No. 670189 122B South Waukesha Street Bonifay, FL 32425 Telephone: (850) 547-7301 Fax: (850) 547-7303 Personal Representative: William Newton Vail, 1338 Dancey Landing Road, Bonifay, Florida 32425. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser February 1, 8, 2012. 2-5032 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO.: 2011-CA-212 DIVISION:, 21st MORTGAGE CORPORATION, etc., Plaintiff, vs. RONALD O. WILLIAMS, et al. Defendants NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment entered on January 10, 2012, in Case No: 2011-CA-212 of the Circuit Court, Holmes County Florida, in which 21st Mortgage Corporation is Plaintiff and Ronald O. Williams et al., are the defendants, the Clerk of this Court will sell at public sale the following described real property: Exhibit A: Commence at an existing iron pipe marking the northeast corner of NW 1/4 of NW 1/4 of section 27, township 6 north, range 15 west, Holmes County, Florida; thence N. 895925 W. along the north boundary line of said NW 1/4 of NW 1/4 for a distance of 147.58 feet to an iron rod, said rod being the point of beginning; thence S. 000230 W. for 295.16 feet to an iron rod; thence N. 895925 W. for 147.58 feet to an iron rod; thence N. 000230 E. for 295.16 feet to an iron rod set on the aforesaid north boundary line of NW 1/4 of NW 1/4; thence S. 895925 E. along said north boundary line for 147.58 feet to the point of beginning. This parcel is located in the NW 1/4 of NW 1/4 of section 27, township 6 north, range 15 west, Holmes County, Florida, and contains 1.00 acre, more or less. Together with 2006 Nobility Kingswood 44 x 28 manufactured home, Serial N o: N8-12597A/B, located on the property. The sale will be held on February 16, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. (Central) to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the front door of the Holmes County Courthouse, 201 N. Oklahoma St., Bonifay, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in the proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact ADA Coordinator, 201 N. Oklahoma St., Bonifay, Florida 3 2425. (850)747-5338 at least 7 days before you scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 11 day of January, 2012. CODY TAYLOR, CLERK OF SAID COURT By: Diane Eaton As Deputy Clerk. Lance P. Cohen, 1912 Hamilton St. Suite 206, Jacksonville, FL 32210, (904)388-6500, Attorney for Plaintiff. As published in the Holmes County Times Advertiser February 1, 8, 2012. Classifiedcan!If youre ready to move up or are just starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. Weve got properties at every price, with locations all over town! And if youre planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the markets best prospects.

PAGE 15

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 Holmes County Times Advertiser | B7 B B USINESS USINESS G G UIDE UIDE To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 To Place An Ad Call 638-0212 or 547-9414 Dentons RecyclingNEWBERRY LANE, BONIFAY, FLORIDAWE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS$ TOP $ PAID FOR JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & FARM EQUIPMENTMon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours(850) 547-4709 THARP & SONS MINI STORAGEHwy. 77 S., Chipley, FL(850) 638-8183Hwy. 177A, Bonifay, FL(850) 547-0726 5x5 $25.68 5x10 $35.31 10x10 $46.01 10x20 $80.25Open 24 Hours, Self-Service, No Deposit, Units are CarpetedVan Hillard Siding Co.Vinyl Siding Overhang & Facia Aluminum Patio Covers & Carports Energy E cient Windows Insulated Mobile Home Roof Systems Pressure Washing Wood Decks Screen Rooms Metal Roo ng Shingle Roo ng Painting Bonifay-Chipley 850-526-5029Free EstimatesOver 30 Years Experience Quality Workmanship Van Hillard We Do Good WorkDALES CHIMNEY SWEEPSComplete Chimney & Fireplace Services850-547-04103411 Spring Valley Lane Bonifay, FL 25 Years Experience HastyHeating & CoolingLic. #1814468, ER0013265, RF0066690, AL 03147 Serving Washington, Holmes and Jackson Counties for 16 Years With, Friendly and Reliable Service!Service On All Brands Sales For Residential & Commercial Commercial Refrigeration & Hoods638-3611Call For Monthly Specials HELP WANTEDPAINTERS NEEDEDD&G Painting & Remodeling849-7982 849-0736 Talk about a great deal, advertise your Business or Service here for only$18.00per week!8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 Advertise your business or service here for only$10.00per week8 week minimum638-0212 547-9414 Find the right person for your job today at emeraldcoastjobs.com 1,460 Sq Ft OfficeSpace for rent in Bonifay. 850-547-4238 Executive OfficeSpace for rent downtown Chipley. All util. incld 638-1918 For Rent: Bright 2BR/2BA screened porch Townhouse apartment. Non-Smoker, references. Good location Bonifay Area 850-547-3494 or 850-532-2177 SpaciousOne Bedroom $425 Stove & Refrigerator. Free W/S/G No Pets Convenient location Downtown Chipley 638-3306. A Few Pro Drivers Needed Top Pay & 401K 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com WANTED 10 HOMES needing siding, windows, roofs or sunrooms. Save hundreds of dollars. No money down. Payments $89/mo. All credit accepted. Senior/Military discounts! (866) 668-8681 Child Care needs loving person. Experience preferred. Call (850)547-1444. DriversExp. Tanker. Great Pay! Regional/ Linehaul. CDL-A w/ H&T Dbls. Good MVR. www. drive4sbi.com Paul 800-826-3413 Medical/HealthER ManagerNorthwest Florida Community Hospital, Chipley, FL, is seeking an experienced ER Manager. Florida RN license required. Must be customer service oriented.RN,ERAll shifts available, FL. license required. Applications available online:NFCH.org Fax (850)-638-0622 E-mail: dblount@nfch.org Ph (850)-415-8106 Drug Free and Smoke Free Work Place. EOE Web-Id 34195058Text fl95058 to 56654 Drivers: RUN 5 STATE REGIONAL! Get Home Weekends, Earn Up to 39/mi., 1 yr OTR Flatbed exp. reqd. SUNBELT TRANSPORTATION, LLC (800) 572-5489 ext. 227 Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of advertising! 122 weekly newspapers, 32 websites, 25 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida (866) 742-1373. Administrative The Chipley Housing Authority of the City of Chipley, Florida is seeking an experienced housing professional for the position of Executive Director who will direct the operations of an agency of 88 units of Conventional Public Housing and answer to a five member Board of Commissioners. Requirements include a Bachelors Degree in Public Administration, Finance, Business Administration or a related field with experience in public housing work, financial planning, administrative management or a combination of education, training and experience equivalent to these requirements.The successful candidate must be PHM certified or certifiable with in one year of employment The salary is negotiable and will be commensurate with qualifications and experience of the successful candidate. The Authority offers excellent health and retirement benefits. Successful candidate must obtain and maintain a valid FL drivers licenses, must be bondable, pass drug screening, criminal and credit check. A detailed letter of interest including salary requirements, detailed resume and reference in triplicate should be submitted no later that February 22, 2012 to: Search Committee Chipley Housing Authority P.O.Box 388 Chipley, Florida 32428-0388 Equal Opportunity Employer Wood mizer LT-40 bend sawmill 18 planer, electric powered. Oaiyer tractor 115 hp. Treated lumber, 184, 186, 286, 686, 284 on 2x4s, 16 ft. long. For more info call (850)547-0956 or (850)326-4548. Burn barrels $15.00. 2012 Nursing Drug handbook $75.00. Guinea birds $10.00 each. (850)373-2873, (850)319-5797. Caryville Flea Market Produce, knives, tupelo honey, fresh greens $1.50, western books, games, movies, new and used items. Open Saturdays. Commercial Tanning Bed. 32 light bed. $2500, OBO. 850-527-5250 Queen size plush Pillowtop Mattress Set New-in plastic, 10 yr. factory warranty. Can deliver. List price $799, sacrifice $240. (850)527-2295. Wanted to Rent : Farmland for 2012 season. (850) 415-1217. Wanted to Rent; Farm land or pasture in suroundding area. 850-718-1859. Wanted: Junk appliances. Lawn-mowers, farm and garden equipment, golf carts, satellites for free. I will pick up. Call (850)-547-0088 WANTED; Musical Instruments of any kind in any condition. Piano, banjoes, drums, guitars, amps. LESSONS. Covington Music, Chipley. 850-638-5050. Camellia Sale Up to 1/2 off reg prices! Many sizes & colors. Arbor Lane Nursury 2636 Bruner Dairy RD Vernon 850-535-9886 Huge Garage Sale Low Prices Sat Feb 4 744 3rd St LARGE ABANDONED GOODS SALE: Like a big Flea Market, but yard sale prices. Friday & Saturday February 3rd & 4th 8:00AM5:00PM. Located on the bypass (Maple Avenue) Geneva, AL. Near Courthouse. Multi-Family Garage sale Saturday Feb.4. 905 Banfill Ave. 8 a.muntil. All sizes name brand clothes-lots of girls size 10-12. Yard Sale Fri & SatFeb 3rd & 4th.Furniture, kids cloths,from 24 mth to teen, toys. 1362 Cherry Ave, behind WC Health Dept. Yard Sale Sat Feb 4 7:00AM 847 S 8th St 1 Blk behind Brock Paint & Body. 326-2920 Yard Sale Saturday Beside Shavers & Brock Furniture. Beds, reclining sofa, sofas, daybed,mattresss, headboards, children clothes. HANDGUN TRAINING-Learn the POINT SHOOT METHOD TAUGHT BY POLICE ACADEMIES. Our shooting equipment offers no flinch, no noise, no recoil. CBL Handgun Training 850-260-1342 Chipley SMALL LIVESTOCK & MISCELLANEOUS AUCTION 4100 Pate Pond Rd Vernon, Fl. Every Saturday Livestock-3 pm-bring your own cages. Miscellaneous-6pm. Cash, debit/credit cards. Refreshments available. Sellers welcome. No buyers premium. (850)547-9140, (850)415-0183, (850)326-1606. Michelle & HCs Auctions, Michelle Roof FL AU3014, AB2224 Firewood Delivered. Cut to length. (850)547-9291. B&B Furniture 1342 North RR Avenue, Chipley. We pay cash for clean, quality furniture. and some appaliences 850-557-0211 or 850-415-6866. Ask for Pasco or Carolyn HUGE 4 FAMILY YARD SALE. Sat Feb 4th @ 743 5th St Chipley.Baby, childrens, woman, men, plus size clothing & shoes, household items, furniture, nursery items, toys & yard toys. ALL PRICED TO GO!!!! A UCTION Sat.,February 25th, 2012-8am 5529 Hwy 231 N. Campbellton, FL. 3 Local Farm Dispersals, 2 Estates Bank Repos Sheriff Depts, City and County Surplus Plus Consignments Mason Auction & sales LLC.#AB2766 850-263-0473 office 850-258-7652 Chad Mason 850-849-0792 Gerald Masonwww.masonauction.com Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Earn College Degree Online. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (877) 206-5165 www.CenturaOnline.com RED GREEN LIVE Experience this hilarious one-man show! April 5th, Tampa Theatre (800-745-3000), April 7th, News-Journal Centre, Davidson Theatre, Daytona State College. (800-595-4849) www.redgreen.com For Rent first in Chipley, Mini Warehouses. If you dont have the room, We Do Lamar Townsend (850)638-4539, north of Townsends. C&C Bookkeeping and Tax Service. Open 5 days a week. 8am to 5pm. Call (850)638-1483 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Allied Health career training-Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com

PAGE 16

B8| Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, February 1, 2012 Jorge Says Come join us during our2961 Penn. Ave., Marianna, FL(850) 526-3511 1-800-423-8002 www.mariannatoyota.com All prices and discounts after any factory rebate, factory to dealer cash excludes tax, tag, registration, title and includes d ealer fees. Subject to pre-sale. MARIANNA TOYOTA 7 Years, 100,000 Mile Limited Powertrain Warranty 1 Year, 12,000 Miles Platinum Warranty**Sale ends 2/6/12Zero Down Approved Credit. Zero Down Approved Credit. Great Selection Special Lease Programs. Great Selection Special Lease Programs. Competitive Interest Rates. Competitive Interest Rates. Friendly Staff. No Games. Friendly Staff. No Games. Great Service & Parts Department. Great Service & Parts Department. No Gimmicks. 29 years of service No Gimmicks. 29 years of service u r PRE-OWNED VEHICLES SUPER SALE PRE-OWNED VEHICLES SUPER SALE Come check it out! Come check it out! New 2011 Toyota Avalon LimitedLeather, Sunroof, LoadedSAVE$4,000 Off MSRPModel # 3554 Stock # 9525New 2012 Toyota Sienna XLE LimitedNavigation, Leather, Sunroof, LoadedSAVE$5,000 Off MSRPModel # 5356 Stock # 9356New 2011 Toyota Corolla S4 door Automatic only 2 leftModel # 1834 MORE TO CHOOSE FROM! Chris FarrarSales Travis RussSales Aaron PetersonSalesVance McGoughSales Ronnie AllenSales Steve HughesSales Steven AdkisonSales Lester TinsleySales Mgr.David CumbieSales Mgr. Steve RobertsSales MARIANNA TOYOTA Remember, If You Cant Come to Us, Just Give Us a Call, and Well Drive it to You!MORE TO CHOOSE FROM MORE TO CHOOSE FROMGREAT SELECTION COMPETITIVE INTEREST RATES! GREAT SELECTION COMPETITIVE INTEREST RATES!All prices and discounts after any factory rebates, factory to dealer cash, excludes tax, tag, registration and title and incl udes dealer fees. Subject to Pre-sale. Toyota Tundra Double Cab, SR5, Auto, Sharp, Super Deal $19,949 Toyota Highlander, Limited Edition, Loaded, Come get it! Toyota FS Cruiser, auto, low miles, Super Nice, SAVE! Toyota Sequoia Limited, loaded, Tow Package, alloys, leather, SHARP! Toyota Corolla, 4-door sedan, automatic, low payments! Toyota 4-Runner, SR5-V6, Local Trade Toyota Rav4, Automatic, Sharp! Toyota Camry LE 4-door automatic, come get it! Toyota Highlander, automatic, special $17,974 Tundra Double Cab Limited, V8, 4x4, Ready to Go! Toyota Landcruiser, 4x4, Sunroof, Leather, Special $26,888 Toyota Avalon, luxury, price to go $14,888 1 Toyota 4-Runner Limited, Navigation, Leather, Sunroof, Low miles 1 Toyota Corolla LE, 4-door, automatic, only 8K miles, save! 1 Toyota Sequoia Platinum Edition one owner 1 Toyota Tacoma Double cab, Pre-runner V-6, sharp! 1 Toyota Camry XLE, V6, navigation, leather, sunroof, SAVE! 1 Toyota Camry LE, 4-door, power package, Dont Miss It! $17,688 Toyota Venza, auto, power package, alloy wheels, SHARP! Toyota Tundra, Double Cab, SR5, V-8, Special SHARP! Toyota Corolla LE, 4-Door, Automatic, Priced To Go! Toyota 4-Runner Limited, Navigation, loaded Toyota Prius, Great Gas Mileage! Toyota Camry LE, leather, sunroof, alloy wheels, SAVE! New 2012 Toyota Prius V HybridIn Stock NowModel # 1243 Stock # 9750New 2012 Toyota TacomaDouble Cab, Automatic TRD w/ navigation, 18 wheelsModel #7188 Stock # 9757New 2012 Toyota Camry LAutomatic 4 doorModel # 2514 Stock # 9711 Chrysler 300M4-Door Sharp!$12,8481 Honda CRV EX-LLeather, Sunroof only 7k miles$ Save Dodge 1500Reg. Cab, Auto Trans., Special$5,449 Chevy TahoeLeather w/ Barn doors, must see$9,888 Dodge 1500V-8 4x4, Automatic, 62k milesSuper Deal$12,848 DodgeCaravanFamily vehicle must go Super Deal$7,888 Honda RidgelineAutomatic, 4x4Special$16,949 Jeep Wrangler44, Only 27K Miles, Sharp! Cadillac 8RXLeather, Navigation, Luxury Honda Accord EX-LLeather, Sunroof, V6, Sharp!$21,888 Lincoln Town CarLuxury, 59k miles Special$11,949Mercedes-BenzS550 Luxury Low, Low miles Ford EdgeSharp utility vehicle Special$17,988 Toyota Camry LEAuto, Spoiler, Special!$8,848 Chevy TrailblazerClean, low miles, only 44k milesSave! Great Selection From Corollas to Sequoias, All Priced To Sell, Come Check It Out! Toyota Sienna LEFamily van Must goSuper Deal$8,779 Toyota Rav4Automatic, Must go$11,879 Ford Windstarmini van, family vehicleSuper$5,579 Nissan Armadaonly 14k miles Nice, one ownerSave $ PT CruiserAutomatic Price to go$4,990 COMPLETE PACKAGES FROM $4,995All Welded, All Aluminum BoatsBonifay Floridawww.xtremeindustries.com(850) 547-9500 Bonifay Florid a Xtreme BoatsFACTORY DIRECT Your land or family land is all you need to buy a new home. Call 850-682-3344 Buell S3 Thunderbolt Motorcycle, Harley Davidson Motor, runs great and garage kept, 17,000 miles. $3,500!! Call 850-271-5761 and leave a message. 1988 DODGE P/UP Automatic, air-assist breaks. $700/OBO 96 TOYOTA TACOMA Auto, AC, radio, CD, liner, box, hitch $3,1000/OBO 99 DODGE DAKOTA SPORT LONG BED. V.6-3.9 L engine auto. AC, radio, hitch, steel, wheels $ 2,850/OBO PRIVATE OWNER Please leave name/# Chipley, 850-638-3306 For sale ford F600 18 ft flat bed dump plus scissor lift. For construction or hay. Receiver hitch, V8, 2 speed $4300 Call 956-2220 2003 Venture LS Van 6 passenger. Runs good. 97,000 miles. $4,000 firm. Call (850)547-2427. 99 Pontiac Grand Prix $575 down 02 Dodge Durango $ 675 down 02 Ford F250 X/Cab 4 Door $975 down 02 Chevy Silverado X/Cab 4 Door $2000 down 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!!! $37,000 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. Reduced Price! Two 8 acres on Bedie Rd Two 9 acres on Bedie Rd. Two 5 acres & One 10 acres on Buddy Rd. One 10 acres on Gainer Rd. 10 acres on Hwy 77. Owner financing For more info call Milton Peel @ 850-638-1858. Driver -Start out the year with Daily Pay and Weekly Hometime! Single Source Dispatch. Van and Refrigeration. CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. (800) 414-9569 www.driveknight.com 5 Acres TrackFor Sale 40 miles North of PanamaCity Beach,1 mile off Hwy 79. Owner financing w/$3000 down 0% interest for 2 yr $200/mth. Mike Stansberry 423-253-4226 Mobile Homes in Cottondale on Sapp Rd, 8 miles E. of Chipley. 3br/2ba Doublewide & 2br/2ba singlewide avail. Total elec. (850)-258-4868 or 850-209-8847 www.charlos countryliving.com 2BR/2BA, MH for rent. on Pioneer Rd. Call 850-638-7315, 850-849-6842 or 638-9933. 3BD/2BA MH 3/4 mile from Elementary School. On Hwy 177A. Family oriented park. Call (850)547-3746. 3BD/2BA MH. Very nice & on private lot w/ extras on the Mill Pond in Marianna. $600/mth $600 deposit 638-7822 3BD/2BA Mobile Home. In quiet Chipley park CH/A W/D hook up. No Pets. $475/mth plus deposit 638-0560 or 850-774-3034 For Rent 2 BR/ 2BA MH in Bonifay. Water & sewage included. 638-2999 For Rent 3 bedroom 2 Bath in quiet area Water & gar barge furnished. No pets. $ 550/ mth $250 deposit 850-638-8570 Ridgewood Apartments of Bonifay Studio $350, 2 bedroom $470 City utilities incl. (850)557-7732. Cute House in the Country! 4 BR/ 2BA $850/mth, section8 okay. Call Amy @ 786-586-9826 Small 3BR/1BA in Vernon. Newly updated $550/mth. $550 deposit. HUD accepted. 850-527-5250 2 and 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes for rent in Bonifay. No Pets. (850)547-3462. 2BD Mobile Home on Large lot no pets. 1772 Old Bonifay Rd. 638-1716Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. Washington County News (850) 638-0212 Holmes County Times-Advertiser (850) 547-9414