Citation
The Apalachicola times

Material Information

Title:
The Apalachicola times
Place of Publication:
Apalachicola, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group,Tim Thompson - Publisher, Tim Croft- Editor
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates:
29.725278 x -84.9925

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Cf. Gregory, W. Amer. newspapers, 1937.:
Began in 1885.
General Note:
Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Apalachicola Times. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
32911693 ( OCLC )
sn 95026907 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by:
Apalachicola herald

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** Volume 133 Number 8 Phone: 850-653-8868 Fax: 850-653-8893 Law Enforcement ........A2 Opinion ...............A4-A5 Society ......................A8 Faith ........................A9 Outdoors .................A12 Sports .....................A13 A2Six inmates sickened from smoking SpiceA6Lt. Marks remembered a century later OUT TO SEE Thursday, June 14, 2018 @ApalachTimes facebook.com/Apalachitimes50 ¢ apalachtimes.com CELEBRATING 130 YEARS AS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER By David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl.com 850-653-8894There wont an Airstream Park in Tin Can Alley just west of Carrabelle, any time soon, after a divided city commission last week voted 3-2 to deny the request for a special exception.Pam McCreerys plan to put in the RV lots behind her Beach Trader shop along U.S. 98 drew heated criticism from city residents, as well as McCreerys neighbor, at the June 7 meeting. Commissioners Frank Mathis, who was absent from the May meeting when the board split 2-2, voted in support of the proposed park, as did Com-missioner Cal Allen, who had backed it in May.But Keith Walden decided he couldnt go along with it, abandoning his support voiced last month, and he was joined by Tony Millender and Mayor Brenda La Paz, both of whom maintained their opposition.Carrabelle nixes Airstream Park ideaBy David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl.com 850-653-8894Last year, a little more than half of Franklin Countys third graders were tested to be proficient in English language arts, just six percentage points below the states 58 percent mark.This year, the margin doubled, to a 13 percent differential, between the states 57 percent proficiency mark, and the districts 44 percent of students whose score reflect that they are reading at grade level in that all-important first year of Florida Standards Assessment.You dont have the same children in third grade each year, its a total different population,Ž said Apalachicola Bay Charter School Prin-cipal Chimene Johnson. Every year looks differ-ent with the third grade.ŽLast years, the ABC School produced a whop-ping 81 percent of its 37 third-graders reading at or beyond grade level, with double the percentage of 4s than state average, and better than one in 10 of the students scoring 5s, the best you can do.At the lower end of the scale, only one in 20 of the ABC thirds graders scored a 1, much better than the one in five stu-dents statewide who read at that level. The number of 2s were also well below the state average.This year, the numbers at the ABC School arent as jaw-dropping, but they still are running about on par with state averages. Of the 36 students tested. 61 percent were at 3 or better, more than half of Third grade reading scores atBy David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl.com 850-653-8894Apalachicola city commis-sioners last week decided to hire a broker to market several city-owned properties, including the old fire station property on Water Street.In doing so, the city out an end to the recently-begun process of seeking bids just on the fire station property, and so how muchthat sale would have brought in wont be known, because the bids will be returned, unopened, at the June 22 opening.I do believe we should offer an assortment of prop-erties for sale, to a broad audience,Ž resident Diane Brewer advised the city commissionersat theJune 7 regular meeting, and the commissioners agreed.We think there is a method that is superior to the one currently being used,Ž Brewer said, advising that an expert broker would help in marketing the most saleable properties.For properties to be sold a value has to be ascertained,Ž City to broker more real estate FATHERS DAY! HAPPY ABC School continues to exceed state average Oysters still not plentiful in Apalachicola BayBy David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl.com 850-653-8894The Apalachicola Bays summer oyster harvest got started last week, and the 40 or so watermen willing to brave slim pickings on hot mornings have a little less acreage to work with.In addition to conservation measures already in place for a couple years, including the closure of East Hole, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has now prohibited harvest of oysters in area 1652, north of John Gorrie Memorial Br idge, the span that connects Apalachicola and Eastpoint. In addition, FWC wrote into its rules that both harvest and possession of oysters in or on waters taken from the Hotel Bar Experimental AreaŽ are prohibited. The Univer-sity of Florida researchers midway through a fiveyear study, funded by BP money, on the best, most cost-effective way to replant oysters, have set aside tracts in the bay to compare densities, and have stressed for oyster-men to avoid those areas.The oystermen havent always avoided the Hotel Bar experimental Sluggish summer season startsSee OYSTERS, A7 See SCORES, A7 See PARK, A7 See COMMISH, A9Tween girls to take over Apalachicola libraryPsst! Tween girls. Wanna takeover the library?Sign up now for Tween Girls Library Take-over at the Apalachicola Margaret Key Library planned for Thursday, June 14, 6 to 9 p.m. The evening will be full of games, food, and prizes. And maybe a movie. Or a craft project. It'll be up to you!This takeover is for girls only, ages 10-12, to participate and each must have parent or guardian approval. For more infor-mation and to sign-up, stop by the library at 80 12th St. Filmmaker at HCA Saturday afternoonThe Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art will host Cinematic Journeys, a presentation by National Geographic filmmaker Kevin McCa-reythis Saturday, June 16. McCarey, best known for his Emmy-award winning environmental work in films and books, will talk about his environmental film career that has taken him from remote Pacific Islands to Africas Kalahari Desert.The 3 p.m. talk will be followed by a discussion on writing the travel adven-ture memoir. McCarey will also be available afterwards to sign his most recent work Oceans Apart. Book signing from 5 to 6 p.m. Sea turtle talk WednesdayThe regular Summer Sea Turtle Talk will be from 2 to 3 p.m. this Wednesday, June 20 at the Apalachicola NationalEstaurine Research Reserve in East-point.Learn all about sea turtles. Dems plan June 22-23 forumThe Franklin County Democratic Executive Committee is hosting an After Hours Political Forum Debate" at the Car-rabelle Boat Club, 1570 US 98, just west of the Carrabelle bridge.The event begins Friday, June 22 at 4 p.m. and runs until 8:30 p.m., and resumes Saturday, June 23 at 3 p.m. and runs until 6:30 p.m. All candidates have been invited.If you would like to submit questions to the moderators, for the candidates please email your questions to Ada Long at adalong@uab.eduFor further information concerning this event, please email Carol Barfield, chair of the Franklin County Democratic Executive Committee at. Franklinc.dec@gmail.com, or by phone, at 850-323-0625.An oysterman works in the morning Apalachicola Bay. [ SOUTHERN FOODWAYS ALLIANCE | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ]

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** A2 Thursday, June 14, 2018 | The TimesBy David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl.com 850-653-8894EASTPOINT„ After her arrest for smuggling contraband into the Franklin Correctional Institution, a Jackson-ville woman booked into the Franklin County Jail apparently managed to complete her mission by distributing a highly potent synthetic marijuana to at least six inmates, all of whom had to be rushed to the hospi-tal Monday morning.Sheriff A.J. Smith said as of Tuesday afternoon, five of the six men had been treated and released from Weems Memorial Hospital. A sixth man, who was administered CPR by jail staff and later flown by helicopter to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, remains in the intensive care unit there.Vanda Venssa McElveen, 56 „ at the time a visitor at Franklin Correctional Institution was arrested by Carra-belle police Saturday for smuggling a controlled substance into the state prison and trafficking in methamphetamine, transported to the jail and given a $35,000 bond. Because McElveen was diabetic, staffers at the jail decided it made sense to place her with other inmates in the female dorm, rather than in iso-lation for 72 hours, which is typical for newly arriv-ing inmates.They made the call because of her condi-tion,Ž Smith said.McElveen was strip-searched before entering the jail, but nothing was found, as the additional drugs reportedly were stuffed into a body cavity."They searched her the best they could,Ž Smith said. You really need an x-ray machine to see contraband inside the body. Were exploring those other options.ŽThe sheriff said another female inmate helped remove the drug, K2, which then was brought to the kitchen at Mon-days breakfast and given to some male inmates. When the inmates smoked a K2 joint in one of the cells, they began to show symptoms of vom-iting, hallucinations and convulsions.They hadnt taken very many drags before they started having a reaction to it,Ž Smith said. One of the inmates, they had to do CPR on him. Thats how terrible these drugs are.This is the first time weve had K2 in the jail; this is our first experience with it,Ž he added. Weve done a real good job of keeping it out until yesterday.ŽK2, also referred to as Spice, is ablend of indus-trial chemicals sprayed on dried leaves and lawn clippings,designed to look like marijuana but whichaffects the brain differently than the nat-ural drug.According to the National Institute of Drug Abuse, users can experience "anxiety and agitation, nausea and vomiting, high blood pressure, shaking and seizures, hallucinations and paranoia, and they may act violently." A constantly changing range of chemicals is used, and the combination and potency can change by batch.The jail incident comes about two weeks after Julia Eagerton, an officer at nearby Gulf Correctional Institution, was charged with smuggling in more than 300 grams of K2 into that prison, according to the Florida Department of Corrections.Smith said after a more intensive search on Monday and Tuesday, officers found a K2 ciga-rette in another females bunk, and she is expected to face drug possession charges.Smith said while the county remains responsible for medical bills racked up by inmates under their care, were going to send these bills to these inmates, includ-ing the Lifeflight bill. Well see what happens.ŽSix jail inmates hospitalized after smoking K2During the week of May 25 to 31, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Officers Travis and Kossey were working an oyster detail around the Cat Point Oyster Bar. They saw a vessel with one person onboard actively harvesting oysters, and pulled alongside the vessel to conduct a resource inspection. They retrieved a bag of oysters from the vessel and measured and counted each oyster. The oysters in the bag were 70 percent undersized. The subject was cited and 251 undersized oysters were returned to the water alive.Officers Travis and Kossey, working an oyster detail in the East-point area, saw a vessel with two people onboard returning from harvest-ing oysters and stopped the vessel for a resource inspection. They located two bags of untagged oysters onboard the vessel. Both subjects were cited and two bags of oysters were returned to the water alive.Officer Pestka, working an oyster detail in the Eastpoint area, saw a vessel returning from harvesting and stopped it to conduct a resource inspection. Pestka inspected a bag of oysters found onboard the vessel. After counting and measuring each oyster, she determined the bag contained 46 percent undersized oysters. She cited one subject and seized 260 undersized oysters. The undersized oysters were returned to the water alive.Officer Peterson and Reserve Officer Martin, working an oyster detail in the Eastpoint area, saw a vessel returning from harvesting oysters and stopped it to conduct a resource inspection. The officers inspected a bag of oysters found onboard the vessel. After counting and measuring each oyster, they determined the bag contained 72 per-cent undersized oysters. Officer Peterson cited one subject and seized 306 undersized oysters, which were returned to the water alive.FWC REPORTJune 3Tony Sadler, 56, Apalachicola, domes-tic battery; $1,000 bond (FCSO) June 6Anthony J. Budzko, 51, Apalachicola, trespassing on property … not structure or conveyance, violation of conditional release; held without bond (APD)Michael Reese Downing, 48, Eastpoint, trespassing on property … structure or conveyance, larceny … theft over $300 and less than $5,000, violation of probation; held without bond (FCSO) Mary Ruth Wetzel, 48, Eastpoint, trespassing on property … structure or conveyance; released on own recognizance (FCSO)Cynthia Renae Hutchins, 33, Eastpoint, trespassing on property … structure or conveyance; released on own recogni-zance (FCSO)Tina Joyce Davis, 51, Carrabelle, violation of probation; held without bond (FCSO) June 9Vanda Venssa McElveen, 56, Jacksonville, smuggling contraband into prison … controlled substance, trafficking in amphetamine or meth-amphetamine … 14 grams or over; $35,000 bond (CPD) June 10Rosta M. Russell, 24, Apalachicola, domestic battery; $500 bond (APD)The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Office. Arrests listed this week were made by officers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Carrabelle Police Department, and the Franklin County Sheriffs Office. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.ARREST REPORTVanda Venssa McElveen is charged with introducing contraband to Franklin Correctional Institution, leading to six men being hospitalized after smoking K2, a synthetic marijuana. [FCSO PHOTO] By David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl.com 850-653-8894The accountant who audited the books for the last four years of former tax collector Jimmy Harris term in office has told county commissioners hell release his report as soon as he gets the goahead from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.In a June 8 letter to county commissioners, certified public accoun-tant Ralph Roberson said we will report to the board just as soon as we have clearance from the FDLE to do so.We have made numerous requests to the FDLE regarding the status of their investigation, and when it will be completed,Ž he said. We are unable to report to you until the FDLE issues their report, and concludes their investigation.ŽIn August 2017, at the request of Harris successor, Rick Watson, and with the approval of the county commission, Roberson & Associates was engaged to perform forensic accounting services for the years 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017, as the result of irregularities discovered during the countys annual financial audit.Roberson said he met August 17, 2017 with Meschelle Pittman and Keith Kameg, inspectors with FDLEs Office of Executive Investigations, which is responsible for perform-ing the investigation based on Robersons findings. Both Paul Marxsen and Roberson provided sworn testimony on the results of their forensic examinations.We were advised by FDLE, that we could not disclose our findings while the investigation is in progress.Ž Rober-son wrote.He said that on June 5, an FDLE communication he received said Pittman was completing her report that day, but it had to be reviewed by her superiors and the FDLE general counsel prior to issuing the results. She declined to give a time frame for this to be completed, indicating they had higher priority cases including the school shooting in Bro-ward County,Ž Roberson wrote.In an interview with the Times in March, State Attorney Jack Campbell said the evi-dence gleaned by FDLE, as well as Harris death, had led to his office deciding to abate prosecution for any theft in office. He did not release details as to what is alleged to have occurred.Everything we found comes back to him being the responsible party,Ž said Campbell. Obviously with his death theres no way to proceed with criminal prosecution. The evi-dence is supporting that he was the sole person responsible for the theft.There is totally no evidence of other crimi-nal conduct,Ž he said. Theres no indication of anyone else being com-plicit in the crimes. Right now we have no evidence to suggest anyone else was involved.ŽHarris audit still in FDLE hands Jacksonville woman charged with introducing contrabandRoberson John Clark does not believe theres a flood coming, or anything like that. He just had to move a houseboat hes building from off a wharf on St. George Island.Like Noah. drawing attention from his neighbors,Clark built it in his yard on the island, and a friend was nice enough to let him use dock space after that. But now Clark had to move it, and thats why its sitting there now, across the river from the Tin Shed.Right now its not finished,Ž he said, tick-ing off a list of touches, including air condition-ing, he still has to do. I didnt know what moving would do to it. I didnt know what flexing that houseboat would do," he said.The boat got bounced from Regatta Park, the old ferry dock at the center of the island, after the mover, J. P. Stone, took it down there, not heeding Clarks warning that no boat launching was allowed there.He said its not a boat, its a house,Ž Clark said. The sheriff showed up, he was real nice.ŽSo there it sits, across the water, as Clark decides what hes going to do next. If the rivers right and the tides right I can always swim over for beer,Ž he said. By David AdlersteinHouse migrates down river[ JO PEARMAN | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ]

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** The Times | Thursday, June 14, 2018 A3 Special to the TimesNearly 40 volunteers were treated to lunch on Monday, June 4 at the Holy Family Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon held at the Senior Center in Apalachicola. The event was planned and sponsored by the Holy Family Senior Center Ad Hoc Commit-tee, which is comprised of representation from the city of Apalachicola, ECCC (Elder Care Community Council), Franklins Promise Coalition and HCOLA (Hillside Coalition Of Laborers for Apalachicola), in conjunction with Erica Head, the senior centers activities coordinator, who han-dledemcee duties.It was all to show appreciation to organizations and individuals who have donated or con-tributed in any way to the growth and strengthen-ing of the Centers senior programs and services. I think it was a wonderful event, and besides every now and then everyone wants to feel appreciated,Ž said Sandi Little, who volunteers at the center at least once a week helping with the daily lunch program.The invited participants were treated to a delicious lunch that included spaghetti, mixed green salad, green beans, assorted desserts, sweet tea, and water. Entertainment was provided by Jenny Odom and Tony Partington.During the luncheon, The Holy Family volunteers pose after the meeting [ DAVID ADLERSTEIN | THE TIMES ] See SENIORS, A18 Holy Family is thankful of its volunteers

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** A4 Thursday, June 14, 2018 | The TimesHave something to say?The Times editorial page is a forum where differing opinions and fresh ideas are freely exchanged. Comments on the news from readers, as letters to the editor or guest columns, are welcomed and encouraged. All submissions must be signed, and include the email address and/or phone number of the author for veri“ cation purposes only. The Times considers all letters, but reserves the right to decline to publish them if they fail to meet community standards for decency and avoidance of personal attack.We may edit them so as to ensure they meet guidelines for style. Please email your letters to Dadlerstein@star” .com. Or fax them to (850) 653-8893. Or mail them to Letters to the Editor, P.O. Box 820, Apalachicola, FL 32329. Submissions must be received by Monday evening for publication in Thursdays paper. USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Postmaster: Send address change to The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone: 850-653-8868 Periodical rate postage paid at: Apalachicola, FL 32329 Weekly Publishing Circulation: 1-850-522-5197 Formerly The Apalachicola Times SUBSCRIPTIONS In county Out of county 1 year: $24.15 $34.65 6 months: $15.75 $31.00 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such ads. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. PUBLISHER Tim Thompson EDITOR Tim Croft OPINION California has worn me quite thin I just cant wait to see you again.Ž„From Come MondayŽ as performed by Jimmy BuffettWhen I was 17, I took a trip to California that included a visit to San Diego, a stop at Disneyland, Knott's Berry Farm and the Hearst Castle, and a drive up that state's spectacular coastal highway. The turns were both frightening and exhilarating, especially around Big Sur. Monterey, Pacific Grove and Carmel were gorgeous; the air was clean and fresh; the quality of light remarkable. The sequoia trees near Mount Whitney were awesome, and John Muirs redwoods were equally majestic. The climate was wonderful. When we landed it was 55 degrees with no humidity. In August! Most of us, I think, especially those of us who spend a lot of time in the South, dream about being able to enjoy a summer afternoon without stifling heat and bugs. You can do that in California. There was a sense then that California was a special place, a desired location to visit or live. Times change, though. A dozen mudslides and twice as many wildfires later, the Golden State has lost some luster. Especially if you want to own a home there. Consider this: the median price for a home in San Francisco recently rose to $1.6 million, or double the cost from only five years ago. Are wages keeping up, so that most folks can afford that increase? No way. So it's no surprise that Californians are bailing. In addition to being one of the most highly-taxed states, most folks simply can't afford to buy a home. Home prices are high throughout the state. So where are Californians moving? Everywhere, apparently. But especially to places like Las Vegas. It's close by, and home prices are still rebounding from the Great Recession. The median list price for a home in Vegas in April 2018 was about $280,000. Eight percent of those Californians who left the state in the first quarter of 2017 landed in Las Vegas. From 2006 to 2016, California experienced a net decrease of a million residents. Contrast that with a state like, say, Florida, which over the same 10-year time span grew from a population of 18.17 million to 20.66 million, a net increase of almost two-and-a-half million residents. Many people still desire to own a house, and paying a million dollars for a two-bedroom starter home is unappealing to most, even if you've landed a high-paying tech job. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, author of the syndicated economic column Arbor Outlook,Ž is founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850.608.6121 … www. arborwealth.net), a fiduciary, fee-only, registered investment advisory firm near Destin. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any specific strategy or investment will be suitable or profitable for an investor. ARBOR OUTLOOKSequoias, berries and the high cost of housing Margaret McDowell A well-mannered mosquito truck Big time shout out for utmost courtesy. Stepped onto my porch when truck was passing and spray was immediately suspended. A neighbor was arriving home at the same time. The driver turned around and finished the treatment. Sure wish city water bills delivered as much! Fees are just obscene.Day McGeeHelp make America sane again All Aboard! Franklin County Democrats, its time to climb on board the DŽ train. We are at a very crucial time... the train is leaving the station and our first destination is August 28, the primary, and then on to the general election on Nov. 6, 2018. We need folks to stand up and be counted. support your local Democrat organization, volunteer, make phone calls, come to meetings, hear our plans, be a precinct captain and help get out the vote. Where are you? There is no change if there is no change. We need to make America sane again. Thank you.Sharon SleeperLETTERS TO THE EDITORUsed to be a time if you were lucky, your Daddy gave you a weekly allowance, but where I came from not. So, that meant you had to figure out a way to make some money if you wanted any. Most Saturdays you would see kids in the neighborhood pushing a lawnmower down the street with a can of gas balanced on top, going door-to-door offering to cut your yard for 50 cents. Now, I grew up in the country so that wasnt an option for me, but I did have to cut the grass every Saturday morning before I could go do anything else. You might think thats no big deal, but our yard was three acres. Mama would get me up early, feed me, then I would start about 7 a.m. Truth of the matter, I didnt have to use a push mower. Daddy had a self-propelled cylinder or reel mower with a tractor-like seat attached. It could really move out on the long stretches of the three acres, so usually I could finish about noon, whereby I would be rewarded with 25 cents and the rest of the day off. All this went fine until some folks built next door with this cute little girl about my age and they situated her bedroom facing our house so from time to time, I might catch a glimpse of her. Im convinced they did that just to torture me. Well, anyway, one Saturday morning I was mowing back and to, up and down the yard when I thought I saw her in her nightie. I lost track of what I was doing and ate up a pine tree, cut my leg and Pops lawn mower met its untimely demise. Most times, I would hop on my bicycle, cruise to town to the movie theater and hope maybe my favorite cowboy, Lash Larue, might be playing, and of course there was always a serial, so you had to show up every Saturday to keep up with the action. Playing cowboys and Indians while growing up, everybody assumed I would want to be Gene Autry but I liked Lash Larue and Hop-a-Long Cassidy better. (When folks ask me if Im kin to Gene Autry, I tell them, No, Im kin to Champion.Ž) Well, the movie cost 14 cents for some reason so that meant I had 11 cents to spend. If I bought a fudgesicle, my favorite, for a nickel, that left me six cents which I took home and deposited in my piggy bank. After I accumulated a few dollars Daddy took me down to the First National Bank and opened me up my own passbook savings account with the funds compounded quarterly. (Albert Einstein said that compound interest was the greatest invention of man.) I think the going rate was 1.5 percent at the time and every time you made a deposit, the teller would enter the amount plus any interest that had accrued. The only investment disappointment I had was the bank down the street came up with a youth passbook named the, yep, Hop-a-long Cassidy Savings Account,Ž with a passbook shaped like a saddle and Daddy wouldnt let me transfer over. The best prospect I got to make the big time was when the farmer next door hired me to help bale hay at the rate of $1 per day. I was so proud. Unfortunately, I turned out to be too little to toss a bale up on the stack so the kind soul felt sorry for me, gave me 75 cents, then politely fired me. When I got a little older, after mowing the grass, I would hitchhike to the country club where most of my friends were playing golf. But now, you could caddy and make $3 for nine holes but that was hard and I wasnt too big and the bags were heavy. Or, there was no such a thing as a driving range so all the big shot golfers had their own bag of practice balls called a shag bag, so you could shag balls for $5, much easier. All you had to do was go down the fairway a short distance while the big shot hit practice balls and then you had to retrieve them and put them in the bag. Of course, by the time they got to their driver, the accuracy waned and you had to do a right smart of running to keep up but all in all a pretty easy five bucks. So, my passbook savings account got healthier. When I was 11, I talked Mamma and Daddy into giving me a guitar for Christmas, Well, I learned to play the thing and by the time I was 13 I had formed my own rock and roll band, I think they call them garage bands. We werent any good but nobody knew the difference because we were the first and only live band in town. We started booking gigs for $35. Five of us were involved so we each made $7, as we were a democratic organization. Four band members plus our manager, so designated because he was older and could drive us to the gigs. Hey, this was 1959! No other kids made that kind of money so my passbook account continued to grow. Well, by the time I graduated from high school I had a rather tidy sum accumulated and was fixin to start matriculatin at the University of Georgia, when a new and the first stock brokerage firm opened up. So, I went down and invested $1,000 in the latest hot pick and was told it would be worth a pile by the time I graduated. After four years of college and five in the Marine Corps, I think I cashed out for about $250, but hey, now its zero. If I had bought Coca-Cola instead, just think. By the way, if I had played golf instead of trying to make money shagging balls, I would have probably won the Masters and be worth a lot of money and most likely be miserable. My little band The TorquesŽ was asked to open for Billy CrashŽ Craddock in Statesboro, Georgia, but I had no way of getting there. If I could have, I would have become a teen idol, then nothing but sex, drugs and rock-n-roll and probably dead. A feller told me once, sez, Gill, if a bullfrog had wings, he wouldnt bump his ass when he hopped.Ž By the way, its been a long time since I saw any kids mowing grass.ƒ.Theyve gone to iPhones everyone. Your friend, Capt. GillWhere are the lawn mowers?The Torques in rehearsal. Can you guess which one is Gill Autrey?[ PHOTO COURTESY CAPT. GILL ] G i l l A u t r e y Gill Autrey

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** The Times | Thursday, June 14, 2018 A5Franklin County is managed by individual department heads who report directly to county commissioners as well as our elected constitutional officers who are required to request their annual budgets from the county commission. Franklin Countys current budget of $52 million supports a population of approximately 10,000, not including state inmates. Small county we may be, but county taxes, to the tune of over $5,000 for every man, woman and child, puts our county budget at the very top rank of county spending per capita in the state. Absent a county manager, many of the countys key financial decisions are made by well-meaning but too often financially inexperienced, individuals who perform well on the operational side of their position, but struggle with sophisticated financial decisions and operations that may be above and beyond their everyday duties and skills. Questions that need to be asked and issues that need to be addressed by every department and constitutional officer before they make capital requests or before they submit a budget request are: € What is the economic life of an asset? Every piece of capital equipment should have an asset card associated with it that tracks its history and helps predict future obsolescence. € Does each piece of equipment follow a prescribed preventative maintenance program to maximize its life? Who ensures that standards are met? € Is there a standardized approach to the acquisition of capital equipment through open bidding or does the county leave that up to the individual discretion of constitutionals and department heads? € When financing is involved, does the county have an annual arrangement with a financial institution to acquire equipment for the lowest possible finance cost? Is this arrangement transparent and open to competition? € Under what conditions should leasing of equipment be sought? Leasing is rarely the most economic form of ownership for county government. Exceptions are capital leases with a defined buyout. € Does every county department have a mission statement that clearly states what is expected of that department and its employees so they can budget to that requirement? € Does the county undertake a periodic operational review by a qualified company to look for opportunities for savings and efficiencies that exist in every operational area? € In department and overall county-wide, is there a shared assumption by staff, management and commissioners to attempt to operate within the current years budget footprint when they submit their next budget? While not always possible, a stated goal/policy to aggressively attempt to keep costs level. € Is there anyone tasked by county leadership who looks for ways to reduce spending, increase efficiency and provide better services to the citizens? € Is there a countywide personnel policy and compensation program that employees can rely on for dayto-day operations and promotion guidance? € Be wary of Free Money,Ž aka grants that are a huge part of our budget. Many grants start you off but dont sustain that purpose over time. This means that when the grant money runs out, the county frequently continues paying for whatever activity or person that was at first free.Ž € County leaders should expect and budget for excess funds not used in a budget year. There must not be a mad rush to expend every dollar to bolster next years request. As we enter this years budget cycle, those that request and approve budgets should be cognizant of recent spending increases. In 2012-13, the county budget was approximately $38 million. The most recent budget saw a $14 million increase in spending to the current $52 million. That is a 37 percent increase in five years. That is substantial and hard to justify by our way of thinking when population numbers have not increased and no new services have been introduced. Has the population grown or number of visitors demanding services substantially changed? After several years of increases in financial spending, its time for a pause in the annual Fleecing of the Lambs.Ž We the taxpayers and citizens are all, of course, those Lambs!Ž The CCFC is asking the county commission to pledge a no net increase in millage rate taxesŽ this year. Ask your representatives if they are willing to take the pledge. Allan Feifer is president of the Concerned Citizens of Franklin County, Inc.GUEST COLUMNGood stewards make good neighborsThe Mission Act of 2018 is a rather wordy document that addresses the changes demanded of the VA health care system by Congress and the President. Several portions of this law will be of greater interest to Franklin County veterans. The authorization for walk-in care at community clinics section of this law provides for veterans currently in VA health care, and having been seen by a VA health care provider in the last 24 months, can be authori zed to visit community clinics for non-emergency care. Restrictions are that the clinic will have to be authorized by VA as a provider. Co-pay for veterans who currently pay for VA services will continue. Veterans who do not pay co-pay will be authorized two visits annually, before being assessed a co-pay. The law authorizes the VA to establish a local provider agreement with less red tape, and establishes a requirement for timely payment. The law also requires the VA to expand the Caregiver program to all veterans who are medically discharged and have a serious injury incurred or aggravated in the line of duty. The expansion is being staged in with a target start date of no later the Oct. 2018. For the first two years the program will be expanded to cover not only veterans injured after Sept. 11, 2001, but also veterans injured prior to May 5, 1975. After the two-year period the program will be expanded to all veterans. As with all new laws there is a period of time as the law is implemented. The Choice Act currently supporting Franklin County veterans is fully funded until it is replaced by this law. Emergency care is always available for veterans in the VA health care system. Charles B. Elliott is the county veteran service officer for Franklin County. He can be reached at 653-8096; by cellphone at 653-7051; or by email to Veteranservice@franklincountyflorida.comVETERANS CORNERMy take on the Mission ActAnew element of our Independence Eve Celebration this year is the addition of food trucks, which will replace our usual food tent. Danny Itzkovitz, owner of Tamaras Caf and Tamaras Tapas Bar, has been an integral part the food service team each year, donating time, money, and equipment to the operation of the food tent. The event got so big so fast, we just couldnt keep up,Ž he said, And we only have 500 restaurant seats in this town. We just cant feed everyone. The crowds are more than the restaurants can handle, and when were that busy, the experience for the customer isnt the same,Ž Itzkovitz said. Were recruiting food trucks to help meet the demand.Ž This year, his concept for a food truck food courtŽ is designed to alleviate stress on downtown restaurants and the volunteers, while adding unique cuisine. Food trucks are a huge draw,Ž he said. Were looking for a large variety of different foods from local and regional vendors.Ž Itzkovitz reflected on how the Independence Eve event has changed the downtown economy. It used be everybody closed down around July 4. Several years ago it was a ghost town; everyone would go somewhere else because we didnt have fireworks,Ž he said. Now, the whole downtown is filled with patrons every restaurant, every shop, every parking spot is full.Ž Across the county, food trucks began booming in 2008 as the recession hit. Vendors began catering to the changing consumer preferences for affordable gourmet cuisine. Industry experts think the trend is here to stay. Food trucks are our way of extending Southern hospitality to everyone who comes downtown for the event. Our goal is to provide fast, efficient food service at family-friendly prices, with delicious options to suit every taste. If you are interested in being a food vendor, please feel free to contact us. The requirements include a license from the Department of Business and Professional Regulation to sell food in the state of Florida, and a $1 million product liability certificate of insurance. Augusta West is executive director of Apalachicola Main Street, a non-profit organization dedicated to downtown economic development in the context of historic preservation. She can be reached at awest@ apalachicolamainstreet. org or (850) 274-1321. Main Streets mailing address is 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, FL 32320WEST ON MAINFood trucks to replace food tent A u g u s t a W e s t Augusta West A l l a n F e i f e r Allan Feifer C h a r l e s E l l i o t t Charles Elliott For more news go to apalachtimes.com

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** A6 Thursday, June 14, 2018 | The Times CHASING SHADOWSBy Alec HargreavesSpecial to the TimesEditor's note: The Times was fortunate to receive this article last week and is grateful for the workd done by its author. Prof. Hargreaves wrote that two of his sources -the inscription on the memorial in Apalachicola, unveiled in 1921, and the citation for the award of the Distinguished Service Cross, published under War Department general orders in 1923 … 1st Lt. Marks died on Oct. 12, 1918. Two other sources, Hargreaves wrote, say Marks died on Oct. 14, thedate given in Marks military service record, typed on a pro-forma card printed after the war and stored in the Florida State Archives. The same date (October 14) is cited by the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC), which has administered the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery since 1934. TheABMC account of the Meuse-Argonne offensive, the battle around the village of Cunel in which Marks died, raged intensely from Oct. 12 to14, by when the German main line of defense was broken.One hundred years ago, a World War I hero from Apalachicola died in one of the bloodiest battles ever fought by American troops. This week I travelled to the cemetery where he is buried in north-eastern France and laid flowers on his grave.First Lieutenant Willoughby Ryan Marks, whose valor is commemorated in a memorial that stands opposite the Gibson Inn and the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola, died while trying to rescue a wounded comrade. The climactic battle in which he fell in October 1918 in the Argonne region of France played a key role in helping to bring the war to an end with the defeat of Ger-many a few weeks later.As a French professor at Florida State University, I often gazed on the memorial to Lt. Marks during weekends spent at the Gibson Inn, and wanted to know more about him. After retiring from FSU and moving to France, I conducted searches of U.S. military archives and other sources. These showed that Marks final resting place is in the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery, the largest U.S. military cemetery in Europe. Most of the 14,246 Americans buried there, including Marks, lost their lives during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive in the fall of 1918.On my visit to the cemetery to commemorate the centenary of Marks death I was joined by a friend from FSU, Bill Cloonan, also a retired French professor. We took a wreath bearing the words Remembered in Apalachic-ola, 2018Ž and a photograph of present-day Apalachicola showing the memorial to Marks erected in the town in 1921.Like many other parts of north-eastern France, the wooded terrain of the Argonne region, close to the river Meuse, was laid waste during ferocious fighting on the Western Front, in which small hilltops became bitterly contested military objectives. Today, the gently undulating countryside, dotted with sleepy villages and small towns, is a haven of peace. In contrast with the rain-soaked mud with which the Western Front became synonymous, our visit was bathed in bright sunshine, highlighting row after row of white gravestones running up the beautifully landscaped hillside on which the U.S. cemetery stands. Lieutenant Markss grave lies half way up the slope. After laying our wreath on Markss grave, Bill and I observed a minutes silence. Then we reflected on the chain of events that brought Marks to this final resting place.Born in Columbus, Georgia in 1888, Marks grew up in Apalachicola, where his father Charles Willoughby Marks died in 1900. His mother, Annie Marks, was a founding member of the Philaco Womans Reading Club, which was to play an important role in helping to provide library facilities for Apalachicolas inhabitants. In Nov. 1917, Marks was called into military service at the age of 29. After training at Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, and passing through Camp Greene, North Carolina, he shipped out to Europe from Camp Merritt, New Jersey, in April 1918.A year earlier, when the United States entered World War I, the nation had a regular army of 130,000 men. Boosted by the draft, introduced in June 1917, the numbers in uniform were to rise to overfour million by the time war ended in Nov. 1918. Among these, Marks, a first lieutenant in the 5th Division, was one of nearly a million Americans stationed in France in the summer of 1918. After four years of stalemate in which the European powers had inflicted millions of casu-alties upon each other, France and Britain desperately hoped that this new influx of man-power from the United States would at last enable them to defeat Germany.In the early fall, Marks was among 600,000 Ameri-can soldiers positioned in the Meuse-Argonne sector, where the last major attack of the war was launched on Sept. 26. The Meuse-Argonne offensive … the largest battle in which Americans had fought … raged until Nov. 11, when the retreating Germans signed the Armistice that ended the war, a date that has since then been commemorated in the annual observation of Veterans Day in the United States.Marks was killed in action at the height of one of the fiercest phases of the battle in a wooded area off the road between the villages of Cunel and Brieulles within sight of another small village, Romagne, where the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery now stands. The citation for the Distinguished Service Cross awarded to Marks post-humously reads as follows:While in command of Com-pany C, 61st Infantry, he was severely wounded but continued to lead his company, refusing to be evacuated until the objective was reached and his lines reorganized. About to be evacuated, he learned that an officer of his battalion was mortally wounded and lying exposed to terrific enemy fire in front of the lines. With utter disregard for his own safety he rushed forward to rescue his fellow officer, and in the attempt was struck by enemy high-explosive shell-fire and mortally wounded, dying a few minutes later. His undaunted courage and devotion to duty served as a splendid example of soldierly conduct to the men of his command.Not far from the American Cemetery lies the hilltop vil-lage of Montfaucon, where a 200-feet high granite tower was erected to com-memorate the six-week long Meuse-Argonne offensive. At the bottom of the tower, in a description of key phases of the offensive, we read: The prolonged struggles for the strongly fortified German main line of defense on the heights near Brieulles, Cunel and Romagne were unsur-passed in fury but by October 14 this line had been broken.Ž It was during that crucial phase of the battle that Marks lost his life in an act of hero-ism that a century later is still remembered in the memorial to him in Apalachicola and in the cemetery of Meuse-Argonne in France. Alec G. Hargreaves is the Emeritus Winthrop-King Professor of Transcultural French Studies at Florida State University. He can be reached at ahargreaves@fsu.eduMarking an American heros centenaryProf. Alec Hargreaves places a wreath at the g rave of Willoughby Marks in France. [ PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEC HARGREAVES PHOTOS] The wreath placed at the grave of Willoughby Marks Alec Hargreaves at the foot of a 200-feet high granite tower was erected in Montfaucon to commemorate the six-week long MeuseArgonne offensive. Prof. Bill Cloonan at the cemetery in France where Willoughby Marks is buried.

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** The Times | Thursday, June 14, 2018 A7areas, just off St. George Island, and so now these researchers strong recommendations have become lawmens stern warnings.Certain ones are going to steal whatever they can find, they dont care,Ž said Shannon Hartsfield, president of the Franklin County Seafood Works Association.Hartsfield said he could understand FWC closing the bars just north of the Gorrie Bridge, in an effort to help replenish the volume of spat, oysters in their infancy stage. Were becoming too spat limited, theres not enough spat,Ž he said.There is a good possibility of oysters in that area successfully spawning and getting carried to areas south in the river flow,Ž said Amanda Nalley, FWC spokeswoman.The bottom line is, the bottom of the bay doesnt have very many oysters on it, plagued by a lack of freshwater and exacerbated by the appetites of various other fish and sea creatures who also like to eat oysters. Dealers are paying $65 a bag, but theres not many you can fill if you strictly adhere to the law. FWC is issuing undersized oyster viola-tion tickets at a steady clip, often finding not a few, but nearly a full bag of oysters all under the three-inch length limit.A lot of oystermen, quite a few, they know the bay is such a disaster they dont want to deplete it,Ž said Hartsfield. I havent seen maybe 40 out there.ŽHe said the most productive areas are south of the bridge, in areas that were replenished with state-funded shelling efforts last year and the year before.Thats the only place theyre finding oysters,Ž said Hartsfield. The daily limit for commercial harvesters is three bags of oysters in the shell per person, each bag weighing 60 pounds and the size of two five-gallon buckets. Recreational har-vesters can take no more than half that amount, five gallons of oysters in the shell.Harvesters can get started no earlier than sunrise and, unless theyre greentagging,Ž they have to their catch into their coolers by 11 a.m. Greentagging means they are harvesting oysters expressly to be shucked and shipped out, not to be consumed raw, and those have until 4 p.m. to work the waters.The harvesters are allowed to work four days a week, not on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, and because of Tropical Storm Alberto, didnt really get started until June 7.Hartsfield estimated many will be off the water in another two weeks, well ahead of the last day of the summer season, on Aug. 31.There just aint noth-ing nowhere,Ž he said. There just aint hardly no oysters there.Ž OYSTERSFrom Page A1From the outset of the discussion, La Paz pressed McCreerys con-sultant Russell Large as to how many Airstreams, intended for short-term stays for tourists, would be on site. He said there would be a total of seven but La Paz said an eighth unit, which is not on the lots under discussion, had to be considered as well, since it would require access off of U.S. 98 through a road running behind the shop.She also pressed McCreery on whether she had already begun operating a rental unit in one of the trailers. Its going on right now and its not legal,Ž said the mayor. Campers have been brought in and put in place. You werent even told you could do it.ŽMcCreery said that to be in operation, Carrabelle would have to run water and sewer to the Airstreams, and that hasnt happened yet.He uses my water and sewer,Ž she said. Theres nothing going on back there. Theres no sewer being used in that trailer.ŽLa Paz insisted the plan was too dense for the existing space. McCreery said she intends to comply with rules requiring the renovated Airstreams can be moved off site in the event of a pending hurricane.The RVs have to be ready to be pulled off. Well need an evacuation plan,Ž she said. I own them and Ill own them all. They wont be coming and going.ŽThe proposal drew criticism from Carrabelle resident Rod Gasche. He said last year he wanted the city to intercede with what he said was an illegal filling in of wetlands behind the store, conced-ing the city had limited jurisdiction in this regard.McCreerys neighbors, the Patricia Moore family, said they saw multiple loads of fill dirtŽ being brought in to fill wetland areas. The depth of fill would cause pine trees to die,Ž he said. And if and when we put water in, thats going to damage the roots.ŽHe said the fill has led to as much as two feet of water up to the Moores house. It wont drain now,Ž Gasche said. Theres no stream to run any more, that was protected wetlands.Mrs. Moores grandson is starting up a greenhouse,Ž he said. You have a hard rain and that will be flooded.ŽGasche was followed by former city commissioner Gathana Parmenas, who cast doubt on the claim the units would be evacu-ated in the event of a bad storm.We were under evacu-ation orders two weeks ago and they were not moved out of the county,Ž she said. I just think youre fooling yourself if you think more units are going to be moved. Theyre going to become debris.Its never OK to say lets just give them forgiveness because they didnt get permission,Ž Parmenas said.She said the traffic would all come out of a single driveway on to a curve along U.S. 98, and that approval of the spe-cial exception could lead to more property owners in the area seeking permission. Where does it stop?Ž she asked.Grandson Steve Moore said he had gone through all the hoops to secure permission to put in a nursery on the adjacent property, and now finds stormwater gathering on his property. Theres no more flow,Ž he said. I have water and rain.The fill dirt is the big thing,Ž he said. This is blocking off a way for water to go. Things have been done without your consent.ŽCity Clerk Keisha Smith advised Moore that city water is available for his property, and that the city has not refused him water. It just has to be paid for,Ž she said.Large said that as a critical shoreline area, septic tanks would not be allowed in the Airstream Park area. He said his investigation, and that of state regulators, have shown no significant elevation of the prop-erty. Were making sure drainage is maintained,Ž he said. I certainly will accommodate the flow.ŽMillender expressed his concern that as many as a dozen parking spaces would need to be accom-modated on the site, with La Paz noting that parking for the shop also had to be figured in.The mayor expressed concern that having sta-tionary Airstreams could lead to long-term ten-ants. She said the nearby Carrabelle RV park has park models that are sta-tionary, but visitors can stay no more than three months a year.Yours are privately owned, and theres a high probability to youngsters there,Ž La Paz said. The wetlands cannot be used, and theres no fire escape. Therell be a lot of traffic going in and out.ŽAfter La Paz called for the vote, Walden said he had changed his mind on the matter, and cast the deciding vote to deny the special exception. PARKFrom Page A1them at the 3 level, and almost exactly at state average with 4s and 5s.I was disappointed in the drop but I also know the demographics of my students and know this was a different group of students,Ž said Johnson.ABC fifth grade language arts teacher Sarah Kesterson, with help from ESE teacher Pam Mahr, is overseeing a summer reading camp at the ABC School for about a dozen kids. This course is required of level 1s to prepare them for an endof-summer assessment they must pass to advance to the fourth grade.We ask invite our level 2s to attend as well,Ž said Johnson. We highly rec-ommend it. We feel there was some concern that some of those might fall out.We were happy we had few level 1s,Ž she said. We want to build that reading foundation for level 2s.We encourage those students to come to Proj-ect Impacts summer program. We encourage those parents to send them so they dont have that summer slide,Ž Johnson said.The May 31 report to the school board by Sue Summers, the districts director of special programs, and Jill Rudd, principal at Franklin County School, showed that the 82 third-graders this past spring performed at right about the same level as the 68 third grad-ers did last year.About one in three, or 35 percent, were tested to be proficient, by their scoring a 3 or better. This percent-age was identical to that in 2017 by the class that preceded them.The number of 1s dropped slightly, from 31 percent last year to 27 percent this year, while the number of 2s increased, from 34 to 38 percent. The number of third graders scoring 3s jumped from 18 to 27 percent, while the percentage of 4s dropped from 16 to 6 percent. The number of 5s went from 1 to 2 percent, well below the state average of 9 percent in that highest category.A lot of schools went down,Ž said Board Chair Stacy Kirvin. In fact, the statewide numbers were such that the Florida Department of Education did not send out a news release when they were released, something they traditionally do.Summers said the dis-trict is analyzing the data, and seeing what additional factors may have been at work. Was it because of stress of testing in a later time frame? And trying to get the makeups made?Ž she said. Nobody got for-gotten on that last Friday we were testing kids.ŽRudd said the school showed about 86 percent of students who repeated the third grade showed learning gains, a sign of slow but steady progress. She also said the school is planning on going to a form of block scheduling next year so as to provide more instructional time for teachers to work with. SCORESFrom Page A1 The large squares north of the Gorrie Bridge show where oystering is now prohibited over the summer harvest. [ MAP COURTESY FWC ]

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** A8 Thursday, June 14, 2018 | The Times SOCIETYGracyn Kirvin, of Apala-chicola, earned a bachelor of science summa cum laude, with a major in elementary education, from Troy University in Troy, Alabama at the May 11 spring graduation ceremony.Kirvin, daughter of Ward and Christey Kirvin, and granddaughter of Bobby and Elizabeth Kirvin, and Nancy Horton, all of Apalachicola, is a 2014 Honors graduate from Franklin County High School.She will be teaching fifth grade this fall at Franklin County Schools.Troy University is a public, historic, international university with more than 145,000 alumni. Students on the Troy, Ala. campus enjoy a traditional college experience, while working adult students are the centers of attention at campuses in Dothan, Montgomery and Phenix City, Ala., as well as at locations around the world and online.Gracyn Kirvin graduates from TroyGracyn Kirvin On Monday evening, June 18, beginning at 7 p.m., The Gallery at High Cotton, 230 Water Street, will host an acoustic evening of music, open to the public.Four regional singer-songwriters will perform in the round, singing a mixture of original songs ranging from classic country, folk, jazz and alt-Americana. The lineup includes Eric Bolan-der of Lexington, Kentucky; Chase Crawford of Hahira, Georgia; Rachel Hillman of Nashville, Tennessee; and Kyle Keller, of Gainesville.Bolanders Americana/ folk music offers soulful vocals with thoughtful melodies. Driven by life experiences, his lyrical songs will give you a glimpse into his life and a realization that happiness can be per-petuated through pain.Crawford, returning for his second appearance at the studio concert series, is a songwriter and guitarist who pens beautiful classic-style country songs about love and life on the road. He is lead guitarist for the Georgia Roots Rock band, The Wisebloods. But on this evening he will be sounding more like Steve Earle or Alan Jackson, with his stylish Southern swag. With a brand new album, Roadie,Ž under her belt, Hillman will be making her first appearance on stage at the gallery. Her unique style is influenced by artists such as Kimbra, Michael Jackson, Jack Johnson, Ingrid Michaelson, and John Mayer. A student of Florida State Universitys college of music, she embraces vocal jazz and native Southern blues. She has recently relo-cated to Nashville, where she is pursuing her musical career.Keller will be making his second appearance at the gallery series. His deep, rich and soulful voice will grab you right away and keep you engaged, as he winds his words around your heart, and takes you on a journey. He is a serious man, who works hard to tell us his stories of love, loss and yearning.The event is BYOB, and a donation of $10 per person at the door is requested for musicians. Light snacks will be provided, and concert-goers are welcome to bring something to share.For more information, call (850) 316-0630.Acoustic concert Monday at GalleryThe Florida Board of Pharmacy recently held their annual convention in Orlando, whereas Mrs. Alma R. McMillan, of Daytona Beach, was awarded the Life-time Membership Award.The award is granted by the Florida Pharmacy Association.This prestigious recognition is granted to those who have a history of impeccable professional healthcare prac-tice of 50 years. Her legacy within this industry is a model and testament to future generations of pharmacists, and other healthcare professionals.Mrs. McMillan graduated class of 1966, earning her pharmaceutical degree from Florida Agriculture Mechanical University in Tallahassee.She is married to Lt. Col. Wesley J. McMillan of Apala-chicola. They are both active alumni and major contributors to their alma mater, FAMU.McMillan earns pharmacys lifetime awardSpecial to the TimesOn Saturday, June 23, the Forgotten Coast Parrot Head Club will host its second annual The Lon-gest Day,Ž a benefit to raise awareness and funds for the Alzheimers Association. It promises to be a whole day of family fun.The day will begin at 7 a.m., from the St. George Island Lighthouse. There, we will have our second annual Fins Up! 5K race. Runners will enjoy the early morning ocean breezes, as they traverse their way up and back West Gorrie Drive. The first, second and third place finishers will be awarded nice trophies. All partici-pants will receive a very cool t-shirt! After that, the Parrot Heads will have a Fins Up! 5K walk, for those who prefer the slower-paced activities.Later that day, the festiv-ities will move to Doc Myers Island Pub and Sports Bar, where everyone will find Family Fun on the Lawn.Ž Among the fun, will be corn hole (featuring a tournament), a giant water slide, putting greens, facepainting, and more! The main attraction very well could be a Dunk Tank! We are excited about this because several prominent Forgotten Coast citizens have agreed to sit in the hot, or should we say, wet seat! A few of the names that have agreed to appear are Super-intendent Traci Moses, Carrabelle Mayor Brenda La Paz, County Commissioner Ricky Jones and Sheriff A.J. Smith. As we stated, it promises to be afternoon with a lot of fun!The day will conclude with a Five Oclock Some-where PartyŽ at Doc Myers. There you will find a $10 low country boil, the music of Jimmy Buffett cover artist Bwana Ray, silent auction, trivia contest, 50/50 raffle and more. The Land Shark team will be here with lots of giveaways.So make plans to come on out! It promises to be, as advertised, a Long Day,Ž but one that produces a lot of fun for the whole family! Lets make it a day of good memories, for those who cannot.And as the Forgotten Coast Parrot Heads always sayƒ Fins Up!Parrot Heads plan for Longest DayGRADUATIONThe dunk tank lineup1 p.m. : Barbara Sanders 1:20 p.m. : Traci Moses 1:40 p.m. : Michael Allen 2 p.m. : Tami Ray Hutchinson 2:20 p.m. : Brenda La Paz 2:40 p.m. : Ricky Jones 3 p.m. : Danny Itzkovitz 3:20 p.m. : Patrick Kelly 3:40 p.m. : Doc Myers 4 p.m. : A.J. Smith McMillan Forgotten Coast Parrot Head Club logo designed by video game artist Katy Harg rove Kyle Keller is among the four musicians who will be appearing Monday at The Gallery.

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** The Times | Thursday, June 14, 2018 A9 FAITHGayle Speed Ringo, 58, of Apalachicola and Pensacola, passed away unexpectedly on Sunday, June 10, 2018 in Pensacola. Gayle was born in Apalachicola on August 25, 1959. She was the daughter of Ella Speed and the late Willie Speed. She was educated in the Franklin County school system, graduating in 1977 from Apalachicola High School. She attended Florida A&M University, studying home economics education. After graduating in 1981 from Florida State University, she entered Southern University Law Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in 1982 where she earned her juris doctorate in 1985. She was a licensed member of the Louisiana Bar Association, a Certified Florida Mediator, and practiced Social Security law at the time of her passing. She was also a middle school teacher in Escambia County. While at Southern she met and married fellow classmate, Ronald Ringo on Dec. 30, 1983. Gayle and Ronald welcomed their first child, Ron Charles Ringo, on Dec. 16, 1990, followed by twin daughters Galen and Allison Ringo on Aug. 6, 1993. Gayle was a lifelong member of Love Center Holiness Church of the Living God in Apalachicola, where pastors L.D. and SheLa Martin preside. She was an ordained minister in the five-fold ministry at Love Center Holiness Church. She was a member of New Dimensions Christian Center in Pensacola, with pastors Greg and Diane Burns. Gayle was preceded in death by her father Willie Speed Sr., and older brother Willie BillŽ Speed. Gayle leaves to cherish her memories, her mother Ella Breedlove Speed; her husband Ronald Ringo; one son Ron Charles Ringo; twin daughters Galen and Allison Ringo; two older brothers Allyson and Oryan Speed; sister-in-law Beverly Speed; mother-in-law Beatrice Ringo; sisterin-law Charmaine Price-Newton (Shelby); two brothers-in-law Keith and Kevin Price (Demetria), all of New Orleans, Louisiana, along with a host of nieces and nephews, cousins, and friends, including special friends Kathi Wynn, Rebecca Mathis, Darlene White, and the Apalachicola High School class of 1977. Funeral services will be held on Saturday, June 16 at St. Paul A.M.E. Church, 81 Avenue I, Apalachicola, starting at 1 p.m. ET. Battle Funeral Home in Panama City will be in charge of all arrangements.OBITUARIES GAYLE SPEED RINGOHarvey Daughtry, Jr., of Carrabelle, passed away Monday, June 11, 2018 in Colquitt, Georgia at the age of 47. He was a lifelong resident of Carrabelle. Harvey was a master mechanic and loved his family and friends. He is survived by his son, Christian Daughtry; parents Harvey and Mary Daughtry; siblings, Angie Turner (husband, Ty), Buddy Daughtry (wife, Angie), Jeanette Courtney (husband, Ed), Pauline Colon (husband, Billy), and Kim Brown (husband, Neel); numerous nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles, cousins and other family and friends. Funeral services are being held Friday, June 15 at 2 p.m.graveside in Evergreen Cemetery. Kelley Funeral Home is assisting with arrangements.HARVEY DAUGHTRY, JR. Ephesians 6:4, And, ye fathers, p rovoke not your children to wrath: but bring them up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord.The responsibility of this opportunity fell squarely on the shoulders of the fathers. God gives every father the opportunity to influence his family for greatness. Strong fathers make up strong homes, strong homes make up strong churches, strrong churches make up strong communities. A wise father will make the most of that opportunity. If youre a father, what lives after you is your children, and your children will have children. This is a legacy. Fatherhood is a fulltime job with huge responsibilities consisting of love, commitment, sacrifice and leadership. While it is a difficult time in this world to raise children, it is still possible to be a successful dad. Fathers can and should have a positive influence and impact on their children. One of the ways a father can be a success is to have a consistent relationship with the Lord and with his children. In a world of constant change, just being steady and consistent is vital to becoming and remaining a successful father. According to Deuteronomy 6, God wants men to take their fathering so seriously that it will impact their families for at least a century. Is it possible you may ask? It is. You can lead your family for the next 100 years. Another way is to communicate with them and invest time with your children. One of the greatest gifts a father can ever give to his children is a gift that doesnt cost anything, and that is his time with them. Charles Francis Adams, the 19th century political figure and diplomat, kept a diary. One day he entered: Went fishing with my son today„a day wasted." His son, Brook Adams, also kept a diary, which is still in existence today. On that same day, Brook Adams made this entry: Went fishing with my father„ the most wonderful day of my life!Ž The father thought he was wasting time while fishing with his son, but his son saw it as an investment of time. The time that is lost is spent and it can never be redeemed. No job, career, or salary in this country is ever worth you losing your relationship with your child. Your children are so valuable and precious. The teaching and training about Jesus is extremely important. The time you get to communicate to your kids is precious. Take the time to stop and listen to them. Kids are waiting, longing and desiring for people to communicate with them. Talk to your kids. Be sure to seize the opportunity you have today with your children. The daily opportunities will soon be past. You will not regret making the most of your opportunity to lead! You may not leave your family a single dime of inheritance. You may not leave them an inch of property. But, if you pass down your faith to those who come behind you, you have left them the richest legacy of all! When all is said and done, will your children follow your faith? I know that their decision is purely between them and the Lord. But, I also know that they may base what they do on what they see in your life! Determine in your heart today that you will do everything in your power to see your family come to know the Lord Jesus Christ. Dr. Torey Blackman is pastor of Fellowship Baptist Church in Carrabelle. You can reach him at pastortoreyblackman@yahoo. com, or visit www.fellowshipbaptistcarrabelle.comGUEST COLUMNA fathers greatest investmentFeb. 26, 1941 to Dec. 14, 2014 Happy Fathers Day in Heaven, June 17, 2018, to the Love of my Life My heart was broken to lose you. My life will never be the same since you went to be with our Love. But I know he only takes the best. I thank him for all the time he gave us here on earth together, and all our loved ones. I hope to be with you again some sweet day in Heaven, with all our loved ones. I love you and no one will ever take your place. You was one of the best husbands, fathers, and grandfathers our Lord ever made. May God bless you my love, Your wife Mary Lou King, Alina and Obie Pelt, grandson Lawrence Russell, your five children, Charles Eugene, Vanessa King, Ottis Eugene, Louise, Alina Russell; and all your other grandchildren and family and friends.IN LOVING MEMORYCharles Eugene King, Sr. T o r e y B l a c k m a n Torey Blackman said Brewer, a former banker. The minimum value should be an appraised value.ŽShe asked that a request for proposals from a qual-ified real estate broker be started. They would be responsible for identifying properties and to market them amongst their professional cir-cles,Ž she said. There are things we cant do with an RFP for specific parcels. Well get more exposure.The fire station is pre-mier property on Water Street. It has some issues, its not quite ready for a sale. This way you might be able to meet your goals," she said.Mayor Van Johnson said he expected sales accord-ing to the revised strategy would beginbefore the end of the calendar year. He estimated that the city owned about 130 parcels, but did not enumerate how many of these might be appropriate to sell.The commissioners also acted upon a recommendation from City Administrator Lee Mathes to raise the annual MSBU (municipal service benefit unit) paid by properties served by the Apalachicola volunteer fire department but not within the city from $50 to $95.She said the only way to do that would be to subject it to a vote. Mathes said Supervisor of Elections Heather Riley said it would cost in the neighborhood of $5,000 to $6,000, no more than $6,500, to conduct a mail-in ballot.This will only go for county residents, the city (fire services) are in the millage rate,Ž Mathes said, noting the county finance department esti-mated the increase in MSBU would raise about $40,000 more for the citys fire department.I think its worth it,Ž she said.Commissioner Anita Grove moved, and Brenda Ash seconded, a motion to begin the process of put-ting it on the ballot, and the vote was unanimous.The commissioners also agreed to charge the citys recreation committee with the task of coming up with a long-range strat-egy for renaming streets.Grove had suggested the committee tackle it, after Commissioner Jimmy Elliott raised the prospect of naming a street after the late Dr. Photis Nichols, a physician who served the community for more than 50 years.Im concerned were changing the names of the streets so much that its getting difficult to know,Ž she said. "We need a long-term view on how we could address this. If we came up with an overall vision of what we have, they could make a recommendation on street naming, park naming, and for monuments.ŽElliott said Nichols deserves recognition. I remember when he used to go to houses at night. I was one of the people he saved when I was 9 years old,Ž he said.He delivered me in 1959,Ž added the mayor. COMMISHFrom Page A1

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** A12 Thursday, June 14, 2018 | The Times OUTDOORSCONTACT USEmail outdoor news to timesoutdoors@starfl.comBy David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl.com 850-653-8894Its been 19 years that Charles Pennycuff has been at Fishermans Choice annual youth fishing tournament, the second weekend in June, and last Saturday was no different for the man who first started it.Same is true for Rita Seger, whos been volun-teering for that long. From back when it was behind the bait-and-tackle shop, before it moved to the Eastpoint pavilion. Now youre seeing that the little barefoot kids who use to run up with their pinfish, and their black drum, and all the rest, are now minding children of their own.And theres more visitors coming in from elsewhere, like the family of Jan and Rob Sawyer, from Memphis, Tennessee, who brought along their seventh grade son Nolan, and cousin Easton Nye, and friend J.D. Lunsford.Theyre staying at Coastline RV Park, and they were able to secure a spot there in large part based on a close friendship with the Creamers, because its packed this time of year.The Memphis quintet went fishing beginning in the early morning. We make them do it the hard way,Ž said Jan. We make them do it from the shore.ŽThe crew were very strategic,Ž in moms opinion, up early, starting at Journeys on St. George Island, then fishing off the docks at the Mill Pond, and lastly off U.S. 98 near Lynns Oysters. The kids have figured out the big drums like to come by there,Ž she said.As it turned out Nolan Sawyerfinished third in sailcat, and Lunsford was fifth in drum.Organizer Rex Pennycuff, who oversaw the judges panel, and his sister, Natasha, who took pictures of all the grinning kids with their fish, and the tackle boxes and poles they won, many of them wearing t-shirts they also got for taking part, the back of the shirts filled with a list of the many businesses that have long sponsored this enormous tournament, said about 240 kids signed up, but many, especially the ones who didnt land a whopper, didnt show up for prizes, or to eat lunch.Some of them get back and dont care,Ž he said.He said among the fish-ers this year were three of the summer All-Star teams, which meant 45 kids took part, because of baseball.Fishing tourney reels in the kidsCorey Maxwell, who used to compete in the tourney as a boy, stands in line with daughter Olivia. [ DAVID ADLERSTEIN | THE TIMES ] Longtime volunteer Rita Seger holds up this years youth “ shing tournament t-shirt. [DAVID ADLERSTEIN | THE TIMES ] The winner of the raf” e for a cast net, Kimberly Summerlin, from Leesburg, Georgia, in back row, not wearing sunglasses, stands with her extended family, and that of sisters and friends Cathy Robertson asnd Vickie Colton. [ DAVID ADLERSTEIN | THE TIMES ] Special to the TimesSea turtles are one of the oldest creatures on earth. They live their whole life in the sea and only come on shore to lay their eggs. We love sea turtles and are excited that they have chosen our beaches as their nesting site during May through October! Here are some simple tips for making your night beach walk fun and safe for you and the nesting and hatchling sea turtles:€ When you go out on the beach at night, let your eyes adjust to the ambient light. You will be amazed at how much you can see without manmade lights. If you take a flashlight, make sure it has red LED bulbs that emit long wavelengths (590-750nm) which are less likely to disturb the sea turtles.€ If you see a nesting female on the beach, give her plenty of room to find a place to nest. Do not shine a light at her or take photos with a flash. Remain quiet, behind her, and out of her sight. If she is disturbed, she may abandon her nest and return to the sea. Also, do not disturb her tracks. The tracks are very important because our volunteers use them to locate the nest and pro-tected it. Our volunteers also collect data that can help us better understand the species.After the female nests, the eggs incubate around 50-65 days. The eggs typically hatch at night when it is cooler and the hatchlings have a better chance avoiding their many predators. Ghost crabs, coyotes, raccoons, dogs and birds see hatchlings as a delightful meal. Its estimated that only one in 1,000 hatchlings survive to adulthood.€ Once out of the nest, sea turtle hatchlings instinctively move toward the shore. If distracted by other lights, the hatchlings can easily get disoriented and crawl toward a house or road. Sea turtles are protected under federal law and any harassment or interference with them, their hatchlings or eggs, living or dead, is subject to stiff penalty. If you are lucky enough to witness a sea turtle on land, enjoy the experience from a distance and cherish the memory for life.Please check out our St. George Island Volunteer Turtlers Facebook page for more information and regular updates. The Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve also holds talks on sea turtles every Wednes-day, June through August (except on the 4th of July) at 2 p.m, at 108 Island Drive in Eastpoint. The Friends of the Reserve has Turtle Safe flashlights for sale in the Reserve gift shop.For more information on sea turtles www.myfwc.co/wildlifehabitats/ managed/sea-turtles/ lightingTips for night beach walks while turtles nest FISHING REPORT Last week proved to be a good “ shing week all around the Forgotten Coast. Trout and Red“ sh bite was good in St. Joe Bay and Flounder has been strong as well. Live baits and soft plastics are all taking “ sh. There was good reports of Redsish under the Highland View bridge and live shrimp was doing the job there. Well anglers the long anticipated Red Snapper season opened today June 11th for recreational “ shing. The great news is we had already been hearing from the head boats from Panama City to here in St. Joe since the 1st of June and there's plenty of Snapper to be had. So that being said if your ready to head out for these beauties make sure and gear up and bait up with Bluewater Outriggers. We have everything for your Snapper needs. Even if you just need some reels respooled that have been sitting in the closet come see us and we'll take care of you. Let us know how your Snapper “ shing (and other “ shing) is going Until next week, Happy Fishing

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** The Times | Thursday, June 14, 2018 A13 SPORTSBy David Adlerstein The Apalachicola Times dadlerstein@starfl.com 850-653-8894For 27 years theyve been flinging the fish at the annual Mullet Toss on the beach in front of the Blue Parrot on St. George.They started mid-morning Saturday with the little kids, who can hurl the fish maybe a couple feet at most, all the way up to the men older than age 17, and they can throw it a country mile.Well, actually about 150 feet.In fact, that was the top throw in the first round of the mens completion, by Brandon Nichols, from Wakulla County.Right behind him was Franklin Countys Eli Sheets, who hurled it 141 feet, and his cousin Dillon Grant, a former champ, who threw it 137 feet. The fourth place finisher, a guy from out of town named Jacob, threw it 130 feet, and he too qualified for the onethrow second round that would determine the winner.Failing to earn a berth was Louisville, Kentuckys Perry Finley, who two years ago tied the knot with his fiance Tamara with an island wedding. Evidently, married life has been good to the man, as he settled for nailing a pitcher of beer with an accu-rate throw.Also finishing out of the money was last years champ, Blake Mears, from Tallahas-see, who won the @200 prize money in 2017 with a catapult of 144 feet. He only threw it 123 feet this year.In the finals, Nichols, 23, who has been throwing for about five years in Panacea, his best a 186-foot loft, showed his consistency, by repeating his 150-foot mark. Grant, complaining of a shoulder injury, managed a 133 foot-throw, and the Jacob guy hurled it 138 feet, but Sheets too could not near Nichols distance.Grant, though, will sort of share in the prize money, in that his wife, Jordon Cherry, of Wakulla County, threw it 101 to finish first and collect $200 among the women.Morgan Howell, from Lees-burg, Georgia, and Jordan Gilkerson, both threw for 91 feet in the first round, and while Howell managed to get a day's best 105-foot throw in the toss-off, 15 feet further than Gilkerson, she had to settle for second place.In the division for kids 10 and under, Milo Daniel, a fourth grader out of Charles-ton, South Carolina, whose family has been coming down to the island for 60 years, won it with a 57-foot throw. I overhanded it with a running start,Ž said Daniel.His father, Chadwick, and his younger brother Jeremy, both competed in the adult division, but neither could win a prize like the boy.Finishing second in the 10 and under group was Isaac Medders, out of Sylvester, Georgia, with a 54-foot effort, and Preston Griffin with a 51-foot try for third place.Among youth age 11 to 13, Apalachicolas Weston Bockleman threw it 101 feet to win, followed by Maya Itzkovitz, who managed a 91-foot throw for second place, and Natalie Medder, from Sylvester, Georgia, who finished in third with a 72-foot toss.In the 14 to 16 age group, Franklin County High School junior won a bike with an excellent 141-foot throw, narrowly edging out, by a single foot, 15-yearold Patrick Stewart, from Whitesburg, Kentucky.No teams took part in the launch completion, which can win a team $1,000 if they break the worlds record of 533 feet.A portion of the proceeds, said Blue Parrot owner George Joanos, who emceed the affair along with Brian Bowen, will go towards the Franklins Promise Coalition.Fish y on the island againMullet Toss winner Brandon Nichols casts a shadow as he arches his throw. [DAVID ADLERSTEIN | THE TIMES ] The womens division winner Jordon Cherry stands with her husband, former Mullet Toss champ Dillon Grant. Leon County Commissioner Bob Rackleff, who is seeking the Democratic nomination in 2nd Congressional District race, took part in the mullet toss.

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** A14 Thursday, June 14, 2018 | The Timesf-stop is an abbreviation for a camera lens aper-ture setting that corresponds to an f-number, which is the ratio of the focal length of a lens to the effec-tive diameter of its aperture.Summertime, the living is easy,and it's time to enjoy the hottest weather of the year. Chil-dren are outside running around, so please, be careful. If you have a good summer photo, please share. The Times welcomes readers to send us their best photographs, whether they capture summer fun, a warm smile, brilliant color, an unusuai image, person, place or thing, we want it. Photos can be of any subject, but we especially like people.Please send photographs to David Adlerstein at Dadlerstein@starfl.com. For more information, call 653-8894.F-STOP FRANKLINJune busts outRIGHT: Night catch [ RICK HANBY | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ] Pam Nobles Dance Studio ice cream break at Old Time Soda Fountain, Apalachicola[ LAUREN LUBERTO | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ] Otherworldly boat wake as boat leaves Poston Bayou in Carrabelle at dawn [ SKIP FRINK | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ] Skipping the beach [ LINDA SEXTON | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ] The beach is just over there [ ROGER MUTERSPAUGH | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES ] 1. Which president issued a proclamation establishing todays Flag DayŽ as an annual national event? Washington, Jefferson, Wilson, Harding 2. Which of these does not have the authority to order American flags to be flown at half-staff? Homeland Security, President, State governors, Washington D.C. mayor 3. On what dayŽ following the admission of a new state would a new star be added to the flag? New Years, Presidents, Flag, Fourth of July 4. Where can one find the original Star Spangled Banner today? Disintegrated, Library of Congress, Smithsonian, Carpenters Historic Hall 5. The longest running Flag Day parade since 1909 is claimed by? Fair“ eld (Washington), Newberry (South Carolina), Chipley (Florida), Jerome (Idaho) 6. How many U.S. flags have been placed on the moon? 1, 2, 5, 6 ANSWERS: 1. Wilson, 2. Homeland Security, 3. Fourth of July, 4. Smithsonian, 5. Fair“ eld (Washington), 6. 6Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy.comTRIVIA GUY W i l s o n C a s e y Wilson Casey CROSSWORD

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** A16 Thursday, June 14, 2018 | The Times Special to the TimesHello Franklin County! Summer reading programs are here! Libraries rock! That is this years theme and we kicked it off with the opportunity to meet author Marisella Viega and hear her share her memoir, some history of Cuban recipes and the recipes she taught was awesome. We wont tell you what we got to sample, but will remind you that you can meet her at the Carrabelle branch, Friday, June 15 at 1 p.m. She is a delightful person, a great author, and a wonderful cook. Her book We Carry Our Homes With UsŽ is available at both locations. Join us in Carrabelle branch; summer reading programs are not all just for kids! Tampa Taiko Drumming is back; Thursday June 14 at the Eastpoint branch at 2 p.m. and again at the Carrabelle branch at 4 p.m. This is an interactive program for all ages, literally! Last year there were more adults attending and interacting than children, and it was so much fun. Upcoming programs include Thursday, June 21; magician Michael Crosniak will join us for a magic workshop with opportunities for all children to participate. Join us at 2 p.m. at the Eastpoint branch and again at 4 p.m. at Carrabelle. Then, our very own Denise Williams who teaches yoga at both branches and is an herbalist and healthy lifestyle advocate will be discussing old time poulticing and how it still works today. Join us at the Eastpoint branch Wednesday, June 27 at 1 p.m. and again at the Carrabelle branch, Friday June 29 at p.m. For the kids fun, and adults, Will Keating, a ventriloquist and puppeteer, will perform Thursday, June 28 at 1 p.m. at Eastpoint and 4 p.m. at Carrabelle. His show promises loads of audience participation and is jam packed with music from around the world. And, we will learn some traditional African dance moves. Remember, Libraries Rock! For the kids each week, children ages K-6 can participate in the Rockers & Readers program where they will have fun making crafts and checking out their favorite summer reading items. There are lots of new books being added to the collection each week! Eastpoint childrens programs will be on Wednesdays at 11 a.m., and the Carrabelle Rockers & Readers will meet Fridays at 11 p.m. starting June 15. All events are posted on the website and Facebook, and the full calendar of events is available at the Library. Join us for a summer of fun! The June Gardening program is all about Summer Vegetables Production Success under the Sun.Ž The next program scheduled will be at the Eastpoint branch, Tuesday, June 19 at 1:30 p.m. All garden programs are facilitated by Les Harrison, the Wakulla County extension director. Remember, all library programs are free and open to the public. Now that we are in hurricane season, make sure you are prepared! If you still havent put a supply kit together for the season and need more information about the best approach, the library has a program that can assist you with how to prepare emergency supply kits. The Basics of Better Living program will be at the Eastpoint branch on Friday, June 15 at 1:30 p.m., facilitated by Samantha Kennedy, with the Wakulla County extension office. Ladies, mark your calendars for Saturday, June 30. The Mobile Mammogram bus will be onsite at the Carrabelle Library from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., no early registration is required. The Florida Department of Healths Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program, serving Franklin County will provide vouchers to qualifying women between the ages 50-64; of low income with no health insurance. If you currently have health coverage you may use that insurance to take advantage of this convenient location. Remember to like us and follow us on Facebook at Franklin County Public Library and Franklin County Public Library Eastpoint Branch. The calendar of events and online resources are on the library website at fcpl.wildernesscoast. org/ Contact the Eastpoint branch, Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 670-8151 and the Carrabelle branch, Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturday 10 am. to 2 p.m. at 697-2366. See you at the Library!LIBRARY CORNERSummer reading events help libraries rock! For more news go to apalachtimes.com

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CLASSIFIEDSThe Times | Thursday, June 14, 2018 A17 NF-4529446 NEWLY RENOVATED! (2) Lanark Village Apartments 2 bed, 1 bath Units $1200/ month, $1200 SD All Utilities Included NO PETS AVAILABLE JULY 1st Sands of Carrabelle 3 bed, 2 bath Condo $1200/month, $1200 SD NO PETS AVAILABLE JULY 1st Lanark Village 3 bed, 1 bath $775/month, $1000 SD Pets Considered NF-4529396 The Blue Parrot is Now Hiring:Cooks Servers Cashiers Hostesses Bussers Bartenders68 West Gorrie Dr. St. George IslandApply in Person at Blue Parrot Ocean Front Cafe Adult/Child Care Manager needed to provide case management services in our Apalachicola and Bristol Florida Offices. Requirements: *Bachelor’s Degree in Human Services field and 1 year of mental health experience with adults and children required. Bachelor’s Degree in non-related field acceptable with 3 years of mental health experience with adults and children. *Official transcripts required. *Valid Driver’s License with no more than 6 points over 3 years. $15.40 per hour (includes location differential) Please apply at www.apalacheecenter.org or call Stephanie Luckie at 850-523-3212 or email at stephaniel@apalacheecenter .org for details. Housekeeping Property InspectorsPart-time seasonal positions available. Weekend work required. Personal vehicle, valid driver’s license, and automobile insurance needed. Competitive wages. Come by Collins Vacation Rentals, Inc. located at 60 East Gulf Beach Drive to apply in person or email Quentin Allen to request an application be emailed to you. quentin@collinsvacationrentals.com Maintenance Technician WantedFull time position with competitive wage and benefits. Weekend work required. Must have maintenance experience. Need to be detailed oriented and have basic computer skills. Valid driver’s license required. Come by Collins Vacation Rentals, Inc. located at 60 East Gulf Beach Drive to apply in person or email Quentin Allen to request an application be emailed to you. quentin@collinsvacationrentals.com Now HiringScipio Creek Marina has an immediate opening for a Forklift Operator to work in our family friendly marina in Apalachicola, FL. This is a year round full time position. We will train individual as needed in order for them to become forklift certified. Applicant must be willing to work weekends. We are located at Scipio Creek Marina, 301 Market St., Apalachicola, FL32320, phone # 850 653 8030. Please apply in person or by emailing your resume to info@scipiocreekmarina.com 20675T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2018-000034-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF Frances Thomas Gray Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Frances Thomas Gray, deceased, whose date of death was January 14th, 2018, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Clerk 33 Market Street. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SECTION 733.702 WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is June 7th, 2018 Personal Representative: Stanley E. Gray 3494 Lake Douglas Road Climax, GA 39834 Attorneys for Personal Representative: SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. 80 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 Phone (850) 653-8976 BARBARA SANDERS, ESQ. Florida Bar No. 442178 Email Addresses: bsanders@fairpoint.net rwallaee@fairpomt net Pub: June 7, 14, 2018 20587T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Gary Mitchell, the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a TAX DEED to be issued thereon, The certificate number and year of issuance, thedescription of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: PARCEL ID# 22-08S-06W-6023-000A-00 10 CERTIFICATE NO : 1458 CERTIFICATE YEAR : 2011 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Lot 1, Block “A” Pine Pointe Subdivision, according to the plat thereof recorded in the public records of Franklin County, Florida, in Plat Book 9, Page 5 & 6 PROPERTYADDRESS : 33 Piney Point Lane, Eastpoint, FL NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: Pine Point Partners LLC, a Georgia limited liability company All of said property being in the State of Florida, County of Florida. Unless such certificate or certificates shall be redeemed according to the law the property described in such certificate or certificates will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the First (1st) Monday in the month of July, 2018 which is the 2nd day of July, 2018 AT 11:00 A.M. DATED: May 17, 2018 MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Lauren Luberto Deputy Clerk Pub: May 24, 31, June 7, 14, 2018 20589T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Gary Mitchell, the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a TAX DEED to be issued thereon, The certificate number and year of issuance, thedescription of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: PARCEL ID# 20-075-07W-0000-0020-00 00 CERTIFICATE NO : 1497 CERTIFICATE YEAR : 2011 DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Metes and Bounds legal description for property located in Section 20, Township 7 South, Range 7 West. Full legal description can be viewed in the office of the Clerk of Circuit Court. PROPERTYADDRESS : N/A NAME IN WHICH ASSESSED: Valerie Michelle Lockerman All of said property being in the State of Florida, County of Florida. Unless such certificate or certificates shall be redeemed according to the law the property described insuch certificate or certificates will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the First (1st) Monday in the month of July, 2018 which is the 2nd day of July, 2018 AT 11:00 A.M. DATED: May 17, 2018 MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Lauren Luberto Deputy Clerk Pub: May 24, 31, June 7, 14, 2018 20702T NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation interested in constructing: FRANKLIN COUNTY DOCKS REPLACEMENT PROJECT#50082811 This project consists of the removal and replacement of two existing dilapidated structures. Replacement will consist of constructing new wooden docks within the same footprint and configuration. One is located in Carrabelle, Florida (Timber Island Boat Ramp) and the other in Eastpoint, Florida (Indian Creek Park). Construction will include wooden piles, substructure, wooden decking, and concrete landings. Plans and specifications can be obtained at Dewberry Engineers Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850) 227-7200. Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $50.00 per set and is non-refundable. Checks should be made payable to DEWBERRY ENGINEERS INC. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Completion date for this project will be 60 days from the date of the Notice to Proceed presented to the successful bidder. Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at $750.00 per day. Please indicate on the envelope that this is a sealed bid, for “F ranklin County Docks Replacement”. Bids will be received until 4:00 p.m. eastern time, on July 2, 2018, at the Franklin County Clerk’s Office, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320-2317, and will be opened and read aloud on July 3 2018 at the County Commission meeting at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, FL. The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the best interest of Franklin County. All bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days after the opening. All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration and regulation of contractors doing business to the State of Florida. If you have any questions, please call Clay Smallwood at (850) 571-1217. May 31. June 14, 2018 20724T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File Number: 2018 CP 0014 IN RE: ESTATE OF GREGORY WALSER NEWMAN Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Gregory Walser Newman, deceased, whose date of death was February 5, 2018 is pending in the Circuit Court of Franklin County Florida, Probate Division; File Number 2018 CP 0014 the address of which is The Franklin County Court House, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands against the estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS:June 7, 2018. Personal Representative Laurel H. Newman 317 Frank McKamey Way Carrabelle, FL 32322 Attorney for Personal Representative Daniel H. Cox P.O. Box CC Carrabelle, FL 32322 (850)697-5555 Email dhcox@ gtcom.net Florida Bar No: 146420 Pub June 7, 14, 2018 20704T NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation interested in constructing: GULF SHORE BLVD. RELOCATION PROJECT #50082810 Project is located along Bald Point Road on Alligator Point in Franklin County, Florida and consists of approximately 950 LF of new road construction and includes tree removal, earthwork (stormwater ponds and roadway), base, asphalt and stormwater piping. Plans and specifications can be obtained at Dewberry Engineers Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850) 227-7200. Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $50.00 per set and is non-refundable. Checks should be made payable to DEWBERRY ENGINEERS INC. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. All bidders shall be FDOT qualified per Section 2-1 of the FDOT Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge Constructions, latest edition in the following work classes: Grading, Drainage, Flexible Paving, and Hot Plant mix-Bituminous Course. Completion date for this project will be 45 days from the date of the Notice to Proceed presented to the successful bidder. Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at $750.00 per day. Please indicate on the envelope that this is a sealed bid, for “Gulf Shore Blvd. Reloca tion”. Bids will be received until 4:00 p.m. eastern time, on July 2, 2018, at the Franklin County Clerk’s Office, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320-2317, and will be opened and read aloud on July 3, 2018 at the County Commission meeting at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, FL. The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the best interest of Franklin County. All bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days after the opening. All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration and regulation of contractors doing business to the State of Florida. If you have any questions, please call Dina Bautista at (850) 571-1175. May 31, June 14, 2018 20748T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA IN RE: ESTATE CHARLES DEAN TITSHAW, SR. Deceased PROBATE DIVISION File Number 18-032-CP NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of CHARLES DEAN TITSHAW, SR., deceased, whose date of death was February 1st,2018 and whose social security number is___—9674, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street #203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is June 14, 2018 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin Florida Bar No. 699070 660 Post Office Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 phone: (850) 227-1159 email:ccostin@costinlaw .c om Personal Representatives: Charles Titshaw, Jr 660 Lewis Roberts Road Jefferson, Ga 30549 Pub June 14, 21, 2018 20802T Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of RESORT VACATION PROPERTIES OF SGI located at 123 West Gulf Beach Drive, in the County of Franklin, in the City of St. George Island, Florida 32328, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at St. Petersburg, Florida, this 5th day of June, 2018. RESORT VACATION PROPERTIES OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND, INC. Pub June 14, 2018 20750T THE SCHOOL BOARD OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF INTENT TO AMEND A RULE RULE NUMBERS/ TITLES: Policy 7544 A HEARING WILL BE HELD AT: PLACE: Willie Speed Board Room, 85 School Road, Eastpoint, FL DATE: July 26, 2018 TIME: 6:00 p.m. A COPY OF THE PROPOSED RULE MAY BE OBTAINED BY WRITING TO: Franklin County District Schools 85 School Rd., Suite 1 Eastpoint, FL 32328 (850) 670?2810 June 14, 2018 20752T Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of RESORT VACATION PROPERTIES OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND located at 123 West Gulf Beach Drive, in the County of Franklin, in the City of St. George Island, Florida 32328, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at St. Petersburg, Florida, this 5th day of June, 2018. RESORT VACATION PROPERTIES OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND, INC. Pub June 14, 2018 20794T Public Notice You are hereby notified that your eligibility to vote is in question. Caleb S Gilbert 778 Buck Rd. Eastpoint, FL 32328 Tanith L White 915 NE 2nd St. Carrabelle, FL 32322 You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Apalachicola, Florida no later than (30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. Pub June 14, 2018 20798T Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of RESORT VACATION PROPERTIES located at 123 West Gulf Beach Drive, in the County of Franklin, in the City of St. George Island, Florida 32328, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at St. Petersburg, Florida, this 5th day of June, 2018. RESORT VACATION PROPERTIES OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND, INC. Pub June 14, 2018 20800T Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of RVPSGI located at 123 West Gulf Beach Drive, in the County of Franklin, in the City of St. George Island, Florida 32328, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at St. Petersburg, Florida, this 5th day of June, 2018. RESORT VACATION PROPERTIES OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND, INC. Pub June 14, 2018 20822T In the Circuit Court for Second Judicial Circuit In and for Franklin County, Florida Case No. 2018 CP 36 PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF Zofia Voynar, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Zofia Voynar, deceased, whose date of death was February 8, 2018, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA STATUTES WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is June 14. 2018 Attorney for Personal Representative: Joseph R. Boyd, B.C.S. JoeRBoyd@boydlaw .net Florida Bar No. 179079 Boyd | Durant, P.L. 1407 Piedmont Drive East Tallahassee, Florida 32308 phone (850) 386-2171 Fax (850) 385-4936 Add’l :service@boydlaw .ne t Personal Representative: Andrew J. Voynar 8408 East 82nd StreetTulsa, Oklahoma 74133 Pub June 14, 21, 2018 20804T Notice Under Fictitious Name Law Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of RVP located at 123 West Gulf Beach Drive, in the County of Franklin, in the City of St. George Island, Florida 32328, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at St. Petersburg, Florida, this 5th day of June, 2018. RESORT VACATION PROPERTIES OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND, INC. Pub June 14, 2018 20806T NOTICE OF LEGAL COMPLETION: Notice is hereby given that the undersigned contractor has completed and has ready for acceptance of the Board of Commissioners of Franklin County Project: Apalachicola Airfield Drainage Improvements Contractor : BKW INC 8132 Pittman A venue P ensacola, Florida 32534 If there are any unsettled claims or monies on the above project, contact the Franklin County Administrator’s office before final payment is made to contractor. Pub June 14, 21, 28, July 5, 2018 Gretchen Custom SlipcoversNow on the Coast Cushions, pillows, home sewing needs. Call: 850-841-0298 Apalachicola 172 22nd Avenue June 15th & 16th 8am -till Estate Sale Rain or Shine Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency w/ kitchen & living room. Call for info 850-653-6103 Text FL97546 to 56654 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. St. George Island$210/wk for extended stay, elec, satellite, 12’X 65’ deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5800 Used Single Wides Zone Three, 2016 and 2017 Models. Call: 229-246-1218 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.

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** A18 Thursday, June 14, 2018 | The Timeseach participant was pre-sented with an Outstanding Volunteer medal by the Holy Family Ad hoc Committee as an expression of thanks. We are very fortunate to have people who will take the time to give back to their community in such a selfless and awesome way. Thank you just does not seem sufficient but we really do appreciate them and look forward to their continued support to the growth of the senior program,Ž said Head as she called the honored volunteers forward to receive their medals.It is rewarding to see the community come together to celebrate all of the volunteers who have made Holy Family Senior Center successful. I am especially proud of Erica Head as the center coordinator and our partnerships with HCOLA, ECCC and the city," said Joe Taylor, who represents Franklins Promise Coalition on the ad hoc committee.Bonnie Fulmer, ECCCs representative on the committee added We are so fortunate to have this wonderful Holy Family Senior Center! During the last year we have seen so much growth in participation for our daily lunches and the programs that we are able to provide for Franklin County. Not only do we value all the volunteers who have touched our lives and the lives of seniors, we appreciate the city of Apalachicola who provides this beautiful facility. Elder Care Community Council and Holy Family look forward to another year of strengthen-ing relationships and building new partnerships throughout our county to enhance the services available to our senior population. This is all about our communities work-ing together.ŽSimilar sentiments were echoed by the Ad hoc commit-tees HCOLA spokesperson Elinor Mount-Simmons, who assisted in draping the medals on the honored recipients. Mount-Simmons also presented Head with a beautiful bouquet of flowers as a token of appreciation from the com-mittee, thanking her for her commitment to the Center. The luncheon ended with Head thanking everyone for attending the lunch, empha-sizing her words in song and singing You Were LovedŽ by Whitney Houston. She also encouraged anyone interested in volunteering at any of the senior events, preparing food for the daily lunch program or sponsoring a lunch at one of the special events, to please contact her at 653-3134 or holyfamilyseniorcenter@ gmail.com SENIORSFrom Page A3Whats up at senior center€ Whats On Your Plate?Ž Food Demonstration Tuesday, June 19, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. € Normal Aging or Dementia: How To Tell The DifferenceŽ Thursday, July 19, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. € Understanding Dementia: Improving Communication With Your Loved OneŽ Wednesday, August 22, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Other events include A Special Music and Dinner EventŽ (date to be determined) and the 5K Sizzler on Saturday, August 4. Both events are sponsored by E Triple C. For more information, please contact ecccfranklin@ gmail.com