Citation
The Apalachicola times

Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group,Tim Thompson - Publisher, Tim Croft- Editor
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates:
29.725278 x -84.9925

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Cf. Gregory, W. Amer. newspapers, 1937.:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Apalachicola Times. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
32911693 ( OCLC )
sn 95026907 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald

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** Volume 133 Number 12 Phone: 850-653-8868 Fax: 850-653-8893 Opinion .................... A4 Society ...................... A8 Faith ........................ A9 Outdoors ................. A10 Sports...................... A11 f-stop Franklin.......... A12 Classified ............ A14-15 Law Enforcement ....... A17 A5 Chasing Shadows: How did St. George Island get its name? A8 Foodies step up to help fire victims OUT TO SEE AA ALL-STARS SHOW THEIR FIGHT AT STATE, A11 RESUSCITATING LAUGHING GULLS, A10 Thursday, July 12, 2018 @ApalachTimes facebook.com/Apalachitimes50 ¢ apalachtimes.com CELEBRATING 130 YEARS AS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER By David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl. com 850-653-8894 The light at the end of a long, dark, fire-ravaged tunnel is glimmering this week, and its reflected off the shine of a new trailer. Through a coordinated effort assisted by county, state and federal officials, more than two dozen trailers for temporary housing began arriving Wednesday, to help in sheltering the 36 families displaced by the Lime Rock Road fire that ravaged Buck Street, Ridge Road and Wilderness Road June 24. At a special meeting Monday afternoon, county officials voted unanimously Trailers to shelter re familiesRubble, ash and heat-twisted metal portrayed an apocalypticlike landscape where a Wilderness Road home once stood. Here, contractors from Roberts and Roberts remove what remained of the structure. [ RICHARD BICKEL | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ] County middle man for deal with feds for Capital Area Community Action AgencyBy David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl. com 850-653-8894 Franklin County marked Americas birthday last week with festivities, fireworks and fire relief. Carrabelle got the ball rolling on Monday evening, July 2, with a well-attended evening of parties and fireworks, including big celebrations at the Carrabelle Boat Club, and live music and snow cones at the offices of the Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce. The city paid for the fireworks, and decided to conserve its money by having them on Monday, when it costs $5,000, as opposed to on Wednesday, when it would have been three times that amount. Every place along the river Sam Fortunas treats son Rush, 6 months old, to his “ rst Independence Day parade. [ DAVID ADLERSTEIN | THE TIMES ] HCOLAs Sherry ONeal, left, and Martha Greene scoop up ice cream at the Independence Eve social ar Riverfront Park. [ A. STREET | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ] By David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl. com 850-653-8894 Six top candidates have emerged out of field of 28 applicants vying for the city manager position. Apalachicola Commissioner Anita Grove reported at Tues-day evenings regular meeting hat the screening committee, which includes former City Engineer Bill McCartney and city residents Jim Brown, Valentina Webb, Jack Brewer and Grove, had whittled down the field based on individual scoring., tallied the numbers and arrived at the finalists. We looked at the preferred qualifications, and did they follow instructions?Ž she said, noting that knowledge and experience with Florida municipal government, a proven ability to secure grants, skills in personnel management and management of utilities, a bachelors degree or greater, and specialized training in public administration were all factors. They stand out,Ž she said. They really do stand out.Ž Making the cut, in alphabetical order were: € Don Hart, from Tallahassee, a former city manager of Cuthbert, Georgia, now working in the private sector € Terry Henley, from Surfside, a former acting budget director of North Miami € Paul Larino, from Wiggins, Colorado, where he is the current city manager € William Laurence, from Union, Maine, where he is the current town manager € Ron Nally, from St. George Island, a former town manager of Lake Lure, North Carolina € James Woods, from Hogansville, Georgia., where he served as city manager The city commissioners Six to vie for city manager See MANAGER, A7 Fireworks, re relief marks FourthSee SHELTER, A2 See FOURTH, A3 Apalachicola Farmers Market on SaturdayJoin us this Saturday, July 14 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., for the Apalachicola Farmers Market under the Mill Pond Pavilion and the live oaks by the working harbor at Scipio Creek, for local and regional produce, breads and baked goods, honey jams and flowers. Meet the artisans who create beautiful furniture, jewelry, arts and crafts as you enjoy live music and the spirit of community. HCOLA hosts political forum TuesdayHCOLA (Hillside Coalition of Laborers for Apalachicola) will host a political candidate forum this Tuesday, July 17, beginning at 6 p.m. at the Holy Family Community Center, 203 Dr. Frederick Humphries Street, Apalachicola. Candidates for county judge, tax collector and the school board seat for District 3 will all be featured. The primary election is August 26, the general election is Nov. 6. For more information, call 323-0544. Sea turtle talk WednesdayLearn all about sea turtles at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve this Wednesday, July 18, from 2 to 3 p.m. Learn about bears at FSU marine labThe Florida State University Coastal & Marine Lab in St. Teresa will host a black bear presentation on Thursday, July 19 from 7 to 8 pm at their lab at Turkey Point. The program will feature a lecture by Don Hardeman, Jr., black bear research biologist with the FWC Fish & Wildlife Research Institute. Attend and learn about current research investigating black bear behavior in the humandominated landscape and the demography of the Apalachicola subpopulation of bears. For more info call 697-4120 C-Quarters youth “ shing tourney July 21Kids from all over the South are invited to attend the 14th annual Youth Fishing Tournament at C-Quarters Marina in Carrabelle July 21. Open to all kids 16 and younger. Registration is required on-site. Sponsored by Jimmie Crowder of C-Quarters Marina, FishFloridaTag.org and local businesses. For more info call 697-8400.

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** A2 Thursday, July 12, 2018 | The Timesto approve the purchase of 24 surplus mobile homes from the federal General Services Administration. The mobile homes were used by the Federal Emergency Management Agency to shelter victims of Hurricanes Irma in the Keys. The price tag for the temporary units $8,500 each, for a total cost, including transportation from Homestead, of $204,000. This represents a savings of 37 percent over their market value. The county fronted the money for the trailers, but they wont be owning them long, as they will soon be transferred into the hands of the Capital Area Community Action Agency, which will be administering their usage. Regulations restrict the purchase to government entities, which is why the county had to serve as a middle man for the transaction. The non-profit Capital Area will oversee the units for up to six months, and provide case management to help the displaced families, including 83 children, find permanent housing, said Tim Center, CEO of the Community Action Agency. Were excited that this could be a potential model for other community action programs in the state and country,Ž Center said. And were also excited about being able to help the displaced families rebuild after the disaster.Ž County commissioners sounded a hopeful note at the Monday special meeting, pleased at the comparative swiftness the deal had been completed with the help of both U.S. senators, the governor, and the staff at the Florida Division of Emergency Management. But they werent without their anger, led by Commissioner Noah Lockley, who argued that Wildlands Service Inc., the Tallahassee company that handled a controlled burn that ultimately got out of control and triggered the whirlwind blaze, should be doing more. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders said the controlled burn had been done on land owned and administered by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Chair Smokey Parrish said that once investigators from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services determined that the cause had been from the controlled burn, supposed to have been completely extinguished six days prior, Wildlands Service Inc. lawyered upŽ and that it could be as long as four years before any settlement dollars flow into the affected property owners. Were never going to make them whole again,Ž said Sanders. We got a lawyer,Ž said Lockley. Let him send them something, and lets we lawyer up. Let them know we aint playing.Ž Commissioners stressed that Capital Area would be in charge of determining who would receive the FEMA trailers, with property owners topping the list of priorities. Lockley stressed that he felt renters, and even those without a documented claim to res-idency, should be giving priority as well. They didnt ask for this,Ž he said. If they were on the books or not, they were there.Ž Commissioner Ricky Jones, who has served as point man on the ground for the county since the other commissioners were away at a Florida Association of Counties meeting, told Commissioner William Massey he estimated that the county had lost as much as $20,000 in asphalt road work due to the fire, lobbying their peers for help and helping direct the effort until their return. Jones, who as a child experienced a devastating fire that burned his family out of their home, served as a quiet, reassuring presence in the days immediately following the fire, even though the affected areas are just outside his district. He told his colleagues he was grateful to see their unified effort at this stage. This was no tabletop exercise,Ž he said. While there was not an extensive discussion about the legal ramifications of the fire, County Attorney Michael Shuler advised commissioners that they would not have legal standing in matters that involve private property owners. They (Wildland Services) are not going to voluntarily resolve these lawsuits,Ž said Shuler. He speaks with legal experience in these matters, since his family successfully secured a judgment of more than $700,000 for timberlands they owned that were destroyed from a controlled burn by the state. Shuler said Capital Area will pay for all title costs associated with the trailer purchase, and he expected that to be completed within the next two to three weeks. He also noted that the county has the ability to buy other equipment, such as air conditioners, from the GSA at a discount. Massey noted that an enormous amount of household furnishings, from coffee pots and dishes to mattresses, have been accumulated thanks to the generosity of donors from throughout the region. We could equip 10 houses,Ž he said. Tress Dameron, emergency services coordinator, told commissioners that of the affected properties, 16 of them were residences owned by people who owned the land as well, while another 13 were places rented by families as their primary residence, Four were non-primary residences, she said, with another eight places not destroyed but in need of repair. The remaining damages were of an as-yet undetermined number of sheds, outbuildings, vehicles, boats, tools and other equipment. Land clearing by crews from four companies … Jason White, Coastline, Roberts and Roberts, and the city of Tallahassee … took place Monday and Tuesday, and things went well, according to Sheriff A.J. Smith. He said he has three additional fifth-wheel travel trailers that have been donated to his fundraising campaign, and the first of these was given away Tuesday, to a senior woman, recently out of the hospital, who lost everything in the blaze. Smith said he is in negotiation to buy six permanent mobile homes, all constructed to Zone 3 hurricane standards, out of the more than $106,000 his GoFundMe campaign has raised thus far. He said his office will be determining who receives them based on need, with seniors and families with small children a top priority. The FEMA trailers are being stored at the sheriffs office. In addition, county officials plan to spray paint addresses on all the vehicles and boats moved offsite, so they can be identified easily for insurance purposes in the weeks ahead. As of Monday afternoon, Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis office had paid out 26 emergency expense claims to individuals, totaling $125,000. Claims filed undergo a final verification, so funding can be disbursed as soon as possible. SHELTERFrom Page A1 The Glass familys new home is a one-room c. 1955 trailer donated by a family friend and parked on their burnt-to-the-ground pr operty. There is no water nor power. Pictured are, from left: Austin and his brother Joe Michael with their grandfather Luther. Everybody here wa nts to go home,Ž says the elder Mr. Glass. But theres no home to go to.Ž [RICHARD BICKEL | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ]

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** The Times | Thursday, July 12, 2018 A3Fireworks explode over the river. Athena Reeder, 3, daugher of Josh and Brandy Reeder, does a little dance at the July 3 parade in Apalachicola. [PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | THE TIMES] Former U.S. Rep Allen Boyd, standing, was on hand with family and friends at the Independence Eve party. was packed,Ž said Mayor Brenda La Paz. It went very well.Ž The city of Apalachicola did its usual thing, which was to make the July 3 Independence Day Eve its day of mass festivity. The annual parade, from Lafayette Park to Riverfront Park, was especially long this year, full of politicians eager to be a part of the exuberance. Charter captain Charles Wilson, a Vietnam vet who has organized the annual veterans picnic for years, led the parade aboard a fire truck as the grand marshall. The day was hot, and visitors enjoyed the ice cream booth, staffed by volunteers from HCOLA (Hillside Coalition of Laborers for Apalachicola) who were among the more than 50 volunteers who helped make the massive event a success. A partnership between Gulfside IGA and Tabernacle of Faith provided the ice cream for the free social after the parade. Merrill Livingston, director of the Apalachic-ola Center for History, Culture and the Arts, oversaw an afternoon of free kids art activities at the HCA, which was bustling with children creating art in expression of the meaning of Independence Day. The evenings festivities got underway with Gordon Adkins crooning God Bless America,Ž and Angeline Stanley singing The Star Spangled Banner,Ž but the highlight was a fundraising effort on behalf of the victims of the June 24 Lime Rock Road fire. Apalachicola Main Street board member Lisa Johnston introduced Dr. Larry Sterling, pastor of the Eastpoint Church of God, for a moment of reflection and to lead the crowd in prayer. As we celebrate tonight, wed like to pause to remember our neighbors in Eastpoint who were impacted by the catastrophic fire last week,Ž she said. Sterling gave a message of hope, pointing out that even in the midst of trag-edy miracles can be found. Following the prayer, Main Street Board Chair Jim Bachrach was joined on stage by board members Torben Madson, State Rep. Halsey Beshears, Apalachicola resident George Mahr, and Sheriff A.J. Smith. After each placed a $100 donation in the collection bin, Madson implored the crowd to join those assembled on stage to open their hearts to give generously to the fire relief effort. Volunteers dispersed through the crowd, collecting almost $4,000 in just 30 minutes. We didnt even have to ask,Ž said Bachrach. People were coming up to us wanting to give. It was really amazing to see people pulling together to help like that.Ž Johnston said a woman came running up and said to me, I'm from Georgia, and I want to help, with a $20 bill in her hand. Locals and visitors contributed much to this relief effort.Ž The Bo Spring Band also contributed several hundred dollars from their tips and money earned from selling t-shirts and CDs at the event. Main Street board members and staff contributed additional funds to round out the $4,000 for the relief effort. As keynote speaker, Beshears urged the crowd to set aside animosity and adopt a manner of unity and civility as Americans. Be respectful of other peoples opinions even if they differ from your own,Ž he said. Be mindful of the military and be appreciative of their service. I thank God every day for the freedoms that we have. Going to Apalachicola for the Independence Eve Celebration is one of my familys favorite memories of the year. What a great time and a great place to be on the eve of our nations birthday,Ž he said. Apalachicola Main Street this year introduced food trucks to the event, and they turned out to be a success. In addition to AJs food truck and Kelleys Coastal Kitchen, both local, the trucks included Temperleys British Eatery and Haole Pino HawaiianFilipino Island Cuisine, both from Panama City, and Rankin Tacos and Big Easy Snowballs, both from Tallahassee. We had very positive feedback from event attendees and the food truck owners,Ž said Main Street Director Augusta West. They all sold out and are already asking to come back next year.Ž Following an incredible fireworks display, all paid for out of private donations, the party continued throughout town into the night. On Wednesday, St. George Island held its annual Independence Day parade, complete with squirt guns, but no water balloons. A fireworks display on the beach closed out the three days of festivities. FOURTHFrom Page A1 Gus Hosay, 8, right, and young brother Ike, 6, were watching the July 3 parade in Apalachicola mom Lynn Hosay, from Tennessee, and Nickie Bergin, who made their shirts. Greg Lemons, son of Holly Lemons, stands with his daughter Morgan, a sixth grader in Smyrna, Tennessee, at the July 3 parade in Apalachicola.

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** A4 Thursday, July 12, 2018 | The TimesHave something to say?The Times editorial page is a forum where differing opinions and fresh ideas are freely exchanged. Comments on the news from readers, as letters to the editor or guest columns, are welcomed and encouraged. All submissions must be signed, and include the email address and/or phone number of the author for veri“ cation purposes only. The Times considers all letters, but reserves the right to decline to publish them if they fail to meet community standards for decency and avoidance of personal attack.We may edit them so as to ensure they meet guidelines for style. Please email your letters to Dadlerstein@star” .com. Or fax them to (850) 653-8893. Or mail them to Letters to the Editor, P.O. Box 820, Apalachicola, FL 32329. Submissions must be received by Monday evening for publication in Thursdays paper. USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Postmaster: Send address change to The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone: 850-653-8868 Periodical rate postage paid at: Apalachicola, FL 32329 Weekly Publishing Circulation: 1-850-522-5197 Formerly The Apalachicola Times SUBSCRIPTIONS In county Out of county 1 year: $24.15 $34.65 6 months: $15.75 $31.00 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such ads. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. PUBLISHER Tim Thompson EDITOR Tim Croft OPINION Hundred dollar car note, two hundred rent I get a check on Friday, but its all already spent.ŽFrom Workin for a Livin  as performed by Huey Lewis and the News I n spite of low unemployment and a consensus that an economic recovery has taken place, wage growth continues to stall. If the economy is good, where are the highpaying jobs which can support a family? Unemployment is at its lowest level in 17 years and is likely to remain below 4 percent for the foreseeable future. Wage growth has often been a byproduct of tight labor markets: Employers have to pay more to get good employees, or for that matter, any employees, because there is such competition for labor. But while wages have grown at over 3 percent per year since 2015, the rate of growth has stalled significantly. Wage growth was at its lowest level since the Great Recession (under 2 percent) in 2010, and has increased somewhat since then, but remains far below the 5 percent growth level achieved by the economy in 2000. The Federal Reserve is raising interest rates periodically this year based partly on these low unemployment numbers. Simply stated, wage growth has traditionally accompanied low unemployment, and raising interest rates is a hedge against inflation. So why arent paychecks getting considerably larger? Lets consider two aspects of our current economy: An aging populace and hyper-globalization. A large number of potential employees out there are growing older. But many business owners and employers are hesitant to hire and pay large salaries to older workers. We have shorter runways than our millennial peers. The median age in the U.S. is now over 38, more than a year older than it was only four years ago. The alternative, of course, is to hire to a younger person, a person with less experience but who may be willing to work for less. So unemployment remains low, but actual wage growth is stymied. Secondly, international business competition is exerting forces on our economy that we havent experienced since the late 1800s. When a foreign company makes a competitive product, while paying its workers far less than U.S. workers are paid, its difficult for American businesses to compete on price. So business owners save money by paying employees less and then pass those savings on to consumers in order to remain competitive in the international marketplace Theres always been international business competition, but increasing hyper-globalization is creating a larger impact on our economy, and on the level of our wages, than at any time in American history. Theres just no way around it. Its complicated and confounding. The economy continues to improve; wages remain relatively flat. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, author of the syndicated economic column Arbor Outlook,Ž is founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850.608.6121 … www.arborwealth.net), a fiduciary, fee-only, registered investment advisory firm near Destin. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any specific strategy or investment will be suitable or profitable for an investor. ARBOR OUTLOOKUnemployment declines but wage growth stallsBy Brad Buck U niversity of Florida scientists believe they can control some nematodes that can harm or even kill plants as they try to grow hops to help quench the evergrowing demand for craft beer. Zhanao Deng, a professor of environmental horticulture and Shinshuke Agehara, an assistant professor of horticultural sciences, are trying to grow hops at the Gulf Coast Research and Education Center (GCREC) in Balm, part of the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Deng and Agehara hope to see a viable hops crop so growers can meet the increasing consumer taste for craft beer. There were 195 craft brewers in Florida in 2016, and their economic impact was a little more than $3.07 billion, according to statistics from www.brewersassociation.org. Johan Desaeger, an assistant professor of nematology, also at GCREC, found stunted plants in the hop yard at the center. Thats often a sign of root-knot nematodes, so Desaeger took the pests from the soil and sent them to the state Division of Plant Industries (DPI), which confirmed his suspicions. State scientists identified them as Javanese root-knot nematodes, a very common species in Florida soils. Desaeger has already suggested shortand long-term solutions to the potential of root-knot nematodes damaging the emerging hops crop. Soil fumigants can be applied prior to establishing a hop yard, but this will only give shortterm relief and will not protect perennial crops like hops long enough, Desaeger said. Our focus is on finding cultivars that are resistant or tolerant to the nematodes, and thats what we are focusing on now,Ž he said. Some of the cultivars that perform best in our hop yard also seem to have fewer nematodes, which is probably not a coincidence.Ž Root-knot nematodes are the most well-known plant parasitic nematodes. They are microscopic roundworms that live in the soil and attack the roots of plants, UF/IFAS researchers say. The extent of the damage they can cause to crops varies by the plant involved. We need to recognize that these nematodes can be a problem, so we need to monitor hops plants for nematode presence and/or damage,Ž Desaeger said. Existing hops varieties have likely not been selected for nematode resistance, Deng said We are glad that some of the varieties in the hop yard can grow quite well under root-knot nematode pressure,Ž he said. The Hillsborough County Economic Development Department, a big backer of the hops research, remains optimistic about the ability of UF/ IFAS researchers to find a solution for the nematodes and the root knot. We have been made aware of nematodes on the hops, and we support the hops research at the center,Ž said Simon Bollin, agribusiness development manager with the Hillsborough County Economic Development Department. Desaeger co-authored a paper on the finding. The lead author is Janete Andrade Brito with DPI, a division of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Their findings will soon be published in the Journal of Nematology. Brad Buck is a writer with the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. He can be reached at bradbuck@ufl.edu UF/IFAS RESEARCH Nematodes dont deter hops cropZhanao Deng works with hops at the UF/IFAS Gulf Coast Research and Education Center. [ PHOTO COURTESY, ZHANAO DENG, UF/IFAS ] Y ou know the Pledge of Allegiance, probably by heart. You may recite it only occasionally, or get the chance several times a week. Sometimes, Im guessing, you say it mechanically, and other times filled with deep meaning. I hope its more often the latter, because heres whats remarkable about the Pledge: in a few short phrases, it lays out the fundamentals of what our country represents and strives to achieve. Lets start with these words: and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation, under God, indivisible.Ž Its not just talking about any nation or form of government; its talking about a republic a unified nation, under divine Providence, with three fully equal branches that are strong, independent, and each entrusted with limited and defined powers within their constitutional boundaries. The meaning goes even deeper than that. Really, were talking about power being dispersed across a large number of people and institutions. Were talking about a system that was designed by people who were so wary of concentrated power that they made it difficult for any one person or institution to wield it. They created a republic that to its core rejects autocratic political leadership and authoritarianism. It sees them as a threat to our democracy, and depends upon a system of elections in which ballots are counted fairly and citizens have equal voting rights. This, in turn, provides a system that has the capacity to reform and renew itself, because its institutions rest on the political involvement of our citizens. Elected representatives make the laws, but government is bound by the electoral process, an independent judiciary, and constitutional guarantees of freedom of speech, assembly, religion and the press. This brings us to the final words: with liberty and justice for all.Ž These are crucial to understand. They represent what some pundits have called a framework of decency: a system built on individual dignity and respect for each person. This is a monumental achievement a country that seeks liberty and justice for all within its borders, and often beyond them, with no limitations or caveats. Liberty and justice are not reserved for white males, or even for citizens only. In all this, we recognize and tolerate our differences. We may not always measure up to our ideals, but we certainly know what they are. We expect differences in race, religion, and political beliefs. We dont try to demonize those who are different. At heart, then, this is a system based on a core belief that were all in this enterprise together, and all connected to one another. Everyone has the right to enjoy the promise of America. Put these two parts of the Pledge together, and what its telling us is that we live in a system that binds us together by adherence to rules of political engagement, respect for the rule of law, and belief in our democratic institutions. We may disagree about all kinds of issues, but we firmly believe in equal political rights and equal opportunity. Liberty and justice for allŽ means giving individuals the space to make choices in their own lives that will enable them to flourish. What the country expects in return is that most individuals will live a life of honor, excellence and responsibility. The system demands hard work on the part of its citizens if it is to succeed. So the next time you stand as the Pledge is recited, think about what youre saying. Its deceptively simple. But it packs a powerful message. Lee Hamilton is a senior advisor for the Indiana University Center on Representative Government; a Distinguished Scholar, IU School of Global and International Studies; and a professor of practice, IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years. GUEST COLUMNThinking of what the Pledge means L e e H a m i l t o n Lee Hamilton Margaret McDowell

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** The Times | Thursday, July 12, 2018 A5 CHASING SHADOWSBy James L. Hargrove Special to the Times Along the Florida Panhandle from St. Marks in the east to Santa Rosa Island near the Alabama border, the Gulf Coast is dotted with islands and bays named after Catholic saints. With the exceptions of Dog Island and Alligator Point, the Forgotten Coast follows the same rule, with St. Joseph Bay, Cape San Blas, St. Vincent Island, St. George Island, St. James, St. Theresa and St. Marks. Given the numerous saints names, it is easy to picture Spanish explorers sailing along the Gulf Coast, naming islands and bays based on the calendar of Catholic feast days. One problem with this idea is that early maps by Spanish cartographers rarely name landmarks along the Gulf, and most barrier islands went unnamed until 1700. So who really named St. George Island, and when did they name it? The age of exploration In 1519, the governor of Jamaica, Francisco Garay, sent Alonso Alvarez de Pineda on an expedition to claim the land as far as Texas. Pineda discovered Florida was a peninsula, and from his ship logs, the first map of the Gulf was drawn. Pineda was killed in Texas, but his map survived. However, the only feature Pineda named was Espiritu Santo, possibly the mouth of the Mississippi River. Few local names derived from the early, disastrous expeditions by Pnfilo de Narvez (1528), Hernando de Soto (1539-1544) and Tristan de Luna (1559), and even then, it took over 50 years to place the names on European maps. The first modern name to be placed on a map of the Panhandle was the Bay of St. Joseph, noted on a chart from 1584 by Geronimo Chavez. (See map). The map did not name the peninsula that shelters the bay, but Sansons map of 1654 called it Escondido, or hidden cape (now Cape San Blas). His map shows a Rio Grande that may depict the Apalachicola River, and a few unnamed islands in the area. No more detail was added until the Spanish missions reached Apalache Province between 1633 and 1656. Several modern names in Franklin County, including Apalachicola, originated with the Spanish missions in north Florida, followed by military expeditions launched from St. Marks to counteract French explorers who settled by Mobile Bay. Franciscan friars and the Spanish missions In 1565, King Phillip II of Spain instructed Pedro Menendez to drive the French out of Fort Caroline on the St. Johns River, convert the Indians to Christianity, and develop an economy that could support the Spanish treasury. After founding St. Augustine, Menendez sent friars overland to the high, fertile land that extended through modern Tallahassee and the Flint River. By 1633, the friars had established mission towns among the Timucua and Apalachee people. In 1656, Mission San Luis was established in what is now Tallahassee, and the mission complex quickly became the capital of west Florida. Unlike other tribes, Apalachee men and women were excellent agriculturists. Traditional crops of maize, beans, and squash were augmented by wheat, barley, peas, tobacco, watermelons and domestic animals brought by the Spanish. A landing on the river now called San Marcos de Apalache (or St. Marks) served as a port, and a spur of the kings road linked it to Mission San Luis. Supply ships from Havana and St. Augustine brought iron tools, plowshares, firearms, gunpowder, ceramics, and jugs of olive oil and wine. The mission farms and ranches exported cow and deer hides, tallow, lard, cured meat, maize, wheat, and beans back to Havana and St. Augustine. Although the neighboring Apalachicola people refused to convert to Christianity and remained hostile to the Spanish friars, a mission was set up briefly on the Flint River at the end of the kings road. It is very likely the friars, soldiers and sailors explored west to the Apalachicola River, learned place names, and corresponded with authorities. Around 1680, political events stimulated a new phase of exploration and naming that literally put St. George Island on the map. The French and English threats In 1670, British colonists founded Charleston, South Carolina, and Indian traders from the colony reached the Apalachicola River by 1685, threatening the mission settlements. Also, French cavalier Robert La Salle founded a colony in Texas in 1684, and the French claimed the Gulf Coast as far as Mobile, Alabama. Alarmed, the Spanish initiated several expeditions by land and sea to locate the French and drive them out. In 1686, Spanish ships left Havana in search of the French, and one of their first stops was the port at St. Marks. The pilot, Enriquez Barroto, was a highly regarded cartographer who kept extensive records of the journey, no doubt including information provided by the friars and soldiers in Apalache province. By 1690, Barroto had piloted three expeditions that spanned the coast from St. Marks to Veracruz. He furnished his logs to a fellow pilot named Juan Bisente in Havana, and in 1696, Bisente drafted the first detailed map of the Gulf Coast that names St. George Island. (See map) Although Bisentes map was carefully guarded, a French ship intercepted the Spanish vessel taking it to Spain, and the map wound up in the hands of royal French cartographers. They quickly engraved and printed the information on new maps of the Gulf of Mexico, and by 1703, St. George Island and the Apalachicola River began appearing on some European maps, such as the De LIsle map of 1703. The island east of St. George was called St. Catalina (or Catherine) for a number of years, but was changed to Ysla de Perros (Dog Island) before Spain transferred Florida to Britain. Responding to the French threat, the Spanish sent expeditions from Mission San Luis and St. Marks to explore Pensacola Bay in 1693, and established a fortified town there in 1698. However, the Spanish could not defend Apalache province against hostile Indians, British and French. Attacks weakened the missions in 1702, and then Governor James Moore of Charleston led a raid in 1704 that destroyed the missions. The Apalache, who had numbered over 30,000 when the friars arrived, died or dispersed. The few survivors assimilated into other cultures and the Apalache identify vanished. Maps from Slowley to Swi When the British acquired Florida from Spain in 1763, some maps still called Cape San Blas Cabo Escondido,Ž and called the entire island chain either St. Georges Islands or Dog Island. Over the next 60 years, maps of the barrier islands became much more detailed. A good example is the navigators map of the barrier islands made by Robert Slowley in 1767. (See map) Slowleys map shows the triangular shape of what is now called St. Vincent Island. Modern St. George Island is divided in two, with Little St. George separate from St. George Island, just as described by the hapless Pierre Viaud, who was shipwrecked on Dog Island ( Ile aux Chiens in French) in 1766 (see May 24, 2017 Times Saga of a shipwreckŽ ). An Indian rescued Viaud and three companions by canoeing to what is now called St. George Island. Three survivors were eventually rescued by a British navy patrol from St. Marks. Although it may be true Spanish friars named St. Vincent Island, in 1810 the Spanish cartographer of West Florida, Vincent Pintado, called it St. Dionisio. Pintado changed the name to St. Vincent in 1815, and the first American maps kept his nomenclature, as shown on an 1829 map prepared by Lt. W. H. Swift And so the barrier islands and rivers of Franklin County got their names over 300 years in a process that began with early explorers, but primarily took place during the Spanish mission period from 1656 to 1704. Even then, the names had to be accepted when ownership changed to British occupation of 1763 to 1783, back to the Spanish from 1783 to 1819, and finally be retained on American maps. Incidentally, a copy of the Slowley map was purchased by Apalachicola resident Bill Spohrer, and is displayed at the Raney House. Who named St. George Island?At top, a 1657 map by Nicolas Sanson, royal geographer of France, misplaced St. Joseph Bay on the Florida peninsula when it should have been next to Cape Escondido (Cape San Blas). The Apalachicola River was called Rio Grande and no barrier islands were named. At bottom, during the Spanish mission period (1633 to 1704 in Apalache Province), the kings road linked St. Augustine to missions in the Apalache region, and a spur connected Mission San Luis to St. Marks, the only port on the northern Gulf of Mexico. [ LIBRARY OF CONGRESS ] First known map showing St. George Island was drawn by Spanish ship pilots, Enriquez Barroto and Juan Bisente, based on expeditions in 1686 that stopped for provisions at San Marcos de Apalache. [BIBLIOTHEQUE NATIONALE DE FRANCE ] At top, a navigators chart by Robert Slowley includes all the barrier islands as St. Georges Islands (arrow), and indicates St. George Island was divided in two by a channel. At bottom, an 1829 map by Lt. W. H. Swift with the modern system of naming was partly derived from Spanish cartographer Vicente Pintado after the United States acquired the territory in 1821. [IMAGES FROM THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS]

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** A6 Thursday, July 12, 2018 | The Times

PAGE 7

** The Times | Thursday, July 12, 2018 A7agreed to hold interviews on Monday and Tuesday, July 23 and 24, and would like to make a decision by the August 7 meeting. McCartney said the committee will call these finalists and see if theyre still interested. Plans are to begin the process at 4 p.m. on those dates, with a reception and meet-and-greet, followed by the interviews. In May citycommissioners voted to back the hiring of a city manager,ahead of the start of the next fiscal year. The individual would be on probation for their first year, and be required to attract additional monies to city coffers at or above the cost of their own compensation package, or risk termination. The city plansa salaryin the $65,000 to $85,000 range, with additional health and life insurance, sick leave and retirement benefits. Estimates are thethe job will cost between $95,000 and $115,000, with about $17,000 needed to be taken out of the current fiscal year budget, which ends Sept. 30, to fund the manager for this year. In other business the commissioners opened one bid for the former fire department property on Water Street. The bid for the three lots was for $150,000, from Harry Arnold. The commissioners voted to reject the bid, and plan to group the property with others they plan to sell, and have it handled by a broker. After an inquiry was presented by City Planner Cindy Clark, the commissioners decided not to address a request whether specific language should be added to the code regarding what constitutes a long-term stay. The citys code already has stipulations in several zoning areas that prevent homeowners from renting out their property for short-term stays of less than 30 days, but widespread flouting of the law to appeal to a growing tourist market has led the city to institute tougher penalties. There really is no mention whether houses can be rented long-term,Ž said Clark. Recently realtors have requested to put it in writing.Ž City Attorney Pat Floyd said it would be best not to address this issue, and let it be governed by a longstanding principle. If it is not prohibited it is therefore reserved to an individual as a right,Ž he said. MANAGERFrom Page A1 Dems to train volunteers SaturdayThe Franklin County Democratic Executive Committee is holding a volunteer training event on Saturday, July 14, from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Holy Family Senior Center in Apalachicola. The event will focus on DEC membership, precinct captain training, effective volunteering, and more. Please RSVP at this link https://events.mobilizeamerica.io/floridadems/ event/4394/ to receive more details. Seating is limited and materials will be created based on the number of RSVPs. Islands civic club cancels Tuesday bingoThe St. George Island Civic Club has cancelled its Tuesday night summer bingo, citing Florida Statute 849.0931, which states that persons under age 18 are not allowed to attend bingo. Knowing that Summer Bingo with their families is a big part of vacation plans for many Island visitors, and recognizing that these families will be understandably upset if they arrive at the fire station only to be told the children are not allowed upstairs, the board has decided to cancel Summer Bingo,Ž wrote Civic Club President James Donald in an email Monday on behalf of the civic club board. Thank you for your understanding and support.Ž Carrabelle looking for fulltime police of“ cerCarrabelle Police Department is currently accepting applications for the position of fulltime police officer. Applicants must be age 19 years or older, and have obtained a high school diploma or GED, and have completed the Law Enforcement Basic Recruit course through a program approved by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. The applicant must have received a passing score on the State Officer Certification Examination, pass a physical and drug screening, and be able to work nights, weekends, and holidays. The starting salary is $16.27 an hour, of $33,840 per year. Applications can be accessed and printed at www.carrabellepolice.com under the Employment tab. Applications should be returned to the Carrabelle Police Department, at 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, between normal business hours. Please include a copy of Florida-issued drivers license, copy of Social Secu-rity card, copy of high school diploma, and copy of Basic Recruit certificate. TDC to review vendor applications WednesdayA special meeting of the Franklin County Tourist Development Council board of directors will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday, July 18 at the Eastpoint Visitor Center, 731 U.S. 98. The agenda will be limited to a review of applications from prospective vendors who responded to the recent requests for qualifications. For information call Deb at 670-3474. School district launches mobile app To enhance parent and community engagement, the latest news and information from the Franklin County School District is now available on smartphones and mobile devices with the launching of a new mobile app. The district is partnering with Blackboard to expand its communications outreach with a mobile app now available for free in the online iTunes and Google Play app stores. The mobile app will offer an updated feed of district news and events with photos and links to the districts website as well as all social media posts. Log-in credentials will be disbursed during Open House to allow parents to customize notifications they wish to receive. Notifications may include breaking news, updates about school closures, calendar changes, attendance alerts or even sports updates. Research has shown that students are more successful when parents and community members are actively engaged in their academic and extracurricular activities,Ž said Superintendent Traci Moses. The new district mobile app will help parents and community members to stay connected with our local schools, and stay involved in supporting the activities that our students are engaged in every day.Ž The mobile app will combine all of the districts communication platforms into one source available at the fingertips. All stakeholders are encouraged to download the free mobile app Franklin County SDŽ to their smart-devices. Allens Family Childcare opensBetty Stephens Allen has opened Allens Family Childcare Home Inc. at her home on 233 Sixth Street. Allens facility, licensed and certified by the Florida Department of Children and Families, is open weekdays from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. and serves children age 2 and older. For more information, call Allen at (850) 323-0931. NEWS BRIEFS

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** A8 Thursday, July 12, 2018 | The Times SOCIETY By David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl. com 850-653-8894 Their possessions destroyed by the June 24 Lime Rock Road wildfire, scores of Eastpoint people faced a long Independence Day holiday lacking the three basic necessities of life … food, clothing and shelter. Clothing came in the form of abundant donations from neighbors throughout the county and region, distributed by volunteers, with much of it in storage for the weeks and months ahead. Shelter will arrive by weeks end, thanks to a temporary trailer solution worked out by local, state and federal officials in conjunction with an area non-profit. And a lavish tables of food arrived thanks to the generosity of two Tallahassee caterers. On July 3, Justin Chiricos of Catering Capers stepped up to deliver 200 meals to fire victims, volunteers and first responders. And then the next day, July 4, Jared Schiess, whose day job is to feed Florida State University football players in his role as a chef at the Figg Performance Table, served up a picnic barbecue of ribs, hamburgers and hot dogs, on the grounds of the Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department. Plus there was 80 pounds of smoked chicken, pre-pared at the fire department right alongside by Jarrod Taylor, who works with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, andMike Shierling, who works for the Florida Department of Corrections, both from Liberty County. And to wash it all down, figuratively speaking, Doug Cone, ofCone Distributing, a regional beer and beverage distributor, on July 3 arrived with a check for $10,000, with a promise to donate another $10,000 in matching funds for that much given to Sheriff A. J. Smiths fundraising outreach on GoFundMe, which as of press time had gathered over $106,000 in donations for housing needs. The July 3 meals from Catering Capers arrived with the help of Apalachicola resident Karen Cox-Dennis, who worked closely with Paula Sapp-Dasher, who has coordinated relief efforts at the Eastpoint Church of God for the community at large. Cox-Dennis brought down the food in insulated containers, and a cast of volunteers went to work. Melissa Hayes, Patty and Julian Kulick, Francesca Gainer, Diana Boan, Jeri Carroll, Sharron Shiver, Josephine Krehl, Carson Dennis, Sophie Hightower, together with Cox-Dennis and Sapp-Dasher, dished up the meals and the volunteers distributed them to victims of the Eastpoint fire and to the sheriffs department. Thank you to Justin Chiricos for the very generous donation of 200 meals to feed the victims of the Eastpoint Fire, volunteers and the sheriffs department,Ž said Cox-Dennis. We have deep gratitude also to Paula Dasher and all of the remarkable volunteers at Eastpoint Church of God, who have been tirelessly ministering to the 40 fam-ilies who lost their homes.ŽFor his July 4 barbecue,Schiess turned to Stephanie White, who works as medical first responder coordinator at Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy, to help in putting together the affairat the Eastpoint fire house. White and her sister Christi Henthorn, and several of Schiess friends, helped him set up the grounds, complete with tents, big screen televisions, and horseshoes and corn hole board for anyone who wanted to play. Mostly it was all about just celebrating Americas birthday in fine style, and no one enjoyed it more than 18-month-old James Russell Dale New, son of Robert New and Kayla Osburn, of Eastpoint. Nicknamed Thumper,Ž the little boy calmly munched on a hamburger while his buddy, 14-month-old Dustin Grimes, enjoyed one too. The fact that Thumper had a healthy appetite pleased his mom and dad, because they want nothing more than to see their son put meat on his little bones. Born several months premature, no bigger than, as he pointed out, his dads foot, Thumper spent his first seven months in the intensive care unit, including weeks at a Miami hospital, as he defeated several abdominal difficulties that so far has kept him smaller than his buddy Grimes. But hes doing well now, and he enjoyed the Independence Day meal, and movies, and swinging on the playground at Vrooman Park, as much as all the other kids. Schiess came up with the picnicidea after delivering clothing and supplies to Eastpoint the week prior, when he saw he could help with brining food to victims as well as first responders and volunteers. He said friends and other restaurants donated food and supplies. Hes the kind of guy who will give you his last dollar,Ž said White. And then hell find 20 other people to give you their last dollar.Ž The picnic ran from 3 to 8 p.m., with people drop-ping by all afternoon to share in a meal or pick ones up for friends. The community is immeasurably grateful to county citizens, businesses and patrons thereof, who have offered remarkable support, on so many levels, to those in need,Ž said Cox-Dennis, The community is deeply thankful to all of the emergency personnel and fire departments for saving lives, and to all the people in and outside of our close-knit county for their continued support.Ž Foodies pitch in over July 4thHappy birthday my sweet Obie Lee Pelt, who will turn 7 on Thursday, July 12, 2018. He is the son of Mary Rae Nowling and Willie Pelt. He has two sisters, Alina and Shirah Pelt; and three brothers, Steven Pelt, and John and Andrew Sanders. His grandparents are Aline Murray and William Murray, Kendell Shiver, the late Mary and Steven Pelt, Jean Shiver and the late Johnny Shiver. Great-grandparents are Charles E. King, who is now in Heaven, and Mary Lou King, the late Ruby Murray and Bill Murray, and greatgreat-grandmother Blanch Caldwell. Obie is a very happy little boy who is still in the care of his Granny Mary Lou King, and his sister Alina Pelt. Happy birthday my love, God bless you, and we hope you have many more to come. Granny Mary Lou King, sister Alina, and all your family and friends. BIRTHDAYObie Pelt turns 7 Obie Lee Pelt Deputy Travis Osburn holds his nephew, James Russell Dale New, at the Eastpoint “ re house picnic. Stephanie White, right, serves up barbecue along with Jody Becker. [PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | THE TIMES ] Deanna Millender, left, and son Dustin Grimes, swing along with Kayla Osburn, and son ThumperŽ New. Celebrate with the TimesCreate lasting memories by sending celebrations to Dadlerstein@ star” .com

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** The Times | Thursday, July 12, 2018 A9 FAITHSpecial to the Times H ello Franklin County! Only one more week of summer reading program fun, it all ends Friday, July 20. For the kids next week, children ages K-6 can participate in the last Rockers & Readers program where they will have fun making crafts and checking out their favorite summer reading items. Join the fun in Carrabelle on Friday, July 20 at 11 a.m. Lots of new books were added this summer for the kids, some great reading, in print and e-books. Check out the Overdrive system for great reads that can be downloaded on your device and go with you anywhere. Tristan Harrenstein with the Florida Public Archaeology Network will be with us on Thursday, July 12 at 2 p.m. at the Eastpoint branch and again at 4 p.m. at the Carrabelle branch. We will learn about ancient Florida and a demonstration of knapping. These programs are for all ages, very interactive, children and adults alike will learn so much. All programs are free and open to the public. If you love Danish cookies and food, you will enjoy meeting author Sidsel Sid Munkholm McOmie who will be sharing her books with us and lots of recipe information. Check out her first book Hygge Danish Food & RecipesŽ available at both library locations. Her second book, just released Nibbles & Bites Volume OneŽ will be available the day of the program. Her final program will be at the Carrabelle branch this Friday, July 13 at 1 p.m. The program wouldnt be complete without samples. The finale for our summer reading program, Libraries Rock, will be none other than Animal Tales. This years performance themed Born to Be WildŽ will be one you wont want to miss. All new animals to the program and each animal have some connection to a unique noise or sound (they rock!). The Eastpoint show will be Thursday, July 19 at 2 p.m. and then head on over to Carrabelle at 4 p.m. to see them again. This program is for all ages and will not disappoint! The Basics of Better Living program, with topic Strategies for Avoiding Scams & FraudŽ will be held at the Eastpoint branch on Friday, July 20 at 1:30 p.m. These informative programs are facilitated by Samantha Kennedy, with the Wakulla County extension office. Topic for August is something anyone who works in the kitchen will want to attend Kitchen Hacks: Learn tips and tricks for making life in the kitchen quick and easy.Ž First program will be held in Carrabelle on Friday, August 3 at 1:30 p.m. As the summer continues, we enjoy seeing many birds and butterflies in the area and along the shores. Join us Tuesday, July 17 at 1:30 at the Eastpoint branch for the monthly Gardening program. This month the topic is Birds & Butterflies: Keeping Colorful Nature Close to Home.Ž Join us each month for these informative and enjoyable programs facilitated by Les Harrison, Wakulla County extension director. The Writers Forum will meet at the Eastpoint branch on Wednesday, July 18 at 1 p.m. and the Teen Book Club will be held at the Eastpoint branch on Wednesday, August 1 at 2 p.m. All calendar of events is available on the website or pick up a copy when you visit the library. Remember to like us and follow us on Facebook at Franklin County Public Library and Franklin County Public Library Eastpoint Branch. The calendar of events and online resources are on the library website at fcpl.wildernesscoast. org/ Contact the Eastpoint branch, Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 670-8151 and the Carrabelle branch, Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday 10 am. to 2 p.m. at 697-2366. See you at the Library! LIBRARY CORNERSummer reading program ends next week Robert Lloyd Nute Jr. was born Sept. 2, 1958 in Oxnard, California. Robert passed away Thursday, June 28, 2018 in Gainesville. Memorial services will be held Thursday, July 12 at 5:30 p.m. at the Eastpoint Church of God. He was survived by his two children, daughter K'yla Shiver and son Seth Nute; mother, Ora Lee Nute; sisters, Vickie Lee Dragojevic, Deborah Nute, and Joanna Beldin; and three beautiful grandkids, Jaxon, Kyson, and Ellora. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to help Robert's kids with a headstone. Donations can be sent to 111 Patty Lane, Eastpoint, FL 32328 and will go directly to his memorial fund. Kelley Funeral Home is handling all arrangements. OBITUARIES ROBERT LLOYD NUTE JR.Elizabeth Ann (Lyd) Brown Mills Stokoe, 77, of Port St. Joe,went to be with her Lord and Saviour, Friday, June 29, 2018. She was the daughter of Charles A. (Bo) and Ida Ethel Kilbourn Brown of Port St. Joe. Elizabeth was preceded in death by her parents: her first husband, William J. Mills; uncle Fayette Kilbourn; sister, Maxie Smith; and her nephew, Max Clardy. She is survived by her husband, Gerald Stokoe, of Port St. Joe; son, Christopher Mills (Belci Lisbet) of Deridda, Louisiana; sister, Lenohr Clardy (Charles) of Wadley, Alabama; niece, Lenohr Dickson (Walt) of Whigham, Georgia; niece, Laurie Faison (Jim) of Dozier, Alabama; nephew, Tyler Smith of Port St. Joe; nephew, Tom Clardy (Amanda) of Wadley, Alabama, and numerous cousins, grandnieces and grandnephews. Elizabeth was a Christian and believed in truth and honor. She was a member of St. Joseph Catholic Church, United Daughters of the Confederacy, Apalachicola Chapter 826, and St. Joseph Bay Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution. She attended Port St. Joe High School, played drums in the band, andattended Sacred Heart College in Cullman, Alabama, and Florida State University, Tallahassee. Elizabeth taught kindergarten in Blakely, Georgia, Happyland Kindergarten in Port St. Joe, and the first grade in Apalachicola. For years she helped at the Senior Citizens Center, Meals on Wheels, and always cooked turkeys at Thanksgiving for the needy. She will be missed by relatives and friends. She was an Angel on Earth, and now she is an Angel in Heaven. Elizabeth will be buried in Holly Hill Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, please give to the charity of your choice. At her request, a private graveside service will be held. Services are under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home. ELIZABETH ANN (LYD) STOKOE God saw she was getting tired And a cure was not to be, So He put His arms around her And whispered Come with me.Ž With tearful eyes we watched Her suffer, and saw her fade away. Although we loved her dearly, We could not make her stay. A golden heart stopped beating, Hard-working hands to rest, God, it broke our hearts to see you go, But He only takes the best. You were my best friend who I loved with all my heart. I miss and love you. God bless you in Heaven. I hope to see you again some sweet day. Mary Lou King, Carl, and all your friends and familyIN LOVING MEMORY RUBY PAULA SANDERS RUTHERFORDDEC. 7, 1968 TO JULY 27, 2017C-Quarters hosts “ re victim bene“ t Saturday C-Quarters Marina will host a benefit lunch on behalf of the schoolchildren of the Eastpoint fire victims this Saturday, July 14 beginning at 11 a.m. at the marina, US 98 East, 501 St James Ave, in Carrabelle. Sponsored by the First Baptist Church of Carrabelle and Millenders Seafood, the benefit will feature shrimp or smoked chicken lunches, with cole slaw, baked beans, roll and drink, for $10. Lunches will be sold until they run out. Noahs Park Friday evening in Carrabelle The First Baptist Church of Carrabelle, 206 Storrs Avenue SE, will host a Noahs ParkŽ fun-filled free, family event this Friday from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Join us and get wet! Habitat for Humanity to meet Tuesday When you hear anyone comment about the Habitat for Humanity organization, you know it involves building homes. So you are correct, that is the focus, but how does it work? First, Habitats mission statement says: To eliminate poverty housing from Franklin County. Florida and to make decent, affordable shelter for all people a matter of conscience.Ž The organization is comprised of volunteers from all walks of life who have the same vision, to assist families become homeowners. Homeowners must first meet some specific requirements; including employment verification, credit check and more. The selection process is done by committee. In Franklin County, five homes were built for families that qualified for this program, the most recent completed in 2015 in Eastpoint. The next board meeting of the Franklin Habitat for Humanity, will be this Tuesday, July 17 at 5:30 pm at Kristy BranchBanks law office, 171 US-98 A, in Eastpoint. The group is beginning to look forward to House #6 and to potentially start accepting applications for it. If you are a civicminded individual, or you just want to help in some way, we would be happy to have you join us. For more information about Habitat for Humanity of Franklin County, visit www.habitatfranklin.org FAITH BRIEFS Island civic club hosts July 18-19 forums The St. George Island Civic Club will hold political forums at 6:30 p.m. this Wednesday and Thursday, July 18 and 19 upstairs at the Jay Abbott Volunteer Fire Station, 324 E. Pine Ave. on St. George Island. The SGI Civic Club is a non-political organization and does not endorse any candidate. The civic club is sponsoring these forums to allow registered voters an opportunity to hear the candidates in advance of the August 28 election. Candidates for county judge will appear on Wednesday, July 18, and candidates for county tax collector will appear on Thurs-day, July 19. For additional information, please see the SGI Civic ClubŽ Facebook page. To suggest questions for the candidates, please email Diane Bodenhamer at bodenhmr@me.com. NEWS BRIEFS

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** A10 Thursday, July 12, 2018 | The Times FISHING REPORTWe have had a lot of rain and storms the last couple weeks and this has made fishing a little difficult having to outrun the storms or being run off the beach while trying to fish. Never the less fishing has not been to bad on the Forgotten Coast. Flats fishing has not been bad but you have to be on the water very early and hit it hard with live shrimp or soft plastics. Trout and Redfish are being taken and plenty of slot fish out there. Flounder has been real good since spring and we've seen some nice fish. Our favorite bait is Bull Minnows but white or cream colored grubs will take fish as well. Off shore Snapper continues to be great with many very nice fish showing up. With only a couple weeks left for Snapper get out there anglers and make it happen. Keep in mind though that next month we'll move in to Scallop season if everything stays as it is the season will open Aug. 17 and run till Sept. 30. OUTDOORSCONTACT USEmail outdoor news to timesoutdoors@starfl.com Star Staff Report The St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge celebrated its 50th anniversarylast week. On Thursday, the Friends of St. Vincent invited Refuge retirees and volunteers to a luncheon reunion. The following day, the festivities continued with the public in on the fun. In all, close to 350 attended. The party started with a trip on the government barge from Indian Pass to St. Vincent Island, where visitors were greeted by staff from the St. Marksand St. Vin-cent NWRs where US Fish and Wildlife firefighters displayed equipment and had a drone exercise. St. Marks staff brought natural hides and skull and scat replicas of native animals. Other exhibitors included the Florida State Park Service, Florida Fish and Wildlife Service with a shorebird display and a live ghost crab in a tank, and the St. Joseph Bay Buffer Preserve had a native rare plant booth. Hot dogs were served by St. Marks grill team. Along the beach, Apalachicola National Estuarian Research Reserve presented shells, a loggerhead sea turtle laid a nest on the beach which has been protected from predators by use of a special self-release cage. Continuing on near the protected western PointŽ area, spotting scopes were available for bird viewing. Everyone was able to explore and discover the beauty of the island. While one family brought bikes and made use of the oyster shell roads, many others partook with a splash in the pristine Gulf waters. It was a day of appreciation of this most important uninhabited barrier island,a haven for threatened and endangered birds, animals and sea turtles. Friends of St. Vincent NWR is working to fund and develop an interpretive center to bring the island to the mainland for visitors and school educational opportunities with an expected opening winter 2019. To learn more, visit stvincentfriends.com. St. Vincent celebrates 50th anniversary[COURTESY OF DEBBIE HOOPER AT JOEBAY.COM] Special to the Times Gag grouper recreational harvestclosed in state waters off the coasts of Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties on July 1, andwill reopen off these waters Sept. 1 through Dec. 31. The four-county region includes all waters of Apalachicola Bay and Indian Pass, including those in Gulf County, and all waters of the Steinhatchee River, including those in Dixie County. The gag grouper recreational harvest season in Gulf of Mexico state waters not including Franklin, Jefferson, Wakulla and Taylor counties, opened June 1 and will remain open through Dec. 31, closing Jan. 1, 2019. Monroe County is also excluded from this season because it follows the Atlantic season for gag grouper. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) manages marine fish from the shore to 9 nautical miles out in the Gulf of Mexico. Anglers targeting gag grouper and several other reef fish species from a private vessel must have Gulf Reef Fish Angler on their license. Learn more at MyFWC.com/Fishing by clicking on Saltwater Fishing,Ž Recreational RegulationsŽ and Gulf Reef Fish Survey.Ž For-hire operations that do not have a federal reef fish permit must have Gulf Reef Fish Charter added to their license. This can be done at no cost at your local tax collectors office. Visit MyFWC.com/Snappers for more information. Gag grouper caught in federal waters during the federal season and in state waters outside the fourcounty region may be taken ashore in Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties, but boats with gag grouper aboard may not stop and must have gear stowed while traveling through state waters in that region. To learn more, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on Saltwater Fishing,Ž Recreational RegulationsŽ and Groupers.Ž Gag grouper season in bay closesBy David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl.com 850-653-8894 Of all the animal rescues stories youll ever hear, this one has to be among the most unusual. It took place Monday on the porch of Aunt Ebbys Ice Cream on St. George Island. Stephen Hoyt, a recently retired Air Force senior master sergeant, together with his fiance and two girls, 10 and 13, were enjoying their ice cream. They could not have wished for a sunnier, calmer summer day, part of a long Independence Day holiday away from their homes in Jones County, Georgia, just north of Macon. Each year they come down during this week, a welcome break for Hoyt, who at 54, has retired from his days in the service, a career spent mainly at Robins Air Force Base. No longer does he have to cope with the stress and pressure of being a volunteer firefighter in the rural community of Jones County, where he served as district chief for 17 years. Suddenly we heard a pop above the street and two seagulls came tumbling to the ground on their backs,Ž said Hoyt. As a retired firefighter and first responder, I couldn't not render some assistance so I ran down to survey the situation.Ž On the ground at his feet lay a pair of lifeless laughing gulls, motionless, about two feet apart. Hoyt summoned his training and experience, and set about doing what to him was the obvious thing. Any first responder would have done the same thing. deliver chest compressions that is,Ž he said.Not all island visitors comprehended the seriousness and urgency of Hoyts mission. Although people driving by were stopped and laughing, I kept right on,Ž he said. And after a few minutes both birds were awake and looking around at each other and at me, wondering what happened and who was this man standing over us?Ž Because they appeared to be breathing once again, and becoming more alert, Hoytflipped them right side up.They both rocked on their heels but remained standing,Ž he said. A few more moments of coming around, they both flew off at a low altitude and that was that. They never seemed afraid or tried to bite,Ž Hoyt said. Because photos were taken of the miracle rescue Hoyt and company have drawn hundreds of reactions, all praising the rescue. I must emphasize any first responder or caregiving profession would have done the same thing,Ž he said. I'm sure this sort of thing happens all the time but luckily everyone has a camera now and everybody loves a good story.Ž As for the birds, no word has been heard from them, as they presumably went about their business, eating insects, fish, and invertebrates, walking the beach, scavenging. It may have only been a divine moment, with man and nature cohabitating together,Ž said Hoyt. Laughing gulls brought back to life "It may have only been a divine moment" Stephen Hoyt does chest compressions. [ PHOTO COURTESY OF STEPHEN HOYT ] Stephen Hoyt stabilizes the two birds Stephen Hoyt holds one of the rescued birds, as it prepares to ” y. [ PHOTO COURTESY OF STEPHEN HOYT ]

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** The Times | Thursday, July 12, 2018 A11 SPORTSBy David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl.com 850-653-8894 The AA All Stars, for boys age 7-8, went to state in Bristol the first week of July, and lost a series of tough ballgames to finish out of the money. Coached by Tyler Poloronis, with assistants Ronnie Joseph, Justin Mathes and Jimmy Adair, the team includes Karcen Poloronis, Kobe Joseph, JT Mathes, Ethan Shiver, Blanton Adair, Jasiah Fleming, Braylin Morris, Brody Johnson, Bentley Gay, Brian Lee Taylor, Presley Hicks and Gabriel Kelly. The boys won their opener 6-5 against East Lakeland, after they smacked a two-out hit in the sixth inning for a walk-off win. In the second game, they fell in a 7-6 heartbreaker to Shalimar, but then came back and beat Graceville 8-5. While nine teams began the tourney, four teams entered the tourneys final phase and Franklin County was among them, because they had two wins. They sent home five teams, and the other four teams played it out,Ž said Tyler Poloronis. In the first game against Holmes County, the young Seahawks were up the entire game, but the opponents scored a pair of runs in the sixth inning to go up 3-2, and go on to win. It was a heartbreaking loss,Ž said the coach. I coach a lot of ball and that was one of the toughest losses Ive had.Ž After Poloronis got into a verbal altercation with the opposing coach, both men were suspended for the finale, and so assistant coach Ronnie Joseph stepped up. But the boys, disap-pointed at the Holmes County loss, fell 10-5 to Blountstown, a team they had downed twice in the District 4 tourney to advance to state. Tyler Poloronis is optimistic that his young team, which had only two returners this year … Karcen Poloronis and Kobe Joseph and third older player, JT Mathes, all of whom served as captains, will be back strong next year. I have seven guys coming back next year, seven returning players,Ž he said. If they stay together and practice all season they should be favorites to win. If this same team stays together. We did way better than our expectations,Ž he said. This team had a lot of fight to them.Ž AA All-Stars show their ght at stateThe AA boys at districts. [ PHOTO COURTESY OF LINDSAY POLORONIS ] By David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl.com 850-653-8894 Last month, the Ponytails AllStar team, for girls ages 11-12, played mightily in the district tournament but a trip to state wasnt in the cards. The team, coached by Michael Gilbert, with assistants Lake Smith and Angela Arroyo, beat Marianna and Liberty County 7-6 to open, with Maya Itzkovitz slamming a two-run homer against the Lady Bulldogs that completely changed the momentum of that game in the young Lady Seahawks favor. After that the Franklin County girls lost a 16-15 heartbreaker to Sneads. The team was up 15-9 in the top of the fifth, but Sneads hit a grand slam, and then tied it up. After going three up, three down in the top of the sixth, Sneads stroked a base hit in the bottom of the sixth to score a runner from third to win. The following day, also against Sneads, Franklin County was down 8-3 in the final at bat, in the bottom of the sixth. The team accumulated hits and walks and got the score to 8-6. With bases loaded and two outs, Taylor Mallon smacked a double to right field, for the 9-8 win. Arissa Gilberts phenomenal pitching helped secure a 7-6 win against Liberty County, and a berth in the championship game. In the championship against Marianna, Mallon hurled four innings, giving up just one run. But it wasnt enough, as the girls lost 5-4 and were eliminated with a 3-2 record. The team consisted of Hannah Abel, Jasmin Pavon, Taylor Mallon, Maddie Millender, Alexcia McNair, Emily Patterson, Micahlyn ONeal, Maya Itzkovitz, Brooklyn Freeman, Marisa Gilbert, Jocelyn Escobar, and Jayla White. The coaches were all grateful for the players and parents who invested their time. Ponytails fall at district tourneyThe Franklin County Ponytails are, front row, from left, Hannah Abel, Jasmin Pavon, Taylor Mallon, Maddie Millender, Alexcia McNair, Emily Patterson. Middle row, from left, are Micahlyn ONeal, Maya Itzkovitz, Brooklyn Freeman, Marisa Gilbert, Jocelyn Escobar, Jayla White. Back row, from left, are Coach Lake Smith, Coach Michael Gilbert, and Coach Angela Arroyo. [ PHOTO COURTESY OF JENNY MALLON ]

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** Trivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy. com 1. Whose quotes included,  It does not make sense to hire smart people and tell them what to do; we hire smart people to tell us what to do.Ž? Henry Ford, Steve Jobs, Dave Thomas, George Eastman 2. Whats the focus of the famed Patterson/Gimlin short film clip? JFK assassination, Loch Ness monster, Alien being, Bigfoot 3. In 2017, the Postal Service ordered more than how many million rubber bands?18, 235, 412, 660 4. What was the first regularappearing TV series of the late Dennis Hopper? JAG,Ž E-Ring,Ž 24,Ž NCISŽ 5. Which state has the town with the highest ZIP code number? Alaska, Hawaii, New York, Oregon 6. What does the makeŽ of a vehicle mean?Rating, VIN, Manufacturer, Driver ANSWERS: 1 .Steve Jobs, 2. Bigfoot, 3. 660, 4. E-Ring,Ž 5. Alaska (Ketchikan 99950), 6. Manufacturer A12 Thursday, July 12, 2018 | The Times W i l s o n C a s e y Wilson Casey TRIVIA FUN f-stop is an abbreviation for a camera lens aperture setting that corresponds to an f-number, which is the ratio of the focal length of a lens to the effective diameter of its aperture.If you have a good summer photo, please share. The Times welcomes readers to send us their best photographs, whether they capture summer fun, a warm smile, brilliant color, an unusuai image, person, place or thing, we want it. Photos can be of any subject, but we especially like people.Please send photographs to David Adlerstein at Dadlerstein@starfl.com. For more information, call 653-8894.F-STOP FRANKLINThe dog daysIt turns out Skip and Kathy Frinks grandson is actually Spiderman. [ SKIP FRINK | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ] A self-portrait in the sand. [ ROGER MUTERSPAUGH | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ] Oak branches cup the Honey Moon on June 27. [ JAMES HARGROVE | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ] A northern mockingbird, at Bald Point State Park. [ ROD GASCHE | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ] A July 7 storm heads for Alligator Point. [ BRENDA LA PAZ | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ]

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** The Times | Thursday, July 12, 2018 A13

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** A14 Thursday, July 12, 2018 | The Times 20909T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 18000023CPAXMX PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF RICHARD M. CHARRON, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Richard M. Charron, deceased, File Number 18000023CPAXMX is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is July 5, 2018 Attorney for Personal Representative Wendy Ennis-Volcy, Esq. & Christine C. Gill, Esq. P.O. Box 822238 Pembroke Pines, FL 33082-2238 (954) 436-2003; (954) 462-3430 WEV olcy@aol.com Cbast3@aol.com FBN: 883440 & 983764 Personal Representative: Kelly Charron 22 Boxwood COurt Huntington, NY 11746 Pub: July 5, 12, 2018 21008T In the Circuit Court for Second Judicial Circuit In and for Franklin County, Florida Probate Division Case No. 2018 CP 40 In Re: Estate of Gloria Gale Miller Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Gloria Gale Miller, deceased, whose date of death was May 6, 2018, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market St, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICAITON OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SECTION 733.702 WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is July 5, 2018 /s/ Joseph R. Boyd Joseph R. Boyd, B.C.S. JoeRBoyd@boydlaw .net Florida Bar No. 179079 Boyd & Durant, P.L. 1407 Piedmont Drive East Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Telephone: (850) 386-2171 Facsimile: (850) 385-4936 Addl:service@boyd law .net Attorney for Personal Representatives /s/ Kimberly Crum Kimberly Crum P.O. Box 354 Carrabelle, FL 32322 /s/ Ruby Litton P.O. Box 490 Carrabelle, FL 32322 Personal Representatives Pub July 5, 12, 2018 21014T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 2018-96 CA APALACHICOLA BAY COLONY HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, a Florida Corporation, a/k/a BAY COLONY HOMEOWNERS ASSOCAITION, Inc. Plaintiff, vs. J. BEN WATKINS PRIVATE FOUNDATION, a Inc., a Florida Corporation Defendant. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 17, 2018, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the 2ND FLOOR LOBBY OF COURTHOUSE at the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola at 11:00 am EST on July 26, 2018, the following described property: Lot 10, Bay Colony, as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 5, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE DATE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), disabled persons who, because of their disabilities, need special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator at 33 Market Street, Suite 33, Apalachicola, FL 32320 or Telephone Voice/TDD (904) 653-8861 prior to such proceeding. Dated: June 27, 2018 Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michelle Maxwell Deputy Clerk Kristy Branch Banks, PA 171 US Hwy 98 W, Suite A Eastpoint, FL 32328 phone: 850-670-1255 Fax: 866-601-4805 Pub July 5, 12 2018 21016T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 2017-15 CA BRUCE LATEN Plaintiff, vs. MICHAEL J. CAULEY; DECEASED, UNIVERSAL LIFE CHURCH MONASTARY STOREHOUSE, INC.; GEORGE FREEMAN; TERESA CAULEY, SURVIVING SPOUSE OF DECEDENT MICHAEL J. CAULEY; ERIC CAULEY, SURVIVING SON OF DECEDENT MICHAEL J. CAULEY; DOUG CAULEY, SURVIVING SON OF DECEDENT MICHAEL J. CAULEY; HEATHER CAULEY UTT, SURVIVING DAUGHTER OF DECEDENT MICHAEL J. CAULEY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED DECEASED DEFENDANT WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM IN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; AND UNKNOWN TENANT Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 13, 2018, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the 2ND FLOOR LOBBY OF COURTHOUSE at the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola at 11:00 am EST on July 26, 2018, the following described property: Lot 3, Block 1 (175), KEOUGHS SECOND ADDITION TO OFFICIAL MAP OF CITY OF CARRABELLE, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 20, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE DATE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), disabled persons who, because of their disabilities, need special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator at 33 Market Street, Suite 33, Apalachicola, FL 32320 or Telephone Voice/TDD (904) 653-8861 prior to such proceeding. Dated: June 27, 2018 Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michelle Maxwell Deputy Clerk Kristy Branch Banks, PA 171 US Hwy 98 W, Suite A Eastpoint, FL 32328 phone: 850-670-1255 Fax: 866-601-4805 July 5, 12 2018 Pub July 5,12, 2018 21058T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 192016CA000141CAAXM X MTGLQ INVESTORS, L.P., Plaintiff, VS. PAMELA A. WHITE; FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION; CHASE BANK USA, N.A.; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated June 27, 2018, and entered in Case No. 192016CA000141CAAXMX of the Circuit Court in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein MTGLQ INVESTORS, L.P. is Plaintiff and PAMELA A. WHITE; FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION; CHASE BANK USA, N.A.; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED.: are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash the 2nd Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, 11:00 a.m., on August 23, 2018, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 5, ALLIGATOR POINT, UNRECORDED. A PARCEL OF LAND IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE I WEST, IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A PARCEL OF LAND DESCRIBED AS TRACT 5, THE COMMON INTRODUCTORY POINT OF WHICH IS AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE POINT OF INTERSECTION OF THE EAST BOUNDARY SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WITH THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF GULF SHORE BOULEVARD (STATE ROAD 370), SAID POINT BEING MARKED BY A CONCRETE MONUMENT AND BEING THE NORTHEASTERN CORNER OF LANDS PLATTED AS PENINSULAR POINT, UNIT NUMBER 4, SAID PLAT BEING OF RECORD IN PLAT BOOK I, PAGE 24, IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; FROM SAID POINT RUN THENCE

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CLASSIFIEDSThe Times | Thursday, July 12, 2018 A15 NF-4529603NEWLY RENOVATED! (2) Lanark Village Apartments 2 bed, 1 bath Units $1200/ month, $1200 SD All Utilities Included NO PETS AVAILABLE AUGUST 56-3 Parker in Lanark 1 bed, 1 bath € $550/month $1000 Refundable SD No Pets AVAILABLE AUGUST 308 A 1st Street 2 bed, 1 bath € $800/month $1000 Refundable SD No Pets NF-4529592 The Blue Parrot is Now Hiring:Cooks Servers Cashiers Hostesses Bussers Bartenders68 West Gorrie Dr. St. George IslandApply in Person at Blue Parrot Ocean Front Cafe FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS JOB ANNOUNCEMENT Franklin County Public Library Position Title: Library Assistant / Permanent Full Time Salary: $25,000 This position will close to applicants on July 13, 2018 at 4:00 pm Job applications available on the county website: http://www .franklincountyflorida.com/resources/job p ostings/ -applications can also be picked up at any county office. Job applications must to be returned to the Planning and Building Department County Office, 34 Forbes St, Suite 1, Apalachicola Florida or the County Finance Office The Franklin County Board of Commissioners is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Drug Free Workplace Employer. Typical work example but not limited to: Check library materials in and out; Issues library cards according to established procedures; Computes and collects fines and makes cash transactions. Organize and shelve or file materials appropriately, such as alphabetically or by Dewey decimal classification number. Assess patron needs and provide assistance using printed materials, online databases and other library technologies. Instruct patrons in the basic usage of the public access to the Internet, online services and resources, and other library technologies; including but not limited to copiers, faxes, scanners. Respond and resolve requests for library materials, including assistance to physical location oflibrary materials; process requests to other Library Cooperatives or interlibrary loan request. Complete special projects and other duties, as assigned, to assist with programs and library services Knowledge, Skills and Abilities: High level of computer usage and skills required. Excellent customer service skills and experience, sequential skills (Dewey decimal system) and the ability to work at a fast paced environment are necessary; willingness to learn new skills and attend training is imperative; preparing reports and lifting required. Skills in organizing, planning, and record keeping are essential. Minimum Qualifications: High School Diploma, At least 2 years experience working in a library is preferred. Any equivalent combination of training and experience that provide the required knowledge, skills and abilities may be considered. Must relate well with the general public, other library staff, volunteers, children and young adults, be adaptable and flexible, willing to work evenings and weekends; and willing to work if requested at other branch library. Ability to make decisions, to implement policies and procedures, and maintain quality standards is necessary. RN & LPN Hiring Event-On the Spot InterviewsWhen: Friday, July 13th 11am-7pm Where: Hilton Garden Inn Tallahassee Central 1330 Blairstone Road Tallahassee, FL 32301 We’re hiring for Full Time, Part Time and PRN positions in the following locations: Bristol Carrabelle Crawfordville Monticello Perry Sneads Job Seekers Bring: resume, professional license/certification, driver’s license & CPR certification Think outside the hospital and consider a career in correctional nursing. For additional information please contact Michelle Conley at 850-692-5579 or michelle@mhmcareers.com NORTH 84 DEGREES 51 MINUTES WEST 40.16 FEET ALONG THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF GULF SHORE BOULEVARD TO A POINT MARKED BY A CONCRETE MONUMENT AND BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF A LOT DEED BY PENINSULAR POINT, INC. A FLORIDA CORPORATION, TO R. E. KESTNER, IN DECEMBER 1949, SAPD KESTNER PROPERTY BEING A STRIP OF LAND APPROXIMATELY 100 FEET IN WIDTH EXTENDING FROM THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF SAID GULF SHORE BOULEVARD (STATE ROAD 370) NORTH TO THE WATERS OF ALLIGATOR BAY, ALSO KNOWN AS ALLIGATOR HARBOR AND BEING BOUNDED ON THE WEST BY CERTAIN LANDS OF THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION OF FLORIDA, A PUBLIC CORPORATION OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA (F.S.U. MARINE LABORATORY), FROM SAID SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SAID R. E. KESTNER PROPERTY RUN THENCE DUE NORTH ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID R. E. KESTNER PROPERTY AND PARALLEL TO THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, A DISTANCE 822.5 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 78 DEGREES 40 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY SIDE OF A ROAD A DISTANCE OF 153 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 79 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST 534.5 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 74 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 711 FEET TO A POINT MARKED BY A CONCRETE MONUMENT, BEING SAID COMMON INTRODUCTORY POINT; FROM SAID COMMON INTRODUCTORY POINT, RUN THENCE SOUTH 79 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 421.4 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 55 DEGREES 54 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF A PROPOSED 50 FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAY CONTAINING AN EXISTING ROCK PAVED STREET OR ROAD A DISTANCE OF 289.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 5 DEGREES 52 MINUTES EAST 299.5 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTH SHORE OF ALLIGATOR BAY, ALSO KNOWN AS ALLIGATOR HARBOR, THENCE NORTH 84 DEGREES 03 MINUTES EAST 59 FEET ALONG THE SAID SOUTHERN SHORE LINE, THENCE SOUTH 58 DEGREES 00 MINUTES EAST 6 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 4 DEGREES 29 MINUTES WEST 355.1 FEET TO THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF SAID PROPOSED ROAD, THENCE NORTH 55 DEGREES 54 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF SAID PROPOSED ROAD RIGHT-OF-WAY A DISTANCE OF 85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE I WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. THE ABOVE DESCRIPTION IS PURSUANT TO THE ATTACHED PLAT, WITH PERMANENT RIGHT OF INGRESS, EGRESS AND REGRESS TO, FROM AND OVER SAID 50 FEET RIGHT-OF-WAY AND SAID ROCK PAVED ROAD, INCLUDING A CONNECTING CAUSEWAY TO S. R. 370 (GULF SHORE BOULEVARD) SAID TRACT 5 FRONTING ON ALLIGATOR BAY BEACH AND LOCATED ON THE BAY HARBOR SIDE OF THE ISLAND TYPE PENINSULAR NOW COMMONLY KNOWN AS ALLIGATOR POINT. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Franklin County Courthouse. Telephone 850-653-8861 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, on June 28, 2018 MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 19519 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33318 phone: (954) 564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegal group.com Pub July 12, 19, 2018 21070T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 192015CA000316CAAXM X WILMINGTON SAVINGS FUND SOCIETY FSB D/B/A CHRISTIANA TRUST NOT INDIVIDUALLY BUT AS TRUSTEE FOR PRETIUM MORTGAGE ACQUISITION TRUST, Plaintiff, vs. NANCY L. BURKE A/K/A NANCY BURKE; PATRICK J. BURKE A/K/A PARTICK BURKE; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 19, 2018, and entered in 192015CA000316CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein WILMINGTON SAVINGS FUND SOCIETY FSB D/B/A CHRISTIANA TRUST NOT INDIVIDUALLY BUT AS TRUSTEE FOR PRETIUM MORTGAGE ACQUISITION TRUST is the Plaintiff and NANCY L. BURKE A/K/A NANCY BURKE; PATRICK J. BURKE A/K/A PARTICK BURKE; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendant(s). Marcia M. Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 33 Market Street, 2nd Floor Lobby of Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM, on July 26, 2018 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 20, BAYOU HARBOR, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 38, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Property Address: 1621 BAYOU DR CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Dated this 21st day of May, 2018 Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Terry C. Segree As Deputy Clerk IMPORT ANT AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.606.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L., Boca Raton, FL 33487 phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-997-6909 17-077002-MaMPub July 12, 19, 2018 21059T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File Number: 2018 CP 0025 IN RE: ESTATE OF Manuel Steven Norris Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Manuel Steven Norris, deceased, whose date of death was January 19, 2018 is pending in the Circuit Court of Franklin County Florida, Probate Division; File Number 2018 CP 0025, the address of which is The Franklin County Court House, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands against the estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS: July 12, 2018. Personal Representative Kansas Norris 510 N.W. 5th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322 Attorney for Personal Representative Daniel H. Cox P.O. Box CC Carrabelle, FL 32322 (850)697-5555 Email dhcox@gtcom.net Florida Bar No: 146420 Pub: July 12, 19, 2018 21082T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 14000335CAAXMX FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (“FANNIE MAE”), A CORPORATION ORGANIZED AND EXISTING UNDER THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA., Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM CURTIS WATSON A/K/A WILLIAM C. WATSON, et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 24, 2015, and entered in 14000335CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (“FANNIE MAE”), A CORPORATION ORGANIZED AND EXISTING UNDER THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. is the Plaintiff and BOBBIE WATSON; WILLIAM CURTIS WATSON AKA WILLIAM C. WATSON are the Defendant(s). Marcia M. Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 33 Market Street, 2nd Floor Lobby of Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM, on July 26, 2018 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT A 1 INCH IRON PIPE MARKING THE POINT OF INTERSECTION OF THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF BLUFF ROAD (COUNTY ROAD NO. 384) WITH THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1508.49 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 177.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4889), THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 237.41 FEET TO A NAIL AND CAP (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST 376.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4215), THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 279.50 FEET TO A 3/4 IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 87 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 32.91 FEET TO A 1 INCH IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 551.42 FEET TO A 1 INCH IRON PIPE LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID BLUFF ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 74.96 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Property Address: 556 BLUFF RD, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 10th day of July, 2018. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORT ANT AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.606.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-997-6909 14-76289-MaM Pub July 12, 19, 2018 21105T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT GARY MITCHELL the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a TAX DEED to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: PARCEL ID# 20-075-07W-0000-0020-0 000 CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 1017 CERTIFICATE YEAR: 2011 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: LOTS 13, 14, 15 AND 16, BLOCK 247 (OLD BLOCK 84) OF KEOUGH’S SECOND ADDITION, IN THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS REOCRDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGES(S) 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MOBILE HOME SITUATE THERON PROPERTY ADDRESS: N/A NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: Randall W. Scott and David E. Snyder All of said property being in the State of Florida, County of Franklin. Unless such certificate or certificates shall be redeemed according to the law the property described in such certificate or certificates will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the First (1st) Monday in the month of AUGUST, 2018 which is the 6TH day of AUGUST, 2018 AT 11:00 A.M. MARCIA M. JOHNSON (SEAL) CLERK OF COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Lauren Luberto, Deputy Clerk WARNING THERE ARE UNPAID TAXES ON PROPERTY WHICH YOU OWN, IN WHICH YOU HAVE A LEGAL INTEREST, OR IS CONTIGUOUS TO YOUR PROPERTY. THE PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION ON AUGUST 6, 2018 UNLESS BACK TAXES ARE PAID. ALL P A YMENTS SHALL BE MADE TO THE T AX COLLECTOR OF FRANKLIN COUNTY FOR QUESTIONS CONCERNING T AXES, Y OU MA Y CALL THE T AX COL LECTOR A T (850) 653 9323. TO RECEIVE FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE SCHEDULED AUCTION CONTACT THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, TAX DEED COORDINATOR at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Phone Number (850) 653-2275 EXT. 146. Pub: July 12, 19, 26, August 2, 2018 21109T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT STEPHEN & CAROLYN COLEMAN, the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a TAX DEED to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: PARCEL ID# 14-07S-04W-3131-0000-0 020 CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 319 CERTIFICATE YEAR: 2012 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Lot 2, Block “0”, Lanark Beach tfl, per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 13, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida PROPERTY ADDRESS: 163 Idaho Street, Lanark Beach, FL 32322 NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: Charles M. Smith All of said property being in the State of Florida, County of Franklin. Unless such certificate or certificates shall be redeemed according to the law the property described in such certificate or certificates will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the First (1st) Monday in the month of AUGUST, 2018 which is the 6TH day of AUGUST, 2018 AT 11:00 A.M. MARCIA M. JOHNSON (SEAL) CLERK OF COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Lauren Luberto, Deputy Clerk WARNING THERE ARE UNPAID TAXES ON PROPERTY WHICH YOU OWN, IN WHICH YOU HAVE A LEGAL INTEREST, OR IS CONTIGUOUS TO YOUR PROPERTY. THE PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION ON AUGUST 6, 2018 UNLESS BACK TAXES ARE PAID. ALL P A YMENTS SHALL BE MADE TO THE T AX COLLECTOR OF FRANKLIN COUNTY FOR QUESTIONS CONCERNING T AXES, Y OU MA Y CALL THE T AX COL LECTOR A T (850) 653 9323. TO RECEIVE FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE SCHEDULED AUCTION CONTACT THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, TAX DEED COORDINATOR at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Phone Number (850) 653-2275 EXT. 146. Pub: July 12, 19, 26, August 2, 2018 21107T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT MARGARET POSTEN the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a TAX DEED to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: PARCEL ID# 03-08S-05W-1001-0000-0 070 CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 617 CERTIFICATE YEAR: 2014 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Lot 7, BAY MAGNOLIA, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 14, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida PROPERTY ADDRESS: N/A NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: Bay Magnolia LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company All of said property being in the State of Florida, County of Franklin. Unless such certificate or certificates shall be redeemed according to the law the property described in such certificate or certificates will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the First (1st) Monday in the month of AUGUST, 2018 which is the 6TH day of AUGUST, 2018 AT 11:00 A.M. MARCIA M. JOHNSON (SEAL) CLERK OF COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Lauren Luberto, Deputy Clerk WARNING THERE ARE UNPAID TAXES ON PROPERTY WHICH YOU OWN, IN WHICH YOU HAVE A LEGAL INTEREST, OR IS CONTIGUOUS TO YOUR PROPERTY. THE PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION ON AUGUST 6, 2018 UNLESS BACK TAXES ARE PAID. ALL P A YMENTS SHALL BE MADE TO THE T AX COLLECTOR OF FRANKLIN COUNTY FOR QUESTIONS CONCERNING T AXES, Y OU MA Y CALL THE T AX COL LECTOR A T (850) 653 9323. TO RECEIVE FURTHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE SCHEDULED AUCTION CONTACT THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, TAX DEED COORDINATOR at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Phone Number (850) 653-2275 EXT. 146. Pub: July 12, 19, 26, August 2, 2018 Gretchen Custom SlipcoversNow on the Coast Cushions, pillows, home sewing needs. Call: 850-841-0298 Attached are photos of the 1973 John Deere 310D backhoe, serial No. 208958T. The hour meter shows 6,672 hours so despite the age it was hardly used. It was used sparingly over the years on a large piece of property in the area by one man. He liked to move dirt. I have charged the battery and it turns over, but I was not able to start it. My experience with small Diesel tractors is that they have glow plugs and/or a compression release to aid in starting. If this thing has one I couldn’t figure it out. I didn’t notice any leaks from the engine or hydraulic system. Some of the hydraulic lines appear new. I am asking $8,000. The machine is located in Eastpoint close to the bay. Open to offers. Pro Shop and Restaurant Customer Service WorkerSt Joseph Bay Golf Club seeks a part-time worker to perform outstanding customer service to the patrons of the St Joseph Bay Golf Club to include Pro Shop, Restaurant and Bar. Candidates should have experience in computer operations, cash register operations, food preparation, handling and cooking. Candidate must have excellent customer service skills, be able to work independently, processing sales, handling money, cleaning facility, stocking merchandise and knowledge of golf course rules. Candidates must apply in person, applications available at the St Joseph Bay Golf Club Pro Shop Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency w/ kitchen & living room. Call for info 850-653-6103 Text FL97546 to 56654 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. St. George Island$210/wk for extended stay, elec, satellite, 12’X 65’ deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5800 Indian Pass Area 4 bedroom / 2bath on 5 acres with pond. 1 Year Lease. $1800 per month $750 deposit. Call (850)370-6001 Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you!

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** A16 Thursday, July 12, 2018 | The TimesThe following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Office. Arrests listed this week were made by officers from the Carrabelle Police Department, and the Franklin County Sheriffs Office. All defendants are to be considered innocent until p roven guilty in a court of law.July 3 Kevon J. Todd, 27, Miramar, sexual offense unnatural and lascivious act; $2,500 bond (FCSO) Johnathyn Duane Crum, 26, Carrabelle, domestic battery; $500 bond (CPD) July 4 Justin Wray Causseaux, 25. St. George Island, resisting an officer without violence, possession of methamphetamine, revocation of pre-trial release; held without bond (FCSO) Heather A. Scoggin, 42, Eastpoint, two counts of child neglect causing great bodily harm, failure to appear, violation of probation; held without bond (FCSO) Olin Dakota Bush, 26, Quincy, possession of methamphetamine, two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia; $11,000 bond (FCSO) July 5 Carlise Grace Akers, 39, East Mobile, Alabama, DUI alcohol or drugs … first offense; $500 bond (CPD) Cole Harden Nichols, 34, Eastpoint, violation of probation; held without bond (FCSO) James Robert Laymac, 50, Cummings, Georgia, DUI alcohol or drugs … first offense, resisting officer with violence; $2,000 bond (FCSO) July 6 Tina Nichole Keith, 30 Carrabelle, violation of probation; released on own recognizance (FCSO) Tony Sadler, 56, Apalachicola, child abuse without great bodily harm; $1,000 bond (FCSO) Victor Wayne Cain, 42, Eastpoint, trespassing on property not structure or conveyance, possession of short-barreled gun, rifle or machine gun, possession of weapon or ammunition by a convicted felon; $5,250 bond (FCSO) Davis King, 55, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked … first offense; $250 bond (FCSO) Jimmie Howard Stancil, 37, Apalachicola, possession of methamphetamine with intent to sell, manufacture or deliver, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, drug paraphernalia; $3,000 bond (FCSO) Karen Cooper Foley, 55, Eastpoint, DUI alcohol or drugs … first offense; $500 bond (FCSO) ARREST REPORT LAW ENFORCEMENT