Title: Garden of memory and hope
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100466/00001
 Material Information
Title: Garden of memory and hope
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Reyes, Yenlys
Publisher: College of Design, Construction & Planning, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2010
Copyright Date: 2010
 Notes
Abstract: The Garden of Memory and Hope aims to provide families, with special spaces such as: an outdoor chapel, private gardens, outdoor plazas, interactive trails for the community and outdoor open spaces to provide comfort and compassion to every person and family facing end-of-life. As a result, this new expansion and garden will help provide the community with a familiar space towards a compassionate and comprehensive approach for the families’ difficult journey. Aside from being designed to improve the life quality of the patients and loved ones by reducing the anxiety, pain and burdens that may accompany illness, these new spaces and facilities will support families during their difficult time and assist them in making the necessary adjustments to life without their loved ones.
Acquisition: Landscape Architecture capstone project
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100466
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: Permissions granted to the University of Florida Institutional Repository and University of Florida Digital Collections to allow use by the submitter. All rights reserved by the author.

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"1 found I could say things with color and shapes that I couldn't say
any other way things I had no words for"
Georgia O'Keefe



HOSP CE
OF9



CARE




GARDEN OF MEMORY AND HOPE
A NEW HEALING SPACE FOR HOSPICES

PREPARED BY:




CAPSTONE ADVISOR: LESTER L. LINSCOTT
SENIOR CAPSTONE PROJECT
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
SPRING 2010 -
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I would like to dedicate this entire book to the following individuals:

First and foremost I would like to extend my gratitude towards my advisor, Lester L. Linscott, who has been a
tremendous help and inspiration throughout my research and design process.

To my future husband, Adrian, for all of his support and strength in this stressful endeavor. I could not have done
this without your advice babe. I love you!

To my roommates, Nicole and Chelsea, who kept my sanity in check (via ice cream & salt 'n vinegar chips) and
suffered along with me.

To Camille, who saved me and my project from the dreaded computer lab.

Last, but not least, to my mother. For giving me purpose and the opportunity to become the person I am today.
Te quiero much mami!








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PROJECT OVERVIEW
PROJECT LOCATION
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES


OREGON BURN CENTER
JUPITER MEDICAL CENTER
PORTLAND MEMORY GARDEN
RICE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
SAN DIEGO HOSPICE AND PALLIATIVE MEDICINE
BRATTLEBORO AREA HOSPICE


BASE MAP
TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS
SOIL SURVEY
MICROCLIMATE STUDY
ADA DESIGN GUIDELINE RULES AND REGULATIONS
EXISTING CONDITIONS
SITE ANALYSIS
SITE SYNTHESIS
SITE AERIAL
DESIGN PROGRAM


PAGES 14-15
PAGES 16-17
PAGES 18-19
PAGES 20-21
PAGES 22-23
PAGES 24-25


PAGES 28-29
PAGES 30-33
PAGE 34
PAGE 35
PAGES 36-37
PAGES 38-41
PAGES 42-43
PAGES 44-45
PAGE 46
PAGE 47


PAGES 8-9
PAGE 10
PAGE 11


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CONCEPT #1
CONCEPT #2
CONCEPT #3
FINAL DESIGN CONCEPT
DECONSTRUCTED DIAGRAMS
SCHEMATIC MASTER PLAN


FINAL MASTER PLAN
MASTER PLAN (NIGHT)




PLAN VIEW ENLARGEMENTS
PERSPECTIVES
ENTRY SIGN CONCEPT


PAGES 50-51
PAGES 52-53
PAGES 54-55
PAGES 56-57
PAGES 58-59
PAGES 60-61
PAGES 62-63
PAGES 64-65




PAGES 68-73
PAGES 74-77
PAGES 78-79


MATERIALS BOARD
MATERIAL ENLARGEMENTS (AREA SPECIFIC)
LIGHTING PLAN ENLARGEMENTS


PAGES 82-83
PAGES 84-91
PAGES 92-93


CONCLUSION AND FINAL THOUGHTS


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PAGES 96-97


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
. REFERENCES
..,APPENDIX
:. POWERPOINT PRESENTATION


PAGE 100
PAGE 101
PAGES 102-103
PAGES 104-105





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PROJECT OVERVIEW ................PAGES 8-9

PROJECT LOCATION................PAGE 10

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES..........PAGE 11


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MISSION STATEMENT
The Garden of Memory and Hope aims to provide families, with special spaces such as: an outdoor chapel, private gardens,
outdoor plazas, interactive trails for the community and outdoor open spaces to provide comfort and compassion to every person and
family facing end-of-life. As a result, this new expansion and garden will help provide the community with a familiar space
towards a compassionate and comprehensive approach for the families' difficult journey. Aside from being designed to improve the life
quality of the patients and loved ones by reducing the anxiety, pain and burdens that may accompany illness, these new spaces
and facilities will support families during their difficult time and assist them in making the necessary adjustments to life without their
loved ones.

PROJECT OVERVIEW
The Halifax Health Hospice of Volusia/Flagler has been the respected leader in end-of-life care since 1979 for Volusia and Flagler
counties. They are a non-profit organization which is committed to providing extraordinary and dignified comfort and compassion to
every person and family facing end-of-life.

Their goal for care is simple: to provide expert and compassionate end-of-life care to patients and families. They help improve the
quality of the lives of their patients and loved ones by reducing the anxiety, pain and burdens that may accompany illness.

PROGRAMS AND SERVICES OFFERED

The Halifax Health Hospice of Volusia/Flagler works with the community to educate and generate awareness about their programs,
services, and patient care.
Their outreach programs include:
Memorial ceremonies
Designed to honor those loved one who have passed away.
Memorial celebrations
"Celebration of life" Special services held for family member about their loved ones.
Education workshops
Designed to provide educational workshops for the community about end-of-life related topics.
Ambassador program
Community outreach volunteers participate in all parts for their community outreach programs .
Spiritual outreach
During Fall and Spring of each year, the hospice hosts the "celebration of life" ceremonies. This ceremony consist of ':":
special memorial services to honor those who have recently passed away. Furthermore, through their multi curt :rl 1 .Il
outreach program, they ensure all people have access to their offered services. Ultimately, they wish to ensure that end-of-lIiffi'e'.
decisions are made by the patient and their families.

8_______________________* *_ ** --









Programs offered:

Medical Care
Nursing Care
Personal Care
Emotional Care
Spiritual Care
Volunteer Assistance

GRIEF SUPPORT AND COUNSELING

The facility offers a compassionate and comprehensive approach for the families' journey. With over 30 years of experience, they have
developed services to support families during their difficult time and assist them in making the necessary adjustments to life without their
loved one.

Understanding grief and loss
Helps family members with the process of grief and loss
Traumatic loss
Offers help to county residents who have experiences loss due to homicide, accidents, suicides, and/or any other tragic death.
Children's grief centers
Helps children deal and understand loss of their loved one
Camp begin-again
Established in 1993, this camp is designed for children to deal with grief and loss of their loved one.

EXISTING SITE

Presently, the existing site size is approximately 3 acres. The facility consists of 18 patient rooms, all of which have a view to an
available green area and/or the existing retention area. Furthermore, there are common rooms such as: music/living room, kid's rooms,
dining room, sitting rooms, paved courtyards, chapel, staff lounge, common kitchen and a spa area for aromatherapy treatment.

My design plan is to use the existing site with future plans for expanding an additional 11 acres. Important proposed features to include
are:
Outdoor spaces/gardens Straightforward pedestrian circulation
Outdoor plazas Pet area
Outdoor gathering space "Memory" area
Outdoor chapel


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PROJECT LOCATION

WVCC Halifax Hospice Care Center
1625 Veteran Memorial Parkway ;a
Orange City, FL 32141

The existing site is located in Volusia County, Orange City in the
State of Florida. It is South of a multi-use park and Eait of a Water 1 .
Treatment Facility. Veteran's Memorial Parkway runs adjacent to
the property and it is the main road access for the site.










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GOAL NUMBER I
DeveloD a multi-use space for families to share their experience and/or memories of their loved ones


Provide
Provide
Provide
Provide
Provide


usable outdoor spaces
outdoor chapel area
outdoor plazas
outdoor gardens
"memory walk" and/or plaques, bricks as memorable elements


GOAL NUMBER 2
Demonstrate how to successfully integrate calming capabilities while enhancing patient experiences within a therapeutic garden


Provide
Provide
Provide


didactic areas
signs/labels for staff to share with patients while outdoors
white noise through the use of retention areas or smaller water elements throughout the gardens


GOAL NUMBER 3
Develop a strong integration between outdoor and indoor spaces for patients and staff to feel comfortable and at peace with their
surroundings

Provide sufficient shade structures for effective outdoor use
Provide outdoor plazas for staff/visitor use
Provide integration between outdoor areas and facility seating areas through ideal placements via viewsheds

GOAL NUMBER 4
Provide efficient wav-findin2 for vehicular access and Dedestrian circulation


Consolidate parking to simplify vehicular movement through site
Improve signage to improve wayfinding
Follow ADA Design Guidelines throughout the site for easy access

GOAL NUMBER 5
Provide peaceful surroundings for patients and staff


Provide outdoor "pocket" gardens for individual use
Provide outdoor plazas for staff/visitor use
Use therapeutic plants throughout for relaxing and comforting surroundings


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OREGON BURN CENTER....................................................PAGES 14-15
JUPITER MEDICAL CENTER ......... ................................ PAGES 16-17
PORTLAND MEMORY GARDEN.........................................PAGES 18-19
RICE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL...............................................PAGES 20-21
SAN DIEGO HOSPICE AND PALLIATIVE MEDICINE..............PAGES 22-23
BRATTLEBORO AREA HOSPICE..........................................PAGES 24-25


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HISTORY AND OVERVIEW

Oregon Burn Center
3001 N. Gantenbein
Portland, Oregon 97227
503-413-4232

This 9,000' sq. garden was opened in 2004 and aside from winning first place in the therapeutic garden design awards and
being featured in the April 2008 landscape architecture magazine, it was also the country's first healing garden designed for
burn patients.

The garden is enclosed on two sides by a two-story building (rooms for burn patients are on the first floor looking into the
garden). The garden also incorporates two shade structures with steel roofs and moveable garden furniture, which create the
perfect setting for physical therapist who work outside with patients and/or for visiting family groups to gather. Moreover, it
also offers a variety of walking surfaces and slopes for recovery purposes. This space is highly used by staff members while on
break due to its accessibility and ease of seating elements throughout the site.

Plant diversity provides a constantly changing vista from different angles due to the visual interest provided by the variety in
color, texture, massing and height of the selected plants. Furthermore, to enhance the sensory experience for patients; bird
feeders, wind chimes, labels and small water elements were placed throughout. It is an exemplary case of a health care outdoor
space created with the needs of a particular patient group in mind and the views of clinical staff and patients are incorporated
into the design process,

Important factors to consider:

Moveable seating provides a level of familiarity and comfort for users
Shade structures allow for the space to be pleasant at any point in time
Smaller element (i.e. Bird feeders, water elements) help to distract patients and add character to the space
Labels although engaging can be a detriment if used too often throughout
The black fence surrounding the space feels too constricted and visually harsh





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Elevation Details
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Water Feature Detail


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HISTORY AND OVERVIEW

Jupiter Medical Center
1210 South Old Dixie Hwy.
Jupiter, FL 33458
(561)747-2234

This small scale design consists of a series of garden spaces connected by paths and paving. This garden offers a variety of
spaces to choose from; accommodating the privacy of two people sitting alone to a group of twenty staff members. Moveable
furniture allows visitors to modify space according to their needs. The garden also gives a beautiful view of nature as well as
provides an attractive destination for additional exercise with looped walks under mature trees and flowering shrubs.

Rehabilitation elements including a putting green, enabling bridge, steps and gravel paths allow for outdoor strengthening
exercises. The goal of the Jacqueline Fiske Healing Garden is to foster the physical, mental and spiritual restoration of patients,
visitors and staff by distracting from the medical setting. A series of garden spaces connected by paths create a tranquil and
sheltered environment. The garden can be seen from inside the cardiopulmonary rehabilitation center exercise room and
offers an alternative outdoor route between hospital units and seating areas for visitors, patients and staff.


Important factors to consider:

Central focus is a calming pool of water that can be touched and provides a soothing sound.
A sculpture of a pair of rising herons by a local artist provides a healing metaphor in the fountain.
A large arbor provides a sheltered meeting place and a shaded transition area from indoors.
Individual seating arrangements makes it accessible and personable.









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Water feature detail


Pergola With Water Feature


Pergola With Water Feature


Entry "

Overall Master Plan


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HISTORY AND OVERVIEW

Portland Memory Garden
Se 104th Ave & SE Powell blvd.
Portland, Oregon 97266
(503) 292-2912

The purpose of this medium sized garden is to maintain and support the 'memory garden' as a safe and restorative
environment for all who visit; particularly, elders living with memory disorders. This garden provides respite and educational
activities for caregivers and patients alike. The garden includes four seasons of plants and flowers in raised beds that have been
chosen to stimulate the senses and to spark past memories, as well as provide an accessible circular pathway and visual landmarks.

The design is meant to create new memories, as well as bring back fond memories from the past, the garden is a beautiful place
for anyone to visit and for those with Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia, there are special features throughout the space.


Important factors to consider:

The entry to the garden provides a slightly raised overlook area that allows visitors to preview the layout of the
entire garden before entering.
There are many places to just sit and enjoy the garden.
Memory garden plantings evoke childhood memories. Many plant varieties common in older gardens are
featured to spark pleasant memories of the past.
The rich botanical collection provides four seasons of sensory stimulation, including plants that are interesting to
look at, touch and smell.










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Open Green Space and Pergola
Open Green Space and Pergola ...


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Green Space and Hardscape


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HISTORY AND OVERVIEW

Rice Memorial Hospital
301 Becker Ave. SW
Willmar, MN 56201
(320) 235-4543

This proposed medium sized healing garden will be home to trees, plants, flowers, sitting areas, a fountain and other naturally
inspiring scenery. This space will provide a unique environment of beauty, silence and serenity the kind that nurtures the
body, mind and spirit. It will be a place to experience the outdoors as the seasons change providing a place to think, pray,
grieve, hope, give thanks and remember. It will be located on the hospital's campus and will be easily viewed and accessed
from the main entrance as well as the parking lot. The garden will be home to trees, plants, flowers, sitting areas, a fountain
and other naturally inspiring scenery. A respite and a place of solitude; not just for their patients, but also for their families and
staff. It will also will provide a unique environment of beauty, silence and serenity the kind that nurtures the body, mind and
spirit. It will be a place to experience the outdoors as the seasons and world change around us. The garden will be a place to
think, pray, grieve, hope, give thanks and remember.

Important factors to consider:

Water feature use important for white noise and calming capability
Multi-use space for patient, family and staff
Easy access and visually accessible
Good integration of space (healing and context)












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Walkway


Planter Details


\Vtater Feature Detail


Seating Areas


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HISTORY AND OVERVIEW

San Diego Hospice and the Institute for Palliative Medicine
4311 Third Avenue
San Diego, CA 92103
(619) 688-1600


This medium sized garden is composed of mostly hardscape elements with planters, potted plants and accent trees. Their
garden space consists of many "lasting gifts" for family members to remember their loved ones. These include the Thousand
Words Tribute, the Memorial Point Tribute, the Pillars of Inspiration, the Wall of Tribute and the Tribute Garden. All of these
are donations made to their facility by family members.


Important factors to consider:

Memory element are the driving force behind the design
Unique ideas (such as plaques in columns, brick along paths, small details along the retaining wall)
Not enough shade, especially along the thousand words tribute
Family involvement has been influential in the design












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Wall of Tribute Detail


Memorial Point


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HISTORY AND OVERVIEW

Brattleboro Area Hospice
191 Canal Street
Brattleboro, Vermont 05301
(802) 257-0775


This medium size garden is a Memorial Garden for all members of the Guildford Street Community in Brattleboro.
Community members can plant significant flowers, plants and trees, and use this garden space in memory of their loved ones.
This unique ability allows for this public garden to demonstrate great opportunities for expansion and improvement. It also
aids family members through their grieving process in a community-type setting.


Important factors to consider:

Memory elements are unique
Plant design (variety and color) are attractive and organic in nature
Somewhat simple design meant more as a community setting for volunteers














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Planting Samples


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BASE MAP................................................................................PAGES 28-29
TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS.......................................................PAGES 30-33
SO IL SURVEY........................................................................ PAGE 34
MICROCLIMATE STUDY......................................................PAGE 35
ADA DESIGN GUIDELINE RULES AND REGULATIONS..........PAGES 36-37
EXISTING CONDITIONS................................................... PAGES 38-41
SITE ANALYSIS.................................................................... PAGES 42-43
SITE SYNTHESIS ................................................................... PAGES 44-45
SITE AERIAL........................................................................ PAG E 46
DESIGN PROGRAM.... ......................................................PAGE 47
















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SITE TOPOGRAPHY (Natural)



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EXISTING SITE TOPOGRAPHY (Post-Construction)



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SITE TOPOGRAPHY (Natural)
Sketchup 3D


EXISTING SITE TOPOGRAPHY (Post-Construction)
Sketchup 3D


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LEFT Topography before
construction with facility for
reference.

BELOW Topography after
construction with facility and
constructed retention area.







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LEFT Topography before -
construction with facility for
reference.
Delineating important features.

BELOW Topography after
construction with facility and
constructed retention area.
Delineating important features.


SITE TOPOGRAPHY (Natural)
Sketchup 3D












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Sketchup 3D


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TYPES OF SOIL


2 Apopka fine sand, 5 to 12 percent slope-
4 Astatula fine sand, 0 to 8 percent slopes
8 Basinger fine sand, depressional
17 Daytona sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes
22 Electra fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slope.
32 Myakka fine sand
37 Orsino fine sand, 0 to 5 percent slopes

43 Paola fine sand, 8 to 17 percent slopes
60 Smyrna fine sand
99 Water
poor topsoil quality

Map Unit Setting

Elevation: 10 to 150 feet
Mean annual precipitation: 53 to 61 inches
Mean annual air temperature: 66 to 73
degrees F
Frost-free period: 285 to 315 days

ProDerties and qualities


Slope: 0 to 8 percent
Depth to restrictive feature: More than 80
inches
Drainage class: Excessively drained
Capacity of the most limiting layer to
transmit water (Ksat): Very high .,..
(19.98 to 50.02 in/hr)
Depth to water table: More than 80 inches
Frequency of flooding: None
Frequency of ponding: None
Maximum salinity: Nonsaline (0.0 to 2.0 mmhos/cm)
Sodium adsorption ratio, maximum: 4.0
Available water capacity: Very low (about 2.4 inches)


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IMPORTANCE:

Building Orientation (Future ExDansion)


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Eastern exposure would be best for patient rooms,
common space areas, etc...

Western exposure would be best for offices and/or minor
spaces not used by patients.

Human Comfort

Eastern exposure (in the morning) allows a comforting
warming without receiving too hot exposure from after-
noon to evening sun

Planting Design

A combination of shade and sun loving plant is
important to maintain a diverse plant palette which
patients, staff and visitors can enjoy throughout the
year.















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ACCESSIBLE ROUTE
STANDARDS


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SPACE ALLOWANCE AND
REACH RANGES


CLEAR FLOOR OR
GROUND SPACE


ACCESSIBLE ROUTE
STANDARDS


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SIDE REACH


These guidelines were important to the proposed design since all of
my design has to be handicap accessible for all patients and/or family
members. Reaching capabilities also played an important roles,
especially for my didactic areas within the garden areas.


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. FORWARD REACH. 122
S,". FORWARDD REACH


These guidelines are for accessibility to places of public accommodation
and commercial facilities by individuals with disabilities. These guidelines
are to be applied during the design, construction, and alteration of such
7 buildings and facilities to the extent required by regulations issued by
-Federal Agencies, including the Department Of Justice, under the
Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990.

Importance:
48
For this project these guidelines will become very important for my final
design since it will be easily accessible for all patients, staff members and
visitors to the facility.
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PARKING LOT (IMPERVIOUS)


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2. OVERFLOW PARKING (PERVIOUS)


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Currently, the site is 2.990 acres (130,234' sq) with the Hospice
Facility covering 0.663 acres (28,875' sq)

The existing facility consists of 18 patient rooms, all of which have a
view to an available green area and/or the existing retention area.
Furthermore, there are common rooms such as: music/living room,
kid's rooms, dining room, sitting rooms, paved courtyards, chapel,
staff lounge, common kitchen and a spa area for aromatherapy
treatment.

These images portray existing conditions on site.

1. Parking Lot (Impervious)
2. Overflow Parking (Pervious)
3. Facility Entrance






















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5. PATIENTS AREAS


6. RETENTION AREA


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For the purpose of this project I plan to re-evaluate the existing
facility and propose an expansion plan totalling in an additional 11
acres Making the projected site approximately 14 acres.

These images portray existing conditions on site.

4. Main Entrance Sign
5. Patient Areas
6. Retention Areas






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GOOD VIEWS


BAD VIEWS


CONNECTION
POSSIBILITY


STAFF AREA



FACILITY ENTRANCE



MAIN ENTRANCE

PRIMARY ROAD

EXISTING SIDEWALK

BUFFER NEEDED


kJ^ EXTEND BUFFER ZONE

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OVERVIEW: '

Through my analysis, I was able to determine specific areas, points and elements in the existing site. One main road (Veteran's
Memorial Parkway) acts as the only adjacent and main road which leads to the entrance of the facility. The entrance leads you to the
existing parking which is both pervious and impervious. A main covered entrance forms the main focus to delineate the main entrance to
the building. A man-made retention are covers almost half of the site located along the North-West side of the facility. A small buffer zone
is present designing the edge of the property along all sides of the site.

FINDINGS:

OPPORTUNITIES:
Good views are attained throughout all 18 patient rooms via window/doors form floor to ceiling.
Bad view is located near the north-east side of the building where it looks to the waste container.
Buffer is minimal and sporadic
Retention area offers potential for softer edge via site elements
Definite connection with proposed expansion due to minimal buffer zones

CONSTRAINS:
Building orientation in not best for human comfort
Architectonic nature of the retention area
Buffer is minimal and sporadic
Entry sign difficult to see














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^ CONNECTION POSSIBILITY FACILITY ENTRANCE
M EXISTING SIDEWALK
rt EXTEND BUFFER ZONE 0 STAFF AREA
( BUFFER NEEDED


v MAIN ENTRANCE
lmo PRIMARY ROAD
*Uft OPPORTUNITY FOR SECONhARY
ROAD/ENTRANCE ,,
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OVERVIEW:

The proposed site expansion consists of a predominately pine vegetation. Which
mostly consists of slash pine and long leaf pine (possible replanting for Long
Leaf Pines with 4-5" caliper due to environmental importance). A service road,
running west to east offers potential for secondary road and entrance for the
expansion.

*Refer to Analysis overview for Existing Site Details.

FINDINGS:

OPPORTUNITIES:
Potential service road to be re-used as secondary road and entrance
Buffer potential for all sides of the property
S- Better building orientation for future facility based on research
Cohesive connections of existing site and proposed site.
Ability to create smaller pockets of spaces due to site length

CONSTRAINS:
Site length can be problematic
Only one main road is adjacent to property








HIGH VISUAL ENERGY





POOR VISUAL ENERGY

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Above Existing Site With Adjacent Context (Zoomed In) Map
Base By Google Earth

Left- Existing Site With Proposed Expansion And Adjacent Conte '.S""
Map Base By Google Earth


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DIAGRAM 1

ELEMENTS to include:
Outdoor Spaces/Gardens
Outdoor Gathering Spaces
Outdoor Plazas
Outdoor Chapel
Pet Area
"Memory" Area
"Memory" Walk
Straightforward Pedestrian Circulation
Visitor Spaces
I i. Retention Area (White Noise Elements)
"" Bigger Staff Area
.. .. .


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proposed facility for better understanding relationships between users.
Diagram Illustrates typical diagram placement.
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CONCEPT #1........................................ PAGES 50-51
CONCEPT #2..........................................PAGES 52-53
CONCEPT #3...................................... PAGES 54-55
FINAL DESIGN CONCEPT.................PAGES 56-57
DECONSTRUCTED DIAGRAMS...............PAGES 58-59
SCHEMATIC MASTER PLAN..................PAGES 60-61
FINAL MASTER PLAN...........................PAGES 62-63
MASTER PLAN (NIGHT).......................PAGES 64-65


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VETERANSS MEMORIAL PARKWAY
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MAIN ROAD


PROPOSED SECONDARY ROAD

PROPOSED SECONDARY ENTRANCE
EXISTING MAIN ENTRANCE


PROPOSED BUILDING ENTRANCE

PROPOSED PEDESTRIAN CONNECTION


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DESCRIPTION:


For this concept the existing site remains the same, except for a
secondary accessible road which connects both sites internally and
leads to the secondary entrance and road located on the southern
part of the property (aligned with an allee of trees). The site will be
connected through a "memory walk" with possible site elements
such as arbors and/or canopy and transects other spaces such as:
the pet area, outdoor plazas, outdoor gardens, outdoor chapel
and outdoor gathering space. This walk will end in a retention
area which can be used as an amenity by the open spaces adjacent
to it and also serve as the focal/end point to the "memory walk".
The proposed building will face the secondary road and will
have an entry plaza for patient drop-off. Each patient room will
also receive a view of the secondary retention are south of the
proposed building along with the proposed staff area. The site
will be contained by a natural buffer which will serve as a more
natural setting for patients, staff and visitors while using the site.

CONSTRAINTS:

Concept geared mostly toward visitors Not patients somewhat
disjointed in design


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SCALE = 50'-
SCALE 1" = 50'-O"
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DESCRIPTION:

4 For this concept the existing site remains the same and the
main road (Veteran's Memorial Parkway) will serve as the only
access for the main entrance and the secondary entrance into
the property located on the southern side. The proposed
buildings (2) will be adjacent to the secondary road and will
TEN have a main entry/pedestrian connector for the site (also seen at
,......A the northern end where existing site ends and proposed begins).

A big retention area will serve as the main focus for
EXl IN patients and the proposed staff area at the southern end of the
'BUILD"I. property. The bigger green space in the middle of the design will
have a dual purpose for the outdoor chapel and the outdoor
:. Gathering space surrounded by canopy making it a semi-formal,
somewhat enclosed space. The "memory walk" will surround
this space and will be adjacent on the east/west side by outdoor
garden spaces. At the junction of the existing and proposed site
a proposed green area will serve as a connector. The site will
EXISTING PARKING be contained by a natural buffer which will serve as a more
natural setting for patients, staff and visitors while using the site.

CONSTRAINS:
Parking is somewhat inaccessible
Garden spaces are constrained
Weak connection between existing and proposed site







SCALE 1"= 50'-0"


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MAIN ROAD


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EXISTING MAIN ENTRANCE


PROPOSED BUILDING ENTRANCE

PROPOSED PEDESTRIAN CONNECTIONS


PROPOSED SECONDARY ENTRANCE/ROAD


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DESCRIPTION:

. .For this concept the existing site remains the same and the
main road (Veteran's Memorial Parkway) will serve as
the only access for the main entrance and the secondary
entrance into the property located on the southern side.
SED G The proposed building will become two separate buildings
NTI for maximum use and architectural interest while also
P. ET..'AR .. providing a pedestrian connector between them and the
AR :. other areas.

EXISTING A retention area will serve as a focal for both buildings and
patient rooms. Smaller gardens will surround the more


CHA ,and gathering space surrounded by an allee of trees. The
"Memory Walk" will surround this space with possible
shade structures. A third retention area will serve as the
main connector between the existing and the proposed
ARE EXISTING PARKING site with another pedestrian connector. Smaller garden
areas will surround the property along with strategically
placed outdoor plazas near the proposed buildings for staff
and visitor use. The site will be contained by a natural buffer
which will serve as a more natural setting for patients, staff
and visitors while using the site. This concept also allows for
possible phases for a more feasible project.

CONSTRAINS:
Smaller gardens to accommodate more retention
Retention areas may exceed need




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For my final design concept I incorporated all the important
elements and features from previous concepts, but made
the garden spaces more personable and connected. The
existing/proposed retention area will serve as the main anchorto
connect both sites and make the site flow seamlessly
without interruptions. Garden areas will be the main focus
incorporating in-ground garden areas for all individuals to
learn about the plants while touching, smelling and feeling
them. Furthermore, each garden will provide enough shade
EXISTING/IPROPOSt and seating by means of shade structures, seating walls/
RETENTION AR~ EXISTING planters and/or moveable furniture. The proposed building
BUILDING will consist of an expansion of the existing Hospice as well
as an Assisted Living Facility which will give its community
members more of a reason to come to this site and enjoy being
with family members while outdoors. The proposed parking
will be completely permeable and will provide ample parking
spaces (57 total) for staff and family events. Plaza/staff areas
will be close to each proposed building to give staff easy access
to the outdoors. Further open space will be incorporated via
smaller pathways which will also incorporate seating, shade
and plenty of open space for families to enjoy.

This concept will allow for didactic learning, easy
access to all garden areas, provide plenty of open space
for larger families and provide the community with a
Hospice facility as well as an Assisted Living Facility for
any member of the community to enjoy with their family.





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PROPOSED -1
SITE (-11 ACRES)


1. EXISTING/PROPOSED AREA DIAGRAM


Zoookmi eAA.Aci (Dn


VEGETATIVE MASS

BUILDING
MASS


3. BUILDING/VEGETATIVE MASS DIAGRAM


PLAZA
GARDEN AREAS
AREAS

PLAZM'.TAFFAR
AREA


PLAZA., STAFF
AREA'
GARDEN
AREAS


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2. GARDEN/PLAZA AREA DIAGRAM


58


4. VEHICULAR/PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION DIAGRA: :,,:
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PEDESTRIAN
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VEHICULAR
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PEDESTRIAN
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5. PRELIMINARY WATER RUNOFF DIAGRAM


SOFTSCAPE
(EXISTING PROPOSED) .
HARDSCAPE
(PROPOSED)

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PERVIOUS PAVEMENT-
(PROPOSED)


SI.:6.OFTSCAPE/HARDSCAPE DIAGRAM

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6. SOFTSCAPE/HARDSCAPE DIAGRAM
This diagram showed the impact between hardscape
(proposed) and softscape (existing). Preserving most of the existing
canopy was key to help reduce water runoff and environmental
impact. 59


.. ,* ,
1. EXISTING/PROPOSED AREA DIAGRAM
This quick diagram aided my understanding the difference in
size between the existing and proposed site. It gave me insight to
design the proposed site at a more human scale to make the space
seem smaller and personable.

2. GARDEN/PLAZA AREA DIAGRAM
This diagram helped me place my garden areas and plaza
areas. Plazas are closer to building facilities for easy access by staff
and garden areas scattered throughout with winding pathways for
further human interaction.

3. BUILDING/VEGETATIVE MASS DIAGRAM
This diagram helped determine the placement of my
proposed building so as to not impact the existing vegetation. Based
on my Synthesis and Analysis map, I utilized the dirt road as the
secondary entry road between both buildings.

4. VEHICULAR/PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION DIAGRAM
This diagram helped me to incorporate pedestrian flow
through the site via walkways and pathways (all handicap accessible)
for easy and direct movement. Moreover, it helped me to design a
more pedestrian oriented space.

5. PRELIMINARY WATER RUNOFF DIAGRAM
This diagram aided me to demonstrate runoff for my proposed
design. After determining my garden and plaza areas, this diagram
offered insight to reducing the size of each area and pedestrian
pathway. Reducing their size would reduce runoff and make my
design fit better with my original idea of making each space
at a more human scale.




















































60" -



60












































































Placing my final concept within the existing conditions and canopy

truly helped me ti envision my plan. Based on my research and my

deconstructed diagrams, I was able to refine and produce my Final

Master Plan.


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EI EI~N iT I


This plan displays the overall
SLighting Plan to be utilized.
However, to conserve energy,
lighting zones are to be
designated (See Pages 94-95 for
Lighting Plan Enlargements and
designated zones) which can be
self-sufficient and be personalized
depending on staff and/or patient
needs.
65





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PLAN VIEW ENLARGEMENTS...... .........PAGES 68-73
PERSPECTIVES................................................PAGES 74-77
ENTRY SIGN CONCEPT................................... PAGES 78-79


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2. RETENTION AREA


i3. PEDESTRIAN PAT
3. PEDESTRIAN PATHWAYS


This space consists of a large area to
accommodate group memorial services for the
Hospice and Assisted Living Facilities. The large
water feature will be planted and become part
of the existing landscape through bamboo trees
and other organic materials. This feature also
provides white noise and signifies calm and
serenity towards patients and families. The
water feature extends through the space as
means of unity within the space and breaks
the large hardscape area. The sculpture piece
in the center, provides strength and hope for
lost loved ones through "The Eternal Flame";
while at the base of the structure plaques can be
displayed with family names.


This space provides a retention area for
storm-water runoff, but also provides a
natural space in midst of all the surrounding
hardscape walkways. This space, although
engineered, will have natural planting and
organic materials to soften its edge and
be more integrated within each space. A
shade structure will allow patients, staff
and families to enjoy this space while
cantilevered over the calming water.


These areas will be scattered throughout the
garden areas for pedestrian access to open
spaces and outdoor areas for the family.
The pathways will have informal planting
for shade, designated seating along the path
and informal seating under palm clusters and
accent trees within each open area. These
spaces can also be utilized for family events,
facility events, public gatherings, picnics and
family pets.





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ETENTIO
RE
TRIAN
(WAY
EDESTRIA
WALKWAY
7T


4. GARDEN AREA


5. PEDESTRIAN WALKWAYS


This space is one of the several other garden
spaces throughout the site. The water feature
will provide white noise and a focal point
to the space. In-ground gardens will provide
patients and family members to interact with
the landscape and learn about healing
plants and their capabilities. Above ground
planters also provide didactic capabilities
with incorporated seating and help to
organize the garden area. Shade structures
will provide shaded seating and more private
areas for individuals.


These walkways are the main pedestrian
connector between the main entry plazas
and the garden areas. They are lined with
accent trees and will provide seating and
additional shade through shade structures.
All the walkways have views of the natural
retention area and provide a relaxing
transitory areas for individuals. Along the
edge of each walkway, bricks will be placed
to represent lost loved ones. Each shade
structure will also display plaques to
commemorate family members' donations.


GRAPHIC LEGEND


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6. PLAZA AND STAFF AREA


This space is easily accessible to all staff
members from the facility. A seating wall
frames the space and the water feature
provides white noise to calm the senses.
Accent trees provide shade to the seating
wall and a nice color punch to the space
during the Spring and Summer months.
Water surrounds the space to provide a
softer edge and tranquil surroundings for staff
member to enjoy. Moveable seating can be
placed around the seating wall to further
personalize the space to staff needs.


7. SECONDARY ENTRANCE


This space will provide easy access to both
building main entrances and secondary
parking lot. An allee of palms welcome
users into the space and allow for easy
access to each building entrance with the
roundabout design. Pedestrians also have
easy access and can safely cross the main
road through the pedestrian crosswalk. Entry
shade structures provide pedestrian shelter
and frame the entrance to make it visible for
vehicular users to easily identify each
building entrance. Accent trees also frame
the crosswalk and entrance for a warm
welcome.


8. PROPOSED PARKING LOT
8. PROPOSED PARKING LOT


This space will consist of 57 parking spaces to
accommodate all events and staff needs. The
parking lot will be all permeable (see Design
Development Section for Material selection)
and shaded by palm clusters scattered
throughout. This no-curb parking lot is
sustainable and will have little impact on the
surrounding canopy structure. Furthermore, it
can be easily adapted to the facilities needs.
For instance, if less green space and more
parking space is needed, this parking lot can be
modified to specific client/staff needs.




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PROPOSE ALLEE EXISTING
BUILDING CCENT-TREES VEGETAT10N
TREE RE



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9. PLAZA AND STAFF AREA
This space is another staff/plaza area for the
secondary facility. The water feature encloses
this space and a pedestrian friendly trench
drain (see Design Development Section for
Material selection) fully encircles this area for
a more dynamic space. Seating walls provide
a place for passive activities and moveable
furniture can be used for staff use and needs.
An in-ground garden allows for a didactic
experience and for shade, accent trees
surround the space.




i,.



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10. GARDEN AREA
This space provides families to really
experience and learn about healing plants and
their capabilities. All the gardens within this
space are at ground level for accessibility and
will contain different herbs and healing plants
along with a small plaque for explanation. All
seating is incorporated at the center with an
accent tree as the focal element. This space
is mostly transitory and serves as a means to
learn about the different plants, their healing
abilities and domestic uses.


GRAPHIC LEGEND




























12. PEDESTRIAN WALKWAYS 13. PLAZA/GARDEN AREA


11. GARDEN AREA


This space provides families for a more
secluded and private area. Shade structure
enclose most of the space and seating wall
surrounds the space for extra seating. Accent
trees and palm trees enclose the space for
added seclusion and added shade. A central
water feature acts as the main focal point to
draw people into the space and provides
soothing white noise for relaxation and
calming sounds.


These walkways are the main pedestrian
connector between the main entry plazas
and the garden areas. They are lined with
accent trees and will provide seating and
additional shade through shade structures.
All the walkways have views of the natural
retention area and provide a relaxing
transitory areas for individuals. Smaller open
space pockets will be placed throughout for
extra openness feel and for families to
enjoy picnics, smaller gatherings or simply
appreciate being outdoors.


This space provides the main connection
between the existing site and my proposed
design. Accent trees and water feature attract
users through color and prickling sounds and
frame the inner space. Shade structures and
seating wall provide a secluded space near the
plaza/garden edge. This space also has views
from the two nearby natural retention area
for added views.










PROPOSED EXISTING
RETENTION RETENTION

SACCEN

TRE AND

LUE

PEDESTRIAN
BRIDGE

PALM'
: CLUSTER


14. PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE
This bridge is the only main connector
between the existing facility and the
proposed plaza/garden areas. (see
Design Development for Material selec-
tion). this accessible and pedestrian wooden
bride will allow for a smooth connection
between these two somewhat differ-
ent spaces and unify them via pedes-
trian connections. Tree and palm cluster
will frame viewsheds for a smooth and
appealing transition between both sites.
Further connection will be made by expand- -
ing the existing retention area and enhanc-
.ing its landscape through natural materials
-' and planting. CRAPHIC LEGEND


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ENTRY SIGN CONCEPT


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ENTRY SIGN LIGHTING PERSPECTIVE


This concept entry sign design is
existing and proposed site via
images, there was a disconnect
Sand the existing site.


meant to unify both the
signage. As seen in the
between the entry sign


This concept uses similar materials located in both
site while enhancing the character at each entrance by
providing an easy to read and vibrant sign for easier
wayfinding and marking each entrance.







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MATERIALS BOARD.................................................... PAGES 82-83

MATERIAL ENLARGEMENTS (AREA SPECIFIC).............PAGES 84-91

LIGHTING PLAN ENLARGEMENTS...........................PAGES 92-93


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REFER TO APPENDi,, FOiR MfNTERin L L .,OUv EL.,
REFER TO PAGES 84-91 FOR MATERIALS TO BE USED IN DESIGNATED AREAS
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7. PLAZA AND STAFF AREA


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5. PLAZA AND STAFF AREA


On site, lighting will be kept at a human scale and personal. In the overall
Master Plan-Night, shown previously (Pages 64-65), all the lighting capabilities
are displayed within the proposed site; however, lighting zones will be designated
at night to conserve energy. These enlargements exhibit these specific zones and
are independent of each other according to staff and/or patient use and needs.


O1.ARDEN AREA


4. PEDESTRIAN WALKWAY


6. SECONDARY ENTRANCE


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CONCLUSION AND FINAL THOUGHTS............PAGES 96-97


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When I began this project, I knew I wanted to design something that, as a student, I had never experienced before.
Healing landscapes became a subject I had been interested in throughout my years at this program and as I researched
on the subject I became truly enthralled by its intricacy and its ability to provide spiritual and physical healing spaces for
individuals. I loved the fact that this type of design is more personable and at a more human scale than others. As a
designer, I enjoy fabricating spaces with a complex simplicity for people to enjoy, but most importantly to learn
something unique.

The relatively new concept of healing gardens allows for individuals to interact with the landscape in unique ways. Many
people know of healing plants, but not of their healing capabilities and its possible domestic uses. Many also think of
healing landscape as being part of a hospital and/or a hospice only for the facility patients. Notwithstanding, I wanted to
create a space that was more communal than individual while still retaining a human scale for personable uses. My design
fully integrates the existing and proposed site into a space for its patients, staff, family members, and the community overall.
By incorporating an Assisted Living Facility, members of the community will feel closer to a familiar space, especially for their
loved ones. Moreover, with this type of facility, the overall use of the gardens will be highly utilized and effective for as long as
the facility exists.

Although the site is relatively large (approximately 14 acres) to create a more intimate space; I realized by creating smaller
"pocket" gardens within the larger design, I was able to bring the scale down to a more human scale. Furthermore, by creating
several gardens, people would use each space according to their needs. Each garden area is unique yet they all serve the same
purpose. Any individual will be able to enjoy each space (whether in a large group or a small group) and they will be able to
learn something unique about the surrounding healing plants. Plaques would be minimal and tastefully integrated into the
landscape to communicate important features and healing capabilities. I also wanted people to not be defined by how each
space was designed, therefore, integrating pedestrian pathway also become an important element within my design. These
pathways provide freedom for individuals and/or groups to enjoy the surrounding landscape in a family setting and use each space
accordingly within the open space provided.





96
..,,, ..:i.i












Overall, this endeavor has taught me much about landscapes and its healing power. I realized the ability to provide people with
a space where they are able to interact with the surrounding landscape, experience being with their loved ones in a "natural"
setting and understand how much healing landscapes can aid their loved ones to feel comfortable and at ease with their
condition, is something which can be incorporated into any small scale design. Creating family spaces and the ability to integrate
community members to share experiences can truly bring people together towards an altruistic cause.

As a designer, I think it is imperative to teach others the power of landscape, whether healing or not, in order for individuals to
understand how complex this field is. If you design a landscape where people use it its an accomplishment. However, if by using
that landscape, people understand its simple intricacy and message, as a designer, you would have succeeded in extending your
message and people will understand nature and its magnificent healing power.























-97
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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS................................PAGE 100
REFERENCES ........... ......................................PAGE 101
APPEN DIX ..................................................PAGES 102-103
POWERPOINT PRESENTATION.....................PAGES 104-105


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Further thanks:

To Fran Davis, for providing all the information 1 needed to make this project happen and further allowing me to
bring my ideas into your Hospice.

To Tina, for always believing in me and my ideas.

To Kevin, for providing guidance throughout this entire process.

To the entire faculty in the Landscape Department, for always being supportive and understanding of our needs.

To all my classmates, for your friendship and support throughout this program. 1 will miss you and your craziness!

GO GATORS!

















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