Holmes County times-advertiser
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PDF VIEWER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100549/00122
 Material Information
Title: Holmes County times-advertiser
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
Place of Publication: Bonifay, FL
Publication Date: 06-22-2011
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00100549:00122

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text


















er


o HOLMES COUNTY


Holmes County High Graduation
B1


Wednesday, JUNE 22,2011 www.bonifaynow.com Volume 121, Number 10 50C


For the latest
breaking news, visit
BONIFAYNOW.(OM

INSIDE


Join the conversation
on Facebook
A4


Money woes for Bonifay council


By Steve Liner
Managing Editor
The only difference in lis-
tening in on a Bonifay City
Council meeting and a fam-
ily financial review is that
tax dollars are discussed.
Bottom line: There sim-
ply isn't enough money to
stretch over all the priori-
ties. Whether the council
is discussing finishing a
contract for the roof at City
Hall, the water system or
the state of Memorial Stadi-
um, as they did during their
June 14 meeting, it all boils


down to money, the need for
it and where it might come
from.
By the end of last week,
the council was hoping
finishing touches would
be completed on a long-
standing, contract to make
repairs to the roof of City
Hall, complete with a new
awning over the drive-thru
service window. Ultimately,
their contractor's represen-
tative said all work should
be finished before a review
to mark substantial comple-
tion on June 26.
One challenge for the


council has been the chang-
es in the long-standing
project have not been prop-
erly documented through
change orders with the
contractor.
"This is just a typical
Bonifay City Council situ-
ation," a frustrated Rog-
ers Brooks finally blurted
out as the issue was being
discussed at the recent
meeting.
Next, the council hopes
to turn its attention to
more efficient and effective
lighting and air condition-
ing in City Hall - when it


can find the money. Such a
move would allow the city
to get maximum benefits
from the improved insula-
tion and new roof, accord-
ing to Councilman Richard
Woodham.
Another key concern for
the council was the needed
repairs at Memorial Field.
Woodham, who has been
charged in meeting with the
Bonifay Kiwanis Clubs and
Holmes County Schools
concerning the repairs in-
dicated progress has been
made.
Next, the council turned


I


its attention to derelict prop-
erties around town that are
not in compliance with city
ordinances, and instruc-
tions were given to pass out
warnings and, in one case of
an unlicensed business, the
police department was in-
structed to move forward.
A result of new state law
concerning growth man-
agement and planning will
cause the city to host a pub-
lic meeting of the planning
board, the mayor said. Date
and time for the meeting
will be announced at a later
date, he said.


olmes Schools

weathering

'continuous


Anglers help in
Snapper research


Miss Watermelon
B1


Global Ministries lends
helping hand at BCF
B4


INDEX
Opinion ............................ A4
Arrests ............................. A5
Outdoors.......................... A6
Sports ................. .............. A7
Extra..................... ............ BI
Obituaries ............................. B3
Faith ..................... ........... B4
Classifieds......................... 6-B8

FREEDOM
F L 0 R T D A
NEWSPAPERS-INTERACTIVE

Phone: 850-547-9414
Web site: bonifaynow.com
Fax: 850-547-9418




6 1111142694 00008 1
6 4 2694 C0000C8 1


Washi rn; Homes and Ba c nties - decline' in revenue

submit Dr aht Disaster Declaration to state By Gary Gway
lm,: ByGry alonway


By (edlia Spears
j~t.tt NVI-It,1
(speats- dip~eypapel. (



(LI lit


and1(1a th-' o(iLet-I ('Ia Ii za Lo 'ii
L, 0(11Th- L11) '% li � i a Iitinh-' t
I-ICUl Litiir-and1(1 irstoLck[DI-



I llsl lb-IP a1(1La i-i 11 1 DI IiSrl



Decartin o aileilirto


enmcin fi ina ncialI IardshiIp~.s. L !t-llt- - 1 - -ps
aII Andrlaem -iSI' ...1IiT- n-L- ti- ni.
6:--) b~ ~ to 711da% s, cau]' I;t uit S, I tIC AD
20 c* i<.O percict-nL of the i I - -i�a.44 -td- 'h -id-
a al L1 IMI Ii be Uc4 ..i I

~P~tts eIxte JflIidSP* *~~ all the faiqri~ea~s et


conditions." Andreasen said
" Fitti to 6,,1 percent of
plants hale come Lip. but there
are a lot It slkips in the i ro\s
and a ery :,- lo\\ plant popula-
tion," lie said --The majority
ot these crops are \%here the
crops hale died and the tarinm-
ers had replanted then three
or tourl' times
He said that \' hat \\ as need-
ed \\as a mood. general rain to
ble repeated eiery \Leek tor
several weekss to Ret the crops
to lbe decently sallaoeable
-"A problem \ith some
areas is that eren it they
do oet rain. \\e'lre see-
imi silns t \\hire mold."
Andreasen said "It \%e et an
a\ eraoe rainfall, then the \" hte


do is --pray olr rain "
."\e need, at the least, a
0ood quarter oat an inch ot rain
a da.y woi seiertal weeks s and
everyone needs to get it," hei
said "L e' e had some iso-
lated showers, but unless you
\iere nah1t under the cIloud it
didn't hell)pyou much "
He said that another con-
cern \\as that problems \ithl
crops al\a.s attects nimo-e
than just the tal-niers, but the
cattle ranchers too
--They'\e gotten to (the
point \here theyL hale to ball
\\heat stra\ tor the cattle.
otherwise they'll hame to sell
their cattle." he said "-Animials
need stood el eralday, and taaln-
ers are doing eerie thino they
can to oet all kind ot toraae
they can oet "
The majority ot tJhese
talniers also depend on ro\\ -
me soy and cotton atter their
\\ heat crops, but there hasn't
been enough nmo[Isture to
ro\\ soy.
--To make matters horse e is
that those that hale managed
to eroi\\ some soy,. the deer
hale tound it and ate it to the
round." Andreasen said "So
\ 2e'e 0ot the drought condi-l
tons to contend \%ith and no\\
\\e're ettinl lthe animals to
tend on. it's a tough year to
l)e a tarnier In this part ot the
country"


CATHERINE LAMB | !. _..... .\ ,, .w.. .
A bove lr.:::..,:jl-,t .:.::.e i
paul ,ia leo r.:::. cr.:ops Ca&led
alO lose ,.,.,e:.ll oas ,:razwn,:l
becco:n-es scarce e


Superintendent of Schools
Special to the Times-Advertiser


Editor's Note: Superintendent
Galloway provided this report at
the request of the Times-Advertiser
in the interest of keeping voters in-
formed of the challenges facing local
schools - Steve Liner
Over the past four years, the Hol-
mes County School District has been
coping with a continuous decline in
revenue. Our district budget during
the 2006/2007 school was approxi-
mately $25,000,000; the projected
budget for the 2011-2012 school year
is approximately $20,000,000 this
amount includes a $1.85 million cut
from 2010-2011. Districts have been
told to expect another 5 percent cut
during the 2012/2013 school year. If
the state decreases our budget by 5
percent next year, then the district
will have experienced a 25.5 percent
decline in funds in recent years.
Dealing with this shortfall in funds
has been a tremendous challenge. A
few of the actions that the district
has taken are as follows:
*No raises for employees, except
for steps totaling approximately
$225,000 per year.
*No extension of the drop pro-
gram beyond the sixth year.
*Reducing rehired/retired per-
sonnel to a beginning salary with 7
years experience.
*Drastic reduction of the use of
substitutes when employees are absent.
*Limited expenditures in mainte-
nance with no new construction at all.
*Grants have been revised to
direct funds to salaries as much as
possible.
*Principal's have not overspent
their budgets and have adhered to
their spending plans.
*The Voluntary Pre-K program
was historically going over budget by
approximately $100,000 per year, but
this year it has operated within bud-
get and has approximately $10,000 in
reserve.
*The district has absorbed
over 50 positions, mostly through
retirements and resignations; we will
continue to absorb positions at every
opportunity.
*Lunchrooms have reduced over

See HOLMES SCHOOLS A3


_n" WeJt With U Follow Us
T HOLMES COUNTY .4lU4l ' On Facebook E

Simes 2417

a, dver tiser vid Get breaking news, And


www.bonifaynow.com


photo galleries, opinions
& more...


ivwiovt


NE ~*I


LtfT


7






A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser


Local


Wednesday, June 22, 2011


BANK OF BONIFAY




Moxley to be mortgage originator


Debbie Moxley has with their home financing
accepted the mort- needs.
gage originator po- -..'.. With more than
sition at The Bank ' - 19 years of bank-
of Bonifay, a divi- * k--. ing and mortgage
sion of First Feder- - , experience, Moxley
al Bank of Florida. is knowledgeable
Moxley will be -:-' in front line sales,
working at the Mar- ____ new accounts,
ianna branch on DEBBIE consumer loans
2914 Green St. and MOXLEY and mortgages.
will be responsible She also has sev-
for assisting customers eral years' experience as a


legal assistant in real es-
tate law firms.
Most recently, Moxley
was Mortgage Loan Origi-
nator at Regions Bank.
During her banking years
she has received such ac-
colades as top producer,
superior customer service
ratings and was recognized
on two different occasions
by the U.S. Department
of Agriculture's Office of


Rural Development for her
volume of loans.
"We are excited that
Debbie has joined our
team," said Park Jones, di-
rector of lending. "With her
excellent customer service
track record and mortgage
expertise, Debbie makes
an excellent addition to
The Bank of Bonifay."
Moxley is actively in the
Jackson County Chamber,


an affiliate member of the
Chipola Area Board of Re-
altors and is vice chairman
of the Jackson County Af-
fordable Housing Advisory
Committee.

Bank of Bonifay
The Bank of Bonifay, a
division of First Federal
Bank of Florida, offers a
comprehensive portfolio


of products and services
for personal and business
customers.
Established in 1906, The
Bank of Bonifay in con-
junction with First Federal
has 18 branches located
in Amelia Island, Bonifay,
Bradenton, Chipley, Dowl-
ing Park, Jasper, Lake City,
Live Oak, Macclenny, Mari-
anna, Mayo, Sarasota and
Yulee.


J.D. OWENS INC.
Carpet & Ceramic Outlet
YOUR HOMETOWN LOW PRICE!
CARPET, CERAMIC, PORCELAIN, VINYL,
NAFCO, LAMINATE, HARDWOOD & AREA RUGS
We've Got It At The Price You Want!
HII 1 0a1'


HUGE REMNANT SALE!
12' x 10'9" Gold Frieze................................ 90
12' x 12' Mingled Frieze....................... $13550
12' x 12' Berber ..............................1... s11990
12' x 13' Mint Plush...........................1... 3550
12' x 14' Pattern Comm....................... $19990
12' x 14'10" Pattern Comm....................$... 10550
12' x 15' Cream Frieze........................ 18550
12' x 15'6" Chocolate Frieze.................. 8550
12' x 16'7" Blue Frieze............................. 17990
12' x 16' Pattern Comm....................... 14550
12' x 19'10" Purple Frieze .........................22990
12' x 23' Frieze...................................... 27990






e Place To Shoop
fIIoney fmattOeR '


Traffic stop leads to marijuana arrests


At 2:38 Friday morning
an officer with the Bonifay
Police Department con-
ducted a traffic stop on a
2009 Chevrolet truck for a
speed violation. As the offi-
cer approached the driver's
door a strong odor of burnt
marijuana was detected.
Flirther investigation led to
the discovery and seizure
of approximately 24 grams
of suspected marijuana
packaged for individual


MICHAEL WILLIAM CLARK
CLAY HOCUTT LEDBETTER
sale. Numerous items of
drug paraphernalia asso-
ciated with marijuana use
were located as well, along


with alcoholic beverages
and approximately $400 in
cash.
The driver of the vehicle
was identified as William
Clark Ledbetter a white
male, 20, from Bessemer,
Ala. He and his passen-
ger, identified as Michael
Clay Hocutt, a white male,
20, from Birmingham, Ala.
were placed under arrest
and taken to the Holmes
County Jail.


Ledbetter was been
charged with possession of
marijuana over 20 grams
with intent to distribute,
possession of drug para-
phernalia and possession of
alcohol under 21. Bond was
set in his case at $7,000.
Hocutt was booked on
charges of possession of
drug paraphernalia and
possession of alcohol un-
der 21. He pled to county
probation.


Florida names new Commissioner of Education


TAMPA (AP) - Virginia's current
education secretary, Gerard Robin-
son, has been named Florida's new
education commissioner.
The six members of the State
Board of Education conducted the
interviews June 20 in the Hillsborough
Grand Ballroom at the Tampa Airport
Marriott, allowing each candidate up
to an hour to answer questions and
make the case for his or her selection
as Commissioner of Education.
None took the entire time allotment,
and all enjoyed cordial exchanges
about their qualifications, goals and
management styles.


Other candidates were Stacia
A. Smith, an Ohio educator who
earned her bachelor's degree at the
University of Florida; former New
Jersey Commissioner Bret Schundler,
who was fired by Gov. Chris Christie
last August because of an improperly
completed grant application that cost
the state some $400 million in federal
aid; Florida native Loretta Costin,
now the state's Career and Adult
Education Chancellor; and Thomas
P Jandris, called himself "the hybrid
candidate," because of his experience
as an entrepreneur, educator,
consultant and political advisor.


The last interview went to
Robinson. From a working-class Los
Angeles upbringing to a master's
degree in education from Harvard, he
told the board, "I don't have a career.
I have a calling." A strong supporter
of school choice, he said it is a priority
to find common ground with various
groups and to listen to their concerns
before making a decision. His style,
he said, is "to lead without running
over" people. He said he believes in a
variety of public-private partnerships
to help solve problems in supporting
and improving schools. "Always look,
listen and learn," he added.


3032E Compact Utility Tractor
* 31.4HPI Yanmar� diesel engine
* Hydrostatic transmission
* Standard 4WD

As low as
$158/MONTH**


5083E Limited Utility Tractor
* 83HP John Deere PowerTech'" 4-cylinder
turbocharged diesel engine
* 12F/12R PowrReverserT' transmission
* MFWD
As low as

$465/MONTH^


Samson, AL 3 WEST MAIN STREET......(334) 898-7156
Mon - Fri: 6:00 am - 5:00 pm * Sat: 6:00 am -1:00 pm
Dothan, AL 168 ROSS CLARK CIRCLE......(334) 794-0691
Mon- Fri: 7:00 am - 5:00 pm Sat: 7:00 am -1:00 pm
Offer ends 6/30/2011 Prices and model avalabiity may vary by dealer Some restrictionsapply, other specialrates
and other financing options Available at participating dealers **Offer ends 6/30/2011 Subject to approved credl
j, . l l ,.


BEST SERVICE UNDER THE SUN.
Facebook
d terms may be available, so see yourdealer for details
n John Deere Financial Revolvng Plan, a serviceofFPC


O JOHN DEERE


Doctors Memorial Hospital
"' .'.n Hiii,' H . ,,,'.. < .'./,/,,'' H , "... !'"


In recognition of


00000 Men's Health Month
mIAEFAmEE and


mIIIIIm National
SMmEONE Men's Health Week



The Clinical Laboratory

is offering

FREE Screenings for Men
through June 30, 2011

Screenings include Glucose, Cholesterol and PSAs
No appointment necessary, fasting recommended




Alarming statistics show that

a man's health is at great risk.
* Men do not see physicians for a physical exam nearly as
often as women
* Men are dying of the top causes of death at higher rates
than women
* Men are more likely to be uninsured than women
* Approximately 30,000 men in the US die each year from
prostate cancer



DOCTORS
MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
2600 Hospital Drive Bonifay, FL 32425
850-547-8000


NE ~*I


n






Wednesday, June 22, 2011


Local


Holmes County Times-Advertiser I A3


Bonifay Lions sponsor 'Recycle for Sight' luncheon


Special to the Times-Advertiser

The Bonifay Lions Club
members are asking resi-
dents to look through dress-
er drawers and closets for
used eyeglasses and donate
them to the Lions Recycle
For Sight program. In con-
junction with the collection
effort, a learning luncheon
took place at 12 noon on
Tuesday, June 28, at Doctors
Memorial Hospital.
Dr. Kelly Smith, from the


Eye Center giae a presen-
tation on "The Aging Eye."
Admission to the luncheon
was free with a donation of
one pair of used eyeglasses.
For more information on the
program and how you can
help call (850) 547-8193.
The Bonifay Lions Club
will be continually collect-
ing used prescription eye-
glasses and prescription and
non-prescription sunglasses
as part of a unique recy-
cling program. The donated


glasses will be shipped to a
regional Lions Eyeglass Re-
cycling Center where they
will be cleaned, categorized
by prescription and prepared
for distribution by Lions and
other groups.
In most developing coun-
tries, an eye exam can cost
as much as one month's
wages and a single eye doc-
tor may serve a community
of hundreds of thousands of
people. Locally, the club has
already helped several citi-


zens in need of replacement
eyeglasses.
To donate used glasses
(including sunglasses and
reading glasses), place them
in the specially marked Lions
Recycle For Sight collection
boxes presently located in
the Doctors Memorial Hos-
pital lobby, 2600 Hospital
Drive and the office of Dr.
Cliff Wood, OD, 408 E. Hwy.
90 in Bonifay.
Visit www.lionsclubs.
org or call (850) 849-7151.


HOLMES SCHOOLS from page Al


MeoilStces , ee baneDcl








TeSign Lad

63899


budget expenditures from
approximately $280,000 per
year to less than $50,000 per
year.
* Fulinds spent on In-ser-
vice training and travel have
been dramatically reduced.
* Transportation proce-
dures have been revised and
resulted in an approximate
increase of $400,000 in new
monies.
* Only four new district
buses in the last three years.
Other factors that make
dealing with the revenue
decline a challenge is the in-
crease in costs that the dis-
trict has little or no control
over including
*Health insurances rates
have increased by 14 per-
cent for an additional cost of


$215,000 per year.
*Increasing fuel prices
could cost the district an ad-
ditional $300,000 per year.
* Electricity cost and even
the price of trash pickup
have increased significantly.
*Costs related to State
mandated class size reduc-
tion will continue to be a sig-
nificant expenditure.
*All schools must be fully
digital in 5 years.
The Holmes District
School System has had
many challenges in dealing
with the decreasing budget;
however, personnel at all
levels have been willing to
step up and do more without
compensation. The Super-
intendent and School Board
members for the Holmes


Watch First Baptist Church - Panama City
On Your Local Television Station.
MEDIA: COM - : hnnel '
M.:.n.avs- - T AM r. FM 11 M
Tuestidyv - - AM .6 FPM FPM 11 PM
VVeonesdasv - 7 AM 6 F M 11 FM M


County Schools appreciate
everything that everyone
has done. It has truly been a
team effort.
Even during this time of
challenges, personnel and
students have stepped up
to the plate as indicated by
our Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test (FCAT)
scores. Across the board the
district ranged from a few
points below the state aver-
age to a few points above the
state average. Our percent-
age of students who scored
three and above in reading
at the ninth and 10th grade
was the same as the state
average while our eighth
grade students were five
points above the state aver-
age in reading. Our math-


ematics scores continue to
parallel the state average.
Our science scores were just
below the state average for
eighth and llth grade. There
was a wider discrepancy at
fifth grade; we are review-
ing and developing plans for
improvement.
Most of our schools
showed an increase in learn-
ing gains over last year, but
there is still room for im-
provement. This year the
state has transitioned to a
more difficult test, FCAT 2.0,
which reflects the more rig-
orous Next Generation Sun-
shine State Standards. Our
district is still in the process
of reviewing the data and in-
structional decisions will be
made based on this data.


Get Professional Results
in Your Own Backyard.


RZ3016 Zero Turn Mower
* 16.5 hp Briggs & Stratton OHV Intek
engine
* 30" deck, electric start
* Adjustable cutting from 1.5" to 4.5" in
1/2" increments
Price...$2,299.95


RZ5424 Consumer Zero Turn
Mower
S24 hp Kohler Courage engine
* 54" deck, electric start
*Adjustable cutting from 1.5" to 4.5" in
1/2" increments
Price...$2999.95


www.husqcom




eljII.I~] ! [el I"J I 1mm11I


NE ~*I


FAIR HOUSING
The City of Bonifay is an Equal Housing
Opportunity Community. In an effort to
further Fair Housing Practices, the City of
Bonifay has passed a Fair Housing Ordinance
which states that it is illegal to discriminate
against any person because of race, color,
religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or
national origin in accordance with the Fair
Housing Amendments Act of 1988. Anyone
who feels he or she has been discriminated
against may file a complaint of housing
discrimination by call 1-800-927-9275 or
contact the City of Bonifay at (850) 547-
4238.










A4 Holmes County Times-Advertiser


Opinion


Wednesday, June 22, 2011


A visit to the Isagora Community and the BHS Class of '53


An impromptu invitation
from Jean Brown Rich
last Saturday morning
had me heading north on
highway 179 about noon

the Bethlehem
graduating class of
1953 were gathering
at the home of
Mavis Harris Oliver
for an informal
lunch. Because my
husband wasn't HAPPY
able to attend, Hazel WV
I headed out by
myself. Not sure of where I
was heading, I just knew if
I got to Isagora Church, I'd
gone too far. Fortunately,
I found my way to the old
home of the Harris family
where Mavis now resides.
It's a good thing I didn't
need to ask directions as
there was no one a-stir in
those parts of the county on
that hot morning.


I


I was reminded of when
I took the Farm Census in
that area in 1953. As I went
from house to house in the
Holmes County portion
of the Gritney
community, I found
almost no human
habitation, only
Bantam chickens. I
began to think that
the "Rapture" had
occurred and I had
CORNER been left behind.
1s Tison When I arrived
at the old Harris
Homestead set among the
spreading live oak trees
where Mavis, Ralph, Roy
and Dowling grew up, I
found a group of Bethlehem
High School Class of 1953
gathered. They were a
small class, but Mavis,
Jean, Fred Andrews,
Virginia Forehand Hendrix,
Shirley Clark Taylor and
Barbara Bryant Moore


were there. Melba Pate
Andrews, and Hubert
Hendrix, who were also
Bethlehem graduates, were
in attendance along with
Jo Brown, sister-in-law to
Barbara and yours truly.
It was interesting to
see Mavis living the rural
life after so many years of
following her late husband
about the country to his
Naval appointments. Her
kitchen counter contained
brown yard eggs from her
chickens and home grown
tomatoes. She, Virginia
and Melba were working
side by side to serve the
gracious lunch as if 58
years had not intervened
since they were classmates
at BHS.
I remembered the
class of 1953 because I
substituted as a teacher
at Bethlehem during
those years. I particularly


remembered helping
put make-up on the cast
members for their Junior
Class play of which Fred
was a member. He even
remembered his stage
name. Virginia remembered
me demonstrating a
basket-ball cheer (pregnant
though I was) for the girls
at their practice. She also
remembered how they
aspired to be a newly wed
as I was.
Jean and Mavis
reminisced about their
days at Isagora School
which was located at
the site of the Isagora
Methodist Church. In fact,
the building where they
attended first through
seventh grades is still there
and is used as a fellowship
hall for the church. They
especially remembered
a beloved teacher Dixie
Whitaker who, though


kind and caring, had
no reservations about
punishing the disobedient.
They remembered her
taking all her students at
the end of the year to the
store about a mile up the
road. She gave them each a
nickle to spend on whatever
they chose. Then, a nickle
would buy a Coca Cola, a
large Moon Pie, a package
of chewing gum, 5 pieces of
penny candy or some other
mouth-watering delicacy.
Isagora is one of the
oldest schools in the
county. In fact, Whitmill
Curry, the first School
Superintendent, grew up
in that community. Curry's
Ferry, a Holmes County
landmark, is just west of
the church and school.
In 1918, it is listed in the
Heritage of Holmes County
as having 29 students. EM.
Murphy was the teacher.


Later, it was a two teacher
school with grades one
through four in one room
and grades five through
eight in the other.
When the Brown
children and the Harris
children attended there
through the 1940s, a small
lunch room was in back
where lunches of pork and
beans and other commodity
foods were served.
However, most of the years,
the children carried their
biscuits and sausage, fried
ham, baked sweet potato
or whatever our Mama's
could find to stuff in them.
Like the Wells children
at Bracken School where
we went, it was usually
wrapped in a newspaper or
carried in a syrup bucket.
Those days are more fun
to remember in retrospect
than when they actually
were happening.


Letters to THE EDITOR


Killed by medical
negligence
Why does Florida law
allow unmarried adults
with no children younger
than 25 and retired people
without spouses to be killed
by medical negligence
without recourse? Florida
statue 768.21 elevates only
doctors, hospitals and
other health care providers
to this exalted status of
having virtual immunity
for negligently killing some
of the most defenseless
members of our society, i.e.,
the elderly, the disabled,
and the underemployed.
My mother is one of the
elderly who was killed by
the medical negligence
of the ER doctor and his
unconcerned nursing staff
on the night of Oct. 11


and 12, 2009, at Doctor's
Memorial Hospital in
Bonifay. The doctor let
my mother bleed out of
a brain aneurysm, when
he could have saved her
life by transferring her
to Flowers Hospital in
Dothan per my repeated
requests to him. My heart
breaks when I think of how
the doctor and ER staff
treated her that night.
Their neglect in giving
her the wrong medication,
withholding the correct
medication, denying my
repeated requests for her
transfer, not ordering a
head CT scan, not ordering
a C-spine of her neck,
not continuing vital signs
on her, not performing a
fundoscopic exam (eye
exam) on her, failing to
recognize her symptoms as


HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?
Letters to the editor and comments on Web versions
of news stories are welcomed.
Letters are edited only for grammar, spelling,
clarity, space and consistency, but we ask that they
be limited to 300 words where possible. Letter writers
are asked to provide a home address and daytime
telephone number (neither is printed) for verification
purposes.
Letters may be sent to 1364 N. Railroad Ave.,
Chipley, FL 32428 or emailed to news@chipleypaper.
com. Please specify if the letter should be printed
in the Washington County News or Holmes County
Times-Advertiser.
Questions may be addressed _
to Managing Editor Steve Liner by --
calling 638-0212 or via email at
sliner@chipleypaper.com.



T!- HOLMES (COUNTY

Limes

Advertiser

Nicole P. Barefield, Publisher
Steve Liner, Managing Editor
Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor
Brad Goodyear, Composition Supervisor
The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Florida
Freedom Newspapers Inc., 112 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifay, FL
32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifay, Florida.
� Copyright 2011, Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Holmes
County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and
cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the
expressed permission of Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
Holmes County
Times-Advertiser
P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425
USPS 004-341


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
IN COUNTY
13 weeks: $12.61; 26 weeks:
$18.90; 52 weeks: $30.45
OUT OF COUNTY
13 weeks: $16.17; 26 weeks:
$24.20; 52 weeks: $40.95


Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions.


CONTACTS
PUBLISHER
Nicole Barefield: nbarefield@chipleypaper.com
MANAGING EDITOR
Steve Liner: sliner@chipleypaper.com
NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION
news@bonifaynow.com
CLASSIFIED & CIRCULATION
Melissa Kabad: mkabaci@chipleypaper.com
1-800-645-8688
ADVERTISING
850-547-9414


WANTMORE?
Find us online at
chipleypaper.com,
friend us on Facebook, or
tweet us @WCN HCT.


The views expressed here
are not necessarily those
of this paper or Freedom
Communications.


an intracranial catastrophe
and not timely recognizing
the doctors limitations and
the limitations of Doctors
Hospital and their inability
to care for my mother
appropriately. When my
mother was code blue, it
took them nine attempts
and about one-and-a-half
hours to intubate her. I
have never received an
explanation from the
doctor or the hospital as to
why it took nine attempts
and so long. This caused
my mother tremendous
suffering and resulted
in her untimely death.
This also resulted in the
doctor being found guilty of
Medical malpractice by the
Department of Health and
the Board of Medicine. For
this much, I am grateful.
But, Florida statue
768.21 needs to be changed.
Those of us who have lost
a loved one due to medical
malpractice or wrongful
death need to be able to
hold those responsible
accountable for their
actions. This statue states
if the person has no spouse
(due to death or divorce) or
has no dependents younger
than 25, you can't recover
for anything other than the
funeral and the medical
bills (if you paid them.)
I miss my mother
terribly; she was my
best friend, mentor and
confidant. She encouraged
me to be all I can and is
responsible for me going


back to school to get my
degree. Her grandchildren
miss her and her great-
grandchildren ask "where
is grandma?" She was not
your typical 75-year-old.
She was healthy and very
active. She held down a full-
time job and was Awana
leader at church. I try
so hard to push back the
tears and the image of her
bald, scarred head lying
unresponsive in Flowers
hospital. I fight the heart
wrenching reality that she
was taken prematurely
from our family. I can
still see the anger of the
neurologist at Flowers
Hospital when he realized
he couldn't operate on my
mother until the effects of
the wrong drugs wore off
(that ER doctor in Bonifay
gave her). In a situation
where time is golden,
the actions of Bonifay
ER doctor took that time
away from my mother.
The horrible actions of
the doctor have shaken
my faith in the medical
community. I will forever
remember what this doctor
did to my mother and how
she was brutally treated,
tormented, and eventually
lost her life because of
the actions of the doctor
and his staff. The citizens
of Florida put their trust
in its health care system
and doctors expecting that
they are qualified, humane,
caring and professional.
The sad reality is this is not


always the case, which I
have had to come to terms
with in the death of my
mother.
Diane Smith, Bonifay


Disrespect for the
graduation ceremony
Dear Editor:
I recently attended
a Holmes County high
school graduation and
I was utterly shocked,
appalled and disgusted
by the blatant disrespect
and contempt those in
attendance had for the
dignity and decorum of
the graduation ceremony.
Additionally, certain
aspects of the ceremony
gave the appearance of
severe disorganization
and a lack of planning that
one would not expect for
such an important and
momentous occasion.
Throughout the entire
ceremony, people were
continually walking in
and out of the gymnasium
in a nonchalant and
disrespectful manner. To
give an idea of how much
foot traffic, it was as if one
were sitting in an outside
market. Not only was this
constant movement an
affront to the ceremony
and the graduates, but it
was also distracting from
the night's events and the
consequential noise made
it rather difficult to hear the
speakers.
Compounding the
distractions caused by the
continual movement of
people and the resulting
noise, many attendants
were yelling and cheering
as if at some type of
athletic event instead of an
occasion calling for a high
degree of respect, formality
and decorum. Appreciation
for a graduate's
accomplishments should
be shown in the strongest
possible manner. However,
common sense would
suggest and even dictate
that such pride, admiration
and appreciation be shown
in a style that is decent,
in order and conforms
to the level of formality
appropriate to a graduation
ceremony.
While disruptions
from the attendants of
the graduation ceremony
are frustrating and
inexcusable, they do not
compare to a disorganized
ceremony caused by a lack
of planning and attention to
detail by those in charge of
conducting such an event.
Although numerous details
could be mentioned, I will
mention only one. When
the final graduate entered
the gym, he proceeded to
his assigned seat. Upon
reaching his seat, none
was to be found. The
back row was short one
chair. This graduate was
forced to retrieve a chair
from the adjacent faculty
seating area before he


could sit down at his own
graduation. Conventional
wisdom would suggest
those in charge of such
an important event would
have, at the very least,
counted and checked
multiple times to make
sure there was sufficient
seating for the graduates.
However, it would appear
that no such check was
performed.
For some members of
this particular graduating
class, a disorganized
and unruly graduation
ceremony might be of no
consequence. Many of
the class members will go
on to further educational
endeavors and likely
experience a graduation
ceremony where the
traditional decorum and
other formalities are
observed. However, other
members of the class,
for various reasons, will
not be fortunate enough
to go forward and have
another graduation
experience. Their high
school graduation was their
one night to bask in the
glory of their educational
accomplishments. To
think that these students'
one night to shine was
essentially desecrated by
people either too ignorant
or too rude to appreciate
the full measure of the
occasion is at the very
least maddening. Such
anger should be strong
motivation for parents
of future high school
graduates to take proactive
steps that will ensure the
protection of the dignity
of their child's graduation
ceremony. Because
whether someone goes
forward and experiences a
college graduation or not, a
person only graduates from
high school once.
It is undeniable that
Holmes County, and even
the tri-county area, is
the textbook example of
small town USA. However,
such a characteristic
does not automatically
mean at a momentous
and dignified occasion,
such as graduation, those
in attendance must act in
a "backwoods" manner
that seems to display
a stereotypical rural
ignorance and lack of
sophistication. One can only
hope that before next year's
graduation season arrives,
people will learn to act
with the common decency
the graduation ceremony
calls for. However, in the
event the attendants act
unruly or there is a lack of
organization and planning,
we must hope those with
the power and ability to
protect the dignity of our
high school graduation
ceremonies will muster
the necessary courage
and exercise that power of
protection.
Respectfully,
C. Tyler Land, Bethlehem


NE ~*I


onlineXTRAS

Your trusted news source online at
BONIFAYNOW.COM

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE


Holmes County High Graduation!


ALSO ONLINE
Scroll to the bottom of any story to leave a comment.







Wednesday, June 22, 2011 Holmes County Times-Advertiser I AS Local


Gov. Scott appoints 2 to



1st District Court of Appeal


Special to The Times-Advertiser
Gov. Rick Scott on June 17 announced the
appointment of Judge Ronald V Swanson
of Pensacola and Commissioner Stephanie
Williams Ray of Tallahassee to the First
District Court of Appeal.
"The First DCA is one of the state's
most important courts, and with these two
appointments, the court gains jurists with
a deep intellect, an abiding commitment to
judicial restraint and great professional and
personal integrity," Scott said.
Swanson, 63, has served on the First
Judicial Circuit Court since 2003 and served on
the Santa Rosa County Court from 2000 to 2003.
He was an assistant state attorney from 1995
to 2000. From 1975 to 1995, Swanson served
in the United States Navy Judge Advocate
General's Corps. He earned a bachelor's
degree from Florida State University, a law
degree from the University of Florida College
of Law and a Master of Laws from George
Washington University.
"With eleven years on the bench and a long
and distinguished careers a Navy JAG, Judge
Swanson will bring integrity, wisdom and
experience to the First DCA," Scott said. "He
has a proven record of judicial conservatism
and a reputation for considering cases with
respect and patience, coming to each decision
in a firm but fair manner. As a well-respected
member of the Pensacola community, Judge
Swanson will bring that community's values
and perspectives with him to the bench. I


am confident he will prove to be a wonderful
addition to this important court."
Ray, 41, has served as the chairwoman
of the Florida Public Employees Relations
Commission since 2008. As chairwoman, Ray
has led the panel that issues final orders in
the state's labor and employment disputes
and has served as the chief executive and
administrative officer of the agency. From
2004 to 2007, Ray held several leadership roles
at the Florida State University College of Law,
including associate dean for administration,
assistant dean for academic affairs and
director of career placement. Before that, Ray
was in private practice at Ausley & McMullen
PA. She earned her bachelor's degree from
Vanderbilt University and her law degree,
with honors, from Florida State University,
where she was a member of the Law Review.
"Throughout her career, Commissioner
Ray has demonstrated an ability to analyze
complex legal issues while also taking on
significant management responsibilities,"
Scott said. "Her record of decisions as a PERC
commissioner is impressive and reflects
respect for and adherence to the rule of law.
She has an abiding commitment to ensuring
that judges say what the law is, rather than
what it should be, and I am confident that
Commissioner Ray will have a long and
distinguished tenure on the First DCA."
Swanson will fill the vacancy created by
the resignation of Judge Peter D. Webster,
and Ray will fill the vacancy created by the
resignation of Judge Charles J. Kahn Jr.


Help your student


online at 'Teacher Talk'


Special to the Times-Advertiser
Parents looking for additional
opportunities to help their students
succeed in and out of the classroom
this summer are encouraged to tune
in to the latest Florida Department
of Education (DOE) "Teacher Talk"
show. This month's episode of the
popular series, available through the
Florida Knowledge Network and on
the Just for Teachers website, focus-
es on unique ways parents can get
involved in their child's education.
"Establishing a positive relation-
ship with parents is an essential role
that teachers must play right from
the start," said DOE Teacher Liai-
son Kelly Seay. "A supportive home
environment is crucial to a child's
academic success. By working with
their students' families, teachers
can be assured that learning contin-
ues even after the child has left the
classroom."
Throughout the show, teacher
Liaison Kelly Seay shares why it is
important to involve parents in the
educational process and interviews
teachers who are able to share
common parental communication
techniques. In addition, the show
highlights various ways for parents
to become co-educators within the
classroom, enhancing the overall
student experience.
The show rounds out with in-


"4 supportive home
enivirl m ielit is crucial to
a child's academic success.
By iWorlJng with their
students'families, teachers
can be assured that
learning continues even
after the child has left the
classroolil."

DOE Teacher Liaison Kelly Seay

formation on how families can get
involved with their local School
Choice Parental Advisory Council
and provides teachers and parents
with a collection of resources, strate-
gies and ideas to improve the home,
school and teacher relationship.
Teachers who view this episode
will also learn of the Teacher Trea-
sures giveaway for the month of
June, a two-night stay at the Palms
Hotel. In May, Exceptional Student
Education Teacher Kathryn Hall
from Palm Beach County Public
Schools won a two-night stay for two
at Jupiter Beach Resort.
To view the latest "Teacher Talk"
show or to learn of the many re-
sources available for parents, visit
www.fldoe.org/justforteachers.


Arrest REPORT


The following arrests
were made in Holmes
County from June 5-11:

Mandy Alexander, 32,
county ordinance violation
Robert Earl Anderson,
44, Bonifay, driving while
license suspended or
revoked (second offense),
driving under the
influence, refusal to submit
Johnathon Jeffery
Baker, 20, Panama City,
violation of probation
Shaun Battles, 30,
hold for prison transport
services
John Bond, 38, county
ordinance violation
Daniel Tod Brauer, 45,
Graceville, violation of
probation
William Joseph Bryant,
51, Hartford, Ala., domestic
battery
Andrew Lee Butler, 28,
county ordinance violation
Ashley Marie Caddell,
22, domestic battery
Ronald Clark, 36, hold
for Hillsborough County
Stephanie Covell, 45,
child support
Jose Cruzperez, 24, hold
for Walton County
Donald Lynn Curry,
56, Bonifay, failure to
appear on dealing in stolen
property
Orlando Duarte, 33,
hold for Hillsborough
County
David Fliller, 37,
improper exhibition of
firearm
Robert Fusco, 40,
Westville, disorderly
intoxication
Scott Dylan Garner,
23, Bonifay, violation of
probation
John Gillespie, county
ordinance violation
Derrick Haynes, 27, out
of state warrant
Nicklaas
Dwayne Helms, 32,


Westville, trafficking
methamphetamine,
manufacturing
drug paraphernalia,
manufacturing meth
Stephanie Hoover, 35,
county ordinance violation
Justin Jackson, 24,
hold for prison transport
service
Cartez Sharod Johnson,
22, hold for prison
transport service
Franklin Kevin
Johnson, 41, Blountstown,
child support
Bryan Douglas
Kilpatrick, 42,
manufacturing meth,
trafficking meth,
manufacturing drug
paraphernalia
John Lewis, 26, Bonifay,
driving while license
suspended or revoked,
unlawful use of temporary
tag
James David
McCullers, 22, Bonifay,
possession of marijuana
Bradley Kyle-Nelson
McDonald, 18, Bonifay,
uttering forged instrument
John Robert Millwee,
42, out of county warrant
Stephen Moore, 26, hold
for Jackson County
Joseph Pete, 38, hold for
Walton County
Stephanie Register, 38,
contempt of court
Kristina Reyes, 29,
county ordinance violation


Jerry Robert, 32, county
ordinance violation
Jesse Elijah Rogers,
28, Bonifay, criminal
mischief, burglary,
grand theft, violation of
probation, harassing a
victim, false information
to law enforcement during
investigation (two counts),
criminal solicitation
Luis Alberto Ruiz, 42,
hold for prison transport
service
Aaron Mathew Shirley,
30, hold for prison
transport service
Robbie Edward
Simmons, 27, Caryville,
hold for court
Phillip Lavelle Soles, 27
domestic battery
Erenestein Stephenson,
26, hold for prison
transport service
Pedro Torres, 32, hold
for Walton County
Joey Lynn Truett, 37,
Bonifay, county ordinance
violation
Treva Ann Turnbough,
52, domestic battery
Travis Turner, 28, hold
for Hillsborough County
Homero Villarreal,
43, hold for Hillsborough
County
Tony Walker, 20, hold for
prison transport service
Rikki Williams, 31,
county ordinance violation
James Willmon, 44,
county ordinance violation


1730 Sims Blvd.* Bonifay

" - _ -_ 3 bedroom
2, "at...fTom Jenkins
Performance
I1-acre corner lot Realty
SGreat starter 547-9400
or retirement A
hhome ,,


FOR NEW PATIENTS
59 AND OLDER
This certificate is good for a complete
Medical Eye Exam with
Lee Mullis, M.D.
In Our Chipley Office
Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.
The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for
I Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.
FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL:
850-638-7220
Coupon Expires 6- 3011
L _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _J- - -


MULLIS EYE
INSTITUTE


*r-* ~
'I
p


Lee Mullis M.D.
Board Certified Eye Surgeon
and Cataract Specialist


Facebook commenting moves online


Special to The Times-Advertkser
In an attempt to provide a more
user-friendly format and more mean-
ingful discussion on our online stories,
The Holmes County Times-Advertiser
have moved to Facebook as their com-
menting engine. For those who are
currently commenting, all you will
have to do is use your Facebook login
to join the discussion.
All comments left under the previ-
ous system have been deleted.
Though this move might not be pop-


ular with everyone, it's our hope that
tying our commenting to the web's
most popular social network will elimi-
nate many of the anonymous attacks
and elevate the discourse and level of
civility on our sites.
As always, we value your thoughts.
Feel free to e-mail Managing Editor
Steve Liner at sliner@chipleypaper.
com.
Also don't forget to follow us on
Facebook. Just search Washington
County News or Holmes County-Times
Advertiser and make us your friend.


Vwe( a


YO LI COl I niitV

Healthcare Partner


-b l ,JKLJ.


/.



i - ... .


7R)


L2IILbLIL


Serving the community of Vernon, Wausau,
Sunny Hills, Greenhead and Ebro

Open Monday-Friday * Walk-ins Welcome
School & Sports Physicals
For appointments please call

850-535-2096
3250 Main Street * Vernon, FL 32462
Next to Vernon Discount Drugs



NFCH
Northwest Florida
Community Hospital
We Treat You Like Family


"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALL TODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT"
NO HIDDEN CHARGES It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed
by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free,
discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment


I SMART LENSESSM
Can produce clear vision without classes. at all distances -


Dr. Mullis In Our Chipley Office
1691 Main St., Ste. 1
Chipley FL 32428
850-638-7220
We are located directly across the parking
lot from the Walmart in Chipley
1600 Jenks Ave. * Panama City, FL
(850) 763-6666 * 1-800-227-5704
www.mulliseye.com


Wednesday, June 22, 2011


Local


Holmes County Times-Advertiser I AS










Send your
Outdoors news to
news@chipleypaper.com


OUTDOORS


A
Section


Wednesday, June 22, 2011 www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Page 6


Hooked on

Outdoors

There's a new sheriff
in town. Well, not exactly
a law officer, this sheriff
is a fish. Our area of the
Gulf is sort of like U.S.
Highway 98 with all the
transients coming by
both on land and in the
water. Our latest transient
to visit our area is the
tarpon.
A fellow once said, "If
you want to catch a lot
of mullet, you have to be
where a lot
of mullet
live." The
same goes
for tarpon. If
you want to
catch a lot
of tarpon,
Scott Lindsey go where
OutdoorWriter they are the
thickest,
which in our
case is Boca Grand Pass,
about an eight-hour ride
south of here. But if you
want to catch a tarpon
and not leave home, it can
be done right here in the
Panama City area.
There are several
thoughts on catching
tarpon, and they're all
different. A lot of people
see tarpon off our beaches
and never know what
they are seeing. They will
either see them as they
slide under their boat or
on top rolling. If you get a
good look at one you will
be amazed at the size of
these fish. Most of them
will weigh more than 100
pounds.
We have two types
of guides in this area
that fish for tarpon. The
ones that use "chicken
feathers" as they call
it, you might call it fly
fishing, and then you
have the live bait guide.
The fly fishing guides are
secretive about where
they fish and with good
reason.
Tarpon are easily
upset, and a bunch of
boats running around is
not conducive to catching
them with live bait or flies.
Fly fishing for tarpon is a
specialty sport. Not every
one is cut out to do it, and
you have to be dedicated.
You might spend many
hours anchored up and
not see a fish.
The same can be said
for live baiting tarpon. You
can move down the beach
and get into position in
front of the fish and wait
for them to get into range
to cast a live greenback
and hope for the best.
If you think you might
want to take up this
sport, I wouldn't advise
trying it on the fly at first
simply because it takes
special tackle and a lot of
practice. Look for a guide
that specializes in tarpon
fishing and try this sport
out before they leave this
area.


FWC asks anglers to help




with snapper research


Want to help state researchers protect
the long-term population of red
snapper?
If so, biologists with the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
(FWC) are offering a way you can help.
FWC's Fish and Wildlife Research Institute
(FWRI) is undertaking a research project
focusing on red snapper caught in Florida's
offshore waters. The project will provide fisheries
researchers and managers with vital catch-and-
release survival information needed for assessing
the status of red snapper.
FWRI biologists will approach anglers at
public areas along the Gulf coast of Florida,
including boat ramps, fishing piers and marinas,
to request participation in the study. These
biologists will distribute survey cards designed
to collect detailed information on fishing trips
targeting red snapper.
This information includes where red
snapper are caught and released, the type of
fishing equipment used, and the condition of
the fish when released. The data will provide
vital information that will help improve the
management of red snapper.
Anyone fishing for red snapper in Florida
can also request a postage-paid survey card in
the mail, by mailing their name and address to
FishStats@MyFWC.com.
In addition to completing survey cards,
anglers, vessel captains and mates can assist with
reef fish research by reporting tagged fish to the
Angler Tag Return Hotline at 800-367-4461. Since
2009, FWRI biologists have been tagging and
releasing reef fish back into the Gulf of Mexico iin
an effort to evaluate the survival offish caught
and released with hook-and-line recreational
fishing gear.
Previous studies estimate that


When reporting a tagged fish,
anglers should provide the species
of fish, tag number, date and
time of capture, where the fish was
caught, fish length, type of bait used
and whether the fish was kept or
released. If the fish is released,
anglers should leave the tag in the
fish so biologists can continue to
collect data.

approximately 60 percent of red snapper survive
when released after being caught on hook-and-
line. A similar tagging program began this year
on the Atlantic coast. By reporting tagged fish,
anglers will help to improve the accuracy of
estimated release survival rates for this species.
For this project, biologists are inserting yellow
or orange tags near the dorsal fin of the fish. Each
tag has a unique number printed on the side.
When reporting a tagged fish, anglers should
provide the species offish, tag number, date and
time of capture, where the fish was caught, fish
length, type of bait used and whether the fish was
kept or released. If the fish is released, anglers
should leave the tag in the fish so biologists can
continue to collect data.


'if


SELIAL IU IFLUKIUA FKREUUMNE HWSIAPtK)
Summer is here, and anglers on the water are urged to practice safe boating
techniques and show respect to those who share the water. The FWC offers tips for
boating safety and education at MyFWC.com/boating/safety-education.


SPECIAL TO FLORIDA FREEDOM NEWSPAPERS
This 32-inch red snapper was caught on
June 3 by Jeff and Tina Lane aboard "Our
Dream" with a piece of Spanish mackerel.


Coyotes have


found ways

to endure
By Stan Kirkland
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
Years ago, we were
introduced through
cartoon lore to the
bumbling, inept coyote,
always pursuing the fleet-
footed roadrunner.
As it turns out, coyotes
are anything but bumbling
and inept. While some
wildlife species have
suffered from the impacts
of development, that's not
the case with coyotes.
Contrary to what some
people think, coyotes
were found in Florida
long before Europeans
arrived here, according to
a paper written in 2007 by
staff of the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission's Fish and
Wildlife Research Institute.
The authors, Walt McCown
and Brian Scheick, say
fossil records indicate
coyotes disappeared from
eastern North America
about 15,000-20,000 years
ago, near the end of the
last ice age, at a time when
the number of red wolves
increased.
In the 1800s and early
1900s, habitat changes
opened the door for the
ever-adaptable coyote to
expand its range east of
the Mississippi River. In
addition, some coyotes
were transported into
Florida by hunters, who
ran them with hounds, but
how many were brought in
is anyone's guess.
In 1983, the Game
and Fresh Water Fish
Commission said coyotes
were in at least 18 counties
and by 1990, in 48 counties.
Today, they're found in
every county.
Coyotes are in the same
family (Canidae) as wolves,
foxes and dogs. They
weigh 20-35 pounds, are
lean, almost looking unfed,
and highly resourceful in
finding food and a place
to live. The fact is coyotes
can live almost anywhere
except dense urban areas.
Always the
opportunistic feeder,
coyotes generally move
about at night and eat
rodents, birds, snakes,
eggs, turtles, goats, sheep
and even small deer on
occasion. Coyotes readily
feed on carrion and can
consume an animal
carcass in a single night.
They'll eat fruits such as
blackberries, persimmons,
wild plums and wild grapes.
They also eat cantaloupes
and watermelons and can
cause big losses to farmers.
What raises the ire of
many residents is the fact
they'll sometimes go after
house cats and even small
dogs. Newspaper articles
or TV stories detailing a
pet owner's anguish are
becoming more common.
In 2009, the highly
respected Journal of
Wildlife Management
published a scientific
paper that summarized
the results of a study
conducted in a residential
area of Tucson, Ariz.,
from November 2005
through February 2006.
Eight coyotes were
captured, fitted with radio
collars, released, and
monitored. Of 36 coyote-
cat interactions, cats were
killed in 19 instances.
But they also noted such
situations could be avoided
if owners kept their pets
indoors at night.
Some residents who
have lost pets want coyotes
eliminated from their area,
but biologists say it's just
not that simple.


SUBMIT YOUR HUNTING AND FISHING PHOTOS TO NEWS@CHIPLEYPAPER.COM


I \Wl . I






Wednesday, June 22, 2011


Local


Holmes County Times-Advertiser I A7


WILDFIRES BURN THROUGHOUT STATE


FWC, Division of Forestry



bans campfires in region


Special to The News
In light of significant drought condi-
tions and the increased threat of wildfires,
the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission (FWC), in cooperation
with the state Division of Forestry and
other partner agencies, issued an execu-
tive order June 16 prohibiting campfires
in wildlife management areas, wildlife
and environmental areas and all other
lands it manages.
The order went into effect at 12:01 a.m.
June 17 and remains in effect until re-
scinded by a subsequent order. The FWC
joins the DOF the Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection and Florida water
management districts in this effort.
"Special regulations are necessary to
mitigate risk to public safety and to mini-
mize the likelihood of igniting fires that


will adversely impact wildlife and wildlife
habitat," read the order, signed by FWC
Executive Director Nick Wiley.
In its executive order, the FWC notes
that Florida is experiencing inordinately
dry conditions for this time of year. "As a
result, DOF and FWC have been fighting
multiple wildfires within wildlife manage-
ment areas, wildlife and environmental ar-
eas and other lands managed by FWC."
If placed openly on the ground, the fire
is considered a campfire and therefore
barred. Only cooking fires contained in
commercially designed apparatuses are
allowed.
Any violation is considered a second-
degree misdemeanor, punishable by up
to a $500 fine and 60 days in jail. Law en-
forcement agencies on each respective
state property are responsible for enforc-
ing violations.


2 rangers killed fighting



wildfire near Jasper


TALLAHASSEE (AP) - Two state forest
rangers trapped by shifting flames died
while fighting a wildfire that also injured
two others near Jasper in north Florida,
officials said Tuesday.
The rangers were working Monday
to stop a rekindled blaze called the Blue
Ribbon Fire in Hamilton County on the
Georgia line, one of more than 400 wildfires
currently burning around Florida in one
of the busiest fire seasons in years.
The rangers killed were 31-year-old
Josh Burch of Lake City and 52-year-old
Brett Fulton of White Springs, said Sterling
Ivey, a spokesman for the Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services.
Officials say the injured rangers, Robert
Marvin and Stephen Carpenter, suffered
smoke- and heat-related injuries while
trying to help their fellow firefighters.
They were treated and released from
hospitals in Lake City and Gainesville.
The Blue Ribbon Fire started June 16
and had been declared contained before
dry conditions allowed the fire to flare up
again Monday
"Josh and Brett were cutting a fire
line around the fire," Ivey said. "The wind
changed, and they became trapped by the
flames and couldn't get out."
Both men were married. Fulton had
two grown children, and Burch had
young two sons, ages 4 and 5, Ivey said.
Burch had been with the department's
Division of Forestry for 10 years and


Flilton for 11 years.
Gov. Rick Scott told CBS's "The Early
Show" on Tuesday that his "heart goes
out to the families."
"It's tragic, but pray for rain," Scott
said. "It looks like we're going to start
getting more rain tomorrow."
Scott said the rains are expected
to begin in north Florida and then in
the southern part of the state by the
weekend.
"So that will damp this out and stop
this," Scott said.
Forestry officials, though, have warned
that lightning accompanying the rains
might briefly worsen the situation before
trees and underbrush become damp
enough to resist burning.
Firefighters have fought more than
1,500 wildfires since May 1 that have
burned nearly 200,000 acres across the
state. That's made this one of the busiest
wildfire seasons in recent Florida history.
Florida firefighters have been facing an
average of more than 31 new wildfires
every day.
Agriculture Commissioner Adam
Putnam also expressed his sorrow "to
the families and loved ones of the two
courageous men who sacrificed their lives
for the safety of others."
"We can rebuild the structures and
restore the land, but the lives of these two
heroes can never be replaced," Putnam
said in a statement.


~pr N=@n!

lPwI�I�Z32P

&HlA% aa,


Chipley grad to play outfield


for Enterprise State


Special to The News
One of the new faces in the Enterprise
(Ala.) State Community College Weevil
Women's 2011-12 team photo is Shelby
Bowen of Chipley.
"Shelby is an honor student and an
outstanding outfielder with strong defen-
sive skills," said ESCC coach King Jones.
"She is a very quick slapper who has
generated a batting average of .434 and a
.610 on-base percentage on her travel ball
team. She has a .357 average on her Chi-
pley High School team.
"Shelby put on an impressive display
of outfield skills during her tryouts at
ESCC, and we are excited to have her join
our team!"
Asked why she selected Enterprise
State, Bowen quickly responded, "Be-
cause I know I can fulfill my dreams
here.
"I want to become a physical educa-
tion teacher and coach softball."


Fifty years from now, Bowen said,
she'd like to look back on her life and re-
alize she'd fulfilled her dreams.
"Sports mean everything to me," the
5-foot-1 speedster said. "I started playing
softball at 10 and played middle and high
school softball and travel softball (ever
since.)"
Bowen, who bats left-handed and
throws right-handed, played center field
at Chipley High.
"We had somehow gotten away from
having a team full of quick, fast players,"
Jones said. "We're getting back to what's
become our norm, and Shelby will be a
big part of that movement."
Bowen said shrimp is her favorite food
and "Glory Road" is her choice in movies.
She enjoys watching "Criminal Minds" on
TV listens to all kinds of music and said
Charlotte Morgan is her favorite athlete.
Bowen said that until now, not every-
one knows "everything I wear has to be
ironed, including my hair."


Of Helping the World Hear Better!


Allen Barnes
HAS; BC-HIS
21 Years Experience


* The world's smallest
RIE Hearing Instrument
* Virtually Invisible with 7
Wireless Transmission
* Direct TV Link and 6
Direct Phone Link


1 . $100IsatRbt A E$9
Rebte ff SRP - Epie.63 -11 1 MdlpiaAccss- Epre -301


Chipley, FL


1611 Main St. Ste 4 1756 US Hwy 90 West
Shoppes next to Walmart Twin Lakes Shopping Center


Marianna, FL


3025 6th. St.
In Feitz Foot Clinic


(850)387-4931 (850)307-5183 (850)387-4931
Benefits of hearing instruments vary by type and degree of hearing loss, noise environment, accuracy of hearing
evaluation and proper fit. Some restrictions may apply. Not to be combined with other offers or previous purchases.
Limited time offer.



IIOLMES COUNTY

CRIME STOPPERS





CRIME STOPPERS is a community action program that gives citizens
the opportunity to become involved in the fight against crime in Holmes
County and make our communities a better place to live, work, and go to
school. Crime Stoppers of Holmes County is comprised of three segments
- the community, law enforcement, and the media - working together in a
partnership that has one common goal - reducing crime in Holmes County.
CRIME STOPPERS provides a means of communication for the members of
the public to provide law enforcement agencies with information on crimes
or suspects without having to reveal their identity. Crime Stoppers is not a
LAW ENFORCEMENT program. It is a partnership between the community,
the media and law enforcement. Crime Stoppers offers individual anonymity
and a financial reward for the information provided if it results in an arrest.
Law Enforcement - The Holmes County Sheriff's Department provides personnel
support by assigning deputies and investigators to follow up on information provided
to theTIPS line. Phone lines are paid for by the Crime Stoppers Program.
Media- Media provides the avenue to promote awareness of the program by
educating the community about the TIPS phone number. They also can produce
reenactments and promote the Crime Stoppers initiatives. All media participate as a
public service.
Caller or Tipster The caller or tipster is the most important partner in our program.
He or she is a member of the community who sees, hears or knows of criminal
activity. When a caller contacts Crime Stoppers, he or she is GUARANTEED
ANONYMITY. Once a call is received, the tipster is given a control number. If, as a
result of their information, an arrest and filing of criminal charges has been made,
the caller is eligible for a monetary REWARD OF UP TO $1,000.00. The anonymity
allows members of the community to offer information to law enforcement without
the fear of reprisals.
Board of Directors - A volunteer group of citizens comprise the Board of Directors,
the governing body of Crime Stoppers of Holmes County. They raise funds through
donations and fund raisers. The Board of Directors also approves and administers all
rewards.
Rewards - Rewards are approved and distributed monthly. The Board of Directors
meets, review the cases and determines the reward to be paid. Once a reward has
been determined, the caller is given a method to collect their reward by providing
their control number. The identity of the caller is never known throughout the entire
process.

C.AL 1-64*41 *9 IP
NONA EREUIE


NE ~*I


At Beltone we offer:
* Free Annual Hearing
Evaluations
* Free Lifetime Instrument Care
* 95% Customer
Satisfaction Rating
* Experienced, Professionally
Trained Consultants
* Satisfaction Guaranteed /


Beltone
Helping the world hear better
www.Beltone.com
DeFuniak Springs, FL


I


True.,










Farmers facing cuts to food aid programs, agriculture


WASHINGTON (AP) - The
Republican-led House
voted to slash domestic
and international food aid
Thursday while rejecting
cuts to farm subsidies.
A spending bill to fund
the nation's food and farm
programs would cut the
Women, Infants and Chil-
dren program, which offers
food aid and educational
support for low-income
mothers and their children,
by $868 million, or 13 per-
cent. An international food
assistance program that
provides emergency aid
and agricultural develop-
ment would drop by more
than $450 million, one-third
of the program's budget.
The legislation passed
217-203.
The bill would trim the
Food and Drug Administra-
tion's $2.5 billion budget by


almost 12 percent, strain-
ing the agency's ability to
implement a new food safe-
ty law signed by President
Barack Obama this year.
Democratic attempts to re-
store some of the food safe-
ty money were rejected.
As they cut other pro-
grams, lawmakers rejected
two proposals that would
have saved money by lower-
ing the maximum amount
of money a farmer can re-
ceive in subsidies from the
government. While fiscal
conservatives and other
critics of subsidies argued
that they need to be cut as
lawmakers look for ways to
save, farm-state members
said those cuts should be
pushed back until Congress
considers a new five-year
farm bill next year.
Democrats said the cuts
to food aid were reckless


and that farm subsidies
should be trimmed instead.
"The Republican bill is
harmful, ineffective and
plays politics with our chil-
dren's health," said Rep.
George Miller, D-Calif.
Critics of farm subsidies
did score one victory: The
House voted to block a $147
million annual payment to
Brazil's cotton industry.
The United States agreed
to make that payment
last year after Brazil's in-
dustry complained to the
World Trade Organization
that Washington unfairly
was subsidizing U.S. cot-
ton farmers. The United
States lost the WTO case
and agreed to make the
payments to Brazil as a
settlement.
Rep. Ron Kind, D-Wis.,
a frequent critic of domes-
tic farm subsidies, offered
the amendment, saying the
U.S. should lower domestic
cotton subsidies to comply
with the WTO instead of
paying the settlement to
Brazil. Kind was joined by


fiscal conservatives who
agreed the Brazil payment
is wasteful.
"Let's end this non-
sense of stacking subsidy
program on top of subsidy
program to blackmail other
governments," Kind said.
In addition to making
spending cuts, Republi-
cans in the House used the
legislation to express dis-
satisfaction with a number
of Obama administration
policies, including healthier
eating initiatives champi-
oned by first lady Michelle
Obama as part of her "Let's
Move" campaign:
The bill:
* Directs the Agricul-
ture Department to rewrite
rules it issued in Janu-
ary meant to make school
meals healthier. Repub-
licans say the new rules,
the first major overhaul of
school lunches in 15 years,
are too costly.
* Forces USDA to report
to Congress every time offi-
cials travel to promote the
department's "Know Your


Grab Cb Head to he Big Apple Adventure"
Discover adventure waiting at every corner during Vacation Bible School. Amid the exciting sights and sounds of
r. � , cA . 1 , I I. .- I r-.II l '..'*IP j. .,,I 't.,'l--2 ' ...I ',I .: .-,-',-," .: ':11 ;' *,y.-'d," ,-,-t II . 1- . j , ., ' 11
learn that they can connect faith and life through a relationship with Jesus.
In this one-week adventure kids will connect faith and life through Bible stories, crafts, motivating music, and games.
The Adventure Begins:
June 27 - July 1 * 8:30 a.m.-12:00
Doors open at 8 a.m. each morning
First Baptist Church, Chipley
1300 South Blvd.
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
638-1830 * www.firstbaptistchipley.com


Farmer, Know Your Food"
program, which supports
locally grown food, and dis-
courages the department
from giving research grants
to support local food sys-
tems. Large agribusiness
has been critical of the de-
partment's focus on these
smaller food producers.
* Prevents USDA from
moving forward with new
rules that would make it
easier for smaller farm-
ers and ranchers to sue
large livestock companies
on antitrust grounds. The
proposed rules are meant
to address the growing
concentration of corporate
power in agriculture.
* Delays for more than a
year new rules for reporting
trades in derivatives, the
complex financial instru-
ments blamed for helping
precipitate the 2008 finan-
cial crisis. A Republican
amendment adopted Thurs-
day would require the Com-
modity Futures Trading
Commission, which funded
in the bill, to first have other


rules in place to facilitate
its collection of derivatives
market data.
* Prevents the FDA
from approving genetically
modified salmon for human
consumption, a decision set
for later this year.
* Questions the scope of
Obama administration ini-
tiatives to put calories on
menus and limit the mar-
keting of unhealthy foods to
children.
The House bill would
provide $17.3 billion for the
day-to-day operations of
USDA and FDA. The Sen-
ate has not released its ver-
sion of the bill.
The agriculture mea-
sure is the third of 12 an-
nual spending bills funding
government operations for
the budget year beginning
Oct. 1. Republicans have
promised to cut tens of bil-
lions of dollars this year
as they tackle the annual
budget process, in addi-
tion to trillions in cuts they
hope to make across the
government.


E


Wachovia is now




Wells Fargo



Let's move forward together


Together we're one team moving forward stronger than ever, working with you. This means more bank locations,
more ATMs, and more online capabilities. You'll have the same great customer service you've come to expect from
Wachovia, along with more than 150 years of strength and stability from Wells Fargo. At Wells Fargo, we're with you
when you're working toward your financial goals.

Talk with a Wells Fargo banker about what this means for you. Call 1-800-TO-WELLS (1-800-869-3557),
click wellsfargo.com/wachovia, or visit us today.


Together we'll go far


Banking * Investments * Financial Planning
Business Banking * Mortgage * Insurance


Investment and insurance products: NOT FDIC-Insured NO Bank Guarantee MAY Lose Value

1 Wells Fargo Insurance, Inc., is a licensed agency that represents - and is compensated by - the insurer based on the amount of insurance sold.
LENDER6 �2011 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. NMLSR ID 399801


NE ~*I


In loving memory of
LANAJ. POWELL
(August 13, 1950-June 21, 2010)

Thinking of You with Love
We thought of you with love
today,
but that is nothing new.
S We thought about you
yesterday,
and days before that too.
We think of you in silence,
we often speak your name
All we have are memories,
and your picture in a frame.
Your memory is our keepsake,
with which we will never part
God has you in His keeping,
we have you in our hearts.
A million times we've wanted you.
A million times we cried.
If love could only have saved you,
you never would have died.
It broke our hearts to lose you
But you didn't go alone.
For a part of us went with you...
the day God called you Home.
~Author Unknown~
Love always,
Lori Yates, Nikki Powell, &e Jimmy Wells
(your children)


Iappn Birthdag


Nicole


From all your staff
Washington County News
and
Holmes County Times-Advertiser


I


A8 I Holmes County Times-Advertiser


Nation


Wednesday, June 22, 2011












EXTRA


B
Section


Wednesday, JUNE 22,2011 Washington County News 0 Holmes County Times-Advertiser PAGE 1


Washington,

Holmes

at a glance


Mission from
Orlando

B4


SPECIAL TO EXTRA


The crowd applauds during the Watermelon Pageant.


Watermelon Pageant draws hundreds


COURTESY OF FORGET ME NOT PHOTOGRAPHY
Erica Smith is crowned Miss Watermelon 2011.


The two-night Watermelon
Festival Beauty Pageant, held
June 10-11 at the Washington
County Agricultural Center in
Chipley, drew 93 contestants
in 12 categories, and the
attendance for both evenings
combined was in excess of
700 people, with 574 paid
attendees.
A poll taken at the event in
accordance with Washington
County Tourist Development
Council regulations
highlighted attendees
from Florida, Georgia and
Alabama, accomplishing the
mandate of the TDC, which
is the attraction of visitors to
the county from outside the
area.
The winners of the 12
categories were:
SUGAR BABY MISS: Madeline
Benary


BABY MISS: Aniston Fayth
Anderson
PEE WEE MISS: Skyleigh
Lynn O'Conner
TINY MISS: Keira Alana
Boswell
FUTURE LITTLE MISS: Jocelyn
Makaley Boswell
LITTLE MISS: Erilyn Grace
Smith
PETITE MISS: Kaylee Marie
Bullard
MISS PRE TEEN: Bella Grace
Ekstrom
YOUNG JR MISS: Skye
Kennedy
JR MISS: Maggie Beth
Harrison
TEEN MISS: Olivia McCall
Guettler
MISS: Erica Smith
Photos from the 2011 Miss
Watermelon Pageant can be
viewed in a gallery online at
www.chipleypaper.com.


WATERMELON
FEST ACTIVITIES
Events
FRIDAY
Activities for
children (seed
spitting, watermelon
eating, melon
rolling)
SATURDAY
Panhandle Shrine
Club Pancake
Breakfast: 7-9 a.m.
(Washington County
Agricultural Center)
5,000 meter run:
7:30 a.m. (starts at
Washington-Holmes
Technical Center)
Antique car
show: all day
(WHTC)
Arts and crafts
booths: all day
(WHTC)
Parade: 10 a.m.
(through downtown)
Big watermelon
contest and auction:
12:30 p.m.. (ag
center)
Horseshoe
tournament:
1 p.m. (ag center)

Concerts
FRIDAY AT PALS
PARK
Chad Street: 6
p .m.
John Anderson:
8 p.m.
SATURDAY AT AG
CENTER
Big Bend
Bluegrass: 10:30-
11:15 a.m. and
11:30 a.m. to
12:15 p.m.
Wilson Fairchild:
2-4 p.m.


Little Miss
Firecracker


winner
B2


English birth
announced
B2


Editor's Life:
Out of the rut
B4


INDEX
Society......................... Page B2
Faith ............................ Page B4
Classifieds.................... Page B6







ABOUT
Things to do in
Washington, Holmes and
Surrounding Counties
Check out or submit events at
www.chipleypaper.com
or www.bonifaynow.com
I---------


Pomp accompanies 2011

Holmes County High graduates


By Steve Liner
Managing Editor
sliner@chipleypaper.com
As the sun moved into its red-
dish early evening glow, the green
grass of Memorial Stadium in Boni-
fay was dotted with the sedate blue
and gold as members of the Holmes
County High School Class off 2011
moved across the field to take their
places for commencement.
In the class were three valedic-
torians, a salutatorian and 33 hon-
ors graduates, who completed high
school with an cumulative average
of 3.25 and above. And waiting for
them as they walked in were the
members of their faculty and staff
along with VIP guests invited for
the ceremonies.
"If I have seen further, it is be-
cause I stood on the shoulder of
giants," said Class President Ryan
Pickwick in his welcome address.
Pickwick had served the class as its
president for three years, he said.
"I encourage everyone to look
forward and not back," Hannah Pip-
pin said in her salutatory address.
"Never lose hope," said Valedic-


torian Jenna Belser. "Even dark-
ness will pass. Good is worth fight-
ing for."
One of the most unusual mo-
ments of any of this year's local
graduations came with a valedictory
story about manure and optimism.
"There once was a little boy who
always, always looked on the bright
side," recounted valedictorian Car-
ley Long. In fact, she said, the boy's
sense of optimism got so strong that
it concerned his parents, who tried
everything to dampen his positivity.
Finally, she said, they came upon a
plan. They dropped the boy in a vat
of horse manure. The boy stood for-
lorn for a moment, but then, his ex-
pression brightened and he began
to dig toward the bottom of the vat.
"What are you doing?" inquired
the parents.
"With this much manure," the
delighted boy said, "there must be
a pony in here somewhere."
And so the members of the Class
of 2011, diplomas in hand, were
sent out to seek their personal po-
nies with a unique vision arising
from standing on the shoulders of
giants.
PHOTOS BY STEVE LINER | Extra A


From top, family, friends and well-wishers gather for the 2011
graduation exercises for Holmes County High School at
Me.:::.ril Stdiiu Class President RyVan Pick...ick (fr.:::.nt) ra
.:l:.lir .:|rc,-_icl'-les er-elr Menio.:::.rcil Soli'i I.:::. ithe- mn'sic o. P.:onIFmp
r-id Circuilnsiria.ce pl.:r l [: l sch.:::..:: :.l s bciard Th HCHS
Color GGuar:d nm rches l.::: pl:;ce 1.. [:::.:1ir ihe ceren:::ones


*-t >i-


'*;

NE ~*I






B2 I Holmes County Times-Advertiser I Washington County News


gee...... gee......a 0 00 00seae......0 aae0ag......0


.. e__g...... e s..... eseeS_____e


Chloe Strayhan marks 2nd birthday
Chloe Elizabeth Strayhan turned 2 on June 5.
Chloe is the daughter of Marni Taylor and Kory Strayhan of
Bonifay. She is the granddaughter of Brenda Taylor and Marty Taylor
of Bonifay and Linda and Lonnie Strayhan of Bonifay, and the great-
granddaughter of Lila Taylor of Bonifay.
Chloe celebrated her birthday on June 4 with a Tinker Bell party.


Martinez completes
basic training
Army National Guard Pfc.
Joel Martinez has graduated
from basic combat training at
Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of
training, Martinez studied
the Army mission, history,
tradition and core values,
physical fitness and received
instruction and practice in
basic combat skills, military
weapons, chemical warfare
and bayonet training, drill
and ceremony, marching,
rifle marksmanship, armed
and unarmed combat, map
reading, field tactics, military
courtesy, military justice
system, basic first aid, foot
marches and field training
exercises.
He is the son of Jose
Martinez of Highway 79 in
Estero. Martinez graduated
in 2010 from Holmes County
High School.


Parish named to Samford Dean's List for spring


Mallory A. Parish of Bonifay
has been named to the Dean's
List for the spring semester at
Samford (Ala.) University.
To qualify, a student must have
earned a minimum 3.5 grade point
average out of a possible 4.0 while
attempting at least 12 credit hours
of coursework. The Dean's List is
the highest academic recognition
given by the school at the end of


each semester.
Samford University is
consistently ranked in the top
tier of its peer group by U.S.
News & World Report. Founded
in 1841, it is the largest private
university in Alabama with
more than 4,700 undergraduate
and graduate students enrolled
annually. The university offers
undergraduate, graduate and


professional degrees in eight
schools: arts, arts and sciences,
business, divinity, education, law,
nursing and pharmacy. Samford
also is consistently recognized
nationally as an exceptional value,
with the top academic programs
and affordable tuition and fees.
Samford competes in NCAA
Division I athletics in the historic
Southern Conference.


*V


F 1
NiQl


: Englishes announce daughter's birth
Jesse and Melissa English of Phenix City,
* Ala., are pleased to announce the birth of their
0 daughter, Maci Nichole English. Maci was born
* at Columbus Regional Medical Center on Feb. 24,
* 2011, at 1:12 p.m. She weighed 7 pounds, 3 ounces,
0 and was 2112 inches long.
* Her maternal grandparents are David
* and Debbie Carnley of Bonifay. Her
* ;% paternal grandparents are Alan and
�. Elizabeth English of Caryville.
* Maci was welcomed home
� by her big brother Daylan,
S* numerous family and friends
* and a very special great-great-
* grandmother, Ms. Florene
* .Judah.


Students give piano recital
Students of Karen Owen recently gave
their annual piano recital at Chipola College.
ABOVE: From left, back row, are Joel Owen,
Brighton Basinger, Emaleigha Munn, Sarah
Bowen, Autumn Basinger, Lilia Taylor and
Mary-Rosalyn Taylor. Front row:
Mary Bowen, Jaqueline Stewart,
River Basinger, Nathaniel
Bowen, Elizabeth Bowen w:
and Nathan Crawford.
LEFT: Ian Weeks,
left, and Luke
Welch.


see.......g.s.eg.ee. @6.....


BONIFAY
NURSING & REHAB CENTER

Li!i'1 S- &Ls & * * * * *

The NUTS & BOLTS of

VA BENEFITS r
For Veterans Spouses of Veterans n
Physicians. Healthcare Professionals
Speaker
GLENDA SWEARINGEN
Elder Law Attorney
June 23 at 12:30 pm ..
in the Regency Dining Room
RSVP to 547-9278 by June 14, 2011

* Holmes County Chamber of Commerce "Business of the Year"
* 24 Hour Skilled Nursing for Short-term & Long-term Care
* Inpatient & Outpatient Physical Therapy, Occupational
Therapy and Speech Therapy
Main Dining Area with Fireplace
Additional Dining Area as well as Private Dining Area
Ice Cream Parlor with Visitor Seating Area
Visitor/Patient Lounges* Cable TV
Enclosed Courtyard * Activities
Rehabilitation Gym* Beauty/Barber Salon
Laundry Services* Admissions 7 Days a Week N7

NANCY E. HALL, NHA, Administrator
306 West Brock Avenue * Bonifay, FL 32425
850-547-9289 www.BonifayRehab.com


gee..........a..... e. g...... *


Hanna Duke named
Little Miss Firecracker
Hanna Elaine Duke was crowned
Little Miss Firecracker on June 4,
2011. Hanna is 5 years old and
is excited to begin kindergarten
at Kate M. Smith Elementary in
August. Hanna loves swimming,
playing T-ball, singing, dancing
and playing dress-up.
Hanna's parents are Scott
and Chastity Duke of Chipley.
Grandparents are Marvin and
Judy Reno of Wausau, and Danny
and Jan Duke of Caryville. Hanna's
little brother Colton, 4 years old, is
also proud of his big sister, saying I
she was "beautiful!"


JULY


4T H


DEADLINES
Deadlines For
Wednesday, July 6
Display Ads and Legals:
Thursday, June 30 at 5 P.M.
Classifieds: Friday, July 1 at 4 p.m.

BUSINESS OFFICES WILL BE
CLOSED MONDAY, JULY 4th.
WE WISH EVERYONE A SAFE & HAPPY
INDEPENDENCE DAY WEEKEND!

ashinon Count r i.OLMESCOUNTY

Nt VS ' ver'tiser
(850) 638-0212 (850) 547-9414


NE ~*I


I


Society


Wednesday, June 22, 2011






Wednesday, June 22, 2011


Extra


Washington County News I Holmes County Times-Advertiser I B3


Obituaries


Joe K. Hughen


Joe K. Hughen, age
66, passed from this life
Wednesday, June 15,
2011, at his home. He was
born in Orlando, Florida,
on February 12, 1945, to
Walker and Sally (Spence)
Hughen. Mr. Hughen was
an attorney-at-law.
He was preceded in
death by his brother,
Jerry Hughen.
Mr. Hughen is
survived by one son,
Walker K. Hughen of
North Carolina; one
brother, Jimmy Hughen


of Orlando, Florida; one
niece, Shawndra Holley
and husband Lyman of
Chipley, Florida, and two
nephews, Matthew and
Jay Hughen; two great-
nieces, Kaylee and Lacey
Holley; a lifelong friend,
Celicia Bunce; and lots of
friends.
Memorization was by
cremation. Brown Funeral
Home is in charge of the
arrangements. Friends
and family may sign the
online register at www.
brownfh.net.


Grittney Re
The Grittney Reun
be held today at Harri
Church starting at 11
Everyone is invited to
bring a covered dish f
noon. For more inform
Beatrice Judah at 535

Union Sch
(1928-1961)
Attention, all former
and teachers of Union
(1928-1961). You are ir
to attend the first
Union School
Reunion,




4,041


Charles C. Cobb, Jr.


Mr. Charles Calvert
Cobb, Jr., age 69, of Vernon,
Florida, passed away June
15, 2011, at Northwest
Florida Community
Hospital in Chipley, FL.
He was born February
28, 1942, in Asheville,
North Carolina, to the late
Charles Calvert Cobb,
Sr., and Margaret Carson
Cobb.
In addition to his
parents, Mr. Cobb was
preceded in death by a
daughter, Teresa Lynn
Cobb, and a brother,
Richard Cobb.


Mr. Cobb is survived
by his wife, Sharon H.
Cobb of Vernon, FL; a son,
Mark Cobb of Panama
City Beach, FL; and two
sisters, Mary Shockley and
Nancy Kirkpatrick, both of
Panama City, FL.
A memorial service
was held at 10 a.m.
Saturday, June 18, 2011,
at Vernon Methodist
Church with the Rev.
Wesley Syfrett officiating.
Memorialization was
by cremation with Peel
Funeral Home in charge of
arrangements.


Lillian Mateja


Lillian Mateja, age 82,
of Sunny Hills, passed
away Tuesday, June 14,
2011, at her home. A native
of Poland, Lillian was
a child survivor of the
Holocaust. She had been
a resident of Sunny Hills
since 1990, coming from
Chicago. She was a retired
bank teller and was of
Catholic faith.
Survivors include
a nephew, Miroslaw
A. Mihun and his wife,
Bozena, of Morton Grove,
Illinois; a niece, Pola
Korbik, her husband and


family of Poland; several
great-nieces and nephews;
as well as many, many
special friends.
Memorial services were
held Thursday, June 16,
2011, at 1 p.m. at Brown
Funeral Home, Main Street
Chapel. Memorialization
was by cremation. In lieu
of flowers, contributions
may be made to Emerald
Coast Hospice, 4374
LaFayette St., Marianna,
Florida 32446. Friends and
family may sign the online
register at www.brownfh.
net.


Frances S. Morris


Frances Stokes Morris,
age 71, passed away at
her home in Studio City,
California, on June 6,
2011, after a brief illness.
She was born in Chipley,
Florida, on August 5, 1939,
the youngest child of John
and Edith Stokes. She was
the granddaughter of the
Rev. George N. Winslett,
who was responsible for
the building of the First
United Methodist Church
in Chipley in 1903.
Frances graduated
from Chipley High
School and continued
her education at the
Sacred Heart School of
Nursing in Pensacola,
Florida. She received
her RN degree from the
Washington Hospital
Center in Washington,
D.C. She spent her long
and distinguished nursing
career in the Los Angeles,
California, area, retiring
from the Liberty Mutual
Life Insurance Company.
Frances enjoyed her
leisure time pursuits with
a great intensity. She was
well-known as a gourmet
cook and enjoyed catering
activities with an upscale
food club. She was able
to refinish old furniture
like a true professional.
She had a special love for
antiques and owned many
fine pieces. Although she
spent her adult life in a
large city, Frances was
devoted to her hometown,
Chipley, Florida. She
cherished the memories
of growing up in a small
Southern community


and the citizens and dear
friends who touched her
life forever. She continued
to eagerly read the online
newspapers from Chipley
and looked forward
to visiting when she
could. The family would
like to extend special
appreciation to Frances'
friends who have always
provided unconditional
love and exceptional
support.
Frances was
predeceased by her
parents; a sister, Carolyn
Stokes Nelson; brother-
in-law, Leon Nelson, M.D.,
and nephew, Keith Nelson.
She is survived by her
son, Sam Morris, San
Francisco, California;
daughter, Heather Morris,
Studio City, California;
brother, George (Sonny)
Stokes (Helen), Aurora,
Colorado; sister, Margaret
Ann Stokes Hayes,
Chattahoochee, Florida;
nieces, Edee Janton (Ron),
Bolton, Connecticut,
and Michelle Strickland
(David), Colorado Springs,
Colorado; nephews,
Mark Stokes (Nancy),
Centennial, Colorado,
Robert Hayes (Jane),
Tallahassee, Florida,
Colvin Hayes (Patti),
Auburn, Alabama, and
Cary Nelson, Atlanta,
Georgia; and numerous
great-nieces, great-
nephews and cousins.
Services were held
in Chipley. Brown
Funeral Home of Chipley
was in charge of local
arrangements.


See OBITUARIES B5


union
ion will
is Chapel
a.m.
attend and
or lunch at
nation, call
-6332.

iool
Reunion
er students
iSchool
ivited


Reunions
Saturday, June 25, from 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. at the Graceville Civic
Center. A covered-dish lunch
will be served at noon. For
more information, call Pearline
Williams Snell, 638-0773, or Martha
Pennington Williams, 263-3000.

Fourth annual
Smyrna School Reunion
The fourth annual Smyrna
School Reunion will be held June
25 at Simbo's Restaurant. We will
have a buffet lunch at noon, but


If you used the prescription drug Fosunv\ and suffered a
broken leg, you may be entitled to compensation. You pay
no fee or expenses unless we recover money for you.


L/;PISCITELLI
LAW FIRM


Call Today!
1-800-931-7071


O U O O






v Prudential
presents the
)j 2011
DAVIS
'PRODUCTIVITY
AWARDS
with partner sponsors

AvMED O
,. HEALTH PtAXS RP

BRADTW- "!i . CS � Tefid northhighland.

Accenture * ACS Government Solutions * Association Studios * AT&T
Awards4U * Bank of America Merrill Lynch * Dominic & Debbie Calabro
Correctional Healthcare Companies * Steve & Linda Evans
The Florida Network * Florida Transportation Builders' Association
Infinity Software Development * MAXIMUS * NorthgateArinso * NSI
Publix Super Markets Charities * Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare
FloridaT Tate Enterprises
www.floridataxwatch.org/dpa
,qlnkiiqlrm�


come at 10:30
and catch up
more inform
Garrett at 547

Finch/(
The annua
reunion will b
26, at the Gap
Sunny Hills. L
at 12:30 p.m. I
bring a well-fi
a day of fun ai
For more i



I o


a.m. so we can visit
on the news. For
ition, call Thelma
'-2090.

Curlee Reunion
1 Finch/Curlee
e held Sunday, June
Pond Church in
Lunch will be served
Fish will be fried, so
lled basket and enjoy
nd fellowship.
information, call
Margaret Riley
Q at 638-3073.


NE ~*I


Community NEWS

Supervisor training
Drug Free Workplaces and The Centers Soccer sign-ups
for Drug Action and Care are providing the The City of Chipley Parks and Recreation
Department of Transportation-required three- The of Chipley Parks and Recreation
hour supervisor training Friday, June 24. Two Department will continue soccer sign-ups till
sessions are offered: 9 a.m. to noon and 1-4 July 1. If there are enough participants registered
p.m. Cost is $100 for each trainee. Registration on time, practice will begin July 18, and games
is required. For more information, please call Aug. 15. The season will end the week of Sept. 30.
850-434-3782. Ages: 4-14
ACD (age control date): Sept. 30, 2011
Holmes CFee: $42
Holmes County High School graduates How to register: Stop by the Pals Park Office
Holmes County High School Graduates are between 3 and 4 p.m. Monday-Friday by July 1,
invited to a gathering of classmates and friends and fill out a registration form. Walk-in
at Simbo's Restaurant in Bonifay on June 25 from registrations will not be accepted Friday, June 24.
6-8 p.m. Applications can be downloaded from www.
Casual dress; dutch-treat affair. palspark.org and mailed with payment to PO.
Box 1007, Chipley, FL 32428. Please make checks
Washington County Public Library payable to the City of Chipley. You can also email
a completed application form to palspark@
to present 'Fable Stable' cityofchipley.com and pay by 4 p.m. July 1.
The Washington County Public Library We are looking for coaches and officials. If
presents Fable Stable on Saturday, July 9, from you or someone you know might be interested,
2-4 p.m. contact Guy Lane: office, 850-638-6348; cell, 850-
For more information, contact Renae at 638- 527-9275; or email, palspark@cityofchipley.com.
1314 or request@wcplfl.com.

One World Many Stories
The Holmes County Library will be holding 1.', *
the Florida Library Youth Program One World
Many Stories every Thursday through July 28,
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The event will be held at
the Holmes County Library, 303 North J. Harvey
Etheridge St. in Bonifay. This is a free family
event. For more information, call 547-3573.
* June 23: Africa - Dwight Baldwin African
Drummer
*June 30: South America - Dan Godwin - South
America Culture
* July 7: Australia - Animals
* July 14: Europe -Atlantic Coast Theatre
- "Brothers Grimm Fairy Tales"
* July 21: Asia - Kuniko Yamamoto - Origami
Tales
* July 28: Antarctica - Snow Day Carnival

Holmes County Dixie
Youth Baseball Banquet
The Holmes County Dixie Youth Baseball
Banquet will be held Monday, July 25, at the Ag
Center in Bonifay at 6:30 p.m.
Families will be fed with food from the Bonifay
Piggly Wiggly, and trophies will be presented.


/ onate A Boat

or Car Today!
Boa4 ,

"2-Night Free Vacation!"

14OO. CAIAHKIl
www.boatanigel.cow
p\ flarilA.hInr I mDr: :h r fmIWIME :A.ANO: NORlI













FAITH


B
Section


Wednesday, June 22, 2011 www.bonifaynow.com | www.chipleypaper.com Page4


Finding thankfulness

in 'the rut'


One of
my greatest
challenges as
a believer is
making sure
I am relating
to God in a
fresh way
that, I hope,
is meaningful


STEVE LINER
Living the Editor's Life


worship
for Him and truly
heartfelt by me.
Sometimes I have
to stop myself in mid-
prayer for a little self-
reminder. See, I am a
creature of planning
- and that often can
be read as a creature
of habit.
I neither go to bed
at night nor do I rise
up to face my day
without prayer.
But the repetition
of that can be
spiritually deadly, I'm
afraid.
I find myself saying
my version of "Now
I law me down to
sleep," and I have
to stop, regroup and
start over.
Truth is, God is
so good to us that
He deserves our
complete attention
when we pray.
Talking about this
reminds me of one
of the most startling
episodes in the life
of Christ. He was
walking in Judea
when he came upon
10 men with leprosy.
"Help us!" they


cried.
And he did.
Immediately,
off they went,
celebrating.
But one thinks
better of it
and comes
back to thank
Jesus.


"Where are
the others?" Jesus
asks.
Naturally, there is
no answer to that.
The point is, we
get in a rut and,
while there, we start
to feel entitled to
the blessings we
receive. The logical
next step is to go
our way celebrating
or belly aching or
whatever, based on
our personality or
state of life.
So, my chore each
morning and each
night is to make
sure I'm living in the
moment when I am
thankful or when I
ask for a blessing or
guidance.
I definitely do not
want the Savior to be
looking at my back,
saying, "Where's
Steve? Didn't he
receive the blessing,
too?"
And, of course
the truth is, I have
been blessed beyond
any way to express
gratitude.
So, thank you,
Lord.


BELIEVE IN FREEDoM
There is a long-standing debate among philosophers
concerning the nature of freedom. The positions
on this issue range from those who claim we are
nothing more than machines (and thus freedom is
merely an illusion), to those
who claim that our actions are


completely undetermined by
nature or nurture, and thus that
we are radically free. As usual
in philosophical debates, the
truth most probably lies
somewhere in the middle. Our
behavior is determined to some
degree by our inherited const
tution and by our upbringing,


7


and yet in most circumstances, those factors don't
compel us to act in any particular way. As humans
we can choose not to do the habitual or expected
thing, however difficult this may be. And, we actu-
ally "prove" our freedom most when we resist the
inclination to do wrong and force ourselves instead
to do what is right. While the greatest hindrance to
our freedom is the belief that we are just cogs in a
wheel whose movements are determined by forces
beyond our control, perhaps the greatest boon to
our freedom is the belief that we are indeed free,
and the resolution to always make good use of it.
Therefore, we should believe that we are free, and
we will be.
ttttttt
Watch and pray that you may not enter into temptation;
the spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak.
- R.S.V. Matthew 26:41
This Message Courtesy Of

BROWN Badcock&
FUNERAL HOME MEFURNITRE ore
1068 Main Street, Chipley Hwy. 77 S, Chipley * 638.4097
638-4010 Hwy. 79 S., Bonifay ' 547-9688

Washington County News F t 4 4 t ? 0
Holmes County Times-Advertiser "come as you are"
, . Mike Orr, Pastor
1364N I' iii,, (l, ipl, 1 .,:'"..e 1300 South Blvd.- PO Box 643
112 E, i,'."I i Bonifay* 347-9414 Chipley, Florida
(850) 638-1830

Place your ad here Stephen B. Register,
for only $8.00 per CPA
week. 1552 Brickyard Road
Chipley, FL * 638-4251

"Verily, verily, I say unto
thee, Except a man be born Place your ad here
again, he cannot see the for only $8.00 per
kingdom of God." week.
--John 3:2-4


SPECIAL TO EXTRA


FBC Orlando Mission Team


FBC of Orlando Global Mission


Team lends BCF helping hand


Special to Extra
For eleven years, First Baptist
Church (FBC) of Orlando's Global
Mission Team has given time, energy
and resources on mission at The
Baptist College of Florida (BCD in
Graceville. This year, the mission
team, coordinated by Jim Worthan
and his wife, Pat, arrived on campus
the third week of June with willing
hearts ready to work and lend a
helping hand.
The 73 member team provided
manual labor around the campus in
addition to the prayer support for what
God continues to do in the lives of the
students attending BCE For years, the
volunteers have worked tirelessly on
projects around the campus laboring
long hours in the sweltering summer
heat. Many of the team members
speak of Graceville as their "adopted
summer home" as they return each


year investing their time and skills in
improving the facilities and landscape.
Members of the Global Mission
Team recognize the value of an
institution that trains men and women
for areas of Christian service and
ministry, which is why they repeatedly
devote their time and money into
helping maintain its physical
premises. When asked, Wortham
humbly acknowledges that working
on the BCF campus allows the school
to focus and channel more resources
on student scholarships and obtaining
faculty members that are training the
next generation to spread the Gospel.
The visiting mission team made
visible impacts all over campus this
year as they worked hundreds of
man-hours sprucing up the grounds,
trimming bushes, painting, and
maintaining the academic beauty
of the campus. They also filled a
tremendous need in restoring and


Atheist group drops anti-church lawsuit


Special to Extra
A group of atheists and
anti-religionists agreed
Friday to voluntarily
dismiss a federal
lawsuit challenging
the constitutionality
of centuries-old tax
exemptions for parsonages
and other ministerial
housing.
The voluntary dismissal
was filed today with the
U.S. District Court in
Sacramento. The plaintiffs,
led by the Freedom From
Religion Foundation and
represented by atheist
Michael Newdow, had
not alleged that they had
ever asked federal and
state tax officials for the
same treatment prior to
filing suit and claiming
favoritism toward religion.
Pacific Justice Institute
represented a Sacramento
pastor, on behalf of
thousands of clergy
throughout California, who
would have been directly
affected by a ruling in favor


of the FFRE The District
Court initially denied PJI's
request to intervene in
the case, holding that the
IRS and Franchise Tax
Board would adequately
represent ministers'
interests. However, the
Ninth Circuit Court of
Appeal reversed that
decision last month, and
PJI had been preparing to
enter the case and present
a staunch defense of the
pastors.
PJI Chief Counsel
Kevin Snider, who
successfully argued PJI's
motion to intervene in the
case at the Ninth Circuit,
stated, "We are pleased
that this case has been
dismissed, but we have no
illusions that the FFRF
and its allies will abandon
their attacks on the clergy.
We will remain vigilant to
protect the outstanding
men and women who serve
our faith communities,
and we are prepared to
counter any future court
challenges of this nature."


preparing the new classroom complex
located in Heritage Village.
The actions and dedication of the
missionaries from Orlando serve
as a clear indicator of their love for
God and Kingdom work. They make
the five and a half hour journey to
Graceville each year and sleep in
the dorms each night after prayer
time and devotions. They are a
welcome sight and joy to the staff and
administration at BCE It is because
of their vision, their dedication,
and unending passion for people
and service that keeps this group
of volunteer construction workers,
electricians, teachers, Sunday school
workers, praise leaders, moms, dads,
grandparents, and young people,
returning to their summer home.
More information about mission
opportunities is available by
contacting The Baptist College of
Florida at (800) 328-2660 ext. 460.


Baptists adopt

immigration resolution


Southern Baptists
adopted a resolution
Wednesday that supports
a path to citizenship for
undocumented immigrants
but clearly states they
reject "amnesty."
After heated debate
at their annual meeting
in Phoenix, the Baptists
approved a statement
that called for secure
borders and "a just and
compassionate path
to legal status, with
appropriate restitutionary
measures" for illegal
immigrants already in the U.S.
Some delegates said
the language on "legal
status" was tantamount
to amnesty, prompting
an almost equally divided
vote over whether to
remove it. In response,
officials added language
that said: "This resolution
is not to be construed
as support for amnesty
for any undocumented
immigrant."
After Tuesday's


election that put an
African-American pastor
in the denomination's No.
2 leadership position, and
plans to increase ethnic
diversity, the resolution
emphasized the church
should minister regardless
of a person's immigration
status or country of origin.
"The intention ... is to
point us all toward thinking
about those who have come
into the United States from
other nations," said Paul
Jimenez, a South Carolina
pastor and chair of the
resolutions committee.
In a separate and
unexpected vote, delegates
expressed "profound
disappointment" with the
2011 translation of the
popular New International
Version of the Bible, saying
its use of gender-neutral
language has made it an
"inaccurate translation of
God's inspired Scripture."
The meeting was attend-
ed by 4,814 registrants, the
lowest number since 1944.


Faith BRIEFS


The River is Flowing
Healing Service
Bonifay House of Prayer and
Praise welcome Someone to Care
International Ministries for The
River is Flowing Healing Service
today, June 22, at 6:30 p.m. The
speaker will be the Rev. Shirley J.
Cunningham.
For questions, directions, or
more information, call 547-3299 or
547-5941.

West Bonifay Baptist Church
Vacation Bible School
Surfs Up at West Bonifay Baptist
Church, for SonSurf Beach Bash
Vacation Bible School! Boy and girls
in PK- 6th Grade in 2011-2012 school
year are invited to attend. Bible
stories, games, music, crafts and


snacks all add to the fun! Come join
us June 20 thru 24, from 5:30 to 8:30
p.m. Beach Bash VBS where kids
meet up with Jesus!

Evergreen Baptist Church
Vacation Bible School
Evergreen Baptist Church will be
holding Vacation Bible School June
20 to 24 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. VBS is
for children 3 years old through the
6th grade.
For more information call
548-5949.

Leonia Baptist Church
Vacation Bible School
Leonia Baptist Church will
be having Vacation Bible School
"Beach Blast" beginning Sunday,
June 26th - June 30th, 5:30-8:30 p.m.


nightly. Classes for children ages 3
- 17 years.
Family Day will be Sunday, July
3, with services beginning at 11
a.m., followed by a time of fellowship
with hamburgers, hotdogs, &
watermelons. There will be water
slides and games for the children.

Little Rock Assembly
94th Homecoming
Little Rock Assembly will hold its
94th Homecoming service on June
26. The Rev. Lousie Green will be the
guest speaker Other events during
the day will include Sunday School,
a memorial service, dedication of
the new parking lot and special
singing by Marshall Steverson and
Cornerstone. Lunch will follow the
morning worship in the fellowship
hall.


NE ~*I






Wednesday, June 22, 2011


Local


Washington County News I Holmes County Times-Advertiser I BS


OBITUARIES from page B3


Erin L. Clemmons


Ms. Mary Evelyn
Cholerton, age 73, a
lifelong resident of Vernon,
Florida, passed away June
16, 2011, at Community
Hospice of Northeast
Florida in Jacksonville,
Florida. She was born
September 10, 1937, in
Jacksonville, Florida, to
the late Eddie Augustus
and Neoma Evelyn Parish
Cholerton. Ms. Cholerton
taught for many years in
the Washington County
School System. She was an
avid reader, and she loved
to travel. She enjoyed
gardening, fishing and
visiting with friends. Mary
had a positive impact on
the lives of others. She was
a dedicated educator who
helped countless students
and their parents. She
lived her life according
to her strong Christian
values. She was loved and
will be missed by all who


knew her.
In addition to her
parents, Ms. Cholerton
was preceded in death
by a sister, Charlotte,
and brothers, Denny and
Buddy, and a longtime
friend, Tobe Russ.
She is survived by
two nieces, Pam Cowart,
and Kelly McLarty and
husband Edward, both of
Macclenny, Florida. She
took great joy in spending
much time with two great-
nephews, Dakota and Alex,
and a great-niece, Brandi,
over the last 2 years of
her life, along with other
relatives and friends.
Funeral services were
held 10 a.m. Saturday,
June 18, 2011, at Peel
Funeral Home Chapel with
the Rev. Aubrey Herndon
officiating. Interment
followed in the Vernon
City Cemetery with Peel
Funeral Home directing.


Helen M. Kelley


Helen M. Kelley, 76, of
Taylor, Alabama, departed
this life on June 13, 2011,
after a short battle with
pancreatic cancer.
Mrs. Kelley was born
August 8, 1934, in Bonifay,
Florida, to the late William
Culles and Mary Lavada
Clark Brown. She resided
in Dothan and Daleville,
Alabama, and Alford,
Florida, before moving to
the Taylor Community. Mrs.
Kelley retired from the
Finance and Accounting
Office at Ft. Rucker after
28'2 years of service.
Survivors include
her husband of 58 years,
Billy J. Kelley; daughter
and son-in-law, Patricia
(Charles) Littlefield of
Ozark, Alabama; two
grandchildren, William
Paul (Amanda) Littlefield
of Rehobeth, Alabama,
and Kellie (Kevin) Kuyl
of El Paso, Texas; five
great-grandchildren,
Cierra Jade, Shellie Paige,
Sara Elizabeth Littlefield
of Rehobeth, Alabama,
Zachary Kuyl of El Paso,
Texas, and Kelsey Kuyl
of Olympia, Washington;
one sister, Ruth Lynn
(Tink) (Jimmy) Brown
of Bonifay, Florida; two
brothers, Eddie Wayne
(Bud) (Charlotte) Brown
of Compass Lake,
Florida, and William
Ronald (fiancee, Peggy


Trant) Brown of Bonifay,
Florida; two sisters-in-
law, Patsy Kelley and
Willa Dean Kelley of
Tallahassee, Florida; one
brother and sister-in-law,
Charles (Frankie) Kelley
of Fountain Inn, South
Carolina; special friends
Beatrice Rodriguez and
Ronnie Morris; several
nieces and nephews; and a
host of friends.
General services were
held at 10:00 a.m. Thursday,
June 16, 2011, at Taylor
Assembly of God Church in
Taylor, Alabama, with the
Rev. Charles Littlefield and
the Rev. Thomas Harrison
officiating. Interment
was at 2 p.m. Thursday,
June 16, 2011, at Bethany
Baptist Church Cemetery
in Bonifay, Florida, with
Peel Funeral Home of
Bonifay, Florida, directing.
The family would like to
thank Ozark Health and
Rehabilitation, Dr. Roddy
Cook, Dr. Samuel Tarwater,
Dr. Jonathan Skinner,
Dr. Rafael Mayor and
Covenant Hospice for their
care.
It is Mrs. Kelley's wish
that flowers be omitted
and contributions made to
Faith Christian Center, PO.
Box 1728, Ozark, Alabama
36301, or to Covenant
Hospice of Dothan, 104
Rock Bridge Road, Dothan,
Alabama 36303.


Mrs. Erin Latisha
"Patsy" Clemmons, age
88, of Bonifay, Florida,
passed away June 12, 2011,
at Bonifay Nursing and
Rehab Center. She was
born September 25, 1922,
in Wrightsville, Georgia, to
the late Leaston and Katie
Pullen Powell. In addition
to her parents, Mrs.
Clemmons was preceded
in death by a brother,
Lanier Powell; a sister,
Merle Price; and a brother-
in-law, Leonard C. Bell.
Mrs. Clemmons is
survived by her husband
of 69 years, Couphlin
Clemmons of Bonifay, FL;
a daughter, Celia Forehand
and husband, James, of


Jack Payton Campbell,
87, a life-long resident
of Chipley, passed away
Saturday, June 11, 2011,
following several years of
declining health. Jack was
born in Chipley November
10, 1923, the youngest
son of John Neel, Sr. and
Mildred Farrior Campbell.
Jack was a student at
the University of Florida
prior to his induction into
the U.S. Army during
W.W II. He was proud to
have served his country
honorably, including
the Battle of the Bulge.
Following his discharge
from the military, Jack
enrolled in Florida State
as part of the first co-
educational class there.
While earning a B.S.
Degree, Jack lettered as
a member of the first golf
team. His love of golf never
diminished.
In addition to
his parents, he was
predeceased by a brother,
John Neel Campbell Jr.,
and a sister, Mary Douglas
Fisk.
Survivors include
two nieces, Marylynn


Winder, GA; a son, Randy
Clemmons of Foley, AL;
a sister, Kathy Bell of
Tallahassee, FL; and four
grandchildren, five great-
grandchildren and two
great-great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were
held at 2 p.m. Wednesday,
June 15, 2011, at Peel
Funeral Home Chapel
with the Rev. Tim Hall
officiating. Interment
followed in the Bonifay
City Cemetery with Peel
Funeral Home of Bonifay
directing. Memorial
donations may be given
to St. Jude Children's
Research Hospital, 262
Danny Thomas Place,
Memphis, TN 38105.


Fisk of Gainesville and
Sarah Nell Robinson of
Brooks, Georgia; two
nephews, Dwight Fisk
of Jacksonville and Ted
Campbell of Chipley; five
great- nieces and nephews;
nine great-great- nieces
and nephews; cousin, Flo
Chase of Chipley; devoted
friend, Gayvon Carter; and
many, many close friends.
Visitation was held
Wednesday, June 15, at
Brown Funeral Home,
Brickyard Road Chapel
from 6 to 8 p.m. General
services were held at
10 a.m. Thursday, June
16, 2011, at the First
Presbyterian Church in
Chipley. The sanctuary
was open one hour prior
to the service. Interment
followed in Glenwood
Cemetery. Flowers will
be accepted or in lieu
of flowers, donations
in Jack's memory can
be made to the First
Presbyterian Church, 658
5th St. Chipley, Florida
32428. Friends and family
may sign the online
register at www.brownfh.
net.


Livestock REPORT


For the week
ending June 17
* Florida Livestock Auctions:
Receipts totaled $7,674
compared to $6,929 last
week and $7668 a year ago.
Compared to one week
ago, slaughter cows sold
steady $1-3 lower; bulls
were $2-3 lower; feeder
steers were unevenly
steady to $3 lower; heifers
were steady to $2 lower;
and replacement cows
were mostly steady.
* Georgia Livestock Auctions:
Receipts in 25 markets
totaled $11,541 compared
to $10,503 last week
and $8,963 a year ago.
Compared to one week
ago, slaughter cows were
$3-5 lower; bulls were $1-2
lower; feeder steers were
steady to $2 lower; heifers
were steady to $3 lower;
steer calves were steady
to $2 lower; heifer calves
were steady to $1 lower;
and replacement cows
were mostly steady.
* Alabama Livestock Auctions:
Receipts totaled $13,400
compared to $11,838 a
week ago and $11,540 a
year ago. Compared to
a week ago, slaughter
cows were $2-3 lower
and bulls were $3 lower;
feeder steers were $2
higher; feeder heifers
were $2 higher; feeder
bulls were $2 higher; and
replacement cows and
pairs sold steady to $50 per
head higher in a light test.
Trade was moderate with
moderate to good demand
on feeders.

More news at
BONIFAYNOW.COM
and
CHIPLEYPAPER.COM


Feeder Steers:
Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
300-400 pounds: FL $136-170, GA $125-157,
AL $128-148
400-500 pounds: FL $118-150, GA $117-142,
AL $118-139
500-600 pounds: FL $106-137.50, GA $114-130,
AL $110-129

Feeder Heifers:
Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
300-400 pounds: FL $112-137.50, GA $114-136,
AL $119-130


400-500 pounds: FL $106-125, GA $105-126,
AL $111-125
500-600 pounds: FL $102-118, GA $99-124,
AL $107-118


Slaughter Cows: 90 Percent Lean
750-1,200 pounds: FL $60-71, GA $62-75, AL
$63-68


Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade, No. 1-2
1,500-2,100 pounds: FL $84-100, GA $86-101,
AL $87-92


Find Obituaries.

Share Condolences,


31 Li�o


Upload your Legacy guest book photos now for FREE!
\Witih our paid obitiia;i. Jamihl and friceds will no1\
have unlimited access to uploaded photos free of charge.

On the IMPROVED obituary section
of www.chiplevpaper.com or
bonifavnow.com, you can:
' * More easily search the most timely and
complete online resource for newspaper
\obituaries
. View and sign the new online
Guest Books
" ' ** Online access will also allow you to
Attach a candle to your love ones name
along with your message.


Find obituaries, share condolences and
celebrate a life at www.chipleypaper.com or bonifaynow.com
For further information or questions call 638-0212


uNr


Advertiser


In partnership with

Legacy.com�


USDA announces compensation

for claims of discrimination


Staff Report
The U.S. Department of
Agriculture this week re-
leased the following state-
ment in its ongoing legally
required effort to locate
and eliminate discrimina-
tory practices related par-
ticularly to Hispanics and
women.
Those who feel they
have been unfairly treated
in matters relating to farm
loans are given instruc-
tions in the following state-
ment related to steps they
should take to correct any
problem.
At the request of the
USDA, as a result of court
orders relative to the agen-
cy's lending practices,
the statement is printed
in full as presented to the
newspaper.
"If you believe that the
United States Department
of Agriculture (USDA) im-
properly denied farm loan
benefits to you between
1981 and 2000 because you
are Hispanic, or because
you are female, you may
be eligible to apply for
compensation.
"This means you may
be eligible if:
"l.you sought a farm
loan or farm-loan servic-
ing during that period; and
"2. the loan was denied,
provided late, approved
for a lesser amount than


requested, or approved
with restrictive conditions,
or USDA failed to provide
an appropriate loan ser-
vice; and
"3. you believe these ac-
tions were based on your
being Hispanic, or your be-
ing female.
"If you want to register
your name to receive a
claims packet, you can call
the Farmer and Rancher
Call Center at 1-888-508-
4429 or access the follow-
ing website: www.farmer-
claims.gov
"In 2011, a claims ad-
ministrator will begin
mailing claims packages
to those who have request-
ed one through the Call
Center or website. The
claims package will have
detailed information about
the eligibility and claims
process.
"For guidance, you may
contact a lawyer or other
legal services provider in
your community.
"If you are currently
represented by counsel re-
garding allegations of dis-
crimination or in a lawsuit
claiming discrimination,
you should contact your
counsel regarding this
claims process.
USDA Cannot Provide
Legal Advice to You.
USDA is an equal op-
portunity provider and
employer."


Marriages and DIVORCES


Holmes County
Divorces
Jay Edward Thomas
and Emily A. Thomas
Kenneth Lawler and
Rita Lawler
Michael Smith and
Rebecca Smith
Marriages
Ammon Nathaniel
Kriser, 11/10/1991, of
Bonifay, and Britney
Nicole English, 2/2/1991,
of Bonifay
Bruce Lamar Jones,
7/14/1979, of Daleville,
Ala., and Christina Marie
Parker, 11/10/1980, of
Daleville
Jason Daniel Hayes,


10/11/1978, of Noma,
and Kelly Lynn Rust,
2/27/1983, of Noma
Brandon M. Devlin,
10/29/1990, of Westville,
and Kasey Kaye Smith,
4/12/1991, of Westville
William Leonard
Davis, 11/15/1988, of
Bonifay, and Cassandra
Marie Sellers, 2/16/1993,
of Bonifay
Bryon Karl McCrary,
7/16/1963, of Enterprise,
Ala., and Anita Michelle
Idas, 10/12/1965, of Stuart
Keith Evans Gore,
8/6/1970, of Columbia,
Ala., and Evangeline
Sybil King, 10/2/1974, of
Columbia


NE ~*I


Mary E. Cholerton


Jack P. Campbell


In loving memory of
RUTH THOMAS (GRANDMA)
(August 27, 1920-June 25, 2005)
Ifflowers grow in heaven, Lord
,-" *. Then pick a bunch for me,
- . And place them in my
Grandma's arms
And tell her they're from me.
Tell her that I love and miss her,
And when she turns to smile,
Place a kiss upon her cheek
.,n And hold her for a while.
~Author Unknown-
With love,
Randall, Richard, and Tommy
(her grandson)


this saturday in



www.parade.com
and


NTN Washin ton Coun


_NEWS








B6 I Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, June 22, 2011


COVERING MILTON TO APALACHICOLA


Senwald Caxd










YOUR FLORIDA FREEDOM CLASSIFIED CONNECTION


WE'RE AVAILABLE 24/7


for all of your buying and selling needs.



85063-012* 80-38422 e85-57-414orviitus nlneatemealcostarktpac^cm


Find & Post


job related items:


> resumes & career opportunities <


relevant to the Florida panhandle


To place an ad, call 800.345.8688 or go to


emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster


[I i UCEMEN
1100 - Legal Advertising
1110 - Classified Notices
1120 - Public Notices/
Announcements
1125 - Carpools &
Rideshare
1130 -Adoptions
1140 - Happy Ads
1150 - Personals
1160 - Lost
1170 - Found


| 1100
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT FOR THE
FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HOLMES
COUNTY STATE OF
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 11-21-CA
WENDELL W.
WOODHAM and
PATSY B. WOODHAM,
AS TRUSTEES
OF THE WENDELL W.
WOODHAM AND
PATSY B. WOODHAM
LIVING TRUST,
dated May 16, 2005,
Plaintiffs, vs.
RICKEY D. CALLAHAN,
SR.,
MEDEA CALLAHAN,
IRENE FISH,
WACHOVIA BANK,
N.A., THE UNITED
STATES
OF AMERICA DE-
PARTMENT OF
TREASURY
(INTERNAL REVENUE
SERVICE), UNKNOWN
TENANT #1, and UN-
KNOWN TENANT #2,
the
names being fictitious
to account for parties
who
may be in possession,
defendants.
CLERK'S NOTICE OF
SALE
PURSUANT TO F.S.
CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that,
in accordance with the
Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated
June 6, 2011, in Case
No.: 11-21-CA of the


1100
Circuit Court of the
Fourteenth Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Holmes
County, Florida, in the
above-styled cause, I
will sell to the highest
and best bidder for
cash at the Holmes
County Courthouse in
Bonifay, Holmes
County, Florida at 11
a.m. on July 8, 2011
the following described
property:
The West 50 feet of
Lots 10, 11, and 12 in
Block 122, Section 31,
Township 5 North,
Range 14 West, as the
same is shown by the
Map of the Town of
Bonifay, Florida, drawn
by G. W. Banfill, which
Plat is recorded in the
Public Records of
Holmes County, Flor-
ida, at Page 1 of Plat
Book 1.
Dated June 9, 2011
Cody Taylor
Clerk of the Circuit
Court
By: Diane Eaton
Deputy Clerk
As published in the
Holmes County Times
Advertiser June 22, 29,
2011.

IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HOLMES
COUNTY FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.:
30-2009-CA-000421
Division:
GMAC MORTGAGE,
LLC,
Plaintiff, vs.
JONELLE M. KOVAL ,
et al, Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Fi-
nal Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure
dated May 23, 2011
and entered in Case
N o
30-2009-CA-000421 of
the Circuit Court of the
FOURTEENTH Judicial
Circuit in and for
HOLMES County, Flor-


1100
ida wherein GMAC
MORTGAGE, LLC is
the Plaintiff and
JONELLE M. KOVAL;
THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF JONELLE
M. KOVAL N/K/A
ROGER GUY
SPIELMAN N/K/A
ROGER GUY
SPIELMAN N/K/A
ROGER GUY
SPIELMAN; RONALD L.
BONGIORNO; AMY
BONGIORNO; ANY
AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSE, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANT-
EES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS; are the
Defendants, The Clerk
of the Court will sell to
the highest and best
bidder for cash at
FRONT STEPS OF THE
HOLMES COUNTY
COURTHOUSE at
11:00AM, on the 30th
day of June, 2011, the
following described
property as set forth in
said Final Judgment:
ALL THAT PART OF


1100
THE NORTHEAST
QUARTER OF THE
SOUTHWEST QUAR-
TER LYING NORTH OF
A COUNTY ROAD IN
SECTION 21, TOWN-
SHIP 5 NORTH,
RANGE 17 WEST,
ALSO THE SOUTH-
WEST QUARTER OF
THE SOUTHWEST
QUARTER OF THE
NORTHEAST QUAR-
TER OF SECTION 21,
TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH,
RANGE 17 WEST AND
A 15 FEET EASEMENT
DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS: BEGIN AT THE
SOUTHWEST COR-
NER OF THE SOUTH-
WEST QUARTER OF
SOUTHWEST QUAR-
TER OF NORTHEAST
QUARTER AND RUN
NORTH ALONG THE
WEST LINE OF SAID
SOUTHWEST QUAR-
TER OF SOUTHWEST
QUARTER OF NORTH-
EAST QUARTER 15
FEET, MORE OR
LESS; THENCE RUN
WEST TO THE EAST
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE
TO THE NORTH LINE
OF THE NORTHEAST
QUARTER OF THE
SOUTHWEST QUAR-
TER; THENCE RUN
EAST ALONG SAID
NORTH LINE TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING
IN SECTION 21,


1100
TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH,
RANGE 17 WEST,
HOLMES COUNTY
FLORIDA.
A/K/A 2163 HORSE
BARN ROAD, WEST-
VILLE, FL 32464
Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any,
other than the property
owner as of the date of
the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty
(60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND
and the seal of this
Court on June 3, 2011.
Cody Taylor
Clerk of the Circuit
Court
By Diane Eaton
Deputy Clerk
**See Americans with
Disabilities Act
In accordance with the
Americans with Disa-
bilities Act, persons
needing a special
accommodation to par-
ticipate in this pro-
ceeding should contact
the A.D.A. coordinator
not later than 7 (seven)
days prior to the
proceeding. Hearing
Impaired contact Cody
Taylor (850) 547-1100
201 N. Oklahoma
Street.
As published in the
Holmes County News
Advertiser
June 15, 22, 2011.


Independence Day

Holiday
(Monday, July 4)

Classified Line Ad

Deadlines

Washington County Times
Holmes County Times-Advertiser
To Run: Due By:
Wednesday, July 6 Friday, July 1, 4:00 p.m. (CST)
The classified department and the business offices
of The Washington County Times and Holmes County Times Advertiser
will be closed Monday, July 4
We will reopen Tuesday, July 5, at 8:00 a.m..
L_____-_____________-____J----------


I oo1100
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR HOLMES
COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 11-181-CA
UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA, acting


WOW!
Advertise your
business or
service here for
only

$10.00
per week
8 week minimum

638-0212

547-9414


WOW!
Advertise your
business or
service here for
only

$10.00
per week
8 week minimum

638-0212

547-9414


S 1100
through the
United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture, Ru-
ral
Development, f/k/a
Farmers Home Admin-
istration, Plaintiff,vs.
HARVEY G. RADCLIFF,
heir and lineal de-
scendant of BETTY


| o1100
DEAN McKENZIE, a/k/a
BETTY D. McKENZIE,
Deceased; et
al.,Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF HOLMES
TO: Any and all un-
known heirs, devisees,


WE BUY ALL SCRAP METAL $$$
ALUMINUM, COPPER, BRASS, IRON, STOVES,
REFRIGERATORS, WASHERS, DRYERS



Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Call For Sat. Hours
(850) 547-4709



Make your

as beautiful as you've always
dreamed it would be...
Invitations Menu Cards
Bookmarks Place Cards
Napkins Favor Boxes
Thank You Cards & Scrolls


Call Kim at
638-0212


S 1100
grantees, assignees,
lienors, creditors, trus-
tees, or other claimants
claiming by, through,
under or against the
Estate of BETTY DEAN
McKENZIE, a/k/a
BETTY D. McKENZIE,
Deceased.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED


WOW!
Advertise your
business or
service here for
only

$10.00
per week
8 week minimum

638-0212

547-9414



THARP & SONS

MINI STORAGE
Hwy 77 S., Chipley, FL
(850) 638-8183
Hwy 177A, Bonifay, FL
(850) 547-0726
5x5 $25.68
5x10 $35.31
10x10 $46.01
10x20 $80.25
SOpen 24 Hous, Self-Service, No
SDepost, Units are Carpeted i


B6 I Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser


Wednesday, June 22, 2011


: E

N Washi C
rmn, t '" tv

�Xs






Wednesday, June 22, 2011


Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser I B7


that an action to fore- Fitzpatrick at
close a mortgage re- 850-547-1119 for more
garding the following information. Holmes
property in Holmes County is an Equal
County, Florida: Opportunity
Commencing at the Employer and reserves
SW corner of the SW the right to accept or
1/4 of the SE 1/4 of reject any or all bids it
Section 35, Township 5 deems to be in the best
North, Range 16 West interest of the
and running NI�30'W citizens of Holmes
along forty line 990 County.
feet, thence N90 OO'E As published in the
380 feet for Point of Be- Holmes County Times
ginning, thence con- Advertiser June 15, 22,
tinue N89�00'E 283.5 2011.
feet; thence NI�00'W,
210 feet; thence_______
S8900'W, 210 feet;
thence S1 00'E 190
feet; thence S89�00W,
73.5 feet; thence
S1�00'E, 20 feet to 1110
Point of Beginning,
Holmes County, Florida r-------
has been filed against COLOR
you and you are re- I O O
quired to serve a copy I SELLS!.
of your written tde- Get Your Classified
fenses, if any, to it on: Ad in
FREDERICK J. MUR- I COLOR!.
PHY JR., Esquire, At- Call now for details
torney for Plaintiff, Bos- and be noticed!
well & Dunlap LLP 245 638-0212
South Central Avenue, I or
Post Office Drawer 30, L 547-9414
Bartow, FL 33831,
within thirty (30) days
after the first publica-
tion of this Notice Of
Action, and file the Incorrect
original with the Clerk Insertion
of this Court either be-
fore service on Policy
Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; For Classified
otherwise a default will In-column Ad-
be entered against you
for the relief demanded vertisers
in the Complaint or Pe-
tition. All ads placed by
Dated on this 10 day of phone are read back
June, 2011. to the advertiser to
REQUESTS FOR AC- insure correctness.
COMMODATIONS BY The newspaper will
PERSONS WITH DIS- assume .orr .tnr??
ABILITIES: If you are a at the tirt.- :i ,
person with a disability read-back I
who needs any accom- unless oth-, ,-
modation in order to formed.
participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are enti-
tied, at no cost to you, Please0 , - :I
to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please Advertisers
contact the OFFICE OF quested to .:i,.-..I II,-
THE COURT ADMINIS- advertsem ,,
TRATOR, OFFICE OF first insertic .
CODY TAYLOR, P. 0. rectness
BOX 397, BONIFAY, FL should be ,
32425, (850) 547-1100 s d be
at least 7 days before immediately.
your scheduled court Your Flor
appearance, or imme- domur nlr -
diately upon receiving do ra newsl,.l,,-, II
this notificaton f the not be responsible
time before the sched- or morethan one in-
uled appearance s less correctinsertion, nor
than 7 days; if you are will it be hliable for
hearing or voice im- any error in adver-
paired, call 711. tisements to a
CODYTAYLOR greater extent than
Clerk of Circuit Court the cost of the space
P 0. Box 397 occupied by the er-
Bonifay, FL 32425 ror.
By: Diane Eaton
Deputy Clerk Any copy change,
As published in the during an ordered
Holmes County Times schedule constitutes
Advertiser June 22, 29, a new ad and new
2011. charges.
Tharp and Sons Mini We do not
Storage in Bonifay, Fl guarantee position
will hold a sale for of ANY ad under
non- payment of rent in any classification.
accordance with the
Florida Statute
83-801-83-809. Tenants
will have until July 1,
2011 to pay in full. No
checks accepted.
1. Eve Mitchell, 1120
Bonifay, FI
2. Unknown.
As published in the - - - --- --
Holmes County Times $200 Reward For The
Advertiser June 15, 22, Two Boys &Thee
2011. turn Of A Mens Blue
The Holmes County Marlin's Baseball
Board of Commission- Team Bicycle, Teal I
ers will accept sealed in color, Stolen from
bids for the following: my yard 766 S4th
Storage Shed St Chipley next to
Enclosure. Shiver's Park the af-
All bids must be ternoon of June 15.
marked "Storage Shed Neighbor can iden-
Enclosure # 136" and tify the Culprits. Call I
submitted on the Bid Elsie Mynrick
Form provided by the 850-209-5241
County L---------
Commissioner Office,_
107 E Virginia Ave,
Bonifay, FL 32425 no
later than 2:00 p.m. on
June 27, 2011. Bids will f
be
publicly opened in the
Commissioner's Board
meeting held on June 1
28, 2011 commencing .
at 6:00 pm. Bid
specifications and a PETS& ANIMALS
bid form can be
downloaded online at 2100 - Pets
2110 - Pets Free to
W w w Good Home
holmescountyfl.org or 2120 - Pet Supplies
may be picked up at 2130 - Farm Animals/
the Supplies
Holmes County Board 2140 - Pets/Livestock
of Commissioner's Wanted
office. 2150 - Pat Memorials
Contact Sherry Snell


C&C Bookkeeping
and Tax Service. Open
5 days a week. 8am to
5pm. Call
(850)638-1483




Airlines are Hiring-
Train for high paying
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid
if qualified - Housing
available. CALL Avia-
tion Institute of Mainte-
nance (866)314-3769.

Allied Health career
training-Attend college
100% online. Job
placement assistance.
Computer available. Fi-
nancial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call
(800)48 1 -9409
www.CenturaOnline.com


Birds for Sale Fresh from the farm-
irds for ale yellow crook neck _-- - - -
Proven pair of blue & squash available in one I BUYING all types
gold macaw breeders, week. Sweet corn, okra I of scrap metals and
Ph 850-260260-2611 and peas available over I junk cars or trucks. I
Text FL62931 to 56654 the next 3 months. Call I 850-547-0224,
-for availability. Summer I Family operated
l l @ (850)956-4556 We have references

_____ _____--- -- -
2130-I
For SaleI I
Jersey Heifer Yearling Mclntosh Sawmills - Band/
call after 5pm. cIntosh I Chainsaw - Spring Sale
850-956-5090 Produce Now I- Cut lumber any di-
-Open I mension, anytime.
Make Money and Save
S Peas and u-pick Money In stock ready
% Tomatoes. to ship. Starting at
850-263-4123 or $995.00 www.Norwood
850-326-8019, Sawmills.com/300N
near Poplar Springs I(800) 578-1363
SSchool Ext.300N
II--Pick


I[ " " "N II Blueberries
3100 - Antiques r re
3110 - Appliances $8/gallon Wanted: Junk
3120 -Arts & Crafts Muffin's Blueberry appliances.
3130 - Auclions Patch Lawn-mowers, farm
3140 - Baby Items
3150 - Building Supplies Bob & Linda Wells and garden equipment,
3160 - Business Mon-Sat, closed Sun. golf carts, satellites for
Equipment 2488 Hwy 277, 6 mi N. free. I will pick up.
3170-Collectibles of Vernon/10 mi S. of Call (850)-547-0088
3180 - Computers Chipley. (850)638-3181
3190 - Electronics
3200 - Firewood
3210- Free Pass it On
3220 - Furniture
3230 - Garage/Yard Sales
3240 - Guns
3250 - Good Things to Eat
3260 - Health & Fitness -
3270 - Jewelry/Clothing L t
3280 - Machinery/ Jo ge-lS s
Equipment
3290 - Medical Equipment M
3300 - Miscellaneous
3310 -Musical Instruments
3320 - Plants & Shrubs/
Supplies
3330 - Restaurant/Hotel
3340 - Sporting Goods Q T
3350 - Tickets (Buy & Sell)


I 3130 ,E O D I
AUCTION ZER
Saturday June 2S. PE AL i
2011 2:00 A.M.27 A Of
bell. Fla. C, A .2-7 EA R S O



. i



I i s a "ci,'1,'. ,, , I e


Michelle & HC s
4100 Pate Pond Rd
Vernon, FL * *
2nd Sat of the
Miscellaneous Auction.
Multi sellers.
Selection varies. Cash,
Debit/Credit Cards.
50 Buyer s Premium
Thinking Auction?
FL AU30 AB2224 ALL PRICES AND DISCOUNTS AFTER ANY F
850-326-1606 DEALER FEES. 0.0% APR 60 MONT
850-415-0183

S Pre-Owne oA
MotI 32 P0


Large dining room
hutch $400.00. Table
and five chairs $300.00,
excellent condition.
Love seat, couch, chair
$400.00. (850)547-4114


3230
Benefit Yard Sale
All proceeds go to
returning military son at
Ed's Auto Sales
2957 Hwy. 90W,
Bonifay, Fl.
Tues-Frn 8-4,
Sats 8-12, entire
month of June.


| 3240
22 Ruger
Stainless rifle. $200 or
Trade for good bow
saw. 850-830-7653


3250
r K&L Farm
Home grown Toma-
toes. 1567 Piney
Grove Rd in Chipley.
Mon-Fri 8am-6pm &
Saturday 8am-4pm.
850-638-5002
850-260-5003 &
850-527-3380
TextFL60849 to 56654
16----------.


Attend College Online For Rent first in Chip-
from Home. *Medical, ley, Mini Warehouses.
*Business, *Paralegal, If you don't have the
*Accounting, *Criminal room, "We Do" Lamar
Justice. Job placement T o w n s e n d
assistance. Computer (850)638-4539, north of
available. Financial Aid Townsends.
if qualified. Call
www.CenturaOnline.com W LOIN
Heat & Air Jobs Mural Painting
Ready to work? 3 week MuService Pting
accelerated program. for children rooms &
Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifica- floor designs. Call
tons and Local Job (850)547-5244 for free
Placement Assistance! estimate and
(877)994-9904 consultation. Earn
I incomee for referrals.


SOD & SEED on the
farm, delivered or in- Heavy Equipment
stalled. Centipede St. Work
Augustine Bermuda. Pond digging,
West Florida Turf Tree removal,
(850) 415-0385; land clearing,
638-4860. Established Road building, etc.
1980 (850)547-2068


09 NISSAN
ALTIMA
2.5 SL
Naviqallon. Lealhe-.
Suniool

LOADED


CET
9mmwu


-I


Call one of our

"ad-visors" and put the

Classifieds to

WORK FOR YOU!


WASHINGTON COUNTY
NEWS
(850) 638-0212

HOLMES COUNTY
TIM ES-ADVERTISER
(850) 547-9414


[of*& fth RohaileiLaimaiDutoha we~ Roambmbee I&fhlb holmiU hum


yuEe umiEy J VII


m m m m --- w -m m mm --

SALES ENDS 6/27/11

OWN WITH APPROVED CREDIT * GREATSELECTION * GREAT DEALS

EASE PROGRAMS t COMPETITIVE INTEREST RATES FRIEND

SERVICE. NO GAMES, NOGIMMI(KS. GREAT.AR1iERIcEEPT


FACTORY REBATE, ANY FACTORY TO DEALER CASH, PLUS TAX, TAG, TITLE& REGISTRATION., INCLUDES
HS, S.E.T. FINANCE, TIER 1,2,3,4, WITH APPROVED CREDIT. ALL UNITS SUBJECT TO PRE-SALE.

tel" S-Upetr e..R BRING YOUR TRADE
&eoW . LET'S DO BUSINESS!


GREAT SELECTION * GREAT DEALS * PAYMENTS TO FIT YOUR BUDGET!


05 HYUNDAI 00 NISSAN
ACCENT MAXIMA
Gmeal GGa Ml aai e Aulomilic.
66K Mik 1 Loaded
SPECIAL! SUPER DEAL!

51,848 $7,888


11 HONDA
ACCORD
J Dooi Sedin. Aulo..
-.K Mile -
DEAL OF THE DAY!

$20,979


07 CHEVY
TRAILBLAZER
Por-I Pka..
CD Played.
Aulomalic

CLEAN!


07 LINCOLN
MKX
Elhi Packaoe.
Lealhei S-eall.
Sunlool. Lusuly

MUST SEE!


08 GMC SIERRA
EXT. CAB
J Dooi. Aulomalic.
Shaip Tluck!
COME &
GET IT!


04 NISSAN 08 FORD 09 FORD 09 HONDA 08 FORD 10 CHRYSLER
XTERRA EDGE FUSION ACCORD EDGE SEBRING
4x4, 4 Door, Limited Edition 4 Door Sedan, EX-L Sharp Utility 4 Door Sedan,
Automatic, Sharp Utility Automatic, Power Pkg. Leather Seats, Vehicle Automatic, Power Pkg.,
READY I Vehicle NEEDS A AlloyWheels LOCAL CD Player
TO GO! CLEAN! HOME! LOADED TRADE SHARP!

PLUS MANY MORE TO CHOOSE FROM!
* 7 Years, 100,000 Mile * 160 Point Quality
Limited Warranty** Assurance Inspection
*7 Years, 100,000 Mile * Great Selection In
Roadside Assistance** Stock To Choose From

'______ 1 Year - 12,000 Mile Platinum Warranty

7 Years - 100,000 Miles Limited Powertrain Warranty.















MORE TO CHOOSE FROM.


David Chris Travis Ronnie Steve Vance Elliott Steven Lamar Lester
Cumbie Farrar Russ Allen Hughes McGough Curry Adkison English Tinsley
Sales Mgr. Sales Sales Sales Sales Sales Sales Sales Sales Sales Mgr.
All prices and discounts after any factory rebate, factory to dealer cash plus tax, tag, registration, title and includes dealer fees. Subject to pre-sale.


Remember, If You
Can't Come To


2961 Penn. Ave., Marianna, FL Us, JustGiveUs

Q .� (850) 526-3511 * 1-800-423-8002 A WeDrive
Check us out at: www.mariannatoyota.com It To You.


09 DODGE 08 CHEVY 07 FORD 10 CHRYSLER
GRAND TRAILBLAZER LT F-150 EXT. CAB 300M
CARAVAN LealheI Seal, Sunlol. 4^j. V.6o D oo Sed.in.
Nice Family Mini van Loaded! Nice TLuck! Slh.p!
SPECIAL! WAS S21.949 SPECIAL SPECIAL

5,949 $17,949 $19,879 $19,949


m . M% ==NE


09 DODGE
RAM 1500 SLT
DOUBLE CAB
V.6. Shaip!
SPECIAL!

$21,848


F7-i-kU



.... ..........
. . .........

...........................................


I


IL


LMARIANNA TOYOTA I


i


i


I


Ie1a 5 PUU f-iII






B8 I Washington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Wednesday, June 22, 2011


3310 4100 110 6110 6140 6170 | 6170 7120 I 7190
WANTED; Musical In- Pre-School Teacher For Rent. Sleepy 2BD/ 1BA HOUSE. -1 Vl Mobile Home RETAIL & OFFICE
struments of any kind Needed for Childcare Hollow Duplex SUNROOM, pollbarn, ^ V SPACES for rent lease Developer Forced
in any condition. Piano, Facility. Must have 40 21 BR Apartments HUD 8x10 shed, A/C large For Rent or sale. 3 months free Liquidation Smokey
banjoes, drums, gu- hours certification apartments not accepted. yard. 2672 Lazy Bone 3 br, 2 br, Single Wide rent. 850-209-3291 Mountain TN. Lake
tars, amps. LESSONS. Call547-1444_inBonifaywalkin 2BR/1BA and Dr Vernon Fl. Refer- 2&3BR in Quite Neighborhood. Condos & Lots Priced
Covington Music, Chip- Seven Reasons Salon closet, deck in back, 3BR/1BA. Water, ences & deposit re- $590-$615 Hard Wood Floors, @ Foreclosure/Short
ley. 850-638-5050. and Spa is now fencend yard. garbage, lawn care quired. $500/mth Greenhead Central A/C, Large 4 sale! Up to 100%
interviewing for boothIncludes water, included. Spacious, A hi Washer & Dryer Incl Front Yard, Very Nice 7150 Financing/5% interest.
renters. Contact sewer, energy efficient. Large lot, &A.S Some pes welcome Water and Garage Reduced Price! 2 Acre Lake Lot
Mller at garba elet8506387128. e Re e 248-004800eo 8 acres onBedie(866)434-8969ext 00
S(850)547- 1277 or Hud approved. $500/ quired. Call (850) Refrences Require RdTwo 9 acres on
(850)849-5724. MTH For Rent: 2 Bedroom 547-2091. 2 and 3 Bedroom (850)-638-8425 Leave Bedle Rd. Two 5 acres
850-547WestFlorida 5244 apt. furnished or (850) 441-8181. Mobile Homes for rent Message & One 10 acres on
Wilderness Institute, a unfurnished, 1 bath. in Bonifay. No Pets. Buddy Rd. One 10 ac- Land Sale Stein-
residential juvenile Water, sewer included. Bethelemarea:(850)547-1386.res on Gainer Rd. 10 hatchee, FL 10 Acres
rdfacliuty eils Near Walmart, Chipley. 2 Bdrm/1 Bath Mobile Homes For acres on Hwy 77. $39,900 $900 Down,
EMPLOYMENT Rent in Chipley & Bon Owner financing For $326/Mo. Great
accepting applications NO PETS. Washer/dryer 2 br, 2 ba 16 wide, on ifRentay $385 & up more info call MiltonHuntng/shng. Near
4100- Help Wanted for Direct Care Call 850-547-3129 furnished, also water, large lot in the country. 638-2999 up e l Hunting/Fishing. Near
4130 - Employment position. If you are Publisher's garbage, sewage. Washington County Peel @ 850-638-1858. Gulf and River. Call
Information highly motivated and bi For Rent: Bright $475/mo + $200/depo. (New Hope area) $425 (352)542-7835 cell:
. would like to help Notice I 2BR/2BA screened Call (850)547-5195 per month, $300 dep, Mobile Homes in Cot- , (352)356-1099
OIij troubled youth we are porch Townhouse I BRAND NEW HOUSE 501-6649 or 456-4867 tondale on Sapp Rd, 8 -
the place for you. High All real estate advertis- apartment. FOR Text FL44047 to 56654 miles E. of Chipley. 7160 -
I 4*100 school diploma or GED ing in this newspaper is Non-Smoker, FOR RENT. 3BD/2BA T FL -------3br/2ba Doublewide &
Certified teacher Housingrequred. ApplcantAct which references. non $800/mth $400 2BR Mobile Home, 2br2ba singlewde 1998 home& NC Mountain Property
needed for residential must be able to pass makes it illegal to ad- Good location deposit No Pets good location in avail. Total elec. acre $32,000 Auctions, Mountain
juvenile facility to teach background and drug vertise "any preference, Bonifay Area 850-896-8131 Chipley. No Pets. (850) 258 4868 3 br, 2 ba, Mobile Castle, Acreage, Lots,
Math, Science and screening. Vacation, limitation or discrimina- Now Available I 850-638-4640. 8 5 0 - 2 0 9 - 8 8 4 7 home on 1 acre in Homes, Month of June,
History grades 6-12, holiday pay, insurance tion based on race, 850-547-3494 or Clean, all electric Apts w w w . c h a r I o s Caryville located at Sealed Bid, Online &
must be certified in and retirement color, region, sex, 850-532-2177 & Mobile Homes for 3BR/1BA, 3/4 mile countryliving.com 1775 Cypress Cove Rd Live. Iron Horse
field applying. Please package included. handicap, familial status rent. 3 Bdrm Houses from Bonfay Elem close to five points A u c t o n
contact Lesley Perdue Apply in person 1912 or national origin, or anrent. 3 Bdrm Houses from Bonifay Elem close to five points A u c t i o n
contact Lesley Perdue Apply in persn Rd., 1912 intention, to make any * for sale. (850)547-2531. School. On Hwy 177A. Mobile Homes/ Rent (850)-503-2449 for (8 0 0 ) 9 9 7 - 2 2 4 8 .
at perduel@hdsb.orgOld Mt.Zon Rd., such preference, limita- Family oriented park. In Cottondale. more details N C A L 3 9 3 6
or Kimberly Blain at Ponce de Leon, Fl. For tlon or discrimination" ii Country Living Extra Call 547-3746. 2BR/1BA$ 325/mth www.ironhorseauction.co
blain@hdsb.org or by more information call Familial status includes 6140 Nice 3BD/ 1.5 BA on 2BR/2BA $400/mth m
phone at Jennie Rushing at children under the age 2 Houses For Rent Corbin Rd near Sapp DW Mobile Home 3 3BR/2BA $ 450/mth
(850)548-5524. 850-548-5524. of 18 living with parents 2BD/1BA& 3BD/1BA. Community Church. br, 2 ba, located on No Pets. CH/A
or legal custodians, No pets Water,& garbage Hwy 177A three miles LEAVE MESSAGE -
CNA needed for home pregnant women and 638-1918 furnished. We also from Bonfay Elemen- 850-258-1594
CNA needed for home people securing cus- furnish exterminate tary School. $550 mo
health care, for 93yr old tody of children under
female. Give rmeds, 4130 18. 2 Houses For Rent once a month , mow + $400 deposit. Sec 8 - 8210 -
bathing, feeding, and Act Now! New Pay In- 3BR/ 1BA House In grass in summer mths, ok. 850-630-6721 ,
general care. Call 850- crease! 37-46 cpm. This newspaper will not Esto, CH/A. Call change air filter once a
265-8717 New Trucks in 2011. knowingly accept any 850-573-0041 day & mth. For more info call For Rent 3 BR/ 2 BA 1
_Need 2 months CDL-A advertising for real es- 263-3072 night & Liou Corbin @ Doublewide in Bonifay Destin 3 br, 3 ba, St.
Co-Driver or Team Driving Exp. tate which is in violation 3BR/1BA house near 638-1911 or 326-0044 Sorry No Pets Maarten highrise condo
A DriverCDL-Has mat-Tw lasx www.meltontruck.com that all dwellings adver- CH/A 263 -4 74 Spacious 3BD/1BA 850 -373 -8938 ico. Best Location; Best COMPLETE PACKAGES
Card. 3 years varinflable CDL-A Divers. Central tised in this newspaper 263-3072 night House CBonifay. CH/A. For Rent: e ttiO
OTR experience. NOFlorida company seeks areavailableRoneanequalSale price $1.5 Million
Feloniesx. Call Daniel No Flda co nyseerks opportunity basis. To 3 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath 547-2091 441-8181 2BR/1BA trailer, $250. 7100g- Homes
(850)5472644Solo & Team Drivers complain of discrimina- Brick home on 4 acres a month, 7105 - Open HoUSB All Welded,
(850)547-2644 TanksandoffryVan po- ton call HUD toll-free at of land. 2 car carport. Ponce de Leon area. 7110- Beach Home/ AllAluminum Boats
Cell (850)393-3198 sitions offering some 1-800-669-9777. The ollafreeAat ofuIinrm0
regional. lyr OTR & toll-free number for the North of Bonifay. 850-2695000 7120 - Comercial
Install/Maint/Repair Good MVR required. hearing impaired is 1-251-300-8421 or 6170 7130 - ConduTwnhoumm erial
(877)882-6537 or apply 1-800-927 9275. 1-251-421-0270 2 & 3 Bdrm MH's. LARGE 3BR/2BA one 7140 Farms & Ranches.t
www.oakletransport.comDeposit required. block to KateSmith 7150 - Lots and Acreage F
Sandestin wwwoakleytransport.com 1282 HolleyAve No Pets. Water/ School. W/D hookup, 7160- Mobile Homes/Lots B O tS
Investments,LLC Claims Adjusters 3Bdrm/1 Bath sewage furnished. CH/A. No Pets. 71s70 Walerfront Owners:Eddie (813) Bonifay Florida
Is searching for dy- Needed due to active 'fY Convenient location in Bonifay, Fl. $525/mth $525 deposit. Property 45-4028 or Ed (13 wwwxt dustr
namic individuals to Storm Season. JEL s Chipley. $675/mo + (850)547-5007 1 yr lease. 7190 - Out-ol-Town 391-3593. baylivinginc wwxtremeindustries.corn
join our team for the 5-day Boot Camp, Na- $650 sec.depo If no answer leave 8 5 0 - 6 3 8- 0 5 6 0 Real Estate @yahoo.com t I M o
positions of: tons #1 hands-on (850)271-9973 message 352-284-2338 7200 - Timeshare Text 61092 to 56654
trainer can prepare
+Area Supervisor you. High Income
+Equipment www.JELTraining.com -
Operator Companies waiting
+Maintenance Cypress Truck Lines0
Technician Home Weekends!

our job openings fits 6 Months TT exp
please visit CDL with clean MVR.
http://www.sandestin. Call (800)545- 1351
com/careers.aspx. www.cypresstruck.com
Competitive wage,
full benefits for quali- Driver - Not getting
flying positions and enough miles! Join 1
more. EOE/ Drug Knight Transportation
Free Workplace. and increase your
Sandestin income with our steady
(Wfand Rea o, freight. New Trucks! I FlANGER 21111 F D ANGER 21111 F
Web ID 34163908 CDLA, 3 months re 2011 FORD RANGER XL 211 FRD RANGERXL su CAB 2011 FRD F-15 SUPER CAB XL
Text FL63908 to 56654 cent experience.
www.d0 1veknight.co r ~" MSRP ....................................319,87 0 MSRP....................................S21,565 MSRP ...................... ... ..... $2 480
General Ddsneukngntsht........................ 070 ......-SI0480
General Driver- Recession cou S ............................. - 875 Discounts ............................ -S1,07D 0 - Discounts .............. ..... -.. . 5 .
Deliver Phone Proof Freight. Plenty of Retail Cuiter Csh,....-S o Retail Cust0r Cashas......-S3, Retail Customer Cash -S.500
B o o k s m ile s . N e e d ref re s h e r? S . ....- :STOr.......s.., - I rO a d e - ln As si s an c e ....e.... . C A S H . -S I2
Work YoursOwn No out-of-pocket tuition I Tpade-IAssistance........... ,....-31,000 U FMCCBON ASH.. ..-S D
Hours. at FFE. $1000 Bonus 23LI4ENGINE;5-SPDAUTDMATICU/D0TRANS;A/C 4YA A/C b 0 . .[:
Have Insured Vehi- for Co's & $1500 Incen- 4CYLAutomatic;A/C; H i .a.na.'16. [;..:a
cle, Must be at Least tive for 0/0's.
r3 t&$1 NDW.....S14,935 NDW.....S1B,495 NDW.....S23,495
18 yrs old, Valid DL. recruit@ffex.net. N
No Experience (855)356-7121
Necessary Drivers - CDL-A Start
1-800-518-1333x up to 430 per mile! 151] 2011 r In F CREW 1 FORD F 2LR
224 Sign-on Bonus! Gea 2011 FORD F-15 SUPER CAB XLT 2011 FORD F-150 SUPER CREW LARIAT 2011 FORD F-25 CREW CAB LARIAT
ww.deliverthephone Home Time! Lease _--
book.com purchase available. Ex- Stock#120S :2o
perience Req'd. R - - SR MSRP-8....................................S57,98S
General H (800)441-4271 x FL-100 M..................................... S33,85 ] MSRP....................................S45,430 - . Discounts............................. $4,990
Wanted HornadyTransportation.co CDiscounts ............................ 5 Discounts ............................iscounts............................ 3,35 Retail Customer Cash......-S2,500
m Retail Customer Cash.......-S3,5D Retail Customer Cash....-S2,D000 FMCC BONUS CASH .............-SI,DD
Servicing Greeting Frac Sand Haulers with FMCC BDNUS CASH.............-$1,0 0 FMCC BONUS CASH .............-SI,000OD El ... ...L Trade-In Assistance ........... -S,000
Cards. complete bulk 3.7 V-B, 305 HP. XLT Plus Pkg, Chrome Pkg ... i Hi..:, ifMAi niiA i. '*. i, i.
10-20 hrs per week, pneumatic rigs only.
varble days & hours, Relocate toTexasfor NOW S2 495 NOW.....S3 495 NOW.....S48495
Monday-Friday, Tons of work. Great N.. .O.
8-5. company/pay. Gas
Computer skills, & cards/Quick Pay
land phone. a v a i I a b I e
Pay by experience. (800)491-9029 / , / / ^d
chard.wood Movie Extras Earn up
@amgreetings.com to $250 per day To
stand in the back- __________R27 ___1034_A1IR3272
Health Care grounds for a major 298A 04 FORD F-150 #R3276 08 FORD ESCAPE '10349A 09 FORD F-150 #R3272 08 FORD F-150
Heath Care film e productioren expert SUPER CAB FX-4 LIMITED SUPER CAB LARIAT SUPER CREW 4X2 LARIAT
Direct Care staff for 56 looks needed. Call 41 4FLAIRS-DE LEATHER, LTCHRO E C LEIATHER,
bed facility. Duties in- Now! (877)435-5877 CHOBMw'Ei.E BH SUPER NICE: KCONTROL,
clude cleaning Mo oF WHEELS, ONLY 30K LIKE NEW,
resident's apartment, Need CDL Drivers A or LEAMIER 33K MILES MILES ONLY
assisting with ADL's B with 2 yrs recent
preparing supper and commercial experience ""1 7 9 9 5 4 9 5 'O25,495
assistance with medi- to transfer motor 1 8 ! 9 9| I L --'
cation. Hours are homes, straight trucks,
11:30- 7:30 p.m. with tractors, and buses.
pay starting at $ 8.50 www.mamotransporta- 07 CHRYSLER T CRUISER 05 JEEP W RANGL
an hour. Applications tion.com (800)501-3783 10 FORD 07 CHRYSLER PATCRUISER 0E R
(850) 547-3708 for C EDGE SEL 71 K MILES, #ii280AA UNLIMITED 4X4
morenformation / #R3301 ADIOPOWERPKG., POWER PACKAGE, AUTO........................7,995 #11259A AUTO., LOTS OF EXTRAS, $17 995
Industrial -. ALLOYS, 30K MILES.................. 08 DODGE CHARGER #11158 72KMILES.............................
Manpower 06 FORD F-150 SXT POWER PKG., TILT, 07 FORD SPORT
I cattong BUSINESS & FINANC. #10333B n CRUISE, CD, 62K MILES....................... 12,995 TRAC L. 4X4

WRDUCSTIAON SUPER CAB XL4X4 507 VOLVO s60 #11268A #P3296
FORKLIFT 5110 Money to Lend LEATHER, MOONROOF, LEATHER, LOADED,49K MILES.........
M n Chipley, FL 06 NISSAN , SUPER NICE, 61K MILES.......... ............$16,995 10 DODGE CHALLENGER
I sMonda Se d PizS & ng ARMADA LE .i 08 LINCOLN MKZ #R3302 2000R, V6, #10319B
Third Shifts Franchise LEATHER, MOON ROOF, LOADED, 1 I 9 LEATHER, LOADED, AUTOMATIC, NICE, 36K MILES.........
Candidates must Dine-in and/or delivery 76K.MILES................................ 33K MILES..........................................$21,995 .
School Educationgh Call (800) 3108848 10 FORD E-250 10 FORD FLEX SEL #3310 08 FORD FUSION SE WR330,
and will also be re- r L "#SL
I quired to pass a I CARGO VAN #P3284^ LEATHER, 3RD ROW SEATING, POWER PK1, 4 CYLINDER,
drug stand bck POW S . $20, 5 ALLOYS, 19KMILES...............................$28,995 NICE! 45K MILES....................... $16,985
Iin forati 10 FORD E-350 glli^ 09 FORD F-250 #11217A 07 GMC YUKON
334 794 7564. 12 PASS. VAN CREW CAB LARIAT 4X4 DENALI
..-- --------1 si----- w $#P3282 DIESEL, LEATHER, OSENECK HITCH, #11211C MOONROOF, LEATHER.
Medical/Health ommer ial OLL MILES....:............... $21 95 26K MILES..........................................$39,995 DV', CHROME WHEELS,71K MILES....
6120 - Beach Rentals
Chipola Nursing 6130 - Condo/Townhouse____________
Pavilion & 6140 -House Rentals
RetirementCenter p - Hooms f o teet Our Sales '. nyr
Ing applications for 6180 - Out-of-Town Rentals
Director of 6190-TimeshareRentals Team Is i Great Deals


Nursng26 481r c rs q., John Allen John Bryan Craig Bard Ronnie Coley Ryan McLaulin
(85) 6d 34163883 entures. sCallf RicRk All prices plus S299.50 PSH. Tax, Tag S Title. Pictures for Illustration only. Incentive good thru 06/3D/11. W.A.C
MuText fbel63883 to 56654 8502586621.
Part Time/ Full Timrse and 610Executive


no experience. If interequred Officerial Building
name and mesa e town Chipley. All utI W W W . hIn l Joh rdan ri Bard Rick Barnes, Sales Manager
please call and leave Space for rent down
638-4619 inc'd 638-1918




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated May 24, 2011 - Version 3.0.0 - mvs