Citation
The Apalachicola times

Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group,Tim Thompson - Publisher, Tim Croft- Editor
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates:
29.725278 x -84.9925

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Cf. Gregory, W. Amer. newspapers, 1937.:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Apalachicola Times. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
32911693 ( OCLC )
sn 95026907 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald

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** Volume 133 Number 13 Phone: 850-653-8868 Fax: 850-653-8893 Opinion .................... A4 Society ...................... A6 Faith ........................ A7 Outdoors ................... A8 Sports....................... A9 f-stop Franklin......... A10 Classified ............ A13-14 Law Enforcement ....... A14 A4Bonavita: The best gun controlA9Chip Sanders zips his skimboard TRY OUR CROSSWORD, A10 TALES OF THE FRANKLIN RIFLES, A5 Thursday, July 19, 2018 @ApalachTimes facebook.com/Apalachitimes50 ¢ apalachtimes.com CELEBRATING 130 YEARS AS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER By David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl.com 850-653-8894Nearly one month after the Lime Rock Road fire in Eastpoint devastated the lives of three dozen Eastpoint fam-ilies, and left scores of others affected, shelter has arrived.This week, title to the two dozen surplus mobile homes from the fed-eral General Services Administration, left over from hurricanes in the Keys, was transferred from the countys very brief ownership to the Capital Area Community Action Agency, the non-profit agency that will own and manage them.Capital Area is funding the temporary housing units at a price tag of $204,000, plus the $4,000 in title transfer fees.In addition, on Wednesday, Sher-iff A. J. Smith was slated to move the first of at least five permanent mobile homes, bought from a fund he set up immediately after the fire, and which had raised more than $108,000 as of press time.In a release from the county emer-gency management office, these permanent structures were slated to go to the families of James Boone, at 599 Ridge Rd.; Lucy Bettinger, at 697 Ridge Rd.; Phillip Holian, at 686 Ridge Rd.; Earl Moses, at 640 Ridge Rd,; and Belinda Nowling, at 674 Ridge Rd.Land code requirements that must be met for all permanent structures meant the process of permitting the new mobile homes would take a few extra days.County commissioners Tuesday Returning to their homesAs of Wednesday, Michael Boone and wife Tammy, burned-out by the Lime Rock Road “ res, were living in a leaky tent on Wilderness Road. All our clothes are soaked and were covered by bugs,Ž said Tammy, And weve heard nothing absolutely nothing from nobody. Some folks get the front of the lamb; I guess we get the back. [RICHARD BICKEL | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ] Temporary dwellings, and some permanent, are being put into place this week on lands ravaged by the Lime Rock Road reBy David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl. com 850-653-8894The tax base in Franklin County this past year contin-ued the steady modest climb it has maintained every year since it hit a 21st century low during the 2013-14 fiscal year.Property Appraiser Rhonda Skipper said certified preliminary property values she submitted earlier this month to the state showed the countys tax base grew from $1.83 billion to $1.89 billion, a growth of 3.46 percent, or about $63 million.That size of the tax base puts the county right about where it was in 2011-12, but well below the high of about $4.1 billion that it reached a decade ago.The county tax base has picked up steam ever since 2013-14, when it stood at $1.63 billion. The following year it grew by about $20 mil-lion, and then by $40 million the next year, and then about $72 million the year after that, and by another $62 million last year.Were starting to see a little bit of a steady growth each year,Ž said Skipper. Thats encouraging.I think a 3 to 3.5 percent growth is really great, especially since so much of our property stayed on as County tax base continues expansionBy David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl.com 850-653-8894The results for the Algebra I end-ofcourse exam, which must be passed in order for a high school student to earn a diploma, showed that more than three-quarters of the 26 eighth graders at the Apalachicola Bay Char-ter School passed it.In contrast, only 39 percent of the 76 stu-dents at Franklin County High School, in grades ranging from eighth through 12th, had passed it. This meantthat several of these students would have to attend an Algebra 1 boot camp at the school during the months of June and July, in an effort to help them pass the state-mandated Algebra 1 assessment requirement.So far, 27 students in grades 9-12, have met their requirement this summer through the PERT assessment, one of several alternative tests given to meet the requirement.A problem surfaced, however, because the Florida Department of Education (FLDOE) this year adopted a rule which no longer permits the use of the PERT exam for students who are enrolled in ninth grade for the 2018-19 school year.There was a misinterpretation of the rule by the district, believing that this new rule would not take effect until July 30, 2018,Ž wrote the dis-trict, in a news release last week.On July 9 and10, the PERT was offered to some of the eighthgrade students Problems surface with Algebra 1 testingSkipper See TAX, A2 See TESTING, A3 See RETURN, A2 Learn about bears tonightThe Florida State Uni-versity Coastal & Marine Lab in St. Teresa will host a black bear presentation on Thursday, July 19 from 7 to 8 pm at their lab at Turkey Point. The program will feature a lecture by Don Hardeman, Jr., black bear research biologist with the FWC Fish & Wildlife Research Institute.For more info call 697-4120 C-Quarters youth “ shing tourney SaturdayKids from all over the South are invited to attend the 14th annual Youth Fishing Tournament at C-Quarters Marina in Carrabelle this Saturday, July 21. Open to all kids 16 and younger. Registration is required on-site. Spon-sored by Jimmie Crowder of C-Quarters Marina, FishFloridaTag.org and local businesses.Last year, over 150 kids fished the tournament with some traveling as far away as Louisiana. Friday evening, prior to Saturday's fishing day, all entries in the tournament must attend a Fishing Clinic taught by the dock master of C-Quarters Marina, Millard Collins. At comple-tion of the clinic, each one receives a rod and reel, a tee shirt, hat, and bait.On Saturday morning, the kids can fish from docks or, if they can go out on a boat, they are allowed to fish the Carrabelle River up to Dog Island. There will be a weighmaster available all day. Lunch will be provided to the kids while the officials determine the tournament winners. For more info call 697-8400. Crab Cook-off July 28The third annual Crab Cake Cook-off will be held Saturday, July 28, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Marine Street Grill, next to Harrys Bar, 306 Marine Street in Carrabelle. Guests will be able to sample crab cake bites from several talented com-petitors and cast their vote for which crab cake will be named the greatest in Car-rabelle and perhaps the Forgotten Coast!Attendees may purchase a ticket for just $7 allowing them to taste and judge the crab cake entries.Back by popular demand, the amazing music of Slim FatzŽ, playing some cool blues sounds during the event.New this year will be the unveiling of the plans for Carrabella IIŽ, the pirate ship playground Proceeds benefit the Crooked River Lighthouse. For those wishing to enter their crab cakes into the competition or learn more about being a competitor, contact Kathleen at 607-353-9167.OUT TO SEE

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** A2 Thursday, July 19, 2018 | The Timesaddressed these require-ments, stressing that rules to meet the code for these permanent homes were not waivable, unlike the case of the temporary units. Following the June 24 fire, the county immediately put in two-year moratorium for those temporary structures. Thats what we have to do as county govern-mentŽ said Chairman Smokey Parrish. We have to follow FEMA rules and federal and state guidelines. Its just what we have to do and as a board we will try to do that as quickly as we can.ŽFunds raised by dona-tions to the county, more than $216,000 at last official count, will cover additional infra-structure and regulatory costs for the many resi-dents affected by the fire. We are doing every-thing we can in the scope of our ability and jurisdiction and this is all we can do,Ž said Commissioner Cheryl Sanders. Were all a family; were all from Franklin County.When you have a tragedy theres nothing about me, me, me,Ž she said. Its about them, its all about what you do, its what we do, to help the people.ŽOnce all the trailers have been cleaned, and readied and prepared for occupancy … which emergency management staffers Tress Dameron and Jennifer Daniels and a team of volunteers began right after their arrival Friday from Homestead, and storage on school district property adjacent to the county jail … the affected property owners will be assigned them by Capital Area.According to an emer-gency management list, primary land owners who were residing in the home at the time of the fire, include Charles Granger, 587 Wilderness Rd,; Glen Woodall, 605 Wilderness Rd.; Billy Dalton, 658 Ridge Rd,; Carol Dasen,615 Ridge Rd.; William Banks, 638 Ridge Rd,; and Mary Thomas, 633 Ridge Rd.Those who are listed living in a primary resi-dence they owned, on rented land, include Paul Sanders, 582 Ridge Rd.; Luther Glass, 595 Ridge Rd.; Shawn Boatwright/ Ortega, 601 Ridge Rd.; Dennis Riner/Thornburg, 667 Ridge Rd.; James Joyner, 701 Ridge Rd.; and Arlene Thompson, 714 Buck Street.Amanda Hall, 621 Wilderness Rd. is listed as renting both the structure and the land. Those who rented the structure and who are in need of temporary housing also include Stephanie Johns, 675 Ridge Rd.; and Hope Savage, 691 Ridge Rd.Secondary residents in need of temporary housing include residents Michael Boone, 599 Wilderness Rd.; Nellar, 624 Ridge Rd.; Carrie Richards, 674 Wilderness Rd.; Henry Parramore, 658 Ridge Rd,; and Nowling, 579 Ridge Rd.William Hattaway and Melanie Cooper, 607 Wilderness Rd.; and Matt and Paula Polous, 605 Ridge Rd. are listed as either having their own temporary housing or renting at an alter-nate location.With lots cleared by three volunteer companies and the city of Tallahassee, and with arrangement for electrical, water and sewer hookup all in the imme-diate plans, the trailers are set for occupancy.Power poles and sewage hookup, those two things youve got to have before you can put someone into a home,Ž said Pam Brownell, emergency management director, back to work following surgery in the days immediately after the fire. She thanked Dameron and Daniels for their work in her absence.Were just trying to do it the right way,Ž said Commissioner Ricky Jones. The stance of this board is were not just going to wheel them in there and plop them down. It needs to be done decently and orderly.ŽParrish opened the meeting with a strong statement of support for all the many county employees, and numerous volunteer individuals and businesses, who have been diligent in responding to a variety of needs.Theres often been no mention of what our county employees have done for us, and I think its prudent now. The cleanup over there went really well. Everybody jumped in and done their part,Ž he said.Theres a lot of people in our community who really worked hard over there and got no recognition. Theres a tremendous amount of people,Ž Parrish said, making a point to name as many as he could.I want to recognize those people on behalf of the board,Ž he said. This was a concerted effort, a collaboration of all the different departments and independent constructors.ŽIn a long-term move, the county took steps to work with Debbie Belcher, the grant writer who has for many years handled the Commu-nity Development Block Grant process, to secure additional state funds in conjunction with an earlier grant.Belcher outlined details of how state offi-cials from the Florida Department of Economic Development, have been willing to waive rules that set levels of funding, based on applying the countys low to moderate income (LMI) population. This temporary waiver would apply to a $700,000 grant received for the 2016 fiscal year, and ending no later than Dec. 31, 2021.The county is requesting the funding ceiling for Franklin County's CDBG Housing Rehabilitation project be increased to $4,463,529 for the specific purpose of addressing the housing needs left in the wake of the Eastpoint Limer-ock wildfire,Ž Belcher wrote in a letter to a state official.Because of the out-pouring of donations to the county, of everything from toothpaste to clothing and furniture, Franklins Promise Coalition, which administers long-term recovery operations on behalf of the county emergency management office, is asking for donations to be strictly monetary.Were still taking in furniture donations, but we have no room for any more clothes. No personal toiletries or cleaning supplies, we have an abundance of that,Ž said Tamara Allen, chair of Franklins Promises unmet needs committee. What we really need are new mattresses, we have some gently used mattresses,Ž she said. Were seeing the beginning of people being able to use the amazing and bountiful donations that have been made.ŽFranklins Promise struck a deal last week to rent temporary space at the Carrabelle city complex, several rooms of which have become filled with donations.Allen said four families have so far got move-in kits from Franklins Promise, which consisted a kitchen garbage can and cleaning supplies; a per-sonal hygiene basket; a basket of linens, towels, and sheets; a box of houseware box, such as dishes, glasses and silverware; and an elec-trical appliance of their choice, a coffee pot, crock pot or microwave; and pots and pans.So far four sets of people have come in, two were single adults, one was an older couple and there was a family, a mom, a dad and two kids,Ž Allen said.Our goal is to have 20 additional kits available this week,Ž she said. We have enough prepared that theyre all ready to go.Ž RETURNFrom Page A1Tress Dameron, left, and Jennifer Daniels, coordinators for Franklin County Emergency Management, arrive on the Franklin County Sheriff grounds Thursday to inspect just-delivered FEMA trailers. It will take a few days to clean them up --theyve absolutely got to be in a condition that I would want to live in,Ž said Daniels. [RICHARD BICKEL | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES] government-owned,Ž she said. I think it (the tax base) been continu-ously picking up on a small scale, not by huge leaps and bounds.ŽBecause there are varia-tions on the extent property owners can take exemptions, the valuations of the other two countywide taxing authorities were each a little higher.The tax base of the Northwest Florida Water Management District, which does not allow for an exemption extended by the county and both cities to low-income seniors of an additional $50,000 off their property valuation, was slightly higher, as it rose by 3.35 percent, or about $63.5 million, from $1.83 billion to $1.9 billion.The Franklin County School District, which does not have the low income senior exemption, does not allow for an additional $25,000 in homesteaded exemption and is not sub-ject to a 10 percent annual cap on non-homesteaded property, grew from $1.944 billion to $2.02 billion, an expansion of about $77 mil-lion, or about 3.81 percent.On a percentage basis, this countywide growth was about one-half to 1 percent greater than the growth the year before.On the eastern end of the county, growth in Alligator Point was the highest of any of the countys various taxing authorities. The tax base there expanded from $124.5 million to $133.1 million, or by about $8.6 million, or 6.45 percent. This exceeded the growth one year ago by about 1 percentage point.Carrabelle, which has recovered more gradually from the bursting of the real estate bubble, saw a healthy jump of $5.5 million, from $104.3 million to $109.8 million, or about 5 percent, almost double the percentage hike of a year ago.For first time I have seen growth in Carrabelle where Im seeing values turn around there,Ž said Skipper. We probably had more sales to work with in the city of Carrabelle than I have since being in office.ŽSkipper first took office Jan. 1, 2013, and was reelected in 2016 without opposition.Across the water from Carrabelle, Dog Island saw a decrease in its tax base, the only taxing authority in Franklin County to see shrinkage.Dog Islands property values dropped from $27.8 million to $27.5 million, a decline of about $322,000, or 1.17 percent. The drop was in contrast with one year ago, when the tax base rose by a seven-tenths of 1 percent.Theyre eroding away, theyre losing land left and right,Ž said Skipper. They have areas there where the islands cut almost in two.ŽGrowth in Eastpoint, as measured by its water and sewer district, mirrored that of the county, as the tax base there expanded by 3.24 percent, growing from $64.4 million to $66.6 million, a boost of about $2.2 million. That growth was better than one year ago, when Eastpoint saw an expansion of just about one-third of 1 percent. Because the tax bill is for assessments made during 2017, Skipper cannot alter the tax obligations for any of the properties affected by the Lime Rock Road fire.Theres nothing Ill be able to do legally for them this year, especially since there were no declarations of emergency,Ž Skipper said. Also the majority of those properties were homesteaded so a lot of these were covered under the $50,000 homestead exemption.ŽAcross the river, Apala-chicola saw a slightly smaller 3 percent increase in its tax base, as it went from $142.9 million to $147.3 million, an expansion of $4.4 million. This rise was smallerthan the 5.5 percent growth the city experienced a year ago.Skipper said the countys 19,000 TRIM (Truth in Millage) notices will be mailed out August 13, with the process this year han-dled in-house, as opposed to farming them out to a printing company.We normally send the files to someone else, but they keep increasing (in price),Ž she said. This year were processing in house. I think we can save money by having have staff printing the inserts.ŽSkipper encouraged property owners who have questions about their appraisals to contact her office, before they lodge a formal challenge that must go through the Value Adjustment Board.Theres been numerous times when all they had to do is talk to us and talk about it,Ž Skipper said. I hate to see people pay filing fees when all they have to do is pick the phone up and call us.ŽSkippers office can be reached at 653-9236. TAXFrom Page A1 We are doing everything we can in the scope of our ability and jurisdiction and this is all we can do. Were all a family; were all from Franklin County. When y ou have a tra gedy theres nothing about me, me, me. Its about them, its all about what you do, its what we do, to help the people.ŽCheryl Sanders, commissioner Were just trying to do it the right way. The stance of this board is were not just going to wheel them in there and plop them down. It needs to be done decently and orderly.ŽRicky Jones, commissioner

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** The Times | Thursday, July 19, 2018 A3By David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl.com 850-653-8894Three of the 50 campers who experienced the Sem-inole spirit this summer at the seventh annual Florida State University College of Social Work Arts & Athletics Camp were from Franklin County, giving the camp an opportunity to reach a population it had never served before.Twin sisters Betsy and Emily Mosley, 14, of Apalachicola, and Jayden Nichols, 12, of Apalachic-ola, commuted each day to the Florida State Univer-sity campus, their parents taking turns carpooling.The Arts & Athletics Camp began June 4 and used arts and athletics as vehicles to introduce local youth, ages 11-14, to the university environment and encourage them to pursue higher education.This program aims to enhance leadership devel-opment, grow confidence in academic achievement, socialization, and other life skills for those living within our community with limited social and economic opportunity,Ž said Camp Director Alexandra Givens.This summer the Arts & Athletics Camp was able to expand to two weeklong sessions serving approximately 50 children. According to first year counselor Aaron Carswell, who is pursuing a bachelor of social work, camp allows the kids to bond with peers and try new things in a safe and fun environment.ŽThroughout the week, campers were able to participate in a wide range of activities from creating positive affirmation stones, climbing a seven-foot wall with the Veterans Student Union, and much more.During a Poetry Therapy session, conducted by Dean Emeritus Nick Mazza, the campers were able to write a poem on what camp meant to them. The final line of this poem read this camp is home.ŽBoth Emily Mosley and Jayden Nichols felt as though they found a home while at camp. Camp taught me a lot of things,Ž said Emily. I thank the counselors for that. I genuinely had fun!ŽNichols felt as though he too learned a lot about FSU. Camp was very fun and interesting!ŽKelly Mosley, mom of the twins, said she especially like the attitude of her daughers upon their return."The biggest thingfor me is when they came back, they were all excited about going to college. Before that they were 'Yeah, yeah,college," she said. "They were actually inspired and motivatedby their experience. That was a neat thing for me to experience as a parent."Bachelor of Social Work student and first year counselor Sabrina Sprott summed up the Arts & Athletics Camp in a simple yet powerful sen-tence "Camp gives kids a chance to explore options for their future that they may not otherwise have.ŽThe camp was free of charge for those who attended, allowing kids who come from lowincome areas of the Big Bend community a chance to attend summer camp. The idea behind Mazzas initial project, seven years ago, was to make an impact. All of those involved in camp can see the impact being made. This camp is home.ŽFSU camp inspires kidsCamp Director Alexandra Givens, left, stands with, from left, Emily Mosley, Jayden Nichols, and Virginia Scott, who was the camps head counselor. [PHOTO COURTESY FSU COLLEGE OF SOCIAL WORK] Jayden Nichols, left, and Betsy Mosley do some sidewalk chalk art on the FSU campus. [ PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEXANDRA GIVENS ] attending the boot camp and five of them passed the assessment.Upon further investi-gation and confirmation from FLDOE, the district determined that the new rule was in effect and the 8th-grade students who were tested and passed the PERT will still need to meet the Algebra 1 assessment require-ments,Ž read the release. All students that passed the PERT and are affected by this new law were noti-fied of the error and have been offered additional instructional support.ŽThe school district extended the Algebra 1 camp an additional four days to include July 16 to 19 with the Florida Standards Assessment Algebra end-of-course exam to be given on July 18-19.In remarks to the school board Monday night, FCHS Principal Jill Rudd noted that she had learned that a local cheer camp, held this summer at the school, included some students who should have attended the boot camp which ran some of the same days.That sets the wrong precedent,Ž she said. Now its on us to find the time to instruct themŽ in order to pass the required test.The state data shows that at the ABC School, the 77 percent of the 26 eight graders who took Algebra was 14 percent-age points better than the state average. Of these, 13 scored a 3, three scored a 4, and four scored a 5.Three students scored a 1 and three students scored a 2, each score considered below profi-ciency in the subject.At Franklin County, the 39 percent proficiency showing was 24 percent-age points below state average. There were no 5s, and eight students scored 4s, and 22 scored a 3.Ten students scored a 2, and 35 students scored a 1. TESTINGFrom Page A1Special to the TimesThe third annual Crab Cake Cook-off will be held on Saturday, July 28, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Marine Street Grill, next to Harrys Bar, 306 Marine Street in Carrabelle.Guests will be able to sample some yummy crab cake bites from several talented compet-itors and cast their vote for which crab cake will be named the greatest in Carrabelle and perhaps the Forgotten Coast!Last year, Jon Johnson won first place as Judge's Choice, and Sid McOmie won first as People's Choice. Both are returning this year to defend their titles.Attendees may purchase a ticket for just $7 allowing them to taste and judge the crab cake entries.Back by popular demand, the amazing music of "Slim Fatz," playing some cool blues sounds during the event. You may have caught his gritty Delta tunes at Blues in the LotŽ in Apalachicola or other venues. In addition to great food and amazing music, this event will also feature wonderful door prizes and silent auction items too.New this year will be the unveiling of the plans for Carrabella IIŽ, the pirate ship playground to replace the one that burned at the Crooked River Lighthouse. The original and much beloved playground ship, Car-rabellaŽ was destroyed by arson on May 10, 2015. Come see the exciting drawings and designs for the replacement ship.Everyone is invited to this fun food-filled event to benefit the Crooked River Lighthouse. For more information, contact the lighthouse at697-2732 or carrabellelight-house@gmail.com.For those wishing to enter their crab cakes into the competition or learn more about being a competitor, contact Kathleen at 607-353-9167.May the best crab cake winCrooked River Lighthouse Director Joan Matey at last years Crab Cake Cook-Off. [SHERIA WESSON | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES]

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** A4 Thursday, July 19, 2018 | The TimesUSPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Postmaster: Send address change to The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone: 850-653-8868 Periodical rate postage paid at: Apalachicola, FL 32329 Weekly Publishing Circulation: 1-850-522-5197 Formerly The Apalachicola Times SUBSCRIPTIONS In county Out of county 1 year: $24.15 $34.65 6 months: $15.75 $31.00 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such ads. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. PUBLISHER Tim Thompson EDITOR Tim Croft OPINION "With every mistake we must surely be learning"From "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" as per-formed by The BeatlesRecently I read about a fast food restaurant chain that is investing millions into computerized food service. The customer programs his food selection, then robots make each hamburger to order, adding desired condiments and even slicing whole pickles with millimeter precision. Artificial intelligence has also been utilized recently in an attempt to recreate a Beatles song. Critics called the final product somewhat "emotionless,Ž and noted that it sounded more like the Beach Boys than the Beatles, but the very fact that we've got the technology to attempt such an endeavor is disconcerting to human artists. Our ability to control, regulate and direct AI represents a significant signpost toward a healthy economy in the 21st century. So the viability of using cobots, or collaborative robots, in the manufacturing sector is especially encouraging. A 2016 study by the International Federation of Robotics reveals that fewer than 10 percent of jobs can be completely automated. Of course, that statistic suggests that 90 percent of tasks can be at least partially automated. Most of those jobs are currently filled by low-wage, low-skilled workers. Traditional robots require extensive programming. They are often cumbersome, relatively immobile and dangerous for nearby workers, and many perform their functions locked away from employees. Perhaps most importantly, their presence was a threat to employees because they replaced human hands. Cobots work in tandem with human workers and can help boost productivity, which then increases overall employment. Designed to shut down if a person crosses their path, cobots minimize worksite injury. Most require no sophisticated coding and are generally lighter and more mobile than traditional robots. Just under a quarter million global industrial robots were sold last year, and only 5 percent of these were cobots. But cobots, sometimes called flexible robots, could soon become an important component of the profitability of small manufacturing plants. As economist Gary Schilling has written, "Collaborative robots that work alongside humans... are getting cheaper and easier to program. And theyre safer and more userfriendly than earlier models that had to be caged to protect humans... Cobots are being used in warehouses and are much cheaper in moving goods than miles of conveyor belts." Integrating technology like cobots into industrial manufacturing makes imminent sense to me, from a human standpoint. We simply cannot afford to invent and program ourselves into a state of high unemployment. But using technology as a complementary feature on the factory floor is an evolved solution that can simultaneously assist us in achieving maximum efficiency and high employment. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, author of the syndicated economic column Arbor Outlook,Ž is founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850.608.6121 … www.arborwealth.net), a fiduciary, fee-only, registered investment advisory firm near Destin. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any specific strategy or investment will be suitable or profitable for an investor.ARBOR OUTLOOKCobots, robots and recreating the Fab Four Margaret McDowellBy Denny Bonavita Special to the TimesTwenty-four years ago, I had a thought about "gun control." Back in 1994, a young guy brought a gun to an after school dance at the YMCA in DuBois, Pennsylvania. My younger daughter had been at that dance. Nothing further of substance happened. The gun was taken, the youth was handled... nobody got killed. But quite a few people, myself included, were bothered. "Gun control" bothers me. I wrote a column back then, arguing that we need people control. Guns are tools, dangerous tools (as are chainsaws and dynamite), but tools nonetheless. My guns cannot kill anyone right now. Impossible. Cannot happen. Why not? I take sensible precautions. The details are my business. There is a reason why "concealed carry" works better than open carry for self-defense while avoiding rash challenges: Nobody really knows who is carrying what. That breeds restraint, or ought to. As I write this, nobody is within reach of my stored guns. That is effective "gun control." Therein lies the truth of the clich, "Guns don't kill people; people kill people." In 50 years as a journalist, 75 years of living, I have never heard of a rifle, shotgun or handgun spontaneously exploding. I have heard about loaded guns, usually rifles or shotguns, discharging after having been carelessly leaned against walls or vehicles. That was not spontaneous, it was stupidity, caused by people, not the guns themselves. I do believe in sensible limits to the Constitutional right (not privilege) of "bearing arms." My limit stops well short of legal ownership of an M1A1 Abrams battle tank in combatready condition. Heck, my personal right to bear arms stops well short of ownership of a semi-automatic or fullauto rifle, shotgun or handgun „ not because of the Constitution, not because of any laws, but because I am a Clint Eastwood fan and I myself made the don't-own decisions. "A man's got to know his limitations," Eastwood's character, "Dirty Harry" Callahan, iconically said in the movie "Magnum Force," along with "Nothing wrong with shooting as long as the right people get shot." I know my limitations. I know that, at my age and skill level, I am not trustworthy that "the right people" would get shot or the wrong people would not get shot were I to cut loose with a rapid-fire weapon. I stick with more deliberate firing rates. You might choose differently. That's OK „ if you know your limitations. My personal "gun control" comes back to what it always comes back to, which is "people control." In that long-ago column, I revisited my lifelong close association with guns. Why, I mused rhetorically, had I not shot and killed one of my best friends, Pat Hartnett, during our childhood? Pat and I were thick as thieves, with one exception: He walloped me, or nearly so, just about every day for five or six years. I knew where Dad kept Grandpa's revolver. At age 10, I secretly played with that revolver, to my retrospective horror. I could have used it to shoot Pat. Then again, Pat and I shared confidences. I knew that Pat also knew where his Dad kept the .30-30 deer rifle, and Pat secretly played with that weapon. I had access. He had access. So... deterrence through childhood acceptance of the theory of mutually assured destruction? I wrote in 1994 that such might have been the case back in 1957 or so when Pat and I engaged in our daily wrestle-punch-grab tussles. But I also wrote, back in 1994, that Pat and I stopped short of grabbing guns because we knew something else at first hand. We knew that dead is dead. By 1957, both Pat and I had hunted. He had killed deer. I had killed squirrels and grouse. We had seen them die (death by shooting is usually not instantaneous, movie versions aside). We had cut them open, seen what bullets or shotgun pellets did to internal organs. We had seen deer hung on clothesline T-poles, great red holes gaping where their innards had been. I wonder about the school shooters. Did they know, at first hand, that dead is dead? Most of us know as children that Wile E. Coyote does not die during those thousandfoot falls while pursuing his cartoon nemesis, the Road Runner. Coyote does not die because Coyote does not live. It is a cartoon, fiction. Movie "deaths" are fiction, too. The "victims" get up and go eat lunch or supper, get on with their lives. But in real life, dead is dead. There is something sobering about holding a dead squirrel, or positioning a dead deer for evisceration. What is happening is final. I don't know if knowing that at first hand would deter pre-adult school shooters. I do think it solidified my knowledge that using guns to settle fights is unacceptable in real life. How, though, do we teach that? Therein lies a good part of the solution to what we need to do for "gun control."Denny Bonavita is a former editor and publisher at daily and weekly newspapers in western Pennsylvania. He winters in Apala-chicola. Email him at denny2319@windstream.net.THE GOOD LIFEGun control means knowing limitationsSpecial to the TimesAFlorida State University professor is leading an effort to bring to life and celebrate the powerful contributions of 1960s civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer, while empowering youth through the art of filmmaking. Davis W. Houck, FSUs Fannie Lou Hamer professor of rhetorical studies in the college of communication and information, helped conduct a workshop with high school teachers in the Mississippi Delta to develop a K-12 Find Your VoiceŽ curriculum about the life of Fannie Lou Hamer. In addition, FSU School of Communication doctoral student Pablo Correa and alumnus Joseph Davenport taught a college-level media production course, Find Your Voice Young Filmmakers Workshop,Ž to high school students. The Mississippi Delta has given me and my students so much. The filmmakers workshop and the Find Your Voice curriculum are ways to give back to this unique part of the world,Ž Houck said. Fannie Lou Hamer was born, raised and lived in the Delta. Teaching her story in a film and in schools provides a strong voice of resistance in todays hard and perilous times.Ž Houck collaborated on the Find Your VoiceŽ project with Maegan Parker Brooks, an assistant professor at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon. They worked with seven teachers in Mississippi to design a K-12 curriculum that boosts students interest in Hamers life. The professors will debut these lesson plans in October to celebrate what would have been Hamers 101st birthday. The Find Your Voice Young Filmmakers WorkshopŽ taught by Correa and Davenport included 16 high school students from the Delta, including several from Gentry High School, which hosted the program in Indianola, Mississippi. The five-week workshop introduced students to all aspects of filmmaking, including composition, shooting, lighting, sound and editing. Carledia Jones, a rising senior at Gentry High School, said the workshop provided valuable hands-on experience with documentary production that will help her after graduation. I never knew how much work goes into video editing,Ž said Jones, who plans to pursue a communications degree in college. I would like to produce YouTube videos one day, and this workshop made me realize I would probably need to partner with an editor when I do. We also learned so much about everything that goes into filmmaking and being able to use our own creativity and ideas for film projects.Ž Workshop participants tapped into those creative ideas during the course and produced their own documentaries. Their films wereshown during a public screening Saturday, at the B.B. King Museum in Indianola.FSU prof hones  Find Your Voice curriculumFocus centers on life of civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer

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** The Times | Thursday, July 19, 2018 A5 CHASING SHADOWSEditor's Note: The following account was written by William H. Trimmer, of Molino,on Feb. 24, 1909 for theUnited Daughters of the Confederacy Scrapbooks. M96-18, Volume 1. Trimmer was avolunteer in Co. B. 1st Florida Infantry, from Apalachicola. March 25th, 1861 … The members of the Franklin Rifles of Apalachicola, Fla. were invited to partake of a farewell supper before leaving for Pensacola at Mrs. D. P. Hollands house at 8 PM. Mrs. Holland was the wife of Lawyer Holland who afterwards became Colonel of the 3rd Florida Regiment. After the supper the company was presented with a flag white & trimmed in blue which was accepted but never carried. At 10 AM on morn of 26th the company composed of about 90 men with William Cropp as captain filed upon the side wheeled boat Wm. H. Young for Chattahoochee, where we arrived on 27th and in the afternoon assembled with numerous other companies to elect our field officers. There were companies from Madison, Jackson, Leon, Gadsden, Jefferson, Bradford & Franklin present. We formed on the parade ground at the then US Arsenal and choose for Colonel Patton Anderson, a lawyer at Monticello who had served in the Mexican War of 1846. William K. Geard of Tallahassee for Lieut. Colonel and McDonald for Major, each company selected its own officers. The Franklin Rifles elected Cropp for Captain; he then was out of door shipping clerk at Apalachicola for the Buckman Cotton Press, for 1st Lieut. Wm. T. Ormand, 2nd Lieut. Charlie Babcock and 3rd Lieut. Nat Hunter. We then embarked on the steamboat again with the other companies and went up the river to Columbus, Ga. At Columbus we were entertained by the Light Blues & Columbus Guards company in their tents out on the fair grounds. After two days spent in Columbus we were transported over the West Point Road to Montgomery remaining till early Saturday morn then boarded the cars for Pensacola arriving at Garland then the end of the completed road and camped for the night. At daylight we got coffee and started to march through the country for Evergreen. Just as we were leaving we received the news of the bombardment & capture of Fort Sumpter which put us all in good spirits. The day before in coming from Montgomery the train stopped at Auburn for breakfast. Here the young ladies from the college turned out en masse and could not do enough for us. This spontaneous reception at Auburn loveliest village of the plainŽ has followed me in memory hundreds of times in past years. The distance across country through cotton plantations to Evergreen was about 18 miles. Here we camped, tired & hungry, each with his knapsack, gun and cartridge box. Next morning took cars again not nicely cushioned seats for us but flats & boxcars, plenty good for volunteer soldiers. At Cantonment we were joined by a regiment of La. Zouaves and the Shreveport Greys, landing in Pensacola at corner of Government & Tarragonia and marched to plazza and told to camp on the square which most of us did as then there was plenty of grass & big trees. On the plazza at about 9 AM we were formed and each of us pledged our lives and services to the Confederate State of America for twelve months. We were then marched down to Knapps wharf (now Palafox) where steam boats were waiting to carry us to the Navy Yd. arriving we were quartered in one of the sail lofts and rations issued. In meantime our tents and baggage arriving we were sent out into the woods back of the Navy Yard and made to clear & clean up camps for the Regiment, now the 1st Florida Infantry. If any of us boys imagined they came for a nice easy pleasant time the heavy details daily imposed on each company soon learned us differently. First orderly Sergeant R. F. Abbot made out his guard duty. This was imposed on each company and a line of sentries from Ft. Barrancas to the outside wall of Navy Yard was established day & night. The camp detail was daily kept at work cleaning up the timber, digging up roots of pine trees, levelling the soil and in a few days had prepared a fine parade ground of ten acres. At daylight every morning Colonel Patton Anderson had the regiment out for drill till 8 AM and again at 10 AM and at 1PM. Six hours were spent daily in drilling. In the meantime other squads of men were called off for fatigue duty. This consisted in constructing sand batteries along the outside beach mounting big Columbian and Dalghren guns, building bomb proofs and magazines, tearing down and demolishing the dwelling houses in Warrington which had been abandoned by residents who left furniture, bedding, crockery, etc. Large amounts of this stuff found places in our tents and at our messes. At the Colonels tent were his two horses and the purple silk Regimental flag with In God we trustŽ in gold letters. Each company had the same guns we had brought with us. The Franklin Rifles had a small brass mounted rifle known as the Jeff Davis as it was made during his term as Sec. of War in 1857. The Quincy Guards, Capt. Gee, had smooth bore muskets bright barrels and the Jefferson & Bradford Companies drilled with the old flintlock musket. This necessitated all different ammunition in our cartridge boxes. After about a month in camp we had a visit from Gen. Beauregard to inspect our batteries, etc. Soon after which all our guns were turned in and each soldier was given a smoothbore Springfield musket bright barrels muzzle loaders with big copper percussion caps 20 rounds of cartridges were issued. These we had to bite at end & empty powder with three buck shot & one big ball. Each of us as infantry had served out a big bowie knife & sheath which we strapped round the waist. A big side wheel steam boat called the Time slipped into the harbor past Fort Pickens. She had been engaged in carrying cotton from Columbus, Ga. Via Eufaula to Apalachicola; the Quartermaster Department soon pressed her into service carrying supplies for the troops from Pensacola. In early part of September 1861 Gen. Bragg was in command of some ten thousand finely drilled men who were spoiling daily to cross & capture the Yankee garrison at Fort Pickens. Outside across Santa Rosa Island could be seen laying at anchor numerous men of war, many big transports like the 3000 ton steamship Vanderbilt that had brought troops to reinforce Harry Brown in command at the Fort. About 2 AM on the morning of Sep. 14, an armed boat from the flagship Colorado slipped up to a schooner named the Judah and set her on fire. She was laying fast at the Navy Yard and on it was a guard were 7 or 8 men from the Apalachicola Company. They killed three Yankees and wounded some 8 or 10 others. On the night of Oct. 8th … morning of 9th about 1500 men selected and representing each regiment and company were quietly landed on Santa Rosa Island being put on big lumber flats and towed over. A fine body of men about 400 of 9th & 10th Mississippi Colonel Chambers and First Ala. Three companies of the 7th Ala. 2 companies of La infantry and 2 companies of the 1st Fla. composed the 1st & 2nd Battalions in command of Colonel Patton Anderson. The 3rd Battalion in command of Colonel John K. Jackson of the 5th Ga. Also Capt. Homers company of artillery who were armed with pistols and bowie knives and carrying material for spiking cannon, burning and destroying buildings, gun carriages, etc. in command of Lieut. Hallonquist and Lieut Nelms adjutant of the 5th Ga. Several medical men also were taken. Doctor Gamble of the 1st Fla. Dr. Tompkins of the 5th Ga. Dr. Gholson of the 9th Miss., Dr. Lipps of the 10th Miss. and Dr. Gamble of the 1st Florida. Micks of the La. Infantry to attend on the doctors a squad of 20 men were also detailed. Landing on the beach of Santa Rosa Island about 2 AM Colonel Chalmers took his command up the north beach, Patton Anderson marched his up the south beach and Colonel Jackson followed in rear of Col. Chalmers. After a hard march in the heavy beach sand of between three and four miles, Col. Chalmers column was fired into by sentry on post who was immediately shot down. Colonel Jackson now pushed his way through the thicket to the middle of the Island advancing rapidly to the outposts of the Zouaves who were rapidly driven in or shot down charging them with the bayonet right into their camp which they found deserted, tents standing alone houses full of provisions sheds and stables all empty save a few sleepers who were shot and bayonetted in their tents. These troops were the notorious Billy Wilson Zouaves from New York City. Wilson was an Alderman in the city and he raised this body of roughs uniforming them as Zouaves. Colonel Jacksons command hastily set fire to tents & store houses and ran lots of the Zouaves with the bayonet into the Gulf. Meantime Colonel Chalmers and Anderson advancing along the shores of the island with which they had some sharp skirmishing. About half way between the Zouave camp and where we disembarked we encountered two companies of US regulars which had passed us in the dark, posting themselves in a dense thicket to intercept our men who were retiring here a very sharp and severe skirmish ensued which delayed for some time the men getting on the flats and barges to return. In the meantime the tide had fallen and some of the flats were aground in the sand. In trying to pull off the steamboat Neaffie got her propeller foul in a hawse causing much delay. The US regulars taking advantage of this soon appeared among the sand hills forming themselves on the beach fronting the flats upon which our men had scrambled. Now commenced a scene for the US soldiers fired as fast as they could load on us who were comparatively helpless to return, and waiting for the steam boats to drag us off the beach. Our loss in this night attack was heavy. Captain Bradford of 1st Fla. was killed, also Lieut. Nelms of the 5th Ga., the adj. of the 1st Fla. Reg, was wounded by spent ball. The Franklin Rifles lost one killed, Gill Hicks, and Thompson shot through thigh died in hospital. Gen. R. H. Anderson was shot in the arm. Our loss with prisoners was about 100. The prisoners they captured 5 commissioned officers and 32 privates were the guard left for the protection of their hospital and sick and the five doctors left to attend our own wounded who were left. Mrs. Gradys big store building outside the West Gate in Woolsey was used as a hospital for our wounded and our dead were brought over at night by flag of truce boat at request of Gen. Bragg and now lay in Cemetery at Navy Yard.1861: Tales of the Franklin Ri esDigital Collection in the State Archives of Florida This portrait by J. E. Taylor is of Brevet Brigadier General William Wilson, who was appointed Colonel 6th N.Y. Infantry, April 19, 1861. Known as Billy Wilsons Zouaves (a.k.a. Wilsons Fighting Brigade), the regiment was recruited in New York City, organized under Wilson, and accepted by the state on May 22, 1861. They left N.Y. on June 15, 1861, serving in the Department of Florida at Santa Rosa Island and Fort Jefferson. They also served at Pensacola and Barrancas, Fla., and Port Hudson, Irish Bend and Bayou Vermillion, La. Wilson received the rank of brevet brigadier general, March 13, 1865.[ STATE ARCHIVES OF FLORIDA | TAYLOR ]

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** A6 Thursday, July 19, 2018 | The Times Special to the TimesHello Franklin County! The last of the summer reading program fun ends this week. Carrabelle will host the final Rockers & Readers program for children ages K-6 on Friday, July 20 at 11 a.m. They will have fun making crafts and checking out their favorite summer reading items. We hope the kids have had a great summer and enjoyed all of the fun programs and events that weve had. Animal Tales, Born to Be Wild will be the finale for our summer reading program, Libraries Rock. All new animals to the program, and each animal, have some connection to a unique noise or sound (they rock!). The Eastpoint show will be Thursday, July 19 at 2 p.m. and then head on over to Carrabelle at 4 p.m. to see them again. This program is for all ages and will not disappoint! The Basics of Better Living program, with topic Strategies for Avoiding Scams & Fraud, will be at the Eastpoint branch on Friday, July 20 at 1:30 p.m. These informative programs are facilitated by Samantha Kennedy, with the IFAS extension office. The topic for August is something anyone that works in the kitchen will want to attend Kitchen Hacks: Learn tips and tricks for making life in the kitchen quick and easy. First program will be held in Carrabelle on Friday, August 3 at 1:30 p.m. Kids, dont miss the Back to School Party & Scavenger Hunt at the Eastpoint Branch on Tuesday, August 2 at 11 a.m. and in Carrabelle at 4 p.m. Snacks for the kids and a scavenger hunt filled with clues that spell a mystery word. Suggested ages kindergarten through 8; younger children will need assistance from a parent or adult. And remember, Libraries Rock! Other upcoming programs include, the Teen Book Club, at the Eastpoint branch on Wednesday, August 1 at 2 p.m.; Eastpoint Book Chat, Tuesday, August 7 at 1:30 p.m. and the Writers Forum, Wednesday, August 15 at 1 p.m. The Carrabelle Book Social will meet again starting in September. All calendars of events are available on the website or pick up a copy when you visit the library. Remember to like us and follow us on Facebook at Franklin County Public Library and Franklin County Public Library Eastpoint Branch. The calendar of events and online resources are on the library website at fcpl.wildernesscoast.org/ Contact the Eastpoint branch, Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 670-8151 and the Carrabelle branch, Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday 10 am. to 2 p.m. at 697-2366. See you at the Library!LIBRARY CORNERSummer reading program wraps up FridayHelen and Marion Jones Captain Marion and Miss Helen Jones celebrate 65 years. We love you, The Jones FamilyANNIVERSARYJoneses mark 65 years of marriageThe Carrabelle Volunteer Fire Department has a new flag and pole, thanks to a donation by WoodmenLife.On June 30, Carrabelle Fire Chief Carl Whaley and fellow firefighters accepted the gift, fully installed, from WoodmenLife, which over the past 70 years, has donated more than three million American and state flags to local chapters for presentation to nonprofit civic and youth groups, schools, churches, and community centers across the country.If theyre tattered or they dont have one, its all part of giving back to the community,Ž said Teresa Howard, WoodmenLife sales representative for Franklin County. I drove by there one day and saw they didnt even have one.ŽHoward said WoodmenLife is plan-ning on getting a new flag for Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 in Lanark Village. Last year, a new flag was donated by Woodmen-Life to the Eastpoint branch of the Franklin County Library.New Old Glory waves in CarrabelleCarrabelle dignitaries celebrate new ” agpole at Carrabelle “ rehouse June 30. [ DANA WHALEY | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ] At an event held July 9 by the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce, William and Susan Schmidt snip the ribbon on their newly-opened The Chow-der House, at 117 Market Street in Apalachicola. The restaurant, which features a variety of chowders, soups and bisques, as well as artisan salads and hand-crafted sandwiches, is open for lunches, from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.New Chowder House opens[ JOHN SOLOMON | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ]

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** The Times | Thursday, July 19, 2018 A7 FAITHEvan Patrick Rhodes, 68, of Odessa, passed away on Thursday evening, July 12, 2018 at Suncoast Hospice in Clearwater after a long battle with cancer. Rhodes was born May 30, 1950 in Apalachicola to Yvonne Patricia Wilson. After receiving his GED, he joined the U.S. Army in 1968, and served in Vietnam. He was honorably discharged in 1971. He worked as a landscaper at Bay Pines VA Hospital for 20 years. He loved family, and enjoyed being a blessing to many people through his generosity. He attended Mass at All Saints Catholic Church in Clearwater. He is survived by three sisters, twin sister Yvonne Patricia (Arnold) Tolliver, of Apalachicola, Sonia (Joseph) Jefferson, of Roseville,North Carolina; and Yasmin Rhodes, of Tampa; special friend Beverly Robinson, of Odessa; half-brothers Ernest and Edward Griffin, both of Apalachicola; nieces Juanita Jefferson, of Roseville, North Carolina, and Dreama Davidson, of Tampa; nephews Evan Patrick Rhodes, of New York City, Victor Jefferson of Wake Forest, North Carolina, and Ryan and Drake Jefferson, both of Raleigh, North Carolina, and John Davidson, of Tampa; and several great-nieces and great-nephews, and a host of friends. He was preceded in death by his father Moses Wilson; and brother Dexter Gerard Rhodes, A funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Patrick Catholic Church in Apalachicola this Saturday, July 21 at 11 a.m. Viewing at the church for family and friends will begin at 10 a.m., with rosary recited at 10:30 a.m. Burial with full military honors will follow at Magnolia Cemetery.OBITUARIES PATRICK RHODESRuth Ann Barnes died Tuesday, July 3, 2018, at Ozark Mountain Regional Healthcare in Crane, Missouri. She passed peacefully in her sleep with her youngest son, Christopher, by her side and with the help of hospice, nurses, and aides to comfort her. Ruth Ann was born Ruth Ann Walz to Martin and Jeanette Walz at St. Lukes Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri, on February 1, 1924. She entered first grade at age 5 in 1929 at E.F. Swinney School, which has since been placed in the National Registry of Historic Places. Ruth Ann skipped one grade due to proficiency in her schoolwork and graduated from eighth grade at the age of 12 in 1936. Ruth Ann began her high school years at Westport High School before her family moved to Shawnee Mission, Kansas, where she graduated in 1940 from Shawnee Mission Rural High School at age 16. She worked for Skelly Oil Company and then Western Union in Kansas City, Missouri, during World War II. Ruth Ann converted to Catholicism and enjoyed swing and jitterbug dancing at organized events throughout the war years. On April 26, 1944, Ruth Ann Walz married Navy pilot Lt. Cmdr. William G. Barnes who returned to school after the war to become a physician. Dr. Barnes passed away in 2002. To this marriage three children were born, William G. Barnes, Jr., Christopher M. Barnes, and Janet Lee Barnes. All three survive. Ruth Ann devoted her youth to making a home for her husband and children. With her encouragement, all three of her children went to college. Ruth Ann was a voracious reader of fiction, nonfiction, and periodicals. She returned to school in her 50s to complete her education at Stephens College in Columbia, Missouri, where she earned a bachelors degree in political science. Ruth Ann enjoyed an active social life and formed many lifelong f riendships with her golfing and travel buddies, and the nuns and priests with whom she worked at the Catholic Tribunal in Kansas City. While in her 60s, Ruth Ann moved to Apalachicola, and made many new friends in her new home. She was an avid letter writer, often gracing her correspondents with handwritten letters in longhand in her beautiful penmanship. She was a cat lover and dog lover and shared her life caring for many treasured family pets. Ruth Ann was opinionated and passionate about her beliefs, and could be fiercely loyal as well as a formidable opponent in a debate. In addition to her children, Ruth Ann left behind two granddaughters, Laurel and Lindsay, and one great-granddaughter, Shelby. Ruth Anns brother, John, and her sister, Pat, preceded her in death. Ruth Ann dearly loved her many nieces and nephews. She lived and worked in Arizona, Florida, Arkansas, and Missouri in the years following her graduation from college. Ruth Ann lived for many years with her daughter, Janet Lee, before Alzheimers disease required her constant care. Ruth Ann became a resident at Ozark Mountain Regional Healthcare on Feb. 7, 2015, where she used her walker to visit all corners of the facility day and night until Jan. 2018 when a bout of influenza slowed her down. The staff and residents knew her well and appreciated her sunny disposition and enjoyed her daily walkabouts. Ruth Anns wishes were to have her cremains scattered in the Gulf of Mexico. A memorial Mass will be celebrated at St. Josephs Parish in Billings, Missouri, at 8 a.m. on Sunday, July 29. Ruth Ann was a member of the Missouri Cremation Service. Online guestbook and obituary at www. missouricremation. com.RUTH ANN BARNES George Wilburn Creamer, Jr., 82, of Eastpoint, passed away Tuesday, July 10, 2018 in Jacksonville. He was born in Eastpoint, Oct. 29, 1935 to the late George Wilburn Creamer, Sr. and Mary Virginia (Segree) Creamer. He proudly served in the United States Air Force and was a retired Postmaster. He was of the Assembly of God faith. Survivors include his wife, Maxine Creamer, of Eastpoint; two sons, George Miles Creamer, and George Buckley Creamer and wife, Melissa, also of Eastpoint; two daughters, Virginia Gail Capps and husband, Jonathan, of Cleveland, Tennessee, and Cynthia Maxine Creamer, of Eastpoint; six grandchildren, Valentino, Gabrielle, Abigail, Annalyse, Grace, and Trulee; and one great-grandchild, Elisha; brothers, Greg Creamer and wife, Barbara, of St. Petersburg, and Doug Creamer and wife, Gwen, of Eastpoint; and a sister, Fay Burton and husband, Orlis, of Monroe, Tennessee. A graveside service was held in Eastpoint Cemetery at 11 a.m. Friday, July 13, with the Rev. Bobby Shiver officiating. Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown is assisting the family with the arrangements and you may offer the family condolences online at adamsfh.com.GEORGE W. CREAMER JR.A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated this Friday, July 20 at 9:30 a.m. at Sacred Heart Church, 2653 Hwy 98 East, Lanark Village, for James Joseph Welsh. Welsh, 80, passed away peacefully, surrounded by friends, under the care of Big Bend Hospice at St. James Bay Health and Rehabilitation Center in Carrabelle, on Tuesday afternoon, June 26. A reception will be held in the parish hall of the church right after Mass. Burial will follow at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Cemetery, Crawfordville. Jim was born in Granite City, Illinois on Jan. 1, 1938 to the late James and Alice Key Welsh. He retired from the state of Florida, after working for many years in an administrative role. Jim was a longtime columnist for the Apalachicola Times, faithfully authoring the column Lanark News every week for many years. In addition to being a member of Sacred Heart Parish, he was a member of the Apalachicola Knights of Columbus, of which he was a former district deputy. He is survived by one sister, Patricia Welsh Bentley, of Winter Haven, and two brothers, Gerald Welsh, of Eugene, Oregon, and Thomas Earl Welsh. Donations in Jims memory may be sent to Sacred Heart Church in Lanark Village, or to Big Bend Hospice.JIM WELSH The Eastpoint First Baptist Church would like to extend our deepest gratitude to the many people, organizations and churches that have been involved in many ways with our church and food ministry through this most difficult time with the recent fire. The Eastpoint com-munity is blessed to have such a caring neighbors. Please continue to pray for these families and their needs in the coming months. May God bless everyone that supported Eastpoint in its time of need.CARD OF THANKSEastpoint First Baptist ChurchButch Money at Fellowship Baptist SundayFellowship Baptist Church, 10 Ellis Van Vleet Street, Apala-chicola, invites you to a Sunday Morning Sing at 10:30 a.m. this Sunday, July 22.Local favorite Butch Money will be in con-cert. Everyone welcome.For more info call Tommy Luster at 653-8683.FAITH BRIEFS The Florida Depart-ment of Health in Franklin County will host Florida Health Day on Friday, July 27 at 11 a.m. in front of the Apalachicola Bay Charter School.This fun-filled event will offer fun for the whole family to enjoy. The onestop-shop event will offer on-site health screenings, games, prize raffles and inter-active public health information booths.For more info, call 653-2111 ext. 0119 Enjoy Florida Health Day July 27HEALTH BRIEF

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** A8 Thursday, July 19, 2018 | The Times OUTDOORSCONTACT USEmail outdoor news to timesoutdoors@starfl.com Fantastic Friday kids enjoyed crabbing on St. George Island last week. [ KAREN KESSEL | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ] By Jennifer A. SheffieldSpecial to the TimesFree classes in the sport of windsurfing are in full swing at Shell Point Beach, on Apalachee Bay east of Medart, in Wakulla County.The classes are offered by the Shell Point Sailboarding Club (SPSC) for the remainder of the summer. Students sign up for four hours of pro-fessional instruction, on a single day, and after that participating in open club practice days is encour-aged to continue learning technique.This 72-member social club is the longest in exis-tence for this activity in the Southeast. It operates on the public beach main-tained by the Wakulla County Department of Parks and Recreation. With Gulf access and optimal sea breeze, this coastline provides ideal conditions for a wind enthusiast,Lessons include orient-ing the board; up hauling, or lifting, the sail; and ways in which to tilt the boom to catch the wind. This sport does not require strength, or a specific body size, just developing surefootedness and remembering you have knees,Ž said member Andrea Schewndinger.Sailboarding differs only from windsurfing by its design. The latter became popular when the joint that attaches the sail to the board was trademarked in 1970, making equipment viable downwind. People were sailboarding before that, but the mast was fixed, as on a sailboat.Many principles, how-ever, are the same as with boating. You tell the board where to go,Ž said Bill Olson, a professional instructor at SPSC.Part of it is muscle memory, and the other part, is a realization of the wind,Ž he said.In addition to lessons, the club hosts several events.On Sunday, August 12 is an old-fashioned beach party, for kids and adults, called the Rum and Root Beer. And in October, anyone can join the fun and frivolity of its Endless Summer Sailboard Classic that includes a competition both for experts and for novice boarders. Distance races are ongo-ing, and a musical Wind CeremonyŽ kicks off the season.If you go to coastal places such as Pensacola,Ž said founding member, Perry Morris, there are so many places to sail, but they are split up. Here, it is Shell Point that brings us together.ŽFor information about membership or club trips, contact Bob Graves at 850-508-1587. Lesson sign-up is done, on the clubs website, where a calendar, can also be found www.20knotsnob.com.Sailboarding at Shell Point in full swingBring Me A Book Franklin, in collaboration with Eastpoint United Methodist Church is providing fun, educational Fridays during the dog days of summer. With partial funding from a summer reading grant by Dollar General and the Eastpoint UMC con-gregations generosity, children ages 4-10 can attend Fantastic Fridays through August 3.Breakfast, lunch and snacks are provided, as well as supervised day care from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. On Friday, July 13 children experienced St. George Island in a kayak, learning about boat safety, shore animals and plants through the Apalachicola Maritime Museum staff. Each child received a free book about boats and ocean life at the end of the day for their home Kids can enjoy Fantastic FridaysSometimes getting the hang of sailboarding can take a little time.[ JENNIFER SHEFFIELD | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ] Special to the TimesIts that time of year when you may be fishing for snapper and grouper. Continue your role as a conservationist by looking out for fish with signs of barotrauma and being prepared to respond.Barotrauma is a condition seen in many fish caught in waters greater than 50 feet that is caused by expansion of gases in the swim bladder.Its important to know in advance what tools are available and how to use them to help fish return to the bottom and increase their chances of survival. Signs of barotrauma include the stomach coming out of the mouth, bulging eyes, bloated belly and distended intestines.Descending devices take fish back down to a depth where increased pressure from the water will recom-press swim bladder gases. They fall into three categories: mouth clamps, inverted hooks and fish elevators. Learn more about descending devices and how to use them at MyFWC.com/Saltwater-Fishing by clicking on the Descending DevicesŽ playlist.Venting tools are sharp-ened, hollow instruments that treat barotrauma by releasing expanded gas from the swim bladder, enabling the fish to swim back down to capture depth.Please note, items such as fillet knives, ice picks, screwdrivers and gaffs are not venting tools and should never be used to vent a fish. Venting a fish incorrectly may cause more harm than good.To properly vent, lay the fish on its side (on a cool, wet surface). Venting tools should be inserted one to two inches behind the base of the pectoral fin, under a scale at a 45-degree angle, just deep enough to release trapped gasses. Never insert venting tools into a fishs belly, back or stom-ach that may be protruding from the mouth. Learn how to vent properly by visiting https://youtu.be/jhkzv1_2Bpc Descending devices and venting tools should only be used when fish show one or more signs of baro-trauma and cannot swim back down on their own. It is essential to work quickly when using these tools and return the fish to the water as soon as possible. Anglers should choose the device and method they are most comfortable with and that best fits the situation.To learn more about catch-and-release techniques, visit MyFWC. com/Fishing and click on Saltwater Fishing,Ž Recreational RegulationsŽ and Fish Handling.Ž To learn more about barotrauma, descending devices and venting tools, visit our YouTube channel at MyFWC.com/Saltwater-Fishing. For answers to questions, contact 850487-0554 orMarine@MyFWC.com.With barotrauma, use the right toolsRecreational red snapper season closes SaturdayIf you havent made it out yet, the red snapper season for recreational anglers fishing from private vessels and for charter captains who do not have a federal reef fish permit closes this Satur-day, July 21. The federal season for for-hire opera-tions with federal reef fish permits is open through Sunday, July 22.Share your real-time catch data with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commis-sion by downloading and using the iAngler Gulf Red Snapper app for pri-vate anglers or the iAngler Gulf Red Snapper Charter app if you are a charter operation. These new smartphone apps were designed specifically for voluntary reporting of red snapper catch information and are available via your phones app store.Dont forget to add Gulf Reef Fish Angler on your license (includes those that are exempt) before you go fishing for reef fish from a private recreational boat in Gulf state and federal waters (excluding Monroe County). You can get this printed on your license at no cost at GoOutdoors-Florida.com or by visiting any location where you can purchase a license.For-hire operations that do not have a federal reef fish permit are limited to state waters only for red snapper fishing and must have State Gulf Reef Fish Charter on their license to target red snap-per and other reef fish in Gulf state waters (exclud-ing Monroe County). This can be done at no cost at a local tax collectors office.To learn more about the 40-day recreational red snapper season in Gulf state and federal waters, including season size and bag limits, visit MyFWC.com/Snappers.OUTDOOR BRIEFVenting tools should be inserted 1-2 inches behind the base of the pectoral “ n, under a scale at a 45-degree angle, just deep enough to release trapped gasses. FISHING REPORTWe have had a lot of rain and storms the last couple weeks and this has made fishing a little difficult having to outrun the storms or being run off the beach while trying to fish. Never the less fishing has not been to bad on the Forgotten Coast. Flats fishing has not been bad but you have to be on the water very early and hit it hard with live shrimp or soft plastics. Trout and Redfish are being taken and plenty of slot fish out there. Flounder has been real good since spring and we've seen some nice fish. Our favorite bait is Bull Minnows but white or cream colored grubs will take fish as well. Off shore Snapper continues to be great with many very nice fish showing up. With only a couple weeks left for Snapper get out there anglers and make it happen. Keep in mind though that next month we'll move in to Scallop season if everything stays as it is the season will open Aug. 17 and run till Sept. 30.

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** The Times | Thursday, July 19, 2018 A9 SPORTSBy David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl.com 850-653-8894Its been a second-place kind of summer for Chip Sanders, who is once again riding the circuit on his skimboard.Sanders has finished second twice, but hes still in the running to capture the point championship for the Grand-masters Tour. At the Virginia Beach Show-down June 8-10, Sanders placed second, missing first by a single point, once against representing his chief sponsor and team, Zap Skimboards. He also enjoys the sponsorship of Panhandle Heli-copter, Enjoy Apalachicola, the Atlanta Br eakfast Club, Harry A's, Kara Landiss, the Grady Market and Ace Hardware.Im excited to bring home this state of Virginia-shaped trophy back to Florida, I cant wait to put it in the showcase,Ž he wrote on Facebook to his fans. This competition was a tough one and I thought I wouldnt make it to the finals. It seemed impossible as I was facing all Virginia Beach locals on their home tuff in the semi-final heat, but I didnt give up. I was able to fight through and bring home second place, which was a blessing because I was able to gain lots of points for the championship points chase.ŽOn June 22, Sanders flew from Atlanta to the Skim Jam in Sea Bright, New Jersey, feeling a bit dehydrated but ready for the completion.To get on a plane feeling like this is no good, but through the grace of God I will find a way,Ž he wrote. If you want some-thing bad enough you will find a way, and thats my mind set.ŽSanders said the most impor-tant part of the trip was being to see the Statue of Liberty from the Jersey shore. He later vis-ited the site of the World Trade Center, and now wears a neck-lace commemorating 9-11. I wear that its like my charm,Ž he said.The memories I got from this trip will forever be engraved into my heart and soul as I vis-ited Ground Zero (911) for the first time in New York City and it hit me just as if it happened that day,Ž Sanders wrote.Sanders again took second, noting that you have no idea what I would do to have one more shot at this wave... If I would of landed this Swack, then I would have won the contest.ŽHe now heads this weekend to the Outer Banks, North Car-olina to compete at Kill Devil Hills in Dare County, the site of the Wright Brothers famed flight. In August, its the East Coast World Championships in Dewey Beach Delaware, and then in October, the tour wraps up in California.So far I just like to compete,Ž he said. Its my ability.ŽSanders in chase on skimboard tourChip Sanders rides a wave. [ PHOTO COURTESY OF SALTY TIDES ] The Sea Bright trophy is the most strangest but most appreciated trophy I have won so far,Ž wrote Sanders. It is a masterpiece and its made all from collected beach trash from the ocean and you know I love a clean beach.Ž [ PHOTO COURTESY CHIP SANDERS ] Chip Sanders Virginia-shaped trophy. [ PHOTO COURTESY CHIP SANDERS ]

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** 1. 1902s  Le Voyage dans la LuneŽ often is considered to be the first film of what genre? Horror, Comedy, Science “ ction, Romance 2. Where is the only country in the world that ends in the letter  KŽ? South America, Scandinavia, Polynesia, Caribbean 3. Which Major League Baseball team plays its home games at 100 Main St.? Reds, White Sox, Padres, Orioles 4. The Yellow Coach Co. later became what brand of trucks? Peterbilt, GMC, Mack, Kenworth 5. Which singer is/was called Little Miss DynamiteŽ? Dolly Parton, Petula Clark, Brenda Lee, Patsy Cline 6. In auto-racing flags, what color means  finishŽ? Black, White, Checkered, Green ANSWERS: 1. Science “ ction, 2. Scandinavia (Denmark), 3. Reds (Cincinnati), 4. GMC, 5. Brenda Lee, 6. CheckeredTrivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy.com A10 Thursday, July 19, 2018 | The Times W i l s o n C a s e y Wilson Casey TRIVIA FUNf-stop is an abbreviation for a camera lens aperture setting that corresponds to an f-number, which is the ratio of the focal length of a lens to the effective diameter of its aperture. If you have a good summer photo, please share. The Times welcomes readers to send us their best photographs, whether they capture summer fun, a warm smile, brilliant color, an unusuai image, person, place or thing, we want it. Photos can be of any subject, but we especially like people. Please send photographs to David Adlerstein at Dadlerstein@starfl.com. For more information, call 653-8894.F-STOP FRANKLINKayaks at the ready waiting out an early morning storm off St. George Island. [JEFF KNUTSON | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ] Black-bellied plover at Bald Point State Park. [ROD GASCHE | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ] River otter in the rain. [JAMES HARGROVE | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES] A shrimper heads out. [JO PEARMAN | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES] You can almost hear it. [ ROGER MUTERSPAUGH | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES] St. George Plantation is again sponsoring a summer photo contest for 2018. Photos will be accepted for the eighth annual contest, this year entitled Action on St. George Island, until August 31. Consider St. George Islands scenery, activities, events, businesses, and vacation shots. Prizes are $150 for first place, $100 for second place, $75 for third and for Peoples Choice. For rules and how to enter, go to stgeorgeplan tation.com, and click on Photo Contest 2018. Or e-mail office@sgpoa.com.Have a good photo of St. George Island? Summer heat

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** The Times | Thursday, July 19, 2018 A11

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** A12 Thursday, July 19, 2018 | The Times 21108 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Comian X Tax Lien Fund, LLC, the Certificate Holder of the following Tax Sale Certificate, has filed said Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Tax Deed Application number, Real Estate number, Certificate number, Date of Issuance and Name(s) in which it was assessed are Application #2018-08 Tax Sale Certificate # 2010-519 Name in which assessed: Estate of Edith M. Nations R.E. No. 02166-000R Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 Description of Property: Lots 18 and 19, Block 6, Lake Alice Subdivision, Wewahitchka, Florida, according to a recorded plat in the Clerks Office, Port St. Joe, Florida. All of said property being in Gulf County, State Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 am E.T., Wednesday, 22nd day of August, 2018. DATED: July 16, 2019 REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Elaine Bland, Deputy Clerk Pub July 19, 26, August 2, 9, 2018 21083S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 17000071CAAXMX TRINITY FINANCIAL SERVICES, LLC, Plaintiff, VS. DAVID A. TRUNZO, et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Clerk of Court of Gulf County, will on the 2nd day of August, 2018, at 11:00 AM EST at In the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situate in Gulf County, Florida: LOT 5, BLOCK B, PARK POINT AT SECLUDED DUNES, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, AT PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. PROPERTY ADDRESS: LOT 5 BLOCK B PARK POINT, PORT ST JOE, FL 32456 pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in Case No. 232017CA000071CAAXIVIX of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, the style of which indicated above. WITNESS MY HAND and seal of this Court on July 3rd, 2018. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: B A Baxter Deputy Clerk Law Offices of Damian G. Waldman, Esq. PO Box 5162 Seminole, FL 33779 Pub: July 12, 19, 2018 21085S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2017-CA-000067 CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, V. THE UNKNOWN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF LINDA D. GREEN, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on August 2, 2018, at 11:00 a.m. EST, in the Gulf County Courthouse Lobby, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 in accordance with Chapter 45, F.S., offer for sale and sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in Gulf County, Florida, to wit: Lot Thirty-One (31), Block One Thousand Ten (1010), Millview Addition to the City of Port St. Joe, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Pages 46 and 47, in the office of the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. Property Address: 502 Battles Street, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pending in said Court, the style and case number of which is set forth above. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagees attorney. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. 0. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is lessthan seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email AD ARequest@jud14.flco urts.org ITNESS my hand and official seal of this Honorable Court, this 5th day of July, 2018. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: B A Baxter Deputy Clerk Sirote & Permutt, P.C. 1201 S. Orlando Ave, Suite 430 Winter Park, FL 32789 floridaservice@sirote.com Pub: July 12, 19, 2018 21089S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2016-CA-000114 DIVISION: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. GINGER TAYLOR BERNAL, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 28th, 2018, and entered in Case No. 23-2016-CA-000114 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which Nationstar Mortgage, LLC, is the Plaintiff and GINGER TAYLOR BERNAL; JOHN PAUL BERNAL; JAE J. PATE; LAURA M. TAYLOR; MARLEN E. TAYLOR; THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST ALFRED EDWARD JOINES, DECEASED; AND ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, re defendants, the Gulf County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M.Eastern Time on the 2nd day of August, 2018 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT TWENTY-TWO (22) IN BLOCK EIGHTY-FOUR (84) OF UNIT NO. 1, OF ST. JOSEPHS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 28, PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 1002 GARRISON AVENUE, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 5th day of July, 2018. Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: B A Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attornet for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 Fax eService: servealaw@albertellilaw .co m Pub: July 12, 19, 2018 21097S PUBLIC NOTICE THE CODE ENFORCEMENT SPECIAL MASTER WILL HOLD CODE ENFORCEMENT HEARINGS: WHEN:F riday, July 20, 2018 TIME: 3:00 p.m. -4:00 p.m. WHERE:Commissioners Chamber 2775 Garrison Ave. SUBJECT: Code Enforcement violations For the following location: 103 Monica Drive Gulf County P arcel 03060 000R 3:00 p.m. 302 16th Street Gulf County P arcel 05219 080R 4:00p.m All persons are invited to attend these hearings. Any person who decides to appeal any decision made by the Special Master with respect to any matter considered at said hearing will need a record of the proceedings, and for such purpose may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. The Code Enforcement Special Master of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida will not provide a verbatim record of this meeting. IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceedings should contact Charlotte Pierce, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, Telephone No. 850/229-8261. THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE Charlotte Pierce City Clerk Pub: July 12,19, 2018 21110S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File Number 18-44-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF ANTHONY DAVID SHULER File Number 18-44-PR Deceased.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, July 19, 2018 The Times | A13 NF-4529592 The Blue Parrot is Now Hiring:Cooks Servers Cashiers Hostesses Bussers Bartenders68 West Gorrie Dr. St. George IslandApply in Person at Blue Parrot Ocean Front Cafe NF-4529603NEWLY RENOVATED! (2) Lanark Village Apartments 2 bed, 1 bath Units $1200/ month, $1200 SD All Utilities Included NO PETS AVAILABLE AUGUST 56-3 Parker in Lanark 1 bed, 1 bath € $550/month $1000 Refundable SD No Pets AVAILABLE AUGUST 308 A 1st Street 2 bed, 1 bath € $800/month $1000 Refundable SD No Pets is currently seekingFull Time Counselors, Case Managers, and Nursesto work with children and adults in Bay, Gulf, Calhoun, Jackson, Holmes and Washington Counties. For more details on these and other positions, please visit us online at: http://lmccares.org/careers/employment opportunities NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of ANTHONY DAVID SHULER, deceased, whose date of death was June 9th, 2018 and whose social security number is ___-__-0855, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is July 19, 2018. Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin Florida Bar No. 699070 Post Office Box 98 Port Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Telephone: (850) 227-1159 email:ccostin@costinlaw .c om Personal Representatives: Shirley Shuler 9323 Olive Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Pub July 19, 26, 2018 21112S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File Number 18-41-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF CLAUDE RANDOLF WESTON, JR. Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of CLAUDE RANDOLF WESTON, JR., deceased, whose date of death was July 24, 2017 and whose social security number is ___-__-9239, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is July 19, 2018. Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin Florida Bar No. 699070 Post Office Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Telephone: (850) 227-1159 email:ccostin@costinlaw .c om Personal Representatives: George G. Weston 321 N. Diana Street Wewahitchka, FL 32465 John M. Weston 4403 Bayou Oaks Drive Panama City, FL 32465 Pub July 19, 26, 2018 21122S PUBLIC NOTICE The FY 2018 Continuum of Care (CoC) NOFA has been released and can be found on www .hudexchange.info/pro grams/coc/. Any organization, including those that are not cur rently funded through the NWFL CoC, may submit new project ap plications for the D V bonus in the amount of $78, 384 and/or Rapid Rehousing bonus in the amount of $45,831. Please visit www .doorwaysnwfl.org for more information and timelines. If you have any questions, please contact 850 481 5446. Pub July 19, 2018 Port Saint Joe310 4th Street Sat. July 21 8am -tillJohnnie’s Trim Shop Moving SaleFurniture, Remnant Fabrics, Old Retro Tables, Some Tools, Revolving Display Racks, Old Bicycles & Parts (Some New), & misc. Attached are photos of the 1973 John Deere 310D backhoe, serial No. 208958T. The hour meter shows 6,672 hours so despite the age it was hardly used. It was used sparingly over the years on a large piece of property in the area by one man. He liked to move dirt. I have charged the battery and it turns over, but I was not able to start it. My experience with small Diesel tractors is that they have glow plugs and/or a compression release to aid in starting. If this thing has one I couldn’t figure it out. I didn’t notice any leaks from the engine or hydraulic system. Some of the hydraulic lines appear new. I am asking $8,000. The machine is located in Eastpoint close to the bay. Call 504-523-3456 Open to offers. Acorn Outdoor / Indoor Stair LiftExcellent Condition Outdoor stair lift but always under cover of stairwell out of weather/elements. Easily used indoors. New computer board, remotes & cover. 17ft right-side travel rail. $1,350. 850.294.7494, jessemckenzie50@gma il.com Golf Course Maintenance Employees NeededFull Time or Part time Applications available at the Club House 700 Country Club Rd Drug Free Establishment Equal Opportunity Employer Pro Shop and Restaurant Customer Service WorkerSt Joseph Bay Golf Club seeks a part-time worker to perform outstanding customer service to the patrons of the St Joseph Bay Golf Club to include Pro Shop, Restaurant and Bar. Candidates should have experience in computer operations, cash register operations, food preparation, handling and cooking. Candidate must have excellent customer service skills, be able to work independently, processing sales, handling money, cleaning facility, stocking merchandise and knowledge of golf course rules. Candidates must apply in person, applications available at the St Joseph Bay Golf Club Pro Shop Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Indian Pass Area 4 bedroom / 2bath on 5 acres with pond. 1 Year Lease. $1800 per month $750 deposit. Call (850)370-6001 Bluff Road Small Engine RepairRepairs -Lawn Mowers, Weed Eaters, Blowers, Etc. Located at 636 Bluff Road Apalachicola, FL Contact: 850-653-8632 or 850-653-5439 pcreamer123@ gmail.com If you’re ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 Look No Further Than The Classifieds What you want is right before your eyes in the Classified Section of your daily and Sunday newspaper. For Fast Results,Call 864-0320

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** A14 Thursday, July 19, 2018 | The TimesThe following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Office. Arrests listed this week were made by officers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department, and the Franklin County Sheriffs Office. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. July 7Mark W. Westmoreland, 59, Apalachicola, battery on person age 65 or older; $1,000 bond (FCSO) July 8Jason Paul James, 37, East-point, violation of pre-trial release for domestic battery; $15,000 bond (FCSO) July 9Warren Keith Cadwallader, 69, Apalachicola, domestic battery; released on own recognizance (FCSO) July 10Lanny Clinton Rester, 60, Apalachicola, driving while license suspended or revoked … second offense; $500 bond (FCSO)Miguel Juan De Juan, 39, Apalachicola, fleeing or eluding a law enforcement officer, operating a motor vehicle without a valid drivers license; $6,000 bond (APD) July 11Esmeralda Dominguez, 50, Apalachicola, trespassing … failure to leave property upon order by owner; $500 bond (APD) July 12Sierra Downing, 27, Panama City, possession of methamphetamine with intent to sell, manufacture or deliver, possession of drug paraphernalia; $26,000 bond (FCSO)Sherion Sweat, 27, Pell City, Alabama, possession of methamphetamine with intent to sell, manufacture or deliver, possession of drug paraphernalia; $26,000 bond (FCSO)Rachel Caudle, 19, Eastpoint, possession of methamphetamine with intent to sell, manufacture or deliver, possession of drug paraphernalia; $16,000 bond (FCSO)Kristopher Michael Suggs, 41, Eastpoint, failure to appear; held without bond (FCSO)Melissa S. Britcher, 34, Eastpoint, failure to appear; $1,000 bond (FCSO) July 13Jason Paul James, 37, East-point, violation of conditional release for domestic violence, resisting officer without vio-lence; $500 bond (FCSO)Jessica Anne Scarborough, 28, Crawfordville, possession of cocaine with intent to sell, manufacture or deliver, pos-session of drug paraphernalia: $15,000 bond (FCSO)Julia Ann Wilhoit, 34, Quincy, driving while license suspended or revoked; $500 bond (FCSO)Brittany Lee Cooper, 20, Carrabelle, felony domestic battery; released on own recognizance (CPD)Jimmy Roger Shiver, 26, Eastpoint, two counts viola-tion of probation, failure to appear on charge of introducing contraband into the county jail; held without bail (FCSO) July 14Stacey Leigh Francway, 27, Tallahassee, two counts misdemeanor violation of probation, violation of pre-trial release, failure to appear; held without bond (FCSO)Elijah Cole Wheeler, 21, Carrabelle, possession of a controlled substance without a prescription; $2,500 bond (CPD)ARREST REPORTDuring the week of June 22 through 28, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva-tion Commission Officer Travis was on patrol near the John Gorrie Bridge and saw several subjects returning from fishing to their vehicles. Travis conducted a resource inspection and found the subjects in possession of eight undersized seat-rout and one undersized bull shark. The fish were seized and two subjects were cited.FWC REPORT Full moon climb July 27 at island lighthouseThe July Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Light-house on St. George Island will be Friday, July 27. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb, from 8:30 to 10 p.m., will include light hors d'oeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended.The sun will set at 8:36 p.m. and the BuckŽ moon will rise at 8:36 p.m., so called because buck deer start growing velvety hair-covered antlers in July. Full moon names are attribut-able to native American tribes, most notably the Algonquin, who named the moons to mark the changing seasons.After sunset, people without reservations are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members.The Cape St. George Light is in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park.For reservations or more information, please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745. Paddle Jams seeks volunteersForgotten Coast Paddle Club is having open meetings for volunteers, members, those interested in becoming new members or volunteers and those interested in helping with Paddle Jam.The Fall Paddle Jam is slated for Oct. 5-7, and the Spring Paddle Jam will be April 5-7, 2019The meetings will be held at the Battery Park Community Center on the last Monday of the month from 6 to 7 p.m. Upcoming meeting dates are July 30, August 27, and Sept. 24.For more information, call Steven Grogan, Paddle Jam coordinator, at (850) 340-0127 or email him at fcpaddleclub@gmail.comNEWS BRIEFS

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, July 19, 2018 The Times | B1 21058T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 192016CA000141CAAXM X MTGLQ INVESTORS, L.P., Plaintiff, VS. PAMELA A. WHITE; FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION; CHASE BANK USA, N.A.; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated June 27, 2018, and entered in Case No. 192016CA000141CAAXMX of the Circuit Court in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein MTGLQ INVESTORS, L.P. is Plaintiff and PAMELA A. WHITE; FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION; CHASE BANK USA, N.A.; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED.: are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, 11:00 a.m., on August 23, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 5, ALLIGATOR POINT, UNRECORDED. A PARCEL OF LAND IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE I WEST, IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A PARCEL OF LAND DESCRIBED AS TRACT 5, THE COMMON INTRODUCTORY POINT OF WHICH IS AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE POINT OF INTERSECTION OF THE EAST BOUNDARY SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WITH THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF GULF SHORE BOULEVARD (STATE ROAD 370), SAID POINT BEING MARKED BY A CONCRETE MONUMENT AND BEING THE NORTHEASTERN CORNER OF LANDS PLATTED AS PENINSULAR POINT, UNIT NUMBER 4, SAID PLAT BEING OF RECORD IN PLAT BOOK I, PAGE 24, IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; FROM SAID POINT RUN THENCE NORTH 84 DEGREES 51 MINUTES WEST 40.16 FEET ALONG THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF GULF SHORE BOULEVARD TO A POINT MARKED BY A CONCRETE MONUMENT AND BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF A LOT DEED BY PENINSULAR POINT, INC. A FLORIDA CORPORATION, TO R. E. KESTNER, IN DECEMBER 1949, SAPD KESTNER PROPERTY BEING A STRIP OF LAND APPROXIMATELY 100 FEET IN WIDTH EXTENDING FROM THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF SAID GULF SHORE BOULEVARD (STATE ROAD 370) NORTH TO THE WATERS OF ALLIGATOR BAY, ALSO KNOWN AS ALLIGATOR HARBOR AND BEING BOUNDED ON THE WEST BY CERTAIN LANDS OF THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION OF FLORIDA, A PUBLIC CORPORATION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA (F.S.U. MARINE LABORATORY), FROM SAID SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SAID R. E. KESTNER PROPERTY RUN THENCE DUE NORTH ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID R. E. KESTNER PROPERTY AND PARALLEL TO THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, A DISTANCE 822.5 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 78 DEGREES 40 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY SIDE OF A ROAD A DISTANCE OF 153 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 79 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST 534.5 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 74 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 711 FEET TO A POINT MARKED BY A CONCRETE MONUMENT, BEING SAID COMMON INTRODUCTORY POINT; FROM SAID COMMON INTRODUCTORY POINT, RUN THENCE SOUTH 79 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 421.4 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 55 DEGREES 54 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF A PROPOSED 50 FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAY CONTAINING AN EXISTING ROCK PAVED STREET OR ROAD A DISTANCE OF 289.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 5 DEGREES 52 MINUTES EAST 299.5 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTH SHORE OF ALLIGATOR BAY, ALSO KNOWN AS ALLIGATOR HARBOR, THENCE NORTH 84 DEGREES 03 MINUTES EAST 59 FEET ALONG THE SAID SOUTHERN SHORE LINE, THENCE SOUTH 58 DEGREES 00 MINUTES EAST 6 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 4 DEGREES 29 MINUTES WEST 355.1 FEET TO THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF SAID PROPOSED ROAD, THENCE NORTH 55 DEGREES 54 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF SAID PROPOSED ROAD RIGHT-OF-WAY A DISTANCE OF 85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE I WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. THE ABOVE DESCRIPTION IS PURSUANT TO THE ATTACHED PLAT, WITH PERMANENT RIGHT OF INGRESS, EGRESS AND REGRESS TO, FROM AND OVER SAID 50 FEET RIGHT-OF-WAY AND SAID ROCK PAVED ROAD, INCLUDING A CONNECTING CAUSEWAY TO S. R. 370 (GULF SHORE BOULEVARD) SAID TRACT 5 FRONTING ON ALLIGATOR BAY BEACH AND LOCATED ON THE BAY HARBOR SIDE OF THE ISLAND TYPE PENINSULAR NOW COMMONLY KNOWN AS ALLIGATOR POINT. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Franklin County Courthouse. Telephone 850-653-8861 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, on June 28, 2018 MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 19519 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33318 phone: (954) 564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.c om Pub July 12, 19, 2018 21059T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File Number: 2018 CP 0025 IN RE: ESTATE OF Manuel Steven Norris Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Manuel Steven Norris, deceased, whose date of death was January 19, 2018 is pending in the Circuit Court of Franklin County Florida, Probate Division; File Number 2018 CP 0025, the address of which is The Franklin County Court House, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands against the estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS: July 12, 2018. Personal Representative Kansas Norris 510 N.W. 5th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322 Attorney for Personal Representative Daniel H. Cox P.O. Box CC Carrabelle, FL 32322 (850)697-5555 Email dhcox@gtcom.net Florida Bar No: 146420 Pub: July 12, 19, 2018 21070T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 192015CA000316CAAXM X WILMINGTON SAVINGS FUND SOCIETY FSB D/B/A CHRISTIANA TRUST NOT INDIVIDUALLY BUT AS TRUSTEE FOR PRETIUM MORTGAGE ACQUISITION TRUST, Plaintiff, vs. NANCY L. BURKE A/K/A NANCY BURKE; PATRICK J. BURKE A/K/A PARTICK BURKE; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 19, 2018, and entered in 192015CA000316CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein WILMINGTON SAVINGS FUND SOCIETY FSB D/B/A CHRISTIANA TRUST NOT INDIVIDUALLY BUT AS TRUSTEE FOR PRETIUM MORTGAGE ACQUISITION TRUST is the Plaintiff and NANCY L. BURKE A/K/A NANCY BURKE; PATRICK J. BURKE A/K/A PARTICK BURKE; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendant(s). Marcia M. Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 33 Market Street, 2nd Floor Lobby of Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM, on July 26, 2018 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 20, BAYOU HARBOR, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 38, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Property Address: 1621 BAYOU DR CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Dated this 21st day of May, 2018 Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Terry C. Segree As Deputy Clerk IMPORT ANT AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.606.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L., Boca Raton, FL 33487 phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-997-6909 17-077002-MaMPub July 12, 19, 2018 21082T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 14000335CAAXMX FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (“FANNIE MAE”), A CORPORATION ORGANIZED AND EXISTING UNDER THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA., Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM CURTIS WATSON A/K/A WILLIAM C. WATSON, et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 24, 2015, and entered in 14000335CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (“FANNIE MAE”), A CORPORATION ORGANIZED AND EXISTING UNDER THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. is the Plaintiff and BOBBIE WATSON; WILLIAM CURTIS WATSON AKA WILLIAM C. WATSON are the Defendant(s). Marcia M. Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 33 Market Street, 2nd Floor Lobby of Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM, on July 26, 2018 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT A 1 INCH IRON PIPE MARKING THE POINT OF INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF BLUFF ROAD (COUNTY ROAD NO. 384) WITH THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1508.49 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 177.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4889), THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 237.41 FEET TO A NAIL AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST 376.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4215), THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 279.50 FEET TO A 3/4 IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 87 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 32.91 FEET TO A 1 INCH IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 551.42 FEET TO A 1 INCH IRON PIPE LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID BLUFF ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 74.96 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Property Address: 556 BLUFF RD, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 10th day of July, 2018. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORT ANT AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.606.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-997-6909 14-76289-MaM Pub July 12, 19, 2018 21103T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 19-2017-CA-000058 CU MEMBERS MORTGAGE, ADIVISION OF COLONIALSAVINGS, F.A., Plaintiff, vs. PAULH MATTHEWS, ET. AL., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed June 27, 2018 entered in Civil Case No. 19-2017-CA-000058 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Apalachicola, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL. 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 23rd day of August, 2018 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 6 and the North 14 feet of Lot 7, Block D, Pickett`s Addition to the Town of Carrabelle, Florida, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 20, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 28th day of June, 2018 CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk MCCALLARAYMER LEIBERTPIERCE, LLC, ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF 110 SE 6TH STREET FORTLAUDERDALE, FL33301 (407) 674-1850 July 19, 26, 2018 21105T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT GARY MITCHELL the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a TAX DEED to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: PARCEL ID# 20-075-07W-0000-0020-0 000 CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 1017 CERTIFICATE YEAR: 2011 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: LOTS 13, 14, 15 AND 16, BLOCK 247 (OLD BLOCK 84) OF KEOUGH’S SECOND ADDITION, IN THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS REOCRDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGES(S) 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MOBILE HOME SITUATE THERON PROPERTY ADDRESS: N/A NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: Randall W. Scott and David E. Snyder All of said property being in the State of Florida, County of Franklin. Unless such certificate or certificates shall be redeemed according to the law the property described in such certificate or certificates will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the First (1st) Monday in the month of AUGUST, 2018 which is the 6TH day of AUGUST, 2018 AT 11:00 A.M. MARCIA M. JOHNSON (SEAL) CLERK OF COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Lauren Luberto, Deputy Clerk Pub: July 12, 19, 26, August 2, 2018 21109T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT STEPHEN & CAROLYN COLEMAN, the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a TAX DEED to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: PARCEL ID# 14-07S-04W-3131-0000-0 020 CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 319 CERTIFICATE YEAR: 2012 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Lot 2, Block “0”, Lanark Beach tfl, per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 13, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida PROPERTY ADDRESS: 163 Idaho Street, Lanark Beach, FL 32322 NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: Charles M. Smith All of said property being in the State of Florida, County of Franklin. Unless such certificate or certificates shall be redeemed according to the law the property described in such certificate or certificates will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the First (1st) Monday in the month of AUGUST, 2018 which is the 6TH day of AUGUST, 2018 AT 11:00 A.M. MARCIA M. JOHNSON (SEAL) CLERK OF COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Lauren Luberto, Deputy Clerk Pub: July 12, 19, 26, August 2, 2018 21107T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT MARGARET POSTEN the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a TAX DEED to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: PARCEL ID# 03-08S-05W-1001-0000-0 070 CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 617 CERTIFICATE YEAR: 2014 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Lot 7, BAY MAGNOLIA, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 14, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida PROPERTY ADDRESS: N/A NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: Bay Magnolia LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company All of said property being in the State of Florida, County of Franklin. Unless such certificate or certificates shall be redeemed according to the law the property described in such certificate or certificates will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the First (1st) Monday in the month of AUGUST, 2018 which is the 6TH day of AUGUST, 2018 AT 11:00 A.M. MARCIA M. JOHNSON (SEAL) CLERK OF COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Lauren Luberto, Deputy Clerk Pub: July 12, 19, 26, August 2, 2018 21113T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2018-CP-000043 Division PROBATE RONALD JOE HARPER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Ronald Joe Harper deceased, whose date of death was March 20th, 2018 is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Room 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320 The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SECTION 733.702 WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is July 19, 2018. Attorneys for Personal Representative: DONNA DUNCAN, ESQ. SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. 80 MARKET STREETAPALACHICOLA, FL 32320 By: DONNA DUNCAN, ESQ. Florida Bar No. 63869 Email Address: dduncan@fairpoint.com Personal Representative: Marjorie Langley 216 Old Ferry Dock Road Eastpoint, FL 32328 Pub: July 19, 26, 2018

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B2| The Times Thursday, July 19, 2018 CLASSIFIEDS NF-4529592 The Blue Parrot is Now Hiring:Cooks Servers Cashiers Hostesses Bussers Bartenders68 West Gorrie Dr. St. George IslandApply in Person at Blue Parrot Ocean Front Cafe NF-4529603NEWLY RENOVATED! (2) Lanark Village Apartments 2 bed, 1 bath Units $1200/ month, $1200 SD All Utilities Included NO PETS AVAILABLE AUGUST 56-3 Parker in Lanark 1 bed, 1 bath € $550/month $1000 Refundable SD No Pets AVAILABLE AUGUST 308 A 1st Street 2 bed, 1 bath € $800/month $1000 Refundable SD No Pets is currently seekingFull Time Counselors, Case Managers, and Nursesto work with children and adults in Bay, Gulf, Calhoun, Jackson, Holmes and Washington Counties. For more details on these and other positions, please visit us online at: http://lmccares.org/careers/employment opportunities Bluff Road Small Engine RepairRepairs -Lawn Mowers, Weed Eaters, Blowers, Etc. Located at 636 Bluff Road Apalachicola, FL Contact: 850-653-8632 or 850-653-5439 pcreamer123@ gmail.com Gretchen Custom SlipcoversNow on the Coast Cushions, pillows, home sewing needs. Call: 850-841-0298 Attached are photos of the 1973 John Deere 310D backhoe, serial No. 208958T. The hour meter shows 6,672 hours so despite the age it was hardly used. It was used sparingly over the years on a large piece of property in the area by one man. He liked to move dirt. I have charged the battery and it turns over, but I was not able to start it. My experience with small Diesel tractors is that they have glow plugs and/or a compression release to aid in starting. If this thing has one I couldn’t figure it out. I didn’t notice any leaks from the engine or hydraulic system. Some of the hydraulic lines appear new. I am asking $8,000. The machine is located in Eastpoint close to the bay. Call 504-523-3456 Open to offers. Acorn Outdoor / Indoor Stair LiftExcellent Condition Outdoor stair lift but always under cover of stairwell out of weather/elements. Easily used indoors. New computer board, remotes & cover. 17ft right-side travel rail. $1,350. 850.294.7494, jessemckenzie50@gma il.com Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency w/ kitchen & living room. Call for info 850-653-6103 Text FL97546 to 56654 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. St. George Island$210/wk for extended stay, elec, satellite, 12’X 65’ deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5800 Indian Pass Area 4 bedroom / 2bath on 5 acres with pond. 1 Year Lease. $1800 per month $750 deposit. Call (850)370-6001 If you’re ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you!