Title: Holmes County times-advertiser
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100549/00031
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Title: Holmes County times-advertiser
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Florida Freedom Newspapers Inc.
Place of Publication: Bonifay, FL
Publication Date: May 13, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
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Bibliographic ID: UF00100549
Volume ID: VID00031
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Wednesday, MAY 13, 2009 www.bonifaynow.com Volu me 119, Number 5 50(


1


Local Owners, Local Mrcanagement, Local Decisions


JAY FELSBERG
Managing Editor
afelsberg@chipleypaper.com
BONIFAY The Holmes County
Board of County Commissioners
unanimously approved advertis-
ing for a new county administra-
tor. The position would be adver-
tised for 60 days in a variety of
media beginning May 22, the day


after current County Adminis-
trator Greg Wood's contract ex-
pires.
Commissioners Jim King
and Philip Music voted to table
discussion of the ordinance and
contract, but Chairman Monte
Merchant and Commissioners
Kenneth Williams and Ron Monk
voted "no," and after consider-
able discussion the BOCC voted


to advertise the draft contract
prepared by County Attorney
Brandon Young, with several
changes including:
*Length of contract for two
years instead of one.
*Pay scale of $60,000-$70,000
so the administrator would make
more than the department heads
he supervises; King voted against
offering this salary range.


*Thirty days written notice of
dismissal.
*Action in case of suspension
and involving pay if suspended.
*Eight weeks severance pay.
"We need to get the changes
made and get it advertised as
soon as possible," Merchant said.
More coverage including last
week's workshop at bonifaynow.
com.



Ull(11Hg 100KS

RSsured for


;ewer project
JAY FELSBERG
Managing Editor
afelsberg@chipleypaper.com


BONIFAY Bonifay City Council heard
some very good news Monday night as
the City's engineering firm, Hatch Mott
McDonald, announced that $3.06 million
in funding has been obtained for the city's
sewer project.
Most of the work was done by Amir Za-
far of HMM, who gathered up the health
ands safety pints necessary for the project
to be ranked second in the entire state.
The federal funding package includes
$2.3 million of "principal forgiveness" and
other funding in very low interest loans.
In effect, 82.19 percent of the package
would be a grant that the City would not
have to replay.
"The plans and specifications are with
the Florida Department of Community
Affairs," Zafar said. The plan is to replace
infiltration and inflow pipe, reline man-
holes and reline pipe. About 17,000-18,000
linear feet of pipe would be replaced and
the same amount relined. There are about
115,000 linear feet in the City system.
It would take about to three months
complete the contract phase and issue
bids. Once everything is finished the
project would take about nine months to
complete.
A public hearing on the project will be
held at City Hall on May 15.
Council also approved a request to
make June 25 Al Boswell Day to honor
the past president of the Bonifay Kiwanis
Club and former city clerk and Boswell's
many other accomplishments. A procla-
mation will be drawn up for Mayor Eddie
Sims to sign.
In other business, Council:
*Approved a grant agreement of
$650,000 with DCA for the Community De-
velopment Block Grant for the new well.
Once DCA signs off the project would
move forward. Council also approved an
offer for Bob Jones to administer the proj-
ect.
*Approved accepting a $2,500 grant
from the American Ramp Company to
use toward the new skateboard park at
the Recreation Center. The park would
he set up on a slab at the end of the walk-
ing train. A preliminary design should be
ready at the next meeting in June.
*Cancelled the May 25 meeting be-
cause it falls on Memorial Day Monday.
*Approved buying concrete to repair
the sidewalk near Son's Tire. Son's would
supply the labor.
*Heard that the planned Edison/Sand-
path Road paying project is already on the
county's SCRAP list for 2010, and Council
approved putting the project on hold.


breakinthekewstvisit
B ON IFAYN OW. COM

N ews

BRIE FS
El beth Stuck
benefit dinner
There will be a
benefit dinner for
Elizabeth Stuck on
Saturday, May I 6,
beginning at 10:30
em natC Ih Iene he
will be mullet or
chicken plates with
assorted side dishes,
dessert and a drink
for a $5 donation per
plate.

Million dollar visit
The "Million Dollar
Man," Ted DiBiase,
visited the area last
week.



IINSID E


Students visit
DOCt0f5 MeoMrial
Ei hth grade
students from Bonifay
Middle School and
Poplar Springs School
recently visited
Doctors Memorial
Hospital for a field
trip.


Tara Thompson
signs scholarshiP
Bethlehem High
School student Tara
Thompson signed a
basketball scholarship
with the Alabama
Southern Eagles
Tues ay.
All

INDEX
Opini on.............................Pa ge A4
Extra ................................. Pa ge B1
(lassifieds ........................Page B10

FREEDOM


Phone: 850-547-9414
We~basite: bonif lnwcom




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e HOLMES COUNTYY


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HoImue haoshdis dB oa dwa y


BOCC approves advertising for new county administrator


See PROJECT Al0





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~a=


A2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser


Local


Wednesday, May 13, 2009


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750 ml bottrlle


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10-14.5 Oz. Select Varieties

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BISQUICK SHAKE & POUR
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WHITE VINEGAR CANNED FRUIT
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64 Oz. Assorted
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12 Pack, 12 Oz. Cans

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32 Oz. Regular Only m n 18 Oz. Select Varieties

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26-26.5 Oz. Asstd.

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CAKE MIX ma 0 BROWNIE


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17.3-18 Oz. Jar, Asstd.

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FOR | FOR FOR FO


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Tablerite Family Pack Fresh
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Arrest REPORTS


(~btnTj~


Wednesday, May 13, 2009


Local


Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A3


Holmes County arrest
report for the week of May
4 through May 11, 2009.

Christopher Bruner:
25, Bonifay, reckless driv-
ing, driving under the influ-
ence.
Sammy Leland Bur-
cham: 48, Bonifay, failure
to appear on issuing worth-
less checks.
Clifford Wayne Davis:
48, Geneva, Ala. violation
of probation on trafficking
in stolen property, grand
theft (2 counts) battery by
detainee, burglary.
Ryan Dockery: 24, De-
Ekniak Springs, violation of
probation.
Chalop Floyd: 20, no


address listed, criminal
mischief.
Roy Harold German:
50, Ozark, Ala., violation of
probation.
David Hall: 46,
Caryville, hold for Washing-
ton County.
James Hereford: 42, no
address, driving under the
influence.
Carey Kenneth Hood:
54, Bonifay, battery.
M/elissa Hood: 54, Boni-
fay, battery.
Lisa Denine Nolin: 43,
DeEkniak Springs, parole
violation.
Amanda Peavey: 31,
armed burglary of dwelling
or structure.
Terrance Pope: 27,


Bonifay, county ordinance
violation.
Christopher Joseph
Prine: 21, Pensacola, resist
officer without violence,
failure to appear on no val-
id drivers license, driving
while license suspended or
revoked.
Jeremy Scarpa: 29, Na-
varre, violation of proba-
tion on battery/domestic
violence battery.
Robert Strickland: 22,
Bonifay, driving under the
influence.
Angela Vaughn: 30, no
address listed, failure to
appear on no valid drivers
license.
Victor Williams: 45, no
address, battery.


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V MEORIAL HOSPITAL


Major and Minor Surgery

Providing In-Patient and Out-Patient Procedures

COLONOSCOPY GALL BLADDER BIOPSY HERNIA SCOPES


BONIFAY Fourteen of
some of Holmes County's
finest students participated
in this year's County 4/H/
Tropicana Public Speaking
Contest on May 4.
More than 120 family,
friends, and school figures
gathered at the Holmes
County Ag Center to ob-
serve the final competition
amongst the students.
A variety of speech top-
ics were presented cov-
ering activities such as
swimming and recycling
and touching stories about
siblings and pets.
The judges had difficult
decisions to make regard-
ing which youth won the
grade level contests.
Beautiful awards and
Camp Timpoochee schol-
arships in the amount of
$200.00 were given to win-
ners at this year's event.
More than 159,000 young



Tropicana has spon-
soredthecontestsincel969
andter vis seaass oom
tificates of participation,
medallions for school win-
ners, trophies for county
winners, summer camp
scholarships and Tropicana


Illlli~'~Y~t~:r~l(cli"?Lll~fl3:r"


Mykala Merritt, fifth grade, won for Most Educational
Speech.


orange juice refreshments
for county contests.
To learn more about
this event or other 4-H pro-
gramming, contact Niki


Crawson, 4-H Youth De-
velopment Agent, Holmes
County Extension Service,
at 547-1108 or by e-mail at
nerawson~ufl.edu.

JRTH GRADE: First place


h Dvd s toe d a

~r Stev rs ,t dni ace
mentary aMos Entetrtaining

nifay Elementary; Most
ucational Speech John

rig gS Io a~nodp ost
suasive Speech Tori
version, Bonifay Elementary


FIFTH GRADE: First place Thomas Parish, Bonifay Middle School; second
place Samantha Snell, Poplar Springs; third place Melea Kirk, Bonifay
Middle School; Honorable Mention Tazia Velazquez, Poplar Springs;
Most Entertaining Speech Zachary Frost, Ponce de Leon Elementary;
Most Educational Speech Mykala Merritt, Ponce de Leon Elementary; Most
Persuasive Speech Rebekah Dixon, Bethlehem School.
SIXTH GRADE WINNERS: First place
r Kelsey Stewart, Bethlehem
School; second place -Joley
Dixon, Poplar Springs School;
third place Cami Dixon,
ki Poplar Springs School;
Honorable Mention Sabrina
Justice, Bethlehem School; Most
Entertaining Speech Kelsey
Stewart, Bethlehem School;
Most Educational Speech
Cami Dixon, Poplar Springs
School; Most Persuasive
Speech Joley Dixon, Poplar
Springs School.


CARPEL TUNNEL GASTRO-INTESTINAL ENDOSCOPY


LAP BAND PROCEDURES
FOR WEIGHT LOSS

Our Staff of Board Certified Surgeons


Dr. Dale Mitchum Dr. Muhammad Amin Dr.Timothy Klepper


'Annie' coming
to Betlileiem
BETHLEHEM Bethlehem
High School will present
their spring musical per-
formance of "Annie" on
May 14 and 15 as a dinner
theater with a matinee on
Saturday May 16. Diner
theater starts at 6 p.m. and
matinee at 2 p.m.
Dinner theater tickets
are $10 each, and matinee
tickets are $5. For more in-
formation, call Bethlehem
School at 547-3621.

Safety check ointS
planned in Bonifly
BONIFAY Bonifay Po-
lice Department will be
conducting safety check-


NeWS BRIEFS

points within the city lim-
its during May on the fol-
lowing roads; Highway 79,
Highway 90, Highway 173,
Highway 177A, Jenkins
Boulevard, Saint Johns
Road, Caryville Road, Hub-
bard Street, Weeks Street,
Oklahoma Avenue, McGee
Road and Banfil Avenue.
Vehicle equipment and
seatbelt violations will be
enforced.

Angel Food MinistrieS
HOw taking oderS
New Smyrna Assembly
of God Church, host site for
Angel Food Ministries, is
taking orders for May. The
last day to order is Monday,
May 18; delivery will be on
Saturday, May 30.


Angel Food Ministries
reserves the right to substi-
tute any of the above items
due to availability, cost, and
quality. Food Stamps (EBT)
are accepted.
Call Sis Julie at 547-
9559, between 8:30 a.m. and
1 p.m. Monday, and from
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday
for a list of items available
and to place an order. You
can also mail in your or-
der to NSAG, 1849 Adolph
Whitaker Road, Bonifay,
FL 32425, as long as it is re-
ceived by the due date.
For more information
about Angel Food Minis-
tries and to see a detailed
list of items available go on
line and visit the Web site:
www.angelfoodminitries.
com.


Over 50 years of combined quality surgical
nursing experience ready to serve you.

DO C TO RS

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

Surgery Department


2600 Hospital Drive


*Bonifay, Florida 32425


(850) 547-8000


Holmes County students


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_


Local VIEWS


Wednesday, May 13, 2009


A4 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser


Families are an
odd sort of organism.
A family is born,
grows older and either
reproduces itself or dies.
My family is growing
older.
Four years separate
me from my sister.
She's the youngest,
after my brother and
me. When she was born,


Candyland and Uno. We
read stories like "Amelia
Bedelia" and "Mrs.
Piggle-Wiggle."
But we're an older
}}family now. The movies
we watch have real
people in them. We
VORD occasionally eat at
lollinger restaurants that set a
place with three forks,
two spoons and two
knives. We play hearts and
spades. And, OK, we still read
"Harry Potter," but I'm sure
it's with a more mature literary
view.
When I entered high school,
my brother was in middle
school and my sister was still
in elementary. She was a giggly
little girl who didn't know or


understand the things that I
knew and understood. She is
finishing her second year of
college this May. Not much of a
baby anymore.
Now my sister is articulate
(quite articulate; she practices
all the time). She is creative. She
is smart. It is strange to see her
grown up. I saw myself getting
older, watched myself getting
taller, watched my thinking
mature, watched my writing
change. It was no surprise to me
that I grew up.
While it was happening, I
didn't notice my family getting
older. I look at my family now
and see five adults living as a
family all out of the house, but
still a family. No more young-
uns.


Kids love growing up. Their
parents are ambivalent about it,
both happy and sad. Talk to my
mom. When I was a baby, she
thought infancy was the best.
When I became a toddler, she
thought early childhood was the
best. Then middle school and
high school were the best. Now
she thinks my being a college
graduate and teacher is the
best. But at the same time, she
misses the other "bests," the
ones behind us, the times that
are gone forever. And she always
gets misty when Trace Adkins
sings:
"I see them as babies. Guess
that'll never change... You pray
all their lives someday they will
find happiness. Then they do and
that's how it is. It's just quiet in


the morning, Can't believe how
much you miss all they do and
all they did. You want all their
dreams to come true. Then they
do."
My family's growing up.
In August, my sister will be a
college junior. My brother will be
a senior. And I'll be in my second
year of teaching. We each want
our dreams to come true. I know
how the story ends, though.
After I wish and pray and hope
that they succeed -
Then they do.

Andrew Hollinger is the
author of "One Word" and
the co-author oflNKSTAIN,
available on i~unes. For e-mail
and information, visit www.
andrewhollingencom.


my parents were only 30 years
old. The five of us were a young
family. We did young family
things. We went to cartoon
movies: "Oliver & Company"
and "All Dogs Go to Heaven."
We would eat out at places that
had paper tablecloths and didn't
take too long to prepare the
food. We played kiddie games:


welcome relief. We ended
up spending over eight
hours with his family.
People need to know
that there are individuals
out there that are willing
to take time out of their
lives to help strangers
when needed. Often
times you only hear
the negatives, but you
also need to hear the
positives. My hat is off
to the men and women
we encountered in your
community.
Martin T. Blethen, PLS
Montgomery, Ala.


HCHS Drama Club
3Uts on great sl0W
To the Editor:
We would like to
extend a big thank you
to the Holmes County
Chamber of Commerce;
its corporate sponsors,
and the Holmes County
High School Drama Club
for a wonderful reception
Tuesday May 5. The food
and drink provided by
the hosts was superb
dswell as th costumes
pleasantly su prised b
the enormous amount of
talent at the high school
and thought that the
entire crew did a terrific
job with their sneak
performance of "Into the
Woods." It was our first
time to attend a play at
the school, but it won't be
our last.
The Mason's/Dogwoo If 2


fact that here comes the brother-in-
law deals. Sit back and hold on I think
it is going to be a bumpy ride. We will
get thru it and gain strength from it,
hopefully. To everyone on both sides
of the issue, God Bless You and Keep
us in each others prayers.
disappointed

Mrs. Wood did demand that they
all speak up about their "decision"
out side of the sunshine. King was
the only one that spoke up. Monk
nor Music spoke up and went on
the record. We'll have to make them
do it next time so that voters have


It was wonderful to hear
Mr. DiBiase's message
for the students and also
the heart-wrenching
story that Ms. Prescott
shared. I know their words
touched the hearts of the B
students. I was very proud TED D
to see the students listen so
respectfully to these fine people. We
have some great students at HCHS!
Lori Stude
Just wait, some bleeding heart
ACLU liberal will file a law suit
because someone spoke the name of
Jesus in a school. Some Muslim could
come talk about Allah and that will be
the greatest thing since pockets on
T-shirt. People will have nothing but
great things tosay about nothing. H

Great story I was wondering what
ever happened to him. Now I know.
Keep up the good work Ted. God
Bless You.
AMEN

The ongoing controversy over
Holmes County Administrator Greg
Wood and the Board of County
Commissioners' decision not to
renew Wood's contract continues to
draw comment online. 'lb comment'
go to bonifaynow.com
or chipleypapercom.
I've never been so disappointed
in anyone as in Jim King and Monty
Merchant. I myself have heard our
Emergency Management Director
gripe about Mr Wood because I


Former Sheriff Jol
Braxton thinks he is r
)iBIASE sheriff and is making
the decisions at the s
office. It is not a surprise thai
doesn't want this county to ha
a good administrator. An ignt
populace is easy to control. Av
Wood is not ignorant. But the
commissioners must be. Who
what Braxton thinks? I'm mo
impressed with what Bob Jor
Mr. Jenkins thinks.


I had a dream that my child
could grow up, go away and g
educated then come back to i
County and make a difference
Guess that's all it will ever be
the fit they pitched when Jere
came back to the county and
they have treated Mr. Wood. t
come on King, didn't you reach
man's resume when you hire
oh yeah you never voted for h-


Well, no matter the outcome
ramifications will be long last
you honestly believe that anol
administrator will take the jol
knowing that no matter what
performance, is if he tries to r
departments accountable, he
have a job at the end of the co
The clause about him having
in Holmes County only solidif


conydocumentation to go back to when
crs they try to lie like King did last time
rewhen he said he never did vote on Mr.
nsad Wood. It was a unanimous vote for
Mr. Wood. King did vote against his
djgtdcontract last year and he said then the
dsut only reason he did was because Mr.
ldren Wood had not done a good job letting
pet everyone know what he'd been doing.
H~olmes This time he grips when he does try to
e. let people know what he's done. King
:, seeing isn't firm on anything but lying!
ome speak the facts
the way ..
And A fair job. I would say that with no
d the guidelines in place and having to wing
d him, it, as Greg put it, that he has done a
,im. remarkable job. Look at the figures
Dreamer trlt I su tat Grehewas dtoig a
re the Fine job then what does. As for King,
ing. Do he is nothing and never will be nothing
their but a half, fill in the rest, road grader
operator. He has cost this county more
his money than any of the Staffords ever
make all did. He doesn't even know what he
will not votes for at the meetings. Thankyou
,ntract? Greg for all you have done for Holmes
to live County in the past year.
ies the what


A huge difference
between champions of
a fully free society (or
libertarianism) and others (
who are concerned with
political economic matters r
is that the former really do .
not approve of imposing any
kind of agenda on the lives TIBOR M
of others no matter how ec
desirable it would be.
Not even universal education,
let alone universal health care,
is deemed important enough for
libertarians to assume power over
other people, e.g., the parents of
children, those with ailing elderly in
their homes, etc. Unless there really
is negligence involved, such that
someone is failing to fulfill a legal
obligation to feed his or her children,
the government simply has no role.
R~rthermore, those who really accept
the imperative to respect the rights
of everyone to live as they choose
provided no one's rights are being
violated, may not force others to do
the right thing in, say, abstaining from
racial or gender discrimination at the
work place, just as this is something
one may not impose on others in their
personal lives,
This full commitment to human
liberty is really quite an unusual and
often difficult stance. Yet it is at the
heart of the difference between what
a free and what an authoritarian or
totalitarian society is about.
Just as no one may force others
to go to a certain church, regardless
of how sincerely and devoutly one
holds to one's religious faith, neither
may these other practices that to
many appear to be elementary
decency be imposed on other
persons. Just as no one may impose


on others what they must
read, so others must not be
forced to do all kinds of things
that are deemed to be just
and proper. Just as in one's
Personal life one must be free
& /' to choose with whom one will
or will not associate, the same
1ACHANI holds for one's professional
omitassociations. (There are
some intricacies here that
can make it appear that one isn't
free to avoid others with whom one
doesn't want to fraternize as
when one joins a club that has a non-
discriminatory policy but those
are complications that would need to
be discussed elsewhere.)
Many decent people recoil in
disgust from these elements of a free
society while they accept others that
are very similar. They do not mind
that freedom implies that people can
read or write whatever they please,
however immoral it may be; yet they
refuse to accept that one has a basic
and should have a legal right to
adopt highly objectionable policies at
the factory or office that one owns.
They see nothing odd about people
refusing to accept someone into
their family who does not share their
religious or even political convictions
while they consider it impermissible
that they may refuse to hire such
people even if this is a fully disclosed
condition for employment.
The realm of the private is
far broader in a free society than
most people realize, so private
choices and preferences have a
greater scope. Which can be a very
benign influence over the society
as well as introduce some not very
admirable ones. This, however, is
the implication of taking the right


to liberty really seriously instead
of cherry picking liberties that one
likes and are uncontroversial.
A truly free country leaves it to its
citizens to plan their lives, for better
or for worse, and refuses to permit
the imposition of plans on them
even by the most wise and smart
among us. If one has plans for others,
regardless how worthy they may
be, these must be promoted without
coercion, by voluntary means. That
is indeed the mark of civilization
- human relations must at all
levels adhere to the principle of free
association and avoid treating people
as if they may be included in the
plans of others without their willing
participation. However cumbersome
this may appear, it is still the basic
imperative of a free society.
Those who understand this
and advocate it may themselves
find some of the implications very
distasteful. That people may indulge
their anti-Semitic, racist, male
chauvinist and similar objectionable
attitudes is not something that is
easy to accept. But if one is going
to be serious about trying to build a
just and free society, accepting it all
is simply unavoidable.

T~ibor Machan holds the R.C.
Hoiles Chair in Business Ethics
& Free Enterprise at Chapman
University's Argyros School ofB&E
and is a research fellow at the Pacific
Research Institute and Hoover
Institution (Stanford). He advises
Freedom Communications, parent
company ofthis newspaper His
most recent book is "The Morality of
Business, A Profession for Human
Wealth-Care" (Springe?; 2007). E-mail
him at Tl~achanelinkc.freedocom.cm


SUBSCRIPTIONS RATES
LOCAL
(Holmes, Washington,
walton & Jackson)
$29 year plus tax
ELSEWHERE
$39 per year plus tax



WANTMORE?

(an't get enough commentary by
national columnists? Find it all at
bonifaynow.cons


The views ex ressed here
are not necessarily those
of this paper or Freedom
Communications.


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
Holmes County
Times-Advertiser
P.O. Box 67, Bonifay, FL 32425
USPS004-341



CONTACTUS
PUBLISHER
Nicole Borefield: nbarefield@
chipleypalper.com
NEWS, SPORTS OR OPINION
Jay Felsberg
news~bonifaynow.om
(LASSIIETD& offRGILATION

chipleypalper.com
ADVERTISING
850-638-0212


O~in *


Oh, my! We're all grown up


ONE W
Andrew H


Letters to the EDITOR


Hats off to citizens
of Holmes County
To The Editor:
I would like to take
this opportunity to say
thanks to several citizens
of Holmes County. My
girlfriend and I were
riding our motorcycle
through Bonifay after
Thunder Beach on a
Sunday afternoon on
our way to Montgomery,
Ala., when the electrical
s stem went out on the
motorcycle. Deputy
Harrison with the
sheriff 's department
stopped and offered his
assistance. This officer
went above and beyond
what was expected. He
went to his house and
brought personal tools
in order to work on the
bike. He also called the
local Advance Auto Parts
store and made sure
they had the parts if
necessary. If this is the
quality of officers in the
Sheriff's Department
then Holmes County can
be proud. Richard Gibbs
who lives off Moss Road
assisted us in getting to
the store. The employees
at Advance Auto eagerly
assisted us with tools
and knowledge and
offered any further help if
needed. We were not able
to fix the motorcycle, and
Me. Gikbebs otfflereedtooustore
get back. His hospitality
and that of the entire

muhapec itedadw da


The visit of "The M~illion Dollar
Man," Ted DiBiase to the area drew
several comments.


guess he expects her to work during
work hours. Isn't that what we paid
him to do? Manage the county? Well
he has done a good job. Mr.
King and Mr. Merchant, you
are listening to the wrong

sad


hn
still
most of


Full freedom permits objectionable attitudes


e HOLMES (011NTY

me S




Nicole P. Barefield, Publisher
Jay Felsberg, Managing Editor
Cameron Everett, Production Supervisor
Brad Goodyear, Composition Supervisor
Zola Anderson, Office Manager
The Times-Advertiser is published on Wednesdays by Florida
Freedom Newspapers, Inc., 1 12 E. Virginia Ave., Bonifaly, FL
32425. Periodicals postage paid at Bonifaly, Florida.
@ Copyright 2009, Florida Freedom Newspapers, Inc. All
Rights Reserved
COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The entire contents of the Holmes
County Times-Advertiser are fully protected by copyright and
cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without the
expressed permission of Florida Freedom Newspapers, Inc.





McCONKEY HONORED















Cadet Major Kari McConkey of Holmes
County High School receives the DAR JROTC
bronze medal with ribbon from Sharon
Wilkerson, Chairman of National Defense
Awards for Chipola Chapter, National Society
Daughters of the American Revolution.
Cadet Major McConkey was selected for her
record of military and scholastic achievement
as well as for her demonstrated loyalty and
patriotism while participating in the ROTC
Program. Only one student may be selected
from a Junior ROTC program each year for
this prestigious award. For information about
DAR email snoopyxii60@hotmail.com or call
579-21 03.



.4 ~ab Th~efamily of I-
ii Betty Hall

would like to thank

Scltrer one fo r your support, *

~y flowers and food2. iif


Hickory Hills meeting to

be lield on Monday


Mairy Ann W. I "ITom W





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Holmes County Times-Advertiser | AS


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Starting at UU

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Starting at
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We Accept BCBS, Medicare/Medicaid, Health Ease,
Healthy Kids, Wellcare, Spectra and most insurances.

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O pto metrist
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The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or
be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination, or treatment which Is performed as a result of
and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service,
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Excellence in compassionate care.
"I am inspired everyday by the bravery and loving commitment
that is shown by Covenant Hospice patients and their families."
Dr. Peter Sylvester, Panama City Medical Director


BONIFAY Eighth grade
students from B nfayS1Vidndl
School recently visited Doctors
Memorial Hospital for a field
trip. The students visited six
departments within the hos-
pital, including clinical lab,
radiology, pharmacy, nursing,
cardiopulmonary and rehabili-
tation.
During the tours the stu-
dents viewed each department
and various equipment used
to take x-rays, draw and store
blood, take EKGs or EEGs,
along with rehab machines, in-
cluding everyone's favorite, the
Aquatic Therapy Pool.
Another highlight of the tour
featured "HazMat Man." A
member of the hazardous ma-
terials team donned a chemi-
cal suit to illustrate what could
happen during a hazardous
chemical spill and the precau-
tions that would be taken to en-
sure safety for the patients as
well as the team.
Career education is becom-
ing increasingly important in
early high school years, with
students being encouraged to
research various occupations.
Doctors Memorial is pleased
to partner with the counties
schools, to provide information
about medical professions and
job opportunities.


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Si Locke and Glenn Rich from
Bonifay Middle School.


Warren Bailey, pharmacist, on right
making a presentation.


Emily Miller, radiology tech, on
left shows students a CT scan of a
brain.


"HazMat Man", Robbie Waldron, on
left with a Poplar Springs student


The monthly neigh-
borhood watch meeting
in the Hickory Hill com-
munity is Monday night,
May 18, at 6:30 p.m. The
guest speaker is Veron-
ica Peel, a licensed fu-






will conduct driver license
and vehicle inspection
checkpoints during the
month of April on the road-
ways listed below in Holm-
es, Jackson and Washing-
ton counties.
Recognizing the danger
presented to the public by
defective vehicle equip-
ment, troopers will con-
centrate their efforts on
vehicles being operated
with defects such as bad
brakes, worn tires and de-
fective lighting equipment.
In addition, attention will
be directed to drivers who
would violate the driver li-
cense laws of Florida.
R dfice will be 0n State
77, 79, 81, 273, 276, 277, and
286 during the month.
County roads with in-
spection points include No.
69A, 162, 164, 165, 165A, 167,

18, \',?, 2 6, 1 9A, 21809, 8,
and Snow Hill Road.
The Patrol has found
these checkpoints to be an
effective means of enforc-
ing the equipment and driv-
er liCeHSe lRWs of Florida
while ensuring the protec-
tion of all motorists.


neral director with Peel
Funeral Home. The Hol-
mes County Sheriff's
Department will also be
on hand.
For more informa-
tion, call 956-2000.


Quit Smot/iingB 9\ Or V!

JOin OUT cla5s/Su~pport grouLp

Date
'Tuesdta, 92a~y 19, 2009
Location
Holmes County Hieatldi Department
crime
6:oo-7:oo (once a weerefor 6 weeks)
Cost


0b (a iter contact
RCay 'M/ardten @ 547-85'00 eCt. 267


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Staff trained in end-of-life care
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Eighth Graders tour hospital


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SJoHN DEERE











JROTC Blue Devil Battalion awards banquet


Rabies vaccination clinic takes place Friday


604 Hwy. 90 West (across from IGA)
(850) 547-51 70















Bag Sale rUnS nOW
through May ;22nd.
BO SUre to CheCK OUt
~Y~the store for bargains
On electronics, books,
furniture, household items, crafts
and decorating ideas!


*

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SUM M BE is conce

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,aic a


ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE: Front row: Hunter Somerset,
Cameron Bailey, Kari McConkey, Gary Moore.
Middle row; Ryan Corne, Paige Dault, Sheetal Patel,
David Duncan. Back row: Brandon Carnley, Cody
Brentner, Joshua Coulier.


A6 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser


Local


Wednesday, May 13, 2009


Thank goodness for Goodman


KARI I
MCCONIKEY
NEW PROMOTIONS: Gary Moore C/COL; Distinguished Cadet CADET CHALLENGE MEDALLION (MALE): Gary Moore,
Joshua Coulier C/LTC; Carol Griffin C/ Cody Brentner, Cameron Bailey, Stephen
MAJ; Cameron Bailey C/CSM. Strickland, Caleb Lee.


SUPERIOR CADET: LET 1 Brandon Carnley; LET 2
Ryan Corne; LET 3 Joshua Coulier; LET 4 Stephen
Strickland.


Always online
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GRADUATING SENIORS: John Durko, Gary Moore, Kari
McConkey, Stephen Strickland, Jacob Strickland,
David Duncan, Vernon Gonzalez and Cody Brentner.


ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT: Front row: Hunter Somerset,
Maranda Derosa, Meghan Bean, Kari McConkey,
John Durko, Gary Moore. Middle row, Cameron
Bailey, Ryan Corne, Paige Dault. Back row: Brandon
Carnley, Cody Brentner, Johnny Rose.


CADET CHALLENGE MEDALLION (FEMALE): Ashley Sheraw,
Kayla Walker, Carol Griffin, Kari McConkey.


BONIFAY Holmes County High
School JROTC Blue Devil Battal-
ion hosted its 24th annual awards
banquet on April 24. Cadets were
received awards for their perfor-
mances in academics, physical fit-
ness, and military proficiency. Next


year's battalion officers were also
announced. They were promoted
to the rank and assignment as fol-
lows:
Joshua Coulier, C/LTC Battal-
ion Commander; Carol Griffin, C/
MAJ Battalion Executive Officer;


Cameron Bailey, C/CSM Battalion
Command Sergeant Major.
The Blue Devil Battalion also
said goodbye to LTC (ret.) John E.
Gross who has been their Senior
Army Instructor for eight years and
is retiring at the end of May.


BONIFAY There will be
a rabies vaccination clinic
on Friday, May 29 from 1-
5 p.m. at the office of Dr.
Brad Johnson, D.YM.,
Dixieland Vet Services,
903 N. Oklahoma Street in
Bonifay. Dr. Johnson will
he administering the ra-
bies vaccine for a one-time
reduced fee of $10 per vac-
cination.
With the increasing


number of rabies cases,
the Holmes County Health
Department urges resi-
dents to take rabies pre-
vention seriously. Rabies
in humans is nearly always
fatal and residents are
Holmes County's first line
of defense against rabies.
The Holmes County
Health Department asks
each resident to take three
simple steps to prevent ra-


bies:
*Vaccinate all pets
against rabies -- dogs,
cats, ferrets, horses, and
any domesticated mam-
mal at their home, ranch
or farm that has regular
contact with humans.
*Avoid contact with
wild animals, especially
bats, raccoons, foxes, and
skunks.
*Learn to prevent be-


ing exposed to rabies and
teach your children.
Rabies is fatal to hu-
mans and pets. Rabies
is carried in the saliva of
an infected animal and
can be transmitted even
through a minor scratch
from a wild animal or an
unvaccinated pet. Unvac-
cinated pets are exposed
to the disease through
contact with wild animals.
*Do not let your pets roam
free. Most rabies exposure
comes from wild animals
like raccoons and bats
- when your pet roams
free, they are more likely
to come into contact with
wild animals.
*Spaying or neutering
tendnyt midh chav
to roam or fight which re-
duces the chance that they
will be exposed to rabies.
*Walk your pets on a
::ash.d r

cause they have more con-
tact with dogs. Teach your
children and teenagers to:
*Tell you immediately if
they are scratched, bitten
or licked by an animal.
*Not to pet stray dogs
and cats. Strays usually are
lytv ccie nboutcmom

wit wild animals carrying
*Do not adopt wild ani-
mals or bring them into
your home.
*Do not try to nurse sick
animals to health.
*Contact your local
health care provider if you
feel you have had expo-
sure to rabies. If you have
Hyqouesisons p es~e aaH
Department at 547-8500.


Call us today to schedule your SEA
(Safety Efficiency Agreements)


(850) 263-2823





~~ Al)W~yC~j'l) WEIGHT OS ICS


Wednesday, May 13, 2009


Local


Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A7


National Women's Health
Week empowers women across
the country to get healthy by tak-
ing action. During the week, fami-
lies, communities, businesses,
government, health organizations
and other groups work together to
educate women about steps they
can take to improve their physical
and mental health and prevent
disease.
These steps include: Engag-
ing in physical activity most days
of the week; choosing healthful
foods; visiting a health care pro-


vider to receive regular check-
ups and preventive screenings;
and avoiding risky behaviors, like
smoking and not wearing a seat
belt.
*5K run/walk on May 14
Holmes County Health De-
partment is partnering with
Tri County Community Council
and the Florida Tobacco and
Prevention Control Program to
sponsor a 5K run/walk to raise
awareness for women's health on
May 14 at 6 p.m. The race will start
and end at Middlebrooks Park.


T-shirts will be available two
weeks after the race for all par-
ticipants.
Register in advance by May 7
at the Holmes County Health De-
partment or download the regis-
tration form at www.holmeschd.
com.
The day of the race, registra-
tion begins at 5 p.m. at Middle-
brooks Park. Cost is $10 per per-
son. Proceeds benefit the PINK
program to pay for mammogram
screenings to Holmes County
women younger than 50.


~II~RIIiI~n


Photos by JAT FkLSBhKUI


'Hillbilly


Hayride' at

Ponce de Leon

PONCE DE LEON The citizens of Lonesome
Polecat are being invaded! The 200-year-old
feud between the Calhouns and the Tollivers
got attention from two New York book
companies and even Hollywood in "Hillbilly
Hayride" presented by the Ponce De Leon
High School Drama Department directed
by Tommy Hicks, who was presented with
an autographed megaphone by the cast and
crew.
There was also true love, not-so true
love and a mystery that needed to be solved
before the happy ending. The play was
adapted from the book by Tom Kelly, with
music and lyrics by Bill Francour.
More video and photo coverage online at
bonifaynow.com.


WOmen's Health Week events include SK


Barfield


Cemetery



A cemetery workday
is scheduled for Saturday,
May 16, at Barfield Cem-
etery on Highway 77, just
south of Wausau.
Anyone with relatives
buried there is encour-
aged to help clean up. Call
638-8258 for more infor-
mation.


Proceed s beneit

mammogram
PTOgram

BONIFAY Women in Holmes
County are encouraged to take
simple steps to lead longer, hap-
pier, healthier lives during the
10th annual National Women's
Health Week, which ends Satur-
day, May 16.


24'x36'x10'
starting @

5 3,10 0


rl VI LVInstalle
*Hlur a.pnmam a forgsianlvasedat, colorme~ avadlbklofrshghtiymon CMIfor a beesotlma. Paces subject to chmEqwtout noeee





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l...... ank Yo7W

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0008511811 an Dvid Clutchlield WOUld like 10

thallk 00odq- 811 Calmela, OWilers Of HOrSeS,

Saddles & Tradler Mercantile at 410 S. Okla-

h1081 St. in Bonifay, for the use of their busi-

IleSS durill oOur Street Revival. Also thanks to

Bollift Cit4; COUllcil, til6 pleaclifs, Sillgefs

8118 06e hiddlebf00kS Wil0 played a part ill

tliS evellt. MSV G00 BleSS IOu \lWavs




8~l FREE d
RABIES CLIllC
L~ii~lMay 29th --
One Year Vaccine

Our Services Include:
Preventative Medicine
General Surgery
Internal Medicine
Digital Radiology
Boarding
G rooming a
Hills/Science Diet Food -
Flea/Heartworm Prevention
Open Monday-Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. *


5 B I


A8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser


Local


Wednesday, May 13, 2009


National Salvation Army
Week is May 11 17
CHIPLEY Salvation Army Thrift
Stores in Chipley and Panama City
are celebrating with the storewide
sale. The Chipley store is open from
9 a.m. 5 p.m., Monday, Wednesday,
Friday and Saturday.
The Salvation Army is a non-profit
organization. The programs offered
include a Social Service Department
and Domestic Violence Program.
Donations are needed, especially
furniture, refrigerators, washers,
dryers, clothing, household and other
useable items and can be made by
calling the Chipley main branch.


For more information on any of
the above services contact the Chi-
pley main branch at 638-7102.

(0Uncil on Aging, AARP
Sponsor mature driving course
BONIFAY Washington County
Council on Aging and AARP are co-
sponsoring a mature driving class
Wednesday, April 15 and Thurs-
day, April 16, from 8 a.m. until noon
each day. The course will be held
at the Esther Lodge at the cor-
ner of Tracy and Michigan Ave. in
Bonifay.
This eight-hour course was devel-
oped especially for the senior driver


with years of driving experience. It
is geared to senior safety needs and
helping to compensate for age re-
lated changes. The National Safety
Council course reviews basic driving
knowledge, new traffic laws and in-
troduces techniques to help offset the
effects of the aging process on driver
performance.
This course is approved by the
DHSMV for a three-year insur-
ance premium reduction. Course
fee is $12 for AARP members and
$14 for non-members. There is no
testing.
To enroll call Debra at Washington
County Council on Aging at 638-6217 or
Holmes Council on Aging at 547-2345.


Paint, Painting & Moore!
Hwy. 177-A Bonifay, FL 32425
(850) 547-9511*}
(3 miles past Bonifay Elementary on ?
Dogwood Lakes Hwy.) PA Nu?


Staecey & lraeamrc 2%~oawc, Owyen
We Can Help Brighten
Your Home & Your Heart-


'Int th









BONIFAY The Stephen Sond-
heim Broadway musical hit,
"Into the Woods," opened May 5
in Holmes County as part of a lo-
cal Chamber of Commerce Mem-
ber Reception. The performance
was delivered by the Holmes
County High School Drama De-
partment from 5 to 9 p.m. Tues-
day, May 5, in the school audito-
rium. Ricky Ward directed the
prod tbomber used the perfor-
mance to showcase local corpo-
rate sponsors and to raise money
for the local drama department.
Corporate sponsors brought an in-
ternational flair to the production
by preparing and serving cuisine
from around the world. Corporate
sponsors preparing hors d'oeuvres
and culinary delights included the
Bank of Bonifay, One South Bank,
community South Credit Union,
Doctors Memorial Hospital, Boni-
fay Nursing and Rehabilitation
and West Florida Electric Coop-
erative.
Holmes County High School
Drama presented the musical on
Thursday May 7, Friday May 8,
Monday May 11, and Tuesday May
12 at the HCHS.
An ambivalent Cinderella? A
feisty Little Red Ridinghood? A
Prince Charming that's less than
sympathetic? A Witch...who raps?
They're all among the cockeyed
characters in James Lapine and
Stephen Sondheim's fractured
fairy tale. When a baker and his
wife learn they've been cursed
with childlessness by the witch
next door, they embark on a quest
for the special objects required
to break the spell, swindling, ly-
ing to and stealing from Cinder-
ella, Little Red, Rapunzel and
Jack (the one who climbed the
beanstalk).
Everyone's wish is granted at
the end of act one, but the conse-
quences of their actions return to
haunt them later, with disastrous
results. What begins a lively fairy
tale becomes a moving lesson
about community responsibility
and the stories we tell our chil-
dren.
More coverage online un-
der photo galleries and video at
bonifaynow.com.


News BRIEFS


2206

eari s







-I I


Always online
www.bomifaynow.com


HOLMES COUNTY TRANSPORTATION
DISADVANTAGE ED COORDINATING MEETINGS
Overview of the program will be provided, followed by comments
from the community. Tri County Community Council is the
Community Transportation Coordinator.
TUESDAY, MAY 19, 2009
PUBLIC HEARING 1:00 PM
BOARD MEETING AFTER Public Hearing
Holmes Commissioner's Building
107 E. Virginia Av. Bonifay, Florida
PUBLIC IS INVITED TO ATTEND IN COM PLIANCE WITH AMERICAN DISABI LITI ES
ACT, REASONABLE MODIFICATIONS TO ACCESS MTG UPON REQUEST -
CALL Amy Brown 850-392-1105 48 HOURS ADVANCE


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To purchase tickets, stop by or see an employee.
$2/Ticket or $20/12 Tickets
Purchase Deadline: May 14 Winners will be drawn May 15 at 2 pm

BONIFAY
NURSING &r REHAB CENTER
306 West Brock Avenue Bonifay, FL (850) 547-9289


Wednesday, May 13, 2009


Local


Holmes County Times-Advertiser | A9


HUNDREDS TURN OUT FOR ANNUAL RELAY FOR LIFE
JAY FELSBERG "God Bless America" and Terry Ellis gave the invoca-
Managing Editor tion. Ellis and the other team members from WestPoint
afelsberg@chipleypaper.com Home were recognized for their years of service to Re-
lay. The plant is closing by end of year.
CHIPLEY One of the largest turnouts ever was Friday Wayne Cagle of WestPoint Home was also recognized
night as the Annual Relay for Life was held at the for his cross-country bike ride to raise money for Re-
old Chipley High School track. About 117 survi- la.
vors of cancer registered, and more than 70 led RELAY. Speakers included School Superintendent
off the annual event. FOR LIFE Dr. Sandra Cook, Board of County Commis-
Emcee Angela Grantham conducted the open- soesCara ilHwlAeia a-
ing eremnyreconizng sonsos, eamsandcer Society Representative Alisha Townsend
others that made the event possible. The Chipley High and Survivors Chairperson Connie Wheeler.
cheerleaders, the CHS Band and the CHS JROTC were Tropicana Speech winner Ansleigh Walters pre-
at the event. The JROTC presented the colors and led sented her speech "cancer." The speech is on video
the survivors' opening march through a cordon of honor. with other highlights, as well as a photo gallery, at
Bella Andrews performed the National Anthem and chipleypaperccom.


ii


PHOTOS BY JAY FELASBERG
Teams were on hand early to set up booths around
the track.


The Chipley High cheerleaders were on hand to
support Relay for Life.


The Chipley JROTC Color Guard was on hand for
Relay


Scehcol Superin endent Dr. Sandra Cook addresses


Minnie Mouse was among the celebrities on hand
at Relay for Life.


Proceeds will be used to purchase a
computer for the residents.


Fri ndly pirates were on hand from the Shrine


T ahms joined the survivors on the track Friday


Survivors fellowship after opening the event.





PROJECT from page A0 O


Always online |www. bon ifayn ow.com



Public Notice

Personnel representing the Holmes District School Board will hold two
meetings at the Board Room at 701 E. Pennsylvania Avenue on May
19, 2009. At 3:30 p.m. district personnel will present information to
private school representatives and at 4:00 p.m. personnel will provide
information and accept input on all federal and state projects, and all
School Improvement Plans. Projects up for discussion at this time will
include but are not limited to:

IDEA, Part B Education of the Handicapped These funds are
allocated for the support of special projects which will contribute to the
solution of persisting state-wide needs in the education of exceptional
students.

IDEA, Part B Preschool Handicapped These funds are allocated to
provide special education and related services to handicapped children
ages three through five.

Title I Part A This program is to provide resources to help schools
with high concentrations of students from low-income families be able
to offer high-quality education that will enable all children to meet, at a
minimum, proficiency levels on challenging state academic achievement
standards and state academic assessments.

Title I, Part C Education of Migratory Children

Title I, Part D, Neglected and Delinquent This programs' purpose is
to improve educational services to youth in local and state facilities for
neglected and delinquent youth.

Title II, Part A Teacher and Principal Training/Recruiting This
program's purpose is to improve teacher and principal quality and
increase the number of highly qualified teachers and principals.

Title II, Part D Enhancing Education Through Technology

Title VI, Part A Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities

Title VI, Part B, Subpart 2 These funds are allocated to provide
additional support to rural or low income districts.

Title X Homeless Education Program

ESOL This program is for limited English proficient students and is
tailored to individual student needs.

School Improvement Plans


Two rounds of public voting will run from May
25 through June 18. You may vote online at
newsherald.com, mail-in your votes, or drop them
off at The News Herald office. Each vote is just $1.00
and you can vote as many times as you'd like. Don't
forget to tell your family and friends to vote! All proceeds
from the contest will benefit Newspapers In Education.

The first place winners along with the rest of the top
six vote getters from each category will be featured on
a "Cutest Summer Kids" keepsake insert in The News
Herald on Sunday, June 28th and online Saturday ,
June Also, First, Second, and Third Place for each
category will receive fabulous prizes.
For more information call 850-747-5008 ~ -cn
NE\ HE;LDTHE STAR I''

NrEWSHERnMS. ITasar=,,,, T4001
com r


Al 0 1 Holmes County Times-Advertiser


Local


Wednesday, May 13, 2009


*Approved by 3-2 vote,
with Sims and Councilman
Richard Woodham oppos-
ing, paying $1,000.54 for
damage to a house caused
by backup of the sewer
lines during the recent had
weather. Both thought the
cost was too much. City Su-


pervisor Jack Marell has
finally been given permis-
sion by the property owner
to fix the problem.
*Approved holding Am-
nesty Days June 1-12 just
for yard trash and no fur-
niture or white goods. If
anyone is on the list before


June 12 and their trash is
not picked up before June
12 it would still be picked
up.
*Heard from Police
Chief Chris Wells that the
new uniforms are here and
the new police cars were
set to arrive Tuesday.


~~a~?


s


.I


QSend in a clear, sharp, recent photo of your child or

grandchild enjoying the summer. You may enter as
many children as you wish, but only one child per
entry. Photos will NOT be returned! Please do not
submit your only copy.
Choose which category to enter the child:
First Category: Newborn 2 yrs. old
Second Category: 3 yrs. old 5 yrs.old
c You can submit your entry three ways:
1.Complete and mail entry form along with a $10 entry
fee to: Cutest Summer Baby Contest INIE, P O. Box
1940, Panama City, Florida 32402.
2. Enter online at www. newsherald.com, look for the
"Cutest Summer Kids" icon and instructions.
3. Drop off form, photo, and entry fee at
The News Herald, 501 W. 11th Street, Panama City.
Deadline for all entries is May 21, 2009 by 12 p.m. (CST)


Tri-state livestock market report for
the week ending May 8, 2009:
*Flonida Livestock Auctions: Receipts
totaled $8,225 compared to $7,341 last
week and $6,909 a year ago. Compared to
one week ago; slaughter cows were un-
evenly steady and bulls were $1-2 lower;
feeder steers were steady to $1 lower;
heifers were steady to $2 lower; replace-
ment cows were unevenly steady.
*Georgia Livestock Auctions: Re-
ceipts in 25 markets totaled $10,597 com-
pared to $12,107 last week and $10,360
a year ago. Compared to one week ago;
slaughter cows were $1-2 higher and
bulls were $1 higher; feeder steers and
heifers were steady to $2 higher; calves
were steady to $1 higher; replacement
cows were steady to $1-2 higher.
*Alabama Livestock Auctions: Re-
ceipts totaled $10,597 compared to
$12,107 a week ago and $10,360 a year
ago. Compared to a week ago; slaughter
cows were $1-2 higher and bulls were $1
higher; feeder steers and heifers were


steady to $2 higher; calves were steady
to $1 higher and replacement cows $1-2
higher.
Feeder Steers: Medium and Large
Frame No. 1-2
300-400 lbs.: Fla. $97.50-128 Ga.
$104-128 Ala. $105-124
400-500 lbs.: Fla. $88-116 Ga. $95-
116 Ala. $96-115
500-600 lbs.: Fla. $83-105 Ga. $88-
107 Ala. $87-107
Feeder Heifers: Medium and Large
Frame No. 1-2
300-400 lbs.: Fla. $88-110 Ga. $90-
111 Ala. $92-107
400-500 lbs.: Fla. $85-100 Ga. $85-
103 Ala. $86-99
500-600 lbs.: Fla. $79-92 Ga. $79-
97- Ala. $82-96
Slaughter Cows: 90-percent Lean
750-1200 lbs.: Fla. $30-48 Ga. $42-
54.50 -Ala. $43-47
Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade, No. 1-2
1,500-2,100 lbs.: Fla. $55-67.50 -Ga.
$60.50-69 Ala. $60-64


,imn Sot




has gand oenia


~I 1:

_~~L .d


Livestock REPORT















Wednesday, May 13, 2009 w ww. bonifa yno w. com Page 11



Bethlehem's Thompson sig ns


with Alabama Southern Eagles


.. - -



Aaron Mo lett holds a Northview runner on base.


VM/S Lady Jackets place second in tourney

GRAND RIDGE Last Thursday, Vernon Middle School
Lady Jackets traveled to Grand Ridge to play in the Tri-
County volleyball tournament.
The bracket pairings had third seeded Vernon playing
their cross-county
rival, the second-
seeded Roulhac
Tigers. Both teams
played very well.
Vernon was able
to win the match
taking the first two
sets.
In the final
match of the eve-
E~7! ~f~L~:ning,Vernonplayed
the hosting team
and first seeded,
Grand Ridge Indi-
ans. The Lady Jackets played some of their best volleyball
of the year. The thrilling game ended with Grand Ridge
taking the match and winning the tournament.


By (EllLIA SPEARS
StaffWriter
espears@chipleypaper.com
BETHLEHEM Bethlehem High
School student Tara Thompson
signed a basketball scholarship
with the Alabama Southern Eagles
Tuesday as their newest guard.
Thompson said she was feeling
"pretty good" about going on to
play for the Eagles. "I hope to go


on to a four-year college and then
become a sports physical thera-
pist," she said.
She ended up playing basket-
ball because of her mother. "My
mom made me play basketball for
a year and said at the end of that
year I could drop out if I wanted
to."
She never did drop out, she
said, because she fell in love with
the sport.


"I'm so very proud of her," said
her mother, Rene Turner. "I dread
to see her leave home, but after
talking with the coach I'm very
confident that she'll be taken care
of."
Her father, Gary Thompson,
said that he was sure that she was
going to go far with both her sports
and academic endeavors.

See THOMPSON Al2


Bethlehem High School student Tara Thompson signed a
basketball scholarship with the Alabama Southern Eagles
Tuesday as their newest quard.


n. .'l* --:, i
:. .. - v


Travis Mosley digs in against Pensacola Catholic.


By JAY FELSBERG
Managing Editor
afelsberg@chipleypaper.com
BONIFAY Pensacola Cath-
olic (26-3) advanced to the
regional championship with
a 15-1 defeat of host Holmes
County (22-7) Friday night.
Catholic had just six hits but
took advantage of two balks,
two errors and several walks
to beat the Blue Devils in five
innings.

sonvJi, :neroe": :Madsiokn
County, for the regional title at
4 p.m. Friday in Pensacola.
Perennial state contender
Catholic started off in the top
of the first when Wade Wass hit
a two-run homer over the 365-
foot mark in right center. Hol-
mes County got one back when
Jeremy McGowan scored off
an error. However, Catholic
starter Cody Allen settled
down and stayed or worked
his way out of trouble to go the


luck with Northview and we
got this one."
Catholic Coach Richard
Labounty said he team played
with more emotion in memory
of long-time basketball coach
Ron Robison, who passed
away earlier this week.
"We had an angel in center
field," Labounty said. "Coach
Robo was with us in spirit.
They came and played with
emotion and I was proud to be
their coach."

HCHS edges Nortliview
"Sometimes you've got
to get a little break to win a
game," said Holmes County
Coach Ron Dixon Tuesday
night. The veteran coach and
his Blue Devils got a huge
break in the bottom of the
seventh inning as Clayton
French scored when a throw
went over the fence to beat a
scrappy Northview team 2-1.
See HOLMES Al 2


OPINION


Small-school


playoff system

is broken
The athletics gap between small
rural schools and small schools in
suburban areas, most of which are
priva e, hasbeb na big
several states for many
years.
41@ Florida is no
exception to that
problem. But because
of the state's unique
RANDY geographic shape and
DKCKSONI uneven population
Florida Freedom distribution, coaches
News oers here in Northwest

has not been gi enr Iute at enion.
Small schools from metropolitan
areas have dominated state
competition in Class 1A and 2A for the
better part of the last 20 years. That's
not to say they have won every state
championship in every sport, but the
monopoly is definitely apparent.
All you have to do is look at the
state series records in any sport on the
FHSAA Web site (www.fhsaa.org) and

te prble i as eosemc= =

want to make it a public school vs.
private school battle.
Yet more often than not it boils down
to just that.
In no sport is the seeming lack of
balance between public schools and
private schools more obvious than in
baseball.
Walton County neighbor Paxton has
been the last public school left in the
Class 1A playoffs the last three years.
In each of those years the Bobcats,
who are coached by Baker graduate
Jeff Bradley, have been eliminated by
Eagle's View Christian, a private school
from Jacksonville. Eagle's View has

See BROKEN Al2


Sports BRIEF S

YOUth golf championship
PANAMA CITY Emerald Coast Golf
Tour announces a special tournament
for high school golfers across the pan-
handle area. The Emerald Coast Pro
High School Junior Am will be played
at Scenic Hills Country Club Monday
and Tuesday, June 22 and June 23. All

poes oona Igofr sso t ea nme a

Coas isi 3u6-hole stroke play cham-
pionship open to juniors 13-18 years old
from Panama City to Mobile, Ala.
prThte to rnamant will kickM mfwith a
For entry information on the tourna-
ment and for sponsorship opportunities,
contact Mark Naes at 850-390-2001 or by
e-mail mnecgtecox.net.

ilUrtil g0If tourney
Bethel Baptist Church will hold its
10th annual invitational golf tourna-
ment on May 16 at Dogwood Lakes Golf
Course. Registration is from 7-8 a.m.
Start time is 8 a.m. Four-person scram-
ble.
Entry fee is $40 and includes on free
Mulligan. Extra Mulligan is $5 each.
Hole sponsorships are available for $25
each. Prizes for first, second and third
place; longest drive; closest pin and
lunch.
Proceeds benefit church related mis-
sions. Registration deadline is May 14.
For more information, call 263-6589,
Kent Lampp 209-1723 or Don West,
263-4395.


distance, striking out nine and
giving up just six hits.
Catholic took advantage of
a two-run error in the second
inning to add three runs and
go up 5-1, added four more in
the third and finished off the
Blue Devils with six in the
fifth. Austin Farrell accounted


for four Catholic hits.
"They're talented," said
HCHS Coach Ron Dixon. It
was Dixon's fourth trip to the
sweet 16, "and we had a good
run," he said. "We got a little
luck with Chipley and Mari-
anna was flat" in the district
playoffs, "and we got a little


SPORTS


A
Section


Holmes County bows out


BUe Devils defeated I 5-1 by Pensacola Catholic










BROKEN from page All


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advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment


A12 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser


Local


Wednesday, May 13, 2009


sent as many players to college
and the pros in the last few years
as local 5A power Niceville.
That one example hardly
scratches the surface to show
the real problem.
You have to go back to 1982 to
find the last public school to win a
Class 1A baseball championship.
And that school, Ernest Ward
High School in Walnut Hill,
is no longer open. Jay won a
small school state baseball
championship in 1970 when Class
B was the lowest classification.
'Two public school champions


in a classification in 40 years is
not a level playing field.
Last fall five of the eight
state champions in football were
private schools.
Pahokee is a small public
school power with several state
titles, but even that is a bit
misleading. It is true that the
population of Pahokee is 6,000,
but it is located in Palm Beach
County, the third-most populous
county in the state with more
than 1.3 million residents.
I was able to tag along with
Baker head football coach and


athletic director Bob Kellogg
to the meeting of small school
coaches and administrators in
Graceville last week.
One football coach said he
had done some research and
found one perennial private
school football power that often
faces panhandle programs in the
playoffs has had more players
sign Division I scholarships than
all the small rural public schools
in the panhandle combined.
I'll take it a step further. In a
typical year most small private
schools will send more players to


big-time college programs than
all of the schools in Okaloosa
County combined. That's a school
of 400 students or so getting more
football scholarships than schools
with a combined population of
about 8,000.
The concerns raised in the
meeting aren't new to those in
this part of the state. What was
new was new FHSAA Executive
Director Dr. Roger Dearing
attended the meeting. Dearing
seemed to have a genuine
interest in putting some new
structure into the system.


Dearing warned it will take
time to make the desired changes,
and a first model for restructuring
things might not work.
At least he gave the small
public schools some hope that
brighter days are ahead.
Realistically there are no
easy answers to the problem.
In the long run Baker, Laurel
Hill and their small school
partners across the panhandle
need to feel they have a real
opportunity to compete.
It's past time to make it
happen.


"She's not just a good
player," said Bethlehem
High School Principal
Jerry Dixon. "She's a very
good kid."
Her high school bas-
ketball and softball coach
Joan Albury praised Tara
on her "tremendous work
ethic," and dedication to
physical well being. "She's
small in stature but she's
exceptionally strong," she
said. "This will help her
against the bigger oppo-
nents."
She said because of
this dedication to physical


upkeep that will allow her
to be encouraging to her
future patients. "She has
some high expectations
and works hard to achieve
them," she said. "She'll
have to maintain her ath-
leticism and those of oth-
ers and I know she'll do just
fine at both."
The coach of the Ala-
bama Southern Eagles, Ro-
salind Jennings, said that
she was impressed with
Thompson from the first
time she saw her play.
"I heard about Tara and
had to come down at see


her for myself," said Jen-
nings. "When I saw her
play there was no doubt in
my mind she was perfect
for our team."
She said she was im-
pressed with Tara's ability
to "play ball already in the
college level."
"She already has the
college body and mentality
and an excellent feel for the
game," she said. "I'm am
very excited about having
her on our team."
More photo coverage
online at chipleypapercom
and bonifaynow.com.


Newly inducted black belts Zachary Williams and Blake Gardner (front) pose
with Instructor Trainee, Terry Wilks and Instructor Phillip Byrd.


ATA StUdent5 receive black belts


GRACEVILLE 'Two area Taekwondo stu-
dents recently received the rank of first-
degree black belt at a special ceremony
held at the Black Belt Academy in the
Graceville/Poplar Springs area.
Zachary Williams and Blake Gardner
demonstrated a variety of skills, includ-
ing form demonstration, sparring, basic
techniques and oral questioning. The
belts were awarded after a minimum of
2%/ years of training.
Other black belts testing were second-


degree black belts Terry Wilks and Eric
Todd, who completed their third mid-term
testing toward third-degree black belt.
Color belts receiving new belts and
rank include: red belt: DJ Rock, brown belt
decided: Allison Williams, blue belt: Anna
Williams, green belts: Karen O'Steen, Can-
dace O'Steen, and Zachary Neitsch, camo
belt: Alex Sims and Levi Williams, yellow
belts: Perry Wells, Paisley Howell, Nathan
Johnson, orange belts: Haylee Hughes
and David Pearson.


(850) 526-7775
or
1 (800) 769-3429


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THOMPSON from pone Al l


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4320 5th Ave. Marianna FL
(2 Blks from Jackson Hospital)


HOLMES

from page All
French singled off the
centerfielder's glove to open
the bottom of the inning and
took off on an errant throw,
sliding into third as an en-
suing throw bounced over
the fence, sending the Blue
Devil catcher home with the
winning run.
Coming off a 7-3 win over
arch-rival Chipley and a l9-
4 beating of host Marianna
towin t Cass 3A De%

found a tough opponent in
the team from Bratt.
The game was tied 1-
1 going into the bottom of
the seventh on an excellent
pitecsheros duelshetweenGH 11
and Northview's Brad Low-
ery.Lowery twice pitched out
of bases loaded situations.
Aaron Mollet got the win
in relief for Holmes County.
"Jesse pitched well and it
was time to go get the clos-
er, and Aaron has filled that
role for us for the last two
weeks," Dixon said.
"He's done a really good
job and done what he need-
ed to for us to be successful
and win," said Northview
Coach Sid Wheatly. "His
pitch count was getting up
around 100.
"It was a couple of big
plays."
Dixon noted that North-
view beat Holmes County
1-0 in 2000 when a Holmes
County throw ended up
OVer the first-base fence.
The Blue Devils scored
in the fifth when Travis
Mosely, who saved a run
with a diving catch to end
the previous inning, led off
with a single and dashed
home on a French single.
"I was running so fast I
didn't know my legs were
moving," Mosley joked.
Northview scored in the
sixth inning when Luke
Killian singled in a run.

stas Jse Gai an ly
ships Tuesday to play at
Wallace -Selma.MIore cov-
eTage Online at bonifaynow.
com or chipleypapercom.


O


IrT 1
















Wednesday, MAY 13, 2009 Washington County News Holmes County Times-Advertiser PAGE 1


;IllIIIIIII;~.Y;Z;IIllnl;~C;Ird~rd~r


'Million Dollar Man'



Ted DiBiase leaves the ring to spread the Gospel


__


B
Section


(EllLIA SPEARS
StaffWriter
espears@chipleypaper.com

BONIFAY With a height of 6-3 and weigh-
ing in at 260 pounds, came Ted DiBiase,
otherwise known as "The Million Dollar
Man." The former wrestling star visited the
students of Holmes County High School the
afternoon of May 7.
"I had it all, the money, the women, the
fame," said DiBiase. "But when it came
down to it, it didn't amount to anything be-
cause it meant almost sacrificing my family
for it.
DiBiase came to tell the students about
his life, from growing up in a small town, to
becoming the wrestler known as The Mil-
lion Dollar Man to where he is today with his
new traveling ministry to reach the youth of
America.
"Guys I've been there, done that, bought
the t-shirt, and wore it out..." he said "I've
come to wrestle with your hearts today."
He said he had "everything that every
young man would want and yet still found it
all em ty."
His story started when his mother mar-
ried "Iron" Mike DiBiase, popular wrestler
for nearly two decades in the 40's and 50's.
He looked up to his stepfather with great
admiration, he said, hoping that one day he
would follow in his footsteps by getting a
scholarship to play football and then go on
to become a professional wrestler.
When his stepfather passed away, he
said it tore his mother apart and she turned
to drinking and was very depressed for a
long time.
All through high school, he said, he did
the right thing and refused to do what the
popular kids were.
"Growing up in a small town, there
wasn't much to do, except smoke dope, get
drunk and party," he said. "But I had a goal
you see, everyone laughed at me for
wanting a scholarship, everyone
laughed at me for being differ-
ent."


same slogan, only with a twist, for his minis-
try called the Heart of David Ministries.
The slogan being: "Every man has a
price and the price was paid in full."
This dramatic change occurred in 1992,
when his wife confronted him after Wres-
tlemania VIII about having an affair; he
said it was then he realized that he put his
marriage and family at risk just because he
wanted fame and glory.
"I seen for the first time that I could re-
ally loose everything that I cared about," he
said. "And if it wasn't for a friend, I would've
probably never snapped out of it."
He said he then told his wife everything
and asked for forgiveness.
It took many years to regain her trust, he
said, and his role as spiritual leader of his
family.
Now he goes from schools to churches
spreading the gospel and his testimony.
"What I really want to achieve, with
all my heart, is to help the youth to find a
personal relationship with Jesus Christ,"
he said. "Because no matter what you can
achieve in life, no matter the riches and pop-
ularity, no matter the drugs or the addiction,
the only thing that's going to fill that void is
a personal relationship with our Lord and
Savior."
DiBiase appeared at schools throughout
Holmes County Friday and was at the Win-
terville Assembly of God Saturday.
For more information on the Heart of
David Ministries, go to www.milliondollar-
man.com.
Sponsoring the event was the Holmes
County Countywide Anti-Substance Abuse
Effort Coalition.
Also visiting was the Director of the
Holmes County C.A.S.E. Coalition, Jeana
Prescott, who shared her experiences with
drugs and difficulties of turning her life
around.
"I was raised in a home that was full of
drugs and alcohol and I swore that I would
grow up to be different, but I didn't," she
said. "Only by the grace of God am I still
around today, so if any of you are having
trouble with such matters, don't hesitate to
call me, because I know exactly how hard it
can be."
The Coalition is located across from
the Bonifay Middle School and can be con-
tacted at 547-0880. More coverage online
at chipleypaper.
com and boni-
faynow~com






''''"". .f

......


Ted DiBiase's picture from his heyday
with WWF illustrates the front of his
DVD.

ular, I'm the big man on campus," he said.
"And it gets to my head, needless to say,
there was no football after that."
He then went on to his wrestling career,
with his big break being in 1979, no more
than five years after entering the business
was called to join the World Wrestling Fed-
eration (WWF).
During his first WWF tenure he was met
and defeated by a young wrestler by the
name of "The Incredible" Hulk Hogan in
Hogan's Madison Square Garden debut in
1979.
He wasn't known for being The Million
Dollar Man until February 5,
1988. Before Hulk Hogan
was going to have a re-
match with Andre the Gi-
ant during Wrestlemania
III, DiBiase told every-
Sone that it didn't matter
Swho won the match, he
was going to buy the
heavyweight champion-
61111~ship, which started his
catch phrase "Everyone
as a price."
.: Being a wrestler known
for a lavish lifesty-le of riches,
u'omen a~nd tame. he \\as
seen~l as monellt\ madel man31
Now,\ he Is usIng~ that

CECILIA SPEARS | li ..1....




11.1 b:::..r cF' I1 CIH:::.1T.s la -


its tre ar d tIe ArAP a' rncTohnui u
as it passed through Milton. The Solar
Car Project started on June 12 of last
year and at Seneca College in Toronto'
Ontario, Canada. On July 27 the car
reached the Arctic Circle and now it has
visited numerous cities including recent
stops in New Orleans and Mobile. The
car has never been plugged into a grid
and has crossed the Continental Divide
eight times including thousands of miles
on gravel, snow, ice and the low angle of
the northern hemisphere. The car is being
driven by Marcelo da Luz, who built the
car. For more information on the project
go to www.xofl.com.


BILL GAMBLIN | Florida Freedon Coninunication


EXTPLA


Washington,







BONI FAY -The Holmes
Council on Aging annual
HealthaFailr is sch Id l
9 a.m. in the Holmes
County Ag Center on
Highway 90 in Bonifay.
There will be door
prizes, local entertain-
ment, arts and crafts
cake walks, vendor'
booths and much more.
A meal will be provided
free of charge for par-
ticipants age 60 and over
and booth vendors.

Auditin f r


Rock Live!' *
CHIPLEY The Span-
ish Trail Playhouse will
hold open auditions for
their summer production
of "Schoolhouse Rock
Live!" on May 11 and 12
at 6 p.m. nightly at the
Historic Chipley High
School. No children will
be cast in this produc-
tion. Anyone age 16 and
older may participate
in the auditions for this
high-energy musical. No
prior experience is nec-
essmfy raCome d essed
11l consists ausin in
and dancing
This Saturday morn-
ing educational cartoon
series is one of the most
fun, and energetic musi-
cals ever to hit the stage.
Tom, a schoolteacher
nervous about his first
day of teaching, tries to
relax by watching TV
Suddenly, various charac-
ters representing facets
of his personality emerge
from the set. They pro-
ceed to show him how
to win his students over
with imagination and
music through beloved
Schoolhouse Rock songs
that cover a variety of
subjects: math, science,
history and grammar.
Schoolhouse Rock
Live! will take the stage
August 6-8, and will mark
the second production of
the 2009 season,
For more information,
visit www.spanishtrail
playhouse.com or e-mail
spanishtrailplayhouseea
gmail.com.





Always connected
I0 y0Uf community
Look to
chipleypaper.com and
bonifaynow.com for
up-to-date coverage of:
*The controversy
over Holmes County
administrator
*Relay for Life
*High school plays
throughout the area



INDEX



(lassif ieds ........................Page B10










wash nto, d nseand
Surrounding Counties
Check out or submit events at
www.chipleypaper.com
or www.bonifaynow.com


TEA Party meeting to

be hel On Wednesday

MARIANNA On May 14, Marianna We
surround Them Group meeting is sched-
uled at the Agricultural Center, next to
National Guard Armory, Highway 90 W in
Marianna from 6 7:30 p.m.
Meeting agenda includes topic "Shift-
ing the Foundation" with a guest speak-
er.
Other topics of discussion will include
Taxes Today and Getting Involved fol-
lowed byan open discussion.
A copy of the constitution will be avail-
able to each family that attends.
To learn more visit www.meetup.com.
If you go to meetup.com and input your
zip code or 32446.


SOLAR (AR PROJECT BUZZES DOWN HIGHWAY 90


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Washington County News 638-0212


Vanns celebrate Golden Anniversary
George and Alma Vann celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on April 18 at
Vernon Middle School. They were married on April 19, 1959. Their children, Muriel,
Terrence, Oswald and Romontey hosted the event.


B2 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser I Washington County News


Society


Wednesday, May 13, 2009


Alyssa Mobley,
14, was a student
at Bethlehem
until this year.
A professionally
trained actress,
she recently went
to Orlando for her
first filming in a
short feature film
called "Crooked." It
is being produced
by Todd Thompson
of Stars North
Productions in
Orlando and stars
Kendall Ganey from
A Little Princess.
She has also
auditioned in
Atlanta for an
upcoming ION
network sitcom,
"My Parents,
My Sister & Me"
starring Jasmine
Guy, and a Lifetime
series called "Drop
Dead Diva.


David William
and Amanda JaNan
Broadfoot, along with
their son, William Dallas
(Billy D.), announce
the birth of Willow
Fiona. She was born
March 14 at Gulf Coast
Community Hospital in
Panama City.
Willow's paternal
grandparents are Janet
Newton Broadfoot,
and the late William
David Broadfoot
of Cheltenham,
England. Her maternal
grandparents are
Ronnie B. and Nancy
Sloan Finch of Chipley.
Willow and her
family currently reside
in Chipley. She will be
going to England in
September to meet
her Broadfoot family
when she attends her
Uncle Will Broadfoot's
wedding.


WASHINGTON COUNTY

CHRISTIAN
SCHOOL

Schristian


in Education
Pnov22e


In 2008, American par-
ents voted for change in
naming their children. Af-
ter a 12-year reign as the
most popular baby name,
Emily has slipped to third


on the list. Emma is now
the nation's most popular
name for girls.
The most popular boy's
name, Jacob, remained
the same for the tenth
year mna row.
Please click on the
Most Popular Baby
Names link at Social Se-
curity's website -- www.
socialsecurity.gov -- to see
all of the top baby names
for 2008. The Top 10 boys
and girls names for 2008
are Boys' names, in or-
der of popularity; Jacob,
Michael, Ethan, Joshua,
Daniel, Alexander, Antho-
ny, William, Christopher
and Matthew.
Girls' names in order
of popularity; Emma,
Isabella, Emily, Madison,
Ava, Olivia, Sophia, Abi-
gail, Elizabeth and Chloe
The ascendancy of
Emma means that Social
Security spokes baby Em-
ily, who you should visit
to say farewell at www.
socialsecurity.gov, will be
retiring. Emily indicated
that she would not be re-
questing a recount and
that she is busily prepar-
ing for nursery school.
Visitors checking out this
year's results at www.
socialsecurity.gov are en-
couraged to look at the
nearby information about
the Medicare Extra Help
Program--in case they
know someone eligible for
Medicare who could use
up to $3,900 to help pay for
medicine."


Sara Skoog and Daniel Hunter,
together with their families, announce
their engagement and approaching
marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Brenda Prather of McDonough, Ga.;
Elinor Skoog of Andover, Conn.
and the late Pete Skoog. She is the
granddaughter of Linda and John
Goddard of Puryear,Tenn.
Sara, a Senior Airman at Ty~Sndall Air
Force Base is a 2004 graduate of Rham
High School in Hebron,Conn.


The prospective groom is the son of
Robert and Nancy Hunter of Chipley.
He is the grandson of Rich and Helen
Techmanski of Wausau; Ruth Shevalier
of Chipley; Guy and Gerry of Palm Beach
Gardens and the great-grandson of
Florence Zupitza of Wausau.
Daniel is a 2006 graduate of Vernon
High School and is employed at Gail
Force Protection, Inc.
The Couple is planning a February
wedding in 2010. Formal invitations to
follow with date.


Shelby
Lyn Gardner
celebrated
her second
birthday on
March 14 at
Middlebrooks
Park with
a My Little
Pony birthday
theme. A
lot of family
and friends
enjoyed the
pony rides
and the party.


Bailey
Eldridge
turned three
years old on
May 11. She
celebrated
with a Care
Bear themed
party at Middle
Brooks Park in
Bonifay with
family and
friends. She is
the daughter
of cecil
and Connie
Eldridge of
Bonifay.


Willow Fiona Broadfoot


Alyssa Mobley


MOSt popular baby names

Emma overtakes Emily after

a 12-year reign; Elvis slips


Skoog/Hunter engaged


Shelby Lyn Gardner


Bailey Eldridge






















































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COLLEGEE PARTNERSHIP TOURS GREEN (IR{LE


AREA COLLEGE PRESIDENTS TOUR GREEN CIRCLE BIO: Chipola College hosted the
Alabama-Florida Border Colleges Partnership quarterly meeting on May 1.
The group toured the Green Circle Bio Energy plant in Cottondale.


Wednesday, May 13, 2009


Society


Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B3


Three of the grand prizes at Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative's 61st Annua
Members' Meeting were vacation packages, courtesy of Florida Media. Pictured
are winners Connie Jensen of Wewahitchka, Elaine Alonso of Fountain and
Margaret Jackson of Wewahitchka.


Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative also gave away $100 electric bill credits.
Credit winners included Oliver Brewer of Panama City, Barbara Alday of
Wewahitchka, Evie Lee lonagethridge of Kinard, Timothy Price of Wewahitchka,
Tracey Stacey of Youngstown, Anita Askew of Wewahitchka, Oscar Turlington
of Kinard, Aaron Kent of Wewahitchka, Rhonda House of Wewahitchka and
Kenneth E. Carroll of Panama City.


WEWAHITCHKA Gulf Coast Electric
Cooperative held its 61st annual Mem-
bers' Meeting Saturday, April 25 at its
headquarter office in Wewahitchka. The
purpose of the meeting is to communi-
cate information about the Cooperative,
including the financial reports and over-
all business status, as well as serve as a
social event for the entire membership.
Nearly 1,000 people attended the event
this year.
For entertainment, Gulf Coast Electric
Cooperative provided bounce house for
the children and Wild Rose Ranch and
Rescue donated a petting zoo. Music
was provided by Alicia Davis. Informa-
tive booths were open for the duration of
the meeting, offering information about
the programs that GCEC has to offer.


Each registered member received
a $10 electric bill credit and coupons to
redeem at food booths run by local civic
organizations as fundraisers. In addi-
tion, registered members were entered
in drawings to win door prizes, including
the grand prizes, which were $100 elec-
tric bill credits and vacation packages.
Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative is part
of the Touchstone Energy@ national alli-
ance of local, consumer-owned electric
cooperatives providing high standards
of service to customers large and small.
GCEC serves approximately 20,200 me-
ters in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Jackson, Wal-
ton and Washington counties and in the
municipalities of Wewahitchka, Ebro,
White City, Lynn Haven, Fountain and
Southport.


We have an energy challenge, America.


When it comes to find ing solutions,

We must me et climate change

go08 SWhile keeping costs down
and electricity available. America needs

a plan. Immediately. Because we all know
that our en ergy needs keep on g ro win g -

Ge ery d ay.


Now is the time to have a candid

conversation with your officials. Together,
we can find answers and take action.


Start the conversation today at
w ww. 0u re n erg y.coo p


Gulf Coast
Electric Cooperative
A Tuchstone Energby" Cooperative ~


West Flonida Electric
A Touchstone Energy" Cooperative ~~
nhe ower of uman connectious


Volunter program graduates master gardener from training

On April 15 the joint Jackson and Gadsden County Exten-
sion Master Gardener Volunteer Program graduated 26 par- PIlg
ticipants after they successfully completed nine weeks of
training on home horticulture. The training program prepares I~i
individuals interested in becoming an extension horticulture
volunteer.
Trained Master Gardener volunteers assist the county hor-
ticulture agent with a variety of tasks including: installation
and/or maintenance of demonstration gardens or landscapes,
office and program assistance, perform or assist in giving pre- 1
sentations at meetings, garden clubs, etc., just to name a few.-
Nineteen graduates will be serving with the Jackson
County Extension Service and seven will be volunteering
through Gadsden County Extension. This year's training was
unique with participation in the state Master Gardener Volun- .4*
teer Training Program via video conferencing technology, also
known as Poly-Com. *
To contact a Master Gardener in Jackson County, stop by
the Jackson County Extension Service, 2741 Pennsylvania in
Marianna or call 482-9620.


Gulf Coast Electric holds annual meeting Ion at


Receive up to a $1,200 Rebate*
Or
with the purchase of a qualifying
K OnneL HOm0 00mf0rt S stem


ma w


Our Energy, Our Future'"
A Dialogue With America
www~ourenergy.coop





,


0 a
r ~ I r

, a ,

.


AT TENTI 0N
AIL II EVIgIg4 1p



PR1OFE1SS FINALS
THE JACKSON COUNTY BUIlDING DEPT.
AND THE TRI-COUNTY BUILDERS
ASSOCIATION WILL BE SPONSORING A
.-a 1














2II )AY- 4IIUR


MAY 29-30, 2000

.AI41' ag IFEE3 $110000
Make check payable to Tri-County Builders Association
Class instructed by:
Universal Inspection Service, Inc.
State Approved Provider #0000907
For more information and to
Sign Up contact: Wanda Biggs -
Building Dept. (850) 482-9901
Tammy Dean (850) 209-0397
IommuIIT)IN'IA nny waJn I


Twelve candidates recently completed the Basic Corrections
Academy at Chipola College. Graduates are from left, front
ro. Edun GC set o Mtaoiana eShornek Grin tof
Chattahoochee, Ashley Lindsey of Bonifay, Brandon Sikora
of Graceville, Pamela Walker of Grand Ridge. Back row;
Tina Anderson of Cottondale, Joyce Barbaree of Grand
Ridge, Simone Cooper of Blountstown, Matthew Durham of
Greenwood and Jennifer Ethridge of Sneads.


DNA IN THE LAB


B4 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser I Washington County News


Local


Wednesday, May 13, 2009


CHIPLEY Washington
Holmes Technical Center
will begin a Firefighter
I class on June 8. This
class will be under the
current curriculum. This
curriculum is scheduled
to change in September,
Firefighter I is the en-
trydl sel uiFirefighter II
pations such as Depart-
ment of Forestry, paid full
time firefighter and most
emergency medical jobs.
If you are interested or
have ever been interested
in becoming a certified


Firefighter in the State of
Florida, this is your chance
before the new curriculum
begins. The new curricu-
lum will be lengthier and
require more information
along with other certifica-
tion prior to entry.
Applicants must be at
last 18 yas f ael?:

burn, which will take place
at the end of the class.
For more information,
stop by the Technical Cen-
ter or call Greg Hutching,
Scott Curry, or Brandon
Stevenson at 850-638-1180.


Chipola FCA hosts Chariot Races
MARIANNA The Chipola College Fel-
lowship of Christian Athletes recently held
their first Annual Chariot Races for area
high school FCA chapters.
Five-member teams race bearing one r."~
member in the "chariot," which is a bed
sheet, with four other members at each ( 8

some" from Cottondale High School with
team members Kaylie Scott, Megan Scott,
Amanda Ostrum, Kristen Reynolds and ....
Coty Drew. They received the "traveling" -
trophy to keep until next year and Chipola ~ ~~
toan hawke already under way for repeat-r
ing the event next year."


ONSORED BY:
WIest Floridca Electric
A Touchsnine Energy" C eprayrnesr r t.


Alton Rogers of Vernon adjusts a burner in a Chipola science
lab. Chipola College students in Dr. Virginia Baker's biology for
majors (BSC 2010) lab are engaged in the insertion of foreign
DNA plasmidss) into bacterial hosts. The technique is the same


Each month we have new clients
saving at least $1000 a year. Some have
saved as much as $1500 a year on their

This t nmteh thesm eag eoar even
better coverage. Drop by the office and
see how much you can save or give us a
5 minute call to make sure you have the
best rate possible. The peace of mind
that you have the best rate and coverage
can come with your own personal
insurance agent and local office.


MARIANNA Law en-
forcement officers from as
Sfar away as California and
SVirginia recently complet-
Sen Chpola Co lgs E~quiv
course.
The Chipola Criminal
Justice Training Center
offers (EOT) for formerly
certified Florida law en-
forcement officers or those
certified in other states.
Upcoming classes will
meet June 22-26, from 8:30
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Florida
Law Enforcement Officers
whose certification has
expired, or out-of-state of-
ficers who would like to
become Florida-certified'
must complete assessment
procedures, complete a
40-hour High Liability Pro-
Sficiency Review Course
and a pass the Florida Law
Enforcement Officer Certi-
fication State Exam. Cost is
$300.
Those previously certi-
fied as a Florida Correc-
tional Officer or an out-of

who would like to become
Florida-certified will be re-stt orcinlOfcr
quired to complete the as-
sessment procedure, the


OFFKCER EQUIVALENCY TRAINING: Law enforcement officers from as far away as
California and Virginia recently completed Chipola College's Equivalency of
Training (EOT) course. Pictured from left, front row, Eric Scott Aden, Jasen Paul
Bethlehem, Michael Alan Eidenberg, Christian Machel Eriksen, Michael Guenter
Goldsworthy, Sanford Rogers Harris, Adam Michael Heckman; middle row, Edwin
M. Kent, Jackie Jones King, Scott Andrew Lutz, Angela Ana Negrin, Jose Antonio
Negrin, Adrian J. Richardson, David Wayne Slusser; back row, Christopher Scott
Teeple, Glenda Faye Towner, William Geoffrey Warmington, Mark Andrew Wendel,
Cathy Elizabeth Collier, Randy Steven Vickers and Joshua Dewey Whittenberg.


32-hour High Liability Pro-
ficiency ReviewCourse and
earn a passing score on
the Florida Correctional
Officer Certification State
Exam. Cost is $240.
Employment recruiting
information is available by
on-site recruiters and ad-


vertisements posted in the
training facility. EOT class-
es are offered throughout
the school year and are
limited in class size in or-
der to promote individual-
ized instruction. Classes
are presented in a manner
to confirm High Liability


Proficiencies as well as to
prepare the student for
readiness to take Florida
Certification Exams.
For information, contact
Steve Anderson, 850-718-
2479, e-mail andersonsea
chipola.edu, or fax requests
to 850-718-2497.


June firefighter class

to use existing curriculum


FEL.L.OWSHI-P Op-


Lv FL(TION A(A F Y


'B00k Machine'


performance set
MARIANNA Chipola College Theater
will present "Beanie and the Bamboo-
zming Booke M hin, "tonhun reds o e-
performance is set for Thursday, May 14,
at 7p.m.
General admission tickets are on sale
now for $5 each.
The show tells the story of Beanie Bo-
ren, science wiz who is not keen on read-
ing. Beanie has designed a book reading
machine for the science fair which can
read three books at once. Unfortunately,
the machine is neither user friendly nor
bug free. When Beanie turns it on, lights
flash, thunder booms, and out pop the
",':,h safo SnSw Whiz, Hanseleand
wreak havoc. Beanie must get them back
into the books with help from the good
guys. Afterward, he is eager to read the
old fashioned way.
Cast in the following roles, are: Aus-
tin Pettis as Mr. Wright, Aaron Moore
as Beanie Boren, Keith Watford as The
Queen, Kristina Lopez as Candy, Kyndall
Covington as The Wicked Witch of the
West, Aven Pitts as Professor Librum,
Brenna Kneiss as Dorothy, Courtney
Corbin as Gretel, Ben Grande as Hansel,
Dianna Glaze as Snow White, Garrett
Brolund as Dewie Decimal, Kris Samp-
son as Hewie, Stephanie Lawson as Lou-
ie and Sarah Lovins as Gidget.
For information about Chipola The-
ater, call 718-2227.



certification


SP

namp~rueuc
UTILITIE 5


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POfficers train for state


i~ja~~CHd

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Ilrir*


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ackson Ave.


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Bg~ IFAY
1108 N. 1 au S ~L~
: 85-547












WHTC students win at state SkillsUSA competition


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on Saturday, May 16th
At our NEW LOCATION:
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Call & place your order today toll free 1-877-638-2330 7am-4pm
Orders MUST be placed by May 14th to Pick-up: May 16th 1:30 pm 5 pm


Wednesday, May 13, 2009


Local


Washington County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B5


BRADENTON Fourteen
Washington-Holmes Tech-
nical Center students tray-
eled to Bradenton to the
Florida SkillsUSA State
Leadership and Skills Con-
ference, and seven returned
with silver or gold medals.
"I think that 50 percent
of the students taking a top
medal is outstanding for our
first state competition, but
to even get to the state level
of competition makes them
all champions for WHTC,"
said Tommy Smith, direc-
tor of Washington-Holmes
Technical Center.
Approximately 2,000 stu-
dents were in attendance
competing in 84 contests
at the high school and post-
secondary levels. Students


technical program. The
Tech Prep Biofuel Team
. will advance to the National
Competition in Kansas City,
Mo. June 21-25.
SkillsUSA is a national
nonprofit organization
serving teachers and high
JAMS JSHschool and college students
NELSON STRAUB who are preparing for ca-
reers in trade, technical and
The company willingly al- skilled service occupations.
lowed Josh a week off to The SkillsUSA partnership
travel to the state competi- of students, teachers and
tion, but is unable to spare industry representatives
him for the week of nation- works together to ensure
als because two other tech- America has a skilled work-
nicians are being deployed force. Florida SkillsUSA
to Iraq. Nathan Toro has has a membership of more
also washeen offered part- than 10,000 students and is
time position with Ranch the third largest SkillsUSA
Biodiesel while completing organization in the U.S.
his high school diploma and


TARA DONNEA
ALFORD BAGUZIS

Toro and Robert Wheeler,
placed first in their com-
petition with a 100 percent
ranking. Josh Straub also
brought home a gold medal
in Industrial Motor Control.
After placing first at the
regional finals, Josh was
offered a job at Spanish
Trail Lumber Company as
an Industrial Motor Control
Maintenance Technician.


m I
Tech Prep Biofuel Team placed first in competition, with a
100 percent ranking. Team members included, from left,
Dylan Cummings, Nathan Toro and Robert Wheeler.


who placed first in their re-
gional contests were invit-
ed to compete at the state
conference.
The State Silver Medal-
ists included Tara Alford
in Cosmetology, Donna Ba-


guzis in the Job Skills Dem-
onstration for her Tranquil-
ity Garden, and James Nel-
son in Technical Drafting.
The Tech Prep Bio-
fuel Team, which included
Dylan Cummings, Nathan


PAMAMA CITY The Visual and Per-
forming Arts Division of Gulf Coast
Community College will offer "Summer
Camps in the Arts" for Bay County's
middle and high school students.
The first camp for middle school stu-
dents is scheduled for June 1-5, from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. in the Amelia G. Tapper Center
for the Arts. Students entering grades six
through eight in the fall of 2009 will have the
opportunity to rotate through classes in art,
dance, music and theater. Cost is $200; reg-
istration will be held May 26-29 at the Ame-
lia Tapper Center for the Arts office from
9 a.m. to 4p.m.
High school students entering grades
nine through 12 in the fall of 2009 and in-
terested in art, dance, music or theatre


may enroll in the high school Camp in the
Arts. The camps will have two sessions:
June 8-12, and June 15-19. Morning ses-
sion hours are from 9 a.m. to noon, and
afternoon sessions from 1-4 p.m. Stu-
dents can choose from classes in Music
Technology, Acting, Dance, Chamber
Chorale/Voice, Theatre Technology and
Visual Art (including Drawing, Painting,
Ceramics and Sculpture).
All camp instructors are GCCC faculty
and staff. Registration will be held at the
Amelia Tapper Center for the Arts office
from June 1-5 for the first session, and
from June 8-12 for the second session.
Tuition cost is $175 for the week.
For more information, call Sherri Ren-
froe at 872-3886.


Three Chipola College sophomores have been awarded scholarships to the
Florida State University/Panama City campus. From left are: Renee Green,
FSU/PC Admissions director; Alicia Hatcher of Greenwood; Jessica Weeks of
Cotton dale; and Aaron Thomas White of Grand Ridge.



ChC ipola recognizes


OUtstanding achievements


MARIANNA Chipola College recog-
nized the outstanding achievements of
its students at the recent annual Awards
Ceremony. Awards were presented for
academics, athletics and extracurricular
activities.
The following students received aca-
demic awards: Courtney L. Pettis Corbin
of Chipley, Accounting; Kayla Stewart of
Chipley, Accounting Principles Student;
Christopher E. Peyton of Chipley, Fresh-
man Chemistry; Lindsey S. Tate of Bonifay,
Sophomore Chemistry; Ciara N. Jackson of
Graceville, Earth Science; Alan C. Moss of
Chipley, Calculus I; Kimberly Sloan of Cot-
tondale, Calculus II; Jordan Belser of Chi-
pley, C.H. Barton Award; Kara L. Jumper
of Graceville, Dr. Robert E. Ringer Award;
Jessica Renee Weeks of Cottondale, FSU/
PC Transfer ScholarshipS.
Students in Workforce Development
programs received the following awards:
David Ellis Park of Cottondale, Law En-
for deenns received awards for athlet-
ics: Allison Ellis of Chipley, Highest GPA
Cheerleader Award.
The following students received awards
for extracurricular activities: Zachary T.
Jones of Chipley, State Phi Beta Lambda;
Courtney Corbin of Graceville, Govern-
ment Association; Jessica Weeks of Chi-
pley, The Papoose Student Newspaper;
Brain Bowl State Champions Jordan
Belser, Anthony Garrett, Brad Wells and
Ryan Wells.


TOP: The student body selected English
professor Rachel West (left) for the
Distinguished Faculty Award and ACE
Coordinator Bonnie Smith (right) for the
Distinguished Administrator Award. SGA
president Courtney Corbin (center)
Presented the awards. ABOVE: Out-going
Chipola SGA president Courtney Corbin
of Graceville (left) passes the gavel to
incoming president Maggie Mathis of
Marianna (right) as Student Activities
Director Nancy Johnson (center) looks on.


Fordhooks.............................$20.0
Baby Butter Beans................$16.00
Green Beans.........................$16.00
Pole Beans.................. ..........$16.00
Speckled Butter Beans.........$1 6.00
Cranberry Beans. .................$20.00
Blackeye Peas............. ..........$16.00
Butter Peas................. ..........$16.00
Cream 40 Peas......................$25.00
Crowder Peas.............. .........$16.00
Green Peas............................$16.00
Pinkeye Peas.........................$16.00
White Acre Peas...................$16.00
Zipper Peas................ ...........$16.00
Cream White Corn 4#..........$10.00
Cream Yellow Corn 4#.........$10.00
White Corn...........................$16.00
Yellow Corn................. ..........$16.00
Collard Greens......................$16.00
Turnip Greens.......................$16.00


Mustard Greens................$16.00
Spinach........................ .....$16.00
Cut Okra....................... ....$16.00
Breaded Okra................ ...$16.00
Whole Okra................... ...$16.00
Sliced Yellow Squash........$1 6.00
Sliced Zucchini............... ...$16.00
Baby Carrots.................. ....$16.00
Broccoli........................ .....$16.00
Cauliflower.................... ....$16.00
Mixed Vegetables.............$816.00
Soup Blend.................... ...$16.00
Brussel Sprouts............... ..$16.00
Blueberries 5#...................$820.00
Blackberries 5#.................$820.00
Raspberries 5#............... ...$20.00
Mango Chunks 5#............. $18.00
Pineapple Chunks 5#........$18.00
Cranberries 5#.................. $20.00


Arts camps planned at GCCC
















Wednesday, Mayl13, 2009 w ww.bo0n i fay now. co0m |ww w.ch i pleyp ap er. com Page 6


B
Section


GRACEVILLE The spring 2009 graduating class at The Bap-
tist College of Florida (BCF) in Graceville consists of pastors,
church leaders, administrators, youth workers, worship lead-
ers, musicians, counselors, teachers, and ministry profession-
als. Each one has a story to tell about how the Lord brought
them to BCE One such story that literally captured the heart
of the BCF faculty and staff comes from Phillip W. Adcock II.
While serving as the youth minister in the church where he
was raised, Adcock enrolled in one of BCF's online programs
during the fall 2005 semester. Adcock showed great determi-
nation during that first semester stating that he was following
God's will for his life. "The fall semester of 2005 found me en-
rolling into my new adventure. I had great teachers and some
really interesting courses. I learned much about studying the
bible and how to evangelize in my community," said Adcock.
"It was exciting and the Lord was leading all the way."
Life and academics, for the most part, seemed to go
smoothly for Adcock during the next three years of his life.
In the fall of 2008, however, he would face developments that
would challenge his studies, as well as every aspect of his life.
After a routine procedure to remove one of his wisdom teeth,
Adcock's oral surgeon diagnosed him with cancer. Previously,
at the age of thirteen, Adcock lost his left leg to bone cancer,
and now was faced with the discovery of cancer in the soft
tissues of his jaw. After multiple trips to the hospital, the can-
cer was found to be in his actual jawbone as well, and was
deteriorating it to the point that it was broken in two places.
As Adcock was scheduled to graduate that fall, these series of
events would be a huge hindrance to actually completing all
of the assignments required for graduation.
After this news, a phone call was made to BCF and fac-
ulty and staff, wasting no time, rallied together and became
determined that Adcock's coursework could eventually be
completed and graduation attained. Administrators waited
patiently and prayerfully as Adcock underwent three rounds
of chemotherapy and a surgery that replaced the right side
of his jawbone with titanium. Adcock, continuing to gain
strength, completed all of the coursework and will be gradu-
ating with the spring 2009 class.
Adcock acknowledged the utmost respect and extreme


Baptist College of Florida graduating senior and cancer
survivor Phillip W. Adcock II.

gratitude for the men and women that work and serve at BCE
"This semester I will graduate with a tremendous amount of
knowledge learned in class, but I will long hold dear the edu-
cation on how to imitate Christ from this group of people,"
stated Adcock. "If you're looking for a school to fulfill God's
call on your life, there is no better choice than The Baptist
College of Florida. Thank you all for being used of God to
touch one life beyond the call of duty."


With the condition of our country,
I have heard people saying, "What
we need is an old fashioned revival."
They are referring to the days when
people from all over the community
would gather in a church every day
for two weeks or more with lots of
singing and preaching. Every time
I hear that comment I want to as ,
"If I schedule two weeks of back-to-


But as I heard yesterday on the
radio, I do believe there is life after
Television and technology, all is not
lost! As I can personally testify, God
can take dead and dying churches
and individuals and revive them to
hI e awesome tools that God can use
THE to lead the lost to Him for eternity,
RT which is the greatest healing
Hall service you will ever be a part of.
It starts just like the old two week
revivals started, but they can last
for a life time. It begins when individuals
realize that our life is more than things.
It is a relationship with God Almighty, the
Creator of all things, Jehovah, who is a
jealous God and will not share or compete
with our foolishness. My book "Church, Go
To Hell! Please?" brings us to that point,
where revival will come to this country, the
world, our church, and our family, when
it first takes place in our life, when we
confess our sins and things that we have
placed before God, and lay ourselves anew
at the feet of Christ, as we truly worship
and obey Him as Lord.
There's an evangelist who is now
with our Lord, who many like myself still
admire. He was born to gypsy's in a tent,
never had a day of formal education, yet
he influenced millions for Christ though
his powerful preaching, during his lifetime
(1860-1947). Rodney "Gypsy" Smith was
known as the evangelist whose pants knees
were always worn out because of the time
he spent on his knees with His Lord.
Recently, I learned something else
about Gypsy Smith as I was reading a
blog from "Life Action Revival Ministries"



MiniStry BR IEF S

Sunday evening services will begin at 5
p.m. and evening service s, Monday through
Thursday will begin at 7 p.m.

Evergreen Baptist Mission benefit
WESTVILLE Evergreen Baptist Church of
Westville will be host a pancake supper on
May 15 from 6-8-p.m. Proceeds will help to
fund a mission trip. All you can eat for $5.
You can eat in or take out. For more infor-
mation, call 548-5949.

New worship times
CHIPLEY Living Above Ministries, 844
Main Street, in Chipley has new worship
service hours.
Sunday service is at 3 p.m. and Thurs-
day services start at 7 p.m. Pastors are
Glen and Rhonda Gipson.

New Bayview outreach yard sale
Huge church wide yard sale, Saturday,
May 16, from 8 a.m. until noon at New Bay-
view Church of God of Prophecy on New
Bayview Church Road, just off Hwy. 2 East


written by Bryon Paulus. Bryon used 2
Corinthians 10:12 which says, "For we dare
not class ourselves or compare ourselves
with those who commend themselves. But
they, measuring themselves by themselves,
and comparing themselves among
themselves, are not wise." (NKJV)
Bryon went on then and shared that
when Gypsy "wanted to see God do His
great work, he was known to draw a circle
around himself with a piece of chalk and
pray,'Lord, send a revival, and let it begin
inside this circle'." Bryon went on to
comment that this is "Not exactly a recipe
for success ... unless we take our eyes off
of everyone else (refuse to compare), step
inside a chalk drawn circle or Hula-hoop,
and say 'Lord I need revival!"'
Maybe I'm wrong, hopefully I am. But
when I hear people say we need revival
meetings I hear them saying "others
need to change because I'm happy with
me (in my sins) just like am, but Lord,
please change them." When it is I myself
who needs to place myself in the circle,
confess my faults, failures, excuses and
sins, so that I can once again be a tool in
the Master's hand as salt and light in this
world for His Kingdom, regardless of what
others may say or do (M/atthew 5:13-16).
This message has been brought to you
From the Heart of Tim Hall, Senior Pastor;
Gully Springs Baptist Church, and author
of "Church Go 'lb Hell! Please?" RO.
Box 745, 2824 Highway 90 West Bonifay,
Florida 32425. Located, three miles west
of the light at Highway 79, 850-547-3920,
E-mail: mhall 2000@yahoo.com" timhall
2000@yahoo.com


FROM
HEA
Tm iT





back preaching and singing every
morning and every evening like the
revivals you are referring to, would you
and all your family attend every service
as they did back then before there were
televisions, automobiles, Internet, cell
phones and drug stores on every corner?"
But I don't normally ask, because I just
don't want to hear their stuttering and
spattering about their health, family and
financial problems that would keep them
from making that kind of commitment.
This leads us to the real problem, of why
there is a great need for true revival today.
What most of these people forget is that
the reason for these meetings was because
the church had become so carnal (worldly),
they, themselves, were not an effective
witness for our Lord as they should be.
So it took the first week or so, to get the
church and themselves, confessing their
sins, becoming "holy" before God, so that
God could then use them and hear their
prayers in the latter part of the second
week, so that they could get out of the way,
so that the un-churched (lost) would come
to Christ (get saved), because they could
then finally see a true difference in those
who proclaimed Christ.


Bethany Baptist sing
BONIFAY The gospel group The Thomp-
slots will bein coner cSha urday May 23nat
ing begins at 6 p.m.

B Ueg0f0SS Sina at New Vision UMC
GREEN HEAD Big River Bluegrass Band
will play at New Vision United Methodist
Church In Greenhead Friday May 15 at 6
p.m. This band recently played at the Blue-
grass Festival in Dothan Ala. and received
two standing ovations. There will be open
mic following their performance. Bring
finger foods for the short break during
the evening. The church is also collecting
canned and non-perishable food for those
in need.

C1Uftil Of Christ gospel meeting
ESTO Esto Church of Christ will hold a
gospel meet May 17 21 with Cecil May,
Jr. as guest speaker. Sunday morning ser-
vices begin at 9:30 followed by the regular
worship service.


of Miller's Crossroads. Proceeds benefit
the church's outreach ministry.

Bible School at Northside Baptist
PONCE DE LEON Northside Baptist Church
in Ponce de Leon has scheduled Bible
School July 6 10 from 9 until noon each
day. The theme this year is Boomerang
Express.

Otter Creek sing
PONCE DE LEON The Millers will be sing-
ing at Otter Creek Methodist Church, Sat-
urday, May 16 at 7 p.m. The church is lo-
cated four miles north of Ponce de Leon off
Hwy. 81.

Winterville AOG Homecoming
BONIFAY Winterville Assembly of God
will hold Homecoming services on May 17.
Morning worship starts at 10 a.m. followed
by a covered dish meal. Take a covered
dish and enjoy the fellowship. The Kirk-
lands will be singing. Winterville Assembly
of God is at 1897 Hwy. 177A.


FAITH


'While


we have


ODDOrtun ty

"A young soldier and his
commanding officer got on a
train together. The only available
seats were across
from an attractive
young lady who
Swas traveling with
her grandmother.
As they engaged
in pleasant
conversation,
the soldier and
LET YOUR the young lady
LIGHTSHINEI kept eyeing one
Wes Webb another; there
was an obvious
mutual attraction. Suddenly
the train went into a tunnel
and the room became dark.
Immediately two sounds were
heard-the "smack" of a kiss, and
the "whack" of a slap across the
face. The grandmother thought,
"I can't believe he kissed my
granddaughter, but I'm glad she
gave him the slap he deserved."
The commanding officer thought,
"I don't blame the boy for kissing
the girl, but it's a shame that
she missed his face and hit me
instead." The young girl thought,
"I'm glad he kissed me, but I
wish my grandmother hadn't
slapped him for doing it." And as
the train broke into the sunlight,
the soldier could not wipe the
proud smile off his face. He had
just seized the opportunity to
kiss a pretty girl and slap his
commanding officer and he had
gotten away with both!"
This young soldier seized
his opportunity. We have
opportunities everyday to serve
God and do good for others.
The problem is not a lack of
opportunities; it is a lack of desire
to seize the opportunities. When
we really want something and
the opportunity presents itself
we will usually take it. If there
is a job opening we desire, a
vacation to be taken, an amount
of money to be made, or even a
hobby to be enjoyed. We have no
problem clearing our schedules,
rearranging our plans, or maybe
even putting out a few dollars.
Its worth it because we desire it,
However, is it a different story
when it comes to doing good for
others or doing things God would
desire of us?
Paul said in Galatians 6:1-10,
"Brethren, even if anyone is
caught in any trespass, you who
are spiritual, restore such a one
in a spirit of gentleness; each one
looking to yourself, so that you
too will not be tempted. Bear one
another's burdens, and thereby
fulfill the law of Christ. For if
anyone thinks he is something
when he is nothing, he deceives
himself. But each one must
examine his own work, and then
he will have reason for boasting
in regard to himself alone, and
not in regard to another. For each
one will bear his own load. The
one who is taught the word is to
share all good things with the
one who teaches him Do not be
deceived, God is not mocked; for
whatever a man sows, this he will
also reap. For the one who sows
to his own flesh will from the
flesh reap corruption, but the one
who sows to the Spirit will from
the Spirit reap eternal life. Let us
not lose heart in doing good, for
in due time we will reap if we do
not grow weary. So then, while we
have opportunity, let us do good
to all people, and especially to
those who are of the household of
the faith." (NAU)
Paul admonishes us to do
good while we have opportunities.
We must take advantage of the
opportunities while we can. There
are those who no longer have
the opportunities they once had.
Some because of declining health,
disabilities, or even because of
circumstances in their everyday
life that no longer provide them
the opportunities they once
had. The fact of the matter is
we all have opportunities in our
life everyday, but will we take
advantage of them?
This message has been
provided by Wes Webb,
evangelist, Chipley Church
of Christ, 1295 Brickyard Rd.
Chipley, FL 32428 850-638-2366.


C00(61 SUf ViV01 (jf &UoteS


hlk 0 n 0 U 00 pS





















Wednesday, Mayl13, 2009 w ww. bo0n ifay no0w. co0m | w ww.c hi pley pa p er. com Page 7


Houses of WORSHIP


George E. Deese, Chairman of the Board, President,
and CEO of Flowers Foods speaks during chapel at
The Baptist College of Florida in Graceville.


GRACEVILLE George E. Deese, Chairman of the Board,
President, and CEO of Flowers Foods spoke of his personal
testimony and recent passing of his son during the April 27
chapel service at The Baptist College of Florida (BCF) in.
Deese joined Flowers Foods in Thomasville, Ga., in 1964.
He reminisced about delivering baked goods to The Baptist
College of Florida cafeteria years ago when it was called the
Baptist Bible Institute. Since then, Flowers Foods has been
placed on the Forbes' Fortune 400 list and is now the nation's
leading producer and marketer of fresh and frozen bakery
items. Throughout the chapel service, Deese used person-
al illustrations to describe how God is working in the lives of
His people and how His timing is always impeccable.




BCF dedication and



open house

GRACEVILLE The general public is invited to attend the
dedication service and open house for the new adminis-
tration building at The Baptist College of Florida (BCF)
in Graceville May 22 at 10:30 am. Formerly the historic
Graceville Railroad Depot, the renovated construction
HOW contains the presidential offices and administrative
Staff of the College.
For more information, call 800-328-2660 ext. 460.


How To Be Happier
Resea rchers in the bu rgeon ing field of Positive Psychology
have begun studying simple activities which people can add
to their daily lives in the hopes of making them happier. It


immediate levels of happiness, while the exercise to reflect
on three good things that happened each day did the most
to increase long-term happiness. (This research was carried
out by Martin Seligman and others, and was reported in the
July-August edition of American Psychologist in the article
"Positive Psychology Prog ress.") What is really worth noting
here is that much of their work validates what religious figures
have been telling us for thousands of years:to be thankful
and express our gratitude to those around us. Recall too, how
Saint Paul be ins most of his Eistles with a note of thanks.

We give thanks to God always for you all, constantly mentioning
you in our prayers, remembering before our God and Father your
work of faith and labor of love and steadfastness of hope in our
Lord Jesus Christ. R.S.V. 1Thessalonians 1:2-3


Tis 1Mess e COurtesy Of



BROWN Bdokmr

FNR L (1HOE URITR

1068 Main Street, Chipley Hwy.77 5, Chipley *638-4097
UJU*TU1U 14Wy.79 5., Bonifay 547-9688



W~2Ehinetrm~oun"come as~ you~~ are"

Mike Orr, Pastor
1364 03(ivod ) pey 638-02 2 1300 South Blvd. PO Box 643
~Chiple Florida
11 Eigini d oifay 549 (850) 638-1830

But When the holy Spirit Ste )Ien B. RegiSter,
COmeS Upon you, y0U Will be FDA
filled With p0Wef, and you
Will be my WitnOSses... 1552 Brickyard Road
G00d News Bible Acts 1:8 Chipley, FL 638-4251



TV 0 T 1 1 Place your message

HOME here for only $8.00

Chi 1ey FL per week.


PEEL FUNERAL HOME, INC.
H.I. Peel, Jr., LFD 10 all thy WayS aCitnOW10ig0
Veronica Peel, LFD Him and He shal irctth
Vernon
2849 Church St.* 850-535-2115 pat $=
Bon~f~yProverbs 3:6
301 E. Evans Ave.* 850-547-4114


B
Section


BCF Orlando
Instructor,
Christopher
Fouche,
presented
the BCF
scholarships
to the three
winners at
the Florida
State Bible
Drill and
Speakers
Tournament.
From left are;
Matthew
Guy,
Christopher
Fouche,
Steven
Warren and
Ka itlynn
Floyd.


ORLANDO After years of prac-
ticing and months competing
three Florida youth were named
winners in the Florida Baptist
State Bible Drill and Speakers
Tournament competition held
on April 25, at the First Baptist
Church in Orlando. Each year,
The Baptist College of Florida


(BCF) in Graceville provides a
thousand dollar scholarship to
each of the winners for their ac-
complishment and to encourage
their continued biblical educa-
tion and academic pursuits.
This year's frontrunners and
scholarship recipients were Mat-
thew Guy, Youth Bible Drill win-


ner from Eustis; Steven Warren,
High School Bible Drill winner
from Brandon; and Kaitlynn
Floyd, Speakers Tournament
winner from Pace. The winners
will represent the State in the
National Invitational competi-
tion to be held in Covington, a. in
June.


African Methodist Episcopal
Grant Tabernacle AME 577 Martin
Luther King, Chipley Pastor Is the Rev
Larry Brown
New Bethel AME U S 90 In Bonifay
Pastor Is Alice Hennessey
St John AME 3816 Clemmons
Road, Vernon Service on first and third
Sunday at 11 15 a m Pastor Is the Rev
LoSt noepohnAME 1401 Monroe Shef-
field Road, Chipley Pastor Is the Rev
Roy Hudson
St Luke AME 4009 Jackson Com-
munity Road, Vernon Service on second
and fourth Sunday at 11 a m Pastor Is
the Rev Leon Singleton
Assembly of God
Bonifay First Assembly 1009 S
Waukesha St Pastor Is John Chance
CarmelAssemblyofGod County
160 In the Bethlehem Community Pastor
Is Tommy Moore
Grace Assembly of God 567 N
Main St Pastor the Rev Dallas Pettis
Cords of Love Assembly of God
2060 Bethlehem Road In the Kynesvlle
area Pastor Is Jerry Sanford
Ebro Assem bly of God State 79
South Pastor Is Lloyd Lykins
Falth Assembly dGod Underwood
Road behind Poplar Springs School
Pastor Is Charles Carlton
Graceville First Assembly of God
5565 Brown St Pastor Is Charles
Jackson
Lighthouse Assem bly of God, 1201
S Waukesha St (State 79) Bonifay
Sunday School 10 a m Sunday ser
vices 11 a m and 6 p m every second
Wednesday fellowship supper Pastor
Michael Presley
Little Rock Assem bly of God 1923
Hwy 173, six miles north of Bonifay Pas-
tor Is the Rev Ben Peters
Live Oak Assem bly of God Just off
Hwy 177 A north of Bonifay
Mt Olive Assembly dGod Hwy
179 A off Hwy 2 Pastor Thomas Ealum

Mt Pleasant Assembly of God Hwy
179 A, eight miles north ofWestville
Pastor Is the Rev Clyde Sm ith
ShNew BethanyAssembly of2 0 t
Hlnson's Crossroads Pastor Is Leon
Jenkins
New Life Fellowship Assembly of
God 695 5th St Chipley Pastor Vince
Spencer
New Smyrna Assembly of God,
Adolph Whitaker Road six miles north of
Bonifay The Rev Josh Garner Is pastor
Noma Assem bly of God 1062 Tlndel
Street, Noma Pastor Is Jerry Lelsz
Northside Assembly ofGod 1009
N Rangeline St across from Bonifay
Elementary Pastor Edwin Bell
Smith Chapel Assembly of God
2549 Smith Chapel Road, just off Hwy
177 A Pastor George Stafford
Vernon Assembly of God Church
3349 McFatter Avenue Pastor Is the
Rev Wesley Hall
Wausau Assembly of God Hwy 77
Pastor Is Danny Burns
Westville Assembly of God Hwy 181
North Pastor Is Lavon Burke
Winterville Assem bly of God
Dogwood Lakes Road Pastor Mitch
Johnson
Baptist
Abigall Free Will Baptist Dawkins
Street In Vernon
Berean Baptist 1438 Nearing Hills
Road In Chipley Pastor Is Jesse Bowen
Wausau First Baptist Hwy 77
Bethany Baptist 10 miles north of
Bonifay on Hwy 79 Pastor Is Ed Barley
Bethlehem Baptist Hwy 177 Pastor
Is Dr Wesley Adams
Beulah Anna Baptist Coursey Road
a half-mile off Hwy 81 Pastor Is David
Hldle
Blue Lake Baptist Southeast corner
where |-10 and Highway 77 cross on
the lake
Bonifay First Baptist 311 N Wauke-
sha Pastor Shelley Chandler
Bonifay Free Will Baptist Corner of
Kansas Avenue and Oklahoma Street
Pastor Is Tim Schnelder
Caryville Baptist 4217 Old Bonifay
Road Pastor Aubrey Herndon
Chipley First Baptist 1300 South
Blvd Pastor Is Michael Orr
Chipley First Free Will Baptist 1387
South Blvd
The Fellowship at Country Oaks 574
Buckhorn Blvd 17 miles southeast of
Chipley off Orange
East Pittman Freewill Baptist 1/2 mile
north of Hwy 2on 179 Pastor Is Herman


Sellers
Eastside Baptist Hwy 277, Vernon
Esto First Baptist 1050 N Hwy 79
Pastor Is Ryan Begue
Evergreen Missionary Baptist
Church, Westville
Gap Pond Free Will Baptist 1980
Gap Blvd In Sunny Hills Interim Pastor
Is the Rev George Cooper
17Grltney Baptdst Church, 2249 Hwy
Gully Springs Baptist Three miles
west of Bonifay on Hwy 90 Pastor Tim
Hall
Hickory Hill Baptist 1656 Hlckory Hill
Road (Hwy 181 N), Westville
Holmes Creek Baptist Cope Road
northwest df Chipley
Holyneck Missionary Baptist 3395
Cemetery Lane, Campbellton Pastor
Richard Peterson Sr
Jerusalem Missionary Baptist 614
Bennett Drive, Chipley Price Wilson Is
pastor
Leonia Baptist Church Is located
In northwest Holmes County Pastor Is
Stacy Stafford
Loymwood Free Will Baptist 1745
Lovewood Road. Cottondale Pastor Is
Henry Matthews
Mt Ararat Missionary Baptist 1233
Old Bonifay Rd Chipley Pastor Is Dr
HG McCollough
Mt Zlon Independent Baptist Hwy 2,
one mile west of Hwy 79 In Esto Pastor
Is Steve Boroughs
New Beginning Baptist 1049 Sand-
ers Ave ,Gracevlle Pastor Is Rudolph
Dickens
New Concord Free Will Baptist
James Paulk Road off Hwy 177 Pastor
James Carnley
New Hope Baptist Intersection of
Hwys 2 and 179A
New Hope Missionary Baptist
Church (Two Egg), 3996 Wintergreen
Road, Greenwood
New Orange Baptist 782 Alford
Road Pastor Is Alcus Brock
New Prospect Baptist 761 New
Prospect Road, Chipley Pastor Is Kermit
Solleau
New Zion Baptist Hwy 177 A north

SN m~a Baptist Hwy 175 north of
Hwy 2
Northside Baptist Intersection of
Hwys 81 and 90 In Ponce de Leon Pas-
tor Is Ken Harrison
Oakle Ridge Baptist Corner d
Orange Hill and Gilbert's Mill roads,
southeast of Chipley
Orange Hill Baptist 3 6 miles east of
Wausau, dff Ploneer Road at 3485 Gainer
Road Pastor Phllip Gainer
Orange Hill Missionary Baptist, 816
Sunday Rd Chipley Pastor If the Rev
James Johns
Piney Grove Free Will Baptist 1783
Piney Grove Rd, south df Chipley Pastor
Is Tim Owen
Pleasant Hill Free Will Baptist 1900
Pleasant Hill Rd
Poplar Head Independent Free Will
Baptist Poplar Head Road Pastor Is the
Rev James Pate
Poplar Springs Baptist 1098
Loymwood Road, Graceville Pastor
John Howell
Salem Free Will Baptist 2555 Kynes-
vile Road (Hwy 276) between Cottondale
and Alford Pastor Is Donnie Hussey
Sand Hills Baptist 6758 Hwy 77 Pas-
tor Is T Keith Gann
Shady Grove Baptist Church, 1955
Highway 177 A, Bonifay Pastor, Tim
Shumaker
St John Free Will Baptist St John's
Road, Bonifay
St Matthews Missionary Baptist
4156 St Matthew's Road, Caryville Pas-
tor Is the Rev James Johns
Shady Grove Baptist Church, 1955
Highway 177 A, Bonifay 547-3517 Pas-
tor Is Tim Shumaker
Shiloh Baptist Church located on
Hwy 277, three miles south of Hwy 90
In Chipley
Shiloh Missionary Baptist 3013 Moss
Hill Road In Vernon Pastor Rev Marcell-
ous Willis Jr
Sunny Hills First Baptist 1886 Sunny
Hills Blvd Pastor Is Mike Swingle
Union Hill Baptist Hwy 177, a
mile south of Hwy 2 Pastor Is Maurice
Jenkins
Unity Baptist 3274 River Road,
Hlnson'sCrossroads Pastor Is Lindsey
Martin
Vernon First Baptist, 2888 Church
St Vernon
West Bonifay Baptist 609W Indlana
Ave


Lutheran
Grace Lutheran Hwy 90 East,
Bonifay Interim pastor Is Jerry Conley
Catholic
Blessed Trinity Catholic Hwy 177-
A In Bonifay
St Joseph the Worker Catholic
Hwy 77 South, Chipley
Church of Christ
BcChpley Churcheo Chis 1 Iser
Esto Church of Christ 1247 N
Hwy 79
Church of God
Bonifay Church of God Brock Ave
Pastor Is John Stamey
Tabernacle of Praise Church of
God Hwy 77 South Pastor Is Victor
Fisher
Church of God by Falth 3012
Church St Vernon Pastor Is Elder T
Powell
Church of God In Christ
Yes Lord Deliverance Church of
God In Christ 739 7th Street (next to
the National Guard Armory) In Chipley
Pastor Is David Woods. Jr
Spirlt-Filled Church of God In
Christ 2128 Pate Pond Rd, Caryville
Pastor Is Elder Tony Howard
Church of God in Prophecy
Church of God of Prophecy 1386
W Jackson Ave Chipley Pastor Is
Ernest Dupree
Episcopal
St Matthew's Episcopal Hwy 90
West, Chipley Vicar Is Ward S Clarke
Holiness
Harris Chapel Holiness Elght miles
north of Caryville on Hwy 179 Pastors
are the Rev Norman and Judy Harris
Sweet Gum Holiness 105 Corbln
Rd Cottondale
Third United Holiness 608 West
8th Ave Graceville Pastor Is Arthur
Fulton
Jehovah's Witnesses
Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Wit-
nesses 2048 Hwy 77, Chipley
Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Wit-
nesses Hwy 90, Bonifay
Jewish
Temples are available In Dothan
rn Panama City

Mosque available In Blountstown
Pentecostal
First United Pentecostal 1816 Hwy
90 W, Chipley Pastor Is James Caudle
First United Pentecostal 2100
Highway 90 West, Westville Pastor
Jason Campbell
Open Pond United Pentecostal
1885 Hwy 179-A, Westville Pastor
Is Ray
Connell
Trinity Pentecostal Tabernacle Hwy
77 between Sunny Hills and Green-
head Pastor Is Larry Willoughby
True Holiness Pentecostal 5099
Little Rock Circle, Ebro Pastor Is Louis
D Brown
Turning Point First United Pente-
costal Hwy 90 West, Chipley Pastor Is
James Caudle
Wausau Pentecostal Holiness
2201 Ploneer Road Pastor Is James
Bawilck
Fifth United Pentecostal Holliness
church, 776 Peach Street, Chipley Pas-
tor Is Elder Billy Wilson and Assistant
Pastor Is Evangelist B Snipes
Seventh Day Adventist
Bonifay Seventh Day Adventist 604
Mathusek St Pastor Is Jeff Westberg
Methodist
Bethlehem United Methodist Hwy
177, look for sign
Bonifay United Methodist Okla-
homa Street
Cedar Grove United Methodist Two
miles west of Miller's Crossroads on
Hwy 2 Pastor Is John Hinkle
Chipley First United Methodist
1285 Jackson Ave
East Mt Zion United Methodist
Hwy 173 N 10 miles from Bonifay
Lakeview United Methodist Hwy
279 near Five Points, 1970 Lakeview
Drive Pastor Mike Weeks
Mt Ida Congregational Methodist
Just off Hwy 2 In Holmes County's
New Hope community Pastor Is the
Rev Tom Whiddon
New Hope United Methodist State
Road 79 south of Vernon
Orange Hill United Methodist
Sunday Road off Orange Hill Road
Pastor Is Ron Alderman
Otter Creek United Methodist
North of Ponce de Leon off Hwy 81
(look for sign)
Pleasant Grove United Methodist


2430 Shakey Joe Road, near Hlnson
Crossroads
Poplar Head United Methodist 1 5
miles north of Hwy 2 on Hwy 163
Red Hill United Methodist State
Road 2, two miles west of SR 79 Pas-
tor Is the Rev Buddy Pennington
Vernon United Methodist Hwy 79
Pastor Is John Kramer
77Wausau United Methodist Hwy
Presbyterian
Chipley First Presbyterlan Fifth
Street and Watts Avenue
Sunny Hills Presbyterlan 3768
Country Club Blvd Pastor Is Kenneth
Kelley
Other
Christian Fellowship Center, 1458
Monroe Sheffield Rd, Chipley, Pastor
Isaac Harmon
The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter day SaintsNorth Ride, Bonifay,
Florida 32425 (850)547-1254 or
(850)547-4557 Bonifay Ward Bishop
Joshua Bowen Chipley Ward Bishop
Charles Munns
Courts of Praise 1720 Clayton
Road, Chipley Pastor Is Rick Lovett
Covenant Community Fellowship,
844 Main Street, Chipley Pastor Joey
Robbins
Family Worship Center 531 Rock
Hill Church Road
Sunny Hills Chapel 4283 Hwy 77
Pastor Is William E Holman
Northwest Florida Christian
Church 4465 Hwy 77
Amazing Grace Falth Fellowship
Assembly 3253 Hwy 2 Pastor Is
Bobby Tldwell
New Effort Church New Effort
Church Road, Bonifay Pastor Is Brent
Jones
Christian Haven Finch Circle,
Wausau Pastor Carlos Finch
Trinity Free Church, Living, Loving
God, old Howell Chevrolet bldg ,
Tuesdays and Thursdays at 6 30 p m
each night, Sunday, 2 30-4 30 p m TG
Hobbs, pastor
Vernon Evangelistic Hwy 79 Pas-
tor Keith Mashburn
MiWhiteM Duble Pond Pastor Is
Liberty Church Creek Road In
Vernon Pastor Is Dennis Boyett
Graceville Community 1005 E
Prim Ave Pastor Dale Worle
The Word Church 335 Alford
Road, Cottondale Pastors are Buddy
and Jeanne Steele
Grace & Glory Worship Center
1328 Rallroad Ave Chipley Pastor Is
Debble Willilams
House of Prayer Worship Center
763 West Blvd Pastor Is Anthony B
McKinnie
Northwest Florida Christian
Church 4465 Hwy 77 (meets Sundays
at 6 p m for Bible study) Pastor Is
Fred King
Moss Hill Church Second and
fourth Sundays, 2 p m Off Hwy 279
Cornerstone Harvest Outreach
Corner of Reno and Fanning Branch,
Vernon Pastors are Willils and Drucile
Hagan
Pine Hill Church 1675 Robins
Bridge Road, Bonifay 32425 Pastors
BT Owens and James Bush
Cypress Creek Community Church
2 5 miles west of Alford at 1772 Mace-
donia Road Pastor Is James Vickery
Bonnett Pond Community Church
2680 Bonnett Pond Rd between
Wausau and Vernon Pastor Is the Rev
Teddy Joe Blas
The Potter's Hands Greenhead at
corner of Hwy 77 and Pine Log Road
Pastors are Robert and Shella Smith
Holmes Valley Community Church
3550 Fanning Branch Road, Vernon
Pastors Willils and Drucile Hagan
Bonifay House of Prayer 826 N
Caryville Rd Pastor Devon Richter
Sapp Holiness Church 2207 Sapp
Road, Cottondale
Falth Covenant Fellowship Hwy
277 half-mile south of 1-10
Caryville Evangelistic Center
Wright's Creek Road In Caryville, just
north of Hwy 90 Pastor Is Wayne
Brannon
Someone To Care International
Ministries, Inc 1705 Ploneer Rd,
Chipley Just 2 5 miles east of caution
Ilght In Wausau Pastor Is the Rev S J
Cunningham
Cornerstone Fellowship of Chipley,
1301 Main St (old Chuckwiagon),
Chipley, Sunday services 10 30 a m
Pastor Is Larry Capan


turns out, perhaps not surprising,
that two of the activities that
most mecreased people's levels of
happiness were 1) writing a letter
of gratitude and then delivering
it in person,and 2) writing down
three things that went well each
day and explaining their causes,
and doing this daily for a week.
Of all the activities studied,
the letter of gratitude and
personal delivery most increased


.~ ~


FAITH


Flowers president,



CEO speaks at BCF


B{F AWARDS SCHOLARSHIPS TO BIBLE DRILL AND

SPEAKERS TOURNAMENT WINNERS





B8 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser I Washington County News


Local


Wednesday, May 13, 2009


Ninna Juanita Brock, 76 of Chipley, died May 1 in
the Northwest Florida Community Hospital. A na-
tive and life-long resident of Chipley, she had been a
housekeeper at Washington County Rehab and Nurs-
ing and a member of Blue Lake Baptist Church in
Chipley.
Survivors include two sons, Billy Sr. and wife Nor-
ma Brock of Marianna and Wesley Brock of Chipley;


one daughter, Peggy Brock of Panama City; one sister,
Iris Giddines of Tampa; 10 grandchildren and five-
great-grandchildren.
General services were May 4 in the funeral home's
Main Street chapel with Don Milton officiating. Inter-
ment followed in Orange Hill Cemetery. Family and
friends may sign the online register at www.brownfh.
net.


Howard Edward McGhee, 80, of Caryville died May
6 at his home in Caryville.
He was the son of the late William McGhee and the
late Ethel (White) McGhee.
Survivors include two daughters, Becky Pate of
Caryville and Ann Lewis, both of Caryville; three sis-
ters, Mary Isenberg of Baltimore, Md., Shirley Baggett


of Brewton, Ala. and Martha Bradshaw of Geneva, Ala.;
a brother, Jim McGhee of Esto; 11 grandchildren and
14 great-grandchildren.
General service was in the funeral home chapel with
the Revs. Edward Williams and Rod Jones officiating.
Interment followed in the Caryville Cemetery with
Sims Ekneral Home of Bonifay directing.


Ruby Hood Pennington, 99, of Ponce de Leon died
April 24 at her home. She was born August 4, 1909 in
Westville to the late Charles Dana and Amanda Ar-
nold Hood.
In addition to her parents, she is preceded in death
by her husband, Henry Grady Pennington; one son-
in-law, Charles Brooks; one great-granddaughter, Abi-
gail Mattox; six brothers, Curtis Wade, Howard Hood,
David Crockett Hood, John Randolph Hood, Kimmie
Hood, Wilbur Glenn Hood; three sisters, Annie Lee
Wade, Geraldine Hood Guntner; Annie B. Hood Wind-
ham.
Survivors include one son, Charles Pennington and


wife, Carolyn of Panama City; four daughters, Lavelle
Brooks of Ponce de Leon, Pauline Luechauer and
husband, Dan of Hollywood, Grady Sue Williams and
husband, Buford of Chipley, Glendine Haneline and
husband, Don of Jacksonville; 10 grandchildren,
17 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grand-
children.
Services were held April 28, at Northside Baptist
Church in Ponce de Leon with the Revs. Kenneth
Harrison, Dan Padgett, Buford Williams and Calvert
Wallace officiating. Interment followed in the Ponce
de Leon City Cemetery with Peel Ekneral Home of
Bonifay directing.


Betty J. Hall, 69, of Bonifay died April 27 at her
home. She was born Dec. 11, 1939 in Terrell, Texas to
Robert and Jimmie Carr Pitts.
Survivors include her husband, W.L. Hall; two
daughters, Jackie Gaddy and Debra Parnell; three
sons, Ron Hall, John Hall and Roger Hall; a brother,
Jim Mark and several grandchildren and great-


grandchildren.
General service was held April 29 at Oak Grove
Pentecostal Ministries with the Revs. Tracy Hobbs
and Jerry Helmes officiating.
Burial followed in Whitewater Cemetery
with Bottoms Garden Chapel in charge of arrange-
ments.


Olin Corbin, 83, died May 2 after an extended stay
in Long Term Care at Northwest Florida Community
Hospital. He was born July 25, 1925 to Jule and Nellie
Corbin. He joined the U.S. Army and served his coun-
try for three years during WW II, receiving the ATO
medal, a Good Conduct medal and the World WarITwo
Victory medal. He worked at Coggin and Deermont
doing road construction for thirty nine years, leaving
as a superintendent when the business closed. He then
worked for the County as a road grader operator and
retired there after ten years of service. He was a mem-
her of Rock Hill Methodist Church.
He was preceded in death by his parents, Jule and
Nellie Corbin; brother Owin Corbin and sisters, Eunice
Locke and Mary Alice Vickery.


Survivors include: his children, Jerry Corbin of
Chipley, Barbara Joyce Bowen and her husband Jeff
and Brenda Woodham and her husband Hayward, all
of Dothan, Ala.; six grandchildren, three step grand-
children, five great-grandchildren, four step-great-
grandchildren; a sister, Myrtle Bush and her husband
Bryson of Niceville; his sister-in-law Kathryn Corbin of
Blounstown and several nieces and nephews.
General services were held May 5 at the funeral
home's Brickyard Road chapel in Chipley with the Rev.
James Vickery, Bro, Gerald Vickery and Bro. William
Watson officiating. Burial followed at Cypress Creek
Community Church Cemetery with Brown Ekneral
Home directing. Friends and family may sign the on-
line register at www. brownfh.net.


WEDNESDAY, MAY 13
CLOSED: Wausau Library.
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.-Holmes County Library open.
9 a.m.-6 p.m.-Chipley Library open.
1-6 p.m.-Vernon Library open
10 a.m.-12 p.m.-Holmes Council on Aging provides
hot meals and socialization.
10 a.m.-Sunny Hills Garden Club meets at the Sunny
Hills Community Center.
10 a.m.-2 p.m.-The Vernon Historical Society Muse-
um is open to the public every Wednesday from 10 a.m.
till 2 p.m. and meetings are the fourth Wednesday of the
month at 2 p.m.
11 a.m.-Washington Council on Aging (located in Chi-
pley) senior lunches, for reservations call 638-6217, do-
nations accepted.
Noon-Bonifay Kiwanis Club weekly meeting, held at
Simbo's Restaurant in Bonifay.
Noon-Chipley Woman's Club meeting, held at club
house.
1 p.m.-Line dancing, Washington Council on Aging in
Chipley
7 p.m.-Depression and Bipolar Support Group-meets
at First Baptist Church educational annex building in
Bonifay. Call 547-4397.
8 p.m.-Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, held at Ponce
de Leon Methodist Church, located on Main Street in
Ponce de Leon.

THURSDAY, MAY 14
CLOSED: Vernon Library
8 a.m.-Holmes County Library open.
9 a.m.-6 p.m.-Chipley Library open.
1-6 p.m.-Wausau Library open.
10 a.m.-noon-Holmes Council on Aging provides hot
meals and socialization.
10:30-11 a.m.-Chipley Library preschool storytime.
11 a.m.-Washington Council on Aging (located in Chi-
pley) senior lunches, for reservations call 638-6217, do-
nations accepted.
Noon-Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life
Assembly Fellowhship Hall, Chipley.
1-6 p.m.-Wausau Library open.
5:30 p.m.-Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, held at
1360 Foxworth Road in Chipley.
6-9 p.m.-GED Prep classes each Tuesday and Thurs-
day at Washington-Holmes Technical Center, 757 Hoyt
St. in Chipley.
6 p.m.-Wausau City Council meeting, held at city
hall.
6 p.m.-TOPS meeting, held at Mt. Olive Baptist
Church, located three miles north of Bonifay on Hwy. 79.
8 p.m.-Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, held at New
Hope Volunteer Fire Station, located on Highway 2 in
Holmes County.
8 p.m.-Narcotics Anonymous meeting, held at Blessed
Trinity Catholic Church in Bonifay.

FRIDAY, MAY 15
CLOSED: Wausau Library
8 a.m.-5 p.m.-Holmes County Library open.
1-6 p.m.-Vernon Library open
9:30 a.m.-1 p.m.-Chipley Library open.
10 a.m.-noon-Homes Council on Aging provides bin-
go, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and socializa-
tion.
11 a.m.-Washington Council on Aging (located in Chi-
pley) senior lunches, for reservations call 638-6217, do-
nations accepted.
8 p.m.-Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, held at
Presbyterian Church in Chipley

SATURDAY, MAY 16
8 a.m.-noon-Holmes County Library open.
CLOSED: Wausau Library, Chipley Library, Vernon
Library
8 p.m.-Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, held at Boni-
fay Methodist Church, Oklahoma Street Bonifay.

SUNDAY, MAY 17
8 p.m.-Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, held in the
board room at Graceville-Campbellton Hospital in
Graceville.

MONDAY, MAY 18
CLOSED: Holmes County Library, Wausau Library,
Vernon Library.
9 a.m.-6 p.m.-Chipley Library open.
10 a.m.-12 p.m.-Holmes Council on Aging provides
bingo, exercise, games, activities, hot meals and social-
ization
11 a.m.-Washington Council on Aging (located in Chi-
pley) senior lunches, for reservations call 638-6217, do-
nations accepted.
6-7:30 p.m.-Salvation Army Domestic Violence and

Ra tic vIonc spmort gup each ilnday he s et-:
ing will be held at the SADVP Rural Outreach office at
E461mSa Railroad A41enue apartment one, in Chipley. Call
7 p.m.-Esther Masonic Lodge #144, Bonifay.
8 p.m.-Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, held at
Blessed Trinity Catholic Church, located on Hwy. 177A,
Bonifay.

TUESDAY, MAY 20
8 a.m.-5 p.m.-Holmes County Library open.
9 a.m.-6 p.m.-Chipley Library open.
9 a.m.-6 p.m.-Vernon Library open.
1-6 p.m.-Wausau Library open.
11 a.m.-Washington Council on Aging (located in Chi-
pley) senior lunches, for reservations call 638-6217, do-
nations accepted.
Noon-Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, New Life
Assembly Fellowhship Hall, Chipley.
5:30 p.m.-Chipley Downtown Merchants Association,
827 Main Street
6-9 p.m.-GED Prep classes each Tuesday and Thurs-
day at Washington-Holmes Technical Center, 757 Hoyt
St. in Chipley.
6 p.m.-Holmes County School Board meeting.
8 p.m.-Narcotics Anonymous meeting, held at Blessed


Trinity Catholic Church in Bonifay.
8 p.m.-Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, First
Presbyterian Church, Chipley.


TALLAHASSEE The State
of Florida has opened a toll-
free telephone service where
residents can call to receive
health information about swine
flu.
The number for Florida resi-
dents to call is 1-800-342-3557.
The line will be staffed from 8
a.m. to 8 p.m. daily until further
notice. After hours calls will be
handled by an automated ser-
vice.
As Florida responds to swine
flu, the Florida Department of
Health off rs the following rec-

People with respiratory ill-
ness or fever should stay home
from work or school to avoid
spreading infections, including
influenza, to others in the com-
munity. .
Avoid close contact with peo-
ple who are coughing or other-
wise appear ill.
Avoid touching your eyes,
nose and mouth,


Wash hands frequently to
lessen the spread of respiratory
illness.
Symptoms of swine flu are
rapid onset fever, cough fatigue
and in some cases vomiting and
diarrhea.
If you think you have the flu,
please call your health care pro-
vider and discuss whether you
need to be seen in their office or
an emergency department, or
stay home.
Swine flu is not transmitted
by food and you cannot get swine

flTrlemS t nof Flrd kis r iv-
ing frequent updates from the
CDC, and working with local
health departments to monitor
the situation and immediately
follow up on suspected cases.
The Florida Department of
Health has created a webpage
with information at www.doh.
state.fl.us, and the CDC has
a Web page at www.cdc.gov/
swineflu.


GAINESVILLE Debby Folsom, Act-
ing State Executive Director for US-
DA's Farm Service Agency (FSA),
reminded farmers and ranchers
that the 2008 Farm Bill created five
new disaster programs, one of which
is the Emergency Assistance for
Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-
Raised Fish Program (ELAP).
ELAP provides emergency re-
lief to producers of livestock, honey
bees, and farm-raised fish to aid in
the reduction of losses because of
disease, adverse weather, or other
conditions, such as blizzards and
wildfires, as determined by the
Secretary, during the calendar
year, that are not covered by the
Supplemental Revenue Assistance
Payments Program (SURE), Live-
stock Indemnity Program (LIP),
and Livestock Forage Disaster
Program (LFP).
"Livestock, honey bee, and farm-
raised fish producers who have in-


curred 2008 and/or 2009 calendar
year losses not covered by SURE,
LIP and LFP are advised to begin
compiling their loss documentation,
if interested in ELAP" said Folsom.
"Livestock, honey bee, or farm-
raised fish producers must provide
FSA with verifiable documentation
for all losses for which compensa-
tion is wanted."
Producers shall be advised that
County Offices will not accept loss
documentation until their ELAP
applications are filed.
All types of losses for which live-
stock, honey bee, and farm-raised
fish producers may be compen-
sated for under ELAP will not be
known until the regulations for
ELAP are published in the Federal
Register.
Verifiable documentation must
include verifiable documentation
for purchased feed and or harvest-
ed feed documentation.


Honeybee producers who incur
physical losses of honeybees and
honeybee hives because of colony
collapse disorder must provide
documentation and/or a certifica-
tion that the loss of honey bees was
because of colony collapse disorder
from one or more of the following:
A registered entomologist; Co-
operative Extension specialist or a
Land Grant University.
Farm-raised fish producers who
incur physical losses of farm-raised
fish because of adverse weather or
other conditions must provide doc-
umentation of beginning inventory
on the beginning date of the ad-
verse weather event and the end-
ing inventory.
Additional information about
LDAP is available at FSA County
offices or by visiting the national
FSA Web site at http://www.fsa.
usda.gov/Internet/FSA_Notice/
Idap_2.pdf.


Obituaries

NINNA J. BROCK


Community

CALEN DAR


HOWARD E. MCGHEE


RUBY PENNINGTON


BETTY J. HALL


OLIN CORBIN


The~~ Floid Flu InomtinL

v il U 1 U 1 1VIan2l il .1


la JOShu l we




Ian Joshua Fowler was born
April 7 and weighed five pounds,
nine ounces and was 19 inches long.
Hisfoparent Cr Joshua EarlisFo le
Sheri. His brother Ethan and sister
Ashlyn welcomed him home. The
family is stationed in Fort Stewart,
Ga.
Ian's grandparents are Paula
Cuspid of Louisiana, Richard Fowl-
er and Lisa Davidson, both of Chi-
pley. His great-grandparents are
Donnie and Irma Glass and Billie
Ray and Wanda Corbin, all of Chi-
pley.


Emergency assistance for hivestock, honey

bees and farm-raised fish program (ELAP)





News BRIEFS


Wednesday, May 13, 2009


Local Washington


County News | Holmes County Times-Advertiser | B9


WEWAHITCHKA Gulf Coast
Electric Cooperative held
its 61st annual Members'
Meeting Saturday, April 25
at its headquarter office in
Wewahitchka. The purpose of
the meeting is to communicate
information about the
Cooperative, including the
financial reports and overall


business status, as well as serve
as a social event for the entire
membership. Nearly 1,000 people
attended the event this year.
For entertainment, Gulf
Coast Electric Cooperative
provided a bounce house for the
children and Wild Rose Ranch
and Rescue donated a petting
zoo. Music was provided by


Alicia Davis. Informative booths
were open for the duration of the
meeting, offering information
about the programs that GCEC
has to offer.
Each registered member
received a $10 electric bill
credit and coupons to redeem
at food booths run by local civic
organizations as fundraisers. In


addition, registered members
were entered in drawings to
win door prizes, including the
grand prizes, which were $100
electric bill credits and vacation
packages.
Gulf Coast Electric
Cooperative is part of the
Touchstone Energy@ national
alliance of local, consumer-owned


electric cooperatives providing
high standards of service to
customers large and small.
GCEC serves approximately
20,200 meters in Bay, Calhoun,
Gulf, Jackson, Walton and
Washington counties and in the
municipalities of Wewahitchka,
Ebro, White City, Lynn Haven,
Fountain and Southport.


As summertime
approaches and the sun's
rays become more and
more intense, people tend
to start sweating more
and wearing fewer clothes.
While your pets may be
stuck with their fur coats
year-round, there are
things that you can do to
get them ready for the
impending heat.
Dr. Mark Stickney,
DirectorofGeneralSurgery
Services at the Texas
A&M University College
of Veterinary Medicine
and Biomedical Sciences
explains that heat stroke in
pets is both dangerous and
preventable.
"With heat stroke an
ounce of prevention really
is worth a pound of cure,"
states Stickney. "Th~e
number one rule is tonever
leave your pet in your car,
even with
yourl ~'


window cracked. It
doesn't take a long time
or a particularly hot
temperature for a pet to
die in a parked car."
If you have an outside
dog or you play with your
dog outside, there are
many things you can do to
make sure your pet is cool
and comfortable.
First you need to assess
your pet's surroundings. If
you must keep
your pet outside make
sure they have plenty of
water and shade.
"Cold water is best
if possible. There are
devices that attach to the
faucet to automatically
fill your pet's water bowl.
These are nice because
they keep the water fresh,
cool and continuous," notes
Stickney. "However, if you
do get one of these devices,
just make sure you check it
regularly to make sure it is
working properly."
If you have an
exceptionally hairy dog it
is also time to cut their hair
and shave them down


for the summer.
"It is actually a good
idea to cut your dogs hair,
not only for comfort from
the heat, but also because
dogs with thick wooly hair
are prone to skin infections.
Shaving the fur down
lets the skin breathe and
reduces the occurrences of
these infections," explains
Stickney.
In order to acclimate
your pet to the summer
heat, Stickney suggests
introducing them to the
weather slowly.
"If you start taking
them outside a little longer
each day, it will work them
into the heat gradually and
help to reduce any negative
effects of the weather,"
says Stickney.
While you may take
every precaution in the
world, it is still possible
for your pet to get
overheated. If your
dog is standing and
panting then take a
break and get out
of the sun. (
"In order to


cool your dog down further
you can hose them down.
This cools them off really
quickly," advises Stickney.
"Another thing that helps
is to put rubbing alcohol on
the pads of their feet."
If your pet doesn't want
to move, is falling over or
having a seizure then it
probably has heat stroke
and it is time to get them to
the veterinarian as quick
as possible.
"Even if you think you
have it under control it is
imperative that
you get them to the
veterinarian," states
Stickney. "Heat stroke can
cause internal injury so it
is necessary that you nip it
in the bud."
As the weather gets
warmer bugs come out
in numbers as well so
it is important to make
sure that your yard
and your animals
are guarded
against these
insects.
"It's


strongly recommended
that you have your pets on
heart worm and flea and
tick prevention year-round,
but if they are not on them
already, it is definitely time
to do that now," suggests
Stickney. "This year looks
to be an exceptionally bad
year for fleas and ticks and
so you need to protect both
your pets and yourselves
from these pests."
Just as pets can suffer
from heat stroke like their
owners, they can also
suffer from sunburns as
well. Although their fur
protects them from a good
deal of the sun's harmful
rays, there are areas that
are exposed.


"Animals


are


susceptible to sun burns
on any area where fur is
particularly thin or where
there is no skin pigment,
like dogs with pink noses,"
notes Stickney. "I would
recommend a sun screen
that is specifically for pets.
These are formulated to
he safe if the pet licks them
off and are available at any
pet store."
Although summer
time does require a little
preparation for both you
and your pet, it is a good
time to get out and enjoy
each other's company. If
you are careful to protect
your furry friend from
the hazards of the season
then you can fun in the sun
together all summer long.
Pet Talk is a service of
the College of Veterinary
Medicine & Biomedical
Sciences, Texas A&M
University. Stories can
be viewed on the Web at
http://tamunews.tamu.
edu/.
Suggestions for future
topics may be directed to
editor @com.tamu.edu.


call Posie Vaughn, 956-
2502; Gordon Huggins, 956-
2688 or Pearl Thompson,
956-4537.

Covenant Hospite



MARIANNA Covenant
Hospice will hold its 4th
Annual Garden Gala from
6 p.m. to 9 p.m. June 27
at the National Guard
Armory, 3645 Hwy 90 West
in Marianna. Hosted by
WJHG's Neysa Wilkins,
the evening will include
dinner and dancing, silent


and live auctions, exhibits
and tasting plus much
more. The Silent auction
and hors d'oeuvres start
at 6 p.m. Tickets are $40
each or $75 per couple.
All proceeds will go to
support under-funded and
non-reimbursed special
programs at Covenant
Hospice.
For more information
about the event or
sponsorship opportunities,
contact Jennifer Griffin at
850-482-8520, 850-209-0221
or via email at jennifer.
griffin ecovenantho spice.
org._Also, visit our website
at www.covenanthospice.


org/mairanna.

0 er ation Militar
Kids camp
Operation Military Kids
and Florida 4-H are excited
to announce four different
weeks of camps especially
for kids who have parents
in active duty, guard and/or
reserve military branches.
The week-long camps
are held around the state
at Florida 4-H campsites.
Canoeing, swimming,
archery, games, campfires,
fishing, dances and so
much more are what kids


can look forward to during
OMK Camp.
OMK Camp for kids,
ages 8-12 will be held at
camp Ocala, located in
the Ocala National Forest,
June 22-26 and July 27-31
and July 13-17 at 4-H Camp
Tim oochee on the Destin
Bay in Niceville.
OMK Camp for kids
ages 13-18 will be held
at Camp Cherry Lake,
located in Madison, on
July 20-24.
Military kids, camp fees
are only $50 and include
three meals a day, camp
t-shirt, daily canteen and
lodging. Cabins at Camp


Ocala and Timpoochee are
air-conditioned.
For more information
on OMK Camp and to get a
registration form, contact
Julie Pigott Dillard at the
Washington County 4-H
Office at 850-638-6180.

T(( B00ft Of
Dire tors to mee
BONIFAY Tri County
Community Council Board
of Directors meeting
is scheduled for 6 p.m.
on Thursday, May 14 at
Simbo's Restaurant in
Bonifay.


Gulf Coast Electric holds annual meeting


PET TALK



Summer fun: Protecting your pet from the season's hazards


New Hope School
Reunion
NEW HOPE New Hope
School will hold its 17th
school reunion on May 30
at the New Hope Volunteer
Fire Department at
the Hwy 2 and Geneva/
Westville Road crossing in
Holmes County. Reunion
festivities begin at 10 a.m.
with a covered dish lunch
at noon. Be sure to take a
covered dish, tea or cold
drinks. Paper goods and
utensils will be furnished.
All former students are
invited to attend.
For more information,






H10B Washington County News/Holmes County Times-Advertiser Wednesday, May 13, 2009


'\YC~ 71 I 638-021221

A ne-.ue x may ma~umn *638-4242
CLASSIFIED ADS. Classified ads are published In the Wednesday Issues of the Washington Cou nty News, Holmes Cou nty Times-Advertiser, Weekly Advertiser and the Weekend Ed ition. Cost Is $6.50 per 5 ~ 91
week for the first 20 words, plus 25 cents per word for each word over 20.
Deadlines for Insertion, correction or cancellation are Monday at 12:00 Noon for the Weekly Advertiser, Holmes County Times-Advertiser and Wednesday News; Thursday at 12:00 Noon for the Weekend
Edition. The News/Times-Advertiser will be responsible for errors In the first Insertion only. Any errors after the first Insertion are the responsibility of the customer. Credit will be given on the first Insertion for errors
only for the portion of the ad In which they occur. ADS WILL BE PU BLISHED ONLY AFTER PAYM ENT RECEIVED. For your conven ience, you m sy charge your classified ads to your Visa or Mastercard. MAILING ADDRESSES
For ourConenince e Acep 1111111111111111111111111111111& IrsnHolmes County Times-Advertiser Washington County News
Fo YurCnvninc e ccpt &REACH OVER 40,000 READERS F011 AS LlWCLE AS $6.50 P.Bx6,onfyFL345P.ox27ChpyL3428


1100 -Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Notices
1120 Public Notices/
Announcements
1130 Adoptions
110- apsponAdss
1160 -Lost
'1170 -Found

1100
FORM OF ADVERTISE-
MENT FOR COMPLETION
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice Is hereby given that
Strickland Construction
Cno pCaonntr ctF' ana cC y
pleted the Contract for
Construction of
HOLMES COUNTY
EMERGENCY OPERA-
TIONS CH y0,Bol-
fay, FL32425
FOM ISS OLOMES CO N Y
fan Iha made request f
Contract. cl Ipersoonsahbaor
material, or otherwise In
conr ctlon withdthis proj-
ectsol Imme itey no-
HatchOM~ott MacDonald

1 5neA5L436526
Sto Van of nanasa c t
Inc. CONTRACTOR


SMORRIS TILE CO. Woonant





850 547-3816


If .u,. o :..n-,..-on~ ,u.. o -r
'"u nui'~ "-" hj t~ I .. t.. :tj


"c. c*. .:e


Hm:l 582-5424 Cell: 264-1793

Hm:l 592-401 adC II: 557-1889


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BILLY BROCK FARMS


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I I


Your Online Destination for


Local News and in ormation



The new Washington County News / Holmes County Times-

Advertiser website provides you with more local news than

ever before! We've enhanced the design, streamlined the

navigation and added lots of exciting new tools and services,
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| 1100 || 1100 |1 1100 || 1100 || 1100
2529 N Bonlta Ave., Pan- Summary Judgment of within 60 days after the fay Fl. 32425 for the SHIP Program to
ama City, FL 32405, Foreclosure entered in the sale. As published In the hold a Public Committee
(Business Address) above-styled cause, In the Witness, my hand and seal Holmes County Meeting at 10:00 a.m.,
As published In the Circuit Court of Holmes of this court on the 28day Times-Advertiser May 6, Thursday, May 14, 2009 at
Holmes County County, Florida, I will sell of April, 2009. 13, 2009. the Holmes County Board
Times-Advertiser April 29, the property situate In CLERK OF CIRCUIT NOIE I EEYof Commissioners Meeting
&May 6, 13, 20, 2009. Holmes County, Florida, COURT GIE.Room, 107 E. Virginla Ave-
described as: By Cindy Jackson nue, Bonifay, FL 32425.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Lt5ad6Blc DeuyCrkBetty J. McCallister The Meeting Is open to the
OF HE OUTEETHTOWN OF NOMA, FLOR- THIS INSTRUMENT PRE- 390HY2public. Interested parties
JUDCIL IRCITOFID, according tothe plan PARED BY GaeilF 24 may attend AHAC Meet-
TNHEA DTA OOF FHLOOR EAS fsre fsi onb Law Offices of Daniel C. hoau aer hereby notife Ings and be heard with re-
GOUNTY ~ P Habicorn In July 1902. Consuegra ttyou egibility t o spect to any proposed
COU IVINT located In Holmes County, 9204 King Palm Dmrve is In uestion. You are re- agenda Items. A copy of
CIVIL DVISIONFlorida, Section 27, Town- Tampa, FL 33619-1328 quired to contact the Su- the agenda Is available for
CT FINANCAO8-L 0E ~U Y shp7 North, Range 14 At nn y8sif 9 n 60 HvseCupblcn h sno-
SERVICES, INC. ADI codnewt h later than thirty(30) days
Plinif Lots 1,2,3,4, 7, and 8, American with Disabilities afethdteothspb
V KOW HERS DEI-Block P all In the TOWN Act of 1990, persons need- U~shinS Falilurde torsnnad
OF NOMA, according to Ing a special accommo-
SIGEES, GRAN ITEES,AS the plan of survey made dation to participate in this to fleiiiiyb h
SIGNEES, CRTEDITORS by P Habicorn In July proceeding should contact Supervisor and your name
LIENRSTRUTEE OF1902, Section 27, Town- the ASA Coordinator no will be removed from the
FAYAESEQ BSRANT L t7 I sa n4 Ir e ce nE stto ies dmvoter registra-
HEIR; TERRY BRANTLEY Fodahern maedplseDebble Wilcox Morris
HEIR; IF LIVING, INCLUD- T nlda:cl(8095-71TD)Holmes County Supervisor
ING AY UNNOWN1996 Skyline VIN or (800) 955-8770 (volce),
SPOUSE OF SAID8U6201201A 69440890 via Florida Relay Service. l...
DEFENEDANI() 0FR- 1 206SB4e40889VIN PIm pblished ioun --s -: I THRP~ SONS
CEASED, THE RESPEC- AKATmsdvrseMay6I -
TI IE NNOGWRNANH RS 94faEast White5Street 13, 2009.
ASESNGNEESACNRDEDITTOUR stpbd aet heh Legal Ad I 1 .
PRON DC|LAMIN HY cash eOn thlemFrsont Steps Howell nI esoh Sea MEn- EFRNEG THE HOLMES 80 3-f3
THROUGH. UNDER OR Corhue oia lo ay F. 32425. WIl hold a COUNT -'ABola F
AGNNSDTAN(SE) NAUENS Ida at 11:00 a.m., on May tphr mnt nftp~su cslnno OSRODRAB COHMOMUrTSE G0 5
KNOWN TENANT #1; UN- TE HS2DAOFfor non-payment, accord- (HC 80 4-76
OWN A~pril 2009. In1.to OFI Statute h8a3s ARTHHOSN NTA Open N Hours. Self.
OWN ~ ~ An T AN #4n srimn ho3 0 p 209 T VES) PRGARTNERSHIP Service, Nlo Deposlt,

NOTICE OF SALE dmeprpetyt oner asn olsrageea NOTICE IS HEREBY Ui~eaptd
Notice Is hereby given shdte of le las Buldn3unt15Toy GIVEN of the Intention of
that pusuan toa Fial ns, u a ImJohns: PO box 976 Bonl- the Holmes County AHAC








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| 1100 || 1100 |
(7) days prior to the meet- PUBLIC AUCTION
Ing at the SHIP Program
Office, 201 N. Oklahoma THE FOLLOWING VEHI-
St., Sulte 203, Bonifay, FL CLE WILL BE SOLD AT
32425 (850) 547-3424. PUBLIC AUCTION AT
Written communication EASTERN DIESEL &
may be sent to the above AUTO WRECKER SERV-
address. ICE, INC. 2005 S WAUKE-
BOARD OF COUNTY SHA BONIFAY FL AT8:00
COMMISSIONERS A.M. ON May 27, 09 FOR
OLFO DOALMES COUNTY, TOWING AND STORAGE.
FLOIDAV IN #
As published In the JM1BK143261476640
Holmes County 2006 MAZDA4 DR.
T mes Advertiser May 13, Charmaine L.Ard


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David M. Ard
1914 N. Hwy 79
Bonifay, FL
HSBC
PO Box 17902
San Diego,CA
EASTERN DIESEL AND
AUTO WRECKER SERV-
ICE, INC
As published In the
Holmes County
Times-Advertiser May 13,
2009.


ii


1300 Railroad Avenue
Chipley. Florida 32428
PUBLIC AUCTION
Every Monday
at 6pm!
SELLERS WANTED!
BUYERS NEEDED!
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Washington County News/Holmes County Times-Advertiser* Wednesday, May 13, 2009*11B 11

1110 22 | 32203300 1 4100 11 4100 4100 11 4100 11 4100 | 6110
COORSLL!100% LEATHER Living Healthcare 1BR Apartment In Chip-
COLR SLLS Rm Set, Lifetime Warranty LvnCr 10Domestic Want to sell or buy Avon? ley. Good location. No
Ge YurClssfid d on Hrwo Fam.years CNA exp r nce. Medical/Health Massage Therapist posl- Call 850-638-2965 or pets. 638-4640.
in NEW, still In crate. $629 .. eeecsaalbe loLive in Housekeeper or tron available for fast grow- 850-814-7966 Ask for MI-
COLOR! I805571.Cndlvr Re ebea al.Aso HealthCare housekeeper needed Ing business In Chipley Fl. chael, I am a Avon sales- 2BR/1%BA two-story Apt
Call now for details aaoue.Must have own transpor- C AsFx rsm o pro o et opt.6811
and be noticed! I A NEW Orthopedic KING More Info, 415-6636 Butterfly Rehabilitation tatIon. 850-333-8503. Washington Rehab & 954-862-5917. or 850-258-5521.
I638-0212 Imattress set In sealed A leading provider of Nursing Center, a signa-
or plastic. NEW-Full warranty. Rehabilitation Therapy ture facility, Is recruiting for LARGE 3BR/1BA apart-
547-9414 Sacrifice $349. Can de- Programs has the 3-11P1 Second shift: Sales/Business Dev ment over 960 sq. ft. $600,
1. - - - 4 lver. 850-222-7783 'per diem opportunities HealthCare an 1-a hr hf.I 1 0S/D $400. Downtown Chip-
B&B Furniture 1342 North | 331 aailblao Phscl IterimHealthcare o arBe lookng for are- Salesperson letcony nent o aion
RR Avenue, Chipley. We Occ national Ther pist. has an Immediate wadn n hlegn e xiigrdosain Ohrerator, city water, sewer,
un 680 lula LI~mS dON~aeAVAI BGL PT OnA~sa opA aand~ Ithe areerI slm ter cae aesoki oreran ag M te h or/cin gra srr3 pt
Cop leteas 5o pcln SolidyP Ope Mon-Sat.ce apnnfrea' nte w complete an y app ain. from, hoe.f Eartng up to- qualty customers s ervce | .80613 0 6
PETS ANIMLS Wod Ber ooe t w/-5701 Co vigo MuSO s i E-mailE Ilf Itretd In II 8063-64 RC i $0 analy alEanu t 10.ady
Dovetai Drawer. Brand Downtow Chile reh labiliatl68@ el- 5-42 eyec aendEOE, apl nd a D rug n Fre e d R andyn (478) 97-44 all (88-53103 2BRp cabin BAn pets
2100 Pels newl $599. Can deivr. 850-638-5050.Pln, l slouthlnet WokPac.$00m nh,1t adls
2110o -r Pels:y Free tos 850425837 or come by @7 W seb y Id ad #hp 34035965ns month.y Depsi required.t ne
u058913i eais Like New. Diningg room Marlnna FL.id 32446. Sout Bonifayit.W rk drrcvrcletto
Supplies, ulte,, breakfas table9130 N 'sIteuny Hls cmpeea ppiain with Experie ance A/C 2BR1B Houset forome rent..
2140et Pespvelo twoi barstoolst loveseat .ra W R.l .6 + and/orl Hwyl 77r Soth 3o miles offa
Wanted ho est dysulte Mae w Co igof-uic | 32 efiertonSevceH uso R al 3 -15
|oeti 2100rs Brn .eallal49@e I If ineese NOWa FO SL. *** 2BR/cbn1BA, House wthar
Bay Ciuha. | 3 3 oldhadytow zonpey 7.thne -5-8227 1..E~naru~ e Ra.....:72-44 In. bakyard. ear Kat
Ready Ma 11t h. Frst $5 Family Ya d S lie.a. Setto.W r Thc ar v I ,11610-Buies/S ih $ 650 month t Cand ll
8 ~ ~ ~ ~ 896855 7r -8womed $200 Ma 16th Tols buldn ergreen follage Fruit;t or .g<..u 5.. "'" 68373
suppies clths books ange coo,1 imee 10- ec etl
lact esp5-867 5th6 Stet. C ed .Ana Ilene., HeI es CC9-2621 t ameruein ate stc
2 2 1 30ptSu ple Lamb s le Marke & o8 al O e 1 0 ev l 2 mm Bonus M aln a ML H246 menuto All real saea vr ig
chcesangup ineas o a -e Friday,8- ast turayl atth e TrnslatNusey:T e Hol es o fCI 10-TmsaeR as teFi osn Actwhc
Inf Pl/Lvsorm ~antdtion callols 8-12. t~m Hwuy.7 Esu to, FL.e ofna saeo l t al o -C C BokeingI anBnfa Fridea, is serwekn 620- aato Retas mae ioth Ileg l t dertse
85-45298 woer family3 frls.Lt 151 Hwy 0 Chpe. awe.8mt p .Cl o l uhom o- Hnya ok uh oine needn o-or dscrnton bd ased on-15

aed2r MT sn e3 7-39or d lrhosT tr eDna euq~ Executiv Ofic S ac e ulteo tom t n hudipe-
Bay Ciuha. 1 3280e l 1.* 1-I uoa0 H oos ntaeecletvra for- d ren dowtow Chile bcyrimntin Feamia status
Ready~~Fon End Loaders One 5FmlyYr ande writte commnica All. util. Incl dv 638-191 Includes cih ildren umndrthe
shosLARR CAGLEd Excaator Noy jobh tools tionin sklls, mustge beit age of 18 lingca with parent

3100- Atiqes Doers, cLoaders, Headiner ande Vinyl, West Floridar Turf (850) buins mretn, ubi u
3120~~oud rs&Cat Cnat 40 elp Waned woka ou oeorEtbihe 90enei pu.Ti i n BS AE IN30 Bol Ow N I-u knowingy cept nyad

E quli pmen estimates.tlles Call anyime faire price Pickup. &n Delly-n Send o vmer leutte ofqal-bdr m $350 $470moaW nthd a ned thtIsd nga
3170 ~~~am ntl -vial Colctbe leave mesae (5)eyAalb .BlloM ry catons ndresue ono it tl & pest co~ntrl praevaabeoaeq l
318 3 Co ptr 63-75 (80)3-49 before Mayr 22. 209 o c.NwOwes ewy oprunt ais ocm
3190' -le Electonic chamber00 wfecanet sremode led Coe~t all: p ela ofdscrmat io cavltlslg
-o wSaoe Dcsd es e ite Ond Forue Retfrti hpe ewn ahn n a-Came oriao 8055-72HD tl-re a
3220~~~a untr in aeoss. fyo u Cleane Reaigur Holmes Countyof habe 1-0-69977 ThoOto-on etl hsnesae ssett
chcn Gara gue/Y als. don t aeteroaWe ate evc one allspan 0u y By%0 veu 1B medromaartmRent up- thol-far Hosnumb Irefo the
325 -God Tins o at Carpentry presur wash-a Don Lamar Tonsn make and models.Fre Bonifay Florida, 3242 stairs ine Boify kitchen, 1-800-927-927
3280 Machinery/ by so rde of: rates (850)638-449 547-3910 rWor an rsue f s houldng bare se 0gaoa
3290 4-32 e r icmelntipen Wam-rn ltone Bay & Okaloos CYoluntyn remerwecye 850-547-5244 llat

asso- Grass nt/Hote THRSAYMY2:9MCS ANUC MENTSPckupo i Acura Intgrsalltes 96i $650 Hronda o hi 10 1hndcp alla tt
3340ere -al Sporting0 Goods, OUTi OFes AREA REALn ognztn I rn o aE ySTAT pEf
3350 Tickets (Bu &oos Sell)at DEFUNAKSPINGS WALTON CO.ntontw Civic 96mnain $500!a Toyta amr 9
zo I yourt clsiida noe 0 monds Foadrs litngs callwte (800)366a- Alullc'6811 nldscide ne
a n t e d b B u y yee s r L a t e m o d e lda to&E e r g d ehrs C a t & D e e e F l o il dIa l N w r s eoaa d e f a ceh g o v 9 8 1 3 e x t 9 2 7 5 c c n e v e n i tt l y I a t e d i a n d rd d r
paitigs calAlShmd Oae s*Dessergraderd r s*Cat3Gdzer large-7382. rduewi u rushin cree wuith viewo of thiden
850-68-730 isdes Haliess tand Viy etFoiaTr 80 uiesmreig ulc 61
3100-Antiques~~~~$ Ecvtr Frety eain sl xperl-Ti newspaper Call HEATH


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HOLM ES COUNTY

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Sharon W. Sullivan (954)654-9899

IRS Public Auction June 3rd
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JUStice Center 2071 Ringling
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A12 | Holmes County Times-Advertiser


Local


Wednesday, May 13, 2009


sent as many players to college
and the pros in the last few years
as local 5A power Niceville.
That one example hardly
scratches the surface to show
the real problem.
You have to go back to 1982 to
find the last public school to win a
Class 1A baseball championship.
And that school, Ernest Ward
High School in Walnut Hill,
is no longer open. Jay won a
small school state baseball
championship in 1970 when Class
B was the lowest classification.
'Two public school champions


in a classification in 40 years is
not a level playing field.
Last fall five of the eight
state champions in football were
private schools.
Pahokee is a small public
school power with several state
titles, but even that is a bit
misleading. It is true that the
population of Pahokee is 6,000,
but it is located in Palm Beach
County, the third-most populous
county in the state with more
than 1.3 million residents.
I was able to tag along with
Baker head football coach and


athletic director Bob Kellogg
to the meeting of small school
coaches and administrators in
Graceville last week.
One football coach said he
had done some research and
found one perennial private
school football power that often
faces panhandle programs in the
playoffs has had more players
sign Division I scholarships than
all the small rural public schools
in the panhandle combined.
I'll take it a step further. In a
typical year most small private
schools will send more players to


big-time college programs than
all of the schools in Okaloosa
County combined. That's a school
of 400 students or so getting more
football scholarships than schools
with a combined population of
about 8,000.
The concerns raised in the
meeting aren't new to those in
this part of the state. What was
new was new FHSAA Executive
Director Dr. Roger Dearing
attended the meeting. Dearing
seemed to have a genuine
interest in putting some new
structure into the system.


Dearing warned it will take
time to make the desired changes,
and a first model for restructuring
things might not work.
At least he gave the small
public schools some hope that
brighter days are ahead.
Realistically there are no
easy answers to the problem.
In the long run Baker, Laurel
Hill and their small school
partners across the panhandle
need to feel they have a real
opportunity to compete.
It's past time to make it
happen.


"She's not just a good
player," said Bethlehem
High School Principal
Jerry Dixon. "She's a very
good kid."
Her high school bas-
ketball and softball coach
Joan Albury praised Tara
on her "tremendous work
ethic," and dedication to
physical well being. "She's
small in stature but she's
exceptionally strong," she
said. "This will help her
against the bigger oppo-
nents."
She said because of
this dedication to physical


upkeep that will allow her
to be encouraging to her
future patients. "She has
some high expectations
and works hard to achieve
them," she said. "She'll
have to maintain her ath-
leticism and those of oth-
ers and I know she'll do just
fine at both."
The coach of the Ala-
bama Southern Eagles, Ro-
salind Jennings, said that
she was impressed with
Thompson from the first
time she saw her play.
"I heard about Tara and
had to come down at see


her for myself," said Jen-
nings. "When I saw her
play there was no doubt in
my mind she was perfect
for our team."
She said she was im-
pressed with Tara's ability
to "play ball already in the
college level."
"She already has the
college body and mentality
and an excellent feel for the
game," she said. "I'm am
very excited about having
her on our team."
More photo coverage
online at chipleypapercom
and bonifaynow.com.


Newly inducted black belts Zachary Williams and Blake Gardner (front) pose
with Instructor Trainee, Terry Wilks and Instructor Phillip Byrd.


ATA StUdent5 receive black belts


GRACEVILLE 'Two area Taekwondo stu-
dents recently received the rank of first-
degree black belt at a special ceremony
held at the Black Belt Academy in the
Graceville/Poplar Springs area.
Zachary Williams and Blake Gardner
demonstrated a variety of skills, includ-
ing form demonstration, sparring, basic
techniques and oral questioning. The
belts were awarded after a minimum of
2%/ years of training.
Other black belts testing were second-


degree black belts Terry Wilks and Eric
Todd, who completed their third mid-term
testing toward third-degree black belt.
Color belts receiving new belts and
rank include: red belt: DJ Rock, brown belt
decided: Allison Williams, blue belt: Anna
Williams, green belts: Karen O'Steen, Can-
dace O'Steen, and Zachary Neitsch, camo
belt: Alex Sims and Levi Williams, yellow
belts: Perry Wells, Paisley Howell, Nathan
Johnson, orange belts: Haylee Hughes
and David Pearson.


(850) 526-7775
or
1 (800) 769-3429


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HOLMES

from page All
French singled off the
centerfielder's glove to open
the bottom of the inning and
took off on an errant throw,
sliding into third as an en-
suing throw bounced over
the fence, sending the Blue
Devil catcher home with the
winning run.
Coming off a 7-3 win over
arch-rival Chipley and a l9-
4 beating of host Marianna
towin t Cass 3A De%

found a tough opponent in
the team from Bratt.
The game was tied 1-
1 going into the bottom of
the seventh on an excellent
pitecsheros duelshetweenGH 11
and Northview's Brad Low-
ery.Lowery twice pitched out
of bases loaded situations.
Aaron Mollet got the win
in relief for Holmes County.
"Jesse pitched well and it
was time to go get the clos-
er, and Aaron has filled that
role for us for the last two
weeks," Dixon said.
"He's done a really good
job and done what he need-
ed to for us to be successful
and win," said Northview
Coach Sid Wheatly. "His
pitch count was getting up
around 100.
"It was a couple of big
plays."
Dixon noted that North-
view beat Holmes County
1-0 in 2000 when a Holmes
County throw ended up
OVer the first-base fence.
The Blue Devils scored
in the fifth when Travis
Mosely, who saved a run
with a diving catch to end
the previous inning, led off
with a single and dashed
home on a French single.
"I was running so fast I
didn't know my legs were
moving," Mosley joked.
Northview scored in the
sixth inning when Luke
Killian singled in a run.

stas Jse Gai an ly
ships Tuesday to play at
Wallace -Selma.MIore cov-
eTage Online at bonifaynow.
com or chipleypapercom.


O


IrT 1




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